Science.gov

Sample records for based sequential dynamic

  1. Sequential memory: Binding dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afraimovich, Valentin; Gong, Xue; Rabinovich, Mikhail

    2015-10-01

    Temporal order memories are critical for everyday animal and human functioning. Experiments and our own experience show that the binding or association of various features of an event together and the maintaining of multimodality events in sequential order are the key components of any sequential memories—episodic, semantic, working, etc. We study a robustness of binding sequential dynamics based on our previously introduced model in the form of generalized Lotka-Volterra equations. In the phase space of the model, there exists a multi-dimensional binding heteroclinic network consisting of saddle equilibrium points and heteroclinic trajectories joining them. We prove here the robustness of the binding sequential dynamics, i.e., the feasibility phenomenon for coupled heteroclinic networks: for each collection of successive heteroclinic trajectories inside the unified networks, there is an open set of initial points such that the trajectory going through each of them follows the prescribed collection staying in a small neighborhood of it. We show also that the symbolic complexity function of the system restricted to this neighborhood is a polynomial of degree L - 1, where L is the number of modalities.

  2. Sequential memory: Binding dynamics.

    PubMed

    Afraimovich, Valentin; Gong, Xue; Rabinovich, Mikhail

    2015-10-01

    Temporal order memories are critical for everyday animal and human functioning. Experiments and our own experience show that the binding or association of various features of an event together and the maintaining of multimodality events in sequential order are the key components of any sequential memories-episodic, semantic, working, etc. We study a robustness of binding sequential dynamics based on our previously introduced model in the form of generalized Lotka-Volterra equations. In the phase space of the model, there exists a multi-dimensional binding heteroclinic network consisting of saddle equilibrium points and heteroclinic trajectories joining them. We prove here the robustness of the binding sequential dynamics, i.e., the feasibility phenomenon for coupled heteroclinic networks: for each collection of successive heteroclinic trajectories inside the unified networks, there is an open set of initial points such that the trajectory going through each of them follows the prescribed collection staying in a small neighborhood of it. We show also that the symbolic complexity function of the system restricted to this neighborhood is a polynomial of degree L - 1, where L is the number of modalities.

  3. Dynamics of Sequential Decision Making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinovich, Mikhail I.; Huerta, Ramón; Afraimovich, Valentin

    2006-11-01

    We suggest a new paradigm for intelligent decision-making suitable for dynamical sequential activity of animals or artificial autonomous devices that depends on the characteristics of the internal and external world. To do it we introduce a new class of dynamical models that are described by ordinary differential equations with a finite number of possibilities at the decision points, and also include rules solving this uncertainty. Our approach is based on the competition between possible cognitive states using their stable transient dynamics. The model controls the order of choosing successive steps of a sequential activity according to the environment and decision-making criteria. Two strategies (high-risk and risk-aversion conditions) that move the system out of an erratic environment are analyzed.

  4. Sequential Monte-Carlo Based Framework for Dynamic Data-Driven Event Reconstruction for Atmospheric Release

    SciTech Connect

    Johannesson, G; Chow, F K; Glascoe, L; Glaser, R E; Hanley, W G; Kosovic, B; Krnjajic, M; Larsen, S C; Lundquist, J K; Mirin, A A; Nitao, J J; Sugiyama, G A

    2005-11-16

    Atmospheric releases of hazardous materials are highly effective means to impact large populations. We propose an atmospheric event reconstruction framework that couples observed data and predictive computer-intensive dispersion models via Bayesian methodology. Due to the complexity of the model framework, a sampling-based approach is taken for posterior inference that combines Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) and sequential Monte Carlo (SMC) strategies.

  5. Dynamic compressed HRRP generation for random stepped-frequency radar based on complex-valued fast sequential homotopy.

    PubMed

    You, Peng; Liu, Zhen; Wang, Hongqiang; Wei, Xizhang; Li, Xiang

    2014-05-08

    Compressed sensing has been applied to achieve high resolution range profiles (HRRPs) using a stepped-frequency radar. In this new scheme, much fewer pulses are required to recover the target's strong scattering centers, which can greatly reduce the coherent processing interval (CPI) and improve the anti-jamming capability. For practical applications, however, the required number of pulses is difficult to determine in advance and any reduction of the transmitted pulses is attractive. In this paper, a dynamic compressed sensing strategy for HRRP generation is proposed, in which the estimated HRRP is updated with sequentially transmitted and received pulses until the proper stopping rules are satisfied. To efficiently implement the sequential update, a complex-valued fast sequential homotopy (CV-FSH) algorithm is developed based on group sparse recovery. This algorithm performs as an efficient recursive procedure of sparse recovery, thus avoiding solving a new optimization problem from scratch. Furthermore, the proper stopping rules are presented according to the special characteristics of HRRP. Therefore, the optimal number of pulses required in each CPI can be sought adapting to the echo signal. The results using simulated and real data show the effectiveness of the proposed approach and demonstrate that the established dynamic strategy is more suitable for uncooperative targets.

  6. Dynamic Compressed HRRP Generation for Random Stepped-Frequency Radar Based on Complex-Valued Fast Sequential Homotopy

    PubMed Central

    You, Peng; Liu, Zhen; Wang, Hongqiang; Wei, Xizhang; Li, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    Compressed sensing has been applied to achieve high resolution range profiles (HRRPs) using a stepped-frequency radar. In this new scheme, much fewer pulses are required to recover the target's strong scattering centers, which can greatly reduce the coherent processing interval (CPI) and improve the anti-jamming capability. For practical applications, however, the required number of pulses is difficult to determine in advance and any reduction of the transmitted pulses is attractive. In this paper, a dynamic compressed sensing strategy for HRRP generation is proposed, in which the estimated HRRP is updated with sequentially transmitted and received pulses until the proper stopping rules are satisfied. To efficiently implement the sequential update, a complex-valued fast sequential homotopy (CV-FSH) algorithm is developed based on group sparse recovery. This algorithm performs as an efficient recursive procedure of sparse recovery, thus avoiding solving a new optimization problem from scratch. Furthermore, the proper stopping rules are presented according to the special characteristics of HRRP. Therefore, the optimal number of pulses required in each CPI can be sought adapting to the echo signal. The results using simulated and real data show the effectiveness of the proposed approach and demonstrate that the established dynamic strategy is more suitable for uncooperative targets. PMID:24815679

  7. Classical sequential growth dynamics for causal sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rideout, D. P.; Sorkin, R. D.

    2000-01-01

    Starting from certain causality conditions and a discrete form of general covariance, we derive a very general family of classically stochastic, sequential growth dynamics for causal sets. The resulting theories provide a relatively accessible ``halfway house'' to full quantum gravity that possibly contains the latter's classical limit (general relativity). Because they can be expressed in terms of state models for an assembly of Ising spins residing on the relations of the causal set, these theories also illustrate how nongravitational matter can arise dynamically from the causal set without having to be built in at the fundamental level. Additionally, our results bring into focus some interpretive issues of importance for a causal set dynamics and for quantum gravity more generally.

  8. On sequential dynamical systems and simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, C.L.; Mortveit, H.S.; Reidys, C.M.

    1999-06-01

    The generic structure of computer simulations motivates a new class of discrete dynamical systems that captures this structure in a mathematically precise way. This class of systems consists of (1) a loopfree graph {Upsilon} with vertex set {l_brace}1,2,{hor_ellipsis},n{r_brace} where each vertex has a binary state, (2) a vertex labeled set of functions (F{sub i,{Upsilon}}:F{sub 2}{sup n} {r_arrow} F{sub 2}{sup n}){sub i} and (3) a permutation {pi} {element_of} S{sub n}. The function F{sub i,{Upsilon}} updates the state of vertex i as a function of the states of vertex i and its {Upsilon}-neighbors and leaves the states of all other vertices fixed. The permutation {pi} represents the update ordering, i.e., the order in which the functions F{sub i,{Upsilon}} are applied. By composing the functions F{sub i,{Upsilon}} in the order given by {pi} one obtains the dynamical system (equation given in paper) which the authors refer to as a sequential dynamical system, or SDS for short. The authors will present bounds for the number of functionally different systems and for the number of nonisomorphic digraphs {Gamma}[F{sub {Upsilon}},{pi}] that can be obtained by varying the update order and applications of these to specific graphs and graph classes. This will be done using both combinatorial/algebraic techniques and probabilistic techniques. Finally the authors give results on dynamical system properties for some special systems.

  9. Sequential Logic Model Deciphers Dynamic Transcriptional Control of Gene Expressions

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Zhen Xuan; Wong, Sum Thai; Arjunan, Satya Nanda Vel; Piras, Vincent; Tomita, Masaru; Selvarajoo, Kumar; Giuliani, Alessandro; Tsuchiya, Masa

    2007-01-01

    Background Cellular signaling involves a sequence of events from ligand binding to membrane receptors through transcription factors activation and the induction of mRNA expression. The transcriptional-regulatory system plays a pivotal role in the control of gene expression. A novel computational approach to the study of gene regulation circuits is presented here. Methodology Based on the concept of finite state machine, which provides a discrete view of gene regulation, a novel sequential logic model (SLM) is developed to decipher control mechanisms of dynamic transcriptional regulation of gene expressions. The SLM technique is also used to systematically analyze the dynamic function of transcriptional inputs, the dependency and cooperativity, such as synergy effect, among the binding sites with respect to when, how much and how fast the gene of interest is expressed. Principal Findings SLM is verified by a set of well studied expression data on endo16 of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus (sea urchin) during the embryonic midgut development. A dynamic regulatory mechanism for endo16 expression controlled by three binding sites, UI, R and Otx is identified and demonstrated to be consistent with experimental findings. Furthermore, we show that during transition from specification to differentiation in wild type endo16 expression profile, SLM reveals three binary activities are not sufficient to explain the transcriptional regulation of endo16 expression and additional activities of binding sites are required. Further analyses suggest detailed mechanism of R switch activity where indirect dependency occurs in between UI activity and R switch during specification to differentiation stage. Conclusions/Significance The sequential logic formalism allows for a simplification of regulation network dynamics going from a continuous to a discrete representation of gene activation in time. In effect our SLM is non-parametric and model-independent, yet providing rich biological

  10. Sequential composition of dynamically dexterous robot behaviors

    SciTech Connect

    Burridge, R.R.; Rizzi, A.A.; Koditschek, D.E.

    1999-06-01

    The authors report on efforts to develop a sequential robot controller-composition technique in the context of dexterous batting maneuvers. A robot with a flat paddle is required to strike repeatedly at a thrown ball until the ball is brought to rest on the paddle at a specified location. The robot`s reachable workspace is blocked by an obstacle that disconnects the free space formed when the ball and paddle remain in contact, forcing the machine to let go for a time to bring the ball to the desired state. The controller compositions the authors create guarantee that a ball introduced in the safe workspace remains there and is ultimately brought to the goal. They report on experimental results from an implementation of these formal composition methods, and present descriptive statistics characterizing the experiments.

  11. Sequential OSCE based on item response theory.

    PubMed

    Hejri, Sara Mortaz; Jalili, Mohammad

    2017-09-08

    In sequential Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) all students initially take a short screening OSCE. Examinees who pass are excused from further testing, but an additional OSCE will be administered for the remaining examinees. Previous investigations on sequential OSCE were based on the Classical Test Theory. We aimed at designing and evaluating screening OSCEs based on Item Response Theory. We carried out a retrospective observational study. In each of a 10-station OSCE, the students' performance was graded on a Likert-type scale. Since data was polytomous, difficulty and discrimination parameters, and students' ability were calculated by graded response model. To design several screening OSCEs, we identified the five most difficult stations and the five most discriminative ones. Five, four, or three stations were selected for each test. Normal and stringent cut-scores were defined for each test. We compared the results of each 12 screening OSCE to the main OSCE and calculated the positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV), as well as the exam cost. 253 students (95.1%) passed the main OSCE. 72.6% to 94.4% of examinees passed the screening tests. The PPV values ranged from 0.98 to 1.00, and the NPV values ranged from 0.18 to 0.59. Two tests effectively predicted the results of the main exam accurately and could result in 34-40% financial saving. Sequential OSCE, if stations with highest values of IRT-based discrimination and stringent cut-scores are applied to the screening test, can be an efficient and convenient way to conduct an OSCE.

  12. A mathematical programming approach for sequential clustering of dynamic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Jonathan C.; Bennett, Laura; Papageorgiou, Lazaros G.; Tsoka, Sophia

    2016-02-01

    A common analysis performed on dynamic networks is community structure detection, a challenging problem that aims to track the temporal evolution of network modules. An emerging area in this field is evolutionary clustering, where the community structure of a network snapshot is identified by taking into account both its current state as well as previous time points. Based on this concept, we have developed a mixed integer non-linear programming (MINLP) model, SeqMod, that sequentially clusters each snapshot of a dynamic network. The modularity metric is used to determine the quality of community structure of the current snapshot and the historical cost is accounted for by optimising the number of node pairs co-clustered at the previous time point that remain so in the current snapshot partition. Our method is tested on social networks of interactions among high school students, college students and members of the Brazilian Congress. We show that, for an adequate parameter setting, our algorithm detects the classes that these students belong more accurately than partitioning each time step individually or by partitioning the aggregated snapshots. Our method also detects drastic discontinuities in interaction patterns across network snapshots. Finally, we present comparative results with similar community detection methods for time-dependent networks from the literature. Overall, we illustrate the applicability of mathematical programming as a flexible, adaptable and systematic approach for these community detection problems. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Temporal Network Theory and Applications", edited by Petter Holme.

  13. Sequential Bayesian Detection: A Model-Based Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, E J; Candy, J V

    2007-08-13

    Sequential detection theory has been known for a long time evolving in the late 1940's by Wald and followed by Middleton's classic exposition in the 1960's coupled with the concurrent enabling technology of digital computer systems and the development of sequential processors. Its development, when coupled to modern sequential model-based processors, offers a reasonable way to attack physics-based problems. In this chapter, the fundamentals of the sequential detection are reviewed from the Neyman-Pearson theoretical perspective and formulated for both linear and nonlinear (approximate) Gauss-Markov, state-space representations. We review the development of modern sequential detectors and incorporate the sequential model-based processors as an integral part of their solution. Motivated by a wealth of physics-based detection problems, we show how both linear and nonlinear processors can seamlessly be embedded into the sequential detection framework to provide a powerful approach to solving non-stationary detection problems.

  14. Sequential Bayesian Detection: A Model-Based Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J V

    2008-12-08

    Sequential detection theory has been known for a long time evolving in the late 1940's by Wald and followed by Middleton's classic exposition in the 1960's coupled with the concurrent enabling technology of digital computer systems and the development of sequential processors. Its development, when coupled to modern sequential model-based processors, offers a reasonable way to attack physics-based problems. In this chapter, the fundamentals of the sequential detection are reviewed from the Neyman-Pearson theoretical perspective and formulated for both linear and nonlinear (approximate) Gauss-Markov, state-space representations. We review the development of modern sequential detectors and incorporate the sequential model-based processors as an integral part of their solution. Motivated by a wealth of physics-based detection problems, we show how both linear and nonlinear processors can seamlessly be embedded into the sequential detection framework to provide a powerful approach to solving non-stationary detection problems.

  15. Introduction to Dynamic Treatment Strategies and Sequential Multiple Assignment Randomization

    PubMed Central

    Lavori, Philip W.; Dawson, Ree

    2014-01-01

    Background In June 2013 a one-day workshop on Dynamic Treatment Strategies (DTS) and Sequential Multiple Assignment Randomized Trials (SMART) was held at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, PA. These two linked topics have generated a great deal of interest as researchers have recognized the importance of comparing entire strategies for managing chronic disease. A number of articles emerged from that workshop. Purpose The purpose of this survey of the DTS/SMART methodology (which is taken from the introductory talk in the workshop) is to provide the reader of the collected articles presented in this volume with sufficient background to appreciate the more detailed discussions in the papers. Methods The way that the DTS arises naturally in clinical practice is described, along with its connection to the well-known difficulties of intepreting the analysis by intention-to-treat. The SMART methodology for comparing DTS is described, and the basics of estimation and inference presented. Results The DTS/SMART methodology can be a flexible and practical way to optimize ongoing clinical decision making, providing evidence (based on randomization) for comparative effectiveness. Limitations The DTS/SMART methodology is not a solution for unstandardized study protocols. Conclusions The DTS/SMART methodology has growing relevance to comparative effectiveness research and the needs of the learning healthcare system. PMID:24784487

  16. Unsteady, one-dimensional gas dynamics computations using a TVD type sequential solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakur, Siddharth; Shyy, Wei

    1992-01-01

    The efficacy of high resolution convection schemes to resolve sharp gradient in unsteady, 1D flows is examined using the TVD concept based on a sequential solution algorithm. Two unsteady flow problems are considered which include the problem involving the interaction of the various waves in a shock tube with closed reflecting ends and the problem involving the unsteady gas dynamics in a tube with closed ends subject to an initial pressure perturbation. It is concluded that high accuracy convection schemes in a sequential solution framework are capable of resolving discontinuities in unsteady flows involving complex gas dynamics. However, a sufficient amount of dissipation is required to suppress oscillations near discontinuities in the sequential approach, which leads to smearing of the solution profiles.

  17. Bursts and Heavy Tails in Temporal and Sequential Dynamics of Foraging Decisions

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Kanghoon; Jang, Hyeran; Kralik, Jerald D.; Jeong, Jaeseung

    2014-01-01

    A fundamental understanding of behavior requires predicting when and what an individual will choose. However, the actual temporal and sequential dynamics of successive choices made among multiple alternatives remain unclear. In the current study, we tested the hypothesis that there is a general bursting property in both the timing and sequential patterns of foraging decisions. We conducted a foraging experiment in which rats chose among four different foods over a continuous two-week time period. Regarding when choices were made, we found bursts of rapidly occurring actions, separated by time-varying inactive periods, partially based on a circadian rhythm. Regarding what was chosen, we found sequential dynamics in affective choices characterized by two key features: (a) a highly biased choice distribution; and (b) preferential attachment, in which the animals were more likely to choose what they had previously chosen. To capture the temporal dynamics, we propose a dual-state model consisting of active and inactive states. We also introduce a satiation-attainment process for bursty activity, and a non-homogeneous Poisson process for longer inactivity between bursts. For the sequential dynamics, we propose a dual-control model consisting of goal-directed and habit systems, based on outcome valuation and choice history, respectively. This study provides insights into how the bursty nature of behavior emerges from the interaction of different underlying systems, leading to heavy tails in the distribution of behavior over time and choices. PMID:25122498

  18. Sequential ensemble-based optimal design for parameter estimation: SEQUENTIAL ENSEMBLE-BASED OPTIMAL DESIGN

    SciTech Connect

    Man, Jun; Zhang, Jiangjiang; Li, Weixuan; Zeng, Lingzao; Wu, Laosheng

    2016-10-01

    The ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) has been widely used in parameter estimation for hydrological models. The focus of most previous studies was to develop more efficient analysis (estimation) algorithms. On the other hand, it is intuitively understandable that a well-designed sampling (data-collection) strategy should provide more informative measurements and subsequently improve the parameter estimation. In this work, a Sequential Ensemble-based Optimal Design (SEOD) method, coupled with EnKF, information theory and sequential optimal design, is proposed to improve the performance of parameter estimation. Based on the first-order and second-order statistics, different information metrics including the Shannon entropy difference (SD), degrees of freedom for signal (DFS) and relative entropy (RE) are used to design the optimal sampling strategy, respectively. The effectiveness of the proposed method is illustrated by synthetic one-dimensional and two-dimensional unsaturated flow case studies. It is shown that the designed sampling strategies can provide more accurate parameter estimation and state prediction compared with conventional sampling strategies. Optimal sampling designs based on various information metrics perform similarly in our cases. The effect of ensemble size on the optimal design is also investigated. Overall, larger ensemble size improves the parameter estimation and convergence of optimal sampling strategy. Although the proposed method is applied to unsaturated flow problems in this study, it can be equally applied in any other hydrological problems.

  19. Dynamic stability of sequential stimulus representations in adapting neuronal networks

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Renato C. F.; Morrison, Abigail

    2014-01-01

    The ability to acquire and maintain appropriate representations of time-varying, sequential stimulus events is a fundamental feature of neocortical circuits and a necessary first step toward more specialized information processing. The dynamical properties of such representations depend on the current state of the circuit, which is determined primarily by the ongoing, internally generated activity, setting the ground state from which input-specific transformations emerge. Here, we begin by demonstrating that timing-dependent synaptic plasticity mechanisms have an important role to play in the active maintenance of an ongoing dynamics characterized by asynchronous and irregular firing, closely resembling cortical activity in vivo. Incoming stimuli, acting as perturbations of the local balance of excitation and inhibition, require fast adaptive responses to prevent the development of unstable activity regimes, such as those characterized by a high degree of population-wide synchrony. We establish a link between such pathological network activity, which is circumvented by the action of plasticity, and a reduced computational capacity. Additionally, we demonstrate that the action of plasticity shapes and stabilizes the transient network states exhibited in the presence of sequentially presented stimulus events, allowing the development of adequate and discernible stimulus representations. The main feature responsible for the increased discriminability of stimulus-driven population responses in plastic networks is shown to be the decorrelating action of inhibitory plasticity and the consequent maintenance of the asynchronous irregular dynamic regime both for ongoing activity and stimulus-driven responses, whereas excitatory plasticity is shown to play only a marginal role. PMID:25374534

  20. Sequential dynamics in visual short-term memory

    PubMed Central

    Conway, Andrew R. A.; Turk-Browne, Nicholas B.

    2014-01-01

    Visual short-term memory (VSTM) is thought to help bridge across changes in visual input, and yet many studies of VSTM employ static displays. Here we investigate how VSTM copes with sequential input. In particular, we characterize the temporal dynamics of several different components of VSTM performance, including: storage probability, precision, variability in precision, guessing, and swapping. We used a variant of the continuous-report VSTM task developed for static displays, quantifying the contribution of each component with statistical likelihood estimation, as a function of serial position and set size. In Experiments 1 and 2, storage probability did not vary by serial position for small set sizes, but showed a small primacy effect and a robust recency effect for larger set sizes; precision did not vary by serial position or set size. In Experiment 3, the recency effect was shown to reflect an increased likelihood of swapping out items from earlier serial positions and swapping in later items, rather than an increased rate of guessing for earlier items. Indeed, a model that incorporated responding to non-targets provided a better fit to these data than alternative models that did not allow for swapping or that tried to account for variable precision. These findings suggest that VSTM is updated in a first-in-first-out manner, and they bring VSTM research into closer alignment with classical working memory research that focuses on sequential behavior and interference effects. PMID:25228092

  1. General solution for classical sequential growth dynamics of causal sets

    SciTech Connect

    Varadarajan, Madhavan; Rideout, David

    2006-05-15

    A classical precursor to a full quantum dynamics for causal sets has been formulated in terms of a stochastic sequential growth process in which the elements of the causal set arise in a sort of accretion process. The transition probabilities of the Markov growth process satisfy certain physical requirements of causality and general covariance, and the generic solution with all transition probabilities nonzero has been found. Here we remove the assumption of nonzero probabilities, define a reasonable extension of the physical requirements to cover the case of vanishing probabilities, and find the completely general solution to these physical conditions. The resulting family of growth processes has an interesting structure reminiscent of an 'infinite tower of turtles' cosmology.

  2. Comparing cluster-level dynamic treatment regimens using sequential, multiple assignment, randomized trials: Regression estimation and sample size considerations.

    PubMed

    NeCamp, Timothy; Kilbourne, Amy; Almirall, Daniel

    2017-08-01

    Cluster-level dynamic treatment regimens can be used to guide sequential treatment decision-making at the cluster level in order to improve outcomes at the individual or patient-level. In a cluster-level dynamic treatment regimen, the treatment is potentially adapted and re-adapted over time based on changes in the cluster that could be impacted by prior intervention, including aggregate measures of the individuals or patients that compose it. Cluster-randomized sequential multiple assignment randomized trials can be used to answer multiple open questions preventing scientists from developing high-quality cluster-level dynamic treatment regimens. In a cluster-randomized sequential multiple assignment randomized trial, sequential randomizations occur at the cluster level and outcomes are observed at the individual level. This manuscript makes two contributions to the design and analysis of cluster-randomized sequential multiple assignment randomized trials. First, a weighted least squares regression approach is proposed for comparing the mean of a patient-level outcome between the cluster-level dynamic treatment regimens embedded in a sequential multiple assignment randomized trial. The regression approach facilitates the use of baseline covariates which is often critical in the analysis of cluster-level trials. Second, sample size calculators are derived for two common cluster-randomized sequential multiple assignment randomized trial designs for use when the primary aim is a between-dynamic treatment regimen comparison of the mean of a continuous patient-level outcome. The methods are motivated by the Adaptive Implementation of Effective Programs Trial which is, to our knowledge, the first-ever cluster-randomized sequential multiple assignment randomized trial in psychiatry.

  3. Sequential experimental design based generalised ANOVA

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Souvik Chowdhury, Rajib

    2016-07-15

    Over the last decade, surrogate modelling technique has gained wide popularity in the field of uncertainty quantification, optimization, model exploration and sensitivity analysis. This approach relies on experimental design to generate training points and regression/interpolation for generating the surrogate. In this work, it is argued that conventional experimental design may render a surrogate model inefficient. In order to address this issue, this paper presents a novel distribution adaptive sequential experimental design (DA-SED). The proposed DA-SED has been coupled with a variant of generalised analysis of variance (G-ANOVA), developed by representing the component function using the generalised polynomial chaos expansion. Moreover, generalised analytical expressions for calculating the first two statistical moments of the response, which are utilized in predicting the probability of failure, have also been developed. The proposed approach has been utilized in predicting probability of failure of three structural mechanics problems. It is observed that the proposed approach yields accurate and computationally efficient estimate of the failure probability.

  4. Sequential experimental design based generalised ANOVA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Souvik; Chowdhury, Rajib

    2016-07-01

    Over the last decade, surrogate modelling technique has gained wide popularity in the field of uncertainty quantification, optimization, model exploration and sensitivity analysis. This approach relies on experimental design to generate training points and regression/interpolation for generating the surrogate. In this work, it is argued that conventional experimental design may render a surrogate model inefficient. In order to address this issue, this paper presents a novel distribution adaptive sequential experimental design (DA-SED). The proposed DA-SED has been coupled with a variant of generalised analysis of variance (G-ANOVA), developed by representing the component function using the generalised polynomial chaos expansion. Moreover, generalised analytical expressions for calculating the first two statistical moments of the response, which are utilized in predicting the probability of failure, have also been developed. The proposed approach has been utilized in predicting probability of failure of three structural mechanics problems. It is observed that the proposed approach yields accurate and computationally efficient estimate of the failure probability.

  5. Analysis problems for sequential dynamical systems and communicating state machines

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, C. L.; Hunt, H. B.; Marathe, M. V.; Ravi, S. S.; Rosenkrantz, D. J.; Stearns, R. E.

    2001-01-01

    A simple sequential dynamical system (SDS) is a triple (G, F, {pi}), where (i) G(V, E) is an undirected graph with n nodes with each node having a 1-bit state, (ii) F = {l_brace} f{sub 1},f{sub 2},...,f{sub n}{r_brace} is a set of local transition functions with f{sub i} denoting a Boolean function associated with node Vv{sub i} and (iii) {pi} is a fixed permutation of (i.e., a total order on) the nodes in V. A single SDS transition is obtained by updating the states of the nodes in V by evaluating the function associated with each of them in the order given by {pi}. Such a (finite) SDS is a mathematical abstraction of simulation systems [BMR99, BR99]. In this paper, we characterize the computational complexity of determining several phase space properties of SDSs. The properties considered are t-REACHABILITY ('Can a given SDS starting from configuration I reach configuration B in t or fewer transitions?'), REACHABILITY('Can a given SDS starting from configuration I ever reach configuration B?') and FIXED POINT REACHABILITY ('Can a given SDS starting from configuration I ever reach configuration in which it stays for ever?'). Our main result is a sharp dichotomy between classes of SDSs whose behavior is 'easy' to predict and those whose behavior is 'hard' to predict. Specifically, we show the following. (1) The t-REACHABILITY, REACHABILITY and the FIXED POINT REACHABILITY problems for SDSs are PSPACE-complete, even when restricted to graphs of bounded bandwidth (and hence of bounded pathwidth and treewidth) and when the function associated with each node is symmetric. The result holds even for regular graphs of constant degree where all the nodes compute the same symmetric Boolean function. (2) In contrast, the t-REACHABILITYm REACHABILITY and FIXED POINT REACHABILITY problems are solvable in polynomial time for SDSs when the Boolean function associated with each node is symmetric and monotone. Two important consequences of our results are the following: (i) The

  6. STRUCTURAL ANALYSES OF FUEL CASKS SUBJECTED TO BOLT PRELOAD, INTERNAL PRESSURE AND SEQUENTIAL DYNAMIC IMPACTS

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, T

    2009-06-25

    Large fuel casks subjected to the combined loads of closure bolt tightening, internal pressure and sequential dynamic impacts present challenges when evaluating their performance in the Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC) specified in the Code of Federal Regulations Title 10 Part 71 (10CFR71). Testing is often limited by cost, difficulty in preparing test units and the limited availability of facilities which can carry out such tests. In the past, many casks were evaluated without testing by using simplified analytical methods. In addition, there are no realistic analyses of closure bolt stresses for HAC conditions reported in the open literature. This paper presents a numerical technique for analyzing the accumulated damages of a large fuel cask caused by the sequential loads of the closure bolt tightening and the internal pressure as well as the drop and crash dynamic loads. The bolt preload and the internal pressure are treated as quasi-static loads so that the finite element method with explicit numerical integration scheme based on the theory of wave propagation can be applied. The dynamic impacts with short durations such as the 30-foot drop and the 40-inch puncture for the hypothetical accident conditions specified in 10CFR71 are also analyzed by using the finite-element method with explicit numerical integration scheme.

  7. Predecessor and permutation existence problems for sequential dynamical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, C. L.; Hunt, H. B.; Marathe, M. V.; Rosenkrantz, D. J.; Stearns, R. E.

    2002-01-01

    A class of finite discrete dynamical systems, called Sequential Dynamical Systems (SDSs), was introduced in BMR99, BR991 as a formal model for analyzing simulation systems. An SDS S is a triple (G, F,n ),w here (i) G(V,E ) is an undirected graph with n nodes with each node having a state, (ii) F = (fi, fi, . . ., fn), with fi denoting a function associated with node ui E V and (iii) A is a permutation of (or total order on) the nodes in V, A configuration of an SDS is an n-vector ( b l, bz, . . ., bn), where bi is the value of the state of node vi. A single SDS transition from one configuration to another is obtained by updating the states of the nodes by evaluating the function associated with each of them in the order given by n. Here, we address the complexity of two basic problems and their generalizations for SDSs. Given an SDS S and a configuration C, the PREDECESSOR EXISTENCE (or PRE) problem is to determine whether there is a configuration C' such that S has a transition from C' to C. (If C has no predecessor, C is known as a garden of Eden configuration.) Our results provide separations between efficiently solvable and computationally intractable instances of the PRE problem. For example, we show that the PRE problem can be solved efficiently for SDSs with Boolean state values when the node functions are symmetric and the underlying graph is of bounded treewidth. In contrast, we show that allowing just one non-symmetric node function renders the problem NP-complete even when the underlying graph is a tree (which has a treewidth of 1). We also show that the PRE problem is efficiently solvable for SDSs whose state values are from a field and whose node functions are linear. Some of the polynomial algorithms also extend to the case where we want to find an ancestor configuration that precedes a given configuration by a logarithmic number of steps. Our results extend some of the earlier results by Sutner [Su95] and Green [@87] on the complexity of the

  8. DYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF HANFORD UNIRRADIATED FUEL PACKAGE SUBJECTED TO SEQUENTIAL LATERAL LOADS IN HYPOTHETICAL ACCIDENT CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, T

    2008-04-30

    Large fuel casks present challenges when evaluating their performance in the Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC) specified in the Code of Federal Regulations Title 10 part 71 (10CFR71). Testing is often limited by cost, difficulty in preparing test units and the limited availability of facilities which can carry out such tests. In the past, many casks were evaluated without testing by using simplified analytical methods. This paper presents a numerical technique for evaluating the dynamic responses of large fuel casks subjected to sequential HAC loading. A nonlinear dynamic analysis was performed for a Hanford Unirradiated Fuel Package (HUFP) [1] to evaluate the cumulative damage after the hypothetical accident Conditions of a 30-foot lateral drop followed by a 40-inch lateral puncture as specified in 10CFR71. The structural integrity of the containment vessel is justified based on the analytical results in comparison with the stress criteria, specified in the ASME Code, Section III, Appendix F [2], for Level D service loads. The analyzed cumulative damages caused by the sequential loading of a 30-foot lateral drop and a 40-inch lateral puncture are compared with the package test data. The analytical results are in good agreement with the test results.

  9. Fractionation of plutonium in environmental and bio-shielding concrete samples using dynamic sequential extraction.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Jixin; Hou, Xiaolin

    2010-03-01

    Fractionation of plutonium isotopes ((238)Pu, (239,240)Pu) in environmental samples (i.e. soil and sediment) and bio-shielding concrete from decommissioning of nuclear reactor were carried out by dynamic sequential extraction using an on-line sequential injection (SI) system combined with a specially designed extraction column. Plutonium in the fractions from the sequential extraction was separated by ion exchange chromatography and measured using alpha spectrometry. The analytical results show a higher mobility of plutonium in bio-shielding concrete, which means attention should be paid to the treatment and disposal of nuclear waste from decommissioning.

  10. Use of personalized Dynamic Treatment Regimes (DTRs) and Sequential Multiple Assignment Randomized Trials (SMARTs) in mental health studies

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; ZENG, Donglin; WANG, Yuanjia

    2014-01-01

    Summary Dynamic treatment regimens (DTRs) are sequential decision rules tailored at each point where a clinical decision is made based on each patient’s time-varying characteristics and intermediate outcomes observed at earlier points in time. The complexity, patient heterogeneity, and chronicity of mental disorders call for learning optimal DTRs to dynamically adapt treatment to an individual’s response over time. The Sequential Multiple Assignment Randomized Trial (SMARTs) design allows for estimating causal effects of DTRs. Modern statistical tools have been developed to optimize DTRs based on personalized variables and intermediate outcomes using rich data collected from SMARTs; these statistical methods can also be used to recommend tailoring variables for designing future SMART studies. This paper introduces DTRs and SMARTs using two examples in mental health studies, discusses two machine learning methods for estimating optimal DTR from SMARTs data, and demonstrates the performance of the statistical methods using simulated data. PMID:25642116

  11. Estimating the parameters of dynamical systems from Big Data using Sequential Monte Carlo samplers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, P. L.; Maskell, S.

    2017-09-01

    In this paper the authors present a method which facilitates computationally efficient parameter estimation of dynamical systems from a continuously growing set of measurement data. It is shown that the proposed method, which utilises Sequential Monte Carlo samplers, is guaranteed to be fully parallelisable (in contrast to Markov chain Monte Carlo methods) and can be applied to a wide variety of scenarios within structural dynamics. Its ability to allow convergence of one's parameter estimates, as more data is analysed, sets it apart from other sequential methods (such as the particle filter).

  12. A sequential nonparametric pattern classification algorithm based on the Wald SPRT. [Sequential Probability Ratio Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poage, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    A sequential nonparametric pattern classification procedure is presented. The method presented is an estimated version of the Wald sequential probability ratio test (SPRT). This method utilizes density function estimates, and the density estimate used is discussed, including a proof of convergence in probability of the estimate to the true density function. The classification procedure proposed makes use of the theory of order statistics, and estimates of the probabilities of misclassification are given. The procedure was tested on discriminating between two classes of Gaussian samples and on discriminating between two kinds of electroencephalogram (EEG) responses.

  13. A sequential nonparametric pattern classification algorithm based on the Wald SPRT. [Sequential Probability Ratio Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poage, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    A sequential nonparametric pattern classification procedure is presented. The method presented is an estimated version of the Wald sequential probability ratio test (SPRT). This method utilizes density function estimates, and the density estimate used is discussed, including a proof of convergence in probability of the estimate to the true density function. The classification procedure proposed makes use of the theory of order statistics, and estimates of the probabilities of misclassification are given. The procedure was tested on discriminating between two classes of Gaussian samples and on discriminating between two kinds of electroencephalogram (EEG) responses.

  14. Sequential ensemble-based optimal design for parameter estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, Jun; Zhang, Jiangjiang; Li, Weixuan; Zeng, Lingzao; Wu, Laosheng

    2016-10-01

    The ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) has been widely used in parameter estimation for hydrological models. The focus of most previous studies was to develop more efficient analysis (estimation) algorithms. On the other hand, it is intuitively understandable that a well-designed sampling (data-collection) strategy should provide more informative measurements and subsequently improve the parameter estimation. In this work, a Sequential Ensemble-based Optimal Design (SEOD) method, coupled with EnKF, information theory and sequential optimal design, is proposed to improve the performance of parameter estimation. Based on the first-order and second-order statistics, different information metrics including the Shannon entropy difference (SD), degrees of freedom for signal (DFS) and relative entropy (RE) are used to design the optimal sampling strategy, respectively. The effectiveness of the proposed method is illustrated by synthetic one-dimensional and two-dimensional unsaturated flow case studies. It is shown that the designed sampling strategies can provide more accurate parameter estimation and state prediction compared with conventional sampling strategies. Optimal sampling designs based on various information metrics perform similarly in our cases. The effect of ensemble size on the optimal design is also investigated. Overall, larger ensemble size improves the parameter estimation and convergence of optimal sampling strategy. Although the proposed method is applied to unsaturated flow problems in this study, it can be equally applied in any other hydrological problems.

  15. Asymmetric sequential Landau-Zener dynamics of Bose-condensed atoms in a cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jiahao; Gong, Pu; Qin, Xizhou; Zhong, Honghua; Lee, Chaohong

    2016-08-01

    We explore the asymmetric sequential Landau-Zener (LZ) dynamics in an ensemble of interacting Bose-condensed two-level atoms coupled with a cavity field. Assuming the couplings between all atoms and the cavity field are identical, the interplay between atom-atom interaction and detuning may lead to a series of LZ transitions. Unlike the conventional sequential LZ transitions, which are symmetric to the zero detuning, the LZ transitions of Bose-condensed atoms in a cavity field are asymmetric and sensitively depend on the photon number distribution of the cavity. In LZ processes involving single excitation numbers, both the variance of the relative atom number and the step slope of the sequential population ladder are asymmetric, and the asymmetry becomes more significant for smaller excitation numbers. Furthermore, in LZ processes involving multiple excitation numbers, there may appear asymmetric population ladders with decreasing step heights. During a dynamical LZ process, due to the atom-cavity coupling, the cavity field shows dynamical collapses and revivals. In comparison with the symmetric LZ transitions in a classical field, the asymmetric LZ transitions in a cavity field originate from the photon-number-dependent Rabi frequency. The asymmetric sequential LZ dynamics of Bose-condensed atoms in a cavity field may open up a way to explore the fundamental many-body physics in coupled atom-photon systems.

  16. A MEMS lamination technology based on sequential multilayer electrodeposition

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, M; Kim, J; Herrault, F; Schafer, R; Allen, MG

    2013-08-06

    A MEMS lamination technology based on sequential multilayer electrodeposition is presented. The process comprises three main steps: (1) automated sequential electrodeposition of permalloy (Ni80Fe20) structural and copper sacrificial layers to form multilayer structures of significant total thickness; (2) fabrication of polymeric anchor structures through the thickness of the multilayer structures and (3) selective removal of copper. The resulting structure is a set of air-insulated permalloy laminations, the separation of which is sustained by insulating polymeric anchor structures. Individual laminations have precisely controllable thicknesses ranging from 500 nm to 5 mu m, and each lamination layer is electrically isolated from adjacent layers by narrow air gaps of similar scale. In addition to air, interlamination insulators based on polymers are investigated. Interlamination air gaps with very high aspect ratio (>1:100) can be filled with polyvinylalcohol and polydimethylsiloxane. The laminated structures are characterized using scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy to directly examine properties such as the roughness and the thickness uniformity of the layers. In addition, the quality of the electrical insulation between the laminations is evaluated by quantifying the eddy current within the sample as a function of frequency. Fabricated laminations are comprised of uniform, smooth (surface roughness < 100 nm) layers with effective electrical insulation for all layer thicknesses and insulator approaches studied. Such highly laminated structures have potential uses ranging from energy conversion to applications where composite materials with highly anisotropic mechanical or thermal properties are required.

  17. Multiplexed Dynamic Imaging of Genomic Loci by Combined CRISPR Imaging and DNA Sequential FISH.

    PubMed

    Takei, Yodai; Shah, Sheel; Harvey, Sho; Qi, Lei S; Cai, Long

    2017-05-09

    Visualization of chromosome dynamics allows the investigation of spatiotemporal chromatin organization and its role in gene regulation and other cellular processes. However, current approaches to label multiple genomic loci in live cells have a fundamental limitation in the number of loci that can be labeled and uniquely identified. Here we describe an approach we call "track first and identify later" for multiplexed visualization of chromosome dynamics by combining two techniques: CRISPR imaging and DNA sequential fluorescence in situ hybridization. Our approach first labels and tracks chromosomal loci in live cells with the CRISPR-Cas9 system, then barcodes those loci by DNA sequential fluorescence in situ hybridization in fixed cells and resolves their identities. We demonstrate our approach by tracking telomere dynamics, identifying 12 unique subtelomeric regions with variable detection efficiencies, and tracking back the telomere dynamics of respective chromosomes in mouse embryonic stem cells. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Schedule-based sequential localization in asynchronous wireless networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zachariah, Dave; De Angelis, Alessio; Dwivedi, Satyam; Händel, Peter

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we consider the schedule-based network localization concept, which does not require synchronization among nodes and does not involve communication overhead. The concept makes use of a common transmission sequence, which enables each node to perform self-localization and to localize the entire network, based on noisy propagation-time measurements. We formulate the schedule-based localization problem as an estimation problem in a Bayesian framework. This provides robustness with respect to uncertainty in such system parameters as anchor locations and timing devices. Moreover, we derive a sequential approximate maximum a posteriori (AMAP) estimator. The estimator is fully decentralized and copes with varying noise levels. By studying the fundamental constraints given by the considered measurement model, we provide a system design methodology which enables a scalable solution. Finally, we evaluate the performance of the proposed AMAP estimator by numerical simulations emulating an impulse-radio ultra-wideband (IR-UWB) wireless network.

  19. The expertise reversal effect for sequential presentation in dynamic soccer visualizations.

    PubMed

    Khacharem, Aïmen; Zoudji, Bachir; Kalyuga, Slava; Ripoll, Hubert

    2013-06-01

    Cognitive load perspective was used as a theoretical framework to investigate effects of expertise and type of presentation of interacting elements of information in learning from dynamic visualizations. Soccer players (N = 48) were required to complete a recall reconstruction test and to rate their invested mental effort after studying a concurrent or sequential presentation of the elements of play. The results provided evidence for an expertise reversal effect. For novice players, the sequential presentation produced better learning outcomes. In contrast, expert players performed better after studying the concurrent presentation. The findings suggest that the effectiveness of different visual presentation formats depend on levels of learner expertise.

  20. Sequential dynamics in the motif of excitatory coupled elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korotkov, Alexander G.; Kazakov, Alexey O.; Osipov, Grigory V.

    2015-11-01

    In this article a new model of motif (small ensemble) of neuron-like elements is proposed. It is built with the use of the generalized Lotka-Volterra model with excitatory couplings. The main motivation for this work comes from the problems of neuroscience where excitatory couplings are proved to be the predominant type of interaction between neurons of the brain. In this paper it is shown that there are two modes depending on the type of coupling between the elements: the mode with a stable heteroclinic cycle and the mode with a stable limit cycle. Our second goal is to examine the chaotic dynamics of the generalized three-dimensional Lotka-Volterra model.

  1. A Fast and Precise Indoor Localization Algorithm Based on an Online Sequential Extreme Learning Machine †

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Han; Lu, Xiaoxuan; Jiang, Hao; Xie, Lihua

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, developing indoor positioning systems (IPSs) has become an attractive research topic due to the increasing demands on location-based service (LBS) in indoor environments. WiFi technology has been studied and explored to provide indoor positioning service for years in view of the wide deployment and availability of existing WiFi infrastructures in indoor environments. A large body of WiFi-based IPSs adopt fingerprinting approaches for localization. However, these IPSs suffer from two major problems: the intensive costs of manpower and time for offline site survey and the inflexibility to environmental dynamics. In this paper, we propose an indoor localization algorithm based on an online sequential extreme learning machine (OS-ELM) to address the above problems accordingly. The fast learning speed of OS-ELM can reduce the time and manpower costs for the offline site survey. Meanwhile, its online sequential learning ability enables the proposed localization algorithm to adapt in a timely manner to environmental dynamics. Experiments under specific environmental changes, such as variations of occupancy distribution and events of opening or closing of doors, are conducted to evaluate the performance of OS-ELM. The simulation and experimental results show that the proposed localization algorithm can provide higher localization accuracy than traditional approaches, due to its fast adaptation to various environmental dynamics. PMID:25599427

  2. A fast and precise indoor localization algorithm based on an online sequential extreme learning machine.

    PubMed

    Zou, Han; Lu, Xiaoxuan; Jiang, Hao; Xie, Lihua

    2015-01-15

    Nowadays, developing indoor positioning systems (IPSs) has become an attractive research topic due to the increasing demands on location-based service (LBS) in indoor environments. WiFi technology has been studied and explored to provide indoor positioning service for years in view of the wide deployment and availability of existing WiFi infrastructures in indoor environments. A large body of WiFi-based IPSs adopt fingerprinting approaches for localization. However, these IPSs suffer from two major problems: the intensive costs of manpower and time for offline site survey and the inflexibility to environmental dynamics. In this paper, we propose an indoor localization algorithm based on an online sequential extreme learning machine (OS-ELM) to address the above problems accordingly. The fast learning speed of OS-ELM can reduce the time and manpower costs for the offline site survey. Meanwhile, its online sequential learning ability enables the proposed localization algorithm to adapt in a timely manner to environmental dynamics. Experiments under specific environmental changes, such as variations of occupancy distribution and events of opening or closing of doors, are conducted to evaluate the performance of OS-ELM. The simulation and experimental results show that the proposed localization algorithm can provide higher localization accuracy than traditional approaches, due to its fast adaptation to various environmental dynamics.

  3. Identifying High-Rate Flows Based on Sequential Sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu; Fang, Binxing; Luo, Hao

    We consider the problem of fast identification of high-rate flows in backbone links with possibly millions of flows. Accurate identification of high-rate flows is important for active queue management, traffic measurement and network security such as detection of distributed denial of service attacks. It is difficult to directly identify high-rate flows in backbone links because tracking the possible millions of flows needs correspondingly large high speed memories. To reduce the measurement overhead, the deterministic 1-out-of-k sampling technique is adopted which is also implemented in Cisco routers (NetFlow). Ideally, a high-rate flow identification method should have short identification time, low memory cost and processing cost. Most importantly, it should be able to specify the identification accuracy. We develop two such methods. The first method is based on fixed sample size test (FSST) which is able to identify high-rate flows with user-specified identification accuracy. However, since FSST has to record every sampled flow during the measurement period, it is not memory efficient. Therefore the second novel method based on truncated sequential probability ratio test (TSPRT) is proposed. Through sequential sampling, TSPRT is able to remove the low-rate flows and identify the high-rate flows at the early stage which can reduce the memory cost and identification time respectively. According to the way to determine the parameters in TSPRT, two versions of TSPRT are proposed: TSPRT-M which is suitable when low memory cost is preferred and TSPRT-T which is suitable when short identification time is preferred. The experimental results show that TSPRT requires less memory and identification time in identifying high-rate flows while satisfying the accuracy requirement as compared to previously proposed methods.

  4. Spatiotemporal Mining of Time-Series Remote Sensing Images Based on Sequential Pattern Mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H. C.; He, G. J.; Zhang, X. M.; Jiang, W.; Ling, S. G.

    2015-07-01

    With the continuous development of satellite techniques, it is now possible to acquire a regular series of images concerning a given geographical zone with both high accuracy and low cost. Research on how best to effectively process huge volumes of observational data obtained on different dates for a specific geographical zone, and to exploit the valuable information regarding land cover contained in these images has received increasing interest from the remote sensing community. In contrast to traditional land cover change measures using pair-wise comparisons that emphasize the compositional or configurational changes between dates, this research focuses on the analysis of the temporal sequence of land cover dynamics, which refers to the succession of land cover types for a given area over more than two observational periods. Using a time series of classified Landsat images, ranging from 2006 to 2011, a sequential pattern mining method was extended to this spatiotemporal context to extract sets of connected pixels sharing similar temporal evolutions. The resultant sequential patterns could be selected (or not) based on the range of support values. These selected patterns were used to explore the spatial compositions and temporal evolutions of land cover change within the study region. Experimental results showed that continuous patterns that represent consistent land cover over time appeared as quite homogeneous zones, which agreed with our domain knowledge. Discontinuous patterns that represent land cover change trajectories were dominated by the transition from vegetation to bare land, especially during 2009-2010. This approach quantified land cover changes in terms of the percentage area affected and mapped the spatial distribution of these changes. Sequential pattern mining has been used for string mining or itemset mining in transactions analysis. The expected novel significance of this study is the generalization of the application of the sequential pattern

  5. Sequential Model-Based Detection in a Shallow Ocean Acoustic Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J V

    2002-03-26

    A model-based detection scheme is developed to passively monitor an ocean acoustic environment along with its associated variations. The technique employs an embedded model-based processor and a reference model in a sequential likelihood detection scheme. The monitor is therefore called a sequential reference detector. The underlying theory for the design is developed and discussed in detail.

  6. Dynamic Modelling of Aquifer Level Using Space-Time Kriging and Sequential Gaussian Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varouchakis, Emmanouil A.; Hristopulos, Dionisis T.

    2016-04-01

    Geostatistical models are widely used in water resources management projects to represent and predict the spatial variability of aquifer levels. In addition, they can be applied as surrogate to numerical hydrological models if the hydrogeological data needed to calibrate the latter are not available. For space-time data, spatiotemporal geostatistical approaches can model the aquifer level variability by incorporating complex space-time correlations. A major advantage of such models is that they can improve the reliability of predictions compared to purely spatial or temporal models in areas with limited spatial and temporal data availability. The identification and incorporation of a spatiotemporal trend model can further increase the accuracy of groundwater level predictions. Our goal is to derive a geostatistical model of dynamic aquifer level changes in a sparsely gauged basin on the island of Crete (Greece). The available data consist of bi-annual (dry and wet hydrological period) groundwater level measurements at 11 monitoring locations for the time period 1981 to 2010. We identify a spatiotemporal trend function that follows the overall drop of the aquifer level over the study period. The correlation of the residuals is modeled using a non-separable space-time variogram function based on the Spartan covariance family. The space-time Residual Kriging (STRK) method is then applied to combine the estimated trend and the residuals into dynamic predictions of groundwater level. Sequential Gaussian Simulation is also employed to determine the uncertainty of the spatiotemporal model (trend and covariance) parameters. This stochastic modelling approach produces multiple realizations, ranks the prediction results on the basis of specified criteria, and captures the range of the uncertainty. The model projections recommend that in 2032 a part of the basin will be under serious threat as the aquifer level will approximate the sea level boundary.

  7. DYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF THE BULK TRITIUM SHIPPING PACKAGE SUBJECTED TO CLOSURE TORQUES AND SEQUENTIAL IMPACTS

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, T; Paul Blanton, P; Kurt Eberl, K

    2007-07-09

    This paper presents a finite-element technique to simulate the structural responses and to evaluate the cumulative damage of a radioactive material packaging requiring bolt closure-tightening torque and subjected to the scenarios of the Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC) defined in the Code of Federal Regulations Title 10 part 71 (10CFR71). Existing finite-element methods for modeling closure stresses from bolt pre-load are not readily adaptable to dynamic analyses. The HAC events are required to occur sequentially per 10CFR71 and thus the evaluation of the cumulative damage is desirable. Generally, each HAC event is analyzed separately and the cumulative damage is partially addressed by superposition. This results in relying on additional physical testing to comply with 10CFR71 requirements for assessment of cumulative damage. The proposed technique utilizes the combination of kinematic constraints, rigid-body motions and structural deformations to overcome some of the difficulties encountered in modeling the effect of cumulative damage. This methodology provides improved numerical solutions in compliance with the 10CFR71 requirements for sequential HAC tests. Analyses were performed for the Bulk Tritium Shipping Package (BTSP) designed by Savannah River National Laboratory to demonstrate the applications of the technique. The methodology proposed simulates the closure bolt torque preload followed by the sequential HAC events, the 30-foot drop and the 30-foot dynamic crush. The analytical results will be compared to the package test data.

  8. Use of solid phase extraction for the sequential injection determination of alkaline phosphatase activity in dynamic water systems.

    PubMed

    Santos, Inês C; Mesquita, Raquel B R; Bordalo, Adriano A; Rangel, António O S S

    2012-08-30

    In this work, a solid phase extraction sequential injection methodology for the determination of alkaline phosphatase activity in dynamic water systems was developed. The determination of the enzymatic activity was based on the spectrophotometric detection of a coloured product, p-nitrophenol, at 405 nm. The p-nitrophenol is the product of the catalytic decomposition of p-nitrophenyl phosphate, a non-coloured substrate. Considering the low levels expected in natural waters and exploiting the fact of alkaline phosphatase being a metalloprotein, the enzyme was pre-concentrated in-line using a NTA Superflow resin charged with Zn(2+) ions. The developed sequential injection method enabled a quantification range of 0.044-0.441 unit mL(-1) of enzyme activity with a detection limit of 0.0082 unit mL(-1) enzyme activity (1.9 μmol L(-1) of pNP) and a determination rate of 17 h(-1). Recovery tests confirmed the accuracy of the developed sequential injection method and it was effectively applied to different natural waters and to plant root extracts.

  9. Sequential Structural and Fluid Dynamics Analysis of Balloon-Expandable Coronary Stents: A Multivariable Statistical Analysis.

    PubMed

    Martin, David; Boyle, Fergal

    2015-09-01

    Several clinical studies have identified a strong correlation between neointimal hyperplasia following coronary stent deployment and both stent-induced arterial injury and altered vessel hemodynamics. As such, the sequential structural and fluid dynamics analysis of balloon-expandable stent deployment should provide a comprehensive indication of stent performance. Despite this observation, very few numerical studies of balloon-expandable coronary stents have considered both the mechanical and hemodynamic impact of stent deployment. Furthermore, in the few studies that have considered both phenomena, only a small number of stents have been considered. In this study, a sequential structural and fluid dynamics analysis methodology was employed to compare both the mechanical and hemodynamic impact of six balloon-expandable coronary stents. To investigate the relationship between stent design and performance, several common stent design properties were then identified and the dependence between these properties and both the mechanical and hemodynamic variables of interest was evaluated using statistical measures of correlation. Following the completion of the numerical analyses, stent strut thickness was identified as the only common design property that demonstrated a strong dependence with either the mean equivalent stress predicted in the artery wall or the mean relative residence time predicted on the luminal surface of the artery. These results corroborate the findings of the large-scale ISAR-STEREO clinical studies and highlight the crucial role of strut thickness in coronary stent design. The sequential structural and fluid dynamics analysis methodology and the multivariable statistical treatment of the results described in this study should prove useful in the design of future balloon-expandable coronary stents.

  10. Exact results for a fully asymmetric exclusion process with sequential dynamics and open boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brankov, Jordan; Pesheva, Nina; Valkov, Nikola

    2000-03-01

    An exact and rigorous calculation of the current and density profile in the steady state of the one-dimensional fully asymmetric simple-exclusion process with open boundaries and forward-ordered sequential dynamics is presented. The method is based on a matrix product representation of the steady-state probability distribution. The main idea is to choose a suitable representation in which the scalar products describing the current and local density profile for a chain of arbitrary finite size depend only on the elements in a finite number of rows and columns. This makes possible the use of a truncated finite-dimensional representation of the matrices and vectors involved. After performing the calculations, we lift the truncation by letting its dimensionality go to infinity. In this limit the results become exact for any size of the chain. By rescaling one of the infinite-dimensional matrix representations found in the work of Derrida et al. [J. Phys. A 26, 1493 (1993)] for their algebra, we obtain a symmetric ``propagator'' matrix. Its truncated version is diagonalized by orthogonal transformation for easy calculation of the relevant scalar products. An interpretation of the phase transitions between the different phases is given in terms of eigenvalue splitting from a bounded quasicontinuous spectrum. A precise description of the local density profiles is given for all values of the parameters. It is shown that the leading-order asymptotic form of the position-dependent terms in the local density changes within the low- and high-density phases, signaling the presence of a higher-order transition.

  11. Efficient Model-Based Sequential Designs for Sensitivity Experiments.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-01

    Monro stochastic approximation, Sensitivity experiments, Spearman - Karber estimator, "- Up-and-Down method 20. ABSTRACT (Continue on revere. aide It...nonparametric sequential design, via the Spearman - Karber estimator, for estimating the median is also proposed.- AMS (MOS) Subject Classifications: 62K05, 62L05...Key Words: Logit, Optimal design, Quantal response curve, Robbins-Monro stochastic approximation, Sensitivity experiments, Spearman - Karber estimator

  12. A Sequential Dynamic Bayesian Network for Pore Pressure Prediction and Quantification of Uncertainty.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oughton, R. H.; Wooff, D. A.; Hobbs, R. W.; Swarbrick, R. E.

    2014-12-01

    Pore pressure prediction is vital when drilling a well, as unexpected overpressure can cause drilling challenges and uncontrolled hydrocarbon leakage. One cause of overpressure is when pore fluid is trapped during burial and takes on part of the lithostatic load. Predictions often use porosity-based techniques, such as the Eaton Ratio method and equivalent depth method. These rely on an idealised compaction trend and use a single wireline log as a proxy for porosity. Such methods do not account for the many sources of uncertainty, or for the multivariate nature of the system. We propose a sequential dynamic Bayesian network (SDBN) as a solution to these issues. The SDBN models the quantities in the system (such as pressures, porosity, lithology, wireline logs, fluid properties and so on) using conditional probability distributions to capture their joint behaviour. A compaction model is central to the SDBN, relating porosity to vertical effective stress, with uncertainty in the relationship, so that the logic is similar to that of the equivalent depth method. The probability distribution for porosity depends on VES and lithology, with much more uncertainty in sandstone-like rocks than in shales to reflect a general lack of understanding of sandstone compaction. The distributions of the wireline logs depend on porosity and lithology, along with other quantities, and so when they are observed the SDBN learns about porosity and lithology and in turn VES and pore pressure, using Bayes theorem. The probability distribution for each quantity in the SDBN is updated in light of any data, so that rather than giving a single-valued prediction for pore pressure, the SDBN gives a prediction with uncertainty that takes into account the whole system, knowledge and data. The dynamic nature of the SDBN enables it to use the bulk density to calculate total vertical stress, and to account for the dissipation of pore pressure. The vertical correlation in the SDBN means it is suited to

  13. LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Retrieval dynamics of neural networks for sparsely coded sequential patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitano, Katsunori; Aoyagi, Toshio

    1998-09-01

    It is well known that a sparsely coded network in which the activity level is extremely low has intriguing equilibrium properties. In this work, we study the dynamical properties of a neural network designed to store sparsely coded sequential patterns rather than static ones. Applying the theory of statistical neurodynamics, we derive the dynamical equations governing the retrieval process which are described by some macroscopic order parameters such as the overlap. It is found that our theory provides good predictions for the storage capacity and the basin of attraction obtained through numerical simulations. The results indicate that the nature of the basin of attraction depends on the methods of activity control employed. Furthermore, it is found that robustness against random synaptic dilution slightly deteriorates with the degree of sparseness.

  14. Developing a Self-Report-Based Sequential Analysis Method for Educational Technology Systems: A Process-Based Usability Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Yi-Chun; Hsieh, Ya-Hui; Hou, Huei-Tse

    2015-01-01

    The development of a usability evaluation method for educational systems or applications, called the self-report-based sequential analysis, is described herein. The method aims to extend the current practice by proposing self-report-based sequential analysis as a new usability method, which integrates the advantages of self-report in survey…

  15. Developing a Self-Report-Based Sequential Analysis Method for Educational Technology Systems: A Process-Based Usability Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Yi-Chun; Hsieh, Ya-Hui; Hou, Huei-Tse

    2015-01-01

    The development of a usability evaluation method for educational systems or applications, called the self-report-based sequential analysis, is described herein. The method aims to extend the current practice by proposing self-report-based sequential analysis as a new usability method, which integrates the advantages of self-report in survey…

  16. Anatomic diagnosis of congenital heart disease. A practical approach based on the sequentiality principle.

    PubMed

    Cervantes-Salazar, Jorge; Curi-Curi, Pedro; Ramírez-Marroquín, Samuel; Calderón-Colmenero, Juan; Munoz-Castellanos, Luis

    2010-01-01

    Based on the sequentiality principle, this review proposes a practical method that allows the systematization of the anatomic diagnosis of congenital heart disease. We emphasize the need to use sequential connection between the different cardiac segments: atria, ventricles and great arteries. Five ordered steps are defined, which include determination of atrial situs and of the connection features between the ventricles and the great arteries. Related lesions and some additional special features are a second stage in the sequential analysis of congenital heart disease, which is also important for the integral diagnosis.

  17. Sequentially Optimized Meshfree Approximation as a New Computational Fluid Dynamics Solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Matthew

    This thesis presents the Sequentially Optimized Meshfree Approximation (SOMA) method, a new and powerful Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solver. While standard computational methods can be faster and cheaper that physical experimentation, both in cost and work time, these methods do have some time and user interaction overhead which SOMA eliminates. As a meshfree method which could use adaptive domain refinement methods, SOMA avoids the need for user generated and/or analyzed grids, volumes, and meshes. Incremental building of a feed-forward artificial neural network through machine learning to solve the flow problem significantly reduces user interaction and reduces computational cost. This is done by avoiding the creation and inversion of possibly dense block diagonal matrices and by focusing computational work on regions where the flow changes and ignoring regions where no changes occur.

  18. Sequential interpenetrating polymer networks produced from vegetable oil based polyurethane and poly(methyl methacrylate).

    PubMed

    Kong, Xiaohua; Narine, Suresh S

    2008-08-01

    Sequential interpenetrating polymer networks (IPNs) were prepared using polyurethane produced from a canola oil based polyol with primary terminal functional groups and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). The properties of the material were studied and compared to the IPNs made from commercial castor oil using dynamic mechanical analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, as well as tensile measurements. The morphology of the IPNs was investigated using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The chemical diversity of the starting materials allowed the evaluation of the effects of dangling chains and graftings on the properties of the IPNs. The polymerization process of canola oil based IPNs was accelerated because of the utilization of polyol with primary functional groups, which efficiently lessened the effect of dangling chains and yielded a higher degree of phase mixing. The mechanical properties of canola oil based IPNs containing more than 75 wt % PMMA were comparable to the corresponding castor oil based IPNs; both were superior to those of the constituent polymers due to the finely divided rubber and plastic combination structures in these IPNs. However, when PMMA content was less than 65 wt %, canola oil based IPNs exhibited a typical mechanical behavior of rigid plastics, whereas castor oil based IPNs showed a typical mechanical behavior of soft rubber. It is proposed that these new IPN materials with high performance prepared from alternative renewable resources can prove to be valuable substitutes for existing materials in various applications.

  19. Tuning the Brake While Raising the Stake: Network Dynamics during Sequential Decision-Making

    PubMed Central

    Meder, David; Haagensen, Brian Numelin; Hulme, Oliver; Morville, Tobias; Gelskov, Sofie; Herz, Damian Marc; Diomsina, Beata; Christensen, Mark Schram; Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard

    2016-01-01

    When gathering valued goods, risk and reward are often coupled and escalate over time, for instance, during foraging, trading, or gambling. This escalating frame requires agents to continuously balance expectations of reward against those of risk. To address how the human brain dynamically computes these tradeoffs, we performed whole-brain fMRI while healthy young individuals engaged in a sequential gambling task. Participants were repeatedly confronted with the option to continue with throwing a die to accumulate monetary reward under escalating risk, or the alternative option to stop to bank the current balance. Within each gambling round, the accumulation of gains gradually increased reaction times for “continue” choices, indicating growing uncertainty in the decision to continue. Neural activity evoked by “continue” choices was associated with growing activity and connectivity of a cortico-subcortical “braking” network that positively scaled with the accumulated gains, including pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA), inferior frontal gyrus, caudate, and subthalamic nucleus (STN). The influence of the STN on continue-evoked activity in the pre-SMA was predicted by interindividual differences in risk-aversion attitudes expressed during the gambling task. Furthermore, activity in dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) reflected individual choice tendencies by showing increased activation when subjects made nondefault “continue” choices despite an increasing tendency to stop, but ACC activity did not change in proportion with subjective choice uncertainty. Together, the results implicate a key role of dorsal ACC, pre-SMA, inferior frontal gyrus, and STN in computing the trade-off between escalating reward and risk in sequential decision-making. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Using a paradigm where subjects experienced increasing potential rewards coupled with increasing risk, this study addressed two unresolved questions in the field of decision

  20. Accurate and fast narcissus calculation based on sequential ray trace.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Zhong, Xiaobing; Zhong, Ning; Zheng, Changsheng; Wen, Lizhan

    2013-11-20

    A narcissus calculating method for cryogenic infrared imaging systems is proposed in this paper. The accuracy is largely improved compared to the traditional paraxial analysis, as ray blocking of the optical opertures is taken into account and real ray data are used during the calculation. The narcissus distribution on the full focal plane can be obtained via analyzing field by field. Meanwhile, it can be implemented simply and fast as sequential ray tracing is utilized and rays only pass through three surfaces during the cold return statistics for every retro-reflecting surface. According to this method, a general narcissus calculation package was realized using the macro language of optical design software Code V. The performance of the new method was tested by calculating an example system using this package and comparing it with traditional methods. The results showed that the new method produced the same result accuracy and information quantity as the nonsequential ray trace, while the whole analysis took only 5 s, which was significantly shortened compared with the nonsequential ray trace, which took about 30 min.

  1. Bipolar ion detector based on sequential conversion reactions.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming-Hsin; Tsai, Shang-Ting; Chen, Chung-Hsuan; Chen, Chiu Wen; Lee, Yuan Tseh; Wang, Yi-Sheng

    2007-02-15

    This work demonstrates the feasibility of a novel scintillation detector with greater detection efficiency than that of chevron-type microchannel plate (MCP) detectors. The detection mechanism involves sequential conversion reactions induced by ion-surface impacts. Identical detection conditions can be utilized to monitor both positive and negative ions in mass spectrometers. The proposed detector comprises an ion beam guiding device, a negatively biased washer-shaped conversion dynode, and an aluminum-coated scintillation detector. The beam guide changes the electric field around the washer-shaped conversion dynode, and it allows the primary and secondary ions to propagate toward the scintillation phosphor and the conversion dynode, respectively. The detection is achieved by the detection of electron-induced luminescence on a phosphor. The amplification efficiency of this bipolar ion detector increases as the conversion dynode voltage increases. For ions with a mass-to-charge ratio of up to 90 000, the sensitivity of the BID is 1.4-14.4 times that of the MCP. Further improvement of the sensitivity can be achieved by increasing the conversion dynode voltage or the ion acceleration voltage. Results of this study demonstrate that this detector is a promising alternative for efficient ion detection.

  2. Physics-based, Bayesian sequential detection method and system for radioactive contraband

    DOEpatents

    Candy, James V; Axelrod, Michael C; Breitfeller, Eric F; Chambers, David H; Guidry, Brian L; Manatt, Douglas R; Meyer, Alan W; Sale, Kenneth E

    2014-03-18

    A distributed sequential method and system for detecting and identifying radioactive contraband from highly uncertain (noisy) low-count, radionuclide measurements, i.e. an event mode sequence (EMS), using a statistical approach based on Bayesian inference and physics-model-based signal processing based on the representation of a radionuclide as a monoenergetic decomposition of monoenergetic sources. For a given photon event of the EMS, the appropriate monoenergy processing channel is determined using a confidence interval condition-based discriminator for the energy amplitude and interarrival time and parameter estimates are used to update a measured probability density function estimate for a target radionuclide. A sequential likelihood ratio test is then used to determine one of two threshold conditions signifying that the EMS is either identified as the target radionuclide or not, and if not, then repeating the process for the next sequential photon event of the EMS until one of the two threshold conditions is satisfied.

  3. Infectious Disease Dynamics Inferred from Genetic Data via Sequential Monte Carlo.

    PubMed

    Smith, R A; Ionides, E L; King, A A

    2017-04-08

    Genetic sequences from pathogens can provide information about infectious disease dynamics that may supplement or replace information from other epidemiological observations. Most currently available methods first estimate phylogenetic trees from sequence data, then estimate a transmission model conditional on these phylogenies. Outside limited classes of models, existing methods are unable to enforce logical consistency between the model of transmission and that underlying the phylogenetic reconstruction. Such conicts in assumptions can lead to bias in the resulting inferences. Here, we develop a general, statistically efficient, plug-and-play method to jointly estimate both disease transmission and phylogeny using genetic data and, if desired, other epidemiological observations. This method explicitly connects the model of transmission and the model of phylogeny so as to avoid the aforementioned inconsistency.We demonstrate the feasibility of our approach through simulation and apply it to estimate stage-specific infectiousness in a subepidemic of HIV in Detroit, Michigan. In a supplement, we prove that our approach is a valid sequential Monte Carlo algorithm. While we focus on how these methods may be applied to population-level models of infectious disease, their scope is more general. These methods may be applied in other biological systems where one seeks to infer population dynamics from genetic sequences, and they may also find application for evolutionary models with phenotypic rather than genotypic data.

  4. Adaptive dynamic programming algorithms for sequential appointment scheduling with patient preferences.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin; Fung, Richard Y K

    2015-01-01

    A well-developed appointment system can help increase the utilization of medical facilities in an outpatient department. This paper outlines the development of an appointment system that can make an outpatient department work more efficiently and improve patient satisfaction level. A Markov decision process model is proposed to schedule sequential appointments with the consideration of patient preferences in order to maximize the patient satisfaction level. Adaptive dynamic programming algorithms are developed to avoid the curse of dimensionality. These algorithms can dynamically capture patient preferences, update the value of being a state, and thus improve the appointment decisions. Experiments were conducted to investigate the performance of the algorithms. The convergence behaviors under different settings, including the number of iterations needed for convergence and the accuracy of results, were examined. Bias-adjusted Kalman filter step-sizes were found to lead to the best convergence behavior, which stabilized within 5000 iterations. As for the effects of exploration and exploitation, it resulted in the best convergence behavior when the probability of taking a myopically optimal action equaled 0.9. The performance of value function approximation algorithm was greatly affected by the combination of basis functions. Under different combinations, errors varied from 2.7% to 8.3%. More preferences resulted in faster convergence, but required longer computation time. System parameters are adaptively updated as bookings are confirmed. The proposed appointment scheduling system could certainly contribute to better patient satisfaction level during the booking periods. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Dynamic Simulation of Shipping Package Subjected to Torque Load and Sequential Impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, T

    2006-04-17

    A numerical technique has been developed to simulate the structural responses of radioactive material packaging components requiring closure-tightening torque to the scenarios of the hypothetical accident conditions (HAC) defined in the Code of Federal Regulations Title 10 part 71 (10CFR 71). A rigorous solution to this type of problem poses a considerable mathematical challenge. Conventional methods for evaluating the residue stresses due to the torque load are either inaccurate or not applicable to dynamic analyses. In addition, the HAC events occur sequentially and the cumulative damage to the package needs to be evaluated. Commonly, individual HAC events are analyzed separately and the cumulative damage is not addressed. As a result, strict compliance of the package with the requirements specified in 10CFR 71 is usually demonstrated by physical testing. The proposed technique utilizes the combination of kinematic constraints, rigid-body motions and structural deformations to overcome some of the difficulties encountered in modeling the effect of cumulative damage in numerical solutions. The analyses demonstrating use of this technique were performed to determine the cumulative damage of torque preload, a 30-foot drop, a 30-foot dynamic crush and a 40-inch free fall onto a mild steel pipe.

  6. Multi-volatile method for aroma analysis using sequential dynamic headspace sampling with an application to brewed coffee.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Nobuo; Tsunokawa, Jun; Sasamoto, Kikuo; Hoffmann, Andreas

    2014-12-05

    A novel multi-volatile method (MVM) using sequential dynamic headspace (DHS) sampling for analysis of aroma compounds in aqueous sample was developed. The MVM consists of three different DHS method parameters sets including choice of the replaceable adsorbent trap. The first DHS sampling at 25 °C using a carbon-based adsorbent trap targets very volatile solutes with high vapor pressure (>20 kPa). The second DHS sampling at 25 °C using the same type of carbon-based adsorbent trap targets volatile solutes with moderate vapor pressure (1-20 kPa). The third DHS sampling using a Tenax TA trap at 80 °C targets solutes with low vapor pressure (<1 kPa) and/or hydrophilic characteristics. After the 3 sequential DHS samplings using the same HS vial, the three traps are sequentially desorbed with thermal desorption in reverse order of the DHS sampling and the desorbed compounds are trapped and concentrated in a programmed temperature vaporizing (PTV) inlet and subsequently analyzed in a single GC-MS run. Recoveries of the 21 test aroma compounds for each DHS sampling and the combined MVM procedure were evaluated as a function of vapor pressure in the range of 0.000088-120 kPa. The MVM provided very good recoveries in the range of 91-111%. The method showed good linearity (r2>0.9910) and high sensitivity (limit of detection: 1.0-7.5 ng mL(-1)) even with MS scan mode. The feasibility and benefit of the method was demonstrated with analysis of a wide variety of aroma compounds in brewed coffee. Ten potent aroma compounds from top-note to base-note (acetaldehyde, 2,3-butanedione, 4-ethyl guaiacol, furaneol, guaiacol, 3-methyl butanal, 2,3-pentanedione, 2,3,5-trimethyl pyrazine, vanillin, and 4-vinyl guaiacol) could be identified together with an additional 72 aroma compounds. Thirty compounds including 9 potent aroma compounds were quantified in the range of 74-4300 ng mL(-1) (RSD<10%, n=5).

  7. A stacked sequential learning method for investigator name recognition from web-based medical articles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoli; Zou, Jie; Le, Daniel X.; Thoma, George

    2010-01-01

    "Investigator Names" is a newly required field in MEDLINE citations. It consists of personal names listed as members of corporate organizations in an article. Extracting investigator names automatically is necessary because of the increasing volume of articles reporting collaborative biomedical research in which a large number of investigators participate. In this paper, we present an SVM-based stacked sequential learning method in a novel application - recognizing named entities such as the first and last names of investigators from online medical journal articles. Stacked sequential learning is a meta-learning algorithm which can boost any base learner. It exploits contextual information by adding the predicted labels of the surrounding tokens as features. We apply this method to tag words in text paragraphs containing investigator names, and demonstrate that stacked sequential learning improves the performance of a nonsequential base learner such as an SVM classifier.

  8. Mineral image enhancement based on sequential combination of toggle and top-hat based contrast operator.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xiangzhi

    2013-01-01

    Enhancing mineral image especially making mineral image details clear is very useful for mineral analysis. To effectively enhance mineral image, an algorithm based on the toggle contrast operator and top-hat based contrast operator is proposed in this paper. Sequentially combining the toggle contrast operator and top-hat based contrast operator could be used to identify image features especially the image details. So, appropriately exacting the identified image features by the sequentially combined toggle and top-hat based contrast operator is important for mineral image enhancement, which is analyzed firstly in this paper. After that, the multi-scale extension of feature extraction is given and used to construct the final features for mineral image enhancement. By importing the final extracted image features into the original mineral image through contrast enlargement, the original mineral image is well enhanced and the mineral image details are very clear. Experimental results on different types of mineral images verified the effective performance of the proposed algorithm. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Actin dynamics and competition for myosin monomer govern the sequential amplification of myosin filaments.

    PubMed

    Beach, Jordan R; Bruun, Kyle S; Shao, Lin; Li, Dong; Swider, Zac; Remmert, Kirsten; Zhang, Yingfan; Conti, Mary A; Adelstein, Robert S; Rusan, Nasser M; Betzig, Eric; Hammer, John A

    2017-02-01

    The cellular mechanisms governing non-muscle myosin II (NM2) filament assembly are largely unknown. Using EGFP-NM2A knock-in fibroblasts and multiple super-resolution imaging modalities, we characterized and quantified the sequential amplification of NM2 filaments within lamellae, wherein filaments emanating from single nucleation events continuously partition, forming filament clusters that populate large-scale actomyosin structures deeper in the cell. Individual partitioning events coincide spatially and temporally with the movements of diverging actin fibres, suppression of which inhibits partitioning. These and other data indicate that NM2A filaments are partitioned by the dynamic movements of actin fibres to which they are bound. Finally, we showed that partition frequency and filament growth rate in the lamella depend on MLCK, and that MLCK is competing with centrally active ROCK for a limiting pool of monomer with which to drive lamellar filament assembly. Together, our results provide new insights into the mechanism and spatio-temporal regulation of NM2 filament assembly in cells.

  10. p-Cresol mineralization and bacterial population dynamics in a nitrifying sequential batch reactor.

    PubMed

    Silva, Carlos David; Beristain-Montiel, Lizeth; de Maria Cuervo-López, Flor; Texier, Anne-Claire

    2014-09-01

    The ability of a nitrifying sludge to oxidize p-cresol was evaluated in a sequential batch reactor (SBR). p-Cresol was first transformed to p-hydroxybenzaldehyde and p-hydroxybenzoate, which were later mineralized. The specific rates of p-cresol consumption increased throughout the cycles. The bacterial population dynamics were monitored by using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and sequencing of DGGE fragments. The ability of the sludge to consume p-cresol and intermediates might be related to the presence of species such as Variovorax paradoxus and Thauera mechernichensis. p-Cresol (25 to 200mgC/L) did not affect the nitrifying SBR performance (ammonium consumption efficiency and nitrate production yield were close to 100% and 1, respectively). This may be related to the high stability observed in the nitrifying communities. It was shown that a nitrifying SBR may be a good alternative to eliminate simultaneously ammonium and p-cresol, maintaining stable the respiratory process as the bacterial community.

  11. Method for the sequential online analysis of enzyme reactions based on capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuanfang; Xu, Liangliang; Zhao, Wenwen; Guo, Liping; Yang, Li

    2012-03-20

    We have developed an easy-to-operate and effective method for performing the sequential online analysis of enzyme reactions based on capillary electrophoresis (CE). The system was constructed by passing two capillaries through a sample vial at a distance of 5 μm between the capillary ends. Direct online sample injection and sequential CE analysis were achieved by periodically switching the high-voltage power supply off and on, without any physical disturbance of the capillary inlet. The sample was injected via concentration diffusion with in-column derivatization of the amino acids occurring at the interface of the capillaries. High reproducibility of the sequential injections was demonstrated with relative standard deviation values (n = 20) of 1.01%, 1.25%, and 0.80% for peak height, peak area, and migration time, respectively. Sequential online CE enzyme assay of a glutamate pyruvate transaminase catalyzed enzyme reaction was carried out by simultaneously monitoring the substrate consumption and the product formation every 30 s from the beginning to the end of the reaction. The Michaelis constants for the reaction were obtained and were found to be in good agreement with the results of traditional off-line enzyme assays. Our method has great potential for usage in sequential online CE analysis of chemical reactions with in-column chemical derivatization of the analytes for ultraviolet or laser-induced fluorescence detection.

  12. Sequential Processes in Palladium-Catalyzed Silicon-Based Cross-Coupling

    PubMed Central

    Denmark, Scott E.; Liu, Jack H.-C.

    2012-01-01

    Although developed somewhat later, silicon-based cross-coupling has become a viable alternative to the more conventional Suzuki-Miyaura, Stille-Kosugi-Migita, and Negishi cross-coupling reactions because of its broad substrate scope, high stability of silicon-containing reagents, and low toxicity of waste streams. An empowering and yet underappreciated feature unique to silicon-based cross-coupling is the wide range of sequential processes available. In these processes, simple precursors are first converted to complex silicon-containing cross-coupling substrates, and the subsequent silicon-based cross-coupling reaction affords an even more highly functionalized product in a stereoselective fashion. In so doing, structurally simple and inexpensive starting materials are quickly transformed into value-added and densely substituted products. Therefore, sequential processes are often useful in constructing the carbon backbones of natural products. In this review, studies of sequential processes involving silicon-based cross-coupling are discussed. Additionally, the total syntheses that utilize these sequential processes are also presented. PMID:23293392

  13. On-line dynamic fractionation and automatic determination of inorganic phosphorus in environmental solid substrates exploiting sequential injection microcolumn extraction and flow injection analysis.

    PubMed

    Buanuam, Janya; Miró, Manuel; Hansen, Elo Harald; Shiowatana, Juwadee

    2006-06-16

    Sequential injection microcolumn extraction (SI-MCE) based on the implementation of a soil-containing microcartridge as external reactor in a sequential injection network is, for the first time, proposed for dynamic fractionation of macronutrients in environmental solids, as exemplified by the partitioning of inorganic phosphorus in agricultural soils. The on-line fractionation method capitalises on the accurate metering and sequential exposure of the various extractants to the solid sample by application of programmable flow as precisely coordinated by a syringe pump. Three different soil phase associations for phosphorus, that is, exchangeable, Al- and Fe-bound, and Ca-bound fractions, were elucidated by accommodation in the flow manifold of the three steps of the Hieltjes-Lijklema (HL) scheme involving the use of 1.0M NH4Cl, 0.1M NaOH and 0.5M HCl, respectively, as sequential leaching reagents. The precise timing and versatility of SI for tailoring various operational extraction modes were utilized for investigating the extractability and the extent of phosphorus re-distribution for variable partitioning times. Automatic spectrophotometric determination of soluble reactive phosphorus in soil extracts was performed by a flow injection (FI) analyser based on the Molybdenum Blue (MB) chemistry. The 3sigma detection limit was 0.02 mg P L(-1) while the linear dynamic range extended up to 20 mg P L(-1) regardless of the extracting media. Despite the variable chemical composition of the HL extracts, a single FI set-up was assembled with no need for either manifold re-configuration or modification of chemical composition of reagents. The mobilization of trace elements, such as Cd, often present in grazed pastures as a result of the application of phosphate fertilizers, was also explored in the HL fractions by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

  14. Spectroscopic and Molecular Dynamics Evidence for a Sequential Mechanism for the A-to-B Transition in DNA

    PubMed Central

    Knee, Kelly M.; Dixit, Surjit B.; Aitken, Colin Echeverría; Ponomarev, Sergei; Beveridge, D. L.; Mukerji, Ishita

    2008-01-01

    The A-to-B form transition has been examined in three DNA duplexes, d(CGCGAATTCGCG)2, d(CGCGAATTGCGC), and d(CGCAAATTTCGC), using circular dichroism spectroscopy, ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopy, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Circular dichroism spectra confirm that these molecules adopt the A form under conditions of reduced water activity. UVRR results, obtained under similar conditions, suggest that the transition involves a series of intermediate forms between A and B. Cooperative and distinct transitions were observed for the bases and the sugars. Independent MD simulations on d(CGCGAATTCGCG)2 show a spontaneous change from the A to B form in aqueous solution and describe a kinetic model that agrees well with UVRR results. Based on these observations, we predict that the mechanism of the transition involves a series of A/B hybrid forms and is sequential in nature, similar to previous crystallographic studies of derivatized duplexes. A simulation in which waters were restrained in the major groove of B DNA shows a rapid, spontaneous change from B to A at reduced water activity. These results indicate that a quasiergodic sampling of the solvent distribution may be a problem in going from B to A at reduced water activity in the course of an MD simulation. PMID:18326653

  15. High resolution x-ray medical sequential image acquisition and processing system based on PCI interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Dongming; Chen, Qian; Gu, Guohua

    2003-11-01

    In the field of medical application, it is of great importance to adopt digital image processing technique. Based on the characteristics of medical image, we introduced the digital image processing method to the X-ray imaging system, and developed a high resolution x-ray medical sequential image acquisition and processing system that employs image enhancer and CCD. This system consists of three basic modules, namely sequential image acquisition, data transfer and system control, and image processing. Under the control of FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array), images acquired by the front-end circuit are transmitted to a PC through high speed PCI bus, and then optimized by the image processing program. The software kits, which include PCI Device Driver and Image Processing Package, are developed with Visual C++ Language based on Windows OS. In this paper, we present a general introduction to the principle and the operating procedure of X-ray Sequential Image Acquisition and Processing System, with special emphasis on the key issues of the hardware design. In addition, the context, principle, status quo and the digitizing trend of X-ray Imaging are explained succinctly. Finally, the preliminary experimental results are shown to demonstrate that the system is capable of achieving high quality X-ray sequential images.

  16. Integrated GPS/DR Vehicle Navigation System Based on Sequential and Square Root Kalman Filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elzoghby, MOSTAFA; Arif, USMAN; Li, FU; Zhi Yu, Xi

    2017-03-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) has become part of many applications in life. In mountainous terrains and around buildings, GPS reception is compromised. In dense urban canyons, signals bounce off the buildings creating multipath reception and provide erroneous measurements. To overcome GPS bandwidth and signal fading problems, Navigation solutions are built on GPS measurements fused with inertial sensors to provide dead reckoning (DR) based position solution. Solution for land vehicle Navigation System using GPS, inertial sensor and odometer is presented. The sensors fusion is performed based on conventional, sequential (SKF) and square root Kalman (SRKF) filters. SRKF based on Cheolesky factorization for covariance matrix P. Simulations are performed on real data, with precisely known covariance’s to simulate mathematical stability, performance and processing time required by each method on a high end microprocessor. The results demonstrate integrated system using SRKF has better performance in stability and estimation accuracy than conventional and sequential filter.

  17. Organizational Readiness for Stage-Based Dynamics of Innovation Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, D. Dwayne

    2009-01-01

    Implementing innovations in social and health-related service programs is a dynamic stage-based process. This article discusses training, adoption, implementation, and practice as sequential elements of a conceptual framework for effective preparation and implementation of evidence-based innovations. However, systems need to be prepared for change…

  18. Treatment of mites folliculitis with an ornidazole-based sequential therapy

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yang; Sun, Yu-Jiao; Zhang, Li; Luan, Xiu-Li

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Treatment of Demodex infestations is often inadequate and associated with low effective rate. We sought to evaluate the efficacy of an ornidazole-based sequential therapy for mites folliculitis treatment. Methods: Two-hundred patients with mites folliculitis were sequentially treated with either an ornidazole- or metronidazole-based regimen. Sebum cutaneum was extruded from the sebaceous glands of each patient's nose and the presence of Demodex mites were examined by light microscopy. The clinical manifestations of relapse of mites folliculitis were recorded and the subjects were followed up at 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks post-treatment. Results: Patients treated with the ornidazole-based regimen showed an overall effective rate of 94.0%. Additionally, at the 2, 4, 8, and 12-week follow-up, these patients had significantly lower rates of Demodex mite relapse and new lesion occurrence compared with patients treated with the metronidazole-based regimen (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Sequential therapy using ornidazole, betamethasone, and recombinant bovine basic fibroblast growth factor (rbFGF) gel is highly effective for treating mites folliculitis. PMID:27399141

  19. Aliphatic and aromatic plant biopolymer dynamics in soil particles isolated from sequential density fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, B.; Filley, T.; Sollins, P.; Lajtha, K.; Swanston, C.; Kleber, M.; Kramer, M.

    2007-12-01

    A recent multi-layer-based soil organic matter-mineral interaction mechanistic model to describe the nature of soil organic matter-mineral surface mechanism for soil organic matter stabilization predicts that proteinaceous and aliphatic materials establish the core of strong binding-interactions upon which other organic matter is layered. A key methodology providing data underpinning this hypothesis is sequential density fractionation where soil is partitioned into particles of increasing density with the assumption that a partial control on organic matter distribution through density series is the thickness of its layering. Four soils of varying mineralogy and texture were investigated for their biopolymer, isotopic, and mineralogical properties. Light fractions (<1.8 g/cm3), although dominanted by organic detritus, did not always contain the highest concentration of lignin and substituted fatty acids from cutin and suberin while heavier fractions, 1.8-2.6 g/cm3, exhibited a progressive decrease in concentration in plant derived biopolymers with density. Extractable lignin phenols exhibited a progressive oxidation state with density. The concentration of biopolymers roughly mirrored the C:N ratio of soil particles which dropped consistently with increasing particle density. Although, in all soils, both lignin phenols and SFA concentration generally decreased with increasing density the ratio SFA/lignin varied with density and depending upon the soil. All soils, except the oxisol, exhibited an increase in SFA with respect to lignin suggesting a selective stabilization of those material with respect to lignin. In the oxisol, which showed little variation in its hematite dominated mineralogy across density, SFA/lignin remained constant, potentially indicating a greater capacity to stabilize lignin in that system. Interestingly, the lignin oxidation state increased with density in the oxisol. Given the variation in soil character, the consistency in these trends it

  20. Non-sequential structure-based alignments reveal topology-independent core packing arrangements in proteins.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xin; Bystroff, Christopher

    2005-04-01

    Proteins of the same class often share a secondary structure packing arrangement but differ in how the secondary structure units are ordered in the sequence. We find that proteins that share a common core also share local sequence-structure similarities, and these can be exploited to align structures with different topologies. In this study, segments from a library of local sequence-structure alignments were assembled hierarchically, enforcing the compactness and conserved inter-residue contacts but not sequential ordering. Previous structure-based alignment methods often ignore sequence similarity, local structural equivalence and compactness. The new program, SCALI (Structural Core ALIgnment), can efficiently find conserved packing arrangements, even if they are non-sequentially ordered in space. SCALI alignments conserve remote sequence similarity and contain fewer alignment errors. Clustering of our pairwise non-sequential alignments shows that recurrent packing arrangements exist in topologically different structures. For example, the three-layer sandwich domain architecture may be divided into four structural subclasses based on internal packing arrangements. These subclasses represent an intermediate level of structure classification, more general than topology, but more specific than architecture as defined in CATH. A strategy is presented for developing a set of predictive hidden Markov models based on multiple SCALI alignments.

  1. A deterministic sequential maximin Latin hypercube design method using successive local enumeration for metamodel-based optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Teng; Wu, Di; Chen, Xin; Guo, Xiaosong; Liu, Li

    2016-06-01

    Space-filling and projective properties of design of computer experiments methods are desired features for metamodelling. To enable the production of high-quality sequential samples, this article presents a novel deterministic sequential maximin Latin hypercube design (LHD) method using successive local enumeration, notated as sequential-successive local enumeration (S-SLE). First, a mesh-mapping algorithm is proposed to map the positions of existing points into the new hyper-chessboard to ensure the projective property. According to the maximin distance criterion, new sequential samples are generated through successive local enumeration iterations to improve the space-filling uniformity. Through a number of comparative studies, several appealing merits of S-SLE are demonstrated: (1) S-SLE outperforms several existing LHD methods in terms of sequential sampling quality; (2) it is flexible and robust enough to produce high-quality multiple-stage sequential samples; and (3) the proposed method can improve the overall performance of sequential metamodel-based optimization algorithms. Thus, S-SLE is a promising sequential LHD method for metamodel-based optimization.

  2. An anomaly detection and isolation scheme with instance-based learning and sequential analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, T. S.; Garcia, H. E.

    2006-07-01

    This paper presents an online anomaly detection and isolation (FDI) technique using an instance-based learning method combined with a sequential change detection and isolation algorithm. The proposed method uses kernel density estimation techniques to build statistical models of the given empirical data (null hypothesis). The null hypothesis is associated with the set of alternative hypotheses modeling the abnormalities of the systems. A decision procedure involves a sequential change detection and isolation algorithm. Notably, the proposed method enjoys asymptotic optimality as the applied change detection and isolation algorithm is optimal in minimizing the worst mean detection/isolation delay for a given mean time before a false alarm or a false isolation. Applicability of this methodology is illustrated with redundant sensor data set and its performance. (authors)

  3. Development of new lipid-based paclitaxel nanoparticles using sequential simplex optimization.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiaowei; Mattingly, Cynthia A; Tseng, Michael; Cho, Moo; Adams, Val R; Mumper, Russell J

    2009-05-01

    The objective of these studies was to develop Cremophor-free lipid-based paclitaxel (PX) nanoparticle formulations prepared from warm microemulsion precursors. To identify and optimize new nanoparticles, experimental design was performed combining Taguchi array and sequential simplex optimization. The combination of Taguchi array and sequential simplex optimization efficiently directed the design of paclitaxel nanoparticles. Two optimized paclitaxel nanoparticles (NPs) were obtained: G78 NPs composed of glyceryl tridodecanoate (GT) and polyoxyethylene 20-stearyl ether (Brij 78), and BTM NPs composed of Miglyol 812, Brij 78, and d-alpha-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (TPGS). Both nanoparticles successfully entrapped paclitaxel at a final concentration of 150 microg/ml (over 6% drug loading) with particle sizes less than 200 nm and over 85% of entrapment efficiency. These novel paclitaxel nanoparticles were stable at 4 degrees C over five months and in PBS at 37 degrees C over 102 h as measured by physical stability. Release of paclitaxel was slow and sustained without initial burst release. Cytotoxicity studies in MDA-MB-231 cancer cells showed that both nanoparticles have similar anticancer activities compared to Taxol. Interestingly, PX BTM nanocapsules could be lyophilized without cryoprotectants. The lyophilized powder comprised only of PX BTM NPs in water could be rapidly rehydrated with a complete retention of original physicochemical properties, in vitro release properties, and cytotoxicity profile. Sequential Simplex Optimization has been utilized to identify promising new lipid-based paclitaxel nanoparticles having useful attributes.

  4. Devaluation and sequential decisions: linking goal-directed and model-based behavior

    PubMed Central

    Friedel, Eva; Koch, Stefan P.; Wendt, Jean; Heinz, Andreas; Deserno, Lorenz; Schlagenhauf, Florian

    2014-01-01

    In experimental psychology different experiments have been developed to assess goal–directed as compared to habitual control over instrumental decisions. Similar to animal studies selective devaluation procedures have been used. More recently sequential decision-making tasks have been designed to assess the degree of goal-directed vs. habitual choice behavior in terms of an influential computational theory of model-based compared to model-free behavioral control. As recently suggested, different measurements are thought to reflect the same construct. Yet, there has been no attempt to directly assess the construct validity of these different measurements. In the present study, we used a devaluation paradigm and a sequential decision-making task to address this question of construct validity in a sample of 18 healthy male human participants. Correlational analysis revealed a positive association between model-based choices during sequential decisions and goal-directed behavior after devaluation suggesting a single framework underlying both operationalizations and speaking in favor of construct validity of both measurement approaches. Up to now, this has been merely assumed but never been directly tested in humans. PMID:25136310

  5. Devaluation and sequential decisions: linking goal-directed and model-based behavior.

    PubMed

    Friedel, Eva; Koch, Stefan P; Wendt, Jean; Heinz, Andreas; Deserno, Lorenz; Schlagenhauf, Florian

    2014-01-01

    In experimental psychology different experiments have been developed to assess goal-directed as compared to habitual control over instrumental decisions. Similar to animal studies selective devaluation procedures have been used. More recently sequential decision-making tasks have been designed to assess the degree of goal-directed vs. habitual choice behavior in terms of an influential computational theory of model-based compared to model-free behavioral control. As recently suggested, different measurements are thought to reflect the same construct. Yet, there has been no attempt to directly assess the construct validity of these different measurements. In the present study, we used a devaluation paradigm and a sequential decision-making task to address this question of construct validity in a sample of 18 healthy male human participants. Correlational analysis revealed a positive association between model-based choices during sequential decisions and goal-directed behavior after devaluation suggesting a single framework underlying both operationalizations and speaking in favor of construct validity of both measurement approaches. Up to now, this has been merely assumed but never been directly tested in humans.

  6. Sequential multi-nuclide emission rate estimation method based on gamma dose rate measurement for nuclear emergency management.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaole; Raskob, Wolfgang; Landman, Claudia; Trybushnyi, Dmytro; Li, Yu

    2017-03-05

    In case of a nuclear accident, the source term is typically not known but extremely important for the assessment of the consequences to the affected population. Therefore the assessment of the potential source term is of uppermost importance for emergency response. A fully sequential method, derived from a regularized weighted least square problem, is proposed to reconstruct the emission and composition of a multiple-nuclide release using gamma dose rate measurement. The a priori nuclide ratios are incorporated into the background error covariance (BEC) matrix, which is dynamically augmented and sequentially updated. The negative estimations in the mathematical algorithm are suppressed by utilizing artificial zero-observations (with large uncertainties) to simultaneously update the state vector and BEC. The method is evaluated by twin experiments based on the JRodos system. The results indicate that the new method successfully reconstructs the emission and its uncertainties. Accurate a priori ratio accelerates the analysis process, which obtains satisfactory results with only limited number of measurements, otherwise it needs more measurements to generate reasonable estimations. The suppression of negative estimation effectively improves the performance, especially for the situation with poor a priori information, where it is more prone to the generation of negative values. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The sequential encoding of competing action goals involves dynamic restructuring of motor plans in working memory.

    PubMed

    Gallivan, Jason P; Bowman, Natasha A R; Chapman, Craig S; Wolpert, Daniel M; Flanagan, J Randall

    2016-06-01

    Recent neural and behavioral findings provide support for the influential idea that in situations in which multiple action options are presented simultaneously, we prepare action plans for each competing option before deciding between and executing one of those plans. However, in natural, everyday environments, our available action options frequently change from one moment to the next, and there is often uncertainty as to whether additional options will become available before having to select a particular course of action. Here, with the use of a target-directed reaching task, we show that in this situation, the brain specifies a competing action for each new, sequentially presented potential target and that recently formed action plans can be revisited and updated so as to conform with separate, more newly developed, plans. These findings indicate that the brain forms labile motor plans for sequentially arising target options that can be flexibly restructured to accommodate new motor plans.

  8. Adaptive list sequential sampling method for population-based observational studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In population-based observational studies, non-participation and delayed response to the invitation to participate are complications that often arise during the recruitment of a sample. When both are not properly dealt with, the composition of the sample can be different from the desired composition. Inviting too many individuals or too few individuals from a particular subgroup could lead to unnecessary costs or decreased precision. Another problem is that there is frequently no or only partial information available about the willingness to participate. In this situation, we cannot adjust the recruitment procedure for non-participation before the recruitment period starts. Methods We have developed an adaptive list sequential sampling method that can deal with unknown participation probabilities and delayed responses to the invitation to participate in the study. In a sequential way, we evaluate whether we should invite a person from the population or not. During this evaluation, we correct for the fact that this person could decline to participate using an estimated participation probability. We use the information from all previously invited persons to estimate the participation probabilities for the non-evaluated individuals. Results The simulations showed that the adaptive list sequential sampling method can be used to estimate the participation probability during the recruitment period, and that it can successfully recruit a sample with a specific composition. Conclusions The adaptive list sequential sampling method can successfully recruit a sample with a specific desired composition when we have partial or no information about the willingness to participate before we start the recruitment period and when individuals may have a delayed response to the invitation. PMID:24965316

  9. Robust bronchoscope motion tracking using sequential Monte Carlo methods in navigated bronchoscopy: dynamic phantom and patient validation.

    PubMed

    Luó, Xióngbiāo; Feuerstein, Marco; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Mori, Kensaku

    2012-05-01

    Accurate and robust estimates of camera position and orientation in a bronchoscope are required for navigation. Fusion of pre-interventional information (e.g., CT, MRI, or US) and intra-interventional information (e.g., bronchoscopic video) were incorporated into a navigation system to provide physicians with an augmented reality environment for bronchoscopic interventions. Two approaches were used to predict bronchoscope movements by incorporating sequential Monte Carlo (SMC) simulation including (1) image-based tracking techniques and (2) electromagnetic tracking (EMT) methods. SMC simulation was introduced to model ambiguities or uncertainties that occurred in image- and EMT-based bronchoscope tracking. Scale invariant feature transform (SIFT) features were employed to overcome the limitations of image-based motion tracking methods. Validation was performed on five phantom and ten human case datasets acquired in the supine position. For dynamic phantom validation, the EMT-SMC simulation method improved the tracking performance of the successfully registered bronchoscopic video frames by 12.7% compared with a hybrid-based method. In comparisons between tracking results and ground truth, the accuracy of the EMT-SMC simulation method was 1.51 mm (positional error) and 5.44° (orientation error). During patient assessment, the SIFT-SMC simulation scheme was more stable or robust than a previous image-based approach for bronchoscope motion estimation, showing 23.6% improvement of successfully tracked frames. Comparing the estimates of our method to ground truth, the position and orientation errors are 3.72 mm and 10.2°, while those of our previous image-based method were at least 7.77 mm and 19.3°. The computational times of our EMT- and SIFT-SMC simulation methods were 0.9 and 1.2 s per frame, respectively. The SMC simulation method was developed to model ambiguities that occur in bronchoscope tracking. This method more stably and accurately predicts the

  10. Precise Sequential DNA Ligation on A Solid Substrate: Solid-Based Rapid Sequential Ligation of Multiple DNA Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Takita, Eiji; Kohda, Katsunori; Tomatsu, Hajime; Hanano, Shigeru; Moriya, Kanami; Hosouchi, Tsutomu; Sakurai, Nozomu; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Shinmyo, Atsuhiko; Shibata, Daisuke

    2013-01-01

    Ligation, the joining of DNA fragments, is a fundamental procedure in molecular cloning and is indispensable to the production of genetically modified organisms that can be used for basic research, the applied biosciences, or both. Given that many genes cooperate in various pathways, incorporating multiple gene cassettes in tandem in a transgenic DNA construct for the purpose of genetic modification is often necessary when generating organisms that produce multiple foreign gene products. Here, we describe a novel method, designated PRESSO (precise sequential DNA ligation on a solid substrate), for the tandem ligation of multiple DNA fragments. We amplified donor DNA fragments with non-palindromic ends, and ligated the fragment to acceptor DNA fragments on solid beads. After the final donor DNA fragments, which included vector sequences, were joined to the construct that contained the array of fragments, the ligation product (the construct) was thereby released from the beads via digestion with a rare-cut meganuclease; the freed linear construct was circularized via an intra-molecular ligation. PRESSO allowed us to rapidly and efficiently join multiple genes in an optimized order and orientation. This method can overcome many technical challenges in functional genomics during the post-sequencing generation. PMID:23897972

  11. Auditory-induced neural dynamics in sensory-motor circuitry predict learned temporal and sequential statistics of birdsong

    PubMed Central

    Bouchard, Kristofer E.; Brainard, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Predicting future events is a critical computation for both perception and behavior. Despite the essential nature of this computation, there are few studies demonstrating neural activity that predicts specific events in learned, probabilistic sequences. Here, we test the hypotheses that the dynamics of internally generated neural activity are predictive of future events and are structured by the learned temporal–sequential statistics of those events. We recorded neural activity in Bengalese finch sensory-motor area HVC in response to playback of sequences from individuals’ songs, and examined the neural activity that continued after stimulus offset. We found that the strength of response to a syllable in the sequence depended on the delay at which that syllable was played, with a maximal response when the delay matched the intersyllable gap normally present for that specific syllable during song production. Furthermore, poststimulus neural activity induced by sequence playback resembled the neural response to the next syllable in the sequence when that syllable was predictable, but not when the next syllable was uncertain. Our results demonstrate that the dynamics of internally generated HVC neural activity are predictive of the learned temporal–sequential structure of produced song and that the strength of this prediction is modulated by uncertainty. PMID:27506786

  12. Sequential dynamic artificial neural network modeling of a full-scale coking wastewater treatment plant with fluidized bed reactors.

    PubMed

    Ou, Hua-Se; Wei, Chao-Hai; Wu, Hai-Zhen; Mo, Ce-Hui; He, Bao-Yan

    2015-10-01

    This study proposed a sequential modeling approach using an artificial neural network (ANN) to develop four independent models which were able to predict biotreatment effluent variables of a full-scale coking wastewater treatment plant (CWWTP). Suitable structure and transfer function of ANN were optimized by genetic algorithm. The sequential approach, which included two parts, an influent estimator and an effluent predictor, was used to develop dynamic models. The former parts of models estimated the variations of influent COD, volatile phenol, cyanide, and NH4 (+)-N. The later parts of models predicted effluent COD, volatile phenol, cyanide, and NH4 (+)-N using the estimated values and other parameters. The performance of these models was evaluated by statistical parameters (such as coefficient of determination (R (2) ), etc.). Obtained results indicated that the estimator developed dynamic models for influent COD (R (2)  = 0.871), volatile phenol (R (2)  = 0.904), cyanide (R (2)  = 0.846), and NH4 (+)-N (R (2)  = 0.777), while the predictor developed feasible models for effluent COD (R (2)  = 0.852) and cyanide (R (2)  = 0.844), with slightly worse models for effluent volatile phenol (R (2)  = 0.752) and NH4 (+)-N (R (2)  = 0.764). Thus, the proposed modeling processes can be used as a tool for the prediction of CWWTP performance.

  13. Portable sequential multicolor thermal imager based on a MCT 384 x 288 focal plane array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breiter, Rainer; Cabanski, Wolfgang A.; Mauk, Karl-Heinz; Rode, Werner; Ziegler, Johann

    2001-10-01

    AIM has developed a sequential multicolor thermal imager to provide customers with a test system to realize real-time spectral selective thermal imaging. In contrast to existing PC based laboratory units, the system is miniaturized with integrated signal processing like non-uniformity correction and post processing functions such as image subtraction of different colors to allow field tests in military applications like detection of missile plumes or camouflaged targets as well as commercial applications like detection of chemical agents, pollution control, etc. The detection module used is a 384 X 288 mercury cadmium telluride (MCT) focal plane array (FPA) available in the mid wave (MWIR) or long wave spectral band LWIR). A compact command and control electronics (CCE) provides clock and voltage supply for the detector as well as 14 bit deep digital conversion of the analog detector output. A continuous rotating wheel with four facets for filters provides spectral selectivity. The customer can choose between various types of filter characteristics, e.g. a 4.2 micrometer bandpass filter for CO2 detection in the MWIR band. The rotating wheel can be synchronized to an external source giving the rotation speed, typical 25 l/s. A position sensor generates the four frame start signals for synchronous operation of the detector -- 100 Hz framerate for the four frames per rotation. The rotating wheel is exchangeable for different configurations and also plates for a microscanner operation to improve geometrical resolution are available instead of a multicolor operation. AIM's programmable MVIP image processing unit is used for signal processing like non- uniformity correction and controlling the detector parameters. The MVIP allows to output the four subsequent images as four quarters of the video screen to prior to any observation task set the integration time for each color individually for comparable performance in each spectral color and after that also to determine

  14. Bayesian Nonparametric Estimation for Dynamic Treatment Regimes with Sequential Transition Times.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanxun; Müller, Peter; Wahed, Abdus S; Thall, Peter F

    2016-01-01

    We analyze a dataset arising from a clinical trial involving multi-stage chemotherapy regimes for acute leukemia. The trial design was a 2 × 2 factorial for frontline therapies only. Motivated by the idea that subsequent salvage treatments affect survival time, we model therapy as a dynamic treatment regime (DTR), that is, an alternating sequence of adaptive treatments or other actions and transition times between disease states. These sequences may vary substantially between patients, depending on how the regime plays out. To evaluate the regimes, mean overall survival time is expressed as a weighted average of the means of all possible sums of successive transitions times. We assume a Bayesian nonparametric survival regression model for each transition time, with a dependent Dirichlet process prior and Gaussian process base measure (DDP-GP). Posterior simulation is implemented by Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling. We provide general guidelines for constructing a prior using empirical Bayes methods. The proposed approach is compared with inverse probability of treatment weighting, including a doubly robust augmented version of this approach, for both single-stage and multi-stage regimes with treatment assignment depending on baseline covariates. The simulations show that the proposed nonparametric Bayesian approach can substantially improve inference compared to existing methods. An R program for implementing the DDP-GP-based Bayesian nonparametric analysis is freely available at https://www.ma.utexas.edu/users/yxu/.

  15. Efficient sequential and parallel algorithms for finding edit distance based motifs.

    PubMed

    Pal, Soumitra; Xiao, Peng; Rajasekaran, Sanguthevar

    2016-08-18

    Motif search is an important step in extracting meaningful patterns from biological data. The general problem of motif search is intractable and there is a pressing need to develop efficient, exact and approximation algorithms to solve this problem. In this paper, we present several novel, exact, sequential and parallel algorithms for solving the (l,d) Edit-distance-based Motif Search (EMS) problem: given two integers l,d and n biological strings, find all strings of length l that appear in each input string with atmost d errors of types substitution, insertion and deletion. One popular technique to solve the problem is to explore for each input string the set of all possible l-mers that belong to the d-neighborhood of any substring of the input string and output those which are common for all input strings. We introduce a novel and provably efficient neighborhood exploration technique. We show that it is enough to consider the candidates in neighborhood which are at a distance exactly d. We compactly represent these candidate motifs using wildcard characters and efficiently explore them with very few repetitions. Our sequential algorithm uses a trie based data structure to efficiently store and sort the candidate motifs. Our parallel algorithm in a multi-core shared memory setting uses arrays for storing and a novel modification of radix-sort for sorting the candidate motifs. The algorithms for EMS are customarily evaluated on several challenging instances such as (8,1), (12,2), (16,3), (20,4), and so on. The best previously known algorithm, EMS1, is sequential and in estimated 3 days solves up to instance (16,3). Our sequential algorithms are more than 20 times faster on (16,3). On other hard instances such as (9,2), (11,3), (13,4), our algorithms are much faster. Our parallel algorithm has more than 600 % scaling performance while using 16 threads. Our algorithms have pushed up the state-of-the-art of EMS solvers and we believe that the techniques introduced in

  16. Exposure assessment of mobile phone base station radiation in an outdoor environment using sequential surrogate modeling.

    PubMed

    Aerts, Sam; Deschrijver, Dirk; Joseph, Wout; Verloock, Leen; Goeminne, Francis; Martens, Luc; Dhaene, Tom

    2013-05-01

    Human exposure to background radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) has been increasing with the introduction of new technologies. There is a definite need for the quantification of RF-EMF exposure but a robust exposure assessment is not yet possible, mainly due to the lack of a fast and efficient measurement procedure. In this article, a new procedure is proposed for accurately mapping the exposure to base station radiation in an outdoor environment based on surrogate modeling and sequential design, an entirely new approach in the domain of dosimetry for human RF exposure. We tested our procedure in an urban area of about 0.04 km(2) for Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) technology at 900 MHz (GSM900) using a personal exposimeter. Fifty measurement locations were sufficient to obtain a coarse street exposure map, locating regions of high and low exposure; 70 measurement locations were sufficient to characterize the electric field distribution in the area and build an accurate predictive interpolation model. Hence, accurate GSM900 downlink outdoor exposure maps (for use in, e.g., governmental risk communication and epidemiological studies) are developed by combining the proven efficiency of sequential design with the speed of exposimeter measurements and their ease of handling.

  17. Thiacalix[4]arene based reconfigurable molecular switches: set-reset memorized sequential device.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manoj; Kumar, Rajesh; Bhalla, Vandana

    2011-12-21

    The fluorescent chemosensors 3, 5 and 7 based on thiacalix[4]arene bearing naphthyl groups have been designed and synthesized. The optical chemosensor 3 based on a thiacalix[4]arene of cone conformation behaves as "turn-on" optical chemosensor for Fe(3+) and F(-) ions. However, chemosensors 5 and 7 based on a thiacalix[4]arene of 1,3-alternate conformation demonstrate "turn-on" optical behaviour for Hg(2+), F(-) ions (with receptor 5 as turn-on for K(+) ions also) and "turn-off" behaviour for Fe(3+) ions. The simultaneous presence of Fe(3+) and Hg(2+) or K(+) or F(-) ions results in formulation of reversible "on-off" switches. Various molecular logic gates developed in response to molecular switching between these chemical inputs have been integrated into sequential logic circuits with memory function in a feedback loop which mimics "set-reset" molecular level information processing device.

  18. Adaptive decision making in a dynamic environment: a test of a sequential sampling model of relative judgment.

    PubMed

    Vuckovic, Anita; Kwantes, Peter J; Neal, Andrew

    2013-09-01

    Research has identified a wide range of factors that influence performance in relative judgment tasks. However, the findings from this research have been inconsistent. Studies have varied with respect to the identification of causal variables and the perceptual and decision-making mechanisms underlying performance. Drawing on the ecological rationality approach, we present a theory of the judgment and decision-making processes involved in a relative judgment task that explains how people judge a stimulus and adapt their decision process to accommodate their own uncertainty associated with those judgments. Undergraduate participants performed a simulated air traffic control conflict detection task. Across two experiments, we systematically manipulated variables known to affect performance. In the first experiment, we manipulated the relative distances of aircraft to a common destination while holding aircraft speeds constant. In a follow-up experiment, we introduced a direct manipulation of relative speed. We then fit a sequential sampling model to the data, and used the best fitting parameters to infer the decision-making processes responsible for performance. Findings were consistent with the theory that people adapt to their own uncertainty by adjusting their criterion and the amount of time they take to collect evidence in order to make a more accurate decision. From a practical perspective, the paper demonstrates that one can use a sequential sampling model to understand performance in a dynamic environment, allowing one to make sense of and interpret complex patterns of empirical findings that would otherwise be difficult to interpret using standard statistical analyses.

  19. Complexity-Measure-Based Sequential Hypothesis Testing for Real-Time Detection of Lethal Cardiac Arrhythmias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Szi-Wen

    2006-12-01

    A novel approach that employs a complexity-based sequential hypothesis testing (SHT) technique for real-time detection of ventricular fibrillation (VF) and ventricular tachycardia (VT) is presented. A dataset consisting of a number of VF and VT electrocardiogram (ECG) recordings drawn from the MIT-BIH database was adopted for such an analysis. It was split into two smaller datasets for algorithm training and testing, respectively. Each ECG recording was measured in a 10-second interval. For each recording, a number of overlapping windowed ECG data segments were obtained by shifting a 5-second window by a step of 1 second. During the windowing process, the complexity measure (CM) value was calculated for each windowed segment and the task of pattern recognition was then sequentially performed by the SHT procedure. A preliminary test conducted using the database produced optimal overall predictive accuracy of[InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.]. The algorithm was also implemented on a commercial embedded DSP controller, permitting a hardware realization of real-time ventricular arrhythmia detection.

  20. Connectivity constraint-based sequential pattern extraction from Satellite Image Time Series (SITS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julea, Andreea; Méger, Nicolas

    2013-10-01

    The temporal evolution of pixel values in Satellite Image Time Series (SITS) is considered as criterion for the characterization, discrimination and identification of terrestrial objects and phenomena. Due to the exponential behavior of sequences number with specialization, Sequential Data Mining (SDM) techniques need to be applied. The huge search and solution spaces imply the use of constraints according to the user's knowledge, interest and expectation. The spatial aspect of the data was taken into account by the introduction of connectivity measures that characterize the pixels tendency to form objects. These measures can highlight stratifications in data structure, can be useful for shape recognition and offer a base for post-processing operations similar to those from mathematical morphology (dilation, erosion etc.). The conjunction of corresponding Connectivity Constraints (CC) with the Support Constraint (SC) leads to the extraction of Grouped Frequent Sequential Patterns (GFSP), a concept with proved capability for preliminary description and localization of terrestrial events. This work is focused on efficient SITS extraction of evolutions that fulfill SC and CC. Different types of extractions using anti-monotone constraints are analyzed. Experiments performed on two interferometric SITS are used to illustrate the potential of the approach to find interesting evolution patterns.

  1. Sequential Fuzzy Diagnosis Method for Motor Roller Bearing in Variable Operating Conditions Based on Vibration Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ke; Ping, Xueliang; Wang, Huaqing; Chen, Peng; Cao, Yi

    2013-01-01

    A novel intelligent fault diagnosis method for motor roller bearings which operate under unsteady rotating speed and load is proposed in this paper. The pseudo Wigner-Ville distribution (PWVD) and the relative crossing information (RCI) methods are used for extracting the feature spectra from the non-stationary vibration signal measured for condition diagnosis. The RCI is used to automatically extract the feature spectrum from the time-frequency distribution of the vibration signal. The extracted feature spectrum is instantaneous, and not correlated with the rotation speed and load. By using the ant colony optimization (ACO) clustering algorithm, the synthesizing symptom parameters (SSP) for condition diagnosis are obtained. The experimental results shows that the diagnostic sensitivity of the SSP is higher than original symptom parameter (SP), and the SSP can sensitively reflect the characteristics of the feature spectrum for precise condition diagnosis. Finally, a fuzzy diagnosis method based on sequential inference and possibility theory is also proposed, by which the conditions of the machine can be identified sequentially as well. PMID:23793021

  2. Sequential document visualization.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yi; Dillon, Joshua; Lebanon, Guy

    2007-01-01

    Documents and other categorical valued time series are often characterized by the frequencies of short range sequential patterns such as n-grams. This representation converts sequential data of varying lengths to high dimensional histogram vectors which are easily modeled by standard statistical models. Unfortunately, the histogram representation ignores most of the medium and long range sequential dependencies making it unsuitable for visualizing sequential data. We present a novel framework for sequential visualization of discrete categorical time series based on the idea of local statistical modeling. The framework embeds categorical time series as smooth curves in the multinomial simplex summarizing the progression of sequential trends. We discuss several visualization techniques based on the above framework and demonstrate their usefulness for document visualization.

  3. Computing by Robust Transience: How the Fronto-Parietal Network Performs Sequential, Category-Based Decisions.

    PubMed

    Chaisangmongkon, Warasinee; Swaminathan, Sruthi K; Freedman, David J; Wang, Xiao-Jing

    2017-03-22

    Decision making involves dynamic interplay between internal judgements and external perception, which has been investigated in delayed match-to-category (DMC) experiments. Our analysis of neural recordings shows that, during DMC tasks, LIP and PFC neurons demonstrate mixed, time-varying, and heterogeneous selectivity, but previous theoretical work has not established the link between these neural characteristics and population-level computations. We trained a recurrent network model to perform DMC tasks and found that the model can remarkably reproduce key features of neuronal selectivity at the single-neuron and population levels. Analysis of the trained networks elucidates that robust transient trajectories of the neural population are the key driver of sequential categorical decisions. The directions of trajectories are governed by network self-organized connectivity, defining a "neural landscape" consisting of a task-tailored arrangement of slow states and dynamical tunnels. With this model, we can identify functionally relevant circuit motifs and generalize the framework to solve other categorization tasks.

  4. Computing by robust transience: How the fronto-parietal network performs sequential category-based decisions

    PubMed Central

    Chaisangmongkon, Warasinee; Swaminathan, Sruthi K.; Freedman, David J.; Wang, Xiao-Jing

    2017-01-01

    Summary Decision making involves dynamic interplay between internal judgements and external perception, which has been investigated in delayed match-to-category (DMC) experiments. Our analysis of neural recordings shows that, during DMC tasks, LIP and PFC neurons demonstrate mixed, time-varying, and heterogeneous selectivity, but previous theoretical work has not established the link between these neural characteristics and population-level computations. We trained a recurrent network model to perform DMC tasks and found that the model can remarkably reproduce key features of neuronal selectivity at the single-neuron and population levels. Analysis of the trained networks elucidates that robust transient trajectories of the neural population are the key driver of sequential categorical decisions. The directions of trajectories are governed by network self-organized connectivity, defining a ‘neural landscape’, consisting of a task-tailored arrangement of slow states and dynamical tunnels. With this model, we can identify functionally-relevant circuit motifs and generalize the framework to solve other categorization tasks. PMID:28334612

  5. Sequentially aerated membrane biofilm reactors for autotrophic nitrogen removal: microbial community composition and dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Pellicer-Nàcher, Carles; Franck, Stéphanie; Gülay, Arda; Ruscalleda, Maël; Terada, Akihiko; Al-Soud, Waleed Abu; Hansen, Martin Asser; Sørensen, Søren J; Smets, Barth F

    2014-01-01

    Membrane-aerated biofilm reactors performing autotrophic nitrogen removal can be successfully applied to treat concentrated nitrogen streams. However, their process performance is seriously hampered by the growth of nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB). In this work we document how sequential aeration can bring the rapid and long-term suppression of NOB and the onset of the activity of anaerobic ammonium oxidizing bacteria (AnAOB). Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses confirmed that such shift in performance was mirrored by a change in population densities, with a very drastic reduction of the NOB Nitrospira and Nitrobacter and a 10-fold increase in AnAOB numbers. The study of biofilm sections with relevant 16S rRNA fluorescent probes revealed strongly stratified biofilm structures fostering aerobic ammonium oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in biofilm areas close to the membrane surface (rich in oxygen) and AnAOB in regions neighbouring the liquid phase. Both communities were separated by a transition region potentially populated by denitrifying heterotrophic bacteria. AOB and AnAOB bacterial groups were more abundant and diverse than NOB, and dominated by the r-strategists Nitrosomonas europaea and Ca. Brocadia anammoxidans, respectively. Taken together, the present work presents tools to better engineer, monitor and control the microbial communities that support robust, sustainable and efficient nitrogen removal. PMID:24112350

  6. Study of sequential optimal control algorithm smart isolation structure based on Simulink-S function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaohuan; Liu, Yanhui

    2017-01-01

    The study of this paper focuses on smart isolation structure, a method for realizing structural vibration control by using Simulink simulation is proposed according to the proposed sequential optimal control algorithm. In the Simulink simulation environment, A smart isolation structure is used to compare the control effect of three algorithms, i.e., classical optimal control algorithm, linear quadratic gaussian control algorithm and sequential optimal control algorithm under the condition of sensor contaminated with noise. Simulation results show that this method can be applied to the simulation of sequential optimal control algorithm and the proposed sequential optimal control algorithm has a good ability of resisting the noise and better control efficiency.

  7. Regeneration of strong-base anion-exchange resins by sequential chemical displacement

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Gilbert M.; Gu, Baohua; Moyer, Bruce A.; Bonnesen, Peter V.

    2002-01-01

    A method for regenerating strong-base anion exchange resins utilizing a sequential chemical displacement technique with new regenerant formulation. The new first regenerant solution is composed of a mixture of ferric chloride, a water-miscible organic solvent, hydrochloric acid, and water in which tetrachloroferrate anion is formed and used to displace the target anions on the resin. The second regenerant is composed of a dilute hydrochloric acid and is used to decompose tetrachloroferrate and elute ferric ions, thereby regenerating the resin. Alternative chemical displacement methods include: (1) displacement of target anions with fluoroborate followed by nitrate or salicylate and (2) displacement of target anions with salicylate followed by dilute hydrochloric acid. The methodology offers an improved regeneration efficiency, recovery, and waste minimization over the conventional displacement technique using sodium chloride (or a brine) or alkali metal hydroxide.

  8. An Improved GPS/RFID Integration Method Based on Sequential Iterated Reduced Sigma Point Kalman Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jing; Wu, Falin; Zhu, Ming; Wang, Feixue; Zhang, Kefei

    In this paper, an improved GPS/RFID integration method based on Sequential Iterated Reduced Sigma Point Kalman Filter (SIRSPKF) is proposed for vehicle navigation applications. It is applied to improve the accuracy, reliability and availability of satellite positioning in the areas where the satellite visibility is limited. An RFID system is employed to assist the GPS system in achieving high accuracy positioning. Further, to reduce the measurement noise and decrease the computational complexity caused by the integrated GPS/RFID, SIRSPKF is investigated as the dominant filter for the proposed integration. Performances and computational complexities of different integration scenarios with different filters are compared in this paper. A field experiment shows that both accuracy and availability of positioning can be improved significantly by this low-cost GPS/RFID integration method with the reduced computational load.

  9. Sequential Model Selection based Segmentation to Detect DNA Copy Number Variation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jianhua; Zhang, Liwen; Wang, Huixia Judy

    2016-01-01

    Summary Array-based CGH experiments are designed to detect genomic aberrations or regions of DNA copy-number variation that are associated with an outcome, typically a state of disease. Most of the existing statistical methods target on detecting DNA copy number variations in a single sample or array. We focus on the detection of group effect variation, through simultaneous study of multiple samples from multiple groups. Rather than using direct segmentation or smoothing techniques, as commonly seen in existing detection methods, we develop a sequential model selection procedure that is guided by a modified Bayesian information criterion. This approach improves detection accuracy by accumulatively utilizing information across contiguous clones, and has computational advantage over the existing popular detection methods. Our empirical investigation suggests that the performance of the proposed method is superior to that of the existing detection methods, in particular, in detecting small segments or separating neighboring segments with differential degrees of copy-number variation. PMID:26954760

  10. A sequential procedure for implementing a computer-based information system.

    PubMed

    Aldrich, D S; Helbig, L C

    1986-09-01

    A sequential procedure is presented for the foodservice manager to follow when considering initial implementation of a computer-based information system (CBIS). A feasibility study is recommended as a first step to analyze the information desired and resources available in order to determine objectives of the proposed CBIS. Alternative CBIS design plans should then be evaluated against critical success factors to determine the direction of initial CBIS efforts. Application software, which provides needed support, then determines the hardware needed. Information about vendors and the suitability of the CBIS to meet needs should be determined next. The following management procedures are suggested: utilization of project management skills, identification of roles for the project team members, and initiation of a phased implementation strategy. Finally, to ensure control of the CBIS project, evaluation and documentation are advised.

  11. Two-stage group sequential robust tests in family-based association studies: controlling type I error.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lihan K; Zheng, Gang; Li, Zhaohai

    2008-07-01

    In family-based association studies, an optimal test statistic with asymptotic normal distribution is available when the underlying genetic model is known (e.g., recessive, additive, multiplicative, or dominant). In practice, however, genetic models for many complex diseases are usually unknown. Using a single test statistic optimal for one genetic model may lose substantial power when the model is mis-specified. When a family of genetic models is scientifically plausible, the maximum of several tests, each optimal for a specific genetic model, is robust against the model mis-specification. This robust test is preferred over a single optimal test. Recently, cost-effective group sequential approaches have been introduced to genetic studies. The group sequential approach allows interim analyses and has been applied to many test statistics, but not to the maximum statistic. When the group sequential method is applied, type I error should be controlled. We propose and compare several approaches of controlling type I error rates when group sequential analysis is conducted with the maximum test for family-based candidate-gene association studies. For a two-stage group sequential robust procedure with a single interim analysis, two critical values for the maximum tests are provided based on a given alpha spending function to control the desired overall type I error.

  12. Conversion of lignocellulosic biomass into its molecular components by sequential combination of organic acid and base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, Yu

    The primary objective of this research is to explore a new concept of converting lignocellulosic biomass into liquid organic products via hydrolysis by sequentially combining acid and base treatments. The concept was examined by studying two-step hydrolytic reactions of biomass (spruce) using oxialic acid (OA) and tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) at moderate reaction temperatures below 200 °C. Different selectivity of C-O bond cleavage of hemicellulose, cellulose, and lignin between the reactions with OA and TMAH was demonstrated, and the sequential combination of OA and TMAH treatments exhibited an enhancing effect on conversion of biomass, which proves the promise of the proposed concept. A similar enhancing effect of combination was further confirmed in the reactions with mineral acid and base. Interestingly, characterization of solid residue from reactions of biomass and further investigation of the reactions of commercial cellulose revealed that the A-B sequence (the first reaction with OA and the second with TMAH) enhanced the conversion of cellulose at the second step with TMAH. It was suggested from the NMR and XRD study of solid residues that this enhancement was caused by the reduction of crystallinity of cellulose by the first reaction with OA. This effect was shown to be an interesting feature of A-B treatment sequence for converting lignocellulosic biomass. To improve the yield of monomeric sugars, the effect of adding organic solvents to the system was also studied. No improvement on sugar yield was observed under the explored conditions. However, it was shown that some furans and phenols can be directly formed from the reactions of biomass in the binary solvent system, which may be beneficial for producing more value-added chemicals from biomass.

  13. Multi-atlas segmentation of the cartilage in knee MR images with sequential volume- and bone-mask-based registrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Han Sang; Kim, Hyeun A.; Kim, Hyeonjin; Hong, Helen; Yoon, Young Cheol; Kim, Junmo

    2016-03-01

    In spite of its clinical importance in diagnosis of osteoarthritis, segmentation of cartilage in knee MRI remains a challenging task due to its shape variability and low contrast with surrounding soft tissues and synovial fluid. In this paper, we propose a multi-atlas segmentation of cartilage in knee MRI with sequential atlas registrations and locallyweighted voting (LWV). First, bone is segmented by sequential volume- and object-based registrations and LWV. Second, to overcome the shape variability of cartilage, cartilage is segmented by bone-mask-based registration and LWV. In experiments, the proposed method improved the bone segmentation by reducing misclassified bone region, and enhanced the cartilage segmentation by preventing cartilage leakage into surrounding similar intensity region, with the help of sequential registrations and LWV.

  14. An automatic system for acidity determination based on sequential injection titration and the monosegmented flow approach.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Joanna; Wójtowicz, Marzena; Gawenda, Nadzieja; Kościelniak, Paweł

    2011-06-15

    An automatic sequential injection system, combining monosegmented flow analysis, sequential injection analysis and sequential injection titration is proposed for acidity determination. The system enables controllable sample dilution and generation of standards of required concentration in a monosegmented sequential injection manner, sequential injection titration of the prepared solutions, data collecting, and handling. It has been tested on spectrophotometric determination of acetic, citric and phosphoric acids with sodium hydroxide used as a titrant and phenolphthalein or thymolphthalein (in the case of phosphoric acid determination) as indicators. Accuracy better than |4.4|% (RE) and repeatability better than 2.9% (RSD) have been obtained. It has been applied to the determination of total acidity in vinegars and various soft drinks. The system provides low sample (less than 0.3 mL) consumption. On average, analysis of a sample takes several minutes.

  15. PredSTP: a highly accurate SVM based model to predict sequential cystine stabilized peptides.

    PubMed

    Islam, S M Ashiqul; Sajed, Tanvir; Kearney, Christopher Michel; Baker, Erich J

    2015-07-05

    Numerous organisms have evolved a wide range of toxic peptides for self-defense and predation. Their effective interstitial and macro-environmental use requires energetic and structural stability. One successful group of these peptides includes a tri-disulfide domain arrangement that offers toxicity and high stability. Sequential tri-disulfide connectivity variants create highly compact disulfide folds capable of withstanding a variety of environmental stresses. Their combination of toxicity and stability make these peptides remarkably valuable for their potential as bio-insecticides, antimicrobial peptides and peptide drug candidates. However, the wide sequence variation, sources and modalities of group members impose serious limitations on our ability to rapidly identify potential members. As a result, there is a need for automated high-throughput member classification approaches that leverage their demonstrated tertiary and functional homology. We developed an SVM-based model to predict sequential tri-disulfide peptide (STP) toxins from peptide sequences. One optimized model, called PredSTP, predicted STPs from training set with sensitivity, specificity, precision, accuracy and a Matthews correlation coefficient of 94.86%, 94.11%, 84.31%, 94.30% and 0.86, respectively, using 200 fold cross validation. The same model outperforms existing prediction approaches in three independent out of sample testsets derived from PDB. PredSTP can accurately identify a wide range of cystine stabilized peptide toxins directly from sequences in a species-agnostic fashion. The ability to rapidly filter sequences for potential bioactive peptides can greatly compress the time between peptide identification and testing structural and functional properties for possible antimicrobial and insecticidal candidates. A web interface is freely available to predict STP toxins from http://crick.ecs.baylor.edu/.

  16. Quantifying Subpopulation Synergy for Antibiotic Combinations via Mechanism-Based Modeling and a Sequential Dosing Design

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Neang S.; Xu, Hongmei; Tsuji, Brian T.

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative modeling of combination therapy can describe the effects of each antibiotic against multiple bacterial populations. Our aim was to develop an efficient experimental and modeling strategy that evaluates different synergy mechanisms using a rapidly killing peptide antibiotic (nisin) combined with amikacin or linezolid as probe drugs. Serial viable counts over 48 h were obtained in time-kill experiments with all three antibiotics in monotherapy against a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus USA300 strain (inoculum, 108 CFU/ml). A sequential design (initial dosing of 8 or 32 mg/liter nisin, switched to amikacin or linezolid at 1.5 h) assessed the rate of killing by amikacin and linezolid against nisin-intermediate and nisin-resistant populations. Simultaneous combinations were additionally studied and all viable count profiles comodeled in S-ADAPT and NONMEM. A mechanism-based model with six populations (three for nisin times two for amikacin) yielded unbiased and precise (r = 0.99, slope = 1.00; S-ADAPT) individual fits. The second-order killing rate constants for nisin against the three populations were 5.67, 0.0664, and 0.00691 liter/(mg · h). For amikacin, the maximum killing rate constants were 10.1 h−1 against its susceptible and 0.771 h−1 against its less-susceptible populations, with 14.7 mg/liter amikacin causing half-maximal killing. After incorporating the effects of nisin and amikacin against each population, no additional synergy function was needed. Linezolid inhibited successful bacterial replication but did not efficiently kill populations less susceptible to nisin. Nisin plus amikacin achieved subpopulation synergy. The proposed sequential and simultaneous dosing design offers an efficient approach to quantitatively characterize antibiotic synergy over time and prospectively evaluate antibiotic combination dosing strategies. PMID:23478962

  17. Sequential injection redox or acid-base titration for determination of ascorbic acid or acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Lenghor, Narong; Jakmunee, Jaroon; Vilen, Michael; Sara, Rolf; Christian, Gary D; Grudpan, Kate

    2002-12-06

    Two sequential injection titration systems with spectrophotometric detection have been developed. The first system for determination of ascorbic acid was based on redox reaction between ascorbic acid and permanganate in an acidic medium and lead to a decrease in color intensity of permanganate, monitored at 525 nm. A linear dependence of peak area obtained with ascorbic acid concentration up to 1200 mg l(-1) was achieved. The relative standard deviation for 11 replicate determinations of 400 mg l(-1) ascorbic acid was 2.9%. The second system, for acetic acid determination, was based on acid-base titration of acetic acid with sodium hydroxide using phenolphthalein as an indicator. The decrease in color intensity of the indicator was proportional to the acid content. A linear calibration graph in the range of 2-8% w v(-1) of acetic acid with a relative standard deviation of 4.8% (5.0% w v(-1) acetic acid, n=11) was obtained. Sample throughputs of 60 h(-1) were achieved for both systems. The systems were successfully applied for the assays of ascorbic acid in vitamin C tablets and acetic acid content in vinegars, respectively.

  18. Design of reversible sequential circuits using electro-optic effect of lithium-niobate-based Mach-Zehnder interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Santosh; Chauhan, Chanderkanta; Bedi, Amna

    2016-12-01

    In recent years, it has been shown that reversible logic can play an important role in power optimization for computer design. The various reversible logic gates such as Feynman, Fredkin, Peres, and Toffoli gates have been discussed by researchers, but very little work has been done on reversible sequential circuits. Design of reversible sequential circuits using lithium-niobate-based Mach-Zehnder interferometers is proposed. Here, flip-flops are designed with the help of basic reversible logic gates such as Feynman, Fredkin, and Peres gates. Theoretical descriptions along with mathematical formulation of the devices are provided. The devices are also analyzed through finite difference-beam propagation method and MATLAB® simulation.

  19. Robust sequential working memory recall in heterogeneous cognitive networks

    PubMed Central

    Rabinovich, Mikhail I.; Sokolov, Yury; Kozma, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Psychiatric disorders are often caused by partial heterogeneous disinhibition in cognitive networks, controlling sequential and spatial working memory (SWM). Such dynamic connectivity changes suggest that the normal relationship between the neuronal components within the network deteriorates. As a result, competitive network dynamics is qualitatively altered. This dynamics defines the robust recall of the sequential information from memory and, thus, the SWM capacity. To understand pathological and non-pathological bifurcations of the sequential memory dynamics, here we investigate the model of recurrent inhibitory-excitatory networks with heterogeneous inhibition. We consider the ensemble of units with all-to-all inhibitory connections, in which the connection strengths are monotonically distributed at some interval. Based on computer experiments and studying the Lyapunov exponents, we observed and analyzed the new phenomenon—clustered sequential dynamics. The results are interpreted in the context of the winnerless competition principle. Accordingly, clustered sequential dynamics is represented in the phase space of the model by two weakly interacting quasi-attractors. One of them is similar to the sequential heteroclinic chain—the regular image of SWM, while the other is a quasi-chaotic attractor. Coexistence of these quasi-attractors means that the recall of the normal information sequence is intermittently interrupted by episodes with chaotic dynamics. We indicate potential dynamic ways for augmenting damaged working memory and other cognitive functions. PMID:25452717

  20. A sequential co-extraction method for DNA, RNA and protein recovery from soil for future system-based approaches.

    PubMed

    Gunnigle, Eoin; Ramond, Jean-Baptiste; Frossard, Aline; Seeley, Mary; Cowan, Don

    2014-08-01

    A co-extraction protocol that sequentially isolates core biopolymer fractions (DNA, RNA, protein) from edaphic microbial communities is presented. In order to confirm compatibility with downstream analyses, bacterial T-RFLP profiles were generated from the DNA- and RNA-derived fractions of an arid-based soil, with metaproteomics undertaken on the corresponding protein fraction.

  1. How Cognitive Styles Affect the Learning Behaviors of Online Problem-Solving Based Discussion Activity: A Lag Sequential Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Sheng-Yi; Hou, Huei-Tse

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive styles play an important role in influencing the learning process, but to date no relevant study has been conducted using lag sequential analysis to assess knowledge construction learning patterns based on different cognitive styles in computer-supported collaborative learning activities in online collaborative discussions. This study…

  2. How Cognitive Styles Affect the Learning Behaviors of Online Problem-Solving Based Discussion Activity: A Lag Sequential Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Sheng-Yi; Hou, Huei-Tse

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive styles play an important role in influencing the learning process, but to date no relevant study has been conducted using lag sequential analysis to assess knowledge construction learning patterns based on different cognitive styles in computer-supported collaborative learning activities in online collaborative discussions. This study…

  3. Sequential UV- and chlorine-based disinfection to mitigate Escherichia coli in drinking water biofilms.

    PubMed

    Murphy, H M; Payne, S J; Gagnon, G A

    2008-04-01

    This study was designed to examine the potential downstream benefits of sequential disinfection to control the persistence of Escherichia coli under conditions relevant to drinking water distribution systems. Eight annular reactors (four polycarbonate and four cast iron) were setup in parallel to address various factors that could influence biofilm growth in distribution systems. Eight reactors were treated with chlorine, chlorine dioxide and monochloramine alone or in combination with UV to examine the effects on Escherichia coli growth and persistence in both the effluent and biofilm. In general, UV-treated systems in combination with chlorine or chlorine dioxide and monochloramine achieved greater log reductions in both effluent and biofilm than systems treated with chlorine-based disinfectants alone. However, during UV-low chlorine disinfection, E. coli was found to persist at low levels, suggesting that the UV treatment had instigated an adaptive mutation. During UV-chlorine-dioxide treatment, the E. coli that was initially below the detection limit reappeared during a low level of disinfection (0.2 mg/L) in the cast iron systems. Chloramine was shown to be effective in disinfecting suspended E. coli in the effluent but was unable to reduce biofilm counts to below the detection limit. Issues such as repair mechanism of E. coli and nitrification could help explain some of these aberrations. Improved understanding of the ability of chlorine-based disinfectant in combination with UV to provide sufficient disinfection will ultimately effect in improved management and safety of drinking water.

  4. Sequential Registration-Based Segmentation of the Prostate Gland in MR Image Volumes.

    PubMed

    Khalvati, Farzad; Salmanpour, Aryan; Rahnamayan, Shahryar; Haider, Masoom A; Tizhoosh, H R

    2016-04-01

    Accurate and fast segmentation and volume estimation of the prostate gland in magnetic resonance (MR) images are necessary steps in the diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of prostate cancer. This paper presents an algorithm for the prostate gland volume estimation based on the semi-automated segmentation of individual slices in T2-weighted MR image sequences. The proposed sequential registration-based segmentation (SRS) algorithm, which was inspired by the clinical workflow during medical image contouring, relies on inter-slice image registration and user interaction/correction to segment the prostate gland without the use of an anatomical atlas. It automatically generates contours for each slice using a registration algorithm, provided that the user edits and approves the marking in some previous slices. We conducted comprehensive experiments to measure the performance of the proposed algorithm using three registration methods (i.e., rigid, affine, and nonrigid). Five radiation oncologists participated in the study where they contoured the prostate MR (T2-weighted) images of 15 patients both manually and using the SRS algorithm. Compared to the manual segmentation, on average, the SRS algorithm reduced the contouring time by 62% (a speedup factor of 2.64×) while maintaining the segmentation accuracy at the same level as the intra-user agreement level (i.e., Dice similarity coefficient of 91 versus 90%). The proposed algorithm exploits the inter-slice similarity of volumetric MR image series to achieve highly accurate results while significantly reducing the contouring time.

  5. Sequential selection of window length for improved SSVEP-based BCI classification.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Erik C; Norton, James J S; Jun, David; Bretl, Timothy; Jones, Douglas L

    2013-01-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCI) utilizing steady-state visually evoked potentials (SSVEP) recorded by electroencephalography (EEG) have exciting potential to enable new systems for disabled individuals and novel controls for robotic and computer systems. To interact with SSVEP-based BCIs, users attend to visual stimuli modulated at predetermined frequencies. A key problem for SSVEP-based BCIs is to classify which modulation frequency the user is attending, for which there is an inherent trade-off between speed and accuracy. As SSVEP signals vary with time and stimulation frequency, a fixed-length data window does not necessarily optimize this trade-off. We propose a strategy, developed from sequential analysis, to vary the window-length used for classification. Our proposed technique adapts to the data, continuing to collect data until it is confident enough to make a classification decision. Our strategy was compared to a fixed window-length method using a simple experiment involving five frequencies presented individually to three participants. Using a canonical correlation analysis classifier to compare the proposed variable-length scheme to a standard fixed-length scheme, the variable-length approach improved the classifier information transfer rate by an average of 43%.

  6. Using sequential Gaussian simulation to quantify uncertainties in interpolated gauge based precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlers, Lennart; Refsgaard, Jens Christian; Sonnenborg, Torben O.; He, Xin; Jensen, Karsten H.

    2016-04-01

    Precipitation is a key input to hydrological models. Spatially distributed rainfall used in hydrological modelling is commonly based on the interpolation of gauge rainfall using conventional geostatistical techniques such as kriging, e.g. Salamon and Feyen [2009], Stisen et al. [2011]. While being effective point interpolators [Moulin et al., 2009], these techniques are unable to reproduce the spatial variability inherent in the rainfall process at unsampled locations. Stochastic simulation approaches provide the means to better capture this variability and hence to quantify the associated spatial uncertainty [McMillan et al., 2011]. The objective of this study is to quantify uncertainties in interpolated gauge based rainfall by employing sequential Gaussian simulation (SGS) coupled with ordinary kriging (OK) to generate realizations of daily precipitation at a 2x2 km2 grid. The rainfall gauge data was collected in a 1055 km2 subcatchment within the HOBE catchment (Jutland, Denmark) [Jensen and Illangasekare, 2011]. The following uncertainties are considered: i) interpolation uncertainty ii) uncertainty on the point measurement iii) location uncertainty. Results from using different numbers of SGS realizations and different lengths of the simulated period as well as different assumptions on the underlying uncertainties will be presented and discussed with regard to mean annual catchment rainfall. Jensen, K. H., and T. H. Illangasekare (2011), HOBE: A Hydrological Observatory, Vadose Zone J, 10(1), 1-7. McMillan, H., B. Jackson, M. Clark, D. Kavetski, and R. Woods (2011), Rainfall uncertainty in hydrological modelling: An evaluation of multiplicative error models, J Hydrol, 400(1-2), 83-94. Moulin, L., E. Gaume, and C. Obled (2009), Uncertainties on mean areal precipitation: assessment and impact on streamflow simulations, Hydrol Earth Syst Sc, 13(2), 99-114. Salamon, P., and L. Feyen (2009), Assessing parameter, precipitation, and predictive uncertainty in a

  7. Progesterone-based contraceptives reduce adaptive immune responses and protection against sequential influenza A virus infections.

    PubMed

    Hall, Olivia J; Nachbagauer, Raffael; Vermillion, Meghan S; Fink, Ashley L; Phuong, Vanessa; Krammer, Florian; Klein, Sabra L

    2017-02-08

    In addition to their intended use, progesterone (P4)-based contraceptives promote anti-inflammatory immune responses, yet their effects on the outcome of infectious diseases, including influenza A virus (IAV), are rarely evaluated. To evaluate their impact on immune responses to sequential IAV infections, adult female mice were treated with placebo or one of two progestins, P4 or levonorgestrel (LNG), and infected with mouse adapted (ma) H1N1 virus. Treatment with P4 or LNG reduced morbidity, but had no effect on pulmonary virus titers, during primary H1N1 infection as compared to placebo treatment. In serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, total anti-IAV IgG and IgA titers and virus neutralizing antibody titers, but not hemagglutinin stalk antibody titers, were lower in progestin-treated mice as compared with placebo-treated mice. Females were challenged six weeks later with either a maH1N1 drift variant (maH1N1dv) or maH3N2 IAV. Protection following infection with the maH1N1dv was similar among all groups. In contrast, following challenge with maH3N2, progestin treatment reduced survival as well as numbers and activity of H1N1- and H3N2-specific memory CD8+ T cells, including tissue resident cells, compared with placebo treatment. In contrast to primary IAV infection, progestin treatment increased neutralizing and IgG antibody titers against both challenge viruses compared with placebo treatment. While the immunomodulatory properties of progestins protected naïve females against severe outcome from IAV infection, it made them more susceptible to secondary challenge with a heterologous IAV, despite improving their antibody responses against a secondary IAV infection. Taken together, the immunomodulatory effects of progestins differentially regulate the outcome of infection depending on exposure history.IMPORTANCE The impact of hormone-based contraceptives on the outcome of infectious diseases outside of the reproductive tract is rarely considered. Using a mouse

  8. Study of ion flow dynamics in an inertial electrostatic confinement device through sequential grid construction

    SciTech Connect

    Murali, S. Krupakar; Kulcinski, G. L.; Santarius, J. F.

    2008-12-15

    Experiments were performed to understand the dynamics of the ion flow in an inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) device. This was done by monitoring the fusion rate as the symmetry of the grid was increased starting with a single loop all the way until the entire grid is constructed. The fusion rate was observed to increase with grid symmetry and eventually saturate. A single loop grid was observed to generate a cylindrical ({approx}line) fusion source. The ion flow distribution was measured by introducing fine wires across a single loop of the grid in the form of a chord of a circle (chord wires). This study revealed that with increased symmetry of the cathode grid wires the convergence of the ions improves. The chord wires provided electrons for ionization even at low pressures ({approx}6.67 mPa) and helped sustain the plasma. The impinging ions heat these wires locally and the temperature of the wires was measured using an infrared thermometer that was used to understand the ion flow distribution across the cathode grid. The presence of the grid wires seems to affect the fusion rate more drastically than previously thought (was assumed to be uniform around the central grid). Most of the fusion reactions were observed to occur in the ion microchannels that form in gaps between the cathode wires. This work helps understand the fusion source regimes and calibrate the IEC device.

  9. Transcriptional dynamics of Phytophthora infestans during sequential stages of hemibiotrophic infection of tomato.

    PubMed

    Zuluaga, Andrea P; Vega-Arreguín, Julio C; Fei, Zhangjun; Ponnala, Lalit; Lee, Sang Jik; Matas, Antonio J; Patev, Sean; Fry, William E; Rose, Jocelyn K C

    2016-01-01

    Hemibiotrophic plant pathogens, such as the oomycete Phytophthora infestans, employ a biphasic infection strategy, initially behaving as biotrophs, where minimal symptoms are exhibited by the plant, and subsequently as necrotrophs, feeding on dead plant tissue. The regulation of this transition and the breadth of molecular mechanisms that modulate plant defences are not well understood, although effector proteins secreted by the pathogen are thought to play a key role. We examined the transcriptional dynamics of P. infestans in a compatible interaction with its host tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) at three infection stages: biotrophy; the transition from biotrophy to necrotrophy; and necrotrophy. The expression data suggest a tight temporal regulation of many pathways associated with the suppression of plant defence mechanisms and pathogenicity, including the induction of putative cytoplasmic and apoplastic effectors. Twelve of these were experimentally evaluated to determine their ability to suppress necrosis caused by the P. infestans necrosis-inducing protein PiNPP1.1 in Nicotiana benthamiana. Four effectors suppressed necrosis, suggesting that they might prolong the biotrophic phase. This study suggests that a complex regulation of effector expression modulates the outcome of the interaction.

  10. Numerical investigation of the sequential-double-ionization dynamics of helium in different few-cycle-laser-field shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wustelt, Philipp; Möller, Max; Schöffler, Markus S.; Xie, Xinhua; Hanus, Vaclav; Sayler, A. Max; Baltuska, Andrius; Paulus, Gerhard G.; Kitzler, Markus

    2017-02-01

    We investigate sequential double ionization of helium by intense near-circularly polarized few-cycle laser pulses using a semiclassical ionization model with two independent electrons. Simulated He2 + ion momentum distributions are compared to those obtained in recent benchmark experiments [M. S. Schöffler, X. Xie, P. Wustelt, M. Möller, S. Roither, D. Kartashov, A. M. Sayler, A. Baltuska, G. G. Paulus, and M. Kitzler, Phys. Rev. A 93, 063421 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevA.93.063421]. We study the influence of a number of pulse parameters such as peak intensity, carrier-envelope phase, pulse duration, and second- and third-order spectral phase on the shape of the ion momentum distributions. Good agreement is found in the main features of these distributions and of their dependence on the laser pulse duration, peak intensity, and carrier-envelope phase. Furthermore, we find that for explaining certain fine-scale features observed in the experiments, it becomes important to consider subtle timing variations in the two-electron emissions introduced by small values of chirp. This result highlights the possibility of measuring and controlling multielectron dynamics on the attosecond time scale by fine tuning the field evolution of intense close-to-single-cycle laser pulses.

  11. Enrichment desired quality chitosan fraction and advance yield by sequential static and static-dynamic supercritical CO2.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yi-Yin; Chin, Hui Yen; Tsai, Min-Lang

    2015-11-20

    This study aimed to establish the sequential static and static-dynamic supercritical carbon dioxide (SDCO2) fractionation conditions to obtain a higher yield and desired chitosan with lower polydispersity index (PDI) and higher degree of deacetylation (DD). The yield increased with increasing DD of used chitosan and amount of cosolvent. The yield of acetic acid cosolvent was higher than those of malic and citric acid cosolvents. SDCO2, compared to static supercritical carbon dioxide, has higher yield. The yield of extracted chitosan was 5.82-14.70% by SDCO2/acetic acid, which increases with increasing pressure. The DD of fractionated chitosan increased from 66.1% to 70.81-85.33%, while the PDI decreased from 3.97 to 1.69-3.16. The molecular weight changed from 622kDa to 412-649kDa, which increased as density of supercritical carbon dioxide increases. Hence, higher DD and lower PDI extracted chitosan can be obtained through controlling the temperature and pressure of SDCO2.

  12. Path-integral Monte Carlo simulations for electronic dynamics on molecular chains. I. Sequential hopping and super exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mühlbacher, Lothar; Ankerhold, Joachim; Escher, Charlotte

    2004-12-01

    An improved real-time quantum Monte Carlo procedure is presented and applied to describe the electronic transfer dynamics along molecular chains. The model consists of discrete electronic sites coupled to a thermal environment which is integrated out exactly within the path integral formulation. The approach is numerically exact and its results reduce to known analytical findings (Marcus theory, golden rule) in proper limits. Special attention is paid to the role of superexchange and sequential hopping at lower temperatures in symmetric donor-bridge-acceptor systems. In contrast to previous approximate studies, superexchange turns out to play a significant role only for extremely high-lying bridges where the transfer is basically frozen or for extremely low temperatures where for weaker dissipation a description in terms of rate constants is no longer feasible. For bridges with increasing length an algebraic decrease of the yield is found for short as well as for long bridges. The approach can be extended to electronic systems with more complicated topologies including impurities and in presence of external time-dependent forces.

  13. A Method for Optimizing Lightweight-Gypsum Design Based on Sequential Measurements of Physical Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vimmrová, Alena; Kočí, Václav; Krejsová, Jitka; Černý, Robert

    2016-06-01

    A method for lightweight-gypsum material design using waste stone dust as the foaming agent is described. The main objective is to reach several physical properties which are inversely related in a certain way. Therefore, a linear optimization method is applied to handle this task systematically. The optimization process is based on sequential measurement of physical properties. The results are subsequently point-awarded according to a complex point criterion and new composition is proposed. After 17 trials the final mixture is obtained, having the bulk density equal to (586 ± 19) kg/m3 and compressive strength (1.10 ± 0.07) MPa. According to a detailed comparative analysis with reference gypsum, the newly developed material can be used as excellent thermally insulating interior plaster with the thermal conductivity of (0.082 ± 0.005) W/(m·K). In addition, its practical application can bring substantial economic and environmental benefits as the material contains 25 % of waste stone dust.

  14. Sequential injection extraction based on restricted access material for determination of furosemide in serum.

    PubMed

    Huclová, Jitka; Satínský, Dalibor; Maia, Tiago; Karlícek, Rolf; Solich, Petr; Araújo, Alberto Nova

    2005-09-16

    Restricted access material (RAM) column containing 25 microm C18 alkyl-diol support was integrated into the sequential injection analysis (SIA) manifold and the SIA-RAM system was tested for direct determination of furosemide in serum. LiChrospher ADS column based on restricted access material is proposed to direct injection of biofluids. The integration of RAM material into SIA enabled creation of a comprehensive on-line sample clean-up technique combined with fluorescence quantitation of analyte. Centrifuged and diluted serum sample was aspirated into the system and loaded onto the column using acetonitrile-water (2:98), pH 2.7. The analyte was retained on the column while proteins contained in the sample were removed to the waste without precipitation and clogging the column. Interfering substances complicating the detection were washed out by acetonitrile-water (15:85), pH 2.7 in the next step. The extracted analyte was eluted by means of acetonitrile-water (25:75), pH 2.3 to the fluorescence detector (emission filter 385 nm). The whole procedure comprising sample pre-treatment, analyte detection and column reconditioning took 20 min. The recoveries of furosemide from serum lay between 101.4 and 103.4% for three concentrations of analyte.

  15. Corpus callosum analysis using MDL-based sequential models of shape and appearance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stegmann, Mikkel B.; Davies, Rhodri H.; Ryberg, Charlotte

    2004-05-01

    This paper describes a method for automatically analysing and segmenting the corpus callosum from magnetic resonance images of the brain based on the widely used Active Appearance Models (AAMs) by Cootes et al. Extensions of the original method, which are designed to improve this specific case are proposed, but all remain applicable to other domain problems. The well-known multi-resolution AAM optimisation is extended to include sequential relaxations on texture resolution, model coverage and model parameter constraints. Fully unsupervised analysis is obtained by exploiting model parameter convergence limits and a maximum likelihood estimate of shape and pose. Further, the important problem of modelling object neighbourhood is addressed. Finally, we describe how correspondence across images is achieved by selecting the minimum description length (MDL) landmarks from a set of training boundaries using the recently proposed method of Davies et al. This MDL-approach ensures a unique parameterisation of corpus callosum contour variation, which is crucial for neurological studies that compare reference areas such as rostrum, splenium, et cetera. We present quantitative and qualitative results that show that the method produces accurate, robust and rapid segmentations in a cross sectional study of 17 subjects, establishing its feasibility as a fully automated clinical tool for analysis and segmentation.

  16. A reduced order model based on Kalman filtering for sequential data assimilation of turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meldi, M.; Poux, A.

    2017-10-01

    A Kalman filter based sequential estimator is presented in this work. The estimator is integrated in the structure of segregated solvers for the analysis of incompressible flows. This technique provides an augmented flow state integrating available observation in the CFD model, naturally preserving a zero-divergence condition for the velocity field. Because of the prohibitive costs associated with a complete Kalman Filter application, two model reduction strategies have been proposed and assessed. These strategies dramatically reduce the increase in computational costs of the model, which can be quantified in an augmentation of 10%- 15% with respect to the classical numerical simulation. In addition, an extended analysis of the behavior of the numerical model covariance Q has been performed. Optimized values are strongly linked to the truncation error of the discretization procedure. The estimator has been applied to the analysis of a number of test cases exhibiting increasing complexity, including turbulent flow configurations. The results show that the augmented flow successfully improves the prediction of the physical quantities investigated, even when the observation is provided in a limited region of the physical domain. In addition, the present work suggests that these Data Assimilation techniques, which are at an embryonic stage of development in CFD, may have the potential to be pushed even further using the augmented prediction as a powerful tool for the optimization of the free parameters in the numerical simulation.

  17. Sequential expectations: the role of prediction-based learning in language.

    PubMed

    Misyak, Jennifer B; Christiansen, Morten H; Bruce Tomblin, J

    2010-01-01

    Prediction-based processes appear to play an important role in language. Few studies, however, have sought to test the relationship within individuals between prediction learning and natural language processing. This paper builds upon existing statistical learning work using a novel paradigm for studying the on-line learning of predictive dependencies. Within this paradigm, a new "prediction task" is introduced that provides a sensitive index of individual differences for developing probabilistic sequential expectations. Across three interrelated experiments, the prediction task and results thereof are used to bridge knowledge of the empirical relation between statistical learning and language within the context of nonadjacency processing. We first chart the trajectory for learning nonadjacencies, documenting individual differences in prediction learning. Subsequent simple recurrent network simulations then closely capture human performance patterns in the new paradigm. Finally, individual differences in prediction performances are shown to strongly correlate with participants' sentence processing of complex, long-distance dependencies in natural language. Copyright © 2009 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  18. Object-based algorithms and methods for quantifying urban growth pattern using sequential satellite images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Bailang; Liu, Hongxing; Gao, Yige; Wu, Jianping

    2008-08-01

    Previously, urban growth pattern is described and measured by the pixel-by-pixel comparison of satellite images. The geographic extent, patterns and types of urban growth are derived from satellite images separated in time. However, the pixel-by-pixel comparison approach suffers from several drawbacks. Firstly, slight error in image geo-reference can cause false detection of changes. Secondly, it's difficult to recognize and correct artifact changes induced by data noise and data processing errors. Thirdly, only limited information can be derived. In this paper, we present a new objectbased method to describe and quantify urban growth patterns. The different types of land cover are classified from sequential satellite images as urban objects. The geometric and shape attributes of objects and the spatial relationship between them are employed to identify the different types of urban growth pattern. The algorithms involved in the object-based method are implemented by using C++ programming language and the software user interface is developed by using ArcObjects and VB.Net. A simulated example is given to demonstrate the utility and effectiveness of this new method.

  19. Comparison of adaptive treatment strategies based on longitudinal outcomes in sequential multiple assignment randomized trials.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiguo

    2017-02-10

    In sequential multiple assignment randomized trials, longitudinal outcomes may be the most important outcomes of interest because this type of trials is usually conducted in areas of chronic diseases or conditions. We propose to use a weighted generalized estimating equation (GEE) approach to analyzing data from such type of trials for comparing two adaptive treatment strategies based on generalized linear models. Although the randomization probabilities are known, we consider estimated weights in which the randomization probabilities are replaced by their empirical estimates and prove that the resulting weighted GEE estimator is more efficient than the estimators with true weights. The variance of the weighted GEE estimator is estimated by an empirical sandwich estimator. The time variable in the model can be linear, piecewise linear, or more complicated forms. This provides more flexibility that is important because, in the adaptive treatment setting, the treatment changes over time and, hence, a single linear trend over the whole period of study may not be practical. Simulation results show that the weighted GEE estimators of regression coefficients are consistent regardless of the specification of the correlation structure of the longitudinal outcomes. The weighted GEE method is then applied in analyzing data from the Clinical Antipsychotic Trials of Intervention Effectiveness. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Efficient Robust Optimization of Metal Forming Processes using a Sequential Metamodel Based Strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiebenga, J. H.; Klaseboer, G.; van den Boogaard, A. H.

    2011-08-01

    The coupling of Finite Element (FE) simulations to mathematical optimization techniques has contributed significantly to product improvements and cost reductions in the metal forming industries. The next challenge is to bridge the gap between deterministic optimization techniques and the industrial need for robustness. This paper introduces a new and generally applicable structured methodology for modeling and solving robust optimization problems. Stochastic design variables or noise variables are taken into account explicitly in the optimization procedure. The metamodel-based strategy is combined with a sequential improvement algorithm to efficiently increase the accuracy of the objective function prediction. This is only done at regions of interest containing the optimal robust design. Application of the methodology to an industrial V-bending process resulted in valuable process insights and an improved robust process design. Moreover, a significant improvement of the robustness (>2σ) was obtained by minimizing the deteriorating effects of several noise variables. The robust optimization results demonstrate the general applicability of the robust optimization strategy and underline the importance of including uncertainty and robustness explicitly in the numerical optimization procedure.

  1. Location Prediction Based on Transition Probability Matrices Constructing from Sequential Rules for Spatial-Temporal K-Anonymity Dataset

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhao; Zhu, Yunhong; Wu, Chenxue

    2016-01-01

    Spatial-temporal k-anonymity has become a mainstream approach among techniques for protection of users’ privacy in location-based services (LBS) applications, and has been applied to several variants such as LBS snapshot queries and continuous queries. Analyzing large-scale spatial-temporal anonymity sets may benefit several LBS applications. In this paper, we propose two location prediction methods based on transition probability matrices constructing from sequential rules for spatial-temporal k-anonymity dataset. First, we define single-step sequential rules mined from sequential spatial-temporal k-anonymity datasets generated from continuous LBS queries for multiple users. We then construct transition probability matrices from mined single-step sequential rules, and normalize the transition probabilities in the transition matrices. Next, we regard a mobility model for an LBS requester as a stationary stochastic process and compute the n-step transition probability matrices by raising the normalized transition probability matrices to the power n. Furthermore, we propose two location prediction methods: rough prediction and accurate prediction. The former achieves the probabilities of arriving at target locations along simple paths those include only current locations, target locations and transition steps. By iteratively combining the probabilities for simple paths with n steps and the probabilities for detailed paths with n-1 steps, the latter method calculates transition probabilities for detailed paths with n steps from current locations to target locations. Finally, we conduct extensive experiments, and correctness and flexibility of our proposed algorithm have been verified. PMID:27508502

  2. Location Prediction Based on Transition Probability Matrices Constructing from Sequential Rules for Spatial-Temporal K-Anonymity Dataset.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haitao; Chen, Zewei; Liu, Zhao; Zhu, Yunhong; Wu, Chenxue

    2016-01-01

    Spatial-temporal k-anonymity has become a mainstream approach among techniques for protection of users' privacy in location-based services (LBS) applications, and has been applied to several variants such as LBS snapshot queries and continuous queries. Analyzing large-scale spatial-temporal anonymity sets may benefit several LBS applications. In this paper, we propose two location prediction methods based on transition probability matrices constructing from sequential rules for spatial-temporal k-anonymity dataset. First, we define single-step sequential rules mined from sequential spatial-temporal k-anonymity datasets generated from continuous LBS queries for multiple users. We then construct transition probability matrices from mined single-step sequential rules, and normalize the transition probabilities in the transition matrices. Next, we regard a mobility model for an LBS requester as a stationary stochastic process and compute the n-step transition probability matrices by raising the normalized transition probability matrices to the power n. Furthermore, we propose two location prediction methods: rough prediction and accurate prediction. The former achieves the probabilities of arriving at target locations along simple paths those include only current locations, target locations and transition steps. By iteratively combining the probabilities for simple paths with n steps and the probabilities for detailed paths with n-1 steps, the latter method calculates transition probabilities for detailed paths with n steps from current locations to target locations. Finally, we conduct extensive experiments, and correctness and flexibility of our proposed algorithm have been verified.

  3. The emotion recognition system based on autoregressive model and sequential forward feature selection of electroencephalogram signals.

    PubMed

    Hatamikia, Sepideh; Maghooli, Keivan; Nasrabadi, Ali Motie

    2014-07-01

    Electroencephalogram (EEG) is one of the useful biological signals to distinguish different brain diseases and mental states. In recent years, detecting different emotional states from biological signals has been merged more attention by researchers and several feature extraction methods and classifiers are suggested to recognize emotions from EEG signals. In this research, we introduce an emotion recognition system using autoregressive (AR) model, sequential forward feature selection (SFS) and K-nearest neighbor (KNN) classifier using EEG signals during emotional audio-visual inductions. The main purpose of this paper is to investigate the performance of AR features in the classification of emotional states. To achieve this goal, a distinguished AR method (Burg's method) based on Levinson-Durbin's recursive algorithm is used and AR coefficients are extracted as feature vectors. In the next step, two different feature selection methods based on SFS algorithm and Davies-Bouldin index are used in order to decrease the complexity of computing and redundancy of features; then, three different classifiers include KNN, quadratic discriminant analysis and linear discriminant analysis are used to discriminate two and three different classes of valence and arousal levels. The proposed method is evaluated with EEG signals of available database for emotion analysis using physiological signals, which are recorded from 32 participants during 40 1 min audio visual inductions. According to the results, AR features are efficient to recognize emotional states from EEG signals, and KNN performs better than two other classifiers in discriminating of both two and three valence/arousal classes. The results also show that SFS method improves accuracies by almost 10-15% as compared to Davies-Bouldin based feature selection. The best accuracies are %72.33 and %74.20 for two classes of valence and arousal and %61.10 and %65.16 for three classes, respectively.

  4. Program Completion of a Web-Based Tailored Lifestyle Intervention for Adults: Differences between a Sequential and a Simultaneous Approach

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Francine; de Vries, Hein; van Osch, Liesbeth ADM; van Nierop, Peter WM; Kremers, Stef PJ

    2012-01-01

    Background Unhealthy lifestyle behaviors often co-occur and are related to chronic diseases. One effective method to change multiple lifestyle behaviors is web-based computer tailoring. Dropout from Internet interventions, however, is rather high, and it is challenging to retain participants in web-based tailored programs, especially programs targeting multiple behaviors. To date, it is unknown how much information people can handle in one session while taking part in a multiple behavior change intervention, which could be presented either sequentially (one behavior at a time) or simultaneously (all behaviors at once). Objectives The first objective was to compare dropout rates of 2 computer-tailored interventions: a sequential and a simultaneous strategy. The second objective was to assess which personal characteristics are associated with completion rates of the 2 interventions. Methods Using an RCT design, demographics, health status, physical activity, vegetable consumption, fruit consumption, alcohol intake, and smoking were self-assessed through web-based questionnaires among 3473 adults, recruited through Regional Health Authorities in the Netherlands in the autumn of 2009. First, a health risk appraisal was offered, indicating whether respondents were meeting the 5 national health guidelines. Second, psychosocial determinants of the lifestyle behaviors were assessed and personal advice was provided, about one or more lifestyle behaviors. Results Our findings indicate a high non-completion rate for both types of intervention (71.0%; n = 2167), with more incompletes in the simultaneous intervention (77.1%; n = 1169) than in the sequential intervention (65.0%; n = 998). In both conditions, discontinuation was predicted by a lower age (sequential condition: OR = 1.04; P < .001; CI = 1.02-1.05; simultaneous condition: OR = 1.04; P < .001; CI = 1.02-1.05) and an unhealthy lifestyle (sequential condition: OR = 0.86; P = .01; CI = 0.76-0.97; simultaneous condition

  5. A computer-based auditory sequential pattern test for school-aged children.

    PubMed

    Rickard, Natalie A; Smales, Caroline J; Rickard, Kurt L

    2013-05-01

    One type of test commonly used to assess auditory processing disorders (APD) is the Frequency Pattern Test, in which triads of pure tones of two different frequencies are presented, and participants are required to accurately report the sequence of tones, typically using a verbal response. The test is widely used clinically, but in its current format, is an under-exploited means of addressing some candidate processes, such as temporal ordering and frequency discrimination, which might be affected in APD. Here we describe a computer-based version of an auditory pattern perception test, the BirdSong Game, which was designed to be an engaging research tool for use with school-aged children. In this study, 128 children aged 6-10 with normal peripheral hearing were tested. The BirdSong Game application was used to administer auditory sequential pattern tests, via a touch-screen presentation and response interface. A conditioning step was included prior to testing, in order to ensure that participants were able to adequately discriminate between the test tones, and reliably describe the difference using their own vocabulary. Responses were collected either verbally or manually, by having participants press cartoon images on the touch-screen in the appropriate sequence. The data was examined for age, gender and response mode differences. Findings on the auditory tests indicated a significant maturational effect across the age range studied, with no difference between response modes or gender. The BirdSong Game is sensitive to maturational changes in auditory sequencing ability, and the computer-based design of the test has several advantages which make it a potentially useful clinical and research tool. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Sequential projection-based metacognitive learning in a radial basis function network for classification problems.

    PubMed

    Babu, G S; Suresh, S

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, we present a sequential projection-based metacognitive learning algorithm in a radial basis function network (PBL-McRBFN) for classification problems. The algorithm is inspired by human metacognitive learning principles and has two components: a cognitive component and a metacognitive component. The cognitive component is a single-hidden-layer radial basis function network with evolving architecture. The metacognitive component controls the learning process in the cognitive component by choosing the best learning strategy for the current sample and adapts the learning strategies by implementing self-regulation. In addition, sample overlapping conditions and past knowledge of the samples in the form of pseudosamples are used for proper initialization of new hidden neurons to minimize the misclassification. The parameter update strategy uses projection-based direct minimization of hinge loss error. The interaction of the cognitive component and the metacognitive component addresses the what-to-learn, when-to-learn, and how-to-learn human learning principles efficiently. The performance of the PBL-McRBFN is evaluated using a set of benchmark classification problems from the University of California Irvine machine learning repository. The statistical performance evaluation on these problems proves the superior performance of the PBL-McRBFN classifier over results reported in the literature. Also, we evaluate the performance of the proposed algorithm on a practical Alzheimer's disease detection problem. The performance results on open access series of imaging studies and Alzheimer's disease neuroimaging initiative datasets, which are obtained from different demographic regions, clearly show that PBL-McRBFN can handle a problem with change in distribution.

  7. Sequential unfolding of individual helices of bacterioopsin observed in molecular dynamics simulations of extraction from the purple membrane.

    PubMed

    Seeber, Michele; Fanelli, Francesca; Paci, Emanuele; Caflisch, Amedeo

    2006-11-01

    Multiple molecular dynamics simulations of bacterioopsin pulling from its C-terminus show that its alpha-helices unfold individually. In the first metastable state observed in the simulations, helix G is unfolded at its C-terminal segment while the rest of helix G (residues 200-216) is folded and opposes resistance because of a salt-bridge network consisting of Asp-212 and Lys-216 on helix G and Arg-82 and Asp-85 on helix C. Helix G unfolds inside the bundle because the external force is applied to its C-terminal end in a direction perpendicular to the surface of the membrane. Inversely, helix F has to flip by 180 degrees to exit from the membrane because the applied force and the helical N-C axis point in opposite directions. At the highest peak of the force, which cannot be interpreted in single-molecule force spectroscopy experiments, helix F has a pronounced kink at Pro-186. Mutation of Pro-186 and/or the charged side chains mentioned above, which are involved in very favorable electrostatic interactions in the low-dielectric region of the membrane, are expected to reduce the highest peak of the force. Helices E and D unfold in a similar way to helices G and F, respectively. Hence, the force-distance profile and sequence of events during forced unfolding of bacterioopsin are influenced by the up-and-down topology of the seven-helix bundle. The sequential extraction of individual helices from the membrane suggests that the spontaneous (un)folding of bacterioopsin proceeds through metastable bundles of fewer than seven helices. The metastable states observed in the simulations provide atomic level evidence that corroborates the interpretation of very recent force spectroscopy experiments of bacteriorhodopsin refolding.

  8. Analytical Approach to the One-Dimensional Disordered Exclusion Process with Open Boundaries and Random Sequential Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loulidi, M.

    2008-07-01

    A one-dimensional disordered particle hopping rate asymmetric exclusion process (ASEP) with open boundaries and a random sequential dynamics is studied analytically. Combining the exact results of the steady states in the pure case with a perturbative mean field-like approach the broken particle-hole symmetry is highlighted and the phase diagram is studied in the parameter space ( α, β), where α and β represent respectively the injection rate and the extraction rate of particles. The model displays, as in the pure case, high-density, low-density and maximum-current phases. All critical lines are determined analytically showing that the high-density low-density first order phase transition occurs at α≠ β. We show that the maximum-current phase extends its stability region as the disorder is increased and the usual 1/sqrt{ell} -decay of the density profile in this phase is universal. Assuming that some exact results for the disordered model on a ring hold for a system with open boundaries, we derive some analytical results for platoon phase transition within the low-density phase and we give an analytical expression of its corresponding critical injection rate α *. As it was observed numerically (Bengrine et al. J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 32:2527, [1999]), we show that the quenched disorder induces a cusp in the current-density relation at maximum flow in a certain region of parameter space and determine the analytical expression of its slope. The results of numerical simulations we develop agree with the analytical ones.

  9. Coronenetetraimide-centered cruciform pentamers containing multiporphyrin units: synthesis and sequential photoinduced energy- and electron-transfer dynamics.

    PubMed

    Hasobe, Taku; Ida, Koichi; Sakai, Hayato; Ohkubo, Kei; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2015-07-27

    A series of coronenetetraimide (CorTIm)-centered cruciform pentamers containing multiporphyrin units, in which four porphyrin units are covalently linked to a CorTIm core through benzyl linkages, were designed and synthesized to investigate their structural, spectroscopic, and electrochemical properties as well as photoinduced electron- and energy-transfer dynamics. These systems afforded the first synthetic case of coroneneimide derivatives covalently linked with dye molecules. The steady-state absorption and electrochemical results indicate that a CorTIm and four porphyrin units were successfully characterized by the corresponding reference monomers. In contrast, the steady-state fluorescence measurements demonstrated that strong fluorescence quenching relative to the corresponding monomer units was observed in these pentamers. Nanosecond laser flash photolysis measurements revealed the occurrence of intermolecular electron transfer from triplet excited state of zinc porphyrins to CorTIm. Femtosecond laser-induced transient absorption measurements for excitation of the CorTIm unit clearly demonstrate the sequential photoinduced energy and electron transfer between CorTIm and porphyrins, that is, occurrence of the initial energy transfer from CorTIm (energy donor) to porphyrins (energy acceptor) and subsequent electron transfer from porphyrins (electron donor) to CorTIm (electron acceptor) in these pentamers, whereas only the electron-transfer process from porphyrins to CorTIm was observed when we mainly excite porphyrin units. Finally, construction of high-order supramolecular patterning of these pentamers was performed by utilizing self-assembly and physical dewetting during the evaporation of solvent. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Off-line experiments on radionuclide detection based on the sequential Bayesian approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qingpei, Xiang; Dongfeng, Tian; Fanhua, Hao; Ge, Ding; Jun, Zeng; Fei, Luo

    2013-11-01

    The sequential Bayesian approach proposed by Candy et al. for radioactive materials detection has aroused increasing interest in radiation detection research and is potentially a useful tool for prevention of the transportation of radioactive materials by terrorists. In our previous work, the performance of the sequential Bayesian approach was studied numerically through a simulation experiment platform. In this paper, a sequential Bayesian processor incorporating a LaBr3(Ce) detector, and using the energy, decay rate and emission probability of the radionuclide, is fully developed. Off-line experiments for the performance of the sequential Bayesian approach in radionuclide detection are developed by placing 60Co, 137Cs, 133Ba and 152Eu at various distances from the front face of the LaBr3(Ce) detector. The off-line experiment results agree well with the results of previous numerical experiments. The maximum detection distance is introduced to evaluate the processor‧s ability to detect radionuclides with a specific level of activity.

  11. Teaching Improvisation through Melody and Blues-Based Harmony: A Comprehensive and Sequential Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heil, Leila

    2017-01-01

    This article describes a sequential approach to improvisation teaching that can be used with students at various age and ability levels by any educator, regardless of improvisation experience. The 2014 National Core Music Standards include improvisation as a central component in musical learning and promote instructional approaches that are…

  12. MRI Based Preterm White Matter Injury Classification: The Importance of Sequential Imaging in Determining Severity of Injury

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Biarge, Miriam; Groenendaal, Floris; Kersbergen, Karina J.; Benders, Manon J. N. L.; Foti, Francesca; Cowan, Frances M.; de Vries, Linda S.

    2016-01-01

    Background The evolution of non-hemorrhagic white matter injury (WMI) based on sequential magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has not been well studied. Our aim was to describe sequential MRI findings in preterm infants with non-hemorrhagic WMI and to develop an MRI classification system for preterm WMI based on these findings. Methods Eighty-two preterm infants (gestation ≤35 weeks) were retrospectively included. WMI was diagnosed and classified based on sequential cranial ultrasound (cUS) and confirmed on MRI. Results 138 MRIs were obtained at three time-points: early (<2 weeks; n = 32), mid (2–6 weeks; n = 30) and term equivalent age (TEA; n = 76). 63 infants (77%) had 2 MRIs during the neonatal period. WMI was non-cystic in 35 and cystic in 47 infants. In infants with cystic-WMI early MRI showed extensive restricted diffusion abnormalities, cysts were already present in 3 infants; mid MRI showed focal or extensive cysts, without acute diffusion changes. A significant reduction in the size and/or extent of the cysts was observed in 32% of the infants between early/mid and TEA MRI. In 4/9 infants previously seen focal cysts were no longer identified at TEA. All infants with cystic WMI showed ≥2 additional findings at TEA: significant reduction in WM volume, mild-moderate irregular ventriculomegaly, several areas of increased signal intensity on T1-weighted-images, abnormal myelination of the PLIC, small thalami. Conclusion In infants with extensive WM cysts at 2–6 weeks, cysts may be reduced in number or may even no longer be seen at TEA. A single MRI at TEA, without taking sequential cUS data and pre-TEA MRI findings into account, may underestimate the extent of WMI; based on these results we propose a new MRI classification for preterm non-hemorrhagic WMI. PMID:27257863

  13. Sequential Application of Ligand and Structure Based Modeling Approaches to Index Chemicals for Their hH4R Antagonism

    PubMed Central

    Basile, Livia; Milardi, Danilo; Zeidan, Mouhammed; Raiyn, Jamal; Guccione, Salvatore; Rayan, Anwar

    2014-01-01

    The human histamine H4 receptor (hH4R), a member of the G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR) family, is an increasingly attractive drug target. It plays a key role in many cell pathways and many hH4R ligands are studied for the treatment of several inflammatory, allergic and autoimmune disorders, as well as for analgesic activity. Due to the challenging difficulties in the experimental elucidation of hH4R structure, virtual screening campaigns are normally run on homology based models. However, a wealth of information about the chemical properties of GPCR ligands has also accumulated over the last few years and an appropriate combination of these ligand-based knowledge with structure-based molecular modeling studies emerges as a promising strategy for computer-assisted drug design. Here, two chemoinformatics techniques, the Intelligent Learning Engine (ILE) and Iterative Stochastic Elimination (ISE) approach, were used to index chemicals for their hH4R bioactivity. An application of the prediction model on external test set composed of more than 160 hH4R antagonists picked from the chEMBL database gave enrichment factor of 16.4. A virtual high throughput screening on ZINC database was carried out, picking ∼4000 chemicals highly indexed as H4R antagonists' candidates. Next, a series of 3D models of hH4R were generated by molecular modeling and molecular dynamics simulations performed in fully atomistic lipid membranes. The efficacy of the hH4R 3D models in discrimination between actives and non-actives were checked and the 3D model with the best performance was chosen for further docking studies performed on the focused library. The output of these docking studies was a consensus library of 11 highly active scored drug candidates. Our findings suggest that a sequential combination of ligand-based chemoinformatics approaches with structure-based ones has the potential to improve the success rate in discovering new biologically active GPCR drugs and increase the

  14. Sequential application of ligand and structure based modeling approaches to index chemicals for their hH4R antagonism.

    PubMed

    Pappalardo, Matteo; Shachaf, Nir; Basile, Livia; Milardi, Danilo; Zeidan, Mouhammed; Raiyn, Jamal; Guccione, Salvatore; Rayan, Anwar

    2014-01-01

    The human histamine H4 receptor (hH4R), a member of the G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR) family, is an increasingly attractive drug target. It plays a key role in many cell pathways and many hH4R ligands are studied for the treatment of several inflammatory, allergic and autoimmune disorders, as well as for analgesic activity. Due to the challenging difficulties in the experimental elucidation of hH4R structure, virtual screening campaigns are normally run on homology based models. However, a wealth of information about the chemical properties of GPCR ligands has also accumulated over the last few years and an appropriate combination of these ligand-based knowledge with structure-based molecular modeling studies emerges as a promising strategy for computer-assisted drug design. Here, two chemoinformatics techniques, the Intelligent Learning Engine (ILE) and Iterative Stochastic Elimination (ISE) approach, were used to index chemicals for their hH4R bioactivity. An application of the prediction model on external test set composed of more than 160 hH4R antagonists picked from the chEMBL database gave enrichment factor of 16.4. A virtual high throughput screening on ZINC database was carried out, picking ∼ 4000 chemicals highly indexed as H4R antagonists' candidates. Next, a series of 3D models of hH4R were generated by molecular modeling and molecular dynamics simulations performed in fully atomistic lipid membranes. The efficacy of the hH4R 3D models in discrimination between actives and non-actives were checked and the 3D model with the best performance was chosen for further docking studies performed on the focused library. The output of these docking studies was a consensus library of 11 highly active scored drug candidates. Our findings suggest that a sequential combination of ligand-based chemoinformatics approaches with structure-based ones has the potential to improve the success rate in discovering new biologically active GPCR drugs and increase the

  15. Separation and sequential recovery of tetracycline and Cu(II) from water using reusable thermo-responsive chitosan-based flocculant.

    PubMed

    Ren, Kexin; Du, Hongwei; Yang, Zhen; Tian, Ziqi; Zhang, Xuntong; Yang, Weiben; Chen, Jianqiang

    2017-02-27

    Coexistence of antibiotics and heavy metals is typically detected in water containing both organic and inorganic contaminants. In this work, flocculation method, using a reusable thermal-responsive chitosan-based flocculant (CS-g-PNNPAM), was applied for separation and sequential recovery of tetracycline (TC) and Cu(II) from water. High synergistic removal rates of both TC and Cu(II) from water (>90%) were reached. Interactive effects among targeted water's temperature (T1), stock solution's temperature (T2) and flocculant dosage on flocculation performance were assessed using response surface methodology. In order to optimize flocculation, operation strategies of adjusting T2 and dosage according to T1, based on the interactive effects, were given through mathematical analyses. Flocculation mechanism, as well as interfacial interactions among CS-g-PNNPAM, TC and Cu(II), was studied through experimental investigations (floc size monitoring, XPS and UV spectra) and theoretical calculations (density functional theory (DFT) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations): Coordination of Cu(II) with TC and the flocculant promoted flocculation; switchable interactions (H-bonds and hydrophobic association) of TC-flocculant at different temperatures were key factors affecting operation strategies. By weaken these interactions step by step, TC and Cu(II) were sequentially recovered from flocs using certain solutions. Meanwhile, the flocculant in flocs was regenerated and found reusable with high flocculation efficiency.

  16. Use of the modified BCR three-step sequential extraction procedure for the study of trace element dynamics in contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Pueyo, M; Mateu, J; Rigol, A; Vidal, M; López-Sánchez, J F; Rauret, G

    2008-03-01

    The modified BCR three-step sequential extraction procedure was used to examine the temporal dynamics of trace elements in soils contaminated by an accidental spill from an opencast mine in south-west Spain. Soils were mainly contaminated with pyritic sludge and acidic wastewater, whereas some soils were affected only by acidic wastewater. The distributions obtained for both some major (Ca, Fe and Mn) and trace elements (As, Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn) in the sludge and soil samples taken at different times after the accident, 1-3 months and 21 months, were compared. Sequential extractions were useful in identifying different sources of contamination, and in obtaining additional information on the solubility of secondary minerals formed by pyrite oxidation. Thus, the effectiveness of the BCR procedure has proved to be a useful tool for predicting short- and long-term mobility of trace elements, even in complex environmental scenarios.

  17. Determination of ambroxol hydrochloride, methylparaben and benzoic acid in pharmaceutical preparations based on sequential injection technique coupled with monolithic column.

    PubMed

    Satínský, Dalibor; Huclová, Jitka; Ferreira, Raquel L C; Montenegro, Maria Conceição B S M; Solich, Petr

    2006-02-13

    The porous monolithic columns show high performance at relatively low pressure. The coupling of short monoliths with sequential injection technique (SIA) results in a new approach to implementation of separation step to non-separation low-pressure method. In this contribution, a new separation method for simultaneous determination of ambroxol, methylparaben and benzoic acid was developed based on a novel reversed-phase sequential injection chromatography (SIC) technique with UV detection. A Chromolith SpeedROD RP-18e, 50-4.6 mm column with 10 mm precolumn and a FIAlab 3000 system with a six-port selection valve and 5 ml syringe were used for sequential injection chromatographic separations in our study. The mobile phase used was acetonitrile-tetrahydrofuran-0.05M acetic acid (10:10:90, v/v/v), pH 3.75 adjusted with triethylamine, flow rate 0.48 mlmin(-1), UV-detection was at 245 nm. The analysis time was <11 min. A new SIC method was validated and compared with HPLC. The method was found to be useful for the routine analysis of the active compounds ambroxol and preservatives (methylparaben or benzoic acid) in various pharmaceutical syrups and drops.

  18. A Forecasting Procedure for Plate Boundary Earthquakes Based on Sequential Data Assimilation - Application to the Nankai Megathrust Earthquake Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, T.; Hyodo, M.; Nakata, R.; Miyazaki, S.; Kaneda, Y.

    2016-12-01

    A forecasting procedure is proposed for plate boundary earthquakes in subduction zones. It is based on spatio-temporal variation in slip velocity on the plate interface, which causes interplate earthquakes. Model outputs are not only information about the occurrence of great earthquakes (time, place, and magnitude) but also information about the physical state evolution that causes earthquakes. To overcome the difficulty in forecasting earthquake generation resulting from uncertainty both in the physical model and in the observation data, we introduce a type of sequential data assimilation. In this method, we compare observed crustal deformation data to simulations of several great interplate earthquake generation cycles. We applied this method to estimate the time interval between the sequential M8 earthquakes along the Nankai trough. We conducted numerical modeling of sequential assimilation using surface deformation calculated from earthquake generation cycle simulations. To account for observation noise, we used measured ocean bottom pressure gauge data, excluding tidal modulation, from a station on the ocean bottom cable network Dense Oceanfloor Network System for Earthquakes and Tsunamis (DONET) in the Kumano basin. We used sequential importance sampling as our data assimilation method. We found that as the amount of data increased, the estimated time interval between the Tonankai (eastern segment) and Nankai (western segment) earthquakes approached the "true" observed interval. In addition, the noise in the pressure gauge data was sufficiently small that simulated crustal deformation patterns could be distinguished for different time intervals. Furthermore, we are currently constructing a prototype, applying this forecasting procedure to the real geodetic data in southwest Japan for great earthquakes along the Nankai trough.

  19. A soft sensor for bioprocess control based on sequential filtering of metabolic heat signals.

    PubMed

    Paulsson, Dan; Gustavsson, Robert; Mandenius, Carl-Fredrik

    2014-09-26

    Soft sensors are the combination of robust on-line sensor signals with mathematical models for deriving additional process information. Here, we apply this principle to a microbial recombinant protein production process in a bioreactor by exploiting bio-calorimetric methodology. Temperature sensor signals from the cooling system of the bioreactor were used for estimating the metabolic heat of the microbial culture and from that the specific growth rate and active biomass concentration were derived. By applying sequential digital signal filtering, the soft sensor was made more robust for industrial practice with cultures generating low metabolic heat in environments with high noise level. The estimated specific growth rate signal obtained from the three stage sequential filter allowed controlled feeding of substrate during the fed-batch phase of the production process. The biomass and growth rate estimates from the soft sensor were also compared with an alternative sensor probe and a capacitance on-line sensor, for the same variables. The comparison showed similar or better sensitivity and lower variability for the metabolic heat soft sensor suggesting that using permanent temperature sensors of a bioreactor is a realistic and inexpensive alternative for monitoring and control. However, both alternatives are easy to implement in a soft sensor, alone or in parallel.

  20. A Soft Sensor for Bioprocess Control Based on Sequential Filtering of Metabolic Heat Signals

    PubMed Central

    Paulsson, Dan; Gustavsson, Robert; Mandenius, Carl-Fredrik

    2014-01-01

    Soft sensors are the combination of robust on-line sensor signals with mathematical models for deriving additional process information. Here, we apply this principle to a microbial recombinant protein production process in a bioreactor by exploiting bio-calorimetric methodology. Temperature sensor signals from the cooling system of the bioreactor were used for estimating the metabolic heat of the microbial culture and from that the specific growth rate and active biomass concentration were derived. By applying sequential digital signal filtering, the soft sensor was made more robust for industrial practice with cultures generating low metabolic heat in environments with high noise level. The estimated specific growth rate signal obtained from the three stage sequential filter allowed controlled feeding of substrate during the fed-batch phase of the production process. The biomass and growth rate estimates from the soft sensor were also compared with an alternative sensor probe and a capacitance on-line sensor, for the same variables. The comparison showed similar or better sensitivity and lower variability for the metabolic heat soft sensor suggesting that using permanent temperature sensors of a bioreactor is a realistic and inexpensive alternative for monitoring and control. However, both alternatives are easy to implement in a soft sensor, alone or in parallel. PMID:25264951

  1. Investigation of mitochondrial dysfunction by sequential microplate-based respiration measurements from intact and permeabilized neurons.

    PubMed

    Clerc, Pascaline; Polster, Brian M

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a component of many neurodegenerative conditions. Measurement of oxygen consumption from intact neurons enables evaluation of mitochondrial bioenergetics under conditions that are more physiologically realistic compared to isolated mitochondria. However, mechanistic analysis of mitochondrial function in cells is complicated by changing energy demands and lack of substrate control. Here we describe a technique for sequentially measuring respiration from intact and saponin-permeabilized cortical neurons on single microplates. This technique allows control of substrates to individual electron transport chain complexes following permeabilization, as well as side-by-side comparisons to intact cells. To illustrate the utility of the technique, we demonstrate that inhibition of respiration by the drug KB-R7943 in intact neurons is relieved by delivery of the complex II substrate succinate, but not by complex I substrates, via acute saponin permeabilization. In contrast, methyl succinate, a putative cell permeable complex II substrate, failed to rescue respiration in intact neurons and was a poor complex II substrate in permeabilized cells. Sequential measurements of intact and permeabilized cell respiration should be particularly useful for evaluating indirect mitochondrial toxicity due to drugs or cellular signaling events which cannot be readily studied using isolated mitochondria.

  2. Investigation of Mitochondrial Dysfunction by Sequential Microplate-Based Respiration Measurements from Intact and Permeabilized Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Clerc, Pascaline; Polster, Brian M.

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a component of many neurodegenerative conditions. Measurement of oxygen consumption from intact neurons enables evaluation of mitochondrial bioenergetics under conditions that are more physiologically realistic compared to isolated mitochondria. However, mechanistic analysis of mitochondrial function in cells is complicated by changing energy demands and lack of substrate control. Here we describe a technique for sequentially measuring respiration from intact and saponin-permeabilized cortical neurons on single microplates. This technique allows control of substrates to individual electron transport chain complexes following permeabilization, as well as side-by-side comparisons to intact cells. To illustrate the utility of the technique, we demonstrate that inhibition of respiration by the drug KB-R7943 in intact neurons is relieved by delivery of the complex II substrate succinate, but not by complex I substrates, via acute saponin permeabilization. In contrast, methyl succinate, a putative cell permeable complex II substrate, failed to rescue respiration in intact neurons and was a poor complex II substrate in permeabilized cells. Sequential measurements of intact and permeabilized cell respiration should be particularly useful for evaluating indirect mitochondrial toxicity due to drugs or cellular signaling events which cannot be readily studied using isolated mitochondria. PMID:22496810

  3. Numerical evaluation of sequential bone drilling strategies based on thermal damage.

    PubMed

    Tai, Bruce L; Palmisano, Andrew C; Belmont, Barry; Irwin, Todd A; Holmes, James; Shih, Albert J

    2015-09-01

    Sequentially drilling multiple holes in bone is used clinically for surface preparation to aid in fusion of a joint, typically under non-irrigated conditions. Drilling induces a significant amount of heat and accumulates after multiple passes, which can result in thermal osteonecrosis and various complications. To understand the heat propagation over time, a 3D finite element model was developed to simulate sequential bone drilling. By incorporating proper material properties and a modified bone necrosis criteria, this model can visualize the propagation of damaged areas. For this study, comparisons between a 2.0 mm Kirschner wire and 2.0 mm twist drill were conducted with their heat sources determined using an inverse method and experimentally measured bone temperatures. Three clinically viable solutions to reduce thermally-induced bone damage were evaluated using finite element analysis, including tool selection, time interval between passes, and different drilling sequences. Results show that the ideal solution would be using twist drills rather than Kirschner wires if the situation allows. A shorter time interval between passes was also found to be beneficial as it reduces the total heat exposure time. Lastly, optimizing the drilling sequence reduced the thermal damage of bone, but the effect may be limited. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using the proposed model to study clinical issues and find potential solutions prior to clinical trials.

  4. Effects of sequentially released BMP-2 and BMP-7 from PELA microcapsule-based scaffolds on the bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xialin; Yi, Weihong; Jin, Anmin; Duan, Yang; Min, Shaoxiong

    2015-01-01

    Osteoinductive biomaterials are helpful for the therapy of large bone defects and provide an alternative to autogenous bone and allografts. Recently, multiple growth factors are delivered to mimic the natural process of bone healing in the bone tissue engineering. Herein, we investigated the effects of sequential released bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) and bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP-7) from polylactide-poly (ethylene glycol)-polylactide (PELA) microcapsule-based scaffolds on the bone regeneration. Through improving the double emulsion/solvent evaporation technique, BMP-7 was encapsulated in PELA microcapsules, to the surface of which BMP-2 was attached. Then, the scaffold (BMP-2/PELA/BMP-7) was fused by these microcapsules with dichloromethane vapor method. In vitro, it sequentially delivered bioactive BMP-2 and BMP-7 and partially imitated the profile of BMPs expression during the fracture healing. To determine the bioactivity of released BMP-2 and BMP-7, alkaline phosphatase (AKP) activity was analyzed in MC3T3-E1 cells. When compared with simple BMP-2 plus BMP-7group and pure PELA group, the AKP activity in BMP-2/PELA/BMP-7 group significantly increased. MTT assay indicated the BMP-loaded PELA scaffold had no adverse effects on cell activity. In addition, the effects of BMP-loaded scaffolds were also investigated in a rat femoral defect model by micro-computed tomographic (mCT) and histological examination. At 4 and 8 weeks post-implantation, BMP-2/PELA/BMP-7 significantly promoted osteogenesis as compared to other groups. The scaffold underwent gradual degradation and replacement by new bones at 8 weeks. Our findings suggest that the sequential release of BMP-2 and BMP-7from PELA microcapsule-based scaffolds is promising for the therapy of bone defects. PMID:26396672

  5. Effects of sequentially released BMP-2 and BMP-7 from PELA microcapsule-based scaffolds on the bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Li, Xialin; Yi, Weihong; Jin, Anmin; Duan, Yang; Min, Shaoxiong

    2015-01-01

    Osteoinductive biomaterials are helpful for the therapy of large bone defects and provide an alternative to autogenous bone and allografts. Recently, multiple growth factors are delivered to mimic the natural process of bone healing in the bone tissue engineering. Herein, we investigated the effects of sequential released bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) and bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP-7) from polylactide-poly (ethylene glycol)-polylactide (PELA) microcapsule-based scaffolds on the bone regeneration. Through improving the double emulsion/solvent evaporation technique, BMP-7 was encapsulated in PELA microcapsules, to the surface of which BMP-2 was attached. Then, the scaffold (BMP-2/PELA/BMP-7) was fused by these microcapsules with dichloromethane vapor method. In vitro, it sequentially delivered bioactive BMP-2 and BMP-7 and partially imitated the profile of BMPs expression during the fracture healing. To determine the bioactivity of released BMP-2 and BMP-7, alkaline phosphatase (AKP) activity was analyzed in MC3T3-E1 cells. When compared with simple BMP-2 plus BMP-7group and pure PELA group, the AKP activity in BMP-2/PELA/BMP-7 group significantly increased. MTT assay indicated the BMP-loaded PELA scaffold had no adverse effects on cell activity. In addition, the effects of BMP-loaded scaffolds were also investigated in a rat femoral defect model by micro-computed tomographic (mCT) and histological examination. At 4 and 8 weeks post-implantation, BMP-2/PELA/BMP-7 significantly promoted osteogenesis as compared to other groups. The scaffold underwent gradual degradation and replacement by new bones at 8 weeks. Our findings suggest that the sequential release of BMP-2 and BMP-7from PELA microcapsule-based scaffolds is promising for the therapy of bone defects.

  6. A non-homogeneous dynamic Bayesian network with sequentially coupled interaction parameters for applications in systems and synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Grzegorczyk, Marco; Husmeier, Dirk

    2012-07-12

    An important and challenging problem in systems biology is the inference of gene regulatory networks from short non-stationary time series of transcriptional profiles. A popular approach that has been widely applied to this end is based on dynamic Bayesian networks (DBNs), although traditional homogeneous DBNs fail to model the non-stationarity and time-varying nature of the gene regulatory processes. Various authors have therefore recently proposed combining DBNs with multiple changepoint processes to obtain time varying dynamic Bayesian networks (TV-DBNs). However, TV-DBNs are not without problems. Gene expression time series are typically short, which leaves the model over-flexible, leading to over-fitting or inflated inference uncertainty. In the present paper, we introduce a Bayesian regularization scheme that addresses this difficulty. Our approach is based on the rationale that changes in gene regulatory processes appear gradually during an organism's life cycle or in response to a changing environment, and we have integrated this notion in the prior distribution of the TV-DBN parameters. We have extensively tested our regularized TV-DBN model on synthetic data, in which we have simulated short non-homogeneous time series produced from a system subject to gradual change. We have then applied our method to real-world gene expression time series, measured during the life cycle of Drosophila melanogaster, under artificially generated constant light condition in Arabidopsis thaliana, and from a synthetically designed strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae exposed to a changing environment.

  7. Classification of epileptic EEG signals based on simple random sampling and sequential feature selection.

    PubMed

    Ghayab, Hadi Ratham Al; Li, Yan; Abdulla, Shahab; Diykh, Mohammed; Wan, Xiangkui

    2016-06-01

    Electroencephalogram (EEG) signals are used broadly in the medical fields. The main applications of EEG signals are the diagnosis and treatment of diseases such as epilepsy, Alzheimer, sleep problems and so on. This paper presents a new method which extracts and selects features from multi-channel EEG signals. This research focuses on three main points. Firstly, simple random sampling (SRS) technique is used to extract features from the time domain of EEG signals. Secondly, the sequential feature selection (SFS) algorithm is applied to select the key features and to reduce the dimensionality of the data. Finally, the selected features are forwarded to a least square support vector machine (LS_SVM) classifier to classify the EEG signals. The LS_SVM classifier classified the features which are extracted and selected from the SRS and the SFS. The experimental results show that the method achieves 99.90, 99.80 and 100 % for classification accuracy, sensitivity and specificity, respectively.

  8. Sequential quadratic programming-based fast path planning algorithm subject to no-fly zone constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Ma, Shunjian; Sun, Mingwei; Yi, Haidong; Wang, Zenghui; Chen, Zengqiang

    2016-08-01

    Path planning plays an important role in aircraft guided systems. Multiple no-fly zones in the flight area make path planning a constrained nonlinear optimization problem. It is necessary to obtain a feasible optimal solution in real time. In this article, the flight path is specified to be composed of alternate line segments and circular arcs, in order to reformulate the problem into a static optimization one in terms of the waypoints. For the commonly used circular and polygonal no-fly zones, geometric conditions are established to determine whether or not the path intersects with them, and these can be readily programmed. Then, the original problem is transformed into a form that can be solved by the sequential quadratic programming method. The solution can be obtained quickly using the Sparse Nonlinear OPTimizer (SNOPT) package. Mathematical simulations are used to verify the effectiveness and rapidity of the proposed algorithm.

  9. Pure perceptual-based learning of second-, third-, and fourth-order sequential probabilities.

    PubMed

    Remillard, Gilbert

    2011-07-01

    There is evidence that sequence learning in the traditional serial reaction time task (SRTT), where target location is the response dimension, and sequence learning in the perceptual SRTT, where target location is not the response dimension, are handled by different mechanisms. The ability of the latter mechanism to learn sequential contingencies that can be learned by the former mechanism was examined. Prior research has established that people can learn second-, third-, and fourth-order probabilities in the traditional SRTT. The present study reveals that people can learn such probabilities in the perceptual SRTT. This suggests that the two mechanisms may have similar architectures. A possible neural basis of the two mechanisms is discussed.

  10. Separation of single-base sequential isomers of single-stranded DNA by capillary electrophoresis and its application in the discrimination of single-base DNA mutations.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Takao; Hoshino, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Toru

    2017-08-01

    Separation of single-base substitution sequential DNA isomers remains one of the most challenging tasks in DNA separation by capillary electrophoresis. We developed a simple, versatile capillary electrophoresis technique for the separation of single-base sequential isomers of DNA having the same chain length. This technique is based on charge differences resulting from the different protonation (acid dissociation) properties of the four DNA bases. A mixture of 13 single-base sequential isomers of 12-mer single-stranded DNA was separated by using an electrophoretic buffer solution containing 20 mM phosphoric acid (pH 2.0) and 8 M urea. We demonstrated that our method could separate all possible mutation patterns under identical experimental conditions. In addition, application of our method to the separation of the polymerase chain reaction product of a 68-mer gene fragment and its single-base isomers indicates that in combination with the appropriate genomic DNA extraction techniques, the method can detect single-base gene mutations. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Modality-specific spectral dynamics in response to visual and tactile sequential shape information processing tasks: An MEG study using multivariate pattern classification analysis.

    PubMed

    Gohel, Bakul; Lee, Peter; Jeong, Yong

    2016-08-01

    Brain regions that respond to more than one sensory modality are characterized as multisensory regions. Studies on the processing of shape or object information have revealed recruitment of the lateral occipital cortex, posterior parietal cortex, and other regions regardless of input sensory modalities. However, it remains unknown whether such regions show similar (modality-invariant) or different (modality-specific) neural oscillatory dynamics, as recorded using magnetoencephalography (MEG), in response to identical shape information processing tasks delivered to different sensory modalities. Modality-invariant or modality-specific neural oscillatory dynamics indirectly suggest modality-independent or modality-dependent participation of particular brain regions, respectively. Therefore, this study investigated the modality-specificity of neural oscillatory dynamics in the form of spectral power modulation patterns in response to visual and tactile sequential shape-processing tasks that are well-matched in terms of speed and content between the sensory modalities. Task-related changes in spectral power modulation and differences in spectral power modulation between sensory modalities were investigated at source-space (voxel) level, using a multivariate pattern classification (MVPC) approach. Additionally, whole analyses were extended from the voxel level to the independent-component level to take account of signal leakage effects caused by inverse solution. The modality-specific spectral dynamics in multisensory and higher-order brain regions, such as the lateral occipital cortex, posterior parietal cortex, inferior temporal cortex, and other brain regions, showed task-related modulation in response to both sensory modalities. This suggests modality-dependency of such brain regions on the input sensory modality for sequential shape-information processing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparison of dynamic mobilization of Co, Cd and Pb in sediments using DGT and metal mobility assessed by sequential extraction.

    PubMed

    Roulier, Jean-Louis; Belaud, Sylvain; Coquery, Marina

    2010-05-01

    Management of metal-contaminated sediments requires an accurate knowledge of metal distribution and metal exchanges between the solid and solution phase. The DGT technique (diffusive gradients in thin films) provides information about the characteristics of metal release from the particles to the porewaters. However, the species of metals that participate in the exchange are not well documented. The aim of this paper was to explore the DGT response of Co, Cd and Pb, to a range of reservoir sediments exhibiting gradients of physico-chemical parameters. We also characterized the chemical partitioning of the three metals by sequential extraction to determine the nature of the sediment-bound metals species that could participate to the metal resupply to the porewaters. Results from DGT experiments and sequential extraction show that specific geochemical phases are key factors for the mobilization of individual metals towards DGT: dissolved organic matter and manganese oxides for Co, acid-volatile sulfides for Cd and particulate organic matter for Pb. Moreover, the masses of metals trapped in DGT are mainly correlated with the concentrations of metals that are easily exchangeable, specifically sorbed or weakly bound to labile organic matter.

  13. Addition of erlotinib to fluoropyrimidine-oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy with or without bevacizumab: Two sequential phase I trials.

    PubMed

    Carlomagno, Chiara; Daniele, Gennaro; Bianco, Roberto; Marciano, Roberta; Damiano, Vincenzo; Matano, Elide; Nappi, Lucia; Pepe, Stefano; DE Placido, Sabino; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2011-05-01

    The combination of EGFR inhibitors and anti-angiogenic drugs has a strong pre-clinical rationale, yet its use has produced controversial clinical results. We conducted two sequential phase I trials to evaluate the feasibility and the recommended dose of erlotinib when combined with fluoropyrimidine-oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy with or without bevacizumab. A total of 21 metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients were treated in two sequential phase I trials. In the first trial, 12 patients were treated with escalating doses of erlotinib plus FOLFOX. In the second, 9 patients were treated with escalating doses of erlotinib combined with oxaliplatin, capecitabine and bevacizumab. No MTD was reached in either of the trials. The only dose-limiting toxicities observed were neutropenia and diarrhea. No unexpected toxicities were noted. Hematological toxicity was the most frequently noted adverse event with infusional 5FU therapy, while gastrointestinal toxicity was the most common adverse event. In the second trial most patients withdrew from treatment due to toxicity, and less than half completed the therapeutic program as per protocol, mostly due to toxicity. In conclusion, the present study confirms the disappointing results of the double combination of EGFR inhibitors and anti-angiogenic drugs in mCRC patients.

  14. Firefly Luciferase-Based Sequential Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET)-Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) Protease Assays.

    PubMed

    Branchini, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    We describe here the preparation of ratiometric luminescent probes that contain two well-separated emission peaks produced by a sequential bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET)-fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) process. The probes are single soluble fusion proteins consisting of a thermostable firefly luciferase variant that catalyzes yellow-green (560 nm maximum) bioluminescence and a red fluorescent protein covalently labeled with a near-Infrared fluorescent dye. The two proteins are connected by a decapeptide containing a protease recognition site specific for factor Xa, thrombin, or caspase 3. The rates of protease cleavage of the fusion protein substrates were monitored by recording emission spectra and plotting the change in peak ratios over time. Detection limits of 0.41 nM for caspase 3, 1.0 nM for thrombin, and 58 nM for factor Xa were realized with a scanning fluorometer. This method successfully employs an efficient sequential BRET-FRET energy transfer process based on firefly luciferase bioluminescence to assay physiologically important protease activities and should be generally applicable to the measurement of any endoprotease lacking accessible cysteine residues.

  15. Urban vehicle detection in high-resolution aerial images via superpixel segmentation and correlation-based sequential dictionary learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xunxun; Xu, Hongke; Fang, Jianwu; Sheng, Gang

    2017-04-01

    Vehicle detection in high-resolution aerial images has received widespread interests when it comes to providing the required information for traffic management and urban planning. It is challenging due to the relatively small size of the vehicles and the complex background. Furthermore, it is particularly challenging if the higher detection efficiency is required. Therefore, an urban vehicle detection algorithm is proposed via improved entropy rate clustering (IERC) and correlation-based sequential dictionary learning (CSDL). First, to enhance the detection accuracy, IERC is designed to generate more regular superpixels. It aims to avoid the situation that one superpixel sometimes straddles multiple vehicles. The generated superpixels are then treated as the seeds for the training sample selection. Then, CSDL is constructed to achieve a fast sequential training and updating of the dictionary. In CSDL, only the atoms correlated with the sparse representation of the new training data are inferred. Finally, comprehensive analyses and comparisons on two data sets demonstrate that the proposed method generates satisfactory and competitive results.

  16. Addition of erlotinib to fluoropyrimidine-oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy with or without bevacizumab: Two sequential phase I trials

    PubMed Central

    CARLOMAGNO, CHIARA; DANIELE, GENNARO; BIANCO, ROBERTO; MARCIANO, ROBERTA; DAMIANO, VINCENZO; MATANO, ELIDE; NAPPI, LUCIA; PEPE, STEFANO; DE PLACIDO, SABINO; TORTORA, GIAMPAOLO

    2011-01-01

    The combination of EGFR inhibitors and anti-angiogenic drugs has a strong pre-clinical rationale, yet its use has produced controversial clinical results. We conducted two sequential phase I trials to evaluate the feasibility and the recommended dose of erlotinib when combined with fluoropyrimidine-oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy with or without bevacizumab. A total of 21 metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients were treated in two sequential phase I trials. In the first trial, 12 patients were treated with escalating doses of erlotinib plus FOLFOX. In the second, 9 patients were treated with escalating doses of erlotinib combined with oxaliplatin, capecitabine and bevacizumab. No MTD was reached in either of the trials. The only dose-limiting toxicities observed were neutropenia and diarrhea. No unexpected toxicities were noted. Hematological toxicity was the most frequently noted adverse event with infusional 5FU therapy, while gastrointestinal toxicity was the most common adverse event. In the second trial most patients withdrew from treatment due to toxicity, and less than half completed the therapeutic program as per protocol, mostly due to toxicity. In conclusion, the present study confirms the disappointing results of the double combination of EGFR inhibitors and anti-angiogenic drugs in mCRC patients. PMID:22977524

  17. Cryptosystems based on chaotic dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    McNees, R.A.; Protopopescu, V.; Santoro, R.T.; Tolliver, J.S.

    1993-08-01

    An encryption scheme based on chaotic dynamics is presented. This scheme makes use of the efficient and reproducible generation of cryptographically secure pseudo random numbers from chaotic maps. The result is a system which encrypts quickly and possesses a large keyspace, even in small precision implementations. This system offers an excellent solution to several problems including the dissemination of key material, over the air rekeying, and other situations requiring the secure management of information.

  18. Decoding-Accuracy-Based Sequential Dimensionality Reduction of Spatio-Temporal Neural Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funamizu, Akihiro; Kanzaki, Ryohei; Takahashi, Hirokazu

    Performance of a brain machine interface (BMI) critically depends on selection of input data because information embedded in the neural activities is highly redundant. In addition, properly selected input data with a reduced dimension leads to improvement of decoding generalization ability and decrease of computational efforts, both of which are significant advantages for the clinical applications. In the present paper, we propose an algorithm of sequential dimensionality reduction (SDR) that effectively extracts motor/sensory related spatio-temporal neural activities. The algorithm gradually reduces input data dimension by dropping neural data spatio-temporally so as not to undermine the decoding accuracy as far as possible. Support vector machine (SVM) was used as the decoder, and tone-induced neural activities in rat auditory cortices were decoded into the test tone frequencies. SDR reduced the input data dimension to a quarter and significantly improved the accuracy of decoding of novel data. Moreover, spatio-temporal neural activity patterns selected by SDR resulted in significantly higher accuracy than high spike rate patterns or conventionally used spatial patterns. These results suggest that the proposed algorithm can improve the generalization ability and decrease the computational effort of decoding.

  19. Design of LabVIEW-based software for the control of sequential injection analysis instrumentation for the determination of morphine.

    PubMed

    Lenehan, Claire E; Barnett, Neil W; Lewis, Simon W

    2002-01-01

    LabVIEW-based software for the automation of a sequential injection analysis instrument for the determination of morphine is presented. Detection was based on its chemiluminescence reaction with acidic potassium permanganate in the presence of sodium polyphosphate. The calibration function approximated linearity (range 5 x 10(-10) to 5 x 10(-6) M) with a line of best fit of y=1.05(x)+8.9164 (R(2) =0.9959), where y is the log10 signal (mV) and x is the log10 morphine concentration (M). Precision, as measured by relative standard deviation, was 0.7% for five replicate analyses of morphine standard (5 x 10(-8) M). The limit of detection (3sigma) was determined as 5 x 10(-11) M morphine.

  20. Sorafenib plus dacarbazine in solid tumors: a phase I study with dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasonography and genomic analysis of sequential tumor biopsy samples.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Vladimir; Lassau, Nathalie; Meurice, Guillaume; Loriot, Yohann; Peña, Carol; Massard, Christophe; Robert, Caroline; Robert, Thomas; Le Berre, Marie-Aude; de Baere, Thierry; Dessen, Philippe; Soria, Jean-Charles; Armand, Jean-Pierre

    2014-04-01

    Improved prognostic accuracy for treatment response and a wider understanding of drug effects in humans are crucial for enhancing the utility of sorafenib and other promising targeted therapies. We developed a strategy of global genomic investigation of sequential tumor biopsy samples at baseline and 21 days post treatment, and applied this approach in a phase I study of sorafenib plus dacarbazine in patients with solid tumors. The objective of this study was also to validate functional parameters of DCE-US as surrogate markers to predict earlier response. Patients received 21-day cycles of oral sorafenib, 400 mg twice daily and dacarbazine, 1,000 mg/m(2) in a 1-h intravenous infusion on day 1. Efficacy was assessed using response evaluation criteria in solid tumors. Sequential biopsy samples (baseline and day 21) were obtained from the same tumor. Changes from baseline in global gene expression (GE) measured by genomic microarrays and in tumor vascularity at baseline, D8, D21, D 42 and every 2 cycles using dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (DCE-US) were analyzed for patients with and without a clinical response to treatment at 3 months. Among 23 patients evaluable for treatment efficacy, 17 were eligible for gene expression and DCE-US analyses. One patient achieved a partial response; 14 exhibited stable disease. Ten patients were defined as exhibiting stable disease (SD) and 7, progressive disease (PD) at 3 months. Genomic analyses identified a 237-gene signature that distinguished SD from PD at 3 months. Of note, CDK4 overexpression and PDGFR downregulation were associated with PD. Functional parameters of DCE-US representing the blood volume at baseline, day 8, and day 21 were correlated with disease progression at 3 months. This novel approach of sequential investigations in a phase I trial was feasible, detecting early changes in gene expression and tumor vascularity evaluated using DCE-US that may be predictive of clinical outcome.

  1. Personalized Recommendation of Learning Material Using Sequential Pattern Mining and Attribute Based Collaborative Filtering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salehi, Mojtaba; Nakhai Kamalabadi, Isa; Ghaznavi Ghoushchi, Mohammad Bagher

    2014-01-01

    Material recommender system is a significant part of e-learning systems for personalization and recommendation of appropriate materials to learners. However, in the existing recommendation algorithms, dynamic interests and multi-preference of learners and multidimensional-attribute of materials are not fully considered simultaneously. Moreover,…

  2. Personalized Recommendation of Learning Material Using Sequential Pattern Mining and Attribute Based Collaborative Filtering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salehi, Mojtaba; Nakhai Kamalabadi, Isa; Ghaznavi Ghoushchi, Mohammad Bagher

    2014-01-01

    Material recommender system is a significant part of e-learning systems for personalization and recommendation of appropriate materials to learners. However, in the existing recommendation algorithms, dynamic interests and multi-preference of learners and multidimensional-attribute of materials are not fully considered simultaneously. Moreover,…

  3. Substrate-independent sequential deposition process to obtain the lotus effect based on mussel-inspired polydopamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Junfei; Pan, Bing; Chen, Yiwei; Xie, Chan; Xue, Mingshan; Wang, Fajun; Li, Wen

    2015-02-01

    A substrate-independent route to achieve the lotus effect on a variety of substrates is proposed based on mussel-inspired polydopamine (PDA), and was tested on titanium alloy, polypropylene and silicon substrates. The substrates were firstly coated with PDA and then sequentially transferred to aqueous CuCl2 and AgNO3 solutions for copper and silver deposition. Finally, the samples were passivated by the low-surface-energy molecules of 1-dodecanethiol, and surface superhydrophobicity (contact angle > 160°; sliding angle between 1° and 2°) could be obtained. Due to the strong adhesion of PDA to a wide range of materials, it is expected that this deposition process can be applied to a variety of other substrates including metal, polymer, and inorganic-nonmetallic materials.

  4. Nonlinear dynamics based digital logic and circuits

    PubMed Central

    Kia, Behnam; Lindner, John. F.; Ditto, William L.

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the role and importance of dynamics in the brain and biological neural networks and argue that dynamics is one of the main missing elements in conventional Boolean logic and circuits. We summarize a simple dynamics based computing method, and categorize different techniques that we have introduced to realize logic, functionality, and programmability. We discuss the role and importance of coupled dynamics in networks of biological excitable cells, and then review our simple coupled dynamics based method for computing. In this paper, for the first time, we show how dynamics can be used and programmed to implement computation in any given base, including but not limited to base two. PMID:26029096

  5. Nonlinear dynamics based digital logic and circuits.

    PubMed

    Kia, Behnam; Lindner, John F; Ditto, William L

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the role and importance of dynamics in the brain and biological neural networks and argue that dynamics is one of the main missing elements in conventional Boolean logic and circuits. We summarize a simple dynamics based computing method, and categorize different techniques that we have introduced to realize logic, functionality, and programmability. We discuss the role and importance of coupled dynamics in networks of biological excitable cells, and then review our simple coupled dynamics based method for computing. In this paper, for the first time, we show how dynamics can be used and programmed to implement computation in any given base, including but not limited to base two.

  6. Mechanochemical solid-state synthesis of 2-aminothiazoles, quinoxalines and benzoylbenzofurans from ketones by one-pot sequential acid- and base-mediated reactions.

    PubMed

    Nagarajaiah, Honnappa; Mishra, Abhaya Kumar; Moorthy, Jarugu Narasimha

    2016-04-26

    α-Chloroketones - obtained by the atom-economical chlorination of ketones with trichloroisocyanuric acid (TCCA) in the presence of p-TSA under ball-milling conditions - were set up for a sequential base-mediated condensation reaction with thiourea/thiosemicarbazides, o-phenylenediamine and salicylaldehyde to afford 2-aminothiazoles, 2-hydrazinylthiazoles, quinoxalines and benzoylbenzofurans, respectively, in respectable yields. The viability of one-pot sequential acid- and base-mediated reactions in the solid state under ball-milling conditions is thus demonstrated.

  7. Sequential RBF surrogate-based efficient optimization method for engineering design problems with expensive black-box functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Lei; Liu, Li; Long, Teng; Guo, Xiaosong

    2014-11-01

    As a promising technique, surrogate-based design and optimization(SBDO) has been widely used in modern engineering design optimizations. Currently, static surrogate-based optimization methods have been successfully applied to expensive optimization problems. However, due to the low efficiency and poor flexibility, static surrogate-based optimization methods are difficult to efficiently solve practical engineering cases. At the aim of enhancing efficiency, a novel surrogate-based efficient optimization method is developed by using sequential radial basis function(SEO-SRBF). Moreover, augmented Lagrangian multiplier method is adopted to solve the problems involving expensive constraints. In order to study the performance of SEO-SRBF, several numerical benchmark functions and engineering problems are solved by SEO-SRBF and other well-known surrogate-based optimization methods including EGO, MPS, and IARSM. The optimal solutions, number of function evaluations, and algorithm execution time are recorded for comparison. The comparison results demonstrate that SEO-SRBF shows satisfactory performance in both optimization efficiency and global convergence capability. The CPU time required for running SEO-SRBF is dramatically less than that of other algorithms. In the torque arm optimization case using FEA simulation, SEO-SRBF further reduces 21% of the material volume compared with the solution from static-RBF subject to the stress constraint. This study provides the efficient strategy to solve expensive constrained optimization problems.

  8. Ventral striatal dopamine reflects behavioral and neural signatures of model-based control during sequential decision making.

    PubMed

    Deserno, Lorenz; Huys, Quentin J M; Boehme, Rebecca; Buchert, Ralph; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Grace, Anthony A; Dolan, Raymond J; Heinz, Andreas; Schlagenhauf, Florian

    2015-02-03

    Dual system theories suggest that behavioral control is parsed between a deliberative "model-based" and a more reflexive "model-free" system. A balance of control exerted by these systems is thought to be related to dopamine neurotransmission. However, in the absence of direct measures of human dopamine, it remains unknown whether this reflects a quantitative relation with dopamine either in the striatum or other brain areas. Using a sequential decision task performed during functional magnetic resonance imaging, combined with striatal measures of dopamine using [(18)F]DOPA positron emission tomography, we show that higher presynaptic ventral striatal dopamine levels were associated with a behavioral bias toward more model-based control. Higher presynaptic dopamine in ventral striatum was associated with greater coding of model-based signatures in lateral prefrontal cortex and diminished coding of model-free prediction errors in ventral striatum. Thus, interindividual variability in ventral striatal presynaptic dopamine reflects a balance in the behavioral expression and the neural signatures of model-free and model-based control. Our data provide a novel perspective on how alterations in presynaptic dopamine levels might be accompanied by a disruption of behavioral control as observed in aging or neuropsychiatric diseases such as schizophrenia and addiction.

  9. Comparison of Proximally Versus Distally Placed Spatially Distributed Sequential Stimulation Electrodes in a Dynamic Knee Extension Task.

    PubMed

    Laubacher, Marco; Aksöz, Efe A; Binder-Macleod, Stuart; Hunt, Kenneth J

    2016-06-13

    Spatially distributed sequential stimulation (SDSS) has demonstrated substantial power output and fatigue benefits compared to single electrode stimulation (SES) in the application of functional electrical stimulation (FES). This asymmetric electrode setup brings new possibilities but also new questions since precise placement of the electrodes is one critical factor for good muscle activation. The aim of this study was to compare the power output, fatigue and activation properties of proximally versus distally placed SDSS electrodes in an isokinetic knee extension task simulating knee movement during recumbent cycling. M. vastus lateralis and medialis of seven able-bodied subjects were stimulated with rectangular bi-phasic pulses of constant amplitude of 40 mA and at an SDSS frequency of 35 Hz for 6 min on both legs with both setups (i.e. n=14). Torque was measured during knee-extension movement by a dynamometer at an angular velocity of 110 deg/s. Mean power, peak power and activation time were calculated and compared for the initial and final stimulation phases, together with an overall fatigue index. Power output values (Pmean, Ppeak) were scaled to a standardised reference input pulse width of 100 μs (Pmean,s, Ppeak,s). The initial evaluation phase showed no significant differences between the two setups for all outcome measures. Ppeak and Ppeak,s were both significantly higher in the final phase for the distal setup (25.4 ± 8.1 W vs. 28.2 ± 6.2 W, p=0.0062 and 34.8 ± 9.5 W vs. 38.9 ± 6.7 W, p=0.021, respectively). With distal SDSS, there was modest evidence of higher Pmean and Pmean,s (p=0.071, p=0.14, respectively) but of longer activation time (p=0.096). The rate of fatigue was similar for both setups. For practical FES applications, distal placement of the SDSS electrodes is preferable.

  10. Sequential biases in accumulating evidence.

    PubMed

    Kulinskaya, Elena; Huggins, Richard; Dogo, Samson Henry

    2016-09-01

    Whilst it is common in clinical trials to use the results of tests at one phase to decide whether to continue to the next phase and to subsequently design the next phase, we show that this can lead to biased results in evidence synthesis. Two new kinds of bias associated with accumulating evidence, termed 'sequential decision bias' and 'sequential design bias', are identified. Both kinds of bias are the result of making decisions on the usefulness of a new study, or its design, based on the previous studies. Sequential decision bias is determined by the correlation between the value of the current estimated effect and the probability of conducting an additional study. Sequential design bias arises from using the estimated value instead of the clinically relevant value of an effect in sample size calculations. We considered both the fixed-effect and the random-effects models of meta-analysis and demonstrated analytically and by simulations that in both settings the problems due to sequential biases are apparent. According to our simulations, the sequential biases increase with increased heterogeneity. Minimisation of sequential biases arises as a new and important research area necessary for successful evidence-based approaches to the development of science. © 2015 The Authors. Research Synthesis Methods Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. © 2015 The Authors. Research Synthesis Methods Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Sequential biases in accumulating evidence

    PubMed Central

    Huggins, Richard; Dogo, Samson Henry

    2015-01-01

    Whilst it is common in clinical trials to use the results of tests at one phase to decide whether to continue to the next phase and to subsequently design the next phase, we show that this can lead to biased results in evidence synthesis. Two new kinds of bias associated with accumulating evidence, termed ‘sequential decision bias’ and ‘sequential design bias’, are identified. Both kinds of bias are the result of making decisions on the usefulness of a new study, or its design, based on the previous studies. Sequential decision bias is determined by the correlation between the value of the current estimated effect and the probability of conducting an additional study. Sequential design bias arises from using the estimated value instead of the clinically relevant value of an effect in sample size calculations. We considered both the fixed‐effect and the random‐effects models of meta‐analysis and demonstrated analytically and by simulations that in both settings the problems due to sequential biases are apparent. According to our simulations, the sequential biases increase with increased heterogeneity. Minimisation of sequential biases arises as a new and important research area necessary for successful evidence‐based approaches to the development of science. © 2015 The Authors. Research Synthesis Methods Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26626562

  12. Ventral striatal dopamine reflects behavioral and neural signatures of model-based control during sequential decision making

    PubMed Central

    Deserno, Lorenz; Huys, Quentin J. M.; Boehme, Rebecca; Buchert, Ralph; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Grace, Anthony A.; Dolan, Raymond J.; Heinz, Andreas; Schlagenhauf, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Dual system theories suggest that behavioral control is parsed between a deliberative “model-based” and a more reflexive “model-free” system. A balance of control exerted by these systems is thought to be related to dopamine neurotransmission. However, in the absence of direct measures of human dopamine, it remains unknown whether this reflects a quantitative relation with dopamine either in the striatum or other brain areas. Using a sequential decision task performed during functional magnetic resonance imaging, combined with striatal measures of dopamine using [18F]DOPA positron emission tomography, we show that higher presynaptic ventral striatal dopamine levels were associated with a behavioral bias toward more model-based control. Higher presynaptic dopamine in ventral striatum was associated with greater coding of model-based signatures in lateral prefrontal cortex and diminished coding of model-free prediction errors in ventral striatum. Thus, interindividual variability in ventral striatal presynaptic dopamine reflects a balance in the behavioral expression and the neural signatures of model-free and model-based control. Our data provide a novel perspective on how alterations in presynaptic dopamine levels might be accompanied by a disruption of behavioral control as observed in aging or neuropsychiatric diseases such as schizophrenia and addiction. PMID:25605941

  13. On the Use of Adaptive Instructional Images Based on the Sequential-Global Dimension of the Felder-Silverman Learning Style Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filippidis, Stavros K.; Tsoukalas, Ioannis A.

    2009-01-01

    An adaptive educational system that uses adaptive presentation is presented. In this system fragments of different images present the same content and the system can choose the one most relevant to the user based on the sequential-global dimension of Felder-Silverman's learning style theory. In order to retrieve the learning style of each student…

  14. On the Use of Adaptive Instructional Images Based on the Sequential-Global Dimension of the Felder-Silverman Learning Style Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filippidis, Stavros K.; Tsoukalas, Ioannis A.

    2009-01-01

    An adaptive educational system that uses adaptive presentation is presented. In this system fragments of different images present the same content and the system can choose the one most relevant to the user based on the sequential-global dimension of Felder-Silverman's learning style theory. In order to retrieve the learning style of each student…

  15. Sequential optimization with particle splitting-based reliability assessment for engineering design under uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Xiaotian; Pan, Rong; Sun, Qing

    2014-08-01

    The evaluation of probabilistic constraints plays an important role in reliability-based design optimization. Traditional simulation methods such as Monte Carlo simulation can provide highly accurate results, but they are often computationally intensive to implement. To improve the computational efficiency of the Monte Carlo method, this article proposes a particle splitting approach, a rare-event simulation technique that evaluates probabilistic constraints. The particle splitting-based reliability assessment is integrated into the iterative steps of design optimization. The proposed method provides an enhancement of subset simulation by increasing sample diversity and producing a stable solution. This method is further extended to address the problem with multiple probabilistic constraints. The performance of the particle splitting approach is compared with the most probable point based method and other approximation methods through examples.

  16. Dynamic holographic three-dimensional projection based on liquid crystal spatial light modulator and cylindrical fog screen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Zhenxiang; Zheng, Huadong; Lu, Xiaoqian; Gao, Hongyue; Yu, Yingjie

    2015-10-01

    A dynamic holographic three-dimensional (3D) projection based on phase-only liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LC-SLM) and cylindrical fog 3D screen is introduced. Sequential kinoforms of a 3D real existing object are calculated from sixty viewing angles using the slice-based fresnel diffraction algorithm. To suppress speckle noise of reconstructed images, sub-kinoforms for each viewing angle are calculated by adding dynamic pseudorandom initial phase factor into each object plane. The sequential kinoforms are reconstructed by a holographic reconstruction system based on phase-only LC-SLM. A specially designed cylindrical fog 3D screen is used as the scattered carrying medium to project the dynamic 3D images. Through our holographic 3D projection system, a vivid dynamic holographic reconstructed projection image can be observed by some observers at the same time.

  17. Comparison of Proximally Versus Distally Placed Spatially Distributed Sequential Stimulation Electrodes in a Dynamic Knee Extension Task

    PubMed Central

    Laubacher, Marco; Aksöz, Efe A.; Binder-Macleod, Stuart; Hunt, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    Spatially distributed sequential stimulation (SDSS) has demonstrated substantial power output and fatigue benefits compared to single electrode stimulation (SES) in the application of functional electrical stimulation (FES). This asymmetric electrode setup brings new possibilities but also new questions since precise placement of the electrodes is one critical factor for good muscle activation. The aim of this study was to compare the power output, fatigue and activation properties of proximally versus distally placed SDSS electrodes in an isokinetic knee extension task simulating knee movement during recumbent cycling. M. vastus lateralis and medialis of seven able-bodied subjects were stimulated with rectangular bi-phasic pulses of constant amplitude of 40 mA and at an SDSS frequency of 35 Hz for 6 min on both legs with both setups (i.e. n=14). Torque was measured during knee-extension movement by a dynamometer at an angular velocity of 110 deg/s. Mean power, peak power and activation time were calculated and compared for the initial and final stimulation phases, together with an overall fatigue index. Power output values (Pmean, Ppeak) were scaled to a standardised reference input pulse width of 100 μs (Pmean,s, Ppeak,s). The initial evaluation phase showed no significant differences between the two setups for all outcome measures. Ppeak and Ppeak,s were both significantly higher in the final phase for the distal setup (25.4 ± 8.1 W vs. 28.2 ± 6.2 W, p=0.0062 and 34.8 ± 9.5 W vs. 38.9 ± 6.7 W, p=0.021, respectively). With distal SDSS, there was modest evidence of higher Pmean and Pmean,s (p=0.071, p=0.14, respectively) but of longer activation time (p=0.096). The rate of fatigue was similar for both setups. For practical FES applications, distal placement of the SDSS electrodes is preferable. PMID:27478563

  18. Electronic excitation of Cl- in liquid water and at the surface of a cluster: a sequential Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics/quantum mechanics approach.

    PubMed

    Galamba, Nuno; Mata, Ricardo A; Cabral, Benedito J Costa

    2009-12-31

    A sequential molecular dynamics/quantum mechanics approach is applied to investigate the electronic excitation of Cl(-) in liquid water and in a water cluster. Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) and equation-of-motion coupled-cluster with single and double excitations (EOM-CCSD) are used to calculate the excitation energies from Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics configurations. The selected configurations include a quantum system with the Cl(-) anion and a number of explicit water molecules (n(w)) as well as an embedding background defined by fractional point charges on the remaining water molecules. Our results indicate that for both the liquid and the cluster environments the excited electron is delocalized on the hydrogen atoms of the first hydration shell and in a nearby cavity. Convergence of the charge-transfer-to-solvent (CTTS) energy with the number of water molecules is observed for a quantum system embedded in the polarizing charge background for n(w) > or = 3. Furthermore, we find that the CTTS energy of Cl(-) in both solution and cluster environments is very similar. The predicted CTTS energy threshold for the ionic solution (approximately 6.6 +/- 0.3 eV) is in good agreement with experiment (6.8 and 7.1 eV).

  19. The Listening and Reading Comprehension (LARC) Program....Experiential Based Sequential Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumenstyk, Holly; And Others

    The LARC (Listening and Reading Comprehension) Program, an experiential based story grammar approach to listening and reading comprehension is described, and a pilot study of its effectiveness with communication handicapped children is reviewed. The LARC framework translates children's own recent experiences into sequenced story episodes which are…

  20. Development of Sequential Optimization Method for CNC Turning Based on In-Process Tool Wear Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriwaki, Toshimichi; Tangjitsitcharoen, Somkiat; Shibasaka, Toshiroh

    A system and procedures are developed to optimize the cutting speed for CNC turning. The current amount of tool wear is estimated based on the in-process cutting force measurement by applying the method developed and reported previously. Once the tool wear is estimated for the different cutting speeds, the coefficients of the Taylor’s tool life equation are determined or successively modified based on the estimated tool wear data. The optimum cutting speed is obtained by referring to the criteria of either the minimum production cost or the maximum production rate. The system developed is applied to actual turning of carbon steel with coated carbide tools, and it has been proved that the system runs satisfactory. The method developed here can be readily applied to unknown combinations of the work material and the tool, as it searches the optimum cutting conditions automatically while the process is going on.

  1. Assessment of outdoor radiofrequency electromagnetic field exposure through hotspot localization using kriging-based sequential sampling.

    PubMed

    Aerts, Sam; Deschrijver, Dirk; Verloock, Leen; Dhaene, Tom; Martens, Luc; Joseph, Wout

    2013-10-01

    In this study, a novel methodology is proposed to create heat maps that accurately pinpoint the outdoor locations with elevated exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) in an extensive urban region (or, hotspots), and that would allow local authorities and epidemiologists to efficiently assess the locations and spectral composition of these hotspots, while at the same time developing a global picture of the exposure in the area. Moreover, no prior knowledge about the presence of radiofrequency radiation sources (e.g., base station parameters) is required. After building a surrogate model from the available data using kriging, the proposed method makes use of an iterative sampling strategy that selects new measurement locations at spots which are deemed to contain the most valuable information-inside hotspots or in search of them-based on the prediction uncertainty of the model. The method was tested and validated in an urban subarea of Ghent, Belgium with a size of approximately 1 km2. In total, 600 input and 50 validation measurements were performed using a broadband probe. Five hotspots were discovered and assessed, with maximum total electric-field strengths ranging from 1.3 to 3.1 V/m, satisfying the reference levels issued by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection for exposure of the general public to RF-EMF. Spectrum analyzer measurements in these hotspots revealed five radiofrequency signals with a relevant contribution to the exposure. The radiofrequency radiation emitted by 900 MHz Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) base stations was always dominant, with contributions ranging from 45% to 100%. Finally, validation of the subsequent surrogate models shows high prediction accuracy, with the final model featuring an average relative error of less than 2dB (factor 1.26 in electric-field strength), a correlation coefficient of 0.7, and a specificity of 0.96.

  2. Structure Controlled Long-Range Sequential Tunneling in Carbon-Based Molecular Junctions.

    PubMed

    Morteza Najarian, Amin; McCreery, Richard L

    2017-04-25

    Carbon-based molecular junctions consisting of aromatic oligomers between conducting sp(2) hybridized carbon electrodes exhibit structure-dependent current densities (J) when the molecular layer thickness (d) exceeds ∼5 nm. All four of the molecular structures examined exhibit an unusual, nonlinear ln J vs bias voltage (V) dependence which is not expected for conventional coherent tunneling or activated hopping mechanisms. All molecules exhibit a weak temperature dependence, with J increasing typically by a factor of 2 over the range of 200-440 K. Fluorene and anthraquinone show linear plots of ln J vs d with nearly identical J values for the range d = 3-10 nm, despite significant differences in their free-molecule orbital energy levels. The observed current densities for anthraquinone, fluorene, nitroazobenzene, and bis-thienyl benzene for d = 7-10 nm show no correlation with occupied (HOMO) or unoccupied (LUMO) molecular orbital energies, contrary to expectations for transport mechanisms based on the offset between orbital energies and the electrode Fermi level. UV-vis absorption spectroscopy of molecular layers bonded to carbon electrodes revealed internal energy levels of the chemisorbed films and also indicated limited delocalization in the film interior. The observed current densities correlate well with the observed UV-vis absorption maxima for the molecular layers, implying a transport mechanism determined by the HOMO-LUMO energy gap. We conclude that transport in carbon-based aromatic molecular junctions is consistent with multistep tunneling through a barrier defined by the HOMO-LUMO gap, and not by charge transport at the electrode interfaces. In effect, interfacial "injection" at the molecule/electrode interfaces is not rate limiting due to relatively strong electronic coupling, and transport is controlled by the "bulk" properties of the molecular layer interior.

  3. Spectrophotometric sequential injection determination of D-penicillamine based on a complexation reaction with nickel ion.

    PubMed

    Martinović-Bevanda, Anita; Radić, Njegomir

    2013-01-01

    A simple and sensitive spectrophotometric method, based on reaction between Ni(II) ion and D-penicillamine (PEN), was developed. The proposed SIA system enhanced the analytical applicability of the reaction of complexation, and allowed the determination of PEN in the concentration range of 3.0 × 10(-6) - 2.0 × 10(-4) mol L(-1) with a sampling rate of 200 h(-1). With the proposed SIA system, PEN could be accurately determinated up to 0.9 nmol quantity. The method was successfully applied to the determination of PEN in laboratory samples and pharmaceuticals.

  4. A sequential school based smoke prevention program in secondary school adolescents.

    PubMed

    Di Paco, A; Boffi, R; De Marco, C; Ambrosino, N

    2013-03-01

    The hazardous health effects of smoking and second-hand smoke are well known and have been confirmed in several studies. We wondered whether a school based programme involving media models such as those represented by famous soccer players and TV characters, was effective in prevention of smoking habit in secondary school adolescents. Since October 2006 to May 2007 an anonymous survey was submitted to 1382 secondary schools pupils. After completing the questionnaire all students of 42 out of 70 classes selected by the school principals underwent a prevention programme consisting of 1 hour lecture on smoke healthy hazard with educational material (slides, video, leaflets). Furthermore each pupil was given card games with significant pictures. Since October 2007 to May 2008 and Since October 2008 to May 2009 pupils underwent a 1 hour interactive lesson on smoke related health hazards respectively. On December 2007 pupils in study attended a theatre event with show business characters acting to smoke dissuasion. No intervention was performed on the 568 pupils of the other classes along all the same 2 school- year period (controls). Among other results at the end of the 2-year program 4% pupils of study group and 14% of controls reported smoking habit (p = 0.001) whereas 7% and 27% (p = 0.001) of study and control pupils respectively ignored smoking induced dependence. A school based programme involving media models such as those represented by famous soccer players, TV characters, was effective in prevention of smoking habit in secondary school adolescents.

  5. Sequential stream segregation of voiced and unvoiced speech sounds based on fundamental frequency.

    PubMed

    David, Marion; Lavandier, Mathieu; Grimault, Nicolas; Oxenham, Andrew J

    2017-02-01

    Differences in fundamental frequency (F0) between voiced sounds are known to be a strong cue for stream segregation. However, speech consists of both voiced and unvoiced sounds, and less is known about whether and how the unvoiced portions are segregated. This study measured listeners' ability to integrate or segregate sequences of consonant-vowel tokens, comprising a voiceless fricative and a vowel, as a function of the F0 difference between interleaved sequences of tokens. A performance-based measure was used, in which listeners detected the presence of a repeated token either within one sequence or between the two sequences (measures of voluntary and obligatory streaming, respectively). The results showed a systematic increase of voluntary stream segregation as the F0 difference between the two interleaved sequences increased from 0 to 13 semitones, suggesting that F0 differences allowed listeners to segregate speech sounds, including the unvoiced portions. In contrast to the consistent effects of voluntary streaming, the trend towards obligatory stream segregation at large F0 differences failed to reach significance. Listeners were no longer able to perform the voluntary-streaming task reliably when the unvoiced portions were removed from the stimuli, suggesting that the unvoiced portions were used and correctly segregated in the original task. The results demonstrate that streaming based on F0 differences occurs for natural speech sounds, and that the unvoiced portions are correctly assigned to the corresponding voiced portions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Sequential dual-energy subtraction technique with a dynamic flat-panel detector (FPD): primary study for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT).

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Rie; Sanada, Shigeru; Matsui, Takeshi; Hayashi, Norio; Matsui, Osamu

    2008-07-01

    A sequential dual-energy subtraction technique for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) was developed. Here, we report on a computerized method for creating sequential soft-tissue images and the accuracy of tracking targets on the images obtained, in comparison to conventional fluoroscopic images. Two sets of sequential chest images during respiration of a normal subject were obtained with X-rays of different energy separately with a flat-panel detector (FPD). Sequential soft-tissue images were created from the two sets of sequential images consisting of real-time images and reference template images, respectively. The creation of sequential soft-tissue images consisted of three steps: one-to-one image correspondence of the two sequential images, image registration, and image subtraction in each frame. Motion tracking of lung vessels was then performed by the template-matching technique. For evaluation of the accuracy of motion tracking on the sequential soft-tissue images, the results were compared with those on the original sequential images. Sequential soft-tissue images provided more accurate tracking than the original images (P < 0.01). There was no significant error throughout all frames in the soft-tissue images, whereas the rib shadow introduced a tracking error in the original images. The maximum errors were 4.1 +/- 0.3 mm in the sequential soft-tissue images and 28.1 +/- 20.0 mm in the original images. In conclusion, sequential soft-tissue images were helpful for tracking of a target affected by respiratory motion. Dual-energy subtraction has the potential to improve the accuracy of IGRT without implanted markers.

  7. Improvements on the refresh rate and dynamical properties of a SLM by sequential readout using an acousto-optic modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mestre, Michael; Viaris de Lesegno, Bruno; Farcy, René; Pruvost, Laurence; Bourderionnet, Jérôme; Delboulbé, Anne; Loiseaux, Brigitte; Dolfi, Daniel

    2006-08-01

    We demonstrate the use of an acousto-optic modulator to enhance the refresh rate and dynamic properties of a liquid-crystal spatial light modulator (SLM). The useful area of the SLM surface is split in several zones which are addressed separately, and read in a sequence by a steered laser beam. This configuration allows to increase the refresh rate by five orders of magnitude. Furthermore, improvements on the nature of the transition between different holograms are experimentally shown. The advantages of this technique are discussed in the particular context of cold atom manipulation with holographic optical tweezers.

  8. Assessment of outdoor radiofrequency electromagnetic field exposure through hotspot localization using kriging-based sequential sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Aerts, Sam Deschrijver, Dirk; Verloock, Leen; Dhaene, Tom; Martens, Luc; Joseph, Wout

    2013-10-15

    In this study, a novel methodology is proposed to create heat maps that accurately pinpoint the outdoor locations with elevated exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) in an extensive urban region (or, hotspots), and that would allow local authorities and epidemiologists to efficiently assess the locations and spectral composition of these hotspots, while at the same time developing a global picture of the exposure in the area. Moreover, no prior knowledge about the presence of radiofrequency radiation sources (e.g., base station parameters) is required. After building a surrogate model from the available data using kriging, the proposed method makes use of an iterative sampling strategy that selects new measurement locations at spots which are deemed to contain the most valuable information—inside hotspots or in search of them—based on the prediction uncertainty of the model. The method was tested and validated in an urban subarea of Ghent, Belgium with a size of approximately 1 km{sup 2}. In total, 600 input and 50 validation measurements were performed using a broadband probe. Five hotspots were discovered and assessed, with maximum total electric-field strengths ranging from 1.3 to 3.1 V/m, satisfying the reference levels issued by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection for exposure of the general public to RF-EMF. Spectrum analyzer measurements in these hotspots revealed five radiofrequency signals with a relevant contribution to the exposure. The radiofrequency radiation emitted by 900 MHz Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) base stations was always dominant, with contributions ranging from 45% to 100%. Finally, validation of the subsequent surrogate models shows high prediction accuracy, with the final model featuring an average relative error of less than 2 dB (factor 1.26 in electric-field strength), a correlation coefficient of 0.7, and a specificity of 0.96. -- Highlights: • We present an

  9. New EL2 structural model based on the observation of two sequential photoquenching processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fávero, P. P.; Cruz, J. M. R.

    2005-10-01

    The EL2 photoquenching kinetics has been studied by measuring the transmittance of a 1.05 μm laser beam as a function of time. The photoquenching curve presents two time constants that we associate to a two-stage transition through an intermediate state to the final metastable state. This was verified by measuring the temperature dependence of the transmittance with the sample prepared in a stage of partial photoquenching. Besides being also metastable, we show that the intermediate state has an optical absorption-cross section that is temperature dependent. In order to explain the existence of such a state, we propose a new structural model for the EL2 in which the motion of an arsenic atom finds two metastable positions after photoexcitation. Our model is based on a mixture of features derived from the models proposed by Chadi and Chang [1] and more recently by Fukuyama et al. [2].

  10. [Motion Analysis of Lumbar Spine and Hip Joint on Sequential Radiographs Acquired with a Dynamic Flat-panel Detector (FPD) System].

    PubMed

    Shimada, Kosuke; Kawashima, Hiroki; Yoshioka, Katsuhito; Sanada, Shigeru

    2015-12-01

    To design an evaluation method for lumbar spine and hip joint function using dynamic radiography using a flat-panel detector (FPD) system. Sixteen healthy subjects (males; age range, 22-60 years; median, 27 years) and 9 patients (7 males and 2 females; age range, 67-85 years; median, 73 years) with L4 degenerative spondylolisthesis were examined using a dynamic FPD system (CANON Inc.). Sequential images were captured with the subjects in the standing position with maximal forward bending followed by backward bending for 10 s. The lateral lumbar radiographs were obtained at 2 frames/s (fps). The flexion-extension angles of L1 and S1 were measured on those images. The range of motion (ROM) of the lumbar joints was significantly larger in the healthy group (82.4 ± 8.7°) than in the disease group (50.4 ± 8.5°; p<0.05). The ROM of the pelvic region was significantly smaller in the healthy group (26.9 ± 17.1°) than in the disease group (53.1 ± 17.6°; p<0.05). The healthy subjects exhibited a normal lumbar-pelvic rhythm. In the disease group, hip joint movements tended to be completed earlier compared with those in the healthy group. In the disease group, the loss of lumbar flexibility was compensated by an increase in hip joint motion due to the lumbar disease. The dynamic FPD system is a convenient imaging modality for the diagnosis of lumbar diseases through the assessment of locomotive function in the lumbar spine and hip joints.

  11. A cascading activity-based probe sequentially targets E1–E2–E3 ubiquitin enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Mulder, Monique P.C.; Witting, Katharina; Berlin, Ilana; Pruneda, Jonathan N.; Wu, Kuen-Phon; Chang, Jer-Gung; Merkx, Remco; Bialas, Johanna; Groettrup, Marcus; Vertegaal, Alfred C.O.; Schulman, Brenda A.; Komander, David; Neefjes, Jacques; Oualid, Farid El; Ovaa, Huib

    2016-01-01

    Post-translational modifications of proteins with ubiquitin (Ub) and ubiquitin-like (Ubl) modifiers, orchestrated by a cascade of specialized E1, E2 and E3 enzymes, control a staggering breadth of cellular processes. To monitor catalysis along these complex reaction pathways, we developed a cascading activity-based probe, UbDha. Akin to the native Ub, upon ATP-dependent activation by the E1, UbDha can travel downstream to the E2 (and subsequently E3) enzymes through sequential trans-thioesterifications. Unlike the native Ub, at each step along the cascade UbDha has the option to react irreversibly with active site cysteine residues of target enzymes, thus enabling their detection. We show that our cascading probe ‘hops’ and ‘traps’ catalytically active ubiquitin-modifying enzymes (but not their substrates) by a mechanism diversifiable to Ubls. Our founder methodology, amenable to structural studies, proteome-wide profiling and monitoring of enzymatic activities in living cells, presents novel and versatile tools to interrogate the Ub/Ubl cascades. PMID:27182664

  12. Development and Application of a Stepwise Assessment Process for Rational Redesign of Sequential Skills-Based Courses

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Andrea L.; Barnett, Susanne G.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To develop and apply a stepwise process to assess achievement of course learning objectives related to advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs) preparedness and inform redesign of sequential skills-based courses. Design. Four steps comprised the assessment and redesign process: (1) identify skills critical for APPE preparedness; (2) utilize focus groups and course evaluations to determine student competence in skill performance; (3) apply course mapping to identify course deficits contributing to suboptimal skill performance; and (4) initiate course redesign to target exposed deficits. Assessment. Focus group participants perceived students were least prepared for skills within the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education’s pre-APPE core domains of Identification and Assessment of Drug-related Problems and General Communication Abilities. Course mapping identified gaps in instruction, performance, and assessment of skills within aforementioned domains. Conclusions. A stepwise process that identified strengths and weaknesses of a course, was used to facilitate structured course redesign. Strengths of the process included input and corroboration from both preceptors and students. Limitations included feedback from a small number of pharmacy preceptors and increased workload on course coordinators. PMID:27899832

  13. Global spherical harmonic models of the internal magnetic field of the Moon based on sequential and coestimation approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purucker, Michael E.; Nicholas, Joseph B.

    2010-12-01

    Three new models of the global internal magnetic field of the Moon based on Lunar Prospector (LP) fluxgate magnetometer observations are developed for use in understanding the origin of the Moon's crustal magnetic field and for modeling its interaction with the solar wind. The models are at spherical harmonic degree 170, corresponding to 64 km wavelength resolution, from 30 km mean altitude LP observations. Coverage is complete except for a few areas near each pole. Original signal amplitudes are best preserved in the sequential approach map, whereas feature recognition is superior in the coestimation and harmonic wave number correlation maps. Spherical harmonic degrees less than 15, corresponding to 666 km wavelength, are largely absent from the Moon's internal magnetic field. We interpret this bound in terms of the Moon's impact history. A derived magnetization map suggests magnetizations may locally exceed 0.2 A/m in the lunar crust at the survey resolution if the magnetic crust is as thick as 40 km.

  14. Deciding when to decide: time-variant sequential sampling models explain the emergence of value-based decisions in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Gluth, Sebastian; Rieskamp, Jörg; Büchel, Christian

    2012-08-01

    The cognitive and neuronal mechanisms of perceptual decision making have been successfully linked to sequential sampling models. These models describe the decision process as a gradual accumulation of sensory evidence over time. The temporal evolution of economic choices, however, remains largely unexplored. We tested whether sequential sampling models help to understand the formation of value-based decisions in terms of behavior and brain responses. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to measure brain activity while human participants performed a buying task in which they freely decided upon how and when to choose. Behavior was accurately predicted by a time-variant sequential sampling model that uses a decreasing rather than fixed decision threshold to estimate the time point of the decision. Presupplementary motor area, caudate nucleus, and anterior insula activation was associated with the accumulation of evidence over time. Furthermore, at the beginning of the decision process the fMRI signal in these regions accounted for trial-by-trial deviations from behavioral model predictions: relatively high activation preceded relatively early responses. The updating of value information was correlated with signals in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, left and right orbitofrontal cortex, and ventral striatum but also in the primary motor cortex well before the response itself. Our results support a view of value-based decisions as emerging from sequential sampling of evidence and suggest a close link between the accumulation process and activity in the motor system when people are free to respond at any time.

  15. Description of Different Solid Adsorbent Surfaces Adsorption Mechanisms Based on a Sequential Decomposition of Isotherms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humpola, Pablo D.; Odetti, Hector S.; Flores, Ethel S. E.; Vicente, Jose Luis

    2013-06-01

    In order to analyze the adsorption capacities of different solid substrates, we present a multi-step method to separately study the isotherm at different pressure ranges (steps). The method is based on simple gas isotherm measurements (nitrogen, methane, carbon dioxide, argon, and oxygen) and is tested to describe the adsorption process and characterize a graphitized surface (GCB) and two different granular activated carbons (GAC). The GCB isotherms are described as a sum of Fowler-Guggenheim-Langmuir shifted curves; isotherm behaviors are quite similar at different temperatures, but change below a certain threshold. In GAC the first steps show the same adsorption characteristics at low pressures (Dubinin's description), but this behavior changes at higher pressure regimes, which allows one to elucidate how heterogeneous the surfaces are or how strong the interactions between adsorbed molecules are for this marginal adsorption to occur. We tested different approaches (from BET multilayer to Aranovich) and found quite different features. We finally conclude that if the description of the adsorption on complex substrates, such as those presented here, is carried using only one model, e. g. Dubinin in case of GACs, the resulting characteristics of the adsorbent would be very biased.

  16. Multicell state estimation using variation based sequential Monte Carlo filter for automotive battery packs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiahao; Klee Barillas, Joaquin; Guenther, Clemens; Danzer, Michael A.

    2015-03-01

    Accurate state monitoring is required for the high performance of battery management systems (BMS) in electric vehicles. By using model-based observation methods, state estimation of a single cell can be achieved with non-linear filtering algorithms e.g. Kalman filtering and Particle filtering. Considering the limited computational capability of a BMS and its real-time constraint, duplication of this approach to a multicell system is very time consuming and can hardly be implemented for a large number of cells in a battery pack. Several possible solutions have been reported in recent years. In this work, an extended two-step estimation approach is studied. At first, the mean value of the battery state of charge is determined in the form of a probability density function (PDF). Secondly, the intrinsic variations in cell SOC and resistance are identified simultaneously in an extended framework using a recursive least squares (RLS) algorithm. The on-board reliability and estimation accuracy of the proposed method is validated by experiment and simulation using an NMC/graphite battery module.

  17. CHIRP-Like Signals: Estimation, Detection and Processing A Sequential Model-Based Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J. V.

    2016-08-04

    Chirp signals have evolved primarily from radar/sonar signal processing applications specifically attempting to estimate the location of a target in surveillance/tracking volume. The chirp, which is essentially a sinusoidal signal whose phase changes instantaneously at each time sample, has an interesting property in that its correlation approximates an impulse function. It is well-known that a matched-filter detector in radar/sonar estimates the target range by cross-correlating a replicant of the transmitted chirp with the measurement data reflected from the target back to the radar/sonar receiver yielding a maximum peak corresponding to the echo time and therefore enabling the desired range estimate. In this application, we perform the same operation as a radar or sonar system, that is, we transmit a “chirp-like pulse” into the target medium and attempt to first detect its presence and second estimate its location or range. Our problem is complicated by the presence of disturbance signals from surrounding broadcast stations as well as extraneous sources of interference in our frequency bands and of course the ever present random noise from instrumentation. First, we discuss the chirp signal itself and illustrate its inherent properties and then develop a model-based processing scheme enabling both the detection and estimation of the signal from noisy measurement data.

  18. A Silicon-Based, Sequential Coat-and-Etch Process to Fabricate Nearly Perfect Substrate Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Mirkarimi, P B; Spiller, E; Baker, S L; Stearns, D G; Robinson, J C; Olynick, D L; Salmassi, F; Liddle, J A; Liang, T; Stivers, A R

    2005-07-05

    For many thin-film applications substrate imperfections such as particles, pits, scratches, and general roughness, can nucleate film defects which can severely detract from the coating's performance. Previously we developed a coat-and-etch process, termed the ion beam thin film planarization process, to planarize substrate particles up to {approx} 70 nm in diameter. The process relied on normal incidence etching; however, such a process induces defects nucleated by substrate pits to grow much larger. We have since developed a coat-and-etch process to planarize {approx}70 nm deep by 70 nm wide substrate pits; it relies on etching at an off-normal incidence angle, i.e., an angle of {approx} 70{sup o} from the substrate normal. However, a disadvantage of this pit smoothing process is that it induces defects nucleated by substrate particles to grow larger. Combining elements from both processes we have been able to develop a silicon-based, coat-and-etch process to successfully planarize {approx}70 nm substrate particles and pits simultaneously to at or below 1 nm in height; this value is important for applications such as extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) masks. The coat-and-etch process has an added ability to significantly reduce high-spatial frequency roughness, rendering a nearly perfect substrate surface.

  19. Sequential decision-making in a variable environment: modeling elk movement in Yellowstone National Park as a dynamic game.

    PubMed

    Noonburg, Erik G; Newman, Lora A; Lewis, Mark; Crabtree, Robert L; Potapov, Alexei B

    2007-03-01

    We develop a suite of models with varying complexity to predict elk movement behavior during the winter on the Northern Range of Yellowstone National Park (YNP). The models range from a simple representation of optimal patch choice to a dynamic game, and we show how the underlying theory in each is related by the presence or absence of state- and frequency-dependence. We compare predictions from each of the models for three variables that are of basic and applied interest: elk survival, aggregation, and use of habitat outside YNP. Our results suggest that despite low overall forage depletion in the winter, frequency-dependence is crucial to the predictions for elk movement and distribution. Furthermore, frequency-dependence interacts with mass-dependence in the predicted outcome of elk decision-making. We use these results to show how models that treat single movement decisions in isolation from the seasonal sequence of decisions are insufficient to capture landscape scale behavior.

  20. Distance-based classification of keystroke dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran Nguyen, Ngoc

    2016-07-01

    This paper uses the keystroke dynamics in user authentication. The relationship between the distance metrics and the data template, for the first time, was analyzed and new distance based algorithm for keystroke dynamics classification was proposed. The results of the experiments on the CMU keystroke dynamics benchmark dataset1 were evaluated with an equal error rate of 0.0614. The classifiers using the proposed distance metric outperform existing top performing keystroke dynamics classifiers which use traditional distance metrics.

  1. Dynamic learning and context-dependence in sequential, attribute-based, stated-preference valuation questions

    Treesearch

    Thomas P. Holmes; Kevin J. Boyle

    2005-01-01

    A hybrid stated-preference model is presented that combines the referendum contingent valuation response format with an experimentally designed set of attributes. A sequence of valuation questions is asked to a random sample in a mailout mail-back format. Econometric analysis shows greater discrimination between alternatives in the final choice in the sequence, and the...

  2. Novel sequential process for enhanced dye synergistic degradation based on nano zero-valent iron and potassium permanganate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiangyu; Liu, Peng; Fu, Minglai; Ma, Jun; Ning, Ping

    2016-07-01

    A novel synergistic technology based on nano zero-valent iron (NZVI) and potassium permanganate (KMnO4) was developed for treatment of dye wastewater. The synergistic technology was significantly superior, where above 99% of methylene blue (MB) was removed, comparatively, removal efficiencies of MB with the sole technology of NZVI and KMnO4 at pH 6.39 being 52.9% and 63.1%, respectively. The advantages of this technology include (1) the in situ formed materials (manganese (hydr)oxides, iron hydroxides and MnFe oxide), resulting in the stable and high removal efficiency of MB and (2) high removal capacity in a wide range of pH value. Compared with simultaneous addition system of NZVI and KMnO4, MB removal was remarkably improved by sequential addition system, especially when KMnO4 addition time was optimized at 20 min. Analyses of crystal structure (XRD), morphological difference (FE-SEM), element valence and chemical groups (XPS) of NZVI before and after reaction had confirmed the formation of in situ materials, which obviously enhanced removal of MB by oxidation and adsorption. More importantly, the roles of in situ formed materials and degradation mechanism were innovatively investigated, and the results suggested that NCH3 bond of MB molecule was attacked by oxidants (KMnO4 and in situ manganese (hydr)oxides) at position C1 and C9, resulting in cleavage of chromophore. This study provides new insights about an applicable technology for treatment of dye wastewater.

  3. Hierarchical Chunking of Sequential Memory on Neuromorphic Architecture with Reduced Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guoqi; Deng, Lei; Wang, Dong; Wang, Wei; Zeng, Fei; Zhang, Ziyang; Li, Huanglong; Song, Sen; Pei, Jing; Shi, Luping

    2016-01-01

    Chunking refers to a phenomenon whereby individuals group items together when performing a memory task to improve the performance of sequential memory. In this work, we build a bio-plausible hierarchical chunking of sequential memory (HCSM) model to explain why such improvement happens. We address this issue by linking hierarchical chunking with synaptic plasticity and neuromorphic engineering. We uncover that a chunking mechanism reduces the requirements of synaptic plasticity since it allows applying synapses with narrow dynamic range and low precision to perform a memory task. We validate a hardware version of the model through simulation, based on measured memristor behavior with narrow dynamic range in neuromorphic circuits, which reveals how chunking works and what role it plays in encoding sequential memory. Our work deepens the understanding of sequential memory and enables incorporating it for the investigation of the brain-inspired computing on neuromorphic architecture. PMID:28066223

  4. Hierarchical Chunking of Sequential Memory on Neuromorphic Architecture with Reduced Synaptic Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Li, Guoqi; Deng, Lei; Wang, Dong; Wang, Wei; Zeng, Fei; Zhang, Ziyang; Li, Huanglong; Song, Sen; Pei, Jing; Shi, Luping

    2016-01-01

    Chunking refers to a phenomenon whereby individuals group items together when performing a memory task to improve the performance of sequential memory. In this work, we build a bio-plausible hierarchical chunking of sequential memory (HCSM) model to explain why such improvement happens. We address this issue by linking hierarchical chunking with synaptic plasticity and neuromorphic engineering. We uncover that a chunking mechanism reduces the requirements of synaptic plasticity since it allows applying synapses with narrow dynamic range and low precision to perform a memory task. We validate a hardware version of the model through simulation, based on measured memristor behavior with narrow dynamic range in neuromorphic circuits, which reveals how chunking works and what role it plays in encoding sequential memory. Our work deepens the understanding of sequential memory and enables incorporating it for the investigation of the brain-inspired computing on neuromorphic architecture.

  5. Conformation-sensitive antibody-based point-of-care immunosensor for serum Ca(2+) using two-dimensional sequential binding reactions.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji-Na; Paek, Sung-Ho; Kim, Dong-Hyung; Seo, Sung-Min; Lim, Guei-Sam; Kang, Ju-Hee; Paek, Sung-Pil; Cho, Il-Hoon; Paek, Se-Hwan

    2016-11-15

    To assess the homeostasis of Ca(2+) metabolism, we have developed a rapid immunosensor for ionic calcium using a membrane chromatographic technique. As calcium-binding protein (CBP) is available for the recognition and undergone conformation change upon Ca(2+) binding, a monoclonal antibody sensitive to the altered structure of CBP has been employed. The sequential binding scheme was mathematically simulated and shown to match with the experimental results. At the initial stage, the rapid analytical system using lateral flow was constructed by immobilizing the antibody on the immuno-strip nitrocellulose membrane and labeling CBP with colloidal gold as a tracer. A major problem with this system in measuring ionic calcium levels was retarded migration of the gold tracer along the immuno-strip. It was conceivable that the divalent cation at a high concentration caused a change in the physical properties of the tracer, resulting in a non-specific interaction with the membrane surface. This problem was circumvented by first eluting a sample containing biotinylated CBP along the immuno-strip and then supplying the gold coupled to streptavidin across the signal generation pad of the strip. The color signal was then generated via biotin-SA linkage and measured using a smartphone-based detector developed in our laboratory. This two-dimensional chromatographic format completed the Ca(2+) analysis within 15min, the analytical performance covered the clinical dynamic range (0.25-2.5mM) and highly correlated with that of the reference system, i-STAT. These results inspired us to eventually investigate a dual-immunoassay system that measures simultaneously ionic calcium and parathyroid hormone, which regulates the ionic calcium level in serum. This will significantly simplify the current diagnostic protocols, which involve separate devices. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Stacked Sequential Learning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    a constant factor of K + 2. (To see this, note sequential stacking requires training K+2 classifiers: the classifiers f1, . . . , fK used in cross...on the non- sequential learners (ME and VP) but improves per- formance of the sequential learners (CRFs and VPH - MMs) less consistently. This pattern

  7. Opinion dynamics model based on quantum formalism

    SciTech Connect

    Artawan, I. Nengah; Trisnawati, N. L. P.

    2016-03-11

    Opinion dynamics model based on quantum formalism is proposed. The core of the quantum formalism is on the half spin dynamics system. In this research the implicit time evolution operators are derived. The analogy between the model with Deffuant dan Sznajd models is discussed.

  8. Volume-based predictive biomarkers of sequential FDG-PET/CT for sunitinib in cancer of unknown primary: identification of the best benefited patients.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yifei; Xu, Wei; Bai, Ruojing; Li, Yiming; Yu, Hongyu; Yang, Chunshan; Shi, Huazheng; Zhang, Jian; Li, Jidong; Wang, Chenguang; Xiao, Jianru

    2017-02-01

    To test the performance of sequential (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) in predicting survival after sunitinib therapies in patients with cancer of unknown primary (CUP). CUP patients were enrolled for sequential PET/CT scanning for sunitinib and a control group. Univariate and multivariate analysis were applied to test the efficacy of sunitinib therapy in CUP patients. Next, sequential analyses involving PET/CT parameters were performed to identify and validate sensitive PET/CT biomarkers for sunitinib therapy. Finally, time-dependent receiver operating characteristic (TDROC) analyses were performed to compare the predictive accuracy. Multivariate analysis proved that sunitinib group had significantly improved survival (p < 0.01) as compared to control group. After cycle 2 of therapy, multivariate analysis identified volume-based PET/CT parameters as sensitive biomarkers for sunitinib (p < 0.01). TDROC curves demonstrated whole-body total lesion glycolysis reduction (Δ WTLG) and follow-up WTLG to have good accuracy for efficacy prediction. This evidence was validated after cycle 4 of therapy with the same method. Sunitinib therapy proved effective in treatment of CUP. PET/CT volume-based parameters may help predict outcome of sunitinib therapy, in which Δ WTLG and follow-up WTLG seem to be sensitive biomarkers for sunitinib efficacy. Patients with greater reduction and lower WTLG at follow-up seem to have better survival outcome.

  9. Sequential extractions for the study of radiocesium and radiostrontium dynamics in mineral and organic soils from Western Europe and Chernobyl areas

    SciTech Connect

    Rigol, A.; Roig, M.; Vidal, M.; Rauret, G.

    1999-03-15

    To study radiostrontium (RSr) and radiocesium (RCs) aging in soils, three sequential extraction schemes were used on Mediterranean loamy and loam-sandy soils, podsols and peaty podsols from the area near Chernobyl, and peats from Western Europe. Aging was quantified by changes in radionuclide distribution. Two factors were thought to affect radionuclide distribution: time elapsed since contamination and drying-wetting cycles. Changes in radionuclide distribution were of low significance in Mediterranean loamy and loam-sandy soils in the short term, even after drying-wetting cycles. In the short term, podsols and peaty podsols showed a decrease in the RSr exchangeable fraction in the laboratory samples, whereas samples taken 6 years after contamination did not show any further decrease. For RCs in podsols and peaty-podsols, the application of drying-wetting cycles for 9 months led to observe a 2--3-fold decrease in the exchangeable fraction, whereas time alone did not lead to any change. No RCs aging was observed in peats with a low or almost negligible content of mineral matter, low base saturation and low interception potential for RCs, even after drying-wetting cycles. Finally, changes in the radionuclide exchangeable fraction over time in these soils corresponded to changes in transfer factors over a similar period.

  10. Complementary sequential measurements generate entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coles, Patrick J.; Piani, Marco

    2014-01-01

    We present a paradigm for capturing the complementarity of two observables. It is based on the entanglement created by the interaction between the system observed and the two measurement devices used to measure the observables sequentially. Our main result is a lower bound on this entanglement and resembles well-known entropic uncertainty relations. Besides its fundamental interest, this result directly bounds the effectiveness of sequential bipartite operations—corresponding to the measurement interactions—for entanglement generation. We further discuss the intimate connection of our result with two primitives of information processing, namely, decoupling and coherent teleportation.

  11. Trial Sequential Methods for Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulinskaya, Elena; Wood, John

    2014-01-01

    Statistical methods for sequential meta-analysis have applications also for the design of new trials. Existing methods are based on group sequential methods developed for single trials and start with the calculation of a required information size. This works satisfactorily within the framework of fixed effects meta-analysis, but conceptual…

  12. Trial Sequential Methods for Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulinskaya, Elena; Wood, John

    2014-01-01

    Statistical methods for sequential meta-analysis have applications also for the design of new trials. Existing methods are based on group sequential methods developed for single trials and start with the calculation of a required information size. This works satisfactorily within the framework of fixed effects meta-analysis, but conceptual…

  13. Grouped frequent sequential patterns derived from terrestrial image time series to monitor landslide behaviour - Application to the dynamics of the Sanières/Roche Plombée rockslide.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Péricault, Youen; Pothier, Catherine; Méger, Nicolas; Trouvé, Emmanuel; Vernier, Flavien; Rigotti, Christophe; Malet, Jean-Philippe

    2016-04-01

    Image time series acquired with remote sensing methods based on optical terrestrial photogrammetry have great potential for understanding and monitoring the Earth surface dynamics at local scale, and are particularly interesting for landslide monitoring. Image correlation techniques can be applied to calculate the displacement fields, in either the image geometry or the terrain geometry if orthorectification procedures are applied. The resulting products are times series of displacement vectors for each epoch in which knowledge extraction techniques can be applied to discover relevant movement patterns in space and time. We used an unsupervised method (Grouped Frequent Sequential patterns / GFS-patterns) based on the mining of the displacement field. The method was originally developed for the analysis of time series of satellite images. It involves the extraction of trends / sub-trends affecting each pixel covering at least a minimum surface area and sufficiently connected to each other. The results of the mining are presented in spatio-temporal location maps (STL-map) of each GFS-pattern. In these maps, the spatial information is given by the pixel locations and the time information is displayed using a color ramp. The method is tested on a time series of 36 optical terrestrial images of the Sanières/Roche Plombée rockslide (South East French Alps) from 28 of July to 1 September 2014. From this series 35 2D displacement fields were calculated for epochs of three days, and the time series of vector magnitude and direction were analysed with GFS-patterns / STL-map. The method allowed identifying several patterns corresponding to different kinematical behaviour of the rockslide (long-term creep at the top of the slope, surficial movement of the debris at the base of the slope). The unsupervised knowledge extraction method GFS-pattern / STL-map, originally developed to analyse time series of satellite images showed in this study real possibilities of use for

  14. Dynamic control of protein conformation transition in chromatographic separation based on hydrophobic interactions: molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Lu, Diannan; Liu, Zheng

    2009-03-20

    Conformational transitions of a protein in hydrophobic interaction based chromatography, including hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) and reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC), and their impact on the separation process and performance were probed by molecular dynamics simulation of a 46-bead beta-barrel coarse-grained model protein in a confined pore, which represents the porous adsorbent. The transition of the adsorbed protein from the native conformation to an unfolded one occurred as a result of strong hydrophobic interactions with the pore surface, which reduced the formation of protein aggregates. The conformational transition was also displayed in the simulation once an elution buffer characterized by weaker hydrophobicity was introduced to strip protein from pore surface. The discharged proteins that underwent conformational transition were prone to aggregation; thus, an unsatisfactory yield of the native protein was obtained. An orthogonal experiment revealed that in addition to the strengths of the protein-protein and protein-adsorbent hydrophobic interactions, the elution time required to reduce the above-mentioned interactions also determined the yield of native protein by HIC and RPLC. Stepwise elution, characterized by sequential reduction of the hydrophobic interactions between the protein and adsorbent, was presented as a dynamic strategy for tuning conformational transitions to favor the native conformation and reduce the formation of protein aggregates during the elution process. The yield of the native protein obtained by this dynamic operation strategy was higher than that obtained by steady-state elution. The simulation study qualitatively reproduced the experimental observations and provided molecular insight that would be helpful for designing and optimizing HIC and RPLC separation of proteins.

  15. Evolutionary history of the endangered fish Zoogoneticus quitzeoensis (Bean, 1898) (Cyprinodontiformes: Goodeidae) using a sequential approach to phylogeography based on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA data

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Tectonic, volcanic and climatic events that produce changes in hydrographic systems are the main causes of diversification and speciation of freshwater fishes. Elucidate the evolutionary history of freshwater fishes permits to infer theories on the biotic and geological evolution of a region, which can further be applied to understand processes of population divergence, speciation and for conservation purposes. The freshwater ecosystems in Central Mexico are characterized by their genesis dynamism, destruction, and compartmentalization induced by intense geologic activity and climatic changes since the early Miocene. The endangered goodeid Zoogoneticus quitzeoensis is widely distributed across Central México, thus making it a good model for phylogeographic analyses in this area. Results We addressed the phylogeography, evolutionary history and genetic structure of populations of Z. quitzeoensis through a sequential approach, based on both microsatellite and mitochondrial cytochrome b sequences. Most haplotypes were private to particular locations. All the populations analysed showed a remarkable number of haplotypes. The level of gene diversity within populations was H¯d = 0.987 (0.714 – 1.00). However, in general the nucleotide diversity was low, π = 0.0173 (0.0015 – 0.0049). Significant genetic structure was found among populations at the mitochondrial and nuclear level (ΦST = 0.836 and FST = 0.262, respectively). We distinguished two well-defined mitochondrial lineages that were separated ca. 3.3 million years ago (Mya). The time since expansion was ca. 1.5 × 106 years ago for Lineage I and ca. 860,000 years ago for Lineage II. Also, genetic patterns of differentiation, between and within lineages, are described at different historical timescales. Conclusion Our mtDNA data indicates that the evolution of the different genetic groups is more related to ancient geological and climatic events (Middle Pliocene, ca. 3.3 Mya) than to the current

  16. Hierarchical Bayesian analysis of outcome- and process-based social preferences and beliefs in Dictator Games and sequential Prisoner's Dilemmas.

    PubMed

    Aksoy, Ozan; Weesie, Jeroen

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, using a within-subjects design, we estimate the utility weights that subjects attach to the outcome of their interaction partners in four decision situations: (1) binary Dictator Games (DG), second player's role in the sequential Prisoner's Dilemma (PD) after the first player (2) cooperated and (3) defected, and (4) first player's role in the sequential Prisoner's Dilemma game. We find that the average weights in these four decision situations have the following order: (1)>(2)>(4)>(3). Moreover, the average weight is positive in (1) but negative in (2), (3), and (4). Our findings indicate the existence of strong negative and small positive reciprocity for the average subject, but there is also high interpersonal variation in the weights in these four nodes. We conclude that the PD frame makes subjects more competitive than the DG frame. Using hierarchical Bayesian modeling, we simultaneously analyze beliefs of subjects about others' utility weights in the same four decision situations. We compare several alternative theoretical models on beliefs, e.g., rational beliefs (Bayesian-Nash equilibrium) and a consensus model. Our results on beliefs strongly support the consensus effect and refute rational beliefs: there is a strong relationship between own preferences and beliefs and this relationship is relatively stable across the four decision situations.

  17. Partitioning of radionuclides and trace elements in phosphogypsum and its source materials based on sequential extraction methods.

    PubMed

    Santos, A J G; Mazzilli, B P; Fávaro, D I T; Silva, P S C

    2006-01-01

    Phosphogypsum is a waste produced by the phosphate fertilizer industry. Although phosphogypsum is mainly calcium sulphate dihydrate, it contains elevated levels of impurities, which originate from the source phosphate rock used in the phosphoric acid production. Among these impurities, radionuclides from 238U and 232Th decay series are of most concern due to their radiotoxicity. Other elements, such as rare earth elements (REE) and Ba are also enriched in the phosphogypsum. The bioavailability of radionuclides (226Ra, 210Pb and 232Th), rare earth elements and Ba to the surrounding aquatic system was evaluated by the application of sequential leaching of the phosphogypsum samples from the Brazilian phosphoric acid producers. The sequential extraction results show that most of the radium and lead are located in the "iron oxide" (non-CaSO4) fraction, and that only 13-18% of these radionuclides are distributed in the most labile fraction. Th, REE and Ba were found predominantly in the residual phase, which corresponds to a small fraction of the phosphate rock or monazite that did not react and to insoluble compounds such as sulphates, phosphates and silicates. It can be concluded that although all these elements are enriched in the phosphogypsum samples they are not associated with CaSO4 itself and therefore do not represent a threat to the surrounding aquatic environment.

  18. How to improve an un-alterable model forecast? A sequential data assimilation based error updating approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gragne, A. S.; Sharma, A.; Mehrotra, R.; Alfredsen, K. T.

    2012-12-01

    Accuracy of reservoir inflow forecasts is instrumental for maximizing value of water resources and influences operation of hydropower reservoirs significantly. Improving hourly reservoir inflow forecasts over a 24 hours lead-time is considered with the day-ahead (Elspot) market of the Nordic exchange market in perspectives. The procedure presented comprises of an error model added on top of an un-alterable constant parameter conceptual model, and a sequential data assimilation routine. The structure of the error model was investigated using freely available software for detecting mathematical relationships in a given dataset (EUREQA) and adopted to contain minimum complexity for computational reasons. As new streamflow data become available the extra information manifested in the discrepancies between measurements and conceptual model outputs are extracted and assimilated into the forecasting system recursively using Sequential Monte Carlo technique. Besides improving forecast skills significantly, the probabilistic inflow forecasts provided by the present approach entrains suitable information for reducing uncertainty in decision making processes related to hydropower systems operation. The potential of the current procedure for improving accuracy of inflow forecasts at lead-times unto 24 hours and its reliability in different seasons of the year will be illustrated and discussed thoroughly.

  19. Sequential visibility-graph motifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacovacci, Jacopo; Lacasa, Lucas

    2016-04-01

    Visibility algorithms transform time series into graphs and encode dynamical information in their topology, paving the way for graph-theoretical time series analysis as well as building a bridge between nonlinear dynamics and network science. In this work we introduce and study the concept of sequential visibility-graph motifs, smaller substructures of n consecutive nodes that appear with characteristic frequencies. We develop a theory to compute in an exact way the motif profiles associated with general classes of deterministic and stochastic dynamics. We find that this simple property is indeed a highly informative and computationally efficient feature capable of distinguishing among different dynamics and robust against noise contamination. We finally confirm that it can be used in practice to perform unsupervised learning, by extracting motif profiles from experimental heart-rate series and being able, accordingly, to disentangle meditative from other relaxation states. Applications of this general theory include the automatic classification and description of physical, biological, and financial time series.

  20. Sequential effects: Superstition or rational behavior?

    PubMed

    Yu, Angela J; Cohen, Jonathan D

    In a variety of behavioral tasks, subjects exhibit an automatic and apparently suboptimal sequential effect: they respond more rapidly and accurately to a stimulus if it reinforces a local pattern in stimulus history, such as a string of repetitions or alternations, compared to when it violates such a pattern. This is often the case even if the local trends arise by chance in the context of a randomized design, such that stimulus history has no real predictive power. In this work, we use a normative Bayesian framework to examine the hypothesis that such idiosyncrasies may reflect the inadvertent engagement of mechanisms critical for adapting to a changing environment. We show that prior belief in non-stationarity can induce experimentally observed sequential effects in an otherwise Bayes-optimal algorithm. The Bayesian algorithm is shown to be well approximated by linear-exponential filtering of past observations, a feature also apparent in the behavioral data. We derive an explicit relationship between the parameters and computations of the exact Bayesian algorithm and those of the approximate linear-exponential filter. Since the latter is equivalent to a leaky-integration process, a commonly used model of neuronal dynamics underlying perceptual decision-making and trial-to-trial dependencies, our model provides a principled account of why such dynamics are useful. We also show that parameter-tuning of the leaky-integration process is possible, using stochastic gradient descent based only on the noisy binary inputs. This is a proof of concept that not only can neurons implement near-optimal prediction based on standard neuronal dynamics, but that they can also learn to tune the processing parameters without explicitly representing probabilities.

  1. Inference for the median residual life function in sequential multiple assignment randomized trials.

    PubMed

    Kidwell, Kelley M; Ko, Jin H; Wahed, Abdus S

    2014-04-30

    In survival analysis, median residual lifetime is often used as a summary measure to assess treatment effectiveness; it is not clear, however, how such a quantity could be estimated for a given dynamic treatment regimen using data from sequential randomized clinical trials. We propose a method to estimate a dynamic treatment regimen-specific median residual life (MERL) function from sequential multiple assignment randomized trials. We present the MERL estimator, which is based on inverse probability weighting, as well as, two variance estimates for the MERL estimator. One variance estimate follows from Lunceford, Davidian and Tsiatis' 2002 survival function-based variance estimate and the other uses the sandwich estimator. The MERL estimator is evaluated, and its two variance estimates are compared through simulation studies, showing that the estimator and both variance estimates produce approximately unbiased results in large samples. To demonstrate our methods, the estimator has been applied to data from a sequentially randomized leukemia clinical trial.

  2. Immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM)-mediated inhibitory signaling is regulated by sequential phosphorylation mediated by distinct nonreceptor tyrosine kinases: a case study involving PECAM-1.

    PubMed

    Tourdot, Benjamin E; Brenner, Michelle K; Keough, Kathleen C; Holyst, Trudy; Newman, Peter J; Newman, Debra K

    2013-04-16

    The activation state of many blood and vascular cells is tightly controlled by a delicate balance between receptors that contain immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAMs) and those that contain immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIMs). Precisely how the timing of cellular activation by ITAM-coupled receptors is regulated by ITIM-containing receptors is, however, poorly understood. Using platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1) as a prototypical ITIM-bearing receptor, we demonstrate that initiation of inhibitory signaling occurs via a novel, sequential process in which Src family kinases phosphorylate the C-terminal ITIM, thereby enabling phosphorylation of the N-terminal ITIM of PECAM-1 by other Src homology 2 domain-containing nonreceptor tyrosine kinases (NRTKs). NRTKs capable of mediating the second phosphorylation event include C-terminal Src kinase (Csk) and Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk). Btk and Csk function downstream of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) activation during ITAM-dependent platelet activation. In ITAM-activated platelets that were treated with a PI3K inhibitor, PECAM-1 was phosphorylated but did not bind the tandem SH2 domain-containing tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2, indicating that it was not phosphorylated on its N-terminal ITIM. Csk bound to and phosphorylated PECAM-1 more efficiently than did Btk and required its SH2 domain to perform these functions. Additionally, the phosphorylation of the N-terminal ITIM of Siglec-9 by Csk is enhanced by the prior phosphorylation of its C-terminal ITIM, providing evidence that the ITIMs of other dual ITIM-containing receptors are also sequentially phosphorylated. On the basis of these findings, we propose that sequential ITIM phosphorylation provides a general mechanism for precise temporal control over the recruitment and activation of tandem SH2 domain-containing tyrosine phosphatases that dampen ITAM-dependent signals.

  3. Prognostics of slurry pumps based on a moving-average wear degradation index and a general sequential Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong; Tse, Peter W.

    2015-05-01

    Slurry pumps are commonly used in oil-sand mining for pumping mixtures of abrasive liquids and solids. These operations cause constant wear of slurry pump impellers, which results in the breakdown of the slurry pumps. This paper develops a prognostic method for estimating remaining useful life of slurry pump impellers. First, a moving-average wear degradation index is proposed to assess the performance degradation of the slurry pump impeller. Secondly, the state space model of the proposed health index is constructed. A general sequential Monte Carlo method is employed to derive the parameters of the state space model. The remaining useful life of the slurry pump impeller is estimated by extrapolating the established state space model to a specified alert threshold. Data collected from an industrial oil sand pump were used to validate the developed method. The results show that the accuracy of the developed method improves as more data become available.

  4. [Neurologic changes in patients with traumatic cord lesion based in the analysis of the sequential clinical history].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Padilla, Luis Alberto; Dufoo-Olvera, Manuel; García-López, Ozcar Felipe; López-Palacios, José de Jesús; Carranco-Toledo, Gabriel Alfonso; Aburto-Trejo, José Antonio

    2008-01-01

    To determine changes in neurological status in patients with traumatic cord lesions before and after surgical treatment. We conducted a descriptive cohort study, and measured 61 points of neurologic evaluation (sensory, motor, reflexes) of the Sequential Clinical History. We studied 28 patients with complete cord lesion (ASIA A) and 16 with incomplete cord lesions (9 ASIA B, 4 ASIA C, and 3 ASIA D). In the patients classified as ASIA-A, twenty-six did not change, and 2 had improvement in one neurologic level (sensory). In ASIA-B patients, four remained with no changes, and in 5 the lesion improved. The four patients with type C lesion, improved. All patients with ASIA-D, improved to ASIA-E. In patients with complete cord lesions (ASIA-A) and the worst prognosis, we did not find improvement in neurologic lesion. In incomplete cord injuries, improvement was variable, and it was more prevalent in preoperative period.

  5. Sequential fragmentation/transport theory, pyroclast size-density relationships, and the emplacement dynamics of pyroclastic density currents — A case study on the Mt. St. Helens (USA) 1980 eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackaman-Lofland, Chelsea; Brand, Brittany D.; Taddeucci, Jacopo; Wohletz, Kenneth

    2014-04-01

    Pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) are the most dangerous hazard associated with explosive volcanic eruptions. Despite recent advancements in the general understanding of PDC dynamics, limited direct observation and/or outcrop scarcity often hinder the interpretation of specific transport and depositional processes at many volcanoes. This study explores the potential of sequential fragmentation/transport theory (SFT; cf. Wohletz et al., 1989), a modeling method capable of predicting particle mass distributions based on the physical principles of fragmentation and transport, to retrieve the transport and depositional dynamics of well-characterized PDCs from the size and density distributions of individual components within the deposits. The extensive vertical and lateral exposures through the May 18th, 1980 PDC deposits at Mt. St. Helens (MSH) provide constraints on PDC regimes and flow boundary conditions at specific locations across the depositional area. Application to MSH deposits suggests that SFT parameter distributions can be effectively used to characterize flow boundary conditions and emplacement processes for a variety of PDC lithofacies and deposit locations. Results demonstrate that (1) the SFT approach reflects particle fragmentation and transport mechanisms regardless of variations in initial component distributions, consistent with results from previous studies; (2) SFT analysis reveals changes in particle characteristics that are not directly observable in grain size and fabric data; and (3) SFT parameters are more sensitive to regional transport conditions than local (outcrop-scale) depositional processes. The particle processing trends produced using SFT analysis are consistent with the degree of particle processing inferred from lithofacies architectures: for all lithofacies examined in this study, suspension sedimentation products exhibit much better processing than concentrated current deposits. Integrated field observations and SFT results

  6. Optimization-based Dynamic Human Lifting Prediction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    Anith Mathai, Steve Beck,Timothy Marler , Jingzhou Yang, Jasbir S. Arora, Karim Abdel-Malek Virtual Soldier Research Program, Center for Computer Aided...Rahmatalla, S., Kim, J., Marler , T., Beck, S., Yang, J., busek, J., Arora, J.S., and Abdel-Malek, K. Optimization-based dynamic human walking prediction

  7. Haptics-based dynamic implicit solid modeling.

    PubMed

    Hua, Jing; Qin, Hong

    2004-01-01

    This paper systematically presents a novel, interactive solid modeling framework, Haptics-based Dynamic Implicit Solid Modeling, which is founded upon volumetric implicit functions and powerful physics-based modeling. In particular, we augment our modeling framework with a haptic mechanism in order to take advantage of additional realism associated with a 3D haptic interface. Our dynamic implicit solids are semi-algebraic sets of volumetric implicit functions and are governed by the principles of dynamics, hence responding to sculpting forces in a natural and predictable manner. In order to directly manipulate existing volumetric data sets as well as point clouds, we develop a hierarchical fitting algorithm to reconstruct and represent discrete data sets using our continuous implicit functions, which permit users to further design and edit those existing 3D models in real-time using a large variety of haptic and geometric toolkits, and visualize their interactive deformation at arbitrary resolution. The additional geometric and physical constraints afford more sophisticated control of the dynamic implicit solids. The versatility of our dynamic implicit modeling enables the user to easily modify both the geometry and the topology of modeled objects, while the inherent physical properties can offer an intuitive haptic interface for direct manipulation with force feedback.

  8. Sequential modelling of a full-scale wastewater treatment plant using an artificial neural network.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joong-Won; Suh, Changwon; Hong, Yoon-Seok Timothy; Shin, Hang-Sik

    2011-10-01

    This work proposes a sequential modelling approach using an artificial neural network (ANN) to develop four independent multivariate models that are able to predict the dynamics of biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), chemical oxygen demand (COD), suspended solid (SS), and total nitrogen (TN) removal in a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). Suitable structures of ANN models were automatically and conveniently optimized by a genetic algorithm rather than the conventional trial and error method. The sequential modelling approach, which is composed of two parts, a process disturbance estimator and a process behaviour predictor, was also presented to develop multivariate dynamic models. In particular, the process disturbance estimator was first employed to estimate the influent quality. The process behaviour predictor then sequentially predicted the effluent quality based on the estimated influent quality from the process disturbance estimator with other process variables. The efficiencies of the developed ANN models with a sequential modelling approach were demonstrated with a practical application using a data set collected from a full-scale WWTP during 2 years. The results show that the ANN with the sequential modelling approach successfully developed multivariate dynamic models of BOD, COD, SS, and TN removal with satisfactory estimation and prediction capability. Thus, the proposed method could be used as a powerful tool for the prediction of complex and nonlinear WWTP performance.

  9. Development of binomial sequential sampling plans for forecasting Listronotus maculicollis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) larvae based on the relationship to adult counts and turfgrass damage.

    PubMed

    McGraw, Benjamin A; Koppenhöfer, Albrecht M

    2009-06-01

    Binomial sequential sampling plans were developed to forecast weevil Listronotus maculicollis Kirby (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), larval damage to golf course turfgrass and aid in the development of integrated pest management programs for the weevil. Populations of emerging overwintered adults were sampled over a 2-yr period to determine the relationship between adult counts, larval density, and turfgrass damage. Larval density and composition of preferred host plants (Poa annua L.) significantly affected the expression of turfgrass damage. Multiple regression indicates that damage may occur in moderately mixed P. annua stands with as few as 10 larvae per 0.09 m2. However, > 150 larvae were required before damage became apparent in pure Agrostis stolonifera L. plots. Adult counts during peaks in emergence as well as cumulative counts across the emergence period were significantly correlated to future densities of larvae. Eight binomial sequential sampling plans based on two tally thresholds for classifying infestation (T = 1 and two adults) and four adult density thresholds (0.5, 0.85, 1.15, and 1.35 per 3.34 m2) were developed to forecast the likelihood of turfgrass damage by using adult counts during peak emergence. Resampling for validation of sample plans software was used to validate sampling plans with field-collected data sets. All sampling plans were found to deliver accurate classifications (correct decisions were made between 84.4 and 96.8%) in a practical timeframe (average sampling cost < 22.7 min).

  10. Monitoring variations of dimethyl sulfide and dimethylsulfoniopropionate in seawater and the atmosphere based on sequential vapor generation and ion molecule reaction mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Iyadomi, Satoshi; Ezoe, Kentaro; Ohira, Shin-Ichi; Toda, Kei

    2016-04-01

    To monitor the fluctuations of dimethyl sulfur compounds at the seawater/atmosphere interface, an automated system was developed based on sequential injection analysis coupled with vapor generation-ion molecule reaction mass spectrometry (SIA-VG-IMRMS). Using this analytical system, dissolved dimethyl sulfide (DMS(aq)) and dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), a precursor to DMS in seawater, were monitored together sequentially with atmospheric dimethyl sulfide (DMS(g)). A shift from the equilibrium point between DMS(aq) and DMS(g) results in the emission of DMS to the atmosphere. Atmospheric DMS emitted from seawater plays an important role as a source of cloud condensation nuclei, which influences the oceanic climate. Water samples were taken periodically and dissolved DMS(aq) was vaporized for analysis by IMRMS. After that, DMSP was hydrolyzed to DMS and acrylic acid, and analyzed in the same manner as DMS(aq). The vaporization behavior and hydrolysis of DMSP to DMS were investigated to optimize these conditions. Frequent (every 30 min) determination of the three components, DMS(aq)/DMSP (nanomolar) and DMS(g) (ppbv), was carried out by SIA-VG-IMRMS. Field analysis of the dimethyl sulfur compounds was undertaken at a coastal station, which succeeded in showing detailed variations of the compounds in a natural setting. Observed concentrations of the dimethyl sulfur compounds both in the atmosphere and seawater largely changed with time and similar variations were repeatedly observed over several days, suggesting diurnal variations in the DMS flux at the seawater/atmosphere interface.

  11. Sequential bioluminescence resonance energy transfer-fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based ratiometric protease assays with fusion proteins of firefly luciferase and red fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Branchini, Bruce R; Rosenberg, Justin C; Ablamsky, Danielle M; Taylor, Kelsey P; Southworth, Tara L; Linder, Samantha J

    2011-07-15

    We report here the preparation of ratiometric luminescent probes that contain two well-separated emission peaks produced by a sequential bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET)-fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) process. The probes are single soluble fusion proteins consisting of a thermostable firefly luciferase variant that catalyze yellow-green (560nm maximum) bioluminescence and a red fluorescent protein covalently labeled with a near-infrared fluorescent dye. The two proteins are connected by a decapeptide containing a protease recognition site specific for factor Xa, thrombin, or caspase 3. The rates of protease cleavage of the fusion protein substrates were monitored by recording emission spectra and plotting the change in peak ratios over time. Detection limits of 0.41nM for caspase 3, 1.0nM for thrombin, and 58nM for factor Xa were realized with a scanning fluorometer. Our results demonstrate for the first time that an efficient sequential BRET-FRET energy transfer process based on firefly luciferase bioluminescence can be employed to assay physiologically important protease activities. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Identification of Crosslinked Peptides after Click-based Enrichment Using Sequential CID and ETD Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Saiful M.; Du, Xiuxia; Tolić, Nikola; Wu, Si; Moore, Ronald J.; Mayer, M. Uljana; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2010-01-01

    Chemical crosslinking combined with mass spectrometry can be a powerful approach for the identification of protein-protein interactions and for providing constraints on protein structures. However, enrichment of crosslinked peptides is crucial to reduce sample complexity before mass spectrometric analysis. In addition compact crosslinkers are often preferred to provide short spacer lengths, surface accessibility to the protein complexes, and must have reasonable solubility under condition where the native complex structure is stable. In this study, we present a novel compact crosslinker that contains two distinct features: 1) an alkyne tag and 2) a small molecule detection tag (NO2-) to maintain reasonable solubility in water. The alkyne tag enables enrichment of the crosslinked peptide after proteolytic cleavage after coupling of an affinity tag using alkyne-azido click chemistry. Neutral loss of the small NO2- moiety provides a secondary means of detecting crosslinked peptides in MS/MS analyses, providing additional confidence in peptide identifications. We show the labeling efficiency of this crosslinker, which we termed CLIP (Click-enabled Linker for Interacting Proteins) using ubiquitin. The enrichment capability of CLIP is demonstrated for crosslinked ubiquitin in highly complex E. coli cell lysates. Sequential CID-MS/MS and ETD-MS/MS of inter-crosslinked peptides (two peptides connected with a crosslinker) are also demonstrated for improved automated identification of crosslinked peptides. PMID:19496583

  13. 13C-direct detected NMR experiments for the sequential J-based resonance assignment of RNA oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Christian; Kovacs, Helena; Buck, Janina; Wacker, Anna; Fürtig, Boris; Bermel, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    We present here a set of 13C-direct detected NMR experiments to facilitate the resonance assignment of RNA oligonucleotides. Three experiments have been developed: (1) the (H)CC-TOCSY-experiment utilizing a virtual decoupling scheme to assign the intraresidual ribose 13C-spins, (2) the (H)CPC-experiment that correlates each phosphorus with the C4′ nuclei of adjacent nucleotides via J(C,P) couplings and (3) the (H)CPC-CCH-TOCSY-experiment that correlates the phosphorus nuclei with the respective C1′,H1′ ribose signals. The experiments were applied to two RNA hairpin structures. The current set of 13C-direct detected experiments allows direct and unambiguous assignment of the majority of the hetero nuclei and the identification of the individual ribose moieties following their sequential assignment. Thus, 13C-direct detected NMR methods constitute useful complements to the conventional 1H-detected approach for the resonance assignment of oligonucleotides that is often hindered by the limited chemical shift dispersion. The developed methods can also be applied to large deuterated RNAs. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s10858-010-9429-5) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20544375

  14. Rapid Access to 2,2'-Bithiazole-Based Copolymers via Sequential Palladium-Catalyzed C-H/C-X and C-H/C-H Coupling Reactions.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qiang; Jiang, Ruyong; Wu, Di; You, Jingsong

    2016-05-01

    A rapid access to 2,2'-bithiazole-based copolymers has been developed on the basis of the sequential palladium-catalyzed CH/CX and CH/CH coupling reactions. To assemble a "copolymer" through homopolymerization, a type of symmetric A-B-A-type building block is designed as the monomer and prepared via the regioselective C5H arylation of thiazole. A PdCl2 /CuCl-cocatalyzed oxidative CH/CH homopolymerization has been established to afford the 2,2'-bithiazole-based copolymers with high Mn (up to 69400). The current protocol features atom- and step-economy and exhibits a potential in the highly efficient construction of conjugated copolymers.

  15. Do dynamic-based MR knee kinematics methods produce the same results as static methods?

    PubMed

    d'Entremont, Agnes G; Nordmeyer-Massner, Jurek A; Bos, Clemens; Wilson, David R; Pruessmann, Klaas P

    2013-06-01

    MR-based methods provide low risk, noninvasive assessment of joint kinematics; however, these methods often use static positions or require many identical cycles of movement. The study objective was to compare the 3D kinematic results approximated from a series of sequential static poses of the knee with the 3D kinematic results obtained from continuous dynamic movement of the knee. To accomplish this objective, we compared kinematic data from a validated static MR method to a fast static MR method, and compared kinematic data from both static methods to a newly developed dynamic MR method. Ten normal volunteers were imaged using the three kinematic methods (dynamic, static standard, and static fast). Results showed that the two sets of static results were in agreement, indicating that the sequences (standard and fast) may be used interchangeably. Dynamic kinematic results were significantly different from both static results in eight of 11 kinematic parameters: patellar flexion, patellar tilt, patellar proximal translation, patellar lateral translation, patellar anterior translation, tibial abduction, tibial internal rotation, and tibial anterior translation. Three-dimensional MR kinematics measured from dynamic knee motion are often different from those measured in a static knee at several positions, indicating that dynamic-based kinematics provides information that is not obtainable from static scans.

  16. Molecular dynamics-based refinement and validation for sub-5 Å cryo-electron microscopy maps

    PubMed Central

    Singharoy, Abhishek; Teo, Ivan; McGreevy, Ryan; Stone, John E; Zhao, Jianhua; Schulten, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Two structure determination methods, based on the molecular dynamics flexible fitting (MDFF) paradigm, are presented that resolve sub-5 Å cryo-electron microscopy (EM) maps with either single structures or ensembles of such structures. The methods, denoted cascade MDFF and resolution exchange MDFF, sequentially re-refine a search model against a series of maps of progressively higher resolutions, which ends with the original experimental resolution. Application of sequential re-refinement enables MDFF to achieve a radius of convergence of ~25 Å demonstrated with the accurate modeling of β-galactosidase and TRPV1 proteins at 3.2 Å and 3.4 Å resolution, respectively. The MDFF refinements uniquely offer map-model validation and B-factor determination criteria based on the inherent dynamics of the macromolecules studied, captured by means of local root mean square fluctuations. The MDFF tools described are available to researchers through an easy-to-use and cost-effective cloud computing resource on Amazon Web Services. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16105.001 PMID:27383269

  17. Molecular dynamics-based refinement and validation for sub-5 Å cryo-electron microscopy maps.

    PubMed

    Singharoy, Abhishek; Teo, Ivan; McGreevy, Ryan; Stone, John E; Zhao, Jianhua; Schulten, Klaus

    2016-07-07

    Two structure determination methods, based on the molecular dynamics flexible fitting (MDFF) paradigm, are presented that resolve sub-5 Å cryo-electron microscopy (EM) maps with either single structures or ensembles of such structures. The methods, denoted cascade MDFF and resolution exchange MDFF, sequentially re-refine a search model against a series of maps of progressively higher resolutions, which ends with the original experimental resolution. Application of sequential re-refinement enables MDFF to achieve a radius of convergence of ~25 Å demonstrated with the accurate modeling of β-galactosidase and TRPV1 proteins at 3.2 Å and 3.4 Å resolution, respectively. The MDFF refinements uniquely offer map-model validation and B-factor determination criteria based on the inherent dynamics of the macromolecules studied, captured by means of local root mean square fluctuations. The MDFF tools described are available to researchers through an easy-to-use and cost-effective cloud computing resource on Amazon Web Services.

  18. Keystroke Dynamics-Based Credential Hardening Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlow, Nick; Cukic, Bojan

    abstract Keystroke dynamics are becoming a well-known method for strengthening username- and password-based credential sets. The familiarity and ease of use of these traditional authentication schemes combined with the increased trustworthiness associated with biometrics makes them prime candidates for application in many web-based scenarios. Our keystroke dynamics system uses Breiman’s random forests algorithm to classify keystroke input sequences as genuine or imposter. The system is capable of operating at various points on a traditional ROC curve depending on application-specific security needs. As a username/password authentication scheme, our approach decreases the system penetration rate associated with compromised passwords up to 99.15%. Beyond presenting results demonstrating the credential hardening effect of our scheme, we look into the notion that a user’s familiarity to components of a credential set can non-trivially impact error rates.

  19. Goal directed hemodynamic therapy based in esophageal Doppler flow parameters: A systematic review, meta-analysis and trial sequential analysis.

    PubMed

    Ripollés-Melchor, J; Casans-Francés, R; Espinosa, A; Abad-Gurumeta, A; Feldheiser, A; López-Timoneda, F; Calvo-Vecino, J M

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have compared perioperative esophageal doppler monitoring (EDM) guided intravascular volume replacement strategies with conventional clinical volume replacement in surgical patients. The use of the EDM within hemodynamic algorithms is called 'goal directed hemodynamic therapy' (GDHT). Meta-analysis of the effects of EDM guided GDHT in adult non-cardiac surgery on postoperative complications and mortality using PRISMA methodology. A systematic search was performed in Medline, PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library (last update, March 2015). Randomized clinical trials (RCTs) in which perioperative GDHT was compared to other fluid management. Overall complications. Mortality; number of patients with complications; cardiac, renal and infectious complications; incidence of ileus. Studies were subjected to quantifiable analysis, pre-defined subgroup analysis (stratified by surgery, type of comparator and risk); pre-defined sensitivity analysis and trial sequential analysis (TSA). Fifty six RCTs were initially identified, 15 fulfilling the inclusion criteria, including 1,368 patients. A significant reduction was observed in overall complications associated with GDHT compared to other fluid therapy (RR=0.75; 95%CI: 0.63-0.89; P=0.0009) in colorectal, urological and high-risk surgery compared to conventional fluid therapy. No differences were found in secondary outcomes, neither in other subgroups. The impact on preventing the development of complications in patients using EDM is high, causing a relative risk reduction (RRR) of 50% for a number needed to treat (NNT)=6. GDHT guided by EDM decreases postoperative complications, especially in patients undergoing colorectal surgery and high-risk surgery. However, no differences versus restrictive fluid therapy and in intermediate-risk patients were found. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Accounting for Test Variability through Sizing Local Domains in Sequential Design Optimization with Concurrent Calibration-Based Model Validation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    Mathematics and Statistics Department,Oakland University,2200 N. Squirrel Road,Rochester,Mi,48309 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER ; #23664 9...SAE Paper No. 2007-01-1251, SAE World Congress, 2007 10. Patel, P., “Development of an Algorithm for Piston Secondary Dynamics and Skirt-liner

  1. Automated microbial metabolism laboratory. [design of advanced labeled release experiment based on single addition of soil and multiple sequential additions of media into test chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The design and rationale of an advanced labeled release experiment based on single addition of soil and multiple sequential additions of media into each of four test chambers are outlined. The feasibility for multiple addition tests was established and various details of the methodology were studied. The four chamber battery of tests include: (1) determination of the effect of various atmospheric gases and selection of that gas which produces an optimum response; (2) determination of the effect of incubation temperature and selection of the optimum temperature for performing Martian biochemical tests; (3) sterile soil is dosed with a battery of C-14 labeled substrates and subjected to experimental temperature range; and (4) determination of the possible inhibitory effects of water on Martian organisms is performed initially by dosing with 0.01 ml and 0.5 ml of medium, respectively. A series of specifically labeled substrates are then added to obtain patterns in metabolic 14CO2 (C-14)O2 evolution.

  2. The impact of sequential ultra-low volume ground aerosol applications of malathion on the population dynamics of Aedes aegypti (L.).

    PubMed

    Focks, D A; Kloter, K O; Carmichael, G T

    1987-05-01

    The efficacy of sequential, ultra-low volume ground aerosol applications of malathion at current U.S. label rates was evaluated as an emergency control measure for adult populations of Aedes aegypti (L.) in New Orleans, Louisiana. Replicates of 11 sequential aerosol treatments applied 12 hr apart during a 5.5-day period reduced mean adult captures and oviposition rates during the treatment period 73% and 75%, respectively. We hypothesize that oviposition was not completely suppressed because females with a developing egg burden remained sequestered during treatment periods or were more tolerant to the pesticide. We further concluded that adults could not be totally suppressed because of continued emergence. After treatment, adult densities recovered to pretreatment and control levels within approximately 1 week. A simulation study of the results suggested that, under the conditions of closely spaced housing and abundant vegetation that is typical of much of New Orleans, a single aerosol killed an average of 88% of the males and only 30% of the females present.

  3. Mining Contiguous Sequential Generators in Biological Sequences.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingsong; Wang, Yinglin; Zhang, Chao; Shi, Yongyong

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of conserved sequential patterns in biological sequences is essential to unveiling common shared functions. Mining sequential generators as well as mining closed sequential patterns can contribute to a more concise result set than mining all sequential patterns, especially in the analysis of big data in bioinformatics. Previous studies have also presented convincing arguments that the generator is preferable to the closed pattern in inductive inference and classification. However, classic sequential generator mining algorithms, due to the lack of consideration on the contiguous constraint along with the lower-closed one, still pose a great challenge at spawning a large number of inefficient and redundant patterns, which is too huge for effective usage. Driven by some extensive applications of patterns with contiguous feature, we propose ConSgen, an efficient algorithm for discovering contiguous sequential generators. It adopts the n-gram model, called shingles, to generate potential frequent subsequences and leverages several pruning techniques to prune the unpromising parts of search space. And then, the contiguous sequential generators are identified by using the equivalence class-based lower-closure checking scheme. Our experiments on both DNA and protein data sets demonstrate the compactness, efficiency, and scalability of ConSgen.

  4. Passive baited sequential filth fly trap

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Filth fly control measures may be optimized with a better understanding of fly population dynamics measured throughout the day. We describe the modification of a commercial motorized sequential mosquito trap to accept liquid odorous bait and leverage a classic inverted cone design to passively confi...

  5. Sequential inductive learning

    SciTech Connect

    Gratch, J.

    1996-12-31

    This article advocates a new model for inductive learning. Called sequential induction, it helps bridge classical fixed-sample learning techniques (which are efficient but difficult to formally characterize), and worst-case approaches (which provide strong statistical guarantees but are too inefficient for practical use). Learning proceeds as a sequence of decisions which are informed by training data. By analyzing induction at the level of these decisions, and by utilizing the only enough data to make each decision, sequential induction provides statistical guarantees but with substantially less data than worst-case methods require. The sequential inductive model is also useful as a method for determining a sufficient sample size for inductive learning and as such, is relevant to learning problems where the preponderance of data or the cost of gathering data precludes the use of traditional methods.

  6. Sequential dependencies in driving.

    PubMed

    Doshi, Anup; Tran, Cuong; Wilder, Matthew H; Mozer, Michael C; Trivedi, Mohan M

    2012-07-01

    The effect of recent experience on current behavior has been studied extensively in simple laboratory tasks. We explore the nature of sequential effects in the more naturalistic setting of automobile driving. Driving is a safety-critical task in which delayed response times may have severe consequences. Using a realistic driving simulator, we find significant sequential effects in pedal-press response times that depend on the history of recent stimuli and responses. Response times are slowed up to 100 ms in particular cases, a delay that has dangerous practical consequences. Further, we observe a significant number of history-related pedal misapplications, which have recently been noted as a cause for concern in the automotive safety community. By anticipating these consequences of sequential context, driver assistance systems could mitigate the effects of performance degradations and thus critically improve driver safety. Copyright © 2012 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  7. Sequential elution process

    DOEpatents

    Kingsley, I.S.

    1987-01-06

    A process and apparatus are disclosed for the separation of complex mixtures of carbonaceous material by sequential elution with successively stronger solvents. In the process, a column containing glass beads is maintained in a fluidized state by a rapidly flowing stream of a weak solvent, and the sample is injected into this flowing stream such that a portion of the sample is dissolved therein and the remainder of the sample is precipitated therein and collected as a uniform deposit on the glass beads. Successively stronger solvents are then passed through the column to sequentially elute less soluble materials. 1 fig.

  8. Sequential growth and monitoring of a polypyrrole actuator system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarrazin, J. C.; Mascaro, Stephen A.

    2014-03-01

    Electroactive polymers (EAPs) have emerged as viable materials in sensing and actuating applications, but the capability to mimic the structure and function of natural muscle is increased due to their ability to permit additional, sequential synthesis steps between stages of actuation. Current work is improving upon the mechanical performance in terms of achievable stresses, strains, and strain rates, but issues still remain with actuator lifetime and adaptability. This work seeks to create a bioinspired polymer actuation system that can be monitored using state estimation and adjusted in vivo during operation. The novel, time-saving process of sequential growth was applied to polymer actuator systems for the initial growth, as well as additional growth steps after actuation cycles. Synthesis of conducting polymers on a helical metal electrode directs polymer shape change during actuation, assists in charge distribution along the polymer for actuation, and as is described in this work, constructs a constant working electrode/polymer connection during operation which allows sequential polymer growth based on a performance need. The polymer system is monitored by means of a reduced-order, state estimation model that works between growth and actuation cycles. In this case, actuator stress is improved between growth cycles. The ability for additional synthesis of the polymer actuator not only creates an actuator system that can be optimized based on demand, but creates a dynamic actuator system that more closely mimics natural muscle capability.

  9. Non-recursive sequential input deconvolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal, Dionisio

    2017-01-01

    A scheme for sequential deconvolution of inputs from measured outputs is presented. The key feature in the formulation is elimination of the initial state from the input-output relations by projecting the output in the left null space of the observability block. Removal of the initial state allows the sequential format of the deconvolution, essential for computational reasons, to be implemented non-recursively, assuring unconditional stability. Identifiability is realized when the input-output arrangement does not have transmission zeros, and observability and controllability are shown immaterial. Comparison of results from the scheme with those from Dynamic Programming highlights the benefits of eliminating the initial state.

  10. Dynamics-based centrality for directed networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Naoki; Kori, Hiroshi

    2010-11-01

    Determining the relative importance of nodes in directed networks is important in, for example, ranking websites, publications, and sports teams, and for understanding signal flows in systems biology. A prevailing centrality measure in this respect is the PageRank. In this work, we focus on another class of centrality derived from the Laplacian of the network. We extend the Laplacian-based centrality, which has mainly been applied to strongly connected networks, to the case of general directed networks such that we can quantitatively compare arbitrary nodes. Toward this end, we adopt the idea used in the PageRank to introduce global connectivity between all the pairs of nodes with a certain strength. Numerical simulations are carried out on some networks. We also offer interpretations of the Laplacian-based centrality for general directed networks in terms of various dynamical and structural properties of networks. Importantly, the Laplacian-based centrality defined as the stationary density of the continuous-time random walk with random jumps is shown to be equivalent to the absorption probability of the random walk with sinks at each node but without random jumps. Similarly, the proposed centrality represents the importance of nodes in dynamics on the original network supplied with sinks but not with random jumps.

  11. Dynamic Digital Channelizer Based on Spectrum Sensing.

    PubMed

    Hu, Junpeng; Zuo, Zhen; Huang, Zhiping; Dong, Zhi

    2015-01-01

    The ability to efficiently channelize a received signal with dynamic sub-channel bandwidths is a key requirement of software defined radio (SDR) systems. The digital channelizer, which is used to split the received signal into a number of sub-channels, plays an important role in SDR systems. In this paper, a design of dynamic digital channelizer is presented. The proposed method is novel in that it employs a cosine modulated filter bank (CMFB) to divide the received signal into multiple frequency sub-bands and a spectrum sensing technique, which is mostly used in cognitive radio, is introduced to detect the presence of signal of each sub-band. The method of spectrum sensing is carried out based on the eigenvalues of covariance matrix of received signal. The ratio of maximum-minimum eigenvalue of each sub-band is vulnerable to noise fluctuation. This paper suggests an optimized method to calculate the ratio of maximum-minimum eigenvalue. The simulation results imply that the design of digital channelizer can effectively separate the received signal with dynamically changeable sub-channel signals.

  12. Sequential Reliability Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eiting, Mindert H.

    1991-01-01

    A method is proposed for sequential evaluation of reliability of psychometric instruments. Sample size is unfixed; a test statistic is computed after each person is sampled and a decision is made in each stage of the sampling process. Results from a series of Monte-Carlo experiments establish the method's efficiency. (SLD)

  13. Sequential Dependencies in Driving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doshi, Anup; Tran, Cuong; Wilder, Matthew H.; Mozer, Michael C.; Trivedi, Mohan M.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of recent experience on current behavior has been studied extensively in simple laboratory tasks. We explore the nature of sequential effects in the more naturalistic setting of automobile driving. Driving is a safety-critical task in which delayed response times may have severe consequences. Using a realistic driving simulator, we find…

  14. Sequential Dependencies in Driving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doshi, Anup; Tran, Cuong; Wilder, Matthew H.; Mozer, Michael C.; Trivedi, Mohan M.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of recent experience on current behavior has been studied extensively in simple laboratory tasks. We explore the nature of sequential effects in the more naturalistic setting of automobile driving. Driving is a safety-critical task in which delayed response times may have severe consequences. Using a realistic driving simulator, we find…

  15. Long-term management of patients with hormone receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer: Concepts for sequential and combination endocrine-based therapies.

    PubMed

    Brufsky, Adam M

    2017-09-01

    Treatment options for hormone receptor-positive (HR-positive) metastatic breast cancer (MBC) continue to increase in parallel with expanding knowledge about the complex biology of breast cancer subtypes and resistance mechanisms to endocrine therapy. For patients with HR-positive MBC, there are now an unprecedented number of endocrine-based treatment options that can improve long-term outcomes, while preserving or optimizing quality of life, and that can be used before selecting more cytotoxic chemotherapeutic regimens. In addition to antiestrogens, steroidal and nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitors, the selective estrogen-receptor degrader, fulvestrant, and new endocrine-based combinations provide significant and clinically meaningful improvements in outcomes in the first line setting and beyond. Also, new clinical scenarios and indications for monotherapy endocrine and targeted therapies continue to be explored. Patients have several therapeutic options when their disease progresses or becomes resistant, although the optimal sequencing of these therapies remains unclear. Ongoing research in the resistant/refractory setting is anticipated to continue improving the outlook for these patients. This review will discuss current and investigational approaches to sequential single-agent endocrine and endocrine-based combination therapy for the long-term management of patients with HR-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative MBC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Dynamic plasmapause model based on THEMIS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W.; Liu, X.

    2015-12-01

    We will present a dynamic plasmapause location model established based on five years of THEMIS measurements from 2009 to 2013. In total, 5878 plasmapause crossing events are identified, sufficiently covering all 24 Magnetic Local Time (MLT) sectors. Based on this plasmapause crossing database, we investigate the correlations between plasmapause locations with solar wind parameters and geomagnetic indices. Input parameters for the best fits are obtained for different MLT sectors and finally we choose five input parameters to build a plasmapause location model, including five-minute-averaged SYM-H, AL and AU indices as well as hourly-averaged AE and Kp indices. An out-of-sample comparison on the evolution of the plasmapause is shown during April 2001 magnetic storm, demonstrating good agreement between model results and observations. Two major advantages are achieved by this model. First, this model provides plasmapause locations at 24 MLT sectors, still providing good consistency with observations. Second, this model is able to reproduce dynamic variations of plasmapause in the time scale as short as five minutes.

  17. Motion detection based on recurrent network dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Joukes, Jeroen; Hartmann, Till S.; Krekelberg, Bart

    2014-01-01

    The detection of visual motion requires temporal delays to compare current with earlier visual input. Models of motion detection assume that these delays reside in separate classes of slow and fast thalamic cells, or slow and fast synaptic transmission. We used a data-driven modeling approach to generate a model that instead uses recurrent network dynamics with a single, fixed temporal integration window to implement the velocity computation. This model successfully reproduced the temporal response dynamics of a population of motion sensitive neurons in macaque middle temporal area (MT) and its constituent parts matched many of the properties found in the motion processing pathway (e.g., Gabor-like receptive fields (RFs), simple and complex cells, spatially asymmetric excitation and inhibition). Reverse correlation analysis revealed that a simplified network based on first and second order space-time correlations of the recurrent model behaved much like a feedforward motion energy (ME) model. The feedforward model, however, failed to capture the full speed tuning and direction selectivity properties based on higher than second order space-time correlations typically found in MT. These findings support the idea that recurrent network connectivity can create temporal delays to compute velocity. Moreover, the model explains why the motion detection system often behaves like a feedforward ME network, even though the anatomical evidence strongly suggests that this network should be dominated by recurrent feedback. PMID:25565992

  18. Dynamic graph cut based segmentation of mammogram.

    PubMed

    Angayarkanni, S Pitchumani; Kamal, Nadira Banu; Thangaiya, Ranjit Jeba

    2015-01-01

    This work presents the dynamic graph cut based Otsu's method to segment the masses in mammogram images. Major concern that threatens human life is cancer. Breast cancer is the most common type of disease among women in India and abroad. Breast cancer increases the mortality rate in India especially in women since it is considered to be the second largest form of disease which leads to death. Mammography is the best method for diagnosing early stage of cancer. The computer aided diagnosis lacks accuracy and it is time consuming. The main approach which makes the detection of cancerous masses accurate is segmentation process. This paper is a presentation of the dynamic graph cut based approach for effective segmentation of region of interest (ROI). The sensitivity, the specificity, the positive prediction value and the negative prediction value of the proposed algorithm are determined and compared with the existing algorithms. Both qualitative and quantitative methods are used to detect the accuracy of the proposed system. The sensitivity, the specificity, the positive prediction value and the negative prediction value of the proposed algorithm accounts to 98.88, 98.89, 93 and 97.5% which rates very high when compared to the existing algorithms.

  19. Modeling of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis dynamics in a dairy herd: An individual based approach.

    PubMed

    Al-Mamun, Mohammad A; Smith, Rebecca L; Schukken, Ynte H; Gröhn, Yrjö T

    2016-11-07

    In the dairy industry, Johne's disease (JD), caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is one of the major investigated diseases. To date, researchers have suggested some control strategies for JD, such as test-and-cull based herd management, isolated calf rearing management, and vaccinations. Due to the slow progressing nature of MAP, tests with low diagnostic test sensitivity and specificity, and economic limitations, implementing these strategies has not resulted in elimination of MAP from farms. To date, no study has integrated detailed dairy herd dynamics with different MAP transmission routes. We have developed an individual-based dairy herd model by incorporating basic herd dynamics in a closed herd environment where no new animals have been bought from outside. The model considered three age groups of animals: calves, heifers and adults. It includes sequential life events of a dairy animal and such key dynamic processes of the dairy herd as lactation cycle, calving, voluntary waiting period, insemination, pregnancy, dry-off period and calf and heifer rearing. After initially validating that the model reproduced typical herd dynamics, it was extended by incorporating MAP infection dynamics, where each individual adult animal belonged to one of four infection compartments: susceptible, latent, low shedding and high shedding. The model includes two disease transmission routes: horizontal transmission (i.e., fecal-oral) and vertical transmission (i.e., in utero infection). The results confirm that this model can simulate a realistic dairy herd and that inclusion of the above-mentioned dynamic processes provides useful information about individual infected animals to farmers. Access to the individual animal information offers more validity to assessment of appropriate control strategies for an endemically MAP infected herd. This model can serve as an accurate and novel tool not only to better understand MAP dynamics, but is also valuable as an

  20. An Approach to Characterizing the Complicated Sequential Metabolism of Salidroside in Rats.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhiqiang; Ma, Xiaoyun; Liu, Yang; Lu, Lina; Yang, Ruirui; Yu, Guohua; Sun, Mohan; Xin, Shaokun; Tian, Simin; Chen, Xinjing; Zhao, Haiyu

    2016-05-30

    Metabolic study of bioactive compounds that undergo a dynamic and sequential process of metabolism is still a great challenge. Salidroside, one of the most active ingredients of Rhodiola crenulata, can be metabolized in different sites before being absorbed into the systemic blood stream. This study proposed an approach for describing the sequential biotransformation process of salidroside based on comparative analysis. In vitro incubation, in situ closed-loop and in vivo blood sampling were used to determine the relative contribution of each site to the total metabolism of salidroside. The results showed that salidroside was stable in digestive juice, and it was metabolized primarily by the liver and the intestinal flora and to a lesser extent by the gut wall. The sequential metabolism method described in this study could be a general approach to characterizing the metabolic routes in the digestive system for natural products.

  1. Dynamics of hospital-based plastic surgery.

    PubMed

    Chandawarkar, Rajiv Y; Dutta, Satyajit

    2007-02-01

    Legislative regulations, decreasing reimbursements for office procedures, and malpractice premiums have transformed plastic surgery from an office-based specialty into a hospital-based one. Simultaneously, hospital economics has altered, wherein the "business model" has all but subsumed the old "medical care" model. Integration between plastic surgeons and the new hospital structure has been difficult for both. Limited understanding of the financial dynamics of hospital-based practices, unfamiliarity with the administrative processes, and resistance to accept and assimilate changes by both sides pose hurdles, in some situations even forcing plastic surgeons out of hospital settings. Using well-defined financial terminology, changing national development in health care policy, and hospital-based administrative strategies as a backdrop, this study finds common ground for the plastic surgery specialty to coapt with the hospital. Key missing elements in the interaction between plastic surgeons and hospital administrations and ways of integrating these components are identified. To do so effectively, plastic surgeons must first understand the basic tenets of management that drive hospital administrators, participate at every level they can in guiding these processes, and assume leadership roles that will ultimately dictate the way they work and conduct their professional lives. It is critical that plastic surgeons engage in important processes that govern the economics of hospital-based health care delivery. This commitment will also ensure that all three groups (the patients, physicians, and hospital administrators) achieve a degree of satisfaction. The message to plastic surgeons is clear: be proactive and lead a campaign of change.

  2. A high-performance ground-based prototype of horn-type sequential vegetable production facility for life support system in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yuming; Liu, Hui; Shao, Lingzhi; Wang, Minjuan; Berkovich, Yu A.; Erokhin, A. N.; Liu, Hong

    2013-07-01

    Vegetable cultivation plays a crucial role in dietary supplements and psychosocial benefits of the crew during manned space flight. Here we developed a ground-based prototype of horn-type sequential vegetable production facility, named Horn-type Producer (HTP), which was capable of simulating the microgravity effect and the continuous cultivation of leaf-vegetables on root modules. The growth chamber of the facility had a volume of 0.12 m3, characterized by a three-stage space expansion with plant growth. The planting surface of 0.154 m2 was comprised of six ring-shaped root modules with a fibrous ion-exchange resin substrate. Root modules were fastened to a central porous tube supplying water, and moved forward with plant growth. The total illuminated crop area of 0.567 m2 was provided by a combination of red and white light emitting diodes on the internal surfaces. In tests with a 24-h photoperiod, the productivity of the HTP at 0.3 kW for lettuce achieved 254.3 g eatable biomass per week. Long-term operation of the HTP did not alter vegetable nutrition composition to any great extent. Furthermore, the efficiency of the HTP, based on the Q-criterion, was 7 × 10-4 g2 m-3 J-1. These results show that the HTP exhibited high productivity, stable quality, and good efficiency in the process of planting lettuce, indicative of an interesting design for space vegetable production.

  3. Module Anchored Network Inference: A Sequential Module-Based Approach to Novel Gene Network Construction from Genomic Expression Data on Human Disease Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Susanna R.; Lee, Jae K.

    2017-01-01

    Different computational approaches have been examined and compared for inferring network relationships from time-series genomic data on human disease mechanisms under the recent Dialogue on Reverse Engineering Assessment and Methods (DREAM) challenge. Many of these approaches infer all possible relationships among all candidate genes, often resulting in extremely crowded candidate network relationships with many more False Positives than True Positives. To overcome this limitation, we introduce a novel approach, Module Anchored Network Inference (MANI), that constructs networks by analyzing sequentially small adjacent building blocks (modules). Using MANI, we inferred a 7-gene adipogenesis network based on time-series gene expression data during adipocyte differentiation. MANI was also applied to infer two 10-gene networks based on time-course perturbation datasets from DREAM3 and DREAM4 challenges. MANI well inferred and distinguished serial, parallel, and time-dependent gene interactions and network cascades in these applications showing a superior performance to other in silico network inference techniques for discovering and reconstructing gene network relationships. PMID:28197408

  4. Effects of sequential paclitaxel–carboplatin followed by gemcitabine-based chemotherapy compared with paclitaxel-carboplatin therapy administered to patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fei; Du, Xuelian; Li, Xiaoxia; Liu, Naifu; Yu, Hao; Sheng, Xiugui

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We aimed to compare the efficacy of paclitaxel and carboplatin followed by gemcitabine-based combination chemotherapy with paclitaxel–carboplatin for treating advanced epithelial ovarian cancer in this retrospective, STROBE-compliant study. Patients’ tolerance to treatment was also assessed. We retrospectively analyzed the records of 178 women who underwent initial optimal debulking surgery between January 2003 and December 2011 to treat FIGO stage IIIc epithelial ovarian cancer. Patients in arm 1 (n = 88) received 4 cycles of paclitaxel and carboplatin followed by 2 to 4 cycles of gemcitabine-based combination chemotherapy. Patients in arm 2 (n = 90) received 6 to 8 cycles of paclitaxel and carboplatin. The granulocyte-colony stimulating factor was administered prophylactically to all patients. The median follow-up for both arms was 62 months. Medianprogression-free survival (PFS) between arms 1 and 2 (28 and 19 months [P = 0.003]) as well as 5-year OS (34.1% and 18.9% [P = 0.021]) differed significantly. The neurotoxicity rate was significantly higher in arm 2 than in arm 1 (45.2% vs 27.1%, P = 0.026). There was no significant difference between study arms in hematological toxicity. The sequential regimen significantly improved PFS and 5-year OS with tolerable toxicity compared with the single regimen, and offers an alternative for treating patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer. PMID:28002342

  5. Tyrosinase biosensor for benzoic acid inhibition-based determination with the use of a flow-batch monosegmented sequential injection system.

    PubMed

    Kochana, Jolanta; Kozak, Joanna; Skrobisz, Agata; Woźniakiewicz, Michał

    2012-07-15

    Amperometric tyrosinase based biosensor for benzoic acid determination with the use of a flow-batch monosegmented sequential injection system is proposed. The functioning of the biosensor is based on the inhibition effect of benzoic acid on the biocatalytic activity of tyrosinase, polyphenol oxidase. In the biosensor, tyrosinase is entrapped in titania gel modified with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) and Nafion. The procedure of optimization of experimental conditions affecting the biosensor response, as well as its analytical characteristics and results of the approach verification using synthetic samples and a reference material are presented. The developed biosensor exhibits linear range up to 2.46μM, good sensitivity toward benzoic acid (1.06μAμM(-1)) and low detection limit (0.03μM). The approach has been applied to benzoic acid determination in a real beverage sample giving the result consistent with that obtained using the HPLC method. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Sequential measurements of conjugate observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmeli, Claudio; Heinosaari, Teiko; Toigo, Alessandro

    2011-07-01

    We present a unified treatment of sequential measurements of two conjugate observables. Our approach is to derive a mathematical structure theorem for all the relevant covariant instruments. As a consequence of this result, we show that every Weyl-Heisenberg covariant observable can be implemented as a sequential measurement of two conjugate observables. This method is applicable both in finite- and infinite-dimensional Hilbert spaces, therefore covering sequential spin component measurements as well as position-momentum sequential measurements.

  7. Spatiotemporal-atlas-based dynamic speech imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Maojing; Woo, Jonghye; Liang, Zhi-Pei; Sutton, Bradley P.

    2016-03-01

    Dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (DS-MRI) has been recognized as a promising method for visualizing articulatory motion of speech in scientific research and clinical applications. However, characterization of the gestural and acoustical properties of the vocal tract remains a challenging task for DS-MRI because it requires: 1) reconstructing high-quality spatiotemporal images by incorporating stronger prior knowledge; and 2) quantitatively interpreting the reconstructed images that contain great motion variability. This work presents a novel imaging method that simultaneously meets both requirements by integrating a spatiotemporal atlas into a Partial Separability (PS) model-based imaging framework. Through the use of an atlas-driven sparsity constraint, this method is capable of capturing high-quality articulatory dynamics at an imaging speed of 102 frames per second and a spatial resolution of 2.2 × 2.2 mm2. Moreover, the proposed method enables quantitative characterization of variability of speech motion, compared to the generic motion pattern across all subjects, through the spatial residual components.

  8. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Lacks, S.A.

    1991-12-31

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA and chromosomal DNA cloned by this method are disclosed. The method includes the selection of a target organism having a segment of chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned. A first DNA segment, having a first restriction enzyme site on either side. homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism`s chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes.

  9. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    DOEpatents

    Lacks, Sanford A.

    1995-07-18

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA of a target organism is disclosed. A first DNA segment homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. The first segment has a first restriction enzyme site on either side. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism's chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction (class IIS) enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes.

  10. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    DOEpatents

    Lacks, S.A.

    1995-07-18

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA of a target organism is disclosed. A first DNA segment homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. The first segment has a first restriction enzyme site on either side. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism`s chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction (class IIS) enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes. 9 figs.

  11. Dynamic visual cryptography based on chaotic oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrauskiene, Vilma; Palivonaite, Rita; Aleksa, Algiment; Ragulskis, Minvydas

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic visual cryptography scheme based on chaotic oscillations is proposed in this paper. Special computational algorithms are required for hiding the secret image in the cover moiré grating, but the decryption of the secret is completely visual. The secret image is leaked in the form of time-averaged geometric moiré fringes when the cover image is oscillated by a chaotic law. The relationship among the standard deviation of the stochastic time variable, the pitch of the moiré grating and the pixel size ensuring visual decryption of the secret is derived. The parameters of these chaotic oscillations must be carefully preselected before the secret image is leaked from the cover image. Several computational experiments are used to illustrate the functionality and the applicability of the proposed image hiding technique.

  12. [Dynamic bimaxillary osteotomy: the new occlusal base].

    PubMed

    Audion, M; Darmon, Y

    1989-01-01

    The authors present an ortho-surgical method which unites occlusion and aesthetic without compromise and without stopping orthodontic work during the immediate post-operative period. The occlusal preparation permits us a global and simultaneous mobilisation of the two maxillars which are ostesynthezed in posterior skeletal disclosing. This disposition allows a lingual replacement and gives more facility to an eventual immediate post-operative occlusal replacement. The stiff osteosynthesis with immovable plates realize a therapeutic dissociation between the skeletal stage and the basal alveolo-dental stage. The "proprioceptive amnesia" and the "muscular sideration" permit a proprioceptive reorganisation and a new neuro-muscular fonctionnement elaborated from a new occlusal base. The free movements of the T.M.J. facilitate these acquisitions and allow a perspective supervision of the occlusion in a dynamic perspective.

  13. Batch sequential designs for computer experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Leslie M; Williams, Brian J; Loeppky, Jason L

    2009-01-01

    Computer models simulating a physical process are used in many areas of science. Due to the complex nature of these codes it is often necessary to approximate the code, which is typically done using a Gaussian process. In many situations the number of code runs available to build the Guassian process approximation is limited. When the initial design is small or the underlying response surface is complicated this can lead to poor approximations of the code output. In order to improve the fit of the model, sequential design strategies must be employed. In this paper we introduce two simple distance based metrics that can be used to augment an initial design in a batch sequential manner. In addition we propose a sequential updating strategy to an orthogonal array based Latin hypercube sample. We show via various real and simulated examples that the distance metrics and the extension of the orthogonal array based Latin hypercubes work well in practice.

  14. Partial discharge localization in power transformers based on the sequential quadratic programming-genetic algorithm adopting acoustic emission techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hua-Long; Liu, Hua-Dong

    2014-10-01

    Partial discharge (PD) in power transformers is one of the prime reasons resulting in insulation degradation and power faults. Hence, it is of great importance to study the techniques of the detection and localization of PD in theory and practice. The detection and localization of PD employing acoustic emission (AE) techniques, as a kind of non-destructive testing, plus due to the advantages of powerful capability of locating and high precision, have been paid more and more attention. The localization algorithm is the key factor to decide the localization accuracy in AE localization of PD. Many kinds of localization algorithms exist for the PD source localization adopting AE techniques including intelligent and non-intelligent algorithms. However, the existed algorithms possess some defects such as the premature convergence phenomenon, poor local optimization ability and unsuitability for the field applications. To overcome the poor local optimization ability and easily caused premature convergence phenomenon of the fundamental genetic algorithm (GA), a new kind of improved GA is proposed, namely the sequence quadratic programming-genetic algorithm (SQP-GA). For the hybrid optimization algorithm, SQP-GA, the sequence quadratic programming (SQP) algorithm which is used as a basic operator is integrated into the fundamental GA, so the local searching ability of the fundamental GA is improved effectively and the premature convergence phenomenon is overcome. Experimental results of the numerical simulations of benchmark functions show that the hybrid optimization algorithm, SQP-GA, is better than the fundamental GA in the convergence speed and optimization precision, and the proposed algorithm in this paper has outstanding optimization effect. At the same time, the presented SQP-GA in the paper is applied to solve the ultrasonic localization problem of PD in transformers, then the ultrasonic localization method of PD in transformers based on the SQP-GA is proposed. And

  15. Sequential administration of a MVA-based MUC1 cancer vaccine and the TLR9 ligand Litenimod (Li28) improves local immune defense against tumors.

    PubMed

    Schaedler, Emmanuelle; Remy-Ziller, Christelle; Hortelano, Julie; Kehrer, Nadine; Claudepierre, Marie-Christine; Gatard, Tanja; Jakobs, Christopher; Préville, Xavier; Carpentier, Antoine F; Rittner, Karola

    2017-01-23

    TG4010 is an immunotherapeutic vaccine based on Modified Vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) encoding the human tumor-associated antigen MUC1 and human IL-2. In combination with first-line standard of care chemotherapy in advanced metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), repeated subcutaneous injection of TG4010 improved progression-free survival in phase 2b clinical trials. In preclinical tumor models, MVATG9931, the research version of TG4010, conferred antigen-specific responses against the weak antigen human MUC1. The combination of a suboptimal dose of MVATG9931 and the type B TLR9 ligand Litenimod (Li28) markedly increased survival in a subcutaneous RMA-MUC1 tumor model compared to the treatment with MVATG9931 or Li28 alone. The requirements for this protection were (i) de novo synthesis of MUC1, (ii) Li28 delivered several hours after MVATG9931 at the same site, (iii) at least two vaccination cycles, and (iv) implantation of MUC1-positive tumor cells in the vicinity to the vaccination site. Subcutaneously injected MVATG9931 allowed transient local gene expression and induced the local accumulation of MCP-1, RANTES, M-CSF, IL-15/IL-15R and IP-10. After repeated injection, CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes, B lymphocytes, NK cells, pDCs, neutrophils, and macrophages accumulated around the injection site, local RANTES levels remained high. Delayed injection of Li28 into this environment, led to further accumulation of macrophages, the secretion of IL-18 and IL-1 beta, and an increase of the percentage of activated CD69(+) NK cell. Combination treatment augmented the number of activated CD86(+) DCs in the draining lymph nodes and increased the percentage of KLRG1(+) CD127(-)CD8(+) T cells at the injection site. In vivo depletion of macrophages around the injection site by Clodronate liposomes reduced local IL-18 levels and diminished survival rates significantly. Thus, sequential administration of MVATG9931 and Li28 improves local innate and adaptive immune defense

  16. The use of group sequential, information-based sample size re-estimation in the design of the PRIMO study of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Pritchett, Yili; Jemiai, Yannis; Chang, Yuchiao; Bhan, Ishir; Agarwal, Rajiv; Zoccali, Carmine; Wanner, Christoph; Lloyd-Jones, Donald; Cannata-Andía, Jorge B; Thompson, Taylor; Appelbaum, Evan; Audhya, Paul; Andress, Dennis; Zhang, Wuyan; Solomon, Scott; Manning, Warren J; Thadhani, Ravi

    2011-04-01

    Chronic kidney disease is associated with a marked increase in risk for left ventricular hypertrophy and cardiovascular mortality compared with the general population. Therapy with vitamin D receptor activators has been linked with reduced mortality in chronic kidney disease and an improvement in left ventricular hypertrophy in animal studies. PRIMO (Paricalcitol capsules benefits in Renal failure Induced cardia MOrbidity) is a multinational, multicenter randomized controlled trial to assess the effects of paricalcitol (a selective vitamin D receptor activator) on mild to moderate left ventricular hypertrophy in patients with chronic kidney disease. Subjects with mild-moderate chronic kidney disease are randomized to paricalcitol or placebo after confirming left ventricular hypertrophy using a cardiac echocardiogram. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging is then used to assess left ventricular mass index at baseline, 24 and 48 weeks, which is the primary efficacy endpoint of the study. Because of limited prior data to estimate sample size, a maximum information group sequential design with sample size re-estimation is implemented to allow sample size adjustment based on the nuisance parameter estimated using the interim data. An interim efficacy analysis is planned at a pre-specified time point conditioned on the status of enrollment. The decision to increase sample size depends on the observed treatment effect. A repeated measures analysis model, using available data at Week 24 and 48 with a backup model of an ANCOVA analyzing change from baseline to the final nonmissing observation, are pre-specified to evaluate the treatment effect. Gamma-family of spending function is employed to control family-wise Type I error rate as stopping for success is planned in the interim efficacy analysis. If enrollment is slower than anticipated, the smaller sample size used in the interim efficacy analysis and the greater percent of missing week 48 data might decrease the parameter

  17. Combined and sequential delivery of bioactive VEGF165 and HGF from poly(trimethylene carbonate) based photo-cross-linked elastomers.

    PubMed

    Chapanian, R; Amsden, B G

    2010-04-02

    The ability of trimethylene carbonate (TMC) based elastomers to release bioactive vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF(165)) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) separately and in combined and sequential fashions using an osmotic release mechanism was investigated. A TMC-based elastomer was chosen since TMC degrades without producing potentially harmful acidic degradation products, and its mechanical properties can be tailored by copolymerizing with D,L-lactide (DLLA) and epsilon-caprolactone (epsilon-CL) and by controlling the cross-link density. The bioactivities of released VEGF(165) and HGF were assessed using the proliferation of human aortic endothelial (HAEC) and CCL 208 monkey lung epithelial cell lines. VEGF(165) and HGF were lyophilized separately or together with trehalose, rat serum albumin (RSA) and NaCl. No significant elastomer degradation occurred over the initial 8 weeks, during which the bulk of the embedded growth factors were released. The presence of a low concentration of NaCl in the release media did not affect the viability of HAEC and CCL 208 cells. The TMC-based elastomer was able to provide a sustained release of highly bioactive VEGF(165) and HGF for more than 10 days. When released in combination from the same device, VEGF(165) and HGF were released at similar rates. By preparing a dual-layered cylinder, in which VEGF(165) was in the outer layer and HGF in the inner layer, a constant release of VEGF alone was first obtained, followed by overlapping and constant release of the two growth factors after a period of 4days. This study demonstrates the potential of TMC-based elastomers combined with an osmotic mechanism to release acid-sensitive growth factors in bioactive form alone and in combination, in controlled rates and sequences.

  18. Confining Functional Nanoparticles into Colloidal Imine-Based COF Spheres by a Sequential Encapsulation-Crystallization Method.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-San-Miguel, David; Yazdi, Amirali; Guillerm, Vincent; Pérez-Carvajal, Javier; Puntes, Víctor; Maspoch, Daniel; Zamora, Félix

    2017-06-27

    Here, a two-step method is reported that enables imparting new functionalities to covalent organic frameworks (COFs) by nanoparticle confinement. The direct reaction between 1,3,5-tris(4-aminophenyl)benzene and 1,3,5-benzenetricarbaldehyde in the presence of a variety of metallic/metal-oxide nanoparticles resulted in embedding of the nanoparticles in amorphous and non-porous imine-linked polymer organic spheres (NP@a-1). Post-treatment reactions of NP@a-1 with acetic acid under reflux led to crystalline and porous imine-based COF-hybrid spheres (NP@c-1). Interestingly, Au@c-1 and Pd@c-1 were found to be catalytically active. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Selection of optimal recording sites for limited lead body surface potential mapping: A sequential selection based approach

    PubMed Central

    Finlay, Dewar D; Nugent, Chris D; Donnelly, Mark P; Lux, Robert L; McCullagh, Paul J; Black, Norman D

    2006-01-01

    Background In this study we propose the development of a new algorithm for selecting optimal recording sites for limited lead body surface potential mapping. The proposed algorithm differs from previously reported methods in that it is based upon a simple and intuitive data driven technique that does not make any presumptions about deterministic characteristics of the data. It uses a forward selection based search technique to find the best combination of electrocardiographic leads. Methods The study was conducted using a dataset consisting of body surface potential maps (BSPM) recorded from 116 subjects which included 59 normals and 57 subjects exhibiting evidence of old Myocardial Infarction (MI). The performance of the algorithm was evaluated using spatial RMS voltage error and correlation coefficient to compare original and reconstructed map frames. Results In all, three configurations of the algorithm were evaluated and it was concluded that there was little difference in the performance of the various configurations. In addition to observing the performance of the selection algorithm, several lead subsets of 32 electrodes as chosen by the various configurations of the algorithm were evaluated. The rationale for choosing this number of recording sites was to allow comparison with a previous study that used a different algorithm, where 32 leads were deemed to provide an acceptable level of reconstruction performance. Conclusion It was observed that although the lead configurations suggested in this study were not identical to that suggested in the previous work, the systems did bear similar characteristics in that recording sites were chosen with greatest density in the precordial region. PMID:16503972

  20. Beyond evidence-based data: scientific rationale and tumor behavior to drive sequential and personalized therapeutic strategies for the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Incorvaia, Lorena; Bronte, Giuseppe; Bazan, Viviana; Badalamenti, Giuseppe; Rizzo, Sergio; Pantuso, Gianni; Natoli, Clara; Russo, Antonio

    2016-04-19

    The recent advances in identification of the molecular mechanisms related to tumorigenesis and angiogenesis, along with the understanding of molecular alterations involved in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) pathogenesis, has allowed the development of several new drugs which have revolutionized the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC).This process has resulted in clinically significant improvements in median overall survival and an increasing number of patients undergoes two or even three lines of therapy. Therefore, it is necessary a long-term perspective of the treatment: planning a sequential and personalized therapeutic strategy to improve clinical outcome, the potential to achieve long-term response, and to preserve quality of life (QOL), minimizing treatment-related toxicity and transforming mRCC into a chronically treatable condition.Because of the challenges still encountered to draw an optimal therapeutic sequence, the main focus of this article will be to propose the optimal sequencing of existing, approved, oral targeted agents for the treatment of mRCC using evidence-based data along with the knowledge available on the tumor behavior and mechanisms of resistance to anti-angiogenic treatment to provide complementary information and to help the clinicians to maximize the effectiveness of targeted agents in the treatment of mRCC.

  1. Highly sensitive sequential injection determination of p-aminophenol in paracetamol formulations with 18-molybdodiphosphate heteropoly anion based on elimination of Schlieren effect.

    PubMed

    Vishnikin, Andriy B; Al-Shwaiyat, Mohammed K E A; Petrushina, Galina A; Tsiganok, Ludmila P; Andruch, Vasil; Bazel, Yaroslav R; Sklenářová, Hana; Solich, Petr

    2012-07-15

    A highly sensitive, precise and automated method using sequential injection analysis to assay quantitatively low levels of the p-aminophenol (PAP) in paracetamol formulations has been developed. A solution containing PAP and paracetamol is injected into an acetate buffer carrier stream and merged on-line with 18-molybdodiphosphate heteropoly complex reagent to form a specific blue derivative that is subsequently detected spectrophotometrically at 820nm. The procedure has been optimized mainly with respect to measurement sensitivity. It is based on the leveling off of the refraction indices of the liquids mixed in the flow system by the careful matching of the refractive index of the reagent solution with that of the carrier and sample solutions. Amount as low as 0.5μmolL(-1) of PAP, which corresponds to the 0.001% of PAP in paracetamol tablets, can be reliably determined using the proposed method, which is clearly below the specification limits recommended for PAP determination in paracetamol drug and tablet formulations (50ppm or 0.005% (w/w)). The developed method was successfully applied to the analysis of paracetamol formulations spiked with PAP and determination of PAP content in Rapidol tablets past their expiration date both by proposed SIA and reference HPLC methods.

  2. Determination of essential elements in beverages, herbal infusions and dietary supplements using a new straightforward sequential approach based on flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Nieto, Beatriz; Gismera, Mª Jesús; Sevilla, Mª Teresa; Procopio, Jesús R

    2017-03-15

    A simple method based on FAAS was developed for the sequential multi-element determination of Cu, Zn, Mn, Mg and Si in beverages and food supplements with successful results. The main absorption lines for Cu, Zn and Si and secondary lines for Mn and Mg were selected to carry out the measurements. The sample introduction was performed using a flow injection system. Using the choice of the absorption line wings, the upper limit of the linear range increased up to 110mgL(-1) for Mg, 200mgL(-1) for Si and 13mgL(-1) for Zn. The determination of the five elements was carried out, in triplicate, without the need of additional sample dilutions and/or re-measurements, using less than 3.5mL of sample to perform the complete analysis. The LODs were 0.008mgL(-1) for Cu, 0.017mgL(-1) for Zn, 0.011mgL(-1) for Mn, 0.16mgL(-1) for Si and 0.11mgL(-1) for Mg. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Synthesis and Application of an Aldazine-Based Fluorescence Chemosensor for the Sequential Detection of Cu2+ and Biological Thiols in Aqueous Solution and Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Hongmin; Yang, Ming; Meng, Qingtao; He, Guangjie; Wang, Yue; Hu, Zhizhi; Zhang, Run; Zhang, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    A fluorescence chemosensor, 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde azine (HNA) was designed and synthesized for sequential detection of Cu2+ and biothiols. It was found that HNA can specifically bind to Cu2+ with 1:1 stoichiometry, accompanied with a dramatic fluorescence quenching and a remarkable bathochromic-shift of the absorbance peak in HEPES buffer. The generated HNA-Cu2+ ensemble displayed a “turn-on” fluorescent response specific for biothiols (Hcy, Cys and GSH) based on the displacement approach, giving a remarkable recovery of fluorescence and UV-Vis spectra. The detection limits of HNA-Cu2+ to Hcy, Cys and GSH were estimated to be 1.5 μM, 1.0 μM and 0.8 μM, respectively, suggesting that HNA-Cu2+ is sensitive enough for the determination of thiols in biological systems. The biocompatibility of HNA towards A549 human lung carcinoma cell, was evaluated by an MTT assay. The capability of HNA-Cu2+ to detect biothiols in live A549 cells was then demonstrated by a microscopy fluorescence imaging assay. PMID:26761012

  4. Beyond evidence-based data: scientific rationale and tumor behavior to drive sequential and personalized therapeutic strategies for the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Badalamenti, Giuseppe; Rizzo, Sergio; Pantuso, Gianni; Natoli, Clara; Russo, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The recent advances in identification of the molecular mechanisms related to tumorigenesis and angiogenesis, along with the understanding of molecular alterations involved in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) pathogenesis, has allowed the development of several new drugs which have revolutionized the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). This process has resulted in clinically significant improvements in median overall survival and an increasing number of patients undergoes two or even three lines of therapy. Therefore, it is necessary a long-term perspective of the treatment: planning a sequential and personalized therapeutic strategy to improve clinical outcome, the potential to achieve long-term response, and to preserve quality of life (QOL), minimizing treatment-related toxicity and transforming mRCC into a chronically treatable condition. Because of the challenges still encountered to draw an optimal therapeutic sequence, the main focus of this article will be to propose the optimal sequencing of existing, approved, oral targeted agents for the treatment of mRCC using evidence-based data along with the knowledge available on the tumor behavior and mechanisms of resistance to anti-angiogenic treatment to provide complementary information and to help the clinicians to maximize the effectiveness of targeted agents in the treatment of mRCC. PMID:26872372

  5. Trial sequential methods for meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Kulinskaya, Elena; Wood, John

    2014-09-01

    Statistical methods for sequential meta-analysis have applications also for the design of new trials. Existing methods are based on group sequential methods developed for single trials and start with the calculation of a required information size. This works satisfactorily within the framework of fixed effects meta-analysis, but conceptual difficulties arise in the random effects model. One approach applying sequential meta-analysis to design is 'trial sequential analysis', developed by Wetterslev, Thorlund, Brok, Gluud and others from the Copenhagen Trial Unit. In trial sequential analysis, information size is based on the required sample size of a single new trial, which, in the random effects model, is obtained by simply inflating it in comparison with fixed effects meta-analysis. However, this is not sufficient as, depending on the amount of heterogeneity, a minimum of several new trials may be indicated, and the total number of new patients needed may be substantially reduced by planning an even larger number of small trials. We provide explicit formulae to determine the requisite minimum number of trials and their sample sizes within this framework, which also exemplify the conceptual difficulties referred to. We illustrate all these points with two practical examples, including the well-known meta-analysis of magnesium for myocardial infarction. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Development of Decision Making: Sequential versus Integrative Rules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jansen, Brenda R. J.; van Duijvenvoorde, Anna C. K.; Huizenga, Hilde M.

    2012-01-01

    Decisions can be made by applying a variety of decision-making rules--sequential rules in which decisions are based on a sequential evaluation of choice dimensions and the integrative normative rule in which decisions are based on an integration of choice dimensions. In this study, we investigated the developmental trajectory of such…

  7. Development of Decision Making: Sequential versus Integrative Rules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jansen, Brenda R. J.; van Duijvenvoorde, Anna C. K.; Huizenga, Hilde M.

    2012-01-01

    Decisions can be made by applying a variety of decision-making rules--sequential rules in which decisions are based on a sequential evaluation of choice dimensions and the integrative normative rule in which decisions are based on an integration of choice dimensions. In this study, we investigated the developmental trajectory of such…

  8. Sequential injection immunoassay for environmental measurements.

    PubMed

    Soh, Nobuaki; Tanaka, Mayumi; Hirakawa, Koji; Zhang, RuiQi; Nakajima, Hizuru; Nakano, Koji; Imato, Toshihiko

    2011-01-01

    Sequential injection immunoassay systems for environmental measurements based on the selective immunoreaction between antigen and antibody were described. A sequential injection analysis (SIA) technique is suitable to be applied for the procedure of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), because the washing and the addition of reagent solutions can be automated by using a computer-controlled syringe pump and switching valve. We selected vitellogenin (Vg), which is a biomarker for evaluating environmental risk caused by endocrine-disrupting chemicals in the hydrosphere, and linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LAS) and alkylphenol polyethoxylates (APEO), which are versatile surfactants, as target analytes in the flow immunoassay systems. For Vg monitoring, SIA systems based on spectrophotometric, chemiluminescence, and electrochemical determinations were constructed. On the other hand, chemiluminescence determination was applied to the detection of LAS and APEO. For APEO, an SIA system combined with surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor was also developed. These new sequential injection immunoassay systems are expected to be useful systems for environmental analysis.

  9. Beyond Problem-Based Learning: Using Dynamic PBL in Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Overton, Tina L.; Randles, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the development and implementation of a novel pedagogy, dynamic problem-based learning. The pedagogy utilises real-world problems that evolve throughout the problem-based learning activity and provide students with choice and different data sets. This new dynamic problem-based learning approach was utilised to teach…

  10. Beyond Problem-Based Learning: Using Dynamic PBL in Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Overton, Tina L.; Randles, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the development and implementation of a novel pedagogy, dynamic problem-based learning. The pedagogy utilises real-world problems that evolve throughout the problem-based learning activity and provide students with choice and different data sets. This new dynamic problem-based learning approach was utilised to teach…

  11. Reliable VLSI sequential controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, S.; Maki, G.; Shamanna, M.

    1990-01-01

    A VLSI architecture for synchronous sequential controllers is presented that has attractive qualities for producing reliable circuits. In these circuits, one hardware implementation can realize any flow table with a maximum of 2(exp n) internal states and m inputs. Also all design equations are identical. A real time fault detection means is presented along with a strategy for verifying the correctness of the checking hardware. This self check feature can be employed with no increase in hardware. The architecture can be modified to achieve fail safe designs. With no increase in hardware, an adaptable circuit can be realized that allows replacement of faulty transitions with fault free transitions.

  12. Implementing stratified primary care management for low back pain: cost-utility analysis alongside a prospective, population-based, sequential comparison study.

    PubMed

    Whitehurst, David G T; Bryan, Stirling; Lewis, Martyn; Hay, Elaine M; Mullis, Ricky; Foster, Nadine E

    2015-03-15

    Within-study cost-utility analysis. To explore the cost-utility of implementing stratified care for low back pain (LBP) in general practice, compared with usual care, within risk-defined patient subgroups (that is, patients at low, medium, and high risk of persistent disabling pain). Individual-level data collected alongside a prospective, sequential comparison of separate patient cohorts with 6-month follow-up. Adopting a cost-utility framework, the base case analysis estimated the incremental LBP-related health care cost per additional quality-adjusted life year (QALY) by risk subgroup. QALYs were constructed from responses to the 3-level EQ-5D, a preference-based health-related quality of life instrument. Uncertainty was explored with cost-utility planes and acceptability curves. Sensitivity analyses examined alternative methodological approaches, including a complete case analysis, the incorporation of non-back pain-related health care use and estimation of societal costs relating to work absence. Stratified care was a dominant treatment strategy compared with usual care for patients at high risk, with mean health care cost savings of £124 and an incremental QALY estimate of 0.023. The likelihood that stratified care provides a cost-effective use of resources for patients at low and medium risk is no greater than 60% irrespective of a decision makers' willingness-to-pay for additional QALYs. Patients at medium and high risk of persistent disability in paid employment at 6-month follow-up reported, on average, 6 fewer days of LBP-related work absence in the stratified care cohort compared with usual care (associated societal cost savings per employed patient of £736 and £652, respectively). At the observed level of adherence to screening tool recommendations for matched treatments, stratified care for LBP is cost-effective for patients at high risk of persistent disabling LBP only. 2.

  13. Test pattern generation for ILA sequential circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feng, YU; Frenzel, James F.; Maki, Gary K.

    1993-01-01

    An efficient method of generating test patterns for sequential machines implemented using one-dimensional, unilateral, iterative logic arrays (ILA's) of BTS pass transistor networks is presented. Based on a transistor level fault model, the method affords a unique opportunity for real-time fault detection with improved fault coverage. The resulting test sets are shown to be equivalent to those obtained using conventional gate level models, thus eliminating the need for additional test patterns. The proposed method advances the simplicity and ease of the test pattern generation for a special class of sequential circuitry.

  14. Optimal sequential Bayesian analysis for degradation tests.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Narciso, Silvia; Christen, J Andrés

    2016-07-01

    Degradation tests are especially difficult to conduct for items with high reliability. Test costs, caused mainly by prolonged item duration and item destruction costs, establish the necessity of sequential degradation test designs. We propose a methodology that sequentially selects the optimal observation times to measure the degradation, using a convenient rule that maximizes the inference precision and minimizes test costs. In particular our objective is to estimate a quantile of the time to failure distribution, where the degradation process is modelled as a linear model using Bayesian inference. The proposed sequential analysis is based on an index that measures the expected discrepancy between the estimated quantile and its corresponding prediction, using Monte Carlo methods. The procedure was successfully implemented for simulated and real data.

  15. Asymmetric Switch Costs as Sequential Difficulty Effects

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Darryl W.; Anderson, John R.

    2010-01-01

    When switching between tasks of unequal difficulty, there is often a larger switch cost for the easy task than for the difficult task. The authors propose a new account of these asymmetric switch costs based on sequential difficulty effects. They argue that the asymmetry arises from impaired performance after a difficult trial regardless of whether the task switches or repeats. Empirical support for this idea is provided in two experiments on arithmetic task switching in which asymmetries are observed for secondary difficulty manipulations, even in the context of arithmetic task repetitions. The authors discuss how their sequential difficulty account might explain asymmetric restart costs in addition to asymmetric switch costs and how sequential difficulty effects might be explained by resource depletion involving executive control or working memory. PMID:20401811

  16. Terminating Sequential Delphi Survey Data Collection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalaian, Sema A.; Kasim, Rafa M.

    2012-01-01

    The Delphi survey technique is an iterative mail or electronic (e-mail or web-based) survey method used to obtain agreement or consensus among a group of experts in a specific field on a particular issue through a well-designed and systematic multiple sequential rounds of survey administrations. Each of the multiple rounds of the Delphi survey…

  17. Terminating Sequential Delphi Survey Data Collection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalaian, Sema A.; Kasim, Rafa M.

    2012-01-01

    The Delphi survey technique is an iterative mail or electronic (e-mail or web-based) survey method used to obtain agreement or consensus among a group of experts in a specific field on a particular issue through a well-designed and systematic multiple sequential rounds of survey administrations. Each of the multiple rounds of the Delphi survey…

  18. Pre filtered Dynamic Time Warping for Posteriorgram Based Keyword Search

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-02-09

    PRE-FILTERED DYNAMIC TIME WARPING FOR POSTERIORGRAM BASED KEYWORD SEARCH Gozde Cetinkaya, Batuhan Gundogdu, Murat Saraclar Bogazici University...In this study, we present a pre-filtering method for dynamic time warping (DTW) to improve the efficiency of a posterior- gram based keyword search...queries and the in-vocabulary (IV) queries. Index Terms— keyword search, posteriorgram, dynamic time warping 1. INTRODUCTION The aim of keyword search

  19. A sequential decision-theoretic model for medical diagnostic system.

    PubMed

    Li, Aiping; Jin, Songchang; Zhang, Lumin; Jia, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Although diagnostic expert systems using a knowledge base which models decision-making of traditional experts can provide important information to non-experts, they tend to duplicate the errors made by experts. Decision-Theoretic Model (DTM) is therefore very useful in expert system since they prevent experts from incorrect reasoning under uncertainty. For the diagnostic expert system, corresponding DTM and arithmetic are studied and a sequential diagnostic decision-theoretic model based on Bayesian Network is given. In the model, the alternative features are categorized into two classes (including diseases features and test features), then an arithmetic for prior of test is provided. The different features affect other features weights are also discussed. Bayesian Network is adopted to solve uncertainty presentation and propagation. The model can help knowledge engineers model the knowledge involved in sequential diagnosis and decide evidence alternative priority. A practical example of the models is also presented: at any time of the diagnostic process the expert is provided with a dynamically updated list of suggested tests in order to support him in the decision-making problem about which test to execute next. The results show it is better than the traditional diagnostic model which is based on experience.

  20. Laser-Based Slam with Efficient Occupancy Likelihood Map Learning for Dynamic Indoor Scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li; Yao, Jian; Xie, Renping; Tu, Jinge; Feng, Chen

    2016-06-01

    Location-Based Services (LBS) have attracted growing attention in recent years, especially in indoor environments. The fundamental technique of LBS is the map building for unknown environments, this technique also named as simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) in robotic society. In this paper, we propose a novel approach for SLAMin dynamic indoor scenes based on a 2D laser scanner mounted on a mobile Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV) with the help of the grid-based occupancy likelihood map. Instead of applying scan matching in two adjacent scans, we propose to match current scan with the occupancy likelihood map learned from all previous scans in multiple scales to avoid the accumulation of matching errors. Due to that the acquisition of the points in a scan is sequential but not simultaneous, there unavoidably exists the scan distortion at different extents. To compensate the scan distortion caused by the motion of the UGV, we propose to integrate a velocity of a laser range finder (LRF) into the scan matching optimization framework. Besides, to reduce the effect of dynamic objects such as walking pedestrians often existed in indoor scenes as much as possible, we propose a new occupancy likelihood map learning strategy by increasing or decreasing the probability of each occupancy grid after each scan matching. Experimental results in several challenged indoor scenes demonstrate that our proposed approach is capable of providing high-precision SLAM results.

  1. A model based on temporal dynamics of fixations for distinguishing expert radiologists' scanpaths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandomkar, Ziba; Tay, Kevin; Brennan, Patrick C.; Mello-Thoms, Claudia

    2017-03-01

    This study investigated a model which distinguishes expert radiologists from less experienced radiologists based on features describing spatio-temporal dynamics of their eye movement during interpretation of digital mammograms. Eye movements of four expert and four less experienced radiologists were recorded during interpretation of 120 two-view digital mammograms of which 59 had biopsy proven cancers. For each scanpath, a two-dimensional recurrence plot, which represents the radiologist's refixation pattern, was generated. From each plot, six features indicating the spatio-temporal dynamics of fixations were extracted. The first feature measured the percentage of recurrent fixations; the second indicated the percentage of recurrent fixations which was fixated later in several consecutive fixations; the third measured the percentage of recurrent fixations that form a repeated sequence of fixations and the fourth assessed whether the recurrent fixations were occurring sequentially close together. The number of switches between the two mammographic views was also measured, as was the average number of consecutive fixations in each view before switching. These six features along with total time on case and average fixation duration were fed into a support vector machine whose performance was evaluated using 10-fold cross validation. The model achieved a sensitivity of 86.3% and a specificity of 85.2% for distinguishing experts' scanpaths. The obtained result suggests that spatio-temporal dynamics of eye movements can characterize expertise level and has potential applications for monitoring the development of expertise among radiologists as a result of different training regimes and continuing education schemes.

  2. Multi-scale structural and chemical analysis of sugarcane bagasse in the process of sequential acid–base pretreatment and ethanol production by Scheffersomyces shehatae and Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Heavy usage of gasoline, burgeoning fuel prices, and environmental issues have paved the way for the exploration of cellulosic ethanol. Cellulosic ethanol production technologies are emerging and require continued technological advancements. One of the most challenging issues is the pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass for the desired sugars yields after enzymatic hydrolysis. We hypothesized that consecutive dilute sulfuric acid-dilute sodium hydroxide pretreatment would overcome the native recalcitrance of sugarcane bagasse (SB) by enhancing cellulase accessibility of the embedded cellulosic microfibrils. Results SB hemicellulosic hydrolysate after concentration by vacuum evaporation and detoxification showed 30.89 g/l xylose along with other products (0.32 g/l glucose, 2.31 g/l arabinose, and 1.26 g/l acetic acid). The recovered cellulignin was subsequently delignified by sodium hydroxide mediated pretreatment. The acid–base pretreated material released 48.50 g/l total reducing sugars (0.91 g sugars/g cellulose amount in SB) after enzymatic hydrolysis. Ultra-structural mapping of acid–base pretreated and enzyme hydrolyzed SB by microscopic analysis (scanning electron microcopy (SEM), transmitted light microscopy (TLM), and spectroscopic analysis (X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, Fourier transform near-infrared (FT-NIR) spectroscopy, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy) elucidated the molecular changes in hemicellulose, cellulose, and lignin components of bagasse. The detoxified hemicellulosic hydrolysate was fermented by Scheffersomyces shehatae (syn. Candida shehatae UFMG HM 52.2) and resulted in 9.11 g/l ethanol production (yield 0.38 g/g) after 48 hours of fermentation. Enzymatic hydrolysate when fermented by Saccharomyces cerevisiae 174 revealed 8.13 g/l ethanol (yield 0.22 g/g) after 72 hours of fermentation. Conclusions Multi-scale structural studies of SB after sequential acid–base

  3. Generalized random sequential adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarjus, G.; Schaaf, P.; Talbot, J.

    1990-12-01

    Adsorption of hard spherical particles onto a flat uniform surface is analyzed by using generalized random sequential adsorption (RSA) models. These models are defined by releasing the condition of immobility present in the usual RSA rules to allow for desorption or surface diffusion. Contrary to the simple RSA case, generalized RSA processes are no longer irreversible and the system formed by the adsorbed particles on the surface may reach an equilibrium state. We show by using a distribution function approach that the kinetics of such processes can be described by means of an exact infinite hierarchy of equations reminiscent of the Kirkwood-Salsburg hierarchy for systems at equilibrium. We illustrate the way in which the systems produced by adsorption/desorption and by adsorption/diffusion evolve between the two limits represented by ``simple RSA'' and ``equilibrium'' by considering approximate solutions in terms of truncated density expansions.

  4. Sequentially Executed Model Evaluation Framework

    SciTech Connect

    2014-02-14

    Provides a message passing framework between generic input, model and output drivers, and specifies an API for developing such drivers. Also provides batch and real-time controllers which step the model and 1/0 through the time domain (or other discrete domain), and sample 1/0 drivers. This is a Framework library framework, and does not, itself, solve any problems or execute any modelling. The SeMe framework aids in development of models which operate on sequential information, such as time-series, where evaluation is based on prior results combined with new data for this iteration. Ha) applications in quality monitoring, and was developed as part of the CANARY-EDS software, where real-time water quality data is being analyzed

  5. Sequentially Executed Model Evaluation Framework

    SciTech Connect

    2014-02-14

    Provides a message passing framework between generic input, model and output drivers, and specifies an API for developing such drivers. Also provides batch and real-time controllers which step the model and 1/0 through the time domain (or other discrete domain), and sample 1/0 drivers. This is a Framework library framework, and does not, itself, solve any problems or execute any modelling. The SeMe framework aids in development of models which operate on sequential information, such as time-series, where evaluation is based on prior results combined with new data for this iteration. Ha) applications in quality monitoring, and was developed as part of the CANARY-EDS software, where real-time water quality data is being analyzed

  6. Sequentially Executed Model Evaluation Framework

    SciTech Connect

    2015-10-20

    Provides a message passing framework between generic input, model and output drivers, and specifies an API for developing such drivers. Also provides batch and real-time controllers which step the model and I/O through the time domain (or other discrete domain), and sample I/O drivers. This is a library framework, and does not, itself, solve any problems or execute any modeling. The SeMe framework aids in development of models which operate on sequential information, such as time-series, where evaluation is based on prior results combined with new data for this iteration. Has applications in quality monitoring, and was developed as part of the CANARY-EDS software, where real-time water quality data is being analyzed for anomalies.

  7. Sequentially Executed Model Evaluation Framework

    SciTech Connect

    2015-10-20

    Provides a message passing framework between generic input, model and output drivers, and specifies an API for developing such drivers. Also provides batch and real-time controllers which step the model and I/O through the time domain (or other discrete domain), and sample I/O drivers. This is a library framework, and does not, itself, solve any problems or execute any modeling. The SeMe framework aids in development of models which operate on sequential information, such as time-series, where evaluation is based on prior results combined with new data for this iteration. Has applications in quality monitoring, and was developed as part of the CANARY-EDS software, where real-time water quality data is being analyzed for anomalies.

  8. Dynamic summarization of bibliographic-based data.

    PubMed

    Workman, T Elizabeth; Hurdle, John F

    2011-02-01

    Traditional information retrieval techniques typically return excessive output when directed at large bibliographic databases. Natural Language Processing applications strive to extract salient content from the excessive data. Semantic MEDLINE, a National Library of Medicine (NLM) natural language processing application, highlights relevant information in PubMed data. However, Semantic MEDLINE implements manually coded schemas, accommodating few information needs. Currently, there are only five such schemas, while many more would be needed to realistically accommodate all potential users. The aim of this project was to develop and evaluate a statistical algorithm that automatically identifies relevant bibliographic data; the new algorithm could be incorporated into a dynamic schema to accommodate various information needs in Semantic MEDLINE, and eliminate the need for multiple schemas. We developed a flexible algorithm named Combo that combines three statistical metrics, the Kullback-Leibler Divergence (KLD), Riloff's RlogF metric (RlogF), and a new metric called PredScal, to automatically identify salient data in bibliographic text. We downloaded citations from a PubMed search query addressing the genetic etiology of bladder cancer. The citations were processed with SemRep, an NLM rule-based application that produces semantic predications. SemRep output was processed by Combo, in addition to the standard Semantic MEDLINE genetics schema and independently by the two individual KLD and RlogF metrics. We evaluated each summarization method using an existing reference standard within the task-based context of genetic database curation. Combo asserted 74 genetic entities implicated in bladder cancer development, whereas the traditional schema asserted 10 genetic entities; the KLD and RlogF metrics individually asserted 77 and 69 genetic entities, respectively. Combo achieved 61% recall and 81% precision, with an F-score of 0.69. The traditional schema achieved 23

  9. Long-term dynamic and pseudo-state modeling of complete partial nitrification process at high nitrogen loading rates in a sequential batch reactor (SBR).

    PubMed

    Soliman, Moomen; Eldyasti, Ahmed

    2017-03-01

    Recently, partial nitrification has been adopted widely either for the nitrite shunt process or intermediate nitrite generation step for the Anammox process. However, partial nitrification has been hindered by the complexity of maintaining stable nitrite accumulation at high nitrogen loading rates (NLR) which affect the feasibility of the process for high nitrogen content wastewater. Thus, the operational data of a lab scale SBR performing complete partial nitrification as a first step of nitrite shunt process at NLRs of 0.3-1.2kg/(m(3)d) have been used to calibrate and validate a process model developed using BioWin® in order to describe the long-term dynamic behavior of the SBR. Moreover, an identifiability analysis step has been introduced to the calibration protocol to eliminate the needs of the respirometric analysis for SBR models. The calibrated model was able to predict accurately the daily effluent ammonia, nitrate, nitrite, alkalinity concentrations and pH during all different operational conditions.

  10. [The possibilities for determining the passenger position inside the car passenger compartment based on the injuries to the extremities estimated with the use of the sequential mathematical analysis].

    PubMed

    Smirenin, S A; Khabova, Z S; Fetisov, V A

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine the diagnostic coefficients (DC) of injuries to the upper and lower extremities of the passengers inside the car passenger compartment based on the analysis of 599 archival expert documents available from 45 regional state bureaus of forensic medical examination of the Russian federation for the period from 1995 till 2014. These materials included the data obtained by the examination of 200 corpses and 300 live persons involved in the traffic accidents. The statistical and mathematical treatment of these materials with the use the sequential analysis method based on the Byes and Wald formulas yielded the diagnostic coefficients that made it possible to identify the most important signs characterizing the risk of injuries for the passenger occupying the front seat of the vehicle. In the case of the lethal outcome, such injuries include fractures of the right femur (DC -8.9), bleeding (DC -7.1), wounds in the soft tissues of the right thigh (DC -5.0) with the injurious force applied to its anterior surface, bruises on the posterior surface of the right shoulder (DC -6.2), the right deltoid region (DC -5.9), and the posterior surface of the right forearm (DC -5.5), fractures of the right humerus (DC -5.), etc. When both the driver and the passengers survive, the most informative signs in the latter are bleeding and scratches (DC -14.5 and 11.5 respectively) in the soft tissues at the posterior surface of the right shoulder, fractures of the right humerus (DC -10.0), bruises on the anterior surface of the right thigh (DC -13.0), the posterior surface of the right forearm (DC -10.0) and the fontal region of the right lower leg (DC -10.0), bleeding in the posterior region of the right forearm (DC -9.0) and the anterior region of the left thigh (DC -8.6), fractures of the right femur (DG -8.1), etc. It is concluded that the knowledge of diagnostic coefficients helps to draw attention of the experts to the analysis of the

  11. Entanglement dynamics with a trajectory-based formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Feng; Martens, Craig C.; Zheng, Yujun

    2017-08-01

    In this paper we present a trajectory-based formulation of entanglement dynamics by employing the Wigner function. The linear entropy of a single trajectory is derived based on the trajectory evolution of the Wigner function. The entanglement dynamics with a separable Gaussian initial state is investigated using different values of Planck's constant ℏ in the evolution of the trajectories, while quantum-classical correspondence in entanglement dynamics is investigated. In addition, we show why chaos can increase entanglement rapidly through analytical results and physical pictures of the underlying dynamics in phase space.

  12. Student Storytelling through Sequential Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, David

    2007-01-01

    If you are interested in using sequential art forms such as comic books in your EFL classroom, this article is full of helpful advice. Reading sequential art is beneficial because students can work with authentic texts with real language and graphic support. Students can also apply research and cultural knowledge to the creation of their own…

  13. Exploratory Sequential Data Analysis: Foundations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanderson, Penelope M.; Fisher, Carolanne

    1994-01-01

    Explains exploratory sequential data analysis (ESDA) and outlines ESDA characteristics that could help human-computer interaction investigators using sequential data make better conceptual and methodological choices. Behavioral, cognitive, and social factors are considered, and failures of expertise, time management, and databased problems are…

  14. Multi-Attribute Sequential Search

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bearden, J. Neil; Connolly, Terry

    2007-01-01

    This article describes empirical and theoretical results from two multi-attribute sequential search tasks. In both tasks, the DM sequentially encounters options described by two attributes and must pay to learn the values of the attributes. In the "continuous" version of the task the DM learns the precise numerical value of an attribute when she…

  15. A quantum mechanics-based approach to model incident-induced dynamic driver behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheu, Jiuh-Biing

    2008-08-01

    A better understanding of the psychological factors influencing drivers, and the resulting driving behavior responding to incident-induced lane traffic phenomena while passing by an incident site is vital to the improvement of road safety. This paper presents a microscopic driver behavior model to explain the dynamics of the instantaneous driver decision process under lane-blocking incidents on adjacent lanes. The proposed conceptual framework decomposes the corresponding driver decision process into three sequential phases: (1) initial stimulus, (2) glancing-around car-following, and (3) incident-induced driving behavior. The theorem of quantum mechanics in optical flows is applied in the first phase to explain the motion-related perceptual phenomena while vehicles approach the incident site in adjacent lanes, followed by the incorporation of the effect of quantum optical flows in modeling the induced glancing-around car-following behavior in the second phase. Then, an incident-induced driving behavior model is formulated to reproduce the dynamics of driver behavior conducted in the process of passing by an incident site in the adjacent lanes. Numerical results of model tests using video-based incident data indicate the validity of the proposed traffic behavior model in analyzing the incident-induced lane traffic phenomena. It is also expected that such a proposed quantum-mechanics based methodology can throw more light if applied to driver psychology and response in anomalous traffic environments in order to improve road safety.

  16. Dynamic Programming Based Segmentation in Biomedical Imaging.

    PubMed

    Ungru, Kathrin; Jiang, Xiaoyi

    2017-01-01

    Many applications in biomedical imaging have a demand on automatic detection of lines, contours, or boundaries of bones, organs, vessels, and cells. Aim is to support expert decisions in interactive applications or to include it as part of a processing pipeline for automatic image analysis. Biomedical images often suffer from noisy data and fuzzy edges. Therefore, there is a need for robust methods for contour and line detection. Dynamic programming is a popular technique that satisfies these requirements in many ways. This work gives a brief overview over approaches and applications that utilize dynamic programming to solve problems in the challenging field of biomedical imaging.

  17. Study of dynamic weighing system based on photoelectric detecting technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Gui-cai; Na, Yan-xiang; Cao, Shi-hao; Yang, Fei-yu

    2011-08-01

    Dynamic weighing is a process that it reckons the weight of vehicles according to measuring the tires which are moving. It makes use of sensors and some others auxiliary apparatus to measure the appearance of a certain vehicle and tires, then calculates the weight and the speed of vehicles. Finally it can note and read this information. To analyze the dynamic weighing system at home and abroad, it can be easily discovered that these are based on the sensors of electricity. The disadvantages of those sensors are very obvious. For example, when vehicles are dynamic weighed, the speed and accuracy can not be ensured at the same time. Dynamic weighing system is designed in the research of papers. Linear CCD can be used as Sensor to be applied in the mold of weighing. This paper describes the dynamic weighing system, analyses the dynamic of the system, and also investigates the modules of the dynamic weighing system.

  18. Neural network based dynamic controllers for industrial robots.

    PubMed

    Oh, S Y; Shin, W C; Kim, H G

    1995-09-01

    The industrial robot's dynamic performance is frequently measured by positioning accuracy at high speeds and a good dynamic controller is essential that can accurately compute robot dynamics at a servo rate high enough to ensure system stability. A real-time dynamic controller for an industrial robot is developed here using neural networks. First, an efficient time-selectable hidden layer architecture has been developed based on system dynamics localized in time, which lends itself to real-time learning and control along with enhanced mapping accuracy. Second, the neural network architecture has also been specially tuned to accommodate servo dynamics. This not only facilitates the system design through reduced sensing requirements for the controller but also enhances the control performance over the control architecture neglecting servo dynamics. Experimental results demonstrate the controller's excellent learning and control performances compared with a conventional controller and thus has good potential for practical use in industrial robots.

  19. A Blackboard-Based Dynamic Instructional Planner

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-02-01

    observing student task performance. Insufficient student progress initiates replanning. This research contributes to an understanding of dynamic...of icons that represent device parts. Other assessment procedures monitor student progress by asking questions or observing student task performance...Device-Simulation is initiated, allowing the student to use the device simulation. The tutor monitors the student in a rather simple way. It just observes

  20. Prospective, case-based assessment of sequential therapy with topical Fluorouracil cream 0.5% and ALA-PDT for the treatment of actinic keratosis.

    PubMed

    Martin, George

    2011-04-01

    The sequential use of topical therapies and short-incubation photodynamic therapy for actinic keratosis (AK) has not been extensively studied. The author reports on treatment with sequential 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) cream 0.5% and 5-aminolevulinic acid?photodynamic therapy (ALA-PDT) in three older men with photodamaged skin and a history of AK. These findings suggest that this combination therapy, when compared with short-contact (1 hour) ALA-PDT alone, is more effective, minimizes the recurrence of areas of field cancerization and improves the appearance of the skin. The use of 5-FU cream 0.5% before and after photodynamic therapy is effective in revealing the presence of both clinical and subclinical AK lesions.

  1. A web-based peer-modeling intervention aimed at lifestyle changes in patients with coronary heart disease and chronic back pain: sequential controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Schweier, Rebecca; Romppel, Matthias; Richter, Cynthia; Hoberg, Eike; Hahmann, Harry; Scherwinski, Inge; Kosmützky, Gregor; Grande, Gesine

    2014-07-23

    Traditional secondary prevention programs often fail to produce sustainable behavioral changes in everyday life. Peer-modeling interventions and integration of peer experiences in health education are a promising way to improve long-term effects in behavior modification. However, effects of peer support modeling on behavioral change have not been evaluated yet. Therefore, we implemented and evaluated a website featuring patient narratives about successful lifestyle changes. Our aim is to examine the effects of using Web-based patient narratives about successful lifestyle change on improvements in physical activity and eating behavior for patients with coronary heart disease and chronic back pain 3 months after participation in a rehabilitation program. The lebensstil-aendern ("lifestyle-change") website is a nonrestricted, no-cost, German language website that provides more than 1000 video, audio, and text clips from interviews with people with coronary heart disease and chronic back pain. To test efficacy, we conducted a sequential controlled trial and recruited patients with coronary heart disease and chronic back pain from 7 inpatient rehabilitation centers in Germany. The intervention group attended a presentation on the website; the control group did not. Physical activity and eating behavior were assessed by questionnaire during the rehabilitation program and 12 weeks later. Analyses were conducted based on an intention-to-treat and an as-treated protocol. A total of 699 patients were enrolled and 571 cases were included in the analyses (control: n=313, intervention: n=258; female: 51.1%, 292/571; age: mean 53.2, SD 8.6 years; chronic back pain: 62.5%, 357/571). Website usage in the intervention group was 46.1% (119/258). In total, 141 trial participants used the website. Independent t tests based on the intention-to-treat protocol only demonstrated nonsignificant trends in behavioral change related to physical activity and eating behavior. Multivariate

  2. A Web-Based Peer-Modeling Intervention Aimed at Lifestyle Changes in Patients With Coronary Heart Disease and Chronic Back Pain: Sequential Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Romppel, Matthias; Richter, Cynthia; Hoberg, Eike; Hahmann, Harry; Scherwinski, Inge; Kosmützky, Gregor; Grande, Gesine

    2014-01-01

    Background Traditional secondary prevention programs often fail to produce sustainable behavioral changes in everyday life. Peer-modeling interventions and integration of peer experiences in health education are a promising way to improve long-term effects in behavior modification. However, effects of peer support modeling on behavioral change have not been evaluated yet. Therefore, we implemented and evaluated a website featuring patient narratives about successful lifestyle changes. Objective Our aim is to examine the effects of using Web-based patient narratives about successful lifestyle change on improvements in physical activity and eating behavior for patients with coronary heart disease and chronic back pain 3 months after participation in a rehabilitation program. Methods The lebensstil-aendern (“lifestyle-change”) website is a nonrestricted, no-cost, German language website that provides more than 1000 video, audio, and text clips from interviews with people with coronary heart disease and chronic back pain. To test efficacy, we conducted a sequential controlled trial and recruited patients with coronary heart disease and chronic back pain from 7 inpatient rehabilitation centers in Germany. The intervention group attended a presentation on the website; the control group did not. Physical activity and eating behavior were assessed by questionnaire during the rehabilitation program and 12 weeks later. Analyses were conducted based on an intention-to-treat and an as-treated protocol. Results A total of 699 patients were enrolled and 571 cases were included in the analyses (control: n=313, intervention: n=258; female: 51.1%, 292/571; age: mean 53.2, SD 8.6 years; chronic back pain: 62.5%, 357/571). Website usage in the intervention group was 46.1% (119/258). In total, 141 trial participants used the website. Independent t tests based on the intention-to-treat protocol only demonstrated nonsignificant trends in behavioral change related to physical

  3. Efficient Quantum Private Communication Based on Dynamic Control Code Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zheng-Wen; Feng, Xiao-Yi; Peng, Jin-Ye; Zeng, Gui-Hua; Qi, Jin

    2017-04-01

    Based on chaos and quantum properties, we propose a quantum private communication scheme with dynamic control code sequence. The initial sequence is obtained via chaotic systems, and the control code sequence is derived by grouping, XOR and extracting. A shift cycle algorithm is designed to enable the dynamic change of control code sequence. Analysis shows that transmission efficiency could reach 100 % with high dynamics and security.

  4. Efficient Quantum Private Communication Based on Dynamic Control Code Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zheng-Wen; Feng, Xiao-Yi; Peng, Jin-Ye; Zeng, Gui-Hua; Qi, Jin

    2016-12-01

    Based on chaos and quantum properties, we propose a quantum private communication scheme with dynamic control code sequence. The initial sequence is obtained via chaotic systems, and the control code sequence is derived by grouping, XOR and extracting. A shift cycle algorithm is designed to enable the dynamic change of control code sequence. Analysis shows that transmission efficiency could reach 100 % with high dynamics and security.

  5. Excited State Dynamics of DNA and RNA bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudock, Hanneli; Levine, Benjamin; Martinez, Todd

    2007-03-01

    Recent ultrafast spectroscopic experiments have reported excited state lifetimes for DNA and RNA bases and assigned these lifetimes to various electronic states. We have used theoretical and simulation methods to describe the excited state dynamics of these bases in an effort to provide a mechanistic explanation for the observed lifetimes. Our simulations are based on ab initio molecular dynamics, where the electronic and nuclear Schrodinger equations are solved simultaneously. The results are further verified by comparison to high-level ab initio electronic structure methods, including dynamic electron correlation effects through multireference perturbation theory, at important points along the dynamical pathways. Our results provide an explanation of the photochemical mechanism leading to nonradiative decay of the electronic excited states and some suggestions as to the origin of the different lifetimes. Comparisons between pyrimidines illustrate how chemical differences impact excited state dynamics and may play a role in explaining the propensity for dimer formation in thymine.

  6. Adaptive sequential controller

    SciTech Connect

    El-Sharkawi, M.A.; Xing, J.; Butler, N.G.; Rodriguez, A.

    1994-11-01

    An adaptive sequential controller for controlling a circuit breaker or other switching device to substantially eliminate transients on a distribution line caused by closing and opening the circuit breaker. The device adaptively compensates for changes in the response time of the circuit breaker due to aging and environmental effects. A potential transformer provides a reference signal corresponding to the zero crossing of the voltage waveform, and a phase shift comparator circuit compares the reference signal to the time at which any transient was produced when the circuit breaker closed, producing a signal indicative of the adaptive adjustment that should be made. Similarly, in controlling the opening of the circuit breaker, a current transformer provides a reference signal that is compared against the time at which any transient is detected when the circuit breaker last opened. An adaptive adjustment circuit produces a compensation time that is appropriately modified to account for changes in the circuit breaker response, including the effect of ambient conditions and aging. When next opened or closed, the circuit breaker is activated at an appropriately compensated time, so that it closes when the voltage crosses zero and opens when the current crosses zero, minimizing any transients on the distribution line. Phase angle can be used to control the opening of the circuit breaker relative to the reference signal provided by the potential transformer. 15 figs.

  7. Adaptive sequential controller

    DOEpatents

    El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A.; Xing, Jian; Butler, Nicholas G.; Rodriguez, Alonso

    1994-01-01

    An adaptive sequential controller (50/50') for controlling a circuit breaker (52) or other switching device to substantially eliminate transients on a distribution line caused by closing and opening the circuit breaker. The device adaptively compensates for changes in the response time of the circuit breaker due to aging and environmental effects. A potential transformer (70) provides a reference signal corresponding to the zero crossing of the voltage waveform, and a phase shift comparator circuit (96) compares the reference signal to the time at which any transient was produced when the circuit breaker closed, producing a signal indicative of the adaptive adjustment that should be made. Similarly, in controlling the opening of the circuit breaker, a current transformer (88) provides a reference signal that is compared against the time at which any transient is detected when the circuit breaker last opened. An adaptive adjustment circuit (102) produces a compensation time that is appropriately modified to account for changes in the circuit breaker response, including the effect of ambient conditions and aging. When next opened or closed, the circuit breaker is activated at an appropriately compensated time, so that it closes when the voltage crosses zero and opens when the current crosses zero, minimizing any transients on the distribution line. Phase angle can be used to control the opening of the circuit breaker relative to the reference signal provided by the potential transformer.

  8. System identification based approach to dynamic weighing revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedźwiecki, Maciej; Meller, Michał; Pietrzak, Przemysław

    2016-12-01

    Dynamic weighing, i.e., weighing of objects in motion, without stopping them on the weighing platform, allows one to increase the rate of operation of automatic weighing systems, used in industrial production processes, without compromising their accuracy. Since the classical identification-based approach to dynamic weighing, based on the second-order mass-spring-damper model of the weighing system, does not yield satisfactory results when applied to conveyor belt type checkweighers, several extensions of this technique are examined. Experiments confirm that when appropriately modified the identification-based approach becomes a reliable tool for dynamic mass measurement in checkweighers.

  9. Sequential Single Shot X-ray Photon Correlation Spectroscopy at the SACLA Free Electron Laser

    PubMed Central

    Lehmkühler, Felix; Kwaśniewski, Paweł; Roseker, Wojciech; Fischer, Birgit; Schroer, Martin A.; Tono, Kensuke; Katayama, Tetsuo; Sprung, Michael; Sikorski, Marcin; Song, Sanghoon; Glownia, James; Chollet, Matthieu; Nelson, Silke; Robert, Aymeric; Gutt, Christian; Yabashi, Makina; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Grübel, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Hard X-ray free electron lasers allow for the first time to access dynamics of condensed matter samples ranging from femtoseconds to several hundred seconds. In particular, the exceptional large transverse coherence of the X-ray pulses and the high time-averaged flux promises to reach time and length scales that have not been accessible up to now with storage ring based sources. However, due to the fluctuations originating from the stochastic nature of the self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) process the application of well established techniques such as X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) is challenging. Here we demonstrate a single-shot based sequential XPCS study on a colloidal suspension with a relaxation time comparable to the SACLA free-electron laser pulse repetition rate. High quality correlation functions could be extracted without any indications for sample damage. This opens the way for systematic sequential XPCS experiments at FEL sources. PMID:26610328

  10. Sequential Single Shot X-ray Photon Correlation Spectroscopy at the SACLA Free Electron Laser.

    PubMed

    Lehmkühler, Felix; Kwaśniewski, Paweł; Roseker, Wojciech; Fischer, Birgit; Schroer, Martin A; Tono, Kensuke; Katayama, Tetsuo; Sprung, Michael; Sikorski, Marcin; Song, Sanghoon; Glownia, James; Chollet, Matthieu; Nelson, Silke; Robert, Aymeric; Gutt, Christian; Yabashi, Makina; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Grübel, Gerhard

    2015-11-27

    Hard X-ray free electron lasers allow for the first time to access dynamics of condensed matter samples ranging from femtoseconds to several hundred seconds. In particular, the exceptional large transverse coherence of the X-ray pulses and the high time-averaged flux promises to reach time and length scales that have not been accessible up to now with storage ring based sources. However, due to the fluctuations originating from the stochastic nature of the self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) process the application of well established techniques such as X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) is challenging. Here we demonstrate a single-shot based sequential XPCS study on a colloidal suspension with a relaxation time comparable to the SACLA free-electron laser pulse repetition rate. High quality correlation functions could be extracted without any indications for sample damage. This opens the way for systematic sequential XPCS experiments at FEL sources.

  11. Sequential single shot X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy at the SACLA free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Lehmkühler, Felix; Kwaśniewski, Paweł; Roseker, Wojciech; Fischer, Birgit; Schroer, Martin A.; Tono, Kensuke; Katayama, Tetsuo; Sprung, Michael; Sikorski, Marcin; Song, Sanghoon; Glownia, James; Chollet, Matthieu; Nelson, Silke; Robert, Aymeric; Gutt, Christian; Yabashi, Makina; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Grübel, Gerhard

    2015-11-27

    In this study, hard X-ray free electron lasers allow for the first time to access dynamics of condensed matter samples ranging from femtoseconds to several hundred seconds. In particular, the exceptional large transverse coherence of the X-ray pulses and the high time-averaged flux promises to reach time and length scales that have not been accessible up to now with storage ring based sources. However, due to the fluctuations originating from the stochastic nature of the self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) process the application of well established techniques such as X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) is challenging. Here we demonstrate a single-shot based sequential XPCS study on a colloidal suspension with a relaxation time comparable to the SACLA free-electron laser pulse repetition rate. High quality correlation functions could be extracted without any indications for sample damage. This opens the way for systematic sequential XPCS experiments at FEL sources.

  12. A Blackboard-Based Dynamic Instructional Planner. ONR Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, William R.

    Dynamic instructional planning was explored as a control mechanism for intelligent tutoring systems through the development of the Blackboard Instructional Planner--a blackboard software-based dynamic planner for computerized intelligent tutoring systems. The planner, designed to be generic to tutors teaching troubleshooting for complex physical…

  13. Dynamic Group Formation Based on a Natural Phenomenon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zedadra, Amina; Lafifi, Yacine; Zedadra, Ouarda

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a new approach of learners grouping in collaborative learning systems. This grouping process is based on traces left by learners. The goal is the circular dynamic grouping to achieve collaborative projects. The proposed approach consists of two main algorithms: (1) the circular grouping algorithm and (2) the dynamic grouping…

  14. A Dynamic Usage Based Perspective on L2 Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verspoor, Marjolijn; Schmid, Monika S.; Xu, Xiaoyan

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to explore the contribution that a dynamic usage based (DUB) perspective can bring to the establishment of objective measures to assess L2 learners' written texts and at the same time to gain insight into the dynamic process of language development. Four hundred and thirty seven texts written by Dutch learners of English…

  15. A Dynamic Usage Based Perspective on L2 Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verspoor, Marjolijn; Schmid, Monika S.; Xu, Xiaoyan

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to explore the contribution that a dynamic usage based (DUB) perspective can bring to the establishment of objective measures to assess L2 learners' written texts and at the same time to gain insight into the dynamic process of language development. Four hundred and thirty seven texts written by Dutch learners of English…

  16. Dynamic Group Formation Based on a Natural Phenomenon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zedadra, Amina; Lafifi, Yacine; Zedadra, Ouarda

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a new approach of learners grouping in collaborative learning systems. This grouping process is based on traces left by learners. The goal is the circular dynamic grouping to achieve collaborative projects. The proposed approach consists of two main algorithms: (1) the circular grouping algorithm and (2) the dynamic grouping…

  17. Eradication of Ebola Based on Dynamic Programming

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jia-Ming; Wang, Lu; Liu, Jia-Bao

    2016-01-01

    This paper mainly studies the eradication of the Ebola virus, proposing a scientific system, including three modules for the eradication of Ebola virus. Firstly, we build a basic model combined with nonlinear incidence rate and maximum treatment capacity. Secondly, we use the dynamic programming method and the Dijkstra Algorithm to set up M-S (storage) and several delivery locations in West Africa. Finally, we apply the previous results to calculate the total cost, production cost, storage cost, and shortage cost. PMID:27313655

  18. Eradication of Ebola Based on Dynamic Programming.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jia-Ming; Wang, Lu; Liu, Jia-Bao

    2016-01-01

    This paper mainly studies the eradication of the Ebola virus, proposing a scientific system, including three modules for the eradication of Ebola virus. Firstly, we build a basic model combined with nonlinear incidence rate and maximum treatment capacity. Secondly, we use the dynamic programming method and the Dijkstra Algorithm to set up M-S (storage) and several delivery locations in West Africa. Finally, we apply the previous results to calculate the total cost, production cost, storage cost, and shortage cost.

  19. Implementation of Temperature Sequential Controller on Variable Speed Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheong, Z. X.; Barsoum, N. N.

    2008-10-01

    There are many pump and motor installations with quite extensive speed variation, such as Sago conveyor, heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) and water pumping system. A common solution for these applications is to run several fixed speed motors in parallel, with flow control accomplish by turning the motors on and off. This type of control method causes high in-rush current, and adds a risk of damage caused by pressure transients. This paper explains the design and implementation of a temperature speed control system for use in industrial and commercial sectors. Advanced temperature speed control can be achieved by using ABB ACS800 variable speed drive-direct torque sequential control macro, programmable logic controller and temperature transmitter. The principle of direct torque sequential control macro (DTC-SC) is based on the control of torque and flux utilizing the stator flux field orientation over seven preset constant speed. As a result of continuous comparison of ambient temperature to the references temperatures; electromagnetic torque response is particularly fast to the motor state and it is able maintain constant speeds. Experimental tests have been carried out by using ABB ACS800-U1-0003-2, to validate the effectiveness and dynamic respond of ABB ACS800 against temperature variation, loads, and mechanical shocks.

  20. Sequential Testing: Basics and Benefits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-03-01

    103-109 44. A. Wald , Sequential Analysis, John Wiley and Sons, 1947 45. A Wald and J. Wolfowitz , "Optimum Character of The Sequential Probability Ratio...work done by A. Wald [44].. Wald’s work on sequential analysis can be used virtually’without modification in a situation where decisions are made... Wald can be used. The decision to accept, reject, or continue the test depends on: 8 < (8 0/el)r exp [-(1/01 - 1/0 0 )V(t)] < A (1) where 0 and A are

  1. Development of video technology to analyze dynamics of inertia-based apple orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefcourt, Alan M.; Narayanan, Priya; Tasch, Uri; Rostamian, Rouben; Kim, Moon S.; Chen, Yud-Ren

    2006-10-01

    Development of machine vision systems to examine fruit for quality and contamination problems has been stalled due to lack of an inexpensive, fast, method for appropriately orienting fruit for imaging. We recently discovered that apples could be oriented based-on inertial properties. Apples were rolled down a ramp consisting of two parallel rails. When sufficient angular velocity was achieved, the apples moved to a configuration where the stem/calyx axis was perpendicular to the direction of travel. This discovery provides a potential basis for development of a commercially-viable orientation system. However, many question remain concerning the underlying dynamic principles that govern this phenomenon. An imaging system and software were constructed to allow detailed observation of the orientation process. Sequential 640×480 monochrome images are acquired at 60 fps and 1/500 sec exposure. The software finds the center of the apple in each image as well as the vertical movement of the track at a selected coordinate. Early tests revealed that the compliance of the track played a significant role in the orientation process. These data will be used to compare results from empirical tests with predictions of dynamic models.

  2. Sequential modeling of fecal coliform removals in a full-scale activated-sludge wastewater treatment plant using an evolutionary process model induction system.

    PubMed

    Suh, Chang-Won; Lee, Joong-Won; Hong, Yoon-Seok Timothy; Shin, Hang-Sik

    2009-01-01

    We propose an evolutionary process model induction system that is based on the grammar-based genetic programming to automatically discover multivariate dynamic inference models that are able to predict fecal coliform bacteria removals using common process variables instead of directly measuring fecal coliform bacteria concentration in a full-scale municipal activated-sludge wastewater treatment plant. A sequential modeling paradigm is also proposed to derive multivariate dynamic models of fecal coliform removals in the evolutionary process model induction system. It is composed of two parts, the process estimator and the process predictor. The process estimator acts as an intelligent software sensor to achieve a good estimation of fecal coliform bacteria concentration in the influent. Then the process predictor yields sequential prediction of the effluent fecal coliform bacteria concentration based on the estimated fecal coliform bacteria concentration in the influent from the process estimator with other process variables. The results show that the evolutionary process model induction system with a sequential modeling paradigm has successfully evolved multivariate dynamic models of fecal coliform removals in the form of explicit mathematical formulas with high levels of accuracy and good generalization. The evolutionary process model induction system with sequential modeling paradigm proposed here provides a good alternative to develop cost-effective dynamic process models for a full-scale wastewater treatment plant and is readily applicable to a variety of other complex treatment processes.

  3. PIE: A Dynamic Failure-Based Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voas, Jeffrey M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a dynamic technique for statistically estimating three program characteristics that affect a program's computational behavior: (1) the probability that a particular section of a program is executed, (2) the probability that the particular section affects the data state, and (3) the probability that a data state produced by that section has an effect on program output. These three characteristics can be used to predict whether faults are likely to be uncovered by software testing. Index Terms: Software testing, data state, fault, failure, testability. 1 Introduction

  4. Dynamic Inversion based Control of a Docking Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, Nilesh V.; Ippolito, Corey; Krishnakumar, Kalmanje

    2006-01-01

    The problem of position and attitude control of the Stewart platform based docking mechanism is considered motivated by its future application in space missions requiring the autonomous docking capability. The control design is initiated based on the framework of the intelligent flight control architecture being developed at NASA Ames Research Center. In this paper, the baseline position and attitude control system is designed using dynamic inversion with proportional-integral augmentation. The inverse dynamics uses a Newton-Euler formulation that includes the platform dynamics, the dynamics of the individual legs along with viscous friction in the joints. Simulation results are presented using forward dynamics simulated by a commercial physics engine that builds the system as individual elements with appropriate joints and uses constrained numerical integration,

  5. Model based control of dynamic atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chibum; Salapaka, Srinivasa M.

    2015-04-15

    A model-based robust control approach is proposed that significantly improves imaging bandwidth for the dynamic mode atomic force microscopy. A model for cantilever oscillation amplitude and phase dynamics is derived and used for the control design. In particular, the control design is based on a linearized model and robust H{sub ∞} control theory. This design yields a significant improvement when compared to the conventional proportional-integral designs and verified by experiments.

  6. Model based control of dynamic atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chibum; Salapaka, Srinivasa M.

    2015-04-01

    A model-based robust control approach is proposed that significantly improves imaging bandwidth for the dynamic mode atomic force microscopy. A model for cantilever oscillation amplitude and phase dynamics is derived and used for the control design. In particular, the control design is based on a linearized model and robust H∞ control theory. This design yields a significant improvement when compared to the conventional proportional-integral designs and verified by experiments.

  7. Model based control of dynamic atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chibum; Salapaka, Srinivasa M

    2015-04-01

    A model-based robust control approach is proposed that significantly improves imaging bandwidth for the dynamic mode atomic force microscopy. A model for cantilever oscillation amplitude and phase dynamics is derived and used for the control design. In particular, the control design is based on a linearized model and robust H(∞) control theory. This design yields a significant improvement when compared to the conventional proportional-integral designs and verified by experiments.

  8. Modeling of a Sequential Two-Stage Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Liu, N.-S.; Gallagher, J. R.; Ryder, R. C.; Brankovic, A.; Hendricks, J. A.

    2005-01-01

    A sequential two-stage, natural gas fueled power generation combustion system is modeled to examine the fundamental aerodynamic and combustion characteristics of the system. The modeling methodology includes CAD-based geometry definition, and combustion computational fluid dynamics analysis. Graphical analysis is used to examine the complex vortical patterns in each component, identifying sources of pressure loss. The simulations demonstrate the importance of including the rotating high-pressure turbine blades in the computation, as this results in direct computation of combustion within the first turbine stage, and accurate simulation of the flow in the second combustion stage. The direct computation of hot-streaks through the rotating high-pressure turbine stage leads to improved understanding of the aerodynamic relationships between the primary and secondary combustors and the turbomachinery.

  9. Modeling of a Sequential Two-Stage Combustor, Supplement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Liu, N.-S.; Gallagher, J. R.; Ryder, R. C.; Brankovic, A.; Hendricks, J. A.

    2005-01-01

    A sequential two-stage, natural gas fueled power generation combustion system is modeled to examine the fundamental aerodynamic and combustion characteristics of the system. The modeling methodology includes CAD-based geometry definition, and combustion computational fluid dynamics analysis. Graphical analysis is used to examine the complex vortical patterns in each component, identifying sources of pressure loss. The simulations demonstrate the importance of including the rotating high-pressure turbine blades in the computation, as this results in direct computation of combustion within the first turbine stage, and accurate simulation of the flow in the second combustion stage. The direct computation of hot-streaks through the rotating high-pressure turbine stage leads to improved understanding of the aerodynamic relationships between the primary and secondary combustors and the turbomachinery.

  10. Feasibility of atomic layer etching of polymer material based on sequential O{sub 2} exposure and Ar low-pressure plasma-etching

    SciTech Connect

    Vogli, Evelina; Metzler, Dominik; Oehrlein, Gottlieb S.

    2013-06-24

    We describe controlled, self-limited etching of a polystyrene polymer using a composite etching cycle consisting of sequential deposition of a thin reactive layer from precursors produced from a polymer-coated electrode within the etching chamber, modification using O{sub 2} exposure, and subsequent low-pressure Ar plasma etching, which removes the oxygen-modified deposited reactive layer along with Almost-Equal-To 0.1 nm unmodified polymer. Deposition prevents net etching of the unmodified polymer during the etching step and enables self-limited etch rates of 0.1 nm/cycle.

  11. Silver-mediated base pairings: towards dynamic DNA nanostructures with enhanced chemical and thermal stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swasey, Steven M.; Gwinn, Elisabeth G.

    2016-04-01

    The thermal and chemical fragility of DNA nanomaterials assembled by Watson-Crick (WC) pairing constrain the settings in which these materials can be used and how they can be functionalized. Here we investigate use of the silver cation, Ag+, as an agent for more robust, metal-mediated self-assembly, focusing on the simplest duplex building blocks that would be required for more elaborate Ag+-DNA nanostructures. Our studies of Ag+-induced assembly of non-complementary DNA oligomers employ strands of 2-24 bases, with varied base compositions, and use electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to determine product compositions. High yields of duplex products containing narrowly distributed numbers of Ag+ can be achieved by optimizing solution conditions. These Ag+-mediated duplexes are stable to at least 60 mM Mg2+, higher than is necessary for WC nanotechnology schemes such as tile assemblies and DNA origami, indicating that sequential stages of Ag+-mediated and WC-mediated assembly may be feasible. Circular dichroism spectroscopy suggests simple helical structures for Ag+-mediated duplexes with lengths to at least 20 base pairs, and further indicates that the structure of cytosine-rich duplexes is preserved at high urea concentrations. We therefore propose an approach towards dynamic DNA nanomaterials with enhanced thermal and chemical stability through designs that combine sturdy silver-mediated ‘frames’ with WC paired ‘pictures’.

  12. A computational study of ultrafast acid dissociation and acid-base neutralization reactions. II. The relationship between the coordination state of solvent molecules and concerted versus sequential acid dissociation.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Patrick; Thomas, Vibin; Iftimie, Radu

    2011-03-07

    We investigate the role played by the coordination state of pre-existing water wires during the dissociation of moderately strong acids by means of first-principles molecular dynamics calculations. By preparing 2,4,6-tricyanophenol (calc. pKa∼0.5) in two different initial states, we are able to observe sequential as well as concerted trajectories of dissociation: On one hand, equilibrium dissociation takes place on a ∼50 ps timescale; proton conduction occurs through three-coordinated water wires in this case, by means of sequential Grotthus hopping. On the other hand, by preparing 2,4,6-tricyanophenol in a hydration state inherited from that of equilibrated phenol (calc. pKa=7.6), the moderately strong acid finds itself in a presolvated state from which dissociation can take place on a ∼1 ps timescale. In this case, concerted dissociation trajectories are observed, which consist of proton translocation through two intervening, four-coordinated, water molecules in 0.1-1.0 ps. The present results suggest that, in general, the mechanism of proton translocation depends on how the excess proton is injected into a hydrogen bond network. In particular, if the initial conditions favour proton release to a fourfold H-bonded water molecule, proton translocation by as much as 6-8 Å can take place on a sub-picosecond timescale.

  13. Sequentially pulsed traveling wave accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.; Nelson, Scott D.; Poole, Brian R.

    2009-08-18

    A sequentially pulsed traveling wave compact accelerator having two or more pulse forming lines each with a switch for producing a short acceleration pulse along a short length of a beam tube, and a trigger mechanism for sequentially triggering the switches so that a traveling axial electric field is produced along the beam tube in synchronism with an axially traversing pulsed beam of charged particles to serially impart energy to the particle beam.

  14. Augment railgun and sequential discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, K.

    1993-01-01

    Proprietary R&D efforts toward the creation of tactical weapon systems-applicable railguns are presented. Attention is given to measures taken for projectile velocity maximization and sequential-discharge operation, and to an augmenting railgun which has demonstrated a 66-percent efficiency improvement over the two-rail baseline railgun system. This device is characterized by strong interaction between capacitor bank submodules during sequential discharge.

  15. Sequential Multiplex Analyte Capturing for Phosphoprotein Profiling*

    PubMed Central

    Poetz, Oliver; Henzler, Tanja; Hartmann, Michael; Kazmaier, Cornelia; Templin, Markus F.; Herget, Thomas; Joos, Thomas O.

    2010-01-01

    Microarray-based sandwich immunoassays can simultaneously detect dozens of proteins. However, their use in quantifying large numbers of proteins is hampered by cross-reactivity and incompatibilities caused by the immunoassays themselves. Sequential multiplex analyte capturing addresses these problems by repeatedly probing the same sample with different sets of antibody-coated, magnetic suspension bead arrays. As a miniaturized immunoassay format, suspension bead array-based assays fulfill the criteria of the ambient analyte theory, and our experiments reveal that the analyte concentrations are not significantly changed. The value of sequential multiplex analyte capturing was demonstrated by probing tumor cell line lysates for the abundance of seven different receptor tyrosine kinases and their degree of phosphorylation and by measuring the complex phosphorylation pattern of the epidermal growth factor receptor in the same sample from the same cavity. PMID:20682761

  16. Sequential stopping for high-throughput experiments.

    PubMed

    Rossell, David; Müller, Peter

    2013-01-01

    In high-throughput experiments, the sample size is typically chosen informally. Most formal sample-size calculations depend critically on prior knowledge. We propose a sequential strategy that, by updating knowledge when new data are available, depends less critically on prior assumptions. Experiments are stopped or continued based on the potential benefits in obtaining additional data. The underlying decision-theoretic framework guarantees the design to proceed in a coherent fashion. We propose intuitively appealing, easy-to-implement utility functions. As in most sequential design problems, an exact solution is prohibitive. We propose a simulation-based approximation that uses decision boundaries. We apply the method to RNA-seq, microarray, and reverse-phase protein array studies and show its potential advantages. The approach has been added to the Bioconductor package gaga.

  17. An Extension Dynamic Model Based on BDI Agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Wang; Feng, Zhu; Hua, Geng; WangJing, Zhu

    this paper's researching is based on the model of BDI Agent. Firstly, This paper analyze the deficiencies of the traditional BDI Agent model, Then propose an extension dynamic model of BDI Agent based on the traditional ones. It can quickly achieve the internal interaction of the tradition model of BDI Agent, deal with complex issues under dynamic and open environment and achieve quick reaction of the model. The new model is a natural and reasonable model by verifying the origin of civilization using the model of monkeys to eat sweet potato based on the design of the extension dynamic model. It is verified to be feasible by comparing the extended dynamic BDI Agent model with the traditional BDI Agent Model uses the SWARM, it has important theoretical significance.

  18. Dynamics of plant DNA replication based on PCNA visualization.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Ryohei; Hirakawa, Takeshi; Hayashi, Seri; Sakamoto, Takuya; Matsunaga, Sachihiro

    2016-07-15

    DNA replication is an essential process for the copying of genomic information in living organisms. Imaging of DNA replication in tissues and organs is mainly performed using fixed cells after incorporation of thymidine analogs. To establish a useful marker line to measure the duration of DNA replication and analyze the dynamics of DNA replication, we focused on the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), which functions as a DNA sliding clamp for replicative DNA polymerases and is an essential component of replisomes. In this study we produced an Arabidopsis thaliana line expressing PCNA1 fused with the green fluorescent protein under the control of its own promoter (pAtPCNA1::AtPCNA1-EGFP). The duration of the S phase measured using the expression line was consistent with that measured after incorporation of a thymidine analog. Live cell imaging revealed that three distinct nuclear localization patterns (whole, dotted, and speckled) were sequentially observable. These whole, dotted, and speckled patterns of subnuclear AtPCNA1 signals were indicative of the G1 or G2 phase, early S phase and late S phase, respectively. The results indicate that the pAtPCNA1::AtPCNA1-EGFP line is a useful marker line for visualization of S-phase progression in live plant organs.

  19. Ultrasonic Periodontal Probing Based on the Dynamic Wavelet Fingerprint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Jidong; Rose, S. Timothy; Hinders, Mark K.

    2005-12-01

    Manual pocket depth probing has been widely used as a retrospective diagnosis method in periodontics. However, numerous studies have questioned its ability to accurately measure the anatomic pocket depth. In this paper, an ultrasonic periodontal probing method is described, which involves using a hollow water-filled probe to focus a narrow beam of ultrasound energy into and out of the periodontal pocket, followed by automatic processing of pulse-echo signals to obtain the periodontal pocket depth. The signal processing algorithm consists of three steps: peak detection/characterization, peak classification, and peak identification. A dynamic wavelet fingerprint (DWFP) technique is first applied to detect suspected scatterers in the A-scan signal and generate a two-dimensional black and white pattern to characterize the local transient signal corresponding to each scatterer. These DWFP patterns are then classified by a two-dimensional FFT procedure and mapped to an inclination index curve. The location of the pocket bottom was identified as the third broad peak in the inclination index curve. The algorithm is tested on full-mouth probing data from two sequential visits of 14 patients. Its performance is evaluated by comparing ultrasonic probing results with that of full-mouth manual probing at the same sites, which is taken as the "gold standard."

  20. Ultrasonic Periodontal Probing Based on the Dynamic Wavelet Fingerprint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinders, Mark K.; Hou, Jidong

    2005-04-01

    Manual pocket depth probing has been widely used as a retrospective diagnosis method in periodontics. However, numerous studies have questioned its ability to accurately measure the anatomic pocket depth. In this paper, an ultrasonic periodontal probing method is described, which involves using a hollow water-filled probe to focus a narrow beam of ultrasound energy into and out of the periodontal pocket, followed by automatic processing of pulse-echo signals to obtain the periodontal pocket depth. The signal processing algorithm consists of three steps: peak detection/characterization, peak classification and peak identification. A dynamic wavelet fingerprint (DWFP) technique was first applied to detect suspected scatterers in the A-scan signal and generate a two-dimensional black and white pattern to characterize the local transient signal corresponding to each scatterer. These DWFP patterns were then classified by a two-dimensional FFT procedure and mapped to an inclination index curve. The location of the pocket bottom was identified as the third broad peak in the inclination index curve. The algorithm was tested on full mouth probing data from two sequential visits of 14 patients. Its performance was evaluated by comparing ultrasonic probing results with that of full-mouth manual probing at the same sites, which was taken as the `gold standard'.

  1. Hybrid Computerized Adaptive Testing: From Group Sequential Design to Fully Sequential Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Shiyu; Lin, Haiyan; Chang, Hua-Hua; Douglas, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Computerized adaptive testing (CAT) and multistage testing (MST) have become two of the most popular modes in large-scale computer-based sequential testing. Though most designs of CAT and MST exhibit strength and weakness in recent large-scale implementations, there is no simple answer to the question of which design is better because different…

  2. Hybrid Computerized Adaptive Testing: From Group Sequential Design to Fully Sequential Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Shiyu; Lin, Haiyan; Chang, Hua-Hua; Douglas, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Computerized adaptive testing (CAT) and multistage testing (MST) have become two of the most popular modes in large-scale computer-based sequential testing. Though most designs of CAT and MST exhibit strength and weakness in recent large-scale implementations, there is no simple answer to the question of which design is better because different…

  3. Adaptive Networks For Sequential Decision Problems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-01

    Problems of this kind can be viewed as discrete-time stochastic control problems. The theory of stochastic sequential decision making and the computational...is to use reinforcement learning as a component of a more complex system. We experimented with a kind of " bahavior based" reinforcement learning in...navigatiwn functions that are computed by using the harmonic function approach t,, path- planning recently developed by Connolly and Grupen

  4. Sequential on-line C-terminal sequencing of peptides based on carboxypeptidase Y digestion and optically gated capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Tian, Miaomiao; Zhang, Ning; Liu, Xiaoxia; Guo, Liping; Yang, Li

    2016-08-12

    We report a novel method for sequential on-line C-terminal sequencing of peptides, which combines carboxypeptidase Y (CPY) digestion with on-line derivatization and optically gated capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection (OGCE-LIF). Various factors that may affect the C-terminal sequencing were investigated and optimized. High repeatability of on-line derivatization and the sequential OGCE-LIF assay of amino acids (AAs) was achieved with relative standard deviation (RSD) (n=20) less than 1.5% and 3.2% for migration time and peak height, respectively. A total of 13 AAs was efficiently separated in the present study, indicating that the method can be used for sequencing of peptides consisting of the 13 AAs studied. Using two synthesized N-terminally blocked peptides as test examples, we show that the present method can on-line monitor the released AAs with a temporal resolution of 50s during the entire CPY digestion process. The rates of AA release as a function of digestion time were easily measured; thus, the AA sequence of the peptide was determined with just one OGCE assay. Our study indicates the present approach is an effective, reliable, and convenient method for rapid analysis of the C-terminal sequence of peptides, with potential application in peptide analysis and proteome research.

  5. A suite of pulse sequences based on multiple sequential acquisitions at one and two radiofrequency channels for solid-state magic-angle spinning NMR studies of proteins.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Kshama; Madhu, Perunthiruthy K; Mote, Kaustubh R

    2016-08-01

    One of the fundamental challenges in the application of solid-state NMR is its limited sensitivity, yet a majority of experiments do not make efficient use of the limited polarization available. The loss in polarization in a single acquisition experiment is mandated by the need to select out a single coherence pathway. In contrast, sequential acquisition strategies can encode more than one pathway in the same experiment or recover unused polarization to supplement a standard experiment. In this article, we present pulse sequences that implement sequential acquisition strategies on one and two radiofrequency channels with a combination of proton and carbon detection to record multiple experiments under magic-angle spinning. We show that complementary 2D experiments such as [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] or DARR and [Formula: see text], and 3D experiments such as [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text], or [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]  can be combined in a single experiment to ensure time savings of at least 40 %. These experiments can be done under fast or slow-moderate magic-angle spinning frequencies aided by windowed [Formula: see text] acquisition and homonulcear decoupling. The pulse sequence suite is further expanded by including pathways that allow the recovery of residual polarization, the so-called 'afterglow' pathways, to encode a number of pulse sequences to aid in assignments and chemical-shift mapping.

  6. Parameterizing Coefficients of a POD-Based Dynamical System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalb, Virginia L.

    2010-01-01

    A method of parameterizing the coefficients of a dynamical system based of a proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) representing the flow dynamics of a viscous fluid has been introduced. (A brief description of POD is presented in the immediately preceding article.) The present parameterization method is intended to enable construction of the dynamical system to accurately represent the temporal evolution of the flow dynamics over a range of Reynolds numbers. The need for this or a similar method arises as follows: A procedure that includes direct numerical simulation followed by POD, followed by Galerkin projection to a dynamical system has been proven to enable representation of flow dynamics by a low-dimensional model at the Reynolds number of the simulation. However, a more difficult task is to obtain models that are valid over a range of Reynolds numbers. Extrapolation of low-dimensional models by use of straightforward Reynolds-number-based parameter continuation has proven to be inadequate for successful prediction of flows. A key part of the problem of constructing a dynamical system to accurately represent the temporal evolution of the flow dynamics over a range of Reynolds numbers is the problem of understanding and providing for the variation of the coefficients of the dynamical system with the Reynolds number. Prior methods do not enable capture of temporal dynamics over ranges of Reynolds numbers in low-dimensional models, and are not even satisfactory when large numbers of modes are used. The basic idea of the present method is to solve the problem through a suitable parameterization of the coefficients of the dynamical system. The parameterization computations involve utilization of the transfer of kinetic energy between modes as a function of Reynolds number. The thus-parameterized dynamical system accurately predicts the flow dynamics and is applicable to a range of flow problems in the dynamical regime around the Hopf bifurcation. Parameter

  7. Dynamic Evolution Model Based on Social Network Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Xi; Gou, Zhi-Jian; Zhang, Shi-Bin; Zhao, Wen

    2013-11-01

    Based on the analysis of evolutionary characteristics of public opinion in social networking services (SNS), in the paper we propose a dynamic evolution model, in which opinions are coupled with topology. This model shows the clustering phenomenon of opinions in dynamic network evolution. The simulation results show that the model can fit the data from a social network site. The dynamic evolution of networks accelerates the opinion, separation and aggregation. The scale and the number of clusters are influenced by confidence limit and rewiring probability. Dynamic changes of the topology reduce the number of isolated nodes, while the increased confidence limit allows nodes to communicate more sufficiently. The two effects make the distribution of opinion more neutral. The dynamic evolution of networks generates central clusters with high connectivity and high betweenness, which make it difficult to control public opinions in SNS.

  8. Mobile robot dynamic path planning based on improved genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong; Zhou, Heng; Wang, Ying

    2017-08-01

    In dynamic unknown environment, the dynamic path planning of mobile robots is a difficult problem. In this paper, a dynamic path planning method based on genetic algorithm is proposed, and a reward value model is designed to estimate the probability of dynamic obstacles on the path, and the reward value function is applied to the genetic algorithm. Unique coding techniques reduce the computational complexity of the algorithm. The fitness function of the genetic algorithm fully considers three factors: the security of the path, the shortest distance of the path and the reward value of the path. The simulation results show that the proposed genetic algorithm is efficient in all kinds of complex dynamic environments.

  9. Multienzyme kinetics and sequential metabolism.

    PubMed

    Wienkers, Larry C; Rock, Brooke

    2014-01-01

    Enzymes are the catalysts of biological systems and are extremely efficient. A typical enzyme accelerates the rate of a reaction by factors of at least a million compared to the rate of the same reaction in the absence of the enzyme. In contrast to traditional catalytic enzymes, the family of cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes are catalytically promiscuous, and thus they possess remarkable versatility in substrates. The great diversity of reactions catalyzed by CYP enzymes appears to be based on two unique properties of these heme proteins, the ability of their iron to exist under multiple oxidation states with different reactivities and a flexible active site that can accommodate a wide variety of substrates. Herein is a discussion of two distinct types of kinetics observed with CYP enzymes. The first example is of CYP complex kinetic profiles when multiple CYP enzymes form the sample product. The second is sequential metabolism, in other words, the formation of multiple products from one CYP enzyme. Given the degree of CYP enzyme promiscuity, it is hardly surprising that there is also a high degree of complex kinetic profiles generated during the catalytic cycle.

  10. Scheduling based on a dynamic resource connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagiyev, A. E.; Botygin, I. A.; Shersntneva, A. I.; Konyaev, P. A.

    2017-02-01

    The practical using of distributed computing systems associated with many problems, including troubles with the organization of an effective interaction between the agents located at the nodes of the system, with the specific configuration of each node of the system to perform a certain task, with the effective distribution of the available information and computational resources of the system, with the control of multithreading which implements the logic of solving research problems and so on. The article describes the method of computing load balancing in distributed automatic systems, focused on the multi-agency and multi-threaded data processing. The scheme of the control of processing requests from the terminal devices, providing the effective dynamic scaling of computing power under peak load is offered. The results of the model experiments research of the developed load scheduling algorithm are set out. These results show the effectiveness of the algorithm even with a significant expansion in the number of connected nodes and zoom in the architecture distributed computing system.

  11. Scale-invariant entropy-based theory for dynamic ordering

    SciTech Connect

    Mahulikar, Shripad P. E-mail: spm@aero.iitb.ac.in; Kumari, Priti

    2014-09-01

    Dynamically Ordered self-organized dissipative structure exists in various forms and at different scales. This investigation first introduces the concept of an isolated embedding system, which embeds an open system, e.g., dissipative structure and its mass and/or energy exchange with its surroundings. Thereafter, scale-invariant theoretical analysis is presented using thermodynamic principles for Order creation, existence, and destruction. The sustainability criterion for Order existence based on its structured mass and/or energy interactions with the surroundings is mathematically defined. This criterion forms the basis for the interrelationship of physical parameters during sustained existence of dynamic Order. It is shown that the sufficient condition for dynamic Order existence is approached if its sustainability criterion is met, i.e., its destruction path is blocked. This scale-invariant approach has the potential to unify the physical understanding of universal dynamic ordering based on entropy considerations.

  12. Improving structure-based function prediction using molecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Glazer, Dariya S.; Radmer, Randall J.; Altman, Russ B.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The number of molecules with solved three-dimensional structure but unknown function is increasing rapidly. Particularly problematic are novel folds with little detectable similarity to molecules of known function. Experimental assays can determine the functions of such molecules, but are time-consuming and expensive. Computational approaches can identify potential functional sites; however, these approaches generally rely on single static structures and do not use information about dynamics. In fact, structural dynamics can enhance function prediction: we coupled molecular dynamics simulations with structure-based function prediction algorithms that identify Ca2+ binding sites. When applied to 11 challenging proteins, both methods showed substantial improvement in performance, revealing 22 more sites in one case and 12 more in the other, with a modest increase in apparent false positives. Thus, we show that treating molecules as dynamic entities improves the performance of structure-based function prediction methods. PMID:19604472

  13. A Human Activity Recognition System Based on Dynamic Clustering of Skeleton Data

    PubMed Central

    Manzi, Alessandro; Dario, Paolo; Cavallo, Filippo

    2017-01-01

    Human activity recognition is an important area in computer vision, with its wide range of applications including ambient assisted living. In this paper, an activity recognition system based on skeleton data extracted from a depth camera is presented. The system makes use of machine learning techniques to classify the actions that are described with a set of a few basic postures. The training phase creates several models related to the number of clustered postures by means of a multiclass Support Vector Machine (SVM), trained with Sequential Minimal Optimization (SMO). The classification phase adopts the X-means algorithm to find the optimal number of clusters dynamically. The contribution of the paper is twofold. The first aim is to perform activity recognition employing features based on a small number of informative postures, extracted independently from each activity instance; secondly, it aims to assess the minimum number of frames needed for an adequate classification. The system is evaluated on two publicly available datasets, the Cornell Activity Dataset (CAD-60) and the Telecommunication Systems Team (TST) Fall detection dataset. The number of clusters needed to model each instance ranges from two to four elements. The proposed approach reaches excellent performances using only about 4 s of input data (~100 frames) and outperforms the state of the art when it uses approximately 500 frames on the CAD-60 dataset. The results are promising for the test in real context. PMID:28492486

  14. Embedding responses in spontaneous neural activity shaped through sequential learning.

    PubMed

    Kurikawa, Tomoki; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2013-01-01

    Recent experimental measurements have demonstrated that spontaneous neural activity in the absence of explicit external stimuli has remarkable spatiotemporal structure. This spontaneous activity has also been shown to play a key role in the response to external stimuli. To better understand this role, we proposed a viewpoint, "memories-as-bifurcations," that differs from the traditional "memories-as-attractors" viewpoint. Memory recall from the memories-as-bifurcations viewpoint occurs when the spontaneous neural activity is changed to an appropriate output activity upon application of an input, known as a bifurcation in dynamical systems theory, wherein the input modifies the flow structure of the neural dynamics. Learning, then, is a process that helps create neural dynamical systems such that a target output pattern is generated as an attractor upon a given input. Based on this novel viewpoint, we introduce in this paper an associative memory model with a sequential learning process. Using a simple hebbian-type learning, the model is able to memorize a large number of input/output mappings. The neural dynamics shaped through the learning exhibit different bifurcations to make the requested targets stable upon an increase in the input, and the neural activity in the absence of input shows chaotic dynamics with occasional approaches to the memorized target patterns. These results suggest that these dynamics facilitate the bifurcations to each target attractor upon application of the corresponding input, which thus increases the capacity for learning. This theoretical finding about the behavior of the spontaneous neural activity is consistent with recent experimental observations in which the neural activity without stimuli wanders among patterns evoked by previously applied signals. In addition, the neural networks shaped by learning properly reflect the correlations of input and target-output patterns in a similar manner to those designed in our previous study.

  15. Embedding Responses in Spontaneous Neural Activity Shaped through Sequential Learning

    PubMed Central

    Kurikawa, Tomoki; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2013-01-01

    Recent experimental measurements have demonstrated that spontaneous neural activity in the absence of explicit external stimuli has remarkable spatiotemporal structure. This spontaneous activity has also been shown to play a key role in the response to external stimuli. To better understand this role, we proposed a viewpoint, “memories-as-bifurcations,” that differs from the traditional “memories-as-attractors” viewpoint. Memory recall from the memories-as-bifurcations viewpoint occurs when the spontaneous neural activity is changed to an appropriate output activity upon application of an input, known as a bifurcation in dynamical systems theory, wherein the input modifies the flow structure of the neural dynamics. Learning, then, is a process that helps create neural dynamical systems such that a target output pattern is generated as an attractor upon a given input. Based on this novel viewpoint, we introduce in this paper an associative memory model with a sequential learning process. Using a simple Hebbian-type learning, the model is able to memorize a large number of input/output mappings. The neural dynamics shaped through the learning exhibit different bifurcations to make the requested targets stable upon an increase in the input, and the neural activity in the absence of input shows chaotic dynamics with occasional approaches to the memorized target patterns. These results suggest that these dynamics facilitate the bifurcations to each target attractor upon application of the corresponding input, which thus increases the capacity for learning. This theoretical finding about the behavior of the spontaneous neural activity is consistent with recent experimental observations in which the neural activity without stimuli wanders among patterns evoked by previously applied signals. In addition, the neural networks shaped by learning properly reflect the correlations of input and target-output patterns in a similar manner to those designed in our previous

  16. Dynamic Strategic Planning in a Professional Knowledge-Based Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olivarius, Niels de Fine; Kousgaard, Marius Brostrom; Reventlow, Susanne; Quelle, Dan Grevelund; Tulinius, Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    Professional, knowledge-based institutions have a particular form of organization and culture that makes special demands on the strategic planning supervised by research administrators and managers. A model for dynamic strategic planning based on a pragmatic utilization of the multitude of strategy models was used in a small university-affiliated…

  17. Is there a future for sequential chemical extraction?

    PubMed

    Bacon, Jeffrey R; Davidson, Christine M

    2008-01-01

    Since their introduction in the late 1970s, sequential extraction procedures have experienced a rapid increase in use. They are now applied for a large number of potentially toxic elements in a wide range of sample types. This review uses evidence from the literature to consider the usefulness and limitations of sequential extraction and thereby to assess its future role in environmental chemical analysis. It is not the intention to provide a comprehensive survey of all applications of sequential extractions or to consider the merits and disadvantages of individual schemes. These aspects have been covered adequately in other, recent reviews. This review focuses in particular on various key issues surrounding sequential extractions such as nomenclature, methodologies, presentation of data and interpretation of data, and discusses typical applications from the recent literature for which sequential extraction can provide useful and meaningful information. Also covered are emerging developments such as accelerated procedures using ultrasound- or microwave energy-assisted extractions, dynamic extractions, the use of chemometrics, the combination of sequential extraction with isotope analysis, and the extension of the approach to non-traditional analytes such as arsenic, mercury, selenium and radionuclides.

  18. Host Amplification in a Dithioacetal-Based Dynamic Covalent Library.

    PubMed

    Orrillo, A Gastón; Escalante, Andrea M; Furlan, Ricardo L E

    2017-03-06

    Molecular amplification in a dithioacetal-based dynamic library is described for the first time. The homatropine induced selection, amplification, and isolation of one cyclophane host demonstrates the utility of dithioacetal exchange for preparing responsive dynamic libraries. Nuclear magnetic resonance and isothermal titration calorimetry analysis suggest that the amplified macrocycle forms a 1:1 complex with the template. This is the first report about a host/guest system involving a dithioacetal cyclophane.

  19. Sequential Syndrome Decoding of Convolutional Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, I. S.; Truong, T. K.

    1984-01-01

    The algebraic structure of convolutional codes are reviewed and sequential syndrome decoding is applied to those codes. These concepts are then used to realize by example actual sequential decoding, using the stack algorithm. The Fano metric for use in sequential decoding is modified so that it can be utilized to sequentially find the minimum weight error sequence.

  20. A particle filter based autocontouring algorithm for lung tumor tracking using dynamic magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Bourque, Alexandra E; Bedwani, Stéphane; Filion, Édith; Carrier, Jean-François

    2016-09-01

    This study introduces a novel autocontouring algorithm based on particle filter for lung tumors. It is validated on dynamic magnetic resonance (MR) images and is developed in the context of MR-linac treatments. A sequential Monte Carlo method called particle filter is used as the main structure of the algorithm and is combined with Otsu's thresholding technique to contour lung tumors on dynamic MR images. Four non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients were imaged with a 1.5 T MR for 60 s at a rate of 4 images/s and were asked to breathe normally. Prior to treatment, some image processing is required by the proposed algorithm, which includes a manual contour of the tumor, the tumor's displacement, and its descriptive statistics. During treatment, the contours are automatically generated by thresholding around the center of mass of the particles. A comparison with the expert's contours is obtained by calculating the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), the precision, the recall, the Hausdorff distance, and the difference in centroid positions (Δd). This autocontouring algorithm is independent of pretreatment training and presents continuous adaptability as provided by the nature of particle filters. The number of particles is proportional to the area of the tumor and increases the computational time at a rate of 2 ms for every 500 particles, whereas the contouring step adds a constant 14 ms. The contours' comparison is obtained with a mean DSC of 0.89-0.91, mean precision of 0.88-0.91, mean recall of 0.89-0.95, and mean Δd of 0.6-2.0 mm. This work presents a proof of concept of a new autocontouring algorithm for NSCLC patients on dynamic MR images. The contours were generated in good agreement with the expert's contours.

  1. Dynamic gold nanoparticle, polymer-based composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firestone, Millicent; Junghans, Ann; Hayden, Steven; Majeski, Jaroslaw; CINT, Lujan Team

    2014-03-01

    Artificial polymer-based biomembranes may serve as a foundational architecture for the integration and spatial organization of metal nanoparticles forming functional nanocomposites. Nonionic triblock copolymer (PEO-PPO-PEO), lipid-based gels, containing Au nanoparticles (NPs) can be prepared by either external doping of the preformed nanoparticles or by in-situ reduction of Au 3+. Neutron reflectivity on quartz supported thin films of the Au NP -doped polymer-based biomembranes was used to determine the location of the Au. The nanoparticles were found to preferentially reside within the ethylene oxide chains located at the interface of the bulk water channels and the amphiphile bilayers. The embedded Au nanoparticles can act as localized heat sinks, inducing changes in the polymer conformation. The collective, thermally-triggered expansion and contraction of the EO chains modulate the mesophase structure of the gels. Synchrotron X-ray scattering (SAXS) was used to monitor mesophase structure as a function of both temperature and photo-irradiation. These studies represent a first step towards designingexternally-responsive polymer-nanoparticle composites.

  2. A Cumulant-based Analysis of Nonlinear Magnetospheric Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Jay R. Johnson; Simon Wing

    2004-01-28

    Understanding magnetospheric dynamics and predicting future behavior of the magnetosphere is of great practical interest because it could potentially help to avert catastrophic loss of power and communications. In order to build good predictive models it is necessary to understand the most critical nonlinear dependencies among observed plasma and electromagnetic field variables in the coupled solar wind/magnetosphere system. In this work, we apply a cumulant-based information dynamical measure to characterize the nonlinear dynamics underlying the time evolution of the Dst and Kp geomagnetic indices, given solar wind magnetic field and plasma input. We examine the underlying dynamics of the system, the temporal statistical dependencies, the degree of nonlinearity, and the rate of information loss. We find a significant solar cycle dependence in the underlying dynamics of the system with greater nonlinearity for solar minimum. The cumulant-based approach also has the advantage that it is reliable even in the case of small data sets and therefore it is possible to avoid the assumption of stationarity, which allows for a measure of predictability even when the underlying system dynamics may change character. Evaluations of several leading Kp prediction models indicate that their performances are sub-optimal during active times. We discuss possible improvements of these models based on this nonparametric approach.

  3. Protein complex formation: computational clarification of the sequential versus probabilistic recruitment puzzle.

    PubMed

    Schölling, Manuel; Thurner, Stefan; Hanel, Rudolf

    2013-01-01

    Our current view on how protein complexes assemble and disassemble at promoter sites is based on experimental data. For instance this data is provided by biochemical methods (e.g. ChIP-on-chip assays) or GFP-based assays. These two approaches suggest very different characteristics for protein recruitment processes that regulate and initiate gene transcription. Biochemical methods suggest a strictly ordered and consecutive protein recruitment while GFP-based assays draw a picture much closer to chaotic or stochastic recruitment. To understand the reason for these conflicting results, we design a generalized recruitment model (GRM) that allows to simulate all possible scenarios between strictly sequential recruitment and completely probabilistic recruitment. With this model we show that probabilistic, transient binding events that are visible in GFP experiments can not be detected by ChIP experiments. We demonstrate that sequential recruitment processes and probabilistic recruitment processes that contain "shortcuts" exhibit periodic dynamics and are hard to distinguish with standard ChIP measurements. Therefore we propose a simple experimental method that can be used to discriminate sequential from probabilistic recruitment processes. We discuss the limitations of this method.

  4. Performance analysis of sequential tests in process control

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyer, K.K.

    1994-04-01

    In recent years, a great deal of emphasis has been placed on quality control of industrial processes. In particular, numerous statistical techniques exist which are designed to continually check an industrial process for machine or component failure, thereby determining if the process is under control, or if it is becoming out of control. In this study, the authors consider a very powerful class of quality control techniques known as sequential tests. Sequential tests classify a set of observations in a manner similar to statistical hypothesis tests, but are characterized by a random sample size. Perhaps the best known sequential test is Wald`s sequential probability ratio test. The sequential probability ratio test (SPRT) is a log likelihood ratio based test for simple or composite hypotheses. After taking each observation, the SPRT decides whether to accept the null hypothesis, reject the null hypothesis, or continue sampling. For the purpose of quality control, an SPRT can be conducted repeatedly over time as incoming observations are received. In the following section, the authors reviews the sequential probability ratio test and state some of its properties. In Section 3, they formulate a Markov additive model which allows them to study the sequential probability ratio test under various types of process behavior. Section 4 develops the theoretical results and the methodological approach that allows them to bound the first passage time distributions of their model. Section 5 illustrates their techniques through numerical examples.

  5. Sequential pattern formation governed by signaling gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jörg, David J.; Oates, Andrew C.; Jülicher, Frank

    2016-10-01

    Rhythmic and sequential segmentation of the embryonic body plan is a vital developmental patterning process in all vertebrate species. However, a theoretical framework capturing the emergence of dynamic patterns of gene expression from the interplay of cell oscillations with tissue elongation and shortening and with signaling gradients, is still missing. Here we show that a set of coupled genetic oscillators in an elongating tissue that is regulated by diffusing and advected signaling molecules can account for segmentation as a self-organized patterning process. This system can form a finite number of segments and the dynamics of segmentation and the total number of segments formed depend strongly on kinetic parameters describing tissue elongation and signaling molecules. The model accounts for existing experimental perturbations to signaling gradients, and makes testable predictions about novel perturbations. The variety of different patterns formed in our model can account for the variability of segmentation between different animal species.

  6. Kinematic and dynamic analysis of an anatomically based knee joint.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kok-Meng; Guo, Jiajie

    2010-05-07

    This paper presents a knee-joint model to provide a better understanding on the interaction between natural joints and artificial mechanisms for design and control of rehabilitation exoskeletons. The anatomically based knee model relaxes several commonly made assumptions that approximate a human knee as engineering pin-joint in exoskeleton design. Based on published MRI data, we formulate the kinematics of a knee-joint and compare three mathematical approximations; one model bases on two sequential circles rolling a flat plane; and the other two are mathematically differentiable ellipses-based models with and without sliding at the contact. The ellipses-based model taking sliding contact into accounts shows that the rolling-sliding ratio of a knee-joint is not a constant but has an average value consistent with published measurements. This knee-joint kinematics leads to a physically more accurate contact-point trajectory than methods based on multiple circles or lines, and provides a basis to derive a knee-joint kinetic model upon which the effects of a planar exoskeleton mechanism on the internal joint forces and torque during flexion can be numerically investigated. Two different knee-joint kinetic models (pin-joint approximation and anatomically based model) are compared against a condition with no exoskeleton. The leg and exoskeleton form a closed kinematic chain that has a significant effect on the joint forces in the knee. Human knee is more tolerant than pin-joint in negotiating around a singularity but its internal forces increase with the exoskeleton mass-to-length ratio. An oversimplifying pin-joint approximation cannot capture the finite change in the knee forces due to the singularity effect.

  7. Effects of violations of prerequisites in sequential triangular designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moder, Karl

    2017-07-01

    Testing group differences in sequential designs is based on critical values of the standard normal distribution. This approximation is not called into question in various variants if sequential tests. It is the basis not only for assessment of the null hypothesis but also for calculating sample size and power. Additional assumption concerning this kind of tests are homogeneity of variances and normal distributed random variables. In a simulation study effects of using the α-percentile of the standard normal distribution and of violating various prerequisites on type I error rate and power are evaluated. Although the focus lies on triangular tests based on Whiteheads method [1] for continuous monitoring other sequential designs like the group sequential test of OBrien-Fleming [2] and Pocock [3] were also taken into consideration.

  8. On the origin of reproducible sequential activity in neural circuits.

    PubMed

    Afraimovich, V S; Zhigulin, V P; Rabinovich, M I

    2004-12-01

    Robustness and reproducibility of sequential spatio-temporal responses is an essential feature of many neural circuits in sensory and motor systems of animals. The most common mathematical images of dynamical regimes in neural systems are fixed points, limit cycles, chaotic attractors, and continuous attractors (attractive manifolds of neutrally stable fixed points). These are not suitable for the description of reproducible transient sequential neural dynamics. In this paper we present the concept of a stable heteroclinic sequence (SHS), which is not an attractor. SHS opens the way for understanding and modeling of transient sequential activity in neural circuits. We show that this new mathematical object can be used to describe robust and reproducible sequential neural dynamics. Using the framework of a generalized high-dimensional Lotka-Volterra model, that describes the dynamics of firing rates in an inhibitory network, we present analytical results on the existence of the SHS in the phase space of the network. With the help of numerical simulations we confirm its robustness in presence of noise in spite of the transient nature of the corresponding trajectories. Finally, by referring to several recent neurobiological experiments, we discuss possible applications of this new concept to several problems in neuroscience.

  9. Mechanism of Actin-Based Motility: A Dynamic State Diagram

    PubMed Central

    Bernheim-Groswasser, Anne; Prost, Jacques; Sykes, Cécile

    2005-01-01

    Cells move by a dynamical reorganization of their cytoskeleton, orchestrated by a cascade of biochemical reactions directed to the membrane. Designed objects or bacteria can hijack this machinery to undergo actin-based propulsion inside cells or in a cell-like medium. These objects can explore the dynamical regimes of actin-based propulsion, and display different regimes of motion, in a continuous or periodic fashion. We show that bead movement can switch from one regime to the other, by changing the size of the beads or the surface concentration of the protein activating actin polymerization. We experimentally obtain the state diagram of the bead dynamics, in which the transitions between the different regimes can be understood by a theoretical approach based on an elastic force opposing a friction force. Moreover, the experimental characteristics of the movement, such as the velocity and the characteristic times of the periodic movement, are predicted by our theoretical analysis. PMID:15923234

  10. Dynamic frequency feature selection based approach for classification of motor imageries.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jing; Feng, Zuren; Zhang, Jun; Lu, Na

    2016-08-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) is one of the most popular techniques to record the brain activities such as motor imagery, which is of low signal-to-noise ratio and could lead to high classification error. Therefore, selection of the most discriminative features could be crucial to improve the classification performance. However, the traditional feature selection methods employed in brain-computer interface (BCI) field (e.g. Mutual Information-based Best Individual Feature (MIBIF), Mutual Information-based Rough Set Reduction (MIRSR) and cross-validation) mainly focus on the overall performance on all the trials in the training set, and thus may have very poor performance on some specific samples, which is not acceptable. To address this problem, a novel sequential forward feature selection approach called Dynamic Frequency Feature Selection (DFFS) is proposed in this paper. The DFFS method emphasized the importance of the samples that got misclassified while only pursuing high overall classification performance. In the DFFS based classification scheme, the EEG data was first transformed to frequency domain using Wavelet Packet Decomposition (WPD), which is then employed as the candidate set for further discriminatory feature selection. The features are selected one by one in a boosting manner. After one feature being selected, the importance of the correctly classified samples based on the feature will be decreased, which is equivalent to increasing the importance of the misclassified samples. Therefore, a complement feature to the current features could be selected in the next run. The selected features are then fed to a classifier trained by random forest algorithm. Finally, a time series voting-based method is utilized to improve the classification performance. Comparisons between the DFFS-based approach and state-of-art methods on BCI competition IV data set 2b have been conducted, which have shown the superiority of the proposed algorithm.

  11. Blocking for Sequential Political Experiments.

    PubMed

    Moore, Ryan T; Moore, Sally A

    2013-10-01

    In typical political experiments, researchers randomize a set of households, precincts, or individuals to treatments all at once, and characteristics of all units are known at the time of randomization. However, in many other experiments, subjects "trickle in" to be randomized to treatment conditions, usually via complete randomization. To take advantage of the rich background data that researchers often have (but underutilize) in these experiments, we develop methods that use continuous covariates to assign treatments sequentially. We build on biased coin and minimization procedures for discrete covariates and demonstrate that our methods outperform complete randomization, producing better covariate balance in simulated data. We then describe how we selected and deployed a sequential blocking method in a clinical trial and demonstrate the advantages of our having done so. Further, we show how that method would have performed in two larger sequential political trials. Finally, we compare causal effect estimates from differences in means, augmented inverse propensity weighted estimators, and randomization test inversion.

  12. A bit serial sequential circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, S.; Whitaker, S.

    1990-01-01

    Normally a sequential circuit with n state variables consists of n unique hardware realizations, one for each state variable. All variables are processed in parallel. This paper introduces a new sequential circuit architecture that allows the state variables to be realized in a serial manner using only one next state logic circuit. The action of processing the state variables in a serial manner has never been addressed before. This paper presents a general design procedure for circuit construction and initialization. Utilizing pass transistors to form the combinational next state forming logic in synchronous sequential machines, a bit serial state machine can be realized with a single NMOS pass transistor network connected to shift registers. The bit serial state machine occupies less area than other realizations which perform parallel operations. Moreover, the logical circuit of the bit serial state machine can be modified by simply changing the circuit input matrix to develop an adaptive state machine.

  13. An Individual-Based Model of Zebrafish Population Dynamics Accounting for Energy Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Beaudouin, Rémy; Goussen, Benoit; Piccini, Benjamin; Augustine, Starrlight; Devillers, James; Brion, François; Péry, Alexandre R. R.

    2015-01-01

    Developing population dynamics models for zebrafish is crucial in order to extrapolate from toxicity data measured at the organism level to biological levels relevant to support and enhance ecological risk assessment. To achieve this, a dynamic energy budget for individual zebrafish (DEB model) was coupled to an individual based model of zebrafish population dynamics (IBM model). Next, we fitted the DEB model to new experimental data on zebrafish growth and reproduction thus improving existing models. We further analysed the DEB-model and DEB-IBM using a sensitivity analysis. Finally, the predictions of the DEB-IBM were compared to existing observations on natural zebrafish populations and the predicted population dynamics are realistic. While our zebrafish DEB-IBM model can still be improved by acquiring new experimental data on the most uncertain processes (e.g. survival or feeding), it can already serve to predict the impact of compounds at the population level. PMID:25938409

  14. Dynamic brittle material response based on a continuum damage model

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, E.P.

    1994-12-31

    The response of brittle materials to dynamic loads was studied in this investigation based on a continuum damage model. Damage mechanism was selected to be interaction and growth of subscale cracks. Briefly, the cracks are activated by bulk tension and the density of activated cracks are described by a Weibull statistical distribution. The moduli of a cracked solid derived by Budiansky and O`Connell are then used to represent the global material degradation due to subscale cracking. This continuum damage model was originally developed to study rock fragmentation and was modified in the present study to improve on the post-limit structural response. The model was implemented into a transient dynamic explicit finite element code PRONTO 2D and then used for a numerical study involving the sudden stretching of a plate with a centrally located hole. Numerical results characterizing the dynamic responses of the material were presented. The effect of damage on dynamic material behavior was discussed.

  15. Sensory neural pathways revisited to unravel the temporal dynamics of the Simon effect: A model-based cognitive neuroscience approach.

    PubMed

    Salzer, Yael; de Hollander, Gilles; Forstmann, Birte U

    2017-02-24

    The Simon task is one of the most prominent interference tasks and has been extensively studied in experimental psychology and cognitive neuroscience. Despite years of research, the underlying mechanism driving the phenomenon and its temporal dynamics are still disputed. Within the framework of the review, we adopt a model-based cognitive neuroscience approach. We first go over key findings in the literature of the Simon task, discuss competing qualitative cognitive theories and the difficulty of testing them empirically. We then introduce sequential sampling models, a particular class of mathematical cognitive process models. Finally, we argue that the brain architecture accountable for the processing of spatial ('where') and non-spatial ('what') information, could constrain these models. We conclude that there is a clear need to bridge neural and behavioral measures, and that mathematical cognitive models may facilitate the construction of this bridge and work towards revealing the underlying mechanisms of the Simon effect.

  16. Sequential learning for robot vision terrain classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witus, Gary; Karlsen, Robert; Hunt, Shawn

    2009-05-01

    Terrains have widely varying visual appearance depending on the type of foliage, season, current weather conditions, recent precipitation, time of day, relative direction of lighting, presence of man-made structures and artifacts, landscaping, etc. It is difficult, if not impossible, to specify in advance the appearance of the different terrains that will be encountered while operating a robot in urban or rural environments. Yet people, having accumulated wide-ranging experience, have little trouble recognizing familiar terrain types and learning to recognize new, previously unfamiliar, terrains. Robots typically accumulate experience in "chunks" and do not have the luxury of years of training. This paper presents recent results in sequential learning methods applied to robot terrain recognition. In this paper we explore different sequential learning problem formulations and alternative machine learning algorithms. The investigations are based on the same data set. We report on the initial development of an incremental fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm capable of learning new information. We report on an approach to convert regression tree modeling, normally a batch learning method, to batch-incremental learning. We investigate issues in formulating the sequential learning problem and the performance of these algorithms. We also compare performance to four incremental learning classifiers. All investigations were conducted using the same set of image features, extracted from on-board video from a small robot traversing different terrains.

  17. Perspective: A Dynamics-Based Classification of Ventricular Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, James N.; Garfinkel, Alan; Karagueuzian, Hrayr S.; Nguyen, Thao P.; Olcese, Riccardo; Chen, Peng-Sheng; Qu, Zhilin

    2015-01-01

    Despite key advances in the clinical management of life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias, culminating with the development of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators and catheter ablation techniques, pharmacologic/biologic therapeutics have lagged behind. The fundamental issue is that biological targets are molecular factors. Diseases, however, represent emergent properties at the scale of the organism that result from dynamic interactions between multiple constantly changing molecular factors. For a pharmacologic/biologic therapy to be effective, it must target the dynamic processes that underlie the disease. Here we propose a classification of ventricular arrhythmias that is based on our current understanding of the dynamics occurring at the subcellular, cellular, tissue and organism scales, which cause arrhythmias by simultaneously generating arrhythmia triggers and exacerbating tissue vulnerability. The goal is to create a framework that systematically links these key dynamic factors together with fixed factors (structural and electrophysiological heterogeneity) synergistically promoting electrical dispersion and increased arrhythmia risk to molecular factors that can serve as biological targets. We classify ventricular arrhythmias into three primary dynamic categories related generally to unstable Ca cycling, reduced repolarization, and excess repolarization, respectively. The clinical syndromes, arrhythmia mechanisms, dynamic factors and what is known about their molecular counterparts are discussed. Based on this framework, we propose a computational-experimental strategy for exploring the links between molecular factors, fixed factors and dynamic factors that underlie life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. The ultimate objective is to facilitate drug development by creating an in silico platform to evaluate and predict comprehensively how molecular interventions affect not only a single targeted arrhythmia, but all primary arrhythmia dynamics

  18. Perspective: a dynamics-based classification of ventricular arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Weiss, James N; Garfinkel, Alan; Karagueuzian, Hrayr S; Nguyen, Thao P; Olcese, Riccardo; Chen, Peng-Sheng; Qu, Zhilin

    2015-05-01

    Despite key advances in the clinical management of life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias, culminating with the development of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators and catheter ablation techniques, pharmacologic/biologic therapeutics have lagged behind. The fundamental issue is that biological targets are molecular factors. Diseases, however, represent emergent properties at the scale of the organism that result from dynamic interactions between multiple constantly changing molecular factors. For a pharmacologic/biologic therapy to be effective, it must target the dynamic processes that underlie the disease. Here we propose a classification of ventricular arrhythmias that is based on our current understanding of the dynamics occurring at the subcellular, cellular, tissue and organism scales, which cause arrhythmias by simultaneously generating arrhythmia triggers and exacerbating tissue vulnerability. The goal is to create a framework that systematically links these key dynamic factors together with fixed factors (structural and electrophysiological heterogeneity) synergistically promoting electrical dispersion and increased arrhythmia risk to molecular factors that can serve as biological targets. We classify ventricular arrhythmias into three primary dynamic categories related generally to unstable Ca cycling, reduced repolarization, and excess repolarization, respectively. The clinical syndromes, arrhythmia mechanisms, dynamic factors and what is known about their molecular counterparts are discussed. Based on this framework, we propose a computational-experimental strategy for exploring the links between molecular factors, fixed factors and dynamic factors that underlie life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. The ultimate objective is to facilitate drug development by creating an in silico platform to evaluate and predict comprehensively how molecular interventions affect not only a single targeted arrhythmia, but all primary arrhythmia dynamics

  19. MEMS-based dynamic cell-to-cell culture platforms using electrochemical surface modifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jiyoung; Yoon, Sang-Hee; Mofrad, Mohammad R. K.; Lin, Liwei

    2011-05-01

    MEMS-based biological platforms with the capability of both spatial placements and time releases of living cells for cell-to-cell culture experiments have been designed and demonstrated utilizing electrochemical surface modification effects. The spatial placement is accomplished by electrochemical surface modification of substrate surfaces to be either adhesive or non-adhesive for living cells. The time control is achieved by the electrical activation of the selective indium tin oxide co-culture electrode to allow the migration of living cells onto the electrode to start the cell-to-cell culture studies. Prototype devices have a three-electrode design with an electrode size of 50 × 50 µm2 and the separation gaps of 2 µm between them. An electrical voltage of -1.5 V has been used to activate the electrodes independently and sequentially to demonstrate the dynamic cell-to-cell culture experiments of NIH 3T3 fibroblast and Madin Darby canine kidney cells. As such, this MEMS platform could be a basic yet versatile tool to characterize transient cell-to-cell interactions.

  20. Testing sequential quantum measurements: how can maximal knowledge be extracted?

    PubMed Central

    Nagali, Eleonora; Felicetti, Simone; de Assis, Pierre-Louis; D'Ambrosio, Vincenzo; Filip, Radim; Sciarrino, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    The extraction of information from a quantum system unavoidably implies a modification of the measured system itself. In this framework partial measurements can be carried out in order to extract only a portion of the information encoded in a quantum system, at the cost of inducing a limited amount of disturbance. Here we analyze experimentally the dynamics of sequential partial measurements carried out on a quantum system, focusing on the trade-off between the maximal information extractable and the disturbance. In particular we implement two sequential measurements observing that, by exploiting an adaptive strategy, is possible to find an optimal trade-off between the two quantities. PMID:22720131

  1. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Perylenediimide DNA Base Surrogates.

    PubMed

    Markegard, Cade B; Mazaheripour, Amir; Jocson, Jonah-Micah; Burke, Anthony M; Dickson, Mary N; Gorodetsky, Alon A; Nguyen, Hung D

    2015-09-03

    Perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic diimides (PTCDIs) are a well-known class of organic materials. Recently, these molecules have been incorporated within DNA as base surrogates, finding ready applications as probes of DNA structure and function. However, the assembly dynamics and kinetics of PTCDI DNA base surrogates have received little attention to date. Herein, we employ constant temperature molecular dynamics simulations to gain an improved understanding of the assembly of PTCDI dimers and trimers. We also use replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations to elucidate the energetic landscape dictating the formation of stacked PTCDI structures. Our studies provide insight into the equilibrium configurations of multimeric PTCDIs and hold implications for the construction of DNA-inspired systems from perylene-derived organic semiconductor building blocks.

  2. Dynamic gesture recognition based on multiple sensors fusion technology.

    PubMed

    Wenhui, Wang; Xiang, Chen; Kongqiao, Wang; Xu, Zhang; Jihai, Yang

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates the roles of a three-axis accelerometer, surface electromyography sensors and a webcam for dynamic gesture recognition. A decision-level multiple sensor fusion method based on action elements is proposed to distinguish a set of 20 kinds of dynamic hand gestures. Experiments are designed and conducted to collect three kinds of sensor data stream simultaneously during gesture implementation and compare the performance of different subsets in gesture recognition. Experimental results from three subjects show that the combination of three kinds of sensor achieves recognition accuracies at 87.5%-91.8%, which are higher largely than that of the single sensor conditions. This study is valuable to realize continuous and dynamic gesture recognition based on multiple sensor fusion technology for multi-model interaction.

  3. Sequential Effects in Essay Ratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attali, Yigal

    2011-01-01

    Contrary to previous research on sequential ratings of student performance, this study found that professional essay raters of a large-scale standardized testing program produced ratings that were drawn toward previous ratings, creating an assimilation effect. Longer intervals between the two adjacent ratings and higher degree of agreement with…

  4. Sequential Effects in Essay Ratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attali, Yigal

    2011-01-01

    Contrary to previous research on sequential ratings of student performance, this study found that professional essay raters of a large-scale standardized testing program produced ratings that were drawn toward previous ratings, creating an assimilation effect. Longer intervals between the two adjacent ratings and higher degree of agreement with…

  5. Evaluation Using Sequential Trials Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Mark E.; Ralls, Stephen A.

    1986-01-01

    Although dental school faculty as well as practitioners are interested in evaluating products and procedures used in clinical practice, research design and statistical analysis can sometimes pose problems. Sequential trials methods provide an analytical structure that is both easy to use and statistically valid. (Author/MLW)

  6. Sequential triangulation of orbital photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajan, M.; Junkins, J. L.; Turner, J. D.

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility of structuring the satellite photogrammetric triangulation as an iterative Extended Kalman estimation algorithm is demonstrated. Comparative numerical results of the sequential against batch estimation algorithm are presented. Difficulty of accurately modeling of the attitude motion is overcome by utilizing the on-board angular rate measurements. Solutions of the differential equations and the evaluation of state transition matrix are carried out numerically.

  7. Development of a sequential workflow based on LC-PRM for the verification of endometrial cancer protein biomarkers in uterine aspirate samples.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Garcia, Elena; Lesur, Antoine; Devis, Laura; Campos, Alexandre; Cabrera, Silvia; van Oostrum, Jan; Matias-Guiu, Xavier; Gil-Moreno, Antonio; Reventos, Jaume; Colas, Eva; Domon, Bruno

    2016-08-16

    About 30% of endometrial cancer (EC) patients are diagnosed at an advanced stage of the disease, which is associated with a drastic decrease in the 5-year survival rate. The identification of biomarkers in uterine aspirate samples, which are collected by a minimally invasive procedure, would improve early diagnosis of EC. We present a sequential workflow to select from a list of potential EC biomarkers, those which are the most promising to enter a validation study. After the elimination of confounding contributions by residual blood proteins, 52 potential biomarkers were analyzed in uterine aspirates from 20 EC patients and 18 non-EC controls by a high-resolution accurate mass spectrometer operated in parallel reaction monitoring mode. The differential abundance of 26 biomarkers was observed, and among them ten proteins showed a high sensitivity and specificity (AUC > 0.9). The study demonstrates that uterine aspirates are valuable samples for EC protein biomarkers screening. It also illustrates the importance of a biomarker verification phase to fill the gap between discovery and validation studies and highlights the benefits of high resolution mass spectrometry for this purpose. The proteins verified in this study have an increased likelihood to become a clinical assay after a subsequent validation phase.

  8. Group sequential monitoring based on the weighted log-rank test statistic with the Fleming-Harrington class of weights in cancer vaccine studies.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Takahiro

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, immunological science has evolved, and cancer vaccines are now approved and available for treating existing cancers. Because cancer vaccines require time to elicit an immune response, a delayed treatment effect is expected and is actually observed in drug approval studies. Accordingly, we propose the evaluation of survival endpoints by weighted log-rank tests with the Fleming-Harrington class of weights. We consider group sequential monitoring, which allows early efficacy stopping, and determine a semiparametric information fraction for the Fleming-Harrington family of weights, which is necessary for the error spending function. Moreover, we give a flexible survival model in cancer vaccine studies that considers not only the delayed treatment effect but also the long-term survivors. In a Monte Carlo simulation study, we illustrate that when the primary analysis is a weighted log-rank test emphasizing the late differences, the proposed information fraction can be a useful alternative to the surrogate information fraction, which is proportional to the number of events. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. A 400 MHz Wireless Neural Signal Processing IC With 625 × On-Chip Data Reduction and Reconfigurable BFSK/QPSK Transmitter Based on Sequential Injection Locking.

    PubMed

    Teng, Kok-Hin; Wu, Tong; Liu, Xiayun; Yang, Zhi; Heng, Chun-Huat

    2017-03-03

    An 8-channel wireless neural signal processing IC, which can perform real-time spike detection, alignment, and feature extraction, and wireless data transmission is proposed. A reconfigurable BFSK/QPSK transmitter (TX) at MICS/MedRadio band is incorporated to support different data rate requirement. By using an Exponential Component-Polynomial Component (EC-PC) spike processing unit with an incremental principal component analysis (IPCA) engine, the detection of neural spikes with poor SNR is possible while achieving 625× data reduction. For the TX, a dual-channel at 401 MHz and 403.8 MHz are supported by applying sequential injection locked techniques while attaining phase noise of -102 dBc/Hz at 100 kHz offset. From the measurement, error vector magnitude (EVM) of 4.60%/9.55% with power amplifier (PA) output power of -15 dBm is achieved for the QPSK at 8 Mbps and the BFSK at 12.5 kbps. Fabricated in 65 nm CMOS with an active area of 1 mm (2), the design consumes a total current of 5  ∼ 5.6 mA with a maximum energy efficiency of 0.7 nJ/b.

  10. Development of a sequential workflow based on LC-PRM for the verification of endometrial cancer protein biomarkers in uterine aspirate samples

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Garcia, Elena; Lesur, Antoine; Devis, Laura; Campos, Alexandre; Cabrera, Silvia; van Oostrum, Jan; Matias-Guiu, Xavier; Gil-Moreno, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    About 30% of endometrial cancer (EC) patients are diagnosed at an advanced stage of the disease, which is associated with a drastic decrease in the 5-year survival rate. The identification of biomarkers in uterine aspirate samples, which are collected by a minimally invasive procedure, would improve early diagnosis of EC. We present a sequential workflow to select from a list of potential EC biomarkers, those which are the most promising to enter a validation study. After the elimination of confounding contributions by residual blood proteins, 52 potential biomarkers were analyzed in uterine aspirates from 20 EC patients and 18 non-EC controls by a high-resolution accurate mass spectrometer operated in parallel reaction monitoring mode. The differential abundance of 26 biomarkers was observed, and among them ten proteins showed a high sensitivity and specificity (AUC > 0.9). The study demonstrates that uterine aspirates are valuable samples for EC protein biomarkers screening. It also illustrates the importance of a biomarker verification phase to fill the gap between discovery and validation studies and highlights the benefits of high resolution mass spectrometry for this purpose. The proteins verified in this study have an increased likelihood to become a clinical assay after a subsequent validation phase. PMID:27447978

  11. Identification of cross-linked peptides after click-based enrichment using sequential collision-induced dissociation and electron transfer dissociation tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Saiful M; Du, Xiuxia; Tolić, Nikola; Wu, Si; Moore, Ronald J; Mayer, M Uljana; Smith, Richard D; Adkins, Joshua N

    2009-07-01

    Chemical cross-linking combined with mass spectrometry can be a powerful approach for the identification of protein-protein interactions and for providing constraints on protein structures. However, enrichment of cross-linked peptides is crucial to reduce sample complexity before mass spectrometric analysis. In addition compact cross-linkers are often preferred to provide short spacer lengths, surface accessibility to the protein complexes, and must have reasonable solubility under conditions where the native complex structure is stable. In this study, we present a novel compact cross-linker that contains two distinct features: (1) an alkyne tag and (2) a small molecule detection tag (NO(2)) to maintain reasonable solubility in water. The alkyne tag enables enrichment of the cross-linked peptides after proteolytic cleavage and coupling of an affinity tag using alkyne-azido click chemistry. Neutral loss of the small NO(2) moiety provides a secondary means of detecting cross-linked peptides in MS/MS analyses, providing additional confidence in peptide identifications. We show the labeling efficiency of this cross-linker, which we termed CLIP (click-enabled linker for interacting proteins) using ubiquitin. The enrichment capability of CLIP is demonstrated for cross-linked ubiquitin in highly complex E. coli cell lysates. Sequential collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry (CID-MS/MS) and electron transfer dissociation (ETD)-MS/MS of intercross-linked peptides (two peptides connected with a cross-linker) are also demonstrated for improved automated identification of cross-linked peptides.

  12. Automated sample preparation based on the sequential injection principle. Solid-phase extraction on a molecularly imprinted polymer coupled on-line to high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Theodoridis, Georgios; Zacharis, Constantinos K; Tzanavaras, Paraskevas D; Themelis, Demetrius G; Economou, Anastasios

    2004-03-19

    A molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) prepared using caffeine, as a template, was validated as a selective sorbent for solid-phase extraction (SPE), within an automated on-line sample preparation method. The polymer produced was packed in a polypropylene cartridge, which was incorporated in a flow system prior to the HPLC analytical instrumentation. The principle of sequential injection was utilised for a rapid automated and efficient SPE procedure on the MIP. Samples, buffers, washing and elution solvents were introduced to the extraction cartridge via a peristaltic pump and a multi-position valve, both controlled by appropriate software developed in-house. The method was optimised in terms of flow rates, extraction time and volume. After extraction, the final eluent from the extraction cartridge was directed to the injection loop and was subsequently analysed on HPLC. The overall set-up facilitated unattended operation, operation and improved both mixing fluidics and method development flexibility. This system may be readily built in the laboratory and can be further used as an automated platform for on-line sample preparation.

  13. An integrative technique based on synergistic coremoval and sequential recovery of copper and tetracycline with dual-functional chelating resin: roles of amine and carboxyl groups.

    PubMed

    Ling, Chen; Liu, Fu-Qiang; Xu, Chao; Chen, Tai-Peng; Li, Ai-Min

    2013-11-27

    A novel chelating resin (R-AC) bearing dual-functional groups (amino and carboxyl groups) was self-synthesized and it showed superior properties on synergistic coremoval of Cu(II) and tetracycline (TC) to commercial resins (amine, carboxyl, and hydrophobic types), which was deeply investigated by equilibrium and kinetic tests in binary, preloading, and saline systems. The adsorption of TC on R-AC was markedly enhanced when coexisted with Cu(II), up to 13 times of that in sole system, whereas Cu(II) uptake seldom decreased in the copresence of TC. Decomplexing-bridging, which included [Cu-TC] decomplexing and [R-Cu] bridging for TC, was demonstrated as the leading mechanism for the synergistic coremoval of Cu(II) and TC. Carboxyl groups of R-AC played a dominant role in decomplexing of [Cu-TC] complex and releasing free TC. Cu(II) coordinated with amine groups of R-AC was further proved to participate in bridging interaction with free TC, and the bridging stoichiometric ratio ([NH-Cu]: TC) possibly was 2:1. About 96.9% of TC and 99.3% of Cu could be sequentially recovered with dilute NaOH followed by HCl. Considering stable application for five cycles in simulated and practical wastewater, R-AC shows great potential in green and simple coremoval of antibiotic and heavy metal ions.

  14. Dynamic Buffer Capacity in Acid-Base Systems.

    PubMed

    Michałowska-Kaczmarczyk, Anna M; Michałowski, Tadeusz

    The generalized concept of 'dynamic' buffer capacity βV is related to electrolytic systems of different complexity where acid-base equilibria are involved. The resulting formulas are presented in a uniform and consistent form. The detailed calculations are related to two Britton-Robinson buffers, taken as examples.

  15. Wavelet-based analysis of blood pressure dynamics in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, A. N.; Anisimov, A. A.; Semyachkina-Glushkovskaya, O. V.; Berdnikova, V. A.; Kuznecova, A. S.; Matasova, E. G.

    2009-02-01

    Using a wavelet-based approach, we study stress-induced reactions in the blood pressure dynamics in rats. Further, we consider how the level of the nitric oxide (NO) influences the heart rate variability. Clear distinctions for male and female rats are reported.

  16. A dynamics based view of atmosphere-fire interactions

    Treesearch

    Brian E. Potter

    2002-01-01

    Current research on severe fire interactions with the atmosphere focuses largely on examination of correlations between fire growth and various atmospheric properties, and on the development of indices based on these correlations. The author proposes that progress requires understanding the physics and atmospheric dynamics behind the correlations. A conceptual 3-stage...

  17. AN INDIVIDUAL-BASED MODEL OF COTTUS POPULATION DYNAMICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We explored population dynamics of a southern Appalachian population of Cottus bairdi using a spatially-explicit, individual-based model. The model follows daily growth, mortality, and spawning of individuals as a function of flow and temperature. We modeled movement of juveniles...

  18. Computer-Based Dynamic Assessment of Multidigit Multiplication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerber, Michael M.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Design details, operation, and initial field test results are reported for DynaMath, a computer-based dynamic assessment system that provides individually tailored, instructionally useful assessment of students with disabilities. DynaMath organizes and outputs student performance data, graphically shows the "zone of proximal…

  19. AN INDIVIDUAL-BASED MODEL OF COTTUS POPULATION DYNAMICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We explored population dynamics of a southern Appalachian population of Cottus bairdi using a spatially-explicit, individual-based model. The model follows daily growth, mortality, and spawning of individuals as a function of flow and temperature. We modeled movement of juveniles...

  20. Multi-attribute Regret-Based Dynamic Pricing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jumadinova, Janyl; Dasgupta, Prithviraj

    In this paper, we consider the problem of dynamic pricing by a set of competing sellers in an information economy where buyers differentiate products along multiple attributes, and buyer preferences can change temporally. Previous research in this area has either focused on dynamic pricing along a limited number of (e.g. binary) attributes, or, assumes that each seller has access to private information such as preference distribution of buyers, and profit/price information of other sellers. However, in real information markets, private information about buyers and sellers cannot be assumed to be available a priori. Moreover, due to the competition between sellers, each seller faces a tradeoff between accuracy and rapidity of the pricing mechanism. In this paper, we describe a multi-attribute dynamic pricing algorithm based on minimax regret that can be used by a seller's agent called a pricebot, to maximize the seller's utility. Our simulation results show that the minimax regret based dynamic pricing algorithm performs significantly better than other algorithms for rapidly and dynamically tracking consumer attributes without using any private information from either buyers or sellers.

  1. Middleware for Processing Message Queues with Elasticity Support and Sequential Integrity of Asynchronous Message Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henrique Teixeira, Eduardo; Patrícia Favacho de Araújo, Aletéia

    2015-10-01

    Elasticity in computing refers to dynamically adjusting the amount of allocated resources to process a distributed application. In order to achieve this, mechanisms are needed to avoid the phenomenon of the elasticity threshold detection moving constantly up or down. The existing work fails to deliver sequential integrity of asynchronous messages processing and the asymmetries of data distribution to achieve parallel consumption. This paper fills this gaps and proposes a middleware solution to dynamically analyze the flow of message queue, and a mechanism to increase the parallelized consumption based on the output behavior. An architecture for IOD (Increase On Demand) middleware is presented, with support for the increase and decrease of thread's to cope with the growth of message queues, using the technique of limit-based heuristics over a given period of time and grouping messages into sub-queues based on classification criteria.

  2. Sequential and combined acceleration tests for crystalline Si photovoltaic modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Chizuko; Uchiyama, Naomi; Ueno, Kiyoshi; Yamazaki, Toshiharu; Mitsuhashi, Kazunari; Tsutsumida, Akihiro; Watanabe, Jyunichi; Shirataki, Jyunko; Matsuda, Keiko

    2016-04-01

    The sequential combination test for photovoltaic modules is effective for accelerating degradation to shorten the test time and for reproducing degradation phenomena observed in modules exposed outdoors for a long time. The damp-heat (DH) test, thermal-cycle (TC) test, humidity-freeze (HF) test or dynamic mechanical load (DML) test is combined for the test modules. It was confirmed that chemical corrosion degradation or physical mechanical degradation is reproduced by the combination of the above tests. Cracks on the back sheet and delamination, often observed upon outdoor exposure, were well reproduced by the combination of DH and TC tests and TC and HF tests, respectively. Sequential DH and TC tests and DML and TC tests accelerated the degradation. These sequential tests are expected to be effective in reducing the required time of indoor testing for ensuring long-term reliability.

  3. Panoramic dynamic data acquisition system based on unmanned helicopter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yigang; Zhao, Shuguang; Lin, Zhaorong; Wen, Gaojin; Zhang, Qian; Zhang, Weiwei

    2012-10-01

    In recent years, the archaeological tourism has rapidly been developed all over the world, and it has become more and more popular. However, the scope of the human activities has been restricted by complicated geographical terrain, and the popularization of archaeological tourism has been hampered. For the purpose of solving the above problem, the archaeological tourism system of the panoramic dynamic data acquisition system based on unmanned helicopter is designed, and we got the image of the Chinese Ming Dynasty Great Wall realtime 360˚ panoramic dynamic monitor. The applying of this system will increase the scope of the archaeological tourism activities.

  4. Simulation of Naval Guns' Breechblock System Dynamics Based on ADAMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Bo; Liu, Hui-Min; Liu, Kai

    In order to study the dynamical characteristics of the breechblock system during gun firing, a virtual prototype model was established based on ADAMS, in which motion and force transmission among mechanisms are realized by collision. By simulation, kinematics and dynamics properties of main components are obtained, and the relationships between the motion of breechblock and the position of breechblock opening plate are analyzed. According to the simulation results, the collision among the breechblock opening plate and the roller is discontinuous, which may make the breechblock system fail to hitch the breechblock reliably. And within allowable scope of the structure, the breechblock opening template should be installed near the upside as much as possible.

  5. Structure and dynamics of acetate anion-based ionic liquids from molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandran, Aneesh; Prakash, Karthigeyan; Senapati, Sanjib

    2010-08-01

    Acetate anion-based ionic liquids (ILs) have found wide range of applications. The microstructure and dynamics of this IL family have not been clearly understood yet. We report molecular dynamics simulation results of three acetate anion-based ionic liquids that encompass the most common IL cations. Simulations are performed based on a set of proposed force field parameters for IL acetate anion which can be combined with existing parameters for IL cations to simulate large variety of ILs. The computed liquid density and IR spectral data for [BMIM][Ac] are found to match very well with available experimental results. The strong amino-group-associated interactions in [TMG][Ac] are seen to bring about higher cohesive energy density, stronger ion packing, and more restricted translational and rotational mobilities of the constituent ions. The IL anions are found to track the cation movements in all systems, implying that ions in ILs travel in pairs or clusters.

  6. MIMO radar 3D imaging based on combined amplitude and total variation cost function with sequential order one negative exponential form.

    PubMed

    Ma, Changzheng; Yeo, Tat Soon; Zhao, Yongbo; Feng, Junjie

    2014-05-01

    In inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) imaging, a target is usually regarded as consist of a few strong (specular) scatterers and the distribution of these strong scatterers is sparse in the imaging volume. In this paper, we propose to incorporate the sparse signal recovery method in 3D multiple-input multiple-output radar imaging algorithm. Sequential order one negative exponential (SOONE) function, which forms homotopy between 1 and 0 norms, is proposed to measure the sparsity. Gradient projection is used to solve a constrained nonconvex SOONE function minimization problem and recover the sparse signal. However, while the gradient projection method is computationally simple, it is not robust when a matrix in the algorithm is ill conditioned. We thus further propose using diagonal loading and singular value decomposition methods to improve the robustness of the algorithm. In order to handle targets with large flat surfaces, a combined amplitude and total-variation objective function is also proposed to regularize the shapes of the flat surfaces. Simulation results show that the proposed gradient projection of SOONE function method is better than orthogonal matching pursuit, CoSaMp, l1-magic, Bayesian method with Laplace prior, smoothed l0 method, and l1-ls in high SNR cases for recovery of ± 1 random spikes sparse signal. The quality of the simulated 3D images and real data ISAR images obtained using the new method is better than that of the conventional correlation method and minimum l2 norm method, and competitive to the aforementioned sparse signal recovery algorithms.

  7. Evaluation of energy expenditure in adult spring Chinook salmon migrating upstream in the Columbia River Basin: an assessment based on sequential proximate analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mesa, M.G.; Magie, C.D.

    2006-01-01

    The upstream migration of adult anadromous salmonids in the Columbia River Basin (CRB) has been dramatically altered and fish may be experiencing energetically costly delays at dams. To explore this notion, we estimated the energetic costs of migration and reproduction of Yakima River-bound spring Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha using a sequential analysis of their proximate composition (i.e., percent water, fat, protein, and ash). Tissues (muscle, viscera, and gonad) were sampled from fish near the start of their migration (Bonneville Dam), at a mid point (Roza Dam, 510 km upstream from Bonneville Dam) and from fresh carcasses on the spawning grounds (about 100 km above Roza Dam). At Bonneville Dam, the energy reserves of these fish were remarkably high, primarily due to the high percentage of fat in the muscle (18-20%; energy content over 11 kJ g-1). The median travel time for fish from Bonneville to Roza Dam was 27 d and ranged from 18 to 42 d. Fish lost from 6 to 17% of their energy density in muscle, depending on travel time. On average, fish taking a relatively long time for migration between dams used from 5 to 8% more energy from the muscle than faster fish. From the time they passed Bonneville Dam to death, these fish, depending on gender, used 95-99% of their muscle and 73-86% of their viscera lipid stores. Also, both sexes used about 32% of their muscular and very little of their visceral protein stores. However, we were unable to relate energy use and reproductive success to migration history. Our results suggest a possible influence of the CRB hydroelectric system on adult salmonid energetics.

  8. Mosquito population dynamics from cellular automata-based simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syafarina, Inna; Sadikin, Rifki; Nuraini, Nuning

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we present an innovative model for simulating mosquito-vector population dynamics. The simulation consist of two stages: demography and dispersal dynamics. For demography simulation, we follow the existing model for modeling a mosquito life cycles. Moreover, we use cellular automata-based model for simulating dispersal of the vector. In simulation, each individual vector is able to move to other grid based on a random walk. Our model is also capable to represent immunity factor for each grid. We simulate the model to evaluate its correctness. Based on the simulations, we can conclude that our model is correct. However, our model need to be improved to find a realistic parameters to match real data.

  9. Momentum-Based Dynamics for Spacecraft with Chained Revolute Appendages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Queen, Steven; London, Ken; Gonzalez, Marcelo

    2005-01-01

    An efficient formulation is presented for a sub-class of multi-body dynamics problems that involve a six degree-of-freedom base body and a chain of N rigid linkages connected in series by single degree-of-freedom revolute joints. This general method is particularly well suited for simulations of spacecraft dynamics and control that include the modeling of an orbiting platform with or without internal degrees of freedom such as reaction wheels, dampers, and/or booms. In the present work, particular emphasis is placed on dynamic simulation of multi-linkage robotic manipulators. The differential equations of motion are explicitly given in terms of linear and angular momentum states, which can be evaluated recursively along a serial chain of linkages for an efficient real-time solution on par with the best of the O(N3) methods.

  10. Dynamic contact angle of water-based titanium oxide nanofluid.

    PubMed

    Radiom, Milad; Yang, Chun; Chan, Weng Kong

    2013-06-11

    This paper presents an investigation into spreading dynamics and dynamic contact angle of TiO2-deionized water nanofluids. Two mechanisms of energy dissipation, (1) contact line friction and (2) wedge film viscosity, govern the dynamics of contact line motion. The primary stage of spreading has the contact line friction as the dominant dissipative mechanism. At the secondary stage of spreading, the wedge film viscosity is the dominant dissipative mechanism. A theoretical model based on combination of molecular kinetic theory and hydrodynamic theory which incorporates non-Newtonian viscosity of solutions is used. The model agreement with experimental data is reasonable. Complex interparticle interactions, local pinning of the contact line, and variations in solid-liquid interfacial tension are attributed to errors.

  11. Dynamic contact angle of water-based titanium oxide nanofluid

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation into spreading dynamics and dynamic contact angle of TiO2-deionized water nanofluids. Two mechanisms of energy dissipation, (1) contact line friction and (2) wedge film viscosity, govern the dynamics of contact line motion. The primary stage of spreading has the contact line friction as the dominant dissipative mechanism. At the secondary stage of spreading, the wedge film viscosity is the dominant dissipative mechanism. A theoretical model based on combination of molecular kinetic theory and hydrodynamic theory which incorporates non-Newtonian viscosity of solutions is used. The model agreement with experimental data is reasonable. Complex interparticle interactions, local pinning of the contact line, and variations in solid–liquid interfacial tension are attributed to errors. PMID:23759071

  12. Evaluation of Landsat-4 orbit determination accuracy using batch least-squares and sequential methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oza, D. H.; Jones, T. L.; Feiertag, R.; Samii, M. V.; Doll, C. E.; Mistretta, G. D.; Hart, R. C.

    1993-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Flight Dynamics Division (FDD) commissioned Applied Technology Associates, Incorporated, to develop the Real-Time Orbit Determination/Enhanced (RTOD/E) system on a Disk Operating System (DOS)-based personal computer (PC) as a prototype system for sequential orbit determination of spacecraft. This paper presents the results of a study to compare the orbit determination accuracy for a Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS) System (TDRSS) user spacecraft, Landsat-4, obtained using RTOD/E, operating on a PC, with the accuracy of an established batch least-squares system, the Goddard Trajectory Determination System (GTDS), operating on a mainframe computer. The results of Landsat-4 orbit determination will provide useful experience for the Earth Observing System (EOS) series of satellites. The Landsat-4 ephemerides were estimated for the May 18-24, 1992, timeframe, during which intensive TDRSS tracking data for Landsat-4 were available. During this period, there were two separate orbit-adjust maneuvers on one of the TDRSS spacecraft (TDRS-East) and one small orbit-adjust maneuver for Landsat-4. Independent assessments were made of the consistencies (overlap comparisons for the batch case and covariances and the first measurement residuals for the sequential case) of solutions produced by the batch and sequential methods. The forward-filtered RTOD/E orbit solutions were compared with the definitive GTDS orbit solutions for Landsat-4; the solution differences were generally less than 30 meters after the filter had reached steady state.

  13. Hybrid Model Predictive Control for Sequential Decision Policies in Adaptive Behavioral Interventions.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yuwen; Deshpande, Sunil; Rivera, Daniel E; Downs, Danielle S; Savage, Jennifer S

    2014-06-01

    Control engineering offers a systematic and efficient method to optimize the effectiveness of individually tailored treatment and prevention policies known as adaptive or "just-in-time" behavioral interventions. The nature of these interventions requires assigning dosages at categorical levels, which has been addressed in prior work using Mixed Logical Dynamical (MLD)-based hybrid model predictive control (HMPC) schemes. However, certain requirements of adaptive behavioral interventions that involve sequential decision making have not been comprehensively explored in the literature. This paper presents an extension of the traditional MLD framework for HMPC by representing the requirements of sequential decision policies as mixed-integer linear constraints. This is accomplished with user-specified dosage sequence tables, manipulation of one input at a time, and a switching time strategy for assigning dosages at time intervals less frequent than the measurement sampling interval. A model developed for a gestational weight gain (GWG) intervention is used to illustrate the generation of these sequential decision policies and their effectiveness for implementing adaptive behavioral interventions involving multiple components.

  14. Sequential nonadiabatic excitation of large molecules and ions driven by strong laser fields

    SciTech Connect

    Markevitch, Alexei N.; Levis, Robert J.; Romanov, Dmitri A.; Smith, Stanley M.; Schlegel, H. Bernhard; Ivanov, Misha Yu.

    2004-01-01

    Electronic processes leading to dissociative ionization of polyatomic molecules in strong laser fields are investigated experimentally, theoretically, and numerically. Using time-of-flight ion mass spectroscopy, we study the dependence of fragmentation on laser intensity for a series of related molecules and report regular trends in this dependence on the size, symmetry, and electronic structure of a molecule. Based on these data, we develop a model of dissociative ionization of polyatomic molecules in intense laser fields. The model is built on three elements: (i) nonadiabatic population transfer from the ground electronic state to the excited-state manifold via a doorway (charge-transfer) transition; (ii) exponential enhancement of this transition by collective dynamic polarization of all electrons, and (iii) sequential energy deposition in both neutral molecules and resulting molecular ions. The sequential nonadiabatic excitation is accelerated by a counterintuitive increase of a large molecule's polarizability following its ionization. The generic theory of sequential nonadiabatic excitation forms a basis for quantitative description of various nonlinear processes in polyatomic molecules and ions in strong laser fields.

  15. Comparison of ERBS orbit determination accuracy using batch least-squares and sequential methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oza, D. H.; Jones, T. L.; Fabien, S. M.; Mistretta, G. D.; Hart, R. C.; Doll, C. E.

    1991-01-01

    The Flight Dynamics Div. (FDD) at NASA-Goddard commissioned a study to develop the Real Time Orbit Determination/Enhanced (RTOD/E) system as a prototype system for sequential orbit determination of spacecraft on a DOS based personal computer (PC). An overview is presented of RTOD/E capabilities and the results are presented of a study to compare the orbit determination accuracy for a Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) user spacecraft obtained using RTOS/E on a PC with the accuracy of an established batch least squares system, the Goddard Trajectory Determination System (GTDS), operating on a mainframe computer. RTOD/E was used to perform sequential orbit determination for the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS), and the Goddard Trajectory Determination System (GTDS) was used to perform the batch least squares orbit determination. The estimated ERBS ephemerides were obtained for the Aug. 16 to 22, 1989, timeframe, during which intensive TDRSS tracking data for ERBS were available. Independent assessments were made to examine the consistencies of results obtained by the batch and sequential methods. Comparisons were made between the forward filtered RTOD/E orbit solutions and definitive GTDS orbit solutions for ERBS; the solution differences were less than 40 meters after the filter had reached steady state.

  16. TDRSS-user orbit determination using batch least-squares and sequential methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oza, D. H.; Jones, T. L.; Hakimi, M.; Samii, Mina V.; Doll, C. E.; Mistretta, G. D.; Hart, R. C.

    1993-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Flight Dynamics Division (FDD) commissioned Applied Technology Associates, Incorporated, to develop the Real-Time Orbit Determination/Enhanced (RTOD/E) system on a Disk Operating System (DOS)-based personal computer (PC) as a prototype system for sequential orbit determination of spacecraft. This paper presents the results of a study to compare the orbit determination accuracy for a Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) user spacecraft, Landsat-4, obtained using RTOD/E, operating on a PC, with the accuracy of an established batch least-squares system, the Goddard Trajectory Determination System (GTDS), and operating on a mainframe computer. The results of Landsat-4 orbit determination will provide useful experience for the Earth Observing System (EOS) series of satellites. The Landsat-4 ephemerides were estimated for the January 17-23, 1991, timeframe, during which intensive TDRSS tracking data for Landsat-4 were available. Independent assessments were made of the consistencies (overlap comparisons for the batch case and covariances and the first measurement residuals for the sequential case) of solutions produced by the batch and sequential methods. The forward-filtered RTOD/E orbit solutions were compared with the definitive GTDS orbit solutions for Landsat-4; the solution differences were less than 40 meters after the filter had reached steady state.

  17. Evaluation of Landsat-4 orbit determination accuracy using batch least-squares and sequential methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oza, D. H.; Jones, T. L.; Feiertag, R.; Samii, M. V.; Doll, C. E.; Mistretta, G. D.; Hart, R. C.

    1993-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Flight Dynamics Division (FDD) commissioned Applied Technology Associates, Incorporated, to develop the Real-Time Orbit Determination/Enhanced (RTOD/E) system on a Disk Operating System (DOS)-based personal computer (PC) as a prototype system for sequential orbit determination of spacecraft. This paper presents the results of a study to compare the orbit determination accuracy for a Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS) System (TDRSS) user spacecraft, Landsat-4, obtained using RTOD/E, operating on a PC, with the accuracy of an established batch least-squares system, the Goddard Trajectory Determination System (GTDS), operating on a mainframe computer. The results of Landsat-4 orbit determination will provide useful experience for the Earth Observing System (EOS) series of satellites. The Landsat-4 ephemerides were estimated for the May 18-24, 1992, timeframe, during which intensive TDRSS tracking data for Landsat-4 were available. During this period, there were two separate orbit-adjust maneuvers on one of the TDRSS spacecraft (TDRS-East) and one small orbit-adjust maneuver for Landsat-4. Independent assessments were made of the consistencies (overlap comparisons for the batch case and covariances and the first measurement residuals for the sequential case) of solutions produced by the batch and sequential methods. The forward-filtered RTOD/E orbit solutions were compared with the definitive GTDS orbit solutions for Landsat-4; the solution differences were generally less than 30 meters after the filter had reached steady state.

  18. Sequential decision rules for failure detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, E. Y.; Willsky, A. S.

    1981-01-01

    The formulation of the decision making of a failure detection process as a Bayes sequential decision problem (BSDP) provides a simple conceptualization of the decision rule design problem. As the optimal Bayes rule is not computable, a methodology that is based on the Baysian approach and aimed at a reduced computational requirement is developed for designing suboptimal rules. A numerical algorithm is constructed to facilitate the design and performance evaluation of these suboptimal rules. The result of applying this design methodology to an example shows that this approach is a useful one.

  19. Sequential decision rules for failure detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, E. Y.; Willsky, A. S.

    1981-01-01

    The formulation of the decision making of a failure detection process as a Bayes sequential decision problem (BSDP) provides a simple conceptualization of the decision rule design problem. As the optimal Bayes rule is not computable, a methodology that is based on the Baysian approach and aimed at a reduced computational requirement is developed for designing suboptimal rules. A numerical algorithm is constructed to facilitate the design and performance evaluation of these suboptimal rules. The result of applying this design methodology to an example shows that this approach is a useful one.

  20. Trotter-based simulation of quantum-classical dynamics.

    PubMed

    Kernan, Dónal Mac; Ciccotti, Giovanni; Kapral, Raymond

    2008-01-17

    Quantum rate processes in condensed phase systems are often computed by combining quantum and classical descriptions of the dynamics. An algorithm for simulating the quantum-classical Liouville equation, which describes the dynamics of a quantum subsystem coupled to a classical bath, is presented in this paper. The algorithm is based on a Trotter decomposition of the quantum-classical propagator, in conjunction with Monte Carlo sampling of quantum transitions, to yield a surface-hopping representation of the dynamics. An expression for the nonadiabatic propagator that is responsible for quantum transitions and associated bath momentum changes is derived in a form that is convenient for Monte Carlo sampling and exactly conserves the total energy of the system in individual trajectories. The expectation values of operators or quantum correlation functions can be evaluated by initial sampling of quantum states and use of quantum-classical Liouville dynamics for the time evolution. The algorithm is tested by calculations on the spin-boson model, for which exact quantum results are available, and is shown to reproduce the exact results for stronger nonadiabatic coupling and much longer times using fewer trajectories than other schemes for simulating quantum-classical Liouville dynamics.

  1. Sequential state generation by model neural networks.

    PubMed Central

    Kleinfeld, D

    1986-01-01

    Sequential patterns of neural output activity form the basis of many biological processes, such as the cyclic pattern of outputs that control locomotion. I show how such sequences can be generated by a class of model neural networks that make defined sets of transitions between selected memory states. Sequence-generating networks depend upon the interplay between two sets of synaptic connections. One set acts to stabilize the network in its current memory state, while the second set, whose action is delayed in time, causes the network to make specified transitions between the memories. The dynamic properties of these networks are described in terms of motion along an energy surface. The performance of the networks, both with intact connections and with noisy or missing connections, is illustrated by numerical examples. In addition, I present a scheme for the recognition of externally generated sequences by these networks. PMID:3467316

  2. Efficient Surgical Cutting with Position-Based Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Berndt, Iago; Torchelsen, Rafael; Maciel, Anderson

    2017-01-01

    Simulations of cuts on deformable bodies have been an active research subject for more than two decades. However, previous works based on finite element methods and mass spring meshes cannot scale to complex surgical scenarios. This article presents a novel method that uses position-based dynamics (PBD) for mesh-free cutting simulation. The proposed solutions include a method to efficiently render force feedback while cutting, an efficient heat diffusion model to simulate electrocautery, and a novel adaptive skinning scheme based on oriented particles.https://extras.computer.org/extra/mcg2017030024s1.mp4.

  3. Dynamics of individual polymers using microfluidic based microcurvilinear flow.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chao-Min; Kim, Yongtae; Yang, Jui-Ming; Leuba, Sanford H; Leduc, Philip R

    2009-08-21

    Polymer dynamics play an important role in a diversity of fields including materials science, physics, biology and medicine. The spatiotemporal responses of individual molecules such as biopolymers have been critical to the development of new materials, the expanded understanding of cell structures including cytoskeletal dynamics, and DNA replication. The ability to probe single molecule dynamics however is often limited by the availability of small-scale technologies that can manipulate these systems to uncover highly intricate behaviors. Advances in micro- and nano-scale technologies have simultaneously provided us with valuable tools that can interface with these systems including methods such as microfluidics. Here, we report on the creation of micro-curvilinear flow through a small-scale fluidic approach, which we have been used to impose a flow-based high radial acceleration ( approximately 10(3) g) on individual flexible polymers. We were able to employ this microfluidic-based approach to adjust and control flow velocity and acceleration to observe real-time dynamics of fluorescently labeled lambda-phage DNA molecules in our device. This allowed us to impose mechanical stimulation including stretching and bending on single molecules in localized regimes through a simple and straightforward technology-based method. We found that the flexible DNA molecules exhibited multimodal responses including distinct conformations and controllable curvatures; these characteristics were directly related to both the elongation and bending dynamics dictated by their locations within the curvilinear flow. We analyzed the dynamics of these individual molecules to determine their elongation strain rates and curvatures ( approximately 0.09 microm(-1)) at different locations in this system to probe the individual polymer structural response. These results demonstrate our ability to create high radial acceleration flow and observe real-time dynamic responses applied directly to

  4. Superelement model based parallel algorithm for vehicle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, O. P.; Danhof, K. J.; Kumar, R.

    1994-05-01

    This paper presents a superelement model based parallel algorithm for a planar vehicle dynamics. The vehicle model is made up of a chassis and two suspension systems each of which consists of an axle-wheel assembly and two trailing arms. In this model, the chassis is treated as a Cartesian element and each suspension system is treated as a superelement. The parameters associated with the superelements are computed using an inverse dynamics technique. Suspension shock absorbers and the tires are modeled by nonlinear springs and dampers. The Euler-Lagrange approach is used to develop the system equations of motion. This leads to a system of differential and algebraic equations in which the constraints internal to superelements appear only explicitly. The above formulation is implemented on a multiprocessor machine. The numerical flow chart is divided into modules and the computation of several modules is performed in parallel to gain computational efficiency. In this implementation, the master (parent processor) creates a pool of slaves (child processors) at the beginning of the program. The slaves remain in the pool until they are needed to perform certain tasks. Upon completion of a particular task, a slave returns to the pool. This improves the overall response time of the algorithm. The formulation presented is general which makes it attractive for a general purpose code development. Speedups obtained in the different modules of the dynamic analysis computation are also presented. Results show that the superelement model based parallel algorithm can significantly reduce the vehicle dynamics simulation time.

  5. Optimizing legacy molecular dynamics software with directive-based offload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael Brown, W.; Carrillo, Jan-Michael Y.; Gavhane, Nitin; Thakkar, Foram M.; Plimpton, Steven J.

    2015-10-01

    Directive-based programming models are one solution for exploiting many-core coprocessors to increase simulation rates in molecular dynamics. They offer the potential to reduce code complexity with offload models that can selectively target computations to run on the CPU, the coprocessor, or both. In this paper, we describe modifications to the LAMMPS molecular dynamics code to enable concurrent calculations on a CPU and coprocessor. We demonstrate that standard molecular dynamics algorithms can run efficiently on both the CPU and an x86-based coprocessor using the same subroutines. As a consequence, we demonstrate that code optimizations for the coprocessor also result in speedups on the CPU; in extreme cases up to 4.7X. We provide results for LAMMPS benchmarks and for production molecular dynamics simulations using the Stampede hybrid supercomputer with both Intel® Xeon Phi™ coprocessors and NVIDIA GPUs. The optimizations presented have increased simulation rates by over 2X for organic molecules and over 7X for liquid crystals on Stampede. The optimizations are available as part of the "Intel package" supplied with LAMMPS.

  6. Droplet-based microfluidics and the dynamics of emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baret, Jean-Christophe; Brosseau, Quentin; Semin, Benoit; Qu, Xiaopeng

    2012-02-01

    Emulsions are complex fluids already involved for a long time in a wide-range of industrial processes, such as, for example, food, cosmetics or materials synthesis [1]. More recently, applications of emulsions have been extended to new fields like biotechnology or biochemistry where the compartmentalization of compounds in emulsion droplets is used to parallelise (bio-) chemical reactions [2]. Interestingly, these applications pinpoint to fundamental questions dealing with surfactant dynamics, dynamic surface tension, hydrodynamic interactions and electrohydrodynamics. Droplet-based microfluidics is a very powerful tool to quantitatively study the dynamics of emulsions at the single droplet level or even at the single interface level: well-controlled emulsions are produced and manipulated using hydrodynamics, electrical forces, optical actuation and combination of these effects. We will describe here how droplet-based microfluidics is used to extract quantitative informations on the physical-chemistry of emulsions for a better understanding and control of the dynamics of these systems [3].[4pt] [1] J. Bibette et al. Rep. Prog. Phys., 62, 969-1033 (1999)[0pt] [2] A. Theberge et al., Angewandte Chemie Int. Ed. 49, 5846 (2010)[0pt] [3] J.-C. Baret et al., Langmuir, 25, 6088 (2009)

  7. Optimizing legacy molecular dynamics software with directive-based offload

    DOE PAGES

    Michael Brown, W.; Carrillo, Jan-Michael Y.; Gavhane, Nitin; ...

    2015-05-14

    The directive-based programming models are one solution for exploiting many-core coprocessors to increase simulation rates in molecular dynamics. They offer the potential to reduce code complexity with offload models that can selectively target computations to run on the CPU, the coprocessor, or both. In our paper, we describe modifications to the LAMMPS molecular dynamics code to enable concurrent calculations on a CPU and coprocessor. We also demonstrate that standard molecular dynamics algorithms can run efficiently on both the CPU and an x86-based coprocessor using the same subroutines. As a consequence, we demonstrate that code optimizations for the coprocessor also resultmore » in speedups on the CPU; in extreme cases up to 4.7X. We provide results for LAMMAS benchmarks and for production molecular dynamics simulations using the Stampede hybrid supercomputer with both Intel (R) Xeon Phi (TM) coprocessors and NVIDIA GPUs: The optimizations presented have increased simulation rates by over 2X for organic molecules and over 7X for liquid crystals on Stampede. The optimizations are available as part of the "Intel package" supplied with LAMMPS. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.« less

  8. Optimizing legacy molecular dynamics software with directive-based offload

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Brown, W.; Carrillo, Jan-Michael Y.; Gavhane, Nitin; Thakkar, Foram M.; Plimpton, Steven J.

    2015-05-14

    The directive-based programming models are one solution for exploiting many-core coprocessors to increase simulation rates in molecular dynamics. They offer the potential to reduce code complexity with offload models that can selectively target computations to run on the CPU, the coprocessor, or both. In our paper, we describe modifications to the LAMMPS molecular dynamics code to enable concurrent calculations on a CPU and coprocessor. We also demonstrate that standard molecular dynamics algorithms can run efficiently on both the CPU and an x86-based coprocessor using the same subroutines. As a consequence, we demonstrate that code optimizations for the coprocessor also result in speedups on the CPU; in extreme cases up to 4.7X. We provide results for LAMMAS benchmarks and for production molecular dynamics simulations using the Stampede hybrid supercomputer with both Intel (R) Xeon Phi (TM) coprocessors and NVIDIA GPUs: The optimizations presented have increased simulation rates by over 2X for organic molecules and over 7X for liquid crystals on Stampede. The optimizations are available as part of the "Intel package" supplied with LAMMPS. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Dynamic reasoning in a knowledge-based system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Anand S.; Foo, Norman Y.

    1988-01-01

    Any space based system, whether it is a robot arm assembling parts in space or an onboard system monitoring the space station, has to react to changes which cannot be foreseen. As a result, apart from having domain-specific knowledge as in current expert systems, a space based AI system should also have general principles of change. This paper presents a modal logic which can not only represent change but also reason with it. Three primitive operations, expansion, contraction and revision are introduced and axioms which specify how the knowledge base should change when the external world changes are also specified. Accordingly the notion of dynamic reasoning is introduced, which unlike the existing forms of reasoning, provide general principles of change. Dynamic reasoning is based on two main principles, namely minimize change and maximize coherence. A possible-world semantics which incorporates the above two principles is also discussed. The paper concludes by discussing how the dynamic reasoning system can be used to specify actions and hence form an integral part of an autonomous reasoning and planning system.

  10. Prediction-based dynamic load-sharing heuristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goswami, Kumar K.; Devarakonda, Murthy; Iyer, Ravishankar K.

    1993-01-01

    The authors present dynamic load-sharing heuristics that use predicted resource requirements of processes to manage workloads in a distributed system. A previously developed statistical pattern-recognition method is employed for resource prediction. While nonprediction-based heuristics depend on a rapidly changing system status, the new heuristics depend on slowly changing program resource usage patterns. Furthermore, prediction-based heuristics can be more effective since they use future requirements rather than just the current system state. Four prediction-based heuristics, two centralized and two distributed, are presented. Using trace driven simulations, they are compared against random scheduling and two effective nonprediction based heuristics. Results show that the prediction-based centralized heuristics achieve up to 30 percent better response times than the nonprediction centralized heuristic, and that the prediction-based distributed heuristics achieve up to 50 percent improvements relative to their nonprediction counterpart.

  11. Multiplexed protein profiling by sequential affinity capture

    PubMed Central

    Ayoglu, Burcu; Birgersson, Elin; Mezger, Anja; Nilsson, Mats; Uhlén, Mathias; Nilsson, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Antibody microarrays enable parallelized and miniaturized analysis of clinical samples, and have proven to provide novel insights for the analysis of different proteomes. However, there are concerns that the performance of such direct labeling and single antibody assays are prone to off‐target binding due to the sample context. To improve selectivity and sensitivity while maintaining the possibility to conduct multiplexed protein profiling, we developed a multiplexed and semi‐automated sequential capture assay. This novel bead‐based procedure encompasses a first antigen capture, labeling of captured protein targets on magnetic particles, combinatorial target elution and a read‐out by a secondary capture bead array. We demonstrate in a proof‐of‐concept setting that target detection via two sequential affinity interactions reduced off‐target contribution, while lowered background and noise levels, improved correlation to clinical values compared to single binder assays. We also compared sensitivity levels with single binder and classical sandwich assays, explored the possibility for DNA‐based signal amplification, and demonstrate the applicability of the dual capture bead‐based antibody microarray for biomarker analysis. Hence, the described concept enhances the possibilities for antibody array assays to be utilized for protein profiling in body fluids and beyond. PMID:26935855

  12. On Disturbed Sequential Hypothesis Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-01

    procedures over the classical single sensor schemes. 14. SUBJECT TERMS iS NUMBER OF PAGES Sensor Fusion, Signal Processing, Detection Comunication 150...matrix. Proakis [28] described the random walk formulation approach and derived the exact distribution of the test length T and the ASN for quantized...Trans. Inform. Theory vol. IT-26, No. 2, pp. 255-259, March 1980. 141 [28] J. G. Proakis , "Exact distribution functions of test length for sequential

  13. Biological effects of fulvestrant on estrogen receptor positive human breast cancer: short, medium and long-term effects based on sequential biopsies.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Amit; Robertson, John F R; Cheung, Kwok L; Gutteridge, Eleanor; Ellis, Ian O; Nicholson, Robert I; Gee, Julia M W

    2016-01-01

    We report the first study of the biological effect of fulvestrant on ER positive clinical breast cancer using sequential biopsies through to progression. Thirty-two locally/systemically advanced breast cancers treated with first-line fulvestrant (250 mg/month) were biopsied at therapy initiation, 6 weeks, 6 months and progression and immunohistochemically-analyzed for Ki67, ER, EGFR and HER2 expression/signaling activity. This series showed good fulvestrant responses (duration of response [DoR] = 25.8 months; clinical benefit = 81%). Ki67 fell (p < 0.001) in 79% of tumours by 6 months and lower Ki67 at all preprogression time-points predicted for longer DoR. ER and PR significantly decreased in all tumours by 6 months (p < 0.001), with some declines in ER (serine 118) phosphorylation and Bcl-2 (p = 0.007). There were modest HER2 increases (p = 0.034, 29% tumours) and loss of any detectable EGFR phosphorylation (p = 0.024, 50% tumours) and MAP kinase (ERK1/2) phosphorylation (p = 0.019, 65% tumours) by 6 months. While ER remained low, there was some recovery of Ki67, Bcl-2 and (weakly) EGFR/MAPK activity in 45-67% patients at progression. Fulvestrant's anti-proliferative impact is related to DoR, but while commonly downregulating ER and indicators of its signaling and depleting EGFR/MAPK signaling in some patients, additional elements must determine response duration. Residual ER at fulvestrant relapse explains reported sensitivity to further endocrine therapies. Occasional modest treatment-induced HER2 and weakly detectable EGFR/HER2/MAPK signaling at relapse suggests targeting of such activity might have value alongside fulvestrant in some patients. However, unknown pathways must drive relapse in most. Ki67 has biomarker potential to predict fulvestrant outcome and as a quantitative measure of response.

  14. Oral Motor Intervention Improved the Oral Feeding in Preterm Infants: Evidence Based on a Meta-Analysis With Trial Sequential Analysis.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xu; Yi, Li-Juan; Zhang, Lei; Zhou, Jian-Guo; Ma, Li; Ou, Yang-Xiang; Shuai, Ting; Zeng, Zi; Song, Guo-Min

    2015-08-01

    Oral feeding for preterm infants has been a thorny problem worldwide. To improve the efficacy of oral feeding in preterm infants, oral motor intervention (OMI), which consists of nonnutritive sucking, oral stimulation, and oral support, was developed. Published studies demonstrated that OMI may be as an alternative treatment to solve this problem; however, these results remain controversial. We conducted a meta-analysis with trial sequential analysis (TSA) to objectively evaluate the potential of OMI for improving the current status of oral feeding in preterm infants.A search of PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, the Cochrane Library, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure was performed to capture relevant citations until at the end of October, 2014. Lists of references of eligible studies and reviews were also hand-checked to include any latent studies. Two independent investigators screened literature, extracted data, and assessed the methodology, and then a meta-analysis and TSA was performed by using Reviewer Manager (RevMan) 5.3 and TSA 0.9 beta, respectively.A total of 11 randomized controlled trials (RCTs), which included 855 participants, were incorporated into our meta-analysis. The meta-analyses suggested that OMI is associated with the reduced transition time (ie, the time needed from tube feeding to totally oral feeding) (mean difference [MD], -4.03; 95% confidence interval [CI], -5.22 to -2.84), shorten hospital stays (MD, -3.64; 95% CI, -5.57 to -1.71), increased feeding efficiency (MD, 0.08; 95% CI, 0.36-1.27), and intake of milk (MD, 0.14; 95% CI, 0.06-0.21) rather than weight gain. Results of TSA for each outcomes of interest confirmed these pooled results.With present evidences, OMI can be as an alternative to improve the condition of transition time, length of hospital stays, feeding efficiency, and intake of milk in preterm infants. However, the pooled results may be impaired due to low quality included, and thus, well-designed and large RCTs

  15. Blocking for Sequential Political Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Sally A.

    2013-01-01

    In typical political experiments, researchers randomize a set of households, precincts, or individuals to treatments all at once, and characteristics of all units are known at the time of randomization. However, in many other experiments, subjects “trickle in” to be randomized to treatment conditions, usually via complete randomization. To take advantage of the rich background data that researchers often have (but underutilize) in these experiments, we develop methods that use continuous covariates to assign treatments sequentially. We build on biased coin and minimization procedures for discrete covariates and demonstrate that our methods outperform complete randomization, producing better covariate balance in simulated data. We then describe how we selected and deployed a sequential blocking method in a clinical trial and demonstrate the advantages of our having done so. Further, we show how that method would have performed in two larger sequential political trials. Finally, we compare causal effect estimates from differences in means, augmented inverse propensity weighted estimators, and randomization test inversion. PMID:24143061

  16. An investigation of dynamic processes in selenium based chalcogenide glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulbiten, Ozgur

    Owing to their excellent infrared transmittance and good rheological properties, selenium based chalcogenide glasses have been materials of choice for a number of technological applications. However, chalcogenide glasses can undergo substantial structural relaxation even at room temperature due to their low glass transition temperatures. The origins of these dynamic processes and their correlation to the glass structure is therefore of fundamental and practical interest. In particular, a deep understanding of the dynamic response near the glass transition region could help elucidate the mechanism of these structural relaxation processes. The correlation between structure and dynamic properties of selenium based glass systems were therefore investigated. NMR and Raman spectroscopy measurements reveal that the structure of Asx Se1-x glass follow the chain crossing model in selenium-rich glasses but contain increasing amounts of cage molecules in arsenic-rich compositions. This structural pattern leads to systematic extrema in physical properties at the stoichiometric composition As40Se60. The dynamic response of AsxSe1-x glasses investigated by heat capacity spectroscopy shows two minima in melt fragility as a function of composition which correlate well with the dimensionality of the glassy network. The structure evolves from 2D to 3D during crosslinking of selenium chains by arsenic but reduces into a 2D layer-like structure at the stoichiometric composition. Upon precipitation of arsenic-rich cages the network first reverts back to 3D and eventually becomes a mix of 2D and 0D structural units. The presence of molecular clusters in the network is evidenced by a strong bimodal dynamic response at high arsenic contents. NMR and Raman spectroscopy measurements of GexSe1-x glasses suggest a structure composed of aggregated tetrahedral units and long selenium chains with little or no connectivity. Distinct dynamic responses of these two separated structural motifs are

  17. Ultrafast dynamics in DNA base pairs following ultraviolet excitation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orr-Ewing, Andrew

    2015-03-01

    Photo-protective mechanisms in DNA are essential to maintain the integrity of the genetic code by preventing damage from absorption of solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation. We have used time-resolved infra-red (TRIR) spectroscopy to observe the dynamics of Watson-Crick nucleobase pairs following absorption of femtosecond UV laser pulses. The base pairs are prepared as nucleosides in solution, and photo-induced dynamics are probed in the carbonyl and N-H bond stretching regions using broadband IR pulses with picosecond time resolution. Results will be presented for the guanine-cytosine (G-C) base pair, contrasting the rapid recovery of ground-state products (the photo-protection pathway) with formation of other photoproducts which might represent photo-damage mechanisms. This work is a collaboration with the group of Prof F. Temps (Christian-Albrechts-Universitat zu Kiel). This research is supported by ERC Advanced Grant 290966 CAPRI.

  18. Tensor-based Dictionary Learning for Dynamic Tomographic Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Shengqi; Zhang, Yanbo; Wang, Ge; Mou, Xuanqin; Cao, Guohua; Wu, Zhifang; Yu, Hengyong

    2015-01-01

    In dynamic computed tomography (CT) reconstruction, the data acquisition speed limits the spatio-temporal resolution. Recently, compressed sensing theory has been instrumental in improving CT reconstruction from far few-view projections. In this paper, we present an adaptive method to train a tensor-based spatio-temporal dictionary for sparse representation of an image sequence during the reconstruction process. The correlations among atoms and across phases are considered to capture the characteristics of an object. The reconstruction problem is solved by the alternating direction method of multipliers. To recover fine or sharp structures such as edges, the nonlocal total variation is incorporated into the algorithmic framework. Preclinical examples including a sheep lung perfusion study and a dynamic mouse cardiac imaging demonstrate that the proposed approach outperforms the vectorized dictionary-based CT reconstruction in the case of few-view reconstruction. PMID:25779991

  19. Percolation-based precursors of transitions in dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez Mendez, Victor Manuel; Eguiluz, Victor M.; Ramasco, Jose J.; Hernandez-Garcia, Emilio

    2015-04-01

    Transitions in complex dynamical systems are ubiquitous in nature. Finding leading indicators in such systems is a fundamental task in many areas of science, such as financial markets, the extinction of species or climate change studies. Here we propose a new framework to study systems close to a bifurcation point by analyzing topological properties, based on clusters and percolation, of functional networks defined from the time series. The use of networks allows us for a global parametrization of the system going far beyond simple two-point relations (classical correlations). The generality and versatility of the cluster-based method to forecast transitions is shown in two different kinds of data. In one hand, three theoretical dynamical systems displaying very different transitions and crossovers were used as a test bed. On the other hand, we have used the field of surface air temperature in the NINO 3.4 zone. In this new approach, critical transitions are identified before they occur.

  20. Process-based design of dynamical biological systems

    PubMed Central

    Tanevski, Jovan; Todorovski, Ljupčo; Džeroski, Sašo

    2016-01-01

    The computational design of dynamical systems is an important emerging task in synthetic biology. Given desired properties of the behaviour of a dynamical system, the task of design is to build an in-silico model of a system whose simulated be- haviour meets these properties. We introduce a new, process-based, design methodology for addressing this task. The new methodology combines a flexible process-based formalism for specifying the space of candidate designs with multi-objective optimization approaches for selecting the most appropriate among these candidates. We demonstrate that the methodology is general enough to both formulate and solve tasks of designing deterministic and stochastic systems, successfully reproducing plausible designs reported in previous studies and proposing new designs that meet the design criteria, but have not been previously considered. PMID:27686219

  1. Tensor-based dictionary learning for dynamic tomographic reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Shengqi; Zhang, Yanbo; Wang, Ge; Mou, Xuanqin; Cao, Guohua; Wu, Zhifang; Yu, Hengyong

    2015-04-01

    In dynamic computed tomography (CT) reconstruction, the data acquisition speed limits the spatio-temporal resolution. Recently, compressed sensing theory has been instrumental in improving CT reconstruction from far few-view projections. In this paper, we present an adaptive method to train a tensor-based spatio-temporal dictionary for sparse representation of an image sequence during the reconstruction process. The correlations among atoms and across phases are considered to capture the characteristics of an object. The reconstruction problem is solved by the alternating direction method of multipliers. To recover fine or sharp structures such as edges, the nonlocal total variation is incorporated into the algorithmic framework. Preclinical examples including a sheep lung perfusion study and a dynamic mouse cardiac imaging demonstrate that the proposed approach outperforms the vectorized dictionary-based CT reconstruction in the case of few-view reconstruction.

  2. Process-based design of dynamical biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanevski, Jovan; Todorovski, Ljupčo; Džeroski, Sašo

    2016-09-01

    The computational design of dynamical systems is an important emerging task in synthetic biology. Given desired properties of the behaviour of a dynamical system, the task of design is to build an in-silico model of a system whose simulated be- haviour meets these properties. We introduce a new, process-based, design methodology for addressing this task. The new methodology combines a flexible process-based formalism for specifying the space of candidate designs with multi-objective optimization approaches for selecting the most appropriate among these candidates. We demonstrate that the methodology is general enough to both formulate and solve tasks of designing deterministic and stochastic systems, successfully reproducing plausible designs reported in previous studies and proposing new designs that meet the design criteria, but have not been previously considered.

  3. Dynamic modulation of detection window in conducting polymer based biosensors.

    PubMed

    Choong, Chwee-Lin; Milne, William I

    2010-06-15

    Here we demonstrate a novel application that employs the ion exchange properties of conducting polymers (CP) to modulate the detection window of a CP based biosensor under electrical stimuli. The detection window can be modulated by electrochemically controlling the degree of swelling of the CP associated with ion transport in and out of the polymer. We show that the modulation in the detection window of a caffeine imprinted polypyrrole biosensor, and by extension other CP based biosensors, can be achieved with this mechanism. Such dynamic modulation in the detection window has great potential for the development of smart biosensors, where the sensitivity of the sensor can be dynamically optimized for a specific test solution. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Rumor diffusion in an interests-based dynamic social network.

    PubMed

    Tang, Mingsheng; Mao, Xinjun; Guessoum, Zahia; Zhou, Huiping

    2013-01-01

    To research rumor diffusion in social friend network, based on interests, a dynamic friend network is proposed, which has the characteristics of clustering and community, and a diffusion model is also proposed. With this friend network and rumor diffusion model, based on the zombie-city model, some simulation experiments to analyze the characteristics of rumor diffusion in social friend networks have been conducted. The results show some interesting observations: (1) positive information may evolve to become a rumor through the diffusion process that people may modify the information by word of mouth; (2) with the same average degree, a random social network has a smaller clustering coefficient and is more beneficial for rumor diffusion than the dynamic friend network; (3) a rumor is spread more widely in a social network with a smaller global clustering coefficient than in a social network with a larger global clustering coefficient; and (4) a network with a smaller clustering coefficient has a larger efficiency.

  5. Chemical and Biological Dynamics Using Droplet-Based Microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Dressler, Oliver J; Casadevall I Solvas, Xavier; deMello, Andrew J

    2017-06-12

    Recent years have witnessed an increased use of droplet-based microfluidic techniques in a wide variety of chemical and biological assays. Nevertheless, obtaining dynamic data from these platforms has remained challenging, as this often requires reading the same droplets (possibly thousands of them) multiple times over a wide range of intervals (from milliseconds to hours). In this review, we introduce the elemental techniques for the formation and manipulation of microfluidic droplets, together with the most recent developments in these areas. We then discuss a wide range of analytical methods that have been successfully adapted for analyte detection in droplets. Finally, we highlight a diversity of studies where droplet-based microfluidic strategies have enabled the characterization of dynamic systems that would otherwise have remained unexplorable.

  6. Prediction-based Dynamic Energy Management in Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xue; Ma, Jun-Jie; Wang, Sheng; Bi, Dao-Wei

    2007-01-01

    Energy consumption is a critical constraint in wireless sensor networks. Focusing on the energy efficiency problem of wireless sensor networks, this paper proposes a method of prediction-based dynamic energy management. A particle filter was introduced to predict a target state, which was adopted to awaken wireless sensor nodes so that their sleep time was prolonged. With the distributed computing capability of nodes, an optimization approach of distributed genetic algorithm and simulated annealing was proposed to minimize the energy consumption of measurement. Considering the application of target tracking, we implemented target position prediction, node sleep scheduling and optimal sensing node selection. Moreover, a routing scheme of forwarding nodes was presented to achieve extra energy conservation. Experimental results of target tracking verified that energy-efficiency is enhanced by prediction-based dynamic energy management.

  7. Available Instruments for Analyzing Molecular Dynamics Trajectories

    PubMed Central

    Likhachev, I. V.; Balabaev, N. K.; Galzitskaya, O. V.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics trajectories are the result of molecular dynamics simulations. Trajectories are sequential snapshots of simulated molecular system which represents atomic coordinates at specific time periods. Based on the definition, in a text format trajectory files are characterized by their simplicity and uselessness. To obtain information from such files, special programs and information processing techniques are applied: from molecular dynamics animation to finding characteristics along the trajectory (versus time). In this review, we describe different programs for processing molecular dynamics trajectories. The performance of these programs, usefulness for analyses of molecular dynamics trajectories, strong and weak aspects are discussed. PMID:27053964

  8. Structure and dynamics of aqueous solutions from PBE-based first-principles molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Tuan Anh; Ogitsu, Tadashi; Lau, Edmond Y.; Schwegler, Eric

    2016-10-01

    Establishing an accurate and predictive computational framework for the description of complex aqueous solutions is an ongoing challenge for density functional theory based first-principles molecular dynamics (FPMD) simulations. In this context, important advances have been made in recent years, including the development of sophisticated exchange-correlation functionals. On the other hand, simulations based on simple generalized gradient approximation (GGA) functionals remain an active field, particularly in the study of complex aqueous solutions due to a good balance between the accuracy, computational expense, and the applicability to a wide range of systems. Such simulations are often performed at elevated temperatures to artificially "correct" for GGA inaccuracies in the description of liquid water; however, a detailed understanding of how the choice of temperature affects the structure and dynamics of other components, such as solvated ions, is largely unknown. To address this question, we carried out a series of FPMD simulations at temperatures ranging from 300 to 460 K for liquid water and three representative aqueous solutions containing solvated Na+, K+, and Cl- ions. We show that simulations at 390-400 K with the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) exchange-correlation functional yield water structure and dynamics in good agreement with experiments at ambient conditions. Simultaneously, this computational setup provides ion solvation structures and ion effects on water dynamics consistent with experiments. Our results suggest that an elevated temperature around 390-400 K with the PBE functional can be used for the description of structural and dynamical properties of liquid water and complex solutions with solvated ions at ambient conditions.

  9. Structure and dynamics of aqueous solutions from PBE-based first-principles molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Pham, Tuan Anh; Ogitsu, Tadashi; Lau, Edmond Y.; Schwegler, Eric

    2016-10-17

    Establishing an accurate and predictive computational framework for the description of complex aqueous solutions is an ongoing challenge for density functional theory based first-principles molecular dynamics (FPMD) simulations. In this context, important advances have been made in recent years, including the development of sophisticated exchange-correlation functionals. On the other hand, simulations based on simple generalized gradient approximation (GGA) functionals remain an active field, particularly in the study of complex aqueous solutions due to a good balance between the accuracy, computational expense, and the applicability to a wide range of systems. In such simulations we often perform them at elevated temperatures to artificially “correct” for GGA inaccuracies in the description of liquid water; however, a detailed understanding of how the choice of temperature affects the structure and dynamics of other components, such as solvated ions, is largely unknown. In order to address this question, we carried out a series of FPMD simulations at temperatures ranging from 300 to 460 K for liquid water and three representative aqueous solutions containing solvated Na+, K+, and Cl- ions. We show that simulations at 390–400 K with the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) exchange-correlation functional yield water structure and dynamics in good agreement with experiments at ambient conditions. Simultaneously, this computational setup provides ion solvation structures and ion effects on water dynamics consistent with experiments. These results suggest that an elevated temperature around 390–400 K with the PBE functional can be used for the description of structural and dynamical properties of liquid water and complex solutions with solvated ions at ambient conditions.

  10. Structure and dynamics of aqueous solutions from PBE-based first-principles molecular dynamics simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Pham, Tuan Anh; Ogitsu, Tadashi; Lau, Edmond Y.; ...

    2016-10-17

    Establishing an accurate and predictive computational framework for the description of complex aqueous solutions is an ongoing challenge for density functional theory based first-principles molecular dynamics (FPMD) simulations. In this context, important advances have been made in recent years, including the development of sophisticated exchange-correlation functionals. On the other hand, simulations based on simple generalized gradient approximation (GGA) functionals remain an active field, particularly in the study of complex aqueous solutions due to a good balance between the accuracy, computational expense, and the applicability to a wide range of systems. In such simulations we often perform them at elevated temperaturesmore » to artificially “correct” for GGA inaccuracies in the description of liquid water; however, a detailed understanding of how the choice of temperature affects the structure and dynamics of other components, such as solvated ions, is largely unknown. In order to address this question, we carried out a series of FPMD simulations at temperatures ranging from 300 to 460 K for liquid water and three representative aqueous solutions containing solvated Na+, K+, and Cl- ions. We show that simulations at 390–400 K with the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) exchange-correlation functional yield water structure and dynamics in good agreement with experiments at ambient conditions. Simultaneously, this computational setup provides ion solvation structures and ion effects on water dynamics consistent with experiments. These results suggest that an elevated temperature around 390–400 K with the PBE functional can be used for the description of structural and dynamical properties of liquid water and complex solutions with solvated ions at ambient conditions.« less

  11. Structure and dynamics of aqueous solutions from PBE-based first-principles molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Pham, Tuan Anh; Ogitsu, Tadashi; Lau, Edmond Y; Schwegler, Eric

    2016-10-21

    Establishing an accurate and predictive computational framework for the description of complex aqueous solutions is an ongoing challenge for density functional theory based first-principles molecular dynamics (FPMD) simulations. In this context, important advances have been made in recent years, including the development of sophisticated exchange-correlation functionals. On the other hand, simulations based on simple generalized gradient approximation (GGA) functionals remain an active field, particularly in the study of complex aqueous solutions due to a good balance between the accuracy, computational expense, and the applicability to a wide range of systems. Such simulations are often performed at elevated temperatures to artificially "correct" for GGA inaccuracies in the description of liquid water; however, a detailed understanding of how the choice of temperature affects the structure and dynamics of other components, such as solvated ions, is largely unknown. To address this question, we carried out a series of FPMD simulations at temperatures ranging from 300 to 460 K for liquid water and three representative aqueous solutions containing solvated Na(+), K(+), and Cl(-) ions. We show that simulations at 390-400 K with the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) exchange-correlation functional yield water structure and dynamics in good agreement with experiments at ambient conditions. Simultaneously, this computational setup provides ion solvation structures and ion effects on water dynamics consistent with experiments. Our results suggest that an elevated temperature around 390-400 K with the PBE functional can be used for the description of structural and dynamical properties of liquid water and complex solutions with solvated ions at ambient conditions.

  12. Sequential estimation and satellite data assimilation in meteorology and oceanography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghil, M.

    1986-01-01

    The role of dynamics in estimating the state of the atmosphere and ocean from incomplete and noisy data is discussed and the classical applications of four-dimensional data assimilation to large-scale atmospheric dynamics are presented. It is concluded that sequential updating of a forecast model with continuously incoming conventional and remote-sensing data is the most natural way of extracting the maximum amount of information from the imperfectly known dynamics, on the one hand, and the inaccurate and incomplete observations, on the other.

  13. Electrical dynamic modulation of THz radiation based on superconducting metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chun; Wu, Jingbo; Jiang, Shoulu; Su, Runfeng; Zhang, Caihong; Jiang, Chengtao; Zhou, Gaochao; Jin, Biaobing; Kang, Lin; Xu, Weiwei; Chen, Jian; Wu, Peiheng

    2017-08-01

    We demonstrate an electrically tunable superconducting metamaterial capable of modulating terahertz waves dynamically. The device is based on electromagnetically induced transparency-like metamaterials, and the maximum modulation depth reaches 79.8% in the transmission window. Controlled by an electrical sinusoidal signal, such a device could achieve a modulation speed of approximately 1 MHz. The superior property and simplicity of design make this device promising for the development of high performance THz systems.

  14. Dynamic Photonic Materials Based on Liquid Crystals (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2015-0059 DYNAMIC PHOTONIC MATERIALS BASED ON LIQUID CRYSTALS (POSTPRINT) Luciano De Sio and Cesare Umeton University...ON LIQUID CRYSTALS (POSTPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-House 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 61102F 6. AUTHOR(S) (see back...10.1016/B978-0-444-62644-8.00001-7. 14. ABSTRACT Liquid crystals, combining optical non-linearity and self-organizing properties with fluidity, and being

  15. [Development of a portable dynamic state ECG based on DSP].

    PubMed

    Song, Li; Meng, Qing-jian; Zhang, Guang-yu; Cao, Wei-fang

    2009-11-01

    The Portable dynamic state electrocardiogram collecting system is introduced by using TMS302VC5402, TLC320AD50C, liquid crystal display model, and so on. This dissertation describes the work principle of the system and uses the united algorithm based on wavelet to identify and locate the ECG characteristic waves. This system has as follows of advantages: big memory, low noise,high common mode rejection ratio, the low power consume,the long record time etc.

  16. Broadband Optical Switch Based on Liquid Crystal Dynamic Scattering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-11

    technology, dynamic scattering mode ( DSM ), for use in light blocking. DSM was initially developed as a display technology in the late 1960s [3- 5 ]. However...in the 1970s a different LC technology, based on twisted nematics, [ 5 ] was shown to be superior to DSM for display applications. Research on...other technologies for optical switching. We demonstrate broadband polarization-insensitive rejection of incoming laser irradiation by 4 to 5

  17. Analysis of filter tuning techniques for sequential orbit determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, T.; Yee, C.; Oza, D.

    1995-01-01

    This paper examines filter tuning techniques for a sequential orbit determination (OD) covariance analysis. Recently, there has been a renewed interest in sequential OD, primarily due to the successful flight qualification of the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) Onboard Navigation System (TONS) using Doppler data extracted onboard the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) spacecraft. TONS computes highly accurate orbit solutions onboard the spacecraft in realtime using a sequential filter. As the result of the successful TONS-EUVE flight qualification experiment, the Earth Observing System (EOS) AM-1 Project has selected TONS as the prime navigation system. In addition, sequential OD methods can be used successfully for ground OD. Whether data are processed onboard or on the ground, a sequential OD procedure is generally favored over a batch technique when a realtime automated OD system is desired. Recently, OD covariance analyses were performed for the TONS-EUVE and TONS-EOS missions using the sequential processing options of the Orbit Determination Error Analysis System (ODEAS). ODEAS is the primary covariance analysis system used by the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Flight Dynamics Division (FDD). The results of these analyses revealed a high sensitivity of the OD solutions to the state process noise filter tuning parameters. The covariance analysis results show that the state estimate error contributions from measurement-related error sources, especially those due to the random noise and satellite-to-satellite ionospheric refraction correction errors, increase rapidly as the state process noise increases. These results prompted an in-depth investigation of the role of the filter tuning parameters in sequential OD covariance analysis. This paper analyzes how the spacecraft state estimate errors due to dynamic and measurement-related error sources are affected by the process noise level used. This information is then used to establish

  18. Synthesizing genetic sequential logic circuit with clock pulse generator.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Chia-Hua; Lin, Chun-Liang

    2014-05-28

    Rhythmic clock widely occurs in biological systems which controls several aspects of cell physiology. For the different cell types, it is supplied with various rhythmic frequencies. How to synthesize a specific clock signal is a preliminary but a necessary step to further development of a biological computer in the future. This paper presents a genetic sequential logic circuit with a clock pulse generator based on a synthesized genetic oscillator, which generates a consecutive clock signal whose frequency is an inverse integer multiple to that of the genetic oscillator. An analogous electronic waveform-shaping circuit is constructed by a series of genetic buffers to shape logic high/low levels of an oscillation input in a basic sinusoidal cycle and generate a pulse-width-modulated (PWM) output with various duty cycles. By controlling the threshold level of the genetic buffer, a genetic clock pulse signal with its frequency consistent to the genetic oscillator is synthesized. A synchronous genetic counter circuit based on the topology of the digital sequential logic circuit is triggered by the clock pulse to synthesize the clock signal with an inverse multiple frequency to the genetic oscillator. The function acts like a frequency divider in electronic circuits which plays a key role in the sequential logic circuit with specific operational frequency. A cascaded genetic logic circuit generating clock pulse signals is proposed. Based on analogous implement of digital sequential logic circuits, genetic sequential logic circuits can be constructed by the proposed approach to generate various clock signals from an oscillation signal.

  19. Dynamic fragmentation of brittle materials: analytical mechanics-based models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drugan, W. J.

    2001-06-01

    Two analytical mechanics-based models of dynamic fragmentation in brittle materials are proposed and solved to predict fragment size and time to fragmentation onset in terms of fundamental material properties and the applied strain rate. Previous widely adopted analytical models of dynamic fragmentation are based on relatively simple energy balance arguments, and assume that the fragmentation event occurs instantaneously. The present models account for the actual time-varying dynamic deformation that occurs prior to fragmentation onset. One of the models treats the fragmenting material as initially flaw-free, and determines the minimum fragment size predicted by a dynamic instability analysis. The second model accounts for initial flaw spacing (which may correlate physically with, for example, grain size), and a dynamic instability analysis is employed to determine which flaws become critical. The fragment size predictions of the present models and two previous energy-based models are found to agree at extremely high strain rates (≈5×10 7/s for dense alumina), but the present, more realistic analysis indicates that the regime of validity of the energy-based models is rather restricted. The predictions of the present models are also shown to agree with those of a recent numerical finite element simulation of dynamic fragmentation which applies to a lower strain rate regime. Comparisons of the two new models show that if a material contains initial flaws whose spacing is smaller than the predicted fragment size of an equivalent "unflawed" material, the fragment size of the preflawed material will be smaller in general, but usually not as small as the initial flaw spacing. The analysis also permits determination of the evolution of the strain rate distribution in a prospective fragment before and after fragmentation initiation; results are presented for some example cases. Finally, closed-form analytical results are derived for minimum fragment size and time to

  20. Antiferromagnetic order and spin dynamics in iron-based superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Pengcheng

    2015-07-01

    High-transition temperature (high-Tc) superconductivity in the iron pnictides or chalcogenides emerges from the suppression of the static antiferromagnetic order in their parent compounds, similar to copper oxide superconductors. This raises a fundamental question concerning the role of magnetism in the superconductivity of these materials. Neutron scattering, a powerful probe to study the magnetic order and spin dynamics, plays an essential role in determining the relationship between magnetism and superconductivity in high-Tc superconductors. The rapid development of modern neutron time-of-flight spectrometers allows a direct determination of the spin dynamical properties of iron-based superconductors throughout the entire Brillouin zone. In this paper, an overview is presented of the neutron scattering results on iron-based superconductors, focusing on the evolution of spin-excitation spectra as a function of electron and hole doping and isoelectronic substitution. Spin dynamical properties of iron-based superconductors are compared with those of copper oxide and heavy fermion superconductors and the common features of spin excitations in these three families of unconventional superconductors and their relationship with superconductivity are discussed.