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Sample records for based stereotactic radiation

  1. Hypofractionated stereotactic radiation therapy in skull base meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Navarria, Pierina; Pessina, Federico; Cozzi, Luca; Clerici, Elena; Villa, Elisa; Ascolese, Anna Maria; De Rose, Fiorenza; Comito, Tiziana; Franzese, Ciro; D'Agostino, Giuseppe; Lobefalo, Francesca; Fogliata, Antonella; Reggiori, Giacomo; Fornari, Maurizio; Tomatis, Stefano; Bello, Lorenzo; Scorsetti, Marta

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the role of hypo-fractionated stereotactic radiation treatment (HSRT) in the management of skull base meningioma. Twenty-six patients were included in the study and treated with a dose of 30 Gy in 5 fractions with volumetric modulated arc therapy (RapidArc). Eighteen patients were symptomatic before treatment. Endpoints were local toxicity and relief from symptoms. Tumors were located in anterior skull base in 4/27 cases, in middle skull base in 12/27 and in posterior skull base in 11/27. HSRT was performed as first treatment in 17 (65 %) patients, in 9 (35 %) patients it followed a previous partial resection. Median follow up was 24.5 months (range 5-57 months). clinical remission of symptoms, complete or partial, was obtained in the vast majority of patients after treatment. Out of the 18 symptomatic patients, partial remission occurred in 9 (50 %) patients and complete remission in 9 (50 %). All asymptomatic patients retained their status after treatment. No severe neurologic toxicity grade III-IV was recorded. No increase of meningioma in the same site of treatment occurred; 16 (62 %) patients had stable disease and 9 (38 %) patients had tumor reduction. The mean tumor volume after treatment was 10.8 ± 17.8 cm(3) compared with 13.0 ± 19.1 cm(3) before treatment (p = 0.02). The mean actuarial OS was 54.4 ± 2.8 months. The 1- and 2-years OS was 92.9 ± 0.7 %. HSRT proved to be feasible for these patients not eligible to full surgery or to ablative radiation therapy. Local control and durability of results suggest for a routine application of this approach in properly selected cases.

  2. [Stereotactic radiation therapy].

    PubMed

    Aristu, J J; Ciérvide, R; Guridi, J; Moreno, M; Arbea, L; Azcona, J D; Ramos, L I; Zubieta, J L

    2009-01-01

    Stereotactic radiotherapy is a form of external radiotherapy that employs a system of three dimensional coordinates independent of the patient for the precise localisation of the lesion. It also has the characteristic that the radiation beams are conformed and precise, and converge on the lesion, making it possible to administer very high doses of radiotherapy without increasing the radiation to healthy adjacent organs or structures. When the procedure is carried out in one treatment session it is termed radiosurgery, and when administered over several sessions it is termed stereotactic radiotherapy. Special systems of fixing or immobilising the patient (guides or stereotactic frames) are required together with radiotherapy devices capable of generating conformed beams (lineal accelerator, gammaknife, cyberknife, tomotherapy, cyclotrons). Modern stereotactic radiotherapy employs intra-tumoural radio-opaque frames or CAT image systems included in the irradiation device, which make possible a precise localisation of mobile lesions in each treatment session. Besides, technological advances make it possible to coordinate the lesion's movements in breathing with the radiotherapy unit (gating and tracking) for maximum tightening of margins and excluding a greater volume of healthy tissue. Radiosurgery is mainly indicated in benign or malign cerebral lesions less than 3-4 centimetres (arteriovenous malformations, neurinomas, meningiomas, cerebral metastases) and stereotactic radiotherapy is basically administered in tumours of extracraneal localisation that require high conforming and precision, such as inoperable early lung cancer and hepatic metastasis.

  3. Stereotactic radiation therapy for skull base recurrences: Is a salvage approach still possible?

    PubMed Central

    Krengli, Marco; Apicella, Giuseppina; Deantonio, Letizia; Paolini, Marina; Masini, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Aim A literature review was performed to analyse the role of stereotactic radiotherapy given in a single shot or in a fractionated fashion for recurrent skull base tumours in order to ascertain if it can be a real salvage approach. Background The management of recurrent skull base tumours can have a curative or palliative intent and mainly includes surgery and RT. Materials and methods One-thousand-ninety-one articles were found in the search databases and the most relevant of them were analysed and briefly described. Results Data on recurrences of meningioma, pituitary adenoma, craniopharyngioma, chordoma and chondrosarcoma, vestibular schwannoma, glomus jugulare tumours, olfactory neuroblastoma and recurrences from head and neck tumours invading the base of skull are reported highlighting the most relevant results in terms of local control, survival, side effects and complications. Conclusions In conclusion, it emerges that SRS and FSRT are effective and safe radiation modalities of realize real salvage treatment for recurrent skull base tumours. PMID:26696783

  4. [Linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiation treatment of patients with medial middle fossa meningiomas].

    PubMed

    Golanov, A V; Cherekaev, V A; Serova, N K; Pronin, I N; Gorlachev, G E; Kotel'nikova, T M; Podoprigora, A E; Kudriavtseva, P A; Galkin, M V

    2010-01-01

    Medial middle fossa meningiomas are challenging for neurosurgical treatment. Invasion of cranial nerves and vessels leads to high risk of complications after removal of such meningiomas. Currently methods of conformal stereotactic radiation treatment are applied wider and wider for the discussed lesions. During a 3.5-year period 80 patients with medial middle fossa meningiomas were treated in Burdenko Moscow Neurosurgical Institute using linear accelerator "Novalis". In 31 case radiation treatment was preceded by surgical resection. In majority of patients symptoms included cranial nerve dysfunction: oculomotor disturbances in 62.5%, trigeminal impairment--in 37.5%, visual deficit--in 43.8%, facial nerve palsy--in 1.25%. 74 patients underwent radiotherapy with classical fractioning, 2--in hypofractionated mode and 4 received radiosurgery. In cases of classical fractioning mean marginal dose reached 46.3 Gy during 28-33 fractions, in hypofractioning (7 fractions)--31.5 Gy, in radiosurgery--16.25 Gy. Mean follow-up period was 18.4 months (6-42 months). Control of tumor growth was achieved in 97.5% of cases (78 patients): in 42 (52.5%) lesion shrinked, in 36 (45%) stabilization was observed. Clinical examination revealed improvement of visual function in 15 patients (18%) and deterioration in 2 (2.5%). No new neuropathies were found. Stereotactic radiation treatment is the method of choice for medial anterior and middle fossa meningiomas due to effective control of tumor progression and minimal rate of complications.

  5. Isocenter verification for linac-based stereotactic radiation therapy: review of principles and techniques.

    PubMed

    Rowshanfarzad, Pejman; Sabet, Mahsheed; O'Connor, Daryl J; Greer, Peter B

    2011-11-15

    There have been several manual, semi-automatic and fully-automatic methods proposed for verification of the position of mechanical isocenter as part of comprehensive quality assurance programs required for linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery/radiotherapy (SRS/SRT) treatments. In this paper, a systematic review has been carried out to discuss the present methods for isocenter verification and compare their characteristics, to help physicists in making a decision on selection of their quality assurance routine.

  6. [Intensity-modulated radiation therapy and stereotactic body radiation therapy for head and neck tumors: evidence-based medicine].

    PubMed

    Lapierre, A; Martin, F; Lapeyre, M

    2014-10-01

    Over the last decade, there have been many technical advances in radiation therapy, such as the spread of intensity-modulated conformal radiotherapy, and the rise of stereotactic body radiation therapy. By allowing better dose-to-target conformation and thus better organs at risk-sparing, these techniques seem very promising, particularly in the field of head and neck tumors. The present work aims at analyzing the level of evidence and recommendation supporting the use of high-technology radiotherapy in head and neck neoplasms, by reviewing the available literature.

  7. Hypofractionated stereotactic radiation therapy for skull base and upper cervical chordoma and chondrosarcoma: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Gwak, Ho-Shin; Yoo, Hyung-Jun; Youn, Sang-Min; Chang, Ungkyu; Lee, Dong Han; Yoo, Seong-Yul; Rhee, Chang Hun

    2005-01-01

    Chordoma and chondrosarcoma are rare tumors of the base of the skull and are difficult candidates for surgical treatment. They are also usually resistant to conventional radiation therapy. We report preliminary results of hypofractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT) using the Cyberknife system (Accuray Inc., Sunnyvale, Calif., USA) for primary and recurrent chordomas and chondrosarcomas of the skull base and upper cervical region. Nine pathologically proven chordoma/chondrosarcoma patients underwent Cyberknife treatment, and in 4 patients Cyberknife was performed as a primary adjuvant treatment after operation. Remainder of the patients had previously received conventional radiotherapy except 1 who had received Gamma Knife treatment. The prescribed tumor dose ranged from 21 to 43.6 Gy in three to five fractions. The dosimetric characteristics were evaluated for conformity and coverage indices. Dose volume histograms of both the tumor and the critical structure were obtained, and the dose delivered to a specific volume (25, 50 and 100%) of the critical structure was calculated in each case. Mass response was measured on follow-up MRI scans. Total tumor doses of different fractionation numbers were converted into single session equivalent doses and linear quadratic equivalent doses of conventional radiation for comparison among patient groups. No significant complications were observed during the treatment and early follow-up periods except one instance of transient esophagitis and one instance of otitis. All treatment plans met the criteria for standard protocol of radiosurgery suggested by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, specifically in terms of conformity index, which ranged from 1.01 to 1.83. Three plans had a coverage index that was rated as a minor acceptable deviation. All patients were followed from 11 to 30 (median 24) months following the treatment with regular magnetic resonance images, and 4 patients showed mass reduction. Disease

  8. Computer-aided beam arrangement based on similar cases in radiation treatment-planning databases for stereotactic lung radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Magome, Taiki; Arimura, Hidetaka; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Mizoguchi, Asumi; Tokunaga, Chiaki; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Honda, Hiroshi; Ohki, Masafumi; Toyofuku, Fukai; Hirata, Hideki

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a computer-aided method for determination of beam arrangements based on similar cases in a radiotherapy treatment-planning database for stereotactic lung radiation therapy. Similar-case-based beam arrangements were automatically determined based on the following two steps. First, the five most similar cases were searched, based on geometrical features related to the location, size and shape of the planning target volume, lung and spinal cord. Second, five beam arrangements of an objective case were automatically determined by registering five similar cases with the objective case, with respect to lung regions, by means of a linear registration technique. For evaluation of the beam arrangements five treatment plans were manually created by applying the beam arrangements determined in the second step to the objective case. The most usable beam arrangement was selected by sorting the five treatment plans based on eight plan evaluation indices, including the D95, mean lung dose and spinal cord maximum dose. We applied the proposed method to 10 test cases, by using an RTP database of 81 cases with lung cancer, and compared the eight plan evaluation indices between the original treatment plan and the corresponding most usable similar-case-based treatment plan. As a result, the proposed method may provide usable beam arrangements, which have no statistically significant differences from the original beam arrangements (P > 0.05) in terms of the eight plan evaluation indices. Therefore, the proposed method could be employed as an educational tool for less experienced treatment planners.

  9. Respiratory gating based on internal electromagnetic motion monitoring during stereotactic liver radiation therapy: First results.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Per Rugaard; Worm, Esben Schjødt; Hansen, Rune; Larsen, Lars Peter; Grau, Cai; Høyer, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Intrafraction motion may compromise the target dose in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of tumors in the liver. Respiratory gating can improve the treatment delivery, but gating based on an external surrogate signal may be inaccurate. This is the first paper reporting on respiratory gating based on internal electromagnetic monitoring during liver SBRT. Two patients with solitary liver metastases were treated with respiratory-gated SBRT guided by three implanted electromagnetic transponders. The treatment was delivered in end-exhale with beam-on when the centroid of the three transponders deviated less than 3 mm [left-right (LR) and anterior-posterior (AP) directions] and 4mm [cranio-caudal (CC)] from the planned position. For each treatment fraction, log files were used to determine the transponder motion during beam-on in the actual gated treatments and in simulated treatments without gating. The motion was used to reconstruct the dose to the clinical target volume (CTV) with and without gating. The reduction in D95 (minimum dose to 95% of the CTV) relative to the plan was calculated for both treatment courses. With gating the maximum course mean (standard deviation) geometrical error in any direction was 1.2 mm (1.8 mm). Without gating the course mean error would mainly increase for Patient 1 [to -2.8 mm (1.6 mm) (LR), 7.1 mm (5.8 mm) (CC), -2.6 mm (2.8mm) (AP)] due to a large systematic cranial baseline drift at each fraction. The errors without gating increased only slightly for Patient 2. The reduction in CTV D95 was 0.5% (gating) and 12.1% (non-gating) for Patient 1 and 0.3% (gating) and 1.7% (non-gating) for Patient 2. The mean duty cycle was 55%. Respiratory gating based on internal electromagnetic motion monitoring was performed for two liver SBRT patients. The gating added robustness to the dose delivery and ensured a high CTV dose even in the presence of large intrafraction motion.

  10. Imaging of Radiation Dose for Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, Timothy Y.; Almond, Peter R.; Park, Hwan C.; Lindberg, Robert D.; Shields, Christopher B.

    2015-01-15

    The distributions of radiation dose for stereotactic radiosurgery, using a modified linear accelerator (Philips SL-25 and SRS-200), have been studied by using three different dosimeters: (1) ferrous-agarose-xylenol orange (FAX) gels, (2) TLD, and (3) thick-emulsion GafChromic dye film. These dosimeters were loaded into a small volume of defect in a phantom head. A regular linac stereotactic radiosurgery treatment was then given to the phantom head for each type of dosimeter. The measured radiation dose and its distributions were found to be in good agreement with those calculated by the treatment planning computer.

  11. Image-Guidance for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fuss, Martin . E-mail: fussm@ohsu.edu; Boda-Heggemann, Judit; Papanikolau, Nikos; Salter, Bill J.

    2007-07-01

    The term stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) describes a recently introduced external beam radiation paradigm by which small lesions outside the brain are treated under stereotactic conditions, in a single or few fractions of high-dose radiation delivery. Similar to the treatment planning and delivery process for cranial radiosurgery, the emphasis is on sparing of adjacent normal tissues through the creation of steep dose gradients. Thus, advanced methods for assuring an accurate relationship between the target volume position and radiation beam geometry, immediately prior to radiation delivery, must be implemented. Such methods can employ imaging techniques such as planar (e.g., x-ray) or volumetric (e.g., computed tomography [CT]) approaches and are commonly summarized under the general term image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). This review summarizes clinical experience with volumetric and ultrasound based image-guidance for SBRT. Additionally, challenges and potential limitations of pre-treatment image-guidance are presented and discussed.

  12. Frameless LINAC-based stereotactic radiation therapy to brain metastasis resection cavity without whole-brain radiation therapy: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kaidar-Person, Orit; Zagar, Timothy M; Ewend, Matthew; Tzuk-Shina, Tzahala; Marks, Lawrence B

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to summarize the findings from the published data of frameless stereotactic radiation therapy (RT) to the resection cavity delivered with nonrobotic linear accelerator in patients with brain metastases. The studies cited in this systematic review were identified through a search of the PubMed database, using the search terms: "stereotactic [Title/Abstract]" and "Brain [Title/Abstract]," and "Metas* [Title/Abstract]." The search was unlimited to language and publication year. A total of 9 studies were included in our review. Stereotactic RT to the resection cavity appears to provide excellent local control rates that are comparable to framed stereotactic RT. There are various factors that influence local control. Distant intracranial control rates are poor with the use of postoperative stereotactic RT compared with local treatment (surgery or stereotactic RT) plus whole-brain RT. Stereotactic RT to the resection cavity appears to provide good local control rates and poor distant intracranial control. Postoperative treatment should be discussed by a multidisciplinary team and tailored to each case individually. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Stereotactic body radiation therapy for liver tumors.

    PubMed

    Maingon, P; Nouhaud, É; Mornex, F; Créhange, G

    2014-01-01

    Recent improvements in radiation therapy delivery techniques provide new tools to treat patients with liver-confined disease, either with hepatocellular carcinoma or liver metastases. An appropriate selection of the patients made during a multidisciplinary specialized tumour board is mandatory. It should be based on the disease extension, an accurate evaluation of the comorbidities and the liver functions. The added value of this approach has to be evaluated in well-designed trials, alone or in combination with other treatments such as surgery, local treatments, chemoembolization and/or chemotherapy with or without targeted agents. Stereotactic body radiation therapy should be applied under strict conditions of expertise of the radiation oncology departments, including equipment and educational training programmes. However under these conditions, preliminary results seems highly encouraging in terms of local control and tolerance but should be confirmed in large controlled prospective trials. Copyright © 2014 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Stereotactic Ablative Radiosurgery for Locally Advanced or Recurrent Skull Base Malignancies with Prior External Beam Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Karen M.; Quan, Kimmen; Clump, David A.; Ferris, Robert L.; Heron, Dwight E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) is an attractive modality to treat malignancies invading the skull base as it can deliver a highly conformal dose with minimal toxicity. However, variation exists in the prescribed dose and fractionation. The purpose of our study is to examine the local control, survival, and toxicities in SABR for the treatment of previously irradiated malignant skull base tumors. Materials and methods: A total of 31 patients and 40 locally advanced or recurrent head and neck malignancies involving the skull base treated with a common SABR regimen, which delivers a radiation dose of 44 Gy in 5 fractions from January 1st, 2004 to December 31st, 2013, were retrospectively reviewed. The local control rate (LC), progression-free survival rate, overall survival (OS) rate, and toxicities were reported. Results: The median follow-up time of all patients was 11.4 months (range: 0.6–67.2 months). The median tumor volume was 27 cm3 (range: 2.4–205 cm3). All patients received prior external beam radiation therapy with a median radiation dose of 64 Gy (range: 24–75.6 Gy) delivered in 12–42 fractions. Twenty patients had surgeries prior to SABR. Nineteen patients received chemotherapy. Specifically, eight patients received concurrent cetuximab (Erbitux™) with SABR. The median time-to-progression (TTP) was 3.3 months (range: 0–16.9 months). For the 29 patients (93.5%) who died, the median time from the end of first SABR to death was 10.3 months (range: 0.5–41.4 months). The estimated 1-year OS rate was 35%. The estimated 2-year OS rate was 12%. Treatment was well-tolerated without grade 4 or 5 treatment-related toxicities. Conclusion: Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy has been shown to achieve low toxicities in locally advanced or recurrent, previously irradiated head and neck malignancies invading the skull base. PMID:25853093

  15. Fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy improves cranial neuropathies in patients with skull base meningiomas: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Skull base meningiomas commonly present with cranial neuropathies. Fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (FSRT) has been used to treat these tumors with excellent local control, but rates of improvement in cranial neuropathies have not been well defined. We review the experience at Thomas Jefferson University using FSRT in the management of these patients with a focus on symptom outcomes. Methods We identified 225 cases of skull base meningiomas treated with FSRT at Thomas Jefferson University from 1994 through 2009. The target volume was the enhancing tumor, treated to a standard prescription dose of 54 Gy. Symptoms at the time of RT were classified based on the cranial nerve affected. Logistic regression was performed to determine predictors of symptom improvement after FSRT. Results The median follow-up time was 4.4 years. In 92% of cases, patients were symptomatic at the time of RT; the most common were impaired visual field/acuity (58%) or extraocular movements (34%). After FSRT, durable improvement of at least one symptom occurred in 57% of cases, including 40% of visual acuity/visual field deficits, and 40% of diplopia/ptosis deficits. Of all symptomatic patients, 27% experienced improvement of at least one symptom within 2 months of the end of RT. Conclusions FSRT is very effective in achieving improvement of cranial neuropathies from skull base meningiomas, particularly visual symptoms. Over half of treated patients experience a durable improvement of at least one symptom, frequently within 2 months from the end of RT. PMID:23270432

  16. Radiosensitivity Differences Between Liver Metastases Based on Primary Histology Suggest Implications for Clinical Outcomes After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Kamran A; Caudell, Jimmy J; El-Haddad, Ghassan; Berglund, Anders E; Welsh, Eric A; Yue, Binglin; Hoffe, Sarah E; Naghavi, Arash O; Abuodeh, Yazan A; Frakes, Jessica M; Eschrich, Steven A; Torres-Roca, Javier F

    2016-08-01

    Evidence from the management of oligometastases with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) reveals differences in outcomes based on primary histology. We have previously identified a multigene expression index for tumor radiosensitivity (RSI) with validation in multiple independent cohorts. In this study, we assessed RSI in liver metastases and assessed our clinical outcomes after SBRT based on primary histology. Patients were identified from our prospective, observational protocol. The previously tested RSI 10 gene assay was run on samples and calculated using the published algorithm. An independent cohort of 33 patients with 38 liver metastases treated with SBRT was used for clinical correlation. A total of 372 unique metastatic liver lesions were identified for inclusion from our prospective, institutional metadata pool. The most common primary histologies for liver metastases were colorectal adenocarcinoma (n=314, 84.4%), breast adenocarcinoma (n=12, 3.2%), and pancreas neuroendocrine (n=11, 3%). There were significant differences in RSI of liver metastases based on histology. The median RSIs for liver metastases in descending order of radioresistance were gastrointestinal stromal tumor (0.57), melanoma (0.53), colorectal neuroendocrine (0.46), pancreas neuroendocrine (0.44), colorectal adenocarcinoma (0.43), breast adenocarcinoma (0.35), lung adenocarcinoma (0.31), pancreas adenocarcinoma (0.27), anal squamous cell cancer (0.22), and small intestine neuroendocrine (0.21) (P<.0001). The 12-month and 24-month Kaplan-Meier rates of local control (LC) for colorectal lesions from the independent clinical cohort were 79% and 59%, compared with 100% for noncolorectal lesions (P=.019), respectively. In this analysis, we found significant differences based on primary histology. This study suggests that primary histology may be an important factor to consider in SBRT radiation dose selection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Dosimetric Comparison of Real-Time MRI-Guided Tri-Cobalt-60 Versus Linear Accelerator-Based Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Lung Cancer Plans.

    PubMed

    Wojcieszynski, Andrzej P; Hill, Patrick M; Rosenberg, Stephen A; Hullett, Craig R; Labby, Zacariah E; Paliwal, Bhudatt; Geurts, Mark W; Bayliss, R Adam; Bayouth, John E; Harari, Paul M; Bassetti, Michael F; Baschnagel, Andrew M

    2017-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging-guided radiation therapy has entered clinical practice at several major treatment centers. Treatment of early-stage non-small cell lung cancer with stereotactic body radiation therapy is one potential application of this modality, as some form of respiratory motion management is important to address. We hypothesize that magnetic resonance imaging-guided tri-cobalt-60 radiation therapy can be used to generate clinically acceptable stereotactic body radiation therapy treatment plans. Here, we report on a dosimetric comparison between magnetic resonance imaging-guided radiation therapy plans and internal target volume-based plans utilizing volumetric-modulated arc therapy. Ten patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer who underwent radiation therapy planning and treatment were studied. Following 4-dimensional computed tomography, patient images were used to generate clinically deliverable plans. For volumetric-modulated arc therapy plans, the planning tumor volume was defined as an internal target volume + 0.5 cm. For magnetic resonance imaging-guided plans, a single mid-inspiratory cycle was used to define a gross tumor volume, then expanded 0.3 cm to the planning tumor volume. Treatment plan parameters were compared. Planning tumor volumes trended larger for volumetric-modulated arc therapy-based plans, with a mean planning tumor volume of 47.4 mL versus 24.8 mL for magnetic resonance imaging-guided plans ( P = .08). Clinically acceptable plans were achievable via both methods, with bilateral lung V20, 3.9% versus 4.8% ( P = .62). The volume of chest wall receiving greater than 30 Gy was also similar, 22.1 versus 19.8 mL ( P = .78), as were all other parameters commonly used for lung stereotactic body radiation therapy. The ratio of the 50% isodose volume to planning tumor volume was lower in volumetric-modulated arc therapy plans, 4.19 versus 10.0 ( P < .001). Heterogeneity index was comparable between plans, 1.25 versus 1

  18. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Spinal Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Kamran A.; Stauder, Michael C.; Miller, Robert C.; Bauer, Heather J.; Rose, Peter S.; Olivier, Kenneth R.; Brown, Paul D.; Brinkmann, Debra H.; Laack, Nadia N.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Based on reports of safety and efficacy, stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for treatment of malignant spinal tumors was initiated at our institution. We report prospective results of this population at Mayo Clinic. Materials and Methods: Between April 2008 and December 2010, 85 lesions in 66 patients were treated with SBRT for spinal metastases. Twenty-two lesions (25.8%) were treated for recurrence after prior radiotherapy (RT). The mean age of patients was 56.8 {+-} 13.4 years. Patients were treated to a median dose of 24 Gy (range, 10-40 Gy) in a median of three fractions (range, 1-5). Radiation was delivered with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and prescribed to cover 80% of the planning target volume (PTV) with organs at risk such as the spinal cord taking priority over PTV coverage. Results: Tumor sites included 48, 22, 12, and 3 in the thoracic, lumbar, cervical, and sacral spine, respectively. The mean actuarial survival at 12 months was 52.2%. A total of 7 patients had both local and marginal failure, 1 patient experienced marginal but not local failure, and 1 patient had local failure only. Actuarial local control at 1 year was 83.3% and 91.2% in patients with and without prior RT. The median dose delivered to patients who experienced local/marginal failure was 24 Gy (range, 18-30 Gy) in a median of three fractions (range, 1-5). No cases of Grade 4 toxicity were reported. In 1 of 2 patients experiencing Grade 3 toxicity, SBRT was given after previous radiation. Conclusion: The results indicate SBRT to be an effective measure to achieve local control in spinal metastases. Toxicity of treatment was rare, including those previously irradiated. Our results appear comparable to previous reports analyzing spine SBRT. Further research is needed to determine optimum dose and fractionation to further improve local control and prevent toxicity.

  19. Stereotactic body radiation therapy in hepatocellular carcinoma: Optimal treatment strategies based on liver segmentation and functional hepatic reserve

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Po-Ming; Chung, Na-Na; Hsu, Wei-Chung; Chang, Feng-Ling; Jang, Chin-Jyh; Scorsetti, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Aim To discuss current dosage for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients and suggest alternative treatment strategies according to liver segmentation as defined by the Couinaud classification. Background SBRT is a safe and effective alternative treatment for HCC patients who are unable to undergo liver ablation/resection. However, the SBRT fractionation schemes and treatment planning strategies are not well established. Materials and methods In this article, the latest developments and key findings from research studies exploring the efficacy of SBRT fractionation schemes for treatment of HCC are reviewed. Patients’ characteristics, fractionation schemes, treatment outcomes and toxicities were compiled. Special attention was focused on SBRT fractionation approaches that take into consideration liver segmentation according to the Couinaud classification and functional hepatic reserve based on Child–Pugh (CP) liver cirrhosis classification. Results The most common SBRT fractionation schemes for HCC were 3 × 10–20 Gy, 4–6 × 8–10 Gy, and 10 × 5–5.5 Gy. Based on previous SBRT studies, and in consideration of tumor size and CP classification, we proposed 3 × 15–25 Gy for patients with tumor size <3 cm and adequate liver reserve (CP-A score 5), 5 × 10–12 Gy for patients with tumor sizes between 3 and 5 cm or inadequate liver reserve (CP-A score 6), and 10 × 5–5.5 Gy for patients with tumor size >5 cm or CP-B score. Conclusions Treatment schemes in SBRT for HCC vary according to liver segmentation and functional hepatic reserve. Further prospective studies may be necessary to identify the optimal dose of SBRT for HCC. PMID:26696781

  20. Repeated delayed onset cerebellar radiation injuries after linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery for vestibular schwannoma: case report.

    PubMed

    Ujifuku, Kenta; Matsuo, Takayuki; Toyoda, Keisuke; Baba, Shiro; Okunaga, Tomohiro; Hayashi, Yukishige; Kamada, Kensaku; Morikawa, Minoru; Suyama, Kazuhiko; Nagata, Izumi; Hayashi, Nobuyuki

    2012-01-01

    A 63-year-old woman presented with right hearing disturbance and vertigo. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging revealed the presence of right vestibular schwannoma (VS). Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) was performed with a tumor marginal dose of 14 Gy using two isocenters. She was followed up clinically and neuroradiologically using three-dimensional spoiled gradient-echo MR imaging. She experienced temporal neurological deterioration due to peritumoral edema in her right cerebellar peduncle and pons for a few months beginning 1.5 years after SRS, when she experienced transient right facial dysesthesia and hearing deterioration. Ten years after SRS, the patient presented with sudden onset of vertigo, gait disturbance, diplopia, dysarthria, and nausea. MR imaging demonstrated a new lesion in the right cerebellar peduncle, which was diagnosed as radiation-induced stroke. The patient was followed up conservatively and her symptoms disappeared within a few months. Multiple delayed onset radiation injuries are possible sequelae of SRS for VS.

  1. Guidelines for safe practice of stereotactic body (ablative) radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Foote, Matthew; Bailey, Michael; Smith, Leigh; Siva, Shankar; Hegi-Johnson, Fiona; Seeley, Anna; Barry, Tamara; Booth, Jeremy; Ball, David; Thwaites, David

    2015-10-01

    The uptake of stereotactic ablative body radiation therapy (SABR)/stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) worldwide has been rapid. The Australian and New Zealand Faculty of Radiation Oncology (FRO) assembled an expert panel of radiation oncologists, radiation oncology medical physicists and radiation therapists to establish guidelines for safe practice of SABR. Draft guidelines were reviewed by a number of international experts in the field and then distributed through the membership of the FRO. Members of the Australian Institute of Radiography and the Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine were also asked to comment on the draft. Evidence-based recommendations (where applicable) address aspects of departmental staffing, procedures and equipment, quality assurance measures, as well as organisational considerations for delivery of SABR treatments. Central to the guidelines is a set of key recommendations for departments undertaking SABR. These guidelines were developed collaboratively to provide an educational guide and reference for radiation therapy service providers to ensure appropriate care of patients receiving SABR. © 2015 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  2. Comparison of doses received by the hippocampus in patients treated with single isocenter- vs multiple isocenter-based stereotactic radiation therapy to the brain for multiple brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Algan, Ozer; Giem, Jared; Young, Julie; Ali, Imad; Ahmad, Salahuddin; Hossain, Sabbir

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the doses received by the hippocampus and normal brain tissue during a course of stereotactic radiation therapy using a single isocenter (SI)-based or multiple isocenter (MI)-based treatment planning in patients with less than 4 brain metastases. In total, 10 patients with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrating 2-3 brain metastases were included in this retrospective study, and 2 sets of stereotactic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans (SI vs MI) were generated. The hippocampus was contoured on SPGR sequences, and doses received by the hippocampus and the brain were calculated and compared between the 2 treatment techniques. A total of 23 lesions in 10 patients were evaluated. The median tumor volume, the right hippocampus volume, and the left hippocampus volume were 3.15, 3.24, and 2.63mL, respectively. In comparing the 2 treatment plans, there was no difference in the planning target volume (PTV) coverage except in the tail for the dose-volume histogram (DVH) curve. The only statistically significant dosimetric parameter was the V100. All of the other measured dosimetric parameters including the V95, V99, and D100 were not significantly different between the 2 treatment planning techniques. None of the dosimetric parameters evaluated for the hippocampus revealed any statistically significant difference between the MI and SI plans. The total brain doses were slightly higher in the SI plans, especially in the lower dose region, although this difference was not statistically different. The use of SI-based treatment plan resulted in a 35% reduction in beam-on time. The use of SI treatments for patients with up to 3 brain metastases produces similar PTV coverage and similar normal tissue doses to the hippocampus and the brain when compared with MI plans. SI treatment planning should be considered in patients with multiple brain metastases undergoing stereotactic treatment. Copyright © 2015 American Association of

  3. Comparison of doses received by the hippocampus in patients treated with single isocenter– vs multiple isocenter–based stereotactic radiation therapy to the brain for multiple brain metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Algan, Ozer Giem, Jared; Young, Julie; Ali, Imad; Ahmad, Salahuddin; Hossain, Sabbir

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the doses received by the hippocampus and normal brain tissue during a course of stereotactic radiation therapy using a single isocenter (SI)–based or multiple isocenter (MI)–based treatment planning in patients with less than 4 brain metastases. In total, 10 patients with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrating 2-3 brain metastases were included in this retrospective study, and 2 sets of stereotactic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans (SI vs MI) were generated. The hippocampus was contoured on SPGR sequences, and doses received by the hippocampus and the brain were calculated and compared between the 2 treatment techniques. A total of 23 lesions in 10 patients were evaluated. The median tumor volume, the right hippocampus volume, and the left hippocampus volume were 3.15, 3.24, and 2.63 mL, respectively. In comparing the 2 treatment plans, there was no difference in the planning target volume (PTV) coverage except in the tail for the dose-volume histogram (DVH) curve. The only statistically significant dosimetric parameter was the V{sub 100}. All of the other measured dosimetric parameters including the V{sub 95}, V{sub 99}, and D{sub 100} were not significantly different between the 2 treatment planning techniques. None of the dosimetric parameters evaluated for the hippocampus revealed any statistically significant difference between the MI and SI plans. The total brain doses were slightly higher in the SI plans, especially in the lower dose region, although this difference was not statistically different. The use of SI-based treatment plan resulted in a 35% reduction in beam-on time. The use of SI treatments for patients with up to 3 brain metastases produces similar PTV coverage and similar normal tissue doses to the hippocampus and the brain when compared with MI plans. SI treatment planning should be considered in patients with multiple brain metastases undergoing stereotactic treatment.

  4. [Stereotactic body radiation therapy for spinal metastases].

    PubMed

    Pasquier, D; Martinage, G; Mirabel, X; Lacornerie, T; Makhloufi, S; Faivre, J-C; Thureau, S; Lartigau, É

    2016-10-01

    After the liver and lungs, bones are the third most common sites of cancer metastasis. Palliative radiotherapy for secondary bone tumours helps relieve pain, improve the quality of life and reduce the risk of fractures. Stereotactic body radiotherapy can deliver high radiation doses with very tight margins, which has significant advantages when treating tumours close to the spinal cord. Strict quality control is essential as dose gradient at the edge of the spinal cord is important. Optimal schedule is not defined. A range of dose-fractionation schedules have been used. Pain relief and local control are seen in over 80%. Toxicity rates are low, although vertebral fracture may occur. Ongoing prospective studies will help clarify its role in the management of oligometastatic patients.

  5. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Karyn A

    2016-01-01

    The role of radiation therapy in the management of pancreatic cancer represents an area of some controversy. However, local disease progression remains a significant cause of morbidity and even mortality for patients with this disease. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is an emerging treatment option for pancreatic cancer, primarily for locally advanced (unresectable) disease as it can provide a therapeutic benefit with significant advantages for patients' quality of life over standard conventional chemoradiation. There may also be a role for SBRT as neoadjuvant therapy for patients with borderline resectable disease to allow conversion to resectability. The objective of this review is to present the data supporting SBRT in pancreatic cancer as well as the potential limitations and caveats of current studies.

  6. Complications Following Linear Accelerator Based Stereotactic Radiation for Cerebral Arteriovenous Malformations

    SciTech Connect

    Skjoth-Rasmussen, Jane; Roed, Henrik; Ohlhues, Lars; Jespersen, Bo; Juhler, Marianne

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: Primarily, gamma knife centers are predominant in publishing results on arteriovenous malformations (AVM) treatments including reports on risk profile. However, many patients are treated using a linear accelerator-most of these at smaller centers. Because this setting is different from a large gamma knife center, the risk profile at Linac departments could be different from the reported experience. Prescribed radiation doses are dependent on AVM volume. This study details results from a medium sized Linac department center focusing on risk profiles. Method and Materials: A database was searched for all patients with AVMs. We included 50 consecutive patients with a minimum of 24 months follow-up (24-51 months). Results: AVM occlusion was verified in 78% of patients (39/50). AVM occlusion without new deficits (excellent outcome) was obtained in 44%. Good or fair outcome (AVM occlusion with mild or moderate new deficits) was seen in 30%. Severe complications after AVM occlusion occurred in 4% with a median interval of 15 months after treatment (range, 1-26 months). Conclusions: We applied an AVM grading score developed at the Mayo Clinic to predict probable outcome after radiosurgery in a large patient population treated with Gamma knife. A cutoff above and below a score of 1.5 could not discriminate between the likelihood of having an excellent outcome (approximately 45%). The chance of having an excellent or good outcome was slightly higher in patients with an AVM score below 1.5 (64% vs. 57%).

  7. Optical Tracking Technology in Stereotactic Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Thomas H. . E-mail: thomas.wagner@orhs.org; Meeks, Sanford L.; Bova, Frank J.; Friedman, William A.; Willoughby, Twyla R.; Kupelian, Patrick A.; Tome, Wolfgang

    2007-07-01

    The last decade has seen the introduction of advanced technologies that have enabled much more precise application of therapeutic radiation. These relatively new technologies include multileaf collimators, 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy planning, and intensity modulated radiotherapy in radiotherapy. Therapeutic dose distributions have become more conformal to volumes of disease, sometimes utilizing sharp dose gradients to deliver high doses to target volumes while sparing nearby radiosensitive structures. Thus, accurate patient positioning has become even more important, so that the treatment delivered to the patient matches the virtual treatment plan in the computer treatment planning system. Optical and image-guided radiation therapy systems offer the potential to improve the precision of patient treatment by providing a more robust fiducial system than is typically used in conventional radiotherapy. The ability to accurately position internal targets relative to the linac isocenter and to provide real-time patient tracking theoretically enables significant reductions in the amount of normal tissue irradiated. This report reviews the concepts, technology, and clinical applications of optical tracking systems currently in use for stereotactic radiation therapy. Applications of radiotherapy optical tracking technology to respiratory gating and the monitoring of implanted fiducial markers are also discussed.

  8. Accuracy of marketing claims by providers of stereotactic radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Narang, Amol K; Lam, Edwin; Makary, Martin A; Deweese, Theodore L; Pawlik, Timothy M; Pronovost, Peter J; Herman, Joseph M

    2013-01-01

    Direct-to-consumer advertising by industry has been criticized for encouraging overuse of unproven therapies, but advertising by health care providers has not been as carefully scrutinized. Stereotactic radiation therapy is an emerging technology that has sparked controversy regarding the marketing campaigns of some manufacturers. Given that this technology is also being heavily advertised on the Web sites of health care providers, the accuracy of providers' marketing claims should be rigorously evaluated. We reviewed the Web sites of all U.S. hospitals and private practices that provide stereotactic radiation using two leading brands of stereotactic radiosurgery technology. Centers were identified by using data from the manufacturers. Centers without Web sites were excluded. The final study population consisted of 212 centers with online advertisements for stereotactic radiation. Web sites were evaluated for advertisements that were inconsistent with advertising guidelines provided by the American Medical Association. Most centers (76%) had individual pages dedicated to the marketing of their brand of stereotactic technology that frequently contained manufacturer-authored images (50%) or text (55%). Advertising for the treatment of tumors that have not been endorsed by professional societies was present on 66% of Web sites. Centers commonly claimed improved survival (22%), disease control (20%), quality of life (17%), and toxicity (43%) with stereotactic radiation. Although 40% of Web sites championed the center's regional expertise in delivering stereotactic treatments, only 15% of Web sites provided data to support their claims. Provider advertisements for stereotactic radiation were prominent and aggressive. Further investigation of provider advertising, its effects on quality of care, and potential oversight mechanisms is needed.

  9. Stereotactic body radiation therapy for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer: Executive Summary of an ASTRO Evidence-Based Guideline.

    PubMed

    Videtic, Gregory M M; Donington, Jessica; Giuliani, Meredith; Heinzerling, John; Karas, Tomer Z; Kelsey, Chris R; Lally, Brian E; Latzka, Karen; Lo, Simon S; Moghanaki, Drew; Movsas, Benjamin; Rimner, Andreas; Roach, Michael; Rodrigues, George; Shirvani, Shervin M; Simone, Charles B; Timmerman, Robert; Daly, Megan E

    This guideline presents evidence-based recommendations for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in challenging clinical scenarios in early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The American Society for Radiation Oncology convened a task force to perform a systematic literature review on 4 key questions addressing: (1) application of SBRT to operable patients; (2) appropriate use of SBRT in tumors that are centrally located, large, multifocal, or unbiopsied; (3) individual tailoring of SBRT in "high-risk" clinical scenarios; and (4) SBRT as salvage therapy after recurrence. Guideline recommendations were created using a predefined consensus-building methodology supported by American Society for Radiation Oncology-approved tools for grading evidence quality and recommendation strength. Although few randomized trials have been completed for SBRT, strong consensus recommendations based on extensive, consistent publications were generated for several questions, including recommendations for fractionation for central tumors and surgery versus SBRT in standard-risk medically operable patients with early-stage NSCLC. Lower quality evidence led to conditional recommendations on use of SBRT for tumors >5 cm, patients with prior pneumonectomy, T3 tumors with chest wall invasion, synchronous multiple primary lung cancer, and as a salvage therapy after prior radiation therapy. These areas of moderate- and low-quality evidence highlight the importance of clinical trial enrollment as well as the role of prospective data registries. SBRT has an important role to play in treating early-stage NSCLC, particularly for medically inoperable patients with limited other treatment options. Shared decision-making with patients should be performed in all cases to ensure the patient understands the risks related to SBRT, the side effects, and the alternative treatments available. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  10. Stereotactic body radiation therapy versus no treatment for early stage non-small cell lung cancer in medically inoperable elderly patients: A National Cancer Data Base analysis.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Ronica H; Liu, Yuan; Gillespie, Theresa W; Mikell, John L; Ramalingam, Suresh S; Fernandez, Felix G; Curran, Walter J; Lipscomb, Joseph; Higgins, Kristin A

    2015-12-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has demonstrated high rates of local control with low morbidity and has now emerged as the standard of care for medically inoperable, early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the impact of lung SBRT on survival in the elderly population is less clear given competing comorbid conditions. An analysis of the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) was undertaken to determine whether definitive SBRT improves survival relative to observation alone patients ages 70 years and older. The NCDB, a retrospective national database that captures approximately 70% of all patients treated for cancer, was queried for patients aged 70 years or older with early stage (T1-T3N0M0) NSCLC from 2003 to 2006. Overall survival was compared between patients who received stereotactic body radiotherapy alone and those who received no treatment. An extended Cox proportional hazards model was applied to estimate the treatment effect of SBRT. In total, 3147 patients met the selection criteria for this analysis. SBRT was delivered to 258 patients (8.2%), and 2889 patients (91.8%) received no treatment. There was no significant difference in the distribution of Charlson/Deyo comorbidity index scores between the 2 groups (P = .076). Multivariable analysis revealed improved overall survival with SBRT compared with observation for the entire cohort (hazard ratio, 0.64; P < .001). SBRT is associated with improved survival in elderly patients with early stage NSCLC who have concurrent comorbid conditions compared with observation alone. The current data support the use of SBRT for the treatment of elderly patients with early stage NSCLC who have limiting comorbid conditions. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  11. Stereotactic body radiation therapy for metastasis to the adrenal glands.

    PubMed

    Shiue, Kevin; Song, Andrew; Teh, Bin S; Ellis, Rodney J; Yao, Min; Mayr, Nina A; Huang, Zhibin; Sohn, Jason; Machtay, Mitchell; Lo, Simon S

    2012-12-01

    Many primary cancers can metastasize to the adrenal glands. Adrenalectomy via an open or laparoscopic approach is the current definitive treatment, but not all patients are eligible or wish to undergo surgery. There are only limited studies on the use of conventional radiation therapy for palliation of symptoms from adrenal metastasis. However, the advent of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) - also named stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for primary lung cancer, metastases to the lung, and metastases to the liver - have prompted some investigators to consider the use of SBRT for metastases to the adrenal glands. This review focuses on the emerging data on SBRT of metastasis to the adrenal glands, while also providing a brief discussion of the overall management of adrenal metastasis.

  12. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Boost in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Young Seok; Kim, Mi-Sook; Yoo, Sung Yul; Cho, Chul Koo; Yang, Kwang Mo; Yoo, Hyung Jun; Choi, Chul Won; Lee, Dong Han; Kim, Jin; Kim, Min Suk; Kang, Hye Jin; Kim, YoungHan

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical application of a stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) boost in locally advanced pancreatic cancer patients with a focus on local efficacy and toxicity. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 30 patients with locally advanced and nonmetastatic pancreatic cancer who had been treated between 2004 and 2006. Follow-up duration ranged from 4 to 41 months (median, 14.5 months). A total dose of 40 Gy was delivered in 20 fractions using a conventional three-field technique, and then a single fraction of 14, 15, 16, or 17 Gy SBRT was administered as a boost without a break. Twenty-one patients received chemotherapy. Overall and local progression-free survival were calculated and prognostic factors were evaluated. Results: One-year overall survival and local progression-free survival rates were 60.0% and 70.2%, respectively. One patient (3%) developed Grade 4 toxicity. Carbohydrate antigen 19-9 response was found to be an independent prognostic factor for survival. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that a SBRT boost provides a safe means of increasing radiation dose. Based on the results of this study, we recommend that a well controlled Phase II study be conducted on locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

  13. Usefulness of target delineation based on the two extreme phases of a four-dimensional computed tomography scan in stereotactic body radiation therapy for lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Seong Soon; Huh, Gil Ja; Park, Suk Young; Yang, Po Song; Cho, EunYoun

    2015-01-01

    Background An evaluation of the usefulness of target delineation based only on the two extreme phases of a four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT) scan in lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods Seventeen patients treated with SBRT via 4D CT scans for lung cancer were retrospectively enrolled. Volumetric and geometric analyses were performed for the internal target volumes (ITVs) and planning target volumes (PTVs) generated using different respiratory phases (all phases and 2 extreme phases) and setup margins (3 mm and 5 mm). Results As the setup margins were added to the ITVs, the overlap percentage between the PTVs based on all phases and the two extreme phases increased (85.1% for ITVs, 89.8% for PTVs_3 mm, and 91.3% for PTVs_5 mm), and there were no differences according to the tumor parameters, such as the gross tumor volume and 3D mobility. The missing-volume differences for ITVs derived from cone-beam CT images also decreased, with values of 5.3% between ITVs, 0.5% between PTVs_3 mm, and 0.2% between PTVs_5 mm. Compared with the plan based on all phases and a 3 mm margin, the average lung-dose differences found for the PTV based on the two extreme phases and a 5 mm margin were 0.41 Gy for the mean lung dose and 0.93% for V20. Conclusions Regardless of tumor characteristics, PTV construction based only on the two extreme phases and a 5 mm setup margin may be a useful tool for reducing the clinical workload involved in target delineation in SBRT for lung cancer. PMID:26273368

  14. Local image descriptor-based searching framework of usable similar cases in a radiation treatment planning database for stereotactic body radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonaka, Ayumi; Arimura, Hidetaka; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Soufi, Mazen; Magome, Taiki; Honda, Hiroshi; Hirata, Hideki

    2014-03-01

    Radiation treatment planning (RTP) of the stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) was more complex compared with conventional radiotherapy because of using a number of beam directions. We reported that similar planning cases could be helpful for determination of beam directions for treatment planners, who have less experiences of SBRT. The aim of this study was to develop a framework of searching for usable similar cases to an unplanned case in a RTP database based on a local image descriptor. This proposed framework consists of two steps searching and rearrangement. In the first step, the RTP database was searched for 10 cases most similar to object cases based on the shape similarity of two-dimensional lung region at the isocenter plane. In the second step, the 5 most similar cases were selected by using geometric features related to the location, size and shape of the planning target volume, lung and spinal cord. In the third step, the selected 5 cases were rearranged by use of the Euclidean distance of a local image descriptor, which is a similarity index based on the magnitudes and orientations of image gradients within a region of interest around an isocenter. It was assumed that the local image descriptor represents the information around lung tumors related to treatment planning. The cases, which were selected as cases most similar to test cases by the proposed method, were more resemble in terms of the tumor location than those selected by a conventional method. For evaluation of the proposed method, we applied a similar-cases-based beam arrangement method developed in the previous study to the similar cases selected by the proposed method based on a linear registration. The proposed method has the potential to suggest the superior beam-arrangements from the treatment point of view.

  15. A computerized framework for monitoring four-dimensional dose distributions during stereotactic body radiation therapy using a portal dose image-based 2D/3D registration approach.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Takahiro; Arimura, Hidetaka; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Mizoguchi, Asumi; Hirose, Taka-Aki; Honda, Hiroshi; Umezu, Yoshiyuki; Nakamura, Yasuhiko; Hirata, Hideki

    2015-03-01

    A computerized framework for monitoring four-dimensional (4D) dose distributions during stereotactic body radiation therapy based on a portal dose image (PDI)-based 2D/3D registration approach has been proposed in this study. Using the PDI-based registration approach, simulated 4D "treatment" CT images were derived from the deformation of 3D planning CT images so that a 2D planning PDI could be similar to a 2D dynamic clinical PDI at a breathing phase. The planning PDI was calculated by applying a dose calculation algorithm (a pencil beam convolution algorithm) to the geometry of the planning CT image and a virtual water equivalent phantom. The dynamic clinical PDIs were estimated from electronic portal imaging device (EPID) dynamic images including breathing phase data obtained during a treatment. The parameters of the affine transformation matrix were optimized based on an objective function and a gamma pass rate using a Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) algorithm. The proposed framework was applied to the EPID dynamic images of ten lung cancer patients, which included 183 frames (mean: 18.3 per patient). The 4D dose distributions during the treatment time were successfully obtained by applying the dose calculation algorithm to the simulated 4D "treatment" CT images. The mean±standard deviation (SD) of the percentage errors between the prescribed dose and the estimated dose at an isocenter for all cases was 3.25±4.43%. The maximum error for the ten cases was 14.67% (prescribed dose: 1.50Gy, estimated dose: 1.72Gy), and the minimum error was 0.00%. The proposed framework could be feasible for monitoring the 4D dose distribution and dose errors within a patient's body during treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Vemurafenib and concomitant stereotactic radiation for the treatment of melanoma with spinal metastases: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Stefan, Dinu; Popotte, Hosni; Stefan, Andreea Raluca; Tesniere, Audrey; Tomaszewski, Aurélie; Lesueur, Paul; Habrand, Jean-Louis; Verneuil, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    A 56-year-old man with BRAFV600E melanoma and spinal metastases treated with vemurafenib and stereotactic radiation showed a partial response without neurological, skin or mucosal toxicity, 8 months after completion of this combination. This case suggests that stereotactic radiation spares normal tissues and might be safer than conventional fractionated radiation with vemurafenib. PMID:26900362

  17. Vemurafenib and concomitant stereotactic radiation for the treatment of melanoma with spinal metastases: A case report.

    PubMed

    Stefan, Dinu; Popotte, Hosni; Stefan, Andreea Raluca; Tesniere, Audrey; Tomaszewski, Aurélie; Lesueur, Paul; Habrand, Jean-Louis; Verneuil, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    A 56-year-old man with BRAFV600E melanoma and spinal metastases treated with vemurafenib and stereotactic radiation showed a partial response without neurological, skin or mucosal toxicity, 8 months after completion of this combination. This case suggests that stereotactic radiation spares normal tissues and might be safer than conventional fractionated radiation with vemurafenib.

  18. Updates in outcomes of stereotactic radiation therapy in acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Gheorghiu, Monica Livia

    2017-02-01

    Purpose Treatment of acromegaly has undergone important progress in the last 20 years mainly due to the development of new medical options and advances in surgical techniques. Pituitary surgery is usually first-line therapy, and medical treatment is indicated for persistent disease, while radiation (RT) is often used as third-line therapy. The benefits of RT (tumor volume control and decreased hormonal secretion) are hampered by the long latency of the effect and the high risk of adverse effects. Stereotactic RT methods have been developed with the aim to provide more precise targeting of the tumor with better control of the radiation dose received by the adjacent brain structures. The purpose of this review is to present the updates in the efficacy and safety of pituitary RT in acromegalic patients, with an emphasis on the new stereotactic radiation techniques. Methods A systematic review was performed using PubMed and articles/abstracts and reviews detailing RT in acromegaly from 2000 to 2016 were included. Results Stereotactic radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic RT (FSRT) for patients with persistent active acromegaly after surgery and/or during medical therapy provide comparable high rates of tumor control, i.e. stable or decrease in size of the tumor in 93-100% of patients at 5-10 years and endocrinological remission in 40-60% of patients at 5 years. Hypofractionated RT is an optimal option for tumors located near the optic structures, due to its lower toxicity for the optic nerves compared to single-dose radiosurgery. The rate of new hypopituitarism varies from 10 to 50% at 5 years and increases with the duration of follow-up. The risk for other radiation-induced complications is usually low (0-5% for new visual deficits, cranial nerves damage or brain radionecrosis and 0-1% for secondary brain tumors) and risk of stroke may be higher in FSRT. Conclusion Although the use of radiotherapy in patients with acromegaly has decreased with advances in

  19. Stereotactic Radiosurgery and Fractionated Stereotactic Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Uveal Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Yazici, Gozde; Kiratli, Hayyam; Ozyigit, Gokhan; Sari, Sezin Yuce; Cengiz, Mustafa; Tarlan, Bercin; Mocan, Burce Ozgen; Zorlu, Faruk

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate treatment results of stereotactic radiosurgery or fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (SRS/FSRT) for uveal melanoma. We retrospectively evaluated 181 patients with 182 uveal melanomas receiving SRS/FSRT between 2007 and 2013. Treatment was administered with CyberKnife. According to Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study criteria, tumor size was small in 1%, medium in 49.5%, and large in 49.5% of the patients. Seventy-one tumors received <45 Gy, and 111 received ≥45 Gy. Median follow-up time was 24 months. Complete and partial response was observed in 8 and 104 eyes, respectively. The rate of 5-year overall survival was 98%, disease-free survival 57%, local recurrence-free survival 73%, distant metastasis-free survival 69%, and enucleation-free survival 73%. There was a significant correlation between tumor size and disease-free survival, SRS/FSRT dose and enucleation-free survival; and both were prognostic for local recurrence-free survival. Enucleation was performed in 41 eyes owing to progression in 26 and complications in 11. The radiation therapy dose is of great importance for local control and eye retention; the best treatment outcome was achieved using ≥45 Gy in 3 fractions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. SU-F-R-53: CT-Based Radiomics Analysis of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated with Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Huynh, E; Coroller, T; Narayan, V; Agrawal, V; Hou, Y; Romano, J; Franco, I; Mak, R; Aerts, H

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is the standard of care for medically inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients and has demonstrated excellent local control and survival. However, some patients still develop distant metastases and local recurrence, and therefore, there is a clinical need to identify patients at high-risk of disease recurrence. The aim of the current study is to use a radiomics approach to identify imaging biomarkers, based on tumor phenotype, for clinical outcomes in SBRT patients. Methods: Radiomic features were extracted from free breathing computed tomography (CT) images of 113 Stage I-II NSCLC patients treated with SBRT. Their association to and prognostic performance for distant metastasis (DM), locoregional recurrence (LRR) and survival was assessed and compared with conventional features (tumor volume and diameter) and clinical parameters (e.g. performance status, overall stage). The prognostic performance was evaluated using the concordance index (CI). Multivariate model performance was evaluated using cross validation. All p-values were corrected for multiple testing using the false discovery rate. Results: Radiomic features were associated with DM (one feature), LRR (one feature) and survival (four features). Conventional features were only associated with survival and one clinical parameter was associated with LRR and survival. One radiomic feature was significantly prognostic for DM (CI=0.670, p<0.1 from random), while none of the conventional and clinical parameters were significant for DM. The multivariate radiomic model had a higher median CI (0.671) for DM than the conventional (0.618) and clinical models (0.617). Conclusion: Radiomic features have potential to be imaging biomarkers for clinical outcomes that conventional imaging metrics and clinical parameters cannot predict in SBRT patients, such as distant metastasis. Development of a radiomics biomarker that can identify patients at high-risk of

  1. Dosimetric verification and clinical evaluation of a new commercially available Monte Carlo-based dose algorithm for application in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fragoso, Margarida; Wen, Ning; Kumar, Sanath; Liu, Dezhi; Ryu, Samuel; Movsas, Benjamin; Munther, Ajlouni; Chetty, Indrin J.

    2010-08-01

    Modern cancer treatment techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), have greatly increased the demand for more accurate treatment planning (structure definition, dose calculation, etc) and dose delivery. The ability to use fast and accurate Monte Carlo (MC)-based dose calculations within a commercial treatment planning system (TPS) in the clinical setting is now becoming more of a reality. This study describes the dosimetric verification and initial clinical evaluation of a new commercial MC-based photon beam dose calculation algorithm, within the iPlan v.4.1 TPS (BrainLAB AG, Feldkirchen, Germany). Experimental verification of the MC photon beam model was performed with film and ionization chambers in water phantoms and in heterogeneous solid-water slabs containing bone and lung-equivalent materials for a 6 MV photon beam from a Novalis (BrainLAB) linear accelerator (linac) with a micro-multileaf collimator (m3 MLC). The agreement between calculated and measured dose distributions in the water phantom verification tests was, on average, within 2%/1 mm (high dose/high gradient) and was within ±4%/2 mm in the heterogeneous slab geometries. Example treatment plans in the lung show significant differences between the MC and one-dimensional pencil beam (PB) algorithms within iPlan, especially for small lesions in the lung, where electronic disequilibrium effects are emphasized. Other user-specific features in the iPlan system, such as options to select dose to water or dose to medium, and the mean variance level, have been investigated. Timing results for typical lung treatment plans show the total computation time (including that for processing and I/O) to be less than 10 min for 1-2% mean variance (running on a single PC with 8 Intel Xeon X5355 CPUs, 2.66 GHz). Overall, the iPlan MC algorithm is demonstrated to be an accurate and efficient dose algorithm, incorporating robust tools for MC-based

  2. Cone beam CT-based set-up strategies with and without rotational correction for stereotactic body radiation therapy in the liver.

    PubMed

    Bertholet, Jenny; Worm, Esben; Høyer, Morten; Poulsen, Per

    2017-06-01

    Accurate patient positioning is crucial in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) due to a high dose regimen. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is often used for patient positioning based on radio-opaque markers. We compared six CBCT-based set-up strategies with or without rotational correction. Twenty-nine patients with three implanted markers received 3-6 fraction liver SBRT. The markers were delineated on the mid-ventilation phase of a 4D-planning-CT. One pretreatment CBCT was acquired per fraction. Set-up strategy 1 used only translational correction based on manual marker match between the CBCT and planning CT. Set-up strategy 2 used automatic 6 degrees-of-freedom registration of the vertebrae closest to the target. The 3D marker trajectories were also extracted from the projections and the mean position of each marker was calculated and used for set-up strategies 3-6. Translational correction only was used for strategy 3. Translational and rotational corrections were used for strategies 4-6 with the rotation being either vertebrae based (strategy 4), or marker based and constrained to ±3° (strategy 5) or unconstrained (strategy 6). The resulting set-up error was calculated as the 3D root-mean-square set-up error of the three markers. The set-up error of the spinal cord was calculated for all strategies. The bony anatomy set-up (2) had the largest set-up error (5.8 mm). The marker-based set-up with unconstrained rotations (6) had the smallest set-up error (0.8 mm) but the largest spinal cord set-up error (12.1 mm). The marker-based set-up with translational correction only (3) or with bony anatomy rotational correction (4) had equivalent set-up error (1.3 mm) but rotational correction reduced the spinal cord set-up error from 4.1 mm to 3.5 mm. Marker-based set-up was substantially better than bony-anatomy set-up. Rotational correction may improve the set-up, but further investigations are required to determine the optimal correction

  3. Clinical Outcomes of Biological Effective Dose-Based Fractionated Stereotactic Radiation Therapy for Metastatic Brain Tumors From Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuyama, Tomohiko; Kogo, Kasei; Oya, Natsuo

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (FSRT) based on biological effective dose (BED), a novel approach to deliver a fixed BED irrespective of dose fractionation, for brain metastases from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Between March 2005 and March 2009 we treated 299 patients with 1 to 5 lesions from NSCLC (573 total brain metastases) with FSRT using Novalis. The dose fractionation schedules were individually determined to deliver a peripheral BED10 (α/β ratio = 10) of approximately 80 Gy{sub 10}. The median number of fractions was 3 (range, 2-10), the median peripheral BED10 was 83.2 Gy (range, 19.1-89.6 Gy). Patients were followed up with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies performed at 1- to 2-month intervals. The local tumor control rate and overall local progression-free and intracranial relapse-free survival were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Local control rates for all 573 lesions at 6 and 12 months were 96.3% and 94.5%, respectively. By multivariate analysis the tumor diameter was the only factor predictive of the local control rate (P=.001). The median overall survival, local progression-free survival, and intracranial relapse-free survival were 17.1, 14.9, and 4.4 months, respectively. The overall survival, local progression-free survival, and intracranial relapse-free survival rates at 6 and 12 months were 78.5% and 63.3%, 74.3% and 57.8%, and 41.0% and 21.8%, respectively. Six patients (2%) manifested progressive radiation injury to the brain even during therapy with corticosteroids; they underwent hyperbaric oxygen therapy, and follow-up MRI showed improvement. Conclusions: This study showed that BED-based FSRT for brain metastases from NSCLC is a promising strategy that may yield excellent outcomes with acceptable toxicity. Criteria must be established to determine the optimal dose fractionation for individual patients.

  4. Normal tissue toxicity after small field hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation

    PubMed Central

    Milano, Michael T; Constine, Louis S; Okunieff, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiation (SBRT) is an emerging tool in radiation oncology in which the targeting accuracy is improved via the detection and processing of a three-dimensional coordinate system that is aligned to the target. With improved targeting accuracy, SBRT allows for the minimization of normal tissue volume exposed to high radiation dose as well as the escalation of fractional dose delivery. The goal of SBRT is to minimize toxicity while maximizing tumor control. This review will discuss the basic principles of SBRT, the radiobiology of hypofractionated radiation and the outcome from published clinical trials of SBRT, with a focus on late toxicity after SBRT. While clinical data has shown SBRT to be safe in most circumstances, more data is needed to refine the ideal dose-volume metrics. PMID:18976463

  5. Contribution of {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT to Target Volume Delineation of Skull Base Meningiomas Treated With Stereotactic Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, Reinhold; Nyuyki, Fonyuy; Steffen, Ingo G.; Michel, Roger; Fahdt, Daniel; Wust, Peter; Brenner, Winfried; Budach, Volker; Wurm, Reinhard; Plotkin, Michail

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the potential impact of {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC positron emission tomography ({sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC-PET) in addition to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) for retrospectively assessing the gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation of meningiomas of the skull base in patients treated with fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (FSRT). Methods and Materials: The study population consisted of 48 patients with 54 skull base meningiomas, previously treated with FSRT. After scans were coregistered, the GTVs were first delineated with MRI and CT data (GTV{sub MRI/CT}) and then by PET (GTV{sub PET}) data. The overlapping regions of both datasets resulted in the GTV{sub common}, which was enlarged to the GTV{sub final} by adding volumes defined by only one of the complementary modalities (GTV{sub MRI/CT-added} or GTV{sub PET-added}). We then evaluated the contribution of conventional imaging modalities (MRI, CT) and {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC-PET to the GTV{sub final}, which was used for planning purposes. Results: Forty-eight of the 54 skull base lesions in 45 patients showed increased {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC uptake and were further analyzed. The mean GTV{sub MRI/CT} and GTV{sub PET} were approximately 21 cm{sup 3} and 25 cm{sup 3}, with a common volume of approximately 15 cm{sup 3}. PET contributed a mean additional GTV of approximately 1.5 cm{sup 3} to the common volume (16% {+-} 34% of the GTV{sub common}). Approximately 4.5 cm{sup 3} of the GTV{sub MRI/CT} was excluded from the contribution to the common volume. The resulting mean GTV{sub final} was significantly smaller than both the GTV{sub MRI/CT} and the GTV{sub PET}. Compared with the initial GTV{sub MRI/CT}, the addition of {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC-PET resulted in more than 10% modification of the size of the GTV{sub final} in 32 (67%) meningiomas Conclusions: {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC-PET/CT seems to improve the target volume delineation in skull base meningiomas, often leading to a reduction of

  6. Stereotactic multibeam radiation therapy system in a PACS environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fresne, Francoise; Le Gall, G.; Barillot, Christian; Gibaud, Bernard; Manens, Jean-Pierre; Toumoulin, Christine; Lemoine, Didier; Chenal, C.; Scarabin, Jean-Marie

    1991-05-01

    A Multibeam radiation therapy treatment is a non-invasive technique devoted to treat a lesion within the cerebral medium by focusing photon-beams on the same target from a high number of entrance points. We present here a computer assisted dosimetric planning procedure which includes: (1) an analysis module to define the target volume by using 2D and 3D displays, (2) a planing module to issue a treatment strategy including the dosimetric simulations and (3) a treatment module setting up the parameters to order the robotized treatment system (i.e. chair- framework, radiation unit machine). Another important feature of this system is its connection to the PACS system SIRENE settled in the University hospital of Rennes which makes possible the archiving and the communication of the multimodal images (CT, MRI, Angiography) used by this application. The corporate use of stereotactic methods and the multimodality imagery ensures spatial coherence and makes the target definition and the cognition of the structures environment more accurate. The dosimetric planning suited to the spatial reference (i.e. the stereotactic frame) guarantees an optimal distribution of the dose computed by an original 3D volumetric algorithm. The robotic approach of the treatment stage has consisted to design a computer driven chair-framework cluster to position the target volume at the radiation unit isocenter.

  7. Gastrointestinal Toxicities With Combined Antiangiogenic and Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pollom, Erqi L.; Deng, Lei; Pai, Reetesh K.; Brown, J. Martin; Giaccia, Amato; Loo, Billy W.; Shultz, David B.; Le, Quynh Thu; Koong, Albert C.; Chang, Daniel T.

    2015-07-01

    Combining the latest targeted biologic agents with the most advanced radiation technologies has been an exciting development in the treatment of cancer patients. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is an ablative radiation approach that has become established for the treatment of a variety of malignancies, and it has been increasingly used in combination with biologic agents, including those targeting angiogenesis-specific pathways. Multiple reports have emerged describing unanticipated toxicities arising from the combination of SBRT and angiogenesis-targeting agents, particularly of late luminal gastrointestinal toxicities. In this review, we summarize the literature describing these toxicities, explore the biological mechanism of action of toxicity with the combined use of antiangiogenic therapies, and discuss areas of future research, so that this combination of treatment modalities can continue to be used in broader clinical contexts.

  8. SU-F-P-05: Initial Experience with an Independent Certification Program for Stereotactic Radiosurgery and Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Solberg, T; Robar, J; Gevaert, T; Todorovic, M; Howe, J

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The ASTRO document “Safety is no accident: A FRAMEWORK FOR QUALITY RADIATION ONCOLOGY AND CARE” recommends external reviews of specialized modalities. The purpose of this presentation is to describe the implementation of such a program for Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) and Stereotactic Body radiation Therapy (SBRT). Methods: The margin of error for SRS and SBRT delivery is significantly smaller than that of conventional radiotherapy and therefore requires special attention and diligence. The Novalis Certified program was created to fill an unmet need for specialized SRS / SBRT credentialing. A standards document was drafted by a panel of experts from several disciplines, including medical physics, radiation oncology and neurosurgery. The document, based on national and international standards, covers requirements in program structure, personnel, training, clinical application, technology, quality management, and patient and equipment QA. The credentialing process was modeled after existing certification programs and includes an institution-generated self-study, extensive document review and an onsite audit. Reviewers generate a descriptive report, which is reviewed by a multidisciplinary expert panel. Outcomes of the review may include mandatory requirements and optional recommendations. Results: 15 institutions have received Novalis Certification, including 3 in the US, 7 in Europe, 4 in Australia and 1 in Asia. 87 other centers are at various stages of the process. Nine reviews have resulted in mandatory requirements, however all of these were addressed within three months of the audit report. All reviews have produced specific recommendations ranging from programmatic to technical in nature. Institutions felt that the credentialing process addressed a critical need and was highly valuable to the institution. Conclusion: Novalis Certification is a unique peer review program assessing safety and quality in SRS and SBRT, while recognizing

  9. SU-E-T-97: An Analysis of Knowledge Based Planning for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy of the Spine

    SciTech Connect

    Foy, J; Marsh, R; Owen, D; Matuszak, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Creating high quality SBRT treatment plans for the spine is often tedious and time consuming. In addition, the quality of treatment plans can vary greatly between treatment facilities due to inconsistencies in planning methods. This study investigates the performance of knowledge-based planning (KBP) for spine SBRT. Methods: Treatment plans were created for 28 spine SBRT patients. Each case was planned to meet strict dose objectives and guidelines. After physician and physicist approval, the plans were added to a custom model in a KBP system (RapidPlan, Varian Eclipse v13.5). The model was then trained to be able to predict estimated DVHs and provide starting objective functions for future patients based on both generated and manual objectives. To validate the model, ten additional spine SBRT cases were planned manually as well as using the model objectives. Plans were compared based on planning time and quality (ability to meet the plan objectives, including dose metrics and conformity). Results: The average dose to the spinal cord and the cord PRV differed between the validation and control plans by <0.25% demonstrating iso-toxicity. Six out of 10 validation plans met all dose objectives without the need for modifications, and overall, target dose coverage was increased by about 4.8%. If the validation plans did not meet the dose requirements initially, only 1–2 iterations of modifying the planning parameters were required before an acceptable plan was achieved. While manually created plans usually required 30 minutes to 3 hours to create, KBP can be used to create similar quality plans in 15–20 minutes. Conclusion: KBP for spinal tumors has shown to greatly decrease the amount of time required to achieve high quality treatment plans with minimal human intervention and could feasibly be used to standardize plan quality between institutions. Supported by Varian Medical Systems.

  10. Helical Tomotherapy-Based STAT Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy: Dosimetric Evaluation for a Real-Time SBRT Treatment Planning and Delivery Program

    SciTech Connect

    Dunlap, Neal; McIntosh, Alyson; Sheng Ke; Yang Wensha; Turner, Benton; Shoushtari, Asal; Sheehan, Jason; Jones, David R.; Lu Weigo; Ruchala, Keneth; Olivera, Gustavo; Parnell, Donald; Larner, James L.; Benedict, Stanley H.; Read, Paul W.

    2010-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) treatments have high-dose gradients and even slight patient misalignment from the simulation to treatment could lead to target underdosing or organ at risk (OAR) overdosing. Daily real-time SBRT treatment planning could minimize the risk of geographic miss. As an initial step toward determining the clinical feasibility of developing real-time SBRT treatment planning, we determined the calculation time of helical TomoTherapy-based STAT radiation therapy (RT) treatment plans for simple liver, lung, and spine SBRT treatments to assess whether the planning process was fast enough for practical clinical implementation. Representative SBRT planning target volumes for hypothetical liver, peripheral lung, and thoracic spine lesions and adjacent OARs were contoured onto a planning computed tomography scan (CT) of an anthropomorphic phantom. Treatment plans were generated using both STAT RT 'full scatter' and conventional helical TomoTherapy 'beamlet' algorithms. Optimized plans were compared with respect to conformality index (CI), heterogeneity index (HI), and maximum dose to regional OARs to determine clinical equivalence and the number of required STAT RT optimization iterations and calculation times were determined. The liver and lung dosimetry for the STAT RT and standard planning algorithms were clinically and statistically equivalent. For the liver lesions, 'full scatter' and 'beamlet' algorithms showed a CI of 1.04 and 1.04 and HI of 1.03 and 1.03, respectively. For the lung lesions, 'full scatter' and 'beamlet' algorithms showed a CI of 1.05 and 1.03 and HI of 1.05and 1.05, respectively. For spine lesions, 'full scatter' and 'beamlet' algorithms showed a CI of 1.15 and 1.14 and HI of 1.22 and 1.14, respectively. There was no difference between treatment algorithms with respect to maximum doses to the OARs. The STAT RT iteration time with current treatment planning systems is 45 sec, and the treatment planning required 3

  11. Adaptive stereotactic body radiation therapy planning for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yujiao; Zhang, Fan; Yoo, David S; Kelsey, Chris R; Yin, Fang-Fang; Cai, Jing

    2013-09-01

    To investigate the dosimetric effects of adaptive planning on lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Forty of 66 consecutive lung SBRT patients were selected for a retrospective adaptive planning study. CBCT images acquired at each fraction were used for treatment planning. Adaptive plans were created using the same planning parameters as the original CT-based plan, with the goal to achieve comparable comformality index (CI). For each patient, 2 cumulative plans, nonadaptive plan (PNON) and adaptive plan (PADP), were generated and compared for the following organs-at-risks (OARs): cord, esophagus, chest wall, and the lungs. Dosimetric comparison was performed between PNON and PADP for all 40 patients. Correlations were evaluated between changes in dosimetric metrics induced by adaptive planning and potential impacting factors, including tumor-to-OAR distances (dT-OAR), initial internal target volume (ITV1), ITV change (ΔITV), and effective ITV diameter change (ΔdITV). 34 (85%) patients showed ITV decrease and 6 (15%) patients showed ITV increase throughout the course of lung SBRT. Percentage ITV change ranged from -59.6% to 13.0%, with a mean (±SD) of -21.0% (±21.4%). On average of all patients, PADP resulted in significantly (P=0 to .045) lower values for all dosimetric metrics. ΔdITV/dT-OAR was found to correlate with changes in dose to 5 cc (ΔD5cc) of esophagus (r=0.61) and dose to 30 cc (ΔD30cc) of chest wall (r=0.81). Stronger correlations between ΔdITV/dT-OAR and ΔD30cc of chest wall were discovered for peripheral (r=0.81) and central (r=0.84) tumors, respectively. Dosimetric effects of adaptive lung SBRT planning depend upon target volume changes and tumor-to-OAR distances. Adaptive lung SBRT can potentially reduce dose to adjacent OARs if patients present large tumor volume shrinkage during the treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Adaptive Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Planning for Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Yujiao; Zhang, Fan; Yoo, David S.; Kelsey, Chris R.; Yin, Fang-Fang; Cai, Jing

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric effects of adaptive planning on lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Forty of 66 consecutive lung SBRT patients were selected for a retrospective adaptive planning study. CBCT images acquired at each fraction were used for treatment planning. Adaptive plans were created using the same planning parameters as the original CT-based plan, with the goal to achieve comparable comformality index (CI). For each patient, 2 cumulative plans, nonadaptive plan (P{sub NON}) and adaptive plan (P{sub ADP}), were generated and compared for the following organs-at-risks (OARs): cord, esophagus, chest wall, and the lungs. Dosimetric comparison was performed between P{sub NON} and P{sub ADP} for all 40 patients. Correlations were evaluated between changes in dosimetric metrics induced by adaptive planning and potential impacting factors, including tumor-to-OAR distances (d{sub T-OAR}), initial internal target volume (ITV{sub 1}), ITV change (ΔITV), and effective ITV diameter change (Δd{sub ITV}). Results: 34 (85%) patients showed ITV decrease and 6 (15%) patients showed ITV increase throughout the course of lung SBRT. Percentage ITV change ranged from −59.6% to 13.0%, with a mean (±SD) of −21.0% (±21.4%). On average of all patients, P{sub ADP} resulted in significantly (P=0 to .045) lower values for all dosimetric metrics. Δd{sub ITV}/d{sub T-OAR} was found to correlate with changes in dose to 5 cc (ΔD5cc) of esophagus (r=0.61) and dose to 30 cc (ΔD30cc) of chest wall (r=0.81). Stronger correlations between Δd{sub ITV}/d{sub T-OAR} and ΔD30cc of chest wall were discovered for peripheral (r=0.81) and central (r=0.84) tumors, respectively. Conclusions: Dosimetric effects of adaptive lung SBRT planning depend upon target volume changes and tumor-to-OAR distances. Adaptive lung SBRT can potentially reduce dose to adjacent OARs if patients present large tumor volume shrinkage during the treatment.

  13. Radiation safety issues with positron-emission/computed tomography simulation for stereotactic body radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Kearns, William T; Urbanic, James J; Hampton, Carnell J; McMullen, Kevin P; Blackstock, A William; Stieber, Volker W; Hinson, William H

    2008-06-23

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) simulations using a Stereotactic Body Frame (SBF: Elekta, Stockholm, Sweden) were expanded to include 18F-deoxyglucosone positron-emission tomography (FDG PET) for treatment planning. Because of the length of time that staff members are in close proximity to the patient, concerns arose over the radiation safety issues associated with these simulations. The present study examines the radiation exposures of the staff performing SBRT simulations, and provides some guidance on limiting staff exposure during these simulations. Fifteen patients were simulated with PET/CT using the SBF. Patients were immobilized in the SBF before the FDG was administered. The patients were removed from the frame, injected with FDG, and allowed to uptake for approximately 45 minutes. After uptake, the patients were repositioned in the SBF. During the repositioning, exposure rates were recorded at the patient's surface, at the SBF surface, and at 15 cm, 30 cm, and 1 m from the SBF. Administered dose and the approximate time spent on patient repositioning were also recorded. The estimated dose to staff was compared with the dose to staff performing conventional diagnostic PET studies. The average length of time spent in close proximity (<50 cm) to the patient after injection was 11.7 minutes, or more than twice the length of time reported for diagnostic PET staff. That time yielded an estimated average dose to the staff of 26.5 microSv per simulation. The annual occupational exposure limit is 50 mSv. Based on dose per simulation, staff would have to perform nearly 1900 SBRT simulations annually to exceed the occupational limit. Therefore, at the current rate of 50-100 simulations annually, the addition of PET studies to SBRT simulations is safe for our staff. However, ALARA ("as low as reasonably achievable") principles still require some radiation safety considerations during SBRT simulations. The PET/CT-based SBRT simulations are safe and

  14. Evaluation of linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery in the management of glomus jugulare tumors.

    PubMed

    Sager, Omer; Beyzadeoglu, Murat; Dincoglan, Ferrat; Gamsiz, Hakan; Demiral, Selcuk; Uysal, Bora; Oysul, Kaan; Dirican, Bahar; Sirin, Sait

    2014-01-01

    Although mostly benign and slow-growing, glomus jugulare tumors have a high propensity for local invasion of adjacent vascular structures, lower cranial nerves and the inner ear, which may result in substantial morbidity and even mortality. Treatment strategies for glomus jugulare tumors include surgery, preoperative embolization followed by surgical resection, conventionally fractionated external beam radiotherapy, radiosurgery in the form of stereotactic radiosurgery or fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy, and combinations of these modalities. In the present study, we evaluate the use of linear accelerator (LINAC)-based stereotactic radiosurgery in the management of glomus jugulare tumors and report our 15-year single center experience. Between May 1998 and May 2013, 21 patients (15 females, 6 males) with glomus jugulare tumors were treated using LINAC-based stereotactic radiosurgery at the Department of Radiation Oncology, Gulhane Military Medical Academy. The indication for stereotactic radiosurgery was the presence of residual or recurrent tumor after surgery for 5 patients, whereas 16 patients having growing tumors with symptoms received stereotactic radiosurgery as the primary treatment. Median follow-up was 49 months (range, 3-98). Median age was 55 years (range, 24-77). Of the 21 lesions treated, 13 (61.9%) were left-sided and 8 (38.1%) were right-sided. Median dose was 15 Gy (range, 10-20) prescribed to the 85%-100% isodose line encompassing the target volume. Local control defined as either tumor shrinkage or the absence of tumor growth on periodical follow-up neuroimaging was 100%. LINAC-based stereotactic radiosurgery offers a safe and efficacious management strategy for glomus jugulare tumors by providing excellent tumor growth control with few complications.

  15. Dynamic Lung Tumor Tracking for Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kunos, Charles A.; Fabien, Jeffrey M.; Shanahan, John P.; Collen, Christine; Gevaert, Thierry; Poels, Kenneth; Van den Begin, Robbe; Engels, Benedikt; De Ridder, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Physicians considering stereotactic ablative body radiation therapy (SBRT) for the treatment of extracranial cancer targets must be aware of the sizeable risks for normal tissue injury and the hazards of physical tumor miss. A first-of-its-kind SBRT platform achieves high-precision ablative radiation treatment through a combination of versatile real-time imaging solutions and sophisticated tumor tracking capabilities. It uses dual-diagnostic kV x-ray units for stereoscopic open-loop feedback of cancer target intrafraction movement occurring as a consequence of respiratory motions and heartbeat. Image-guided feedback drives a gimbaled radiation accelerator (maximum 15 x 15 cm field size) capable of real-time ±4 cm pan-and-tilt action. Robot-driven ±60° pivots of an integrated ±185° rotational gantry allow for coplanar and non-coplanar accelerator beam set-up angles, ultimately permitting unique treatment degrees of freedom. State-of-the-art software aids real-time six dimensional positioning, ensuring irradiation of cancer targets with sub-millimeter accuracy (0.4 mm at isocenter). Use of these features enables treating physicians to steer radiation dose to cancer tumor targets while simultaneously reducing radiation dose to normal tissues. By adding respiration correlated computed tomography (CT) and 2-[18F] fluoro-2-deoxy-ᴅ-glucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) images into the planning system for enhanced tumor target contouring, the likelihood of physical tumor miss becomes substantially less1. In this article, we describe new radiation plans for the treatment of moving lung tumors. PMID:26131774

  16. Feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging-guided liver stereotactic body radiation therapy: A comparison between modulated tri-cobalt-60 teletherapy and linear accelerator-based intensity modulated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Kishan, Amar U; Cao, Minsong; Wang, Pin-Chieh; Mikaeilian, Argin G; Tenn, Stephen; Rwigema, Jean-Claude M; Sheng, Ke; Low, Daniel A; Kupelian, Patrick A; Steinberg, Michael L; Lee, Percy

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the dosimetric feasibility of liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) using a teletherapy system equipped with 3 rotating (60)Co sources (tri-(60)Co system) and a built-in magnetic resonance imager (MRI). We hypothesized tumor size and location would be predictive of favorable dosimetry with tri-(60)Co SBRT. The primary study population consisted of 11 patients treated with SBRT for malignant hepatic lesions whose linear accelerator (LINAC)-based SBRT plans met all mandatory Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 1112 organ-at-risk (OAR) constraints. The secondary study population included 5 additional patients whose plans did not meet the mandatory constraints. Patients received 36 to 60 Gy in 3 to 5 fractions. Tri-(60)Co system SBRT plans were planned with ViewRay system software. All patients in the primary study population had tri-(60)Co SBRT plans that passed all RTOG constraints, with similar planning target volume coverage and OAR doses to LINAC plans. Mean liver doses and V10Gy to the liver, although easily meeting RTOG 1112 guidelines, were significantly higher with tri-(60)Co plans. When the 5 additional patients were included in a univariate analysis, the tri-(60)Co SBRT plans were still equally able to pass RTOG constraints, although they did have inferior ability to pass more stringent liver and kidney constraints (P < .05). A multivariate analysis found the ability of a tri-(60)Co SBRT plan to meet these constraints depended on lesion location and size. Patients with smaller or more peripheral lesions (as defined by distance from the aorta, chest wall, liver dome, and relative lesion volume) were significantly more likely to have tri-(60)Co plans that spared the liver and kidney as well as LINAC plans did (P < .05). It is dosimetrically feasible to perform liver SBRT with a tri-(60)Co system with a built-in MRI. Patients with smaller or more peripheral lesions are more likely to have optimal liver

  17. SU-E-J-200: A Dosimetric Analysis of 3D Versus 4D Image-Based Dose Calculation for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Lung Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, M; Rouabhi, O; Flynn, R; Xia, J; Bayouth, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric difference between 3D and 4Dweighted dose calculation using patient specific respiratory trace and deformable image registration for stereotactic body radiation therapy in lung tumors. Methods: Two dose calculation techniques, 3D and 4D-weighed dose calculation, were used for dosimetric comparison for 9 lung cancer patients. The magnitude of the tumor motion varied from 3 mm to 23 mm. Breath-hold exhale CT was used for 3D dose calculation with ITV generated from the motion observed from 4D-CT. For 4D-weighted calculation, dose of each binned CT image from the ten breathing amplitudes was first recomputed using the same planning parameters as those used in the 3D calculation. The dose distribution of each binned CT was mapped to the breath-hold CT using deformable image registration. The 4D-weighted dose was computed by summing the deformed doses with the temporal probabilities calculated from their corresponding respiratory traces. Dosimetric evaluation criteria includes lung V20, mean lung dose, and mean tumor dose. Results: Comparing with 3D calculation, lung V20, mean lung dose, and mean tumor dose using 4D-weighted dose calculation were changed by −0.67% ± 2.13%, −4.11% ± 6.94% (−0.36 Gy ± 0.87 Gy), −1.16% ± 1.36%(−0.73 Gy ± 0.85 Gy) accordingly. Conclusion: This work demonstrates that conventional 3D dose calculation method may overestimate the lung V20, MLD, and MTD. The absolute difference between 3D and 4D-weighted dose calculation in lung tumor may not be clinically significant. This research is supported by Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc and Iowa Center for Research By Undergraduates.

  18. Management of vestibular schwannomas with linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery: a single center experience.

    PubMed

    Sager, Omer; Beyzadeoglu, Murat; Dincoglan, Ferrat; Demiral, Selcuk; Uysal, Bora; Gamsiz, Hakan; Oysul, Kaan; Dirican, Bahar; Sirin, Sait

    2013-01-01

    The primary goal of treatment for vestibular schwannoma is to achieve local control without comprimising regional cranial nerve function. Stereotactic radiosurgery has emerged as a viable therapeutic option for vestibular schwannoma. The aim of the study is to report our 15-year single center experience using linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery in the management of patients with vestibular schwannoma. Between July 1998 and January 2013, 68 patients with unilateral vestibular schwannoma were treated using stereotactic radiosurgery at the Department of Radiation Oncology, Gulhane Military Medical Academy. All patients underwent high-precision stereotactic radiosurgery using a linear accelerator with 6-MV photons. Median follow-up time was 51 months (range, 9-107). Median age was 45 years (range, 20-77). Median dose was 12 Gy (range, 10-13) prescribed to the 85%-95% isodose line encompassing the target volume. Local tumor control in patients with periodic follow-up imaging was 96.1%. Overall hearing preservation rate was 76.5%. Linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery offers a safe and effective treatment for patients with vestibular schwannoma by providing high local control rates along with improved quality of life through well-preserved hearing function.

  19. Dose as a Function of Lung Volume and Planned Treatment Volume in Helical Tomotherapy Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy-Based Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Small Lung Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Baisden, Joseph M.; Romney, Davis A.; Reish, Andrew G.; Cai Jing; Sheng Ke; Jones, David R.; Benedict, Stanley H.; Read, Paul W.; Larner, James M. . E-mail: JML2P@virginia.edu

    2007-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the limitations of Hi-Art Helical Tomotherapy (Middleton, WI) stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung lesions, and to provide an initial report on patients treated with this method. Stereotactic body radiotherapy was shown to be an effective, well-tolerated treatment for early-stage, non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0236 protocol is currently evaluating three-dimensional conformal SBRT that delivers 60 Gy in three fractions. Methods and Materials: Inverse treatment planning for hypothetical lung gross tumor volumes (GTV) and planned treatment volume (PTV) expansions were performed. We tested the hypothesis that the maximum acceptable dose (MAD) to be delivered to the lesion by SBRT could be predicted by PTV and lung volume. Dose constraints on normal tissue were as designated by the RTOG protocol. Inverse planning was performed to find the maximum tolerated SBRT dose up to 60 Gy. Results: Regression analysis of the data obtained indicated a linear relationship between MAD, PTV, and lung volume. This generated two equations which may be useful predictive tools. Seven patients with Stage I and II NSCLC treated at University of Virginia with this method tolerated the treatment extremely well, and suffered no greater than grade I toxicity, with no evidence of disease recurrence in follow-up from 2-20 months. Conclusions: Helical tomotherapy SBRT for lung lesions is well-tolerated. In addition, the likely MAD for patients considered for this type of treatment can be predicted by PTV and lung volume.

  20. Support vector machine-based prediction of local tumor control after stereotactic body radiation therapy for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Klement, Rainer J; Allgäuer, Michael; Appold, Steffen; Dieckmann, Karin; Ernst, Iris; Ganswindt, Ute; Holy, Richard; Nestle, Ursula; Nevinny-Stickel, Meinhard; Semrau, Sabine; Sterzing, Florian; Wittig, Andrea; Andratschke, Nicolaus; Guckenberger, Matthias

    2014-03-01

    Several prognostic factors for local tumor control probability (TCP) after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have been described, but no attempts have been undertaken to explore whether a nonlinear combination of potential factors might synergistically improve the prediction of local control. We investigated a support vector machine (SVM) for predicting TCP in a cohort of 399 patients treated at 13 German and Austrian institutions. Among 7 potential input features for the SVM we selected those most important on the basis of forward feature selection, thereby evaluating classifier performance by using 10-fold cross-validation and computing the area under the ROC curve (AUC). The final SVM classifier was built by repeating the feature selection 10 times with different splitting of the data for cross-validation and finally choosing only those features that were selected at least 5 out of 10 times. It was compared with a multivariate logistic model that was built by forward feature selection. Local failure occurred in 12% of patients. Biologically effective dose (BED) at the isocenter (BED(ISO)) was the strongest predictor of TCP in the logistic model and also the most frequently selected input feature for the SVM. A bivariate logistic function of BED(ISO) and the pulmonary function indicator forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) yielded the best description of the data but resulted in a significantly smaller AUC than the final SVM classifier with the input features BED(ISO), age, baseline Karnofsky index, and FEV1 (0.696 ± 0.040 vs 0.789 ± 0.001, P<.03). The final SVM resulted in sensitivity and specificity of 67.0% ± 0.5% and 78.7% ± 0.3%, respectively. These results confirm that machine learning techniques like SVMs can be successfully applied to predict treatment outcome after SBRT. Improvements over traditional TCP modeling are expected through a nonlinear combination of multiple features

  1. Support Vector Machine-Based Prediction of Local Tumor Control After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Klement, Rainer J.; Allgäuer, Michael; Appold, Steffen; Dieckmann, Karin; Ernst, Iris; Ganswindt, Ute; Holy, Richard; Nestle, Ursula; Nevinny-Stickel, Meinhard; Semrau, Sabine; Sterzing, Florian; Wittig, Andrea; Andratschke, Nicolaus; Guckenberger, Matthias

    2014-03-01

    Background: Several prognostic factors for local tumor control probability (TCP) after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have been described, but no attempts have been undertaken to explore whether a nonlinear combination of potential factors might synergistically improve the prediction of local control. Methods and Materials: We investigated a support vector machine (SVM) for predicting TCP in a cohort of 399 patients treated at 13 German and Austrian institutions. Among 7 potential input features for the SVM we selected those most important on the basis of forward feature selection, thereby evaluating classifier performance by using 10-fold cross-validation and computing the area under the ROC curve (AUC). The final SVM classifier was built by repeating the feature selection 10 times with different splitting of the data for cross-validation and finally choosing only those features that were selected at least 5 out of 10 times. It was compared with a multivariate logistic model that was built by forward feature selection. Results: Local failure occurred in 12% of patients. Biologically effective dose (BED) at the isocenter (BED{sub ISO}) was the strongest predictor of TCP in the logistic model and also the most frequently selected input feature for the SVM. A bivariate logistic function of BED{sub ISO} and the pulmonary function indicator forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) yielded the best description of the data but resulted in a significantly smaller AUC than the final SVM classifier with the input features BED{sub ISO}, age, baseline Karnofsky index, and FEV1 (0.696 ± 0.040 vs 0.789 ± 0.001, P<.03). The final SVM resulted in sensitivity and specificity of 67.0% ± 0.5% and 78.7% ± 0.3%, respectively. Conclusions: These results confirm that machine learning techniques like SVMs can be successfully applied to predict treatment outcome after SBRT. Improvements over traditional TCP

  2. Treatment of hepatic metastases of colorectal cancer by robotic stereotactic radiation (Cyberknife ®).

    PubMed

    Peiffert, D; Baumann, A-S; Marchesi, V

    2014-04-01

    Cyberknife(®) is a dedicated stereotactic radiotherapy device. This new technology permits precise delivery of high dose gradient radiation therapy while sparing the surrounding organs at risk. Hepatic metastases of colorectal cancer (HMCRC) are an example of a lesion where treatment with Cyberknife(®) is indicated because they are located in a radio-sensitive organ and curative treatment is based on focal eradication (resection, radiofrequency ablation,...). The local control rate at one year is reported to be 70 to 100% depending on the study. Tolerance is excellent with less than a 5% rate of acute grade 3 or 4 side effects (nausea, vomiting, gastro-duodenal ulcer). The specific hepatotoxicity of radiotherapy, so-called radiation-induced liver disease (RILD), was found in only one study. Candidates for stereotactic radiotherapy are patients in whom disease is controlled except for intrahepatic disease with 1-3 hepatic metastases ≤ 6 cm in size who have contraindications for surgery, a WHO stage ≤ 2, a volume of healthy liver ≥ 700 cm(3) and normal liver function. It is actually a very simple treatment that results in very good local control with few contraindications. Its place in the management strategy of liver metastases needs further clarification.

  3. Low Incidence of Chest Wall Pain with a Risk-Adapted Lung Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Approach Using Three or Five Fractions Based on Chest Wall Dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, John H.; Baldini, Elizabeth H.; Chen, Aileen B.; Colson, Yolonda L.; Hacker, Fred L.; Hermann, Gretchen; Kozono, David; Mannarino, Edward; Molodowitch, Christina; Wee, Jon O.; Sher, David J.; Killoran, Joseph H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To examine the frequency and potential of dose-volume predictors for chest wall (CW) toxicity (pain and/or rib fracture) for patients receiving lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) using treatment planning methods to minimize CW dose and a risk-adapted fractionation scheme. Methods We reviewed data from 72 treatment plans, from 69 lung SBRT patients with at least one year of follow-up or CW toxicity, who were treated at our center between 2010 and 2013. Treatment plans were optimized to reduce CW dose and patients received a risk-adapted fractionation of 18 Gy×3 fractions (54 Gy total) if the CW V30 was less than 30 mL or 10–12 Gy×5 fractions (50–60 Gy total) otherwise. The association between CW toxicity and patient characteristics, treatment parameters and dose metrics, including biologically equivalent dose, were analyzed using logistic regression. Results With a median follow-up of 20 months, 6 (8.3%) patients developed CW pain including three (4.2%) grade 1, two (2.8%) grade 2 and one (1.4%) grade 3. Five (6.9%) patients developed rib fractures, one of which was symptomatic. No significant associations between CW toxicity and patient and dosimetric variables were identified on univariate nor multivariate analysis. Conclusions Optimization of treatment plans to reduce CW dose and a risk-adapted fractionation strategy of three or five fractions based on the CW V30 resulted in a low incidence of CW toxicity. Under these conditions, none of the patient characteristics or dose metrics we examined appeared to be predictive of CW pain. PMID:24728448

  4. Medical physics aspects of the synchrotron radiation therapies: Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) and synchrotron stereotactic radiotherapy (SSRT).

    PubMed

    Bräuer-Krisch, Elke; Adam, Jean-Francois; Alagoz, Enver; Bartzsch, Stefan; Crosbie, Jeff; DeWagter, Carlos; Dipuglia, Andrew; Donzelli, Mattia; Doran, Simon; Fournier, Pauline; Kalef-Ezra, John; Kock, Angela; Lerch, Michael; McErlean, Ciara; Oelfke, Uwe; Olko, Pawel; Petasecca, Marco; Povoli, Marco; Rosenfeld, Anatoly; Siegbahn, Erik A; Sporea, Dan; Stugu, Bjarne

    2015-09-01

    Stereotactic Synchrotron Radiotherapy (SSRT) and Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) are both novel approaches to treat brain tumor and potentially other tumors using synchrotron radiation. Although the techniques differ by their principles, SSRT and MRT share certain common aspects with the possibility of combining their advantages in the future. For MRT, the technique uses highly collimated, quasi-parallel arrays of X-ray microbeams between 50 and 600 keV. Important features of highly brilliant Synchrotron sources are a very small beam divergence and an extremely high dose rate. The minimal beam divergence allows the insertion of so called Multi Slit Collimators (MSC) to produce spatially fractionated beams of typically ∼25-75 micron-wide microplanar beams separated by wider (100-400 microns center-to-center(ctc)) spaces with a very sharp penumbra. Peak entrance doses of several hundreds of Gy are extremely well tolerated by normal tissues and at the same time provide a higher therapeutic index for various tumor models in rodents. The hypothesis of a selective radio-vulnerability of the tumor vasculature versus normal blood vessels by MRT was recently more solidified. SSRT (Synchrotron Stereotactic Radiotherapy) is based on a local drug uptake of high-Z elements in tumors followed by stereotactic irradiation with 80 keV photons to enhance the dose deposition only within the tumor. With SSRT already in its clinical trial stage at the ESRF, most medical physics problems are already solved and the implemented solutions are briefly described, while the medical physics aspects in MRT will be discussed in more detail in this paper. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Cost-effectiveness Analysis of Stereotactic Radiosurgery Alone Versus Stereotactic Radiosurgery with Upfront Whole Brain Radiation Therapy for Brain Metastases.

    PubMed

    Kim, H; Rajagopalan, M S; Beriwal, S; Smith, K J

    2017-10-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) alone or upfront whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) plus SRS are the most commonly used treatment options for one to three brain oligometastases. The most recent randomised clinical trial result comparing SRS alone with upfront WBRT plus SRS (NCCTG N0574) has favoured SRS alone for neurocognitive function, whereas treatment options remain controversial in terms of cognitive decline and local control. The aim of this study was to conduct a cost-effectiveness analysis of these two competing treatments. A Markov model was constructed for patients treated with SRS alone or SRS plus upfront WBRT based on largely randomised clinical trials. Costs were based on 2016 Medicare reimbursement. Strategies were compared using the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) and effectiveness was measured in quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were carried out. Strategies were evaluated from the healthcare payer's perspective with a willingness-to-pay threshold of $100 000 per QALY gained. In the base case analysis, the median survival was 9 months for both arms. SRS alone resulted in an ICER of $9917 per QALY gained. In one-way sensitivity analyses, results were most sensitive to variation in cognitive decline rates for both groups and median survival rates, but the SRS alone remained cost-effective for most parameter ranges. Based on the current available evidence, SRS alone was found to be cost-effective for patients with one to three brain metastases compared with upfront WBRT plus SRS. Copyright © 2017 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Novel approach to lung stereotactic body radiation therapy plan evaluation and delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurkovic, Ines-Ana

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy is currently being used as an efficient treatment for Stage I/II medically inoperable and surgically unrespectable non small cell and metastatic lung cancer. Hypofractional dose and dose escalation used in stereotactic body radiation therapy have the potential of increasing the likelihood of the tumor control and the long term progression free survival. Currently available commercial treatment planning systems are capable of calculating accurate dose distributions for static case, where the tumor and surrounding healthy tissues are not moving during the dose delivery. However, respiratory induced organ motion can result in significant movement of the lesion leading to the discrepancies between the dose delivered and the dose planned. The precision and conformity of the stereotactic body radiation therapy makes it very susceptible to motion, i.e. patient respiration can lead to significant dose delivery errors. Conventional stereotactic body radiation therapy treatment plans use free breathing three-dimensional computed tomography images where margins are added to delineated gross tumor volume to create planning tumor volume and avoid geometrical misses of the target. The specific hypothesis of the study is that the true four-dimensional delivery of the four-dimensional plans will allow for more accurate radiation therapy treatment and critical organ sparing along with radiobiological evaluation of the dose distributions. The specific aims are designed to provide in depth understanding of the radiation therapy treatments and influence of the four-dimensional planning and delivery, heterogeneity corrections and various radiobiological factors on the outcome. The primary focus of the Specific Aim 1 was the evaluation of the tumor volume based on the four-dimensional computed tomography scan data through its motion, volume and computed tomography number. The results indicated that tumor motion parameters will exceed the typical

  7. Stereotactic body radiation therapy for inoperable early stage lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Timmerman, Robert; Paulus, Rebecca; Galvin, James; Michalski, Jeffrey; Straube, William; Bradley, Jeffrey; Fakiris, Achilles; Bezjak, Andrea; Videtic, Gregory; Johnstone, David; Fowler, Jack; Gore, Elizabeth; Choy, Hak

    2010-03-17

    Patients with early stage but medically inoperable lung cancer have a poor rate of primary tumor control (30%-40%) and a high rate of mortality (3-year survival, 20%-35%) with current management. To evaluate the toxicity and efficacy of stereotactic body radiation therapy in a high-risk population of patients with early stage but medically inoperable lung cancer. Phase 2 North American multicenter study of patients aged 18 years or older with biopsy-proven peripheral T1-T2N0M0 non-small cell tumors (measuring <5 cm in diameter) and medical conditions precluding surgical treatment. The prescription dose was 18 Gy per fraction x 3 fractions (54 Gy total) with entire treatment lasting between 1(1/2) and 2 weeks. The study opened May 26, 2004, and closed October 13, 2006; data were analyzed through August 31, 2009. The primary end point was 2-year actuarial primary tumor control; secondary end points were disease-free survival (ie, primary tumor, involved lobe, regional, and disseminated recurrence), treatment-related toxicity, and overall survival. A total of 59 patients accrued, of which 55 were evaluable (44 patients with T1 tumors and 11 patients with T2 tumors) with a median follow-up of 34.4 months (range, 4.8-49.9 months). Only 1 patient had a primary tumor failure; the estimated 3-year primary tumor control rate was 97.6% (95% confidence interval [CI], 84.3%-99.7%). Three patients had recurrence within the involved lobe; the 3-year primary tumor and involved lobe (local) control rate was 90.6% (95% CI, 76.0%-96.5%). Two patients experienced regional failure; the local-regional control rate was 87.2% (95% CI, 71.0%-94.7%). Eleven patients experienced disseminated recurrence; the 3-year rate of disseminated failure was 22.1% (95% CI, 12.3%-37.8%). The rates for disease-free survival and overall survival at 3 years were 48.3% (95% CI, 34.4%-60.8%) and 55.8% (95% CI, 41.6%-67.9%), respectively. The median overall survival was 48.1 months (95% CI, 29.6 months to not

  8. Stereotactic radiation therapy and selective internal radiation therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bujold, A; Dawson, L A

    2011-02-01

    Recent technological advances allow precise and safe radiation delivery in hepatocellular carcinoma. Stereotactic body radiotherapy is a conformal external beam radiation technique that uses a small number of relatively large fractions to deliver potent doses of radiation therapy to extracranial sites. It requires stringent breathing motion control and image guidance. Selective internal radiotherapy or radioembolization refers to the injection of radioisotopes, usually delivered to liver tumors via the hepatic artery. Clinical results for both treatments show that excellent local control is possible with acceptable toxicity. Most appropriate patient populations and when which type of radiation therapy should be best employed in the vast therapeutic armamentarium of hepatocellular carcinoma are still to be clarified. Copyright © 2010 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Recurrent Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Wen-Yen; Jen, Yee-Min; Lee, Meei-Shyuan; Chang, Li-Ping; Chen, Chang-Ming; Ko, Kai-Hsiung; Lin, Kuen-Tze; Lin, Jang-Chun; Chao, Hsing-Lung; Lin, Chun-Shu; Su, Yu-Fu; Fan, Chao-Yueh; Chang, Yao-Wen

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To examine the safety and efficacy of Cyberknife stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and its effect on survival in patients of recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods and Materials: This was a matched-pair study. From January 2008 to December 2009, 36 patients with 42 lesions of unresectable recurrent HCC were treated with SBRT. The median prescribed dose was 37 Gy (range, 25 to 48 Gy) in 4-5 fractions over 4-5 consecutive working days. Another 138 patients in the historical control group given other or no treatments were selected for matched analyses. Results: The median follow-up time was 14 months for all patients and 20 months for those alive. The 1- and 2-year in-field failure-free rates were 87.6% and 75.1%, respectively. Out-field intrahepatic recurrence was the main cause of failure. The 2-year overall survival (OS) rate was 64.0%, and median time to progression was 8.0 months. In the multivariable analysis of all 174 patients, SBRT (yes vs. no), tumor size ({<=}4 cm vs. >4 cm), recurrent stage (stage IIIB/IV vs. I) and Child-Pugh classification (A vs. B/C) were independent prognostic factors for OS. Matched-pair analysis revealed that patients undergoing SBRT had better OS (2-year OS of 72.6% vs. 42.1%, respectively, p = 0.013). Acute toxicities were mild and tolerable. Conclusion: SBRT is a safe and efficacious modality and appears to be well-tolerated at the dose fractionation we have used, and its use correlates with improved survival in this cohort of patients with recurrent unresectable HCC. Out-field recurrence is the major cause of failure. Further studies of combinations of SBRT and systemic therapies may be reasonable.

  10. Failure Mode and Effect Analysis for Delivery of Lung Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Perks, Julian R.; Stanic, Sinisa; Stern, Robin L.; Henk, Barbara; Nelson, Marsha S.; Harse, Rick D.; Mathai, Mathew; Purdy, James A.; Valicenti, Richard K.; Siefkin, Allan D.; Chen, Allen M.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To improve the quality and safety of our practice of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), we analyzed the process following the failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) method. Methods: The FMEA was performed by a multidisciplinary team. For each step in the SBRT delivery process, a potential failure occurrence was derived and three factors were assessed: the probability of each occurrence, the severity if the event occurs, and the probability of detection by the treatment team. A rank of 1 to 10 was assigned to each factor, and then the multiplied ranks yielded the relative risks (risk priority numbers). The failure modes with the highest risk priority numbers were then considered to implement process improvement measures. Results: A total of 28 occurrences were derived, of which nine events scored with significantly high risk priority numbers. The risk priority numbers of the highest ranked events ranged from 20 to 80. These included transcription errors of the stereotactic coordinates and machine failures. Conclusion: Several areas of our SBRT delivery were reconsidered in terms of process improvement, and safety measures, including treatment checklists and a surgical time-out, were added for our practice of gantry-based image-guided SBRT. This study serves as a guide for other users of SBRT to perform FMEA of their own practice.

  11. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung cancer patients previously treated with conventional radiotherapy: a review.

    PubMed

    Amini, Arya; Yeh, Norman; Gaspar, Laurie E; Kavanagh, Brian; Karam, Sana D

    2014-09-19

    Lung cancer continues to be one of the most prevalent malignancies worldwide and is the leading cause of death in both men and women. Presently, local control rates are quite poor. Improvements in imaging and radiation treatment delivery systems however have provided radiation oncologists with new tools to better target these tumors. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is one such technique that has shown efficacy as upfront treatment for lung cancer. In addition, more recent studies have demonstrated some effectiveness in recurrent tumors in prior irradiated fields as well. This review summarizes seven recent studies of re-irradiation with SBRT in patients with thoracic recurrences treated previously with conventionally fractionated radiation therapy. Combined, 140 patients were included. The median initial thoracic radiation doses ranged from 50-87.5 Gy and median re-irradiation dose ranged from 40-80 Gy. Local control rates varied from 65-92%. Re-irradiation was well tolerated with few grade 4 and 5 complications (observed in one study). Currently, based on these published reports, re-irradiation with SBRT appears feasible for in-field thoracic recurrences, though caution must be taken in all cases of retreatment.

  12. Single-Fraction Spine Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Chordoma

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Edward W.; Jung, David L.; Balagamwala, Ehsan H.; Angelov, Lilyana; Suh, John H.; Djemil, Toufik; Magnelli, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Chordoma is a radioresistant tumor that presents a therapeutic challenge with spine involvement, as high doses of radiation are needed for local control while limiting dose to the spinal cord. The purpose of this study is to determine the efficacy and safety of single-fraction spine stereotactic body radiation therapy for the treatment of spine chordoma. Methods: A retrospective review of our institutional database from 2006 to 2013 identified 8 patients (12 cases) with chordoma of the spine who were treated with spine stereotactic body radiation therapy. Surgical resection was performed in 7 of the 12 cases. The treatment volume was defined by the bony vertebral level of the tumor along with soft tissue extension appreciated on magnetic resonance imaging fusion. Medical records and imaging were assessed for pain relief and local control. Treatment toxicity was evaluated using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. Results: Median age was 59 years (range, 17-91). Median target volume was 48 cm3 (1-304), and median prescription dose was 16 Gy (11-16). Median conformality index was 1.44 (1.14-3.21), and homogeneity index was 1.12 (1.05-1.19). With a median follow-up time of 9.7 months (.5-84), local control was achieved in 75% of the cases treated. One patient developed limited grade 2 spinal cord myelopathy that resolved with steroids. There were no other treatment toxicities from spine stereotactic body radiation therapy. Conclusion: Single-fraction spine stereotactic body radiation therapy can be safely delivered to treat chordoma of the spine with the potential to improve pain symptoms. Although the early data are suggestive, long-term follow-up with more patients is necessary to determine the efficacy of spine stereotactic body radiation therapy in the treatment of chordoma of the spine. PMID:27260562

  13. Stereotactic radiation therapy of brain metastases from colorectal cancer: A single institution cohort.

    PubMed

    Paix, A; Antoni, D; Adeduntan, R; Noël, G

    2017-05-01

    The brain remains an uncommon site of colorectal cancer metastases. Due to the improvement of overall colorectal cancer patient survival, the incidence of brain metastases will likely rise. We report the efficacy and safety of hypofractionnated stereotactic radiation therapy and stereotactic radiosurgery, and its role in colorectal cancer brain metastasis management. Between June 2010 and December 2014, fifteen consecutive patients received hypofractionnated stereotactic radiation therapy or stereotactic radiosurgery as first local therapy or following surgical removal for colorectal cancer brain metastases. The primary endpoint was overall survival. Secondary endpoints were brain progression free survival, in field control rates and safety. Median follow-up was 41 months (95% confidence interval [CI]: [8.9-73.1 months]), median overall survival was 8 months (95% CI [4.7-11.3 months]), and median brain progression-free survival was 5 months (95% CI [3.9-6.1 months]). Five in field recurrences were observed, which makes a control rate per metastases at 6 and 12 months of 77.8% (95% CI [74.34%-81.26%]), 51.9% (95% CI [44.21%-59.59%]) respectively. Over the 19 treatment sequences, five in field recurences were observed: 6, 12 and 18 months control rate per treatment sequence were 93.3% (95% CI [90.42%-96.18%]), 68.1% (95% CI [62.03%-74.17%]) and 45.4% (95% CI [36.14%-54.66%]) respectively. Immediate tolerance was good with no toxicity grade III or more. Long-term toxicity included two radionecrosis among which, one was symptomatic. The results of this retrospective analysis suggest that hypofractionnated stereotactic radiation therapy and stereotactic radiosurgery are effective and safe treatment modalities for single and multiple small brain metastases from colorectal cancer. However, results need to be confirmed by multicenter, collected data. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  14. Characterization of dose in stereotactic body radiation therapy of lung lesions via Monte Carlo calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rassiah, Premavathy

    Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy is a new form of treatment where hypofractionated (i.e., large dose fractions), conformal doses are delivered to small extracranial target volumes. This technique has proven to be especially effective for treating lung lesions. The inability of most commercially available algorithms/treatment planning systems to accurately account for electron transport in regions of heterogeneous electron density and tissue interfaces make prediction of accurate doses especially challenging for such regions. Monte Carlo which a model based calculation algorithm has proven to be extremely accurate for dose calculation in both homogeneous and inhomogeneous environment. This study attempts to accurately characterize the doses received by static targets located in the lung, as well as critical structures (contra and ipsi -lateral lung, major airways, esophagus and spinal cord) for the serial tomotherapeutic intensity-modulated delivery method used for stereotactic body radiation therapy at the Cancer Therapy and Research Center. PEREGRINERTM (v 1.6. NOMOS) Monte Carlo, doses were compared to the Finite Sized Pencil Beam/Effective Path Length predicted values from the CORVUS 5.0 planning system. The Monte Carlo based treatment planning system was first validated in both homogenous and inhomogeneous environments. 77 stereotactic body radiation therapy lung patients previously treated with doses calculated using the Finite Sized Pencil Beam/Effective Path Length, algorithm were then retrieved and recalculated with Monte Carlo. All 77 patients plans were also recalculated without inhomogeneity correction in an attempt to counteract the known overestimation of dose at the periphery of the target by EPL with increased attenuation. The critical structures were delineated in order to standardize the contouring. Both the ipsi-lateral and contra-lateral lungs were contoured. The major airways were contoured from the apex of the lungs (trachea) to 4 cm below

  15. Comparative effectiveness research in radiation oncology: stereotactic radiosurgery, hypofractionation, and brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Aneja, Sanjay; Yu, James B

    2014-01-01

    Radiation oncology encompasses a diverse spectrum of treatment modalities, including stereotactic radiosurgery, hypofractionated radiotherapy, and brachytherapy. Though all these modalities generally aim to do the same thing-treat cancer with therapeutic doses of radiation while relatively sparing normal tissue from excessive toxicity, the general radiobiology and physics underlying each modality are distinct enough that their equivalence is not a given. Given the continued innovation in radiation oncology, the comparative effectiveness of these modalities is important to review. Given the broad scope of radiation oncology, this article focuses on the 3 most common sites requiring radiation treatment: breast, prostate, and lung cancer.

  16. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Patients With Lung Cancer Previously Treated With Thoracic Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Patrick; Balter, Peter A.; Rebueno, Neal; Sharp, Hadley J.; Liao Zhongxing; Komaki, Ritsuko; Chang, Joe Y.

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) provides excellent local control with acceptable toxicity for patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer. However, the efficacy and safety of SBRT for patients previously given thoracic radiation therapy is not known. In this study, we retrospectively reviewed outcomes after SBRT for recurrent disease among patients previously given radiation therapy to the chest. Materials and Methods: A search of medical records for patients treated with SBRT to the thorax after prior fractionated radiation therapy to the chest at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center revealed 36 such cases. The median follow-up time after SBRT was 15 months. The endpoints analyzed were overall survival, local control, and the incidence and severity of treatment-related toxicity. Results: SBRT provided in-field local control for 92% of patients; at 2 years, the actuarial overall survival rate was 59%, and the actuarial progression-free survival rate was 26%, with the primary site of failure being intrathoracic relapse. Fifty percent of patients experienced worsening of dyspnea after SBRT, with 19% requiring oxygen supplementation; 30% of patients experienced chest wall pain and 8% Grade 3 esophagitis. No Grade 4 or 5 toxic effects were noted. Conclusions: SBRT can provide excellent in-field tumor control in patients who have received prior radiation therapy. Toxicity was significant but manageable. The high rate of intrathoracic failure indicates the need for further study to identify patients who would derive the most benefit from SBRT for this purpose.

  17. Role of functional imaging in treatment plan optimization of stereotactic body radiation therapy for liver cancer.

    PubMed

    De Bari, Berardino; Jumeau, Raphael; Deantonio, Letizia; Adib, Salim; Godin, Sarah; Zeverino, Michele; Moeckli, Raphael; Bourhis, Jean; Prior, John O; Ozsahin, Mahmut

    2016-10-13

    We report the first known instance of the clinical use of 99mTc-mebrofenin hepatobiliary scintigraphy (HBS) for the optimization of radiotherapy treatment planning and for the follow-up of acute toxicity in a patient undergoing stereotactic body radiation therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma. In our experience, HBS allowed the identification and the sparing of more functioning liver areas, thus potentially reducing the risk of radiation-induced liver toxicity.

  18. Outcome Study of Cobalt Based Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Patients with Inoperable Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yingjie; Lan, Fengming; Kang, Xiaoli; Shao, Yinjian; Li, Hongqi; Li, Ping; Wu, Weizhang; Wang, Jidong; Chang, Dongshu; Wang, Yong; Xia, Tingyi

    2015-10-01

    Aim of this paper is to retrospectively evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of specialized Body Cobalt based system (BCBS) treatment in the senior patients group (.65 years) with Stage III non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). A total of 49 patients (41 males and 8 females) with Stage III NSCLC according to UICC TNM classification (6(th) edition) were treated using OUR-QGD™ BCBS which was designed and manufactured in China. Post treatment evaluation with follow-up information was collected from April 2001 to December 2006 in our department. Median age of enrolled patients was 71 years old (65-85). Among those patients, 36 patients were pathologically identified with squamous cell carcinoma, and the other 13 patients were confirmed as adenocarcinoma. All patients were immobilized by vacuum based immobilization mold and then performed slow CT scan without any respiration gating devices. The daily radiation prescription dose was defined at 50% isodose line covering primary lesions and metastatic lymph nodes with doses from 2.5 to 6 Gy in 5 fractions per week according to the tumor stage and internally approved treatment protocols by the Institutional Review Board (IRB). Median daily dose and total delivery dose of 50% isodose line were 4 Gy and 41 Gy, respectively. In this study group, total of 3 patients received neoadjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Tumor response evaluated 12 weeks after radiation has demonstrated 13 complete responses (26.5%), 21 partial responses (42.9%). The overall survival (OS) rate of 1-year, 2-year and 3-year was 63.3%, 40.8% and 20.4%, respectively. The median and mean survival time was 22 and 24 months. All 49 patients tolerated the treatment well and have completed the planned therapy regiment. Body Cobalt based system treatment of those over 65 years old patients with Stage III NSCLC had reasonable and superior curative effect as well as local control, and at the same time without severe radiation side effects. © The Author

  19. SU-E-T-642: Safety Procedures for Error Elimination in Cyberknife Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) and Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT)

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, A; Alkafi, A; Al-Najjar, W; Moftah, B

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Cyberknife system is used for providing stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) hypofractionation scheme. The whole treatment delivery is based on live imaging of the patient. The minor error made at any stage may bring severe radiation injury to the patient or damage to the system itself. Several safety measures were taken to make the system safer. Methods: The radiation treatment provided thru a 6MV linac attached to Kuka robot (Cyberknife G4, Accuray Inc. Sunnyvale, CA, USA). Several possible errors were identified related to patient alignment, treatment planning, dose delivery and physics quality assurance. During dose delivery, manual and visual checks were introduced to confirm pre and intra-treatment imaging to reduce possible errors. One additional step was introduced to confirm that software tracking-tools had worked correctly with highest possible confidence level. Robotic head move in different orientations over and around the patient body, the rigidity of linac-head cover and other accessories was checked periodically. The vender was alerted when a tiny or bigger piece of equipment needed additional interlocked support. Results: As of our experience treating 525 patients on Cyberknife during the last four years, we saw on and off technical issues. During image acquisition, it was made essential to follow the site-specific imaging protocols. Adequate anatomy was contoured to document the respective doses. Followed by auto-segmentation, manual tweaking was performed on every structure. The calculation box was enclosing the whole image during the final calculation. Every plan was evaluated on slice-by slice basis. To review the whole process, a check list was maintained during the physics 2nd-check. Conclusion: The implementation of manual and visual additional checks introduced along with automated checks for confirmation was found promising in terms of reduction in systematic errors and making the system

  20. Long-term Evaluation of Radiation-Induced Optic Neuropathy After Single-Fraction Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Leavitt, Jacqueline A.; Stafford, Scott L.; Link, Michael J.; Pollock, Bruce E.

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the long-term risk of radiation-induced optic neuropathy (RION) in patients having single-fraction stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for benign skull base tumors. Methods and Materials: Retrospective review of 222 patients having Gamma Knife radiosurgery for benign tumors adjacent to the anterior visual pathway (AVP) between 1991 and 1999. Excluded were patients with prior or concurrent external beam radiation therapy or SRS. One hundred twenty-nine patients (58%) had undergone previous surgery. Tumor types included confirmed World Health Organization grade 1 or presumed cavernous sinus meningioma (n=143), pituitary adenoma (n=72), and craniopharyngioma (n=7). The maximum dose to the AVP was ≤8.0 Gy (n=126), 8.1-10.0 Gy (n=39), 10.1-12.0 Gy (n=47), and >12 Gy (n=10). Results: The mean clinical and imaging follow-up periods were 83 and 123 months, respectively. One patient (0.5%) who received a maximum radiation dose of 12.8 Gy to the AVP developed unilateral blindness 18 months after SRS. The chance of RION according to the maximum radiation dose received by the AVP was 0 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0-3.6%), 0 (95% CI 0-10.7%), 0 (95% CI 0-9.0%), and 10% (95% CI 0-43.0%) for patients receiving ≤8 Gy, 8.1-10.0 Gy, 10.1-12.0 Gy, and >12 Gy, respectively. The overall risk of RION in patients receiving >8 Gy to the AVP was 1.0% (95% CI 0-6.2%). Conclusions: The risk of RION after single-fraction SRS in patients with benign skull base tumors who have no prior radiation exposure is very low if the maximum dose to the AVP is ≤12 Gy. Physicians performing single-fraction SRS should remain cautious when treating lesions adjacent to the AVP, especially when the maximum dose exceeds 10 Gy.

  1. A comparison of robotic arm versus gantry linear accelerator stereotactic body radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Avkshtol, Vladimir; Dong, Yanqun; Hayes, Shelly B; Hallman, Mark A; Price, Robert A; Sobczak, Mark L; Horwitz, Eric M; Zaorsky, Nicholas G

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most prevalent cancer diagnosed in men in the United States besides skin cancer. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT; 6–15 Gy per fraction, up to 45 minutes per fraction, delivered in five fractions or less, over the course of approximately 2 weeks) is emerging as a popular treatment option for prostate cancer. The American Society for Radiation Oncology now recognizes SBRT for select low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients. SBRT grew from the notion that high doses of radiation typical of brachytherapy could be delivered noninvasively using modern external-beam radiation therapy planning and delivery methods. SBRT is most commonly delivered using either a traditional gantry-mounted linear accelerator or a robotic arm-mounted linear accelerator. In this systematic review article, we compare and contrast the current clinical evidence supporting a gantry vs robotic arm SBRT for prostate cancer. The data for SBRT show encouraging and comparable results in terms of freedom from biochemical failure (>90% for low and intermediate risk at 5–7 years) and acute and late toxicity (<6% grade 3–4 late toxicities). Other outcomes (eg, overall and cancer-specific mortality) cannot be compared, given the indolent course of low-risk prostate cancer. At this time, neither SBRT device is recommended over the other for all patients; however, gantry-based SBRT machines have the abilities of treating larger volumes with conventional fractionation, shorter treatment time per fraction (~15 minutes for gantry vs ~45 minutes for robotic arm), and the ability to achieve better plans among obese patients (since they are able to use energies >6 MV). Finally, SBRT (particularly on a gantry) may also be more cost-effective than conventionally fractionated external-beam radiation therapy. Randomized controlled trials of SBRT using both technologies are underway. PMID:27574585

  2. A comparison of robotic arm versus gantry linear accelerator stereotactic body radiation therapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Avkshtol, Vladimir; Dong, Yanqun; Hayes, Shelly B; Hallman, Mark A; Price, Robert A; Sobczak, Mark L; Horwitz, Eric M; Zaorsky, Nicholas G

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most prevalent cancer diagnosed in men in the United States besides skin cancer. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT; 6-15 Gy per fraction, up to 45 minutes per fraction, delivered in five fractions or less, over the course of approximately 2 weeks) is emerging as a popular treatment option for prostate cancer. The American Society for Radiation Oncology now recognizes SBRT for select low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients. SBRT grew from the notion that high doses of radiation typical of brachytherapy could be delivered noninvasively using modern external-beam radiation therapy planning and delivery methods. SBRT is most commonly delivered using either a traditional gantry-mounted linear accelerator or a robotic arm-mounted linear accelerator. In this systematic review article, we compare and contrast the current clinical evidence supporting a gantry vs robotic arm SBRT for prostate cancer. The data for SBRT show encouraging and comparable results in terms of freedom from biochemical failure (>90% for low and intermediate risk at 5-7 years) and acute and late toxicity (<6% grade 3-4 late toxicities). Other outcomes (eg, overall and cancer-specific mortality) cannot be compared, given the indolent course of low-risk prostate cancer. At this time, neither SBRT device is recommended over the other for all patients; however, gantry-based SBRT machines have the abilities of treating larger volumes with conventional fractionation, shorter treatment time per fraction (~15 minutes for gantry vs ~45 minutes for robotic arm), and the ability to achieve better plans among obese patients (since they are able to use energies >6 MV). Finally, SBRT (particularly on a gantry) may also be more cost-effective than conventionally fractionated external-beam radiation therapy. Randomized controlled trials of SBRT using both technologies are underway.

  3. Image-guided localization accuracy of stereoscopic planar and volumetric imaging methods for stereotactic radiation surgery and stereotactic body radiation therapy: a phantom study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinkoo; Jin, Jian-Yue; Walls, Nicole; Nurushev, Teamour; Movsas, Benjamin; Chetty, Indrin J; Ryu, Samuel

    2011-04-01

    To evaluate the positioning accuracies of two image-guided localization systems, ExacTrac and On-Board Imager (OBI), in a stereotactic treatment unit. An anthropomorphic pelvis phantom with eight internal metal markers (BBs) was used. The center of one BB was set as plan isocenter. The phantom was set up on a treatment table with various initial setup errors. Then, the errors were corrected using each of the investigated systems. The residual errors were measured with respect to the radiation isocenter using orthogonal portal images with field size 3 × 3 cm(2). The angular localization discrepancies of the two systems and the correction accuracy of the robotic couch were also studied. A pair of pre- and post-cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images was acquired for each angular correction. Then, the correction errors were estimated by using the internal BBs through fiducial marker-based registrations. The isocenter localization errors (μ ±σ) in the left/right, posterior/anterior, and superior/inferior directions were, respectively, -0.2 ± 0.2 mm, -0.8 ± 0.2 mm, and -0.8 ± 0.4 mm for ExacTrac, and 0.5 ± 0.7 mm, 0.6 ± 0.5 mm, and 0.0 ± 0.5 mm for OBI CBCT. The registration angular discrepancy was 0.1 ± 0.2° between the two systems, and the maximum angle correction error of the robotic couch was 0.2° about all axes. Both the ExacTrac and the OBI CBCT systems showed approximately 1 mm isocenter localization accuracies. The angular discrepancy of two systems was minimal, and the robotic couch angle correction was accurate. These positioning uncertainties should be taken as a lower bound because the results were based on a rigid dosimetry phantom. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Image-Guided Localization Accuracy of Stereoscopic Planar and Volumetric Imaging Methods for Stereotactic Radiation Surgery and Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy: A Phantom Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jinkoo; Jin, Jian-Yue; Walls, Nicole; Nurushev, Teamour; Movsas, Benjamin; Chetty, Indrin J.; Ryu, Samuel

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the positioning accuracies of two image-guided localization systems, ExacTrac and On-Board Imager (OBI), in a stereotactic treatment unit. Methods and Materials: An anthropomorphic pelvis phantom with eight internal metal markers (BBs) was used. The center of one BB was set as plan isocenter. The phantom was set up on a treatment table with various initial setup errors. Then, the errors were corrected using each of the investigated systems. The residual errors were measured with respect to the radiation isocenter using orthogonal portal images with field size 3 x 3 cm{sup 2}. The angular localization discrepancies of the two systems and the correction accuracy of the robotic couch were also studied. A pair of pre- and post-cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images was acquired for each angular correction. Then, the correction errors were estimated by using the internal BBs through fiducial marker-based registrations. Results: The isocenter localization errors ({mu} {+-}{sigma}) in the left/right, posterior/anterior, and superior/inferior directions were, respectively, -0.2 {+-} 0.2 mm, -0.8 {+-} 0.2 mm, and -0.8 {+-} 0.4 mm for ExacTrac, and 0.5 {+-} 0.7 mm, 0.6 {+-} 0.5 mm, and 0.0 {+-} 0.5 mm for OBI CBCT. The registration angular discrepancy was 0.1 {+-} 0.2{sup o} between the two systems, and the maximum angle correction error of the robotic couch was 0.2{sup o} about all axes. Conclusion: Both the ExacTrac and the OBI CBCT systems showed approximately 1 mm isocenter localization accuracies. The angular discrepancy of two systems was minimal, and the robotic couch angle correction was accurate. These positioning uncertainties should be taken as a lower bound because the results were based on a rigid dosimetry phantom.

  5. [Brain radiation necrosis after stereotactic radiotherapy of the resection cavity for intracranial metastases: analysis of the literature from four cases].

    PubMed

    Doré, M; Lefebvre, L; Delpon, G; Thillays, F

    2015-04-01

    Stereotactic hypofractionated radiotherapy after resection of brain metastasis is an alternative to whole brain radiotherapy. A high dose per fraction is associated with a risk of radiation necrosis. We present four cases of confirmed histological radiation necrosis. Differentiating recurrent tumour from radiation necrosis in this scenario is challenging. An enhancing area in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with a "cut bell pepper" appearance may suggest radiation necrosis. Advanced imaging modalities such as perfusion MR imaging and positron emission tomography can be useful. Dosimetric predictors of the occurrence of radiation necrosis after stereotactic hypofractionated radiotherapy are poorly understood and require prospective studies on larger cohorts.

  6. Clinical decision tool for optimal delivery of liver stereotactic body radiation therapy: Photons versus protons.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Saumil J; Liang, Xing; Ding, Xuanfeng; Zhu, Timothy C; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Plastaras, John P; Metz, James M; Both, Stefan; Apisarnthanarax, Smith

    2015-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for treatment of liver tumors is often limited by liver dose constraints. Protons offer potential for more liver sparing, but clinical situations in which protons may be superior to photons are not well described. We developed and validated a treatment decision model to determine whether liver tumors of certain sizes and locations are more suited for photon versus proton SBRT. Six spherical mock tumors from 1 to 6 cm in diameter were contoured on computed tomography images of 1 patient at 4 locations: dome, caudal, left medial, and central. Photon and proton plans were generated to deliver 50 Gy in 5 fractions to each tumor and optimized to deliver equivalent target coverage and maximal liver sparing. Using these plans, we developed a hypothesis-generating model to predict the optimal modality for maximal liver sparing based on tumor size and location. We then validated this model in 10 patients with liver tumors. Protons spared significantly more liver than photons for dome or central tumors ≥3 cm (dome: 134 ± 21 cm(3), P = .03; central: 108 ± 4 cm(3), P = .01). Our model correctly predicted the optimal SBRT modality for all 10 patients. For patients with dome or central tumors ≥3 cm, protons significantly increased the volume of liver spared (176 ± 21 cm(3), P = .01) and decreased the mean liver dose (8.4 vs 12.2 Gy, P = .01) while offering no significant advantage for tumors <3 cm at any location or for caudal and left medial tumors of any size. When feasible, protons should be considered as the radiation modality of choice for dome and central tumors >3 cm to allow maximal liver sparing and potentially reduce radiation toxicity. Protons should also be considered for any tumor >5 cm if photon plans fail to achieve adequate coverage or exceed the mean liver threshold. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. SU-E-T-481: Dosimetric Comparison of Acuros XB and Anisotropic Analytic Algorithm with Commercial Monte Carlo Based Dose Calculation Algorithm for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy of Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, M; Tenn, S; Lee, C; Yang, Y; Lamb, J; Agazaryan, N; Lee, P; Low, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate performance of three commercially available treatment planning systems for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of lung cancer using the following algorithms: Boltzmann transport equation based algorithm (AcurosXB AXB), convolution based algorithm Anisotropic Analytic Algorithm (AAA); and Monte Carlo based algorithm (XVMC). Methods: A total of 10 patients with early stage non-small cell peripheral lung cancer were included. The initial clinical plans were generated using the XVMC based treatment planning system with a prescription of 54Gy in 3 fractions following RTOG0613 protocol. The plans were recalculated with the same beam parameters and monitor units using AAA and AXB algorithms. A calculation grid size of 2mm was used for all algorithms. The dose distribution, conformity, and dosimetric parameters for the targets and organs at risk (OAR) are compared between the algorithms. Results: The average PTV volume was 19.6mL (range 4.2–47.2mL). The volume of PTV covered by the prescribed dose (PTV-V100) were 93.97±2.00%, 95.07±2.07% and 95.10±2.97% for XVMC, AXB and AAA algorithms, respectively. There was no significant difference in high dose conformity index; however, XVMC predicted slightly higher values (p=0.04) for the ratio of 50% prescription isodose volume to PTV (R50%). The percentage volume of total lungs receiving dose >20Gy (LungV20Gy) were 4.03±2.26%, 3.86±2.22% and 3.85±2.21% for XVMC, AXB and AAA algorithms. Examination of dose volume histograms (DVH) revealed small differences in targets and OARs for most patients. However, the AAA algorithm was found to predict considerable higher PTV coverage compared with AXB and XVMC algorithms in two cases. The dose difference was found to be primarily located at the periphery region of the target. Conclusion: For clinical SBRT lung treatment planning, the dosimetric differences between three commercially available algorithms are generally small except at target periphery. XVMC

  8. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Is Effective Salvage Therapy for Patients With Prior Radiation of Spinal Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Sahgal, Arjun Ames, Christopher; Chou, Dean; Ma Lijun; Huang, Kim; Xu Wei; Chin, Cynthia; Weinberg, Vivan; Chuang, Cynthia; Weinstein, Phillip; Larson, David A.

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To provide actuarial outcomes and dosimetric data for spinal/paraspinal metastases, with and without prior radiation, treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 39 consecutive patients (60 metastases) were treated with SBRT between April 2003 and August 2006 and retrospectively reviewed. In all, 23 of 60 tumors had no previous radiation (unirradiated) and 37/60 tumors had previous irradiation (reirradiated). Of 37 reirradiated tumors, 31 were treated for 'salvage' given image-based tumor progression. Local failure was defined as progression by imaging and/or clinically. Results: At last follow-up, 19 patients were deceased. Median patient survival time measured was 21 months (95% CI = 8-27 months), and the 2-year survival probability was 45%. The median total dose prescribed was 24 Gy in three fractions prescribed to the 67% and 60% isodose for the unirradiated and reirradiated cohorts, respectively. The median tumor follow-up for the unirradiated and reirradiated group was 9 months (range, 1-26) and 7 months (range, 1-48) respectively. Eight of 60 tumors have progressed, and the 1- and 2-year progression-free probability (PFP) was 85% and 69%, respectively. For the salvage group the 1 year PFP was 96%. There was no significant difference in overall survival or PFP between the salvage reirradiated vs. all other tumors treated (p = 0.08 and p = 0.31, respectively). In six of eight failures the minimum distance from the tumor to the thecal sac was {<=}1 mm. Of 60 tumors treated, 39 have {>=}6 months follow-up and no radiation-induced myelopathy or radiculopathy has occurred. Conclusion: Spine SBRT has shown preliminary efficacy and safety in patients with image-based progression of previously irradiated metastases.

  9. Dosimetric effects on small-field beam-modeling for stereotactic body radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Woong; Kim, Suzy; Kim, Jung-In; Wu, Hong-Gyun; Jung, Joo-Young; Kim, Min-Joo; Suh, Tae-Suk; Kim, Jin-Young; Kim, Jong Won

    2015-02-01

    The treatment planning of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) requires high accuracy of dosimetric data for small radiation fields. The dosimetric effects on the beam-modeling process of a treatment planning system (TPS) were investigated using different measured small-field data sets. We performed small-field dosimetry with three detectors: a CC13 ion chamber, a CC01 ion chamber, and an edge detector. Percentage depth doses (PDDs) and dose profiles for field sizes given by 3 × 3 cm2, 2 × 2 cm2, and 1 × 1 cm2 were obtained for 6 MV and 15 MV photon beams. Each measured data set was used as data input for a TPS, in which a beam-modeling process was implemented using the collapsed cone convolution (CCC) algorithm for dose calculation. The measured data were used to generate six beam-models based on each combination of detector type and photon energy, which were then used to calculate the corresponding PDDs and dose profiles for various depths and field sizes. Root mean square differences (RMSDs) between the calculated and the measured doses were evaluated for the PDDs and the dose profiles. The RMSDs of PDDs beyond the maximum dose depth were within an accuracy of 0.2-0.6%, being clinically acceptable. The RMSDs of the dose profiles corresponding to the CC13, the CC01, and the edge detector were 2.80%, 1.49%, and 1.46% for a beam energy of 6 MV and 2.34%, 1.15%, and 1.44% for a beam energy of 15 MV, respectively. The calculated results for the CC13 ion chamber showed the most discrepancy compared to the measured data, due to the relatively large sensitive volume of this detector. However, the calculated dose profiles for the detectors were not significantly different from another. The physical algorithm used in the beam-modeling process did not seem to be sensitive to blurred data measured with detectors with large sensitive volumes. Each beam-model was used to clinically evaluate lung and lymphatic node SBRT plans

  10. First clinical implementation of audiovisual biofeedback in liver cancer stereotactic body radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Pollock, Sean; Tse, Regina; Martin, Darren; McLean, Lisa; Cho, Gwi; Hill, Robin; Pickard, Sheila; Aston, Paul; Huang, Chen-Yu; Makhija, Kuldeep; O'Brien, Ricky; Keall, Paul

    2015-10-01

    This case report details a clinical trial's first recruited liver cancer patient who underwent a course of stereotactic body radiation therapy treatment utilising audiovisual biofeedback breathing guidance. Breathing motion results for both abdominal wall motion and tumour motion are included. Patient 1 demonstrated improved breathing motion regularity with audiovisual biofeedback. A training effect was also observed. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Oncology published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd on behalf of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  11. Decision Analysis of Stereotactic Radiation Surgery Versus Stereotactic Radiation Surgery and Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy for 1 to 3 Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Lester-Coll, Nataniel H.; Dosoretz, Arie P.; Yu, James B.

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: Although whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) is effective for controlling intracranial disease, it is also associated with neurocognitive side effects. It is unclear whether a theoretically improved quality of life after stereotactic radiation surgery (SRS) alone relative to that after SRS with adjuvant WBRT would justify the omission of WBRT, given the higher risk of intracranial failure. This study compares SRS alone with SRS and WBRT, to evaluate the theoretical benefits of intracranial tumor control with adjuvant WBRT against its possible side effects, using quality-adjusted life expectancy (QALE) as a primary endpoint. Methods and Materials: A Markov decision analysis model was used to compare QALE in a cohort of patients with 1 to 3 brain metastases and Karnofsky performance status of at least 70. Patients were treated with SRS alone or with SRS immediately followed by WBRT. Patients treated with SRS alone underwent surveillance magnetic resonance imaging and received salvage WBRT if they developed intracranial relapse. All patients whose cancer relapsed after WBRT underwent simulation as dying of intracranial progression. Model parameters were estimated from published literature. Results: Treatment with SRS yielded 6.2 quality-adjusted life months (QALMs). The addition of initial WBRT reduced QALE by 1.2 QALMs. On one-way sensitivity analysis, the model was sensitive only to a single parameter, the utility associated with the state of no evidence of disease after SRS alone. At values greater than 0.51, SRS alone was preferred. Conclusions: In general, SRS alone is suggested to have improved quality of life in patients with 1 to 3 brain metastases compared to SRS and immediate WBRT. Our results suggest that immediate treatment with WBRT after SRS can be reserved for patients who would have a poor performance status regardless of treatment. These findings are stable under a wide range of assumptions.

  12. Indirect Tumor Cell Death After High-Dose Hypofractionated Irradiation: Implications for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and Stereotactic Radiation Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Chang W.; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Griffin, Robert J.; Park, Inhwan; Koonce, Nathan A.; Hui, Susanta; Kim, Mi-Sook; Dusenbery, Kathryn E.; Sperduto, Paul W.; Cho, L. Chinsoo

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to reveal the biological mechanisms underlying stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and stereotactic radiation surgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: FSaII fibrosarcomas grown subcutaneously in the hind limbs of C3H mice were irradiated with 10 to 30 Gy of X rays in a single fraction, and the clonogenic cell survival was determined with in vivo–in vitro excision assay immediately or 2 to 5 days after irradiation. The effects of radiation on the intratumor microenvironment were studied using immunohistochemical methods. Results: After cells were irradiated with 15 or 20 Gy, cell survival in FSaII tumors declined for 2 to 3 days and began to recover thereafter in some but not all tumors. After irradiation with 30 Gy, cell survival declined continuously for 5 days. Cell survival in some tumors 5 days after 20 to 30 Gy irradiation was 2 to 3 logs less than that immediately after irradiation. Irradiation with 20 Gy markedly reduced blood perfusion, upregulated HIF-1α, and increased carbonic anhydrase-9 expression, indicating that irradiation increased tumor hypoxia. In addition, expression of VEGF also increased in the tumor tissue after 20 Gy irradiation, probably due to the increase in HIF-1α activity. Conclusions: Irradiation of FSaII tumors with 15 to 30 Gy in a single dose caused dose-dependent secondary cell death, most likely by causing vascular damage accompanied by deterioration of intratumor microenvironment. Such indirect tumor cell death may play a crucial role in the control of human tumors with SBRT and SRS.

  13. Histopathologic tumor response after induction chemotherapy and stereotactic body radiation therapy for borderline resectable pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chuong, Michael D.; Frakes, Jessica M.; Figura, Nicholas; Hoffe, Sarah E.; Shridhar, Ravi; Mellon, Eric A.; Hodul, Pamela J.; Malafa, Mokenge P.; Springett, Gregory M.

    2016-01-01

    Background While clinical outcomes following induction chemotherapy and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) have been reported for borderline resectable pancreatic cancer (BRPC) patients, pathologic response has not previously been described. Methods This single-institution retrospective review evaluated BRPC patients who completed induction gemcitabine-based chemotherapy followed by SBRT and surgical resection. Each surgical specimen was assigned two tumor regression grades (TRG), one using the College of American Pathologists (CAP) criteria and one using the MD Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC) criteria. Overall survival (OS) and progression free survival (PFS) were correlated to TRG score. Results We evaluated 36 patients with a median follow-up of 13.8 months (range, 6.1-24.8 months). The most common induction chemotherapy regimen (82%) was GTX (gemcitabine, docetaxel, capecitabine). A median SBRT dose of 35 Gy (range, 30-40 Gy) in 5 fractions was delivered to the region of vascular involvement. The margin-negative resection rate was 97.2%. Improved response according to MDACC grade trended towards superior PFS (P=061), but not OS. Any neoadjuvant treatment effect according to MDACC scoring (IIa-IV vs. I) was associated with improved OS and PFS (both P=0.019). We found no relationship between CAP score and OS or PFS. Conclusions These data suggest that the increased pathologic response after induction chemotherapy and SBRT is correlated with improved survival for BRPC patients. PMID:27034789

  14. Histopathologic tumor response after induction chemotherapy and stereotactic body radiation therapy for borderline resectable pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Chuong, Michael D; Frakes, Jessica M; Figura, Nicholas; Hoffe, Sarah E; Shridhar, Ravi; Mellon, Eric A; Hodul, Pamela J; Malafa, Mokenge P; Springett, Gregory M; Centeno, Barbara A

    2016-04-01

    While clinical outcomes following induction chemotherapy and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) have been reported for borderline resectable pancreatic cancer (BRPC) patients, pathologic response has not previously been described. This single-institution retrospective review evaluated BRPC patients who completed induction gemcitabine-based chemotherapy followed by SBRT and surgical resection. Each surgical specimen was assigned two tumor regression grades (TRG), one using the College of American Pathologists (CAP) criteria and one using the MD Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC) criteria. Overall survival (OS) and progression free survival (PFS) were correlated to TRG score. We evaluated 36 patients with a median follow-up of 13.8 months (range, 6.1-24.8 months). The most common induction chemotherapy regimen (82%) was GTX (gemcitabine, docetaxel, capecitabine). A median SBRT dose of 35 Gy (range, 30-40 Gy) in 5 fractions was delivered to the region of vascular involvement. The margin-negative resection rate was 97.2%. Improved response according to MDACC grade trended towards superior PFS (P=061), but not OS. Any neoadjuvant treatment effect according to MDACC scoring (IIa-IV vs. I) was associated with improved OS and PFS (both P=0.019). We found no relationship between CAP score and OS or PFS. These data suggest that the increased pathologic response after induction chemotherapy and SBRT is correlated with improved survival for BRPC patients.

  15. The use of stereotactic body radiation therapy for local control of glomangiomatosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Horne, Zachary D; Karam, Sana D; Rashid, Abdul; Snider, J W; Lax, Allison; Ozdemirli, Metin; Harter, K W

    2013-01-01

    The vast majority of glomangiomas are small, benign neoplasms that can occur anywhere in the body but typically arise in the subcutaneous tissues of the extremities and are capable of causing extreme pain. Typically, these lesions are managed surgically with excellent rates of tumor control. On occasion, patients present with a variant of the glomangioma tumor consisting of numerous or recurrent nodules, a condition classified as glomangiomatosis. The authors present a case report of a young patient with multiply recurrent painful glomangiomas of the left foot, who was ultimately diagnosed with glomangiomatosis pedis. After multiple surgeries and surgical consultations, no surgery other than amputation was recommended. Therefore, the patient sought consultation with regard to stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). In the absence of other options, and based on its effectiveness in treating glomus tumors of the head and neck which display similar natural history and histologic features, SBRT was offered. The patient underwent SBRT to the largest of his remaining tumors with excellent local control and significant reduction in pain at two and a half years follow-up.

  16. Probabilities of Radiation Myelopathy Specific to Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy to Guide Safe Practice

    SciTech Connect

    Sahgal, Arjun; Weinberg, Vivian; Ma, Lijun; Chang, Eric; Chao, Sam; Muacevic, Alexander; Gorgulho, Alessandra; Soltys, Scott; Gerszten, Peter C.; Ryu, Sam; Angelov, Lilyana; Gibbs, Iris; Wong, C. Shun; Larson, David A.

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: Dose-volume histogram (DVH) results for 9 cases of post spine stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) radiation myelopathy (RM) are reported and compared with a cohort of 66 spine SBRT patients without RM. Methods and Materials: DVH data were centrally analyzed according to the thecal sac point maximum (Pmax) volume, 0.1- to 1-cc volumes in increments of 0.1 cc, and to the 2 cc volume. 2-Gy biologically equivalent doses (nBED) were calculated using an {alpha}/{beta} = 2 Gy (units = Gy{sub 2/2}). For the 2 cohorts, the nBED means and distributions were compared using the t test and Mann-Whitney test, respectively. Significance (P<.05) was defined as concordance of both tests at each specified volume. A logistic regression model was developed to estimate the probability of RM using the dose distribution for a given volume. Results: Significant differences in both the means and distributions at the Pmax and up to the 0.8-cc volume were observed. Concordant significance was greatest for the Pmax volume. At the Pmax volume the fit of the logistic regression model, summarized by the area under the curve, was 0.87. A risk of RM of 5% or less was observed when limiting the thecal sac Pmax volume doses to 12.4 Gy in a single fraction, 17.0 Gy in 2 fractions, 20.3 Gy in 3 fractions, 23.0 Gy in 4 fractions, and 25.3 Gy in 5 fractions. Conclusion: We report the first logistic regression model yielding estimates for the probability of human RM specific to SBRT.

  17. Probabilities of radiation myelopathy specific to stereotactic body radiation therapy to guide safe practice.

    PubMed

    Sahgal, Arjun; Weinberg, Vivian; Ma, Lijun; Chang, Eric; Chao, Sam; Muacevic, Alexander; Gorgulho, Alessandra; Soltys, Scott; Gerszten, Peter C; Ryu, Sam; Angelov, Lilyana; Gibbs, Iris; Wong, C Shun; Larson, David A

    2013-02-01

    Dose-volume histogram (DVH) results for 9 cases of post spine stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) radiation myelopathy (RM) are reported and compared with a cohort of 66 spine SBRT patients without RM. DVH data were centrally analyzed according to the thecal sac point maximum (Pmax) volume, 0.1- to 1-cc volumes in increments of 0.1 cc, and to the 2 cc volume. 2-Gy biologically equivalent doses (nBED) were calculated using an α/β = 2 Gy (units = Gy(2/2)). For the 2 cohorts, the nBED means and distributions were compared using the t test and Mann-Whitney test, respectively. Significance (P<.05) was defined as concordance of both tests at each specified volume. A logistic regression model was developed to estimate the probability of RM using the dose distribution for a given volume. Significant differences in both the means and distributions at the Pmax and up to the 0.8-cc volume were observed. Concordant significance was greatest for the Pmax volume. At the Pmax volume the fit of the logistic regression model, summarized by the area under the curve, was 0.87. A risk of RM of 5% or less was observed when limiting the thecal sac Pmax volume doses to 12.4 Gy in a single fraction, 17.0 Gy in 2 fractions, 20.3 Gy in 3 fractions, 23.0 Gy in 4 fractions, and 25.3 Gy in 5 fractions. We report the first logistic regression model yielding estimates for the probability of human RM specific to SBRT. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Application of failure mode and effects analysis to intracranial stereotactic radiation surgery by linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Masini, Laura; Donis, Laura; Loi, Gianfranco; Mones, Eleonora; Molina, Elisa; Bolchini, Cesare; Krengli, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the application of the failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) to intracranial stereotactic radiation surgery (SRS) by linear accelerator in order to identify the potential failure modes in the process tree and adopt appropriate safety measures to prevent adverse events (AEs) and near-misses, thus improving the process quality. A working group was set up to perform FMEA for intracranial SRS in the framework of a quality assurance program. FMEA was performed in 4 consecutive tasks: (1) creation of a visual map of the process; (2) identification of possible failure modes; (3) assignment of a risk probability number (RPN) to each failure mode based on tabulated scores of severity, frequency of occurrence and detectability; and (4) identification of preventive measures to minimize the risk of occurrence. The whole SRS procedure was subdivided into 73 single steps; 116 total possible failure modes were identified and a score of severity, occurrence, and detectability was assigned to each. Based on these scores, RPN was calculated for each failure mode thus obtaining values from 1 to 180. In our analysis, 112/116 (96.6%) RPN values were <60, 2 (1.7%) between 60 and 125 (63, 70), and 2 (1.7%) >125 (135, 180). The 2 highest RPN scores were assigned to the risk of using the wrong collimator's size and incorrect coordinates on the laser target localizer frame. Failure modes and effects analysis is a simple and practical proactive tool for systematic analysis of risks in radiation therapy. In our experience of SRS, FMEA led to the adoption of major changes in various steps of the SRS procedure.

  19. Vertebral Compression Fracture (VCF) After Spine Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT): Analysis of Predictive Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Cunha, Marcelo V.R.; Al-Omair, Ameen; Atenafu, Eshetu G.; Masucci, Giuseppina Laura; Letourneau, Daniel; Korol, Renee; Yu, Eugene; Howard, Peter; Lochray, Fiona; Costa, Leodante B. da; Fehlings, Michael G.; Sahgal, Arjun

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Vertebral compression fractures (VCFs) are increasingly observed after spine stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). The aim of this study was to determine the risk of VCF after spine SBRT and identify clinical and dosimetric factors predictive for VCF. The analysis incorporated the recently described Spinal Instability Neoplastic Score (SINS) criteria. Methods and Materials: The primary endpoint of this study was the development of a de novo VCF (ie, new endplate fracture or collapse deformity) or fracture progression based on an existing fracture at the site of treatment after SBRT. We retrospectively scored 167 spinal segments in 90 patients treated with spine SBRT according to each of the 6 SINS criteria. We also evaluated the presence of paraspinal extension, prior radiation, various dosimetric parameters including dose per fraction ({>=}20 Gy vs <20 Gy), age, and histology. Results: The median follow-up was 7.4 months. We identified 19 fractures (11%): 12 de novo fractures (63%) and 7 cases of fracture progression (37%). The mean time to fracture after SBRT was 3.3 months (range, 0.5-21.6 months). The 1-year fracture-free probability was 87.3%. Multivariate analysis confirmed that alignment (P=.0003), lytic lesions (P=.007), lung (P=.03) and hepatocellular (P<.0001) primary histologies, and dose per fraction of 20 Gy or greater (P=.004) were significant predictors of VCF. Conclusions: The presence of kyphotic/scoliotic deformity and the presence of lytic tumor were the only predictive factors of VCF based on the original 6 SINS criteria. We also report that patients with lung and hepatocellular tumors and treatment with SBRT of 20 Gy or greater in a single fraction are at a higher risk of VCF.

  20. Method and devices for performing stereotactic microbeam radiation therapy

    DOEpatents

    Dilmanian, F. Avraham

    2010-01-05

    A radiation delivery system generally includes either a synchrotron source or a support frame and a plurality of microbeam delivery devices supported on the support frame, both to deliver a beam in a hemispherical arrangement. Each of the microbeam delivery devices or synchrotron irradiation ports is adapted to deliver at least one microbeam of radiation along a microbeam delivery axis, wherein the microbeam delivery axes of the plurality of microbeam delivery devices cross within a common target volume.

  1. Dose Escalated Liver Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy at the Mean Respiratory Position

    SciTech Connect

    Velec, Michael; Moseley, Joanne L.; Dawson, Laura A.; Brock, Kristy K.

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: The dosimetric impact of dose probability based planning target volume (PTV) margins for liver cancer patients receiving stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) was compared with standard PTV based on the internal target volume (ITV). Plan robustness was evaluated by accumulating the treatment dose to ensure delivery of the intended plan. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients planned on exhale CT for 27 to 50 Gy in 6 fractions using an ITV-based PTV and treated free-breathing were retrospectively evaluated. Isotoxic, dose escalated plans were created on midposition computed tomography (CT), representing the mean breathing position, using a dose probability PTV. The delivered doses were accumulated using biomechanical deformable registration of the daily cone beam CT based on liver targeting at the exhale or mean breathing position, for the exhale and midposition CT plans, respectively. Results: The dose probability PTVs were on average 38% smaller than the ITV-based PTV, enabling an average ± standard deviation increase in the planned dose to 95% of the PTV of 4.0 ± 2.8 Gy (9 ± 5%) on the midposition CT (P<.01). For both plans, the delivered minimum gross tumor volume (GTV) doses were greater than the planned nominal prescribed dose in all 20 patients and greater than the planned dose to 95% of the PTV in 18 (90%) patients. Nine patients (45%) had 1 or more GTVs with a delivered minimum dose more than 5 Gy higher with the midposition CT plan using dose probability PTV, compared with the delivered dose with the exhale CT plan using ITV-based PTV. Conclusions: For isotoxic liver SBRT planned and delivered at the mean respiratory, reduced dose probability PTV enables a mean escalation of 4 Gy (9%) in 6 fractions over ITV-based PTV. This may potentially improve local control without increasing the risk of tumor underdosing.

  2. Dose escalated liver stereotactic body radiation therapy at the mean respiratory position.

    PubMed

    Velec, Michael; Moseley, Joanne L; Dawson, Laura A; Brock, Kristy K

    2014-08-01

    The dosimetric impact of dose probability based planning target volume (PTV) margins for liver cancer patients receiving stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) was compared with standard PTV based on the internal target volume (ITV). Plan robustness was evaluated by accumulating the treatment dose to ensure delivery of the intended plan. Twenty patients planned on exhale CT for 27 to 50 Gy in 6 fractions using an ITV-based PTV and treated free-breathing were retrospectively evaluated. Isotoxic, dose escalated plans were created on midposition computed tomography (CT), representing the mean breathing position, using a dose probability PTV. The delivered doses were accumulated using biomechanical deformable registration of the daily cone beam CT based on liver targeting at the exhale or mean breathing position, for the exhale and midposition CT plans, respectively. The dose probability PTVs were on average 38% smaller than the ITV-based PTV, enabling an average ± standard deviation increase in the planned dose to 95% of the PTV of 4.0 ± 2.8 Gy (9 ± 5%) on the midposition CT (P<.01). For both plans, the delivered minimum gross tumor volume (GTV) doses were greater than the planned nominal prescribed dose in all 20 patients and greater than the planned dose to 95% of the PTV in 18 (90%) patients. Nine patients (45%) had 1 or more GTVs with a delivered minimum dose more than 5 Gy higher with the midposition CT plan using dose probability PTV, compared with the delivered dose with the exhale CT plan using ITV-based PTV. For isotoxic liver SBRT planned and delivered at the mean respiratory, reduced dose probability PTV enables a mean escalation of 4 Gy (9%) in 6 fractions over ITV-based PTV. This may potentially improve local control without increasing the risk of tumor underdosing. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. [Doses to organs at risk in conformational and stereotactic body radiation therapy: Liver].

    PubMed

    Debbi, K; Janoray, G; Scher, N; Deutsch, É; Mornex, F

    2017-10-01

    The liver is an essential organ that ensures many vital functions such as metabolism of bilirubin, glucose, lipids, synthesis of coagulation factors, destruction of many toxins, etc. The hepatic parenchyma can be irradiated during the management of digestive tumors, right basithoracic, esophagus, abdomen in toto or TBI. In addition, radiotherapy of the hepatic area, which is mainly stereotactic, now occupies a central place in the management of primary or secondary hepatic tumors. Irradiation of the whole liver, or part of it, may be complicated by radiation-induced hepatitis. It is therefore necessary to respect strict dosimetric constraints both in stereotactic and in conformational irradiation in order to limit the undesired irradiation of the hepatic parenchyma which may vary according to the treatment techniques, the basic hepatic function or the lesion size. The liver is an organ with a parallel architecture, so the average tolerable dose in the whole liver should be considered rather than the maximum tolerable dose at one point. The purpose of this article is to propose a development of dose recommendations during conformation or stereotactic radiotherapy of the liver. Copyright © 2017 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Biological equivalent dose studies for dose escalation in the stereotactic synchrotron radiation therapy clinical trials

    SciTech Connect

    Prezado, Y.; Fois, G.; Edouard, M.; Nemoz, C.; Renier, M.; Requardt, H.; Esteve, F.; Adam, JF.; Elleaume, H.; Bravin, A.

    2009-03-15

    Synchrotron radiation is an innovative tool for the treatment of brain tumors. In the stereotactic synchrotron radiation therapy (SSRT) technique a radiation dose enhancement specific to the tumor is obtained. The tumor is loaded with a high atomic number (Z) element and it is irradiated in stereotactic conditions from several entrance angles. The aim of this work was to assess dosimetric properties of the SSRT for preparing clinical trials at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). To estimate the possible risks, the doses received by the tumor and healthy tissues in the future clinical conditions have been calculated by using Monte Carlo simulations (PENELOPE code). The dose enhancement factors have been determined for different iodine concentrations in the tumor, several tumor positions, tumor sizes, and different beam sizes. A scheme for the dose escalation in the various phases of the clinical trials has been proposed. The biological equivalent doses and the normalized total doses received by the skull have been calculated in order to assure that the tolerance values are not reached.

  5. Outcomes targeting the PD-1/PD-L1 axis in conjunction with stereotactic radiation for patients with non-small cell lung cancer brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Kamran A; Kim, Sungjune; Arrington, John; Naghavi, Arash O; Dilling, Thomas J; Creelan, Ben C; Antonia, Scott J; Caudell, Jimmy J; Harrison, Louis B; Sahebjam, Solmaz; Gray, Jhanelle E; Etame, Arnold B; Johnstone, Peter A; Yu, Michael; Perez, Bradford A

    2017-06-01

    Anti-PD-1/PD-L1 therapies have demonstrated activity in patients with advanced stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, little is known about the safety and feasibility of patients receiving anti-PD-1/PD-L1 therapy and stereotactic radiation for the treatment of brain metastases. Data were analyzed retrospectively from NSCLC patients treated with stereotactic radiation either before, during or after anti-PD-1/PD-L1 therapy with nivolumab (anti-PD-1) or durvalumab (anti-PD-L1). Seventeen patients treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) or fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (FSRT) to 49 brain metastases over 21 sessions were identified. Radiation was administered prior to, during and after anti-PD-1/PD-L1 therapy in 22 lesions (45%), 13 lesions (27%), and 14 lesions (29%), respectively. The 6 months Kaplan-Meier (KM) distant brain control rate was 48% following stereotactic radiation. Six and 12 month KM rates of OS from the date of stereotactic radiation and the date of cranial metastases diagnosis were 48/41% and 81/51%, respectively. The 6 month rate of distant brain control following stereotactic radiation for patients treated with stereotactic radiation during or prior to anti-PD-1/PD-L1 therapy was 57% compared to 0% among patients who received anti-PD-1/PD-L1 therapy before stereotactic radiation (p = 0.05). A Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) of <90 was found to be predictive of worse OS following radiation treatment on both univariate and multivariate analyses (MVA, p = 0.01). In our series, stereotactic radiation to NSCLC brain metastases was well tolerated in patients who received anti-PD-1/PD-L1 therapy. Prospective evaluation to determine how these two modalities can be used synergistically to improve distant brain control and OS is warranted.

  6. Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiation Therapy for Octogenarians With Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, Atsuya; Sanuki, Naoko; Eriguchi, Takahisa; Kaneko, Takeshi; Morita, Satoshi; Handa, Hiroshi; Aoki, Yousuke; Oku, Yohei; Kunieda, Etsuo

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively investigate treatment outcomes of stereotactic ablative body radiation therapy (SABR) for octogenarians with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Between 2005 and 2012, 109 patients aged ≥80 years with T1-2N0M0 NSCLC were treated with SABR: 47 patients had histology-unproven lung cancer; 62 patients had pathologically proven NSCLC. The prescribed doses were either 50 Gy/5 fractions for peripheral tumors or 40 Gy/5 fractions for centrally located tumors. The treatment outcomes, toxicities, and the correlating factors for overall survival (OS) were evaluated. Results: The median follow-up duration after SABR was 24.2 (range, 3.0-64.6) months. Only limited toxicities were observed, except for 1 grade 5 radiation pneumonitis. The 3-year local, regional, and distant metastasis-free survival rates were 82.3%, 90.1%, and 76.8%, respectively. The OS and lung cancer-specific survival rates were 53.7% and 70.8%, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that medically inoperable, low body mass index, high T stage, and high C-reactive protein were the predictors for short OS. The OS for the operable octogenarians was significantly better than that for inoperable (P<.01). Conclusions: Stereotactic ablative body radiation therapy for octogenarians was feasible, with excellent OS. Multivariate analysis revealed that operability was one of the predictors for OS. For medically operable octogenarians with early-stage NSCLC, SABR should be prospectively compared with resection.

  7. The clinical outcome of intracranial hemangioblastomas treated with linac-based stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Puataweepong, Putipun; Dhanachai, Mantana; Hansasuta, Ake; Dangprasert, Somjai; Sitathanee, Chomporn; Puddhikarant, Parmon; Jiarpinitnun, Chuleeporn; Ruangkanchanasetr, Rawee; Dechsupa, Patchareporn; Pairat, Kumutinee

    2014-01-01

    Recent publications have reported stereotactic radiosurgery as an effective and safe treatment for intracranial hemangioblastomas. However, because of the low incidence of these particular tumors, reports on large patient number studies have not yet been available. The objective of this study was to analyze the clinical results of 14 patients with 56 intracranial hemangioblastomas treated with linear accelerator (linac)-based stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and radiotherapy (SRT) in the same institute. The median age of patients was 41 years (range, 28–73 years). Nine of the patients (64%) had von Hippel-Lindau disease. A total of 39 lesions (70%) were treated with CyberKnife (CK), and 17 lesions (30%) were treated with X-Knife. The median pretreatment volume was 0.26 cm3 (range, 0.026–20.4 cm3). The median marginal dose was 20 Gy (range, 10–32 Gy) in 1 fraction (range, 1–10 fractions). The median follow-up time was 24 months (range, 11–89 months). At the last follow-up, 47 tumors (84%) were stable, 7 (13%) decreased and 2 (4%) increased. The 1-, 2- and 6-year local control rates were 98%, 88% and 73%, respectively. No radiation complications were observed in this study. There was a trend toward local failure only in cystic tumors, but this trend was not found to be statistically significant. SRS/SRT achieved a high local control rate in intracranial hemangioblastomas without radiation-induced complications. PMID:24554558

  8. Dosimetric comparison of patient setup strategies in stereotactic body radiation therapy for lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Jianzhou; He, Tongming T.; Betzing, Christopher; Fuss, Martin; D'Souza, Warren D.

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: In this work, the authors retrospectively compared the accumulated dose over the treatment course for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of lung cancer for three patient setup strategies. Methods: Ten patients who underwent lung SBRT were selected for this study. At each fraction, patients were immobilized using a vacuum cushion and were CT scanned. Treatment plans were performed on the simulation CT. The planning target volume (PTV) was created by adding a 5-mm uniform margin to the internal target volume derived from the 4DCT. All plans were normalized such that 99% of the PTV received 60 Gy. The plan parameters were copied onto the daily CT images for dose recalculation under three setup scenarios: skin marker, bony structure, and soft tissue based alignments. The accumulated dose was calculated by summing the dose at each fraction along the trajectory of a voxel over the treatment course through deformable image registration of each CT with the planning CT. The accumulated doses were analyzed for the comparison of setup accuracy. Results: The tumor volume receiving 60 Gy was 91.7 {+-} 17.9%, 74.1 {+-} 39.1%, and 99.6 {+-} 1.3% for setup using skin marks, bony structures, and soft tissue, respectively. The isodose line covering 100% of the GTV was 55.5 {+-} 7.1, 42.1 {+-} 16.0, and 64.3 {+-} 7.1 Gy, respectively. The corresponding average biologically effective dose of the tumor was 237.3 {+-} 29.4, 207.4 {+-} 61.2, and 258.3 {+-} 17.7 Gy, respectively. The differences in lung biologically effective dose, mean dose, and V20 between the setup scenarios were insignificant. Conclusions: The authors' results suggest that skin marks and bony structure are insufficient for aligning patients in lung SBRT. Soft tissue based alignment is needed to match the prescribed dose delivered to the tumors.

  9. Optimization of Stereotactic Radiotherapy Treatment Delivery Technique for Base-Of-Skull Meningiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Brenda G. Candish, Charles; Vollans, Emily; Gete, Ermias; Lee, Richard; Martin, Monty; Ma, Roy; McKenzie, Michael

    2008-10-01

    This study compares static conformal field (CF), intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and dynamic arcs (DA) for the stereotactic radiotherapy of base-of-skull meningiomas. Twenty-one cases of base-of-skull meningioma (median planning target volume [PTV] = 21.3 cm{sup 3}) previously treated with stereotactic radiotherapy were replanned with each technique. The plans were compared for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group conformity index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI), and doses to normal structures at 6 dose values from 50.4 Gy to 5.6 Gy. The mean CI was 1.75 (CF), 1.75 (DA), and 1.66 (IMRT) (p < 0.05 when comparing IMRT to either CF or DA plans). The CI (IMRT) was inversely proportional to the size of the PTV (Spearman's rho = -0.53, p = 0.01) and at PTV sizes above 25 cm{sup 3}, the CI (IMRT) was always superior to CI (DA) and CI (CF). At PTV sizes below 25 cm{sup 3}, there was no significant difference in CI between each technique. There was no significant difference in HI between plans. The total volume of normal tissue receiving 50.4, 44.8, and 5.6 Gy was significantly lower when comparing IMRT to CF and DA plans (p < 0.05). There was significantly improved dose sparing for the brain stem and ipsilateral temporal lobe with IMRT but no significant difference for the optic chiasm or pituitary gland. These results demonstrate that stereotactic IMRT should be considered to treat base-of-skull meningiomas with a PTV larger than 25 cm{sup 3}, due to improved conformity and normal tissue sparing, in particular for the brain stem and ipsilateral temporal lobe.

  10. Optimization of stereotactic radiotherapy treatment delivery technique for base-of-skull meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Clark, Brenda G; Candish, Charles; Vollans, Emily; Gete, Ermias; Lee, Richard; Martin, Monty; Ma, Roy; McKenzie, Michael

    2008-01-01

    This study compares static conformal field (CF), intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and dynamic arcs (DA) for the stereotactic radiotherapy of base-of-skull meningiomas. Twenty-one cases of base-of-skull meningioma (median planning target volume [PTV] = 21.3 cm3) previously treated with stereotactic radiotherapy were replanned with each technique. The plans were compared for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group conformity index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI), and doses to normal structures at 6 dose values from 50.4 Gy to 5.6 Gy. The mean CI was 1.75 (CF), 1.75 (DA), and 1.66 (IMRT) (p < 0.05 when comparing IMRT to either CF or DA plans). The CI (IMRT) was inversely proportional to the size of the PTV (Spearman's rho = -0.53, p = 0.01) and at PTV sizes above 25 cm3, the CI (IMRT) was always superior to CI (DA) and CI (CF). At PTV sizes below 25 cm3, there was no significant difference in CI between each technique. There was no significant difference in HI between plans. The total volume of normal tissue receiving 50.4, 44.8, and 5.6 Gy was significantly lower when comparing IMRT to CF and DA plans (p < 0.05). There was significantly improved dose sparing for the brain stem and ipsilateral temporal lobe with IMRT but no significant difference for the optic chiasm or pituitary gland. These results demonstrate that stereotactic IMRT should be considered to treat base-of-skull meningiomas with a PTV larger than 25 cm3, due to improved conformity and normal tissue sparing, in particular for the brain stem and ipsilateral temporal lobe.

  11. Effect of Fractionation in Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Using the Linear Quadratic Model

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jun; Lamond, John; Fowler, Jack; Lanciano, Rachelle; Feng, Jing; Brady, Luther

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: To examine the fractionation effect of stereotactic body radiation therapy with a heterogeneous dose distribution. Methods: Derived from the linear quadratic formula with measurements from a hypothetical 2-cm radiosurgical tumor, the threshold percentage was defined as (α/β{sub tissue}/α/β{sub tumor}), the balance α/β ratio was defined as (prescription dose/tissue tolerance*α/β{sub tumor}), and the balance dose was defined as (tissue tolerance/threshold percentage). Results: With increasing fractions and equivalent peripheral dose to the target, the biological equivalent dose of “hot spots” in a target decreases. The relative biological equivalent doses of serial organs decrease only when the relative percentage of its dose to the prescription dose is above the threshold percentage. The volume of parallel organs at risk decreases only when the tumor's α/β ratio is above the balance α/β ratio and the prescription dose is lower than balance dose. Conclusions: The potential benefits of fractionation in stereotactic body radiation therapy depend on the complex interplay between the total dose, α/β ratios, and dose differences between the target and the surrounding normal tissues.

  12. Local control dependence on consecutive vs. nonconsecutive fractionation in lung stereotactic body radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Alite, Fiori; Stang, Kyle; Balasubramanian, Neelam; Adams, William; Shaikh, Mohammad Parvez; Small, Christina; Sethi, Anil; Nagda, Suneel; Emami, Bahman; Harkenrider, Matthew M

    2016-10-01

    Recent reports demonstrate impaired tumor re-oxygenation 24-48h after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), suggesting that non-consecutive treatment delivery may be advantageous. To test this hypothesis clinically, we compared local control in patients treated in consecutive daily fractions vs. nonconsecutive fractions. We retrospectively reviewed 107 lung SBRT patients (117 tumors) treated for T1-T2N0 NSCLC with LINAC based SBRT (50 or 60Gy/5fractions). Patients were characterized as having been treated in consecutive daily fractions vs. in non-consecutive fractions. Local control, survival and toxicity end points (CTCAE V4.0) were compared. Propensity score matching and Cox regression analyses were performed in order to determine the effect of fractionation on local control. With a median follow up of 23.7months, 3-year local control was superior at 93.3% vs. 63.6% in the non-consecutive and consecutive group, respectively (p=0.001). Multivariate analysis and propensity score matching showed that consecutive fractionation was an independent predictor of local failure. Overall survival trended toward improvement in the non-consecutive group, but this was not statistically significant (p=0.188). Development of any grade 2 toxicity was not significantly different between the two groups (p=0.75). Five-fraction SBRT delivered over non-consecutive days imparts superior LC and similar toxicity compared to consecutive fractionation. These results should be validated in independent datasets and in a prospective fashion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. SU-F-P-23: Setup Uncertainties for the Lung Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Q; Vigneri, P; Madu, C; Potters, L; Cao, Y; Jamshidi, A; Klein, E

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The Exactrack X-ray system with six degree-of-freedom (6DoF) adjustment ability can be used for setup of lung stereotactic body radiation therapy. The setup uncertainties from ExacTrack 6D system were analyzed. Methods: The Exactrack X-ray 6D image guided radiotherapy system is used in our clinic. The system is an integration of 2 subsystems: (1): an infrared based optical position system and (2) a radiography kV x-ray imaging system. The infrared system monitors reflective body markers on the patient’s skin to assistant in the initial setup. The radiographic kV devices were used for patient positions verification and adjustment. The position verification was made by fusing the radiographs with the digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) images generated by simulation CT images using 6DoF fusion algorithms. Those results were recorded in our system. Gaussian functions were used to fit the data. Results: For 37 lung SBRT patients, the image registration results for the initial setup by using surface markers and for the verifications, were measured. The results were analyzed for 143 treatments. The mean values for the lateral, longitudinal, vertical directions were 0.1, 0.3 and 0.3mm, respectively. The standard deviations for the lateral, longitudinal and vertical directions were 0.62, 0.78 and 0.75mm respectively. The mean values for the rotations around lateral, longitudinal and vertical directions were 0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 degrees respectively, with standard deviations of 0.36, 0.34, and 0.42 degrees. Conclusion: The setup uncertainties for the lung SBRT cases by using Exactrack 6D system were analyzed. The standard deviations of the setup errors were within 1mm for all three directions, and the standard deviations for rotations were within 0.5 degree.

  14. Adaptive Liver Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy: Automated Daily Plan Reoptimization Prevents Dose Delivery Degradation Caused by Anatomy Deformations

    SciTech Connect

    Leinders, Suzanne M.; Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Méndez Romero, Alejandra; Schaart, Dennis; Seppenwoolde, Yvette; Heijmen, Ben J.M.

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate how dose distributions for liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) can be improved by using automated, daily plan reoptimization to account for anatomy deformations, compared with setup corrections only. Methods and Materials: For 12 tumors, 3 strategies for dose delivery were simulated. In the first strategy, computed tomography scans made before each treatment fraction were used only for patient repositioning before dose delivery for correction of detected tumor setup errors. In adaptive second and third strategies, in addition to the isocenter shift, intensity modulated radiation therapy beam profiles were reoptimized or both intensity profiles and beam orientations were reoptimized, respectively. All optimizations were performed with a recently published algorithm for automated, multicriteria optimization of both beam profiles and beam angles. Results: In 6 of 12 cases, violations of organs at risk (ie, heart, stomach, kidney) constraints of 1 to 6 Gy in single fractions occurred in cases of tumor repositioning only. By using the adaptive strategies, these could be avoided (<1 Gy). For 1 case, this needed adaptation by slightly underdosing the planning target volume. For 2 cases with restricted tumor dose in the planning phase to avoid organ-at-risk constraint violations, fraction doses could be increased by 1 and 2 Gy because of more favorable anatomy. Daily reoptimization of both beam profiles and beam angles (third strategy) performed slightly better than reoptimization of profiles only, but the latter required only a few minutes of computation time, whereas full reoptimization took several hours. Conclusions: This simulation study demonstrated that replanning based on daily acquired computed tomography scans can improve liver stereotactic body radiation therapy dose delivery.

  15. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for skull base tumors: analysis of treatment accuracy using a stereotactic mask fixation system

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background To assess the accuracy of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) using a stereotactic mask fixation system. Patients and Methods Sixteen patients treated with FSRT were involved in the study. A commercial stereotactic mask fixation system (BrainLAB AG) was used for patient immobilization. Serial CT scans obtained before and during FSRT were used to assess the accuracy of patient immobilization by comparing the isocenter position. Daily portal imaging were acquired to establish day to day patient position variation. Displacement errors along the different directions were calculated as combination of systematic and random errors. Results The mean isocenter displacements based on localization and verification CT imaging were 0.1 mm (SD 0.3 mm) in the lateral direction, 0.1 mm (SD 0.4 mm) in the anteroposterior, and 0.3 mm (SD 0.4 mm) in craniocaudal direction. The mean 3D displacement was 0.5 mm (SD 0.4 mm), being maximum 1.4 mm. No significant differences were found during the treatment (P = 0.4). The overall isocenter displacement as calculated by 456 anterior and lateral portal images were 0.3 mm (SD 0.9 mm) in the mediolateral direction, -0.2 mm (SD 1 mm) in the anteroposterior direction, and 0.2 mm (SD 1.1 mm) in the craniocaudal direction. The largest displacement of 2.7 mm was seen in the cranio-caudal direction, with 95% of displacements < 2 mm in any direction. Conclusions The results indicate that the setup error of the presented mask system evaluated by CT verification scans and portal imaging are minimal. Reproducibility of the isocenter position is in the best range of positioning reproducibility reported for other stereotactic systems. PMID:20070901

  16. A Phase I/II adaptive design for heterogeneous groups with application to a stereotactic body radiation therapy trial.

    PubMed

    Wages, Nolan A; Read, Paul W; Petroni, Gina R

    2015-01-01

    Dose-finding studies that aim to evaluate the safety of single agents are becoming less common, and advances in clinical research have complicated the paradigm of dose finding in oncology. A class of more complex problems, such as targeted agents, combination therapies and stratification of patients by clinical or genetic characteristics, has created the need to adapt early-phase trial design to the specific type of drug being investigated and the corresponding endpoints. In this article, we describe the implementation of an adaptive design based on a continual reassessment method for heterogeneous groups, modified to coincide with the objectives of a Phase I/II trial of stereotactic body radiation therapy in patients with painful osseous metastatic disease. Operating characteristics of the Institutional Review Board approved design are demonstrated under various possible true scenarios via simulation studies. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. A current perspective on stereotactic body radiation therapy for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Julian C; Czito, Brian G; Willett, Christopher G; Palta, Manisha

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a formidable malignancy with poor outcomes. The majority of patients are unable to undergo resection, which remains the only potentially curative treatment option. The management of locally advanced (unresectable) pancreatic cancer is controversial; however, treatment with either chemotherapy or chemoradiation is associated with high rates of local tumor progression and metastases development, resulting in low survival rates. An emerging local modality is stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), which uses image-guided, conformal, high-dose radiation. SBRT has demonstrated promising local control rates and resultant quality of life with acceptable rates of toxicity. Over the past decade, increasing clinical experience and data have supported SBRT as a local treatment modality. Nevertheless, additional research is required to further evaluate the role of SBRT and improve upon the persistently poor outcomes associated with pancreatic cancer. This review discusses the existing clinical experience and technical implementation of SBRT for pancreatic cancer and highlights the directions for ongoing and future studies. PMID:27826200

  18. A simple and robust trajectory-based stereotactic radiosurgery treatment.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Byron; Otto, Karl; Gete, Ermias

    2017-01-01

    We present a Trajectory-based Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (TVMAT) technique for Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) that takes advantage of a modern linacs ability to modulate dose rate and move the couch dynamically. In addition, we investigate the quality of the developed TVMAT method and the dosimetric accuracy of the technique. The main feature of the TVMAT technique is a standard beam trajectory formed by dynamic motion of the treatment couch and the linac gantry. The couch rotates slowly through 180 degrees while the gantry delivers radiation through continuous sweeps of the gantry. The number of partial arcs that constitute the trajectory can be varied between two and eight and as the number of partial arcs increases, the trajectory more finely samples 4π geometry. Along these trajectories, the multi-leaf collimator (MLC) and dose rate are optimized through an inverse planning framework. The TVMAT method was tested on ten cranial SRS patients who were previously treated with the Dynamic Conformal Arc (DCA) technique. The plans were compared with the DCA and a four- arc VMAT technique with regards to dose to the OAR, dose falloff, V12Gy, and V4Gy. Validation measurements were performed using ion-chamber and Gafchromic film. In addition, the trajectory-log files were analyzed and compared with the treatment plan beam data. The TVMAT treatment plans were successfully delivered with a treatment time between 3-8 min which mostly depended on total cumulated dose. Ion chamber measurements had an average measured error of 1.1 ± 0.6% and a maximum value of 2.2% of the delivered dose. The 2%, 2 mm gamma pass rates for the film measurements were 96% or greater. In a preliminary comparison of ten patients who underwent SRS treatments with the DCA technique, the TVMAT and VMAT techniques were able to produce plans with comparable dose falloff and OAR doses, while achieving better dose conformality, V4Gy and V12Gy when compared to the original DCA plans. The

  19. Quantifying Rigid and Nonrigid Motion of Liver Tumors During Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Qianyi; Hanna, George; Grimm, Jimm; Kubicek, Gregory; Pahlajani, Niraj; Asbell, Sucha; Fan, Jiajin; Chen, Yan; LaCouture, Tamara

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: To quantify rigid and nonrigid motion of liver tumors using reconstructed 3-dimensional (3D) fiducials from stereo imaging during CyberKnife-based stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Twenty-three liver patients treated with 3 fractions of SBRT were used in this study. After 2 orthogonal kilovoltage images were taken during treatment, the 3D locations of the fiducials were generated by the CyberKnife system and validated using geometric derivations. A total of 4824 pairs of kilovoltage images from start to end of treatment were analyzed. For rigid motion, the rotational angles and translational shifts were reported by aligning 3D fiducial groups from different image pairs, using least-squares fitting. For nonrigid motion, we quantified interfractional tumor volume variations by using the proportional volume derived from the fiducials, which correlates to the sum of interfiducial distances. The individual fiducial displacements were also reported (1) after rigid corrections and (2) without angle corrections. Results: The proportional volume derived by the fiducials demonstrated a volume-increasing trend in the second (101.9% ± 3.6%) and third (101.0 ± 5.9%) fractions among most patients, possibly due to radiation-induced edema. For all patients, the translational shifts in left-right, anteroposterior, and superoinferior directions were 2.1 ± 2.3 mm, 2.9 ± 2.8 mm, and 6.4 ± 5.5 mm, respectively. The greatest translational shifts occurred in the superoinferior direction, likely due to respiratory motion from the diaphragm. The rotational angles in roll, pitch, and yaw were 1.2° ± 1.8°, 1.8° ± 2.4°, and 1.7° ± 2.1°, respectively. The 3D individual fiducial displacements with rigid corrections were 0.2 ± 0.2 mm and increased to 0.5 ± 0.4 mm without rotational corrections. Conclusions: Accurate 3D locations of internal fiducials can be reconstructed from stereo imaging during treatment. As an

  20. Management of choroidal melanomas with linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Leung, S W; Hsiung, C Y; Chen, H C; Chen, H J; Lin, S A

    1999-02-01

    To discuss the technical aspect, dose prescription, clinical results, and biological responsiveness of linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery for choroidal melanoma. From March 1995 to December 1995, three choroidal melanoma patients were treated with Linac-based radiosurgery in our department. Two patients underwent one dose of radiosurgery with 18 and 20 Gy in single fraction, respectively. The third patient received two doses of radiosurgery with a total dose of 35 Gy. Follow-up time ranged from 19 to 25 months (median: 24 months). One patient had near-total regression, while the other two patients had partial response on the last MR images. Visual acuity was deteriorated in all patients. One patient developed a radiation-induced cataract in the treated eye. Linac-based radiosurgery is technically feasible for management of choroidal melanoma. Although visual acuity was not improved in these patients, they appreciated the preserving of the eyeball without affecting their general appearance.

  1. Six-Dimensional Correction of Intra-Fractional Prostate Motion with CyberKnife Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Siyuan; Piel, Nathaniel; Oermann, Eric K.; Chen, Viola; Ju, Andrew W.; Dahal, Kedar N.; Hanscom, Heather N.; Kim, Joy S.; Yu, Xia; Zhang, Guowei; Collins, Brian T.; Jha, Reena; Dritschilo, Anatoly; Suy, Simeng; Collins, Sean P.

    2011-01-01

    Large fraction radiation therapy offers a shorter course of treatment and radiobiological advantages for prostate cancer treatment. The CyberKnife is an attractive technology for delivering large fraction doses based on the ability to deliver highly conformal radiation therapy to moving targets. In addition to intra-fractional translational motion (left–right, superior–inferior, and anterior–posterior), prostate rotation (pitch, roll, and yaw) can increase geographical miss risk. We describe our experience with six-dimensional (6D) intra-fraction prostate motion correction using CyberKnife stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Eighty-eight patients were treated by SBRT alone or with supplemental external radiation therapy. Trans-perineal placement of four gold fiducials within the prostate accommodated X-ray guided prostate localization and beam adjustment. Fiducial separation and non-overlapping positioning permitted the orthogonal imaging required for 6D tracking. Fiducial placement accuracy was assessed using the CyberKnife fiducial extraction algorithm. Acute toxicities were assessed using Common Toxicity Criteria v3. There were no Grade 3, or higher, complications and acute morbidity was minimal. Ninety-eight percent of patients completed treatment employing 6D prostate motion tracking with intra-fractional beam correction. Suboptimal fiducial placement limited treatment to 3D tracking in two patients. Our experience may guide others in performing 6D correction of prostate motion with CyberKnife SBRT. PMID:22655248

  2. Six-Dimensional Correction of Intra-Fractional Prostate Motion with CyberKnife Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lei, Siyuan; Piel, Nathaniel; Oermann, Eric K; Chen, Viola; Ju, Andrew W; Dahal, Kedar N; Hanscom, Heather N; Kim, Joy S; Yu, Xia; Zhang, Guowei; Collins, Brian T; Jha, Reena; Dritschilo, Anatoly; Suy, Simeng; Collins, Sean P

    2011-01-01

    Large fraction radiation therapy offers a shorter course of treatment and radiobiological advantages for prostate cancer treatment. The CyberKnife is an attractive technology for delivering large fraction doses based on the ability to deliver highly conformal radiation therapy to moving targets. In addition to intra-fractional translational motion (left-right, superior-inferior, and anterior-posterior), prostate rotation (pitch, roll, and yaw) can increase geographical miss risk. We describe our experience with six-dimensional (6D) intra-fraction prostate motion correction using CyberKnife stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Eighty-eight patients were treated by SBRT alone or with supplemental external radiation therapy. Trans-perineal placement of four gold fiducials within the prostate accommodated X-ray guided prostate localization and beam adjustment. Fiducial separation and non-overlapping positioning permitted the orthogonal imaging required for 6D tracking. Fiducial placement accuracy was assessed using the CyberKnife fiducial extraction algorithm. Acute toxicities were assessed using Common Toxicity Criteria v3. There were no Grade 3, or higher, complications and acute morbidity was minimal. Ninety-eight percent of patients completed treatment employing 6D prostate motion tracking with intra-fractional beam correction. Suboptimal fiducial placement limited treatment to 3D tracking in two patients. Our experience may guide others in performing 6D correction of prostate motion with CyberKnife SBRT.

  3. Design and development of new collimator cones for fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy in Samsung Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Y C; Ju, S G; Kim, D Y; Choi, D R; Huh, S J; Park, Y H; Lim, D H; Kim, M K

    1999-05-01

    In stereotactic radiotherapy using X-Knife system, the commercially supplied collimator cone system had a few mechanical limitations. The authors have developed new collimator cones to overcome these limitations and named them "SMC type" collimator cones. We made use of cadmium-free cerrobend alloy within the stainless steel cylinder housing. We made nine cones of relatively larger sizes (3.0 cm to 7.0 cm in diameter) and of shorter length with bigger clearance from the isocenter than the commercial cones. The cone housing and the collimator cones were designed to insert into the wedge mount of the gantry head to enable double-exposure linac-gram taking. The mechanical accuracy of pointing to the isocenter was tested by ball test and cone rotation test, and the dosimetric measurements were performed, all of which were with satisfactory results. A new innovative quality assurance procedure using linac-grams on the patients at the actual treatment setup was attempted after taking 10 sets of AP and lateral linac-grams and the overall mechanical isocenter accuracy was excellent (average error = 0.4 +/- 0.2 mm). We have developed the SMC type collimator cone system mainly for fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy use with our innovative ideas. The new cones' mechanical accuracy and physical properties were satisfactory for clinical use, and the verification of the isocenter accuracy on the actual treatment setup has become possible.

  4. Outcomes for Spine Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and an Analysis of Predictors of Local Recurrence

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, Andrew J.; Tao, Randa; Rebueno, Neal C.; Christensen, Eva N.; Allen, Pamela K.; Wang, Xin A.; Amini, Behrang; Tannir, Nizar M.; Tatsui, Claudio E.; Rhines, Laurence D.; Li, Jing; Chang, Eric L.; Brown, Paul D.; Ghia, Amol J.

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: To investigate local control, survival outcomes, and predictors of local relapse for patients treated with spine stereotactic body radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the records of 332 spinal metastases consecutively treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy between 2002 and 2012. The median follow-up for all living patients was 33 months (range, 0-111 months). Endpoints were overall survival and local control (LC); recurrences were classified as either in-field or marginal. Results: The 1-year actuarial LC and overall survival rates were 88% and 64%, respectively. Patients with local relapses had poorer dosimetric coverage of the gross tumor volume (GTV) compared with patients without recurrence (minimum dose [Dmin] biologically equivalent dose [BED] 23.9 vs 35.1 Gy, P<.001; D98 BED 41.8 vs 48.1 Gy, P=.001; D95 BED 47.2 vs 50.5 Gy, P=.004). Furthermore, patients with marginal recurrences had poorer prescription coverage of the GTV (86% vs 93%, P=.01) compared with those with in-field recurrences, potentially because of more upfront spinal canal disease (78% vs 24%, P=.001). Using a Cox regression univariate analysis, patients with a GTV BED Dmin ≥33.4 Gy (median dose) (equivalent to 14 Gy in 1 fraction) had a significantly higher 1-year LC rate (94% vs 80%, P=.001) compared with patients with a lower GTV BED Dmin; this factor was the only significant variable on multivariate Cox analysis associated with LC (P=.001, hazard ratio 0.29, 95% confidence interval 0.14-0.60) and also was the only variable significant in a separate competing risk multivariate model (P=.001, hazard ratio 0.30, 95% confidence interval 0.15-0.62). Conclusions: Stereotactic body radiation therapy offers durable control for spinal metastases, but there is a subset of patients that recur locally. Patients with local relapse had significantly poorer tumor coverage, which was likely attributable to treatment planning directives that prioritized the

  5. High-quality Linac-based Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy with Flattening Filter Free Beams and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy for Low-Intermediate Risk Prostate Cancer. A Mono-institutional Experience with 90 Patients.

    PubMed

    D'Agostino, G; Franzese, C; De Rose, F; Franceschini, D; Comito, T; Villa, E; Alongi, F; Liardo, R; Tomatis, S; Navarria, P; Mancosu, P; Reggiori, G; Cozzi, L; Scorsetti, M

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this phase II study was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of stereotactic body radiotherapy in patients with low or intermediate risk prostate cancer. Biopsy-confirmed prostate cancer patients were enrolled, provided that they had the following characteristics: initial prostate-specific antigen (PSA) ≤ 20 ng/ml, Gleason Score < 7, International Prostate Symptom Score < 7. The treatment schedule was 35 Gy in five fractions, delivered with volumetric modulated arcs with flattening filter free beams. Toxicity was recorded according to CTCAE criteria v4.0. Biochemical failure was calculated according to the Phoenix definition. The Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite questionnaire was used to record health-related quality of life. Between December 2011 and March 2015, 90 patients were enrolled (53 low risk, 37 intermediate risk). The median age was 71 years (range 48-82). In total, 58 (64.5%) of the patients had Gleason Score=6, the remaining had Gleason Score=7.The median initial PSA was 6.9 ng/ml (range 2.7-17.0). Acute toxicity was mild, with 32.2 patients presenting grade 1 urinary toxicity and 32.2% of patients presenting grade 2 urinary toxicity, mainly represented by urgency, dysuria and stranguria. Rectal grade 1 toxicity was found in 15.5% of patients, whereas grade 2 toxicity was recorded in 6.6% of patients. Regarding late toxicity, grade 1 proctitis was recorded in 11.1% of patients and grade 1 urinary in 38.8%; only two events of grade 2 urinary toxicity were observed (transient urethral stenosis, resolved by a 24 h catheterisation). At a median follow-up of 27 months (6-62 months) only two intermediate risk patients experienced a biochemical failure. Health-related quality of life revealed a slight worsening in all the domains during treatment, with a return to baseline 3 months after treatment. Stereotactic body radiotherapy delivered using linac-based flattening filter free volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy in low and

  6. Reenlargement of radiation necrosis after stereotactic radiotherapy for brain metastasis from lung cancer during bevacizumab treatment.

    PubMed

    Furuuchi, Koji; Nishiyama, Akihiro; Yoshioka, Hiroshige; Yokoyama, Toshihide; Ishida, Tadashi

    2017-03-01

    We describe a 55-year-old man who received stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) for the treatment of brain metastasis from lung adenocarcinoma. Fourteen months after SRT, right-sided hemiparesis developed, and magnetic resonance imaging revealed progression of perifocal edema and an enhanced lesion. Cerebral radiation necrosis was diagnosed, and treatment with bevacizumab was initiated. The lesion clearly responded to bevacizumab therapy, but reenlarged 8 months later and was surgically resected. Histopathological analysis of the resected specimen revealed large areas of necrosis; however, viable tumor cells were detected in the necrotic areas. Reenlargement of the necrotic lesion was attributed to the recurrence of lung cancer. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Respiratory Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Retreatment for prostate cancer with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT): Feasible or foolhardy?

    PubMed

    Arcangeli, Stefano; Agolli, Linda; Donato, Vittorio

    2015-01-01

    The most popular therapeutic option in the management of radio-recurrent prostatic carcinoma is represented by the androgen deprivation therapy, that however should be considered only palliative and hampered by potential adverse effects of testosterone suppression. Local therapies such as surgery, cryoablation or brachytherapy might be curative choices for patients in good conditions and with a long-life expectancy, but at cost of significant risk of failure and severe toxicity. The administration of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in this setting have come about because of tremendous technologic advances in image guidance and treatment delivery techniques that enable the delivery of large doses to tumor with reduced margins and high gradients outside the target, thereby reducing the volume of rectum which already received significant doses from primary radiotherapy. So far, very modest data are available to support its employment. Rationale, clinical experience, and challenges are herein reviewed and discussed.

  8. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Liver Lesions. A Single-institution Experience.

    PubMed

    Caivano, Donatella; Bracci, Stefano; Russo, Ivana; Montalto, Adelaide; Armosini, Veronica; De Sanctis, Vitaliana; Valeriani, Maurizio; Minniti, Giuseppe; Enrici, Riccardo Maurizi; Osti, Mattia Falchetto

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate survival and toxicity in a cohort of patients treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for unresectable intrahepatic malignancies. From 2007 to 2014, 23 patients with 34 lesions (three primary and 31 metastatic liver tumors) were treated with SBRT. The median follow-up was 9 months (range=1-76) for all patients. Local control was reached in 27 out of 34 (79%) treated lesions, with 1 and 2 years rates of 93% and 73%, respectively. The progression-free survival at 1-year and 2-year was 50% and 25%, respectively. Median overall survival was 16 months (95% confidence interval=8-24 months), with 1-year and 2-year rates of 58% and 41%, respectively. Toxicity was very low consisting mainly of grade 1 and 2 events. SBRT provides good local control for both primary and metastatic liver lesions, with minimal toxicity. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  9. Statistical analysis of target motion in gated lung stereotactic body radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Bo; Yang, Yong; Li, Tianfang; Li, Xiang; Heron, Dwight E.; Saiful Huq, M.

    2011-03-01

    An external surrogate-based respiratory gating technique is a useful method to reduce target margins for the treatment of a moving lung tumor. The success of this technique relies on a good correlation between the motion of the external markers and the internal tumor as well as the repeatability of the respiratory motion. In gated lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), the treatment time for each fraction could exceed 30 min due to large fractional dose. Tumor motion may experience pattern changes such as baseline shift during such extended treatment time. The purpose of this study is to analyze tumor motion traces in actual treatment situations and to evaluate the effect of the target baseline shift in gated lung SBRT treatment. Real-time motion data for both the external markers and tumors from 51 lung SBRT treatments with Cyberknife Synchrony technology were analyzed in this study. The treatment time is typically greater than 30 min. The baseline shift was calculated with a rolling average window equivalent to ~20 s and subtracted from that at the beginning. The magnitude of the baseline shift and its relationship with treatment time were investigated. Phase gating simulation was retrospectively performed on 12 carefully selected treatments with respiratory amplitude larger than 5 mm and regular phases. A customized gating window was defined for each individual treatment. It was found that the baseline shifts are specific to each patient and each fraction. Statistical analysis revealed that more than 69% treatments exhibited increased baseline shifts with the lapse of treatment time. The magnitude of the baseline shift could reach 5.3 mm during a 30 min treatment. Gating simulation showed that tumor excursion was caused mainly by the uncertainties in phase gating simulation and baseline shift, the latter being the primary factor. With a 5 mm gating window, 2 out of 12 treatments in the study group showed significant tumor excursion. Baseline shifts

  10. Outcomes and toxicities of stereotactic body radiation therapy for non-spine bone oligometastases

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Dawn; Laack, Nadia N.; Mayo, Charles S.; Garces, Yolanda I.; Park, Sean S.; Bauer, Heather J.; Nelson, Kathryn; Miller, Robert W.; Brown, Paul D.; Olivier, Kenneth R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is being applied more widely for oligometastatic disease. This technique is now being used for non-spine bony metastases in addition to liver, spine, and lung. However, there are few studies examining the toxicity and outcomes of SBRT for non-spine bone metastases. Methods and Materials Between 2008 and 2012, 74 subjects with oligometastatic non-spine bony metastases of varying histologies were treated at the Mayo Clinic with SBRT. A total of 85 non-spine bony sites were treated. Median local control, overall survival, and progression-free survival were described. Acute toxicity (defined as toxicity <90 days) and late toxicity (defined as toxicity ≥90 days) were reported and graded as per standardized Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events 4.0 criteria. Results The median age of patients treated was 60 years. The most common histology was prostate cancer (31%) and most patients had fewer than 3 sites of disease at the time of simulation (64%). Most of the non-spine bony sites lay within the pelvis (65%). Dose and fractionation varied but the most common prescription was 24 Gy/1 fraction. Local recurrence occurred in 7 patients with a median time to failure of 2.8 months. Local control was 91.8% at 1 year. With a median follow-up of 7.6 months, median SBRT specific overall survival and progression-free survival were 9.3 months and 9.7 months, respectively. Eighteen patients developed acute toxicity (mostly grade 1 and 2 fatigue and acute pain flare); 9 patients developed grade 1–2 late toxicities. Two patients developed pathologic fractures but both were asymptomatic. There were no late grade 3 or 4 toxicities. Conclusions Stereotactic body radiation therapy is a feasible and tolerable treatment for non-spine bony metastases. Longer follow-up will be needed to accurately determine late effects. PMID:24890360

  11. Adjuvant Stereotactic Radiosurgery and Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Intracranial Chordomas

    PubMed Central

    Choy, Winward; Terterov, Sergei; Ung, Nolan; Kaprealian, Tania; Trang, Andy; DeSalles, Antonio; Chung, Lawrance K.; Martin, Neil; Selch, Michael; Bergsneider, Marvin; Yong, William; Yang, Isaac

    2015-01-01

    Objective Chordomas are locally aggressive, highly recurrent tumors requiring adjuvant radiotherapy following resection for successful management. We retrospectively reviewed patients treated for intracranial chordomas with adjuvant stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT). Methods A total of 57 patients underwent 83 treatments at the UCLA Medical Center between February 1990 and August 2011. Mean follow-up was 57.8 months. Mean tumor diameter was 3.36 cm. Overall, 8 and 34 patients received adjuvant SRS and SRT, and the mean maximal dose of radiation therapy was 1783.3 cGy and 6339 cGy, respectively. Results Overall rate of recurrence was 51.8%, and 1- and 5-year progression-free survival (PFS) was 88.2% and 35.2%, respectively. Gross total resection was achieved in 30.9% of patients. Adjuvant radiotherapy improved outcomes following subtotal resection (5-year PFS 62.5% versus 20.1%; p = 0.036). SRS and SRT produced comparable rates of tumor control (p = 0.28). Higher dose SRT (> 6,000 cGy) (p = 0.013) and younger age (< 45 years) (p = 0.03) was associated with improved rates of tumor control. Conclusion Adjuvant radiotherapy is critical following subtotal resection of intracranial chordomas. Adjuvant SRT and SRS were safe and improved PFS following subtotal resection. Higher total doses of SRT and younger patient age were associated with improved rates of tumor control. PMID:26949587

  12. Physical properties of new collimator cone system for stereotactic radiation therapy developed in samsung medical center.

    PubMed

    Kim, D Y; Ahn, Y C; Oh, D G; Choi, D R; Ju, S G; Yeo, I H; Huh, S J

    2000-09-01

    A new collimator cone system has been developed at the Samsung Medical Center that overcomes some of the limitations of present commercially supplied collimator cones. The physical properties of the newly developed cone system are described in this report. The new cones have relatively larger aperture sizes (3.0-7.0 cm in diameter) and are 16 cm in length. Each new cone is fabricated with cerrobend alloy melted and poured into a stainless steel housing that is permanently fixed to a mounting plate. The mounting plate of the new cone is designed to insert into the wedge mount slot of the gantry head. The mechanical accuracy of the central axis of the cone pointing to the isocenter was tested using film, a steel ball positioned at the isocenter by the mechanical isocenter device. For the evaluation of beam flatness and penumbra, off-axis ratios at 5 cm depth were measured by film dosimetry using polystyrene phantom. The average error of the mechanical isocenter was 0.27 mm (+/- 0.16 mm). The beam flatness was excellent in the central region of the beam, and the average penumbra width was 3.35 mm (+/- 0.25 mm). The new cone design has more clearance between the patient's head and the gantry, and can more easily be removed from the gantry head because it slides in and out of the wedge slot. This facilitates changing cone sizes during one treatment session, and makes the process of double exposure port films easier. A new collimator cone system for stereotactic radiation therapy has been developed. The mechanical accuracy and physical properties are satisfactory for clinical use, and the new design permits a wider range of clinical applications for stereotactic radiation therapy.

  13. Hematuria following stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for clinically localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Gurka, Marie K; Chen, Leonard N; Bhagat, Aditi; Moures, Rudy; Kim, Joy S; Yung, Thomas; Lei, Siyuan; Collins, Brian T; Krishnan, Pranay; Suy, Simeng; Dritschilo, Anatoly; Lynch, John H; Collins, Sean P

    2015-02-19

    Hematuria following prostate radiotherapy is a known toxicity that may adversely affect a patient's quality of life. Given the higher dose of radiation per fraction using stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) there is concern that post-SBRT hematuria would be more common than with alternative radiation therapy approaches. Herein, we describe the incidence and severity of hematuria following stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for prostate cancer at our institution. Two hundred and eight consecutive patients with prostate cancer treated with SBRT monotherapy with at least three years of follow-up were included in this retrospective analysis. Treatment was delivered using the CyberKnife® (Accuray) to doses of 35-36.25 Gy in 5 fractions. Toxicities were scored using the CTCAE v.4. Hematuria was counted at the highest grade it occurred in the acute and late setting for each patient. Cystoscopy findings were retrospectively reviewed. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Hematuria-associated bother was assessed via the Expanded Prostate Index Composite (EPIC)-26. The median age was 69 years with a median prostate volume of 39 cc. With a median follow-up of 48 months, 38 patients (18.3%) experienced at least one episode of hematuria. Median time to hematuria was 13.5 months. In the late period, there were three grade 3 events and five grade 2 events. There were no grade 4 or 5 events. The 3-year actuarial incidence of late hematuria ≥ grade 2 was 2.4%. On univariate analysis, prostate volume (p = 0.022) and history of prior procedure(s) for benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH) (p = 0.002) were significantly associated with hematuria. On multivariate analysis, history of prior procedure(s) for BPH (p < 0.0001) and α1A antagonist use (p = 0.008) were significantly associated with the development of hematuria. SBRT for prostate cancer was well tolerated with hematuria rates comparable to other radiation modalities. Patients

  14. Stereotactic body radiation therapy salvage reirradiation of radiorecurrent prostatic carcinoma relapsed in the prostatic bed.

    PubMed

    Arcangeli, Stefano; Gambardella, Pasquale; Agolli, Linda; Monaco, Alessia; Dognini, Jessica; Regine, Giovanni; Donato, Vittorio

    2015-04-28

    A 67-year-old man presented with a slow increase of prostate-specific antigen value after radical prostatectomy and postoperative radiotherapy for prostate cancer. The patient had received 3D conformal radiotherapy to a total dose of 66 Gy in 33 fractions of 2 Gy each on the prostatic bed. Three years later, a macroscopic local failure was diagnosed at the apical region. The patient could not receive androgenic deprivation therapy or other types of treatment owing to comorbid conditions. Thus, stereotactic body radiation therapy with helical image-guided tomotherapy was administered. The total dose was 30 Gy in 5 consecutive fractions of 6 Gy each to the site of the local failure. The treatment was preceded by a transperineal-guided injection of a self-absorbable hydrogel into the prostatic bed, between rectum and bladder, in order to preserve the rectal wall, which already had received significant doses from the first radiation course. Radiation therapy was well-tolerated. After a follow-up period of 6 months, the patient remains healthy, and there has been no further evidence of metastatic spread or recurrence.

  15. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Delivery in a Genetically Engineered Mouse Model of Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Du, Shisuo; Lockamy, Virginia; Zhou, Lin; Xue, Christine; LeBlanc, Justin; Glenn, Shonna; Shukla, Gaurav; Yu, Yan; Dicker, Adam P.; Leeper, Dennis B.; Lu, You; Lu, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To implement clinical stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) using a small animal radiation research platform (SARRP) in a genetically engineered mouse model of lung cancer. Methods and Materials A murine model of multinodular Kras-driven spontaneous lung tumors was used for this study. High-resolution cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging was used to identify and target peripheral tumor nodules, whereas off-target lung nodules in the contralateral lung were used as a nonirradiated control. CBCT imaging helps localize tumors, facilitate high-precision irradiation, and monitor tumor growth. SBRT planning, prescription dose, and dose limits to normal tissue followed the guidelines set by RTOG protocols. Pathologic changes in the irradiated tumors were investigated using immunohistochemistry. Results The image guided radiation delivery using the SARRP system effectively localized and treated lung cancer with precision in a genetically engineered mouse model of lung cancer. Immunohistochemical data confirmed the precise delivery of SBRT to the targeted lung nodules. The 60 Gy delivered in 3 weekly fractions markedly reduced the proliferation index, Ki-67, and increased apoptosis per staining for cleaved caspase-3 in irradiated lung nodules. Conclusions It is feasible to use the SARRP platform to perform dosimetric planning and delivery of SBRT in mice with lung cancer. This allows for preclinical studies that provide a rationale for clinical trials involving SBRT, especially when combined with immunotherapeutics. PMID:27681749

  16. 4π Noncoplanar Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Centrally Located or Larger Lung Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Peng; Lee, Percy; Ruan, Dan; Long, Troy; Romeijn, Edwin; Low, Daniel A.; Kupelian, Patrick; Abraham, John; Yang, Yingli; Sheng, Ke

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric improvements in stereotactic body radiation therapy for patients with larger or central lung tumors using a highly noncoplanar 4π planning system. Methods and Materials: This study involved 12 patients with centrally located or larger lung tumors previously treated with 7- to 9-field static beam intensity modulated radiation therapy to 50 Gy. They were replanned using volumetric modulated arc therapy and 4π plans, in which a column generation method was used to optimize the beam orientation and the fluence map. Maximum doses to the heart, esophagus, trachea/bronchus, and spinal cord, as well as the 50% isodose volume, the lung volumes receiving 20, 10, and 5 Gy were minimized and compared against the clinical plans. A dose escalation study was performed to determine whether a higher prescription dose to the tumor would be achievable using 4π without violating dose limits set by the clinical plans. The deliverability of 4π plans was preliminarily tested. Results: Using 4π plans, the maximum heart, esophagus, trachea, bronchus and spinal cord doses were reduced by 32%, 72%, 37%, 44%, and 53% (P≤.001), respectively, and R{sub 50} was reduced by more than 50%. Lung V{sub 20}, V{sub 10}, and V{sub 5} were reduced by 64%, 53%, and 32% (P≤.001), respectively. The improved sparing of organs at risk was achieved while also improving planning target volume (PTV) coverage. The minimal PTV doses were increased by the 4π plans by 12% (P=.002). Consequently, escalated PTV doses of 68 to 70 Gy were achieved in all patients. Conclusions: We have shown that there is a large potential for plan quality improvement and dose escalation for patients with larger or centrally located lung tumors using noncoplanar beams with sufficient quality and quantity. Compared against the clinical volumetric modulated arc therapy and static intensity modulated radiation therapy plans, the 4π plans yielded significantly and consistently improved tumor

  17. Phase 1 Clinical Trial of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Concomitant With Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bondiau, Pierre-Yves; Courdi, Adel; Bahadoran, Phillipe; Chamorey, Emmanuel; Queille-Roussel, Catherine; Lallement, Michel; Birtwisle-Peyrottes, Isabelle; Chapellier, Claire; Pacquelet-Cheli, Sandrine; Ferrero, Jean-Marc

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) allows stereotactic irradiation of thoracic tumors. It may have a real impact on patients who may not otherwise qualify for breast-conserving surgery. We conducted a phase 1 trial that tested 5 dose levels of SBRT concomitant with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) before to surgery. The purpose of the current dose escalation study was to determine the maximum tolerable dose of SBRT in the treatment of breast cancer. Methods and Materials: To define toxicity, we performed dermatologic examinations that included clinical examinations by 2 separate physicians and technical evaluations using colorimetry, dermoscopy, and skin ultrasonography. Dermatologic examinations were performed before NACT, 36 and 56 days after the beginning of NACT, and before surgery. Surgery was performed 4 to 8 weeks after the last chemotherapy session. Efficacy, the primary endpoint, was determined by the pathologic complete response (pCR) rate. Results: Maximum tolerable dose was not reached. Only 1 case of dose-limiting toxicity was reported (grade 3 dermatologic toxicity), and SBRT was overall well tolerated. The pCR rate was 36%, with none being observed at the first 2 dose levels, and the highest rate being obtained at dose level 3 (25.5 Gy delivered in 3 fractions). Furthermore, the breast-conserving surgery rate was up to 92% compared with an 8% total mastectomy rate. No surgical complications were reported. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that SBRT can be safely combined with NACT. Regarding the efficacy endpoints, this trial showed promising results in terms of pCR rate (36%) and breast-conserving rate (92%). The findings provide a strong rationale for extending the study into a phase 2 trial. In view of the absence of correlation between dose and pCR, and given that the data from dose level 3 met the statistical requirements, a dose of 25.5 Gy in 3 fractions should be used for the phase 2 trial.

  18. Fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy for vestibular schwannomas: Dosimetric factors predictive of hearing outcomes.

    PubMed

    Bennion, Nathan R; Nowak, Ryan K; Lyden, Elizabeth R; Thompson, Robert B; Li, Sicong; Lin, Chi

    2016-01-01

    To determine dosimetric factors predictive of hearing loss in vestibular schwannoma (VS) patients treated with definitive fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (FSRT), and to report tumor control, serviceable hearing preservation, and cranial nerve toxicities. We identified 45 patients (29 men and 16 women) with unilateral sporadic VS, who underwent definitive FSRT. All patients had serviceable hearing prior to treatment, defined as Gardner-Robertson Class 1 or 2. All patients underwent an audiogram before the start of treatment and serial audiometric assessments after treatment. The median audiometric follow-up time was 35.2 months (range, 5.0-89.7 months). Patients underwent a median of 4.5 (range, 1-9) posttreatment audiograms. The ipsilateral cochlea was contoured retrospectively, and dosimetric data were used to determine factors predictive of losing serviceable hearing. The median clinical follow-up time was 29.9 months (range, 1.5-83.6 months). At the time of the last audiometric follow-up, 62% of patients retained serviceable hearing. The actuarial 1-, 2-, and 3-year serviceable hearing preservation rates were 83%, 75%, and 51%, respectively. The estimated median time to loss of serviceable hearing was 42.2 months. On multivariate analysis, cochlear volume <0.15 mL (hazard ratio, 2.849; 95% confidence interval, 1.116-7.270; P = .029) and mean cochlear dose <4000 cGy (hazard ratio, 3.178; 95% confidence interval, 1.116-9.049; P = .030) were statistically significant variables associated with serviceable hearing preservation. The actuarial tumor control was 100%. Three of 39 patients (8%) developed hemifacial spasm after FSRT (House-Brackmann Grade 3), 2 of which completely resolved. No patients experienced deterioration in trigeminal nerve function after FSRT. Fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy can provide excellent tumor control with acceptable clinical outcomes. The mean dose to the cochlea is highly predictive of the probability of

  19. Fractionated stereotactic conformal radiotherapy for large benign skull base meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Purpose to assess the safety and efficacy of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) for large skull base meningiomas. Methods and Materials Fifty-two patients with large skull base meningiomas aged 34-74 years (median age 56 years) were treated with FSRT between June 2004 and August 2009. All patients received FSRT for residual or progressive meningiomas more than 4 centimeters in greatest dimension. The median GTV was 35.4 cm3 (range 24.1-94.9 cm3), and the median PTV was 47.6 cm3 (range 33.5-142.7 cm3). Treatment volumes were achieved with 5-8 noncoplanar beams shaped using a micromultileaf collimator (MLC). Treatment was delivered in 30 daily fractions over 6 weeks to a total dose of 50 Gy using 6 MV photons. Outcome was assessed prospectively. Results At a median follow-up of 42 months (range 9-72 months) the 3-year and 5-year progression-free survival (PFS) rates were 96% and 93%, respectively, and survival was 100%. Three patients required further debulking surgery for progressive disease. Hypopituitarism was the most commonly reported late complication, with a new hormone pituitary deficit occurring in 10 (19%) of patients. Clinically significant late neurological toxicity was observed in 3 (5.5%) patients consisting of worsening of pre-existing cranial deficits. Conclusion FSRT as a high-precision technique of localized RT is suitable for the treatment of large skull base meningiomas. The local control is comparable to that reported following conventional external beam RT. Longer follow-up is required to assess long term efficacy and toxicity, particularly in terms of potential reduction of treatment-related late toxicity. PMID:21486436

  20. Clinical applications of stereotactic radiation therapy for oligometastatic cancer patients: a disease-oriented approach

    PubMed Central

    Ricardi, Umberto; Badellino, Serena; Filippi, Andrea Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Oligometastases from solid tumors are currently recognized as a distinct clinical entity, corresponding to an intermediate state between local and widespread disease. It has been suggested that local ablative therapies (including surgery, radiofrequency ablation and radiation therapy) play an important role in this setting, in combination or not with systemic therapies, particularly in delaying disease progression and hopefully in increasing the median survival time. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) rapidly emerged in recent years as one of the most effective and less toxic local treatment modalities for lung, liver, adrenal, brain and bone metastases. The aim of this review was to focus on its clinical role for oligometastatic disease in four major cancer subtypes: lung, breast, colorectal and prostate. On the basis of the available evidence, SBRT is able to provide high rates of local tumor control without significant toxicity. Its global impact on survival is uncertain; however, in specific subpopulations of oligometastatic patients there is a trend towards a significant improvement in progression-free and overall survival rates; these important data might be used as a platform for clinical decision-making and establish the basis for the current and future prospective trials investigating its role with or without systemic treatments. PMID:26962198

  1. 4D VMAT, gated VMAT, and 3D VMAT for stereotactic body radiation therapy in lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, E.; Loewen, S. K.; Nichol, A.; Otto, K.

    2013-02-01

    Four-dimensional volumetric modulated arc therapy (4D VMAT) is a treatment strategy for lung cancers that aims to exploit relative target and tissue motion to improve organ at risk (OAR) sparing. The algorithm incorporates the entire patient respiratory cycle using 4D CT data into the optimization process. Resulting treatment plans synchronize the delivery of each beam aperture to a specific phase of target motion. Stereotactic body radiation therapy treatment plans for 4D VMAT, gated VMAT, and 3D VMAT were generated on three patients with non-small cell lung cancer. Tumour motion ranged from 1.4-3.4 cm. The dose and fractionation scheme was 48 Gy in four fractions. A B-spline transformation model registered the 4D CT images. 4D dose volume histograms (4D DVH) were calculated from total dose accumulated at the maximum exhalation. For the majority of OARs, gated VMAT achieved the most radiation sparing but treatment times were 77-148% longer than 3D VMAT. 4D VMAT plan qualities were comparable to gated VMAT, but treatment times were only 11-25% longer than 3D VMAT. 4D VMAT's improvement of healthy tissue sparing can allow for further dose escalation. Future study could potentially adapt 4D VMAT to irregular patient breathing patterns.

  2. Thallium SPECT-based stereotactic targeting for brain tumor biopsies. A technical note.

    PubMed

    Hemm, S; Vayssiere, Nathalie; Zanca, Michel; Ravel, Patrice; Coubes, Philippe

    2004-01-01

    MR or CT images acquired under stereotactic conditions are often used to plan and guide brain tumor biopsies. The objective of this study was to design and test a methodology to increase target selection reliability by acquiring stereotactic 201Tl-SPECT data and by integrating them into the surgical planning. The three-headed Philips gamma camera system (Prism 3000) was adapted to stereotactic acquisitions (patient pallet, headholder). A software was developed for the stereotactic target determination based on SPECT images (pixel with the highest metabolic activity inside the tumor). The whole system accuracy was tested with the Elekta phantom adapted to SPECT imaging. The methodology was applied to one brain tumor biopsy. Comparison of the specific phantom coordinates evaluated in SPECT with the theoretical ones did not reveal any significant difference. In this way, our methodology including our homemade software (identification of the stereotactic frame, determination of the pixel with highest metabolic activity within the tumor in the stereotactic coordinate system) was validated. No significant geometric deformations were detected. Clinical feasibility was confirmed in 1 patient with a brain glioma. This study illustrates the feasibility and the accuracy of SPECT acquisitions with the stereotactic Leksell G-frame. The clinical relevance of this methodology is under evaluation. This definition of the target, based on the point with the highest metabolic activity within the tumor, might lead to improved diagnosis in biopsies and patient management. Furthermore, it might prepare the future for therapy aimed at delivering a therapeutic agent within a tumor. Copyright 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel

  3. Dosimetric comparison of linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery systems

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, S. D.; Kumar, Sudhir; Dagaonkar, S. S.; Bisht, Geetika; Dayanand, S.; Devi, Reena; Deshpande, S. S.; Chaudhary, S.; Bhatt, B. C.; Kannan, S.

    2007-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is a special radiotherapy technique used to irradiate intracranial lesions by 3-D arrangements of narrow photon beams eliminating the needs of invasive surgery. Three different tertiary collimators, namely BrainLab and Radionics circular cones and BrainLab micro multileaf collimator (mMLC), are used for linear accelerator-based SRS systems (X-Knife). Output factor (St), tissue maximum ratio (TMR) and off axis ratio (OAR) of these three SRS systems were measured using CC01 (Scanditronix/ Welhofer) and Pinpoint (PTW) cylindrical and Markus plane parallel ionization chambers as well as TLD and radiochromic film. Measurement results of CC01 and Pinpoint chambers were very close to each other which indicate that further reduction in volume and physical dimensions of cylindrical ionization chamber is not necessary for SRS/SRT dosimetry. Output factors of BrainLab and Radionics SRS cones were very close to each other while output factors of equivalent diameter mMLC field were different from SRS circular cones. TMR of the three SRS systems compared were very close to one another. OAR of Radionics cone and BrainLab mMLC were very close to each other, within 2%. However, OARs of BrainLab cone were found comparable to OARs of Radionics cone and BrainLab mMLC within maximum variation of 4%. In addition, user-measured similar data of other three mMLC X-Knives were compared with the mMLC X-Knife data measured in this work and found comparable. The concept of switching over to mMLC-based SRS/SRT is thus validated from dosimetric characteristics as well. PMID:21217914

  4. Dosimetric comparison of linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery systems.

    PubMed

    Sharma, S D; Kumar, Sudhir; Dagaonkar, S S; Bisht, Geetika; Dayanand, S; Devi, Reena; Deshpande, S S; Chaudhary, S; Bhatt, B C; Kannan, S

    2007-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is a special radiotherapy technique used to irradiate intracranial lesions by 3-D arrangements of narrow photon beams eliminating the needs of invasive surgery. Three different tertiary collimators, namely BrainLab and Radionics circular cones and BrainLab micro multileaf collimator (mMLC), are used for linear accelerator-based SRS systems (X-Knife). Output factor (S(t)), tissue maximum ratio (TMR) and off axis ratio (OAR) of these three SRS systems were measured using CC01 (Scanditronix/ Welhofer) and Pinpoint (PTW) cylindrical and Markus plane parallel ionization chambers as well as TLD and radiochromic film. Measurement results of CC01 and Pinpoint chambers were very close to each other which indicate that further reduction in volume and physical dimensions of cylindrical ionization chamber is not necessary for SRS/SRT dosimetry. Output factors of BrainLab and Radionics SRS cones were very close to each other while output factors of equivalent diameter mMLC field were different from SRS circular cones. TMR of the three SRS systems compared were very close to one another. OAR of Radionics cone and BrainLab mMLC were very close to each other, within 2%. However, OARs of BrainLab cone were found comparable to OARs of Radionics cone and BrainLab mMLC within maximum variation of 4%. In addition, user-measured similar data of other three mMLC X-Knives were compared with the mMLC X-Knife data measured in this work and found comparable. The concept of switching over to mMLC-based SRS/SRT is thus validated from dosimetric characteristics as well.

  5. A preclinical rodent model of acute radiation-induced lung injury after ablative focal irradiation reflecting clinical stereotactic body radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hong, Zhen-Yu; Lee, Hae-June; Choi, Won Hoon; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Eun, Sung Ho; Lee, Jung Il; Park, Kwangwoo; Lee, Ji Min; Cho, Jaeho

    2014-07-01

    In a previous study, we established an image-guided small-animal micro-irradiation system mimicking clinical stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). The goal of this study was to develop a rodent model of acute phase lung injury after ablative irradiation. A radiation dose of 90 Gy was focally delivered to the left lung of C57BL/6 mice using a small animal stereotactic irradiator. At days 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11 and 14 after irradiation, the lungs were perfused with formalin for fixation and paraffin sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and Masson's trichrome. At days 7 and 14 after irradiation, micro-computed tomography (CT) images of the lung were taken and lung functional measurements were performed with a flexiVent™ system. Gross morphological injury was evident 9 days after irradiation of normal lung tissues and dynamic sequential events occurring during the acute phase were validated by histopathological analysis. CT images of the mouse lungs indicated partial obstruction located in the peripheral area of the left lung. Significant alteration in inspiratory capacity and tissue damping were detected on day 14 after irradiation. An animal model of radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) in the acute phase reflecting clinical stereotactic body radiotherapy was established and validated with histopathological and functional analysis. This model enhances our understanding of the dynamic sequential events occurring in the acute phase of radiation-induced lung injury induced by ablative dose focal volume irradiation.

  6. Dosimetric and late radiation toxicity comparison between iodine-125 brachytherapy and stereotactic radiation therapy for juxtapapillary choroidal melanoma.

    PubMed

    Krema, Hatem; Heydarian, Mostafa; Beiki-Ardakani, Akbar; Weisbrod, Daniel; Xu, Wei; Laperriere, Normand J; Sahgal, Arjun

    2013-07-01

    To compare the dose distributions and late radiation toxicities for (125)I brachytherapy (IBT) and stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT) in the treatment of juxtapapillary choroidal melanoma. Ninety-four consecutive patients with juxtapapillary melanoma were reviewed: 30 have been treated with IBT and 64 with SRT. Iodine-125 brachytherapy cases were modeled with plaque simulator software for dosimetric analysis. The SRT dosimetric data were obtained from the Radionics XKnife RT3 software. Mean doses at predetermined intraocular points were calculated. Kaplan-Meier estimates determined the actuarial rates of late toxicities, and the log-rank test compared the estimates. The median follow-up was 46 months in both cohorts. The 2 cohorts were balanced with respect to pretreatment clinical and tumor characteristics. Comparisons of radiation toxicity rates between the IBT and SRT cohorts yielded actuarial rates at 50 months for cataracts of 62% and 75% (P=.1), for neovascular glaucoma 8% and 47% (P=.002), for radiation retinopathy 59% and 89% (P=.0001), and for radiation papillopathy 39% and 74% (P=.003), respectively. Dosimetric comparisons between the IBT and SRT cohorts yielded mean doses of 12.8 and 14.1 Gy (P=.56) for the lens center, 17.6 and 19.7 Gy (P=.44) for the lens posterior pole, 13.9 and 10.8 Gy (P=.30) for the ciliary body, 61.9 and 69.7 Gy (P=.03) for optic disc center, and 48.9 and 60.1 Gy (P<.0001) for retina at 5-mm distance from tumor margin, respectively. Late radiation-induced toxicities were greater with SRT, which is secondary to the high-dose exposure inherent to the technique as compared with IBT. When technically feasible, IBT is preferred to treat juxtapapillary choroidal melanoma. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Dosimetric and Late Radiation Toxicity Comparison Between Iodine-125 Brachytherapy and Stereotactic Radiation Therapy for Juxtapapillary Choroidal Melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Krema, Hatem

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: To compare the dose distributions and late radiation toxicities for {sup 125}I brachytherapy (IBT) and stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT) in the treatment of juxtapapillary choroidal melanoma. Methods: Ninety-four consecutive patients with juxtapapillary melanoma were reviewed: 30 have been treated with IBT and 64 with SRT. Iodine-125 brachytherapy cases were modeled with plaque simulator software for dosimetric analysis. The SRT dosimetric data were obtained from the Radionics XKnife RT3 software. Mean doses at predetermined intraocular points were calculated. Kaplan-Meier estimates determined the actuarial rates of late toxicities, and the log–rank test compared the estimates. Results: The median follow-up was 46 months in both cohorts. The 2 cohorts were balanced with respect to pretreatment clinical and tumor characteristics. Comparisons of radiation toxicity rates between the IBT and SRT cohorts yielded actuarial rates at 50 months for cataracts of 62% and 75% (P=.1), for neovascular glaucoma 8% and 47% (P=.002), for radiation retinopathy 59% and 89% (P=.0001), and for radiation papillopathy 39% and 74% (P=.003), respectively. Dosimetric comparisons between the IBT and SRT cohorts yielded mean doses of 12.8 and 14.1 Gy (P=.56) for the lens center, 17.6 and 19.7 Gy (P=.44) for the lens posterior pole, 13.9 and 10.8 Gy (P=.30) for the ciliary body, 61.9 and 69.7 Gy (P=.03) for optic disc center, and 48.9 and 60.1 Gy (P<.0001) for retina at 5-mm distance from tumor margin, respectively. Conclusions: Late radiation-induced toxicities were greater with SRT, which is secondary to the high-dose exposure inherent to the technique as compared with IBT. When technically feasible, IBT is preferred to treat juxtapapillary choroidal melanoma.

  8. Patterns of Failure After Concurrent Bevacizumab and Hypofractionated Stereotactic Radiation Therapy for Recurrent High-Grade Glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, Lauren Q.; Beal, Kathryn; Goenka, Anuj; Karimi, Sasan; Iwamoto, Fabio M.; Yamada, Yoshiya; Zhang, Zhigang; Lassman, Andrew B.; Abrey, Lauren E.; Gutin, Philip H.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Concurrent bevacizumab with hypofractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (HSRT) is safe and effective for the treatment of recurrent high-grade gliomas (HGG). The objective of this study was to characterize the patterns of failure after this treatment regimen. Methods and Materials: Twenty-four patients with recurrent enhancing HGG were previously treated on an institutional review board-approved protocol of concurrent bevacizumab and reirradiation. Patients received 30 Gy in 5 fractions to the recurrent tumor with HSRT. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed every 2 cycles, and bevacizumab was continued until clinical or radiographic tumor progression according to the criteria of Macdonald et al. MRI at the time of progression was fused to the HSRT treatment plan, and the location of recurrence was classified on the basis of volume within the 95% isodose line. Outcomes based on patient characteristics, tumor grade, recurrence pattern, and best response to treatment were analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Twenty-two patients experienced either clinical or radiographic progression. Recurrent tumor was enhancing in 15 (71.4%) and nonenhancing in 6 (28.6%) patients. Eleven patients (52.4%) had recurrence within the radiation field, 5 patients (23.8%) had marginal recurrence, and 5 patients had recurrence outside the radiation field. Pattern of enhancement and location of failure did not correlate with overall survival or progression-free survival. Radiographic response was the only variable to significantly correlate with progression-free survival. Conclusions: Despite the promising initial response seen with the addition of HSRT to bevacizumab as salvage treatment for recurrent HGG, approximately half of patients ultimately still experience failure within the radiation field. The rate of local failure with the addition of HSRT seems to be lower than that seen with bevacizumab alone in the salvage setting. Our data underscore the

  9. Respiration correlated cone-beam computed tomography and 4DCT for evaluating target motion in Stereotactic Lung Radiation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Purdie, Thomas G; Moseley, Douglas J; Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre; Sharpe, Michael B; Franks, Kevin; Bezjak, Andrea; Jaffray, David A

    2006-01-01

    An image-guidance process for using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of peripheral lung lesions is presented. Respiration correlated CBCT on the treatment unit and four dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) from planning are evaluated for assessing respiration-induced target motion during planning and treatment fractions. Image-guided SBRT was performed for 12 patients (13 lesions) with inoperable early stage non-small cell lung carcinoma. Kilovoltage (kV) projections were acquired over a 360 degree gantry rotation and sorted based on the pixel value of an image-based aperture located at the air-tissue interface of the diaphragm. The sorted projections were reconstructed to provide volumetric respiration correlated CBCT image datasets at different phases of the respiratory cycle. The 4D volumetric datasets were directly compared with 4DCT datasets acquired at the time of planning. For ten of 12 patients treated, the lung tumour motion, as measured by respiration correlated CBCT on the treatment unit, was consistent with the tumour motion measured by 4DCT at the time of planning. However, in two patients, maximum discrepancies observed were 6 and 10 mm in the anterior-posterior and superior-inferior directions, respectively. Respiration correlated CBCT acquired on the treatment unit allows target motion to be assessed for each treatment fraction, allows target localization based on different phases on the breathing cycle, and provides the facility for adaptive margin design in radiation therapy of lung malignancies. The current study has shown that the relative motion and position of the tumour at the time of treatment may not match that of the planning 4DCT scan. Therefore, application of breathing motion data acquired at simulation for tracking or gating radiation therapy may not be suitable for all patients - even those receiving short course treatment techniques such as SBRT.

  10. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Primary, Recurrent, and Metastatic Tumors in the Head-and-Neck Region

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqui, Farzan; Patel, Mehul; Khan, Mumtaz; McLean, Scott; Dragovic, Jadranka; Jin, J.-Y.; Movsas, Benjamin; Ryu, Samuel

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), also known as radiosurgery, in patients with head-and-neck cancers. Methods and Materials: Patients with pathologically proven malignant lesions in the head-and-neck region were treated using single-dose SBRT (S-SBRT) or fractionated SBRT (F-SBRT). Radiation doses were either single-fraction 13-18 Gy for S-SBRT or 36-48 Gy in five to eight fractions for F-SBRT. Response evaluation was based on clinical examinations and computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging scans. Pre- and post-SBRT tumor dimensions were measured in three axes, and tumor volumes were calculated. Response evaluation also was performed using World Health Organization criteria. Results: Fifty-five lesions were treated in 44 patients (25 men, 19 women). There were three groups of patients: those with primary (n = 10), recurrent (n = 21), and metastatic tumors (n = 13). The predominant histologic type was squamous cell carcinoma (n = 33). The majority of lesions were treated using F-SBRT (n = 37). Based on radiographic and clinical assessment, a 77% (complete + partial response) response rate was noted. Percentage of reduction in tumor volume was 52% {+-} 38% based on follow-up scans in 24 patients. Tumor control rates at 1 year were 83.3% and 60.6% in the primary and recurrent groups, respectively. Median overall survival was 28.7, 6.7, and 5.6 months for the primary, recurrent, and metastatic groups, respectively. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 1-2 mucositis was noted in all patients treated for oropharyngeal or laryngeal lesions. Conclusions: The SBRT in single or fractionated doses offers a viable treatment option for selected patients with primary, recurrent, and metastatic head-and-neck cancers with functional preservation.

  11. Stereotactic radiosurgery for intracranial metastases: linac-based and gamma-dedicated unit approach.

    PubMed

    Alongi, Filippo; Fiorentino, Alba; Mancosu, Pietro; Navarria, Pierina; Giaj Levra, Niccolò; Mazzola, Rosario; Scorsetti, Marta

    2016-07-01

    For intracranial metastases, the role of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy is well recognized. Historically, the first technology, for stereotactic device able to irradiate a brain tumor volume, was Gamma Knife® (GK). Due to the technological advancement of linear accelerator (Linac), there was a continuous increasing interest in SRS Linac-based applications. In those decades, it was assumed a superiority of GK compared to SRS Linac-based for brain tumor in terms of dose conformity and rapid fall-off dose close to the target. Expert commentary: Recently, due to the Linac technologic advancement, the choice of SRS GK-based is not necessarily so exclusive. The current review discussed in details the technical and clinical aspects comparing the two approaches for brain metastases.

  12. Three-dimensional, Time-Resolved, Intrafraction Motion Monitoring Throughout Stereotactic Liver Radiation Therapy on a Conventional Linear Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Worm, Esben S.; Høyer, Morten; Fledelius, Walter; Poulsen, Per R.

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate the time-resolved 3-dimensional (3D) internal motion throughout stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of tumors in the liver using standard x-ray imagers of a conventional linear accelerator. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with implanted gold markers received 11 treatment courses of 3-fraction SBRT in a stereotactic body-frame on a conventional linear accelerator. Two pretreatment and 1 posttreatment cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans were acquired during each fraction. The CBCT projection images were used to estimate the internal 3D marker motion during CBCT acquisition with 11-Hz resolution by a monoscopic probability-based method. Throughout the treatment delivery by conformal or volumetric modulated arc fields, simultaneous MV portal imaging (8 Hz) and orthogonal kV imaging (5 Hz) were applied to determine the 3D marker motion using either MV/kV triangulation or the monoscopic method when marker segmentation was unachievable in either MV or kV images. The accuracy of monoscopic motion estimation was quantified by also applying monoscopic estimation as a test for all treatments during which MV/kV triangulation was possible. Results: Root-mean-square deviations between monoscopic estimations and triangulations were less than 1.0 mm. The mean 3D intrafraction and intrafield motion ranges during liver SBRT were 17.6 mm (range, 5.6-39.5 mm) and 11.3 mm (2.1-35.5mm), respectively. The risk of large intrafraction baseline shifts correlated with intrafield respiratory motion range. The mean 3D intrafractional marker displacement relative to the first CBCT was 3.4 mm (range, 0.7-14.5 mm). The 3D displacements exceeded 8.8 mm 10% of the time. Conclusions: Highly detailed time-resolved internal 3D motion was determined throughout liver SBRT using standard imaging equipment. Considerable intrafraction motion was observed. The demonstrated methods provide a widely available approach for motion monitoring that, combined with motion

  13. Validating FMEA output against incident learning data: A study in stereotactic body radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, F; Cao, N; Young, L; Howard, J; Logan, W; Arbuckle, T; Sponseller, P; Korssjoen, T; Meyer, J; Ford, E

    2015-06-01

    Though failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) is becoming more widely adopted for risk assessment in radiation therapy, to our knowledge, its output has never been validated against data on errors that actually occur. The objective of this study was to perform FMEA of a stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) treatment planning process and validate the results against data recorded within an incident learning system. FMEA on the SBRT treatment planning process was carried out by a multidisciplinary group including radiation oncologists, medical physicists, dosimetrists, and IT technologists. Potential failure modes were identified through a systematic review of the process map. Failure modes were rated for severity, occurrence, and detectability on a scale of one to ten and risk priority number (RPN) was computed. Failure modes were then compared with historical reports identified as relevant to SBRT planning within a departmental incident learning system that has been active for two and a half years. Differences between FMEA anticipated failure modes and existing incidents were identified. FMEA identified 63 failure modes. RPN values for the top 25% of failure modes ranged from 60 to 336. Analysis of the incident learning database identified 33 reported near-miss events related to SBRT planning. Combining both methods yielded a total of 76 possible process failures, of which 13 (17%) were missed by FMEA while 43 (57%) identified by FMEA only. When scored for RPN, the 13 events missed by FMEA ranked within the lower half of all failure modes and exhibited significantly lower severity relative to those identified by FMEA (p = 0.02). FMEA, though valuable, is subject to certain limitations. In this study, FMEA failed to identify 17% of actual failure modes, though these were of lower risk. Similarly, an incident learning system alone fails to identify a large number of potentially high-severity process errors. Using FMEA in combination with incident learning may

  14. Effect of CyberKnife stereotactic body radiation therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma on hepatic toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Ping; Huang, Cheng; Liang, Shi-Xiong; Li, Ye-Fei; Huang, Shang-Xiao; Lian, Zu-Ping; Liu, Jian-Min; Tang, Yang; Lu, Hai-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the safety of CyberKnife stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients and identify the treatment-related risk factors of hepatic toxicity. Materials and methods One hundred and four HCC patients treated with CyberKnife SBRT were included in this study between August 2009 and December 2012. The average dose of prescribed radiation was 42.81±4.78 Gy (28–55 Gy) with the average fraction size of 8–16 Gy to the planning target volume. The average fractions were 3.31±0.81 (2–6 fractions). Response rates were determined, and the Child–Pugh (CP) score and class following CyberKnife SBRT were obtained to evaluate hepatic toxicity. Results Seventeen patients experienced progression in CP class and 24 patients experienced CTCAE V. 4.0 grade 2–3 hepatic toxicity during the five-month follow-up period, while no patient experienced grade 4 liver toxicity. Multivariate analysis indicated that only V25 was an independent factor in grade 2–3 hepatic toxicity (P=0.029, <0.05). Radiation-induced hepatic toxicity (RIHT), defined as an increase of at least two points within three months following CyberKnife SBRT, occurred in 13 of the 104 patients (13/104, 12.5%), and only the normal liver tissue was found to be associated with RIHT (P=0.008, <0.05). Conclusion CyberKnife SBRT is a feasible and safe treatment for HCC with regard to hepatic toxicity, while V25 and normal liver volume may be an independent factor of grade 2–3 hepatic toxicity and RIHT, respectively. PMID:27920555

  15. Lung deformations and radiation-induced regional lung collapse in patients treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Diot, Quentin; Kavanagh, Brian; Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy; Garg, Kavita; Gaspar, Laurie; Miften, Moyed

    2015-11-01

    To differentiate radiation-induced fibrosis from regional lung collapse outside of the high dose region in patients treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung tumors. Lung deformation maps were computed from pre-treatment and post-treatment computed tomography (CT) scans using a point-to-point translation method. Fifty anatomical landmarks inside the lung (vessel or airway branches) were matched on planning and follow-up scans for the computation process. Two methods using the deformation maps were developed to differentiate regional lung collapse from fibrosis: vector field and Jacobian methods. A total of 40 planning and follow-ups CT scans were analyzed for 20 lung SBRT patients. Regional lung collapse was detected in 15 patients (75%) using the vector field method, in ten patients (50%) using the Jacobian method, and in 12 patients (60%) by radiologists. In terms of sensitivity and specificity the Jacobian method performed better. Only weak correlations were observed between the dose to the proximal airways and the occurrence of regional lung collapse. The authors presented and evaluated two novel methods using anatomical lung deformations to investigate lung collapse and fibrosis caused by SBRT treatment. Differentiation of these distinct physiological mechanisms beyond what is usually labeled "fibrosis" is necessary for accurate modeling of lung SBRT-induced injuries. With the help of better models, it becomes possible to expand the therapeutic benefits of SBRT to a larger population of lung patients with large or centrally located tumors that were previously considered ineligible.

  16. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) for Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC).

    PubMed

    Janssen, Stefan; Käsmann, Lukas; Rudat, Volker; Rades, Dirk

    2016-02-01

    For local recurrence of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has become increasingly popular. Many patients with recurrent NSCLC are unable to receive high-dose SBRT [biologically effective dose (BED) >100 Gy] due to poor performance status and potential normal tissue damage. Thirty-one patients receiving lower-dose SBRT with a BED of 57.6 to 96.0 Gy, were analyzed for local control, freedom from distant progression and survival. In the entire series, local control rates were 96% at 1, 2 and 3 years. Freedom from distant progression rates were 74%, 65% and 65%, respectively, and survival rates were 87%, 65% and 65%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, freedom from distant progression was significantly associated with absence of distant metastases (p=0.009), and survival with BED >75 Gy (p=0.039). SBRT with BED <100 Gy provided very promising outcomes when administered for recurrent NSCLC. A BED >75 Gy is recommended, which was superior to lower doses. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  17. Flattening Filter Free vs. Flattened Beams for Lung Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Annede, Pierre; Darreon, Julien; Benkemouche, Ahcene; Valdenaire, Simon; Tyran, Marguerite; Kaeppelin, Bertrand; Macagno, Alban; Barrou, Julien; Cagetti, Leonel Varela; Favrel, Veronique; Moureau-Zabotto, Laurence; Gonzague, Laurence; Fau, Pierre; Chargari, Cyrus; Tallet, Agnes; Salem, Naji

    2017-09-01

    To assess the clinical impact of high dose rate stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in patients with lung neoplastic lesions. From January 2014 to June 2016, a single-center retrospective analysis was performed including all patients treated by either flattening filter free (FFF) beams or flattening filter beams (FF) three-dimensional (3D) SBRT for lung neoplastic lesions. A total of 99 SBRT were performed on 75 patients. Among these, 29 SBRT were performed using a FFF technique while 70 other SBRT were done using a FF technique. Median follow-up time was 12.9 months. Overall, no difference between the two groups was found except for the mean beam on time which was reduced by 3.3 to 0.9 minutes in the FFF group (p<0.001). We report a low toxicity rate and a shortened beam on time in patients treated with 3D FFF SBRT for lung neoplastic lesions. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  18. Interinstitutional Variations in Planning for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuo, Yukinori; Takayama, Kenji; Nagata, Yasushi . E-mail: nag@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Kunieda, Etsuo; Tateoka, Kunihiko; Ishizuka, Naoki; Mizowaki, Takashi; Norihisa, Yoshiki; Sakamoto, Masato; Narita, Yuichiro; Ishikura, Satoshi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess interinstitutional variations in planning for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung cancer before the start of the Japan Clinical Oncology Group (JCOG) 0403 trial. Methods and Materials: Eleven institutions created virtual plans for four cases of solitary lung cancer. The created plans should satisfy the target definitions and the dose constraints for the JCOG 0403 protocol. Results: FOCUS/XiO (CMS) was used in six institutions, Eclipse (Varian) in 3, Cadplan (Varian) in one, and Pinnacle3 (Philips/ADAC) in one. Dose calculation algorithms of Clarkson with effective path length correction and superposition were used in FOCUS/XiO; pencil beam convolution with Batho power law correction was used in Eclipse and Cadplan; and collapsed cone convolution superposition was used in Pinnacle3. For the target volumes, the overall coefficient of variation was 16.6%, and the interinstitutional variations were not significant. For maximal dose, minimal dose, D95, and the homogeneity index of the planning target volume, the interinstitutional variations were significant. The dose calculation algorithm was a significant factor in these variations. No violation of the dose constraints for the protocol was observed. Conclusion: There can be notable interinstitutional variations in planning for SBRT, including both interobserver variations in the estimate of target volumes as well as dose calculation effects related to the use of different dose calculation algorithms.

  19. Dosimetric Implications of an Injection of Hyaluronic Acid for Preserving the Rectal Wall in Prostate Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chapet, Olivier; Udrescu, Corina; Tanguy, Ronan; Ruffion, Alain; Fenoglietto, Pascal; Sotton, Marie-Pierre; Devonec, Marian; Colombel, Marc; Jalade, Patrice; Azria, David

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: This study assessed the contribution of ahyaluronic acid (HA) injection between the rectum and the prostate to reducing the dose to the rectal wall in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: As part of a phase 2 study of hypofractionated radiation therapy (62 Gy in 20 fractions), the patients received a transperineal injection of 10 cc HA between the rectum and the prostate. A dosimetric computed tomographic (CT) scan was systematically performed before (CT1) and after (CT2) the injection. Two 9-beam intensity modulated radiation therapy-SBRT plans were optimized for the first 10 patients on both CTs according to 2 dosage levels: 5 × 6.5 Gy (PlanA) and 5 × 8.5 Gy (PlanB). Rectal wall parameters were compared with a dose–volume histogram, and the prostate–rectum separation was measured at 7 levels of the prostate on the center line of the organ. Results: For both plans, the average volume of the rectal wall receiving the 90% isodose line (V90%) was reduced up to 90% after injection. There was no significant difference (P=.32) between doses received by the rectal wall on CT1 and CT2 at the base of the prostate. This variation became significant from the median plane to the apex of the prostate (P=.002). No significant differences were found between PlanA without HA and PlanB with HA for each level of the prostate (P=.77, at the isocenter of the prostate). Conclusions: HA injection significantly reduced the dose to the rectal wall and allowed a dose escalation from 6.5 Gy to 8.5 Gy without increasing the dose to the rectum. A phase 2 study is under way in our department to assess the rate of acute and late rectal toxicities when SBRT (5 × 8.5 Gy) is combined with an injection of HA.

  20. SU-E-J-89: Motion Effects On Organ Dose in Respiratory Gated Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T; Zhu, L; Khan, M; Landry, J; Rajpara, R; Hawk, N

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Existing reports on gated radiation therapy focus mainly on optimizing dose delivery to the target structure. This work investigates the motion effects on radiation dose delivered to organs at risk (OAR) in respiratory gated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). A new algorithmic tool of dose analysis is developed to evaluate the optimality of gating phase for dose sparing on OARs while ensuring adequate target coverage. Methods: Eight patients with pancreatic cancer were treated on a phase I prospective study employing 4DCT-based SBRT. For each patient, 4DCT scans are acquired and sorted into 10 respiratory phases (inhale-exhale- inhale). Treatment planning is performed on the average CT image. The average CT is spatially registered to other phases. The resultant displacement field is then applied on the plan dose map to estimate the actual dose map for each phase. Dose values of each voxel are fitted to a sinusoidal function. Fitting parameters of dose variation, mean delivered dose and optimal gating phase for each voxel over respiration cycle are mapped on the dose volume. Results: The sinusoidal function accurately models the dose change during respiratory motion (mean fitting error 4.6%). In the eight patients, mean dose variation is 3.3 Gy on OARs with maximum of 13.7 Gy. Two patients have about 100cm{sup 3} volumes covered by more than 5 Gy deviation. The mean delivered dose maps are similar to plan dose with slight deformation. The optimal gating phase highly varies across the patient, with phase 5 or 6 on about 60% of the volume, and phase 0 on most of the rest. Conclusion: A new algorithmic tool is developed to conveniently quantify dose deviation on OARs from plan dose during the respiratory cycle. The proposed software facilitates the treatment planning process by providing the optimal respiratory gating phase for dose sparing on each OAR.

  1. Stereotactic Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy as a Bridge to Transplantation for Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Clinical Outcome and Pathologic Correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, Alan W.; Chawla, Sheema; Qu, Zhenhong; Kashyap, Randeep; Milano, Michael T.; Hezel, Aram F.

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: We sought to determine efficacy, safety, and outcome of stereotactic hypofractionated radiation therapy (SHORT) as a suitable bridging therapy for patients awaiting liver transplantation (LT) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We also examined histological response to radiation in the resected or explanted livers. Methods and Materials: Between August 2007 and January 2009, 18 patients with 21 lesions received SHORT. A median total dose of 50 Gy was delivered in 10 fractions. Three patients underwent either chemoembolization (n = 1) or radiofrequency ablation (n = 2) prior to SHORT. Radiographic response was based on computed tomography evaluation at 3 months after SHORT. Histological response as a percentage of tumor necrosis was assessed by a quantitative morphometric method. Results: Six of 18 patients were delisted because of progression (n = 3) or other causes (n = 3). Twelve patients successfully underwent major hepatic resection (n = 1) or LT (n = 11) at a median follow-up of 6.3 months (range, 0.6-11.6 months) after completion of SHORT. No patient developed gastrointestinal toxicity Grade {>=}3 or radiation-induced liver disease. Ten patients with 11 lesions were evaluable for pathological response. Two lesions had 100% necrosis, three lesions had {>=}50% necrosis, four lesions had {<=}50% necrosis, and two lesions had no necrosis. All patients were alive after LT and/or major hepatic resection at a median follow-up of 19.6 months. Conclusions: SHORT is an effective bridging therapy for patients awaiting LT for HCC. It provides excellent in-field control with minimal side effects, helps to downsize or stabilize tumors prior to LT, and achieves good pathological response.

  2. Lung Volume Reduction After Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy of Lung Tumors: Potential Application to Emphysema

    SciTech Connect

    Binkley, Michael S.; Shrager, Joseph B.; Leung, Ann N.; Popat, Rita; Trakul, Nicholas; Atwood, Todd F.; Chaudhuri, Aadel; Maxim, Peter G.; Diehn, Maximilian; Loo, Billy W.

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: Lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) improves dyspnea and other outcomes in selected patients with severe emphysema, but many have excessive surgical risk for LVRS. We analyzed the dose-volume relationship for lobar volume reduction after stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) of lung tumors, hypothesizing that SABR could achieve therapeutic volume reduction if applied in emphysema. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively identified patients treated from 2007 to 2011 who had SABR for 1 lung tumor, pre-SABR pulmonary function testing, and ≥6 months computed tomographic (CT) imaging follow-up. We contoured the treated lobe and untreated adjacent lobe(s) on CT before and after SABR and calculated their volume changes relative to the contoured total (bilateral) lung volume (TLV). We correlated lobar volume reduction with the volume receiving high biologically effective doses (BED, α/β = 3). Results: 27 patients met the inclusion criteria, with a median CT follow-up time of 14 months. There was no grade ≥3 toxicity. The median volume reduction of the treated lobe was 4.4% of TLV (range, −0.4%-10.8%); the median expansion of the untreated adjacent lobe was 2.6% of TLV (range, −3.9%-11.6%). The volume reduction of the treated lobe was positively correlated with the volume receiving BED ≥60 Gy (r{sup 2}=0.45, P=.0001). This persisted in subgroups determined by high versus low pre-SABR forced expiratory volume in 1 second, treated lobe CT emphysema score, number of fractions, follow-up CT time, central versus peripheral location, and upper versus lower lobe location, with no significant differences in effect size between subgroups. Volume expansion of the untreated adjacent lobe(s) was positively correlated with volume reduction of the treated lobe (r{sup 2}=0.47, P<.0001). Conclusions: We identified a dose-volume response for treated lobe volume reduction and adjacent lobe compensatory expansion after lung tumor SABR, consistent across

  3. Use of PET/CT and Stereotactic Radiation Therapy for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Osteosarcoma Metastases.

    PubMed

    Selmic, Laura Elizabeth; Griffin, Lynn R; Nolan, Michael W; Custis, James; Randall, Elissa; Withrow, Stephen J

    This case report describes the use of two new concepts in the diagnosis and treatment of metastatic osteosarcoma (OSA) in one dog. The dog was initially presented for positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) as full-body staging following amputation and adjuvant chemotherapy for treatment of OSA of the proximal tibia. The initial PET/CT did not show evidence of metastatic disease. Six mo after OSA, diagnosis pulmonary metastatic nodules were identified and oral toceranib phosphate was initiated. Twelve mo postdiagnosis the dog developed neck pain and non-ambulatory tetraparesis and was diagnosed with a C7 vertebral metastatic lesion based on magnetic resonance imaging. A second PET/CT was performed to screen for further metastatic lesions, and a nodule within the right ischium was identified. The C7 and ischial lesions were treated with stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT). Sixteen mo postdiagnosis, a third PET/CT was performed due to increasing size of the pulmonary nodules and a right-sided liver metastasis was detected. The liver mass was treated with SRT. The PET/CT scans facilitated identification of gross metastatic lesions that were subsequently treated with SRT, which resulted in clinical improvement of the dog's neurological signs.

  4. Hypofractionated Stereotactic Radiation Therapy in Recurrent High-Grade Glioma: A New Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Navarria, Pierina; Ascolese, Anna Maria; Tomatis, Stefano; Reggiori, Giacomo; Clerici, Elena; Villa, Elisa; Maggi, Giulia; Bello, Lorenzo; Pessina, Federico; Cozzi, Luca; Scorsetti, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate outcomes of hypofractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (HSRT) in patients re-treated for recurrent high-grade glioma. Materials and Methods From January 2006 to September 2013, 25 patients were treated. Six patients underwent radiation therapy alone, while 19 underwent combined treatment with surgery and/or chemotherapy. Only patients with Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) > 70 and time from previous radiotherapy greater than 6 months were re-irradiated. The mean recurrent tumor volume was 35 cm3 (range, 2.46 to 116.7 cm3), and most of the patients (84%) were treated with a total dose of 25 Gy in five fractions (range, 20 to 50 Gy in 5-10 fractions). Results The median follow-up was 18 months (range, 4 to 36 months). The progression-free survival (PFS) at 1 and 2 years was 72% and 34% and the overall survival (OS) 76% and 50%, respectively. No severe toxicity was recorded. In univariate and multivariate analysis extent of resection at diagnosis significantly influenced PFS and OS (p < 0.01). Patients with smaller recurren tumor volume treated had better local control and survival. Indeed, the 2-year PFS was 40% (≤ 50 cm3) versus 11% (p=0.1) and the 2-year OS 56% versus 33% (> 50 cm3), respectively (p=0.26). Conclusion In our experience, HSRT could be a safe and feasible therapeutic option for recurrent high grade glioma even in patients with larger tumors. We believe that a multidisciplinary evaluation is mandatory to assure the best treatment for selected patients. Local treatment should also be considered as part of an integrated approach. PMID:25761491

  5. Dosimetric comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy with robotic stereotactic radiation therapy in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Paik, Eun Kyung; Choi, Chul Won; Jang, Won Il; Lee, Sung Hyun; Choi, Sang Hyoun; Kim, Kum Bae; Lee, Dong Han

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare volumetric modulated arc therapy of RapidArc with robotic stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of CyberKnife in the planning and delivery of SBRT for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treatment by analyzing dosimetric parameters. Materials and Methods Two radiation treatment plans were generated for 29 HCC patients, one using Eclipse for the RapidArc plan and the other using Multiplan for the CyberKnife plan. The prescription dose was 60 Gy in 3 fractions. The dosimetric parameters of planning target volume (PTV) coverage and normal tissue sparing in the RapidArc and the CyberKnife plans were analyzed. Results The conformity index was 1.05 ± 0.02 for the CyberKnife plan, and 1.13 ± 0.10 for the RapidArc plan. The homogeneity index was 1.23 ± 0.01 for the CyberKnife plan, and 1.10 ± 0.03 for the RapidArc plan. For the normal liver, there were significant differences between the two plans in the low-dose regions of V1 and V3. The normalized volumes of V60 for the normal liver in the RapidArc plan were drastically increased when the mean dose of the PTVs in RapidArc plan is equivalent to the mean dose of the PTVs in the CyberKnife plan. Conclusion CyberKnife plans show greater dose conformity, especially in small-sized tumors, while RapidArc plans show good dosimetric distribution of low dose sparing in the normal liver and body. PMID:26484307

  6. Ipilimumab with Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy: Phase I Results and Immunologic Correlates from Peripheral T Cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chad; Welsh, James W; de Groot, Patricia; Massarelli, Erminia; Chang, Joe Y; Hess, Kenneth R; Basu, Sreyashi; Curran, Michael A; Cabanillas, Maria E; Subbiah, Vivek; Fu, Siqing; Tsimberidou, Apostolia M; Karp, Daniel; Gomez, Daniel R; Diab, Adi; Komaki, Ritsuko; Heymach, John V; Sharma, Padmanee; Naing, Aung; Hong, David S

    2017-03-15

    Purpose: Little prospective data are available on clinical outcomes and immune correlates from combination radiation and immunotherapy. We conducted a phase I trial (NCT02239900) testing stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) with ipilimumab.Experimental Design: SABR was given either concurrently (1 day after the first dose) or sequentially (1 week after the second dose) with ipilimumab (3 mg/kg every 3 weeks for 4 doses) to five treatment groups: concurrent 50 Gy (in 4 fractions) to liver; sequential 50 Gy (in 4 fractions) to liver; concurrent 50 Gy (in 4 fractions) to lung; sequential 50 Gy (in 4 fractions) to lung; and sequential 60 Gy (in 10 fractions) to lung or liver. MTD was determined with a 3 + 3 dose de-escalation design. Immune marker expression was assessed by flow cytometry.Results: Among 35 patients who initiated ipilimumab, 2 experienced dose-limiting toxicity and 12 (34%) grade 3 toxicity. Response outside the radiation field was assessable in 31 patients. Three patients (10%) exhibited partial response and 7 (23%) experienced clinical benefit (defined as partial response or stable disease lasting ≥6 months). Clinical benefit was associated with increases in peripheral CD8(+) T cells, CD8(+)/CD4(+) T-cell ratio, and proportion of CD8(+) T cells expressing 4-1BB and PD1. Liver (vs. lung) irradiation produced greater T-cell activation, reflected as increases in the proportions of peripheral T cells expressing ICOS, GITR, and 4-1BB.Conclusions: Combining SABR and ipilimumab was safe with signs of efficacy, peripheral T-cell markers may predict clinical benefit, and systemic immune activation was greater after liver irradiation. Clin Cancer Res; 23(6); 1388-96. ©2016 AACR.

  7. Risk of Pneumonitis After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Patients With Previous Anatomic Lung Resection.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Jason T; David, Elizabeth A; Qi, LiHong; Chen, Allen M; Daly, Megan E

    2015-09-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has emerged as a standard treatment of early-stage, medically inoperable lung cancer. Limited data have evaluated the radiation pneumonitis (RP) risk with SBRT after previous anatomic lung resection (ALR). We assessed the incidence of RP and all pulmonary toxicity (PT) in patients who underwent lung SBRT after ALR and compared them with those of patients without previous ALR. We reviewed the medical records of 84 consecutively treated patients with stage T1-T2b non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with 88 courses of SBRT for 94 lung tumors from January 2007 to December 2014, including 17 patients with previous ALR. The rates of RP and all PT were compared between the patients with and without previous ALR. At a median follow-up duration of 18.3 months (range, 1.8-85.6 months), the crude grade 2+ RP rate was 5.9% and 2.8% for patients with and without previous ALR, respectively (P = .51). The corresponding 2-year estimates of freedom from RP were 89% and 97% (P = .51). The crude rate of all grade 2+ PT was 11.8% and 2.8% for those with and without previous ALR (P = .11), with 2-year estimates of freedom from PT of 97% and 84% (P = .11), respectively. The 2 cohorts were well matched by the mean lung dose, percentage of lung volume receiving 20 Gy (P = .86), and prescribed dose (P = .75). The 2-year estimates of local control, cause-specific survival, and overall survival were similar between the 2 cohorts. The observed rates of PT were low among all patients, with a trend toward increased grade 2 and 3 lung toxicity among patients with previous ALR. Previous ALR did not increase the risk of grade 4 and 5 RP, and SBRT appears safe and effective in this population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Hypofractionated Stereotactic Radiation Therapy in Recurrent High-Grade Glioma: A New Challenge.

    PubMed

    Navarria, Pierina; Ascolese, Anna Maria; Tomatis, Stefano; Reggiori, Giacomo; Clerici, Elena; Villa, Elisa; Maggi, Giulia; Bello, Lorenzo; Pessina, Federico; Cozzi, Luca; Scorsetti, Marta

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate outcomes of hypofractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (HSRT) in patients re-treated for recurrent high-grade glioma. From January 2006 to September 2013, 25 patients were treated. Six patients underwent radiation therapy alone, while 19 underwent combined treatment with surgery and/or chemotherapy. Only patients with Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) > 70 and time from previous radiotherapy greater than 6 months were re-irradiated. The mean recurrent tumor volume was 35 cm(3) (range, 2.46 to 116.7 cm(3)), and most of the patients (84%) were treated with a total dose of 25 Gy in five fractions (range, 20 to 50 Gy in 5-10 fractions). The median follow-up was 18 months (range, 4 to 36 months). The progression-free survival (PFS) at 1 and 2 years was 72% and 34% and the overall survival (OS) 76% and 50%, respectively. No severe toxicity was recorded. In univariate and multivariate analysis extent of resection at diagnosis significantly influenced PFS and OS (p < 0.01). Patients with smaller recurren tumor volume treated had better local control and survival. Indeed, the 2-year PFS was 40% (≤ 50 cm(3)) versus 11% (p=0.1) and the 2-year OS 56% versus 33% (> 50 cm(3)), respectively (p=0.26). In our experience, HSRT could be a safe and feasible therapeutic option for recurrent high grade glioma even in patients with larger tumors. We believe that a multidisciplinary evaluation is mandatory to assure the best treatment for selected patients. Local treatment should also be considered as part of an integrated approach.

  9. Acceptable Toxicity After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Liver Tumors Adjacent to the Central Biliary System

    SciTech Connect

    Eriguchi, Takahisa; Takeda, Atsuya; Sanuki, Naoko; Oku, Yohei; Aoki, Yousuke; Shigematsu, Naoyuki; Kunieda, Etsuo

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate biliary toxicity after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for liver tumors. Methods and Materials: Among 297 consecutive patients with liver tumors treated with SBRT of 35 to 50 Gy in 5 fractions, patients who were irradiated with >20 Gy to the central biliary system (CBS), including the gallbladder, and had follow-up times >6 months were retrospectively analyzed. Toxicity profiles, such as clinical symptoms and laboratory and radiologic data especially for obstructive jaundice and biliary infection, were investigated in relation to the dose volume and length relationship for each biliary organ. Results: Fifty patients with 55 tumors were irradiated with >20 Gy to the CBS. The median follow-up period was 18.2 months (range, 6.0-80.5 months). In the dose length analysis, 39, 34, 14, and 2 patients were irradiated with >20 Gy, >30 Gy, >40 Gy, and >50 Gy, respectively, to >1 cm of the biliary tract. Seven patients were irradiated with >20 Gy to >20% of the gallbladder. Only 2 patients experienced asymptomatic bile duct stenosis. One patient, metachronously treated twice with SBRT for tumors adjacent to each other, had a transient increase in hepatic and biliary enzymes 12 months after the second treatment. The high-dose area >80 Gy corresponded to the biliary stenosis region. The other patient experienced biliary stenosis 5 months after SBRT and had no laboratory changes. The biliary tract irradiated with >20 Gy was 7 mm and did not correspond to the bile duct stenosis region. No obstructive jaundice or biliary infection was found in any patient. Conclusions: SBRT for liver tumors adjacent to the CBS was feasible with minimal biliary toxicity. Only 1 patient had exceptional radiation-induced bile duct stenosis. For liver tumors adjacent to the CBS without other effective treatment options, SBRT at a dose of 40 Gy in 5 fractions is a safe treatment with regard to biliary toxicity.

  10. Flattening filter-free linac improves treatment delivery efficiency in stereotactic body radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Prendergast, Brendan M; Fiveash, John B; Popple, Richard A; Clark, Grant M; Thomas, Evan M; Minnich, Douglas J; Jacob, Rojymon; Spencer, Sharon A; Bonner, James A; Dobelbower, Michael C

    2013-05-06

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) employs precision target tracking and image-guidance techniques to deliver ablative doses of radiation to localized malignancies; however, treatment with conventional photon beams requires lengthy treatment and immobilization times. The use of flattening filter-free (FFF) beams operating at higher dose rates can shorten beam-on time, and we hypothesize that it will shorten overall treatment delivery time. A total of 111 lung and liver SBRT cases treated at our institution from July 2008 to July 2011 were reviewed and 99 cases with complete data were identified. Treatment delivery times for cases treated with a FFF linac versus a conventional dose rate linac were compared. The frequency and type of intrafraction image guidance was also collected and compared between groups. Three hundred and ninety-one individual SBRT fractions from 99 treatment plans were examined; 36 plans were treated with a FFF linac. In the FFF cohort, the mean (± standard deviation) treatment time (time elapsed from beam-on until treatment end) and patient's immobilization time (time from first alignment image until treatment end) was 11.44 (± 6.3) and 21.08 (± 6.8) minutes compared to 32.94 (± 14.8) and 47.05 (± 17.6) minutes for the conventional cohort (p < 0.01 for all values). Intrafraction-computed tomography (CT) was used more often in the conventional cohort (84% vs. 25%; p < 0.05), but use of orthogonal X-ray imaging remained the same (16% vs. 19%). For lung and liver SBRT, a FFF linac reduces treatment and immobilization time by more than 50% compared to a conventional linac. In addition, treatment with a FFF linac is associated with less physician-ordered image guidance, which contributes to further improvement in treatment delivery efficiency.

  11. Linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery of intracranial meningiomas: results of the first 5 years of clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Abdelaziz, Osama S; Kandil, Alaa; El-Assaal, Shaaban; Abdelaziz, Amro; Rostom, Yosry; Rashed, Yaser

    2011-01-01

    Meningiomas are mostly benign but some are atypical or malignant. Surgical resection is curative when complete removal of benign meningiomas is contemplated. Incompletely excised and recurrent tumors are frequently treated with fractionated radiation therapy or stereotactic radiosurgery. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the short-term radiological and functional outcomes of a single center using linear accelerator (Linac) stereotactic radiosurgery for the treatment of intracranial meningiomas. Twenty-nine patients (12 males and 17 females) with 30 meningiomas, in different brain locations (skull base and non-skull base meningiomas), were treated with Linac-based stereotactic radiosurgery. The mean tumor volume was 6.3 cm³, and the mean tumor marginal and maximum doses were 10.9 and 15 Gy, respectively. The median prescribed isodose line was 80%. The patients were followed-up for a minimum of 3 years. Regarding radiological outcome, nine (30%) meningiomas demonstrated evident volume reduction, 19 (63.3%) meningiomas remained unchanged, and two (6.7%) meningiomas increased in size after radiosurgery. The local tumor control rates for skull base meningiomas and non-skull base meningiomas after radiosurgery were 90.9% and 100%, respectively. Regarding functional outcomes, 64% of patients presenting with cranial neuropathies showed improvement of their cranial nerve functions and 29% of patients remained unchanged. One patient had temporary trigeminal neuropathy. Although radiosurgery for meningiomas is generally effective and quite safe in achieving high control rates with minimum morbidity over short- and intermediate-term periods of follow-up, tumor progression might occur in a delayed manner after initial apparent control for few years. We recommend continued follow-up for longer periods to better assess the long-term outcomes.

  12. Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) / Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT): Benefit to Irish patients and Irish Healthcare Economy.

    PubMed

    Cagney, D N; Armstrong, J G

    2017-01-11

    Cancer incidence across Europe is projected to rise rapidly over the next decade. This rising cancer incidence is mirrored by increasing use of and indications for stereotactic radiation. This paper seeks to summarize the exponential increase in indications for stereotactic radiotherapy as well as the evolving economic advantages of stereotactic radiosurgery and stereotactic body radiotherapy.

  13. Accumulated Delivered Dose Response of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Liver Metastases.

    PubMed

    Swaminath, Anand; Massey, Christine; Brierley, James D; Dinniwell, Rob; Wong, Rebecca; Kim, John J; Velec, Michael; Brock, Kristy K; Dawson, Laura A

    2015-11-01

    To determine whether the accumulated dose using image guided radiation therapy is a stronger predictor of clinical outcomes than the planned dose in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for liver metastases. From 2003 to 2009, 81 patients with 142 metastases were treated in institutional review board-approved SBRT studies (5-10 fractions). Patients were treated during free breathing (with or without abdominal compression) or with controlled exhale breath-holding. SBRT was planned on a static exhale computed tomography (CT) scan, and the minimum planning target volume dose to 0.5 cm(3) (minPTV) was recorded. The accumulated minimum dose to the 0.5 cm(3) gross tumor volume (accGTV) was calculated after performing dose accumulation from exported image guided radiation therapy data sets registered to the planning CT using rigid (2-dimensional MV/kV orthogonal) or deformable (3-dimensional/4-dimensional cone beam CT) image registration. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression models assessed the factors influencing the time to local progression (TTLP). Hazard ratios for accGTV and minPTV were compared using model goodness-of-fit and bootstrapping. Overall, the accGTV dose exceeded the minPTV dose in 98% of the lesions. For 5 to 6 fractions, accGTV doses of >45 Gy were associated with 1-year local control of 86%. On univariate analysis, the cancer subtype (breast), smaller tumor volume, and increased dose were significant predictors for improved TTLP. The dose and volume were uncorrelated; the accGTV dose and minPTV dose were correlated and were tested separately on multivariate models. Breast cancer subtype, accGTV dose (P<.001), and minPTV dose (P=.02) retained significance in the multivariate models. The univariate hazard ratio for TTLP for 5-Gy increases in accGTV versus minPTV was 0.67 versus 0.74 (all patients; 95% confidence interval of difference 0.03-0.14). Goodness-of-fit testing confirmed the accGTV dose as a stronger dose-response predictor than the

  14. Patient-reported outcomes following stereotactic body radiation therapy for clinically localized prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) delivers high doses of radiation to the prostate while minimizing radiation to adjacent normal tissues. Large fraction sizes may increase the risk of functional decrements. Treatment-related bother may be more important to a patient than treatment-related dysfunction. This study reports on patient-reported outcomes following SBRT for clinically localized prostate cancer. Methods Between August 2007 and July 2011, 228 consecutive hormone-naïve patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with 35–36.25 Gy SBRT delivered using the CyberKnife Radiosurgical System (Accuray) in 5 fractions. Quality of life was assessed using the American Urological Association Symptom Score (AUA) and the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC)-26. Urinary symptom flare was defined as an AUA score 15 or more with an increase of 5 or more points above baseline 6 months after treatment. Results 228 patients (88 low-, 126 intermediate- and 14 high-risk) at a median age of 69 (44–90) years received SBRT with a minimum follow-up of 24 months. EPIC urinary and bowel summary scores declined transiently at 1 month and experienced a second, more protracted decline between 9 months and 18 months before returning to near baseline 2 years post-SBRT. 14.5% of patients experienced late urinary symptom flare following treatment. Patients who experienced urinary symptom flare had poorer bowel quality of life following SBRT. EPIC scores for urinary bother declined transiently, first at 1 month and again at 12 months, before approaching pre-treatment scores by 2 years. Bowel bother showed a similar pattern, but the second decline was smaller and lasted 9 months to 18 months. EPIC sexual summary and bother scores progressively declined over the 2 years following SBRT without recovery. Conclusions In the first 2 years, the impact of SBRT on urination and defecation was minimal. Transient late increases in

  15. The Impact of Obesity on Patient Reported Outcomes Following Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cyr, Robyn; Feng, Li Rebekah; Bae, Edward; Danner, Malika T; Ayoob, Marilyn; Yung, Thomas M; Lei, Siyuan; Collins, Brian T; Saligan, Leorey; Simeng, Suy; Kumar, Deepak; Collins, Sean P

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The relationship between obesity (Body Mass Index ­>30 kg/m2) and quality of life (QoL) following prostate cancer (PCa) radiation therapy (RT) is unknown. Excess abdominal fat may compromise the precise delivery of radiation, putting surrounding organs at risk for greater radiation exposure. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) utilizes a real-time tracking system that provides updated prostate position information and allows for correction of the therapeutic beam during treatment with high accuracy. In this study, we evaluate the impact of obesity on patient reported outcomes following SBRT for prostate cancer. Materials and methods Between February 2008 and April 2012, 88 obese and 178 non-obese patients with PCa were treated with SBRT at Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, DC. Health-related quality of life (HRQol) was assessed via the expanded prostate cancer index composite (EPIC)-26 at baseline, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after 5-fraction delivery of 35-36.25 Gy with the CyberKnife. Patients who received androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) were excluded from this analysis due to its known negative impact on HRQoL. Results Pretreatment characteristics of obese and non-obese patient groups were similar except that obese patients had lower total testosterone levels. Urinary and bowel function and bother scores between the two patient cohorts were comparable at baseline and subsequent follow-ups. Sexual function and bother were also similar at baseline between both groups. Bother was defined by displeasure patients may experience from functional decline. At 24 months post-SBRT, obese men experienced borderline clinically significant decrease in sexual function and greater sexual bother compared to non-obese patients. Fatigue was significantly higher in obese patients compared to non-obese patients at 18 months post-SBRT. Conclusions Prostate SBRT affects obese and non-obese patients similarly in total HRQoL scores and majority of its

  16. The Impact of Obesity on Patient Reported Outcomes Following Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Koneru, Harsha; Cyr, Robyn; Feng, Li Rebekah; Bae, Edward; Danner, Malika T; Ayoob, Marilyn; Yung, Thomas M; Lei, Siyuan; Collins, Brian T; Saligan, Leorey; Simeng, Suy; Kumar, Deepak; Collins, Sean P

    2016-07-05

    The relationship between obesity (Body Mass Index ->30 kg/m(2)) and quality of life (QoL) following prostate cancer (PCa) radiation therapy (RT) is unknown. Excess abdominal fat may compromise the precise delivery of radiation, putting surrounding organs at risk for greater radiation exposure. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) utilizes a real-time tracking system that provides updated prostate position information and allows for correction of the therapeutic beam during treatment with high accuracy. In this study, we evaluate the impact of obesity on patient reported outcomes following SBRT for prostate cancer. Between February 2008 and April 2012, 88 obese and 178 non-obese patients with PCa were treated with SBRT at Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, DC. Health-related quality of life (HRQol) was assessed via the expanded prostate cancer index composite (EPIC)-26 at baseline, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after 5-fraction delivery of 35-36.25 Gy with the CyberKnife. Patients who received androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) were excluded from this analysis due to its known negative impact on HRQoL. Pretreatment characteristics of obese and non-obese patient groups were similar except that obese patients had lower total testosterone levels. Urinary and bowel function and bother scores between the two patient cohorts were comparable at baseline and subsequent follow-ups. Sexual function and bother were also similar at baseline between both groups. Bother was defined by displeasure patients may experience from functional decline. At 24 months post-SBRT, obese men experienced borderline clinically significant decrease in sexual function and greater sexual bother compared to non-obese patients. Fatigue was significantly higher in obese patients compared to non-obese patients at 18 months post-SBRT. Prostate SBRT affects obese and non-obese patients similarly in total HRQoL scores and majority of its domains. Obesity has been associated with cancer

  17. [Setup accuracy of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) using virtual isocenter in image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT)].

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Hisato; Uchiyama, Yukio; Komori, Masataka; Hagiwara, Masahiro; Mori, Yoshimasa

    2012-01-01

    We use Novalis Body system for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in lung and liver tumors. Novalis system is dedicated to SBRT with image-guided patient setup system ExacTrac. The spinal bone is the main landmark in patient setup during SBRT using ExacTrac kV X-ray system. When the target tumor is located laterally distant from the spinal bone at the midline, it is difficult to ensure the accuracy of the setup, especially if there are rotational gaps (yaw, pitch and roll) in the setup. For this, we resolve the problem by using a virtual isocenter (VIC) different from isocenter (IC) .We evaluated the setup accuracy in a rand phantom by using VIC and checked the setup errors using rand phantom and patient cases by our original method during the setup for IC. The accuracy of setup using VIC was less than 1.0 mm. Our original method was useful for checking patient setup when VIC used.

  18. Stereotactic body radiation therapy for nonmetastatic lung cancer: An analysis of 75 patients treated over 5 years

    SciTech Connect

    Beitler, Jonathan J. . E-mail: jbeitler92@alumni.gsb.columbia.edu; Badine, Edgard A.; El-Sayah, Danny; Makara, Denise; Friscia, Phillip; Silverman, Phillip; Terjanian, Terenig

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) may not be medically operable even in patients with surgically resectable disease. For patients who either refuse surgery or are medically inoperable, radiation therapy may be the best therapeutic choice. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) employs external fixation and hypofractionation to deliver a high dose per fraction of radiation to a small target volume. Methods and Materials: Retrospective review of 75 patients treated over 5 years at Staten Island University Hospital as definitive treatment for NSCLC or presumed NSCLC. Patients received a median of 5 fractions of 8 Gy per fraction over 27 days. Results: Overall 1-, 2-, and 5-year actuarial survivals were 63%, 45%, and 17%. Patients with a gross tumor volume (GTV) less than 65 cm{sup 3} enjoyed a longer median survival (25.7 vs. 9.9 months, p < 0.003), and at 5 years, the actuarial survival for the patients with GTVs less than 65 cm{sup 3} was 24% vs. 0% for those with GTVs larger than 65 cm{sup 3}. Conclusions: Stereotactic body radiation therapy as delivered was ineffective for curing the patients whose GTVs were larger than 65 cm{sup 3}. SBRT was promising for those with GTVs less than 65 cm{sup 3}.

  19. TEN-YEAR FOLLOW-UP OF EYES TREATED WITH STEREOTACTIC FRACTIONATED EXTERNAL BEAM RADIATION FOR NEOVASCULAR AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION

    PubMed Central

    TRIKHA, RUPAN; MORSE, LAWRENCE S.; ZAWADZKI, ROBERT J.; WERNER, JOHN S.; PARK, SUSANNA S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To determine the long-term effects of stereotactic fractionated external beam radiation on eyes treated for neovascular age-related macular degeneration. Methods A retrospective review of all eyes treated with stereotactic fractionated external beam radiation (20–40 Gy, 2-Gy fractions) between 1997 and 2000 was performed to identify eyes with ≥2-year follow-up for analysis. A subset was imaged prospectively using a high-resolution Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography. Results Among 94 eyes treated, 33 eyes (32 subjects) had ≥2-year follow-up information (mean follow-up, 6.2 years; range, 2–10 years). Final visual acuity ranged from 20/50 to no light perception. Final macular findings included central geographic atrophy (49%), disciform scar (30%), and active choroidal neovascular membrane (9%). Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography images of three eyes with geographic atrophy revealed photoreceptor layer loss within areas of geographic atrophy with intact retinal morphology in areas of radiation exposure outside geographic atrophy. Radiation retinopathy was suspected in 18% and confirmed by fluorescein angiography in 15%, ranging from mild to neovascular glaucoma/phthisis bulbi (2 eyes). Mean time from stereotactic fractionated external beam radiation to development of radiation retinopathy was 5.4 years (range, 1–10 years). Conclusion A moderate rate of delayed radiation retinopathy was noted in eyes with neovascular age-related macular degeneration treated with stereotactic fractionated external beam radiation. Geographic atrophy was a common finding. PMID:21499195

  20. Clinical applicability of biologically effective dose calculation for spinal cord in fractionated spine stereotactic body radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Heon; Lee, Kyu Chan; Choi, Jinho; Ahn, So Hyun; Lee, Seok Ho; Sung, Ki Hoon; Kil, Se Hee

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate whether biologically effective dose (BED) based on linear-quadratic model can be used to estimate spinal cord tolerance dose in spine stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) delivered in 4 or more fractions. Sixty-three metastatic spinal lesions in 47 patients were retrospectively evaluated. The most frequently prescribed dose was 36 Gy in 4 fractions. In planning, we tried to limit the maximum dose to the spinal cord or cauda equina less than 50% of prescription or 45 Gy2/2. BED was calculated using maximum point dose of spinal cord. Maximum spinal cord dose per fraction ranged from 2.6 to 6.0 Gy (median 4.3 Gy). Except 4 patients with 52.7, 56.4, 62.4, and 67.9 Gy2/2, equivalent total dose in 2-Gy fraction of the patients was not more than 50 Gy2/2 (12.1-67.9, median 32.0). The ratio of maximum spinal cord dose to prescription dose increased up to 82.2% of prescription dose as epidural spinal cord compression grade increased. No patient developed grade 2 or higher radiation-induced spinal cord toxicity during follow-up period of 0.5 to 53.9 months. In fractionated spine SBRT, BED can be used to estimate spinal cord tolerance dose, provided that the dose per fraction to the spinal cord is moderate, e.g. < 6.0 Gy. It appears that a maximum dose of up to 45-50 Gy2/2 to the spinal cord is tolerable in 4 or more fractionation regimen.

  1. Consensus Contouring Guidelines for Postoperative Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Metastatic Solid Tumor Malignancies to the Spine.

    PubMed

    Redmond, Kristin J; Robertson, Scott; Lo, Simon S; Soltys, Scott G; Ryu, Samuel; McNutt, Todd; Chao, Samuel T; Yamada, Yoshiya; Ghia, Amol; Chang, Eric L; Sheehan, Jason; Sahgal, Arjun

    2017-01-01

    To develop consensus contouring guidelines for postoperative stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for spinal metastases. Ten spine SBRT specialists representing 10 international centers independently contoured the clinical target volume (CTV), planning target volume (PTV), spinal cord, and spinal cord planning organ at risk volume (PRV) for 10 representative clinical scenarios in postoperative spine SBRT for metastatic solid tumor malignancies. Contours were imported into the Computational Environment for Radiotherapy Research. Agreement between physicians was calculated with an expectation minimization algorithm using simultaneous truth and performance level estimation with κ statistics. Target volume definition guidelines were established by finding optimized confidence level consensus contours using histogram agreement analyses. Nine expert radiation oncologists and 1 neurosurgeon completed contours for all 10 cases. The mean sensitivity and specificity were 0.79 (range, 0.71-0.89) and 0.94 (range, 0.90-0.99) for the CTV and 0.79 (range, 0.70-0.95) and 0.92 (range, 0.87-0.99) for the PTV), respectively. Mean κ agreement, which demonstrates the probability that contours agree by chance alone, was 0.58 (range, 0.43-0.70) for CTV and 0.58 (range, 0.37-0.76) for PTV (P<.001 for all cases). Optimized consensus contours were established for all patients with 80% confidence interval. Recommendations for CTV include treatment of the entire preoperative extent of bony and epidural disease, plus immediately adjacent bony anatomic compartments at risk of microscopic disease extension. In particular, a "donut-shaped" CTV was consistently applied in cases of preoperative circumferential epidural extension, regardless of extent of residual epidural extension. Otherwise more conformal anatomic-based CTVs were determined and described. Spinal instrumentation was consistently excluded from the CTV. We provide consensus contouring guidelines for common scenarios in

  2. Clinical applicability of biologically effective dose calculation for spinal cord in fractionated spine stereotactic body radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Heon; Lee, Kyu Chan; Choi, Jinho; Ahn, So Hyun; Lee, Seok Ho; Sung, Ki Hoon; Kil, Se Hee

    2015-01-01

    Background. The aim of the study was to investigate whether biologically effective dose (BED) based on linear-quadratic model can be used to estimate spinal cord tolerance dose in spine stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) delivered in 4 or more fractions. Patients and methods. Sixty-three metastatic spinal lesions in 47 patients were retrospectively evaluated. The most frequently prescribed dose was 36 Gy in 4 fractions. In planning, we tried to limit the maximum dose to the spinal cord or cauda equina less than 50% of prescription or 45 Gy2/2. BED was calculated using maximum point dose of spinal cord. Results. Maximum spinal cord dose per fraction ranged from 2.6 to 6.0 Gy (median 4.3 Gy). Except 4 patients with 52.7, 56.4, 62.4, and 67.9 Gy2/2, equivalent total dose in 2-Gy fraction of the patients was not more than 50 Gy2/2 (12.1–67.9, median 32.0). The ratio of maximum spinal cord dose to prescription dose increased up to 82.2% of prescription dose as epidural spinal cord compression grade increased. No patient developed grade 2 or higher radiation-induced spinal cord toxicity during follow-up period of 0.5 to 53.9 months. Conclusions. In fractionated spine SBRT, BED can be used to estimate spinal cord tolerance dose, provided that the dose per fraction to the spinal cord is moderate, e.g. < 6.0 Gy. It appears that a maximum dose of up to 45–50 Gy2/2 to the spinal cord is tolerable in 4 or more fractionation regimen. PMID:26029031

  3. SU-E-T-79: Comparison of Doses Received by the Hippocampus in Patients Treated with Single Vs Multiple Isocenter Based Stereotactic Radiation Therapy to the Brain for Multiple Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Algan, O; Giem, J; Young, J; Ali, I; Ahmad, S; Hossain, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the doses received by the hippocampus and normal brain tissue during a course of stereotactic radiotherapy utilizing a single isocenter (SI) versus multiple isocenter (MI) in patients with multiple intracranial metastases. Methods: Seven patients imaged with MRI including SPGR sequence and diagnosed with 2–3 brain metastases were included in this retrospective study. Two sets of stereotactic IMRT treatment plans, (MI vs SI), were generated. The hippocampus was contoured on SPGR sequences and doses received by the hippocampus and whole brain were calculated. The prescribed dose was 25Gy in 5 fractions. The two groups were compared using t-test analysis. Results: There were 17 lesions in 7 patients. The median tumor, right hippocampus, left hippocampus and brain volumes were: 3.37cc, 2.56cc, 3.28cc, and 1417cc respectively. In comparing the two treatment plans, there was no difference in the PTV coverage except in the tail of the DVH curve. All tumors had V95 > 99.5%. The only statistically significant parameter was the V100 (72% vs 45%, p=0.002, favoring MI). All other evaluated parameters including the V95 and V98 did not reveal any statistically significant differences. None of the evaluated dosimetric parameters for the hippocampus (V100, V80, V60, V40, V20, V10, D100, D90, D70, D50, D30, D10) revealed any statistically significant differences (all p-values > 0.31) between MI and SI plans. The total brain dose was slightly higher in the SI plans, especially in the lower dose regions, although this difference was not statistically significant. Utilizing brain-sub-PTV volumes did not change these results. Conclusion: The use of SI treatment planning for patients with up to 3 brain metastases produces similar PTV coverage and similar normal tissue doses to the hippocampus and the brain compared to MI plans. SI treatment planning should be considered in patients with multiple brain metastases undergoing stereotactic treatment.

  4. Benefit and Complications of Frame-Based Stereotactic Biopsy in Old and Very Old Patients.

    PubMed

    Quick-Weller, Johanna; Tichy, Julia; Dinc, Nazife; Tritt, Stephanie; Won, Sae-Yeon; Behmanesh, Bedjan; Bruder, Markus; Seifert, Volker; Weise, Lutz M; Marquardt, Gerhard

    2017-06-01

    Stereotactic biopsy is an everyday procedure implemented in numerous neurosurgical departments. The procedure is performed to obtain tumor tissue of unclear diagnosis. Going in hand with low complication rates and high diagnostic yield, stereotactic biopsies can be performed in adults and children likewise for histopathologic evaluation of lesions in eloquent localizations. However, little is known about whether aged patients do benefit from stereotactic biopsy or rather the therapy that is derived from histopathologic results. In this study, we therefore focused on old (80-84 years) and very old patients (85 years and older) to evaluate whether stereotactic biopsy should be performed leading to further therapy. We also assessed the complication rates of the procedure in this aged population. We performed a retrospective analysis of our database and included all patients older than 80 years who underwent stereotactic biopsy at our department from October 2005 until May 2016. Forty-seven patients were included in this study. These patients were divided into 2 subgroups: group 1 consisted of patients from 80 to 84 years old and group 2 of patients aged 85 years and older. All patients underwent stereotactic biopsy to establish histopathologic diagnosis. We excluded patients who underwent cyst puncture or puncture of a hemorrhage because the procedure was not performed for diagnostic purposes. We assessed gender, neuroradiologic diagnosis, Karnofsky Performance Score (KPS), number of tissue samples taken, histopathologic diagnosis, localization, postoperative hemorrhage, modality of anesthesia anticoagulation, and further therapy. Group 1 consisted of 34 patients and group 2 of 13 patients. KPS was 80 and 70, respectively. A histopathologic diagnosis was possible in all but 1 patient. In group 1, 61.8% of the patients agreed to further postoperative therapy (radiation, 35.3%; chemotherapy, 11.8%; combined radiochemotherapy, 11.8%; complication that prevented therapy

  5. Generalizable Class Solutions for Treatment Planning of Spinal Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Weksberg, David C.; Palmer, Matthew B.; Vu, Khoi N.; Rebueno, Neal C.; Sharp, Hadley J.; Luo, Dershan; Yang, James N.; Shiu, Almon S.; Rhines, Laurence D.; McAleer, Mary Frances; Brown, Paul D.; Chang, Eric L.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Spinal stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) continues to emerge as an effective therapeutic approach to spinal metastases; however, treatment planning and delivery remain resource intensive at many centers, which may hamper efficient implementation in clinical practice. We sought to develop a generalizable class solution approach for spinal SBRT treatment planning that would allow confidence that a given plan provides optimal target coverage, reduce integral dose, and maximize planning efficiency. Methods and Materials: We examined 91 patients treated with spinal SBRT at our institution. Treatment plans were categorized by lesion location, clinical target volume (CTV) configuration, and dose fractionation scheme, and then analyzed to determine the technically achievable dose gradient. A radial cord expansion was subtracted from the CTV to yield a planning CTV (pCTV) construct for plan evaluation. We reviewed the treatment plans with respect to target coverage, dose gradient, integral dose, conformality, and maximum cord dose to select the best plans and develop a set of class solutions. Results: The class solution technique generated plans that maintained target coverage and improved conformality (1.2-fold increase in the 95% van't Riet Conformation Number describing the conformality of a reference dose to the target) while reducing normal tissue integral dose (1.3-fold decrease in the volume receiving 4 Gy (V{sub 4Gy}) and machine output (19% monitor unit (MU) reduction). In trials of planning efficiency, the class solution technique reduced treatment planning time by 30% to 60% and MUs required by {approx}20%: an effect independent of prior planning experience. Conclusions: We have developed a set of class solutions for spinal SBRT that incorporate a pCTV metric for plan evaluation while yielding dosimetrically superior treatment plans with increased planning efficiency. Our technique thus allows for efficient, reproducible, and high-quality spinal

  6. Stereotactic body radiation therapy: A promising chance for oligometastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Scorsetti, Marta; Franceschini, Davide; De Rose, Fiorenza; Comito, Tiziana; Villa, Elisa; Iftode, Cristina; Navarria, Pierina; D'Agostino, Giuseppe Roberto; Masci, Giovanna; Torrisi, Rosalba; Testori, Alberto; Tinterri, Corrado; Santoro, Armando

    2016-04-01

    Multidisciplinary management of oligometastatic breast cancer with local therapy could improve disease control. The aim of our study is the assessment of safety and efficacy of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) in selected subset of patients. Oligometastastic patients from breast cancer were treated with SBRT for 1-3 lung and liver lesions, in an observational study. Inclusion criteria were: age >18 years, ECOG 0-2, diagnosis of breast cancer, no extrapulmonary and/or extrahepatic disease, other metastatic sites stable or responding after chemotherapy were allowed, no life threatening conditions, less than 5 lung and liver lesions (with maximum diameter <5 cm), chemotherapy completed at least 3 weeks before treatment, written informed consent. Prescription dose ranged between 48 and 75 Gy in 3 or 4 consecutive fractions. Primary end-point was local control (LC). Secondary end-points were toxicity, overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). From April 2010 to June 2014, 33 patients for a total number of 43 lesions were irradiated. Median follow up was 24 months (range 3-59). Actuarial LC rates were 98% at 1 year and 90% at 2 and 3 years. Complete response, partial response and progressive disease were detected in 25 (53.2%), 16 (34%), and 6 (12.8%) lesions, respectively. Median OS was 48 months. Actuarial OS rates at 1 and 2 years were 93% and 66% respectively. Median PFS was 11 months, with a PFS rate at 1 and 2 years of 48% and 27%, respectively. At univariate analysis DFI >12 months, hormonal receptor positivity, medical therapies after SBRT showed a significant impact on OS. Treatment was well tolerated, with no G3-4 toxicities. SBRT is a safe and feasible alternative treatment of liver and lung oligometastases from breast cancer, in selected patients not amenable to surgery, with good local control and survival rate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Dosimetric evaluation of simultaneous integrated boost during stereotactic body radiation therapy for pancreatic cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Wensha; Reznik, Robert; Fraass, Benedick A.; Nissen, Nicholas; Hendifar, Andrew; Wachsman, Ashley; Sandler, Howard; Tuli, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) provides a promising way to treat locally advanced pancreatic cancer and borderline resectable pancreatic cancer. A simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) to the region of vessel abutment or encasement during SBRT has the potential to downstage otherwise likely positive surgical margins. Despite the potential benefit of using SIB-SBRT, the ability to boost is limited by the local geometry of the organs at risk (OARs), such as stomach, duodenum, and bowel (SDB), relative to tumor. In this study, we have retrospectively replanned 20 patients with 25 Gy prescribed to the planning target volume (PTV) and 33~80 Gy to the boost target volume (BTV) using an SIB technique for all patients. The number of plans and patients able to satisfy a set of clinically established constraints is analyzed. The ability to boost vessels (within the gross target volume [GTV]) is shown to correlate with the overlap volume (OLV), defined to be the overlap between the GTV + a 1(OLV1)- or 2(OLV2)-cm margin with the union of SDB. Integral dose, boost dose contrast (BDC), biologically effective BDC, tumor control probability for BTV, and normal tissue complication probabilities are used to analyze the dosimetric results. More than 65% of the cases can deliver a boost to 40 Gy while satisfying all OAR constraints. An OLV2 of 100 cm{sup 3} is identified as the cutoff volume: for cases with OLV2 larger than 100 cm{sup 3}, it is very unlikely the case could achieve 25 Gy to the PTV while successfully meeting all the OAR constraints.

  8. Obesity Increases the Risk of Chest Wall Pain From Thoracic Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Welsh, James; Thomas, Jimmy; Shah, Deep; Allen, Pamela K.; Wei, Xiong; Mitchell, Kevin; Gao, Song; Balter, Peter; Komaki, Ritsuko; Chang, Joe Y.

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is increasingly being used to treat thoracic tumors. We attempted here to identify dose-volume parameters that predict chest wall toxicity (pain and skin reactions) in patients receiving thoracic SBRT. Patients and Methods: We screened a database of patients treated with SBRT between August 2004 and August 2008 to find patients with pulmonary tumors within 2.5 cm of the chest wall. All patients received a total dose of 50 Gy in four daily 12.5-Gy fractions. Toxicity was scored according to the NCI-CTCAE V3.0. Results: Of 360 patients in the database, 265 (268 tumors) had tumors within <2.5 cm of the chest wall; 104 (39%) developed skin toxicity (any grade); 14 (5%) developed acute pain (any grade), and 45 (17%) developed chronic pain (Grade 1 in 22 cases [49%] and Grade 2 or 3 in 23 cases [51%]). Both skin toxicity and chest wall pain were associated with the V{sub 30}, or volume of the chest wall receiving 30 Gy. Body mass index (BMI) was also strongly associated with the development of chest pain: patients with BMI {>=}29 had almost twice the risk of chronic pain (p = 0.03). Among patients with BMI >29, diabetes mellitus was a significant contributing factor to the development of chest pain. Conclusion: Safe use of SBRT with 50 Gy in four fractions for lesions close to the chest wall requires consideration of the chest wall volume receiving 30 Gy and the patient's BMI and diabetic state.

  9. Novel Technique for Hepatic Fiducial Marker Placement for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Jarraya, Hajer; Chalayer, Chloé; Tresch, Emmanuelle; Bonodeau, Francois; Lacornerie, Thomas; Mirabel, Xavier; Boulanger, Thomas; Taieb, Sophie; Kramar, Andrew; Lartigau, Eric; Ceugnart, Luc

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: To report experience with fiducial marker insertion and describe an advantageous, novel technique for fiducial placement in the liver for stereotactic body radiation therapy with respiratory tracking. Methods and Materials: We implanted 1444 fiducials (single: 834; linked: 610) in 328 patients with 424 hepatic lesions. Two methods of implantation were compared: the standard method (631 single fiducials) performed on 153 patients from May 2007 to May 2010, and the cube method (813 fiducials: 610 linked/203 single) applied to 175 patients from April 2010 to March 2013. The standard method involved implanting a single marker at a time. The novel technique entailed implanting 2 pairs of linked markers when possible in a way to occupy the perpendicular edges of a cube containing the tumor inside. Results: Mean duration of the cube method was shorter than the standard method (46 vs 61 minutes; P<.0001). Median numbers of skin and subcapsular entries were significantly smaller with the cube method (2 vs 4, P<.0001, and 2 vs 4, P<.0001, respectively). The rate of overall complications (total, major, and minor) was significantly lower in the cube method group compared with the standard method group (5.7% vs 13.7%; P=.013). Major complications occurred while using single markers only. The success rate was 98.9% for the cube method and 99.3% for the standard method. Conclusions: We propose a new technique of hepatic fiducial implantation that makes use of linked fiducials and involves fewer skin entries and shorter time of implantation. The technique is less complication-prone and is migration-resistant.

  10. SU-E-T-651: Quantification of Dosimetric Accuracy of Respiratory Gated Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Thiyagarajan, Rajesh; Vikraman, S; Maragathaveni, S; Dhivya, N; Kataria, Tejinder; Nambiraj, N Arunai; Sigamani, Ashokkumar; Sinha, Sujit Nath; Yadav, Girigesh; Raman, Kothanda

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To quantify the dosimetric accuracy of respiratory gated stereotactic body radiation therapy delivery using dynamic thorax phantom. Methods: Three patients with mobile target (2 lung, 1liver) were chosen. Retrospective 4DCT image sets were acquired for using Varian RPM system. An in-house MATLAB program was designed for MIP, MinIP and AvgIP generation. ITV was contoured on MIP image set for lung patients and on MinIP for liver patient. Dynamic IMRT plans were generated on selected phase bin image set in Eclipse (v10.0) planning system. CIRS dynamic thorax phantom was used to perform the dosimetric quality assurance. Patient breathing pattern file from RPM system was converted to phantom compatible file by an in-house MATLAB program. This respiratory pattern fed to the CIRS dynamic thorax phantom. 4DCT image set was acquired for this phantom using patient breathing pattern. Verification plans were generated using patient gating window and delivered on the phantom. Measurements were carried out using with ion chamber and EBT2 film. Exposed films were analyzed and evaluated in FilmQA software. Results: The stability of gated output in comparison with un-gated output was within 0.5%. The Ion chamber measured and TPS calculated dose compared for all the patients. The difference observed was 0.45%, −0.52% and −0.54 for Patient 1, Patient2 and Patient 3 respectively.Gamma value evaluated from EBT film shows pass rates from 92.41% to 99.93% for 3% dose difference and 3mm distance to agreement criteria. Conclusion: Dosimetric accuracy of respiratory gated SBRT delivery for lung and liver was dosimetrically acceptable. The Ion chamber measured dose was within 0.203±0.5659% of the expected dose. Gamma pass rates were within 96.63±3.84% of the expected dose.

  11. Patients with severe emphysema have a low risk of radiation pneumonitis following stereotactic body radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ishijima, M; Itonaga, T; Tajima, Y; Shiraishi, S; Okubo, M; Mikami, R; Tokuuye, K

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the risk of radiation pneumonitis (RP) after stereotactic radiotherapy (SBRT) for patients presenting with severe pulmonary emphysema. Methods: This study included 40 patients with Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer who underwent SBRT, 75 Gy given in 30 fractions, at the Tokyo Medical University, Tokyo, Japan, between February 2010 and February 2013. The median age of the patients was 79 years (range, 49–90 years), and the male:female ratio was 24:16. There were 20 T1 and 20 T2 tumours. 17 patients had emphysema, 6 had slight interstitial changes on CT images and the remaining 17 had no underlying lung disease. The level of emphysema was classified into three groups according to the modified Goddard's criteria (severe: three patients, moderate: eight patients and mild: six patients). Changes in the irradiated lung following SBRT were evaluated by CT. Results: On CT images, RP was detected in 34 (85%) patients, and not in 6 (15%) patients, during a median observation period of 313 days. Of the six patients, three had severe emphysema and three had no underlying lung disease. Patients with severe emphysema had lower risk of RP than those with moderate emphysema (p = 0.01), mild emphysema (p = 0.04) and no underlying lung disease (p = 0.01). Conclusion: Patients with severe emphysema had a low risk of RP following SBRT. Advances in knowledge: Little is known about the association between RP and pulmonary emphysema. Patients with severe emphysema had lower risk of RP than those with no underlying lung disease. PMID:25490255

  12. The efficacy of stereotactic body radiation therapy on huge hepatocellular carcinoma unsuitable for other local modalities.

    PubMed

    Que, Jenny Y; Lin, Li-Ching; Lin, Kuei-Li; Lin, Chia-Hui; Lin, Yu-Wei; Yang, Ching-Chieh

    2014-05-28

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of Cyberknife stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and its effect on survival in patients with unresectable huge hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) unsuitable of other standard treatment option. Between 2009 and 2011, 22 patients with unresectable huge HCC (≧10 cm) were treated with SBRT. dose ranged from 26 Gy to 40 Gy in five fractions. Overall survival (OS) and disease-progression free survival (DPFS) were determined by Kaplan-Meier analysis. Tumor response and toxicities were also assessed. After a median follow-up of 11.5 month (range 2-46 months). The objective response rate was achieved in 86.3% (complete response (CR): 22.7% and partial response (PR): 63.6%). The 1-yr. local control rate was 55.56%. The 1-year OS was 50% and median survival was 11 months (range 2-46 months). In univariate analysis, Child-Pugh stage (p = 0.0056) and SBRT dose (p = 0.0017) were significant factors for survival. However, in multivariate analysis, SBRT dose (p = 0.0072) was the most significant factor, while Child-Pugh stage of borderline significance. (p = 0.0514). Acute toxicities were mild and well tolerated. This study showed that SBRT can be delivered safely to huge HCC and achieved a substantial tumor regression and survival. The results suggest this technique should be considered a salvage treatment. However, local and regional recurrence remain the major cause of failure. Further studies of combination of SBRT and other treatment modalities may be reasonable.

  13. Stereotactic body radiation therapy for lung metastases from soft tissue sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Navarria, Pierina; Ascolese, Anna Maria; Cozzi, Luca; Tomatis, Stefano; D'Agostino, Giuseppe Roberto; De Rose, Fiorenza; De Sanctis, Rita; Marrari, Andrea; Santoro, Armando; Fogliata, Antonella; Cariboni, Umberto; Alloisio, Marco; Quagliuolo, Vittorio; Scorsetti, Marta

    2015-03-01

    To appraise the role of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in patients with lung metastasis from primary soft tissue sarcoma. Twenty-eight patients (51 lesions) were analysed. All patients were in good performance status (1-2 eastern cooperative oncology group (ECOG)), unsuitable for surgical resection, with controlled primary tumour and the number of lung metastases was ⩽4. In a risk adaptive scheme, the dose prescription was: 30Gy/1fr, 60Gy/3fr, 60Gy/8fr and 48Gy/4fr. Treatments were performed with Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy. Clinical outcome was evaluated by thoracic and abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan before SBRT and than every 3months. Toxicity was evaluated with Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) scale version 4.0. Leiomyosarcoma (36%) and synovial sarcoma (25%) were the most common histologies. Five patients (18%) initially presented with pulmonary metastasis, whereas 23 (82%) developed them at a median time of 51months (range 11-311months) from the initial diagnosis. The median follow-up time from initial diagnosis was 65months (5-139months) and from SBRT was 21months (2-80months). No severe toxicity (grades III-IV) was recorded and no patients required hospitalisation. The actuarial 5-years local control rate (from SBRT treatment) was 96%. Overall survival at 2 and 5years was 96.2% and 60.5%, respectively. At last follow-up 15 patients (54%) were alive. All other died because of distant progression. SBRT provides excellent local control of pulmonary metastasis from soft tissue sarcoma (STS) and may improve survival in selected patients. SBRT should be considered for all patients with pulmonary metastasis (PM) and evaluated in a multidisciplinary team. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Local coverage determination policy and the use of stereotactic body radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Bruce L.; Sunderland, Robert; Yabes, Jonathan; Nelson, Joel B.; Barnato, Amber E.; Bekelman, Justin E.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Local coverage determinations (LCDs) are local decisions that regulate healthcare coverage. We evaluated the impact of LCDs as well as patient, tumor, and market characteristics on the adoption of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for prostate cancer. Methods Using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare, we identified men treated with SBRT, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and robotic prostatectomy. We compared demographics, clinical characteristics, and market factors among these three treatments. Our primary exposure was LCD policy; using the Medicare Coverage Database, we categorized LCDs as favorable (SBRT covered), neutral (SBRT covered in the context of a clinical trial or registry), unfavorable (SBRT not covered), or absent (i.e., SBRT not governed by an LCD at the time of treatment). We fit a multivariable multinomial logistic regression model and generated predicted probabilities to examine the relation between LCDs and SBRT. Results During this early period of SBRT adoption, IMRT was the most common of the three treatments followed by robotic prostatectomy and then SBRT. SBRT use was high when governed by favorable and neutral LCDs and lowest when governed by unfavorable LCDs. Compared with favorable LCDs, areas where LCDs were absent were associated with higher SBRT use compared with IMRT (odds ratio [OR] 1.56; 95%CI, 1.07–2.25) and robotic prostatectomy (OR 1.84; 95%CI, 1.25–2.69). Conclusions When present, LCDs appear to regulate early SBRT adoption, but, when absent, are associated with increased SBRT use. Although SBRT use was uncommon, it varied across a wide range of patient, tumor, and market characteristics. PMID:27493987

  15. Implementation of a volumetric modulated arc therapy treatment planning solution for kidney and adrenal stereotactic body radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Sonier, Marcus; Chu, William; Lalani, Nafisha; Erler, Darby; Cheung, Patrick; Korol, Renee

    2016-01-01

    To develop a volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment planning solution in the treatment of primary renal cell carcinoma and oligometastatic adrenal lesions with stereotactic body radiation therapy. Single-arc VMAT plans (n = 5) were compared with clinically delivered step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with planning target volume coverage normalized between techniques. Target volume conformity, organ-at-risk (OAR) dose, treatment time, and monitor units were compared. A VMAT planning solution, created from a combination of arc settings and optimization constraints, auto-generated treatment plans in a single optimization. The treatment planning solution was evaluated on 15 consecutive patients receiving kidney and adrenal stereotactic body radiation therapy. Treatment time was reduced from 13.0 ± 2.6 to 4.0 ± 0.9 minutes for IMRT and VMAT, respectively. The VMAT planning solution generated treatment plans with increased target homogeneity, improved 95% conformity index, and a reduced maximum point dose to nearby OARs but with increased intermediate dose to distant OARs. The conformity of the 95% isodose improved from 1.32 ± 0.39 to 1.12 ± 0.05 for IMRT and VMAT treatment plans, respectively. Evaluation of the planning solution showed clinically acceptable dose distributions for 13 of 15 cases with tight conformity of the prescription isodose to the planning target volume of 1.07 ± 0.04, delivering minimal dose to OARs. The introduction of a stereotactic body radiation therapy VMAT treatment planning solution improves the efficiency of planning and delivery time, producing treatment plans of comparable or superior quality to IMRT in the case of primary renal cell carcinoma and oligometastatic adrenal lesions.

  16. Integral Dose and Radiation-Induced Secondary Malignancies: Comparison between Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    D’Arienzo, Marco; Masciullo, Stefano G.; de Sanctis, Vitaliana; Osti, Mattia F.; Chiacchiararelli, Laura; Enrici, Riccardo M.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present paper is to compare the integral dose received by non-tumor tissue (NTID) in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) with modified LINAC with that received by three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), estimating possible correlations between NTID and radiation-induced secondary malignancy risk. Eight patients with intrathoracic lesions were treated with SBRT, 23 Gy × 1 fraction. All patients were then replanned for 3D-CRT, maintaining the same target coverage and applying a dose scheme of 2 Gy × 32 fractions. The dose equivalence between the different treatment modalities was achieved assuming α/β = 10Gy for tumor tissue and imposing the same biological effective dose (BED) on the target (BED = 76Gy10). Total NTIDs for both techniques was calculated considering α/β = 3Gy for healthy tissue. Excess absolute cancer risk (EAR) was calculated for various organs using a mechanistic model that includes fractionation effects. A paired two-tailed Student t-test was performed to determine statistically significant differences between the data (p ≤ 0.05). Our study indicates that despite the fact that for all patients integral dose is higher for SBRT treatments than 3D-CRT (p = 0.002), secondary cancer risk associated to SBRT patients is significantly smaller than that calculated for 3D-CRT (p = 0.001). This suggests that integral dose is not a good estimator for quantifying cancer induction. Indeed, for the model and parameters used, hypofractionated radiotherapy has the potential for secondary cancer reduction. The development of reliable secondary cancer risk models seems to be a key issue in fractionated radiotherapy. Further assessments of integral doses received with 3D-CRT and other special techniques are also strongly encouraged. PMID:23202843

  17. Lung deformations and radiation-induced regional lung collapse in patients treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Diot, Quentin Kavanagh, Brian; Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy; Gaspar, Laurie; Miften, Moyed; Garg, Kavita

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To differentiate radiation-induced fibrosis from regional lung collapse outside of the high dose region in patients treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung tumors. Methods: Lung deformation maps were computed from pre-treatment and post-treatment computed tomography (CT) scans using a point-to-point translation method. Fifty anatomical landmarks inside the lung (vessel or airway branches) were matched on planning and follow-up scans for the computation process. Two methods using the deformation maps were developed to differentiate regional lung collapse from fibrosis: vector field and Jacobian methods. A total of 40 planning and follow-ups CT scans were analyzed for 20 lung SBRT patients. Results: Regional lung collapse was detected in 15 patients (75%) using the vector field method, in ten patients (50%) using the Jacobian method, and in 12 patients (60%) by radiologists. In terms of sensitivity and specificity the Jacobian method performed better. Only weak correlations were observed between the dose to the proximal airways and the occurrence of regional lung collapse. Conclusions: The authors presented and evaluated two novel methods using anatomical lung deformations to investigate lung collapse and fibrosis caused by SBRT treatment. Differentiation of these distinct physiological mechanisms beyond what is usually labeled “fibrosis” is necessary for accurate modeling of lung SBRT-induced injuries. With the help of better models, it becomes possible to expand the therapeutic benefits of SBRT to a larger population of lung patients with large or centrally located tumors that were previously considered ineligible.

  18. Integral dose and radiation-induced secondary malignancies: comparison between stereotactic body radiation therapy and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    D'Arienzo, Marco; Masciullo, Stefano G; de Sanctis, Vitaliana; Osti, Mattia F; Chiacchiararelli, Laura; Enrici, Riccardo M

    2012-11-19

    The aim of the present paper is to compare the integral dose received by non-tumor tissue (NTID) in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) with modified LINAC with that received by three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), estimating possible correlations between NTID and radiation-induced secondary malignancy risk. Eight patients with intrathoracic lesions were treated with SBRT, 23 Gy × 1 fraction. All patients were then replanned for 3D-CRT, maintaining the same target coverage and applying a dose scheme of 2 Gy × 32 fractions. The dose equivalence between the different treatment modalities was achieved assuming α/β = 10 Gy for tumor tissue and imposing the same biological effective dose (BED) on the target (BED = 76 Gy(10)). Total NTIDs for both techniques was calculated considering α/β = 3 Gy for healthy tissue. Excess absolute cancer risk (EAR) was calculated for various organs using a mechanistic model that includes fractionation effects. A paired two-tailed Student t-test was performed to determine statistically significant differences between the data (p ≤ 0.05). Our study indicates that despite the fact that for all patients integral dose is higher for SBRT treatments than 3D-CRT (p = 0.002), secondary cancer risk associated to SBRT patients is significantly smaller than that calculated for 3D-CRT (p = 0.001). This suggests that integral dose is not a good estimator for quantifying cancer induction. Indeed, for the model and parameters used, hypofractionated radiotherapy has the potential for secondary cancer reduction. The development of reliable secondary cancer risk models seems to be a key issue in fractionated radiotherapy. Further assessments of integral doses received with 3D-CRT and other special techniques are also strongly encouraged.

  19. Stereotactic radiosurgery planning based on time-resolved CTA for arteriovenous malformation: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Turner, Ryan C; Lucke-Wold, Brandon P; Josiah, Darnell; Gonzalez, Javier; Schmidt, Matthew; Tarabishy, Abdul Rahman; Bhatia, Sanjay

    2016-08-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery has long been recognized as the optimal form of management for high-grade arteriovenous malformations not amenable to surgical resection. Radiosurgical plans have generally relied upon the integration of stereotactic magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), standard contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), or computed tomography angiography (CTA) with biplane digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Current options are disadvantageous in that catheter-based biplane DSA is an invasive test associated with a small risk of complications and perhaps more importantly, the two-dimensional nature of DSA is an inherent limitation in creating radiosurgical contours. The necessity of multiple scans to create DSA contours for radiosurgical planning puts patients at increased risk. Furthermore, the inability to import two-dimensional plans into some radiosurgery programs, such as Cyberknife TPS, limits treatment options for patients. Defining the nidus itself is sometimes difficult in any of the traditional modalities as all draining veins and feeding arteries are included in the images. This sometimes necessitates targeting a larger volume, than strictly necessary, with stereotactic radiosurgery for treatment of the AVM. In this case report, we show the ability to use a less-invasive and three-dimensional form of angiography based on time-lapsed CTA (4D-CTA) rather than traditional DSA for radiosurgical planning. 4D-CTA may allow generation of a series of images, which can show the flow of contrast through the AVM. A review of these series may allow the surgeon to pick and use a volume set that best outlines the nidus with least interference from feeding arteries or draining veins. In addition, 4D-CTA scans can be uploaded into radiosurgery programs and allow three-dimensional targeting. This is the first reported case demonstrating the use of a 4D CTA and an MRI to delineate the AVM nidus for Gamma Knife radiosurgery, with complete

  20. Clinical Value of [{sup 11}C]Methionine PET for Stereotactic Radiation Therapy With Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy to Metastatic Brain Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Miwa, Kazuhiro; Matsuo, Masayuki; Shinoda, Jun; Aki, Tatsuki; Yonezawa, Shingo; Ito, Takeshi; Asano, Yoshitaka; Yamada, Mikito; Yokoyama, Kazutoshi; Yamada, Jitsuhiro; Yano, Hirohito; Iwama, Toru

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the clinical impact of {sup 11}C-labeled methionine-positron emission tomography (MET-PET) for stereotactic radiation therapy with intensity modulated radiation therapy (SRT-IMRT) in metastatic brain tumors. Methods and Materials: Forty-two metastatic brain tumors were examined. All tumors were treated with SRT-IMRT using a helical tomotherapy system. Gross tumor volume (GTV) was defined and drawn on the stereotactic magnetic resonance (MR) image, taking into account the respective contributions of MR imaging and MET-PET. Planning target volume (PTV) encompassed the GTV-PET plus a 2-mm margin. SRT-IMRT was performed, keeping the dose for PTV at 25-35 Gy in 5 fractions. The ratio of the mean value of MET uptake to the contralateral normal brain (L/N ratio) was plotted for the PTV prior to SRT-IMRT, at 3 months following SRT-IMRT, and at 6 months following SRT-IMRT. Tumor characteristic changes of MET uptake before and after SRT-IMRT were evaluated quantitatively, comparing them with MRI examination. Results: Mean {+-} SD L/N ratios were 1.95 {+-} 0.83, 1.18 {+-} 0.21, and 1.12 {+-} 0.25 in the pre-SRT-IMRT group, in the 3 months post-SRT-IMRT group, and in the 6 months post-SRT-IMRT group, respectively. Differences in the mean L/N ratio between the pre-SRT-IMRT group and the 3-month post-SRT-IMRT group and between the pre-SRT-IMRT group and the 6 month post-SRT-IMRT group were statistically significant, irrespective of MRI examination. Conclusions: We showed examples of metastatic lesions demonstrating significant decreases in MET uptake following SRT-IMRT. MET-PET seems to have a potential role in providing additional information, although MRI remains the gold standard for diagnosis and follow-up after SRT-IMRT. The present study is a preliminary approach, but to more clearly define the impact of PET-based radiosurgical assessment, further experimental and clinical analyses are required.

  1. Technical Note: Evaluation of the systematic accuracy of a frameless, multiple image modality guided, linear accelerator based stereotactic radiosurgery system

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, N. Snyder, K. C.; Qin, Y.; Li, H.; Siddiqui, M. S.; Chetty, I. J.; Scheib, S. G.; Schmelzer, P.

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the total systematic accuracy of a frameless, image guided stereotactic radiosurgery system. Methods: The localization accuracy and intermodality difference was determined by delivering radiation to an end-to-end prototype phantom, in which the targets were localized using optical surface monitoring system (OSMS), electromagnetic beacon-based tracking (Calypso®), cone-beam CT, “snap-shot” planar x-ray imaging, and a robotic couch. Six IMRT plans with jaw tracking and a flattening filter free beam were used to study the dosimetric accuracy for intracranial and spinal stereotactic radiosurgery treatment. Results: End-to-end localization accuracy of the system evaluated with the end-to-end phantom was 0.5 ± 0.2 mm with a maximum deviation of 0.9 mm over 90 measurements (including jaw, MLC, and cone measurements for both auto and manual fusion) for single isocenter, single target treatment, 0.6 ± 0.4 mm for multitarget treatment with shared isocenter. Residual setup errors were within 0.1 mm for OSMS, and 0.3 mm for Calypso. Dosimetric evaluation based on absolute film dosimetry showed greater than 90% pass rate for all cases using a gamma criteria of 3%/1 mm. Conclusions: The authors’ experience demonstrates that the localization accuracy of the frameless image-guided system is comparable to robotic or invasive frame based radiosurgery systems.

  2. Technical Note: Evaluation of the systematic accuracy of a frameless, multiple image modality guided, linear accelerator based stereotactic radiosurgery system.

    PubMed

    Wen, N; Snyder, K C; Scheib, S G; Schmelzer, P; Qin, Y; Li, H; Siddiqui, M S; Chetty, I J

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate the total systematic accuracy of a frameless, image guided stereotactic radiosurgery system. The localization accuracy and intermodality difference was determined by delivering radiation to an end-to-end prototype phantom, in which the targets were localized using optical surface monitoring system (OSMS), electromagnetic beacon-based tracking (Calypso®), cone-beam CT, "snap-shot" planar x-ray imaging, and a robotic couch. Six IMRT plans with jaw tracking and a flattening filter free beam were used to study the dosimetric accuracy for intracranial and spinal stereotactic radiosurgery treatment. End-to-end localization accuracy of the system evaluated with the end-to-end phantom was 0.5 ± 0.2 mm with a maximum deviation of 0.9 mm over 90 measurements (including jaw, MLC, and cone measurements for both auto and manual fusion) for single isocenter, single target treatment, 0.6 ± 0.4 mm for multitarget treatment with shared isocenter. Residual setup errors were within 0.1 mm for OSMS, and 0.3 mm for Calypso. Dosimetric evaluation based on absolute film dosimetry showed greater than 90% pass rate for all cases using a gamma criteria of 3%/1 mm. The authors' experience demonstrates that the localization accuracy of the frameless image-guided system is comparable to robotic or invasive frame based radiosurgery systems.

  3. Guaranteed epsilon-optimal treatment plans with the minimum number of beams for stereotactic body radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarmand, Hamed; Winey, Brian; Craft, David

    2013-09-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is characterized by delivering a high amount of dose in a short period of time. In SBRT the dose is delivered using open fields (e.g., beam’s-eye-view) known as ‘apertures’. Mathematical methods can be used for optimizing treatment planning for delivery of sufficient dose to the cancerous cells while keeping the dose to surrounding organs at risk (OARs) minimal. Two important elements of a treatment plan are quality and delivery time. Quality of a plan is measured based on the target coverage and dose to OARs. Delivery time heavily depends on the number of beams used in the plan as the setup times for different beam directions constitute a large portion of the delivery time. Therefore the ideal plan, in which all potential beams can be used, will be associated with a long impractical delivery time. We use the dose to OARs in the ideal plan to find the plan with the minimum number of beams which is guaranteed to be epsilon-optimal (i.e., a predetermined maximum deviation from the ideal plan is guaranteed). Since the treatment plan optimization is inherently a multi-criteria-optimization problem, the planner can navigate the ideal dose distribution Pareto surface and select a plan of desired target coverage versus OARs sparing, and then use the proposed technique to reduce the number of beams while guaranteeing epsilon-optimality. We use mixed integer programming (MIP) for optimization. To reduce the computation time for the resultant MIP, we use two heuristics: a beam elimination scheme and a family of heuristic cuts, known as ‘neighbor cuts’, based on the concept of ‘adjacent beams’. We show the effectiveness of the proposed technique on two clinical cases, a liver and a lung case. Based on our technique we propose an algorithm for fast generation of epsilon-optimal plans.

  4. Guaranteed epsilon-optimal treatment plans with the minimum number of beams for stereotactic body radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Yarmand, Hamed; Winey, Brian; Craft, David

    2013-09-07

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is characterized by delivering a high amount of dose in a short period of time. In SBRT the dose is delivered using open fields (e.g., beam's-eye-view) known as 'apertures'. Mathematical methods can be used for optimizing treatment planning for delivery of sufficient dose to the cancerous cells while keeping the dose to surrounding organs at risk (OARs) minimal. Two important elements of a treatment plan are quality and delivery time. Quality of a plan is measured based on the target coverage and dose to OARs. Delivery time heavily depends on the number of beams used in the plan as the setup times for different beam directions constitute a large portion of the delivery time. Therefore the ideal plan, in which all potential beams can be used, will be associated with a long impractical delivery time. We use the dose to OARs in the ideal plan to find the plan with the minimum number of beams which is guaranteed to be epsilon-optimal (i.e., a predetermined maximum deviation from the ideal plan is guaranteed). Since the treatment plan optimization is inherently a multi-criteria-optimization problem, the planner can navigate the ideal dose distribution Pareto surface and select a plan of desired target coverage versus OARs sparing, and then use the proposed technique to reduce the number of beams while guaranteeing epsilon-optimality. We use mixed integer programming (MIP) for optimization. To reduce the computation time for the resultant MIP, we use two heuristics: a beam elimination scheme and a family of heuristic cuts, known as 'neighbor cuts', based on the concept of 'adjacent beams'. We show the effectiveness of the proposed technique on two clinical cases, a liver and a lung case. Based on our technique we propose an algorithm for fast generation of epsilon-optimal plans.

  5. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy with Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Boost for Unfavorable Prostate Cancer: The Georgetown University Experience.

    PubMed

    Mercado, Catherine; Kress, Marie-Adele; Cyr, Robyn A; Chen, Leonard N; Yung, Thomas M; Bullock, Elizabeth G; Lei, Siyuan; Collins, Brian T; Satinsky, Andrew N; Harter, K William; Suy, Simeng; Dritschilo, Anatoly; Lynch, John H; Collins, Sean P

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is emerging as a minimally invasive alternative to brachytherapy to deliver highly conformal, dose--escalated radiation therapy (RT) to the prostate. SBRT alone may not adequately cover the tumor extensions outside the prostate commonly seen in unfavorable prostate cancer. External beam radiation therapy (EBRT) with high dose rate brachytherapy boost is a proven effective therapy for unfavorable prostate cancer. This study reports on early prostate-specific antigen and prostate cancer-specific quality of life (QOL) outcomes in a cohort of unfavorable patients treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and SBRT boost. Prostate cancer patients treated with SBRT (19.5 Gy in three fractions) followed by fiducial-guided IMRT (45-50.4 Gy) from March 2008 to September 2012 were included in this retrospective review of prospectively collected data. Biochemical failure was assessed using the Phoenix definition. Patients completed the expanded prostate cancer index composite (EPIC)-26 at baseline, 1 month after the completion of RT, every 3 months for the first year, then every 6 months for a minimum of 2 years. One hundred eight patients (4 low-, 45 intermediate-, and 59 high-risk) with median age of 74 years completed treatment, with median follow-up of 4.4 years. Sixty-four percent of the patients received androgen deprivation therapy prior to the initiation of RT. The 3-year actuarial biochemical control rates were 100 and 89.8% for intermediate- and high-risk patients, respectively. At the initiation of RT, 9 and 5% of men felt their urinary and bowel function was a moderate to big problem, respectively. Mean EPIC urinary and bowel function and bother scores exhibited transient declines, with subsequent return to near baseline. At 2 years posttreatment, 13.7 and 5% of men felt their urinary and bowel function was a moderate to big problem, respectively. At 3-year follow-up, biochemical control

  6. Inter-Fraction Tumor Volume Response during Lung Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Correlated to Patient Variables.

    PubMed

    Salamekh, Samer; Rong, Yi; Ayan, Ahmet S; Mo, Xiaokui; Williams, Terence M; Mayr, Nina A; Grecula, John C; Chakravarti, Arnab; Xu-Welliver, Meng

    2016-01-01

    Analyze inter-fraction volumetric changes of lung tumors treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and determine if the volume changes during treatment can be predicted and thus considered in treatment planning. Kilo-voltage cone-beam CT (kV-CBCT) images obtained immediately prior to each fraction were used to monitor inter-fraction volumetric changes of 15 consecutive patients (18 lung nodules) treated with lung SBRT at our institution (45-54 Gy in 3-5 fractions) in the year of 2011-2012. Spearman's (ρ) correlation and Spearman's partial correlation analysis was performed with respect to patient/tumor and treatment characteristics. Multiple hypothesis correction was performed using False Discovery Rate (FDR) and q-values were reported. All tumors studied experienced volume change during treatment. Tumor increased in volume by an average of 15% and regressed by an average of 11%. The overall volume increase during treatment is contained within the planning target volume (PTV) for all tumors. Larger tumors increased in volume more than smaller tumors during treatment (q = 0.0029). The volume increase on CBCT was correlated to the treatment planning gross target volume (GTV) as well as internal target volumes (ITV) (q = 0.0085 and q = 0.0039 respectively) and could be predicted for tumors with a GTV less than 22 mL. The volume increase was correlated to the integral dose (ID) in the ITV at every fraction (q = 0.0049). The peak inter-fraction volume occurred at an earlier fraction in younger patients (q = 0.0122). We introduced a new analysis method to follow inter-fraction tumor volume changes and determined that the observed changes during lung SBRT treatment are correlated to the initial tumor volume, integral dose (ID), and patient age. Furthermore, the volume increase during treatment of tumors less than 22mL can be predicted during treatment planning. The volume increase remained significantly less than the overall PTV expansion, and radiation re

  7. Spine stereotactic body radiation therapy plans: Achieving dose coverage, conformity, and dose falloff.

    PubMed

    Hong, Linda X; Shankar, Viswanathan; Shen, Jin; Kuo, Hsiang-Chi; Mynampati, Dinesh; Yaparpalvi, Ravindra; Goddard, Lee; Basavatia, Amar; Fox, Jana; Garg, Madhur; Kalnicki, Shalom; Tomé, Wolfgang A

    2015-01-01

    We report our experience of establishing planning objectives to achieve dose coverage, conformity, and dose falloff for spine stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) plans. Patients with spine lesions were treated using SBRT in our institution since September 2009. Since September 2011, we established the following planning objectives for our SBRT spine plans in addition to the cord dose constraints: (1) dose coverage—prescription dose (PD) to cover at least 95% planning target volume (PTV) and 90% PD to cover at least 99% PTV; (2) conformity index (CI)—ratio of prescription isodose volume (PIV) to the PTV < 1.2; (3) dose falloff—ratio of 50% PIV to the PTV (R(50%)); (4) and maximum dose in percentage of PD at 2 cm from PTV in any direction (D(2cm)) to follow Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0915. We have retrospectively reviewed 66 separate spine lesions treated between September 2009 and December 2012 (31 treated before September 2011 [group 1] and 35 treated after [group 2]). The χ(2) test was used to examine the difference in parameters between groups. The PTV V(100% PD) ≥ 95% objective was met in 29.0% of group 1 vs 91.4% of group 2 (p < 0.01) plans. The PTV V(90% PD) ≥ 99% objective was met in 38.7% of group 1 vs 88.6% of group 2 (p < 0.01) plans. Overall, 4 plans in group 1 had CI > 1.2 vs none in group 2 (p = 0.04). For D(2cm), 48.3% plans yielded a minor violation of the objectives and 16.1% a major violation for group 1, whereas 17.1% exhibited a minor violation and 2.9% a major violation for group 2 (p < 0.01). Spine SBRT plans can be improved on dose coverage, conformity, and dose falloff employing a combination of RTOG spine and lung SBRT protocol planning objectives. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Spine stereotactic body radiation therapy plans: Achieving dose coverage, conformity, and dose falloff

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Linda X.; Shankar, Viswanathan; Shen, Jin; Kuo, Hsiang-Chi; Mynampati, Dinesh; Yaparpalvi, Ravindra; Goddard, Lee; Basavatia, Amar; Fox, Jana; Garg, Madhur; Kalnicki, Shalom; Tomé, Wolfgang A.

    2015-10-01

    We report our experience of establishing planning objectives to achieve dose coverage, conformity, and dose falloff for spine stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) plans. Patients with spine lesions were treated using SBRT in our institution since September 2009. Since September 2011, we established the following planning objectives for our SBRT spine plans in addition to the cord dose constraints: (1) dose coverage—prescription dose (PD) to cover at least 95% planning target volume (PTV) and 90% PD to cover at least 99% PTV; (2) conformity index (CI)—ratio of prescription isodose volume (PIV) to the PTV < 1.2; (3) dose falloff—ratio of 50% PIV to the PTV (R{sub 50%}); (4) and maximum dose in percentage of PD at 2 cm from PTV in any direction (D{sub 2cm}) to follow Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0915. We have retrospectively reviewed 66 separate spine lesions treated between September 2009 and December 2012 (31 treated before September 2011 [group 1] and 35 treated after [group 2]). The χ{sup 2} test was used to examine the difference in parameters between groups. The PTV V{sub 100%} {sub PD} ≥ 95% objective was met in 29.0% of group 1 vs 91.4% of group 2 (p < 0.01) plans. The PTV V{sub 90%} {sub PD} ≥ 99% objective was met in 38.7% of group 1 vs 88.6% of group 2 (p < 0.01) plans. Overall, 4 plans in group 1 had CI > 1.2 vs none in group 2 (p = 0.04). For D{sub 2cm}, 48.3% plans yielded a minor violation of the objectives and 16.1% a major violation for group 1, whereas 17.1% exhibited a minor violation and 2.9% a major violation for group 2 (p < 0.01). Spine SBRT plans can be improved on dose coverage, conformity, and dose falloff employing a combination of RTOG spine and lung SBRT protocol planning objectives.

  9. Esophageal Dose Tolerance to Hypofractionated Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy: Risk Factors for Late Toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Stephans, Kevin L.; Djemil, Toufik; Diaconu, Claudiu; Reddy, Chandana A.; Xia, Ping; Woody, Neil M.; Greskovich, John; Makkar, Vinit; Videtic, Gregory M.M.

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: To identify factors associated with grade ≥3 treatment related late esophageal toxicity after lung or liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective review of 52 patients with a planning target volume within 2 cm of the esophagus from a prospective registry of 607 lung and liver SBRT patients treated between 2005 and 2011. Patients were treated using a risk-adapted dose regimen to a median dose of 50 Gy in 5 fractions (range, 37.5-60 Gy in 3-10 fractions). Normal structures were contoured using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) defined criteria. Results: The median esophageal point dose and 1-cc dose were 32.3 Gy (range, 8.9-55.4 Gy) and 24.0 Gy (range, 7.8-50.9 Gy), respectively. Two patients had an esophageal fistula at a median of 8.4 months after SBRT, with maximum esophageal point doses of 51.5 and 52 Gy, and 1-cc doses of 48.1 and 50 Gy, respectively. These point and 1-cc doses were exceeded by 9 and 2 patients, respectively, without a fistula. The risk of a fistula for point doses exceeding 40, 45, and 50 Gy was 9.5% (n=2/21), 10.5% (n=2/19), and 12.5% (n=2/16), respectively. The risk of fistula for 1-cc doses exceeding 40, 45, and 50 Gy was 25% (n=2/9), 50% (n=2/4), and 50% (n=2/4), respectively. Eighteen patients received systemic therapy after SBRT (11 systemic chemotherapy, and 6 biologic agents, and 1 both). Both patients with fistulas had received adjuvant anti-angiogenic (vascular endothelial growth factor) agents within 2 months of completing SBRT. No patient had a fistula in the absence of adjuvant VEGF-modulating agents. Conclusions: Esophageal fistula is a rare complication of SBRT. In this series, fistula was seen with esophageal point doses exceeding 51 Gy and 1-cc doses greater than 48 Gy. Notably, however, fistula was seen only in those patients who also received adjuvant VEGF-modulating agents after SBRT. The potential interaction of dose and adjuvant therapy

  10. The impact of respiratory motion and treatment technique on stereotactic body radiation therapy for liver cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Q. Jackie; Thongphiew, Danthai; Wang Zhiheng; Chankong, Vira; Yin Fangfang

    2008-04-15

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), which delivers a much higher fractional dose than conventional treatment in only a few fractions, is an effective treatment for liver metastases. For patients who are treated under free-breathing conditions, however, respiration-induced tumor motion in the liver is a concern. Limited clinical information is available related to the impact of tumor motion and treatment technique on the dosimetric consequences. This study evaluated the dosimetric deviations between planned and delivered SBRT dose in the presence of tumor motion for three delivery techniques: three-dimensional conformal static beams (3DCRT), dynamic conformal arc (DARC), and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Five cases treated with SBRT for liver metastases were included in the study, with tumor motions ranging from 0.5 to 1.75 cm. For each case, three different treatment plans were developed using 3DCRT, DARC, and IMRT. The gantry/multileaf collimator (MLC) motion in the DARC plans and the MLC motion in the IMRT plans were synchronized to the patient's respiratory motion. Retrospectively sorted four-dimensional computed tomography image sets were used to determine patient-organ motion and to calculate the dose delivered during each respiratory phase. Deformable registration, using thin-plate-spline models, was performed to encode the tumor motion and deformation and to register the dose-per-phase to the reference phase images. The different dose distributions resulting from the different delivery techniques and motion ranges were compared to assess the effect of organ motion on dose delivery. Voxel dose variations occurred mostly in the high gradient regions, typically between the target volume and normal tissues, with a maximum variation up to 20%. The greatest CTV variation of all the plans was seen in the IMRT technique with the largest motion range (D99: -8.9%, D95: -8.3%, and D90: -6.3%). The greatest variation for all 3DCRT plans was less

  11. Stereotactic body radiation therapy of early-stage non-small-cell lung carcinoma: Phase I study

    SciTech Connect

    McGarry, Ronald C. . E-mail: rmcgarry@iupui.edu; Papiez, Lech; Williams, Mark; Whitford, Tia; Timmerman, Robert D.

    2005-11-15

    Purpose: A Phase I dose escalation study of stereotactic body radiation therapy to assess toxicity and local control rates for patients with medically inoperable Stage I lung cancer. Methods and Materials: All patients had non-small-cell lung carcinoma, Stage T1a or T1b N0, M0. Patients were immobilized in a stereotactic body frame and treated in escalating doses of radiotherapy beginning at 24 Gy total (3 x 8 Gy fractions) using 7-10 beams. Cohorts were dose escalated by 6.0 Gy total with appropriate observation periods. Results: The maximum tolerated dose was not achieved in the T1 stratum (maximum dose = 60 Gy), but within the T2 stratum, the maximum tolerated dose was realized at 72 Gy for tumors larger than 5 cm. Dose-limiting toxicity included predominantly bronchitis, pericardial effusion, hypoxia, and pneumonitis. Local failure occurred in 4/19 T1 and 6/28 T2 patients. Nine local failures occurred at doses {<=}16 Gy and only 1 at higher doses. Local failures occurred between 3 and 31 months from treatment. Within the T1 group, 5 patients had distant or regional recurrence as an isolated event, whereas 3 patients had both distant and regional recurrence. Within the T2 group, 2 patients had solitary regional recurrences, and the 4 patients who failed distantly also failed regionally. Conclusions: Stereotactic body radiation therapy seems to be a safe, effective means of treating early-stage lung cancer in medically inoperable patients. Excellent local control was achieved at higher dose cohorts with apparent dose-limiting toxicities in patients with larger tumors.

  12. Neural stem cell sparing by linac based intensity modulated stereotactic radiotherapy in intracranial tumors.

    PubMed

    Oehler, Julia; Brachwitz, Tim; Wendt, Thomas G; Banz, Nico; Walther, Mario; Wiezorek, Tilo

    2013-07-24

    Neurocognitive decline observed after radiotherapy (RT) for brain tumors in long time survivors is attributed to radiation exposure of the hippocampus and the subventricular zone (SVZ). The potential of sparing capabilities for both structures by optimized intensity modulated stereotactic radiotherapy (IMSRT) is investigated. Brain tumors were irradiated by stereotactic 3D conformal RT or IMSRT using m3 collimator optimized for PTV and for sparing of the conventional OARs (lens, retina, optic nerve, chiasm, cochlea, brain stem and the medulla oblongata). Retrospectively both hippocampi and SVZ were added to the list of OAR and their dose volume histograms were compared to those from two newly generated IMSRT plans using 7 or 14 beamlets (IMSRT-7, IMSRT-14) dedicated for optimized additional sparing of these structures. Conventional OAR constraints were kept constant. Impact of plan complexity and planning target volume (PTV) topography on sparing of both hippocampi and SVZ, conformity index (CI), the homogeneity index (HI) and quality of coverage (QoC) were analyzed. Limits of agreement were used to compare sparing of stem cell niches with either IMSRT-7 or IMSRT-14. The influence of treatment technique related to the topography ratio between PTV and OARs, realized in group A-D, was assessed by a mixed model. In 47 patients CI (p ≤  0.003) and HI (p  <  0.001) improved by IMSRT-7, IMSRT-14, QoC remained stable (p  ≥  0.50) indicating no compromise in radiotherapy. 90% of normal brain was exposed to a significantly higher dose using IMSRT. IMSRT-7 plans resulted in significantly lower biologically effective doses at all four neural stem cell structures, while contralateral neural stem cells are better spared compared to ipsilateral. A further increase of the number of beamlets (IMSRT-14) did not improve sparing significantly, so IMSRT-7 and IMSRT-14 can be used interchangeable. Patients with tumors contacting neither the subventricular zone nor the

  13. Neural stem cell sparing by linac based intensity modulated stereotactic radiotherapy in intracranial tumors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Neurocognitive decline observed after radiotherapy (RT) for brain tumors in long time survivors is attributed to radiation exposure of the hippocampus and the subventricular zone (SVZ). The potential of sparing capabilities for both structures by optimized intensity modulated stereotactic radiotherapy (IMSRT) is investigated. Methods Brain tumors were irradiated by stereotactic 3D conformal RT or IMSRT using m3 collimator optimized for PTV and for sparing of the conventional OARs (lens, retina, optic nerve, chiasm, cochlea, brain stem and the medulla oblongata). Retrospectively both hippocampi and SVZ were added to the list of OAR and their dose volume histograms were compared to those from two newly generated IMSRT plans using 7 or 14 beamlets (IMSRT-7, IMSRT-14) dedicated for optimized additional sparing of these structures. Conventional OAR constraints were kept constant. Impact of plan complexity and planning target volume (PTV) topography on sparing of both hippocampi and SVZ, conformity index (CI), the homogeneity index (HI) and quality of coverage (QoC) were analyzed. Limits of agreement were used to compare sparing of stem cell niches with either IMSRT-7 or IMSRT-14. The influence of treatment technique related to the topography ratio between PTV and OARs, realized in group A-D, was assessed by a mixed model. Results In 47 patients CI (p ≤ 0.003) and HI (p < 0.001) improved by IMSRT-7, IMSRT-14, QoC remained stable (p ≥ 0.50) indicating no compromise in radiotherapy. 90% of normal brain was exposed to a significantly higher dose using IMSRT. IMSRT-7 plans resulted in significantly lower biologically effective doses at all four neural stem cell structures, while contralateral neural stem cells are better spared compared to ipsilateral. A further increase of the number of beamlets (IMSRT-14) did not improve sparing significantly, so IMSRT-7 and IMSRT-14 can be used interchangeable. Patients with tumors contacting neither the

  14. Radiation-Induced Rib Fractures After Hypofractionated Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy: Risk Factors and Dose-Volume Relationship

    SciTech Connect

    Asai, Kaori; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Sasaki, Tomonari; Ohga, Saiji; Nonoshita, Takeshi; Yoshitake, Tadamasa; Ohnishi, Kayoko; Terashima, Kotaro; Matsumoto, Keiji; Hirata, Hideki; Honda, Hiroshi

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to clarify the incidence, the clinical risk factors, and the dose-volume relationship of radiation-induced rib fracture (RIRF) after hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: One hundred sixteen patients treated with SBRT for primary or metastatic lung cancer at our institution, with at least 6 months of follow-up and no previous overlapping radiation exposure, were included in this study. To determine the clinical risk factors associated with RIRF, correlations between the incidence of RIRF and the variables, including age, sex, diagnosis, gross tumor volume diameter, rib-tumor distance, and use of steroid administration, were analyzed. Dose-volume histogram analysis was also conducted. Regarding the maximum dose, V10, V20, V30, and V40 of the rib, and the incidences of RIRF were compared between the two groups divided by the cutoff value determined by the receiver operating characteristic curves. Results: One hundred sixteen patients and 374 ribs met the inclusion criteria. Among the 116 patients, 28 patients (46 ribs) experienced RIRF. The estimated incidence of rib fracture was 37.7% at 3 years. Limited distance from the rib to the tumor (<2.0 cm) was the only significant risk factor for RIRF (p = 0.0001). Among the dosimetric parameters used for receiver operating characteristic analysis, the maximum dose showed the highest area under the curve. The 3-year estimated risk of RIRF and the determined cutoff value were 45.8% vs. 1.4% (maximum dose, {>=}42.4 Gy or less), 51.6% vs. 2.0% (V40, {>=}0.29 cm{sup 3} or less), 45.8% vs. 2.2% (V30, {>=}1.35 cm{sup 3} or less), 42.0% vs. 8.5% (V20, {>=}3.62 cm{sup 3} or less), or 25.9% vs. 10.5% (V10, {>=}5.03 cm{sup 3} or less). Conclusions: The incidence of RIRF after hypofractionated SBRT is relatively high. The maximum dose and high-dose volume are strongly correlated with RIRF.

  15. Image-Guided Robotic Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Liver Metastases: Is There a Dose Response Relationship?

    SciTech Connect

    Vautravers-Dewas, Claire; Dewas, Sylvain; Bonodeau, Francois; Adenis, Antoine; Lacornerie, Thomas; Penel, Nicolas; Lartigau, Eric; Mirabel, Xavier

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome, tolerance, and toxicity of stereotactic body radiotherapy, using image-guided robotic radiation delivery, for the treatment of patients with unresectable liver metastases. Methods and Material: Patients were treated with real-time respiratory tracking between July 2007 and April 2009. Their records were retrospectively reviewed. Metastases from colorectal carcinoma and other primaries were not necessarily confined to liver. Toxicity was evaluated using National Cancer Institute Common Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Results: Forty-two patients with 62 metastases were treated with two dose levels of 40 Gy in four Dose per Fraction (23) and 45 Gy in three Dose per Fraction (13). Median follow-up was 14.3 months (range, 3-23 months). Actuarial local control for 1 and 2 years was 90% and 86%, respectively. At last follow-up, 41 (66%) complete responses and eight (13%) partial responses were observed. Five lesions were stable. Nine lesions (13%) were locally progressed. Overall survival was 94% at 1 year and 48% at 2 years. The most common toxicity was Grade 1 or 2 nausea. One patient experienced Grade 3 epidermitis. The dose level did not significantly contribute to the outcome, toxicity, or survival. Conclusion: Image-guided robotic stereotactic body radiation therapy is feasible, safe, and effective, with encouraging local control. It provides a strong alternative for patients who cannot undergo surgery.

  16. Quality assurance and commissioning of an infrared marker-based patient positioning system for frameless extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Tejpal; Phurailatpam, Reena; Ajay, Mishra; Rajeshri, Pai; Pranshu, Mohindra; Supriya, Chopra

    2007-12-01

    Rapid advancements in imaging technology have led to remarkable improvements in identification and localization of tumors, ushering the era of high-precision techniques in contemporary radiotherapy practice. However, uncertainties in patient set-up and organ motion during a course of fractionated radiotherapy can compromise precision of radiation therapy. Excellent accuracy has been achieved with invasive and non-invasive fixation systems for stereotactic radiotherapy. This report describes the commissioning procedure and Quality Assurance studies done to evaluate the accuracy of isocenter localization by an infrared marker-based positioning system (ExacTrac). The ExacTrac has two infrared cameras that emit and detect infrared rays from reflective markers and construct three-dimensional coordinates of each marker. It detects the difference of the actual isocenter position from the planned isocenter coordinates in three translational (lateral, longitudinal, vertical, or x,y,z axes) and three rotational axes (six degree of freedom). This study performed on a flat and static phantom shows excellent accuracy achieved by the ExacTrac system. The positioning accuracy of ExacTrac (± 1 mm translational displacement and ± 1° rotational errors) can be a valuable tool in implementing frameless extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy. Nevertheless, it needs to be further evaluated on patients with inherent motion and greater positional uncertainty before being adopted in clinical practice.

  17. Lobulated Enhancement Evaluation in the Follow-Up of Liver Metastases Treated by Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Jarraya, Hajer; Borde, Paul; Mirabel, Xavier; Ernst, Olivier; Boulanger, Thomas; Lartigau, Eric; Ceugnart, Luc; Kramar, Andrew; Taieb, Sophie

    2015-06-01

    Objective: The Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) can have limitations when used to evaluate local treatments for cancer, especially for liver malignancies treated by stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). The aim of this study was to validate the relationship between the occurrence of lobulated enhancement (LE) and local relapse and to evaluate the utility of this relationship for predicting local progression. Patients and Methods: Imaging data of 59 lesions in 46 patients, including 281 computed tomographic (CT) scans, were retrospectively and blindly reviewed by 3 radiologists. One radiologist measured the lesion size, for each CT and overall, to classify responses using RECIST threshold criteria. The second studied LE occurrence. A third radiologist was later included and studied LE occurrence to evaluate the interobserver consistency for LE evaluation. Results: The mean duration of follow-up was 13.6 months. LE was observed in 16 of 18 progressive lesions, occurring before size-based progression in 50% of cases, and the median delay of LE detection was 3.2 months. The sensitivity of LE to predict progression was 89%, and its specificity was 100%. The positive predictive value was 100%, the negative predictive value was 95.3%, and the overall accuracy was 97%. The probability of local progression-free survival at 12 months was significantly higher for lesions without LE compared with all lesions: 0.80 (CI 95%: 0.65-0.89) versus 0.69 (CI 95%: 0.54-0.80), respectively. The overall concordance rate between the 2 readers of LE was 97.9%. Conclusion: Response assessment of liver metastases treated by SBRT can be improved by including LE. This study demonstrates the diagnostic and predictive utility of LE for assessing local progression at a size still eligible for local salvage treatment.

  18. Poster — Thur Eve — 32: Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Peripheral Lung Lesion: Treatment Planning and Quality Assurance

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Shuying; Oliver, Michael; Wang, Xiaofang

    2014-08-15

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), due to its high precision for target localizing, has become widely used to treat tumours at various locations, including the lungs. Lung SBRT program was started at our institution a year ago. Eighteen patients with peripheral lesions up to 3 cm diameter have been treated with 48 Gy in 4 fractions. Based on four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) simulation, internal target volume (ITV) was delineated to encompass the respiratory motion of the lesion. A margin of 5 mm was then added to create the planning target volume (PTV) for setup uncertainties. There was no expansion from gross tumour volume (GTV) to clinical target volume (CTV). Pinnacle 9.6 was used as the primary treatment planning system. Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) technique, with one or two coplanar arcs, generally worked well. For quality assurance (QA), each plan was exported to Eclipse 10 and dose calculation was repeated. Dose volume histograms (DVHs) of the targets and organs at risk (OARs) were then compared between the two treatment planning systems. Winston-Lutz tests were carried out as routine machine QA. Patient-specific QA included ArcCheck measurement with an insert, where an ionization chamber was placed at the centre to measure dose at the isocenter. For the first several patients, and subsequently for the plans with extremely strong modulation, Gafchromic film dosimetry was also employed. For each patient, a mock setup was scheduled prior to treatments. Daily pre- and post-CBCT were acquired for setup and assessment of intra-fractional motion, respectively.

  19. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Centrally and Superiorly Located Stage I or Isolated Recurrent Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Joe Y. Balter, Peter A.; Dong Lei; Yang Qiuan; Liao Zhongxing; Jeter, Melenda; Bucci, M. Kara; McAleer, Mary F.; Mehran, Reza J.; Roth, Jack A.; Komaki, Ritsuko

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and adverse effects of image-guided stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in centrally/superiorly located non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Materials and Methods: We delivered SBRT to 27 patients, 13 with Stage I and 14 with isolated recurrent NSCLC. A central/superior location was defined as being within 2 cm of the bronchial tree, major vessels, esophagus, heart, trachea, pericardium, brachial plexus, or vertebral body, but 1 cm away from the spinal canal. All patients underwent four-dimensional computed tomography-based planning, and daily computed tomography-on-rail guided SBRT. The prescribed dose of 40 Gy (n = 7) to the planning target volume was escalated to 50 Gy (n = 20) in 4 consecutive days. Results: With a median follow-up of 17 months (range, 6-40 months), the crude local control at the treated site was 100% using 50 Gy. However, 3 of 7 patients had local recurrences when treated using 40 Gy. Of the patients with Stage I disease, 1 (7.7%) and 2 (15.4%) developed mediastinal lymph node metastasis and distant metastases, respectively. Of the patients with recurrent disease, 3 (21.4%) and 5 (35.7%) developed mediastinal lymph node metastasis and distant metastasis, respectively. Four patients (28.6%) with recurrent disease but none with Stage I disease developed Grade 2 pneumonitis. Three patients (11.1%) developed Grade 2-3 dermatitis and chest wall pain. One patient developed brachial plexus neuropathy. No esophagitis was noted in any patient. Conclusions: Image-guided SBRT using 50 Gy delivered in four fractions is feasible and resulted in excellent local control.

  20. Treatment Outcomes in Stage I Lung Cancer: A Comparison of Surgery and Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT)

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Varun; Crabtree, Traves D.; Bell, Jennifer M.; Broderick, Stephen R; Morgensztern, Daniel; Colditz, Graham A.; Kreisel, Daniel; Krupnick, A. Sasha; Patterson, G. Alexander; Meyers, Bryan F.; Patel, Aalok; Robinson, Clifford G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The relative roles of surgery and stereotactic body radiation therapy in stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are evolving particularly for marginally operable patients. Since there is limited prospective comparative data for these treatment modalities, we evaluated their relative use and outcomes at the population level using a national database. Methods Patient variables and treatment-related outcomes were abstracted for patients with clinical stage I NSCLC from the National Cancer Database. Patients receiving surgery were compared to those undergoing SBRT in exploratory unmatched and subsequent propensity matched analyses. Results Between 1998 and 2010, 117618 patients underwent surgery or SBRT for clinical stage I NSCLC. Of these, 111731 (95%) received surgery while 5887 (5%) underwent SBRT. Patients in the surgery group were younger, more likely to be males, and had higher Charlson comorbidity scores. SBRT patients were more likely to have T1 (vs.T2) tumors and receive treatment at academic centers. Thirty-day surgical mortality was 2596/109485 (2.4%). Median overall survival favored the surgery group in both unmatched (68.4 months vs. 33.3 months, p<.001) and matched analysis based on patient characteristics (62.3 months vs. 33.1months, p<.001). Disease specific survival was unavailable from the dataset. Conclusion In a propensity matched comparison, patients selected for surgery have improved survival compared with SBRT. In the absence of information on cause of death and with limited variables to characterize comorbidity, it is not possible to assess the relative contribution of patient selection or better cancer control towards the improved survival. Rigorous prospective studies are needed to optimize patient selection for SBRT in the high-risk surgical population. PMID:26334753

  1. Robotic Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Abdominopelvic Tumors: A Single Institute Experience.

    PubMed

    Sezen, D; Gurkaynak, M; Gultekin, M; Cengiz, M; Yildiz, F; Zorlu, F; Akyol, F; Yazici, G; Hurmuz, P; Ozyigit, G

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of robotic CyberKnife (Accuray Incorporated, Sunnyvale, California)-based stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in patients with recurrent or metastatic abdominopelvic tumors. A total of 69 patients treated between May 2008 and January 2011 were evaluated retrospectively. Indication for SBRT was persistent disease in 3 (4%) patients, local recurrence in 29 (42%) patients, regional recurrence in 13 (19%) patients, and oligometastatic disease in 24 (35%) patients. Forty-two (61%) patients were previously irradiated to the same region and 27 (39%) patients were treated for the first time. The median age was 59 years (range, 24-86 years). There were 31 (45%) male and 38 (55%) female patients. The median total dose was 30 Gy (range, 15-60 Gy) delivered with a median 3 fractions (range, 2-5 fractions). The tumor response to treatment was assessed by computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, or positron emission tomography. At the 12-month (range, 2-44 months) median follow-up, local control was 65% and median overall survival (OS) was 20 months. A larger gross tumor volume (≥ 67 cm(3)) was significantly correlated with worse 1-year OS (81% vs 48%, P = .03). The patients with local recurrence occurring <11 months had a significantly shorter 1-year local control rate than patients with ≥ 11 months (31% vs 91%, P < .001). Grade 3-4 acute and late toxicities were seen in 7% and 15% of patients, respectively. The patients with previous radiotherapy history had significantly higher rate of acute toxicity (19% vs 0%, P = .019). Late toxicity was significantly higher in pelvic tumors than in abdominal tumors (3% vs 28%, P = .004). The SBRT seems to be feasible and resulted in good treatment outcomes in patients with recurrent or metastatic abdominopelvic tumors. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Sci—Sat AM: Stereo — 01: 3D Pre-treatment Dose Verification for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Asuni, G; Beek, T van; Van Utyven, E; McCowan, P; McCurdy, B.M.C.

    2014-08-15

    Radical treatment techniques such as stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) are becoming popular and they involve delivery of large doses in fewer fractions. Due to this feature of SBRT, a high-resolution, pre-treatment dose verification method that makes use of a 3D patient representation would be appropriate. Such a technique will provide additional information about dose delivered to the target volume(s) and organs-at-risk (OARs) in the patient volume compared to 2D verification methods. In this work, we investigate an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) based pre-treatment QA method which provides an accurate reconstruction of the 3D-dose distribution in the patient model. Customized patient plans are delivered ‘in air’ and the portal images are collected using the EPID in cine mode. The images are then analysed to determine an estimate of the incident energy fluence. This is then passed to a collapsed-cone convolution dose algorithm which reconstructs a 3D patient dose estimate on the CT imaging dataset. To date, the method has been applied to 5 SBRT patient plans. Reconstructed doses were compared to those calculated by the TPS. Reconstructed mean doses were mostly within 3% of those in the TPS. DVHs of target volumes and OARs compared well. The Chi pass rates using 3%/3mm in the high dose region are greater than 97% in all cases. These initial results demonstrate clinical feasibility and utility of a robust, efficient, effective and convenient pre-treatment QA method using EPID. Research sponsored in part by Varian Medical Systems.

  3. TU-G-BRA-01: Assessing Radiation-Induced Reductions in Regional Lung Perfusion Following Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    McGurk, R; Green, R; Lawrence, M; Schreiber, E; Das, S; Zagar, T; Marks, L; Sheikh, A; McCartney, W; Rivera, P

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The dose-dependent nature of radiation therapy (RT)-induced lung injury following hypo-fractionated stereotactic RT is unclear. We herein report preliminary results of a prospective study assessing the magnitude of RT-induced reductions in regional lung perfusion following hypo-fractionated stereotactic RT. Methods: Four patients undergoing hypo-fractionated stereotactic lung RT (SBRT: 12 Gy x 4 fractions or 10 Gy x 5 fractions) had a pre-treatment SPECT (single-photon emission computed tomography) perfusion scan providing a 3D map of regional lung perfusion. Scans were repeated 3–6 months post-treatment. Pre- and post SPECT scans were registered to the planning CT scan (and hence the 3D dose data). Changes in regional perfusion (counts per cc on the pre-post scans) were computed in regions of the lung exposed to different doses of radiation (in 5 Gy intervals), thus defining a dose-response function. SPECT scans were internally normalized to the regions receiving <5 Gy. Results: At 3 months post-RT, the changes in perfusion are highly variable. At 6 months, there is a consistent dose-dependent reduction in regional perfusion. The average percent decline in regional perfusion was 10% at 15–20 Gy, 20% at 20–25 Gy, and 30% at 25–30 Gy representing a relatively linear dose response with an approximate 2% reduction per Gray for doses in excess of 10 Gy. There was a subtle increase in perfusion in the lung receiving <10 Gy. Conclusion: Hypo-fractionated stereotactic RT appears to cause a dose-dependent reduction in regional lung perfusion. There appears to be a threshold effect with no apparent perfusion loss at doses <10 Gy, though this might be in part due to the normalization technique used. Additional data is needed from a larger number of patients to better assess this issue. This sort of data can be used to assist optimizing RT treatment plans that minimize the risk of lung injury. Partly supported by the NIH (CA69579) and the Lance Armstrong

  4. Prostate Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy Using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy to Dominant Intraprostatic Lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, Louise J.; Lilley, John; Thompson, Christopher M.; Cosgrove, Vivian; Mason, Josh; Sykes, Jonathan; Franks, Kevin; Sebag-Montefiore, David; Henry, Ann M.

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate boosting dominant intraprostatic lesions (DILs) in the context of stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) and to examine the impact on tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). Methods and Materials: Ten prostate datasets were selected. DILs were defined using T2-weighted, dynamic contrast-enhanced and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Four plans were produced for each dataset: (1) no boost to DILs; (2) boost to DILs, no seminal vesicles in prescription; (3) boost to DILs, proximal seminal vesicles (proxSV) prescribed intermediate dose; and (4) boost to DILs, proxSV prescribed higher dose. The prostate planning target volume (PTV) prescription was 42.7 Gy in 7 fractions. DILs were initially prescribed 115% of the PTV{sub Prostate} prescription, and PTV{sub DIL} prescriptions were increased in 5% increments until organ-at-risk constraints were reached. TCP and NTCP calculations used the LQ-Poisson Marsden, and Lyman-Kutcher-Burman models respectively. Results: When treating the prostate alone, the median PTV{sub DIL} prescription was 125% (range: 110%-140%) of the PTV{sub Prostate} prescription. Median PTV{sub DIL} D50% was 55.1 Gy (range: 49.6-62.6 Gy). The same PTV{sub DIL} prescriptions and similar PTV{sub DIL} median doses were possible when including the proxSV within the prescription. TCP depended on prostate α/β ratio and was highest with an α/β ratio = 1.5 Gy, where the additional TCP benefit of DIL boosting was least. Rectal NTCP increased with DIL boosting and was considered unacceptably high in 5 cases, which, when replanned with an emphasis on reducing maximum dose to 0.5 cm{sup 3} of rectum (Dmax{sub 0.5cc}), as well as meeting existing constraints, resulted in considerable rectal NTCP reductions. Conclusions: Boosting DILs in the context of SABR is technically feasible but should be approached with caution. If this therapy is adopted, strict rectal

  5. An evaluation of planning techniques for stereotactic body radiation therapy in lung tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianzhou; Li, Huiling; Shekhar, Raj; Suntharalingam, Mohan; D’Souza, Warren

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate four planning techniques for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in lung tumors. Methods and Materials Four SBRT plans were performed for 12 patients with stage I/II non-small-cell lung cancer under the following conditions: (1) conventional margins on free-breathing CT (plan 1), (2) generation of an internal target volume (ITV) using 4DCT with beam delivery under free-breathing conditions (plan 2), (3) gating at end-exhale (plan 3), and (4) gating at end-inhale (plan 4). Planning was performed following the RTOG 0236 protocol with a prescription dose of 54Gy (3 fractions). For each plan 4D dose was calculated using deformable image registration. Results There was no significant difference in tumor dose delivered by the 4 plans. However, compared with plan 1, plans 2-4 reduced total lung BED by 1.9±1.2Gy, 3.1±1.6Gy and 3.5±2.1Gy, reduced mean lung dose by 0.8±0.5Gy, 1.5±0.8Gy, and 1.6±1.0Gy, reduced V20 by 1.5±1.0%, 2.7±1.4%, and 2.8±1.8% respectively with p<0.01. Compared with plan 2, plans 3-4 reduced lung BED by 1.2±1.0Gy and 1.6±1.5Gy, reduced mean lung dose by 0.6±0.5Gy and 0.8±0.7Gy, reduced V20 by 1.2±1.1% and 1.3±1.5% respectively with p<0.01. The differences in lung BED, mean dose and V20 of plan 4 compared with plan 3 are insignificant. Conclusions Tumor dose coverage was statistically insignificant between all plans. However, compared with plan 1, plans 2-4 significantly reduced lung doses. Compared with plan 2, plan 3-4 also reduced lung toxicity. The difference in lung doses between plan 3 and plan 4 was not significant. PMID:18359529

  6. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Oligometastases to the Lung: A Phase 2 Study

    SciTech Connect

    Nuyttens, Joost J.; Voort van Zyp, Noëlle C.M.G. van der; Verhoef, Cornelis; Maat, A.; Klaveren, Robertus J. van; Holt, Bronno van der; Aerts, Joachim; Hoogeman, Mischa

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: To assess, in a phase 2 study, the efficacy and toxicity of stereotactic body radiation therapy for oligometastases to the lung in inoperable patients. Methods and Materials: Patients with lung metastases were included in this study if (1) the primary tumor was controlled; (2) patients were ineligible for or refused surgery and chemotherapy; and (3) patients had 5 or fewer metastatic lesions in no more than 2 organs. Large peripheral tumors were treated with a dose of 60 Gy (3 fractions), small peripheral tumors with 30 Gy (1 fraction), central tumors received 60 Gy (5 fractions), and mediastinal tumors or tumors close to the esophagus received 56 Gy (7 fractions). Results: Thirty patients with 57 metastatic lung tumors from various primary cancers were analyzed. The median follow-up was 36 months (range, 4-60 months). At 2 years, local control for the 11 central tumors was 100%, for the 23 peripheral tumors treated to 60 Gy it was 91%, and for the 23 tumors treated in a single 30-Gy fraction it was 74% (P=.13). This resulted in an overall local control rate at 1 year of 79%, with a 2-sided 80% confidence interval of 67% to 87%. Because the hypothesized value of 70% lies within the confidence interval, we cannot reject the hypothesis that the true local control rate at 1 year is ≤70%, and therefore we did not achieve the goal of the study: an actuarial local control of the treated lung lesions at 1 year of 90%. The 4-year overall survival rate was 38%. Grade 3 acute toxicity occurred in 5 patients. Three patients complained of chronic grade 3 toxicity, including pain, fatigue, and pneumonitis, and 3 patients had rib fractures. Conclusions: The local control was promising, and the 4-year overall survival rate was 38%. The treatment was well tolerated, even for central lesions.

  7. Salvage Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) for Local Failure After Primary Lung SBRT

    SciTech Connect

    Hearn, Jason W.D. Videtic, Gregory M.M.; Djemil, Toufik; Stephans, Kevin L.

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: Local failure after definitive stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is uncommon. We report the safety and efficacy of SBRT for salvage of local failure after previous SBRT with a biologically effective dose (BED) of ≥100 Gy{sub 10}. Methods and Materials: Using an institutional review board–approved lung SBRT registry, we identified all patients initially treated for early-stage NSCLC between August 2004 and January 2012 who received salvage SBRT for isolated local failure. Failure was defined radiographically and confirmed histologically unless contraindicated. All patients were treated on a Novalis/BrainLAB system using ExacTrac for image guidance, and received a BED of ≥100 Gy{sub 10} for each SBRT course. Tumor motion control involved a Bodyfix vacuum system for immobilization along with abdominal compression. Results: Of 436 patients treated from August 2004 through January 2012, we identified 22 patients with isolated local failure, 10 of whom received SBRT for salvage. The median length of follow-up was 13.8 months from salvage SBRT (range 5.3-43.5 months). Median tumor size was 3.4 cm (range 1.7-4.8 cm). Two of the 10 lesions were “central” by proximity to the mediastinum, but were outside the zone of the proximal bronchial tree. Since completing salvage, 3 patients are alive and without evidence of disease. A fourth patient died of medical comorbidities without recurrence 13.0 months after salvage SBRT. Two patients developed distant disease only. Four patients had local failure. Toxicity included grade 1-2 fatigue (3 patients) and grade 1-2 chest wall pain (5 patients). There was no grade 3-5 toxicity. Conclusions: Repeat SBRT with a BED of ≥100 Gy{sub 10} after local failure in patients with early-stage medically inoperable NSCLC was well tolerated in this series and may represent a viable salvage strategy in select patients with peripheral tumors ≤5 cm.

  8. High-dose MVCT image guidance for stereotactic body radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Westerly, David C.; Schefter, Tracey E.; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Chao, Edward; Lucas, Dan; Flynn, Ryan T.; Miften, Moyed

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is a potent treatment for early stage primary and limited metastatic disease. Accurate tumor localization is essential to administer SBRT safely and effectively. Tomotherapy combines helical IMRT with onboard megavoltage CT (MVCT) imaging and is well suited for SBRT; however, MVCT results in reduced soft tissue contrast and increased image noise compared with kilovoltage CT. The goal of this work was to investigate the use of increased imaging doses on a clinical tomotherapy machine to improve image quality for SBRT image guidance. Methods: Two nonstandard, high-dose imaging modes were created on a tomotherapy machine by increasing the linear accelerator (LINAC) pulse rate from the nominal setting of 80 Hz, to 160 Hz and 300 Hz, respectively. Weighted CT dose indexes (wCTDIs) were measured for the standard, medium, and high-dose modes in a 30 cm solid water phantom using a calibrated A1SL ion chamber. Image quality was assessed from scans of a customized image quality phantom. Metrics evaluated include: contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs), high-contrast spatial resolution, image uniformity, and percent image noise. In addition, two patients receiving SBRT were localized using high-dose MVCT scans. Raw detector data collected after each scan were used to reconstruct standard-dose images for comparison. Results: MVCT scans acquired using a pitch of 1.0 resulted in wCTDI values of 2.2, 4.7, and 8.5 cGy for the standard, medium, and high-dose modes respectively. CNR values for both low and high-contrast materials were found to increase with the square root of dose. Axial high-contrast spatial resolution was comparable for all imaging modes at 0.5 lp/mm. Image uniformity was improved and percent noise decreased as the imaging dose increased. Similar improvements in image quality were observed in patient images, with decreases in image noise being the most notable. Conclusions: High-dose imaging modes are made possible on a

  9. Single- versus Multifraction Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma: Outcomes and Toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Pollom, Erqi L.; Alagappan, Muthuraman; Eyben, Rie von; Kunz, Pamela L.; Fisher, George A.; Ford, James A.; Poultsides, George A.; Visser, Brendan C.; Norton, Jeffrey A.; Kamaya, Aya; Cox, Veronica L.; Columbo, Laurie A.; Koong, Albert C.; Chang, Daniel T.

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: We report updated outcomes of single- versus multifraction stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: We included 167 patients with unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma treated at our institution from 2002 to 2013, with 1-fraction (45.5% of patient) or 5-fraction (54.5% of patients) SBRT. The majority of patients (87.5%) received chemotherapy. Results: Median follow-up was 7.9 months (range: 0.1-63.6). The 6- and 12-month cumulative incidence rates (CIR) of local recurrence for patients treated with single-fraction SBRT were 5.3% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.2%-10.4%) and 9.5% (95% CI, 2.7%-16.2%), respectively. The 6- and 12-month CIR with multifraction SBRT were 3.4% (95% CI, 0.0-7.2%) and 11.7% (95% CI, 4.8%-18.6%), respectively. Median survival from diagnosis for all patients was 13.6 months (95% CI, 12.2-15.0 months). The 6- and 12- month survival rates from SBRT for the single-fraction group were 67.0% (95% CI, 57.2%-78.5%) and 30.8% (95% CI, 21.9%-43.6%), respectively. The 6- and 12- month survival rates for the multifraction group were 75.7% (95% CI, 67.2%-85.3%) and 34.9% (95% CI, 26.1%-46.8%), respectively. There were no differences in CIR or survival rates between the single- and multifraction groups. The 6- and 12-month cumulative incidence rates of gastrointestinal toxicity grade ≥3 were 8.1% (95% CI, 1.8%-14.4%) and 12.3% (95% CI, 4.7%-20.0%), respectively, in the single-fraction group, and both were 5.6% (95% CI, 0.8%-10.5%) in the multifraction group. There were significantly fewer instances of toxicity grade ≥2 with multifraction SBRT (P=.005). Local recurrence and toxicity grade ≥2 were independent predictors of worse survival. Conclusions: Multifraction SBRT for pancreatic cancer significantly reduces gastrointestinal toxicity without compromising local control.

  10. Dosimetric effects of rotational offsets in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yun; Catalano, Suzanne; Kelsey, Chris R.; Yoo, David S.; Yin, Fang-Fang; Cai, Jing

    2014-04-01

    To quantitatively evaluate dosimetric effects of rotational offsets in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung cancer. Overall, 11 lung SBRT patients (8 female and 3 male; mean age: 75.0 years) with medially located tumors were included. Treatment plans with simulated rotational offsets of 1°, 3°, and 5° in roll, yaw, and pitch were generated and compared with the original plans. Both clockwise and counterclockwise rotations were investigated. The following dosimetric metrics were quantitatively evaluated: planning target volume coverage (PTV V{sub 100%}), max PTV dose (PTV D{sub max}), percentage prescription dose to 0.35 cc of cord (cord D{sub 0.35} {sub cc}), percentage prescription dose to 0.35 cc and 5 cc of esophagus (esophagus D{sub 0.35} {sub cc} and D{sub 5} {sub cc}), and volume of the lungs receiving at least 20 Gy (lung V{sub 20}). Statistical significance was tested using Wilcoxon signed rank test at the significance level of 0.05. Overall, small differences were found in all dosimetric matrices at all rotational offsets: 95.6% of differences were < 1% or < 1 Gy. Of all rotational offsets, largest change in PTV V{sub 100%}, PTV D{sub max}, cord D{sub 0.35} {sub cc}, esophagus D{sub 0.35} {sub cc}, esophagus D{sub 5} {sub cc}, and lung V{sub 20} was − 8.36%, − 6.06%, 11.96%, 8.66%, 6.02%, and − 0.69%, respectively. No significant correlation was found between any dosimetric change and tumor-to-cord/esophagus distances (R{sup 2} range: 0 to 0.44). Larger dosimetric changes and intersubject variations were observed at larger rotational offsets. Small dosimetric differences were found owing to rotational offsets up to 5° in lung SBRT for medially located tumors. Larger intersubject variations were observed at larger rotational offsets.

  11. Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy for Subcentimeter Lung Tumors: Clinical, Dosimetric, and Image Guidance Considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Louie, Alexander V.; Senan, Suresh; Dahele, Max; Slotman, Ben J.; Verbakel, Wilko F.A.R.

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: Use of stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) for subcentimeter lung tumors is controversial. We report our outcomes for tumors with diameter ≤1 cm and their visibility on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans and retrospectively evaluate the planned dose using a deterministic dose calculation algorithm (Acuros XB [AXB]). Methods and Materials: We identified subcentimeter tumors from our institutional SABR database. Tumor size was remeasured on an artifact-free phase of the planning 4-dimensional (4D)-CT. Clinical plan doses were generated using either a pencil beam convolution or an anisotropic analytic algorithm (AAA). All AAA plans were recalculated using AXB, and differences among D95 and mean dose for internal target volume (ITV) and planning target volume (PTV) on the average intensity CT dataset, as well as for gross tumor volume (GTV) on the end respiratory phases were reported. For all AAA patients, CBCT scans acquired during each treatment fraction were evaluated for target visibility. Progression-free and overall survival rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Thirty-five patients with 37 subcentimeter tumors were eligible for analysis. For the 22 AAA plans recalculated using AXB, Mean D95 ± SD values were 2.2 ± 4.4% (ITV) and 2.5 ± 4.8% (PTV) lower using AXB; whereas mean doses were 2.9 ± 4.9% (ITV) and 3.7 ± 5.1% (PTV) lower. Calculated AXB doses were significantly lower in one patient (difference in mean ITV and PTV doses, as well as in mean ITV and PTV D95 ranged from 22%-24%). However, the end respiratory phase GTV received at least 95% of the prescription dose. Review of 92 CBCT scans from all AAA patients revealed that the tumor was visualized in 82 images, and its position could be inferred in other images. The 2-year local progression-free survival was 100%. Conclusions: Patients with subcentimeter lung tumors are good candidates for SABR, given the dosimetry, ability to localize

  12. [Hippocampus, brainstem and brain dose-volume constraints for fractionated 3-D radiotherapy and for stereotactic radiation therapy: Limits and perspectives].

    PubMed

    Gérard, M; Jumeau, R; Pichon, B; Biau, J; Blais, E; Horion, J; Noël, G

    2017-10-01

    Cerebral radiation-induced toxicities after radiotherapy (RT) of brain tumors are frequent. The protection of organs at risk (OAR) is crucial, especially for brain tumors, to preserve cognition in cancer survivors. Dose constraints of cerebral OAR used in conventional RT, radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) are debated. In fact, they are based on historical cohorts or calculated with old mathematical models. Values of α/β ratio of cerebral OAR are also controversial leading to misestimate the equivalent dose in 2Gy fractions or the biological equivalent dose, especially during hypofractionated RT. Although recent progresses in medical imaging, the diagnosis of radionecrosis remains difficult. In this article, we propose a large review of dose constraints used for three major cerebral OAR: the brain stem, the hippocampus and the brain. Copyright © 2017 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. A characterization of the LAP Aquarius Phantom for external LAP laser alignment and magnetic resonance geometric distortion verification for stereotactic radiation surgery patient simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergara, Daniel

    The Thesis explores additional applications of LAP's Aquarius external laser alignment verification Phantom by examining geometric accuracy of magnetic resonance images commonly used for planning intracranial stereotactic radiation surgery (ICSRS) cases. The scans were performed with MRI protocols used for ICSRS, and head and neck diagnosis, and their images fused to computerized tomographic (CT) images. The geometric distortions (GDs) were measured against the CT in all axial, sagittal, and coronal directions at different levels. Using the Aquarius Phantom, one is able to detect GD in ICSRS planning MRI acquisitions, and align the external LAP patient alignment lasers, by following the LAP QA protocol. GDs up to about 2 mm are observed at the distal regions of the longitudinal axis in the SRS treatment planning MR images. Based on the results, one may recommend the use of the Aquarius Phantom to determine if margins should be included for SRS treatment planning.

  14. Computed tomographic features predictive of local recurrence in patients with early stage lung cancer treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Halpenny, Darragh; Ridge, Carole A; Hayes, Sara; Zheng, Junting; Moskowitz, Chaya S; Rimner, Andreas; Ginsberg, Michelle S

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to identify computed tomography (CT) features of local recurrence (LR) after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung cancer. Two hundred eighteen patients underwent SBRT for lung cancer from January 1st, 2006 to March 1st, 2011. Signs of LR recorded: opacity with new bulging margin, opacification of air bronchograms, enlarging pleural effusion, new or enlarging mass, and increased lung density at the treatment site. A new bulging margin at the treatment site was the only feature significantly associated with LR (P<.005). Most CT features classically associated with LR following conventional radiation therapy are unreliable for predicting LR following SBRT. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Stereotactic body radiation therapy of liver tumors: post-treatment appearances and evaluation of treatment response: a pictorial review.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Mustafa M; Merrell, Kenneth W; Hallemeier, Christopher L; Johnson, Geoffrey B; Mounajjed, Taofic; Olivier, Kenneth R; Fidler, Jeff L; Venkatesh, Sudhakar K

    2016-10-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is a noninvasive treatment technique for selected patients with primary liver tumors and liver-confined oligometastatic disease. Recently, SBRT has emerged as an alternative treatment option in non-surgical candidates and in whom percutaneous treatment methods are not possible or contraindicated. The experience with SBRT continues to grow. There are currently no imaging guidelines for assessment of tumor response and follow-up schedule following SBRT. SBRT produces characteristic radiation-induced changes in the treated tumor and surrounding liver parenchyma. Knowledge of these changes is essential in the interpretation of follow-up imaging and assessment of treatment response. In this review, we will describe the CT, MRI, and PET imaging findings following SBRT of both the targeted liver tumor and surrounding hepatic parenchyma.

  16. An analysis of tumor control probability of stereotactic body radiation therapy for lung cancer with a regrowth model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, An; Liu, Feng; Gore, Elizabeth; Li, X. Allen

    2016-05-01

    We report a modeling study of tumor response after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for early-stage non-small-cell lung carcinoma using published clinical data with a regrowth model. A linear-quadratic inspired regrowth model was proposed to analyze the tumor control probability (TCP) based on a series of published data of SBRT, in which a tumor is controlled for an individual patient if number of tumor cells is smaller than a critical value K cr. The regrowth model contains radiobiological parameters such as α, α/β the potential doubling time T p. This model also takes into account the heterogeneity of tumors and tumor regrowth after radiation treatment. The model was first used to fit TCP data from a single institution. The extracted fitting parameters were then used to predict the TCP data from another institution with a similar dose fractionation scheme. Finally, the model was used to fit the pooled TCP data selected from 48 publications available in the literature at the time when this manuscript was written. Excellent agreement between model predictions and single-institution data was found and the extracted radiobiological parameters were α  =  0.010  ±  0.001 Gy-1, α /β  =  21.5  ±  1.0 Gy and T p  =  133.4  ±  7.6 d. These parameters were α  =  0.072  ±  0.006 Gy-1, α/β  =  15.9  ±  1.0 Gy and T p  =  85.6  ±  24.7 d when extracted from multi-institution data. This study shows that TCP saturates at a BED of around 120 Gy. A few new dose-fractionation schemes were proposed based on the extracted model parameters from multi-institution data. It is found that the regrowth model with an α/β around 16 Gy can be used to predict the dose response of lung tumors treated with SBRT. The extracted radiobiological parameters may be useful for comparing clinical outcome data of various SBRT trials and for designing new treatment regimens.

  17. Prescription Dose Guideline Based on Physical Criterion for Multiple Metastatic Brain Tumors Treated With Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Sahgal, Arjun; Barani, Igor J.; Novotny, Josef; Zhang Beibei; Petti, Paula; Larson, David A.; Ma Lijun

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: Existing dose guidelines for intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) are primarily based on single-target treatment data. This study investigated dose guidelines for multiple targets treated with SRS. Methods and Materials: A physical model was developed to relate the peripheral isodose volume dependence on an increasing number of targets and prescription dose per target. The model was derived from simulated and clinical multiple brain metastatic cases treated with the Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion at several institutions, where the total number of targets ranged from 2 to 60. The relative increase in peripheral isodose volumes, such as the 12-Gy volume, was studied in the multitarget treatment setting based on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 90-05 study dose levels. Results: A significant increase in the 12-Gy peripheral isodose volumes was found in comparing multiple target SRS to single-target SRS. This increase strongly correlated (R{sup 2} = 0.92) with the total number of targets but not the total target volumes (R{sup 2} = 0.06). On the basis of the correlated curve, the 12-Gy volume for multiple target treatment was found to increase by approximately 1% per target when a low target dose such as 15 Gy was used, but approximately 4% per target when a high dose such as 20-24 Gy was used. Reduction in the prescription dose was quantified for each prescription level in maintaining the 12-Gy volume. Conclusion: Normal brain dose increases predictably with increasing number of targets for multitarget SRS. A reduction of approximately 1-2 Gy in the prescribed dose is needed compared with single target radiosurgery.

  18. WE-F-304-01: Overview of the Working Group On Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (WGSBRT)

    SciTech Connect

    Yorke, E.

    2015-06-15

    Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) was introduced clinically more than twenty years ago, and many subsequent publications have reported safety and efficacy data. The AAPM Working Group on Biological Effects of Hypofractionated Radiotherapy/SBRT (WGSBRT) extracted published treatment outcomes data from extensive literature searches to summarize and construct tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models for six anatomical regions: Cranial, Head and Neck, Thoracic, Abdominal, Pelvic, and Spinal. In this session, we present the WGSBRT’s work for cranial sites, and recurrent head and neck cancer. From literature-based data and associated models, guidelines to aid with safe and effective hypofractionated radiotherapy treatment are being determined. Further, the ability of existing and proposed radiobiological models to fit these data is considered as to the ability to distinguish between the linear-quadratic and alternative radiobiological models such as secondary cell death from vascular damage, immunogenic, or bystander effects. Where appropriate, specific model parameters are estimated. As described in “The lessons of QUANTEC,” (1), lack of adequate reporting standards continues to limit the amount of useful quantitative information that can be extracted from peer-reviewed publications. Recommendations regarding reporting standards are considered, to enable such reviews to achieve more complete characterization of clinical outcomes. 1 Jackson A, Marks LB, Bentzen SM, Eisbruch A, Yorke ED, Ten Haken RK, Constine LS, Deasy JO. The lessons of QUANTEC: recommendations for reporting and gathering data on dose-volume dependencies of treatment outcome. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2010 Mar 1;76(3 Suppl):S155–60. Learning Objectives: Describe the techniques, types of cancer and dose schedules used in treating recurrent H&N cancers with SBRT List the radiobiological models that compete with the linear-quadratic model

  19. Receiver operating curves and dose-volume analysis of late toxicity with stereotactic body radiation therapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Johnson, Julian; Gottschalk, Alexander R; Chang, Albert J; Hsu, I-Chow; Roach, Mack; Seymour, Zachary A

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve method to determine dose thresholds with late genitourinary (GU) toxicity after stereotactic body radiation therapy for prostate cancer. Seventy-eight patients diagnosed with low- to intermediate-risk prostate cancer and treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy alone were reviewed retrospectively. All patients received a total dose of 38 Gy in 4 fractions with a planning target volume expansion of 2 mm. GU toxicity was documented according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4. ROC analysis applied on a logistic regression model was used to determine optimal dosimetric parameters for GU toxicity. The median age at treatment was 69 years with a median prostate volume of 46.2 mL. The median prescription isodose line was 67% (interquartile range, 65, 70). The median clinical follow-up was 35.49 months. Late grade 1, 2, and 3 GU toxicity occurred in 21.8%, 19.2%, and 2.6% of cases, respectively. Late grade 2+ GU toxicity was associated with prescription to isodose line (P = .009) and normalized volumes for heterogeneity ≥46 Gy. The ROC method successfully produced thresholds for dose-volume recommendations for both prostate and urethra, including normalized prostate volumes from 46 to 50 Gy, such as volume of target tissue receiving 46% of the prescribed dose (V46) Gy of 36.7% (sensitivity, 71%; specificity, 61%; area under the curve, 0.67) with an associated probability of late GU grade 2+ toxicity of 21%. Intraprostatic heterogeneity should be controlled with potential thresholds at V46 Gy <36.7%, V48 Gy <21%, and V50 Gy <9.5% of the normalized prostate volume to keep late grade 2+ GU toxicity ≤20% with 4-fraction schemes. This may be facilitated with a higher prescription isodose line (>69%). Copyright © 2016 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for adrenal metastases : a feasibility study of advanced techniques with modulated photons and protons.

    PubMed

    Scorsetti, Marta; Mancosu, Pietro; Navarria, Piera; Tozzi, Angelo; Castiglioni, Simona; Clerici, Elena; Reggiori, Giacomo; Lobefalo, Francesca; Fogliata, Antonella; Cozzi, Luca

    2011-04-01

    To compare advanced treatment techniques with photons and protons as a stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for adrenal glands metastases. Planning computer tomographic (CT) scans of 10 patients were selected. A total dose of 45 Gy in 7.5 Gy fractions was prescribed. Organs at risk (OAR) were liver and kidneys. Dose-volume metrics were defined to quantify quality of plans assessing target coverage and sparing of organs at risk. Plans for RapidArc, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), dynamic conformal arcs, 3D conformal static fields, and intensity modulated protons were compared. The main planning objective for the clinical target volume (CTV) was to cover 100% of the volume with 95% (V(95%) = 100%) and to keep the maximum dose below 107% of the prescribed dose (V(107%) = 0%). Planning objective for planning target volume (PTV) was V(95%) > 80%. For kidneys, the general planning objective was V(15Gy) < 35% and for liver V(15Gy) < (liver volume-700 cm(3)). All techniques achieved the minimum and maximum dose objective for CTV and PTV, D(5-95%) ranged from 1 Gy (protons) to 1.6 Gy (conformal static fields) on CTV. Maximal organ at risk sparing was achieved by protons. RapidArc presented the second lowest dose bath (V(10Gy) and integral dose) after protons and the best conformality together with IMRT. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) to adrenal glands metastases is achievable with several advanced techniques with either photons or protons. The intensity modulated approaches using either static fields, dynamic arcs or protons are superior to the other conformal solutions. For their simplicity, IMRT or RapidArc should be considered as the first option radiation treatment for those patients not eligible for proton treatment.

  1. SU-E-J-165: Dosimetric Impact of Liver Rotations in Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pinnaduwage, D; Paulsson, A; Sudhyadhom, A; Chen, J; Chang, A; Anwar, M; Gottschalk, A; Yom, S S.; Descovich, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Often in liver stereotactic body radiotherapy a single fiducial is implanted near the tumor for image-guided treatment delivery. In such cases, rotational corrections are calculated based on the spine. This study quantifies rotational differences between the spine and liver, and investigates the corresponding dosimetric impact. Methods: Seven patients with 3 intrahepatic fiducials and 4DCT scans were identified. The planning CT was separately co-registered with 4 phases of the 4DCT (0%, 50%, 100% inhale and 50% exhale) by 1) rigid registration of the spine, and 2) point-based registration of the 3 fiducials. Rotation vectors were calculated for each registration. Translational differences in fiducial positions between the 2 registrations methods were investigated. Dosimetric impact due to liver rotations and deformations was assessed using critical structures delineated on the 4DCT phases. For dose comparisons, a single fiducial was translationally aligned following spine alignment to represent what is typically done in the clinic. Results: On average, differences between spine and liver rotations during the 0%, 50%, 100% inhale, and 50% exhale phases were 3.23°, 3.27°, 2.26° and 3.11° (pitch), 3.00°, 2.24°, 3.12° and 1.73° (roll), and 1.57°, 1.98°, 2.09° and 1.36° (yaw), respectively. The maximum difference in rotations was 12°, with differences of >3° seen in 14/28 (pitch), 10/28 (roll), and 6/28 (yaw) cases. Average fiducial displacements of 2.73 (craniocaudal), 1.04 (lateral) and 1.82 mm (vertical) were seen. Evaluating percent dose differences for 5 patients at the peaks of the respiratory cycle, the maximum dose to the duodenum, stomach, bowel and esophagus differed on average by 11.4%, 5.3%, 11.2% and 49.1% between the 2 registration methods. Conclusion: Lack of accounting for liver rotation during treatment might Result in clinically significant dose differences to critical structures. Both rotational and translational deviations

  2. Safety and Efficacy of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in the Treatment of Pulmonary Metastases from High Grade Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Niraj; Selch, Michael; Lee, Jay M.; Eilber, Fritz C.; Chmielowski, Bartosz; Agazaryan, Nzhde; Steinberg, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Patients with high-grade sarcoma (HGS) frequently develop metastatic disease thus limiting their long-term survival. Lung metastases (LM) have historically been treated with surgical resection (metastasectomy). A potential alternative for controlling LM could be stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). We evaluated the outcomes from our institutional experience utilizing SBRT. Methods. Sixteen consecutive patients with LM from HGS were treated with SBRT between 2009 and 2011. Routine radiographic and clinical follow-up was performed. Local failure was defined as CT progression on 2 consecutive scans or growth after initial shrinkage. Radiation pneumonitis and radiation esophagitis were scored using Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC) version 3.0. Results. All 16 patients received chemotherapy, and a subset (38%) also underwent prior pulmonary metastasectomy. Median patient age was 56 (12–85), and median follow-up time was 20 months (range 3–43). A total of 25 lesions were treated and evaluable for this analysis. Most common histologies were leiomyosarcoma (28%), synovial sarcoma (20%), and osteosarcoma (16%). Median SBRT prescription dose was 54 Gy (36–54) in 3-4 fractions. At 43 months, local control was 94%. No patient experienced G2-4 radiation pneumonitis, and no patient experienced radiation esophagitis. Conclusions. Our retrospective experience suggests that SBRT for LM from HGS provides excellent local control and minimal toxicity. PMID:24198717

  3. Evaluation of Rotational Errors in Treatment Setup of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy of Liver Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Cao Minsong; Lasley, Foster D.; Das, Indra J.; DesRosiers, Colleen M.; Slessinger, Eric D.; Cardenes, Higinia R.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric impact of rotational setup errors in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) treatment of liver tumors and to investigate whether translational shifts can compensate for rotation. Methods and Materials: The positioning accuracy in 20 patients with liver malignancies treated with SBRT was reevaluated offline by matching the patients' cone-beam computed tomography (CT) scans (n=75) to the planning CT scans and adjusting the 3 rotational angles (pitch, roll, and yaw). Systematic and random setup errors were calculated. The dosimetric changes caused by rotational setup errors were quantified for both simulated and observed patient rotations. Dose distributions recalculated on the rotated CT scans were compared with the original planned doses. Translational corrections were simulated based on manual translational registration of the rotated images to the original CT scans. The correction efficacy was evaluated by comparing the recalculated plans with the original plans. Results: The systematic rotational setup errors were -0.06 Degree-Sign {+-} 0.68 Degree-Sign , -0.29 Degree-Sign {+-} 0.62 Degree-Sign , and -0.24 Degree-Sign {+-} 0.61 Degree-Sign ; the random setup errors were 0.80 Degree-Sign , 1.05 Degree-Sign , and 0.61 Degree-Sign for pitch, roll, and yaw, respectively. Analysis of CBCT images showed that 56.0%, 14.7%, and 1.3% of treated fractions had rotational errors of >1 Degree-Sign , >2 Degree-Sign , and >3 Degree-Sign , respectively, in any one of the rotational axes. Rotational simulations demonstrated that the reduction of gross tumor volume (GTV) coverage was <2% when rotation was <3 Degree-Sign . Recalculated plans using actual patient roll motions showed similar reduction (<2%) in GTV coverage. Translational corrections improved the GTV coverage to within 3% of the original values. For organs at risk (OAR), the dosimetric impact varied case by case. Conclusion: Actual rotational setup errors in SBRT for liver tumors are

  4. Characterization of 3D printing techniques: Toward patient specific quality assurance spine-shaped phantom for stereotactic body radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Joo; Lee, Seu-Ran; Lee, Min-Young; Sohn, Jason W; Yun, Hyong Geon; Choi, Joon Yong; Jeon, Sang Won; Suh, Tae Suk

    2017-01-01

    Development and comparison of spine-shaped phantoms generated by two different 3D-printing technologies, digital light processing (DLP) and Polyjet has been purposed to utilize in patient-specific quality assurance (QA) of stereotactic body radiation treatment. The developed 3D-printed spine QA phantom consisted of an acrylic body phantom and a 3D-printed spine shaped object. DLP and Polyjet 3D printers using a high-density acrylic polymer were employed to produce spine-shaped phantoms based on CT images. Image fusion was performed to evaluate the reproducibility of our phantom, and the Hounsfield units (HUs) were measured based on each CT image. Two different intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans based on both CT phantom image sets from the two printed spine-shaped phantoms with acrylic body phantoms were designed to deliver 16 Gy dose to the planning target volume (PTV) and were compared for target coverage and normal organ-sparing. Image fusion demonstrated good reproducibility of the developed phantom. The HU values of the DLP- and Polyjet-printed spine vertebrae differed by 54.3 on average. The PTV Dmax dose for the DLP-generated phantom was about 1.488 Gy higher than that for the Polyjet-generated phantom. The organs at risk received a lower dose for the 3D printed spine-shaped phantom image using the DLP technique than for the phantom image using the Polyjet technique. Despite using the same material for printing the spine-shaped phantom, these phantoms generated by different 3D printing techniques, DLP and Polyjet, showed different HU values and these differently appearing HU values according to the printing technique could be an extra consideration for developing the 3D printed spine-shaped phantom depending on the patient's age and the density of the spinal bone. Therefore, the 3D printing technique and materials should be carefully chosen by taking into account the condition of the patient in order to accurately produce 3D printed patient-specific QA

  5. Characterization of 3D printing techniques: Toward patient specific quality assurance spine-shaped phantom for stereotactic body radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Min-Young; Sohn, Jason W.; Yun, Hyong Geon; Choi, Joon Yong; Jeon, Sang Won

    2017-01-01

    Development and comparison of spine-shaped phantoms generated by two different 3D-printing technologies, digital light processing (DLP) and Polyjet has been purposed to utilize in patient-specific quality assurance (QA) of stereotactic body radiation treatment. The developed 3D-printed spine QA phantom consisted of an acrylic body phantom and a 3D-printed spine shaped object. DLP and Polyjet 3D printers using a high-density acrylic polymer were employed to produce spine-shaped phantoms based on CT images. Image fusion was performed to evaluate the reproducibility of our phantom, and the Hounsfield units (HUs) were measured based on each CT image. Two different intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans based on both CT phantom image sets from the two printed spine-shaped phantoms with acrylic body phantoms were designed to deliver 16 Gy dose to the planning target volume (PTV) and were compared for target coverage and normal organ-sparing. Image fusion demonstrated good reproducibility of the developed phantom. The HU values of the DLP- and Polyjet-printed spine vertebrae differed by 54.3 on average. The PTV Dmax dose for the DLP-generated phantom was about 1.488 Gy higher than that for the Polyjet-generated phantom. The organs at risk received a lower dose for the 3D printed spine-shaped phantom image using the DLP technique than for the phantom image using the Polyjet technique. Despite using the same material for printing the spine-shaped phantom, these phantoms generated by different 3D printing techniques, DLP and Polyjet, showed different HU values and these differently appearing HU values according to the printing technique could be an extra consideration for developing the 3D printed spine-shaped phantom depending on the patient’s age and the density of the spinal bone. Therefore, the 3D printing technique and materials should be carefully chosen by taking into account the condition of the patient in order to accurately produce 3D printed patient-specific QA

  6. Linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery for bilateral vestibular schwannomas in patients with neurofibromatosis type 2.

    PubMed

    Meijer, Otto W M; Vandertop, W Peter; Lagerwaard, Frank J; Slotman, Ben J

    2008-05-01

    Patients with neurofibromatosis Type 2 (NF2) patients typically have bilateral vestibular schwannomas (VS) and are at risk for developing bilateral deafness, bilateral trigeminal, and bilateral facial nerve function loss. Previous reports suggested that treatment outcomes in these patients are worse compared with those for patients with sporadic solitary VS. Very few reports, however, have been published on linear accelerator-based radiosurgery (RS) and stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT) in patients with NF2. In particular, in patients with NF2 who already have unilateral hearing loss, avoidance of hearing loss on the opposite side poses a challenge for RS and SRT. We studied our treatment results in patients with NF2 with bilateral VS, treated with linear accelerator-based RS and SRT. In 204 patients with VS treated with RS or SRT in Amsterdam starting from 1992, we identified 25 patients with NF2 who had bilateral tumors. Indications for treatment were either tumor progression on sequential magnetic resonance imaging scans and/or progressive hearing loss. Mean tumor diameter was 2.5 cm. Stereotactic irradiation was administered to all patients using five noncoplanar arcs with a single isocenter to a dose of 10 to 12.5 Gy in a single fraction or 20 to 25 Gy in five fractions in 1 week prescribed to the 80% isodose encompassing the tumor. On the untreated side, all patients showed hearing loss and eight (32%) had ipsilateral deafness. Five patients were followed for less than 1 year. Of the remaining 20 patients, five had ipsilateral deafness before treatment. Consequently, 15 patients were at risk for treatment-related hearing loss. They showed a mean pure tone average (PTA) of 51 dB (8-112 dB) before treatment. After treatment all patients were assessed at yearly intervals including magnetic resonance imaging and pure tone audiometry. Median follow-up time was 51 months (12-109 mo). Local tumor control was obtained in all 20 patients, and no treatment

  7. Optimizing LINAC-based stereotactic radiotherapy of uveal melanomas: 7 years' clinical experience

    SciTech Connect

    Dieckmann, Karin . E-mail: Karin.Dieckmann@akhwien.at; Georg, Dietmar; Bogner, Joachim; Zehetmayer, Martin; Petersch, Bernhard; Chorvat, Martin; Weitmann, Hajo; Poetter, Richard

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To report on the clinical outcome of LINAC-based stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) of uveal melanomas. Additionally, a new prototype (hardware and software) for automated eye monitoring and gated SRT using a noninvasive eye fixation technique is described. Patients and Methods: Between June 1997 and March 2004, 158 patients suffering from uveal melanoma were treated at a LINAC with 6 MV (5 x 14 Gy; 5 x 12 Gy prescribed to 80% isodose) photon beams. To guarantee identical patient setup during treatment planning (CT and MRI) and treatment delivery, patients were immobilized with a BrainLAB thermoplastic mask. Eye immobilization was achieved by instructing the patient to fixate on a light source integrated into the mask system. A mini-video camera was used to provide on-line information about the eye and pupil position, respectively. A new CT and magnetic resonance (MR) compatible prototype, based on head-and-neck fixation and the infrared tracking system ExacTrac, has been developed and evaluated since 2002. This system records maximum temporal and angular deviations during treatment and, based on tolerance limits, a feedback signal to the LINAC enables gated SRT. Results: After a median follow-up of 33.4 months (range, 3-85 months), local control was achieved in 98%. Fifteen patients (9.0%) developed metastases. Secondary enucleation was performed in 23 patients (13.8%). Long-term side effects were retinopathy (n = 70; 44%), cataract (n = 30; 23%), optic neuropathy (n = 65; 41%), and secondary neovascular glaucoma (n = 23; 13.8%). Typical situations when preset deviation criteria were exceeded were slow drifts (fatigue), large sudden eye movements (irritation), or eye closing (fatigue). In these cases, radiation was reliably interrupted by the gating system. In our clinical setup, the novel system for computer-controlled gated SRT of uveal melanoma was well tolerated by about 30 of the patients treated with this system so far. Conclusion: LINAC-based SRT of

  8. WE-G-BRD-07: Investigation of Distal Lung Atelectasis Following Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Using Regional Lung Volume Changes Between Pre- and Post- Treatment CT Scans

    SciTech Connect

    Diot, Q; Kavanagh, B; Miften, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To propose a quantitative method using lung deformations to differentiate between radiation-induced fibrosis and potential airway stenosis with distal atelectasis in patients treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung tumors. Methods: Twenty-four lung patients with large radiation-induced density increases outside the high dose region had their pre- and post-treatment CT scans manually registered. They received SBRT treatments at our institution between 2002 and 2009 in 3 or 5 fractions, to a median total dose of 54Gy (range, 30–60). At least 50 anatomical landmarks inside the lung (airway branches) were paired for the pre- and post-treatment scans to guide the deformable registration of the lung structure, which was then interpolated to the whole lung using splines. Local volume changes between the planning and follow-up scans were calculated using the deformation field Jacobian. Hyperdense regions were classified as atelectatic or fibrotic based on correlations between regional density increases and significant volume contractions compared to the surrounding tissues. Results: Out of 24 patients, only 7 demonstrated a volume contraction that was at least one σ larger than the remaining lung average. Because they did not receive high doses, these shrunk hyperdense regions were likely showing distal atelectasis resulting from radiation-induced airway stenosis rather than conventional fibrosis. On average, the hyperdense regions extended 9.2 cm farther than the GTV contours but not significantly more than 8.6 cm for the other patients (p>0.05), indicating that a large offset between the radiation and hyperdense region centers is not a good surrogate for atelectasis. Conclusion: A method based on the relative comparison of volume changes between different dates was developed to identify potential lung regions experiencing distal atelectasis. Such a tool is essential to study which lung structures need to be avoided to prevent

  9. Normal Liver Tissue Density Dose Response in Patients Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Liver Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Howells, Christopher C.; Stinauer, Michelle A.; Diot, Quentin; Westerly, David C.; Schefter, Tracey E.; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Miften, Moyed

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the temporal dose response of normal liver tissue for patients with liver metastases treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Ninety-nine noncontrast follow-up computed tomography (CT) scans of 34 patients who received SBRT between 2004 and 2011 were retrospectively analyzed at a median of 8 months post-SBRT (range, 0.7-36 months). SBRT-induced normal liver tissue density changes in follow-up CT scans were evaluated at 2, 6, 10, 15, and 27 months. The dose distributions from planning CTs were mapped to follow-up CTs to relate the mean Hounsfield unit change ({Delta}HU) to dose received over the range 0-55 Gy in 3-5 fractions. An absolute density change of 7 HU was considered a significant radiographic change in normal liver tissue. Results: Increasing radiation dose was linearly correlated with lower post-SBRT liver tissue density (slope, -0.65 {Delta}HU/5 Gy). The threshold for significant change (-7 {Delta}HU) was observed in the range of 30-35 Gy. This effect did not vary significantly over the time intervals evaluated. Conclusions: SBRT induces a dose-dependent and relatively time-independent hypodense radiation reaction within normal liver tissue that is characterized by a decrease of >7 HU in liver density for doses >30-35 Gy.

  10. Evaluating radiation-induced white matter changes in patients treated with stereotactic radiosurgery using diffusion tensor imaging: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Chang, Zheng; Kirkpatrick, John P; Wang, Zhiheng; Cai, Jing; Adamson, Justus; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2014-02-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) has been an effective treatment method for brain tumors; however, few data are available regarding radiation-induced white matter (WM) damage by SRS. In this work, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was used to investigate WM changes following SRS. Fifteen patients with gliomas were enrolled, with prescription doses ranging 18-25 Gy. Patients were scanned with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) including DTI before and after SRS. Diffusion tensors were calculated and fiber tracking was performed. Non-irradiated WM volumes and irradiated WM volumes receiving ≥ 12 Gy and ≥ Gy were contoured as volumes of interest (VOI). Apparent diffusion coefficient (〈D〉), fractional anisotropy (FA) and number of fibers (NF) were calculated and assessed using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Compared with those of non-irradiated VOIs, FA and NF decreased considerably after two months of SRS in the irradiated WM VOIs. The variation in (〈D〉 was however small and was not statistically significant. The preliminary results suggested that FA and NF might potentially be more sensitive indicators than (〈D〉 in measuring radiation-induced WM changes and DTI could be a valuable tool to assess radiation-induced WM changes in SRS. Although it is still preliminary, this pilot study may be useful to provide insights for future studies.

  11. Stereotactic body radiation therapy for re-irradiation of persistent or recurrent non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Trovo, Marco; Minatel, Emilio; Durofil, Elena; Polesel, Jerry; Avanzo, Michele; Baresic, Tania; Bearz, Alessandra; Del Conte, Alessandro; Franchin, Giovanni; Gobitti, Carlo; Rumeileh, Imad Abu; Trovo, Mauro G

    2014-04-01

    To retrospectively assess toxicity and outcome of re-irradiation with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in patients with recurrent or persistent non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), who were previously treated with radical radiation therapy (50-60 Gy). The secondary endpoint was to investigate whether there are dosimetric parameter predictors of severe radiation toxicity. The analysis was conducted in 17 patients with "in-field" recurrent/persistent centrally located NSCLC, who underwent re-irradiation with SBRT. SBRT consisted of 30 Gy in 5 to 6 fractions; these prescriptions would be equivalent for the tumor to 37.5 to 40 Gy, bringing the total 2-Gy-per-fraction cumulative dose to 87 to 100 Gy, considering the primary radiation therapy treatment. Actuarial analyses and survival were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method, and P values were estimated by the log-rank test, starting from the date of completion of SBRT. Dosimetric parameters from the subgroups with and without grade ≥3 pulmonary toxicity were compared using a 2-tailed Student t test. The median follow-up was 18 months (range, 4-57 months). Only 2 patients had local failure, corresponding to a local control rate of 86% at 1 year. The Kaplan-Meier estimates of overall survival (OS) rates at 1 and 2 years were 59% and 29%, respectively; the median OS was 19 months. Four patients (23%) experienced grade 3 radiation pneumonitis, and 1 patient developed fatal pneumonitis. One patient died of fatal hemoptysis 2 months after the completion of SBRT. Unexpectedly, heart maximum dose, D5 (minimum dose to at least 5% of the heart volume), and D10 were correlated with risk of radiation pneumonitis (P<.05). Re-irradiation with SBRT for recurrent/persistent centrally located NSCLC achieves excellent results in terms of local control. However, the high rate of severe toxicity reported in our study is of concern. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Intensity-modulated stereotactic radiotherapy (IMSRT) for skull-base meningiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Yenice, Kamil M. . E-mail: kyenice@radonc.uchicago.edu; Narayana, Ashwatha; Chang, Jenghwa; Gutin, Philip H.; Amols, Howard I.

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate the potential benefits of a micromultileaf collimator ({mu}MLC) -based intensity-modulated stereotactic radiotherapy (IMSRT) in skull-base meningiomas. Methods and Materials: Seven patients with inoperable or recurrent small-volume (1.7-15.5 cc) skull-base meningiomas were treated with IMSRT to 54 Gy in 30 fractions using a {mu}MLC in the dynamic mode. IMSRT plan quality was evaluated in comparison with the conformal stereotactic radiotherapy technique, using the same beam arrangement and static delivery with the {mu}MLC. Plans were compared using multiple dose distributions and dose-volume histograms for the planning target volume and organs at risk. The conformity and uniformity metrics, as well as normal-tissue complication probabilities, were calculated for the two techniques. Follow-up with MRI and clinical examination was performed at regular intervals. Results: With a mean follow-up of 17 months, local control has been achieved in all cases, and no treatment-related toxicities have been noted. For cavernous sinus tumors overlapping with optic apparatus, IMSRT has improved the dose uniformity within the target on average by 8%, which resulted in a reduction of the estimated chiasm normal-tissue complication probability by up to 65%. Conclusions: Intensity-modulated stereotactic radiotherapy can be safely delivered to improve the dose distributions in select skull-base meningiomas with an appreciable concomitant dose reduction to involved critical structures. Longer follow-up with a larger patient group is necessary to demonstrate sustained tumor control and low morbidity with IMSRT for small inoperable, recurrent, or subtotally resected meningiomas.

  13. Versatility of the Novalis system to deliver image-guided stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for various anatomical sites.

    PubMed

    Teh, Bin S; Paulino, Arnold C; Lu, Hsin H; Chiu, J Kam; Richardson, Susan; Chiang, Stephen; Amato, Robert; Butler, E Brian; Bloch, Charles

    2007-08-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) programs to treat brain tumors were implemented when we first acquired the Brainlab Novalis system in 2003. Two years later, we started an extra-cranial stereotactic radio-ablation or more appropriately a stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) program using the Brainlab Novalis image-guided system at The Methodist Hospital in Houston, Texas. We hereby summarize our initial experience with this system in delivering image-guided SBRT to a total of 80 patients during our first year of clinical implementation, from February 2005 to January 2006. Over 100 lesions in more than 20 distinct anatomical sites were treated. These include all levels of spine from cervical, thoracic, lumbar, and sacral lesions. Spinal lesions encompass intramedullary, intradural, extradural, or osseous compartments. Also treated were lesions in other bony sites including orbit, clavicle, scapula, humerus, sternum, rib, femur, and pelvis (ilium, ischium, and pubis). Primary or metastatic lesions located in the head and neck, supraclavicular region, axilla, mediastinum, lung (both central and peripheral), abdominal wall, liver, kidney, para-aortic lymph nodes, prostate, and pelvis were also treated. In addition to primary radiotherapy, SBRT program using the Brainlab Novalis system allows re-irradiation for recurrence and "boost" after conventional treatment to various anatomical sites. Treating these sites safely and efficaciously requires knowledge in radiation tolerance, fraction size, total dose, biologically equivalent dose (BED), prior radiotherapy, detailed dose volume histograms (DVH) of normal tissues, and the radiosensitive/radioresistant nature of the tumor. Placement of radio-opaque markers (Visicoil, Radiomed) in anatomical sites not in close proximity to bony landmarks (e.g., kidney and liver) helps in measuring motion and providing image guidance during each treatment fraction. Tumor/organ motion

  14. 2D/3D Image fusion for accurate target localization and evaluation of a mask based stereotactic system in fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy of cranial lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, J.-Y.; Ryu, Samuel; Faber, Kathleen; Mikkelsen, Tom; Chen Qing; Li Shidong; Movsas, Benjamin

    2006-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of a two-dimensional (2D) to three-dimensional (3D) image-fusion-guided target localization system and a mask based stereotactic system for fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) of cranial lesions. A commercial x-ray image guidance system originally developed for extracranial radiosurgery was used for FSRT of cranial lesions. The localization accuracy was quantitatively evaluated with an anthropomorphic head phantom implanted with eight small radiopaque markers (BBs) in different locations. The accuracy and its clinical reliability were also qualitatively evaluated for a total of 127 fractions in 12 patients with both kV x-ray images and MV portal films. The image-guided system was then used as a standard to evaluate the overall uncertainty and reproducibility of the head mask based stereotactic system in these patients. The phantom study demonstrated that the maximal random error of the image-guided target localization was {+-}0.6 mm in each direction in terms of the 95% confidence interval (CI). The systematic error varied with measurement methods. It was approximately 0.4 mm, mainly in the longitudinal direction, for the kV x-ray method. There was a 0.5 mm systematic difference, primarily in the lateral direction, between the kV x-ray and the MV portal methods. The patient study suggested that the accuracy of the image-guided system in patients was comparable to that in the phantom. The overall uncertainty of the mask system was {+-}4 mm, and the reproducibility was {+-}2.9 mm in terms of 95% CI. The study demonstrated that the image guidance system provides accurate and precise target positioning.

  15. A Pilot Study of Hypofractionated Stereotactic Radiation Therapy and Sunitinib in Previously Irradiated Patients With Recurrent High-Grade Glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Wuthrick, Evan J.; Curran, Walter J.; Camphausen, Kevin; Lin, Alexander; Glass, Jon; Evans, James; Andrews, David W.; Axelrod, Rita; Shi, Wenyin; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Haacke, E. Mark; Hillman, Gilda G.; Dicker, Adam P.

    2014-10-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): Angiogenic blockade with irradiation may enhance the therapeutic ratio of radiation therapy (RT) through vascular normalization. We sought to determine the safety and toxicity profile of continuous daily-dosed sunitinib when combined with hypofractionated stereotactic RT (fSRT) for recurrent high-grade gliomas (rHGG). Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had malignant high-grade glioma that recurred or progressed after primary surgery and RT. All patients received a minimum of a 10-day course of fSRT, had World Health Organization performance status of 0 to 1, and a life expectancy of >3 months. During fSRT, sunitinib was administered at 37.5 mg daily. The primary endpoint was acute toxicity, and response was assessed via serial magnetic resonance imaging. Results: Eleven patients with rHGG were enrolled. The fSRT doses delivered ranged from 30 to 42 Gy in 2.5- to 3.75-Gy fractions. The median follow-up time was 40 months. Common acute toxicities included hematologic disorders, fatigue, hypertension, and elevated liver transaminases. Sunitinib and fSRT were well tolerated. One grade 4 mucositis toxicity occurred, and no grade 4 or 5 hypertensive events or intracerebral hemorrhages occurred. One patient had a nearly complete response, and 4 patients had stable disease for >9 months. Two patients (18%) remain alive and progression-free >3 years from enrollment. The 6-month progression-free survival was 45%. Conclusions: Sunitinib at a daily dose of 37.5 mg given concurrently with hypofractionated stereotactic reirradiation for rHGG yields acceptable toxicities and an encouraging 6-month progression-free survival.

  16. Conformity of LINAC-Based Stereotactic Radiosurgery Using Dynamic Conformal Arcs and Micro-Multileaf Collimator

    SciTech Connect

    Hazard, Lisa J. Wang, Brian; Skidmore, Thomas B.; Chern, Shyh-Shi; Salter, Bill J.; Jensen, Randy L.; Shrieve, Dennis C.

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: To assess the conformity of dynamic conformal arc linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery and to describe a standardized method of isodose surface (IDS) selection. Methods and Materials: In 174 targets, the conformity index (CI) at the prescription IDS used for treatment was calculated as CI = (PIV/PVTV)/(PVTV/TV), where TV is the target volume, PIV (prescription isodose volume) is the total volume encompassed by the prescription IDS, and PVTV is the TV encompassed by the IDS. In addition, a 'standardized' prescription IDS (sIDS) was chosen according to the following criteria: 95% of the TV was encompassed by the PIV and 99% of TV was covered by 95% of the prescription dose. The CIs at the sIDS were also calculated. Results: The median CI at the prescription IDS and sIDS was 1.63 and 1.47, respectively (p < 0.001). In 132 of 174 cases, the volume of normal tissue in the PIV was reduced by the prescription to the sIDS compared with the prescription IDS, in 20 cases it remained unchanged, and in 22 cases it was increased. Conclusion: The CIs obtained with linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery are comparable to those previously reported for gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery. Using a uniform method to select the sIDS, adequate target coverage was usually achievable with prescription to an IDS greater than that chosen by the treating physician (prescription IDS), providing sparing of normal tissue. Thus, the sIDS might aid physicians in identifying a prescription IDS that balances coverage and conformity.

  17. Effect of prophylactic hyperbaric oxygen treatment for radiation-induced brain injury after stereotactic radiosurgery of brain metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Ohguri, Takayuki . E-mail: ogurieye@med.uoeh-u.ac.jp; Imada, Hajime; Kohshi, Kiyotaka; Kakeda, Shingo; Ohnari, Norihiro; Morioka, Tomoaki; Nakano, Keita; Konda, Nobuhide; Korogi, Yukunori

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the prophylactic effect of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy for radiation-induced brain injury in patients with brain metastasis treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: The data of 78 patients presenting with 101 brain metastases treated with SRS between October 1994 and September 2003 were retrospectively analyzed. A total of 32 patients with 47 brain metastases were treated with prophylactic HBO (HBO group), which included all 21 patients who underwent subsequent or prior radiotherapy and 11 patients with common predictors of longer survival, such as inactive extracranial tumors and younger age. The other 46 patients with 54 brain metastases did not undergo HBO (non-HBO group). Radiation-induced brain injuries were divided into two categories, white matter injury (WMI) and radiation necrosis (RN), on the basis of imaging findings. Results: Radiation-induced brain injury occurred in 5 lesions (11%) in the HBO group (2 WMIs and 3 RNs) and in 11 (20%) in the non-HBO group (9 WMIs and 2 RNs). The WMI was less frequent for the HBO group than for the non-HBO group (p = 0.05), although multivariate analysis by logistic regression showed that WMI was not significantly correlated with HBO (p = 0.07). The 1-year actuarial probability of WMI was significantly better for the HBO group (2%) than for the non-HBO group (36%) (p < 0.05). Conclusions: The present study showed a potential value of prophylactic HBO for Radiation-induced WMIs, which justifies further evaluation to confirm its definite benefit.

  18. Stereotactic body radiation therapy for prostate cancer: is the technology ready to be the standard of care?

    PubMed

    Zaorsky, Nicholas G; Studenski, Matthew T; Dicker, Adam P; Gomella, Leonard; Den, Robert B

    2013-05-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most prevalent solid tumor diagnosed in men in the United States and Western Europe. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is touted as a superior type of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) for the treatment of various tumors. SBRT developed from the theory that high doses of radiation from brachytherapy implant seeds could be recapitulated from advanced technology of radiation treatment planning and delivery. Moreover, SBRT has been theorized to be advantageous compared to other RT techniques because it has a treatment course shorter than that of conventionally fractionated EBRT (a single session, five days per week, for about two weeks vs. eight weeks), is non-invasive, is more effective at killing tumor cells, and is less likely to cause damage to normal tissue. In areas of the US and Europe where there is limited access to RT centers, SBRT is frequently being used to treat prostate cancer, even though long-term data about its efficacy and safety are not well established. We review the impetus behind SBRT and the current clinical evidence supporting its use for prostate cancer, thus providing oncologists and primary care physicians with an understanding of the continually evolving field of prostate radiation therapy. Studies of SBRT provide encouraging results of biochemical control and late toxicity. However, they are limited by a number of factors, including short follow-up, exclusion of intermediate- and high-risk patients, and relatively small number of patients treated. Currently, SBRT regimens should only be used in the context of clinical trials.

  19. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Octo- and Nonagenarians for the Treatment of Early-Stage Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Giuliani, Meredith; Hope, Andrew; Guckenberger, Matthias; Mantel, Frederick; Peulen, Heike; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Belderbos, José; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Ye, Hong; Grills, Inga S

    2017-07-15

    To determine the safety and efficacy of lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in octo- and nonagenarians and to compare their outcomes with those of younger patients. Patients with primary lung cancer treated with SBRT were identified from a multi-institutional (5 institutions) database of 1083 cases. Details of patient factors, treatment specifics, toxicity, and clinical outcomes were extracted from the database. All events were calculated from the end of radiation therapy. Estimates of local recurrence, regional recurrence, and distant metastases were calculated using the competing risk method. Cause-specific survival (CSS) and overall survival (OS) were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Outcomes were compared for those aged <70, 70 to 79, and ≥80 years. Univariable and multivariable analyses were performed to determine associations with CSS and OS in patients aged ≥80 years. The median (range) follow-up was 1.7 (1-10) years, and median age was 75 (41-94) years. There were 305 patients aged <70 years (28%), 448 aged 70 to 79 years (41%), and 330 aged ≥80 years (30%). There was no difference in 2-year local recurrence (4.2% vs 5.4% vs 3.7%, respectively, P=.7), regional recurrence (10.4% vs 7.8% vs 5.3%, P=.1), distant metastases (12.2% vs 7.7% vs 9.5%, P=.2), or CSS (90.6% vs 90.3% vs 90.4%, P=.6). Those aged ≥80 years had significantly lower 2-year OS (73.6% vs 67.2% vs 63.3%, P<.01). The grade 3+ pneumonitis rate was 1.3% versus 1.6% versus 1.5% (P=1.0) in patients aged <70, 70 to 79, and ≥80 years, respectively. The 90-day mortality rates for patients aged <70, 70 to 79, and ≥80 years were 1.3%, 2.5%, and 2.4% (P=.01), respectively. In patients aged ≥80 years OS was associated with T category (hazard ratio 1.7; P<.01). Stereotactic body radiation therapy is a safe treatment modality in elderly patients (aged ≥80 years). Despite larger tumor volumes, the tumor control outcomes were comparable to those in younger

  20. SU-E-J-247: Time Evolution of Radiation-Induced Lung Injury After Stereotactic Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Grassberger, C; Sharp, G; Fintelmann, F; Paganetti, H; Willers, H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Quantitative metrics to assess patient-specific radiation-induced lung injury have the potential to guide individualization of therapy and be early indicators of recurrence. Here we investigate computed tomography (CT) density changes in normal lung after stereotactic Proton Therapy. Methods: Participants in a phase-I clinical trial for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) with protons are analyzed on a rolling basis. The dataset includes 9 patients with 34 CT images to date. Follow-up images are registered to the planning CT using deformable image registration and the change in CT density is correlated to the dose to examine the time-evolution of Hounsfield Unit (HU) changes after large doses of proton radiation. Results: The lung density observed on the follow-up images increases significantly with dose for all dose levels above 5 Gy(RBE) (p<0.001) for 8/9 patients. The change per unit dose [HU/Gy] varies significantly among the patients, from 0.1 (for the one patient without significant correlation) to 5.7 ΔHU/Gy(RBE). The current population average of ΔHU/Gy(RBE) is 2.1, i.e. a 1 Gy(RBE) increase in dose leads on average to a 2.1 HU increase in CT density. The slope of the dose-response curve is constant for all timepoints investigated (from 3–24+ months). Additionally a pronounced non-linearity in the dose response curve is noted for long follow-up times (>18 months). Conclusion: CT density changes have a robust correlation with proton dose, quantitatively similar to photon dose, and may allow estimation of a patient’s intrinsic radiosensitivity after proton therapy. The stability of the correlation with time however diverges from what is known about CT response after photon irradiation. This could have important implications for clinical decision-making during proton therapy for lung cancer, especially for scheduling of follow-up CT/PET imaging and diagnosis of recurrence.

  1. The challenge of inoperable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC): results of a single-institutional experience on stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT).

    PubMed

    Scorsetti, Marta; Comito, Tiziana; Cozzi, Luca; Clerici, Elena; Tozzi, Angelo; Franzese, Ciro; Navarria, Pierina; Fogliata, Antonella; Tomatis, Stefano; D'Agostino, Giuseppo; Iftode, Cristina; Mancosu, Pietro; Ceriani, Roberto; Torzilli, Guido

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) unsuitable for standard loco-regional therapies. Patients with 1-3 inoperable HCC lesions with diameter ≤6 cm were treated by SBRT. According to lesions size and liver function, two prescription regimens were adopted: 48-75 Gy in three fractions or 36-60 Gy in six fractions. SBRT was delivered using the volumetric modulated arc therapy technique with flattening filter-free photon beams. The primary end points of this study were in-field local control (LC) and toxicity. Secondary end points were overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). Forty-three patients with 63 HCC lesions were irradiated. All patients had Child-Turcotte-Pugh class A or B disease. Thirty lesions (48%) were treated with 48-75 Gy in three consecutive fractions, and 33 (52%) received 36-60 Gy in six fractions. Median follow-up was 8 months (range 3-43 months). Actuarial LC at 6, 12 and 24 months was 94.2 ± 3.3, 85.8 ± 5.5 and 64.4 ± 11.5%, respectively. A biological equivalent dose (BED) >100 Gy and GTV size were significant prognostic factors for LC in univariate analysis (p < 0.001 and p < 0.02). Median OS was 18.0 ± 5.8 months. Actuarial OS at 6, 12 and 24 months was 91.1 ± 4.9, 77.9 ± 8.2 and 45.3 ± 14.0%, respectively. Univariate analysis showed that OS is correlated with LC (p < 0.04), BED >100 (p < 0.05) and cumulative gross tumor volume GTV <5 cm (p < 0.04). Median PFS was 8 months, with a 1-year PFS rate of 41%. A significant (≥ grade 3) toxicity was observed in seven patients (16%) 2-6 months after the completion of the treatment. No classic radiation-induced liver disease was observed. Stereotactic body radiation therapy is a safe and effective therapeutic option for HCC lesions unsuitable to standard loco-regional therapies, with acceptable local control rates and low treatment-related toxicity. The significant correlation

  2. The Impact of Tumor Size on Outcomes After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Medically Inoperable Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Allibhai, Zishan; Taremi, Mojgan; Bezjak, Andrea; Brade, Anthony; Hope, Andrew J.; Sun, Alexander; Cho, B.C. John

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy for medically inoperable early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) offers excellent control rates. Most published series deal mainly with small (usually <4 cm), peripheral, solitary tumors. Larger tumors are associated with poorer outcomes (ie, lower control rates, higher toxicity) when treated with conventional RT. It is unclear whether SBRT is sufficiently potent to control these larger tumors. We therefore evaluated and examined the influence of tumor size on treatment outcomes after SBRT. Methods and Materials: Between October 2004 and October 2010, 185 medically inoperable patients with early (T1-T2N0M0) NSCLC were treated on a prospective research ethics board-approved single-institution protocol. Prescription doses were risk-adapted based on tumor size and location. Follow-up included prospective assessment of toxicity (as per Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0) and serial computed tomography scans. Patterns of failure, toxicity, and survival outcomes were calculated using Kaplan-Meier method, and the significance of tumor size (diameter, volume) with respect to patient, treatment, and tumor factors was tested. Results: Median follow-up was 15.2 months. Tumor size was not associated with local failure but was associated with regional failure (P=.011) and distant failure (P=.021). Poorer overall survival (P=.001), disease-free survival (P=.001), and cause-specific survival (P=.005) were also significantly associated with tumor size (with tumor volume more significant than diameter). Gross tumor volume and planning target volume were significantly associated with grade 2 or worse radiation pneumonitis. However, overall rates of grade ≥3 pneumonitis were low and not significantly affected by tumor or target size. Conclusions: Currently employed stereotactic body radiation therapy dose regimens can provide safe effective local therapy even for larger solitary NSCLC tumors (up to 5.7 cm

  3. Noncoplanar Beam Angle Class Solutions to Replace Time-Consuming Patient-Specific Beam Angle Optimization in Robotic Prostate Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, Linda Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Aluwini, Shafak; Heijmen, Ben

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate development of a recipe for the creation of a beam angle class solution (CS) for noncoplanar prostate stereotactic body radiation therapy to replace time-consuming individualized beam angle selection (iBAS) without significant loss in plan quality, using the in-house “Erasmus-iCycle” optimizer for fully automated beam profile optimization and iBAS. Methods and Materials: For 30 patients, Erasmus-iCycle was first used to generate 15-, 20-, and 25-beam iBAS plans for a CyberKnife equipped with a multileaf collimator. With these plans, 6 recipes for creation of beam angle CSs were investigated. Plans of 10 patients were used to create CSs based on the recipes, and the other 20 to independently test them. For these tests, Erasmus-iCycle was also used to generate intensity modulated radiation therapy plans for the fixed CS beam setups. Results: Of the tested recipes for CS creation, only 1 resulted in 15-, 20-, and 25-beam noncoplanar CSs without plan deterioration compared with iBAS. For the patient group, mean differences in rectum D{sub 1cc}, V{sub 60GyEq}, V{sub 40GyEq}, and D{sub mean} between 25-beam CS plans and 25-beam plans generated with iBAS were 0.2 ± 0.4 Gy, 0.1% ± 0.2%, 0.2% ± 0.3%, and 0.1 ± 0.2 Gy, respectively. Differences between 15- and 20-beam CS and iBAS plans were also negligible. Plan quality for CS plans relative to iBAS plans was also preserved when narrower planning target volume margins were arranged and when planning target volume dose inhomogeneity was decreased. Using a CS instead of iBAS reduced the computation time by a factor of 14 to 25, mainly depending on beam number, without loss in plan quality. Conclusions: A recipe for creation of robust beam angle CSs for robotic prostate stereotactic body radiation therapy has been developed. Compared with iBAS, computation times decreased by a factor 14 to 25. The use of a CS may avoid long planning times without losses in plan quality.

  4. Brain mapping in stereotactic surgery: a brief overview from the probabilistic targeting to the patient-based anatomic mapping.

    PubMed

    Lemaire, Jean-Jacques; Coste, Jérôme; Ouchchane, Lemlih; Caire, François; Nuti, Christophe; Derost, Philippe; Cristini, Vittorio; Gabrillargues, Jean; Hemm, Simone; Durif, Franck; Chazal, Jean

    2007-01-01

    In this article, we briefly review the concept of brain mapping in stereotactic surgery taking into account recent advances in stereotactic imaging. The gold standard continues to rely on probabilistic and indirect targeting, relative to a stereotactic reference, i.e., mostly the anterior (AC) and the posterior (PC) commissures. The theoretical position of a target defined on an atlas is transposed into the stereotactic space of a patient's brain; final positioning depends on electrophysiological analysis. The method is also used to analyze final electrode or lesion position for a patient or group of patients, by projection on an atlas. Limitations are precision of definition of the AC-PC line, probabilistic location and reliability of the electrophysiological guidance. Advances in MR imaging, as from 1.5-T machines, make stereotactic references no longer mandatory and allow an anatomic mapping based on an individual patient's brain. Direct targeting is enabled by high-quality images, an advanced anatomic knowledge and dedicated surgical software. Labeling associated with manual segmentation can help for the position analysis along non-conventional, interpolated planes. Analysis of final electrode or lesion position, for a patient or group of patients, could benefit from the concept of membership, the attribution of a weighted membership degree to a contact or a structure according to its level of involvement. In the future, more powerful MRI machines, diffusion tensor imaging, tractography and computational modeling will further the understanding of anatomy and deep brain stimulation effects.

  5. Frame-Based Stereotactic Biopsy of Canine Brain Masses: Technique and Clinical Results in 26 Cases.

    PubMed

    Rossmeisl, John Henry; Andriani, Rudy T; Cecere, Thomas E; Lahmers, Kevin; LeRoith, Tanya; Zimmerman, Kurt L; Gibo, Denise; Debinski, Waldemar

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the methodology, diagnostic yield, and adverse events (AE) associated with frame-based stereotactic brain biopsies (FBSB) obtained from 26 dogs with solitary forebrain lesions. Medical records were reviewed from dogs that underwent FBSB using two stereotactic headframes designed for use in small animals and compatible with computed tomographic (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Stereotactic plans were generated from MR and CT images using commercial software, and FBSB performed both with (14/26) and without intraoperative image guidance. Records were reviewed for diagnostic yield, defined as the proportion of biopsies producing a specific neuropathological diagnosis, AE associated with FBSB, and risk factors for the development of AE. Postprocedural AE were evaluated in 19/26 dogs that did not proceed to a therapeutic intervention immediately following biopsy. Biopsy targets included intra-axial telencephalic masses (24/26), one intra-axial diencephalic mass, and one extra-axial parasellar mass. The median target volume was 1.99 cm(3). No differences in patient, lesion, or outcome variables were observed between the two headframe systems used or between FBSB performed with or without intraoperative CT guidance. The diagnostic yield of FBSB was 94.6%. Needle placement error was a significant risk factor associated with procurement of non-diagnostic biopsy specimens. Gliomas were diagnosed in 24/26 dogs, and meningioma and granulomatous meningoencephalitis in 1 dog each. AE directly related to FBSB were observed in a total of 7/26 (27%) of dogs. Biopsy-associated clinical morbidity, manifesting as seizures and transient neurological deterioration, occurred in 3/19 (16%) of dogs. The case fatality rate was 5.2% (1/19 dogs), with death attributable to intracranial hemorrhage. FBSB using the described apparatus was relatively safe and effective at providing neuropathological diagnoses in dogs with focal forebrain lesions.

  6. Frame-Based Stereotactic Biopsy of Canine Brain Masses: Technique and Clinical Results in 26 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Rossmeisl, John Henry; Andriani, Rudy T.; Cecere, Thomas E.; Lahmers, Kevin; LeRoith, Tanya; Zimmerman, Kurt L.; Gibo, Denise; Debinski, Waldemar

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the methodology, diagnostic yield, and adverse events (AE) associated with frame-based stereotactic brain biopsies (FBSB) obtained from 26 dogs with solitary forebrain lesions. Medical records were reviewed from dogs that underwent FBSB using two stereotactic headframes designed for use in small animals and compatible with computed tomographic (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Stereotactic plans were generated from MR and CT images using commercial software, and FBSB performed both with (14/26) and without intraoperative image guidance. Records were reviewed for diagnostic yield, defined as the proportion of biopsies producing a specific neuropathological diagnosis, AE associated with FBSB, and risk factors for the development of AE. Postprocedural AE were evaluated in 19/26 dogs that did not proceed to a therapeutic intervention immediately following biopsy. Biopsy targets included intra-axial telencephalic masses (24/26), one intra-axial diencephalic mass, and one extra-axial parasellar mass. The median target volume was 1.99 cm3. No differences in patient, lesion, or outcome variables were observed between the two headframe systems used or between FBSB performed with or without intraoperative CT guidance. The diagnostic yield of FBSB was 94.6%. Needle placement error was a significant risk factor associated with procurement of non-diagnostic biopsy specimens. Gliomas were diagnosed in 24/26 dogs, and meningioma and granulomatous meningoencephalitis in 1 dog each. AE directly related to FBSB were observed in a total of 7/26 (27%) of dogs. Biopsy-associated clinical morbidity, manifesting as seizures and transient neurological deterioration, occurred in 3/19 (16%) of dogs. The case fatality rate was 5.2% (1/19 dogs), with death attributable to intracranial hemorrhage. FBSB using the described apparatus was relatively safe and effective at providing neuropathological diagnoses in dogs with focal forebrain lesions. PMID:26664949

  7. A dosimetric and treatment efficiency evaluation of stereotactic body radiation therapy for peripheral lung cancer using flattening filter free beams

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Dan-Li; Ma, Chang-chun; Peng, Xun; Lin, Zhi-Xiong

    2016-01-01

    To investigate potential dosimetric benefits and treatment efficiency of dynamic conformal arc therapy (DCA), intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and double partial arcs Rapidarc (RA) techniques in the treatment of early-stage peripheral lung cancer using stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) with flattening filter free (FFF) beams. Twenty early-stage peripheral lung cancer patients were selected. For each patient, DCA, IMRT and RA plans were created to meet Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0915 objectives with 48 Gy covering 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) in 4 fractions. PTV coverage, organs at risk (OARs) doses, planning time, monitor units (MU) and treatment time were evaluated. RA was significantly better than DCA for PTV coverage. RA provided a lower V32Gy to chest wall and less V20Gy to lung over those of DCA and IMRT. For other OARs, there is no significant difference among all three techniques. DCA plans showed significantly less planning time, shorter treatment time and lower MU number than those of RA and IMRT. RA provides a superior dosimetric benefit to DCA and IMRT in the treatment of early-stage lung cancer using SBRT with FFF beams. Considering the MU number, planning time and treatment efficiency, DCA technique is an effective treatment strategy. PMID:27655715

  8. Electromagnetic navigational bronchoscopy-guided fiducial markers for lung stereotactic body radiation therapy: analysis of safety, feasibility, and interfraction stability.

    PubMed

    Nabavizadeh, Nima; Zhang, Junan; Elliott, David A; Tanyi, James A; Thomas, Charles R; Fuss, Martin; Deffebach, Mark

    2014-04-01

    Embolization coils as fiducial markers for pulmonary stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) are perceived to be the optimal marker type, given their ability to conform and anchor within the small airways. The aim of our study was to assess retention, placement, migration, feasibility, and safety of electromagnetic navigational bronchoscopy (ENB)-guided embolization coil markers throughout courses of SBRT. Thirty-one patients with 34 nodules underwent ENB-guided fiducial placement of several 4 mm fibered platinum embolization coils before SBRT. Patient and nodule positioning was confirmed with daily pretreatment cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Fiducial positional characteristics were analyzed utilizing radiation treatment-planning software comparing the simulation CT with daily CBCTs. Of 105 fiducials placed, 103 were identifiable on simulation CT (retention rate: 98.1%). Incidence of asymptomatic pneumothoraces was 6%. One patient experienced hemoptysis requiring hospitalization. Eighty-six percent of fiducials were placed within 1 cm of the nodule, with 52% of fiducials placed directly on the nodule surface. Throughout a 5-fraction SBRT course, fiducial displacement was <7, 5, and 2 mm in 98%, 96%, and 67% of pretreatment CBCTs. ENB placement of embolization coils as fiducials for lung SBRT image guidance is associated with a low rate of iatrogenic pneumothoraces, and resulted in reliable placement of the fiducials in close proximity to the lung nodule. Embolization coils retained their relative position to the nodule throughout the course of SBRT, and provide an excellent alternative to linear gold seeds.

  9. Development of collimator insert for linac based stereotactic irradiation.

    PubMed

    Singh, I R; Brindha, S; Ravindran, B P; John, S; Rajshekhar, V; Rangad, F V; Roul, R K

    1999-10-01

    The aim of this study is to develop collimator inserts of various sizes which are either not commercially available or are expensive to import. The dosimetry parameters such as tissue maximum ratio (TMR), off-axis ratio (OAR) and output factor of the developed collimator insert are compared with that of the commercial collimator insert (Radionics). In order to check the suitability of the collimator insert developed locally for clinical use and to standardize the method of development, a collimator insert of 15 mm identical to the one supplied by Radionics is developed with low-melting alloy (Cerrobend). Moreover for the clinical use of the developed collimator insert, certain acceptance tests are performed which include a collimator concentricity test, beam size check and radiation leakage test. The dose verification is carried out with a thermoluminescent dosimeter (7LiF rods) and an FBX chemical dosimeter in a human-head-shaped Perspex phantom filled with water. The variation between the calculated and measured dose is found to be within +2.4% for 7LiF rods and -2.0% for the FBX chemical dosimeter thus ensuring the suitability of the developed collimator insert for clinical use. This has encouraged us to standardize the method adapted to develop the collimator insert and to develop collimator inserts of different field sizes.

  10. Results of linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery for recurrent and newly diagnosed acoustic neuromas.

    PubMed

    Suh, J H; Barnett, G H; Sohn, J W; Kupelian, P A; Cohen, B H

    2000-06-20

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is used to treat acoustic neuromas, but additional information is needed to firmly establish its safety and efficacy. We review our experience over 7 years treating 29 consecutive patients with a modified linear accelerator (linac) SRS system. Between August 1989 and October 1995, 29 patients with a median age of 67 years (range 26 to 83) underwent linac SRS treatment. Twenty-five patients had unilateral acoustic neuromas, and four patients with neurofibromatosis type II had bilateral vestibular schwannoma. Eligibility criteria for SRS were recurrent tumors (n = 9), age >65 (n = 16), or patient preference (n = 6). Follow-up magnetic resonance imaging scans were performed on all patients. The most common presenting symptoms were hearing impairment (18 patients) and gait difficulties (17 patients). Ten patients were deaf in the affected ear prior to treatment. Doses to the periphery of the tumor ranged from 800 to 2,400 cGy (median 1, 600 cGy) prescribed to the 50% to 80% isodose line (median 80%). After a median radiographic follow-up of 49 months (range 4 to 110 months), 11 tumors were smaller, 17 were stable, and one had evidence of progression (at 41 months). The 5-year local disease control rate (Kaplan-Meier estimate) was 94%. Acute complications were minimal, with only two patients experiencing nausea and vomiting after the procedure. Long-term complications included new or progressive trigeminal and facial nerve deficits with estimated 5-year incidences of 15% and 32%, respectively. Subjective hearing reduction or loss occurred in 14 (74%) of the 19 patients who had useful hearing prior to treatment. Five patients died from unrelated causes. These results suggest that linac SRS provides excellent short-term tumor control rates. Since there was a high risk of cranial nerve neuropathy, we do not recommend using only computed tomography-based planning and high prescription doses. Int. J. Cancer (Radiat. Oncol. Invest.) 90, 145

  11. Survey of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Japan by the Japan 3-D Conformal External Beam Radiotherapy Group

    SciTech Connect

    Nagata, Yasushi Hiraoka, Masahiro; Mizowaki, Takashi; Narita, Yuichiro; Matsuo, Yukinori; Norihisa, Yoshiki; Onishi, Hiroshi; Shirato, Hiroki

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To recognize the current status of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in Japan, using a nationwide survey conducted by the Japan 3-D Conformal External Beam Radiotherapy Group. Methods and Materials: The questionnaire was sent by mail to 117 institutions. Ninety-four institutions (80%) responded by the end of November 2005. Fifty-three institutions indicated that they have already started SBRT, and 38 institutions had been reimbursed by insurance. Results: A total of 1111 patients with histologically confirmed lung cancer were treated. Among these patients, 637 had T1N0M0 and 272 had T2N0M0 lung cancer. Metastatic lung cancer was found in 702 and histologically unconfirmed lung tumor in 291 patients. Primary liver cancer was found in 207 and metastatic liver cancer in 76 patients. The most frequent schedule used for primary lung cancer was 48Gy in 4 fractions at 22 institutions (52%), followed by 50Gy in 5 fractions at 11 institutions (26%) and 60Gy in 8 fractions at 4 institutions (10%). The tendency was the same for metastatic lung cancer. The average number of personnel involved in SBRT was 1.8 radiation oncologists, including 1.1 certified radiation oncologists, 2.8 technologists, 0.7 nurses, and 0.6 certified quality assurance personnel and 0.3 physicists. The most frequent amount of time for treatment planning was 61-120min, for quality assurance was 50-60min, and for treatment was 30min. There were 14 (0.6% of all cases) reported Grade 5 complications: 11 cases of radiation pneumonitis, 2 cases of hemoptysis, and 1 case of radiation esophagitis. Conclusion: The current status of SBRT in Japan was surveyed.

  12. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Can Be Used Safely to Boost Residual Disease in Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Prospective Study

    SciTech Connect

    Feddock, Jonathan; Arnold, Susanne M.; Shelton, Brent J.; Sinha, Partha; Conrad, Gary; Chen, Li; Rinehart, John; McGarry, Ronald C.

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To report the results of a prospective, single-institution study evaluating the feasibility of conventional chemoradiation (CRT) followed by stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) as a means of dose escalation for patients with stage II-III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with residual disease. Methods and Materials: Patients without metastatic disease and with radiologic evidence of limited residual disease (≤5 cm) within the site of the primary tumor and good or complete nodal responses after standard CRT to a target dose of 60 Gy were considered eligible. The SBRT boost was done to achieve a total combined dose biological equivalent dose >100 Gy to the residual primary tumor, consisting of 10 Gy × 2 fractions (20 Gy total) for peripheral tumors, and 6.5 Gy × 3 fractions (19.5 Gy total) for medial tumors using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 0813 definitions. The primary endpoint was the development of grade ≥3 radiation pneumonitis (RP). Results: After a median follow-up of 13 months, 4 patients developed acute grade 3 RP, and 1 (2.9%) developed late and persistent grade 3 RP. No patients developed grade 4 or 5 RP. Mean lung dose, V2.5, V5, V10, and V20 values were calculated for the SBRT boost, and none were found to significantly predict for RP. Only advancing age (P=.0147), previous smoking status (P=.0505), and high CRT mean lung dose (P=.0295) were significantly associated with RP development. At the time of analysis, the actuarial local control rate at the primary tumor site was 82.9%, with only 6 patients demonstrating recurrence. Conclusions: Linear accelerator-based SBRT for dose escalation of limited residual NSCLC after definitive CRT was feasible and did not increase the risk for toxicity above that for standard radiation therapy.

  13. Anti-PD-1 Blockade and Stereotactic Radiation Produce Long-Term Survival in Mice With Intracranial Gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Jing; See, Alfred P.; Phallen, Jillian; Jackson, Christopher M.; Belcaid, Zineb; Ruzevick, Jacob; Durham, Nicholas; Meyer, Christian; Harris, Timothy J.; Albesiano, Emilia; Pradilla, Gustavo; Ford, Eric; Wong, John; Hammers, Hans-Joerg; Mathios, Dimitris; Tyler, Betty; Brem, Henry; Tran, Phuoc T.; Pardoll, Drew; Drake, Charles G.; and others

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumor in adults, and radiation is one of the main treatment modalities. However, cure rates remain low despite best available therapies. Immunotherapy is a promising modality that could work synergistically with radiation, which has been shown to increase antigen presentation and promote a proinflammatory tumor microenvironment. Programmed-death-1 (PD-1) is a surface receptor expressed on activated and exhausted T cells, which mediate T cell inhibition upon binding with its ligand PD-L1, expressed on many tumor types including human GBMs. We tested the combination of anti-PD-1 immunotherapy with stereotactic radiosurgery in a mouse orthotopic GBM model. Methods and Materials: We performed intracranial implantation of mouse glioma cell line GL261 transfected with luciferase into C57BL/6 mice. Mice were stratified into 4 treatment groups: (1) control; (2) radiation only; (3) anti-PD-1 antibody only; and (4) radiation plus anti-PD-1 antibody. Overall survival was quantified. The mice were killed on day 21 after implantation to assess immunologic parameters in the brain/tumor, cervical lymph nodes, and spleen. Results: Improved survival was demonstrated with combination anti-PD-1 therapy plus radiation compared with either modality alone: median survival was 25 days in the control arm, 27 days in the anti-PD-1 antibody arm, 28 days in the radiation arm, and 53 days in the radiation plus anti-PD-1 therapy arm (P<.05 by log-rank Mantle-Cox). Long-term survival was seen only in the combined treatment arm, with a fraction (15%-40%) of animals alive at day 180+ after treatment. Immunologic data on day 21 after implantation showed increased tumor infiltration by cytotoxic T cells (CD8+/interferon-γ+/tumor necrosis factor-α+) and decreased regulatory T cells (CD4+/FOXP3) in the combined treatment group compared with the single modality arms. Conclusions: The combination of PD-1 blockade and localized

  14. Dosimetric impact of a frame-based strategy in stereotactic radiotherapy of lung tumors.

    PubMed

    Waldeland, Einar; Ramberg, Christina; Arnesen, Marius Røthe; Helland, Aslaug; Brustugun, Odd Terje; Malinen, Eirik

    2012-05-01

    Technological innovations have taken stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) from frame-based strategies to image-guided strategies. In this study, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images acquired prior to SBRT of patients with lung tumors was used to study the dosimetric impact of a pure frame-based strategy. Thirty patients with inoperable lung tumors were retrospectively analyzed. All patients had received CBCT-guided SBRT with 3 fractions of 15 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV) margin including immobilization in a stereotactic body frame (SBF). Using the set-up corrections from the co-registration of the CBCT with the planning CT, all individual dose plans were recalculated with an isocenter position equal to the initial set-up position. Dose Volume Histogram (DVH) parameters of the recalculated dose plans were then analyzed. The simulated plans showed that 88% of all fractions resulted in minimum 14.5 Gy to the internal target volume (ITV). For the simulated summed treatment (3 fractions per patient), 83% of the patients would minimum receive the prescription dose (45 Gy) to 100% of the ITV and all except one would receive the prescription dose to more than 90% of the ITV. SBRT including SBF, but without image guidance, results in appropriate dose coverage in most cases, using the current margins. With image guidance, margins for SBRT of lung tumors could possibly be reduced.

  15. Potentials and Limitations of Guiding Liver Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Set-Up on Liver-Implanted Fiducial Markers

    SciTech Connect

    Wunderink, Wouter; Mendez Romero, Alejandra; Seppenwoolde, Yvette; Boer, Hans de; Levendag, Peter; Heijmen, Ben

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: We investigated the potentials and limitations of guiding liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) set-up on liver-implanted fiducial markers. Methods and Materials: Twelve patients undergoing compression-supported SBRT in a stereotactic body frame received fluoroscopy at treatment preparation and before each treatment fraction. In fluoroscopic videos we localized the markers and diaphragm tip at expiration and the spine (measurements on free-breathing and abdominal compression). Day-to-day displacements, rotations (markers only), and deformations were determined. Marker guidance was compared to conventional set-up strategies in treatment set-up simulations. Results: For compression, day-to-day motion of markers with respect to their centers of mass (COM) was {sigma} = 0.9 mm (random error SD), {Sigma} = 0.4 mm (systematic error SD), and <2.1 mm (maximum). Consequently, assuming that markers were closely surrounding spherical tumors, marker COM-guided set-up would have required safety margins of {approx}2 mm. Using marker COM as the gold standard, other set-up methods (using no correction, spine registration, and diaphragm tip craniocaudal registration) resulted in set-up errors of 1.4 mm < {sigma} < 2.8 mm, 2.6 mm < {Sigma} < 5.1 mm, and 6.3 mm < max < 12.4 mm. Day-to-day intermarker motion of <16.7%, 2.2% median, and rotations between 3.5{sup o} and 7.2{sup o} were observed. For markers not surrounding the tumor, e.g., 5 cm between respective COMs, these changes could effect residual tumor set-up errors up to 8.4 mm, 1.1 mm median (deformations), and 3.1 mm to 6.3 mm (rotations). Compression did not systematically contribute to deformations and rotations, since similar results were observed for free-breathing. Conclusions: If markers can be implanted near and around the tumor, residual set-up errors by marker guidance are small compared to those of conventional set-up methods, allowing high-precision tumor radiation set-up. However, substantial

  16. Prospective Longitudinal Assessment of Quality of Life for Liver Cancer Patients Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Jonathan; Dawson, Laura A.; Jiang, Haiyan; Kim, John; Dinniwell, Rob; Brierley, James; Wong, Rebecca; Lockwood, Gina; Ringash, Jolie

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate quality of life (QoL), an important outcome owing to poor long-term survival, after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) to the liver. Methods and Materials: Patients (n=222) with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), liver metastases, or intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and Child-Pugh A liver function received 24-60 Gy of 6-fraction image-guided SBRT. Prospective QoL assessment was completed with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Core-30 (QLQ-C30) and/or Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Hepatobiliary (FACT-Hep, version 4) questionnaires at baseline and 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after treatment. Ten HCC patients with Child-Pugh B liver function were also treated. Results: The QLQ-C30 was available for 205 patients, and 196 completed the FACT-Hep. No difference in baseline QoL (P=.17) or overall survival (P=.088) was seen between the HCC, liver metastases, and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma patients. Appetite loss and fatigue measured by the QLQ-C30 clinically and statistically worsened by 1 month after treatment but recovered by 3 months. At 3 and 12 months after treatment, respectively, the FACT-Hep score had improved relative to baseline in 13%/19%, worsened in 36%/27%, and remained stable in 51%/54%. Using the QLQ-C30 Global Health score, QoL improved in 16%/23%, worsened in 34%/39%, and remained stable in 50%/38% at 3 and 12 months, respectively. Median survival was 17.0 months (95% confidence interval [CI] 12.3-19.8 months). Higher baseline scores on both FACT-Hep and QLQ-C30 Global Health were associated with improved survival. Hazard ratios for death, per 10-unit decrease in QoL, were 0.90 (95% CI 0.83-0.98; P=.001) and 0.88 (95% CI 0.82-0.95; P=.001), respectively. Tumor size was inversely correlated with survival. Conclusions: Liver SBRT temporarily worsens appetite and fatigue, but not overall QoL. Stereotactic body radiation therapy is well tolerated and warrants

  17. Stereoelectroencephalography based on the Leksell stereotactic frame and Neurotech operation planning software.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guangming; Chen, Guoqiang; Meng, Dawei; Liu, Yanwu; Chen, Jianwei; Shu, Lanmei; Liu, Wenbo

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to introduce a new stereoelectroencephalography (SEEG) system based on Leksell stereotactic frame (L-SEEG) as well as Neurotech operation planning software, and to investigate its safety, applicability, and reliability.L-SEEG, without the help of navigation, includes SEEG operation planning software (Neurotech), Leksell stereotactic frame, and corresponding surgical instruments. Neurotech operation planning software can be used to display three-dimensional images of the cortex and cortical vessels and to plan the intracranial electrode implantation. In 44 refractory epilepsy patients, 364 intracranial electrodes were implanted through the L-SEEG system, and the postoperative complications such as bleeding, cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) leakage, infection, and electrode-related problems were also investigated.All electrodes were implanted accurately as preoperatively planned shown by postoperative lamina computed tomography and preoperative lamina magnetic resonance imaging. There was no severe complication after intracranial electrode implantation through the L-SEEG system. There were no electrode-related problems, no CSF leakage and no infection after surgery. All the patients recovered favorably after SEEG electrode implantation, and only 1 patient had asymptomatic frontal lateral ventricle hematoma (3 mL).The L-SEEG system with Neurotech operation planning software can be used for safe, accurate, and reliable intracranial electrode implantation for SEEG.

  18. Curative-intent stereotactic body radiation therapy for residual breast cancer liver metastasis after systemic chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kagara, Naofumi; Nakano, Yoshiaki; Watanabe, Ami; Inatome, Junichi; Nakamura, Hidetoshi; Kim, Chiwan; Danno, Katsuki; Taniguchi, Hirokazu; Kanoh, Toshiyuki; Kimura, Yutaka; Ohnishi, Tadashi; Tono, Takeshi; Monden, Takushi; Imaoka, Shingi; Kagawa, Kazufumi

    2014-11-01

    Liver metastases from breast cancer are generally treated with systemic therapy such as chemotherapy or hormonotherapy. However, local treatment options such as resection, radiofrequency ablation (RFA), and radiotherapy can also be considered to treat oligometastases. We report the case of a 45-year-old female treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) after chemotherapy against a solitary liver metastasis from primary breast cancer. A liver metastasis with diameter of 35 mm developed 3.5 years after surgery for primary breast cancer in 2004. Fourteen courses of triweekly docetaxel treatments considerably decreased the metastatic lesion, but there still remained a tiny lesion radiographically. Chemotherapy was stopped because of the side-effects of docetaxel, and then SBRT was selected for additional treatment, aiming at complete cure of metastasis. X-ray irradiation (52.8 Gy/4 fractions) was applied to the remaining metastatic lesion, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed no evidence of residual tumor 4 months after irradiation. Neither regrowth nor recurrences have been found until now, 24 months after SBRT. SBRT for oligometastases of breast cancer may be one of the possible curative-intent options, being less invasive than surgical resection or RFA.

  19. MO-G-BRE-09: Validating FMEA Against Incident Learning Data: A Study in Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, F; Cao, N; Young, L; Howard, J; Sponseller, P; Logan, W; Arbuckle, T; Korssjoen, T; Meyer, J; Ford, E

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Though FMEA (Failure Mode and Effects Analysis) is becoming more widely adopted for risk assessment in radiation therapy, to our knowledge it has never been validated against actual incident learning data. The objective of this study was to perform an FMEA analysis of an SBRT (Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy) treatment planning process and validate this against data recorded within an incident learning system. Methods: FMEA on the SBRT treatment planning process was carried out by a multidisciplinary group including radiation oncologists, medical physicists, and dosimetrists. Potential failure modes were identified through a systematic review of the workflow process. Failure modes were rated for severity, occurrence, and detectability on a scale of 1 to 10 and RPN (Risk Priority Number) was computed. Failure modes were then compared with historical reports identified as relevant to SBRT planning within a departmental incident learning system that had been active for two years. Differences were identified. Results: FMEA identified 63 failure modes. RPN values for the top 25% of failure modes ranged from 60 to 336. Analysis of the incident learning database identified 33 reported near-miss events related to SBRT planning. FMEA failed to anticipate 13 of these events, among which 3 were registered with severity ratings of severe or critical in the incident learning system. Combining both methods yielded a total of 76 failure modes, and when scored for RPN the 13 events missed by FMEA ranked within the middle half of all failure modes. Conclusion: FMEA, though valuable, is subject to certain limitations, among them the limited ability to anticipate all potential errors for a given process. This FMEA exercise failed to identify a significant number of possible errors (17%). Integration of FMEA with retrospective incident data may be able to render an improved overview of risks within a process.

  20. Long-Term Outcomes of Fractionated Stereotactic Radiation Therapy for Pituitary Adenomas at the BC Cancer Agency

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Julian O.; Ma, Roy; Akagami, Ryojo; McKenzie, Michael; Johnson, Michelle; Gete, Ermias; Nichol, Alan

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To assess the long-term disease control and toxicity outcomes of fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (FSRT) in patients with pituitary adenomas treated at the BC Cancer Agency. Methods and Materials: To ensure a minimum of 5 years of clinical follow-up, this study identified a cohort of 76 patients treated consecutively with FSRT between 1998 and 2007 for pituitary adenomas: 71% (54/76) had nonfunctioning and 29% (22/76) had functioning adenomas (15 adrenocorticotrophic hormone-secreting, 5 growth hormone-secreting, and 2 prolactin-secreting). Surgery was used before FSRT in 96% (73/76) of patients. A median isocenter dose of 50.4 Gy was delivered in 28 fractions, with 100% of the planning target volume covered by the 90% isodose. Patients were followed up clinically by endocrinologists, ophthalmologists, and radiation oncologists. Serial magnetic resonance imaging was used to assess tumor response. Results: With a median follow-up time of 6.8 years (range, 0.6 - 13.1 years), the 7-year progression-free survival was 97.1% and disease-specific survival was 100%. Of the 2 patients with tumor progression, both had disease control after salvage surgery. Of the 22 patients with functioning adenomas, 50% (11/22) had complete and 9% (2/22) had partial responses after FSRT. Of the patients with normal pituitary function at baseline, 48% (14/29) experienced 1 or more hormone deficiencies after FSRT. Although 79% (60/76) of optic chiasms were at least partially within the planning target volumes, no patient experienced radiation-induced optic neuropathy. No patient experienced radionecrosis. No secondary malignancy occurred during follow-up. Conclusion: In this study of long-term follow-up of patients treated for pituitary adenomas, FSRT was safe and effective.

  1. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Re-irradiation of Persistent or Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Trovo, Marco; Minatel, Emilio; Durofil, Elena; Polesel, Jerry; Avanzo, Michele; Baresic, Tania; Bearz, Alessandra; Del Conte, Alessandro; Franchin, Giovanni; Gobitti, Carlo; Rumeileh, Imad Abu; Trovo, Mauro G.

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively assess toxicity and outcome of re-irradiation with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in patients with recurrent or persistent non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), who were previously treated with radical radiation therapy (50-60 Gy). The secondary endpoint was to investigate whether there are dosimetric parameter predictors of severe radiation toxicity. Methods and Materials: The analysis was conducted in 17 patients with “in-field” recurrent/persistent centrally located NSCLC, who underwent re-irradiation with SBRT. SBRT consisted of 30 Gy in 5 to 6 fractions; these prescriptions would be equivalent for the tumor to 37.5 to 40 Gy, bringing the total 2-Gy-per-fraction cumulative dose to 87 to 100 Gy, considering the primary radiation therapy treatment. Actuarial analyses and survival were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method, and P values were estimated by the log-rank test, starting from the date of completion of SBRT. Dosimetric parameters from the subgroups with and without grade ≥3 pulmonary toxicity were compared using a 2-tailed Student t test. Results: The median follow-up was 18 months (range, 4-57 months). Only 2 patients had local failure, corresponding to a local control rate of 86% at 1 year. The Kaplan-Meier estimates of overall survival (OS) rates at 1 and 2 years were 59% and 29%, respectively; the median OS was 19 months. Four patients (23%) experienced grade 3 radiation pneumonitis, and 1 patient developed fatal pneumonitis. One patient died of fatal hemoptysis 2 months after the completion of SBRT. Unexpectedly, heart maximum dose, D5 (minimum dose to at least 5% of the heart volume), and D10 were correlated with risk of radiation pneumonitis (P<.05). Conclusions: Re-irradiation with SBRT for recurrent/persistent centrally located NSCLC achieves excellent results in terms of local control. However, the high rate of severe toxicity reported in our study is of concern.

  2. Radiation injury of the lung after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung cancer: a timeline and pattern of CT changes.

    PubMed

    Linda, Anna; Trovo, Marco; Bradley, Jeffrey D

    2011-07-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is a new radiotherapy treatment method that has been applied to the treatment of Stage I lung cancers in medically inoperable patients, with excellent clinical results. SBRT allows the delivery of a very high radiation dose to the target volume, while minimizing the dose to the adjacent normal tissues. As a consequence, CT findings after SBRT have different appearance, geographic extent and progression timeline compared to those following conventional radiation therapy for lung cancer. In particular, SBRT-induced changes are limited to the "shell" of normal tissue outside the tumor and have a complex shape. When SBRT-induced CT changes have a consolidation/mass-like appearance, the differentiation from tumor recurrence can be very difficult. An understanding of SBRT technique as it relates to the development of SBRT-induced lung injury and familiarity with the full spectrum of CT manifestations are important to facilitate diagnosis and management of lung cancer patients treated with this newly emerging radiotherapy method.

  3. Development of patient-specific phantoms for verification of stereotactic body radiation therapy planning in patients with metallic screw fixation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Dongryul; Hong, Chae-Seon; Ju, Sang Gyu; Kim, Minkyu; Koo, Bum Yong; Choi, Sungback; Park, Hee Chul; Choi, Doo Ho; Pyo, Hongryull

    2017-01-01

    A new technique for manufacturing a patient-specific dosimetric phantom using three-dimensional printing (PSDP_3DP) was developed, and its geometrical and dosimetric accuracy was analyzed. External body contours and structures of the spine and metallic fixation screws (MFS) were delineated from CT images of a patient with MFS who underwent stereotactic body radiation therapy for spine metastasis. Contours were converted into a STereoLithography file format using in-house program. A hollow, four-section PSDP was designed and manufactured using three types of 3DP to allow filling with a muscle-equivalent liquid and insertion of dosimeters. To evaluate the geometrical accuracy of PSDP_3DP, CT images were obtained and compared with patient CT data for volume, mean density, and Dice similarity coefficient for contours. The dose distribution in the PSDP_3DP was calculated by applying the same beam parameters as for the patient, and the dosimetric characteristics of the PSDP_3DP were compared with the patient plan. The registered CT of the PSDP_3DP was well matched with that of the real patient CT in the axial, coronal, and sagittal planes. The physical accuracy and dosimetric characteristics of PSDP_3DP were comparable to those of a real patient. The ability to manufacture a PSDP representing an extreme patient condition was demonstrated.

  4. Application of modified dynamic conformal arc (MDCA) technique on liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) planning following RTOG 0438 guideline

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Chengyu Chen, Yong; Fang, Deborah; Iannuzzi, Christopher

    2015-04-01

    Liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is a feasible treatment method for the nonoperable, patient with early-stage liver cancer. Treatment planning for the SBRT is very important and has to consider the simulation accuracy, planning time, treatment efficiency effects etc. The modified dynamic conformal arc (MDCA) technique is a 3-dimensional conformal arc planning method, which has been proposed for liver SBRT planning at our center. In this study, we compared the MDCA technique with the RapidArc technique in terms of planning target volume (PTV) coverage and sparing of organs at risk (OARs). The results show that the MDCA technique has comparable plan quality to RapidArc considering PTV coverage, hot spots, heterogeneity index, and effective liver volume. For the 5 PTVs studied among 4 patients, the MDCA plan, when compared with the RapidArc plan, showed 9% more hot spots, more heterogeneity effect, more sparing of OARs, and lower liver effective volume. The monitor unit (MU) number for the MDCA plan is much lower than for the RapidArc plans. The MDCA plan has the advantages of less planning time, no-collision treatment, and a lower MU number.

  5. Radiological changes on CT after stereotactic body radiation therapy to non-spine bone metastases: a descriptive series.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Nicholas; Probyn, Linda; Raman, Srinivas; McDonald, Rachel; Poon, Ian; Erler, Darby; Brotherston, Drew; Soliman, Hany; Cheung, Patrick; Chung, Hans; Chu, William; Loblaw, Andrew; Thavarajah, Nemica; Lang, Catherine; Chin, Lee; Chow, Edward; Sahgal, Arjun

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has become increasingly used for the management of non-spine bone metastases. Few studies have examined the radiological changes in bone metastases after treatment with SBRT and there is no consensus about what constitutes radiologic response to therapy. This article describes various changes on CT after SBRT to non-spine bone metastases in eight selected cases. A retrospective review was conducted for patients treated with SBRT to non-spine bone metastases between November 2011 and April 2014 at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre. A musculoskeletal radiologist identified eight illustrative cases of interest and provided a description of the findings. Different radiological changes following SBRT were described, including: remineralization of lytic bone metastases, demineralization of sclerotic bone metastases, pathologic fracture, size progression and response in different lesions, as well as lung fibrosis after SBRT to a rib metastasis. We reviewed the radiological images of eight selected cases after SBRT to nonspine bone metastases and a number of characteristic findings were highlighted. We recommend future studies to correlate radiologic changes with clinical outcomes including pain relief, toxicity and long-term local control.

  6. Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy as First Local Therapy for Lung Oligometastases From Colorectal Cancer: A Single-Institution Cohort Study

    SciTech Connect

    Filippi, Andrea Riccardo; Badellino, Serena; Ceccarelli, Manuela; Guarneri, Alessia; Franco, Pierfrancesco; Monagheddu, Chiara; Spadi, Rosella; Ragona, Riccardo; Racca, Patrizia; Ricardi, Umberto

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To estimate stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) efficacy and its potential role as an alternative to surgery for the treatment of lung metastases from colorectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty consecutive patients who received SABR as first local therapy at the time of lung progression were included, from 2004 to 2014. The primary study endpoint was overall survival. Secondary endpoints were progression-free survival and safety. Results: A single nodule was treated in 26 patients (65%), 2 nodules in 10 patients (25%), 3 in 3 patients (7.5%), and 4 in 1 patient (2.5%), for a total of 59 lesions. The median delivered biological effective dose was 96 Gy, in 1 to 8 daily fractions. Median follow-up time was 20 months (range, 3-72 months). Overall survival rates at 1, 2, and 5 years were, respectively, 84%, 73%, and 39%, with 14 patients (35%) dead. Median overall survival was 46 months. Progression occurred in 25 patients (62.5%), at a median interval of 8 months; failure at SABR site was observed in 3 patients (7.5%). Progression-free survival rates were 49% and 27% at 1 and 2 years, respectively. Discussion: The results of this retrospective exploratory analysis suggest safety and efficacy of SABR in patients affected with colorectal cancer lung oligometastases and urge inclusion of SABR in prospective clinical trials.

  7. The incidence of radiation necrosis following stereotactic radiotherapy for melanoma brain metastases: the potential impact of immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kaidar-Person, Orit; Zagar, Timothy M; Deal, Allison; Moschos, Stergios J; Ewend, Matthew G; Sasaki-Adams, Deanna; Lee, Carrie B; Collichio, Frances A; Fried, David; Marks, Lawrence B; Chera, Bhishamjit S

    2017-07-01

    Stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) is the standard treatment for patients with limited number of brain metastases. In the past few years, newer immunotherapies (immune checkpoint inhibitors) have been proven to prolong survival in patients with metastatic melanoma. The safety of the combination of SRT and immunotherapy for brain metastases is unknown. We retrospectively identified patients with melanoma brain metastases treated with SRT between 2007 and 2015. Patients who did not have at least 3 months of follow-up with imaging after SRT were excluded from the analysis. Outcomes were compared between patients who were treated with or without immunotherapy. A total of 58 patients were included; of these, 29 were treated with SRT and immunotherapy. MAPK inhibitors (BRAF, MEK inhibitors) were used more often in the immunotherapy group (nine vs. two patients). There was a higher incidence of intracranial complications in patients treated with immunotherapy and SRT. Eight patients had radiation necrosis; all occurred in patients who were treated with immunotherapy. Nine patients had hemorrhage, of which seven occurred in patients who were treated with immunotherapy (P=0.08). However, patients treated with immunotherapy and SRT had a significant overall survival advantage compared with SRT without immunotherapy (15 vs. 6 months, P=0.0013). Patients treated with SRT and immunotherapy have a higher incidence/risk of intracranial complications, but a longer overall survival.

  8. Multi-institutional application of Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA) to CyberKnife Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT).

    PubMed

    Veronese, Ivan; De Martin, Elena; Martinotti, Anna Stefania; Fumagalli, Maria Luisa; Vite, Cristina; Redaelli, Irene; Malatesta, Tiziana; Mancosu, Pietro; Beltramo, Giancarlo; Fariselli, Laura; Cantone, Marie Claire

    2015-06-13

    A multidisciplinary and multi-institutional working group applied the Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA) approach to assess the risks for patients undergoing Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) treatments for lesions located in spine and liver in two CyberKnife® Centres. The various sub-processes characterizing the SBRT treatment were identified to generate the process trees of both the treatment planning and delivery phases. This analysis drove to the identification and subsequent scoring of the potential failure modes, together with their causes and effects, using the risk probability number (RPN) scoring system. Novel solutions aimed to increase patient safety were accordingly considered. The process-tree characterising the SBRT treatment planning stage was composed with a total of 48 sub-processes. Similarly, 42 sub-processes were identified in the stage of delivery to liver tumours and 30 in the stage of delivery to spine lesions. All the sub-processes were judged to be potentially prone to one or more failure modes. Nineteen failures (i.e. 5 in treatment planning stage, 5 in the delivery to liver lesions and 9 in the delivery to spine lesions) were considered of high concern in view of the high RPN and/or severity index value. The analysis of the potential failures, their causes and effects allowed to improve the safety strategies already adopted in the clinical practice with additional measures for optimizing quality management workflow and increasing patient safety.

  9. Application of modified dynamic conformal arc (MDCA) technique on liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) planning following RTOG 0438 guideline.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chengyu; Chen, Yong; Fang, Deborah Xiangdong; Iannuzzi, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is a feasible treatment method for the nonoperable, patient with early-stage liver cancer. Treatment planning for the SBRT is very important and has to consider the simulation accuracy, planning time, treatment efficiency effects etc. The modified dynamic conformal arc (MDCA) technique is a 3-dimensional conformal arc planning method, which has been proposed for liver SBRT planning at our center. In this study, we compared the MDCA technique with the RapidArc technique in terms of planning target volume (PTV) coverage and sparing of organs at risk (OARs). The results show that the MDCA technique has comparable plan quality to RapidArc considering PTV coverage, hot spots, heterogeneity index, and effective liver volume. For the 5 PTVs studied among 4 patients, the MDCA plan, when compared with the RapidArc plan, showed 9% more hot spots, more heterogeneity effect, more sparing of OARs, and lower liver effective volume. The monitor unit (MU) number for the MDCA plan is much lower than for the RapidArc plans. The MDCA plan has the advantages of less planning time, no-collision treatment, and a lower MU number. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Red Shell: Defining a High-Risk Zone of Normal Tissue Damage in Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jun; Fowler, Jack F.; Lamond, John P.; Lanciano, Rachelle; Feng Jing; Brady, Luther W.

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: To define a volume of tissue just outside of the clinical target volume (CTV) or planning target volume (PTV) in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) that receives doses appreciably above the tolerance level and in which other critical tissue structures must be avoided. Methods and Materials: We define the tissue between the borders of the CTV and PTV as the Inner Red Shell. The tissue surrounding the PTV that receives higher than the local tissue tolerance is defined as the Outer Red Shell. Contributing factors to the volume of the Red Shell include the prescription dose, dose gradient and PTV size, together with the type of tissue and its tolerance are discussed. An illustrative example and two clinical cases are reported. Results: The volume of Red Shell increases with higher prescription dose, slower dose fall-off, larger PTV volume, and higher tissue radiosensitivity. Avoidance of proximal critical serial organs may alter the volume and shape of the Red Shell after repeated, detailed treatment planning. Conclusion: Rather than defining tolerance and toxicity as simply a dose level received by the tissues, the volume of tissue receiving risk levels above tolerance can be quantified as the 'cost' of SBRT. This concept may be adopted in other techniques offering ablative and high-dose gradients. Further consideration should be given to collecting clinical data for refining the choice of constraint doses, especially in parts of the brain, lung, liver, and kidney.

  11. Development of patient-specific phantoms for verification of stereotactic body radiation therapy planning in patients with metallic screw fixation

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Dongryul; Hong, Chae-Seon; Ju, Sang Gyu; Kim, Minkyu; Koo, Bum Yong; Choi, SungBack; Park, Hee Chul; Choi, Doo Ho; Pyo, Hongryull

    2017-01-01

    A new technique for manufacturing a patient-specific dosimetric phantom using three-dimensional printing (PSDP_3DP) was developed, and its geometrical and dosimetric accuracy was analyzed. External body contours and structures of the spine and metallic fixation screws (MFS) were delineated from CT images of a patient with MFS who underwent stereotactic body radiation therapy for spine metastasis. Contours were converted into a STereoLithography file format using in-house program. A hollow, four-section PSDP was designed and manufactured using three types of 3DP to allow filling with a muscle-equivalent liquid and insertion of dosimeters. To evaluate the geometrical accuracy of PSDP_3DP, CT images were obtained and compared with patient CT data for volume, mean density, and Dice similarity coefficient for contours. The dose distribution in the PSDP_3DP was calculated by applying the same beam parameters as for the patient, and the dosimetric characteristics of the PSDP_3DP were compared with the patient plan. The registered CT of the PSDP_3DP was well matched with that of the real patient CT in the axial, coronal, and sagittal planes. The physical accuracy and dosimetric characteristics of PSDP_3DP were comparable to those of a real patient. The ability to manufacture a PSDP representing an extreme patient condition was demonstrated. PMID:28102349

  12. SU-E-J-31: Monitor Interfractional Variation of Tumor Respiratory Motion Using 4D KV Conebeam Computed Tomography for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy of Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Tai, A; Prior, P; Gore, E; Johnstone, C; Li, X

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: 4DCT has been widely used to generate internal tumor volume (ITV) for a lung tumor for treatment planning. However, lung tumors may show different respiratory motion on the treatment day. The purpose of this study is to evaluate 4D KV conebeam computed tomography (CBCT) for monitoring tumor interfractional motion variation between simulation and each fraction of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung cancer. Methods: 4D KV CBCT was acquired with the Elekta XVI system. The accuracy of 4D KV CBCT for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) was tested with a dynamic thorax motion phantom (CIRS, Virginia) with a linear amplitude of 2 cm. In addition, an adult anthropomorphic phantom (Alderson, Rando) with optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeters embedded at the center and periphery of a slab of solid water was used to measure the dose of 4D KV CBCT and to compare it with the dose with 3D KV CBCT. The image registration was performed by aligning\\ each phase images of 4D KV CBCT to the planning images and the final couch shifts were calculated as a mean of all these individual shifts along each direction.A workflow was established based on these quality assurance tests for lung cancer patients. Results: 4D KV CBCT does not increase imaging dose in comparison to 3D KV CBCT. Acquisition of 4D KV CBCT is 4 minutes as compared to 2 minutes for 3D KV CBCT. Most of patients showed a small daily variation of tumor respiratory motion about 2 mm. However, some patients may have more than 5 mm variations of tumor respiratory motion. Conclusion: The radiation dose does not increase with 4D KV CBCT. 4D KV CBCT is a useful tool for monitoring interfractional variations of tumor respiratory motion before SBRT of lung cancer patients.

  13. A treatment-planning comparison of three beam arrangement strategies for stereotactic body radiation therapy for centrally located lung tumors using volumetric-modulated arc therapy.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Kentaro; Okada, Wataru; Ogino, Ryo; Kubo, Kazuki; Kishimoto, Shun; Nakahara, Ryuta; Kawamorita, Ryu; Ishii, Yoshie; Tada, Takuhito; Nakajima, Toshifumi

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine appropriate beam arrangement for volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT)-based stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in the treatment of patients with centrally located lung tumors. Fifteen consecutive patients with centrally located lung tumors treated at our institution were enrolled. For each patient, three VMAT plans were generated using two coplanar partial arcs (CP VMAT), two non-coplanar partial arcs (NCP VMAT), and one coplanar full arc (Full VMAT). All plans were designed to deliver 70 Gy in 10 fractions. Target coverage and sparing of organs at risk (OARs) were compared across techniques. PTV coverage was almost identical for all approaches. The whole lung V10Gy was significantly lower with CP VMAT plans than with NCP VMAT plans, whereas no significant differences in the mean lung dose, V5Gy, V20Gy or V40Gy were observed. Full VMAT increased mean contralateral lung V5Gy by 12.57% and 9.15% when compared with NCP VMAT and CP VMAT, respectively. Although NCP VMAT plans best achieved the dose-volume constraints for mediastinal OARs, the absolute differences in dose were small when compared with CP VMAT. These results suggest that partial-arc VMAT may be preferable to minimize unnecessary exposure to the contralateral lung, and use of NCP VMAT should be considered when the dose-volume constraints are not achieved by CP VMAT. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  14. Phase I dose-escalation study of helical intensity-modulated radiotherapy-based stereotactic body radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jun Won; Seong, Jinsil; Lee, Ik Jae; Woo, Joong Yeol; Han, Kwang-Hyub

    2016-01-01

    Background Phase I trial was conducted to determine feasibility and toxicity of helical intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT)-based stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Results Eighteen patients (22 lesions) were enrolled. With no DLT at 52 Gy (13 Gy/fraction), protocol was amended for further escalation to 60 Gy (15 Gy/fraction). Radiologic complete response rate was 88.9%. Two outfield intrahepatic, 2 distant, 4 concurrent local and outfield, and 1 concurrent local, outfield and distant failures (no local failure at dose levels 3–4) occurred. The worst toxicity was grade 3 hematologic in five patients, with no gastrointestinal toxicity > grade 1. At median follow-up of 28 months for living patients, 2-year local control, progression-free (PFS), and overall survival rates were 71.3%, 49.4% and 69.3%, respectively. Multi-segmental recurrences prior to SBRT was independent prognostic factor for PFS (p = 0.033). Materials and Methods Eligible patients had Child-Pugh's class A or B, unresectable HCC, ≤ 3 lesions, and cumulative tumor diameter ≤ 6 cm. Starting at 36 Gy in four fractions, dose was escalated with 2 Gy/fraction per dose-level. CTCAE v 3.0 ≥ grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity and radiation induced liver disease defined dose-limiting toxicity (DLT). Conclusions Helical IMRT-based SBRT was tolerable and showed encouraging results. Confirmatory phase II trial is underway. PMID:27213593

  15. Pretreatment Modified Glasgow Prognostic Score Predicts Clinical Outcomes After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kishi, Takahiro; Matsuo, Yukinori Ueki, Nami; Iizuka, Yusuke; Nakamura, Akira; Sakanaka, Katsuyuki; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to evaluate the prognostic significance of the modified Glasgow Prognostic Score (mGPS) in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who received stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Data from 165 patients who underwent SBRT for stage I NSCLC with histologic confirmation from January 1999 to September 2010 were collected retrospectively. Factors, including age, performance status, histology, Charlson comorbidity index, mGPS, and recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class based on sex and T stage, were evaluated with regard to overall survival (OS) using the Cox proportional hazards model. The impact of the mGPS on cause of death and failure patterns was also analyzed. Results: The 3-year OS was 57.9%, with a median follow-up time of 3.5 years. A higher mGPS correlated significantly with poor OS (P<.001). The 3-year OS of lower mGPS patients was 66.4%, whereas that of higher mGPS patients was 44.5%. On multivariate analysis, mGPS and RPA class were significant factors for OS. A higher mGPS correlated significantly with lung cancer death (P=.019) and distant metastasis (P=.013). Conclusions: The mGPS was a significant predictor of clinical outcomes for SBRT in NSCLC patients.

  16. A treatment-planning comparison of three beam arrangement strategies for stereotactic body radiation therapy for centrally located lung tumors using volumetric-modulated arc therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Kentaro; Okada, Wataru; Ogino, Ryo; Kubo, Kazuki; Kishimoto, Shun; Nakahara, Ryuta; Kawamorita, Ryu; Ishii, Yoshie; Tada, Takuhito; Nakajima, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine appropriate beam arrangement for volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT)-based stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in the treatment of patients with centrally located lung tumors. Fifteen consecutive patients with centrally located lung tumors treated at our institution were enrolled. For each patient, three VMAT plans were generated using two coplanar partial arcs (CP VMAT), two non-coplanar partial arcs (NCP VMAT), and one coplanar full arc (Full VMAT). All plans were designed to deliver 70 Gy in 10 fractions. Target coverage and sparing of organs at risk (OARs) were compared across techniques. PTV coverage was almost identical for all approaches. The whole lung V10Gy was significantly lower with CP VMAT plans than with NCP VMAT plans, whereas no significant differences in the mean lung dose, V5Gy, V20Gy or V40Gy were observed. Full VMAT increased mean contralateral lung V5Gy by 12.57% and 9.15% when compared with NCP VMAT and CP VMAT, respectively. Although NCP VMAT plans best achieved the dose–volume constraints for mediastinal OARs, the absolute differences in dose were small when compared with CP VMAT. These results suggest that partial-arc VMAT may be preferable to minimize unnecessary exposure to the contralateral lung, and use of NCP VMAT should be considered when the dose–volume constraints are not achieved by CP VMAT. PMID:26951076

  17. Possible Misinterpretation of Demarcated Solid Patterns of Radiation Fibrosis on CT Scans as Tumor Recurrence in Patients Receiving Hypofractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, Atsuya; Kunieda, Etsuo Takeda, Toshiaki; Tanaka, Michio; Sanuki, Naoko; Fujii, Hirofumi; Shigematsu, Naoyuki; Kubo, Atsushi M.D.

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively analyze opacity changes near primary lung cancer tumors irradiated by using hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (HSRT) to determine the presence or absence of tumor recurrence. Methods and Materials: After review-board approval for a retrospective study, we examined data from 50 patients treated with curative intent for proven or highly suspected localized peripheral-lung cancer and followed up for at least 12 months. All patients had received 50 Gy in five fractions (80% isodose) and were followed up monthly with chest X-ray until clinical and X-ray findings stabilized. Follow-up computed tomography scans were performed 1 and 3 months after HSRT and thereafter at 3-month intervals during the first 2 years. Results: Median follow-up was 30.4 months (range, 12.0-73.8 months). Abnormal opacities that were suspicious for recurrent tumor appeared in 20 patients at a median of 20.7 months (range, 5.9-61.4 months). Only 3 patients were finally found to have recurrence; 14 were recurrence free but were suspected to have fibrosis, and findings for the other 3 patients were considered equivocal because of a short follow-up period ({<=}6 months). Conclusion: Radiation fibrosis, which may occur 1 year or longer after completion of HSRT, is difficult to distinguish from tumor recurrence. Even when opacities increase on follow-up radiologic scans, recurrence cannot be diagnosed conclusively based on image findings; biopsy occasionally is warranted.

  18. [Stereotactic radiotherapy for pelvic tumors].

    PubMed

    Mazeron, R; Fumagalli, I

    2014-01-01

    Extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy is booming. The development and spread of dedicated accelerators coupled with efficient methods of repositioning can now allow treatments of mobile lesions with moderate size, with high doses per fraction. Intuitively, except for the prostate, pelvic tumours, often requiring irradiation of regional lymph node drainage, lend little to this type of treatment. However, in some difficult circumstances, such as boost or re-radiation, stereotactic irradiation condition is promising and clinical experiences have already been reported.

  19. Stereotactic Radiation Therapy Augments Antigen-Specific PD-1-Mediated Anti-Tumor Immune Responses via Cross-Presentation of Tumor Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Sharabi, Andrew B.; Nirschl, Christopher J.; Kochel, Christina M.; Nirschl, Thomas R.; Francisca, Brian J.; Velarde, Esteban; Deweese, Theodore L.; Drake, Charles G.

    2014-01-01

    The immune-modulating effects of radiation therapy have gained considerable interest recently and there have been multiple reports of synergy between radiation and immunotherapy. However, additional pre-clinical studies are needed to demonstrate the antigen-specific nature of radiation-induced immune responses and elucidate potential mechanisms of synergy with immunotherapy. Here we demonstrate the ability of stereotactic radiotherapy to induce endogenous antigen-specific immune responses when combined with anti-PD-1 checkpoint blockade immunotherapy. Using the small animal radiation research platform (SARRP), image-guided stereotactic radiotherapy delivered to B16-OVA melanoma or 4T1-HA breast carcinoma tumors resulted in the development of antigen-specific T and B cell-mediated immune responses. These immune-stimulating effects of radiotherapy were significantly increased when combined with either anti-PD-1 therapy or regulatory T cell (Treg) depletion, resulting in improved local tumor control. Phenotypic analyses of antigen-specific CD8 T cells revealed that radiotherapy increased the percentage of antigen-experienced T cells and effector memory T cells. Mechanistically we found that radiotherapy up-regulates tumor-associated antigen-MHC complexes, enhances antigen cross-presentation in the draining lymph node, and increased T-cell infiltration into tumors. These findings demonstrate the ability of radiotherapy to prime an endogenous antigen-specific immune response and provide additional mechanistic rationale for combining radiation with PD-1 blockade in the clinic. PMID:25527358

  20. Is Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy an Attractive Option for Unresectable Liver Metastases? A Preliminary Report From a Phase 2 Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Scorsetti, Marta; Arcangeli, Stefano; Tozzi, Angelo; Comito, Tiziana; Alongi, Filippo; Navarria, Pierina; Mancosu, Pietro; Reggiori, Giacomo; Fogliata, Antonella; Torzilli, Guido; Tomatis, Stefano; Cozzi, Luca

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of high-dose stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in the treatment of unresectable liver metastases. Methods and Materials: Patients with 1 to 3 liver metastases, with maximum individual tumor diameters less than 6 cm and a Karnofsky Performance Status of at least 70, were enrolled and treated by SBRT on a phase 2 clinical trial. Dose prescription was 75 Gy on 3 consecutive days. SBRT was delivered using the volumetric modulated arc therapy by RapidArc (Varian, Palo Alto, CA) technique. The primary end-point was in-field local control. Secondary end-points were toxicity and survival. Results: Between February 2010 and September 2011, a total of 61 patients with 76 lesions were treated. Among the patients, 21 (34.3%) had stable extrahepatic disease at study entry. The most frequent primary sites were colorectal (45.9%) and breast (18%). Of the patients, 78.7% had 1 lesion, 18.0% had 2 lesions, and 3.3% had 3 lesions. After a median of 12 months (range, 2-26 months), the in-field local response rate was 94%. The median overall survival rate was 19 months, and actuarial survival at 12 months was 83.5%. None of the patients experienced grade 3 or higher acute toxicity. No radiation-induced liver disease was detected. One patient experienced G3 late toxicity at 6 months, resulting from chest wall pain. Conclusions: SBRT for unresectable liver metastases can be considered an effective, safe, and noninvasive therapeutic option, with excellent rates of local control and a low treatment-related toxicity.

  1. Detection of Local Cancer Recurrence After Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer: Physician Performance Versus Radiomic Assessment.

    PubMed

    Mattonen, Sarah A; Palma, David A; Johnson, Carol; Louie, Alexander V; Landis, Mark; Rodrigues, George; Chan, Ian; Etemad-Rezai, Roya; Yeung, Timothy P C; Senan, Suresh; Ward, Aaron D

    2016-04-01

    Stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) is a guideline-specified treatment option for early-stage lung cancer. However, significant posttreatment fibrosis can occur and obfuscate the detection of local recurrence. The goal of this study was to assess physician ability to detect timely local recurrence and to compare physician performance with a radiomics tool. Posttreatment computed tomography (CT) scans (n=182) from 45 patients treated with SABR (15 with local recurrence matched to 30 with no local recurrence) were used to measure physician and radiomic performance in assessing response. Scans were individually scored by 3 thoracic radiation oncologists and 3 thoracic radiologists, all of whom were blinded to clinical outcomes. Radiomic features were extracted from the same images. Performances of the physician assessors and the radiomics signature were compared. When taking into account all CT scans during the whole follow-up period, median sensitivity for physician assessment of local recurrence was 83% (range, 67%-100%), and specificity was 75% (range, 67%-87%), with only moderate interobserver agreement (κ = 0.54) and a median time to detection of recurrence of 15.5 months. When determining the early prediction of recurrence within <6 months after SABR, physicians assessed the majority of images as benign injury/no recurrence, with a mean error of 35%, false positive rate (FPR) of 1%, and false negative rate (FNR) of 99%. At the same time point, a radiomic signature consisting of 5 image-appearance features demonstrated excellent discrimination, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.85, classification error of 24%, FPR of 24%, and FNR of 23%. These results suggest that radiomics can detect early changes associated with local recurrence that are not typically considered by physicians. This decision support system could potentially allow for early salvage therapy of patients with local recurrence after SABR. Copyright

  2. Increased Bowel Toxicity in Patients Treated With a Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Inhibitor (VEGFI) After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT)

    SciTech Connect

    Barney, Brandon M.; Markovic, Svetomir N.; Laack, Nadia N.; Miller, Robert C.; Sarkaria, Jann N.; Macdonald, O. Kenneth; Bauer, Heather J.; Olivier, Kenneth R.

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: Gastrointestinal injury occurs rarely with agents that affect the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor and with abdominal stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). We explored the incidence of serious bowel injury (SBI) in patients treated with SBRT with or without vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitor (VEGFI) therapy. Methods and Materials: Seventy-six patients with 84 primary or metastatic intra-abdominal lesions underwent SBRT (median dose, 50 Gy in 5 fractions). Of the patients, 20 (26%) received VEGFI within 2 years after SBRT (bevacizumab, n=14; sorafenib, n=4; pazopanib, n=1; sunitinib, n=1). The incidence of SBI (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0, grade 3-5 ulceration or perforation) after SBRT was obtained, and the relationship between SBI and VEGFI was examined. Results: In the combined population, 7 patients (9%) had SBI at a median of 4.6 months (range, 3-17 months) from SBRT. All 7 had received VEGFI before SBI and within 13 months of completing SBRT, and 5 received VEGFI within 3 months of SBRT. The 6-month estimate of SBI in the 26 patients receiving VEGFI within 3 months of SBRT was 38%. No SBIs were noted in the 63 patients not receiving VEGFI. The log–rank test showed a significant correlation between SBI and VEGFI within 3 months of SBRT (P=.0006) but not between SBI and radiation therapy bowel dose (P=.20). Conclusions: The combination of SBRT and VEGFI results in a higher risk of SBI than would be expected with either treatment independently. Local therapies other than SBRT may be considered if a patient is likely to receive a VEGFI in the near future.

  3. Is stereotactic body radiation therapy an attractive option for unresectable liver metastases? A preliminary report from a phase 2 trial.

    PubMed

    Scorsetti, Marta; Arcangeli, Stefano; Tozzi, Angelo; Comito, Tiziana; Alongi, Filippo; Navarria, Pierina; Mancosu, Pietro; Reggiori, Giacomo; Fogliata, Antonella; Torzilli, Guido; Tomatis, Stefano; Cozzi, Luca

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of high-dose stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in the treatment of unresectable liver metastases. Patients with 1 to 3 liver metastases, with maximum individual tumor diameters less than 6 cm and a Karnofsky Performance Status of at least 70, were enrolled and treated by SBRT on a phase 2 clinical trial. Dose prescription was 75 Gy on 3 consecutive days. SBRT was delivered using the volumetric modulated arc therapy by RapidArc (Varian, Palo Alto, CA) technique. The primary end-point was in-field local control. Secondary end-points were toxicity and survival. Between February 2010 and September 2011, a total of 61 patients with 76 lesions were treated. Among the patients, 21 (34.3%) had stable extrahepatic disease at study entry. The most frequent primary sites were colorectal (45.9%) and breast (18%). Of the patients, 78.7% had 1 lesion, 18.0% had 2 lesions, and 3.3% had 3 lesions. After a median of 12 months (range, 2-26 months), the in-field local response rate was 94%. The median overall survival rate was 19 months, and actuarial survival at 12 months was 83.5%. None of the patients experienced grade 3 or higher acute toxicity. No radiation-induced liver disease was detected. One patient experienced G3 late toxicity at 6 months, resulting from chest wall pain. SBRT for unresectable liver metastases can be considered an effective, safe, and noninvasive therapeutic option, with excellent rates of local control and a low treatment-related toxicity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Feasibility of stereotactic MRI-based image guidance for the treatment of vascular malformations: a phantom study.

    PubMed

    Schwalbe, Marius; Haine, Axel; Schindewolf, Marc; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik; Williamson, Tom; Weber, Stefan; Baumgartner, Iris; Fuss, Torsten

    2016-12-01

    Treatment of vascular malformations requires the placement of a needle within vessels which may be as small as 1 mm, with the current state of the art relying exclusively on two-dimensional fluoroscopy images for guidance. We hypothesize that the combination of stereotactic image guidance with existing targeting methods will result in faster and more reproducible needle placements, as well as reduced radiationexposure, when compared to standard methods based on fluoroscopy alone. The proposed navigation approach was evaluated in a phantom experiment designed to allow direct comparison with the conventional method. An anatomical phantom of the left forearm was constructed, including an independent control mechanism to indicate the attainment of the target position. Three interventionalists (one inexperienced, two of them frequently practice the conventional fluoroscopic technique) performed 45 targeting attempts utilizing the combined and 45 targeting attempts utilizing the standard approaches. In all 45 attempts, the users were able to reach the target when utilizing the combined approach. In two cases, targeting was stopped after 15 min without reaching the target when utilizing only the C-arm. The inexperienced user was faster when utilizing the combined approach and applied significantly less radiation than when utilizing the conventional approach. Conversely, both experienced users were faster when using the conventional approach, in one case significantly so, with no significant difference in radiation dose when compared to the combined approach. This work presents an initial evaluation of a combined navigation fluoroscopy targeting technique in a phantom study. The results suggest that, especially for inexperienced interventionalists, navigation may help to reduce the time and the radiation dose. Future work will focus on the improvement and clinical evaluation of the proposed method.

  5. Using machine learning to predict radiation pneumonitis in patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdes, Gilmer; Solberg, Timothy D.; Heskel, Marina; Ungar, Lyle; Simone, Charles B., II

    2016-08-01

    To develop a patient-specific ‘big data’ clinical decision tool to predict pneumonitis in stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). 61 features were recorded for 201 consecutive patients with stage I NSCLC treated with SBRT, in whom 8 (4.0%) developed radiation pneumonitis. Pneumonitis thresholds were found for each feature individually using decision stumps. The performance of three different algorithms (Decision Trees, Random Forests, RUSBoost) was evaluated. Learning curves were developed and the training error analyzed and compared to the testing error in order to evaluate the factors needed to obtain a cross-validated error smaller than 0.1. These included the addition of new features, increasing the complexity of the algorithm and enlarging the sample size and number of events. In the univariate analysis, the most important feature selected was the diffusion capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO adj%). On multivariate analysis, the three most important features selected were the dose to 15 cc of the heart, dose to 4 cc of the trachea or bronchus, and race. Higher accuracy could be achieved if the RUSBoost algorithm was used with regularization. To predict radiation pneumonitis within an error smaller than 10%, we estimate that a sample size of 800 patients is required. Clinically relevant thresholds that put patients at risk of developing radiation pneumonitis were determined in a cohort of 201 stage I NSCLC patients treated with SBRT. The consistency of these thresholds can provide radiation oncologists with an estimate of their reliability and may inform treatment planning and patient counseling. The accuracy of the classification is limited by the number of patients in the study and not by the features gathered or the complexity of the algorithm.

  6. A pilot study of intensity modulated radiation therapy with hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) boost in the treatment of intermediate- to high-risk prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Oermann, Eric K; Slack, Rebecca S; Hanscom, Heather N; Lei, Sue; Suy, Simeng; Park, Hyeon U; Kim, Joy S; Sherer, Benjamin A; Collins, Brian T; Satinsky, Andrew N; Harter, K William; Batipps, Gerald P; Constantinople, Nicholas L; Dejter, Stephen W; Maxted, William C; Regan, James B; Pahira, John J; McGeagh, Kevin G; Jha, Reena C; Dawson, Nancy A; Dritschilo, Anatoly; Lynch, John H; Collins, Sean P

    2010-10-01

    Clinical data suggest that large radiation fractions are biologically superior to smaller fraction sizes in prostate cancer radiotherapy. The CyberKnife is an appealing delivery system for hypofractionated radiosurgery due to its ability to deliver highly conformal radiation and to track and adjust for prostate motion in real-time. We report our early experience using the CyberKnife to deliver a hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) boost to patients with intermediate- to high-risk prostate cancer. Twenty-four patients were treated with hypofractionated SBRT and supplemental external radiation therapy plus or minus androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Patients were treated with SBRT to a dose of 19.5 Gy in 3 fractions followed by intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to a dose of 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions. Quality of life data were collected with American Urological Association (AUA) symptom score and Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC) questionnaires before and after treatment. PSA responses were monitored; acute urinary and rectal toxicities were assessed using Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC) v3. All 24 patients completed the planned treatment with an average follow-up of 9.3 months. For patients who did not receive ADT, the median pre-treatment PSA was 10.6 ng/ml and decreased in all patients to a median of 1.5 ng/ml by 6 months post-treatment. Acute effects associated with treatment included Grade 2 urinary and gastrointestinal toxicity but no patient experienced acute Grade 3 or greater toxicity. AUA and EPIC scores returned to baseline by six months post-treatment. Hypofractionated SBRT combined with IMRT offers radiobiological benefits of a large fraction boost for dose escalation and is a well tolerated treatment option for men with intermediate- to high-risk prostate cancer. Early results are encouraging with biochemical response and acceptable toxicity. These data provide a basis for the design of a phase II clinical

  7. Stereotactic Image-Guided Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy Using the HI-ART II Helical Tomotherapy System

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Timothy W. Hudes, Richard; Dziuba, Sylwester; Kazi, Abdul; Hall, Mark; Dawson, Dana

    2008-07-01

    The highly integrated adaptive radiation therapy (HI-ART II) helical tomotherapy unit is a new radiotherapy machine designed to achieve highly precise and accurate treatments at all body sites. The precision and accuracy of the HI-ART II is similar to that provided by stereotactic radiosurgery systems, hence the historical distinction between external beam radiotherapy and stereotactic procedures based on differing precision requirements is removed for this device. The objectives of this work are: (1) to describe stereotactic helical tomotherapy processes (SRS, SBRT); (2) to show that the precision and accuracy of the HI-ART meet the requirements defined for SRS and SBRT; and (3) to describe the clinical implementation of a stereotactic image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) system that incorporates optical motion management.

  8. Results of a Conservative Dose Plan Linear Accelerator-Based Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Pediatric Intracranial Arteriovenous Malformations.

    PubMed

    Rajshekhar, Vedantam; Moorthy, Ranjith K; Jeyaseelan, Visalakshi; John, Subhashini; Rangad, Faith; Viswanathan, P N; Ravindran, Paul; Singh, Rabiraja

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the obliteration rate and clinical outcome following linear accelerator (LINAC)-based stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for intracranial arteriovenous malformation (AVM) in pediatric patients (age ≤18 years). Factors associated with the obliteration rate and neurologic complications were studied retrospectively in pediatric patients who underwent LINAC-based SRS for AVM between June 1995 and May 2014. The study cohort comprised 36 males and 33 females, with a median age at the time of SRS of 14 years (range, 7-18 years). The mean AVM volume was 8.5 ± 8.7 cc (range, 0.6-41.8 cc). The median marginal dose of radiation delivered was 15 Gy (range, 9-20 Gy). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated complete obliteration of the AVM in 44 of the 69 patients (63.8%), at a mean follow up of 27.5 months (range, 12-90 months). On subgroup analysis, 41 of the 53 AVMs of ≤14 cc in volume (77.3%) were obliterated. AVMs with a modified AVM radiosurgery score <1 had significantly shorter obliteration times from the time of SRS (P = .006). On multivariate analysis, the mean marginal dose of radiation delivered to the AVM was the sole significant predictor of obliteration (odds ratio, 1.6; 95% confidence interval, 1 to 2.4). A modest median marginal dose of 15 Gy (16 Gy in the obliterated AVM group vs. 12 Gy in the nonobliterated group) resulted in an obliteration rate of 66.7% after LINAC-based SRS for intracranial AVM, with low rate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, and 68Ga-DOTATOC positron emission tomography for imaging skull base meningiomas with infracranial extension treated with stereotactic radiotherapy - a case series

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) with 68Ga-DOTATOC positron emission tomography (68Ga-DOTATOC-PET) were compared retrospectively for their ability to delineate infracranial extension of skull base (SB) meningiomas treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. Methods Fifty patients with 56 meningiomas of the SB underwent MRI, CT, and 68Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT prior to fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. The study group consisted of 16 patients who had infracranial meningioma extension, visible on MRI ± CT (MRI/CT) or PET, and were evaluated further. The respective findings were reviewed independently, analyzed with respect to correlations, and compared with each other. Results Within the study group, SB transgression was associated with bony changes visible by CT in 14 patients (81%). Tumorous changes of the foramen ovale and rotundum were evident in 13 and 8 cases, respectively, which were accompanied by skeletal muscular invasion in 8 lesions. We analysed six designated anatomical sites of the SB in each of the 16 patients. Of the 96 sites, 42 had infiltration that was delineable by MRI/CT and PET in 35 cases and by PET only in 7 cases. The mean infracranial volume that was delineable in PET was 10.1 ± 10.6 cm3, which was somewhat larger than the volume detectable in MRI/CT (8.4 ± 7.9 cm3). Conclusions 68Ga-DOTATOC-PET allows detection and assessment of the extent of infracranial meningioma invasion. This method seems to be useful for planning fractionated stereotactic radiation when used in addition to conventional imaging modalities that are often inconclusive in the SB region. PMID:22217329

  10. Feasibility study on image guided patient positioning for stereotactic body radiation therapy of liver malignancies guided by liver motion.

    PubMed

    Heinz, Christian; Gerum, Sabine; Freislederer, Philipp; Ganswindt, Ute; Roeder, Falk; Corradini, Stefanie; Belka, Claus; Niyazi, Maximilian

    2016-06-27

    Fiducial markers are the superior method to compensate for interfractional motion in liver SBRT. However this method is invasive and thereby limits its application range. In this retrospective study, the compensation method for the interfractional motion using fiducial markers (gold standard) was compared to a new non-invasive approach, which does rely on the organ motion of the liver and the relative tumor position within this volume. We analyzed six patients (3 m, 3f) treated with SBRT in 2014. After fiducial marker implantation, all patients received a treatment CT (free breathing, without abdominal compression) and a 4D-CT (consisting of 10 respiratory phases). For all patients the gross tumor volumes (GTVs), internal target volume (ITV), planning target volume (PTV), internal marker target volumes (IMTVs) and the internal liver target volume (ILTV) were delineated based on the CT and 4D-CT images. CBCT imaging was used for the standard treatment setup based on the fiducial markers. According to the patient coordinates the 3 translational compensation values (t x , t y , t z ) for the interfractional motion were calculated by matching the blurred fiducial markers with the corresponding IMTV structures. 4 observers were requested to recalculate the translational compensation values for each CBCT (31) based on the ILTV structures. The differences of the translational compensation values between the IMTV and ILTV approach were analyzed. The magnitude of the mean absolute 3D registration error with regard to the gold standard overall patients and observers was 0.50 cm ± 0.28 cm. Individual registration errors up to 1.3 cm were observed. There was no significant overall linear correlation between the respiratory motion and the registration error of the ILTV approach. Two different methods to calculate the translational compensation values for interfractional motion in stereotactic liver therapy were evaluated. The registration accuracy of the ILTV approach is

  11. Retrospective cohort study of bronchial doses and radiation-induced atelectasis after stereotactic body radiation therapy of lung tumors located close to the bronchial tree.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Kristin; Nyman, Jan; Baumann, Pia; Wersäll, Peter; Drugge, Ninni; Gagliardi, Giovanna; Johansson, Karl-Axel; Persson, Jan-Olov; Rutkowska, Eva; Tullgren, Owe; Lax, Ingmar

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate the dose-response relationship between radiation-induced atelectasis after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and bronchial dose. Seventy-four patients treated with SBRT for tumors close to main, lobar, or segmental bronchi were selected. The association between incidence of atelectasis and bronchial dose parameters (maximum point-dose and minimum dose to the high-dose bronchial volume [ranging from 0.1 cm(3) up to 2.0 cm(3)]) was statistically evaluated with survival analysis models. Prescribed doses varied between 4 and 20 Gy per fraction in 2-5 fractions. Eighteen patients (24.3%) developed atelectasis considered to be radiation-induced. Statistical analysis showed a significant correlation between the incidence of radiation-induced atelectasis and minimum dose to the high-dose bronchial volumes, of which 0.1 cm(3) (D(0.1cm3)) was used for further analysis. The median value of D(0.1cm3) (α/β = 3 Gy) was EQD(2,LQ) = 147 Gy3 (range, 20-293 Gy3). For patients who developed atelectasis the median value was EQD(2,LQ) = 210 Gy3, and for patients who did not develop atelectasis, EQD(2,LQ) = 105 Gy3. Median time from treatment to development of atelectasis was 8.0 months (range, 1.1-30.1 months). In this retrospective study a significant dose-response relationship between the incidence of atelectasis and the dose to the high-dose volume of the bronchi is shown. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Retrospective Cohort Study of Bronchial Doses and Radiation-Induced Atelectasis After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy of Lung Tumors Located Close to the Bronchial Tree

    SciTech Connect

    Karlsson, Kristin; Nyman, Jan; Baumann, Pia; Wersäll, Peter; Drugge, Ninni; Gagliardi, Giovanna; Johansson, Karl-Axel; Persson, Jan-Olov; Rutkowska, Eva; Tullgren, Owe; Lax, Ingmar

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the dose–response relationship between radiation-induced atelectasis after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and bronchial dose. Methods and Materials: Seventy-four patients treated with SBRT for tumors close to main, lobar, or segmental bronchi were selected. The association between incidence of atelectasis and bronchial dose parameters (maximum point-dose and minimum dose to the high-dose bronchial volume [ranging from 0.1 cm{sup 3} up to 2.0 cm{sup 3}]) was statistically evaluated with survival analysis models. Results: Prescribed doses varied between 4 and 20 Gy per fraction in 2-5 fractions. Eighteen patients (24.3%) developed atelectasis considered to be radiation-induced. Statistical analysis showed a significant correlation between the incidence of radiation-induced atelectasis and minimum dose to the high-dose bronchial volumes, of which 0.1 cm{sup 3} (D{sub 0.1cm3}) was used for further analysis. The median value of D{sub 0.1cm3} (α/β = 3 Gy) was EQD{sub 2,LQ} = 147 Gy{sub 3} (range, 20-293 Gy{sub 3}). For patients who developed atelectasis the median value was EQD{sub 2,LQ} = 210 Gy{sub 3}, and for patients who did not develop atelectasis, EQD{sub 2,LQ} = 105 Gy{sub 3}. Median time from treatment to development of atelectasis was 8.0 months (range, 1.1-30.1 months). Conclusion: In this retrospective study a significant dose–response relationship between the incidence of atelectasis and the dose to the high-dose volume of the bronchi is shown.

  13. American College of Radiology (ACR) and American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Practice Guideline for the Performance of Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS).

    PubMed

    Seung, Steven K; Larson, David A; Galvin, James M; Mehta, Minesh P; Potters, Louis; Schultz, Christopher J; Yajnik, Santosh V; Hartford, Alan C; Rosenthal, Seth A

    2013-06-01

    American College of Radiology and American Society for Radiation Oncology Practice Guideline for the Performance of Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS). SRS is a safe and efficacious treatment option of a variety of benign and malignant disorders involving intracranial structures and selected extracranial lesions. SRS involves a high dose of ionizing radiation with a high degree of precision and spatial accuracy. A quality SRS program requires a multidisciplinary team involved in the patient management. Organization, appropriate staffing, and careful adherence to detail and to established SRS standards is important to ensure operational efficiency and to improve the likelihood of procedural success. A collaborative effort of the American College of Radiology and American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology has produced a practice guideline for SRS. The guideline defines the qualifications and responsibilities of all the involved personnel, including the radiation oncologist, neurosurgeon, and qualified medical physicist. Quality assurance is essential for safe and accurate delivery of treatment with SRS. Quality assurance issues for the treatment unit, stereotactic accessories, medical imaging, and treatment-planning system are presented and discussed. Adherence to these practice guidelines can be part of ensuring quality and patient safety in a successful SRS program.

  14. Physical parameters of very small diameter 10 MV X-ray beams for linac-based stereotactic radiosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sham, Edwin

    Physical aspects of very small diameter X-ray beams used for a linac-based stereotactic radiosurgery are presented in this thesis. A 10 MV linac was used as the radiation source. Very small 10 MV photon fields with diameters of 1.5 mm, 3 mm, and 5 mm are produced by special collimators attached to the treatment head of the linac. The radiation beam data were measured with a small field diode detector as well as radiographic and radiochromic films. Measured beam parameters were compared with the same parameters calculated with Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. For very small photon fields with diameters on the order of the focal spot size, MC calculations show that both the percentage depth dose (PDD) distributions and dose profiles are sensitive to the focal spot size. A simple sliding slit technique was developed to measure the focal spot size and shape for accurate MC simulations of very small diameter beams. The measured focal spot of the 10 MV linac is elliptical in shape and fitted by a Gaussian distribution with full-widths-at-half-maximum (FWHMs) of 2.05 mm and 1.34 mm in the principal axes of the ellipse. A Gaussian circle equivalent in area to the experimentally determined focal spot ellipse was used in MC simulations. The resulting PDD and beam profile calculations are in good agreement with the measurements. Dynamic radiosurgery with very small diameter photon beams was carried out using the 10 MV linac. Radiosurgical isodose distributions were measured with radiographic films in a spherical head phantom and calculated with the MC technique. A good agreement between the measured and MC-calculated isodose distributions for very small diameter fields is achieved. The displacement of the center of the measured isodose distributions relative to the laser-defined isocenter was on the order of 0.7 mm. All these results show the potential of linac-based radiosurgery with very small diameter photon beams for clinical use.

  15. Simple Factors Associated with Radiation-Induced Lung Toxicity after Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy of the Thorax: A Pooled Analysis of 88 Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jing; Yorke, Ellen D.; Li, Ling; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Li, X. Allen; Das, Shiva; Miften, Moyed; Rimner, Andreas; Campbell, Jeffrey; Xue, Jinyu; Jackson, Andrew; Grimm, Jimm; Milano, Michael T.; Kong, Feng-Ming (Spring)

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To study the risk factors for radiation-induced lung toxicity (RILT) after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of the thorax. Methods Published studies on lung toxicity in patients with early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) or metastatic lung tumors treated with SBRT were pooled and analyzed. The primary endpoint was RILT including pneumonitis and fibrosis. Data of RILT and risk factors were extracted from each study, and rates of grade 2-5 (G2+) and grade 3-5 (G3+) RILT were computed. Patient, tumor and dosimetric factors were analyzed for their correlation with RILT. Results Eighty-eight studies (7752 patients), that reported RILT incidence, were eligible. The pooled rates of G2+ and G3+ RILT from all 88 studies were 9.1% (95% CI: 7.15-11.4) and 1.8% (95% CI: 1.3-2.5), respectively. The median of median tumor sizes was 2.3 (range 1.4-4.1) cm. Among the factors analyzed, older patient age (P= 0.044) and larger tumor size (the greatest diameter) were significantly correlated with higher rates of G2+ (P= 0.049) and G3+ RILT (P= 0.001). Patients with stage IA vs. stage IB NSCLC had significantly lower risks of G2+ RILT (8.3% vs 17.1%, OR= 0.43, 95% CI: 0.29-0.64, P<0.0001). Among studies that provided detailed dosimetric data, the pooled analysis demonstrated a significantly higher mean lung dose (MLD) (P= 0.027) and V20 (P= 0.019) in patients with G2+ RILT comparing to that of grade 0-1 RILT. Conclusions The overall rate of RILT is relatively low after thoracic SBRT. Older age and larger tumor size are significant adverse risk factors for RILT. Lung dosimetry, specifically lung V20 and MLD also significantly affect RILT risk. Summary Risk factors for radiation-induced lung toxicity (RILT) after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) were analyzed from 88 published studies (7752 patients). The overall rate of RILT is relatively low after thoracic SBRT. Adverse risk factors for RILT after SBRT include older age, larger tumor size and greater lung

  16. Towards fast online intrafraction replanning for free-breathing stereotactic body radiation therapy with the MR-linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontaxis, C.; Bol, G. H.; Stemkens, B.; Glitzner, M.; Prins, F. M.; Kerkmeijer, L. G. W.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; Raaymakers, B. W.

    2017-09-01

    The hybrid MRI-radiotherapy machines, like the MR-linac (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) installed at the UMC Utrecht (Utrecht, The Netherlands), will be able to provide real-time patient imaging during treatment. In order to take advantage of the system’s capabilities and enable online adaptive treatments, a new generation of software should be developed, ranging from motion estimation to treatment plan adaptation. In this work we present a proof of principle adaptive pipeline designed for high precision stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) suitable for sites affected by respiratory motion, like renal cell carcinoma (RCC). We utilized our research MRL treatment planning system (MRLTP) to simulate a single fraction 25 Gy free-breathing SBRT treatment for RCC by performing inter-beam replanning for two patients and one volunteer. The simulated pipeline included a combination of (pre-beam) 4D-MRI and (online) 2D cine-MR acquisitions. The 4DMRI was used to generate the mid-position reference volume, while the cine-MRI, via an in-house motion model, provided three-dimensional (3D) deformable vector fields (DVFs) describing the anatomical changes during treatment. During the treatment fraction, at an inter-beam interval, the mid-position volume of the patient was updated and the delivered dose was accurately reconstructed on the underlying motion calculated by the model. Fast online replanning, targeting the latest anatomy and incorporating the previously delivered dose was then simulated with MRLTP. The adaptive treatment was compared to a conventional mid-position SBRT plan with a 3 mm planning target volume margin reconstructed on the same motion trace. We demonstrate that our system produced tighter dose distributions and thus spared the healthy tissue, while delivering more dose to the target. The pipeline was able to account for baseline variations/drifts that occurred during treatment ensuring target coverage at the end of the treatment fraction.

  17. SU-E-T-410: Evaluation of Treatment Modalities for Stereotactic Lung Radiation Therapy: A Phantom Study

    SciTech Connect

    Mohatt, D; Malhotra, H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate and verify the accuracy of alternative treatment modalities for stereotactic lung therapy with end-to-end testing. We compared three dimensional conformal therapy (3DCRT), dynamic conformal arc therapy (DCAT), intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment using 6 MV, 6 MV flattening filter free (FFF) and 10 MV FFF photons. Methods: A QUASAR respiratory motion phantom was utilized with custom ion chamber and gafchromatic EBT2 film inserts. The phantom contained a low density lung medium with a cylindrical polystyrene tumor (35 cc). Pseudo representative structures for various organs at risk (OAR) were created. All treatment plans were created using Eclipse ver. 11 using the same image and structure sets, and delivered via Varian TrueBeam STx linear accelerator equipped with high definition MLC. Evaluation of plan quality followed ROTG 0813 criterion for conformity index (CI100%), high dose spillage, D2cm, and R50%. Results: All treatment plans met the OAR dose constraints per protocol and could be delivered without any beam hold offs or other interlocks and hence were deemed clinically safe. For equivalent beam energies, target conformity was improved for all modalities when switching to FFF mode. Treatment efficiency increased for VMAT FFF by a factor of 3–4 over IMRT, and up to factor of 7 when compared to 3DCRT. Pass rates were > 97% for all treatment using gamma criteria of 3%, 3mm. Absolute dose at iso-center was verified with ion chamber, and found to be within 2% of the treatment planning system. Conclusion: The higher dose rate associated with FFF not only reduces delivery times, but in most cases enhances plan quality. The one modality with succeeding best results for all RTOG criterions was VMAT 6 MV FFF. This end-to-end testing provides necessary confidence in the entire dose delivery chain for lung SBRT patients.

  18. Direct plan comparison of RapidArc and CyberKnife for spine stereotactic body radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Young Eun; Kwak, Jungwon; Song, Si Yeol; Choi, Eun Kyung; Ahn, Seung Do; Cho, Byungchul

    2015-07-01

    We compared the treatment planning performance of RapidArc (RA) vs. CyberKnife (CK) for spinal stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Ten patients with spinal lesions who had been treated with CK were re-planned with RA, which consisted of two complete arcs. Computed tomography (CT) and volumetric dose data of CK, generated using the Multiplan (Accuray) treatment planning system (TPS) and the Ray-trace algorithm, were imported to Varian Eclipse TPS in Dicom format, and the data were compared with the RA plan by using an analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA) dose calculation. The optimized dose priorities for both the CK and the RA plans were similar for all patients. The highest priority was to provide enough dose coverage to the planned target volume (PTV) while limiting the maximum dose to the spinal cord. Plan quality was evaluated with respect to PTV coverage, conformity index (CI), high-dose spillage, intermediate-dose spillage (R50% and D2cm), and maximum dose to the spinal cord, which are criteria recommended by the RTOG 0631 spine and 0915 lung SBRT protocols. The mean CI' SD values of the PTV were 1.11' 0.03 and 1.17' 0.10 for RA and CK ( p = 0.02), respectively. On average, the maximum dose delivered to the spinal cord in CK plans was approximately 11.6% higher than that in RA plans, and this difference was statistically significant ( p < 0.001). High-dose spillages were 0.86% and 2.26% for RA and CK ( p = 0.203), respectively. Intermediate-dose spillage characterized by D2cm was lower for RA than for CK; however, R50% was not statistically different. Even though both systems can create highly conformal volumetric dose distributions, the current study shows that RA demonstrates lower high- and intermediate-dose spillages than CK. Therefore, RA plans for spinal SBRT may be superior to CK plans.

  19. Robotic stereotactic body radiation therapy for elderly medically inoperable early-stage non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Karam, Sana D; Horne, Zachary D; Hong, Robert L; Baig, Nimrah; Gagnon, Gregory J; McRae, Don; Duhamel, David; Nasr, Nadim M

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is being increasingly applied in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) because of its high local efficacy. This study aims to examine survival outcomes in elderly patients with inoperable stage I NSCLC treated with SBRT. Methods A total of 31 patients with single lesions treated with fractionated SBRT from 2008 to 2011 were retrospectively analyzed. A median prescribed dose of 48 Gy was delivered to the prescription isodose line, over a median of four treatments. The median biologically effective dose (BED) was 105.6 (range 37.50–180), and the median age was 73 (65–90 years). No patient received concurrent chemotherapy. Results With a median follow up of 13 months (range, 4–40 months), the actuarial median overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were 32 months, and 19 months, respectively. The actuarial median local control (LC) time was not reached. The survival outcomes at median follow up of 13 months were 80%, 68%, and 70% for LC, PFS, and OS, respectively. Univariate analysis revealed a BED of >100 Gy was associated with improved LC rates (P = 0.02), while squamous cell histology predicted for worse LC outcome at median follow up time of 13 months (P = 0.04). Increased tumor volume was a worse prognostic indicator of both LC and OS outcomes (P < 0.05). Finally, female gender was a better prognostic factor for OS than male gender (P = 0.006). There were no prognostic indicators of PFS that reached statistical significance. No acute or subacute high-grade toxicities were documented. Conclusion SBRT is a safe, feasible, and effective treatment option for elderly patients with inoperable early stage NSCLC. BED, histology, and tumor size are predictors of local control, while tumor size and gender predict OS. PMID:28210133

  20. SU-E-T-751: Three-Component Kinetic Model of Tumor Growth and Radiation Response for Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Y; Dahlman, E; Leder, K; Hui, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop and study a kinetic model of tumor growth and its response to stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) by assuming that the cells in irradiated tumor volume were made of three types. Methods: A set of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) were derived for three types of cells and a tumor growth rate. It is assumed that the cells were composed of actively proliferating cells, lethally damaged-dividing cells, and non-dividing cells. We modeled the tumor volume growth with a time-dependent growth rate to simulate the saturation of growth. After SRS, the proliferating cells were permanently damaged and converted to the lethally damaged cells. The amount of damaged cells were estimated by the LQ-model. The damaged cells gradually stopped dividing/proliferating and died with a constant rate. The dead cells were cleared from their original location with a constant rate. The total tumor volume was the sum of the three components. The ODEs were numerically solved with appropriate initial conditions for a given dosage. The proposed model was used to model an animal experiment, for which the temporal change of a rhabdomyosarcoma tumor volume grown in a rat was measured with time resolution sufficient to test the model. Results: To fit the model to the experimental data, the following characteristics were needed with the model parameters. The α-value in the LQ-model was smaller than the commonly used value; furthermore, it decreased with increasing dose. At the same time, the tumor growth rate after SRS had to increase. Conclusions: The new 3-component model of tumor could simulate the experimental data very well. The current study suggested that the radiation sensitivity and the growth rate of the proliferating tumor cells may change after irradiation and it depended on the dosage used for SRS. These preliminary observations must be confirmed by future animal experiments.

  1. [Quality assurance of respiratory-gated stereotactic body radiation therapy in lung using real-time position management system].

    PubMed

    Nakaguchi, Yuji; Araki, Fujio; Kouno, Tomohiro; Maruyama, Masato

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we investigated comprehensive quality assurance (QA) for respiratory-gated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in the lungs using a real-time position management system (RPM). By using the phantom study, we evaluated dose liberality and reproducibility, and dose distributions for low monitor unite (MU), and also checked the absorbed dose at isocenter and dose profiles for the respiratory-gated exposure using RPM. Furthermore, we evaluated isocenter dose and dose distributions for respiratory-gated SBRT plans in the lungs using RPM. The maximum errors for the dose liberality were 4% for 2 MU, 1% for 4-10 MU, and 0.5% for 15 MU and 20 MU. The dose reproducibility was 2% for 1 MU and within 0.1% for 5 MU or greater. The accuracy for dose distributions was within 2% for 2 MU or greater. The dose error along a central axis for respiratory cycles of 2, 4, and 6 sec was within 1%. As for geometric accuracy, 90% and 50% isodose areas for the respiratory-gated exposure became almost 1 mm and 2 mm larger than without gating, respectively. For clinical lung-SBRT plans, the point dose at isocenter agreed within 2.1% with treatment planning system (TPS). And the pass rates of all plans for TPS were more than 96% in the gamma analysis (3 mm/3%). The geometrical accuracy and the dose accuracy of TPS calculation algorithm are more important for the dose evaluation at penumbra region for respiratory-gated SBRT in lung using RPM.

  2. Postoperative Stereotactic Radiosurgery Without Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy for Brain Metastases: Potential Role of Preoperative Tumor Size

    SciTech Connect

    Hartford, Alan C.; Paravati, Anthony J.; Spire, William J.; Li, Zhongze; Jarvis, Lesley A.; Fadul, Camilo E.; Erkmen, Kadir; Friedman, Jonathan; Gladstone, David J.; Hug, Eugen B.; Roberts, David W.; Simmons, Nathan E.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy following resection of a brain metastasis increases the probability of disease control at the surgical site. We analyzed our experience with postoperative stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) as an alternative to whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT), with an emphasis on identifying factors that might predict intracranial disease control and overall survival (OS). Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed all patients through December 2008, who, after surgical resection, underwent SRS to the tumor bed, deferring WBRT. Multiple factors were analyzed for time to intracranial recurrence (ICR), whether local recurrence (LR) at the surgical bed or “distant” recurrence (DR) in the brain, for time to WBRT, and for OS. Results: A total of 49 lesions in 47 patients were treated with postoperative SRS. With median follow-up of 9.3 months (range, 1.1-61.4 months), local control rates at the resection cavity were 85.5% at 1 year and 66.9% at 2 years. OS rates at 1 and 2 years were 52.5% and 31.7%, respectively. On univariate analysis (preoperative) tumors larger than 3.0 cm exhibited a significantly shorter time to LR. At a cutoff of 2.0 cm, larger tumors resulted in significantly shorter times not only for LR but also for DR, ICR, and salvage WBRT. While multivariate Cox regressions showed preoperative size to be significant for times to DR, ICR, and WBRT, in similar multivariate analysis for OS, only the graded prognostic assessment proved to be significant. However, the number of intracranial metastases at presentation was not significantly associated with OS nor with other outcome variables. Conclusions: Larger tumor size was associated with shorter time to recurrence and with shorter time to salvage WBRT; however, larger tumors were not associated with decrements in OS, suggesting successful salvage. SRS to the tumor bed without WBRT is an effective treatment for resected brain metastases, achieving local control particularly for tumors up to

  3. Colorectal Histology Is Associated With an Increased Risk of Local Failure in Lung Metastases Treated With Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Binkley, Michael S.; Trakul, Nicholas; Jacobs, Lisa Rose; Eyben, Rie von; Le, Quynh-Thu; Maxim, Peter G.; Loo, Billy W.; Shultz, David Benjamin; Diehn, Maximilian

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) is increasingly used to treat lung oligometastases. We set out to determine the safety and efficacy of this approach and to identify factors associated with outcomes. Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective study of patients treated with SABR for metastatic lung tumors at our institution from 2003 to 2014. We assessed the association between various patient and treatment factors with local failure (LF), progression, subsequent treatment, systemic treatment, and overall survival (OS), using univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: We identified 122 tumors in 77 patients meeting inclusion criteria for this study. Median follow-up was 22 months. The 12- and 24-month cumulative incidence rates of LF were 8.7% and 16.2%, respectively; the 24-month cumulative incidence rates of progression, subsequent treatment, and subsequent systemic treatment were 75.2%, 64.5%, and 35.1%, respectively. Twenty-four-month OS was 74.6%, and median OS was 36 months. Colorectal metastases had a significantly higher cumulative incidence of LF at 12 and 24 months (25.5% and 42.2%, respectively), than all other histologies (4.4% and 9.9%, respectively; P<.0004). The 24-month cumulative incidences of LF for colorectal metastases treated with a biologically effective dose at α/β = 10 (BED{sub 10}) of <100 Gy versus BED{sub 10} of ≥100 Gy were 62.5% and 16.7%, respectively (P=.08). Toxicity was minimal, with only a single grade 3 or higher event observed. Conclusions: SABR for metastatic lung tumors appears to be safe and effective with excellent local control, treatment-free intervals, and OS. An exception is metastases from colorectal cancer, which have a high LF rate consistent with a radioresistant phenotype, suggesting a potential role for dose escalation.

  4. Prostate-specific antigen kinetics after primary stereotactic body radiation therapy using CyberKnife for localized prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yong Hyun; Choi, In Young; Yoon, Sei Chul; Jang, Hong Seok; Moon, Hyong Woo; Hong, Sung-Hoo; Kim, Sae Woong; Hwang, Tae-Kon; Lee, Ji Youl

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess prostate-specific antigen (PSA) kinetics and report on the oncologic outcomes for patients with localized prostate cancer treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) using CyberKnife. Methods We extracted the list and data of 39 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer who had undergone primary SBRT using CyberKnife between January 2008 and December 2012 from the Smart Prostate Cancer database system of Seoul St. Mary's Hospital. Changes in PSA over time, PSA velocity, and PSA nadir were evaluated from the completion of SBRT using CyberKnife. Biochemical recurrence (BCR)-free survival after primary SBRT using CyberKnife was determined using Kaplan–Meier analysis. Results The rate of PSA decrease was maximal in the first month (median −3.34 ng/mL/mo), which then fell gradually with median values of −1.51, −0.32, −0.28, −0.20, and −0.03 ng/mL/mo for durations of 3, 6, 9, 12, and 24 months after SBRT using CyberKnife, respectively. The median PSA nadir was 0.31 ng/mL after a median 23 months. Kaplan–Meier analysis calculates an actuarial 5-year BCR-free survival after SBRT using CyberKnife as 80.8%. Conclusions PSA decline occurred rapidly in the first month, and then the rate of PSA decline fell off steadily over time throughout 2 years after treatment. Also, SBRT using CyberKnife leads to long-term favorable BCR-free survival in localized prostate cancer. PMID:26157760

  5. SU-E-T-573: Normal Tissue Dose Effect of Prescription Isodose Level Selection in Lung Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Q; Lei, Y; Zheng, D; Zhu, X; Wahl, A; Lin, C; Zhou, S; Zhen, W

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate dose fall-off in normal tissue for lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) cases planned with different prescription isodose levels (IDLs), by calculating the dose dropping speed (DDS) in normal tissue on plans computed with both Pencil Beam (PB) and Monte-Carlo (MC) algorithms. Methods: The DDS was calculated on 32 plans for 8 lung SBRT patients. For each patient, 4 dynamic conformal arc plans were individually optimized for prescription isodose levels (IDL) ranging from 60% to 90% of the maximum dose with 10% increments to conformally cover the PTV. Eighty non-overlapping rind structures each of 1mm thickness were created layer by layer from each PTV surface. The average dose in each rind was calculated and fitted with a double exponential function (DEF) of the distance from the PTV surface, which models the steep- and moderate-slope portions of the average dose curve in normal tissue. The parameter characterizing the steep portion of the average dose curve in the DEF quantifies the DDS in the immediate normal tissue receiving high dose. Provided that the prescription dose covers the whole PTV, a greater DDS indicates better normal tissue sparing. The DDS were compared among plans with different prescription IDLs, for plans computed with both PB and MC algorithms. Results: For all patients, the DDS was found to be the lowest for 90% prescription IDL and reached a highest plateau region for 60% or 70% prescription. The trend was the same for both PB and MC plans. Conclusion: Among the range of prescription IDLs accepted by lung SBRT RTOG protocols, prescriptions to 60% and 70% IDLs were found to provide best normal tissue sparing.

  6. SU-E-T-551: Monitor Unit Optimization in Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Stage I Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, B-T; Lu, J-Y

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The study aims to reduce the monitor units (MUs) in the stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) treatment for lung cancer by adjusting the optimizing parameters. Methods: Fourteen patients suffered from stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) were enrolled. Three groups of parameters were adjusted to investigate their effects on MU numbers and organs at risk (OARs) sparing: (1) the upper objective of planning target volume (UOPTV); (2) strength setting in the MU constraining objective; (3) max MU setting in the MU constraining objective. Results: We found that the parameters in the optimizer influenced the MU numbers in a priority, strength and max MU dependent manner. MU numbers showed a decreasing trend with the UOPTV increasing. MU numbers with low, medium and high priority for the UOPTV were 428±54, 312±48 and 258±31 MU/Gy, respectively. High priority for UOPTV also spared the heart, cord and lung while maintaining comparable PTV coverage than the low and medium priority group. It was observed that MU numbers tended to decrease with the strength increasing and max MU setting decreasing. With maximum strength, the MU numbers reached its minimum while maintaining comparable or improved dose to the normal tissues. It was also found that the MU numbers continued to decline at 85% and 75% max MU setting but no longer to decrease at 50% and 25%. Combined with high priority for UOPTV and MU constraining objectives, the MU numbers can be decreased as low as 223±26 MU/Gy. Conclusion:: The priority of UOPTV, MU constraining objective in the optimizer impact on the MU numbers in SBRT treatment for lung cancer. Giving high priority to the UOPTV, setting the strength to maximum value and the max MU to 50% in the MU objective achieves the lowest MU numbers while maintaining comparable or improved OAR sparing.

  7. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Early-Stage Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: The Pattern of Failure Is Distant

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, Jeffrey D.; El Naqa, Issam; Drzymala, Robert E.; Trovo, Marco; Jones, Griffin; Denning, Mary Dee

    2010-07-15

    Background: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) represents a substantial paradigm shift in the treatment of patients with medically inoperable Stage I/II non-small-cell lung cancer. We reviewed our experience using either three- or five-fraction SBRT for peripheral or central tumors, respectively. Methods and Materials: A total of 91 patients signed an institutional review board-approved consent form, were treated with SBRT, and have had {>=}6 months of follow-up. Patients were referred for SBRT because of underlying comorbidities (poor performance status in 31 or poor lung function in 52) or refusal of surgery (8 patients). Of the cancers, 83 were peripheral and eight were central. Peripheral cancers received a mean dose of 18 Gy x three fractions. Cancers within 2 cm of the bronchus, esophagus, or brachial plexus were treated with 9 Gy x five fractions. Results: The median follow-up duration for these patients was 18 months (range, 6-42 months). TNM staging was as follows: 58 patients with T1N0M0, 22 with T2N0M0, 2 with T3N0M0 (chest wall), and 6 with T1N0M1 cancers. The median tumor diameter was 2 cm (range, 1-5 cm). The median forced expiratory volume in 1 s was 46% (range, 17-133%) and the median carbon monoxide diffusing capacity (DLCO) was 49% (range, 15-144%). Two-year local tumor control was achieved in 86% of patients. The predominant pattern of failure was the development of distant metastasis or second lung cancer. The development of distant metastasis was the only significant prognostic factor for overall survival on multivariate analysis. Conclusions: Local tumor control was shown to be high using SBRT for non-small-cell lung cancer. Overall survival is highly coerrelated with the development of distant metastasis.

  8. Dosimetry And Its Enhancement Using Gold Nanoparticles In Synchrotron Based Microbeam And Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, Wan Nordiana; Davidson, Robert; Geso, Moshi; Wong, Christopher James; Yagi, Naoto

    2010-07-23

    Research into the areas of synchrotron generated microbeam radiotherapy (MRT) and stereotactic radiosurgery is increasing. Such MRT techniques are showing potential of tackling some of the more difficult radiotherapy cases such as certain type of brain tumours. Two challenging aspects of these techniques are addressed in this investigation; the difficulty of dose determination and the delivery of the treatments at lower dose levels. In this research polymer gels were used as phantoms and dosimeters and cells were used to confirm outcomes. Normoxic polyacrylamide gels (nPAG) were tested as potential dosimeters for microbeam dosimetry. Following irradiation using microbeam and minibeam radiation from the BL28BU beam-line at Spring-8, Japan, the nPAG were scanned using a Raman spectroscopy technique. Dose enhancement caused by the inclusion of the gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) in the target was investigated using both cells and polymer gels. The use of AuNP could potentially reduce the dose required for the delivery of MRT. In this study it was shown that using endothelial cells with AuNPs, the minimal dose for clear cell killing along the beam line was reduced to 10 Gy. Both studies cell and gel studies indicates significant dose enhancement caused by the gold atoms in the target.

  9. Synthetic CT for MRI-based liver stereotactic body radiotherapy treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredfeldt, Jeremy S.; Liu, Lianli; Feng, Mary; Cao, Yue; Balter, James M.

    2017-04-01

    A technique for generating MRI-derived synthetic CT volumes (MRCTs) is demonstrated in support of adaptive liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Under IRB approval, 16 subjects with hepatocellular carcinoma were scanned using a single MR pulse sequence (T1 Dixon). Air-containing voxels were identified by intensity thresholding on T1-weighted, water and fat images. The envelope of the anterior vertebral bodies was segmented from the fat image and fuzzy-C-means (FCM) was used to classify each non-air voxel as mid-density, lower-density, bone, or marrow in the abdomen, with only bone and marrow classified within the vertebral body envelope. MRCT volumes were created by integrating the product of the FCM class probability with its assigned class density for each voxel. MRCTs were deformably aligned with corresponding planning CTs and 2-ARC-SBRT-VMAT plans were optimized on MRCTs. Fluence was copied onto the CT density grids, dose recalculated, and compared. The liver, vertebral bodies, kidneys, spleen and cord had median Hounsfield unit differences of less than 60. Median target dose metrics were all within 0.1 Gy with maximum differences less than 0.5 Gy. OAR dose differences were similarly small (median: 0.03 Gy, std:0.26 Gy). Results demonstrate that MRCTs derived from a single abdominal imaging sequence are promising for use in SBRT dose calculation.

  10. Dosimetry And Its Enhancement Using Gold Nanoparticles In Synchrotron Based Microbeam And Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Wan Nordiana; Wong, Christopher James; Yagi, Naoto; Davidson, Robert; Geso, Moshi

    2010-07-01

    Research into the areas of synchrotron generated microbeam radiotherapy (MRT) and stereotactic radiosurgery is increasing. Such MRT techniques are showing potential of tackling some of the more difficult radiotherapy cases such as certain type of brain tumours. Two challenging aspects of these techniques are addressed in this investigation; the difficulty of dose determination and the delivery of the treatments at lower dose levels. In this research polymer gels were used as phantoms and dosimeters and cells were used to confirm outcomes. Normoxic polyacrylamide gels (nPAG) were tested as potential dosimeters for microbeam dosimetry. Following irradiation using microbeam and minibeam radiation from the BL28BU beam-line at Spring-8, Japan, the nPAG were scanned using a Raman spectroscopy technique. Dose enhancement caused by the inclusion of the gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) in the target was investigated using both cells and polymer gels. The use of AuNP could potentially reduce the dose required for the delivery of MRT. In this study it was shown that using endothelial cells with AuNPs, the minimal dose for clear cell killing along the beam line was reduced to 10 Gy. Both studies cell and gel studies indicates significant dose enhancement caused by the gold atoms in the target.

  11. WE-E-BRA-01: Introduction to Treatment Assessment of Radiation Therapy Using MR Functional Imaging and Its Application to Intracranial Stereotactic Radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Chang, Z

    2012-06-01

    Recent developments in MRI have substantially improved its performance, making it a potentially powerful tool for not only diagnosis but also therapy. Treatment assessment using MR functional imaging is the process of using MR functional imaging before and/or during and/or after a course of radiation therapy (RT) to assess treatment responses and as such to optimize therapeutic outcome. Various MR functional techniques including, but not limited to, diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), MR spectroscopy (MRS) and dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) imaging, have been investigated to assess therapeutic outcome in radiotherapy. DCE-MRI uses fast imaging and contrast material to assess changes in the microvascular environment. MRS can be used to assess non-invasively biochemical changes caused by RT. Diffusion imaging techniques are used to assess the changes of cellular density and neural fibers caused by RT. In this lecture, the application of functional imaging to the assessment of stereotactic radiosurgery is illustrated. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is effective in treating brain tumors, but radiation may cause injury to normal brain tissues (e.g., white matter), compromising sensory and neurocognitive brain functions. DTI can be used to track neural fibers and assess radiation-induced damages in white matter. Furthermore, DCE-MRI can be used to interrogate tumor biology and treatment-related changes in tumor vasculature after SRS. These Issues related to treatment-related changes will be discussed. This lecture will provide an overview of the MR functional imaging along with its application to the assessment of stereotactic radiosurgery. 1. Understand the principles of MR functional imaging techniques 2. Understand the issues related to MR functional imaging 3. Understand the clinical application of MR functional imaging in assessing treatment response of SRS. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  12. Sensitivity of 3D Dose Verification to Multileaf Collimator Misalignments in Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy of Spinal Tumor.

    PubMed

    Xin-Ye, Ni; Ren, Lei; Yan, Hui; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to detect the sensitivity of Delt 4 on ordinary field multileaf collimator misalignments, system misalignments, random misalignments, and misalignments caused by gravity of the multileaf collimator in stereotactic body radiation therapy. (1) Two field sizes, including 2.00 cm (X) × 6.00 cm (Y) and 7.00 cm (X) × 6.00 cm (Y), were set. The leaves of X1 and X2 in the multileaf collimator were simultaneously opened. (2) Three cases of stereotactic body radiation therapy of spinal tumor were used. The dose of the planning target volume was 1800 cGy with 3 fractions. The 4 types to be simulated included (1) the leaves of X1 and X2 in the multileaf collimator were simultaneously opened, (2) only X1 of the multileaf collimator and the unilateral leaf were opened, (3) the leaves of X1 and X2 in the multileaf collimator were randomly opened, and (4) gravity effect was simulated. The leaves of X1 and X2 in the multileaf collimator shifted to the same direction. The difference between the corresponding 3-dimensional dose distribution measured by Delt 4 and the dose distribution in the original plan made in the treatment planning system was analyzed with γ index criteria of 3.0 mm/3.0%, 2.5 mm/2.5%, 2.0 mm/2.0%, 2.5 mm/1.5%, and 1.0 mm/1.0%. (1) In the field size of 2.00 cm (X) × 6.00 cm (Y), the γ pass rate of the original was 100% with 2.5 mm/2.5% as the statistical standard. The pass rate decreased to 95.9% and 89.4% when the X1 and X2 directions of the multileaf collimator were opened within 0.3 and 0.5 mm, respectively. In the field size of 7.00 (X) cm × 6.00 (Y) cm with 1.5 mm/1.5% as the statistical standard, the pass rate of the original was 96.5%. After X1 and X2 of the multileaf collimator were opened within 0.3 mm, the pass rate decreased to lower than 95%. The pass rate was higher than 90% within the 3 mm opening. (2) For spinal tumor, the change in the planning target volume V18 under various modes calculated using treatment planning system

  13. Clinical and Dosimetric Predictors of Radiation Pneumonitis in a Large Series of Patients Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy to the Lung

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Ryan; Han Gang; Sarangkasiri, Siriporn; DeMarco, MaryLou; Turke, Carolyn; Stevens, Craig W.; Dilling, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To report clinical and dosimetric factors predictive of radiation pneumonitis (RP) in patients receiving lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) from a series of 240 patients. Methods and Materials: Of the 297 isocenters treating 263 patients, 240 patients (n=263 isocenters) had evaluable information regarding RP. Age, gender, current smoking status and pack-years, O{sub 2} use, Charlson Comorbidity Index, prior lung radiation therapy (yes/no), dose/fractionation, V{sub 5}, V{sub 13}, V{sub 20}, V{sub prescription}, mean lung dose, planning target volume (PTV), total lung volume, and PTV/lung volume ratio were recorded. Results: Twenty-nine patients (11.0%) developed symptomatic pneumonitis (26 grade 2, 3 grade 3). The mean V{sub 20} was 6.5% (range, 0.4%-20.2%), and the average mean lung dose was 5.03 Gy (0.547-12.2 Gy). In univariable analysis female gender (P=.0257) and Charlson Comorbidity index (P=.0366) were significantly predictive of RP. Among dosimetric parameters, V{sub 5} (P=.0186), V{sub 13} (P=.0438), and V{sub prescription} (where dose = 60 Gy) (P=.0128) were significant. There was only a trend toward significance for V{sub 20} (P=.0610). Planning target volume/normal lung volume ratio was highly significant (P=.0024). In multivariable analysis the clinical factors of female gender, pack-years smoking, and larger gross internal tumor volume and PTV were predictive (P=.0094, .0312, .0364, and .052, respectively), but no dosimetric factors were significant. Conclusions: Rate of symptomatic RP was 11%. Our mean lung dose was <600 cGy in most cases and V20 <10%. In univariable analysis, dosimetric factors were predictive, while tumor size (or tumor/lung volume ratio) played a role in multivariable and univariable and analysis, respectively.

  14. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) combined with chemotherapy for unresected pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gurka, Marie K.; Kim, Christine; He, Ruth; Charabaty, Aline; Haddad, Nadim; Johnson, Lynt; Jackson, Patrick; Weiner, Louis; Marshall, John L; Collins, Sean P.; Pishvaian, Michael J.; Unger, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The role of conventionally fractionated radiation therapy in the management of unresectable pancreatic cancer is controversial. One concern about concurrent chemoradiation relates to the timing of chemotherapy. In contrast to conventional radiation therapy, SBRT delivers high doses in a shorter duration resulting in minimal disruption in chemotherapy. Here we report our results of patients treated with SBRT and chemotherapy for inoperable pancreatic cancer. Methods Thirty-eight consecutive patients treated with SBRT and chemotherapy for locally advanced, borderline resectable, and medically inoperable at our institution from January 2008 to December 2012 were included in this retrospective analysis. Treatment was delivered in 5 fractions of 5 or 6 Gy per fraction over five days. Median time from diagnosis to SBRT was 1.9 months. Toxicities were scored using the CTCAE v.3. Survival was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results The median age was 70 years (range 45 – 90). ECOG performance status ranged from 0 – 3. Thirty-four patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Four other patients received sequential chemotherapy. Median OS was 14.3 months and median PFS was 9.2 months from diagnosis. From radiation, OS and PFS were 12.3 months and 6.8 months, respectively. The overall local control rate was 79%. Acute toxicity was minimal. Severe late SBRT-related toxicities included one grade 3 gastric outlet obstruction, one grade 4 biliary stricture and a grade 5 gastric hemorrhage. Conclusions SBRT combined with chemotherapy for unresectable pancreatic cancer is convenient, feasible and generally well tolerated. The outcomes of SBRT combined with chemotherapy compare favorably to the results of treatment with chemotherapy and conventional radiation therapy. PMID:25171298

  15. Fractionated stereotactic radiosurgery for patients with skull base metastases from systemic cancer involving the anterior visual pathway

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To analyze the tumor control, survival outcomes, and toxicity after stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for skull base metastases from systemic cancer involving the anterior visual pathway. Patients and methods We have analyzed 34 patients (23 females and 11 males, median age 59 years) who underwent multi-fraction SRS for a skull base metastasis compressing or in close proximity of optic nerves and chiasm. All metastases were treated with frameless LINAC-based multi-fraction SRS in 5 daily fractions of 5 Gy each. Local control, distant failure, and overall survival were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method calculated from the time of SRS. Prognostic variables were assessed using log-rank and Cox regression analyses. Results At a median follow-up of 13 months (range, 2–36.5 months), twenty-five patients had died and 9 were alive. The 1-year and 2-year local control rates were 89% and 72%, and respective actuarial survival rates were 63% and 30%. Four patients recurred with a median time to progression of 12 months (range, 6–27 months), and 17 patients had new brain metastases at distant brain sites. The 1-year and 2-year distant failure rates were 50% and 77%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, a Karnofsky performance status (KPS) >70 and the absence of extracranial metastases were prognostic factors associated with lower distant failure rates and longer survival. After multi-fraction SRS, 15 (51%) out of 29 patients had a clinical improvement of their preexisting cranial deficits. No patients developed radiation-induced optic neuropathy during the follow-up. Conclusions Multi-fraction SRS (5 x 5 Gy) is a safe treatment option associated with good local control and improved cranial nerve symptoms for patients with a skull base metastasis involving the anterior visual pathway. PMID:24886280

  16. Dosimetric Analysis of Neural and Vascular Structures in Skull Base Tumors Treated with Stereotactic Radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Haidar, Yarah M; Bhatt, Jay M; Ghavami, Yaser; Moshtaghi, Omid; Schwer, Amanda; Chenery, Stafford; Djalilian, Hamid R

    2017-05-01

    Objective To examine the relationship between the prescribed target dose and the dose to healthy neurovascular structures in patients with vestibular schwannomas treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Study Design Case series with chart review. Setting SRS center from 2011 to 2013. Subjects Twenty patients with vestibular schwannomas treated at the center from 2011 to 2013. Methods Twenty patients with vestibular schwannomas were included. The average radiation dose delivered to healthy neurovascular structures (eg, carotid artery, basilar artery, facial nerve, trigeminal nerve, and cochlea) was analyzed. Results Twenty patients with vestibular schwannomas who were treated with fused computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging-guided SRS were included in the study. The prescribed dose ranged from 10.58 to 17.40 Gy over 1 to 3 hypofractions to cover 95% of the target tumor volume. The mean dose to the carotid artery was 5.66 Gy (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.53-6.80 Gy), anterior inferior cerebellar artery was 8.70 Gy (95% CI, 4.54-12.86 Gy), intratemporal facial nerve was 3.76 Gy (95% CI, 3.04-4.08 Gy), trigeminal nerve was 5.21 Gy (95% CI, 3.31-7.11 Gy), and the cochlea was 8.70 Gy (95% CI, 7.81-9.59 Gy). Conclusions SRS for certain vestibular schwannomas can expose the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) and carotid artery to radiation doses that can potentially initiate atherosclerotic processes. The higher doses to the AICA and carotid artery correlated with increasing tumor volume. The dose delivered to other structures such as the cochlea and intratemporal facial nerve appears to be lower and much less likely to cause immediate complications when shielded.

  17. Immobilization in stereotactic radiotherapy: the head and neck localizer frame.

    PubMed

    Fairclough-Tompa, L; Larsen, T; Jaywant, S M

    2001-01-01

    Stereotactic radiotherapy refers to multiple daily fractions of radiation, over days or weeks of treatment, with the patient in a relocatable stereotactic frame. The linear accelerator-based, couch-mounted system from Radionics utilizes the Gill-Thomas-Cosman (GTC) frame and the new Tarbell-Loeffler-Cosman (TLC) pediatric frame for accurate positioning reproducibility. Radionics has now made available the Head and Neck Localizer (HNL) frame to be used with its XPlan treatment planning system and the mini multileaf collimator (MMLC). This will extend the overall capability of stereotactic radiotherapy to the treatment of head and neck cancers. However, with no data available on the HNL frame, a study is being undertaken to assess the accuracy in patient position reproducibility using the frame. This report provides the preliminary findings of comparing depth-helmet readings with radiographic data, together with recommended modifications to the frame.

  18. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure for Motion Management in Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy to the Lung: A Controlled Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, Jeffrey D.; Lawrence, Yaacov R.; Appel, Sarit; Landau, Efrat; Ben-David, Merav A.; Rabin, Tatiana; Benayun, Maoz; Dubinski, Sergey; Weizman, Noam; Alezra, Dror; Gnessin, Hila; Goldstein, Adam M.; Baidun, Khader; Segel, Michael J.; Peled, Nir; Symon, Zvi

    2015-10-01

    Objective: To determine the effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on tumor motion, lung volume, and dose to critical organs in patients receiving stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung tumors. Methods and Materials: After institutional review board approval in December 2013, patients with primary or secondary lung tumors referred for SBRT underwent 4-dimensional computed tomographic simulation twice: with free breathing and with CPAP. Tumor excursion was calculated by subtracting the vector of the greatest dimension of the gross tumor volume (GTV) from the internal target volume (ITV). Volumetric and dosimetric determinations were compared with the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. CPAP was used during treatment if judged beneficial. Results: CPAP was tolerated well in 10 of the 11 patients enrolled. Ten patients with 18 lesions were evaluated. The use of CPAP decreased tumor excursion by 0.5 ± 0.8 cm, 0.4 ± 0.7 cm, and 0.6 ± 0.8 cm in the superior–inferior, right–left, and anterior–posterior planes, respectively (P≤.02). Relative to free breathing, the mean ITV reduction was 27% (95% confidence interval [CI] 16%-39%, P<.001). CPAP significantly augmented lung volume, with a mean absolute increase of 915 ± 432 cm{sup 3} and a relative increase of 32% (95% CI 21%-42%, P=.003), contributing to a 22% relative reduction (95% CI 13%-32%, P=.001) in mean lung dose. The use of CPAP was also associated with a relative reduction in mean heart dose by 29% (95% CI 23%-36%, P=.001). Conclusion: In this pilot study, CPAP significantly reduced lung tumor motion compared with free breathing. The smaller ITV, the planning target volume (PTV), and the increase in total lung volume associated with CPAP contributed to a reduction in lung and heart dose. CPAP was well tolerated, reproducible, and simple to implement in the treatment room and should be evaluated further as a novel strategy for motion management in radiation therapy.

  19. Toxicity After Central versus Peripheral Lung Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy: A Propensity Score Matched-Pair Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Mangona, Victor S.; Aneese, Andrew M.; Marina, Ovidiu; Hymas, Richard V.; Ionascu, Dan; Robertson, John M.; Gallardo, Lori J.; Grills, Inga Siiner

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To compare toxicity after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for “central” tumors—within 2 cm of the proximal bronchial tree or with planning tumor volume (PTV) touching mediastinum—versus noncentral (“peripheral”) lung tumors. Methods and Materials: From November 2005 to January 2011, 229 tumors (110 central, 119 peripheral; T1-3N0M0 non–small-cell lung cancer and limited lung metastases) in 196 consecutive patients followed prospectively at a single institution received moderate-dose SBRT (48-60 Gy in 4-5 fractions [biologic effective dose=100-132 Gy, α/β=10]) using 4-dimensional planning, online image-guided radiation therapy, and institutional dose constraints. Clinical adverse events (AEs) were graded prospectively at clinical and radiographic follow-up using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Pulmonary function test (PFT) decline was graded as 2 (25%-49.9% decline), 3 (50.0%-74.9% decline), or 4 (≥75.0% decline). Central/peripheral location was assessed retrospectively on planning CT scans. Groups were compared after propensity score matching. Characteristics were compared with χ{sup 2} and 2-tailed t tests, adverse events with χ{sup 2} test-for-trend, and cumulative incidence using competing risks analysis (Gray's test). Results: With 79 central and 79 peripheral tumors matched, no differences in AEs were observed after 17 months median follow-up. Two-year cumulative incidences of grade ≥2 pain, musculoskeletal, pulmonary, and skin AEs were 14%, 5%, 6%, and 10% (central) versus 19%, 10%, 10%, and 3% (peripheral), respectively (P=.31, .38, .70, and .09). Grade ≥2 cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and central nervous system AEs were rare (<1%). Two-year incidences of grade ≥2 clinical AEs (28% vs 25%, P=.79), grade ≥2 PFT decline (36% vs 34%, P=.94), grade ≥3 clinical AEs (3% vs 7%, P=.48), and grade ≥3 PFT decline (0 vs 10%, P=.11) were similar for central versus peripheral tumors

  20. Local Control and Toxicity in a Large Cohort of Central Lung Tumors Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Modh, Ankit; Rimner, Andreas; Williams, Eric; Foster, Amanda; Shah, Mihir; Shi, Weiji; Zhang, Zhigang; Gelblum, Daphna Y.; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E.; Yorke, Ellen D.; Jackson, Andrew; Wu, Abraham J.

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in central lung tumors has been associated with higher rates of severe toxicity. We sought to evaluate toxicity and local control in a large cohort and to identify predictive dosimetric parameters. Methods and Materials: We identified patients who received SBRT for central tumors according to either of 2 definitions. Local failure (LF) was estimated using a competing risks model, and multivariate analysis (MVA) was used to assess factors associated with LF. We reviewed patient toxicity and applied Cox proportional hazard analysis and log-rank tests to assess whether dose-volume metrics of normal structures correlated with pulmonary toxicity. Results: One hundred twenty-five patients received SBRT for non-small cell lung cancer (n=103) or metastatic lesions (n=22), using intensity modulated radiation therapy. The most common dose was 45 Gy in 5 fractions. Median follow-up was 17.4 months. Incidence of toxicity ≥ grade 3 was 8.0%, including 5.6% pulmonary toxicity. Sixteen patients (12.8%) experienced esophageal toxicity ≥ grade 2, including 50% of patients in whom PTV overlapped the esophagus. There were 2 treatment-related deaths. Among patients receiving biologically effective dose (BED) ≥80 Gy (n=108), 2-year LF was 21%. On MVA, gross tumor volume (GTV) was significantly associated with LF. None of the studied dose-volume metrics of the lungs, heart, proximal bronchial tree (PBT), or 2 cm expansion of the PBT (“no-fly-zone” [NFZ]) correlated with pulmonary toxicity ≥grade 2. There were no differences in pulmonary toxicity between central tumors located inside the NFZ and those outside the NFZ but with planning target volume (PTV) intersecting the mediastinum. Conclusions: Using moderate doses, SBRT for central lung tumors achieves acceptable local control with low rates of severe toxicity. Dosimetric analysis showed no significant correlation between dose to the lungs, heart, or NFZ and

  1. Stereotactic body radiation therapy for abdominal and pelvic oligometastases: Dosimetric targets for safe and effective local control.

    PubMed

    Rwigema, Jean-Claude M; King, Christopher; Wang, Pin-Chieh; Kamrava, Mitchell; Kupelian, Patrick; Steinberg, Michael L; Lee, Percy

    2015-01-01

    To investigate correlates and predictors of outcomes of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for patients with abdominal and pelvic oligometastases from different primary tumors. We evaluated outcomes of 38 consecutive patients with 44 unresectable nodal and soft-tissue oligometastases in the abdominal pelvic region who were treated with SBRT between November 2008 and April 2014. Thirty-two patients had solitary lesions and 6 patients had 2 lesions. The median prescription dose was 40 Gy (24-50 Gy) delivered in 4-5 fractions. The median gross tumor volume was 18.7 mL (0.7-194.1 mL). We evaluated tumor response, local control (LC), and overall survival (OS) rates as well as acute and chronic toxicities. At a median follow-up of 19 months (0.9-53.4 months), tumor responses were: complete response 31.8%, partial response 38.6%, standard deviation 20.5%, and progressive disease 9.1%. The overall 1- to 2-year LC and OS rates were 100%/75.1% (95% confidence interval [CI], 54.4%-88.4%) and 95.2% (95% CI, 82.8%-98.8%)/88.9% (95% CI, 68.1%-95.1%), respectively. On univariate analysis, increasing SBRT dose, smaller gross tumor volume, and asymptomatic lesions were associated with improved LC (P = .01, P<.001, and P = .01, respectively). On multivariate analysis, advanced original primary disease stage predicted for worse OS (P = .001). One patient developed a colovesicular fistula at 20.9 months in the setting of local tumor progression with a volume of bowel receiving 20 Gy (V(20Gy)) = 26.9 mL. The overall mean bowel V(20Gy) achieved was 16 ± 22.9 mL. Another patient had grade 2 proctitis at 13 months after SBRT. Pain relief was achieved in 81.8% of patients with symptomatic lesions (N = 11). Our results suggest that SBRT doses 40-50 Gy in 5 fractions (biological effective dose 72-100 Gy10) with bowel V(20Gy) ≤20 mL are efficacious and associated with minimal toxicity for abdominal pelvic nodal and soft-tissue oligometastases. Palliation of symptoms is achievable

  2. Active Breathing Control in Combination With Ultrasound Imaging: A Feasibility Study of Image Guidance in Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy of Liver Lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Bloemen-van Gurp, Esther; Meer, Skadi van der; Hendry, Janet; Buijsen, Jeroen; Visser, Peter; Fontanarosa, Davide; Lachaine, Martin; Lammering, Guido; Verhaegen, Frank

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Accurate tumor positioning in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of liver lesions is often hampered by motion and setup errors. We combined 3-dimensional ultrasound imaging (3DUS) and active breathing control (ABC) as an image guidance tool. Methods and Materials: We tested 3DUS image guidance in the SBRT treatment of liver lesions for 11 patients with 88 treatment fractions. In 5 patients, 3DUS imaging was combined with ABC. The uncertainties of US scanning and US image segmentation in liver lesions were determined with and without ABC. Results: In free breathing, the intraobserver variations were 1.4 mm in left-right (L-R), 1.6 mm in superior-inferior (S-I), and 1.3 mm anterior-posterior (A-P). and the interobserver variations were 1.6 mm (L-R), 2.8 mm (S-I), and 1.2 mm (A-P). The combined uncertainty of US scanning and matching (inter- and intraobserver) was 4 mm (1 SD). The combined uncertainty when ABC was used reduced by 1.7 mm in the S-I direction. For the L-R and A-P directions, no significant difference was observed. Conclusion: 3DUS imaging for IGRT of liver lesions is feasible, although using anatomic surrogates in the close vicinity of the lesion may be needed. ABC-based breath-hold in midventilation during 3DUS imaging can reduce the uncertainty of US-based 3D table shift correction.

  3. Predicting Overall Survival After Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy in Early-Stage Lung Cancer: Development and External Validation of the Amsterdam Prognostic Model

    SciTech Connect

    Louie, Alexander V.; Haasbeek, Cornelis J.A.; Mokhles, Sahar; Rodrigues, George B.; Stephans, Kevin L.; Lagerwaard, Frank J.; Palma, David A.; Videtic, Gregory M.M.; Warner, Andrew; Takkenberg, Johanna J.M.; Reddy, Chandana A.; Maat, Alex P.W.M.; Woody, Neil M.; Slotman, Ben J.; Senan, Suresh

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: A prognostic model for 5-year overall survival (OS), consisting of recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) and a nomogram, was developed for patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (ES-NSCLC) treated with stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR). Methods and Materials: A primary dataset of 703 ES-NSCLC SABR patients was randomly divided into a training (67%) and an internal validation (33%) dataset. In the former group, 21 unique parameters consisting of patient, treatment, and tumor factors were entered into an RPA model to predict OS. Univariate and multivariate models were constructed for RPA-selected factors to evaluate their relationship with OS. A nomogram for OS was constructed based on factors significant in multivariate modeling and validated with calibration plots. Both the RPA and the nomogram were externally validated in independent surgical (n=193) and SABR (n=543) datasets. Results: RPA identified 2 distinct risk classes based on tumor diameter, age, World Health Organization performance status (PS) and Charlson comorbidity index. This RPA had moderate discrimination in SABR datasets (c-index range: 0.52-0.60) but was of limited value in the surgical validation cohort. The nomogram predicting OS included smoking history in addition to RPA-identified factors. In contrast to RPA, validation of the nomogram performed well in internal validation (r{sup 2}=0.97) and external SABR (r{sup 2}=0.79) and surgical cohorts (r{sup 2}=0.91). Conclusions: The Amsterdam prognostic model is the first externally validated prognostication tool for OS in ES-NSCLC treated with SABR available to individualize patient decision making. The nomogram retained strong performance across surgical and SABR external validation datasets. RPA performance was poor in surgical patients, suggesting that 2 different distinct patient populations are being treated with these 2 effective modalities.

  4. Advances in treatment techniques: stereotactic body radiation therapy and the spread of hypofractionation.

    PubMed

    Kavanagh, Brian D; Miften, Moyed; Rabinovitch, Rachel A

    2011-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is an essential component of the management of many cancers. Traditionally, a course of external bream RT often involved daily treatments for a duration of 6 weeks or longer in some instances. Now, however, emerging clinical evidence indicates that, for some common cancers, the total length of treatment can be substantially shortened, offering convenience to patients and opportunities for resource utilization efficiencies. This trend toward so-called hypofractionated RT has been supported by hypothesis-driven clinical research guided by a combination of radiobiological and clinical insights and technological enhancements. The present review presents the rationale behind and current status of hypofractionation for prostate, breast, and medically inoperable early stage lung cancer.

  5. Differences in rates of radiation-induced true and false rib fractures after stereotactic body radiation therapy for Stage I primary lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Hideharu; Inoue, Toshihiko; Shiomi, Hiroya; Oh, Ryoong-Jin

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the dosimetry and investigate the clinical outcomes of radiation-induced rib fractures (RIRFs) after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). A total of 126 patients with Stage I primary lung cancer treated with SBRT, who had undergone follow-up computed tomography (CT) at least 12 months after SBRT and who had no previous overlapping radiation exposure were included in the study. We used the Mantel–Haenszel method and multiple logistic regression analysis to compare risk factors. We analyzed D(0.5 cm3) (minimum absolute dose received by a 0.5-cm3 volume) and identified each rib that received a biologically effective dose (BED) (BED3, using the linear–quadratic (LQ) formulation assuming an α/β = 3) of at least 50 Gy. Of the 126 patients, 46 (37%) suffered a total of 77 RIRFs. The median interval from SBRT to RIRF detection was 15 months (range, 3–56 months). The 3-year cumulative probabilities were 45% (95% CI, 34–56%) and 3% (95% CI, 0–6%), for Grades 1 and 2 RIRFs, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that tumor location was a statistically significant risk factor for the development of Grade 1 RIRFs. Of the 77 RIRFs, 71 (92%) developed in the true ribs (ribs 1–7), and the remaining six developed in the false ribs (ribs 8–12). The BED3 associated with 10% and 50% probabilities of RIRF were 55 and 210 Gy to the true ribs and 240 and 260 Gy to the false ribs. We conclude that RIRFs develop more frequently in true ribs than in false ribs. PMID:25504640

  6. Planning Evaluation of C-Arm Cone Beam CT Angiography for Target Delineation in Stereotactic Radiation Surgery of Brain Arteriovenous Malformations

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Jun; Huang, Judy; Gailloud, Philippe; Rigamonti, Daniele; Lim, Michael; Bernard, Vincent; Ehtiati, Tina; Ford, Eric C.

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic radiation surgery (SRS) is one of the therapeutic modalities currently available to treat cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVM). Conventionally, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MR angiography (MRA) and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) are used in combination to identify the target volume for SRS treatment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of C-arm cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in the treatment planning of SRS for cerebral AVMs. Methods and Materials: Sixteen consecutive patients treated for brain AVMs at our institution were included in this retrospective study. Prior to treatment, all patients underwent MRA, DSA, and C-arm CBCT. All images were coregistered using the GammaPlan planning system. AVM regions were delineated independently by 2 physicians using either C-arm CBCT or MRA, resulting in 2 volumes: a CBCT volume (VCBCT) and an MRA volume (V{sub MRA}). SRS plans were generated based on the delineated regions. Results: The average volume of treatment targets delineated using C-arm CBCT and MRA were similar, 6.40 cm{sup 3} and 6.98 cm{sup 3}, respectively (P=.82). However, significant regions of nonoverlap existed. On average, the overlap of the MRA with the C-arm CBCT was only 52.8% of the total volume. In most cases, radiation plans based on V{sub MRA} did not provide adequate dose to the region identified on C-arm CBCT; the mean minimum dose to V{sub CBCT} was 29.5%, whereas the intended goal was 45% (P<.001). The mean volume of normal brain receiving 12 Gy or more in C-arm CBCT-based plans was not greater than in the MRA-based plans. Conclusions: Use of C-arm CBCT images significantly alters the delineated regions of AVMs for SRS planning, compared to that of MRA/MRI images. CT-based planning can be accomplished without increasing the dose to normal brain and may represent a more accurate definition of the nidus, increasing the chances for successful obliteration.

  7. Stereotactic radiotherapy using Novalis for skull base metastases developing with cranial nerve symptoms.

    PubMed

    Mori, Yoshimasa; Hashizume, Chisa; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Shibamoto, Yuta; Kosaki, Katsura; Nagai, Aiko

    2010-06-01

    Skull base metastases are challenging situations because they often involve critical structures such as cranial nerves. We evaluated the role of stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) which can give high doses to the tumors sparing normal structures. We treated 11 cases of skull base metastases from other visceral carcinomas. They had neurological symptoms due to cranial nerve involvement including optic nerve (3 patients), oculomotor (3), trigeminal (6), abducens (1), facial (4), acoustic (1), and lower cranial nerves (1). The interval between the onset of cranial nerve symptoms and Novalis SRT was 1 week to 7 months. Eleven tumors of 8-112 ml in volume were treated by Novalis SRT with 30-50 Gy in 10-14 fractions. The tumors were covered by 90-95% isodose. Imaging and clinical follow-up has been obtained in all 11 patients for 5-36 months after SRT. Seven patients among 11 died from primary carcinoma or other visceral metastases 9-36 months after Novalis SRT. All 11 metastatic tumors were locally controlled until the end of the follow-up time or patient death, though retreatment for re-growth was done in 1 patient. In 10 of 11 patients, cranial nerve deficits were improved completely or partially. In some patients, the cranial nerve symptoms were relieved even during the period of fractionated SRT. Novalis SRT is thought to be safe and effective treatment for skull base metastases with involvement of cranial nerves and it may improve cranial nerve symptoms quickly.

  8. Effect of intra-fraction motion on the accumulated dose for free-breathing MR-guided stereotactic body radiation therapy of renal-cell carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stemkens, Bjorn; Glitzner, Markus; Kontaxis, Charis; de Senneville, Baudouin Denis; Prins, Fieke M.; Crijns, Sjoerd P. M.; Kerkmeijer, Linda G. W.; Lagendijk, Jan J. W.; van den Berg, Cornelis A. T.; Tijssen, Rob H. N.

    2017-09-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has shown great promise in increasing local control rates for renal-cell carcinoma (RCC). Characterized by steep dose gradients and high fraction doses, these hypo-fractionated treatments are, however, prone to dosimetric errors as a result of variations in intra-fraction respiratory-induced motion, such as drifts and amplitude alterations. This may lead to significant variations in the deposited dose. This study aims to develop a method for calculating the accumulated dose for MRI-guided SBRT of RCC in the presence of intra-fraction respiratory variations and determine the effect of such variations on the deposited dose. For this, RCC SBRT treatments were simulated while the underlying anatomy was moving, based on motion information from three motion models with increasing complexity: (1) STATIC, in which static anatomy was assumed, (2) AVG-RESP, in which 4D-MRI phase-volumes were time-weighted, and (3) PCA, a method that generates 3D volumes with sufficient spatio-temporal resolution to capture respiration and intra-fraction variations. Five RCC patients and two volunteers were included and treatments delivery was simulated, using motion derived from subject-specific MR imaging. Motion was most accurately estimated using the PCA method with root-mean-squared errors of 2.7, 2.4, 1.0 mm for STATIC, AVG-RESP and PCA, respectively. The heterogeneous patient group demonstrated relatively large dosimetric differences between the STATIC and AVG-RESP, and the PCA reconstructed dose maps, with hotspots up to 40% of the D99 and an underdosed GTV in three out of the five patients. This shows the potential importance of including intra-fraction motion variations in dose calculations.

  9. Dosimetric and radiobiological comparison of CyberKnife M6™ InCise multileaf collimator over IRIS™ variable collimator in prostate stereotactic body radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kathriarachchi, Vindu; Shang, Charles; Evans, Grant; Leventouri, Theodora; Kalantzis, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    The impetus behind our study was to establish a quantitative comparison between the IRIS collimator and the InCise multileaf collimator (MLC) (Accuray Inc. Synnyvale, CA) for prostate stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Treatment plans for ten prostate cancer patients were performed on MultiPlan™ 5.1.2 treatment planning system utilizing MLC and IRIS for 36.25 Gy in five fractions. To reduce the magnitude of variations between cases, the planning tumor volume (PTV) was defined and outlined for treating prostate gland only, assuming no seminal vesicle or ex-capsule involvement. Evaluation indices of each plan include PTV coverage, conformity index (CI), Paddick's new CI, homogeneity index, and gradient index. Organ at risk (OAR) dose sparing was analyzed by the bladder wall Dmax and V37Gy, rectum Dmax and V36Gy. The radiobiological response was evaluated by tumor control probability and normal tissue complication probability based on equivalent uniform dose. The dose delivery efficiency was evaluated on the basis of planned monitor units (MUs) and the reported treatment time per fraction. Statistical significance was tested using the Wilcoxon signed rank test. The studies indicated that CyberKnife M6™ IRIS and InCise™ MLC produce equivalent SBRT prostate treatment plans in terms of dosimetry, radiobiology, and OAR sparing, except that the MLC plans offer improvement of the dose fall-off gradient by 29% over IRIS. The main advantage of replacing the IRIS collimator with MLC is the improved efficiency, determined from the reduction of MUs by 42%, and a 36% faster delivery time. PMID:27217626

  10. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and the Influence of Chemotherapy on Overall Survival for Large (≥5 Centimeter) Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Verma, Vivek; McMillan, Matthew T; Grover, Surbhi; Simone, Charles B

    2017-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for ≥5 cm lesions is poorly defined, largely owing to the low sample sizes in existing studies. The present analysis examined the SBRT outcomes and assessed the effect of chemotherapy in this population. The National Cancer Data Base was queried for primary non-small cell lung cancer ≥5 cm treated with SBRT (≤10 fractions). Patient, tumor, and treatment parameters were extracted. The primary outcome was overall survival (OS). Statistical methods involved Kaplan-Meier analysis and multivariable Cox proportional hazards modeling. From 2004 to 2012, data from 201 patients were analyzed. The median follow-up was 41.1 months. The median tumor size was 5.5 cm (interquartile range 5.0-6.0), with cT2a, cT2b, and cT3 disease in 24.9%, 53.2%, and 21.9%, respectively. The median total SBRT dose and fractionation was 50 Gy in 4 fractions, and 92.5% of the patients underwent SBRT with ≤5 fractions. The median OS was 25.1 months. Of the 201 patients, 15% received chemotherapy. The receipt of chemotherapy was associated with longer OS (median 30.6 vs 23.4 months; P=.027). On multivariable analysis, worse OS was seen with increasing age (hazard ratio [HR] 1.03; P=.012), poorly differentiated tumors (HR 2.06; P=.049), and T3 classification (HR 2.13; P=.005). On multivariable analysis, chemotherapy remained independently associated with improved OS (HR 0.57; P=.039). SBRT has utility in the setting of tumors ≥5 cm, with chemotherapy associated with improved OS in this subset. These hypothesis-generating data now raise the necessity of performing prospective analyses to determine whether chemotherapy confers outcome benefits after SBRT. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Dosimetric and radiobiological comparison of CyberKnife M6™ InCise multileaf collimator over IRIS™ variable collimator in prostate stereotactic body radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Kathriarachchi, Vindu; Shang, Charles; Evans, Grant; Leventouri, Theodora; Kalantzis, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    The impetus behind our study was to establish a quantitative comparison between the IRIS collimator and the InCise multileaf collimator (MLC) (Accuray Inc. Synnyvale, CA) for prostate stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Treatment plans for ten prostate cancer patients were performed on MultiPlan™ 5.1.2 treatment planning system utilizing MLC and IRIS for 36.25 Gy in five fractions. To reduce the magnitude of variations between cases, the planning tumor volume (PTV) was defined and outlined for treating prostate gland only, assuming no seminal vesicle or ex-capsule involvement. Evaluation indices of each plan include PTV coverage, conformity index (CI), Paddick's new CI, homogeneity index, and gradient index. Organ at risk (OAR) dose sparing was analyzed by the bladder wall Dmax and V37Gy, rectum Dmax and V36Gy. The radiobiological response was evaluated by tumor control probability and normal tissue complication probability based on equivalent uniform dose. The dose delivery efficiency was evaluated on the basis of planned monitor units (MUs) and the reported treatment time per fraction. Statistical significance was tested using the Wilcoxon signed rank test. The studies indicated that CyberKnife M6™ IRIS and InCise™ MLC produce equivalent SBRT prostate treatment plans in terms of dosimetry, radiobiology, and OAR sparing, except that the MLC plans offer improvement of the dose fall-off gradient by 29% over IRIS. The main advantage of replacing the IRIS collimator with MLC is the improved efficiency, determined from the reduction of MUs by 42%, and a 36% faster delivery time.

  12. Linac-based stereotactic radiotherapy and radiosurgery in patients with meningioma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background It was our purpose to analyze long-term clinical outcome and to identify prognostic factors after Linac-based fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (Linac-based FSRT) and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in patients with intracranial meningiomas. Materials and methods Between 10/1995 and 03/2009, 297 patients with a median age of 59 years were treated with FSRT for intracranial meningioma. 50 patients had a Grade I meningioma, 20 patients had a Grade II meningioma, 12 patients suffered from a Grade III tumor, and in 215 cases no histology was obtained (Grade 0). Of the 297 patients, 144 underwent FSRT as their primary treatment and 158 underwent postoperative FSRT. 179 patients received normofractionated radiotherapy (nFSRT), 92 patients received hypofractionated FSRT (hFSRT) and 26 patients underwent SRS. Patients with nFSRT received a mean total dose of 57.31 ± 5.82 Gy, patients with hFSRT received a mean total dose of 37.6 ± 4.4 Gy and patients who underwent SRS received a mean total dose of 17.31 ± 2.58 Gy. Results Median follow-up was 35 months. Overall progression free survival (PFS) was 92.3% at 3 years, 87% at 5 years and 84.1% at 10 years. Patients with adjuvant radiotherapy showed significantly better PFS-rates than patients who had been treated with primary radiotherapy. There was no significant difference between PFS-rates of nFSRT, hFSRT and SRS patients. PFS-rates were independent of tumor size. Patients who had received nFSRT showed less acute toxicity than those who had received hFSRT. In the Grade 0/I group the rate of radiologic focal reactions was significantly lower than in the atypical/malignant histology group. Conclusion This large study showed that FSRT is an effective and safe treatment modality with high PFS-rates for intracranial meningioma. We identified “pathological grading” and and “prior surgery” as significant prognostic factors. PMID:24650090

  13. A Dose-Volume Analysis of Radiation Pneumonitis in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Barriger, R. Bryan; Forquer, Jeffrey A.; Brabham, Jeffrey G.; Andolino, David L.; Shapiro, Ronald H.; Henderson, Mark A.; Johnstone, Peter A.S.; Fakiris, Achilles J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the rates and risk factors of radiation pneumonitis (RP) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Dosimetry records for 251 patients with lymph node-negative Stage I-IIB NSCLC and no prior chest radiation therapy (RT) treated with SBRT were reviewed. Patients were coded on the basis of the presence of at least Grade (G) 2 RP using the Common Toxicity Criteria version 2 criteria. Radiation doses, V5, V10, V20, and mean lung dose (MLD) data points were extracted from the dose-volume histogram (DVH). Results: Median PTV volume was 48 cc. Median prescribed radiation dose was 60 Gy delivered in three fractions to the 80% isodose line. Median age at treatment was 74 years. Median follow-up was 17 months. RP was reported after treatment of 42 lesions: G1 in 19 (8%), G2 in 17 (7%), G3 in 5 (2%), and G4 in 1 (0.4%). Total lung DVHs were available for 143 patients. For evaluable patients, median MLD, V5, V10, and V20 were 4.1 Gy, 20%, 12%, and 4%, respectively. Median MLDs were 4 Gy and 5 Gy for G0-1 and G2-4 groups, respectively (p = 0.14); median V5 was 20% for G0-1 and 24% for G2-4 (p = 0.70); median V10 was 12% in G0-1 and 16% in G2-4 (p = 0.08), and median V20 was 4% in G0-1 and 6.6% in G2-4 (p = 0.05). G2-4 RP was noted in 4.3% of patients with MLD {<=}4 Gy compared with 17.6% of patients with MLD >4 Gy (p = 0.02), and in 4.3% of patients with V20 {<=}4% compared with 16.4% of patients with V20 >4% (p = 0.03). Conclusion: Overall rate of G2-4 RP in our population treated with SBRT was 9.4%. Development of symptomatic RP in this series correlated with MLD and V20.

  14. Impact of Pretreatment Tumor Growth Rate on Outcome of Early-Stage Lung Cancer Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Atallah, Soha; Cho, B.C. John; Allibhai, Zishan; Taremi, Mojgan; Giuliani, Meredith; Le, Lisa W.; Brade, Anthony; Sun, Alexander; Bezjak, Andrea; Hope, Andrew J.

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To determine the influence of pretreatment tumor growth rate on outcomes in patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: A review was conducted on 160 patients with T1-T2N0M0 NSCLC treated with SBRT at single institution. The patient's demographic and clinical data, time interval (t) between diagnostic and planning computed tomography (CT), vital status, disease status, and cause of death were extracted from a prospectively kept database. Differences in gross tumor volume between diagnostic CT (GTV1) and planning CT (GTV2) were recorded, and growth rate was calculated by use of specific growth rate (SGR). Kaplan-Meier curves were constructed for overall survival (OS). Differences between groups were compared with a log-rank test. Multivariate analyses were performed by use of the Cox proportional hazard model with SGR and other relevant clinical factors. Cumulative incidence was calculated for local, regional, and distant failures by use of the competing risk approach and was compared with Gray's test. Results: The median time interval between diagnostic and planning CT was 82 days. The patients were divided into 2 groups, and the median SGR was used as a cut-off. The median survival times were 38.6 and 27.7 months for the low and high SGR groups, respectively (P=.03). Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (P=.01), sex (P=.04), SGR (P=.03), and GTV2 (P=.002) were predictive for OS in multivariable Cox regression analysis and, except sex, were similarly predictive for failure-free survival (FFS). The 3-year cumulative incidences of regional failure were 19.2% and 6.0% for the high and low SGR groups, respectively (P=.047). Conclusion: High SGR was correlated with both poorer OS and FFS in patients with early-stage NSCLC treated with SBRT. If validated, this measurement may be useful in identifying patients most likely to benefit from adjuvant

  15. Feasibility of stereotactic body radiation therapy with volumetric modulated arc therapy and high intensity photon beams for hepatocellular carcinoma patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Po-Ming; Hsu, Wei-Chung; Chung, Na-Na; Chang, Feng-Ling; Jang, Chin-Jyh; Fogliata, Antonella; Scorsetti, Marta; Cozzi, Luca

    2014-01-10

    To report technical features, early outcome and toxicity of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) treatments with volumetric modulated arc therapy (RapidArc) for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Twenty patients (22 lesions) were prospectively enrolled in a feasibility study. Dose prescription was 50 Gy in 10 fractions. Seven patients (35%) were classified as AJCC stage I-II while 13 (65%) were stages III-IV. Eighteen patients (90%) were Child-Pugh stage A, the remaining were stage B. All patients were treated with RapidArc technique with flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams of 10 MV from a TrueBeam linear accelerator. Technical, dosimetric and early clinical assessment was performed to characterize treatment and its potential outcome. Median age was 68 years, median initial tumor volume was 124 cm3 (range: 6-848). Median follow-up time was 7.4 months (range: 3-13). All patients completed treatment without interruption. Mean actuarial overall survival was of 9.6 ± 0.9 months (95%C.L. 7.8-11.4), median survival was not reached; complete response was observed in 8/22 (36.4%) lesions; partial response in 7/22 (31.8%), stable disease in 6/22 (27.3%), 1/22 (4.4%) showed progression. Toxicity was mild with only 1 case of grade 3 RILD and all other types were not greater than grade 2. Concerning dosimetric data, Paddick conformity index was 0.98 ± 0.02; gradient index was 3.82 ± 0.93; V95% to the clinical target volume was 93.6 ± 7.7%. Mean dose to kidneys resulted lower than 3.0 Gy; mean dose to stomach 4.5 ± 3.0 Gy; D(3) 1(cm) to spinal cord was 8.2 ± 4.5 Gy; D1% to the esophagus was 10.2 ± 9.7 Gy. Average beam on time resulted 0.7 ± 0.2 minutes (range: 0.4-1.4) with the delivery of an average of 4.4 partial arcs (range: 3-6) of those 86% non-coplanar. Clinical results could suggest to introduce VMAT-RapidArc as an appropriate SBRT technique for patients with HCC in view of a prospective dose escalation trial.

  16. Interrater Reliability of the Categorization of Late Radiographic Changes After Lung Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Faruqi, Salman; Giuliani, Meredith E.; Raziee, Hamid; Yap, Mei Ling; Roberts, Heidi; Le, Lisa W.; Brade, Anthony; Cho, John; Sun, Alexander; Bezjak, Andrea; Hope, Andrew J.

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: Radiographic changes after lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) have been categorized into 4 groups: modified conventional pattern (A), mass-like fibrosis; (B), scar-like fibrosis (C), and no evidence of increased density (D). The purpose of this study was to assess the interrater reliability of this categorization system in patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Seventy-seven patients were included in this study, all treated with SBRT for early-stage (T1/2) NSCLC at a single institution, with a minimum follow-up of 6 months. Six experienced clinicians familiar with post-SBRT radiographic changes scored the serial posttreatment CT images independently in a blinded fashion. The proportion of patients categorized as A, B, C, or D at each interval was determined. Krippendorff's alpha (KA), Multirater kappa (M-kappa), and Gwet's AC1 (AC1) scores were used to establish interrater reliability. A leave-one-out analysis was performed to demonstrate the variability among raters. Interrater agreement of the first and last 20 patients scored was calculated to explore whether a training effect existed. Results: The number of ratings ranged from 450 at 6 months to 84 at 48 months of follow-up. The proportion of patients in each category was as follows: A, 45%; B, 16%; C, 13%; and D, 26%. KA and M-kappa ranged from 0.17 to 0.34. AC1 measure range was 0.22 to 0.48. KA increased from 0.24 to 0.36 at 12 months with training. The percent agreement for pattern A peaked at 12 month with a 54% chance of having >50% raters in agreement and decreased over time, whereas that for patterns B and C increased over time to a maximum of 20% and 22%, respectively. Conclusion: This post-SBRT radiographic change categorization system has modest interrater agreement, and there is a suggestion of a training effect. Patterns of fibrosis evolve after SBRT and alternative categorization systems should be evaluated.

  17. Dosimetric Analysis of Organs at Risk During Expiratory Gating in Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Taniguchi, Cullen M.; Murphy, James D.; Eclov, Neville; Atwood, Todd F.; Kielar, Kayla N.; Christman-Skieller, Claudia; Mok, Ed; Xing, Lei; Koong, Albert C.; Chang, Daniel T.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To determine how the respiratory phase impacts dose to normal organs during stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Eighteen consecutive patients with locally advanced, unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma treated with SBRT were included in this study. On the treatment planning 4-dimensional computed tomography (CT) scan, the planning target volume (PTV), defined as the gross tumor volume plus 3-mm margin, the duodenum, and the stomach were contoured on the end-expiration (CT{sub exp}) and end-inspiration (CT{sub insp}) phases for each patient. A separate treatment plan was constructed for both phases with the dose prescription of 33 Gy in 5 fractions with 95% coverage of the PTV by the 100% isodose line. The dose-volume histogram (DVH) endpoints, volume of duodenum that received 20 Gy (V{sub 20}), V{sub 25}, and V{sub 30} and maximum dose to 5 cc of contoured organ (D{sub 5cc}), D{sub 1cc}, and D{sub 0.1cc}, were evaluated. Results: Dosimetric parameters for the duodenum, including V{sub 25}, V{sub 30}, D{sub 1cc}, and D{sub 0.1cc} improved by planning on the CT{sub exp} compared to those on the CT{sub insp}. There was a statistically significant overlap of the PTV with the duodenum but not the stomach during the CT{sub insp} compared to the CT{sub exp} (0.38 ± 0.17 cc vs 0.01 ± 0.01 cc, P=.048). A larger expansion of the PTV, in accordance with a Danish phase 2 trial, showed even more overlapping volume of duodenum on the CT{sub insp} compared to that on the CT{sub exp} (5.5 ± 0.9 cc vs 3.0 ± 0.8 cc, P=.0003) but no statistical difference for any stomach dosimetric DVH parameter. Conclusions: Dose to the duodenum was higher when treating on the inspiratory than on the expiratory phase. These data suggest that expiratory gating may be preferable to inspiratory breath-hold and free breathing strategies for minimizing risk of toxicity.

  18. Regional Normal Lung Tissue Density Changes in Patients Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Lung Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Diot, Quentin; Kavanagh, Brian; Schefter, Tracey; Gaspar, Laurie; Stuhr, Kelly; Miften, Moyed

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To describe regional lung tissue density changes in normal lung tissue of patients with primary and metastatic lung tumors who received stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 179 post-SBRT follow-up computed tomography (CT) scans of 62 patients who received SBRT between 2003 and 2009 were studied. Median prescription dose was 54 Gy (range, 30-60 Gy) in 3 to 5 fractions. SBRT-induced lung density changes on post-SBRT follow-up CT were evaluated at approximately 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 30 months after treatment. Dose-response curves (DRC) were generated for SBRT-induced lung damage by averaging CT number (HU) changes for regions of the lungs receiving the same dose at 5-Gy intervals. Results: For all follow-up interval periods, CT numbers linearly increased with dose until 35 Gy and were constant thereafter. For 3, 18, 24, and 30 months, the rate of relative electron density increase with dose was approximately 0.24% per Gy. At 6 months, the rate was also similar below 20 Gy but then rose to 0.6% per Gy above this threshold. After 6 months, DRCs were mostly time-independent. When split between patients treated with 3 fractions of 12 to 20 Gy (median, 20 Gy; average tumor volume, 12 {+-} 16 cm{sup 3}) and with >3 fractions of 6 to 12.5 Gy (median, 9 Gy; average tumor volume, 30 {+-} 40 cm{sup 3}), DRCs differed significantly. In both cases, CT changes at 3, 18, 24, and 30 months were identical to those of the population DRC; however, patients who received >3 fractions showed 6-month CT changes that were more than twice those for the group that received 3 fractions. Conclusions: This analysis of SBRT-induced normal lung density changes indicates that lung normal tissue has more pronounced self-limited acute effects than late effects. Differences in acute CT changes following treatments in 3 fractions were considerably less than for treatments in >3 fractions.

  19. Intracranial stereotactic positioning systems: Report of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Radiation Therapy Committee Task Group No. 68

    SciTech Connect

    Lightstone, A.W.; Benedict, Stanley H.; Bova, Frank J.; Solberg, Timothy D.; Stern, Robin L.

    2005-07-15

    Intracranial stereotactic positioning systems (ISPSs) are used to position patients prior to precise radiation treatment of localized lesions of the brain. Often, the lesion is located in close proximity to critical anatomic features whose functions should be maintained. Many types of ISPSs have been described in the literature and are commercially available. These are briefly reviewed. ISPS systems provide two critical functions. The first is to establish a coordinate system upon which a guided therapy can be applied. The second is to provide a method to reapply the coordinate system to the patient such that the coordinates assigned to the patient's anatomy are identical from application to application. Without limiting this study to any particular approach to ISPSs, this report introduces nomenclature and suggests performance tests to quantify both the stability of the ISPS to map diagnostic data to a coordinate system, as well as the ISPS's ability to be realigned to the patient's anatomy. For users who desire to develop a new ISPS system, it may be necessary for the clinical team to establish the accuracy and precision of each of these functions. For commercially available systems that have demonstrated an acceptable level of accuracy and precision, the clinical team may need to demonstrate local ability to apply the system in a manner consistent with that employed during the published testing. The level of accuracy and precision required of an individual ISPS system is dependent upon the clinical protocol (e.g., fractionation, margin, pathology, etc.). Each clinical team should provide routine quality assurance procedures that are sufficient to support the assumptions of accuracy and precision used during the planning process. The testing of ISPS systems can be grouped into two broad categories, type testing, which occurs prior to general commercialization, and site testing, performed when a commercial system is installed at a clinic. Guidelines to help select

  20. Critical Appraisal of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy in Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Metastases to Abdominal Lymph Nodes

    SciTech Connect

    Bignardi, Mario; Cozzi, Luca; Fogliata, Antonella; Lattuada, Paola; Mancosu, Pietro; Navarria, Piera; Urso, Gaetano; Vigorito, Sabrina; Scorsetti, Marta

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: A planning study was performed comparing volumetric modulated arcs, RapidArc (RA), fixed beam IMRT (IM), and conformal radiotherapy (CRT) with multiple static fields or short conformal arcs in a series of patients treated with hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for solitary or oligo-metastases from different tumors to abdominal lymph nodes. Methods and Materials: Fourteen patients were included in the study. Dose prescription was set to 45 Gy (mean dose to clinical target volume [CTV]) in six fractions of 7.5 Gy. Objectives for CTV and planning target volume (PTV) were as follows: Dose{sub min} >95%, Dose{sub max} <107%. For organs at risk the following objectives were used: Maximum dose to spine <18 Gy; V{sub 15Gy} <35% for both kidneys, V{sub 36Gy} <1% for duodenum, V{sub 36Gy} <3% for stomach and small bowel, V{sub 15Gy} <(total liver volume - 700 cm{sup 3}) for liver. Dose-volume histograms were evaluated to assess plan quality. Results: Planning objectives on CTV and PTV were achieved by all techniques. Use of RA improved PTV coverage (V{sub 95%} = 90.2% +- 5.2% for RA compared with 82.5% +- 9.6% and 84.5% +- 8.2% for CRT and IM, respectively). Most planning objectives for organs at risk were met by all techniques except for the duodenum, small bowel, and stomach, in which the CRT plans exceeded the dose/volume constraints in some patients. The MU/fraction values were as follows: 2186 +- 211 for RA, 2583 +- 699 for IM, and 1554 +- 153 for CRT. Effective treatment time resulted as follows: 3.7 +- 0.4 min for RA, 10.6 +- 1.2 min for IM, and 6.3 +- 0.5 min for CRT. Conclusions: Delivery of SBRT by RA showed improvements in conformal avoidance with respect to standard conformal irradiation. Delivery parameters confirmed logistical advantages of RA, particularly compared with IM.

  1. Dose-Volume Parameters Predict for the Development of Chest Wall Pain After Stereotactic Body Radiation for Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mutter, Robert W.; Liu Fan; Abreu, Andres; Yorke, Ellen; Jackson, Andrew; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Chest wall (CW) pain has recently been recognized as an important adverse effect of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We developed a dose-volume model to predict the development of this toxicity. Methods and Materials: A total of 126 patients with primary, clinically node-negative NSCLC received three to five fractions of SBRT to doses of 40-60 Gy and were prospectively followed. The dose-absolute volume histograms of two different definitions of the CW as an organ at risk (CW3cm and CW2cm) were examined for all 126 patients. Results: With a median follow-up of 16 months, the 2-year estimated actuarial incidence of Grade {>=} 2 CW pain was 39%. The median time to onset of Grade {>=} 2 CW pain (National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, Version 3.0) was 9 months. There was no predictive advantage for biologically corrected dose over physical dose. Neither fraction number (p = 0.07) nor prescription dose (p = 0.07) were significantly correlated with the development of Grade {>=} 2 CW pain. Cox Proportional Hazards analysis identified significant correlation with a broad range of dose-volume combinations, with the CW volume receiving 30 Gy (V30) as one of the strongest predictors (p < 0.001). CW2cm consistently enabled better prediction of CW toxicity. When a physical dose of 30 Gy was received by more than 70 cm{sup 3} of CW2cm, there was a significant correlation with Grade {>=} 2 CW pain (p = 0.004). Conclusions: CW toxicity after SBRT is common and long-term follow-up is needed to identify affected patients. A volume of CW {>=} 70 cm{sup 3} receiving 30 Gy is significantly correlated with Grade {>=} 2 CW pain. We are currently applying this constraint at our institution for patients receiving thoracic SBRT. An actuarial atlas of our data is provided as an electronic supplement to facilitate data-sharing and meta-analysis relating to CW pain.

  2. ExacTrac Snap Verification: A New Tool for Ensuring Quality Control for Lung Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Udrescu, Corina; Mornex, Francoise; Tanguy, Ronan; Chapet, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The intrafraction verification provided by ExacTrac X-ray 6D Snap Verification (ET-SV) allows the tracking of potential isocenter displacements throughout patient position and treatment. The aims of this study were (1) to measure the intrafraction variations of the isocenter position (random errors); (2) to study the amplitude of the variation related to the fraction duration; and (3) to assess the impact of the table movement on positioning uncertainties. Methods and Materials: ET-SV uses images acquired before or during treatment delivery or both to detect isocenter displacement. Twenty patients treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung tumors underwent SV before or during each beam. Noncoplanar beams were sometimes necessary. The time between the setup of the patient and each SV was noted, and values of deviations were compiled for 3 SV time groups: SV performed at {<=}10 min (group 1), between 11 and 20 min (group 2), and {>=}21 min (group 3). Random errors in positioning during the use of noncoplanar fields were noted. Results: The mean isocenter deviation {+-}SD was 2 {+-} 0.5 mm (range, 1-8 mm). The average deviations {+-}SD increased significantly from 1.6 {+-} 0.5 mm to 2.1 {+-} 0.8 mm and 2.2 {+-} 0.6 mm for groups 1, 2, and 3 (P=.002), respectively. Percentages of deviation {>=}3 mm were 7.06%, 22.83%, and 28.07% and 1.08%, 4.15%, and 8.4% for {>=}5 mm (P<.0001). For 11 patients, table rotation was necessary. The mean isocenter deviation {+-}SD increased significantly from 1.9 {+-} 0.5 mm before table rotation to 2.7 {+-} 0.5 mm (P=.001) for the first beam treated after rotation. Conclusions: SV detects isocenter deviations, which increase in amplitude and frequency with the fraction duration, and enables intrafraction verification for SBRT (taking into account clinical condition and technical issues). SV gives accurate targeting at any time during irradiation and may raise confidence to escalate the dose. SV appears to be

  3. Pre-treatment non-target lung FDG-PET uptake predicts symptomatic radiation pneumonitis following Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR).

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Aadel A; Binkley, Michael S; Rigdon, Joseph; Carter, Justin N; Aggarwal, Sonya; Dudley, Sara A; Qian, Yushen; Kumar, Kiran A; Hara, Wendy Y; Gensheimer, Michael; Nair, Viswam S; Maxim, Peter G; Shultz, David B; Bush, Karl; Trakul, Nicholas; Le, Quynh-Thu; Diehn, Maximilian; Loo, Billy W; Guo, Haiwei Henry

    2016-06-01

    To determine if pre-treatment non-target lung FDG-PET uptake predicts for symptomatic radiation pneumonitis (RP) following lung stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR). We reviewed a 258 patient database from our institution to identify 28 patients who experienced symptomatic (grade ⩾ 2) RP after SABR, and compared them to 57 controls who did not develop symptomatic RP. We compared clinical, dosimetric and functional imaging characteristics between the 2 cohorts including pre-treatment non-target lung FDG-PET uptake. Median follow-up time was 26.9 months. Patients who experienced symptomatic RP had significantly higher non-target lung FDG-PET uptake as measured by mean SUV (p < 0.0001) than controls. ROC analysis for symptomatic RP revealed area under the curve (AUC) of 0.74, with sensitivity 82.1% and specificity 57.9% with cutoff mean non-target lung SUV > 0.56. Predictive value increased (AUC of 0.82) when mean non-target lung SUV was combined with mean lung dose (MLD). We developed a 0-2 point model using these 2 variables, 1 point each for SUV > 0.56 or MLD > 5.88 Gy equivalent dose in 2 Gy per fraction (EQD2), predictive for symptomatic RP in our cohort with hazard ratio 10.01 for score 2 versus 0 (p < 0.001). Patients with elevated pre-SABR non-target lung FDG-PET uptake are at increased risk of symptomatic RP after lung SABR. Our predictive model suggests patients with mean non-target lung SUV > 0.56 and MLD > 5.88 Gy EQD2 are at highest risk. Our predictive model should be validated in an external cohort before clinical implementation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The role of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in the treatment of oligometastatic disease in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Scorsetti, Marta; Navarria, Piera; D'Agostino, Giuseppe; Piergallini, Lorenzo; De Rose, Fiorenza; Ascolese, Annamaria; Tozzi, Angelo; Iftode, Cristina; Villa, Elisa; Comito, Tiziana; Franzese, Ciro; Mancosu, Pietro; Tomatis, Stefano; Cozzi, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To report about clinical outcome of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in the treatment of oligometastatic disease in elderly patients. Methods: Patients with 1–4 inoperable metastases were treated with SBRT. Dose prescription ranged from 40 to 75 Gy in 3–8 fractions. SBRT was delivered using the volumetric modulated arc therapy technique with flattening filter-free photon beams. The primary end points were in-field local control (LC) and toxicity. Secondary end points were overall survival (OS) and disease-specific survival (DSS). Results: 82 patients with 111 total metastases were treated. Median age was 79 years. 64 patients (78%) had a single lesion; the remaining patients had 2–4 lesions. 16 (14.4%) lesions were localized in the abdomen, 50 (45.0%) in the liver and 45 (40.5%) in the lungs. Local response was observed for 87 lesions (78.4%) while local progression was observed in 24 lesions (21.6%). Actuarial 1-year LC was 86.8% ± 3.3%. Actuarial 1-year OS was 93.6% ± 2.7%. 2-year findings were 76.3% ± 4.4% and 72.0% ± 5.6%, respectively. Actuarial 1- and 2-year DSS results were 97.5% ± 2.0% and 81.6% ± 4.9%, respectively. Treatment-related Grade 2–3 toxicity was observed in five patients (4.2%); Grade 1 toxicity in seven patients (5.9%) and no toxicity was observed in 85.4% of the cases. Conclusion: SBRT is a safe and effective therapeutic option for the treatment of oligometastatic disease in the elderly with acceptable rates of LC and low treatment-related toxicity. Advances in knowledge: The use of SBRT for oligometastatic disease in the elderly can be considered as a valuable approach, particularly for patients with fragile status or refusing other approaches. PMID:26183933

  5. The role of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in the treatment of oligometastatic disease in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Scorsetti, Marta; Clerici, Elena; Navarria, Piera; D'Agostino, Giuseppe; Piergallini, Lorenzo; De Rose, Fiorenza; Ascolese, Annamaria; Tozzi, Angelo; Iftode, Cristina; Villa, Elisa; Comito, Tiziana; Franzese, Ciro; Mancosu, Pietro; Tomatis, Stefano; Cozzi, Luca

    2015-09-01

    To report about clinical outcome of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in the treatment of oligometastatic disease in elderly patients. Patients with 1-4 inoperable metastases were treated with SBRT. Dose prescription ranged from 40 to 75 Gy in 3-8 fractions. SBRT was delivered using the volumetric modulated arc therapy technique with flattening filter-free photon beams. The primary end points were in-field local control (LC) and toxicity. Secondary end points were overall survival (OS) and disease-specific survival (DSS). 82 patients with 111 total metastases were treated. Median age was 79 years. 64 patients (78%) had a single lesion; the remaining patients had 2-4 lesions. 16 (14.4%) lesions were localized in the abdomen, 50 (45.0%) in the liver and 45 (40.5%) in the lungs. Local response was observed for 87 lesions (78.4%) while local progression was observed in 24 lesions (21.6%). Actuarial 1-year LC was 86.8% ± 3.3%. Actuarial 1-year OS was 93.6% ± 2.7%. 2-year findings were 76.3% ± 4.4% and 72.0% ± 5.6%, respectively. Actuarial 1- and 2-year DSS results were 97.5% ± 2.0% and 81.6% ± 4.9%, respectively. Treatment-related Grade 2-3 toxicity was observed in five patients (4.2%); Grade 1 toxicity in seven patients (5.9%) and no toxicity was observed in 85.4% of the cases. SBRT is a safe and effective therapeutic option for the treatment of oligometastatic disease in the elderly with acceptable rates of LC and low treatment-related toxicity. The use of SBRT for oligometastatic disease in the elderly can be considered as a valuable approach, particularly for patients with fragile status or refusing other approaches.

  6. SU-E-P-40: Dosimetric Characteristics of Field Aperture Margin Design in Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To characterize the dosimetric effects of field aperture margin design in Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT). Methods: Three artificial spherical PTVs, with diameter of 10mm, 20mm and 30mm, were created on CT images of a human body thoracic phantom. Seven non-coplanar isocentric fields were used for treatment planning. For each PTV, treatment plans with margins 0mm, 1mm, 2mm and 3mm were planned. Dosimetric comparison among plans was done considering the following parameters: prescribed isodose line for target coverage, maximum dose, mean dose as well as dose spillages of V80, V50, and V20. Results: Corresponding to aperture margins of 0mm, 1mm,2m and 3mm used in the treatment planning, the percentage of isodose line chosen for dose prescription increases from 65% to 93% for 10mm PTV, 70% to 92% for 20mm PTV, and 75% to 92% for 30mm PTV. The maximum dose decrease accordingly from 155.7% to 109.5% for 10mm PTV, 145% to 111.6% for 20mm PTV, 137% to 112.2% for 30mm PTV. The mean dose decrease from 138.% to 104.4% for 10mm PTV, 122.8% to 106.1% for 20mm PTV, 121.3% to 106% for 30mm PTV. Dose spillages (mm3) increase (V80−2.6 to 4.02, V50−4.55 to 9.3, V20–87.86 to 101.71) for 10 mm PTV, (V80−6.78 to 9.89, V50–13.46 to 20.4, V20-119.16 to 219.1) for 20 mm PTV, (V80–22.01 to 28.59, V50–41.56 to 52.66, V20-532.71 to 551.84) for 30 mm PTV. Conclusion: In SBRT treatment planning, tight field aperture margin requires prescribing dose to lower isodose line that leading to higher dose inhomogeneity and higher mean dose to PTV. Loose margin allows prescribing dose to higher isodose line, therefore improves the dose homogeneity. However, it increases dose spillages. Clinician could try different margins according to the PTV size and location of surrounding critical organs to optimize the dose delivered to the patient.

  7. Recursive Partitioning Analysis Index Is Predictive for Overall Survival in Patients Undergoing Spine Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Spinal Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Samuel T.; Koyfman, Shlomo A.; Woody, Neil; Angelov, Lilyana; Soeder, Sherry L.; Reddy, Chandana A.; Rybicki, Lisa A.; Djemil, Toufik; Suh, John H.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To generate a prognostic index using recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) for patients undergoing spine stereotactic body radiation therapy (sSBRT) for spinal metastases (sMet). Methods and Materials: From an institutional review board-approved database, 174 patients were treated for sMet with sSBRT between February 2006 and August 2009. Median dose was 14 Gy (range, 8-24 Gy), typically in a single fraction (range, 1-5). Kaplan-Meier analysis was performed to detect any correlation between survival and histology. Histologies were divided into favorable (breast and prostate), radioresistant (renal cell, melanoma and sarcoma), and other (all other histologies). RPA was performed to identify any association of the following variables with overall survival (OS) following sSBRT: histology, gender, age, Karnofsky performance status (KPS), control of primary, extraosseous metastases, time from primary diagnosis (TPD), dose of sSBRT ({<=}14 Gy vs. >14 Gy), extent of spine disease (epidural only, bone and epidural, bone only), upfront or salvage treatment, presence of paraspinal extension, and previous surgery. Results: Median follow-up was 8.9 months. Median OS time from sSBRT was 10.7 months. Median OS intervals for favorable histologies were 14 months, 11.2 months for radioresistant histologies, and 7.3 months for other histologies (p = 0.02). RPA analysis resulted in three classes (p < 0.0001). Class 1 was defined as TPD of >30 months and KPS of >70; Class 2 was TPD of >30 months and KPS of {<=}70 or a TPD of {<=}30 months and age <70 years old; Class 3 was TPD of {<=}30 months and age {>=}70 years old. Median OS was 21.1 months for Class 1 (n = 59), 8.7 months for Class 2 (n = 104), and 2.4 months for Class 3 (n = 11). Conclusion: sSBRT patients treated for sMet have a wide variability in OS. We developed an RPA classification system that is predictive of OS. While many patients are treated for palliation of pain or to avoid symptomatic progression, this

  8. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Locally Advanced and Borderline Resectable Pancreatic Cancer Is Effective and Well Tolerated

    SciTech Connect

    Chuong, Michael D.; Springett, Gregory M.; Freilich, Jessica M.; Park, Catherine K.; Weber, Jill M.; Mellon, Eric A.; Hodul, Pamela J.; Malafa, Mokenge P.; Meredith, Kenneth L.; Hoffe, Sarah E.; Shridhar, Ravi

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) provides high rates of local control (LC) and margin-negative (R0) resections for locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) and borderline resectable pancreatic cancer (BRPC), respectively, with minimal toxicity. Methods and Materials: A single-institution retrospective review was performed for patients with nonmetastatic pancreatic cancer treated with induction chemotherapy followed by SBRT. SBRT was delivered over 5 consecutive fractions using a dose painting technique including 7-10 Gy/fraction to the region of vessel abutment or encasement and 5-6 Gy/fraction to the remainder of the tumor. Restaging scans were performed at 4 weeks, and resectable patients were considered for resection. The primary endpoints were overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). Results: Seventy-three patients were evaluated, with a median follow-up time of 10.5 months. Median doses of 35 Gy and 25 Gy were delivered to the region of vessel involvement and the remainder of the tumor, respectively. Thirty-two BRPC patients (56.1%) underwent surgery, with 31 undergoing an R0 resection (96.9%). The median OS, 1-year OS, median PFS, and 1-year PFS for BRPC versus LAPC patients was 16.4 months versus 15 months, 72.2% versus 68.1%, 9.7 versus 9.8 months, and 42.8% versus 41%, respectively (all P>.10). BRPC patients who underwent R0 resection had improved median OS (19.3 vs 12.3 months; P=.03), 1-year OS (84.2% vs 58.3%; P=.03), and 1-year PFS (56.5% vs 25.0%; P<.0001), respectively, compared with all nonsurgical patients. The 1-year LC in nonsurgical patients was 81%. We did not observe acute grade ≥3 toxicity, and late grade ≥3 toxicity was minimal (5.3%). Conclusions: SBRT safely facilitates margin-negative resection in patients with BRPC pancreatic cancer while maintaining a high rate of LC in unresectable patients. These data support the expanded implementation of SBRT for pancreatic cancer.

  9. Characteristics of a dedicated linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery-radiotherapy unit.

    PubMed

    Das, I J; Downes, M B; Corn, B W; Curran, W J; Werner-Wasik, M; Andrews, D W

    1996-01-01

    A stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy (SRS/SRT) system on a dedicated Varian Clinac-600SR linear accelerator with Brown-Roberts-Wells and Gill-Thomas-Cosman relocatable frames along with the Radionics (RSA) planning system is evaluated. The Clinac-600SR has a single 6-MV beam with the same beam characteristics as that of the mother unit, the Clinac-600C. The primary collimator is a fixed cone projecting to a 10-cm diameter at isocenter. The secondary collimator is a heavily shielded cylindrical collimator attached to the face plate of the primary collimator. The tertiary collimation consists of the actual treatment cones. The cone sizes vary from 12.5 to 40.0 mm diameter. The mechanical stability of the entire system was verified. The variations in isocenter position with table, gantry, and collimator rotation were found to be < 0.5 mm with a compounded accuracy of < or = 1.0 mm. The radiation leakage under the cones was < 1% measured at a depth of 5 cm in a phantom. The beam profiles of all cones in the x and y directions were within +/- 0.5 mm and match with the physical size of the cone. The dosimetric data such as tissue maximum ratio, off-axis ratio, and cone factor were taken using film, diamond detector, and ion chambers. The mechanical and dosimetric characteristics including dose linearity of this unit are presented and found to be suitable for SRS/SRT. The difficulty in absolute dose measurement for small cone is discussed.

  10. Influence of segment width on plan quality for volumetric modulated arc based stereotactic body radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Nithiyanantham, Karthikeyan; Kadirampatti Mani, Ganesh; Subramani, Vikraman; Karukkupalayam Palaniappan, Karrthick; Uthiran, Mohanraj; Vellengiri, Sennniandavar; Raju, Sambasivaselli; Supe, Sanjay S; Kataria, Tejinder

    2014-09-01

    To study the influence of segment width on plan quality for volumetric modulated arc based stereotactic body radiotherapy. The redundancy of modulation for regularly shaped small volume tumors results in creation of many small segments and an increase of monitor units, with a consequent prolongation of treatment and uncertainty in treatment delivery. Six cases each in lung, abdomen and liver were taken for the study. For each case, three VMAT SBRT plans were generated with different penalties on minimum segment width of 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 cm. A comparison was made on the metrics of dose volume histogram, dosimetric indices, monitor units (MUs) and delivery accuracy. The mean reduction of total MUs when compared with 0.5 cm plan was observed as 12.7 ± 6.0% and 17.5 ± 7.2% for 1.0 cm and 1.5 cm of minimum segment width, respectively. The p value showed a significant degradation in dosimetric indices for 1.5 cm plans when compared with 0.5 cm and 1.0 cm plans. The average deviation of measured dose with TPS calculated was 3.0 ± 1.1%, 2.1 ± 0.84% and 1.8 ± 0.9% for 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 cm, respectively. The calculated gamma index with pass criteria of 2% dose difference and 2 mm distance to agreement was 95.9 ± 2.8%, 96.5 ± 2.6% and 97.8 ± 1.6% as calculated for 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 cm of penalties, respectively. In view of the trade off between delivery efficiency and plan quality, 1 cm minimum segment width plans showed an improvement. VMAT SBRT plans with increased optimal value of minimum segment width showed better plan quality and delivery efficiency for stereotactic body radiotherapy.

  11. Single-Fraction Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and Sequential Gemcitabine for the Treatment of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Schellenberg, Devin; Kim, Jeff; Christman-Skieller, Claudia; Chun, Carlene L.; Columbo, Laurie Ann; Ford, James M.; Fisher, George A.; Kunz, Pamela L.; Van Dam, Jacques; Quon, Andrew; Desser, Terry S.; Norton, Jeffrey; Hsu, Annie; Maxim, Peter G.; Xing, Lei; Goodman, Karyn A.; Chang, Daniel T.; Koong, Albert C.

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: This Phase II trial evaluated the toxicity, local control, and overall survival in patients treated with sequential gemcitabine and linear accelerator-based single-fraction stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Twenty patients with locally advanced, nonmetastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma were enrolled on this prospective single-institution, institutional review board-approved study. Gemcitabine was administered on Days 1, 8, and 15, and SBRT on Day 29. Gemcitabine was restarted on Day 43 and continued for 3-5 cycles. SBRT of 25 Gy in a single fraction was delivered to the internal target volume with a 2- 3-mm margin using a nine-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy technique. Respiratory gating was used to account for breathing motion. Follow-up evaluations occurred at 4-6 weeks, 10-12 weeks, and every 3 months after SBRT. Results: All patients completed SBRT and a median of five cycles of chemotherapy. Follow-up for the 2 remaining alive patients was 25.1 and 36.4 months. No acute Grade 3 or greater nonhematologic toxicity was observed. Late Grade 3 or greater toxicities occurred in 1 patient (5%) and consisted of a duodenal perforation (G4). Three patients (15%) developed ulcers (G2) that were medically managed. Overall, median survival was 11.8 months, with 1-year survival of 50% and 2-year survival of 20%. Using serial computed tomography, the freedom from local progression was 94% at 1 year. Conclusion: Linear accelerator-delivered SBRT with sequential gemcitabine resulted in excellent local control of locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Future studies will address strategies for reducing long-term duodenal toxicity associated with SBRT.

  12. Real-time in vivo rectal wall dosimetry using MOSkin detectors during linac based stereotactic radiotherapy with rectal displacement.

    PubMed

    Legge, Kimberley; Greer, Peter B; O'Connor, Daryl J; Wilton, Lee; Richardson, Matthew; Hunter, Perry; Wilfert, Alex; Martin, Jarad; Rosenfeld, Anatoly; Cutajar, Dean

    2017-02-27

    MOSFET dosimetry is a method that has been used to measure in-vivo doses during brachytherapy treatments and during linac based radiotherapy treatment. Rectal displacement devices (RDDs) allow for safe dose escalation for prostate cancer treatment. This study used dual MOSkin detectors to assess real-time in vivo rectal wall dose in patients with an RDD in place during a high dose prostate stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) boost trial. The PROMETHEUS study commenced in 2014 and provides a prostate SBRT boost dose with a RDD in place. Twelve patients received two boost fractions of 9.5-10 Gy each delivered to the prostate with a dual arc volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) technique. Two MOSkins in a face-to-face arrangement (dual MOSkin) were used to decrease angular dependence. A dual MOSkin was attached to the anterior surface of the Rectafix and read out at 1 Hz during each treatment. The planned dose at each measurement point was exported from the planning system and compared with the measured dose. The root mean square error normalised to the total planned dose was calculated for each measurement point and treatment arc for the entire course of treatment. The average difference between the measured and planned doses over the whole course of treatment for all arcs measured was 9.7% with a standard deviation of 3.6%. The cumulative MOSkin reading was lower than the total planned dose for 64% of the arcs measured. The average difference between the final measured and final planned doses for all arcs measured was 3.4% of the final planned dose, with a standard deviation of 10.3%. MOSkin detectors were an effective tool for measuring dose delivered to the anterior rectal wall in real time during prostate SBRT boost treatments for the purpose of both ensuring the rectal doses remain within acceptable limits during the treatment and for the verification of final rectal doses.

  13. Short communication: timeline of radiation-induced kidney function loss after stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy of renal cell carcinoma as evaluated by serial (99m)Tc-DMSA SPECT/CT.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Price; Foroudi, Farshad; Pham, Daniel; Hofman, Michael S; Hardcastle, Nicholas; Callahan, Jason; Kron, Tomas; Siva, Shankar

    2014-11-26

    Stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) has been proposed as a definitive treatment for patients with inoperable primary renal cell carcinoma. However, there is little documentation detailing the radiobiological effects of hypofractionated radiation on healthy renal tissue. In this study we describe a methodology for assessment of regional change in renal function in response to single fraction SABR of 26 Gy. In a patient with a solitary kidney, detailed follow-up of kidney function post-treatment was determined through 3-dimensional SPECT/CT imaging and (51)Cr-EDTA measurements. Based on measurements of glomerular filtration rate, renal function declined rapidly by 34% at 3 months, plateaued at 43% loss at 12 months, with minimal further decrease to 49% of baseline by 18 months. The pattern of renal functional change in (99m)Tc-DMSA uptake on SPECT/CT imaging correlates with dose delivered. This study demonstrates a dose effect relationship of SABR with loss of kidney function.

  14. Dose to the intracranial arteries in stereotactic and intensity-modulated radiotherapy for skull base tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Nieder, Carsten . E-mail: cnied@hotmail.com; Grosu, Anca L.; Stark, Sybille; Wiedenmann, Nicole; Busch, Raymonde; Kneschaurek, Peter; Molls, Michael

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: To examine retrospectively the maximum dose to the large skull base/intracranial arteries in fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), because of the potential risk of perfusion disturbances. Methods and Materials: Overall, 56 patients with tumors adjacent to at least one major artery were analyzed. Our strategy was to perform FSRT with these criteria: 1.8 Gy per fraction, planning target volume (PTV) enclosed by the 95% isodose, maximum dose 107%. Dose limits were applied to established organs at risk, but not the vessels. If FSRT planning failed to meet any of these criteria, IMRT was planned with the same objectives. Results: In 31 patients (median PTV, 23 cm{sup 3}), the FSRT plan fulfilled all criteria. No artery received a dose {>=}105%. Twenty-five patients (median PTV, 39 cm{sup 3}) needed IMRT planning. In 11 of 25 patients (median PTV, 85 cm{sup 3}), no plan satisfying all our criteria could be calculated. Only in this group, moderately increased maximum vessel doses were observed (106-110%, n = 7, median PTV, 121 cm{sup 3}). The median PTV dose gradient was 29% (significantly different from the 14 patients with satisfactory IMRT plans). Three of the four patients in this group had paranasal sinus tumors. Conclusion: The doses to the major arteries should be calculated in IMRT planning for critical tumor locations if a dose gradient >13% within the PTV can not be avoided because the PTV is large or includes air cavities.

  15. Stereotactic diffusion tensor imaging tractography for Gamma Knife radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Gavin, Cormac G; Ian Sabin, H

    2016-12-01

    artifacts from the base of the stereotactic frame, but this was overcome by a combination of frame/MRI volume adjustment and DTI seeding parameters. Coregistration of the DTI series with the T1-weighted treatment volume at the time of imaging was essential for the generation of correct tensor data. All patients with the exception of the vestibular schwannoma cases had treatment pathology in the vicinity of eloquent tracts and/or the cortex. No new neurological deficits due to radiation were recorded at the short-term follow-up. CONCLUSIONS Recent reports in the medical literature have suggested that white matter tracts (particularly the optic radiation and arcuate fasciculus) are more vulnerable to radiation during stereotactic radiosurgery than previously thought. Integration of stereotactic tractography into GKRS represents a promising tool for preventing GKRS complications by reduction in radiation doses to functional organs at risk, including critical cortical areas and subcortical white matter tracts.

  16. Increasing radiation therapy dose is associated with improved survival in patients undergoing stereotactic body radiation therapy for stage I non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Koshy, Matthew; Malik, Renuka; Weichselbaum, Ralph R; Sher, David J

    2015-02-01

    To determine the comparative effectiveness of different stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) dosing regimens for early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer, using a large national database, focusing on the relative impact of dose as a function of tumor stage. The study included patients in the National Cancer Database from 2003 to 2006 with T1-T2N0M0 inoperable lung cancer (n=498). The biologically effective dose (BED) was calculated according to the linear quadratic formula using an α/β ratio of 10. High versus lower-dose (HD vs LD) SBRT was defined as a calculated BED above or below 150 Gy. Overall survival was estimated using Kaplan-Meier methods and Cox proportional hazard regression. The 5 most common dose fractionation schemes (percentage of cohort) used were 20 Gy × 3 (34%), 12 Gy × 4 (16%), 18 Gy × 3 (10%), 15 Gy × 3 (10%), and 16 Gy × 3 (4%). The median calculated BED was 150 Gy (interquartile range 106-166 Gy). The 3-year overall survival (OS) for patients who received HD versus LD was 55% versus 46% (log-rank P=.03). On subset analysis of the T1 cohort there was no association between calculated BED and 3-year OS (61% vs 60% with HD vs LD, P=.9). Among the T2 cohort, patients receiving HD experienced superior 3-year OS (37% vs 24%, P=.01). On multivariable analysis, factors independently prognostic for mortality were female gender (hazard ratio [HR] 0.76, P=.01), T2 tumor (HR 1.99, P=.0001), and HD (HR 0.68, P=.001). This comparative effectiveness analysis of SBRT dose for patients with stage I non-small-cell lung cancer suggests that higher doses (>150 Gy BED) are associated with a significant survival benefit in patients with T2 tumors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Performance of a Novel Repositioning Head Frame for Gamma Knife Perfexion and Image-Guided Linac-Based Intracranial Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ruschin, Mark; Nayebi, Nazanin; Carlsson, Per; Brown, Kevin

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the geometric positioning and immobilization performance of a vacuum bite-block repositioning head frame (RHF) system for Perfexion (PFX-SRT) and linac-based intracranial image-guided stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT). Methods and Materials: Patients with intracranial tumors received linac-based image-guided SRT using the RHF for setup and immobilization. Three hundred thirty-three fractions of radiation were delivered in 12 patients. The accuracy of the RHF was estimated for linac-based SRT with online cone-beam CT (CBCT) and for PFX-SRT with a repositioning check tool (RCT) and offline CBCT. The RCT's ability to act as a surrogate for anatomic position was estimated through comparison to CBCT image matching. Immobilization performance was evaluated daily with pre- and postdose delivery CBCT scans and RCT measurements. Results: The correlation coefficient between RCT- and CBCT-reported displacements was 0.59, 0.75, 0.79 (Right, Superior, and Anterior, respectively). For image-guided linac-based SRT, the mean three-dimensional (3D) setup error was 0.8 mm with interpatient ({Sigma}) and interfraction ({sigma}) variations of 0.1 and 0.4 mm, respectively. For PFX-SRT, the initial, uncorrected mean 3D positioning displacement in stereotactic coordinates was 2.0 mm, with {Sigma} = 1.1 mm and {sigma} = 0.8 mm. Considering only RCT setups <1mm (PFX action level) the mean 3D positioning displacement reduced to 1.3 mm, with {Sigma} = 0.9 mm and {sigma} = 0.4 mm. The largest contributing systematic uncertainty was in the superior-inferior direction (mean displacement = -0.5 mm; {Sigma} = 0.9 mm). The largest mean rotation was 0.6{sup o} in pitch. The mean 3D intrafraction motion was 0.4 {+-} 0.3 mm. Conclusion: The RHF provides excellent immobilization for intracranial SRT and PFX-SRT. Some small systematic uncertainties in stereotactic positioning exist and must be considered when generating PFX-SRT treatment plans. The RCT provides reasonable surrogacy

  18. Performance of a novel repositioning head frame for gamma knife perfexion and image-guided linac-based intracranial stereotactic radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ruschin, Mark; Nayebi, Nazanin; Carlsson, Per; Brown, Kevin; Tamerou, Messeret; Li, Winnie; Laperriere, Normand; Sahgal, Arjun; Cho, Young-Bin; Ménard, Cynthia; Jaffray, David

    2010-09-01

    To evaluate the geometric positioning and immobilization performance of a vacuum bite-block repositioning head frame (RHF) system for Perfexion (PFX-SRT) and linac-based intracranial image-guided stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT). Patients with intracranial tumors received linac-based image-guided SRT using the RHF for setup and immobilization. Three hundred thirty-three fractions of radiation were delivered in 12 patients. The accuracy of the RHF was estimated for linac-based SRT with online cone-beam CT (CBCT) and for PFX-SRT with a repositioning check tool (RCT) and offline CBCT. The RCT's ability to act as a surrogate for anatomic position was estimated through comparison to CBCT image matching. Immobilization performance was evaluated daily with pre- and postdose delivery CBCT scans and RCT measurements. The correlation coefficient between RCT- and CBCT-reported displacements was 0.59, 0.75, 0.79 (Right, Superior, and Anterior, respectively). For image-guided linac-based SRT, the mean three-dimensional (3D) setup error was 0.8 mm with interpatient (Sigma) and interfraction (sigma) variations of 0.1 and 0.4 mm, respectively. For PFX-SRT, the initial, uncorrected mean 3D positioning displacement in stereotactic coordinates was 2.0 mm, with Sigma = 1.1 mm and sigma = 0.8 mm. Considering only RCT setups <1mm (PFX action level) the mean 3D positioning displacement reduced to 1.3 mm, with Sigma = 0.9 mm and sigma = 0.4 mm. The largest contributing systematic uncertainty was in the superior-inferior direction (mean displacement = -0.5 mm; Sigma = 0.9 mm). The largest mean rotation was 0.6 degrees in pitch. The mean 3D intrafraction motion was 0.4 +/- 0.3 mm. The RHF provides excellent immobilization for intracranial SRT and PFX-SRT. Some small systematic uncertainties in stereotactic positioning exist and must be considered when generating PFX-SRT treatment plans. The RCT provides reasonable surrogacy for internal anatomic displacement. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc

  19. Ramifications of target motion in localization and dosimetry for stereotactic body radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanyi, James Ayuk

    2005-11-01

    Several key analytical/experimental studies have been conducted to quantify the magnitude of the consequential effect of motion both at the level of target localization and characterization and dose delivery. In the imaging front, Chen et al., 2004 showed that distortions along the axis of motion could result in (1) target lengthening or shortening, (2) target over- or under- estimation, and (3) displacement of reference target centroid by as much as the amplitude of the motion of a target. The authors concluded that the geometric distortion depended on motion phase, motion amplitude, and scan speed, phase being the primary determinant of the resulting type of distortion. In the dosimetry front, Yang et al., 1997 investigated the interplay effect in tomotherapy delivery. Yu et al ., 1998 and Jiang et al., 2003 investigated the interplay effect for MLC-based IMRT. To supplement current understanding of the effects of motion, this study will be divided into two steps. (1) Characterization of potential systematic errors introduced into a patient plan if appropriate steps are not taken to eliminate, or at least, minimize, tumor motion. (2) Quantification of the accuracy of delivering large dose fractions compared to small dose fractions with constant motion period. Actual measurements are performed on a dynamic anthropomorphic phantom. To not base claims regarding accuracy of equipment, quality of dose distributions, and dose tolerance on the virtual computer simulation of the treatment plan, a suitable dosimeter is identified and its response characterized for use in dose measurements.

  20. Linear Accelerator and Gamma Knife-Based Stereotactic Cranial Radiosurgery: Challenges and Successes of Existing Quality Assurance Guidelines and Paradigms

    SciTech Connect

    Goetsch, Steven J.

    2008-05-01

    Intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery has been practiced since 1951. The technique has expanded from a single dedicated unit in Stockholm in 1968 to hundreds of centers performing an estimated 100,000 Gamma Knife and linear accelerator cases in 2005. The radiation dosimetry of small photon fields used in this technique has been well explored in the past 15 years. Quality assurance recommendations have been promulgated in refereed reports and by several national and international professional societies since 1991. The field has survived several reported treatment errors and incidents, generally reacting by strengthening standards and precautions. An increasing number of computer-controlled and robotic-dedicated treatment units are expanding the field and putting patients at risk of unforeseen errors. Revisions and updates to previously published quality assurance documents, and especially to radiation dosimetry protocols, are now needed to ensure continued successful procedures that minimize the risk of serious errors.

  1. Quantification and Minimization of Uncertainties of Internal Target Volume for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy of Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ge Hong; Cai Jing; Kelsey, Chris R.; Yin Fangfang

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To quantify uncertainties in delineating an internal target volume (ITV) and to understand how these uncertainties may be individually minimized for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Twenty patients with NSCLC who were undergoing SBRT were imaged with free-breathing 3-dimensional computed tomography (3DCT) and 10-phase 4-dimensional CT (4DCT) for delineating gross tumor volume (GTV){sub 3D} and ITV{sub 10Phase} (ITV3). The maximum intensity projection (MIP) CT was also calculated from 10-phase 4DCT for contouring ITV{sub MIP} (ITV1). Then, ITV{sub COMB} (ITV2), ITV{sub 10Phase+GTV3D} (ITV4), and ITV{sub 10Phase+ITVCOMB} (ITV5) were generated by combining ITV{sub MIP} and GTV{sub 3D}, ITV{sub 10phase} and GTV{sub 3D}, and ITV{sub 10phase} and ITV{sub COMB}, respectively. All 6 volumes (GTV{sub 3D} and ITV1 to ITV5) were delineated in the same lung window by the same radiation oncologist. The percentage of volume difference (PVD) between any 2 different volumes was determined and was correlated to effective tumor diameter (ETD), tumor motion ranges, R{sub 3D}, and the amplitude variability of the recorded breathing signal (v) to assess their volume variations. Results: The mean (range) tumor motion (R{sub SI}, R{sub AP}, R{sub ML}, and R{sub 3D}) and breathing variability (v) were 7.6 mm (2-18 mm), 4.0 mm (2-8 mm), 3.3 mm (0-7.5 mm), 9.9 mm (4.1-18.7 mm), and 0.17 (0.07-0.37), respectively. The trend of volume variation was GTV{sub 3D}

  2. An approach for online evaluations of dose consequences caused by small rotational setup errors in intracranial stereotactic radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Bo; Li, Jonathan; Kahler, Darren; Yan Guanghua; Mittauer, Kathryn; Shi Wenyin; Okunieff, Paul; Liu, Chihray

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to investigate the impact of small rotational errors on the magnitudes and distributions of spatial dose variations for intracranial stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) treatment setups, and to assess the feasibility of using the original dose map overlaid with rotated contours (ODMORC) method as a fast, online evaluation tool to estimate dose changes (using DVHs) to clinical target volumes (CTVs) and organs-at-risks (OARs) caused by small rotational setup errors. Methods: Fifteen intracranial SRT cases treated with either three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) or intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques were chosen for the study. Selected cases have a variety of anatomical dimensions and pathologies. Angles of {+-}3 deg. and {+-}5 deg. in all directions were selected to simulate the rotational errors. Dose variations in different regions of the brain, CTVs, and OARs were evaluated to illustrate the various spatial effects of dose differences before and after rotations. DVHs accounting for rotations that were recomputed by the treatment planning system (TPS) and those generated by the ODMORC method were compared. A framework of a fast algorithm for multicontour rotation implemented by ODMORC is introduced as well. Results: The average values of relative dose variations between original dose and recomputed dose accounting for rotations were greater than 4.0% and 10.0% in absolute mean and in standard deviation, respectively, at the skull and adjacent regions for all cases. They were less than 1.0% and 2.5% in absolute mean and in standard deviation, respectively, for dose points 3 mm away from the skull. The results indicated that spatial dose to any part of the brain organs or tumors separated from the skull or head surface would be relatively stable before and after rotations. Statistical data of CTVs and OARs indicate the lens and cochleas have the large dose variations before and after rotations

  3. A method of surface marker location optimization for tumor motion estimation in lung stereotactic body radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Bo Park, Justin C.; Fan, Qiyong; Kahler, Darren; Liu, Chihray; Chen, Yunmei

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Accurately localizing lung tumor localization is essential for high-precision radiation therapy techniques such as stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Since direct monitoring of tumor motion is not always achievable due to the limitation of imaging modalities for treatment guidance, placement of fiducial markers on the patient’s body surface to act as a surrogate for tumor position prediction is a practical alternative for tracking lung tumor motion during SBRT treatments. In this work, the authors propose an innovative and robust model to solve the multimarker position optimization problem. The model is able to overcome the major drawbacks of the sparse optimization approach (SOA) model. Methods: The principle-component-analysis (PCA) method was employed as the framework to build the authors’ statistical prediction model. The method can be divided into two stages. The first stage is to build the surrogate tumor matrix and calculate its eigenvalues and associated eigenvectors. The second stage is to determine the “best represented” columns of the eigenvector matrix obtained from stage one and subsequently acquire the optimal marker positions as well as numbers. Using 4-dimensional CT (4DCT) and breath hold CT imaging data, the PCA method was compared to the SOA method with respect to calculation time, average prediction accuracy, prediction stability, noise resistance, marker position consistency, and marker distribution. Results: The PCA and SOA methods which were both tested were on all 11 patients for a total of 130 cases including 4DCT and breath-hold CT scenarios. The maximum calculation time for the PCA method was less than 1 s with 64 752 surface points, whereas the average calculation time for the SOA method was over 12 min with 400 surface points. Overall, the tumor center position prediction errors were comparable between the two methods, and all were less than 1.5 mm. However, for the extreme scenarios (breath hold), the

  4. Role of salvage stereotactic body radiation therapy in post-surgical loco-regional recurrence in a selected population of non-small cell lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Agolli, Linda; Valeriani, Maurizio; Carnevale, Alessia; Falco, Teresa; Bracci, Stefano; De Sanctis, Vitaliana; Minniti, Giuseppe; Enrici, Riccardo Maurizi; Osti, Mattia Falchetto

    2015-03-01

    This is a retrospective analysis of a selected series of high-risk non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with post-surgical loco-regional relapse treated with salvage stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Outcome and toxicity profiles were assessed. Twenty-eight patients (unfit for surgery or systemic therapy) with 30 lesions underwent salvage SBRT as an alternative therapy because of advanced age, co-morbid conditions or no response obtained from other treatments. Complete and partial responses were 16% and 70%, respectively. Local progression was observed in 3 patients. Regional relapse occurred in 5 patients. Distant progression occurred in 10 patients. The 2-year overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were 57.5% and 36.6%, respectively. Radiation acute pneumonitis occurred as follows: three patients developed grade 1, two patients experienced grade 2 and one patient experienced grade 3 toxicity. Stereotactic body radiotherapy could have an alternative role in isolated loco-regional relapse in patients unfit or resistant to other therapies. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  5. Frameless Stereotactic Radiosurgery, a Feasible Alternative to the Frame-Based Technique for the Treatment of Refractory Trigeminal Neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Andrew S; Reed, Aaron D; Skinner, William K

    2016-01-01

    Classic trigeminal neuralgia (TN) causes severe facial pain. Several treatment options exist for classic TN refractory to medical therapy, including stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Most studies in the medical literature used a frame-based SRS technique. Improvements in linear accelerator-based treatment systems and image guidance have led to the use of frameless SRS as a safe and feasible alternative to the frame-based technique for the treatment of refractory TN. We present a case of refractory TN successfully treated with frameless SRS. PMID:27186453

  6. Radiobiological impact of dose calculation algorithms on biologically optimized IMRT lung stereotactic body radiation therapy plans.

    PubMed

    Liang, X; Penagaricano, J; Zheng, D; Morrill, S; Zhang, X; Corry, P; Griffin, R J; Han, E Y; Hardee, M; Ratanatharathom, V

    2016-01-22

    is associated with the lower PTV coverage in AXB-recalculated plans. No obvious trend was observed between the calculation-resulted TCP differences and tumor size or location. AAA and AXB yield very similar NTCP on lung pneumonitis according to the LKB model estimation in the present study. AAA apparently overestimates the PTV dose; the magnitude of resulting difference in calculated TCP was up to 5.8 % in our study. AAA and AXB yield very similar NTCP on lung pneumonitis based on the LKB model parameter sets we used in the present study.

  7. Liver motion during cone beam computed tomography guided stereotactic body radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Justin C.; Park, Sung Ho; Kim, Jong Hoon; Yoon, Sang Min; Song, Si Yeol; Liu Zhaowei; Song Bongyong; Kauweloa, Kevin; Webster, Matthew J.; Sandhu, Ajay; Mell, Loren K.; Jiang, Steve B.; Mundt, Arno J.; Song, William Y.

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: Understanding motion characteristics of liver such as, interfractional and intrafractional motion variability, difference in motion within different locations in the organ, and their complex relationship with the breathing cycles are particularly important for image-guided liver SBRT. The purpose of this study was to investigate such motion characteristics based on fiducial markers tracked with the x-ray projections of the CBCT scans, taken immediately prior to the treatments. Methods: Twenty liver SBRT patients were analyzed. Each patient had three fiducial markers (2 Multiplication-Sign 5-mm gold) percutaneously implanted around the gross tumor. The prescription ranged from 2 to 8 fractions per patient. The CBCT projections data for each fraction ({approx}650 projections/scan), for each patient, were analyzed and the 2D positions of the markers were extracted using an in-house algorithm. In total, >55 000 x-ray projections were analyzed from 85 CBCT scans. From the 2D extracted positions, a 3D motion trajectory of the markers was constructed, from each CBCT scans, resulting in left-right (LR), anterior-posterior (AP), and cranio-caudal (CC) location information of the markers with >55 000 data points. The authors then analyzed the interfraction and intrafraction liver motion variability, within different locations in the organ, and as a function of the breathing cycle. The authors also compared the motion characteristics against the planning 4DCT and the RPM Trade-Mark-Sign (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) breathing traces. Variations in the appropriate gating window (defined as the percent of the maximum range at which 50% of the marker positions are contained), between fractions were calculated as well. Results: The range of motion for the 20 patients were 3.0 {+-} 2.0 mm, 5.1 {+-} 3.1 mm, and 17.9 {+-} 5.1 mm in the planning 4DCT, and 2.8 {+-} 1.6 mm, 5.3 {+-} 3.1 mm, and 16.5 {+-} 5.7 mm in the treatment CBCT, for LR, AP, and CC directions

  8. A comparative study to evaluate the efficacy of on board imaging with cone beam CT using target registration in patients with lung tumors undergoing stereotactic body radiation therapy and comparison with ExacTrac using skeletal registration on Novalis Tx.

    PubMed

    Ram, Thomas S; Badkul, Rajeev; Maraboyina, Sanjay; Wang, Fen

    2011-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy is an advanced technique, which delivers ablative doses to lung lesions. Target verification is done either by orthogonal x-rays or cone beam CT. This study was undertaken to compare these two verification methods. To evaluate the efficacy of ExacTrac and Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) for target repositioning while delivering Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) for lung lesions and derive the population-based margin. All patients who had undergone SBRT for lung lesions from February to September 2009 were involved. Patients were immobilized using the BodyFix double vacuum immobilization system, indexed to the computed tomography (CT) simulator and treatment machine. Four-dimensional (3-D) scan was done to generate internal target volume (ITV) and a free breathing CT scan for planning was done on the BrainLab iPlan 4.1 software. During treatment, patient's position was verified using ExacTrac and CBCT. The resulting vertical, lateral, and longitudinal shifts were noted. The random and systematic error were calculated and the margin recipe derived using the Van Herk formula. Sixteen patients had undergone SBRT for lung tumors from February to September 2009. Data from eight patients who had undergone 34 sessions of SBRT was analyzed. The systematic error for lateral, longitudinal, and vertical shifts for ExacTrac and CBCT were 3.68, 4.27, 3.5 mm and 0.53, 0.38, 0.70 mm, respectively. The random error were 1.10, 1.51, 1.96 mm and 0.32, 0.81, 0.59 mm. The lateral, longitudinal and vertical Van Herk margin recipe for ExacTrac were 9.98, 11.72, 10.18 mm, respectively, and for CBCT was 2.17, 1.53,1.55 mm. The systematic and random errors for CBCT were significantly lesser as compared to the errors with Exactrac.

  9. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Single Fraction of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Compared With Single Fraction of External Beam Radiation Therapy for Palliation of Vertebral Bone Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hayeon; Rajagopalan, Malolan S.; Beriwal, Sushil; Huq, M. Saiful; Smith, Kenneth J.

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has been proposed for the palliation of painful vertebral bone metastases because higher radiation doses may result in superior and more durable pain control. A phase III clinical trial (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0631) comparing single fraction SBRT with single fraction external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in palliative treatment of painful vertebral bone metastases is now ongoing. We performed a cost-effectiveness analysis to compare these strategies. Methods and Materials: A Markov model, using a 1-month cycle over a lifetime horizon, was developed to compare the cost-effectiveness of SBRT (16 or 18 Gy in 1 fraction) with that of 8 Gy in 1 fraction of EBRT. Transition probabilities, quality of life utilities, and costs associated with SBRT and EBRT were captured in the model. Costs were based on Medicare reimbursement in 2014. Strategies were compared using the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER), and effectiveness was measured in quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). To account for uncertainty, 1-way, 2-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed. Strategies were evaluated with a willingness-to-pay (WTP) threshold of $100,000 per QALY gained. Results: Base case pain relief after the treatment was assumed as 20% higher in SBRT. Base case treatment costs for SBRT and EBRT were $9000 and $1087, respectively. In the base case analysis, SBRT resulted in an ICER of $124,552 per QALY gained. In 1-way sensitivity analyses, results were most sensitive to variation of the utility of unrelieved pain; the utility of relieved pain after initial treatment and median survival were also sensitive to variation. If median survival is ≥11 months, SBRT cost <$100,000 per QALY gained. Conclusion: SBRT for palliation of vertebral bone metastases is not cost-effective compared with EBRT at a $100,000 per QALY gained WTP threshold. However, if median survival is ≥11 months, SBRT costs ≤$100

  10. [PET scan and NMR spectroscopy for the differential diagnosis between brain radiation necrosis and tumour recurrence after stereotactic irradiation of brain metastases: Place in the decision tree].

    PubMed

    Menoux, I; Noël, G; Namer, I; Antoni, D

    2017-08-01

    After stereotactic radiation therapy for brain metastases, one of the complications is radionecrosis. Differential diagnosis with tumour recurrence can be helped by different methods of imaging, although histology remains the gold standard. According to the treatment centres, practice diverges. The objective of this single-centre retrospective study was to define the power of MRI, PET scan and NMR spectroscopy to establish a decision tree. This study included patients who underwent stereotactic radiation therapy for brain metastases, and required, during follow-up, both a PET scan and NMR spectroscopy in order to differentiate a radiation necrosis and tumour recurrence. From 2010 to 2015, 25 patients were consistent with these criteria. Conventional MRI technique, with the T1/T2 mismatch criterion, had a specificity of 75% and a sensitivity of only 44%. A lesion quotient greater than 0.3 diagnosed a recurrence with a sensitivity of 92%. PET scan combined the best sensitivity and specificity, respectively of 92% and 69%. Whatever the thresholds used in NMR spectroscopy for choline/N-acetylaspartate and choline/creatin ratios, the power of this imaging modality did not exceed that of PET scan. The criteria described in conventional MRI cannot by themselves establish the differential diagnosis. In first intention in case of doubt, PET scan should be done, combining the best sensitivity and specificity, whereas NMR spectroscopy used in combination does not improve these factors. Copyright © 2017 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Preliminary Results of a Phase 1 Dose-Escalation Trial for Early-Stage Breast Cancer Using 5-Fraction Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Partial-Breast Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Asal; Thomas, Kimberly; Spangler, Ann; Rao, Roshni; Leitch, Marilyn; Wooldridge, Rachel; Rivers, Aeisha; Seiler, Stephen; Albuquerque, Kevin; Stevenson, Stella; Goudreau, Sally; Garwood, Dan; Haley, Barbara; Euhus, David; Heinzerling, John; Ding, Chuxiong; Gao, Ang; Ahn, Chul; Timmerman, Robert

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the tolerability of a dose-escalated 5-fraction stereotactic body radiation therapy for partial-breast irradiation (S-PBI) in treating early-stage breast cancer after partial mastectomy; the primary objective was to escalate dose utilizing a robotic stereotactic radiation system treating the lumpectomy cavity without exceeding the maximum tolerated dose. Eligible patients included those with ductal carcinoma in situ or invasive nonlobular epithelial histologies and stage 0, I, or II, with tumor size <3 cm. Patients and physicians completed baseline and subsequent cosmesis outcome questionnaires. Starting dose was 30 Gy in 5 fractions and was escalated by 2.5 Gy total for each cohort to 40 Gy. In all, 75 patients were enrolled, with a median age of 62 years. Median follow-up for 5 cohorts was 49.9, 42.5, 25.7, 20.3, and 13.5 months, respectively. Only 3 grade 3 toxicities were experienced. There was 1 dose-limiting toxicity in the overall cohort. Ten patients experienced palpable fat necrosis (4 of which were symptomatic). Physicians scored cosmesis as excellent or good in 95.9%, 100%, 96.7%, and 100% at baseline and 6, 12, and 24 months after S-PBI, whereas patients scored the same periods as 86.5%, 97.1%, 95.1%, and 95.3%, respectively. The disagreement rates between MDs and patients during those periods were 9.4%, 2.9%, 1.6%, and 4.7%, respectively. There have been no recurrences or distant metastases. Dose was escalated to the target dose of 40 Gy in 5 fractions, with the occurrence of only 1 dose-limiting toxicity. Patients felt cosmetic results improved within the first year after surgery and stereotactic body radiation therapy. Our results show minimal toxicity with excellent cosmesis; however, further follow-up is warranted in future studies. This study is the first to show the safety, tolerability, feasibility, and cosmesis results of a 5-fraction dose-escalated S-PBI treatment for early-stage breast cancer in the adjuvant setting

  12. Stereotactic body radiation therapy planning with duodenal sparing using volumetric-modulated arc therapy vs intensity-modulated radiation therapy in locally advanced pancreatic cancer: A dosimetric analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Rachit; Wild, Aaron T.; Ziegler, Mark A.; Hooker, Ted K.; Dah, Samson D.; Tran, Phuoc T.; Kang, Jun; Smith, Koren; Zeng, Jing; Pawlik, Timothy M.; Tryggestad, Erik; Ford, Eric; Herman, Joseph M.

    2013-10-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) achieves excellent local control for locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), but may increase late duodenal toxicity. Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivers intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with a rotating gantry rather than multiple fixed beams. This study dosimetrically evaluates the feasibility of implementing duodenal constraints for SBRT using VMAT vs IMRT. Non–duodenal sparing (NS) and duodenal-sparing (DS) VMAT and IMRT plans delivering 25 Gy in 1 fraction were generated for 15 patients with LAPC. DS plans were constrained to duodenal D{sub max} of<30 Gy at any point. VMAT used 1 360° coplanar arc with 4° spacing between control points, whereas IMRT used 9 coplanar beams with fixed gantry positions at 40° angles. Dosimetric parameters for target volumes and organs at risk were compared for DS planning vs NS planning and VMAT vs IMRT using paired-sample Wilcoxon signed rank tests. Both DS VMAT and DS IMRT achieved significantly reduced duodenal D{sub mean}, D{sub max}, D{sub 1cc}, D{sub 4%}, and V{sub 20} {sub Gy} compared with NS plans (all p≤0.002). DS constraints compromised target coverage for IMRT as demonstrated by reduced V{sub 95%} (p = 0.01) and D{sub mean} (p = 0.02), but not for VMAT. DS constraints resulted in increased dose to right kidney, spinal cord, stomach, and liver for VMAT. Direct comparison of DS VMAT and DS IMRT revealed that VMAT was superior in sparing the left kidney (p<0.001) and the spinal cord (p<0.001), whereas IMRT was superior in sparing the stomach (p = 0.05) and the liver (p = 0.003). DS VMAT required 21% fewer monitor units (p<0.001) and delivered treatment 2.4 minutes faster (p<0.001) than DS IMRT. Implementing DS constraints during SBRT planning for LAPC can significantly reduce duodenal point or volumetric dose parameters for both VMAT and IMRT. The primary consequence of implementing DS constraints for VMAT is increased dose to other organs at

  13. Long-term outcomes of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) with fiducial tracking for inoperable stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

    PubMed

    Lischalk, Jonathan W; Woo, Stephanie M; Kataria, Shaan; Aghdam, Nima; Paydar, Ima; Repka, Michael C; Anderson, Eric D; Collins, Brian T

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is considered standard of care in the medically inoperable patient population. Multiple methods of SBRT delivery exist including fiducial-based tumor tracking, which allows for smaller treatment margins and avoidance of patient immobiliz