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Sample records for basement membrane zone

  1. Perineurial cells coexpress genes encoding interstitial collagens and basement membrane zone components

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Perineurial cell cultures were established from the sciatic nerves of adult Wistar rats. Highly enriched cultures were studied with respect to the production of extracellular matrix components under conditions free from the influence of Schwann cells, axons, or the extracellular matrix of peripheral nerves. Indirect immunofluorescence staining revealed the presence of collagen type IV epitopes, and electron microscopy demonstrated patches of basement membrane on the perineurial cell surfaces. Collagenous fibrils with a diameter of 15-20 nm were also observed in the intracellular space. SDS-PAGE of radiolabeled medium proteins showed a pattern of bands suggesting the synthesis and secretion of fibronectin, and type I and IV collagens. Northern hybridizations revealed characteristic polymorphic mRNA transcripts corresponding to fibronectin, laminin B2 chain, as well as to the alpha- chain subunits of type I, III, and IV collagens. Furthermore, in situ hybridizations suggested expression of these genes by cultured perineurial cells without apparent heterogeneity within the cell populations. In situ hybridizations of sciatic nerve tissue from 2-wk- old rats also suggested that perineurial cells express alpha 1(I) and alpha 2(IV) collagen, as well as laminin B2 chain genes in vivo. This profile of matrix gene expression is different from that of Schwann cells, which do not synthesize fibronectin, or that of fibroblastic cells, which do not form a cell surface basement membrane. The capability of perineurial cells to express genes for the basement membrane zone and for interstitial collagens further adds to our understanding of the functional role of perineurial cells in developing and healing peripheral nerve, as well as in certain neoplastic lesions of neural origin, such as von Recklinghausen's neurofibromas. PMID:2921281

  2. Basement Membrane Zone Collagens XV and XVIII/Proteoglycans Mediate Leukocyte Influx in Renal Ischemia/Reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Zaferani, Azadeh; Talsma, Ditmer T.; Yazdani, Saleh; Celie, Johanna W. A. M.; Aikio, Mari; Heljasvaara, Ritva; Navis, Gerjan J.; Pihlajaniemi, Taina; van den Born, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Collagen type XV and XVIII are proteoglycans found in the basement membrane zones of endothelial and epithelial cells, and known for their cryptic anti-angiogenic domains named restin and endostatin, respectively. Mutations or deletions of these collagens are associated with eye, muscle and microvessel phenotypes. We now describe a novel role for these collagens, namely a supportive role in leukocyte recruitment. We subjected mice deficient in collagen XV or collagen XVIII, and their compound mutant, as well as the wild-type control mice to bilateral renal ischemia/reperfusion, and evaluated renal function, tubular injury, and neutrophil and macrophage influx at different time points after ischemia/reperfusion. Five days after ischemia/reperfusion, the collagen XV, collagen XVIII and the compound mutant mice showed diminished serum urea levels compared to wild-type mice (all p<0.05). Histology showed reduced tubular damage, and decreased inflammatory cell influx in all mutant mice, which were more pronounced in the compound mutant despite increased expression of MCP-1 and TNF-α in double mutant mice compared to wildtype mice. Both type XV and type XVIII collagen bear glycosaminoglycan side chains and an in vitro approach with recombinant collagen XVIII fragments with variable glycanation indicated a role for these side chains in leukocyte migration. Thus, basement membrane zone collagen/proteoglycan hybrids facilitate leukocyte influx and tubular damage after renal ischemia/reperfusion and might be potential intervention targets for the reduction of inflammation in this condition. PMID:25188209

  3. Anti-glomerular basement membrane blood test

    MedlinePlus

    GBM antibody test; Antibody to human glomerular basement membrane; Anti-GBM antibodies ... Normally, there are none of these antibodies in the blood. Normal ... labs use different measurements or test different samples. Talk ...

  4. Investigations on the binding sites of the basement membrane zone for pemphigoid antibodies in vitro. II. Immunohistochemical reactions of the reactive groups.

    PubMed

    Bockendahl, H; Remy, W; Remy, B; Petersen, G; Stüttgen, G

    1977-01-01

    In continuing our studies on the characteristics of the antigenic structures of the basement membrane, procedures used in histochemistry for the identification and blocking of reactive groups have been adapted in this present work to the pretreatment of cryostat sections of guinea-pig tongue. These sections have then been studied by the indirect immunofluorescence method. By means or reagents, which produce a reversible extinction of the basement membrane fluorescence produced with pemphigoid sera, it proved possible to determine the existence of certain chemical groupings which bind the anti-basement membrane antibodies, namely: free carboxyl groups deriving from amino acids, hydrogen bridges in which the hydroxyl groups from the carbohydrates in the antigen are probably involved, bonds involving the free aldehydes of the antigen (either cross-links from aldehydes, or formation of Schiff's bases with amino groups of the antibodies), and lastly, to a lesser extent, disulphide bonds. The antigen/antibody reaction probably occurs in the neighbourhood of the alpha-glucosido-beta-galactosido-hydroxylysine. A reaction model has been developed from these findings. There were also some indications that the antigenic structures of the intercellular substance are chemically related to those of the basement membrane. The cell nucleus antigens, on the other hand, appear to possess different chemical properties.

  5. Developmental and Pathogenic Mechanisms of Basement Membrane Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Yurchenco, Peter D.; Patton, Bruce L.

    2010-01-01

    Basement membranes are sheet-like cell-adherent extracellular matrices that serve as cell substrata and solid-phase agonists, contributing to tissue organization, stability and differentiation. These matrices are assembled as polymers of laminins and type IV collagens that are tethered to nidogens and proteoglycans. They bind to cell surface molecules that include signal-transducing receptors such as the integrins and dystroglycan and form attachments to adjacent connective tissues. The cell receptors, in turn, provide links between the matrix and underlying cytoskeleton. Genetic diseases of basement membrane and associated components, collectively the basement membrane zone, disrupt the extracellular matrix and/or its linkages to affect nerve, muscle, skin, kidney and other tissues. These diseases can arise due to a loss of matrix integrity, adhesion strength and/or receptor-mediated signaling. An understanding of the mechanisms of basement membrane zone assembly and resulting structure can provide insights into the development of normal tissues and the pathogenic mechanisms that underlie diverse disorders. PMID:19355968

  6. ROCK1-directed basement membrane positioning coordinates epithelial tissue polarity.

    PubMed

    Daley, William P; Gervais, Elise M; Centanni, Samuel W; Gulfo, Kathryn M; Nelson, Deirdre A; Larsen, Melinda

    2012-01-01

    The basement membrane is crucial for epithelial tissue organization and function. However, the mechanisms by which basement membrane is restricted to the basal periphery of epithelial tissues and the basement membrane-mediated signals that regulate coordinated tissue organization are not well defined. Here, we report that Rho kinase (ROCK) controls coordinated tissue organization by restricting basement membrane to the epithelial basal periphery in developing mouse submandibular salivary glands, and that ROCK inhibition results in accumulation of ectopic basement membrane throughout the epithelial compartment. ROCK-regulated restriction of PAR-1b (MARK2) localization in the outer basal epithelial cell layer is required for basement membrane positioning at the tissue periphery. PAR-1b is specifically required for basement membrane deposition, as inhibition of PAR-1b kinase activity prevents basement membrane deposition and disrupts overall tissue organization, and suppression of PAR-1b together with ROCK inhibition prevents interior accumulations of basement membrane. Conversely, ectopic overexpression of wild-type PAR-1b results in ectopic interior basement membrane deposition. Significantly, culture of salivary epithelial cells on exogenous basement membrane rescues epithelial organization in the presence of ROCK1 or PAR-1b inhibition, and this basement membrane-mediated rescue requires functional integrin β1 to maintain epithelial cell-cell adhesions. Taken together, these studies indicate that ROCK1/PAR-1b-dependent regulation of basement membrane placement is required for the coordination of tissue polarity and the elaboration of tissue structure in the developing submandibular salivary gland.

  7. Ocular abnormalities in thin basement membrane disease

    PubMed Central

    Colville, D.; Savige, J.; Branley, P.; Wilson, D.

    1997-01-01

    AIM/BACKGROUND—Alport syndrome is an X linked disease that results in renal failure, deafness, and ocular abnormalities including a dot and fleck retinopathy and anterior lenticonus. The ultrastructural appearance of the glomerular basement membrane in thin basement membrane disease (TBMD) resembles that seen in some patients with Alport syndrome, and in some cases this disease is inherited too. The aim of this study was to determine whether patients with TBMD have any ocular abnormalities.
METHODS—The eyes of 17 unrelated individuals with TBMD were studied by slit-lamp, including biomicroscopic fundus examination with a 78 D lens, by direct ophthalmoscopy, and by fundal photographs. The findings were compared with those in patients with IgA glomerulonephritis or Alport syndrome, and in normals.
RESULTS—No patient with TBMD had a dot and fleck retinopathy or anterior lenticonus. A corneal dystrophy (n = 2) or pigmentation (n = 1), and retinal pigment epithelial clumping and maculopathy (n = 1) were noted. Corneal, lens, and retinal dots were found in five (29%), three (18%), and 16 (94%) patients, respectively, but these were also demonstrated in individuals with other renal diseases and in normal individuals.
CONCLUSIONS—The dot and fleck retinopathy and anterior lenticonus typical of Alport syndrome do not occur in TBMD. The protein abnormality and genetic defect in TBMD are not known, but the lack of ocular lesions suggests that the abnormal protein in this disease is more sparsely distributed or less important in the basement membranes of the eye than of the kidney. Alternatively, the protein may be less affected by the mutations responsible for TBMD.

 PMID:9227202

  8. Colorectal Cancer and Basement Membranes: Clinicopathological Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Mylonas, Charalampos C.; Lazaris, Andreas C.

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer in males and the second in females. In 2008, an estimated 1.2 million people were diagnosed with and 608,700 people died of CRC. Besides diagnosis and treatment, prognosis is an important matter for cancer patients. Today, clinicopathological correlations have many applications in cancer prognostication. Examples include the prediction of the medium patient survival and the screening for patients suitable for specific therapeutic approaches. Apart from traditional prognostic factors, such as tumor stage and grade, new markers may be useful in clinical practice. Possible markers may result from the study of basement membranes (BMs). BM seems to play a role in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer, so BM alterations may have prognostic significance as well. The purpose of this review is to briefly describe BMs and their relationship with CRC, in the aspect of clinicopathological correlations. PMID:25614736

  9. Heterotypic control of basement membrane dynamics during branching morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Deirdre A; Larsen, Melinda

    2015-05-01

    Many mammalian organs undergo branching morphogenesis to create highly arborized structures with maximized surface area for specialized organ function. Cooperative cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesions that sculpt the emerging tissue architecture are guided by dynamic basement membranes. Properties of the basement membrane are reciprocally controlled by the interacting epithelial and mesenchymal cell populations. Here we discuss how basement membrane remodeling is required for branching morphogenesis to regulate cell-matrix and cell-cell adhesions that are required for cell patterning during morphogenesis and how basement membrane impacts morphogenesis by stimulation of cell patterning, force generation, and mechanotransduction. We suggest that in addition to creating mature epithelial architecture, remodeling of the epithelial basement membrane during branching morphogenesis is also essential to promote maturation of the stromal mesenchyme to create mature organ structure. Recapitulation of developmental cell-matrix and cell-cell interactions are of critical importance in tissue engineering and regeneration strategies that seek to restore organ function.

  10. [Research progress of corneal epithelial basal cells and basement membrane].

    PubMed

    Qu, J H; Sun, X G

    2016-09-11

    The cylinder cells at the bottom of corneal epithelial cells are basal cells. Their cytoplasm contains keratin intermediate filament which is important in secretion of basement membrane. Corneal epithelial dysfunction due to diabetes or ocular surgery is intimately related with basal cell abnormality. Corneal epithelial basement membrane is a highly specific extracellular matrix which is made up of lamina lucida and lamina densa. It plays an extremely important role in renewal and restoration. Many ocular abnormalities and diseases have been described to relate to the corneal epithelial basement membrane, such as traumatic recurrent corneal erosion, corneal dystrophy and keratoconus. (Chin J Ophthalmol, 2016, 52: 703-707). PMID:27647251

  11. Immunology of anti-glomerular basement membrane disease.

    PubMed

    Salama, Alan D; Pusey, Charles D

    2002-05-01

    Anti-glomerular basement membrane disease is a form of autoimmune glomerulonephritis often accompanied by lung haemorrhage. It is characterized by circulating and deposited antibodies that bind basement membrane components in the glomerulus and lung alveolus. Since early descriptions of the deposition of immunoglobulin on the glomerular basement membrane, work has focused on the binding properties of the autoantibodies, and this has led to the identification of the autoantigen as the non-collagenous region of the alpha 3 chain of type IV collagen. Despite being thought of as a prototypic antibody mediated autoimmune disease, it is becoming apparent that both humoral and cellular immune mechanisms act in concert to initiate and perpetuate disease. Recent data have shed light on the molecular pathogenesis of anti-glomerular basement membrane disease and provided a more complete framework on which to build our understanding of autoimmune renal disease. This should lead to novel approaches to immunotherapy for patients with glomerulonephritis. PMID:11981257

  12. Ultrastructure of basement membranes in developing shark tooth.

    PubMed

    Sawada, T; Inoue, S

    2003-01-01

    Based on studies of the tooth of largely mammalian species, the dental basement membranes are shown to be specialized for various roles significant in the development and maintenance of the tooth. Comparative studies with the nonmammalian tooth will facilitate further clarification of the mechanisms of mammalian tooth formation. In this study, basement membranes of the shark tooth in successive developmental stages was ultrastructurally examined for elucidation of their roles in odontogenesis. Teeth of a shark, Cephaloscyllium umbratile, were processed for thin section electron microscopy. Throughout the developmental stages the lamina densa of the basement membrane was made up of a fine network of "cords," irregular anastomosing strands known to be the major component of mammalian basement membranes. In the presecretory stage of the shark tooth, dental papilla cells were immobilized for their differentiation into odontoblasts by means of the binding of their processes to numerous narrow extensions of the lamina densa of the inner dental epithelium. In the secretory stage, a number of cords of the widened lamina densa were extended towards and bound to tubular vesicles of the forming enameloid. During the mineralization stage, fragments of the degrading enameloid matrix appeared to be moving through the lamina densa to the epithelial cells for processing. In the maturation stage, half of the lamina densa facing the enameloid was mineralized forming an advancing edge of mineralization of the enameloid. It provided strong binding and smooth transition of organic to mineral phase which may allow transportation of substances across the phases for enameloid maturation in a way similar to that reported in the mammalian tooth. These observations indicate that basement membranes of the developing shark tooth, as those in the mammalian tooth, play various roles, including anchoring, firm binding, and possible mediation of the transport of substances that are known to be

  13. Regulation of the basement membrane by epithelia generated forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, Kandice

    2012-12-01

    Tumor metastasis involves a progressive loss of tissue architecture and dissolution of structural boundaries between the epithelium and connective tissue. The basement membrane (BM), a specialized network of extracellular matrix proteins forms a barrier that physically restricts pre-invasive lesions such that they remain as local insults. The BM is not a static structure, but one that is constantly regenerated and remodeled in the adult organism. Matrix organization also regulates cell function. Thus alterations in the balance of synthesis, remodeling and proteolytic degradation of the extracellular matrix proteins may contribute to a loss of structural integrity. However, the de novo assembly and maintenance of the complex structural properties of in vivo basement membranes remain elusive. Here, this paper highlights the current understanding on the structural properties and the establishment of the BM, and discusses the potential role of self-generated forces in adult tissue remodeling and the maintenance of the BM as a malignancy suppressor.

  14. Coexistent Wegener's granulomatosis and anti-glomerular basement membrane disease.

    PubMed

    Wahls, T L; Bonsib, S M; Schuster, V L

    1987-02-01

    Wegener's granulomatosis and Goodpasture's syndrome represent two major causes of a pulmonary-renal syndrome. We describe the clinical course and morphologic features of a patient in whom pulmonary manifestations of Wegener's granulomatosis developed and were followed six months later by anti-glomerular basement membrane disease. Although we regard this as a unique and probably fortuitous association, a genetic predisposition or a secondary form of anti-GBM disease cannot be excluded. PMID:3542802

  15. The role of laminins in basement membrane function

    PubMed Central

    AUMAILLEY, MONIQUE; SMYTH, NEIL

    1998-01-01

    Laminins are a family of multifunctional macromolecules, ubiquitous in basement membranes, and represent the most abundant structural noncollagenous glycoproteins of these highly specialised extracellular matrices. Their discovery started with the difficult task of isolating molecules produced by cultivated cells or extracted from tissues. The development of molecular biology techniques has facilitated and accelerated the identification and the characterisation of new laminin variants making it feasible to identify full-length polypeptides which have not been purified. Further, genetically engineered laminin fragments can be generated for studies of their structure-function relationship, permitting the demonstration that laminins are involved in multiple interactions with themselves, with other components of the basal lamina, and with cells. It endows laminins with a central role in the formation, the architecture, and the stability of basement membranes. In addition, laminins may both separate and connect different tissues, i.e. the parenchymal and the interstitial connective tissues. Laminins also provide adjacent cells with a mechanical scaffold and biological information either directly by interacting with cell surface components, or indirectly by trapping growth factors. In doing so they trigger and control cellular functions. Recently, the structural and biological diversity of the laminins has started to be elucidated by gene targeting and by the identification of laminin defects in acquired or inherited human diseases. The consequent phenotypes highlight the pivotal role of laminins in determining heterogeneity in basement membrane functions. PMID:9758133

  16. Effects of radiation on the permeability of human basement membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, B.-T.; Achour, S.; Simmonet, F.; Guerin, D.

    1999-02-01

    The influence of radiation on the permeability properties of human basement membrane was investigated by measuring the diffusion rate of several organic compounds (glycine, proline, glucose, urea and insulin) through human anterior lens capsules. The basement membranes borne an γ-irradiation treatment change significantly their permeability vis-a-vis studied organic substances. This modification in physico-chemical properties is probably due to the radiation, which alters or degrades the complex structure (or architecture) of basement membranes. Moreover the change in permeability is dependent upon the diffusing compounds. An increase in diffusion has been observed for glucose, glycine and urea. However for insulin and proline, a decrease in diffusion rate was observed. L'influence de radiation sur la perméabilité de la membrane basale a été étudiée par la mesure de la vitesse de diffusion de plusieurs composés organiques d'intérêt biologique (glycine, proline, glucose, urée et insuline) à travers la lame basale antérieure du cristallin de l'oil humain. Les membranes basales qui sont traitées avec l'irradiation γ changent significativement leur perméabilité vis-à-vis des substances organiques. Ce changement de propriétés physico-chimiques est probablement dû à l'altération ou la dégradation de la structure (ou de l'architecture) de la membrane basale entraînée par l'irradiation. De plus, la modification de la perméabilité de la membrane basale est dépendante des composés diffusants. Une augmentation de la vitesse de diffusion a été observée pour le glucose, le glycine et l'urée. Par contre, dans les cas de l'insuline et de la proline, on a observé une diminution de la vitesse de diffusion.

  17. Atypical anti-glomerular basement membrane disease: lessons learned

    PubMed Central

    Glassock, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) disease usually pursues a self-limited course, at least from the immunological perspective. In addition, circulating antibodies to cryptic, conformational epitopes within the NC1 domain of the alpha 3 chain of Type IV Collagen are commonly found at the zenith of the clinical disease. However, exceptions to these general rules do occur, as exemplified by two remarkable cases reported in this issue of the Clinical Kidney Journal. The possible explanations for and the lessons learned from these uncommon occurrences are discussed in this short commentary. PMID:27679709

  18. Atypical anti-glomerular basement membrane disease: lessons learned

    PubMed Central

    Glassock, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) disease usually pursues a self-limited course, at least from the immunological perspective. In addition, circulating antibodies to cryptic, conformational epitopes within the NC1 domain of the alpha 3 chain of Type IV Collagen are commonly found at the zenith of the clinical disease. However, exceptions to these general rules do occur, as exemplified by two remarkable cases reported in this issue of the Clinical Kidney Journal. The possible explanations for and the lessons learned from these uncommon occurrences are discussed in this short commentary.

  19. Remodeling of epithelial cells and basement membranes in a corneal deficiency model with long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Kameishi, Sumako; Sugiyama, Hiroaki; Yamato, Masayuki; Sado, Yoshikazu; Namiki, Hideo; Kato, Takashi; Okano, Teruo

    2015-02-01

    The ocular surface consists of the cornea, conjunctiva, and the limbus that is located in the transitional zone between the cornea and conjunctiva. The corneal epithelial cells are generated through the mitosis of corneal epithelial stem cells in the limbus. This study investigated a rabbit corneal deficiency model prepared by the surgical removal of the corneal and limbal epithelia, which express cytokeratin 12 (K12). After the surgery, K13-expressing conjunctival epithelium migrated onto the corneal surface and completely covered the surface, leading to neovascularization and corneal opacification. However, at 24 and 48 weeks after the surgery, K12-expressing cornea-like cells reappeared on the model ocular surface. These cells formed an island surrounded by invaded conjunctiva and were isolated from the limbus. Interestingly, in the 24-week model surface, α1(IV) and α2(IV) collagen chains, which are normally found in the basement membrane of the native limbus and conjunctiva, and not in the cornea, were continuously deposited throughout the entire basement membrane, including the basement membrane under cornea-like cells. By contrast, in the 48-week model surface, α1(IV) and α2(IV) collagen chains were absent from the basement membrane beneath the central part of cornea-like cells and were localized below the invaded conjunctiva and the transitional zone between cornea-like cells and the invaded conjunctiva, which had similar distribution to the native ocular basement membrane. Moreover, K12, K14, p63, vimentin, and α1(IV) and α2(IV) collagen chains, which are colocalized in the native limbus, were all present at the transitional zone of the 48-week model surface. Therefore, a limbus-like structure appeared to be reconstructed on the surface of the 48-week model as a stem cell niche. This study should aid in the understanding of human corneal deficiency, the correlation between the epithelial cell phenotype and the composition of the basement membrane, and

  20. Assessment of sulfur mustard interaction with basement membrane components

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.; Peters, B.P.; Monteiro-Rivier, N.A.

    1995-08-01

    Bis-2-chloroethyl sulfide (sulfur mustard, RD) is a bifunctional alkylating agent which causes severe vesication characterized by slow wound healing. Our previous studies have shown that the vesicant RD disrupts the epidermal-dermal junction at the lamina lucida of the basement membrane. The purpose of this study was to examine whether RD directly modifies basement membrane components (BMCs), and to evaluate the effect of RD on the cell adhesive activity of BMCs. EHS laminin was incubated with (14C)HRD, and extracted by gel filtration. Analysis of the (14C)HRD-conjugated laminin fraction by a reduced sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylaminde gel electrophoresis (SD S-PAGE) revealed the incorporation of radioactivity into both laminin subunits and a laminin trimer resistant to dissociation in reduced SDS-PAGE sample buffer, suggesting direct alkylation and cross-linking of EHS laminin by (14C)HD. Normal human foreskin epidermal keratinocytes were biosynthetically labeled with (35S)cysteine. (35S)-labeled laminin isoforms, Ae.Ble.B2e. laminin and K.Ble.B2e. laminin (using the nomenclature of Engel), fibronectin, and heparan sulfate proteoglycan were isolated by irnmunoprecipitation from the cell culture medium, treated with RD or ethanol as control, and then analyzed by SDS-PAGE.

  1. Basement membranes in the worm: a dynamic scaffolding that instructs cellular behaviors and shapes tissues

    PubMed Central

    Clay, Matthew R.; Sherwood, David R.

    2015-01-01

    The nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans has all the major basement membrane proteins found in vertebrates, usually with a smaller gene family encoding each component. With its powerful forward genetics, optical clarity, simple tissue organization, and the capability to functionally tag most basement membrane components with fluorescent proteins, C. elegans has facilitated novel insights into the assembly and function of basement membranes. Although basement membranes are generally thought of as static structures, studies in C. elegans have revealed their active properties and essential functions in tissue formation and maintenance. Here we review discoveries from C. elegans development that highlight dynamic aspects of basement membrane assembly, function, and regulation during organ growth, tissue polarity, cell migration, cell invasion, and tissue attachment. These studies have helped transform our view of basement membranes from static support structures to dynamic scaffoldings that play broad roles in regulating tissue organization and cellular behavior that are essential for development and have important implications in human diseases. PMID:26610919

  2. The bi-functional organization of human basement membranes.

    PubMed

    Halfter, Willi; Monnier, Christophe; Müller, David; Oertle, Philipp; Uechi, Guy; Balasubramani, Manimalha; Safi, Farhad; Lim, Roderick; Loparic, Marko; Henrich, Paul Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    The current basement membrane (BM) model proposes a single-layered extracellular matrix (ECM) sheet that is predominantly composed of laminins, collagen IVs and proteoglycans. The present data show that BM proteins and their domains are asymmetrically organized providing human BMs with side-specific properties: A) isolated human BMs roll up in a side-specific pattern, with the epithelial side facing outward and the stromal side inward. The rolling is independent of the curvature of the tissue from which the BMs were isolated. B) The epithelial side of BMs is twice as stiff as the stromal side, and C) epithelial cells adhere to the epithelial side of BMs only. Side-selective cell adhesion was also confirmed for BMs from mice and from chick embryos. We propose that the bi-functional organization of BMs is an inherent property of BMs and helps build the basic tissue architecture of metazoans with alternating epithelial and connective tissue layers.

  3. Building from the ground up: basement membranes in Drosophila development

    PubMed Central

    Isabella, Adam J.; Horne-Badovinac, Sally

    2016-01-01

    Basement Membranes (BMs) are sheet-like extracellular matrices found at the basal surfaces of epithelial tissues. The structural and functional diversity of these matrices within the body endows them with the ability to affect multiple aspects of cell behavior and communication; for this reason, BMs are integral to many developmental processes. The power of Drosophila genetics, as applied to the BM, has yielded substantial insight into how these matrices influence development. Here, we explore three facets of BM biology to which Drosophila research has made particularly important contributions. First we discuss how newly synthesized BM proteins are secreted to and assembled exclusively on basal epithelial surfaces. Next, we examine how regulation of the structural properties of the BM mechanically supports and guides tissue morphogenesis. Finally, we explore how BMs influence development through the modulation of several major signaling pathways. PMID:26610918

  4. The Acinar Cage: Basement Membranes Determine Molecule Exchange and Mechanical Stability of Human Breast Cell Acini.

    PubMed

    Gaiko-Shcherbak, Aljona; Fabris, Gloria; Dreissen, Georg; Merkel, Rudolf; Hoffmann, Bernd; Noetzel, Erik

    2015-01-01

    The biophysical properties of the basement membrane that surrounds human breast glands are poorly understood, but are thought to be decisive for normal organ function and malignancy. Here, we characterize the breast gland basement membrane with a focus on molecule permeation and mechanical stability, both crucial for organ function. We used well-established and nature-mimicking MCF10A acini as 3D cell model for human breast glands, with ether low- or highly-developed basement membrane scaffolds. Semi-quantitative dextran tracer (3 to 40 kDa) experiments allowed us to investigate the basement membrane scaffold as a molecule diffusion barrier in human breast acini in vitro. We demonstrated that molecule permeation correlated positively with macromolecule size and intriguingly also with basement membrane development state, revealing a pore size of at least 9 nm. Notably, an intact collagen IV mesh proved to be essential for this permeation function. Furthermore, we performed ultra-sensitive atomic force microscopy to quantify the response of native breast acini and of decellularized basement membrane shells against mechanical indentation. We found a clear correlation between increasing acinar force resistance and basement membrane formation stage. Most important native acini with highly-developed basement membranes as well as cell-free basement membrane shells could both withstand physiologically relevant loads (≤ 20 nN) without loss of structural integrity. In contrast, low-developed basement membranes were significantly softer and more fragile. In conclusion, our study emphasizes the key role of the basement membrane as conductor of acinar molecule influx and mechanical stability of human breast glands, which are fundamental for normal organ function.

  5. The Acinar Cage: Basement Membranes Determine Molecule Exchange and Mechanical Stability of Human Breast Cell Acini

    PubMed Central

    Gaiko-Shcherbak, Aljona; Fabris, Gloria; Dreissen, Georg; Merkel, Rudolf; Hoffmann, Bernd; Noetzel, Erik

    2015-01-01

    The biophysical properties of the basement membrane that surrounds human breast glands are poorly understood, but are thought to be decisive for normal organ function and malignancy. Here, we characterize the breast gland basement membrane with a focus on molecule permeation and mechanical stability, both crucial for organ function. We used well-established and nature-mimicking MCF10A acini as 3D cell model for human breast glands, with ether low- or highly-developed basement membrane scaffolds. Semi-quantitative dextran tracer (3 to 40 kDa) experiments allowed us to investigate the basement membrane scaffold as a molecule diffusion barrier in human breast acini in vitro. We demonstrated that molecule permeation correlated positively with macromolecule size and intriguingly also with basement membrane development state, revealing a pore size of at least 9 nm. Notably, an intact collagen IV mesh proved to be essential for this permeation function. Furthermore, we performed ultra-sensitive atomic force microscopy to quantify the response of native breast acini and of decellularized basement membrane shells against mechanical indentation. We found a clear correlation between increasing acinar force resistance and basement membrane formation stage. Most important native acini with highly-developed basement membranes as well as cell-free basement membrane shells could both withstand physiologically relevant loads (≤ 20 nN) without loss of structural integrity. In contrast, low-developed basement membranes were significantly softer and more fragile. In conclusion, our study emphasizes the key role of the basement membrane as conductor of acinar molecule influx and mechanical stability of human breast glands, which are fundamental for normal organ function. PMID:26674091

  6. The Acinar Cage: Basement Membranes Determine Molecule Exchange and Mechanical Stability of Human Breast Cell Acini.

    PubMed

    Gaiko-Shcherbak, Aljona; Fabris, Gloria; Dreissen, Georg; Merkel, Rudolf; Hoffmann, Bernd; Noetzel, Erik

    2015-01-01

    The biophysical properties of the basement membrane that surrounds human breast glands are poorly understood, but are thought to be decisive for normal organ function and malignancy. Here, we characterize the breast gland basement membrane with a focus on molecule permeation and mechanical stability, both crucial for organ function. We used well-established and nature-mimicking MCF10A acini as 3D cell model for human breast glands, with ether low- or highly-developed basement membrane scaffolds. Semi-quantitative dextran tracer (3 to 40 kDa) experiments allowed us to investigate the basement membrane scaffold as a molecule diffusion barrier in human breast acini in vitro. We demonstrated that molecule permeation correlated positively with macromolecule size and intriguingly also with basement membrane development state, revealing a pore size of at least 9 nm. Notably, an intact collagen IV mesh proved to be essential for this permeation function. Furthermore, we performed ultra-sensitive atomic force microscopy to quantify the response of native breast acini and of decellularized basement membrane shells against mechanical indentation. We found a clear correlation between increasing acinar force resistance and basement membrane formation stage. Most important native acini with highly-developed basement membranes as well as cell-free basement membrane shells could both withstand physiologically relevant loads (≤ 20 nN) without loss of structural integrity. In contrast, low-developed basement membranes were significantly softer and more fragile. In conclusion, our study emphasizes the key role of the basement membrane as conductor of acinar molecule influx and mechanical stability of human breast glands, which are fundamental for normal organ function. PMID:26674091

  7. Identification of Goodpasture antigens in human alveolar basement membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshioka, K; Iseki, T; Okada, M; Morimoto, Y; Eryu, N; Maki, S

    1988-01-01

    Goodpasture (GP) antigens, protein components reactive with human autoantibodies against glomerular basement membrane (GBM), were identified in human alveolar basement membrane (ABM) using an enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA), Western blotting and immunoprecipitation. All six anti-GBM antisera studied, three obtained from patients with glomerulonephritis and pulmonary haemorrhages (i.e. GP syndrome), and three from patients with glomerulonephritis alone, distinctively reacted with collagenase-digested (CD) ABM. Very cationic 22-28 kD and 40-48 kD components were detected by blot analysis combined with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. These proteins showed some similarities to GP antigens in human GBM with respect to the monomer-dimer composition and charge distribution. Inhibition ELISA revealed that the binding of anti-GBM antisera to CDGBM decreased when they were pre-incubated with CDABM, suggesting that the anti-GBM antisera recognized the same epitope(s) on the GBM and ABM. Heterogeneity of the GP antigens in human ABM was demonstrated by blotting; monomeric antigens were absent or at low levels in the CDABM of three out of 10 normal individuals. In immunoprecipitation, anti-GBM antisera from patients with and without pulmonary haemorrhage showed different reactivities with CDABM. The former antisera precipitated both monomeric and dimeric components, but the latter did not. The observations of variation in monomer-dimer composition of ABM, and the different binding of anti-GBM antisera to it may explain why only some patients with anti-GBM nephritis have lung involvement. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:2466590

  8. The corneal epithelial basement membrane: structure, function, and disease.

    PubMed

    Torricelli, André A M; Singh, Vivek; Santhiago, Marcony R; Wilson, Steven E

    2013-09-01

    The corneal epithelial basement membrane (BM) is positioned between basal epithelial cells and the stroma. This highly specialized extracellular matrix functions not only to anchor epithelial cells to the stroma and provide scaffolding during embryonic development but also during migration, differentiation, and maintenance of the differentiated epithelial phenotype. Basement membranes are composed of a diverse assemblage of extracellular molecules, some of which are likely specific to the tissue where they function; but in general they are composed of four primary components--collagens, laminins, heparan sulfate proteoglycans, and nidogens--in addition to other components such as thrombospondin-1, matrilin-2, and matrilin-4 and even fibronectin in some BM. Many studies have focused on characterizing BM due to their potential roles in normal tissue function and disease, and these structures have been well characterized in many tissues. Comparatively few studies, however, have focused on the function of the epithelial BM in corneal physiology. Since the normal corneal stroma is avascular and has relatively low keratocyte density, it is expected that the corneal BM would be different from the BM in other tissues. One function that appears critical in homeostasis and wound healing is the barrier function to penetration of cytokines from the epithelium to stroma (such as transforming growth factor β-1), and possibly from stroma to epithelium (such as keratinocyte growth factor). The corneal epithelial BM is also involved in many inherited and acquired corneal diseases. This review examines this structure in detail and discusses the importance of corneal epithelial BM in homeostasis, wound healing, and disease.

  9. Basement membrane proteins in salivary gland tumours. Distribution of type IV collagen and laminin.

    PubMed

    Skalova, A; Leivo, I

    1992-01-01

    Immunohistochemical localization of type IV collagen and laminin in normal salivary glands and in salivary gland tumours of various types was studied using rabbit antisera. In normal salivary glands, type IV collagen and laminin were co-localized in basement membranes surrounding acini, ducts, fat cells and peripheral nerves. In salivary gland tumours, three main patterns of co-expression of these basement membrane proteins were distinguished. Linear basement membrane-like staining was detected in duct-cell-derived benign salivary gland tumours and in acinic cell carcinomas. In invasive lesions, however, these basement membrane proteins were distributed in an irregular, interrupted manner, and in many cases they were completely absent. Both benign and malignant salivary gland tumours which have a prominent myoepithelial cell component display a particular deposition of basement membrane molecules adjacent to the modified myoepithelial cells, and at the margins of extracellular matrix deposits within these tumours.

  10. Kalinin: an epithelium-specific basement membrane adhesion molecule that is a component of anchoring filaments

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Basal keratinocytes attach to the underlying dermal stroma through an ultrastructurally unique and complex basement membrane zone. Electron- dense plaques along the basal surface plasma membrane, termed hemidesmosomes, appear to attach directly to the lamina densa of the basement membrane through fine strands, called anchoring filaments. The lamina densa is secured to the stroma through a complex of type VII collagen containing anchoring fibrils and anchoring plaques. We have identified what we believe is a novel antigen unique to this tissue region. The mAbs to this antigen localize to the anchoring filaments, just below the basal-dense plate of the hemidesmosomes. In cell culture, the antigen is deposited upon the culture substate by growing and migrating human keratinocytes. Addition of mAb to the cultures causes the cells to round and detach, but does not impair them metabolically. Skin fragments incubated with antibody extensively de- epithelialize. These findings strongly suggest that this antigen is intimately involved in attachment of keratinocytes to the basement membrane. This antigen was isolated from keratinocyte cultures by immunoaffinity chromatography. Two molecules are observed. The most intact species contains three nonidentical chains, 165, 155, and 140 kD linked by interchain disulfide bonds. The second and more abundant species contains the 165- and 140-kD chains, but the 155-kD chain has been proteolytically cleaved to 105 kD. Likewise, two rotary-shadowed images are observed. The larger of the two, presumably corresponding to the most intact form, appears as an asymmetric 107-nm-long rod, with a single globule at one end and two smaller globules at the other. The more abundant species, presumably the proteolytically cleaved form, lacks the distal small globule. We propose the name "kalinin" for this new molecule. PMID:1860885

  11. Glomerular basement membrane thickness among the Saudi population.

    PubMed

    Kfoury, Hala

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the mean glomerular basement membrane (GBM) thickness in the Saudi population. We calculated the average GBM thickness in patients diagnosed with minimal change disease, and the ultrastructural analysis of at least three glomeruli was reviewed using a digital camera installed in an electron microscope. There were a total of 53 cases from 53 Saudi patients aged 2-70 years old. The mean GBM thickness for all cases was 323.6 ± 49.5 nm. There was no significant statistical difference in the mean GBM thickness between males and females. There were significant differences in the mean GBM thickness between all age groups, except for between the age groups 18-60 and >60 years old, where GBM thickness did not differ significantly. Age was significantly correlated with definite progression or diminution in the thickness of the GBM. The mean GBM thickness in our Saudi sample population was comparable to the very few reported measurements in the literature. There was no significant association between GBM thickness and gender; however, GBM thickness is directly proportional to age, up to 60 years old.

  12. Fluid Mechanics of the Vascular Basement Membrane in the Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coloma, Mikhail; Hui, Jonathan; Chiarot, Paul; Huang, Peter; Carare, Roxana; McLeod, Kenneth; Schaffer, David

    2013-11-01

    Beta-amyloid is a normal product of brain metabolic function and is found within the interstitial fluid of the brain. Failure of the clearance of beta-amyloid from the aging brain leads to its accumulation within the walls of arteries and to Alzheimer's disease. The vascular basement membrane (VBM) within the walls of cerebral arteries surrounds the spirally arranged smooth muscle cells and represents an essential pathway for removal of beta-amyloid from the brain. This process fails with the stiffening of arterial walls associated with aging. In this study we hypothesize that the deformation of the VBM associated with arterial pulsations drives the interstitial fluid to drain in the direction opposite of the arterial blood flow. This hypothesis is theoretically investigated by modeling the VBM as a thin, coaxial, fluid-filled porous medium surrounding a periodically deforming cylindrical tube. Flow and boundary conditions required to achieve such a backward clearance are derived through a control volume analysis of mass, momentum, and energy.

  13. Type IV Collagens and Basement Membrane Diseases: Cell Biology and Pathogenic Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Mao, Mao; Alavi, Marcel V; Labelle-Dumais, Cassandre; Gould, Douglas B

    2015-01-01

    Basement membranes are highly specialized extracellular matrices. Once considered inert scaffolds, basement membranes are now viewed as dynamic and versatile environments that modulate cellular behaviors to regulate tissue development, function, and repair. Increasing evidence suggests that, in addition to providing structural support to neighboring cells, basement membranes serve as reservoirs of growth factors that direct and fine-tune cellular functions. Type IV collagens are a major component of all basement membranes. They evolved along with the earliest multicellular organisms and have been integrated into diverse fundamental biological processes as time and evolution shaped the animal kingdom. The roles of basement membranes in humans are as complex and diverse as their distributions and molecular composition. As a result, basement membrane defects result in multisystem disorders with ambiguous and overlapping boundaries that likely reflect the simultaneous interplay and integration of multiple cellular pathways and processes. Consequently, there will be no single treatment for basement membrane disorders, and therapies are likely to be as varied as the phenotypes. Understanding tissue-specific pathology and the underlying molecular mechanism is the present challenge; personalized medicine will rely upon understanding how a given mutation impacts diverse cellular functions.

  14. High-resolution ultrastructural study of the rat glomerular basement membrane in aminonucleoside nephrosis.

    PubMed

    Inoue, S; Bendayan, M

    1996-01-01

    In the initial stages of aminonucleoside nephrosis, functional alterations in the glomerular basement membrane occur, as evidenced by the development of proteinuria. However, it has not been possible to observe important ultrastructural modifications at the level of the basement membrane, probably because the changes are taking place at the molecular level. In this study, by the use of high-resolution electron microscopy, an attempt was made to evaluate such changes in rat glomerular basement membrane during acute aminonucleoside nephrosis. As previously reported, in control animals the glomerular basement membrane is composed of a network of 4-nm-wide irregular anastomosing strands, referred to as "cords," which are known to contain a core filament of type IV collagen surrounded by a "sheath" of other components, such as laminin and heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG). The most conspicuous ultrastructural alteration of the nephrotic glomerular basement membrane, recognizable only at high magnification, is that the cords were denuded leaving only the core filament through the loss of the sheath material. Thus, the cord network was transformed, with the progress of pathological conditions, into a network of fine filaments. On the other hand, abundance and distribution of HSPG molecules known to be present in the form of 4.5- to 5-nm-wide ribbon-like "double tracks," were found to be similar in control and nephrotic tissues. Since HSPG is one of the charge proteins of the basement membrane, the little changes observed for HSPG are difficult to interpret in view of reported decreases in basement membrane anionic sites in nephrosis. In conclusion, the glomerular basement membrane in aminonucleoside nephrosis loses its cord network components and replaces them with a more perforated network, which could be a cause for the increased permeability of this basement membrane. PMID:8883324

  15. Pericapillary basement membrane thickening in human skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Baum, Oliver; Bigler, Marius

    2016-09-01

    The basement membrane (BM) surrounding capillaries in skeletal muscles varies physiologically in thickness according to age, physical fitness, and anatomical site in humans. Furthermore, the pericapillary BM thickness (CBMT) increases pathophysiologically during several common disease states, including peripheral arterial disease and diabetes mellitus. This review on CBM thickening in human skeletal muscles is two pronged. First, it addresses the advantages/disadvantages of grid- and tablet-based measuring and morphometric techniques that are implemented to assess the CBMT on transmission electron micrographs. Second, it deals with the biology of CBM thickening in skeletal muscles, particularly its possible causes, molecular mechanisms, and functional impact. CBM thickening is triggered by several physical factors, including diabetes-associated glycation, hydrostatic pressure, and inflammation. Increased biosynthesis of type IV collagen expression or repetitive cycles in pericyte or endothelial cell degeneration/proliferation appear to be most critical for CBM accumulation. A thickened CBM obviously poses a greater barrier for diffusion, lowers the microvascular elasticity, and impedes transcytosis of inflammatory cells. Our own morphometric data reveal the CBM enlargement to be not accompanied by the pericyte coverage. Owing to an overlap or redundancy in the capillary supply, CBM thickening in skeletal muscles might not be such a devastating occurrence as in organs with endarterial circulation (e.g., kidney and retina). CBM growth in skeletal muscles can be reversed by training or administration of antidiabetic drugs. In conclusion, CBM thickening in skeletal muscles is a microvascular remodeling process by which metabolic, hemodynamic, and inflammatory forces are integrated together and which could play a hitherto underestimated role in etiology/progression of human diseases.

  16. Possible continuity of subplasmalemmal cytoplasmic network with basement membrane cord network: ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    Inoue, S

    1995-05-01

    The ultrastructure of the subplasmalemmal cytoplasm of the cell and the associated basement membrane as well as the area of the cell-basement membrane border were observed with high resolution electron microscopy after preparation of the tissues with cryofixation or glutaraldehyde fixation followed by freeze substitution. The subplasmalemmal cytoplasm of the smooth muscle cells of rat epididymal tubules and the podocyte processes of the mouse glomerular visceral epithelium were found to be composed of a fine network of irregular anastomosing strands. This network closely resembled the previously characterized cord network of the basement membrane. The cords are known to be composed of a 1.5 to 3 nm thick core filament made up of type IV collagen which is surrounded by an irregular 'sheath' of other components. The strands in the subplasmalemmal network showed ultrastructural features similar to those of the cord network. Ribbon-like, 4.5 nm wide heparan sulfate proteoglycan 'double tracks' were previously reported to be associated with the cord network. Structures similar in size and appearance to the double tracks were also found in the subplasmalemmal network. At the cell-basement membrane border, the lamina densa of the basement membrane was in contact with the cell without the intervening space of a lamina lucida which was recently found to be an artefact caused by conventional tissue processing. Furthermore, the subplasmalemmal network appeared to be continuous through the plasma membrane, with the cord network of the basement membrane.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7657717

  17. A Review on the Potential Role of Basement Membrane Laminin in the Pathogenesis of Psoriasis.

    PubMed

    McFadden, J P; Kimber, I

    2016-01-01

    We have previously reviewed alterations to basement membrane laminin in psoriasis and how disruption of this layer could lead to at least some of the pathological changes observed. We here postulate that basement membrane laminin is the key antigen in driving psoriasis, inducing a T cell-mediated autoimmune response. For laminin to be considered as the key autoantigen in psoriasis, it would be reasonable to expect the following to be demonstrable: (1) that autoantigens are present in psoriatic inflammation; (2) that basement membrane laminin is perturbed in involved and uninvolved skin, and that some of the pathological changes associated with psoriasis could be predicted as a sequel to this; (3) that disruption of the basement membrane is among the earliest events in the evolution of psoriatic lesions; (4) that as streptococcal pharyngitis is the most clearly defined event to trigger or exacerbate psoriasis, then a T cell-mediated autoimmune response to laminin should be anticipated as a potential sequelae to streptococcal pharyngitis; (5) that T cells in psoriasis can be shown to react to peptides with homology to laminin; (6) that HLACw6, as the most closely related gene associated with psoriasis and which is involved in antigen expression, should be preferentially expressed within lesional psoriasis towards the basement membrane, together with other proximal associated immune activity; and (7) that there is some association between antilaminin pemphigoid, a humorally mediated autoimmune disease to skin basement membrane laminin, and psoriasis. We here review the data relevant to each of these requirements.

  18. Basement membrane protein distribution in LYVE-1-immunoreactive lymphatic vessels of normal tissues and ovarian carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Vainionpää, Noora; Bützow, Ralf; Hukkanen, Mika; Jackson, David G; Pihlajaniemi, Taina; Sakai, Lynn Y; Virtanen, Ismo

    2007-05-01

    The endothelial cells of blood vessels assemble basement membranes that play a role in vessel formation, maintenance and function, and in the migration of inflammatory cells. However, little is known about the distribution of basement membrane constituents in lymphatic vessels. We studied the distribution of basement membrane proteins in lymphatic vessels of normal human skin, digestive tract, ovary and, as an example of tumours with abundant lymphatics, ovarian carcinomas. Basement membrane proteins were localized by immunohistochemistry with monoclonal antibodies, whereas lymphatic capillaries were detected with antibodies to the lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronan receptor-1, LYVE-1. In skin and ovary, fibrillar immunoreactivity for the laminin alpha4, beta1, beta2 and gamma1 chains, type IV and XVIII collagens and nidogen-1 was found in the basement membrane region of the lymphatic endothelium, whereas also heterogeneous reactivity for the laminin alpha5 chain was detected in the digestive tract. Among ovarian carcinomas, intratumoural lymphatic vessels were found especially in endometrioid carcinomas. In addition to the laminin alpha4, beta1, beta2 and gamma1 chains, type IV and XVIII collagens and nidogen-1, carcinoma lymphatics showed immunoreactivity for the laminin alpha5 chain and Lutheran glycoprotein, a receptor for the laminin alpha5 chain. In normal lymphatic capillaries, the presence of primarily alpha4 chain laminins may therefore compromise the formation of endothelial basement membrane, as these truncated laminins lack one of the three arms required for efficient network assembly. The localization of basement membrane proteins adjacent to lymphatic endothelia suggests a role for these proteins in lymphatic vessels. The distribution of the laminin alpha5 chain and Lutheran glycoprotein proposes a difference between normal and carcinoma lymphatic capillaries.

  19. Vascular basement membranes as pathways for the passage of fluid into and out of the brain.

    PubMed

    Morris, Alan W J; Sharp, Matthew MacGregor; Albargothy, Nazira J; Fernandes, Rute; Hawkes, Cheryl A; Verma, Ajay; Weller, Roy O; Carare, Roxana O

    2016-05-01

    In the absence of conventional lymphatics, drainage of interstitial fluid and solutes from the brain parenchyma to cervical lymph nodes is along basement membranes in the walls of cerebral capillaries and tunica media of arteries. Perivascular pathways are also involved in the entry of CSF into the brain by the convective influx/glymphatic system. The objective of this study is to differentiate the cerebral vascular basement membrane pathways by which fluid passes out of the brain from the pathway by which CSF enters the brain. Experiment 1: 0.5 µl of soluble biotinylated or fluorescent Aβ, or 1 µl 15 nm gold nanoparticles was injected into the mouse hippocampus and their distributions determined at 5 min by transmission electron microscopy. Aβ was distributed within the extracellular spaces of the hippocampus and within basement membranes of capillaries and tunica media of arteries. Nanoparticles did not enter capillary basement membranes from the extracellular spaces. Experiment 2: 2 µl of 15 nm nanoparticles were injected into mouse CSF. Within 5 min, groups of nanoparticles were present in the pial-glial basement membrane on the outer aspect of cortical arteries between the investing layer of pia mater and the glia limitans. The results of this study and previous research suggest that cerebral vascular basement membranes form the pathways by which fluid passes into and out of the brain but that different basement membrane layers are involved. The significance of these findings for neuroimmunology, Alzheimer's disease, drug delivery to the brain and the concept of the Virchow-Robin space are discussed. PMID:26975356

  20. Basal cell carcinoma with thickened basement membrane: a variant that resembles some benign adnexal neoplasms.

    PubMed

    El-Shabrawi, L; LeBoit, P E

    1997-12-01

    Because cutaneous basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is such a common malignancy, its unusual histologic manifestations are important. We identified a variant of BCC in which thickened basement membranes surround aggregations of neoplastic epithelial cells. Thickened basement membranes of similar appearance have previously been observed in benign cutaneous adnexal neoplasms, in basaloid monomorphic adenomas of the salivary gland and in other benign conditions, such as folliculocentric basaloid proliferation. We identified nine BCCs that otherwise met standard criteria, but which also had thick basement membranes surrounding some of the aggregations, and examined them by routine and histochemical staining. The cases included BCC with nodular, micronodular, and infiltrating patterns. Two neoplasms were composed largely of clear cells, suggesting, together with the thickened membranes, outer root sheath differentiation. CD34, which labels keratinocytes of the outer root sheath, marked only the epithelial cells of one of these cases. The thickened membranes were stained by periodic-acid Schiff with and without diastase (PAS-D) and by antibodies to type IV collagen and laminin, with slightly different staining patterns. Intraepithelial droplets within aggregations stained with PAS-D and type IV collagen antibodies. Thickened basement membranes therefore can occur in most of the common growth patterns of BCC. The absence of CD34 staining of epithelial cells in most cases makes it problematic at this time to prove that the thickened membranes indicate trichilemmal differentiation. BCC with thick basement membranes can closely mimic benign neoplasms, such as cylindroma and trichilemmoma, from which they can be distinguished in routinely stained sections. The presence of a continuous thick basement membrane around aggregates of epithelial cells does not in and of itself distinguish between benign and malignant cutaneous epithelial neoplasms.

  1. Delineation of Active Basement Faults in the Eastern Tennessee and Charlevoix Intraplate Seismic Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, C. A.; Langston, C. A.; Cooley, M.

    2013-12-01

    Recognition of distinct, seismogenic basement faults within the eastern Tennessee seismic zone (ETSZ) and the Charlevoix seismic zone (CSZ) is now possible using local earthquake tomography and datasets containing a sufficiently large number of earthquakes. Unlike the New Madrid seismic zone where seismicity clearly defines active fault segments, earthquake activity in the ETSZ and CSZ appears diffuse. New arrival time inversions for hypocenter relocations and 3-D velocity variations using datasets in excess of 1000 earthquakes suggest the presence of distinct basement faults in both seismic zones. In the ETSZ, relocated hypocenters align in near-vertical segments trending NE-SW, parallel to the long dimension of the seismic zone. Earthquakes in the most seismogenic portion of the ETSZ delineate another set of near-vertical faults trending roughly E-ESE. These apparent trends and steep dips are compatible with ETSZ focal mechanism solutions. The solutions are remarkably consistent and indicate strike-slip motion along the entire length of the seismic zone. Relocated hypocenter clusters in the CSZ define planes that trend and dip in directions that are compatible with known Iapitan rift faults. Seismicity defining the planes becomes disrupted where the rift faults encounter a major zone of deformation produced by a Devonian meteor impact. We will perform a joint statistical analysis of hypocenter alignments and focal mechanism nodal plane orientations in the ETSZ and the CSZ to determine the spatial orientations of dominant seismogenic basement faults. Quantifying the locations and dimensions of active basement faults will be important for seismic hazard assessment and for models addressing the driving mechanisms for these intraplate zones.

  2. Determining the mechanical properties of human corneal basement membranes with Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Last, Julie A.; Liliensiek, Sara J.; Nealey, Paul F.; Murphya, Christopher J.

    2009-01-01

    Biophysical cues such as substrate modulus have been shown to influence a variety of cell behaviors. We have determined the elastic modulus of the anterior basement membrane and Descemet’s membrane of the human cornea with atomic force microscopy (AFM). A spherical probe was used with a radius approximating that of a typical cell focal adhesion. Values obtained for the elastic modulus of the anterior basement membrane range from 2 kPa to 15 kPa, with a mean of 7.5 ± 4.2 kPa. The elastic modulus of Descemet’s membrane was found to be slightly higher than those observed for the anterior basement membrane, with a mean of 50 ± 17.8 kPa and a range of 20 kPa — 80 kPa. The topography of Descemet’s membrane has been shown to be similar to that of the anterior basement, but with smaller pore sizes resulting in a more tightly packed structure. This structural difference may account for the observed modulus differences. The determination of these values will allow for the design of a better model of the cellular environment as well as aid in the design and fabrication of artificial corneas. PMID:19341800

  3. The timing of metamorphism in the Odenwald-Spessart basement, Mid-German Crystalline Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Will, T. M.; Schulz, B.; Schmädicke, E.

    2016-07-01

    New in situ electron microprobe monazite and white mica 40Ar/39Ar step heating ages support the proposition that the Odenwald-Spessart basement, Mid-German Crystalline Zone, consists of at least two distinct crustal terranes that experienced different geological histories prior to their juxtaposition. The monazite ages constrain tectonothermal events at 430 ± 43 Ma, 349 ± 14 Ma, 331 ± 16 Ma and 317 ± 12 Ma/316 ± 4 Ma, and the 40Ar/39Ar analyses provide white mica ages of 322 ± 3 Ma and 324 ± 3 Ma. Granulite-facies metamorphism occurred in the western Odenwald at c. 430 and 349 Ma, and amphibolite-facies metamorphism affected the eastern Odenwald and the central Spessart basements between c. 324 and 316 Ma. We interpret these data to indicate that the Otzberg-Michelbach Fault Zone, which separates the eastern Odenwald-Spessart basement from the Western Odenwald basement, is part of the Rheic Suture, which marks the position of a major Variscan plate boundary separating Gondwana- and Avalonia-derived crustal terranes. The age of the Carboniferous granulite-facies event in the western Odenwald overlaps with the minimum age of eclogite-facies metamorphism in the adjacent eastern Odenwald. The granulite- and eclogite-facies rocks experienced contrasting pressure-temperature paths but occur in close spatial proximity, being separated by the Rheic Suture. As high-pressure and high-temperature metamorphisms are of similar age, we interpret the Odenwald-Spessart basement as a paired metamorphic belt and propose that the adjacent high-pressure and high-temperature rocks were metamorphosed in the same subduction zone system. Juxtaposition of these rocks occurred during the final stages of the Variscan orogeny along the Rheic Suture.

  4. Monoclonal antibody GB3, a new probe for the study of human basement membranes and hemidesmosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Verrando, P.; Pisani, A.; Serieys, N.; Ortonne, J.P. ); Hsi, Baeli; Yeh, Changjing )

    1987-05-01

    A monoclonal antibody, GB3, has been raised against human amnion. Not only does GB3 bind to amniotic basement membrane, but it also recognizes an antigenic structure expressed by epidermal as well as by some other human basement membranes. This antigen is synthesized (and excreted) by cultured normal human epidermal keratinocytes. It is expressed to a lesser extent by the A431 epidermoid carcinoma cell line, but is not expressed by the SV40 virus-transformed SVK14 keratinocyte cell line. In ultrastructural studies, this antigen was located in the epidermal basement membrane, both in the lamina densa and in the lamina lucida, associated with hemidesmosomes. It was identified as a protein by in vitro proteolytic cleavage studies. The radio-immunoprecipitates from cultured human keratinocytes, analyzed by SDS-PAGE, showed that GB3 recognized five polypeptides of 93.5, 125, 130, 146 and 150 kD under reducing conditions. The tissue distribution of the antigen and the molecular weights (MWs) of its constitutive polypeptides suggest that it is different from other known components of basement membranes. It may provide a biochemical marker for hemidesmosomes. Furthermore, GB3 represents an interesting and original clinical probe, since the antigenic structure recognized by GB3 is lacking in Junctional Epidermolysis Bullosa, a lethal genodermatosis in which a dermo-epidermal splitting occurs at the level of lamina lucida.

  5. Tissue specificity of a baculovirus expressed, basement membrane-degrading protease in larvae of Heliothis virescens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ScathL is a cathepsin L-like cysteine protease from flesh fly Sarcophaga peregrina, which digests components of the basement membrane during insect metamorphosis. A recombinant baculovirus (AcMLF9.ScathL) expressing ScathL kills larvae of the tobacco budworm, Heliothis virescens, significantly faste...

  6. Drosophila laminins act as key regulators of basement membrane assembly and morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Urbano, Jose M.; Torgler, Catherine N.; Molnar, Cristina; Tepass, Ulrich; López-Varea, Ana; Brown, Nicholas H.; de Celis, Jose F.; Martín-Bermudo, Maria D.

    2009-01-01

    Laminins are heterotrimeric molecules found in all basement membranes. In mammals, they have been involved in diverse developmental processes, from gastrulation to tissue maintenance. The Drosophila genome encodes two laminin α chains, one β and one Γ, which form two distinct laminin trimers. So far, only mutations affecting one or other trimer have been analysed. In order to study embryonic development in the complete absence of laminins, we mutated the gene encoding the sole laminin β chain in Drosophila, LanB1, so that no trimers can be made. We show that LanB1 mutant embryos develop until the end of embryogenesis. Electron microscopy analysis of mutant embryos reveals that the basement membranes are absent and the remaining extracellular material appears disorganised and diffuse. Accordingly, abnormal accumulation of major basement membrane components, such as Collagen IV and Perlecan, is observed in mutant tissues. In addition, we show that elimination of LanB1 prevents the normal morphogenesis of most organs and tissues, including the gut, trachea, muscles and nervous system. In spite of the above structural roles for laminins, our results unravel novel functions in cell adhesion, migration and rearrangement. We propose that while an early function of laminins in gastrulation is not conserved in Drosophila and mammals, their function in basement membrane assembly and organogenesis seems to be maintained throughout evolution. PMID:19906841

  7. Anti-DNA autoantibodies initiate experimental lupus nephritis by binding directly to the glomerular basement membrane in mice.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Meera R; Wang, Congmiao; Marion, Tony N

    2012-07-01

    The strongest serological correlate for lupus nephritis is antibody to double-stranded DNA, although the mechanism by which anti-DNA antibodies initiate lupus nephritis is unresolved. Most recent reports indicate that anti-DNA must bind chromatin in the glomerular basement membrane or mesangial matrix to form glomerular deposits. Here we determined whether direct binding of anti-DNA antibody to glomerular basement membrane is critical to initiate glomerular binding of anti-DNA in experimental lupus nephritis. Mice were co-injected with IgG monoclonal antibodies or hybridomas with similar specificity for DNA and chromatin but different IgG subclass and different relative affinity for basement membrane. Only anti-DNA antibodies that bound basement membrane bound to glomeruli, activated complement, and induced proteinuria whether injected alone or co-injected with a non-basement-membrane-binding anti-DNA antibody. Basement membrane-binding anti-DNA antibodies co-localized with heparan sulfate proteoglycan in glomerular basement membrane and mesangial matrix but not with chromatin. Thus, direct binding of anti-DNA antibody to antigens in the glomerular basement membrane or mesangial matrix may be critical to initiate glomerular inflammation. This may accelerate and exacerbate glomerular immune complex formation in human and murine lupus nephritis.

  8. Immunochemical studies of streptococcal cell membrane antigens immunologically related to glomerular basement membrane.

    PubMed

    Zelman, M E; Lange, C F

    1995-12-01

    Pursuing an autoimmune model for the etiology of poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis, protein antigens isolated from the cytoplasmic membrane of nephritogenic group A Type 12 Streptococcus pyogenes were immunochemically characterized using antistreptococcal cell membrane (SCM) monoclonal antibody (MAb) cross-reactive with glomerular basement membrane (GBM). Low molecular weight (9.2, 7.0, 4.7, 2.3 kDa) HPLC-purified SCM polypeptide antigens were characterized by competitive inhibition and equilibrium dialysis. Competitive inhibition of the MAb, by different sized SCM polypeptide antigens showed an inverse relationship between the size of these antigens and the molar amount required to obtain 50% inhibition of the MAb, confirming previous observations that suggested that these SCM antigens exhibit increasing epitope concentration with increasing size, that is constant epitope density. The observed changes in epitope concentration correlated with differences in the valence and affinity of the MAb as determined by equilibrium dialysis. The Kds of the MAb for 9.2-, 7.0-, 4.7-, and 2.3-kDa SCM antigens ranged from 7.42 x 10(-7) to 1.15 x 10(-5). The experimentally determined MAb valence for these antigens was 2 for the 9.2-kDa antigen and approached 10 for the smaller antigens. Finally, the similarity of these SCM antigens was reflected in similar amino acid compositions; of note, these data agreed with the compositions previously reported for sized GBM antigens. Concentrations of Asp, Thr, Ser, Glu, Gly, Ala, Val, Ile, and Leu paralleled increasing epitope concentration. Apparent N-terminal blocking prevented sequencing of these peptides, but these immunochemical data suggest that intact SCM antigen recognized by the anti-SCM MAb consists of repeating epitopes, an observation consistent with the cytoplasmic membrane source of the antigen.

  9. Immunohistochemical expression of basement membrane proteins of verrucous carcinoma of the oral mucosa.

    PubMed

    Arduino, Paolo G; Carrozzo, Marco; Pagano, Marco; Broccoletti, Roberto; Scully, Crispian; Gandolfo, Sergio

    2010-06-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oral cavity is an extremely invasive tumour of stratified squamous epithelium that spreads throughout degradation of the basement membrane (BM) and extra-cellular matrix. Oral verrucous carcinoma (VC) is a rare low-grade variant of oral SCC that penetrates into the subepithelial connective tissue. It also has a different clinical behaviour from classical oral SCC. We investigated the immunohistochemical expression of laminin, laminin-5, collagen IV and fibronectin in VC, severe epithelial dysplasia (SED) and SCC in order to analyse if the pattern of these molecules expression contributes to the differences in the biological behaviour of these diseases. The staining pattern of laminin was less intensive in SCC compared with SED and VC, and collagen IV expression was increased in VC compared with SED. Discontinuities of laminin, collagen IV and fibronectin were more evident in SED than in VC. This study indicates that VC has a biological behaviour different from SED or SCC, observable by immunohistochemistry in the BM zone.

  10. Geometry of the Iapetus Baltoscandian continental margin; evidence for basement highs from the external imbricate zone.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, A. Hugh N.

    2015-04-01

    The geometry of the Iapetus Baltoscandian continental margin prior to Scandinavian Caledonian collision is important, since only with a detailed initial input can synthetic palaeogeographic and deformation models be correctly applied. The Scandes comprise ~SE-directed nappes pierced by tectonic windows exposing basement with condensed, post-Gaskiers-glaciation (582-580Ma) cover sequences. Here, evidence, largely from the Lower Allochthon (external imbricate zone), for major displacement of these basement rocks ('Window Allochthon'), is summarized; palaeogeographically they formed a topographic-high along the Baltoscandian continental margin. In the Oslo Graben and East Finnmark areas (southernmost/northernmost Scandinavia), the transition from (par)-autochthon to allochthon is preserved (Osen-Roa Nappe Complex/Gaissa Thrust Belt; ORNC/GTB). These areas give reliable templates for other parts of the orogen, where the orogen leading edge has been extensively eroded. In the ORNC and GTB, bulk shortening was ~50%, with values rising towards the hinterland; metamorphic grades also increase towards the hinterland. Balanced-sections restore the trailing-edges of the ORNC and GTB to Norwegian coastal areas. In Finnmark, restoration places pre-Marinoan (pre~650 Ma) GTB anchizone-grade rocks above epizone-grade post-Gaskiers rocks lying unconformably on basement in the Komagfjord tectonic window. In southern Norway, restored pre-Gaskiers ORNC rocks overlie Cambro-Ordovician sediments unconformable on basement in the Atnsjøen/Spekedalen windows and WGR. Caledonian Middle Allochthon deformation in Finnmark was SE-directed and in the GTB E- to ESE-directed. In the Komagfjord window basement, Caledonian imbrication was SE-directed, but the overlying basal Middle Allochthon mylonites have an out-of-sequence E-ESE overprint. Thus the Komagfjord basement/cover lies structurally between the Middle and Lower Allochthons. In the Atnsjøen/Spekedalen windows, SE-directed Caledonian

  11. Ultrastructure of basement membranes in monkey and shark teeth at an early stage of development.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Takashi

    2003-12-01

    The basement membrane, which separates the inner enamel epithelium from the dental papilla in the early stages of tooth development, is known to play a significant role in odontogenesis. In this review article, this basement membrane was described in detail based on our recent findings with the use of high-resolution electron microscopy. Tooth germs of a monkey (Macaca fuscata) and a shark (Cephaloscyllium umbratile) were processed for thin-section observations. During the early stage of development, the basement membrane of the inner enamel (dental) epithelium was composed of a lamina lucida, lamina densa, and much wider lamina fibroreticularis. At higher magnification, the lamina densa in both species was made up of a fine network of cords, which are generally the main constituents of the basement membranes. In the monkey tooth, the lamina fibroreticularis was rich in fibrils, which were now characterized as basotubules, 10-nm-wide microfibril-like structures. The space between the basotubules was filled with a cord network that extended from the lamina densa. Dental papilla cell processes were inserted into the lamina fibroreticularis, and their surface was closely associated with numerous parallel basotubules via 1.5- to 3-nm-wide filaments. In the shark tooth during its early stage of development, the basotubules were absent in the lamina fibroreticularis and only narrow extensions, 60-90 nm wide and 1-2 microm long, of the cord network of the lamina densa were present. The dental papilla cells were immobilized by means of the binding of their processes to the extensions. These results indicate that basement membranes in both monkey and shark teeth at early stage of development are specialized for functions as anchoring and firm binding, which are essential for the successful differentiation of the odontoblasts.

  12. Heparan sulfate proteoglycan is present in basement membrane as a double-tracked structure.

    PubMed

    Inoue, S; Grant, D; Leblond, C P

    1989-05-01

    Basement membranes contain 4.5-nm wide sets of two parallel lines, along which short prongs called "spikes" occur at regular intervals. The nature of this structure, referred to as "double tracks," was investigated in Lowicryl sections of mouse kidney and rat Reichert's membrane immunolabeled for basement membrane components using secondary antibodies conjugated to 5-nm gold particles. When the mouse glomerular basement membrane and rat Reichert's membrane were exposed to antibodies directed to the core protein of heparan sulfate proteoglycan, 95% or more of the gold particles were over double tracks, whereas after exposure of Reichert's membrane to antisera against laminin, collagen IV, or entactin, labeling of the double tracks remained at the random level. When heparan sulfate proteoglycan was incubated in Tris buffer, pH 7.4, at 35 degrees C for 1 hr, a precipitate resulted which, on electron microscopic examination, was found to consist of 5- to 6-nm wide sets of two parallel lines along which densities were observed. Immunolabeling confirmed the presence of the proteoglycan's core protein in the sets. Since double tracks were closely similar to this structure and were labeled with the same antibodies, they were likely to be also composed of heparan sulfate proteoglycan. PMID:2522961

  13. Hypoplastic basement membrane of the lens anlage in the inheritable lens aplastic mouse (lap mouse).

    PubMed

    Aso, S; Baba, R; Noda, S; Ikuno, S; Fujita, M

    2000-04-01

    Adult homozygous lap mice show various eye abnormalities such as aphakia, retinal disorganization, and dysplasia of the cornea and anterior chamber. In the fetal eye of a homozygous lap mouse, the lens placode appears to develop normally. However, the lens vesicle develops abnormally to form a mass of cells without a cavity, and the mass vanishes soon afterward. Apoptotic cell death is associated with the disappearance of the lens anlage. We examined the basement membranes of the lens anlage of this mutant by immunohistochemical methods under light microscopy using antibodies against basement membrane components of the lens anlage, type IV collagen, fibronectin, laminin, heparan sulfate proteoglycan, and entactin and by transmission electron microscopy. Immunohistochemistry showed the distribution and intensity of antibody binding to the lens anlage to be almost the same for each these antibodies regardless of the stage of gestation or whether the anlagen were from normal BALB/c or lap mice. Thus, positive continuous reactions were observed around the exterior region of the lens anlage from day 10 of gestation for type IV collagen, fibronectin, laminin, heparan sulfate proteoglycan antibodies, and at least from day 11of gestation for entactin antibody. The basement membrane lamina densa of both normal and lap mice was shown by electron microscopy to be discontinuous at days 10 and 10.5 of gestation. However, by day 11 the lamina densa was continuous in the lens anlagen of normal mice but still discontinuous in the lap mice. By day 12 of gestation, the lamina densa had thickened markedly in normal mice, whereas in lap mice it remained discontinuous and its thinness indicated hypoplasia. These results indicate that, while all basement components examined are produced and deposited in the normal region of the lens anlage in the lap mouse, the basement membrane is, for some reason, imperfectly formed. The time at which hypoplasia of the basement membrane was observed

  14. Isotropic Versus Bipolar Functionalized Biomimetic Artificial Basement Membranes and Their Evaluation in Long-Term Human Cell Co-Culture.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Angela; Wistlich, Laura; Heffels, Karl-Heinz; Walles, Heike; Groll, Jürgen

    2016-08-01

    In addition to dividing tissues into compartments, basement membranes are crucial as cell substrates and to regulate cellular behavior. The development of artificial basement membranes is indispensable for the ultimate formation of functional engineered tissues; however, pose a challenge due to their complex structure. Herein, biodegradable electrospun polyester meshes are presented, exhibiting isotropic or bipolar bioactivation as a biomimetic and biofunctional model of the natural basement membrane. In a one-step preparation process, reactive star-shaped prepolymer additives, which generate a hydrophilic fiber surface, are electrospun with cell-adhesion-mediating peptides, derived from major components of the basement membrane. Human skin cells adhere to the functionalized meshes, and long-term co-culture experiments confirm that the artificial basement membranes recapitulate and preserve tissue specific functions. Several layers of immortalized human keratinocytes grow on the membranes, differentiating toward the surface and expressing typical epithelial markers. Fibroblasts migrate into the reticular lamina mimicking part of the mesh. Both cells types begin to produce extracellular matrix proteins and to remodel the initial membrane. It is shown at the example of skin that the artificial basement membrane design provokes biomimetic responses of different cell types and can thus be used as basis for the future development of basement membrane containing tissues. PMID:27283510

  15. Isotropic Versus Bipolar Functionalized Biomimetic Artificial Basement Membranes and Their Evaluation in Long-Term Human Cell Co-Culture.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Angela; Wistlich, Laura; Heffels, Karl-Heinz; Walles, Heike; Groll, Jürgen

    2016-08-01

    In addition to dividing tissues into compartments, basement membranes are crucial as cell substrates and to regulate cellular behavior. The development of artificial basement membranes is indispensable for the ultimate formation of functional engineered tissues; however, pose a challenge due to their complex structure. Herein, biodegradable electrospun polyester meshes are presented, exhibiting isotropic or bipolar bioactivation as a biomimetic and biofunctional model of the natural basement membrane. In a one-step preparation process, reactive star-shaped prepolymer additives, which generate a hydrophilic fiber surface, are electrospun with cell-adhesion-mediating peptides, derived from major components of the basement membrane. Human skin cells adhere to the functionalized meshes, and long-term co-culture experiments confirm that the artificial basement membranes recapitulate and preserve tissue specific functions. Several layers of immortalized human keratinocytes grow on the membranes, differentiating toward the surface and expressing typical epithelial markers. Fibroblasts migrate into the reticular lamina mimicking part of the mesh. Both cells types begin to produce extracellular matrix proteins and to remodel the initial membrane. It is shown at the example of skin that the artificial basement membrane design provokes biomimetic responses of different cell types and can thus be used as basis for the future development of basement membrane containing tissues.

  16. Ultrastructural appearance of renal and other basement membranes in the Bull terrier model of autosomal dominant hereditary nephritis.

    PubMed

    Hood, J C; Savige, J; Seymour, A E; Dowling, J; Martinello, P; Colville, D; Sinclair, R; Naito, I; Jennings, G; Huxtable, C

    2000-08-01

    Bull terrier hereditary nephritis may represent a model for autosomal dominant Alport's syndrome because affected dogs have the typically lamellated glomerular basement membrane (GBM) and father-to-son disease transmission occurs. This study examined the ultrastructural appearance of the renal and extrarenal basement membranes and their composition in affected Bull terriers. Affected stillborn animals and puppies had subepithelial frilling and vacuolation of the GBM. In adult dogs, lamellation was common, and subepithelial frilling and vacuolation were less prominent. Foot-process effacement and mesangial matrix expansion occurred frequently. Basement membranes in the glomeruli, tubules, and Bowman's capsule were significantly thickened and often mineralized. Immunohistochemical examination showed alpha 1(IV) and alpha 2(IV) collagen chains in all renal basement membranes; alpha 3(IV), alpha 4(IV), and alpha 5(IV) chains in the GBM, distal tubular basement membrane, and Bowman's capsule; and the alpha 6(IV) chain in Bowman's capsule. Conversely, the basement membranes from the affected Bull terrier cornea, lens capsule, retina, skin, lung, and muscle had a normal ultrastructural appearance and were not thickened compared with membranes in normal age-matched dogs. The distribution of basement membrane abnormalities in Bull terrier hereditary nephritis may occur because the defective protein is present exclusively or more abundantly in the kidney and is structurally more important in the kidney or because of local intrarenal stresses. PMID:10922317

  17. Degradation of basement membrane collagens by metalloproteases released by human, murine and amphibian tumours.

    PubMed

    Shields, S E; Ogilvie, D J; McKinnell, R G; Tarin, D

    1984-07-01

    In this investigation it has been found that naturally-occurring (i.e. indigenous, not transplanted) tumours of diverse organs in a spectrum of vertebrates from frogs to man can secrete enzymes which degrade basement membrane collagens (type IV and V). The enzymes are inhibited by chelating agents (EDTA) but not by other protease antagonists and are, therefore, specific metalloproteases. Individual tumours do not necessarily secrete collagenases active against all collagen types (I, IV and V) and release of these different enzymes does not, therefore, appear to be coordinated. These biochemical findings support those reported for serially transplanted tumour cell lines and provide a plausible mechanism for the destruction of basement membranes and stromal collagen fibres observed morphologically in tumour spread.

  18. Delayed reepithelialization and basement membrane regeneration after wounding in mice lacking CXCR3

    PubMed Central

    Yates, Cecelia C.; Whaley, Diana; Hooda, Shveta; Hebda, Patricia A.; Bodnar, Richard J.; Wells, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Wound healing is a complex, orchestrated series of biological events that is controlled by extracellular components that communicate between cell types to re-establish lost tissue. We have found that signaling by ELR-negative CXC chemokines through their common CXCR3 receptor is critical for dermal maturation during the resolving phase. In addition there needs to be complete maturation of the epidermis and regeneration of a delineating basement membrane for proper functioning. The role of this ligand–receptor system appears confounding as one ligand, CXCL4/(PF4), is present during the initial dissolution and two others, CXCL10/(IP-10) and CXCL11/(IP-9/I-TAC), are expressed by keratinocytes in the later regenerative and resolving phases during which the basement membrane is re-established. We examined CXCR3 signaling role in healing using a mouse lacking this receptor, as all three ligands act solely via the common receptor. Reepithelialization was delayed in CXCR3-deficient mice in both full and partial-thickness excisional wounds. Even at 90 days postwounding, the epidermis of these mice appeared less mature with lower levels of E-cadherin and cytokeratin 18. The underlying basement membrane, a product of both dermal fibroblasts and epidermal keratinocytes, was not fully established with persistent diffuse expression of the matrix components laminin 5, collagen IV, and collagen VII throughout the wound bed. These results suggest that CXCR3 and its ligands play an important role in the re-establishment of the basement membrane and epidermis. These studies further establish the emerging signaling network that involves the CXCR3 chemokine receptor and its ligands as a key regulator of wound repair. PMID:19152649

  19. Normal mammary epithelial cells promote carcinoma basement membrane invasion by inducing microtubule-rich protrusions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Meng-Horng; Wu, Pei-Hsun; Gilkes, Daniele; Aifuwa, Ivie; Wirtz, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Recent work suggests that the dissemination of tumor cells may occur in parallel with, and even preceed, tumor growth. The mechanism for this early invasion is largely unknown. Here, we find that mammary epithelial cells (MECs) induce neighboring breast carcinoma cells (BCCs) to cross the basement membrane by secreting soluble laminin. Laminin continuously produced by MECs induce long membrane cellular protrusions in BCCs that promote their contractility and invasion into the surrounding matrix. These protrusions depend on microtubule bundles assembled de novo through laminin-integrin β1 signaling. These results describe how non-cancerous MECs can actively participate in the invasive process of BCCs. PMID:26334095

  20. Basement membrane of mouse bone marrow sinusoids shows distinctive structure and proteoglycan composition: a high resolution ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    Inoue, S; Osmond, D G

    2001-11-01

    Venous sinusoids in bone marrow are the site of a large-scale traffic of cells between the extravascular hemopoietic compartment and the blood stream. The wall of the sinusoids consists solely of a basement membrane interposed between a layer of endothelial cells and an incomplete covering of adventitial cells. To examine its possible structural specialization, the basement membrane of bone marrow sinusoids has now been examined by high resolution electron microscopy of perfusion-fixed mouse bone marrow. The basement membrane layer was discontinuous, consisting of irregular masses of amorphous material within a uniform 60-nm-wide space between apposing endothelial cells and adventitial cell processes. At maximal magnifications, the material was resolved as a random arrangement of components lacking the "cord network" formation seen in basement membranes elsewhere. Individual components exhibited distinctive ultrastructural features whose molecular identity has previously been established. By these morphological criteria, the basement membrane contained unusually abundant chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) revealed by 3-nm-wide "double tracks," and moderate amounts of both laminin as dense irregular coils and type IV collagen as 1-1.5-nm-wide filaments, together with less conspicuous amounts of amyloid P forming pentagonal frames. In contrast, 4.5-5-nm-wide "double tracks" characteristic of heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) were absent. The findings demonstrate that, in comparison with "typical" basement membranes in other tissues, the bone marrow sinusoidal basement membrane is uniquely specialized in several respects. Its discontinuous nature, lack of network organization, and absence of HSPG, a molecule that normally helps to maintain membrane integrity, may facilitate disassembly and reassembly of basement membrane material in concert with movements of adventitial cell processes as maturing hemopoietic cells pass through the sinusoidal wall: the

  1. Basement membrane of mouse bone marrow sinusoids shows distinctive structure and proteoglycan composition: a high resolution ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    Inoue, S; Osmond, D G

    2001-11-01

    Venous sinusoids in bone marrow are the site of a large-scale traffic of cells between the extravascular hemopoietic compartment and the blood stream. The wall of the sinusoids consists solely of a basement membrane interposed between a layer of endothelial cells and an incomplete covering of adventitial cells. To examine its possible structural specialization, the basement membrane of bone marrow sinusoids has now been examined by high resolution electron microscopy of perfusion-fixed mouse bone marrow. The basement membrane layer was discontinuous, consisting of irregular masses of amorphous material within a uniform 60-nm-wide space between apposing endothelial cells and adventitial cell processes. At maximal magnifications, the material was resolved as a random arrangement of components lacking the "cord network" formation seen in basement membranes elsewhere. Individual components exhibited distinctive ultrastructural features whose molecular identity has previously been established. By these morphological criteria, the basement membrane contained unusually abundant chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) revealed by 3-nm-wide "double tracks," and moderate amounts of both laminin as dense irregular coils and type IV collagen as 1-1.5-nm-wide filaments, together with less conspicuous amounts of amyloid P forming pentagonal frames. In contrast, 4.5-5-nm-wide "double tracks" characteristic of heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) were absent. The findings demonstrate that, in comparison with "typical" basement membranes in other tissues, the bone marrow sinusoidal basement membrane is uniquely specialized in several respects. Its discontinuous nature, lack of network organization, and absence of HSPG, a molecule that normally helps to maintain membrane integrity, may facilitate disassembly and reassembly of basement membrane material in concert with movements of adventitial cell processes as maturing hemopoietic cells pass through the sinusoidal wall: the

  2. Ultrastructural verification of anchoring role of lamina fibroreticularis of dental basement membrane in odontogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sawada, T; Inoue, S

    1999-01-01

    In a previous study of the developing tooth a characteristic fibrillar layer associated with the basement membrane of the inner enamel epithelium was found to be a highly specialized lamina fibroreticularis of the basement membrane which is unusually rich in basotubules, 10 nm wide microfibril-like structures. In this study this layer was further examined in detail in the hope of ultrastructurally elucidating its role in odontogenesis. Tooth germs of the monkey (Macaca fuscata) were processed for thin section observations. Dental papilla cell processes were inserted into the lamina fibroreticularis and their surface was closely associated with numerous parallel basotubules. With high-resolution observations the space between the surface and nearest basotubules as well as the spaces between neighbouring basotubules were bridged by 1.5-3 nm wide filaments running perpendicular to the axis of basotubules. These results indicate that the processes of dental papilla cells are linked to groups of basotubules by means of 1.5-3 nm wide filaments. Immunoperoxidase staining showed the presence of fibronectin along basotubules as well as within the space between the process and basotubule. This result, together with the comparison of these filaments with microfibril-associated 1.2-3 nm wide fibronectin filaments and the reported abundance of fibronectin in the basement membrane area during odontogenesis, indicates that these 1.5-3 nm wide filaments are composed of fibronectin. After immunostaining for amyloid P component, done with the rat tissue because of the nature of an available antiserum, basotubules in the lamina fibroreticularis were positively stained, as has been shown in basotubules/microfibrils in other locations. Microfibrils function as anchoring rods by interlinking connective tissue components to one another and to the cells. Basotubules, thought to be basement membrane-incorporated microfibrils, in the lamina fibroreticularis in this study are also likely to

  3. Basement membrane protein nidogen-1 is a target of meprin β in cisplatin nephrotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Herzog, Christian; Marisiddaiah, Raju; Haun, Randy S.; Kaushal, Gur P.

    2015-01-01

    Meprins are oligomeric metalloproteinases that are abundantly expressed in the brush-border membranes of renal proximal tubules. During acute kidney injury (AKI) induced by cisplatin or ischemia-reperfusion, membrane-bound meprins are shed and their localization is altered from the apical membranes toward the basolateral surface of the proximal tubules. Meprins are capable of cleaving basement membrane proteins in vitro, however, it is not known whether meprins are able of degrade extracellular matrix proteins under pathophysiological conditions in vivo. The present study demonstrates that a basement membrane protein, nidogen-1, is cleaved and excreted in the urine of mice subjected to cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity, a model of AKI. Cleaved nidogen-1 was not detected in the urine of untreated mice, but during the progression of cisplatin nephrotoxicity, the excretion of cleaved nidogen-1 increased in a time-dependent manner. The meprin inhibitor actinonin markedly prevented urinary excretion of the cleaved nidogen-1. In addition, meprin β-deficient mice, but not meprin α-deficient mice, subjected to cisplatin nephrotoxicity significantly suppressed excretion of cleaved nidogen-1, further suggesting that meprin β is involved in the cleavage of nidogen-1. These studies provide strong evidence for a pathophysiological link between meprin β and urinary excretion of cleaved nidogen-1 during cisplatin-induced AKI. PMID:25957482

  4. Fluid Flow and Fault Zone Damage in Crystalline Basement Rocks (Ore Mountains Saxony)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achtziger-Zupančič, P.; Loew, S.; Hiller, A.; Mariethoz, G.

    2015-12-01

    Groundwater flow in fractured basement rocks on aquifer scale and processes involved in the creation of fracture network permeability are poorly understood even though they have been studied for decades. A unique hydrogeological dataset consisting of 1030 discrete inflows (corresponding to preferential groundwater pathways) to the Poehla Ore Mine (Ore Mountains) of the SDAG Wismut has been compiled and quantitatively interpreted. Transmissivities and permeabilities were calculated from discrete and cumulative inflows using analytical equations and numerical groundwater flow models. The Variscan basement at Poehla Mine was modelled in 3-D, covering a volume of 14x4x1 km3 with 14 metamorphosed litho-stratigraphic units and 131 faults separated in 6 main strike directions. Mesoscale fractures mapped at inflows points, i.e. locally conductive fractures, show a weak correlation with fault orientation, and a large orientation scattering, which could be related to small scale stress heterogeneities. Inflow points were spatially correlated with major faults considering two distance criteria. This correlation suggests that mainly NW-SE and NE-SW striking faults are transmissive, which should be critically stressed considering all available data about the regional stress field. The trace length (extent) and width of the core and damage zones of the modelled faults were compiled in order to investigate the flow distribution and permeability profiles in directions perpendicular to fault strike. It can be shown that 90% of all inflows are located in damage zones. The inflows are usually situated within multiple fault zones which overlap each other. Cumulative flow distribution functions within damage zones are non-linear and vary between faults with different orientation. 75-95% of the flow occurs in the inner 50% of the damage zone. Significantly lower flow rates were recognized within most fault cores.

  5. Disruption of the subendothelial basement membrane during neutrophil diapedesis in an in vitro construct of a blood vessel wall.

    PubMed Central

    Huber, A R; Weiss, S J

    1989-01-01

    To examine the course of physiologic interactions between extravasating neutrophils and the subendothelial basement membrane, a model of the venular vessel wall was constructed by culturing human umbilical vein endothelial cells on a collagen matrix. After 21 d in culture, the endothelial cell monolayer displayed in vivo-like intercellular borders and junctions, deposited a single-layered, continuous basement membrane that was impenetrable to colloidal particles, and supported neutrophil extravasation in a physiologic manner. Using this model, we demonstrate that neutrophil transmigration in a plasma milieu was associated with a significant disruption of the retentive properties of the basement membrane in the absence of discernable morphologic changes. The loss of basement membrane integrity associated with neutrophil diapedesis was not dependent on neutrophil elastase or cathepsin G and was resistant to inhibitors directed against neutrophil collagenase, gelatinase, and heparanase. Despite the fact that this loss in matrix integrity could not be prevented, basement membrane defects were only transiently expressed before they were repaired by the overlying endothelium via a mechanism that required active protein and RNA synthesis. These data indicate that neutrophil extravasation and reversible basement membrane disruption are coordinated events that occur as a consequence of vessel wall transmigration. Images PMID:2703527

  6. Thickness and volume constants and ultrastructural organization of basement membrane (lens capsule).

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, R F; Hayes, B P

    1979-01-01

    1. The basement membrane of the crystalline lens of the rat has been found to have the following elastic constants: a Young's Modulus of elasticity of 0.56 +/- 0.38 x 10(6) Nm-2 at low stress and 11.3 +/- 1.9 x 10(6) Nm-2 at rupture, an ultimate stress of 28.8 +/- 4.5 x 10(5) Nm-2, and a maximum percentage elongation of 41.3 +/- 5.8. 2. The ratio of initial thickness of the membrane to the thickness at the point of rupture is 0.271 +/- 0.02 while the similar ratio for volume is 0.461 +/- 0.031. 3. Electron microscopic observations of ultrasonicated fragments of the entire membrane show long filaments in parallel arrays and sheets. The filaments show a periodicity of 3.7 nm and a spacing of 3.5 nm. 4. Electron microscopic observations of collagenase-treated membrane show a poorly staining matrix associated with separate short straight non-periodic filaments some 2.5 nm in diameter. In addition strands project from the ends of the filaments with a diameter of between 0.5 and 1.0 nm. 5. A model is proposed which consists of these filaments, composed of between three and five parallel strands, some 0.8 nm in diameter, wound in a superhelix. 6. The model predicts satisfactorily thickness and volume changes in the membrane when subjected to stress, and also indicates that the filaments would have a similar Young's Modulus of elasticity and ultimate stress to those of collagen. 7. If the basement membrane of the smallest retinal capillaries is subjected to a change of pressure of only 5 mmHg within the vessel lumen, then the membrane is likely to undergo some 30% reduction in thickness. Images Text-fig. 4 Plate 1 Plate 2 Plate 3 PMID:501593

  7. [The relationship between expression of basement membrane in squamous cell carcinoma of oral cavity and cervical lymph node metastasis].

    PubMed

    Gu, X; Shen, Z; Liu, S; Qian, Z

    1997-01-01

    Fifty seven cases of oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) were studied by immunohistochemical ABC method using type IV collagen and laminin antibody to investigate the relationship between expression and distribution of basement membrane in oral SCC and clinicopathologic characteristics and cervical lymph node metastasis. The distribution of basement membrane of oral SCC was discontinuous and in some cases the membranes disappeared. There was highly significant correlation between the staining patterns together with histologic differentiation degrees and cervical lymph node metastasis (P < 0.05). These indicate that the expression of baasement membrane in oral SCC may be a useful parameter for evaluation of tumor histologic differentiation and tumor invasion and metastasis. PMID:9868026

  8. Permselectivity Replication of Artificial Glomerular Basement Membranes in Nanoporous Collagen Multilayers

    PubMed Central

    Pullela, Srinivasa R.; Andres, Christine; Chen, Wei; Xu, Chuanlai; Wang, Libing; Kotov, Nicholas A.

    2011-01-01

    Basement membranes (BMs) play important roles in many biological functions such as tissue regeneration, cancer proliferation, nutrient/drug delivery, breathing, and many others. While there are many theoretical models, adequate experimental analogs of BMs describing basic physicochemical properties of BM, such as diffusion and permselectivity are not available. Taking BMs found in glomerulus of kidneys as an example, adequate reproduction of their permselectivity requires biomimetic membranes with submicron thickness, high uniformity, nanoscale porosity, and size-selective permeability. Artificial kidney BMs were assembled from poly(acrylic acid) and collagen using layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly technology and display multiple structural similarities with glomerular BMs. Diffusional transport through the artificial BMs faithfully replicate cut-off parameters of kidney membranes. Their utilization in understanding of unique diffusion processes in kidneys, in vitro studies of blood clearance time of small drugs/nanoscale drug carriers and design of more complex organoids including live cells for cancer proliferation studies is anticipated. PMID:22200004

  9. Beta-amyloid fibrils of Alzheimer's disease: pathologically altered, basement membrane-associated microfibrils?

    PubMed

    Inoue, S; Kisilevsky, R

    2001-01-01

    Beta amyloid fibrils were examined in situ in the cerebral cortex of brains from patients with Alzheimer's disease using high resolution ultrastructural and immunohistochemical techniques. The main body of the fibril was identical with that of microfibrils and was made up of a core containing amyloid P component (AP), and a surface layer. Beta amyloid protein (Abeta) in the form of 1 nm wide flexible filaments was associated with the external surface of the microfibril. In cerebrovascular amyloid angiopathy the fibrils were formed at the outer surface of the vascular basement membrane. Overproduction of microfibrils has been reported at the basement membrane of "leaky" capillaries including the glomerular capillary in disease or leaky alveolar-capillary walls of normal lungs. Similarly, in Alzheimer's disease overproduction of microfibril-like beta amyloid fibrils in amyloid angiopathy coincided with breakdown of the blood-brain barrier of the cerebromicrovasculature. Thus, in the above three locations, the presence of abundant microfibrils, or microfibril-like structures, may be related to plasma which leaks out of the circulation into the adjoining vascular basement membrane. AP is an essential constituent of microfibrils and since the only site where AP is available in the cerebral cortex is in leaky microvasculature, a chronic, steady supply of AP into perivascular areas may be the cause of overproduction of microfibrils. Brain "microfibrils" may further be altered pathologically into beta amyloid fibrils by the addition of Abeta. The origin of the fibrils in senile plaques may also be the microvasculature since in the area of the plaques no source of AP is apparent.

  10. Beta-amyloid fibrils of Alzheimer's disease: pathologically altered, basement membrane-associated microfibrils?

    PubMed

    Inoue, S; Kisilevsky, R

    2001-01-01

    Beta amyloid fibrils were examined in situ in the cerebral cortex of brains from patients with Alzheimer's disease using high resolution ultrastructural and immunohistochemical techniques. The main body of the fibril was identical with that of microfibrils and was made up of a core containing amyloid P component (AP), and a surface layer. Beta amyloid protein (Abeta) in the form of 1 nm wide flexible filaments was associated with the external surface of the microfibril. In cerebrovascular amyloid angiopathy the fibrils were formed at the outer surface of the vascular basement membrane. Overproduction of microfibrils has been reported at the basement membrane of "leaky" capillaries including the glomerular capillary in disease or leaky alveolar-capillary walls of normal lungs. Similarly, in Alzheimer's disease overproduction of microfibril-like beta amyloid fibrils in amyloid angiopathy coincided with breakdown of the blood-brain barrier of the cerebromicrovasculature. Thus, in the above three locations, the presence of abundant microfibrils, or microfibril-like structures, may be related to plasma which leaks out of the circulation into the adjoining vascular basement membrane. AP is an essential constituent of microfibrils and since the only site where AP is available in the cerebral cortex is in leaky microvasculature, a chronic, steady supply of AP into perivascular areas may be the cause of overproduction of microfibrils. Brain "microfibrils" may further be altered pathologically into beta amyloid fibrils by the addition of Abeta. The origin of the fibrils in senile plaques may also be the microvasculature since in the area of the plaques no source of AP is apparent. PMID:11730002

  11. Nephrotoxic potency of antisera to three rat glomerular basement membrane glycoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Devulder, B; Bardos, P; Plouvier, B; Martin, J C; Muh, J P; Tacquet, A

    1978-01-01

    In a previous article, we cited studies which have allowed us to isolate diverse glycoproteins of the rat glomerular basement membrane (GMB) and to study their biochemical structures and antigenicity. This present study attempts to examine, using the heterologous nephrotoxic nephritis model (Masugi's nephritis) the nephrotoxicity of immune sera prepared from three of these glycoproteins: one fairly rich in collagen-like structures (A3), another lacking collagen-like structures (A1), and a third of intermediate composition (A2). The results obtained are discussed in relation to those already published concerning the nature of the GBM antigen(s) responsible for the nephrotoxicity of the sera. PMID:357054

  12. Basement nappes on the NE boundary the Ossa-Morena Zone (SW Iberian Variscides)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romao, Jose Manuel; Ribeiro, Antonio; Munha, Jose; Ribeiro, Luisa

    2010-05-01

    basement nappe is considerable, at least 5 to 10 km, considering the presence of mafic granulites included in intermediate granulites, both retrograded into the amphibolite facies, in the SW Bioucas and in the NE Olalhas klippe, resting on top of the lower-grade poly-metamorphic Cadomian assemblages. Geological data summarized above confirm the presence of Cadomian basement nappes that were reactivated under a thick-skinned thrust regime during the Variscan cycle; therefore, implying a poly-orogenic evolution for the studied tectonic units. TBCSZ represents a Cadomian suture that was initially reactivated during Lower Paleozoic intercontinental rifting, later evolving to transpressive intra-plate flower structure during the Upper Paleozoic Variscan convergence phase. It is concluded that thick-skinned tectonic regime by Variscan reactivation of Cadomian basement is a major element in the geodynamic evolution in the internal zones of SW European Variscides and of the Variscan Orogen in general terms.

  13. An Overlapping Case of Alport Syndrome and Thin Basement Membrane Disease.

    PubMed

    Alganabi, Mashriq; Eter, Ahmad

    2016-10-01

    We report a case of a 48-year-old male who presented with hematuria of at least 10 years, and has a daughter with hematuria as well. The patient has a history of degenerative hearing loss, decreased vision and cataract formation, but no diabetes, hypertension or proteinuria. A full serology and urology workup was negative for any abnormality. A kidney biopsy for the patient revealed a diagnosis of Alport syndrome but was unable to rule out thin basement membrane disease. The biopsy was inconclusive in making the diagnosis but the patient's clinical presentation led to the diagnosis of Alport syndrome. The patient's 10-year-old daughter also has hematuria with no clear etiology but now can subsequently be anticipatorily managed for Alport syndrome progression. Due to the rarity of the disease, diagnosis is often missed or delayed by primary care providers especially when no associated proteinuria has yet developed. This can lead to confusion and misdiagnosis with thin basement membrane disease, a generally benign hematuria without kidney failure progression. Additionally, biopsy can be inconclusive in these patients, relying on the physician's history and physical examination findings to diagnose. It is important to appropriately diagnose Alport syndrome not only to manage the patient's rate of kidney failure progression but also allow for a higher degree of suspicion, screening and intervention in the patient's family members. Both the inconclusive nature of kidney biopsies and the usefulness of diagnosis for family member screening are often overlooked in medical literature but are explored in this case. PMID:27635185

  14. Matriglycan: a novel polysaccharide that links dystroglycan to the basement membrane

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida-Moriguchi, Takako; Campbell, Kevin P

    2015-01-01

    Associations between cells and the basement membrane are critical for a variety of biological events including cell proliferation, cell migration, cell differentiation and the maintenance of tissue integrity. Dystroglycan is a highly glycosylated basement membrane receptor, and is involved in physiological processes that maintain integrity of the skeletal muscle, as well as development and function of the central nervous system. Aberrant O-glycosylation of the α subunit of this protein, and a concomitant loss of dystroglycan's ability to function as a receptor for extracellular matrix (ECM) ligands that bear laminin globular (LG) domains, occurs in several congenital/limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (also referred to as dystroglycanopathies). Recent genetic studies revealed that mutations in DAG1 (which encodes dystroglycan) and at least 17 other genes disrupt the ECM receptor function of dystroglycan and cause disease. Here, we summarize recent advances in our understanding of the enzymatic functions of two of these disease genes: the like-glycosyltransferase (LARGE) and protein O-mannose kinase (POMK, previously referred to as SGK196). In addition, we discuss the structure of the glycan that directly binds the ECM ligands and the mechanisms by which this functional motif is linked to dystroglycan. In light of the fact that dystroglycan functions as a matrix receptor and the polysaccharide synthesized by LARGE is the binding motif for matrix proteins, we propose to name this novel polysaccharide structure matriglycan. PMID:25882296

  15. Binding of human plasminogen to basement-membrane (type IV) collagen.

    PubMed

    Stack, M S; Moser, T L; Pizzo, S V

    1992-05-15

    Plasminogen, the zymogen form of the serine proteinase plasmin, has been implicated in numerous physiological and pathological processes involving extracellular-matrix remodelling. We have previously demonstrated that the activation of plasminogen catalysed by tissue plasminogen activator is dramatically stimulated in the presence of basement-membrane-specific type IV collagen [Stack, Gonzalez-Gronow & Pizzo (1990) Biochemistry 29, 4966-4970]. The present paper describes the binding of plasminogen to type IV collagen. Plasminogen binds to both the alpha 1(IV) and alpha 2(IV) chains of basement-membrane collagen, with binding to the alpha 2(IV) chain preferentially inhibited by 6-aminohexanoic acid. This binding is specific and saturable, with Kd,app. values of 11.5 and 12.7 nM for collagen and gelatin respectively. Although collagen also binds to immobilized plasminogen, this interaction is unaffected by 6-aminohexanoic acid. Limited elastase proteolysis of plasminogen generated distinct collagen-binding fragments, which were identified as the kringle 1-3 and kringle 4 domains. No binding of collagen to mini-plasminogen was observed. These studies demonstrate a specific interaction between plasminogen and type IV collagen and provide further evidence for regulation of plasminogen activation by protein components of the extracellular matrix. PMID:1599390

  16. Expert guidelines for the management of Alport syndrome and thin basement membrane nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Savige, Judy; Gregory, Martin; Gross, Oliver; Kashtan, Clifford; Ding, Jie; Flinter, Frances

    2013-02-01

    Few prospective, randomized controlled clinical trials address the diagnosis and management of patients with Alport syndrome or thin basement membrane nephropathy. Adult and pediatric nephrologists and geneticists from four continents whose clinical practice focuses on these conditions have developed the following guidelines. The 18 recommendations are based on Level D (Expert opinion without explicit critical appraisal, or based on physiology, bench research, or first principles-National Health Service category) or Level III (Opinions of respected authorities, based on clinical experience, descriptive studies, or reports of expert committees-U.S. Preventive Services Task Force) evidence. The recommendations include the use of genetic testing as the gold standard for the diagnosis of Alport syndrome and the demonstration of its mode of inheritance; the need to identify and follow all affected members of a family with X-linked Alport syndrome, including most mothers of affected males; the treatment of males with X-linked Alport syndrome and individuals with autosomal recessive disease with renin-angiotensin system blockade, possibly even before the onset of proteinuria; discouraging the affected mothers of males with X-linked Alport syndrome from renal donation because of their own risk of kidney failure; and consideration of genetic testing to exclude X-linked Alport syndrome in some individuals with thin basement membrane nephropathy. The authors recognize that as evidence emerges, including data from patient registries, these guidelines will evolve further.

  17. Nephritogenic Lupus Antibodies Recognize Glomerular Basement Membrane-Associated Chromatin Fragments Released from Apoptotic Intraglomerular Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kalaaji, Manar; Mortensen, Elin; Jørgensen, Leif; Olsen, Randi; Rekvig, Ole Petter

    2006-01-01

    Antibodies to dsDNA represent a classification criterion for systemic lupus erythematosus. Subpopulations of these antibodies are involved in lupus nephritis. No known marker separates nephritogenic from non-nephritogenic anti-dsDNA antibodies. It is not clear whether specificity for glomerular target antigens or intrinsic antibody-affinity for dsDNA or nucleosomes is a critical parameter. Furthermore, it is still controversial whether glomerular target antigen(s) is constituted by nucleosomes or by non-nucleosomal glomerular structures. Previously, we have demonstrated that antibodies eluted from murine nephritic kidneys recognize nucleosomes, but not other glomerular antigens. In this study, we determined the structures that bind nephritogenic autoantibodies in vivo by transmission electron microscopy, immune electron microscopy, and colocalization immune electron microscopy using experimental antibodies to dsDNA, to histones and transcription factors, or to laminin. The data obtained are consistent and point at glomerular basement membrane-associated nucleosomes as target structures for the nephritogenic autoantibodies. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl-transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling or caspase-3 assays demonstrate that lupus nephritis is linked to intraglomerular cell apoptosis. The data suggest that nucleosomes are released by apoptosis and associate with glomerulus basement membranes, which may then be targeted by pathogenic anti-nucleosome antibodies. Thus, apoptotic nucleosomes may represent both inducer and target structures for nephritogenic autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:16723695

  18. Nephritogenic lupus antibodies recognize glomerular basement membrane-associated chromatin fragments released from apoptotic intraglomerular cells.

    PubMed

    Kalaaji, Manar; Mortensen, Elin; Jørgensen, Leif; Olsen, Randi; Rekvig, Ole Petter

    2006-06-01

    Antibodies to dsDNA represent a classification criterion for systemic lupus erythematosus. Subpopulations of these antibodies are involved in lupus nephritis. No known marker separates nephritogenic from non-nephritogenic anti-dsDNA antibodies. It is not clear whether specificity for glomerular target antigens or intrinsic antibody-affinity for dsDNA or nucleosomes is a critical parameter. Furthermore, it is still controversial whether glomerular target antigen(s) is constituted by nucleosomes or by non-nucleosomal glomerular structures. Previously, we have demonstrated that antibodies eluted from murine nephritic kidneys recognize nucleosomes, but not other glomerular antigens. In this study, we determined the structures that bind nephritogenic autoantibodies in vivo by transmission electron microscopy, immune electron microscopy, and colocalization immune electron microscopy using experimental antibodies to dsDNA, to histones and transcription factors, or to laminin. The data obtained are consistent and point at glomerular basement membrane-associated nucleosomes as target structures for the nephritogenic autoantibodies. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl-transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling or caspase-3 assays demonstrate that lupus nephritis is linked to intraglomerular cell apoptosis. The data suggest that nucleosomes are released by apoptosis and associate with glomerulus basement membranes, which may then be targeted by pathogenic anti-nucleosome antibodies. Thus, apoptotic nucleosomes may represent both inducer and target structures for nephritogenic autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus.

  19. Cell Receptor-Basement Membrane Interactions in Health and Disease: a Kidney-Centric View

    PubMed Central

    Borza, Corina M.; Chen, Xiwu; Zent, Roy; Pozzi, Ambra

    2016-01-01

    Cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions are essential for tissue development, homeostasis, and response to injury. Basement membranes (BMs) are specialized ECMs that separate epithelial or endothelial cells from stromal components and interact with cells via cellular receptors, including integrins and discoidin domain receptors. Disruption of cell-BM interactions due to either injury or genetic defects in either the ECM components or cellular receptors often lead to irreversible tissue injury and loss of organ function. Animal models that lack specific BM components or receptors either globally or in selective tissues have been used to help with our understanding of the molecular mechanisms whereby cell-BM interactions regulate organ function in physiological and pathological conditions. We review recently published work on animal models that explore how cell-BM interactions regulate kidney homeostasis in both health and disease. PMID:26610916

  20. The Cerebrovascular Basement Membrane: Role in the Clearance of β-amyloid and Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Alan W. J.; Carare, Roxana O.; Schreiber, Stefanie; Hawkes, Cheryl A.

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), the accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides in the walls of cerebral blood vessels, is observed in the majority of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) brains and is thought to be due to a failure of the aging brain to clear Aβ. Perivascular drainage of Aβ along cerebrovascular basement membranes (CVBMs) is one of the mechanisms by which Aβ is removed from the brain. CVBMs are specialized sheets of extracellular matrix that provide structural and functional support for cerebral blood vessels. Changes in CVBM composition and structure are observed in the aged and AD brain and may contribute to the development and progression of CAA. This review summarizes the properties of the CVBM, its role in mediating clearance of interstitial fluids and solutes from the brain, and evidence supporting a role for CVBM in the etiology of CAA. PMID:25285078

  1. Detection of Goodpasture antigen in fractions prepared from collagenase digests of human glomerular basement membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Fish, A J; Lockwood, M C; Wong, M; Price, R G

    1984-01-01

    Preparations of human glomerular basement membrane (GBM) were digested with collagenase, and a Goodpasture (GP) antigen rich pool from gel filtration column runs was identified by antibody inhibition radioimmunoassay. The components of the GP antigen pool were separated on polyacrylamide gels, and transferred to nitrocellulose sheets by the 'western' blotting technique. The blots were separately reacted with thirteen GP sera as primary antibody, followed by peroxidase labelled goat anti-human IgG and revealed 45-50K (two bands) and 25-28K (one-three bands) components. No corresponding reactivity was observed using convalescent GP sera or other control sera (normal human serum, rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis with or without pulmonary haemorrhage, and lupus erythematosus) as primary antibody. Images Fig. 3 PMID:6319059

  2. Laminin in the cutaneous basement membrane as a potential target in lewisite vesication.

    PubMed

    King, J R; Peters, B P; Monteiro-Riviere, N A

    1994-05-01

    The epidermal-dermal junction has a complex molecular architecture, with numerous components playing key roles in adhesion of the epidermis to the dermis. The purpose of this study was to examine structural components of the epidermal-dermal junction as potential targets for toxicity by lewisite (dichloro(2-chlorovinyl)arsine). This was accomplished by (1) immunocytochemical mapping of laminin, type IV collagen, and bullous pemphigoid antigen (BPA) in lewisite-treated isolated perfused porcine skin flaps (IPPSF), (2) evaluation of protease activity in IPPSF blister fluid against laminin substrate from murine EHS tumor and human keratinocytes, and (3) examination of human keratinocyte laminin for direct chemical modification by lewisite. Lewisite-induced epidermal-dermal separation was localized to the lamina lucida. Localization of the separation suggested that laminin, a cysteine-rich and highly protease-sensitive adhesive glycoprotein, is a potential target for lewisite action. It was hypothesized that chemical modification of laminin directly (via chemical alkylation of laminin thiols by the arsenical) or indirectly (due to lewisite-induced cytotoxic release of proteases) could result in blister formation. Employing sensitive methodology, no evidence of proteolytic activity against EHS tumor laminin or human keratinocyte laminin was identified in the blister fluid. In addition, no evidence for direct chemical modification of laminin by lewisite was demonstrated. However, up to 36% of the thiol groups in human keratinocyte laminin immunoprecipitates was potentially available for reaction with alkylating agents. While these studies did not demonstrate a lewisite-induced chemical modification of laminin, they do not rule out the possibility that other adhesive molecules of the basement membrane are targets for lewisite action. Further evaluation of the molecular role that these binding modalities play in vesicant-induced separation may provide new insights into

  3. Thin basement membrane nephropathy cannot be diagnosed reliably in deparaffinized, formalin-fixed tissue.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Samih H; Markowitz, Glen S; Valeri, Anthony M; Yu, Zhimin; Chen, Liqun; D'Agati, Vivette D

    2007-04-01

    In diagnostic renal pathology, electron microscopy is ideally performed on glutaraldehyde-fixed, plastic resin-embedded tissue (EM-G). When no glomeruli are present in the portion of the biopsy fixed in glutaraldehyde, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue can be reprocessed for electron microscopy (EM-F). The usefulness of this salvage technique for the diagnosis of thin basement membrane nephropathy (TBMN) has not been studied systematically. Here we compare the glomerular basement membrane (GBM) thickness by EM-G vs EM-F in 21 renal biopsies, including TBMN (eight patients), normals (two patients), minimal change disease (MCD) (six patients) and diabetic nephropathy (DN) (five patients). There was significant reduction of the GBM thickness by EM-F compared with EM-G across all diagnostic categories in all 21 cases. The mean percentage reduction in GBM thickness was 23% for the TBMN cases, 40% for the normal/MCD cases and 34% for the DN cases. Four patients with MCD had a mean GBM thickness by EM-F that fell below the defining threshold for diagnosis of TBMN. For the TBMN cases, the 99th percentile for GBM thickness by EM-F was 194 nm, suggesting that the diagnosis of TBMN by EM-F can be excluded with confidence if the GBM thickness is above 200 nm. No clear criteria could be established to diagnose TBMN by EM-F. Renal pathologists should be aware that reprocessing of paraffin tissue for EM causes artifactual GBM thinning that precludes accurate diagnosis of TBMN.

  4. Basement membrane structure in situ: evidence for lateral associations in the type IV collagen network

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    To determine molecular architecture of the type IV collagen network in situ, the human amniotic basement membrane has been studied en face in stereo relief by high resolution unidirectional metal shadow casting aided by antibody decoration and morphometry. The appearance of the intact basement membrane is that of a thin sheet in which there are regions of branching strands. Salt extraction further exposes these strands to reveal an extensive irregular polygonal network that can be specifically decorated with gold-conjugated anti-type IV collagen antibody. At high magnification one sees that the network, which contains integral (9-11 nm net diameter) globular domains, is formed in great part by lateral association of monomolecular filaments to form branching strands of variable but narrow diameters. Branch points are variably spaced apart by an average of 45 nm with 4.4 globular domains per micron of strand length. Monomolecular filaments (1.7-nm net diameter) often appear to twist around each other along the strand axis; we propose that super helix formation is an inherent characteristic of lateral assembly. A previous study (Yurchenco, P. D., and H. Furthmayr. 1984. Biochemistry. 23:1839) presented evidence that purified murine type IV collagen dimers polymerize to form polygonal arrays of laterally as well as end-domain-associated molecules. The architecture of this polymer is similar to the network seen in the amnion, with lateral binding a major contributor to each. Thus, to a first approximation, isolated type IV collagen can reconstitute in vitro the polymeric molecular architecture it assumes in vivo. PMID:3693393

  5. In vivo turnover of the basement membrane and other heparan sulfate proteoglycans of rat glomerulus

    SciTech Connect

    Beavan, L.A.; Davies, M.; Couchman, J.R.; Williams, M.A.; Mason, R.M.

    1989-03-01

    The metabolic turnover of rat glomerular proteoglycans in vivo was investigated. Newly synthesized proteoglycans were labeled during a 7-h period after injecting sodium (35S)sulfate intraperitoneally. At the end of the labeling period a chase dose of sodium sulfate was given. Subsequently at defined times (0-163 h) the kidneys were perfused in situ with 0.01% cetylpyridinium chloride in phosphate-buffered saline to maximize the recovery of 35S-proteoglycans. Glomeruli were isolated from the renal cortex and analyzed for 35S-proteoglycans by autoradiographic, biochemical, and immunochemical methods. Grain counting of autoradiographs revealed a complex turnover pattern of 35S-labeled macromolecules, commencing with a rapid phase followed by a slower phase. Biochemical analysis confirmed the biphasic pattern and showed that the total population of (35S)heparan sulfate proteoglycans had a metabolic half-life (t1/2) of 20 and 60 h in the early and late phases, respectively. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans accounted for 80% of total 35S-proteoglycans, the remainder being chondroitin/dermatan sulfate proteoglycans. Whole glomeruli were extracted with 4% 3-((cholamidopropyl)dimethy-lammonio)-1-propanesulfonate-4 M guanidine hydrochloride, a procedure which solubilized greater than 95% of the 35S-labeled macromolecules. Of these 11-13% was immunoprecipitated by an antiserum against heparan sulfate proteoglycan which, in immunolocalization experiments, showed specificity for staining the basement membrane of rat glomeruli. Autoradiographic analysis showed that 18% of total radioactivity present at the end of the labeling period was associated with the glomerular basement membrane.

  6. An Overlapping Case of Alport Syndrome and Thin Basement Membrane Disease

    PubMed Central

    Alganabi, Mashriq; Eter, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 48-year-old male who presented with hematuria of at least 10 years, and has a daughter with hematuria as well. The patient has a history of degenerative hearing loss, decreased vision and cataract formation, but no diabetes, hypertension or proteinuria. A full serology and urology workup was negative for any abnormality. A kidney biopsy for the patient revealed a diagnosis of Alport syndrome but was unable to rule out thin basement membrane disease. The biopsy was inconclusive in making the diagnosis but the patient’s clinical presentation led to the diagnosis of Alport syndrome. The patient’s 10-year-old daughter also has hematuria with no clear etiology but now can subsequently be anticipatorily managed for Alport syndrome progression. Due to the rarity of the disease, diagnosis is often missed or delayed by primary care providers especially when no associated proteinuria has yet developed. This can lead to confusion and misdiagnosis with thin basement membrane disease, a generally benign hematuria without kidney failure progression. Additionally, biopsy can be inconclusive in these patients, relying on the physician’s history and physical examination findings to diagnose. It is important to appropriately diagnose Alport syndrome not only to manage the patient’s rate of kidney failure progression but also allow for a higher degree of suspicion, screening and intervention in the patient’s family members. Both the inconclusive nature of kidney biopsies and the usefulness of diagnosis for family member screening are often overlooked in medical literature but are explored in this case.

  7. An Overlapping Case of Alport Syndrome and Thin Basement Membrane Disease

    PubMed Central

    Alganabi, Mashriq; Eter, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 48-year-old male who presented with hematuria of at least 10 years, and has a daughter with hematuria as well. The patient has a history of degenerative hearing loss, decreased vision and cataract formation, but no diabetes, hypertension or proteinuria. A full serology and urology workup was negative for any abnormality. A kidney biopsy for the patient revealed a diagnosis of Alport syndrome but was unable to rule out thin basement membrane disease. The biopsy was inconclusive in making the diagnosis but the patient’s clinical presentation led to the diagnosis of Alport syndrome. The patient’s 10-year-old daughter also has hematuria with no clear etiology but now can subsequently be anticipatorily managed for Alport syndrome progression. Due to the rarity of the disease, diagnosis is often missed or delayed by primary care providers especially when no associated proteinuria has yet developed. This can lead to confusion and misdiagnosis with thin basement membrane disease, a generally benign hematuria without kidney failure progression. Additionally, biopsy can be inconclusive in these patients, relying on the physician’s history and physical examination findings to diagnose. It is important to appropriately diagnose Alport syndrome not only to manage the patient’s rate of kidney failure progression but also allow for a higher degree of suspicion, screening and intervention in the patient’s family members. Both the inconclusive nature of kidney biopsies and the usefulness of diagnosis for family member screening are often overlooked in medical literature but are explored in this case. PMID:27635185

  8. A unique covalent bond in basement membrane is a primordial innovation for tissue evolution.

    PubMed

    Fidler, Aaron L; Vanacore, Roberto M; Chetyrkin, Sergei V; Pedchenko, Vadim K; Bhave, Gautam; Yin, Viravuth P; Stothers, Cody L; Rose, Kristie Lindsey; McDonald, W Hayes; Clark, Travis A; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan; Steele, Robert E; Ivy, Michael T; Hudson, Julie K; Hudson, Billy G

    2014-01-01

    Basement membrane, a specialized ECM that underlies polarized epithelium of eumetazoans, provides signaling cues that regulate cell behavior and function in tissue genesis and homeostasis. A collagen IV scaffold, a major component, is essential for tissues and dysfunctional in several diseases. Studies of bovine and Drosophila tissues reveal that the scaffold is stabilized by sulfilimine chemical bonds (S = N) that covalently cross-link methionine and hydroxylysine residues at the interface of adjoining triple helical protomers. Peroxidasin, a heme peroxidase embedded in the basement membrane, produces hypohalous acid intermediates that oxidize methionine, forming the sulfilimine cross-link. We explored whether the sulfilimine cross-link is a fundamental requirement in the genesis and evolution of epithelial tissues by determining its occurrence and evolutionary origin in Eumetazoa and its essentiality in zebrafish development; 31 species, spanning 11 major phyla, were investigated for the occurrence of the sulfilimine cross-link by electrophoresis, MS, and multiple sequence alignment of de novo transcriptome and available genomic data for collagen IV and peroxidasin. The results show that the cross-link is conserved throughout Eumetazoa and arose at the divergence of Porifera and Cnidaria over 500 Mya. Also, peroxidasin, the enzyme that forms the bond, is evolutionarily conserved throughout Metazoa. Morpholino knockdown of peroxidasin in zebrafish revealed that the cross-link is essential for organogenesis. Collectively, our findings establish that the triad-a collagen IV scaffold with sulfilimine cross-links, peroxidasin, and hypohalous acids-is a primordial innovation of the ECM essential for organogenesis and tissue evolution.

  9. Anti-glomerular basement membrane crescentic glomerulonephritis: A report from India and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, A.; Agrawal, V.; Kaul, A.; Verma, R.; Pandey, R.

    2016-01-01

    Anti-glomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM) disease is an autoimmune disease that most commonly presents as rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis with or without pulmonary involvement. It is characterized by the presence of antibodies directed to antigenic targets within glomerular and alveolar basement membranes. This study was performed to evaluate the clinicopathological features and outcome in anti-GBM crescentic glomerulonephritis (CrGN) at a tertiary care center in North India over a period of 9 years (January 2004 to December 2012). A diagnosis of anti-GBM CrGN was made in the presence of >50% crescents, linear deposits of IgG along GBM, and raised serum anti-GBM antibody titer. Of 215 cases of CrGN diagnosed during this period, 11 had anti-GBM CrGN. Anti-GBM CrGN was found at all ages but was most common in the third to fifth decade with no gender predilection (mean age 48 +/- 15 years, 13–67 years). Patients presented with a mean serum creatinine of 10.2 +/- 5.3 mg/dl and sub-nephrotic proteinuria. Pulmonary involvement was present in two patients. Myeloperoxidase-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody was positive in two (2/11) elderly patients. Follow-up was available in four patients for a range of 30-270 (mean 99.5 ± 114.5) days, two remained dialysis dependent while two died due to uremia and sepsis. Our findings show that anti-GBM disease is a rare cause of CrGN in India, accounting for only 5% of patients. It usually presents as a renal-limited disease and is associated with a poor renal outcome. PMID:27795626

  10. Basement membrane and connective tissue proteins in intestinal mucosa of patients with coeliac disease

    PubMed Central

    Verbeke, S; Gotteland, M; Fernández, M; Bremer, J; Ríos, G; Brunser, O

    2002-01-01

    Aims: Gluten ingestion in coeliac disease is associated with alterations of the intestinal mucosa, especially the expansion of the lamina propria. Antiendomysium and antireticulin antibodies may result from interactions between gliadin and extracellular matrix components. By behaving as autoantigens, connective tissue proteins could initiate mucosal damage. This study evaluates changes in the distribution of laminin, type IV collagen, and fibronectin in the mucosa of patients with coeliac disease in an attempt to explain the alterations of mucosal morphology. Methods: Intestinal biopsies were obtained from patients with coeliac disease on admission and while on a gluten free diet. The distribution of type IV collagen, laminin, fibronectin, and α-smooth muscle actin was evaluated by immunofluorescence and by immunogold labelling and electron microscopy. Results: In patients with coeliac disease, the intensity of type IV collagen, laminin, and fibronectin immunofluorescent staining was decreased and less well defined than in controls, with frequent breaches in the basement membrane; fibronectin staining was weak in the distal third of the elongated crypts and absent under the flat surface. The distribution of smooth muscle fibre in the distal lamina propria of flat mucosae was altered. The distribution of these proteins was normal as assessed by immunoelectron microscopy. Conclusions: The intensity of staining of some components of the basement membrane is decreased in coeliac disease and the distribution of smooth muscle fibres is altered. These changes may result from interactions between gliadin and components of the extracellular matrix and may play a role in the genesis of mucosal lesions and in the damage to the epithelium. PMID:12037027

  11. Role of 17 beta-estradiol on type IV collagen fibers volumetric density in the basement membrane of bladder wall.

    PubMed

    de Fraga, Rogerio; Dambros, Miriam; Miyaoka, Ricardo; Riccetto, Cássio Luís Zanettini; Palma, Paulo César Rodrigues

    2007-10-01

    The authors quantified the type IV collagen fibers volumetric density in the basement membrane of bladder wall of ovariectomized rats with and without estradiol replacement. This study was conducted on 40 Wistar rats (3 months old) randomly divided in 4 groups: group 1, remained intact (control); group 2, submitted to bilateral oophorectomy and daily replacement 4 weeks later of 17 beta-estradiol for 12 weeks; group 3, sham operated and daily replacement 4 weeks later of sesame oil for 12 weeks; and group 4, submitted to bilateral oophorectomy and killed after 12 weeks. It was used in immunohistochemistry evaluation using type IV collagen polyclonal antibody to stain the fibers on paraffin rat bladder sections. The M-42 stereological grid system was used to analyze the fibers. Ovariectomy had an increase effect on the volumetric density of the type IV collagen fibers in the basement membrane of rat bladder wall. Estradiol replacement in castrated animals demonstrated a significative difference in the stereological parameters when compared to the castrated group without hormonal replacement. Surgical castration performed on rats induced an increasing volumetric density of type IV collagen fibers in the basement membrane of rats bladder wall and the estradiol treatment had a significant effect in keeping a low volumetric density of type IV collagen fibers in the basement membrane of rats bladder wall.

  12. Insecticidal Activity of a Basement Membrane-Degrading Protease against Heliothis virescens (Fabricius) and Acyrthosiphon pisum (Harris)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ScathL is a cathepsin L-like cysteine protease derived from the flesh fly Sarcophaga peregrina that functions in basement membrane (BM) remodeling during insect development. A recombinant baculovirus expressing ScathL (AcMLF9.ScathL) kills larvae of the tobacco budworm, Heliothis virescens, signific...

  13. Association of malachite green-positive material with heparan sulfate proteoglycan double tracks in basement membrane of mouse kidney tubules.

    PubMed

    Inoue, S

    1995-03-01

    The presence of lipids in the basement membrane of the mouse kidney tubules was examined by histochemical staining with malachite green. Pieces of mouse kidney cortex were immersed in a fixative containing 3% glutaraldehyde and 0.1% malachite green in 0.067 M sodium cacodylate buffer, pH 6.8, for 18 hr at 4 degrees C. Control tissue was fixed in the same way except that no malachite green was added to the fixative. The tissue pieces were cryoprotected, frozen in Freon 22, and subjected to freeze-substitution in dry acetone containing 1% OsO4. Thin sections of Epon-embedded specimens were observed by electron microscopy at first without uranyl-lead counterstaining. The basement membrane of mouse kidney tubules was positively stained in a pattern composed of an irregular assembly of 5-8-nm wide strands. The nature of these malachite green-positive strands was further examined by counterstaining thin sections with uranyl-lead, and they were identified as 4.5-5-nm wide ribbon-like "double tracks" previously characterized as the form taken by heparan sulfate proteoglycan in basement membranes. It is concluded that lipids are present in the basement membrane of mouse kidney tubules in association with heparan sulfate proteoglycan. PMID:7868858

  14. Inhibition of laminin alpha 1-chain expression leads to alteration of basement membrane assembly and cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The expression of the constituent alpha 1 chain of laminin-1, a major component of basement membranes, is markedly regulated during development and differentiation. We have designed an antisense RNA strategy to analyze the direct involvement of the alpha 1 chain in laminin assembly, basement membrane formation, and cell differentiation. We report that the absence of alpha 1-chain expression, resulting from the stable transfection of the human colonic cancer Caco2 cells with an eukaryotic expression vector comprising a cDNA fragment of the alpha 1 chain inserted in an antisense orientation, led to (a) an incorrect secretion of the two other constituent chains of laminin-1, the beta 1/gamma 1 chains, (b) the lack of basement membrane assembly when Caco2-deficient cells were cultured on top of fibroblasts, assessed by the absence of collagen IV and nidogen deposition, and (c) changes in the structural polarity of cells accompanied by the inhibition of an apical digestive enzyme, sucrase-isomaltase. The results demonstrate that the alpha 1 chain is required for secretion of laminin-1 and for the assembly of basement membrane network. Furthermore, expression of the laminin alpha 1-chain gene may be a regulatory element in determining cell differentiation. PMID:8609173

  15. Quantitative image analysis of laminin immunoreactivity in skin basement membrane irradiated with 1 GeV/nucleon iron particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costes, S.; Streuli, C. H.; Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.

    2000-01-01

    We previously reported that laminin immunoreactivity in mouse mammary epithelium is altered shortly after whole-body irradiation with 0.8 Gy from 600 MeV/nucleon iron ions but is unaffected after exposure to sparsely ionizing radiation. This observation led us to propose that the effect could be due to protein damage from the high ionization density of the ion tracks. If so, we predicted that it would be evident soon after radiation exposure in basement membranes of other tissues and would depend on ion fluence. To test this hypothesis, we used immunofluorescence, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and image segmentation techniques to quantify changes in the basement membrane of mouse skin epidermis. At 1 h after exposure to 1 GeV/nucleon iron ions with doses from 0.03 to 1.6 Gy, neither the visual appearance nor the mean pixel intensity of laminin in the basement membrane of mouse dorsal skin epidermis was altered compared to sham-irradiated tissue. This result does not support the hypothesis that particle traversal directly affects laminin protein integrity. However, the mean pixel intensity of laminin immunoreactivity was significantly decreased in epidermal basement membrane at 48 and 96 h after exposure to 0.8 Gy 1 GeV/nucleon iron ions. We confirmed this effect with two additional antibodies raised against affinity-purified laminin 1 and the E3 fragment of the long-arm of laminin 1. In contrast, collagen type IV, another component of the basement membrane, was unaffected. Our studies demonstrate quantitatively that densely ionizing radiation elicits changes in skin microenvironments distinct from those induced by sparsely ionizing radiation. Such effects may might contribute to the carcinogenic potential of densely ionizing radiation by altering cellular signaling cascades mediated by cell-extracellular matrix interactions.

  16. Heterogeneity of groundwater storage properties in the critical zone of Irish metamorphic basement from geophysical surveys and petrographic analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comte, Jean-Christophe; Cassidy, Rachel; Caulfield, John; Nitsche, Janka; Ofterdinger, Ulrich; Wilson, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    Weathered/fractured bedrock aquifers contain groundwater resources that are crucial in hard rock basement regions for rural water supply and maintaining river flow and ecosystem resilience. Groundwater storage in metamorphic rocks is subject to high spatial variations due to the large degree of heterogeneity in fracture occurrence and weathering patterns. Point measurements such as borehole testing are, in most cases, insufficient to characterise and quantify those storage variations because borehole sampling density is usually much lower than the scale of heterogeneities. A suite of geophysical and petrographic investigations was implemented in the weathered/fractured micaschist basement of Donegal, NW Ireland. Electrical Resistivity Tomography provided a high resolution 2D distribution of subsurface resistivities. Resistivity variations were transferred into storage properties (i.e. porosities) in the saturated critical zone of the aquifer through application of a petrophysical model derived from Archie's Law. The petrophysical model was calibrated using complementary borehole gamma logging and clay petrographic analysis at multi-depth well clusters distributed along a hillslope transect at the site. The resulting distribution of porosities shows large spatial variations along the studied transect. With depth, porosities rapidly decrease from about a few % in the uppermost, highly weathered basement to less than 0.5% in the deep unweathered basement, which is encountered at depths of between 10 and 50m below the ground surface. Along the hillslope, porosities decrease with distance from the river in the valley floor, ranging between 5% at the river to less than 1% at the top of the hill. Local traces of regional fault zones that intersect the transect are responsible for local increases in porosity in relation to deeper fracturing and weathering. Such degrees of spatial variation in porosity are expected to have a major impact on the modality of the response of

  17. High-yielding aquifers in crystalline basement: insights about the role of fault zones, exemplified by Armorican Massif, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roques, Clément; Bour, Olivier; Aquilina, Luc; Dewandel, Benoît

    2016-08-01

    While groundwater constitutes a crucial resource in many crystalline-rock regions worldwide, well-yield conditions are highly variable and barely understood. Nevertheless, it is well known that fault zones may have the capacity to ensure sustainable yield in crystalline media, but there are only a few and disparate examples in the literature that describe high-yield conditions related to fault zones in crystalline rock basements. By investigating structural and hydraulic properties of remarkable yielding sites identified in the Armorican Massif, western France, this study discusses the main factors that may explain such exceptional hydrogeological properties. Twenty-three sites, identified through analysis of databases available for the region, are investigated. Results show that: (1) the highly transmissive fractures are related to fault zones which ensure the main water inflow in the pumped wells; (2) the probability of intersecting such transmissive fault zones does not vary significantly with depth, at least within the range investigated in this study (0-200 m); and (3) high yield is mainly controlled by the structural features of the fault zones, in particular the fault dip and the presence of a connected storage reservoir. Conceptual models that summarize the hydrological properties of high-yield groundwater resources related to fault zones in crystalline basement are shown and discussed.

  18. Functional differentiation and alveolar morphogenesis of primary mammary cultures on reconstituted basement membrane

    SciTech Connect

    BARCELLOS-HOFF, M. H; AGGELER, J.; RAM, T. G; BISSELL, M. J

    1989-02-01

    An essential feature of mammary gland differentiation during pregnancy is the formation of alveoli composed of polarized epithelial cells, which, under the influence of lactogenic hormones, secrete vectorially and sequester milk proteins. Previous culture studies have described either organization of cells polarized towards lumina containing little or no demonstrable tissue-specific protein, or establishment of functional secretory cells exhibiting little or no glandular architecture. In this paper, we report that tissue-specific vectorial secretion coincides with the formation of functional alveoli-like structures by primary mammary epithelial cells cultured on a reconstituted basement membrane matrix (derived from Engelbreth-Holm-Swarm murine tumour). Morphogenesis of these unique three-dimensional structures was initiated by cell-directed remodelling of the exogenous matrix leading to reorganization of cells into matrixensheathed aggregates by 24 h after plating. The aggregates subsequently cavitated, so that by day 6 the cells were organized into hollow spheres in which apical cell surfaces faced lumina sealed by tight junctions and basal surfaces were surrounded by a distinct basal lamina. The profiles of proteins secreted into the apical (luminal) and basal (medium) compartments indicated that these alveoli-like structures were capable of an appreciable amount of vectorial secretion. Immunoprecipitation with a broad spectrum milk antiserum showed that more than 80% of caseins were secreted into the lumina, whereas iron-binding proteins (both lactoferrin and transferrin) were present in comparable amounts in each compartment. Thus, these mammary cells established protein targeting pathways directing milk-specific proteins to the luminal compartment. A time course monitoring secretory activity demonstrated that establishment of tissue-specific vectorial secretion and increased total and milk protein secretion coincided with functional alveolar

  19. SPARC Promotes Cell Invasion In Vivo by Decreasing Type IV Collagen Levels in the Basement Membrane.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, Meghan A; Jayadev, Ranjay; Miley, Ginger R; Blebea, Catherine A; Chi, Qiuyi; Ihara, Shinji; Sherwood, David R

    2016-02-01

    Overexpression of SPARC, a collagen-binding glycoprotein, is strongly associated with tumor invasion through extracellular matrix in many aggressive cancers. SPARC regulates numerous cellular processes including integrin-mediated cell adhesion, cell signaling pathways, and extracellular matrix assembly; however, the mechanism by which SPARC promotes cell invasion in vivo remains unclear. A main obstacle in understanding SPARC function has been the difficulty of visualizing and experimentally examining the dynamic interactions between invasive cells, extracellular matrix and SPARC in native tissue environments. Using the model of anchor cell invasion through the basement membrane (BM) extracellular matrix in Caenorhabditis elegans, we find that SPARC overexpression is highly pro-invasive and rescues BM transmigration in mutants with defects in diverse aspects of invasion, including cell polarity, invadopodia formation, and matrix metalloproteinase expression. By examining BM assembly, we find that overexpression of SPARC specifically decreases levels of BM type IV collagen, a crucial structural BM component. Reduction of type IV collagen mimicked SPARC overexpression and was sufficient to promote invasion. Tissue-specific overexpression and photobleaching experiments revealed that SPARC acts extracellularly to inhibit collagen incorporation into BM. By reducing endogenous SPARC, we also found that SPARC functions normally to traffic collagen from its site of synthesis to tissues that do not express collagen. We propose that a surplus of SPARC disrupts extracellular collagen trafficking and reduces BM collagen incorporation, thus weakening the BM barrier and dramatically enhancing its ability to be breached by invasive cells. PMID:26926673

  20. Boundary cells restrict dystroglycan trafficking to control basement membrane sliding during tissue remodeling

    PubMed Central

    McClatchey, Shelly TH; Wang, Zheng; Linden, Lara M; Hastie, Eric L; Wang, Lin; Shen, Wanqing; Chen, Alan; Chi, Qiuyi; Sherwood, David R

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial cells and their underlying basement membranes (BMs) slide along each other to renew epithelia, shape organs, and enlarge BM openings. How BM sliding is controlled, however, is poorly understood. Using genetic and live cell imaging approaches during uterine-vulval attachment in C. elegans, we have discovered that the invasive uterine anchor cell activates Notch signaling in neighboring uterine cells at the boundary of the BM gap through which it invades to promote BM sliding. Through an RNAi screen, we found that Notch activation upregulates expression of ctg-1, which encodes a Sec14-GOLD protein, a member of the Sec14 phosphatidylinositol-transfer protein superfamily that is implicated in vesicle trafficking. Through photobleaching, targeted knockdown, and cell-specific rescue, our results suggest that CTG-1 restricts BM adhesion receptor DGN-1 (dystroglycan) trafficking to the cell-BM interface, which promotes BM sliding. Together, these studies reveal a new morphogenetic signaling pathway that controls BM sliding to remodel tissues. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17218.001 PMID:27661254

  1. AMACO is a novel component of the basement membrane associated Fraser complex

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Rebecca J.; Gebauer, Jan M.; Zhang, Jin-Li; Kobbe, Birgit; Keene, Douglas R.; Karlsen, Kristina Røkenes; Richetti, Stefânia; Wohl, Alexander P.; Sengle, Gerhard; Neiss, Wolfram F.; Paulsson, Mats; Hammerschmidt, Matthias; Wagener, Raimund

    2015-01-01

    Fraser syndrome (FS) is a phenotypically variable, autosomal recessive disorder characterized by cryptophthalmus, cutaneous syndactyly and other malformations resulting from mutations in FRAS1, FREM2 and GRIP1. Transient embryonic epidermal blistering causes the characteristic defects of the disorder. Fras1, Frem1 and Frem2 form the extracellular Fraser complex, which is believed to stabilize the basement membrane (BM). However, several cases of FS could not be attributed to mutations in FRAS1, FREM2 or GRIP1, while Fraser syndrome displays high clinical variability, suggesting there is an additional genetic, possibly modifying contribution to this disorder. AMACO, encoded by the VWA2 gene, has a very similar tissue distribution to the Fraser complex proteins in both mouse and zebrafish. Here, we show that AMACO deposition is lost in Fras1 deficient zebrafish and mice and that Fras1 and AMACO interact directly via their CSPG and P2 domains. Knockdown of vwa2, which alone causes no phenotype, enhances the phenotype of hypomorphic Fras1 mutant zebrafish. Together, our data suggest that AMACO represents a novel member of the Fraser complex. PMID:24232570

  2. SPARC Promotes Cell Invasion In Vivo by Decreasing Type IV Collagen Levels in the Basement Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Morrissey, Meghan A.; Jayadev, Ranjay; Miley, Ginger R.; Blebea, Catherine A.; Chi, Qiuyi; Ihara, Shinji; Sherwood, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of SPARC, a collagen-binding glycoprotein, is strongly associated with tumor invasion through extracellular matrix in many aggressive cancers. SPARC regulates numerous cellular processes including integrin-mediated cell adhesion, cell signaling pathways, and extracellular matrix assembly; however, the mechanism by which SPARC promotes cell invasion in vivo remains unclear. A main obstacle in understanding SPARC function has been the difficulty of visualizing and experimentally examining the dynamic interactions between invasive cells, extracellular matrix and SPARC in native tissue environments. Using the model of anchor cell invasion through the basement membrane (BM) extracellular matrix in Caenorhabditis elegans, we find that SPARC overexpression is highly pro-invasive and rescues BM transmigration in mutants with defects in diverse aspects of invasion, including cell polarity, invadopodia formation, and matrix metalloproteinase expression. By examining BM assembly, we find that overexpression of SPARC specifically decreases levels of BM type IV collagen, a crucial structural BM component. Reduction of type IV collagen mimicked SPARC overexpression and was sufficient to promote invasion. Tissue-specific overexpression and photobleaching experiments revealed that SPARC acts extracellularly to inhibit collagen incorporation into BM. By reducing endogenous SPARC, we also found that SPARC functions normally to traffic collagen from its site of synthesis to tissues that do not express collagen. We propose that a surplus of SPARC disrupts extracellular collagen trafficking and reduces BM collagen incorporation, thus weakening the BM barrier and dramatically enhancing its ability to be breached by invasive cells. PMID:26926673

  3. Protein kinase C regulates endothelial cell tube formation on basement membrane matrix, Matrigel.

    PubMed

    Kinsella, J L; Grant, D S; Weeks, B S; Kleinman, H K

    1992-03-01

    Human umbilical vein endothelial cells differentiate within 12 h to form capillary-like networks of tube structures when the cells are plated on Matrigel, a mixture of basement membrane proteins. Nothing is known about the intracellular signaling events involved in this differentiation. As a first step to define the process, we investigated the possible role of protein kinase C activation by beta-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) in regulating the formation of the tube structures. In this model, PMA increased tube formation several-fold in a dose-dependent manner with half-maximum stimulation of tube formation at approximately 5 nM PMA. In the absence of serum, essentially little or no tubes were formed on Matrigel unless PMA was added to the medium. Only active phorbol analogs increased tube formation, while the protein kinase C inhibitor, H-7, blocked tube formation. The protein kinase C activators and inhibitors were effective only when added at or just after plating of the cells and did not affect already formed tubes. This study suggests that protein kinase C is involved in the early events of in vitro endothelial cell tube formation on Matrigel.

  4. Promoting epithelium regeneration for esophageal tissue engineering through basement membrane reconstitution.

    PubMed

    Lv, Jingjing; Chen, Ling; Zhu, Yabin; Hou, Lei; Liu, Yuxin

    2014-04-01

    Scaffolds mimicking hierarchical features of native extracellular matrices may facilitate cell growth and anatomical tissue regeneration. In our previous study, esophageal basement membrane (BM) was shown to be composed of interwoven fibers with mean diameter of 66 ± 24 nm (range 28-165 nm) and with abundant pores of unequal sizes. The main extracellular matrix (ECM) contents found in porcine esophageal BM were collagen IV, laminin, entactin, and proteoglycans. In this work, biodegradable polycaprolactone (PCL) and silk fibroin (SF) were spun with electrospinning technology, both individually and in combination, to fabricate fibrous scaffolds with diameters between 64 and 200 nm. The surface morphologies of PCL, PCL/SF, and SF scaffolds were observed under scanning electron microscopy. Their mechanical properties were tested and the cytocompatibility was evaluated in vitro via culture of primary epithelial cells (ECs). The SF or PCL/SF scaffold favorably promoted epithelial cell attachment and proliferation comparing with PCL scaffold. However, mitochondrial activity of epithelial cells was greatly promoted when major BM proteins were coated onto the electrospun scaffold to provide an ECM-like structure. Results from in vivo tests revealed that the electrospun scaffolds coated with BM protein possess good biocompatibility and capability to promote epithelium regeneration.

  5. Chitosan facilitates structure formation of the salivary gland by regulating the basement membrane components.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tsung-Lin; Hsiao, Ya-Chuan

    2015-10-01

    Tissue structure is important for inherent physiological function and should be recapitulated during tissue engineering for regenerative purposes. The salivary gland is a branched organ that is responsible for saliva secretion and regulation. The salivary glands develop from epithelial-mesenchymal interactions, and depend on the support of the basement membrane (BM). Chitosan-based biomaterials have been demonstrated to be competent in facilitating the formation of salivary gland tissue structure. However, the underlying mechanisms have remained elusive. In the developing submandibular gland (SMG), the chitosan effect was found to diminish when collagen and laminin were removed from cultured SMG explants. Chitosan increased the expression of BM components including collagen, laminin, and heparan sulfate proteoglycan, and also facilitated BM components and the corresponding receptors to be expressed in tissue-specific patterns beneficial for SMG branching. The chitosan effect decreased when either laminin components or receptors were inhibited, as well when the downstream signaling was blocked. Our results revealed that chitosan promotes salivary glands branching through the BM. By regulating BM components and receptors, chitosan efficiently stimulated downstream signaling to facilitate salivary gland branching. The present study revealed the underlying mechanism of the chitosan effect in engineering SMG structure formation.

  6. Does Tensile Rupture of Tumor Basement Membrane Mark the Onset of Cancer Metastasis?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Sai

    2015-03-01

    Recognizing a conceptual analogy from polymer physics and reasoning via induction, we infer the plausibility that a malignant tumor (carcinoma) grows in size until a threshold determined by its mechanochemical state in relation to its microenvironment whence, peripheral cells undergo epithelial-to-mesenchymal transitions (EMT) facilitating metastasis. This state is equated to the tensile yielding/rupture of the proteolytically-weakened basement membrane (BM) that encapsulates the growing neoplasm. BMs are typically constituted of tri-continuous hydrogel networks of collagen-IV, laminin, and interstitial fluid, with connector proteins such as nidogens, and perlecans. We test this postulate by formulating a theoretical model based on continuum fluid-solid mechanics, diffusion, and biochemical kinetics of energy metabolism. Herein, a prototypical, viscous tumor spheroid grows radially, consuming metabolic nutrients while being constrained by an elastic BM ca. 0.5-2 microns-thick, and cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), chiefly cadherins and integrins. The model is computationally analyzed via Comsol®. Results validate the a priori conjecture, and predict subsequent crack-tip stresses shifting strains on the CAMs from compressive to tensile, that might also indicate mechanotransduced switches in their conformations, such as from non-invasive, adhesive E-cadherins to invasive, non-adhesive N-cadherin phenotypes. Grant from Brady Urological Institute, JHMI.

  7. Degradation of endothelial basement membrane by human breast cancer cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, C.; Shiu, R.P.

    1986-04-01

    During metastasis, it is believed that tumor cells destroy the basement membrane (BM) of blood vessels in order to disseminate through the circulatory system. By radioactively labeling the extracellular matrix produced by primary endothelial cells in vitro, the ability of human breast cancer cells to degrade BM components was studied. We found that T-47D, a human breast cancer line, was able to degrade significant amounts of (35S)methionine-labeled and (3H)proline-labeled BM, but not 35SO4-labeled BM. Six other tumor cell lines of human breast origin were assayed in the same manner and were found to degrade BM to varying degrees. Several non-tumor cell lines tested showed relatively little degrading activity. The use of serum-free medium greatly enhanced degradation of the BM by tumor cells, suggesting a role for naturally occurring enzyme inhibitors in the serum. Direct cell contact with the BM was required for BM degradation, suggesting that the active enzymes are cell associated. The addition of hormones implicated in the etiology of breast cancer did not significantly alter the ability of T-47D cells to degrade the BM. The use of this assay affords future studies on the mechanism of invasion and metastasis of human breast cancer.

  8. Nodular basement membrane deposits in breast carcinoma and atypical ductal hyperplasia: mimics of collagenous spherulosis.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, T J; Hird, P M; Laing, R W; Davies, J D

    1994-06-01

    Collagenous spherulosis is characterised histologically by the accumulation of hyaline globules containing basement membrane components. Originally described in the breast, it has also been found in skin and salivary gland neoplasms. In the breast it has hitherto always been associated with benign disease and reports have asserted that this is invariably the case, cautioning against the diagnosis of malignancy when the condition is seen. We present here five cases with similar appearances to collagenous spherulosis in routine histology and immunohistochemistry, and ultrastructural studies in one of them, in which the condition was not associated with simple benign breast disease. Two of the cases were associated with invasive carcinomas of unusual histological types, one with intracystic papillary carcinoma, one with comedo ductal carcinoma-in-situ and one with atypical ductal hyperplasia. We suggest that appearances similar to collagenous spherulosis can be associated, either through being formed by a lesion or by collision, with malignancy and warn that on encountering the lesions the pathologist must not assume, as suggested in previous accounts, that it denotes a benign process. This is an important observation since collagenous spherulosis is likely to be encountered more frequently in the range of lesions biopsied in national breast screening programs.

  9. ER stress and basement membrane defects combine to cause glomerular and tubular renal disease resulting from Col4a1 mutations in mice.

    PubMed

    Jones, Frances E; Bailey, Matthew A; Murray, Lydia S; Lu, Yinhui; McNeilly, Sarah; Schlötzer-Schrehardt, Ursula; Lennon, Rachel; Sado, Yoshikazu; Brownstein, David G; Mullins, John J; Kadler, Karl E; Van Agtmael, Tom

    2016-02-01

    Collagen IV is a major component of basement membranes, and mutations in COL4A1, which encodes collagen IV alpha chain 1, cause a multisystemic disease encompassing cerebrovascular, eye and kidney defects. However, COL4A1 renal disease remains poorly characterized and its pathomolecular mechanisms are unknown. We show that Col4a1 mutations in mice cause hypotension and renal disease, including proteinuria and defects in Bowman's capsule and the glomerular basement membrane, indicating a role for Col4a1 in glomerular filtration. Impaired sodium reabsorption in the loop of Henle and distal nephron despite elevated aldosterone levels indicates that tubular defects contribute to the hypotension, highlighting a novel role for the basement membrane in vascular homeostasis by modulation of the tubular response to aldosterone. Col4a1 mutations also cause diabetes insipidus, whereby the tubular defects lead to polyuria associated with medullary atrophy and a subsequent reduction in the ability to upregulate aquaporin 2 and concentrate urine. Moreover, haematuria, haemorrhage and vascular basement membrane defects confirm an important vascular component. Interestingly, although structural and compositional basement membrane defects occurred in the glomerulus and Bowman's capsule, no tubular basement membrane defects were detected. By contrast, medullary atrophy was associated with chronic ER stress, providing evidence for cell-type-dependent molecular mechanisms of Col4a1 mutations. These data show that both basement membrane defects and ER stress contribute to Col4a1 renal disease, which has important implications for the development of treatment strategies for collagenopathies.

  10. Kinematics and surface fracture pattern of the Anaran basement fault zone in NW of the Zagros fold-thrust belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joudaki, M.; Farzipour-Saein, A.; Nilfouroushan, F.

    2016-04-01

    The preexisting north-south trending basement faults and their reactivation played an important role during the evolution of the Zagros fold-thrust belt. The Anaran Basement Fault (ABF) in the Lurestan region, NW of the Zagros, has been considered as a N-S trending basement lineament, although its surface structural expression is still debated. In this study, we use satellite images and field observations to identify and analyze the fractures in the sedimentary cover above the ABF. Fracture analysis demonstrates that approaching the ABF, the fracture pattern changes. The fractures association with reactivation of the deep-seated preexisting ABF can be categorized in four sets based on their directions. The mean direction for maximum compressional stress is different between the fault- and fold-related fractures within and around the ABF shear zone. We estimated an orientation of N30° ± 5° for the fault-related fractures and N45° ± 5° for the fold-related fracture sets outside of the ABF shear zone. This difference suggests that the fold-related and fault-related fracture sets have been formed in different two stages of deformation throughout the area. The axial traces of some folds, especially the Anaran anticline, demonstrate a right-lateral offset along the ABF, such that, in central part of the Anaran anticline, the fold axis of this anticline is changed from its original NW-SE trend to approximately north-south trend of the ABF.

  11. Immunohistochemical localization of basement membrane type VII collagen and laminin in neoplasms of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Wetzels, R H; van der Velden, L A; Schaafsma, H E; Manni, J J; Leigh, I M; Vooijs, G P; Ramaekers, F C

    1992-11-01

    The distribution pattern of the basement membrane components type VII collagen and laminin, was studied immunohistochemically in normal human head and neck tissues and in a series of benign and malignant tumours from the same site. Using monoclonal antibodies, a basement membrane containing type VII collagen and laminin could be demonstrated beneath the epithelial cell layer in 16 normal head and neck tissues from different localizations. Unlike type VII collagen, laminin was also abundantly present around blood vessels and muscle fibres. With respect to 42 squamous cell carcinomas studied, type VII collagen and laminin were present in basement membranes surrounding small and large tumour fields, independent of the tumour grade. Type VII collagen was demonstrated in the cytoplasm of tumour cells in 36% of the cases, while the antibody to laminin displayed a basement membrane staining pattern mainly. Both antibodies showed a staining gradient in more than half of the cases, with strong staining in the centre of the tumour and weakening of the staining towards the tumour periphery. In a series of 22 salivary gland tumours consisting of 19 pleomorphic adenomas and three adenoid cystic carcinomas, the distribution pattern of type VII collagen and laminin was very heterogeneous. Laminin was present in 17 and type VII collagen in 10 of 19 cases of pleomorphic adenoma, mostly scattered throughout the tumour fields. In the tumours positive for type VII collagen areas with little or no positivity were also found. A correlation between type VII collagen positivity and the presence of basal cell keratin 14 positivity was noticed in the majority of cases.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Lysyl Hydroxylase 3 Localizes to Epidermal Basement Membrane and Is Reduced in Patients with Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa

    PubMed Central

    Watt, Stephen A.; Dayal, Jasbani H. S.; Wright, Sheila; Riddle, Megan; Pourreyron, Celine; McMillan, James R.; Kimble, Roy M.; Prisco, Marco; Gartner, Ulrike; Warbrick, Emma; McLean, W. H. Irwin; Leigh, Irene M.; McGrath, John A.; Salas-Alanis, Julio C.; Tolar, Jakub; South, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) is caused by mutations in COL7A1 resulting in reduced or absent type VII collagen, aberrant anchoring fibril formation and subsequent dermal-epidermal fragility. Here, we identify a significant decrease in PLOD3 expression and its encoded protein, the collagen modifying enzyme lysyl hydroxylase 3 (LH3), in RDEB. We show abundant LH3 localising to the basement membrane in normal skin which is severely depleted in RDEB patient skin. We demonstrate expression is in-part regulated by endogenous type VII collagen and that, in agreement with previous studies, even small reductions in LH3 expression lead to significantly less secreted LH3 protein. Exogenous type VII collagen did not alter LH3 expression in cultured RDEB keratinocytes and we show that RDEB patients receiving bone marrow transplantation who demonstrate significant increase in type VII collagen do not show increased levels of LH3 at the basement membrane. Our data report a direct link between LH3 and endogenous type VII collagen expression concluding that reduction of LH3 at the basement membrane in patients with RDEB will likely have significant implications for disease progression and therapeutic intervention. PMID:26380979

  13. Laminin Production and Basement Membrane Deposition by Mesenchymal Stem Cells upon Adipogenic Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Sillat, Tarvo; Virtanen, Ismo; Ingerpuu, Sulev; Bäck, Nils; Konttinen, Yrjö T.; Korhonen, Matti

    2013-01-01

    The aim was to study laminin (LM) synthesis, integration, and deposition into the basement membrane (BM) during adipogenesis. Human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) were induced along the adipogenic lineage. LM chain mRNA and protein levels were followed using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), immunofluorescence (IF) staining, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and immunoprecipitation. MSCs produced low levels of LM mRNAs but were not surrounded by BM in IF and TEM imaging. LM-α4, LM-β1, and LM-γ1 mRNAs increased during adipogenesis 3.9-, 5.8-, and 2.8-fold by day 28. LM-411 was immunoprecipitated from the ECM of the differentiated cells. Immunostaining suggested deposition of LM-411 and some LM-421. BM build-up was probably organized in part by integrin (Int) α6β1. At day 28, TEM images revealed BM-like structures around fat droplet-containing cells. The first signs of BM formation and Int α6β1 were seen using IF imaging at day 14. Laminin-411 and Int α6β1 were expressed in vivo in mature human subcutaneous fat tissue. Undifferentiated human MSCs did not organize LM subunits into BM, whereas LM-411 and some LM-421 are precipitated in the BM around adipocytes. This is the first demonstration of LM-411 precipitation during hMSC adipogenesis around adipocytes as a structural scaffold and Int-regulated signaling element. PMID:23900596

  14. Analysis of Adhesion Molecules and Basement Membrane Contributions to Synaptic Adhesion at the Drosophila Embryonic NMJ

    PubMed Central

    Koper, Andre; Schenck, Annette; Prokop, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Synapse formation and maintenance crucially underlie brain function in health and disease. Both processes are believed to depend on cell adhesion molecules (CAMs). Many different classes of CAMs localise to synapses, including cadherins, protocadherins, neuroligins, neurexins, integrins, and immunoglobulin adhesion proteins, and further contributions come from the extracellular matrix and its receptors. Most of these factors have been scrutinised by loss-of-function analyses in animal models. However, which adhesion factors establish the essential physical links across synaptic clefts and allow the assembly of synaptic machineries at the contact site in vivo is still unclear. To investigate these key questions, we have used the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) of Drosophila embryos as a genetically amenable model synapse. Our ultrastructural analyses of NMJs lacking different classes of CAMs revealed that loss of all neurexins, all classical cadherins or all glutamate receptors, as well as combinations between these or with a Laminin deficiency, failed to reveal structural phenotypes. These results are compatible with a view that these CAMs might have no structural role at this model synapse. However, we consider it far more likely that they operate in a redundant or well buffered context. We propose a model based on a multi-adaptor principle to explain this phenomenon. Furthermore, we report a new CAM-independent adhesion mechanism that involves the basement membranes (BM) covering neuromuscular terminals. Thus, motorneuronal terminals show strong partial detachment of the junction when BM-to-cell surface attachment is impaired by removing Laminin A, or when BMs lose their structural integrity upon loss of type IV collagens. We conclude that BMs are essential to tie embryonic motorneuronal terminals to the muscle surface, lending CAM-independent structural support to their adhesion. Therefore, future developmental studies of these synaptic junctions in Drosophila need

  15. The effect of asthma on the perimeter of the airway basement membrane.

    PubMed

    Elliot, John G; Budgeon, Charley A; Harji, Salima; Jones, Robyn L; James, Alan L; Green, Francis H

    2015-11-15

    When comparing the pathology of airways in individuals with and without asthma, the perimeter of the basement membrane (Pbm) is used as a marker of airway size, as it is independent of airway smooth muscle shortening or airway collapse. The extent to which the Pbm is itself altered in asthma has not been quantified. The aim of this study was to compare the Pbm from the same anatomical sites in postmortem lungs from subjects with (n = 55) and without (n = 30) asthma (nonfatal or fatal). Large and small airways were systematically sampled at equidistant "levels" from the apical segment of the left upper lobes and anterior and basal segments of the left lower lobes of lungs fixed in inflation. The length of the Pbm was estimated from cross sections of airway at each relative level. Linear mixed models were used to investigate the relationships between Pbm and sex, age, height, smoking status, airway level, and asthma group. The final model showed significant interactions between Pbm and airway level in small (<3 mm) airways, in subjects having asthma (P < 0.0001), and by sex (P < 0.0001). No significant interactions for Pbm between asthma groups were observed for larger airways (equivalent to a diameter of ∼3 mm and greater) or smoking status. Asthma is not associated with remodeling of the Pbm in large airways. In medium and small airways, the decrease in Pbm in asthma (≤20%) would not account for the published differences in wall area or area of smooth muscle observed in cases of severe asthma.

  16. Structure and biology of the globular domain of basement membrane type IV collagen.

    PubMed

    Timpl, R; Oberbäumer, I; von der Mark, H; Bode, W; Wick, G; Weber, S; Engel, J

    1985-01-01

    A procedure was developed for purifying the globular domain NC1 of basement membrane collagen from collagenase digests of a variety of tissues. The globule (Mr = 170,000) is a hexameric structure originating from two collagen IV molecules that are cross-linked at their COOH-terminal ends. Dissociation into subunits derived from alpha 1(IV) and alpha 2(IV) chains occurs at a pH below 4 and after denaturation (8 M urea). The subunits obtained include monomers (Mr = 28,000) and two different dimers (Da,Db) which are connected by disulfide bonds (Db) and/or nonreducible bonds (Da). Almost perfect reconstitution to hexamers is obtained in neutral buffer with mixtures of the subunits or purified dimers but not with purified monomers. Stabilization by dimer formation and other physical data suggest conformationally distinct segments within the subunits, which is also supported by a repeating subdomain structure deduced from cDNA sequences. Monocline crystals of NC1 give a sufficiently detailed X-ray diffraction pattern that should permit elucidation of the three-dimensional structure of the hexamer. Antibodies raised against the globular domain react with all subunits and mainly recognize epitopes stabilized by internal disulfide bridges and/or the hexameric assembly. Immunoprecipitation tests with these antibodies demonstrated a slightly larger subunit size of NC1 in PYS-2 cell culture and the rapid release of precursor-specific segments prior to secretion from the cells. Autoantibodies against mouse tumor NC1 were produced in mice and were detected both in the blood and as tissue-bound forms (kidney, lung). The autoantibody response is accompanied by certain pathological alterations mimicking Goodpasture's syndrome. The possible relationship between the two diseases is substantiated by reaction of Goodpasture antisera with the globular domain obtained from various tissue sources. PMID:2421628

  17. Long-Term Outcome of Anti-Glomerular Basement Membrane Antibody Disease Treated with Immunoadsorption

    PubMed Central

    Biesenbach, Peter; Kain, Renate; Derfler, Kurt; Perkmann, Thomas; Soleiman, Afschin; Benharkou, Alexandra; Druml, Wilfred; Rees, Andrew; Säemann, Marcus D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) antibody disease may lead to acute crescentic glomerulonephritis with poor renal prognosis. Current therapy favours plasma exchange (PE) for removal of pathogenic antibodies. Immunoadsorption (IAS) is superior to PE regarding efficiency of antibody-removal and safety. Apart from anecdotal data, there is no systemic analysis of the long-term effects of IAS on anti-GBM-disease and antibody kinetics. Objective To examine the long-term effect of high-frequency IAS combined with standard immunosuppression on patient and renal survival in patients with anti-GBM-disease and to quantify antibody removal and kinetics through IAS. Design Retrospective review of patients treated with IAS for anti-GBM-antibody disease confirmed by biopsy and/or anti-GBM-antibodies. Setting University Hospital of Vienna, Austria. Participants 10 patients with anti-GBM-disease treated with IAS. Measurements Patient and renal survival, renal histology, anti-GBM-antibodies. Results Anti-GBM-antibodies were reduced by the first 9 IAS treatments (mean number of 23) to negative levels in all patients. Renal survival was 40% at diagnosis, 70% after the end of IAS, 63% after one year and 50% at the end of observation (mean 84 months, range 9 to 186). Dialysis dependency was successfully reversed in three of six patients. Patient survival was 90% at the end of observation. Conclusion IAS efficiently eliminates anti-GBM-antibodies suggesting non-inferiority to PE with regard to renal and patient survival. Hence IAS should be considered as a valuable treatment option for anti-GBM-disease, especially in patients presenting with a high percentage of crescents and dialysis dependency due to an unusual high proportion of responders. PMID:25079220

  18. Uncommon structural motifs dominate the antigen binding site in human autoantibodies reactive with basement membrane collagen.

    PubMed

    Foster, Mary H; Buckley, Elizabeth S; Chen, Benny J; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Clark, Amy G

    2016-08-01

    Autoantibodies mediate organ destruction in multiple autoimmune diseases, yet their origins in patients remain poorly understood. To probe the genetic origins and structure of disease-associated autoantibodies, we engrafted immunodeficient mice with human CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells and immunized with the non-collagenous-1 (NC1) domain of the alpha3 chain of type IV collagen. This antigen is expressed in lungs and kidneys and is targeted by autoantibodies in anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) nephritis and Goodpasture syndrome (GPS), prototypic human organ-specific autoimmune diseases. Using Epstein Barr virus transformation and cell fusion, six human anti-alpha3(IV)NC1 collagen monoclonal autoantibodies (mAb) were recovered, including subsets reactive with human kidney and with epitopes recognized by patients' IgG. Sequence analysis reveals a long to exceptionally long heavy chain complementarity determining region3 (HCDR3), the major site of antigen binding, in all six mAb. Mean HCDR3 length is 25.5 amino acids (range 20-36), generated from inherently long DH and JH genes and extended regions of non-templated N-nucleotides. Long HCDR3 are suited to forming noncontiguous antigen contacts and to binding recessed, immunologically silent epitopes hidden from conventional antibodies, as seen with self-antigen crossreactive broadly neutralizing anti-HIV Ig (bnAb). The anti-alpha3(IV)NC1 collagen mAb also show preferential use of unmutated variable region genes that are enriched among human chronic lymphocytic leukemia antibodies that share features with natural polyreactive Ig. Our findings suggest unexpected relationships between pathogenic anti-collagen Ig, bnAb, and autoreactive Ig associated with malignancy, all of which arise from B cells expressing unconventional structural elements that may require transient escape from tolerance for successful expansion. PMID:27450516

  19. WY14,643, a PPARα ligand, attenuates expression of anti-glomerular basement membrane disease

    PubMed Central

    Archer, D C; Frkanec, J T; Cromwell, J; Clopton, P; Cunard, R

    2007-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) ligands are medications used to treat hyperlipidaemia and atherosclerosis. Increasing evidence suggests that these agents are immunosuppressive. In the following studies we demonstrate that WY14,643, a PPARα ligand, attenuates expression of anti-glomerular basement membrane disease (AGBMD). C57BL/6 mice were fed 0·05% WY14,643 or control food and immunized with the non-collagenous domain of the α3 chain of Type IV collagen [α3(IV) NC1] in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). WY14,643 reduced proteinuria and greatly improved glomerular and tubulo-interstitial lesions. However, the PPARα ligand did not alter the extent of IgG-binding to the GBM. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that the prominent tubulo-interstitial infiltrates in the control-fed mice consisted predominately of F4/80+ macrophages and WY14,643-feeding decreased significantly the number of renal macrophages. The synthetic PPARα ligand also reduced significantly expression of the chemokine, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1/CCL2. Sera from mice immunized with AGBMD were also evaluated for antigen-specific IgGs. There was a significant increase in the IgG1 : IgG2c ratio and a decline in the intrarenal and splenocyte interferon (IFN)-γ mRNA expression in the WY14,643-fed mice, suggesting that the PPARα ligand could skew the immune response to a less inflammatory T helper 2-type of response. These studies suggest that PPARα ligands may be a novel treatment for inflammatory renal disease. PMID:17888025

  20. A Review of String Vessels or Collapsed, Empty Basement Membrane Tubes

    PubMed Central

    Brown, William R.

    2011-01-01

    String vessels are thin connective tissue strands, remnants of capillaries, with no endothelial cells; they do not carry blood flow. They occur in numerous species, particularly in the central nervous system, but can occur in any tissue where capillaries have died. String vessels are often associated with pathologies such as Alzheimer’s disease, ischemia, and irradiation, but are also found in normal human brains from preterm babies to the aged. They provide a record of the original blood vessel location, but gradually disappear after months or years. There have been numerous studies of string vessels (acellular capillaries) in the retina, because retinal vessels can be seen in great detail in whole mounts after trypsin digestion. Capillary regression occurs by apoptosis, synchronously along capillary segments, with macrophages engulfing apoptotic endothelial cells. Macrophages may cause the apoptosis, or the regression may be triggered by loss of the endothelial cell survival factor VEGF. VEGF expression is induced by hypoxia and promotes capillary growth. Cessation of blood flow eliminates the shear stress that helps maintain endothelial cell survival. Capillaries can re-grow by proliferation and migration of endothelial cells into empty basement membrane tubes, which provide a structural scaffold, replete with signaling molecules. This is a problem in tumor control, but useful for recovery from capillary loss. There is an age-related waning of VEGF expression in response to hypoxia. This causes an age-related decline in cerebral angiogenesis and results in neuronal loss. It may also contribute to the proposed age-related loss of brain reserve. PMID:20634580

  1. Mesenchymal cell chondrogenesis is stimulated by basement membrane matrix and inhibited by age-associated factors.

    PubMed

    Bradham, D M; Passaniti, A; Horton, W E

    1995-07-01

    During development of the embryonic limb, differentiation of mesenchymal progenitor cells into chondrocytes is regulated by cell shape, extracellular matrix, and growth and differentiation factors. In this study, reconstituted basement membrane (Matrigel) prepared from mouse Englebreth-Holm-Swarm tumor tissue was found to stimulate mesenchymal cell chondrogenesis in vitro and the production of cartilage at ectopic sites in athymic mice. The rate of chondrogenesis of mesenchymal cells from chick limb bud was increased four-fold by the addition of 400 micrograms/ml Matrigel to the media of micromass cultures, and this activity was not blocked by neutralizing antibodies to transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) or fibroblast growth factor (FGF). Mesenchymal cells cultured on Matrigel, but not laminin or collagen type I or IV, formed spheres of condensed cells which stained with Alcian blue. Chick limb-bud mesenchymal cells suspended in Matrigel prepared from tumors grown in C57 mice aged 3, 12, or 26 months formed disks of hyaline cartilage within 2 weeks with wet weights of 59.1 mg, 35.7 mg, and 21.4 mg, indicating that the Matrigel from the old animals was less biologically active. In agreement with the in vivo data, Alcian blue staining of proteoglycan was over two-fold higher in micromass cultures supplemented with the Matrigel from young animals than in cultures treated with the Matrigel from old mice. A high-salt wash preparation of Matrigel from tumors grown in old mice increased the rate of chondrogenesis and cartilage production, suggesting that an inhibitor of chondrogenesis is produced by the old host. Thus, Matrigel contains chondrogenic activity distinct from TGF-beta or FGF. The aged host may produce factors that are inhibitory to mesenchymal cell differentiation and adversely affect cartilage formation and repair.

  2. Peroxynitrous acid induces structural and functional modifications to basement membranes and its key component, laminin.

    PubMed

    Degendorfer, Georg; Chuang, Christine Y; Hammer, Astrid; Malle, Ernst; Davies, Michael J

    2015-12-01

    Basement membranes (BM) are specialized extracellular matrices underlying endothelial cells in the artery wall. Laminin, the most abundant BM glycoprotein, is a structural and biologically active component. Peroxynitrous acid (ONOOH), a potent oxidizing and nitrating agent, is formed in vivo at sites of inflammation from superoxide and nitric oxide radicals. Considerable data supports ONOOH formation in human atherosclerotic lesions, and an involvement of this oxidant in atherosclerosis development and lesion rupture. These effects may be mediated, at least in part, via extracellular matrix damage. In this study we demonstrate co-localization of 3-nitrotyrosine (a product of tyrosine damage by ONOOH) and laminin in human atherosclerotic lesions. ONOOH-induced damage to BM was characterized for isolated murine BM, and purified murine laminin-111. Exposure of laminin-111 to ONOOH resulted in dose-dependent loss of protein tyrosine and tryptophan residues, and formation of 3-nitrotyrosine, 6-nitrotryptophan and the cross-linked material di-tyrosine, as detected by amino acid analysis and Western blotting. These changes were accompanied by protein aggregation and fragmentation as detected by SDS-PAGE. Endothelial cell adhesion to isolated laminin-111 exposed to 10 μM or higher levels of ONOOH was significantly decreased (~25%) compared to untreated controls. These data indicate that laminin is oxidized by equimolar or greater concentrations of ONOOH, with this resulting in structural and functional changes. These modifications, and resulting compromised cell-matrix interactions, may contribute to endothelial cell dysfunction, a weakening of the structure of atherosclerotic lesions, and an increased propensity to rupture.

  3. Hindered transport of macromolecules in isolated glomeruli. II. Convection and pressure effects in basement membrane.

    PubMed

    Edwards, A; Daniels, B S; Deen, W M

    1997-01-01

    The filtration rates for water and a polydisperse mixture of Ficoll across films of isolated glomerular basement membrane (GBM) were measured to characterize convective transport across this part of the glomerular capillary wall. Glomeruli were isolated from rat kidneys and the cells were removed by detergent lysis, leaving a preparation containing almost pure GBM that could be consolidated into a layer at the base of a small ultrafiltration cell. A Ficoll mixture with Stokes-Einstein radii ranging from about 2.0 to 7.0 nm was labeled with fluorescein, providing a set of rigid, spherical test macromolecules with little molecular charge. Filtration experiments were performed at two physiologically relevant hydraulic pressure differences (delta P), 35 and 60 mmHg. The sieving coefficient (filtrate-to-retentate concentration ratio) for a given size of Ficoll tended to be larger at 35 than at 60 mmHg, the changes being greater for the smaller molecules. The Darcy permeability also varied inversely with pressure, averaging 1.48 +/- 0.10 nm2 at 35 mmHg and 0.82 +/- 0.07 nm2 at 60 mmHg. Both effects could be explained most simply by postulating that the intrinsic permeability properties of the GBM change in response to compression. The sieving data were consistent with linear declines in the hindrance factors for convection and diffusion with increasing pressure, and correlations were derived to relate those hindrance factors to molecular size and delta P. Comparisons with previous Ficoll sieving data for rats in vivo suggest that the GBM is less size-restrictive than the cell layers, but that its contribution to the overall size selectivity of the barrier is not negligible. Theoretical predictions of the Darcy permeability based on a model in which the GBM is a random fibrous network consisting of two populations of fibers were in excellent agreement with the present data and with ultrastructural observations in the literature.

  4. The transcription factor HLH-2/E/Daughterless regulates anchor cell invasion across basement membrane in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Adam J; Sherwood, David R

    2011-09-15

    Cell invasion through basement membrane is a specialized cellular behavior critical for many developmental processes and leukocyte trafficking. Invasive cellular behavior is also inappropriately co-opted during cancer progression. Acquisition of an invasive phenotype is accompanied by changes in gene expression that are thought to coordinate the steps of invasion. The transcription factors responsible for these changes in gene expression, however, are largely unknown. C. elegans anchor cell (AC) invasion is a genetically tractable in vivo model of invasion through basement membrane. AC invasion requires the conserved transcription factor FOS-1A, but other transcription factors are thought to act in parallel to FOS-1A to control invasion. Here we identify the transcription factor HLH-2, the C. elegans ortholog of Drosophila Daughterless and vertebrate E proteins, as a regulator of AC invasion. Reduction of HLH-2 function by RNAi or with a hypomorphic allele causes defects in AC invasion. Genetic analysis indicates that HLH-2 has functions outside of the FOS-1A pathway. Using expression analysis, we identify three genes that are transcriptionally regulated by HLH-2: the protocadherin cdh-3, and two genes encoding secreted extracellular matrix proteins, mig-6/papilin and him-4/hemicentin. Further, we show that reduction of HLH-2 function causes defects in polarization of F-actin to the invasive cell membrane, a process required for the AC to generate protrusions that breach the basement membrane. This work identifies HLH-2 as a regulator of the invasive phenotype in the AC, adding to our understanding of the transcriptional networks that control cell invasion.

  5. Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist ameliorates experimental anti-glomerular basement membrane antibody-associated glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed Central

    Tang, W W; Feng, L; Vannice, J L; Wilson, C B

    1994-01-01

    The contribution of IL-1 to leukocyte infiltration in anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) antibody (Ab) glomerulonephritis (GN) was examined by the administration of a specific IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra). Lewis rats received anti-GBM Ab or normal rabbit serum and were treated with either 0.9% saline or 6 mg IL-1ra over a 24-h time period. Plasma IL-1ra concentration was 2,659 +/- 51 ng/ml 4 h after anti-GBM Ab and IL-1ra administration. PMN and monocyte/macrophage infiltration declined 39% (9.8 +/- 1.9 to 6.0 +/- 1.5 PMN/glomerulus, P < 0.001) and 29% (4.9 +/- 0.8 to 3.5 +/- 0.8 ED-1 cells/glomerulus, P = 0.002) with IL-1ra treatment at 4 h, respectively. Similarly, the number of glomerular cells staining for lymphocyte function-associated molecule-1 beta (CD18) declined 39% from 16.7 +/- 1.9 to 10.7 +/- 1.6 cells/glomerulus at 4 h (P = 0.0001). This was associated with a decrease in glomerular intracellular adhesion molecule-1 expression. The mean glomerular intracellular adhesion molecule-1 score in anti-GBM Ab GN rats treated with IL-1ra was less than that of rats administered anti-GBM Ab and 0.9% saline at 4 (2.0 +/- 0.2 vs 2.5 +/- 0.2, P < 0.05) and 24 (2.5 +/- 0.1 vs 3.1 +/- 0.2, P = 0.0001) h. These immunopathologic changes correlated with a 50% reduction in proteinuria from 147 +/- 34 to 75 +/- 25 mg/d (P < 0.002). Treatment with IL-1ra did not affect the steady state mRNA expression of either IL-1 beta or TNF alpha. An increase in the IL-1ra dose to 30 mg given within the initial 4 h provided no additional benefit. The decline in PMN and monocyte/macrophage infiltration of the glomerulus at 4 h was similar to that found in the initial study. Furthermore, the protective benefit of IL-1ra was abrogated by doubling the dose of the anti-GBM Ab GN, despite administering high dose IL-1ra (30 mg). In these studies, detectable IL-1ra was found in the serum of untreated anti-GBM Ab GN controls. These data suggest a positive yet limited role for IL-1ra in

  6. Differential binding of fibroblast growth factor-2 and -7 to basement membrane heparan sulfate: comparison of normal and abnormal human tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Friedl, A.; Chang, Z.; Tierney, A.; Rapraeger, A. C.

    1997-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) play multiple roles during development and in adult tissues as paracrine regulators of growth and differentiation. FGFs signal through transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinases, but heparan sulfate is also required for signaling by members of the FGF family. In addition, heparan sulfate may be involved in determining tissue distribution of FGFs. Using biotinylated FGF-2 and FGF-7 (KGF) as probes, we have identified specific interactions between FGFs and heparan sulfates in human tissues. Both FGF species bind to tissue mast cells and to epithelial cell membranes. Binding to basement membrane heparan sulfate is tissue source dependent and specific. Although FGF-2 strongly binds to basement membrane heparan sulfate in skin and most other tissue sites examined, FGF-7 fails to bind to basement membrane heparan sulfate in most locations. However, in subendothelial matrix in blood vessels and in the basement membrane of a papillary renal cell carcinoma, strong FGF-7 binding is seen. In summary, distinct and specific affinities of heparan sulfates for different FGFs were identified that may affect growth factor activation and local distribution. Heparan sulfate may have a gatekeeper function to either restrict or permit diffusion of heparin-binding growth factors across the basement membrane. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9094999

  7. Recombinant vascular basement-membrane-derived multifunctional peptide inhibits angiogenesis and growth of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wu, You-Hua; Cao, Jian-Guo; Xiang, Hong-Lin; Xia, Hong; Qin, Yong; Huang, A-Ji; Xiao, Di; Xu, Fang

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the anti-angiogenic and anti-tumor activities of recombinant vascular basement membrane-derived multifunctional peptide (rVBMDMP) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). METHODS: HepG2, Bel-7402, Hep-3B, HUVE-12 and L-02 cell lines were cultured in vitro and the inhibitory effect of rVBMDMP on proliferation of cells was detected by MTT assay. The in vivo antitumor efficacy of rVBMDMP on HCC was assessed by HepG2 xenografts in nude mice. Distribution of rVBMDMP, mechanism by which the growth of HepG2 xenografts is inhibited, and microvessel area were observed by proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and CD31 immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: MTT assay showed that rVBMDMP markedly inhibited the proliferation of human HCC (HepG2, Bel-7402, Hep-3B) cells and human umbilical vein endothelial (HUVE-12) cells in a dose-dependent manner, with little effect on the growth of L-02 cells. When the IC50 was 4.68, 7.65, 8.96, 11.65 and 64.82 μmol/L, respectively, the potency of rVBMDMP to HepG2 cells was similar to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) with an IC50 of 4.59 μmol/L. The selective index of cytotoxicity to HepG2 cells of rVBMDMP was 13.8 (64.82/4.68), which was higher than that of 5-FU [SI was 1.9 (8.94/4.59)]. The VEGF-targeted recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody bevacizumab (100 mg/L) did not affect the proliferation of HepG2, Bel-7402, Hep-3B and L-02 cells, but the growth inhibitory rate of bevacizumab (100 mg/L) to HUVE-12 cells was 87.6% ± 8.2%. Alternis diebus intraperitoneal injection of rVBMDMP suppressed the growth of HepG2 xenografts in a dose-dependent manner. rVBMDMP (1, 3, 10 mg/kg) decreased the tumor weight by 12.6%, 55.9% and 79.7%, respectively, compared with the vehicle control. Immunohistochemical staining of rVBMDMP showed that the positive area rates (2.2% ± 0.73%, 4.5% ± 1.3% and 11.5% ± 3.8%) in rVBMDMP treated group (1, 3, 10 mg/kg) were significantly higher than that (0.13% ± 0.04%) in the control group (P < 0.01). The positive

  8. A Novel Function for the nm23-Hl Gene: Overexpression in Human Breast Carcinoma Cells Leads to the Formation of Basement Membrane and Growth Arrest

    SciTech Connect

    Howlett, Anthony R; Petersen, Ole W; Steeg, Patricia S; Bissell, Mina J

    1994-01-01

    We have developed a culture system using reconstituted basement membrane components in which normal human mammary epithelial cells exhibit several aspects of the development and differentiation process, including formation of acinar-like structures, production and basal deposition of basement membrane components, and production and apical secretion of sialomucins. Cell lines and cultures from human breast carcinomas failed to recapitulate this process. The data indicate the importance of cellular interactions with the basement membrane in the regulation of normal breast differentiation and, potentially, its loss in neoplasia. Our purpose was to use this assay to investigate the role of the putative metastasis suppressor gene nm23-H1 in mammary development and differentiation. The metastatic human breast carcinoma cell line MDA-MB-435, clones transfected with a control pCMVBamneo vector, and clones transfected with pCMVBamneo vector containing nm23-H1 complementary DNA (the latter of which exhibited a substantial reduction in spontaneous metastatic potential in vivo) were cultured within a reconstituted basement membrane. Clones were examined for formation of acinus-like spheres, deposition of basement membrane components, production of sialomucin, polarization, and growth arrest. In contrast to the parental cell line and control transfectants, MDA-MB-435 breast carcinoma cells overexpressing Nm23-H1 protein regained several aspects of the normal phenotype within reconstituted basement membrane. Nm23-H1 protein-positive cells formed organized acinus-like spheres, deposited the basement membrane components type IV collagen and, to some extent, laminin to the outside of the spheres, expressed sialomucin, and growth arrested. Growth arrest of Nm23-H1 protein-positive cells was preceded by and correlated with formation of a basement membrane, suggesting a causal relationship. The data indicate a previously unidentified cause-and-effect relationship between nm23-H1 gene

  9. Defective muscle basement membrane and lack of M-laminin in the dystrophic dy/dy mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, H; Christmas, P; Wu, X R; Wewer, U M; Engvall, E

    1994-01-01

    M-laminin is a major member of the laminin family of basement membrane proteins. It is prominently expressed in striated muscle and peripheral nerve. M-laminin is deficient in patients with the autosomal recessive Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy but is normal in patients with the sex-linked Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies. We have examined M-laminin expression in mice with autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy caused by the mutation dy. The heavy chain of M-laminin was undetectable in skeletal muscle, heart muscle, and peripheral nerve by immunofluorescence and immunoblotting in homozygous dystrophic dy/dy mice but was normal in heterozygous and wild-type nondystrophic mice. Immunofluorescence confirmed the presence of other major basement membrane proteins in the dystrophic mice. Very low levels of M-laminin heavy chain mRNA were detected by Northern blotting of muscle and heart tissue from dy/dy mice, suggesting that M-laminin heavy-chain mRNA may be produced at very low levels or is unstable. Information about the chromosomal localization of the M heavy-chain in human and mouse suggests that a mutation in the M-chain gene causes the muscular dystrophy in dy/dy mice. The dy mouse may provide a model for autosomal muscular dystrophies in humans and facilitate studies of functions of M-laminin. Images PMID:8202529

  10. Basement membrane heparan sulfate proteoglycan (perlecan) synthesized by ACC3, adenoid cystic carcinoma cells of human salivary gland origin.

    PubMed

    Kimura, S; Cheng, J; Toyoshima, K; Oda, K; Saku, T

    1999-02-01

    The biosynthesis of basement membrane heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG), known as perlecan, in ACC3 cells established from a adenoid cystic carcinoma of the human salivary gland was studied using metabolic labeling and immunoprecipitation with discriminative antibodies specific for HSPG core protein. Treatment of immunoprecipitated HSPG with HNO2, heparitinase, and chondroitinase ABC revealed that ACC3 cells synthesized HSPG molecules composed of 470-kDa core protein and heparan sulfate but not of chondroitin sulfate. The core protein was shown to contain complex type N-linked oligosaccharides by digestion with N-glycanase and endoglycosidase H. Pulse-chase experiments showed that the mature form of HSPG was formed in the cells in 30 min and released into the medium thereafter. Degradation of HSPG was also found in the chase period of 3 h. In time course experiments, HSPG was found to be synthesized maximally at day 4 after plating, deposited in the cell layer maximally at day 6, and secreted maximally at day 8. This was also confirmed by immunofluorescence, Northern blotting, and in-situ hybridization. The results indicate that ACC3 cells synthesize, secrete and degrade basement membrane type HSPG, which is analogous to those produced by other cell types, and that the biosynthesis and secretion of HSPG in ACC3 cells are strictly regulated by the cell growth, that may be reflected in the characteristic histology of adenoid cystic carcinomas. PMID:9990141

  11. Defective muscle basement membrane and lack of M-laminin in the dystrophic dy/dy mouse.

    PubMed

    Xu, H; Christmas, P; Wu, X R; Wewer, U M; Engvall, E

    1994-06-01

    M-laminin is a major member of the laminin family of basement membrane proteins. It is prominently expressed in striated muscle and peripheral nerve. M-laminin is deficient in patients with the autosomal recessive Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy but is normal in patients with the sex-linked Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies. We have examined M-laminin expression in mice with autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy caused by the mutation dy. The heavy chain of M-laminin was undetectable in skeletal muscle, heart muscle, and peripheral nerve by immunofluorescence and immunoblotting in homozygous dystrophic dy/dy mice but was normal in heterozygous and wild-type nondystrophic mice. Immunofluorescence confirmed the presence of other major basement membrane proteins in the dystrophic mice. Very low levels of M-laminin heavy chain mRNA were detected by Northern blotting of muscle and heart tissue from dy/dy mice, suggesting that M-laminin heavy-chain mRNA may be produced at very low levels or is unstable. Information about the chromosomal localization of the M heavy-chain in human and mouse suggests that a mutation in the M-chain gene causes the muscular dystrophy in dy/dy mice. The dy mouse may provide a model for autosomal muscular dystrophies in humans and facilitate studies of functions of M-laminin.

  12. Structural analysis of the Hasan-Robat marbles as traces of folded basement in the Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadimi, Alireza

    2015-11-01

    Cherty marbles of Hasan-Robat area, northwest of Isfahan, in the Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone of Iran preserves evidences of multiple deformational events. The Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone is the inner crystalline zone of the Zagros Orogen, which has been highly deformed and exhumed during continental collision between the Arabian Plate and Central Iran. The Hasan-Robat area is an example of the exposed Precambrian-Paleozoic basement rocks that stretched along two NW-SE-trending faults and located in the inner part of the HasanRobat positive flower strcuture. The Hasan-Robat marbles record a complex shortening and shearing history. This lead to the development of disharmonic ptygmatic folds with vertical to sub-vertical axes and some interference patterns of folding that may have been created from deformations during the Pan-African Orogeny and later phases. Based on this research, tectonic evolution of the Hasan-Robat area is interpreted as the product of three major geotectonic events that have been started after Precambrian to Quaternary: (1) old deformation phases (2) contractional movements and (3) strike-slip movements. Different sets and distributions of joints, faults and folds are confirmed with effect of several deformational stages of the area and formation of the flower structure.

  13. Control of Precambrian basement deformation zones on emplacement of the Laramide Boulder batholith and Butte mining district, Montana, United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berger, Byron R.; Hildenbrand, Thomas G.; O'Neill, J. Michael

    2011-01-01

    What are the roles of deep Precambrian basement deformation zones in the localization of subsequent shallow-crustal deformation zones and magmas? The Paleoproterozoic Great Falls tectonic zone and its included Boulder batholith (Montana, United States) provide an opportunity to examine the importance of inherited deformation fabrics in batholith emplacement and the localization of magmatic-hydrothermal mineral deposits. Northeast-trending deformation fabrics predominate in the Great Falls tectonic zone, which formed during the suturing of Paleoproterozoic and Archean cratonic masses approximately 1,800 mega-annum (Ma). Subsequent Mesoproterozoic to Neoproterozoic deformation fabrics trend northwest. Following Paleozoic through Early Cretaceous sedimentation, a Late Cretaceous fold-and-thrust belt with associated strike-slip faulting developed across the region, wherein some Proterozoic faults localized thrust faulting, while others were reactivated as strike-slip faults. The 81- to 76-Ma Boulder batholith was emplaced along the reactivated central Paleoproterozoic suture in the Great Falls tectonic zone. Early-stage Boulder batholith plutons were emplaced concurrent with east-directed thrust faulting and localized primarily by northwest-trending strike-slip and related faults. The late-stage Butte Quartz Monzonite pluton was localized in a northeast-trending pull-apart structure that formed behind the active thrust front and is axially symmetric across the underlying northeast-striking Paleoproterozoic fault zone, interpreted as a crustal suture. The modeling of potential-field geophysical data indicates that pull-apart?stage magmas fed into the structure through two funnel-shaped zones beneath the batholith. Renewed magmatic activity in the southern feeder from 66 to 64 Ma led to the formation of two small porphyry-style copper-molybdenum deposits and ensuing world-class polymetallic copper- and silver-bearing veins in the Butte mining district. Vein orientations

  14. Pancreatic carcinomas deposit laminin-5, preferably adhere to laminin-5, and migrate on the newly deposited basement membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Tani, T.; Lumme, A.; Linnala, A.; Kivilaakso, E.; Kiviluoto, T.; Burgeson, R. E.; Kangas, L.; Leivo, I.; Virtanen, I.

    1997-01-01

    We studied the adhesion mechanism of pancreatic carcinoma using in vitro adhesion and migration assays of stable cell lines and tumors grown from these cell lines in nude mice. We also compared the results with the expression profiles of laminins and their receptors in pancreatic carcinomas to evaluate the relevance of these mechanisms in vivo. All of the cell lines preferably adhered to laminin-5, irrespective of their capability to synthesize laminin-5. Cell migration was studied in the presence of hepatocyte growth factor, as it increased the speed of migration manyfold. Herbimycin A treatment and antibodies against the beta 1 and alpha 3 integrin subunits and laminin alpha 3 chain almost entirely blocked cell migration of the BxPC-3 cell line, whereas migration was nearly unaffected by RGD peptide and only moderately inhibited by antibody against the alpha 6 integrin subunit. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy of wounded BxPC-3 cells suggested a rapid endocytosis of alpha 3 integrin subunit in the cells at the margin of the wound and a rapid, polarized rearrangement of the alpha 6 beta 4 integrin. Especially HGF-treated cultures showed a prominent cytoplasmic reaction for laminin-5 at the margin of the wound. Xenografted cells formed tumors that produced and deposited the same laminin chains as the in vitro cultures. Frozen sections of human pancreatic carcinomas showed reactivity for laminin chains suggestive for expression of laminin-1 and laminin-5. Both xenografted tumors and human pancreatic carcinomas also showed stromal reactivity for laminin-5. Electron microscopy of the human tumors suggested that this was due to an abundant reduplication the basement-membrane-like material around the nests of malignant cells. Our results suggest that pancreatic carcinomas synthesize and deposit laminin-5 in the basement membrane in an abnormal manner. Invading cells adhere to this newly produced basement membrane and migrate on it by using the alpha 3 beta 1

  15. A role for PDGF-C/PDGFRα signaling in the formation of the meningeal basement membranes surrounding the cerebral cortex

    PubMed Central

    Andrae, Johanna; Gouveia, Leonor; Gallini, Radiosa; He, Liqun; Fredriksson, Linda; Nilsson, Ingrid; Johansson, Bengt R.; Eriksson, Ulf; Betsholtz, Christer

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Platelet-derived growth factor-C (PDGF-C) is one of three known ligands for the tyrosine kinase receptor PDGFRα. Analysis of Pdgfc null mice has demonstrated roles for PDGF-C in palate closure and the formation of cerebral ventricles, but redundancy with other PDGFRα ligands might obscure additional functions. In search of further developmental roles for PDGF-C, we generated mice that were double mutants for Pdgfc−/− and PdgfraGFP/+. These mice display a range of severe phenotypes including spina bifida, lung emphysema, abnormal meninges and neuronal over-migration in the cerebral cortex. We focused our analysis on the central nervous system (CNS), where PDGF-C was identified as a critical factor for the formation of meninges and assembly of the glia limitans basement membrane. We also present expression data on Pdgfa, Pdgfc and Pdgfra in the cerebral cortex and microarray data on cerebral meninges. PMID:26988758

  16. Multiple recurrences of anti-glomerular basement membrane disease with variable antibody detection: can the laboratory be trusted?

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Patricia; Waheed, Sana; Boujelbane, Lamya; Maursetter, Laura J.

    2016-01-01

    Anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) disease is commonly a monophasic illness. We present the case of multiple recurrences of anti-GBM disease with varying serum anti-GBM antibody findings. A 33-year-old female tobacco user presenting with hematuria was diagnosed with anti-GBM disease by renal biopsy. Five years later, she presented with alveolar hemorrhage and positive anti-GBM antibody. She presented a third time with alveolar hemorrhage but undetectable anti-GBM antibody. With each occurrence, symptoms resolved with plasmapheresis, intravenous methylprednisone and oral cyclophosphamide. The relationship between anti-GBM antibody findings and disease presentation is complex. Clinicians should be aware of the possibility of seronegative anti-GBM disease. PMID:27679710

  17. Frequently relapsing anti-glomerular basement membrane antibody disease with changing clinical phenotype and antibody characteristics over time.

    PubMed

    Gu, Bobby; Magil, Alex B; Barbour, Sean J

    2016-10-01

    Anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) antibody disease is a typically monophasic autoimmune disease with severe pulmonary and renal involvement. We report an atypical case of frequently relapsing anti-GBM antibody disease with both anti-GBM antibody-positive flares with pulmonary and renal involvement, and anti-GBM antibody-negative flares that were pulmonary limited with no histologic renal disease. This is the first report of alternating disease phenotype and anti-GBM antibody status over time. Disease severity paralleled the detection of anti-GBM antibodies but was independent of IgG subtype staining along the GBM. This case suggests a role for changing subpopulations of pathogenic antibodies as an explanation for variation in disease phenotype and anti-GBM antibody results. PMID:27679711

  18. Multiple recurrences of anti-glomerular basement membrane disease with variable antibody detection: can the laboratory be trusted?

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Patricia; Waheed, Sana; Boujelbane, Lamya; Maursetter, Laura J.

    2016-01-01

    Anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) disease is commonly a monophasic illness. We present the case of multiple recurrences of anti-GBM disease with varying serum anti-GBM antibody findings. A 33-year-old female tobacco user presenting with hematuria was diagnosed with anti-GBM disease by renal biopsy. Five years later, she presented with alveolar hemorrhage and positive anti-GBM antibody. She presented a third time with alveolar hemorrhage but undetectable anti-GBM antibody. With each occurrence, symptoms resolved with plasmapheresis, intravenous methylprednisone and oral cyclophosphamide. The relationship between anti-GBM antibody findings and disease presentation is complex. Clinicians should be aware of the possibility of seronegative anti-GBM disease.

  19. The HPV16 and MusPV1 papillomaviruses initially interact with distinct host components on the basement membrane.

    PubMed

    Day, Patricia M; Thompson, Cynthia D; Lowy, Douglas R; Schiller, John T

    2015-07-01

    To understand and compare the mechanisms of murine and human PV infection, we examined pseudovirion binding and infection of the newly described MusPV1 using the murine cervicovaginal challenge model. These analyses revealed primary tissue interactions distinct from those previously described for HPV16. Unlike HPV16, MusPV1 bound basement membrane (BM) in an HSPG-independent manner. Nevertheless, subsequent HSPG interactions were critical. L2 antibodies or low doses of VLP antibodies, sufficient to prevent infection, did not lead to disassociation of the MusPV1 pseudovirions from the BM, in contrast to previous findings with HPV16. Similarly, furin inhibition did not lead to loss of MusPV1 from the BM. Therefore, phylogenetically distant PV types differ in their initial interactions with host attachment factors, but initiate their lifecycle on the acellular BM. Despite these differences, these distantly related PV types displayed similar intracellular trafficking patterns and susceptibilities to biochemical inhibition of infection.

  20. Creatinine clearance, urinary excretion of glomerular basement membrane antigens and renal histology in congenital nephrotic syndrome of Finnish type.

    PubMed

    Huttunen, N P

    1977-04-01

    The endogenous creatinine clearance and urinary excretion rate of glomerular basement membrane (GBM) antigens were followed from 2 to 19 months in fifteen patients with congenital nephrotic syndrome (CNF). The quantitative examination of renal morphology was made on fourteen of these patients. Creatinine clearance increased during the first few months of life and thereafter gradually decreased. The urinary excretion rate of GBM antigens rose during the course of the disease. The creatinine clearance did not correlate significantly with glomerular fibrosis but it did correlate with tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis. The urinary excretion of GBM antigens correlated significantly with glomerular and interstitial fibrosis and with tubular atrophy. It is concluded that there is a clear progress in the disease and the renal histological changes probably are caused by accumulation of GBM material in glomeruli.

  1. Frequently relapsing anti-glomerular basement membrane antibody disease with changing clinical phenotype and antibody characteristics over time

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Bobby; Magil, Alex B.; Barbour, Sean J.

    2016-01-01

    Anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) antibody disease is a typically monophasic autoimmune disease with severe pulmonary and renal involvement. We report an atypical case of frequently relapsing anti-GBM antibody disease with both anti-GBM antibody–positive flares with pulmonary and renal involvement, and anti-GBM antibody–negative flares that were pulmonary limited with no histologic renal disease. This is the first report of alternating disease phenotype and anti-GBM antibody status over time. Disease severity paralleled the detection of anti-GBM antibodies but was independent of IgG subtype staining along the GBM. This case suggests a role for changing subpopulations of pathogenic antibodies as an explanation for variation in disease phenotype and anti-GBM antibody results.

  2. (/sup 3/H)glucosamine and (/sup 3/H)proline radioautography of embryonic mouse dental basement membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Osman, M.; Ruch, J.V.

    1981-01-01

    (/sup 3/H)proline and (/sup 3/H)glucosamine radioautography was performed to analyze the labeling pattern of mouse embryonic dental basement membrane before and during odontoblast terminal differentiation. Sixteen- and eighteen-day-old first lower molars and trypsin-isolated enamel organs, as well as EDTA-isolated dental papillae, were used. Continuous labeling for 12 to 24 hr was required with (/sup 3/H)proline to obtain a clear labeling of epithelial-mesenchymal junction in intact tooth germs or accumulation of surface label in trypsin-isolated enamel organs. With (/sup 3/H)glucosamine, after 6-hr labeling, the epithelial-mesenchymal junction was heavily labeled and the trypsin-isolated enamel organs accumulated substantial amounts of surface label, corresponding to the redeposited basement membrane. At Day 16 stage, these labels always had a uniform distribution and decreased during chase without any redistribution. At Day 18 stage, when the terminal differentiation of odontoblasts occurred the label accumulated in a unique pattern: much more label was at the epithelial surface corresponding to the top of the cusps than in the apical parts. During chase and only in intact tooth germs epithelial surfaces which had labeled poorly during pulse became labeled, but those labeling heavily during pulse lost label. This pattern existed only in the presence of mesenchyme. EDTA treatment of (/sup 3/H)glucosamine-labeled teeth enabled us to obtain isolated dental papillae with surface label. Distribution of this label was exactly the same as that for the epithelial-mesenchymal junction of intact teeth. During chase, these dental papillae completely lost the surface label. The mesenchyme seen to control the synthesis and/or the degradation of epithelially derived (/sup 3/H)glucosamine-labeled material.

  3. Statin Attenuates Experimental Anti-Glomerular Basement Membrane Glomerulonephritis Together with the Augmentation of Alternatively Activated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Emiko; Shimizu, Akira; Masuda, Yukinari; Kuwahara, Naomi; Arai, Takashi; Nagasaka, Shinya; Aki, Kaoru; Mii, Akiko; Natori, Yasuhiro; Iino, Yasuhiko; Katayama, Yasuo; Fukuda, Yuh

    2010-01-01

    Macrophages are heterogeneous and include classically activated M1 and alternatively activated M2 macrophages, characterized by pro- and anti-inflammatory functions, respectively. Macrophages that express heme oxygenase-1 also exhibit anti-inflammatory effects. We assessed the anti-inflammatory effects of statin in experimental anti-glomerular basement membrane glomerulonephritis and in vitro, focusing on the macrophage heterogeneity. Rats were induced anti-glomerular basement membrane glomerulonephritis and treated with atorvastatin (20 mg/kg/day) or vehicle (control). Control rats showed infiltration of macrophages in the glomeruli at day 3 and developed crescentic glomerulonephritis by day 7, together with increased mRNA levels of the M1 macrophage-associated cytokines, interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interleukin-12. In contrast, statin reduced the level of proteinuria, reduced infiltration of macrophages in glomeruli with suppression of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 expression, and inhibited the formation of necrotizing and crescentic lesions. The number of glomerular ED3-positive macrophages decreased with down-regulation of M1 macrophage-associated cytokines. Furthermore, statin augmented ED2-positive M2 macrophages with up-regulation of the M2 macrophage-associated chemokines and cytokines, chemokine (C-C motif) Iigand-17 and interleukin-10. Statin also increased the glomerular interleukin-10-expressing heme oxygenase-1-positive macrophages. Statin inhibited macrophage development, and suppressed ED3-positive macrophages, but augmented ED2-positive macrophages in M2-associated cytokine environment in vitro. We conclude that the anti-inflammatory effects of statin in glomerulonephritis are mediated through inhibition of macrophage infiltration as well as augmentation of anti-inflammatory macrophages. PMID:20696778

  4. Histones have high affinity for the glomerular basement membrane. Relevance for immune complex formation in lupus nephritis

    SciTech Connect

    Schmiedeke, T.M.; Stoeckl, F.W.W.; Weber, R.; Sugisaki, Y.; Batsford, S.R.; Vogt, A.

    1989-06-01

    An effort has been made to integrate insights on charge-based interactions in immune complex glomerulonephritis with nuclear antigen involvement in lupus nephritis. Attention was focussed on the histones, a group of highly cationic nuclear constituents, which could be expected to bind to fixed anionic sites present in the glomerular basement membrane (GBM). We demonstrated that all histone subfractions, prepared according to Johns, have a high affinity for GBM and the basement membrane of peritubular capillaries. Tissue uptake of /sup 125/I-labeled histones was measured by injecting 200 micrograms of each fraction into the left kidney via the aorta and measuring organ uptake after 15 min. In glomeruli isolated from the left kidneys, the following quantities of histones were found: f1, 13 micrograms; f2a (f2al + f2a2), 17 micrograms; f2b, 17 micrograms; and f3, 32 micrograms. Kinetic studies of glomerular binding showed that f1 disappeared much more rapidly than f2a. The high affinity of histones (pI between 10.5 and 11.0; mol wt 10,000-22,000) for the GBM correlates well with their ability to form aggregates (mol wt greater than 100,000) for comparison lysozyme (pI 11, mol wt 14,000), which does not aggregate spontaneously bound poorly (0.4 micrograms in isolated glomeruli). The quantity of histones and lysozyme found in the isolated glomeruli paralleled their in vitro affinity for a Heparin-Sepharose column (gradient elution studies). This gel matrix contains the sulfated, highly anionic polysaccharide heparin, which is similar to the negatively charged heparan sulfate present in the GBM. Lysozyme eluted with 0.15 M NaCl, f1 with 1 M NaCl, and f2a, f2b, and f3 could not be fully desorbed even with 2 M NaCl; 6 M guanidine-HCl was necessary.

  5. Assessment of a Basement Membrane-Degrading Protease on Dissemination and Secondary Infection of Autographa californica Multiple Nucleopolyhedrovirus in Heliothis virescens L.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ScathL is a cathepsin L-like cysteine protease from the flesh fly, Sarcophaga peregrina, that digests components of the basement membrane during insect metamorphosis. A recombinant baculovirus that expresses ScathL (AcMLF9.ScathL) kills larvae of the tobacco budworm, Heliothis virescens, significant...

  6. Merosin, a protein specific for basement membranes of Schwann cells, striated muscle, and trophoblast, is expressed late in nerve and muscle development.

    PubMed Central

    Leivo, I; Engvall, E

    1988-01-01

    We have identified a tissue-specific basement membrane-associated protein by using monoclonal antibodies prepared against a protein fraction of human placenta. In immunofluorescence, the monoclonal antibodies stained basement membranes of Schwann cells, striated muscle, and trophoblast, whereas no reaction was seen with any other basement membrane or tissue structure. In antibody-affinity chromatography of proteolytic digests of human placenta, a 65-kDa polypeptide was bound by these monoclonal antibodies. Rabbit antisera and monoclonal antibodies raised against the isolated 65-kDa polypeptide stained human and monkey tissues identically to the original monoclonal antibodies and reacted with an 80-kDa polypeptide in tissue extracts prepared without proteolysis. The 65-kDa and 80-kDa polypeptides were shown to be immunologically distinct from laminin, type IV collagen, fibronectin, and major serum proteins. They presumably represent a novel basement membrane-associated protein, which we have named merosin. No merosin immunoreactivity could be detected in cultures of any of 28 established cell lines. In developing mouse tissues, merosin staining first appeared at the newborn stage. The restricted tissue distribution and late developmental appearance of merosin suggest that the protein has a tissue-specific function associated with a high level of differentiation. Images PMID:3278318

  7. The basement membrane and the sex establishment in the juvenile hermaphroditism during gonadal differentiation of the Gymnocorymbus ternetzi (Teleostei: Characiformes: Characidae).

    PubMed

    Mazzoni, Talita Sarah; Grier, Harry J; Quagio-Grassiotto, Irani

    2015-12-01

    Although there are several studies on morphogenesis in Teleostei, until now there is no research describing the role of the basement membrane in the establishment of the germinal epithelium during gonadal differentiation in Characiformes. In attempt to study these events that result in the formation of ovarian and testicular structures, gonads of Gymnocorymbus ternetzi were prepared for light microscopy. During gonadal development in G. ternetzi, all individuals first developed ovarian tissue. The undifferentiated gonad was formed by somatic cells (SC) and primordial germ cells (PGCs). After successive mitosis, the PGCs became oogonia, which entered into meiosis originating oocytes. An interstitial tissue developed. In half of the individuals, presumptive female, prefollicle cells synthesized a basement membrane around oocyte forming a follicle. Along the ventral region of the ovary, the tissue invaginated to form the ovigerous lamellae, bordered by the germinal epithelium. Stroma developed and the follicle complexes were formed. The gonadal aromatase was detected in interstitial cells in the early steps of the gonadal differentiation in both sexes. In another half of the individuals, presumptive male, there was no synthesis of basement membrane. The interstitium was invaded by numerous granulocytes. Pre-Leydig cells proliferated. Apoptotic oocytes were observed and afterward degenerated. Spermatogonia appeared near the degenerating oocytes and associated to SCs, forming testicular tubules. Germinal epithelium developed and the basement membrane was synthesized. Concomitantly, there was decrease of the gonadal aromatase and increase in the 3β-HSD enzyme expression. Thus, the testis was organized on an ovary previously developed, constituting an indirect gonochoristic differentiation.

  8. High matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression induces angiogenesis and basement membrane degradation in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats after cerebral infarction

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Huilian; Zhang, Guanjun; Wang, Hongyan; Gong, Huilin; Wang, Chunbao; Zhang, Xuebin

    2014-01-01

    Basement membrane degradation and blood-brain barrier damage appear after cerebral infarction, severely impacting neuronal and brain functioning; however, the underlying pathogenetic mechanisms remain poorly understood. In this study, we induced cerebral infarction in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats by intragastric administration of high-sodium water (1.3% NaCl) for 7 consecutive weeks. Immunohistochemical and immunofluorescence assays demonstrated that, compared with the non-infarcted contralateral hemisphere, stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats on normal sodium intake and Wistar-Kyoto rats, matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression, the number of blood vessels with discontinuous collagen IV expression and microvessel density were significantly higher, and the number of continuous collagen IV-positive blood vessels was lower in the infarct border zones of stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats given high-sodium water. Linear correlation analysis showed matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression was positively correlated with the number of discontinuously collagen IV-labeled blood vessels and microvessel density in cerebral infarcts of stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats. These results suggest that matrix metalloproteinase-9 upregulation is associated with increased regional angiogenesis and degradation of collagen IV, the major component of the basal lamina, in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats with high-sodium water-induced focal cerebral infarction. PMID:25206775

  9. Proteomic analysis of urinary exosomes from patients of early IgA nephropathy and thin basement membrane nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Moon, Pyong-Gon; Lee, Jeong-Eun; You, Sungyong; Kim, Taek-Kyun; Cho, Ji-Hoon; Kim, In-San; Kwon, Tae-Hwan; Kim, Chan-Duck; Park, Sun-Hee; Hwang, Daehee; Kim, Yong-Lim; Baek, Moon-Chang

    2011-06-01

    To identify biomarker candidates associated with early IgA nephropathy (IgAN) and thin basement membrane nephropathy (TBMN), the most common causes presenting isolated hematuria in childhood, a proteomic approach of urinary exosomes from early IgAN and TBMN patients was introduced. The proteomic results from the patients were compared with a normal group to understand the pathophysiological processes associated with these diseases at the protein level. The urinary exosomes, which reflect pathophysiological processes, collected from three groups of young adults (early IgAN, TBMN, and normal) were trypsin-digested using a gel-assisted protocol, and quantified by label-free LC-MS/MS, using an MS(E) mode. A total of 1877 urinary exosome proteins, including cytoplasmic, membrane, and vesicle trafficking proteins, were identified. Among the differentially expressed proteins, four proteins (aminopeptidase N, vasorin precursor, α-1-antitrypsin, and ceruloplasmin) were selected as biomarker candidates to differentiate early IgAN from TBMN. We confirmed the protein levels of the four biomarker candidates by semi-quantitative immunoblot analysis in urinary exosomes independently prepared from other patients, including older adult groups. Further clinical studies are needed to investigate the diagnostic and prognostic value of these urinary markers for early IgAN and TBMN. Taken together, this study showed the possibility of identifying biomarker candidates for human urinary diseases using urinary exosomes and might help to understand the pathophysiology of early IgAN and TBMN at the protein level.

  10. Biochemical and biophysical changes underlie the mechanisms of basement membrane disruptions in a mouse model of dystroglycanopathy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Yang, Yuan; Candiello, Joseph; Thorn, Trista L.; Gray, Noel; Halfter, Willi M.; Hu, Huaiyu

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in glycosyltransferases, such as protein O-mannose N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase 1 (POMGnT1), causes disruptions of basement membranes (BMs) that results in neuronal ectopias and muscular dystrophy. While the mutations diminish dystroglycan-mediated cell-ECM interactions, the cause and mechanism of BM disruptions remain unclear. In this study, we established an in vitro model to measure BM assembly on the surface of neural stem cells. Compared to control cells, the rate of BM assembly on POMGnT1 knockout neural stem cells was significantly reduced. Further, immunofluorescence staining and quantitative proteomic analysis of the inner limiting membrane (ILM), a BM of the retina, revealed that laminin-111 and nidogen-1 were reduced in POMGnT1 knockout mice. Finally, atomic force microscopy showed that the ILM from POMGnT1 knockout mice was thinner with an altered surface topography. The results combined demonstrate that reduced levels of key BM components cause physical changes that weaken the BM in POMGnT1 knockout mice. These changes are caused by a reduced rate of BM assembly during the developmental expansion of the neural tissue. PMID:23454088

  11. Goodpasture's disease in the absence of circulating anti-glomerular basement membrane antibodies as detected by standard techniques.

    PubMed

    Salama, Alan D; Dougan, Tammy; Levy, Jeremy B; Cook, H Terry; Morgan, Steve H; Naudeer, Sarah; Maidment, Geoff; George, Andrew J T; Evans, David; Lightstone, Liz; Pusey, Charles D

    2002-06-01

    Goodpasture's disease is characterized by rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis, often accompanied by pulmonary hemorrhage, in association with deposition of antibodies in a linear pattern on the glomerular basement membrane (GBM). The diagnosis of Goodpasture's disease in patients with acute renal failure often relies on the use of immunoassays to detect circulating anti-GBM antibodies in serum samples. We describe three cases of Goodpasture's disease in which no circulating anti-GBM antibodies were detectable in serum by well-established enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay or Western blotting techniques. The diagnosis of Goodpasture's disease was confirmed by renal biopsy, with linear deposition of immunoglobulin along the GBM and crescentic glomerulonephritis. In addition, an alternative method of antibody detection using a highly sensitive biosensor system confirmed that circulating antibodies were present in sera from both patients tested. Because this technique is not routinely available for the detection of anti-GBM antibodies, we suggest that diagnosis always be confirmed with a renal biopsy, and despite negative serological test results using immunoassay, the diagnosis of Goodpasture's disease should still be considered in the correct clinical context. PMID:12046026

  12. Complement and Humoral Adaptive Immunity in the Human Choroid Plexus: Roles for Stromal Concretions, Basement Membranes, and Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Laule, Cornelia; Leung, Esther; Pavlova, Vladimira; Morgan, B. Paul; Esiri, Margaret M.

    2016-01-01

    The choroid plexus (CP) provides a barrier to entry of toxic molecules from the blood into the brain and transports vital molecules into the cerebrospinal fluid. While a great deal is known about CP physiology, relatively little is known about its immunology. Here, we show immunohistochemical data that help define the role of the CP in innate and adaptive humoral immunity. The results show that complement, in the form of C1q, C3d, C9, or C9neo, is preferentially deposited in stromal concretions. In contrast, immunoglobulin (Ig) G (IgG) and IgA are more often found in CP epithelial cells, and IgM is found in either locale. C4d, IgD, and IgE are rarely, if ever, seen in the CP. In multiple sclerosis CP, basement membrane C9 or stromal IgA patterns were common but were not specific for the disease. These findings indicate that the CP may orchestrate the clearance of complement, particularly by deposition in its concretions, IgA and IgG preferentially via its epithelium, and IgM by either mechanism. PMID:26994633

  13. Characteristic matrix and tubular basement membrane abnormalities in the CBA/Ca-kdkd mouse model of hereditary tubulointerstitial disease.

    PubMed

    Sibalic, V; Sun, L; Sibalic, A; Oertli, B; Ritthaler, T; Wüthrich, R P

    1998-11-01

    CBA/CaH-kdkd mice develop hereditary tubulointerstitial disease with mononuclear cell infiltration and cyst formation, possibly representing a model of human nephronophthisis. The purpose of the present investigation was to examine the components of the fibrotic changes which typically develop in the kidneys of these mice. By conventional histology, kdkd mice displayed progressive interstitial fibroblast and matrix accumulation. Immunohistological analysis of kdkd kidneys showed marked deposition of fibronectin in the tubulointerstitial space and revealed prominent irregularities for laminin and collagen type IV in the tubular basement membrane (TBM), including thickening, widening and folding. Electron microscopy confirmed the TBM abnormalities and showed marked undulation and thickening in areas of proximal tubular (PT) degeneration. Immunofluorescence staining analysis for the fibronectin receptors VLA-4 and VLA-5 showed no expression on injured proximal tubules, whereas the expression of the laminin receptor VLA-6 was increased and irregular on altered PT. Analysis of RNA derived from kdkd kidneys revealed marked upregulation of steady-state mRNA levels for the fibrogenic growth factor TGF-beta. We conclude that TBM alterations, matrix accumulation and changes in integrin expression together with enhanced TGF-beta production are typical features of kdkd tubulointerstitial disease and suggest that characteristic TBM or matrix alterations could contribute to the pathogenesis of the disease in these mice.

  14. Cleavage of human fibronectin and other basement membrane-associated proteins by a Cryptococcus neoformans serine proteinase.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Marcio L; dos Reis, Flavia C G; Puccia, Rosana; Travassos, Luiz R; Alviano, Celuta S

    2003-02-01

    The interaction between the fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans and human fibronectin (HFN) was examined in this study. Polypeptides from cryptococcal whole homogenates and cell wall with molecular masses of 25 and 35 kDa, respectively reacted with HFN. The relevance of the occurrence of these proteins in intact cells was uncertain, since yeast cells from different strains and serotypes of C. neoformans did not significantly adhere to soluble or solid-phased HFN. In contrast, an exocellular proteolytic activity that cleaves HFN was suggested. Degradation of HFN by culture supernatant fluids was demonstrated by Western blotting using a monoclonal anti-HFN antibody. Several fragments of lower molecular weights were observed which reacted with the antibody. Proteolysis was mediated by a serine protease activity, since HFN cleavage was completely inhibited by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), aprotinin, and N-tosyl-L-phenylalanyl chloromethylketone (TPCK), but not by inhibitors of metalo, cysteine, or aspartyl proteases. Similar results were obtained when the fluorogenic peptide carbobenzoxy-phenylalanyl-arginyl-7-amido-4-methylcoumarin (CBZ-Phe-Arg-NHmet-C) was used as substrate. The cryptococcal supernatant also cleaved laminin and type IV collagen, as demonstrated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with co-polymerized proteins. The hydrolysis of these proteins was mediated by a single cryptococcal protease with a molecular mass of 75 kDa. The cleavage of key host components of the basement membrane and extracellular matrix by C. neoformans may be a relevant factor in the process of fungal invasion.

  15. Polarized deposition of basement membrane proteins depends on Phosphatidylinositol synthase and the levels of Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate.

    PubMed

    Devergne, Olivier; Tsung, Karen; Barcelo, Gail; Schüpbach, Trudi

    2014-05-27

    The basement membrane (BM), a specialized sheet of the extracellular matrix contacting the basal side of epithelial tissues, plays an important role in the control of the polarized structure of epithelial cells. However, little is known about how BM proteins themselves achieve a polarized distribution. Here, we identify phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) as a critical regulator of the polarized secretion of BM proteins. A decrease of PIP2 levels, in particular through mutations in Phosphatidylinositol synthase (Pis) and other members of the phosphoinositide pathway, leads to the aberrant accumulation of BM components at the apical side of the cell without primarily affecting the distribution of apical and basolateral polarity proteins. In addition, PIP2 controls the apical and lateral localization of Crag (Calmodulin-binding protein related to a Rab3 GDP/GTP exchange protein), a factor specifically required to prevent aberrant apical secretion of BM. We propose that PIP2, through the control of Crag's subcellular localization, restricts the secretion of BM proteins to the basal side.

  16. Suppression of Apoptosis by Basement Membrane Requires three-dimensional Tissue Organization and Withdrawal from the Cell Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Boudreau, N.; Werb, Z.; Bissell, M.J.

    1995-12-28

    The basement membrane (BM) extracellular matrix induces differentiation and suppresses apoptosis in mammary epithelial cells, whereas cells lacking BM lose their differentiated phenotype and undergo apoptosis. Addition of purified BM components, which are known to induce {beta}-casein expression, did not prevent apoptosis, indicating that a more complex BM was necessary. A comparison of culture conditions where apoptosis would or would not occur allowed us to relate inhibition of apoptosis to a complete withdrawal from the cell cycle, which was observed only when cells acquired a three-dimensional alveolar structure in response to BM. In the absence of this morphology, both the G1 cyclin kinase inhibitor p21/WAF-I and positive proliferative signals including c-myc and cyclin Dl were expressed and the retinoblastoma protein (Rb) continued to be hyperphosphorylated. When we overexpressed either c-myc in quiescent cells or p21 when cells were still cycling, apoptosis was induced. In the absence of three-dimensional alveolar structures, mammary epithelial cells secrete a number of factors including transforming growth factor a and tenascin, which when added exogenously to quiescent cells induced expression of c-myc and interleukin-{beta}1-converting enzyme (ICE) mRNA and led to apoptosis. These experiments demonstrate that a correct tissue architecture is crucial for long-range homeostasis, suppression of apoptosis, and maintenance of differentiated phenotype.

  17. Basement-membrane heparan sulphate with high affinity for antithrombin synthesized by normal and transformed mouse mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Pejler, G; David, G

    1987-01-01

    Basement-membrane proteoglycans, biosynthetically labelled with [35S]sulphate, were isolated from normal and transformed mouse mammary epithelial cells. Proteoglycans synthesized by normal cells contained mainly heparan sulphate and, in addition, small amounts of chondroitin sulphate chains, whereas transformed cells synthesized a relatively higher proportion of chondroitin sulphate. Polysaccharide chains from transformed cells were of lower average Mr and of lower anionic charge density compared with chains isolated from the untransformed counterparts, confirming results reported previously [David & Van den Berghe (1983) J. Biol. Chem. 258, 7338-7344]. A large proportion of the chains isolated from normal cells bound with high affinity to immobilized antithrombin, and the presence of 3-O-sulphated glucosamine residues, previously identified as unique markers for the antithrombin-binding region of heparin [Lindahl, Bäckström, Thunberg & Leder (1980) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 77, 6551-6555], could be demonstrated. A significantly lower proportion of the chains derived from transformed cells bound with high affinity to antithrombin, and a corresponding decrease in the amount of incorporated 3-O-sulphate was observed. PMID:2963617

  18. The HPV16 and MusPV1 papillomaviruses initially interact with distinct host components on the basement membrane

    PubMed Central

    Day, Patricia M.; Thompson, Cynthia D.; Lowy, Douglas R.; Schiller, John T.

    2015-01-01

    To understand and compare the mechanisms of murine and human PV infection, we examined pseudovirion binding and infection of the newly described MusPV1 using the murine cervicovaginal challenge model. These analyses revealed primary tissue interactions distinct from those previously described for HPV16. Unlike HPV16, MusPV1 bound basement membrane (BM) in an HSPG-independent manner. Nevertheless, subsequent HSPG interactions were critical. L2 antibodies or low doses of VLP antibodies, sufficient to prevent infection, did not lead to disassociation of the MusPV1 pseudovirions from the BM, in contrast to previous findings with HPV16. Similarly, furin inhibition did not lead to loss of MusPV1 from the BM. Therefore, phylogenetically distant PV types that differ in their initial interactions with host attachment factors, but initiate their lifecycle on the acellular BM. Despite these differences, these distantly related PV types displayed similar intracellular trafficking patterns and susceptibilities to biochemical inhibition of infection. PMID:25771496

  19. Reorganization of endothelial cord-like structures on basement membrane complex (Matrigel): involvement of transforming growth factor beta 1.

    PubMed

    Kuzuya, M; Kinsella, J L

    1994-11-01

    The formation of capillary-like network structures by cultured vascular endothelial cells on reconstituted basement membrane matrix, Matrigel, models endothelial cell differentiation, the final step of angiogenesis (Kubota et al., 1988; Grant et al., 1989). When endothelial cells derived from bovine aorta and brain capillaries were plated on Matrigel, DNA synthesis was suppressed and a network of capillary-like structures rapidly formed in 8-12 h. With time, the network broke down, resulting in dense cellular cords radiating from multiple cellular clusters in 16-24 h. Finally, multicellular aggregates of cells were formed as the network underwent further retraction. Network regression was prevented when either dithiothreitol (DTT) or anti-TGF-beta 1 antibodies were added during the assay. The addition of exogenous TGF-beta 1 promoted the regression of endothelial cells into the clusters. This response to TGF-beta 1 was blocked by potent serine threonine protein kinase inhibitors, H-7 and HA100. TGF-beta 1 was released from polymerized Matrigel by incubation with Dulbecco's modified eagle's medium (DMEM) in the absence of cells. The Matrigel-conditioned DMEM inhibited endothelial DNA synthesis even in the presence of anti-TGF-beta 1 antibodies. These results suggest that TGF-beta 1 and possibly other soluble factors from Matrigel may be important for differentiation and remodeling of endothelial cells in a capillary network with possible implications for wound healing and development.

  20. Reinforcement of epithelial cell adhesion to basement membrane by a bacterial pathogen as a new infectious stratagem.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minsoo; Ogawa, Michinaga; Mimuro, Hitomi; Sasakawa, Chihiro

    2010-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium undergoes a rapid turnover in addition to rapid exfoliation in response to bacterial infection, thus acting as an intrinsic defense against microbial intruders. It has long been questioned how mucosal pathogens can circumvent the intestinal defense systems. Our recent discovery of a bacterial ploy used by Shigella provided us with fresh insight. Shigella delivers OspE via the type III secretion system during multiplication within epithelial cells. This effector protein reinforces epithelial adherence to the basement membrane by interacting with integrin-linked kinase (ILK), a unique intracellular Ser/Thr kinase that links the cell-adhesion receptors, integrin, and growth factors to the actin cytoskeleton. The interaction between OspE and ILK increased formation of focal adhesions (FAs) and surface levels of b1-integrin, while suppressing phosphorylation of FAK and paxillin, thus suppressing rapid turnover of FAs, reducing cell motility and promoting cell adhesion to extracellular matrix. The impact of this OspE-ILK interplay was demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo by infecting polarized epithelial cell monolayers and guinea pig colons with Shigella possessing or lacking the ospE gene. The findings thus establish a new class of virulence-associated factors, and provide new insight into the functioning of the intestinal barrier and bacterial strategies for circumventing it. PMID:21178415

  1. Skin Basement Membrane: The Foundation of Epidermal Integrity—BM Functions and Diverse Roles of Bridging Molecules Nidogen and Perlecan

    PubMed Central

    Koxholt, Isabell; Thiemann, Kathrin; Nischt, Roswitha

    2013-01-01

    The epidermis functions in skin as first defense line or barrier against environmental impacts, resting on extracellular matrix (ECM) of the dermis underneath. Both compartments are connected by the basement membrane (BM), composed of a set of distinct glycoproteins and proteoglycans. Herein we are reviewing molecular aspects of BM structure, composition, and function regarding not only (i) the dermoepidermal interface but also (ii) the resident microvasculature, primarily focusing on the per se nonscaffold forming components perlecan and nidogen-1 and nidogen-2. Depletion or functional deficiencies of any BM component are lethal at some stage of development or around birth, though BM defects vary between organs and tissues. Lethality problems were overcome by developmental stage- and skin-specific gene targeting or by cell grafting and organotypic (3D) cocultures of normal or defective cells, which allows recapitulating BM formation de novo. Thus, evidence is accumulating that BM assembly and turnover rely on mechanical properties and composition of the adjacent ECM and the dynamics of molecular assembly, including further “minor” local components, nidogens largely functioning as catalysts or molecular adaptors and perlecan as bridging stabilizer. Collectively, orchestration of BM assembly, remodeling, and the role of individual players herein are determined by the developmental, tissue-specific, or functional context. PMID:23586018

  2. Trans-basement membrane migration of eosinophils induced by LPS-stimulated neutrophils from human peripheral blood in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Nishihara, Fuyumi; Kobayashi, Takehito; Noguchi, Toru; Araki, Ryuichiro; Uchida, Yoshitaka; Soma, Tomoyuki; Nagata, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    In the airways of severe asthmatics, an increase of neutrophils and eosinophils is often observed despite high-dose corticosteroid therapy. We previously reported that interleukin-8-stimulated neutrophils induced trans-basement membrane migration (TBM) of eosinophils, suggesting the link between neutrophils and eosinophils. Concentrations of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the airway increase in severe asthma. As neutrophils express Toll-like receptor (TLR)4 and can release chemoattractants for eosinophils, we investigated whether LPS-stimulated neutrophils modify eosinophil TBM. Neutrophils and eosinophils were isolated from peripheral blood of healthy volunteers and severe asthmatics. Eosinophil TBM was examined using a modified Boyden's chamber technique. Eosinophils were added to the upper compartment, and neutrophils and LPS were added to the lower compartment. Migrated eosinophils were measured by eosinophil peroxidase assays. LPS-stimulated neutrophils induced eosinophil TBM (about 10-fold increase), although LPS or neutrophils alone did not. A leukotriene B4 receptor antagonist, a platelet-activating factor receptor antagonist or an anti-TLR4 antibody decreased eosinophil TBM enhanced by LPS-stimulated neutrophils by almost half. Neutrophils from severe asthmatics induced eosinophil TBM and lower concentrations of LPS augmented neutrophil-induced eosinophil TBM. These results suggest that the combination of neutrophils and LPS leads eosinophils to accumulate in the airways, possibly involved the pathogenesis of severe asthma. PMID:27730145

  3. Abnormalities in the basement membrane structure promote basal keratinocytes in the epidermis of hypertrophic scars to adopt a proliferative phenotype.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shaowei; Sun, Yexiao; Geng, Zhijun; Ma, Kui; Sun, Xiaoyan; Fu, Xiaobing

    2016-05-01

    The majority of studies on scar formation have mainly focused on the dermis and little is known of the involvement of the epidermis. Previous research has demonstrated that the scar tissue-derived keratinocytes are different from normal cells at both the genetic and cell biological levels; however, the mechanisms responsible for the fundamental abnormalities in keratinocytes during scar development remain elusive. For this purpose, in this study, we used normal, wound edge and hypertrophic scar tissue to examine the morphological changes which occur during epidermal regeneration as part of the wound healing process and found that the histological structure of hypertrophic scar tissues differed from that of normal skin, with a significant increase in epidermal thickness. Notably, staining of the basement membrane (BM) appeared to be absent in the scar tissues. Moreover, immunofluorescence staining for cytokeratin (CK)10, CK14, CK5, CK19 and integrin-β1 indicated the differential expression of cell markers in the epidermal keratinocytes among the normal, wound edge and hypertrophic scar tissues, which corresponded with the altered BM structures. By using a panel of proteins associated with BM components, we validated our hypothesis that the BM plays a significant role in regulating the cell fate decision of epidermal keratinocytes during skin wound healing. Alterations in the structure of the BM promote basal keratinocytes to adopt a proliferative phenotype both in vivo and in vitro.

  4. Complement and Humoral Adaptive Immunity in the Human Choroid Plexus: Roles for Stromal Concretions, Basement Membranes, and Epithelium.

    PubMed

    Moore, G R Wayne; Laule, Cornelia; Leung, Esther; Pavlova, Vladimira; Morgan, B Paul; Esiri, Margaret M

    2016-05-01

    The choroid plexus (CP) provides a barrier to entry of toxic molecules from the blood into the brain and transports vital molecules into the cerebrospinal fluid. While a great deal is known about CP physiology, relatively little is known about its immunology. Here, we show immunohistochemical data that help define the role of the CP in innate and adaptive humoral immunity. The results show that complement, in the form of C1q, C3d, C9, or C9neo, is preferentially deposited in stromal concretions. In contrast, immunoglobulin (Ig) G (IgG) and IgA are more often found in CP epithelial cells, and IgM is found in either locale. C4d, IgD, and IgE are rarely, if ever, seen in the CP. In multiple sclerosis CP, basement membrane C9 or stromal IgA patterns were common but were not specific for the disease. These findings indicate that the CP may orchestrate the clearance of complement, particularly by deposition in its concretions, IgA and IgG preferentially via its epithelium, and IgM by either mechanism.

  5. Seismic basement in Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grad, Marek; Polkowski, Marcin

    2016-06-01

    The area of contact between Precambrian and Phanerozoic Europe in Poland has complicated structure of sedimentary cover and basement. The thinnest sedimentary cover in the Mazury-Belarus anteclize is only 0.3-1 km thick, increases to 7-8 km along the East European Craton margin, and 9-12 km in the Trans-European Suture Zone (TESZ). The Variscan domain is characterized by a 1- to 2-km-thick sedimentary cover, while the Carpathians are characterized by very thick sediments, up to c. 20 km. The map of the basement depth is created by combining data from geological boreholes with a set of regional seismic refraction profiles. These maps do not provide data about the basement depth in the central part of the TESZ and in the Carpathians. Therefore, the data set is supplemented by 32 models from deep seismic sounding profiles and a map of a high-resistivity (low-conductivity) layer from magnetotelluric soundings, identified as a basement. All of these data provide knowledge about the basement depth and of P-wave seismic velocities of the crystalline and consolidated type of basement for the whole area of Poland. Finally, the differentiation of the basement depth and velocity is discussed with respect to geophysical fields and the tectonic division of the area.

  6. Thermo-physical rock properties of greywacke basement rock and intrusive lavas from the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielke, P.; Weinert, S.; Bignall, G.; Sass, I.

    2016-09-01

    Greywacke of the Waipapa and Torlesse (Composite) Terrane form the basement of the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ), New Zealand. Together with inferred buried lavas, domes and igneous complexes they are likely to be the dominant rock type prevailing at depths > 4 km beneath the TVZ. A fundamental understanding of the rock properties of the deep formations is of utmost importance for the exploration of deep unconventional geothermal resources. An outcrop analogue study was conducted to improve the understanding of the thermo-physical rock properties of likely deep buried rock formations beneath the TVZ. A total of 145 core samples were taken at 10 locations inside and outside the TVZ and their grain and bulk density, porosity, matrix permeability, bulk thermal conductivity and specific heat capacity, and the compressional and shear wave velocities measured on oven-dry samples. Additional tests of the unconfined compressive strength were conducted for selected greywacke samples to quantify their mechanical rock strength. The obtained data indicates that the thermo-physical rock properties are mainly controlled by porosity, and minor by mineralogy, texture and grain size. Samples from Waipapa-type and Torlesse-type greywacke exhibit minor rheological differences, with Waipapa-type greywacke having lowest porosity (about 1% vs. 3%) and highest bulk thermal conductivity (2.5 W m- 1 K- 1 vs. 1.7 W m- 1 K- 1) and specific heat capacity (0.8 kJ kg- 1 K- 1 vs. 0.7 kJ kg- 1 K- 1). Matrix permeability is < 1E-16 m2 for all greywacke samples. Tested lavas exhibit heterogeneous rock properties due to their wide range of porosity (< 1% up to 32%). The thermo-physical rock properties were tested at laboratory conditions (ambient temperature and pressure), which do not reflect the in situ conditions at greater depth. With depth, thermal conductivity and acoustic wave velocity are likely to decrease caused by micro fractures resulting from thermal cracking of the rock, while specific

  7. [Simultaneous presence of antibodies against the glomerular basement membrane and anti-myeloperoxidase antibodies in 2 patients with rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis].

    PubMed

    Díaz Rodríguez, C; Costero, O; Torre, A; De Alvaro, F; Gil, F; Picazo, M L; Martínez-Ara, J

    2002-01-01

    We report two patients with rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis without alveolar hemorrhage. Renal biopsy showed extracapillary glomerulonephritis with linear deposits of immunoglobulin G. Serologically anti-glomerular basement membrane antibodies (Ac AMBG) and ANCA anti-myeloperoxidase were present. All patients were treated with steroids, cyclophosphamide and plasma exchange. One patient needed dialysis, and other one died from a renal biopsy complication. We discuss the epidemiologic, pathogenic and prognostic aspects of this association.

  8. The basement membrane and the sex establishment in the juvenile hermaphroditism during gonadal differentiation of the Gymnocorymbus ternetzi (Teleostei: Characiformes: Characidae).

    PubMed

    Mazzoni, Talita Sarah; Grier, Harry J; Quagio-Grassiotto, Irani

    2015-12-01

    Although there are several studies on morphogenesis in Teleostei, until now there is no research describing the role of the basement membrane in the establishment of the germinal epithelium during gonadal differentiation in Characiformes. In attempt to study these events that result in the formation of ovarian and testicular structures, gonads of Gymnocorymbus ternetzi were prepared for light microscopy. During gonadal development in G. ternetzi, all individuals first developed ovarian tissue. The undifferentiated gonad was formed by somatic cells (SC) and primordial germ cells (PGCs). After successive mitosis, the PGCs became oogonia, which entered into meiosis originating oocytes. An interstitial tissue developed. In half of the individuals, presumptive female, prefollicle cells synthesized a basement membrane around oocyte forming a follicle. Along the ventral region of the ovary, the tissue invaginated to form the ovigerous lamellae, bordered by the germinal epithelium. Stroma developed and the follicle complexes were formed. The gonadal aromatase was detected in interstitial cells in the early steps of the gonadal differentiation in both sexes. In another half of the individuals, presumptive male, there was no synthesis of basement membrane. The interstitium was invaded by numerous granulocytes. Pre-Leydig cells proliferated. Apoptotic oocytes were observed and afterward degenerated. Spermatogonia appeared near the degenerating oocytes and associated to SCs, forming testicular tubules. Germinal epithelium developed and the basement membrane was synthesized. Concomitantly, there was decrease of the gonadal aromatase and increase in the 3β-HSD enzyme expression. Thus, the testis was organized on an ovary previously developed, constituting an indirect gonochoristic differentiation. PMID:26386207

  9. Fetal rat septal cells adhere to and extend processes on basement membrane, laminin, and a synthetic peptide from the laminin A chain sequence.

    PubMed

    Jucker, M; Kleinman, H K; Ingram, D K

    1991-04-01

    Responses of rat embryonic septal cells to reconstituted basement membrane, laminin, and laminin A chain-derived synthetic peptides were studied in culture. Dissociated fetal E16/17 septal cells were grown for three days on differently coated plastic substrata. Reconstituted basement membrane (Matrigel), laminin, and a 19-amino acid synthetic peptide CSRARKQAASIKVAVSADR-NH2 (PA22-2) from the laminin A chain sequence mediated cell-substratum adhesion and promoted neurite outgrowth. In contrast, cells did not attach to or form processes on uncoated plastic or on plastic substrata coated with synthetic, laminin-derived control peptides. Polyethylenimine (PEI) supported the adhesion and survival of fetal septal cells; however, when laminin was added to the medium during cell plating or 18 hr afterward, a dose-dependent increase was observed in neurite outgrowth of cells attached to this substratum. Cells grown for 6 days on PEI in the presence of laminin showed a determined increase in the number of cholinergic neurons as marked by acetylcholinesterase staining. These data suggest that the subpopulation of cholinergic septal neurons present in the septal cells studied here were also responding to laminin. The results of this in vitro study suggest potential uses for basement membrane, laminin, or synthetic peptides, such as PA22-2, in fetal septal grafts to enhance regeneration in the damaged septo-hippocampal system.

  10. Regulation of basement membrane-reactive B cells in BXSB, (NZBxNZW)F1, NZB, and MRL/lpr lupus mice

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Amy G.; Fan, Qihua; Brady, Graham F.; Mackin, Katherine M.; Coffman, Evan D.; Weston, Melissa L.; Foster, Mary H.

    2013-01-01

    Autoantibodies to diverse antigens escape regulation in systemic lupus erythematosus under the influence of a multitude of predisposing genes. To gain insight into the differential impact of diverse genetic backgrounds on tolerance mechanisms controlling autoantibody production in lupus, we established a single lupus-derived nephritis associated anti-basement membrane Ig transgene on each of four inbred murine lupus strains, including BXSB, (NZBxNZW)F1, NZB, and MRL/lpr, as approved by the Duke University and the Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Centers’ Animal Care and Use Committees. In nonautoimmune C57BL/6 mice, B cells bearing this anti-laminin Ig transgene are stringently regulated by central deletion, editing, and anergy. Here, we show that tolerance is generally intact in unmanipulated Ig transgenic BXSB, (NZBxNZW)F1, and NZB mice, based on absence of serum transgenic anti-laminin autoantibodies and failure to recover spontaneous anti-laminin monoclonal antibodies. Four- to six-fold depletion of splenic B cells in transgenic mice of these strains, as well as in MRL/lpr transgenic mice, and reduced frequency of IgM+ bone marrow B cells suggest that central deletion is grossly intact. Nonetheless the four strains demonstrate distinct transgenic B cell phenotypes, including endotoxin-stimulated production of anti-laminin antibodies by B cells from transgenic NZB mice, and in vitro hyperproliferation of both endotoxin- and BCR-stimulated B cells from transgenic BXSB mice, which are shown to have an enrichment of CD21-high marginal zone cells. Rare anti-laminin transgenic B cells spontaneously escape tolerance in MRL/lpr mice. Further study of the mechanisms underlying these strain-specific B cell fates will provide insight into genetic modification of humoral autoimmunity in lupus. PMID:23157336

  11. Membrane Contact Sites: Complex Zones for Membrane Association and Lipid Exchange

    PubMed Central

    Quon, Evan; Beh, Christopher T.

    2015-01-01

    Lipid transport between membranes within cells involves vesicle and protein carriers, but as agents of nonvesicular lipid transfer, the role of membrane contact sites has received increasing attention. As zones for lipid metabolism and exchange, various membrane contact sites mediate direct associations between different organelles. In particular, membrane contact sites linking the plasma membrane (PM) and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) represent important regulators of lipid and ion transfer. In yeast, cortical ER is stapled to the PM through membrane-tethering proteins, which establish a direct connection between the membranes. In this review, we consider passive and facilitated models for lipid transfer at PM–ER contact sites. Besides the tethering proteins, we examine the roles of an additional repertoire of lipid and protein regulators that prime and propagate PM–ER membrane association. We conclude that instead of being simple mediators of membrane association, regulatory components of membrane contact sites have complex and multilayered functions. PMID:26949334

  12. Delineation of groundwater potential zones in the crystalline basement terrain of SW-Nigeria: an integrated GIS and remote sensing approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fashae, Olutoyin A.; Tijani, Moshood N.; Talabi, Abel O.; Adedeji, Oluwatola I.

    2014-03-01

    Due to complex and erratic nature of groundwater occurrences in crystalline basement terrains, groundwater development in form of boreholes/wells without the necessary pre-drilling hydrogeological investigations usually results in failure. Therefore, there is the need for adequate characterization of aquifers and delineation of groundwater potential zones in such crystalline basement setting. This study employed the integration of multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA), remote sensing (RS) and geographical information system (GIS) techniques to delineate groundwater potential zones in crystalline basement terrain of SW-Nigeria and validation of the result with existing borehole/well yield data. The study approach involved integration of nine different thematic layers (geology, rainfall geomorphology, soil, drainage density, lineament density, landuse, slope and drainage proximity) based on weights assignment and normalization with respect to the relative contribution of the different themes to groundwater occurrence using Saaty's analytic hierarchy approach. Following weigh normalization and ranking, the thematic maps were integrated using ArcGIS 10.0 software to generate the overall groundwater potential map for the study area. The result revealed that the study area can be categorized into three different groundwater potential zones: high, medium and low. Greater portion of the study area (84,121.8 km2) representing about 78 % of the total area, fall within the medium groundwater potential zone which are generally underlain by medium-porphyritic granite, biotite-hornblende granite and granite gneiss bedrock settings. About 18,239.7 km2 (17 %) fall under high groundwater potential zone which are characterized by weathered/fractured quartzite, quartz-schist, amphibolite schist and phyllite bedrock settings. However, areas of low groundwater potentials constitute only 3 % (3,416.54 km2) of the total study area and are mostly underlain by migmatite, banded and augen

  13. Characterization and mechanisms of photoageing-related changes in skin. Damages of basement membrane and dermal structures.

    PubMed

    Amano, Satoshi

    2016-08-01

    Sun-exposed skin is characterized by superficial changes such as wrinkles, sagging and pigmentary changes, and also many internal changes in the structure and function of epidermis, basement membrane (BM) and dermis. These changes (so-called photoageing) are predominantly induced by the ultraviolet (UV) component of sunlight. Epidermis of UV-irradiated skin produced several enzymes such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), urinary plasminogen activator (uPA)/plasmin and heparanase, which degrade dermal collagen fibres and elastic fibres in the dermis, and components of epidermal BM. The BM at the dermal-epidermal junction (DEJ) controls dermal-epidermal signalling and plays an important role in the maintenance of a healthy epidermis and dermis. BM is repetitively damaged in sun-exposed skin compared with unexposed skin, leading to epidermal and dermal deterioration and accelerated skin ageing. UV exposure also induces an increase in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), an angiogenic factor, while thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1), an anti-angiogenic factor, is decreased; these changes induce angiogenesis in papillary dermis with increased migration of elastase-positive leucocytes, leading to dermal elastic fibre damage. Elastic fibres, such as oxytalan fibres in papillary dermis, are associated with not only skin resilience, but also skin surface texture, and elastic fibre formation by fibroblasts is facilitated by increased expression of fibulin-5. Thus, induction of fibulin-5 expression is a damage-repair mechanism, and fibulin-5 is an early marker of photoaged skin. UV-induced skin damage is cumulative and leads to premature ageing of skin. However, appropriate daily skincare may ameliorate photoageing by inhibiting processes causing damage and enhancing repair processes. PMID:27539897

  14. Type IV Collagen Controls the Axogenesis of Cerebellar Granule Cells by Regulating Basement Membrane Integrity in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Miki; Yamaguchi, Shingo; Yonemura, Shigenobu; Kakiguchi, Kisa; Sato, Yoshikatsu; Higashiyama, Tetsuya; Shimizu, Takashi; Hibi, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    Granule cells (GCs) are the major glutamatergic neurons in the cerebellum, and GC axon formation is an initial step in establishing functional cerebellar circuits. In the zebrafish cerebellum, GCs can be classified into rostromedial and caudolateral groups, according to the locations of their somata in the corresponding cerebellar lobes. The axons of the GCs in the caudolateral lobes terminate on crest cells in the dorsal hindbrain, as well as forming en passant synapses with Purkinje cells in the cerebellum. In the zebrafish mutant shiomaneki, the caudolateral GCs extend aberrant axons. Positional cloning revealed that the shiomaneki (sio) gene locus encodes Col4a6, a subunit of type IV collagen, which, in a complex with Col4a5, is a basement membrane (BM) component. Both col4a5 and col4a6 mutants displayed similar abnormalities in the axogenesis of GCs and retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Although type IV collagen is reported to control axon targeting by regulating the concentration gradient of an axonal guidance molecule Slit, Slit overexpression did not affect the GC axons. The structure of the BM surrounding the tectum and dorsal hindbrain was disorganized in the col4a5 and col4a6 mutants. Moreover, the abnormal axogenesis of the caudolateral GCs and the RGCs was coupled with aberrant BM structures in the type IV collagen mutants. The regrowth of GC axons after experimental ablation revealed that the original and newly formed axons displayed similar branching and extension abnormalities in the col4a6 mutants. These results collectively suggest that type IV collagen controls GC axon formation by regulating the integrity of the BM, which provides axons with the correct path to their targets. PMID:26451951

  15. Genome wide analysis indicates genes for basement membrane and cartilage matrix proteins as candidates for hip dysplasia in Labrador Retrievers.

    PubMed

    Lavrijsen, Ineke C M; Leegwater, Peter A J; Martin, Alan J; Harris, Stephen J; Tryfonidou, Marianna A; Heuven, Henri C M; Hazewinkel, Herman A W

    2014-01-01

    Hip dysplasia, an abnormal laxity of the hip joint, is seen in humans as well as dogs and is one of the most common skeletal disorders in dogs. Canine hip dysplasia is considered multifactorial and polygenic, and a variety of chromosomal regions have been associated with the disorder. We performed a genome-wide association study in Dutch Labrador Retrievers, comparing data of nearly 18,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 48 cases and 30 controls using two different statistical methods. An individual SNP analysis based on comparison of allele frequencies with a χ(2) statistic was used, as well as a simultaneous SNP analysis based on Bayesian variable selection. Significant association with canine hip dysplasia was observed on chromosome 8, as well as suggestive association on chromosomes 1, 5, 15, 20, 25 and 32. Next-generation DNA sequencing of the exons of genes of seven regions identified multiple associated alleles on chromosome 1, 5, 8, 20, 25 and 32 (p<0.001). Candidate genes located in the associated regions on chromosomes 1, 8 and 25 included LAMA2, LRR1 and COL6A3, respectively. The associated region on CFA20 contained candidate genes GDF15, COMP and CILP2. In conclusion, our study identified candidate genes that might affect susceptibility to canine hip dysplasia. These genes are involved in hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes and extracellular matrix integrity of basement membrane and cartilage. The functions of the genes are in agreement with the notion that disruptions in endochondral bone formation in combination with soft tissue defects are involved in the etiology of hip dysplasia. PMID:24498183

  16. The Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase p38α Regulates Tubular Damage in Murine Anti-Glomerular Basement Membrane Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Ralf; Daniel, Christoph; Hugo, Christian; Amann, Kerstin; Mielenz, Dirk; Endlich, Karlhans; Braun, Tobias; van der Veen, Betty; Heeringa, Peter; Schett, Georg; Zwerina, Jochen

    2013-01-01

    p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) is thought to play a central role in acute and chronic inflammatory responses. Whether p38MAPK plays a pathogenic role in crescentic GN (GN) and which of its four isoforms is preferentially involved in kidney inflammation is not definitely known. We thus examined expression and activation of p38MAPK isoforms during anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) nephritis. Therefore, p38α conditional knockout mice (MxCre-p38αΔ/Δ) were used to examine the role of p38α in anti-GBM induced nephritis. Both wild type and MxCre-p38αΔ/Δ mice developed acute renal failure over time. Histological examinations revealed a reduced monocyte influx and less tubular damage in MxCre-p38αΔ/Δ mice, whereas glomerular crescent formation and renal fibrosis was similar. Likewise, the levels of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF, IL-1 and IL-10 were similar, but IL-8 was even up-regulated in MxCre-p38αΔ/Δ mice. In contrast, we could detect strong down-regulation of chemotactic cytokines such as CCL-2, -5 and -7, in the kidneys of MxCre-p38αΔ/Δ mice. In conclusion, p38α is the primary p38MAPK isoform expressed in anti-GBM nephritis and selectively affects inflammatory cell influx and tubular damage. Full protection from nephritis is however not achieved as renal failure and structural damage still occurs. PMID:23441175

  17. The Alteration of the Epidermal Basement Membrane Complex of Human Nevus Tissue and Keratinocyte Attachment after High Hydrostatic Pressurization

    PubMed Central

    Jinno, Chizuru; Sakamoto, Michiharu; Kakudo, Natsuko; Inoie, Masukazu; Fujisato, Toshia; Suzuki, Shigehiko; Kusumoto, Kenji; Yamaoka, Tetsuji

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that human nevus tissue was inactivated after high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) higher than 200 MPa and that human cultured epidermis (hCE) engrafted on the pressurized nevus at 200 MPa but not at 1000 MPa. In this study, we explore the changes to the epidermal basement membrane in detail and elucidate the cause of the difference in hCE engraftment. Nevus specimens of 8 mm in diameter were divided into five groups (control and 100, 200, 500, and 1000 MPa). Immediately after HHP, immunohistochemical staining was performed to detect the presence of laminin-332 and type VII collagen, and the specimens were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). hCE was placed on the pressurized nevus specimens in the 200, 500, and 1000 MPa groups and implanted into the subcutis of nude mice; the specimens were harvested at 14 days after implantation. Then, human keratinocytes were seeded on the pressurized nevus and the attachment was evaluated. The immunohistochemical staining results revealed that the control and 100 MPa, 200 MPa, and 500 MPa groups were positive for type VII collagen and laminin-332 immediately after HHP. TEM showed that, in all of the groups, the lamina densa existed; however, anchoring fibrils were not clearly observed in the 500 or 1000 MPa groups. Although the hCE took in the 200 and 500 MPa groups, keratinocyte attachment was only confirmed in the 200 MPa group. This result indicates that HHP at 200 MPa is preferable for inactivating nevus tissue to allow its reuse for skin reconstruction in the clinical setting. PMID:27747221

  18. An ultrastructural analysis of isolated basement membranes in the acellular renal cortex: a comparison study of human and laboratory animals.

    PubMed

    Carlson, E C; Kenney, M C

    1982-02-01

    Freshly harvested kidneys from New Zealand white rabbits, Sprague-Dawley white rats, rhesus monkeys, and transplant-quality human kidneys were used in this study. Minced renal cortical tissue blocks (less than 2 mm3) were treated with 1 mM EDTA, 3% Triton X-100, 0.025% DNAse, and 4% sodium deoxycholate in an effort to remove all cellular elements and leave the extracellular matrix (ECM) intact. These preparations showed remarkable structural preservation and all components of the ECM, including basement membranes (BMs), maintained their in vivo histoarchitectural relationships. By light microscopy, at least four major BM types were recognizable, including Bowman's capsular BM (BCBM), tubular BM (TBM), glomerular BM (GBM), and peritubular capillary BM (PTCBM). Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that, despite the lack of supporting interstitium, GBMs in human, monkey, and rat (and rabbit to a lesser degree) exhibit intrinsic structural rigidity such that their convoluted spheroidal shapes are maintained following cell removal. Transmission electron microscopy showed that major BM types are morphologically heterogeneous and vary markedly within and between species. Randomized measurements showed that isolated BM thicknesses (lamina densa only) compared favorably with those reported in cellular preparations. Mean thicknesses of GBMs were within normal ranges in all species with or without power transformations to reduce right-sided skew of distribution curves. In all species, thickness of BCBM greater than TBM greater than GBM greater than PTCBM. The striking morphologic heterogeneity of major BM types demonstrated in the acellular renal cortex is not surprising in view of recent biochemical analyses that show that BMs derived from different sources are compositionally disparate. We conclude that BMs should be evaluated and characterized individually and that morphologic definition of isolated BMs necessary prior to further analysis. PMID:7062344

  19. Granular IgM Deposition at Basement Membrane Zone in an Infant with Diffuse Cutaneous Mastocytosis.

    PubMed

    Kumudhini, Subramanian; Rao, Raghavendra; Salgaonkar, Gauri; Shetty, Sricharith; Pai, Sathish

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse Cutaneous mastocytosis (DCM) occurs due to abnormal accumulation of mast cells in the skin. We report an 8-month-old infant presented papulovesicular lesions, predominantly on the trunk. Skin biopsy revealed subepidermal bulla, interspersed with mast cells, eosinophils and neutrophils. Direct immunofluorescence microscopy of perilesional skin revealed nonspecific deposition of IgM in granular pattern along the dermoepidermal junction. PMID:27688466

  20. Granular IgM Deposition at Basement Membrane Zone in an Infant with Diffuse Cutaneous Mastocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Kumudhini, Subramanian; Rao, Raghavendra; Salgaonkar, Gauri; Shetty, Sricharith; Pai, Sathish

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse Cutaneous mastocytosis (DCM) occurs due to abnormal accumulation of mast cells in the skin. We report an 8-month-old infant presented papulovesicular lesions, predominantly on the trunk. Skin biopsy revealed subepidermal bulla, interspersed with mast cells, eosinophils and neutrophils. Direct immunofluorescence microscopy of perilesional skin revealed nonspecific deposition of IgM in granular pattern along the dermoepidermal junction. PMID:27688466

  1. Granular IgM Deposition at Basement Membrane Zone in an Infant with Diffuse Cutaneous Mastocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Kumudhini, Subramanian; Rao, Raghavendra; Salgaonkar, Gauri; Shetty, Sricharith; Pai, Sathish

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse Cutaneous mastocytosis (DCM) occurs due to abnormal accumulation of mast cells in the skin. We report an 8-month-old infant presented papulovesicular lesions, predominantly on the trunk. Skin biopsy revealed subepidermal bulla, interspersed with mast cells, eosinophils and neutrophils. Direct immunofluorescence microscopy of perilesional skin revealed nonspecific deposition of IgM in granular pattern along the dermoepidermal junction.

  2. Normal and tumor-derived myoepithelial cells differ in their ability to interact with luminal breast epithelial cells for polarity and basement membrane deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Gudjonsson, Thorarinn; Ronnov-Jessen, Lone; Villadsen, Rene; Rank, Fritz; Bissell, Mina J.; Petersen, Ole William

    2001-10-04

    The signals that determine the correct polarity of breast epithelial structures in vivo are not understood. We have shown previously that luminal epithelial cells can be polarized when cultured within a reconstituted basement membrane gel. We reasoned that such cues in vivo may be given by myoepithelial cells. Accordingly, we used an assay where luminal epithelial cells are incorrectly polarized to test this hypothesis. We show that culturing human primary luminal epithelial cells within collagen-I gels leads to formation of structures with no lumina and with reverse polarity as judged by dual stainings for sialomucin, epithelial specific antigen or occludin. No basement membrane is deposited, and {beta}4-integrin staining is negative. Addition of purified human myoepithelial cells isolated from normal glands corrects the inverse polarity, and leads to formation of double-layered acini with central lumina. Among the laminins present in the human breast basement membrane (laminin-1, -5 and -10/11), laminin-1 was unique in its ability to substitute for myoepithelial cells in polarity reversal. Myoepithelial cells were purified also from four different breast cancer sources including a biphasic cell line. Three out of four samples either totally lacked the ability to interact with luminal epithelial cells, or conveyed only correction of polarity in a fraction of acini. This behavior was directly related to the ability of the tumor myoepithelial cells to produce {alpha}-1 chain of laminin. In vivo, breast carcinomas were either negative for laminin-1 (7/12 biopsies) or showed a focal, fragmented deposition of a less intensely stained basement membrane (5/12 biopsies). Dual staining with myoepithelial markers revealed that tumorassociated myoepithelial cells were either negative or weakly positive for expression of laminin-1, establishing a strong correlation between loss of laminin-1 and breast cancer. We conclude that the double-layered breast acinus may be

  3. Stromal issues in cervical cancer: a review of the role and function of basement membrane, stroma, immune response and angiogenesis in cervical cancer development.

    PubMed

    Sahebali, Shaira; Van den Eynden, Gert; Murta, Eddie F; Michelin, Marcia A; Cusumano, Pino; Petignat, Patrick; Bogers, Johannes J

    2010-05-01

    The carcinogenesis of cervical carcinoma implies an intricate interplay of neoplastic, human papillomavirus infected epithelial cells and stromal tissue, in which different factors have distinct but interacting influence. Persistent infection with an oncogenic human papillomavirus type may lead to epithelial dysplasia with progressive severity. To access the adjacent stromal tissue, tumour cells have to breach the basement membrane. The stroma partly controls tumour growth, invasion and angiogenesis. Last but not least there is considerable influence of the immune response. In this review we describe the importance of various stromal factors in carcinogenesis of cervical cancer.

  4. Basement Insulation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2002-01-01

    This is one of a series of technology fact sheets created to help housing designers and builders adopt a whole-house design approach and energy efficient design practices. The fact sheet advises how to create a comfortable basement environment that is free of moisture problems and easy to condition.

  5. Increased Goodpasture Antigen-Binding Protein Expression Induces Type IV Collagen Disorganization and Deposit of Immunoglobulin A in Glomerular Basement Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Revert, Fernando; Merino, Ramón; Monteagudo, Carlos; Macias, Jesús; Peydró, Amando; Alcácer, Javier; Muniesa, Pedro; Marquina, Regina; Blanco, Mario; Iglesias, Marcos; Revert-Ros, Francisco; Merino, Jesús; Saus, Juan

    2007-01-01

    Increased expression of Goodpasture antigen-binding protein (GPBP), a protein that binds and phosphorylates basement membrane collagen, has been associated with immune complex-mediated pathogenesis. However, recent reports have questioned this biological function and proposed that GPBP serves as a cytosolic ceramide transporter (CERTL). Thus, the role of GPBP in vivo remains unknown. New Zealand White (NZW) mice are considered healthy animals although they convey a genetic predisposition for immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis. Here we show that NZW mice developed age-dependent lupus-prone autoimmune response and immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis characterized by elevated GPBP, glomerular basement membrane (GBM) collagen disorganization and expansion, and deposits of IgA on disrupted GBM. Transgenic overexpression of human GPBP (hGPBP) in non-lupus-prone mice triggered similar glomerular abnormalities including deposits of IgA on a capillary GBM that underwent dissociation, in the absence of an evident autoimmune response. We provide in vivo evidence that GPBP regulates GBM collagen organization and its elevated expression causes dissociation and subsequent accumulation of IgA on the GBM. Finally, we describe a previously unrecognized pathogenic mechanism that may be relevant in human primary immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis. PMID:17916599

  6. Basement blocks and basin inversion structures mapped using reprocessed Gulfrex 2D seismic data, Caribbean-South American oblique collisional zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escalona, A.; Sena, A.; Mann, P.

    2003-12-01

    We have reprocessed and reinterpreted more than 10,000 km of "Gulfrex" multi-channel 2D seismic reflection lines collected by Gulf Oil Corporation in 1972 along the northern margin of South America (offshore Venezuela and Trinidad). These digital data were donated to the University of Texas Institute for Geophysics and represent the largest single, digital reflection survey of the region. Reprocessing of these data included: format correction, filtering, post-stack multiple suppression, and fk migration. Reprocessed data were loaded and interpreted on a workstation. The data straddle a 2,000,000 km2 zone of Paleocene-Recent, time-transgressive, oblique collision between the Caribbean arc system and the passive continental margin of northern South America. Free-air, satellite gravity data shows the remarkable 1000-km-scale continuity of four basement ridges between the uncollided part of the Caribbean arc system (NS-trending Lesser Antilles arc) and the EW-trending collisional area north of Venezuela. The basement ridges involved in the Venezuelan collisional zone include: 1) Aruba-Bonaire-Curacao ridge that can be traced as a continuous feature to the Aves ridge remnant arc of the Lesser Antilles; 2) the partially inverted Blanquilla-Bonaire basin that can be traced into the Grenada back-arc basin; 3) Margarita-Los Testigos platform that can be traced to the Lesser Antilles volcanic arc; and 4) foreland basins and fold-thrust belts of eastern Venezuela (Serrania del Interior and Maturin basin) that can be traced to the Tobago forearc basin and Barbados accretionary prism. Gulfrex data document the progressive change of basinal fault systems from NS-striking normal faults formed in extensional, Lesser Antilles intra-arc settings to rotated and inverted, NE and EW-striking normal faults deformed in the collisional area north of Venezuela. Age of initial shortening of basinal areas and inversion of normal faults setting does not follow the simple, expected pattern of

  7. Gondwanan/peri-Gondwanan origin for the Uchee terrane, Alabama and georgia: Carolina zone or Suwannee terrane(?) and its suture with Grenvillian basement of the Pine Mountain window

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steltenpohl, M.G.; Mueller, P.M.; Heatherington, A.L.; Hanley, T.B.; Wooden, J.L.

    2008-01-01

    The poorly known, suspect, Uchee terrane occupies a critical tectonic position with regard to how and when peri-Gondwanan (Carolina) and Gondwanan (Suwannee) terranes were sutured to Laurentia. It lies sandwiched between Laurentian(?) continental basement exposed in the Pine Mountain window and adjacent buried Gondwanan crust of the Suwannee terrane. The Uchee terrane has been proposed as both a septum of Piedmont rocks that once was continuous across the erosionally breached Pine Mountain window or part of the Carolina zone. To help resolve this issue, we conducted U-Pb (SHRIMP-RG) (sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe-reverse geometry) zircon studies and whole-rock isotopic analyses of principal metasedimentary and metaplutonic units. U-Pb ages for zircons from the Phenix City Gneiss suggest igneous crystallization at ca. 620 Ma, inheritance ca. 1000 to ca. 1700 Ma, and a ca. 300 Ma (Alleghanian) overprint recorded by zircon rims. Zircons from the metasedimentary/metavolcaniclastic Moffits Mill Schist yield bimodal dates at ca. 620 and 640 Ma. The 620 to 640 Ma dates make these rocks age-equivalent to the oldest parts of the Carolina slate belt (Virgilina and Savannah River) and strongly suggest a Gondwanan (Pan-African and/or Trans-Brasiliano) origin for the Uchee terrane. Alternatively, the Uchee terrane may be correlative with metamorphic basement of the Suwannee terrane. The ca. 300 Ma overgrowths on zircons are compatible with previously reported 295 to 288 Ma 40Ar/39Ar hornblende dates on Uchee terrane rocks, which were interpreted to indicate deep tectonic burial of the Uchee terrane contemporaneous with the Alleghanian orogeny recorded in the foreland. Temperature-time paths for the Uchee terrane are similar to that of the Pine Mountain terrane, indicating a minimum age of ca. 295 Ma for docking. In terms of tectono-metamorphic history of the Uchee terrane, it is important to note that no evidence for intermediate "Appalachian" dates (e.g, Acadian or

  8. Variscan terrane boundaries in the Odenwald-Spessart basement, Mid-German Crystalline Zone: New evidence from ocean ridge, intraplate and arc-derived metabasaltic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Will, T. M.; Lee, S.-H.; Schmädicke, E.; Frimmel, H. E.; Okrusch, M.

    2015-04-01

    The Mid-German Crystalline Zone is part of a large Variscan suture and consists of various basement complexes that are exposed in central Germany. New lithogeochemical and Sr-Nd-Pb isotope data obtained on various amphibolites from the Odenwald-Spessart basement show that their protoliths formed in different tectonic settings and were subsequently incorporated into a subduction zone prior to Variscan continental collision. Metabasic rocks from the northernmost Spessart and the western Odenwald are geochemically almost identical and their protoliths are interpreted to have formed in an extensional, possibly, a back-arc setting. The tholeiitic and calc-alkaline rocks have intermediate TiO2 concentrations and high Th/Nb ratios, typical of volcanic arc-type and/or subduction-fluid modified rocks. The Nd initial ratios are depleted (εNd330 Ma = 5.0-5.8) and Nd model ages range from 660 to 610 Ma, which points at juvenile crustal addition towards the end of the Neoproterozoic. The samples define a linear array in 206Pb/204Pb versus 207Pb/204Pb space. In contrast, the protoliths of the metabasic rocks from the southern and central Spessart formed either in an intraplate oceanic island or a continental arc setting. The alkaline intraplate rocks from the southern Spessart basement are very TiO2-rich and have very low Th/Nb ratios. The rocks have weakly depleted Nd initals (εNd330 Ma = 2.6-3.3) and Nd model ages between 870 and 810 Ma. In contrast, the central Spessart within-plate rocks have considerably lower TiO2 concentrations but higher Th/Nb ratios. In addition, these rocks are isotopically enriched (εNd330 Ma = - 13.1 to - 9.5) and have Palaeoproterozoic Nd model ages. The continental arc rocks from the central and southern Spessart basement have low TiO2 concentrations and variable Th/Nb ratios. Mostly negative Nd initials (εNd330 Ma = - 2.6 to + 0.9) and late Mesoproterozoic Nd model ages indicate that recycling of older crust or mixing of crustal components of

  9. VP08R from Infectious Spleen and Kidney Necrosis Virus Is a Novel Component of the Virus-Mock Basement Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaopeng; Yan, Muting; Wang, Rui; Lin, Ting; Tang, Junliang; Li, Chaozheng; Weng, Shaoping

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Infectious spleen and kidney necrosis virus (ISKNV), the type species of the genus Megalocytivirus, family Iridoviridae, brings great harm to fish farming. In infected tissues, ISKNV infection is characterized by a unique phenomenon, in that the infected cells are attached by lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs), which are speculated to wall off the infected cells from host immune attack. A viral membrane protein, VP23R, binds and recruits the host nidogen-1 protein to construct a basement membrane (BM)-like structure, termed virus-mock basement membrane (VMBM), on the surface of infected cells to provide attaching sites for LECs. VMBMs do not contain collagen IV protein, which is essential for maintenance of BM integrity and functions. In this study, we identified the VP08R protein encoded by ISKNV. VP08R was predicted to be a secreted protein with a signal peptide but without a transmembrane domain. However, immunofluorescence assays demonstrated that VP08R is located on the plasma membrane of infected cells and shows an expression profile similar to that of VP23R. Coimmunoprecipitation showed that VP08R interacts with both VP23R and nidogen-1, indicating that VP08R is a component of VMBM and is present on the cell membrane by binding to VP23R. Through formation of intermolecular disulfide bonds, VP08R molecules self-organized into a multimer, which may play a role in the maintenance of VMBM integrity and stability. Moreover, the VP08R multimer was easily degraded when the ISKNV-infected cells were lysed, which may be a mechanism for VMBM disassembly when necessary to free LECs and release the mature virions. IMPORTANCE Infectious spleen and kidney necrosis virus (ISKNV; genus Megalocytivirus, family Iridovirus) is most harmful to cultured fishes. In tissues, the ISKNV-infected cells are attached by lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs), which are speculated to segregate the host immune system. A viral membrane protein, VP23R, binds and recruits the host

  10. A microRNA from infectious spleen and kidney necrosis virus modulates expression of the virus-mock basement membrane component VP08R.

    PubMed

    Yan, Muting; He, Jianhui; Zhu, Weibin; Zhang, Jing; Xia, Qiong; Weng, Shaoping; He, Jianguo; Xu, Xiaopeng

    2016-05-01

    Infectious spleen and kidney necrosis virus (ISKNV) is the type species of the genus Megalocytivirus, family Iridoviridae. Infection of ISKNV is characterized by a unique pathological phenomenon in that the infected cells are attached by lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs). ISKNV mediates the formation of a virus-mock basement membrane (VMBM) structure on the surface of infected cells to provide attaching sites for LECs. The viral protein VP08R is an important component of VMBM. In this study, a novel ISKNV-encoded microRNA, temporarily named ISKNV-miR-1, was identified. ISKNV-miR-1 is complementary to the VP08R-coding sequence and can modulate VP08R expression through reducing its mRNA level. This suggests that formation of VMBM may be under fine regulation by ISKNV. PMID:26896933

  11. A microRNA from infectious spleen and kidney necrosis virus modulates expression of the virus-mock basement membrane component VP08R.

    PubMed

    Yan, Muting; He, Jianhui; Zhu, Weibin; Zhang, Jing; Xia, Qiong; Weng, Shaoping; He, Jianguo; Xu, Xiaopeng

    2016-05-01

    Infectious spleen and kidney necrosis virus (ISKNV) is the type species of the genus Megalocytivirus, family Iridoviridae. Infection of ISKNV is characterized by a unique pathological phenomenon in that the infected cells are attached by lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs). ISKNV mediates the formation of a virus-mock basement membrane (VMBM) structure on the surface of infected cells to provide attaching sites for LECs. The viral protein VP08R is an important component of VMBM. In this study, a novel ISKNV-encoded microRNA, temporarily named ISKNV-miR-1, was identified. ISKNV-miR-1 is complementary to the VP08R-coding sequence and can modulate VP08R expression through reducing its mRNA level. This suggests that formation of VMBM may be under fine regulation by ISKNV.

  12. Successful Treatment of Dual-Positive Anti-Myeloperoxidase and Anti-Glomerular Basement Membrane Antibody Vasculitis with Pulmonary-Renal Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jinxian; Wu, Ling; Huang, Xiaoyan; Xie, Yan; Yu, Jinquan; Yang, Jin; Fang, Huiqiong; Zhang, Lijun

    2016-01-01

    Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis and anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) disease are two separate diseases, while sometimes they can coexist together. The exact mechanisms are not clear, but due to the rapid progression and poor prognosis, prompt and aggressive treatment is usually required. We treated with steroids combined with cyclophosphamide and rituximab an 84-year-old man with ANCA-associated vasculitis and anti-GBM disease who had prior pulmonary fibrosis and a coexisting anterosuperior mediastinal mass. Conventional therapy including steroids, plasmapheresis and cyclophosphamide failed to attenuate the anti-GBM disease, yet he responded to an alternative treatment of rituximab. This case suggests the efficacy of steroids and immunosuppressant for the treatment of a dual-positive case with an anterosuperior mediastinal mass. PMID:26889474

  13. Reciprocal interactions between Beta1-integrin and epidermal growth factor in three-dimensional basement membrane breast cultures: A different perspective in epithelial biology

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, F.; Weaver, V.M.; Petersen, O.W.; Larabell, C.A.; Dedhar, S.; Briand, P.; Lupu, R.; Bissell, M.J.

    1998-09-30

    Anchorage and growth factor independence are cardinal features of the transformed phenotype. Although it is logical that the two pathways must be coregulated in normal tissues to maintain homeostasis, this has not been demonstrated directly. We showed previously that down-modulation of {beta}1-integrin signaling reverted the malignant behavior of a human breast tumor cell line (T4-2) derived from phenotypically normal cells (HMT-3522) and led to growth arrest in a threedimensional (3D) basement membrane assay in which the cells formed tissue-like acini (14). Here, we show that there is a bidirectional cross-modulation of {beta}1-integrin and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling via the mitogenactivated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. The reciprocal modulation does not occur in monolayer (2D) cultures. Antibodymediated inhibition of either of these receptors in the tumor cells, or inhibition of MAPK kinase, induced a concomitant downregulation of both receptors, followed by growth-arrest and restoration of normal breast tissue morphogenesis. Crossmodulation and tissue morphogenesis were associated with attenuation of EGF-induced transient MAPK activation. To specifically test EGFR and {beta}1-integrin interdependency, EGFR was overexpressed in nonmalignant cells, leading to disruption of morphogenesis and a compensatory up-regulation of {beta}1-integrin expression, again only in 3D. Our results indicate that when breast cells are spatially organized as a result of contact with basement membrane, the signaling pathways become coupled and bidirectional. They further explain why breast cells fail to differentiate in monolayer cultures in which these events are mostly uncoupled. Moreover, in a subset of tumor cells in which these pathways are misregulated but functional, the cells could be 'normalized' by manipulating either pathway.

  14. Origins of streamflow in a crystalline basement catchment in a sub-humid Sudanian zone: The Donga basin (Benin, West Africa): Inter-annual variability of water budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Séguis, L.; Kamagaté, B.; Favreau, G.; Descloitres, M.; Seidel, J.-L.; Galle, S.; Peugeot, C.; Gosset, M.; Le Barbé, L.; Malinur, F.; Van Exter, S.; Arjounin, M.; Boubkraoui, S.; Wubda, M.

    2011-05-01

    SummaryDuring the last quarter of the 20th century, West Africa underwent a particularly intense and generalized drought. During this period, the biggest drops in streamflow were observed in the Sudanian zone rather than in the Sahelian zone, but the reasons are still poorly understood. In 2000, a meso-scale hydrological observatory was set up in the sub-humid Sudanian zone of the Upper Ouémé Valley (Benin). Three embedded catchments of 12-586 km 2 located on a crystalline bedrock were intensively instrumented to document the different terms of the water budget and to identify the main streamflow generating processes and base-flow mechanisms at different scales. Geophysical, hydrological and geochemical data were collected throughout the catchments from 2002 to 2006. Crossing these data helped define their hydrological functioning. The region has seasonal streamflow, and the permanent groundwater in the weathered mantle does not drain to rivers, instead, seasonal perched groundwaters are the major contributor to annual streamflow. The perched groundwaters are mainly located in seasonally waterlogged sandy layers in the headwater bottom-lands called bas-fonds in French-speaking West Africa of 1st order streams. During the period 2003-2006, regolith groundwater recharge ranged between 10% and 15% of the annual rainfall depth. Depletion of permanent groundwater during the dry season is probably explained by local evapotranspiration which was seen not to be limited to gallery forests. During the 4-year study period, a reduction of 20% in annual rainfall led to a 50% reduction in streamflow. This reduction was observed in the two components of the flow: direct runoff and drainage of perched groundwater. Thanks to the comprehensive dataset obtained, the results obtained for the Donga experimental catchment are now being extrapolated to the whole upper Ouémé valley, which can be considered as representative of sub-humid Sudanian rivers flowing on a crystalline

  15. Alterations of anionic charge and/or sites of the glomerular basement membrane in the heterologous phase of passive Heymann nephritis.

    PubMed

    Arai, T; Nagase, M; Kobayashi, S; Tamura, H; Ichinose, N

    1992-04-01

    Alterations of the anionic charge and/or sites of the glomerular basement membrane (GBM) in the heterologous phase of passive Heymann nephritis (PHN) were studied. Rats with PHN induced by a single injection of anti-Fx1A IgG were examined at days 1, 2, 3 and 4. The left kidney was perfused with ruthenium red (RR) solution as a cationic probe. The RR particles (= anionic sites) in the GBM were counted and expressed as the number of RR particles per unit length of GBM. For quantitative determination of the total anionic charge of the GBM, the GBM-bound ruthenium (= anionic charge) was measured with an atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAS). Abnormal proteinuria corresponding to a decrease in anionic charge was detected at days 3 and 4. The anionic sites in the lamina rara externa (LRE) adjacent to immune complex (IC) deposits were found to have diminished earlier from day 1 onwards. This diminution was largely confined to areas adjacent to the IC deposits and was significantly correlated with the amount of urinary albumin excretion. Proteinuria in the heterologous phase of PHN would thus appear to be causally related to a decrease in the number of anionic sites in the LRE adjacent to IC deposits.

  16. Basement membrane protein ladinin-1 and the MIF-CD44-β1 integrin signaling axis are implicated in laryngeal cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Klobučar, Marko; Sedić, Mirela; Gehrig, Peter; Grossmann, Jonas; Bilić, Mario; Kovač-Bilić, Lana; Pavelić, Krešimir; Kraljević Pavelić, Sandra

    2016-10-01

    Laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) is the most common form of malignant disease in the head and neck region characterized by frequent occurrence of metastases in the neck lymph nodes early in the disease onset. In the presented study, we performed quantitative proteomic profiling of patient-matched primary tumor and adjacent non-tumorous tissues derived from metastatic LSCC as to identify new protein candidates with potential diagnostic and therapeutic significance. Obtained results revealed for the first time involvement of the basement membrane protein ladinin-1 in laryngeal cancer metastases. Alterations in the cellular microenvironment that propel metastatic events in laryngeal cancer include activation of MIF-CD44-β1 integrin signal transduction pathway and induction of downstream signaling mediated by NF-κB and Src tyrosine kinase, which ultimately impinge on cytoskeletal dynamics and architecture resulting in increased cellular motility and invasiveness. In this context, particularly interesting finding is upregulation of several actin-binding proteins novel to laryngeal cancer pathogenesis including coronin-1C and plastin-2, whose functional significance in laryngeal carcinogenesis has yet to be established. We also detected for the first time a complete loss of afamin in metastatic laryngeal cancer tissues, which warrants further studies into its use as a possible marker for monitoring disease progression and/or treatment outcome. PMID:27460703

  17. H-ras oncogene-transformed human bronchial epithelial cells (TBE-1) secrete a single metalloprotease capable of degrading basement membrane collagen

    SciTech Connect

    Collier, I.E.; Wilhelm, S.M.; Eisen, A.Z.; Marmer, B.L.; Grant, G.A.; Seltzer, J.L.; Kronberger, A.; He, C.; Bauer, E.A.; Goldberg, G.I.

    1988-05-15

    H-ras transformed human bronchial epithelial cells (TBE-1) secrete a single major extracellular matrix metalloprotease which is not found in the normal parental cells. The enzyme is secreted in a latent form which can be activated to catalyze the cleavage of the basement membrane macromolecule type IV collagen. The substrates in their order of preference are: gelatin, type IV collagen, type V collagen, fibronectin, and type VII collagen; but the enzyme does not cleave the interstitial collagens or laminin. This protease is identical to gelatinase isolated from normal human skin explants, normal human skin fibroblasts, and SV40-transformed human lung fibroblasts. Based on this ability to initiate the degradation of type IV collagen in a pepsin-resistant portion of the molecule, it will be referred to as type IV collagenase. This enzyme is most likely the human analog of type IV collagenase detected in several rodent tumors. Type IV collagenase consists of three domains. Type IV collagenase represents the third member of a newly recognized gene family coding for secreted extracellular matrix metalloproteases, which includes interstitial fibroblast collagenase and stromelysin.

  18. [A case of mixed connective tissue disease with microscopic polyarteritis nodosa associated with perinuclear-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody and anti-glomerular basement membrane].

    PubMed

    Inada, Y; Tanaka, Y; Saito, K; Fujii, K; Aso, M; Nishino, T; Awazu, Y; Ota, T; Eto, S

    1999-10-01

    A 46-year-old female was admitted to our hospital due to general fatigue, systemic edema and dyspnea with history of systemic sclerosis (SSc). The patient was diagnosed as mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) based on Raynaud phenomenon, a high anti-RNP antibody level and clinical symptoms and laboratory findings suggesting SSc, dermatomyositis (DM) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). After the admission, both alveolar hemorrhage and a rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (RPGN) also developed and laboratory findings showed a positive remark of myeloperoxydase-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (MPO-ANCA) and anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) antibody. She was therefore re-diagnosed as microscopic polyarteritis nodosa (microscopic PAN) combined with MCTD and treatment with high dose prednisolone and steroid pulse therapy dramatically improved general conditions and lung symptoms, but maintenance dialysis was persistent because of irreversible renal failure. However, 3 months after the admission, she died of acute exacerbation of interstitial pneumonitis that was unresponsive to steroid pulse therapy. Autopsy revealed interstitial pneumonitis with alveolar hemorrhage and crescentic glomerulonephritis (CrGN), in which immunofluorescent microscopy showed no deposition in agreement with pauciimmune type. The histological findings supported the diagnosis; primary microscopic PAN combined with MCTD, which is a quite rare case, to our knowledge. Furthermore, co-existence of MPO ANCA and anti-GBM antibody, clinical and histological findings of the case also lead us to reconsider the relevance of these antibodies to pathogenesis and/or categories of microscopic PAN and Goodpasture's syndrome.

  19. A two-dimensional model of the colonic crypt accounting for the role of the basement membrane and pericryptal fibroblast sheath.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Sara-Jane; Appleton, Paul L; Nelson, Scott A; Näthke, Inke S; Gavaghan, David J; Osborne, James M

    2012-01-01

    The role of the basement membrane is vital in maintaining the integrity and structure of an epithelial layer, acting as both a mechanical support and forming the physical interface between epithelial cells and the surrounding connective tissue. The function of this membrane is explored here in the context of the epithelial monolayer that lines the colonic crypt, test-tube shaped invaginations that punctuate the lining of the intestine and coordinate a regular turnover of cells to replenish the epithelial layer every few days. To investigate the consequence of genetic mutations that perturb the system dynamics and can lead to colorectal cancer, it must be possible to track the emerging tissue level changes that arise in the crypt. To that end, a theoretical crypt model with a realistic, deformable geometry is required. A new discrete crypt model is presented, which focuses on the interaction between cell- and tissue-level behaviour, while incorporating key subcellular components. The model contains a novel description of the role of the surrounding tissue and musculature, based upon experimental observations of the tissue structure of the crypt, which are also reported. A two-dimensional (2D) cross-sectional geometry is considered, and the shape of the crypt is allowed to evolve and deform. Simulation results reveal how the shape of the crypt may contribute mechanically to the asymmetric division events typically associated with the stem cells at the base. The model predicts that epithelial cell migration may arise due to feedback between cell loss at the crypt collar and density-dependent cell division, an hypothesis which can be investigated in a wet lab. This work forms the basis for investigation of the deformation of the crypt structure that can occur due to proliferation of cells exhibiting mutant phenotypes, experiments that would not be possible in vivo or in vitro. PMID:22654652

  20. Type VII collagen associated with the basement membrane of amniotic epithelium forms giant anchoring rivets which penetrate a massive lamina reticularis.

    PubMed

    Ockleford, C D; McCracken, S A; Rimmington, L A; Hubbard, A R D; Bright, N A; Cockcroft, N; Jefferson, T B; Waldron, E; d'Lacey, C

    2013-09-01

    In human amnion a simple cuboidal epithelium and underlying fibroblast layer are separated by an almost acellular compact layer rich in collagen types I and III. This (>10 μm) layer, which may be a thick lamina reticularis, apparently presents an unusual set of conditions. Integration of the multilaminous tissue across it is apparently achieved by waisted structures which we have observed with the light microscope in frozen, paraffin-wax and semi-thin resin sections. We have also captured transmission and scanning electron micrographs of the structures. These structures which cross the compact layer we call "rivets". The composition of these "rivets" has been examined immunocytochemically and in three dimensions using the confocal laser scanning epi-fluorescence microscope. The rivets contain type VII collagen and an α6 integrin. They associate with type IV collagen containing structures (basement membrane lamina densa and spongy coils) and a special population of fibroblasts which may generate, maintain or anchor rivets to the underlying mesenchymal layer. Although type VII collagen is well known to anchor basal lamina to underlying mesodermal collagen fibres these "rivets" are an order of magnitude larger than any previously described type VII collagen containing anchoring structures. Intriguing possible functions of these features include nodes for growth of fibrous collagen sheets and sites of possible enzymatic degradation during regulated amnion weakening approaching term. If these sites are confirmed to be involved in amnion degradation and growth they may represent important targets for therapeutic agents that are designed to delay preterm premature rupture of the membranes a major cause of fetal morbidity and mortality.

  1. Deformation behaviour of feldspar in greenschist facies granitoide shear zones from the Austroalpine basement to the south of the western Tauern window, Eastern Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hentschel, Felix; Trepmann, Claudia

    2015-04-01

    Objective of this study is to elucidate the feldspar deformation behaviour at greenschist facies conditions relevant for the long-term rheological properties of continental crust. Uncertainties in models for the rheological properties are partly due to a poor knowledge of the deformation mechanisms taking place in granitoid rocks at inaccessible depth. The deformation behaviour of feldspar, the most abundant mineral in the continental crust, is characterized by an interaction of brittle, dissolution-precipitation and crystal-plastic processes, which is difficult to evaluate in experiments given the problematic extrapolation of experimental conditions to reasonable natural conditions. However, microfabrics of metamorphic granitoid rocks record the grain-scale deformation mechanisms and involved chemical reactions proceeding during their geological history. This usually includes deformation and modification through several stages in space (depth, i.e., P, T conditions) and/or time. For deciphering the rock's record this implies both, challenge and chance to resolve these different stages. Here, we use the deformation record of mylonitic pegmatites from the Austroalpine basement south to the western Tauern window. The structural, crystallographic and chemical characteristics of the feldspar microfabrics are determined via micro-analytical techniques (polarized light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, SEM, electron back scatter diffraction, EBSD) to identify the relevant deformation mechanisms and deformation conditions. The pegmatites represent a relatively simple Ca-poor granitoid system, mineralogically dominated by albite-rich plagioclase, K-feldspar and quartz. The matrix of the mylonitic pegmatites is composed of alternating monomineralic albite and quartz ribbons defining the foliation. Fragmented tourmaline and K-feldspar porphyroclasts occur isolated within the matrix. At sites of dilation along the stretching lineation K-feldspar porphyroclasts show

  2. Three-dimensional stress orientation in the basement basalt at the subduction input site, Nankai Subduction Zone, using anelastic strain recovery (ASR) data , IODP NanTroSEIZE Site C0012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Y.; Lin, W.; Oda, H.; Byrne, T. B.; Yamamoto, Y.; Underwood, M.; Saito, S.; Kubo, Y.; Iodp Expedition 322 Shipboard Scientific Party

    2010-12-01

    Three-dimensional stress orientation in the basement basalt at subduction input was first obtained by anelastic strain recovery (ASR) measurements. IODP Expedition 322 penetrated the sediment-basement boundary and recovered successive cores at Site C0012, the subduction input site in Nankai Subduction Zone. The collected basement samples are composed of alternating beds of pillow basalts and hyaroclastite and were retrieved by rotary core barrel (RCB) drilling system. We collected a whole-round core sample for measurements of ASR from pillow basalt by the same methods of sample preparation and anelastic strain data acquisition conducted in the previous Stage-1 expeditions of the same NanTroSEIZE drilling program (Byrne et al., 2009; GRL, Vol.36, L23310). Anelastic normal strains, measured every ten minutes in nine directions, including six independent directions, were used to calculate the anelastic strain tensors. The sample showed coherent strain recovery over a long period more than 1 month. The ASR measurement results in Kumano Forearc Basin obtained from C0002 (Byrne et al., 2009) showed the maximum stress orientation is nearly vertical and a normal stress regime. However, the ASR results in the basement basalt in the subduction input from C0012 show that the maximum principal stress axes was nearly horizontal and oriented NE-SW, almost parallel (or slightly oblique) to the trench axis. On the other hand, the minimum principal stress axis plunges steeply SE. The stress state of the basement basalts suggests strike-slip or thrust (reverse fault) regimes, which is very different from “state at rest” condition, theoretic stress condition on the ocean floor far from subduction zone. The basement basalt in the subduction input at Site C0012 has been experienced trench-parallel shortening. Although there is no logging data from Site C0012, the borehole breakouts in the sedimentary intervals at neighboring Site C0011 show a consistent maximum horizontal principal

  3. Poliomyelitis in MuLV-infected ICR-SCID mice after injection of basement membrane matrix contaminated with lactate dehydrogenase-elevating virus.

    PubMed

    Carlson Scholz, Jodi A; Garg, Rohit; Compton, Susan R; Allore, Heather G; Zeiss, Caroline J; Uchio, Edward M

    2011-10-01

    The arterivirus lactate dehydrogenase-elevating virus (LDV) causes life-long viremia in mice. Although LDV infection generally does not cause disease, infected mice that are homozygous for the Fv1(n) allele are prone to develop poliomyelitis when immunosuppressed, a condition known as age-dependent poliomyelitis. The development of age-dependent poliomyelitis requires coinfection with endogenous murine leukemia virus. Even though LDV is a common contaminant of transplantable tumors, clinical signs of poliomyelitis after inadvertent exposure to LDV have not been described in recent literature. In addition, LDV-induced poliomyelitis has not been reported in SCID or ICR mice. Here we describe the occurrence of poliomyelitis in ICR-SCID mice resulting from injection of LDV-contaminated basement membrane matrix. After exposure to LDV, a subset of mice presented with clinical signs including paresis, which was associated with atrophy of the hindlimb musculature, and tachypnea; in addition, some mice died suddenly with or without premonitory signs. Mice presenting within the first 6 mo after infection had regions of spongiosis, neuronal necrosis and astrocytosis of the ventral spinal cord, and less commonly, brainstem. Axonal degeneration of ventral roots prevailed in more chronically infected mice. LDV was identified by RT-PCR in 12 of 15 mice with typical neuropathology; positive antiLDV immunolabeling was identified in all PCR-positive animals (n = 7) tested. Three of 8 mice with neuropathology but no clinical signs were LDV negative by RT-PCR. RT-PCR yielded murine leukemia virus in spinal cords of all mice tested, regardless of clinical presentation or neuropathology.

  4. Nonautonomous Roles of MAB-5/Hox and the Secreted Basement Membrane Molecule SPON-1/F-Spondin in Caenorhabditis elegans Neuronal Migration.

    PubMed

    Josephson, Matthew P; Miltner, Adam M; Lundquist, Erik A

    2016-08-01

    Nervous system development and circuit formation requires neurons to migrate from their birthplaces to specific destinations.Migrating neurons detect extracellular cues that provide guidance information. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the Q right (QR) and Q left (QL) neuroblast descendants migrate long distances in opposite directions. The Hox gene lin-39 cell autonomously promotes anterior QR descendant migration, and mab-5/Hox cell autonomously promotes posterior QL descendant migration. Here we describe a nonautonomous role of mab-5 in regulating both QR and QL descendant migrations, a role masked by redundancy with lin-39 A third Hox gene, egl-5/Abdominal-B, also likely nonautonomously regulates Q descendant migrations. In the lin-39 mab-5 egl-5 triple mutant, little if any QR and QL descendant migration occurs. In addition to well-described roles of lin-39 and mab-5 in the Q descendants, our results suggest that lin-39, mab-5, and egl-5 might also pattern the posterior region of the animal for Q descendant migration. Previous studies showed that the spon-1 gene might be a target of MAB-5 in Q descendant migration. spon-1 encodes a secreted basement membrane molecule similar to vertebrate F-spondin. Here we show that spon-1 acts nonautonomously to control Q descendant migration, and might function as a permissive rather than instructive signal for cell migration. We find that increased levels of MAB-5 in body wall muscle (BWM) can drive the spon-1 promoter adjacent to the Q cells, and loss of spon-1 suppresses mab-5 gain of function. Thus, MAB-5 might nonautonomously control Q descendant migrations by patterning the posterior region of the animal to which Q cells respond. spon-1 expression from BWMs might be part of the posterior patterning necessary for directed Q descendant migration.

  5. Deoxynivalenol affects the composition of the basement membrane proteins and influences en route the migration of CD16(+) cells into the intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Nossol, Constanze; Diesing, A K; Kahlert, S; Kersten, S; Kluess, J; Ponsuksili, S; Hartig, R; Wimmers, K; Dänicke, S; Rothkötter, H J

    2013-11-01

    The numerous pores in the basement membrane (BM) of the intestinal villi are essential for the communication of enterocytes with cells in the lamina propria, an important mechanism for the induction of intestinal immune responses. The intestinal epithelial barrier is affected by the mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) from both the apical (luminal) and basolateral (serosal) side. The pig is the most susceptible species to the anorectic and immune-modulating effects of DON, which is most prevalent in crops. We analysed in pigs the effect of DON-contaminated feed on the composition and perforation of the BM and the presence of CD16(+) cells or their dendrites in the epithelium. In addition to in vivo experiments, in vitro studies were carried out. Using microarray analyses, the effects of DON on IPEC-J2 cells were studied with the focus on the BM. Our in vivo results showed in the control pigs: (1) a significant increased pore number (p ≤ 0.001) in the jejunum in comparison to ileum, (2) no difference in the pore size, and (3) comparable frequency of intraepithelial CD16(+) cells/dendrites in the jejunum and ileum. There was a marked trend that DON feeding increases: (1) the pore number in jejunum, and (2) the number of CD16(+) cells/dendrites in the epithelium (Tukey-Kramer; p = 0.055 and p = 0.067, respectively). The in vivo results were extended with microarray analyses of epithelial cell (IPEC-J2 cells). The down-regulation of genes like syndecan, fibulin 6 and BM-40 was observed. These proteins are important factors in the BM composition and in formation of pores. Our results provide evidence that already low basolateral concentrations of DON (50 ng/mL) influence the production of the BM protein laminin by epithelial cells. Thus, DON affects the composition of the BM.

  6. Symposium: Role of the extracellular matrix in mammary development. Regulation of milk protein and basement membrane gene expression: The influence of the extracellular matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Aggeler, J.; Park, C.S.; Bissell, M.J.

    1988-10-01

    Synthesis and secretion of milk proteins ({alpha}-casein, {beta}-casein, {gamma}-casein, and transferrin) by cultured primary mouse mammary epithelial cells is modulated by the extracellular matrix. In cells grown on released or floating type I collagen gels, mRNA for {beta}-casein and transferrin is increased as much as 30-fold over cells grown on plastic. Induction of {beta}-casein expression depends strongly on the presence of lactogenic hormones, especially prolactin, in the culture. When cells are plated onto partially purified reconstituted basement membrane, dramatic changes in morphology and milk protein gene expression are observed. Cells cultured on the matrix for 6 to 8 d in the presence of prolactin, insulin, and hydrocortisone form hollow spheres and duct-like structures that are completely surrounded by matrix. The cells lining these spheres appear actively secretory and are oriented with their apices facing the lumen. Hybridization experiments indicate that mRNA for {beta}-casein can be increased as much as 70-fold in these cultures. Because > 90% of the cultured cells synthesize immunoreactive {beta}-casein, as compared with only 40% of cells in the late pregnant gland, the matrix appears to be able to induce protein expression in previously silent cells. Synthesis of laminin and assembly of a mammary-specific basal lamina by cells cultured on different extracellular matrices also appears to depend on the presence of lactogenic hormones. These studies provide support for the concept of dynamic reciprocity in which complex interactions between extracellular matrix and the cellular cytoskeleton contribute to the induction and maintenance of tissue-specific gene expression in the mammary gland.

  7. Mapping structural landmarks, ligand binding sites and missense mutations to the collagen IV heterotrimers predicts major functional domains, novel interactions and variation in phenotypes in inherited diseases affecting basement membranes

    PubMed Central

    Des Parkin, J.; San Antonio, James D.; Pedchenko, Vadim; Hudson, Billy; Jensen, Shane T.; Savige, Judy

    2016-01-01

    Collagen IV is the major protein found in basement membranes. It comprises 3 heterotrimers (α1α1α2, α3α4α5, and α5α5α6) that form distinct networks, and are responsible for membrane strength and integrity. We constructed linear maps of the collagen IV heterotrimers (‘interactomes’) that indicated major structural landmarks, known and predicted ligand-binding sites, and missense mutations, in order to identify functional and disease-associated domains, potential interactions between ligands, and genotype-phenotype relationships. The maps documented more than 30 known ligand-binding sites as well as motifs for integrins, heparin, von Willebrand factor (VWF), decorin and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP). They predicted functional domains for angiogenesis and haemostasis, and disease domains for autoimmunity, tumor growth and inhibition, infection and glycation. Cooperative ligand interactions were indicated by binding site proximity, for example, between integrins, matrix metalloproteinases and heparin. The maps indicated that mutations affecting major ligand-binding sites, for example for Von Hippel Lindau (VHL) protein in the α1 chain or integrins in the α5 chain, resulted in distinctive phenotypes (Hereditary Angiopathy, Nephropathy, Aneurysms and muscle Cramps (HANAC) syndrome, and early onset Alport syndrome respectively). These maps further our understanding of basement membrane biology and disease, and suggest novel membrane interactions, functions, and therapeutic targets. PMID:21280145

  8. Targeted Expression of Stromelysin-1 in Mammary Gland Provides Evidence for a Role of Proteinases in Branching Morphogenesis and the Requirement for an Intact Basement Membrane for Tissue-specific Gene Expression

    SciTech Connect

    Sympson, Carolyn J; Talhouk, Rabih S; Alexander, Caroline M; Chin, Jennie R; Cliff, Shirley M; Bissell, Mina J; Werb, Zena

    1994-05-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is an important regulator of the differentiated phenotype of mammary epithelial cells in culture. Despite the fact that ECM-degrading enzymes have been implicated in morphogenesis and tissue remodeling, there is little evidence for a direct role for such regulation in vivo. We generated transgenic mice that express autoactivated isoforms of the matrix metalloproteinase stromelysin-1, under the control of the whey acidic protein gene promoter, to examine the effect of inappropriate expression of this enzyme. Stromelysin-1 is implicated as the primary player in the loss of basement membrane and loss of function in the mammary gland during involution. The transgene was expressed at low levels in mammary glands of virgin female mice, leading to an unexpected phenotype: The primary ducts had supernumerary branches and showed precocious development of alveoli that expressed beta-casein at levels similar to that of an early- to mid-pregnant gland. Lactating glands showed high levels of transgene expression, with accumulation at the basement membrane, and a decrease in laminin and collagen IV, resulting in a loss of basement membrane integrity; this was accompanied by a dramatic alteration of alveolar morphology, with decreased size and shrunken lumina containing little beta-casein. During pregnancy, expression of endogenous whey acidic protein and beta-casein was reduced in transgenic glands, confirming the observed dependence of milk protein transcription of ECM in mammary epithelial cells in culture. These data provide direct evidence that stromelysin-1 activity can be morphogenic for mammary epithelial cells, inducing hyperproliferation and differentiation in virgin animals, and that its lytic activity can, indeed, disrupt membrane integrity and reduce mammary-specific function. We conclude that the balance of ECM-degrading enzymes with their inhibitors, and the associated regulation of ECM structure, is crucial for tissue-specific gene

  9. Wnt5a Deficiency Leads to Anomalies in Ureteric Tree Development, Tubular Epithelial Cell Organization and Basement Membrane Integrity Pointing to a Role in Kidney Collecting Duct Patterning

    PubMed Central

    Pietilä, Ilkka; Prunskaite-Hyyryläinen, Renata; Kaisto, Susanna; Tika, Elisavet; van Eerde, Albertien M.; Salo, Antti M.; Garma, Leonardo; Miinalainen, Ilkka; Feitz, Wout F.; Bongers, Ernie M. H. F.; Juffer, André; Knoers, Nine V. A. M.; Renkema, Kirsten Y.; Myllyharju, Johanna; Vainio, Seppo J.

    2016-01-01

    The Wnts can be considered as candidates for the Congenital Anomaly of Kidney and Urinary Tract, CAKUT diseases since they take part in the control of kidney organogenesis. Of them Wnt5a is expressed in ureteric bud (UB) and its deficiency leads to duplex collecting system (13/90) uni- or bilateral kidney agenesis (10/90), hypoplasia with altered pattern of ureteric tree organization (42/90) and lobularization defects with partly fused ureter trunks (25/90) unlike in controls. The UB had also notably less tips due to Wnt5a deficiency being at E15.5 306 and at E16.5 765 corresponding to 428 and 1022 in control (p<0.02; p<0.03) respectively. These changes due to Wnt5a knock out associated with anomalies in the ultrastructure of the UB daughter epithelial cells. The basement membrane (BM) was malformed so that the BM thickness increased from 46.3 nm to 71.2 nm (p<0.01) at E16.5 in the Wnt5a knock out when compared to control. Expression of a panel of BM components such as laminin and of type IV collagen was also reduced due to the Wnt5a knock out. The P4ha1 gene that encodes a catalytic subunit of collagen prolyl 4-hydroxylase I (C-P4H-I) in collagen synthesis expression and the overall C-P4H enzyme activity were elevated by around 26% due to impairment in Wnt5a function from control. The compound Wnt5a+/-;P4ha1+/- embryos demonstrated Wnt5a-/- related defects, for example local hyperplasia in the UB tree. A R260H WNT5A variant was identified from renal human disease cohort. Functional studies of the consequence of the corresponding mouse variant in comparison to normal ligand reduced Wnt5a-signalling in vitro. Together Wnt5a has a novel function in kidney organogenesis by contributing to patterning of UB derived collecting duct development contributing putatively to congenital disease. PMID:26794322

  10. How to Study Basement Membrane Stiffness as a Biophysical Trigger in Prostate Cancer and Other Age-related Pathologies or Metabolic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Teja, Mercedes; Breit, Claudia; Clarke, Mitchell; Talar, Kamil; Wang, Kai; Mohammad, Mohammad A; Pickwell, Sage; Etchandy, Guillermina; Stasiuk, Graeme J; Sturge, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Here we describe a protocol that can be used to study the biophysical microenvironment related to increased thickness and stiffness of the basement membrane (BM) during age-related pathologies and metabolic disorders (e.g. cancer, diabetes, microvascular disease, retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy). The premise of the model is non-enzymatic crosslinking of reconstituted BM (rBM) matrix by treatment with glycolaldehyde (GLA) to promote advanced glycation endproduct (AGE) generation via the Maillard reaction. Examples of laboratory techniques that can be used to confirm AGE generation, non-enzymatic crosslinking and increased stiffness in GLA treated rBM are outlined. These include preparation of native rBM (treated with phosphate-buffered saline, PBS) and stiff rBM (treated with GLA) for determination of: its AGE content by photometric analysis and immunofluorescent microscopy, its non-enzymatic crosslinking by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS PAGE) as well as confocal microscopy, and its increased stiffness using rheometry. The procedure described here can be used to increase the rigidity (elastic moduli, E) of rBM up to 3.2-fold, consistent with measurements made in healthy versus diseased human prostate tissue. To recreate the biophysical microenvironment associated with the aging and diseased prostate gland three prostate cell types were introduced on to native rBM and stiff rBM: RWPE-1, prostate epithelial cells (PECs) derived from a normal prostate gland; BPH-1, PECs derived from a prostate gland affected by benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH); and PC3, metastatic cells derived from a secondary bone tumor originating from prostate cancer. Multiple parameters can be measured, including the size, shape and invasive characteristics of the 3D glandular acini formed by RWPE-1 and BPH-1 on native versus stiff rBM, and average cell length, migratory velocity and persistence of cell movement of 3D spheroids formed by PC3 cells under

  11. CD44/chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan and alpha 2 beta 1 integrin mediate human melanoma cell migration on type IV collagen and invasion of basement membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Knutson, J R; Iida, J; Fields, G B; McCarthy, J B

    1996-01-01

    Tumor cell invasion of basement membranes (BM) represents one of the critical steps in the metastatic process. Tumor cell recognition of individual BM matrix components may involve individual cell adhesion receptors, such as integrins or cell surface proteoglycans, or may involve a coordinate action of both types of receptors. In this study, we have focused on the identification of a cell surface CD44/chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) and alpha 2 beta 1 integrin on human melanoma cells that are both directly involved in the in vitro invasion of reconstituted BM via a type IV collagen-dependent mechanism. Interfering with cell surface expression of human melanoma CSPG with either p-nitro-phenyl-beta-D-xylopyranoside treatment or anti-CD44 monoclonal antibody (mAb) preincubation (mAb) preincubation inhibits melanoma cell invasion through reconstituted BM. These treatments also strongly inhibit melanoma cell migration on type IV collagen, however, they are ineffective at inhibiting cell adhesion to type IV collagen. Purified melanoma cell surface CD44/CSPG, or purified chondroitin sulfate, bind to type IV collagen affinity columns, consistent with a role for CD44/CSPG-type IV collagen interactions in mediating tumor cell invasion. In contrast, melanoma cell migration on laminin (LM) does not involve CD44/CSPG, nor does CD44/CSPG bind to LM, suggesting that CD44/CSPG-type IV collagen interactions are specific in nature. Additionally, anti-alpha 2 and anti-beta 1 integrin mAbs are capable of blocking melanoma cell invasion of reconstituted BM. Both of these anti-integrin mAbs inhibit melanoma cell adhesion and migration on type IV collagen, whereas only anti-beta 1 mAb inhibits cell adhesion to LM. Collectively, these results indicate that melanoma cell adhesion to type IV collagen is an important consideration in invasion of reconstituted BM in vitro, and suggest that CD44/CSPG and alpha 2 beta 1 integrin may collaborate to promote human melanoma cell adhesion

  12. Wnt5a Deficiency Leads to Anomalies in Ureteric Tree Development, Tubular Epithelial Cell Organization and Basement Membrane Integrity Pointing to a Role in Kidney Collecting Duct Patterning.

    PubMed

    Pietilä, Ilkka; Prunskaite-Hyyryläinen, Renata; Kaisto, Susanna; Tika, Elisavet; van Eerde, Albertien M; Salo, Antti M; Garma, Leonardo; Miinalainen, Ilkka; Feitz, Wout F; Bongers, Ernie M H F; Juffer, André; Knoers, Nine V A M; Renkema, Kirsten Y; Myllyharju, Johanna; Vainio, Seppo J

    2016-01-01

    The Wnts can be considered as candidates for the Congenital Anomaly of Kidney and Urinary Tract, CAKUT diseases since they take part in the control of kidney organogenesis. Of them Wnt5a is expressed in ureteric bud (UB) and its deficiency leads to duplex collecting system (13/90) uni- or bilateral kidney agenesis (10/90), hypoplasia with altered pattern of ureteric tree organization (42/90) and lobularization defects with partly fused ureter trunks (25/90) unlike in controls. The UB had also notably less tips due to Wnt5a deficiency being at E15.5 306 and at E16.5 765 corresponding to 428 and 1022 in control (p<0.02; p<0.03) respectively. These changes due to Wnt5a knock out associated with anomalies in the ultrastructure of the UB daughter epithelial cells. The basement membrane (BM) was malformed so that the BM thickness increased from 46.3 nm to 71.2 nm (p<0.01) at E16.5 in the Wnt5a knock out when compared to control. Expression of a panel of BM components such as laminin and of type IV collagen was also reduced due to the Wnt5a knock out. The P4ha1 gene that encodes a catalytic subunit of collagen prolyl 4-hydroxylase I (C-P4H-I) in collagen synthesis expression and the overall C-P4H enzyme activity were elevated by around 26% due to impairment in Wnt5a function from control. The compound Wnt5a+/-;P4ha1+/- embryos demonstrated Wnt5a-/- related defects, for example local hyperplasia in the UB tree. A R260H WNT5A variant was identified from renal human disease cohort. Functional studies of the consequence of the corresponding mouse variant in comparison to normal ligand reduced Wnt5a-signalling in vitro. Together Wnt5a has a novel function in kidney organogenesis by contributing to patterning of UB derived collecting duct development contributing putatively to congenital disease. PMID:26794322

  13. 2D and 3D modelling of the Linking Zone between the Iberian and the Catalan Coastal Ranges (NE Spain): Characterizing basement and cover deformation from geological and geophysical cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izquierdo-Llavall, Esther; Ayala, Concepción; Rubio, Félix Manuel; Pueyo, Emilio; Casas, Antonio; Oliva-Urcia, Belén; Rodríguez-Pintó, Adriana; Rey-Moral, Carmen

    2015-04-01

    reality. Second, the cross sections were imported in Move (by Midland Valley Exploration) and GeoModeller (by Intrepid Geosciences) to create a 3D geological model in accordance with all the geological observations. Finally, a 3D gravimetric inversion using GeoModeller was carried out to obtain the lithological horizons that also honor the petrophysical and gravimetric data. The studied area can be divided in three structural domains: (1) the eastern margin of the Aragonian Branch, (2) the Linking Zone and (3) the transition between the Linking Zone and the Catalan Coastal Ranges. In the Aragonian Branch, the main structures partly correspond to the inversion of basement faults limiting the margins of the Oliete sub-basin, Lower Cretaceous in age. The boundaries of this basin coincide with positive residual gravity anomalies. Structures in the Linking Zone belong to the northern margin of the inverted Morella basin (Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous) to the South and the thin-skinned Portalrubio-Vandellòs thrust system to the North, both separated by a strongly deformed zone corresponding to inverted structures in the marginal areas of the Mesozoic basin. In the Catalan Coastal Ranges, faults affecting the basement are dominant. Positive residual gravity anomalies match with antiformal structures at the front of the range and negative gravity anomalies to Plio-Quaternary basins superimposed on the Alpine compressional structure. In the foreland of the Iberian and Catalan Coastal ranges, the slightly deformed basement of the Cenozoic Ebro Basin is characterized by positive residual anomalies indicating the location of basement uplifts. From the 3D model we obtained a faulted, deformed basement at a maximum depth of 1700 m but generally found between 350 and 1400 m.

  14. Bioaugmented membrane bioreactor (MBR) with a GAC-packed zone for high rate textile wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Hai, Faisal Ibney; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Nakajima, Fumiyuki; Fukushi, Kensuke

    2011-03-01

    The long-term performance of a bioaugmented membrane bioreactor (MBR) containing a GAC-packed anaerobic zone for treatment of textile wastewater containing structurally different azo dyes was observed. A unique feeding strategy, consistent with the mode of evolution of separate waste streams in textile plants, was adopted to make the best use of the GAC-zone for dye removal. Dye was introduced through the GAC-zone while the rest of the colorless media was simultaneously fed through the aerobic zone. Preliminary experiments confirmed the importance of coupling the GAC-amended anaerobic zone to the aerobic MBR and also evidenced the efficacy of the adopted feeding strategy. Following this, the robustness of the process under gradually increasing dye-loading was tested. The respective average dye concentrations (mg/L) in the sample from GAC-zone and the membrane-permeate under dye-loadings of 0.1 and 1 g/L.d were as follows: GAC-zone (3, 105), permeate (0, 5). TOC concentration in membrane-permeate for the aforementioned loadings were 3 and 54 mg/L, respectively. Stable decoloration along with significant TOC removal during a period of over 7 months under extremely high dye-loadings demonstrated the superiority of the proposed hybrid process.

  15. Down-Regulation of the miRNA-200 Family at the Invasive Front of Colorectal Cancers with Degraded Basement Membrane Indicates EMT Is Involved in Cancer Progression12

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, Emily L; Kazenwadel, Jan; Bert, Andrew G; Khew-Goodall, Yeesim; Ruszkiewicz, Andrew; Goodall, Gregory J

    2013-01-01

    Cancer progression is a complex series of events thought to incorporate the reversible developmental process of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). In vitro, the microRNA-200 family maintains the epithelial phenotype by posttranscriptionally inhibiting the E-cadherin repressors, ZEB1 and ZEB2. Here, we used in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry to assess expression of miR-200 and EMT biomarkers in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded human colorectal adenocarcinomas. In addition, laser capture microdissection and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction were employed to quantify levels of miR-200 in the normal epithelium, tumor core, invasive front, and stroma. We find that miR-200 is downregulated at the invasive front of colorectal adenocarcinomas that have destroyed and invaded beyond the basement membrane. However, regional lymph node metastases and vascular carcinoma deposits show strong expression of miR-200, suggesting this family of miRNAs is involved in the recapitulation of the primary tumor phenotype at metastatic sites. In contrast, adenomas and adenocarcinomas with intact basement membranes showed uniform miR-200 expression from the tumor core to the tumor-host interface. Taken together, these data support the involvement of EMT and mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition (MET) in the metastasis cascade and show that miR-200 is downregulated in the initial stages of stromal invasion but is restored at metastatic sites. PMID:23441132

  16. NPHP4 controls ciliary trafficking of membrane proteins and large soluble proteins at the transition zone

    PubMed Central

    Awata, Junya; Takada, Saeko; Standley, Clive; Lechtreck, Karl F.; Bellvé, Karl D.; Pazour, Gregory J.; Fogarty, Kevin E.; Witman, George B.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The protein nephrocystin-4 (NPHP4) is widespread in ciliated organisms, and defects in NPHP4 cause nephronophthisis and blindness in humans. To learn more about the function of NPHP4, we have studied it in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. NPHP4 is stably incorporated into the distal part of the flagellar transition zone, close to the membrane and distal to CEP290, another transition zone protein. Therefore, these two proteins, which are incorporated into the transition zone independently of each other, define different domains of the transition zone. An nphp4-null mutant forms flagella with nearly normal length, ultrastructure and intraflagellar transport. When fractions from isolated wild-type and nphp4 flagella were compared, few differences were observed between the axonemes, but the amounts of certain membrane proteins were greatly reduced in the mutant flagella, and cellular housekeeping proteins >50 kDa were no longer excluded from mutant flagella. Therefore, NPHP4 functions at the transition zone as an essential part of a barrier that regulates both membrane and soluble protein composition of flagella. The phenotypic consequences of NPHP4 mutations in humans likely follow from protein mislocalization due to defects in the transition zone barrier. PMID:25150219

  17. Radon ( 222Rn) level variations on a regional scale from the Singhbhum Shear Zone, India: A comparative evaluation between influence of basement U-activity and porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, K. S.; Basu, A.; Guin, R.; Sengupta, D.

    2011-05-01

    This paper is devoted to the comparative study of the radon flux vs. uranium content and radon flux vs. porosity for mineral samples from some typical Indian rocks (schists, quartzites, argillaceous quartzites, slates and granites) used as building materials, primarily around the Singhbhum Shear Zone, Jharkhand State. As the radon flux of any particular rock type was investigated with reference to its uranium activity and porosity, a good concordance of porosity on radon flux was observed. Such a significant influence of porosity on radon flux was also observed when different rock types were inter-compared. For example, granite that is commonly considered as typical source of indoor radon showed depleted level of radon flux when compared to most other rocks in the study area. In case of rocks such as slates and argillaceous quartzites, low porosity exhibited reduced radon flux in spite of their enhanced radioactive source content. It is concluded that it may not be advisable to utilize materials that are uranium depleted for construction purposes without giving importance to the materials' porosity.

  18. Membrane interface probe protocol for contaminants in low-permeability zones.

    PubMed

    Adamson, David T; Chapman, Steven; Mahler, Nicholas; Newell, Charles; Parker, Beth; Pitkin, Seth; Rossi, Michael; Singletary, Mike

    2014-01-01

    Accurate characterization of contaminant mass in zones of low hydraulic conductivity (low k) is essential for site management because this difficult-to-treat mass can be a long-term secondary source. This study developed a protocol for the membrane interface probe (MIP) as a low-cost, rapid data-acquisition tool for qualitatively evaluating the location and relative distribution of mass in low-k zones. MIP operating parameters were varied systematically at high and low concentration locations at a contaminated site to evaluate the impact of the parameters on data quality relative to a detailed adjacent profile of soil concentrations. Evaluation of the relative location of maximum concentrations and the shape of the MIP vs. soil profiles led to a standard operating procedure (SOP) for the MIP to delineate contamination in low-k zones. This includes recommendations for: (1) preferred detector (ECD for low concentration zones, PID or ECD for higher concentration zones); (2) combining downlogged and uplogged data to reduce carryover; and (3) higher carrier gas flow rate in high concentration zones. Linear regression indicated scatter in all MIP-to-soil comparisons, including R(2) values using the SOP of 0.32 in the low concentration boring and 0.49 in the high concentration boring. In contrast, a control dataset with soil-to-soil correlations from borings 1-m apart exhibited an R(2) of ≥ 0.88, highlighting the uncertainty in predicting soil concentrations using MIP data. This study demonstrates that the MIP provides lower-precision contaminant distribution and heterogeneity data compared to more intensive high-resolution characterization methods. This is consistent with its use as a complementary screening tool.

  19. 7. VIEW OF BASEMENT, LOOKING NORTH ALONG EAST BASEMENT WALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW OF BASEMENT, LOOKING NORTH ALONG EAST BASEMENT WALL TOWARD TURBINES. AT RIGHT IS A WATER-POWERED EAR CORN CRUSHER (manufacturer unknown), WHICH PERFORMED THE INITIAL COARSE GRINDING OF EAR CORN Photographer: Jet T. Lowe, 1985 - Alexander's Grist Mill, Lock 37 on Ohio & Erie Canal, South of Cleveland, Valley View, Cuyahoga County, OH

  20. The genes for the alpha 1(IV) and alpha 2(IV) chains of human basement membrane collagen type IV are arranged head-to-head and separated by a bidirectional promoter of unique structure.

    PubMed Central

    Pöschl, E; Pollner, R; Kühn, K

    1988-01-01

    The human basement membrane specific collagen type IV is a heterotrimer composed of two alpha 1(IV) chains and one alpha 2(IV) chain. A partial genomic EcoRI library was screened with cDNA clones representing the 5' end regions of the alpha 1(IV) and the alpha 2(IV) mRNA. A 2.2-kb genomic fragment was isolated and sequenced, which contains the 5' terminal exons of both genes located in close vicinity. The two genes were found to be arranged in opposite direction, head-to-head, separated only by a short region of 127 bp, apparently representing promoters of both genes as indicated by the existence of typical sequence motifs (CAT-box, SP1 consensus sequence). These data suggest that the alpha 1(IV) and alpha 2(IV) genes use a common, bidirectional promoter. The striking symmetrical arrangement of sequence elements within the promoter may be of basic importance for the coordination of bidirectional transcription. The promoter region had no detectable transcriptional activity in transient gene expression assays after fusion to the chloramphenicol acetylase (CAT) gene in either direction, indicating the necessity of additional elements for efficient and tissue-specific expression of both genes. Constructs containing different segments of both genes failed to identify regions with enhancing activity for the homologous collagen type IV promoter. When the heterologous HSV thymidine kinase promoter was used, a negatively acting region was identified. This indicates that the alpha 1(IV) and alpha 2(IV) promoter activity is controlled by additional regulatory elements present on distant portions of both genes. Images PMID:2846280

  1. A Novel Teflon-membrane Gas Tension Device for Denitrification-studies in Oxygen Minimum Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, A. C.; McNeil, C. L.; D'Asaro, E. A.; Altabet, M. A.; Johnson, B.; Bourbonnais, A.

    2014-12-01

    Oxygen Minimum Zones (OMZs) are global hotspots for the biogeochemical transformation of biologically-available forms of nitrogen to unusable nitrogen-gas. We present a new Teflon-membrane based Gas Tension Device (GTD) for measuring the excess N2 signal generated by denitrification and anammox in OMZs, with a hydrostatic pressure-independent response and a depth range from 0 - 550 m, a significant advancement from previous GTD models. The GTD consists of a 4/1000" thick by 2" diameter Teflon-membrane with a water-side plenum connected to SeaBird 5T pump. Dissolved gases in the water equilibrate across the membrane with a low-dead-volume housing connected to a high-precision quart pressure sensor. Laboratory data characterizing the GTD will be presented. The e-folding (response) time ranges from 14 min at continuous (100%) pumping to 28 min at pulse (10%) pumping. We also demonstrate the pressure dependence of the partial pressures from Henry's Law in the laboratory for pure nitrogen, pure oxygen, and standard atmospheric ratios of gases. GTD's were field tested on two floats deployed in the Eastern Tropical North Pacific (ETNP) OMZ for 15 days that targeted a productive mesoscale surface eddy originating from the Mexican coast. We anticipated that high organic carbon export should stimulate denitrification within the OMZ below. The floats profiled between the surface and 400 m depth and concurrently measured T, S, PAR, O2 (SBE 43 and Optode), and nitrate (SUNA). The N2-profiles from the GTDs are validated against independently measured N2/Ar ratio data collected during the deployment.

  2. [Species specificity of morphogenetic factors of Acetabularia, localized in the cytoplasmic zone adjacent to the cell membrane].

    PubMed

    Naumova, G A; Naumova, L P; Puchkova, L I; Savchenko, S M; Sandakhchiev, L S

    1976-01-01

    The species specificity of the factors controlling the cap development was established in the experiments with the transplantation of both the intact and centrifuged in the basal direction apical regions of Acetabularia meditteranea on nuclear basal regions of A. crenulata. These factors are found at the stage of 72 hrs of regeneration primarily in the cytoplasmic zone adjacent to the cell membrane which is not displaced during centrifugation. Using direct measurements and radiochemical method, we have shown that the accumulation of proteins proceeded in this zone due, mainly, to their transition from the cytoplasmic zone displaced during centrifugation.

  3. The interplay of fold mechanisms and basement weaknesses at the transition between Laramide basement-involved arches, north-central Wyoming, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neely, Thomas G.; Erslev, Eric A.

    2009-09-01

    Horizontally-shortened, basement-involved foreland orogens commonly exhibit anastomosing networks of bifurcating basement highs (here called arches) whose structural culminations are linked by complex transition zones of diversely-oriented faults and folds. The 3D geometry and kinematics of the southern Beartooth arch transition zone of north-central Wyoming were studied to understand the fold mechanisms and control on basement-involved arches. Data from 1581 slickensided minor faults are consistent with a single regional shortening direction of 065°. Evidence for oblique-slip, vertical axis rotations and stress refraction at anomalously-oriented folds suggests formation over reactivated pre-existing weaknesses. Restorable cross-sections and 3D surfaces, constrained by surface, well, and seismic data, document blind, ENE-directed basement thrusting and associated thin-skinned backthrusting and folding along the Beartooth and Oregon Basin fault systems. Between these systems, the basement-cored Rattlesnake Mountain backthrust followed basement weaknesses and rotated a basement chip toward the basin before the ENE-directed Line Creek fault system broke through and connected the Beartooth and Oregon Basin fault systems. Slip was transferred at the terminations of the Rattlesnake Mountain fault block by pivoting to the north and tear faulting to the south. In summary, unidirectional Laramide compression and pre-existing basement weaknesses combined with fault-propagation and rotational fault-bend folding to create an irregular yet continuous basement arch transition.

  4. Basement plan. ("Alter COC Bldg 2605, Basement Plan and Architectural ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Basement plan. ("Alter COC Bldg 2605, Basement Plan and Architectural Details.") Strategic Air Command, Riverside, California, March Air Force Base. Drawing no. B-973, sheet no. 1 of 6, 14 April 1966; project no. MAR-267-5; CE-353; file drawer 1308. Last revised 20 October 1966. Various scales. 28x40 inches. pencil on paper - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  5. 22. VIEW OF THE BASEMENT FLOOR PLAN. THE BASEMENT TUNNELS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. VIEW OF THE BASEMENT FLOOR PLAN. THE BASEMENT TUNNELS WERE DESIGNED AS FALLOUT SHELTERS AND USED FOR STORAGE. THE ORIGINAL DRAWING HAS BEEN ARCHIVED ON MICROFILM. THE DRAWING WAS REPRODUCED AT THE BEST QUALITY POSSIBLE. LETTERS AND NUMBERS IN THE CIRCLES INDICATE FOOTER AND/OR COLUMN LOCATIONS. - Rocky Flats Plant, General Manufacturing, Support, Records-Central Computing, Southern portion of Plant, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  6. Measure Guideline: Basement Insulation Basics

    SciTech Connect

    Aldrich, R.; Mantha, P.; Puttagunta, S.

    2012-10-01

    This guideline is intended to describe good practices for insulating basements in new and existing homes, and is intended to be a practical resources for building contractors, designers, and also to homeowners.

  7. Seismotectonics of Reelfoot rift basement structures

    SciTech Connect

    Dart, R.L.; Swolfs, H.S. )

    1993-03-01

    Contour maps of the Precambrian basement surface show major northwest-trending structural features within the boundaries of the northeast-oriented Reelfoot rift. These northwest-trending features, southeast of New Madrid, Missouri, consist of a trough flanked on the northeast by a 2-km-high ridge. These features correlate with similar features on an updated depth-to-magnetic basement map. The boundary between the trough and the ridge slopes gently to the southwest. The upward projection of this boundary into the overlying Paleozoic strata may be expressed on a structure-contour map of the Cambrian rocks. The vertical relief of this boundary on the younger datum is inferred to be about 1 km. This Precambrian trough-ridge structure may correlate with a southwest dipping, west-northwest-striking normal fault inferred by Schwalb (1982) to offset rocks of the Cambrian-Ordovician Knox Megagroup that subcrop at the Paleozoic surface. Schwalb (1982) inferred 1.22 km of vertical relief on this fault near the bootheel of Missouri. The nature and significance of this tectonic-structural boundary is unclear, but at the top of the Precambrian basement rocks, it coincides with the southwestern terminus of the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ) near the end of the Blytheville arch in northeastern Arkansas. Since the mid-1970's, when instrumental recording began, some of the earthquakes in the NMSZ having the largest magnitudes occurred in this area. The authors working hypothesis is that this trough-ridge structural boundary may concentrate stress and/or may be a barrier that defines the southwestern limit of the seismically active axial fault zone in the rift. Future study will concentrate on improving the understanding of the influence of rift-bounding faults on the lateral extent of this structure, as well as constructing a tectonic stress model of seismically active rift faults and this trough-ridge structure.

  8. 20. VIEW OF THE BASEMENT FLOOR PLAN. THE BASEMENT AREA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. VIEW OF THE BASEMENT FLOOR PLAN. THE BASEMENT AREA INCLUDES A UTILITY ROOM, PROCESS WASTE STORAGE AND MAINTENANCE AREAS, AND THE ENTRANCE TO AN UNDERGROUND TUNNEL LEADING TO BUILDING 881. THE ORIGINAL DRAWING HAS BEEN ARCHIVED ON MICROFILM. THE DRAWING WAS REPRODUCED AT THE BEST QUALITY POSSIBLE. LETTERS AND NUMBERS IN THE CIRCLES INDICATE FOOTER AND/OR COLUMN LOCATIONS. - Rocky Flats Plant, Uranium Rolling & Forming Operations, Southeast section of plant, southeast quadrant of intersection of Central Avenue & Eighth Street, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  9. Plasma membrane proteomics in the maize primary root growth zone: novel insights into root growth adaptation to water stress.

    PubMed

    Voothuluru, Priyamvada; Anderson, Jeffrey C; Sharp, Robert E; Peck, Scott C

    2016-09-01

    Previous work on maize (Zea mays L.) primary root growth under water stress showed that cell elongation is maintained in the apical region of the growth zone but progressively inhibited further from the apex. These responses involve spatially differential and coordinated regulation of osmotic adjustment, modification of cell wall extensibility, and other cellular growth processes that are required for root growth under water-stressed conditions. As the interface between the cytoplasm and the apoplast (including the cell wall), the plasma membrane likely plays critical roles in these responses. Using a simplified method for enrichment of plasma membrane proteins, the developmental distribution of plasma membrane proteins was analysed in the growth zone of well-watered and water-stressed maize primary roots. The results identified 432 proteins with differential abundances in well-watered and water-stressed roots. The majority of changes involved region-specific patterns of response, and the identities of the water stress-responsive proteins suggest involvement in diverse biological processes including modification of sugar and nutrient transport, ion homeostasis, lipid metabolism, and cell wall composition. Integration of the distinct, region-specific plasma membrane protein abundance patterns with results from previous physiological, transcriptomic and cell wall proteomic studies reveals novel insights into root growth adaptation to water stress.

  10. Plasma membrane proteomics in the maize primary root growth zone: novel insights into root growth adaptation to water stress.

    PubMed

    Voothuluru, Priyamvada; Anderson, Jeffrey C; Sharp, Robert E; Peck, Scott C

    2016-09-01

    Previous work on maize (Zea mays L.) primary root growth under water stress showed that cell elongation is maintained in the apical region of the growth zone but progressively inhibited further from the apex. These responses involve spatially differential and coordinated regulation of osmotic adjustment, modification of cell wall extensibility, and other cellular growth processes that are required for root growth under water-stressed conditions. As the interface between the cytoplasm and the apoplast (including the cell wall), the plasma membrane likely plays critical roles in these responses. Using a simplified method for enrichment of plasma membrane proteins, the developmental distribution of plasma membrane proteins was analysed in the growth zone of well-watered and water-stressed maize primary roots. The results identified 432 proteins with differential abundances in well-watered and water-stressed roots. The majority of changes involved region-specific patterns of response, and the identities of the water stress-responsive proteins suggest involvement in diverse biological processes including modification of sugar and nutrient transport, ion homeostasis, lipid metabolism, and cell wall composition. Integration of the distinct, region-specific plasma membrane protein abundance patterns with results from previous physiological, transcriptomic and cell wall proteomic studies reveals novel insights into root growth adaptation to water stress. PMID:27341663

  11. Ivory Basements and Ivory Towers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Tanya

    2012-01-01

    The metaphors of the ivory tower and ivory basement are used in this chapter to reflect how many women understand and experience the academy. The ivory tower signifies a place that is protected, a place of privilege and authority and a place removed from the outside world (and consequently the rigours of the market place). The ivory tower, by…

  12. Injection-induced seismicity on basement faults including poroelastic stressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, K. W.; Segall, P.

    2016-04-01

    Most significant induced earthquakes occur on faults within the basement beneath sedimentary cover. In this two-dimensional plane strain numerical study, we examine the full poroelastic response of basement faults to fluid injection into overlying strata, considering both (1) the permeability of the fault zone and (2) the hydraulic connectivity of the faults to the target horizon. Given hydraulic and mechanical properties, we compute the spatiotemporal change in Coulomb stress, which we separate into (1) the change in poroelastic stresses Δτs+fΔσn, where Δτs and Δσn are changes in shear and normal stress (Δτs>0 and Δσn>0 both favor slip), and (2) the change in pore pressure fΔp. Pore pressure diffusion into hydraulically connected, permeable faults dominates their mechanical stability. For hydraulically isolated or low-permeability faults, however, poroelastic stresses transmitted to deeper basement levels can trigger slip, even without elevated pore pressure. The seismicity rate on basement fault zones is predicted using the model of Dieterich (1994). High seismicity rates can occur on permeable, hydraulically connected faults due to direct pore pressure diffusion. Lower rates are predicted on isolated steeply dipping normal faults, caused solely by poroelastic stressing. In contrast, seismicity on similarly oriented reverse faults is inhibited.

  13. Aldosterone secretion, measurements of membrane potential and intracellular potassium activity in the isolated adrenal zone glomerulosa.

    PubMed

    Wiederholt, M; Hampel, J; Belkien, L; Oelkers, W

    1984-09-01

    Cell membrane potential and intracellular potassium activity (microelectrodes filled with ion-sensitive liquid ion exchanger) were measured in the zona glomerulosa of superfused hemi-adrenals of rats kept on different diets. Simultaneously, samples of the superfusate were collected and analyzed by radioimmunoassay for aldosterone content. Cell membrane potential and intracellular potassium activity were not influenced by high sodium, low sodium or high potassium diet. However, aldosterone secretion significantly changed. These results suggest that membrane potential and intracellular potassium activity per se may not be linked to changes in aldosterone secretion.

  14. Basement control on sand distribution in the Hamaca area of the Orinoco Belt

    SciTech Connect

    Flores, D.; Uzcategui, M. )

    1993-02-01

    The interpretation of aeromagnetic and seismic data in the Hamaca area of the Orinoco Belt helped to determine the basement topographic control of the sedimentation in the Hamaca area. The Cretaceous thin wedge preserved in the northwestern part of the area had a very limited effect on the deposition of sediments. Two different basement grains were interpreted from the aeromagnetic data. The contact between these two basement typed precluded the existence of a differential erosional zone along it, which exerted control on the drainage pattern of the tertiary sedimentation. Focally, fault scarps and monaduocks affected sand deposition. Regional mapping of the lower tertiary sands correlates with the basement features. The integrated regional interpretation of geophysical and geological data allowed the delineation of passive and active basement structures and their effect on the tertiary sand-shale distribution.

  15. Hercynian basement faults control and hydrocarbon habitat in Morocco

    SciTech Connect

    Elouataoui, A.; Jabour, H.; Ait, S.A.

    1996-12-31

    Geologic, geophysical and remote sensing evidence shows that the Paleozoic basement of Morocco is fragmented at various scales. Wrench faults, difficult to identify by conventional methods were examined from a regional perspective and through careful observation and assessment of many factors. Subsurface structural mapping and geoseismic cross-sections supported by outcrop studies and geomorphological features revealed a network of strike slip faults. Although controversy still surrounds interpretation of major faults as wrench type, with various amounts of strike-slip, or as reverse dip-slip with large amount of shortening, mapping of these basement fault block pattern in Moroccan sedimentary basins revealed literally many correlations of these blocks with prospective structures. These range from simple fault traps, to horst blocks, to fracture systems, to asymmetrical folds over reverse faults. Additionally, many types of stratigraphic traps correlate with basement shear zones. One example is the Middle Devonian algal mounds complex in the Doukkala Basin that evidently formed on fault scarps and/or fault-caused sea floor highs. The present study demonstrates that most of defined prospective structures in Morocco result from basement fault control and considers precise mapping of these pattern a pervasive and prerequisite exploration approach to go forward in upcoming exploration programs.

  16. Hercynian basement faults control and hydrocarbon habitat in Morocco

    SciTech Connect

    Elouataoui, A.; Jabour, H.; Ait, S.A. )

    1996-01-01

    Geologic, geophysical and remote sensing evidence shows that the Paleozoic basement of Morocco is fragmented at various scales. Wrench faults, difficult to identify by conventional methods were examined from a regional perspective and through careful observation and assessment of many factors. Subsurface structural mapping and geoseismic cross-sections supported by outcrop studies and geomorphological features revealed a network of strike slip faults. Although controversy still surrounds interpretation of major faults as wrench type, with various amounts of strike-slip, or as reverse dip-slip with large amount of shortening, mapping of these basement fault block pattern in Moroccan sedimentary basins revealed literally many correlations of these blocks with prospective structures. These range from simple fault traps, to horst blocks, to fracture systems, to asymmetrical folds over reverse faults. Additionally, many types of stratigraphic traps correlate with basement shear zones. One example is the Middle Devonian algal mounds complex in the Doukkala Basin that evidently formed on fault scarps and/or fault-caused sea floor highs. The present study demonstrates that most of defined prospective structures in Morocco result from basement fault control and considers precise mapping of these pattern a pervasive and prerequisite exploration approach to go forward in upcoming exploration programs.

  17. Precambrian basement geologic map of Montana; an interpretation of aeromagnetic anomalies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sims, P.K.; O'Neill, J. M.; Bankey, Viki; Anderson, E.

    2004-01-01

    Newly compiled aeromagnetic anomaly data of Montana, in conjunction with the known geologic framework of basement rocks, have been combined to produce a new interpretive geologic basement map of Montana. Crystalline basement rocks compose the basement, but are exposed only in the cores of mountain ranges in southwestern Montana. Principal features deduced from the map are: (1) A prominent northeast-trending, 200-km-wide zone of spaced negative anomalies, which extends more than 700 km from southwestern Montana's Beaverhead Mountains to the Canadian border and reflects suturing of the Archean Mexican Hat Block against the Archean Wyoming Province along the Paleoproterozoic Trans-Montana Orogen (new name) at about 1.9-1.8 Ga; (2) North-northwest-trending magnetic lows in northeastern Montana, which reflect the 1.9-1.8 Ga Trans-Hudson Orogen and truncate the older Trans-Montana Zone; and (3) Subtle northwest- and west-trending negative anomalies in central and western Montana, which represent the northernmost segment of brittle-ductile transcurrent faults of the newly recognized Mesoproterozoic Trans-Rocky Mountain fault system. Structures developed in the Proterozoic provided zones of crustal weakness reactivated during younger Proterozoic and Phanerozoic igneous and tectonic activity. For example, the Trans-Montana Zone guided basement involved thrust faulting in southwestern Montana during the Sevier Orogeny. The Boulder Batholith and associated ore deposits and the linear belt of alkaline intrusions to the northeast were localized along a zone of weakness between the Missouri River suture and the Dillon shear zone of the Trans-Montana Orogen. The northwest-trending faults of Trans-Rocky Mountain system outline depocenters for sedimentary rocks in the Belt Basin. This fault system provided zones of weakness that guided Laramide uplifts during basement crustal shortening. Northwest-trending zones have been locally reactivated during Neogene basin-range extension.

  18. Quantitative determination of the prograde P-T path by garnet zonation pattern from the Buchan-type pelitic schists of the Hamadan crystalline basement, Sanandaj-Sirjan zone, western Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monfaredi, Behzad; Hauzenberger, Christoph; Neubauer, Franz; Shakerardakani, Farzaneh; Halama, Ralf

    2015-04-01

    Garnet frequently records the P-T evolution of metamorphic rocks by changes in their chemical composition during growth. Unless diffusive modifications or resorption of the garnet grains occur, the chemical zonation pattern can be used to quantitatively model the prograde metamorphic history. A case study using an automated calculation method determining the P-T path based on garnet zoning (Moynihan and Pattison 2013) is presented for the Hamadan metamorphic area. The studied area is located in the Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone (SSZ) and consists of a large region ~ 600 km2 of mainly five different types of medium- to high-grade garnet-bearing rocks: (1) garnet±staurolite schist, (2) andalusite±staurolite schist, (3) silimanite±andalusite schist, (4) andalusite±cordierite hornfels, and (5) cordierite hornfels adjacent to the eastern/south-eastern part of the middle-Jurassic Alvand pluton. Garnet is nearly ubiquitous and occurs in different grain sizes and textures mainly having a post-deformation origin in all metamorphic zones. Garnets contain quartz, graphite and ilmenite inclusions and typically appear euhedral to subhedral in shape, although corners and edges of crystals show some retrograde features such as rounding and partial replacement by biotite and chlorite. Nearly all mentioned different schists contain compositionally zoned garnet with dominant almandine (66-81%), minor spessartine (4-20%) and pyrope (7-13%) and subordinate grossular (2-8%) components. Core-to-rim profiles of garnet porphyroblasts from garnet-staurolite schists typically display a remarkable increase in XAlm, a slight increase in XPrp, whereas XGrs is roughly constant and XSps decreases. Garnet zonation patterns reflect prograde metamorphism and zonation variations apparently are due to bulk-rock depletion caused by fractional garnet crystallization. Best-fit P-T paths were calculated for the five different Hamadan metamorphic zones using a MATLAB script and the THERIAK software (de

  19. Subsidence resistant repair of a block basement

    SciTech Connect

    Mahar, J.W.; Marino, G.G.; Murphy, E.; Farnetti, J.

    1998-12-31

    A one story house was damaged by mine subsidence movement. The house is located in a small subsidence sag and is experiencing differential settlement and compressive ground strains. Instead of waiting for the ground movements to eventually stop, The Illinois Mine Subsidence Insurance Fund developed a permanent repair scheme that was implemented at the same time damaging mine subsidence movement was affecting the structure. This repair provided a significant structural resistance against the anticipated residual mine subsidence movement and was aesthetically acceptable to the homeowners. The repair consisted of epoxying vertical and horizontal steel straps and then applying a cover coat of fiber-cement on the unreinforced concrete block basement walls. The repair scheme was relatively untried, but had been successfully researched. This paper provides information on the mine subsidence movement/damage, the design concepts of steel strap/fiber-cement repair, construction details, performance and costs. Other applications of the use of the steel strap repair method are also discussed for releveling of a building and/or correcting subsidence damage to structures located in the tension zone.

  20. Regional geophysics and the basement of cratonic basins: a comparative study with the Michigan basin

    SciTech Connect

    Hinze, W.J.; Lidiak, E.G.

    1986-08-01

    The basement of the Michigan basin consists of four major provinces - the complex metasedimentary, metavolcanic, and igneous rocks of the Penokean orogenic assemblage in the north, the felsic anorogenic igneous rocks to the south, the highly metamorphosed schists, gneisses, and related igneous intrusions of the Grenville province in the east, and a middle Proterozoic rift zone, which transects the basin from the north to the southeast margin. Sparse basement drill holes and characteristic geophysical patterns support this interpretation. The direct geologic information on the basement of other cratonic basins is not as well known. However, regional geophysical surveys and sparse, poorly distributed basement drill holes provide information on the complex character and structural relationships of the basement of other basins. Like the Michigan basin, many cratonic basins (e.g., Illinois, Williston, and Paris basins) are underlain by dense and commonly more magnetic rocks than adjacent areas. As in the Michigan basin, these rocks are interpreted to have a profound effect on the origin and tectonic development of the basins. Geologic and geophysical evidence indicates that many of these dense basement rocks originated in rifts that formed hundreds of millions of years prior to basin development. A comparison of the basement in cratonic basins provides important constraints on the origin and tectonic development of the Michigan basin.

  1. Basement-cover interaction in the Adelaide Foldbelt, South Australia: the development of an arcuate foldbelt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, Geoffrey L.; Powell, Roger

    1989-02-01

    The upper Proterozoic- to Cambrian-aged sedimentary and volcanic rocks comprising the Adelaide Foldbelt were deformed and, in places, metamorphosed during the Cambro-Ordovician Delamerian Orogeny. Tectonic fabrics developed in the central portion of the foldbelt (Mt. Lofty Ranges) demonstrate westward transport during the orogeny. The sigmoidal shape outlined by the Kangaroo Is., Mt. Lofty Ranges, Olary portion of the foldbelt is interpreted to have been the result of dextral wrench faulting in the lower- to mid-Proterozoic basement. Thus, cover rocks overlying such basement wrench fault zones would have suffered a transpressional stress regime, giving rise to the observed fold axis oriented at an oblique angle to the thrust boundary. In the northern portion of the foldbelt (Northern Flinders Ranges), wrench faulting is interpreted to have accommodated considerable basement shortening which initiated a basement-cover décollement and resulted in thrust-bound pop-up structures in the cover.

  2. Mesozoic tectonic features of the Floridan Plateau basement

    SciTech Connect

    Lord, K.M. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    Digitally-filtered Bouguer gravity anomaly maps of the Floridan Plateau delineate the Mesozoic extensional basins in the southwestern half of the plateau and suggest modification of existing basement models. The extension into Florida of the Triassic South Georgia Rift is marked by a gravity low and appears to have small ancillary rift basins paralleling its southeastern border. The Jurassic Apalachicola, Tampa, and South Florida Basins are delineated by positive anomalies, possibly attributable to the emplacement of hypabyssal rocks, and are separated by the negative anomalies of the Middle Ground and Sarasota Arches. The Tampa Basin is more aerially extensive than shown on previous basement maps, extending from the Jay Fault zone to the western edge of the plateau. The South Florida Basin is likely comprised of three separate NW-trending grabens sharing a common northwestern boundary. Existing seismic reflection profiles provide a characterization of some of the boundaries of these features. All of them, with the possible exception of the Apalachicola Basin, are bounded by the Jay Fault zone, a probable Paleozoic right-lateral strike-slip zone, segments of which were reactivated during the Mesozoic to accommodate differential vertical movement related to extension.

  3. Basement extension and salt mobility, southern Grand Banks, Newfoundland

    SciTech Connect

    Balkwill, H.R.; Legall, F.

    1986-05-01

    The Grand Banks, an especially wide cratonic segment of the North American Atlantic continental shelf, extended vigorously during Late Triassic-Aptian rift-phase episodes, accompanied by syntectonic basin filling and large-scale structural disruption. Thereafter, the rift-disrupted domain underwent drift-phase subsidence and was buried by a seaward-prograding continental terrace wedge, in which progressively feeble extension is evident. Rift-faulted cratonic basement is perceptible on industry-acquired reflection seismic profiles from the southern Grand Banks. The profiles also show that Carboniferous and Lower Jurassic salt were the main levels of supracrustal detachment during Jurassic and Early Cretaceous extension. Large salt-mobilized structures within the rift-phase succession include fault-zone sheaths, elongate pillows, aligned piercement spires, and immense walls. These elements parallel large extension faults in basement and, in many places, are superposed on the faults. In striking contrast, upper Aptian and younger drift-phase strata are regionally subhorizontal, and are broken to middle and late Tertiary stratigraphic levels by only a few small extension faults and aligned diapirs. The authors interpret the structural/stratigraphic relationships in the southern Grand Banks to indicate that episodic Mesozoic and Cenozoic basement extension was the principal dynamic agent in determining the timing of salt structures, their orientations, and styles of disruption on enclosing strata. This genetic association may be applicable to other parts of the Grand Banks tectonic province, and possibly to other extensional cratonic margin basins.

  4. Properties of the mitochondrial membrane and carnitine palmitoyltransferase in the periportal and the perivenous zone of the liver. Effects of chronic ethanol feeding.

    PubMed

    Castro, J; Cortés, J P; Guzmán, M

    1991-06-15

    Rats were fed for 35 days a high-fat diet containing either 36% of total calories as ethanol (ethanol group) or an isocaloric amount of carbohydrate (control group). Then, mitochondria were isolated from the periportal and the perivenous zone of the liver in order to study the acinar heterogeneity of the effects of prolonged ethanol administration upon the properties of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT-I) and its membrane environment. Chronic ethanol ingestion selectively decreased CPT-I activity in periportal hepatocytes but equally increased enzyme sensitivity to malonyl-CoA and enzyme energy of activation in the two zones of the liver. In control animals, mitochondrial membrane showed higher fluidity and lower degree of saturation of phospholipid fatty acyl moieties in periportal than in perivenous hepatocytes. Prolonged ethanol feeding (i) decreased mitochondrial membrane fluidity; (ii) increased the proportion of palmitic acid and decreased that of arachidonic acid in mitochondrial phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine, whereas it drastically reduced the content of linoleic acid and concomitantly increased that of saturated and monoenoic fatty acids in cardiolipin; (iii) suppressed the disordering effects of the addition of ethanol to mitochondrial suspensions. All these ethanol-induced alterations of membrane fluidity and fatty acyl composition were not significantly different between periportal and perivenous mitochondria. In conclusion, chronic ethanol feeding changes the activity of CPT-I in a zone-selective manner but modifies both the regulatory properties of the enzyme and the properties of its lipid environment in a non-zone-selective manner. Hence factors in addition to the properties of the mitochondrial membrane seem to be involved in the ethanol-induced alterations of the CPT-I enzyme.

  5. Occupant radon exposure in houses with basements

    SciTech Connect

    Franklin, E.M.; Fuoss, S.

    1995-12-31

    This study compares basement and main-level radon exposure based on bi-level week-long radon measurements, occupancy and activity data collected in normal use during heating and non-heating seasons in a geographically-stratified random sample of about 600 Minnesota homes, in response to critiques of radon measurement protocol. Basement radon (RN1) (M=4.5, SD=4.5) and main level (Rn2)(M=2.9, SD=3.4) correlation was 0.8 (p=.00), including seasonal variation. In a 101-house subsample where Rn1 >=4.0 pCi/L and Rn2 <=3.9 pCi/L, maximum household exposure in basements was 1162 pCiHrs (M=120, Sd=207), main-level 2486 pCiHrs (M-434, SD=421). In same households, persons with most basement-time maxed 100 hrs (M=13,SD=23), persons with most main-level time maxed 160 hrs (M=79, SD=39). Basement activities show two patterns, (1) member used it for personal domain, e.g. sleeping, and (2) household used it for general activities, e.g. TV or children`s play. Basement occupancy justifies measurement of radon in the lowest livable housing level.

  6. Sub‐cellular location of FtsH proteases in the cyanobacterium S ynechocystis sp. PCC 6803 suggests localised PSII repair zones in the thylakoid membranes

    PubMed Central

    Sacharz, Joanna; Bryan, Samantha J.; Yu, Jianfeng; Burroughs, Nigel J.; Spence, Edward M.; Nixon, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary In cyanobacteria and chloroplasts, exposure to HL damages the photosynthetic apparatus, especially the D1 subunit of Photosystem II. To avoid chronic photoinhibition, a PSII repair cycle operates to replace damaged PSII subunits with newly synthesised versions. To determine the sub‐cellular location of this process, we examined the localisation of FtsH metalloproteases, some of which are directly involved in degrading damaged D1. We generated transformants of the cyanobacterium S ynechocystis sp. PCC6803 expressing GFP‐tagged versions of its four FtsH proteases. The ftsH2–gfp strain was functional for PSII repair under our conditions. Confocal microscopy shows that FtsH1 is mainly in the cytoplasmic membrane, while the remaining FtsH proteins are in patches either in the thylakoid or at the interface between the thylakoid and cytoplasmic membranes. HL exposure which increases the activity of the Photosystem II repair cycle led to no detectable changes in FtsH distribution, with the FtsH2 protease involved in D1 degradation retaining its patchy distribution in the thylakoid membrane. We discuss the possibility that the FtsH2–GFP patches represent Photosystem II ‘repair zones’ within the thylakoid membranes, and the possible advantages of such functionally specialised membrane zones. Anti‐GFP affinity pull‐downs provide the first indication of the composition of the putative repair zones. PMID:25601560

  7. Regional trends in radiogenic heat generation in the Precambrian basement of the Western Canadian Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, F. W.; Majorowicz, J. A.

    Radiogenic heat generation values for 381 basement samples from 229 sites in the western Canadian basin exhibit a lognormal frequency distribution. The mean value = 2.06 (S.D. = 1.22) µWm-3 is larger than the radiogenic heat generation values reported for the shield in the Superior (ca. 1.2 µWm-3, Jessop and Lewis, 1978) and Churchill (ca. 0.7 µWm-3, Drury, 1985) provinces. When equal Log A contour intervals are used to map the basement heat generation, three large zones of relatively high heat generation are found. One coincides with the Peace River Arch basement structure and one with the Athabasca axis (Darnley, 1981). There is no apparent indication of increased heat flow through the Paleozoic formations associated with these two zones. The third zone, in southwestern Saskatchewan, coincides with a high heat flow zone in the Swift Current area. The lack of correlation between heat flow and heat generation in Alberta may be due to the disturbance to the heat flow in the Paleozoic formations by water motion, or may indicate that the heat is from uranium, thorium and potassium isotope enrichment near the basement surface rather than enrichment throughout the entire upper crust.

  8. In situ hybridization reveals temporal and spatial changes in cellular expression of mRNA for a laminin receptor, laminin, and basement membrane (type IV) collagen in the developing kidney

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    The appearance of extracellular matrix molecules and their receptors represent key events in the differentiation of cells of the kidney. Steady-state mRNA levels for a laminin receptor, the laminin B1, B2, and A chains, and the alpha 1-chain of collagen IV (alpha 1[IV]), were examined in mouse kidneys at 16 d gestation and birth, when cell differentiation is active, and 1-3 wk after birth when this activity has subsided. Northern analysis revealed that mRNA expression of laminin receptor precedes the alpha 1(IV) and laminin B chains whereas laminin A chain mRNA expression was very low. In situ hybridization reflected this pattern and revealed the cells responsible for expression. At 16 d gestation, laminin receptor mRNA was elevated in cells of newly forming glomeruli and proximal and distal tubules of the nephrogenic zone located in the kidney cortex. These cells also expressed mRNA for alpha 1(IV) and laminin chains. At birth, mRNA expression of receptor and all chains remained high in glomeruli but was reduced in proximal and distal tubules. At 1 wk after birth, expression was located in the medulla over collecting ducts and loops of Henle. Little expression was detectable by 3 wk. These results suggest that cellular expression of steady-state mRNA for laminin receptor, laminin, and collagen IV is temporally linked, with laminin receptor expression proceeding first and thereafter subsiding. PMID:2527859

  9. Fault geometries in basement-induced wrench faulting under different initial stress states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naylor, M. A.; Mandl, G.; Supesteijn, C. H. K.

    Scaled sandbox experiments were used to generate models for relative ages, dip, strike and three-dimensional shape of faults in basement-controlled wrench faulting. The basic fault sequence runs from early en échelon Riedel shears and splay faults through 'lower-angle' shears to P shears. The Riedel shears are concave upwards and define a tulip structure in cross-section. In three dimensions, each Riedel shear has a helicoidal form. The sequence of faults and three-dimensional geometry are rationalized in terms of the prevailing stress field and Coulomb-Mohr theory of shear failure. The stress state in the sedimentary overburden before wrenching begins has a substantial influence on the fault geometries and on the final complexity of the fault zone. With the maximum compressive stress (∂ 1) initially parallel to the basement fault (transtension), Riedel shears are only slightly en échelon, sub-parallel to the basement fault, steeply dipping with a reduced helicoidal aspect. Conversely, with ∂ 1 initially perpendicular to the basement fault (transpression), Riedel shears are strongly oblique to the basement fault strike, have lower dips and an exaggerated helicoidal form; the final fault zone is both wide and complex. We find good agreement between the models and both mechanical theory and natural examples of wrench faulting.

  10. Recurrent motion on Precambrian-age basement faults, Palo Duro basin, Texas Panhandle

    SciTech Connect

    Budnik, R.T.

    1983-03-01

    The distribution of Late Precambrian through Quaternary strata in the Palo Duro basin and surrounding uplifts documents recurrent motion on Precambrian-age basement faults. Basement blocks have been uplifted with little tilting or folding of overlying strata along a system of northwest-southeast oriented faults, part of a regional trend extending from central Colorado to southwestern Oklahoma. The orientation of basement terranes in Colorado and that of a 50-mi (80-km) long mylonite zone in east-central New Mexico suggest a Precambrian age for the faults. An Arkosic sandstone overlies basement and underlies a Cambrian(.) quartzose sandstone in a few Palo Duro basin wells. It may represent debris shed from active fault blocks during the opening of the southern Oklahoma aulocogen in the Late Precambrian or Early Cambrian. Ordovician carbonates thin or are missing beneath Mississippian carbonates on some fault blocks, indicating a post-Ordovician-pre-Mississippian period of faulting. The greatest amount of deformation occurred during the Pennsylvanian. Thickness, distribution, and facies of sediments were controlled by the location of active faults. Lower Pennsylvanian strata thin by up to 50% across some structures. Fault blocks provided sources of arkosic debris and loci for carbonate buildups throughout the Pennsylvanian and Early Permian. Around the periphery of the basin, Late Pennsylvanian or Early Permian faulting caused a wedging out of older units beneath the Wolfcamp. Permian, Triassic, and Neogene units, along with present topography, all have been subtly affected by basement structures. The entire section thins over basement highs. Middle and Upper Permian evaporites are thicker in structural lows. The overlying Dockum Group (Triassic) and Ogallala Formation (Neogene), both nonmarine clastic units, become finer grained over basement highs. Present topographic highs coincide with some basement highs.

  11. LOFT. Containment and service building (TAN650) basement floor plan. Basement ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LOFT. Containment and service building (TAN-650) basement floor plan. Basement airlock, shielded roadway, service areas, connection to control building. Kaiser engineers 6413-11-STEP/LOFT-650-A-1. Date: October 1964. INEEL index code no. 036-650-00-416-122213 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  12. Basement and cover-rock deformation during Laramide contraction in the northern Madison Range (Montana) and its influence on Cenozoic basin formation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kellogg, K.S.; Schmidt, C.J.; Young, S.W.

    1995-01-01

    Two major Laramide fault systems converge in the northwestern Madison Range: the northwest-striking, southwest-vergent Spanish Peaks reverse fault and the north-striking, east-vergent Hilgard thrust system. Analysis of foliation attitudes in basement gneiss north and south of the Spanish Peaks fault indicates that the basement in thrusted blocks of the Hilgard thrust system have been rotated by an amount similar to that of the basement-cover contact. Steeply dipping, north-striking breccia zones enclosing domains of relatively undeformed basement may have permitted domino-style rotation of basement blocks during simple shear between pairs of thrusts. No hydrocarbon discoveries have been made in this unique structural province. However, petroleum exploration here has focused on basement-cored anticlines, both surface and subthrust, related to the two major Laramide fault systems and on the fault-bounded blocks of Tertiary rocks within the post-Laramide extensional basins. -from Authors

  13. Precambrian crystalline basement map of Idaho-an interpretation of aeromagnetic anomalies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sims, P.K.; Lund, Karen; Anderson, E.

    2005-01-01

    Idaho lies within the northern sector of the U.S. Cordillera astride the boundary between the Proterozoic continent (Laurentia) to the east and the Permian to Jurassic accreted terranes to the west. The continental basement is mostly covered by relatively undeformed Mesoproterozoic metasedimentary rocks and intruded or covered by Phanerozoic igneous rocks; accordingly, knowledge of the basement geology is poorly constrained. Incremental knowledge gained since the pioneering studies by W. Lindgren, C.P. Ross, A.L. Anderson, A. Hietanen, and others during the early- and mid-1900's has greatly advanced our understanding of the general geology of Idaho. However, knowledge of the basement geology remains relatively poor, partly because of the remoteness of much of the region plus the lack of a stimulus to decipher the complex assemblage of high-grade gneisses and migmatite of central Idaho. The availability of an updated aeromagnetic anomaly map of Idaho (North American Magnetic Anomaly Group, 2002) provides a means to determine the regional Precambrian geologic framework of the State. The combined geologic and aeromagnetic data permit identification of previously unrecognized crystalline basement terranes, assigned to Archean and Paleoproterozoic ages, and the delineation of major shear zones, which are expressed in the aeromagnetic data as linear negative anomalies (Finn and Sims, 2004). Limited geochronologic data on exposed crystalline basement aided by isotopic studies of zircon inheritance, particularly Bickford and others (1981) and Mueller and others (1995), provide much of the geologic background for our interpretation of the basement geology. In northwestern United States, inhomogeneities in the basement inherited from Precambrian tectogenesis controlled many large-scale tectonic features that developed during the Phanerozoic. Two basement structures, in particular, provided zones of weakness that were repeatedly rejuvenated: (1) northeast-trending ductile

  14. Reactivated basement structures in the central Savannah River area and their relationship to coastal plain deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Cumbest, R.J.; Price, V. ); Temples, T.J. ); Fallaw, W.C. . Dept. of Geology); Snipes, D.S. . Dept. of Earth Sciences)

    1993-03-01

    Structural surface mapping and geophysical studies have identified several faults in the crystalline basement and overlying Coastal Plain sedimentary sequences in the central Savannah River area. Major subsurface basement shear zones occur parallel to and near Upper Three Runs Creek and Tinker Creek and are associated with linear aeromagnetic anomalies. Reflection seismic imaging of the basement shows a band of southeast dipping events parallel to Upper Three Runs Creek. Drill core from basement contain phyllonites, mylonites, fault breccia and pseudotachylite. The magnetic anomalies also mark the boundary separating greenschist facies metavolcanic rocks from amphibolite facies felsic gneiss, schist, and amphibolite. These features are similar to those that characterize other Paleozoic faults of the Eastern Piedmont Fault system. Reflection seismic imaging shows the sub-Cretaceous unconformity as well defined and easily identified event as well as easily traced laterally extensive events in Coastal Plain sequences. The unconformity and sedimentary sequences are faulted or deformed in several locations which also coincide with changes in dip of the unconformity. In the vicinity of Upper Three Runs Creek the unconformity shows a broad warping across which the elevation drops to the southeast and sedimentary sequences show a marked rate of thickening southeast. This indicates deformation of the basement exerted a control on deposition of the Coastal Plain sediments with down to the southeast movement. The basement shear zones are closely associated with the Dunbarton basin and are probable reactivated Paleozoic structures associated with extensional basin development as commonly seen associated with extensional basins on the east coast of North America.

  15. APPALACHIAN FOLDS, LATERAL RAMPS, AND BASEMENT FAULTS: A MODERN ENGINEERING PROBLEM?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pohn, Howard A.

    1987-01-01

    Field studies and analysis of radar data have shown that cross-strike faulting in the central and southern Appalachians has affected geologic structures at the surface. These basement faults appear to have been active through much of geologic time. Indeed, more than 45 percent of modern earthquakes occur along these narrow zones here termed 'lateral ramps. ' Because of this seismic activity, these lateral ramps are likely to be zones that are prone to slope failure. The engineer should be aware of the presence of such zones and the higher landslide potential along them.

  16. Pressure-Temperature-Time Relationships of Allochthons to Basement, Western Gneiss Region, Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, E. O.; Hacker, B. R.

    2002-12-01

    The Western Gneiss region of Norway contains one of the largest expanses of ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) rocks in the world. Our new findings of coesite pseudomorphs increase the known width of the UHP terrane to 100 km. In this same area, continental and oceanic allochthons are folded into the Baltica basement in complex patterns. To determine the role that the allochthons played in the UHP metamorphism, it is essential to understand the relationship of the allochthons to the Baltica basement. To this purpose, we have studied the temperature-pressure-time histories of the rocks along a 160 x 100 km E-W transect from orogen core to foreland. Allochthon pelites (garnet + biotite +/- kyanite +/- staurolite) and garnet amphibolites record consistent pressures of ~1.1 GPa across the entire transect; this contends earlier studies that implied a westward increasing P-T gradient. Temperatures are high, ranging from 650-800 °C. Basement rocks record similar temperatures but lower pressures (0.6-0.7 GPa). In situ eclogites in both allochthons and basement yield minimum pressures of ~1.5 GPa, and a basement orthopyroxene eclogite yields about 3 GPa and 825 °C. While basement garnets are homogeneous, allochthon garnets display prograde zoning. All garnets show retrograde resorption, the effects of which were removed by recalculation using the Mn peak at garnet rims. The Gibbs method of Spear was used to model P-T paths for the rocks. Although the presence of in situ eclogites requires at least 0.4 GPa decompression of the allochthons, modeling of garnets across the area reveals only uniform heating and mild compression. We tentatively attribute the lack of decompression recorded in garnet zoning to resorption of garnets during decompression. In summary, our observations suggest that: i) the eclogites formed in a relatively warm subduction zone; ii) the allochthon recrystallized as a subhorizontal sheet that stalled at lower crustal conditions (1.1 GPa) after exhumation from the

  17. Three-dimensional geometry, strain rates and basement deformation mechanisms of thrust-bend folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wibberley, Christopher A. J.

    1997-03-01

    Models for thrust-bend folding of an isotropic medium are used to predict initial basement thrust sheet geometries and sub-surface thrust fault shapes from final basement thrust sheet structure. Predicted strains and strain rates from these models are compared with data on deformation fabrics in an example of a basement thrustbend fold in order to characterise the deformation response to thrust-bend folding. The Glencoul thrust sheet in the Moine Thrust Zone of north-west Scotland is restored to an initial thrust sheet geometry. Spatial and orientation distribution data of syn-emplacement fractures and cataclastic fault zones from within the Glencoul thrust sheet are then compared with the strain and strain rate histories predicted by thrust-bend folding models. A different set of cataclastic fault seams is demonstrated to have been generated at each frontal thrust bend. Cataclastic failure is restricted to portions of the thrust sheet that have moved over frontal bends with smaller radii of curvature. From model thrust-bend geometries and an assumed slip rate of 1 x 10 -10 ms -1, estimated minimum (critical) strain rates required for fracture failure of the Lewisian basement are 10 -11 to 10 -14 s -1 for shear strain rates and 10 -12 to 10 -15 s -1 for extensional strain rates.

  18. ETR BASEMENT, TRA642, INTERIOR. BASEMENT. CUBICLE INTERIOR (SEE PHOTOS ID33G101 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ETR BASEMENT, TRA-642, INTERIOR. BASEMENT. CUBICLE INTERIOR (SEE PHOTOS ID-33-G-101 AND ID-33-G-102) WITH TANK AND SODIUM-RELATED APPARATUS. CAMERA STANDS BEFORE ROLL-UP DOOR SHOWN IN PHOTO ID-33-G-101. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD24-3-3. Mike Crane, Photographer, 11/2000 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  19. Structural analysis of a fractured basement reservoir, central Yemen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veeningen, Resi; Rice, Hugh; Schneider, Dave; Grasemann, Bernhard; Decker, Kurt

    2013-04-01

    The Pan-African Arabian-Nubian Shield (ANS), within which Yemen lies, formed as a result of Neoproterozoic collisional events between c. 870-550 Ma. Several subsequent phases of extension occurred, from the Mesozoic (due to the breakup of Gondwana) to the Recent (forming the Gulf of Aden and the Red Sea). These resulted in the formation of numerous horst- and-graben structures and the development of fractured basement reservoirs in the southeast part of the ANS. Two drill cores from the Mesozoic Marib-Shabwa Basin, central Yemen, penetrated the upper part of the Pan-African basement. The cores show both a lithological and structural inhomogeneity, with variations in extension-related deformation structures such as dilatational breccias, open fractures and closed veins. At least three deformation events have been recognized: D1) Ductile to brittle NW-SE directed faulting during cooling of a granitic pluton. U-Pb zircon ages revealed an upper age limit for granite emplacement at 627±3.5 Ma. As these structures show evidence for ductile deformation, this event must have occurred during the Ediacaran, shortly after intrusion, since Rb/Sr and (U-Th)/He analyses show that subsequent re-heating of the basement did not take place. D2) The development of shallow dipping, NNE-SSW striking extensional faults that formed during the Upper Jurassic, simultaneously with the formation of the Marib-Shabwa Basin. These fractures are regularly cross-cut by D3. D3) Steeply dipping NNE-SSW to ENE-WSW veins that are consistent with the orientation of the opening of the Gulf of Aden. These faults are the youngest structures recognized. The formation of ductile to brittle faults in the granite (D1) resulted in a hydrothermally altered zone ca. 30 cm wide replacing (mainly) plagioclase with predominantly chlorite, as well as kaolinite and heavy element minerals such as pyrite. The alteration- induced porosity has an average value of 20%, indicating that the altered zone is potentially a

  20. EXCAVATION OF EAST (FRONT) BASEMENT WELL AND DRAINAGE SYSTEM, WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EXCAVATION OF EAST (FRONT) BASEMENT WELL AND DRAINAGE SYSTEM, WITH ARCHED ENTRY INTO BASEMENT UNDER FRONT ENTRY IN BACKGROUND, LOOKING NORTH (NOTE GALLETING IN BRICK FOUNDATION) - Belair, Tulip Grove Drive, Belair-at-Bowie, Bowie, Prince George's County, MD

  1. Bunkhouse basement interior showing storage area and a conveyor belt ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Bunkhouse basement interior showing storage area and a conveyor belt (circa 1936) used to unload dry goods into the basement through an opening on the east side of the bunkhouse. - Sespe Ranch, Bunkhouse, 2896 Telegraph Road, Fillmore, Ventura County, CA

  2. [Membranous nephropathy].

    PubMed

    Mercadal, Lucile

    2013-12-01

    Membranous nephropathy is characterized by immune complex deposits on the outer side of the glomerular basement membrane. Activation of complement and of oxidation lead to basement membrane lesions. The most frequent form is idiopathic. At 5 and 10 years, renal survival is around 90 and 65% respectively. A prognostic model based on proteinuria, level and duration, progression of renal failure in a few months can refine prognosis. The urinary excretion of C5b-9, β2 and α1 microglobuline and IgG are strong predictors of outcome. Symptomatic treatment is based on anticoagulation in case of nephrotic syndrome, angiotensin conversion enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers and statins. Immunosuppressive therapy should be discussed for patients having a high risk of progression. Corticoids alone has no indication. Treatment should include a simultaneous association or more often alternating corticoids and alkylant agent for a minimum of 6 months. Adrenocorticoid stimulating hormone and steroids plus mycophenolate mofetil may be equally effective. Steroids plus alkylant decrease the risk of end stage renal failure. Cyclosporine and tacrolimus decrease proteinuria but are associated with a high risk of recurrence at time of withdrawal and are nephrotoxic. Rituximab evaluated on open studies needs further evaluations to define its use.

  3. Pd-Ag Membrane Coupled to a Two-Zone Fluidized Bed Reactor (TZFBR) for Propane Dehydrogenation on a Pt-Sn/MgAl2O4 Catalyst

    PubMed Central

    Medrano, José-Antonio; Julián, Ignacio; Herguido, Javier; Menéndez, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Several reactor configurations have been tested for catalytic propane dehydrogenation employing Pt-Sn/MgAl2O4 as a catalyst. Pd-Ag alloy membranes coupled to the multifunctional Two-Zone Fluidized Bed Reactor (TZFBR) provide an improvement in propane conversion by hydrogen removal from the reaction bed through the inorganic membrane in addition to in situ catalyst regeneration. Twofold process intensification is thereby achieved when compared to the use of traditional fluidized bed reactors (FBR), where coke formation and thermodynamic equilibrium represent important process limitations. Experiments were carried out at 500–575 °C and with catalyst mass to molar flow of fed propane ratios between 15.1 and 35.2 g min mmol−1, employing three different reactor configurations: FBR, TZFBR and TZFBR + Membrane (TZFBR + MB). The results in the FBR showed catalyst deactivation, which was faster at high temperatures. In contrast, by employing the TZFBR with the optimum regenerative agent flow (diluted oxygen), the process activity was sustained throughout the time on stream. The TZFBR + MB showed promising results in catalytic propane dehydrogenation, displacing the reaction towards higher propylene production and giving the best results among the different reactor configurations studied. Furthermore, the results obtained in this study were better than those reported on conventional reactors. PMID:24958620

  4. Pd-Ag Membrane Coupled to a Two-Zone Fluidized Bed Reactor (TZFBR) for Propane Dehydrogenation on a Pt-Sn/MgAl2O4 Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Medrano, José-Antonio; Julián, Ignacio; Herguido, Javier; Menéndez, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Several reactor configurations have been tested for catalytic propane dehydrogenation employing Pt-Sn/MgAl2O4 as a catalyst. Pd-Ag alloy membranes coupled to the multifunctional Two-Zone Fluidized Bed Reactor (TZFBR) provide an improvement in propane conversion by hydrogen removal from the reaction bed through the inorganic membrane in addition to in situ catalyst regeneration. Twofold process intensification is thereby achieved when compared to the use of traditional fluidized bed reactors (FBR), where coke formation and thermodynamic equilibrium represent important process limitations. Experiments were carried out at 500-575 °C and with catalyst mass to molar flow of fed propane ratios between 15.1 and 35.2 g min mmol-1, employing three different reactor configurations: FBR, TZFBR and TZFBR + Membrane (TZFBR + MB). The results in the FBR showed catalyst deactivation, which was faster at high temperatures. In contrast, by employing the TZFBR with the optimum regenerative agent flow (diluted oxygen), the process activity was sustained throughout the time on stream. The TZFBR + MB showed promising results in catalytic propane dehydrogenation, displacing the reaction towards higher propylene production and giving the best results among the different reactor configurations studied. Furthermore, the results obtained in this study were better than those reported on conventional reactors. PMID:24958620

  5. Application of high resolution aeromagnetic data for basement topography mapping of Siluko and environs, southwestern Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osinowo, Olawale O.; Akanji, Adesoji O.; Olayinka, Abel I.

    2014-11-01

    The discovery of hydrocarbon in commercial quantity in the Niger Delta, southern Nigeria, has since the early fifties shifted the attention of exploration/active geological studies from the Dahomey basin and the adjacent basement terrain in south-western Nigeria towards the south and this has left some gaps in information required for the discovery and exploitation of the economic potential of the region. This study mapped the Siluko transition zone in south-western Nigeria in terms of structures, geometry and basement topography with the object of providing requisite geological information that will engender interest in the exploration and exploitation of the numerous economic potentials of south-western part of Nigeria. Acquired high resolution aeromagnetic data were filtered, processed and enhanced, the resultant data were subjected to qualitative and quantitative magnetic interpretation, depth weighting analyses and modelling to generate the subsurface basement topography across the study area. The obtained results indicate regions of high and low magnetic anomalies with residual magnetic intensity values ranging from -100.8 nT to 100.9 nT. Euler Deconvolution indicates generally undulating basement topography with depth range of 125-1812 m. The basement relief is generally gentle and flat lying within the basement terrain with depth ranging from 125 to 500 m. However the sedimentary terrain is undulating and generally steeps south, down the basin with depth range of 300-1812 m. A basement topography model of the magnetic data constrained by Euler solutions correlate positively with the geology of the study area and indicates a generally increasing sedimentary deposits' thickness southward toward the western part of Dahomey basin. The revealed basement topography and structures as well as the delineated direction of continuous increase in thickness of sedimentary deposit provide insight to the controlling factor responsible for tar sand deposit and bitumen

  6. Using the IODP Expedition 312 Vertical Seismic Profile to Investigate Sub-basement Reflections in Multi-Channel Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nag, S.; Swift, S. A.; Stephen, R. A.

    2008-05-01

    The Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) initiated drilling at Site 1256D in the Guatemala Basin, about 1000km off the East Pacific Rise to penetrate plutonic rocks, anticipated to be relatively shallow in this region formed at an ultra- fast spreading rate. IODP Expedition E312 successfully drilled into gabbros at ~ 1150m in basement. Multi- channel seismic traces, although not processed for the purpose, show weak laterally-coherent sub-basement reflections at borehole depths (Hallenborg et. al., Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol 108 No. B11, 2532, 2003). Synthetic reflectivity seismograms were computed using a Ricker wavelet and impedance profiles from borehole sonic logs. They strongly suggest the presence of significant sub-basement amplitude peaks - although attenuation has not been modeled. Zero-offset vertical seismic profiles were processed to investigate the authenticity of these reflections and interpret the geological features that caused them. A dual scheme of the median filtering and F-K dip filtering was used. Down-going energy is clearly identified but negligible up-going energy is visible over random noise. The absence of geophones above the basement prevents comparison of basement reflections with sub-basement ones, so that a critical energy level above the noise could be established to identify up-going energy. The negative results are consistent with the topography of geological horizons on horizontal scales less than the Fresnel Zone (~ 300m). This expedition is the first penetration through volcanic extrusives and dikes into plutonic basement. In such a setting, sub-basement reflections, if present, would have been accurately measured. Absence of such clear and comprehensible observations in this area strongly suggests that lava flows and igneous contacts in upper ocean crust have significant topography on lateral scales < 300 m due to igneous and tectonic processes.

  7. Impact of climate changes during the last 5 million years on groundwater in basement aquifers

    PubMed Central

    Aquilina, Luc; Vergnaud-Ayraud, Virginie; Les Landes, Antoine Armandine; Pauwels, Hélène; Davy, Philippe; Pételet-Giraud, Emmanuelle; Labasque, Thierry; Roques, Clément; Chatton, Eliot; Bour, Olivier; Ben Maamar, Sarah; Dufresne, Alexis; Khaska, Mahmoud; La Salle, Corinne Le Gal; Barbecot, Florent

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is thought to have major effects on groundwater resources. There is however a limited knowledge of the impacts of past climate changes such as warm or glacial periods on groundwater although marine or glacial fluids may have circulated in basements during these periods. Geochemical investigations of groundwater at shallow depth (80–400 m) in the Armorican basement (western France) revealed three major phases of evolution: (1) Mio-Pliocene transgressions led to marine water introduction in the whole rock porosity through density and then diffusion processes, (2) intensive and rapid recharge after the glacial maximum down to several hundred meters depths, (3) a present-day regime of groundwater circulation limited to shallow depth. This work identifies important constraints regarding the mechanisms responsible for both marine and glacial fluid migrations and their preservation within a basement. It defines the first clear time scales of these processes and thus provides a unique case for understanding the effects of climate changes on hydrogeology in basements. It reveals that glacial water is supplied in significant amounts to deep aquifers even in permafrosted zones. It also emphasizes the vulnerability of modern groundwater hydrosystems to climate change as groundwater active aquifers is restricted to shallow depths. PMID:26392383

  8. Impact of climate changes during the last 5 million years on groundwater in basement aquifers.

    PubMed

    Aquilina, Luc; Vergnaud-Ayraud, Virginie; Les Landes, Antoine Armandine; Pauwels, Hélène; Davy, Philippe; Pételet-Giraud, Emmanuelle; Labasque, Thierry; Roques, Clément; Chatton, Eliot; Bour, Olivier; Ben Maamar, Sarah; Dufresne, Alexis; Khaska, Mahmoud; Le Gal La Salle, Corinne; Barbecot, Florent

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is thought to have major effects on groundwater resources. There is however a limited knowledge of the impacts of past climate changes such as warm or glacial periods on groundwater although marine or glacial fluids may have circulated in basements during these periods. Geochemical investigations of groundwater at shallow depth (80-400 m) in the Armorican basement (western France) revealed three major phases of evolution: (1) Mio-Pliocene transgressions led to marine water introduction in the whole rock porosity through density and then diffusion processes, (2) intensive and rapid recharge after the glacial maximum down to several hundred meters depths, (3) a present-day regime of groundwater circulation limited to shallow depth. This work identifies important constraints regarding the mechanisms responsible for both marine and glacial fluid migrations and their preservation within a basement. It defines the first clear time scales of these processes and thus provides a unique case for understanding the effects of climate changes on hydrogeology in basements. It reveals that glacial water is supplied in significant amounts to deep aquifers even in permafrosted zones. It also emphasizes the vulnerability of modern groundwater hydrosystems to climate change as groundwater active aquifers is restricted to shallow depths. PMID:26392383

  9. Basement Aquifers : How Useful Are Gravity Data ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genthon, P.; Mouhouyouddine, A. H.; Hinderer, J.; Hector, B.; Yameogo, S.

    2014-12-01

    Gravity data with a few microgal precision were proved to be able to constrain the specific yield of various kinds of aquifer in West Africa from annual fluctuations of both the gravimetric and piezometric signals (Pfeffer et al., Geophys. J. Int., 2011; Hector et al., Geophys. J. Int., 2013). However some recent papers reported a disappointing potential of gravity measurements during a pumping experiment in a sandy aquifer (Blainey et al., WRR, 2007; Herckenrath et al., WRR, 2012) and their poor ability in constraining the transmissity and specific yield of the aquifer, which are the parameters to which pumping tests give access. Fresh basement rocks present generally a null porosity and the structure of basement aquifers is given by the weathering profile. In tropical climate, this profile consists of a few tens meter thick saprolite layer, with noticeable porosity but low permeability overlying the weathering front. This weathering front includes in many instances a fractured medium and presents a high permeability with variable porosity. It is hardly sampled in coring experiments. We present some numerical simulation results on the ability of gravity to constrain the transmissivity of this medium. Due to poroelasticity of clay minerals in the saprolite, soil subsidence is expected to occur during pumping with a significant gravity effect. Gravity measurements have therefore to be completed with leveling data at a millimetric precision. We present first the results of numerical modeling of the gravity and subsidence for a theoretical horizontally stratified basement aquifer, and show that gravity and leveling are able to provide independently the poroelasticity coefficient and a single transmissivity coefficient for the bottom of the aquifer, if the properties of the upper saprolites are known. We will discuss then the general case, where the aquifer presents a vertical fracture where the weathering profile thickens.

  10. Depth-to-basement, sediment-thickness, and bathymetry data for the deep-sea basins offshore of Washington, Oregon, and California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wong, Florence L.; Grim, Muriel S.

    2015-01-01

    Contours and derivative raster files of depth-to-basement, sediment-thickness, and bathymetry data for the area offshore of Washington, Oregon, and California are provided here as GIS-ready shapefiles and GeoTIFF files. The data were used to generate paper maps in 1992 and 1993 from 1984 surveys of the U.S. Exclusive Economic Zone by the U.S. Geological Survey for depth to basement and sediment thickness, and from older data for the bathymetry.

  11. Integrating Reflection Seismic, Gravity and Magnetic Data to Reveal the Structure of Crystalline Basement: Implications for Understanding Rift Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenhart, Antje; Jackson, Christopher A.-L.; Bell, Rebecca E.; Duffy, Oliver B.; Fossen, Haakon; Gawthorpe, Robert L.

    2016-04-01

    Numerous rifts form above crystalline basement containing pervasive faults and shear zones. However, the compositional and mechanical heterogeneity within crystalline basement and the geometry and kinematics of discrete and pervasive basement fabrics are poorly understood. Furthermore, the interpretation of intra-crustal structures beneath sedimentary basins is often complicated by limitations in the depth of conventional seismic imaging, the commonly acoustically transparent nature of basement, limited well penetrations, and complex overprinting of multiple tectonic events. Yet, a detailed knowledge of the structural and lithological complexity of crystalline basement rocks is crucial to improve our understanding of how rifts evolve. Potential field methods are a powerful but perhaps underutilised regional tool that can decrease interpretational uncertainty based solely on seismic reflection data. We use petrophysical data, high-resolution 3D reflection seismic volumes, gridded gravity and magnetic data, and 2D gravity and magnetic modelling to constrain the structure of crystalline basement offshore western Norway. Intra-basement structures are well-imaged on seismic data due to relatively shallow burial of the basement beneath a thin (<3.5 km) sedimentary cover. Variations in basement composition were interpreted from detailed seismic facies analysis and mapping of discrete intra-basement reflections. A variety of data filtering and isolation techniques were applied to the original gravity and magnetic data in order to enhance small-scale field variations, to accentuate formation boundaries and discrete linear trends, and to isolate shallow and deep crustal anomalies. In addition, 2D gravity and magnetic data modelling was used to verify the seismic interpretation and to further constrain the configuration of the upper and lower crust. Our analysis shows that the basement offshore western Norway is predominantly composed of Caledonian allochthonous nappes

  12. Nature of basement rocks under the Los Angeles Basin, southern California, as inferred from aeromagnetic data

    SciTech Connect

    Langenheim, V.E.; Jachens, R.C. . Branch of Geophysics)

    1993-04-01

    The Los Angeles (L.A.) Basin, one of the world's richest oil-producing basins, is underlain by at least two basement assemblages. Because the thickness of the basin sediments reaches up to a minimum of 10 km, magnetic data allow a more regional view of the juxtaposition and nature of basement rocks than do available drill-hole data. Aeromagnetic data indicate that a zone of magnetic rocks extends along the coast east of the Newport-Inglewood fault zone from the San Joaquin Hills northwest to the Santa Monica Mountains. The magnetic highs produced by these rocks appear to be a continuation of intense magnetic highs that are present over exposed rocks of the Peninsular Ranges batholith to the southwest. Modeling of a 180 nT magnetic high over the San Joaquin Hills indicates that the tops of two concealed magnetic sources are at about 1.5 km and 4.5 km depth, which places these bodies at or beneath the basement surface. Modeling of magnetic highs over the exposed batholithic rocks to the south reveals a source with similar geometry and magnetic properties. The associated gravity highs of the San Joaquin Hills suggest that the probable lithology of these concealed magnetic bodies is a dense crystalline rock such as gabbro.

  13. 3. AERIAL VIEW, LOOKING SOUTH, OF BUILDING 371 BASEMENT UNDER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. AERIAL VIEW, LOOKING SOUTH, OF BUILDING 371 BASEMENT UNDER CONSTRUCTION. THE BASEMENT HOUSES HEATING, VENTILATION, AND AIR CONDITIONING EQUIPMENT AND MECHANICAL UTILITIES, THE UPPER PART OF THE PLUTONIUM STORAGE VAULT AND MAINTENANCE BAY, AND SMALL PLUTONIUM PROCESSING AREAS. THE BASEMENT LEVEL IS DIVIDED INTO NEARLY EQUAL NORTH AND SOUTH PARTS BY THE UPPER PORTION OF THE PLUTONIUM STORAGE VAULT. (10/7/74) - Rocky Flats Plant, Plutonium Recovery Facility, Northwest portion of Rocky Flats Plant, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  14. Dissolved amino acids in oceanic basaltic basement fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Huei-Ting; Amend, Jan P.; LaRowe, Douglas E.; Bingham, Jon-Paul; Cowen, James P.

    2015-09-01

    The oceanic basaltic basement contains the largest aquifer on Earth and potentially plays an important role in the global carbon cycle as a net sink for dissolved organic carbon (DOC). However, few details of the organic matter cycling in the subsurface are known because great water depths and thick sediments typically hinder direct access to this environment. In an effort to examine the role of water-rock-microorganism interaction on organic matter cycling in the oceanic basaltic crust, basement fluid samples collected from three borehole observatories installed on the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge were analyzed for dissolved amino acids. Our data show that dissolved free amino acids (1-13 nM) and dissolved hydrolyzable amino acids (43-89 nM) are present in the basement. The amino acid concentrations in the ridge-flank basement fluids are at the low end of all submarine hydrothermal fluids reported in the literature and are similar to those in deep seawater. Amino acids in recharging deep seawater, in situ amino acid production, and diffusional input from overlying sediments are potential sources of amino acids in the basement fluids. Thermodynamic modeling shows that amino acid synthesis in the basement can be sustained by energy supplied from inorganic substrates via chemolithotrophic metabolisms. Furthermore, an analysis of amino acid concentrations and compositions in basement fluids support the notion that heterotrophic activity is ongoing. Similarly, the enrichment of acidic amino acids and depletion of hydrophobic ones relative to sedimentary particulate organic matter suggests that surface sorption and desorption also alters amino acids in the basaltic basement. In summary, although the oceanic basement aquifer is a net sink for deep seawater DOC, similar amino acid concentrations in basement aquifer and deep seawater suggest that DOC is preferentially removed in the basement over dissolved amino acids. Our data also suggest that organic carbon

  15. Constraining heat production rates in Ireland's basement rocks: measurements of exposed basement and correlations from across the Caledonides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willmot Noller, Nicola; Daly, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    Ireland is situated on stable lithosphere and much of its surface geology features thick Upper Palaeozoic sedimentary sequences, and a few shallow Permo-Triassic basins, for which measured geothermal gradients are generally moderate. Nevertheless, crystalline rocks beneath these basins might produce enough heat for a viable deep-drilled, low enthalpy geothermal resource. Accurate knowledge of the lateral and vertical distribution of radiogenic heat production is, therefore, important in helping to define geothermal exploration targets. The crystalline basement of Ireland is interpreted as an assemblage formed from the convergence of Laurentia and Gondwanan terranes during the closure of the Iapetus Ocean and the Caledonian orogenic event. Despite the extensive sedimentary cover observed today, folding and faulting episodes during the Caledonian and the subsequent Variscan orogenies enabled exhumation of a wide range of Precambrian and Palaeozoic rocks, albeit exposed at relatively few sites across Ireland. A mean calculated heat production rate (HPR) derived from these outcrops is used as a proxy for the equivalent stratigraphic unit at depth. This has been achieved using established heat production constants, rock density and known concentrations of uranium, thorium and potassium, combined with a knowledge of geological mapping and geophysical data. To further constrain the vertical component of heat production distribution, Irish metapelitic xenoliths emplaced in Lower Carboniferous volcanics in the Iapetus Suture Zone (ISZ) in central Ireland are regarded as a reliable representation of the present-day lower crust there. The xenoliths have a mean HPR of 1.7 μW/m3; this is similar to a mean HPR of 1.9 μW/m3 measured in exposed Ordovician sedimentary rocks in the south east of Ireland. The slightly lower HPR in the xenoliths is a consequence of reduced uranium concentrations, probably owing to the radioelement's mobility. It is likely that these Ordovician rocks

  16. Water coning in fractured basement reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Saad, S.E.D.M.; Darwich, T.D.; Asaad, Y.

    1995-11-01

    The problem of water coning in fractured basement reservoirs has been addressed in this work. The outcome of experimental and theoretical investigation to determine the critical production rate for single- and multi-fractured system, the capillary pressure effect, and the break-through time is presented. The results of the experimental work verify the presented theoretical relationship for different fluid viscosities, fracture angles, oil-water contacts (OWC), and rates for the case of single fracture system. The results also indicate that the capillary pressure effect may be generally neglected if the distance between the OWC and the fluid entry is sufficiently large compared to the capillary rise. The extension of the critical rate determination for a multi-fractured reservoir is also discussed. Finally, the main factors influencing the break-through time were investigated. The difference in viscosity between the oil and water phases has been fond to be the main factor affecting the breakthrough time.

  17. Geophysical siting of boreholes in crystalline basement areas of Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olayinka, A. I.

    1992-02-01

    This paper assesses the effectiveness of surface geophysical methods namely electrical resistivity, electromagnetic, seismic refraction, magnetic, gravity and induced polarization for groundwater exploration in crystalline basement complex areas. Most of these geophysical techniques can provide quantitative information on the characteristics of the weathered zone which relate to the occurrence of an economic aquifer. The critical factors in the choice of a particular method include the local geological setting, the initial and maintenance costs of the equipment, the speed of surveying, the manpower required as field crew, the degree of sophistication entailed in data processing to enable a geologically meaningful interpretation, and anomaly resolution. The particular advantages and limitations of each technique are highlighted. Several case histories from Nigeria and the rest of Africa indicate that electrical resistivity (both vertical sounding and horizontal profiling) is the most widely used, followed by electromagnetic traversing. These are often employed in combination to improve upon the percentage of successful boreholes. Due to the high cost of equipment, large scale of the field operations and difficulties in data interpretation, seismic refraction is not widely adopted in commercial-type surveys. Similarly, magnetic, gravity and induced polarization are used only sparingly.

  18. Basement structure based on gravity anomaly in the northern Noto peninsula, Central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizubayashi, T.; Sawada, A.; Hamada, M.; Hiramatsu, Y.; Honda, R.

    2012-12-01

    (density is 2670kg/m3), Neocene volcanic rock (density is 2400kg/m3, or 2550kg/m3), Neocene sedimentary rock (density is 2200kg/m3), and Quaternary sedimentary rock (density is 1800kg/m3, or 1500kg/m3) (Honda et al., 2008). To compare our basement model to the geological block structures, we focus on a transition zone of the basement depth. We recognize that two of three geological block boundaries correspond to the transition zones. These boundaries also correspond to the boundary of active fault segments on the seafloor. Therefore, based on the relationship between the source fault of the 2007 Noto Hanto earthquake and the geological block, we suggest that the movement of those geological blocks is possibly controlled by the corresponding active fault segments. However, we find that the other block boundary doesn't correspond to the transition zone.

  19. Avoid the Wet Basement Blues: Construction Methods Guarantee Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Domermuth, David

    2006-01-01

    A damp basement can be a nightmare, especially after mildew creates its eye-watering, nose-offending stench. There are two enemies to overcome: damp air condensing on interior walls and ground water penetrating the exterior. One can address condensation by drying or heating the air in a basement to raise it above the dew point. The simple way to…

  20. 65. INTERIOR OF 1902 GENERATOR HOUSE. BASEMENT WALL OF 1901 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    65. INTERIOR OF 1902 GENERATOR HOUSE. BASEMENT WALL OF 1901 STEAM ENGINE HOUSE VISIBLE AT REAR. BASEMENT WALL OF 1873 WING AT RIGHT. OPENINGS MADE FOR MECHANICALLY TRANSMITTING POWER FROM STEAM ENGINES TO GENERATORS HAVE BEEN BRICKED UP. - Boston Manufacturing Company, 144-190 Moody Street, Waltham, Middlesex County, MA

  1. Induced seismicity in crystalline basement: Understanding the reasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, Sandra

    2014-05-01

    In recent years, cases of induced seismicity have been reported for geothermal wells in aseismic regions. The use of geothermal energy naturally influences the reservoir as heat and water are withdrawn. However, most geothermal plants reinject the water so that pressure levels within the reservoir remain more or less stable. Despite this and despite low injection pressures, some of these reinjecting plants experience induced seismicity. One example is the well Unterhaching Gt2, close to Munich, Germany. Here, the reservoir is an approximately 500 m thick karstified limestone layer of the Upper Jurassic, in which extraction and reinjection take place. Flow rates of more than 100 l/s have been established with reinjection pressures below 10 bar. Nevertheless, induced seismicity occurs. Most of the events are below 1.0 but some reach up to 2.4 on the Richter scale. Due to their location, they can without any doubt be attributed to the reinjection process. However, the origin of the quakes is not within the reservoir but located in the crystalline basement. As the reinjection well cuts through a steeply inclined fault, a hydraulic connection between reservoir, borehole and basement is given if a hydraulically open fault is assumed. So far, it was impossible to find a correlation between the occurrence of induced seismicity and operating parameters of the geothermal plant like flow rate, injection pressure, or temperature. Therefore, thermo-hydraulic-mechanical numerical models of the subsurface have been developed to understand the interaction between different parameters and to possibly identify critical thresholds for the initiation of induced seismicity. Due to the large scale of the model, several kilometers in each direction, an equivalent porosity approach has been chosen for the hydraulic modeling of the karstic limestone layer. Flow within in the fault is also described by Darcy's law as the fault is not assumed to be a surface but a volume. This assumption is

  2. Basement-driven strike-slip deformation involving a salt-stock canopy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dooley, Tim; Jackson, Martin; Hudec, Mike

    2016-04-01

    NW-striking basement-involved strike-slip zones have been reported or inferred from the northern Gulf of Mexico (GoM). This interpretation is uncertain, because the effects of strike-slip deformation are commonly difficult to recognize in cross sections. Recognition is doubly difficult if the strike-slip zone passes through a diapir field that complicates deformation, and an associated salt canopy that partially decouples shallow deformation from deep deformation. We use physical models to explore the effects of strike-slip deformation above and below a salt-stock canopy system. Canopies of varying maturity grew from a series of 14 feeders/diapirs located on and off the axis of a dextral basement fault. Strike-slip deformation styles in the overburden vary significantly depending on: (1) the location of the diapirs with respect to the basement fault trace, and; (2) the continuity of the canopy system. On-axis diapirs (where the diapirs lie directly above the basement fault) are typically strongly deformed and pinched shut at depth to form sharp S-shapes, whereas their shallow deformation style is that of a open-S-shaped pop-up structure in a restraining bend. The narrow diapir stem acts as a shear zone at depth. Pull-apart structures form between diapirs that are arranged in a right-stepping array tangental to the basement fault trace. These grade along strike into narrow negative flower structures. Off-axis diapirs (diapirs laterally offset from the basement fault but close enough to participate in the deformation) form zones of distributed deformation in the form of arrays of oblique faults (R shears) that converge along strike onto the narrower deformation zones associated with on-axis diapirs. Above an immature, or patchy, canopy system the strike-slip structures closely match sub canopy structures, with the exception of wrench fold formation where the supracanopy roof is thin. In contrast, the surface structures above a mature canopy system consist of a broad

  3. Timing and conditions of regional metamorphism and crustal shearing in the granulite facies basement of south Namibia: Implications for the crustal evolution of the Namaqualand metamorphic basement in the Mesoproterozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bial, Julia; Büttner, Steffen; Appel, Peter

    2016-11-01

    Granulite facies basement gneisses from the Grünau area in the Kakamas Domain of the Namaqua-Natal Metamorphic Province in south Namibia show high-grade mineral assemblages, most commonly consisting of garnet, cordierite, sillimanite, alkali feldspar and quartz. Cordierite + hercynitic spinel, and in some places quartz + hercynitic spinel, indicate granulite facies P-T conditions. The peak assemblage equilibrated at 800-850 °C at 4.0-4.5 kbar. Sillimanite pseudomorphs after kyanite1 and late-stage staurolite and kyanite2 indicate that the metamorphic record started and ended within the stability field of kyanite. Monazite in the metamorphic basement gneisses shows a single-phase growth history dated as 1210-1180 Ma, which we interpret as the most likely age of the regional metamorphic peak. This time coincides with the emplacement of granitic plutons in the Grünau region. The ∼10 km wide, NW-SE striking Grünau shear zone crosscuts the metamorphic basement and overprints high-temperature fabrics. In sheared metapelites, the regional metamorphic peak assemblage is largely obliterated, and is replaced by synkinematic biotite2, quartz, alkali feldspar, sillimanite and cordierite or muscovite. In places, gedrite, staurolite, sillimanite and green biotite3 may have formed late- or post-kinematically. The mylonitic mineral assemblage equilibrated at 590-650 °C at 3.5-5.0 kbar, which is similar to a retrograde metamorphic stage in the basement away from the shear zone. Monazite cores in two mylonite samples are similar in texture and age (∼1200 Ma) to monazite in metapelites away from the shear zone. Chemically distinct monazite rims indicate a second growth episode at ∼1130-1120 Ma. This age is interpreted to date the main deformation episode along the Grünau shear zone and the retrograde metamorphic stage seen in the basement. The main episode of ductile shearing along the Grünau shear zone took place 70-80 million years after the thermal peak metamorphism

  4. Late Riphean age of the crystalline basement of the carbonate cover of the Dzabkhan microcontinent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozakov, I. K.; Kirnozova, T. I.; Kovach, V. P.; Terent'eva, L. B.; Tolmacheva, E. V.; Fugzan, M. M.; Erdenezhargal, Ch.

    2015-05-01

    The Dzabkhan microcontinent was earlier considered as a fragment of an ancient craton in the structure of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt. Deposits of the Tsagaan Oloom Formation were included in the shelf zone, under the assumption that they were related to the regional unconformity between the Early-Late Precambrian crystal formations. The carbonate sequence of the Tsagaan Oloom Formation overlaps crystalline rocks only in the eastern part of the Dzabkhan microcontinent, where dolomites lie unconformably on high-grade metamorphic rocks intruded by granitoids of the Bogdyngol massif. The latter were included in the composition of both the Early Precambrian basement and the Middle Riphean intrusive complex. We have determined the U-Pb zircon age of these granitoids at 717 ± 5 Ma and the Nd model ages of granitoids and gneisses of the basement of the Tsagaan Oloom Formation at 2.0-1.9 Ga at ɛNd = -10.0...-6.6. Recent geochronological and Nd and Pb-Pb isotopic and geochemical data indicate that intrusive and high-grade metamorphic complexes are absent in the crystalline basement of the Dzabkhan microcontinent, similar to those in ancient cratons. One can assume that the Late Riphean carbonate cover (Tsagaan Oloom Formation) deposited on the Late Precambrian continental block.

  5. Basement Tectonics 8: Characterization and comparison of ancient and mesozoic continental margins. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Bartholomew, M.J.; Hyndman, D.W.; Mogk, D.W.; Mason, R.

    1988-12-31

    The International Conference on Basement Tectonics was held in Butte, Montana, August 8--12,1988. Historically, basement tectonics conferences have focused on such topics as reactivation of faults, the influence of basement faults on metallogeny and hydrocarbon accumulation, and the use of geophysical and remote sensing techniques to interpret subsurface and surface geology. The 8th Conference diverged from past conferences in that a unifying theme was selected. Because ancient major terrane or cratonic boundaries are often postulated to be fault zones which are subsequently reactivated, the conference was organized to examine all aspects of ancient continental margins and terrane boundaries and to compare younger (Mesozoic) ones, about which more is known, with older (Paleozoic and Precambrian) ones. Moreover, because the 8th Conference was held in the northwestern United States, a greater emphasis was placed on the Mesozoic margin of western North America and the North American shield. The seven oral sessions and four poster sessions all dealt with aspects of the conference theme: characterization and comparison of ancient continental margins. The papers will be indexed individually.

  6. Basement Tectonics 8: Characterization and comparison of ancient and mesozoic continental margins

    SciTech Connect

    Bartholomew, M.J. . Inst. of Earth Sciences and Resources); Hyndman, D.W. . Dept. of Geology); Mogk, D.W. . Dept. of Earth Sciences); Mason, R. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1988-01-01

    The International Conference on Basement Tectonics was held in Butte, Montana, August 8--12,1988. Historically, basement tectonics conferences have focused on such topics as reactivation of faults, the influence of basement faults on metallogeny and hydrocarbon accumulation, and the use of geophysical and remote sensing techniques to interpret subsurface and surface geology. The 8th Conference diverged from past conferences in that a unifying theme was selected. Because ancient major terrane or cratonic boundaries are often postulated to be fault zones which are subsequently reactivated, the conference was organized to examine all aspects of ancient continental margins and terrane boundaries and to compare younger (Mesozoic) ones, about which more is known, with older (Paleozoic and Precambrian) ones. Moreover, because the 8th Conference was held in the northwestern United States, a greater emphasis was placed on the Mesozoic margin of western North America and the North American shield. The seven oral sessions and four poster sessions all dealt with aspects of the conference theme: characterization and comparison of ancient continental margins. The papers will be indexed individually.

  7. Basement-cover relationships in the Tambo nappe (Central Alps, Switzerland): geometry, structure and kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudin, Thierry; Marquer, Didier; Persoz, Francis

    1993-05-01

    In the Pennine zone of the Central Alps, the Tambo nappe forms a thin crystalline sliver embedded in the Mesozoic cover. Four Tertiary Alpine deformations are observed. The D1 ductile deformation is linked to the progressive Eocene stacking of the nappes towards the northwest. During D1, basement deformation is governed by imbricate tectonics whereas cover is thin-skinned and intensively folded. These different structures reflect the original strong rheological contrast between basement and cover. During the heterogeneous and ductile D2 deformation, the behaviour of the basement and cover became similar. The strong vertical D2 shortening, associated with a 'top-to-the-east' shear, led to the folding of the prior SE-dipping structures, developing SE-vergent folds with axes close to the E-W L2 stretching lineation. D2 corresponds to post-collisional crustal thinning following D2 crustal thickening. The D3 and D4 deformations occurred under retrograde conditions and can be correlated with uplift and late dextral movement on the Insubric line, respectively.

  8. Contour mapping of relic structures in the Precambrian basement of the Reelfoot rift, North American midcontinent

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dart, R.L.; Swolfs, H.S.

    1998-01-01

    A new contour map of the basement of the Reelfoot rift constructed from drill hole and seismic reflection data shows the general surface configuration as well as several major and minor structural features. The major features are two asymmetric intrarift basins, bounded by three structural highs, and the rift margins. The basins are oriented normal to the northeast trend of the rift. Two of the highs appear to be ridges of undetermined width that extend across the rift. The third high is an isolated dome or platform located between the basins. The minor features are three linear structures of low relief oriented subparallel to the trend of the rift. Two of these, located within the rift basins, may divide the rift basins into paired subbasins. These mapped features may be the remnants of initial extensional rifting, half graben faulting, and basement subsidence. The rift basins are interpreted as having formed as opposing half graben, and the structural highs are interpreted as having formed as associated accommodation zones. Some of these features appear to be reactivated seismogenic structures within the modem midcontinent compressional stress regime. A detailed knowledge of the geometries of the Reelfoot rift's basement features, therefore, is essential when evaluating their seismic risk potential.

  9. Hydrocarbons in New Guinea, controlled by basement fabric, Mesozoic extension and Tertiary convergent margin tectonics

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, K.C.; Kendrick, R.D.; Crowhurst, P.V. SAEFUDIN Ijep, GRDC )

    1996-01-01

    Most models for the tectonic evolution of New Guinea involve Early and Late Miocene arc-continent collisions, creating an orogenic belt. Structural trends and prospectivity are then analyzed in terms of belts across the country; the Fold Belt (with the discovered oil and gas fields), the Mobile Belt and the accreted arcs. This model inhibits realistic assessment of prospectivity. It now appears the Mobile Belt formed by Oligocene compression then by Early Miocene extension, related to slab-rollback, that unroofed metamorphic core complexes adjacent to starved half-grabens. The grabens filled in the Middle Miocene and were largely transported intact during the Pliocene arc-collision. Early Miocene reefs and hypothesized starved basin source rocks create a viable play throughout northern New Guinea as in the Salawati Basin. The Pliocene clastic section is locally prospective due to overthrusting and deep burial. Within the Fold Belt, the site and types of oil and gas fields are largely controlled by the basement architecture. This controlled the transfer zones and depocentres during Mesozoic extension and the location of major basement uplifts during compression. In PNG, the Bosavi lineament separates an oil province from a gas province. In Irian Jaya the transition from a relatively competent sequence to a rifted sequence west of [approx]139[degrees]E may also be a gas-oil province boundary. Understanding, in detail, the compartmentalization of inverted blocks and areas of thin-skinned thrusting, controlled by the basement architecture, will help constrain hydrocarbon prospectivity.

  10. Hydrocarbons in New Guinea, controlled by basement fabric, Mesozoic extension and Tertiary convergent margin tectonics

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, K.C.; Kendrick, R.D.; Crowhurst, P.V. |

    1996-12-31

    Most models for the tectonic evolution of New Guinea involve Early and Late Miocene arc-continent collisions, creating an orogenic belt. Structural trends and prospectivity are then analyzed in terms of belts across the country; the Fold Belt (with the discovered oil and gas fields), the Mobile Belt and the accreted arcs. This model inhibits realistic assessment of prospectivity. It now appears the Mobile Belt formed by Oligocene compression then by Early Miocene extension, related to slab-rollback, that unroofed metamorphic core complexes adjacent to starved half-grabens. The grabens filled in the Middle Miocene and were largely transported intact during the Pliocene arc-collision. Early Miocene reefs and hypothesized starved basin source rocks create a viable play throughout northern New Guinea as in the Salawati Basin. The Pliocene clastic section is locally prospective due to overthrusting and deep burial. Within the Fold Belt, the site and types of oil and gas fields are largely controlled by the basement architecture. This controlled the transfer zones and depocentres during Mesozoic extension and the location of major basement uplifts during compression. In PNG, the Bosavi lineament separates an oil province from a gas province. In Irian Jaya the transition from a relatively competent sequence to a rifted sequence west of {approx}139{degrees}E may also be a gas-oil province boundary. Understanding, in detail, the compartmentalization of inverted blocks and areas of thin-skinned thrusting, controlled by the basement architecture, will help constrain hydrocarbon prospectivity.

  11. Basement geology in the sedimentary basins of Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avbovbo, Akpo A.

    1980-07-01

    In Nigeria, the dominant type of basement rock intersected by wells drilled for hydrocarbons, limestone, or water is granite. The three sedimentary basins in Nigeria are underlain by continental crust except in the Niger delta, where the basement rock is interpreted to be oceanic crust. Most of the wells that penetrated the basement are in the Eastern Dahomey embayment of western Nigeria. A maximum thickness of about 12,000 m of sedimentary rocks is attained in the offshore western Niger delta, but maximum thicknesses of sedimentary rocks are about 2,000 m in the Chad basin and only 500 m in the Sokoto embayment.

  12. Deforming Etna's Basement: Implications for Edifice stability.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, Richard; Benson, Philip; Vinciguerra, Sergio

    2013-04-01

    At over 3 kilometers in height, Mt. Etna (Italy) is the largest volcano of continental Europe. The volcano formed on top of the alpine fold and thrust belt, with basaltic outflows lying unconformably on top of an alternation between sandstones, limestones and clays. Presently Etna's eastern flank is moving with speeds up to 2cm/yr to the east [Tibaldi and Groppelli, 2002]. It is the sequence of layers below the volcano that is thought to provide a complex, structurally controlled, mechanism to the volcano deformation as a whole. This is due to the interplay of gravitational forces, volcanic pressurization, and regional tectonics, which combine to play a complex role that remains poorly understood, especially when the physical and mechanical properties of the rocks are considered. In this study, we concentrate on the rock mechanical component, and in particular the formation known as Comiso Limestone. This limestone forms of one of the key lithologies of Etna's basement. The formation has been suggested to be affected by thermal weakening [Heap et al., 2013]. Previous work on Comiso Limestone suggests brittle behavior for the range of temperatures (up to 760 ˚C) and a significant reduction in strength with higher temperatures. [Mollo et al., 2011]. Chiodini et al [2011], speculate carbonate assimilation. This implies that the Carbondioxide created by decarbonatization, is able to escape. Using an internally heated "Paterson" type pressure vessel, we recreated conditions at 2-4 km depth (50-100 MPa) and using an anomalously high geotherm, as expected in volcanic settings (ranging from room to 600 ˚C). With the addition of confining pressure, we show a brittle to ductile transition occurs at a relatively low temperature of 300 ˚C. A significant decrease in strength occurs when the rock is exposed to temperatures exceeding 400 ˚C. In addition, we observe a significant difference in mechanical behavior between vented and unvented situations when decarbonatization is

  13. Basement in the Uintas: an enigma

    SciTech Connect

    Ritzma, H.R.

    1987-08-01

    The eastern Uinta Mountains, Utah-Colorado, contain the only exposures of the Precambrian Red Creek Quartzite (or Complex) and its contact with the Uinta Mountain Group (also Precambrian). Because of the higher metamorphic grade of the Red Creek and the relatively unmetamorphosed nature of the Uinta, the former has come to be regarded as the older unit, with the Uinta metasediments described as resting unconformably upon the Red Creek metamorphics, or faulted against them. The Uinta Mountain Group is more than 24,000 ft thick and comprises more than 99% of the outcropping Precambrian core of the Uinta Mountain arch (or anticline). Regional and local field relationships disprove existence of the unconformity. The so-called oldest rocks are exposed in a 15-mi/sup 2/ area on the north flank, instead of along the axis of the Uinta Mountain arch, in violation of the law of superposition. Xenoliths of younger rock occur within older rock, and the so-called basal conglomerate and as much as 3500 ft of Uinta Mountain Group bedding are transected by the Red Creek-Uinta contact. The Red Creek Complex rocks resulted from advance of a metamorphic front, with brecciation, melting, and reconstitution of the pre-existing sediments. The metamorphic contact ranges from sharp to gradational and diffuse. Faulting of post-Eocene(.) age has juxtaposed the two units in some places. The Red Creek has been dated at 1.55-1.65 b.y. (K-Ar). The Uinta metasediments must, therefore, be older, and are the oldest rocks in the range. No crystalline basement is exposed. Admittedly, this interpretation disagrees almost totally with more than a century of published geologic work on the Precambrian of the Uintas and has broad repercussions on long-standing concepts of regional Precambrian geology.

  14. BASEMENT, A view looking north into the tunnel connecting HH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BASEMENT, A view looking north into the tunnel connecting HH Building to the balance of the complex - Department of Energy, Mound Facility, Hydrolysis House Building (HH Building), One Mound Road, Miamisburg, Montgomery County, OH

  15. Basement hall under the northeast part of the building. Live ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Basement hall under the northeast part of the building. Live animal cages and dissection rooms are to the right. Note concrete footings. - San Bernardino Valley College, Life Science Building, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  16. Interior view of loading dock basement facing east, showing wood ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view of loading dock basement facing east, showing wood posts and capitals, wood floor beams and flooring storage shelves - Southern Pacific Railroad Depot, Railroad Terminal Post Office & Express Building, Fifth & I Streets, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  17. BASEMENT, A view looking east at the various equipment and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BASEMENT, A view looking east at the various equipment and gauges in Room 5 - Department of Energy, Mound Facility, Hydrolysis House Building (HH Building), One Mound Road, Miamisburg, Montgomery County, OH

  18. BASEMENT, A view looking south at the recording equipment contained ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BASEMENT, A view looking south at the recording equipment contained in Room 121 - Department of Energy, Mound Facility, Hydrolysis House Building (HH Building), One Mound Road, Miamisburg, Montgomery County, OH

  19. BASEMENT, A view looking west in Room 8 at lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BASEMENT, A view looking west in Room 8 at lab counters and various machines - Department of Energy, Mound Facility, Hydrolysis House Building (HH Building), One Mound Road, Miamisburg, Montgomery County, OH

  20. BASEMENT, A view looking southwest toward the three panel, sliding ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BASEMENT, A view looking southwest toward the three panel, sliding glass door of walk-in hood and dial guage - Department of Energy, Mound Facility, Hydrolysis House Building (HH Building), One Mound Road, Miamisburg, Montgomery County, OH

  1. BASEMENT, A view looking east into Room 24. An exit ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BASEMENT, A view looking east into Room 24. An exit door is at the far end - Department of Energy, Mound Facility, Hydrolysis House Building (HH Building), One Mound Road, Miamisburg, Montgomery County, OH

  2. 12. Credit WS. Basement of Mill, showing wooden flywheels to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Credit WS. Basement of Mill, showing wooden flywheels to water wheel and Fairbanks. Morse 20 hp, 350 rpm diesel engine, patented April 20, 1920. - Bunker Hill Mill, County Route 26, Bunker Hill, Berkeley County, WV

  3. 8. VIEW EAST, INTERIOR VIEW OF BUILDING 11, BASEMENT, FULLER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW EAST, INTERIOR VIEW OF BUILDING 11, BASEMENT, FULLER VACUUM PUMPS - Naval Surface Warfare Center, Supersonic Wind Tunnel Building, Bounded by Clara Barton Parkway & McArthur Boulevard, Silver Spring, Montgomery County, MD

  4. 16. INTERIOR VIEW, BASEMENT, LOOKING NORTHWEST AT 'SMUT MILL' CLEANER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. INTERIOR VIEW, BASEMENT, LOOKING NORTHWEST AT 'SMUT MILL'- CLEANER FOR BUCKWHEAT, AND GRAIN CHUTES. GRAIN ELEVATOR TURN-AROUND AT BASE. - Schech's Mill, Beaver Creek State Park, La Crescent, Houston County, MN

  5. INTERIOR VIEW OF BASEMENT UNDER FURNACE NO. 2 SHOWING STEEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW OF BASEMENT UNDER FURNACE NO. 2 SHOWING STEEL AND REFRACTORY BRICK SUPPORT SYSTEM. - Chambers-McKee Window Glass Company, Furnace No. 2, Clay Avenue Extension, Jeannette, Westmoreland County, PA

  6. North rear, east part. Ramp leads to basement utility rooms ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    North rear, east part. Ramp leads to basement utility rooms and specimen preparation rooms. - San Bernardino Valley College, Life Science Building, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  7. 23. LOWER END OF HIDE CHUTE, BASEMENT LEVEL; NOTE SORTING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. LOWER END OF HIDE CHUTE, BASEMENT LEVEL; NOTE SORTING TABLE AND HANDCART FOR MOVING HIDES - Rath Packing Company, Beef Killing Building, Sycamore Street between Elm & Eighteenth Streets, Waterloo, Black Hawk County, IA

  8. 11. INTERIOR DETAIL, BASEMENT, SHOWING CONDUITS LEADING UNDERGROUND TO SWITCHES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. INTERIOR DETAIL, BASEMENT, SHOWING CONDUITS LEADING UNDERGROUND TO SWITCHES AND SIGNALS - Baltimore & Potomac Interlocking Tower, Adjacent to AMTRAK railroad tracks in block bounded by Howard Street, Jones Falls Expressway, Maryland Avenue & Falls Road, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  9. MTR BASEMENT. GENERAL ELECTRIC CONTROL CONSOLE FOR AIRCRAFT NUCLEAR PROPULSION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR BASEMENT. GENERAL ELECTRIC CONTROL CONSOLE FOR AIRCRAFT NUCLEAR PROPULSION EXPERIMENT NO. 1. INL NEGATIVE NO. 6510. Unknown Photographer, 9/29/1959 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  10. 20. VIEW WEST OF TUNNEL FROM BASEMENT OF GRANITEVILLE MILL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. VIEW WEST OF TUNNEL FROM BASEMENT OF GRANITEVILLE MILL TO OUTBUILDINGS. TUNNEL IS USED TO CONDUCT WATER AND OTHER UTILITY PIPES. - Graniteville Mill, Marshall Street, Graniteville, Aiken County, SC

  11. Building America Top Innovations 2012: Basement Insulation Systems

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2013-01-01

    This Building America Top Innovations profile describes research on basement insulation, which identifies the wall installation methods and materials that perform best in terms of insulation and water resistance.

  12. 20. INTERIOR, BASEMENT, CAFETERIA, DETAIL OF LUNETTE OF EAST WALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. INTERIOR, BASEMENT, CAFETERIA, DETAIL OF LUNETTE OF EAST WALL AND WALL BEHIND (4' x 5' negative; 8' x 10' print) - U.S. Department of the Interior, Eighteenth & C Streets Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  13. 10. View of basement door and circular window beneath N ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. View of basement door and circular window beneath N porch; looking N. (Ceronie and Harms) - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 360, Gillespie Avenue between Rodman Avenue & North Avenue, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  14. BASEMENT, A view looking northeast that captures the storage lockers ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BASEMENT, A view looking northeast that captures the storage lockers in the woman's side of the change room (Room 119A) - Department of Energy, Mound Facility, Isolated Building (I Building), One Mound Road, Miamisburg, Montgomery County, OH

  15. 5. Interior view of the basement, facing southwest and showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Interior view of the basement, facing southwest and showing the water storage tank for elevator hydraulic system. - Terminal Building, 184 Kinsley Avenue & 11-25 Terminal Way, Providence, Providence County, RI

  16. Interior of seminar room on central south side of basement ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior of seminar room on central south side of basement (first floor), with laboratory spacew beyone, southeast view - University of Wyoming Campus, Library, East of Ninth Street & North of Ivinson Avenue, Laramie, Albany County, WY

  17. Interior of seminar room on central south side of basement ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior of seminar room on central south side of basement (first floor), north view towards north entrance to building - University of Wyoming Campus, Library, East of Ninth Street & North of Ivinson Avenue, Laramie, Albany County, WY

  18. 35. Basement, passage beneath main entrance porch, showing circular skylight ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. Basement, passage beneath main entrance porch, showing circular skylight opening, view to northwest - Portsmouth Naval Hospital, Hospital Building, Rixey Place, bounded by Williamson Drive, Holcomb Road, & The Circle, Portsmouth, Portsmouth, VA

  19. 77. SAC control center administrative section basement floor plan, drawing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    77. SAC control center administrative section basement floor plan, drawing number not listed, dated 1 February, 1955 - Offutt Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command Headquarters & Command Center, Headquarters Building, 901 SAC Boulevard, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  20. 7. BLOCK HOUSE BASEMENT LOOKING THROUGH DOOR INTO CABLE TUNNEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. BLOCK HOUSE BASEMENT LOOKING THROUGH DOOR INTO CABLE TUNNEL RUNNING BETWEEN BLOCK HOUSE AND STATIC TEST TOWER. - Marshall Space Flight Center, East Test Area, Block House, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  1. 118. Stage basement. View, facing south, of the south hydraulic ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    118. Stage basement. View, facing south, of the south hydraulic ram (type D) in the middle row. Photo was taken before the stage flooring was removed. - Auditorium Building, 430 South Michigan Avenue, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  2. 4. VIEW LOOKING WEST FROM BASEMENT UNDER OPEN CONCOURSE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW LOOKING WEST FROM BASEMENT UNDER OPEN CONCOURSE - CEILING OF BRICK ARCHES; WOOD PANELS MARK LOCATION OF ORIGINAL GLASS PRISM SKYLIGHTS REPLACED WITH CONCRETE - Pennsylvania Railroad Station, Open Concourse & Concourse Roof Extension, 1101 Liberty Avenue, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA

  3. 17. Woodworking Mill (basement): view looking north showing Ames Iron ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Woodworking Mill (basement): view looking north showing Ames Iron Works steam boiler; note turbine control handle in middle right of photo - Ben Thresher's Mill, State Aid No. 1, Barnet, Caledonia County, VT

  4. 2. WATER PUMPS IN THE BASEMENT OF THE VISITORS CENTER, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. WATER PUMPS IN THE BASEMENT OF THE VISITORS CENTER, LOOKING WEST. - Hot Springs National Park, Bathhouse Row, Visitor's Center, State Highway 7, 1 mile north of U.S. Highway 70, Hot Springs, Garland County, AR

  5. 3. WATER PUMPS IN THE BASEMENT OF THE VISITORS CENTER, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. WATER PUMPS IN THE BASEMENT OF THE VISITORS CENTER, LOOKING EAST. - Hot Springs National Park, Bathhouse Row, Visitor's Center, State Highway 7, 1 mile north of U.S. Highway 70, Hot Springs, Garland County, AR

  6. 12. COLD CALIBRATION BLOCKHOUSE BASEMENT VIEW FROM LEFT TO RIGHT, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. COLD CALIBRATION BLOCKHOUSE BASEMENT VIEW FROM LEFT TO RIGHT, CABLE TRAYS, RACKS, CABLE CONNECTION TERMINALS. - Marshall Space Flight Center, East Test Area, Cold Calibration Test Stand, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  7. Basement, room 23, looking southwest into two adjacent offices with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Basement, room 23, looking southwest into two adjacent offices with soundproof walls and pedestal flooring - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  8. 17. INTERIOR VIEW OF BASEMENT EXHIBITION OF EVENTS OF CIVIL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. INTERIOR VIEW OF BASEMENT EXHIBITION OF EVENTS OF CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT AND THE 1963 BOMBING OF THE CHURCH, LOOKING SOUTH - Sixteenth Street Baptist Church, 1530 Sixth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  9. 26. OVERALL SHOT OF BASEMENT, MILL NO. 1. ORIGINALLY MACHINE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. OVERALL SHOT OF BASEMENT, MILL NO. 1. ORIGINALLY MACHINE SHOP. PALLETS ON FLOOR ADDED IN LATE 20th C. FOR CLOTH STORAGE. - Prattville Manufacturing Company, Number One, 242 South Court Street, Prattville, Autauga County, AL

  10. Mapping Precambrian Basement Fabric with Magnetic Data in the Karonga Basin Area and its Control on the Development of the Malawi Rift.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, T.; Abdelsalam, M. G.; Atekwana, E. A.; Chindandali, P. R. N.; Clappe, B.; Laó-Dávila, D. A.; Dawson, S.; Hull, C. D.; Nyalugwe, V.; Salima, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Malawi Rift forms the southern termination of the western branch of the East African Rift System. It is suggested that it propagates from the Rungwe Volcanic Province in the north for ~700 km into Mozambique in the south. The northern portion of the Malawi Rift is dominated by the Mesoproterozoic basement rocks of the Ubendian-Usagaran belts to the north and west and the Irumide Belt in the south. The Mugese shear zone (MSZ) forms the boundary between the Ubendian-Usagaran and Irumide Belts. We used magnetic data to determine the relationship between the geology of the nascent Malawi Rift and the strong magnetic fabric observed in the Mugese shear zone from aeromagnetic maps. We integrated the aeromagnetic data with ground magnetic data acquired along two W-E transects using a cesium vapor magnetometer at a nominal station spacing of 500 m. We also acquired kinematic data (strike and dip) on exposed basement geology and Karoo sediments. Both transects extend from the uplifted basement areas cutting across the MSZ into the rift floor sediments. Our results show that the MSZ is characterized by a prominent WNW-ESE magnetic anomaly that is parallel to the basement fabric north of the town of Karonga but changes orientation to NNW-SSE south of Karonga. This shear zone is composed of gneisses in amphibolite to granulite facies that are steeply dipping (50-80°) to the west. The strong magnetization and magnetic lineation of the MSZ results from alternating light and dark colored gneissic bands. This magnetization is strongest in unweathered basement rocks and lowest in weathered basement rocks and Karoo sediments. The orientation of the strong magnetic fabric of the Mugese shear zone may play an important role on the accommodation of strain within the rift basin. Detailed mapping of the magnetic fabric can improve our understanding of the formation of faults in the nascent Malawi Rift.

  11. 22. VIEW OF THE BASEMENT AND MEZZANINE FLOOR PLANS. ALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. VIEW OF THE BASEMENT AND MEZZANINE FLOOR PLANS. ALL MECHANICAL AND ELECTRICAL UTILITY EQUIPMENT IS CONTAINED IN THE BASEMENT. THE MEZZANINE CONTAINS OFFICES. THE DRAWING WAS REPRODUCED AT THE BEST QUALITY POSSIBLE. LETTERS AND NUMBERS IN THE CIRCLES INDICATE FOOTER AND/OR COLUMN LOCATIONS. - Rocky Flats Plant, Non-Nuclear Production Facility, South of Cottonwood Avenue, west of Seventh Avenue & east of Building 460, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  12. EXCAVATION OF EAST (FRONT) BASEMENT WELL AND DRAINAGE SYSTEM, WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EXCAVATION OF EAST (FRONT) BASEMENT WELL AND DRAINAGE SYSTEM, WITH ARCHED ENTRY INTO BASEMENT UNDER FRONT ENTRY IN BACKGROUND, LOOKING NORTH (NOTE GALLETING IN BRICK FOUNDATION) BUT CLOSER RANGE SHOWING BRICK STRUCTURE WHICH CARRIED WATER FROM THE GUTTER DRAIN PIPE INTO THE BRICK DRAIN ALONG THE GROUND AND AWAY FROM THE FOUNDATION OF THE HOUSE - Belair, Tulip Grove Drive, Belair-at-Bowie, Bowie, Prince George's County, MD

  13. Control of salt tectonics by young basement tectonics in Brazil`s offshore basins

    SciTech Connect

    Szatmari, P.; Mohriak, W.

    1995-08-01

    The Campos basin (offshore SE Brazil) is one of the most successful areas of oil exploration in South America. Discovered 20 years ago, its production (500,000 b/d) and reserves (2.9 billion barrels) are second only to Venezuela`s. This richness is due, to a large extent, to intense salt tectonics and the abundance of turbidites. Reactivated basement structures onshore provide a unique opportunity to understand the role of young basement tectonics in controlling salt tectonics and petroleum occurrence. The mountains of SE Brazil, over 1500 m high, formed by the reactivation of late Precambrian thrust and wrench zones under E-W compression, presumably caused by Mid-Atlantic ridge push. Coastal mountain ranges, up to 3000 m high, are limited to the segment of the Atlantic between the Vitoria-Trindade hotspot chain and the Rio Grande Rise. The coastal ranges formed as this segment of oceanic crust and adjacent continental margin were pushed WSW along a reactivated Precambrian wrench zone. To the north of this segment, salt tectonics is mostly due to basinward sliding on a tilted salt layer. Along the coastal ranges, to this is added basinward escape of the salt from beneath prograding sediments derived from the rising mountains. Extension above the salt tends to be compensated by compression farther basinward. Salt canopies, frequent in the Gulf of Mexico, occur only near the Abrolhos hotspot, where high temperatures during volcanic activity sharply reduced the viscosity of the salt.

  14. Low-temperature constraints on the Alpine thermal evolution of the Western Carpathian basement rock complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Králiková, Silvia; Vojtko, Rastislav; Hók, Jozef; Fügenschuh, Bernhard; Kováč, Michal

    2016-10-01

    The Cretaceous to Palaeogene Alpine exhumation of previously buried Variscan basements is recorded in the southern portion of the Western Carpathians in the Gemeric and Veporic units. The Meso-Cenozoic collisional processes resulted in basement exhumation of the Tatric Unit from Palaeogene to Neogene times. According to zircon and apatite fission track data, the Gemeric Unit, an uppermost thick-skinned thrust sheet, cooled from depth levels of ∼10 up to 2.5 km (temperature interval of ∼250-60 °C) about 88-64 Ma ago, after the collapse of overlying Meliata-Turňa-Silica Mesozoic accretionary prism. The middle and lower thick-skinned thrust sheets, Veporic and Tatric units, cooled from the depths of ∼10 up to 2.5 km ∼110-40 Ma ago. The process was controlled by unroofing of footwall from beneath the Gemeric Unit. About 50-20 Ma ago, the internal zone of Tatric Unit gradually exhumed to depth of <2 km and some parts of the unit appeared at the surface level. However, the external zone of Tatric Unit was buried beneath the Eocene to Lower Miocene sedimentary successions and exhumed to the subsurface level at ∼21-8 Ma ago, as a result of oblique collision of the Western Carpathians with the European Platform.

  15. Estimation of Precambrian basement topography in Central and Southeastern Wisconsin from 3D modeling of gravity and aeromagnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skalbeck, John D.; Koski, Adrian J.; Peterson, Matthew T.

    2014-07-01

    Increased concerns about groundwater resources in Wisconsin have brought about the need for better understanding of the subsurface geologic structure that leads to developing conceptual hydrogeologic models for numerical simulation of groundwater flow. Models are often based on sparse data from well logs usually located large distances apart and limited in depth. Model assumptions based on limited spatial data typically require simplification that may add uncertainty to the simulation results and the accuracy of a groundwater model. Three dimensional (3D) modeling of gravity and aeromagnetic data provides another tool for the groundwater modeler to better constrain the conceptual model of a hydrogeologic system. The area near the Waukesha Fault in southeastern Wisconsin provides an excellent research opportunity for our proposed approach because of the strong gravity and aeromagnetic anomalies associated with the fault, the apparent complexity in fault geometry, and uncertainty in Precambrian basement depth and structure. Fond du Lac County provides another opportunity to apply this approach because the Precambrian basement topography throughout the area is known to be very undulated and this uneven basement surface controls water well yields and creates zones of stagnant water. The results of the 3D modeling of gravity and aeromagnetic data provide a detailed estimation of the Precambrian basement topography in Fond Du Lac County and southeastern Wisconsin that may be useful in determining ground water flow and quality in this region.

  16. The deep structure of the Scythian Plate basement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, V. A.

    2014-11-01

    Over the last decade, the Scythian Plate and the adjacent territory in the north have been covered by high-precision aeromagnetic (1 : 50000) and aerogravimetric (1 : 100000) surveys. An interpretation of the results allows us to reveal the Riphean-Early Paleozoic basement beneath the fold basement of the Scythian Plate. The ophiolitic complex, three volcanic-terrigenous sequences, basic intrusions and Early Paleozoic granitoids, as well as large folds have been identified within the basement. The large sheet of the Early Paleozoic basement thrust over the pre-Riphean basement of Baltica is traced along the entire Scythian Plate from the Azov Sea to the Caspian Sea. A presumably Early Kimmerian fold complex that underlies the Middle-Upper Jurassic platform cover has been recognized in the West Kuban Trough and Timashevsky Step. This complex is thrust in the northeastern direction over the Early Paleozoic fold complex. The above data make it possible to revise the geological history of the southern framework of the East European Platform and to prove the consecutive accretion of heterogeneous terranes differing in age from the south.

  17. Microbial community transitions across the deep sediment-basement interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labonté, J.; Lever, M. A.; Orcutt, B.

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies of microbial abundance and geochemistry in deep marine sediments indicate a stimulation of microbial activity near the sediment-basement interface; yet, the extent to which microbial communities in bottom sediments and underlying crustal habitats interact is unclear. We conducted tag pyrosequencing on DNA extracted from a spectrum of deep sediment-basement samples to try to identify patterns in microbial community shifts across sediment-basement interfaces, focusing on samples from the subsurface of the Juan de Fuca Ridge flank (IODP Expedition 327). Our results demonstrate that sediment and the basaltic crust harbor microbial communities that are phylogenetically connected, but the eveness is characteristic of the environment. We will discuss the microbial community transitions that occur horizontally along fluid flow pathways and vertically across the sediment basement interface, as well as the possible implications regarding the controls of microbial community composition along deep sediment-basement interfaces in hydrothermal systems. We will also highlight efforts to overcome sample contamination in crustal subsurface samples.

  18. Scaling and geometric properties of extensional fracture systems in the proterozoic basement of Yemen. Tectonic interpretation and fluid flow implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Garzic, Edouard; de L'Hamaide, Thibaut; Diraison, Marc; Géraud, Yves; Sausse, Judith; de Urreiztieta, Marc; Hauville, Benoît; Champanhet, Jean-Michel

    2011-04-01

    Multi-scale mappings of fracture systems in the crystalline basement of Yemen are presented. Fracture datasets are described through statistical analyses of direction, length, spacing, density, and spatial distribution. Results are combined with field observations and can be directly used to model the geometry of the fracture networks in analog basement rocks, from multi-kilometric to decametric scales. The fractured reservoir analog is defined with a dual porosity model in which tectonic and joint systems correspond to the basement reservoir "backbone" and "matrix" respectively. These two end-members reveal contrasting geometrical, reservoir, and scaling properties. In tectonic systems, multi-scale geometries are "self-similar", the fracture network shows fractal behavior (power-law length distribution and clustered spacing), and fault zones show hierarchical organization of geometrical parameters such as length, thickness, and spacing. In joint systems, the fracture network is scale dependent with exponential length distribution, and shows anti-clustered spacing. However, these two end-members have both well-connected properties, with fault zones acting as main drain and joint systems acting as the fluid supply.

  19. Influence of Inherited Indian Basement Cross-Strike Structures on the Evolution of the Himalayan Middle and Upper Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godin, L.; Harris, L.; Waffle, L.; Gibson, R.

    2015-12-01

    The Himalaya is the result of on-going convergence and collision of India and Asia. Knowledge of the configuration of the Indian plate prior to collision with Asia is often over-looked, despite its importance in controlling the subsequent evolution of the orogen. Three fault-bounded northeast-trending paleotopographic ridges of Precambrian Indian basement underlie the Ganga Basin south of the Himalaya. Analysis of spectrally filtered Bouguer gravity data and edges in its horizontal gradient at different source depths suggests that they extend as far north as the underplated Indian lithosphere beneath the Asia crust (Bagong suture), and as deep as the base of the Indian lithosphere. Along-strike diachronous deformation and metamorphism within the Himalayan metamorphic core in west-central Nepal, documented by U-Th/Pb geochronology, as well as lateral ramps in the foreland thrust belt, spatially correspond to faults in the Indian basement bounding the subsurface Faizabad ridge. Analogue centrifuge modeling confirms that offset along such deep-seated basement faults can affect the location, orientation, and type of structures developed in the mid- and upper crust at various stages of orogenesis. Our models suggest that (1) deep-seated, reactivated basement faults can localize structures in the upper crust during different stages of orogen evolution, and (2) it is mechanically feasible for movement along a basement fault to influence the mid- and upper crust and for strain to propagate through a low-viscosity medium. We suggest that these major orogenic cross-strike structures may have affected the ramp-flat geometry of the basal Main Himalayan thrust, in turn partition the Himalayan range into distinct zones, and ultimately contribute to lateral variability in tectonic evolution along the orogen's strike. Our interpretation also suggests that south Tibet graben are spatially related to deep-seated lithospheric-scale faults rooted in the underplated Indian crust.

  20. Mapping of Basement Faults with Gravity and Magnetic Data at NE Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yutsis, V.; Krivosheya, K.; Tamez Ponce, A.

    2012-04-01

    Northeast Mexico is essentially the juncture of two distinctly different tectono-stratigraphic provinces, the eastern Gulf of Mexico (Coastal Plane, Sierra Madre Oriental) province and the western Pacific Mexico (Rivera plate, Meso-American trench, Sierra Madre Occidental) province (Goldhammer & Johnson, 2001). Tectonic evolution in northeast Mexico is dominated by divergent-margin development associated with the opening of the Gulf of Mexico and overprinted by non-igneous Laramide orogenic effects (Pindell et al., 1988). The structural grain of northeast Mexico consists of Triassic to Liassic fault-controlled basement blocks, the development of which reflects in part late Paleozoic orogenic patterns of metamorphism and igneous intrusion (Wilson, 1990). There are different tectonic provinces which are recognized interpreting the basement and sediment cover of this area: Coahuila block, La Popa sub-basin, Sabinas basin, Burgos basin, Sierra Madre Oriental (Monterrey trough), and Parras basin. Mojave-Sonora megashear and San Marcos fault (Chavez-Cabello et al., 2007) are two principal fault zones crossing the northeast Mexico in NW-SE direction. This paper is presented the integral analysis of the gravity and magnetic data in the northeast Mexico. Complementing with a Digital Model of Elevations (DME) that combined with the review of previous geological studies it serves to compare the surface structures and blocks of basement in this area. Also the separation of the most important tectonic blocks was done, and 2.5D geological-geophysical model was finally developed. This model represents in a general way the principal structural characteristics of northeast Mexico. Gravity and magnetic data analysis was used with purpose to study the structure of the substrata in order to allow modeling of the basement structure and its relation with the sedimentary cover features. The Bouguer gravity and the total field aeromagnetic data were supplied by Geological Survey of Mexico

  1. Precambrian shield and basement tectonics in sedimentary basin analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Touborg, J.F.

    1984-04-01

    This study focused on the use of (1) regional structural analysis of basement and Precambrian rocks surrounding a sedimentary basin, and (2) tracing basement structures into the sedimentary basin. The structural analysis of the Precambrian shield has a fundamental bearing on interpretation of overlying sedimentary cover rocks. This is expressed in the southern part of the Hudson's Bay basin and its southeastern arm, the Moose River basin. For instance, the rims of both basins are controlled by faults or graben structures. Approximately 13 major fault systems with strike lengths of 200-300 km (125-186 mi) or more can be traced from the exposed Precambrian shield into the basin in terms of lineament arrays and/or aeromagnetic and/or gravity signature. The data suggest reactivation of faults during basin sedimentation. This type of basement structural analysis in areas adjacent to sedimentary basins can provide a valuable interpretation base for subsequent seismic surveys and basin evaluation.

  2. Sub-basement sensible heat storage for solar energy

    SciTech Connect

    Doty, F.D.

    1982-03-30

    A sensible heat storage method for use in conventional buildings with basements is disclosed that permits the long term storage of solar energy at reasonable efficiency in amounts appropriate for home heating. An exchanger consisting of a plurality of closely spaced, small diameter parallel or serpentine tubes with suitable manifolds is constructed on the central portion of the basement floor. The exchanger is covered with a layer of fine gravel, followed with a layer of waterproof insulation. Finally a second floor is supported on studs resting edgewise on the original basement floor. Horizontal conduction heat losses are reduced by allowing a peripheral margin, insulated from above, about the exchanger and by using a flow reversing system that maintains a horizontal temperature gradient within the exchanger.

  3. Structural Controls on Groundwater Flow in Basement Terrains: Geophysical, Remote Sensing, and Field Investigations in Sinai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Lamees; Sultan, Mohamed; Ahmed, Mohamed; Zaki, Abotalib; Sauck, William; Soliman, Farouk; Yan, Eugene; Elkadiri, Racha; Abouelmagd, Abdou

    2015-09-01

    An integrated [very low frequency (VLF) electromagnetic, magnetic, remote sensing, field, and geographic information system (GIS)] study was conducted over the basement complex in southern Sinai (Feiran watershed) for a better understanding of the structural controls on the groundwater flow. The increase in satellite-based radar backscattering values following a large precipitation event (34 mm on 17-18 January 2010) was used to identify water-bearing features, here interpreted as preferred pathways for surface water infiltration. Findings include: (1) spatial analysis in a GIS environment revealed that the distribution of the water-bearing features (conductive features) corresponds to that of fractures, faults, shear zones, dike swarms, and wadi networks; (2) using VLF (43 profiles), magnetic (7 profiles) techniques, and field observations, the majority (85 %) of the investigated conductive features were determined to be preferred pathways for groundwater flow; (3) northwest-southeast- to north-south-trending conductive features that intersect the groundwater flow (southeast to northwest) at low angles capture groundwater flow, whereas northeast-southwest to east-west features that intersect the flow at high angles impound groundwater upstream and could provide potential productive well locations; and (4) similar findings are observed in central Sinai: east-west-trending dextral shear zones (Themed and Sinai Hinge Belt) impede south to north groundwater flow as evidenced by the significant drop in hydraulic head (from 467 to 248 m above mean sea level) across shear zones and by reorientation of regional flow (south-north to southwest-northeast). The adopted integrated methodologies could be readily applied to similar highly fractured basement arid terrains elsewhere.

  4. Verification of some geohydrological implications of deep weathering in the Basement Complex of Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omorinbola, E. O.

    1982-04-01

    The geomorphologic process of deep weathering in crystalline rocks of the Nigerian Basement Complex gives rise to a number of important geohydrological implications of which verification is needed for a proper understanding of the subsurface hydrology. The specific implications of the depth and pattern of weathering in four areas were verified in this study, using appropriate statistical and section-drawing methods. The main findings are: (1) Prevalence of a generally widespread saturated zone in the regolith rather than a series of isolated groundwater compartments implied by the basin-and-dome weathering pattern. (2) A strong correlation between saturated-zone thickness and weathering depth that enables the former to be reliably predicted from the latter. (3) A temporal variation pattern of saturated-zone thickness that conforms with the seasonal pattern of rainfall distribution typical of most parts of the country. The environmental factors favouring the identified geohydrologic conditions appear to be a thick and generally widespread regolith, flat or gently undulating terrains on which overland flow and subaerial erosion of regolith are minimal, and a humid climate to supply the rain water needed for adequate groundwater recharge in the overburden. Variations in one or more of these factors in specific areas may therefore be used to explain the resultant or likely deviations from the geohydrologic characteristics established in this study. The findings indicate, among other things, that the major rivers in the Basement Complex derive from saturated regoliths baseflow components of which magnitude further studies are required to determine. Some outstanding practical aspects of the findings with particular reference to the more humid areas include the non-relevance of searching for basins of decomposition as well sites in deeply weathered landscapes, the ability to estimate the success ratio of wells prior to the actual digging or drilling operations, and the

  5. Polymetamorphic evolution of the granulite-facies Paleoproterozoic basement of the Kabul Block, Afghanistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collett, Stephen; Faryad, Shah Wali; Mosazai, Amir Mohammad

    2015-08-01

    The Kabul Block is an elongate crustal fragment which cuts across the Afghan Central Blocks, adjoining the Indian and Eurasian continents. Bounded by major strike slip faults and ophiolitic material thrust onto either side, the block contains a strongly metamorphosed basement consisting of some of the only quantifiably Proterozoic rocks south of the Herat-Panjshir Suture Zone. The basement rocks crop-out extensively in the vicinity of Kabul City and consist predominantly of migmatites, gneisses, schists and small amounts of higher-grade granulite-facies rocks. Granulite-facies assemblages were identified in felsic and mafic siliceous rocks as well as impure carbonates. Granulite-facies conditions are recorded by the presence of orthopyroxene overgrowing biotite in felsic rocks; by orthopyroxene overgrowing amphibole in mafic rocks and by the presence of olivine and clinohumite in the marbles. The granulite-facies assemblages are overprinted by a younger amphibolite-facies event that is characterized by the growth of garnet at the expense of the granulite-facies phases. Pressure-temperature (P-T) conditions for the granulite-facies event of around 850 °C and up to 7 kbar were calculated through conventional thermobarometry and phase equilibria modeling. The younger, amphibolite-facies event shows moderately higher pressures of up to 8.5 kbar at around 600 °C. This metamorphism likely corresponds to the dominant metamorphic event within the basement of the Kabul Block. The results of this work are combined with the litho-stratigraphic relations and recent geochronological dating to analyze envisaged Paleoproterozoic and Neoproterozoic metamorphic events in the Kabul Block.

  6. 33. VIEW OF BASEMENT UNDER EAST BOILER ROOM LOOKING TOWARD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. VIEW OF BASEMENT UNDER EAST BOILER ROOM LOOKING TOWARD WEST BOILER ROOM BASEMENT THROUGH THE ASH TRANSFER TUNNEL. ASH HOPPER FOR BOILER 900 IS ON THE RIGHT. NOTE THE TRACKS ALONG THE FLOOR OF THE TUNNEL. A SMALL ELECTRIC LOCOMOTIVE HAULED CARS FOR TRANSFERRING ASH FROM BOILERS TO DISPOSAL SITES OUTSIDE THE BUILDING. THIS SYSTEM BECAME OBSOLETE IN 1938 WHEN BOILERS IN THE WEST BOILER ROOM WERE REMOVED AND PULVERIZED COAL WAS ADOPTED AS THE FUEL. - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Cos Cob Power Plant, Sound Shore Drive, Greenwich, Fairfield County, CT

  7. 14. View toward the northwest corner of the basement in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. View toward the northwest corner of the basement in the north segment of the building. Portions of the basement floor are earth, and portions are concrete. For some undetermined reason an unbonded, narrow panel of brick occurs in the west (left) wall. A corbeled brick footing is seen under this panel, as if the panel is carrying a concentrated load. An identical element occurs to the left, outside the camera's view. These 'columns' may support the second-story brick facade over the ground floor store windows. Credit GADA/MRM. - Stroud Building, 31-33 North Central Avenue, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  8. Surface analogue outcrops of deep fractured basement reservoirs in extensional geological settings. Examples within active rift system (Uganda) and proximal passive margin (Morocco).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Bastien; Géraud, Yves; Diraison, Marc

    2014-05-01

    The important role of extensive brittle faults and related structures in the development of reservoirs has already been demonstrated, notably in initially low-porosity rocks such as basement rocks. Large varieties of deep-seated resources (e.g. water, hydrocarbons, geothermal energy) are recognized in fractured basement reservoirs. Brittle faults and fracture networks can develop sufficient volumes to allow storage and transfer of large amounts of fluids. Development of hydraulic model with dual-porosity implies the structural and petrophysical characterization of the basement. Drain porosity is located within the larger fault zones, which are the main fluid transfer channels. The storage porosity corresponds both to the matrix porosity and to the volume produced by the different fractures networks (e.g. tectonic, primary), which affect the whole reservoir rocks. Multi-scale genetic and geometric relationships between these deformation features support different orders of structural domains in a reservoir, from several tens of kilometers to few tens of meters. In subsurface, 3D seismic data in basement can be sufficient to characterize the largest first order of structural domains and bounding fault zones (thickness, main orientation, internal architecture, …). However, lower order structural blocks and fracture networks are harder to define. The only available data are 1D borehole electric imaging and are used to characterize the lowest order. Analog outcrop studies of basement rocks fill up this resolution gap and help the understanding of brittle deformation, definition of reservoir geometries and acquirement of reservoir properties. These geological outcrop studies give information about structural blocks of second and third order, getting close to the field scale. This allows to understand relationships between brittle structures geometry and factors controlling their development, such as the structural inheritance or the lithology (e.g. schistosity, primary

  9. Seismicity on Basement Faults Induced by Simultaneous Fluid Injection-Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Kyung Won; Segall, Paul

    2016-08-01

    Large-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) injection into geological formations increases pore pressure, potentially inducing seismicity on critically stressed faults by reducing the effective normal stress. In addition, poroelastic expansion of the reservoir alters stresses, both within and around the formation, which may trigger earthquakes without direct pore-pressure diffusion. One possible solution to mitigate injection-induced earthquakes is to simultaneously extract pre-existing pore fluids from the target reservoir. To examine the feasibility of the injection-extraction strategy, we compute the spatiotemporal change in Coulomb stress on basement normal faults, including: (1) the change in poroelastic stresses Δ τ _s+fΔ σ _n, where Δ τ _s and Δ σ _n are changes in shear and normal stress. respectively, and (2) the change in pore-pressure fΔ p. Using the model of (J. Geophys. Res. Solid Earth 99(B2):2601-2618, 1994), we estimate the seismicity rate on basement fault zones. Fluid extraction reduces direct pore-pressure diffusion into conductive faults, generally reducing the risk of induced seismicity. Limited diffusion into/from sealing faults results in negligible pore pressure changes within them. However, fluid extraction can cause enhanced seismicity rates on deep normal faults near the injector as well as shallow normal faults near the producer by poroelastic stressing. Changes in seismicity rate driven by poroelastic response to fluid injection-extraction depends on fault geometry, well operations, and the background stressing rate.

  10. Fractured-basement reservoir modeling using continuous fracture modeling (CFM) method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isniarny, Nadya; Haris, Abdul; Nurdin, Safrizal

    2016-02-01

    The challenge in oil and gas exploration has now shifted due to increasingly difficult to get back up economic value in a conventional reservoir. Explorationist are developing various drilling technology, optimizing conventional reserves and unconventional reserve in reservoirs. One of the unconventional reservoir that has been developed is the basement reservoir. This rock type has no primary porosity and the permeability of the rocks of this type are generally influenced by the naturally fracture networks. The purpose of this study is to map the fracture intensity distribution in the basement reservoir using Continuous Fracture Modeling (CFM) method. CFM method applies the basic concepts of neural network in finding a relationship between well data with seismic data in order to build a model of fracture intensity. The Formation Micro Imager (FMI) interpretation data is used to identify the presence of fracture along the well as dip angle and dip azimuth. This indicator will be laterally populated in 3D grid model. Several seismic attribute which are generated from seismic data is used as a guidance to populate fracture intensity in the model. The results from the model were validated with Drill Stem Test (DST) data. Zones of high fracture intensity on the model correlates positively with the presence of fluid in accordance with DST data.

  11. Origin of microbial life hypothesis: a gel cytoplasm lacking a bilayer membrane, with infrared radiation producing exclusion zone (EZ) water, hydrogen as an energy source and thermosynthesis for bioenergetics.

    PubMed

    Trevors, J T; Pollack, G H

    2012-01-01

    The hypothesis is proposed that pre-biotic bacterial cell(s) and the first cells capable of growth/division did not require a cytoplasmic membrane. A gel-like microscopic structure less than a cubic micrometer may have had a dual role as both an ancient pre-cytoplasm and a boundary layer to the higher-entropy external environment. The gel pre-cytoplasm exposed to radiant energy, especially in the infrared (IR) region of the EM spectrum resulted in the production of an exclusion zone (EZ) with a charge differential (-100 to -200 mV) and boundary that may have been a possible location for the latter organization of the first cytoplasmic membrane. Pre-biotic cells and then-living cells may have used hydrogen as the universal energy source, and thermosynthesis in their bioenergetic processes. These components will be discussed as to how they are interconnected, and their hypothesized roles in the origin of life.

  12. Thermotectonic history of the southeastern Brazilian margin: Evidence from apatite fission track data of the offshore Santos Basin and continental basement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelmann de Oliveira, Christie Helouise; Jelinek, Andréa Ritter; Chemale, Farid; Cupertino, José Antônio

    2016-08-01

    The Santos Basin is the largest offshore sedimentary basin in the southeastern Brazilian margin and originated by breakup of West Gondwana in the Early Cretaceous. We carried out a new thermochronological study by apatite fission track analysis from borehole samples of the Santos Basin and its continental basement to constrain the tectonic history of the southeastern Brazilian margin. Apatite fission track central ages of the basement and borehole samples vary from 21.0 ± 1.8 to 157.0 ± 35.0 Ma and from 6.5 ± 1.1 to 208.0 ± 11.0 Ma, respectively. From thermal modeling, the basement samples reached the maximum paleotemperatures during the final breakup of South America and Africa. The onshore basement and offshore basin record an early thermotectonic event during the Late Cretaceous linked to the uplift and denudation of the Serra do Mar and Serra da Mantiqueira. Maturation of the organic matter in the offshore basin is related with the progressive increase of the geothermal gradient due to burial. The thermal modeling indicates that the oil generation window started at 55-25 Ma. The basement samples experienced the final cooling during the Cenozoic, with an estimated amount of denudation linked to the sedimentary influx in the offshore basin. A rapid cooling during the Neogene becomes evident and it is linked to the reactivation along Precambrian shear zones and change of the Paraíba do Sul drainage system.

  13. BASEMENT, A view of the southeast corner of Room 6 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BASEMENT, A view of the southeast corner of Room 6 and connection to Room 5, looking southeast at the gauges and various equipment on the walls - Department of Energy, Mound Facility, Hydrolysis House Building (HH Building), One Mound Road, Miamisburg, Montgomery County, OH

  14. 12. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy, Architect's Drawing BASEMENT AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy, Architect's Drawing BASEMENT AND ATTIC PLANS Restricted: Permission for use must be obtained in writing from Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library Yale University, New Haven, Conn. - Willis Bristol House, 584 Chapel Street, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  15. 10. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy BASEMENT PLAN, NORTH ELEVATION, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy BASEMENT PLAN, NORTH ELEVATION, ARCHITECT'S ORIGINAL PLAN Restricted: Not to be reproduced without written permission from Beinecke Rare Books Library, Yale University, New Haven, Conn. - John Pitkin Norton House, 52 Hillhouse Avenue, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  16. Pneumatic vacuum tube message center, basement room 23, looking southeast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Pneumatic vacuum tube message center, basement room 23, looking southeast toward doorway and corridor. Note soundproof walls, pedestal flooring, and cable tray suspended from the ceiling - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  17. Thermal performance of residential duct systems in basements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treidler, Burke; Modera, Mark

    1994-01-01

    There are many unanswered questions about the typical effects of duct system operation on the infiltration rates and energy usage of single-family residences with HVAC systems in their basements. Results from preliminary field studies and computer simulations are used to examine the potential for improvements in efficiency of air distribution systems in such houses. The field studies comprise thermal and flow measurements on four houses in Maryland. The houses were found to have significant envelope leakage, duct leakage, and duct conduction losses. Simulations of a basement house, the characteristics of which were chosen from the measured houses, were performed to assess the energy savings potential for basement house. The simulations estimate that a nine percent reduction in space conditioning energy use is obtained by sealing eighty percent of the duct leaks and insulating ducks to an R-value of 0.88 (C x sq. m)/W(100 F x sq. ft x h/BTU) where they are exposed in the basement. To determine the maximum possible reduction in energy use, simulations were run with all ducts insulated to (17.6 C x sq m)/W(100 F x sq. ft x h/BTU) and with no duct leakage. A reduction of energy use by 14% is obtained by using perfect ducts instead of normal ducts.

  18. 7. INTERIOR VIEW OF BASEMENT OF CA. 1948 FACTORY ADDITION, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. INTERIOR VIEW OF BASEMENT OF CA. 1948 FACTORY ADDITION, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. AT CENTER IS A DEEP-BRAWN, HEAVY PRESS MANUFACTURED BY E. W. BLISS CO., BROOKLYN, NEW YORK. PRESS #3-1/2-C PATENTED BY E. W. BLISS CO., 1893. MANUFACTURER'S PLATE INDICATES PRESS DATES FROM 1922. - Illinois Pure Aluminum Company, 109 Holmes Street, Lemont, Cook County, IL

  19. 8. INTERIOR VIEW OF BASEMENT OF CA. 1948 FACTORY ADDITION, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. INTERIOR VIEW OF BASEMENT OF CA. 1948 FACTORY ADDITION, LOOKING SOUTHWEST. AT CENTER IS THE SAME PRESS AS SHOWN ABOVE (IL-25-7). TO LEFT IS PART OF THE OVERHEAD BELT GUARD. - Illinois Pure Aluminum Company, 109 Holmes Street, Lemont, Cook County, IL

  20. 5. INTERIOR VIEW OF BASEMENT, LOOKING WEST. DEEP DRAW, HEAVY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. INTERIOR VIEW OF BASEMENT, LOOKING WEST. DEEP DRAW, HEAVY PRESS MANUFACTURED BY E. W. BLISS CO., BROOKLYN, NEW YORK. PRESS #3-3/4 S, PATENTED BY E. W. BLISS CO., AUGUST 16, 1892, AND JANUARY 31, 1893. THIS PRESS DATES FROM CA. 1920. - Illinois Pure Aluminum Company, 109 Holmes Street, Lemont, Cook County, IL

  1. 10. INTERIOR VIEW OF BASEMENT OF CA. 1948 FACTORY ADDITION, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. INTERIOR VIEW OF BASEMENT OF CA. 1948 FACTORY ADDITION, LOOKING SOUTH. AT CENTER IS A SHALLOW-DRAWN PRESS (#3-1/2) MANUFACTURED BY E. W. BLISS OF BROOKLYN, NEW YORK. - Illinois Pure Aluminum Company, 109 Holmes Street, Lemont, Cook County, IL

  2. 15. ELECTRICAL REACTOR SHELVES, CONSTRUCTED OF CONCRETE IN THE BASEMENT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. ELECTRICAL REACTOR SHELVES, CONSTRUCTED OF CONCRETE IN THE BASEMENT ALONG EAST WALL, WITH REACTOR PADS BEHIND FRAMED AND SCREENED CAGE, AND PORCELAIN-LINED CABLE DUCTS VISIBLE IN WALL NEAR FLOOR AT REAR - Bonneville Power Administration South Bank Substation, I-84, South of Bonneville Dam Powerhouse, Bonneville, Multnomah County, OR

  3. 5. March 1960 ROOM IN BASEMENT OF THE ADDITION BUILT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. March 1960 ROOM IN BASEMENT OF THE ADDITION BUILT BY JOHN RUSSELL POPE, SUPPER ROOM, LOOKING NORTH 9I.E. IN THE DIRECTION OF MOUNT VERNON PLACE) - Garrett-Jacobs House, 7, 9, 11, 13 West Mount Vernon Place, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  4. MTR BASEMENT. WORKERS (DON ALVORD AND CYRIL VAN ORDEN OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR BASEMENT. WORKERS (DON ALVORD AND CYRIL VAN ORDEN OF PHILLIPS PETROLEUM CO.) POSE FOR GAMMA IRRADIATION EXPERIMENT IN MTR CANAL. CANS OF FOOD WILL BE LOWERED TO CANAL BOTTOM, WHERE SPENT MTR FUEL ELEMENTS EMIT GAMMA RADIATION. INL NEGATIVE NO. 11746. Unknown Photographer, 8/20/1954 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  5. Thermal performance of residential duct systems in basements

    SciTech Connect

    Treidler, B.; Modera, M.

    1994-02-01

    There are many unanswered questions about the typical effects of duct system operation on the infiltration rates and energy usage of single- family residences with HVAC systems in their basements. In this paper, results from preliminary field studies and computer simulations are used to examine the potential for improvements in efficiency of air distribution systems in such houses. The field studies comprise thermal and flow measurements on four houses in Maryland. The houses were found to have significant envelope leakage, duct leakage, and duct conduction losses. Simulations of a basement house, the characteristics of which were chosen from the measured houses, were performed to assess the energy savings potential for basement house. The simulations estimate that a nine percent reduction in space conditioning energy use is obtained by sealing eighty percent of the duct leaks and insulating ducts to an R-value of 0.88 {degree}C{center_dot}m{sup 2}/W (5{degree}F{center_dot}ft{sup 2}{center_dot}h/BTU) where they are exposed in the basement. To determine the maximum possible reduction m energy use, simulations were run with all ducts insulated to 17.6 {degree}C{center_dot}m{sup 2}/W (100 {degree}F{center_dot}ft{sup 2}{center_dot}h/BTU) and with no duct leakage. A reduction of energy use by 14% is obtained by using perfect ducts instead of nominal ducts.

  6. 11. VIEW NORTH OF MACHINE SHOP IN BASEMENT OF OLD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. VIEW NORTH OF MACHINE SHOP IN BASEMENT OF OLD POWERHOUSE, WITH PIPECUTTER (LEFT), DRILL PRESS LEFT (CENTER), AND GRINDER (RIGHT CENTER) BENEATH LINE SHAFTING) - Trenton Falls Hydroelectric Station, Powerhouse & Substation, On west bank of West Canada Creek, along Trenton Falls Road, 1.25 miles north of New York Route 28, Trenton Falls, Oneida County, NY

  7. 22. INTERIOR VIEW, BASEMENT UNDER NORTH ROOM OF MAIN BLOCK, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. INTERIOR VIEW, BASEMENT UNDER NORTH ROOM OF MAIN BLOCK, VIEW OF NORTHWEST WALL SHOWING CORBELING BASE OF FIRST FLOOR CHIMNEY BLOCK WITH STOVE-PIPE HOLE, AND MORTISE AND TENON FRAMING FOR HEARTH BED - Clifton Farm, Off Baker Road, Frederick, Frederick County, MD

  8. 29. Basement under central corridor. Shaft on right actuates cross ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. Basement under central corridor. Shaft on right actuates cross over valve. Shaft at left operates main flood valve to admit water into the bed. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Filtration Plant, South side of Armory Street between Edgehill Road & Whitney Avenue, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  9. VIEW OF PROCESS DEVELOPMENT PILE (PDP) TANK, LOOKING WESTSOUTHWEST, BASEMENT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF PROCESS DEVELOPMENT PILE (PDP) TANK, LOOKING WEST-SOUTHWEST, BASEMENT LEVEL -15’. EDGE O FRESONANCE TEST REACTOR (RTR), LATER KNOWN AS LATTICE TEST REACTOR (LTR), VISIBLE TO RIGHT OF PDP TANK - Physics Assembly Laboratory, Area A/M, Savannah River Site, Aiken, Aiken County, SC

  10. 7. AGENT STORAGE TANKS LOCATED IN CONCRETE BASEMENT. PHOTOGRAPH IS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. AGENT STORAGE TANKS LOCATED IN CONCRETE BASEMENT. PHOTOGRAPH IS OF THE EASTERN MOST TANK LOOKING SOUTH. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Tank House, Quadrant 1, approximately 1000 feet South of December Seventh Avenue; 2200 feet East of D Street, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  11. 22. INTERIOR, BASEMENT, WEST SIDE AISLE OF GRAND STAIRCASE (STAIRS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. INTERIOR, BASEMENT, WEST SIDE AISLE OF GRAND STAIRCASE (STAIRS G), RIGHT OF SOUTH ENTRANCE TO CAFETERIA, DETAIL OF WALL MURAL (4' x 5' negative; 8' x 10' print) - U.S. Department of the Interior, Eighteenth & C Streets Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  12. Basement utility room (room 24; air handling room), near the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Basement utility room (room 24; air handling room), near the west end of the combat operations center, looking southwest towards fan system one, air ducts, and walk-in filter rooms. The exterior equipment well is visible at the left - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  13. Precambrian from basement well in Mingo County, West Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    Heald, M.T.

    1981-04-01

    The Precambrian core from a basement test well in Mingo County, West Virginia, is granodiorite with minor quartz monzonite and tonalite. The potassium-argon method indicates a date of 939 +- 34 m.y. The core shows local shearing; microveins of sericite, orthoclase, and calcite indicate hydrothermal activity. 3 figures.

  14. 17. INTERIOR VIEW, BASEMENT, LOOKING SOUTHWEST AT THE GEAR PIT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. INTERIOR VIEW, BASEMENT, LOOKING SOUTHWEST AT THE GEAR PIT BELOW THE GRINDING STONES, SHOWING WOODEN COGS ATTACHED TO UNDERGROUND TURBINES. FRICTION DRIVE VISIBLE BEHIND CONTROL BAR (LEFT) WHICH OPERATES SMUT MILL - Schech's Mill, Beaver Creek State Park, La Crescent, Houston County, MN

  15. 6. DETAIL VIEW OF FLUTTER WHEEL IN BASEMENT OF GRISTMILL. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. DETAIL VIEW OF FLUTTER WHEEL IN BASEMENT OF GRISTMILL. THE RECTANGULAR ENCLOSED FLUME PROTRUDING FROM THE WALL AT CENTER/LEFT CARRIED WATER FROM THE EQUALIZING VAT THAT POWERED THE WHEEL - San Jose Grist Mill, Southwest of San Jose Drive, east of Espada Road, San Antonio, Bexar County, TX

  16. 44. Men's lounge in basement in SW corner of building. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. Men's lounge in basement in SW corner of building. (Aug. 1991) Stairs lead up to right to foyer in SW corner of building near Seventh Avenue entrance. See WA-197-17. - Fox Theater, Seventh Avenue & Olive Way, Seattle, King County, WA

  17. 27. DETAIL OF BASEMENT, MILL NO. 1 POWER ENTRY FILLED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. DETAIL OF BASEMENT, MILL NO. 1 POWER ENTRY FILLED IN AREA WHERE WATER-POWERED SHAFTING ENTERS BUILDING. NOTE CONTROL WHEEL ON FLOOR AND BELT HOLES IN CEILING TO FIRST FLOOR. - Prattville Manufacturing Company, Number One, 242 South Court Street, Prattville, Autauga County, AL

  18. Interior view of loading dock basement facing east and showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view of loading dock basement facing east and showing concrete cross beam, wood posts and beams, and storage shelving for Railway Express material - Southern Pacific Railroad Depot, Railroad Terminal Post Office & Express Building, Fifth & I Streets, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  19. NORTH BASEMENT WALL. IBEAM COLUMNS HAVE BEEN ENCASED IN CONCRETE. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    NORTH BASEMENT WALL. I-BEAM COLUMNS HAVE BEEN ENCASED IN CONCRETE. STEEL BEAMS LAY ACROSS FIRST FLOOR AWAITING CONCRETE POUR. CAMERA LOOKS SOUTHWEST. INL NEGATIVE NO. 735. Unknown Photographer, 10/6/1950 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  20. Rear semicircular section of the highlift pumping station basement with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Rear semi-circular section of the high-lift pumping station basement with remnants of the piping systems and suction wells at rear wall. - Robert B. Morse Water Filtration Plant, 10700 and 10701 Columbia Pike, Silver Spring, Montgomery County, MD

  1. DRIVE TERMINAL WITH VAULT MOTOR ROOM IN BASEMENT. SINGLE CHAIR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DRIVE TERMINAL WITH VAULT MOTOR ROOM IN BASEMENT. SINGLE CHAIR SKI LIFT (1947) ON LEFT, DOUBLE CHAIR SKI LIFT (1962) ON RIGHT. LOOKING SOUTHWEST WITH GENERAL STARK MOUNTAIN IN THE BACKGROUND. - Mad River Glen, Single Chair Ski Lift, 62 Mad River Glen Resort Road, Fayston, Washington County, VT

  2. 3. West end. Note arched basement entrance at north half ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. West end. Note arched basement entrance at north half of west endwall. Sand tower (MN-99-E) at right. View to east. - Duluth & Iron Range Rail Road Company Shops, Oil House, Southwest of downtown Two Harbors, northwest of Agate Bay, Two Harbors, Lake County, MN

  3. REACTIVITY MEASUREMENT FACILITY, UNDER CONSTRUCTION OVER MTR CANAL IN BASEMENT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    REACTIVITY MEASUREMENT FACILITY, UNDER CONSTRUCTION OVER MTR CANAL IN BASEMENT OF MTR BUILDING, TRA-603. WOOD PLANKS REST ON CANAL WALL OBSERVABLE IN FOREGROUND. INL NEGATIVE NO. 11745. Unknown Photographer, 8/20/1954 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  4. Barents Sea Paleozoic basement and basin configurations: Crustal structure from deep seismic and potential field data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aarseth, Iselin; Mjelde, Rolf; Breivik, Asbjørn Johan; Huismans, Ritske; Faleide, Jan Inge

    2016-04-01

    The Barents Sea is underlain by at least two different basement domains; the Caledonian in the west and the Timanian in the east. The transition between these two domains is not well constrained and contrasting interpretations have been published recently. Interpretations of new high-quality magnetic data covering most of the SW Barents Sea has challenged the Late Paleozoic basin configurations in the western and central Barents Sea as outlined in previous studies. Two regional ocean bottom seismic (OBS) profiles were acquired in 2014. This new dataset crosses the two major directions of Caledonian deformation proposed by different authors: N-S direction and SW-NE direction. Of particular importance are the high velocity anomalies related to Caledonian eclogites, revealing the location of Caledonian suture zones in the northern Barents Sea. One of the main objectives with this project is to locate the main Caledonian suture in the western Barents Sea, as well as the possible Barentsia-Baltica suture postulated further eastwards. The collapse of the Caledonian mountain range predominantly along these suture zones is expected to be tightly linked to the deposition of large thicknesses of Devonian erosional products, and later rifting is expected to be influenced by inheritance of Caledonian trends. The P-wave travel-time modelling is done by use of a combined ray-tracing and inversion scheme, and gravity- and magnetic modelling will be used to augment the seismic model. The preliminary results indicate high P-wave velocities (mostly over 4 km/s) close to the seafloor as well as high velocity (around 6 km/s) zones at shallow depths which are interpreted as volcanic sills. The crustal transects reveal areas of complex geology and velocity inversions. A low seismic impedance contrast between the sedimentary section and top crystalline basement makes identification of this interface uncertain. Depth to Moho mostly lies around 30 km, except in an area of rapid change in

  5. Ultrastructural analysis of blood-brain barrier breakdown in the peri-infarct zone in young adult and aged mice.

    PubMed

    Nahirney, Patrick C; Reeson, Patrick; Brown, Craig E

    2016-02-01

    Following ischemia, the blood-brain barrier is compromised in the peri-infarct zone leading to secondary injury and dysfunction that can limit recovery. Currently, it is uncertain what structural changes could account for blood-brain barrier permeability, particularly with aging. Here we examined the ultrastructure of early and delayed changes (3 versus 72 h) to the blood-brain barrier in young adult and aged mice (3-4 versus 18 months) subjected to photothrombotic stroke. At both time points and ages, permeability was associated with a striking increase in endothelial caveolae and vacuoles. Tight junctions were generally intact although small spaces were detected in a few cases. In young mice, ischemia led to a significant increase in pericyte process area and vessel coverage whereas these changes were attenuated with aging. Stroke led to an expansion of the basement membrane region that peaked at 3 h and partially recovered by 72 h in both age groups. Astrocyte endfeet and their mitochondria were severely swollen at both times points and ages. Our results suggest that blood-brain barrier permeability in young and aged animals is mediated by transcellular pathways (caveolae/vacuoles), rather than tight junction loss. Further, our data indicate that the effects of ischemia on pericytes and basement membrane are affected by aging. PMID:26661190

  6. Crustal heterogeneity and basement influence on the development of the Kenya Rift, East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Martin; Mosley, Peter

    1993-01-01

    Structural and metamorphic studies within the exposed Precambrian basement in Kenya indicate that a number of heterogeneities exist within the lithosphere beneath the line of the Kenya Rift. Of these, the most important is the mechanical and thermal contrast between thick, cold, and rigid Archean lithosphere and thinner anisotropic Proterozoic mobile belt crust/lithosphere. Structural, geophysical, and heat flow data indicate that during a late Proterozoic collisional event the margin of the Tanzanian Archean craton was reworked, overthrust, and effectively buried by tectonically emplaced "Mozambique Belt" rocks. Its position now lies some 100 km east and northeast of the exposed outcrop. These variations in crust/lithosphere type may be directly correlated with the morphotectonic and structural framework of the Kenya Rift and in particular are reflected in the spatial patterns of Cenozoic volcanism within the Gregory Rift zone. Along the craton margin and within the mobile belt a series of late Proterozoic continental-scale NW-SE and N-S trending ductile/brittle shear zones are fundamental. The reactivation of these shear zones under varying stress field conditions is presented as a model to account for the patterns of rift subsidence, including the location and geometry of graben structures, and the intrusion of magmas since early Miocene times.

  7. Lateral continuity of basement seismic reflections in 15 Ma ultrafast-spreading crust at ODP Site 1256

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nag, Sreeja; Swift, Stephen A.

    2011-09-01

    The Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) initiated drilling at Site 1256D in the Guatemala Basin, about 1,000 km off the East Pacific Rise to penetrate plutonic rocks, anticipated to be relatively shallow in this region, formed at an ultra-fast spreading rate. IODP Expedition E312 successfully drilled into gabbros at ~1,150 m in basement. Multi-channel seismic traces show weak laterally coherent sub-basement reflections at borehole depths. Synthetic reflectivity seismograms were computed using a Ricker wavelet and impedance profiles from borehole sonic logs. These seismograms show significant sub-basement amplitude peaks. A zero-offset vertical seismic profile, shot on E312, was processed to investigate the authenticity of these reflections and their relationship to borehole geology. A dual scheme of the median filtering and F-K dip filtering was used. Tests with synthetic seismograms indicate the approach is effective at reasonable SNR levels. Downgoing energy is clearly identified but negligible upgoing energy is visible over random noise. These results indicate that lava flows and igneous contacts in upper ocean crust have significant topography on lateral scales less than the Fresnel Zone (~300 m) due to igneous and tectonic processes.

  8. [Comparative characteristics of the numbers of microorganisms in soils and their basement sedimentary rocks].

    PubMed

    Zviagintsev, D G; Khlebnikova, G M; Gorin, S E

    1979-01-01

    Comparative studies on the quantitative composition of microorganisms in soils and basement sedimentary rocks have shown that the latter are rich in microorganisms. The number of microorganisms in basement grounds changes with time, thus indicating their activity. The qualitative composition is poor. At the same time, the total quantity of microorganisms in basement layers is equal to that in soil. Basement layers contain 10 times more microorganisms than eutrophic water reservoirs and 1000 times more than oligotrophic water reservoirs.

  9. Basement units in the southernmost Austroalpine domain (Nötsch, Eastern Alps): Significance for Alpine-Carpathian tectonics and paleogeography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubauer, Franz; Genser, Johann; Heberer, Bianca; Liu, Xiaoming; Friedl, Gertrude; Bernroider, Manfred; Dong, Yunpeng

    2015-04-01

    result from an advanced stage of Alpine rifting. White mica from orthogneiss boulders of the Pölland Fm. from the Nötsch Group show plateau ages ranging from 343 ± 4 Ma to 380 ± 2 Ma and are affected by a post-depositional very low-grade metamorphic overprint. The new data demonstrate, beside its significance for the Variscan history, that the tectonic succession of the Nötsch area at the southernmost part of the Austroalpine unit has a strong similarity to the nappe stack (including the NVO unit) of the northern Austroalpine sectors (Greywacke zone and Ochtina area). We consider, therefore, these three units of the Nötsch area as a remnant of the root zone of the basement and cover nappes in the footwall of the Meliata suture. The structural relationships demonstrate >150-200 km large-scale nappe transport of the Meliata suture remnants in the Eastern Alps and the involvement of large, hitherto undetected Cenozoic strike-slip faults in the Austroalpine structure.

  10. Equipment Location Plan, partial basement plan. (Includes identification of each ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Equipment Location Plan, partial basement plan. (Includes identification of each separate CPU, tape drive, hard drive, printer, keyboard, etc., within the data processing center in the southeast part of the basement.) March Air Force Base, Riverside, California, Combat Operations Center, 465-L DPC. By International Electric Corporation, Paramus, New Jersey (3/5/62); for Moffatt and Nichol, Engineers, 122 West Fifth Street, Long Beach, California; for the Corps of Engineers, U.S. Army, Office of the District Engineer, Los Angeles, California. Drawing no. AW-60-02-03, sheet no. 100, approved March, 1962; specifications no. OCI-62-66; D.O. series AW 1596/100, Rev. "A"; file drawer 1290. Last revised 3 October 1966. Scale one-quarter inch to one foot. 28.75x40.5 inches. ink on linen - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  11. 6. INTERIOR VIEW OF BASEMENT OF CA. 1948 FACTORY ADDITION, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. INTERIOR VIEW OF BASEMENT OF CA. 1948 FACTORY ADDITION, WITH REINFORCED CONCRETE FRAME AND FLOOR OF REINFORCED CONCRETE TEE-BEAMS, LOOKING NORTH. AT LEFT IS DEEP DRAW, HEAVY PRESS MANUFACTURED BY E. W. BLISS CO., BROOKLYN, NEW YORK. PRESS #3-1/2 B, PATENTED BY E. W. BLISS CO., 1893. MANUFACTURERS PLATE INDICATES PRESS DATES FROM 1920. - Illinois Pure Aluminum Company, 109 Holmes Street, Lemont, Cook County, IL

  12. 4. INTERIOR VIEW OF BASEMENT. CENTRAL LINE SHAFTING RUNNING NORTHSOUTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. INTERIOR VIEW OF BASEMENT. CENTRAL LINE SHAFTING RUNNING NORTH-SOUTH IS IN PLACE; AT RIGHT IS A PRESS FOR WORKING THE ALUMINUM SHEETS; E. W. BLISS CO. OF BROOKLYN, NEW YORK, MANUFACTURED THE PRESS. MACHINERY ORIGINALLY POWERED BY OVERHEAD BELTS CONNECTED TO CENTRAL LINE SHAFTS; BY ABOUT THE 1940s THE MACHINERY WAS ELECTRICALLY POWERED. - Illinois Pure Aluminum Company, 109 Holmes Street, Lemont, Cook County, IL

  13. Repair Air Conditioning, COC Bldg 2605, Basement Plan. By Strategic ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Repair Air Conditioning, COC Bldg 2605, Basement Plan. By Strategic Air Command, Civil Engineering. Drawing no. R-156, sheet no. 1 of 4, 15 August 1968; project no. MAR-125-8;CE-572; file drawer 2605-5. Last revised 31 August 1968?. Scale one-eighth inch and one-quarter inch to one foot. 29x41 inches. pencil on paper - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  14. 10. VIEW OF BASEMENT, LOOKING NORTHEAST. AT LEFT CENTER IS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. VIEW OF BASEMENT, LOOKING NORTHEAST. AT LEFT CENTER IS A 'BISON' CORN CRACKER (Wolf Co., Champ, Pennsylvania), DESIGNED TO CRACK KERNEL CORN. AT LEFT IS A 'EUREKA' CLEANER (S. Howe Co., Silver Creek, New York), WHOSE RECIPROCATING SIEVES REMOVED COARSE FOREIGN MATERIAL FROM WHEAT BEFORE MAKING FLOUR. Photographer: Jet T. Lowe, 1985 - Alexander's Grist Mill, Lock 37 on Ohio & Erie Canal, South of Cleveland, Valley View, Cuyahoga County, OH

  15. 120. Stage basement. View of the downstage, right, hydraulic ram ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    120. Stage basement. View of the downstage, right, hydraulic ram (type B) "star lift" and trap mechanism. The trap is in the retracted (open) position, but the opening in the stage floor was covered after the lift was taken out of service (see also sheet 8 of 9, details 5, 6A and 6B). - Auditorium Building, 430 South Michigan Avenue, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  16. Basement plan. San Bernardino Valley Union Junior College, Auditorium building. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Basement plan. San Bernardino Valley Union Junior College, Auditorium building. G. Stanley Wilson, Architect, A.I.A., Riverside, California. Sheet 2, Job no. 692. Scale 1/8 inch to the foot. March 27, 1936. Application no. 1446, approved by the State of California, Department of Public Works, Division of Architecture, April 22, 1936. - San Bernardino Valley College, Auditorium, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  17. MTR BASEMENT. DOORWAY TO SOURCE STORAGE VAULT IS AT CENTER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR BASEMENT. DOORWAY TO SOURCE STORAGE VAULT IS AT CENTER OF VIEW; TO DECONTAMINATION ROOM, AT RIGHT. PART OF MAZE ENTRY IS VISIBLE INSIDE VAULT DOORWAY. INL NEGATIVE NO. 7763. Unknown Photographer, photo was dated as 3/30/1953, but this was probably an error. The more likely date is 3/30/1952. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  18. Staged membrane oxidation reactor system

    SciTech Connect

    Repasky, John Michael; Carolan, Michael Francis; Stein, VanEric Edward; Chen, Christopher Ming-Poh

    2013-04-16

    Ion transport membrane oxidation system comprising (a) two or more membrane oxidation stages, each stage comprising a reactant zone, an oxidant zone, one or more ion transport membranes separating the reactant zone from the oxidant zone, a reactant gas inlet region, a reactant gas outlet region, an oxidant gas inlet region, and an oxidant gas outlet region; (b) an interstage reactant gas flow path disposed between each pair of membrane oxidation stages and adapted to place the reactant gas outlet region of a first stage of the pair in flow communication with the reactant gas inlet region of a second stage of the pair; and (c) one or more reactant interstage feed gas lines, each line being in flow communication with any interstage reactant gas flow path or with the reactant zone of any membrane oxidation stage receiving interstage reactant gas.

  19. Staged membrane oxidation reactor system

    SciTech Connect

    Repasky, John Michael; Carolan, Michael Francis; Stein, VanEric Edward; Chen, Christopher Ming-Poh

    2014-05-20

    Ion transport membrane oxidation system comprising (a) two or more membrane oxidation stages, each stage comprising a reactant zone, an oxidant zone, one or more ion transport membranes separating the reactant zone from the oxidant zone, a reactant gas inlet region, a reactant gas outlet region, an oxidant gas inlet region, and an oxidant gas outlet region; (b) an interstage reactant gas flow path disposed between each pair of membrane oxidation stages and adapted to place the reactant gas outlet region of a first stage of the pair in flow communication with the reactant gas inlet region of a second stage of the pair; and (c) one or more reactant interstage feed gas lines, each line being in flow communication with any interstage reactant gas flow path or with the reactant zone of any membrane oxidation stage receiving interstage reactant gas.

  20. Staged membrane oxidation reactor system

    DOEpatents

    Repasky, John Michael; Carolan, Michael Francis; Stein, VanEric Edward; Chen, Christopher Ming-Poh

    2012-09-11

    Ion transport membrane oxidation system comprising (a) two or more membrane oxidation stages, each stage comprising a reactant zone, an oxidant zone, one or more ion transport membranes separating the reactant zone from the oxidant zone, a reactant gas inlet region, a reactant gas outlet region, an oxidant gas inlet region, and an oxidant gas outlet region; (b) an interstage reactant gas flow path disposed between each pair of membrane oxidation stages and adapted to place the reactant gas outlet region of a first stage of the pair in flow communication with the reactant gas inlet region of a second stage of the pair; and (c) one or more reactant interstage feed gas lines, each line being in flow communication with any interstage reactant gas flow path or with the reactant zone of any membrane oxidation stage receiving interstage reactant gas.

  1. Recognizing Basement Fault Reactivation in 3D Seismic Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imber, J.; McCaffrey, K.; Holdsworth, R.; England, R.; Freeman, S.; Dore, T.; Geldjvik, G.

    2003-04-01

    3D seismic data are now widely used for hydrocarbon exploration and production, and because of its ability to image sub-surface structures, the technology represents one of the most important conceptual advances in the Earth Sciences in recent years. It provides an important tool capable of addressing fundamental questions concerning the way in which fault systems evolve in the continental crust, the effects of inherited crustal weakness on rifting style and the control of fault networks on reservoir properties. Preliminary analyses of published offshore seismic data demonstrate that there are quantifiable differences in the geometric evolution and growth of "thin-skinned" normal fault systems in which there is no direct basement involvement compared to those developed above little- and highly-reactivated basement structures. Reactivated fault systems are characterised by rapid strain localisation and fault lengths that are controlled by up-dip propagation of basement structures (Walsh et al. 2002). Thus, fault growth during reactivation is likely to be achieved by increasing cumulative displacement with negligible lateral propagation. Important questions remain, however, concerning the way in which faults grow and localise displacement during the earliest stages of reactivation. In particular, we have little detailed understanding of the extent to which basement fault geometry (e.g. polarity, segmentation) influences the pattern of faulting observed in the cover sequence, the kinematics of up-dip fault propagation and/or linkage, or the degree of displacement localisation at low bulk strains. Normal faults that developed in response to glacial retreat on the NE Atlantic Margin reactivate pre-existing Mesozoic, Caledonian and/or Precambrian structures and are characterised by low displacements (throws typically 100--101 m), thus representing the earliest stages in the development of a reactivated fault system. Spectacular images of postglacial and underlying

  2. Geo-electrical investigation of near surface conductive structures suitable for groundwater accumulation in a resistive crystalline basement environment: A case study of Isuada, southwestern Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayode, J. S.; Adelusi, A. O.; Nawawi, M. N. M.; Bawallah, M.; Olowolafe, T. S.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a geophysical surveying for groundwater identification in a resistive crystalline basement hard rock in Isuada area, Southwestern Nigeria. Very low frequency (VLF) electromagnetic and electrical resistivity geophysical techniques combined with well log were used to characterize the concealed near surface conductive structures suitable for groundwater accumulation. Prior to this work; little was known about the groundwater potential of this area. Qualitative and semi-quantitative interpretations of the data collected along eight traverses at 20 m spacing discovered conductive zones suspected to be fractures, faults, and cracks which were further mapped using Vertical Electrical Sounding (VES) technique. Forty VES stations were utilized using Schlumberger configurations with AB/2 varying from 1 to 100 m. Four layers i.e. the top soil, the weathered layer, the partially weathered/fractured basement and the fresh basement were delineated from the interpreted resistivity curves. The weathered layers constitute the major aquifer unit in the area and are characterized by moderately low resistivity values which ranged between about 52 Ωm and 270 Ωm while the thickness varied from 1 to 35 m. The depth to the basement and the permeable nature of the weathered layer obtained from both the borehole and the hand-dug wells was used to categorize the groundwater potential of the study area into high, medium and low ratings. The groundwater potential map revealed that about 45% of the study area falls within the low groundwater potential rating while about 10% constitutes the medium groundwater potential and the remaining 45% constitutes high groundwater potential. The low resistivity, thick overburden, and fractured bedrock constitute the aquifer units and the series of basement depressions identified from the geoelectric sections as potential conductive zones appropriate for groundwater development.

  3. The basement of the Mount Athos peninsula, northern Greece: insights from geochemistry and zircon ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Himmerkus, F.; Zachariadis, P.; Reischmann, T.; Kostopoulos, D.

    2012-09-01

    The Mount Athos Peninsula is situated in the south-easternmost part of the Chalkidiki Peninsula in northern Greece. It belongs to the Serbo-Macedonian Massif (SMM), a large basement massif within the Internal Hellenides. The south-eastern part of the Mount Athos peninsula is built by fine-grained banded biotite gneisses and migmatites forming a domal structure. The southern tip of the peninsula, which also comprises Mount Athos itself, is built by limestone, marble and low-grade metamorphic rocks of the Chortiatis Unit. The northern part and the majority of the western shore of the Mount Athos peninsula are composed of highly deformed rocks belonging to a tectonic mélange termed the Athos-Volvi-Suture Zone (AVZ), which separates two major basement units: the Vertiskos Terrane in the west and the Kerdillion Unit in the east. The rock-types in this mélange range from metasediments, marbles and gneisses to amphibolites, eclogites and peridotites. The gneisses are tectonic slivers of the adjacent basement complexes. The mélange zone and the gneisses were intruded by granites (Ierissos, Ouranoupolis and Gregoriou). The Ouranoupolis intrusion obscures the contact between the mélange and the gneisses. The granites are only slightly deformed and therefore postdate the accretionary event that assembled the units and created the mélange. Pb-Pb- and U-Pb-SHRIMP-dating of igneous zircons of the gneisses and granites of the eastern Athos peninsula in conjunction with geochemical and isotopic analyses are used to put Athos into the context of a regional tectonic model. The ages form three clusters: The basement age is indicated by two samples that yielded Permo-Carboniferous U-Pb-ages of 292.6 ± 2.9 Ma and 299.4 ± 3.5 Ma. The main magmatic event of the granitoids now forming the gneiss dome is dated by Pb-Pb-ages between 140.0 ± 2.6 Ma and 155.7 ± 5.1 Ma with a mean of 144.7 ± 2.4 Ma. A within-error identical age of 146.6 ± 2.3 Ma was obtained by the U

  4. Aeromagnetic anomalies uncover the Precambrian basement in the Chhattisgarh basin area, Central India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ram, Bahadur; Singh, Nagendra; Murthy, A.

    2008-12-01

    This paper presents aeromagnetic images for the Chhattisgarh basin region, in Central India, to provide a new window on Precambrian basement geology and structure. On the basis of aeromagnetic patterns, the Chhattisgarh basin is sub-divided into a northern low (negative) anomaly zone and a southern high (positive) anomaly zone. The northern portion of the main Chhattisgarh basin has been further divided into two subbasins, the Hirri sub-basin in the west, and Baradwar sub-basin in the east. A prominent negative anomaly delineates a NW-SE trending greenstone belt separating these sub-basins. Positive magnetic anomalies delineate the extent of the Dongargarh granite and equivalents, while the weak magnetic anomaly in the southeast of the Dongargarh granite and equivalents reflect granulite gneisses of the Eastern Ghat Mobile Belt. By applying the reduced-to-the-equator filter we enhanced the possible magnetic sources and structural lineaments within the Chhattisgarh basin. A new sketch map of structural elements was then compiled from aeromagnetic interpretation over the Chhattisgarh basin area. It includes possible faults, folds and an inferred lithological boundary.

  5. Preliminary low-T thermochronology of basement rocks and cover sequences in NE Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdel, C.; Stockli, D. F.

    2013-12-01

    We measured apatite and zircon (U-Th)/He ages from basement rocks of the Thomson Orogen and overlying Paleozoic strata in the back-arc of the New England Orogen in NE Australia. Zircon (U-Th)/He ages from cover sequences and most basement samples (including those recovered from boreholes at depths of up to 1.1 km) are characterized by large inter- and intra-sample variability and range from approximately 200 to 350 Ma. Our interpretation is that this large range results from protracted residence of these rocks in the zircon (U-Th)/He partial retention zone (temperatures of roughly 130-200 °C) during a ~100 My period that encompassed late Carboniferous-early Permian extensional exhumation, Triassic burial beneath thick sedimentary basins, and Late Triassic tectonic denudation related to retroarc shortening during the Hunter-Bowen Orogeny. Relatively tightly-clustered Paleogene zircon (U-Th)/He ages from an exposure of Ordovician granitic rocks in the core of a structural dome in east-central Queensland are exceptions to this pattern. These granitoids also have Paleogene apatite (U-Th)/He ages, suggesting either rapid Eocene-Oligocene exhumation of the dome or resetting of both apatite and zircon (U-Th)/He ages by nearby Paleogene magmas. Apatite (U-Th)/He data from late Permian sandstone in the Bowen Basin also suggest cooling to near-surface conditions during the Paleogene. Overall, these data refine the timing of major extensional and contractional events that have affected the back-arc of the northern New England Orogen over approximately the last 300 My.

  6. Precambrian Basement Surface Estimation using Coupled 3D Modeling of Gravity and Aeromagnetic Data in Southeastern Wisconsin and Fond Du Lac County

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skalbeck, J.; Koski, A. J.

    2011-12-01

    Increased concerns about groundwater resources in Wisconsin have brought about the need for better understanding of the subsurface geologic structure that lead to developing conceptual hydrogeologic models for numerical simulation of groundwater flow. Models are often based on sparse data from well logs usually located large distances apart and limited in depth. Model assumptions based on limited spatial data typically requires simplification that may add uncertainty to the simulation results and the accuracy of a groundwater model. This research provides another tool for the groundwater modeler to better constrain the conceptual model of a hydrogeologic system. The area near the Waukesha Fault in southeastern Wisconsin provides an excellent research opportunity for our proposed approach because of the strong gravity and aeromagnetic anomalies associated with the fault, the apparent complexity in fault geometry, and uncertainty in Precambrian basement depth and structure. Precambrian basement surface throughout Fond du Lac County is known to be very undulated and this uneven basement topography controls water well yields and zones of stagnant water. Therefore, an accurate estimation of the basement topography in Fond Du Lac County is vital to determining ground water flow and quality of groundwater in this region.

  7. Peri-Amazonian provenance of the Proto-Pelagonian basement (Greece), from zircon U-Pb geochronology and Lu-Hf isotopic geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlatkin, Olga; Avigad, Dov; Gerdes, Axel

    2014-01-01

    The basement of the Pelagonian zone of the Hellenides, in the Eastern Mediterranean realm, has been shaped by mid-Neoproterozoic (700 Ma) and Variscan (300 Ma) igneous activities. In the present study, detrital zircon U-Pb geochronology and Lu-Hf isotope geochemistry of ca. 700 Ma-aged granites and of pre-700 Ma metasediments from the Pelagonian zone allow a genuine perspective into the provenance and origin of this terrane which hosts one of the oldest sedimentary sequences known in SE Europe. Pelagonian crustal vestiges comprising 700 Ma granitoids and their hosting metasediments are termed here "Proto-Pelagonian".

  8. Basement reservoir in Zeit Bay oil field, Gulf of Suez

    SciTech Connect

    Zahran, I.; Askary, S.

    1988-02-01

    Fractured basement, one of the most important reservoirs of Zeit Bay field, contains nearly one-third of oil in place of the field. The flow rates per well vary from 700 to 9,000 BOPD. Due to its well-established production potential, 60% of the wells for the development of the field were drilled down to basement. The Zeit Bay basement consists of granitic rocks of pegmatitic to coarse porphyritic texture and has equal proportions of alkali feldspars. Dykes of various compositions are present, traversing the granite at different intervals. Dykes include aplite, microsyenite, diabase and lamprophyre. The last two pertain to the post-granitic dykes of late Proterozoic age. The main granitic pluton is related to one of the final stages of the tectonic-magmatic cycle of the Arabo-Nubian shield. The Zeit Bay area was a significant paleohigh until the Miocene, hence its structural picture is very complicated due to the impact of different tectonic movements from the late Precambrian to Cenozoic. The resulting structural elements were carefully investigated and statistically analyzed to decipher the influence of various tectonic events. The presence of high porosity in some intervals and low porosity in others could be tied to the presence of new fractures and the nature of cementing minerals. The relation of mineralized fractures and their depths lead to zonation of porous layers in the granitic pluton. Diagenetic processes on the granitic body and the alteration/resedimentation of the diagenetic products controlled the magnitude and amplitude of the porosity layers. A model has been constructed to illustrate the changes in the primary rock texture and structure with sequential diagenetic processes, taking into consideration the fracture distribution and their opening affinities as related to their depths.

  9. Basement reservoir in Zeit Bay oil field, Gulf of Suez

    SciTech Connect

    Zahran, I.; Askary, S.

    1988-01-01

    Fractured basement, one of the most important reservoirs of Zeit Bay field, contains nearly one-third of oil in place of the field. The flow rates per well vary from 700 to 9,000 BOPD. Due to its well-established production potential, 60% of the wells for the development of the field were drilled down to basement. The Zeit Bay basement consist of granitic rocks of pegmatitic to coarse porphyritic texture and has equal proportions of alkali feldspars. Dykes of various compositions are present, traversing the granite at different intervals. Dykes include aplite, microsyenite, diabase and lamprophyre. The last two pertain to the post-granitic dykes of later Proterozoic age. The main granitic luton is related to one of the final stages of the tectonic-magmatic cycle of the Arabo-Nubian sheild. The Zeit Bay area was a significant paleohigh until the Miocene, hence its structural picture is very complicated due to the impact of different tectonic movements from the late Precambrian to Cenozoic. The resulting structural elements were carefully investigated and statistically analyzed to decipher the influence of various tectonic events. The presence of high porosity in some intervals and low porosity in others could be tied to the presence of new fractures and the nature of cementing minerals. The relation of mineralized fractures and their depths lead to zonation of porous layers in the granitic pluton. Diagenetic processes on the granitic body and the alternation/resedimentation of the diagenetic products controlled the magnitude and amplitude of the porosity layers.

  10. Geochemical, microtextural and petrological studies of the Samba prospect in the Zambian Copperbelt basement: a metamorphosed Palaeoproterozoic porphyry Cu deposit.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Master, Sharad; Mirrander Ndhlovu, N.

    2015-04-01

    Ever since Wakefield (1978, IMM Trans., B87, 43-52) described a porphyry-type meta-morphosed Cu prospect, the ca 50 Mt, 0.5% Cu Samba deposit (12.717°S, 27.833°E), hosted by porphyry-associated quartz-sericite-biotite schists in northern Zambia, there has been controversy about its origin and significance. This is because it is situated in the basement to the world's largest stratabound sediment-hosted copper province, the Central African Copperbelt, which is hosted by rocks of the Neoproterozoic Katanga Supergroup. Mineralization in the pre-Katangan basement has long played a prominent role in ore genetic models, with some authors suggesting that basement Cu mineralization may have been recycled into the Katangan basin through erosion and redeposition, while others have suggested that the circulation of fluids through Cu-rich basement may have leached out the metals which are found concentrated in the Katangan orebodies. On the basis of ca 490-460 Ma Ar-Ar ages, Hitzman et al. (2012, Sillitoe Vol., SEG Spec. Publ., 16, 487-514) suggested that Samba represents late-stage impregnation of copper mineralization into the basement, and that it was one of the youngest copper deposits known in the Central African Copperbelt. If the Samba deposit really is that young, then it would have post-dated regional deformation and metamorphism (560-510 Ma), and it ought to be undeformed and unmetamorphosed. The Samba mineralization consists of chalcopyrite and bornite, occurring as disseminations, stringers and veinlets, found in a zone >1 km along strike, in steeply-dipping lenses up to 10m thick and >150m deep. Our new major and trace element XRF geochemical data (14 samples) show that the host rocks are mainly calc-alkaline metadacites. Cu is correlated with Ag (Cu/Ag ~10,000:1) with no Au or Mo. Our study focused on the microtextures and petrology of the Samba ores. We confirm that there is alteration of similar style to that accompanying classical porphyry Cu mineralization

  11. Geochronology and geochemistry of deep-drill-core samples from the basement of the central Tarim basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhao-Jie; Yin, An; Robinson, Alexander; Jia, Cheng-Zao

    2005-04-01

    The Tarim basin between the Tibetan plateau to the south and Tian Shan to the north in the Indo-Asian collision zone is little deformed as indicated by flat-lying Cenozoic strata across much of the basin. Due to the lack of direct observations from its crystalline basement, the geologic setting for the existence of such a rigid Cenozoic block remains elusive. Hypotheses for the nature of the Tarim basement include (1) Precambrian basement, (2) late Paleozoic trapped oceanic basin, (3) a late Precambrian failed rift, and (4) a Precambrian oceanic plateau. These models make specific predictions about the age and composition of the Tarim basement. To test these hypotheses, we conduct geochemical and geochronologic analyses of samples recovered from a deep well that reached a depth of >7000 m and drilled into the crystalline basement for ˜35 m beneath the central Tarim basin. Mineralogical composition and major element analysis suggest that the crystalline from the drill core is a diorite. Under think sections the rocks samples consist of fine-grained (0.1-0.4 mm in the longest dimension) and medium-grain domains (2-3 mm in the longest dimension). The contact between the two domains is sharp and the change in grain size across the boundary is abrupt. The rock under thin section shows undeformed igneous textures. Rare earth element patterns and isotopic compositions of Sr and Nd suggest that the central Tarim diorite was derived from an arc setting. The minimum age of the diorite is determined by 40Ar/ 39Ar dating of hornblende, which yields three ages from three different samples: 790.0±22.1, 754.4±22.6, and 744.0±9.3 Ma, respectively (uncertainty is reported at 1 σ). The older age is associated with the fine-grained sample while the younger ages are associated with the medium-grained samples. We are unable to determine whether the different ages are due to argon loss as the rock was located in partial retention zone or caused by different phases of igneous

  12. Formation and Evolution of the Junggar basin basement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, D.

    2015-12-01

    Junggar Basin is located in the central part of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB). Its basement nature is a highly controversial scientific topic, involving the basic style and processes of crustal growth.Based on the borehole data from over 300 wells drilled into the Carboniferous System, together with the high-resolution gravity and magnetic data (in a 1:50,000 scale), we made a detailed analysis of the basement structure, formation timing and process and later evolution on basis of core geochemical and isotopic analysis. Firstly, we defined the Mahu Precambrian micro-continental block in the juvenile crust of Junggar Basin according to the Hf isotopic analysis of the Carboniferous volcanic rocks. Secondly, the results of the tectonic setting and basin analysis suggest that the Junggar area incorporates three approximately E-W trending island arc belts (from north to south: Yemaquan-Wulungu-Chingiz, Jiangjunmiao-Luliang-Darbut and Zhongguai-Mosuowan-Baijiahai-Qitai respectively) and intervened three approximately E-W trending retro-arc or inter-arc basin belts from north to south, such as Santanghu-Suosuoquan-Emin, Wucaiwan-Dongdaohaizi-Mahu (Mahu block sunk as a bathyal basin during this phase) and Fukang-western well Pen1 accordingly. Thirdly, the closure of these retro-arc or inter-arc basins gradually toward the south led to the occurrence of collision and amalgamation of the above-mentioned island arcs during the Carboniferous, constituting the basic framework of the Junggar "block". Fourthly, the emplacement of large-scale mantle-derived magmas occurred in the latest Carboniferous or Early Permian. For instance, the well Mahu 5 penetrate the latest Carboniferous basalts with a thickness of over 20m, and these mantle-derived magmas concreted the above-mentioned island arc-collaged body. Therefore, the Junggar basin basement mainly comprises pre-Carboniferous collaged basement, and its formation is characterized by two-stage growth model, involving the

  13. Precambrian basement geology of North and South Dakota.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klasner, J.S.; King, E.R.

    1986-01-01

    Combined analysis of drill-hole, gravity and magnetic data indicates that the Precambrian rocks in the basement of the Dakotas may be divided into a series of lithotectonic terrains. On the basis of an analysis of geological and geophysical data in the Dakotas and from the surrounding states and Canada, it is shown how the exposed Precambrian rocks of the adjacent shield areas project into the study area. Brief comments are made on the tectonic implications of this study. Geological and geophysical characteristics of 11 terrains are tabulated. -P.Br.

  14. Lineaments in basement terrane of the Peninsular Ranges, Southern California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merifield, P. M. (Principal Investigator); Lamar, D. L.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. ERTS and Skylab images reveal a number of prominent lineaments in the basement terrane of the Peninsular Ranges, Southern California. The major, well-known, active, northwest trending, right-slip faults are well displayed; northeast and west to west-northwest trending lineaments are also present. Study of large-scale airphotos followed by field investigations have shown that several of these lineaments represent previously unmapped faults. Pitches of striations on shear surfaces of the northeast and west trending faults indicate oblique slip movement; data are insufficient to determine the net-slip. These faults are restricted to the pre-tertiary basement terrane and are truncated by the major northwest trending faults. They may have been formed in response to an earlier stress system. All lineaments observed in the space photography are not due to faulting, and additional detailed geologic investigations are required to determine the nature of the unstudied lineaments, and the history and net-slip of fault-controlled lineaments.

  15. Basement involvement, Bulldog Creek area, southern Canadian Rockies

    SciTech Connect

    McDonough, M.R.

    1985-01-01

    Two distinct basement gneiss bodies are involved in the western Main Ranges of the Rocky Mountains adjacent to the rocky Mountain Trench near Valemount, British Columbia. Bulldog Gneiss comprises paragneisses intruded by Aphebian or older granitic orthogneiss, while the larger and more easterly Yellowjacket Gneiss (new name, age unknown) is composed mostly of granodioritic orthogneiss. Both gneiss bodies are overlain by Hadrynian metasediments ascribed to the lower Miette Group. The base-cover contacts in the Bulldog Creek area are marked by mylonite, which is suggestive of detachment. These contacts were strongly annealed during middle amphibolite facies metamorphism, however, and kinematic indicators are few and ambiguous. The gneisses were incorporated into a structural culmination by imbrication of the hanging wall of the Bear Foot Fault (new name; BFF). The culmination is, in part, due to a large overturned antiform that is cored by Yellowjacket Gneiss. This antiform constitutes the leading edge of the Bear Foot sheet, which places Yellowjacket Gneiss and lower Miette cover onto lower and middle Miette Group rocks. Kinematic indicators from BFF suggest a complex movement history, the final stage of which is easterly-directed thrusting. Thus, basement is incorporated in the eastern part of the Columbian orogen by thin-skinned thrusting and subsequent development of a leading edge antiform.

  16. Provenance of Neoproterozoic sedimentary basement of northern Iran, Kahar Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etemad-Saeed, Najmeh; Hosseini-Barzi, Mahboubeh; Adabi, Mohammad Hossein; Sadeghi, Abbas; Houshmandzadeh, Abdolrahim

    2015-11-01

    This article presents new data to understand the nature of the hidden crystalline basement of northern Iran and the tectonic setting of Iran during late Neoproterozoic time. The siliciclastic-dominated Kahar Formation represents the oldest known exposures of northern Iran and comprises late Ediacaran (ca. 560-550 Ma) compositionally immature sediments including mudrocks, sandstones, and conglomerates. This work focuses on provenance of three well preserved outcrops of this formation in Alborz Mountains: Kahar Mountain, Sarbandan, and Chalus Road, through petrographic and geochemical methods. Mineralogical Index of Alteration (MIA) and Chemical Index of Alteration (CIA-after correction for K-metasomatism) values combined with A-CN-K relations suggest moderate weathering in the source areas. The polymictic nature of Kahar conglomerates indicates a mixed provenance for them. However, modal analysis of Kahar sandstones (volcanic to plagioclase-rich lithic arkose) and whole rock geochemistry of mudrocks suggest that they are largely first-cycle sediments and that their sources were remarkably late Ediacaran, intermediate-felsic igneous rocks from proximal arc settings. Tectonic setting discrimination diagrams also indicate a convergent plate margin and continental arc related basin for Kahar sediments. This interpretation is supported by the phyllo-tectic to tectic composition and geochemistry of mudrocks. These results reveal the presence of a felsic/intermediate subduction-related basement (∼600-550 Ma) in this region, which provides new constraints on subduction scenario during this time interval in Iran, as a part of the Peri-Gondwanan terranes.

  17. [Proteoglycan in Bruch's membrane of senescence accelerated mouse: localization and age-related changes].

    PubMed

    Takada, Y; Ohkuma, H; Ogata, N; Matsushima, M; Sugasawa, K; Uyama, M

    1994-05-01

    We demonstrated the distribution of sulfated proteoglycans in Bruch's membrane of Senescence Accelerated Mouse histochemically and ultrastructurally using cuprolinic blue in conjunction with specific enzyme treatments and nitrous acid digestion. Two kinds of proteoglycan filaments were observed in the inner and outer collagenous layers, i.e., small collagen fibril-associated filaments (11 nm in average length), and large filaments (32 nm in average length). Intermediate size filaments (25 nm in average length) were seen in the basement membranes of the retinal pigment epithelium and choriocapillaris. Chondroitinase AC treatment eliminated the staining of filaments in the collagenous layers (chondroitin sulfate). Chondroitinase ABC treatment also eliminated the staining of filaments in the collagenous layers (chondroitin sulfate and dermatan sulfate). Nitrous acid eliminated the staining of filaments in both basement membranes (heparan sulfate). Proteoglycans containing chondroitin sulfate and dermatan sulfate were associated uniquely with collagen fibrils. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans were associated with the basement membranes of the pigment epithelium and choriocapillaris. With aging, the thickness of the basement membrane of the choriocapillaris and the staining of the filaments in the basement membranes of the pigment epithelium and choriocapillaris (heparan sulfate proteoglycans) increased. Collagen fibers became disarranged and the staining of both filaments in the collagenous layers decreased. The results of the staining characteristics probably reflect the aging of Bruch's membrane.

  18. Damage function rating procedure for flat slab basement shelters. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, R.E.; Bernard, R.D.; Tansley, R.S.; Willoughby, A.B.; Wilton, C.

    1982-12-01

    This report presents the development of procedures for rating of damage function and casualty functions for basement Civil Defense shelters. Suitable large basements, after having been upgraded during a crisis period, to withstand nuclear weapons effects including air blast, and nuclear radiation are expected to be utilized to provide protection for a large portion of the population in the event of a nuclear attack on the United States. Both risk area personnel shelters for essential workers and host area shelters for the general population are included. The report includes: a descriptive listing of basement structural systems and other pertinent basement parameters; a description of the characteristics of typical flat slab basement designs; a review of applicable casualty data and prediction models for nuclear warfare casualties; a summary of previous research on development of casualty functions; a description of the current status of the damage and casualty function development procedure; casualty function predictions for representative flat slab basements; and conclusions and recommendations.

  19. Precambrian Basement Structure Map of the Continental United States - An Interpretation of Geologic and Aeromagnetic Data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sims, Paul K.; Saltus, Richard W.; Anderson, Eric D.

    2008-01-01

    The Precambrian basement rocks of the continental United States are largely covered by younger sedimentary and volcanic rocks, and the availability of updated aeromagnetic data (NAMAG, 2002) provides a means to infer major regional basement structures and tie together the scattered, but locally abundant, geologic information. Precambrian basement structures in the continental United States have strongly influenced later Proterozoic and Phanerozoic tectonism within the continent, and there is a growing awareness of the utility of these structures in deciphering major younger tectonic and related episodes. Interest in the role of basement structures in the evolution of continents has been recently stimulated, particularly by publications of the Geological Society of London (Holdsworth and others, 1998; Holdsworth and others, 2001). These publications, as well as others, stress the importance of reactivation of basement structures in guiding the subsequent evolution of continents. Knowledge of basement structures is an important key to understanding the geology of continental interiors.

  20. Thick-skinned tectonics and basement control on geometry, kinematics and mechanics of fold-and-thrust belts. Insights from some cenozoic belts worldwide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacombe, Olivier; Bellahsen, Nicolas

    2015-04-01

    Fold-and-thrust belts (FTBs) form either in lower and upper plates at the expense of proximal parts of former passive margins during collision or within the upper plate of subduction orogens. In contrast, inner parts of mountain belts are likely made of stacked units from the distal passive margin domains that have undergone continental subduction and HP-LT metamorphism. There are increasing lines of evidence that the basement is involved in shortening in many FTBs worldwide, either pervasively (across the entire belt; tectonic inversion may even occur more forelandward than the mountain front) or mainly in their innermore domains where this basement is commonly exhumed. For thick-skinned FTBs that developed from former passive margins, the occurrence of weak mechanical layers within the proximal margin lithosphere (the middle and most of the lower crust are expectedly ductile) may explain that contractional deformation be distributed within most of the crust giving rise to basement-involved tectonic style. In contrast, because these weak crustal levels are usually lacking in distal parts of the margins as a result of thinning, these stronger lithospheric domains are more prone to localized deformation/subduction. Less understandable this way is the occurrence of thick-skinned wide domains within cold and strong interiors of upper plates of subduction zones, such as the Paleocene Laramide orogenic belt or the active Sierras Pampeanas belt. Structural, geophysical and thermochronological investigations within Cenozoic thick-skinned (or basement-involved thin-skinned) FTBs provide evidence for how the pre-orogenic and syn-orogenic deformation of the basement may control the geometry, kinematics and mechanics of FTBs. In this contribution, we examine some examples of FTBs where the basement is known to be involved in shortening and we review some aspects of the control exerted by the basement on the deformation. This control is demonstrated (1) at the scale of the

  1. Electrophysiological characterization of neurons in the dorsolateral pontine REM sleep induction zone of the rat: intrinsic membrane properties and responses to carbachol and orexins

    PubMed Central

    Brown§, Ritchie E.; Winston, Stuart; Basheer, Radhika; Thakkar, Mahesh M; McCarley, Robert W.

    2006-01-01

    Pharmacological, lesion and single-unit recording techniques in several animal species have identified a region of the pontine reticular formation (Subcoeruleus, SubC) just ventral to the locus coeruleus as critically involved in the generation of rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep. However, the intrinsic membrane properties and responses of SubC neurons to neurotransmitters important in REM sleep control, such as acetylcholine and orexins/hypocretins, have not previously been examined in any animal species and thus were targeted in this study. We obtained whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from visually identified SubC neurons in rat brain slices in vitro. Two groups of large neurons (mean diameter 30 and 27μm) were tentatively identified as cholinergic (rostral SubC) and noradrenergic (caudal SubC) neurons. SubC reticular neurons (non-cholinergic, non-noradrenergic) showed a medium-sized depolarizing sag during hyperpolarizing current pulses and often had a rebound depolarization (low-threshold spike, LTS). During depolarizing current pulses they exhibited little adaptation and fired maximally at 30–90 Hz. Those SubC reticular neurons excited by carbachol (n=27) fired spontaneously at 6 Hz, often exhibited a moderately sized LTS, and varied widely in size (17–42 μm). Carbachol-inhibited SubC reticular neurons were medium-sized (15–25 μm) and constituted two groups. The larger group (n=22) was silent at rest and possessed a prominent LTS and associated 1–4 action potentials. The second, smaller group (n=8) had a delayed return to baseline at the offset of hyperpolarizing pulses. Orexins excited both carbachol excited and carbachol inhibited SubC reticular neurons. SubC reticular neurons had intrinsic membrane properties and responses to carbachol similar to those described for other reticular neurons but a larger number of carbachol inhibited neurons were found (> 50 %), the majority of which demonstrated a prominent LTS and may correspond to PGO-on neurons

  2. Electrophysiological characterization of neurons in the dorsolateral pontine rapid-eye-movement sleep induction zone of the rat: Intrinsic membrane properties and responses to carbachol and orexins.

    PubMed

    Brown, R E; Winston, S; Basheer, R; Thakkar, M M; McCarley, R W

    2006-12-01

    Pharmacological, lesion and single-unit recording techniques in several animal species have identified a region of the pontine reticular formation (subcoeruleus, SubC) just ventral to the locus coeruleus as critically involved in the generation of rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep. However, the intrinsic membrane properties and responses of SubC neurons to neurotransmitters important in REM sleep control, such as acetylcholine and orexins/hypocretins, have not previously been examined in any animal species and thus were targeted in this study. We obtained whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from visually identified SubC neurons in rat brain slices in vitro. Two groups of large neurons (mean diameter 30 and 27 mum) were tentatively identified as cholinergic (rostral SubC) and noradrenergic (caudal SubC) neurons. SubC reticular neurons (non-cholinergic, non-noradrenergic) showed a medium-sized depolarizing sag during hyperpolarizing current pulses and often had a rebound depolarization (low-threshold spike, LTS). During depolarizing current pulses they exhibited little adaptation and fired maximally at 30-90 Hz. Those SubC reticular neurons excited by carbachol (n=27) fired spontaneously at 6 Hz, often exhibited a moderately sized LTS, and varied widely in size (17-42 mum). Carbachol-inhibited SubC reticular neurons were medium-sized (15-25 mum) and constituted two groups. The larger group (n=22) was silent at rest and possessed a prominent LTS and associated one to four action potentials. The second, smaller group (n=8) had a delayed return to baseline at the offset of hyperpolarizing pulses. Orexins excited both carbachol excited and carbachol inhibited SubC reticular neurons. SubC reticular neurons had intrinsic membrane properties and responses to carbachol similar to those described for other reticular neurons but a larger number of carbachol inhibited neurons were found (>50%), the majority of which demonstrated a prominent LTS and may correspond to pontine

  3. 18. VIEW SOUTHWEST OF 450 HP TURBINE INSTALLATION IN BASEMENT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. VIEW SOUTHWEST OF 450 HP TURBINE INSTALLATION IN BASEMENT OF GRANITEVILLE MILL. MAIN FEATURE OF THE PHOTOGRAPH IS THE PENSTOCK CONDUCTING WATER TO THE TURBINE IN THE BACKGROUND. THE PENSTOCK IS OF RIVETED IRON CONSTRUCTION AND REPLACED A WOOD PENSTOCK IN 1882. THE COVERED OPENING IN THE CENTER OF THE PHOTOGRAPH ORIGINALLY CONNECTED TO A STANDPIPE WHICH EXITED VERTICALLY THROUGH THE MILL. THE STANDPIPE MODERATED WATER PRESSURE AND SERVED AS A SAFETY FEATURE IN THE EVENT THE TURBINE GATES WERE RAPIDLY CLOSED. (IF LOAD IN THE MILL WERE SUDDENLY STOPPED-SAY AT QUITTING TIME-THE GATES WOULD SHUT DOWN FLOW TO THE TURBINE. THE STANDPIPE OFFERED A PLACE FOR THE WATER, RAPIDLY MOVING THROUGH THE PENSTOCK, TO ESCAPE. IN A SHUT-DOWN SITUATION WATER WOULD ... - Graniteville Mill, Marshall Street, Graniteville, Aiken County, SC

  4. 17. VIEW SOUTHEAST OF 450 HP TURBINE IN BASEMENT OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. VIEW SOUTHEAST OF 450 HP TURBINE IN BASEMENT OF GRANITEVILLE MILL. THE MAIN BEARING OF THE TURBINE IS AT LEFT CENTER OF THE PHOTOGRAPH. A LOMBARD REGULATOR CAN BE SEEN AT THE LEFT CENTER REAR. THE LARGE HANDWHEEL AT THE LEFT CENTER IS GEARED TO A SECTIONAL GEAR AT THE CENTER OF THE PHOTOGRAPH AND IS USED TO MANUALLY OPEN THE GATES AND ALLOW WATER INTO THE TURBINE. THE SMALL PULLEY ON THE END OF THE MAIN SHAFT NORMALLY WOULD HAVE A BELT CONNECTING IT TO A PULLEY ON THE LOMBARD REGULATOR. THIS BELT TRANSMITTED TURBINE SPEED (RPM) TO THE LOMBARD WHICH WOULD OPEN OR CLOSE THE GATES TO KEEP TURBINE SPEED CONSTANT UNDER VARYING LOADS. THIS TURBINE WAS INSTALLED IN THE REFIT OF 1912. - Graniteville Mill, Marshall Street, Graniteville, Aiken County, SC

  5. Basement domain map of the conterminous United States and Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lund, Karen; Box, Stephen E.; Holm-Denoma, Christopher S.; San Juan, Carma A.; Blakely, Richard J.; Saltus, Richard W.; Anderson, Eric D.; DeWitt, Ed

    2015-01-01

    The tectonic settings for crustal types represented in the basement domains are subdivided into constituent geologic environments and the types of primary metals endowments and deposits in them are documented. The compositions, architecture, and original metals endowments are potentially important to assessments of primary mineral deposits and to the residence and recycling of metals in the crust of the United States portion of the North American continent. The databases can be configured to demonstrate the construction of the United States through time, to identify specific types of crust, or to identify domains potentially containing metal endowments of specific genetic types or endowed with specific metals. The databases can also be configured to illustrate other purposes chosen by users.

  6. Matrigel Basement Membrane Matrix influences expression of microRNAs in cancer cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Karina J.; Tsykin, Anna; Giles, Keith M.; Sladic, Rosemary T.; Epis, Michael R.; Ganss, Ruth; Goodall, Gregory J.; Leedman, Peter J.

    2012-10-19

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Matrigel alters cancer cell line miRNA expression relative to culture on plastic. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Many identified Matrigel-regulated miRNAs are implicated in cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-1290, -210, -32 and -29b represent a Matrigel-induced miRNA signature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-32 down-regulates Integrin alpha 5 (ITGA5) mRNA. -- Abstract: Matrigel is a medium rich in extracellular matrix (ECM) components used for three-dimensional cell culture and is known to alter cellular phenotypes and gene expression. microRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression and have roles in cancer. While miRNA profiles of numerous cell lines cultured on plastic have been reported, the influence of Matrigel-based culture on cancer cell miRNA expression is largely unknown. This study investigated the influence of Matrigel on the expression of miRNAs that might facilitate ECM-associated cancer cell growth. We performed miRNA profiling by microarray using two colon cancer cell lines (SW480 and SW620), identifying significant differential expression of miRNAs between cells cultured in Matrigel and on plastic. Many of these miRNAs have previously been implicated in cancer-related processes. A common Matrigel-induced miRNA signature comprised of up-regulated miR-1290 and miR-210 and down-regulated miR-29b and miR-32 was identified using RT-qPCR across five epithelial cancer cell lines (SW480, SW620, HT-29, A549 and MDA-MB-231). Experimental modulation of these miRNAs altered expression of their known target mRNAs involved in cell adhesion, proliferation and invasion, in colon cancer cell lines. Furthermore, ITGA5 was identified as a novel putative target of miR-32 that may facilitate cancer cell interactions with the ECM. We propose that culture of cancer cell lines in Matrigel more accurately recapitulates miRNA expression and function in cancer than culture on plastic and thus is a valuable approach to the in vitro study of miRNAs.

  7. Terminal short arm domains of basement membrane laminin are critical for its self-assembly

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Laminin self-assembles into large polymers by a cooperative two-step calcium-dependent mechanism (Yurchenco, P. D., E. C. Tsilibary, A. S. Charonis, and H. Furthmayr. 1985. J. Biol. Chem. 260:7636-7644). The domain specificity of this process was investigated using defined proteolytically generated fragments corresponding to the NH2-terminal globule and adjacent stem of the short arm of the B1 chain (E4), a complex of the two short arms of the A and B2 chains attached to the proximal stem of a third short arm (E1'), a similar complex lacking the globular domains (P1'), and the distal half of the long arm attached to the adjacent portion of the large globule (E8). Polymerization, followed by an increase of turbidity at 360 nm in neutral isotonic TBS containing CaCl2 at 35 degrees C, was quantitatively inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner with laminin fragments E4 and E1' but not with fragments E8 and P1'. Affinity retardation chromatography was used for further characterization of the binding of laminin domains. The migration of fragment E4, but not of fragments E8 and P1', was retarded in a temperature- and calcium-dependent fashion on a laminin affinity column but not on a similar BSA column. These data are evidence that laminin fragments E4 and E1' possess essential terminal binding domains for the self-aggregation of laminin, while fragments E8 and P1' do not. Furthermore, the individual domain-specific interactions that contribute to assembly are calcium dependent and of low affinity. PMID:2307709

  8. Effects of Aminoguanidine on Glomerular Basement Membrane Thickness and Anionic Charge in a Diabetic Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Ersöz, Halil Önder; Tuncel, Mürvet; Sargon, Mustafa F.; Küçükkaya, Belgin; Ahiskali, Rengin; Akalin, Sema

    2001-01-01

    We investigated the effect of aminoguanidine (AG) administration on GBM thickness, glomerular heparan sulfate (HS) content, and urinary albumin and HS excretion in diabetic rats. After induction of diabetes, female Wistar rats were divided into 2 groups: Group AGDM (n=11) received 1g/L aminoguanidine bicarbonate in drinking water, group DC (n=12) was given only tap water. Control rats received AG (group AGH, n=8) or tap water (group HC, n=8). At the end of a period of 8 weeks, urinary albumin and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) excretion was detected. GBM heparan sulfate distribution and count was determined under the electron microscope. The AGDM group had lower urinary albumin and GAG excretion than diabetic controls. GBM thickness was increased in diabetic rats compared to groups of AGDM and HC. In AGDM group alcian blue stained particle distribution and count in the GBM was similar to healthy controls. In conclusion AG prevents the decrease of anionic charged molecules in the GBM and GBM thickening. This can be one of the mechanisms by which AG decreases albuminuria in diabetic rats. PMID:12369711

  9. Structural Analysis of How Podocytes Detach from the Glomerular Basement Membrane Under Hypertrophic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Kriz, Wilhelm; Hähnel, Brunhilde; Hosser, Hiltraud; Rösener, Sigrid; Waldherr, Rüdiger

    2014-01-01

    Podocytes are lost by detachment from the GBM as viable cells; details are largely unknown. We studied this process in the rat after growth stimulation with FGF-2. Endothelial and mesangial cells responded by hyperplasia, podocytes underwent hypertrophy, but, in the long run, developed various changes that could either be interpreted showing progressing stages in detachment from the GBM or stages leading to a tighter attachment by foot process effacement (FPE). This occurred in microdomains within the same podocyte; thus, features of detachment and of reinforced attachment may simultaneously be found in the same podocyte. (1) Initially, hypertrophied podocytes underwent cell body attenuation and formed large pseudocysts, i.e., expansions of the subpodocyte space. (2) Podocytes entered the process of FPE starting with the retraction of foot processes (FPs) and the replacement of the slit diaphragm by occluding junctions, thereby sealing the filtration slits. Successful completion of this process led to broad attachments of podocyte cell bodies to the GBM. (3) Failure of sealing the slits led to gaps of varying width between retracting FPs facilitating the outflow of the filtrate from the GBM. (4) Since those gaps are frequently overarched by broadened primary processes, the drainage of the filtrate into the Bowman’s space may be hindered leading to the formation of small pseudocysts associated with bare areas of GBM. (5) The merging of pseudocysts created a system of communicating chambers through which the filtrate has to pass to reach Bowman’s space. Multiple flow resistances in series likely generated an expansile force on podocytes contributing to detachment. (6) Such a situation appears to proceed to complete disconnection generally of a group of podocytes owing to the junctional connections between them. (7) Since such groups of detaching podocytes generally make contact to parietal cells, they start the formation of tuft adhesions to Bowman’s capsule. PMID:25566184

  10. Grenville age of basement rocks in Cape May NJ well: New evidence for Laurentian crust in U.S. Atlantic Coastal Plain basement Chesapeake terrane

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sheridan, R.E.; Maguire, T.J.; Feigenson, M.D.; Patino, L.C.; Volkert, R.A.

    1999-01-01

    The Chesapeake terrane of the U.S. mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain basement is bounded on the northwest by the Salisbury positive gravity and magnetic anomaly and extends to the southeast as far as the Atlantic coast. It underlies the Coastal Plain of Virginia, Maryland, Delaware and southern New Jersey. Rubidium/Strontium dating of the Chesapeake terrane basement yields an age of 1.025 ?? 0.036 Ga. This age is typical of Grenville province rocks of the Middle to Late Proterozoic Laurentian continent. The basement lithologies are similar to some exposed Grenville-age rocks of the Appalachians. The TiO2 and Zr/P2O5 composition of the metagabbro from the Chesapeake terrane basement is overlapped by those of the Proterozoic mafic dikes in the New Jersey Highlands. These new findings support the interpretation that Laurentian basement extends southeast as far as the continental shelf in the U.S. mid-Atlantic region. The subcrop of Laurentian crust under the mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain implies unroofing by erosion of the younger Carolina (Avalon) supracrustal terrane. Dextral-transpression fault duplexes may have caused excessive uplift in the Salisbury Embayment area during the Alleghanian orogeny. This extra uplift in the Salisbury area may have caused the subsequent greater subsidence of the Coastal Plain basement in the embayment.

  11. LPT. Shield test facility (TAN645 and 646). Basement and subbasement ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LPT. Shield test facility (TAN-645 and -646). Basement and sub-basement plan. Stairway plans and details. Ralph M. Parsons 1229-17 ANP/GE-6-645-A-2. April 1957. Approved by INEEL Classification Office for public release. INEEL index code no. 037-0645/0646-00-693-107348 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  12. Tectonic and neotectonic implications of a new basement map of the Lower Tagus Valley, Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, João; Rabeh, Taha; Dias, Rui; Dias, Ruben; Pinto, Carlos; Oliveira, Tomás; Cunha, Teresa; Borges, José

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we present a new basement (defined here as Paleozoic, Precambrian and Mesozoic igneous rocks) map of the Lower Tagus Valley area. This map is a contribution to the understanding of the structural evolution of the top of the basement in the Lower Tagus Valley area during the Mesozoic and Cenozoic Eras. The map was produced using aeromagnetic, well, seismic reflection and geological outcrop data. It shows unprecedented details of the geometry of the basement rock's surface with higher resolution and covers a larger area than the previous basement map of the study area. In spite of an estimated average error of 200 m in depth and an horizontal resolution of 4 km, our map not only reproduces with accuracy several well known basement structures but it also emphasizes previously unknown features. Major basement faults were inferred from large depth variations at the top of the basement, magnetic 2D Euler deconvolution and horizontal gradient analysis and are compatible with surface geological structures, well data and hydrogeological information. Implications to the geodynamic evolution of the SW European Variscides and consequences to Meso-Cenozoic tectonics are discussed. The correlation of the basement structures with instrumental seismicity is carried out and their neotectonic activity is discussed on the basis of existing geological outcrop data.

  13. MTR BUILDING INTERIOR, TRA603. BASEMENT. CAMERA IS IN SOUTHWEST QUADRANT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR BUILDING INTERIOR, TRA-603. BASEMENT. CAMERA IS IN SOUTHWEST QUADRANT OF BASEMENT AND FACING NORTHEAST. PANEL DISPLAYS DATA READOUTS. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-6-2. Mike Crane, Photographer, 2/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  14. Basement Surface Faulting and Topography for Savannah River Site and Vicinity

    SciTech Connect

    Cumbest, R.J.

    1998-12-17

    This report integrates the data from more than 60 basement borings and over 100 miles of seismic reflection profiling acquired on the Savannah River Site to map the topography of the basement (unweathered rock) surface and faulting recorded on this surface.

  15. Geochronologic and isotopic study of the La Désirade island basement complex: Jurassic oceanic crust in the Lesser Antilles?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattinson, James M.; Fink, L. Kenneth; Hopson, Clifford A.

    1980-01-01

    La Désirade, a small island east of Guadeloupe, is underlain by the only exposed pre-Tertiary basement rocks in the Lesser Antilles. The basement complex comprises spilitic and keratophyric flows and pillow lavas (with interbedded and overlying radiolarian cherts), swarms of mafic to silicic dikes, and subjacent plagiogranite. These features, and the absence of carbonates, terrigenous clastic sediments, or tuffaceous sediments from the complex indicate that it developed in a deep marine environment beyond the reach of terrigenous sedimentation or emergent island arc pyroclastic deposition. Previous workers have suggested that the Désirade basement complex originated either as oceanic crust or during an early (tholeiitic) stage of island arc growth. The isotopic compositions of Sr and Pb from the complex, and previously reported rare earth data (Johnston and Schilling, 1974) do not provide a clear distinction between these two possibilities. Nor does the presence of siliceous keratophyre in the complex rule out an oceanic crustal origin-such rocks are common in well studied ophiolites that originated as oceanic crust. Hence we turn to the age relationships of the complex, the surrounding ocean floor, and adjacent island arcs in an attempt to resolve this problem. The age of the complex strongly supports an oceanic crustal (ophiolitic) origin. The ages of zircons and a previously reported K-Ar age indicate that the complex is 145±5 m.y. old. The complex predates the next oldest volcanic rocks of the Lesser Antilles arc by ca. 110 m.y., and the oldest known rocks of the Aves Ridge, a possible Mesozoic precursor of the Lesser Antilles arc, by 50 60 m.y. This makes it unlikely that the Désirade complex is related to an early phase of either of these arcs. Instead, the age of the complex falls in the range of ages expected for oceanic crust in the vicinity of the Lesser Antilles prior to the development of any subduction zone and resulting arc. Thus we interpret the

  16. Structure of the basement beneath the Illizi Basin: insights from the reinterpretation of an aeromagnetic survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brahimi, Sonia; Bourmatte, Amar; Ghienne, Jean-François; Munschy, Marc

    2016-04-01

    -S oriented structures are identified within the TAI terrane, which also intersect the RSZ. Ten kilometers dextral or sinistral offsets are evidenced by the shifts of N-S oriented anomalies. NE-SW structures are thus interpreted as shear zones as well. To the east of RSZ, N-S elongated strong amplitude magnetic anomalies are suspected being magmatic intrusions, especially beneath the Zarzaitine and Edjeleh oil fields. Several magnetic lineations with NW-SE orientation are also identified, which are parallel to the regional structural grain. The basement of the Illizi Basin thus has a composite structure including two major mega-shear zones, several other subordinate shear zones and numerous plutons. In particular, the later phase of the Panafrican orogeny dissected the Tazat-Assodé-Issalane terranes. Related faults affected on the long term the development of the Illizi Basin. Indeed, the Fadnoun fault, which is coincident with one of the related shear zone, had a synsedimentary imprint through most of its Paleozoic evolution and currently corresponds to a geomorphic lineament.

  17. Teleseismic Tomography of the Eastern Tennessee Seismic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olasanmi, O. T.; Arroucau, P.; Vlahovic, G.

    2014-12-01

    In this work we perform a tomographic inversion of teleseismic data to investigate the properties of the crust and the uppermost mantle beneath the eastern Tennessee seismic zone (ETSZ). The ETSZ is a major seismic feature located in the southeastern United States. The zone spans portions of eastern Tennessee, North Carolina, Virginia, Georgia and Alabama and is, after the New Madrid seismic zone, the second most active seismic region of the North America east of the Rocky Mountains. Earthquakes in the ETSZ appear to align along a sharp, linear magnetic feature, called the New York-Alabama Lineament (NYAL), which acts as the northwest edge of the seismic zone and is attributed to a strike-slip fault affecting the Precambrian basement. A total of 2652 relative P-wave arrival time residuals from 201 teleseismic events recorded at 28 regional seismic station have been extracted from the continuous records using the adaptive stacking code. The three-dimensional model was computed down to 300km. The tomographic images show significant velocity anomalies, confirming complex tectonic evolution and revealing basement features that can be correlated with regional gravity and magnetic anomalies. One of the main features of the three-dimensional model is a significant velocity contrast across the NYAL that extends through the crust and the uppermost mantle, with high velocity anomalies northwest of the NYAL and lower velocities southwest of the NYAL. Our results support the hypothesis that the lineament is a major basement fault associated with a tectonic boundary produced by merging of the southern Appalachian basement with the Granite-Rhyolite basement during the Grenville orogeny.

  18. Structural and thermochronological evidence for Paleogene basement-involved shortening in the axial Eastern Cordillera, Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saylor, Joel E.; Horton, Brian K.; Stockli, Daniel F.; Mora, Andrés; Corredor, Jaime

    2012-11-01

    Although most recent studies regard the northern Andes primarily as a low-shortening inversion orogen, new mapping and thermochronology along the paired basement-involved Floresta massif and Floresta basin in the axial Eastern Cordillera of Colombia suggest major Paleogene shortening in a ramp-flat fold-thrust belt. Field mapping indicates that the hanging wall of the east-directed Soápaga fault system contains a series of upright thrust sheets with flat-on-flat cutoff relationships and a deformed footwall characterized by a complex triangle zone. These geometries necessitate roughly east-west shortening exceeding that of a previously mapped overturned hanging wall anticline and disharmonic footwall folds. Zircon (U-Th)/He (ZHe) ages indicate exhumation-induced cooling of the Soápaga hanging wall through the ˜180 °C closure temperature at 31-25 Ma. This cooling postdated documented shortening to the west and predated shortening to the east, suggesting an eastward progression of Paleogene deformation. Synorogenic Oligocene footwall strata of the Floresta basin contain distal fine-grained sediments and lack growth strata or Oligocene detrital ZHe ages, suggesting relatively high heave along the Soápaga fault system. These results are consistent with a rapidly eastward-propagating, basement-involved fold-thrust belt with ramp-flat structures that accommodated tens of km of shortening. Long-term stasis of the deformation front on the eastern and western flanks of the Eastern Cordillera due to localization of Neogene shortening along Mesozoic rift-bounding normal faults indicates a shift in deformational style in late Oligocene-early Miocene time. This geometric and temporal framework implies: 1) a total shortening in the northern Andes exceeding most current estimates; 2) Paleogene deformation in the Eastern Cordillera marked by rapid advances of the deformation front along a ramp-flat thrust system; and 3) focused Neogene reactivation (inversion) of master rift

  19. Plumbotectonic aspects of polymetallic vein mineralization in Paleozoic sediments and Proterozoic basement of Moravia (Czech Republic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slobodník, Marek; Jacher-Śliwczyńska, Katarzyna; Taylor, Matthew C.; Schneider, Jens; Dolníček, Zdeněk

    2008-02-01

    A regional isotopic study of Pb and S in hydrothermal galenas and U-Pb and S in potential source rocks was carried out for part of Moravia, Czech Republic. Two major generations of veins, (syn-) Variscan and post-Variscan, are defined based on the Pb-isotope system together with structural constraints (local structures and regional trends). The Pb-isotopic compositions of galena plot in two distinct populations with outliers in 206Pb/204Pb-207Pb/204Pb space. Galena from veins hosted in greywackes provides a cluster with the lowest Pb-Pb ratios: 206Pb/204Pb = 18.15-18.27, 207Pb/204Pb = 15.59-15.61, 208Pb/204Pb = 38.11-38.23. Those hosted in both limestones and greywackes provide the second cluster: 206Pb/204Pb = 18.37-18.44, 207Pb/204Pb = 15.60-15.63, 208Pb/204Pb = 38.14-38.32. These clusters suggest model Pb ages as Early Carboniferous and Triassic-Jurassic, the latter associated with MVT-like deposits. Two samples from veins hosted in Proterozoic rocks lie outside the two clusters: in metagranitoid (206Pb/204Pb = 18.55, 207Pb/204Pb = 15.64, 208Pb/204Pb = 38.29) and in orthogneiss (206Pb/204Pb = 18.79, 207Pb/204Pb = 15.73, 208Pb/204Pb = 38.54). The results from these two samples suggest an interaction of mineralizing fluids with the radiogenic Pb-rich source (basement?). The values of δ34S suggest the Paleozoic host rocks (mostly -6.7 to +5.2‰ CDT) as the source of S for hydrothermal sulfides (mostly -4.8 to +2.5‰ CDT). U-Pb data and Pb isotope evolutionary curves indicate that Late Devonian and Early Carboniferous sediments, especially siliciclastics, are the general dominant contributor of Pb for galena mineralization developed in sedimentary rocks. Plumbotectonic mixing occurred, it is deduced, only between the lower and the upper crust (the latter involving Proterozoic basement containing heterogeneous radiogenic Pb), without any significant input from the mantle. It is concluded that in the Moravo-Silesian and Rhenohercynian zones (including proximal

  20. K-Ar geochronology of basement rocks on the northern flank of the Huancabama deflection, Ecuador

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Feininger, Tomas; Silberman, M.L.

    1982-01-01

    The Huancabamba deflection, a major Andean orocline located at the Ecuador-Peru border, constitutes an important geologic boundary on the Pacific coast of South America. Crust to the north of the deflection is oceanic and the basement is composed of basic igneous rocks of Cretaceous age, whereas crust to the south is continental and felsic rocks of Precambrian to Cretaceous age make up the basement. The northern flank of the Huancabamba Deflection in El Oro Province, Ecuador, is underlain by Precambrian polymetamorphic basic rocks of the Piedras Group; shale, siltstone, sandstone, and their metamorphosed equivalents in the Tahuin Group (in part of Devonian age); concordant syntectonic granitic rocks; quartz diorite and alaskite of the Maroabeli pluton; a protrusion of serpentinized harzburgite that contains a large inclusion of blueschist-facies metamorphic rocks, the Raspas Formation, and metamorphic rocks north of the La Palma fault. Biotite from gneiss of the Tahuin Group yields a Late Triassic K-Ar age (210 ? 8 m.y.). This is interpreted as an uplift age and is consistent with a regional metamorphism of Paleozoic age. A nearby sample from the Piedras Group that yielded a hornblende K-Ar age of 196 ? 8 m.y. was affected by the same metamorphic event. Biotite from quartz diorite of the mesozonal Maroabeli pluton yields a Late Triassic age (214 ? 6 m.y.) which is interpreted as an uplift age which may be only slightly younger than the age of magmatic crystallization. Emplacement of the pluton may postdate regional metamorphism of the Tahuin Group. Phengite from politic schist of the Raspas Formation yields an Early Cretaceous K-Ar age (132 ? 5 m.y.). This age is believed to date the isostatic rise of the encasing serpentinized harzburgite as movement along a subjacent subduction zone ceased, and it is synchronous with the age of the youngest lavas of a coeval volcanic arc in eastern Ecuador. A Late Cretaceous K-Ar age (74.4 ? 1.1 m.y.) from hornblende in

  1. U-Pb (SIMS) Zircon Ages of Granitoids from the Basement of Pechora Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soboleva, A. A.; Andreichev, V. L.; Dovzhikova, E. G.; Coble, M. A.; Sergeev, S. A.; Miller, E. L.; Ronkin, Y. L.

    2015-12-01

    SIMS dating (SHRIMP-RG, SHRIMP-II) of zircons from granitoids penetrated by boreholes in the basement of Pechora Basin yield mostly ages of 544-565 Ma similar to Pb-Pb ages by Gee et al. (2000). Intrusive rocks studied in 8 boreholes are subduction-related mainly I-type granitoids within the Pripechora-Ilych-Chikshino fault zone, an assumed Neoproterozoic suture (Olovyanishnikov et al., 1995, Kostiuchenko, 1994). Older granites and plagiogranites in the 1-Prilukskaya borehole (595 ± 14 Ma) and 1-Nizhnyaya Omra borehole (602 ± 2 Ma) also have geochemical characteristics of subduction-related rocks. Their origin is probably related to the long-term development of active margin magmatism within the Arctida paleocontinent. The most ancient of the granitoids studied are sub-alkaline A-type granites from the 50-West Hilchuyu borehole (625 ± 25 Ma) and granosyenites and granodiorites of the 2-Veyak borehole (607 ± 6 Ma). Their within plate geochemical characteristics (high alkalinity, relatively high content of HREE, HFSE, and crustal ISr = 0.70622 (2-Veyak borehole) indicate that granite melts were generated in thick continental crust and indirectly support the hypothesis of existence of Pre-Neoproterozoic blocks of continental crust in the basement of the NE part of the Pechora Basin. These granites were formed prior to the proposed Timanide collision or accretion. They are comparable to 613-617 Ma syenites and subalkaline granites which intruded the NE passive margin of Baltica and are exposed at the surface in the Northern Timan (Larionov et al., 2004). This magmatic stage marks Late Neoproterozoic rifting on the NE edge of Baltica during which rifting apart of continental crustal blocks could have occurred. As suggested by geophysical data, one of these, the Khoreyver microcontinent (Olovyanishnikov et al., 1995) currently lies at a depth of more than 4 km beneath the Pechora Basin. At the end of Vendian to the beginning of Cambrian time, these terranes, which

  2. Uemachi flexure zone investigated by borehole database and numeical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, N.; Kitada, N.; Takemura, K.

    2014-12-01

    The Uemachi fault zone extending north and south, locates in the center of the Osaka City, in Japan. The Uemachi fault is a blind reverse fault and forms the flexure zone. The effects of the Uemachi flexure zone are considered in constructing of lifelines and buildings. In this region, the geomorphological survey is difficult because of the regression of transgression. Many organizations have carried out investigations of fault structures. Various surveys have been conducted, such as seismic reflection survey in and around Osaka. Many borehole data for construction conformations have been collected and the geotechnical borehole database has been constructed. The investigation with several geological borehole data provides the subsurface geological information to the geotechnical borehole database. Various numerical simulations have been carried out to investigate the growth of a blind reverse fault in unconsolidated sediments. The displacement of the basement was given in two ways. One is based on the fault movement, such as dislocation model, the other is a movement of basement block of hanging wall. The Drucker-Prager and elastic model were used for the sediment and basement, respectively. The simulation with low and high angle fault movements, show the good agree with the actual distribution of the marine clay inferred from borehole data in the northern and southern Uemachi fault flexure zone, respectively. This research is partly funded by the Comprehensive Research on the Uemachi Fault Zone (from FY2010 to FY2012) by The Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT).

  3. New Constraints on the Extent of Paleoproterozoic and Archean Basement in the Northwest U.S. Cordillera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, R. A.; Vervoort, J.; Lewis, R. S.; Gaschnig, R. M.; Hart, G.

    2008-12-01

    The Laurentian basement west of the Wyoming craton in southwest Montana and northern Idaho has been interpreted as a collage of Archean and Proterozoic terranes which accreted to the North American craton and incorporated into Laurentia at ~ 1.86 Ga [1]. This basement and the geometry of the Archean and Proterozoic crust are poorly understood due to coverage by metasediments of the Belt-Purcell Supergroup and are further obscured by Mesozoic magmatism (Idaho Batholith, sensu lato). Exposures of the basement are rare but have been documented in a few regions including the Priest River Complex in northern Idaho and the Sevier fold and thrust belt just northwest of the Wyoming craton in the Great Falls tectonic zone (Foster et al. 2006). New ages and isotopic data from orthogneisses in north-central Idaho provide evidence for previously undocumented exposures of both Paleoproterozoic and Archean basement that may place important constraints on the reconstruction of Laurentia and its tectonic setting. The orthogneisses analyzed in this study (all previously mapped as deformed Cretaceous plutons) fall into two distinct age groups of 1.86 Ga and 2.67 Ga. The zircons from both the Archean and Proterozoic rocks have simple systematics. The zircons from three Archean samples have ɛHf(i) values of 2.4 ± 2.1, 3.8 ± 1.8, and 5.2 ± 3.5 (average values based on 6 individual zircon Hf analyses per sample). Zircons from the Paleoproterozoic gneisses have different but internally consistent ɛHf(i) values of -8.0 ± 0.9 and -0.6 ± 1.4. In contrast, both Hf and Nd whole rock data are highly scattered in these samples especially in the Archean samples in which ɛHf(i) varies from -25 to +21 and ɛNd(i) varies from -8 to +11. These extreme values are implausible for initial compositions and indicate open system behavior in both Lu-Hf and Sm-Nd in the whole rocks. The zircons, in contrast, appear to be closed to significant Hf mobility on the scale of the laser analyses. The data

  4. A study on the seismic AVO signatures of deep fractured geothermal reservoirs in an intrusive basement.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleardi, M.; Mazzotti, A.

    2012-04-01

    Amplitude-variation-with-offset (AVO) analysis of reflected waves has become an important tool for hydrocarbon prospecting. However, while the AVO responses of reservoirs in clastic lithologies (oil or gas bearing sands) are well known, the AVO behaviour of reservoirs hosted in the interconnected fractures of massive rocks are almost unknown due to the rarity of this type of reservoirs and the consequent lack of seismic and well log data. Thanks to the availability of the data of boreholes that ENEL GreenPower drilled in the deep intrusive basement of the Larderello-Travale geothermal field, we have derived the expected AVO responses of the vapour reservoirs found in some intensely, but very localized, fractured volumes within the massive rocks. Therefore we wish to determine what are the expected AVO responses of geothermal reservoirs inside fractured igneous rocks and we seek to find one or more AVO attributes that may help identifying fracture locations. To this end, we have analysed the velocity (P-wave and S-wave) and the density logs pertaining to three wells which reached five deep fractured zones in the basement. However, comparing well log data with surface seismic data the known issues of the different scales and thus different resolutions arise. Therefore, making use of the Backus theory of the equivalent layer, we have downscaled the well logs, acquired at a decimetric scale, to a decametric scale typical of the wavelengths of seismic waves, producing a blocky model of the original logs. Subsequently, we have followed two different approaches to estimate the expected responses. First, on the basis of the P and S velocities and densities of the fractured level and of the encasing rock, we have computed the analytical AVO response of each fractured zone. To this end we have made use of the linear Shuey equation that well describes the AVO response up to incident angles of 30 degrees. This would be the theoretical, noise free, response that perfectly

  5. Geochronology of the deep profile through archean basement at Vredefort, with implications for early crustal evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, R. J.; Welke, H. J.; Nicolaysen, L. O.

    1981-11-01

    The presence of Archean granite forming the core of an updomed and overturned sequence of strata at Vredefort, South Africa, has been known for over 70 years. Recent geophysical, geochemical, and geological evidence has given rise to the proposal that the basement granite core has also been overturned, presenting a section of the earth's granitic crust to view and that radial traverses in the Vredefort basement penetrate through a ˜15 km thick section of the Archean crust, when moving from the contact of collar strata to the center of the dome. The upper levels of the Vredefort crust are dominated by a relatively homogeneous outer granite gneiss (OGG) displaying marked gradients in large ion lithophile elements. These rocks grade inward into the deeper levels which occur in granulite facies metamorphism. The deeper levels of the Vredefort crust exposed in the central parts of the dome consist predominantly of felsic Inlandsee Leucogranofels (ILG) which occurs interleaved with inclusions of mafic metavolcanic and metasedimentary rocks termed Steynskraal Metamorphic Zone (SMZ). A comprehensive isotopic study using four decay schemes (87Rb, 232Th, 238U, and 235U) on this crustal section is now reported. The results permit unique and direct tests on the theories of Archean crust forming processes. In the upper Vredefort crust, whole rock isochron ages of ˜3050 m.y. are obtained from the four decay schemes, and almost all evidence of an extended crustal history prior to ˜3050 m.y. has been obliterated. Establishment of strong vertical gradients in Rb/Sr ratio, shortly before `setting' of Rb-Sr whole rock systems, has wide implications for the interpretation of Sr initial ratios. Although the Vredefort upper levels of the crust has a low 87Sr/86Sr initial ratio of 0.7019 ± 0.0002, it probably participated in a crustal prehistory for at least 500 m.y. In the deeper levels of the Vredefort basement the geochronology is much more complex. Rb-Sr and Th-Pb isochrons of

  6. Formation of flower structures in a geological layer at a strike-slip displacement in the basement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanov, Yu. P.; Bakeev, R. A.

    2015-07-01

    Formation of dislocations in a geological layer at a strike-slip displacement in its basement is studied by three-dimensional (3D) numerical modeling. It is shown that the pattern of strain localization is determined by the initial stress state or thickness of the deformed layer as well as by the Poisson ratio and strength of the medium. Three types of fracture zones are observed. Shear bands of the first type are dominated by the propeller-like surfaces of Riedel R-shears, which merge into a single main fault with feathering structures. In the second type of dislocation zones, the primary role is played by the surfaces oriented at an angle of ˜40° to the shear axis in the horizontal projections. After reaching the free surface, these discontinuities are cut by a V-shaped fault. In this case, the pattern of dislocations most closely corresponds to the flower structures. The third type is a trough, which may accommodate the formation of yet another strain localization zone along its axial part—a vertical fault.

  7. Crustal thickening and attenuation as revealed by regional fold interference patterns: Ciudad Rodrigo basement area (Salamanca, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díez Fernández, Rubén; Gómez Barreiro, Juan; Martínez Catalán, José R.; Ayarza, Puy

    2013-01-01

    The structure of the Ciudad Rodrigo area (Iberian Massif, Central Iberian Zone) has been revisited in order to integrate new geological data with recent models of the evolution of the Iberian Massif. Detailed mapping of fold structures along with a compilation of field data have been used to constrain the geometry and relative timing of ductile deformation events in this section of the hinterland of the Variscan belt. The structural evolution shows, in the first place, the development of a regional train of overturned folds with associated axial planar foliation (D1). Towards the lower structural levels, the deflection of the fold limbs and a subhorizontal crenulation cleavage depict the upper structural boundary of a superimposed low angle shear zone (D2), which extends at least to the deepest parts of the basement exposed in the study area. The amplification and rotation of D1 folds about a horizontal axis also occurred within this shear zone. The flat-lying character of the D2 structures accounts for the attenuation of the previously thickened crust, which developed following gravity gradients during thermal re-equilibration. Subsequent deformation led to the formation of two orthogonal sets of upright folds (D3), representing a new shift between crustal thinning and crustal thickening in the region.

  8. Precambrian basement control on joint domains in northwestern Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Dean, S.L.; Armstrong, W.B.; Kulander, B.R.

    1986-08-01

    Joint attitudes in Upper Silurian and Lower Devonian carbonates in northwestern Ohio reveal a marked north-south-trending joint domain boundary in Lucas and Wood Counties. East of the domain boundary, first-formed systematic joints trend N45/sup 0/W; west of this boundary, first-formed systematics trend N40/sup 0/E. The line of change in joint trends follows the Lucas County monocline-Bowling Green fault complex and the projected position of the Grenville front from the Canadian shield. Basement well information and gravity and magnetic data indicate a major change in Precambrian rock types across the domain boundary that is coincident with the projected position of the Grenville front. Observed joint patterns are interpreted to result from extensional tectonics associated with the evolution of the Findlay arch and Michigan basin. Recurrent movements on the Bowling Green fault during the early and middle Paleozoic may have been caused by reactivation of Grenville-age faults, which ultimately localized the joint domain boundary along the Lucas County monocline-Bowling Green fault trend.

  9. Basement structures in the northern Tularosa Basin, central New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Whitebread, M.W.; Adams, D.C. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-02-01

    A variety of geophysical data consisting of gravity and magnetic measurements, drill holes, and other geologic information have provided an analysis of basement structures within the northern Tularosa Basin of central New Mexico. Both the Laramide and Ancestral Rockies orogenies and the extension associated with the Rio Grande rift affected the structural development of this area. This area is significant in that it is the region in which the eastern boundary of the Rio Grande rift shifts 115 km eastward to the bounding fault between the Tularosa basin and the Sacramento uplift. The Tularosa basin is a large, complex structure consisting of two grabens and a horst block. At this latitude, it is probably the major Rio Grande rift structure. In fact, gravity modeling has determined that the thinnest crust (above 32 km) in the region lies beneath the north Tularosa basin. Analysis of gravity and magnetic anomaly maps identify gravity lows associated with Paleozoic or Precambrian basins. Gravity lows northeast of the Oscura uplift form a semi-continuous regional depression eastward to the late Paleozoic Pedernal uplift, a topographic feature believed to be a remnant of the Ancestral Rocky Mountains.

  10. Magnetically inferred basement structure in central Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, P.R.; Stewart, I.C.F.

    1995-01-01

    A compilation of magnetic data acquired during the past three decades for a region in central Saudi Arabia where Precambrian basement is partly exposed on the Arabian shield and partly concealed by overlying Phanerozoic strata, shows a central sector of conspicuous N-S-trending anomalies, a heterogeneous western sector of short-wavelength, high-intensity anomalies, and an eastern sector of low- to moderate-intensity broad-wavelength anomalies. Anomalies in the western and central sectors correlate with Neoproterozoic metavolcanic, metasedimentary, and intrusive rocks of the Arabian shield and are interpreted as delineating extensions of shield-type rocks down-dip beneath Phanerozoic cover. These rocks constitute terranes making up part of a Neoproterozoic orogenic belt that underlies Northeast Africa and western Arabia and it is proposed that their magnetically indicated easternmost extent marks the concealed eastern edge of the orogenic belt in central Arabia. The flat magnetic signature of the eastern sector, not entirely accounted for as an effect of deep burial, may reflect the presence of a crustal block different in character to the terranes of the orogenic belt and, speculatively, may outline a continental block that, according to some tectonic models of the region, collided with the Neoproterozoic terranes and thereby caused their deformation and tectonic accretion.

  11. Magnetically inferred basement structure in central Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Peter R.; Stewart, Ian C. F.

    1995-05-01

    A compilation of magnetic data acquired during the past three decades for a region in central Saudi Arabia where Precambrian basement is partly exposed on the Arabian shield and partly concealed by overlying Phanerozoic strata, shows a central sector of conspicuous N-S-trending anomalies, a heterogeneous western sector of short-wavelength, high-intensity anomalies, and an eastern sector of low- to moderate-intensity broad-wavelength anomalies. Anomalies in the western and central sectors correlate with Neoproterozoic metavolcanic, metasedimentary, and intrusive rocks of the Arabian shield and are interpreted as delineating extensions of shield-type rocks down-dip beneath Phanerozoic cover. These rocks constitute terranes making up part of a Neoproterozoic orogenic belt that underlies Northeast Africa and western Arabia and it is proposed that their magnetically indicated easternmost extent marks the concealed eastern edge of the orogenic belt in central Arabia. The flat magnetic signature of the eastern sector, not entirely accounted for as an effect of deep burial, may reflect the presence of a crustal block different in character to the terranes of the orogenic belt and, speculatively, may outline a continental block that, according to some tectonic models of the region, collided with the Neoproterozoic terranes and thereby caused their deformation and tectonic accretion.

  12. Forced folding and basement-detached normal faulting in the Haltenbanken area, offshore Norway

    SciTech Connect

    Withjack, M.O.; Meisling, K.E.; Russell, L.R.

    1988-01-01

    Triassic evaporites affected the structural development of the Haltenbanken area of offshore Norway during the Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous by mechanically isolating Triassic and younger strata from older strata and basement. Many folds in the Haltenbanken area are forced folds above basement-involved normal faults. Forced folds formed, at least in part, because Triassic evaporites behaved ductilely, decoupling overlying strata from underlying faulted strata and basement. Seismic data show that these forced folds are asymmetric flexures that affect Lower Cretaceous, Jurassic, and Triassic strata. Strata beneath the Traiassic evaporites are faulted. Some forced folds die out along strike into, and are cut by, basement-involved normal faults. Folding predominated above salt swells where decoupling was enhanced, whereas faulting occurred on the flanks of salt swells where salt thicknesses were reduced and decoupling was less effective. Many normal faults in the Haltenbanken area are basement-detached and flatten within the Triassic evaporites. Seismic data show that rollover anticlines and antithetic normal faults affect Lower Cretaceous, Jurassic, and Triassic strata within the hanging walls of these basement-detached normal faults. Strata beneath the evaporites are not affected by this deformation. Some basement-detached normal faults may be secondary structures associated with forced folding. Others, especially those with large displacements, may have formed in response to gravity sliding.

  13. Forced folding and basement-detached normal faulting in the Haltenbanken area, offshore Norway

    SciTech Connect

    Withjack, M.O.; Meisling, K.E.; Russell, L.R.

    1988-02-01

    Triassic evaporites affected the structural development of the Haltenbanken area of offshore Norway during the Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous by mechanically isolating Triassic and younger strata from older strata and basement. Many folds in the Haltenbanken area are forced folds above basement-involved normal faults. Forced folds formed, at least in part, because Triassic evaporites behaved ductilely, decoupling overlying strata from underlying faulted strata and basement. Seismic data show that these forced folds are asymmetric flexures that affect Lower Cretaceous, Jurassic, and Triassic strata. Strata beneath the Triassic evaporites are faulted. Some forced folds die out along strike into, and are cut by, basement-involved normal faults. Folding predominated above salt swells where decoupling was enhanced, whereas faulting occurred on the flanks of salt swells where salt thicknesses were reduced and decoupling was less effective. Many normal faults in the Haltenbanken area are basement-detached and flatten within the Triassic evaporites. Seismic data show that rollover anticlines and antithetic normal faults affect Lower Cretaceous, Jurassic, and Triassic strata within the hanging walls of these basement-detached normal faults. Strata beneath the evaporites are not affected by this deformation. Some basement-detached normal faults may be secondary structures associated with forced folding. Others, especially those with large displacements, may have formed in response to gravity sliding.

  14. Membrane stabilizer

    DOEpatents

    Mingenbach, William A.

    1988-01-01

    A device is provided for stabilizing a flexible membrane secured within a frame, wherein a plurality of elongated arms are disposed radially from a central hub which penetrates the membrane, said arms imposing alternately against opposite sides of the membrane, thus warping and tensioning the membrane into a condition of improved stability. The membrane may be an opaque or translucent sheet or other material.

  15. Geophysical and remote sensing applications for a better understanding of the structural (faults/ basement uplifts) controls on groundwater flow in the Lucerne Valley, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultan, M.; Dailey, D. R.; Sauck, W.; Milewski, A.; Laton, W. R.; Foster, J. H.; Eckhart, L.; Garcia, A.; Chouinard, K.

    2012-12-01

    An integrated (near-surface geophysics, remote sensing, field, isotope geochemistry) study was conducted in the Mojave Basin to investigate the potential role of faults and basement uplifts for groundwater flow in the Mojave Desert. Observations made include: (1) Very Low Frequency (VLF) measurements (25 transects) across mapped (using LIDAR and Geoeye-1 imagery) fault traces showed significant radio field dip angles (up to 60%) indicative of presence of shallow sub-vertical, sheet-like conductors; many of the VLF tilt peaks coincided with changes in the magnetic profiles; (2) Vertical Electrical Soundings (VES; 10 transect) indicate shallow (120 ft) basement west of, and parallel to, the Helendale Fault along and deep (up to 100 ft) saturated zones east of the fault/basement outcrop (F/B); and (3) isotopic analyses (δD and δ18O) for groundwater from productive wells (depth: 130-150 ft), and mountain front and valley springs sampled west of the F/B are less depleted (Mojave River Regional Aquifer: average δD: -88.1 ‰) than samples east of the F/B (Lucerne Valley Aquifer: δD: average δD: -93.6‰), whereas samples along, or proximal to, the fault have compositions similar to Group I but show evidence for mixing with Group II compositions. Findings are consistent with the Helendale Fault channeling groundwater from the San Bernardino Mountains with basement uplifts acting as barriers to lateral groundwater flow. Findings highlight the importance of developing sound water management schemes for the Basin that take into account the significant role of faults channeling, and uplifts restricting the flow in the basin and elsewhere in similar surroundings.

  16. The first deep heat flow determination in crystalline basement rocks beneath the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majorowicz, Jacek; Chan, Judith; Crowell, James; Gosnold, Will; Heaman, Larry M.; Kück, Jochem; Nieuwenhuis, Greg; Schmitt, Douglas R.; Unsworth, Martyn; Walsh, Nathaniel; Weides, Simon

    2014-05-01

    Heat flow (Q) determined from bottom-hole temperatures measured in oil and gas wells in Alberta show a large scatter with values ranging from 40 to 90 mW m-2. Only two precise measurements of heat flow were previously reported in Alberta, and were made more than half a century ago. These were made in wells located near Edmonton, Alberta, and penetrated the upper kilometre of clastic sedimentary rocks yielding heat flows values of 61 and 67 mW m-2 (Garland & Lennox). Here, we report a new precise heat flow determination from a 2363-m deep well drilled into basement granite rocks just west of Fort McMurray, Alberta (the Hunt Well). Temperature logs acquired in 2010-2011 show a significant increase in the thermal gradient in the granite due to palaeoclimatic effects. In the case of the Hunt Well, heat flow at depths >2200 m is beyond the influence of the glacial-interglacial surface temperatures. Thermal conductivity and temperature measurements in the Hunt Well have shown that the heat flow below 2.2 km is 51 mW m-2 (±3 mW m-2), thermal conductivity measured by the divided bar method under bottom of the well in situ like condition is 2.5 W m-1 K-1, and 2.7 W m-1 K-1 in ambient conditions), and the geothermal gradient was measured as 20.4 mK m-1. The palaeoclimatic effect causes an underestimate of heat flow derived from measurements collected at depths shallower than 2200 m, meaning other heat flow estimates calculated from basin measurements have likely been underestimated. Heat production (A) was calculated from spectral gamma recorded in the Hunt Well granites to a depth of 1880 m and give an average A of 3.4 and 2.9 μW m-3 for the whole depth range of granites down to 2263 m, based on both gamma and spectral logs. This high A explains the relatively high heat flow measured within the Precambrian basement intersected by the Hunt Well; the Taltson Magmatic Zone. Heat flow and related heat generation from the Hunt Well fits the heat flow-heat generation

  17. Star clusters evolution simulation on basement of linguo- combinatorial approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatyev, Mikhail B.

    2015-08-01

    Each of the clusters of star systems can be described using linguo- combinatorial approach through a formula that determines the number of arbitrary factors in the structure of equivalent equations as the number of combinations of n by m + 1, where n - number of stars in the cluster, m - number of constraints imposed on the stars cluster(M.Ignatyev “The linguo- combinatorial simulation in modern physics”\\\\ J. of Modern Physics,USA, 2012, Vol.1, No 1, p.7-11). Such clusters can be multiple, they can be combined into larger clusters or clusters can decay based on the effect of the collective. For example, if we have two clusters are characterized by the number of arbitrary coefficients S1 and S2, wherem1 + 1 m2 + 1S1 = C S2 = Cn1 n2then by imposing general restrictions mcol we will havem1 + m2 + mcol +1Scol = Cn1 + n2At the same time, depending on the specific parameters can be Scol > S1 + S2, when the union in collective increases the adaptive capabilities, and can be Scol < S1 + S2, where adaptive capacity of less than the sum of the collective adaptation a possibly initial clusters. In the first case, we can observe the effect of the formation of new large clusters, in the second case - the collapse of large clusters into smaller ones. The report deals with the simulation of the evolution of star clusters on the basement of linguo- combinatorial approach.

  18. Distinguishing Grenvillian basement from pre-Taconian cover rocks in the Northern Appalachians

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karabinos, P.; Aleinikoff, J.N.; Fanning, C.M.

    1999-01-01

    Distinguishing Grenvillian basement rocks from pre-Taconian cover sequences in the Appalachians is a first-order problem essential for accurate structural interpretations. The Cavendish Formation in southeastern Vermont presents a classic example of this problem. Doll and others (1961) showed the Cavendish Formation as younger than the Middle Proterozoic Mount Holly Complex but older than the lithologically similar Cambrian Tyson and Hoosac Formations. More recently, the name Cavendish Formation has been informally abandoned, and its metasedimentary units have been mapped as the Tyson and Hoosac Formations of Late Proterozoic to Cambrian age. In a radical departure from these interpretations, Ratcliffe and others (1997) reassigned metasedimentary rocks of the Cavendish Formation to the Mount Holly Complex based on an inferred intrusive relationship between them and a 1.42 Ga tonalite. This new age assignment, if correct, requires a completely new structural interpretation of the region. SHRIMP and Pb evaporation ages of detrital zircons extracted from a quartzite layer from Cavendish Gorge near the proposed intrusive contact with the tonalite constrain the time of deposition of the Cavendish Formation. Grain shapes of the zircons vary from euhedral to nearly spherical. Virtually all the grains have pitted surfaces and show at least some rounding of edges and terminations; grains exhibit oscillatory zoning typical of zircons that crystallized from a magma. Single-grain Pb evaporation analyses of ten zircons and SHRIMP analyses of 15 zircons all yield ages less than 1.42 Ga. Seven of the grains are consistent with derivation from the Bull Hill Gneiss that postdates the Grenville orogenic cycle and predates deposition of the Cavendish Formation. Thus, the metasedimentary units of the Cavendish Formation should not be assigned to the Mount Holly Complex.

  19. Evolution of Pre-Jurassic basement beneath northern Gulf of Mexico coastal plain

    SciTech Connect

    Van Siclen, D.C.

    1990-09-01

    Data from the northern Gulf Coast region reveal a late Paleozoic wrench fault system along which North America (NA) moved southeast (present directions) alongside the northeastern edge of future South America (SA), to where collision with that continent converted a broad continental embankment off the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen into the Ouachita thrust belt. At the same time, Africa farther east, to which protruding SA was firmly joined, was continuing to advance the Appalachian thrusts on the opposite side of these faults. This relationship left no space between the American continents for the conventional remnant ocean or microcontinents. By Late Triassic time, however, extension south of the Ouachita Mountains was forming the series of Interior rift basins, at both ends of which new wrench faults transferred the extension southward to the DeSoto Canyon and South Texas rift basins. Genetically, the Ouachita thrusts are part of the subduction zone along the front of a former SA forearc basin, which continued to receive marine sediments into middle Permian. The Wiggins arch southeast of it is a sliver of that continent, left with NA when the Interior basin rifting jumped from that forearc basin southward across bordering outer basement highs to begin opening the deep Gulf of Mexico (GOM) basin. The Late Triassic crustal extension resulted from right-lateral translation of NA around the bulge of northwestern Africa. About 200 mi of this placed Cape Hatteras against Africa's Cap Blanc, in the configuration from which the magnetic data indicate spreading began in the Central North Atlantic Ocean. The reality of this translation is confirmed by widespread rifting at the same time in western North Africa and between all three northern Atlantic continents; this drew the tip of the Tethys sea southward to Cape Hatteras and led to deposition of voluminous Late Triassic red beds and evaporites along it.

  20. Age and Geochemistry of Central American Forearc Basement Rocks (DSDP Leg 67 and 84) Reveal a Complex Geodynamic History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geldmacher, J.; Hoernle, K. A.; Hauff, F.; Kluegel, A.; Bogaard, P. V.

    2006-12-01

    distinctly more enriched initial isotope ratios (e.g. high 206Pb/204Pb=19.42-20.34 and 207Pb/204Pb=15.65-15.70 but low ^{143}Nd/^{144}Nd=0.51272-0.51297, ^{176}Hf/^{177}Hf= 0.28281-0.28292). Preliminary results of step-heating 40Ar/39Ar age determinations of mineral separates range from ~100-143 Ma for the depleted group and 104-219 Ma for the enriched group. Because of a different mode and larger degree of isotopic enrichment it is highly questionable whether the enriched group samples are related to the CLIP or were derived from the Galápagos plume. Instead, these rocks most likely represent accreted Mesozoic intraplate seamounts/ocean islands of central Pacific origin. The depleted group can be interpreted as a submerged upper Cretaceous island arc, accreted to the Chortis Block subduction zone. Rocks of similar age and geochemistry to both groups can be found on the Santa Elena Peninsula in Costa Rica, which probably represents the subaerial exposed southern termination of the forarc basement.

  1. Fault-related folding during extension: Plunging basement-cored folds in the Basin and Range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howard, K.A.; John, Barbara E.

    1997-01-01

    Folds are able to form in highly extended areas where stratified cover rocks respond to basement fault offsets. The response of cover rocks to basement faulting can be studied especially well in plunging structures that expose large structural relief. The southern Basin and Range province contains plunging folds kilometres in amplitude at the corners of domino-like tilt blocks of basement rocks, where initially steep transverse and normal faults propagated upward toward the layered cover rocks. Exposed tilted cross sections, as much as 8 km thick, display transitions from faulted basement to folded cover that validate laboratory models of forced folds. The folded cover masks a deeper extensional style of brittle segmentation and uniform steep tilting.

  2. PBF (PER620) interior, first basement level. Sampling equipment. Date: March ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PBF (PER-620) interior, first basement level. Sampling equipment. Date: March 2004. INEEL negative no. HD-41-4-1 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, SPERT-I & Power Burst Facility Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  3. PBF (PER620) interior, basement level. Sampling equipment. Date: May 2004. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PBF (PER-620) interior, basement level. Sampling equipment. Date: May 2004. INEEL negative no. HD-41-5-4 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, SPERT-I & Power Burst Facility Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  4. DETAIL OF VACUUM PIPE AT BASEMENT LEVEL OF O&C BUILDING, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF VACUUM PIPE AT BASEMENT LEVEL OF O&C BUILDING, ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, FACING NORTHEAST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  5. Basement, bathroom, looking south U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Basement, bathroom, looking south - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Medical Officer in Charge Residence, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  6. 30. VIEW WEST IN BASEMENT OF BUILDING 41A; NOTE PLASTIC ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. VIEW WEST IN BASEMENT OF BUILDING 41A; NOTE PLASTIC DUCTING WHICH WAS USED TO VENT CORROSIVE FUMES FROM ACID PICKLING AND ELECTROPLATING TANKS - Scovill Brass Works, 59 Mill Street, Waterbury, New Haven County, CT

  7. 21. Building L9; 'basement,' view of west steam engine and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. Building L-9; 'basement,' view of west steam engine and gearing, looking SW. (Ryan and Harms) - Holston Army Ammunition Plant, RDX-and-Composition-B Manufacturing Line 9, Kingsport, Sullivan County, TN

  8. Public staircase (ST2), looking north (bearing 20) from basement level, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Public staircase (ST2), looking north (bearing 20) from basement level, with trash chute door open to right of frame. - California State Office Building No. 1, 915 Capitol Mall, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  9. HPF HIGH PRESSURE FACILITY GAS ANALYSIS SYSTEM IN BASEMENT / HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS FACILITY IN THE E

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    HPF HIGH PRESSURE FACILITY GAS ANALYSIS SYSTEM IN BASEMENT / HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS FACILITY IN THE ENGINE RESEARCH BUILDING ERB TEST CELL CE-13 / AUTOMATIC SCAN VALUE SYSTEM ON THE SECOND FLOOR OF THE INSTRUMENT RESEARCH LABORATORY IRL

  10. New Mexico structural zone - An analogue of the Colorado mineral belt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sims, P.K.; Stein, H.J.; Finn, C.A.

    2002-01-01

    Updated aeromagnetic maps of New Mexico together with current knowledge of the basement geology in the northern part of the state (Sangre de Cristo and Sandia-Manzano Mountains)-where basement rocks were exposed in Precambrian-cored uplifts-indicate that the northeast-trending Proterozoic shear zones that controlled localization of ore deposits in the Colorado mineral belt extend laterally into New Mexico. The shear zones in New Mexico coincide spatially with known epigenetic precious- and base-metal ore deposits; thus, the mineralized belts in the two states share a common inherited basement tectonic setting. Reactivation of the basement structures in Late Cretaceous-Eocene and Mid-Tertiary times provided zones of weakness for emplacement of magmas and conduits for ore-forming solutions. Ore deposits in the Colorado mineral belt are of both Late Cretaceous-Eocene and Mid-Tertiary age; those in New Mexico are predominantly Mid-Tertiary in age, but include Late Cretaceous porphyry-copper deposits in southwestern New Mexico. The mineralized belt in New Mexico, named the New Mexico structural zone, is 250-km wide. The northwest boundary is the Jemez subzone (or the approximately equivalent Globe belt), and the southeastern boundary was approximately marked by the Santa Rita belt. Three groups (subzones) of mineral deposits characterize the structural zone: (1) Mid-Tertiary porphyry molybdenite and alkaline-precious-metal deposits, in the northeast segment of the Jemez zone; (2) Mid-Tertiary epithermal precious-metal deposits in the Tijeras (intermediate) zone; and (3) Late Cretaceous porphyry-copper deposits in the Santa Rita zone. The structural zone was inferred to extend from New Mexico into adjacent Arizona. The structural zone provides favorable sites for exploration, particularly those parts of the Jemez subzone covered by Neogene volcanic and sedimentary rocks. ?? 2002 Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  11. Crustal velocity structure associated with the eastern Tennessee seismic zone: Vp and Vs images based upon local earthquake tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Christine A.; Withers, Mitchell M.; Cox, Randel Tom; Vlahovic, Gordana; Arroucau, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    We present three-dimensional P and S wave velocity models for the active eastern Tennessee seismic zone (ETSZ) using arrival time data from more than 1000 local earthquakes. A nonlinear tomography method is used that involves sequential inversion for model and hypocenter parameters. We image several velocity anomalies that persist through most of the inversion volume. Some anomalies support the presence of known features such as an ancient rift zone in northern Tennessee. Other anomalies reveal the presence of basement features that can be correlated with regional gravity and magnetic anomalies. We image a narrow, NE-SW trending, steeply dipping zone of low velocities that extends to a depth of at least 24 km and is associated with the vertical projection of the prominent New York-Alabama magnetic lineament. The low-velocity zone may have an apparent dip to the SE at depths exceeding 15 km. The low-velocity zone is interpreted as a major basement fault juxtaposing Granite-Rhyolite basement to the NW from Grenville southern Appalachian basement to the SE. Relocated hypocenters align in near-vertical segments suggesting reactivation of a distributed zone of deformation associated with a major strike-slip fault. We suggest that the ETSZ represents reactivation of an ancient shear zone established during formation of the super continent Rodinia.

  12. Chlorine stable isotopic composition of basement fluids of the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge (ODP Leg 168)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifacie, Magali; Monnin, Christophe; Jendrzejewski, Nathalie; Agrinier, Pierre; Javoy, Marc

    2007-08-01

    This paper presents chlorine stable isotope compositions (δ 37Cl) of sediment pore waters collected by squeezing sediment cores from the sediment-basement interface along an East-West transect through the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge (ODP Leg 168). These "near basement fluids" (NBF) are generally thought to be representative of low-temperature fluids circulating in the off-axis basaltic crust. The δ 37Cl value of the fluid directly sampled from a flow at the base of Site 1026 (WSTP1026) is also reported. NBF display δ 37Cl values between - 2.09‰ and - 0.12‰ relative to the Standard Mean Ocean Chloride (SMOC defined as 0‰) and small variations in chlorinity (˜ 4%). These data contrast with the homogeneity of δ 37Cl values associated with highly variable chlorinities observed in high-temperature on-axis fluids [M. Bonifacie, J.L. Charlou, N. Jendrzejewski, P. Agrinier, J.P. Donval, Chlorine isotopic compositions of ridge axis high temperature hydrothermal vent fluids, Chem. Geol. 221(2005) 279-288.]. The NBF δ 37Cl values show a general decreasing trend with distance from the ridge-axis except for two fluids. When plotted against δ 18O values, the δ 37Cl of the NBF show two different trends. This paper discusses the possible contributions on NBF δ 37Cl values of fluid-mixing, water-rock interactions and transport processes (diffusion, ion membrane filtration) that can occur in the igneous basement. However, as none of these processes can fully explain the observed δ 37Cl variations, the potential effect of the sediment cover is also investigated. At site 1026, the interstitial pore fluid displays a δ 37Cl signature significantly lower than that of the fluid discharge sample (- 1.90‰ and - 0.28‰, respectively). This difference, demonstrated here cannot be an artifact of the sampling method, rather indicates the influence of the sediment cover on NBF δ 37Cl values. The potential contributions of physical processes associated with

  13. Low-temperature thermochronology of the northern Thomson Orogen: Implications for exhumation of basement rocks in NE Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdel, Charles; Stockli, Daniel; Purdy, David

    2016-01-01

    The Tasmanides of eastern Australia record much of the Phanerozoic tectonic development of the retreating Pacific-Australia plate boundary and are an oft-cited example of an orogen that has undergone "tectonic mode switching." To begin to constrain the timing of exhumation of basement rocks that are now exposed in portions of the NE Tasmanides, we measured apatite and zircon (U-Th)/He ages from the Thomson Orogen and overlying Paleozoic strata in the back-arc of the New England Orogen in NE Australia. Zircon (U-Th)/He ages from basement samples (including those recovered from boreholes at depths of up to 1.1 km) are characterized by large inter- and intra-sample variability and range from approximately 180 Ma (Early Jurassic) to 375 Ma (Late Devonian). (U-Th)/He zircon ages from several individual samples are negatively correlated with effective uranium (eU), a pattern that is also true of the dataset as a whole, suggesting that variations in U and Th zoning and radiation damage are partially responsible for the age variability. The oldest zircon (U-Th)/He cooling ages coincide with the formation of regionally extensive Late Devonian-early Carboniferous back-arc basins, suggesting that Late Devonian extension played a significant role in exhumation of parts of the northern Thomson Orogen. Apatite (U-Th)/He ages from a basement sample and a late Permian sandstone in the overlying Bowen Basin, which are also marked by intra-sample variability and age-eU correlations, span from the Early Cretaceous through Oligocene, in general agreement with previous apatite fission track data. In conjunction with observations of key geologic relationships and prior K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar data, our results suggest four overall phases in the thermal history of the northern Thomson Orogen: (1) Cambrian-early Silurian metamorphism during the Delamerian and Benambran Orogenies; (2) protracted cooling during the Late Devonian through mid-Permian that likely resulted from extensional

  14. Integrating seismic reflection and geological data and interpretations across an internal basement massif: The southern Appalachian Pine Mountain window, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McBride, J.H.; Hatcher, R.D.; Stephenson, W.J.; Hooper, R.J.

    2005-01-01

    The southern Appalachian Pine Mountain window exposes 1.1 Ga Grenvillian basement and its metasedimentary Paleozoic(?) cover through the allochthonous Inner Piedmont. The issue of whether the crustal block inside the window was either transported above the master Appalachian (late Alleghanian) de??collement or is an autochthonous block that was overridden by the de??collement has been debated for some time. New detrital zircon geochronologic data from the cover rocks inside the window suggest this crustal block was derived from Gondwana but docked with Laurentia before the Alleghanian event. Reprocessed deep seismic reflection data from west-central Georgia (pre- and poststack noise reduction, amplitude variation analysis, and prestack depth migration) indicate that a significant band of subhorizontal reflections occurs almost continuously beneath the window collinear with the originally recognized de??collement reflections north of the window. A marked variation in the de??collement image, from strong and coherent north of the window to more diffuse directly beneath the window, is likely a partial consequence of the different geology between the Inner Piedmont and the window. The more diffuse image beneath the window may also result from imaging problems related to changes in topography and fold of cover (i.e., signal-to-noise ratio). Two alternative tectonic models for the Pine Mountain window can partially account for the observed variation in the de??collement reflectivity. (1) The Pine Mountain block could be truncated below by a relatively smooth continuation of the de??collement. The window would thus expose an allochthonous basement duplex or horse-block thrust upward from the south along the Late Proterozoic rifted continental margin. (2) The window represents localized exhumation of autochthonous basement and cover along a zone of distributed intrabasement shearing directly beneath the window. Either model is viable if only reflector geometry is

  15. A Quantitative Comparison of Fracture Attributes and Fracture Patterns: Insights From Deformation Bands and Basement-hosted Fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awdal, A. H.; Healy, D.; Alsop, G.

    2012-12-01

    Fractures can act as conduits or barriers to fluid flow, and understanding the geometrical attributes of individual fractures and their patterns is a crucial step in quantifying their connectivity. The quantification of fracture attributes and fracture patterns from outcrop analogues can guide the construction of testable expressions for multidimensional scaling relationships. These relationships may offer a key to better fracture prediction in the subsurface. Deformation band and basement fracture datasets have been collected from selected outcrops with a variety of sub-horizontal and sub-vertical rock faces. Cataclastic deformation bands and their patterns have been mapped and quantified in outcrops of aeolian sandstones of the Entrada formation in SE Utah (USA) and Hopeman formation in Moray (Scotland). Basement-hosted fracture data has been collected from outcrops of Lewisian gneiss and Torridonian sandstone in Clachtoll (Scotland), and Moine gneiss and Devonian sandstone in Portskerra (Scotland). Fracture orientations and spacing have been measured from maps, sections and linear scanlines, and fracture intensity, density and mean trace lengths have all been estimated through the application of the circular scan window method. Fracture trace angles and lengths have been calculated from 2D maps and sections using custom image analysis software. In addition, we have quantified the geometrical attributes of lozenges and lenses, the area or volume of relatively undeformed rock situated between two strands of a composite deformation band. We have investigated the statistical trends among different lozenge and lens datasets (Goblin Valley, Hopeman, Bartlett Wash) and explored their potential correlation to other attributes of the fracture pattern and petrophysical properties. Quantitative statistical analysis of these natural fracture datasets from 3 approximately orthogonal planes will allow us to test multidimensional scaling relationships of fracture attributes

  16. Fission-track thermochronology of the Wind River Range and other basement-cored uplifts in the Rocky Mountain foreland

    SciTech Connect

    Cerveny, P.F. III.

    1990-01-01

    Fission-track analysis of apatites from basement rocks of the Laramide foreland provides information about the timing, magnitude, and apparent rate of uplift of the mountain ranges in this area. One hundred thirty-five samples were collected from various mountain ranges in the Wyoming and northern Colorado foreland, with special emphasis on the Wind River Range. Apatite ages from the flanks of the range indicate that uplift may have initiated in the Wind Rivers by about 85 Ma, but was definitely occurring by 75 Ma. Weaker evidence suggests that uplift had commenced by 100 Ma. Data from Green River Lakes and Fremont Peak in the northern part of the range indicate that uplift/cooling was occurring around 62 Ma, and was most rapid between 60 and 57 Ma. Apparent uplift rates vary from 94 m/m.y. to 246 m/m.y. in this section of the Wind Rivers. Samples from a drill hole in the central Wind Rivers have apatite ages ranging from 37 Ma to 86 Ma, confirm the rapid uplift event at 60 Ma, and suggest a significant cooling event at approximately 42 Ma involving nearly 2 km of the rock column. Ages from the Medicine Bow and bighorn ranges suggest possible uplift as early as 100 Ma. Evidence confirm that uplift was definitely occurring by 75 Ma throughout the foreland, and continued through at least 58 Ma. Data from the Beartooth Range, Park Range, and Laramie Range suggest a rapid uplift/cooling event at about 62 Ma. Data collected from Precambrian/Cambrian boundary localities throughout Wyoming indicate that the basement surface was largely within a zone of partial track annealing prior to the Laramide orogeny, and has been uplifted no more than about 5-6 km relative to the present day surface.

  17. Basement - Cover decoupling and progressive exhumation of metamorphic sediments at hot rifted margin. Insights from the Northeastern Pyrenean analog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clerc, Camille; Lagabrielle, Yves; Labaume, Pierre; Ringenbach, Jean-Claude; Vauchez, Alain; Nalpas, Thierry; Bousquet, Romain; Ballard, Jean-François; Lahfid, Abdeltif; Fourcade, Serge

    2016-08-01

    We compile field data collected along the eastern part of the North Pyrenean Zone (NPZ) to point to a tectonic evolution under peculiar thermal conditions applying to the basin sediments in relation with the opening of the Cretaceous Pyrenean rift. Based on this compilation, we show that when thinning of the continental crust increased, isotherms moved closer to the surface with the result that the brittle-ductile transition propagated upward and reached sediments deposited at the early stage of the basin opening. During the continental breakup, the pre-rift Mesozoic cover was efficiently decoupled from the Paleozoic basement along the Triassic evaporite level and underwent drastic ductile thinning and boudinage. We suggest that the upper Albian and upper Cretaceous flysches acted as a blanket allowing temperature increase in the mobile pre-rift cover. Finally, we show that continuous spreading of the basin floor triggered the exhumation of the metamorphic, ductily sheared pre-rift cover, thus contributing to the progressive thinning of the sedimentary pile. In a second step, we investigate the detailed geological records of such a hot regime evolution along a reference-section of the eastern NPZ. We propose a balanced restoration from the Mouthoumet basement massif (north) to the Boucheville Albian basin (south). This section shows a north to south increase in the HT Pyrenean imprint from almost no metamorphic recrystallization to more than 600 °C in the pre- and syn-rift sediments. From this reconstruction, we propose a scenario of tectonic thinning involving the exhumation of the pre-rift cover by the activation of various detachment surfaces at different levels in the sedimentary pile. In a third step, examination of the architecture of current distal passive margin domains provides confident comparison between the Pyrenean case and modern analogs. Finally, we propose a general evolutionary model for the pre-rift sequence of the Northeastern Pyrenean rifted

  18. Integrated Analysis on Gravity and Magnetic Fields of the Hailar Basin, NE China: Implications for Basement Structure and Deep Tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Bin; Wang, Liangshu; Dong, Ping; Wu, YongJing; Li, Changbo; Hu, Bo; Wang, Chong

    2012-11-01

    The Hailar Basin is one of the typical basins among the NE China Basin Groups, which is situated in the east of East Asia Orogene between the Siberia Plate and the North China Plate. Based on the detailed analysis of magnetic, gravity, petrophysical, geothermal and seismological data, we separate the Gravity and Magnetic Anomalies (GMA) into four orders using Wavelet Multi-scale Decomposition (WMD). The apparent depths of causative sources were then assessed by Power Spectrum Analysis (PSA) of each order. Low-order wavelet detail anomalies were used to study the basin's basement structure such as major faults, the basement lithology, uplifts and depressions. High-order ones were used for the inversion of Moho and Curie discontinuities using the Parker method. The results show that the Moho uplifting area of the Hailar Basin is located at the NE part of the basin, the Curie uplifting area is at the NW part, and neither of them is consistent with the basin's sedimentary center. This indicates that the Hailar Basin may differ in basin building pattern from other middle and eastern basins of the basin groups, and the Hailar Basin might be of a passive type. When the Pacific Plate was subducting to NE China, the frontier of the plate lying on the mantle transition zone didn't pass through the Great Khingan Mountains region, so there is not an obvious magma upwelling or lithospheric extension in the Hailar Basin area. Finally, based on the seismological data and results of WMD, a probable 2D crust model is derived from an across-basin profile using the 2D forward modeling of the Bouguer gravity anomaly. The results agree with those from seismic inversion, suggesting WMD is suitable for identifying major crustal density interfaces.

  19. Mineralogical and geochemical characterization of a rare ultramafic lamprophyre in the Tandilia belt basement, Río de la Plata Craton, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dristas, Jorge A.; Martínez, Juan Cruz; Massonne, Hans-Joachim; Pimentel, Marcio M.

    2013-04-01

    A metre-thick ultramafic lamprophyre dyke intrudes the basement of the Tandilia belt at the Sierra Alta de Vela, Argentina. A petrological and geochemical study of this rock and associated small dykes indicates a predominantly calc-alkaline trend. Phlogopite K-Ar dating of the ultramafic lamprophyre gave a minimum age of 1928 ± 54 Ma as a late event of the Transamazonian Orogeny, which is well represented in the basement of the Tandilia belt. An electron microprobe study indicates the presence of phlogopite, albite, chromite and Cr-rich phenocrysts and Cr-free microphenocrysts of diopside as primary minerals. Subsequent to deformation at the contacts with the wall rock, metasomatism generated strongly zoned amphibole (edenite, pargasite, Mg-hastingite and tremolite compositions) and andradite as well as chlorite, sericite, albite, apatite and calcite. The central zone of the lamprophyre is almost undeformed and exhibits some ocellar texture. Geochemical and isotopic signatures of the lamprophyre suggest that its magma source may have previously undergone incompatible element enrichment of the mantle source, representing the original precursor magma for the calc-alkaline dyke series of the Sierra Alta de Vela.

  20. Faults in Paleozoic basement and their participation in Alpine deformation of Greater Caucasus – evidences from materials of restored (balanced) sections in folded sedimentary cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakovlev, Fedor

    2015-04-01

    Method. As each fold has information about strain, numerous folds (0.1-1 km width) inside of hinterland (stripe about 1000 x 50 km) of Greater Caucasus (GC) allow to restore structure for whole sedimentary cover. Material of 24 detailed sections of 510 km total actual length in three regions was used for restoration of structure. These sections were split on 505 domains as associations of 2-5 folds. Three parameters of morphology were measured in these domains: dip of axial plain, dip of envelope plain, value of shortening as interlimb angle [1, 2, 3]. Because these parameters correlate with ellipsoid (ellipse) of strain for domain, sequence of three kinematic operations allow to restore actual state of domain to pre-folded state (from ellipse to circle): rotation to horizontal position of envelope plain, horizontal simple shear to vertical axial plain and vertical flattening (pure shear). Aggregation of chain of pre-folded domains is forming a pre-folded state of whole section, and it allows to calculate of shortening value. For correct detailing of strain study, 78 "structural cells" were formed by aggregation of 5-10 domains in each cell. Some additional observations and calculations allow to find initial and post-folded thickness of sedimentary cover, depth of cover bottom, virtual position of cover top (amplitude of erosion) for all tectonic cells. The received result for 78 cells allowed to understand the main features of GC structure, to see a distribution of basement top depth, to give behavior pattern of the basement and to find a role of faults in shortening of the basement and of sedimentary cover. Results. Three regions of GC were studied: North-Western Caucasus (NWC) [1], Chiaur tectonic zone in South Ossetia (ChZ) and two zones in South-Eastern Caucasus - Tfan Zone (TZ) and Shakhdag zone (ShZ) [3]. The shortening values for structural cells were found as 49% in average for ShZ (with deviations 37÷62%), 55% for TZ (36÷67%), 57% for ChZ (46÷67%) and

  1. Membrane stabilizer

    DOEpatents

    Mingenbach, W.A.

    1988-02-09

    A device is provided for stabilizing a flexible membrane secured within a frame, wherein a plurality of elongated arms are disposed radially from a central hub which penetrates the membrane, said arms imposing alternately against opposite sides of the membrane, thus warping and tensioning the membrane into a condition of improved stability. The membrane may be an opaque or translucent sheet or other material. 10 figs.

  2. Pre-Alpine and Alpine microfabrics in the Austroalpine crystalline basement (Matsch Unit, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberlei, T.; Habler, G.; Grasemann, B.; Thöni, M.

    2012-04-01

    The Matsch Unit is part of the Austroalpine crystalline basement of the Eastern Alps. Three distinct tectonometamorphic events have been recognized in this unit. These include Variscan amphibolite-facies metamorphism, a Permian low-pressure event related with pegmatite emplacement and a Cretaceous greenschist-facies metamorphic overprint (Haas, 1985; Habler et al., 2009). The Cretaceous "Vinschgau Shear Zone" representing the southern tectonic boundary of the Matsch unit is supposed to show an increase in shear zone width and metamorphic grade from W to E (Schmid & Haas, 1989; Froitzheim et al., 1997). Cretaceous deformation in the Matsch crystalline complex was typically restricted to distinct shear zones, especially at subunit boundaries as well as at the northern and southern margin of the Matsch unit. The current study is focused on comparing deformation and reaction microstructures in high- and low-strain domains of Cretaceous deformation affecting Permian pegmatites and their metapelitic host rocks from the eastern portion of the Matsch unit. A major challenge was the discrimination of Cretaceous and pre-Cretaceous microfabrics. Remarkable differences of heterochronous deformation stages are reflected by the deformation and recrystallization behaviour of quartz, feldspar, biotite and white mica as well as characteristic syn-tectonic phase assemblages that replaced Variscan and Permian parageneses in peraluminous metapelites. Pre-existing staurolite was decomposed to chloritoid and paragonite, whereas a second garnet generation grew at the expense of biotite. Furthermore, biotite fishes were marginally decomposed to aggregates of white mica and ilmenite. This reaction was also observed at kink bands within biotite clasts. Cretaceous quartz microfabrics imply dynamic recrystallization by subgrain rotation (SGR) and grain boundary migration (GBM) associated with the development of a strong lattice preferred orientation (LPO). Subsequently, bulging

  3. Ion Probe U-Pb dating of the Central Sakarya basement: a peri-Gondwana terrane cut by late Lower Carboniferous subduction/collision related granitic magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayda Ustaömer, P.; Ustaömer, Timur; Robertson, Alastair. H. F.

    2010-05-01

    Our aim here is to better understand the age and tectonic history of crystalline basement units in the Sakarya Zone of N Turkey, north of the Neotethyan İzmir-Ankara-Erzincan Suture Zone, utilising field, petrographic and ion probe dating, the latter carried out at the University of Edinburgh. One of the largest basement units, Central Sakarya, is dominated by paragneisses and schists that are best exposed between Bilecik and Sarıcakaya, forming a belt ~15 km wide x 100 km long. Smaller outcrops of this basement are exposed further north, for instance in the Geyve area. High-grade metamorphic basement is unconformably overlain by Lower Jurassic-Upper Cretaceous cover sediments of the Sakarya Zone and is in tectonic contact with the Late Palaeozoic-Early Mesozoic Karakaya Complex to the south. Ion-probe U-Pb dating of 89 detrital zircons, separated from one garnet micaschist sample, range from 551 Ma (Ediacaran) to 2738 Ma (Neoarchean). 85% of the ages are > 90 % concordant. Zircon populations cluster at ~550-750 Ma (28 grains), ~950-1050 Ma (27 grains) and ~2000 Ma (5 grains), with smaller groupings at ~800 Ma and ~1850 Ma. The first, prominent population (Neoproterozoic) reflects derivation from a source area related to a Cadomian-Avalonian magmatic arc, likely to be associated with a Cadomian/NE African terrane rather than Baltica (Baltica is known to be magmatically inactive during this period), or Avalonia/Amazonia (in view of the absence of Mesoproterozoic ages in Avalonian-Amazonian terranes). The early Neoproterozoic ages (0.9-1 Ga) deviate significantly from the known age spectra of Cadomian terranes (i.e. Armorican Terrane Assemblage) and instead suggest derivation from an original part of NE Africa. The detrital zircon age spectrum of Cambrian-Ordovician sandstones deposited at the northern periphery of the Arabian-Nubian Shield (i.e. the Elat sandstone) is notably similar to that of the Sakarya basement. The Central Sakarya terrane may have rifted in

  4. U redox fronts and kaolinisation in basement-hosted unconformity-related U ores of the Athabasca Basin (Canada): late U remobilisation by meteoric fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercadier, Julien; Cuney, Michel; Cathelineau, Michel; Lacorde, Mathieu

    2011-02-01

    Proterozoic basement-hosted unconformity-related uranium deposits of the Athabasca Basin (Saskatchewan, Canada) were affected by significant uranium redistribution along oxidation-reduction redox fronts related to cold and late meteoric fluid infiltration. These redox fronts exhibit the same mineralogical and geochemical features as the well-studied uranium roll-front deposits in siliclastic rocks. The primary hydrothermal uranium mineralisation (1.6-1.3 Ga) of basement-hosted deposits is strongly reworked to new disseminated ores comprising three distinctly coloured zones: a white-green zone corresponding to the previous clay-rich alteration halo contemporaneous with hydrothermal ores, a uranium front corresponding to the uranium deposition zone of the redox front (brownish zone, rich in goethite) and a hematite-rich red zone marking the front progression. The three zones directly reflect the mineralogical zonation related to uranium oxides (pitchblende), sulphides, iron minerals (hematite and goethite) and alumino-phosphate-sulphate (APS) minerals. The zoning can be explained by processes of dissolution-precipitation along a redox interface and was produced by the infiltration of cold (<50°C) meteoric fluids to the hydrothermally altered areas. U, Fe, Ca, Pb, S, REE, V, Y, W, Mo and Se were the main mobile elements in this process, and their distribution within the three zones was, for most of them, directly dependent on their redox potential. The elements concentrated in the redox fronts were sourced by the alteration of previously crystallised hydrothermal minerals, such as uranium oxides and light rare earth element (LREE)-rich APS. The uranium oxides from the redox front are characterised by LREE-enriched patterns, which differ from those of unconformity-related ores and clearly demonstrate their distinct conditions of formation. Uranium redox front formation is thought to be linked to fluid circulation episodes initiated during the 400-300 Ma period during

  5. Rift architecture and evolution: The Sirt Basin, Libya: The influence of basement fabrics and oblique tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdunaser, K. M.; McCaffrey, K. J. W.

    2014-12-01

    zones and adjoining highs. Late Eocene rocks exposed in the western part of the basin exhibit a complex network of branching segmented normal and strike-slip faults, generally with a NNW-SSE structural orientations. Many surface structural features have been interpreted from satellite images which confirm sinistral strike-slip kinematics. Relay ramp structures, numerous elongate asymmetric synclines associated with shallow west limbs and steeper dipping east limbs are developed in the hangingwalls adjacent to west downthrowing normal faults. These structural patterns reflect Cretaceous/Tertiary extensional tectonics with additional control by underlying pre-existing Pan-African basement fabrics and ENE-WSW trending Hercynian structures. We relate the Sirt Basin rift development as exemplified in our study area to the break-up of Gondwana represented by the structural evolution of the West-Central African rift system, and the South and Central Atlantic, the Tethys and the Indian Oceans.

  6. Late-Paleozoic emplacement and Meso-Cenozoic reactivation of the southern Kazakhstan granitoid basement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Pelsmaeker, Elien; Glorie, Stijn; Buslov, Mikhail M.; Zhimulev, Fedor I.; Poujol, Marc; Korobkin, Valeriy V.; Vanhaecke, Frank; Vetrov, Evgeny V.; De Grave, Johan

    2015-11-01

    The Ili-Balkhash Basin in southeastern Kazakhstan is located at the junction of the actively deforming mountain ranges of western Junggar and the Tien Shan, and is therefore part of the southwestern Central Asian Orogenic Belt. The basement of the Ili-Balkhash area consists of an assemblage of mainly Precambrian microcontinental fragments, magmatic arcs and accretionary complexes. Eight magmatic basement samples (granitoids and tuffs) from the Ili-Balkhash area were dated with zircon U-Pb LA-ICP-MS and yield Carboniferous to late Permian (~ 350-260 Ma) crystallization ages. These ages are interpreted as reflecting the transition from subduction to (post-) collisional magmatism, related to the closure of the Junggar-Balkhash Ocean during the Carboniferous-early Permian and hence, to the final late Paleozoic accretion history of the ancestral Central Asian Orogenic Belt. Apatite fission track (AFT) dating of 14 basement samples (gneiss, granitoids and volcanic tuffs) mainly provides Cretaceous cooling ages. Thermal history modeling based on the AFT data reveals that several intracontinental tectonic reactivation episodes affected the studied basement during the late Mesozoic and Cenozoic. Late Mesozoic reactivation and associated basement exhumation is interpreted as distant effects of the Cimmerian collisions at the southern Eurasian margin and possibly of the Mongol-Okhotsk Orogeny in SE Siberia during the Jurassic-Cretaceous. Following tectonic stability during the Paleogene, inherited basement structures were reactivated during the Neogene (constrained by Miocene AFT ages of ~ 17-10 Ma). This late Cenozoic reactivation is interpreted as the far-field response of the India-Eurasia collision and reflects the onset of modern mountain building and denudation in southeast Kazakhstan, which seems to be at least partially controlled by the inherited basement architecture.

  7. Fracture and vein characterization of a crystalline basement reservoir, central Yemen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veeningen, R.; Grasemann, B.; Decker, K.; Bischoff, R.; Rice, A. H. N.

    2012-04-01

    The country of Yemen is located in the south-western part of the Arabian plate. The Pan-African basement found in western and central Yemen is highly deformed during the Proterozoic eon and is part of the Arabian-Nubian shield ANS (670-540Ma). This ANS is a result of the amalgamation of high-grade gneiss terranes and low-grade island arcs. The development of an extensive horst-and-graben system related to the breakup of Gondwana in the Mesozoic, has reactivated the Pan-African basement along NW-SE trending normal faults. As a result, younger Meosozoic marls, sandstones, clastics and limestones are unconformably overlying the basement. Some of these formations act as a source and/or reservoir for hydrocarbons. Due to fracturing of the basement, hydrocarbons have migrated horizontally into the basement, causing the crystalline basement to be a potential hydrocarbon reservoir. Unfortunately, little is known about the Pan-African basement in Central Yemen and due its potential as a reservoir, the deformation and oil migration history (with a main focus on the fracturing and veining history) of the basement is investigated in high detail. Representative samples are taken from 2 different wells from the Habban Field reservoir, located approximately 320 ESE of Sana'a. These samples are analysed using e.g. the Optical Microscope, SEM, EDX and CL, but also by doing Rb-Sr age dating, isotope analysis and fluid inclusion analysis. In well 1, the only lithology present is an altered gneiss with relative large (<5 cm diameter) multi-mineralic veins. In well 3, quartzite (top), gneiss (middle) and quartz porphyry's (middle) are intruded by a so called "younger" granitoid body (592.6±4.1Ma). All lithologies record polyphase systems of mineral veins. Pyrite and saddle dolomite in these veins have euhedral shapes, which means that they have grown in open cavities. Calcite is the youngest mineral in these veins, closing the vein and aborting the fluid flow. Fluid inclusions inside

  8. Exposure of basement rock on the continental slope of the bering sea.

    PubMed

    Scholl, D W; Buffington, E C; Hopkins, D M

    1966-08-26

    Profiles of repetitive seismnic reflections reveal that the Bering con tinental slope, outer shelf, and rise overlay an acoustically reflective "basement" which extends at least 750 kilometers parallel to the trend of the slope. This acoustic basement is usually covered by several hundred meters of stratified sediments at the top and bottom of the slope; however, it is exposed in sub marine canyons and flanking spurs along the main part of the slope for a distance of at least 550 kilometers northwest of the Pribilof Islands. The lithologic composition and the age of the rocks of the acoustic basement are not known. However, its probable seismic velocity of 3.1 to 3.7 kilometers per second suggests that it is composed of volcanic rocks or lithified sedimentary rocks or both. The regional geology suggests that the acoustic basement is the upper surface of folded late Mesozoic rocks which were locally intruded by granite and serpentine. The structure of the Bering slope, as deduced from the acoustic profiles, suggests that the surface of the basement has been monoclinically flexed and faulted between the shelf edge and the deep Aleutian Basin.

  9. Exposure of basement rock on the continental slope of the bering sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scholl, D. W.; Buffington, E.C.; Hopkins, D.M.

    1966-01-01

    Profiles of repetitive seismic reflections reveal that the Bering continental slope, outer shelf, and rise overlay an acoustically reflective "basement" which extends at least 750 kilometers parallel to the trend of the slope. This acoustic basement is usually covered by several hundred meters of stratified sediments at the top and bottom of the slope; however, it is exposed in submarine canyons and flanking spurs along the main part of the slope for a distance of at least 550 kilometers northwest of the Pribilof Islands. The lithologic composition and the age of the rocks of the acoustic basement are not known. However, its probable seismic velocity of 3.1 to 3.7 kilometers per second suggests that it is composed of volcanic rocks or lithified sedimentary rocks or both. The regional geology suggests that the acoustic basement is the upper surface of folded late Mesozoic rocks which were locally intruded by granite and serpentine. The structure of the Bering slope, as deduced from the acoustic profiles, suggests that the surface of the basement has been monoclinically flexed and faulted between the shelf edge and the deep Aleutian Basin.

  10. Basement lithostratigraphy of the Adula nappe: implications for Palaeozoic evolution and Alpine kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavargna-Sani, Mattia; Epard, Jean-Luc; Bussy, François; Ulianov, Alex

    2014-01-01

    The Adula nappe belongs to the Lower Penninic domain of the Central Swiss Alps. It consists mostly of pre-Triassic basement lithologies occurring as strongly folded and sheared gneisses of various types with mafic boudins. We propose a new lithostratigraphy for the northern Adula nappe basement that is supported by detailed field investigations, U-Pb zircon geochronology, and whole-rock geochemistry. The following units have been identified: Cambrian clastic metasediments with abundant carbonate lenses and minor bimodal magmatism (Salahorn Formation); Ordovician metapelites associated with amphibolite boudins with abundant eclogite relicts representing oceanic metabasalts (Trescolmen Formation); Ordovician peraluminous metagranites of calc-alkaline affinity ascribed to subduction-related magmatism (Garenstock Augengneiss); Ordovician metamorphic volcanic-sedimentary deposits (Heinisch Stafel Formation); Early Permian post-collisional granites recording only Alpine orogenic events (Zervreila orthogneiss). All basement lithologies except the Permian granites record a Variscan + Alpine polyorogenic metamorphic history. They document a complex Paleozoic geotectonic evolution consistent with the broader picture given by the pre-Mesozoic basement framework in the Alps. The internal consistency of the Adula basement lithologies and the stratigraphic coherence of the overlying Triassic sediments suggest that most tectonic contacts within the Adula nappe are pre-Alpine in age. Consequently, mélange models for the Tertiary emplacement of the Adula nappe are not consistent and must be rejected. The present-day structural complexity of the Adula nappe is the result of the intense Alpine ductile deformation of a pre-structured entity.

  11. Unraveling an antique subduction process from metamorphic basement around Medellín city, Central Cordillera of Colombian Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bustamante, Andres; Juliani, Caetano

    2011-10-01

    In the surroundings of Caldas and El Retiro cities (Colombia) metamorphic rocks derived from basic and pelitic protoliths comprise the Caldas amphibole schist and the Ancón schist respectively. Subordinated metamorphosed granite bodies (La Miel gneiss) are associated to these units, and The El Retiro amphibolites, migmatites and granulites crops out eastwards of these units, separated by shear zones. The Caldas amphibole schist and the Ancón schist protoliths could have been formed in a distal marine reduced environment and amalgamated to the South American continent in an apparent Triassic subduction event. The El Retiro rocks are akin to a continental basement and possible include impure metasediments of continental margin, whose metamorphism originated granulite facies rocks and migmatites as a result of the anatexis of quartz-feldspathic rocks. The metamorphism was accompanied by intense deformation, which has juxtaposed both migmatites and granulite blocks. Afterward, heat and fluid circulation associated with the emplacement of minor igneous intrusions resulted in intense fluid-rock interaction, variations in the grain size of the minerals and, especially, intense retrograde metamorphic re-equilibrium. Thermobarometric estimations for the Caldas amphibole schist indicate metamorphism in the Barrovian amphibolite facies. The metamorphic path is counter-clockwise, but retrograde evolution could not be precisely defined. The pressures of the metamorphism in these rocks range from 6.3 to 13.5 kbar, with narrow temperature ranging from 550 to 630 °C. For the Ancón schist metapelites the P- T path is also counter-clockwise, with a temperature increase evidenced by the occurrence of sillimanite and the cooling by later kyanite. The progressive metamorphism event occurred at pressures of 7.6-7.2 kbar and temperatures of 645-635 °C for one sample and temperature between 500 and 600 °C under constant pressure of 6 kbar. The temperature estimated for these rocks

  12. Dissolution of biogenic ooze over basement edifices in the equatorial Pacific with implications for hydrothermal ventilation of the oceanic crust

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bekins, B.A.; Spivack, A.J.; Davis, E.E.; Mayer, L.A.

    2007-01-01

    Recent observations indicate that curious closed depressions in carbonate sediments overlying basement edifices are widespread in the equatorial Pacific. A possible mechanism for their creation is dissolution by fluids exiting basement vents from off-axis hydrothermal flow. Quantitative analysis based on the retrograde solubility of calcium carbonate and cooling of basement fluids during ascent provides an estimate for the dissolution capacity of the venting fluids. Comparison of the dissolution capacity and fluid flux with typical equatorial Pacific carbonate mass accumulation rates shows that this mechanism is feasible. By maintaining sediment-free basement outcrops, the process may promote widespread circulation of relatively unaltered seawater in the basement in an area where average sediment thicknesses are 300-500 m. The enhanced ventilation can explain several previously puzzling observations in this region, including anomalously low heat flux, relatively unaltered seawater in the basement, and aerobic and nitrate-reducing microbial activity at the base of the sediments. ?? 2007 The Geological Society of America.

  13. A seismotectonic model for the 300-kilometer-long eastern Tennessee seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Powell, C.A.; Bollinger, G.A.; Chapman, M.C.; Sibol, M.S.; Johnston, A.C.; Wheeler, R.L.

    1994-01-01

    Ten years of monitoring microearthquakes with a regional seismic network has revealed the presence of a well-defined, linear zone of seismic activity in eastern Tennessee. This zone produced the second highest release of seismic strain energy in the United States east of the Rocky Mountains during the last decade, when normalized by crustal area. The data indicate that seismicity produced by regional, intraplate stresses is now concentrating near the boundary between relatively strong and weak basement crustal blocks.

  14. Membrane tension and membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Kozlov, Michael M; Chernomordik, Leonid V

    2015-08-01

    Diverse cell biological processes that involve shaping and remodeling of cell membranes are regulated by membrane lateral tension. Here we focus on the role of tension in driving membrane fusion. We discuss the physics of membrane tension, forces that can generate the tension in plasma membrane of a cell, and the hypothesis that tension powers expansion of membrane fusion pores in late stages of cell-to-cell and exocytotic fusion. We propose that fusion pore expansion can require unusually large membrane tensions or, alternatively, low line tensions of the pore resulting from accumulation in the pore rim of membrane-bending proteins. Increase of the inter-membrane distance facilitates the reaction. PMID:26282924

  15. Revisiting Seafloor-Spreading in the Red Sea: Basement Nature, Transforms and Ocean-Continent Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapponnier, P.; Dyment, J.; Zinger, M. A.; Franken, D.; Afifi, A. M.; Wyllie, A.; Ali, H. G.; Hanbal, I.

    2013-12-01

    A new marine geophysical survey on the Saudi Arabian side of the Red Sea confirms early inferences that ~ 2/3 of the eastern Red Sea is floored by oceanic crust. Most seismic profiles south of 24°N show a strongly reflective, landward-deepening volcanic basement up to ~ 100 km east of the axial ridge, beneath thick evaporitic deposits. This position of the Ocean-Continent Boundary (OCB) is consistent with gravity measurements. The low amplitudes and long wavelengths of magnetic anomalies older than Chrons 1-3 can be accounted for by low-pass filtering due to thick sediments. Seafloor-spreading throughout the Red Sea started around 15 Ma, as in the western Gulf of Aden. Its onset was coeval with the activation of the Aqaba/Levant transform and short-cutting of the Gulf of Suez. The main difference between the southern and northern Red Sea lies not in the nature of the crust but in the direction and modulus of the plate motion rate. The ~ 30° counterclockwise strike change and halving of the spreading rate (~ 16 to ~ 8 mm/yr) between the Hermil (17°N) and Suez triple junctions results in a shift from slow (≈ North Atlantic) to highly oblique, ultra-slow (≈ Southwest Indian) ridge type. The obliquity of spreading in the central and northern basins is taken up by transform discontinuities that stop ~ 40 km short of the coastline, at the OCB. Three large transform fault systems (Jeddah, Zabargad, El Akhawein) nucleated as continental transfer faults reactivating NNE-trending Proterozoic shear zones. The former two systems divide the Red Sea into three main basins. Between ~15 and ~5 Ma, for about 10 million years, thick evaporites were deposited directly on top of oceanic crust in deep water, as the depositional environment, modulated by climate, became restricted by the Suez and Afar/Bab-el-Mandeb volcano-tectonic 'flood-gates.' The presence of these thick deposits (up to ~ 8 km) suffices to account for the difference between the Red Sea and the Gulf of Aden

  16. Inversion tectonics in the pre-andean basement of the Sierra de Cachi (Salta, Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tubía, J. M.; Hongn, F. D.; Aranguren, A.; Vegas, N.

    2012-04-01

    The Sierra de Cachi is a mountain range located in NW Argentina, near Salta; it spreads along 50 km in a N-S direction across the pre-Andean basement of the Calchaqui Valley. This window of pre-Andean consists of: 1) greywacke and slates of the uppermost Neoproterozoic to Early Cambrian Puncoviscana Formation, 2) schists, gneissic rocks and migmatites grouped in the so-called La Paya Formation, and 3) granodiorite and trondhjemite plutons, intruded at different structural levels within the La Paya Formation. Detailed cartographic and structural data support that the Sierra de Cachi forms a complex plutono-metamorphic dome, reflecting a polyorogenic evolution. This region is characterized by the following features: 1) there is a reverse metamorphism ranging from very-low metamorphic grade conditions below, to migmatization at upper structural levels, 2) the metamorphism was associated to a strong telescoping of the isograds and is representative of LP and HT conditions, 3) metamorphism reached partial melting conditions and was coeval with the intrusion of sheeted granodiorite and trondhjemite plutons, 4) these plutons are concordant with the metamorphic zoning and are also affected by the east-verging folds 5) the reverse metamorphism is related to large- scale and E-verging folds that are linked to the dominant west-dipping foliation, 6) the dominant N-S striking and W-dipping schistosity post-dates the regional metamorphism and is related with a major D2-deformation, as an older extensional foliation is still recognized in the gneissic domain, and 7) subsequent to the east-verging folds and the development of the main foliation, the active shortening gave rise to mylonitic bands parallel to the reverse limbs of the folds. We consider that such features are the result of a positive inversion tectonics within intermediate crustal levels. The metamorphic evolution and the formation of the sheeted plutons are consistent with an extensional event, whereas the

  17. Decrypting the Formation Conditions of the Basement Carbonate-Bearing Rocks at Nili Fossae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Nili Fossae region is the site of a number of proposed Landing Sites for the Mars 2020 Rover. A distinguishing feature of many of these sites is the access to large exposures of carbonate (Ehlmann et al. 2008). Serpentinization has been proposed as a formation mechanism of these carbonates, including carbonated (Brown et al. 2010, Viviano, et al. 2013) and low temperature, near surface serpentinization. The potential for carbonated serpentization at Nili Fossae links the region to Earth analogs in terrestrial greenstone belts such as the Pilbara in Western Australia, where talc-carbonate bearing komatiite cumulate units of the Dresser Formation overlie the siliceous, stromatolite-bearing Strelley Pool Chert unit (Van Kranendonk and Pirajno, 2004). If a similar relationship exists on Mars, investigations of rocks stratigraphically beneath the carbonate-bearing units at Nili Fossae ("the basement rocks") may provide the best chance to examine well preserved organic material from the Noachian. This hypothesis is testable by Mars 2020. In preparation for the the Mars 2020 landing site, we are examining the thermodynamic relationships that favor formation of serpentine and talc-carbonate and different pressures and temperatures in the crust (Barnes 2007). This will allow us to constrain the low grade metamorphism required to replicate the proposed models of serpentinisation and help us understand the regional metamophic gradient that is critical to furthering our knowledge of the ancient rocks of Nili Fossae. Refs:Barnes, S. J. "Komatiites: Petrology, Volcanology, Metamorphism, and Geochemistry." S.E.G. 13 (2007): 13. Brown, A. J., et al.. "Hydrothermal Formation of Clay-Carbonate Alteration Assemblages in the Nili Fossae Region of Mars." EPSL 297 (2010): 174-82. Ehlmann, B. L. et al. "Orbital Identification of Carbonate-Bearing Rocks on Mars." Science 322, no. 5909 1828-32. Van Kranendonk, M.J., and F. Pirajno. "Geochemistry of Metabasalts and Hydrothermal

  18. Rigid Basement and the Evolution of the Pakistani Convergent Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haq, S. S.; Davis, D. M.

    2007-12-01

    In Pakistan, along the western edge of the Indian-Eurasian collision there are a series of fold-and-thrust belts that have highly variable strikes and shortening directions with respect to the local relative plate motion. Much of the complexity in the deformation of this margin can easily be explained by the shape, location, and long-term motion of a fragment of relatively rigid oceanic lithosphere that is believed to underlie the Katawaz Basin. In particular, the deformation that has formed the Sulaiman Range and Lobe is a direct consequence of the Katawaz Basin's over all higher strength. The presence of deformed sedimentary strata in the basin comparable to those presently found in the Indus delta are indicative of the basins long-term motion parallel to the Chaman fault zone. In Pakistan, the transition in the strike and shortening directions occurs over a short distance compared to the width of the fold-belts and the length of the margin. We present a series of analog models along with detailed quantitative analysis that we compare to the observed deformation as indicated by both geologic and geophysical data. By quantitatively distinguishing the style and magnitude of deformation in each of a variety of analog experiments we are able to evaluate the viability of various alternative models that have been proposed for fold- belt formation and evolution of the Pakistani margin, including our favored model. The model that best fits the geological and geophysical evidence suggests that the complexity of the Pakistani margin is a result of the long- term northeastward migration of the Katawaz basin along the curving trend of the Chaman fault zone. The vertically integrated mechanical strength of the Katawaz basin allows it to act as a strong 'backstop' that has relative motion to both stable India and stable Eurasia. This northeastward motion and the resulting clockwise rotation of the Katawaz 'block' during the margin's development can explain the location and

  19. Hydrogeologic controls on induced seismicity in crystalline basement rocks due to fluid injection into basal reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yipeng; Person, Mark; Rupp, John; Ellett, Kevin; Celia, Michael A; Gable, Carl W; Bowen, Brenda; Evans, James; Bandilla, Karl; Mozley, Peter; Dewers, Thomas; Elliot, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    A series of Mb 3.8-5.5 induced seismic events in the midcontinent region, United States, resulted from injection of fluid either into a basal sedimentary reservoir with no underlying confining unit or directly into the underlying crystalline basement complex. The earthquakes probably occurred along faults that were likely critically stressed within the crystalline basement. These faults were located at a considerable distance (up to 10 km) from the injection wells and head increases at the hypocenters were likely relatively small (∼70-150 m). We present a suite of simulations that use a simple hydrogeologic-geomechanical model to assess what hydrogeologic conditions promote or deter induced seismic events within the crystalline basement across the midcontinent. The presence of a confining unit beneath the injection reservoir horizon had the single largest effect in preventing induced seismicity within the underlying crystalline basement. For a crystalline basement having a permeability of 2 × 10(-17)  m(2) and specific storage coefficient of 10(-7) /m, injection at a rate of 5455 m(3) /d into the basal aquifer with no underlying basal seal over 10 years resulted in probable brittle failure to depths of about 0.6 km below the injection reservoir. Including a permeable (kz  = 10(-13)  m(2) ) Precambrian normal fault, located 20 m from the injection well, increased the depth of the failure region below the reservoir to 3 km. For a large permeability contrast between a Precambrian thrust fault (10(-12)  m(2) ) and the surrounding crystalline basement (10(-18)  m(2) ), the failure region can extend laterally 10 km away from the injection well.

  20. The surface of crystalline basement, Great Valley and Sierra Nevada, California: A digital map database

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wentworth, Carl M.; Fisher, G. Reid; Levine, Paia; Jachens, Robert C.

    1995-01-01

    Crystalline basement in central California extends westward from the exposed Sierra Nevada beneath the sedimentary fill of the Great Valley and under the eastern edge of the Coast Ranges at mid-crustal depth. The surface of this basement is defined from three types of control: in the Sierra Nevada from the topography itself, beneath the eastern two thirds of the Great Valley in considerable detail from numerous wells drilled for oil and gas, and beneath the western San Joaquin Valley in less detail from seismic reflection and refraction profiles. Together, these data demonstrate that the surface of crystalline rock is continuous from the exposed rock in the mountains to the top of high-velocity rock buried deep beneath the eastern front of the southern Coast Ranges. This report presents a compilation of data through 1985 that define the surface of this crystalline basement, a contour map of the surface, and the lithology of the basement rock sampled by many of the wells. The compilation was begun as part of the investigation of the 1983 Coalinga earthquake, and was subsequently converted to digital form and extended to the whole of the Great Valley and Sierra Nevada. The main purpose was to explore and document the shape and continuity of the basement surface and to determine the relation of the surface to the tectonic wedge hypothesis (Wentworth and others, 1984; Wentworth and Zoback, 1989). Available basement samples from wells - principally the thin-section collection of May and Hewitt (1948) preserved by the California Academy of Sciences - were also reexamined by cooperating petrologists in an effort to distinguish wells that bottomed in ophiolitic rocks.