Science.gov

Sample records for based fluid modeling

  1. Verification strategies for fluid-based plasma simulation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahadevan, Shankar

    2012-10-01

    Verification is an essential aspect of computational code development for models based on partial differential equations. However, verification of plasma models is often conducted internally by authors of these programs and not openly discussed. Several professional research bodies including the IEEE, AIAA, ASME and others have formulated standards for verification and validation (V&V) of computational software. This work focuses on verification, defined succinctly as determining whether the mathematical model is solved correctly. As plasma fluid models share several aspects with the Navier-Stokes equations used in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), the CFD verification process is used as a guide. Steps in the verification process: consistency checks, examination of iterative, spatial and temporal convergence, and comparison with exact solutions, are described with examples from plasma modeling. The Method of Manufactured Solutions (MMS), which has been used to verify complex systems of PDEs in solid and fluid mechanics, is introduced. An example of the application of MMS to a self-consistent plasma fluid model using the local mean energy approximation is presented. The strengths and weaknesses of the techniques presented in this work are discussed.

  2. Physically-Based Modelling and Real-Time Simulation of Fluids.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jim Xiong

    1995-01-01

    Simulating physically realistic complex fluid behaviors presents an extremely challenging problem for computer graphics researchers. Such behaviors include the effects of driving boats through water, blending differently colored fluids, rain falling and flowing on a terrain, fluids interacting in a Distributed Interactive Simulation (DIS), etc. Such capabilities are useful in computer art, advertising, education, entertainment, and training. We present a new method for physically-based modeling and real-time simulation of fluids in computer graphics and dynamic virtual environments. By solving the 2D Navier -Stokes equations using a CFD method, we map the surface into 3D using the corresponding pressures in the fluid flow field. This achieves realistic real-time fluid surface behaviors by employing the physical governing laws of fluids but avoiding extensive 3D fluid dynamics computations. To complement the surface behaviors, we calculate fluid volume and external boundary changes separately to achieve full 3D general fluid flow. To simulate physical activities in a DIS, we introduce a mechanism which uses a uniform time scale proportional to the clock-time and variable time-slicing to synchronize physical models such as fluids in the networked environment. Our approach can simulate many different fluid behaviors by changing the internal or external boundary conditions. It can model different kinds of fluids by varying the Reynolds number. It can simulate objects moving or floating in fluids. It can also produce synchronized general fluid flows in a DIS. Our model can serve as a testbed to simulate many other fluid phenomena which have never been successfully modeled previously.

  3. The predictive performance of infusion strategy nomogram based on a fluid kinetic model

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Byung Moon; Karm, Myung Hwan; Jung, Kyeo Woon; Yeo, Young Goo

    2015-01-01

    Background In a previous study, fluid kinetic models were applied to describe the volume expansion of the fluid space by administration of crystalloid and colloid solutions. However, validation of the models were not performed, it is necessary to evaluate the predictive performance of these models in another population. Methods Ninety five consenting patients undergoing elective spinal surgery under general anesthesia were enrolled in this study. These patients were randomly assigned to three fluid groups i.e. Hartmann's solution (H group, n = 28), Voluven® (V group, n = 34), and Hextend® (X group, n = 33). After completion of their preparation for surgery, the patients received a loading and maintenance volume of each fluid predetermined by nomograms based on fluid pharmacokinetic models during the 60-minute use of an infusion pump. Arterial samples were obtained at preset intervals of 0, 10, 20, and 30 min after fluid administration. The predictive performances of the fluid kinetic modes were evaluated using the fractional change of arterial hemoglobin. The relationship between blood-volume dilution and target dilution of body fluid space was also evaluated using regression analysis. Results A total of 194 hemoglobin measurements were used. The bias and inaccuracy of these models were -2.69 and 35.62 for the H group, -1.53 and 43.21 for the V group, and 9.05 and 41.82 for the X group, respectively. The blood-volume dilution and target dilution of body-fluid space showed a significant linear relationship in each group (P < 0.05). Conclusions Based on the inaccuracy of predictive performance, the fluid-kinetic model for Hartmann's solution showed better performance than the other models. PMID:25844130

  4. Magnetic fluid hyperthermia modeling based on phantom measurements and realistic breast model.

    PubMed

    Miaskowski, Arkadiusz; Sawicki, Bartosz

    2013-07-01

    Magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) is a minimally invasive procedure that destroys cancer cells. It is based on a superparamagnetic heat phenomenon and consists in feeding a ferrofluid into a tumor, and then applying an external electromagnetic field, which leads to apoptosis. The strength of the magnetic field, optimal dose of the ferrofluid, the volume of the tumor and the safety standards have to be taken into consideration when MFH treatment is planned. In this study, we have presented the novel complementary investigation based both on the experiments and numerical methodology connected with female breast cancer. We have conducted experiments on simplified female breast phantoms with numerical analysis and then we transferred the results on an anatomically-like breast model.

  5. On Rayleigh-Plesset based cavitation modelling of fluid film bearings using the Reynolds equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Troy A.; Braun, Minel J.; Pierson, Kristopher

    2015-12-01

    In the ‘universe’ of the general cavitation phenomena the issue of cavitation in bearings, due to its particular application and the mostly non-homogeneous working fluids associated with it, has presented a rather specialized challenge. The present paper models the phenomenon of pseudo-cavitation in fluid film bearings and offers a physics-based approach that conserves mass while solving the Reynolds (RE) and Rayleigh-Plesset (RP) equations in a coupled, fully transient environment. The RP solution calculates a time dependent void fraction synchronized with the RE transient solution, where density and viscosity are (re)calculated at every grid point of this homogeneous two-phase fluid. The growth and evolution of the cavitation zone expanse is physics-based and thus can accommodate evaporation, diffusion, or pseudocavitation as separate processes. This is a step beyond the present available cavitation models both for the RE and the Navier-Stokes equations.

  6. A Rayleigh-Plesset based transport model for cryogenic fluid cavitating flow computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, SuGuo; Wang, GuoYu; Hu, ChangLi

    2014-04-01

    The present article focuses on modeling issues to simulate cryogenic fluid cavitating flows. A revised cavitation model, in which the thermal effect is considered, is derivated and established based on Kubota model. Cavitating flow computations are conducted around an axisymmetric ogive and a 2D quarter caliber hydrofoil in liquid nitrogen implementing the revised model and Kubota model coupled with energy equation and dynamically updating the fluid physical properties, respecitively. The results show that the revised cavitation model can better describe the mass transport process in the cavitation process in cryogenic fluids. Compared with Kubota model, the revised model can reflect the observed "frosty" appearance within the cavity. The cavity length becomes shorter and it can capture the temperature and pressure depressions more consistently in the cavitating region, particularly at the rear of the cavity. The evaporation rate decreases, and while the magnitude of the condensation rate becomes larger because of the thermal effect terms in the revised model compared with the results obtained by the Kubota model.

  7. Predicting multidimensional annular flows with a locally based two-fluid model

    SciTech Connect

    Antal, S.P. Edwards, D.P.; Strayer, T.D.

    1998-06-01

    Annular flows are a well utilized flow regime in many industrial applications, such as, heat exchangers, chemical reactors and industrial process equipment. These flows are characterized by a droplet laden vapor core with a thin, wavy liquid film wetting the walls. The prediction of annular flows has been largely confined to one-dimensional modeling which typically correlates the film thickness, droplet loading, and phase velocities by considering the average flow conditions and global mass and momentum balances to infer the flow topology. In this paper, a methodology to predict annular flows using a locally based two-fluid model of multiphase flow is presented. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate a modeling approach for annular flows using a multifield, multidimensional two-fluid model and discuss the need for further work in this area.

  8. Verification Benchmarks to Assess the Implementation of Computational Fluid Dynamics Based Hemolysis Prediction Models.

    PubMed

    Hariharan, Prasanna; D'Souza, Gavin; Horner, Marc; Malinauskas, Richard A; Myers, Matthew R

    2015-09-01

    As part of an ongoing effort to develop verification and validation (V&V) standards for using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in the evaluation of medical devices, we have developed idealized flow-based verification benchmarks to assess the implementation of commonly cited power-law based hemolysis models in CFD. Verification process ensures that all governing equations are solved correctly and the model is free of user and numerical errors. To perform verification for power-law based hemolysis modeling, analytical solutions for the Eulerian power-law blood damage model (which estimates hemolysis index (HI) as a function of shear stress and exposure time) were obtained for Couette and inclined Couette flow models, and for Newtonian and non-Newtonian pipe flow models. Subsequently, CFD simulations of fluid flow and HI were performed using Eulerian and three different Lagrangian-based hemolysis models and compared with the analytical solutions. For all the geometries, the blood damage results from the Eulerian-based CFD simulations matched the Eulerian analytical solutions within ∼1%, which indicates successful implementation of the Eulerian hemolysis model. Agreement between the Lagrangian and Eulerian models depended upon the choice of the hemolysis power-law constants. For the commonly used values of power-law constants (α  = 1.9-2.42 and β  = 0.65-0.80), in the absence of flow acceleration, most of the Lagrangian models matched the Eulerian results within 5%. In the presence of flow acceleration (inclined Couette flow), moderate differences (∼10%) were observed between the Lagrangian and Eulerian models. This difference increased to greater than 100% as the beta exponent decreased. These simplified flow problems can be used as standard benchmarks for verifying the implementation of blood damage predictive models in commercial and open-source CFD codes. The current study only used power-law model as an illustrative example to emphasize the need

  9. 2D Computational Fluid Dynamic Modeling of Human Ventricle System Based on Fluid-Solid Interaction and Pulsatile Flow.

    PubMed

    Masoumi, Nafiseh; Framanzad, F; Zamanian, Behnam; Seddighi, A S; Moosavi, M H; Najarian, S; Bastani, Dariush

    2013-01-01

    Many diseases are related to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) hydrodynamics. Therefore, understanding the hydrodynamics of CSF flow and intracranial pressure is helpful for obtaining deeper knowledge of pathological processes and providing better treatments. Furthermore, engineering a reliable computational method is promising approach for fabricating in vitro models which is essential for inventing generic medicines. A Fluid-Solid Interaction (FSI)model was constructed to simulate CSF flow. An important problem in modeling the CSF flow is the diastolic back flow. In this article, using both rigid and flexible conditions for ventricular system allowed us to evaluate the effect of surrounding brain tissue. Our model assumed an elastic wall for the ventricles and a pulsatile CSF input as its boundary conditions. A comparison of the results and the experimental data was done. The flexible model gave better results because it could reproduce the diastolic back flow mentioned in clinical research studies. The previous rigid models have ignored the brain parenchyma interaction with CSF and so had not reported the back flow during the diastolic time. In this computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis, the CSF pressure and flow velocity in different areas were concordant with the experimental data.

  10. 2D Computational Fluid Dynamic Modeling of Human Ventricle System Based on Fluid-Solid Interaction and Pulsatile Flow

    PubMed Central

    Masoumi, Nafiseh; Framanzad, F.; Zamanian, Behnam; Seddighi, A.S.; Moosavi, M.H.; Najarian, S.; Bastani, Dariush

    2013-01-01

    Many diseases are related to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) hydrodynamics. Therefore, understanding the hydrodynamics of CSF flow and intracranial pressure is helpful for obtaining deeper knowledge of pathological processes and providing better treatments. Furthermore, engineering a reliable computational method is promising approach for fabricating in vitro models which is essential for inventing generic medicines. A Fluid-Solid Interaction (FSI)model was constructed to simulate CSF flow. An important problem in modeling the CSF flow is the diastolic back flow. In this article, using both rigid and flexible conditions for ventricular system allowed us to evaluate the effect of surrounding brain tissue. Our model assumed an elastic wall for the ventricles and a pulsatile CSF input as its boundary conditions. A comparison of the results and the experimental data was done. The flexible model gave better results because it could reproduce the diastolic back flow mentioned in clinical research studies. The previous rigid models have ignored the brain parenchyma interaction with CSF and so had not reported the back flow during the diastolic time. In this computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis, the CSF pressure and flow velocity in different areas were concordant with the experimental data. PMID:25337330

  11. Fluid-structure interaction-based biomechanical perception model for tactile sensing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng

    2013-01-01

    The reproduced tactile sensation of haptic interfaces usually selectively reproduces a certain object attribute, such as the object's material reflected by vibration and its surface shape by a pneumatic nozzle array. Tactile biomechanics investigates the relation between responses to an external load stimulus and tactile perception and guides the design of haptic interface devices via a tactile mechanism. Focusing on the pneumatic haptic interface, we established a fluid-structure interaction-based biomechanical model of responses to static and dynamic loads and conducted numerical simulation and experiments. This model provides a theoretical basis for designing haptic interfaces and reproducing tactile textures.

  12. Update and assessment of geothermal economic models, geothermal fluid flow and heat distribution models, and geothermal data bases

    SciTech Connect

    Kenkeremath, D.

    1985-05-01

    Numerical simulation models and data bases that were developed for DOE as part of a number of geothermal programs have been assessed with respect to their overall stage of development and usefulness. This report combines three separate studies that focus attention upon: (1) economic models related to geothermal energy; (2) physical geothermal system models pertaining to thermal energy and the fluid medium; and (3) geothermal energy data bases. Computerized numerical models pertaining to the economics of extracting and utilizing geothermal energy have been summarized and catalogued with respect to their availability, utility and function. The 19 models that are discussed in detail were developed for use by geothermal operators, public utilities, and lending institutions who require a means to estimate the value of a given resource, total project costs, and the sensitivity of these values to specific variables. A number of the models are capable of economically assessing engineering aspects of geothermal projects. Computerized simulations of heat distribution and fluid flow have been assessed and are presented for ten models. Five of the models are identified as wellbore simulators and five are described as reservoir simulators. Each model is described in terms of its operational characteristics, input, output, and other pertinent attributes. Geothermal energy data bases are reviewed with respect to their current usefulness and availability. Summaries of eight data bases are provided in catalogue format, and an overall comparison of the elements of each data base is included.

  13. An earthquake instability model based on faults containing high fluid-pressure compartments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lockner, D.A.; Byerlee, J.D.

    1995-01-01

    It has been proposed that large strike-slip faults such as the San Andreas contain water in seal-bounded compartments. Arguments based on heat flow and stress orientation suggest that in most of the compartments, the water pressure is so high that the average shear strength of the fault is less than 20 MPa. We propose a variation of this basic model in which most of the shear stress on the fault is supported by a small number of compartments where the pore pressure is relatively low. As a result, the fault gouge in these compartments is compacted and lithified and has a high undisturbed strength. When one of these locked regions fails, the system made up of the neighboring high and low pressure compartments can become unstable. Material in the high fluid pressure compartments is initially underconsolidated since the low effective confining pressure has retarded compaction. As these compartments are deformed, fluid pressure remains nearly unchanged so that they offer little resistance to shear. The low pore pressure compartments, however, are overconsolidated and dilate as they are sheared. Decompression of the pore fluid in these compartments lowers fluid pressure, increasing effective normal stress and shear strength. While this effect tends to stabilize the fault, it can be shown that this dilatancy hardening can be more than offset by displacement weakening of the fault (i.e., the drop from peak to residual strength). If the surrounding rock mass is sufficiently compliant to produce an instability, slip will propagate along the fault until the shear fracture runs into a low-stress region. Frictional heating and the accompanying increase in fluid pressure that are suggested to occur during shearing of the fault zone will act as additional destabilizers. However, significant heating occurs only after a finite amount of slip and therefore is more likely to contribute to the energetics of rupture propagation than to the initiation of the instability. We present

  14. Hierarchical calibration and validation of computational fluid dynamics models for solid sorbent-based carbon capture

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Canhai; Xu, Zhijie; Pan, Wenxiao; Sun, Xin; Storlie, Curtis; Marcy, Peter; Dietiker, Jean-François; Li, Tingwen; Spenik, James

    2016-01-01

    To quantify the predictive confidence of a solid sorbent-based carbon capture design, a hierarchical validation methodology—consisting of basic unit problems with increasing physical complexity coupled with filtered model-based geometric upscaling has been developed and implemented. This paper describes the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) multi-phase reactive flow simulations and the associated data flows among different unit problems performed within the said hierarchical validation approach. The bench-top experiments used in this calibration and validation effort were carefully designed to follow the desired simple-to-complex unit problem hierarchy, with corresponding data acquisition to support model parameters calibrations at each unit problem level. A Bayesian calibration procedure is employed and the posterior model parameter distributions obtained at one unit-problem level are used as prior distributions for the same parameters in the next-tier simulations. Overall, the results have demonstrated that the multiphase reactive flow models within MFIX can be used to capture the bed pressure, temperature, CO2 capture capacity, and kinetics with quantitative accuracy. The CFD modeling methodology and associated uncertainty quantification techniques presented herein offer a solid framework for estimating the predictive confidence in the virtual scale up of a larger carbon capture device.

  15. Modeling and test of a kinaesthetic actuator based on MR fluid for haptic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tae-Heon; Koo, Jeong-Hoi; Kim, Sang-Youn; Kwon, Dong-Soo

    2017-03-01

    Haptic display units have been widely used for conveying button sensations to users, primarily employing vibrotactile actuators. However, the human feeling for pressing buttons mainly relies on kinaesthetic sensations (rather than vibrotactile sensations), and little studies exist on small-scale kinaesthetic haptic units. Thus, the primary goals of this paper are to design a miniature kinaesthetic actuator based on Magneto-Rheological (MR) fluid that can convey various button-clicking sensations and to experimentally evaluate its haptic performance. The design focuses of the proposed actuator were to produce sufficiently large actuation forces (resistive forces) for human users in a given size constraint and to offer a wide range of actuation forces for conveying vivid haptic sensations to users. To this end, this study first performed a series of parametric studies using mathematical force models for multiple operating modes of MR fluid in conjunction with finite element electromagnetism analysis. After selecting design parameters based on parametric studies, a prototype actuator was constructed, and its performance was evaluated using a dynamic mechanical analyzer. It measured the actuator's resistive force with a varying stroke (pressed depth) up to 1 mm and a varying input current from 0 A to 200 mA. The results show that the proposed actuator creates a wide range of resistive forces from around 2 N (off-state) to over 9.5 N at 200 mA. In order to assess the prototype's performance in the terms of the haptic application prospective, a maximum force rate was calculated to determine just noticeable difference in force changes for the 1 mm stoke of the actuator. The results show that the force rate is sufficient to mimic various levels of button sensations, indicating that the proposed kinaesthetic actuator can offer a wide range of resistive force changes that can be conveyed to human operators.

  16. Fluid flow model of the Cerro Prieto geothermal field based on well log interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Halfman, S.E.; Lippmann, M.J.; Zelwer, R.; Howard, J.H.

    1982-10-01

    The subsurface geology of the Cerro Prieto geothermal field was analyzed using geophysical and lithologic logs. The distribution of permeable and relatively impermeable units and the location of faults are shown in a geologic model of the system. By incorporating well completion data and downhole temperature profiles into the geologic model, it was possible to determine he direction of geothermal fluid flow and the role of subsurface geologic features that control this movement.

  17. Fluid flow model of the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field based on well log interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Halfman, S.E.; Lippmann, M.J.; Zelwe, R.; Howard, J.H.

    1982-08-10

    The subsurface geology of the Cerro Prieto geothermal field was analyzed using geophysical and lithologic logs. The distribution of permeable and relatively impermeable units and the location of faults are shown in a geologic model of the system. By incorporating well completion data and downhole temperature profiles into the geologic model, it was possible to determine the direction of geothermal fluid flow and the role of subsurface geologic features that control this movement.

  18. Simulation of single microorganism motion in fluid based on granular model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viridi, S.; Nuraini, N.

    2016-04-01

    Microorganism model for simulating its motion is proposed in this work. It consists of granular particles which can interact to each other through linear spring mimicking microorganism muscles, which is simpler than other model. As a part of the organism organ is moving, while the other remains at its position, it will push the surrounding fluid through Stoke's force and as reaction the fluid pushes back the microorganism. Contracting force is used to change the distance between two points in the organ. Gravity influence is simply neglected in this work. All the considered forces are used to get motion parameters of organism through molecular dynamics method. It is observed that the use of contracting (push-pull) organ constructs slightly more effective model than shrink- and swell-organs as previously investigated, if weighted effectiveness formula is used as function of number of considered forces and involved particles.

  19. Unsteady wall shear stress analysis from image-based computational fluid dynamic aneurysm models under Newtonian and Casson rheological models.

    PubMed

    Castro, Marcelo A; Ahumada Olivares, María C; Putman, Christopher M; Cebral, Juan R

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this work was to determine whether or not Newtonian rheology assumption in image-based patient-specific computational fluid dynamics (CFD) cerebrovascular models harboring cerebral aneurysms may affect the hemodynamics characteristics, which have been previously associated with aneurysm progression and rupture. Ten patients with cerebral aneurysms with lobulations were considered. CFD models were reconstructed from 3DRA and 4DCTA images by means of region growing, deformable models, and an advancing front technique. Patient-specific FEM blood flow simulations were performed under Newtonian and Casson rheological models. Wall shear stress (WSS) maps were created and distributions were compared at the end diastole. Regions of lower WSS (lobulation) and higher WSS (neck) were identified. WSS changes in time were analyzed. Maximum, minimum and time-averaged values were calculated and statistically compared. WSS characterization remained unchanged. At high WSS regions, Casson rheology systematically produced higher WSS minimum, maximum and time-averaged values. However, those differences were not statistically significant. At low WSS regions, when averaging over all cases, the Casson model produced higher stresses, although in some cases the Newtonian model did. However, those differences were not significant either. There is no evidence that Newtonian model overestimates WSS. Differences are not statistically significant.

  20. Physics-Based Computational Algorithm for the Multi-Fluid Plasma Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-30

    thermodynamic equilibrium. 1.2 Introduction to Fluid Plasma Models Taking moments of the Boltzmann equation, Eq. (1), provides equations that govern the...framework called WARPX (Washington Approximate Riemann Plasma), which uses C++ object oriented programming and other modern software techniques to sim...stability in a shearing box with zero net flux. Astronomy and Astrophysics , 476(3):1113–1122, 2007. [5] V. A. Izzo, D. G. Whyte, R. S. Granetz, P. B

  1. Regulation of amniotic fluid volume: mathematical model based on intramembranous transport mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Brace, Robert A; Anderson, Debra F; Cheung, Cecilia Y

    2014-11-15

    Experimentation in late-gestation fetal sheep has suggested that regulation of amniotic fluid (AF) volume occurs primarily by modulating the rate of intramembranous transport of water and solutes across the amnion into underlying fetal blood vessels. In order to gain insight into intramembranous transport mechanisms, we developed a computer model that allows simulation of experimentally measured changes in AF volume and composition over time. The model included fetal urine excretion and lung liquid secretion as inflows into the amniotic compartment plus fetal swallowing and intramembranous absorption as outflows. By using experimental flows and solute concentrations for urine, lung liquid, and swallowed fluid in combination with the passive and active transport mechanisms of the intramembranous pathway, we simulated AF responses to basal conditions, intra-amniotic fluid infusions, fetal intravascular infusions, urine replacement, and tracheoesophageal occlusion. The experimental data are consistent with four intramembranous transport mechanisms acting in concert: 1) an active unidirectional bulk transport of AF with all dissolved solutes out of AF into fetal blood presumably by vesicles; 2) passive bidirectional diffusion of solutes, such as sodium and chloride, between fetal blood and AF; 3) passive bidirectional water movement between AF and fetal blood; and 4) unidirectional transport of lactate into the AF. Further, only unidirectional bulk transport is dynamically regulated. The simulations also identified areas for future study: 1) identifying intramembranous stimulators and inhibitors, 2) determining the semipermeability characteristics of the intramembranous pathway, and 3) characterizing the vesicles that are the primary mediators of intramembranous transport.

  2. Validation of a numerical 3-D fluid-structure interaction model for a prosthetic valve based on experimental PIV measurements.

    PubMed

    Guivier-Curien, Carine; Deplano, Valérie; Bertrand, Eric

    2009-10-01

    A numerical 3-D fluid-structure interaction (FSI) model of a prosthetic aortic valve was developed, based on a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software program using an Arbitrary Eulerian Lagrangian (ALE) formulation. To make sure of the validity of this numerical model, an equivalent experimental model accounting for both the geometrical features and the hydrodynamic conditions was also developed. The leaflet and the flow behaviours around the bileaflet valve were investigated numerically and experimentally by performing particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements. Through quantitative and qualitative comparisons, it was shown that the leaflet behaviour and the velocity fields were similar in both models. The present study allows the validation of a fully coupled 3-D FSI numerical model. The promising numerical tool could be therefore used to investigate clinical issues involving the aortic valve.

  3. Physical-based non-Newtonian fluid animation using SPH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Hai

    Fluids are commonly seen in our daily lives. They exhibit a wide range of motions, which depend on their physical properties, and often result in amazing visual phenomena. Hence, fluid animation is a popular topic in computer graphics. The animation results not only enrich a computer-generated virtual world but have found applications in generating special effects in motion pictures and in computer games. The three-dimensional (3D) Navier-Stokes (NS) equation is a comprehensive mechanical description of the fluid motions. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) is a popular particle-based fluid modeling formulation. In physical-based fluid animation, the fluid models are based on the 3D NS equation, which can be solved using SPH based methods. Non-Newtonian fluids form a rich class of fluids. Their physical behavior exhibits a strong and complex stress-strain relationship which falls outside the modeling range of Newtonian fluid mechanics. In physical-based fluid animation, most of the fluid models are based on Newtonian fluids, and hence they cannot realistically animate non-Newtonian fluid motions such as stretching, bending, and bouncing. Based on the 3D NS equation and SPH, three original contributions are presented in this dissertation, which address the following three aspects of fluid animation: (1) particle-based non-Newtonian fluids, (2) immiscible fluid-fluid collision, and (3) heating non-Newtonian fluids. Consequently, more varieties of non-Newtonian fluid motions can be animated, which include stretching, bending, and bouncing.

  4. Investigations of microscale fluid-thermal phenomena based on the deterministic Boltzmann-ESBGK model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiaohui

    Fluid and thermal problems are widely encountered in micro/nano-scale devices, the characteristic lengths of which are from hundreds of microns down to tens of nanometers. A great number of such devices involve fundamental components like microchannels, capillaries, membranes and cantilever beams. Continuum assumptions that lead to classical governing equations such as Navier-Stokes equations and Fourier Laws break down when the characteristic size shrinks by an order of millions. In addition, conventional sensors, actuators and controllers turn to be insufficient to depict the flow, thermal, or electrical fields in micro-devices without impacting the original conditions greatly. Therefore, the development of numerical methods becomes indispensable in design and performance analysis of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS). The main goal of this PhD research is the development, implementation and application of comprehensive deterministic Boltzmann-ESBGK modeling framework to micro-scale fluid-thermal phenomena. Investigation of gas flows in short rectangular microchannels has been carried out to understand the rarefaction effects on the reduced mass-flow-rate as well as the non-equilibrium effects on the temperature components. At high Knudsen numbers, the reduced mass-flow-rate only depends on the pressure ratio and the temperature components deviate at the channel exit. For gas flows in long microchannels with and without constrictions, the Navier-Stokes equations with first-order slip boundary conditions are solved. Numerical results accurately predict the entrance pressure drop comparing to high-resolution experimental data using pressure-sensitive-paint (PSP). Simultions show clearly that the compressibility effects become less important than the rarefaction effects at low pressures. The coupled gas-phonon Boltzmann solver has been developed. The reduced distribution functions are used in the two-dimensional code to reduce the computational cost. The

  5. Incorporating and Compensating Cerebrospinal Fluid in Surface-Based Forward Models of Magneto- and Electroencephalography

    PubMed Central

    Stenroos, Matti; Nummenmaa, Aapo

    2016-01-01

    MEG/EEG source imaging is usually done using a three-shell (3-S) or a simpler head model. Such models omit cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) that strongly affects the volume currents. We present a four-compartment (4-C) boundary-element (BEM) model that incorporates the CSF and is computationally efficient and straightforward to build using freely available software. We propose a way for compensating the omission of CSF by decreasing the skull conductivity of the 3-S model, and study the robustness of the 4-C and 3-S models to errors in skull conductivity. We generated dense boundary meshes using MRI datasets and automated SimNIBS pipeline. Then, we built a dense 4-C reference model using Galerkin BEM, and 4-C and 3-S test models using coarser meshes and both Galerkin and collocation BEMs. We compared field topographies of cortical sources, applying various skull conductivities and fitting conductivities that minimized the relative error in 4-C and 3-S models. When the CSF was left out from the EEG model, our compensated, unbiased approach improved the accuracy of the 3-S model considerably compared to the conventional approach, where CSF is neglected without any compensation (mean relative error < 20% vs. > 40%). The error due to the omission of CSF was of the same order in MEG and compensated EEG. EEG has, however, large overall error due to uncertain skull conductivity. Our results show that a realistic 4-C MEG/EEG model can be implemented using standard tools and basic BEM, without excessive workload or computational burden. If the CSF is omitted, compensated skull conductivity should be used in EEG. PMID:27472278

  6. Measurement-based quantum lattice gas model of fluid dynamics in 2+1 dimensions.

    PubMed

    Micci, Michael M; Yepez, Jeffrey

    2015-09-01

    Presented are quantum simulation results using a measurement-based quantum lattice gas algorithm for Navier-Stokes fluid dynamics in 2+1 dimensions. Numerical prediction of the kinematic viscosity was measured by the decay rate of an initial sinusoidal flow profile. Due to local quantum entanglement in the quantum lattice gas, the minimum kinematic viscosity in the measurement-based quantum lattice gas is lower than achievable in a classical lattice gas. The numerically predicted viscosities precisely match the theoretical predictions obtained with a mean field approximation. Uniform flow profile with double shear layers, on a 16K×8K lattice, leads to the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, breaking up the shear layer into pairs of counter-rotating vortices that eventually merge via vortex fusion and dissipate because of the nonzero shear viscosity.

  7. Adaptive particle-based pore-level modeling of incompressible fluid flow in porous media: a direct and parallel approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovaysi, S.; Piri, M.

    2009-12-01

    We present a three-dimensional fully dynamic parallel particle-based model for direct pore-level simulation of incompressible viscous fluid flow in disordered porous media. The model was developed from scratch and is capable of simulating flow directly in three-dimensional high-resolution microtomography images of naturally occurring or man-made porous systems. It reads the images as input where the position of the solid walls are given. The entire medium, i.e., solid and fluid, is then discretized using particles. The model is based on Moving Particle Semi-implicit (MPS) technique. We modify this technique in order to improve its stability. The model handles highly irregular fluid-solid boundaries effectively. It takes into account viscous pressure drop in addition to the gravity forces. It conserves mass and can automatically detect any false connectivity with fluid particles in the neighboring pores and throats. It includes a sophisticated algorithm to automatically split and merge particles to maintain hydraulic connectivity of extremely narrow conduits. Furthermore, it uses novel methods to handle particle inconsistencies and open boundaries. To handle the computational load, we present a fully parallel version of the model that runs on distributed memory computer clusters and exhibits excellent scalability. The model is used to simulate unsteady-state flow problems under different conditions starting from straight noncircular capillary tubes with different cross-sectional shapes, i.e., circular/elliptical, square/rectangular and triangular cross-sections. We compare the predicted dimensionless hydraulic conductances with the data available in the literature and observe an excellent agreement. We then test the scalability of our parallel model with two samples of an artificial sandstone, samples A and B, with different volumes and different distributions (non-uniform and uniform) of solid particles among the processors. An excellent linear scalability is

  8. In Vivo/Ex Vivo MRI-Based 3D Non-Newtonian FSI Models for Human Atherosclerotic Plaques Compared with Fluid/Wall-Only Models.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chun; Tang, Dalin; Yuan, Chun; Hatsukami, Thomas S; Zheng, Jie; Woodard, Pamela K

    2007-01-01

    It has been recognized that fluid-structure interactions (FSI) play an important role in cardiovascular disease initiation and development. However, in vivo MRI multi-component FSI models for human carotid atherosclerotic plaques with bifurcation and quantitative comparisons of FSI models with fluid-only or structure-only models are currently lacking in the literature. A 3D non-Newtonian multi-component FSI model based on in vivo/ex vivo MRI images for human atherosclerotic plaques was introduced to investigate flow and plaque stress/strain behaviors which may be related to plaque progression and rupture. Both artery wall and plaque components were assumed to be hyperelastic, isotropic, incompressible and homogeneous. Blood flow was assumed to be laminar, non-Newtonian, viscous and incompressible. In vivo/ex vivo MRI images were acquired using histologically-validated multi-spectral MRI protocols. The 3D FSI models were solved and results were compared with those from a Newtonian FSI model and wall-only/fluid-only models. A 145% difference in maximum principal stresses (Stress-P(1)) between the FSI and wall-only models and 40% difference in flow maximum shear stress (MSS) between the FSI and fluid-only models were found at the throat of the plaque using a severe plaque sample (70% severity by diameter). Flow maximum shear stress (MSS) from the rigid wall model is much higher (20-40% in maximum MSS values, 100-150% in stagnation region) than those from FSI models.

  9. Computations of two-fluid models based on a simple and robust hybrid primitive variable Riemann solver with AUSMD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Yang-Yao

    2016-03-01

    This paper is to continue our previous work in 2008 on solving a two-fluid model for compressible liquid-gas flows. We proposed a pressure-velocity based diffusion term original derived from AUSMD scheme of Wada and Liou in 1997 to enhance its robustness. The proposed AUSMD schemes have been applied to gas and liquid fluids universally to capture fluid discontinuities, such as the fluid interfaces and shock waves, accurately for the Ransom's faucet problem, air-water shock tube problems and 2D shock-water liquid interaction problems. However, the proposed scheme failed at computing liquid-gas interfaces in problems under large ratios of pressure, density and volume of fraction. The numerical instability has been remedied by Chang and Liou in 2007 using the exact Riemann solver to enhance the accuracy and stability of numerical flux across the liquid-gas interface. Here, instead of the exact Riemann solver, we propose a simple AUSMD type primitive variable Riemann solver (PVRS) which can successfully solve 1D stiffened water-air shock tube and 2D shock-gas interaction problems under large ratios of pressure, density and volume of fraction without the expensive cost of tedious computer time. In addition, the proposed approach is shown to deliver a good resolution of the shock-front, rarefaction and cavitation inside the evolution of high-speed droplet impact on the wall.

  10. Phase-field-based lattice Boltzmann model for incompressible binary fluid systems with density and viscosity contrasts.

    PubMed

    Zu, Y Q; He, S

    2013-04-01

    A lattice Boltzmann model (LBM) is proposed based on the phase-field theory to simulate incompressible binary fluids with density and viscosity contrasts. Unlike many existing diffuse interface models which are limited to density matched binary fluids, the proposed model is capable of dealing with binary fluids with moderate density ratios. A new strategy for projecting the phase field to the viscosity field is proposed on the basis of the continuity of viscosity flux. The new LBM utilizes two lattice Boltzmann equations (LBEs): one for the interface tracking and the other for solving the hydrodynamic properties. The LBE for interface tracking can recover the Chan-Hilliard equation without any additional terms; while the LBE for hydrodynamic properties can recover the exact form of the divergence-free incompressible Navier-Stokes equations avoiding spurious interfacial forces. A series of 2D and 3D benchmark tests have been conducted for validation, which include a rigid-body rotation, stationary and moving droplets, a spinodal decomposition, a buoyancy-driven bubbly flow, a layered Poiseuille flow, and the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. It is shown that the proposed method can track the interface with high accuracy and stability and can significantly and systematically reduce the parasitic current across the interface. Comparisons with momentum-based models indicate that the newly proposed velocity-based model can better satisfy the incompressible condition in the flow fields, and eliminate or reduce the velocity fluctuations in the higher-pressure-gradient region and, therefore, achieve a better numerical stability. In addition, the test of a layered Poiseuille flow demonstrates that the proposed scheme for mixture viscosity performs significantly better than the traditional mixture viscosity methods.

  11. Trajectory-based modeling of fluid transport in a medium with smoothly varying heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasco, D. W.; Pride, Steven R.; Commer, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Using an asymptotic methodology, valid in the presence of smoothly varying heterogeneity and prescribed boundaries, we derive a trajectory-based solution for tracer transport. The analysis produces a Hamilton-Jacobi partial differential equation for the phase of the propagating tracer front. The trajectories follow from the characteristic equations that are equivalent to the Hamilton-Jacobi equation. The paths are determined by the fluid velocity field, the total porosity, and the dispersion tensor. Due to their dependence upon the local hydrodynamic dispersion, they differ from conventional streamlines. This difference is borne out in numerical calculations for both uniform and dipole flow fields. In an application to the computational X-ray imaging of a saline tracer test, we illustrate that the trajectories may serve as the basis for a form of tracer tomography. In particular, we use the onset time of a change in attenuation for each volume element of the X-ray image as a measure of the arrival time of the saline tracer. The arrival times are used to image the spatial variation of the effective hydraulic conductivity within the laboratory sample.

  12. A Kinetic-fluid Model

    SciTech Connect

    First Author = C.Z. Cheng; Jay R. Johnson

    1998-07-10

    A nonlinear kinetic-fluid model for high-beta plasmas with multiple ion species which can be applied to multiscale phenomena is presented. The model embeds important kinetic effects due to finite ion Larmor radius (FLR), wave-particle resonances, magnetic particle trapping, etc. in the framework of simple fluid descriptions. When further restricting to low frequency phenomena with frequencies less than the ion cyclotron frequency the kinetic-fluid model takes a simpler form in which the fluid equations of multiple ion species collapse into single-fluid density and momentum equations and a low frequency generalized Ohm's law. The kinetic effects are introduced via plasma pressure tensors for ions and electrons which are computed from particle distribution functions that are governed by the Vlasov equation or simplified plasma dynamics equations such as the gyrokinetic equation. The ion FLR effects provide a finite parallel electric field, a perpendicular velocity that modifies the ExB drift, and a gyroviscosity tensor, all of which are neglected in the usual one-fluid MHD description. Eigenmode equations are derived which include magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling effects for low frequency waves (e.g., kinetic/inertial Alfven waves and ballooning-mirror instabilities).

  13. Arterial hypertension due to fructose ingestion: model based on intermittent osmotic fluid trapping in the small bowel

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Based on recently reported data that fructose ingestion is linked to arterial hypertension, a model of regulatory loops involving the colon role in maintenance of fluid and sodium homeostasis is proposed. In normal digestion of hyperosmolar fluids, also in cases of postprandial hypotension and in patients having the "dumping" syndrome after gastric surgery, any hyperosmolar intestinal content is diluted by water taken from circulation and being trapped in the bowel until reabsorption. High fructose corn sirup (HFCS) soft drinks are among common hyperosmolar drinks. Fructose is slowly absorbed through passive carrier-mediated facilitated diffusion, along the entire small bowel, thus preventing absorption of the trapped water for several hours. Here presented interpretation is that ingestion of hyperosmolar HFCS drinks due to a transient fluid shift into the small bowel increases renin secretion and sympathetic activity, leading to rise in ADH and aldosterone secretions. Their actions spare water and sodium in the large bowel and kidneys. Alteration of colon absorption due to hormone exposure depends on cell renewal and takes days to develop, so the momentary capacity of sodium absorption in the colon depends on the average aldosterone and ADH exposure during few previous days. This inertia in modulation of the colon function can make an individual that often takes HFCS drinks prone to sodium retention, until a new balance is reached with an expanded ECF pool and arterial hypertension. In individuals with impaired fructose absorption, even a higher risk of arterial hypertension can be expected. PMID:20579372

  14. Comprehensive Mathematical Model Of Real Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Peter G.

    1996-01-01

    Mathematical model of thermodynamic properties of water, steam, and liquid and gaseous hydrogen and oxygen developed for use in computational simulations of flows of mass and heat in main engine of space shuttle. Similar models developed for other fluids and applications. Based on HBMS equation of state.

  15. Dynamic modelling and simulation of linear Fresnel solar field model based on molten salt heat transfer fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakkarainen, Elina; Tähtinen, Matti

    2016-05-01

    Demonstrations of direct steam generation (DSG) in linear Fresnel collectors (LFC) have given promising results related to higher steam parameters compared to the current state-of-the-art parabolic trough collector (PTC) technology using oil as heat transfer fluid (HTF). However, DSG technology lacks feasible solution for long-term thermal energy storage (TES) system. This option is important for CSP technology in order to offer dispatchable power. Recently, molten salts have been proposed to be used as HTF and directly as storage medium in both line-focusing solar fields, offering storage capacity of several hours. This direct molten salt (DMS) storage concept has already gained operational experience in solar tower power plant, and it is under demonstration phase both in the case of LFC and PTC systems. Dynamic simulation programs offer a valuable effort for design and optimization of solar power plants. In this work, APROS dynamic simulation program is used to model a DMS linear Fresnel solar field with two-tank TES system, and example simulation results are presented in order to verify the functionality of the model and capability of APROS for CSP modelling and simulation.

  16. VISCOPLASTIC FLUID MODEL FOR DEBRIS FLOW ROUTING.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, Cheng-lung

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes how a generalized viscoplastic fluid model, which was developed based on non-Newtonian fluid mechanics, can be successfully applied to routing a debris flow down a channel. The one-dimensional dynamic equations developed for unsteady clear-water flow can be used for debris flow routing if the flow parameters, such as the momentum (or energy) correction factor and the resistance coefficient, can be accurately evaluated. The writer's generalized viscoplastic fluid model can be used to express such flow parameters in terms of the rheological parameters for debris flow in wide channels. A preliminary analysis of the theoretical solutions reveals the importance of the flow behavior index and the so-called modified Froude number for uniformly progressive flow in snout profile modeling.

  17. Parametric Modeling for Fluid Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizarro, Yaritzmar Rosario; Martinez, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Fluid Systems involves different projects that require parametric modeling, which is a model that maintains consistent relationships between elements as is manipulated. One of these projects is the Neo Liquid Propellant Testbed, which is part of Rocket U. As part of Rocket U (Rocket University), engineers at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida have the opportunity to develop critical flight skills as they design, build and launch high-powered rockets. To build the Neo testbed; hardware from the Space Shuttle Program was repurposed. Modeling for Neo, included: fittings, valves, frames and tubing, between others. These models help in the review process, to make sure regulations are being followed. Another fluid systems project that required modeling is Plant Habitat's TCUI test project. Plant Habitat is a plan to develop a large growth chamber to learn the effects of long-duration microgravity exposure to plants in space. Work for this project included the design and modeling of a duct vent for flow test. Parametric Modeling for these projects was done using Creo Parametric 2.0.

  18. Oil base drilling fluid composition

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, A.D.; Salandanan, C.

    1988-04-26

    This patent describes an improved oil-base drilling fluid composition characterized by thixotropic properties resulting in a yield point of from about 10 to about 75 comprising an oil-base continuous phase and a gelling composition. The gelling composition includes a latex material copolymerized with one or more functional monomers selected from the group consisting of: amides, amines, sulfonates, monocarboxylic acids, dicarboxylic acids and combinations thereof and wherein at least one of the one or more functional monomers is an amide selected from the group consisting of: acrylamide, N-methylolacrylamide, N-alkyl-acrylamide, vinylacetamide, vinylpyrrolidone, N-vinyl-N-methylacetamide, vinylformamide and combinations thereof.

  19. Fluids and Combustion Facility: Fluids Integrated Rack Modal Model Correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNelis, Mark E.; Suarez, Vicente J.; Sullivan, Timothy L.; Otten, Kim D.; Akers, James C.

    2005-01-01

    The Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR) is one of two racks in the Fluids and Combustion Facility on the International Space Station. The FIR is dedicated to the scientific investigation of space system fluids management supporting NASA s Exploration of Space Initiative. The FIR hardware was modal tested and FIR finite element model updated to satisfy the International Space Station model correlation criteria. The final cross-orthogonality results between the correlated model and test mode shapes was greater than 90 percent for all primary target modes.

  20. Modeling and Design of an Electro-Rheological Fluid Based Haptic System for Tele-Operation of Space Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavroidis, Constantinos; Pfeiffer, Charles; Paljic, Alex; Celestino, James; Lennon, Jamie; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2000-01-01

    For many years, the robotic community sought to develop robots that can eventually operate autonomously and eliminate the need for human operators. However, there is an increasing realization that there are some tasks that human can perform significantly better but, due to associated hazards, distance, physical limitations and other causes, only robot can be employed to perform these tasks. Remotely performing these types of tasks requires operating robots as human surrogates. While current "hand master" haptic systems are able to reproduce the feeling of rigid objects, they present great difficulties in emulating the feeling of remote/virtual stiffness. In addition, they tend to be heavy, cumbersome and usually they only allow limited operator workspace. In this paper a novel haptic interface is presented to enable human-operators to "feel" and intuitively mirror the stiffness/forces at remote/virtual sites enabling control of robots as human-surrogates. This haptic interface is intended to provide human operators intuitive feeling of the stiffness and forces at remote or virtual sites in support of space robots performing dexterous manipulation tasks (such as operating a wrench or a drill). Remote applications are referred to the control of actual robots whereas virtual applications are referred to simulated operations. The developed haptic interface will be applicable to IVA operated robotic EVA tasks to enhance human performance, extend crew capability and assure crew safety. The electrically controlled stiffness is obtained using constrained ElectroRheological Fluids (ERF), which changes its viscosity under electrical stimulation. Forces applied at the robot end-effector due to a compliant environment will be reflected to the user using this ERF device where a change in the system viscosity will occur proportionally to the force to be transmitted. In this paper, we will present the results of our modeling, simulation, and initial testing of such an

  1. Method of recovering oil-based fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkley, H.E.

    1993-07-13

    A method is described of recovering oil-based fluid, said method comprising the steps of: applying an oil-based fluid absorbent cloth of man-made fiber to an oil-based fluid, the cloth having at least a portion thereof that is napped so as to raise ends and loops of the man-made fibers and define voids; and absorbing the oil-based fluid into the napped portion of the cloth.

  2. Standardization of Thermo-Fluid Modeling in Modelica.Fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Franke, Rudiger; Casella, Francesco; Sielemann, Michael; Proelss, Katrin; Otter, Martin; Wetter, Michael

    2009-09-01

    This article discusses the Modelica.Fluid library that has been included in the Modelica Standard Library 3.1. Modelica.Fluid provides interfaces and basic components for the device-oriented modeling of onedimensional thermo-fluid flow in networks containing vessels, pipes, fluid machines, valves and fittings. A unique feature of Modelica.Fluid is that the component equations and the media models as well as pressure loss and heat transfer correlations are decoupled from each other. All components are implemented such that they can be used for media from the Modelica.Media library. This means that an incompressible or compressible medium, a single or a multiple substance medium with one or more phases might be used with one and the same model as long as the modeling assumptions made hold. Furthermore, trace substances are supported. Modeling assumptions can be configured globally in an outer System object. This covers in particular the initialization, uni- or bi-directional flow, and dynamic or steady-state formulation of mass, energy, and momentum balance. All assumptions can be locally refined for every component. While Modelica.Fluid contains a reasonable set of component models, the goal of the library is not to provide a comprehensive set of models, but rather to provide interfaces and best practices for the treatment of issues such as connector design and implementation of energy, mass and momentum balances. Applications from various domains are presented.

  3. Fluid and hybrid models for streamers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonaventura, Zdeněk

    2016-09-01

    Streamers are contracted ionizing waves with self-generated field enhancement that propagate into a low-ionized medium exposed to high electric field leaving filamentary trails of plasma behind. The widely used model to study streamer dynamics is based on drift-diffusion equations for electrons and ions, assuming local field approximation, coupled with Poisson's equation. For problems where presence of energetic electrons become important a fluid approach needs to be extended by a particle model, accompanied also with Monte Carlo Collision technique, that takes care of motion of these electrons. A combined fluid-particle approach is used to study an influence of surface emission processes on a fast-pulsed dielectric barrier discharge in air at atmospheric pressure. It is found that fluid-only model predicts substantially faster reignition dynamics compared to coupled fluid-particle model. Furthermore, a hybrid model can be created in which the population of electrons is divided in the energy space into two distinct groups: (1) low energy `bulk' electrons that are treated with fluid model, and (2) high energy `beam' electrons, followed as particles. The hybrid model is then capable not only to deal with streamer discharges in laboratory conditions, but also allows us to study electron acceleration in streamer zone of lighting leaders. There, the production of fast electrons from streamers is investigated, since these (runaway) electrons act as seeds for the relativistic runaway electron avalanche (RREA) mechanism, important for high-energy atmospheric physics phenomena. Results suggest that high energy electrons effect the streamer propagation, namely the velocity, the peak electric field, and thus also the production rate of runaway electrons. This work has been supported by the Czech Science Foundation research project 15-04023S.

  4. Modeling Strains Associated with Fluid Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbour, A. J.; Agnew, D. C.; Wyatt, F. K.

    2013-12-01

    A class of strain signals found in data from a number of borehole strainmeters in the Plate Boundary Observatory network is believed to be associated with pumping of nearby water wells. In order to test the connection between fluid extraction and deformation, we have collected a multi- year record of the pump activity at two actively-pumped wells near the pair of strainmeters at the Pathfinder Ranch, a summer camp located in the Garner Valley in southern California. The data we have collected indicate strong correlations between (1) times of fluid extraction and the onset of significant strain and pore-fluid pressure changes, and (2) cumulative extraction volumes and the sizes of the pressure and strain perturbations. In order to model these observations, we use a sum of K autoregressive models to create a statistical description of the effect, and a poroelastic model to create a physical description. We show that for K = 2 the mixture model adequately preserves both long- and short-term effects, and can be used to construct a ';correction series' from the binary pumping series in a numerically efficient manner. Spatiotemporal strain and pore- fluid pressure fields associated with episodes of fluid extraction are simulated in a layered, radially extensive poroelastic medium. Based on the interpretations of our parameter exploration, the simplest model which fits the observed strains and pressures is a two layer model where rigid bedrock having relatively high diffusivity is overlain by roughly 100 meters of alluvium having slightly higher diffusivity and behaving as an unconfined aquifer system. The lack of a strong contrast in diffusivity between lithologic units suggests that the bedrock material has a relatively high density of hydraulically conductive fractures; borehole logging data and drillers' logs corroborate this. Further, the requirement that both layers have high conductivity helps explain the relatively low sensitivity of the aquifer system to dynamic

  5. Simplified Aeroelastic Model for Fluid Structure Interaction between Microcantilever Sensors and Fluid Surroundings.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Zhao, Liang; Zhang, Yanling; Qiao, Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Fluid-structural coupling occurs when microcantilever sensors vibrate in a fluid. Due to the complexity of the mechanical characteristics of microcantilevers and lack of high-precision microscopic mechanical testing instruments, effective methods for studying the fluid-structural coupling of microcantilevers are lacking, especially for non-rectangular microcantilevers. Here, we report fluid-structure interactions (FSI) of the cable-membrane structure via a macroscopic study. The simplified aeroelastic model was introduced into the microscopic field to establish a fluid-structure coupling vibration model for microcantilever sensors. We used the finite element method to solve the coupled FSI system. Based on the simplified aeroelastic model, simulation analysis of the effects of the air environment on the vibration of the commonly used rectangular microcantilever was also performed. The obtained results are consistent with the literature. The proposed model can also be applied to the auxiliary design of rectangular and non-rectangular sensors used in fluid environments.

  6. A study of the variation of physical conditions in the cometary coma based on a 3D multi-fluid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shou, Y.; Combi, M. R.; Fougere, N.; Tenishev, V.; Toth, G.; Gombosi, T. I.; Huang, Z.; Jia, X.; Bieler, A. M.; Hansen, K. C.

    2015-12-01

    Physics-based numerical coma models are desirable whether to interpret the spacecraft observations of the inner coma or to compare with the ground-based observations of the outer coma. One example is Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method, which has been successfully adopted to simulate the coma under various complex conditions. However, for bright comets with large production rates, the time step in DSMC model has to be tiny to accommodate the small mean free path and the high collision frequency. In addition a truly time-variable 3D DSMC model would still be computationally difficult or even impossible under most circumstances. In this work, we develop a multi-neutral-fluid model based on BATS-R-US in the University of Michigan's SWMF (Space Weather Modeling Framework), which can serve as a useful alternative to DSMC methods to compute both the inner and the outer coma and to treat time-variable phenomena. This model treats H2O, OH, H2, O, H and CO2 as separate fluids and each fluid has its own velocity and temperature. But collisional interactions can also couple all fluids together. Collisional interactions tend to decrease the velocity differences and are also able to re-distribute the excess energy deposited by chemical reactions among all species. To compute the momentum and energy transfer caused by such interactions self-consistently, collisions between fluids, whose efficiency is proportional to the densities, are included as well as heating from various chemical reactions. By applying the model to comets with different production rates (i.e. 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, 1P/Halley, etc.), we are able to study how the heating efficiency varies with cometocentric distances and production rates. The preliminary results and comparison are presented and discussed. This work has been partially supported by grant NNX14AG84G from the NASA Planetary Atmospheres Program, and US Rosetta contracts JPL #1266313, JPL #1266314 and JPL #1286489.

  7. On a basic model of circulatory, fluid, and electrolyte regulation in the human system based upon the model of Guyton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    A detailed description of Guyton's model and modifications are provided. Also included are descriptions of several typical experiments which the model can simulate to illustrate the model's general utility. A discussion of the problems associated with the interfacing of the model to other models such as respiratory and thermal regulation models which is prime importance since these stimuli are not present in the current model is also included. A user's guide for the operation of the model on the Xerox Sigma 3 computer is provided and two programs are described. A verification plan and procedure for performing experiments is also presented.

  8. Modelling induced seismicity due to fluid injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, S.; O'Brien, G. S.; Bean, C. J.; McCloskey, J.; Nalbant, S. S.

    2011-12-01

    Injection of fluid into the subsurface alters the stress in the crust and can induce earthquakes. The science of assessing the risk of induced seismicity from such ventures is still in its infancy despite public concern. We plan to use a fault network model in which stress perturbations due to fluid injection induce earthquakes. We will use this model to investigate the role different operational and geological factors play in increasing seismicity in a fault system due to fluid injection. The model is based on a quasi-dynamic relationship between stress and slip coupled with a rate and state fiction law. This allows us to model slip on fault interfaces over long periods of time (i.e. years to 100's years). With the use of the rate and state friction law the nature of stress release during slipping can be altered through variation of the frictional parameters. Both seismic and aseismic slip can therefore be simulated. In order to add heterogeneity along the fault plane a fractal variation in the frictional parameters is used. Fluid injection is simulated using the lattice Boltzmann method whereby pore pressure diffuses throughout a permeable layer from the point of injection. The stress perturbation this causes on the surrounding fault system is calculated using a quasi-static solution for slip dislocation in an elastic half space. From this model we can generate slip histories and seismicity catalogues covering 100's of years for predefined fault networks near fluid injection sites. Given that rupture is a highly non-linear process, comparison between models with different input parameters (e.g. fault network statistics and injection rates) will be based on system wide features (such as the Gutenberg-Richter b-values), rather than specific seismic events. Our ultimate aim is that our model produces seismic catalogues similar to those observed over real injection sites. Such validation would pave the way to probabilistic estimation of reactivation risk for

  9. Modeling of fluid injection and withdrawal induced fault activation using discrete element based hydro-mechanical and dynamic coupled simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jeoung Seok; Zang, Arno; Zimmermann, Günter; Stephansson, Ove

    2016-04-01

    Operation of fluid injection into and withdrawal from the subsurface for various purposes has been known to induce earthquakes. Such operations include hydraulic fracturing for shale gas extraction, hydraulic stimulation for Enhanced Geothermal System development and waste water disposal. Among these, several damaging earthquakes have been reported in the USA in particular in the areas of high-rate massive amount of wastewater injection [1] mostly with natural fault systems. Oil and gas production have been known to induce earthquake where pore fluid pressure decreases in some cases by several tens of Mega Pascal. One recent seismic event occurred in November 2013 near Azle, Texas where a series of earthquakes began along a mapped ancient fault system [2]. It was studied that a combination of brine production and waste water injection near the fault generated subsurface pressures sufficient to induced earthquakes on near-critically stressed faults. This numerical study aims at investigating the occurrence mechanisms of such earthquakes induced by fluid injection [3] and withdrawal by using hydro-geomechanical coupled dynamic simulator (Itasca's Particle Flow Code 2D). Generic models are setup to investigate the sensitivity of several parameters which include fault orientation, frictional properties, distance from the injection well to the fault, amount of fluid withdrawal around the injection well, to the response of the fault systems and the activation magnitude. Fault slip movement over time in relation to the diffusion of pore pressure is analyzed in detail. Moreover, correlations between the spatial distribution of pore pressure change and the locations of induced seismic events and fault slip rate are investigated. References [1] Keranen KM, Weingarten M, Albers GA, Bekins BA, Ge S, 2014. Sharp increase in central Oklahoma seismicity since 2008 induced by massive wastewater injection, Science 345, 448, DOI: 10.1126/science.1255802. [2] Hornbach MJ, DeShon HR

  10. Computational fluid dynamic modelling of cavitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, Manish; Feng, Jinzhang; Merkle, Charles L.

    1993-01-01

    Models in sheet cavitation in cryogenic fluids are developed for use in Euler and Navier-Stokes codes. The models are based upon earlier potential-flow models but enable the cavity inception point, length, and shape to be determined as part of the computation. In the present paper, numerical solutions are compared with experimental measurements for both pressure distribution and cavity length. Comparisons between models are also presented. The CFD model provides a relatively simple modification to an existing code to enable cavitation performance predictions to be included. The analysis also has the added ability of incorporating thermodynamic effects of cryogenic fluids into the analysis. Extensions of the current two-dimensional steady state analysis to three-dimensions and/or time-dependent flows are, in principle, straightforward although geometrical issues become more complicated. Linearized models, however offer promise of providing effective cavitation modeling in three-dimensions. This analysis presents good potential for improved understanding of many phenomena associated with cavity flows.

  11. First-Order Systems Least-Squares Finite Element Methods and Nested Iteration for Electromagnetic Two-Fluid Kinetic-Based Plasma Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leibs, Christopher A.

    Efforts are currently being directed towards a fully implicit, electromagnetic, JFNK-based solver, motivating the necessity of developing a fluid-based, electromag- netic, preconditioning strategy. The two-fluid plasma (TFP) model is an ideal approximation to the kinetic Jacobian. The TFP model couples both an ion and an electron fluid with Maxwell's equations. The fluid equations consist of the conservation of momentum and number density. A Darwin approximation of Maxwell is used to eliminate light waves from the model in order to facilitate coupling to non-relativistic particle models. We analyze the TFP-Darwin system in the context of a stand-alone solver with consideration of preconditioning a kinetic-JFNK approach. The TFP-Darwin system is addressed numerically by use of nested iteration (NI) and a First-Order Systems Least Squares (FOSLS) discretization. An important goal of NI is to produce an approximation that is within the basis of attraction for Newton's method on a relatively coarse mesh and, thus, on all subsequent meshes. After scaling and modification, the TFP-Darwin model yields a nonlinear, first-order system of equa- tions whose Frechet derivative is shown to be uniformly H1-elliptic in a neighborhood of the exact solution. H1 ellipticity yields optimal finite element performance and lin- ear systems amenable to solution with Algebraic Multigrid (AMG). To efficiently focus computational resources, an adaptive mesh refinement scheme, based on the accuracy per computational cost, is leveraged. Numerical tests demonstrate the efficacy of the approach, yielding an approximate solution within discretization error in a relatively small number of computational work units.

  12. Fluid-solid modeling of lymphatic valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caulk, Alexander; Ballard, Matthew; Nepiyushchikh, Zhanna; Dixon, Brandon; Alexeev, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    The lymphatic system performs important physiological functions such as the return of interstitial fluid to the bloodstream to maintain tissue fluid balance, as well as the transport of immune cells in the body. It utilizes contractile lymphatic vessels, which contain valves that open and close to allow flow in only one direction, to directionally pump lymph against a pressure gradient. We develop a fluid-solid model of geometrically representative lymphatic valves. Our model uses a hybrid lattice-Boltzmann lattice spring method to capture fluid-solid interactions with two-way coupling between a viscous fluid and lymphatic valves in a lymphatic vessel. We use this model to investigate the opening and closing of lymphatic valves, and its effect on lymphatic pumping. This helps to broaden our understanding of the fluid dynamics of the lymphatic system.

  13. A fluid model simulation of a simplified plasma limiter based on spectral-element time-domain method

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Cheng; Ding, Dazhi Fan, Zhenhong; Chen, Rushan

    2015-03-15

    A simplified plasma limiter prototype is proposed and the fluid model coupled with Maxwell's equations is established to describe the operating mechanism of plasma limiter. A three-dimensional (3-D) simplified sandwich structure plasma limiter model is analyzed with the spectral-element time-domain (SETD) method. The field breakdown threshold of air and argon at different frequency is predicted and compared with the experimental data and there is a good agreement between them for gas microwave breakdown discharge problems. Numerical results demonstrate that the two-layer plasma limiter (plasma-slab-plasma) has better protective characteristics than a one-layer plasma limiter (slab-plasma-slab) with the same length of gas chamber.

  14. Fluid discrimination based on rock physics templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qian; Yin, Xingyao; Li, Chao

    2015-10-01

    Reservoir fluid discrimination is an indispensable part of seismic exploration. Reliable fluid discrimination helps to decrease the risk of exploration and to increase the success ratio of drilling. There are many kinds of fluid indicators that are used in fluid discriminations, most of which are single indicators. But single indicators do not always work well under complicated reservoir conditions. Therefore, combined fluid indicators are needed to increase accuracies of discriminations. In this paper, we have proposed an alternative strategy for the combination of fluid indicators. An alternative fluid indicator, the rock physics template-based indicator (RPTI) has been derived to combine the advantages of two single indicators. The RPTI is more sensitive to the contents of fluid than traditional indicators. The combination is implemented based on the characteristic of the fluid trend in the rock physics template, which means few subjective factors are involved. We also propose an inversion method to assure the accuracy of the RPTI input data. The RPTI profile is an intuitionistic interpretation of fluid content. Real data tests demonstrate the applicability and validity.

  15. Computational fluid dynamics modelling in cardiovascular medicine

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Paul D; Narracott, Andrew; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik; Silva Soto, Daniel Alejandro; Hsiao, Sarah; Lungu, Angela; Evans, Paul; Bressloff, Neil W; Lawford, Patricia V; Hose, D Rodney; Gunn, Julian P

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews the methods, benefits and challenges associated with the adoption and translation of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling within cardiovascular medicine. CFD, a specialist area of mathematics and a branch of fluid mechanics, is used routinely in a diverse range of safety-critical engineering systems, which increasingly is being applied to the cardiovascular system. By facilitating rapid, economical, low-risk prototyping, CFD modelling has already revolutionised research and development of devices such as stents, valve prostheses, and ventricular assist devices. Combined with cardiovascular imaging, CFD simulation enables detailed characterisation of complex physiological pressure and flow fields and the computation of metrics which cannot be directly measured, for example, wall shear stress. CFD models are now being translated into clinical tools for physicians to use across the spectrum of coronary, valvular, congenital, myocardial and peripheral vascular diseases. CFD modelling is apposite for minimally-invasive patient assessment. Patient-specific (incorporating data unique to the individual) and multi-scale (combining models of different length- and time-scales) modelling enables individualised risk prediction and virtual treatment planning. This represents a significant departure from traditional dependence upon registry-based, population-averaged data. Model integration is progressively moving towards ‘digital patient’ or ‘virtual physiological human’ representations. When combined with population-scale numerical models, these models have the potential to reduce the cost, time and risk associated with clinical trials. The adoption of CFD modelling signals a new era in cardiovascular medicine. While potentially highly beneficial, a number of academic and commercial groups are addressing the associated methodological, regulatory, education- and service-related challenges. PMID:26512019

  16. Computational fluid dynamics modelling in cardiovascular medicine.

    PubMed

    Morris, Paul D; Narracott, Andrew; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik; Silva Soto, Daniel Alejandro; Hsiao, Sarah; Lungu, Angela; Evans, Paul; Bressloff, Neil W; Lawford, Patricia V; Hose, D Rodney; Gunn, Julian P

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews the methods, benefits and challenges associated with the adoption and translation of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling within cardiovascular medicine. CFD, a specialist area of mathematics and a branch of fluid mechanics, is used routinely in a diverse range of safety-critical engineering systems, which increasingly is being applied to the cardiovascular system. By facilitating rapid, economical, low-risk prototyping, CFD modelling has already revolutionised research and development of devices such as stents, valve prostheses, and ventricular assist devices. Combined with cardiovascular imaging, CFD simulation enables detailed characterisation of complex physiological pressure and flow fields and the computation of metrics which cannot be directly measured, for example, wall shear stress. CFD models are now being translated into clinical tools for physicians to use across the spectrum of coronary, valvular, congenital, myocardial and peripheral vascular diseases. CFD modelling is apposite for minimally-invasive patient assessment. Patient-specific (incorporating data unique to the individual) and multi-scale (combining models of different length- and time-scales) modelling enables individualised risk prediction and virtual treatment planning. This represents a significant departure from traditional dependence upon registry-based, population-averaged data. Model integration is progressively moving towards 'digital patient' or 'virtual physiological human' representations. When combined with population-scale numerical models, these models have the potential to reduce the cost, time and risk associated with clinical trials. The adoption of CFD modelling signals a new era in cardiovascular medicine. While potentially highly beneficial, a number of academic and commercial groups are addressing the associated methodological, regulatory, education- and service-related challenges.

  17. Fluid casting of particle-based articles

    DOEpatents

    Menchhofer, Paul

    1995-01-01

    A method for the production of articles made of a particle-based material; e.g., ceramics and sintered metals. In accordance with one aspect of the invention, a thermally settable slurry containing a relatively high concentration of the particles is introduced into an immiscible, heated fluid. The slurry sets or hardens into a shape determined by the physical characteristics of the fluid and the manner of introduction of the slurry into the fluid. For example, the slurry is pulse injected into the fluid to provide spherical articles. The hardened spheres may then be sintered to consolidate the particles and provide a high density product.

  18. Fluid casting of particle-based articles

    DOEpatents

    Menchhofer, P.

    1995-03-28

    A method is disclosed for the production of articles made of a particle-based material; e.g., ceramics and sintered metals. In accordance with one aspect of the invention, a thermally settable slurry containing a relatively high concentration of the particles is introduced into an immiscible, heated fluid. The slurry sets hardens into a shape determined by the physical characteristics of the fluid and the manner of introduction of the slurry into the fluid. For example, the slurry is pulse injected into the fluid to provide spherical articles. The hardened spheres may then be sintered to consolidate the particles and provide a high density product. 1 figure.

  19. Cosmological mesonic viscous fluid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, G.; Pradhan, B. D.

    1992-01-01

    A class of exact nonstatic solutions is obtained for Einstein field equations in a closed elliptic Robertson-Walker spacetime filled with viscous perfect fluid in the presence of attractive scalar fields. The solutions characterize strong interaction of elementary particles. It is also shown that the massive graviton possesses zero spin.

  20. Fluid Dynamics Lagrangian Simulation Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-02-08

    Virginia 22102 (703) 821-43"K Oth~er SAIC Offices Albuquerque. Boston. Colorado Springs . Dayton, Huntsville. Las Vegas, Los AngeLes. Oak Ridge, Orlando...of a Cylinder Wake Subjected to Localized Surface Ex- Journal of Fluid Mechanics, Vol. 191. pp. 197-223. citation."Jogrialof -jdd Mecanics , Vol. 234

  1. Direct modeling for computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Kun

    2015-06-01

    All fluid dynamic equations are valid under their modeling scales, such as the particle mean free path and mean collision time scale of the Boltzmann equation and the hydrodynamic scale of the Navier-Stokes (NS) equations. The current computational fluid dynamics (CFD) focuses on the numerical solution of partial differential equations (PDEs), and its aim is to get the accurate solution of these governing equations. Under such a CFD practice, it is hard to develop a unified scheme that covers flow physics from kinetic to hydrodynamic scales continuously because there is no such governing equation which could make a smooth transition from the Boltzmann to the NS modeling. The study of fluid dynamics needs to go beyond the traditional numerical partial differential equations. The emerging engineering applications, such as air-vehicle design for near-space flight and flow and heat transfer in micro-devices, do require further expansion of the concept of gas dynamics to a larger domain of physical reality, rather than the traditional distinguishable governing equations. At the current stage, the non-equilibrium flow physics has not yet been well explored or clearly understood due to the lack of appropriate tools. Unfortunately, under the current numerical PDE approach, it is hard to develop such a meaningful tool due to the absence of valid PDEs. In order to construct multiscale and multiphysics simulation methods similar to the modeling process of constructing the Boltzmann or the NS governing equations, the development of a numerical algorithm should be based on the first principle of physical modeling. In this paper, instead of following the traditional numerical PDE path, we introduce direct modeling as a principle for CFD algorithm development. Since all computations are conducted in a discretized space with limited cell resolution, the flow physics to be modeled has to be done in the mesh size and time step scales. Here, the CFD is more or less a direct

  2. Two-compartmental population balance modeling of a pulsed spray fluidized bed granulation based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huolong; Li, Mingzhong

    2014-11-20

    In this work a two-compartmental population balance model (TCPBM) was proposed to model a pulsed top-spray fluidized bed granulation. The proposed TCPBM considered the spatially heterogeneous granulation mechanisms of the granule growth by dividing the granulator into two perfectly mixed zones of the wetting compartment and drying compartment, in which the aggregation mechanism was assumed in the wetting compartment and the breakage mechanism was considered in the drying compartment. The sizes of the wetting and drying compartments were constant in the TCPBM, in which 30% of the bed was the wetting compartment and 70% of the bed was the drying compartment. The exchange rate of particles between the wetting and drying compartments was determined by the details of the flow properties and distribution of particles predicted by the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. The experimental validation has shown that the proposed TCPBM can predict evolution of the granule size and distribution within the granulator under different binder spray operating conditions accurately.

  3. Poiseuille flow to measure the viscosity of particle model fluids.

    PubMed

    Backer, J A; Lowe, C P; Hoefsloot, H C J; Iedema, P D

    2005-04-15

    The most important property of a fluid is its viscosity, it determines the flow properties. If one simulates a fluid using a particle model, calculating the viscosity accurately is difficult because it is a collective property. In this article we describe a new method that has a better signal to noise ratio than existing methods. It is based on using periodic boundary conditions to simulate counter-flowing Poiseuille flows without the use of explicit boundaries. The viscosity is then related to the mean flow velocity of the two flows. We apply the method to two quite different systems. First, a simple generic fluid model, dissipative particle dynamics, for which accurate values of the viscosity are needed to characterize the model fluid. Second, the more realistic Lennard-Jones fluid. In both cases the values we calculated are consistent with previous work but, for a given simulation time, they are more accurate than those obtained with other methods.

  4. Modeling quantum fluid dynamics at nonzero temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Berloff, Natalia G.; Brachet, Marc; Proukakis, Nick P.

    2014-01-01

    The detailed understanding of the intricate dynamics of quantum fluids, in particular in the rapidly growing subfield of quantum turbulence which elucidates the evolution of a vortex tangle in a superfluid, requires an in-depth understanding of the role of finite temperature in such systems. The Landau two-fluid model is the most successful hydrodynamical theory of superfluid helium, but by the nature of the scale separations it cannot give an adequate description of the processes involving vortex dynamics and interactions. In our contribution we introduce a framework based on a nonlinear classical-field equation that is mathematically identical to the Landau model and provides a mechanism for severing and coalescence of vortex lines, so that the questions related to the behavior of quantized vortices can be addressed self-consistently. The correct equation of state as well as nonlocality of interactions that leads to the existence of the roton minimum can also be introduced in such description. We review and apply the ideas developed for finite-temperature description of weakly interacting Bose gases as possible extensions and numerical refinements of the proposed method. We apply this method to elucidate the behavior of the vortices during expansion and contraction following the change in applied pressure. We show that at low temperatures, during the contraction of the vortex core as the negative pressure grows back to positive values, the vortex line density grows through a mechanism of vortex multiplication. This mechanism is suppressed at high temperatures. PMID:24704874

  5. AFDM: An Advanced Fluid-Dynamics Model

    SciTech Connect

    Bohl, W.R.; Parker, F.R. ); Wilhelm, D. . Inst. fuer Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik); Berthier, J. ); Goutagny, L. . Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire); Ninokata,

    1990-09-01

    AFDM, or the Advanced Fluid-Dynamics Model, is a computer code that investigates new approaches simulating the multiphase-flow fluid-dynamics aspects of severe accidents in fast reactors. The AFDM formalism starts with differential equations similar to those in the SIMMER-II code. These equations are modified to treat three velocity fields and supplemented with a variety of new models. The AFDM code has 12 topologies describing what material contacts are possible depending on the presence or absence of a given material in a computational cell, on the dominant liquid, and on the continuous phase. Single-phase, bubbly, churn-turbulent, cellular, and dispersed flow regimes are permitted for the pool situations modeled. Virtual mass terms are included for vapor in liquid-continuous flow. Interfacial areas between the continuous and discontinuous phases are convected to allow some tracking of phenomenological histories. Interfacial areas are also modified by models of nucleation, dynamic forces, turbulence, flashing, coalescence, and mass transfer. Heat transfer is generally treated using engineering correlations. Liquid-vapor phase transitions are handled with the nonequilibrium, heat-transfer-limited model, whereas melting and freezing processes are based on equilibrium considerations. Convection is treated using a fractional-step method of time integration, including a semi-implicit pressure iteration. A higher-order differencing option is provided to control numerical diffusion. The Los Alamos SESAME equation-of-state has been implemented using densities and temperatures as the independent variables. AFDM programming has vectorized all computational loops consistent with the objective of producing an exportable code. 24 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Fluid Dynamic Modeling to Support the Development of Flow-Based Hepatocyte Culture Systems for Metabolism Studies.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Jenny M; Shim, Yoo-Sik; Hans, Vaibhav; Phillips, Martin B; Macdonald, Jeffrey M; Walker, Glenn; Andersen, Melvin E; Clewell, Harvey J; Yoon, Miyoung

    2016-01-01

    Accurate prediction of metabolism is a significant outstanding challenge in toxicology. The best predictions are based on experimental data from in vitro systems using primary hepatocytes. The predictivity of the primary hepatocyte-based culture systems, however, is still limited due to well-known phenotypic instability and rapid decline of metabolic competence within a few hours. Dynamic flow bioreactors for three-dimensional cell cultures are thought to be better at recapitulating tissue microenvironments and show potential to improve in vivo extrapolations of chemical or drug toxicity based on in vitro test results. These more physiologically relevant culture systems hold potential for extending metabolic competence of primary hepatocyte cultures as well. In this investigation, we used computational fluid dynamics to determine the optimal design of a flow-based hepatocyte culture system for evaluating chemical metabolism in vitro. The main design goals were (1) minimization of shear stress experienced by the cells to maximize viability, (2) rapid establishment of a uniform distribution of test compound in the chamber, and (3) delivery of sufficient oxygen to cells to support aerobic respiration. Two commercially available flow devices - RealBio(®) and QuasiVivo(®) (QV) - and a custom developed fluidized bed bioreactor were simulated, and turbulence, flow characteristics, test compound distribution, oxygen distribution, and cellular oxygen consumption were analyzed. Experimental results from the bioreactors were used to validate the simulation results. Our results indicate that maintaining adequate oxygen supply is the most important factor to the long-term viability of liver bioreactor cultures. Cell density and system flow patterns were the major determinants of local oxygen concentrations. The experimental results closely corresponded to the in silico predictions. Of the three bioreactors examined in this study, we were able to optimize the experimental

  7. Fluid Dynamic Modeling to Support the Development of Flow-Based Hepatocyte Culture Systems for Metabolism Studies

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Jenny M.; Shim, Yoo-Sik; Hans, Vaibhav; Phillips, Martin B.; Macdonald, Jeffrey M.; Walker, Glenn; Andersen, Melvin E.; Clewell, Harvey J.; Yoon, Miyoung

    2016-01-01

    Accurate prediction of metabolism is a significant outstanding challenge in toxicology. The best predictions are based on experimental data from in vitro systems using primary hepatocytes. The predictivity of the primary hepatocyte-based culture systems, however, is still limited due to well-known phenotypic instability and rapid decline of metabolic competence within a few hours. Dynamic flow bioreactors for three-dimensional cell cultures are thought to be better at recapitulating tissue microenvironments and show potential to improve in vivo extrapolations of chemical or drug toxicity based on in vitro test results. These more physiologically relevant culture systems hold potential for extending metabolic competence of primary hepatocyte cultures as well. In this investigation, we used computational fluid dynamics to determine the optimal design of a flow-based hepatocyte culture system for evaluating chemical metabolism in vitro. The main design goals were (1) minimization of shear stress experienced by the cells to maximize viability, (2) rapid establishment of a uniform distribution of test compound in the chamber, and (3) delivery of sufficient oxygen to cells to support aerobic respiration. Two commercially available flow devices – RealBio® and QuasiVivo® (QV) – and a custom developed fluidized bed bioreactor were simulated, and turbulence, flow characteristics, test compound distribution, oxygen distribution, and cellular oxygen consumption were analyzed. Experimental results from the bioreactors were used to validate the simulation results. Our results indicate that maintaining adequate oxygen supply is the most important factor to the long-term viability of liver bioreactor cultures. Cell density and system flow patterns were the major determinants of local oxygen concentrations. The experimental results closely corresponded to the in silico predictions. Of the three bioreactors examined in this study, we were able to optimize the experimental

  8. Guideline for fluid modeling of atmospheric diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, W. H.

    1981-04-01

    The usefulness of fluid models are evaluated from both scientific and engineering viewpoints. Because many detailed decisions must be made during the design and execution of each model study, and because the fundamental principles frequency do not provide enough guidance, extensive discussion of the details of the most common types of modeling problems are provided. The hardware requirements are also discussed. This guidance is intended to be of use both to scientists and engineering involved in operating fluid modeling facilities and to air pollution control officials in evaluating the quality and credibility of the reports from such studies.

  9. Fluid Coupling in a Discrete Cochlear Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, S. J.; Lineton, B.; Ni, G.

    2011-11-01

    The interaction between the basilar membrane, BM, dynamics and the fluid coupling in the cochlea can be formulated using a discrete model by assuming that the BM is divided into a number of longitudinal elements. The form of the fluid coupling can then be understood by dividing it into a far field component, due to plane wave acoustic coupling, and a near field component, due to higher order evanescent acoustic modes. The effects of non-uniformity and asymmetry in the cross-sectional areas of the fluid chambers can also be accounted for within this formulation. The discrete model is used to calculate the effect on the coupled BM response of a short cochlear implant, which reduces the volume of one of the fluid chambers over about half its length. The passive response of the coupled cochlea at lower frequencies is shown to be almost unaffected by this change in volume.

  10. Clay-based geothermal drilling fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Guven, N.; Carney, L.L.; Lee, L.J.; Bernhard, R.P.

    1982-11-01

    The rheological properties of fluids based on fibrous clays such as sepiolite and attapulgite have been systematically examined under conditions similar to those of geothermal wells, i.e. at elevated temperatures and pressures in environments with concentrated brines. Attapulgite- and sepiolite-based fluids have been autoclaved at temperatures in the range from 70 to 800/sup 0/F with the addition of chlorides and hydroxides of Na, K, Ca, and Mg. The rheological properties (apparent and plastic viscosity, fluid loss, gel strength, yield point, and cake thickness) of the autoclaved fluids have been studied and correlated with the chemical and physical changes that occur in the clay minerals during the autoclaving process.

  11. Fluid-line math model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandelman, A.; Nelson, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    Simplified mathematical model simulates large hydraulic systems on either analog or digital computers. Models of pumps, servoactuators, reservoirs, accumulators, and valves are connected generating systems containing six hundred elements.

  12. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of Bacillus anthracis ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Journal Article Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics and Lagrangian particle deposition models were developed to compare the deposition of aerosolized Bacillus anthracis spores in the respiratory airways of a human with that of the rabbit, a species commonly used in the study of anthrax disease. The respiratory airway geometries for each species were derived from computed tomography (CT) or µCT images. Both models encompassed airways that extended from the external nose to the lung with a total of 272 outlets in the human model and 2878 outlets in the rabbit model. All simulations of spore deposition were conducted under transient, inhalation-exhalation breathing conditions using average species-specific minute volumes. Four different exposure scenarios were modeled in the rabbit based upon experimental inhalation studies. For comparison, human simulations were conducted at the highest exposure concentration used during the rabbit experimental exposures. Results demonstrated that regional spore deposition patterns were sensitive to airway geometry and ventilation profiles. Despite the complex airway geometries in the rabbit nose, higher spore deposition efficiency was predicted in the upper conducting airways of the human at the same air concentration of anthrax spores. This greater deposition of spores in the upper airways in the human resulted in lower penetration and deposition in the tracheobronchial airways and the deep lung than that predict

  13. Yield Stress Modeling of Electrorheological Fluids Using Neural Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Kexiang; Meng, Guang

    Electrorheological (ER) fluids are a kind of smart materials whose rheological properties can be rapidly changed by applied electric fields. Many potential industrial applications of ER technology have been proposed. In order to formulate better ER fluids and design ER devices, it is important to predict the yield stress of ER fluids based on the ER fluids components and the operating conditions. This paper proposes a new method for predicting the yield stress of ER fluids with neural network (NN). A multilayer perceptron with a single hidden layer of neurons is used to model the ER effect. The data for training and test were produced from the simulation of previous proposed mathematical models. The Levernberg-Marquardt back propagation algorithm was selected for fast learning. The results show the neural network model can well approximate the previous theoretical model, and the predicted outputs of NN agree nearly with the theoretical model values under the same input, all of which demonstrate that it is possible to generate a robust NN model for rapidly predicting the yield stress of ER fluids under different input parameters.

  14. Non-Markovian coarse-grained modeling of polymeric fluids based on the Mori-Zwanzig formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhen; Bian, Xin; Li, Xiantao; Karniadakis, George

    The Mori-Zwanzig formalism for coarse-graining a complex dynamical system typically introduces memory effects. The Markovian assumption of delta-correlated fluctuating forces is often employed to simplify the formulation of coarse-grained (CG) models and numerical implementations. However, when the time scales of a system are not clearly separated, the memory effects become strong and the Markovian assumption becomes inaccurate. To this end, we incorporate memory effects into CG modeling by preserving non-Markovian interactions between CG variables based on the Mori-Zwanzig formalism. For a specific example, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of star polymer melts are performed while the corresponding CG system is defined by grouping many bonded atoms into single clusters. Then, the effective interactions between CG clusters as well as the memory kernel are obtained from the MD simulations. The constructed CG force field with a memory kernel leads to a non-Markovian dissipative particle dynamics (NM-DPD). Quantitative comparisons on both static and dynamic properties between the CG models with Markovian and non-Markovian approximations will be presented. Supported by the DOE Center on Mathematics for Mesoscopic Modeling of Materials (CM4) and an INCITE grant.

  15. Developments in the hard sphere model for self-diffusion and shear viscosity. II. Applications based on methane as a model hard sphere fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Easteal, A. J.; Woolf, L. A.

    1984-05-01

    The ratios D/ DE (where D is diffusion coefficient and DE is the Enskog dense fluid diffusion coefficient) for smooth hard spheres, and η/η E (η being shear viscosity and η E the Enskog dense fluid viscosity) for methane, are used in conjunction with equivalent hard spheres diameters (σ ϱ) derived from liquid densities on solid-liquid coexistenxe curves to examine (a) application of the smooth hard spheres (SHS) model to self-diffusion in the liquefied rare gases; (b) application of the Chandler rough hard spheres (RHS) model to diffusion and viscosity of the complex molecular liquids carbon tetrachloride, benzene, acetonitrile, carbon disulphide, 1,2-dichloroethane, mesitylene, octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane and deuteromethanol. Predictions of the SHS model are satisfactory for the liquefied rare gases provided that σ ϱ values are corrected to allow for less dense liquid packing, at temperatures approaching the triple points, than for hard spheres. Translational- rotational coupling factors for diffusion ( AD) and in some cases viscosity ( Aη) for the complex molecular liquids show all four kinds of temperature ( T) and density (ϱ) dependence: (i) independent of T and ϱ (CS 2); (ii) temperature-dependent, density-independent (CH 3CN, CH 2OD); (iii) density-dependent, temperature-independent (CCl 4); (iv) density and temperature- dependent (benzene).

  16. Modeling the Migration of Fluids in Subduction Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, C. R.; Spiegelman, M.; Van Keken, P. E.; Vrijmoed, J. C.; Hacker, B. R.

    2011-12-01

    Fluids play a major role in the formation of arc volcanism and the generation of continental crust. Progressive dehydration reactions in the downgoing slab release fluids to the hot overlying mantle wedge, causing flux melting and the migration of melts to the volcanic front. While the qualitative concept is well established, the quantitative details of fluid release and especially that of fluid migration and generation of hydrous melting in the wedge is still poorly understood. Here we present new models of the fluid migration through the mantle wedge for subduction zones. We use an existing set of high resolution metamorphic models (van Keken et al, 2010) to predict the regions of water release from the sediments, upper and lower crust, and upper most mantle. We use this water flux as input for the fluid migration calculation based on new finite element models built on advanced computational libraries (FEniCS/PETSc) for efficient and flexible solution of coupled multi-physics problems. The first generation of one-way coupled models solves for the evolution of porosity and fluid-pressure/flux throughout the slab and wedge given solid flow, viscosity and thermal fields from separate solutions to the incompressible Stokes and energy equations in the mantle wedge. These solutions are verified by comparing to previous benchmark studies (van Keken et al, 2008) and global suites of thermal subduction models (Syracuse et al, 2010). Fluid flow depends on both permeability and the rheology of the slab-wedge system as interaction with rheological variability can induce additional pressure gradients that affect the fluid flow pathways. These non-linearities have been shown to explain laboratory-scale observations of melt band orientation in labratory experiments and numerical simulations of melt localization in shear bands (Katz et al 2006). Our second generation of models dispense with the pre-calculation of incompressible mantle flow and fully couple the now compressible

  17. A Choroid Plexus Epithelial Cell-based Model of the Human Blood-Cerebrospinal Fluid Barrier to Study Bacterial Infection from the Basolateral Side.

    PubMed

    Dinner, Stefanie; Borkowski, Julia; Stump-Guthier, Carolin; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Tenenbaum, Tobias; Schroten, Horst; Schwerk, Christian

    2016-05-06

    The epithelial cells of the choroid plexus (CP), located in the ventricular system of the brain, form the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB). The BCSFB functions in separating the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from the blood and restricting the molecular exchange to a minimum extent. An in vitro model of the BCSFB is based on cells derived from a human choroid plexus papilloma (HIBCPP). HIBCPP cells display typical barrier functions including formation of tight junctions (TJs), development of a transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER), as well as minor permeabilities for macromolecules. There are several pathogens that can enter the central nervous system (CNS) via the BCSFB and subsequently cause severe disease like meningitis. One of these pathogens is Neisseria meningitidis (N. meningitidis), a human-specific bacterium. Employing the HIBCPP cells in an inverted cell culture filter insert system enables to study interactions of pathogens with cells of the BCSFB from the basolateral cell side, which is relevant in vivo. In this article, we describe seeding and culturing of HIBCPP cells on cell culture inserts. Further, infection of the cells with N. meningitidis along with analysis of invaded and adhered bacteria via double immunofluorescence is demonstrated. As the cells of the CP are also involved in other diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer`s disease and Multiple Sclerosis, as well as during the brain metastasis of tumor cells, the model system can also be applied in other fields of research. It provides the potential to decipher molecular mechanisms and to identify novel therapeutic targets.

  18. Electrorheological Fluid Based Force Feedback Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfeiffer, Charles; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Mavroidis, Constantinos; Dolgin, Benjamin

    1999-01-01

    Parallel to the efforts to develop fully autonomous robots, it is increasingly being realized that there are applications where it is essential to have a fully controlled robot and "feel" its operating conditions, i.e. telepresence. This trend is a result of the increasing efforts to address tasks where humans can perform significantly better but, due to associated hazards, distance, physical limitations and other causes, only robots can be employed to perform these tasks. Such robots need to be assisted by a human that remotely controls the operation. To address the goal of operating robots as human surrogates, the authors launched a study of mechanisms that provide mechanical feedback. For this purpose, electrorheological fluids (ERF) are being investigated for the potential application as miniature haptic devices. This family of electroactive fluids has the property of changing the viscosity during electrical stimulation. Consequently, ERF can be used to produce force feedback haptic devices for tele-operated control of medical and space robotic systems. Forces applied at the robot end-effector due to a compliant environment are reflected to the user using an ERF device where a change in the system viscosity will occur proportionally to the transmitted force. Analytical model and control algorithms are being developed taking into account the non-linearities of these type of devices. This paper will describe the concept and the developed mechanism of ERF based force feedback. The test process and the physical properties of this device will be described and the results of preliminary tests will be presented.

  19. A model of scientific attitudes assessment by observation in physics learning based scientific approach: case study of dynamic fluid topic in high school

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusliana Ekawati, Elvin

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to produce a model of scientific attitude assessment in terms of the observations for physics learning based scientific approach (case study of dynamic fluid topic in high school). Development of instruments in this study adaptation of the Plomp model, the procedure includes the initial investigation, design, construction, testing, evaluation and revision. The test is done in Surakarta, so that the data obtained are analyzed using Aiken formula to determine the validity of the content of the instrument, Cronbach’s alpha to determine the reliability of the instrument, and construct validity using confirmatory factor analysis with LISREL 8.50 program. The results of this research were conceptual models, instruments and guidelines on scientific attitudes assessment by observation. The construct assessment instruments include components of curiosity, objectivity, suspended judgment, open-mindedness, honesty and perseverance. The construct validity of instruments has been qualified (rated load factor > 0.3). The reliability of the model is quite good with the Alpha value 0.899 (> 0.7). The test showed that the model fits the theoretical models are supported by empirical data, namely p-value 0.315 (≥ 0.05), RMSEA 0.027 (≤ 0.08)

  20. Comparing fluid mechanics models with experimental data.

    PubMed

    Spedding, G R

    2003-09-29

    The art of modelling the physical world lies in the appropriate simplification and abstraction of the complete problem. In fluid mechanics, the Navier-Stokes equations provide a model that is valid under most circumstances germane to animal locomotion, but the complexity of solutions provides strong incentive for the development of further, more simplified practical models. When the flow organizes itself so that all shearing motions are collected into localized patches, then various mathematical vortex models have been very successful in predicting and furthering the physical understanding of many flows, particularly in aerodynamics. Experimental models have the significant added convenience that the fluid mechanics can be generated by a real fluid, not a model, provided the appropriate dimensionless groups have similar values. Then, analogous problems can be encountered in making intelligible but independent descriptions of the experimental results. Finally, model predictions and experimental results may be compared if, and only if, numerical estimates of the likely variations in the tested quantities are provided. Examples from recent experimental measurements of wakes behind a fixed wing and behind a bird in free flight are used to illustrate these principles.

  1. Comparing fluid mechanics models with experimental data.

    PubMed Central

    Spedding, G R

    2003-01-01

    The art of modelling the physical world lies in the appropriate simplification and abstraction of the complete problem. In fluid mechanics, the Navier-Stokes equations provide a model that is valid under most circumstances germane to animal locomotion, but the complexity of solutions provides strong incentive for the development of further, more simplified practical models. When the flow organizes itself so that all shearing motions are collected into localized patches, then various mathematical vortex models have been very successful in predicting and furthering the physical understanding of many flows, particularly in aerodynamics. Experimental models have the significant added convenience that the fluid mechanics can be generated by a real fluid, not a model, provided the appropriate dimensionless groups have similar values. Then, analogous problems can be encountered in making intelligible but independent descriptions of the experimental results. Finally, model predictions and experimental results may be compared if, and only if, numerical estimates of the likely variations in the tested quantities are provided. Examples from recent experimental measurements of wakes behind a fixed wing and behind a bird in free flight are used to illustrate these principles. PMID:14561348

  2. Comparison between traditional laboratory tests, permeability measurements and CT-based fluid flow modelling for cultural heritage applications.

    PubMed

    De Boever, Wesley; Bultreys, Tom; Derluyn, Hannelore; Van Hoorebeke, Luc; Cnudde, Veerle

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we examine the possibility to use on-site permeability measurements for cultural heritage applications as an alternative for traditional laboratory tests such as determination of the capillary absorption coefficient. These on-site measurements, performed with a portable air permeameter, were correlated with the pore network properties of eight sandstones and one granular limestone that are discussed in this paper. The network properties of the 9 materials tested in this study were obtained from micro-computed tomography (μCT) and compared to measurements and calculations of permeability and the capillary absorption rate of the stones under investigation, in order to find the correlation between pore network characteristics and fluid management characteristics of these sandstones. Results show a good correlation between capillary absorption, permeability and network properties, opening the possibility of using on-site permeability measurements as a standard method in cultural heritage applications.

  3. Comparison of Fractional Flow Reserve Based on Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling Using Coronary Angiographic Vessel Morphology Versus Invasively Measured Fractional Flow Reserve.

    PubMed

    Tröbs, Monique; Achenbach, Stephan; Röther, Jens; Redel, Thomas; Scheuering, Michael; Winneberger, David; Klingenbeck, Klaus; Itu, Lucian; Passerini, Tiziano; Kamen, Ali; Sharma, Puneet; Comaniciu, Dorin; Schlundt, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Invasive fractional flow reserve (FFRinvasive), although gold standard to identify hemodynamically relevant coronary stenoses, is time consuming and potentially associated with complications. We developed and evaluated a new approach to determine lesion-specific FFR on the basis of coronary anatomy as visualized by invasive coronary angiography (FFRangio): 100 coronary lesions (50% to 90% diameter stenosis) in 73 patients (48 men, 25 women; mean age 67 ± 9 years) were studied. On the basis of coronary angiograms acquired at rest from 2 views at angulations at least 30° apart, a PC-based computational fluid dynamics modeling software used personalized boundary conditions determined from 3-dimensional reconstructed angiography, heart rate, and blood pressure to derive FFRangio. The results were compared with FFRinvasive. Interobserver variability was determined in a subset of 25 narrowings. Twenty-nine of 100 coronary lesions were hemodynamically significant (FFRinvasive ≤ 0.80). FFRangio identified these with an accuracy of 90%, sensitivity of 79%, specificity of 94%, positive predictive value of 85%, and negative predictive value of 92%. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.93. Correlation between FFRinvasive (mean: 0.84 ± 0.11) and FFRangio (mean: 0.85 ± 0.12) was r = 0.85. Interobserver variability of FFRangio was low, with a correlation of r = 0.88. In conclusion, estimation of coronary FFR with PC-based computational fluid dynamics modeling on the basis of lesion morphology as determined by invasive angiography is possible with high diagnostic accuracy compared to invasive measurements.

  4. AFDM: An Advanced Fluid-Dynamics Model

    SciTech Connect

    Wilhelm, D.

    1990-09-01

    This volume describes the Advanced Fluid-Dynamics Model (AFDM) for topologies, flow regimes, and interfacial areas. The objective of these models is to provide values for the interfacial areas between all components existing in a computational cell. The interfacial areas are then used to evaluate the mass, energy, and momentum transfer between the components. A new approach has been undertaken in the development of a model to convect the interfacial areas of the discontinuous velocity fields in the three-velocity-field environment of AFDM. These interfacial areas are called convectible surface areas. The continuous and discontinuous components are chosen using volume fraction and levitation criteria. This establishes so-called topologies for which the convectible surface areas can be determined. These areas are functions of space and time. Solid particulates that are limited to being discontinuous within the bulk fluid are assumed to have a constant size. The convectible surface areas are subdivided to model contacts between two discontinuous components or discontinuous components and the structure. The models have been written for the flow inside of large pools. Therefore, the structure is tracked only as a boundary to the fluid volume without having a direct influence on velocity or volume fraction distribution by means of flow regimes or boundary layer models. 17 refs., 7 tabs., 18 figs.

  5. Experimental Evaluation of Equivalent-Fluid Models for Melamine Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Albert R.; Schiller, Noah H.

    2016-01-01

    Melamine foam is a soft porous material commonly used in noise control applications. Many models exist to represent porous materials at various levels of fidelity. This work focuses on rigid frame equivalent fluid models, which represent the foam as a fluid with a complex speed of sound and density. There are several empirical models available to determine these frequency dependent parameters based on an estimate of the material flow resistivity. Alternatively, these properties can be experimentally educed using an impedance tube setup. Since vibroacoustic models are generally sensitive to these properties, this paper assesses the accuracy of several empirical models relative to impedance tube measurements collected with melamine foam samples. Diffuse field sound absorption measurements collected using large test articles in a laboratory are also compared with absorption predictions determined using model-based and measured foam properties. Melamine foam slabs of various thicknesses are considered.

  6. Mathematical modeling of fluid-electrolyte alterations during weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, J. I.

    1984-01-01

    Fluid electrolyte metabolism and renal endocrine control as it pertains to adaptation to weightlessness were studied. The mathematical models that have been particularly useful are discussed. However, the focus of the report is on the physiological meaning of the computer studies. A discussion of the major ground based analogs of weightlessness are included; for example, head down tilt, water immersion, and bed rest, and a comparison of findings. Several important zero g phenomena are described, including acute fluid volume regulation, blood volume regulation, circulatory changes, longer term fluid electrolyte adaptations, hormonal regulation, and body composition changes. Hypotheses are offered to explain the major findings in each area and these are integrated into a larger hypothesis of space flight adaptation. A conceptual foundation for fluid electrolyte metabolism, blood volume regulation, and cardiovascular regulation is reported.

  7. MRI-Based Computational Fluid Dynamics in Experimental Vascular Models: Toward the Development of an Approach for Prediction of Cardiovascular Changes During Prolonged Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spirka, T. A.; Myers, J. G.; Setser, R. M.; Halliburton, S. S.; White, R. D.; Chatzimavroudis, G. P.

    2005-01-01

    A priority of NASA is to identify and study possible risks to astronauts health during prolonged space missions [l]. The goal is to develop a procedure for a preflight evaluation of the cardiovascular system of an astronaut and to forecast how it will be affected during the mission. To predict these changes, a computational cardiovascular model must be constructed. Although physiology data can be used to make a general model, a more desirable subject-specific model requires anatomical, functional, and flow data from the specific astronaut. MRI has the unique advantage of providing images with all of the above information, including three-directional velocity data which can be used as boundary conditions in a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) program [2,3]. MRI-based CFD is very promising for reproduction of the flow patterns of a specific subject and prediction of changes in the absence of gravity. The aim of this study was to test the feasibility of this approach by reconstructing the geometry of MRI-scanned arterial models and reproducing the MRI-measured velocities using CFD simulations on these geometries.

  8. Modeling of Non-Isothermal Cryogenic Fluid Sloshing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agui, Juan H.; Moder, Jeffrey P.

    2015-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamic model was used to simulate the thermal destratification in an upright self-pressurized cryostat approximately half-filled with liquid nitrogen and subjected to forced sinusoidal lateral shaking. A full three-dimensional computational grid was used to model the tank dynamics, fluid flow and thermodynamics using the ANSYS Fluent code. A non-inertial grid was used which required the addition of momentum and energy source terms to account for the inertial forces, energy transfer and wall reaction forces produced by the shaken tank. The kinetics-based Schrage mass transfer model provided the interfacial mass transfer due to evaporation and condensation at the sloshing interface. The dynamic behavior of the sloshing interface, its amplitude and transition to different wave modes, provided insight into the fluid process at the interface. The tank pressure evolution and temperature profiles compared relatively well with the shaken cryostat experimental test data provided by the Centre National D'Etudes Spatiales.

  9. Image-Based Computational Fluid Dynamics in Blood Vessel Models: Toward Developing a Prognostic Tool to Assess Cardiovascular Function Changes in Prolonged Space Flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatzimavroudis, George P.; Spirka, Thomas A.; Setser, Randolph M.; Myers, Jerry G.

    2004-01-01

    One of NASA's objectives is to be able to perform a complete, pre-flight, evaluation of cardiovascular changes in astronauts scheduled for prolonged space missions. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has shown promise as a method for estimating cardiovascular function during reduced gravity conditions. For this purpose, MRI can provide geometrical information, to reconstruct vessel geometries, and measure all spatial velocity components, providing location specific boundary conditions. The objective of this study was to investigate the reliability of MRI-based model reconstruction and measured boundary conditions for CFD simulations. An aortic arch model and a carotid bifurcation model were scanned in a 1.5T Siemens MRI scanner. Axial MRI acquisitions provided images for geometry reconstruction (slice thickness 3 and 5 mm; pixel size 1x1 and 0.5x0.5 square millimeters). Velocity acquisitions provided measured inlet boundary conditions and localized three-directional steady-flow velocity data (0.7-3.0 L/min). The vessel walls were isolated using NIH provided software (ImageJ) and lofted to form the geometric surface. Constructed and idealized geometries were imported into a commercial CFD code for meshing and simulation. Contour and vector plots of the velocity showed identical features between the MRI velocity data, the MRI-based CFD data, and the idealized-geometry CFD data, with less than 10% differences in the local velocity values. CFD results on models reconstructed from different MRI resolution settings showed insignificant differences (less than 5%). This study illustrated, quantitatively, that reliable CFD simulations can be performed with MRI reconstructed models and gives evidence that a future, subject-specific, computational evaluation of the cardiovascular system alteration during space travel is feasible.

  10. A preliminary study to Assess Model Uncertainties in Fluid Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Marc Oliver Delchini; Jean C. Ragusa

    2009-09-01

    The goal of this study is to assess the impact of various flow models for a simplified primary coolant loop of a light water nuclear reactor. The various fluid flow models are based on the Euler equations with an additional friction term, gravity term, momentum source, and energy source. The geometric model is purposefully chosen simple and consists of a one-dimensional (1D) loop system in order to focus the study on the validity of various fluid flow approximations. The 1D loop system is represented by a rectangle; the fluid is heated up along one of the vertical legs and cooled down along the opposite leg. A pressurizer and a pump are included in the horizontal legs. The amount of energy transferred and removed from the system is equal in absolute value along the two vertical legs. The various fluid flow approximations are compressible vs. incompressible, and complete momentum equation vs. Darcy’s approximation. The ultimate goal is to compute the fluid flow models’ uncertainties and, if possible, to generate validity ranges for these models when applied to reactor analysis. We also limit this study to single phase flows with low-Mach numbers. As a result, sound waves carry a very small amount of energy in this particular case. A standard finite volume method is used for the spatial discretization of the system.

  11. Sample preparation by supercritical fluid extraction for quantification. A model based on the diffusion-layer theory for determination of extraction time.

    PubMed

    Veress, T

    1994-05-13

    A mathematical model based on the diffusion-layer theory was elaborated in order to calculate the extraction time in dynamic supercritical fluid extraction required to reach a predefined level of extraction recovery. The goodness of the model is demonstrated by application to the extraction of the main neutral cannabinoids from marihuana and hashish samples. For monitoring of the cannabinoid content of extracts normal-phase HPLC was applied. To obtain reliable quantitative results, the extraction time ensuring a predefined level of recovery should be calculated for each individual sample according to the model because the extraction recovery depends on the sample matrix. The systematic error caused by the unextracted compounds can be eliminated by correction of the experimental data. For semi-quantitative determinations, where a knowledge of the correct value of the extraction recovery is not important, as a rule of thumb the extraction of marihuana with carbon dioxide of density 0.9 g/ml at 40 degrees C for 34 min and of hashish for 18 min can be suggested. The application of the proposed extraction times ensured at least a 95% recovery for the main neutral cannabinoids.

  12. The trapped fluid transducer: modeling and optimization.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lei; Grosh, Karl

    2008-06-01

    Exact and approximate formulas for calculating the sensitivity and bandwidth of an electroacoustic transducer with an enclosed or trapped fluid volume are developed. The transducer is composed of a fluid-filled rectangular duct with a tapered-width plate on one wall emulating the biological basilar membrane in the cochlea. A three-dimensional coupled fluid-structure model is developed to calculate the transducer sensitivity by using a boundary integral method. The model is used as the basis of an optimization methodology seeking to enhance the transducer performance. Simplified formulas are derived from the model to estimate the transducer sensitivity and the fundamental resonant frequency with good accuracy and much less computational cost. By using the simplified formulas, one can easily design the geometry of the transducer to achieve the optimal performance. As an example design, the transducer achieves a sensitivity of around -200 dB (1 VmuPa) at 10 kHz frequency range with piezoelectric sensing. In analogy to the cochlea, a tapered-width plate design is considered and shown to have a more uniform frequency response than a similar plate with no taper.

  13. Numerical Modeling of Fluid Transient in Cryogenic Fluid Network of Rocket Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, Alok; Flachbart, Robin

    2003-01-01

    Fluid transients, also known as water hammer, can have a significant impact on the design and operation of both spacecraft and launch vehicles propulsion systems. These transients often occur at system activation and shut down. For ground safety reasons, many spacecrafts are launched with the propellant lines dry. These lines are often evacuated by the time the spacecraft reaches orbit. When the propellant isolation valve opens during propulsion system activation, propellant rushes into lines creating a pressure surge. During propellant system shutdown, a pressure surge is created due to sudden closure of a valve. During both activation and shutdown, pressure surges must be predicted accurately to ensure structural integrity of the propulsion system fluid network. The method of characteristics is the most widely used method of calculating fluid transients in pipeline [ 1,2]. The method of characteristics, however, has limited applications in calculating flow distribution in complex flow circuits with phase change, heat transfer and rotational effects. A robust cryogenic propulsion system analyzer must have the capability to handle phase change, heat transfer, chemical reaction, rotational effects and fluid transients in conjunction with subsystem flow model for pumps, valves and various pipe fittings. In recent years, such a task has been undertaken at Marshall Space Flight Center with the development of the Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP), which is based on finite volume method in fluid network [3]. GFSSP has been extensively verified and validated by comparing its predictions with test data and other numerical methods for various applications such as internal flow of turbo-pump [4], propellant tank pressurization [5,6], chilldown of cryogenic transfer line [7] and squeeze film damper rotordynamics [8]. The purpose of the present paper is to investigate the applicability of the finite volume method to predict fluid transient in cryogenic flow

  14. Erosion of a model geophysical fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luu, Li-Hua; Philippe, Pierre; Chambon, Guillaume

    2014-05-01

    A specificity of natural flows such as debris flows, landslides or snow avalanches is that, mostly, the material forming the static bed has mechanical properties similar to those of the flowing material (mud/mud, snow/snow). To explore the bed erosion phenomenon induced by such geophysical flows, we consider the geomaterial as a continuum by performing experiments in laboratory on a model fluid that can behaves as a solid or as a liquid, depending on the conditions. Indeed, we propose an experimental study where a yield-stress fluid is implemented to model both the eroding flow and the eroded bed. Our approach is to capture the process of erosion in terms of solid-liquid transition. The studied hydrodynamics consists of a pipe-flow disturbed by the presence of an obstacle. We use a polymer micro-gel Carbopol that exhibits a Hershel-Bulkley (HB) rheology. By taking advantage of the fluid transparency, the flow is monitoring by Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) internal visualization technique. Upstream of the obstacle, a solid-liquid-like interface between a flow zone and a dead zone appears in the fluid. In this study, we aim to investigate the dominant physical mechanism underlying the formation of the static domain, by combining the rheological characterization of the yield-stress fluid (using a rheometer), with the observation of the morphological evolution of the system substratum / flow and the local measurement of related hydrodynamic parameters. Our first result shows that the flow above the dead zone behaves as a classical plug flow, whose velocity profile can successfully be described by a Hagen-Poiseuille equation including a HB rheology, but except in a thin zone (compared to the whole flow zone) at the close vicinity of the solid-liquid interface. Thanks to a high PIV measurement resolution, we then properly examine the typical feature lying at the tail of the velocity profile. The numerical derivation of the profile shows that the shear rate in this

  15. A new statistical model of small-scale fluid turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarmah, Deep; Tessarotto, Massimo

    2004-11-01

    A famous and still unsolved theoretical problem in fluid dynamics is related to the statistical description of small-scale (or subgrid ) turbulence in fluids [1,2]. As is well known, in fact, no physically consistent model, based on first principles, is yet available, which is able to cope with numerical (or laboratory) experiments in so-called non-asymptotic regimes. These are characterized locally by finite values of the the characteristic lengths and time scales of subgrid fluid-field fluctuations δ p, δ V, which result comparable in order, or at least not so small, with respect to the corresponding quantities for the average fields , . Purpose of this investigation is to propose a new statistical model of small-scale turbulence based on a consistent kinetic description of an incompressible Newtonian fluid. Predictions of the theory [3] will be presented with particular reference to small-amplitude fluctuations. References 1 - A.N.Kolgomorov, Dokl.Akad. Nauk. SSSR 32, 16 (1941). 2 - A.N.Kolgomorov, J.Fluid Mech.13, 82 (1962). 3 - D.Sarmarh and M.Tessarotto, to appear (2004).

  16. Transient thermohydraulic modeling of two-phase fluid systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blet, N.; Delalandre, N.; Ayel, V.; Bertin, Y.; Romestant, C.; Platel, V.

    2012-11-01

    This paper presents a transient thermohydraulic modeling, initially developed for a capillary pumped loop in gravitational applications, but also possibly suitable for all kinds of two-phase fluid systems. Using finite volumes method, it is based on Navier-Stokes equations for transcribing fluid mechanical aspects. The main feature of this 1D-model is based on a network representation by analogy with electrical. This paper also proposes a parametric study of a counterflow condenser following the sensitivity to inlet mass flow rate and cold source temperature. The comparison between modeling results and experimental data highlights a good numerical evaluation of temperatures. Furthermore, the model is able to represent a pretty good dynamic evolution of hydraulic variables.

  17. Development of a Rat Plasma and Brain Extracellular Fluid Pharmacokinetic Model for Bupropion and Hydroxybupropion Based on Microdialysis Sampling, and Application to Predict Human Brain Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Cremers, Thomas I F H; Flik, Gunnar; Folgering, Joost H A; Rollema, Hans; Stratford, Robert E

    2016-05-01

    Administration of bupropion [(±)-2-(tert-butylamino)-1-(3-chlorophenyl)propan-1-one] and its preformed active metabolite, hydroxybupropion [(±)-1-(3-chlorophenyl)-2-[(1-hydroxy-2-methyl-2-propanyl)amino]-1-propanone], to rats with measurement of unbound concentrations by quantitative microdialysis sampling of plasma and brain extracellular fluid was used to develop a compartmental pharmacokinetics model to describe the blood-brain barrier transport of both substances. The population model revealed rapid equilibration of both entities across the blood-brain barrier, with resultant steady-state brain extracellular fluid/plasma unbound concentration ratio estimates of 1.9 and 1.7 for bupropion and hydroxybupropion, respectively, which is thus indicative of a net uptake asymmetry. An overshoot of the brain extracellular fluid/plasma unbound concentration ratio at early time points was observed with bupropion; this was modeled as a time-dependent uptake clearance of the drug across the blood-brain barrier. Translation of the model was used to predict bupropion and hydroxybupropion exposure in human brain extracellular fluid after twice-daily administration of 150 mg bupropion. Predicted concentrations indicate that preferential inhibition of the dopamine and norepinephrine transporters by the metabolite, with little to no contribution by bupropion, would be expected at this therapeutic dose. Therefore, these results extend nuclear imaging studies on dopamine transporter occupancy and suggest that inhibition of both transporters contributes significantly to bupropion's therapeutic efficacy.

  18. Coating Of Model Rheological Fluids In Microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koelling, Kurt; Boehm, Michael

    2008-07-01

    Researchers have strived to understand and quantify the dynamics within the myriad micro/nano-devices proposed and developed within the last decade. Concepts such as fluid flow, mass transfer, molecule manipulation, and reaction kinetics must be understood in order to intelligently design and operate these devices. In addition to general engineering principles, intelligent design should also focus on material properties (e.g. density, viscosity, conductivity). One key property, viscosity, will play a large part of any fluidic device, including biomedical devices, because the fluids used will, most likely, be non-Newtonian and therefore highly dependent upon the shear rate. Be it a biomedical or macromolecule separation device, or simply the processing of polymeric material, select model polymers and simple flow schemes can be used to investigate the dynamics within micro-devices. Here, we present results for the processing of Newtonian and non-Newtonian polymeric fluids in micro-channels during two-phase penetrating flow. The system investigated is a circular capillary 100 microns in diameter, which is pre-filled with a polymeric liquid. The polymeric liquid is either of Newtonian viscosity, or the same liquid with dispersed high molecular weight polystyrene, which exhibits viscoelastic behavior. A second, immiscible phase, silicone oil of low Newtonian viscosity, is pumped into the system and subsequently cores the polymeric liquid. The dynamics of bubble flow (e.g. bubble velocity and bubble shape) as well as the influence of rheology on coating will be investigated. By studying these model systems, we will learn how complex fluids behave on progressively smaller size scales.

  19. Method of recovering oil-based fluid and apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkley, H.E.

    1993-07-20

    A method is described for recovering oil-based fluid from a surface having oil-based fluid thereon comprising the steps of: applying to the oil-based fluid on the surface an oil-based fluid absorbent cloth of man-made fibers, the cloth having at least one napped surface that defines voids therein, the nap being formed of raised ends or loops of the fibers; absorbing, with the cloth, oil-based fluid; feeding the cloth having absorbed oil-based fluid to a means for applying a force to the cloth to recover oil-based fluid; and applying force to the cloth to recover oil-based fluid therefrom using the force applying means.

  20. Performance of a thrombectomy device for aspiration of thrombus with various sizes based on a computational fluid dynamic modeling.

    PubMed

    Soleimani, Sajjad; Dubini, Gabriele; Pennati, Giancarlo

    2016-06-01

    It is important to thoroughly remove the thrombus within the course of aspiration thrombectomy; otherwise, it may lead to further embolization. The performance of the aspiration thrombectomy device with a generic geometry is studied through the computational approach. In order to model the thrombus aspiration, a real left coronary artery is chosen while thrombi with various sizes are located at the bifurcation area of the coronary artery and, depending on the size of the thrombus, it is stretched toward the side branches. The thrombus occupies the artery resembling the blood current obstruction in the coronary vessel similar to the situation that leads to heart attack. It is concluded that the aspiration ability of the thrombectomy device is not linked to the thrombus size; it is rather linked to the aspiration pressure and thrombus age (organized versus fresh thrombus). However, the aspiration time period correlates to the thrombus size. The minimum applicable aspiration pressure is also investigated in this study.

  1. Including fluid shear viscosity in a structural acoustic finite element model using a scalar fluid representation

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Lei; Li, Yizeng; Grosh, Karl

    2013-01-01

    An approximate boundary condition is developed in this paper to model fluid shear viscosity at boundaries of coupled fluid-structure system. The effect of shear viscosity is approximated by a correction term to the inviscid boundary condition, written in terms of second order in-plane derivatives of pressure. Both thin and thick viscous boundary layer approximations are formulated; the latter subsumes the former. These approximations are used to develop a variational formation, upon which a viscous finite element method (FEM) model is based, requiring only minor modifications to the boundary integral contributions of an existing inviscid FEM model. Since this FEM formulation has only one degree of freedom for pressure, it holds a great computational advantage over the conventional viscous FEM formulation which requires discretization of the full set of linearized Navier-Stokes equations. The results from thick viscous boundary layer approximation are found to be in good agreement with the prediction from a Navier-Stokes model. When applicable, thin viscous boundary layer approximation also gives accurate results with computational simplicity compared to the thick boundary layer formulation. Direct comparison of simulation results using the boundary layer approximations and a full, linearized Navier-Stokes model are made and used to evaluate the accuracy of the approximate technique. Guidelines are given for the parameter ranges over which the accurate application of the thick and thin boundary approximations can be used for a fluid-structure interaction problem. PMID:23729844

  2. Development of a semi-implicit fluid modeling code using finite-volume method based on Cartesian grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Matthew R.; Hung, Chieh-Tsan; Lin, Kun-Mo; Wu, Jong-Shinn; Yu, Jen-Perng

    2011-01-01

    Presented is the HLLG (Harten, Lax and van Leer with Gradient inclusion) method for application to the numerical solution of general Partial Differential Equations (PDEs) in conservation form. The HLLG method is based on the traditional HLL method with formal mathematical inclusion of gradients of conserved properties across the control volume employed for flux derivation. The simple extension demonstrates that conventional higher extensions of the HLL method are mathematically inconsistent and produce various numerical instabilities. The HLLG method, with higher order extensions consistent with the flux derivation, is absent of (or less affected by) the said numerical instabilities. The HLLG method is then applied to solutions of the Euler Equations and the simulation of 1D argon RF plasma simulation.

  3. A Two-Fluid, MHD Coronal Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, S. T.; Wang, A.-H.; Wu, S. T.; Poletto, G.; McComas, D. J.

    1999-01-01

    We describe first results from a numerical two-fluid MHD model of the global structure of the solar Corona. The model is two-fluid in the sense that it accounts for the collisional energy exchange between protons and electrons. As in our single-fluid model, volumetric heat and Momentum sources are required to produce high speed wind from Corona] holes, low speed wind above streamers, and mass fluxes similar to the empirical solar wind. By specifying different proton and electron heating functions we obtain a high proton temperature in the coronal hole and a relatively low proton temperature above the streamer (in comparison with the electron temperature). This is consistent with inferences from SOHO/UltraViolet Coronagraph Spectrometer instrument (UVCS), and with the Ulysses/Solar Wind Observations Over the Poles of the Sun instrument (SWOOPS) proton and electron temperature measurements which we show from the fast latitude scan. The density in the coronal hole between 2 and 5 solar radii (2 and 5 R(sub S)) is similar to the density reported from SPARTAN 201.-01 measurements by Fisher and Guhathakurta [19941. The proton mass flux scaled to 1 AU is 2.4 x 10(exp 8)/sq cm s, which is consistent with Ulysses observations. Inside the closed field region, the density is sufficiently high so that the simulation gives equal proton and electron temperatures due to the high collision rate. In open field regions (in the coronal hole and above the streamer) the proton and electron temperatures differ by varying amounts. In the streamer the temperature and density are similar to those reported empirically by Li et al. [1998], and the plasma beta is larger than unity everywhere above approx. 1.5 R(sub S), as it is in all other MHD coronal streamer models [e.g., Steinolfson et al., 1982; also G. A. Gary and D. Alexander, Constructing the coronal magnetic field, submitted to Solar Physics, 1998].

  4. A Two-Fluid, MHD Coronal Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, Steven T.; Wang, A.-H.; Wu, S. T.; Poletto, G.; McComas, D. J.

    1998-01-01

    We describe first results from a numerical two-fluid MHD model of the global structure of the solar corona. The model is two-fluid in the sense that it accounts for the collisional energy exchange between protons and electrons. As in our single-fluid model, volumetric heat and momentum sources are required to produce high speed wind from coronal holes, low speed wind above streamers, and mass fluxes similar to the empirical solar wind. By specifying different proton and electron heating functions we obtain a high proton temperature in the coronal hole and a relatively low proton temperature in the streamer (in comparison with the electron temperature). This is consistent with inferences from SOHO/UVCS, and with the Ulysses/SWOOPS proton and electron temperature measurements which we show from the fast latitude scan. The density in the coronal hole between 2 solar radii and 5 solar radii (2RS and 5RS) is similar to the density reported from SPARTAN 201-01 measurements by Fisher and Guhathakurta. The proton mass flux scaled to 1 AU is 2.4 x 10(exp 8)/sq cm s, which is consistent with Ulysses observations. Inside the closed field region, the density is sufficiently high so that the simulation gives equal proton and electron temperatures due to the high collision rate. In open field regions (in the coronal hole and above the streamer) the proton and electron temperatures differ by varying amounts. In the streamer, the temperature and density are similar to those reported empirically by Li et al and the plasma beta is larger than unity everywhere above approx. 1.5 R(sub s), as it is in all other MHD coronal streamer models.

  5. Computational fluid dynamics investigation of turbulence models for non-newtonian fluid flow in anaerobic digesters.

    PubMed

    Wu, Binxin

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, 12 turbulence models for single-phase non-newtonian fluid flow in a pipe are evaluated by comparing the frictional pressure drops obtained from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with those from three friction factor correlations. The turbulence models studied are (1) three high-Reynolds-number k-ε models, (2) six low-Reynolds-number k-ε models, (3) two k-ω models, and (4) the Reynolds stress model. The simulation results indicate that the Chang-Hsieh-Chen version of the low-Reynolds-number k-ε model performs better than the other models in predicting the frictional pressure drops while the standard k-ω model has an acceptable accuracy and a low computing cost. In the model applications, CFD simulation of mixing in a full-scale anaerobic digester with pumped circulation is performed to propose an improvement in the effective mixing standards recommended by the U.S. EPA based on the effect of rheology on the flow fields. Characterization of the velocity gradient is conducted to quantify the growth or breakage of an assumed floc size. Placement of two discharge nozzles in the digester is analyzed to show that spacing two nozzles 180° apart with each one discharging at an angle of 45° off the wall is the most efficient. Moreover, the similarity rules of geometry and mixing energy are checked for scaling up the digester.

  6. Reduced order modeling of fluid/structure interaction.

    SciTech Connect

    Barone, Matthew Franklin; Kalashnikova, Irina; Segalman, Daniel Joseph; Brake, Matthew Robert

    2009-11-01

    This report describes work performed from October 2007 through September 2009 under the Sandia Laboratory Directed Research and Development project titled 'Reduced Order Modeling of Fluid/Structure Interaction.' This project addresses fundamental aspects of techniques for construction of predictive Reduced Order Models (ROMs). A ROM is defined as a model, derived from a sequence of high-fidelity simulations, that preserves the essential physics and predictive capability of the original simulations but at a much lower computational cost. Techniques are developed for construction of provably stable linear Galerkin projection ROMs for compressible fluid flow, including a method for enforcing boundary conditions that preserves numerical stability. A convergence proof and error estimates are given for this class of ROM, and the method is demonstrated on a series of model problems. A reduced order method, based on the method of quadratic components, for solving the von Karman nonlinear plate equations is developed and tested. This method is applied to the problem of nonlinear limit cycle oscillations encountered when the plate interacts with an adjacent supersonic flow. A stability-preserving method for coupling the linear fluid ROM with the structural dynamics model for the elastic plate is constructed and tested. Methods for constructing efficient ROMs for nonlinear fluid equations are developed and tested on a one-dimensional convection-diffusion-reaction equation. These methods are combined with a symmetrization approach to construct a ROM technique for application to the compressible Navier-Stokes equations.

  7. Assessment of the interaction of Portland cement-based materials with blood and tissue fluids using an animal model

    PubMed Central

    Schembri Wismayer, P.; Lung, C. Y. K.; Rappa, F.; Cappello, F.; Camilleri, J.

    2016-01-01

    Portland cement used in the construction industry improves its properties when wet. Since most dental materials are used in a moist environment, Portland cement has been developed for use in dentistry. The first generation material is mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), used in surgical procedures, thus in contact with blood. The aim of this study was to compare the setting of MTA in vitro and in vivo in contact with blood by subcutaneous implantation in rats. The tissue reaction to the material was also investigated. ProRoot MTA (Dentsply) was implanted in the subcutaneous tissues of Sprague-Dawley rats in opposite flanks and left in situ for 3 months. Furthermore the material was also stored in physiological solution in vitro. At the end of the incubation time, tissue histology and material characterization were performed. Surface assessment showed the formation of calcium carbonate for both environments. The bismuth was evident in the tissues thus showing heavy element contamination of the animal specimen. The tissue histology showed a chronic inflammatory cell infiltrate associated with the MTA. MTA interacts with the host tissues and causes a chronic inflammatory reaction when implanted subcutaneously. Hydration in vivo proceeds similarly to the in vitro model with some differences particularly in the bismuth oxide leaching patterns. PMID:27683067

  8. Assessment of the interaction of Portland cement-based materials with blood and tissue fluids using an animal model.

    PubMed

    Schembri Wismayer, P; Lung, C Y K; Rappa, F; Cappello, F; Camilleri, J

    2016-09-29

    Portland cement used in the construction industry improves its properties when wet. Since most dental materials are used in a moist environment, Portland cement has been developed for use in dentistry. The first generation material is mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), used in surgical procedures, thus in contact with blood. The aim of this study was to compare the setting of MTA in vitro and in vivo in contact with blood by subcutaneous implantation in rats. The tissue reaction to the material was also investigated. ProRoot MTA (Dentsply) was implanted in the subcutaneous tissues of Sprague-Dawley rats in opposite flanks and left in situ for 3 months. Furthermore the material was also stored in physiological solution in vitro. At the end of the incubation time, tissue histology and material characterization were performed. Surface assessment showed the formation of calcium carbonate for both environments. The bismuth was evident in the tissues thus showing heavy element contamination of the animal specimen. The tissue histology showed a chronic inflammatory cell infiltrate associated with the MTA. MTA interacts with the host tissues and causes a chronic inflammatory reaction when implanted subcutaneously. Hydration in vivo proceeds similarly to the in vitro model with some differences particularly in the bismuth oxide leaching patterns.

  9. A numerical model for dynamic crustal-scale fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachau, Till; Bons, Paul; Gomez-Rivas, Enrique; Koehn, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Fluid flow in the crust is often envisaged and modeled as continuous, yet minimal flow, which occurs over large geological times. This is a suitable approximation for flow as long as it is solely controlled by the matrix permeability of rocks, which in turn is controlled by viscous compaction of the pore space. However, strong evidence (hydrothermal veins and ore deposits) exists that a significant part of fluid flow in the crust occurs strongly localized in both space and time, controlled by the opening and sealing of hydrofractures. We developed, tested and applied a novel computer code, which considers this dynamic behavior and couples it with steady, Darcian flow controlled by the matrix permeability. In this dual-porosity model, fractures open depending on the fluid pressure relative to the solid pressure. Fractures form when matrix permeability is insufficient to accommodate fluid flow resulting from compaction, decompression (Staude et al. 2009) or metamorphic dehydration reactions (Weisheit et al. 2013). Open fractures can close when the contained fluid either seeps into the matrix or escapes by fracture propagation: mobile hydrofractures (Bons, 2001). In the model, closing and sealing of fractures is controlled by a time-dependent viscous law, which is based on the effective stress and on either Newtonian or non-Newtonian viscosity. Our simulations indicate that the bulk of crustal fluid flow in the middle to lower upper crust is intermittent, highly self-organized, and occurs as mobile hydrofractures. This is due to the low matrix porosity and permeability, combined with a low matrix viscosity and, hence, fast sealing of fractures. Stable fracture networks, generated by fluid overpressure, are restricted to the uppermost crust. Semi-stable fracture networks can develop in an intermediate zone, if a critical overpressure is reached. Flow rates in mobile hydrofractures exceed those in the matrix porosity and fracture networks by orders of magnitude

  10. Two-dimensional hybrid Monte Carlo–fluid modelling of dc glow discharges: Comparison with fluid models, reliability, and accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Eylenceoğlu, E.; Rafatov, I.; Kudryavtsev, A. A.

    2015-01-15

    Two-dimensional hybrid Monte Carlo–fluid numerical code is developed and applied to model the dc glow discharge. The model is based on the separation of electrons into two parts: the low energetic (slow) and high energetic (fast) electron groups. Ions and slow electrons are described within the fluid model using the drift-diffusion approximation for particle fluxes. Fast electrons, represented by suitable number of super particles emitted from the cathode, are responsible for ionization processes in the discharge volume, which are simulated by the Monte Carlo collision method. Electrostatic field is obtained from the solution of Poisson equation. The test calculations were carried out for an argon plasma. Main properties of the glow discharge are considered. Current-voltage curves, electric field reversal phenomenon, and the vortex current formation are developed and discussed. The results are compared to those obtained from the simple and extended fluid models. Contrary to reports in the literature, the analysis does not reveal significant advantages of existing hybrid methods over the extended fluid model.

  11. The Chemical Behavior of Fluids Released during Deep Subduction Based on Fluid Inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frezzotti, M. L.; Ferrando, S.

    2014-12-01

    We present a review of current research on fluid inclusions in (HP-) UHP metamorphic rocks that, combined with existing experimental research and thermodynamic models, allow us to investigate the chemical and physical properties of fluids released during deep subduction, their solvent and element transport capacity, and the subsequent implications for the element recycling in the mantle wedge. An impressive number of fluid inclusion studies indicate three main populations of fluid inclusions in HP and UHP metamorphic rocks: i) aqueous and/or non-polar gaseous fluid inclusions (FI), ii) multiphase solid inclusions (MSI), and iii) melt inclusions (MI). Chemical data from preserved fluid inclusions in rocks match with and implement "model" fluids by experiments and thermodynamics, revealing a continuity behind the extreme variations of physico-chemical properties of subduction-zone fluids. From fore-arc to sub-arc depths, fluids released by progressive devolatilization reactions from slab lithologies change from relatively diluted chloride-bearing aqueous solutions (± N2), mainly influenced by halide ligands, to (alkali) aluminosilicate-rich aqueous fluids, in which polymerization probably governs the solubility and transport of major (e.g., Si and Al) and trace elements (including C). Fluid inclusion data implement the petrological models explaining deep volatile liberation in subduction zones, and their flux into the mantle wedge.

  12. Modelling non-dust fluids in cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Christopherson, Adam J.; Hidalgo, Juan Carlos; Malik, Karim A. E-mail: juan.hidalgo@port.ac.uk

    2013-01-01

    Currently, most of the numerical simulations of structure formation use Newtonian gravity. When modelling pressureless dark matter, or 'dust', this approach gives the correct results for scales much smaller than the cosmological horizon, but for scenarios in which the fluid has pressure this is no longer the case. In this article, we present the correspondence of perturbations in Newtonian and cosmological perturbation theory, showing exact mathematical equivalence for pressureless matter, and giving the relativistic corrections for matter with pressure. As an example, we study the case of scalar field dark matter which features non-zero pressure perturbations. We discuss some problems which may arise when evolving the perturbations in this model with Newtonian numerical simulations and with CMB Boltzmann codes.

  13. Characterization of Fluid Flow in Paper-Based Microfluidic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walji, Noosheen; MacDonald, Brendan

    2014-11-01

    Paper-based microfluidic devices have been presented as a viable low-cost alternative with the versatility to accommodate many applications in disease diagnosis and environmental monitoring. Current microfluidic designs focus on the use of silicone and PDMS structures, and several models have been developed to describe these systems; however, the design process for paper-based devices is hindered by a lack of prediction capability. In this work we simplify the complex underlying physics of the capillary-driven flow mechanism in a porous medium and generate a practical numerical model capable of predicting the flow behaviour. We present our key insights regarding the properties that dictate the behaviour of fluid wicking in paper-based microfluidic devices. We compare the results from our model to experiments and discuss the application of our model to design of paper-based microfluidic devices for arsenic detection in drinking water in Bangladesh.

  14. Fluid mechanical model of the Helmholtz resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hersh, A. S.; Walker, B.

    1977-01-01

    A semi-empirical fluid mechanical model of the acoustic behavior of Helmholtz resonators is presented which predicts impedance as a function of the amplitude and frequency of the incident sound pressure field and resonator geometry. The model assumes that the particle velocity approaches the orifice in a spherical manner. The incident and cavity sound fields are connected by solving the governing oscillating mass and momentum conservation equations. The model is in agreement with the Rayleigh slug-mass model at low values of incident sound pressure level. At high values, resistance is predicted to be independent of frequency, proportional to the square root of the amplitude of the incident sound pressure field, and virtually independent of resonator geometry. Reactance is predicted to depend in a very complicated way upon resonator geometry, incident sound pressure level, and frequency. Nondimensional parameters are defined that divide resonator impedance into three categories corresponding to low, moderately low, and intense incident sound pressure amplitudes. The two-microphone method was used to measure the impedance of a variety of resonators. The data were used to refine and verify the model.

  15. Modeling and Algorithmic Approaches to Constitutively-Complex, Microstructured Fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Gregory H.; Forest, Gregory

    2014-05-01

    We present a new multiscale model for complex fluids based on three scales: microscopic, kinetic, and continuum. We choose the microscopic level as Kramers' bead-rod model for polymers, which we describe as a system of stochastic differential equations with an implicit constraint formulation. The associated Fokker-Planck equation is then derived, and adiabatic elimination removes the fast momentum coordinates. Approached in this way, the kinetic level reduces to a dispersive drift equation. The continuum level is modeled with a finite volume Godunov-projection algorithm. We demonstrate computation of viscoelastic stress divergence using this multiscale approach.

  16. Design and development of magnetorheological fluid-based passive actuator.

    PubMed

    Shokrollahi, Elnaz; Price, Karl; Drake, James M; Goldenberg, Andrew A

    2015-08-01

    We present the design and experimental validation of a magnetorheological (MR) fluid-based passive actuator for tele-robotic bone biopsy procedures. With Finite Element Method Magnet (FEMM) software, the required uniform magnetic field circuit design was simulated. An 1100 turn 24 AWG copper wire coil wrapped around a magnetic core was used to create a magnetic field. The field strength was measured with a Hall effect sensor, and compared to the simulation. The maximum magnetic field flux produced by a constant current of 1.4 A was 0.2 T, similar to the simulation results. A series of quasi-static experiments were conducted to characterize the forces generated by the MR fluid-based actuator under various currents up to 12 N. An analytical model was developed to validate the measurements from the passive actuator.

  17. State-of-the-art review of computational fluid dynamics modeling for fluid-solids systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lyczkowski, R.W.; Bouillard, J.X.; Ding, J.; Chang, S.L.; Burge, S.W.

    1994-05-12

    As the result of 15 years of research (50 staff years of effort) Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), through its involvement in fluidized-bed combustion, magnetohydrodynamics, and a variety of environmental programs, has produced extensive computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software and models to predict the multiphase hydrodynamic and reactive behavior of fluid-solids motions and interactions in complex fluidized-bed reactors (FBRS) and slurry systems. This has resulted in the FLUFIX, IRF, and SLUFIX computer programs. These programs are based on fluid-solids hydrodynamic models and can predict information important to the designer of atmospheric or pressurized bubbling and circulating FBR, fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) and slurry units to guarantee optimum efficiency with minimum release of pollutants into the environment. This latter issue will become of paramount importance with the enactment of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1995. Solids motion is also the key to understanding erosion processes. Erosion rates in FBRs and pneumatic and slurry components are computed by ANL`s EROSION code to predict the potential metal wastage of FBR walls, intervals, feed distributors, and cyclones. Only the FLUFIX and IRF codes will be reviewed in the paper together with highlights of the validations because of length limitations. It is envisioned that one day, these codes with user-friendly pre and post-processor software and tailored for massively parallel multiprocessor shared memory computational platforms will be used by industry and researchers to assist in reducing and/or eliminating the environmental and economic barriers which limit full consideration of coal, shale and biomass as energy sources, to retain energy security, and to remediate waste and ecological problems.

  18. Effect of turbulence modelling to predict combustion and nanoparticle production in the flame assisted spray dryer based on computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Septiani, Eka Lutfi; Widiyastuti, W.; Winardi, Sugeng; Machmudah, Siti; Nurtono, Tantular; Kusdianto

    2016-02-01

    Flame assisted spray dryer are widely uses for large-scale production of nanoparticles because of it ability. Numerical approach is needed to predict combustion and particles production in scale up and optimization process due to difficulty in experimental observation and relatively high cost. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) can provide the momentum, energy and mass transfer, so that CFD more efficient than experiment due to time and cost. Here, two turbulence models, k-ɛ and Large Eddy Simulation were compared and applied in flame assisted spray dryer system. The energy sources for particle drying was obtained from combustion between LPG as fuel and air as oxidizer and carrier gas that modelled by non-premixed combustion in simulation. Silica particles was used to particle modelling from sol silica solution precursor. From the several comparison result, i.e. flame contour, temperature distribution and particle size distribution, Large Eddy Simulation turbulence model can provide the closest data to the experimental result.

  19. Modelling Transcapillary Transport of Fluid and Proteins in Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pietribiasi, Mauro; Waniewski, Jacek; Załuska, Alicja; Załuska, Wojciech; Lindholm, Bengt

    2016-01-01

    Background The kinetics of protein transport to and from the vascular compartment play a major role in the determination of fluid balance and plasma refilling during hemodialysis (HD) sessions. In this study we propose a whole-body mathematical model describing water and protein shifts across the capillary membrane during HD and compare its output to clinical data while evaluating the impact of choosing specific values for selected parameters. Methods The model follows a two-compartment structure (vascular and interstitial space) and is based on balance equations of protein mass and water volume in each compartment. The capillary membrane was described according to the three-pore theory. Two transport parameters, the fractional contribution of large pores (αLP) and the total hydraulic conductivity (LpS) of the capillary membrane, were estimated from patient data. Changes in the intensity and direction of individual fluid and solute flows through each part of the transport system were analyzed in relation to the choice of different values of small pores radius and fractional conductivity, lymphatic sensitivity to hydraulic pressure, and steady-state interstitial-to-plasma protein concentration ratio. Results The estimated values of LpS and αLP were respectively 10.0 ± 8.4 mL/min/mmHg (mean ± standard deviation) and 0.062 ± 0.041. The model was able to predict with good accuracy the profiles of plasma volume and serum total protein concentration in most of the patients (average root-mean-square deviation < 2% of the measured value). Conclusions The applied model provides a mechanistic interpretation of fluid transport processes induced by ultrafiltration during HD, using a minimum of tuned parameters and assumptions. The simulated values of individual flows through each kind of pore and lymphatic absorption rate yielded by the model may suggest answers to unsolved questions on the relative impact of these not-measurable quantities on total vascular refilling and

  20. Modelling couplings between reaction, fluid flow and deformation: Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malvoisin, Benjamin; Podladchikov, Yury Y.; Connolly, James A. D.

    2016-04-01

    Mineral assemblages out of equilibrium are commonly found in metamorphic rocks testifying of the critical role of kinetics for metamorphic reactions. As experimentally determined reaction rates in fluid-saturated systems generally indicate complete reaction in less than several years, i.e. several orders of magnitude faster than field-based estimates, metamorphic reaction kinetics are generally thought to be controlled by transport rather than by processes at the mineral surface. However, some geological processes like earthquakes or slow-slip events have shorter characteristic timescales, and transport processes can be intimately related to mineral surface processes. Therefore, it is important to take into account the kinetics of mineral surface processes for modelling fluid/rock interactions. Here, a model coupling reaction, fluid flow and deformation was improved by introducing a delay in the achievement of equilibrium. The classical formalism for dissolution/precipitation reactions was used to consider the influence of the distance from equilibrium and of temperature on the reaction rate, and a dependence on porosity was introduced to model evolution of reacting surface area during reaction. The fitting of experimental data for three reactions typically occurring in metamorphic systems (serpentine dehydration, muscovite dehydration and calcite decarbonation) indicates a systematic faster kinetics close from equilibrium on the dehydration side than on the hydration side. This effect is amplified through the porosity term in the reaction rate since porosity is formed during dehydration. Numerical modelling indicates that this difference in reaction rate close from equilibrium plays a key role in microtextures formation. The developed model can be used in a wide variety of geological systems where couplings between reaction, deformation and fluid flow have to be considered.

  1. Onset of slugging criterion based on characteristics and stability analyses of transient one-dimensional two-phase flow equations of two-fluid model

    SciTech Connect

    Chun, M.H.; Sung, C.K.

    1996-07-01

    A two-step approach has been used to obtain a new criterion for the onset of slug formation: (1) In the first step, a more general expression than the existing models for the onset of slug flow criterion has been derived from the analysis of singular points and neutral stability conditions of the transient one-dimensional two-phase flow equations of two-fluid model. (2) In the second step, introducing simplifications and incorporating a parameter into the general expression obtained in the first step to satisfy a number of physical conditions a priori specified, a new simple criterion for the onset of slug flow has been derived. Comparisons of the present model with existing models and experimental data show that the present model agrees very closely with Taitel and Dukler`s model and experimental data in horizontal pipes. In an inclined pipe ({theta} = 50{degree}), however, the difference between the predictions of the present model and those of existing models is appreciably large and the present model gives the best agreement with Ohnuki et al.`s data.

  2. Computational fluid dynamic modeling of fluidized-bed polymerization reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Rokkam, Ram

    2012-01-01

    Polyethylene is one of the most widely used plastics, and over 60 million tons are produced worldwide every year. Polyethylene is obtained by the catalytic polymerization of ethylene in gas and liquid phase reactors. The gas phase processes are more advantageous, and use fluidized-bed reactors for production of polyethylene. Since they operate so close to the melting point of the polymer, agglomeration is an operational concern in all slurry and gas polymerization processes. Electrostatics and hot spot formation are the main factors that contribute to agglomeration in gas-phase processes. Electrostatic charges in gas phase polymerization fluidized bed reactors are known to influence the bed hydrodynamics, particle elutriation, bubble size, bubble shape etc. Accumulation of electrostatic charges in the fluidized-bed can lead to operational issues. In this work a first-principles electrostatic model is developed and coupled with a multi-fluid computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model to understand the effect of electrostatics on the dynamics of a fluidized-bed. The multi-fluid CFD model for gas-particle flow is based on the kinetic theory of granular flows closures. The electrostatic model is developed based on a fixed, size-dependent charge for each type of particle (catalyst, polymer, polymer fines) phase. The combined CFD model is first verified using simple test cases, validated with experiments and applied to a pilot-scale polymerization fluidized-bed reactor. The CFD model reproduced qualitative trends in particle segregation and entrainment due to electrostatic charges observed in experiments. For the scale up of fluidized bed reactor, filtered models are developed and implemented on pilot scale reactor.

  3. Tribological and Rheological Properties of a Synovial Fluid Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klossner, Rebecca; Liang, Jing; Krause, Wendy

    2010-03-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) and the plasma proteins, albumin and globulins, are the most abundant macromolecules in synovial fluid, the fluid that lubricates freely moving joints. In previous studies, bovine synovial fluid, a synovial fluid model (SFM) and albumin in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) were observed to be rheopectic---viscosity increases over time under constant shear. Additionally, steady shear experiments have a strong shear history dependence in protein-containing solutions, whereas samples of HA in PBS behaved as a ``typical'' polyelectrolyte. The observed rheopexy and shear history dependence are indicative of structure building in solution, which is most likely caused by protein aggregation. The tribology of the SFM was also investigated using nanoindenter-based scratch tests. The coefficient of frictions (μ) between the diamond nanoindenter tip and a polyethylene surface was measured in the presence of the SFM and solutions with varied protein and HA concentrations. The lowest μ is observed in the SFM, which most closely mimics a healthy joint. Finally, an anti-inflammatory drug, hydroxychloroquine, was shown to inhibit protein interactions in the SFM in rheological studies, and thus the tribological response was examined. We hypothesize that the rheopectic behavior is important in lubrication regimes and therefore, the rheological and tribological properties of these solutions will be correlated.

  4. Modeling of Fluid-Membrane Interaction in Cellular Microinjection Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karzar-Jeddi, Mehdi; Diaz, Jhon; Olgac, Nejat; Fan, Tai-Hsi

    2009-11-01

    Cellular microinjection is a well-accepted method to deliver matters such as sperm, nucleus, or macromolecules into biological cells. To improve the success rate of in vitro fertilization and to establish the ideal operating conditions for a novel computer controlled rotationally oscillating intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) technology, we investigate the fluid-membrane interactions in the ICSI procedure. The procedure consists of anchoring the oocyte (a developing egg) using a holding pipette, penetrating oocyte's zona pellucida (the outer membrane) and the oolemma (the plasma or inner membrane) using an injection micropipette, and finally to deliver sperm into the oocyte for fertilization. To predict the large deformation of the oocyte membranes up to the piercing of the oolemma and the motion of fluids across both membranes, the dynamic fluid-pipette-membrane interactions are formulated by the coupled Stokes' equations and the continuum membrane model based on Helfrich's energy theory. A boundary integral model is developed to simulate the transient membrane deformation and the local membrane stress induced by the longitudinal motion of the injection pipette. The model captures the essential features of the membranes shown on optical images of ICSI experiments, and is capable of suggesting the optimal deformation level of the oolemma to start the rotational oscillations for piercing into the oolemma.

  5. A THC Simulator for Modeling Fluid-Rock Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamidi, Sahar; Galvan, Boris; Heinze, Thomas; Miller, Stephen

    2014-05-01

    Fluid-rock interactions play an essential role in many earth processes, from a likely influence on earthquake nucleation and aftershocks, to enhanced geothermal system, carbon capture and storage (CCS), and underground nuclear waste repositories. In THC models, two-way interactions between different processes (thermal, hydraulic and chemical) are present. Fluid flow influences the permeability of the rock especially if chemical reactions are taken into account. On one hand solute concentration influences fluid properties while, on the other hand, heat can affect further chemical reactions. Estimating heat production from a naturally fractured geothermal systems remains a complex problem. Previous works are typically based on a local thermal equilibrium assumption and rarely consider the salinity. The dissolved salt in fluid affects the hydro- and thermodynamical behavior of the system by changing the hydraulic properties of the circulating fluid. Coupled thermal-hydraulic-chemical models (THC) are important for investigating these processes, but what is needed is a coupling to mechanics to result in THMC models. Although similar models currently exist (e.g. PFLOTRAN), our objective here is to develop algorithms for implementation using the Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) computer architecture to be run on GPU clusters. To that aim, we present a two-dimensional numerical simulation of a fully coupled non-isothermal non-reactive solute flow. The thermal part of the simulation models heat transfer processes for either local thermal equilibrium or nonequilibrium cases, and coupled to a non-reactive mass transfer described by a non-linear diffusion/dispersion model. The flow process of the model includes a non-linear Darcian flow for either saturated or unsaturated scenarios. For the unsaturated case, we use the Richards' approximation for a mixture of liquid and gas phases. Relative permeability and capillary pressure are determined by the van Genuchten relations

  6. Dynamic mean field theory for lattice gas models of fluids confined in porous materials: higher order theory based on the Bethe-Peierls and path probability method approximations.

    PubMed

    Edison, John R; Monson, Peter A

    2014-07-14

    Recently we have developed a dynamic mean field theory (DMFT) for lattice gas models of fluids in porous materials [P. A. Monson, J. Chem. Phys. 128(8), 084701 (2008)]. The theory can be used to describe the relaxation processes in the approach to equilibrium or metastable states for fluids in pores and is especially useful for studying system exhibiting adsorption/desorption hysteresis. In this paper we discuss the extension of the theory to higher order by means of the path probability method (PPM) of Kikuchi and co-workers. We show that this leads to a treatment of the dynamics that is consistent with thermodynamics coming from the Bethe-Peierls or Quasi-Chemical approximation for the equilibrium or metastable equilibrium states of the lattice model. We compare the results from the PPM with those from DMFT and from dynamic Monte Carlo simulations. We find that the predictions from PPM are qualitatively similar to those from DMFT but give somewhat improved quantitative accuracy, in part due to the superior treatment of the underlying thermodynamics. This comes at the cost of greater computational expense associated with the larger number of equations that must be solved.

  7. Dynamic mean field theory for lattice gas models of fluids confined in porous materials: Higher order theory based on the Bethe-Peierls and path probability method approximations

    SciTech Connect

    Edison, John R.; Monson, Peter A.

    2014-07-14

    Recently we have developed a dynamic mean field theory (DMFT) for lattice gas models of fluids in porous materials [P. A. Monson, J. Chem. Phys. 128(8), 084701 (2008)]. The theory can be used to describe the relaxation processes in the approach to equilibrium or metastable states for fluids in pores and is especially useful for studying system exhibiting adsorption/desorption hysteresis. In this paper we discuss the extension of the theory to higher order by means of the path probability method (PPM) of Kikuchi and co-workers. We show that this leads to a treatment of the dynamics that is consistent with thermodynamics coming from the Bethe-Peierls or Quasi-Chemical approximation for the equilibrium or metastable equilibrium states of the lattice model. We compare the results from the PPM with those from DMFT and from dynamic Monte Carlo simulations. We find that the predictions from PPM are qualitatively similar to those from DMFT but give somewhat improved quantitative accuracy, in part due to the superior treatment of the underlying thermodynamics. This comes at the cost of greater computational expense associated with the larger number of equations that must be solved.

  8. Model reduction for parametric instability analysis in shells conveying fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochupillai, Jayaraj; Ganesan, N.; Padmanabhan, Chandramouli

    2003-05-01

    Flexible pipes conveying fluid are often subjected to parametric excitation due to time-periodic flow fluctuations. Such systems are known to exhibit complex instability phenomena such as divergence and coupled-mode flutter. Investigators have typically used weighted residual techniques, to reduce the continuous system model into a discrete model, based on approximation functions with global support, for carrying out stability analysis. While this approach is useful for straight pipes, modelling based on FEM is needed for the study of complicated piping systems, where the approximation functions used are local in support. However, the size of the problem is now significantly larger and for computationally efficient stability analysis, model reduction is necessary. In this paper, model reduction techniques are developed for the analysis of parametric instability in flexible pipes conveying fluids under a mean pressure. It is shown that only those linear transformations which leave the original eigenvalues of the linear time invariant system unchanged are admissible. The numerical technique developed by Friedmann and Hammond (Int. J. Numer. Methods Eng. Efficient 11 (1997) 1117) is used for the stability analysis. One of the key research issues is to establish criteria for deciding the basis vectors essential for an accurate stability analysis. This paper examines this issue in detail and proposes new guidelines for their selection.

  9. Hemodynamics in Transplant Renal Artery Stenosis and its Alteration after Stent Implantation Based on a Patient-specific Computational Fluid Dynamics Model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong-Yang; Liu, Long-Shan; Cao, Hai-Ming; Li, Jun; Deng, Rong-Hai; Fu, Qian; Zhang, Huan-Xi; Fei, Ji-Guang; Wang, Chang-Xi

    2017-01-01

    Background: Accumulating studies on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) support the involvement of hemodynamic factors in artery stenosis. Based on a patient-specific CFD model, the present study aimed to investigate the hemodynamic characteristics of transplant renal artery stenosis (TRAS) and its alteration after stent treatment. Methods: Computed tomography angiography (CTA) data of kidney transplant recipients in a single transplant center from April 2013 to November 2014 were reviewed. The three-dimensional geometry of transplant renal artery (TRA) was reconstructed from the qualified CTA images and categorized into three groups: the normal, stenotic, and stented groups. Hemodynamic parameters including pressure distribution, velocity, wall shear stress (WSS), and mass flow rate (MFR) were extracted. The data of hemodynamic parameters were expressed as median (interquartile range), and Mann–Whitney U-test was used for analysis. Results: Totally, 6 normal, 12 stenotic, and 6 stented TRAs were included in the analysis. TRAS presented nonuniform pressure distribution, adverse pressure gradient across stenosis throat, flow vortex, and a separation zone at downstream stenosis. Stenotic arteries had higher maximal velocity and maximal WSS (2.94 [2.14, 3.30] vs. 1.06 [0.89, 1.15] m/s, 256.5 [149.8, 349.4] vs. 41.7 [37.8, 45.3] Pa at end diastole, P = 0.001; 3.25 [2.67, 3.56] vs. 1.65 [1.18, 1.72] m/s, 281.3 [184.3, 364.7] vs. 65.8 [61.2, 71.9] Pa at peak systole, P = 0.001) and lower minimal WSS and MFRs (0.07 [0.03, 0.13] vs. 0.52 [0.45, 0.67] Pa, 1.5 [1.0, 3.0] vs. 11.0 [8.0, 11.3] g/s at end diastole, P = 0.001; 0.08 [0.03, 0.19] vs. 0.70 [0.60, 0.81] Pa, 2.0 [1.3, 3.3] vs. 16.5 [13.0, 20.3] g/s at peak systole, P = 0.001) as compared to normal arteries. Stent implantation ameliorated all the alterations of the above hemodynamic factors except low WSS. Conclusions: Hemodynamic factors were significantly changed in severe TRAS. Stent implantation can restore or

  10. Lattice Boltzmann Models for Multicomponent Fluids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    between multiphase fluids. Two specific physical problems investigated: the shape of a sessile drop on a horizontal surface subjected to a gravitational field, and the effect of surface tension on contact angle .

  11. Modeling of relationship between glucose concentration in blood and glucose concentration in interstitial fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Ting; Li, Dachao; Ji, Yongjie; Li, Guoqing; Xu, Kexin

    2012-03-01

    In recent years, using the detection of interstitial fluid glucose concentration to realize the real-time continuous monitoring of blood glucose concentration gets more and more attention, because for one person, the relationship between blood glucose concentration and interstitial fluid glucose concentration satisfies specific rules. However, the glucose concentration in interstitial fluid is not entirely equal to the glucose concentration in blood and has a physiological lag because of the physiological difference of cells in blood and interstitial fluid. Because the clinical diagnostic criteria of diabetes are still blood glucose concentration, the evaluation model of the physiological lag parameter between the glucose concentration in blood and the glucose concentration in interstitial fluid should be established. The physiological difference in glucose molecules uptake, utilization, and elimination by cells in blood and interstitial fluid and the diffusion velocity of glucose molecule from blood to interstitial fluid will be induced to the mass transfer model to express the physiological lag parameter. Based on the continuous monitoring of glucose concentration in interstitial fluid, the project had studied the mass transfer model to establish the evaluation model of the physiological lag parameter between the glucose concentration in blood and the glucose concentration in interstitial fluid. We have preliminary achieved to evaluate the physiological lag parameter exactly and predict the glucose concentration in blood through the glucose concentration in interstitial fluid accurately.

  12. Investigating the Fate of Hydraulic Fracturing Fluid in Shale Gas Formations Through Two-Phase Numerical Modelling of Fluid Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, R.; Doster, F.; Celia, M. A.; Bandilla, K.

    2015-12-01

    The process of hydraulic fracturing in shale gas formations typically involves the injection of large quantities of water-based fluid (2×107L typical) into the shale formations in order to fracture the rock. A large proportion of the fracturing fluids injected into shale gas wells during hydraulic fracturing does not return out of the well once production begins. The percentage of water returning varies within and between different shale plays, but is generally around 30%. The large proportion of the fluid that does not return raises the possibility that it could migrate out of the target shale formation and potentially toward aquifers and the surface through pathways such as the created hydraulic fractures, faults and adjacent wells. A leading hypothesis for the fate of the remaining fracturing fluid is that it is spontaneously imbibed from the hydraulic fractures into the shale rock matrix due to the low water saturation and very high capillary pressure in the shale. The imbibition hypothesis is assessed using numerical modeling of the two-phase flow of fracturing fluid and gas in the shale during injection. The model incorporates relevant two-phase physical phenomena such as capillarity and relative permeability, including hysteretic behavior in both. Modeling scenarios for fracturing fluid injection were assessed under varying conditions for shale reservoir parameters and spatial heterogeneities in permeability and wettability. The results showed that the unaccounted fracturing fluid may plausibly be imbibed into the shale matrix under certain conditions, and that significant small-scale spatial heterogeneity in the shale permeability likely plays an important role in imbibing the fracturing fluid.

  13. Mitral valve dynamics in structural and fluid-structure interaction models.

    PubMed

    Lau, K D; Diaz, V; Scambler, P; Burriesci, G

    2010-11-01

    Modelling and simulation of heart valves is a challenging biomechanical problem due to anatomical variability, pulsatile physiological pressure loads and 3D anisotropic material behaviour. Current valvular models based on the finite element method can be divided into: those that do model the interaction between the blood and the valve (fluid-structure interaction or 'wet' models) and those that do not (structural models or 'dry' models). Here an anatomically sized model of the mitral valve has been used to compare the difference between structural and fluid-structure interaction techniques in two separately simulated scenarios: valve closure and a cardiac cycle. Using fluid-structure interaction, the valve has been modelled separately in a straight tubular volume and in a U-shaped ventricular volume, in order to analyse the difference in the coupled fluid and structural dynamics between the two geometries. The results of the structural and fluid-structure interaction models have shown that the stress distribution in the closure simulation is similar in all the models, but the magnitude and closed configuration differ. In the cardiac cycle simulation significant differences in the valvular dynamics were found between the structural and fluid-structure interaction models due to difference in applied pressure loads. Comparison of the fluid domains of the fluid-structure interaction models have shown that the ventricular geometry generates slower fluid velocity with increased vorticity compared to the tubular geometry. In conclusion, structural heart valve models are suitable for simulation of static configurations (opened or closed valves), but in order to simulate full dynamic behaviour fluid-structure interaction models are required.

  14. Flow modification in canine intracranial aneurysm model by an asymmetric stent: studies using digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and image-based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoi, Yiemeng; Ionita, Ciprian N.; Tranquebar, Rekha V.; Hoffmann, Kenneth R.; Woodward, Scott H.; Taulbee, Dale B.; Meng, Hui; Rudin, Stephen

    2006-03-01

    An asymmetric stent with low porosity patch across the intracranial aneurysm neck and high porosity elsewhere is designed to modify the flow to result in thrombogenesis and occlusion of the aneurysm and yet to reduce the possibility of also occluding adjacent perforator vessels. The purposes of this study are to evaluate the flow field induced by an asymmetric stent using both numerical and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) methods and to quantify the flow dynamics of an asymmetric stent in an in vivo aneurysm model. We created a vein-pouch aneurysm model on the canine carotid artery. An asymmetric stent was implanted at the aneurysm, with 25% porosity across the aneurysm neck and 80% porosity elsewhere. The aneurysm geometry, before and after stent implantation, was acquired using cone beam CT and reconstructed for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. Both steady-state and pulsatile flow conditions using the measured waveforms from the aneurysm model were studied. To reduce computational costs, we modeled the asymmetric stent effect by specifying a pressure drop over the layer across the aneurysm orifice where the low porosity patch was located. From the CFD results, we found the asymmetric stent reduced the inflow into the aneurysm by 51%, and appeared to create a stasis-like environment which favors thrombus formation. The DSA sequences also showed substantial flow reduction into the aneurysm. Asymmetric stents may be a viable image guided intervention for treating intracranial aneurysms with desired flow modification features.

  15. Microscope-Based Fluid Physics Experiments in the Fluids and Combustion Facility on ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doherty, Michael P.; Motil, Susan M.; Snead, John H.; Malarik, Diane C.

    2000-01-01

    At the NASA Glenn Research Center, the Microgravity Science Program is planning to conduct a large number of experiments on the International Space Station in both the Fluid Physics and Combustion Science disciplines, and is developing flight experiment hardware for use within the International Space Station's Fluids and Combustion Facility. Four fluids physics experiments that require an optical microscope will be sequentially conducted within a subrack payload to the Fluids Integrated Rack of the Fluids and Combustion Facility called the Light Microscopy Module, which will provide the containment, changeout, and diagnostic capabilities to perform the experiments. The Light Microscopy Module is planned as a fully remotely controllable on-orbit microscope facility, allowing flexible scheduling and control of experiments within International Space Station resources. This paper will focus on the four microscope-based experiments, specifically, their objectives and the sample cell and instrument hardware to accommodate their requirements.

  16. Pulmonary Fluid Flow Challenges for Experimental and Mathematical Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Rachel; Hill, David B.; Forest, M. Gregory; Grotberg, James B.

    2014-01-01

    Modeling the flow of fluid in the lungs, even under baseline healthy conditions, presents many challenges. The complex rheology of the fluids, interaction between fluids and structures, and complicated multi-scale geometry all add to the complexity of the problem. We provide a brief overview of approaches used to model three aspects of pulmonary fluid and flow: the surfactant layer in the deep branches of the lung, the mucus layer in the upper airway branches, and closure/reopening of the airway. We discuss models of each aspect, the potential to capture biological and therapeutic information, and open questions worthy of further investigation. We hope to promote multi-disciplinary collaboration by providing insights into mathematical descriptions of fluid-mechanics in the lung and the kinds of predictions these models can make. PMID:25096289

  17. Development of Efficient Real-Fluid Model in Simulating Liquid Rocket Injector Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Gary; Farmer, Richard

    2003-01-01

    The characteristics of propellant mixing near the injector have a profound effect on the liquid rocket engine performance. However, the flow features near the injector of liquid rocket engines are extremely complicated, for example supercritical-pressure spray, turbulent mixing, and chemical reactions are present. Previously, a homogeneous spray approach with a real-fluid property model was developed to account for the compressibility and evaporation effects such that thermodynamics properties of a mixture at a wide range of pressures and temperatures can be properly calculated, including liquid-phase, gas- phase, two-phase, and dense fluid regions. The developed homogeneous spray model demonstrated a good success in simulating uni- element shear coaxial injector spray combustion flows. However, the real-fluid model suffered a computational deficiency when applied to a pressure-based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. The deficiency is caused by the pressure and enthalpy being the independent variables in the solution procedure of a pressure-based code, whereas the real-fluid model utilizes density and temperature as independent variables. The objective of the present research work is to improve the computational efficiency of the real-fluid property model in computing thermal properties. The proposed approach is called an efficient real-fluid model, and the improvement of computational efficiency is achieved by using a combination of a liquid species and a gaseous species to represent a real-fluid species.

  18. Surface tension driven flow in glass melts and model fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcneil, T. J.; Cole, R.; Subramanian, R. S.

    1982-01-01

    Surface tension driven flow has been investigated analytically and experimentally using an apparatus where a free column of molten glass or model fluids was supported at its top and bottom faces by solid surfaces. The glass used in the experiments was sodium diborate, and the model fluids were silicone oils. In both the model fluid and glass melt experiments, conclusive evidence was obtained to prove that the observed flow was driven primarily by surface tension forces. The experimental observations are in qualitative agreement with predictions from the theoretical model.

  19. Improvement of Basic Fluid Dynamics Models for the COMPASS Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuai; Morita, Koji; Shirakawa, Noriyuki; Yamamoto, Yuichi

    The COMPASS code is a new next generation safety analysis code to provide local information for various key phenomena in core disruptive accidents of sodium-cooled fast reactors, which is based on the moving particle semi-implicit (MPS) method. In this study, improvement of basic fluid dynamics models for the COMPASS code was carried out and verified with fundamental verification calculations. A fully implicit pressure solution algorithm was introduced to improve the numerical stability of MPS simulations. With a newly developed free surface model, numerical difficulty caused by poor pressure solutions is overcome by involving free surface particles in the pressure Poisson equation. In addition, applicability of the MPS method to interactions between fluid and multi-solid bodies was investigated in comparison with dam-break experiments with solid balls. It was found that the PISO algorithm and free surface model makes simulation with the passively moving solid model stable numerically. The characteristic behavior of solid balls was successfully reproduced by the present numerical simulations.

  20. Modeling Tools Predict Flow in Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    "Because rocket engines operate under extreme temperature and pressure, they present a unique challenge to designers who must test and simulate the technology. To this end, CRAFT Tech Inc., of Pipersville, Pennsylvania, won Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts from Marshall Space Flight Center to develop software to simulate cryogenic fluid flows and related phenomena. CRAFT Tech enhanced its CRUNCH CFD (computational fluid dynamics) software to simulate phenomena in various liquid propulsion components and systems. Today, both government and industry clients in the aerospace, utilities, and petrochemical industries use the software for analyzing existing systems as well as designing new ones."

  1. Lateral Fluid Percussion: Model of Traumatic Brain Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Alder, Janet; Fujioka, Wendy; Lifshitz, Jonathan; Crockett, David P.; Thakker-Varia, Smita

    2011-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) research has attained renewed momentum due to the increasing awareness of head injuries, which result in morbidity and mortality. Based on the nature of primary injury following TBI, complex and heterogeneous secondary consequences result, which are followed by regenerative processes 1,2. Primary injury can be induced by a direct contusion to the brain from skull fracture or from shearing and stretching of tissue causing displacement of brain due to movement 3,4. The resulting hematomas and lacerations cause a vascular response 3,5, and the morphological and functional damage of the white matter leads to diffuse axonal injury 6-8. Additional secondary changes commonly seen in the brain are edema and increased intracranial pressure 9. Following TBI there are microscopic alterations in biochemical and physiological pathways involving the release of excitotoxic neurotransmitters, immune mediators and oxygen radicals 10-12, which ultimately result in long-term neurological disabilities 13,14. Thus choosing appropriate animal models of TBI that present similar cellular and molecular events in human and rodent TBI is critical for studying the mechanisms underlying injury and repair. Various experimental models of TBI have been developed to reproduce aspects of TBI observed in humans, among them three specific models are widely adapted for rodents: fluid percussion, cortical impact and weight drop/impact acceleration 1. The fluid percussion device produces an injury through a craniectomy by applying a brief fluid pressure pulse on to the intact dura. The pulse is created by a pendulum striking the piston of a reservoir of fluid. The percussion produces brief displacement and deformation of neural tissue 1,15. Conversely, cortical impact injury delivers mechanical energy to the intact dura via a rigid impactor under pneumatic pressure 16,17. The weight drop/impact model is characterized by the fall of a rod with a specific mass on the closed

  2. Lateral fluid percussion: model of traumatic brain injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Alder, Janet; Fujioka, Wendy; Lifshitz, Jonathan; Crockett, David P; Thakker-Varia, Smita

    2011-08-22

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) research has attained renewed momentum due to the increasing awareness of head injuries, which result in morbidity and mortality. Based on the nature of primary injury following TBI, complex and heterogeneous secondary consequences result, which are followed by regenerative processes (1,2). Primary injury can be induced by a direct contusion to the brain from skull fracture or from shearing and stretching of tissue causing displacement of brain due to movement (3,4). The resulting hematomas and lacerations cause a vascular response (3,5), and the morphological and functional damage of the white matter leads to diffuse axonal injury (6-8). Additional secondary changes commonly seen in the brain are edema and increased intracranial pressure (9). Following TBI there are microscopic alterations in biochemical and physiological pathways involving the release of excitotoxic neurotransmitters, immune mediators and oxygen radicals (10-12), which ultimately result in long-term neurological disabilities (13,14). Thus choosing appropriate animal models of TBI that present similar cellular and molecular events in human and rodent TBI is critical for studying the mechanisms underlying injury and repair. Various experimental models of TBI have been developed to reproduce aspects of TBI observed in humans, among them three specific models are widely adapted for rodents: fluid percussion, cortical impact and weight drop/impact acceleration (1). The fluid percussion device produces an injury through a craniectomy by applying a brief fluid pressure pulse on to the intact dura. The pulse is created by a pendulum striking the piston of a reservoir of fluid. The percussion produces brief displacement and deformation of neural tissue (1,15). Conversely, cortical impact injury delivers mechanical energy to the intact dura via a rigid impactor under pneumatic pressure (16,17). The weight drop/impact model is characterized by the fall of a rod with a specific

  3. Numerical modeling of fluid migration in subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, M. J.; Quinteros, J.; Sobolev, S. V.

    2015-12-01

    It is well known that fluids play a crucial role in subduction evolution. For example, mechanical weakening along tectonic interfaces, due to high fluid pressure, may enable oceanic subduction. Hence, the fluid content seems to be a critical parameter for subduction initiation. Studies have also shown a correlation between the location of slab dehydration and intermediate seismic activity. Furthermore, expelled fluids from the subduction slab affect the melting temperature, consequently, contributing to partial melting in the wedge above the down-going plate and extensive volcanism. In summary, fluids have a great impact on tectonic processes and therefore should be incorporated into geodynamic numerical models. Here we use existing approaches to couple and solve fluid flow equations in the SLIM-3D thermo-mechanical code. SLIM-3D is a three-dimensional thermo-mechanical code capable of simulating lithospheric deformation with elasto-visco-plastic rheology. It has been successfully applied to model geodynamic processes at different tectonic settings, including subduction zones. However, although SLIM-3D already includes many features, fluid migration has not been incorporated into the model yet. To this end, we coupled solid and fluid flow assuming that fluids flow through a porous and deformable solid. Thereby, we introduce a two-phase flow into the model, in which the Stokes flow is coupled with the Darcy law for fluid flow. Ultimately, the evolution of porosity is governed by a compaction pressure and the advection of the porous solid. We show the details of our implementation of the fluid flow into the existing thermo-mechanical finite element code and present first results of benchmarks and experiments. We are especially interested in the coupling of subduction processes and the evolution of the magmatic arc. Thereby, we focus on the key factors controlling magma emplacement and its influence on subduction processes.

  4. Properties of forced convection experimental with silicon carbide based nano-fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soanker, Abhinay

    With the advent of nanotechnology, many fields of Engineering and Science took a leap to the next level of advancements. The broad scope of nanotechnology initiated many studies of heat transfer and thermal engineering. Nano-fluids are one such technology and can be thought of as engineered colloidal fluids with nano-sized colloidal particles. There are different types of nano-fluids based on the colloidal particle and base fluids. Nano-fluids can primarily be categorized into metallic, ceramics, oxide, magnetic and carbon based. The present work is a part of investigation of the thermal and rheological properties of ceramic based nano-fluids. alpha-Silicon Carbide based nano-fluid with Ethylene Glycol and water mixture 50-50% volume concentration was used as the base fluid here. This work is divided into three parts; Theoretical modelling of effective thermal conductivity (ETC) of colloidal fluids, study of Thermal and Rheological properties of alpha-SiC nano-fluids, and determining the Heat Transfer properties of alpha-SiC nano-fluids. In the first part of this work, a theoretical model for effective thermal conductivity (ETC) of static based colloidal fluids was formulated based on the particle size, shape (spherical), thermal conductivity of base fluid and that of the colloidal particle, along with the particle distribution pattern in the fluid. A MATLAB program is generated to calculate the details of this model. The model is specifically derived for least and maximum ETC enhancement possible and thereby the lower and upper bounds was determined. In addition, ETC is also calculated for uniform colloidal distribution pattern. Effect of volume concentration on ETC was studied. No effect of particle size was observed for particle sizes below a certain value. Results of this model were compared with Wiener bounds and Hashin- Shtrikman bounds. The second part of this work is a study of thermal and rheological properties of alpha-Silicon Carbide based nano-fluids

  5. Base Flow Model Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinha, Neeraj; Brinckman, Kevin; Jansen, Bernard; Seiner, John

    2011-01-01

    A method was developed of obtaining propulsive base flow data in both hot and cold jet environments, at Mach numbers and altitude of relevance to NASA launcher designs. The base flow data was used to perform computational fluid dynamics (CFD) turbulence model assessments of base flow predictive capabilities in order to provide increased confidence in base thermal and pressure load predictions obtained from computational modeling efforts. Predictive CFD analyses were used in the design of the experiments, available propulsive models were used to reduce program costs and increase success, and a wind tunnel facility was used. The data obtained allowed assessment of CFD/turbulence models in a complex flow environment, working within a building-block procedure to validation, where cold, non-reacting test data was first used for validation, followed by more complex reacting base flow validation.

  6. A two-fluid model for avalanche and debris flows.

    PubMed

    Pitman, E Bruce; Le, Long

    2005-07-15

    Geophysical mass flows--debris flows, avalanches, landslides--can contain O(10(6)-10(10)) m(3) or more of material, often a mixture of soil and rocks with a significant quantity of interstitial fluid. These flows can be tens of meters in depth and hundreds of meters in length. The range of scales and the rheology of this mixture presents significant modelling and computational challenges. This paper describes a depth-averaged 'thin layer' model of geophysical mass flows containing a mixture of solid material and fluid. The model is derived from a 'two-phase' or 'two-fluid' system of equations commonly used in engineering research. Phenomenological modelling and depth averaging combine to yield a tractable set of equations, a hyperbolic system that describes the motion of the two constituent phases. If the fluid inertia is small, a reduced model system that is easier to solve may be derived.

  7. Finite Element Modelling of Fluid Coupling in the Coiled Cochlea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Guangjian; Elliott, S. J.; Lineton, B.; Saba, R.

    2011-11-01

    A finite element model is first used to calculate the modal pressure difference for a box model of the cochlea, which shows that the number of fluid elements across the width of the cochlea determines the accuracy with which the near field, or short wavenumber, component of the fluid coupling is reproduced. Then results are compared with the analytic results to validate the accuracy of the FE model. It is, however, the far field, or long wavelength, component of the fluid coupling that is most affected by the geometry. A finite element model of the coiled cochlea is then used to calculate fluid coupling in this case, which has similar characteristics to the uncoiled model.

  8. A Comprehensive Numerical Model for Simulating Fluid Transport in Nanopores.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan; Yu, Wei; Sepehrnoori, Kamy; Di, Yuan

    2017-01-16

    Since a large amount of nanopores exist in tight oil reservoirs, fluid transport in nanopores is complex due to large capillary pressure. Recent studies only focus on the effect of nanopore confinement on single-well performance with simple planar fractures in tight oil reservoirs. Its impacts on multi-well performance with complex fracture geometries have not been reported. In this study, a numerical model was developed to investigate the effect of confined phase behavior on cumulative oil and gas production of four horizontal wells with different fracture geometries. Its pore sizes were divided into five regions based on nanopore size distribution. Then, fluid properties were evaluated under different levels of capillary pressure using Peng-Robinson equation of state. Afterwards, an efficient approach of Embedded Discrete Fracture Model (EDFM) was applied to explicitly model hydraulic and natural fractures in the reservoirs. Finally, three fracture geometries, i.e. non-planar hydraulic fractures, non-planar hydraulic fractures with one set natural fractures, and non-planar hydraulic fractures with two sets natural fractures, are evaluated. The multi-well performance with confined phase behavior is analyzed with permeabilities of 0.01 md and 0.1 md. This work improves the analysis of capillarity effect on multi-well performance with complex fracture geometries in tight oil reservoirs.

  9. A Comprehensive Numerical Model for Simulating Fluid Transport in Nanopores

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuan; Yu, Wei; Sepehrnoori, Kamy; Di, Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Since a large amount of nanopores exist in tight oil reservoirs, fluid transport in nanopores is complex due to large capillary pressure. Recent studies only focus on the effect of nanopore confinement on single-well performance with simple planar fractures in tight oil reservoirs. Its impacts on multi-well performance with complex fracture geometries have not been reported. In this study, a numerical model was developed to investigate the effect of confined phase behavior on cumulative oil and gas production of four horizontal wells with different fracture geometries. Its pore sizes were divided into five regions based on nanopore size distribution. Then, fluid properties were evaluated under different levels of capillary pressure using Peng-Robinson equation of state. Afterwards, an efficient approach of Embedded Discrete Fracture Model (EDFM) was applied to explicitly model hydraulic and natural fractures in the reservoirs. Finally, three fracture geometries, i.e. non-planar hydraulic fractures, non-planar hydraulic fractures with one set natural fractures, and non-planar hydraulic fractures with two sets natural fractures, are evaluated. The multi-well performance with confined phase behavior is analyzed with permeabilities of 0.01 md and 0.1 md. This work improves the analysis of capillarity effect on multi-well performance with complex fracture geometries in tight oil reservoirs. PMID:28091599

  10. A Comprehensive Numerical Model for Simulating Fluid Transport in Nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuan; Yu, Wei; Sepehrnoori, Kamy; di, Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Since a large amount of nanopores exist in tight oil reservoirs, fluid transport in nanopores is complex due to large capillary pressure. Recent studies only focus on the effect of nanopore confinement on single-well performance with simple planar fractures in tight oil reservoirs. Its impacts on multi-well performance with complex fracture geometries have not been reported. In this study, a numerical model was developed to investigate the effect of confined phase behavior on cumulative oil and gas production of four horizontal wells with different fracture geometries. Its pore sizes were divided into five regions based on nanopore size distribution. Then, fluid properties were evaluated under different levels of capillary pressure using Peng-Robinson equation of state. Afterwards, an efficient approach of Embedded Discrete Fracture Model (EDFM) was applied to explicitly model hydraulic and natural fractures in the reservoirs. Finally, three fracture geometries, i.e. non-planar hydraulic fractures, non-planar hydraulic fractures with one set natural fractures, and non-planar hydraulic fractures with two sets natural fractures, are evaluated. The multi-well performance with confined phase behavior is analyzed with permeabilities of 0.01 md and 0.1 md. This work improves the analysis of capillarity effect on multi-well performance with complex fracture geometries in tight oil reservoirs.

  11. Numerical modeling of fluid and electrical currents through geometries based on synchrotron X-ray tomographic images of reservoir rocks using Avizo and COMSOL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, M. B.; Butler, S. L.; Hawkes, C. D.; Kotzer, T.

    2014-12-01

    The use of numerical simulations to model physical processes occurring within subvolumes of rock samples that have been characterized using advanced 3D imaging techniques is becoming increasingly common. Not only do these simulations allow for the determination of macroscopic properties like hydraulic permeability and electrical formation factor, but they also allow the user to visualize processes taking place at the pore scale and they allow for multiple different processes to be simulated on the same geometry. Most efforts to date have used specialized research software for the purpose of simulations. In this contribution, we outline the steps taken to use commercial software Avizo to transform a 3D synchrotron X-ray-derived tomographic image of a rock core sample to an STL (STereoLithography) file which can be imported into the commercial multiphysics modeling package COMSOL. We demonstrate that the use of COMSOL to perform fluid and electrical current flow simulations through the pore spaces. The permeability and electrical formation factor of the sample are calculated and compared with laboratory-derived values and benchmark calculations. Although the simulation domains that we were able to model on a desk top computer were significantly smaller than representative elementary volumes, and we were able to establish Kozeny-Carman and Archie's Law trends on which laboratory measurements and previous benchmark solutions fall. The rock core samples include a Fountainebleau sandstone used for benchmarking and a marly dolostone sampled from a well in the Weyburn oil field of southeastern Saskatchewan, Canada. Such carbonates are known to have complicated pore structures compared with sandstones, yet we are able to calculate reasonable macroscopic properties. We discuss the computing resources required.

  12. Multiscale modeling for fluid transport in nanosystems.

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jonathan W.; Jones, Reese E.; Mandadapu, Kranthi Kiran; Templeton, Jeremy Alan; Zimmerman, Jonathan A.

    2013-09-01

    Atomistic-scale behavior drives performance in many micro- and nano-fluidic systems, such as mircrofludic mixers and electrical energy storage devices. Bringing this information into the traditionally continuum models used for engineering analysis has proved challenging. This work describes one such approach to address this issue by developing atomistic-to-continuum multi scale and multi physics methods to enable molecular dynamics (MD) representations of atoms to incorporated into continuum simulations. Coupling is achieved by imposing constraints based on fluxes of conserved quantities between the two regions described by one of these models. The impact of electric fields and surface charges are also critical, hence, methodologies to extend finite-element (FE) MD electric field solvers have been derived to account for these effects. Finally, the continuum description can have inconsistencies with the coarse-grained MD dynamics, so FE equations based on MD statistics were derived to facilitate the multi scale coupling. Examples are shown relevant to nanofluidic systems, such as pore flow, Couette flow, and electric double layer.

  13. Smoothed particle hydrodynamic model for viscoelastic fluids with thermal fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Quesada, Adolfo; Ellero, Marco; Español, Pep

    2009-05-01

    We present a fluid-particle model for a polymer solution in nonisothermal situations. The state of the fluid particles is characterized by the thermodynamic variables and a configuration tensor that describes the underlying molecular orientation of the polymer molecules. The specification of very simple physical mechanisms inspired by the dynamics of single polymer molecules allows one, with the help of the general equation for nonequilibrium reversible-irreversible coupling (GENERIC) formalism, to derive the equations of motion for a set of fluid particles carrying polymer molecules in suspension. In the simplest case of Hookean dumbbells we recover a fluid-particle version of the Oldroyd-B model in which thermal fluctuations are included consistently. Generalization to more complex viscoelastic models, such as finitely extensible nonlinear elastic Peterlin (FENE-P) model, with the proper introduction of thermal fluctuations is straightforward.

  14. Accurate method for including solid-fluid boundary interactions in mesoscopic model fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Berkenbos, A. Lowe, C.P.

    2008-04-20

    Particle models are attractive methods for simulating the dynamics of complex mesoscopic fluids. Many practical applications of this methodology involve flow through a solid geometry. As the system is modeled using particles whose positions move continuously in space, one might expect that implementing the correct stick boundary condition exactly at the solid-fluid interface is straightforward. After all, unlike discrete methods there is no mapping onto a grid to contend with. In this article we describe a method that, for axisymmetric flows, imposes both the no-slip condition and continuity of stress at the interface. We show that the new method then accurately reproduces correct hydrodynamic behavior right up to the location of the interface. As such, computed flow profiles are correct even using a relatively small number of particles to model the fluid.

  15. Development of an analytical model for organic-fluid fouling

    SciTech Connect

    Panchal, C.B.; Watkinson, A.P.

    1994-10-01

    The research goal of this project is to determine ways to effectively mitigate fouling in organic fluids: hydrocarbons and derived fluids. The fouling research focuses on the development of methodology for determining threshold conditions for fouling. Initially, fluid containing chemicals known to produce foulant is analyzed; subsequently, fouling of industrial fluids is investigated. The fouling model developed for determining the effects of physical parameters is the subject of this report. The fouling model is developed on the premise that the chemical reaction for generation of precursor can take place in the bulk fluid, in the thermal-boundary layer, or at the fluid/wall interface, depending upon the interactive effects of fluid dynamics, heat and mass transfer, and the controlling chemical reaction. In the analysis, the experimental data are examined for fouling deposition of polyperoxide produced by autoxidation of indene in kerosene. The effects of fluid and wall temperatures for two flow geometries are analyzed. The results show that the relative effects of physical parameters on the fouling rate differ for the three fouling mechanisms. Therefore, to apply the closed-flow-loop data to industrial conditions, the controlling mechanism must be identified.

  16. A Lower Hybrid Fluid Model and Asymptotic Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaogang

    2016-10-01

    Hall MHD is for ion dynamics with a zero mass electron fluid. EMHD is for electron dynamics with fixed (infinity mass) ions. Also, other approximations such as electron incompressibility and low frequency appraisal (by ignoring the displacement current) have limited the application of EMHD. We then introduce a ``Lower Hybrid Fluid'' model by keeping the higher order mass ratio terms in the two-fluid model to investigate the problems in a hybrid scale range between the electron skin depth and the ion inertial length.

  17. Small data global existence for a fluid-structure model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatova, Mihaela; Kukavica, Igor; Lasiecka, Irena; Tuffaha, Amjad

    2017-02-01

    We address the system of partial differential equations modeling motion of an elastic body inside an incompressible fluid. The fluid is modeled by the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations while the structure is represented by the damped wave equation with interior damping. The additional boundary stabilization γ, considered in our previous paper, is no longer necessary. We prove the global existence and exponential decay of solutions for small initial data in a suitable Sobolev space.

  18. Attenuation of numerical artefacts in the modelling of fluid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evrard, Fabien; van Wachem, Berend G. M.; Denner, Fabian

    2015-11-01

    Numerical artefacts in the modelling of fluid interfaces, such as parasitic currents or spurious capillary waves, present a considerable problem in two-phase flow modelling. Parasitic currents result from an imperfect evaluation of the interface curvature and can severely affect the flow, whereas spatially underresolved (spurious) capillary waves impose strict limits on the time-step and, hence, dictate the required computational resources for surface-tension-dominated flows. By applying an additional shear stress term at the fluid interface, thereby dissipating the surface energy associated with small wavelengths, we have been able to considerably reduce the adverse impact of parasitic currents and mitigate the time-step limit imposed by capillary waves. However, a careful choice of the applied interface viscosity is crucial, since an excess of additional dissipation compromises the accuracy of the solution. We present the derivation of the additional interfacial shear stress term, explain the underlying physical mechanism and discuss the impact on parasitic currents and interface instabilities based on a variety of numerical experiments. We acknowledge financial support from the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) through Grant No. EP/M021556/1 and from PETROBRAS.

  19. Implementation of a model of bodily fluids regulation.

    PubMed

    Fontecave-Jallon, Julie; Thomas, S Randall

    2015-09-01

    The classic model of blood pressure regulation by Guyton et al. (Annu Rev Physiol 34:13-46, 1972a; Ann Biomed Eng 1:254-281, 1972b) set a new standard for quantitative exploration of physiological function and led to important new insights, some of which still remain the focus of debate, such as whether the kidney plays the primary role in the genesis of hypertension (Montani et al. in Exp Physiol 24:41-54, 2009a; Exp Physiol 94:382-388, 2009b; Osborn et al. in Exp Physiol 94:389-396, 2009a; Exp Physiol 94:388-389, 2009b). Key to the success of this model was the fact that the authors made the computer code (in FORTRAN) freely available and eventually provided a convivial user interface for exploration of model behavior on early microcomputers (Montani et al. in Int J Bio-med Comput 24:41-54, 1989). Ikeda et al. (Ann Biomed Eng 7:135-166, 1979) developed an offshoot of the Guyton model targeting especially the regulation of body fluids and acid-base balance; their model provides extended renal and respiratory functions and would be a good basis for further extensions. In the interest of providing a simple, useable version of Ikeda et al.'s model and to facilitate further such extensions, we present a practical implementation of the model of Ikeda et al. (Ann Biomed Eng 7:135-166, 1979), using the ODE solver Berkeley Madonna.

  20. Magnetorheological properties of sodium sulphonate capped electrolytic iron based MR fluid: a comparison with CI based MR fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinod, Sithara; John, Reji; Philip, John

    2017-02-01

    Magnetorheological fluids have numerous engineering applications due to their interesting field assisted rheological behavior. Most commonly used dispersed phase in MR fluids is carbonyl iron (CI). The relatively high cost of CI warrants the need to develop cheaper alternatives to CI, without compromising rheological properties. With the above goal in mind, we have synthesized sodium sulphonate capped electrolytic iron based MR fluid and studied their magnetorheological properties. The results are compared with that of CI based MR fluid. EI and CI particles of average particle size of ∼10 μm with fumed silica particles additives are used in the present study. The dynamic yield stress for EI and CI based MR fluid were found to vary with field strength with an exponent of roughly 1.2 and 1.24, respectively. The slightly lower static and dynamic yield stress values of EI based MR fluid is attributed to the lower magnetization and polydispersity values. The dynamic yield stress showed a decrease of 18.73% and 61.8% for field strengths of 177 mT and 531 mT, respectively as the temperature was increased from 293 to 323 K. The optorheological studies showed a peak in the loss moduli, close to the crossover point of the storage and loss moduli, due to freely moving large sized aggregates along the shear direction that are dislodged from the rheometer plates at higher strains. Our results suggests that EI based MR fluids have magnetorheological behavior comparable to that of CI based MR fluids. As EI is much cheaper than CI, our findings will have important commercial implications in producing cost effective EI based MR fluids.

  1. Using record player demonstrations as analog models for geophysical fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grannan, A. M.; Cheng, J. S.; Hawkins, E. K.; Ribeiro, A.; Aurnou, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    All celestial bodies, including stars, planets, satellites, and asteroids, rotate. The influence of rotation on the fluid layers in these bodies plays an important and diverse role, affecting many processes including oceanic and atmospheric circulation at the surface and magnetic field generation occurring in the interior. To better understand these large-scale processes, record players and containers of water are used as analog models to demonstrate the basic interplay between rotation and fluid motions. To contrast between rotating and non-rotating fluid motions, coffee creamer and food coloring are used as fluid tracers to provide a hands-on method of understanding the influence of rotation on the shapes of the planets, weather patterns, and the alignment of magnetic fields with rotational axes. Such simple demonstrations have been successfully employed for children in public outreach events and for adults in graduate level fluid dynamics courses.

  2. Validation of an All-Pressure Fluid Drop Model: Heptane Fluid Drops in Nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harstad, K.; Bellan, J.; Bulzan, Daniel L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Despite the fact that supercritical fluids occur both in nature and in industrial situations, the fundamentals of their behavior is poorly understood because supercritical fluids combine the characteristics of both liquids and gases, and therefore their behavior is not intuitive. There are several specific reasons for the lack of understanding: First, data from (mostly optical) measurements can be very misleading because regions of high density thus observed are frequently identified with liquids. A common misconception is that if in an experiment one can optically identify "drops" and "ligaments", the observed fluid must be in a liquid state. This inference is incorrect because in fact optical measurements detect any large change (i.e. gradients) in density. Thus, the density ratio may be well below Omicron(10(exp 3)) that characterizes its liquid/gas value, but the measurement will still identify a change in the index of refraction providing that the change is sudden (steep gradients). As shown by simulations of supercritical fluids, under certain conditions the density gradients may remain large during the supercritical binary fluids mixing, thus making them optically identifiable. Therefore, there is no inconsistency between the optical observation of high density regions and the fluids being in a supercritical state. A second misconception is that because a fluid has a liquid-like density, it is appropriate to model it as a liquid. However, such fluids may have liquid-like densities while their transport properties differ from those of a liquid. Considering that the critical pressure of most fuel hydrocarbons used in Diesel and gas turbine engines is in the range of 1.5 - 3 MPa, and the fact that the maximum pressure attained in these engines is about 6 Mps, it is clear that the fuel in the combustion chamber will experience both subcritical and supercritical conditions. Studies of drop behavior over a wide range of pressures were performed in the past

  3. An efficient fully atomistic potential model for dense fluid methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chuntao; Ouyang, Jie; Zhuang, Xin; Wang, Lihua; Li, Wuming

    2016-08-01

    A fully atomistic model aimed to obtain a general purpose model for the dense fluid methane is presented. The new optimized potential for liquid simulation (OPLS) model is a rigid five site model which consists of five fixed point charges and five Lennard-Jones centers. The parameters in the potential model are determined by a fit of the experimental data of dense fluid methane using molecular dynamics simulation. The radial distribution function and the diffusion coefficient are successfully calculated for dense fluid methane at various state points. The simulated results are in good agreement with the available experimental data shown in literature. Moreover, the distribution of mean number hydrogen bonds and the distribution of pair-energy are analyzed, which are obtained from the new model and other five reference potential models. Furthermore, the space-time correlation functions for dense fluid methane are also discussed. All the numerical results demonstrate that the new OPLS model could be well utilized to investigate the dense fluid methane.

  4. Influence of resuscitation fluids, fresh frozen plasma and antifibrinolytics on fibrinolysis in a thrombelastography-based, in-vitro, whole-blood model.

    PubMed

    Kostousov, Vadim; Wang, Yao-Wei W; Cotton, Bryan A; Wade, Charles E; Holcomb, John B; Matijevic, Nena

    2013-07-01

    Hyperfibrinolysis has been identified as a mechanism of trauma coagulopathy associated with poor outcome. The aim of the study was to create a trauma coagulopathy model (TCM) with a hyperfibrinolysis thrombelastography (TEG) pattern similar to injured patients and test the effects of different resuscitation fluids and antifibrinolytics on fibrinolysis. TCM was established from whole blood by either 15% dilution with isotonic saline, lactated Ringer's, Plasma-Lyte, 5% albumin, Voluven, Hextend, 6% dextran in isotonic saline or 30% dilution with lactated Ringer's plus Voluven and supplementation with tissue factor and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). These combinations resulted in a TCM that could then be 'treated' with tranexamic acid (TXA) or 6-aminocaproic acid (ACA). Clot formation was evaluated by TEG. Whole-blood dilution by 15% with crystalloids and albumin in the presence of tissue factor plus tPA resulted in an abnormal TEG pattern and increased fibrinolysis, as did dilution with synthetic colloids. TXA 1 μg/ml or ACA 10 μg/ml were sufficient to suppress fibrinolysis when TCM was diluted 15% with lactated Ringer's, but 3 μg/ml of TXA or 30 μg/ml of ACA were needed for fibrinolysis inhibition induced by simultaneous euvolemic dilution with lactated Ringer's plus Voluven by 30%. A total of 15% dilution of whole blood in the presence of tissue factor plus tPA results in a hyperfibrinolysis TEG pattern similar to that observed in severely injured patients. Synthetic colloids worsen TEG variables with a further increase of fibrinolysis. Low concentrations of TXA or ACA reversed hyperfibrinolysis, but the efficient concentrations were dependent on the degree of fibrinolysis and whole-blood dilution.

  5. Modeling the orientational and positional behavior of polyhedral nanoparticles at fluid-fluid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Unmukt

    Using Molecular Dynamics simulations to explicitly model fluid molecules, we study the effect of solvent wetting on the behavior of polyhedral nanoparticles at a fluid-fluid interface. First, we quantify the positional and orientational free energy characteristics of an isolated nanoparticle. Our results suggest that the thickness of the interface can introduce non-trivial effects on the preferential particle orientations. A continuum model is proposed to account for the finite interfacial mixing region, and a qualitative comparison between the two approaches is presented. We examine the effect on the free energy of the system of changes in the particle's solvation preference towards one fluid, and the degree of miscibility between the two fluids. By tuning these interaction parameters, we can potentially access and favor different orientations for the particle shapes examined. Further, we extend the insights gained from single particle analyses to the attachment of two particles. Our results reveal conditions that can drive the assembly of Cuboctahedra into either 2D Puckered Honeycomb lattices or linear rod-like structures.

  6. Modeling the acid-base properties of glutathione in different ionic media, with particular reference to natural waters and biological fluids.

    PubMed

    Cigala, Rosalia Maria; Crea, Francesco; De Stefano, Concetta; Lando, Gabriele; Milea, Demetrio; Sammartano, Silvio

    2012-08-01

    The acid-base properties of γ-L-glutamyl-L-cysteinyl-glycine (glutathione, GSH) were determined by potentiometry (ISE-H(+), glass electrode) in pure NaI((aq)) and in NaCl((aq))/MgCl(2(aq)), and NaCl((aq))/CaCl(2(aq)) mixtures, at T = 298.15 K and different ionic strengths (up to I(c) ~ 5.0 mol L(-1)). In addition, the activity coefficients of glutathione were also determined by the distribution method at the same temperature in various ionic media (LiCl((aq)), NaCl((aq)), KCl((aq)), CsCl((aq)), MgCl(2(aq)), CaCl(2(aq)), NaI((aq))). The results obtained were also used to calculate the Specific ion Interaction Theory (SIT) and Pitzer coefficients for the dependence on medium and ionic strength of glutathione species, as well as the formation constants of weak Mg(j)H( i )(GSH)((i+2j-3)) and Ca(j)H(i)(GSH)((i+2j-3)) complexes. Direct calorimetric titrations were also carried out in pure NaCl((aq)) and in NaCl((aq))/CaCl(2(aq)) mixtures at different ionic strengths (0.25 ≤ I (c )/mol L(-1) ≤ 5.0) in order to determine the enthalpy changes for the protonation and complex formation equilibria in these media at T = 298.15 K. Results obtained are useful for the definition of glutathione speciation in any aqueous media containing the main cations of natural waters and biological fluids, such as Na(+), K(+), Mg(2+), and Ca(2+). Finally, this kind of systematic studies, where a series of ionic media (e.g., all alkali metal chlorides) is taken into account in the determination of various thermodynamic parameters, is useful for the definition of some trends in the thermodynamic behavior of glutathione in aqueous solution.

  7. Computational fluid dynamics modeling for emergency preparedness & response

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.L.; Albritton, J.R.; Ermak, D.L.; Kim, J.

    1995-07-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has played an increasing role in the improvement of atmospheric dispersion modeling. This is because many dispersion models are now driven by meteorological fields generated from CFD models or, in numerical weather prediction`s terminology, prognostic models. Whereas most dispersion models typically involve one or a few scalar, uncoupled equations, the prognostic equations are a set of highly-coupled, nonlinear equations whose solution requires a significant level of computational power. Until recently, such computer power could be found only in CRAY-class supercomputers. Recent advances in computer hardware and software have enabled modestly-priced, high performance, workstations to exhibit the equivalent computation power of some mainframes. Thus desktop-class machines that were limited to performing dispersion calculations driven by diagnostic wind fields may now be used to calculate complex flows using prognostic CFD models. The Atmospheric Release and Advisory Capability (ARAC) program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has, for the past several years, taken advantage of the improvements in hardware technology to develop a national emergency response capability based on executing diagnostic models on workstations. Diagnostic models that provide wind fields are, in general, simple to implement, robust and require minimal time for execution. Such models have been the cornerstones of the ARAC operational system for the past ten years. Kamada (1992) provides a review of diagnostic models and their applications to dispersion problems. However, because these models typically contain little physics beyond mass-conservation, their performance is extremely sensitive to the quantity and quality of input meteorological data and, in spite of their utility, can be applied with confidence to only modestly complex flows.

  8. A computational fluid dynamics model of viscous coupling of hairs.

    PubMed

    Lewin, Gregory C; Hallam, John

    2010-06-01

    Arrays of arthropod filiform hairs form highly sensitive mechanoreceptor systems capable of detecting minute air disturbances, and it is unclear to what extent individual hairs interact with one another within sensor arrays. We present a computational fluid dynamics model for one or more hairs, coupled to a rigid-body dynamics model, for simulating both biological (e.g., a cricket cercal hair) and artificial MEMS-based systems. The model is used to investigate hair-hair interaction between pairs of hairs and quantify the extent of so-called viscous coupling. The results show that the extent to which hairs are coupled depends on the mounting properties of the hairs and the frequency at which they are driven. In particular, it is shown that for equal length hairs, viscous coupling is suppressed when they are driven near the natural frequency of the undamped system and the damping coefficient at the base is small. Further, for certain configurations, the motion of a hair can be enhanced by the presence of nearby hairs. The usefulness of the model in designing artificial systems is discussed.

  9. Hybrid fluid/kinetic model for parallel heat conduction

    SciTech Connect

    Callen, J.D.; Hegna, C.C.; Held, E.D.

    1998-12-31

    It is argued that in order to use fluid-like equations to model low frequency ({omega} < {nu}) phenomena such as neoclassical tearing modes in low collisionality ({nu} < {omega}{sub b}) tokamak plasmas, a Chapman-Enskog-like approach is most appropriate for developing an equation for the kinetic distortion (F) of the distribution function whose velocity-space moments lead to the needed fluid moment closure relations. Further, parallel heat conduction in a long collision mean free path regime can be described through a combination of a reduced phase space Chapman-Enskog-like approach for the kinetics and a multiple-time-scale analysis for the fluid and kinetic equations.

  10. Numerical modeling of fluid migration in subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Marius J.; Quinteros, Javier; Sobolev, Stephan V.

    2015-04-01

    It is well known that fluids play a crucial role in subduction evolution. For example, excess mechanical weakening along tectonic interfaces, due to excess fluid pressure, may enable oceanic subduction. Hence, the fluid content seems to be a critical parameter for subduction initiation. Studies have also shown a correlation between the location of slab dehydration and intermediate seismic activity. Furthermore, expelled fluids from the subduction slab affect the melting temperature, consequently, contributing to partial melting in the wedge above the downgoing plate, and resulting in chemical changes in earth interior and extensive volcanism. In summary, fluids have a great impact on tectonic processes and therefore should be incorporated into geodynamic numerical models. Here we use existing approaches to couple and solve fluid flow equations in the SLIM-3D thermo-mechanical code. SLIM-3D is a three-dimensional thermo-mechanical code capable of simulating lithospheric deformation with elasto-visco-plastic rheology. It incorporates an arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian formulation, free surface, and changes in density and viscosity, due to endothermic and exothermic phase transitions. It has been successfully applied to model geodynamic processes at different tectonic settings, including subduction zones. However, although SLIM-3D already includes many features, fluid migration has not been incorporated into the model yet. To this end, we coupled solid and fluid flow assuming that fluids flow through a porous and deformable solid. Thereby, we introduce a two-phase flow into the model, in which the Stokes flow is coupled with the Darcy law for fluid flow. This system of equations becomes, however, nonlinear, because the rheology and permeability are depended on the porosity (fluid fraction of the matrix). Ultimately, the evolution of porosity is governed by the compaction pressure and the advection of the porous solid. We show the details of our implementation of the

  11. Viscous quark-gluon plasma model through fluid QCD approach

    SciTech Connect

    Djun, T. P.; Soegijono, B.; Mart, T.; Handoko, L. T. E-mail: Laksana.tri.handoko@lipi.go.id

    2014-09-25

    A Lagrangian density for viscous quark-gluon plasma has been constructed within the fluid-like QCD framework. Gauge symmetry is preserved for all terms inside the Lagrangian, except for the viscous term. The transition mechanism from point particle field to fluid field, and vice versa, are discussed. The energy momentum tensor that is relevant to the gluonic plasma having the nature of fluid bulk of gluon sea is derived within the model. By imposing conservation law in the energy momentum tensor, shear viscosity appears as extractable from the equation.

  12. Comments on Frequency Swept Rotating Input Perturbation Techniques and Identification of the Fluid Force Models in Rotor/bearing/seal Systems and Fluid Handling Machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muszynska, Agnes; Bently, Donald E.

    1991-01-01

    Perturbation techniques used for identification of rotating system dynamic characteristics are described. A comparison between two periodic frequency-swept perturbation methods applied in identification of fluid forces of rotating machines is presented. The description of the fluid force model identified by inputting circular periodic frequency-swept force is given. This model is based on the existence and strength of the circumferential flow, most often generated by the shaft rotation. The application of the fluid force model in rotor dynamic analysis is presented. It is shown that the rotor stability is an entire rotating system property. Some areas for further research are discussed.

  13. Regional Multi-Fluid-Based Geophysical Excitation of Polar Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nastula, Jolanta; Salstein, David A.; Gross, Richard

    2011-01-01

    By analyzing geophysical fluids geographic distribution, we can isolate the regional provenance for some of the important signals in polar motion. An understanding of such will enable us to determine whether certain climate signals can have an impact on polar motion. Here we have compared regional patterns of three surficial fluids: the atmosphere, ocean and land-based hydrosphere. The oceanic excitation function of polar motion was estimated with the ECCO/JPL data - assimilating model, and the atmospheric excitation function was determined from NCEP/NCAR reanalyses. The excitation function due to land hydrology was estimated from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) data by an indirect approach that determines water thickness. Our attention focuses on the regional distribution of atmospheric and oceanic excitation of the annual and Chandler wobbles during 1993-2010, and on hydrologic excitation of these wobbles during 2002.9-2011.5. It is found that the regions of maximum fractional covariance (those exceeding a value of 3 .10 -3) for the annual band are over south Asia, southeast Asia and south central Indian ocean, for hydrology, atmosphere and ocean respectively; and for the Chandler period, areas over North America, Asia, and South America; and scattered across the southern oceans for the atmosphere and oceans respectively

  14. A mathematical model of blood, cerebrospinal fluid and brain dynamics.

    PubMed

    Linninger, Andreas A; Xenos, Michalis; Sweetman, Brian; Ponkshe, Sukruti; Guo, Xiaodong; Penn, Richard

    2009-12-01

    Using first principles of fluid and solid mechanics a comprehensive model of human intracranial dynamics is proposed. Blood, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and brain parenchyma as well as the spinal canal are included. The compartmental model predicts intracranial pressure gradients, blood and CSF flows and displacements in normal and pathological conditions like communicating hydrocephalus. The system of differential equations of first principles conservation balances is discretized and solved numerically. Fluid-solid interactions of the brain parenchyma with cerebral blood and CSF are calculated. The model provides the transitions from normal dynamics to the diseased state during the onset of communicating hydrocephalus. Predicted results were compared with physiological data from Cine phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging to verify the dynamic model. Bolus injections into the CSF are simulated in the model and found to agree with clinical measurements.

  15. A computational model for doctoring fluid films in gravure printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariprasad, Daniel S.; Grau, Gerd; Schunk, P. Randall; Tjiptowidjojo, Kristianto

    2016-04-01

    The wiping, or doctoring, process in gravure printing presents a fundamental barrier to resolving the micron-sized features desired in printed electronics applications. This barrier starts with the residual fluid film left behind after wiping, and its importance grows as feature sizes are reduced, especially as the feature size approaches the thickness of the residual fluid film. In this work, various mechanical complexities are considered in a computational model developed to predict the residual fluid film thickness. Lubrication models alone are inadequate, and deformation of the doctor blade body together with elastohydrodynamic lubrication must be considered to make the model predictive of experimental trends. Moreover, model results demonstrate that the particular form of the wetted region of the blade has a significant impact on the model's ability to reproduce experimental measurements.

  16. Combined thermodynamic-geochemical modeling in metamorphic geology: Boron as tracer of fluid-rock interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konrad-Schmolke, Matthias; Halama, Ralf

    2014-11-01

    Quantitative geochemical modeling is today applied in a variety of geological environments from the petrogenesis of igneous rocks to radioactive waste disposal. In addition, the development of thermodynamic databases and computer programs to calculate equilibrium phase diagrams has greatly advanced our ability to model geodynamic processes. Combined with experimental data on elemental partitioning and isotopic fractionation, thermodynamic forward modeling unfolds enormous capacities that are far from exhausted. In metamorphic petrology the combination of thermodynamic and trace element forward modeling can be used to study and to quantify processes at spatial scales from μm to km. The thermodynamic forward models utilize Gibbs energy minimization to quantify mineralogical changes along a reaction path of a chemically open fluid/rock system. These results are combined with mass balanced trace element calculations to determine the trace element distribution between rock and melt/fluid during the metamorphic evolution. Thus, effects of mineral reactions, fluid-rock interaction and element transport in metamorphic rocks on the trace element and isotopic composition of minerals, rocks and percolating fluids or melts can be predicted. Here we illustrate the capacities of combined thermodynamic-geochemical modeling based on two examples relevant to mass transfer during metamorphism. The first example focuses on fluid-rock interaction in and around a blueschist-facies shear zone in felsic gneisses, where fluid-induced mineral reactions and their effects on boron (B) concentrations and isotopic compositions in white mica are modeled. In the second example, fluid release from a subducted slab, the associated transport of B as well as variations in B concentrations and isotopic compositions in liberated fluids and residual rocks are modeled. We compare the modeled results of both examples to geochemical data of natural minerals and rocks and demonstrate that the combination

  17. Numerical Modeling of Conjugate Heat Transfer in Fluid Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, Alok

    2004-01-01

    Fluid network modeling with conjugate heat transfer has many applications in Aerospace engineering. In modeling unsteady flow with heat transfer, it is important to know the variation of wall temperature in time and space to calculate heat transfer between solid to fluid. Since wall temperature is a function of flow, a coupled analysis of temperature of solid and fluid is necessary. In cryogenic applications, modeling of conjugate heat transfer is of great importance to correctly predict boil-off rate in propellant tanks and chill down of transfer lines. In TFAWS 2003, the present author delivered a paper to describe a general-purpose computer program, GFSSP (Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program). GFSSP calculates flow distribution in complex flow circuit for compressible/incompressible, with or without heat transfer or phase change in all real fluids or mixtures. The flow circuit constitutes of fluid nodes and branches. The mass, energy and specie conservation equations are solved at the nodes where as momentum conservation equations are solved at the branches. The proposed paper describes the extension of GFSSP to model conjugate heat transfer. The network also includes solid nodes and conductors in addition to fluid nodes and branches. The energy conservation equations for solid nodes solves to determine the temperatures of the solid nodes simultaneously with all conservation equations governing fluid flow. The numerical scheme accounts for conduction, convection and radiation heat transfer. The paper will also describe the applications of the code to predict chill down of cryogenic transfer line and boil-off rate of cryogenic propellant storage tank.

  18. A reduced order model for fluid-structure interaction of thin shell structures conveying fluid for physiological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Gary Han; Modarres-Sadeghi, Yahya

    2015-11-01

    In this work, a reduced-order model (ROM) is constructed to study fluid-structure interaction of thin shell structures conveying fluid. The method of snapshot Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) is used to construct the reduced-order bases based on a series of CFD results, which then are improved using a QR-factorization technique to satisfy the various boundary conditions in physiological flow problems. In the process, two sets of POD modes are extracted: those due to the shell wall's motion and those due to the pulsatile flow. The Modal Assurance Criterion (MAC) technique is used for selecting the final POD modes used in the reduced-order model. The structure model is solved by Galerkin's method and the FSI coupling is done by adapting a coupled momentum method. The results show that the dynamic behavior of thin shells conveying fluid is closely related to the distribution of the shell's Gaussian curvature, the existence of imperfections and the physiological flow conditions. This method can effectively construct a computationally efficient FSI model, which allows us to examine a wide range of parameters which exist in real-life physiological problems.

  19. International journal of computational fluid dynamics real-time prediction of unsteady flow based on POD reduced-order model and particle filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Ryota; Misaka, Takashi; Obayashi, Shigeru

    2016-04-01

    An integrated method consisting of a proper orthogonal decomposition (POD)-based reduced-order model (ROM) and a particle filter (PF) is proposed for real-time prediction of an unsteady flow field. The proposed method is validated using identical twin experiments of an unsteady flow field around a circular cylinder for Reynolds numbers of 100 and 1000. In this study, a PF is employed (ROM-PF) to modify the temporal coefficient of the ROM based on observation data because the prediction capability of the ROM alone is limited due to the stability issue. The proposed method reproduces the unsteady flow field several orders faster than a reference numerical simulation based on Navier-Stokes equations. Furthermore, the effects of parameters, related to observation and simulation, on the prediction accuracy are studied. Most of the energy modes of the unsteady flow field are captured, and it is possible to stably predict the long-term evolution with ROM-PF.

  20. A New Model for Temperature Jump at a Fluid-Solid Interface

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Jian-Jun; Teo, Ji Bin Melvin; Chan, Weng Kong

    2016-01-01

    The problem presented involves the development of a new analytical model for the general fluid-solid temperature jump. To the best of our knowledge, there are no analytical models that provide the accurate predictions of the temperature jump for both gas and liquid systems. In this paper, a unified model for the fluid-solid temperature jump has been developed based on our adsorption model of the interfacial interactions. Results obtained from this model are validated with available results from the literature. PMID:27764230

  1. Soy Protein Isolate As Fluid Loss Additive in Bentonite-Water-Based Drilling Fluids.

    PubMed

    Li, Mei-Chun; Wu, Qinglin; Song, Kunlin; Lee, Sunyoung; Jin, Chunde; Ren, Suxia; Lei, Tingzhou

    2015-11-11

    Wellbore instability and formation collapse caused by lost circulation are vital issues during well excavation in the oil industry. This study reports the novel utilization of soy protein isolate (SPI) as fluid loss additive in bentonite-water based drilling fluids (BT-WDFs) and describes how its particle size and concentration influence on the filtration property of SPI/BT-WDFs. It was found that high pressure homogenization (HPH)-treated SPI had superior filtration property over that of native SPI due to the improved ability for the plugging pore throat. HPH treatment also caused a significant change in the surface characteristic of SPI, leading to a considerable surface interaction with BT in aqueous solution. The concentration of SPI had a significant impact on the dispersion state of SPI/BT mixtures in aquesous solution. At low SPI concentrations, strong aggregations were created, resulting in the formation of thick, loose, high-porosity and high-permeability filter cakes and high fluid loss. At high SPI concentrations, intercatlated/exfoliated structures were generated, resulting in the formation of thin, compact, low-porosity and low-permeability filter cakes and low fluid loss. The SPI/BT-WDFs exhibited superior filtration property than pure BT-WDFs at the same solid concentraion, demonstrating the potential utilization of SPI as an effective, renewable, and biodegradable fluid loss reducer in well excavation applications.

  2. A Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program to Model Flow Distribution in Fluid Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, Alok; Bailey, John W.; Schallhorn, Paul; Steadman, Todd

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes a general purpose computer program for analyzing steady state and transient flow in a complex network. The program is capable of modeling phase changes, compressibility, mixture thermodynamics and external body forces such as gravity and centrifugal. The program's preprocessor allows the user to interactively develop a fluid network simulation consisting of nodes and branches. Mass, energy and specie conservation equations are solved at the nodes; the momentum conservation equations are solved in the branches. The program contains subroutines for computing "real fluid" thermodynamic and thermophysical properties for 33 fluids. The fluids are: helium, methane, neon, nitrogen, carbon monoxide, oxygen, argon, carbon dioxide, fluorine, hydrogen, parahydrogen, water, kerosene (RP-1), isobutane, butane, deuterium, ethane, ethylene, hydrogen sulfide, krypton, propane, xenon, R-11, R-12, R-22, R-32, R-123, R-124, R-125, R-134A, R-152A, nitrogen trifluoride and ammonia. The program also provides the options of using any incompressible fluid with constant density and viscosity or ideal gas. Seventeen different resistance/source options are provided for modeling momentum sources or sinks in the branches. These options include: pipe flow, flow through a restriction, non-circular duct, pipe flow with entrance and/or exit losses, thin sharp orifice, thick orifice, square edge reduction, square edge expansion, rotating annular duct, rotating radial duct, labyrinth seal, parallel plates, common fittings and valves, pump characteristics, pump power, valve with a given loss coefficient, and a Joule-Thompson device. The system of equations describing the fluid network is solved by a hybrid numerical method that is a combination of the Newton-Raphson and successive substitution methods. This paper also illustrates the application and verification of the code by comparison with Hardy Cross method for steady state flow and analytical solution for unsteady flow.

  3. Model for a pump that drives circulation of pleural fluid.

    PubMed

    Butler, J P; Huang, J; Loring, S H; Lai-Fook, S J; Wang, P M; Wilson, T A

    1995-01-01

    Physical and mathematical models were used to study a mechanism that could maintain the layer of pleural fluid that covers the surface of the lung. The pleural space was modeled as a thin layer of viscous fluid lying between a membrane carrying tension (T), representing the lung, and a rigid wall, representing the chest wall. Flow of the fluid was driven by sliding between the membrane and wall. The physical model consisted of a cylindrical balloon with strings stretched along its surface. When the balloon was inflated inside a vertical circular cylinder containing a viscous fluid, the strings formed narrow vertical channels between broad regions in which the balloon pressed against the outer cylinder. The channels simulated the pleural space in the regions of lobar margins. Oscillatory rotation of the outer cylinder maintained a lubricating layer of fluid between the balloon and the cylinder. The thickness of the fluid layer (h), measured by fluorescence videomicroscopy, was larger for larger fluid viscosity (mu), larger sliding velocity (U), and smaller pressure difference (delta P) between the layer and the channel. A mathematical model of the flow in a horizontal section was analyzed, and numerical solutions were obtained for parameter values of mu, U, delta P, and T that matched those of the physical model. The computed results agreed reasonably well with the experimental results. Scaling laws yield the prediction that h is approximately (T/delta P)(microU/T)2/3. For physiological values of the parameters, the predicted value of h is approximately 10(-3) cm, in good agreement with the observed thickness of the pleural space.

  4. Fully Coupled Well Models for Fluid Injection and Production

    SciTech Connect

    White, Mark D.; Bacon, Diana H.; White, Signe K.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2013-08-05

    Wells are the primary engineered component of geologic sequestration systems with deep subsurface reservoirs. Wells provide a conduit for injecting greenhouse gases and producing reservoirs fluids, such as brines, natural gas, and crude oil, depending on the target reservoir. Well trajectories, well pressures, and fluid flow rates are parameters over which well engineers and operators have control during the geologic sequestration process. Current drilling practices provided well engineers flexibility in designing well trajectories and controlling screened intervals. Injection pressures and fluids can be used to purposely fracture the reservoir formation or to purposely prevent fracturing. Numerical simulation of geologic sequestration processes involves the solution of multifluid transport equations within heterogeneous geologic media. These equations that mathematically describe the flow of fluid through the reservoir formation are nonlinear in form, requiring linearization techniques to resolve. In actual geologic settings fluid exchange between a well and reservoir is a function of local pressure gradients, fluid saturations, and formation characteristics. In numerical simulators fluid exchange between a well and reservoir can be specified using a spectrum of approaches that vary from totally ignoring the reservoir conditions to fully considering reservoir conditions and well processes. Well models are a numerical simulation approach that account for local conditions and gradients in the exchange of fluids between the well and reservoir. As with the mathematical equations that describe fluid flow in the reservoir, variation in fluid properties with temperature and pressure yield nonlinearities in the mathematical equations that describe fluid flow within the well. To numerically simulate the fluid exchange between a well and reservoir the two systems of nonlinear multifluid flow equations must be resolved. The spectrum of numerical approaches for resolving

  5. Macroscopic surface tension in a lattice Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook model of two immiscible fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, I.; Thompson, S. P.; Care, C. M.

    1998-01-01

    We present a method by which an interface generating algorithm, similar to that of earlier lattice Boltzmann models of immiscible fluids, may be extended to a two component, two-speed two-dimensional (D2), nine-link (Q9) lattice Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook fluid. For two-dimensional, microcurrent-free planar interfaces between the two immiscible fluids we derive expressions for static interfacial tensions and interfacial distributions of the two fluids. Extending our analysis to curved interfaces, we propose a scheme for incorporating the influence of interfacial microcurrents that is based upon general symmetry arguments and is correct to second order in lattice velocity. The analysis demonstrates that the interfacial microcurrents have only second-order influence upon the macroscopic behavior of the model. We find good agreement between our calculations and simulation results based on the microcurrent stream function and surface tension results from the pressure tensor or Laplace law.

  6. Macroscopic Surface Tension in a Lattice Boltzmann BGK Model of Two Immiscible Fluids.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, S. P.; Halliday, I.; Care, C. M.

    1997-08-01

    We present a method by which an interface generating algorithm, similar to that of earlier lattice Boltzmann models of immisible fluids, may be extended to a two component, two-speed D2Q9 lattice Bhatnagar Gross Krook fluid. For two-dimensional, microcurrent-free planar interfaces between the two immiscible fluids we derive expressions for static interfacial tensions and interfacial distributions of the two fluids. Extending our analysis to curved interfaces we propose a scheme for incorporating the influence of interfacial microcurrents which is based upon general symmetry arguments and is correct to second order in lattice velocity. The analysis demonstrates that the interfacial microcurrents have only second order influence upon the macroscopic behaviour of the model. We find good agreement between our calculations and simulation results based on the microcurrent stream function and surface tension results from the pressure tensor or Laplace law.

  7. Two-Fluid Models and Interfacial Area Transport in Microgravity Condition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishii, Mamoru; Sun, Xiao-Dong; Vasavada, Shilp

    2004-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to develop a two-fluid model formulation with interfacial area transport equation applicable for microgravity conditions. The new model is expected to make a leapfrog improvement by furnishing the constitutive relations for the interfacial interaction terms with the interfacial area transport equation, which can dynamically model the changes of the interfacial structures. In the first year of this three-year project supported by the U.S. NASA, Office of Biological and Physics Research, the primary focus is to design and construct a ground-based, microgravity two-phase flow simulation facility, in which two immiscible fluids with close density will be used. In predicting the two-phase flow behaviors in any two-phase flow system, the interfacial transfer terms are among the most essential factors in the modeling. These interfacial transfer terms in a two-fluid model specify the rate of phase change, momentum exchange, and energy transfer at the interface between the two phases. For the two-phase flow under the microgravity condition, the stability of the fluid particle interface and the interfacial structures are quite different from those under normal gravity condition. The flow structure may not reach an equilibrium condition and the two fluids may be loosely coupled such that the inertia terms of each fluid should be considered separately by use of the two-fluid model. Previous studies indicated that, unless phase-interaction terms are accurately modeled in the two-fluid model, the complex modeling does not necessarily warrant an accurate solution.

  8. High-water-base hydraulic fluid-irradiation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, E.C.; Meacham, S.A.

    1981-10-01

    A remote system for shearing spent nuclear fuel assemblies is being designed under the direction of the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP). The design incorporates a dual hydraulic fluid actuation system in which only one of the fluids, a high-water-base (HWBF), would be exposed to ionizing radiation and radioactive contamination. A commercially available synthetic, solution-type HWBF was selected as the reference. Single-sample irradiation experiments were conducted with three commercial fluids over a range of irradiation exposures. The physical and chemical properties of the irradiated HWBFs were analyzed and compared with unirradiated samples. In general, the results of the analyses showed increasing degradation of fluid properties with increasing irradiation dose. The results also indicated that a synthetic solution-type HWBF would perform satisfactorily in the remote shear system where irradiation doses up to 10/sup 6/ Gy (10/sup 8/ rad) are expected.

  9. Fines classification based on sensitivity to pore-fluid chemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jang, Junbong; Santamarina, J. Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The 75-μm particle size is used to discriminate between fine and coarse grains. Further analysis of fine grains is typically based on the plasticity chart. Whereas pore-fluid-chemistry-dependent soil response is a salient and distinguishing characteristic of fine grains, pore-fluid chemistry is not addressed in current classification systems. Liquid limits obtained with electrically contrasting pore fluids (deionized water, 2-M NaCl brine, and kerosene) are combined to define the soil “electrical sensitivity.” Liquid limit and electrical sensitivity can be effectively used to classify fine grains according to their fluid-soil response into no-, low-, intermediate-, or high-plasticity fine grains of low, intermediate, or high electrical sensitivity. The proposed methodology benefits from the accumulated experience with liquid limit in the field and addresses the needs of a broader range of geotechnical engineering problems.

  10. Salt tectonics and shallow subseafloor fluid convection: models of coupled fluid-heat-salt transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, A.; Ruppel, C.

    2007-01-01

    Thermohaline convection associated with salt domes has the potential to drive significant fluid flow and mass and heat transport in continental margins, but previous studies of fluid flow associated with salt structures have focused on continental settings or deep flow systems of importance to petroleum exploration. Motivated by recent geophysical and geochemical observations that suggest a convective pattern to near-seafloor pore fluid flow in the northern Gulf of Mexico (GoMex), we devise numerical models that fully couple thermal and chemical processes to quantify the effects of salt geometry and seafloor relief on fluid flow beneath the seafloor. Steady-state models that ignore halite dissolution demonstrate that seafloor relief plays an important role in the evolution of shallow geothermal convection cells and that salt at depth can contribute a thermal component to this convection. The inclusion of faults causes significant, but highly localized, increases in flow rates at seafloor discharge zones. Transient models that include halite dissolution show the evolution of flow during brine formation from early salt-driven convection to later geothermal convection, characteristics of which are controlled by the interplay of seafloor relief and salt geometry. Predicted flow rates are on the order of a few millimeters per year or less for homogeneous sediments with a permeability of 10−15 m2, comparable to compaction-driven flow rates. Sediment permeabilities likely fall below 10−15 m2 at depth in the GoMex basin, but such thermohaline convection can drive pervasive mass transport across the seafloor, affecting sediment diagenesis in shallow sediments. In more permeable settings, such flow could affect methane hydrate stability, seafloor chemosynthetic communities, and the longevity of fluid seeps.

  11. Particle hopping vs. fluid-dynamical models for traffic flow

    SciTech Connect

    Nagel, K.

    1995-12-31

    Although particle hopping models have been introduced into traffic science in the 19509, their systematic use has only started recently. Two reasons for this are, that they are advantageous on modem computers, and that recent theoretical developments allow analytical understanding of their properties and therefore more confidence for their use. In principle, particle hopping models fit between microscopic models for driving and fluiddynamical models for traffic flow. In this sense, they also help closing the conceptual gap between these two. This paper shows connections between particle hopping models and traffic flow theory. It shows that the hydrodynamical limits of certain particle hopping models correspond to the Lighthill-Whitham theory for traffic flow, and that only slightly more complex particle hopping models produce already the correct traffic jam dynamics, consistent with recent fluid-dynamical models for traffic flow. By doing so, this paper establishes that, on the macroscopic level, particle hopping models are at least as good as fluid-dynamical models. Yet, particle hopping models have at least two advantages over fluid-dynamical models: they straightforwardly allow microscopic simulations, and they include stochasticity.

  12. A two-fluid model of the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandbaek, O.; Leer, E.; Holzer, T. E.

    1992-01-01

    A method is presented for the integration of the two-fluid solar-wind equations which is applicable to a wide variety of coronal base densities and temperatures. The method involves proton heat conduction, and may be applied to coronal base conditions for which subsonic-supersonic solar wind solutions exist.

  13. Nuclear Energy -- Knowledge Base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS) Code Verification and Validation Data Standards and Requirements: Fluid Dynamics Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Greg Weirs; Hyung Lee

    2011-09-01

    V&V and UQ are the primary means to assess the accuracy and reliability of M&S and, hence, to establish confidence in M&S. Though other industries are establishing standards and requirements for the performance of V&V and UQ, at present, the nuclear industry has not established such standards or requirements. However, the nuclear industry is beginning to recognize that such standards are needed and that the resources needed to support V&V and UQ will be very significant. In fact, no single organization has sufficient resources or expertise required to organize, conduct and maintain a comprehensive V&V and UQ program. What is needed is a systematic and standardized approach to establish and provide V&V and UQ resources at a national or even international level, with a consortium of partners from government, academia and industry. Specifically, what is needed is a structured and cost-effective knowledge base that collects, evaluates and stores verification and validation data, and shows how it can be used to perform V&V and UQ, leveraging collaboration and sharing of resources to support existing engineering and licensing procedures as well as science-based V&V and UQ processes. The Nuclear Energy Knowledge base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS) is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory in conjunction with Bettis Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Argonne National Laboratory, Utah State University and others with the objective of establishing a comprehensive and web-accessible knowledge base to provide V&V and UQ resources for M&S for nuclear reactor design, analysis and licensing. The knowledge base will serve as an important resource for technical exchange and collaboration that will enable credible and reliable computational models and simulations for application to nuclear power. NE-KAMS will serve as a valuable resource for the nuclear industry, academia, the national laboratories, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and

  14. Thermal conductivity of the Lennard-Jones chain fluid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galliero, Guillaume; Boned, Christian

    2009-12-01

    Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to estimate, analyze, and correlate the thermal conductivity of a fluid composed of short Lennard-Jones chains (up to 16 segments) over a large range of thermodynamic conditions. It is shown that the dilute gas contribution to the thermal conductivity decreases when the chain length increases for a given temperature. In dense states, simulation results indicate that the residual thermal conductivity of the monomer increases strongly with density, but is weakly dependent on the temperature. Compared to the monomer value, it has been noted that the residual thermal conductivity of the chain was slightly decreasing with its length. Using these results, an empirical relation, including a contribution due to the critical enhancement, is proposed to provide an accurate estimation of the thermal conductivity of the Lennard-Jones chain fluid model (up to 16 segments) over the domain 0.8≤T∗≤6 and 0≤ρ∗≤1 . Additionally, it has been noted that all reduced thermal conductivity values of the Lennard-Jones chain fluid model merge on the same “universal” curve when plotted as a function of the excess entropy. Furthermore, it is shown that the reduced configurational thermal conductivity of the Lennard-Jones chain fluid model is approximately proportional to the reduced excess entropy for all fluid states and all chain lengths.

  15. Noncommutative cosmological model in the presence of a phantom fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira-Neto, G.; Vaz, A. R.

    2017-03-01

    We study noncommutative classical Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmological models. The constant curvature of the spatial sections can be positive (k=1), negative (k=-1) or zero (k=0). The matter is represented by a perfect fluid with negative pressure, phantom fluid, which satisfies the equation of state p =α ρ, with α < -1, where p is the pressure and ρ is the energy density. We use Schutz's formalism in order to write the perfect fluid Hamiltonian. The noncommutativity is introduced by nontrivial Poisson brackets between few variables of the models. In order to recover a description in terms of commutative variables, we introduce variables transformations that depend on a noncommutative parameter (γ). The main motivation for the introduction of the noncommutativity is trying to explain the present accelerated expansion of the universe. We obtain the dynamical equations for these models and solve them. The solutions have four constants: γ, a parameter associated with the fluid energy C, k, α and the initial conditions of the models variables. For each value of α, we obtain different equations of motion. Then, we compare the evolution of the universe in the noncommutative models with the corresponding commutative ones (γ → 0). The results show that γ is very useful for describing an accelerating universe. We also obtain estimates for the noncommutative parameter γ . Then, using those values of γ, in one of the noncommutative cosmological models with a specific value of α, we compute the amount of time those universes would take to reach the big rip.

  16. CO2-based mixtures as working fluids for geothermal turbines.

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Steven Alan; Conboy, Thomas M.; Ames, David E.

    2012-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is investigating advanced Brayton cycles using supercritical working fluids for application to a variety of heat sources, including geothermal, solar, fossil, and nuclear power. This work is centered on the supercritical CO{sub 2} (S-CO{sub 2}) power conversion cycle, which has the potential for high efficiency in the temperature range of interest for these heat sources and is very compact-a feature likely to reduce capital costs. One promising approach is the use of CO{sub 2}-based supercritical fluid mixtures. The introduction of additives to CO{sub 2} alters the equation of state and the critical point of the resultant mixture. A series of tests was carried out using Sandia's supercritical fluid compression loop that confirmed the ability of different additives to increase or lower the critical point of CO{sub 2}. Testing also demonstrated that, above the modified critical point, these mixtures can be compressed in a turbocompressor as a single-phase homogenous mixture. Comparisons of experimental data to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Reference Fluid Thermodynamic and Transport Properties (REFPROP) Standard Reference Database predictions varied depending on the fluid. Although the pressure, density, and temperature (p, {rho}, T) data for all tested fluids matched fairly well to REFPROP in most regions, the critical temperature was often inaccurate. In these cases, outside literature was found to provide further insight and to qualitatively confirm the validity of experimental findings for the present investigation.

  17. Integrating kinetic effects in fluid models for magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Hakim, A.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Germaschewski, K.

    2014-12-01

    The integration of kinetic effects in global fluid models is a grand challenge in space plasma physics, and has implication for our ability to model space weather in collisionless plasma environments such as the Earth's magnetosphere. We propose an extensible multi-fluid moment model, with focus on the physics of magnetic reconnection. This model evolves the full Maxwell equations, and simultaneously moments of the Vlasov-Maxwell equation for each species in the plasma. Effects like the Hall effect, the electron inertia, and the pressure gradient are self-consistently embedded in the resulting multi-fluid moment equations, without the need to explicitly solving a generalized Ohm's law. Two limits of the multi-fluid moment model are discussed, namely, the five-moment limit that evolves a scalar pressure for each species, and the ten-moment limit that evolves the full anisotropic, non-gyrotropic pressure tensor. Particularly, the five-moment model reduces to the widely used Hall Magnetohydrodynamics (Hall MHD) model under the assumptions of vanishing electron inertia, infinite speed of light, and quasi-neutrality. In this presentation, we first compare ten-moment and fully kinetic Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulations of a large scale Harris sheet reconnection problem, where the ten-moment equations are closed with a local linear collisionless approximation for the heat flux. The ten-moment simulation gives reasonable agreement with the PIC results, regarding the structures and magnitudes of the electron flows, the polarities and magnitudes of elements of the electron pressure tensor, and the decomposition of the generalized Ohm's law. Preliminary results of application of the multi-fluid moment model to Ganymede are also discussed.

  18. Good modelling practice in applying computational fluid dynamics for WWTP modelling.

    PubMed

    Wicklein, Edward; Batstone, Damien J; Ducoste, Joel; Laurent, Julien; Griborio, Alonso; Wicks, Jim; Saunders, Stephen; Samstag, Randal; Potier, Olivier; Nopens, Ingmar

    2016-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling in the wastewater treatment (WWT) field is continuing to grow and be used to solve increasingly complex problems. However, the future of CFD models and their value to the wastewater field are a function of their proper application and knowledge of their limits. As has been established for other types of wastewater modelling (i.e. biokinetic models), it is timely to define a good modelling practice (GMP) for wastewater CFD applications. An International Water Association (IWA) working group has been formed to investigate a variety of issues and challenges related to CFD modelling in water and WWT. This paper summarizes the recommendations for GMP of the IWA working group on CFD. The paper provides an overview of GMP and, though it is written for the wastewater application, is based on general CFD procedures. A forthcoming companion paper to provide specific details on modelling of individual wastewater components forms the next step of the working group.

  19. A fluid model for Helicobacter pylori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reigh, Shang-Yik; Lauga, Eric

    2015-11-01

    Swimming microorganisms and self-propelled nanomotors are often found in confined environments. The bacterium Helicobacter pylori survives in the acidic environment of the human stomach and is able to penetrate gel-like mucus layers and cause infections by locally changing the rheological properties of the mucus from gel-like to solution-like. In this talk we propose an analytical model for the locomotion of Helicobacter pylori as a confined spherical squirmer which generates its own confinement. We solve analytically the flow field around the swimmer, and derive the swimming speed and energetics. The role of the boundary condition in the outer wall is discussed. An extension of our model is also proposed for other biological and chemical swimmers. Newton Trust.

  20. Fluid mechanics in stented arterial model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernad, S. I.; Totorean, A.; Bosioc, A.; Crainic, N.; Hudrea, C.; Bernad, E. S.

    2015-12-01

    Local hemodynamic factors are known affect the natural history of the restenosis critically after coronary stenting of atherosclerosis. Stent-induced flows disturbance magnitude dependent directly on the strut design. Strut shape, strut thickness and the distance between consecutive struts have been associated clinically with the with post-intervention clinical outcomes. Hemodynamically favorable designs according to computational modeling can reduced in-stent restenosis after coronary stenting intervention.

  1. Thermodynamic micellization model of asphaltene precipitation from petroleum fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Victorov, A.I.; Firoozabadi, A.

    1996-06-01

    A thermodynamic micellization model is proposed for the description of asphaltene precipitation from petroleum fluids. It describes the solubilization of asphaltene polar species by resin bipolar molecules in the micelles. A simple form of the standard Gibbs free energy of micellization is used. The petroleum fluid is assumed to be a dilute solution with respect to the monomeric asphaltenes, resins, and micelles. The Peng-Robinson equation of state (PR-EOS) is applied to describe the fugacity of monomeric asphaltene in the bulk of the petroleum fluid. Intermicellar interactions as well as osmotic pressure effects are neglected. The proposed model shows promising results to describe asphaltene deposition from crude mixtures. It predicts the change in precipitation power of different alkane precipitants and the effect of pressure on asphaltene precipitation. The amount and the onset of predicted asphaltene precipitation are sensitive to the amount of resins in the crude. All these results are in line with laboratory observations and oil-field data.

  2. Preparation and electrical properties of oil-based magnetic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartoratto, P. P. C.; Neto, A. V. S.; Lima, E. C. D.; Rodrigues de Sá, A. L. C.; Morais, P. C.

    2005-05-01

    This paper describes an improvement in the preparation of magnetic fluids for electrical transformers. The samples are based on surface-coated maghemite nanoparticles dispersed in transformer insulating oil. Colloidal stability at 90°C was higher for oleate-grafted maghemite-based magnetic fluid, whereas decanoate and dodecanoate-grafted samples were very unstable. Electrical properties were evaluated for samples containing 0.80%-0.0040% maghemite volume fractions. Relative permittivity varied from 8.8 to 2.1 and the minimum value of the loss factor was 12% for the most diluted sample. The resistivity falls in the range of 0.7-2.5×1010Ωm, whereas the ac dielectric strength varied from 70to79kV. These physical characteristics reveal remarkable step forward in the properties of the magnetic fluid samples and may result in better operation of electrical transformers.

  3. A new approach for fluid dynamics simulation: The Short-lived Water Cuboid Particle model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Changjian; Li, Jiansong; Tian, Zongshun

    2016-09-01

    There are many researches to simulate the fluid which adopt the traditional particle-based approach and the grid-based approach. However, it needs massive storage in the traditional particle-based approach and it is very complicated to design the grid-based approach with the Navier-Stokes Equations or the Shallow Water Equations (SWEs) because of the difficulty of solving equations. This paper presents a new model called the Short-lived Water Cuboid Particle model. It updates the fluid properties (mass and momentum) recorded in the fixed Cartesian grids by computing the weighted sum of the water cuboid particles with a time step life. Thus it is a two-type-based approach essentially, which not only owns efficient computation and manageable memory like the grid-based approach, but also deals with the discontinuous water surface (wet/dry fronts, boundary conditions, etc.) with high accuracy as well as the particle-based approach. The proposed model has been found capable to simulate the fluid excellently for three laboratory experimental cases and for the field case study of the Malpasset dam-break event occurred in France in 1959. The obtained results show that the model is proved to be an alternative approach to simulate the fluid dynamics with a fair accuracy.

  4. Wave front distortion based fluid flow imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iffa, Emishaw; Heidrich, Wolfgang

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, a transparent flow surface reconstruction based on wave front distortion is investigated. A camera lens is used to focus the image formed by the micro-lens array to the camera imaging plane. The irradiance of the captured image is transformed to frequency spectrum and then the x and y spatial components are separated. A rigid spatial translation followed by low pass filtering yields a single frequency component of the image intensity. Index of refraction is estimated from the inverse Fourier transform of the spatial frequency spectrum of the irradiance. The proposed method is evaluated with synthetic data of a randomly generated index of refraction value and used to visualize a fuel injection volumetric data.

  5. Inhomogeneous generalizations of Bianchi type VIh models with perfect fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, S. R.; Prasad, A.

    1991-07-01

    Inhomogeneous universes admitting an Abelian G2 of isometry and filled with perfect fluid have been derived. These contain as special cases exact homogeneous universes of Bianchi type VIh. Many of these universes asymptotically tend to homogeneous Bianchi VIh universes. The models have been discussed for their physical and kinematical behaviors.

  6. Mathematical modeling of the instability of viscous fluid films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokudina, L. A.

    2016-08-01

    Nonlinear mathematical model of free surface fluid film is presents. Increment, frequency, phase velocity for thin layers of viscous liquids at low Reynolds numbers are calculated. The instability region is found. Optimal flow regimes of films of water and alcohol, corresponding to the maximum values of increment, are calculated.

  7. ASTP fluid transfer measurement experiment. [using breadboard model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogal, G. L.

    1974-01-01

    The ASTP fluid transfer measurement experiment flight system design concept was verified by the demonstration and test of a breadboard model. In addition to the breadboard effort, a conceptual design of the corresponding flight system was generated and a full scale mockup fabricated. A preliminary CEI specification for the flight system was also prepared.

  8. Historical Review of the Fluid-Percussion TBI Model

    PubMed Central

    Lyeth, Bruce G.

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major health concern worldwide. Laboratory studies utilizing animal models of TBI are essential for addressing pathological mechanisms of brain injury and development of innovative treatments. Over the past 75 years, pioneering head injury researchers have devised and tested a number of fluid percussive methods to reproduce the concussive clinical syndrome in animals. The fluid-percussion brain injury technique has evolved from early investigations that applied a generalized loading of the brain to more recent computer-controlled systems. Of the many preclinical TBI models, the fluid-percussion technique is one of the most extensively characterized and widely used models. Some of the most important advances involved the development of the Stalhammer device to produce concussion in cats and the later characterization of this device for application in rodents. The goal of this historical review is to provide readers with an appreciation for the time and effort expended by the pioneering researchers who have led to today’s state of the art fluid-percussion animal models of TBI. PMID:27994570

  9. The analysis of frequency-dependent characteristics for fluid detection: a physical model experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuang-Quan; Li, Xiang-Yang; Wang, Shang-Xu

    2012-06-01

    According to the Chapman multi-scale rock physical model, the seismic response characteristics vary for different fluid-saturated reservoirs. For class I AVO reservoirs and gas-saturation, the seismic response is a high-frequency bright spot as the amplitude energy shifts. However, it is a low-frequency shadow for the Class III AVO reservoirs saturated with hydrocarbons. In this paper, we verified the high-frequency bright spot results of Chapman for the Class I AVO response using the frequency-dependent analysis of a physical model dataset. The physical model is designed as inter-bedded thin sand and shale based on real field geology parameters. We observed two datasets using fixed offset and 2D geometry with different fluidsaturated conditions. Spectral and time-frequency analyses methods are applied to the seismic datasets to describe the response characteristics for gas-, water-, and oil-saturation. The results of physical model dataset processing and analysis indicate that reflection wave tuning and fluid-related dispersion are the main seismic response characteristic mechanisms. Additionally, the gas saturation model can be distinguished from water and oil saturation for Class I AVO utilizing the frequency-dependent abnormal characteristic. The frequency-dependent characteristic analysis of the physical model dataset verified the different spectral response characteristics corresponding to the different fluid-saturated models. Therefore, by careful analysis of real field seismic data, we can obtain the abnormal spectral characteristics induced by the fluid variation and implement fluid detection using seismic data directly.

  10. OpenFLUID: an open-source software environment for modelling fluxes in landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabre, Jean-Christophe; Rabotin, Michaël; Crevoisier, David; Libres, Aline; Dagès, Cécile; Moussa, Roger; Lagacherie, Philippe; Raclot, Damien; Voltz, Marc

    2013-04-01

    Integrative landscape functioning has become a common concept in environmental management. Landscapes are complex systems where many processes interact in time and space. In agro-ecosystems, these processes are mainly physical processes, including hydrological-processes, biological processes and human activities. Modelling such systems requires an interdisciplinary approach, coupling models coming from different disciplines, developed by different teams. In order to support collaborative works, involving many models coupled in time and space for integrative simulations, an open software modelling platform is a relevant answer. OpenFLUID is an open source software platform for modelling landscape functioning, mainly focused on spatial fluxes. It provides an advanced object-oriented architecture allowing to i) couple models developed de novo or from existing source code, and which are dynamically plugged to the platform, ii) represent landscapes as hierarchical graphs, taking into account multi-scale, spatial heterogeneities and landscape objects connectivity, iii) run and explore simulations in many ways : using the OpenFLUID software interfaces for users (command line interface, graphical user interface), or using external applications such as GNU R through the provided ROpenFLUID package. OpenFLUID is developed in C++ and relies on open source libraries only (Boost, libXML2, GLib/GTK, OGR/GDAL, …). For modelers and developers, OpenFLUID provides a dedicated environment for model development, which is based on an open source toolchain, including the Eclipse editor, the GCC compiler and the CMake build system. OpenFLUID is distributed under the GPLv3 open source license, with a special exception allowing to plug existing models licensed under any license. It is clearly in the spirit of sharing knowledge and favouring collaboration in a community of modelers. OpenFLUID has been involved in many research applications, such as modelling of hydrological network

  11. A gravitational test of wave reinforcement versus fluid density models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Jacqueline Umstead

    1990-01-01

    Spermatozoa, protozoa, and algae form macroscopic patterns somewhat analogous to thermally driven convection cells. These bioconvective patterns have attracted interest in the fluid dynamics community, but whether in all cases these waves were gravity driven was unknown. There are two conflicting theories, one gravity dependent (fluid density model), the other gravity independent (wave reinforcement theory). The primary objectives of the summer faculty fellows were to: (1) assist in sample collection (spermatozoa) and preparation for the KC-135 research airplane experiment; and (2) to collaborate on ground testing of bioconvective variables such as motility, concentration, morphology, etc., in relation to their macroscopic patterns. Results are very briefly given.

  12. A gravitational test of wave reinforcement versus fluid density models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Jacqueline Umstead

    1990-10-01

    Spermatozoa, protozoa, and algae form macroscopic patterns somewhat analogous to thermally driven convection cells. These bioconvective patterns have attracted interest in the fluid dynamics community, but whether in all cases these waves were gravity driven was unknown. There are two conflicting theories, one gravity dependent (fluid density model), the other gravity independent (wave reinforcement theory). The primary objectives of the summer faculty fellows were to: (1) assist in sample collection (spermatozoa) and preparation for the KC-135 research airplane experiment; and (2) to collaborate on ground testing of bioconvective variables such as motility, concentration, morphology, etc., in relation to their macroscopic patterns. Results are very briefly given.

  13. Magneto-optical fiber sensor based on magnetic fluid.

    PubMed

    Zu, Peng; Chan, Chi Chiu; Lew, Wen Siang; Jin, Yongxing; Zhang, Yifan; Liew, Hwi Fen; Chen, Li Han; Wong, Wei Chang; Dong, Xinyong

    2012-02-01

    A novel magnetic field fiber sensor based on magnetic fluid is proposed. The sensor is configured as a Sagnac interferometer structure with a magnetic fluid film and a section of polarization maintaining fiber inserted into the fiber loop to produce a sinusoidal interference spectrum for measurement. The output interference spectrum is shifted as the change of the applied magnetic field strength with a sensitivity of 16.7 pm/Oe and a resolution of 0.60 Oe. The output optical power is varied with the change of the applied magnetic field strength with a sensitivity of 0.3998 dB/Oe.

  14. A fluid mechanical model for current-generating-feeding jellyfish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jifeng; Dabiri, John

    2008-11-01

    Many jellyfish species, e.g. moon jellyfish Aurelia aurita, use body motion to generate fluid currents which carry their prey to the vicinity of their capture appendages. In this study, a model was developed to understand the fluid mechanics for this current-generating-feeding mode of jellyfish. The flow generated by free-swimming Aurelia aurita was measured using digital particle image velocimetry. The dynamics of prey (e.g., brine shrimp Artemia) in the flow field were described by a modified Maxey-Riley equation which takes into consideration the inertia of prey and the escape forces, which prey exert in the presence of predator. A Lagrangian analysis was used to identify the region of the flow in which prey can be captured by the jellyfish and the clearance rate was quantified. The study provides a new methodology to study biological current-generating-feeding and the transport and mixing of particles in fluid flow in general.

  15. Acoustic waves switch based on meta-fluid phononic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xue-Feng

    2012-08-01

    The acoustic waves switch based on meta-fluid phononic crystals (MEFL PCs) is theoretically investigated. The MEFL PCs consist of fluid matrix and fluid-like inclusions with extremely anisotropic-density. The dispersion relations are calculated via the plane wave expansion method, which are in good agreement with the transmitted sound pressure level spectra obtained by the finite element method. The results show that the width of absolute band gap in MEFL PCs depends sensitively upon the orientation of the extremely anisotropic-density inclusions and reaches maximum at the rotating angle of 45°, with the gap position nearly unchanged. Also, the inter-mode conversion inside anisotropic-density inclusions can be ignored due to large acoustic mismatch. The study gives a possibility to realize greater flexibility and stronger effects in tuning the acoustic band gaps, which is very significant in the enhanced control over sound waves and has potential applications in ultrasonic imaging and therapy.

  16. Hydrodynamic focusing of conducting fluids for conductivity-based biosensors.

    PubMed

    Nasir, Mansoor; Ateya, Daniel A; Burk, Diana; Golden, Joel P; Ligler, Frances S

    2010-02-15

    Hydrodynamic focusing of a conducting fluid by a non-conducting fluid to form a constricted current path between two sensing electrodes is implemented in order to enhance the sensitivity of a 4-electrode conductance-based biosensor. The sensor has a simple two-inlet T-junction design and performs four-point conductivity measurements to detect particles immobilized between the sensing electrode pair. Computational simulations conducted in conjunction with experimental flow studies using confocal microscopy show that a flat profile for the focused layer is dependent on the Reynolds number for the chosen flow parameters. The results also indicate that a flat focused layer is desirable for both increased sensitivity as well as surface-binding efficiency. Proof of concept for conductance measurements in a hydrodynamically focused conducting fluid was demonstrated with entrapped magnetic beads.

  17. Quantitative results for square gradient models of fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Ling-Ti; Vriesinga, Dan; Denniston, Colin

    2011-03-01

    Square gradient models for fluids are extensively used because they are believed to provide a good qualitative understanding of the essential physics. However, unlike elasticity theory for solids, there are few quantitative results for specific (as opposed to generic) fluids. Indeed the only numerical value of the square gradient coefficients for specific fluids have been inferred from attempts to match macroscopic properties such as surface tensions rather than from direct measurement. We employ all-atom molecular dynamics, using the TIP3P and OPLS force fields, to directly measure the coefficients of the density gradient expansion for several real fluids. For all liquids measured, including water, we find that the square gradient coefficient is negative, suggesting the need for some regularization of a model including only the square gradient, but only at wavelengths comparable to the molecular separation of molecules. The implications for liquid-gas interfaces are also examined. Remarkably, the square gradient model is found to give a reasonably accurate description of density fluctuations in the liquid state down to wavelengths close to atomic size.

  18. Fluid coupling in a discrete model of cochlear mechanics.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Stephen J; Lineton, Ben; Ni, Guangjian

    2011-09-01

    A discrete model of cochlear mechanics is introduced that includes a full, three-dimensional, description of fluid coupling. This formulation allows the fluid coupling and basilar membrane dynamics to be analyzed separately and then coupled together with a simple piece of linear algebra. The fluid coupling is initially analyzed using a wavenumber formulation and is separated into one component due to one-dimensional fluid coupling and one comprising all the other contributions. Using the theory of acoustic waves in a duct, however, these two components of the pressure can also be associated with a far field, due to the plane wave, and a near field, due to the evanescent, higher order, modes. The near field components are then seen as one of a number of sources of additional longitudinal coupling in the cochlea. The effects of non-uniformity and asymmetry in the fluid chamber areas can also be taken into account, to predict both the pressure difference between the chambers and the mean pressure. This allows the calculation, for example, of the effect of a short cochlear implant on the coupled response of the cochlea.

  19. The AFDM (advanced fluid dynamics model) program: Scope and significance

    SciTech Connect

    Bohl, W.R.; Parker, F.R. ); Wilhelm, D. . Inst. fuer Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik); Berthier, J. )

    1990-01-01

    The origins and goals of the advanced fluid dynamics model (AFDM) program are described, and the models, algorithm, and coding used in the resulting AFDM computer program are summarized. A sample fuel-steel boiling pool calculation is presented and compared with a similar SIMMER-II calculation. A subjective assessment of the AFDM developments is given, and areas where future work is possible are detailed. 10 refs.

  20. Freezable Radiator Model Correlation Improvements and Fluids Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lillibridge, Sean; Navarro, Moses

    2011-01-01

    Freezable radiators offer an attractive solution to the issue of thermal control system scalability. As thermal environments change, a freezable radiator will effectively scale the total heat rejection it is capable of as a function of the thermal environment and flow rate through the radiator. Scalable thermal control systems are a critical technology for spacecraft that will endure missions with widely varying thermal requirements. These changing requirements are a result of the space craft s surroundings and because of different thermal rejection requirements during different mission phases. However, freezing and thawing (recovering) a radiator is a process that has historically proven very difficult to predict through modeling, resulting in highly inaccurate predictions of recovery time. To attempt to improve this, tests were conducted in 2009 to determine whether the behavior of a simple stagnating radiator could be predicted or emulated in a Thermal Desktop(trademark) numerical model. A 50-50 mixture of DowFrost HD and water was used as the working fluid. Efforts to scale this model to a full scale design, as well as efforts to characterize various thermal control fluids at low temperatures are also discussed. Previous testing and modeling efforts showed that freezable radiators could be operated as intended, and be fairly, if not perfectly predicted by numerical models. This paper documents the improvements made to the numerical model, and outcomes of fluid studies that were determined necessary to go forward with further radiator testing.

  1. Fluids and Combustion Facility: Combustion Integrated Rack Modal Model Correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNelis, Mark E.; Suarez, Vicente J.; Sullivan, Timothy L.; Otten, Kim D.; Akers, James C.

    2005-01-01

    The Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF) is a modular, multi-user, two-rack facility dedicated to combustion and fluids science in the US Laboratory Destiny on the International Space Station. FCF is a permanent facility that is capable of accommodating up to ten combustion and fluid science investigations per year. FCF research in combustion and fluid science supports NASA's Exploration of Space Initiative for on-orbit fire suppression, fire safety, and space system fluids management. The Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR) is one of two racks in the FCF. The CIR major structural elements include the International Standard Payload Rack (ISPR), Experiment Assembly (optics bench and combustion chamber), Air Thermal Control Unit (ATCU), Rack Door, and Lower Structure Assembly (Input/Output Processor and Electrical Power Control Unit). The load path through the rack structure is outlined. The CIR modal survey was conducted to validate the load path predicted by the CIR finite element model (FEM). The modal survey is done by experimentally measuring the CIR frequencies and mode shapes. The CIR model was test correlated by updating the model to represent the test mode shapes. The correlated CIR model delivery is required by NASA JSC at Launch-10.5 months. The test correlated CIR flight FEM is analytically integrated into the Shuttle for a coupled loads analysis of the launch configuration. The analysis frequency range of interest is 0-50 Hz. A coupled loads analysis is the analytical integration of the Shuttle with its cargo element, the Mini Payload Logistics Module (MPLM), in the Shuttle cargo bay. For each Shuttle launch configuration, a verification coupled loads analysis is performed to determine the loads in the cargo bay as part of the structural certification process.

  2. Simulation of fluid-solid coexistence via thermodynamic integration using a modified cell model.

    PubMed

    Nayhouse, Michael; Amlani, Ankur M; Heng, Vincent R; Orkoulas, G

    2012-04-18

    Despite recent advances, precise simulation of fluid-solid transitions still remains a challenging task. Thermodynamic integration techniques are the simplest methods to study fluid-solid coexistence. These methods are based on the calculation of the free energies of the fluid and the solid phases, starting from a state of known free energy which is usually an ideal-gas state. Despite their simplicity, the main drawback of thermodynamic integration techniques is the large number of states that must be simulated. In the present work, a thermodynamic integration technique, which reduces the number of simulated states, is proposed and tested on a system of particles interacting via an inverse twelfth-power potential energy function. The simulations are implemented at constant pressure and the solid phase is modeled according to the constrained cell model of Hoover and Ree. The fluid and the solid phases are linked together by performing constant-pressure simulations of a modified cell model. The modified cell model, which was originally proposed by Hoover and Ree, facilitates transitions between the fluid and the solid phase by tuning a homogeneous external field. This model is simulated on a constant-pressure path for a series of progressively increasing values of the field, thus allowing for direct determination of the free energy difference between the fluid and the solid phase via histogram reweighting. The size-dependent results are analyzed using histogram reweighting and finite-size scaling techniques. The scaling analysis is based on studying the size-dependent behavior of the second- and higher-order derivatives of the free energy as well as the dimensionless moment ratios of the order parameter. The results clearly demonstrate the importance of accounting for size effects in simulation studies of fluid-solid transitions.

  3. Integrating kinetic effects in fluid models for magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liang

    The integration of kinetic effects in global fluid models is a grand challenge in space plasma physics, and has implication for our ability to model space weather in collisionless plasma environments such as the Earth's magnetosphere. We propose an extensible multi-fluid moment model, with focus on the physics of magnetic reconnection. This model evolves the full Maxwell equations, and simultaneously moments of the Vlasov-Maxwell equation for each species in the plasma. Effects like the Hall effect, the electron inertia, and the pressure gradient are self-consistently embedded in the resulting multi-fluid moment equations, without the need to explicitly solving a generalized Ohm's law. Two limits of the multi-fluid moment model are discussed, namely, the five-moment limit that evolves a scalar pressures for each species, and the ten-moment limit that evolves the full anisotropic, non-gyrotropic pressure tensor. Particularly, the five-moment model reduces to the widely used Hall Magnetohydrodynamics (Hall MHD) model under the assumptions of vanishing electron inertia, infinite speed of light, and quasi-neutrality. In this thesis, we first numerically confirm the reduction of five-moment to Hall MHD under the limit of vanishing electron inertia. Then, we compare ten-moment and fully kinetic Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulations of a large scale Harris sheet reconnection problem, where the ten-moment equations are closed with a local linear collisionless approximation for the heat flux. The ten-moment simulation gives reasonable agreement with the PIC results, regarding the structures and magnitudes of the electron flows, the polarities and magnitudes of elements of the electron pressure tensor, and the decomposition of the generalized Ohm's law. Possible ways to improve the simple closure towards a non-local, fully three-dimensional description are also discussed.

  4. Cellulose nanoparticles as modifiers for rheology and fluid loss in bentonite water-based fluids.

    PubMed

    Li, Mei-Chun; Wu, Qinglin; Song, Kunlin; Qing, Yan; Wu, Yiqiang

    2015-03-04

    Rheological and filtration characteristics of drilling fluids are considered as two critical aspects to ensure the success of a drilling operation. This research demonstrates the effectiveness of cellulose nanoparticles (CNPs), including microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) and cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) in enhancing the rheological and filtration performances of bentonite (BT) water-based drilling fluids (WDFs). CNCs were isolated from MFC through sulfuric acid hydrolysis. In comparison with MFC, the resultant CNCs had much smaller dimensions, more negative surface charge, higher stability in aqueous solutions, lower viscosity, and less evident shear thinning behavior. These differences resulted in the distinctive microstructures between MFC/BT- and CNC/BT-WDFs. A typical "core-shell" structure was created in CNC/BT-WDFs due to the strong surface interactions among BT layers, CNCs, and immobilized water molecules. However, a similar structure was not formed in MFC/BT-WDFs. As a result, CNC/BT-WDFs had superior rheological properties, higher temperature stability, less fluid loss volume, and thinner filter cakes than BT and MFC/BT-WDFs. Moreover, the presence of polyanionic cellulose (PAC) further improved the rheological and filtration performances of CNC/BT-WDFs, suggesting a synergistic effect between PAC and CNCs.

  5. Ferromagnetic Fluid as a Model of Social Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fronczak, Piotr; Fronczak, Agata; Hołyst, Janusz A.

    The paper proposes a new model of spin dynamics which can be treated as a model of sociological coupling between individuals. Our approach takes into account two different human features: Gregariousness and individuality. We will show how they affect a psychological distance between individuals and how the distance changes the opinion formation in a social group. Apart from its sociological aplications the model displays the variety of other interesting phenomena like self-organizing ferromagnetic state or a second order phase transition and can be studied from different points of view, e.g., as a model of ferromagnetic fluid, complex evolving network or multiplicative random process.

  6. Fluid and kinetic models of negative ion sheaths

    SciTech Connect

    Cavenago, M.

    2011-09-26

    Due to the presence of a large transverse magnetic field (B{sub x} and B{sub y} where z is the extraction axis), the extraction of electrons from a negative ion source is likely to happen with a large angle with respect to z axis. The negative ion and electron sheaths are here studied both with kinetic and with fluid models. First, Vlasov-Poisson models are reduced to one dimensional integrodifferential equations, discussing also trapped orbits. The integrodifferential equations for electron transport are analytically solved for a variety of extraction potentials (in 1D). Collision frequency dependency from electron flow speed and temperature is discussed. Then both ion and electron space charge and fluid motion are solved, using electron densities expression consistent with kinetic model. Results for the sheath charge profile and extraction field as a function of B{sub x} are shown.

  7. DPSM technique for ultrasonic field modelling near fluid-solid interface.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Sourav; Kundu, Tribikram; Alnuaimi, Nasser A

    2007-06-01

    Distributed point source method (DPSM) is gradually gaining popularity in the field of non-destructive evaluation (NDE). DPSM is a semi-analytical technique that can be used to calculate the ultrasonic fields produced by transducers of finite dimension placed in homogeneous or non-homogeneous media. This technique has been already used to model ultrasonic fields in homogeneous and multi-layered fluid structures. In this paper the method is extended to model the ultrasonic fields generated in both fluid and solid media near a fluid-solid interface when the transducer is placed in the fluid half-space near the interface. Most results in this paper are generated by the newly developed DPSM technique that requires matrix inversion. This technique is identified as the matrix inversion based DPSM technique. Some of these results are compared with the results produced by the Rayleigh-Sommerfield integral based DPSM technique. Theory behind both matrix inversion based and Rayleigh-Sommerfield integral based DPSM techniques is presented in this paper. The matrix inversion based DPSM technique is found to be very efficient for computing the ultrasonic field in non-homogeneous materials. One objective of this study is to model ultrasonic fields in both solids and fluids generated by the leaky Rayleigh wave when finite size transducers are inclined at Rayleigh critical angles. This phenomenon has been correctly modelled by the technique. It should be mentioned here that techniques based on paraxial assumptions fail to model the critical reflection phenomenon. Other advantages of the DPSM technique compared to the currently available techniques for transducer radiation modelling are discussed in the paper under Introduction.

  8. A Landau fluid model for dissipative trapped electron modes

    SciTech Connect

    Hedrick, C.L.; Leboeuf, J.N.; Sidikman, K.L.

    1995-09-01

    A Landau fluid model for dissipative trapped electron modes is developed which focuses on an improved description of the ion dynamics. The model is simple enough to allow nonlinear calculations with many harmonics for the times necessary to reach saturation. The model is motivated by a discussion that starts with the gyro-kinetic equation and emphasizes the importance of simultaneously including particular features of magnetic drift resonance, shear, and Landau effects. To ensure that these features are simultaneously incorporated in a Landau fluid model with only two evolution equations, a new approach to determining the closure coefficients is employed. The effect of this technique is to reduce the matching of fluid and kinetic responses to a single variable, rather than two, and to allow focusing on essential features of the fluctuations in question, rather than features that are only important for other types of fluctuations. Radially resolved nonlinear calculations of this model, advanced in time to reach saturation, are presented to partially illustrate its intended use. These calculations have a large number of poloidal and toroidal harmonics to represent the nonlinear dynamics in a converged steady state which includes cascading of energy to both short and long wavelengths.

  9. On the Mathematical Modelling of a Compressible Viscoelastic Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollada, P. C.; Phillips, T. N.

    2012-07-01

    Thermodynamical considerations have largely been avoided in the modelling of complex fluids by invoking the assumption of incompressibility. This approximation allows pressure to be defined as a Lagrange multiplier, and therefore its natural connection with other thermodynamic variables such as density and temperature is irretrievably lost. Relaxing this condition to allow more realistic modelling involves much more than prescribing an equation of state. Even for a simple isothermal viscoelastic model, as explored in this paper, the transition to a compressible model is non-trivial. This paper shows that pressure enters the governing equations in a non-intuitive way. Furthermore, a fluid volume element, which is no longer constant, radically changes the way the basic element of the constitutive equations is viewed—stress is no longer the fundamental constitutive link between the momentum equations and velocity. The importance of geometry in fluid modelling is emphasised through the use of the Lie derivative, which is of a more fundamental character than the "upper" and "lower" convected derivatives prevalent in the literature and which are found to be almost redundant for a compressible fluid. There is now a strong body of non-equilibrium thermodynamics theory for flowing systems, which proves indispensible for this development. These fundamental principles are described herein using methodology and examples, that are sometimes conflicting, from the literature. The main conflict arises from the relationship between thermodynamic pressure and the trace of Cauchy stress, where the current preferred choice is (up to a constant) to set them equal—this is shown to be incorrect. Other issues such as the dependence of viscosity on density, bulk viscosity, integral modelling, the principle of objectivity and convected derivatives, are also clarified and resolved.

  10. Numerical modeling of fracking fluid migration through fault zones and fractures in the North German Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfunt, Helena; Houben, Georg; Himmelsbach, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Gas production from shale formations by hydraulic fracturing has raised concerns about the effects on the quality of fresh groundwater. The migration of injected fracking fluids towards the surface was investigated in the North German Basin, based on the known standard lithology. This included cases with natural preferential pathways such as permeable fault zones and fracture networks. Conservative assumptions were applied in the simulation of flow and mass transport triggered by a high pressure boundary of up to 50 MPa excess pressure. The results show no significant fluid migration for a case with undisturbed cap rocks and a maximum of 41 m vertical transport within a permeable fault zone during the pressurization. Open fractures, if present, strongly control the flow field and migration; here vertical transport of fracking fluids reaches up to 200 m during hydraulic fracturing simulation. Long-term transport of the injected water was simulated for 300 years. The fracking fluid rises vertically within the fault zone up to 485 m due to buoyancy. Progressively, it is transported horizontally into sandstone layers, following the natural groundwater flow direction. In the long-term, the injected fluids are diluted to minor concentrations. Despite the presence of permeable pathways, the injected fracking fluids in the reported model did not reach near-surface aquifers, either during the hydraulic fracturing or in the long term. Therefore, the probability of impacts on shallow groundwater by the rise of fracking fluids from a deep shale-gas formation through the geological underground to the surface is small.

  11. Computational Implementation of a Coupled Plasma-Neutral Fluid Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vold, E. L.; Najmabadi, F.; Conn, R. W.

    1992-12-01

    This paper describes the computational transport of coupled plasma-neutral fluids in the edge region of a toroidally symmetric magnetic confinement device, with applications to the tokamak. The model couples neutral density in a diffusion approximation with a set of transport equations for the plasma including density, classical plasma parallel velocity, anomalous cross-field velocity, and ion and electron temperature equations. The plasma potential, gradient electric fields, drift velocity, and net poloidal velocity are computed as dependent quantities under the assumption of ambipolarity. The implementation is flexible to permit extension in the future to a fully coupled set of non-ambipolar momentum equations. The computational method incorporates sonic flow and particle recycling of ions and neutrals at the vessel boundary. A numerically generated orthogonal grid conforms to the poloidal magnetic flux surfaces. Power law differencing based on the SIMPLE relaxation method is modified to accomodate the compressible reactive plasma flow with a "semi-implicit" diffusion method. Residual corrections are applied to obtain a valid convergence to the steady state solution. Results are presented for a representative divertor tokamak in a high recycling regime, showing strongly peaked neutral and plasma densities near the divertor target. Solutions show large poloidal and radial gradients in the plasma density, potential, and temperatures. These findings may help to understand the strong turbulence experimentally observed in the plasma edge region of the tokamak.

  12. Comprehensive Profiling of Modulation of Nitric Oxide Levels and Mitochondrial Activity in the Injured Brain: An Experimental Study Based on the Fluid Percussion Injury Model in Rats.

    PubMed

    Üçal, Muammer; Kraitsy, Klaus; Weidinger, Adelheid; Paier-Pourani, Jamile; Patz, Silke; Fink, Bruno; Molcanyi, Marek; Schäfer, Ute

    2017-01-15

    Nitric oxide (NO) has frequently been associated with secondary damage after brain injury. However, average NO levels in different brain regions before and after traumatic brain injury (TBI) and its role in post-TBI mitochondrial dysfunction remain unclear. In this comprehensive profiling study, we demonstrate for the first time that basal NO levels vary significantly in the healthy cortex (0.44 ± 0.04 μM), hippocampus (0.26 ± 0.03 μM), and cerebellum (1.24 ± 0.08 μM). Within 4 h of severe lateral fluid percussion injury, NO levels almost doubled in these regions, thereby preserving regional differences in NO levels. TBI-induced NO generation was associated with inducible NO synthase (iNOS) increase in ipsilateral but not in contralateral regions. The transient NO increase resulted in a persistent tyrosine nitration adjacent to the injury site. Nitrosative stress-associated cell loss via apoptosis and receptor-interacting serine/threonine-protein kinase 3 (RIPK3)-mediated necrosis were also observed in the ipsilateral cortex, despite high levels of NO in the contralateral cortex. NO-mediated impairment of mitochondrial state 3 respiration dependent on complex I substrates was transient and confined to the ipsilateral cortex. Our results demonstrate that NO dynamics and associated effects differ in various regions of the injured brain. A potential association between the observed mitochondrial electron flow through complex I, but not complex II, and the modulation of TBI induced NO levels in different brain regions has to be prospectively analyzed in more detail.

  13. Stability of stationary solutions for inflow problem on the micropolar fluid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Haiyan

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we study the asymptotic behavior of solutions to the initial boundary value problem for the micropolar fluid model in a half-line R+:=(0,∞). We prove that the corresponding stationary solutions of the small amplitude to the inflow problem for the micropolar fluid model are time asymptotically stable under small H1 perturbations in both the subsonic and degenerate cases. The microrotation velocity brings us some additional troubles compared with Navier-Stokes equations in the absence of the microrotation velocity. The proof of asymptotic stability is based on the basic energy method.

  14. Nonrigid coregistration of diffusion tensor images using a viscous fluid model and mutual information.

    PubMed

    Van Hecke, Wim; Leemans, Alexander; D'Agostino, Emiliano; De Backer, Steve; Vandervliet, Evert; Parizel, Paul M; Sijbers, Jan

    2007-11-01

    In this paper, a nonrigid coregistration algorithm based on a viscous fluid model is proposed that has been optimized for diffusion tensor images (DTI), in which image correspondence is measured by the mutual information criterion. Several coregistration strategies are introduced and evaluated both on simulated data and on brain intersubject DTI data. Two tensor reorientation methods have been incorporated and quantitatively evaluated. Simulation as well as experimental results show that the proposed viscous fluid model can provide a high coregistration accuracy, although the tensor reorientation was observed to be highly sensitive to the local deformation field. Nevertheless, this coregistration method has demonstrated to significantly improve spatial alignment compared to affine image matching.

  15. Modeling the Fracturing of Rock by Fluid Injection - Comparison of Numerical and Experimental Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinze, Thomas; Galvan, Boris; Miller, Stephen

    2013-04-01

    Fluid-rock interactions are mechanically fundamental to many earth processes, including fault zones and hydrothermal/volcanic systems, and to future green energy solutions such as enhanced geothermal systems and carbon capture and storage (CCS). Modeling these processes is challenging because of the strong coupling between rock fracture evolution and the consequent large changes in the hydraulic properties of the system. In this talk, we present results of a numerical model that includes poro-elastic plastic rheology (with hardening, softening, and damage), and coupled to a non-linear diffusion model for fluid pressure propagation and two-phase fluid flow. Our plane strain model is based on the poro- elastic plastic behavior of porous rock and is advanced with hardening, softening and damage using the Mohr- Coulomb failure criteria. The effective stress model of Biot (1944) is used for coupling the pore pressure and the rock behavior. Frictional hardening and cohesion softening are introduced following Vermeer and de Borst (1984) with the angle of internal friction and the cohesion as functions of the principal strain rates. The scalar damage coefficient is assumed to be a linear function of the hardening parameter. Fluid injection is modeled as a two phase mixture of water and air using the Richards equation. The theoretical model is solved using finite differences on a staggered grid. The model is benchmarked with experiments on the laboratory scale in which fluid is injected from below in a critically-stressed, dry sandstone (Stanchits et al. 2011). We simulate three experiments, a) the failure a dry specimen due to biaxial compressive loading, b) the propagation a of low pressure fluid front induced from the bottom in a critically stressed specimen, and c) the failure of a critically stressed specimen due to a high pressure fluid intrusion. Comparison of model results with the fluid injection experiments shows that the model captures most of the experimental

  16. Particle-based methods for multiscale modeling of blood flow in the circulation and in devices: challenges and future directions. Sixth International Bio-Fluid Mechanics Symposium and Workshop March 28-30, 2008 Pasadena, California.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Takami; Ishikawa, Takuji; Imai, Y; Matsuki, N; Xenos, Mikhail; Deng, Yuefan; Bluestein, Danny

    2010-03-01

    A major computational challenge for a multiscale modeling is the coupling of disparate length and timescales between molecular mechanics and macroscopic transport, spanning the spatial and temporal scales characterizing the complex processes taking place in flow-induced blood clotting. Flow and pressure effects on a cell-like platelet can be well represented by a continuum mechanics model down to the order of the micrometer level. However, the molecular effects of adhesion/aggregation bonds are on the order of nanometer. A successful multiscale model of platelet response to flow stresses in devices and the ensuing clotting responses should be able to characterize the clotting reactions and their interactions with the flow. This paper attempts to describe a few of the computational methods that were developed in recent years and became available to researchers in the field. They differ from traditional approaches that dominate the field by expanding on prevailing continuum-based approaches, or by completely departing from them, yielding an expanding toolkit that may facilitate further elucidation of the underlying mechanisms of blood flow and the cellular response to it. We offer a paradigm shift by adopting a multidisciplinary approach with fluid dynamics simulations coupled to biophysical and biochemical transport.

  17. Modelling of fluid-solid interactions using an adaptive mesh fluid model coupled with a combined finite-discrete element model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viré, Axelle; Xiang, Jiansheng; Milthaler, Frank; Farrell, Patrick Emmet; Piggott, Matthew David; Latham, John-Paul; Pavlidis, Dimitrios; Pain, Christopher Charles

    2012-12-01

    Fluid-structure interactions are modelled by coupling the finite element fluid/ocean model `Fluidity-ICOM' with a combined finite-discrete element solid model `Y3D'. Because separate meshes are used for the fluids and solids, the present method is flexible in terms of discretisation schemes used for each material. Also, it can tackle multiple solids impacting on one another, without having ill-posed problems in the resolution of the fluid's equations. Importantly, the proposed approach ensures that Newton's third law is satisfied at the discrete level. This is done by first computing the action-reaction force on a supermesh, i.e. a function superspace of the fluid and solid meshes, and then projecting it to both meshes to use it as a source term in the fluid and solid equations. This paper demonstrates the properties of spatial conservation and accuracy of the method for a sphere immersed in a fluid, with prescribed fluid and solid velocities. While spatial conservation is shown to be independent of the mesh resolutions, accuracy requires fine resolutions in both fluid and solid meshes. It is further highlighted that unstructured meshes adapted to the solid concentration field reduce the numerical errors, in comparison with uniformly structured meshes with the same number of elements. The method is verified on flow past a falling sphere. Its potential for ocean applications is further shown through the simulation of vortex-induced vibrations of two cylinders and the flow past two flexible fibres.

  18. STM-Controlled Capillary Based Non-Contact Fluid Deposition Nanolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutfurakhmanov, Artur; Sailer, Rob; Schulz, Doug; Akhatov, Iskander

    2007-11-01

    A new method of fluid deposition based on scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) is presented. STM-Controlled Capillary Based Non-Contact Fluid Deposition Nanolithography consists of a Au-coated glass nanocapillary tip integrated into a commercial STM scanner platform where the tip serves the dual purpose of imaging and deposition. The small diameter hollow fiber (O.D. less than 500 nm) coupled with a conducting coating allows sub-angstrom-level z-resolution imaging using standard STM methodology. For fluid deposition, the tip is first located within 10 nm of the substrate before the nanocapillary is pressurized with a fluid (P = 50-500 KPa) leading to the formation of a small meniscus that then interacts with the underlying surface to give small spot of fluid deposition. Initial results show the ability to form features less than 500 nm in diameter using alpha-terpineol as the model fluid and highly-oriented pyrolytic graphite as the substrate. In addition to non-contact deposition, this technology also allows non-contact imaging using the constant height STM mode thereby eliminating the difficulties associated with finding nanometer-sized features.

  19. Fouling resistance prediction using artificial neural network nonlinear auto-regressive with exogenous input model based on operating conditions and fluid properties correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biyanto, Totok R.

    2016-06-01

    Fouling in a heat exchanger in Crude Preheat Train (CPT) refinery is an unsolved problem that reduces the plant efficiency, increases fuel consumption and CO2 emission. The fouling resistance behavior is very complex. It is difficult to develop a model using first principle equation to predict the fouling resistance due to different operating conditions and different crude blends. In this paper, Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) MultiLayer Perceptron (MLP) with input structure using Nonlinear Auto-Regressive with eXogenous (NARX) is utilized to build the fouling resistance model in shell and tube heat exchanger (STHX). The input data of the model are flow rates and temperatures of the streams of the heat exchanger, physical properties of product and crude blend data. This model serves as a predicting tool to optimize operating conditions and preventive maintenance of STHX. The results show that the model can capture the complexity of fouling characteristics in heat exchanger due to thermodynamic conditions and variations in crude oil properties (blends). It was found that the Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) are suitable to capture the nonlinearity and complexity of the STHX fouling resistance during phases of training and validation.

  20. Coupling lattice Boltzmann and molecular dynamics models for dense fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupuis, A.; Kotsalis, E. M.; Koumoutsakos, P.

    2007-04-01

    We propose a hybrid model, coupling lattice Boltzmann (LB) and molecular dynamics (MD) models, for the simulation of dense fluids. Time and length scales are decoupled by using an iterative Schwarz domain decomposition algorithm. The MD and LB formulations communicate via the exchange of velocities and velocity gradients at the interface. We validate the present LB-MD model in simulations of two- and three-dimensional flows of liquid argon past and through a carbon nanotube. Comparisons with existing hybrid algorithms and with reference MD solutions demonstrate the validity of the present approach.

  1. Coupling lattice Boltzmann and molecular dynamics models for dense fluids.

    PubMed

    Dupuis, A; Kotsalis, E M; Koumoutsakos, P

    2007-04-01

    We propose a hybrid model, coupling lattice Boltzmann (LB) and molecular dynamics (MD) models, for the simulation of dense fluids. Time and length scales are decoupled by using an iterative Schwarz domain decomposition algorithm. The MD and LB formulations communicate via the exchange of velocities and velocity gradients at the interface. We validate the present LB-MD model in simulations of two- and three-dimensional flows of liquid argon past and through a carbon nanotube. Comparisons with existing hybrid algorithms and with reference MD solutions demonstrate the validity of the present approach.

  2. Lennard-Jones and lattice models of driven fluids.

    PubMed

    Díez-Minguito, M; Garrido, P L; Marro, J

    2005-08-01

    We introduce a nonequilibrium off-lattice model for anisotropic phenomena in fluids. This is a Lennard-Jones generalization of the driven lattice-gas model in which the particles' spatial coordinates vary continuously. A comparison between the two models allows us to discuss some exceptional, hardly realistic features of the original discrete system--which has been considered a prototype for nonequilibrium anisotropic phase transitions. We thus help to clarify open issues, and discuss on the implications of our observations for future investigation of anisotropic phase transitions.

  3. Analog model for quantum gravity effects: phonons in random fluids.

    PubMed

    Krein, G; Menezes, G; Svaiter, N F

    2010-09-24

    We describe an analog model for quantum gravity effects in condensed matter physics. The situation discussed is that of phonons propagating in a fluid with a random velocity wave equation. We consider that there are random fluctuations in the reciprocal of the bulk modulus of the system and study free phonons in the presence of Gaussian colored noise with zero mean. We show that, in this model, after performing the random averages over the noise function a free conventional scalar quantum field theory describing free phonons becomes a self-interacting model.

  4. Mean-field fluid behavior of the gaussian core model

    PubMed

    Louis; Bolhuis; Hansen

    2000-12-01

    We show that the Gaussian core model of particles interacting via a penetrable repulsive Gaussian potential, first considered by Stillinger [J. Chem. Phys. 65, 3968 (1976)], behaves as a weakly correlated "mean-field fluid" over a surprisingly wide density and temperature range. In the bulk, the structure of the fluid phase is accurately described by the random phase approximation for the direct correlation function, and by the more sophisticated hypernetted chain integral equation. The resulting pressure deviates very little from a simple mean-field-like quadratic form in the density, while the low density virial expansion turns out to have an extremely small radius of convergence. Density profiles near a hard wall are also very accurately described by the corresponding mean-field free-energy functional. The binary version of the model exhibits a spinodal instability against demixing at high densities. Possible implications for semidilute polymer solutions are discussed.

  5. Approaches to Validation of Models for Low Gravity Fluid Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, David J.; Marchetta, Jeffery; Hochstein, John I.; Kassemi, Mohammad

    2005-01-01

    This paper details the author experiences with the validation of computer models to predict low gravity fluid behavior. It reviews the literature of low gravity fluid behavior as a starting point for developing a baseline set of test cases. It examines authors attempts to validate their models against these cases and the issues they encountered. The main issues seem to be that: Most of the data is described by empirical correlation rather than fundamental relation; Detailed measurements of the flow field have not been made; Free surface shapes are observed but through thick plastic cylinders, and therefore subject to a great deal of optical distortion; and Heat transfer process time constants are on the order of minutes to days but the zero-gravity time available has been only seconds.

  6. Agent-Based Chemical Plume Tracing Using Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zarzhitsky, Dimitri; Spears, Diana; Thayer, David; Spears, William

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a rigorous evaluation of a novel, distributed chemical plume tracing algorithm. The algorithm is a combination of the best aspects of the two most popular predecessors for this task. Furthermore, it is based on solid, formal principles from the field of fluid mechanics. The algorithm is applied by a network of mobile sensing agents (e.g., robots or micro-air vehicles) that sense the ambient fluid velocity and chemical concentration, and calculate derivatives. The algorithm drives the robotic network to the source of the toxic plume, where measures can be taken to disable the source emitter. This work is part of a much larger effort in research and development of a physics-based approach to developing networks of mobile sensing agents for monitoring, tracking, reporting and responding to hazardous conditions.

  7. A model for fluid-injection-induced seismicity at the KTB, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baisch, S.; Harjes, H.-P.

    2003-01-01

    The 9.1 km deep KTB (Kontinentale Tiefbohrung, Germany) drilling hole is one of the best investigated deep-drilling sites in the world. Among other parameters, in situ measurements revealed continuous profiles of principal stresses, pore fluid pressure and fracture geometry in the vicinity of the borehole. The present study combines these parameters with hydraulic and seismicity data obtained during fluid-injection experiments conducted at the KTB to derive a conceptual model for fluid-injection-induced seismicity at the KTB. This model rests on the well constrained assumptions that (1) the crust is highly fractured with a permeable fracture network between 9 km depth and the Earth's surface and (2) the crust is in near-failure equilibrium, whereby a large number of fracture planes are under near-critical condition. During the injection experiment, the elevated pore fluid pressure remained well below the least principal stress and thus was too small to cause hydraulic opening of existing fractures. Consequently, the geometry of the fracture network was assumed to have not changed during fluid injection with induced seismicity occurring solely as a result of lowering of the effective normal stress, consistent with observed source mechanisms. The key parameter in the present model is the fracture permeability, which exhibits large spatial and directional variations. These variations are proposed to primarily control fluid migration paths and associated propagation of elevated fluid pressure during fluid injection. In contrast with common models based on isotropic fluid diffusion or spatially averaged permeability, highly permeable branches of the fracture network strongly affect the propagation of fluid pressure and prohibit the concept of a smooth `pressure front'. We find evidence that major fluid flow exists at comparatively low fluid pressure (below the critical pressure required to cause seismic failure) without being detected seismically. This might also

  8. Fluid-Structure interaction modeling in deformable porous arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakerzadeh, Rana; Zunino, Paolo

    2015-11-01

    A computational framework is developed to study the coupling of blood flow in arteries interacting with a poroelastic arterial wall featuring possibly large deformations. Blood is modeled as an incompressible, viscous, Newtonian fluid using the Navier-Stokes equations and the arterial wall consists of a thick material which is modeled as a Biot system that describes the mechanical behavior of a homogeneous and isotropic elastic skeleton, and connecting pores filled with fluid. Discretization via finite element method leads to the system of nonlinear equations and a Newton-Raphson scheme is adopted to solve the resulting nonlinear system through consistent linearization. Moreover, interface conditions are imposed on the discrete level via mortar finite elements or Nitsche's coupling. The discrete linearized coupled FSI system is solved by means of a splitting strategy, which allows solving the Navier-Stokes and Biot equations separately. The numerical results investigate the effects of proroelastic parameters on the pressure wave propagation in arteries, filtration of incompressible fluids through the porous media, and the structure displacement. The fellowship support from the Computational Modeling & Simulation PhD program at University of Pittsburgh for Rana Zakerzadeh is gratefully acknowledged.

  9. Modeling interfacial area transport in multi-fluid systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yarbro, Stephen Lee

    1996-11-01

    Many typical chemical engineering operations are multi-fluid systems. They are carried out in distillation columns (vapor/liquid), liquid-liquid contactors (liquid/liquid) and other similar devices. An important parameter is interfacial area concentration, which determines the rate of interfluid heat, mass and momentum transfer and ultimately, the overall performance of the equipment. In many cases, the models for determining interfacial area concentration are empirical and can only describe the cases for which there is experimental data. In an effort to understand multiphase reactors and the mixing process better, a multi-fluid model has been developed as part of a research effort to calculate interfacial area transport in several different types of in-line static mixers. For this work, the ensemble-averaged property conservation equations have been derived for each fluid and for the mixture. These equations were then combined to derive a transport equation for the interfacial area concentration. The final, one-dimensional model was compared to interfacial area concentration data from two sizes of Kenics in-line mixer, two sizes of concurrent jet and a Tee mixer. In all cases, the calculated and experimental data compared well with the highest scatter being with the Tee mixer comparison.

  10. Fluid particle diffusion in a semidilute suspension of model micro-organisms.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Takuji; Locsei, J T; Pedley, T J

    2010-08-01

    We calculate non-Brownian fluid particle diffusion in a semidilute suspension of swimming micro-organisms. Each micro-organism is modeled as a spherical squirmer, and their motions in an infinite suspension otherwise at rest are computed by the Stokesian-dynamics method. In calculating the fluid particle motions, we propose a numerical method based on a combination of the boundary element technique and Stokesian dynamics. We present details of the numerical method and examine its accuracy. The limitation of semidiluteness is required to ensure accuracy of the fluid particle velocity calculation. In the case of a suspension of non-bottom-heavy squirmers the spreading of fluid particles becomes diffusive in a shorter time than that of the squirmers, and the diffusivity of fluid particles is smaller than that of squirmers. It is confirmed that the probability density distribution of fluid particles also shows diffusive properties. The effect of tracer particle size is investigated by inserting some inert spheres of the same radius as the squirmers, instead of fluid particles, into the suspension. The diffusivity for inert spheres is not less than one tenth of that for fluid particles, even though the particle size is totally different. Scaling analysis indicates that the diffusivity of fluid particles and inert spheres becomes proportional to the volume fraction of squirmers in the semidilute regime provided that there is no more than a small recirculation region around a squirmer, which is confirmed numerically. In the case of a suspension of bottom-heavy squirmers, horizontal diffusivity decreases considerably even with small values of the bottom heaviness, which indicates the importance of bottom heaviness in the diffusion phenomena. We believe that these fundamental findings will enhance our understanding of the basic mechanics of a suspension of swimming micro-organisms.

  11. Fluid particle diffusion in a semidilute suspension of model micro-organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Takuji; Locsei, J. T.; Pedley, T. J.

    2010-08-01

    We calculate non-Brownian fluid particle diffusion in a semidilute suspension of swimming micro-organisms. Each micro-organism is modeled as a spherical squirmer, and their motions in an infinite suspension otherwise at rest are computed by the Stokesian-dynamics method. In calculating the fluid particle motions, we propose a numerical method based on a combination of the boundary element technique and Stokesian dynamics. We present details of the numerical method and examine its accuracy. The limitation of semidiluteness is required to ensure accuracy of the fluid particle velocity calculation. In the case of a suspension of non-bottom-heavy squirmers the spreading of fluid particles becomes diffusive in a shorter time than that of the squirmers, and the diffusivity of fluid particles is smaller than that of squirmers. It is confirmed that the probability density distribution of fluid particles also shows diffusive properties. The effect of tracer particle size is investigated by inserting some inert spheres of the same radius as the squirmers, instead of fluid particles, into the suspension. The diffusivity for inert spheres is not less than one tenth of that for fluid particles, even though the particle size is totally different. Scaling analysis indicates that the diffusivity of fluid particles and inert spheres becomes proportional to the volume fraction of squirmers in the semidilute regime provided that there is no more than a small recirculation region around a squirmer, which is confirmed numerically. In the case of a suspension of bottom-heavy squirmers, horizontal diffusivity decreases considerably even with small values of the bottom heaviness, which indicates the importance of bottom heaviness in the diffusion phenomena. We believe that these fundamental findings will enhance our understanding of the basic mechanics of a suspension of swimming micro-organisms.

  12. Semiclassical approach to model quantum fluids using the statistical associating fluid theory for systems with potentials of variable range.

    PubMed

    Trejos, Víctor M; Gil-Villegas, Alejandro

    2012-05-14

    Thermodynamic properties of quantum fluids are described using an extended version of the statistical associating fluid theory for potentials of variable range (SAFT-VR) that takes into account quantum corrections to the Helmholtz free energy A, based on the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation. We present the theoretical background of this approach (SAFT-VRQ), considering two different cases depending on the continuous or discontinuous nature of the particles pair interaction. For the case of continuous potentials, we demonstrate that the standard Wigner-Kirkwood theory for quantum fluids can be derived from the de Broglie-Bohm formalism for quantum mechanics that can be incorporated within the Barker and Henderson perturbation theory for liquids in a straightforward way. When the particles interact via a discontinuous pair potential, the SAFT-VR method can be combined with the perturbation theory developed by Singh and Sinha [J. Chem. Phys. 67, 3645 (1977); and ibid. 68, 562 (1978)]. We present an analytical expression for the first-order quantum perturbation term for a square-well potential, and the theory is applied to model thermodynamic properties of hydrogen, deuterium, neon, and helium-4. Vapor-liquid equilibrium, liquid and vapor densities, isochoric and isobaric heat capacities, Joule-Thomson coefficients and inversion curves are predicted accurately with respect to experimental data. We find that quantum corrections are important for the global behavior of properties of these fluids and not only for the low-temperature regime. Predictions obtained for hydrogen compare very favorably with respect to cubic equations of state.

  13. Spherically symmetric Einstein-aether perfect fluid models

    SciTech Connect

    Coley, Alan A.; Latta, Joey; Leon, Genly; Sandin, Patrik E-mail: genly.leon@ucv.cl E-mail: lattaj@mathstat.dal.ca

    2015-12-01

    We investigate spherically symmetric cosmological models in Einstein-aether theory with a tilted (non-comoving) perfect fluid source. We use a 1+3 frame formalism and adopt the comoving aether gauge to derive the evolution equations, which form a well-posed system of first order partial differential equations in two variables. We then introduce normalized variables. The formalism is particularly well-suited for numerical computations and the study of the qualitative properties of the models, which are also solutions of Horava gravity. We study the local stability of the equilibrium points of the resulting dynamical system corresponding to physically realistic inhomogeneous cosmological models and astrophysical objects with values for the parameters which are consistent with current constraints. In particular, we consider dust models in (β−) normalized variables and derive a reduced (closed) evolution system and we obtain the general evolution equations for the spatially homogeneous Kantowski-Sachs models using appropriate bounded normalized variables. We then analyse these models, with special emphasis on the future asymptotic behaviour for different values of the parameters. Finally, we investigate static models for a mixture of a (necessarily non-tilted) perfect fluid with a barotropic equations of state and a scalar field.

  14. A two-phase solid/fluid model for dense granular flows including dilatancy effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangeney, Anne; Bouchut, Francois; Fernandez-Nieto, Enrique; Koné, El-Hadj; Narbona-Reina, Gladys

    2016-04-01

    Describing grain/fluid interaction in debris flows models is still an open and challenging issue with key impact on hazard assessment [{Iverson et al.}, 2010]. We present here a two-phase two-thin-layer model for fluidized debris flows that takes into account dilatancy effects. It describes the velocity of both the solid and the fluid phases, the compression/dilatation of the granular media and its interaction with the pore fluid pressure [{Bouchut et al.}, 2016]. The model is derived from a 3D two-phase model proposed by {Jackson} [2000] based on the 4 equations of mass and momentum conservation within the two phases. This system has 5 unknowns: the solid and fluid velocities, the solid and fluid pressures and the solid volume fraction. As a result, an additional equation inside the mixture is necessary to close the system. Surprisingly, this issue is inadequately accounted for in the models that have been developed on the basis of Jackson's work [{Bouchut et al.}, 2015]. In particular, {Pitman and Le} [2005] replaced this closure simply by imposing an extra boundary condition at the surface of the flow. When making a shallow expansion, this condition can be considered as a closure condition. However, the corresponding model cannot account for a dissipative energy balance. We propose here an approach to correctly deal with the thermodynamics of Jackson's model by closing the mixture equations by a weak compressibility relation following {Roux and Radjai} [1998]. This relation implies that the occurrence of dilation or contraction of the granular material in the model depends on whether the solid volume fraction is respectively higher or lower than a critical value. When dilation occurs, the fluid is sucked into the granular material, the pore pressure decreases and the friction force on the granular phase increases. On the contrary, in the case of contraction, the fluid is expelled from the mixture, the pore pressure increases and the friction force diminishes. To

  15. Acoustic intensity calculations for axisymmetrically modeled fluid regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hambric, Stephen A.; Everstine, Gordon C.

    1992-01-01

    An algorithm for calculating acoustic intensities from a time harmonic pressure field in an axisymmetric fluid region is presented. Acoustic pressures are computed in a mesh of NASTRAN triangular finite elements of revolution (TRIAAX) using an analogy between the scalar wave equation and elasticity equations. Acoustic intensities are then calculated from pressures and pressure derivatives taken over the mesh of TRIAAX elements. Intensities are displayed as vectors indicating the directions and magnitudes of energy flow at all mesh points in the acoustic field. A prolate spheroidal shell is modeled with axisymmetric shell elements (CONEAX) and submerged in a fluid region of TRIAAX elements. The model is analyzed to illustrate the acoustic intensity method and the usefulness of energy flow paths in the understanding of the response of fluid-structure interaction problems. The structural-acoustic analogy used is summarized for completeness. This study uncovered a NASTRAN limitation involving numerical precision issues in the CONEAX stiffness calculation causing large errors in the system matrices for nearly cylindrical cones.

  16. Numerical modeling of a cryogenic fluid within a fuel tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greer, Donald S.

    1994-01-01

    The computational method developed to study the cryogenic fluid characteristics inside a fuel tank in a hypersonic aircraft is presented. The model simulates a rapid draining of the tank by modeling the ullage vapor and the cryogenic liquid with a moving interface. A mathematical transformation was developed and applied to the Navier-Stokes equations to account for the moving interface. The formulation of the numerical method is a transient hybrid explicit-implicit technique where the pressure term in the momentum equations is approximated to first order in time by combining the continuity equation with an ideal equation of state.

  17. Characterization of a plasma photonic crystal using the multi-fluid plasma model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Whitney; Shumlak, Uri; Miller, Sean

    2016-10-01

    Plasma photonic crystals have great potential to expand the capabilities of current microwave filtering and switching technologies by providing high speed control of energy band-gap/pass characteristics. While there has been considerable research into dielectric, semiconductor, metallic, and even liquid crystal based radiation manipulation, using plasmas is a relatively new field. Concurrently, processing power has reached levels where realistic, computationally expensive, multi-fluid plasma simulations are now possible. Unlike single-fluid magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models, multi-fluid plasma models capture the electron fluid response to electromagnetic waves, a key process responsible for reflecting radiation. In this study, a 5-moment multi-fluid plasma model is implemented in University of Washington's WARPXM computational plasma physics code to examine the energy band-gap characteristics of an array of plasma-filled rods. This configuration permits the thorough analysis of the effect that plasma temperature, density, and array configuration have on energy transmission, absorption, and reflection. Furthermore, high-resolution simulations of the plasma columns gives a detailed window into plasma-radiation interactions. This work is supported by a Grant from the United States Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  18. Numerical modeling of coupled pressure solution and fluid flow in quartz sandstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheldon, H. A.; Wheeler, J.; Worden, R.

    2001-12-01

    Pressure solution in quartz sandstones can be envisaged as a 3-stage process, involving dissolution along grain contacts, diffusion of the solute along the grain contact to the pore space, and removal of the solute from the pore fluid by a combination of diffusive and/or advective transport and chemical reactions (e.g. precipitation of dissolved silica on free grain surfaces). A number of authors have developed mathematical models of pressure solution in order to assess the impact of this process on porosity and permeability in sandstones. However, such models have always been based on a simplified subset of the governing equations, in order to reduce the computation time to an acceptable level. For example, some models assume diffusion through the grain contact zone to be the rate-limiting step, with all the dissolved material precipitating locally in the pore space. Other models assume that the rate of removal of solute from the pore fluid, by diffusion and precipitation, is rate-limiting. It is now possible to solve the full coupled system of equations on a PC, without such simplifications. This enables us to investigate the coupling and interactions between pressure solution, chemical reactions in the pore spaces and macroscale advective/diffusive transport in the pore fluid. Preliminary results of such modeling will be presented, highlighting the importance of modeling pressure solution in an open system, where there is a strong coupling between macroscale transport in the pore fluid and the rate of porosity loss due to compaction and cementation.

  19. Green Algae as Model Organisms for Biological Fluid Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Raymond E

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade the volvocine green algae, spanning from the unicellular Chlamydomonas to multicellular Volvox, have emerged as model organisms for a number of problems in biological fluid dynamics. These include flagellar propulsion, nutrient uptake by swimming organisms, hydrodynamic interactions mediated by walls, collective dynamics and transport within suspensions of microswimmers, the mechanism of phototaxis, and the stochastic dynamics of flagellar synchronization. Green algae are well suited to the study of such problems because of their range of sizes (from 10 μm to several millimetres), their geometric regularity, the ease with which they can be cultured and the availability of many mutants that allow for connections between molecular details and organism-level behavior. This review summarizes these recent developments and highlights promising future directions in the study of biological fluid dynamics, especially in the context of evolutionary biology, that can take advantage of these remarkable organisms.

  20. Green Algae as Model Organisms for Biological Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade, the volvocine green algae, spanning from the unicellular Chlamydomonas to multicellular Volvox, have emerged as model organisms for a number of problems in biological fluid dynamics. These include flagellar propulsion, nutrient uptake by swimming organisms, hydrodynamic interactions mediated by walls, collective dynamics and transport within suspensions of microswimmers, the mechanism of phototaxis, and the stochastic dynamics of flagellar synchronization. Green algae are well suited to the study of such problems because of their range of sizes (from 10 μm to several millimeters), their geometric regularity, the ease with which they can be cultured, and the availability of many mutants that allow for connections between molecular details and organism-level behavior. This review summarizes these recent developments and highlights promising future directions in the study of biological fluid dynamics, especially in the context of evolutionary biology, that can take advantage of these remarkable organisms.

  1. A mathematical model of post-instability in fluid mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, M. A.

    1982-01-01

    Postinstability of fluids is eliminated in numerical models by introducing multivalued velocity fields after discarding the principle of impenetrability. Smooth functions are shown to be incapable of keeping the derivatives from going towards infinity when iterating solutions for the governing equations such as those defined by Navier-Stokes. Enlarging the class of functions is shown to be necessary to eliminate the appearance of imaginary characteristic roots in the systems of arbitrary partial differential equations, a condition which leads to physically impossible motions. The enlarging is demonstrated to be achievable by allowing several individual particles with different velocities to appear at the same point of space, and the subsequent multivaluedness of the solutions is purely a mathematical concern, rather than one of actual physical existence. Applications are provided for an inviscid fluid and for turbulence.

  2. Green Algae as Model Organisms for Biological Fluid Dynamics*

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade the volvocine green algae, spanning from the unicellular Chlamydomonas to multicellular Volvox, have emerged as model organisms for a number of problems in biological fluid dynamics. These include flagellar propulsion, nutrient uptake by swimming organisms, hydrodynamic interactions mediated by walls, collective dynamics and transport within suspensions of microswimmers, the mechanism of phototaxis, and the stochastic dynamics of flagellar synchronization. Green algae are well suited to the study of such problems because of their range of sizes (from 10 μm to several millimetres), their geometric regularity, the ease with which they can be cultured and the availability of many mutants that allow for connections between molecular details and organism-level behavior. This review summarizes these recent developments and highlights promising future directions in the study of biological fluid dynamics, especially in the context of evolutionary biology, that can take advantage of these remarkable organisms. PMID:26594068

  3. FluidCam 1&2 - UAV-Based Fluid Lensing Instruments for High-Resolution 3D Subaqueous Imaging and Automated Remote Biosphere Assessment of Reef Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirayath, V.

    2015-12-01

    We present NASA ESTO FluidCam 1 & 2, Visible and NIR Fluid-Lensing-enabled imaging payloads for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). Developed as part of a focused 2014 earth science technology grant, FluidCam 1&2 are Fluid-Lensing-based computational optical imagers designed for automated 3D mapping and remote sensing of underwater coastal targets from airborne platforms. Fluid Lensing has been used to map underwater reefs in 3D in American Samoa and Hamelin Pool, Australia from UAV platforms at sub-cm scale, which has proven a valuable tool in modern marine research for marine biosphere assessment and conservation. We share FluidCam 1&2 instrument validation and testing results as well as preliminary processed data from field campaigns. Petabyte-scale aerial survey efforts using Fluid Lensing to image at-risk reefs demonstrate broad applicability to large-scale automated species identification, morphology studies and reef ecosystem characterization for shallow marine environments and terrestrial biospheres, of crucial importance to improving bathymetry data for physical oceanographic models and understanding climate change's impact on coastal zones, global oxygen production, carbon sequestration.

  4. Base fluid in improving heat transfer for EV car battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bin-Abdun, Nazih A.; Razlan, Zuradzman M.; Shahriman, A. B.; Wan, Khairunizam; Hazry, D.; Ahmed, S. Faiz; Adnan, Nazrul H.; Heng, R.; Kamarudin, H.; Zunaidi, I.

    2015-05-01

    This study examined the effects of base fluid (as coolants) channeling inside the heat exchanger in the process of the increase in thermal conductivity between EV car battery and the heat exchanger. The analysis showed that secondary cooling system by means of water has advantages in improving the heat transfer process and reducing the electric power loss on the form of thermal energy from batteries. This leads to the increase in the efficiency of the EV car battery, hence also positively reflecting the performance of the EV car. The present work, analysis is performed to assess the design and use of heat exchanger in increasing the performance efficiency of the EV car battery. This provides a preface to the use this design for nano-fluids which increase and improve from heat transfer.

  5. Fluid-based radon mitigation technology development for industrial applications

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, K.V.; Gabor, J.D.; Holtz, R.E.; Gross, K.C.

    1996-06-01

    The objective of the radon mitigation technology development effort is to develop an efficient and economical radon gas removal technology based on a fluid absorption process. The technology must be capable of cleaning up a wide range of radon gas stream concentrations to a level that meets EPA gas emission standards for residential and industrial applications. Argonne has recently identified a phenomenon that offers the possibility of radon recovery from the atmosphere with high efficiency at room temperature, and radon release at slightly elevated temperatures (50-60 degrees C.) such a device would offer numerous substantial advantages over conventional cryogenic charcoal systems for the removal of radon. Controlled sources of radon in Argonne`s radon research facility are being used to quantitatively assess the performance of a selected class of absorbing fluids over a range of radon concentrations. This paper will discuss the design of laboratory- and engineering-scale radon absorption units and present some preliminary experimental test results.

  6. Roughness and growth in a continuous fluid invasion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecht, Inbal; Taitelbaum, Haim

    2004-10-01

    We have studied interface characteristics in a continuous fluid invasion model, first introduced by Cieplak and Robbins [Phys. Rev. Lett. 60, 2042 (1988)]. In this model, the interface grows as a response to an applied quasistatic pressure, which induces various types of instabilities. We suggest a variant of the model, which differs from the original model by the order of instabilities treatment. This order represents the relative importance of the physical mechanisms involved in the system. This variant predicts the existence of a third, intermediate regime, in the behavior of the roughness exponent as a function of the wetting properties of the system. The gradual increase of the roughness exponent in this third regime can explain the scattered experimental data for the roughness exponent in the literature. The growth exponent in this model was found to be around zero, due to the initial rough interface.

  7. One-dimensional cloud fluid model for propagating star formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titus, Timothy N.; Struck-Marcell, Curtis

    1990-01-01

    The aim of this project was to study the propagation of star formation (SF) with a self-consistent deterministic model for the interstellar gas. The questions of under what conditions does star formation propagate in this model and what are the mechanisms of the propagation are explored. Here, researchers used the deterministic Oort-type cloud fluid model of Scalo and Struck-Marcell (1984, also see the review of Struck-Marcell, Scalo and Appleton 1987). This cloud fluid approach includes simple models for the effects of cloud collisional coalescence or disruption, collisional energy dissipation, and cloud disruption and acceleration as the result of young star winds, HII regions and supernovae. An extensive one-zone parameter study is presented in Struck-Marcell and Scalo (1987). To answer the questions above, researchers carried out one-dimensional calculations for an annulus within a galactic disk, like the so-called solar neighborhood of the galactic chemical evolution. In the calculations the left-hand boundary is set equal to the right hand boundary. The calculation is obviously idealized; however, it is computationally convenient to study the first order effects of propagating star formation. The annulus was treated as if it were at rest, i.e., in the local rotating frame. This assumption may remove some interesting effects of a supersonic gas flow, but was necessary to maintain a numerical stability in the annulus. The results on the one-dimensional propagation of SF in the Oort cloud fluid model follow: (1) SF is propagated by means of hydrodynamic waves, which can be generated by external forces or by the pressure generated by local bursts. SF is not effectively propagated via diffusion or variation in cloud interaction rates without corresponding density and velocity changes. (2) The propagation and long-range effects of SF depend on how close the gas density is to the critical threshold value, i.e., on the susceptibility of the medium.

  8. Fluid and gyrokinetic modelling of particle transport in plasmas with hollow density profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tegnered, D.; Oberparleiter, M.; Nordman, H.; Strand, P.

    2016-11-01

    Hollow density profiles occur in connection with pellet fuelling and L to H transitions. A positive density gradient could potentially stabilize the turbulence or change the relation between convective and diffusive fluxes, thereby reducing the turbulent transport of particles towards the center, making the fuelling scheme inefficient. In the present work, the particle transport driven by ITG/TE mode turbulence in regions of hollow density profiles is studied by fluid as well as gyrokinetic simulations. The fluid model used, an extended version of the Weiland transport model, Extended Drift Wave Model (EDWM), incorporates an arbitrary number of ion species in a multi-fluid description, and an extended wavelength spectrum. The fluid model, which is fast and hence suitable for use in predictive simulations, is compared to gyrokinetic simulations using the code GENE. Typical tokamak parameters are used based on the Cyclone Base Case. Parameter scans in key plasma parameters like plasma β, R/LT , and magnetic shear are investigated. It is found that β in particular has a stabilizing effect in the negative R/Ln region, both nonlinear GENE and EDWM show a decrease in inward flux for negative R/Ln and a change of direction from inward to outward for positive R/Ln . This might have serious consequences for pellet fuelling of high β plasmas.

  9. Magnetic field sensor based on selectively magnetic fluid infiltrated dual-core photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangwar, Rahul Kumar; Bhardwaj, Vanita; Singh, Vinod Kumar

    2016-02-01

    We reported the modeling result of selectively magnetic fluid infiltrated dual-core photonic crystal fiber based magnetic field sensor. Inside the cross-section of the designed photonic crystal fiber, the two fiber cores filled with magnetic fluid (Fe3O4) form two independent waveguides with mode coupling. The mode coupling under different magnetic field strengths is investigated theoretically. The sensitivity of the sensor as a function of the structural parameters of the photonic crystal fiber is calculated. The result shows that the proposed sensing device with 1 cm photonic crystal fiber length has a large sensitivity of 305.8 pm/Oe.

  10. GIS-based mapping for marine geohazards in seabed fluid leakage areas (Gulf of Cadiz, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    León, Ricardo; Somoza, Luis

    2011-03-01

    This paper applies, for the first time in offshore deepwater, a method based on geographic information systems for seafloor susceptibility assessment as a first approach to marine geohazard mapping in fluid leakage areas (slope instabilities, gas escapes, seabed collapses, pockmarks, etc.). The assessment was carried out in a known seabed fluid-flow province located on the Iberian margin of the Gulf of Cádiz, Spain. The method (based on statistical bivariate analysis) creates a susceptibility map that defines the likelihood of occurrence of seafloor features related to fluid flow: crater-like depressions and submarine landslides. It is based on the statistical index ( Wi) method (Van Westen in Statistical landslide hazard analysis. ILWIS 2.1 for Windows application guide. ITC Publication, Enschede, pp 73-84, 1997), in which Wi is a function of the cartographic density of seafloor features on "factor maps". The factors selected monitor the seafloor's capability to store and transfer hydrocarbon gases and gravitational instability triggers: geology-lithology, gas hydrate stability zone thickness (temperature, pressure-water depth and geothermal gradient), occurrence of diapirs, proximity to faults or lineaments, and slope angle of the seafloor. Results show that the occurrence of seafloor features related to fluid flow is highest where the factors "gas source and storage" and "pathways of fluid escape" converge. This means that they are particularly abundant over diapirs in contourite deposits, in the vicinity of faults, and inside theoretical gas hydrate stability fields thinned by warm undercurrents. Furthermore, the submarine landslides located on the Palaeozoic-Toarcian basement are not related to fluid leakage. This methodology provides helpful information for hazard mitigation in regional selection of potential drill sites, deep-water construction sites or pipeline routes. It is an easily applied and useful tool for taking the first step in risk assessment on

  11. Numerical Modeling of Pressurization of Cryogenic Propellant Tank for Integrated Vehicle Fluid System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, Alok K.; LeClair, Andre C.; Hedayat, Ali

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical model of pressurization of a cryogenic propellant tank for the Integrated Vehicle Fluid (IVF) system using the Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP). The IVF propulsion system, being developed by United Launch Alliance, uses boiloff propellants to drive thrusters for the reaction control system as well as to run internal combustion engines to develop power and drive compressors to pressurize propellant tanks. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been running tests to verify the functioning of the IVF system using a flight tank. GFSSP, a finite volume based flow network analysis software developed at MSFC, has been used to develop an integrated model of the tank and the pressurization system. This paper presents an iterative algorithm for converging the interface boundary conditions between different component models of a large system model. The model results have been compared with test data.

  12. A new interacting two-fluid model and its consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharov, G. S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Pan, S.; Nunes, R. C.; Chakraborty, S.

    2017-04-01

    In the background of a homogeneous and isotropic space-time with zero spatial curvature, we consider interacting scenarios between two barotropic fluids, one is the pressureless dark matter and the other one is dark energy (DE), in which the equation of state (EoS) in DE is either constant or time-dependent. In particular, for constant EoS in DE, we show that the evolution equations for both fluids can be analytically solved. For all these scenarios, the model parameters have been constrained using the current astronomical observations from Type Ia supernovae, Hubble parameter measurements and baryon acoustic oscillation distance measurements. Our analysis shows that both for constant and variable EoS in DE, a very small but non-zero interaction in the dark sector is favoured while the EoS in DE can predict a slight phantom nature, i.e. the EoS in DE can cross the phantom divide line '-1'. On the other hand, although the models with variable EoS describe the observations better, the Akaike Information Criterion supports models with minimal number of parameters. However, it is found that all the models are very close to the Λ cold dark matter cosmology.

  13. Particle-fluid two-phase flow modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Mortensen, G.A.; Trapp, J.A. |

    1992-09-01

    This paper describes a numerical scheme and computer program, DISCON, for the calculation of two-phase flows that does not require the use of flow regime maps. This model is intermediate between-thermal instantaneous and the averaged two-fluid model. It solves the Eulerian continuity, momentum, and energy equations for each liquid control volume, and the Lagrangian mass, momentum, energy, and position equations for each bubble. The bubbles are modeled individually using a large representative number of bubbles thus avoiding the numerical diffusion associated with Eulerian models. DISCON has been used to calculate the bubbling of air through a column of water and the subcooled boiling of water in a flow channel. The results of these calculations are presented.

  14. Particle-fluid two-phase flow modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Mortensen, G.A. ); Trapp, J.A. Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID )

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a numerical scheme and computer program, DISCON, for the calculation of two-phase flows that does not require the use of flow regime maps. This model is intermediate between-thermal instantaneous and the averaged two-fluid model. It solves the Eulerian continuity, momentum, and energy equations for each liquid control volume, and the Lagrangian mass, momentum, energy, and position equations for each bubble. The bubbles are modeled individually using a large representative number of bubbles thus avoiding the numerical diffusion associated with Eulerian models. DISCON has been used to calculate the bubbling of air through a column of water and the subcooled boiling of water in a flow channel. The results of these calculations are presented.

  15. An Anisotropic Fluid-Solid Model of the Mouse Heart

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, James P.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Jiao, Xiangmin; del Pin, Facundo; Einstein, Daniel R.

    2010-01-01

    A critical challenge in biomechanical simulations is the spatial discretization of complex fluid-solid geometries created from imaging. This is especially important when dealing with Lagrangian interfaces, as there must be at a minimum both geometric and topological compatibility between fluid and solid phases, with exact matching of the interfacial nodes being highly desirable. We have developed a solution to this problem and applied the approach to the creation of a 3D fluidsolid mesh of the mouse heart. First, a 50 micron isotropic MRI dataset of a perfusion-fixed mouse heart was segmented into blood, tissue, and background using a customized multimaterial connected fuzzy thresholding algorithm. Then, a multimaterial marching cubes algorithm was applied to produce two compatible isosurfaces, one for the blood-tissue boundary and one for the tissue-background boundary. A multimaterial smoothing algorithm that rigorously conserves volume for each phase simultaneously smoothed the isosurfaces. Next we applied novel automated meshing algorithms to generate anisotropic hybrid meshes with the number of layers and the desired element anisotropy for each material as the only input parameters. As the meshes are scale-invariant within a material and include boundary layer prisms, fluid-structure interaction computations would have a relative error equilibrated over the entire mesh. The resulting model is highly detailed mesh representation of the mouse heart, including features such as chordae and coronary vasculature, that is also maximally efficient to produce the best simulation results for the computational resources available

  16. Modelling cavitation erosion using fluid-material interaction simulations.

    PubMed

    Chahine, Georges L; Hsiao, Chao-Tsung

    2015-10-06

    Material deformation and pitting from cavitation bubble collapse is investigated using fluid and material dynamics and their interaction. In the fluid, a novel hybrid approach, which links a boundary element method and a compressible finite difference method, is used to capture non-spherical bubble dynamics and resulting liquid pressures efficiently and accurately. The bubble dynamics is intimately coupled with a finite-element structure model to enable fluid/structure interaction simulations. Bubble collapse loads the material with high impulsive pressures, which result from shock waves and bubble re-entrant jet direct impact on the material surface. The shock wave loading can be from the re-entrant jet impact on the opposite side of the bubble, the fast primary collapse of the bubble, and/or the collapse of the remaining bubble ring. This produces high stress waves, which propagate inside the material, cause deformation, and eventually failure. A permanent deformation or pit is formed when the local equivalent stresses exceed the material yield stress. The pressure loading depends on bubble dynamics parameters such as the size of the bubble at its maximum volume, the bubble standoff distance from the material wall and the pressure driving the bubble collapse. The effects of standoff and material type on the pressure loading and resulting pit formation are highlighted and the effects of bubble interaction on pressure loading and material deformation are preliminarily discussed.

  17. Computational modeling of fluid structural interaction in arterial stenosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bali, Leila; Boukedjane, Mouloud; Bahi, Lakhdar

    2013-12-01

    Atherosclerosis affects the arterial blood vessels causing stenosis because of which the artery hardens resulting in loss of elasticity in the affected region. In this paper, we present: an approach to model the fluid-structure interaction through such an atherosclerosis affected region of the artery, The blood is assumed as an incompressible Newtonian viscous fluid, and the vessel wall was treated as a thick-walled, incompressible and isotropic material with uniform mechanical properties. The numerical simulation has been studied in the context of The Navier-Stokes equations for an interaction with an elastic solid. The study of fluid flow and wall motion was initially carried out separately, Discretized forms of the transformed wall and flow equations, which are coupled through the boundary conditions at their interface, are obtained by control volume method and simultaneously to study the effects of wall deformability, solutions are obtained for both rigid and elastic walls. The results indicate that deformability of the wall causes an increase in the time average of pressure drop, but a decrease in the maximum wall shear stress. Displacement and stress distributions in the wall are presented.

  18. Magnetorheology of dimorphic magnetorheological fluids based on nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bombard, Antonio J. F.; Gonçalves, Flavia R.; Morillas, Jose R.; de Vicente, Juan

    2014-12-01

    We report a systematic experimental investigation on the use of nanofibers to enhance the magnetorheological (MR) effect in conventional (microsphere-based) MR fluids formulated in polyalphaolefin oil/1-octanol. Two kinds of nanofibers are employed that have very similar morphology but very different magnetic properties. On the one hand we use non-magnetic goethite nanofibers. On the other hand we employ magnetic chromium dioxide nanofibers. For appropriate concentrations the on-state relative yield stress increases up to 80% when incorporating the nanofibers in the formulation. A similar yield stress enhancement is found for both nanofibers investigated (magnetic and non-magnetic) suggesting that the main factor behind this MR enhancement is the particle shape anisotropy. The relative yield stresses obtained by partial substitution of carbonyl iron particles with nanofibers are significantly larger than those measured in previous works on MR fluids formulated by partial substitution with non-magnetic micronsized spherical particles. We also demonstrate that these dimorphic MR fluids also exhibit remarkably larger long-term sedimentation stability while keeping the same penetration and redispersibility characteristics.

  19. Flow of a blood analogue fluid in a compliant abdominal aortic aneurysm model: experimental modelling.

    PubMed

    Deplano, Valérie; Knapp, Yannick; Bailly, Lucie; Bertrand, Eric

    2014-04-11

    The aim of this work is to develop a unique in vitro set-up in order to analyse the influence of the shear thinning fluid-properties on the flow dynamics within the bulge of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). From an experimental point of view, the goals are to elaborate an analogue shear thinning fluid mimicking the macroscopic blood behaviour, to characterise its rheology at low shear rates and to propose an experimental device able to manage such an analogue fluid without altering its feature while reproducing physiological flow rate and pressure, through compliant AAA. Once these experimental prerequisites achieved, the results obtained in the present work show that the flow dynamics is highly dependent on the fluid rheology. The main results point out that the propagation of the vortex ring, generated in the AAA bulge, is slower for shear thinning fluids inducing a smaller travelled distance by the vortex ring so that it never impacts the anterior wall in the distal region, in opposition to Newtonian fluids. Moreover, scalar shear rate values are globally lower for shear thinning fluids inducing higher maximum stress values than those for the Newtonian fluids. Consequently, this work highlights that a Newtonian fluid model is finally inadequate to obtain a reliable prediction of the flow dynamics within AAA.

  20. Equivalent Liénard-type models for a fluid transmission line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Lizeth; Aguiñaga, Jorge Alejandro Delgado; Besançon, Gildas; Verde, Cristina; Begovich, Ofelia

    2016-08-01

    The main contribution of this paper is the derivation of spatiotemporal Liénard-type models for expressing the dynamical behavior of a fluid transmission line. The derivation is carried out from a quasilinear hyperbolic system made of a momentum equation and a continuity one. An advantage of these types of models is that they are suitable for formulating estimation algorithms. This claim is confirmed in the present paper for the case of fluid dynamics, since the article presents the conception and evaluation of a Liénard model-based observer that estimates the parameters of a pipeline such as the friction factor, the equivalent length and the wave speed. To show the potentiality of the approach, results based on some simulation and experimental tests are presented. xml:lang="fr"

  1. Effect of fluid overpressure on thrust wedges deformation - insight from sandbox models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pons, A.; Mourgues, R.

    2012-04-01

    Elevated pore pressures are commonly invoked as a key factor for thrust wedges deformation. Even in the well-known and widely used critical taper model of an accretionary wedge, they are introduced as a first-order parameter. This parameter is the Hubbert-Rubey pore pressure ratio λ. Despite the fact that the importance of fluid overpressure is not discussed and that more and more field measurements focus on quantifying pressure distributions, either numerical or analogue modelers are a few to take into account fluid pressure in their modeling. In the critical taper model, fluid overpressure reduces frictional resistance at the base and many experimenters used low frictional materials to create basal detachments. But fluid overpressures also act as body forces on the whole wedge in addition to that of gravity and this second effect was never experimentally confirmed. In this work, we performed scaled experiments in which compressed air is used as the pore fluid, to understand how fluid pressure controls the first stages of thrusting. The models were built with non-cohesive sand in their upper part and glass microbeads for the décollement to insure the weakness of the detachment. Both materials have similar permeabilities and as we applied horizontally varying fluid pressureat the base of the model, the pore pressure ratio λ was almost constant in the whole wedge. We found a good match with the critical taper model predictions. Combining these experiments with an optical image correlation technique (particle imaging velocimetry - PIV), we were able to follow the strain in the model during the entire duration of the shortening. In particular, we studied the propagation of the décollement and highlighted a strong influence of the pressure ratio, λ, on the activation rate of the décollement. Indeed, higher the overpressure is, faster the propagation of the décollement is. Moreover, we found that the distance to the critical taper condition, which depends on both

  2. Application of Ester based Drilling Fluid for Shale Gas Drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauki, Arina; Safwan Zazarli Shah, Mohamad; Bakar, Wan Zairani Wan

    2015-05-01

    Water based mud is the most commonly used mud in drilling operation. However, it is ineffective when dealing with water-sensitive shale that can lead to shale hydration, consequently wellbore instability is compromised. The alternative way to deal with this kind of shale is using synthetic-based mud (SBM) or oil-based mud (OBM). OBM is the best option in terms of technical requirement. Nevertheless, it is toxic and will create environmental problems when it is discharged to onshore or offshore environment. SBM is safer than the OBM. The aim of this research is to formulate a drilling mud system that can carry out its essential functions for shale gas drilling to avoid borehole instability. Ester based SBM has been chosen for the mud formulation. The ester used is methyl-ester C12-C14 derived from palm oil. The best formulation of ester-based drilling fluid was selected by manipulating the oil-water ratio content in the mud which are 70/30, 80/20 and 90/10 respectively. The feasibility of using this mud for shale gas drilling was investigated by measuring the rheological properties, shale reactivity and toxicity of the mud and the results were compared with a few types of OBM and WBM. The best rheological performance can be seen at 80/20 oil-water ratio of ester based mud. The findings revealed that the rheological performance of ester based mud is comparable with the excellent performance of sarapar based OBM and about 80% better than the WBM in terms of fluid loss. Apart from that, it is less toxic than other types of OBM which can maintain 60% prawn's survival even after 96 hours exposure in 100,000 ppm of mud concentration in artificial seawater.

  3. Modeling fluid interactions with the rigid mush in alloy solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotkowski, Alexander J.

    Macrosegregation is a casting defect characterized by long range composition differences on the length scale of the ingot. These variations in local composition can lead to the development of unwanted phases that are detrimental to mechanical properties. Unlike microsegregation, in which compositions vary over the length scale of the dendrite arms, macrosegregation cannot be removed by subsequent heat treatment, and so it is critical to understand its development during solidification processing. Due to the complex nature of the governing physical phenomena, many researchers have turned to numerical simulations for these predictions, but properly modeling alloy solidification presents a variety of challenges. Among these is the appropriate treatment of the interface between the bulk fluid and the rigid mushy zone. In this region, the non-linear and coupled behavior of heat transfer, fluid mechanics, solute transport, and alloy thermodynamics has a dramatic effect on macrosegregation predictions. This work investigates the impact of numerical approximations at this interface in the context of a mixture model for alloy solidification. First, the numerical prediction of freckles in columnar solidification is investigated, and the predictive ability of the model is evaluated. The model is then extended to equiaxed solidification, in which the analogous interface is the transition of free-floating solid particles to a rigid dendritic network. Various models for grain attachment are investigated, and found to produce significant artifacts caused by the discrete nature of their implementation on the numerical grid. To reduce the impact of these artifacts, a new continuum grain attachment model is proposed and evaluated. The differences between these models are compared using uncertainty quantification, and recommendations for future research are presented.

  4. A relativistic two-fluid model of compact stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Koushik; Rahaman, Farook; Mallick, Arkopriya

    2017-03-01

    We propose a relativistic model of compact star admitting conformal symmetry. Quark matter and baryonic matter which are considered as two different fluids, constitute the star. We define interaction equations between the normal baryonic matter and the quark matter and study the physical situations for repulsive, attractive and zero interaction between the constituent matters. The measured value of the Bag constant is used to explore the spacetime geometry inside the star. From the observed values of the masses of some compact objects, we have obtained theoretical values of the radii. Theoretical values of the radii match well with the previous predictions for such compact objects.

  5. Bridging the gap between global models and full fluid models: a fast 1D semi-analytical fluid model for electronegative plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurlbatt, A.; O'Connell, D.; Gans, T.

    2016-08-01

    Analytical and numerical models allow investigation of complicated discharge phenomena and the interplay that makes plasmas such a complex environment. Global models are quick to implement and can have almost negligible computation cost, but provide only bulk or spatially averaged values. Full fluid models take longer to develop, and can take days to solve, but provide accurate spatio-temporal profiles of the whole plasma. The work presented here details a different type of model, analytically similar to fluid models, but computationally closer to a global model, and able to give spatially resolved solutions for the challenging environment of electronegative plasmas. Included are non-isothermal electrons, gas heating, and coupled neutral dynamics. Solutions are reached in seconds to minutes, and spatial profiles are given for densities, fluxes, and temperatures. This allows the semi-analytical model to fill the gap that exists between global and full fluid models, extending the tools available to researchers. The semi-analytical model can perform broad parameter sweeps that are not practical with more computationally expensive models, as well as exposing non-trivial trends that global models cannot capture. Examples are given for a low pressure oxygen CCP. Excellent agreement is shown with a full fluid model, and comparisons are drawn with the corresponding global model.

  6. Fluid Structure Interaction Analysis on Sidewall Aneurysm Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Qing

    2016-11-01

    Wall shear stress is considered as an important factor for cerebral aneurysm growth and rupture. The objective of present study is to evaluate wall shear stress in aneurysm sac and neck by a fluid-structure-interaction (FSI) model, which was developed and validated against the particle image velocimetry (PIV) data. In this FSI model, the flow characteristics in a straight tube with different asymmetric aneurysm sizes over a range of Reynolds numbers from 200 to 1600 were investigated. The FSI results agreed well with PIV data. It was found that at steady flow conditions, when Reynolds number above 700, one large recirculating vortex would be formed, occupying the entire aneurysm sac. The center of the vortex is located at region near to the distal neck. A pair of counter rotating vortices would however be formed at Reynolds number below 700. Wall shear stresses reached highest level at the distal neck of the aneurysmal sac. The vortex strength, in general, is stronger at higher Reynolds number. Fluid Structure Interaction Analysis on Sidewall Aneurysm Models.

  7. Computational Fluid Dynamics-Based Aeroservoelastic Analysis with Hyper-X Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, K. K.; Bach, C.

    2007-01-01

    A finite element computational fluids dynamics-based aeroservoelastic analysis methodology is presented in this paper, in which both structural and fluids discretization are achieved by the finite element method, and their interaction is modeled by the transpiration boundary condition technique. In the fluids discipline either inviscid or viscous flow may be accounted for, usually employing unstructured grids.Adescription of a novel viscous flow solver employing unstructured grids is given in detail. Provisions are made for digital as well as analog controllers. These new aeroservoelastic analysis techniques are next applied for the solution of a number of example problems including the novel Hyper-X launch vehicle. Experimental and actual flight test data are also compared with analysis results that signify to the efficacy and accuracy of the newly developed solution procedures.

  8. Morphing-Based Shape Optimization in Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, Yannick; Men'Shov, Igor; Nakamura, Yoshiaki

    In this paper, a Morphing-based Shape Optimization (MbSO) technique is presented for solving Optimum-Shape Design (OSD) problems in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). The proposed method couples Free-Form Deformation (FFD) and Evolutionary Computation, and, as its name suggests, relies on the morphing of shape and computational domain, rather than direct shape parameterization. Advantages of the FFD approach compared to traditional parameterization are first discussed. Then, examples of shape and grid deformations by FFD are presented. Finally, the MbSO approach is illustrated and applied through an example: the design of an airfoil for a future Mars exploration airplane.

  9. Modeling of supercritical fluid extraction from herbaceous matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Reverchon, E.; Donsi, G.; Osseo, L.S. . Dipt. di Ingegneria Chimica e Alimentare)

    1993-11-01

    Experimental results of supercritical fluid extraction from various herbaceous matrices are presented. In optimal extraction conditions, the use of a fractional separation technique allows a nearly complete separation of the extract in cuticular waxes and essential oil. The modeling of these results is proposed starting from the description of the mass transfer from a single spherical particle. The simultaneous extraction of two pseudocompounds is assumed to simulate the two compound families obtained by fractionation. The model is then extended to simulate the whole extractor. The yields of essential oil and cuticular waxes obtained from rosemary, basil, and marjoram leaves are fairly simulated by the model. Intraparticle mass transfer resulted as the controlling stage in supercritical extraction of essential oils.

  10. Fluid mechanical model of the acoustic impedance of small orifices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hersh, A. S.; Rogers, T.

    1976-01-01

    A fluid mechanical model of the acoustic behavior of small orifices is presented which predicts orifice resistance and reactance as a function of incident sound pressure level, frequency, and orifice geometry. Agreement between predicted and measured values is excellent. The model shows the following: (1) The acoustic flow in immediate neighborhood of the orifice can be modeled as a locally spherical flow. Within this near field, the flow is, to a first approximation, unsteady and incompressible. (2) At very low sound pressure levels, the orifice viscous resistance is directly related to the effect of boundary-layer displacement along the walls containing the orifice, and the orifice reactance is directly related to the inertia of the oscillating flow in the neighborhood of the orifice. (3) For large values of the incident acoustic pressure, the impedance is dominated by nonlinear jet-like effects. (4) For low values of the pressure, the resistance and reactance are roughly equal.

  11. Model energy landscapes of low-temperature fluids: Dipolar hard spheres.

    PubMed

    Matyushov, Dmitry V

    2007-07-01

    An analytical model of non-Gaussian energy landscape of low-temperature fluids is developed based on the thermodynamics of the fluid of dipolar hard spheres. The entire excitation profile of the liquid, from the high-temperature liquid to the point of ideal-glass transition, has been obtained from Monte Carlo simulations. The fluid of dipolar hard spheres loses stability close to the point of ideal-glass transition transforming via a first-order transition into a columnar liquid phase of dipolar chains locally arranged in a body-centered-tetragonal order. Significant non-Gaussianity of the energy landscape is responsible for narrowing of the distribution of potential energies and energies of inherent structures with decreasing temperature. We suggest that the proposed functionality of the enumeration function is widely applicable to both polar and nonpolar low-temperature liquids.

  12. Dynamic coupling between fluid flow and vein growth in fractures: a 3D numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, J.-O.; Enzmann, F.

    2012-04-01

    Fluid flow is one of the main mass transport mechanisms in the Earth's crust and abundant mineral vein networks are important indicators for fluid flow and fluid rock interaction. These systems are dynamic and part of the so called RTM processes (reaction-transport-mechanics). Understanding of mineral vein systems requires coupling of these processes. Here we present a conceptional model for dynamic vein growth of syntaxial, posttectonic veins generated by advective fluid flow and show first results of a numerical model for this scenario. Vein generation requires three processes to occur: (i) fracture generation by mechanical stress e.g. hydro-fracturing, (ii) flow of a supersaturated fluid on that fracture and (iii) crystallization of phase(s) on or in the fracture. 3D synthetic fractures are generated with the SynFrac code (Ogilvie, et al. 2006). Subsequently solutions of the Navier-Stokes equation for this fracture are computed by a computational fluid dynamics code called GeoDict (Wiegmann 2007). Transport (advective and diffusive) of chemical species to growth sites in the fracture and vein growth are computed by a self-written MATLAB script. The numerical model discretizes the wall rock and fracture geometry by volumetric pixels (voxels). Based on this representation, the model computes the three basic functions for vein generation: (a) nucleation, (b) fluid flow with transport of chemical species and (c) growth. The following conditions were chosen for these three modules. Nucleation is heterogeneous and occurs instantaneously at the wall rock/fracture interface. Advective and diffusive flow of a supersaturated fluid and related transport of chemical species occurs according to the computed fluid flow field by GeoDict. Concentration of chemical species at the inflow is constant, representing external fluid buffering. Changes/decrease in the concentration of chemical species occurs only due to vein growth. Growth of nuclei is limited either by transport of

  13. A New Method Based on the F-Curve for Characterizing Fluid Flow in Continuous Casting Tundishes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dongxia; Cui, Heng; Liu, Yang; Tian, Enhua; Du, Jianxin

    2016-04-01

    "Combined Model" is often applied to characterize the fluid flow in tundishes. There are different ways to manage the calculation of this model, while the most recently used is introduced by SAHAI and EMI. But this approach may lead to incorrect results in some special cases. In this paper, a new method based on the F-Curve is proposed to analyze the fluid flow in tundishes, and the relationship between E-Curve and F-Curve is concerned. In the end, their application to tundish fluid flow has been outlined. The dead volume calculated by the new method is much close to the results of dye experiment and the numerical simulation.

  14. Benchmarking computational fluid dynamics models for lava flow simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietterich, Hannah; Lev, Einat; Chen, Jiangzhi

    2016-04-01

    Numerical simulations of lava flow emplacement are valuable for assessing lava flow hazards, forecasting active flows, interpreting past eruptions, and understanding the controls on lava flow behavior. Existing lava flow models vary in simplifying assumptions, physics, dimensionality, and the degree to which they have been validated against analytical solutions, experiments, and natural observations. In order to assess existing models and guide the development of new codes, we conduct a benchmarking study of computational fluid dynamics models for lava flow emplacement, including VolcFlow, OpenFOAM, FLOW-3D, and COMSOL. Using the new benchmark scenarios defined in Cordonnier et al. (Geol Soc SP, 2015) as a guide, we model viscous, cooling, and solidifying flows over horizontal and sloping surfaces, topographic obstacles, and digital elevation models of natural topography. We compare model results to analytical theory, analogue and molten basalt experiments, and measurements from natural lava flows. Overall, the models accurately simulate viscous flow with some variability in flow thickness where flows intersect obstacles. OpenFOAM, COMSOL, and FLOW-3D can each reproduce experimental measurements of cooling viscous flows, and FLOW-3D simulations with temperature-dependent rheology match results from molten basalt experiments. We can apply these models to reconstruct past lava flows in Hawai'i and Saudi Arabia using parameters assembled from morphology, textural analysis, and eruption observations as natural test cases. Our study highlights the strengths and weaknesses of each code, including accuracy and computational costs, and provides insights regarding code selection.

  15. Dynamic bulk and shear moduli due to grain-scale local fluid flow in fluid-saturated cracked poroelastic rocks: Theoretical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yongjia; Hu, Hengshan; Rudnicki, John W.

    2016-07-01

    Grain-scale local fluid flow is an important loss mechanism for attenuating waves in cracked fluid-saturated poroelastic rocks. In this study, a dynamic elastic modulus model is developed to quantify local flow effect on wave attenuation and velocity dispersion in porous isotropic rocks. The Eshelby transform technique, inclusion-based effective medium model (the Mori-Tanaka scheme), fluid dynamics and mass conservation principle are combined to analyze pore-fluid pressure relaxation and its influences on overall elastic properties. The derivation gives fully analytic, frequency-dependent effective bulk and shear moduli of a fluid-saturated porous rock. It is shown that the derived bulk and shear moduli rigorously satisfy the Biot-Gassmann relationship of poroelasticity in the low-frequency limit, while they are consistent with isolated-pore effective medium theory in the high-frequency limit. In particular, a simplified model is proposed to quantify the squirt-flow dispersion for frequencies lower than stiff-pore relaxation frequency. The main advantage of the proposed model over previous models is its ability to predict the dispersion due to squirt flow between pores and cracks with distributed aspect ratio instead of flow in a simply conceptual double-porosity structure. Independent input parameters include pore aspect ratio distribution, fluid bulk modulus and viscosity, and bulk and shear moduli of the solid grain. Physical assumptions made in this model include (1) pores are inter-connected and (2) crack thickness is smaller than the viscous skin depth. This study is restricted to linear elastic, well-consolidated granular rocks.

  16. THE NOAA/EPA FLUID MODELING FACILITY'S CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE UNDERSTANDING OF THE ATMOSPHERIC DISPERSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past thirty years, scientists at the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Fluid Modeling Facility (FMF) have conducted laboratory studies of fluid flow and pollutant dispersion within three distinct experimental chambers: a meteorological wind tunnel, a water-channel ...

  17. Experiments and Modeling of G-Jitter Fluid Mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leslie, F. W.; Ramachandran, N.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    While there is a general understanding of the acceleration environment onboard an orbiting spacecraft, past research efforts in the modeling and analysis area have still not produced a general theory that predicts the effects of multi-spectral periodic accelerations on a general class of experiments nor have they produced scaling laws that a prospective experimenter can use to assess how an experiment might be affected by this acceleration environment. Furthermore, there are no actual flight experimental data that correlates heat or mass transport with measurements of the periodic acceleration environment. The present investigation approaches this problem with carefully conducted terrestrial experiments and rigorous numerical modeling for better understanding the effect of residual gravity and gentler on experiments. The approach is to use magnetic fluids that respond to an imposed magnetic field gradient in much the same way as fluid density responds to a gravitational field. By utilizing a programmable power source in conjunction with an electromagnet, both static and dynamic body forces can be simulated in lab experiments. The paper provides an overview of the technique and includes recent results from the experiments.

  18. Two-fluid model for two-phase flow

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, M.

    1987-01-01

    The two-fluid model formulation is discussed in detail. The emphasis of the paper is on the three-dimensional formulation and the closure issues. The origin of the interfacial and turbulent transfer terms in the averaged formulation is explained and their original mathematical forms are examined. The interfacial transfer of mass, momentum, and energy is proportional to the interfacial area and driving force. This is not a postulate but a result of the careful examination of the mathematical form of the exact interfacial terms. These two effects are considered separately. Since all the interfacial transfer terms involve the interfacial area concentration, the accurate modeling of the local interfacial area concentration is the first step to be taken for a development of a reliable two-fluid model closure relations. The interfacial momentum interaction has been studied in terms of the standard-drag, lift, virtual mass, and Basset forces. Available analytical and semi-empirical correlations and closure relations are reviewed and existing shortcomings are pointed out. The other major area of importance is the modeling of turbulent transfer in two-phase flow. The two-phase flow turbulence problem is coupled with the phase separation problem even in a steady-state fully developed flow. Thus the two-phase turbulence cannot be understood without understanding the interfacial drag and lift forces accurately. There are some indications that the mixing length type model may not be sufficient to describe the three-dimensional turbulent and flow structures. Although it is a very difficult challenge, the two-phase flow turbulence should be investigated both experimentally and analytically with long time-scale research. 87 refs.

  19. Computational methods of the Advanced Fluid Dynamics Model

    SciTech Connect

    Bohl, W.R.; Wilhelm, D.; Parker, F.R.; Berthier, J.; Maudlin, P.J.; Schmuck, P.; Goutagny, L.; Ichikawa, S.; Ninokata, H.; Luck, L.B.

    1987-01-01

    To more accurately treat severe accidents in fast reactors, a program has been set up to investigate new computational models and approaches. The product of this effort is a computer code, the Advanced Fluid Dynamics Model (AFDM). This paper describes some of the basic features of the numerical algorithm used in AFDM. Aspects receiving particular emphasis are the fractional-step method of time integration, the semi-implicit pressure iteration, the virtual mass inertial terms, the use of three velocity fields, higher order differencing, convection of interfacial area with source and sink terms, multicomponent diffusion processes in heat and mass transfer, the SESAME equation of state, and vectorized programming. A calculated comparison with an isothermal tetralin/ammonia experiment is performed. We conclude that significant improvements are possible in reliably calculating the progression of severe accidents with further development.

  20. Industrial processing of complex fluids: Formulation and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Scovel, J.C.; Bleasdale, S.; Forest, G.M.; Bechtel, S.

    1997-08-01

    The production of many important commercial materials involves the evolution of a complex fluid through a cooling phase into a hardened product. Textile fibers, high-strength fibers(KEVLAR, VECTRAN), plastics, chopped-fiber compounds, and fiber optical cable are such materials. Industry desires to replace experiments with on-line, real time models of these processes. Solutions to the problems are not just a matter of technology transfer, but require a fundamental description and simulation of the processes. Goals of the project are to develop models that can be used to optimize macroscopic properties of the solid product, to identify sources of undesirable defects, and to seek boundary-temperature and flow-and-material controls to optimize desired properties.

  1. Physics based simulation of seismicity induced in the vicinity of a high-pressure fluid injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCloskey, J.; NicBhloscaidh, M.; Murphy, S.; O'Brien, G. S.; Bean, C. J.

    2013-12-01

    High-pressure fluid injection into subsurface is known, in some cases, to induce earthquakes in the surrounding volume. The increasing importance of ';fracking' as a potential source of hydrocarbons has made the seismic hazard from this effect an important issue the adjudication of planning applications and it is likely that poor understanding of the process will be used as justification of refusal of planning in Ireland and the UK. Here we attempt to understand some of the physical controls on the size and frequency of induced earthquakes using a physics-based simulation of the process and examine resulting earthquake catalogues The driver for seismicity in our simulations is identical to that used in the paper by Murphy et al. in this session. Fluid injection is simulated using pore fluid movement throughout a permeable layer from a high-pressure point source using a lattice Boltzmann scheme. Diffusivities and frictional parameters can be defined independently at individual nodes/cells allowing us to reproduce 3-D geological structures. Active faults in the model follow a fractal size distribution and exhibit characteristic event size, resulting in a power-law frequency-size distribution. The fluid injection is not hydraulically connected to the fault (i.e. fluid does not come into physical contact with the fault); however stress perturbations from the injection drive the seismicity model. The duration and pressure-time function of the fluid injection can be adjusted to model any given injection scenario and the rate of induced seismicity is controlled by the local structures and ambient stress field as well as by the stress perturbations resulting from the fluid injection. Results from the rate and state fault models of Murphy et al. are incorporated to include the effect of fault strengthening in seismically quite areas. Initial results show similarities with observed induced seismic catalogues. Seismicity is only induced where the active faults have not been

  2. Knowledge-based zonal grid generation for computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Alison E.

    1988-01-01

    Automation of flow field zoning in two dimensions is an important step towards reducing the difficulty of three-dimensional grid generation in computational fluid dynamics. Using a knowledge-based approach makes sense, but problems arise which are caused by aspects of zoning involving perception, lack of expert consensus, and design processes. These obstacles are overcome by means of a simple shape and configuration language, a tunable zoning archetype, and a method of assembling plans from selected, predefined subplans. A demonstration system for knowledge-based two-dimensional flow field zoning has been successfully implemented and tested on representative aerodynamic configurations. The results show that this approach can produce flow field zonings that are acceptable to experts with differing evaluation criteria.

  3. Method for inverting reflection trace data from 3-D and 4-D seismic surveys and identifying subsurface fluid and pathways in and among hydrocarbon reservoirs based on impedance models

    DOEpatents

    He, Wei; Anderson, Roger N.

    1998-01-01

    A method is disclosed for inverting 3-D seismic reflection data obtained from seismic surveys to derive impedance models for a subsurface region, and for inversion of multiple 3-D seismic surveys (i.e., 4-D seismic surveys) of the same subsurface volume, separated in time to allow for dynamic fluid migration, such that small scale structure and regions of fluid and dynamic fluid flow within the subsurface volume being studied can be identified. The method allows for the mapping and quantification of available hydrocarbons within a reservoir and is thus useful for hydrocarbon prospecting and reservoir management. An iterative seismic inversion scheme constrained by actual well log data which uses a time/depth dependent seismic source function is employed to derive impedance models from 3-D and 4-D seismic datasets. The impedance values can be region grown to better isolate the low impedance hydrocarbon bearing regions. Impedance data derived from multiple 3-D seismic surveys of the same volume can be compared to identify regions of dynamic evolution and bypassed pay. Effective Oil Saturation or net oil thickness can also be derived from the impedance data and used for quantitative assessment of prospective drilling targets and reservoir management.

  4. Method for inverting reflection trace data from 3-D and 4-D seismic surveys and identifying subsurface fluid and pathways in and among hydrocarbon reservoirs based on impedance models

    DOEpatents

    He, W.; Anderson, R.N.

    1998-08-25

    A method is disclosed for inverting 3-D seismic reflection data obtained from seismic surveys to derive impedance models for a subsurface region, and for inversion of multiple 3-D seismic surveys (i.e., 4-D seismic surveys) of the same subsurface volume, separated in time to allow for dynamic fluid migration, such that small scale structure and regions of fluid and dynamic fluid flow within the subsurface volume being studied can be identified. The method allows for the mapping and quantification of available hydrocarbons within a reservoir and is thus useful for hydrocarbon prospecting and reservoir management. An iterative seismic inversion scheme constrained by actual well log data which uses a time/depth dependent seismic source function is employed to derive impedance models from 3-D and 4-D seismic datasets. The impedance values can be region grown to better isolate the low impedance hydrocarbon bearing regions. Impedance data derived from multiple 3-D seismic surveys of the same volume can be compared to identify regions of dynamic evolution and bypassed pay. Effective Oil Saturation or net oil thickness can also be derived from the impedance data and used for quantitative assessment of prospective drilling targets and reservoir management. 20 figs.

  5. Development of a parallel implicit solver of fluid modeling equations for gas discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Chieh-Tsan; Chiu, Yuan-Ming; Hwang, Feng-Nan; Wu, Jong-Shinn

    2011-01-01

    A parallel fully implicit PETSc-based fluid modeling equations solver for simulating gas discharges is developed. Fluid modeling equations include: the neutral species continuity equation, the charged species continuity equation with drift-diffusion approximation for mass fluxes, the electron energy density equation, and Poisson's equation for electrostatic potential. Except for Poisson's equation, all model equations are discretized by the fully implicit backward Euler method as a time integrator, and finite differences with the Scharfetter-Gummel scheme for mass fluxes on the spatial domain. At each time step, the resulting large sparse algebraic nonlinear system is solved by the Newton-Krylov-Schwarz algorithm. A 2D-GEC RF discharge is used as a benchmark to validate our solver by comparing the numerical results with both the published experimental data and the theoretical prediction. The parallel performance of the solver is investigated.

  6. Effect of Cerebrospinal Fluid Modelling on Spherically Convergent Shear Waves during Blunt Head Trauma.

    PubMed

    Madhukar, Amit; Chen, Ying; Ostoja-Starzewski, Martin

    2017-03-14

    The MRI-based computational model, previously validated by tagged MRI and HARP imaging analysis technique on in vivo human brain deformation, is employed to study transient wave dynamics during blunt head trauma. Three different constitutive models are used for the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF): incompressible solid elastic, viscoelastic and fluid-like elastic using an equation of state model. Three impact cases are simulated which indicate that the blunt impacts give rise not only to a fast pressure wave but also to a slow, and potentially much more damaging, shear (distortional) wave that converges spherically towards the brain center. The wave amplification due to spherical geometry is balanced by damping due to tissues' viscoelasticity and the heterogeneous brain structure, suggesting a stochastic competition of these two opposite effects. It is observed that this convergent shear wave is dependent on the constitutive property of the CSF whereas the peak pressure is not as significantly affected.

  7. Critical Crossover Functions for Simple Fluids: Towards the Crossover Modelling Uniqueness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrabos, Yves; Lecoutre, Carole; Marre, Samuel; LeNeindre, Bernard; Hahn, Inseob

    2016-11-01

    Based on a single non-universal temperature scaling factor present in a simple fluid case, a detailed analysis of non-universal parameters involved in different critical-to-classical crossover models is given. For the infinite limit of the cutoff wave number, a set of three scaling-parameters is defined for each model such that it shows all the shapes of the theoretical crossover functions overlap on the mean crossover function shapes close to the non-trivial fixed point. The analysis of corresponding links between their fluid-dependent parameters opens a route to define a parametric model of crossover equation-of-state, closely satisfying the universal features calculated from the Ising-like limit in the massive renormalization scheme.

  8. Fluid-percussion–induced traumatic brain injury model in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kabadi, Shruti V.; Hilton, Genell D.; Stoica, Bogdan A.; Zapple, David N.; Faden, Alan I.

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of mortality and morbidity. Various attempts have been made to replicate clinical TBI using animal models. The fluid-percussion model (FP) is one of the oldest and most commonly used models of experimentally induced TBI. Both central (CFP) and lateral (LFP) variations of the model have been used. Developed initially for use in larger species, the standard FP device was adapted more than 20 years ago to induce consistent degrees of brain injury in rodents. Recently, we developed a microprocessor-controlled, pneumatically driven instrument, micro-FP (MFP), to address operational concerns associated with the use of the standard FP device in rodents. We have characterized the MFP model with regard to injury severity according to behavioral and histological outcomes. In this protocol, we review the FP models and detail surgical procedures for LFP. The surgery involves tracheal intubation, craniotomy and fixation of Luer fittings, and induction of injury. The surgical procedure can be performed within 45–50 min. PMID:20725070

  9. Compressible cell gas models for asymmetric fluid criticality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerdeiriña, Claudio A.; Orkoulas, Gerassimos

    2017-03-01

    We thoroughly describe a class of models recently presented by Fisher and coworkers [Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 040601 (2016)], 10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.040601. The crucial feature of such models, termed compressible cell gases (CCGs), is that the individual cell volumes of a lattice gas are allowed to fluctuate. They are studied via the seldom-used (μ , p , T ) ensemble, which leads to their exact mapping onto the Ising model. Remarkably, CCGs obey complete scaling, a formulation for the thermodynamic behavior of fluids near the gas-liquid critical point that accommodates features inherent to the asymmetric nature of this phase transition like the Yang-Yang (YY) and singular coexistence-curve diameter anomalies. The CCG0 models generated when volumes vary freely reveal local free volume fluctuations as the origin of these phenomena. Local energy-volume coupling is found to be another relevant microscopic factor. Furthermore, the CCG class is greatly extended by using the decoration transformation, with an interesting example being the Sastry-Debenedetti-Sciortino-Stanley model for hydrogen bonding in low-temperature water. The magnitude of anomalies is characterized by a single parameter, the YY ratio, which for the models so far considered here ranges from -∞ to 1/2 .

  10. Versatile and Robust Software for Multi-Fluid Plasma Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-21

    resolved problem (2) by using a semi-implicit two-fluid (and 10-moment 2 fluid) algorithm designed by Harish Kumar “ Entropy Stable Numerical Schemes for...on  a  two-­‐fluid  shock  in  Figure  12  showing   that  it  can  be  applied  to  multiple  fluids,   Maxwell

  11. A lateral thoracotomy approach for thoracic duct cannulation and lymphatic fluid collection in a feline model.

    PubMed

    Hardie, Robert J; Sheehan, Nora K

    2016-10-01

    This study describes a lateral thoracotomy approach for thoracic duct cannulation and lymphatic fluid collection in a feline model. The thoracic duct was cannulated via a left lateral intercostal thoracotomy in 12 cats. Lymphatic fluid was collected for up to 16 days and analyzed on days 3, 9 and 16. The volume collected and duration of cannula patency were recorded. Contrast imaging of the thoracic duct was performed if fluid ceased to flow or at the end of the 16-day study period. In two cats, the cannula became dislodged within 24 h. For the remaining 10 cats, mean daily volume collected was 43.7 mL (median 41.0, range 2.3 to 152.4 mL), and mean duration of cannula patency was 8.2 days (median 6.5, range 3 to 16 days). Contrast imaging revealed that the cannula was patent in three cats, obstructed in two cats, and the thoracic duct had ruptured or had extravasation of contrast outside the duct in five cats. Cytological examination of lymphatic fluid from the three time points revealed normal appearing small lymphocytes (97%) and few (3%) non-degenerate neutrophils, macrophages, eosinophils, and plasma cells. Based on the results of this study, lateral thoracotomy approach for thoracic duct cannulation is a feasible technique for collecting lymphatic fluid in cats. This technique may have application as a model for short-term evaluation of thoracic fluid in cats; however, cannula patency was unpredictable and should be considered when utilizing this technique.

  12. BOOK REVIEW: Plasma and Fluid Turbulence: Theory and Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshizawa, A.; Itoh, S. I.; Itoh, K.

    2003-03-01

    The area of turbulence has been covered by many books over the years. This has, of course, mainly been fluid turbulence, while the area of plasma turbulence has been treated much less. This book by Yoshizawa et al covers both plasma and fluid turbulence, in a way that does justice to both areas at the same time as cross-disciplinary aspects are illuminated. The book should be useful to physicists working in both areas partly because it examines fundamental aspects in a pedagogical way, partly because it is up to date and partly because of the cross-disciplinary aspects which enrich both areas. It is written as an advanced textbook. The reader should have previous knowledge of at least one of the areas and also some background in statistical physics. The book starts with the very important and highly up to date area of structure formation which is relevant both to fluids and plasmas. Here, pipe flow of fluids is treated as an introduction to the area, then follows discussion of the generation of magnetic fields by turbulent motion in stellar objects and stucture formation in plasmas confined by a magnetic field. Also the concept of bifurcation is introduced. This part builds up knowledge from the simple fluid case to the problems of magnetic confinement of plasmas in a very pedagogical way. It continues by introducing the fundamentals of fluid turbulence. This is done very systematically and concepts useful for industrial applications like the K-e method and several ways of heuristic modelling are introduced. Also the two dimensional vortex equation, which is also relevant to magnetized plasmas is introduced. In chapter 5 the statistical theory of turbulence is treated. It starts with a very nice and easy to understand example of renormalization of a simple nonlinear equation where the exact solution is known. It introduces the method of partial renormalization, Greens functions and the direct interaction approximation (DIA). The book then continues with an

  13. Oil drainage in model porous media by viscoelastic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaumont, Julien; Bodiguel, Hugues; Colin, Annie

    2012-11-01

    Crude oil recovery efficiency has been shown to depend directly on the capillary number (Ca). If the capillary phenomenon is well described for Newtonian fluids, the consequences of non linear rheology and viscoelasticity require more experimental work at the pore scale. In this work we take advantage of microfluidic to revisit this field. We carried out oil drainage experiments through a micromodel made up with photoresist resin. The wetting phase trapped is a model oil. The invading phases used are aqueous solutions of high molecular weight hydrolyzed polyacrylamide (HPAM) and surfactant. Qualitatively, we observed a transition between a capillary fingering at low flow rates and a stable front at high flow rates for the drainage experiments with HPAM and surfactant solutions as it happened for drainage with Newtonian fluids. From movies of the filling of the device, we determine the local velocity of all menisci in the porous media. Thus, we quantify the capillary fingering. Surprisingly, local velocities are not significantly different from those measured using water, whereas the HPAM solutions are much more viscous. With betaine solutions, we observed an emulsification of the oil clusters trapped during the invasion leading to a very high oil recovery after percolation.

  14. An Office-Based Fluid to Fluid Exchange Technique for the Treatment of Postvitrectomy Vitreous Cavity Hemorrhage and Secondary Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    A case of postvitrectomy hemorrhage with secondary glaucoma successfully treated with an office-based fluid to fluid exchange is described. A 25 Ga trocar was placed 3 mm from the sclerocorneal limbus at the 2 o'clock position and connected to a 250 cc elevated bottle of balanced salt solution (BSS) through an intravenous (IV) line and an infusion cannula. Afterward, a 25 Ga needle was inserted 3 mm from the limbus at the 5 o'clock position approximately. The BSS fluid entered the eye through the 25 Ga trocar lavaging the vitreous cavity and the anterior chamber. About 4 to 6 cc of hemorrhagic fluid egressed the eye through the 25 Ga needle. PMID:28321352

  15. Lamellar biogels: Fluid-membrane-based hydrogels containing polymer lipids

    SciTech Connect

    Warriner, H.E.; Idziak, S.H.J.; Slack, N.L.

    1996-02-16

    A class of lamellar biological hydrogels comprised of fluid membranes of lipids and surfactants with small amounts of low molecular weight poly(ethylene glycol)-derived polymer pipids (PEG-lipids) were studied by x-ray diffraction, polarized light microscopy, and rheometry. In contrast to isotropic hydrogels of polymer networks, these membrane-based birefringent liquid crystalline biogels, labeled L{sub {alpha},g,} form the gel phase when water is added to the liquid-like lamellar L{sub {alpha}} phase, which reenters a liquid-like mixed phase upon further dilution. Furthermore, gels with larger water content require less PEG-lipid to remain stable. Although concentrated ({approx}50 weight percent) mixtures of free PEG (molecular weight, 5000) and water do not gel, gelatin does occur in mixtures containing as little as 0.5 weight percent PEG lipid. A defining signature of the L{sub {alpha}, g} regime as it sets in from the fluid lamellar L{sub {alpha}} phase is the proliferation of layer-dislocation-type defects, which are stabilized by the segregation of PEG-lipids to the defect regions of high membrane curvature that connect the membranes. 32 refs., 5 figs.

  16. Titanium glycerolate-based electrorheological fluids with stable properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Xufeng; Zhao, Hong; Qi, Min; Tao, Wanyong

    2014-04-01

    Titanium glycerolate (TiGly) particles were prepared with different molar ratios of glycerol to tetrabutyltitanate (TBOT) (glycerol/TBOT = 2, 2.5, and 3) by a simple precipitation method. For comparison, titanium propanediol (TiPro) particles were prepared with 1,3-propanediol and TBOT (propanediol/TBOT = 2) by the same route. The composition and morphology of the four kinds of particles were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. The results indicate that the secondary hydroxyl groups originating from glycerolate are doped into the TiGly particles, and the four kinds of particles present different morphology. The suspensions prepared with TiGly particles by 60% weight fraction and silicone oil show significant electrorheological (ER) performance, while the TiPro particles-based fluid with the same particles fraction present weak ER properties. Constant shear rate and step-function electric field pulses were applied to investigate the stability of the ER fluids. The TiGly particles synthesized with the molar ratio of glycerol to TBOT equaling 2.5 exhibit significant (˜40 kPa at 5 kV mm-1) and stable ER activity.

  17. An unsteady state retention model for fluid desorption from sorbents.

    PubMed

    Bazargan, Alireza; Sadeghi, Hamed; Garcia-Mayoral, Ricardo; McKay, Gordon

    2015-07-15

    New studies regarding the sorption of fluids by solids are published every day. In performance testing, after the sorbent has reached saturation, it is usually removed from the sorbate bath and allowed to drain. The loss of liquid from the sorbents with time is of prime importance in the real-world application of sorbents, such as in oil spill response. However, there is currently no equation used for modeling the unsteady state loss of the liquid from the dripping sorbent. Here, an analytical model has been provided for modeling the dynamic loss of liquid from the sorbent in dripping experiments. Data from more than 60 sorbent-sorbate systems has been used to validate the model. The proposed model shows excellent agreement with experimental results and is expressed as: U(t)=U(L)e(-Kt)+U(e) In which U(t) (kg/kg) is the uptake capacity of the sorbent at any time t (s) during dripping, U(L) (kg/kg) is the uptake capacity lost due to dripping, and U(e) (kg/kg) is the equilibrium uptake capacity reached after prolonged dripping. K (1/s) is defined as the Kamaan coefficient and controls the curvature of the retention profile. Kamaan ([symbol: see text] IPA phonetics: kæmɒn) is an Iranian (Farsi/Persian) word meaning "arc" or "curve" and hence the letter K has been designated.

  18. Model Order Reduction for Fluid Dynamics with Moving Solid Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Haotian; Wei, Mingjun

    2016-11-01

    We extended the application of POD-Galerkin projection for model order reduction from usual fixed-domain problems to more general fluid-solid systems when moving boundary/interface is involved. The idea is similar to numerical simulation approaches using embedded forcing terms to represent boundary motion and domain change. However, such a modified approach will not get away with the unsteadiness of boundary terms which appear as time-dependent coefficients in the new Galerkin model. These coefficients need to be pre-computed for prescribed motion, or worse, to be computed at each time step for non-prescribed motion. The extra computational cost gets expensive in some cases and eventually undermines the value of using reduced-order models. One solution is to decompose the moving boundary/domain to orthogonal modes and derive another low-order model with fixed coefficients for boundary motion. Further study shows that the most expensive integrations resulted from the unsteady motion (in both original and domain-decomposition approaches) have almost negligible impact on the overall dynamics. Dropping these expensive terms reduces the computation cost by at least one order while no obvious effect on model accuracy is noticed. Supported by ARL.

  19. Carbon dioxide-based supercritical fluids as IC manufacturing solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, J.B.; Davenhall, L.B.; Taylor, C.M.V.; Sivils, L.D.; Pierce, T.; Tiefert, K.

    1999-05-11

    The production of integrated circuits (IC's) involves a number of discrete steps which utilize hazardous or regulated solvents and generate large waste streams. ES&H considerations associated with these chemicals have prompted a search for alternative, more environmentally benign solvent systems. An emerging technology for conventional solvent replacement is the use of supercritical fluids based on carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). Research work, conducted at Los Alamos in conjunction with the Hewlett-Packard Company, has lead to the development of a CO{sub 2}-based supercritical fluid treatment system for the stripping of hard-baked photoresists. This treatment system, known as Supercritical CO{sub 2} Resist Remover, or CORR, uses a two-component solvent composed of a nonhazardous, non-regulated compound, dissolved in supercritical CO{sub 2}. The solvent/treatment system has been successfully tested on metallized Si wafers coated with negative and positive photoresist, the latter both before and after ion-implantation. A description of the experimental data will be presented. Based on the initial laboratory results, the project has progressed to the design and construction of prototype, single-wafer photoresist-stripping equipment. The integrated system involves a closed-loop, recirculating cycle which continuously cleans and regenerates the CO{sub 2}, recycles the dissolved solvent, and separates and concentrates the spent resist. The status of the current design and implementation strategy of a treatment system to existing IC fabrication facilities will be discussed. Additional remarks will be made on the use of a SCORR-type system for the cleaning of wafers prior to processing.

  20. Modeling fluid-structure interactions in shallow microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shidhore, Tanmay C.; Christov, Ivan C.

    2016-11-01

    Rectangular microfluidic conduits with deformable walls are some of the simplest and most extensively studied microfluidic devices, primarily due to their practical design applications in a variety of fields like biology, medical diagnostics (e.g., lab-on-a-chip), nanotechnology, etc. Experimentally, these devices are found to deform into a non-rectangular cross-section due to fluid-structure interactions occurring at the channel walls. These deformations significantly affect the flow profile, which results in a non-linear relationship between the flow rate and the pressure drop, which cannot be explained by a 'generalised Poiseuille flow solution'. To this end, we perform a numerical study of these fluid-structure interactions and their effect on the flow rate and the pressure drop occurring in microfluidic conduits with a single deformable wall. The behavior of several shallow conduit systems (l >> w >> h) with rigid base and side walls and a soft top wall (e.g., PDMS) is simulated under laminar flow conditions using the commercial software suite ANSYS. Simulation results are compared against experimental pressure drop-flow rate data from the literature and also newly developed analytical expressions for the wall deformation, the pressure and the normalized flow rate.

  1. Rheological investigations of water based drilling fluid system developed using synthesized nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Rajat; Mahto, Triveni K.; Mahto, Vikas

    2016-02-01

    In the present study, polyacrylamide grafted xanthan gum/multiwalled carbon nanotubes (PA-g-XG/MWCNT) nanocomposite was synthesized by free radical polymerization technique using potassium persulfate as an initiator. The polyacrylamide was grafted on xanthan gum backbone in the presence of MWCNT. The synthesized nanocomposite was characterized by X-ray diffraction technique (XRD), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis (FT-IR). The morphological characteristics of the nanocomposite were analyzed by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) analyses. Also, its temperature resistance property was observed with Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The effect of nanocomposite on the rheological properties of the developed drilling fluid system was analyzed with a strain controlled rheometer and Fann viscometer. Flow curves were drawn for the developed water based drilling fluid system at elevated temperatures. The experimental data were fitted to Bingham, power-law, and Herschel Bulkley flow models. It was observed that the Herschel Bulkley flow model predict the flow behavior of the developed system more accurately. Further, nanocomposite exhibited non-Newtonian shear thinning flow behavior in the developed drilling fluid system. Nanocomposite showed high temperature stability and had a significant effect on the rheological properties of the developed drilling fluid system as compared to conventionally used partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide (PHPA) polymer.

  2. Functional assessment of cerebral artery stenosis: A pilot study based on computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Yan, Zhengzheng; Pu, Yuehua; Shiu, Wen-Shin; Wu, Jianhuang; Chen, Rongliang; Leng, Xinyi; Qin, Haiqiang; Liu, Xin; Jia, Baixue; Song, Ligang; Wang, Yilong; Miao, Zhongrong; Wang, Yongjun; Liu, Liping; Cai, Xiao-Chuan

    2016-10-04

    The fractional pressure ratio is introduced to quantitatively assess the hemodynamic significance of severe intracranial stenosis. A computational fluid dynamics-based method is proposed to non-invasively compute the FPRCFD and compared against fractional pressure ratio measured by an invasive technique. Eleven patients with severe intracranial stenosis considered for endovascular intervention were recruited and an invasive procedure was performed to measure the distal and the aortic pressure (Pd and Pa). The fractional pressure ratio was calculated as [Formula: see text] The computed tomography angiography was used to reconstruct three-dimensional (3D) arteries for each patient. Cerebral hemodynamics was then computed for the arteries using a mathematical model governed by Navier-Stokes equations and with the outflow conditions imposed by a model of distal resistance and compliance. The non-invasive [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], and FPRCFD were then obtained from the computational fluid dynamics calculation using a 16-core parallel computer. The invasive and non-invasive parameters were tested by statistical analysis. For this group of patients, the computational fluid dynamics method achieved comparable results with the invasive measurements. The fractional pressure ratio and FPRCFD are very close and highly correlated, but not linearly proportional, with the percentage of stenosis. The proposed computational fluid dynamics method can potentially be useful in assessing the functional alteration of cerebral stenosis.

  3. Numerical modeling of fluid effects on seismic properties of fractured magmatic geothermal reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grab, Melchior; Quintal, Beatriz; Caspari, Eva; Maurer, Hansruedi; Greenhalgh, Stewart

    2017-02-01

    Seismic investigations of geothermal reservoirs over the last 20 years have sought to interpret the resulting tomograms and reflection images in terms of the degree of reservoir fracturing and fluid content. Since the former provides the pathways and the latter acts as the medium for transporting geothermal energy, such information is needed to evaluate the quality of the reservoir. In conventional rock physics-based interpretations, this hydro-mechanical information is approximated from seismic velocities computed at the low-frequency (field-based) and high-frequency (lab-based) limits. In this paper, we demonstrate how seismic properties of fluid-filled, fractured reservoirs can be modeled over the full frequency spectrum using a numerical simulation technique which has become popular in recent years. This technique is based on Biot's theory of poroelasticity and enables the modeling of the seismic velocity dispersion and the frequency dependent seismic attenuation due to wave-induced fluid flow. These properties are sensitive to key parameters such as the hydraulic permeability of fractures as well as the compressibility and viscosity of the pore fluids. Applying the poroelastic modeling technique to the specific case of a magmatic geothermal system under stress due to the weight of the overlying rocks requires careful parameterization of the model. This includes consideration of the diversity of rock types occurring in the magmatic system and examination of the confining-pressure dependency of each input parameter. After the evaluation of all input parameters, we use our modeling technique to determine the seismic attenuation factors and phase velocities of a rock containing a complex interconnected fracture network, whose geometry is based on a fractured geothermal reservoir in Iceland. Our results indicate that in a magmatic geothermal reservoir the overall seismic velocity structure mainly reflects the lithological heterogeneity of the system, whereas

  4. Numerical investigation of dynamics of unsteady sheet/cloud cavitating flow using a compressible fluid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guang-Hao; Wang, Guo-Yu; Huang, Biao; Hu, Chang-Li; Wang, Zhi-Ying; Wang, Jian

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, a compressible fluid model is proposed to investigate dynamics of the turbulent cavitating flow over a Clark-Y hydrofoil. The numerical simulation is based on the homogeneous mixture approach coupled with filter-based density correction model (FBDCM) turbulence model and Zwart cavitation model. Considering the compressibility effect, the equation of state of each phase is introduced into the numerical model. The results show that the predicted results agree well with experimental data concerning the time-averaged lift/drag coefficient and shedding frequency. The quasi-periodic evolution of sheet/cloud cavitation and the resulting lift and drag are discussed in detail. Especially, the present compressible-mixture numerical model is capable of simulating the shock waves in the final stage of cavity collapse. It is found that the shock waves may cause the transient significant increase and decrease in lift and drag if the cavity collapses near the foil surface.

  5. [Present status and trend of heart fluid mechanics research based on medical image analysis].

    PubMed

    Gan, Jianhong; Yin, Lixue; Xie, Shenghua; Li, Wenhua; Lu, Jing; Luo, Anguo

    2014-06-01

    With introduction of current main methods for heart fluid mechanics researches, we studied the characteristics and weakness for three primary analysis methods based on magnetic resonance imaging, color Doppler ultrasound and grayscale ultrasound image, respectively. It is pointed out that particle image velocity (PIV), speckle tracking and block match have the same nature, and three algorithms all adopt block correlation. The further analysis shows that, with the development of information technology and sensor, the research for cardiac function and fluid mechanics will focus on energy transfer process of heart fluid, characteristics of Chamber wall related to blood fluid and Fluid-structure interaction in the future heart fluid mechanics fields.

  6. Critique of fluid theory of magnetospheric phenomena. [kinetic theory vs two fluid models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heikkila, W. J.

    1973-01-01

    Discussion of the limitations and shortcomings of the fluid theory of magnetospheric phenomena. Following a brief qualitative review of the various theoretical approaches and of their interrelation, some of the limitations of the fluid theory with respect to magnetospheric problems are outlined, and the subsequent fallacies are exposed. The idea of frozen field convection and the concept of field line annihilation or merging are criticized. In conclusion, a plea is made for a more balanced approach to magnetospheric problems.

  7. Fluid-Structure Interaction Modeling of Intracranial Aneurysm Hemodynamics: Effects of Different Assumptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajabzadeh Oghaz, Hamidreza; Damiano, Robert; Meng, Hui

    2015-11-01

    Intracranial aneurysms (IAs) are pathological outpouchings of cerebral vessels, the progression of which are mediated by complex interactions between the blood flow and vasculature. Image-based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has been used for decades to investigate IA hemodynamics. However, the commonly adopted simplifying assumptions in CFD (e.g. rigid wall) compromise the simulation accuracy and mask the complex physics involved in IA progression and eventual rupture. Several groups have considered the wall compliance by using fluid-structure interaction (FSI) modeling. However, FSI simulation is highly sensitive to numerical assumptions (e.g. linear-elastic wall material, Newtonian fluid, initial vessel configuration, and constant pressure outlet), the effects of which are poorly understood. In this study, a comprehensive investigation of the sensitivity of FSI simulations in patient-specific IAs is investigated using a multi-stage approach with a varying level of complexity. We start with simulations incorporating several common simplifications: rigid wall, Newtonian fluid, and constant pressure at the outlets, and then we stepwise remove these simplifications until the most comprehensive FSI simulations. Hemodynamic parameters such as wall shear stress and oscillatory shear index are assessed and compared at each stage to better understand the sensitivity of in FSI simulations for IA to model assumptions. Supported by the National Institutes of Health (1R01 NS 091075-01).

  8. Thermal-fluid modeling of the Missouri S&T Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sipaun, Susan Maria

    Thermal-fluid modeling of the Missouri University of Science and Technology Reactor (MSTR) was carried out using a computational fluid dynamics code (CFD), STAR-CCM+. First, a three-dimensional parallel-plate model was developed, and the cosine-shaped heat flux was applied to the MSTR core. Simulation results for fluid flow under natural convection condition show coolant temperature and velocity as a function of core power. A characteristic equation for the parallel-plate model was obtained based on Forchheimer's flow equation. The inertial resistance tensor and viscous resistance tensor were found to be 281005 kg/m. 4 and 7121.6 kg/m. 3 respectively. The MSTR core was then definedas a porous region with porosity 0.7027. A second model was developed to study convection within a section of the MSTR includes 3 fuel elements (power density of 1.86E+6 Wm-3) in one third of the reactor pool volume. For validation work, both plume temperature and pool temperature measurements were recorded at several locations within the MSTR pool. At 200kW, the temperature field was consistent with the pool temperature data at 15 locations. A third model included the workings of an eductor outlet from, and inlet into the active cooling system to predict heat removal capability. The major contribution of this study is to explain the thermal flow in the MSTR channels and pool, and to provide a framework for supporting reactor license renewal, and power uprate plans.

  9. Scalable parallel methods for monolithic coupling in fluid-structure interaction with application to blood flow modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, Andrew T. Cai Xiaochuan

    2010-02-01

    We introduce and study numerically a scalable parallel finite element solver for the simulation of blood flow in compliant arteries. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are used to model the fluid and coupled to an incompressible linear elastic model for the blood vessel walls. Our method features an unstructured dynamic mesh capable of modeling complicated geometries, an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian framework that allows for large displacements of the moving fluid domain, monolithic coupling between the fluid and structure equations, and fully implicit time discretization. Simulations based on blood vessel geometries derived from patient-specific clinical data are performed on large supercomputers using scalable Newton-Krylov algorithms preconditioned with an overlapping restricted additive Schwarz method that preconditions the entire fluid-structure system together. The algorithm is shown to be robust and scalable for a variety of physical parameters, scaling to hundreds of processors and millions of unknowns.

  10. A Two-Phase Solid/Fluid Model for Dense Granular Flows Including Dilatancy Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangeney, A.; Bouchut, F.; Fernández-Nieto, E. D.; Narbona-Reina, G.; Kone, E. H.

    2014-12-01

    We propose a thin layer depth-averaged two-phase model to describe solid-fluid mixtures such as debris flows. It describes the velocity of the two phases, the compression/dilatation of the granular media and its interaction with the pore fluid pressure, that itself modifies the friction within the granular phase (Iverson et al., 2010). The model is derived from a 3D two-phase model proposed by Jackson (2000) based on the 4 equations of mass and momentum conservation within the two phases. This system has 5 unknowns: the solid and fluid velocities, the solid and fluid pressures and the solid volume fraction. As a result, an additional equation inside the mixture is necessary to close the system. Surprisingly, this issue is inadequately accounted for in the models that have been developed on the basis of Jackson's work (Bouchut et al., 2014). In particular, Pitman and Le replaced this closure simply by imposing an extra boundary condition at the surface of the flow. When making a shallow expansion, this condition can be considered as a closure condition. However, the corresponding model cannot account for a dissipative energy balance. We propose here an approach to correctly deal with the thermodynamics of Jackson's equations. We close the mixture equations by a weak compressibility relation involving a critical density, or equivalently a critical pressure. Moreover, we relax one boundary condition, making it possible for the fluid to escape the granular media when compression of the granular mass occurs. Furthermore, we introduce second order terms in the equations making it possible to describe the evolution of the pore fluid pressure in response to the compression/dilatation of the granular mass without prescribing an extra ad-hoc equation for the pore pressure. We prove that the energy balance associated with this Jackson closure is dissipative, as well as its thin layer associated model. We present several numerical tests for the 1D case that are compared to the

  11. A Two-Phase Solid/Fluid Model for Dense Granular Flows Including Dilatancy Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangeney, Anne; Bouchut, Francois; Fernandez-Nieto, Enrique; Narbona-Reina, Gladys

    2015-04-01

    We propose a thin layer depth-averaged two-phase model to describe solid-fluid mixtures such as debris flows. It describes the velocity of the two phases, the compression/dilatation of the granular media and its interaction with the pore fluid pressure, that itself modifies the friction within the granular phase (Iverson et al., 2010). The model is derived from a 3D two-phase model proposed by Jackson (2000) based on the 4 equations of mass and momentum conservation within the two phases. This system has 5 unknowns: the solid and fluid velocities, the solid and fluid pressures and the solid volume fraction. As a result, an additional equation inside the mixture is necessary to close the system. Surprisingly, this issue is inadequately accounted for in the models that have been developed on the basis of Jackson's work (Bouchut et al., 2014). In particular, Pitman and Le replaced this closure simply by imposing an extra boundary condition at the surface of the flow. When making a shallow expansion, this condition can be considered as a closure condition. However, the corresponding model cannot account for a dissipative energy balance. We propose here an approach to correctly deal with the thermodynamics of Jackson's equations. We close the mixture equations by a weak compressibility relation involving a critical density, or equivalently a critical pressure. Moreover, we relax one boundary condition, making it possible for the fluid to escape the granular media when compression of the granular mass occurs. Furthermore, we introduce second order terms in the equations making it possible to describe the evolution of the pore fluid pressure in response to the compression/dilatation of the granular mass without prescribing an extra ad-hoc equation for the pore pressure. We prove that the energy balance associated with this Jackson closure is dissipative, as well as its thin layer associated model. We present several numerical tests for the 1D case that are compared to the

  12. Specific shear-dependent viscoelastic third-grade fluid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carapau, Fernando; Correia, Paulo; Grilo, Luis M.

    2016-12-01

    A specific modified constitutive equation for a third-grade fluid is proposed so that the model be suitable for applications where shear-thinning or shear-thickening may occur. For that, we use the Cosserat theory approach reducing the exact three-dimensional equations to a system depending only on time and on a single spatial variable. This one-dimensional system is obtained by integrating the linear momentum equation over the cross-section of the tube, taking a velocity field approximation provided by the Cosserat theory. From this reduced system, we obtain the unsteady equations for the wall shear stress and mean pressure gradient depending on the volume flow rate, Womersley number, viscoelastic coefficient and flow index over a finite section of the tube geometry with constant circular cross-section.

  13. COTHERM: Modelling fluid-rock interactions in Icelandic geothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thien, Bruno; Kosakowski, Georg; Kulik, Dmitrii

    2014-05-01

    Mineralogical alteration of reservoir rocks, driven by fluid circulation in natural or enhanced geothermal systems, is likely to influence the long-term performance of geothermal power generation. A key factor is the change of porosity due to dissolution of primary minerals and precipitation of secondary phases. Porosity changes will affect fluid circulation and solute transport, which, in turn, influence mineralogical alteration. This study is part of the Sinergia COTHERM project (COmbined hydrological, geochemical and geophysical modeling of geotTHERMal systems) that is an integrative research project aimed at improving our understanding of the sub-surface processes in magmatically-driven natural geothermal systems. We model the mineralogical and porosity evolution of Icelandic geothermal systems with 1D and 2D reactive transport models. These geothermal systems are typically high enthalphy systems where a magmatic pluton is located at a few kilometers depth. The shallow plutons increase the geothermal gradient and trigger the circulation of hydrothermal waters with a steam cap forming at shallow depth. We investigate two contrasting geothermal systems: Krafla, for which the water recharge consists of meteoritic water; and Reykjanes, for which the water recharge mainly consists of seawater. The initial rock composition is a fresh basalt. We use the GEM-Selektor geochemical modeling package [1] for calculation of kinetically controlled mineral equilibria between the rock and the ingression water. We consider basalt minerals dissolution kinetics according to Palandri & Kharaka [2]. Reactive surface areas are assumed to be geometric surface areas, and are corrected using a spherical-particle surface/mass relationship. For secondary minerals, we consider the partial equilibrium assuming that the primary mineral dissolution is slow, and the secondary mineral precipitation is fast. Comparison of our modeling results with the mineralogical assemblages observed in the

  14. Model for hydromagnetic convection in a magnetized fluid.

    PubMed

    Macek, Wiesław M; Strumik, Marek

    2010-08-01

    We consider convection in a horizontally magnetized viscous fluid layer in the gravitational field heated from below with a vertical temperature gradient. Following Rayleigh-Bénard scenario and using a general magnetohydrodynamic approach, we obtain a simple set of four ordinary differential equations. In addition to the usual three-dimensional Lorenz model a new variable describes the profile of the induced magnetic field. We show that nonperiodic oscillations are influenced by anisotropic magnetic forces resulting not only in an additional viscosity but also substantially modifying nonlinear forcing of the system. On the other hand, this can stabilize convective motion of the flow. However, for certain values of the model parameters we have identified a deterministic intermittent behavior of the system resulting from bifurcation. In this way, we have identified here a basic mechanism of intermittent release of energy bursts, which is frequently observed in space and laboratory plasmas. Hence, we propose this model as a useful tool for the analysis of intermittent behavior of various environments, including convection in planets and stars. Therefore, we hope that our simple but still a more general nonlinear model could shed light on the nature of hydromagnetic convection.

  15. Personal Computer (PC) based image processing applied to fluid mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Y.-C.; McLachlan, B. G.

    1987-10-01

    A PC based image processing system was employed to determine the instantaneous velocity field of a two-dimensional unsteady flow. The flow was visualized using a suspension of seeding particles in water, and a laser sheet for illumination. With a finite time exposure, the particle motion was captured on a photograph as a pattern of streaks. The streak pattern was digitized and processed using various imaging operations, including contrast manipulation, noise cleaning, filtering, statistical differencing, and thresholding. Information concerning the velocity was extracted from the enhanced image by measuring the length and orientation of the individual streaks. The fluid velocities deduced from the randomly distributed particle streaks were interpolated to obtain velocities at uniform grid points. For the interpolation a simple convolution technique with an adaptive Gaussian window was used. The results are compared with a numerical prediction by a Navier-Stokes computation.

  16. Personal Computer (PC) based image processing applied to fluid mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Y.-C.; Mclachlan, B. G.

    1987-01-01

    A PC based image processing system was employed to determine the instantaneous velocity field of a two-dimensional unsteady flow. The flow was visualized using a suspension of seeding particles in water, and a laser sheet for illumination. With a finite time exposure, the particle motion was captured on a photograph as a pattern of streaks. The streak pattern was digitized and processed using various imaging operations, including contrast manipulation, noise cleaning, filtering, statistical differencing, and thresholding. Information concerning the velocity was extracted from the enhanced image by measuring the length and orientation of the individual streaks. The fluid velocities deduced from the randomly distributed particle streaks were interpolated to obtain velocities at uniform grid points. For the interpolation a simple convolution technique with an adaptive Gaussian window was used. The results are compared with a numerical prediction by a Navier-Stokes computation.

  17. Spatial and Temporal Low-Dimensional Models for Fluid Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalb, Virginia

    2008-01-01

    A document discusses work that obtains a low-dimensional model that captures both temporal and spatial flow by constructing spatial and temporal four-mode models for two classic flow problems. The models are based on the proper orthogonal decomposition at two reference Reynolds numbers. Model predictions are made at an intermediate Reynolds number and compared with direct numerical simulation results at the new Reynolds number.

  18. A one-domain approach for modeling and simulation of free fluid over a porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huangxin; Wang, Xiao-Ping

    2014-02-01

    We propose a one-domain approach based on the Brinkman model for the modeling and simulation of the transport phenomenon between free fluid and a porous medium. A thin transition layer is introduced between the free fluid region and the porous media region, across which the porosity and permeability undergo a rapid but continuous change. We study the behavior of the solution to the one-domain model analytically and numerically. Using the method of matched asymptotic expansion, we recover the Beavers-Joseph-Saffman (BJS) interface condition as the thickness of the transition layer goes to zero. We also calculate the error estimates between the leading order solution of the one-domain model and the standard Darcy-Stokes model of two-domain model with BJS condition. Numerical methods are developed for both the one-domain model and the two-domain model. Numerical results are presented to support the analytical results, thereby justifying the one-domain model as a good approximation to the two domain Stokes-Darcy model.

  19. An evaluation of Computational Fluid dynamics model for flood risk analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Francesco, Silvia; Biscarini, Chiara; Montesarchio, Valeria

    2014-05-01

    This work presents an analysis of the hydrological-hydraulic engineering requisites for Risk evaluation and efficient flood damage reduction plans. Most of the research efforts have been dedicated to the scientific and technical aspects of risk assessment, providing estimates of possible alternatives and of the risk associated. In the decision making process for mitigation plan, the contribute of scientist is crucial, due to the fact that Risk-Damage analysis is based on evaluation of flow field ,of Hydraulic Risk and on economical and societal considerations. The present paper will focus on the first part of process, the mathematical modelling of flood events which is the base for all further considerations. The evaluation of potential catastrophic damage consequent to a flood event and in particular to dam failure requires modelling of the flood with sufficient detail so to capture the spatial and temporal evolutions of the event, as well of the velocity field. Thus, the selection of an appropriate mathematical model to correctly simulate flood routing is an essential step. In this work we present the application of two 3D Computational fluid dynamics models to a synthetic and real case study in order to evaluate the correct evolution of flow field and the associated flood Risk . The first model is based on a opensource CFD platform called openFoam. Water flow is schematized with a classical continuum approach based on Navier-Stokes equation coupled with Volume of fluid (VOF) method to take in account the multiphase character of river bottom-water- air systems. The second model instead is based on the Lattice Boltzmann method, an innovative numerical fluid dynamics scheme based on Boltzmann's kinetic equation that represents the flow dynamics at the macroscopic level by incorporating a microscopic kinetic approach. Fluid is seen as composed by particles that can move and collide among them. Simulation results from both models are promising and congruent to

  20. Methods for simulation-based analysis of fluid-structure interaction.

    SciTech Connect

    Barone, Matthew Franklin; Payne, Jeffrey L.

    2005-10-01

    Methods for analysis of fluid-structure interaction using high fidelity simulations are critically reviewed. First, a literature review of modern numerical techniques for simulation of aeroelastic phenomena is presented. The review focuses on methods contained within the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) framework for coupling computational fluid dynamics codes to computational structural mechanics codes. The review treats mesh movement algorithms, the role of the geometric conservation law, time advancement schemes, wetted surface interface strategies, and some representative applications. The complexity and computational expense of coupled Navier-Stokes/structural dynamics simulations points to the need for reduced order modeling to facilitate parametric analysis. The proper orthogonal decomposition (POD)/Galerkin projection approach for building a reduced order model (ROM) is presented, along with ideas for extension of the methodology to allow construction of ROMs based on data generated from ALE simulations.

  1. A Lumped-Parameter Subject-Specific Model of Blood Volume Response to Fluid Infusion

    PubMed Central

    Bighamian, Ramin; Reisner, Andrew T.; Hahn, Jin-Oh

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a lumped-parameter model that can reproduce blood volume response to fluid infusion. The model represents the fluid shift between the intravascular and interstitial compartments as the output of a hypothetical feedback controller that regulates the ratio between the volume changes in the intravascular and interstitial fluid at a target value (called “target volume ratio”). The model is characterized by only three parameters: the target volume ratio, feedback gain (specifying the speed of fluid shift), and initial blood volume. This model can obviate the need to incorporate complex mechanisms involved in the fluid shift in reproducing blood volume response to fluid infusion. The ability of the model to reproduce real-world blood volume response to fluid infusion was evaluated by fitting it to a series of data reported in the literature. The model reproduced the data accurately with average error and root-mean-squared error (RMSE) of 0.6 and 9.5% across crystalloid and colloid fluids when normalized by the underlying responses. Further, the parameters derived for the model showed physiologically plausible behaviors. It was concluded that this simple model may accurately reproduce a variety of blood volume responses to fluid infusion throughout different physiological states by fitting three parameters to a given dataset. This offers a tool that can quantify the fluid shift in a dataset given the measured fractional blood volumes. PMID:27642283

  2. Molecular modeling the microstructure and phase behavior of bulk and inhomogeneous complex fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bymaster, Adam

    Accurate prediction of the thermodynamics and microstructure of complex fluids is contingent upon a model's ability to capture the molecular architecture and the specific intermolecular and intramolecular interactions that govern fluid behavior. This dissertation makes key contributions to improving the understanding and molecular modeling of complex bulk and inhomogeneous fluids, with an emphasis on associating and macromolecular molecules (water, hydrocarbons, polymers, surfactants, and colloids). Such developments apply broadly to fields ranging from biology and medicine, to high performance soft materials and energy. In the bulk, the perturbed-chain statistical associating fluid theory (PC-SAFT), an equation of state based on Wertheim's thermodynamic perturbation theory (TPT1), is extended to include a crossover correction that significantly improves the predicted phase behavior in the critical region. In addition, PC-SAFT is used to investigate the vapor-liquid equilibrium of sour gas mixtures, to improve the understanding of mercaptan/sulfide removal via gas treating. For inhomogeneous fluids, a density functional theory (DFT) based on TPT1 is extended to problems that exhibit radially symmetric inhomogeneities. First, the influence of model solutes on the structure and interfacial properties of water are investigated. The DFT successfully describes the hydrophobic phenomena on microscopic and macroscopic length scales, capturing structural changes as a function of solute size and temperature. The DFT is used to investigate the structure and effective forces in nonadsorbing polymer-colloid mixtures. A comprehensive study is conducted characterizing the role of polymer concentration and particle/polymer size ratio on the structure, polymer induced depletion forces, and tendency towards colloidal aggregation. The inhomogeneous form of the association functional is used, for the first time, to extend the DFT to associating polymer systems, applicable to any

  3. Methods of use for sensor based fluid detection devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Nathan S. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Methods of use and devices for detecting analyte in fluid. A system for detecting an analyte in a fluid is described comprising a substrate having a sensor comprising a first organic material and a second organic material where the sensor has a response to permeation by an analyte. A detector is operatively associated with the sensor. Further, a fluid delivery appliance is operatively associated with the sensor. The sensor device has information storage and processing equipment, which is operably connected with the device. This device compares a response from the detector with a stored ideal response to detect the presence of analyte. An integrated system for detecting an analyte in a fluid is also described where the sensing device, detector, information storage and processing device, and fluid delivery device are incorporated in a substrate. Methods for use for the above system are also described where the first organic material and a second organic material are sensed and the analyte is detected with a detector operatively associated with the sensor. The method provides for a device, which delivers fluid to the sensor and measures the response of the sensor with the detector. Further, the response is compared to a stored ideal response for the analyte to determine the presence of the analyte. In different embodiments, the fluid measured may be a gaseous fluid, a liquid, or a fluid extracted from a solid. Methods of fluid delivery for each embodiment are accordingly provided.

  4. Computational fluid dynamic modeling of the flame spray pyrolysis process for silica nanopowder synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivas-Martinez, Miguel; Sohn, Hong Yong; Jang, Hee Dong; Rhee, Kang-In

    2015-07-01

    A computational fluid dynamic model that couples the fluid dynamics with various processes involving precursor droplets and product particles during the flame spray pyrolysis (FSP) synthesis of silica nanopowder from volatile precursors is presented. The synthesis of silica nanopowder from tetraethylorthosilicate and tetramethylorthosilicate in bench- and pilot-scale FSP reactors, with the ultimate purpose of industrial-scale production, was simulated. The transport and evaporation of liquid droplets are simulated from the Lagrangian viewpoint. The quadrature method of moments is used to solve the population balance equation for particles undergoing homogeneous nucleation and Brownian collision. The nucleation rate is computed based on the rates of thermal decomposition and oxidation of the precursor with no adjustable parameters. The computed results show that the model is capable of reproducing the magnitude as well as the variations of the average particle diameter with different experimental conditions using a single value of the collision efficiency factor α for a given reactor size.

  5. Model fluids representing aqueous in-vitro diagnostic reagents for the development of dispensing systems.

    PubMed

    Losleben, Nadine; Spinke, Jürgen; Adler, Sabrina; Oranth, Norbert; Zengerle, Roland

    2013-11-01

    Analyzers for in-vitro diagnostic (IVD) testing facilitate the determination of medical information from biological samples. To reach a high quality, the detection reagents have to be dispensed with a high degree of precision and accuracy. A technology change from conventional pipetting systems to contact-free dispensers provides the opportunity to reduce carry-over and handle reagents in the microliter range. A great challenge for the development and validation of new systems is the huge variety of the IVD reagents. This work presents the fluidic properties of 646 different aqueous IVD reagents and how they can be represented by a set of easy-to-prepare model fluids, covering the rheological range of the reagents. In addition, based on the model fluids, a standardized approach is presented for the evaluation of dispensers for IVD applications.

  6. A Well-Posed Two Phase Flow Model and its Numerical Solutions for Reactor Thermal-Fluids Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kadioglu, Samet Y.; Berry, Ray; Martineau, Richard

    2016-08-01

    A 7-equation two-phase flow model and its numerical implementation is presented for reactor thermal-fluids applications. The equation system is well-posed and treats both phases as compressible flows. The numerical discretization of the equation system is based on the finite element formalism. The numerical algorithm is implemented in the next generation RELAP-7 code (Idaho National Laboratory (INL)’s thermal-fluids code) built on top of an other INL’s product, the massively parallel multi-implicit multi-physics object oriented code environment (MOOSE). Some preliminary thermal-fluids computations are presented.

  7. Microtomography and pore-scale modeling of two-phase Fluid Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Silin, D.; Tomutsa, L.; Benson, S.; Patzek, T.

    2010-10-19

    Synchrotron-based X-ray microtomography (micro CT) at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) line 8.3.2 at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory produces three-dimensional micron-scale-resolution digital images of the pore space of the reservoir rock along with the spacial distribution of the fluids. Pore-scale visualization of carbon dioxide flooding experiments performed at a reservoir pressure demonstrates that the injected gas fills some pores and pore clusters, and entirely bypasses the others. Using 3D digital images of the pore space as input data, the method of maximal inscribed spheres (MIS) predicts two-phase fluid distribution in capillary equilibrium. Verification against the tomography images shows a good agreement between the computed fluid distribution in the pores and the experimental data. The model-predicted capillary pressure curves and tomography-based porosimetry distributions compared favorably with the mercury injection data. Thus, micro CT in combination with modeling based on the MIS is a viable approach to study the pore-scale mechanisms of CO{sub 2} injection into an aquifer, as well as more general multi-phase flows.

  8. Fluid pressure relaxation depends upon osteonal microstructure: modeling an oscillatory bending experiment.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Fritton, S P; Cowin, S C; Weinbaum, S

    1999-07-01

    When bone is mechanically loaded, bone fluid flow induces shear stresses on bone cells that have been proposed to be involved in bone's mechanosensory system. To investigate bone fluid flow and strain-generated potentials, several theoretical models have been proposed to mimic oscillatory four-point bending experiments performed on thin bone specimens. While these previous models assume that the bone fluid relaxes across the specimen thickness, we hypothesize that the bone fluid relaxes primarily through the vascular porosity (osteonal canals) instead and develop a new poroelastic model that integrates the microstructural details of the lacunar-canalicular porosity, osteonal canals, and the osteonal cement lines. Local fluid pressure profiles are obtained from the model, and we find two different fluid relaxation behaviors in the bone specimen, depending on its microstructure: one associated with the connected osteonal canal system, through which bone fluid relaxes to the nearby osteonal canals; and one associated with the thickness of a homogeneous porous bone specimen (approximately 1 mm in our model), through which bone fluid relaxes between the external surfaces of the bone specimen at relatively lower loading frequencies. Our results suggest that in osteonal bone specimens the fluid pressure response to cyclic loading is not sensitive to the permeability of the osteonal cement lines, while it is sensitive to the applied loading frequency. Our results also reveal that the fluid pressure gradients near the osteonal canals (and thus the fluid shear stresses acting on the nearby osteocytes) are significantly amplified at higher loading frequencies.

  9. Fluid versus global model approach for the modeling of active species production by streamer discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levko, Dmitry; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we seek to validate the zero-dimensional (global) model approach for the modeling of the plasma composition in high pressure reactive streamer discharges. We focus on streamers typical of dielectric barrier discharge that are widely used, for instance, for plasma-assisted reforming of greenhouse gases. However, our conclusions can be extended to the streamers used in plasma-assisted ignition/combustion and other related systems. First, we perform two-dimensional fluid simulations for streamers with positive and negative trigger voltages and analyze the difference between the breakdown mechanisms of these two modes. Second, we use the time evolution of the electron heating term obtained from the fluid simulations as the input parameter of the global model and compare the plasma component content predicted by this model with the results of the fluid model. We obtain a very good agreement between fluid and global models for all species generated in plasma. However, we conclude that streamers initiated by the positive and negative trigger voltage cannot be considered as symmetrical which is usually done in global models of barrier discharge reactors.

  10. Thermal fluid-solid interaction model and experimental validation for hydrostatic mechanical face seals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Weifeng; Liao, Chuanjun; Liu, Xiangfeng; Suo, Shuangfu; Liu, Ying; Wang, Yuming

    2014-09-01

    Hydrostatic mechanical face seals for reactor coolant pumps are very important for the safety and reliability of pressurized-water reactor power plants. More accurate models on the operating mechanism of the seals are needed to help improve their performance. The thermal fluid-solid interaction (TFSI) mechanism of the hydrostatic seal is investigated in this study. Numerical models of the flow field and seal assembly are developed. Based on the mechanism for the continuity condition of the physical quantities at the fluid-solid interface, an on-line numerical TFSI model for the hydrostatic mechanical seal is proposed using an iterative coupling method. Dynamic mesh technology is adopted to adapt to the changing boundary shape. Experiments were performed on a test rig using a full-size test seal to obtain the leakage rate as a function of the differential pressure. The effectiveness and accuracy of the TFSI model were verified by comparing the simulation results and experimental data. Using the TFSI model, the behavior of the seal is presented, including mechanical and thermal deformation, and the temperature field. The influences of the rotating speed and differential pressure of the sealing device on the temperature field, which occur widely in the actual use of the seal, are studied. This research proposes an on-line and assembly-based TFSI model for hydrostatic mechanical face seals, and the model is validated by full-sized experiments.

  11. Computational modelling of a non-viscous fluid flow in a multi-walled carbon nanotube modelled as a Timoshenko beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosravian, N.; Rafii-Tabar, H.

    2008-07-01

    In the design of nanotube-based fluidic devices, a critical issue is the effect of the induced vibrations in the nanotube arising from the fluid flow, since these vibrations can promote structural instabilities, such as buckling transitions. It is known that the induced resonant frequencies depend on the fluid flow velocity in a significant manner. We have studied, for the first time, the flow of a non-viscous fluid in stubby multi-walled carbon nanotubes, using the Timoshenko classical beam theory to model the nanotubes as a continuum structure. We have obtained the variations of the resonant frequencies with the fluid flow velocity under several experimentally interesting boundary conditions and aspect ratios of the nanotube. The main finding from our work is that, compared to an Euler-Bernoulli classical beam model of a nanotube, the Timoshenko beam predicts the loss of stability at lower fluid flow velocities.

  12. A fully dynamic magneto-rheological fluid damper model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Z.; Christenson, R. E.

    2012-06-01

    Control devices can be used to dissipate the energy of a civil structure subjected to dynamic loading, thus reducing structural damage and preventing failure. Semiactive control devices have received significant attention in recent years. The magneto-rheological (MR) fluid damper is a promising type of semiactive device for civil structures due to its mechanical simplicity, inherent stability, high dynamic range, large temperature operating range, robust performance, and low power requirements. The MR damper is intrinsically nonlinear and rate-dependent, both as a function of the displacement across the MR damper and the command current being supplied to the MR damper. As such, to develop control algorithms that take maximum advantage of the unique features of the MR damper, accurate models must be developed to describe its behavior for both displacement and current. In this paper, a new MR damper model that includes a model of the pulse-width modulated (PWM) power amplifier providing current to the damper, a proposed model of the time varying inductance of the large-scale 200 kN MR dampers coils and surrounding MR fluid—a dynamic behavior that is not typically modeled—and a hyperbolic tangent model of the controllable force behavior of the MR damper is presented. Validation experimental tests are conducted with two 200 kN large-scale MR dampers located at the Smart Structures Technology Laboratory (SSTL) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the Lehigh University Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation (NEES) facility. Comparison with experimental test results for both prescribed motion and current and real-time hybrid simulation of semiactive control of the MR damper shows that the proposed MR damper model can accurately predict the fully dynamic behavior of the large-scale 200 kN MR damper.

  13. Direct numerical simulation of viscoelastic-fluid-based nanofluid turbulent channel flow with heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Juan-Cheng; Li, Feng-Chen; Cai, Wei-Hua; Zhang, Hong-Na; Yu, Bo

    2015-08-01

    Our previous experimental studies have confirmed that viscoelastic-fluid-based nanofluid (VFBN) prepared by suspending nanoparticles in a viscoelastic base fluid (VBF, behaves drag reduction at turbulent flow state) can reduce turbulent flow resistance as compared with water and enhance heat transfer as compared with VBF. Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is performed in this study to explore the mechanisms of heat transfer enhancement (HTE) and flow drag reduction (DR) for the VFBN turbulent flow. The Giesekus model is used as the constitutive equation for VFBN. Our previously proposed thermal dispersion model is adopted to take into account the thermal dispersion effects of nanoparticles in the VFBN turbulent flow. The DNS results show similar behaviors for flow resistance and heat transfer to those obtained in our previous experiments. Detailed analyses are conducted for the turbulent velocity, temperature, and conformation fields obtained by DNSs for different fluid cases, and for the friction factor with viscous, turbulent, and elastic contributions and heat transfer rate with conductive, turbulent and thermal dispersion contributions of nanoparticles, respectively. The mechanisms of HTE and DR of VFBN turbulent flows are then discussed. Based on analogy theory, the ratios of Chilton-Colburn factor to friction factor for different fluid flow cases are investigated, which from another aspect show the significant enhancement in heat transfer performance for some cases of water-based nanofluid and VFBN turbulent flows. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51276046), the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20112302110020), the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant No. 2014M561037), and the President Fund of University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, China (Grant No. Y3510213N00).

  14. Working fluid selection for space-based two-phase heat transport systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclinden, Mark O.

    1988-01-01

    The working fluid for externally-mounted, space-based two-phase heat transport systems is considered. A sequence of screening criteria involving freezing and critical point temperatures and latent heat of vaporization and vapor density are applied to a data base of 860 fluids. The thermal performance of the 52 fluids which pass this preliminary screening are then ranked according to their impact on the weight of a reference system. Upon considering other nonthermal criteria (flammability, toxicity, and chemical stability) a final set of 10 preferred fluids is obtained. The effects of variations in system parameters is investigated for these 10 fluids by means of a factorial design.

  15. Four fluid model and numerical simulations of magnetic structures in the heliosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avinash, K.; Cox, S. M.; Shaikh, D.; Zank, G. P.

    2007-12-01

    A magnetic hole/hump is a stable structure with small scale minima/maxima of the mean magnetic field in the centre. Such structure has been observed in inter-planetary magnetic field, planetary magneto sheath, cometary's plasma, and very recently in the heliosheath, as revealed by Voyager I observations. Recently, we have proposed a realistic three fluid model that comprises of three fluids in the model are electrons, heliosheath ions, and neutrals. Stationary, time independent solutions of this model consisting of holes, humps, trains of holes and humps etc. were found to be consistent with Voyager observations e.g. a few tens of ion gyro-radii width, large magnetic maxima/minima, oblique angles of propagation and well approximated by Gaussians. In the first part of the present work, we extend the three fluid model to a four fluid model consisting of electrons, pick up ions (PUI), solar wind ions (SWI), and neutrals. The PUIs are generated by neutrals via charge exchange with SWI. The kinetic pressure of PUI is nearly three to four times the pressure of SWI. Hence these are more suited to mediate small scale structures in heliosheath like shocks, magnetic holes/humps etc. We show that the constant energy exchange between these two fluid drives them non adiabatic. The modified adiabatic index, is calculated by solving the corresponding enthalpy equation. The PUI are found to be isothermal ( = 1) while SWI have 1.25. In the four fluid model, these effects are captured by including a modified equation of state for PUIs and SWIs. The phase space of time independent solutions in terms of the Mach numbers of PUI and SWI is constructed to delineate the parameter space which allows structure formation. In the second part of the present work, we examine the stability of our time independent solution by evolving them via a full set of modified Hall-MHD equations. The evolutions are examined using two codes e.g. a pseudo spectral code and a code based on finite difference

  16. Relativistic model of anisotropic charged fluid sphere in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pant, Neeraj; Pradhan, N.; Bansal, Rajeev K.

    2016-01-01

    In this present paper, we present a class of static, spherically symmetric charged anisotropic fluid models of super dense stars in isotropic coordinates by considering a particular type of metric potential, a specific choice of electric field intensity E and pressure anisotropy factor Δ which involve parameters K (charge) and α (anisotropy) respectively. The solutions so obtained are utilized to construct the models for super-dense stars like neutron stars and strange quark stars. Our solutions are well behaved within the following ranges of different constant parameters. In the absence of pressure anisotropy and charge present model reduces to the isotropic model Pant et al. (Astrophys. Space Sci. 330:353-359, 2010). Our solution is well behaved in all respects for all values of X lying in the range 0< X ≤ 0.18, α lying in the range 0 ≤ α ≤6.6, K lying in the range 0< K ≤ 6.6 and Schwarzschild compactness parameter "u" lying in the range 0< u ≤ 0.38. Since our solution is well behaved for a wide ranges of the parameters, we can model many different types of ultra-cold compact stars like quark stars and neutron stars. We have shown that corresponding to X=0.088, α=0.6 and K=4.3 for which u=0.2054 and by assuming surface density ρb = 4.6888 × 10^{14} g/cm3 the mass and radius are found to be 1.51 M_{\\varTheta} and 10.90 km respectively. Assuming surface density ρb = 2 × 10^{14} g/cm3 the mass and radius for a neutron star candidate are found to be 2.313 M_{\\varTheta} and 16.690 km respectively. Hence we obtain masses and radii that fall in the range of what is generally expected for quark stars and neutron stars.

  17. Molecular dynamics simulations of simple fluids confined in realistic models of nanoporous carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikunic, J.; Gubbins, K. E.

    2003-09-01

    We present molecular dynamics simulations in the micro-canonical ensemble of a Lennard-Jones model of nitrogen confined in realistic models for saccharose-based carbons developed in our previous work. We calculate the velocity autocorrelation function and mean-squared displacement, and the self-diffusivities from the latter. We observe that the self-diffusivity increases with temperature and exhibits a maximum with loading or adsorbate density. To the best of our knowledge, a maximum in self-diffusivities has not been observed in molecular dynamics simulations of fluids confined in slit pores.

  18. Application of computational fluid dynamics modelling in the process of forensic fire investigation: problems and solutions.

    PubMed

    Delémont, O; Martin, J-C

    2007-04-11

    Fire modelling has been gaining more and more interest into the community of forensic fire investigation. Despite an attractiveness that is partially justified, the application of fire models in that field of investigation rises some difficulties. Therefore, the understanding of the basic principles of the two main categories of fire models, the knowledge of their effective potential and their limitations are crucial for a valid and reliable application in forensic science. The present article gives an overview of the principle and basics that characterise the two kinds of fire models: zone models and field models. Whereas the first ones are developed on the basis of mathematical relation from empirical observations, such as stratification of fluid zones, and give a relatively broad view of mass and energy exchanges in an enclosure, the latter are based on fundamentals of fluid mechanics and represent the application of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to fire scenarii. Consequently, the data that are obtained from these two categories of fire models differ in nature, quality and quantity. First used in a fire safety perspective, fire models are not easily applied to assess parts of forensic fire investigation. A suggestion is proposed for the role of fire modelling in this domain of competence: a new tool for the evaluation of alternative hypotheses of origin and cause by considering the dynamic development of the fire. An example of a real case where such an approach was followed is explained and the evaluation of the obtained results comparing to traces revealed during the on-site investigation is enlightened.

  19. New models for perfect fluids in EGB gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilambwe, Brian; Hansraj, Sudan; Maharaj, Sunil D.

    2015-04-01

    We obtain new exact solutions to the field equations in the Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet (EGB) modified theory of gravity for a five-dimensional spherically symmetric static matter distribution. By using a coordinate transformation, the study is reduced to the analysis of a single first-order nonlinear differential equation which is an Abel equation of the second kind. Three classes of exact models are generated. The first solution has a constant density and a nonlinear equation-of-state; it contains the familiar Einstein static universe as a special case. The second solution has variable energy density and is expressible in terms of elementary functions. The third solution has vanishing Gauss-Bonnet coupling constant and is a five-dimensional generalization of the Durgapal-Bannerji model. The solution is briefly examined for physical admissibility. In particular, a set of constants is found which ensures that a pressure-free hypersurface exists which in turn defines the boundary of the distribution. The matter distribution is well behaved and the adiabatic sound speed criterion is also satisfied within the fluid ensuring a subluminal sound speed. Furthermore, the weak, strong and dominant conditions hold throughout the distribution.

  20. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURAL, MECHANICAL, AND THERMAL PROPERTIES: Gas-Fluid and Fluid-Solid Phase Instability for Restricted Primitive Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yuan-Yuan; Chen, Xiao-Song

    2009-08-01

    By considering the fluctuation of grand potential Ω around equilibrium with respect to small one-particle density fluctuations δρα(vec r), the phase instability of restricted primitive model (RPM) of ionic systems is investigated. We use the integral equation theory to calculate the direct correlation functions in the reference hypernetted chain approximation and obtain the spinodal line of RPM. Our analysis explicitly indicates that the gas-fluid phase instability is induced by k = 0 fluctuation mode, while the fluid-solid phase instability is related to k ≠ 0 fluctuation modes. The spinodal line is qualitatively consistent with the result of computer simulations by others.

  1. A SUB-GRID VOLUME-OF-FLUIDS (VOF) MODEL FOR MIXING IN RESOLVED SCALE AND IN UNRESOLVED SCALE COMPUTATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    VOLD, ERIK L.; SCANNAPIECO, TONY J.

    2007-10-16

    A sub-grid mix model based on a volume-of-fluids (VOF) representation is described for computational simulations of the transient mixing between reactive fluids, in which the atomically mixed components enter into the reactivity. The multi-fluid model allows each fluid species to have independent values for density, energy, pressure and temperature, as well as independent velocities and volume fractions. Fluid volume fractions are further divided into mix components to represent their 'mixedness' for more accurate prediction of reactivity. Time dependent conversion from unmixed volume fractions (denoted cf) to atomically mixed (af) fluids by diffusive processes is represented in resolved scale simulations with the volume fractions (cf, af mix). In unresolved scale simulations, the transition to atomically mixed materials begins with a conversion from unmixed material to a sub-grid volume fraction (pf). This fraction represents the unresolved small scales in the fluids, heterogeneously mixed by turbulent or multi-phase mixing processes, and this fraction then proceeds in a second step to the atomically mixed fraction by diffusion (cf, pf, af mix). Species velocities are evaluated with a species drift flux, {rho}{sub i}u{sub di} = {rho}{sub i}(u{sub i}-u), used to describe the fluid mixing sources in several closure options. A simple example of mixing fluids during 'interfacial deceleration mixing with a small amount of diffusion illustrates the generation of atomically mixed fluids in two cases, for resolved scale simulations and for unresolved scale simulations. Application to reactive mixing, including Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF), is planned for future work.

  2. Evaluation of generic types of drilling fluid using a risk-based analytic hierarchy process.

    PubMed

    Sadiq, Rehan; Husain, Tahir; Veitch, Brian; Bose, Neil

    2003-12-01

    The composition of drilling muds is based on a mixture of clays and additives in a base fluid. There are three generic categories of base fluid--water, oil, and synthetic. Water-based fluids (WBFs) are relatively environmentally benign, but drilling performance is better with oil-based fluids (OBFs). The oil and gas industry developed synthetic-based fluids (SBFs), such as vegetable esters, olefins, ethers, and others, which provide drilling performance comparable to OBFs, but with lower environmental and occupational health effects. The primary objective of this paper is to present a methodology to guide decision-making in the selection and evaluation of three generic types of drilling fluids using a risk-based analytic hierarchy process (AHP). In this paper a comparison of drilling fluids is made considering various activities involved in the life cycle of drilling fluids. This paper evaluates OBFs, WBFs, and SBFs based on four major impacts--operations, resources, economics, and liabilities. Four major activities--drilling, discharging offshore, loading and transporting, and disposing onshore--cause the operational impacts. Each activity involves risks related to occupational injuries (safety), general public health, environmental impact, and energy use. A multicriteria analysis strategy was used for the selection and evaluation of drilling fluids using a risk-based AHP. A four-level hierarchical structure is developed to determine the final relative scores, and the SBFs are found to be the best option.

  3. Controllable magneto-rheological fluid-based dampers for drilling

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, David W.; Elsayed, Mostafa Ahmed

    2006-05-02

    A damping apparatus and method for a drillstring comprising a bit comprising providing to the drillstring a damping mechanism comprising magnetorheological fluid and generating an electromagnetic field affecting the magnetorheological fluid in response to changing ambient conditions encountered by the bit.

  4. Application of two-fluid model in the unsteady flow simulation for a multiphase rotodynamic pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Y Yu, Z.; Zhu, B. S.; Cao, S. L.; Y Wang, G.

    2013-12-01

    Based on the assumption of tiny bubbly flow, the gas-liquid two-phase unsteady flow in a multiphase rotodynamic pump was numerically simulated with two-fluid model. The two-phase transport process and the evolution characteristic of the pump head were analyzed. In the working conditions, the liquid flow rate was constant, and the IGVF (inlet gas volume fraction) was 0.05, 0.15 and 0.25, respectively. The k ω- based SST model was used for turbulence; the drag force and the added mass force were accounted for in the interfacial momentum transfer terms. Because the wrap angle of the blade was large, the hybrid mesh was adopted to guarantee high mesh quality. The simulation results demonstrate that two-fluid model can more reasonably capture the transport process than the homogeneous model; and the drag law should be corrected based on the mixture viscosity in high gas volume fraction conditions. If the liquid flow rate is constant, the increase of IGVF can raise the pressure in the inlet extended region, while the pressure in the outlet extended region will not be affected much, thus the pump head will go down. In addition, due to the fluctuation of gas volume fraction field, the pump head will also fluctuate around a stable value in the transport process.

  5. [Security evaluation of subcutaneous injection with water-based dextran-coated magnetic fluid].

    PubMed

    Zhai, Yu; Wang, Xiaoliang; Wang, Xuman; Xie, Hong; Gu, Hongchen

    2006-12-01

    Water-based magnetic fluid was synthesized by using 50% dextran 40,000 as coated reagent. The acute toxicity and irritant of the magnetic fluid injected into mice subcutaneous tissues were examined. The lethal dosage 50 of dextran-coated magnetic fluid was 4409.61 +/- 514.93 mg/kg. Twenty four h after subcutaneous injecting with 30 mg/0.3 ml dextran-coated magnetic fluid, no more inflammation than hemangiectasia and leucocytes infiltration had been seen in subcutaneous tissues, 72 h later the reaction phenomena disappeared. While, injection with 30 mg/0.3 ml water-based oleate sodium-coated magnetic fluid, ulceration and break-off of cutis had been seen in the seventh days. That is to say, the dextran-coated magnetic fluid was safe and well tolerate, however, the oleate sodium-coated magnetic fluid was not fit to subcutaneous injection.

  6. E-1 Dynamic Fluid-Flow Model Update: EASY/ROCETS Enhancement and Model Development Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Follett, Randolph F.; Taylor, Robert P.

    1998-01-01

    This report documents the research conducted to update computer models for dynamic fluid flow simulation of the E-1 test stand subsystems at te NASA John C. Stennis Space Center.Work also involved significant upgrades to the capabilities of EASY/ROCKETS library through the inclusion of the NIST-12 thermodynamic property database and development of new control system modules.

  7. Microconfined shear deformation of a droplet in an equiviscous non-newtonian immiscible fluid: experiments and modeling.

    PubMed

    Minale, Mario; Caserta, Sergio; Guido, Stefano

    2010-01-05

    In this work, the microconfined shear deformation of a droplet in an equiviscous non-Newtonian immiscible fluid is investigated by modeling and experiments. A phenomenological model based on the assumption of ellipsoidal shape and taking into account wall effects is proposed for systems made of non-Newtonian second-order fluids. The model, without any adjustable parameters, is tested by comparison with experiments under simple shear flow performed in a sliding plate apparatus, where the ratio between the distance between the confining walls and the droplet radius can be varied. The agreement between model predictions and experimental data is good both in steady state shear and in transient drop retraction upon cessation of flow. The results obtained in this work are relevant for microfluidics applications where non-Newtonian fluids are used.

  8. Numerical modeling of heat transfer and fluid flow in laser metal deposition by powder injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Zhiqiang

    Laser metal deposition is an additive manufacturing technique which allows quick fabrication of fully-dense metallic components directly from Computer Aided Design (CAD) solid models. A self-consistent three-dimensional model was developed for the laser metal deposition process by powder injection, which simulates heat transfer, phase changes, and fluid flow in the melt pool. The governing equations for solid, liquid and gas phases in the calculation domain have been formulated using the continuum model. The free surface in the melt pool has been tracked by the Volume of Fluid (VOF) method, while the VOF transport equation was solved using the Piecewise Linear Interface Calculation (PLIC) method. Surface tension was modeled by taking the Continuum Surface Force (CSF) model combined with a force-balance flow algorithm. Laser-powder interaction was modeled to account for the effects of laser power attenuation and powder temperature rise during the laser metal deposition process. The governing equations were discretized in the physical space using the finite volume method. The advection terms were approximated using the MUSCL flux limiter scheme. The fluid flow and energy equations were solved in a coupled manner. The incompressible flow equations were solved using a two-step projection method, which requires a solution of a Poisson equation for the pressure field. The discretized pressure Poisson equation was solved using the ICCG (Incomplete Cholesky Conjugate Gradient) solution technique. The energy equation was solved by an enthalpy-based method. Temperature-dependent thermal-physical material properties were considered in the numerical implementation. The numerical model was validated by comparing simulations with experimental measurements.

  9. Kantowski-Sachs Einstein-æther perfect fluid models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latta, Joey; Leon, Genly; Paliathanasis, Andronikos

    2016-11-01

    We investigate Kantowski-Sachs models in Einstein-æ ther theory with a perfect fluid source using the singularity analysis to prove the integrability of the field equations and dynamical system tools to study the evolution. We find an inflationary source at early times, and an inflationary sink at late times, for a wide region in the parameter space. The results by A.A. Coley, G. Leon, P. Sandin and J. Latta (JCAP 12 (2015) 010), are then re-obtained as particular cases. Additionally, we select other values for the non-GR parameters which are consistent with current constraints, getting a very rich phenomenology. In particular, we find solutions with infinite shear, zero curvature, and infinite matter energy density in comparison with the Hubble scalar. We also have stiff-like future attractors, anisotropic late-time attractors, or both, in some special cases. Such results are developed analytically, and then verified by numerics. Finally, the physical interpretation of the new critical points is discussed.

  10. Mass-Conserved Phase Field Models for Binary Fluids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    substrate [27], a wide variety of diffusive and diffusion -less solid -state phase transitions [10, 39], dislo- cation modeling in microstructure...has been proven effective in the numerical solution of the incompressible field phase model [32, 33]. Scheme based on a pressure-stabilization method...of the transient solution , the next set of figures (Figures 10-13) portrait the solutions up to nearly quasi-static states. The phase behavior

  11. Global Model Reduction for Fluid-Structure Interaction in Flapping Flexible Wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Mingjun; Yang, Tao

    2009-11-01

    Reduced-order models (ROMs) for fully-coupled fluid-structure interaction problems are desired in many applications (e.g. design of flapping-wing Micro Air Vehicles). Traditional approach is to build ROMs individually for fluid and solid and couple them through the interface. In this work, we suggest an approach to apply model reduction globally on a uniform description of fluid and solid in Eulerian framework. The idea has been made possible by a set of combined fluid-structue equations, where solid properties are presented as extra terms to Navier-Stokes equations. Then, typical Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD)/Galerkin projection can be used for model reduction as in most fluid-only problems, with special care of the extra ``solid'' terms. In the example, we show that one can capture most energy by only a few POD modes. More importantly, the leading POD modes show the signatures of both fluid flow and solid structure.

  12. Comparison of two-fluid and gyrokinetic models for kinetic Alfvén waves in solar and space plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, L.; Wu, D. J.; Wang, S. J.; Lee, L. C.

    2014-09-01

    An analytical comparative study of a two-fluid and a gyrokinetic model of kinetic Alfvén waves (KAWs) is presented for various solar and space plasma environments. Based on the linear KAW dispersion relation for gyrokinetics (Howes et al. 2006), the wave group velocity and electromagnetic polarizations are obtained analytically. Then the gyrokinetic wave properties are compared with those of the two-fluid model. The results show that both models agree well with each other not only in the long wavelength regime (>> the ion gyroradius ρ {sub i}) for all cases considered, but also in wavelengths ∼ρ {sub i} and <<ρ {sub i} (still much larger than the electron gyroscale) for a moderate or low (≲ 1) and a high (>>1) ion/electron temperature ratio T {sub 0i}/T {sub 0e}, respectively. However, the fluid model calculations deviate strongly from the gyrokinetic model at scales <ρ {sub i} for a relatively low T {sub 0i}/T {sub 0e} due to the electron gyroradius effect. Meanwhile, the plasma β {sub i} can make the gyrokinetic dispersion relation of KAWs become complex and sometimes have an oscillation-like structure. With the inherent simplicity of the fluid theory, these results may improve our understanding of the applicability of the two-fluid model, and may have important implications for computer simulation studies of KAWs in the solar and space plasma surroundings.

  13. Graphene oxide as a high-performance fluid-loss-control additive in water-based drilling fluids.

    PubMed

    Kosynkin, Dmitry V; Ceriotti, Gabriel; Wilson, Kurt C; Lomeda, Jay R; Scorsone, Jason T; Patel, Arvind D; Friedheim, James E; Tour, James M

    2012-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) performs well as a filtration additive in water-based drilling fluids at concentrations as low as 0.2 % (w/w) by carbon content. Standard American Petroleum Institute (API) filtration tests were conducted on pH-adjusted, aqueous dispersions of GO and xanthan gum. It was found that a combination of large-flake GO and powdered GO in a 3:1 ratio performed best in the API tests, allowing an average fluid loss of 6.1 mL over 30 min and leaving a filter cake ~20 μm thick. In comparison, a standard suspension (~12 g/L) of clays and polymers used in the oil industry gave an average fluid loss of 7.2 mL and a filter cake ~280 μm thick. Scanning electron microscopy imaging revealed the extreme pliability of well-exfoliated GO, as the pressure due to filtration crumpled single GO sheets, forcing them to slide through pores with diameters much smaller than the flake's flattened size. GO solutions also exhibited greater shear thinning and higher temperature stability compared to clay-based fluid-loss additives, demonstrating potential for high-temperature well applications.

  14. Fluid-structure interaction simulation of an avian flight model.

    PubMed

    Ruck, Sebastian; Oertel, Herbert

    2010-12-15

    A three-dimensional numerical avian model was developed to investigate the unsteady and turbulent aerodynamic performance of flapping wings for varying wingbeat frequencies and flow velocities (up to 12 Hz and 9 m s(-1)), corresponding to a reduced frequency range of k=0.22 to k=1.0 and a Reynolds number range of Re=16,000 to Re=50,000. The wings of the bird-inspired model consist of an elastic membrane. Simplifying the complicated locomotion kinematics to a sinusoidal wing rotation about two axes, the main features of dynamic avian flight were approximated. Numerical simulation techniques of fluid-structure interaction (FSI) providing a fully resolved flow field were applied to calculate the aerodynamic performance of the flapping elastic wings with the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) approach. The results were used to characterize and describe the macroscopic flow configurations in terms of starting, stopping, trailing and bound vortices. For high reduced frequencies up to k=0.67 it was shown that the wake does not consist of individual vortex rings known as the discrete vortex ring gait. Rather, the wake is dominated by a chain of elliptical vortex rings on each wing. The structures are interlocked at the starting and stopping vortices, which are shed in pairs at the reversal points of the wingbeat cycle. For decreasing reduced frequency, the results indicate a transition to a continuous vortex gait. The upstroke becomes more aerodynamically active, leading to a consistent circulation of the bound vortex on the wing and a continuous spanwise shedding of small scale vortices. The formation of the vortices shed spanwise in pairs at the reversal points is reduced and the wake is dominated by the tip and root vortices, which form long drawn-out vortex structures.

  15. A Blended Finite Element Method for Multi-Fluid Plasma Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Eder Marinho

    In a multi-fluid plasma model electrons and ions are represented as separate fluids that interact through collisions and electromagnetic fields. The model encapsulates physics that spans a vast range of temporal and spatial scales, which renders the model stiff and consequently difficult to solve numerically. To address the large range of time scales, a blended continuous and discontinuous Galerkin method is proposed, where ions are modeled using an explicit Runge-Kutta discontinuous Galerkin method while the electrons and electromagnetic fields are modeled using an implicit continuous Galerkin method. This approach is able to capture large-gradient ion physics like shock formation, while resolving high-frequency electron dynamics in a computationally efficient manner. The convergence properties of the method are analyzed and the method is tested on an electromagnetic shock problem. The numerical method produces results comparable with current state-of-the-art finite volume and discontinuous Galerkin methods, while decreasing the computational time for cases where realistic ion-to-electron mass ratios are used, and realistic speed-of-light to thermal speed ratios are needed. The method is used to study Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) fuel species separation where multi-fluid effects are relevant, and the high pressure gradient experienced by the ions causes them to shock, separate, and generate large electric fields. In addition, it is shown that single-fluid plasma codes can overestimate the neutron yield in ICF. For validation purposes, simulation results are compared with experimental data. A meaningful comparison requires the quantification of uncertainties in simulations. The uncertainties in the method are quantified using the multi-level Monte Carlo (MMC) method. The method reduces the computational cost over the standard Monte Carlo method by using multiple levels of discretization to calculate the statistical information of a given model. The MMC method

  16. An integrative model of internal axoneme mechanics and external fluid dynamics in ciliary beating.

    PubMed

    Dillon, R H; Fauci, L J

    2000-12-07

    We present a fluid-mechanical model of an individual cilium which incorporates discrete representations of the dynein arms, the passive elastic structure of the axoneme including the microtubules and nexin links. This model, based upon the immersed boundary method (Peskin, 1977), couples the internal force generation of the molecular motors through the passive elastic structure with the external fluid mechanics governed by the Navier-Stokes equations. Detailed geometric information is available, such as the spacing and shear between the microtubules, the local curvature of individual microtubules and the stretching of the nexin links. In addition, the explicit representation of the dynein motors allows us the flexibility to incorporate a variety of activation theories. In this article, we choose a simple activation theory so that the ciliary beat is not present, but is an emergent property of the interacting components of the coupled fluid-axoneme system. We present numerical results from computer simulations of sliding disintegration and ciliary beating with several different viscosities.

  17. Modelling of fluid-structure interaction with multiphase viscous flows using an immersed-body method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, P.; Xiang, J.; Fang, F.; Pavlidis, D.; Latham, J.-P.; Pain, C. C.

    2016-09-01

    An immersed-body method is developed here to model fluid-structure interaction for multiphase viscous flows. It does this by coupling a finite element multiphase fluid model and a combined finite-discrete element solid model. A coupling term containing the fluid stresses is introduced within a thin shell mesh surrounding the solid surface. The thin shell mesh acts as a numerical delta function in order to help apply the solid-fluid boundary conditions. When used with an advanced interface capturing method, the immersed-body method has the capability to solve problems with fluid-solid interfaces in the presence of multiphase fluid-fluid interfaces. Importantly, the solid-fluid coupling terms are treated implicitly to enable larger time steps to be used. This two-way coupling method has been validated by three numerical test cases: a free falling cylinder in a fluid at rest, elastic membrane and a collapsing column of water moving an initially stationary solid square. A fourth simulation example is of a water-air interface with a floating solid square being moved around by complex hydrodynamic flows including wave breaking. The results show that the immersed-body method is an effective approach for two-way solid-fluid coupling in multiphase viscous flows.

  18. Modeling of Viscoelastic Properties of Porous Rocks Saturated with Viscous Fluid at Seismic Frequencies at the Core Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, D. R.; Wang, Z.; Wang, F.; Wang, R.

    2015-12-01

    Currently the moduli and velocities of rocks at seismic frequencies are usually measured by the strain-stress method in lab. However, such measurements require well-designed equipment and skilled technicians, which greatly hinders the experimental investigation on the elastic and visco-elastic properties of rocks at seismic frequencies. We attempt to model the dynamic moduli of porous rocks saturated with viscous fluid at seismic frequencies on core scale using the strain-stress method, aiming to provide a complement to real core measurements in lab. First, we build 2D geometrical models containing the pore structure information of porous rocks based on the digital images (such as thin section, SEM, CT, etc.) of real rocks. Then we assume the rock frames are linearly elastic, and use the standard Maxwell spring-dash pot model to describe the visco-elastic properties of pore fluids. Boundary conditions are set according to the strain-stress method; and the displacement field is calculated using the finite element method (FEM). We numerically test the effects of fluid viscosity, frequency, and pore structure on the visco-elastic properties based on the calculation results. In our modeling, the viscosity of the pore fluid ranges from 103mPas to 109mPas; and the frequency varies from 5Hz to 500Hz. The preliminary results indicate that the saturated rock behaves stiffer and shows larger phase lag between stress and strain when the viscosity of the pore fluid and (or) the frequency increase.

  19. Statistical properties of three-dimensional two-fluid plasma model

    SciTech Connect

    Qaisrani, M. Hasnain; Xia, ZhenWei; Zou, Dandan

    2015-09-15

    The nonlinear dynamics of incompressible non-dissipative two-fluid plasma model is investigated through classical Gibbs ensemble methods. Liouville's theorem of phase space for each wave number is proved, and the absolute equilibrium spectra for Galerkin truncated two-fluid model are calculated. In two-fluid theory, the equilibrium is built on the conservation of three quadratic invariants: the total energy and the self-helicities for ions and electrons fluid, respectively. The implications of statistic equilibrium spectra with arbitrary ratios of conserved invariants are discussed.

  20. ASSESSING THE IMPACT OF SYNTHETIC-BASED DRILLING FLUIDS ON BENTHIC ORGANISMS IN TEMPERATE WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Efforts to enhance the efficiency of oil/gas drilling operations and to minimize hazards to marine ecosystems have resulted in the increased use of synthetic-based fluids (SBF). SBFs have performance characteristics closely related to oil-based fluids (OBF) however their lower PA...

  1. 40 CFR Appendix 3 to Subpart A of... - Procedure for Mixing Base Fluids With Sediments

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Sediments 3 Appendix 3 to Subpart A of Part 435 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... With Sediments This procedure describes a method for amending uncontaminated and nontoxic (control) sediments with the base fluids that are used to formulate synthetic-based drilling fluids and other...

  2. 40 CFR Appendix 3 to Subpart A of... - Procedure for Mixing Base Fluids With Sediments

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Sediments 3 Appendix 3 to Subpart A of Part 435 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... With Sediments This procedure describes a method for amending uncontaminated and nontoxic (control) sediments with the base fluids that are used to formulate synthetic-based drilling fluids and other...

  3. Computational Fluid Dynamic Modeling of Zinc Slag Fuming Process in Top-Submerged Lance Smelting Furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huda, Nazmul; Naser, Jamal; Brooks, Geoffrey; Reuter, Markus A.; Matusewicz, Robert W.

    2012-02-01

    Slag fuming is a reductive treatment process for molten zinciferous slags for extracting zinc in the form of metal vapor by injecting or adding a reductant source such as pulverized coal or lump coal and natural gas. A computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model was developed to study the zinc slag fuming process from imperial smelting furnace (ISF) slag in a top-submerged lance furnace and to investigate the details of fluid flow, reaction kinetics, and heat transfer in the furnace. The model integrates combustion phenomena and chemical reactions with the heat, mass, and momentum interfacial interaction between the phases present in the system. A commercial CFD package AVL Fire 2009.2 (AVL, Graz, Austria) coupled with a number of user-defined subroutines in FORTRAN programming language were used to develop the model. The model is based on three-dimensional (3-D) Eulerian multiphase flow approach, and it predicts the velocity and temperature field of the molten slag bath, generated turbulence, and vortex and plume shape at the lance tip. The model also predicts the mass fractions of slag and gaseous components inside the furnace. The model predicted that the percent of ZnO in the slag bath decreases linearly with time and is consistent broadly with the experimental data. The zinc fuming rate from the slag bath predicted by the model was validated through macrostep validation process against the experimental study of Waladan et al. The model results predicted that the rate of ZnO reduction is controlled by the mass transfer of ZnO from the bulk slag to slag-gas interface and rate of gas-carbon reaction for the specified simulation time studied. Although the model is based on zinc slag fuming, the basic approach could be expanded or applied for the CFD analysis of analogous systems.

  4. Evaluation of Propylene Glycol-Based Fluids for Constellation Habitats and Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Steve

    2009-01-01

    Two fluid life tests have been conducted to evaluate propylene glycol-based fluids for use in Constellation habitats and vehicles. The first test was conducted from November 2008 to January 2009 to help determine the compatibility of the propylene glycol-based fluid selected for Orion at the time. When the first test uncovered problems with the fluid selection, an investigation and selection of a new fluid were conducted. A second test was started in March 2010 to evaluate the new selection. For the first test, the fluid was subjected to a thermal fluid loop that had flight-like properties, as compared to Orion. The fluid loop had similar wetted materials, temperatures, flow rates, and aluminum wetted surface area to fluid volume ratio. The test was designed to last for 10 years, the life expectancy of the lunar habitat. However, the test lasted less than two months. System filters became clogged with precipitate, rendering the fluid system inoperable. Upon examination of the precipitate, it was determined that the precipitate composition contained aluminum, which could have only come from materials in the test stand, as aluminum is not part of the original fluid composition. Also, the fluid pH was determined to have increased from 10.1, at the first test sample, to 12.2, at the completion of the test. This high of a pH is corrosive to aluminum and was certainly a contributing factor to the development of precipitate. Due to the problems encountered during this test, the fluid was rejected as a coolant candidate for Orion. A new propylene glycol-based fluid was selected by the Orion project for use in the Orion vehicle. The Orion project has conducted a series of screening tests to help verify that there will be no problems with the new fluid selection. To compliment testing performed by the Orion project team, a new life test was developed to test the new fluid. The new test bed was similar to the original test bed, but with some improvements based on experience

  5. ADDRESSING HUMAN EXPOSURES TO AIR POLLUTANTS AROUND BUILDINGS IN URBAN AREAS WITH COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper discusses the status and application of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models to address challenges for modeling human exposures to air pollutants around urban building microenvironments. There are challenges for more detailed understanding of air pollutant sour...

  6. Geophysical models of heat and fluid flow in damageable poro-elastic continua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roubíček, Tomáš

    2017-03-01

    A rather general model for fluid and heat transport in poro-elastic continua undergoing possibly also plastic-like deformation and damage is developed with the goal to cover various specific models of rock rheology used in geophysics of Earth's crust. Nonconvex free energy at small elastic strains, gradient theories (in particular the concept of second-grade nonsimple continua), and Biot poro-elastic model are employed, together with possible large displacement due to large plastic-like strains evolving during long time periods. Also the additive splitting is justified in stratified situations which are of interest in modelling of lithospheric crust faults. Thermodynamically based formulation includes entropy balance (in particular the Clausius-Duhem inequality) and an explicit global energy balance. It is further outlined that the energy balance can be used to ensure, under suitable data qualification, existence of a weak solution and stability and convergence of suitable approximation schemes at least in some particular situations.

  7. Using Models at the Mesoscopic Scale in Teaching Physics: Two Experimental Interventions in Solid Friction and Fluid Statics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Besson, Ugo; Viennot, Laurence

    2004-01-01

    This article examines the didactic suitability of introducing models at an intermediate (i.e. mesoscopic) scale in teaching certain subjects, at an early stage. The design and evaluation of two short sequences based on this rationale will be outlined: one bears on propulsion by solid friction, the other on fluid statics in the presence of gravity.…

  8. SDEM modelling of deformation associated with a listric fault system and associated fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, Marie L.; Clausen, Ole R.; Egholm, David L.; Andresen, Katrine J.

    2016-04-01

    zones of high chimney probability coincide with the modelled vertical deformation zones. It cannot be excluded that the vertical deformation zones which have been inferred from the numerical modelling are responsible for or highly influence the high chimney probabilities observed in the chimney cube and thus that the interpretation of chimneys (and vertical fluid migration) is incorrect. However, since the chimney cube is also based on seed picks from areas without deformation, we suggest that the vertical deformation zones contributed to vertical fluid flow from the deeper succession into the shallow gas compartments. Thus the modelling demonstrates the capability of resolving sub-seismic deformation zones which appear to be critical for the facilitation of vertical fluid migration in the study area. Similar vertical deformation zones may therefore constitute the fluid migration routes in areas where such are only inferred but not imaged by the seismic data.

  9. Integrated geophysical and hydrothermal models of flank degassing and fluid flow at Masaya Volcano, Nicaragua

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanford, Ward E.; Pearson, S.C.P.; Kiyosugi, K.; Lehto, H.L.; Saballos, J.A.; Connor, C.B.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate geologic controls on circulation in the shallow hydrothermal system of Masaya volcano, Nicaragua, and their relationship to surface diffuse degassing. On a local scale (~250 m), relatively impermeable normal faults dipping at ~60° control the flowpath of water vapor and other gases in the vadose zone. These shallow normal faults are identified by modeling of a NE-SW trending magnetic anomaly of up to 2300 nT that corresponds to a topographic offset. Elevated SP and CO2 to the NW of the faults and an absence of CO2 to the SE suggest that these faults are barriers to flow. TOUGH2 numerical models of fluid circulation show enhanced flow through the footwalls of the faults, and corresponding increased mass flow and temperature at the surface (diffuse degassing zones). On a larger scale, TOUGH2 modeling suggests that groundwater convection may be occurring in a 3-4 km radial fracture zone transecting the entire flank of the volcano. Hot water rising uniformly into the base of the model at 1 x 10-5 kg/m2s results in convection that focuses heat and fluid and can explain the three distinct diffuse degassing zones distributed along the fracture. Our data and models suggest that the unusually active surface degassing zones at Masaya volcano can result purely from uniform heat and fluid flux at depth that is complicated by groundwater convection and permeability variations in the upper few km. Therefore isolating the effects of subsurface geology is vital when trying to interpret diffuse degassing in light of volcanic activity.

  10. Computational Fluid Dynamics Based Extraction of Heat Transfer Coefficient in Cryogenic Propellant Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, H. Q.; West, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Current reduced-order thermal model for cryogenic propellant tanks is based on correlations built for flat plates collected in the 1950's. The use of these correlations suffers from: inaccurate geometry representation; inaccurate gravity orientation; ambiguous length scale; and lack of detailed validation. The work presented under this task uses the first-principles based Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) technique to compute heat transfer from tank wall to the cryogenic fluids, and extracts and correlates the equivalent heat transfer coefficient to support reduced-order thermal model. The CFD tool was first validated against available experimental data and commonly used correlations for natural convection along a vertically heated wall. Good agreements between the present prediction and experimental data have been found for flows in laminar as well turbulent regimes. The convective heat transfer between tank wall and cryogenic propellant, and that between tank wall and ullage gas were then simulated. The results showed that commonly used heat transfer correlations for either vertical or horizontal plate over predict heat transfer rate for the cryogenic tank, in some cases by as much as one order of magnitude. A characteristic length scale has been defined that can correlate all heat transfer coefficients for different fill levels into a single curve. This curve can be used for the reduced-order heat transfer model analysis.

  11. Enhanced Geothermal Systems Research and Development: Models of Subsurface Chemical Processes Affecting Fluid Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Moller, Nancy; Weare J. H.

    2008-05-29

    Successful exploitation of the vast amount of heat stored beneath the earth’s surface in hydrothermal and fluid-limited, low permeability geothermal resources would greatly expand the Nation’s domestic energy inventory and thereby promote a more secure energy supply, a stronger economy and a cleaner environment. However, a major factor limiting the expanded development of current hydrothermal resources as well as the production of enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) is insufficient knowledge about the chemical processes controlling subsurface fluid flow. With funding from past grants from the DOE geothermal program and other agencies, we successfully developed advanced equation of state (EOS) and simulation technologies that accurately describe the chemistry of geothermal reservoirs and energy production processes via their free energies for wide XTP ranges. Using the specific interaction equations of Pitzer, we showed that our TEQUIL chemical models can correctly simulate behavior (e.g., mineral scaling and saturation ratios, gas break out, brine mixing effects, down hole temperatures and fluid chemical composition, spent brine incompatibilities) within the compositional range (Na-K-Ca-Cl-SO4-CO3-H2O-SiO2-CO2(g)) and temperature range (T < 350°C) associated with many current geothermal energy production sites that produce brines with temperatures below the critical point of water. The goal of research carried out under DOE grant DE-FG36-04GO14300 (10/1/2004-12/31/2007) was to expand the compositional range of our Pitzer-based TEQUIL fluid/rock interaction models to include the important aluminum and silica interactions (T < 350°C). Aluminum is the third most abundant element in the earth’s crust; and, as a constituent of aluminosilicate minerals, it is found in two thirds of the minerals in the earth’s crust. The ability to accurately characterize effects of temperature, fluid mixing and interactions between major rock-forming minerals and hydrothermal and

  12. Comparison of fluid neutral models for one-dimensional plasma edge modeling with a finite volume solution of the Boltzmann equation

    SciTech Connect

    Horsten, N. Baelmans, M.; Dekeyser, W.; Samaey, G.

    2016-01-15

    We derive fluid neutral approximations for a simplified 1D edge plasma model, suitable to study the neutral behavior close to the target of a nuclear fusion divertor, and compare its solutions to the solution of the corresponding kinetic Boltzmann equation. The plasma is considered as a fixed background extracted from a detached 2D simulation. We show that the Maxwellian equilibrium distribution is already obtained very close to the target, justifying the use of a fluid approximation. We compare three fluid neutral models: (i) a diffusion model; (ii) a pressure-diffusion model (i.e., a combination of a continuity and momentum equation) assuming equal neutral and ion temperatures; and (iii) the pressure-diffusion model coupled to a neutral energy equation taking into account temperature differences between neutrals and ions. Partial reflection of neutrals reaching the boundaries is included in both the kinetic and fluid models. We propose two methods to obtain an incident neutral flux boundary condition for the fluid models: one based on a diffusion approximation and the other assuming a truncated Chapman-Enskog distribution. The pressure-diffusion model predicts the plasma sources very well. The diffusion boundary condition gives slightly better results overall. Although including an energy equation still improves the results, the assumption of equal ion and neutral temperature already gives a very good approximation.

  13. Mathematical modeling of a non-Newtonian fluid flow in the main fracture inside permeable porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyasov, A. M.; Bulgakova, G. T.

    2016-08-01

    This paper describes a mathematical model of the main fracture isolation in porous media by water-based mature gels. While modeling injection, water infiltration from the gel pack through fracture walls is taking into account, due to which the polymer concentration changes and the residual water resistance factor changes as a consequence. The salutation predicts velocity and pressure fields of the non-Newtonian incompressible fluid filtration for conditions of a non-deformable formation as well as a gel front trajectory in the fracture. The mathematical model of agent injection into the main fracture is based on the fundamental laws of continuum mechanics conservation describing the flow of non-Newtonian and Newtonian fluids separated by an interface plane in a flat channel with permeable walls. The mathematical model is based on a one-dimensional isothermal approximation, with dynamic parameters pressure and velocity, averaged over the fracture section.

  14. Adaptive forward-inverse modeling of reservoir fluids away from wellbores

    SciTech Connect

    Ziagos, J P; Gelinas, R J; Doss, S K; Nelson, R G

    1999-07-30

    This Final Report contains the deliverables of the DeepLook Phase I project entitled, ''Adaptive Forward-Inverse Modeling of Reservoir Fluids Away from Wellbores''. The deliverables are: (i) a description of 2-D test problem results, analyses, and technical descriptions of the techniques used, (ii) a listing of program setup commands that construct and execute the codes for selected test problems (these commands are in mathematical terminology, which reinforces technical descriptions in the text), and (iii) an evaluation and recommendation regarding continuance of this project, including considerations of possible extensions to 3-D codes, additional technical scope, and budget for the out-years. The far-market objective in this project is to develop advanced technologies that can help locate and enhance the recovery of oil from heterogeneous rock formations. The specific technical objective in Phase I was to develop proof-of-concept of new forward and inverse (F-I) modeling techniques [Gelinas et al, 1998] that seek to enhance estimates (images) of formation permeability distributions and fluid motion away from wellbore volumes. This goes to the heart of improving industry's ability to jointly image reservoir permeability and flow predictions of trapped and recovered oil versus time. The estimation of formation permeability away from borehole measurements is an ''inverse'' problem. It is an inseparable part of modeling fluid flows throughout the reservoir in efforts to increase the efficiency of oil recovery at minimum cost. Classic issues of non-uniqueness, mathematical instability, noise effects, and inadequate numerical solution techniques have historically impeded progress in reservoir parameter estimations. Because information pertaining to fluid and rock properties is always sampled sparsely by wellbore measurements, a successful method for interpolating permeability and fluid data between the measurements must be: (i) physics-based, (ii) conditioned by

  15. Field Demonstration of Bio-based Hydraulic Fluids for Military Construction Equipment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-24

    Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Committed to Excellence 21-24 May 2007 2 Outline Background Federal Biobased Products Preferred Procurement Program New...Biodegradable/ Biobased Hydraulic Fluid Specification Field Demonstration-Final results Conclusions Committed to Excellence 21-24 May 2007 3 Background...Developing and Promoting Biobased Products and Bioenergy U.S. Army has issued a Biodegradable Hydraulic Fluid (BHF) Specification to accept Bio-based Fluids

  16. A new model for the determination of fluid status and body composition from bioimpedance measurements.

    PubMed

    Kraemer, M

    2006-09-01

    In patients with end stage renal failure, control of the fluid status of the body is lost and fluid accumulates continuously. By dialysis therapy, excess fluid can be removed, but there are no reliable methods to establish the amount of excess fluid to be removed. Severe and even lethal complications may be the consequence of longer term deviations from a normal fluid status in dialysis patients, but also in other patient groups. Therefore, a large medical need exists for a precise and pragmatic method to determine fluid status. Bioimpedance measurement, today mainly used for nutrition status assessment, is regarded as an interesting candidate method for fluid status determination. This paper presents a four-compartment model of the human body, developed to derive information on fluid status from extra- and intracellular volumes measured by bioimpedance spectroscopy. The model allows us to determine weights of each of four compartments (overhydration, fat, muscle and remaining 'basic' components) by analyzing extra- and intracellular water volumes in different tissues of the body. Thereby fluid status (overhydration volume, normohydrated weight of the patient) as well as nutrition and fitness status (lean body, fat and muscle mass) can be determined quantitatively from a single measurement. A preliminary evaluation of the performance of a system consisting of a bioimpedance spectrum analyzer and the four-compartment model is also provided.

  17. Computational fluid mechanics utilizing the variational principle of modeling damping seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abernathy, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics code for application to traditional incompressible flow problems has been developed. The method is actually a slight compressibility approach which takes advantage of the bulk modulus and finite sound speed of all real fluids. The finite element numerical analog uses a dynamic differencing scheme based, in part, on a variational principle for computational fluid dynamics. The code was developed in order to study the feasibility of damping seals for high speed turbomachinery. Preliminary seal analyses have been performed.

  18. Fracture Propagation, Fluid Flow, and Geomechanics of Water-Based Hydraulic Fracturing in Shale Gas Systems and Electromagnetic Geophysical Monitoring of Fluid Migration

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jihoon; Um, Evan; Moridis, George

    2014-12-01

    We investigate fracture propagation induced by hydraulic fracturing with water injection, using numerical simulation. For rigorous, full 3D modeling, we employ a numerical method that can model failure resulting from tensile and shear stresses, dynamic nonlinear permeability, leak-off in all directions, and thermo-poro-mechanical effects with the double porosity approach. Our numerical results indicate that fracture propagation is not the same as propagation of the water front, because fracturing is governed by geomechanics, whereas water saturation is determined by fluid flow. At early times, the water saturation front is almost identical to the fracture tip, suggesting that the fracture is mostly filled with injected water. However, at late times, advance of the water front is retarded compared to fracture propagation, yielding a significant gap between the water front and the fracture top, which is filled with reservoir gas. We also find considerable leak-off of water to the reservoir. The inconsistency between the fracture volume and the volume of injected water cannot properly calculate the fracture length, when it is estimated based on the simple assumption that the fracture is fully saturated with injected water. As an example of flow-geomechanical responses, we identify pressure fluctuation under constant water injection, because hydraulic fracturing is itself a set of many failure processes, in which pressure consistently drops when failure occurs, but fluctuation decreases as the fracture length grows. We also study application of electromagnetic (EM) geophysical methods, because these methods are highly sensitive to changes in porosity and pore-fluid properties due to water injection into gas reservoirs. Employing a 3D finite-element EM geophysical simulator, we evaluate the sensitivity of the crosswell EM method for monitoring fluid movements in shaly reservoirs. For this sensitivity evaluation, reservoir models are generated through the coupled flow

  19. Numerical model of self-propulsion in a fluid.

    PubMed

    Farnell, D J J; David, T; Barton, D C

    2005-03-22

    We provide initial evidence that a structure formed from an articulated series of linked elements, where each element has a given stiffness, damping and driving term with respect to its neighbours, may 'swim' through a fluid under certain conditions. We derive a Lagrangian for this system and, in particular, we note that we allow the leading edge to move along the x-axis. We assume that no lateral displacement of the leading edge of the structure is possible, although head 'yaw' is allowed. The fluid is simulated using a computational fluid dynamics technique, and we are able to determine and solve Euler-Lagrange equations for the structure. These two calculations are solved simultaneously by using a weakly coupled solver. We illustrate our method by showing that we are able to induce both forward and backward swimming. A discussion of the relevance of these simulations to a slowly swimming body, such as a mechanical device or a fish, is given.

  20. The magnetic mirror force in plasma fluid models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comfort, R. H.

    1988-01-01

    In the past decade, there have been several attempts to include the magnetic mirror force in the equation of motion for a plasma in a fluid formalism. In the process, some confusion has been evident regarding when and how this should be done. This problem has been addressed in the literature, but these treatments appear to have been forgotten or misunderstood. The mathematical arguments are summarized so that the physical consequences are readily perceived. It is shown that for an isotropic plasma fluid, in the direction parallel or anti-parallel to a magnetic field, the forces associated with a diverging magnetic field cancel out. Only for anisotropies in the fluid properties does the diverging field influence the plasma dynamics.

  1. Cloud fluid models of gas dynamics and star formation in galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Struck-Marcell, Curtis; Scalo, John M.; Appleton, P. N.

    1987-01-01

    The large dynamic range of star formation in galaxies, and the apparently complex environmental influences involved in triggering or suppressing star formation, challenges the understanding. The key to this understanding may be the detailed study of simple physical models for the dominant nonlinear interactions in interstellar cloud systems. One such model is described, a generalized Oort model cloud fluid, and two simple applications of it are explored. The first of these is the relaxation of an isolated volume of cloud fluid following a disturbance. Though very idealized, this closed box study suggests a physical mechanism for starbursts, which is based on the approximate commensurability of massive cloud lifetimes and cloud collisional growth times. The second application is to the modeling of colliding ring galaxies. In this case, the driving processes operating on a dynamical timescale interact with the local cloud processes operating on the above timescale. The results is a variety of interesting nonequilibrium behaviors, including spatial variations of star formation that do not depend monotonically on gas density.

  2. A unified approach to fluid-flow, geomechanical, and seismic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarushina, Viktoriya; Minakov, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    The perturbations of pore pressure can generate seismicity. This is supported by observations from human activities that involve fluid injection into rocks at high pressure (hydraulic fracturing, CO2 storage, geothermal energy production) and natural examples such as volcanic earthquakes. Although the seismic signals that emerge during geotechnical operations are small both in amplitude and duration when compared to natural counterparts. A possible explanation for the earthquake source mechanism is based on a number of in situ stress measurements suggesting that the crustal rocks are close to its plastic yield limit. Hence, a rapid increase of the pore pressure decreases the effective normal stress, and, thus, can trigger seismic shear deformation. At the same time, little attention has been paid to the fact that the perturbation of fluid pressure itself represents an acoustic source. Moreover, non-double-couple source mechanisms are frequently reported from the analysis of microseismicity. A consistent formulation of the source mechanism describing microseismic events should include both a shear and isotropic component. Thus, improved understanding of the interaction between fluid flow and seismic deformation is needed. With this study we aim to increase the competence in integrating real-time microseismic monitoring with geomechanical modelling such that there is a feedback loop between monitored deformation and stress field modelling. We propose fully integrated seismic, geomechanical and reservoir modelling. Our mathematical formulation is based on fundamental set of force balance, mass balance, and constitutive poro-elastoplastic equations for two-phase media consisting of deformable solid rock frame and viscous fluid. We consider a simplified 1D modelling setup for consistent acoustic source and wave propagation in poro-elastoplastic media. In this formulation the seismic wave is generated due to local changes of the stress field and pore pressure induced by

  3. Reparameterized United Atom Model for Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Gel and Fluid Phosphatidylcholine Bilayers.

    PubMed

    Tjörnhammar, Richard; Edholm, Olle

    2014-12-09

    A new united atom parametrization of diacyl lipids like dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and the dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) has been constructed based on ab initio calculations to obtain fractional charges and the dihedral potential of the hydrocarbon chains, while the Lennard-Jones parameters of the acyl chains were fitted to reproduce the properties of liquid hydrocarbons. The results have been validated against published experimental X-ray and neutron scattering data for fluid and gel phase DPPC. The derived charges of the lipid phosphatidylcholine (PC) headgroup are shown to yield dipole components in the range suggested by experiments. The aim has been to construct a new force field that retains and improves the good agreement for the fluid phase and at the same time produces a gel phase at low temperatures, with properties coherent with experimental findings. The gel phase of diacyl-PC lipids forms a regular triangular lattice in the hydrocarbon region. The global bilayer tilt obtains an azimuthal value of 31° and is aligned between lattice vectors in the bilayer plane. We also show that the model yields a correct heat of melting as well as decent heat capacities in the fluid and gel phase of DPPC.

  4. Dynamic mesoscale model of dipolar fluids via fluctuating hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Persson, Rasmus A. X.; Chu, Jhih-Wei; Voulgarakis, Nikolaos K.

    2014-11-07

    Fluctuating hydrodynamics (FHD) is a general framework of mesoscopic modeling and simulation based on conservational laws and constitutive equations of linear and nonlinear responses. However, explicit representation of electrical forces in FHD has yet to appear. In this work, we devised an Ansatz for the dynamics of dipole moment densities that is linked with the Poisson equation of the electrical potential ϕ in coupling to the other equations of FHD. The resulting ϕ-FHD equations then serve as a platform for integrating the essential forces, including electrostatics in addition to hydrodynamics, pressure-volume equation of state, surface tension, and solvent-particle interactions that govern the emergent behaviors of molecular systems at an intermediate scale. This unique merit of ϕ-FHD is illustrated by showing that the water dielectric function and ion hydration free energies in homogeneous and heterogenous systems can be captured accurately via the mesoscopic simulation. Furthermore, we show that the field variables of ϕ-FHD can be mapped from the trajectory of an all-atom molecular dynamics simulation such that model development and parametrization can be based on the information obtained at a finer-grained scale. With the aforementioned multiscale capabilities and a spatial resolution as high as 5 Å, the ϕ-FHD equations represent a useful semi-explicit solvent model for the modeling and simulation of complex systems, such as biomolecular machines and nanofluidics.

  5. Dynamic mesoscale model of dipolar fluids via fluctuating hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Persson, Rasmus A X; Voulgarakis, Nikolaos K; Chu, Jhih-Wei

    2014-11-07

    Fluctuating hydrodynamics (FHD) is a general framework of mesoscopic modeling and simulation based on conservational laws and constitutive equations of linear and nonlinear responses. However, explicit representation of electrical forces in FHD has yet to appear. In this work, we devised an Ansatz for the dynamics of dipole moment densities that is linked with the Poisson equation of the electrical potential ϕ in coupling to the other equations of FHD. The resulting ϕ-FHD equations then serve as a platform for integrating the essential forces, including electrostatics in addition to hydrodynamics, pressure-volume equation of state, surface tension, and solvent-particle interactions that govern the emergent behaviors of molecular systems at an intermediate scale. This unique merit of ϕ-FHD is illustrated by showing that the water dielectric function and ion hydration free energies in homogeneous and heterogenous systems can be captured accurately via the mesoscopic simulation. Furthermore, we show that the field variables of ϕ-FHD can be mapped from the trajectory of an all-atom molecular dynamics simulation such that model development and parametrization can be based on the information obtained at a finer-grained scale. With the aforementioned multiscale capabilities and a spatial resolution as high as 5 Å, the ϕ-FHD equations represent a useful semi-explicit solvent model for the modeling and simulation of complex systems, such as biomolecular machines and nanofluidics.

  6. Advances in modelling of biomimetic fluid flow at different scales

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The biomimetic flow at different scales has been discussed at length. The need of looking into the biological surfaces and morphologies and both geometrical and physical similarities to imitate the technological products and processes has been emphasized. The complex fluid flow and heat transfer problems, the fluid-interface and the physics involved at multiscale and macro-, meso-, micro- and nano-scales have been discussed. The flow and heat transfer simulation is done by various CFD solvers including Navier-Stokes and energy equations, lattice Boltzmann method and molecular dynamics method. Combined continuum-molecular dynamics method is also reviewed. PMID:21711847

  7. Static contact angle in lattice Boltzmann models of immiscible fluids.

    PubMed

    Latva-Kokko, M; Rothman, Daniel H

    2005-10-01

    We study numerically the capillary rise between two horizontal plates and in a rectangular tube, using a lattice Boltzmann (LB) method. We derive an equation for the static fluid-solid contact angle as a function of the wetting tendency of the walls and test its validity. We show that the generalized Laplace law with two independent radii of curvature is followed in capillary rise in rectangular tubes. Our method removes the history dependence of the fluid-solid contact angle that had been present in earlier LB schemes.

  8. Kinetic model of turbulence in an incompressible fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tchen, C. M.

    1978-01-01

    A statistical description of turbulence in an incompressible fluid obeying the Navier-Stokes equations is proposed, where pressure is regarded as a potential for the interaction between fluid elements. A scaling procedure divides a fluctuation into three ranks representing the three transport processes of macroscopic evolution, transport property, and relaxation. Closure is obtained by relaxation, and a kinetic equation is obtained for the fluctuation of the macroscopic rank of the distribution function. The solution gives the transfer function and eddy viscosity. When applied to the inertia subrange of the energy spectrum the analysis recovers the Kolmogorov law and its numerical coefficient.

  9. Steady shear rheometry of dissipative particle dynamics models of polymer fluids in reverse Poiseuille flow.

    PubMed

    Fedosov, Dmitry A; Karniadakis, George Em; Caswell, Bruce

    2010-04-14

    Polymer fluids are modeled with dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) as undiluted bead-spring chains and their solutions. The models are assessed by investigating their steady shear-rate properties. Non-Newtonian viscosity and normal stress coefficients, for shear rates from the lower to the upper Newtonian regimes, are calculated from both plane Couette and plane Poiseuille flows. The latter is realized as reverse Poiseuille flow (RPF) generated from two Poiseuille flows driven by uniform body forces in opposite directions along two-halves of a computational domain. Periodic boundary conditions ensure the RPF wall velocity to be zero without density fluctuations. In overlapping shear-rate regimes the RPF properties are confirmed to be in good agreement with those calculated from plane Couette flow with Lees-Edwards periodic boundary conditions (LECs), the standard virtual rheometer for steady shear-rate properties. The concentration and the temperature dependence of the properties of the model fluids are shown to satisfy the principles of concentration and temperature superposition commonly employed in the empirical correlation of real polymer-fluid properties. The thermodynamic validity of the equation of state is found to be a crucial factor for the achievement of time-temperature superposition. With these models, RPF is demonstrated to be an accurate and convenient virtual rheometer for the acquisition of steady shear-rate rheological properties. It complements, confirms, and extends the results obtained with the standard LEC configuration, and it can be used with the output from other particle-based methods, including molecular dynamics, Brownian dynamics, smooth particle hydrodynamics, and the lattice Boltzmann method.

  10. Computer modeling of fluid flow and combustion in the ISV (In Situ Vitrification) confinement hood

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.W.; Paik, S.

    1990-09-01

    Safety and suitability objectives for the application of the In Situ Vitrification (ISV) technology at the INEL require that the physical processes involved in ISVV be modeled to determine their operational behavior. The mathematical models that have been determined to address the modeling needs adequately for the ISV analysis package are detailed elsewhere. The present report is concerned with the models required for simulating the reacting flow that occurs in the ISV confinement hood. An experimental code named COYOTE has been secured that appears adequate to model the combustion in the confinement hood. The COYOTE code is a two-dimensional, transient, compressible, Eulerian, gas dynamics code for modeling reactive flows. It recognizes nonuniform Cartesian and cylindrical geometry and is based on the ICE (Implicit Continuous-fluid Eulerian) family of solution methods. It includes models for chemical reactions based on chemical kinetics as well as equilibrium chemistry. The mathematical models contained in COYOTE, their discrete analogs, the solution procedure, code structure and some test problems are presented in the report. 12 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs.

  11. Model study of the effects of interactions between systemic and peripheral circulation on interstitial fluid balance.

    PubMed

    Aletti, Federico; Baselli, Giuseppe

    2007-07-01

    Interstitial fluid balance is severely altered in microgravity, but the mechanisms underlying the fluid shift from lower to upper body are still partially unclear. A lumped parameter model of the arterial tree with active and non linear modulation of peripheral resistances and capillary fluid exchange was adopted to simulate the response of microcirculation to pulsatility and edema. Results suggest that myogenic regulation not only impinges on arteriolar radius, but it also indirectly affects interstitial fluid balance. Non linear dynamics of blood pressure (BP) and flow in capillary beds are influenced by systemic pulsatility, hinting that local activity is involved in the response to peripheral edema as well.

  12. A FOUR-FLUID MHD MODEL OF THE SOLAR WIND/INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM INTERACTION WITH TURBULENCE TRANSPORT AND PICKUP PROTONS AS SEPARATE FLUID

    SciTech Connect

    Usmanov, Arcadi V.; Matthaeus, William H.; Goldstein, Melvyn L.

    2016-03-20

    We have developed a four-fluid, three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic model of the solar wind interaction with the local interstellar medium. The unique features of the model are: (a) a three-fluid description for the charged components of the solar wind and interstellar plasmas (thermal protons, electrons, and pickup protons), (b) the built-in turbulence transport equations based on Reynolds decomposition and coupled with the mean-flow Reynolds-averaged equations, and (c) a solar corona/solar wind model that supplies inner boundary conditions at 40 au by computing solar wind and magnetic field parameters outward from the coronal base. The three charged species are described by separate energy equations and are assumed to move with the same velocity. The fourth fluid in the model is the interstellar hydrogen which is treated by separate continuity, momentum, and energy equations and is coupled with the charged components through photoionization and charge exchange. We evaluate the effects of turbulence transport and pickup protons on the global heliospheric structure and compute the distribution of plasma, magnetic field, and turbulence parameters throughout the heliosphere for representative solar minimum and maximum conditions. We compare our results with Voyager 1 observations in the outer heliosheath and show that the relative amplitude of magnetic fluctuations just outside the heliopause is in close agreement with the value inferred from Voyager 1 measurements by Burlaga et al. The simulated profiles of magnetic field parameters in the outer heliosheath are in qualitative agreement with the Voyager 1 observations and with the analytical model of magnetic field draping around the heliopause of Isenberg et al.

  13. Fluid dynamic modelling of renal pelvic pressure during endoscopic stone removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oratis, Alexandros; Subasic, John; Bird, James; Eisner, Brian

    2015-11-01

    Endoscopic kidney stone removal procedures are known to increase internal pressure in the renal pelvis, the kidney's urinary collecting system. High renal pelvic pressure incites systemic absorption of irrigation fluid, which can increase the risk of postoperative fever and sepsis or the unwanted absorption of electrolytes. Urologists choose the appropriate surgical procedure based on patient history and kidney stone size. However, no study has been conducted to compare the pressure profiles of each procedure, nor is there a precise sense of how the renal pelvic pressure scales with various operational parameters. Here we develop physical models for the flow rates and renal pelvic pressure for various procedures. We show that the results of our models are consistent with existing urological data on each procedure and that the models can predict pressure profiles where data is unavailable.

  14. Complete classification of the Wainwright Petrov type D perfect fluid models

    SciTech Connect

    Wylleman, Lode

    2009-05-01

    Perfect fluid spacetimes of Petrov type D, for which the fluid's four-velocity, the vorticity vector and one of the shear eigenvectors lie in the plane of principal null directions at each point, were naturally subdivided by Wainwright into four classes. The complete classification of these models is presented.

  15. Stochastic two-fluid model for relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Ayik, S. |; Ivanov, Y.B.; Russkikh, V.N.; Noerenberg, W.

    1993-04-01

    A reduction of the relativistic Boltzmann-Langevin Equation (BLE), to a stochastic two-fluid model is presented, and transport coefficients associated with fluid dynamical variables are extracted. The approach is applied to investigate equilibration in a counter-streaming nuclear system.

  16. Stochastic two-fluid model for relativistic heavy-ion collisions. [Boltzmann[endash]Langevin Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Ayik, S. Joint Inst. for Heavy Ion Research, Oak Ridge, TN ); Ivanov, Y.B.; Russkikh, V.N.; Noerenberg, W. )

    1993-01-01

    A reduction of the relativistic Boltzmann-Langevin Equation (BLE), to a stochastic two-fluid model is presented, and transport coefficients associated with fluid dynamical variables are extracted. The approach is applied to investigate equilibration in a counter-streaming nuclear system.

  17. Deriving a blood-mimicking fluid for particle image velocimetry in Sylgard-184 vascular models.

    PubMed

    Yousif, Majid Y; Holdsworth, David W; Poepping, Tamie L

    2009-01-01

    A new blood-mimicking fluid (BMF) has been developed for particle image velocimetry (PIV), which enables flow studies in vascular models (phantoms). A major difficulty in PIV that affects measurement accuracy is the refraction and distortion of light passing through the interface between the model and the fluid, due to the difference in refractive index (n) between the two materials. The problem can be eliminated by using a fluid with a refractive index matching that of the model. Such fluids are not commonly available, especially for vascular research where the fluid should also have a viscosity similar to human blood. In this work, a blood-mimicking fluid, composed of water (47.38% by weight), glycerol (36.94% by weight) and sodium iodide salt (15.68% by weight), was developed for compatibility with our silicone (Sylgard 184; n = 1.414) phantoms. The fluid exhibits a dynamic viscosity of 4.31+/-0.03 cP which lies within the range of human blood viscosity (4.4+/-0.6 cP). Both refractive index and viscosity were attained at 22.2+/-0.2 degrees C, which is a feasible room temperature, thus eliminating the need for a temperature-control system. The fluid will be used to study hemodynamics in vascular flow models fabricated from Sylgard 184.

  18. Differential Geometry Based Multiscale Models

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Guo-Wei

    2010-01-01

    Large chemical and biological systems such as fuel cells, ion channels, molecular motors, and viruses are of great importance to the scientific community and public health. Typically, these complex systems in conjunction with their aquatic environment pose a fabulous challenge to theoretical description, simulation, and prediction. In this work, we propose a differential geometry based multiscale paradigm to model complex macromolecular systems, and to put macroscopic and microscopic descriptions on an equal footing. In our approach, the differential geometry theory of surfaces and geometric measure theory are employed as a natural means to couple the macroscopic continuum mechanical description of the aquatic environment with the microscopic discrete atom-istic description of the macromolecule. Multiscale free energy functionals, or multiscale action functionals are constructed as a unified framework to derive the governing equations for the dynamics of different scales and different descriptions. Two types of aqueous macromolecular complexes, ones that are near equilibrium and others that are far from equilibrium, are considered in our formulations. We show that generalized Navier–Stokes equations for the fluid dynamics, generalized Poisson equations or generalized Poisson–Boltzmann equations for electrostatic interactions, and Newton's equation for the molecular dynamics can be derived by the least action principle. These equations are coupled through the continuum-discrete interface whose dynamics is governed by potential driven geometric flows. Comparison is given to classical descriptions of the fluid and electrostatic interactions without geometric flow based micro-macro interfaces. The detailed balance of forces is emphasized in the present work. We further extend the proposed multiscale paradigm to micro-macro analysis of electrohydrodynamics, electrophoresis, fuel cells, and ion channels. We derive generalized Poisson–Nernst–Planck equations that

  19. Differential geometry based multiscale models.

    PubMed

    Wei, Guo-Wei

    2010-08-01

    Large chemical and biological systems such as fuel cells, ion channels, molecular motors, and viruses are of great importance to the scientific community and public health. Typically, these complex systems in conjunction with their aquatic environment pose a fabulous challenge to theoretical description, simulation, and prediction. In this work, we propose a differential geometry based multiscale paradigm to model complex macromolecular systems, and to put macroscopic and microscopic descriptions on an equal footing. In our approach, the differential geometry theory of surfaces and geometric measure theory are employed as a natural means to couple the macroscopic continuum mechanical description of the aquatic environment with the microscopic discrete atomistic description of the macromolecule. Multiscale free energy functionals, or multiscale action functionals are constructed as a unified framework to derive the governing equations for the dynamics of different scales and different descriptions. Two types of aqueous macromolecular complexes, ones that are near equilibrium and others that are far from equilibrium, are considered in our formulations. We show that generalized Navier-Stokes equations for the fluid dynamics, generalized Poisson equations or generalized Poisson-Boltzmann equations for electrostatic interactions, and Newton's equation for the molecular dynamics can be derived by the least action principle. These equations are coupled through the continuum-discrete interface whose dynamics is governed by potential driven geometric flows. Comparison is given to classical descriptions of the fluid and electrostatic interactions without geometric flow based micro-macro interfaces. The detailed balance of forces is emphasized in the present work. We further extend the proposed multiscale paradigm to micro-macro analysis of electrohydrodynamics, electrophoresis, fuel cells, and ion channels. We derive generalized Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations that are

  20. Permeability generation and resetting of tracers during metamorphic fluid flow: implications for advection-dispersion models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright, Ian

    Advection-dispersion fluid flow models implicitly assume that the infiltrating fluid flows through an already fluid-saturated medium. However, whether rocks contain a fluid depends on their reaction history, and whether any initial fluid escapes. The behaviour of different rocks may be illustrated using hypothetical marble compositions. Marbles with diverse chemistries (e.g. calcite + dolomite + quartz) are relatively reactive, and will generally produce a fluid during heating. By contrast, marbles with more restricted chemistries (e.g. calcite + quartz or calcite-only) may not. If the rock is not fluid bearing when fluid infiltration commences, mineralogical reactions may produce a reaction-enhanced permeability in calcite + dolomite + quartz or calcite + quartz, but not in calcite-only marbles. The permeability production controls the pattern of mineralogical, isotopic, and geochemical resetting during fluid flow. Tracers retarded behind the mineralogical fronts will probably be reset as predicted by the advection-dispersion models; however, tracers that are expected to be reset ahead of the mineralogical fronts cannot progress beyond the permeability generating reaction. In the case of very unreactive lithologies (e.g. pure calcite marbles, cherts, and quartzites), the first reaction to affect the rocks may be a metasomatic one ahead of which there is little pervasive resetting of any tracer. Centimetre-scale layering may lead to the formation of self-perpetuating fluid channels in rocks that are not fluid saturated due to the juxtaposition of reactants. Such layered rocks may show patterns of mineralogical resetting that are not predicted by advection-dispersion models. Patterns of mineralogical and isotopic resetting in marbles from a number of terrains, for example: Chillagoe, Marulan South, Reynolds Range (Australia); Adirondack Mountains, Old Woman Mountains, Notch Peak (USA); and Stephen Cross Quarry (Canada) vary as predicted by these models.

  1. Fiber magnetic-field sensor based on nanoparticle magnetic fluid and Fresnel reflection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Luan Xiong; Huang, Xu Guang; Zhu, Jia Hu; Li, Guang Can; Lan, Sheng

    2011-08-01

    A simple fiber sensor for magnetic field measurement based on nanoparticle Fe(3)O(4) magnetic fluid and relative Fresnel reflection is presented. The sensor includes only a light source, three couplers, two photodetectors, and two fiber sensing ends. Magnetic fields at different concentrations of magnetic fluid are measured. Magnetic fluid with high concentration can be used for the measurement of weak magnetic fields, while low concentration fluid is used for the measurement of strong magnetic fields. The temperature dependence of the sensor is also addressed.

  2. THE ROLE OF POROUS MEDIA IN MODELING FLUID FLOW WITHIN HOLLOW FIBER MEMBRANES OF THE TOTAL ARTIFICIAL LUNG.

    PubMed

    Khanafer, Khalil; Cook, Keith; Marafie, Alia

    2012-01-01

    A numerical study was conducted to analyze fluid flow within hollow fiber membranes of the artificial lungs. The hollow fiber bundle was approximated using a porous media model. In addition, the transport equations were solved using the finite-element formulation based on the Galerkin method of weighted residuals. Comparisons with previously published work on the basis of special cases were performed and found to be in excellent agreement. A Newtonian viscous fluid model for the blood was used. Different flow models for porous media, such as the Brinkman-extended Darcy model, Darcy's law model, and the generalized flow model, were considered. Results were obtained in terms of streamlines, velocity vectors, and pressure distribution for various Reynolds numbers and Darcy numbers. The results from this investigation showed that the pressure drop across the artificial lung device increased with an increase in the Reynolds number. In addition, the pressure drop was found to increase significantly for small Darcy numbers.

  3. A knowledge-based approach to automated flow-field zoning for computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogel, Alison Andrews

    1989-01-01

    An automated three-dimensional zonal grid generation capability for computational fluid dynamics is shown through the development of a demonstration computer program capable of automatically zoning the flow field of representative two-dimensional (2-D) aerodynamic configurations. The applicability of a knowledge-based programming approach to the domain of flow-field zoning is examined. Several aspects of flow-field zoning make the application of knowledge-based techniques challenging: the need for perceptual information, the role of individual bias in the design and evaluation of zonings, and the fact that the zoning process is modeled as a constructive, design-type task (for which there are relatively few examples of successful knowledge-based systems in any domain). Engineering solutions to the problems arising from these aspects are developed, and a demonstration system is implemented which can design, generate, and output flow-field zonings for representative 2-D aerodynamic configurations.

  4. A two-fluid model for relativistic heat conduction

    SciTech Connect

    López-Monsalvo, César S.

    2014-01-14

    Three years ago it was presented in these proceedings the relativistic dynamics of a multi-fluid system together with various applications to a set of topical problems [1]. In this talk, I will start from such dynamics and present a covariant formulation of relativistic thermodynamics which provides us with a causal constitutive equation for the propagation of heat in a relativistic setting.

  5. Hybrid kinetic/fluid modeling of silicon nanoparticles dynamics in silane plasma discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlac'h, J.-M.; Giovangigli, V.; Novikova, T.; Cabarrocas, P. Roca i.

    2016-11-01

    We present a fully coupled self-consistent model for the evolution of nanoparticles in a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) reactor. The plasma is treated as a fluid while the nanoparticles are handled kinetically. The plasma fluid model is derived from kinetic theory applied to multicomponent two-temperature chemically reactive polyatomic plasmas. The model has been implemented numerically for a silane-hydrogen plasma in the early stage of nanoparticles generation.

  6. A simple model of fluid flow and electrolyte balance in the body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, R. J.; Neal, L.

    1973-01-01

    The model is basically a three-compartment model, the three compartments being the plasma, interstitial fluid and cellular fluid. Sodium, potassium, chloride and urea are the only major solutes considered explicitly. The control of body water and electrolyte distribution is affected via drinking and hormone levels. Basically, the model follows the effect of various oral input water loads on solute and water distribution throughout the body.

  7. Regional Fluid Flow and Basin Modeling in Northern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelley, Karen D.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The foothills of the Brooks Range contain an enormous accumulation of zinc (Zn) in the form of zinc sulfide and barium (Ba) in the form of barite in Carboniferous shale, chert, and mudstone. Most of the resources and reserves of Zn occur in the Red Dog deposit and others in the Red Dog district; these resources and reserves surpass those of most deposits worldwide in terms of size and grade. In addition to zinc and lead sulfides (which contain silver, Ag) and barite, correlative strata host phosphate deposits. Furthermore, prolific hydrocarbon source rocks of Carboniferous and Triassic to Early Jurassic age generated considerable amounts of petroleum that may have contributed to the world-class petroleum resources of the North Slope. Deposits of Zn-Pb-Ag or barite as large as those in the Brooks Range are very rare on a global basis and, accordingly, multiple coincident favorable factors must be invoked to explain their origins. To improve our understanding of these factors and to contribute to more effective assessments of resources in sedimentary basins of northern Alaska and throughout the world, the Mineral Resources Program and the Energy Resources Program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) initiated a project that was aimed at understanding the petroleum maturation and mineralization history of parts of the Brooks Range that were previously poorly characterized. The project, titled ?Regional Fluid Flow and Basin Modeling in Northern Alaska,? was undertaken in collaboration with industry, academia, and other government agencies. This Circular contains papers that describe the results of the recently completed project. The studies that are highlighted in these papers have led to a better understanding of the following: *The complex sedimentary facies relationships and depositional settings and the geochemistry of the sedimentary rocks that host the deposits (sections 2 and 3). *The factors responsible for formation of the barite and zinc deposits

  8. Free-Surface Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of a Spillway and Tailrace: Case Study of The Dalles Project

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, Chris B.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.; Ebner, Laurie L.

    2002-07-30

    Based upon acoustic tracking and fish tagging data, The Dalles Project constructed and operated by the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers has been shown to have the highest mortality rates for juvenile salmonids on the Lower Columbia River. In efforts to assist the hydraulic and biological communities in managing this hydroelectric project, a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was applied to the spillway, stilling basin, and tailrace zones downstream of the dam. To simulate the highly transient and turbulent flow conditions in this region, a free-surface computational fluid dynamics (CFD) numerical model has been applied. This model is based upon the volume-of-fluids (VOF) method, and is capable of simulating sudden discontinuities in the free surface, including wave breakup. The model solves the non-hydrostatic Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations over variable-sized hexahedral cells. To verify the ability of the numerical model to simulate flows downstream of the spillway, the model was verified against data from three different physical models of The Dalles tailrace at scales of 1:36, 1:40, and 1:80. Results from these physical models allow for validation of the numerical model at various scales of motion from the small scale highly dynamic variations near the baffle blocks (1:36 and 1:40 scale) to the larger scale general circulation patterns that encompass the tailrace (1:80 scale).

  9. Probing Reliability of Transport Phenomena Based Heat Transfer and Fluid Flow Analysis in Autogeneous Fusion Welding Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bag, S.; de, A.

    2010-09-01

    The transport phenomena based heat transfer and fluid flow calculations in weld pool require a number of input parameters. Arc efficiency, effective thermal conductivity, and viscosity in weld pool are some of these parameters, values of which are rarely known and difficult to assign a priori based on the scientific principles alone. The present work reports a bi-directional three-dimensional (3-D) heat transfer and fluid flow model, which is integrated with a real number based genetic algorithm. The bi-directional feature of the integrated model allows the identification of the values of a required set of uncertain model input parameters and, next, the design of process parameters to achieve a target weld pool dimension. The computed values are validated with measured results in linear gas-tungsten-arc (GTA) weld samples. Furthermore, a novel methodology to estimate the overall reliability of the computed solutions is also presented.

  10. Modeling and Simulation of Petroleum Coke Calcination in Pot Calciner Using Two-Fluid Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Jin; Huang, Jindi; Zhong, Qifan; Zhang, Hongliang; Li, Jie

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this work was to establish a mathematical model for the analysis of calcining process of petroleum coke in a 24-pot calciner via computational fluid dynamics (CFD) numerical simulation method. The model can be divided into two main parts (1) heterogeneous reacting flow of petroleum coke calcination in the pot was simulated using a two-fluid model approach where the gas and solid phase are treated as a continuous phases; and (2) the standard turbulence equations combined with the finite rate/eddy-dissipation combustion model and discrete ordinates model were solved for the turbulent gas reacting flow in the flue. The model of the calcining process was implemented in ANSYS Fluent 15.0 (commercial CFD software) and validated by industrial production data. After the validation research, the model has been applied to inspect the distribution features of the temperature field in the furnace, the concentration field of residual moisture and volatiles in the petroleum coke, and the vector velocity field of gas and solid phases. This research can provide a theoretical basis for optimizing the structure and improving the automatic control level of a pot calciner.

  11. Acute toxicity and irritation of water-based dextran-coated magnetic fluid injected in mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhai; Xiaoliang, Wang; Xuman, Wang; Hong, Xie; Hongchen, Gu

    2008-06-01

    Based on the elements that magnetic nanoparticles could heat in an alternating magnetic field, magnetic fluid hyperthermia occurred to inhibit tumor growth in vivo. However, biocompatibility of those fluids as well as the fluid-body interaction remains unclear. In this article, acute toxicity and irritation of the water-based dextran-coated magnetic fluid (dextran-magnetic fluid) injected into mice subcutaneous tissues were examined. Lethal dosage 50 of single treatment with the magnetic fluid was 4409.61 +/- 514.93 mg/kg. When injected with 30 mg/0.3 mL dextran-magnetic fluid, activities of glutamicoxalacetictransaminase (AST) and glutamicpyruvictransaminase (ALT) and cell number of mice blood did not change statistically. Hemangiectasia and leucocytes infiltration were seen in subcutaneous tissues and these phenomena almost disappeared 72 h later. That is to say, the dextran-magnetic fluid was tolerable, safe, and biocompatible. The work is a basic for application of the dextran-magnetic fluid in subcutaneous tumor therapy.

  12. Thermodynamically consistent modeling of granular-fluid mixtures incorporating pore pressure evolution and hypoplastic behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heß, Julian; Wang, Yongqi; Hutter, Kolumban

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a new, thermodynamically consistent model for granular-fluid mixtures, derived with the entropy principle of Müller and Liu. Including a pressure diffusion equation combined with the concept of extra pore pressure, and hypoplastic material behavior, thermodynamic restrictions are imposed on the constitutive quantities. The model is applied to a granular-fluid flow, using a closing assumption in conjunction with the fluid pressure. While the focal point of the work is the conceptional part, i.e. the thermodynamic consistent modeling, numerical simulations with physically reasonable results for simple shear flow are also carried out.

  13. Three-Fluid Magnetohydrodynamic Modeling of the Solar Wind in the Outer Heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usmanov, Arcadi V.; Goldstein, Melvyn L.; Matthaeus, William H.

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a three-fluid, fully three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic model of the solar wind plasma in the outer heliosphere as a co-moving system of solar wind protons, electrons, and interstellar pickup protons, with separate energy equations for each species. Our approach takes into account the effects of electron heat conduction and dissipation of Alfvenic turbulence on the spatial evolution of the solar wind plasma and interplanetary magnetic fields. The turbulence transport model is based on the Reynolds decomposition of physical variables into mean and fluctuating components and uses the turbulent phenomenologies that describe the conversion of fluctuation energy into heat due to a turbulent cascade. We solve the coupled set of the three-fluid equations for the mean-field solar wind and the turbulence equations for the turbulence energy, cross helicity, and correlation length. The equations are written in the rotating frame of reference and include heating by turbulent dissipation, energy transfer from interstellar pickup protons to solar wind protons, and solar wind deceleration due to the interaction with the interstellar hydrogen. The numerical solution is constructed by the time relaxation method in the region from 0.3 to 100 AU. Initial results from the novel model are presented.

  14. Dust emission modelling around a stockpile by using computational fluid dynamics and discrete element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derakhshani, S. M.; Schott, D. L.; Lodewijks, G.

    2013-06-01

    Dust emissions can have significant effects on the human health, environment and industry equipment. Understanding the dust generation process helps to select a suitable dust preventing approach and also is useful to evaluate the environmental impact of dust emission. To describe these processes, numerical methods such as Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) are widely used, however nowadays particle based methods like Discrete Element Method (DEM) allow researchers to model interaction between particles and fluid flow. In this study, air flow over a stockpile, dust emission, erosion and surface deformation of granular material in the form of stockpile are studied by using DEM and CFD as a coupled method. Two and three dimensional simulations are respectively developed for CFD and DEM methods to minimize CPU time. The standard κ-ɛ turbulence model is used in a fully developed turbulent flow. The continuous gas phase and the discrete particle phase link to each other through gas-particle void fractions and momentum transfer. In addition to stockpile deformation, dust dispersion is studied and finally the accuracy of stockpile deformation results obtained by CFD-DEM modelling will be validated by the agreement with the existing experimental data.

  15. Model of heterogeneous material dissolution in simulated biological fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knyazeva, A. G.; Gutmanas, E. Y.

    2015-11-01

    In orthopedic research, increasing attention is being paid to bioresorbable/biodegradable implants as an alternative to permanent metallic bone healing devices. Biodegradable metal based implants possessing high strength and ductility potentially can be used in load bearing sites. Biodegradable Mg and Fe are ductile and Fe possess high strength, but Mg degrades too fast and Fe degrades too slow, Ag is a noble metal and should cause galvanic corrosion of the more active metallic iron - thus, corrosion of Fe can be increased. Nanostructuring should results in higher strength and can result in higher rate of dissolution/degradation from grain boundaries. In this work, a simple dissolution model of heterogeneous three phase nanocomposite material is considered - two phases being metal Fe and Ag and the third - nanopores. Analytical solution for the model is presented. Calculations demonstrate that the changes in the relative amount of each phase depend on mass exchange and diffusion coefficients. Theoretical results agree with preliminary experimental results.

  16. Modeling Coupled Processes for Multiphase Fluid Flow in Mechanically Deforming Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenna, S. A.; Pike, D. Q.

    2011-12-01

    Modeling of coupled hydrological-mechanical processes in fault zones is critical for understanding the long-term behavior of fluids within the shallow crust. Here we utilize a previously developed cellular-automata (CA) model to define the evolution of permeability within a 2-D fault zone under compressive stress. At each time step, the CA model calculates the increase in fluid pressure within the fault at every grid cell. Pressure surpassing a critical threshold (e.g., lithostatic stress) causes a rupture in that cell, and pressure is then redistributed across the neighboring cells. The rupture can cascade through the spatial domain and continue across multiple time steps. Stress continues to increase and the size and location of rupture events are recorded until a percolating backbone of ruptured cells exists across the fault. Previous applications of this model consider uncorrelated random fields for the compressibility of the fault material. The prior focus on uncorrelated property fields is consistent with development of a number of statistical physics models including percolation processes and fracture propagation. However, geologic materials typically express spatial correlation and this can have a significant impact on the results of the pressure and permeability distributions. We model correlation of the fault material compressibility as a multiGaussian random field with a correlation length defined as the full-width at half maximum (FWHM) of the kernel used to create the field. The FWHM is varied from < 0.001 to approximately 0.47 of the domain size. The addition of spatial correlation to the compressibility significantly alters the model results including: 1) Accumulation of larger amounts of strain prior to the first rupture event; 2) Initiation of the percolating backbone at lower amounts of cumulative strain; 3) Changes in the event size distribution to a combined power-law and exponential distribution with a smaller power; and 4) Evolution of the

  17. CONE - An STS-based cryogenic fluid management experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, R. S.; Vento, D. M.; Hanna, G. J.

    1992-01-01

    An overview of the CONE program is presented which includes a definition of the technology addressed by CONE and a baseline experiment set, a description of the experimental and support subsystems, interface requirements between the STS and the experiment carrier (Hitchhiker M), and the reusability and expansion capacity for additional experiment flights. CONE evaluates three primary technologies: the active thermodynamic vent system, the passive thermodynamic vent system, and liquid acquisition device performance. The cryogenic fluid management technology database that the system offers will allow for efficient subcritical cryogenic system designs for operation in a low-gravity environment. This system maximizes the balance between existing component technology and the need for the development of a cryogenic-fluid-management (CFM) test bed to investigate and demonstrate methods of storage and handling arenas.

  18. Speckle tracking and speckle content based composite strain imaging for solid and fluid filled lesions.

    PubMed

    Rabbi, Md Shifat-E; Hasan, Md Kamrul

    2017-02-01

    Strain imaging though for solid lesions provides an effective way for determining their pathologic condition by displaying the tissue stiffness contrast, for fluid filled lesions such an imaging is yet an open problem. In this paper, we propose a novel speckle content based strain imaging technique for visualization and classification of fluid filled lesions in elastography after automatic identification of the presence of fluid filled lesions. Speckle content based strain, defined as a function of speckle density based on the relationship between strain and speckle density, gives an indirect strain value for fluid filled lesions. To measure the speckle density of the fluid filled lesions, two new criteria based on oscillation count of the windowed radio frequency signal and local variance of the normalized B-mode image are used. An improved speckle tracking technique is also proposed for strain imaging of the solid lesions and background. A wavelet-based integration technique is then proposed for combining the strain images from these two techniques for visualizing both the solid and fluid filled lesions from a common framework. The final output of our algorithm is a high quality composite strain image which can effectively visualize both solid and fluid filled breast lesions in addition to the speckle content of the fluid filled lesions for their discrimination. The performance of our algorithm is evaluated using the in vivo patient data and compared with recently reported techniques. The results show that both the solid and fluid filled lesions can be better visualized using our technique and the fluid filled lesions can be classified with good accuracy.

  19. Novel models on fluid's variable thermo-physical properties for extensive study on convection heat and mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, De-Yi; Zhong, Liang-Cai

    2017-01-01

    Our novel models for fluid's variable physical properties are improved and reported systematically in this work for enhancement of theoretical and practical value on study of convection heat and mass transfer. It consists of three models, namely (1) temperature parameter model, (2) polynomial model, and (3) weighted-sum model, respectively for treatment of temperature-dependent physical properties of gases, temperature-dependent physical properties of liquids, and concentration- and temperature-dependent physical properties of vapour-gas mixture. Two related components are proposed, and involved in each model for fluid's variable physical properties. They are basic physic property equations and theoretical similarity equations on physical property factors. The former, as the foundation of the latter, is based on the typical experimental data and physical analysis. The latter is built up by similarity analysis and mathematical derivation based on the former basic physical properties equations. These models are available for smooth simulation and treatment of fluid's variable physical properties for assurance of theoretical and practical value of study on convection of heat and mass transfer. Especially, so far, there has been lack of available study on heat and mass transfer of film condensation convection of vapour-gas mixture, and the wrong heat transfer results existed in widespread studies on the related research topics, due to ignorance of proper consideration of the concentration- and temperature-dependent physical properties of vapour-gas mixture. For resolving such difficult issues, the present novel physical property models have their special advantages.

  20. Prediction of fluid forces acting on a hand model in unsteady flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Shigetada; Yanai, Toshimasa; Wilson, Barry; Takagi, Hideki; Vennell, Ross

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a method to predict fluid forces acting on the human hand in unsteady flow swimming conditions. A mechanical system consisting of a pulley and chain mechanism and load cell was constructed to rotate a hand model in fluid flows. To measure the angular displacement of the hand model a potentiometer was attached to the axis of the rotation. The hand model was then fixed at various angles about the longitudinal axis of the hand model and rotated at different flow velocities in a swimming flume for 258 different trials to approximate a swimmer's stroke in unsteady flow conditions. Pressures were taken from 12 transducers embedded in the hand model at a sampling frequency of 200Hz. The resultant fluid force acting on the hand model was then determined on the basis of the kinetic and kinematic data taken from the mechanical system at the frequency of 200Hz. A stepwise regression analysis was applied to acquire higher order polynomial equations that predict the fluid force acting on the accelerating hand model from the 12 pressure values. The root mean square (RMS) difference between the resultant fluid force measured and that predicted from the single best-fit polynomial equation across all trials was 5N. The method developed in the present study accurately predicted the fluid forces acting on the hand model.

  1. Validation of Numerical Two-Fluid and Kinetic Plasma Models

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel Barnes

    2011-03-25

    This was a four year grant commencing October 1, 2003 and finishing September 30, 2007. The funding was primarily used to support the work of the Principal Investigator, who collaborated with Profs. Scott Parker and John Cary at U. Colorado, and with two students, N. Xiang and J. Cheng also of U. Colorado. The technical accomplishments of this grant can be found in the publications listed in the final Section here. The main accomplishments of the grant work were: (1) Development and implementation of time-implicit two-fluid simulation methods in collaboration with the NIMROD team; and (2) Development and testing of a new time-implicit delta-f, energy-conserving method The basic two-fluid method, with many improvements is used in present NIMROD calculations. The energy-conserving delta-f method is under continuing development under contract between Coronado Consulting, a New Mexico sole proprietorship and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  2. Long Duration Life Test of Propylene Glycol Water Based Thermal Fluid Within Thermal Control Loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, Hung; Hill, Charles; Stephan, Ryan A.

    2010-01-01

    Evaluations of thermal properties and resistance to microbial growth concluded that 50% Propylene Glycol (PG)-based fluid and 50% de-ionized water mixture was desirable for use as a fluid within a vehicle s thermal control loop. However, previous testing with a commercial mixture of PG and water containing phosphate corrosion inhibitors resulted in corrosion of aluminum within the test system and instability of the test fluid. This paper describes a follow-on long duration testing and analysis of 50% Propylene Glycol (PG)-based fluid and 50% de-ionized water mixture with inorganic corrosion inhibitors used in place of phosphates. The test evaluates the long-term fluid stability and resistance to microbial and chemical changes

  3. Cationic polymer drilling fluid can sometimes replace oil-based mud

    SciTech Connect

    Beihoffer, T.W.; Dorrough, D.S.; Deem, C.K.; Schmidt, D.D.; Bray, R.P. )

    1992-03-16

    A recently developed cationic polymer/brine drilling fluid (CBF) system, tested in a number of wells drilled in the U.S. and the North Sea, can replace oil-based fluids in certain applications. This paper reports that the field tests have shown CBF to be more inhibitive than other water-based muds used in the same areas. To date, the primary applications have been in large diameter hole sections drilled through Tertiary shales with high semectite clay content. The CBF system uses a cationic polymer and potassium chloride for shale inhibition, starch for fluid loss control, and a biopolymer for rheology. Tests have been developed to quantitatively measure the concentrations of the inhibitive additives in the fluid, allowing the fluid to be run with a high degree of control.

  4. Optimization and scale-up of oligonucleotide synthesis in packed bed reactors using computational fluid dynamics modeling.

    PubMed

    Wolfrum, Christian; Josten, Andre; Götz, Peter

    2014-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model for the analysis of oligonucleotide synthesis in packed bed reactors was developed and used to optimize the scale up of the process. The model includes reaction kinetics data obtained under well defined conditions comparable to the situation in the packed bed. The model was validated in terms of flow conditions and reaction kinetics by comparison with experimental data. Experimental validation and the following model parameter studies by simulation were performed on the basis of a column with 0.3 g oligonucleotide capacity. The scale-up studies based on CFD modelling were calculated on a 440 g scale (oligonucleotide capacity).

  5. A FRAMEWORK FOR FINE-SCALE COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS AIR QUALITY MODELING AND ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fine-scale Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation of pollutant concentrations within roadway and building microenvironments is feasible using high performance computing. Unlike currently used regulatory air quality models, fine-scale CFD simulations are able to account rig...

  6. Computational fluid mechanics utilizing the variational principle of modeling damping seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abernathy, J. M.; Farmer, R.

    1985-01-01

    An analysis for modeling damping seals for use in Space Shuttle main engine turbomachinery is being produced. Development of a computational fluid mechanics code for turbulent, incompressible flow is required.

  7. Computational fluid mechanics utilizing the variational principle of modeling damping seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The pressure solution for incompressible flow was investigated in support of a computational fluid mechanics model which simulates the damping seals considered for use in the space shuttle main engine turbomachinery. Future work directions are discussed briefly.

  8. Magnetic fluid-modeled microgravity: a novel way to treat tumor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Yan, Zhiqiang; Liu, Rongrong; Wang, Nanding; Li, Jing; Wang, Zongren

    2011-12-01

    With the advances of nanotechnology in recent years, our understanding of the therapy of cancers has deepened and the development of new technologies for cancer diseases has emerged. Here, with the recent discoveries of nanomagnetic fluids as well as microgravity effects upon cancerous cells, we suggest an innovative method of treating tumor using magnetic fluid-modeled microgravity. Magnetic fluids are delivered by outside magnetic field to tumor issue either intravenously or through direct injection, and this is followed by application of an uniform external magnetic field that causes microgravity. The modeled microgravity is to inhibit cancerous cells growth and invasion.

  9. Mosquitoes drink with a burst in reserve: explaining pumping behavior with a fluid mechanics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Souvick; Socha, Jake; Stremler, Mark

    2014-11-01

    Mosquitoes drink using a pair of in-line pumps in the head that draw liquid food through the proboscis. Experimental observations with synchrotron x-ray imaging indicate two modes of drinking: a predominantly occurring continuous mode, in which the cibarial and pharyngeal pumps expand cyclically at a constant phase difference, and an occasional, isolated burst mode, in which the pharyngeal pump expansion is 10 to 30 times larger than in the continuous mode. We have used a reduced order model of the fluid mechanics to hypothesize an explanation of this variation in drinking behavior. Our model results show that the continuous mode is more energetically efficient, whereas the burst mode creates a large pressure drop across the proboscis, which could potentially be used to clear blockages. Comparisons with pump knock-out configurations demonstrate different functional roles of the pumps in mosquito feeding. This material is based upon work supported by the NSF under Grant No. #0938047.

  10. Modeling Lymph Flow and Fluid Exchange with Blood Vessels in Lymph Nodes

    PubMed Central

    Jafarnejad, Mohammad; Woodruff, Matthew C.; Zawieja, David C.; Carroll, Michael C.; Moore, J.E.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Lymph nodes (LNs) are positioned strategically throughout the body as critical mediators of lymph filtration and immune response. Lymph carries cytokines, antigens, and cells to the downstream LNs, and their effective delivery to the correct location within the LN directly impacts the quality and quantity of immune response. Despite the importance of this system, the flow patterns in LN have never been quantified, in part because experimental characterization is so difficult. Methods and Results: To achieve a more quantitative knowledge of LN flow, a computational flow model has been developed based on the mouse popliteal LN, allowing for a parameter sensitivity analysis to identify the important system characteristics. This model suggests that about 90% of the lymph takes a peripheral path via the subcapsular and medullary sinuses, while fluid perfusing deeper into the paracortex is sequestered by parenchymal blood vessels. Fluid absorption by these blood vessels under baseline conditions was driven mainly by oncotic pressure differences between lymph and blood, although the magnitude of fluid transfer is highly dependent on blood vessel surface area. We also predict that the hydraulic conductivity of the medulla, a parameter that has never been experimentally measured, should be at least three orders of magnitude larger than that of the paracortex to ensure physiologic pressures across the node. Conclusions: These results suggest that structural changes in the LN microenvironment, as well as changes in inflow/outflow conditions, dramatically alter the distribution of lymph, cytokines, antigens, and cells within the LN, with great potential for modulating immune response. PMID:26683026

  11. Thermally stable drilling fluid additive comprised of a copolymer of catechol-based monomer

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, A.D.

    1986-06-17

    A water soluble polymer is described having thermal stability and exhibiting utility as an aqueous drilling fluid additive comprising: (a) a major portion of a catechol based monomer; (b) a minor portion of a dicarboxylic acid monomer.

  12. Predictive models for pressure-driven fluid infusions into brain parenchyma

    PubMed Central

    Raghavan, Raghu; Brady, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Direct infusions into brain parenchyma of biological therapeutics for serious brain diseases have been, and are being, considered. However, individual brains, as well as distinct cytoarchitectural regions within brains, vary in their response to fluid flow and pressure. Further, the tissue responds dynamically to these stimuli, requiring a nonlinear treatment of equations that would describe fluid flow and drug transport in brain. We here report in detail on an individual–specific model and a comparison of its prediction with simulations for living porcine brains. Two critical features we introduced into our model — absent from previous ones, but requirements for any useful simulation — are the infusion-induced interstitial expansion and the backflow. These are significant determinants of the flow. Another feature of our treatment is the use of cross–property relations to obtain individual–specific parameters that are coefficients in the equations. The quantitative results are at least encouraging, showing a high fraction of overlap between the computed and measured volumes of distribution of a tracer molecule, and are potentially clinically useful. Several improvements are called for; principally a treatment of the interstitial expansion more fundamentally based on poroelasticity, and a better delineation of the diffusion tensor of a particle confined to the interstitial spaces. PMID:21891847

  13. Numerical modeling of fluid flow with rafts: An application to lava flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsepelev, Igor; Ismail-Zadeh, Alik; Melnik, Oleg; Korotkii, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    Although volcanic lava flows do not significantly affect the life of people, its hazard is not negligible as hot lava kills vegetation, destroys infrastructure, and may trigger a flood due to melting of snow/ice. The lava flow hazard can be reduced if the flow patterns are known, and the complexity of the flow with debris is analyzed to assist in disaster risk mitigation. In this paper we develop three-dimensional numerical models of a gravitational flow of multi-phase fluid with rafts (mimicking rigid lava-crust fragments) on a horizontal and topographic surfaces to explore the dynamics and the interaction of lava flows. We have obtained various flow patterns and spatial distribution of rafts depending on conditions at the surface of fluid spreading, obstacles on the way of a fluid flow, raft landing scenarios, and the size of rafts. Furthermore, we analyze two numerical models related to specific lava flows: (i) a model of fluid flow with rafts inside an inclined channel, and (ii) a model of fluid flow from a single vent on an artificial topography, when the fluid density, its viscosity, and the effusion rate vary with time. Although the studied models do not account for lava solidification, crust formation, and its rupture, the results of the modeling may be used for understanding of flows with breccias before a significant lava cooling.

  14. Modelling the absorption refrigeration cycle using partially miscible working fluids by group contribution methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larkeche, O.; Meniai, A.-H.; Cachot, T.

    2012-06-01

    The present study concerns the cycle performance modelling of a particular configuration of an absorption refrigeration machine based on phase separation as well as development of a strategy for computer aided design of absorbents. The model uses predictive methods based on the group contribution concept for the computation of the thermodynamic phase equilibria involved such as liquid-liquid and vapour-liquid as well as enthalpy-concentration diagrams. The proposed absorbents computer-aided design strategy is based on the exploration of a number of structural group combinations obtained from a selected set of functional groups, according to the chemistry laws. The model was tested on four different absorbent-refrigerant pairs reported in the literature, namely (benzyl ethyl amine-glycerol), (water-hexanoic acid), (water-2-hexanone) and (water-ethyl propionate) as well as on pairs where the absorbent compound is generated by the proposed absorbent design strategy and the refrigerant is water. The results show that quite good values of the coefficient of performance (COP) can be obtained, indicating that this cycle configuration is promising and energetically efficient, mainly due to hardware savings, i.e. absence of condenser. However, other working fluid combinations have to be tested using the proposed model.

  15. Modelling of a hydraulic engine mount with fluid-structure interaction finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shangguan, Wen-Bin; Lu, Zhen-Hua

    2004-08-01

    Hydraulic engine mount (HEM) is now widely used as a highly effective vibration isolator in automotive powertrain. A lumped parameter (LP) model is a traditional model for modelling the dynamic characteristics of HEM, in which the system parameters are usually obtained by experiments. In this paper, a fluid-structure interaction (FSI) finite element analysis (FEA) method and a non-linear FEA technology are used to determine the system parameters, and a fully coupled FSI model is developed for modelling the static and lower-frequency performance of an HEM. A FSI FEA technique is used to estimate the parameters of volumetric compliances, equivalent piston area, inertia and resistance of the fluid in the inertia track and the decoupler of an HEM. A non-linear FEA method is applied to determine the dynamic stiffness of rubber spring of the HEM. The system parameters predicated by FEA are compared favorably with experimental data and/or analytical solutions. A numerical simulation for an HEM with an inertia track and a free decoupler is performed based on the FSI model and the LP model along with the estimated system parameters, and again the simulation results are compared with experimental data. The calculated time histories of some variables in the model, such as the pressure in the upper chamber, the displacement of the free decoupler and the volume flow through the inertia track and the decoupler, under different excitations, elucidate the working mechanism of the HEM. The pressure distribution calculated with the FSI model in the chambers of the HEM validates the assumption that the pressure distribution in the upper and lower chamber is uniform in the LP model. The work conducted in the paper demonstrates that the methods for estimating the system parameters in the LP model and the FSI model for modelling HEM are effective, with which the dynamic characteristic analysis and design optimization of an HEM can be performed before its prototype development, and this

  16. Parameter estimation from flowing fluid temperature logging data in unsaturated fractured rock using multiphase inverse modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, S.; Tsang, Y.; Finsterle, S.

    2009-01-15

    A simple conceptual model has been recently developed for analyzing pressure and temperature data from flowing fluid temperature logging (FFTL) in unsaturated fractured rock. Using this conceptual model, we developed an analytical solution for FFTL pressure response, and a semianalytical solution for FFTL temperature response. We also proposed a method for estimating fracture permeability from FFTL temperature data. The conceptual model was based on some simplifying assumptions, particularly that a single-phase airflow model was used. In this paper, we develop a more comprehensive numerical model of multiphase flow and heat transfer associated with FFTL. Using this numerical model, we perform a number of forward simulations to determine the parameters that have the strongest influence on the pressure and temperature response from FFTL. We then use the iTOUGH2 optimization code to estimate these most sensitive parameters through inverse modeling and to quantify the uncertainties associated with these estimated parameters. We conclude that FFTL can be utilized to determine permeability, porosity, and thermal conductivity of the fracture rock. Two other parameters, which are not properties of the fractured rock, have strong influence on FFTL response. These are pressure and temperature in the borehole that were at equilibrium with the fractured rock formation at the beginning of FFTL. We illustrate how these parameters can also be estimated from FFTL data.

  17. Computational fluid dynamic modeling of a medium-sized surface mine blasthole drill shroud

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Y.; Reed, W.R.; Zhou, L.; Rider, J.P.

    2016-01-01

    The Pittsburgh Mining Research Division of the U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) recently developed a series of models using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to study airflows and respirable dust distribution associated with a medium-sized surface blasthole drill shroud with a dry dust collector system. Previously run experiments conducted in NIOSH’s full-scale drill shroud laboratory were used to validate the models. The setup values in the CFD models were calculated from experimental data obtained from the drill shroud laboratory and measurements of test material particle size. Subsequent simulation results were compared with the experimental data for several test scenarios, including 0.14 m3/s (300 cfm) and 0.24 m3/s (500 cfm) bailing airflow with 2:1, 3:1 and 4:1 dust collector-to-bailing airflow ratios. For the 2:1 and 3:1 ratios, the calculated dust concentrations from the CFD models were within the 95 percent confidence intervals of the experimental data. This paper describes the methodology used to develop the CFD models, to calculate the model input and to validate the models based on the experimental data. Problem regions were identified and revealed by the study. The simulation results could be used for future development of dust control methods for a surface mine blasthole drill shroud. PMID:27932851

  18. Robust and general method for determining surface fluid flow boundary conditions in articular cartilage contact mechanics modeling.

    PubMed

    Pawaskar, Sainath Shrikant; Fisher, John; Jin, Zhongmin

    2010-03-01

    Contact detection in cartilage contact mechanics is an important feature of any analytical or computational modeling investigation when the biphasic nature of cartilage and the corresponding tribology are taken into account. The fluid flow boundary conditions will change based on whether the surface is in contact or not, which will affect the interstitial fluid pressurization. This in turn will increase or decrease the load sustained by the fluid phase, with a direct effect on friction, wear, and lubrication. In laboratory experiments or clinical hemiarthroplasty, when a rigid indenter or metallic prosthesis is used to apply load to the cartilage, there will not be any fluid flow normal to the surface in the contact region due to the impermeable nature of the indenter/prosthesis. In the natural joint, on the other hand, where two cartilage surfaces interact, flow will depend on the pressure difference across the interface. Furthermore, in both these cases, the fluid would flow freely in non-contacting regions. However, it should be pointed out that the contact area is generally unknown in advance in both cases and can only be determined as part of the solution. In the present finite element study, a general and robust algorithm was proposed to decide nodes in contact on the cartilage surface and, accordingly, impose the fluid flow boundary conditions. The algorithm was first tested for a rigid indenter against cartilage model. The algorithm worked well for two-dimensional four-noded and eight-noded axisymmetric element models as well as three-dimensional models. It was then extended to include two cartilages in contact. The results were in excellent agreement with the previous studies reported in the literature.

  19. Predicting Individual Action Switching in Covert and Continuous Interactive Tasks Using the Fluid Events Model

    PubMed Central

    Radvansky, Gabriel A.; D’Mello, Sidney K.; Abbott, Robert G.; Bixler, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    The Fluid Events Model is aimed at predicting changes in the actions people take on a moment-by-moment basis. In contrast with other research on action selection, this work does not investigate why some course of action was selected, but rather the likelihood of discontinuing the current course of action and selecting another in the near future. This is done using both task-based and experience-based factors. Prior work evaluated this model in the context of trial-by-trial, independent, interactive events, such as choosing how to copy a figure of a line drawing. In this paper, we extend this model to more covert event experiences, such as reading narratives, as well as to continuous interactive events, such as playing a video game. To this end, the model was applied to existing data sets of reading time and event segmentation for written and picture stories. It was also applied to existing data sets of performance in a strategy board game, an aerial combat game, and a first person shooter game in which a participant’s current state was dependent on prior events. The results revealed that the model predicted behavior changes well, taking into account both the theoretically defined structure of the described events, as well as a person’s prior experience. Thus, theories of event cognition can benefit from efforts that take into account not only how events in the world are structured, but also how people experience those events. PMID:26858673

  20. Predicting Individual Action Switching in Covert and Continuous Interactive Tasks Using the Fluid Events Model.

    PubMed

    Radvansky, Gabriel A; D'Mello, Sidney K; Abbott, Robert G; Bixler, Robert E

    2016-01-01

    The Fluid Events Model is aimed at predicting changes in the actions people take on a moment-by-moment basis. In contrast with other research on action selection, this work does not investigate why some course of action was selected, but rather the likelihood of discontinuing the current course of action and selecting another in the near future. This is done using both task-based and experience-based factors. Prior work evaluated this model in the context of trial-by-trial, independent, interactive events, such as choosing how to copy a figure of a line drawing. In this paper, we extend this model to more covert event experiences, such as reading narratives, as well as to continuous interactive events, such as playing a video game. To this end, the model was applied to existing data sets of reading time and event segmentation for written and picture stories. It was also applied to existing data sets of performance in a strategy board game, an aerial combat game, and a first person shooter game in which a participant's current state was dependent on prior events. The results revealed that the model predicted behavior changes well, taking into account both the theoretically defined structure of the described events, as well as a person's prior experience. Thus, theories of event cognition can benefit from efforts that take into account not only how events in the world are structured, but also how people experience those events.

  1. Predicting individual action switching in covert and continuous interactive tasks using the fluid events model

    SciTech Connect

    Radvansky, Gabriel A.; D’Mello, Sidney K.; Abbott, Robert G.; Bixler, Robert E.

    2016-01-27

    The Fluid Events Model is aimed at predicting changes in the actions people take on a moment-by-moment basis. In contrast with other research on action selection, this work does not investigate why some course of action was selected, but rather the likelihood of discontinuing the current course of action and selecting another in the near future. This is done using both task-based and experience-based factors. Prior work evaluated this model in the context of trial-by-trial, independent, interactive events, such as choosing how to copy a figure of a line drawing. In this paper, we extend this model to more covert event experiences, such as reading narratives, as well as to continuous interactive events, such as playing a video game. To this end, the model was applied to existing data sets of reading time and event segmentation for written and picture stories. It was also applied to existing data sets of performance in a strategy board game, an aerial combat game, and a first person shooter game in which a participant’s current state was dependent on prior events. The results revealed that the model predicted behavior changes well, taking into account both the theoretically defined structure of the described events, as well as a person’s prior experience. Hence, theories of event cognition can benefit from efforts that take into account not only how events in the world are structured, but also how people experience those events.

  2. Predicting individual action switching in covert and continuous interactive tasks using the fluid events model

    DOE PAGES

    Radvansky, Gabriel A.; D’Mello, Sidney K.; Abbott, Robert G.; ...

    2016-01-27

    The Fluid Events Model is aimed at predicting changes in the actions people take on a moment-by-moment basis. In contrast with other research on action selection, this work does not investigate why some course of action was selected, but rather the likelihood of discontinuing the current course of action and selecting another in the near future. This is done using both task-based and experience-based factors. Prior work evaluated this model in the context of trial-by-trial, independent, interactive events, such as choosing how to copy a figure of a line drawing. In this paper, we extend this model to more covertmore » event experiences, such as reading narratives, as well as to continuous interactive events, such as playing a video game. To this end, the model was applied to existing data sets of reading time and event segmentation for written and picture stories. It was also applied to existing data sets of performance in a strategy board game, an aerial combat game, and a first person shooter game in which a participant’s current state was dependent on prior events. The results revealed that the model predicted behavior changes well, taking into account both the theoretically defined structure of the described events, as well as a person’s prior experience. Hence, theories of event cognition can benefit from efforts that take into account not only how events in the world are structured, but also how people experience those events.« less

  3. Modeling fires in adjacent ship compartments with computational fluid dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Wix, S.D.; Cole, J.K.; Koski, J.A.

    1998-05-10

    This paper presents an analysis of the thermal effects on radioactive (RAM) transportation packages with a fire in an adjacent compartment. An assumption for this analysis is that the adjacent hold fire is some sort of engine room fire. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis tools were used to perform the analysis in order to include convective heat transfer effects. The analysis results were compared to experimental data gathered in a series of tests on tile US Coast Guard ship Mayo Lykes located at Mobile, Alabama.

  4. A dynamic model of valveless micropumps with a fluid damping effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinh, T. X.; Ogami, Y.

    2011-11-01

    A simple fluid-diaphragm coupling model for studying the dynamic performance of valveless micropumps is presented. The model includes fluid inertia and a squeeze film effect by solving the coupling equation simultaneously with the Reynolds equation. The model is validated with a valveless diffuser micropump actuated by either a piezoelectric or electromagnetic diaphragm. The performance of the pump is considered for pumping liquid and air. The resonant frequency and dynamic performance of the micropumps obtained by the model are in good agreement with the experimental data. The model can predict well the damping behavior of the pump.

  5. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics model for phase separating fluid mixtures. I. General equations.

    PubMed

    Thieulot, Cedric; Janssen, L P B M; Español, Pep

    2005-07-01

    We present a thermodynamically consistent discrete fluid particle model for the simulation of a recently proposed set of hydrodynamic equations for a phase separating van der Waals fluid mixture [P. Español and C.A.P. Thieulot, J. Chem. Phys. 118, 9109 (2003)]. The discrete model is formulated by following a discretization procedure given by the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method within the thermodynamically consistent general equation for the nonequilibrium reversible-irreversible coupling (GENERIC) framework. Each fluid particle carries information on the mass, momentum, energy, and the mass fraction of the different components. The discrete model allows one to simulate nonisothermal dynamic evolution of phase separating fluids with surface tension effects while respecting the first and second laws of thermodynamics exactly.

  6. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics model for phase separating fluid mixtures. I. General equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thieulot, Cedric; Janssen, L. P. B. M.; Español, Pep

    2005-07-01

    We present a thermodynamically consistent discrete fluid particle model for the simulation of a recently proposed set of hydrodynamic equations for a phase separating van der Waals fluid mixture [P. Español and C.A.P. Thieulot, J. Chem. Phys. 118, 9109 (2003)]. The discrete model is formulated by following a discretization procedure given by the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method within the thermodynamically consistent general equation for the nonequilibrium reversible-irreversible coupling (GENERIC) framework. Each fluid particle carries information on the mass, momentum, energy, and the mass fraction of the different components. The discrete model allows one to simulate nonisothermal dynamic evolution of phase separating fluids with surface tension effects while respecting the first and second laws of thermodynamics exactly.

  7. A computational study of the dynamic motion of a bubble rising in Carreau model fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Mitsuhiro; Yoshida, Yutaka; Sussman, Mark

    2010-04-01

    We present the results of three-dimensional direct numerical simulations of the dynamic motion of a gas bubble rising in Carreau model fluids. The simulations are carried out by a coupled level-set/volume-of-fluid (CLSVOF) method, which combines some of the advantages of the volume-of-fluid (VOF) method with the level-set (LS) method. In our study, it is shown that the motion of a rising gas bubble largely depends on the Carreau model parameters, n and B (n, the slope of decreasing viscosity and B, time constant). Both the model parameters, n and B, have considerable influence on the bubble rise motion. Using numerical analysis, we can understand in detail the bubble morphology for non-Newtonian two-phase flow systems. We also discuss bubble rise motion in shear-thinning fluids in terms of the effective viscosity, ηeff, the effective Reynolds number, Reeff and the effective Morton number, Meff.

  8. A mathematical model of fluid and gas flow in nanoporous media.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Paulo J M; Rycroft, Chris H; Barenblatt, Grigory Isaakovich

    2012-12-11

    The mathematical modeling of the flow in nanoporous rocks (e.g., shales) becomes an important new branch of subterranean fluid mechanics. The classic approach that was successfully used in the construction of the technology to develop oil and gas deposits in the United States, Canada, and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics becomes insufficient for deposits in shales. In the present article a mathematical model of the flow in nanoporous rocks is proposed. The model assumes the rock consists of two components: (i) a matrix, which is more or less an ordinary porous or fissurized-porous medium, and (ii) specific organic inclusions composed of kerogen. These inclusions may have substantial porosity but, due to the nanoscale of pores, tubes, and channels, have extremely low permeability on the order of a nanodarcy (~109-²¹ m² ) or less. These inclusions contain the majority of fluid: oil and gas. Our model is based on the hypothesis that the permeability of the inclusions substantially depends on the pressure gradient. At the beginning of the development of the deposit, boundary layers are formed at the boundaries of the low-permeable inclusions, where the permeability is strongly increased and intensive flow from inclusions to the matrix occurs. The resulting formulae for the production rate of the deposit are presented in explicit form. The formulae demonstrate that the production rate of deposits decays with time following a power law whose exponent lies between -1/2 and -1. Processing of experimental data obtained from various oil and gas deposits in shales demonstrated an instructive agreement with the prediction of the model.

  9. A mathematical model of fluid and gas flow in nanoporous media

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Paulo J. M.; Rycroft, Chris H.; Barenblatt, Grigory Isaakovich

    2012-01-01

    The mathematical modeling of the flow in nanoporous rocks (e.g., shales) becomes an important new branch of subterranean fluid mechanics. The classic approach that was successfully used in the construction of the technology to develop oil and gas deposits in the United States, Canada, and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics becomes insufficient for deposits in shales. In the present article a mathematical model of the flow in nanoporous rocks is proposed. The model assumes the rock consists of two components: (i) a matrix, which is more or less an ordinary porous or fissurized-porous medium, and (ii) specific organic inclusions composed of kerogen. These inclusions may have substantial porosity but, due to the nanoscale of pores, tubes, and channels, have extremely low permeability on the order of a nanodarcy () or less. These inclusions contain the majority of fluid: oil and gas. Our model is based on the hypothesis that the permeability of the inclusions substantially depends on the pressure gradient. At the beginning of the development of the deposit, boundary layers are formed at the boundaries of the low-permeable inclusions, where the permeability is strongly increased and intensive flow from inclusions to the matrix occurs. The resulting formulae for the production rate of the deposit are presented in explicit form. The formulae demonstrate that the production rate of deposits decays with time following a power law whose exponent lies between and . Processing of experimental data obtained from various oil and gas deposits in shales demonstrated an instructive agreement with the prediction of the model. PMID:23188803

  10. Fluid modeling and design of gas channels of solar non-stoichiometric redox reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedlaya, Aditya

    The present numerical study in FLUENT analyzes the fluid flow field within a solar powered reactor designed for syngas production. The thermochemical reactor is based on continuous cycling of cerium oxide (ceria) in a non-stoichiometric reduction/oxidation cycle. The reactor uses a hollow cylinder of porous ceria which rotates through a high-temperature zone, by exposure to concentrated sunlight and partially reduced in an inert atmosphere due to flow of the sweep gas (N2), and then through a lower temperature zone where the reduced ceria is re-oxidized with a flow of CO2 and/or H2O, to produce CO and/or H2. In terms of fluid flow modeling, the issue of crossover of species (leakage) within the reactor is critical for proper functioning of the reactor. The first part of the work relates to the geometry and placement of the inlet/outlet gas channels for the reactor optimized to minimize crossover of the species. This is done by conducting a parametric study of geometric variables associated with the inlet/outlet geometry. A simplified 2D fluid flow reactor model which incorporates multi-species flow is used for this study. Further, 2D and 3D reactor models which capture the internal structure more accurately are used to refine the inlet/outlet design. The optimized reactor model is found to have an O2 crossover of 2%-6% and oxidizer crossover of 8%-21% at different flow rates of the sweep gas and the oxidizer studied. In the second part of the work, the reactor model is simulated under varying test conditions. Different working conditions include morphologies of the reactive material, rotational speed of the ceria ring and the recuperator, flow rates of sweep gas and the oxidizer, types of oxidizer (CO2, H2O). The 3D reactor model is also tested using one, two and three discrete inlet/outlet ports and compared with slot configuration.

  11. COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS MODELING OF SCALED HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK MIXING - CFD MODELING SENSITIVITY STUDY RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    JACKSON VL

    2011-08-31

    The primary purpose of the tank mixing and sampling demonstration program is to mitigate the technical risks associated with the ability of the Hanford tank farm delivery and celtification systems to measure and deliver a uniformly mixed high-level waste (HLW) feed to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Uniform feed to the WTP is a requirement of 24590-WTP-ICD-MG-01-019, ICD-19 - Interface Control Document for Waste Feed, although the exact definition of uniform is evolving in this context. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling has been used to assist in evaluating scaleup issues, study operational parameters, and predict mixing performance at full-scale.

  12. FE Modelling of the Fluid-Structure-Acoustic Interaction for the Vocal Folds Self-Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Švancara, Pavel; Horáček, J.; Hrůza, V.

    The flow induced self-oscillation of the human vocal folds in interaction with acoustic processes in the simplified vocal tract model was explored by three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) model. Developed FE model includes vocal folds pretension before phonation, large deformations of the vocal fold tissue, vocal folds contact, fluid-structure interaction, morphing the fluid mesh according the vocal folds motion (Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian approach), unsteady viscous compressible airflow described by the Navier-Stokes equations and airflow separation during the glottis closure. Iterative p