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Sample records for bases moleculares del

  1. DNA based molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaelis, Jens; Muschielok, Adam; Andrecka, Joanna; Kügel, Wolfgang; Moffitt, Jeffrey R.

    2009-12-01

    Most of the essential cellular processes such as polymerisation reactions, gene expression and regulation are governed by mechanical processes. Controlled mechanical investigations of these processes are therefore required in order to take our understanding of molecular biology to the next level. Single-molecule manipulation and force spectroscopy have over the last 15 years been developed into extremely powerful techniques. Applying these techniques to the investigation of proteins and DNA molecules has led to a mechanistic understanding of protein function on the level of single molecules. As examples for DNA based molecular machines we will describe single-molecule experiments on RNA polymerases as well as on the packaging of DNA into a viral capsid-a process that is driven by one of the most powerful molecular motors.

  2. Polypeptides Based Molecular Electronics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-06

    can be nanoengineer/ nanoassemble individual building blocks at the molecular level, atom by atom, to form conducting channel towards realization of...properties of the self-assembled interconnects are characterized as well. These peptides can be nanoengineer/ nanoassemble individual building blocks at

  3. Rotaxane-based molecular muscles.

    PubMed

    Bruns, Carson J; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2014-07-15

    CONSPECTUS: More than two decades of investigating the chemistry of bistable mechanically interlocked molecules (MIMs), such as rotaxanes and catenanes, has led to the advent of numerous molecular switches that express controlled translational or circumrotational movement on the nanoscale. Directed motion at this scale is an essential feature of many biomolecular assemblies known as molecular machines, which carry out essential life-sustaining functions of the cell. It follows that the use of bistable MIMs as artificial molecular machines (AMMs) has been long anticipated. This objective is rarely achieved, however, because of challenges associated with coupling the directed motions of mechanical switches with other systems on which they can perform work. A natural source of inspiration for designing AMMs is muscle tissue, since it is a material that relies on the hierarchical organization of molecular machines (myosin) and filaments (actin) to produce the force and motion that underpin locomotion, circulation, digestion, and many other essential life processes in humans and other animals. Muscle is characterized at both microscopic and macroscopic length scales by its ability to generate forces that vary the distance between two points at the expense of chemical energy. Artificial muscles that mimic this ability are highly sought for applications involving the transduction of mechanical energy. Rotaxane-based molecular switches are excellent candidates for artificial muscles because their architectures intrinsically possess movable filamentous molecular components. In this Account, we describe (i) the different types of rotaxane "molecular muscle" architectures that express contractile and extensile motion, (ii) the molecular recognition motifs and corresponding stimuli that have been used to actuate them, and (iii) the progress made on integrating and scaling up these motions for potential applications. We identify three types of rotaxane muscles, namely, "daisy

  4. The R215W mutation in NBS1 impairs {gamma}-H2AX binding and affects DNA repair: molecular bases for the severe phenotype of 657del5/R215W Nijmegen breakage syndrome patients

    SciTech Connect

    Masi, Alessandra di Viganotti, Mara; Polticelli, Fabio; Ascenzi, Paolo; Tanzarella, Caterina; Antoccia, Antonio

    2008-05-09

    Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS) is a genetic disorder characterized by chromosomal instability and hypersensitivity to ionising radiation. Compound heterozygous 657del5/R215W NBS patients display a clinical phenotype more severe than the majority of NBS patients homozygous for the 657del5 mutation. The NBS1 protein, mutated in NBS patients, contains a FHA/BRCT domain necessary for the DNA-double strand break (DSB) damage response. Recently, a second BRCT domain has been identified, however, its role is still unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the R215W mutation in NBS1 impairs histone {gamma}-H2AX binding after induction of DNA damage, leading to a delay in DNA-DSB rejoining. Molecular modelling reveals that the 215 residue of NBS1 is located between the two BRCT domains, affecting their relative orientation that appears critical for {gamma}-H2AX binding. Present data represent the first evidence for the role of NBS1 tandem BRCT domains in {gamma}-H2AX recognition, and could explain the severe phenotype observed in 657del5/R215W NBS patients.

  5. Carbon Nanotube Based Molecular Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash; Menon, Madhu

    1998-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes and the nanotube heterojunctions have recently emerged as excellent candidates for nanoscale molecular electronic device components. Experimental measurements on the conductivity, rectifying behavior and conductivity-chirality correlation have also been made. While quasi-one dimensional simple heterojunctions between nanotubes with different electronic behavior can be generated by introduction of a pair of heptagon-pentagon defects in an otherwise all hexagon graphene sheet. Other complex 3- and 4-point junctions may require other mechanisms. Structural stability as well as local electronic density of states of various nanotube junctions are investigated using a generalized tight-binding molecular dynamics (GDBMD) scheme that incorporates non-orthogonality of the orbitals. The junctions investigated include straight and small angle heterojunctions of various chiralities and diameters; as well as more complex 'T' and 'Y' junctions which do not always obey the usual pentagon-heptagon pair rule. The study of local density of states (LDOS) reveal many interesting features, most prominent among them being the defect-induced states in the gap. The proposed three and four pointjunctions are one of the smallest possible tunnel junctions made entirely of carbon atoms. Furthermore the electronic behavior of the nanotube based device components can be taylored by doping with group III-V elements such as B and N, and BN nanotubes as a wide band gap semiconductor has also been realized in experiments. Structural properties of heteroatomic nanotubes comprising C, B and N will be discussed.

  6. Interference-based molecular transistors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying; Mol, Jan A.; Benjamin, Simon C.; Briggs, G. Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular transistors have the potential for switching with lower gate voltages than conventional field-effect transistors. We have calculated the performance of a single-molecule device in which there is interference between electron transport through the highest occupied molecular orbital and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of a single molecule. Quantum interference results in a subthreshold slope that is independent of temperature. For realistic parameters the change in gate potential required for a change in source-drain current of two decades is 20 mV, which is a factor of six smaller than the theoretical limit for a metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor. PMID:27646692

  7. Niobate-based octahedral molecular sieves

    DOEpatents

    Nenoff, Tina M.; Nyman, May D.

    2006-10-17

    Niobate-based octahedral molecular sieves having significant activity for multivalent cations and a method for synthesizing such sieves are disclosed. The sieves have a net negatively charged octahedral framework, comprising niobium, oxygen, and octahedrally coordinated lower valence transition metals. The framework can be charge balanced by the occluded alkali cation from the synthesis method. The alkali cation can be exchanged for other contaminant metal ions. The ion-exchanged niobate-based octahedral molecular sieve can be backexchanged in acidic solutions to yield a solution concentrated in the contaminant metal. Alternatively, the ion-exchanged niobate-based octahedral molecular sieve can be thermally converted to a durable perovskite phase waste form.

  8. Niobate-based octahedral molecular sieves

    DOEpatents

    Nenoff, Tina M.; Nyman, May D.

    2003-07-22

    Niobate-based octahedral molecular sieves having significant activity for multivalent cations and a method for synthesizing such sieves are disclosed. The sieves have a net negatively charged octahedral framework, comprising niobium, oxygen, and octahedrally coordinated lower valence transition metals. The framework can be charge balanced by the occluded alkali cation from the synthesis method. The alkali cation can be exchanged for other contaminant metal ions. The ion-exchanged niobate-based octahedral molecular sieve can be backexchanged in acidic solutions to yield a solution concentrated in the contaminant metal. Alternatively, the ion-exchanged niobate-based octahedral molecular sieve can be thermally converted to a durable perovskite phase waste form.

  9. [Molecular bases of cancer immunology].

    PubMed

    Barrera-Rodríguez, R; Peralta-Zaragoza, O; Madrid-Marina, V

    1995-01-01

    The immune system is a tight network of different types of cells and molecules. The coordinated action of these elements mounts a precise immune response against tumor cells. However, these cells present several escape mechanisms, leading to tumor progression. This paper shows several cellular and molecular events involved in the regulation of the immune response against tumor cells. The interaction of several molecules such as MHC, TcR, adhesins, tumor antigens and cytokines are discussed, as well as the most recent knowledge about escape mechanisms and immunotherapy.

  10. Ultrathin inorganic molecular nanowire based on polyoxometalates

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhenxin; Murayama, Toru; Sadakane, Masahiro; Ariga, Hiroko; Yasuda, Nobuhiro; Sakaguchi, Norihito; Asakura, Kiyotaka; Ueda, Wataru

    2015-01-01

    The development of metal oxide-based molecular wires is important for fundamental research and potential practical applications. However, examples of these materials are rare. Here we report an all-inorganic transition metal oxide molecular wire prepared by disassembly of larger crystals. The wires are comprised of molybdenum(VI) with either tellurium(IV) or selenium(IV): {(NH4)2[XMo6O21]}n (X=tellurium(IV) or selenium(IV)). The ultrathin molecular nanowires with widths of 1.2 nm grow to micrometre-scale crystals and are characterized by single-crystal X-ray analysis, Rietveld analysis, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy, thermal analysis and elemental analysis. The crystals can be disassembled into individual molecular wires through cation exchange and subsequent ultrasound treatment, as visualized by atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The ultrathin molecular wire-based material exhibits high activity as an acid catalyst, and the band gap of the molecular wire-based crystal is tunable by heat treatment. PMID:26139011

  11. Bioassays Based on Molecular Nanomechanics

    DOE PAGES

    Majumdar, Arun

    2002-01-01

    Recent experiments have shown that when specific biomolecular interactions are confined to one surface of a microcantilever beam, changes in intermolecular nanomechanical forces provide sufficient differential torque to bend the cantilever beam. This has been used to detect single base pair mismatches during DNA hybridization, as well as prostate specific antigen (PSA) at concentrations and conditions that are clinically relevant for prostate cancer diagnosis. Since cantilever motion originates from free energy change induced by specific biomolecular binding, this technique is now offering a common platform for label-free quantitative analysis of protein-protein binding, DNA hybridization DNA-protein interactions, and in general receptor-ligandmore » interactions. Current work is focused on developing “universal microarrays” of microcantilever beams for high-throughput multiplexed bioassays.« less

  12. Graphene-based nanoprobes for molecular diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shixing; Li, Fuwu; Fan, Chunhai; Song, Shiping

    2015-10-07

    In recent years, graphene has received widespread attention owing to its extraordinary electrical, chemical, optical, mechanical and structural properties. Lately, considerable interest has been focused on exploring the potential applications of graphene in life sciences, particularly in disease-related molecular diagnostics. In particular, the coupling of functional molecules with graphene as a nanoprobe offers an excellent platform to realize the detection of biomarkers, such as nucleic acids, proteins and other bioactive molecules, with high performance. This article reviews emerging graphene-based nanoprobes in electrical, optical and other assay methods and their application in various strategies of molecular diagnostics. In particular, this review focuses on the construction of graphene-based nanoprobes and their special advantages for the detection of various bioactive molecules. Properties of graphene-based materials and their functionalization are also comprehensively discussed in view of the development of nanoprobes. Finally, future challenges and perspectives of graphene-based nanoprobes are discussed.

  13. Molecular profiling of neurons based on connectivity.

    PubMed

    Ekstrand, Mats I; Nectow, Alexander R; Knight, Zachary A; Latcha, Kaamashri N; Pomeranz, Lisa E; Friedman, Jeffrey M

    2014-05-22

    The complexity and cellular heterogeneity of neural circuitry presents a major challenge to understanding the role of discrete neural populations in controlling behavior. While neuroanatomical methods enable high-resolution mapping of neural circuitry, these approaches do not allow systematic molecular profiling of neurons based on their connectivity. Here, we report the development of an approach for molecularly profiling projective neurons. We show that ribosomes can be tagged with a camelid nanobody raised against GFP and that this system can be engineered to selectively capture translating mRNAs from neurons retrogradely labeled with GFP. Using this system, we profiled neurons projecting to the nucleus accumbens. We then used an AAV to selectively profile midbrain dopamine neurons projecting to the nucleus accumbens. By comparing the captured mRNAs from each experiment, we identified a number of markers specific to VTA dopaminergic projection neurons. The current method provides a means for profiling neurons based on their projections.

  14. Molecular-Based Devices and Circuits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-23

    nano-cavities (50nm x 50nm) etched into the Si3N4 layer at the center of the electrode. Subsequently, molecules are self - assembled onto the bottom...various types of self assembled monolayers (SAMs) arranged in vertical configuration (Fig 2) . Each floor consists of different type of molecular layer...modified ferrocene film (Figure 2 compound 1) , and a the protein Azurin (Az). The Fc-based SAM can be used as a candidate for the bottom layer as we have

  15. Organic-based molecular switches for molecular electronics.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Noelia; Martín-Lasanta, Ana; Alvarez de Cienfuegos, Luis; Ribagorda, Maria; Parra, Andres; Cuerva, Juan M

    2011-10-05

    In a general sense, molecular electronics (ME) is the branch of nanotechnology which studies the application of molecular building blocks for the fabrication of electronic components. Among the different types of molecules, organic compounds have been revealed as promising candidates for ME, due to the easy access, great structural diversity and suitable electronic and mechanical properties. Thanks to these useful capabilities, organic molecules have been used to emulate electronic devices at the nanoscopic scale. In this feature article, we present the diverse strategies used to develop organic switches towards ME with special attention to non-volatile systems.

  16. Multicolor Electrochromic Devices Based on Molecular Plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Stec, Grant J; Lauchner, Adam; Cui, Yao; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J

    2017-03-28

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules, the hydrogen-terminated, sub-nanometer-scale version of graphene, support plasmon resonances with the addition or removal of a single electron. Typically colorless when neutral, they are transformed into vivid optical absorbers in either their positively or negatively charged states. Here, we demonstrate a low-voltage, multistate electrochromic device based on PAH plasmon resonances that can be reversibly switched between nearly colorless (0 V), olive (+4 V), and royal blue (-3.5 V). The device exhibits highly efficient color change compared to electrochromic polymers and metal oxides, lower power consumption than liquid crystals, and is shown to reversibly switch for at least 100 cycles. We also demonstrate the additive property of molecular plasmon resonances in a single-layer device to display a reversible, transmissive-to-black device. This work illuminates the potential of PAH molecular plasmonics for the development of color displays and large-area color-changing applications due to their processability and ultralow power consumption.

  17. Clinical features and molecular bases of neuroacanthocytosis.

    PubMed

    Rampoldi, Luca; Danek, Adrian; Monaco, Anthony P

    2002-08-01

    The term acanthocytosis is derived from the Greek for "thorn" and is used to describe a peculiar spiky appearance of erythrocytes. Acanthocytosis is found to be associated with at least three hereditary neurological disorders that are generally referred to as neuroacanthocytosis. Abetalipoproteinaemia is an autosomal recessive condition, characterised by absence of serum apolipoprotein B containing lipoproteins leading to fat intolerance and fat-soluble vitamin deficiency. This results in a progressive spinocerebellar ataxia with peripheral neuropathy and retinitis pigmentosa. Chorea-acanthocytosis is also an autosomal recessive condition and is characterised by chorea, orofaciolingual dyskinesia, dysphagia, dysarthria, areflexia, seizures and dementia. Some of its features, including choreic movements, peripheral neuropathy with areflexia, elevated serum creatine kinase levels and myopathy are shared by another form of neuroacanthocytosis, McLeod syndrome. Patients affected by this X-linked disorder also show abnormal expression of Kell blood group antigens and a permanent haemolytic state. In addition to these cases, acanthocytosis is occasionally associated with other neurological disorders, such as Hallervorden-Spatz disease. For each of the neuroacanthocytosis syndromes we review the main clinical features and their molecular bases. The recent molecular genetics findings are the first step towards the understanding of the pathogenetic mechanisms and eventually the search for effective treatments.

  18. Protein-based tumor molecular imaging probes

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xin; Xie, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Molecular imaging is an emerging discipline which plays critical roles in diagnosis and therapeutics. It visualizes and quantifies markers that are aberrantly expressed during the disease origin and development. Protein molecules remain to be one major class of imaging probes, and the option has been widely diversified due to the recent advances in protein engineering techniques. Antibodies are part of the immunosystem which interact with target antigens with high specificity and affinity. They have long been investigated as imaging probes and were coupled with imaging motifs such as radioisotopes for that purpose. However, the relatively large size of antibodies leads to a half-life that is too long for common imaging purposes. Besides, it may also cause a poor tissue penetration rate and thus compromise some medical applications. It is under this context that various engineered protein probes, essentially antibody fragments, protein scaffolds, and natural ligands have been developed. Compared to intact antibodies, they possess more compact size, shorter clearance time, and better tumor penetration. One major challenge of using protein probes in molecular imaging is the affected biological activity resulted from random labeling. Site-specific modification, however, allows conjugation happening in a stoichiometric fashion with little perturbation of protein activity. The present review will discuss protein-based probes with focus on their application and related site-specific conjugation strategies in tumor imaging. PMID:20232092

  19. An InDel-based linkage map of hot pepper (Capsicum annuum).

    PubMed

    Li, Weipeng; Cheng, Jiaowen; Wu, Zhiming; Qin, Cheng; Tan, Shu; Tang, Xin; Cui, Junjie; Zhang, Li; Hu, Kailin

    Two independent pepper (Capsicum annuum) genomes were published recently, opening a new era of molecular genetics research on pepper. However, pepper molecular marker technologies are still mainly focusing on the simple sequence repeats derived from public database or genomic library. The development and application of the third generation marker system such as single nucleotide polymorphisms, structure variations as well as insertion/deletion polymorphisms (InDels) is still in its infancy. In the present study, we developed InDel markers for pepper genetic mapping with the convenience of two whole-genome re-sequenced inbred lines BA3 (C. annuum) and B702 (C. annuum). A total of 154,519 and 149,755 InDel (1-5 bp) sites were identified for BA3 and B702, respectively, by the alignment of re-sequencing reads to Zunla-1 reference genome. Then, 14,498 InDel sites (only 4 and 5 bp) that are different between BA3 and B702 were predicted. Finally, within a random set of 1,000 primer pairs, 251 InDel markers were validated and mapped onto a linkage map using F2 population derived from the intraspecific cross BA3 × B702. The first InDel-based map, named as BB-InDel map, consisted of 12 linkage groups, covered a genetic distance of 1,178.01 cM and the average distance between bin markers was 5.01 cM. Compared to the Zunla-1 reference physical map, high consistency was observed on all 12 chromosomes, and the total length of scaffold anchored and physical distance covered by this map was 299.66 and 2,558.68 Mb, respectively, which accounted for 8.95 and 76.38 % of the Zunla-1 reference genome (3.35 Gb), respectively. Furthermore, 37 scaffolds (total length of 36.21 Mb) from the pseudo-chromosome (P0) of the current genome assembly were newly assigned to the corresponding chromosomes by 40 InDel markers. Thus, this map provided good genome coverage and would be useful for basic and applied research in pepper.

  20. PET-based molecular imaging in neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, A H; Li, H; Winkeler, A; Hilker, R; Knoess, C; Rüger, A; Galldiks, N; Schaller, B; Sobesky, J; Kracht, L; Monfared, P; Klein, M; Vollmar, S; Bauer, B; Wagner, R; Graf, R; Wienhard, K; Herholz, K; Heiss, W D

    2003-07-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) allows non-invasive assessment of physiological, metabolic and molecular processes in humans and animals in vivo. Advances in detector technology have led to a considerable improvement in the spatial resolution of PET (1-2 mm), enabling for the first time investigations in small experimental animals such as mice. With the developments in radiochemistry and tracer technology, a variety of endogenously expressed and exogenously introduced genes can be analysed by PET. This opens up the exciting and rapidly evolving field of molecular imaging, aiming at the non-invasive localisation of a biological process of interest in normal and diseased cells in animal models and humans in vivo. The main and most intriguing advantage of molecular imaging is the kinetic analysis of a given molecular event in the same experimental subject over time. This will allow non-invasive characterisation and "phenotyping" of animal models of human disease at various disease stages, under certain pathophysiological stimuli and after therapeutic intervention. The potential broad applications of imaging molecular events in vivo lie in the study of cell biology, biochemistry, gene/protein function and regulation, signal transduction, transcriptional regulation and characterisation of transgenic animals. Most importantly, molecular imaging will have great implications for the identification of potential molecular therapeutic targets, in the development of new treatment strategies, and in their successful implementation into clinical application. Here, the potential impact of molecular imaging by PET in applications in neuroscience research with a special focus on neurodegeneration and neuro-oncology is reviewed.

  1. Molecular Survey of Hepatitis C Virus in the Touristic City of Mar Del Plata, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Culasso, Andrés C. A.; Elizalde, Mercedes; Campos, Rodolfo H.; Barbini, Luciana

    2012-01-01

    The global epidemiology of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) may be roughly described by two groups of genotypes: the worldwide distributed ones (subtypes 1a, 1b, 2a and 3a, among others) and the endemic ones (subtypes 4a, 5a, 6a, among others). Epidemiological and population dynamic studies of the worldwide distributed genotypes have shown that subtypes 1a and 3a are common among intravenous drug users (IDUs) and that they are also in expansion in some countries. The molecular survey of HCV provides some clues about the epidemiological status of the infections in a local scale and the phylogenetic and demographic reconstruction analyses complement this study by inferring whether the infections of certain subtypes are in a steady state or expanding. Here, a molecular survey of the HCV variants that circulate in the touristic city of Mar del Plata (Buenos Aires, Argentina) was performed in samples obtained from 42 patients. The subtypes detected were 1a (32 patients), 3a (8 patients) and 1b (2 patients). The demographic history of subtype 1a inferred using the sequence data showed an exponential growth in the 1990′s. The period of viral expansion was delayed compared with that observed for the same genotype in other countries where the transmission was associated with IDUs. Also, the phylogeographic analysis of HCV-1a showed a statistically significant association between the location of the samples and the phylogeny, which may be the result of the local transmission of HCV in the city. The molecular analysis helped in the description of the complex epidemiological context of a touristic city, and pointed out that some sanitary measures should be taken in order to reduce the transmission of HCV (and maybe of HIV) among IDUs. PMID:23028605

  2. Molecular Orbital Based Design Guidelines for Hypergolic Energetic Ionic Liquids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    Journal Article 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) October 2013- December 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Molecular Orbital Based Design Guidelines for Hypergolic... orbitals (HOMO) of the anions for a series of ionic liquids and the lowest occupied molecular orbital (LUMO) of HNO3, and variation in the computed...code) 661-525-5657 Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. 239.18 DOI: 10.1002/prep.201400087 Molecular Orbital Based Design

  3. Molecular epidemiology and genetic diversity of hepatitis B virus in Mar del Plata city, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Barbini, Luciana; Elizalde, Mercedes; Torres, Carolina; Campos, Rodolfo

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this work was to describe the current molecular epidemiology and genetic diversity of HBV in Mar del Plata, an important Argentinean touristic city. The phylogenetic analysis of 29 HBV DNA positive serum samples showed that F1b was the predominant subgenotype (sgt, 62.1%), followed by sgt A2 (13.8%) and sgt F4, gt D and gt G (6.9% each). Among anti-HBc IgM positive samples, 75.0% were sgt F1b, followed by sgt F4 (12.5%), sgt A2 (6.25%) and sgt D (6.25%). Three recombinant full length genomes were found: two G/F1b (some of the first gt G detected in Argentina) and one F4/D2. The circulation of clinical important mutations in the city was described. Mutations at the HBsAg were detected in 34.5% of the analyzed samples, associated with laboratory diagnosis and antiviral treatment failures, immune escape and hepatocellular carcinoma. Most of the samples presented wild type BCP/PC sequences. Coalescence analysis for the most prevalent sgt F1b estimated that the diversification mainly occured during mid '90s and the tMRCA was estimated in 1987. Finally, the high presence of the autochthonous sgt F1b, associated with the anti-HBc IgM positive infection and its present-day diversification process, shows the strong impact of internal human migratory movements into the current population of Mar del Plata.

  4. Optical materials based on molecular nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Patra, A; Chandaluri, Ch G; Radhakrishnan, T P

    2012-01-21

    A major part of contemporary nanomaterials research is focused on metal and semiconductor nanoparticles, constituted of extended lattices of atoms or ions. Molecular nanoparticles assembled from small molecules through non-covalent interactions are relatively less explored but equally fascinating materials. Their unique and versatile characteristics have attracted considerable attention in recent years, establishing their identity and status as a novel class of nanomaterials. Optical characteristics of molecular nanoparticles capture the essence of their nanoscale features and form the basis of a variety of applications. This review describes the advances made in the field of fabrication of molecular nanoparticles, the wide spectrum of their optical and nonlinear optical characteristics and explorations of the potential applications that exploit their unique optical attributes.

  5. Logic circuits based on molecular spider systems.

    PubMed

    Mo, Dandan; Lakin, Matthew R; Stefanovic, Darko

    2016-08-01

    Spatial locality brings the advantages of computation speed-up and sequence reuse to molecular computing. In particular, molecular walkers that undergo localized reactions are of interest for implementing logic computations at the nanoscale. We use molecular spider walkers to implement logic circuits. We develop an extended multi-spider model with a dynamic environment wherein signal transmission is triggered via localized reactions, and use this model to implement three basic gates (AND, OR, NOT) and a cascading mechanism. We develop an algorithm to automatically generate the layout of the circuit. We use a kinetic Monte Carlo algorithm to simulate circuit computations, and we analyze circuit complexity: our design scales linearly with formula size and has a logarithmic time complexity.

  6. Unidirectional light-driven molecular motors based on overcrowded alkenes.

    PubMed

    Cnossen, Arjen; Browne, Wesley R; Feringa, Ben L

    2014-01-01

    Over the last two decades, interest in nanotechnology has led to the design and synthesis of a toolbox of nanoscale versions of macroscopic devices and components. In molecular nanotechnology, linear motors based on rotaxanes and rotary motors based on overcrowded alkenes are particularly promising for performing work at the nanoscale. In this chapter, progress on light-driven molecular motors based on overcrowded alkenes is reviewed. Both the so-called first and second generation molecular motors are discussed, as well as their potential applications.

  7. Quantitative molecular thermochemistry based on path integrals.

    PubMed

    Glaesemann, Kurt R; Fried, Laurence E

    2005-07-15

    The calculation of thermochemical data requires accurate molecular energies and heat capacities. Traditional methods rely upon the standard harmonic normal-mode analysis to calculate the vibrational and rotational contributions. We utilize path-integral Monte Carlo for going beyond the harmonic analysis and to calculate the vibrational and rotational contributions to ab initio energies. This is an application and an extension of a method previously developed in our group [J. Chem. Phys. 118, 1596 (2003)].

  8. Molecular and Clinical Based Cardiovascular Care Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    pathogenesis of coronary artery, peripheral vascular , and cerebrovascular disease . Impairment of endothelial function has been demonstrated after high...cardio’Va~ ct•b.r disease , Subsequently, ultrnlow-fat diets (:;;1.0% of totlll caloric intake as fat), emphasi?.in,g the amount ra.thcr th<•.o the...cardiovascular disease at the molecular disease stage and identify biomarkers predictive of sub- clinical CVD; and 3) Relate genomic/proteomic changes to the

  9. Molecular Bases of Cutaneous and Uveal Melanomas

    PubMed Central

    Gaudi, Sudeep; Messina, Jane L.

    2011-01-01

    Intensive research in recent years has begun to unlock the mysteries surrounding the molecular pathogenesis of melanoma, the deadliest of skin cancers. The high-penetrance, low-frequency susceptibility gene CDKN2A produces tumor suppressor proteins that function in concert with p53 and retinoblastoma protein to thwart melanomagenesis. Aberrant CDKN2A gene products have been implicated in a great many cases of familial cutaneous melanoma. Sporadic cases, on the other hand, often involve constitutive signal transduction along the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, with particular focus falling upon mutated RAS and RAF protooncogenes. The proliferative effects of the MAPK pathway may be complemented by the antiapoptotic signals of the PI3K/AKT pathway. After skin, melanoma most commonly affects the eye. Data for the constitutive activation of the MAPK pathway in uveal melanoma exists as well, however, not through mutations of RAS and RAF. Rather, evidence implicates the proto-oncogene GNAQ. In the following discussion, we review the major molecular pathways implicated in both familial and sporadic cutaneous melanomagenesis, the former accounting for approximately 10% of cases. Additionally, we discuss the molecular pathways for which preliminary evidence suggests a role in uveal melanomagenesis. PMID:21876842

  10. Antibody-controlled actuation of DNA-based molecular circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelen, Wouter; Meijer, Lenny H. H.; Somers, Bram; de Greef, Tom F. A.; Merkx, Maarten

    2017-02-01

    DNA-based molecular circuits allow autonomous signal processing, but their actuation has relied mostly on RNA/DNA-based inputs, limiting their application in synthetic biology, biomedicine and molecular diagnostics. Here we introduce a generic method to translate the presence of an antibody into a unique DNA strand, enabling the use of antibodies as specific inputs for DNA-based molecular computing. Our approach, antibody-templated strand exchange (ATSE), uses the characteristic bivalent architecture of antibodies to promote DNA-strand exchange reactions both thermodynamically and kinetically. Detailed characterization of the ATSE reaction allowed the establishment of a comprehensive model that describes the kinetics and thermodynamics of ATSE as a function of toehold length, antibody-epitope affinity and concentration. ATSE enables the introduction of complex signal processing in antibody-based diagnostics, as demonstrated here by constructing molecular circuits for multiplex antibody detection, integration of multiple antibody inputs using logic gates and actuation of enzymes and DNAzymes for signal amplification.

  11. Molecular bases of methamphetamine-induced neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Cadet, Jean Lud; Krasnova, Irina N

    2009-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a highly addictive psychostimulant drug, whose abuse has reached epidemic proportions worldwide. The addiction to METH is a major public concern because its chronic abuse is associated with serious health complications including deficits in attention, memory, and executive functions in humans. These neuropsychiatric complications might, in part, be related to drug-induced neurotoxic effects, which include damage to dopaminergic and serotonergic terminals, neuronal apoptosis, as well as activated astroglial and microglial cells in the brain. Thus, the purpose of the present paper is to review cellular and molecular mechanisms that might be responsible for METH neurotoxicity. These include oxidative stress, activation of transcription factors, DNA damage, excitotoxicity, blood-brain barrier breakdown, microglial activation, and various apoptotic pathways. Several approaches that allow protection against METH-induced neurotoxic effects are also discussed. Better understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in METH toxicity should help to generate modern therapeutic approaches to prevent or attenuate the long-term consequences of psychostimulant use disorders in humans.

  12. Controlling charge current through a DNA based molecular transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behnia, S.; Fathizadeh, S.; Ziaei, J.

    2017-01-01

    Molecular electronics is complementary to silicon-based electronics and may induce electronic functions which are difficult to obtain with conventional technology. We have considered a DNA based molecular transistor and study its transport properties. The appropriate DNA sequence as a central chain in molecular transistor and the functional interval for applied voltages is obtained. I-V characteristic diagram shows the rectifier behavior as well as the negative differential resistance phenomenon of DNA transistor. We have observed the nearly periodic behavior in the current flowing through DNA. It is reported that there is a critical gate voltage for each applied bias which above it, the electrical current is always positive.

  13. The molecular bases of the suicidal brain

    PubMed Central

    Turecki, Gustavo

    2017-01-01

    Suicide ranks among the leading causes of death around the world, and takes a heavy emotional and public health toll on most societies. Both distal and proximal factors contribute to suicidal behaviour. Distal factors — such as familial and genetic predisposition, as well as early-life adversity — increase the lifetime risk of suicide. They alter responses to stress and other processes through epigenetic modification of genes and associated changes in gene expression, and through the regulation of emotional and behavioural traits. Proximal factors associate with the precipitation of a suicidal event and include alterations in key neurotransmitter systems, inflammatory changes and glial dysfunction in the brain. This Review explores the key molecular changes associated with suicidality, and presents some promising avenues for future research. PMID:25354482

  14. Ab initio Path Integral Molecular Dynamics Based on Fragment Molecular Orbital Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Takatoshi; Watanabe, Hirofumi; Tanaka, Shigenori

    2009-10-01

    We have developed an ab initio path integral molecular dynamics method based on the fragment molecular orbital method. This “FMO-PIMD” method can treat both nuclei and electrons quantum mechanically, and is useful to simulate large hydrogen-bonded systems with high accuracy. After a benchmark calculation for water monomer, water trimer and glycine pentamer have been studied using the FMO-PIMD method to investigate nuclear quantum effects on structure and molecular interactions. The applicability of the present approach is demonstrated through a number of test calculations.

  15. Inquiry-Based Learning of Molecular Phylogenetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campo, Daniel; Garcia-Vazquez, Eva

    2008-01-01

    Reconstructing phylogenies from nucleotide sequences is a challenge for students because it strongly depends on evolutionary models and computer tools that are frequently updated. We present here an inquiry-based course aimed at learning how to trace a phylogeny based on sequences existing in public databases. Computer tools are freely available…

  16. Optimal separable bases and molecular collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, Lionel W.

    1997-12-01

    A new methodology is proposed for the efficient determination of Green`s functions and eigenstates for quantum systems of two or more dimensions. For a given Hamiltonian, the best possible separable approximation is obtained from the set of all Hilbert space operators. It is shown that this determination itself, as well as the solution of the resultant approximation, are problems of reduced dimensionality for most systems of physical interest. Moreover, the approximate eigenstates constitute the optimal separable basis, in the sense of self-consistent field theory. These distorted waves give rise to a Born series with optimized convergence properties. Analytical results are presented for an application of the method to the two-dimensional shifted harmonic oscillator system. The primary interest however, is quantum reactive scattering in molecular systems. For numerical calculations, the use of distorted waves corresponds to numerical preconditioning. The new methodology therefore gives rise to an optimized preconditioning scheme for the efficient calculation of reactive and inelastic scattering amplitudes, especially at intermediate energies. This scheme is particularly suited to discrete variable representations (DVR`s) and iterative sparse matrix methods commonly employed in such calculations. State to state and cumulative reactive scattering results obtained via the optimized preconditioner are presented for the two-dimensional collinear H + H2 → H2 + H system. Computational time and memory requirements for this system are drastically reduced in comparison with other methods, and results are obtained for previously prohibitive energy regimes.

  17. Electronic transport properties of a quinone-based molecular switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Ya-Peng; Bian, Bao-An; Yuan, Pei-Pei

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we carried out first-principles calculations based on density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's function to investigate the electronic transport properties of a quinone-based molecule sandwiched between two Au electrodes. The molecular switch can be reversibly switched between the reduced hydroquinone (HQ) and oxidized quinone (Q) states via redox reactions. The switching behavior of two forms is analyzed through their I- V curves, transmission spectra and molecular projected self-consistent Hamiltonian at zero bias. Then we discuss the transmission spectra of the HQ and Q forms at different bias, and explain the oscillation of current according to the transmission eigenstates of LUMO energy level for Q form. The results suggest that this kind of a quinone-based molecule is usable as one of the good candidates for redox-controlled molecular switches.

  18. Plasmonic-Based Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy: Application to Molecular Binding

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jin; Wang, Wei; Wang, Shaopeng; Shan, Xiaonan; Li, Jinghong; Tao, Nongjian

    2012-01-01

    Plasmonic-based electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (P-EIS) is developed to investigate molecular binding on surfaces. Its basic principle relies on the sensitive dependence of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) signal on surface charge density, which is modulated by applying an AC potential to a SPR chip surface. The AC component of the SPR response gives the electrochemical impedance, and the DC component provides the conventional SPR detection. The plasmonic-based impedance measured over a range of frequency is in quantitative agreement with the conventional electrochemical impedance. Compared to the conventional SPR detection, P-EIS is sensitive to molecular binding taking place on the chip surface, and less sensitive to bulk refractive index changes or non-specific binding. Moreover, this new approach allows for simultaneous SPR and surface impedance analysis of molecular binding processes. PMID:22122514

  19. Efficient Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Multiple Radical Center Systems Based on the Fragment Molecular Orbital Method

    SciTech Connect

    Nakata, Hiroya; Schmidt, Michael W; Fedorov, Dmitri G; Kitaura, Kazuo; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Gordon, Mark S

    2014-10-16

    The fully analytic energy gradient has been developed and implemented for the restricted open-shell Hartree–Fock (ROHF) method based on the fragment molecular orbital (FMO) theory for systems that have multiple open-shell molecules. The accuracy of the analytic ROHF energy gradient is compared with the corresponding numerical gradient, illustrating the accuracy of the analytic gradient. The ROHF analytic gradient is used to perform molecular dynamics simulations of an unusual open-shell system, liquid oxygen, and mixtures of oxygen and nitrogen. These molecular dynamics simulations provide some insight about how triplet oxygen molecules interact with each other. Timings reveal that the method can calculate the energy gradient for a system containing 4000 atoms in only 6 h. Therefore, it is concluded that the FMO-ROHF method will be useful for investigating systems with multiple open shells.

  20. Efficient molecular dynamics simulations of multiple radical center systems based on the fragment molecular orbital method.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Hiroya; Schmidt, Michael W; Fedorov, Dmitri G; Kitaura, Kazuo; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Gordon, Mark S

    2014-10-16

    The fully analytic energy gradient has been developed and implemented for the restricted open-shell Hartree-Fock (ROHF) method based on the fragment molecular orbital (FMO) theory for systems that have multiple open-shell molecules. The accuracy of the analytic ROHF energy gradient is compared with the corresponding numerical gradient, illustrating the accuracy of the analytic gradient. The ROHF analytic gradient is used to perform molecular dynamics simulations of an unusual open-shell system, liquid oxygen, and mixtures of oxygen and nitrogen. These molecular dynamics simulations provide some insight about how triplet oxygen molecules interact with each other. Timings reveal that the method can calculate the energy gradient for a system containing 4000 atoms in only 6 h. Therefore, it is concluded that the FMO-ROHF method will be useful for investigating systems with multiple open shells.

  1. High molecular weight polyglycerol-based multivalent mannose conjugates.

    PubMed

    Kizhakkedathu, Jayachandran N; Creagh, A Louise; Shenoi, Rajesh A; Rossi, Nicholas A A; Brooks, Donald E; Chan, Timmy; Lam, Jonathan; Dandepally, Srinivasa R; Haynes, Charles A

    2010-10-11

    We report the synthesis and characterization of multivalent mannose conjugates based on high molecular weight hyperbranched polyglycerols (HPG). A range of glycoconjugates were synthesized from high molecular weight HPGs (up to 493 kDa) and varying mannose units (22-303 per HPG). Hemagglutination assays using fresh human red blood cells and concanavalin A (Con A) showed that HPG-mannose conjugates exhibited a large enhancement in the relative potency of conjugates (as high as 40000) along with a significant increment in relative activity per sugar (up to 255). The size of the HPG scaffold and the number of mannose residues per HPG were all shown to influence the enhancement of binding interactions with Con A. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) experiments confirmed the enhanced binding affinity and showed that both molecular size and ligand density play important roles. The enhancement in Con A binding to the high molecular weight HPG-mannose conjugates is due to a combination of inter- and intramolecular mannose binding. A few fold increments in the binding constant were obtained over mannose upon covalent attachment to HPG. The binding enhancement is due to the highly favorable entropic contribution to the multiple interactions of Con A to mannose residues on HPG. The high molecular weight HPG-mannose conjugates showed positive cooperativity in binding to Con A. Although carbohydrate density has less of an effect on functional valency of the conjugate compared to the molecular size, it determines the binding affinity.

  2. Computer-Based Semantic Network in Molecular Biology: A Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callman, Joshua L.; And Others

    This paper analyzes the hardware and software features that would be desirable in a computer-based semantic network system for representing biology knowledge. It then describes in detail a prototype network of molecular biology knowledge that has been developed using Filevision software and a Macintosh computer. The prototype contains about 100…

  3. Antibody-controlled actuation of DNA-based molecular circuits

    PubMed Central

    Engelen, Wouter; Meijer, Lenny H. H.; Somers, Bram; de Greef, Tom F. A.; Merkx, Maarten

    2017-01-01

    DNA-based molecular circuits allow autonomous signal processing, but their actuation has relied mostly on RNA/DNA-based inputs, limiting their application in synthetic biology, biomedicine and molecular diagnostics. Here we introduce a generic method to translate the presence of an antibody into a unique DNA strand, enabling the use of antibodies as specific inputs for DNA-based molecular computing. Our approach, antibody-templated strand exchange (ATSE), uses the characteristic bivalent architecture of antibodies to promote DNA-strand exchange reactions both thermodynamically and kinetically. Detailed characterization of the ATSE reaction allowed the establishment of a comprehensive model that describes the kinetics and thermodynamics of ATSE as a function of toehold length, antibody–epitope affinity and concentration. ATSE enables the introduction of complex signal processing in antibody-based diagnostics, as demonstrated here by constructing molecular circuits for multiplex antibody detection, integration of multiple antibody inputs using logic gates and actuation of enzymes and DNAzymes for signal amplification. PMID:28211541

  4. Molecular Recognition: Detection of Colorless Compounds Based on Color Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khalafi, Lida; Kashani, Samira; Karimi, Javad

    2016-01-01

    A laboratory experiment is described in which students measure the amount of cetirizine in allergy-treatment tablets based on molecular recognition. The basis of recognition is competition of cetirizine with phenolphthalein to form an inclusion complex with ß-cyclodextrin. Phenolphthalein is pinkish under basic condition, whereas it's complex form…

  5. A molecular diffusion based utility model for Drosophila larval phototaxis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Generally, utility based decision making models focus on experimental outcomes. In this paper we propose a utility model based on molecular diffusion to simulate the choice behavior of Drosophila larvae exposed to different light conditions. Methods In this paper, light/dark choice-based Drosophila larval phototaxis is analyzed with our molecular diffusion based model. An ISCEM algorithm is developed to estimate the model parameters. Results By applying this behavioral utility model to light intensity and phototaxis data, we show that this model fits the experimental data very well. Conclusions Our model provides new insights into decision making mechanisms in general. From an engineering viewpoint, we propose that the model could be applied to a wider range of decision making practices. PMID:22300450

  6. Intelligent DNA-based molecular diagnostics using linked genetic markers

    SciTech Connect

    Pathak, D.K.; Perlin, M.W.; Hoffman, E.P.

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes a knowledge-based system for molecular diagnostics, and its application to fully automated diagnosis of X-linked genetic disorders. Molecular diagnostic information is used in clinical practice for determining genetic risks, such as carrier determination and prenatal diagnosis. Initially, blood samples are obtained from related individuals, and PCR amplification is performed. Linkage-based molecular diagnosis then entails three data analysis steps. First, for every individual, the alleles (i.e., DNA composition) are determined at specified chromosomal locations. Second, the flow of genetic material among the individuals is established. Third, the probability that a given individual is either a carrier of the disease or affected by the disease is determined. The current practice is to perform each of these three steps manually, which is costly, time consuming, labor-intensive, and error-prone. As such, the knowledge-intensive data analysis and interpretation supersede the actual experimentation effort as the major bottleneck in molecular diagnostics. By examining the human problem solving for the task, we have designed and implemented a prototype knowledge-based system capable of fully automating linkage-based molecular diagnostics in X-linked genetic disorders, including Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). Our system uses knowledge-based interpretation of gel electrophoresis images to determine individual DNA marker labels, a constraint satisfaction search for consistent genetic flow among individuals, and a blackboard-style problem solver for risk assessment. We describe the system`s successful diagnosis of DMD carrier and affected individuals from raw clinical data.

  7. [Morphofunctional and molecular bases of pineal gland aging].

    PubMed

    Khavinson, V Kh; Lin'kova, N S

    2012-01-01

    The review analyzed morphology, molecular and functional aspects of pineal gland aging and methods of it correction. The pineal gland is central organ, which regulates activity of neuroimmunoendocrine, antioxidant and other organisms systems. Functional activity of pineal gland is discreased at aging, which is the reason of melatonin level changing. The molecular and morphology research demonstrated, that pineal gland hadn't strongly pronounced atrophy at aging. Long-term experience showed, that peptides extract of pineal gland epithalamin and synthetic tetrapeptide on it base epithalon restored melatonin secretion in pineal gland and had strong regulatory activity at neuroimmunoendocrine and antioxidant organism systems.

  8. A molecular shift register based on electron transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopfield, J. J.; Onuchic, Josenelson; Beratan, David N.

    1988-01-01

    An electronic shift-register memory at the molecular level is described. The memory elements are based on a chain of electron-transfer molecules and the information is shifted by photoinduced electron-transfer reactions. This device integrates designed electronic molecules onto a very large scale integrated (silicon microelectronic) substrate, providing an example of a 'molecular electronic device' that could actually be made. The design requirements for such a device and possible synthetic strategies are discussed. Devices along these lines should have lower energy usage and enhanced storage density.

  9. NEW MOLECULAR MEDICINE-BASED SCAR MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES

    PubMed Central

    Arno, Anna I; Gauglitz, Gerd G; Barret, Juan P; Jeschke, Marc G

    2014-01-01

    Keloids and hypertrophic scars are prevalent disabling conditions with still suboptimal treatments. Basic science and molecular-based medicine research has contributed to unravel new bench-to-bedside scar therapies, and to dissect the complex signaling pathways involved. Peptides such as transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) superfamily, with SMADs, Ski, SnoN, Fussels, endoglin, DS-Sily, Cav-1p, AZX100, thymosin-β4 and other related molecules may emerge as targets to prevent and treat keloids and hypertrophic scars. The aim of this review is to describe the basic complexity of these new molecular scar management strategies, and point out new fibrosis research lines. PMID:24438742

  10. Theory of zwitterionic molecular-based organic magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelton, William A.; Aprà, Edoardo; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Saraiva-Souza, Aldilene; Souza Filho, Antonio G.; Nero, Jordan Del; Meunier, Vincent

    2011-08-01

    We describe a class of organic molecular magnets based on zwitterionic molecules (betaine derivatives) possessing donor, π bridge, and acceptor groups. Using extensive electronic structure calculations we show the electronic ground-state in these systems is magnetic. In addition, we show that the large energy differences computed for the various magnetic states indicate a high Neel temperature. The quantum mechanical nature of the magnetic properties originates from the conjugated π bridge (only p electrons) in cooperation with the molecular donor-acceptor character. The exchange interactions between electron spin are strong, local, and independent on the length of the π bridge.

  11. Optically induced transport through semiconductor-based molecular electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guangqi; Fainberg, Boris D.; Seideman, Tamar

    2015-04-01

    A tight binding model is used to investigate photoinduced tunneling current through a molecular bridge coupled to two semiconductor electrodes. A quantum master equation is developed within a non-Markovian theory based on second-order perturbation theory with respect to the molecule-semiconductor electrode coupling. The spectral functions are generated using a one dimensional alternating bond model, and the coupling between the molecule and the electrodes is expressed through a corresponding correlation function. Since the molecular bridge orbitals are inside the bandgap between the conduction and valence bands, charge carrier tunneling is inhibited in the dark. Subject to the dipole interaction with the laser field, virtual molecular states are generated via the absorption and emission of photons, and new tunneling channels open. Interesting phenomena arising from memory are noted. Such a phenomenon could serve as a switch.

  12. Optically induced transport through semiconductor-based molecular electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Guangqi; Seideman, Tamar; Fainberg, Boris D.

    2015-04-21

    A tight binding model is used to investigate photoinduced tunneling current through a molecular bridge coupled to two semiconductor electrodes. A quantum master equation is developed within a non-Markovian theory based on second-order perturbation theory with respect to the molecule-semiconductor electrode coupling. The spectral functions are generated using a one dimensional alternating bond model, and the coupling between the molecule and the electrodes is expressed through a corresponding correlation function. Since the molecular bridge orbitals are inside the bandgap between the conduction and valence bands, charge carrier tunneling is inhibited in the dark. Subject to the dipole interaction with the laser field, virtual molecular states are generated via the absorption and emission of photons, and new tunneling channels open. Interesting phenomena arising from memory are noted. Such a phenomenon could serve as a switch.

  13. Nanocoax-based molecular imprint polymer for electrochemical biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizal, Binod; Archibald, Michelle; Simko, Laura; Connolly, Timothy; Shepard, Stephen; Burns, Michael; Chiles, Thomas; Naughton, Michael

    2013-03-01

    We have used molecular imprint polymerization (MIP) on planar, nanopillar, and nanocoax structures to fabricate label-free, all-electronic electrochemical biosensors with high selectivity and sensitivity. MIP-based films of ~ 7 nm thickness are formed on gold-coated surfaces by electropolymerization of a solution containing phenol and a target protein (streptavidin, at 100 μg/ml, or 1 nanomole concentration) and subsequent removal of exposed target protein, leaving behind its molecular imprint. With its molecular memory, MIP subsequently specifically recognizes and binds target protein with attomolar sensitivity, detected via differential pulse voltammetry. We will discuss and compare the results of MIP for different proteins on planar, nanopillar, and nanocoax structures, along with their respective ultimate sensitivities. Supported by the NIH grants NCI CA137681 and NIAID AI100216.

  14. Virtual Screening and Molecular Design Based on Hierarchical Qsar Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuz'min, Victor E.; Artemenko, A. G.; Muratov, Eugene N.; Polischuk, P. G.; Ognichenko, L. N.; Liahovsky, A. V.; Hromov, A. I.; Varlamova, E. V.

    This chapter is devoted to the hierarchical QSAR technology (HiT QSAR) based on simplex representation of molecular structure (SiRMS) and its application to different QSAR/QSPR tasks. The essence of this technology is a sequential solution (with the use of the information obtained on the previous steps) of the QSAR paradigm by a series of enhanced models based on molecular structure description (in a specific order from 1D to 4D). Actually, it's a system of permanently improved solutions. Different approaches for domain applicability estimation are implemented in HiT QSAR. In the SiRMS approach every molecule is represented as a system of different simplexes (tetratomic fragments with fixed composition, structure, chirality, and symmetry). The level of simplex descriptors detailed increases consecutively from the 1D to 4D representation of the molecular structure. The advantages of the approach presented are an ability to solve QSAR/QSPR tasks for mixtures of compounds, the absence of the "molecular alignment" problem, consideration of different physical-chemical properties of atoms (e.g., charge, lipophilicity), and the high adequacy and good interpretability of obtained models and clear ways for molecular design. The efficiency of HiT QSAR was demonstrated by its comparison with the most popular modern QSAR approaches on two representative examination sets. The examples of successful application of the HiT QSAR for various QSAR/QSPR investigations on the different levels (1D-4D) of the molecular structure description are also highlighted. The reliability of developed QSAR models as the predictive virtual screening tools and their ability to serve as the basis of directed drug design was validated by subsequent synthetic, biological, etc. experiments. The HiT QSAR is realized as the suite of computer programs termed the "HiT QSAR" software that so includes powerful statistical capabilities and a number of useful utilities.

  15. Molecular biomimetics: GEPI-based biological routes to technology.

    PubMed

    Tamerler, Candan; Khatayevich, Dmitriy; Gungormus, Mustafa; Kacar, Turgay; Oren, E Emre; Hnilova, Marketa; Sarikaya, Mehmet

    2010-01-01

    In nature, the viability of biological systems is sustained via specific interactions among the tens of thousands of proteins, the major building blocks of organisms from the simplest single-celled to the most complex multicellular species. Biomolecule-material interaction is accomplished with molecular specificity and efficiency leading to the formation of controlled structures and functions at all scales of dimensional hierarchy. Through evolution, Mother Nature developed molecular recognition by successive cycles of mutation and selection. Molecular specificity of probe-target interactions, e.g., ligand-receptor, antigen-antibody, is always based on specific peptide molecular recognition. Using biology as a guide, we can now understand, engineer, and control peptide-material interactions and exploit them as a new design tool for novel materials and systems. We adapted the protocols of combinatorially designed peptide libraries, via both cell surface or phage display methods; using these we select short peptides with specificity to a variety of practical materials. These genetically engineered peptides for inorganics (GEPI) are then studied experimentally to establish their binding kinetics and surface stability. The bound peptide structure and conformations are interrogated both experimentally and via modeling, and self-assembly characteristics are tested via atomic force microscopy. We further engineer the peptide binding and assembly characteristics using a computational biomimetics approach where bioinformatics based peptide-sequence similarity analysis is developed to design higher generation function-specific peptides. The molecular biomimetic approach opens up new avenues for the design and utilization of multifunctional molecular systems in a wide-range of applications from tissue engineering, disease diagnostics, and therapeutics to various areas of nanotechnology where integration is required among inorganic, organic and biological materials. Here, we

  16. [Molecular bases of α-thalassemia in Argentina].

    PubMed

    Scheps, Karen G; Francipane, Liliana; Nash, Abigail; Cerrone, Gloria E; Copelli, Silvia B; Varela, Viviana

    2015-01-01

    The α-thalassemia is one of the most common hereditary disorders worldwide. Currently, molecular diagnostics is the only available tool to achieve an accurate diagnosis. The purpose of this study was to characterize the molecular bases of these syndromes in our environment and to establish genotype-phenotype associations. Through a combination of different molecular techniques and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH),we were able to find α-thalassemic mutations in 145 of the 184 patients (78.8%) studied with hematological parameters compatible with α-thalassemia. Deletions of the α-globin genes resulted the major molecular cause of the disease, and the most frequent mutation was -α(3.7), found in homozygous and heterozygous genotypes. In patients with α° phenotypes, other prevalent mutations were( _MED) and (_CAL/CAMP). The description of a sub-telomeric deletion in a patient with α-thalassemia and mental retardation was also achieved. β-thalassemic mutations in heterozygous state were found in 7.6% of the patients, who presented α-thalassemic clinical features (microcytosis and Hb A₂levels below 3.5%). Hematologic profiles for the α+ and α° genotypes were established for adult and pediatric patients. Hopefully, this work will provide guidelines for the detection of possible α-thalassemic carriers. It also highlights the collaborative work of hematologists, the biochemical and molecular biology laboratory and genetists, in order to provide appropriate genetic counseling.

  17. Molecular crowding-based imprinted monolithic column for capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Zong, Hai-Yan; Liu, Xiao; Liu, Zhao-Sheng; Huang, Yan-Ping

    2015-03-01

    Molecular crowding is a new approach to stabilizing binding sites and improving molecular recognition. In this work, the concept was applied to the preparation of imprinted monolithic columns for CEC. The imprinted monolithic column was synthesized using a mixture of d-zopiclone (d-ZOP)(template), methacrylic acid, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate, and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) (molecular crowding agent). The resulting PMMA-based imprinted capillary was able to separate ZOP enantiomers in CEC mode. The resolution of enantiomer separation achieved on the d-ZOP-imprinted monolithic column was up to 2.09. Some polymerization factors, such as template-monomer molar ratio, functional monomer-cross-linker molar ratio and the composition of the porogen, on the imprinting effect of resulting molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) monolithic column were systematically investigated. Chromatographic parameters, including pH values, the content of acetonitrile and the salt concentration on chiral separation were also studied. The results indicated the addition of PMMA resulted in MIPs with superior retention properties and excellent selectivity for d-ZOP, as compared to the MIPs prepared without addition of the crowding-inducing agent. The results revealed that molecular crowding is an effective method for the preparation of a highly efficient MIP stationary phase for chiral separation in CEC.

  18. Bio-Mimetic Sensors Based on Molecularly Imprinted Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Algieri, Catia; Drioli, Enrico; Guzzo, Laura; Donato, Laura

    2014-01-01

    An important challenge for scientific research is the production of artificial systems able to mimic the recognition mechanisms occurring at the molecular level in living systems. A valid contribution in this direction resulted from the development of molecular imprinting. By means of this technology, selective molecular recognition sites are introduced in a polymer, thus conferring it bio-mimetic properties. The potential applications of these systems include affinity separations, medical diagnostics, drug delivery, catalysis, etc. Recently, bio-sensing systems using molecularly imprinted membranes, a special form of imprinted polymers, have received the attention of scientists in various fields. In these systems imprinted membranes are used as bio-mimetic recognition elements which are integrated with a transducer component. The direct and rapid determination of an interaction between the recognition element and the target analyte (template) was an encouraging factor for the development of such systems as alternatives to traditional bio-assay methods. Due to their high stability, sensitivity and specificity, bio-mimetic sensors-based membranes are used for environmental, food, and clinical uses. This review deals with the development of molecularly imprinted polymers and their different preparation methods. Referring to the last decades, the application of these membranes as bio-mimetic sensor devices will be also reported. PMID:25196110

  19. Bio-mimetic sensors based on molecularly imprinted membranes.

    PubMed

    Algieri, Catia; Drioli, Enrico; Guzzo, Laura; Donato, Laura

    2014-07-30

    An important challenge for scientific research is the production of artificial systems able to mimic the recognition mechanisms occurring at the molecular level in living systems. A valid contribution in this direction resulted from the development of molecular imprinting. By means of this technology, selective molecular recognition sites are introduced in a polymer, thus conferring it bio-mimetic properties. The potential applications of these systems include affinity separations, medical diagnostics, drug delivery, catalysis, etc. Recently, bio-sensing systems using molecularly imprinted membranes, a special form of imprinted polymers, have received the attention of scientists in various fields. In these systems imprinted membranes are used as bio-mimetic recognition elements which are integrated with a transducer component. The direct and rapid determination of an interaction between the recognition element and the target analyte (template) was an encouraging factor for the development of such systems as alternatives to traditional bio-assay methods. Due to their high stability, sensitivity and specificity, bio-mimetic sensors-based membranes are used for environmental, food, and clinical uses. This review deals with the development of molecularly imprinted polymers and their different preparation methods. Referring to the last decades, the application of these membranes as bio-mimetic sensor devices will be also reported.

  20. Arthropod phylogeny based on eight molecular loci and morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giribet, G.; Edgecombe, G. D.; Wheeler, W. C.

    2001-01-01

    The interrelationships of major clades within the Arthropoda remain one of the most contentious issues in systematics, which has traditionally been the domain of morphologists. A growing body of DNA sequences and other types of molecular data has revitalized study of arthropod phylogeny and has inspired new considerations of character evolution. Novel hypotheses such as a crustacean-hexapod affinity were based on analyses of single or few genes and limited taxon sampling, but have received recent support from mitochondrial gene order, and eye and brain ultrastructure and neurogenesis. Here we assess relationships within Arthropoda based on a synthesis of all well sampled molecular loci together with a comprehensive data set of morphological, developmental, ultrastructural and gene-order characters. The molecular data include sequences of three nuclear ribosomal genes, three nuclear protein-coding genes, and two mitochondrial genes (one protein coding, one ribosomal). We devised new optimization procedures and constructed a parallel computer cluster with 256 central processing units to analyse molecular data on a scale not previously possible. The optimal 'total evidence' cladogram supports the crustacean-hexapod clade, recognizes pycnogonids as sister to other euarthropods, and indicates monophyly of Myriapoda and Mandibulata.

  1. Graph-based interpretation of the molecular interstellar medium segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombo, D.; Rosolowsky, E.; Ginsburg, A.; Duarte-Cabral, A.; Hughes, A.

    2015-12-01

    We present a generalization of the giant molecular cloud identification problem based on cluster analysis. The method we designed, SCIMES (Spectral Clustering for Interstellar Molecular Emission Segmentation) considers the dendrogram of emission in the broader framework of graph theory and utilizes spectral clustering to find discrete regions with similar emission properties. For Galactic molecular cloud structures, we show that the characteristic volume and/or integrated CO luminosity are useful criteria to define the clustering, yielding emission structures that closely reproduce `by-eye' identification results. SCIMES performs best on well-resolved, high-resolution data, making it complementary to other available algorithms. Using 12CO(1-0) data for the Orion-Monoceros complex, we demonstrate that SCIMES provides robust results against changes of the dendrogram-construction parameters, noise realizations and degraded resolution. By comparing SCIMES with other cloud decomposition approaches, we show that our method is able to identify all canonical clouds of the Orion-Monoceros region, avoiding the overdivision within high-resolution survey data that represents a common limitation of several decomposition algorithms. The Orion-Monoceros objects exhibit hierarchies and size-line width relationships typical to the turbulent gas in molecular clouds, although `the Scissors' region deviates from this common description. SCIMES represents a significant step forward in moving away from pixel-based cloud segmentation towards a more physical-oriented approach, where virtually all properties of the ISM can be used for the segmentation of discrete objects.

  2. Optimizing legacy molecular dynamics software with directive-based offload

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Brown, W.; Carrillo, Jan-Michael Y.; Gavhane, Nitin; Thakkar, Foram M.; Plimpton, Steven J.

    2015-05-14

    The directive-based programming models are one solution for exploiting many-core coprocessors to increase simulation rates in molecular dynamics. They offer the potential to reduce code complexity with offload models that can selectively target computations to run on the CPU, the coprocessor, or both. In our paper, we describe modifications to the LAMMPS molecular dynamics code to enable concurrent calculations on a CPU and coprocessor. We also demonstrate that standard molecular dynamics algorithms can run efficiently on both the CPU and an x86-based coprocessor using the same subroutines. As a consequence, we demonstrate that code optimizations for the coprocessor also result in speedups on the CPU; in extreme cases up to 4.7X. We provide results for LAMMAS benchmarks and for production molecular dynamics simulations using the Stampede hybrid supercomputer with both Intel (R) Xeon Phi (TM) coprocessors and NVIDIA GPUs: The optimizations presented have increased simulation rates by over 2X for organic molecules and over 7X for liquid crystals on Stampede. The optimizations are available as part of the "Intel package" supplied with LAMMPS. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Optimizing legacy molecular dynamics software with directive-based offload

    DOE PAGES

    Michael Brown, W.; Carrillo, Jan-Michael Y.; Gavhane, Nitin; ...

    2015-05-14

    The directive-based programming models are one solution for exploiting many-core coprocessors to increase simulation rates in molecular dynamics. They offer the potential to reduce code complexity with offload models that can selectively target computations to run on the CPU, the coprocessor, or both. In our paper, we describe modifications to the LAMMPS molecular dynamics code to enable concurrent calculations on a CPU and coprocessor. We also demonstrate that standard molecular dynamics algorithms can run efficiently on both the CPU and an x86-based coprocessor using the same subroutines. As a consequence, we demonstrate that code optimizations for the coprocessor also resultmore » in speedups on the CPU; in extreme cases up to 4.7X. We provide results for LAMMAS benchmarks and for production molecular dynamics simulations using the Stampede hybrid supercomputer with both Intel (R) Xeon Phi (TM) coprocessors and NVIDIA GPUs: The optimizations presented have increased simulation rates by over 2X for organic molecules and over 7X for liquid crystals on Stampede. The optimizations are available as part of the "Intel package" supplied with LAMMPS. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.« less

  4. Standardised PCR-based molecular epidemiology of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Allix-Béguec, C; Supply, P; Wanlin, M; Bifani, P; Fauville-Dufaux, M

    2008-05-01

    A population-based molecular epidemiology investigation has been undertaken to evaluate tuberculosis transmission and control in the Brussels-Capital Region (Belgium). All tuberculosis cases reported from January 2003 to December 2004 were investigated. In total, 536 Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates (89% of culture-positive samples) were genotyped by the newly standardised 24 loci-based mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable number tandem-repeat typing, spoligotyping and IS6110 fingerprinting. Of all the patients, 30% were grouped based on strain clusters, suggesting a transmission index of 20%. An unsuspected outbreak entailing > or = 23 patients was evidenced by molecular typing analysis and confirmed by contact tracing. Foreign-born status accounted for 79% of the studied patients, including 37.9% illegal immigrants and asylum seekers. Among foreign-born patients, asylum seekers and illegal immigrants were significantly less abundant in strain clusters than settled residents. Tuberculosis in the Brussels-Capital Region is a bi-faceted problem, comprising both persisting recent transmission and "imported diseases". Molecular epidemiology based on real-time genotyping techniques has proven invaluable in better understanding tuberculosis transmission. However, it will most efficiently contribute to tuberculosis control when implemented in an integrated public health system.

  5. Context-based preprocessing of molecular docking data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Data preprocessing is a major step in data mining. In data preprocessing, several known techniques can be applied, or new ones developed, to improve data quality such that the mining results become more accurate and intelligible. Bioinformatics is one area with a high demand for generation of comprehensive models from large datasets. In this article, we propose a context-based data preprocessing approach to mine data from molecular docking simulation results. The test cases used a fully-flexible receptor (FFR) model of Mycobacterium tuberculosis InhA enzyme (FFR_InhA) and four different ligands. Results We generated an initial set of attributes as well as their respective instances. To improve this initial set, we applied two selection strategies. The first was based on our context-based approach while the second used the CFS (Correlation-based Feature Selection) machine learning algorithm. Additionally, we produced an extra dataset containing features selected by combining our context strategy and the CFS algorithm. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method, we evaluated its performance based on various predictive (RMSE, MAE, Correlation, and Nodes) and context (Precision, Recall and FScore) measures. Conclusions Statistical analysis of the results shows that the proposed context-based data preprocessing approach significantly improves predictive and context measures and outperforms the CFS algorithm. Context-based data preprocessing improves mining results by producing superior interpretable models, which makes it well-suited for practical applications in molecular docking simulations using FFR models. PMID:24564276

  6. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Perylenediimide DNA Base Surrogates.

    PubMed

    Markegard, Cade B; Mazaheripour, Amir; Jocson, Jonah-Micah; Burke, Anthony M; Dickson, Mary N; Gorodetsky, Alon A; Nguyen, Hung D

    2015-09-03

    Perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic diimides (PTCDIs) are a well-known class of organic materials. Recently, these molecules have been incorporated within DNA as base surrogates, finding ready applications as probes of DNA structure and function. However, the assembly dynamics and kinetics of PTCDI DNA base surrogates have received little attention to date. Herein, we employ constant temperature molecular dynamics simulations to gain an improved understanding of the assembly of PTCDI dimers and trimers. We also use replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations to elucidate the energetic landscape dictating the formation of stacked PTCDI structures. Our studies provide insight into the equilibrium configurations of multimeric PTCDIs and hold implications for the construction of DNA-inspired systems from perylene-derived organic semiconductor building blocks.

  7. Envisioning the molecular choreography of DNA base excision repair.

    PubMed

    Parikh, S S; Mol, C D; Hosfield, D J; Tainer, J A

    1999-02-01

    Recent breakthroughs integrate individual DNA repair enzyme structures, biochemistry and biology to outline the structural cell biology of the DNA base excision repair pathways that are essential to genome integrity. Thus, we are starting to envision how the actions, movements, steps, partners and timing of DNA repair enzymes, which together define their molecular choreography, are elegantly controlled by both the nature of the DNA damage and the structural chemistry of the participating enzymes and the DNA double helix.

  8. Molecularly Imprinted Polymer Based Sensor for the Detection of Theophylline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braga, Guilherme S.; Paterno, Leonardo G.; Fonseca, Fernando J.; del Valle, Manel

    2011-11-01

    A molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) impedance-based sensor was employed to detect theophylline in distilled water. To evaluate its sensibility, impedance measurements were carried out in a diluted solution of theophylline (1 mM) and distilled water using MIP and NIP (reference non-imprinted polymer) sensors. MIP showed higher sensitivity to theophylline than the NIP. This feature shows their suitability for developing an electronic tongue system for determination of methylxanthines.

  9. Phylogeny of Kinorhyncha Based on Morphology and Two Molecular Loci

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Martin V.; Dal Zotto, Matteo; Rho, Hyun Soo; Herranz, Maria; Sánchez, Nuria; Pardos, Fernando; Yamasaki, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    rRNA had been omitted. Analysis of the morphological data produced results that were similar with those from the combined molecular and morphological analysis. E.g., the morphological data also supported exclusion of Dracoderes from Cyclorhagida. The main differences between the morphological analysis and analyses based on the combined datasets include: 1) Homalorhagida appears as monophyletic in the morphological tree only, 2) the morphological analyses position Franciscideres and the new genus within Cyclorhagida near Zelinkaderidae and Cateriidae, whereas analyses including molecular data place the two genera inside Allomalorhagida, and 3) species of Campyloderes appear in a basal trichotomy within Kentrorhagata in the morphological tree, whereas analysis of the combined datasets places species of Campyloderes as a sister clade to Echinoderidae and Kentrorhagata. PMID:26200115

  10. Phylogeny of Kinorhyncha Based on Morphology and Two Molecular Loci.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Martin V; Dal Zotto, Matteo; Rho, Hyun Soo; Herranz, Maria; Sánchez, Nuria; Pardos, Fernando; Yamasaki, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    RNA had been omitted. Analysis of the morphological data produced results that were similar with those from the combined molecular and morphological analysis. E.g., the morphological data also supported exclusion of Dracoderes from Cyclorhagida. The main differences between the morphological analysis and analyses based on the combined datasets include: 1) Homalorhagida appears as monophyletic in the morphological tree only, 2) the morphological analyses position Franciscideres and the new genus within Cyclorhagida near Zelinkaderidae and Cateriidae, whereas analyses including molecular data place the two genera inside Allomalorhagida, and 3) species of Campyloderes appear in a basal trichotomy within Kentrorhagata in the morphological tree, whereas analysis of the combined datasets places species of Campyloderes as a sister clade to Echinoderidae and Kentrorhagata.

  11. Molecular switching behavior in isosteric DNA base pairs.

    PubMed

    Jissy, A K; Konar, Sukanya; Datta, Ayan

    2013-04-15

    The structures and proton-coupled behavior of adenine-thymine (A-T) and a modified base pair containing a thymine isostere, adenine-difluorotoluene (A-F), are studied in different solvents by dispersion-corrected density functional theory. The stability of the canonical Watson-Crick base pair and the mismatched pair in various solvents with low and high dielectric constants is analyzed. It is demonstrated that A-F base pairing is favored in solvents with low dielectric constant. The stabilization and conformational changes induced by protonation are also analyzed for the natural as well as the mismatched base pair. DNA sequences capable of changing their sequence conformation on protonation are used in the construction of pH-based molecular switches. An acidic medium has a profound influence in stabilizing the isostere base pair. Such a large gain in stability on protonation leads to an interesting pH-controlled molecular switch, which can be incorporated in a natural DNA tract.

  12. A Molecular Selection Index Method Based on Eigenanalysis

    PubMed Central

    Cerón-Rojas, J. Jesús; Castillo-González, Fernando; Sahagún-Castellanos, Jaime; Santacruz-Varela, Amalio; Benítez-Riquelme, Ignacio; Crossa, José

    2008-01-01

    The traditional molecular selection index (MSI) employed in marker-assisted selection maximizes the selection response by combining information on molecular markers linked to quantitative trait loci (QTL) and phenotypic values of the traits of the individuals of interest. This study proposes an MSI based on an eigenanalysis method (molecular eigen selection index method, MESIM), where the first eigenvector is used as a selection index criterion, and its elements determine the proportion of the trait's contribution to the selection index. This article develops the theoretical framework of MESIM. Simulation results show that the genotypic means and the expected selection response from MESIM for each trait are equal to or greater than those from the traditional MSI. When several traits are simultaneously selected, MESIM performs well for traits with relatively low heritability. The main advantages of MESIM over the traditional molecular selection index are that its statistical sampling properties are known and that it does not require economic weights and thus can be used in practical applications when all or some of the traits need to be improved simultaneously. PMID:18716338

  13. Design of two and three input molecular logic gates using non-Watson-Crick base pairing-based molecular beacons.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jia-Hui; Tseng, Wei-Lung

    2014-03-21

    This study presents a single, resettable, and sensitive molecular beacon (MB) used to operate molecular-scale logic gates. The MB consists of a random DNA sequence, a fluorophore at the 5'-end, and a quencher at the 3'-end. The presence of Hg(2+), Ag(+), and coralyne promoted the formation of stable T-Hg(2+)-T, C-Ag(+)-C, and A2-coralyne-A2 coordination in the MB probe, respectively, thereby driving its conformational change. The metal ion or small molecule-mediated coordination of mismatched DNA brought the fluorophore and the quencher into close proximity, resulting in collisional quenching of fluorescence between the two organic dyes. Because thiol can bind Hg(2+) and remove it from the T-Hg(2+)-T-based MB, adding thiol to a solution of the T-Hg(2+)-T-based MB allowed the fluorophore and the quencher to be widely separated. A similar phenomenon was observed when replacing Hg(2+) with Ag(+). Because Ag(+) strongly binds to iodide, cyanide, and cysteine, they were capable of removing Ag(+) from the C-Ag(+)-C-based MB, restoring the fluorescence of the MB. Moreover, the fluorescence of the A2-coralyne-A2-based MB could be switched on by adding polyadenosine. Using these analytes as inputs and the MB as a signal transducer, we successfully developed a series of two-input, three-input, and set-reset logic gates at the molecular level.

  14. Kinetic modeling based probabilistic segmentation for molecular images.

    PubMed

    Saad, Ahmed; Hamarneh, Ghassan; Möller, Torsten; Smith, Ben

    2008-01-01

    We propose a semi-supervised, kinetic modeling based segmentation technique for molecular imaging applications. It is an iterative, self-learning algorithm based on uncertainty principles, designed to alleviate low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and partial volume effect (PVE) problems. Synthetic fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and simulated Raclopride dynamic positron emission tomography (dPET) brain images with excessive noise levels are used to validate our algorithm. We show, qualitatively and quantitatively, that our algorithm outperforms state-of-the-art techniques in identifying different functional regions and recovering the kinetic parameters.

  15. Molecular Beacon CNT-based Detection of SNPs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorova, V. P.; Krylova, H. V.; Lipnevich, I. V.; Veligura, A. A.; Shulitsky, B. G.; Y Fedotenkova, L.

    2015-11-01

    An fluorescence quenching effect due to few-walled carbon nanotubes chemically modified by carboxyl groups has been utilized to discriminate Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP). It was shown that the complex obtained from these nanotube and singlestranded primer DNA is formed due to stacking interactions between the hexagons of the nanotubes and aromatic rings of nucleotide bases as well as due to establishing of hydrogen bonds between acceptor amine groups of nucleotide bases and donor carboxyl groups of the nanotubes. It has been demonstrated that these complexes may be used to make highly effective DNA biosensors detecting SNPs which operate as molecular beacons.

  16. Competency-Based Education for the Molecular Genetic Pathology Fellow

    PubMed Central

    Talbert, Michael L.; Dunn, S. Terence; Hunt, Jennifer; Hillyard, David R.; Mirza, Imran; Nowak, Jan A.; Van Deerlin, Vivianna; Vnencak-Jones, Cindy L.

    2009-01-01

    The following report represents guidelines for competency-based fellowship training in Molecular Genetic Pathology (MGP) developed by the Association for Molecular Pathology Training and Education Committee and Directors of MGP Programs in the United States. The goals of the effort were to describe each of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education competencies as they apply to MGP fellowship training, provide a summary of goals and objectives, and recommend assessment tools. These guidelines are particularly pertinent to MGP training, which is a relatively new specialty that operates within a rapidly changing scientific and technological arena. It is hoped that this document will provide additional material for directors of existing MGP programs to consider for improvement of program objectives and enhancement of evaluation tools already in place. In addition, the guidelines should provide a valuable framework for the development of new MGP programs. PMID:19797613

  17. Affinity sensor based on immobilized molecular imprinted synthetic recognition elements.

    PubMed

    Lenain, Pieterjan; De Saeger, Sarah; Mattiasson, Bo; Hedström, Martin

    2015-07-15

    An affinity sensor based on capacitive transduction was developed to detect a model compound, metergoline, in a continuous flow system. This system simulates the monitoring of low-molecular weight organic compounds in natural flowing waters, i.e. rivers and streams. During operation in such scenarios, control of the experimental parameters is not possible, which poses a true analytical challenge. A two-step approach was used to produce a sensor for metergoline. Submicron spherical molecularly imprinted polymers, used as recognition elements, were obtained through emulsion polymerization and subsequently coupled to the sensor surface by electropolymerization. This way, a robust and reusable sensor was obtained that regenerated spontaneously under the natural conditions in a river. Small organic compounds could be analyzed in water without manipulating the binding or regeneration conditions, thereby offering a viable tool for on-site application.

  18. Molecular-based choice of cancer therapy: realities and expectations.

    PubMed

    Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Moiseyenko, Vladimir M

    2007-04-01

    Current choice of cancer therapy is usually empirical and relies mainly on the statistical prediction of the treatment success. Molecular research provides some opportunities to personalize antitumor treatment. For example, life-threatening toxic reactions can be avoided by the identification of subjects, who carry susceptible genotypes of drug-metabolizing genes (e.g. TPMT, UGT1A1, MTHFR, DPYD). Tumor sensitivity can be predicted by molecular portraying of targets and other molecules associated with drug response. Tailoring of antiestrogen and trastuzumab therapy based on hormone and HER2 receptor status has already become a classical example of customized medicine. Other predictive markers have been identified both for cytotoxic and for targeted therapies, and include, for example, expression of TS, TP, DPD, OPRT, ERCC1, MGMT, TOP2A, class III beta-tubulin molecules as well as genomic alterations of EGFR, KIT, ABL oncogenes.

  19. Programmable molecular recognition based on the geometry of DNA nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Sungwook; Rothemund, Paul W. K.

    2011-08-01

    From ligand-receptor binding to DNA hybridization, molecular recognition plays a central role in biology. Over the past several decades, chemists have successfully reproduced the exquisite specificity of biomolecular interactions. However, engineering multiple specific interactions in synthetic systems remains difficult. DNA retains its position as the best medium with which to create orthogonal, isoenergetic interactions, based on the complementarity of Watson-Crick binding. Here we show that DNA can be used to create diverse bonds using an entirely different principle: the geometric arrangement of blunt-end stacking interactions. We show that both binary codes and shape complementarity can serve as a basis for such stacking bonds, and explore their specificity, thermodynamics and binding rules. Orthogonal stacking bonds were used to connect five distinct DNA origami. This work, which demonstrates how a single attractive interaction can be developed to create diverse bonds, may guide strategies for molecular recognition in systems beyond DNA nanostructures.

  20. Del Xq23 in a mosaic Turner female: molecular and cytogenetic studies.

    PubMed

    Mesa-Cornejo, V M; García-Cruz, D; Monroy-Jaramillo, N; Vásquez, A I; Dávalos, N O; Galaviz, C; Kofman, S

    2001-01-01

    We report a Turner patient aged 22 years with a 45,X/46,X,del(X)(q23) karyotype. Late replication studies showed preferential inactivation of the deleted X chromosome; FISH studies with a probe for total human telomeres showed hybridisation signal in the telomeres on both the normal and the deleted X chromosomes. Microsatellite analysis in the proposita and her family permitted us to conclude to the maternal origin of the deleted X chromosome, and to detect using the marker DXS1106 (Xq22) a probable meiotic recombination event above the breakage point suggesting that the deletion occurred underneath this point. The mild Turner stigmata may be explained by the 45,X cell line, and the gonadal dysgenesis probably by a partial deletion of the gonadal dysgenesis region Xq13-q23 (excluding Xq22).

  1. Treatment Algorithms Based on Tumor Molecular Profiling: The Essence of Precision Medicine Trials

    PubMed Central

    Le Tourneau, Christophe; Kamal, Maud; Tsimberidou, Apostolia-Maria; Bedard, Philippe; Pierron, Gaëlle; Callens, Céline; Rouleau, Etienne; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Servant, Nicolas; Alt, Marie; Rouzier, Roman; Paoletti, Xavier; Delattre, Olivier; Bièche, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    With the advent of high-throughput molecular technologies, several precision medicine (PM) studies are currently ongoing that include molecular screening programs and PM clinical trials. Molecular profiling programs establish the molecular profile of patients’ tumors with the aim to guide therapy based on identified molecular alterations. The aim of prospective PM clinical trials is to assess the clinical utility of tumor molecular profiling and to determine whether treatment selection based on molecular alterations produces superior outcomes compared with unselected treatment. These trials use treatment algorithms to assign patients to specific targeted therapies based on tumor molecular alterations. These algorithms should be governed by fixed rules to ensure standardization and reproducibility. Here, we summarize key molecular, biological, and technical criteria that, in our view, should be addressed when establishing treatment algorithms based on tumor molecular profiling for PM trials. PMID:26598514

  2. A Molecular Imaging Approach to Mercury Sensing Based on Hyperpolarized (129)Xe Molecular Clamp Probe.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qianni; Zeng, Qingbin; Jiang, Weiping; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Luo, Qing; Zhang, Xu; Bouchard, Louis-S; Liu, Maili; Zhou, Xin

    2016-03-14

    Mercury pollution, in the form of mercury ions (Hg(2+)), is a major health and environmental hazard. Commonly used sensors are invasive and limited to point measurements. Fluorescence-based sensors do not provide depth resolution needed to image spatial distributions. Herein we report a novel sensor capable of yielding spatial distributions by MRI using hyperpolarized (129)Xe. A molecular clamp probe was developed consisting of dipyrrolylquinoxaline (DPQ) derivatives and twocryptophane-A cages. The DPQ derivatives act as cation receptors whereas cryptophane-A acts as a suitable host molecule for xenon. When the DPQ moiety interacts with mercury ions, the molecular clamp closes on the ion. Due to overlap of the electron clouds of the two cryptophane-A cages, the shielding effect on the encapsulated Xe becomes important. This leads to an upfield change of the chemical shift of the encapsulated Xe. This sensor exhibits good selectivity and sensitivity toward the mercury ion. This mercury-activated hyperpolarized (129)Xe-based chemosensor is a new concept method for monitoring Hg(2+) ion distributions by MRI.

  3. Molecular Bases Underlying the Hepatoprotective Effects of Coffee

    PubMed Central

    Salomone, Federico; Galvano, Fabio; Li Volti, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    Coffee is the most consumed beverage worldwide. Epidemiological studies with prospective cohorts showed that coffee intake is associated with reduced cardiovascular and all-cause mortality independently of caffeine content. Cohort and case-control studies reported an inverse association between coffee consumption and the degree of liver fibrosis as well as the development of liver cancer. Furthermore, the beneficial effects of coffee have been recently confirmed by large meta-analyses. In the last two decades, various in vitro and in vivo studies evaluated the molecular determinants for the hepatoprotective effects of coffee. In the present article, we aimed to critically review experimental evidence regarding the active components and the molecular bases underlying the beneficial role of coffee against chronic liver diseases. Almost all studies highlighted the beneficial effects of this beverage against liver fibrosis with the most solid results indicating a pivot role for both caffeine and chlorogenic acids. In particular, in experimental models of fibrosis, caffeine was shown to inhibit hepatic stellate cell activation by blocking adenosine receptors, and emerging evidence indicated that caffeine may also favorably impact angiogenesis and hepatic hemodynamics. On the other side, chlorogenic acids, potent phenolic antioxidants, suppress liver fibrogenesis and carcinogenesis by reducing oxidative stress and counteract steatogenesis through the modulation of glucose and lipid homeostasis in the liver. Overall, these molecular insights may have translational significance and suggest that coffee components need clinical evaluation. PMID:28124992

  4. Polarizable Atomic Multipole-based Molecular Mechanics for Organic Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Pengyu; Wu, Chuanjie; Ponder, Jay W.

    2011-01-01

    An empirical potential based on permanent atomic multipoles and atomic induced dipoles is reported for alkanes, alcohols, amines, sulfides, aldehydes, carboxylic acids, amides, aromatics and other small organic molecules. Permanent atomic multipole moments through quadrupole moments have been derived from gas phase ab initio molecular orbital calculations. The van der Waals parameters are obtained by fitting to gas phase homodimer QM energies and structures, as well as experimental densities and heats of vaporization of neat liquids. As a validation, the hydrogen bonding energies and structures of gas phase heterodimers with water are evaluated using the resulting potential. For 32 homo- and heterodimers, the association energy agrees with ab initio results to within 0.4 kcal/mol. The RMS deviation of hydrogen bond distance from QM optimized geometry is less than 0.06 Å. In addition, liquid self-diffusion and static dielectric constants computed from molecular dynamics simulation are consistent with experimental values. The force field is also used to compute the solvation free energy of 27 compounds not included in the parameterization process, with a RMS error of 0.69 kcal/mol. The results obtained in this study suggest the AMOEBA force field performs well across different environments and phases. The key algorithms involved in the electrostatic model and a protocol for developing parameters are detailed to facilitate extension to additional molecular systems. PMID:22022236

  5. Structure-based molecular modeling approaches to GPCR oligomerization.

    PubMed

    Kaczor, Agnieszka A; Selent, Jana; Poso, Antti

    2013-01-01

    Classical structure-based drug design techniques using G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) as targets focus nearly exclusively on binding at the orthosteric site of a single receptor. Dimerization and oligomerization of GPCRs, proposed almost 30 years ago, have, however, crucial relevance for drug design. Targeting these complexes selectively or designing small molecules that affect receptor-receptor interactions might provide new opportunities for novel drug discovery. In order to study the mechanisms and dynamics that rule GPCRs oligomerization, it is essential to understand the dynamic process of receptor-receptor association and to identify regions that are suitable for selective drug binding, which may be determined with experimental methods such as Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) or Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) and computational sequence- and structure-based approaches. The aim of this chapter is to provide a comprehensive description of the structure-based molecular modeling methods for studying GPCR dimerization, that is, protein-protein docking, molecular dynamics, normal mode analysis, and electrostatics studies.

  6. Molecular imprinting sensor based on quantum weak measurement.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongmei; He, Qinghua; He, Yonghong; Xin, Meiguo; Zhang, Yilong; Shen, Zhiyuan

    2017-03-10

    A new type of sensing protocol, based on a high precision metrology of quantum weak measurement, was first proposed for molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) sensor. The feasibility, sensitivity and selectivity of weak measurement based MIP (WMMIP) sensor were experimentally demonstrated with bovine serum albumin (BSA). Weak measurement system exhibits high sensitivity to the optical phase shift corresponding to the refractive index change, which is induced by the specific capture of target protein molecules with its recognition sites. The recognition process can be finally characterized by the central wavelength shift of output spectra through weak value amplification. In our experiment, we prepared BSA@MIP with modified reversed-phase microemulsion method, and coated it on the internal surface of measuring channels assembled into the Mach-Zehnder (MZ) interferometer based optical weak measurement system. The design of this home-built optical system makes it possible to detect analyte in real time. The dynamic process of the specific adsorption and concentration response to BSA from 5×10(-4) to 5×10(-1)μg/L was achieved with a limit of detection (LOD) of 8.01×10(-12)g/L. This WMMIP shows superiority in accuracy, fast response and low cost. Furthermore, real-time monitoring system can creatively promote the performance of MIP in molecular analysis.

  7. Recent Advances of Radionuclide-based Molecular Imaging of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Kazuma, Soraya M.; Sultan, Deborah; Zhao, Yongfeng; Detering, Lisa; You, Meng; Luehmann, Hannah P.; Abdalla, Dulcineia S.P.; Liu, Yongjian

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a systemic disease characterized by the development of multifocal plaque lesions within vessel walls and extending into the vascular lumen. The disease takes decades to develop symptomatic lesions, affording opportunities for accurate detection of plaque progression, analysis of risk factors responsible for clinical events, and planning personalized treatment. Of the available molecular imaging modalities, radionuclide-based imaging strategies have been favored due to their sensitivity, quantitative detection and pathways for translational research. This review summarizes recent advances of radiolabeled small molecules, peptides, antibodies and nanoparticles for atherosclerotic plaque imaging during disease progression. PMID:26369676

  8. Molecular Dipole Osmosis Based on Induced Charge Electro-Osmosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugioka, Hideyuki

    2016-09-01

    We propose a novel mechanism of producing a large nonlinear electrokinetic vortex flow around a nonconductive polar molecule in an electrolyte. That is, a large nonlinear electrokinetic slip velocity is derived by considering a local giant permittivity due to a molecular electric dipole moment with induced-charge electro-osmosis (ICEO). Different from the conventional ICEO theory, our theory predicts that a nonconductive biomaterial, such as a base of a deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecule, has a significantly high ICEO flow velocity because of its large local permittivity. We consider that our findings will contribute markedly to promising biomedical applications.

  9. Estudio multifrecuencia del flujo bipolar-molecular asociado con la proto-estrella VLA 1623

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artur de la Villarmois, E.; Merlo, D. C.; Gómez, M.

    In this work; we present a multi-wavelength study of the bipolar molecular outflow associated with the VLA 1623 proto-star (age 10 yrs). We analyze images obtained by Spitzer as well as other images from the literature. We identify 32 H (2.12 m) emission knots and 25 objects predominantly emitting in the [4.5] m band; usually known as EGOs (Extended Green Objects). Seven of these emissions are new EGO candidates; five of which have 2.12 m counter-parts. We compare the morphology of the emissions at 2.12 m and [4.5] m with the bipolar molecular outflow; finding an excellent agreement. The emissions are quasi-regularly spaced. We determine a dynamical time of 194.3 yrs between consecutive knots; which agrees with the lapse of time between eruptive FU Orionis events. This suggests that events of this type experimented by the central source might be the cause of the intermittency in the detected emissions. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  10. Predictive Value of Molecular Drug Resistance Testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates in Valle del Cauca, Colombia

    PubMed Central

    García, Pamela K.; Nieto, Luisa Maria; van Soolingen, Dick

    2013-01-01

    Previous evaluations of the molecular GenoType tests have promoted their use to detect resistance to first- and second-line antituberculosis drugs in different geographical regions. However, there are known geographic variations in the mutations associated with drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and especially in South America, there is a paucity of information regarding the frequencies and types of mutations associated with resistance to first- and second-line antituberculosis drugs. We therefore evaluated the performance of the GenoType kits in this region by testing 228 M. tuberculosis isolates in Colombia, including 134 resistant and 94 pansusceptible strains. Overall, the sensitivity and specificity of the GenoType MTBDRplus test ranged from 92 to 96% and 97 to 100%, respectively; the agreement index was optimal (Cohen's kappa, >0.8). The sensitivity of the GenoType MTBDRsl test ranged from 84 to 100% and the specificity from 88 to 100%. The most common mutations were katG S315T1, rpoB S531L, embB M306V, gyrA D94G, and rrs A1401G. Our results reflect the utility of the GenoType tests in Colombia; however, as some discordance still exists between the conventional and molecular approaches in resistance testing, we adhere to the recommendation that the GenoType tests serve as early guides for therapy, followed by phenotypic drug susceptibility testing for all cases. PMID:23658272

  11. Three decades of structure- and property-based molecular design.

    PubMed

    Müller, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Roche has pioneered structure- and property-based molecular design to drug discovery. While this is an ongoing development, the past three decades feature key events that have revolutionized the way drug discovery is conducted in Big Pharma industry. It has been a great privilege to have been involved in this transformation process, to have been able to collaborate with, direct, guide, or simply encourage outstanding experts in various disciplines to build and further develop what has become a major pillar of modern small-molecule drug discovery. This article is an account of major events that took place since the early decision of Roche to implement computer-assisted molecular modeling 32 years ago and is devoted to the key players involved. It highlights the internal build-up of structural biology, with protein X-ray structure determination at its core, and the early setup of bioinformatics. It describes the strategic shift to large compound libraries and high-throughput screening with the development of novel compound storage and ultra-high-throughput screening facilities, as well as the strategic return to focused screening of small motif-based compound libraries. These developments were accompanied by the rise of miniaturized parallel compound property analytics which resulted in a major paradigm shift in medicinal chemistry from linear to multi-dimensional lead optimization. The rapid growth of huge collections of property data stimulated the development of various novel data mining concepts with 'matched molecular pair' analysis and novel variants thereof playing crucial roles. As compound properties got more prominent in molecular design, exploration of specific structural motifs for property modulation became a research activity complementary to target-oriented medicinal chemistry. The exploration of oxetane is given as an example. For the sake of brevity, this account cannot detail all further developments that have taken place in each individual area of

  12. Analysis of charge transfer effects in molecular complexes based on absolutely localized molecular orbitals

    SciTech Connect

    Khaliullin, Rustam Z.; Head-Gordon, Martin; Bell, Alexis T.

    2008-05-14

    A new method based on absolutely localized molecular orbitals (ALMOs) is proposed to measure the degree of intermolecular electron density delocalization (charge transfer) in molecular complexes. ALMO charge transfer analysis (CTA) enables separation of the forward and backward charge transfer components for each pair of molecules in the system. The key feature of ALMO CTA is that all charge transfer terms have corresponding well defined energetic effects that measure the contribution of the given term to the overall energetic stabilization of the system. To simplify analysis of charge transfer effects, the concept of chemically significant complementary occupied-virtual orbital pairs (COVPs) is introduced. COVPs provide a simple description of intermolecular electron transfer effects in terms of just a few localized orbitals. ALMO CTA is applied to understand fundamental aspects of donor-acceptor interactions in borane adducts, synergic bonding in classical and nonclassical metal carbonyls, and multiple intermolecular hydrogen bonds in a complex of isocyanuric acid and melamine. These examples show that the ALMO CTA results are generally consistent with the existing conceptual description of intermolecular bonding. The results also show that charge transfer and the energy lowering due to charge transfer are not proportional to each other, and some interesting differences emerge which are discussed. Additionally, according to ALMO CTA, the amount of electron density transferred between molecules is significantly smaller than charge transfer estimated from various population analysis methods.

  13. Analysis of charge transfer effects in molecular complexes based on absolutely localized molecular orbitals.

    PubMed

    Khaliullin, Rustam Z; Bell, Alexis T; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2008-05-14

    A new method based on absolutely localized molecular orbitals (ALMOs) is proposed to measure the degree of intermolecular electron density delocalization (charge transfer) in molecular complexes. ALMO charge transfer analysis (CTA) enables separation of the forward and backward charge transfer components for each pair of molecules in the system. The key feature of ALMO CTA is that all charge transfer terms have corresponding well defined energetic effects that measure the contribution of the given term to the overall energetic stabilization of the system. To simplify analysis of charge transfer effects, the concept of chemically significant complementary occupied-virtual orbital pairs (COVPs) is introduced. COVPs provide a simple description of intermolecular electron transfer effects in terms of just a few localized orbitals. ALMO CTA is applied to understand fundamental aspects of donor-acceptor interactions in borane adducts, synergic bonding in classical and nonclassical metal carbonyls, and multiple intermolecular hydrogen bonds in a complex of isocyanuric acid and melamine. These examples show that the ALMO CTA results are generally consistent with the existing conceptual description of intermolecular bonding. The results also show that charge transfer and the energy lowering due to charge transfer are not proportional to each other, and some interesting differences emerge which are discussed. Additionally, according to ALMO CTA, the amount of electron density transferred between molecules is significantly smaller than charge transfer estimated from various population analysis methods.

  14. Analysis of charge transfer effects in molecular complexes based on absolutely localized molecular orbitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaliullin, Rustam Z.; Bell, Alexis T.; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2008-05-01

    A new method based on absolutely localized molecular orbitals (ALMOs) is proposed to measure the degree of intermolecular electron density delocalization (charge transfer) in molecular complexes. ALMO charge transfer analysis (CTA) enables separation of the forward and backward charge transfer components for each pair of molecules in the system. The key feature of ALMO CTA is that all charge transfer terms have corresponding well defined energetic effects that measure the contribution of the given term to the overall energetic stabilization of the system. To simplify analysis of charge transfer effects, the concept of chemically significant complementary occupied-virtual orbital pairs (COVPs) is introduced. COVPs provide a simple description of intermolecular electron transfer effects in terms of just a few localized orbitals. ALMO CTA is applied to understand fundamental aspects of donor-acceptor interactions in borane adducts, synergic bonding in classical and nonclassical metal carbonyls, and multiple intermolecular hydrogen bonds in a complex of isocyanuric acid and melamine. These examples show that the ALMO CTA results are generally consistent with the existing conceptual description of intermolecular bonding. The results also show that charge transfer and the energy lowering due to charge transfer are not proportional to each other, and some interesting differences emerge which are discussed. Additionally, according to ALMO CTA, the amount of electron density transferred between molecules is significantly smaller than charge transfer estimated from various population analysis methods.

  15. Improving structure-based function prediction using molecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Glazer, Dariya S.; Radmer, Randall J.; Altman, Russ B.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The number of molecules with solved three-dimensional structure but unknown function is increasing rapidly. Particularly problematic are novel folds with little detectable similarity to molecules of known function. Experimental assays can determine the functions of such molecules, but are time-consuming and expensive. Computational approaches can identify potential functional sites; however, these approaches generally rely on single static structures and do not use information about dynamics. In fact, structural dynamics can enhance function prediction: we coupled molecular dynamics simulations with structure-based function prediction algorithms that identify Ca2+ binding sites. When applied to 11 challenging proteins, both methods showed substantial improvement in performance, revealing 22 more sites in one case and 12 more in the other, with a modest increase in apparent false positives. Thus, we show that treating molecules as dynamic entities improves the performance of structure-based function prediction methods. PMID:19604472

  16. Clinical and molecular cytogenetic studies in ten patients with hematological malignancies characterized by t(20;21)(q11;q11) resulted from del(20q).

    PubMed

    Wu, Chunxiao; Zhang, Jun; Bai, Shuxiao; Yao, Jianxin; Qiu, Huiying; Xue, Yongquan; Chen, Suning; Wu, Yafang; Shen, Juan; Pan, Jinlan

    2016-10-01

    This study reports 10 patients with hematological malignances with t(20;21)(q11;q11) resulting from del(20q) (for example, der(20)del(20)(q11q13)t(20;21)(q11;q11) and der(21)t(20;21)(q11;q11)) and described their clinical features and the possible prognostic significance of this abnormality. The t(20;21)(q11;q11) was a rare but recurrent abnormality secondary to del(20q) besides i(20q-). The frequency of der(20)del(20)(q11q13)t(20;21)(q11;q11) among our patients with del(20q) was 2.4%. It was considered that the 20q deletion preceded translocation with chromosome 21. This abnormality is often cryptic, occurs predominantly in older men and is observed most often in myelodysplastic syndromes. Patients with this abnormality have an unfavorable prognosis, similar to patients with i(20q-). The molecular consequences of der(20)del(20)(q11q13)t(20;21)(q11;q11) may be different from patients with i(20q-). To the best of our knowledge this is the largest dataset published to date.

  17. A molecularly based theory for electron transfer reorganization energy.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Bilin; Wang, Zhen-Gang

    2015-12-14

    Using field-theoretic techniques, we develop a molecularly based dipolar self-consistent-field theory (DSCFT) for charge solvation in pure solvents under equilibrium and nonequilibrium conditions and apply it to the reorganization energy of electron transfer reactions. The DSCFT uses a set of molecular parameters, such as the solvent molecule's permanent dipole moment and polarizability, thus avoiding approximations that are inherent in treating the solvent as a linear dielectric medium. A simple, analytical expression for the free energy is obtained in terms of the equilibrium and nonequilibrium electrostatic potential profiles and electric susceptibilities, which are obtained by solving a set of self-consistent equations. With no adjustable parameters, the DSCFT predicts activation energies and reorganization energies in good agreement with previous experiments and calculations for the electron transfer between metallic ions. Because the DSCFT is able to describe the properties of the solvent in the immediate vicinity of the charges, it is unnecessary to distinguish between the inner-sphere and outer-sphere solvent molecules in the calculation of the reorganization energy as in previous work. Furthermore, examining the nonequilibrium free energy surfaces of electron transfer, we find that the nonequilibrium free energy is well approximated by a double parabola for self-exchange reactions, but the curvature of the nonequilibrium free energy surface depends on the charges of the electron-transferring species, contrary to the prediction by the linear dielectric theory.

  18. Toward Understanding the Molecular Bases of Stretch Activation

    PubMed Central

    Sanfelice, Domenico; Sanz-Hernández, Máximo; de Simone, Alfonso; Bullard, Belinda; Pastore, Annalisa

    2016-01-01

    Muscles are usually activated by calcium binding to the calcium sensory protein troponin-C, which is one of the three components of the troponin complex. However, in cardiac and insect flight muscle activation is also produced by mechanical stress. Little is known about the molecular bases of this calcium-independent activation. In Lethocerus, a giant water bug often used as a model system because of its large muscle fibers, there are two troponin-C isoforms, called F1 and F2, that have distinct roles in activating the muscle. It has been suggested that this can be explained either by differences in structural features or by differences in the interactions with other proteins. Here we have compared the structural and dynamic properties of the two proteins and shown how they differ. We have also mapped the interactions of the F2 isoform with peptides spanning the sequence of its natural partner, troponin-I. Our data have allowed us to build a model of the troponin complex and may eventually help in understanding the specialized function of the F1 and F2 isoforms and the molecular mechanism of stretch activation. PMID:27226601

  19. A molecularly based theory for electron transfer reorganization energy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, Bilin; Wang, Zhen-Gang

    2015-12-14

    Using field-theoretic techniques, we develop a molecularly based dipolar self-consistent-field theory (DSCFT) for charge solvation in pure solvents under equilibrium and nonequilibrium conditions and apply it to the reorganization energy of electron transfer reactions. The DSCFT uses a set of molecular parameters, such as the solvent molecule’s permanent dipole moment and polarizability, thus avoiding approximations that are inherent in treating the solvent as a linear dielectric medium. A simple, analytical expression for the free energy is obtained in terms of the equilibrium and nonequilibrium electrostatic potential profiles and electric susceptibilities, which are obtained by solving a set of self-consistent equations. With no adjustable parameters, the DSCFT predicts activation energies and reorganization energies in good agreement with previous experiments and calculations for the electron transfer between metallic ions. Because the DSCFT is able to describe the properties of the solvent in the immediate vicinity of the charges, it is unnecessary to distinguish between the inner-sphere and outer-sphere solvent molecules in the calculation of the reorganization energy as in previous work. Furthermore, examining the nonequilibrium free energy surfaces of electron transfer, we find that the nonequilibrium free energy is well approximated by a double parabola for self-exchange reactions, but the curvature of the nonequilibrium free energy surface depends on the charges of the electron-transferring species, contrary to the prediction by the linear dielectric theory.

  20. Xerogel-based molecularly imprinted polymers for explosives detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holthoff, Ellen L.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra N.; Hankus, Mikella E.

    2010-04-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) can be utilized as artificial recognition elements for target chemical analytes of interest. Molecular imprinting involves arranging polymerizable functional monomers around a template followed by polymerization and template removal. The selectivity for the target analyte is based on the spatial orientation of the binding site and covalent or noncovalent interactions between the functional monomer and the analyte. The polymer materials of particular interest are sol-gel-derived xerogels. To allow for increased target recognition, the xerogel has specific functional groups, which allow for polymer interactions with the template molecule (and target analyte). In a sensor format, the recognition event is monitored with some form of transduction. MIP technology is still in its infancy and limitations such as non-specific binding may be overcome utilizing surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) as an integrated transduction method for enhanced sensor performance. The objective of the present work is to create a sensitive and selective MIP-SERS sensing platform for 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT).

  1. Molecular bases of circadian rhythmicity in renal physiology and pathology

    PubMed Central

    Bonny, Olivier; Vinciguerra, Manlio; Gumz, Michelle L.; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi

    2013-01-01

    The physiological processes that maintain body homeostasis oscillate during the day. Diurnal changes characterize kidney functions, comprising regulation of hydro-electrolytic and acid-base balance, reabsorption of small solutes and hormone production. Renal physiology is characterized by 24-h periodicity and contributes to circadian variability of blood pressure levels, related as well to nychthemeral changes of sodium sensitivity, physical activity, vascular tone, autonomic function and neurotransmitter release from sympathetic innervations. The circadian rhythmicity of body physiology is driven by central and peripheral biological clockworks and entrained by the geophysical light/dark cycle. Chronodisruption, defined as the mismatch between environmental–social cues and physiological–behavioral patterns, causes internal desynchronization of periodic functions, leading to pathophysiological mechanisms underlying degenerative, immune related, metabolic and neoplastic diseases. In this review we will address the genetic, molecular and anatomical elements that hardwire circadian rhythmicity in renal physiology and subtend disarray of time–dependent changes in renal pathology. PMID:23901050

  2. Hydrophobic composition based on mixed-molecular weight polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorlenko, Nikolay; Debelova, Natalya; Sarkisov, Yuriy; Volokitin, Gennadiy; Zavyalova, Elena; Lapova, Tatyana

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents investigations of compositions based on low and high molecular weight polyethylene so as to synthesize a hydrophobic composition for moisture protection of timber. X-ray phase analysis and measurements of the tear-off force of hydrophobic coating needed to apply to the timber surface and the limiting wetting angle are carried out to detect the hydrophobic, adhesive, electrophysical, and physicochemical properties of compositions. Kinetic dependencies are given for moisture absorption of timber specimens. It is shown that the preliminary formation of the texture by the surface patterning or its treatment with low-temperature plasma with the following protective coating results in the improvement of hydrophobic properties of the suggested compositions. These compositions can be used in the capacity of water repellents to protect building materials from moisture including restoration works.

  3. [Targeted molecular therapy based on advanced cancer stem cell model].

    PubMed

    Hirao, Atsushi

    2015-08-01

    Improvement of cell purification and transplantation techniques have contributed to the identification of cell populations known as tumor-initiating cells (TICs). Although it was hypothesized that tumors are organized as hierarchies of tumor cells that are sustained by rare TICs, like normal tissue stem cells, there are several controversies towards such cancer stem cell model, e.g. reversible change of stem cell like population based on epigenetic changes, clonal genetic evolution and problems in xenotransplantation system. Despite complexity in cancer stem cell models, studies in cancer stem cell field have revealed that there are close relationship between cancer malignancy and stem cell properties, called "stemness". Understanding molecular mechanisms for controlling stemness would contribute to establishment of novel diagnostics or therapeutics for cancer.

  4. DNA Aptamer Based Nanodrugs: Molecular Engineering for Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Cansiz, Sena; Zhang, Liqin; Wu, Cuichen; Wu, Yuan; Teng, I-Ting; Hou, Weijia; Wang, Yanyue; Wan, Shuo; Cai, Ren; Jin, Chen; Liu, Qiaoling; Tan, Weihong

    2015-01-01

    In the past two decades, the study of cancer therapy has gradually advanced to the “Nano” era. Numerous novel nanomaterials armed with unique physical properties have been introduced into biomedical research. At the same time, functional nucleic acid molecules, especially aptamers, have aroused broad attention from the biomedical community. Benefiting from the advancement of molecular engineering strategies, it is now feasible to combine the cancer specific recognition capability of aptamers with various other special functions of nanomaterials to develop cancer specific drugs at the nanoscale. Nanodrugs are now offering an unprecedented opportunity to achieve the goal of efficient targeted delivery as well as controlled release. This review highlights some achievements of multiple aptamer-based nanodrug systems which have emerged in recent years, including studies in the infant stage of “proof-of-concept”. PMID:26177853

  5. Genomic and epigenetic insights into the molecular bases of heterosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Z Jeffrey

    2013-07-01

    Heterosis, also known as hybrid vigour, is widespread in plants and animals, but the molecular bases for this phenomenon remain elusive. Recent studies in hybrids and allopolyploids using transcriptomic, proteomic, metabolomic, epigenomic and systems biology approaches have provided new insights. Emerging genomic and epigenetic perspectives suggest that heterosis arises from allelic interactions between parental genomes, leading to altered programming of genes that promote the growth, stress tolerance and fitness of hybrids. For example, epigenetic modifications of key regulatory genes in hybrids and allopolyploids can alter complex regulatory networks of physiology and metabolism, thus modulating biomass and leading to heterosis. The conceptual advances could help to improve plant and animal productivity through the manipulation of heterosis.

  6. Molecular pincers – new antibody-based homogenous protein sensors

    PubMed Central

    Heyduk, Ewa; Dummit, Benjamin; Chang, Yie-Hwa; Heyduk, Tomasz

    2008-01-01

    We describe here a new homogenous antibody-based protein sensor design (molecular pincers) that allows rapid and sensitive detection of a specific protein in solution. In the presence of the target protein these sensors produce fluorescence signal derived from target-dependent annealing of short complementary fluorochrome-labeled oligonucleotides attached to a pair of target-specific antibodies via nanometer-scale flexible linkers. The sensors allow near-instantaneous detection of the target with sensitivity and specificity approaching ELISA but requiring no sample manipulation other then the addition of the sample to the sensor mix. We used cardiac troponin I and C-reactive protein as the targets to validate these desirable properties of the sensors. Due to the availability of antibodies to thousands of interesting targets and the straightforward design blueprint of the sensors we expect their wide-ranging applications in research and medical diagnosis, especially when simplicity, high throughput, and short detection time are essential. PMID:18491925

  7. Current Progress of Aptamer-Based Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Andrew Z.; Farokhzad, Omid C.

    2014-01-01

    Aptamers, single-stranded oligonucleotides, are an important class of molecular targeting ligand. Since their discovery, aptamers have been rapidly translated into clinical practice. They have been approved as therapeutics and molecular diagnostics. Aptamers also possess several properties that make them uniquely suited to molecular imaging. This review aims to provide an overview of aptamers’ advantages as targeting ligands and their application in molecular imaging. PMID:24525205

  8. Molecular Beacon-Based MicroRNA Imaging During Neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jonghwan; Kim, Soonhag

    2016-01-01

    The fluorescence monitoring system for examining endogenous microRNA (miRNA) activity in cellular level provides crucial information on not only understanding a critical role of miRNA involving a variety of biological processes, but also evaluating miRNA expression patterns in a noninvasive manner. In this protocol, we report the details of a new procedure for a molecular beacon-based miRNA monitoring system, which includes the illustration scheme for miRNA detection strategy, exogenous miRNA detection, and measurement of endogenous miRNA expression level during neurogenesis. The fluorescence signal of miR-124a beacon quenched by BHQ2 was gradually recovered as increasing concentration of the miR-124a in tube. The functional work of miR-124a beacon was examined in intracellular environment, allowing for the internalization of the miR-124a beacon by lipofectamine, which resulted in activated fluorescent signals of the miR-124a beacon in the HeLa cells after the addition of synthetic miR-124a. The endogenous miR-124a expression level was detected by miR-124a beacon system during neurogenesis, showing brighter fluorescence intensity in cytoplasmic area of P19 cells after induction of neuronal differentiation by retinoic acid. The molecular beacon based-miRNA detection technique could be applicable to the simultaneous visualization of a variety of miRNA expression patterns using different fluorescence dyes. For the study of examining endogenous miRNA expression level using miRNA-beacon system, if cellular differentiation step is already prepared, transfection step of miR-124a beacon into P19 cells, and acquisition of activated fluorescence signal measured by confocal microscope can be conducted approximately within 6 h.

  9. POLYANA-A tool for the calculation of molecular radial distribution functions based on Molecular Dynamics trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitroulis, Christos; Raptis, Theophanes; Raptis, Vasilios

    2015-12-01

    We present an application for the calculation of radial distribution functions for molecular centres of mass, based on trajectories generated by molecular simulation methods (Molecular Dynamics, Monte Carlo). When designing this application, the emphasis was placed on ease of use as well as ease of further development. In its current version, the program can read trajectories generated by the well-known DL_POLY package, but it can be easily extended to handle other formats. It is also very easy to 'hack' the program so it can compute intermolecular radial distribution functions for groups of interaction sites rather than whole molecules.

  10. Estrellas jóvenes en la nube molecular del Camaleón II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavero, C.; Mazzalay, X.; Paz, D.; Quinzio, B.; Racca, G.; Sales, L.; Stasyszyn, F.; Ahumada, A.; Gómez, M.

    We present optical spectra of three candidate young stellar objects in the Chamaeleon II dark cloud. The observations were carried out at the CASLEO with the REOSC (DS) spectrograph, covering a spectral range between 5000 < λ < 8000 Å. These objects were selected from two lists of candidate young stars proposed by Larson et al. (1998, A&A 337:465) and Voung et al. (2001, A&A 379:208) based on the infrared excesses. We find Hα in emission in two of the three objects. This is an indicator of the pre-main sequence evolutionary state of a star. In addition, for one of the objects with Hα in emission we detect the TiO absorption bands (6180 and 7100 Å), characteristic of the M spectral type. The nature of the third object remains uncertain and higher signal to noise spectra are required to clarify its evolutionary status.

  11. A Raman-based endoscopic strategy for multiplexed molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Zavaleta, Cristina L; Garai, Ellis; Liu, Jonathan T C; Sensarn, Steven; Mandella, Michael J; Van de Sompel, Dominique; Friedland, Shai; Van Dam, Jacques; Contag, Christopher H; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2013-06-18

    Endoscopic imaging is an invaluable diagnostic tool allowing minimally invasive access to tissues deep within the body. It has played a key role in screening colon cancer and is credited with preventing deaths through the detection and removal of precancerous polyps. However, conventional white-light endoscopy offers physicians structural information without the biochemical information that would be advantageous for early detection and is essential for molecular typing. To address this unmet need, we have developed a unique accessory, noncontact, fiber optic-based Raman spectroscopy device that has the potential to provide real-time, multiplexed functional information during routine endoscopy. This device is ideally suited for detection of functionalized surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanoparticles as molecular imaging contrast agents. This device was designed for insertion through a clinical endoscope and has the potential to detect and quantify the presence of a multiplexed panel of tumor-targeting SERS nanoparticles. Characterization of the Raman instrument was performed with SERS particles on excised human tissue samples, and it has shown unsurpassed sensitivity and multiplexing capabilities, detecting 326-fM concentrations of SERS nanoparticles and unmixing 10 variations of colocalized SERS nanoparticles. Another unique feature of our noncontact Raman endoscope is that it has been designed for efficient use over a wide range of working distances from 1 to 10 mm. This is necessary to accommodate for imperfect centering during endoscopy and the nonuniform surface topology of human tissue. Using this endoscope as a key part of a multiplexed detection approach could allow endoscopists to distinguish between normal and precancerous tissues rapidly and to identify flat lesions that are otherwise missed.

  12. Molecular based equation of state for shocked liquid nitromethane.

    PubMed

    Desbiens, Nicolas; Bourasseau, Emeric; Maillet, Jean-Bernard; Soulard, Laurent

    2009-07-30

    An approach is proposed to obtain the equation of state of unreactive shocked liquid nitromethane. Unlike previous major works, this equation of state is not based on extended integration schemes [P.C. Lysne, D.R. Hardesty, Fundamental equation of state of liquid nitromethane to 100 kbar, J. Chem. Phys. 59 (1973) 6512]. It does not follow the way proposed by Winey et al. [J.M. Winey, G.E. Duvall, M.D. Knudson, Y.M. Gupta, Equation of state and temperature measurements for shocked nitromethane, J. Chem. Phys. 113 (2000) 7492] where the specific heat C(v), the isothermal bulk modulus B(T) and the coefficient of thermal pressure (deltaP/deltaT)(v) are modeled as functions of temperature and volume using experimental data. In this work, we compute the complete equation of state by microscopic calculations. Indeed, by means of Monte Carlo molecular simulations, we have proposed a new force field for nitromethane that lead to a good description of shock properties [N. Desbiens, E. Bourasseau, J.-B. Maillet, Potential optimization for the calculation of shocked liquid nitromethane properties, Mol. Sim. 33 (2007) 1061; A. Hervouët, N. Desbiens, E. Bourasseau, J.-B. Maillet, Microscopic approaches to liquid nitromethane detonation properties, J. Phys. Chem. B 112 (2008) 5070]. Particularly, it has been shown that shock temperatures and second shock temperatures are accurately reproduced which is significative of the quality of the potential. Here, thermodynamic derivative properties are computed: specific heats, Grüneisen parameter, sound velocity among others, along the Hugoniot curve. This work constitutes to our knowledge the first determination of the equation of state of an unreactive shocked explosive by molecular simulations.

  13. Magnetic and electronic properties of porphyrin-based molecular nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Jia-Jia; Li, Qiao-Zhi; Dang, Jing-Shuang; Zhao, Xiang; Wang, Wei-Wei

    2016-01-15

    Using spin-polarized density functional theory calculations, we performed theoretical investigations on the electronic and magnetic properties of transition metal embedded porphyrin-based nanowires (TM-PNWs, TM = Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn). Our results indicate that Ni-PNW and Zn-PNW are nonmagnetic while the rest species are magnetic, and the magnetic moments in TM-PNWs and their corresponding isolated monomer structures are found to be the same. In addition, the spin coupling in the magnetic nanowires can be ignored leading to their degenerate AFM and FM states. These results can be ascribed to the weak intermetallic interactions because of the relatively large distances between neighbor TM atoms. Among all TM-PNW structures considered here, only Mn-PNW shows a half-metallic property while the others are predicted to be semiconducting. The present work paves a new way of obtaining ferromagnetic porphyrin-based nanowires with TM atoms distributed separately and orderly, which are expected to be good candidates for catalysts, energy storage and molecular spintronics.

  14. Maintain rigid structures in Verlet based cartesian molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Tao, Peng; Wu, Xiongwu; Brooks, Bernard R

    2012-10-07

    An algorithm is presented to maintain rigid structures in Verlet based cartesian molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. After each unconstrained MD step, the coordinates of selected particles are corrected to maintain rigid structures through an iterative procedure of rotation matrix computation. This algorithm, named as SHAPE and implemented in CHARMM program suite, avoids the calculations of Lagrange multipliers, so that the complexity of computation does not increase with the number of particles in a rigid structure. The implementation of this algorithm does not require significant modification of propagation integrator, and can be plugged into any cartesian based MD integration scheme. A unique feature of the SHAPE method is that it is interchangeable with SHAKE for any object that can be constrained as a rigid structure using multiple SHAKE constraints. Unlike SHAKE, the SHAPE method can be applied to large linear (with three or more centers) and planar (with four or more centers) rigid bodies. Numerical tests with four model systems including two proteins demonstrate that the accuracy and reliability of the SHAPE method are comparable to the SHAKE method, but with much more applicability and efficiency.

  15. Pathological Bases for a Robust Application of Cancer Molecular Classification

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Cano, Salvador J.

    2015-01-01

    Any robust classification system depends on its purpose and must refer to accepted standards, its strength relying on predictive values and a careful consideration of known factors that can affect its reliability. In this context, a molecular classification of human cancer must refer to the current gold standard (histological classification) and try to improve it with key prognosticators for metastatic potential, staging and grading. Although organ-specific examples have been published based on proteomics, transcriptomics and genomics evaluations, the most popular approach uses gene expression analysis as a direct correlate of cellular differentiation, which represents the key feature of the histological classification. RNA is a labile molecule that varies significantly according with the preservation protocol, its transcription reflect the adaptation of the tumor cells to the microenvironment, it can be passed through mechanisms of intercellular transference of genetic information (exosomes), and it is exposed to epigenetic modifications. More robust classifications should be based on stable molecules, at the genetic level represented by DNA to improve reliability, and its analysis must deal with the concept of intratumoral heterogeneity, which is at the origin of tumor progression and is the byproduct of the selection process during the clonal expansion and progression of neoplasms. The simultaneous analysis of multiple DNA targets and next generation sequencing offer the best practical approach for an analytical genomic classification of tumors. PMID:25898411

  16. Magnetic and electronic properties of porphyrin-based molecular nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jia-Jia; Li, Qiao-Zhi; Dang, Jing-Shuang; Wang, Wei-Wei; Zhao, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Using spin-polarized density functional theory calculations, we performed theoretical investigations on the electronic and magnetic properties of transition metal embedded porphyrin-based nanowires (TM-PNWs, TM = Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn). Our results indicate that Ni-PNW and Zn-PNW are nonmagnetic while the rest species are magnetic, and the magnetic moments in TM-PNWs and their corresponding isolated monomer structures are found to be the same. In addition, the spin coupling in the magnetic nanowires can be ignored leading to their degenerate AFM and FM states. These results can be ascribed to the weak intermetallic interactions because of the relatively large distances between neighbor TM atoms. Among all TM-PNW structures considered here, only Mn-PNW shows a half-metallic property while the others are predicted to be semiconducting. The present work paves a new way of obtaining ferromagnetic porphyrin-based nanowires with TM atoms distributed separately and orderly, which are expected to be good candidates for catalysts, energy storage and molecular spintronics.

  17. Ultrafast molecular orbital imaging based on attosecond photoelectron diffraction.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Qin, Meiyan; Zhu, Xiaosong; Zhang, Qingbin; Lan, Pengfei; Lu, Peixiang

    2015-04-20

    We present ab initio numerical study of ultrafast ionization dynamics of H(2)(+) as well as CO(2) and N(2) exposed to linearly polarized attosecond extreme ultraviolet pulses. When the molecules are aligned perpendicular to laser polarization direction, photonionization of these molecules show clear and distinguishing diffraction patterns in molecular attosecond photoelectron momentum distributions. The internuclear distances of the molecules are related to the position of the associated diffraction patterns, which can be determined with high accuracy. Moreover, the relative heights of the diffraction fringes contain fruitful information of the molecular orbital structures. We show that the diffraction spectra can be well produced using the two-center interference model. By adopting a simple inversion algorithm which takes into account the symmetry of the initial molecular orbital, we can retrieve the molecular orbital from which the electron is ionized. Our results offer possibility for imaging of molecular structure and orbitals by performing molecular attosecond photoelectron diffraction.

  18. Structural distortions in molecular-based quantum cellular automata: a minimal model based study.

    PubMed

    Bonilla, Alejandro Santana; Gutierrez, Rafael; Sandonas, Leonardo Medrano; Nozaki, Daijiro; Bramanti, Alessandro Paolo; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2014-09-07

    Molecular-based quantum cellular automata (m-QCA), as an extension of quantum-dot QCAs, offer a novel alternative in which binary information can be encoded in the molecular charge configuration of a cell and propagated via nearest-neighbor Coulombic cell-cell interactions. Appropriate functionality of m-QCAs involves a complex relationship between quantum mechanical effects, such as electron transfer processes within the molecular building blocks, and electrostatic interactions between cells. The influence of structural distortions of single m-QCA are addressed in this paper within a minimal model using an diabatic-to-adiabatic transformation. We show that even small changes of the classical square geometry between driver and target cells, such as those induced by distance variations or shape distortions, can make cells respond to interactions in a far less symmetric fashion, modifying and potentially impairing the expected computational behavior of the m-QCA.

  19. Ridge-based bias potentials to accelerate molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Penghao; Duncan, Juliana; Zhang, Liang; Henkelman, Graeme

    2015-12-01

    An effective way to accelerate rare events in molecular dynamics simulations is to apply a bias potential which destabilizes minima without biasing the transitions between stable states. This approach, called hyperdynamics, is limited by our ability to construct general bias potentials without having to understand the reaction mechanisms available to the system, a priori. Current bias potentials are typically constructed in terms of a metric which quantifies the distance that a trajectory deviates from the reactant state minimum. Such metrics include detection of negative curvatures of the potential, an energy increase, or deviations in bond lengths from the minimum. When one of these properties exceeds a critical value, the bias potentials are constructed to approach zero. A problem common to each of these schemes is that their effectiveness decreases rapidly with system size. We attribute this problem to a diminishing volume defined by the metrics around a reactant minimum as compared to the total volume of the reactant state basin. In this work, we mitigate the dimensionality scaling problem by constructing bias potentials that are based upon the distance to the boundary of the reactant basin. This distance is quantified in two ways: (i) by following the minimum mode direction to the reactant boundary and (ii) by training a machine learning algorithm to give an analytic expression for the boundary to which the distance can be calculated. Both of these ridge-based bias potentials are demonstrated to scale qualitatively better with dimensionality than the existing methods. We attribute this improvement to a greater filling fraction of the reactant state using the ridge-based bias potentials as compared to the standard potentials.

  20. Molecular and Cellular Bases of Iron Metabolism in Humans.

    PubMed

    Milto, I V; Suhodolo, I V; Prokopieva, V D; Klimenteva, T K

    2016-06-01

    Iron is a microelement with the most completely studied biological functions. Its wide dissemination in nature and involvement in key metabolic pathways determine the great importance of this metal for uni- and multicellular organisms. The biological role of iron is characterized by its indispensability in cell respiration and various biochemical processes providing normal functioning of cells and organs of the human body. Iron also plays an important role in the generation of free radicals, which under different conditions can be useful or damaging to biomolecules and cells. In the literature, there are many reviews devoted to iron metabolism and its regulation in pro- and eukaryotes. Significant progress has been achieved recently in understanding molecular bases of iron metabolism. The purpose of this review is to systematize available data on mechanisms of iron assimilation, distribution, and elimination from the human body, as well as on its biological importance and on the major iron-containing proteins. The review summarizes recent ideas about iron metabolism. Special attention is paid to mechanisms of iron absorption in the small intestine and to interrelationships of cellular and extracellular pools of this metal in the human body.

  1. Actin-based motility propelled by molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadyayula, Sai Pramod; Rangarajan, Murali

    2012-09-01

    Actin-based motility of Listeria monocytogenes propelled by filament end-tracking molecular motors has been simulated. Such systems may act as potential nanoscale actuators and shuttles useful in sorting and sensing biomolecules. Filaments are modeled as three-dimensional elastic springs distributed on one end of the capsule and persistently attached to the motile bacterial surface through an end-tracking motor complex. Filament distribution is random, and monomer concentration decreases linearly as a function of position on the bacterial surface. Filament growth rate increases with monomer concentration but decreases with the extent of compression. The growing filaments exert push-pull forces on the bacterial surface. In addition to forces, torques arise due to two factors—distribution of motors on the bacterial surface, and coupling of torsion upon growth due to the right-handed helicity of F-actin—causing the motile object to undergo simultaneous translation and rotation. The trajectory of the bacterium is simulated by performing a force and torque balance on the bacterium. All simulations use a fixed value of torsion. Simulations show strong alignment of the filaments and the long axis of the bacterium along the direction of motion. In the absence of torsion, the bacterial surface essentially moves along the direction of the long axis. When a small amount of the torsion is applied to the bacterial surface, the bacterium is seen to move in right-handed helical trajectories, consistent with experimental observations.

  2. Sensitive determination of citrinin based on molecular imprinted electrochemical sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atar, Necip; Yola, Mehmet Lütfi; Eren, Tanju

    2016-01-01

    In this report, a novel molecular imprinted voltammetric sensor based on glassy carbon electrode (GCE) modified with platinum nanoparticles (PtNPs) involved in a polyoxometalate (H3PW12O40, POM) functionalized reduced graphene oxide (rGO) was prepared for the determination of citrinin (CIT). The developed surfaces were characterized by using scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) method. CIT imprinted GCE was prepared via electropolymerization process of 80.0 mM pyrrole as monomer in the presence of phosphate buffer solution (pH 6.0) containing 20.0 mM CIT. The linearity range and the detection limit of the developed method were calculated as 1.0 × 10-12-1.0 × 10-10 M and 2.0 × 10-13 M, respectively. In addition, the voltammetric sensor was applied to rye samples. The stability and selectivity of the voltammetric sensor were also reported.

  3. A portable, integrated analyzer for microfluidic - based molecular analysis.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xianbo; Chen, Dafeng; Liu, Changchun; Mauk, Michael G; Kientz, Terry; Bau, Haim H

    2011-10-01

    A portable, fully automated analyzer that provides actuation and flow control to a disposable, self-contained, microfluidic cassette ("chip") for point-of-care, molecular testing is described. The analyzer provides mechanical actuation to compress pouches that pump liquids in the cassette, to open and close diaphragm valves for flow control, and to induce vibrations that enhance stirring. The analyzer also provides thermal actuation for the temperature cycling needed for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of nucleic acids and for various drying processes. To improve the temperature uniformity of the PCR chamber, the system utilizes a double-sided heating/cooling scheme with a custom feedforward, variable, structural proportional-integral-derivative (FVSPID) controller. The analyzer includes a programmable central processing unit that directs the sequence and timing of the various operations and that is interfaced with a computer. The disposable cassette receives a sample, and it carries out cell lysis, nucleic acid isolation, concentration, and purification, thermal cycling, and either real time or lateral flow (LF) based detection. The system's operation was demonstrated by processing saliva samples spiked with B. cereus cells. The amplicons were detected with a lateral flow assay using upconverting phosphor reporter particles. This system is particularly suited for use in regions lacking centralized laboratory facilities and skilled personnel.

  4. Molecular pincers: antibody-based homogeneous protein sensors.

    PubMed

    Heyduk, Ewa; Dummit, Benjamin; Chang, Yie-Hwa; Heyduk, Tomasz

    2008-07-01

    We describe here a new homogeneous antibody-based protein sensor design (molecular pincers) that allows rapid and sensitive detection of a specific protein in solution. In the presence of the target protein these sensors produce fluorescence signal derived from target-dependent annealing of short complementary fluorochrome-labeled oligonucleotides attached to a pair of target-specific antibodies via nanometer-scale flexible linkers. The sensors allow near-instantaneous detection of the target with sensitivity and specificity approaching that of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) but requiring no sample manipulation other then the addition of the sample to the sensor mix. We used cardiac troponin I and C-reactive protein as the targets to validate these desirable properties of the sensors. Due to the availability of antibodies to thousands of interesting targets and the straightforward design blueprint of the sensors we expect their wide-ranging applications in research and medical diagnosis, especially when simplicity, high throughput, and short detection time are essential.

  5. Interfacial activation-based molecular bioimprinting of lipolytic enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Mingarro, I; Abad, C; Braco, L

    1995-01-01

    Interfacial activation-based molecular (bio)-imprinting (IAMI) has been developed to rationally improve the performance of lipolytic enzymes in nonaqueous environments. The strategy combinedly exploits (i) the known dramatic enhancement of the protein conformational rigidity in a water-restricted milieu and (ii) the reported conformational changes associated with the activation of these enzymes at lipid-water interfaces, which basically involves an increased substrate accessibility to the active site and/or an induction of a more competent catalytic machinery. Six model enzymes have been assayed in several model reactions in nonaqueous media. The results, rationalized in light of the present biochemical and structural knowledge, show that the IAMI approach represents a straightforward, versatile method to generate manageable, activated (kinetically trapped) forms of lipolytic enzymes, providing under optimal conditions nonaqueous rate enhancements of up to two orders of magnitude. It is also shown that imprintability of lipolytic enzymes depends not only on the nature of the enzyme but also on the "quality" of the interface used as the template. PMID:7724558

  6. Interfacial activation-based molecular bioimprinting of lipolytic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Mingarro, I; Abad, C; Braco, L

    1995-04-11

    Interfacial activation-based molecular (bio)-imprinting (IAMI) has been developed to rationally improve the performance of lipolytic enzymes in nonaqueous environments. The strategy combinedly exploits (i) the known dramatic enhancement of the protein conformational rigidity in a water-restricted milieu and (ii) the reported conformational changes associated with the activation of these enzymes at lipid-water interfaces, which basically involves an increased substrate accessibility to the active site and/or an induction of a more competent catalytic machinery. Six model enzymes have been assayed in several model reactions in nonaqueous media. The results, rationalized in light of the present biochemical and structural knowledge, show that the IAMI approach represents a straightforward, versatile method to generate manageable, activated (kinetically trapped) forms of lipolytic enzymes, providing under optimal conditions nonaqueous rate enhancements of up to two orders of magnitude. It is also shown that imprintability of lipolytic enzymes depends not only on the nature of the enzyme but also on the "quality" of the interface used as the template.

  7. Molecular microenvironments: Solvent interactions with nucleic acid bases and ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macelroy, R. D.; Pohorille, A.

    1986-01-01

    The possibility of reconstructing plausible sequences of events in prebiotic molecular evolution is limited by the lack of fossil remains. However, with hindsight, one goal of molecular evolution was obvious: the development of molecular systems that became constituents of living systems. By understanding the interactions among molecules that are likely to have been present in the prebiotic environment, and that could have served as components in protobiotic molecular systems, plausible evolutionary sequences can be suggested. When stable aggregations of molecules form, a net decrease in free energy is observed in the system. Such changes occur when solvent molecules interact among themselves, as well as when they interact with organic species. A significant decrease in free energy, in systems of solvent and organic molecules, is due to entropy changes in the solvent. Entropy-driven interactioins played a major role in the organization of prebiotic systems, and understanding the energetics of them is essential to understanding molecular evolution.

  8. MrGrid: A Portable Grid Based Molecular Replacement Pipeline

    PubMed Central

    Reboul, Cyril F.; Androulakis, Steve G.; Phan, Jennifer M. N.; Whisstock, James C.; Goscinski, Wojtek J.; Abramson, David; Buckle, Ashley M.

    2010-01-01

    Background The crystallographic determination of protein structures can be computationally demanding and for difficult cases can benefit from user-friendly interfaces to high-performance computing resources. Molecular replacement (MR) is a popular protein crystallographic technique that exploits the structural similarity between proteins that share some sequence similarity. But the need to trial permutations of search models, space group symmetries and other parameters makes MR time- and labour-intensive. However, MR calculations are embarrassingly parallel and thus ideally suited to distributed computing. In order to address this problem we have developed MrGrid, web-based software that allows multiple MR calculations to be executed across a grid of networked computers, allowing high-throughput MR. Methodology/Principal Findings MrGrid is a portable web based application written in Java/JSP and Ruby, and taking advantage of Apple Xgrid technology. Designed to interface with a user defined Xgrid resource the package manages the distribution of multiple MR runs to the available nodes on the Xgrid. We evaluated MrGrid using 10 different protein test cases on a network of 13 computers, and achieved an average speed up factor of 5.69. Conclusions MrGrid enables the user to retrieve and manage the results of tens to hundreds of MR calculations quickly and via a single web interface, as well as broadening the range of strategies that can be attempted. This high-throughput approach allows parameter sweeps to be performed in parallel, improving the chances of MR success. PMID:20386612

  9. Optical sensors based on the molecular condensation nuclei detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuptsov, Vladimir D.; Katelevsky, Vadim Y.; Valyukhov, Vladimir P.

    2015-05-01

    Molecular condensation nuclei (MCN) detector is a specialized optical sensor which provides for monitoring of various chemicals impurity in the environment and diagnosis of diseases in human exhaled air ("electronic nose" biosensor). Structurally MCN detector is included in the highly sensitive gas analyzers based on MCN method. The article describes the fundamental principles, specific features and application fields of the advanced highly sensitive MCN method. The MCN method is based on the application of various physico-chemical processes to the flow of a gas containing impurities. As a result of these processes aerosol particle that are about 106 times larger than the original molecule of the impurity are produced. The ability of the aerosol particle to scatter incident light also increases ~1014÷1016 times compared with the original molecule and the aerosol particle with the molecule of the impurity in the center is easily detected by light scattering inside a photometer. By measuring of the light scattering intensity is determined concentration of chemical impurities in the air. Aerosol particles in the MCN detector are formed in the condensing devices through overgrowth of the molecule detectable impurity by molecules so-called «developer» substance. At the final stage of the analysis in the MCN detector is measured light scattering by aerosol particles which is proportional to the concentration of determined impurities in the environment. For calculations of the scattered radiation is applicable Mie's theory considering the scattering of light by spherical particles whose size is comparable to the wavelength of light. We have determined that the light scattering by aerosol particles is interferometric and is comparable within an order of magnitude with light scattering by the air inside a photometer. The detection threshold for the target component of the gas analyzer is attained at the spontaneous ionization background level and not at the limiting

  10. A modular hierarchy-based theory of the chemical origins of life based on molecular complementarity.

    PubMed

    Root-Bernstein, Robert

    2012-12-18

    Albert Szent-Gyorgyi once defined discovery as seeing what everyone else sees and thinking what no one else thinks. I often find that phenomena that are obvious to other people are not obvious to me. Molecular complementarity is one of these phenomena: while rare among any random set of compounds, it is ubiquitous in living systems. Because every molecule in a living system binds more or less specifically to several others, we now speak of "interactomes". What explains the ubiquity of molecular complementarity in living systems? What might such an explanation reveal about the chemical origins of life and the principles that have governed its evolution? Beyond this, what might complementarity tell us about the optimization of integrated systems in general? My research combines theoretical and experimental approaches to molecular complementarity relating to evolution from prebiotic chemical systems to superorganismal interactions. Experimentally, I have characterized complementarity involving specific binding between small molecules and explored how these small-molecule modules have been incorporated into macromolecular systems such as receptors and transporters. Several general principles have emerged from this research. Molecules that bind to each other almost always alter each other's physiological effects; and conversely, molecules that have antagonistic or synergistic physiological effects almost always bind to each other. This principle suggests a chemical link between biological structure and function. Secondly, modern biological systems contain an embedded molecular paleontology based on complementarity that can reveal their chemical origins. This molecular paleontology is often manifested through modules involving small, molecularly complementary subunits that are built into modern macromolecular structures such as receptors and transporters. A third principle is that complementary modules are conserved and repurposed at every stage of evolution. Molecular

  11. Development of EST-based SNP and InDel markers and their utilization in tetraploid cotton genetic mapping

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were analyzed in silico in order to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and insertion-deletion polymorphisms (InDels) in cotton. A total of 1349 EST-based SNP and InDel markers were developed by comparing ESTs between Gossypium hirsutum and G. barbadense, m...

  12. Recent advances in molecular recognition based on nanoengineered platforms.

    PubMed

    Mu, Bin; Zhang, Jingqing; McNicholas, Thomas P; Reuel, Nigel F; Kruss, Sebastian; Strano, Michael S

    2014-04-15

    they are able to obtain loading curves similar to surface plasmon resonance measurements. They demonstrate the sensitivity and specificity of this platform with two higher-affined glycan-lectin pairs: fucose (Fuc) to PA-IIL and N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) to GafD. Lastly, we discuss how developments in protein biomarker detection in general are benefiting specifically from label-free molecular recognition. Electrical field effect transistors, chemi-resistive and fluorometric nanosensors based on various nanomaterials have demonstrated substantial progress in recent years in addressing this challenging problem. In this Account, we compare the balance between sensitivity, selectivity, and nonspecific adsorption for various applications. In particular, our group has utilized SWNTs as fluorescence sensors for label-free protein-protein interaction measurements. In this assay, we have encapsulated each nanotube in a biocompatible polymer, chitosan, which has been further modified to conjugate nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) groups. After Ni(2+) chelation, NTA Ni(2+) complexes bind to his-tagged proteins, resulting in a local environment change of the SWNT array, leading to optical fluorescence modulation with detection limit down to 100 nM. We have further engineered the platform to monitor single protein binding events, with an even lower detection limit down to 10 pM.

  13. Molecular mechanics modeling of azobenzene-based photoswitches.

    PubMed

    Duchstein, Patrick; Neiss, Christian; Görling, Andreas; Zahn, Dirk

    2012-06-01

    We present an extension of the generalized amber force field to allow the modeling of azobenzenes by means of classical molecular mechanics. TD-DFT calculations were employed to derive different interaction models for 4-hydroxy-4'-methyl-azobenzene, including the ground (S(0)) and S(1) excited state. For both states, partial charges and the -N = N- torsion potentials were characterized. On this basis, we pave the way to large-scale model simulations involving azobenzene molecular switches. Using the example of an isolated molecule, the mechanics of cyclic switching processes are demonstrated by classical molecular dynamics simulations.

  14. Prediction of molecular properties including symmetry from quantum-based molecular structural formulas, VIF.

    PubMed

    Alia, Joseph D; Vlaisavljevich, Bess; Abbot, Matthew; Warneke, Hallie; Mastin, Tyson

    2008-10-09

    Structurally covariant valency interaction formulas, VIF, gain chemical significance by comparison with resonance structures and natural bond orbital, NBO, bonding schemes and at the same time allow for additional prediction such as symmetry of ring systems and destabilization of electron pairs with respect to reference energy of -1/2 Eh. Comparisons are based on three chemical interpretations of Sinanoğlu's theory of structural covariance: (1) sets of structurally covariant quantum structural formulas, VIF, are interpreted as the same quantum operator represented in linearly related basis frames; (2) structurally covariant VIF pictures are interpreted as sets of molecular species with similar energy; and (3) the same VIF picture can be interpreted as different quantum operators, one-electron density or Hamiltonian; for example. According to these three interpretations, bond pair, lone pair, and free radical electrons understood in terms of a localized orbital representation are recognized as having energies above, below, or equal to a predetermined reference, frequently-1/2 Eh. The probable position of electron pairs and radical electrons is predicted. The selectivity of concerted ring closures in allyl anion and cation is described. Symmetries of conjugated ring systems are predicted according to their numbers of pi-electrons and spin-multiplicity. The pi-distortivity of benzene is predicted.The 3c/2e- H-bridging bonds in diborane are derived in a natural way according to the notion that the bridging bonds will have delocalizing interactions between them consistent with results of the NBO method. Key chemical bonding motifs are described using VIF. These include 2c/1e-, 2c/2e-, 2c/3e-, 3c/2e-, 3c/3e-,3c/4e-, 4n antiaromatic, and 4n+2 aromatic bonding systems. Some common organic functional groups are represented as VIF pictures and because these pictures can be interpreted simultaneously as one-electron density and Hamiltonian operators, the valence shell

  15. Conformational Analysis in 18-Membered Macrolactones Based on Molecular Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Belaidi, Salah; Harkati, Dalal

    2011-01-01

    Conformational analysis of 18-ring membered macrolactones has been carried out using molecular mechanics calculations and molecular dynamics. A high conformational flexibility of macrolactones was obtained, and an important stereoselectivity was observed for the complexed macrolides. For 18d macrolactone, which was presented by a most favored conformer with 20.1% without complex, it was populated with 50.1% in presence of Fe(CO)3. PMID:24052826

  16. Congenital neutropenia: diagnosis, molecular bases and patient management.

    PubMed

    Donadieu, Jean; Fenneteau, Odile; Beaupain, Blandine; Mahlaoui, Nizar; Chantelot, Christine Bellanné

    2011-05-19

    The term congenital neutropenia encompasses a family of neutropenic disorders, both permanent and intermittent, severe (<0.5 G/l) or mild (between 0.5-1.5 G/l), which may also affect other organ systems such as the pancreas, central nervous system, heart, muscle and skin. Neutropenia can lead to life-threatening pyogenic infections, acute gingivostomatitis and chronic parodontal disease, and each successive infection may leave permanent sequelae. The risk of infection is roughly inversely proportional to the circulating polymorphonuclear neutrophil count and is particularly high at counts below 0.2 G/l.When neutropenia is detected, an attempt should be made to establish the etiology, distinguishing between acquired forms (the most frequent, including post viral neutropenia and auto immune neutropenia) and congenital forms that may either be isolated or part of a complex genetic disease.Except for ethnic neutropenia, which is a frequent but mild congenital form, probably with polygenic inheritance, all other forms of congenital neutropenia are extremely rare and have monogenic inheritance, which may be X-linked or autosomal, recessive or dominant.About half the forms of congenital neutropenia with no extra-hematopoietic manifestations and normal adaptive immunity are due to neutrophil elastase (ELANE) mutations. Some patients have severe permanent neutropenia and frequent infections early in life, while others have mild intermittent neutropenia.Congenital neutropenia may also be associated with a wide range of organ dysfunctions, as for example in Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (associated with pancreatic insufficiency) and glycogen storage disease type Ib (associated with a glycogen storage syndrome). So far, the molecular bases of 12 neutropenic disorders have been identified.Treatment of severe chronic neutropenia should focus on prevention of infections. It includes antimicrobial prophylaxis, generally with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and also granulocyte

  17. Molecular recognition-based detoxification of aluminum in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Demircelik, Ahmet H; Andac, Muge; Andac, Cenk A; Say, Ridvan; Denizli, Adil

    2009-01-01

    Molecular recognition-based Al(3+)-imprinted poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate-N-methacryloyl-L-glutamic acid) (PHEMAGA-Al(3+)) beads were prepared to be used in selective removal of Al(3+) out of human plasma overdosed with Al(3+) cations. The PHEMAGA-Al(3+) beads were synthesized by suspension polymerization in the presence of a template-monomer complex (MAGA-Al(3+)). The specific surface area of PHEMAGA-Al(3+) beads was found to be 55.6 m(2)/g on the average. The MAGA content in the PHEMAGA-Al(3+) beads were found to be 640 micgomol/g polymer. The template Al(3+) cations could be reversibly detached from the matrix to form PHEMAGA-Al(3+) using a 50 mM solution of EDTA. The Al(3+)-free PHEMAGA-Al(3+) beads were then exposed to a selective separation procedure of Al(3+) out of human plasma, which was implemented in a continuous system by packing the beads into a separation column (10 cm long with an inner diameter of 0.9 cm) equipped with a water jacket to control the temperature. The Al(3+) adsorption capacity of the PHEMAGA-Al(3+) beads decreased drastically from 0.76 mg/g polymer to 0.22 mg/g polymer as the flow rate was increased from 0.3 ml/min to 1.5 ml/min. The relative selectivity coefficients of the PHEMAGA-Al(3+) beads for Al(3+)/Fe(3+), Al(3+)/Cu(2+) and Al(3+)/Zn(2+) were found to be 4.49, 8.95 and 32.44 times greater than those of the non-imprinted PHEMAGA beads, respectively. FT-IR analyses on the synthesized PHEMAGA-Al(3+) beads reveals monodentate and bidentate binding modes of Al(3+) in complex with the carboxylate groups of the glutamate residues. Density functional theory computations at the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) basis set suggests that structured water molecules play essential role in the stability of the monodentate binding mode in 1:1 PHEMAGA-Al(3+) complexes. The PHEMAGA-Al(3+) beads were recovered and reused many times, with no significant decrease in their adsorption capacities.

  18. An Inquiry-based Introduction to Molecular Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Foster

    2000-01-01

    Presents investigative approaches to teaching molecular biology. Emphasizes a deductive determination of the nature of nucleic acids visualized in a gel, and a comparison of different genomes. Asks why students should take it on faith that what they view on a gel is DNA. (SAH)

  19. Engineering controllable bidirectional molecular motors based on myosin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lu; Nakamura, Muneaki; Schindler, Tony D; Parker, David; Bryant, Zev

    2012-02-19

    Cytoskeletal motors drive the transport of organelles and molecular cargoes within cells and have potential applications in molecular detection and diagnostic devices. Engineering molecular motors with controllable properties will allow selective perturbation of mechanical processes in living cells and provide optimized device components for tasks such as molecular sorting and directed assembly. Biological motors have previously been modified by introducing activation/deactivation switches that respond to metal ions and other signals. Here, we show that myosin motors can be engineered to reversibly change their direction of motion in response to a calcium signal. Building on previous protein engineering studies and guided by a structural model for the redirected power stroke of myosin VI, we have constructed bidirectional myosins through the rigid recombination of structural modules. The performance of the motors was confirmed using gliding filament assays and single fluorophore tracking. Our strategy, in which external signals trigger changes in the geometry and mechanics of myosin lever arms, should make it possible to achieve spatiotemporal control over a range of motor properties including processivity, stride size and branchpoint turning.

  20. Web Based Learning Support for Experimental Design in Molecular Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilmsen, Tinri; Bisseling, Ton; Hartog, Rob

    An important learning goal of a molecular biology curriculum is a certain proficiency level in experimental design. Currently students are confronted with experimental approaches in textbooks, in lectures and in the laboratory. However, most students do not reach a satisfactory level of competence in the design of experimental approaches. This…

  1. Molecular filter-based diagnostics in high speed flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, Gregory S.; Samimy, MO; Arnette, Stephen A.

    1993-01-01

    The use of iodine molecular filters in nonintrusive planar velocimetry methods is examined. Detailed absorption profiles are obtained to highlight the effects that determine the profile shape. It is shown that pressure broadening induced by the presence of a nonabsorbing vapor can be utilized to significantly change the slopes bounding the absorbing region while remaining in the optically-thick regime.

  2. Web-based cheminformatics and molecular property prediction tools supporting drug design and development at Novartis.

    PubMed

    Ertl, P; Mühlbacher, J; Rohde, B; Selzer, P

    2003-01-01

    Web-based tools offer many advantages for processing chemical information, most notably ease of use and high interactivity. Therefore more and more pharmaceutical companies are using web technology to deliver sophisticated molecular processing tools directly to the desks of their chemists, to assist them in the process of designing and developing new drugs. In this paper, the web-based cheminformatics system developed at Novartis and currently used by more than thousand users is described. The system allows various molecular modeling and molecular processing tasks, including the calculation of molecular and substituent properties, property-based virtual screening, visualization of molecules, bioisosteric design, diversity analysis, and support of combinatorial chemistry. The methodology to calculate various molecular properties relevant to drug design is described, including the prediction of intestinal absorption, blood-brain barrier penetration, efflux, and water solubility. Information about the web technology used is also provided.

  3. Deciphering the molecular bases for drought tolerance in Arabidopsis autotetraploids.

    PubMed

    del Pozo, Juan C; Ramirez-Parra, Elena

    2014-12-01

    Whole genome duplication (autopolyploidy) is common in many plant species and often leads to better adaptation to adverse environmental conditions. However, little is known about the physiological and molecular mechanisms underlying these adaptations. Drought is one of the major environmental conditions limiting plant growth and development. Here, we report that, in Arabidopsis thaliana, tetraploidy promotes alterations in cell proliferation and organ size in a tissue-dependent manner. Furthermore, it potentiates plant tolerance to salt and drought stresses and decreases transpiration rate, likely through controlling stomata density and closure, abscisic acid (ABA) signalling and reactive oxygen species (ROS) homeostasis. Our transcriptomic analyses revealed that tetraploidy mainly regulates the expression of genes involved in redox homeostasis and ABA and stress response. Taken together, our data have shed light on the molecular basis associated with stress tolerance in autopolyploid plants.

  4. The HITRAN molecular data base - Editions of 1991 and 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothman, Laurence S.; Gamache, R. R.; Tipping, R. H.; Rinsland, C. P.; Smith, M. A. H.; Benner, D. C.; Devi, V. M.; Flaud, J.-M.; Camy-Peyret, C.; Perrin, A.

    1992-01-01

    We describe in this paper the modifications, improvements, and enhancements to the HITRAN molecular absorption database that have occurred in the two editions of 1991 and 1992. The current database includes line parameters for 31 species and their isotopomers that are significant for terrestrial atmospheric studies. This line-by-line portion of HITRAN presently contains about 709,000 transitions between 0 and 23,000/cm and contains three molecules not present in earlier versions: COF2, SF6, and H2S. The HITRAN compilation has substantially more information on chlorofluorocarbons and other molecular species that exhibit dense spectra which are not amenable to line-by-line representation. The user access of the database has been advanced, and new media forms are now available for use on personal computers.

  5. Effect of molecular electrical doping on polyfuran based photovoltaic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Shuwen; Opitz, Andreas; Salzmann, Ingo; Frisch, Johannes; Cohen, Erez; Bendikov, Michael; Koch, Norbert

    2015-05-18

    The electronic, optical, and morphological properties of molecularly p-doped polyfuran (PF) films were investigated over a wide range of doping ratio in order to explore the impact of doping in photovoltaic applications. We find evidence for integer-charge transfer between PF and the prototypical molecular p-dopant tetrafluoro-tetracyanoquinodimethane (F4TCNQ) and employed the doped polymer in bilayer organic solar cells using fullerene as acceptor. The conductivity increase in the PF films at dopant loadings ≤2% significantly enhances the short-circuit current of photovoltaic devices. For higher doping ratios, however, F4TCNQ is found to precipitate at the heterojunction between the doped donor polymer and the fullerene acceptor. Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that its presence acts beneficial to the energy-level alignment by doubling the open-circuit voltage of solar cells from 0.2 V to ca. 0.4 V, as compared to pristine PF.

  6. An electrochemical sensor for phenylephrine based on molecular imprinting.

    PubMed

    Yao, Liuduan; Tang, Youwen; Zeng, Weipeng; Huang, Zhaofa

    2009-09-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) were applied as molecular recognition elements to an electrochemical sensor for phenylephrine. A MIPs membrane was created on a glassy carbon electrode. SEM revealed a gradual change on the morphology of modified electrodes as the ratios of function monomer and cross-linking varied. When the ratio was 4:40, the surface morphology between the imprinted electrode (M-electrode) and the control electrode (N-electrode) became unambiguously different. This artificial receptor exhibited high selectivity for the template compared to closely related analogue. The response of the sensor varied in different concentration range might due to the heterogeneity of the MIPs membrane. This sensor was also used to determine phenylephrine in tablet samples.

  7. VAMMPIRE: a matched molecular pairs database for structure-based drug design and optimization.

    PubMed

    Weber, Julia; Achenbach, Janosch; Moser, Daniel; Proschak, Ewgenij

    2013-06-27

    Structure-based optimization to improve the affinity of a lead compound is an established approach in drug discovery. Knowledge-based databases holding molecular replacements can be supportive in the optimization process. We introduce a strategy to relate the substitution effect within matched molecular pairs (MMPs) to the atom environment within the cocrystallized protein-ligand complex. Virtually Aligned Matched Molecular Pairs Including Receptor Environment (VAMMPIRE) database and the supplementary web interface ( http://vammpire.pharmchem.uni-frankfurt.de ) provide valuable information for structure-based lead optimization.

  8. Extending the molecular clutch beyond actin-based cell motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havrylenko, Svitlana; Mezanges, Xavier; Batchelder, Ellen; Plastino, Julie

    2014-10-01

    Many cell movements occur via polymerization of the actin cytoskeleton beneath the plasma membrane at the front of the cell, forming a protrusion called a lamellipodium, while myosin contraction squeezes forward the back of the cell. In what is known as the ‘molecular clutch’ description of cell motility, forward movement results from the engagement of the acto-myosin motor with cell-matrix adhesions, thus transmitting force to the substrate and producing movement. However during cell translocation, clutch engagement is not perfect, and as a result, the cytoskeleton slips with respect to the substrate, undergoing backward (retrograde) flow in the direction of the cell body. Retrograde flow is therefore inversely proportional to cell speed and depends on adhesion and acto-myosin dynamics. Here we asked whether the molecular clutch was a general mechanism by measuring motility and retrograde flow for the Caenorhabditis elegans sperm cell in different adhesive conditions. These cells move by adhering to the substrate and emitting a dynamic lamellipodium, but the sperm cell does not contain an acto-myosin cytoskeleton. Instead the lamellipodium is formed by the assembly of major sperm protein, which has no biochemical or structural similarity to actin. We find that these cells display the same molecular clutch characteristics as acto-myosin containing cells. We further show that retrograde flow is produced both by cytoskeletal assembly and contractility in these cells. Overall this study shows that the molecular clutch hypothesis of how polymerization is transduced into motility via adhesions is a general description of cell movement regardless of the composition of the cytoskeleton.

  9. Extending the molecular clutch beyond actin-based cell motility

    PubMed Central

    Havrylenko, Svitlana; Mezanges, Xavier; Batchelder, Ellen; Plastino, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Many cell movements occur via polymerization of the actin cytoskeleton beneath the plasma membrane at the front of the cell, forming a protrusion called a lamellipodium, while myosin contraction squeezes forward the back of the cell. In what is known as the “molecular clutch” description of cell motility, forward movement results from the engagement of the acto-myosin motor with cell-matrix adhesions, thus transmitting force to the substrate and producing movement. However during cell translocation, clutch engagement is not perfect, and as a result, the cytoskeleton slips with respect to the substrate, undergoing backward (retrograde) flow in the direction of the cell body. Retrograde flow is therefore inversely proportional to cell speed and depends on adhesion and acto-myosin dynamics. Here we asked whether the molecular clutch was a general mechanism by measuring motility and retrograde flow for the Caenorhabditis elegans sperm cell in different adhesive conditions. These cells move by adhering to the substrate and emitting a dynamic lamellipodium, but the sperm cell does not contain an acto-myosin cytoskeleton. Instead the lamellipodium is formed by the assembly of Major Sperm Protein (MSP), which has no biochemical or structural similarity to actin. We find that these cells display the same molecular clutch characteristics as acto-myosin containing cells. We further show that retrograde flow is produced both by cytoskeletal assembly and contractility in these cells. Overall this study shows that the molecular clutch hypothesis of how polymerization is transduced into motility via adhesions is a general description of cell movement regardless of the composition of the cytoskeleton. PMID:25383039

  10. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Carbon Nanotube Based Gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Jie; Globus, Al; Jaffe, Richard; Deardorff, Glenn; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    We used molecular dynamics to investigate the properties and design space of molecular gears fashioned from carbon nanotubes with teeth added via a benzyne reaction known to occur with C60. A modified, parallelized version of Brenner's potential was used to model interatomic forces within each molecule. A Leonard-Jones 6-12 potential was used for forces between molecules. One gear was powered by forcing the atoms near the end of the buckytube to rotate, and a second gear was allowed.to rotate by keeping the atoms near the end of its buckytube on a cylinder. The meshing aromatic gear teeth transfer angular momentum from the powered gear to the driven gear. A number of gear and gear/shaft configurations were simulated. Cases in vacuum and with an inert atmosphere were examined. In an extension to molecular dynamics technology, some simulations used a thermostat on the atmosphere while the hydrocarbon gear's temperature was allowed to fluctuate. This models cooling the gears with an atmosphere. Results suggest that these gears can operate at up to 50-100 gigahertz in a vacuum or inert atmosphere at room temperature. The failure mode involves tooth slip, not bond breaking, so failed gears can be returned to operation by lowering temperature and/or rotation rate. Videos and atomic trajectory files in xyz format are presented.

  11. The Eyes Have It: A Problem-Based Learning Exercise in Molecular Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Harold B.

    2007-01-01

    Molecular evolution provides an interesting context in which to use problem-based learning because it integrates a variety of topics in biology, biochemistry, and molecular biology. This three-stage problem for advanced students deals with the structure, multiple functions, and properties of lactate dehydrogenase isozymes, and the related…

  12. Syntheses of steroid-based molecularly imprinted polymers and their molecular recognition study with spectrometric detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, He; Tong, Ai-jun; Li, Long-di

    2003-01-01

    Recognition of five steroid compounds, β-estradiol, ethynylestradiol, estradiolbenzoate, testosterone and methyltestosterone were studied using a synthesized molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP). When β-estradiol was used as the template molecule, the polymer was synthesized with methacrylic acid (MAA) as the functional monomer and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as the cross linking agent through non-covalent interactions. It is found that the kind of porogen solvent and the polymerization conditions greatly affected the binding ability of a MIP to a certain molecule. Releasing of the template was performed by continuous extraction with methanol containing 10% acetic acid in a Soxhlet extractor. Our results indicated that such carefully synthesized MIP showed specific affinity toward β-estradiol in the adsorption process.

  13. Small molecule correctors of F508del-CFTR discovered by structure-based virtual screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalid, Ori; Mense, Martin; Fischman, Sharon; Shitrit, Alina; Bihler, Hermann; Ben-Zeev, Efrat; Schutz, Nili; Pedemonte, Nicoletta; Thomas, Philip J.; Bridges, Robert J.; Wetmore, Diana R.; Marantz, Yael; Senderowitz, Hanoch

    2010-12-01

    Folding correctors of F508del-CFTR were discovered by in silico structure-based screening utilizing homology models of CFTR. The intracellular segment of CFTR was modeled and three cavities were identified at inter-domain interfaces: (1) Interface between the two Nucleotide Binding Domains (NBDs); (2) Interface between NBD1 and Intracellular Loop (ICL) 4, in the region of the F508 deletion; (3) multi-domain interface between NBD1:2:ICL1:2:4. We hypothesized that compounds binding at these interfaces may improve the stability of the protein, potentially affecting the folding yield or surface stability. In silico structure-based screening was performed at the putative binding-sites and a total of 496 candidate compounds from all three sites were tested in functional assays. A total of 15 compounds, representing diverse chemotypes, were identified as F508del folding correctors. This corresponds to a 3% hit rate, tenfold higher than hit rates obtained in corresponding high-throughput screening campaigns. The same binding sites also yielded potentiators and, most notably, compounds with a dual corrector-potentiator activity (dual-acting). Compounds harboring both activity types may prove to be better leads for the development of CF therapeutics than either pure correctors or pure potentiators. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of structure-based discovery of CFTR modulators.

  14. Construction of an interspecific genetic map based on InDel and SSR for mapping the QTLs affecting the initiation of flower primordia in pepper (Capsicum spp.).

    PubMed

    Tan, Shu; Cheng, Jiao-Wen; Zhang, Li; Qin, Cheng; Nong, Ding-Guo; Li, Wei-Peng; Tang, Xin; Wu, Zhi-Ming; Hu, Kai-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Re-sequencing permits the mining of genome-wide variations on a large scale and provides excellent resources for the research community. To accelerate the development and application of molecular markers and identify the QTLs affecting the flowering time-related trait in pepper, a total of 1,038 pairs of InDel and 674 SSR primers from different sources were used for genetic mapping using the F2 population (n = 154) derived from a cross between BA3 (C. annuum) and YNXML (C. frutescens). Of these, a total of 224 simple PCR-based markers, including 129 InDels and 95 SSRs, were validated and integrated into a map, which was designated as the BY map. The BY map consisted of 13 linkage groups (LGs) and spanned a total genetic distance of 1,249.77 cM with an average marker distance of 5.60 cM. Comparative analysis of the genetic and physical map based on the anchored markers showed that the BY map covered nearly the whole pepper genome. Based on the BY map, one major and five minor QTLs affecting the number of leaves on the primary axis (Nle) were detected on chromosomes P2, P7, P10 and P11 in 2012. The major QTL on P2 was confirmed based on another subset of the same F2 population (n = 147) in 2014 with selective genotyping of markers from the BY map. With the accomplishment of pepper whole genome sequencing and annotations (release 2.0), 153 candidate genes were predicted to embed in the Nle2.2 region, of which 12 important flowering related genes were obtained. The InDel/SSR-based interspecific genetic map, QTLs and candidate genes obtained by the present study will be useful for the downstream isolation of flowering time-related gene and other genetic applications for pepper.

  15. Molecular nanostamp based on one-dimensional porphyrin polymers.

    PubMed

    Kanaizuka, Katsuhiko; Izumi, Atsushi; Ishizaki, Manabu; Kon, Hiroki; Togashi, Takanari; Miyake, Ryosuke; Ishida, Takao; Tamura, Ryo; Haga, Masa-aki; Moritani, Youji; Sakamoto, Masatomi; Kurihara, Masato

    2013-08-14

    Surface design with unique functional molecules by a convenient one-pot treatment is an attractive project for the creation of smart molecular devices. We have employed a silane coupling reaction of porphyrin derivatives that form one-dimensional polymer wires on substrates. Our simple one-pot treatment of a substrate with porphyrin has successfully achieved the construction of nanoscale bamboo shoot structures. The nanoscale bamboo shoots on the substrates were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), UV-vis spectra, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. The uneven and rigid nanoscale structure has been used as a stamp for constructing bamboo shoot structures of fullerene.

  16. Fishing the molecular bases of Treacher Collins syndrome.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Andrea M J; Scampoli, Nadia L; Calcaterra, Nora B

    2012-01-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is an autosomal dominant disorder of craniofacial development, and mutations in the TCOF1 gene are responsible for over 90% of TCS cases. The knowledge about the molecular mechanisms responsible for this syndrome is relatively scant, probably due to the difficulty of reproducing the pathology in experimental animals. Zebrafish is an emerging model for human disease studies, and we therefore assessed it as a model for studying TCS. We identified in silico the putative zebrafish TCOF1 ortholog and cloned the corresponding cDNA. The derived polypeptide shares the main structural domains found in mammals and amphibians. Tcof1 expression is restricted to the anterior-most regions of zebrafish developing embryos, similar to what happens in mouse embryos. Tcof1 loss-of-function resulted in fish showing phenotypes similar to those observed in TCS patients, and enabled a further characterization of the mechanisms underlying craniofacial malformation. Besides, we initiated the identification of potential molecular targets of treacle in zebrafish. We found that Tcof1 loss-of-function led to a decrease in the expression of cellular proliferation and craniofacial development. Together, results presented here strongly suggest that it is possible to achieve fish with TCS-like phenotype by knocking down the expression of the TCOF1 ortholog in zebrafish. This experimental condition may facilitate the study of the disease etiology during embryonic development.

  17. Novel Metal Ion Based Estrogen Mimics for Molecular Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Rajagopalan, Raghavan

    2006-01-30

    The overall objective of the SBIR Phase I proposal is to prepare and evaluate a new class of {sup 99m}Tc or {sup 94m}Tc containing estrogen-like small molecules ('estrogen mimics') for SPECT or PET molecular imaging of estrogen receptor positive (ER+) tumors. In this approach, the metal ion is integrated into the estrone skeleton by isosteric substitution of a carbon atom in the steroidal structure to give new class of mimics that are topologically similar to the native estrogen (Fig. 1). Although both N{sub 2}S{sub 2} and N{sub 3}S mimics 1 and 2 were considered as target structures, molecular modeling study revealed that the presence of the acetyl group at position-15 in the N{sub 3}S mimic 2 causes steric hinderance toward binding of 2 to SHBG. Therefore, initial efforts were directed at the synthesis and evaluation of the N{sub 2}S{sub 2} mimic 1.

  18. Quantum-dots-encoded-microbeads based molecularly imprinted polymer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yixi; Liu, Le; He, Yonghong; He, Qinghua; Ma, Hui

    2016-03-15

    Quantum dots encoded microbeads have various advantages such as large surface area, superb optical properties and the ability of multiplexing. Molecularly imprinted polymer that can mimic the natural recognition entities has high affinity and selectivity for the specific analyte. Here, the concept of utilizing the quantum dots encoded microbeads as the supporting material and the polydopamine as the functional monomer to form the core-shell molecular imprinted polymer was proposed for the first time. The resulted imprinted polymer can provide various merits: polymerization can complete in aqueous environment; fabrication procedure is facile and universal; the obvious economic advantage; the thickness of the imprinting layer is highly controllable; polydopamine coating can improve the biocompatibility of the quantum dot encoded microbeads. The rabbit IgG binding and flow cytometer experiment result showed the distinct advantages of this strategy: cost-saving, facile and fast preparation procedure. Most importantly, the ability for the multichannel detection, which makes the imprinted polydopamine modified encoded-beads very attractive in protein pre-concentration, recognition, separation and biosensing.

  19. Linking traits based on their shared molecular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Oren, Yael; Nachshon, Aharon; Frishberg, Amit; Wilentzik, Roni; Gat-Viks, Irit

    2015-01-01

    There is growing recognition that co-morbidity and co-occurrence of disease traits are often determined by shared genetic and molecular mechanisms. In most cases, however, the specific mechanisms that lead to such trait–trait relationships are yet unknown. Here we present an analysis of a broad spectrum of behavioral and physiological traits together with gene-expression measurements across genetically diverse mouse strains. We develop an unbiased methodology that constructs potentially overlapping groups of traits and resolves their underlying combination of genetic loci and molecular mechanisms. For example, our method predicts that genetic variation in the Klf7 gene may influence gene transcripts in bone marrow-derived myeloid cells, which in turn affect 17 behavioral traits following morphine injection; this predicted effect of Klf7 is consistent with an in vitro perturbation of Klf7 in bone marrow cells. Our analysis demonstrates the utility of studying hidden causative mechanisms that lead to relationships between complex traits. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04346.001 PMID:25781485

  20. Synopsis of Trichosanthes (Cucurbitaceae) based on recent molecular phylogenetic data.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Hugo J; Thulin, Mats

    2012-01-01

    The snake gourd genus, Trichosanthes, is the largest genus in the Cucurbitaceae family, with over 90 species. Recent molecular phylogenetic data have indicated that the genus Gymnopetalum is to be merged with Trichosanthes to maintain monophyly. A revised infrageneric classification of Trichosanthes including Gymnopetalum is proposed with two subgenera, (I) subg. Scotanthus comb. nov. and (II) subg. Trichosanthes, eleven sections, (i) sect. Asterospermae, (ii) sect. Cucumeroides, (iii) sect. Edulis, (iv) sect. Foliobracteola, (v) sect. Gymnopetalum, (vi) sect. Involucraria, (vii) sect. Pseudovariifera sect. nov., (viii) sect. Villosae stat. nov., (ix) sect. Trichosanthes, (x) sect. Tripodanthera, and (xi) sect. Truncata. A synopsis of Trichosanthes with the 91 species recognized here is presented, including four new combinations, Trichosanthes orientalis, Trichosanthes tubiflora, Trichosanthes scabra var. pectinata, Trichosanthes scabra var. penicaudii, and a clarified nomenclature of Trichosanthes costata and Trichosanthes scabra.

  1. ChemPreview: an augmented reality-based molecular interface.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Min; Waller, Mark P

    2017-05-01

    Human computer interfaces make computational science more comprehensible and impactful. Complex 3D structures such as proteins or DNA are magnified by digital representations and displayed on two-dimensional monitors. Augmented reality has recently opened another door to access the virtual three-dimensional world. Herein, we present an augmented reality application called ChemPreview with the potential to manipulate bio-molecular structures at an atomistic level. ChemPreview is available at https://github.com/wallerlab/chem-preview/releases, and is built on top of the Meta 1 platform https://www.metavision.com/. ChemPreview can be used to interact with a protein in an intuitive way using natural hand gestures, thereby making it appealing to computational chemists or structural biologists. The ability to manipulate atoms in real world could eventually provide new and more efficient ways of extracting structural knowledge, or designing new molecules in silico.

  2. Peptide-Based Molecular Hydrogels as Supramolecular Protein Mimics.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nishant; Kumar, Mohit; Miravet, Juan F; Ulijn, Rein V; Escuder, Beatriu

    2017-01-23

    This Minireview concerns recent advances in the design, synthesis, and application of low molecular-weight peptidic hydrogelators. The sequence-specific combinations of amino acid side chain functionalities combined with hydrogen bonding of amide backbones and hydrophobic (aromatic) capping groups give these peptidic molecules the intrinsic tendency to self-assemble. The most prevalent designs include N-capped amino acid residues, bolamphiphilic peptides, and amphipathic peptides. Factors such as hydrophobic effects, the Hofmeister effect, and tunable ionization influence their aggregation properties. The self-assembly of simple bio-inspired building blocks into higher organized structures allows comparisons to be drawn with proteins and their complex functionalities, providing preliminary insights into complex biological functions and also enabling their application in a wide range of fields including catalysis, biomedical applications, and mimicry of natural dissipative systems. The Minireview is concluded by a short summary and outlook, highlighting the advances and steps required to bridge the gaps in the understanding of such systems.

  3. Uncovering Molecular Bases Underlying Bone Morphogenetic Protein Receptor Inhibitor Selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Alsamarah, Abdelaziz; LaCuran, Alecander E.; Oelschlaeger, Peter; Hao, Jijun; Luo, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal alteration of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling is implicated in many types of diseases including cancer and heterotopic ossifications. Hence, small molecules targeting BMP type I receptors (BMPRI) to interrupt BMP signaling are believed to be an effective approach to treat these diseases. However, lack of understanding of the molecular determinants responsible for the binding selectivity of current BMP inhibitors has been a big hindrance to the development of BMP inhibitors for clinical use. To address this issue, we carried out in silico experiments to test whether computational methods can reproduce and explain the high selectivity of a small molecule BMP inhibitor DMH1 on BMPRI kinase ALK2 vs. the closely related TGF-β type I receptor kinase ALK5 and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor type 2 (VEGFR2) tyrosine kinase. We found that, while the rigid docking method used here gave nearly identical binding affinity scores among the three kinases; free energy perturbation coupled with Hamiltonian replica-exchange molecular dynamics (FEP/H-REMD) simulations reproduced the absolute binding free energies in excellent agreement with experimental data. Furthermore, the binding poses identified by FEP/H-REMD led to a quantitative analysis of physical/chemical determinants governing DMH1 selectivity. The current work illustrates that small changes in the binding site residue type (e.g. pre-hinge region in ALK2 vs. ALK5) or side chain orientation (e.g. Tyr219 in caALK2 vs. wtALK2), as well as a subtle structural modification on the ligand (e.g. DMH1 vs. LDN193189) will cause distinct binding profiles and selectivity among BMP inhibitors. Therefore, the current computational approach represents a new way of investigating BMP inhibitors. Our results provide critical information for designing exclusively selective BMP inhibitors for the development of effective pharmacotherapy for diseases caused by aberrant BMP signaling. PMID:26133550

  4. Fragment based G-QSAR and molecular dynamics based mechanistic simulations into hydroxamic-based HDAC inhibitors against spinocerebellar ataxia.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Siddharth; Tyagi, Chetna; Goyal, Sukriti; Jamal, Salma; Somvanshi, Pallavi; Grover, Abhinav

    2016-10-01

    Expansion of polyglutamine (CAG) triplets within the coding gene ataxin 2 results in transcriptional repression, forming the molecular basis of the neurodegenerative disorder named spinocerebellar ataxia type-2 (SCA2). HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) have been elements of great interest in polyglutamine disorders such as Huntington's and Ataxia's. In this study, we have selected hydroxamic acid derivatives as HDACi and performed fragment-based G-QSAR, molecular docking studies and molecular dynamics simulations for elucidating the dynamic mode of action of HDACi with His-Asp catalytic dyad of HDAC4. The model was statistically validated to establish its predictive robustness. The model was statistically significant with r(2) value of .6297, cross-validated co-relation coefficient q(2) value of .5905 and pred_r(2) (predicted square co-relation coefficient) value of .85. An F-test value of 56.11 confirms absolute robustness of the model. Two combinatorial libraries comprising of 3180 compounds were created with hydroxamate moiety as the template and their pIC50 activities were predicted based on the G-QSAR model. The combinatorial library created was screened on the basis of predicted activity (pIC50), with two resultant top scoring compounds, HIC and DHC. The interaction of the compounds with His-Asp dyad in terms of H-bond interactions with His802, Asp840, Pro942, and Gly975 residues of HDAC4 was evaluated by docking and 20 ns long molecular dynamics simulations. This study provides valuable leads for structural substitutions required for hydroxamate moiety to exhibit enhanced inhibitory activity against HDAC4. The reported compounds demonstrated good binding and thus can be considered as potent therapeutic leads against ataxia.

  5. A new graph-based molecular descriptor using the canonical representation of the molecule.

    PubMed

    Hentabli, Hamza; Saeed, Faisal; Abdo, Ammar; Salim, Naomie

    2014-01-01

    Molecular similarity is a pervasive concept in drug design. The basic idea underlying molecular similarity is the similar property principle, which states that structurally similar molecules will exhibit similar physicochemical and biological properties. In this paper, a new graph-based molecular descriptor (GBMD) is introduced. The GBMD is a new method of obtaining a rough description of 2D molecular structure in textual form based on the canonical representations of the molecule outline shape and it allows rigorous structure specification using small and natural grammars. Simulated virtual screening experiments with the MDDR database show clearly the superiority of the graph-based descriptor compared to many standard descriptors (ALOGP, MACCS, EPFP4, CDKFP, PCFP, and SMILE) using the Tanimoto coefficient (TAN) and the basic local alignment search tool (BLAST) when searches were carried.

  6. Ab initio study on (CO2)n clusters via electrostatics- and molecular tailoring-based algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovan Jose, K. V.; Gadre, Shridhar R.

    An algorithm based on molecular electrostatic potential (MESP) and molecular tailoring approach (MTA) for building energetically favorable molecular clusters is presented. This algorithm is tested on prototype (CO2)n clusters with n = 13, 20, and 25 to explore their structure, energetics, and properties. The most stable clusters in this series are seen to show more number of triangular motifs. Many-body energy decomposition analysis performed on the most stable clusters reveals that the 2-body is the major contributor (>96%) to the total interaction energy. Vibrational frequencies and molecular electrostatic potentials are also evaluated for these large clusters through MTA. The MTA-based MESPs of these clusters show a remarkably good agreement with the corresponding actual ones. The most intense MTA-based normal mode frequencies are in fair agreement with the actual ones for smaller clusters. These calculated asymmetric stretching frequencies are blue-shifted with reference to the CO2 monomer.

  7. Molecular cloning of the 8000-base thyroglobulin structural gene.

    PubMed

    Christophe, D; Mercken, L; Brocas, H; Pohl, V; Vassart, G

    1982-03-01

    Bovine thyroglobulin mRNA was reverse-transcribed into full-length double-stranded cDNA. The existence of three HindIII restriction endonuclease sites in the 8000-base thyroglobulin structural gene had allowed the easy cloning of the two internal HindIII fragments [Christophe et al. (1980) Eur. J. Biochem. 111, 419-423]. In the present study, the central portion of the structural gene was cloned in Escherichia coli as two individual recombinant plasmids containing 2000-base-pair and 4700-base-pair segments located respectively 5' and 3' relative to the unique BamHI site of the cDNA. BamHI linkers were added to the double-stranded cDNA and, following restriction with HindIII, selective cloning of the 5' (2600-base-pair) and 3' (1000-base-pair) terminal HindIII fragments was achieved by inserting them between the HindIII and BamHI sites of the plasmid pBR322. Partial sequencing of the 1000-base-pair 3'-terminal fragment demonstrated the presence of an A-A-U-A-A-A sequence in the mRNA 14 bases upstream from a poly(A) tract corresponding to the 3' end of the mRNA. Together, the four clones represent about 99% of the thyroglobulin structural gene and provide the starting material for the determination of thyroglobulin primary structure.

  8. Density functional theory based study of molecular interactions, recognition, engineering, and quantum transport in π molecular systems.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yeonchoo; Cho, Woo Jong; Youn, Il Seung; Lee, Geunsik; Singh, N Jiten; Kim, Kwang S

    2014-11-18

    CONSPECTUS: In chemical and biological systems, various interactions that govern the chemical and physical properties of molecules, assembling phenomena, and electronic transport properties compete and control the microscopic structure of materials. The well-controlled manipulation of each component can allow researchers to design receptors or sensors, new molecular architectures, structures with novel morphology, and functional molecules or devices. In this Account, we describe the structures and electronic and spintronic properties of π-molecular systems that are important for controlling the architecture of a variety of carbon-based systems. Although DFT is an important tool for describing molecular interactions, the inability of DFT to accurately represent dispersion interactions has made it difficult to properly describe π-interactions. However, the recently developed dispersion corrections for DFT have allowed us to include these dispersion interactions cost-effectively. We have investigated noncovalent interactions of various π-systems including aromatic-π, aliphatic-π, and non-π systems based on dispersion-corrected DFT (DFT-D). In addition, we have addressed the validity of DFT-D compared with the complete basis set (CBS) limit values of coupled cluster theory with single, double, and perturbative triple excitations [CCSD(T)] and Møller-Plesset second order perturbation theory (MP2). The DFT-D methods are still unable to predict the correct ordering in binding energies within the benzene dimer and the cyclohexane dimer. Nevertheless, the overall DFT-D predicted binding energies are in reasonable agreement with the CCSD(T) results. In most cases, results using the B97-D3 method closely reproduce the CCSD(T) results with the optimized energy-fitting parameters. On the other hand, vdW-DF2 and PBE0-TS methods estimate the dispersion energies from the calculated electron density. In these approximations, the interaction energies around the equilibrium

  9. The molecular bases of Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Maccioni, R B; Muñoz, J P; Barbeito, L

    2001-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease, the cause of one of the most common types of dementia, is a brain disorder affecting the elderly and is characterized by the formation of two main protein aggregates: senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, which are involved in the process leading to progressive neuronal degeneration and death. Neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease is a pathologic condition of cells rather than an accelerated way of aging. The senile plaques are generated by a deposition in the human brain of fibrils of the beta-amyloid peptide (Abeta), a fragment derived from the proteolytic processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). Tau protein is the major component of paired helical filaments (PHFs), which form a compact filamentous network described as neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs). Experiments with hippocampal cells in culture have indicated a relationship between fibrillary amyloid and the cascade of molecular signals that trigger tau hyperphosphorylations. Two main protein kinases have been shown to be involved in anomalous tau phosphorylations: the cyclin-dependent kinase Cdk5 and glycogen synthase kinase GSK3beta. Cdk5 plays a critical role in brain development and is associated with neurogenesis as revealed by studies in brain cells in culture and neuroblastoma cells. Deregulation of this protein kinase as induced by extracellular amyloid loading results in tau hyperphosphorylations, thus triggering a sequence of molecular events that lead to neuronal degeneration. Inhibitors of Cdk5 and GSK3beta and antisense oligonucleotides exert protection against neuronal death. On the other hand, there is cumulative evidence from studies in cultured brain cells and on brains that oxidative stress constitutes a main factor in the modification of normal signaling pathways in neuronal cells, leading to biochemical and structural abnormalities and neurodegeneration as related to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. This review is focused on the main protein

  10. Polyphosphazene Based Star-Branched and Dendritic Molecular Brushes

    PubMed Central

    Henke, Helena; Posch, Sandra; Brüggemann, Oliver; Teasdale, Ian

    2016-01-01

    A new synthetic procedure is described for the preparation of poly(organo)phosphazenes with star-branched and star dendritic molecular brush type structures, thus describing the first time it has been possible to prepare controlled, highly branched architectures for this type of polymer. Furthermore, as a result of the extremely high-arm density generated by the phosphazene repeat unit, the second-generation structures represent quite unique architectures for any type of polymer. Using two relativity straight forward iterative syntheses it is possible to prepare globular highly branched polymers with up to 30 000 functional end groups, while keeping relatively narrow polydispersities (1.2–1.6). Phosphine mediated polymerization of chlorophosphoranimine is first used to prepare three-arm star polymers. Subsequent substitution with diphenylphosphine moieties gives poly(organo)phosphazenes to function as multifunctional macroinitiators for the growth of a second generation of polyphosphazene arms. Macrosubstitution with Jeffamine oligomers gives a series of large, water soluble branched macromolecules with high-arm density and hydrodynamic diameters between 10 and 70 nm. PMID:27027404

  11. Electrochemical sensors based on magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers: A review.

    PubMed

    Yáñez-Sedeño, Paloma; Campuzano, Susana; Pingarrón, José M

    2017-04-01

    Participation of magnetic component in molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) has facilitated enormously the incorporation of these polymeric materials on electrode surfaces allowing the design of electrochemical sensors with very attractive analytical characteristics in terms of simplicity, reproducibility, low fabrication cost, high sensitivity and selectivity and rapid assay time. The magnetically susceptible resultant MIPs (MMIPs) allowed a simple and fast elution of the template molecules from MMIPs, are easily and faster collected without filtration, centrifugation or other complex operations and are also faster assembled and removed from the electrode surface by simply using an external magnetic field. A wide range of different (nano)materials such as gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), graphene oxide, single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs and MWCNTs) as well as different electrode modifiers (ionic liquids (ILs) and surfactants/dispersants) have been incorporated into the MMIPs to improve the analytical performance of the resulting electrochemical sensors which have demonstrated great promise for determination of relevant analytes in environmental, food and clinical analyses.

  12. Molecular and biomolecular-based nanomaterials: Tubulin and taxol as molecular constituents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro Carmona, Javier Servando

    The new field of protein-based nano-technology takes advantage of the complex interactions between proteins to form unique structures with properties that cannot be achieved with traditional components. Microtubules (MTs), self assembled proteinaceous hollow filaments, offer promise in the development of MT-based nano-systems. The compelling need for the controlled assembly of 3D MT arrays is the fundamental motivation for the first part of this research. We report on the morphology of MTs grown in a crowded environment in the form of high viscosity fluids containing agarose and a novel process that enables the assembly of MTs supported by gel-based 3D scaffolds. Our research on MTs and their interaction with other molecules lead us to discover extraordinary spherulitic structures that changed the course of the project. The novel subject situate us into a complicated dilemma that question the nature of MT asters reported in experiments carried out in cells. The second part of this research is focused in the crystallization of Taxol, a MT stabilizing molecule used as anti-cancer drug. It was confirmed via fluorescent and differential interference contrast microscopy that Taxol crystals can be decorated with fluorescent proteins and fluorochromes without perturbing their morphology. We used theoretical calculations to further investigate Taxol-fluorescent agent interactions. Furthermore, the crystallization of Taxol was studied in pure water, aqueous solutions containing tubulin proteins and tubulin-containing agarose gels. We demonstrated that tubulin is able to heterogeneously nucleate Taxol spherulites. To explain the formation of tubulin-Taxol nuclei a new, secondary Taxol-binding site within the tubulin heterodimer is suggested. Results presented in this work are important for in vivo and in vitro microtubule studies due to the possibility of mistaking these Taxol spherulites for microtubule asters. Thus, we are confirming the need for careful interpretation of

  13. A communication theoretical analysis of FRET-based mobile ad hoc molecular nanonetworks.

    PubMed

    Kuscu, Murat; Akan, Ozgur B

    2014-09-01

    Nanonetworks refer to a group of nanosized machines with very basic operational capabilities communicating to each other in order to accomplish more complex tasks such as in-body drug delivery, or chemical defense. Realizing reliable and high-rate communication between these nanomachines is a fundamental problem for the practicality of these nanonetworks. Recently, we have proposed a molecular communication method based on Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) which is a nonradiative excited state energy transfer phenomenon observed among fluorescent molecules, i.e., fluorophores. We have modeled the FRET-based communication channel considering the fluorophores as single-molecular immobile nanomachines, and shown its reliability at high rates, and practicality at the current stage of nanotechnology. In this study, for the first time in the literature, we investigate the network of mobile nanomachines communicating through FRET. We introduce two novel mobile molecular nanonetworks: FRET-based mobile molecular sensor/actor nanonetwork (FRET-MSAN) which is a distributed system of mobile fluorophores acting as sensor or actor node; and FRET-based mobile ad hoc molecular nanonetwork (FRET-MAMNET) which consists of fluorophore-based nanotransmitter, nanoreceivers and nanorelays. We model the single message propagation based on birth-death processes with continuous time Markov chains. We evaluate the performance of FRET-MSAN and FRET-MAMNET in terms of successful transmission probability and mean extinction time of the messages, system throughput, channel capacity and achievable communication rates.

  14. Simple nanoparticle-based luminometric method for molecular weight determination of polymeric compounds.

    PubMed

    Pihlasalo, Sari; Virtamo, Maria; Legrand, Nicolas; Hänninen, Pekka; Härmä, Harri

    2014-01-21

    A nanoparticle-based method utilizing time-resolved luminescence resonance energy transfer (TR-LRET) was developed for molecular weight determination. This mix-and-measure nanoparticle method is based on the competitive adsorption between the analyte and the acceptor-labeled protein to donor Eu(III) nanoparticles. The size-dependent adsorption of molecules enables the molecular weight determination of differently sized polymeric compounds down to a concentration level of micrograms per liter. The molecular weight determination from 1 to 10 kDa for polyamino acids and from 0.3 to 70 kDa for polyethylene imines is demonstrated. The simple and cost-effective nanoparticle method as microtiter plate assay format shows great potential for the detection of the changes in molecular weight or for quantification of differently sized molecules in biochemical laboratories and in industrial polymeric processes.

  15. Spin-dependent Seebeck effects in graphene-based molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianwei; Wang, Bin; Xu, Fuming; Wei, Yadong; Wang, Jian

    2016-05-01

    We report a first-principles investigation of spin-dependent transport properties in two different graphene-based molecular junctions. By applying different temperatures between two leads without bias voltage, spin-dependent currents are driven which depend on reference temperature T , temperature gradient Δ T , and gate voltage Vg. Moreover, pure spin currents without charge currents can be obtained by adjusting T ,Δ T , and Vg for both molecular junctions. The directions of pure spin currents in these two molecular junctions are opposite, which can be understood by analyzing the transmission coefficients under equilibrium states. Spin thermopower, thermal conductance, and the figure of merit as functions of T ,Vg, and chemical potential μ were also investigated in the linear response regime. Large spin thermopower and spin figure of merit can be obtained by adjusting Vg and μ for each junction, which indicates proper application of spin caloritronic devices of our graphene-based molecular junctions.

  16. Foraging on the potential energy surface: A swarm intelligence-based optimizer for molecular geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehmeyer, Christoph; Falk von Rudorff, Guido; Wolf, Sebastian; Kabbe, Gabriel; Schärf, Daniel; Kühne, Thomas D.; Sebastiani, Daniel

    2012-11-01

    We present a stochastic, swarm intelligence-based optimization algorithm for the prediction of global minima on potential energy surfaces of molecular cluster structures. Our optimization approach is a modification of the artificial bee colony (ABC) algorithm which is inspired by the foraging behavior of honey bees. We apply our modified ABC algorithm to the problem of global geometry optimization of molecular cluster structures and show its performance for clusters with 2-57 particles and different interatomic interaction potentials.

  17. NLP-based information extraction for managing the molecular biology literature.

    PubMed Central

    Libbus, Bisharah; Rindflesch, Thomas C.

    2002-01-01

    We present research aimed at devising a tool for using natural language processing to identify and extract biomedical information from text for the purpose of assisting researchers in molecular biology manage large amounts of information. A pilot project based on the molecular genetics of diabetes demonstrates our ability to explore the interaction of genomic phenomena and clinical findings. We suggest the cooperation of this extracted information with systems for clustering text and constructing labeled networks of data. PMID:12463863

  18. Magnetic wire trap arrays for biomarker-based molecular detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, Gregory; Mahajan, Kalpesh; Ruan, Gang; Winter, Jessica; Sooryakumar, R.

    2012-02-01

    Submicrometer-scale magnetic devices built on chip-based platforms have recently been shown to present opportunities for new particle trapping and manipulation technologies. Meanwhile, advances in nanoparticle fabrication allow for the building of custom-made particles with precise control of their size, composition, and other properties such as magnetism, fluorescence, and surface biomarker characteristics. In particular, carefully tailored surface biomarkers facilitate precise binding to targeted molecules, self-actuated construction of hybrid structures, and fluorescence-based detection schemes. Based on these progresses, we present an on-chip detection mechanism for molecules with known surface markers. Hybrid nanostructures consisting of micelle nanoparticles, fluorescent quantum dots, and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are used to detect proteins or DNA molecules. The target is detected by the magnetic and fluorescent functionalities of the composite nanostructure, whereas in the absence of the target these signals are not present. Underlying this approach is the simultaneous manipulation via ferromagnetic zigzag nanowire arrays and imaging via quantum dot excitation. This chip-based detection technique could provide a powerful, low cost tool for ultrasensitive molecule detection with ramifications in healthcare diagnostics and small-scale chemical synthesis.

  19. Discrete Biogeography Based Optimization for Feature Selection in Molecular Signatures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Tian, Meihong; Zhang, Chunhua; Li, Xiangtao

    2015-04-01

    Biomarker discovery from high-dimensional data is a complex task in the development of efficient cancer diagnoses and classification. However, these data are usually redundant and noisy, and only a subset of them present distinct profiles for different classes of samples. Thus, selecting high discriminative genes from gene expression data has become increasingly interesting in the field of bioinformatics. In this paper, a discrete biogeography based optimization is proposed to select the good subset of informative gene relevant to the classification. In the proposed algorithm, firstly, the fisher-markov selector is used to choose fixed number of gene data. Secondly, to make biogeography based optimization suitable for the feature selection problem; discrete migration model and discrete mutation model are proposed to balance the exploration and exploitation ability. Then, discrete biogeography based optimization, as we called DBBO, is proposed by integrating discrete migration model and discrete mutation model. Finally, the DBBO method is used for feature selection, and three classifiers are used as the classifier with the 10 fold cross-validation method. In order to show the effective and efficiency of the algorithm, the proposed algorithm is tested on four breast cancer dataset benchmarks. Comparison with genetic algorithm, particle swarm optimization, differential evolution algorithm and hybrid biogeography based optimization, experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is better or at least comparable with previous method from literature when considering the quality of the solutions obtained.

  20. Molecular Design of Benzodithiophene-Based Organic Photovoltaic Materials.

    PubMed

    Yao, Huifeng; Ye, Long; Zhang, Hao; Li, Sunsun; Zhang, Shaoqing; Hou, Jianhui

    2016-06-22

    Advances in the design and application of highly efficient conjugated polymers and small molecules over the past years have enabled the rapid progress in the development of organic photovoltaic (OPV) technology as a promising alternative to conventional solar cells. Among the numerous OPV materials, benzodithiophene (BDT)-based polymers and small molecules have come to the fore in achieving outstanding power conversion efficiency (PCE) and breaking 10% efficiency barrier in the single junction OPV devices. Remarkably, the OPV device featured by BDT-based polymer has recently demonstrated an impressive PCE of 11.21%, indicating the great potential of this class of materials in commercial photovoltaic applications. In this review, we offered an overview of the organic photovoltaic materials based on BDT from the aspects of backbones, functional groups, alkyl chains, and device performance, trying to provide a guideline about the structure-performance relationship. We believe more exciting BDT-based photovoltaic materials and devices will be developed in the near future.

  1. New molecular descriptors based on local properties at the molecular surface and a boiling-point model derived from them.

    PubMed

    Ehresmann, Bernd; de Groot, Marcel J; Alex, Alexander; Clark, Timothy

    2004-01-01

    New molecular descriptors based on statistical descriptions of the local ionization potential, local electron affinity, and the local polarizability at the surface of the molecule are proposed. The significance of these descriptors has been tested by calculating them for the Maybridge database in addition to our set of 26 descriptors reported previously. The new descriptors show little correlation with those already in use. Furthermore, the principal components of the extended set of descriptors for the Maybridge data show that especially the descriptors based on the local electron affinity extend the variance in our set of descriptors, which we have previously shown to be relevant to physical properties. The first nine principal components are shown to be most significant. As an example of the usefulness of the new descriptors, we have set up a QSPR model for boiling points using both the old and new descriptors.

  2. Lewis Acid-Base, Molecular Modeling, and Isotopic Labeling in a Sophomore Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nataro, Chip; Ferguson, Michelle A.; Bocage, Katherine M.; Hess, Brian J.; Ross, Vincent J.; Swarr, Daniel T.

    2004-01-01

    An experiment to prepare a deuterium labeled adduct of a Lewis acid and Lewis base, to use computational methods allowing students to visualize the LUMO of Lewis acids, the HOMO of Lewis bases and the molecular orbitals of the adduct that is formed is developed. This allows students to see the interplay between calculated and experimental results.

  3. Microbial detection method based on sensing molecular hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, J. R.; Stoner, G. E.; Boykin, E. H.

    1974-01-01

    A simple method for detecting bacteria, based on the time of hydrogen evolution, was developed and tested against various members of the Enterobacteriaceae group. The test system consisted of (1) two electrodes, platinum and a reference electrode, (2) a buffer amplifier, and (3) a strip-chart recorder. Hydrogen evolution was measured by an increase in voltage in the negative (cathodic) direction. A linear relationship was established between inoculum size and the time hydrogen was detected (lag period). Lag times ranged from 1 h for 1 million cells/ml to 7 h for 1 cell/ml. For each 10-fold decrease in inoculum, length of the lag period increased 60 to 70 min. Based on the linear relationship between inoculum and lag period, these results indicate the potential application of the hydrogen-sensing method for rapidly detecting coliforms and other gas-producing microorganisms in a variety of clinical, food, and other samples.

  4. Molecular engineering of manipulated alginate-based polyurethanes.

    PubMed

    Daemi, Hamed; Barikani, Mehdi

    2014-11-04

    The novel soluble alginate-based polyurethanes in organic solvents were synthesized by the reaction of NCO-terminated prepolymers and tributylammonium alginate (TBA-Alg) for the first time. The chemical structures of synthesized polyurethanes were characterized using FTIR, (1)H NMR and TGA. The reaction completion was confirmed by disappearing of NCO band in FTIR spectra. Furthermore, a peak at 4.71 ppm and some small peaks at a range of 4.12-4.37 ppm in the (1)H NMR of alginate-based polyurethanes were assigned to the backbone of alginate. The results of both FTIR and (1)H NMR were remarkably confirmed by TGA data. The ionic nature of polyurethane backbone not only affects on thermal properties of samples, but it also changes the chemically-bonded alginate morphology. Both polyether and polyester based non-ionic polyurethanes extended by TBA-Alg illustrated the distinct alginate, whereas those ionomers extended by alginate were appeared as the continuous systems at nanoscale.

  5. Genetic diversity and population structure in Physalis peruviana and related taxa based on InDels and SNPs derived from COSII and IRG markers

    PubMed Central

    Garzón-Martínez, Gina A.; Osorio-Guarín, Jaime A.; Delgadillo-Durán, Paola; Mayorga, Franklin; Enciso-Rodríguez, Felix E.; Landsman, David

    2015-01-01

    The genus Physalis is common in the Americas and includes several economically important species, among them Physalis peruviana that produces appetizing edible fruits. We studied the genetic diversity and population structure of P. peruviana and characterized 47 accessions of this species along with 13 accessions of related taxa consisting of 222 individuals from the Colombian Corporation of Agricultural Research (CORPOICA) germplasm collection, using Conserved Orthologous Sequences (COSII) and Immunity Related Genes (IRGs). In addition, 642 Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNPs) markers were identified and used for the genetic diversity analysis. A total of 121 alleles were detected in 24 InDels loci ranging from 2 to 9 alleles per locus, with an average of 5.04 alleles per locus. The average number of alleles in the SNP markers was two. The observed heterozygosity for P. peruviana with InDel and SNP markers was higher (0.48 and 0.59) than the expected heterozygosity (0.30 and 0.41). Interestingly, the observed heterozygosity in related taxa (0.4 and 0.12) was lower than the expected heterozygosity (0.59 and 0.25). The coefficient of population differentiation FST was 0.143 (InDels) and 0.038 (SNPs), showing a relatively low level of genetic differentiation among P. peruviana and related taxa. Higher levels of genetic variation were instead observed within populations based on the AMOVA analysis. Population structure analysis supported the presence of two main groups and PCA analysis based on SNP markers revealed two distinct clusters in the P. peruviana accessions corresponding to their state of cultivation. In this study, we identified molecular markers useful to detect genetic variation in Physalis germplasm for assisting conservation and crossbreeding strategies. PMID:26550601

  6. A model for integrating molecular-based testing in transfusion services

    PubMed Central

    Sandler, S. Gerald; Horn, Trina; Keller, Jessica; Langeberg, Al; Keller, Margaret A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Molecular-based laboratory tests can predict blood group antigens and supplement serological methods, adding a unique technology to assist in resolving discrepant or incomplete blood group typing or antibody identification. Hospital transfusion services have options for integrating molecular-based methods in their routine operations. We describe here the model of a hospital-reference laboratory partnership. Materials and methods Blood samples for compatibility testing were obtained from patients in a 609-bed hospital serving an urban multiethnic and multiracial population. When results of blood group phenotyping by serological methods were inconclusive, samples were referred for molecular-based testing. The reference laboratory used several methods for genotyping, including polymerase chain reaction followed by restriction enzyme-linked polymorphism analysis, sequence-specific primer polymerase chain reaction and array-based approaches. Human erythrocyte antigen, RHCE and RHD single nucleotide polymorphism arrays were integrated into the laboratory as they became commercially available. Results The hospital-reference laboratory model made it possible to integrate blood group genotyping promptly by current technology without the expense of new laboratory equipment or adding personnel with technical expertise. We describe ten cases that illustrate the categories of serological problems that were resolved by molecular methods. Discussion In-hospital molecular testing for transfusion services has logistical advantages, but is financially impractical for most hospitals. Our model demonstrates the advantages of a hospital-reference laboratory partnership. In conclusion, hospital transfusion services can integrate molecular-based testing in their routine services without delay by establishing a partnership with a molecular blood group reference laboratory. The hospital reference-laboratory model promotes genomic medicine without the expense of new equipment and

  7. Molecular Engineering of Technetium and Rhenium Based Radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Zubieta, J.

    2003-06-30

    The research was based on the observation that despite the extraordinarily rich coordination chemistry of technetium and rhenium and several notable successes in reagent design, the extensive investigations by numerous research groups on a variety of N{sub 2}S{sub 2} and N{sub 3}S donor type ligands and on HYNIC have revealed that the chemistries of these ligands with Tc and Re are rather complex, giving rise to considerable difficulties in the development of reliable procedures for the development of radiopharmaceutical reagents.

  8. A molecular marker based linkage map of Vitis.

    PubMed

    Lodhi, M A; Daly, M J; Ye, G N; Weeden, N F; Reisch, B I

    1995-08-01

    Genetic linkage maps of Vitis (2n = 38) have been constructed from a single interspecific hybrid grape population (60 seedlings) of 'Cayuga White' X 'Aurore'. The maps were primarily based on 422 RAPD markers but also included 16 RFLP and isozyme markers. These maps had an average distance of 6.1 cM between markers and were developed using a double-pseudotestcross strategy. The 'Cayuga White' map had 214 markers covering 1196 cM and that of 'Aurore' spanned over 1477 cM with 225 markers. The 'Cayuga White' map consisted of 20 linkage groups, whereas 22 linkage groups comprised the 'Aurore' map. The number of groups reduced to 19, as in some instances two or more groups from one parent showed homology with a single group from the other parent on the basis of markers heterozygous in both parents. Each linkage group ranged in size from 14 to 135 cM in 'Aurore' and from 14 to 124 cM in 'Cayuga White'. These maps provide enough coverage of the genome to allow quantitative trait locus analysis and map-based gene cloning.

  9. Microbial detection method based on sensing molecular hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, J R; Stoner, G E; Boykin, E H

    1974-05-01

    A simple method for detecting bacteria, based on the time of hydrogen evolution, was developed and tested against various members of the Enterobacteriaceae group. The test system consisted of (i) two electrodes, platinum and a reference electrode, (ii) a buffer amplifier, and (iii) a strip-chart recorder. Hydrogen evolution was measured by an increase in voltage in the negative (cathodic) direction and recorded on a strip-chart recorder. Hydrogen response curves consisted of (i) a lag period, (ii) a period of rapid buildup in potential due to hydrogen, and (iii) a period of decline in potential. A linear relationship was established between inoculum size and the time hydrogen was detected (lag period). Lag times ranged from 1 h for 10(6) cells/ml to 7 h for 10(0) cells/ml. For each 10-fold decrease in inoculum, length of the lag period increased 60 to 70 min. Mean cell concentrations at the time of hydrogen evolution were 10(6)/ml. Based on the linear relationship between inoculum size and lag period, these results indicate the potential application of the hydrogen-sensing method for rapidly detecting coliforms and other gas-producing microorganisms in a variety of clinical, food, and other samples.

  10. Raoult's law-based method for determination of coal tar average molecular weight

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.G.; Gupta, L.; Horace, H.K.; Coleman, A.J.

    2005-08-01

    A Raoult's law-based method for determining the number average molecular weight of coal tars is presented. The method requires data from two-phase coal tar/water equilibrium experiments, which readily are performed in environmental laboratories. An advantage of this method for environmental samples is that it is not impacted by the small amount of inert debris often present in coal tar samples obtained from contaminated sites. Results are presented for 10 coal tars from nine former manufactured gas plants located in the eastern United States. Vapor pressure osmometry (VPO) analysis provided similar average molecular weights to those determined with the Raoult's law-based method, except for one highly viscous coal tar sample. Use of the VPO-based average molecular weight for this coal tar resulted in underprediction of the coal tar constituents' aqueous concentrations. Additionally, one other coal tar was not completely soluble in solvents used for VPO analysis. The results indicate that the Raoult's law-based method is able to provide an average molecular weight that is consistent with the intended application of the data (e.g., modeling the dissolution of coal tar constituents into surrounding waters), and this method can be applied to coal tars that may be incompatible with other commonly used methods for determining average molecular weight, such as vapor pressure osmometry.

  11. Bio-molecular sensors based on guided mode resonance filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleem, M. R.; Ali, R.; Honkanen, S.; Turunen, J.

    2016-08-01

    In this work a low surface roughness and homogenous, high refractive index, and amorphous TiO2 layer on corrugated structures of diffractive optical element is coated by Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) for biosensors. The design of Guided Mode Resonance Filters (GMRFs) is based on refractive indices and thicknesses of the waveguide biomolecular layers. The designed spectral shifts are calculated by Fourier Modal Method (FMM) and depend on the magnitude of the variations in refractive index of the biomolecular layer on waveguide structures. Furthermore, the sensitivity of the biomolecular sensors depends on the thickness of biomolecular layer and periodicity of the structures. The waveguide structures designed for larger periods show an enhancement in the sensitivity (nm/RIU) of the biomolecular sensor at longer wavelengths. The periodicities of nanophotonic structures are varied from 300 to 500 nm in design calculations with predominance of increase in effective index of the structure to support leaky waveguide modes.

  12. Pulsed diode laser-based monitor for singlet molecular oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seonkyung; Zhu, Leyun; Minhaj, Ahmed M.; Hinds, Michael F.; Vu, Danthu H.; Rosen, David I.; Davis, Steven J.; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2010-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising cancer treatment. PDT uses the affinity of photosensitizers to be selectively retained in malignant tumors. When tumors, pretreated with the photosensitizer, are irradiated with visible light, a photochemical reaction occurs and tumor cells are destroyed. Oxygen molecules in the metastable singlet delta state O2(1Δ) are believed to be the species that destroys cancerous cells during PDT. Monitoring singlet oxygen produced by PDT may lead to more precise and effective PDT treatments. Our approach uses a pulsed diode laser-based monitor with optical fibers and a fast data acquisition system to monitor singlet oxygen during PDT. We present results of in vitro singlet oxygen detection in solutions and in a rat prostate cancer cell line as well as PDT mechanism modeling. PMID:18601555

  13. Manganese-Based Molecular Electrocatalysts for Oxidation of Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Hulley, Elliott; Kumar, Neeraj; Raugei, Simone; Bullock, R. Morris

    2015-10-05

    Oxidation of H2 (1 atm) is catalyzed by the manganese electrocatalysts [(P2N2)MnI(CO)(bppm)]+ and [(PNP)MnI(CO)(bppm)]+ (P2N2= 1,5-dibenzyl-3,7-diphenyl-1,5-diaza-3,7-diphosphacyclooctane; PNP = (Ph2PCH2)2NMe); bppm = (PArF2)2CH2, and ArF = 3,5-(CF3)2C6H3). In fluorobenzene solvent using 2,6-lutidine as the exogeneous base, the turnover frequency for [(P2N2)MnI(CO)(bppm)]+ is 3.5 s-1 with an estimated overpotential of 590 mV. For [(PNP)MnI(CO)(bppm)], in fluorobenzene solvent using N-methylpyrrolidine as the exogeneous base, the turnover frequency is 1.4 s-1 with an estimated overpotential of 700 mV. Density functional theory calculations suggest that the slow step in the catalytic cycle is proton transfer from the oxidized 17-electron manganese hydride, e.g., [(P2N2)MnIIH(CO)(bppm)]+ to the pendant amine. The computed activation barrier for intramolecular proton transfer from the metal to the pendant amine is 20.4 kcal/mol in [(P2N2)MnIIH(CO)(bppm)]+ and 21.3 kcal/mol in [(PNP)MnI(CO)(bppm)]. The high barrier appears to result from both the unfavorability of metal-to-nitrogen proton transfer (thermodynamically uphill by 6.6 pKa units, 9 kcal/mol), as well as the relatively long manganese-nitrogen separation in the MnIIH complexes.

  14. Algorithms and novel applications based on the isokinetic ensemble. I. Biophysical and path integral molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minary, Peter; Martyna, Glenn J.; Tuckerman, Mark E.

    2003-02-01

    In this paper (Paper I) and a companion paper (Paper II), novel new algorithms and applications of the isokinetic ensemble as generated by Gauss' principle of least constraint, pioneered for use with molecular dynamics 20 years ago, are presented for biophysical, path integral, and Car-Parrinello based ab initio molecular dynamics. In Paper I, a new "extended system" version of the isokinetic equations of motion that overcomes the ergodicity problems inherent in the standard approach, is developed using a new theory of non-Hamiltonian phase space analysis [M. E. Tuckerman et al., Europhys. Lett. 45, 149 (1999); J. Chem. Phys. 115, 1678 (2001)]. Reversible multiple time step integrations schemes for the isokinetic methods, first presented by Zhang [J. Chem. Phys. 106, 6102 (1997)] are reviewed. Next, holonomic constraints are incorporated into the isokinetic methodology for use in fast efficient biomolecular simulation studies. Model and realistic examples are presented in order to evaluate, critically, the performance of the new isokinetic molecular dynamic schemes. Comparisons are made to the, now standard, canonical dynamics method, Nosé-Hoover chain dynamics [G. J. Martyna et al., J. Chem. Phys. 97, 2635 (1992)]. The new isokinetic techniques are found to yield more efficient sampling than the Nosé-Hoover chain method in both path integral molecular dynamics and biophysical molecular dynamics calculations. In Paper II, the use of isokinetic methods in Car-Parrinello based ab initio molecular dynamics calculations is presented.

  15. Identification of promising DNA GyrB inhibitors for Tuberculosis using pharmacophore-based virtual screening, molecular docking and molecular dynamics studies.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Ataul; Pillay, Tahir S

    2017-01-21

    In this study, we searched for potential DNA GyrB inhibitors using pharmacophore-based virtual screening followed by molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation approaches. For this purpose, a set of 248 DNA GyrB inhibitors was collected from the literature and a well-validated pharmacophore model was generated. The best pharmacophore model explained that two each of hydrogen bond acceptors and hydrophobicity regions were critical for inhibition of DNA GyrB. Good statistical results of the pharmacophore model indicated that the model was robust in nature. Virtual screening of molecular databases revealed three molecules as potential antimycobacterial agents. The final screened promising compounds were evaluated in molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation studies. In the molecular dynamics studies, RMSD and RMSF values undoubtedly explained that the screened compounds formed stable complexes with DNA GyrB. Therefore, it can be concluded that the compounds identified may have potential for the treatment of TB.

  16. Toward molecular trait-based ecology through integration of biogeochemical, geographical and metagenomic data.

    PubMed

    Raes, Jeroen; Letunic, Ivica; Yamada, Takuji; Jensen, Lars Juhl; Bork, Peer

    2011-03-15

    Using metagenomic 'parts lists' to infer global patterns on microbial ecology remains a significant challenge. To deduce important ecological indicators such as environmental adaptation, molecular trait dispersal, diversity variation and primary production from the gene pool of an ecosystem, we integrated 25 ocean metagenomes with geographical, meteorological and geophysicochemical data. We find that climatic factors (temperature, sunlight) are the major determinants of the biomolecular repertoire of each sample and the main limiting factor on functional trait dispersal (absence of biogeographic provincialism). Molecular functional richness and diversity show a distinct latitudinal gradient peaking at 20° N and correlate with primary production. The latter can also be predicted from the molecular functional composition of an environmental sample. Together, our results show that the functional community composition derived from metagenomes is an important quantitative readout for molecular trait-based biogeography and ecology.

  17. Computational design of intrinsic molecular rectifiers based on asymmetric functionalization of N-phenylbenzamide

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Wendu; Koepf, Matthieu; Koenigsmann, Christopher; Batra, Arunabh; Venkataraman, Latha; Negre, Christian F. A.; Brudvig, Gary W.; Crabtree, Robert H.; Schmuttenmaer, Charles A.; Batista, Victor S.

    2015-11-03

    Here, we report a systematic computational search of molecular frameworks for intrinsic rectification of electron transport. The screening of molecular rectifiers includes 52 molecules and conformers spanning over 9 series of structural motifs. N-Phenylbenzamide is found to be a promising framework with both suitable conductance and rectification properties. A targeted screening performed on 30 additional derivatives and conformers of N-phenylbenzamide yielded enhanced rectification based on asymmetric functionalization. We demonstrate that electron-donating substituent groups that maintain an asymmetric distribution of charge in the dominant transport channel (e.g., HOMO) enhance rectification by raising the channel closer to the Fermi level. These findings are particularly valuable for the design of molecular assemblies that could ensure directionality of electron transport in a wide range of applications, from molecular electronics to catalytic reactions.

  18. Electronic shift register memory based on molecular electron-transfer reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopfield, J. J.; Onuchic, Jose Nelson; Beratan, David N.

    1989-01-01

    The design of a shift register memory at the molecular level is described in detail. The memory elements are based on a chain of electron-transfer molecules incorporated on a very large scale integrated (VLSI) substrate, and the information is shifted by photoinduced electron-transfer reactions. The design requirements for such a system are discussed, and several realistic strategies for synthesizing these systems are presented. The immediate advantage of such a hybrid molecular/VLSI device would arise from the possible information storage density. The prospect of considerable savings of energy per bit processed also exists. This molecular shift register memory element design solves the conceptual problems associated with integrating molecular size components with larger (micron) size features on a chip.

  19. Computational design of intrinsic molecular rectifiers based on asymmetric functionalization of N-phenylbenzamide

    DOE PAGES

    Ding, Wendu; Koepf, Matthieu; Koenigsmann, Christopher; ...

    2015-11-03

    Here, we report a systematic computational search of molecular frameworks for intrinsic rectification of electron transport. The screening of molecular rectifiers includes 52 molecules and conformers spanning over 9 series of structural motifs. N-Phenylbenzamide is found to be a promising framework with both suitable conductance and rectification properties. A targeted screening performed on 30 additional derivatives and conformers of N-phenylbenzamide yielded enhanced rectification based on asymmetric functionalization. We demonstrate that electron-donating substituent groups that maintain an asymmetric distribution of charge in the dominant transport channel (e.g., HOMO) enhance rectification by raising the channel closer to the Fermi level. These findingsmore » are particularly valuable for the design of molecular assemblies that could ensure directionality of electron transport in a wide range of applications, from molecular electronics to catalytic reactions.« less

  20. Radical gas-based DNA decontamination for ultra-sensitive molecular experiments.

    PubMed

    Morono, Yuki; Yamamoto, Katsuhiro; Inagaki, Fumio

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we tested a radical gas-based decontamination technique to prevent possible DNA contamination by the air and/or equipment used in molecular experiments. We prepared 10(4) molecules of model DNA contaminant and placed the dried DNA into test tubes, which were then exposed to radical gas. Quantitative PCR analysis showed that, even after a short exposure time of 30 minutes, 99.54% of the model DNA contaminant was effectively decomposed to undetectable levels. Our results demonstrate that the radical gas-based treatment is a useful method for eliminating potential DNA contaminant in ultra-sensitive molecular experiments.

  1. SWIFT MODELLER: a Java based GUI for molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Abhinav; Shankaracharya; Vidyarthi, Ambarish S

    2011-10-01

    MODELLER is command line argument based software which requires tedious formatting of inputs and writing of Python scripts which most people are not comfortable with. Also the visualization of output becomes cumbersome due to verbose files. This makes the whole software protocol very complex and requires extensive study of MODELLER manuals and tutorials. Here we describe SWIFT MODELLER, a GUI that automates formatting, scripting and data extraction processes and present it in an interactive way making MODELLER much easier to use than before. The screens in SWIFT MODELLER are designed keeping homology modeling in mind and their flow is a depiction of its steps. It eliminates the formatting of inputs, scripting processes and analysis of verbose output files through automation and makes pasting of the target sequence as the only prerequisite. Jmol (3D structure visualization tool) has been integrated into the GUI which opens and demonstrates the protein data bank files created by the MODELLER software. All files required and created by the software are saved in a folder named after the work instance's date and time of execution. SWIFT MODELLER lowers the skill level required for the software through automation of many of the steps in the original software protocol, thus saving an enormous amount of time per instance and making MODELLER very easy to work with.

  2. Detecting Molecular Properties by Various Laser-Based Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hsin, Tse-Ming

    2007-01-01

    Four different laser-based techniques were applied to study physical and chemical characteristics of biomolecules and dye molecules. These techniques are liole burning spectroscopy, single molecule spectroscopy, time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy and laser-induced fluorescence microscopy. Results from hole burning and single molecule spectroscopy suggested that two antenna states (C708 & C714) of photosystem I from cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6803 are connected by effective energy transfer and the corresponding energy transfer time is ~6 ps. In addition, results from hole burning spectroscopy indicated that the chlorophyll dimer of the C714 state has a large distribution of the dimer geometry. Direct observation of vibrational peaks and evolution of coumarin 153 in the electronic excited state was demonstrated by using the fs/ps CARS, a variation of time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy. In three different solvents, methanol, acetonitrile, and butanol, a vibration peak related to the stretch of the carbonyl group exhibits different relaxation dynamics. Laser-induced fluorescence microscopy, along with the biomimetic containers-liposomes, allows the measurement of the enzymatic activity of individual alkaline phosphatase from bovine intestinal mucosa without potential interferences from glass surfaces. The result showed a wide distribution of the enzyme reactivity. Protein structural variation is one of the major reasons that are responsible for this highly heterogeneous behavior.

  3. Recent advances in molecular electronics based on carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Bourgoin, Jean-Philippe; Campidelli, Stéphane; Chenevier, Pascale; Derycke, Vincent; Filoramo, Arianna; Goffman, Marcelo F

    2010-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have exceptional physical properties that make them one of the most promising building blocks for future nanotechnologies. They may in particular play an important role in the development of innovative electronic devices in the fields of flexible electronics, ultra-high sensitivity sensors, high frequency electronics, opto-electronics, energy sources and nano-electromechanical systems (NEMS). Proofs of concept of several high performance devices already exist, usually at the single device level, but there remain many serious scientific issues to be solved before the viability of such routes can be evaluated. In particular, the main concern regards the controlled synthesis and positioning of nanotubes. In our opinion, truly innovative use of these nano-objects will come from: (i) the combination of some of their complementary physical properties, such as combining their electrical and mechanical properties, (ii) the combination of their properties with additional benefits coming from other molecules grafted on the nanotubes, and (iii) the use of chemically- or bio-directed self-assembly processes to allow the efficient combination of several devices into functional arrays or circuits. In this article, we outline the main issues concerning the development of carbon nanotubes based electronics applications and review our recent results in the field.

  4. Biomedical wellness monitoring system based upon molecular markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingram, Whitney

    2012-06-01

    We wish to assist caretakers with a sensor monitoring systems for tracking the physiological changes of homealone patients. One goal is seeking biomarkers and modern imaging sensors like stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM), which has achieved visible imaging at the nano-scale range. Imaging techniques like STORM can be combined with a fluorescent functional marker in a system to capture the early transformation signs from wellness to illness. By exploiting both microscopic knowledge of genetic pre-disposition and the macroscopic influence of epigenetic factors we hope to target these changes remotely. We adopt dual spectral infrared imaging for blind source separation (BSS) to detect angiogenesis changes and use laser speckle imaging for hypertension blood flow monitoring. Our design hypothesis for the monitoring system is guided by the user-friendly, veteran-preferred "4-Non" principles (noninvasive, non-contact, non-tethered, non-stop-to-measure) and by the NIH's "4Ps" initiatives (predictive, personalized, preemptive, and participatory). We augment the potential storage system with the recent know-how of video Compressive Sampling (CSp) from surveillance cameras. In CSp only major changes are saved, which reduces the manpower cost of caretakers and medical analysts. This CSp algorithm is based on smart associative memory (AM) matrix storage: change features and detailed scenes are written by the outer-product and read by the inner product without the usual Harsh index for image searching. From this approach, we attempt to design an effective household monitoring approach to save healthcare costs and maintain the quality of life of seniors.

  5. Model of self assembled monolayer based molecular diodes made of ferrocenyl-alkanethiols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duche, David; Planchoke, Ujwol; Dang, Florian-Xuan; Le Rouzo, Judikael; Bescond, Marc; Simon, Jean-Jacques; Balaban, Teodor Silviu; Escoubas, Ludovic

    2017-03-01

    There has been significant work investigating the use of self assembled monolayers (SAMs) made of ferrocenyl terminated alkanethiols for realizing molecular diodes, leading to remarkably large forward-to-reverse current rectification ratios. In this study, we use a multiband barrier tunneling model to examine the electrical properties of SAM-based molecular diodes made of HSC9Fc, HSC11Fc, and HSCiFcC13-i (0 ≤ i ≤ 13). Using our simple physical model, we reproduce the experimental data of charge transport across various ferrocenyl substituted alkanethiols performed by Nijhuis, Reus, and Whitesides [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 132, 18386-184016 (2010)] and Yuan et al. [Nat. Commun. 6, 6324 (2015)]. Especially, the model allows predicting the rectification direction in HSCiFcC13-i (0 ≤ i ≤ 13) based molecular diodes depending on the position of the ferrocenyl (Fc) moiety within the molecules. We show that the asymmetry of the barrier length at both sides of the Highest Occupied Molecular Orbital of the ferrocenyl moiety strongly contributes to the rectifying properties of ferrocenyl-alkanethiol based molecular junctions. Furthermore, our results reveal that bound and quasi-bound states play an important role in the charge transport.

  6. Flexibility and explicit solvent in molecular-dynamics-based docking of protein-glycosaminoglycan systems.

    PubMed

    Samsonov, Sergey A; Gehrcke, Jan-Philip; Pisabarro, M Teresa

    2014-02-24

    We present Dynamic Molecular Docking (DMD), a novel targeted molecular dynamics-based protocol developed to address ligand and receptor flexibility as well as the inclusion of explicit solvent in local molecular docking. A class of ligands for which docking performance especially benefits from overcoming these challenges is the glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). GAGs are periodic, highly flexible, and negatively charged polysaccharides playing an important role in the extracellular matrix via interaction with proteins such as growth factors and chemokines. The goal of our work has been to develop a proof of concept for an MD-based docking approach and to analyze its applicability for protein-GAG systems. DMD exploits the electrostatics-driven attraction of a ligand to its receptor, treats both as entirely flexible, and considers solvent explicitly. We show that DMD has high predictive significance for systems dominated by electrostatic attraction and demonstrate its capability to reliably identify the receptor residues contributing most to binding.

  7. Fast parallel molecular algorithms for DNA-based computation: factoring integers.

    PubMed

    Chang, Weng-Long; Guo, Minyi; Ho, Michael Shan-Hui

    2005-06-01

    The RSA public-key cryptosystem is an algorithm that converts input data to an unrecognizable encryption and converts the unrecognizable data back into its original decryption form. The security of the RSA public-key cryptosystem is based on the difficulty of factoring the product of two large prime numbers. This paper demonstrates to factor the product of two large prime numbers, and is a breakthrough in basic biological operations using a molecular computer. In order to achieve this, we propose three DNA-based algorithms for parallel subtractor, parallel comparator, and parallel modular arithmetic that formally verify our designed molecular solutions for factoring the product of two large prime numbers. Furthermore, this work indicates that the cryptosystems using public-key are perhaps insecure and also presents clear evidence of the ability of molecular computing to perform complicated mathematical operations.

  8. Hydration of Watson-Crick base pairs and dehydration of Hoogsteen base pairs inducing structural polymorphism under molecular crowding conditions.

    PubMed

    Miyoshi, Daisuke; Nakamura, Kaori; Tateishi-Karimata, Hisae; Ohmichi, Tatsuo; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2009-03-18

    It has been revealed recently that molecular crowding, which is one of the largest differences between in vivo and in vitro conditions, is a critical factor determining the structure, stability, and function of nucleic acids. However, the effects of molecular crowding on Watson-Crick and Hoogsteen base pairs remain unclear. In order to investigate directly and quantitatively the molecular crowding effects on base pair types in nucleic acids, we designed intramolecular parallel- and antiparallel-stranded DNA duplexes consisting of Hoogsteen and Watson-Crick base pairs, respectively, as well as an intramolecular parallel-stranded triplex containing both types of base pairs. Thermodynamic analyses demonstrated that the values of free energy change at 25 degrees C for Hoogsteen base-pair formations decreased from +1.45 +/- 0.15 to +1.09 +/- 0.13 kcal mol(-1), and from -1.89 +/- 0.13 to -2.71 +/- 0.11 kcal mol(-1) in the intramolecular duplex and triplex, respectively, when the concentration of PEG 200 (polyethylene glycol with average molecular weight 200) increased from 0 to 20 wt %. However, corresponding values for Watson-Crick formation in the duplex and triplex increased from -10.2 +/- 0.2 to -8.7 +/- 0.1 kcal mol(-1), and from -10.8 +/- 0.2 to -9.2 +/- 0.2 kcal mol(-1), respectively. Furthermore, it was revealed that the opposing effects of molecular crowding on the Hoogsteen and Watson-Crick base pairs were due to different behaviors of water molecules binding to the DNA strands.

  9. [New strategies in the clinical evaluation of patients with colon cancer based on molecular studies].

    PubMed

    Panduro, A; Morales, L; Santos, A; Valdés, L; Lima, G; Meléndez, J; Cabrera, G; Maldonado, V; Villalobos, J J

    1993-01-01

    During the last five years molecular studies allowed important advances in the knowledge of cancer colon with important clinical implications. The main finding was the identification and sequence analysis of the APC gen. Structural alterations of this gene have been detected in patients with Familial Adenomatous Polyposis and Gardner syndrome, which suggest a common disease. Furthermore, alterations of the APC gen appears to be also altered in cases of cancer of colon sporadic. Indicating that structural alteration of the APC gen can be inherited and/or acquired. Restriction fragment-length polymorphisms in the chromosome 5q21-22 can now be used clinically for premorbid diagnosis and counseling in familial adenomatous polyposis. The molecular studies allow the clinician to have a new approach in the management and screening of families with familial adenomatous polyposis. The sequence analysis and specific identification of the structural alteration of the APC gene is a more expensive and sophisticated study, although represent a more direct approach. In the Department of Gastroenterology of the INNSZ we are performing such molecular studies. The main purpose of our group is to proportionate integral clinical-molecular studies for families with hereditary colon cancer, create a national register of these diseases and investigate the molecular bases in order to generate new molecular diagnosis tools.

  10. Feasibility of using molecular docking-based virtual screening for searching dual target kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shunye; Li, Youyong; Hou, Tingjun

    2013-04-22

    Multitarget agents have been extensively explored for solving limited efficacies, poor safety, and resistant profiles of an individual target. Theoretical approaches for searching and designing multitarget agents are critically useful. Here, the performance of molecular docking to search dual-target inhibitors for four kinase pairs (CDK2-GSK3B, EGFR-Src, Lck-Src, and Lck-VEGFR2) was assessed. First, the representative structures for each kinase target were chosen by structural clustering of available crystal structures. Next, the performance of molecular docking to distinguish inhibitors from noninhibitors for each individual kinase target was evaluated. The results show that molecular docking-based virtual screening illustrates good capability to find known inhibitors for individual targets, but the prediction accuracy is structurally dependent. Finally, the performance of molecular docking to identify the dual-target kinase inhibitors for four kinase pairs was evaluated. The analyses show that molecular docking successfully filters out most noninhibitors and achieves promising performance for identifying dual-kinase inhibitors for CDK2-GSK3B and Lck-VEGFR2. But a high false-positive rate leads to low enrichment of true dual-target inhibitors in the final list. This study suggests that molecular docking serves as a useful tool in searching inhibitors against dual or even multiple kinase targets, but integration with other virtual screening tools is necessary for achieving better predictions.

  11. Double-hairpin molecular-beacon-based amplification detection for gene diagnosis linked to cancer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huo; Zhang, Rongbo; Li, Feng; Zhou, Yingying; Peng, Ting; Wang, Xuedong; Shen, Zhifa

    2016-09-01

    A powerful double-hairpin molecular beacon (DHMB) was developed for cancer-related KRAS gene detection based on the one-to-two stoichiometry. During target DNA detection, DHMB can execute signal transduction even if no any exogenous element is involved. Unlike the conventional molecular beacon based on the one-to-one interaction, one target DNA not only hybridizes with one DHMB and opens its hairpin but also promotes the interaction between two DHMBs, causing the separation of two fluorophores from quenchers. This leads to an enhanced fluorescence signal. As a result, the target KRAS gene is able to be detected within a wide dynamic range from 0.05 to 200 nM with the detection limit of 50 pM, indicating a dramatic improvement compared with traditional molecular beacons. Moreover, the point mutations existing in target DNAs can be easily screened. The potential application for target species in real samples was indicated by the analysis of PCR amplicons of DNAs from the DNA extracted from SW620 cell. Besides becoming a promising candidate probe for molecular biology research and clinical diagnosis of genetic diseases, the DHMB is expected to provide a significant insight into the design of DNA probe-based homogenous sensing systems. Graphical Abstract A powerful double-hairpin molecular beacon (DHMB) was developed for cancer-related gene KRAS detection based on the one-to-two stoichiometry. Without the help of any exogenous probe, the point mutation is easily screened, and the target DNA can be quantified down to 50 pM, indicating a dramatic improvement compared with traditional molecular beacons.

  12. The Value of Molecular Haplotypes in a Family-Based Linkage Study

    PubMed Central

    Gillanders, E. M.; Pearson, J. V.; Sorant, A. J. M.; Trent, J. M.; O’Connell, J. R.; Bailey-Wilson, J. E.

    2006-01-01

    Novel methods that could improve the power of conventional methods of gene discovery for complex diseases should be investigated. In a simulation study, we aimed to investigate the value of molecular haplotypes in the context of a family-based linkage study. The term “haplotype” (or “haploid genotype”) refers to syntenic alleles inherited on a single chromosome, and we use the term “molecular haplotype” to refer to haplotypes that have been determined directly by use of a molecular technique such as long-range allele-specific polymerase chain reaction. In our study, we simulated genotype and phenotype data and then compared the powers of analyzing these data under the assumptions that various levels of information from molecular haplotypes were available. (This information was available because of the simulation procedure.) Several conclusions can be drawn. First, as expected, when genetic homogeneity is expected or when marker data are complete, it is not efficient to generate molecular haplotyping information. However, with levels of heterogeneity and missing data patterns typical of complex diseases, we observed a 23%–77% relative increase in the power to detect linkage in the presence of heterogeneity with heterogeneity LOD scores >3.0 when all individuals are molecularly haplotyped (compared with the power when only standard genotypes are used). Furthermore, our simulations indicate that most of the increase in power can be achieved by molecularly haplotyping a single individual in each family, thereby making molecular haplotyping a valuable strategy for increasing the power of gene mapping studies of complex diseases. Maximization of power, given an existing family set, can be particularly important for late-onset, often-fatal diseases such as cancer, for which informative families are difficult to collect. PMID:16909384

  13. Quantum Computing Using Pulse-Based Electron-Nuclear Double Resonance (endor):. Molecular Spin-Qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Kazuo; Nakazawa, Shigeki; Rahimi, Robabeh D.; Nishida, Shinsuke; Ise, Tomoaki; Shimoi, Daisuke; Toyota, Kazuo; Morita, Yasushi; Kitagawa, Masahiro; Carl, Parick; Höfner, Peter; Takui, Takeji

    2009-06-01

    Electrons with the spin quantum number 1/2, as physical qubits, have naturally been anticipated for implementing quantum computing and information processing (QC/QIP). Recently, electron spin-qubit systems in organic molecular frames have emerged as a hybrid spin-qubit system along with a nuclear spin-1/2 qubit. Among promising candidates for QC/QIP from the materials science side, the reasons for why electron spin-qubits such as molecular spin systems, i.e., unpaired electron spins in molecular frames, have potentialities for serving for QC/QIP will be given in the lecture (Chapter), emphasizing what their advantages or disadvantages are entertained and what technical and intrinsic issues should be dealt with for the implementation of molecular-spin quantum computers in terms of currently available spin manipulation technology such as pulse-based electron-nuclear double resonance (pulsed or pulse ENDOR) devoted to QC/QIP. Firstly, a general introduction and introductory remarks to pulsed ENDOR spectroscopy as electron-nuclear spin manipulation technology is given. Super dense coding (SDC) experiments by the use of pulsed ENDOR are also introduced to understand differentiating QC ENDOR from QC NMR based on modern nuclear spin technology. Direct observation of the spinor inherent in an electron spin, detected for the first time, will be shown in connection with the entanglement of an electron-nuclear hybrid system. Novel microwave spin manipulation technology enabling us to deal with genuine electron-electron spin-qubit systems in the molecular frame will be introduced, illustrating, from the synthetic strategy of matter spin-qubits, a key-role of the molecular design of g-tensor/hyperfine-(A-)tensor molecular engineering for QC/QIP. Finally, important technological achievements of recently-emerging CD ELDOR (Coherent-Dual ELectron-electron DOuble Resonance) spin technology enabling us to manipulate electron spin-qubits are described.

  14. Phylogenetic relationships of Iberian Aphodiini (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) based on morphological and molecular data.

    PubMed

    Cabrero-Sañudo, Francisco-José; Zardoya, Rafael

    2004-06-01

    A phylogeny of Iberian Aphodiini dung beetles was reconstructed based on morphological and molecular data. The data set included a total of 84 variable characters from wing venation, mouthparts, genitalia, and external morphology, as well as mitochondrial partial cytochrome c oxidase I (COI), complete tRNA-Leu (UUR), and partial cytochrome c oxidase II (COII) gene nucleotide sequences (1210 positions). Phylogenetic trees based on molecular data were relatively more resolved than those based on morphological characters. The Bayesian analysis of combined molecular and morphological data provided resolution not achieved by each data set separately. Ammoecius and Aphodius are the first lineages that branch off from the tree, followed by Acrossus, Nimbus, and Heptaulacus. The remaining studied taxa are recovered in a more derived clade that lacks internal resolution. Reconstructed trees based on molecular data showed relatively short internal nodes that were weakly supported. Such pattern may reflect a rapid radiation at the origin of the tribe Aphodiini, but also saturation of mutational changes. Several tests were conducted to discern between both competing hypotheses, as well as to assess the effect of incomplete taxon sampling.

  15. Molecular Docking of Enzyme Inhibitors: A Computational Tool for Structure-Based Drug Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudnitskaya, Aleksandra; Torok, Bela; Torok, Marianna

    2010-01-01

    Molecular docking is a frequently used method in structure-based rational drug design. It is used for evaluating the complex formation of small ligands with large biomolecules, predicting the strength of the bonding forces and finding the best geometrical arrangements. The major goal of this advanced undergraduate biochemistry laboratory exercise…

  16. Molecular Interactions between a Novel Soybean Oil-Based Polymer and Doxorubicin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel soybean oil-based polymer, hydrolyzed polymers of epoxidized soybean oil (HPESO), was developed and investigated for drug delivery. This work was aimed at determining the molecular interactions between HPESO and doxorubicin (DOX), an anticancer drug. Powder X-ray diffraction, ATR-FTIR and ...

  17. Designing and Implementing a Hands-On, Inquiry-Based Molecular Biology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regassa, Laura B.; Morrison-Shetlar, Alison I.

    2007-01-01

    Inquiry-based learning was used to enhance an undergraduate molecular biology course at Georgia Southern University, a primarily undergraduate institution in rural southeast Georgia. The goal was to use a long-term, in-class project to accelerate higher-order thinking, thereby enabling students to problem solve and apply their knowledge to novel…

  18. Base de linhas moleculares para síntese espectral estelar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milone, A.; Sanzovo, G.

    2003-08-01

    A análise das abundâncias quí micas fotosféricas em estrelas do tipo solar ou tardia, através do cálculo teórico de seus espectros, emprega a espectroscopia de alta resolução e necessita de uma base representativa de linhas atômicas e moleculares com suas respectivas constantes bem determinadas. Nesse trabalho, utilizamos como ponto de partida as extensas listas de linhas espectrais de sistemas eletrônicos de algumas moléculas diatômicas compiladas por Kurucz para a construção de uma base de linhas moleculares para a sí ntese espectral estelar. Revisamos as determinações dos fatores rotacionais de Honl-London das forças de oscilador das linhas moleculares, para cada banda vibracional de alguns sistemas eletrônicos, seguindo a regra usual de normalização. Usamos as forças de oscilador eletrônicas da literatura. Os fatores vibracionais de Franck-Condon de cada banda foram especialmente recalculados empregando-se novas constantes moleculares. Reproduzimos, com êxito, as absorções espectrais de determinadas bandas eletrônicas-vibracionais das espécies moleculares C12C12, C12N14 e Mg24H em espectros de estrelas de referência como o Sol e Arcturus.

  19. Highly efficient and exact method for parallelization of grid-based algorithms and its implementation in DelPhi.

    PubMed

    Li, Chuan; Li, Lin; Zhang, Jie; Alexov, Emil

    2012-09-15

    The Gauss-Seidel (GS) method is a standard iterative numerical method widely used to solve a system of equations and, in general, is more efficient comparing to other iterative methods, such as the Jacobi method. However, standard implementation of the GS method restricts its utilization in parallel computing due to its requirement of using updated neighboring values (i.e., in current iteration) as soon as they are available. Here, we report an efficient and exact (not requiring assumptions) method to parallelize iterations and to reduce the computational time as a linear/nearly linear function of the number of processes or computing units. In contrast to other existing solutions, our method does not require any assumptions and is equally applicable for solving linear and nonlinear equations. This approach is implemented in the DelPhi program, which is a finite difference Poisson-Boltzmann equation solver to model electrostatics in molecular biology. This development makes the iterative procedure on obtaining the electrostatic potential distribution in the parallelized DelPhi several folds faster than that in the serial code. Further, we demonstrate the advantages of the new parallelized DelPhi by computing the electrostatic potential and the corresponding energies of large supramolecular structures.

  20. Highly efficient and exact method for parallelization of grid-based algorithms and its implementation in DelPhi

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chuan; Li, Lin; Zhang, Jie; Alexov, Emil

    2012-01-01

    The Gauss-Seidel method is a standard iterative numerical method widely used to solve a system of equations and, in general, is more efficient comparing to other iterative methods, such as the Jacobi method. However, standard implementation of the Gauss-Seidel method restricts its utilization in parallel computing due to its requirement of using updated neighboring values (i.e., in current iteration) as soon as they are available. Here we report an efficient and exact (not requiring assumptions) method to parallelize iterations and to reduce the computational time as a linear/nearly linear function of the number of CPUs. In contrast to other existing solutions, our method does not require any assumptions and is equally applicable for solving linear and nonlinear equations. This approach is implemented in the DelPhi program, which is a finite difference Poisson-Boltzmann equation solver to model electrostatics in molecular biology. This development makes the iterative procedure on obtaining the electrostatic potential distribution in the parallelized DelPhi several folds faster than that in the serial code. Further we demonstrate the advantages of the new parallelized DelPhi by computing the electrostatic potential and the corresponding energies of large supramolecular structures. PMID:22674480

  1. Detection of DNA damage based on metal-mediated molecular beacon and DNA strands displacement reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Yanxiang; Wei, Min; Wei, Wei; Yin, Lihong; Pu, Yuepu; Liu, Songqin

    2014-01-01

    DNA hairpin structure probes are usually designed by forming intra-molecular duplex based on Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds. In this paper, a molecular beacon based on silver ions-mediated cytosine-Ag+-cytosine base pairs was used to detect DNA. The inherent characteristic of the metal ligation facilitated the design of functional probe and the adjustment of its binding strength compared to traditional DNA hairpin structure probes, which make it be used to detect DNA in a simple, rapid and easy way with the help of DNA strands displacement reaction. The method was sensitive and also possesses the good specificity to differentiate the single base mismatched DNA from the complementary DNA. It was also successfully applied to study the damage effect of classic genotoxicity chemicals such as styrene oxide and sodium arsenite on DNA, which was significant in food science, environmental science and pharmaceutical science.

  2. Nonadiabatic molecular dynamics simulation: An approach based on quantum measurement picture

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Wei; Xu, Luting; Li, Xin-Qi; Fang, Weihai; Yan, YiJing

    2014-07-15

    Mixed-quantum-classical molecular dynamics simulation implies an effective quantum measurement on the electronic states by the classical motion of atoms. Based on this insight, we propose a quantum trajectory mean-field approach for nonadiabatic molecular dynamics simulations. The new protocol provides a natural interface between the separate quantum and classical treatments, without invoking artificial surface hopping algorithm. Moreover, it also bridges two widely adopted nonadiabatic dynamics methods, the Ehrenfest mean-field theory and the trajectory surface-hopping method. Excellent agreement with the exact results is illustrated with representative model systems, including the challenging ones for traditional methods.

  3. Isatin based thiosemicarbazone derivatives as potential bioactive agents: Anti-oxidant and molecular docking studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haribabu, J.; Subhashree, G. R.; Saranya, S.; Gomathi, K.; Karvembu, R.; Gayathri, D.

    2016-04-01

    A new series of isatin based thiosemicarbazones has been synthesized from benzylisatin and unsubstituted/substituted thiosemicarbazides (1-5). The synthesized compounds were characterized by elemental analyses, and UV-Visible, FT-IR, 1H &13C NMR and mass spectroscopic techniques. Three dimensional molecular structure of three compounds (1, 3 and 4) was determined by single crystal X-ray crystallography. Anti-oxidant activity of the thiosemicarbazone derivatives showed their excellent scavenging effect against free radicals. In addition, all the compounds showed good anti-haemolytic activity. In silico molecular docking studies were performed to screen the anti-inflammatory and anti-tuberculosis properties of thiosemicarbazone derivatives.

  4. Luminescence-based Imaging Approaches in the Field of Interventional Molecular Imaging.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, Fijs W B; Hardwick, James C H; van Erkel, Arian R

    2015-07-01

    Luminescence imaging-based guidance technologies are increasingly gaining interest within surgical and radiologic disciplines. Their promise to help visualize molecular features of disease in real time and with microscopic detail is considered desirable. Integrating luminescence imaging with three-dimensional radiologic- and/or nuclear medicine-based preinterventional imaging may overcome limitations such as the limited tissue penetration of luminescence signals. At the same time, the beneficial features of luminescence imaging may be used to complement the routinely used radiologic- and nuclear medicine-based modalities. To fully exploit this integrated concept, and to relate the largely experimental luminesce-based guidance approaches into perspective with routine imaging approaches, it is essential to understand the advantages and limitations of this relatively new modality. By providing an overview of the available luminescence technologies and the various clinically evaluated exogenous luminescent tracers (fluorescent, hybrid, and theranostic tracers), this review attempts to place luminescence-based interventional molecular imaging technologies into perspective to the available radiologic- and/or nuclear medicine-based imaging technologies. At the same time, the transition from anatomic to physiologic and even molecular interventional luminescence imaging is illustrated.

  5. Enzymic and molecular properties of base-plate parts of bacteriophage P22.

    PubMed

    Iwashita, S; Kanegasaki, S

    1976-05-17

    Using 14C-labeled Salmonella bacterial cells as the substrate, the enzymic and molecular properties of the base-plate parts of phage P22 were studied. The base-plate part consisted of a single protein species which cleaved extensively the O-antigen of Salmonella typhimurium, Salmonelly schottmuellerie and with somewhat slower rate that of Salmonella typhi, releasing oligo-saccharide products with rhamnose at the reducing end. Much less cleavage was observed with a strain of S. typhimurium lysogenic for P22, and no significant reaction with Salmonella anatum, Salmonella newington and Salmonella minneapolis. The base-plate part enzyme was a very heat-stable protein and only 10-20% loss was observed after treatment at 85 degrees C for 5 min. The pH optimum of the enzyme was around 7.5, and the glycosidase activity was not influenced by the ionic strength (25-250 mM( of the medium or the presence of Mg2+. The molecular weight of the base-plate part was 320,000 by sedimentation equilibrium. Dodecylsulphate-acrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed a single band of molecular weight 77,000, indicating that a single base-plate part corresponds to a tetramer of identical subunits. Circular dichroism spectra of P22 base-plate parts showed a major contribution of beta structure. The protein was rich in acidic amino acids, glycine and serine.

  6. Synchrotron-based and globar-sourced molecular (micro)spectroscopy contributions to advances in new hulless barley (with structure alteration) research on molecular structure, molecular nutrition, and nutrient delivery.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ling; Yu, Peiqiang

    2017-01-02

    This paper aimed to review synchrotron-based and globar-sourced molecular infrared (micro)spectroscopy contributions to advances in new hulless barley (with structure alteration) research on molecular structure, molecular nutrition, and nutrient delivery in ruminants. It reviewed recent progress in barley varieties, its utilization for animal and human, inherent structure features and chemical make-up, evaluation and research methodology, breeding progress, rumen degradation, and intestinal digestion. The emphasis of this review was focused on the effect of alteration of carbohydrate traits of newly developed hulless barley on molecular structure changes and nutrient delivery and quantification of the relationship between molecular structure features and changes and truly absorbed nutrient supply to ruminants. This review provides an insight into how inherent structure changes on a molecular basis affect nutrient utilization and availability in ruminants.

  7. Fibrin-based biomaterials: Modulation of macroscopic properties through rational design at the molecular level

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Ashley C.; Barker, Thomas H.

    2013-01-01

    Fibrinogen is one of the primary components of the coagulation cascade and rapidly forms an insoluble matrix following tissue injury. In addition to its important role in hemostasis, fibrin acts as a scaffold for tissue repair and provides important cues for directing cell phenotype following injury. Because of these properties and the ease of polymerization of the material, fibrin has been widely utilized as a biomaterial for over a century. Modifying the macroscopic properties of fibrin, such as elasticity and porosity, has been somewhat elusive until recently, yet with a molecular-level rational design approach can now be somewhat easily modified through alterations of molecular interactions key to the protein’s polymerization process. This review outlines the biochemistry of fibrin and discusses methods for modification of molecular interactions and their application to fibrin based biomaterials. PMID:24056097

  8. Construction of a Chassis for a Tripartite Protein-Based Molecular Motor.

    PubMed

    Small, Lara S R; Bruning, Marc; Thomson, Andrew R; Boyle, Aimee L; Davies, Roberta B; Curmi, Paul M G; Forde, Nancy R; Linke, Heiner; Woolfson, Derek N; Bromley, Elizabeth H C

    2017-03-14

    Improving our understanding of biological motors, both to fully comprehend their activities in vital processes, and to exploit their impressive abilities for use in bionanotechnology, is highly desirable. One means of understanding these systems is through the production of synthetic molecular motors. We demonstrate the use of orthogonal coiled-coil dimers (including both parallel and antiparallel coiled coils) as a hub for linking other components of a previously described synthetic molecular motor, the Tumbleweed. We use circular dichroism, analytical ultracentrifugation, dynamic light scattering, and disulfide rearrangement studies to demonstrate the ability of this six-peptide set to form the structure designed for the Tumbleweed motor. The successful formation of a suitable hub structure is both a test of the transferability of design rules for protein folding as well as an important step in the production of a synthetic protein-based molecular motor.

  9. Mass Spectrometry Based Molecular 3D-Cartography of Plant Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Floros, Dimitrios J.; Petras, Daniel; Kapono, Clifford A.; Melnik, Alexey V.; Ling, Tie-Jun; Knight, Rob; Dorrestein, Pieter C.

    2017-01-01

    Plants play an essential part in global carbon fixing through photosynthesis and are the primary food and energy source for humans. Understanding them thoroughly is therefore of highest interest for humanity. Advances in DNA and RNA sequencing and in protein and metabolite analysis allow the systematic description of plant composition at the molecular level. With imaging mass spectrometry, we can now add a spatial level, typically in the micrometer-to-centimeter range, to their compositions, essential for a detailed molecular understanding. Here we present an LC-MS based approach for 3D plant imaging, which is scalable and allows the analysis of entire plants. We applied this approach in a case study to pepper and tomato plants. Together with MS/MS spectra library matching and spectral networking, this non-targeted workflow provides the highest sensitivity and selectivity for the molecular annotations and imaging of plants, laying the foundation for studies of plant metabolism and plant-environment interactions.

  10. Molecular drag model based on differential reduction of the Kruger-Shapiro equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmer, J. C.; Levi, G.

    2002-07-01

    The history of the method of differential probability in molecular flow is reviewed, beginning with the little known derivation by D. Santeler (5th Annual Symposium on Space Environmental Simulation, Arnold Air Force Station, TN, May, 1964), based on the equation of C. W. Oatley [Br. J. Appl. Phys. 8, 15 (1957)]. This method contains the aperture correction within the theory, without phenomenological assumptions. A new equation of this type, for molecular pumping, is derived by differential reduction of the Kruger-Shapiro equations. A simple solution of the differential equations yields results of good accuracy for engineering use. The physical characteristics of molecular pumping are clarified by describing the pressure distribution within the pumping tube as if it were a conductance. By this method the calculated performance of a model pump is shown to be in satisfactory agreement with a Clausing-type solution from a previous publication. copyright 2002 American Vacuum Society.

  11. A Cobalt Supramolecular Triple-Stranded Helicate-based Discrete Molecular Cage

    PubMed Central

    Mai, Hien Duy; Kang, Philjae; Kim, Jin Kyung; Yoo, Hyojong

    2017-01-01

    We report a strategy to achieve a discrete cage molecule featuring a high level of structural hierarchy through a multiple-assembly process. A cobalt (Co) supramolecular triple-stranded helicate (Co-TSH)-based discrete molecular cage (1) is successfully synthesized and fully characterized. The solid-state structure of 1 shows that it is composed of six triple-stranded helicates interconnected by four linking cobalt species. This is an unusual example of a highly symmetric cage architecture resulting from the coordination-driven assembly of metallosupramolecular modules. The molecular cage 1 shows much higher CO2 uptake properties and selectivity compared with the separate supramolecular modules (Co-TSH, complex 2) and other molecular platforms. PMID:28262690

  12. [Molecular biology of renal cancer: bases for genetic directed therapy in advanced disease].

    PubMed

    Maroto Rey, José Pablo; Cillán Narvaez, Elena

    2013-06-01

    There has been expansion of therapeutic options in the management of metastatic renal cell carcinoma due to a better knowledge of the molecular biology of kidney cancers. There are different tumors grouped under the term renal cell carcinoma, being clear cell cancer the most frequent and accounting for 80% of kidney tumors. Mutations in the Von Hippel-Lindau gene can be identified in up to 80% of sporadic clear cell cancer, linking a genetically inheritable disease where vascular tumors are frequent, with renal cell cancer. Other histologic types present specific alterations in molecular pathways, like c-MET in papillary type I tumors, and Fumarase Hydratase in papillary type II tumors. Identification of the molecular alteration for a specific tumor may offer an opportunity for treatment selection based on biomarkers, and, in the future, for developing an engineering designed genetic treatment.

  13. A tetraphenylethylene core-based 3D structure small molecular acceptor enabling efficient non-fullerene organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuhang; Mu, Cheng; Jiang, Kui; Zhao, Jingbo; Li, Yunke; Zhang, Lu; Li, Zhengke; Lai, Joshua Yuk Lin; Hu, Huawei; Ma, Tingxuan; Hu, Rongrong; Yu, Demei; Huang, Xuhui; Tang, Ben Zhong; Yan, He

    2015-02-01

    A tetraphenylethylene core-based small molecular acceptor with a unique 3D molecular structure is developed. Bulk-heterojunction blend films with a small feature size (≈20 nm) are obtained, which lead to non-fullerene organic solar cells (OSCs) with 5.5% power conversion efficiency. The work provides a new molecular design approach to efficient non-fullerene OSCs based on 3D-structured small-molecule acceptors.

  14. Hierarchical QSAR technology based on the Simplex representation of molecular structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuz'min, V. E.; Artemenko, A. G.; Muratov, E. N.

    2008-06-01

    This article is about the hierarchical quantitative structure-activity relationship technology (HiT QSAR) based on the Simplex representation of molecular structure (SiRMS) and its application for different QSAR/QSP(property)R tasks. The essence of this technology is a sequential solution (with the use of the information obtained on the previous steps) to the QSAR problem by the series of enhanced models of molecular structure description [from one dimensional (1D) to four dimensional (4D)]. It is a system of permanently improved solutions. In the SiRMS approach, every molecule is represented as a system of different simplexes (tetratomic fragments with fixed composition, structure, chirality and symmetry). The level of simplex descriptors detailing increases consecutively from the 1D to 4D representation of the molecular structure. The advantages of the approach reported here are the absence of "molecular alignment" problems, consideration of different physical-chemical properties of atoms (e.g. charge, lipophilicity, etc.), the high adequacy and good interpretability of obtained models and clear ways for molecular design. The efficiency of the HiT QSAR approach is demonstrated by comparing it with the most popular modern QSAR approaches on two representative examination sets. The examples of successful application of the HiT QSAR for various QSAR/QSPR investigations on the different levels (1D-4D) of the molecular structure description are also highlighted. The reliability of developed QSAR models as predictive virtual screening tools and their ability to serve as the base of directed drug design was validated by subsequent synthetic and biological experiments, among others. The HiT QSAR is realized as a complex of computer programs known as HiT QSAR software that also includes a powerful statistical block and a number of useful utilities.

  15. A Formaldehyde Sensor Based on Molecularly-Imprinted Polymer on a TiO₂ Nanotube Array.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaohui; Raskin, Jean-Pierre; Lahem, Driss; Krumpmann, Arnaud; Decroly, André; Debliquy, Marc

    2017-03-24

    Today, significant attention has been brought to the development of sensitive, specific, cheap, and reliable sensors for real-time monitoring. Molecular imprinting technology is a versatile and promising technology for practical applications in many areas, particularly chemical sensors. Here, we present a chemical sensor for detecting formaldehyde, a toxic common indoor pollutant gas. Polypyrrole-based molecularly-imprinted polymer (PPy-based MIP) is employed as the sensing recognition layer and synthesized on a titanium dioxide nanotube array (TiO₂-NTA) for increasing its surface-to-volume ratio, thereby improving the sensor performance. Our sensor selectively detects formaldehyde in the parts per million (ppm) range at room temperature. It also shows a long-term stability and small fluctuation to humidity variations. These are attributed to the thin fishnet-like structure of the PPy-based MIP on the highly-ordered and vertically-aligned TiO₂-NTA.

  16. Molecular and cellular bases of adaptation to a changing environment in microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Bleuven, Clara

    2016-01-01

    Environmental heterogeneity constitutes an evolutionary challenge for organisms. While evolutionary dynamics under variable conditions has been explored for decades, we still know relatively little about the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved. It is of paramount importance to examine these molecular bases because they may play an important role in shaping the course of evolution. In this review, we examine the diversity of adaptive mechanisms in the face of environmental changes. We exploit the recent literature on microbial systems because those have benefited the most from the recent emergence of genetic engineering and experimental evolution followed by genome sequencing. We identify four emerging trends: (i) an adaptive molecular change in a pathway often results in fitness trade-off in alternative environments but the effects are dependent on a mutation's genetic background; (ii) adaptive changes often modify transcriptional and signalling pathways; (iii) several adaptive changes may occur within the same molecular pathway but be associated with pleiotropy of different signs across environments; (iv) because of their large associated costs, macromolecular changes such as gene amplification and aneuploidy may be a rapid mechanism of adaptation in the short-term only. The course of adaptation in a variable environment, therefore, depends on the complexity of the environment but also on the molecular relationships among the genes involved and between the genes and the phenotypes under selection. PMID:27798299

  17. Molecular and cellular bases of adaptation to a changing environment in microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Bleuven, Clara; Landry, Christian R

    2016-10-26

    Environmental heterogeneity constitutes an evolutionary challenge for organisms. While evolutionary dynamics under variable conditions has been explored for decades, we still know relatively little about the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved. It is of paramount importance to examine these molecular bases because they may play an important role in shaping the course of evolution. In this review, we examine the diversity of adaptive mechanisms in the face of environmental changes. We exploit the recent literature on microbial systems because those have benefited the most from the recent emergence of genetic engineering and experimental evolution followed by genome sequencing. We identify four emerging trends: (i) an adaptive molecular change in a pathway often results in fitness trade-off in alternative environments but the effects are dependent on a mutation's genetic background; (ii) adaptive changes often modify transcriptional and signalling pathways; (iii) several adaptive changes may occur within the same molecular pathway but be associated with pleiotropy of different signs across environments; (iv) because of their large associated costs, macromolecular changes such as gene amplification and aneuploidy may be a rapid mechanism of adaptation in the short-term only. The course of adaptation in a variable environment, therefore, depends on the complexity of the environment but also on the molecular relationships among the genes involved and between the genes and the phenotypes under selection.

  18. Molecular design toward highly efficient photovoltaic polymers based on two-dimensional conjugated benzodithiophene.

    PubMed

    Ye, Long; Zhang, Shaoqing; Huo, Lijun; Zhang, Maojie; Hou, Jianhui

    2014-05-20

    As researchers continue to develop new organic materials for solar cells, benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene (BDT)-based polymers have come to the fore. To improve the photovoltaic properties of BDT-based polymers, researchers have developed and applied various strategies leading to the successful molecular design of highly efficient photovoltaic polymers. Novel polymer materials composed of two-dimensional conjugated BDT (2D-conjugated BDT) have boosted the power conversion efficiency of polymer solar cells (PSCs) to levels that exceed 9%. In this Account, we summarize recent progress related to the design and synthesis of 2D-conjugated BDT-based polymers and discuss their applications in highly efficient photovoltaic devices. We introduce the basic considerations for the construction of 2D-conjugated BDT-based polymers and systematic molecular design guidelines. For example, simply modifying an alkoxyl-substituted BDT to form an alkylthienyl-substituted BDT can improve the polymer hole mobilities substantially with little effect on their molecular energy level. Secondly, the addition of a variety of chemical moieties to the polymer can produce a 2D-conjugated BDT unit with more functions. For example, the introduction of a conjugated side chain with electron deficient groups (such as para-alkyl-phenyl, meta-alkoxyl-phenyl, and 2-alkyl-3-fluoro-thienyl) allowed us to modulate the molecular energy levels of 2D-conjugated BDT-based polymers. Through the rational design of BDT analogues such as dithienobenzodithiophene (DTBDT) or the insertion of larger π bridges, we can tune the backbone conformations of these polymers and modulate their photovoltaic properties. We also discuss the influence of 2D-conjugated BDT on polymer morphology and the blends of these polymers with phenyl-C61 (or C71)-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM). Finally, we summarize the various applications of the 2D-conjugated BDT-based polymers in highly efficient PSC devices. Overall, this Account

  19. Responsive small molecular hydrogels based on adamantane-peptides for cell culture.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cuihong; Li, Dongxia; Liu, Zheng; Hong, Ge; Zhang, Jun; Kong, Deling; Yang, Zhimou

    2012-01-12

    The development of responsive small molecular hydrogels that can be applied for recovery of cells postculture attract extensive interests for researchers in fields of cell biology, stem cell differentiation, and tissue engineering. We report in this study several responsive small molecular hydrogels based on adamantane-peptides whose gel to clear solution phase transition can be achieved by addition of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) derivatives. The small molecular hydrogels are formed by our recently developed method of disulfide bond cleavage by glutathione (GSH). Mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells attach and grow well at the surface of hydrogels. Furthermore, 3T3 cells postculture can be recovered from the gels by the addition of a β-CD derivative due to formation of clear solutions by the adamantane-β-CD interaction. The culture on hydrogels and recovery process do not cause obvious effects on behaviors of 3T3 cells. The results shown in this study indicate that small molecular hydrogels based on adamantane-peptides have great potentials in research fields where further analysis of cells is needed.

  20. Computational molecular design of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane based organic-inorganic hybrid semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Feng

    Cubic silsesquioxanes (T8 SQs), with the formula of [RSiO1.5] 8, enable advanced materials design. In this thesis, a computational materials science framework, including ab initio density functional theory (DFT) calculations, molecular dynamics (MD), and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, was developed to perform computational molecular design and crystal engineering of silsesquioxane based diacene-SQ and then octa(halogenphenyl)-SQ molecular systems. The goal of this project was to identify novel molecular architectures, a priori, that exhibit targeted self-assembly behaviors and result in materials with improved electronic properties. First, existing force fields, including our in house charge transfer reactive (CTR) force field, and COMPASS, were evaluated for simulating cubic silsesquioxane systems. All force fields reproduced the experimental structure of SQ-based crystals very well. However, only the FLX force field reproduced the experimentally observed vibrational properties and thermodynamic behavior. Next, targeting materials performance, such as high electronic mobility, a series of diacene-SQ molecules were designed and their crystal structures predicted by following the computational molecular design recipe that accounts for transport theory, symmetry relationships, polymorph prediction procedures, and solid state electronic property evaluation methods. Computationally derived diacene-SQ crystals are predicted to exhibit advanced electronic properties, such as very small band gaps and parallel packing of the acene groups in crystal structures, indicating excellent transport properties, as well as improved thermal and mechanical properties. Finally, a series of new small-band gap octa(halogenphenyl)-SQ molecular systems were identified by computationally exploring alternative architectures and functionalization of recently synthesized octa(halogenphenyl)-SQ crystals. These hybrid molecular crystals also feature other unique properties, such as solution

  1. Molecular analysis of single oocyst of Eimeria by whole genome amplification (WGA) based nested PCR.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunzhou; Tao, Geru; Cui, Yujuan; Lv, Qiyao; Xie, Li; Li, Yuan; Suo, Xun; Qin, Yinghe; Xiao, Lihua; Liu, Xianyong

    2014-09-01

    PCR-based molecular tools are widely used for the identification and characterization of protozoa. Here we report the molecular analysis of Eimeria species using combined methods of whole genome amplification (WGA) and nested PCR. Single oocyst of Eimeria stiedai or Eimeriamedia was directly used for random amplification of the genomic DNA with either primer extension preamplification (PEP) or multiple displacement amplification (MDA), and then the WGA product was used as template in nested PCR with species-specific primers for ITS-1, 18S rDNA and 23S rDNA of E. stiedai and E. media. WGA-based PCR was successful for the amplification of these genes from single oocyst. For the species identification of single oocyst isolated from mixed E. stiedai or E. media, the results from WGA-based PCR were exactly in accordance with those from morphological identification, suggesting the availability of this method in molecular analysis of eimerian parasites at the single oocyst level. WGA-based PCR method can also be applied for the identification and genetic characterization of other protists.

  2. Photoelectrochemical sensor for pentachlorophenol on microfluidic paper-based analytical device based on the molecular imprinting technique.

    PubMed

    Sun, Guoqiang; Wang, Panpan; Ge, Shenguang; Ge, Lei; Yu, Jinghua; Yan, Mei

    2014-06-15

    Combining microfluidic paper-based analytical device (μ-PAD) and the molecular imprinting technique, a visible light photoelectrochemical (PEC) sensing platform for the detection of pentachlorophenol (PCP) was established on gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) decorated paper working electrode using polypyrrole-functionalized ZnO nanoparticles. Ascorbic acid (AA) was exploited as an efficient and nontoxic electron donor for scavenging photogenerated holes under mild solution medium and facilitating the generation of stable photocurrent. The microfluidic molecular imprinted polymer-based PEC analytical origami device is developed for the detection of PCP in the linear range from 0.01 ng mL(-1) to 100 ng mL(-1) with a low detection limit of 4 pg mL(-1). This disposable microfluidic PEC origami device would provide a new platform for sensitive, specific, and multiplex assay in public health, environmental monitoring, and the developing world.

  3. Molecular electronic devices based on single-walled carbon nanotube electrodes.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Alina K; Steigerwald, Michael L; Guo, Xuefeng; Nuckolls, Colin

    2008-12-01

    As the top-down fabrication techniques for silicon-based electronic materials have reached the scale of molecular lengths, researchers have been investigating nanostructured materials to build electronics from individual molecules. Researchers have directed extensive experimental and theoretical efforts toward building functional optoelectronic devices using individual organic molecules and fabricating metal-molecule junctions. Although this method has many advantages, its limitations lead to large disagreement between experimental and theoretical results. This Account describes a new method to create molecular electronic devices, covalently bridging a gap in a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) with an electrically functional molecule. First, we introduce a molecular-scale gap into a nanotube by precise oxidative cutting through a lithographic mask. Now functionalized with carboxylic acids, the ends of the cleaved carbon nanotubes are reconnected with conjugated diamines to give robust diamides. The molecular electronic devices prepared in this fashion can withstand and respond to large environmental changes based on the functional groups in the molecules. For example, with oligoanilines as the molecular bridge, the conductance of the device is sensitive to pH. Similarly, using diarylethylenes as the bridge provides devices that can reversibly switch between conjugated and nonconjugated states. The molecular bridge can perform the dual task of carrying electrical current and sensing/recognition through biological events such as protein/substrate binding and DNA hybridization. The devices based on DNA can measure the difference in electrical properties of complementary and mismatched strands. A well-matched duplex DNA 15-mer in the gap exhibits a 300-fold lower resistance than a duplex with a GT or CA mismatch. This system provides an ultrasensitive way to detect single-nucleotide polymorphisms at the individual molecule level. Restriction enzymes can cleave

  4. Charge transport and rectification in molecular junctions formed with carbon-based electrodes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taekyeong; Liu, Zhen-Fei; Lee, Chulho; Neaton, Jeffrey B; Venkataraman, Latha

    2014-07-29

    Molecular junctions formed using the scanning-tunneling-microscope-based break-junction technique (STM-BJ) have provided unique insight into charge transport at the nanoscale. In most prior work, the same metal, typically Au, Pt, or Ag, is used for both tip and substrate. For such noble metal electrodes, the density of electronic states is approximately constant within a narrow energy window relevant to charge transport. Here, we form molecular junctions using the STM-BJ technique, with an Au metal tip and a microfabricated graphite substrate, and measure the conductance of a series of graphite/amine-terminated oligophenyl/Au molecular junctions. The remarkable mechanical strength of graphite and the single-crystal properties of our substrates allow measurements over few thousand junctions without any change in the surface properties. We show that conductance decays exponentially with molecular backbone length with a decay constant that is essentially the same as that for measurements with two Au electrodes. More importantly, despite the inherent symmetry of the oligophenylamines, we observe rectification in these junctions. State-of-art ab initio conductance calculations are in good agreement with experiment, and explain the rectification. We show that the highly energy-dependent graphite density of states contributes variations in transmission that, when coupled with an asymmetric voltage drop across the junction, leads to the observed rectification. Together, our measurements and calculations show how functionality may emerge from hybrid molecular-scale devices purposefully designed with different electrodes beyond the so-called "wide band limit," opening up the possibility of assembling molecular junctions with dissimilar electrodes using layered 2D materials.

  5. A chemically powered unidirectional rotary molecular motor based on a palladium redox cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Beatrice S. L.; Kistemaker, Jos C. M.; Otten, Edwin; Feringa, Ben L.

    2016-09-01

    The conversion of chemical energy to drive directional motion at the molecular level allows biological systems, ranging from subcellular components to whole organisms, to perform a myriad of dynamic functions and respond to changes in the environment. Directional movement has been demonstrated in artificial molecular systems, but the fundamental motif of unidirectional rotary motion along a single-bond rotary axle induced by metal-catalysed transformation of chemical fuels has not been realized, and the challenge is to couple the metal-centred redox processes to stepwise changes in conformation to arrive at a full unidirectional rotary cycle. Here, we present the design of an organopalladium-based motor and the experimental demonstration of a 360° unidirectional rotary cycle using simple chemical fuels. Exploiting fundamental reactivity principles in organometallic chemistry enables control of directional rotation and offers the potential of harnessing the wealth of opportunities offered by transition-metal-based catalytic conversions to drive motion and dynamic functions.

  6. All-Carbon Electrode Molecular Electronic Devices Based on Langmuir-Blodgett Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Sangiao, Soraya; Martín, Santiago; González-Orive, Alejandro; Magén, César; Low, Paul J; De Teresa, José M; Cea, Pilar

    2017-02-01

    Nascent molecular electronic devices, based on monolayer Langmuir-Blodgett films sandwiched between two carbonaceous electrodes, have been prepared. Tightly packed monolayers of 4-((4-((4-ethynylphenyl)ethynyl)phenyl)ethynyl)benzoic acid are deposited onto a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite electrode. An amorphous carbon top contact electrode is formed on top of the monolayer from a naphthalene precursor using the focused electron beam induced deposition technique. This allows the deposition of a carbon top-contact electrode with well-defined shape, thickness, and precise positioning on the film with nm resolution. These results represent a substantial step toward the realization of integrated molecular electronic devices based on monolayers and carbon electrodes.

  7. Recent emergence of photon upconversion based on triplet energy migration in molecular assemblies.

    PubMed

    Yanai, Nobuhiro; Kimizuka, Nobuo

    2016-04-07

    An emerging field of triplet energy migration-based photon upconversion (TEM-UC) is reviewed. Highly efficient photon upconversion has been realized in a wide range of chromophore assemblies, such as non-solvent liquids, ionic liquids, amorphous solids, gels, supramolecular assemblies, molecular crystals, and metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). The control over their assembly structures allows for unexpected air-stability and maximum upconversion quantum yield at weak solar irradiance that has never been achieved by the conventional molecular diffusion-based mechanism. The introduction of the "self-assembly" concept offers a new perspective in photon upconversion research and triplet exciton science, which show promise for numerous applications ranging from solar energy conversion to chemical biology.

  8. A Novel Methodology for Metal Ion Separation Based on Molecularly Imprinting

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo, Xiaobin; Mosha, Donnati; Hassan, Mansour M.; Givens, Richard S.; Busch, Daryle H.

    2004-03-31

    The siderophore-based extraction of iron from the soil by bacteria is proposed as a model for a new separation methodology labeled the soil poutice, a molecular device that would selectively retrieve the complex of a targeted metal ion. In this report we described the synthesis and characterization of molecularly imprinted polymers and their application in the specific recognition of macrocyclic metal complexes. The imprinting is based on non-covalent interactions such as hydrogen bonding, electrostatic attractions and minor metal-ligand coordination. Good rebinding capacity for the imprinting metal complex was observed in acetonitrile as well as in water. The polymers are resistant to strong acids and oxidizing agents and showed an increase of rebinding capacity during cycles of reuse. The imprinting procedure, combined with the previously known selective chelation of macrocyclic ligands, supports the feasibility of a new methodology that can be used to extract waste metal ions effectively and selectively from soils and ground water.

  9. Performance Evaluation and Optimal Detection of Relay-Assisted Diffusion-Based Molecular Communication with Drift.

    PubMed

    Tavakkoli, Nooshin; Azmi, Paeiz; Mokari, Nader

    2016-11-16

    In this paper, we consider a decode-and-forward (DF) relay-assisted diffusion-based molecular communication system inside one of the blood vessels of a human body with positive drift from transmitter to receiver. We use the normal approximation to the distribution of the number of received molecules and derive a closed-form expression for the end-toend bit error probability of the system. We then propose an optimization problem that aims at minimizing the bit error probability of the system and solve it at the receiver nanomachine by an algorithm based on the bisection method to determine the optimal detection threshold. Furthermore, we study the impact of the system parameters, such as drift velocity, position of the relay node and number of allocated molecules on the performance of the system. The numerical results show that with a constant molecular budget, DF relying strategy can considerably improve the system performance.

  10. Development of a molecularly imprinted polymer based surface plasmon resonance sensor for theophylline monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Rui; Cameron, Brent D.

    2011-03-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) thin films and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensing technologies were combined to develop a novel sensing platform for monitoring real-time theophylline concentration, which is a compound of interest in environmental monitoring and a molecular probe for phenotyping certain cytochrome P450 enzymes. The MIPs hydrogel is easy to synthesize and provides shape-selective recognition with high affinity to specific target molecules. Different polymerization formulas were tested and optimized. The influence of the monomer sensitive factors were addressed by SPR. SPR is an evanescent wave optics based sensing technique that is suitable for real-time and label free sensing purposes. Gold nanorods (Au NRs) were uniformly immobilized onto a SPR sensing surface for the construction of a fiber optics based prism-free localized SPR (LSPR) measurement. This technique can be also applied to assess the activities of other small organic molecules by adjusting the polymerization formula, thus, this approach also has many other potential applications.

  11. Molecular Engineering of Vector-Based Oncolytic and Imaging Approaches for Advanced Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-01

    Oncolytic and Imaging Approaches for Advanced Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Lily Wu, M.D., Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION...SUBTITLE Molecular Engineering of Vector-based Oncolytic and Imaging Approaches for 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Advanced Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT...reproductions will be in black and white. 14. ABSTRACT Hormone refractory and metastatic prostate cancer are not well understood. Better animal models

  12. The Design of a Molecular Assembly Line Based on Biological Molecules

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-06-01

    and will demonstrate how one can construct a purely synthetic analogue of a polyketide synthase . 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF...scaffold in programmed assembly and molecular electronics. It is based on the principles of the biological molecules polyketide synthase and kinesin, and in...stereoselective centers) with any reasonable yield, not including the R&D and process development time. Figure 1.6 shows how a polyketide synthase

  13. Playing Tic-Tac-Toe with a Sugar-Based Molecular Computer.

    PubMed

    Elstner, M; Schiller, A

    2015-08-24

    Today, molecules can perform Boolean operations and circuits at a level of higher complexity. However, concatenation of logic gates and inhomogeneous inputs and outputs are still challenging tasks. Novel approaches for logic gate integration are possible when chemical programming and software programming are combined. Here it is shown that a molecular finite automaton based on the concatenated implication function (IMP) of a fluorescent two-component sugar probe via a wiring algorithm is able to play tic-tac-toe.

  14. Model of molecular bonding based on the Bohr Sommerfeld picture of atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svidzinsky, Anatoly A.; Chin, Siu A.; Scully, Marlan O.

    2006-07-01

    We develop a model of molecular binding based on the Bohr Sommerfeld description of atoms together with a constraint taken from conventional quantum mechanics. The model can describe the binding energy curves of H2, H3 and other molecules with striking accuracy. Our approach treats electrons as point particles with positions determined by extrema of an algebraic energy function. Our constrained model provides a physically appealing, accurate description of multi-electron chemical bonds.

  15. Dithienogermole-based solution-processed molecular solar cells with efficiency over 9.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vinay; Lai, Lai Fan; Datt, Ram; Chand, Suresh; Heeger, Alan J; Bazan, Guillermo C; Singh, Surya Prakash

    2016-06-30

    A molecular donor of intermediate dimensions based on dithienogermole (DTG) as the central electron rich unit, coded as DTG(FBT2Th2)2, was designed and synthesized for use in bulk heterojunction, solution-processed organic solar cells. Under optimized conditions, a maximum power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 9.1% can be achieved with [6,6]-phenyl C71-butyric acid methyl ester (PC71BM) as the acceptor semiconductor component.

  16. Low molecular weight Neutral Boron Dipyrromethene (Bodipy) dyads for fluorescence-based neural imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Dan; Benniston, Andrew C.; Clift, Sophie; Baisch, Ulrich; Steyn, Jannetta; Everitt, Nicola; Andras, Peter

    2014-05-01

    The neutral low molecular weight julolidine-based borondipyrromethene (Bodipy) dyads JULBD and MJULBD were used for fast voltage-sensitive dye imaging of neurons in the crab stomatogastric ganglion. The fluorescence modulation of the dyads mirrors alterations in the membrane potential of the imaged neurons. The toxicity of the dyes towards the neurons is related to their structure in that methyl groups at the 3,5 positions results in reduced toxic effects.

  17. Feasibility study of molecular memory device based on DNA using methylation to store information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Liming; Qiu, Wanzhi; Al-Dirini, Feras; Hossain, Faruque M.; Evans, Robin; Skafidas, Efstratios

    2016-07-01

    DNA, because of its robustness and dense information storage capability, has been proposed as a potential candidate for next-generation storage media. However, encoding information into the DNA sequence requires molecular synthesis technology, which to date is costly and prone to synthesis errors. Reading the DNA strand information is also complex. Ideally, DNA storage will provide methods for modifying stored information. Here, we conduct a feasibility study investigating the use of the DNA 5-methylcytosine (5mC) methylation state as a molecular memory to store information. We propose a new 1-bit memory device and study, based on the density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's function method, the feasibility of electrically reading the information. Our results show that changes to methylation states lead to changes in the peak of negative differential resistance which can be used to interrogate memory state. Our work demonstrates a new memory concept based on methylation state which can be beneficial in the design of next generation DNA based molecular electronic memory devices.

  18. Visualizing BPA by molecularly imprinted ratiometric fluorescence sensor based on dual emission nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hongzhi; Xu, Shoufang

    2017-06-15

    Construction of ratiometric fluorescent probe often involved in tedious multistep preparation or complicated coupling or chemical modification process. The emergence of dual emission fluorescent nanoparticles would simplify the construction process and avoids the tedious chemical coupling. Herein, we reported a facile strategy to prepare ratiometric fluorescence molecularly imprinted sensor based on dual emission nanoparticles (d-NPs) which comprised of carbon dots and gold nanoclusters for detection of Bisphenol A (BPA). D-NPs emission at 460nm and 580nm were first prepared by seed growth co-microwave method using gold nanoparticles as seeds and glucose as precursor for carbon dots. When they were applied to propose ratiometric fluorescence molecularly imprinted sensor, the preparation process was simplified, and the sensitivity of sensor was improved with detection limit of 29nM, and visualizing BPA was feasible based on the distinguish fluorescence color change. The feasibility of the developed method in real samples was successfully evaluated through the analysis of BPA in water samples with satisfactory recoveries of 95.9-98.9% and recoveries ranging from 92.6% to 98.6% in canned food samples. When detection BPA in positive feeding bottles, the results agree well with those obtained by accredited method. The developed method proposed in this work to prepare ratiometric fluorescence molecularly imprinted sensor based on dual emission nanoparticles proved to be a convenient, reliable and practical way to prepared high sensitive and selective fluorescence sensors.

  19. Band-selective chemical exchange saturation transfer imaging with hyperpolarized xenon-based molecular sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meldrum, Tyler; Bajaj, Vikram S.; Wemmer, David E.; Pines, Alexander

    2011-12-01

    Molecular imaging based on saturation transfer in exchanging systems is a tool for amplified and chemically specific magnetic resonance imaging. Xenon-based molecular sensors are a promising category of molecular imaging agents in which chemical exchange of dissolved xenon between its bulk and agent-bound phases has been use to achieve sub-picomolar detection sensitivity. Control over the saturation transfer dynamics, particularly when multiple exchanging resonances are present in the spectra, requires saturation fields of limited bandwidth and is generally accomplished by continuous wave irradiation. We demonstrate instead how band-selective saturation sequences based on multiple pulse inversion elements can yield saturation bandwidth tuneable over a wide range, while depositing less RF power in the sample. We show how these sequences can be used in imaging experiments that require spatial-spectral and multispectral saturation. The results should be applicable to all CEST experiments and, in particular, will provide the spectroscopic control required for applications of arrays of xenon chemical sensors in microfluidic chemical analysis devices.

  20. Band-selective chemical exchange saturation transfer imaging with hyperpolarized xenon-based molecular sensors.

    PubMed

    Meldrum, Tyler; Bajaj, Vikram S; Wemmer, David E; Pines, Alexander

    2011-12-01

    Molecular imaging based on saturation transfer in exchanging systems is a tool for amplified and chemically specific magnetic resonance imaging. Xenon-based molecular sensors are a promising category of molecular imaging agents in which chemical exchange of dissolved xenon between its bulk and agent-bound phases has been use to achieve sub-picomolar detection sensitivity. Control over the saturation transfer dynamics, particularly when multiple exchanging resonances are present in the spectra, requires saturation fields of limited bandwidth and is generally accomplished by continuous wave irradiation. We demonstrate instead how band-selective saturation sequences based on multiple pulse inversion elements can yield saturation bandwidth tuneable over a wide range, while depositing less RF power in the sample. We show how these sequences can be used in imaging experiments that require spatial-spectral and multispectral saturation. The results should be applicable to all CEST experiments and, in particular, will provide the spectroscopic control required for applications of arrays of xenon chemical sensors in microfluidic chemical analysis devices.

  1. Enrichment of low molecular weight serum proteins using acetonitrile precipitation for mass spectrometry based proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Kay, Richard; Barton, Chris; Ratcliffe, Lucy; Matharoo-Ball, Balwir; Brown, Pamela; Roberts, Jane; Teale, Phil; Creaser, Colin

    2008-10-01

    A rapid acetonitrile (ACN)-based extraction method has been developed that reproducibly depletes high abundance and high molecular weight proteins from serum prior to mass spectrometric analysis. A nanoflow liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (nano-LC/MS/MS) multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) method for 57 high to medium abundance serum proteins was used to characterise the ACN-depleted fraction after tryptic digestion. Of the 57 targeted proteins 29 were detected and albumin, the most abundant protein in serum and plasma, was identified as the 20th most abundant protein in the extract. The combination of ACN depletion and one-dimensional nano-LC/MS/MS enabled the detection of the low abundance serum protein, insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), which has a serum concentration in the region of 100 ng/mL. One-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis of the depleted serum showed no bands corresponding to proteins of molecular mass over 75 kDa after extraction, demonstrating the efficiency of the method for the depletion of high molecular weight proteins. Total protein analysis of the ACN extracts showed that approximately 99.6% of all protein is removed from the serum. The ACN-depletion strategy offers a viable alternative to the immunochemistry-based protein-depletion techniques commonly used for removing high abundance proteins from serum prior to MS-based proteomic analyses.

  2. Computational prediction and experimental selectivity coefficients for hydroxyzine and cetirizine molecularly imprinted polymer based potentiometric sensors.

    PubMed

    Azimi, Abolfazl; Javanbakht, Mehran

    2014-02-17

    In spite of the increasing usages number of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) in many scientific applications, the theoretical aspects of participating intra molecular forces are not fully understood. This work investigates effects of the electrostatic force, the Mulliken charge and the role of cavity's backbone atoms on the selectivity of MIPs. Moreover, charge distribution, which is a computational parameter, was proposed for the prediction of the selectivity coefficients of MIP-based sensors. In the computational approaches and experimental study, methacrylic acid (MAA) was chosen as the functional monomer and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as the cross linker for hydroxyzine and cetirizine imprinted polymers. Ab initio, DFT B3LYP method was carried out on molecular optimization. With regard to results obtained from molecules optimization and hydrogen bonding properties, possible configurations of 1:n (n≤5) template/monomer complexes were designed and optimized. The binding energy for each complex in gas phase was calculated. Depending on the most stable configuration, hydroxyzine and cetirizine imprinted polymer models were designed. The calculations including the porogen were also investigated. The theoretical charge distributions for the template and some potential interfering molecules were calculated. The results showed a correlation between the selectivity coefficients and the theoretical charge distributions. The results surprisingly show that charge distribution based model was able to predict the selectivity coefficients of MIP based potentiometric sensors.

  3. TOPICAL REVIEW: Magnetoresistance of nanoscale molecular devices based on Aharonov Bohm interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hod, Oded; Baer, Roi; Rabani, Eran

    2008-09-01

    Control of conductance in molecular junctions is of key importance in the growing field of molecular electronics. The current in these junctions is often controlled by an electric gate designed to shift conductance peaks into the low bias regime. Magnetic fields, on the other hand, have rarely been used due to the small magnetic flux captured by molecular conductors (an exception is the Kondo effect in single-molecule transistors). This is in contrast to a related field, electronic transport through mesoscopic devices, where considerable activity with magnetic fields has led to a rich description of transport. The scarcity of experimental activity is due to the belief that significant magnetic response is obtained only when the magnetic flux is of the order of the quantum flux, while attaining such a flux for molecular and nanoscale devices requires unrealistic magnetic fields. Here we review recent theoretical work regarding the essential physical requirements necessary for the construction of nanometer-scale magnetoresistance devices based on an Aharonov-Bohm molecular interferometer. We show that control of the conductance properties using small fractions of a magnetic flux can be achieved by carefully adjusting the lifetime of the conducting electrons through a pre-selected single state that is well separated from other states due to quantum confinement effects. Using a simple analytical model and more elaborate atomistic calculations we demonstrate that magnetic fields which give rise to a magnetic flux comparable to 10-3 of the quantum flux can be used to switch a class of different molecular and nanometer rings, ranging from quantum corrals, carbon nanotubes and even a molecular ring composed of polyconjugated aromatic materials. The unique characteristics of the magnetic field as a gate is further discussed and demonstrated in two different directions. First, a three-terminal molecular router devices that can function as a parallel logic gate, processing

  4. Magnetoresistance of nanoscale molecular devices based on Aharonov-Bohm interferometry.

    PubMed

    Hod, Oded; Baer, Roi; Rabani, Eran

    2008-09-24

    Control of conductance in molecular junctions is of key importance in the growing field of molecular electronics. The current in these junctions is often controlled by an electric gate designed to shift conductance peaks into the low bias regime. Magnetic fields, on the other hand, have rarely been used due to the small magnetic flux captured by molecular conductors (an exception is the Kondo effect in single-molecule transistors). This is in contrast to a related field, electronic transport through mesoscopic devices, where considerable activity with magnetic fields has led to a rich description of transport. The scarcity of experimental activity is due to the belief that significant magnetic response is obtained only when the magnetic flux is of the order of the quantum flux, while attaining such a flux for molecular and nanoscale devices requires unrealistic magnetic fields. Here we review recent theoretical work regarding the essential physical requirements necessary for the construction of nanometer-scale magnetoresistance devices based on an Aharonov-Bohm molecular interferometer. We show that control of the conductance properties using small fractions of a magnetic flux can be achieved by carefully adjusting the lifetime of the conducting electrons through a pre-selected single state that is well separated from other states due to quantum confinement effects. Using a simple analytical model and more elaborate atomistic calculations we demonstrate that magnetic fields which give rise to a magnetic flux comparable to 10(-3) of the quantum flux can be used to switch a class of different molecular and nanometer rings, ranging from quantum corrals, carbon nanotubes and even a molecular ring composed of polyconjugated aromatic materials. The unique characteristics of the magnetic field as a gate is further discussed and demonstrated in two different directions. First, a three-terminal molecular router devices that can function as a parallel logic gate, processing

  5. Hybrid schemes based on quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations goals to success, problems, and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Silvia; Ruiz-Pernía, Javier; Martí, Sergio; Moliner, Vicent; Tuñón, Iñaki; Bertrán, Juan; Andrés, Juan

    2011-01-01

    The development of characterization techniques, advanced synthesis methods, as well as molecular modeling has transformed the study of systems in a well-established research field. The current research challenges in biocatalysis and biotransformation evolve around enzyme discovery, design, and optimization. How can we find or create enzymes that catalyze important synthetic reactions, even reactions that may not exist in nature? What is the source of enzyme catalytic power? To answer these and other related questions, the standard strategies have evolved from trial-and-error methodologies based on chemical knowledge, accumulated experience, and common sense into a clearly multidisciplinary science that allows one to reach the molecular design of tailor-made enzyme catalysts. This is even more so when one refers to enzyme catalysts, for which the detailed structure and composition are known and can be manipulated to introduce well-defined residues which can be implicated in the chemical rearrangements taking place in the active site. The methods and techniques of theoretical and computational chemistry are becoming more and more important in both understanding the fundamental biological roles of enzymes and facilitating their utilization in biotechnology. Improvement of the catalytic function of enzymes is important from scientific and industrial viewpoints, and to put this fact in the actual perspective as well as the potentialities, we recommend the very recent report of Sanderson [Sanderson, K. (2011). Chemistry: enzyme expertise. Nature 471, 397.]. Great fundamental advances have been made toward the ab initio design of enzyme catalysts based on molecular modeling. This has been based on the molecular mechanistic knowledge of the reactions to be catalyzed, together with the development of advanced synthesis and characterization techniques. The corresponding molecular mechanism can be studied by means of powerful quantum chemical calculations. The catalytic

  6. A molecular receptor targeted, hydroxyapatite nanocrystal based multi-modal contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Ashokan, Anusha; Menon, Deepthy; Nair, Shantikumar; Koyakutty, Manzoor

    2010-03-01

    Multi-modal molecular imaging can significantly improve the potential of non-invasive medical diagnosis by combining basic anatomical descriptions with in-depth phenotypic characteristics of disease. Contrast agents with multifunctional properties that can sense and enhance the signature of specific molecular markers, together with high biocompatibility are essential for combinatorial molecular imaging approaches. Here, we report a multi-modal contrast agent based on hydroxyapatite nanocrystals (nHAp), which is engineered to show simultaneous contrast enhancement for three major molecular imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), X-ray imaging and near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging. Monodispersed nHAp crystals of average size approximately 30 nm and hexagonal crystal structure were in situ doped with multiple rare-earth impurities by a surfactant-free, aqueous wet-chemical method at 100 degrees C. Doping of nHAp with Eu(3+) (3 at%) resulted bright near-infrared fluorescence (700 nm) due to efficient (5)D(0)-(7)F(4) electronic transition and co-doping with Gd(3+) resulted enhanced paramagnetic longitudinal relaxivity (r(1) approximately 12 mM(-1) s(-1)) suitable for T(1) weighted MR imaging together with approximately 80% X-ray attenuation suitable for X-ray contrast imaging. Capability of MF-nHAp to specifically target and enhance the signature of molecular receptors (folate) in cancer cells was realized by carbodiimide grafting of cell-membrane receptor ligand folic acid (FA) on MF-nHAp surface aminized with dendrigraft polymer, polyethyleneimine (PEI). The FA-PEI-MF-nHAp conjugates showed specific aggregation on FR(+ve) cells while leaving the negative control cells untouched. Nanotoxicity evaluation of this multifunctional nHAp carried out on primary human endothelial cells (HUVEC), normal mouse lung fibroblast cell line (L929), human nasopharyngeal carcinoma (KB) and human lung cancer cell line (A549) revealed no apparent toxicity even

  7. Logic integration of mRNA signals by an RNAi-based molecular computer

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhen; Liu, Siyuan John; Bleris, Leonidas; Benenson, Yaakov

    2010-01-01

    Synthetic in vivo molecular ‘computers’ could rewire biological processes by establishing programmable, non-native pathways between molecular signals and biological responses. Multiple molecular computer prototypes have been shown to work in simple buffered solutions. Many of those prototypes were made of DNA strands and performed computations using cycles of annealing-digestion or strand displacement. We have previously introduced RNA interference (RNAi)-based computing as a way of implementing complex molecular logic in vivo. Because it also relies on nucleic acids for its operation, RNAi computing could benefit from the tools developed for DNA systems. However, these tools must be harnessed to produce bioactive components and be adapted for harsh operating environments that reflect in vivo conditions. In a step toward this goal, we report the construction and implementation of biosensors that ‘transduce’ mRNA levels into bioactive, small interfering RNA molecules via RNA strand exchange in a cell-free Drosophila embryo lysate, a step beyond simple buffered environments. We further integrate the sensors with our RNAi ‘computational’ module to evaluate two-input logic functions on mRNA concentrations. Our results show how RNA strand exchange can expand the utility of RNAi computing and point toward the possibility of using strand exchange in a native biological setting. PMID:20194121

  8. Logic integration of mRNA signals by an RNAi-based molecular computer.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhen; Liu, Siyuan John; Bleris, Leonidas; Benenson, Yaakov

    2010-05-01

    Synthetic in vivo molecular 'computers' could rewire biological processes by establishing programmable, non-native pathways between molecular signals and biological responses. Multiple molecular computer prototypes have been shown to work in simple buffered solutions. Many of those prototypes were made of DNA strands and performed computations using cycles of annealing-digestion or strand displacement. We have previously introduced RNA interference (RNAi)-based computing as a way of implementing complex molecular logic in vivo. Because it also relies on nucleic acids for its operation, RNAi computing could benefit from the tools developed for DNA systems. However, these tools must be harnessed to produce bioactive components and be adapted for harsh operating environments that reflect in vivo conditions. In a step toward this goal, we report the construction and implementation of biosensors that 'transduce' mRNA levels into bioactive, small interfering RNA molecules via RNA strand exchange in a cell-free Drosophila embryo lysate, a step beyond simple buffered environments. We further integrate the sensors with our RNAi 'computational' module to evaluate two-input logic functions on mRNA concentrations. Our results show how RNA strand exchange can expand the utility of RNAi computing and point toward the possibility of using strand exchange in a native biological setting.

  9. NGS-based Molecular diagnosis of 105 eyeGENE(®) probands with Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Ge, Zhongqi; Bowles, Kristen; Goetz, Kerry; Scholl, Hendrik P N; Wang, Feng; Wang, Xinjing; Xu, Shan; Wang, Keqing; Wang, Hui; Chen, Rui

    2015-12-15

    The National Ophthalmic Disease Genotyping and Phenotyping Network (eyeGENE(®)) was established in an effort to facilitate basic and clinical research of human inherited eye disease. In order to provide high quality genetic testing to eyeGENE(®)'s enrolled patients which potentially aids clinical diagnosis and disease treatment, we carried out a pilot study and performed Next-generation sequencing (NGS) based molecular diagnosis for 105 Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) patients randomly selected from the network. A custom capture panel was designed, which incorporated 195 known retinal disease genes, including 61 known RP genes. As a result, disease-causing mutations were identified in 52 out of 105 probands (solving rate of 49.5%). A total of 82 mutations were identified, and 48 of them were novel. Interestingly, for three probands the molecular diagnosis was inconsistent with the initial clinical diagnosis, while for five probands the molecular information suggested a different inheritance model other than that assigned by the physician. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that NGS target sequencing is efficient and sufficiently precise for molecular diagnosis of a highly heterogeneous patient cohort from eyeGENE(®).

  10. Synchrotron based mass spectrometry to investigate the molecular properties of mineral-organic associations

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Suet Yi; Kleber, Markus; Takahashi, Lynelle K.; Nico, Peter; Keiluweit, Marco; Ahmed, Musahid

    2013-04-01

    Soil organic matter (OM) is important because its decay drives life processes in the biosphere. Analysis of organic compounds in geological systems is difficult because of their intimate association with mineral surfaces. To date there is no procedure capable of quantitatively separating organic from mineral phases without creating artifacts or mass loss. Therefore, analytical techniques that can (a) generate information about both organic and mineral phases simultaneously and (b) allow the examination of predetermined high-interest regions of the sample as opposed to conventional bulk analytical techniques are valuable. Laser Desorption Synchrotron Postionization (synchrotron-LDPI) mass spectrometry is introduced as a novel analytical tool to characterize the molecular properties of organic compounds in mineral-organic samples from terrestrial systems, and it is demonstrated that when combined with Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS), can provide complementary information on mineral composition. Mass spectrometry along a decomposition gradient in density fractions, verifies the consistency of our results with bulk analytical techniques. We further demonstrate that by changing laser and photoionization energies, variations in molecular stability of organic compounds associated with mineral surfaces can be determined. The combination of synchrotron-LDPI and SIMS shows that the energetic conditions involved in desorption and ionization of organic matter may be a greater determinant of mass spectral signatures than the inherent molecular structure of the organic compounds investigated. The latter has implications for molecular models of natural organic matter that are based on mass spectrometric information.

  11. Molecular dynamics study of the structure and performance of simple and double bases propellants.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiufang; Zhu, Weihua; Xiao, Jijun; Xiao, Heming

    2008-08-15

    To investigate the structure and performance of simple and double bases propellants, the nitrocellulose (NC), nitroglycerin (NG), and double mixed system (NC+NG) have been simulated by using the molecular dynamics (MD) method with the COMPASS force field. The interactions between NC and NG have been analyzed by means of pair correlation functions. The mechanical properties of the three model systems, i.e. elastic coefficients, modulus, Cauchy pressure, and Poisson's ratio, etc., have been obtained. It is found that the rigidity, ductibility, and tenacity of the double bases propellants (NC+NG) are stronger than those of simple base propellants (NC), which attributes to the effect of NG and the strong interactions between NC and NG. The detonation properties of the three systems have also been calculated and the results show that compared with the simple base propellant (NC), the detonation heat and detonation velocity of the double base propellants (NC+NG) are increased.

  12. Promising ZnO-based DSSC performance using HMP molecular dyes of high extinction coefficients.

    PubMed

    Ganesh, T; Nguyen, Hong-Minh; Mane, Rajaram S; Kim, Nakjoong; Shinde, Dipak V; Bhande, Sambhaji S; Naushad, Mu; Hui, K N; Han, Sung Hwan

    2014-08-07

    Employing newly synthesized di-substituted tri-phenyl amine (HMP-9) and carbazole (HMP-11) dyes (with limited acidic carboxyl anchor groups), a power conversion efficiency as high as 7.03% in ZnO nanocrystallite (NC)-based dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) is achieved. The specific molecular designs of HMP-09 and HMP-11 consisting of with and without hexyloxy spacer groups, and added tri-phenyl amine or 9-phenyl-9H-carbazole donor groups, respectively, attached on the ancillary ligands are advantageous, evidenced from electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements, for ZnO NC-based DSSCs.

  13. Novel nanodispersed coal liquefaction catalysts: Molecular design via microemulsion-based synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Osseo-Asare, K.; Radovic, L.R.

    1991-07-01

    The objective of this project is to pursue the development of highly dispersed and inexpensive catalysts for improved coal solubilization and upgrading of coal liquids. A novel study of the synthesis of liquefaction catalysts of nanometer size will be carried out. It is based on the molecular design of reverse micelles (microemulsions). These surfactant-stabilized, metal-bearing microdrops offer unique opportunities for synthesizing very small particles by providing a cage-like effect that limits particle nucleation, growth and agglomeration. The emphasis will be on iron- and molybdenum-based catalysts, but the techniques to be developed should also be generally applicable. (VC)

  14. Novel nanodispersed coal liquefaction catalysts: Molecular design via microemulsion-based synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Osseo-Asare, K.; Radovic, L.R.

    1991-02-01

    The objective of this project is to pursue the development of highly dispersed and inexpensive catalysts for improved coal solubilization and upgrading of coal liquids. A novel study of the synthesis of liquefaction catalysts of nanometer size will be carried out. It is based on the molecular design of reverse micelles (microemulsions). These surfactant-stabilized, metal-bearing microdrops offer unique opportunities for synthesizing very small particles by providing a cage-like effects that limits particle nucleation, growth and agglomeration. The emphasis will be on iron- and molybdenum-based catalysts, but the techniques to be developed should also be generally applicable.

  15. Novel nanodispersed coal liquefaction catalysts: Molecular design via microemulsion-based synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Osseo-Asare, K.; Boakye, E.; Vaidyanathan, N.; Radovic, L.R.

    1992-04-01

    The objective of this project is to pursue the development of highly dispersed and inexpensive catalysts for improved coal solubilization and upgrading of coal liquids. A novel study of the synthesis of liquefaction catalysts of nanometer size will be carried out. It is based on the molecular design of reverse micelles (microemulsions). These surfactant-stabilized, metal-bearing microdrops offer unique opportunities for synthesizing very small particles by providing a cage-like effect that limits particle nucleation, growth and agglomeration. The emphasis will be on iron- and molybdenum-based catalysts, but the techniques to be developed should also be generally applicable. (VC)

  16. Multiplatform-based molecular subtypes of non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, F; Zhang, Y; Parra, E; Rodriguez, J; Behrens, C; Akbani, R; Lu, Y; Kurie, J M; Gibbons, D L; Mills, G B; Wistuba, I I; Creighton, C J

    2017-03-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) demonstrates remarkable molecular diversity. With the completion of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), there is opportunity for systematic analyses of the entire TCGA NSCLC cohort, including comparisons and contrasts between different disease subsets. On the basis of multidimensional and comprehensive molecular characterization (including DNA methylation and copy, and RNA and protein expression), 1023 NSCLC cases-519 from TCGA adenocarcinoma (AD) project and 504 from TCGA squamous cell carcinoma (SQCC) project-were classified using a 'cluster-of-clusters' analytic approach. Patterns from TCGA NSCLC subsets were examined in independent external databases, including the PROSPECT (Profiling of Resistance patterns and Oncogenic Signaling Pathways in Evaluation of Cancers of the Thorax) NSCLC data set. Nine genomic subtypes of NSCLC were identified, three within SQCC and six within AD. SQCC subtypes were associated with transcriptional targets of SOX2 or p63. One predominately AD subtype (with a large proportion of SQCC) shared molecular features with neuroendocrine tumors. Two AD subtypes manifested a CpG island methylator phenotype. Three AD subtypes showed high p38 and mTOR pathway activation. AD subtypes associated with low differentiation showed relatively worse prognosis. SQCC subtypes and two of the AD subtypes expressed cancer testis antigen genes, whereas three AD subtypes expressed several immune checkpoint genes including PDL1 and PDL2, corresponding with patterns of greater immune cell infiltration. Subtype associations for several immune-related markers-including PD1, PDL1, CD3 and CD8-were confirmed in the PROSPECT cohort using immunohistochemistry. NSCLC molecular subtypes have therapeutic implications and lend support to a personalized approach to NSCLC management based on molecular characterization.

  17. Initiating heavy-atom-based phasing by multi-dimensional molecular replacement

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Bjørn Panyella; Gourdon, Pontus; Liu, Xiangyu; Karlsen, Jesper Lykkegaard; Nissen, Poul

    2016-01-01

    To obtain an electron-density map from a macromolecular crystal the phase problem needs to be solved, which often involves the use of heavy-atom derivative crystals and concomitant heavy-atom substructure determination. This is typically performed by dual-space methods, direct methods or Patterson-based approaches, which however may fail when only poorly diffracting derivative crystals are available. This is often the case for, for example, membrane proteins. Here, an approach for heavy-atom site identification based on a molecular-replacement parameter matrix (MRPM) is presented. It involves an n-dimensional search to test a wide spectrum of molecular-replacement parameters, such as different data sets and search models with different conformations. Results are scored by the ability to identify heavy-atom positions from anomalous difference Fourier maps. The strategy was successfully applied in the determination of a membrane-protein structure, the copper-transporting P-type ATPase CopA, when other methods had failed to determine the heavy-atom substructure. MRPM is well suited to proteins undergoing large conformational changes where multiple search models should be considered, and it enables the identification of weak but correct molecular-replacement solutions with maximum contrast to prime experimental phasing efforts. PMID:26960131

  18. A Bayesian Target Predictor Method based on Molecular Pairing Energies estimation.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Antoni; Canals, Vincent; Rosselló, Josep L

    2017-03-06

    Virtual screening (VS) is applied in the early drug discovery phases for the quick inspection of huge molecular databases to identify those compounds that most likely bind to a given drug target. In this context, there is the necessity of the use of compact molecular models for database screening and precise target prediction in reasonable times. In this work we present a new compact energy-based model that is tested for its application to Virtual Screening and target prediction. The model can be used to quickly identify active compounds in huge databases based on the estimation of the molecule's pairing energies. The greatest molecular polar regions along with its geometrical distribution are considered by using a short set of smart energy vectors. The model is tested using similarity searches within the Directory of Useful Decoys (DUD) database. The results obtained are considerably better than previously published models. As a Target prediction methodology we propose the use of a Bayesian Classifier that uses a combination of different active compounds to build an energy-dependent probability distribution function for each target.

  19. A Bayesian Target Predictor Method based on Molecular Pairing Energies estimation

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Antoni; Canals, Vincent; Rosselló, Josep L.

    2017-01-01

    Virtual screening (VS) is applied in the early drug discovery phases for the quick inspection of huge molecular databases to identify those compounds that most likely bind to a given drug target. In this context, there is the necessity of the use of compact molecular models for database screening and precise target prediction in reasonable times. In this work we present a new compact energy-based model that is tested for its application to Virtual Screening and target prediction. The model can be used to quickly identify active compounds in huge databases based on the estimation of the molecule’s pairing energies. The greatest molecular polar regions along with its geometrical distribution are considered by using a short set of smart energy vectors. The model is tested using similarity searches within the Directory of Useful Decoys (DUD) database. The results obtained are considerably better than previously published models. As a Target prediction methodology we propose the use of a Bayesian Classifier that uses a combination of different active compounds to build an energy-dependent probability distribution function for each target. PMID:28263323

  20. A Bayesian Target Predictor Method based on Molecular Pairing Energies estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, Antoni; Canals, Vincent; Rosselló, Josep L.

    2017-03-01

    Virtual screening (VS) is applied in the early drug discovery phases for the quick inspection of huge molecular databases to identify those compounds that most likely bind to a given drug target. In this context, there is the necessity of the use of compact molecular models for database screening and precise target prediction in reasonable times. In this work we present a new compact energy-based model that is tested for its application to Virtual Screening and target prediction. The model can be used to quickly identify active compounds in huge databases based on the estimation of the molecule’s pairing energies. The greatest molecular polar regions along with its geometrical distribution are considered by using a short set of smart energy vectors. The model is tested using similarity searches within the Directory of Useful Decoys (DUD) database. The results obtained are considerably better than previously published models. As a Target prediction methodology we propose the use of a Bayesian Classifier that uses a combination of different active compounds to build an energy-dependent probability distribution function for each target.

  1. Initiating heavy-atom-based phasing by multi-dimensional molecular replacement.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Bjørn Panyella; Gourdon, Pontus; Liu, Xiangyu; Karlsen, Jesper Lykkegaard; Nissen, Poul

    2016-03-01

    To obtain an electron-density map from a macromolecular crystal the phase problem needs to be solved, which often involves the use of heavy-atom derivative crystals and concomitant heavy-atom substructure determination. This is typically performed by dual-space methods, direct methods or Patterson-based approaches, which however may fail when only poorly diffracting derivative crystals are available. This is often the case for, for example, membrane proteins. Here, an approach for heavy-atom site identification based on a molecular-replacement parameter matrix (MRPM) is presented. It involves an n-dimensional search to test a wide spectrum of molecular-replacement parameters, such as different data sets and search models with different conformations. Results are scored by the ability to identify heavy-atom positions from anomalous difference Fourier maps. The strategy was successfully applied in the determination of a membrane-protein structure, the copper-transporting P-type ATPase CopA, when other methods had failed to determine the heavy-atom substructure. MRPM is well suited to proteins undergoing large conformational changes where multiple search models should be considered, and it enables the identification of weak but correct molecular-replacement solutions with maximum contrast to prime experimental phasing efforts.

  2. Potential of molecular based diagnostics and its impact on allergen immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Melioli, Giovanni; Savi, Eleonora; Crivellaro, Maria Angiola; Passalacqua, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Molecular based in vitro technologies greatly changed the diagnostic approaches in allergy. At present, sensitization profiles can be dissected according to IgE subsets, which are specific for genuine or cross-reacting components and potentially dangerous or virtually harmless components. The identification of IgE in components with specific characteristics has a direct impact on the accuracy of the diagnosis (indeed, it is possible at present to not only identify the allergen derived from a given allergen source but also the family of molecules to which the patient is sensitized), on the prognosis of the patient's allergy, and on the prevention activities to be implemented. More interestingly, during the last few years, and thanks to the tools of molecular diagnostics, the indications for Allergen Immunotherapy (AIT) have also be modified, and novel strategies for the selection of the allergens to be administered have been better defined. Indeed, protocols indicating how Molecular Based Diagnosis (MBD) can be used to identify the best AIT approach have been recently published. In this review, the rationale for the use of MBD tools is discussed, and the recent strategies for the choice of allergens to be used in AIT are reported.

  3. Characterization of nanoparticle-based contrast agents for molecular magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Liang; Chopra, Arvind; Leung, Kam; Eckelman, William C.; Menkens, Anne E.

    2012-09-01

    The development of molecular imaging agents is currently undergoing a dramatic expansion. As of October 2011, 4,800 newly developed agents have been synthesized and characterized in vitro and in animal models of human disease. Despite this rapid progress, the transfer of these agents to clinical practice is rather slow. To address this issue, the National Institutes of Health launched the Molecular Imaging and Contrast Agents Database (MICAD) in 2005 to provide freely accessible online information regarding molecular imaging probes and contrast agents for the imaging community. While compiling information regarding imaging agents published in peer-reviewed journals, the MICAD editors have observed that some important information regarding the characterization of a contrast agent is not consistently reported. This makes it difficult for investigators to evaluate and meta-analyze data generated from different studies of imaging agents, especially for the agents based on nanoparticles. This article is intended to serve as a guideline for new investigators for the characterization of preclinical studies performed with nanoparticle-based MRI contrast agents. The common characterization parameters are summarized into seven categories: contrast agent designation, physicochemical properties, magnetic properties, in vitro studies, animal studies, MRI studies, and toxicity. Although no single set of parameters is suitable to define the properties of the various types of contrast agents, it is essential to ensure that these agents meet certain quality control parameters at the preclinical stage, so that they can be used without delay for clinical studies.

  4. Tunable electronic structures and optical properties of fluorenone-based molecular materials by heteroatoms.

    PubMed

    Song, Peng; Ma, Fengcai

    2010-02-11

    The ground-state and excited-state electronic structures as well as the tunable optical properties of a variety of newly designed fluorenone-based molecular materials have been theoretically investigated using density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) methods. The substitutes on the O atom in the carbonyl group of the fluorenone (FN) molecule with S (FN-C=S), Se (FN-C=Se), and Te (FN-C=Te) atoms can significantly influence their electronic structures, molecular orbitals, geometric conformations, and optical properties of fluorenone-based molecular materials. Due to the important difference of electronegativity for O, S, Se, and Te atoms in the same group, the ground-state dipole moment of these fluorenone-based molecular materials is gradually decreased in the order FN, FN-C=S, FN-C=Se, and FN-C=Te. At the same time, the ground-state bond length of the C=X (X refers O, S, Se, and Te) is gradually increased in the order of FN, FN-C=S, FN-C=Se, and FN-C=Te. Due to the different nature of the S(1) state for FN (pipi* character) and FN-C=S, FN-C=Se, and FN-C=Te (sigmapi* character), the excited-state dipole moment of FN in the S(1) state is dramatically increased in comparison with that in the ground state; however, the excited-state dipole moments of FN-C=S, FN-C=Se, and FN-C=Te are significantly diminished. In addition, the excited-state bond length of C=X (X refers O, S, Se, and Te) in the S(1) state is lengthened in comparison with that in the ground state due to the photoexcitation of the C=X bond FN, FN-C=S, FN-C=Se, and FN-C=Te. On the other hand, the energy level of the HOMO orbital is heightened and that of LUMO orbital is lowered with the introduction of heteroatoms in the order of S, Se, and Te. Consequently, the energy gap between LUMO and HOMO orbtials is gradually decreased in the order of the FN, FN-C=S, FN-C=Se, and FN-C=Te. Consequently, the calculated fluorescence wavelengths are strongly red-shifted from the

  5. The identification of molecular surfaces' feature regions based on spherical mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Meiling; Zhang, Jingqiao

    2017-02-01

    As possible active sites, the concave and convex feature regions of the molecule are the locations where the molecular docking will happen more possibly. Then how to search for those regions is valuable to study. In this paper, a new method is proposed for identifying concave and convex regions. Based on the established spherical mapping between molecular surfaces and its bounding-sphere surfaces, the concave and convex vertices of local areas can be determined according to the expansion distance defined by the spherical mapping. Then through mesh growing, a feature region can be firmed by a concave point or a convex point, also called center point, and its neighboring faces, whose normal vector has an angle in a specified range with the center point. After that, areas and volumes of feature regions are calculated. The experimental results indicate that the method can well identify the concave and convex characteristics of the molecule.

  6. Restoring electronic coherence/decoherence for a trajectory-based nonadiabatic molecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Chaoyuan

    2016-01-01

    By utilizing the time-independent semiclassical phase integral, we obtained modified coupled time-dependent Schrödinger equations that restore coherences and induce decoherences within original simple trajectory-based nonadiabatic molecular dynamic algorithms. Nonadiabatic transition probabilities simulated from both Tully’s fewest switches and semiclassical Ehrenfest algorithms follow exact quantum electronic oscillations and amplitudes for three out of the four well-known model systems. Within the present theory, nonadiabatic transitions estimated from statistical ensemble of trajectories accurately follow those of the modified electronic wave functions. The present theory can be immediately applied to the molecular dynamic simulations of photochemical and photophysical processes involving electronic excited states. PMID:27063337

  7. Discriminating single-molecule sensing by crown-ether-based molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismael, Ali K.; Al-Jobory, Alaa; Grace, Iain; Lambert, Colin J.

    2017-02-01

    Crown-ether molecules are well known to selectively bind alkali atoms, so by incorporating these within wires, any change in electrical conductance of the wire upon binding leads to discriminating sensing. Using a density functional theory-based approach to quantum transport, we investigate the potential sensing capabilities of single-molecule junctions formed from crown ethers attached to anthraquinone units, which are in turn attached to gold electrodes via alkyl chains. We calculate the change in electrical conductance for binding of three different alkali ions (lithium, sodium, and potassium). Depending on the nature of the ionic analyte, the conductance is enhanced by different amounts. This change in electrical conductance is due to charge transfer from the ion to molecular wire causing the molecular resonances to shift closer to the electrode Fermi energy.

  8. Spin-dependent Otto quantum heat engine based on a molecular substance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hübner, W.; Lefkidis, G.; Dong, C. D.; Chaudhuri, D.; Chotorlishvili, L.; Berakdar, J.

    2014-07-01

    We explore the potential of single molecules for thermodynamic cycles. To this end we propose two molecular heat engines based on the Ni2 dimer in the presence of a static magnetic field: (a) a quantum Otto engine and (b) a modified quantum Otto engine for which optical excitations induced by a laser pulse substitute for one of the heat-exchange points. For reliable predictions and to inspect the role of spin and electronic correlations we perform fully correlated ab initio calculations of the molecular electronic structure including spin-orbital effects. We analyze the efficiency of the engines in dependence of the electronic level scheme and the entanglement and find a significant possible enhancement connected to the quantum nature and the heat capacity of the dimer, as well as to the zero-field triplet states splitting.

  9. Controlled Sol-gel Transitions by Actuating Molecular Machine based Supramolecular Polymers.

    PubMed

    Goujon, Antoine; Mariani, Giacomo; Lang, Thomas; Moulin, Emilie; Rawiso, Michel; Buhler, Eric; Giuseppone, Nicolas

    2017-03-13

    The implementation of artificial molecular machines in polymer science is an important objective that challenges chemists and physicists in order to access an entirely new class of smart materials. To design such systems, the amplification of a mechanical actuation from the nanoscale up to a macroscopic response in the bulk material is a central issue. In this article we show that bistable [c2]daisy chain rotaxanes (i.e. molecular muscles) can be linked into main-chain Upy-based supramolecular polymers. We then reveal by an in depth quantitative study that the pH actuation of the mechanically active rotaxane at the nanoscale influences the physical reticulation of the polymer chains by changing the supramolecular behavior of the Upy units. This nano-actuation within the local structure of the main chain polymer results in a mechanically controlled sol-gel transition at the macroscopic level.

  10. Determination of Quantum Chemistry Based Force Fields for Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Aromatic Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, Richard; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Ab initio quantum chemistry calculations for model molecules can be used to parameterize force fields for molecular dynamics simulations of polymers. Emphasis in our research group is on using quantum chemistry-based force fields for molecular dynamics simulations of organic polymers in the melt and glassy states, but the methodology is applicable to simulations of small molecules, multicomponent systems and solutions. Special attention is paid to deriving reliable descriptions of the non-bonded and electrostatic interactions. Several procedures have been developed for deriving and calibrating these parameters. Our force fields for aromatic polyimide simulations will be described. In this application, the intermolecular interactions are the critical factor in determining many properties of the polymer (including its color).

  11. Titanium compounds as catalysts of higher alpha-olefin-based super-high-molecular polymers synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalov, K. B.; Kazaryan, M. A.; Manzhay, V. N.; Vetrova, O. V.

    2016-01-01

    The synthesis of polymers of 10 million or more molecular weight is a difficult task even in a chemical lab. Higher α-olefin-based polymer agents of such kind have found a narrow but quite important niche, the reduction of drag in the turbulent flow of hydrocarbon fluids such as oil and oil-products. In its turn, searching for a catalytic system capable to produce molecules of such a high length and to synthesize polymers of a low molecular-mass distribution is part of a global task of obtaining a high-quality product. In this paper we had observed a number of industrial catalysts with respect to their suitability for higher poly-α- olefins synthesis. A number samples representing copolymers of 1-hexene with 1-decene obtained on a previous generation catalyst, a microsphere titanium chloride catalytic agent had been compared to samples synthesized using a titanium-magnesium catalyst both in solution and in a polymer medium.

  12. Gold nanoprobe-based non-crosslinking hybridization for molecular diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Larguinho, Miguel; Canto, Rafaela; Cordeiro, Milton; Pedrosa, Pedro; Fortuna, Andreia; Vinhas, Raquel; Baptista, Pedro V

    2015-01-01

    Non-crosslinking (NCL) approaches using DNA-modified gold nanoparticles for molecular detection constitute powerful tools with potential implications in clinical diagnostics and tailored medicine. From detection of pathogenic agents to identification of specific point mutations associated with health conditions, these methods have shown remarkable versatility and simplicity. Herein, the NCL hybridization assay is broken down to the fundamentals behind its assembly and detection principle. Gold nanoparticle synthesis and derivatization is addressed, emphasizing optimal size homogeneity and conditions for maximum surface coverage, with direct implications in downstream detection. The detection principle is discussed and the advantages and drawbacks of different NCL approaches are discussed. Finally, NCL-based applications for molecular detection of clinically relevant loci and potential integration into more complex biosensing platforms, projecting miniaturization and portability are addressed.

  13. High-Resolution Mesoscopic Fluorescence Molecular Tomography Based on Compressive Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fugang; Ozturk, Mehmet S.; Zhao, Lingling; Cong, Wenxiang; Wang, Ge

    2017-01-01

    Mesoscopic fluorescence molecular tomography (MFMT) is new imaging modality aiming at 3-D imaging of molecular probes in a few millimeter thick biological samples with high-spatial resolution. In this paper, we develop a compressive sensing-based reconstruction method with l1-norm regularization for MFMT with the goal of improving spatial resolution and stability of the optical inverse problem. Three-dimensional numerical simulations of anatomically accurate microvasculature and real data obtained from phantom experiments are employed to evaluate the merits of the proposed method. Experimental results show that the proposed method can achieve 80 μm spatial resolution for a biological sample of 3 mm thickness and more accurate quantifications of concentrations and locations for the fluorophore distribution than those of the conventional methods. PMID:25137718

  14. A molecularly imprinted sensor based on an electrochemiluminescent membrane for ultratrace doxycycline determination.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuhuai; Li, Jianping; Lin, Qingyu; Wei, Xiaoping

    2015-07-07

    A new molecularly imprinted sensor was developed based on an electroluminescent molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) membrane and used for doxycycline determination. The MIP was prepared by electropolymerization of pyrogallol doped with alizarin red. An electrochemiluminescence (ECL) signal was produced by the oxidation of the poly-pyrogallol polymer and reaction with alizarin red. The luminescence intensity was enhanced by doxycycline molecules which were re-adsorbed in cavities in MIP due to the energy transfer of the doxycycline oxidized intermediate to alizarin red. The changes of ECL intensities were linear with the concentrations of doxycycline in the range of 2 × 10(-10) to 5 × 10(-8) mol L(-1). The detection limit was 5.17 × 10(-11) mol L(-1). This method was utilized to determine doxycycline residuals in fish muscles with satisfactory results.

  15. Considerations on the Design of a Molecular Frequency Standard Based on the Molecular Beam Electric Resonance Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Vernon W.

    1959-01-01

    The use of a rotational state transition as observed by the molecular beam electric resonance method is discussed as a possible frequency standard particularly in the millimeter wavelength range. As a promising example the 100 kMc transition between the J = 0 and J = 1 rotational states of Li 6F19 is considered. The relative insensitivity of the transition frequency to external electric and magnetic fields and the low microwave power requirements appear favorable; the small fraction of the molecular beam that is in a single rotational state is a limiting factor.

  16. Molecular diversification of Trichuris spp. from Sigmodontinae (Cricetidae) rodents from Argentina based on mitochondrial DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Callejón, Rocío; Robles, María Del Rosario; Panei, Carlos Javier; Cutillas, Cristina

    2016-08-01

    A molecular phylogenetic hypothesis is presented for the genus Trichuris based on sequence data from mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase 1 (cox1) and cytochrome b (cob). The taxa consisted of nine populations of whipworm from five species of Sigmodontinae rodents from Argentina. Bayesian Inference, Maximum Parsimony, and Maximum Likelihood methods were used to infer phylogenies for each gene separately but also for the combined mitochondrial data and the combined mitochondrial and nuclear dataset. Phylogenetic results based on cox1 and cob mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) revealed three clades strongly resolved corresponding to three different species (Trichuris navonae, Trichuris bainae, and Trichuris pardinasi) showing phylogeographic variation, but relationships among Trichuris species were poorly resolved. Phylogenetic reconstruction based on concatenated sequences had greater phylogenetic resolution for delimiting species and populations intra-specific of Trichuris than those based on partitioned genes. Thus, populations of T. bainae and T. pardinasi could be affected by geographical factors and co-divergence parasite-host.

  17. A molecular beacon-based DNA switch for reversible pH sensing in vesicles and live cells.

    PubMed

    Narayanaswamy, Nagarjun; Nair, Raji R; Suseela, Y V; Saini, Deepak Kumar; Govindaraju, T

    2016-07-05

    In this Communication, a molecular beacon-based DNA switch (LMB) is developed as an efficient and reversible pH sensing probe. Remarkably, LMB exhibited reversible structural transition between the closed (molecular beacon) and open (A-motif) states very efficiently in synthetic vesicles and live cells without the need for any transfection agents.

  18. A Phylogeny of the Family Poritidae (Cnidaria, Scleractinia) Based on Molecular and Morphological Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Kitano, Yuko F.; Benzoni, Francesca; Arrigoni, Roberto; Shirayama, Yoshihisa; Wallace, Carden C.; Fukami, Hironobu

    2014-01-01

    The family Poritidae formerly included 6 genera: Alveopora, Goniopora, Machadoporites, Porites, Poritipora, and Stylaraea. Morphologically, the genera can be differentiated based on the number of tentacles, the number of septa and their arrangement, the length of the polyp column, and the diameter of the corallites. However, the phylogenetic relationships within and between the genera are unknown or contentious. On the one hand, Alveopora has been transferred to the Acroporidae recently because it was shown to be more closely related to this family than to the Poritidae by previous molecular studies. On the other hand, Goniopora is morphologically similar to 2 recently described genera, Machadoporites and Poritipora, particularly with regard to the number of septa (approximately 24), but they have not yet been investigated at the molecular level. In this study, we analyzed 93 samples from all 5 poritid genera and Alveopora using 2 genetic markers (the barcoding region of the mitochondrial COI and the ITS region of the nuclear rDNA) to investigate their phylogenetic relationships and to revise their taxonomy. The reconstructed molecular trees confirmed that Alveopora is genetically distant from all poritid genera but closely related to the family Acroporidae, whereas the other genera are genetically closely related. The molecular trees also revealed that Machadoporites and Poritipora were indistinguishable from Goniopora. However, Goniopora stutchburyi was genetically isolated from the other congeneric species and formed a sister group to Goniopora together with Porites and Stylaraea, thus suggesting that 24 septa could be an ancestral feature in the Poritidae. Based on these data, we move G. stutchburyi into a new genus, Bernardpora gen. nov., whereas Machadoporites and Poritipora are merged with Goniopora. PMID:24871224

  19. Molecular thermodynamic modeling of ionic liquids using the perturbation-based linear Yukawa isotherm regularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohrabi Mahboub, Mahdi; Farrokhpour, Hossein

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we present the results of an extensive study on a novel approach to the molecular modeling of pure ionic liquids (ILs) that incorporates the perturbed thermodynamic linear Yukawa isotherm regularity (LYIR), which is derived based on an effective nearest neighboring pair attractive interaction of the Yukawa potential. The LYIR was used to model the densities of ILs up to high pressures (35 MPa) and in the temperature range 293.15 to 393.15 K. To use the LYIR for ILs, a simple molecular model was proposed to describe their molecular structure, in which they were considered as a liquid consisting of the ion pairs moving together in the fluid, and each ion pair was assumed to be a one-center spherical united atom. The ILs under consideration contained one of the IL cations [C2mim]+, [C4mim]+, [C7mim]+, [C8mim]+, [C3mpy]+, [C3mpip]+, [C3mpyr]+ or [C4mpyr]+, and one of the IL anions [BF4]-, [C(CN)3]-, [CF3SO4]- or [NTf2]-. The reliability and physical significance of the parameters as well as the proposed molecular model were tested by calculating the densities of pure imidazolium-, pyridinium-, piperidinium- and pyrrolidimium-based ILs. The results showed that the LYIR can be used to predict and reproduce the density of ILs in good agreement with the experimental data. In addition, the LYIR enabled us to determine the physical quantities, such as an effective Yukawa screening length, λ eff, the product of the effective energy well depth and the effective coordination number, (ɛ eff/k)z eff, the contribution of the non-reference thermal pressure and also the influence of the anionic and cationic structure on the λ eff parameter. The standard deviation of the IL densities predicted in this work is lower than those calculated by the one other important equation of state reported in the literature.

  20. Molecular classification based on apomorphic amino acids (Arthropoda, Hexapoda): Integrative taxonomy in the era of phylogenomics

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hao-Yang; Wang, Yan-Hui; Xie, Qiang; Ke, Yun-Ling; Bu, Wen-Jun

    2016-01-01

    With the great development of sequencing technologies and systematic methods, our understanding of evolutionary relationships at deeper levels within the tree of life has greatly improved over the last decade. However, the current taxonomic methodology is insufficient to describe the growing levels of diversity in both a standardised and general way due to the limitations of using only morphological traits to describe clades. Herein, we propose the idea of a molecular classification based on hierarchical and discrete amino acid characters. Clades are classified based on the results of phylogenetic analyses and described using amino acids with group specificity in phylograms. Practices based on the recently published phylogenomic datasets of insects together with 15 de novo sequenced transcriptomes in this study demonstrate that such a methodology can accommodate various higher ranks of taxonomy. Such an approach has the advantage of describing organisms in a standard and discrete way within a phylogenetic framework, thereby facilitating the recognition of clades from the view of the whole lineage, as indicated by PhyloCode. By combining identification keys and phylogenies, the molecular classification based on hierarchical and discrete characters may greatly boost the progress of integrative taxonomy. PMID:27312960

  1. Structural and molecular docking studies of biologically active mercaptopyrimidine Schiff bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirubavathy, S. Jone; Velmurugan, R.; Karvembu, R.; Bhuvanesh, N. S. P.; Enoch, Israel V. M. V.; Selvakumar, P. Mosae; Premnath, D.; Chitra, S.

    2017-01-01

    Novel Schiff bases derived from the treatment of mercapto-diamino pyrimidine with two different aldehydes are characterized using elemental analysis, single crystal X-ray diffraction and 1H NMR spectroscopy. The pharmacological action of the synthesized compounds viz., antimicrobial, anticancer and antitubercular activities is studied. The Schiff bases show a very good activity against various test pathogens. DNA and β-CD binding interactions of the compounds are studied using UV-Visible absorption and fluorescence spectral measurements. The binding constants of the compounds towards β-CD are in the order of 103 to 104. Molecular docking is done using MOE program on the 3D structure of the enzymes, viz., human thymidylate synthase complexed with dump and raltitrex, candida albicans N-myristoyltransferasepeptidic inhibitor, catalytic domain of protein kinase pKnb from mycobacterium tuberculosis in complex with mitoxantrone, pare, topoisomerase atpase inhibitor, E. coli and lactobacillus casdihydrofolatereductase. The MIC/IC50 values of the Schiff bases are compared with the glide scores from the molecular docking studies. The number of hydrogen bonding interactions between the Schiff bases and amino acid residues are also reported.

  2. Molecular classification based on apomorphic amino acids (Arthropoda, Hexapoda): Integrative taxonomy in the era of phylogenomics.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao-Yang; Wang, Yan-Hui; Xie, Qiang; Ke, Yun-Ling; Bu, Wen-Jun

    2016-06-17

    With the great development of sequencing technologies and systematic methods, our understanding of evolutionary relationships at deeper levels within the tree of life has greatly improved over the last decade. However, the current taxonomic methodology is insufficient to describe the growing levels of diversity in both a standardised and general way due to the limitations of using only morphological traits to describe clades. Herein, we propose the idea of a molecular classification based on hierarchical and discrete amino acid characters. Clades are classified based on the results of phylogenetic analyses and described using amino acids with group specificity in phylograms. Practices based on the recently published phylogenomic datasets of insects together with 15 de novo sequenced transcriptomes in this study demonstrate that such a methodology can accommodate various higher ranks of taxonomy. Such an approach has the advantage of describing organisms in a standard and discrete way within a phylogenetic framework, thereby facilitating the recognition of clades from the view of the whole lineage, as indicated by PhyloCode. By combining identification keys and phylogenies, the molecular classification based on hierarchical and discrete characters may greatly boost the progress of integrative taxonomy.

  3. High performance computing for three-dimensional agent-based molecular models.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Rodríguez, G; Pérez-Pérez, M; Fdez-Riverola, F; Lourenço, A

    2016-07-01

    Agent-based simulations are increasingly popular in exploring and understanding cellular systems, but the natural complexity of these systems and the desire to grasp different modelling levels demand cost-effective simulation strategies and tools. In this context, the present paper introduces novel sequential and distributed approaches for the three-dimensional agent-based simulation of individual molecules in cellular events. These approaches are able to describe the dimensions and position of the molecules with high accuracy and thus, study the critical effect of spatial distribution on cellular events. Moreover, two of the approaches allow multi-thread high performance simulations, distributing the three-dimensional model in a platform independent and computationally efficient way. Evaluation addressed the reproduction of molecular scenarios and different scalability aspects of agent creation and agent interaction. The three approaches simulate common biophysical and biochemical laws faithfully. The distributed approaches show improved performance when dealing with large agent populations while the sequential approach is better suited for small to medium size agent populations. Overall, the main new contribution of the approaches is the ability to simulate three-dimensional agent-based models at the molecular level with reduced implementation effort and moderate-level computational capacity. Since these approaches have a generic design, they have the major potential of being used in any event-driven agent-based tool.

  4. AN EFFICIENT HIGHER-ORDER FAST MULTIPOLE BOUNDARY ELEMENT SOLUTION FOR POISSON-BOLTZMANN BASED MOLECULAR ELECTROSTATICS

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Chandrajit; Chen, Shun-Chuan; Rand, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    In order to compute polarization energy of biomolecules, we describe a boundary element approach to solving the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation. Our approach combines several important features including the derivative boundary formulation of the problem and a smooth approximation of the molecular surface based on the algebraic spline molecular surface. State of the art software for numerical linear algebra and the kernel independent fast multipole method is used for both simplicity and efficiency of our implementation. We perform a variety of computational experiments, testing our method on a number of actual proteins involved in molecular docking and demonstrating the effectiveness of our solver for computing molecular polarization energy. PMID:21660123

  5. Friction in carborane-based molecular rotors driven by gas flow or electric field: classical molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Prokop, Alexandr; Vacek, Jaroslav; Michl, Josef

    2012-03-27

    Friction in molecular rotors is examined by classical molecular dynamics simulations for grid-mounted azimuthal dipolar molecular rotors, whose rotation is either allowed to decay freely or is driven at GHz frequencies by a flow of rare gas or by a rotating electric field. The rotating parts (rotators) are propeller-shaped. Their two to six blades consist of condensed aromatic rings and are attached to a deltahedral carborane hub, whose antipodal carbons carry [n]staffane axles mounted on a square molecular grid. The dynamic friction constant η has been derived in several independent ways with similar results. Analysis of free rotation decay yields η as a continuous exponentially decreasing function of rotor frequency. The calculated dependence of friction torque on frequency resembles the classical macroscopic Stribeck curve. Its relation to rotational potential energy barriers and the key role of the rate of intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR) of energy and angular momentum from rotator rotation to other modes are considered in two limiting regimes. (i) In the strongly overdamped regime, rotation is much slower than IVR, and effective friction can be expressed through potential barriers to rotation. (ii) In the strongly underdamped regime, rotation is much faster than IVR, whose rate then determines friction.

  6. Molecular engineering of Schiff-base linked covalent polymers with diverse topologies by gas-solid interface reaction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuan-He; Guan, Cui-Zhong; Zheng, Qing-Na; Wang, Dong; Wan, Li-Jun

    2015-03-14

    The design and construction of molecular nanostructures with tunable topological structures are great challenges in molecular nanotechnology. Herein, we demonstrate the molecular engineering of Schiff-base bond connected molecular nanostructures. Building module construction has been adopted to modulate the symmetry of resulted one dimensional (1D) and two dimensional (2D) polymers. Specifically, we have designed and constructed 1D linear and zigzag polymers, 2D hexagonal and chessboard molecular nanostructures by varying the number of reactive sites and geometry and symmetry of precursors. It is demonstrated that high-quality conjugated polymers can be fabricated by using gas-solid interface reaction. The on-demanding synthesis of polymeric architectures with diverse topologies paves the way to fabricate molecular miniature devices with various desired functionalities.

  7. Outcome-based profiling of astrocytic tumours identifies prognostic gene expression signatures which link molecular and morphology-based pathology.

    PubMed

    Beetz, Christian; Bergner, Sven; Brodoehl, Stefan; Brodhun, Michael; Ewald, Christian; Kalff, Rolf; Krüger, Jutta; Patt, Stephan; Kiehntopf, Michael; Deufel, Thomas

    2006-11-01

    Astrocytomas are intracranial malignancies for which invasive growth and high motility of tumour cells preclude total resection; the tumours usually recur in a more aggressive and, eventually, lethal form. Clinical outcome is highly variable and the accuracy of morphology-based prognostic statements is limited. In order to identify novel molecular markers for prognosis we obtained expression profiles of: i) tumours associated with particularly long recurrence-free intervals, ii) tumours which led to rapid patient death, and iii) tumour-free control brain. Unsupervised data analysis completely separated the three sample entities indicating a strong impact of the selection criteria on general gene expression. Consequently, significant numbers of specifically expressed genes could be identified for each entity. An extended set of tumours was then investigated by RT-PCR targeting 12 selected genes. Data from these experiments were summarised into a sample-specific index which assigns tumours to high- and low-risk groups as successfully as does morphology-based grading. Moreover, this index directly correlates with definite survival suggesting that integrated gene expression data allow individualised prognostic statements. We also analysed localisation of selected marker transcripts by in situ hybridization. Our finding of cell-specificity for some of these outcome-determining genes relates global expression data to the presence of morphological correlates of tumour behaviour and, thus, provides a link between morphology-based and molecular pathology. Our identification of expression signatures that are associated individually with clinical outcome confirms the prognostic relevance of gene expression data and, thus, represents a step towards eventually implementing molecular diagnosis into clinical practice in neuro-oncology.

  8. "Molecular beacon"-based fluorescent assay for selective detection of glutathione and cysteine.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hui; Hepel, Maria

    2011-02-01

    We report on the development of a fluorescence turn-on "molecular beacon" probe for the detection of glutathione (GSH) and cysteine (Cys). The method is based on a competitive ligation of Hg(2+) ions by GSH/Cys and thymine-thymine (T-T) mismatches in a DNA strand of the self-hybridizing beacon strand. The assay relies on the distance-dependent optical properties of the fluorophore/quencher pair attached to the ends of the molecular beacon DNA strand. In a very selective coordination of Hg(2+) to GSH/Cys, the fluorophore/quencher distance increases concomitantly with the dehybridization and dissociation of the beacon stem T-Hg(2+)-T due to the extraction of Hg(2+) ions. This process results in switching the molecular beacon to the "on" state. The concentration range of the probe is 4-200 nM with the limit of detection (LOD) of 4.1 nM for GSH and 4.2 nM Cys. The probe tested satisfactorily against interference for a range of amino acids including sulfur-containing methionine.

  9. Mass-spectrometry-based molecular characterization of extracellular vesicles: lipidomics and proteomics.

    PubMed

    Kreimer, Simion; Belov, Arseniy M; Ghiran, Ionita; Murthy, Shashi K; Frank, David A; Ivanov, Alexander R

    2015-06-05

    This review discusses extracellular vesicles (EVs), which are submicron-scale, anuclear, phospholipid bilayer membrane enclosed vesicles that contain lipids, metabolites, proteins, and RNA (micro and messenger). They are shed from many, if not all, cell types and are present in biological fluids and conditioned cell culture media. The term EV, as coined by the International Society of Extracellular Vesicles (ISEV), encompasses exosomes (30-100 nm in diameter), microparticles (100-1000 nm), apoptotic blebs, and other EV subsets. EVs have been implicated in cell-cell communication, coagulation, inflammation, immune response modulation, and disease progression. Multiple studies report that EV secretion from disease-affected cells contributes to disease progression, e.g., tumor niche formation and cancer metastasis. EVs are attractive sources of biomarkers due to their biological relevance and relatively noninvasive accessibility from a range of physiological fluids. This review is focused on the molecular profiling of the protein and lipid constituents of EVs, with emphasis on mass-spectrometry-based "omic" analytical techniques. The challenges in the purification and molecular characterization of EVs, including contamination of isolates and limitations in sample quantities, are discussed along with possible solutions. Finally, the review discusses the limited but growing investigation of post-translational modifications of EV proteins and potential strategies for future in-depth molecular characterization of EVs.

  10. Synthesis and Self-Assembly Behaviors of Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane Based Giant Molecular Shape Amphiphiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Kan; Yu, Xinfei; Liu, Chang; Zhang, Wen-Bin; Cheng, Stephen

    2013-03-01

    Recently, our group has focus on the synthesis and characterization of novel giant molecular shape amphiphiles (GMSAs) based on functionalized molecular nanoparticles (MNPs), such as polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS), tethered with polymeric tails. A general synthetic method via the combination of sequential ?click? reactions has been developed and several model GMSAs with various tail lengths and distinct molecular topologies, which can be referred as the ?giant surfactants?, ?giant lipids?, ?giant gemini surfactants?, and ?giant bolaform surfactants? etc., have been demonstrated. Studies on their self-assembly behaviors in the bulk have revealed the formation of different ordered mesophase structures with feature sizes around 10 nanometers, which have been investigated in detail by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) technique and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). These findings have general implications on understanding the underlying principles of self-assembly behaviors of GMSAs, and might have potential applications in nano-patterning technology. This work is supported by NSF (DMR-0906898) and the Joint-Hope Foundation.

  11. Multiple-Time Step Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Based on Two-Electron Integral Screening.

    PubMed

    Fatehi, Shervin; Steele, Ryan P

    2015-03-10

    A multiple-timestep ab initio molecular dynamics scheme based on varying the two-electron integral screening method used in Hartree-Fock or density functional theory calculations is presented. Although screening is motivated by numerical considerations, it is also related to separations in the length- and timescales characterizing forces in a molecular system: Loose thresholds are sufficient to describe fast motions over short distances, while tight thresholds may be employed for larger length scales and longer times, leading to a practical acceleration of ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. Standard screening approaches can lead, however, to significant discontinuities in (and inconsistencies between) the energy and gradient when the screening threshold is loose, making them inappropriate for use in dynamics. To remedy this problem, a consistent window-screening method that smooths these discontinuities is devised. Further algorithmic improvements reuse electronic-structure information within the dynamics step and enhance efficiency relative to a naı̈ve multiple-timestepping protocol. The resulting scheme is shown to realize meaningful reductions in the cost of Hartree-Fock and B3LYP simulations of a moderately large system, the protonated sarcosine/glycine dipeptide embedded in a 19-water cluster.

  12. Low-molecular-weight polyethylenimine enhanced gene transfer by cationic cholesterol-based nanoparticle vector.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Yoshiyuki; Maitani, Yoshie

    2007-09-01

    Both polyethylenimine (PEI) polymers and cationic nanoparticles have been widely used for non-viral DNA transfection. Previously, we reported that cationic nanoparticles composed of cholesteryl-3beta-carboxyamidoethylene-N-hydroxyethylamine and Tween 80 (NP-OH) could deliver plasmid DNA (pDNA) with high transfection efficiency. To increase the transfection activity of NP-OH, we investigated the potential synergism of PEI and NP-OH for the transfection of DNA into human prostate tumor PC-3, human cervices tumor Hela, and human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells. The transfection efficiency with low-molecular PEI (MW 600) was low, but that with a combination of NP-OH and PEI was higher than with NP-OH alone, being comparable to commercially available lipofectamine 2,000 and lipofectamine LTX, with very low cytotoxicity. Low-molecular weight PEI could not compact pDNA in size, but rather might help to dissociate pDNA from the complex and release pDNA from the endosome to cytoplasm by the proton sponge effect. Therefore, the combination of cationic cholesterol-based nanoparticles and a low-molecular PEI has potential as a non-viral DNA vector for gene delivery.

  13. Label-Free Sensing of Adenosine Based on Force Variations Induced by Molecular Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jingfeng; Li, Qing; Colombi Ciacchi, Lucio; Wei, Gang

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a simple force-based label-free strategy for the highly sensitive sensing of adenosine. An adenosine ssDNA aptamer was bound onto an atomic force microscopy (AFM) probe by covalent modification, and the molecular-interface adsorption force between the aptamer and a flat graphite surface was measured by single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS). In the presence of adenosine, the molecular recognition between adenosine and the aptamer resulted in the formation of a folded, hairpin-like DNA structure and hence caused a variation of the adsorption force at the graphite/water interface. The sensitive force response to molecular recognition provided an adenosine detection limit in the range of 0.1 to 1 nM. The addition of guanosine, cytidine, and uridine had no significant interference with the sensing of adenosine, indicating a strong selectivity of this sensor architecture. In addition, operational parameters that may affect the sensor, such as loading rate and solution ionic strength, were investigated. PMID:25808841

  14. Quantitative Description of a Protein Fitness Landscape Based on Molecular Features

    PubMed Central

    Meini, María-Rocío; Tomatis, Pablo E.; Weinreich, Daniel M.; Vila, Alejandro J.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the driving forces behind protein evolution requires the ability to correlate the molecular impact of mutations with organismal fitness. To address this issue, we employ here metallo-β-lactamases as a model system, which are Zn(II) dependent enzymes that mediate antibiotic resistance. We present a study of all the possible evolutionary pathways leading to a metallo-β-lactamase variant optimized by directed evolution. By studying the activity, stability and Zn(II) binding capabilities of all mutants in the preferred evolutionary pathways, we show that this local fitness landscape is strongly conditioned by epistatic interactions arising from the pleiotropic effect of mutations in the different molecular features of the enzyme. Activity and stability assays in purified enzymes do not provide explanatory power. Instead, measurement of these molecular features in an environment resembling the native one provides an accurate description of the observed antibiotic resistance profile. We report that optimization of Zn(II) binding abilities of metallo-β-lactamases during evolution is more critical than stabilization of the protein to enhance fitness. A global analysis of these parameters allows us to connect genotype with fitness based on quantitative biochemical and biophysical parameters. PMID:25767204

  15. Quantitative Description of a Protein Fitness Landscape Based on Molecular Features.

    PubMed

    Meini, María-Rocío; Tomatis, Pablo E; Weinreich, Daniel M; Vila, Alejandro J

    2015-07-01

    Understanding the driving forces behind protein evolution requires the ability to correlate the molecular impact of mutations with organismal fitness. To address this issue, we employ here metallo-β-lactamases as a model system, which are Zn(II) dependent enzymes that mediate antibiotic resistance. We present a study of all the possible evolutionary pathways leading to a metallo-β-lactamase variant optimized by directed evolution. By studying the activity, stability and Zn(II) binding capabilities of all mutants in the preferred evolutionary pathways, we show that this local fitness landscape is strongly conditioned by epistatic interactions arising from the pleiotropic effect of mutations in the different molecular features of the enzyme. Activity and stability assays in purified enzymes do not provide explanatory power. Instead, measurement of these molecular features in an environment resembling the native one provides an accurate description of the observed antibiotic resistance profile. We report that optimization of Zn(II) binding abilities of metallo-β-lactamases during evolution is more critical than stabilization of the protein to enhance fitness. A global analysis of these parameters allows us to connect genotype with fitness based on quantitative biochemical and biophysical parameters.

  16. A continuum breakdown parameter based on the characteristic function of the molecular velocity distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alamatsaz, Arghavan; Venkattraman, Ayyaswamy

    2014-11-01

    Rarefied flows characterized by Knudsen numbers (Kn) greater than 0.1 are frequently encountered in several applications including low-pressure, high speed and microscale flows and require computationally expensive molecular approaches such as direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) to accurately capture the physical phenomena unique to these flows. However, most of these flows also contain regions where traditional inexpensive continuum techniques such as the Navier-Stokes (NS) equations are sufficiently accurate making a hybrid NS-DSMC approach attractive and optimal. Such a hybrid method typically requires a robust continuum breakdown parameter (CBP) to determine regions where each method should be applied. Historically, hybrid methods have used CBPs based on the macroscopic properties which are lower order moments of the molecular velocity distribution function (VDF) and their gradients which can have significant inaccuracies. In this work, we propose a novel CBP that utilizes all moments of the VDF by computing the characteristic function with limited computational overhead. We also compare the performance of this CBP using standard benchmark problems including structure of a normal shock wave and Fourier-Couette flow for various Kn from continuum to free-molecular.

  17. Improved student linkage of Mendelian and molecular genetic concepts through a yeast-based laboratory module.

    PubMed

    Wolyniak, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    A study of modern genetics requires students to successfully unite the principles of Mendelian genetics with the functions of DNA. Traditional means of teaching genetics are often successful in teaching Mendelian and molecular ideas but not in allowing students to see how the two subjects relate. The laboratory module presented here attempts to present classical and molecular genetic concepts together as an inquiry-based exploration appropriate for high school or introductory undergraduate students. Using the non-essential APQ12 gene in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, students perform PCR, selective growth, and sporulation experiments to establish the ploidy and APQ12 zygosity of a series of unknown strains. Each experiment contributes data to characterize the unknown strains, but complete characterization is not possible without assimilating the data from all of the experiments. The module allows students to consider concepts normally introduced and emphasized in Mendelian genetics and explore them using molecular and experimental tools. Comparison of pre-module and post-module assessment surveys show an increase in student ability to link Mendelian concepts to experimental procedures relying on DNA analysis. The development of modules such as these provides students of all backgrounds with the tools to engage the complexities and issues that constitute modern principles of inheritance.

  18. Quantum dot-based molecular imaging of cancer cell growth using a clone formation assay.

    PubMed

    Geng, Xia-Fei; Fang, Min; Liu, Shao-Ping; Li, Yan

    2016-10-01

    This aim of the present study was to investigate clonal growth behavior and analyze the proliferation characteristics of cancer cells. The MCF‑7 human breast cancer cell line, SW480 human colon cancer cell line and SGC7901 human gastric cancer cell line were selected to investigate the morphology of cell clones. Quantum dot‑based molecular targeted imaging techniques (which stained pan‑cytokeratin in the cytoplasm green and Ki67 in the cell nucleus yellow or red) were used to investigate the clone formation rate, cell morphology, discrete tendency, and Ki67 expression and distribution in clones. From the cell clone formation assay, the MCF‑7, SW480 and SGC7901 cells were observed to form clones on days 6, 8 and 12 of cell culture, respectively. These three types of cells had heterogeneous morphology, large nuclear:cytoplasmic ratios, and conspicuous pathological mitotic features. The cells at the clone periphery formed multiple pseudopodium. In certain clones, cancer cells at the borderline were separated from the central cell clusters or presented a discrete tendency. With quantum dot‑based molecular targeted imaging techniques, cells with strong Ki67 expression were predominantly shown to be distributed at the clone periphery, or concentrated on one side of the clones. In conclusion, cancer cell clones showed asymmetric growth behavior, and Ki67 was widely expressed in clones of these three cell lines, with strong expression around the clones, or aggregated at one side. Cell clone formation assay based on quantum dots molecular imaging offered a novel method to study the proliferative features of cancer cells, thus providing a further insight into tumor biology.

  19. Rayleigh light scattering properties of atmospheric molecular clusters consisting of sulfuric acid and bases.

    PubMed

    Elm, Jonas; Norman, Patrick; Mikkelsen, Kurt V

    2015-06-28

    The Rayleigh light scattering properties of (H2SO4)a(NH3)b and (H2SO4)a((CH3)2NH)b atmospheric molecular clusters have been investigated using a response theory approach. Using density functional theory the molecular structures and stepwise formation free energies of clusters with a and b up to 4 have been re-investigated. The Rayleigh scattering intensities are calculated from the dipole polarizability tensor α using the CAM-B3LYP functional by applying linear response methods. The intrinsic scattering properties of (H2SO4)a(NH3)b and (H2SO4)a((CH3)2NH)b indicate that amine containing clusters scatter light significantly more efficiently then their ammonia containing counterparts. Using the Atmospheric Cluster Dynamics Code (ACDC) the steady state cluster concentrations are estimated and the effective scattering is calculated. The effective scattering is shown to be highly dependent on the estimated concentrations and indicates that there exist competitive pathways, such as nucleation and coagulation, which influence the cluster distributions. The frequency dependence of the scattering is found to depend on the cluster composition and show increased responses when clusters contain more bases than acid molecules. Based on structures obtained using semi-empirical molecular dynamics simulations the Rayleigh scattering properties of clusters with up to 20 acid-base pairs are evaluated. This study represents the first step towards gaining a fundamental understanding of the scattering properties of small atmospheric clusters in the ambient atmosphere.

  20. Detergent-dispersant additives based on high-molecular-weight alkylphenols

    SciTech Connect

    Kulieva, K.N.; Namazova, I.I.; Ismailova, N.D.; Dorokhina, I.V.

    1988-09-01

    This article describes the synthesis and investigation of Mannich bases produced for alkylphenols, obtained in turn from ethylene oligomers. These oligomers are the still bottoms from distillation products of high-temperature oligomerization of ethylene in the presence of triethylaluminum. Two narrow cuts obtained from the distillation of oligomer fraction were used to study the influence of ethylene oligomer molecular weight on the properties of the additives. The additives were blended in DS-11 oil to evaluate their detergency-dispersancy and other properties. Comparison blends were made with succinimide additives based on the same ethylene oligomers. The Mannich bases give improvements in the oxidation resistance, anticorrosion properties, and detergency-dispersancy of the DS-11 diesel oil.

  1. Structure and dynamics of acetate anion-based ionic liquids from molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandran, Aneesh; Prakash, Karthigeyan; Senapati, Sanjib

    2010-08-01

    Acetate anion-based ionic liquids (ILs) have found wide range of applications. The microstructure and dynamics of this IL family have not been clearly understood yet. We report molecular dynamics simulation results of three acetate anion-based ionic liquids that encompass the most common IL cations. Simulations are performed based on a set of proposed force field parameters for IL acetate anion which can be combined with existing parameters for IL cations to simulate large variety of ILs. The computed liquid density and IR spectral data for [BMIM][Ac] are found to match very well with available experimental results. The strong amino-group-associated interactions in [TMG][Ac] are seen to bring about higher cohesive energy density, stronger ion packing, and more restricted translational and rotational mobilities of the constituent ions. The IL anions are found to track the cation movements in all systems, implying that ions in ILs travel in pairs or clusters.

  2. Mass Spectrometry-Based Approaches to Understand the Molecular Basis of Memory.

    PubMed

    Pontes, Arthur H; de Sousa, Marcelo V

    2016-01-01

    The central nervous system is responsible for an array of cognitive functions such as memory, learning, language, and attention. These processes tend to take place in distinct brain regions; yet, they need to be integrated to give rise to adaptive or meaningful behavior. Since cognitive processes result from underlying cellular and molecular changes, genomics and transcriptomics assays have been applied to human and animal models to understand such events. Nevertheless, genes and RNAs are not the end products of most biological functions. In order to gain further insights toward the understanding of brain processes, the field of proteomics has been of increasing importance in the past years. Advancements in liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) have enabled the identification and quantification of thousands of proteins with high accuracy and sensitivity, fostering a revolution in the neurosciences. Herein, we review the molecular bases of explicit memory in the hippocampus. We outline the principles of mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics, highlighting the use of this analytical tool to study memory formation. In addition, we discuss MS-based targeted approaches as the future of protein analysis.

  3. Mass Spectrometry-based Approaches to Understand the Molecular Basis of Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontes, Arthur; de Sousa, Marcelo

    2016-10-01

    The central nervous system is responsible for an array of cognitive functions such as memory, learning, language and attention. These processes tend to take place in distinct brain regions; yet, they need to be integrated to give rise to adaptive or meaningful behavior. Since cognitive processes result from underlying cellular and molecular changes, genomics and transcriptomics assays have been applied to human and animal models to understand such events. Nevertheless, genes and RNAs are not the end products of most biological functions. In order to gain further insights toward the understanding of brain processes, the field of proteomics has been of increasing importance in the past years. Advancements in liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) have enable the identification and quantification of thousand of proteins with high accuracy and sensitivity, fostering a revolution in the neurosciences. Herein, we review the molecular bases of explicit memory in the hippocampus. We outline the principles of mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics, highlighting the use of this analytical tool to study memory formation. In addition, we discuss MS-based targeted approaches as the future of protein analysis.

  4. Sinocurculigo, a New Genus of Hypoxidaceae from China Based on Molecular and Morphological Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li-Jun; Xiao, Xin-Ju; Zheng, Yu-Yun; Cai, Jing; Zhai, Jun-Wen; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Liu, Zhong-Jian

    2012-01-01

    Background The monocot family Hypoxidaceae consists of nine genera with nearly 200 species. They occur mostly in the Southern Hemisphere with only a few species in the Northern Hemisphere, of which three genera, Hypoxis, Molineria, and Curculigo, with eight species are distributed in China. Recently, we have found a hypoxid-like plant in China that is quite different in floral structure from any of the three genera and even of the known taxa in Hypoxidaceae. Methodology/Principal Findings In addition to morphological analysis, we performed maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian inference analyses based on fragments of the chloroplast matK and rbcL genes of 60 taxa in 12 families representing all major clades of the Hypoxidaceae alliance. Results showed that Hypoxidaceae is monophyletic and and that the new plant belongs to it, forming a distinct clade within the family Hypoxidaceae as a sister of Molineria. Phylogeny of the Hypoxidaceae family was constructed based on a combined matrix of the chloroplast rbcL, trnS-G, and trnL-F regions of 59 taxa in Hypoxidaceae and its alliance. Findings of the molecular investigation is consistent with those of the morphological analysis. Conclusions/Significance Based on the results of our molecular and morphological analyses in the present study, we propose a new genus, Sinocurculigo. PMID:22761711

  5. Zeolite molecular sieves have dramatic acid-base effects on enzymes in nonaqueous media.

    PubMed

    Fontes, Nuno; Partridge, Johann; Halling, Peter J; Barreiros, Susana

    2002-02-05

    Zeolite molecular sieves very commonly are used as in situ drying agents in reaction mixtures of enzymes in nonaqueous media. They often affect enzyme behavior, and this has been interpreted in terms of altered hydration. Here, we show that zeolites can also have dramatic acid-base effects on enzymes in low water media, resulting from their cation-exchange ability. Initial rates of transesterification catalyzed by cross-linked crystals of subtilisin were compared in supercritical ethane, hexane, and acetonitrile with water activity fixed by pre-equilibration. Addition of zeolite NaA (4 A powder) still caused remarkable rate enhancements (up to 20-fold), despite the separate control of hydration. In the presence of excess of an alternative solid-state acid-base buffer, however, zeolite addition had no effect. The more commonly used Merck molecular sieves (type 3 A beads) had similar but somewhat smaller effects. All zeolites have ion-exchange ability and can exchange H+ for cations such as Na+ and K+. These exchanges will tend to affect the protonation state of acidic groups in the protein and, hence, enzymatic activity. Zeolites pre-equilibrated in aqueous suspensions of varying pH-pNa gave very different enzyme activities. Their differing basicities were demonstrated directly by equilibration with an indicator dissolved in toluene. The potential of zeolites as acid-base buffers for low-water media is discussed, and their ability to overcome pH memory is demonstrated.

  6. Mass Spectrometry-Based Approaches to Understand the Molecular Basis of Memory

    PubMed Central

    Pontes, Arthur H.; de Sousa, Marcelo V.

    2016-01-01

    The central nervous system is responsible for an array of cognitive functions such as memory, learning, language, and attention. These processes tend to take place in distinct brain regions; yet, they need to be integrated to give rise to adaptive or meaningful behavior. Since cognitive processes result from underlying cellular and molecular changes, genomics and transcriptomics assays have been applied to human and animal models to understand such events. Nevertheless, genes and RNAs are not the end products of most biological functions. In order to gain further insights toward the understanding of brain processes, the field of proteomics has been of increasing importance in the past years. Advancements in liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) have enabled the identification and quantification of thousands of proteins with high accuracy and sensitivity, fostering a revolution in the neurosciences. Herein, we review the molecular bases of explicit memory in the hippocampus. We outline the principles of mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics, highlighting the use of this analytical tool to study memory formation. In addition, we discuss MS-based targeted approaches as the future of protein analysis. PMID:27790611

  7. Molecular Solid EOS based on Quasi-Harmonic Oscillator approximation for phonons

    SciTech Connect

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2014-09-02

    A complete equation of state (EOS) for a molecular solid is derived utilizing a Helmholtz free energy. Assuming that the solid is nonconducting, phonon excitations dominate the specific heat. Phonons are approximated as independent quasi-harmonic oscillators with vibrational frequencies depending on the specific volume. The model is suitable for calibrating an EOS based on isothermal compression data and infrared/Raman spectroscopy data from high pressure measurements utilizing a diamond anvil cell. In contrast to a Mie-Gruneisen EOS developed for an atomic solid, the specific heat and Gruneisen coefficient depend on both density and temperature.

  8. Base metal-catalyzed benzylic oxidation of (aryl)(heteroaryl)methanes with molecular oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Sterckx, Hans; De Houwer, Johan; Mensch, Carl; Herrebout, Wouter; Tehrani, Kourosch Abbaspour

    2016-01-01

    Summary The methylene group of various substituted 2- and 4-benzylpyridines, benzyldiazines and benzyl(iso)quinolines was successfully oxidized to the corresponding benzylic ketones using a copper or iron catalyst and molecular oxygen as the stoichiometric oxidant. Application of the protocol in API synthesis is exemplified by the alternative synthesis of a precursor to the antimalarial drug Mefloquine. The oxidation method can also be used to prepare metabolites of APIs which is illustrated for the natural product papaverine. ICP–MS analysis of the purified reaction products revealed that the base metal impurity was well below the regulatory limit. PMID:26877817

  9. Ion Pair in Extreme Aqueous Environments, Molecular-Based and Electric Conductance Approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Chialvo, Ariel A; Gruszkiewicz, Miroslaw {Mirek} S; Simonson, J Michael {Mike}; Palmer, Donald; Cole, David R

    2009-01-01

    We determine by molecular-based simulation the density profiles of the Na+!Cl! ion-pair association constant in steam environments along three supercritical isotherms to interrogate the behavior of ion speciation in dilute aqueous solutions at extreme conditions. Moreover, we describe a new ultra-sensitive flow-through electric conductance apparatus designed to bridge the gap between the currently lowest steam-density conditions at which we are experimentally able to attain electric conductance measurements and the theoretically-reachable zero-density limit. Finally, we highlight important modeling challenges encountered near the zero-density limit and discuss ways to overcome them.

  10. CL-20/DNB co-crystal based PBX with PEG: molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiang; Gao, Pei; Xiao, Ji Jun; Zhao, Feng; Xiao, He Ming

    2016-12-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation was carried out for CL-20/DNB co-crystal based PBX (polymer-bonded explosive) blended with polymer PEG (polyethylene glycol). In this paper, the miscibility of the PBX models is investigated through the calculated binding energy. Pair correlation function (PCF) analysis is applied to study the interaction of the interface structures in the PBX models. The mechanical properties of PBXs are also discussed to understand the change of the mechanical properties after adding the polymer. Moreover, the calculated diffusion coefficients of the interfacial explosive molecules are used to discuss the dispersal ability of CL-20 and DNB molecules in the interface layer.

  11. Efficient vibrational analysis for unrestricted Hartree-Fock based on the fragment molecular orbital method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, Hiroya; Fedorov, Dmitri G.; Yokojima, Satoshi; Kitaura, Kazuo; Nakamura, Shinichiro

    2014-05-01

    We developed the analytic second derivative of the energy for unrestricted Hartree-Fock based on the fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method. We formulated the second order derivative for the separated dimer approximation in both restricted and unrestricted methods, which accelerated the calculations by the factor of 9 for a radical system containing 704 atoms. The accuracy was evaluated for organic radicals in explicit solvent, in comparison to full ab initio results. The method was applied to study the change of IR absorption spectra in the tyrosine oxidation reaction for a polypeptide representing the active part of the photosynthetic reaction center.

  12. A real-time proximity querying algorithm for haptic-based molecular docking.

    PubMed

    Iakovou, Georgios; Hayward, Steven; Laycock, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Intermolecular binding underlies every metabolic and regulatory processes of the cell, and the therapeutic and pharmacological properties of drugs. Molecular docking systems model and simulate these interactions in silico and allow us to study the binding process. Haptic-based docking provides an immersive virtual docking environment where the user can interact with and guide the molecules to their binding pose. Moreover, it allows human perception, intuition and knowledge to assist and accelerate the docking process, and reduces incorrect binding poses. Crucial for interactive docking is the real-time calculation of interaction forces. For smooth and accurate haptic exploration and manipulation, force-feedback cues have to be updated at a rate of 1 kHz. Hence, force calculations must be performed within 1 ms. To achieve this, modern haptic-based docking approaches often utilize pre-computed force grids and linear interpolation. However, such grids are time-consuming to pre-compute (especially for large molecules), memory hungry, can induce rough force transitions at cell boundaries and cannot be applied to flexible docking. Here we propose an efficient proximity querying method for computing intermolecular forces in real time. Our motivation is the eventual development of a haptic-based docking solution that can model molecular flexibility. Uniquely in a haptics application we use octrees to decompose the 3D search space in order to identify the set of interacting atoms within a cut-off distance. Force calculations are then performed on this set in real time. The implementation constructs the trees dynamically, and computes the interaction forces of large molecular structures (i.e. consisting of thousands of atoms) within haptic refresh rates. We have implemented this method in an immersive, haptic-based, rigid-body, molecular docking application called Haptimol_RD. The user can use the haptic device to orientate the molecules in space, sense the interaction

  13. Molecular Recognition of DNA. Synthesis of Novel Bases for Triple Helix Formation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    to the purine strand in the major groove of the Watson - Crick double helical DNA (TAT, C+GC triplets). Purine oligonucleotides bind antiparallel to...R&T Code 4135018 S MAy 05 199411 "Molecular Recognition of DNA . Synthesis of Novel Bases for Triple Helix Formation" Peter B. Dervan cv _California...035 T"IQA""D PART I A) Completed work (1988-91) Triple Helix Formation by Oligonucleotides on DNA Extended to the Physiological pH Range. T. J. Povsic

  14. Four- and five-component molecular solids: crystal engineering strategies based on structural inequivalence.

    PubMed

    Mir, Niyaz A; Dubey, Ritesh; Desiraju, Gautam R

    2016-03-01

    A synthetic strategy is described for the co-crystallization of four- and five-component molecular crystals, based on the fact that if any particular chemical constituent of a lower cocrystal is found in two different structural environments, these differences may be exploited to increase the number of components in the solid. 2-Methylresorcinol and tetramethylpyrazine are basic template molecules that allow for further supramolecular homologation. Ten stoichiometric quaternary cocrystals and one quintinary cocrystal with some solid solution character are reported. Cocrystals that do not lend themselves to such homologation are termed synthetic dead ends.

  15. Physical and molecular bases of protein thermal stability and cold adaptation.

    PubMed

    Pucci, Fabrizio; Rooman, Marianne

    2017-02-01

    The molecular bases of thermal and cold stability and adaptation, which allow proteins to remain folded and functional in the temperature ranges in which their host organisms live and grow, are still only partially elucidated. Indeed, both experimental and computational studies fail to yield a fully precise and global physical picture, essentially because all effects are context-dependent and thus quite intricate to unravel. We present a snapshot of the current state of knowledge of this highly complex and challenging issue, whose resolution would enable large-scale rational protein design.

  16. A description of the mechanical behavior of composite solid propellants based on molecular theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landel, R. F.

    1976-01-01

    Both the investigation and the representation of the stress-strain response (including rupture) of gum and filled elastomers can be based on a simple functional statement. Internally consistent experiments are used to sort out the effects of time, temperature, strain and crosslink density on gum rubbers. All effects are readily correlated and shown to be essentially independent of the elastomer when considered in terms of non-dimensionalized stress, strain and time. A semiquantitative molecular theory is developed to explain this result. The introduction of fillers modifies the response, but, guided by the framework thus provided, their effects can be readily accounted for.

  17. Glucose optical fibre sensor based on a luminescent molecularly imprinted polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elosua, C.; Wren, S. P.; Sun, T.; Arregui, F. J.; Grattan, Kenneth T. V.

    2015-09-01

    An optrode able to detect glucose dissolved in water has been implemented. The device is based on the luminescence emission of a Molecularly Imprinted Polymer synthesized specifically for glucose detection, therefore its intensity changes in presence of glucose. This sensing material is attached onto a cleaved ended polymer-clad optical fibre and it is excited by light via 1x2 fibre coupler. The reflected fluorescence signal increases when it is immersed into glucose solutions and recovers to the baseline when it is dipped in ultrapure water. This reversible behaviour indicates the measurement repeatability of using such a glucose sensor.

  18. NACE: A web-based tool for prediction of intercompartmental efficiency of human molecular genetic networks.

    PubMed

    Popik, Olga V; Ivanisenko, Timofey V; Saik, Olga V; Petrovskiy, Evgeny D; Lavrik, Inna N; Ivanisenko, Vladimir A

    2016-06-15

    Molecular genetic processes generally involve proteins from distinct intracellular localisations. Reactions that follow the same process are distributed among various compartments within the cell. In this regard, the reaction rate and the efficiency of biological processes can depend on the subcellular localisation of proteins. Previously, the authors proposed a method of evaluating the efficiency of biological processes based on the analysis of the distribution of protein subcellular localisation (Popik et al., 2014). Here, NACE is presented, which is an open access web-oriented program that implements this method and allows the user to evaluate the intercompartmental efficiency of human molecular genetic networks. The method has been extended by a new feature that provides the evaluation of the tissue-specific efficiency of networks for more than 2800 anatomical structures. Such assessments are important in cases when molecular genetic pathways in different tissues proceed with the participation of various proteins with a number of intracellular localisations. For example, an analysis of KEGG pathways, conducted using the developed program, showed that the efficiencies of many KEGG pathways are tissue-specific. Analysis of efficiencies of regulatory pathways in the liver, linking proteins of the hepatitis C virus with human proteins involved in the KEGG apoptosis pathway, showed that intercompartmental efficiency might play an important role in host-pathogen interactions. Thus, the developed tool can be useful in the study of the effectiveness of functioning of various molecular genetic networks, including metabolic, regulatory, host-pathogen interactions and others taking into account tissue-specific gene expression. The tool is available via the following link: http://www-bionet.sscc.ru/nace/.

  19. MALDI mass spectrometry based molecular phenotyping of CNS glial cells for prediction in mammalian brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Hanrieder, Jörg; Wicher, Grzegorz; Bergquist, Jonas; Andersson, Malin; Fex-Svenningsen, Asa

    2011-07-01

    The development of powerful analytical techniques for specific molecular characterization of neural cell types is of central relevance in neuroscience research for elucidating cellular functions in the central nervous system (CNS). This study examines the use of differential protein expression profiling of mammalian neural cells using direct analysis by means of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). MALDI-MS analysis is rapid, sensitive, robust, and specific for large biomolecules in complex matrices. Here, we describe a newly developed and straightforward methodology for direct characterization of rodent CNS glial cells using MALDI-MS-based intact cell mass spectrometry (ICMS). This molecular phenotyping approach enables monitoring of cell growth stages, (stem) cell differentiation, as well as probing cellular responses towards different stimulations. Glial cells were separated into pure astroglial, microglial, and oligodendroglial cell cultures. The intact cell suspensions were then analyzed directly by MALDI-TOF-MS, resulting in characteristic mass spectra profiles that discriminated glial cell types using principal component analysis. Complementary proteomic experiments revealed the identity of these signature proteins that were predominantly expressed in the different glial cell types, including histone H4 for oligodendrocytes and S100-A10 for astrocytes. MALDI imaging MS was performed, and signature masses were employed as molecular tracers for prediction of oligodendroglial and astroglial localization in brain tissue. The different cell type specific protein distributions in tissue were validated using immunohistochemistry. ICMS of intact neuroglia is a simple and straightforward approach for characterization and discrimination of different cell types with molecular specificity.

  20. Low molecular weight PEIs modified by hydrazone-based crosslinker and betaine as improved gene carriers.

    PubMed

    Fang, Gang; Zeng, Fang; Yu, Changmin; Wu, Shuizhu

    2014-10-01

    Low-molecular-weight polyethyleneimine (LMW PEI) exhibits poorer transfection efficiency but lower cytotoxicity compared to high-molecular-weight polyethyleneimine (such as PEI 25kDa). To enhance the gene transfection performance of LMW PEI, we herein demonstrate a new strategy for modifying LMW PEI. A crosslinker containing an acid-labile hydrazone bond (hydrazone-based crosslinker) was synthesized and used to crosslink PEI 1.8kDa and convert it into higher-molecular-weight polycations. And the crosslinked polycations were further modified by incorporating a betaine monomer [N,N-dimethyl(acrylamidopropyl)ammonium propane sulfonate, DMAAPS] onto their surfaces. The molar percentages of the incorporated betaine molecules to amino groups on the polycations were determined as 21.2%, 36.0% and 77.2%, respectively. Molecular weights of the modified polycations were measured using capillary viscometry at pH 7.4 and 5.0, respectively, and the degradation of the polymers in acidic solution was confirmed. The PEIs modified with hydrazone and betaine (PEI-Hdz-DMAAPS) exhibit much lower cytotoxicity than PEI 25K, and they also show no or little hemolytic effect with their hemolysis rates around 5%. PEI-Hdz-DMAAPS21.2%/DNA and PEI-Hdz-DMAAPS36.0%/DNA complexes exhibit high transfection efficiencies, which are comparable to or higher than that of PEI 25K/DNA complex in the absence or presence of 10% serum. With these improved gene delivery properties, the PEI-Hdz-DMAAPS samples have great potential for serving as efficient gene carriers. This strategy may provide some insights for constructing some other biocompatible materials.

  1. Investigating the binding behaviour of two avidin-based testosterone binders using molecular recognition force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rangl, Martina; Leitner, Michael; Riihimäki, Tiina; Lehtonen, Soili; Hytönen, Vesa P; Gruber, Hermann J; Kulomaa, Markku; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Ebner, Andreas

    2014-02-01

    Molecular recognition force spectroscopy, a biosensing atomic force microscopy technique allows to characterise the dissociation of ligand-receptor complexes at the molecular level. Here, we used molecular recognition force spectroscopy to study the binding capability of recently developed testosterone binders. The two avidin-based proteins called sbAvd-1 and sbAvd-2 are expected to bind both testosterone and biotin but differ in their binding behaviour towards these ligands. To explore the ligand binding and dissociation energy landscape of these proteins, we tethered biotin or testosterone to the atomic force microscopy probe while the testosterone-binding protein was immobilized on the surface. Repeated formation and rupture of the ligand-receptor complex at different pulling velocities allowed determination of the loading rate dependence of the complex-rupturing force. In this way, we obtained the molecular dissociation rate (k(off)) and energy landscape distances (x(β)) of the four possible complexes: sbAvd-1-biotin, sbAvd-1-testosterone, sbAvd-2-biotin and sbAvd-2-testosterone. It was found that the kinetic off-rates for both proteins and both ligands are similar. In contrast, the x(β) values, as well as the probability of complex formations, varied considerably. In addition, competitive binding experiments with biotin and testosterone in solution differ significantly for the two testosterone-binding proteins, implying a decreased cross-reactivity of sbAvd-2. Unravelling the binding behaviour of the investigated testosterone-binding proteins is expected to improve their usability for possible sensing applications.

  2. Solvation of Co(III)-cysteinato complexes in water: a DFT-based molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Spezia, Riccardo; Bresson, Carole; Den Auwer, Christophe; Gaigeot, Marie-Pierre

    2008-05-22

    Structural, dynamical, and vibrational properties of complexes made of metal cobalt(III) coordinated to different amounts of cysteine molecules were investigated with DFT-based Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CPMD) simulations in liquid water solution. The systems are composed of Co(III):3Cys and Co(III):2Cys immersed in liquid water which are modeled by about 110 explicit water molecules, thus one of the biggest molecular systems studied with ab initio molecular simulations so far. In such a way, we were able to investigate structural and dynamical properties of a model of a typical metal binding site used by several proteins. Cobalt, mainly a toxicological agent, can replace the natural binding metal and thus modify the biochemical activity. The structure of the surrounding solvent around the metal-ligands complexes is reported in detail, as well as the metal-ligands coordination bonds, using radial distribution functions and electronic analyses with Mayer bond orders. Structures of the Cocysteine complexes are found in very good agreement with EXAFS experimental data, stressing the importance of considering the surrounding solvent in the modeling. A vibrational analysis is also conducted and compared to experiment, which strengthens the reliability of the solvent interactions with the Cocysteine complexes from our molecular dynamics simulations, as well as the dynamics of the systems. From this preliminary analysis, we could suggest a vibrational fingerprint able to distinguish Co(III):2Cys from Co(III):3Cys. Our simulations also show the importance of considering a quantum explicit solvent, as solute-to-solvent proton transfer events have been observed.

  3. A density-functional study of heterometallic Cr-based molecular rings.

    PubMed

    Bellini, V; Affronte, M

    2010-11-25

    We present a density-functional theoretical investigation of the electronic and magnetic properties of octametallic Cr-based molecular antiferromagnetic rings. The presence of the divalent magnetic ion M unbalances the charge and the spin of the parent Cr(8) ring, leading to a finite total spin in the molecules. Results are presented for Cr(8), i.e., [Cr(8)F(8)(O(2)CH)(16)] (1), and for Cr(7)M rings belonging to two different derivatives, i.e., [Me(2)NH(2)][Cr(7)MF(8)(O(2)CH)(16)], with M = Ni, Mn, Fe, and Cu, and Me=CH(3) (2, "green" derivative), and [Cr(7) NiF(3)(C(6)H(10)NO(5))(O(2)CH)(15) (H(2)O)] (3, "purple" derivative). Exchange interaction parameters have been extracted from broken-symmetry calculations and compared with the available experiments; in agreement with them, we find that exchange parameters are rather similar in the two derivatives, although somewhat larger in the "purple" derivative. The analysis of the electronic properties shows some differences depending on M, in particular in the size of the highest occupied molecular orbital to lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (HOMO-LUMO) gaps. For all the "green" rings we observe that the HOMOs are localized on the divalent ion site, while the HOMOs for the "purple" Cr(7)Ni have a more delocalized nature; LUMOs, instead, are, except for "green" Cr(7)Cu, localized on the Cr atoms opposite to the M site. We discuss how these findings may show up in terms of an asymmetric I-V curve in molecular junctions working in the sequential tunneling regime, or help in discerning the orientation of the molecules with respect to a surface, in scanning tunneling experiments.

  4. Recent research in flaxseed (oil seed) on molecular structure and metabolic characteristics of protein, heat processing-induced effect and nutrition with advanced synchrotron-based molecular techniques.

    PubMed

    Doiron, Kevin J; Yu, Peiqiang

    2017-01-02

    Advanced synchrotron radiation-based infrared microspectroscopy is able to reveal feed and food structure feature at cellular and molecular levels and simultaneously provides composition, structure, environment, and chemistry within intact tissue. However, to date, this advanced synchrotron-based technique is still seldom known to food and feed scientists. This article aims to provide detailed background for flaxseed (oil seed) protein research and then review recent progress and development in flaxseed research in ruminant nutrition in the areas of (1) dietary inclusion of flaxseed in rations; (2) heat processing effect; (3) assessing dietary protein; (4) synchrotron-based Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy as a tool of nutritive evaluation within cellular and subcellular dimensions; (5) recent synchrotron applications in flaxseed research on a molecular basis. The information described in this paper gives better insight in flaxseed research progress and update.

  5. Taxonomic Position and Phylogeny of the Genus Vargasiella (Orchidaceae, Vandoideae) Based on Molecular and Morphological Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Szlachetko, Dariusz L.; Górniak, Marcin; Kolanowska, Marta; Mytnik-Ejsmont, Joanna; Kowalkowska, Agnieszka K.; Rutkowski, Piotr; Koliński, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    Since the description of the Neotropical genus Vargasiella in 1952, its taxonomic position has remained unclear, mainly due to a lack of sufficient data. In this study, the taxonomic position of Vargasiella was revised based on the outcomes of macro- and micromorphological studies, analyses of selected molecular markers and ecological methods of niche distribution modeling. The phylogenetic relationships were inferred using three DNA markers: matK, trnL-F and ITS sequences. The morphological studies included the analysis of macromorphological features of herbarium specimens as well as micromorphological examination of preserved flowers. The ecological niche modeling was applied to identify the distribution of the suitable niches of the studied taxa. The relationships between Vargasiella and most similar taxa remain unresolved based on the molecular analysis. The outcomes from the morphological studies indicated significant differences between Vargasiella, Warrea and Warreopsis. Moreover, a niche shift in response to changing climate after the last glacial maximum is observed in Vargasiella, while no substantial changes in the occupied habitats were identified in the other related taxa. The clocktree of the Zygopetaleae estimated from the matK gene indicated that the most recent common ancestors of Vargasiella, Warrea and Warreopsis originated in the Miocene, while the divergence time for Vargasiella and Warrea was assessed at approximately 5.4 Ma ago. Vargasiella seems to be an outshoot of the main branch of evolution of the Zygopetaleae. It is noteworthy that the Vargasiella-Warrea dichotomy could have taken place later than the divergence of Warreopsis from the mutual lineage. The molecular analysis and morphological data suggest that Vargasiella and Warrea could have evolved from a common ancestor. Accumulation of morphological differences and acceleration of the evolution of Vargasiella were more intensive than in other Warreinae and this could probably be

  6. Hybrid Materials Based on Magnetic Layered Double Hydroxides: A Molecular Perspective.

    PubMed

    Abellán, Gonzalo; Martí-Gastaldo, Carlos; Ribera, Antonio; Coronado, Eugenio

    2015-06-16

    Design of functional hybrids lies at the very core of synthetic chemistry as it has enabled the development of an unlimited number of solids displaying unprecedented or even improved properties built upon the association at the molecular level of quite disparate components by chemical design. Multifunctional hybrids are a particularly appealing case among hybrid organic/inorganic materials. Here, chemical knowledge is used to deploy molecular components bearing different functionalities within a single solid so that these properties can coexist or event interact leading to unprecedented phenomena. From a molecular perspective, this can be done either by controlled assembly of organic/inorganic molecular tectons into an extended architecture of hybrid nature or by intercalation of organic moieties within the empty channels or interlamellar space offered by inorganic solids with three-dimensional (MOFs, zeolites, and mesoporous hosts) or layered structures (phosphates, silicates, metal dichalcogenides, or anionic clays). This Account specifically illustrates the use of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) in the preparation of magnetic hybrids, in line with the development of soft inorganic chemistry processes (also called "Chimie Douce"), which has significantly contributed to boost the preparation hybrid materials based on solid-state hosts and subsequent development of applications. Several features sustain the importance of LDHs in this context. Their magnetism can be manipulated at a molecular level by adequate choice of constituting metals and interlayer separation for tuning the nature and extent of magnetic interactions across and between planes. They display unparalleled versatility in accommodating a broad range of anionic species in their interlamellar space that encompasses not only simple anions but chemical systems of increasing dimensionality and functionalities. Their swelling characteristics allow for their exfoliation in organic solvents with high

  7. Development of New Candidate Gene and EST-Based Molecular Markers for Gossypium Species.

    PubMed

    Buyyarapu, Ramesh; Kantety, Ramesh V; Yu, John Z; Saha, Sukumar; Sharma, Govind C

    2011-01-01

    New source of molecular markers accelerate the efforts in improving cotton fiber traits and aid in developing high-density integrated genetic maps. We developed new markers based on candidate genes and G. arboreum EST sequences that were used for polymorphism detection followed by genetic and physical mapping. Nineteen gene-based markers were surveyed for polymorphism detection in 26 Gossypium species. Cluster analysis generated a phylogenetic tree with four major sub-clusters for 23 species while three species branched out individually. CAP method enhanced the rate of polymorphism of candidate gene-based markers between G. hirsutum and G. barbadense. Two hundred A-genome based SSR markers were designed after datamining of G. arboreum EST sequences (Mississippi Gossypium arboreum  EST-SSR: MGAES). Over 70% of MGAES markers successfully produced amplicons while 65 of them demonstrated polymorphism between the parents of G. hirsutum and G. barbadense RIL population and formed 14 linkage groups. Chromosomal localization of both candidate gene-based and MGAES markers was assisted by euploid and hypoaneuploid CS-B analysis. Gene-based and MGAES markers were highly informative as they were designed from candidate genes and fiber transcriptome with a potential to be integrated into the existing cotton genetic and physical maps.

  8. On the optimal design of molecular sensing interfaces with lipid bilayer assemblies - A knowledge based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siontorou, Christina G.

    2012-12-01

    Biosensors are analytic devices that incorporate a biochemical recognition system (biological, biologicalderived or biomimic: enzyme, antibody, DNA, receptor, etc.) in close contact with a physicochemical transducer (electrochemical, optical, piezoelectric, conductimetric, etc.) that converts the biochemical information, produced by the specific biological recognition reaction (analyte-biomolecule binding), into a chemical or physical output signal, related to the concentration of the analyte in the measuring sample. The biosensing concept is based on natural chemoreception mechanisms, which are feasible over/within/by means of a biological membrane, i.e., a structured lipid bilayer, incorporating or attached to proteinaceous moieties that regulate molecular recognition events which trigger ion flux changes (facilitated or passive) through the bilayer. The creation of functional structures that are similar to natural signal transduction systems, correlating and interrelating compatibly and successfully the physicochemical transducer with the lipid film that is self-assembled on its surface while embedding the reconstituted biological recognition system, and at the same time manage to satisfy the basic conditions for measuring device development (simplicity, easy handling, ease of fabrication) is far from trivial. The aim of the present work is to present a methodological framework for designing such molecular sensing interfaces, functioning within a knowledge-based system built on an ontological platform for supplying sub-systems options, compatibilities, and optimization parameters.

  9. Development of molecularly imprinted polymer-based field effect transistor for sugar chain sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishitani, Shoichi; Kajisa, Taira; Sakata, Toshiya

    2017-04-01

    In this study, we developed a molecularly imprinted polymer-based field-effect transistor (MIP-gate FET) for selectively detecting sugar chains in aqueous media, focusing on 3‧-sialyllactose (3SLac) and 6‧-sialyllactose (6SLac). The FET biosensor enables the detection of small molecules as long as they have intrinsic charges. Additionally, the MIP gels include the template for the target molecule, which is selectively trapped without requiring enzyme-target molecule reaction. The MIP gels were synthesized on the gate surface of the FET device, including phenylboronic acid (PBA), which enables binding to sugar chains. Firstly, the 3SLac-MIP-gate FET quantitatively detected 3SLac at µM levels. This is because the FET device recognized the change in molecular charges on the basis of PBA-3SLac binding in the MIP gel. Moreover, 3SLac was selectively detected using the 3SLac- and 6SLac-MIP-gate FETs to some extent, where the detecting signal from the competent was suppressed by 40% at maximum. Therefore, a platform based on the MIP-coupled FET biosensor is suitable for a selective biosensing system in an enzyme-free manner, which can be applied widely in medical fields. However, we need to further improve the selectivity of MIP-gate FETs to discriminate more clearly between similar structures of sugar chains such as 3SLac and 6SLac.

  10. Molecular dynamics of the cryomilled base and hydrochloride ziprasidones by means of dielectric spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kaminski, K; Adrjanowicz, K; Wojnarowska, Z; Grzybowska, K; Hawelek, L; Paluch, M; Zakowiecki, D; Mazgalski, J

    2011-07-01

    Cryomilling was applied to obtain amorphous forms of the base ziprasidone and its hydrochloride salt. Complete amorphization of both samples was confirmed by differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray measurements. As it turned out, cryogrinding is very effective way to obtain these drugs in the amorphous state, especially because melting of both ziprazidones accompanies significant chemical decomposition as revealed by ultra performance liquid chromatography examination. Consequently, the glassy state cannot be reached in conventional way, that is, by supercooling of melt. Broadband dielectric relaxation measurements were performed on both drugs to describe their molecular dynamics above as well as below their glass transition temperatures (T(g)). We found out that ziprasidone base and its hydrochloride salt differ in T(g) in the same way as it was previously reported for tramadol monohydrate and its hydrochloride. Moreover, our dielectric studies revealed that molecular mobility is not the main factor controlling kinetics of crystallization of both ziprasidones above their T(g) . Below the T(g) relaxation related to water as well as secondary relaxation process originating from the intermolecular interaction (Johari-Goldstein) were identified in the loss spectra of both materials. We have demonstrated that except of local mobility, water is the dominant factor moving both ziprasidones toward recrystallization process. Finally, we have also carried out solubility measurements to show that dissolution rate of the amorphous ziprasidones is much higher with respect to the crystalline samples.

  11. High-Performance Fluorescence Molecular Tomography through Shape-Based Reconstruction Using Spherical Harmonics Parameterization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Daifa; He, Jin; Qiao, Huiting; Song, Xiaolei; Fan, Yubo; Li, Deyu

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence molecular tomography in the near-infrared region is becoming a powerful modality for mapping the three-dimensional quantitative distributions of fluorochromes in live small animals. However, wider application of fluorescence molecular tomography still requires more accurate and stable reconstruction tools. We propose a shape-based reconstruction method that uses spherical harmonics parameterization, where fluorophores are assumed to be distributed as piecewise constants inside disjointed subdomains and the remaining background. The inverse problem is then formulated as a constrained nonlinear least-squares problem with respect to shape parameters, which decreases ill-posedness because of the significantly reduced number of unknowns. Since different shape parameters contribute differently to the boundary measurements, a two-step and modified block coordinate descent optimization algorithm is introduced to stabilize the reconstruction. We first evaluated our method using numerical simulations under various conditions for the noise level and fluorescent background; it showed significant superiority over conventional voxel-based methods in terms of the spatial resolution, reconstruction accuracy with regard to the morphology and intensity, and robustness against the initial estimated distribution. In our phantom experiment, our method again showed better spatial resolution and more accurate intensity reconstruction. Finally, the results of an in vivo experiment demonstrated its applicability to the imaging of mice. PMID:24732826

  12. Cosolvent-Based Molecular Dynamics for Ensemble Docking: Practical Method for Generating Druggable Protein Conformations.

    PubMed

    Uehara, Shota; Tanaka, Shigenori

    2017-04-07

    Protein flexibility is a major hurdle in current structure-based virtual screening (VS). In spite of the recent advances in high-performance computing, protein-ligand docking methods still demand tremendous computational cost to take into account the full degree of protein flexibility. In this context, ensemble docking has proven its utility and efficiency for VS studies, but it still needs a rational and efficient method to select and/or generate multiple protein conformations. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are useful to produce distinct protein conformations without abundant experimental structures. In this study, we present a novel strategy that makes use of cosolvent-based molecular dynamics (CMD) simulations for ensemble docking. By mixing small organic molecules into a solvent, CMD can stimulate dynamic protein motions and induce partial conformational changes of binding pocket residues appropriate for the binding of diverse ligands. The present method has been applied to six diverse target proteins and assessed by VS experiments using many actives and decoys of DEKOIS 2.0. The simulation results have revealed that the CMD is beneficial for ensemble docking. Utilizing cosolvent simulation allows the generation of druggable protein conformations, improving the VS performance compared with the use of a single experimental structure or ensemble docking by standard MD with pure water as the solvent.

  13. Molecular Subtyping of Serous Ovarian Cancer Based on Multi-omics Data

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhe; Huang, Ke; Gu, Chenglei; Zhao, Luyang; Wang, Nan; Wang, Xiaolei; Zhao, Dongsheng; Zhang, Chenggang; Lu, Yiming; Meng, Yuanguang

    2016-01-01

    Classification of ovarian cancer by morphologic features has a limited effect on serous ovarian cancer (SOC) treatment and prognosis. Here, we proposed a new system for SOC subtyping based on the molecular categories from the Cancer Genome Atlas project. We analyzed the DNA methylation, protein, microRNA, and gene expression of 1203 samples from 599 serous ovarian cancer patients. These samples were divided into nine subtypes based on RNA-seq data, and each subtype was found to be associated with the activation and/or suppression of the following four biological processes: immunoactivity, hormone metabolic, mesenchymal development and the MAPK signaling pathway. We also identified four DNA methylation, two protein expression, six microRNA sequencing and four pathway subtypes. By integrating the subtyping results across different omics platforms, we found that most RNA-seq subtypes overlapped with one or two subtypes from other omics data. Our study sheds light on the molecular mechanisms of SOC and provides a new perspective for the more accurate stratification of its subtypes. PMID:27184229

  14. Polyoxometalate-based layered structures for charge transport control in molecular devices.

    PubMed

    Douvas, Antonios M; Makarona, Eleni; Glezos, Nikos; Argitis, Panagiotis; Mielczarski, Jerzy A; Mielczarski, Ela

    2008-04-01

    Hybrid organic-inorganic films consisted of molecular layers of a Keggin-structure polyoxometalate (POM: 12-tungstophosphoric acid, H(3)PW(12)O(40)) and 1,12-diaminododecane (DD) on 3-aminopropyl triethoxysilane (APTES)-modified silicon surface, fabricated via the layer-by-layer (LBL) self-assembly method are evaluated as molecular materials for electronic devices. The effect of the fabrication process parameters, including primarily compositions of deposition solutions, on the structural characteristics of the POM-based multilayers was studied extensively with a combination of spectroscopic methods (UV, FTIR, and XPS). Well-characterized POM-based films (both single-layers and multilayers) in a controlled and reproducible way were obtained. The conduction mechanisms in single-layered and multilayered structures were elucidated by the electrical characterization of the produced films supported by the appropriate theoretical analysis. Fowler-Nordheim (FN) tunneling and percolation mechanisms were encountered in good correlation with the structural characteristics of the films encouraging further investigation on the use of these materials in electronic and, in particular, in memory devices.

  15. A molecular ruler based on plasmon coupling of single gold andsilver nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnichsen, Carsten; Reinhard, Bjorn M.; Liphardt, Jan; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2005-05-22

    Molecular rulers based on Foerster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) that report conformational changes and intramolecular distances of single biomolecules have helped to understand important biological processes. However, these rulers suffer from low and fluctuating signal intensities from single dyes and limited observation time due to photobleaching. The plasmon resonance in noble metal particles has been suggested as an alternative probe to overcome the limitations of organic fluorophores and the coupling of plasmons in nearby particles has been exploited to detect particle aggregation by a distinct color change in bulk experiments. Here we demonstrate that plasmon coupling can be used to monitor distances between single pairs of gold and silver nanoparticles. We use this effect to follow the directed assembly of gold and silver nanoparticle dimers in real time and to study the time dynamics of single DNA hybridization events. These ''plasmon rulers'' allowed us to continuously monitor separations of up to 70 nm for more than 3000 seconds. Single molecule in vitro studies of biological processes previously inaccessible with fluorescence based molecular rulers are enabled with plasmon rulers with extended time and distance range.

  16. Electrochemical sensor for dopamine based on a novel graphene-molecular imprinted polymers composite recognition element.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yan; Bao, Yu; Gan, Shiyu; Li, Fenghua; Niu, Li

    2011-10-15

    A novel composite of graphene sheets/Congo red-molecular imprinted polymers (GSCR-MIPs) was synthesized through free radical polymerization (FRP) and applied as a molecular recognition element to construct dopamine (DA) electrochemical sensor. The template molecules (DA) were firstly absorbed at the GSCR surface due to their excellent affinity, and subsequently, selective copolymerization of methacrylic acid (MAA) and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) was further achieved at the GSCR surface. Potential scanning was presented to extract DA molecules from the imprinted polymers film, and as a result, DA could be rapidly and completely removed by this way. With regard to the traditional MIPs, the GSCR-MIPs not only possessed a faster desorption and adsorption dynamics, but also exhibited a higher selectivity and binding capacity toward DA molecule. As a consequence, an electrochemical sensor for highly sensitive and selective detection of DA was successfully constructed as demonstration based on the synthesized GSCR-MIPs nanocomposites. Under experimental conditions, selective detection of DA in a linear concentration range of 1.0 × 10(-7)-8.3 × 10(-4)M was obtained, which revealed a lower limit of detection and wider linear response compared to some previously reported DA electrochemical MIPs sensors. The new DA electrochemical sensor based on GSCR-MIPs composites also exhibited excellent repeatability, which expressed as relative standard deviation (RSD) was about 2.50% for 30 repeated analyses of 20 μM DA.

  17. Kazusa Marker DataBase: a database for genomics, genetics, and molecular breeding in plants.

    PubMed

    Shirasawa, Kenta; Isobe, Sachiko; Tabata, Satoshi; Hirakawa, Hideki

    2014-09-01

    In order to provide useful genomic information for agronomical plants, we have established a database, the Kazusa Marker DataBase (http://marker.kazusa.or.jp). This database includes information on DNA markers, e.g., SSR and SNP markers, genetic linkage maps, and physical maps, that were developed at the Kazusa DNA Research Institute. Keyword searches for the markers, sequence data used for marker development, and experimental conditions are also available through this database. Currently, 10 plant species have been targeted: tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), pepper (Capsicum annuum), strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa), radish (Raphanus sativus), Lotus japonicus, soybean (Glycine max), peanut (Arachis hypogaea), red clover (Trifolium pratense), white clover (Trifolium repens), and eucalyptus (Eucalyptus camaldulensis). In addition, the number of plant species registered in this database will be increased as our research progresses. The Kazusa Marker DataBase will be a useful tool for both basic and applied sciences, such as genomics, genetics, and molecular breeding in crops.

  18. Kazusa Marker DataBase: a database for genomics, genetics, and molecular breeding in plants

    PubMed Central

    Shirasawa, Kenta; Isobe, Sachiko; Tabata, Satoshi; Hirakawa, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    In order to provide useful genomic information for agronomical plants, we have established a database, the Kazusa Marker DataBase (http://marker.kazusa.or.jp). This database includes information on DNA markers, e.g., SSR and SNP markers, genetic linkage maps, and physical maps, that were developed at the Kazusa DNA Research Institute. Keyword searches for the markers, sequence data used for marker development, and experimental conditions are also available through this database. Currently, 10 plant species have been targeted: tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), pepper (Capsicum annuum), strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa), radish (Raphanus sativus), Lotus japonicus, soybean (Glycine max), peanut (Arachis hypogaea), red clover (Trifolium pratense), white clover (Trifolium repens), and eucalyptus (Eucalyptus camaldulensis). In addition, the number of plant species registered in this database will be increased as our research progresses. The Kazusa Marker DataBase will be a useful tool for both basic and applied sciences, such as genomics, genetics, and molecular breeding in crops. PMID:25320561

  19. Rotating-Electric-Field-Induced Carbon-Nanotube-Based Nanomotor in Water: A Molecular Dynamics Study.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Mushfiqur; Chowdhury, Mokter Mahmud; Alam, Md Kawsar

    2017-03-29

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, it is shown that a carbon nanotube (CNT) suspended in water and subjected to a rotating electric field of proper magnitude and angular speed can be rotated with the aid of water dipole orientations. Based on this principle, a rotational nanomotor structure is designed and the system is simulated in water. Use of the fast responsiveness of electric-field-induced CNT orientation in water is employed and its operation at ultrahigh-speed (over 10(11) r.p.m.) is shown. To explain the basic mechanism, the behavior of the rotational actuation, originated from the water dipole orientation, is also analyzed . The proposed nanomotor is capable of rotating an attached load (such as CNT) at a precise angle as well as nanogear-based complex structures. The findings suggest potential way of using the electric-field-induced CNT rotation in a polarizable fluids as a novel tool to operate nanodevices and systems.

  20. Remote Stabilization of Copper Paddlewheel Based Molecular Building Blocks in Metal-Organic Frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Wen-Yang; Cai, Rong; Pham, Tony; Forrest, Katherine A.; Hogan, Adam; Nugent, Patrick; Williams, Kia; Wojtas, Lukasz; Luebke, Ryan; Weseliinski, Lukasz J.; Zaworotko, Michael J.; Space, Brian; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Eddaoudi, Mohamed; Shi, Xiaodong; Ma, Shengqian

    2015-08-21

    Copper paddlewheel based molecular building blocks (MBBs) are ubiquitous and have been widely employed for the construction of highly porous metal–organic frameworks (MOFs). However, most copper paddlewheel based MOFs fail to retain their structural integrity in the presence of water. This instability is directly correlated to the plausible displacement of coordinating carboxylates in the copper paddlewheel MBB, [Cu₂(O₂C-)₄], by the strongly coordinating water molecules. In this comprehensive study, we illustrate the chemical stability control in the rht-MOF platform via strengthening the coordinating bonds within the triangular inorganic MBB, [Cu₃O(N4–x(CH)xC-)₃] (x = 0, 1, or 2). Remotely, the chemical stabilization propagated into the paddlewheel MBB to afford isoreticular rht-MOFs with remarkably enhanced water/chemical stabilities compared to the prototypal rht-MOF-1.

  1. Functionality in Electrospun Nanofibrous Membranes Based on Fiber's Size, Surface Area, and Molecular Orientation

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Hidetoshi; Tanioka, Akihiko

    2011-01-01

    Electrospinning is a versatile method for forming continuous thin fibers based on an electrohydrodynamic process. This method has the following advantages: (i) the ability to produce thin fibers with diameters in the micrometer and nanometer ranges; (ii) one-step forming of the two- or three-dimensional nanofiber network assemblies (nanofibrous membranes); and (iii) applicability for a broad spectrum of molecules, such as synthetic and biological polymers and polymerless sol-gel systems. Electrospun nanofibrous membranes have received significant attention in terms of their practical applications. The major advantages of nanofibers or nanofibrous membranes are the functionalities based on their nanoscaled-size, highly specific surface area, and highly molecular orientation. These functionalities of the nanofibrous membranes can be controlled by their fiber diameter, surface chemistry and topology, and internal structure of the nanofibers. This report focuses on our studies and describes fundamental aspects and applications of electrospun nanofibrous membranes. PMID:24957735

  2. The importance of the rotor in hydrazone-based molecular switches

    PubMed Central

    Su, Xin; Lessing, Timo

    2012-01-01

    Summary The pH-activated E/Z isomerization of a series of hydrazone-based systems having different functional groups as part of the rotor (R = COMe, CN, Me, H), was studied. The switching efficiency of these systems was compared to that of a hydrazone-based molecular switch (R = COOEt) whose E/Z isomerization is fully reversible. It was found that the nature of the R group is critical for efficient switching to occur; the R group should be a moderate H-bond acceptor in order to (i) provide enough driving force for the rotor to move upon protonation, and (ii) stabilize the obtained Z configuration, to achieve full conversion. PMID:23015836

  3. The importance of the rotor in hydrazone-based molecular switches.

    PubMed

    Su, Xin; Lessing, Timo; Aprahamian, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    The pH-activated E/Z isomerization of a series of hydrazone-based systems having different functional groups as part of the rotor (R = COMe, CN, Me, H), was studied. The switching efficiency of these systems was compared to that of a hydrazone-based molecular switch (R = COOEt) whose E/Z isomerization is fully reversible. It was found that the nature of the R group is critical for efficient switching to occur; the R group should be a moderate H-bond acceptor in order to (i) provide enough driving force for the rotor to move upon protonation, and (ii) stabilize the obtained Z configuration, to achieve full conversion.

  4. Interpretation of pH-activity profiles for acid-base catalysis from molecular simulations.

    PubMed

    Dissanayake, Thakshila; Swails, Jason M; Harris, Michael E; Roitberg, Adrian E; York, Darrin M

    2015-02-17

    The measurement of reaction rate as a function of pH provides essential information about mechanism. These rates are sensitive to the pK(a) values of amino acids directly involved in catalysis that are often shifted by the enzyme active site environment. Experimentally observed pH-rate profiles are usually interpreted using simple kinetic models that allow estimation of "apparent pK(a)" values of presumed general acid and base catalysts. One of the underlying assumptions in these models is that the protonation states are uncorrelated. In this work, we introduce the use of constant pH molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent (CpHMD) with replica exchange in the pH-dimension (pH-REMD) as a tool to aid in the interpretation of pH-activity data of enzymes and to test the validity of different kinetic models. We apply the methods to RNase A, a prototype acid-base catalyst, to predict the macroscopic and microscopic pK(a) values, as well as the shape of the pH-rate profile. Results for apo and cCMP-bound RNase A agree well with available experimental data and suggest that deprotonation of the general acid and protonation of the general base are not strongly coupled in transphosphorylation and hydrolysis steps. Stronger coupling, however, is predicted for the Lys41 and His119 protonation states in apo RNase A, leading to the requirement for a microscopic kinetic model. This type of analysis may be important for other catalytic systems where the active forms of the implicated general acid and base are oppositely charged and more highly correlated. These results suggest a new way for CpHMD/pH-REMD simulations to bridge the gap with experiments to provide a molecular-level interpretation of pH-activity data in studies of enzyme mechanisms.

  5. Prediction of retention in hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography using solute molecular descriptors based on chemical structures.

    PubMed

    Taraji, Maryam; Haddad, Paul R; Amos, Ruth I J; Talebi, Mohammad; Szucs, Roman; Dolan, John W; Pohl, Christopher A

    2017-02-24

    Quantitative structure-retention relationship (QSRR) models are developed to predict the retention times of analytes on five hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) stationary phases (bare silica, amine, amide, diol and zwitterionic), with a view to selecting the most suitable stationary phase(s) for the separation of these analytes. The study was conducted using six β-adrenergic agonists as target analytes. Molecular descriptors were calculated based only on chemical structures optimized using density functional theory. A genetic algorithm (GA) was then used to select the most relevant molecular descriptors and these were used to build a retention model for each stationary phase using partial least squares (PLS) regression. This model was then used to predict the retention of the test set of target analytes. This process created an optimized descriptor set which enhanced the reliability of the developed QSRR models. Finally, the QSRR models developed in the work were utilized to provide some insight into the separation mechanisms operating in the HILIC mode. Three performance criteria - mean absolute error (MAE), root mean square error of prediction scaled to retention time (RMSEP), and the number of selected descriptors, were used to evaluate the developed models when applied to an external test set of six β-adrenergic agonists and showed highly predictive abilities. MAE values ranged from 13 to 25s on four of the stationary phases, with a somewhat higher error (50s) being observed for the zwitterionic phase. RMSEP values of 4.88-11.12% were recorded. Validation was performed through Y-randomization and chemical domain applicability, from which it was evident that the developed optimized GA-PLS models were robust. The high levels of accuracy, reliability and applicability of the models were to a large extent due to the optimization of the GA descriptor set and the presence of relevant structural and geometric molecular descriptors, together with

  6. Molecular and cell-based therapies for muscle degenerations: a road under construction.

    PubMed

    Berardi, Emanuele; Annibali, Daniela; Cassano, Marco; Crippa, Stefania; Sampaolesi, Maurilio

    2014-01-01

    Despite the advances achieved in understanding the molecular biology of muscle cells in the past decades, there is still need for effective treatments of muscular degeneration caused by muscular dystrophies and for counteracting the muscle wasting caused by cachexia or sarcopenia. The corticosteroid medications currently in use for dystrophic patients merely help to control the inflammatory state and only slightly delay the progression of the disease. Unfortunately, walkers and wheel chairs are the only options for such patients to maintain independence and walking capabilities until the respiratory muscles become weak and the mechanical ventilation is needed. On the other hand, myostatin inhibition, IL-6 antagonism and synthetic ghrelin administration are examples of promising treatments in cachexia animal models. In both dystrophies and cachectic syndrome the muscular degeneration is extremely relevant and the translational therapeutic attempts to find a possible cure are well defined. In particular, molecular-based therapies are common options to be explored in order to exploit beneficial treatments for cachexia, while gene/cell therapies are mostly used in the attempt to induce a substantial improvement of the dystrophic muscular phenotype. This review focuses on the description of the use of molecular administrations and gene/stem cell therapy to treat muscular degenerations. It reviews previous trials using cell delivery protocols in mice and patients starting with the use of donor myoblasts, outlining the likely causes for their poor results and briefly focusing on satellite cell studies that raise new hope. Then it proceeds to describe recently identified stem/progenitor cells, including pluripotent stem cells and in relationship to their ability to home within a dystrophic muscle and to differentiate into skeletal muscle cells. Different known features of various stem cells are compared in this perspective, and the few available examples of their use in

  7. QCL- and CO_2 Laser-Based Mid-Ir Spectrometers for High Accuracy Molecular Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sow, P. L. T.; Chanteau, B.; Auguste, F.; Mejri, S.; Tokunaga, S. K.; Argence, B.; Lopez, O.; Chardonnet, C.; Amy-Klein, A.; Daussy, C.; Darquie, B.; Nicolodi, D.; Abgrall, M.; Le Coq, Y.; Santarelli, G.

    2013-06-01

    With their rich internal structure, molecules can play a decisive role in precision tests of fundamental physics. They are now being used, for example in our group, to test fundamental symmetries such as parity and time reversal, and to measure either absolute values of fundamental constants or their temporal variation. Most of those experiments can be cast as the measurement of molecular frequencies. Ultra-stable and accurate sources in the mid-IR spectral region, the so-called molecular fingerprint region that hosts many intense rovibrational signatures, are thus highly desirable. We report on the development of a widely tunable quantum cascade laser (QCL) based spectrometer. Our first characterization of a free-running cw near-room-temperature DFB 10.3 μm QCL led to a ˜200 kHz linewidth beat-note with our frequency-stabilized CO_2 laser. Narrowing of the QCL linewidth was achieved by straightforwardly phase-locking the QCL to the CO_2 laser. The great stability of the CO_2 laser was transferred to the QCL resulting in a record linewidth of a few tens of hertz. The use of QCLs will allow the study of any species showing absorption between 3 and 25 μm which will broaden the scope of our experimental setups dedicated to molecular spectroscopy-based precision measurements. Eventually we want to lock the QCL to a frequency comb itself stabilized to an ultra-stable near-IR reference provided via a 43-km long fibre by the French metrological institute and monitored against atomic fountain clocks. We report on the demonstration of this locking-scheme with a ˜10 μm CO_2 laser resulting in record 10^{-14}-10^{-15} fractional accuracy and stability. Stabilizing a QCL this way will free us from having to lock it to a molecular transition or a CO_2 laser. It will make it possible for any laboratory to have a stabilized QCL at any desired wavelength with spectral performances currently only achievable in the visible and near-IR, in metrological institutes.

  8. Molecular and cell-based therapies for muscle degenerations: a road under construction

    PubMed Central

    Berardi, Emanuele; Annibali, Daniela; Cassano, Marco; Crippa, Stefania; Sampaolesi, Maurilio

    2014-01-01

    Despite the advances achieved in understanding the molecular biology of muscle cells in the past decades, there is still need for effective treatments of muscular degeneration caused by muscular dystrophies and for counteracting the muscle wasting caused by cachexia or sarcopenia. The corticosteroid medications currently in use for dystrophic patients merely help to control the inflammatory state and only slightly delay the progression of the disease. Unfortunately, walkers and wheel chairs are the only options for such patients to maintain independence and walking capabilities until the respiratory muscles become weak and the mechanical ventilation is needed. On the other hand, myostatin inhibition, IL-6 antagonism and synthetic ghrelin administration are examples of promising treatments in cachexia animal models. In both dystrophies and cachectic syndrome the muscular degeneration is extremely relevant and the translational therapeutic attempts to find a possible cure are well defined. In particular, molecular-based therapies are common options to be explored in order to exploit beneficial treatments for cachexia, while gene/cell therapies are mostly used in the attempt to induce a substantial improvement of the dystrophic muscular phenotype. This review focuses on the description of the use of molecular administrations and gene/stem cell therapy to treat muscular degenerations. It reviews previous trials using cell delivery protocols in mice and patients starting with the use of donor myoblasts, outlining the likely causes for their poor results and briefly focusing on satellite cell studies that raise new hope. Then it proceeds to describe recently identified stem/progenitor cells, including pluripotent stem cells and in relationship to their ability to home within a dystrophic muscle and to differentiate into skeletal muscle cells. Different known features of various stem cells are compared in this perspective, and the few available examples of their use in

  9. Quinacridone-based molecular donors for solution processed bulk-heterojunction organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, John Jun-An; Chen, Teresa L; Kim, BongSoo; Poulsen, Daniel A; Mynar, Justin L; Fréchet, Jean M J; Ma, Biwu

    2010-09-01

    New soluble quinacridone-based molecules have been developed as electron donor materials for solution-processed organic solar cells. By functionalizing the pristine pigment core of quinacridone with solubilizing alkyl chains and light absorbing/charge transporting thiophene units, i.e., bithiophene (BT) and thienylbenzo[c][1,2,5]thiadiazolethienyl (BTD), we prepared a series of multifunctional quinacridone-based molecules. These molecular donors show intense absorption in the visible spectral region, and the absorption range and intensity are well-tuned by the interaction between the quinacridone core and the incorporated thiophene units. The thin film absorption edge extends with the expansion of molecular conjugation, i.e., 552 nm for N,N'-di(2-ethylhexyl)quinacridone (QA), 592 nm for 2,9-Bis(5'-hexyl-2,2'-bithiophene)-N,N'-di(2-ethylhexyl)quinacridone (QA-BT), and 637 nm for 4-(5-hexylthiophen-2-yl)-7-(thiophen-2-yl)benzo[c][1,2,5]thiadiazole (QA-BTD). The change of molecular structure also influences the electrochemical properties. Observed from cyclic voltammetry measurements, the oxidation and reduction potentials (vs ferrocene) are 0.7 and -1.83 V for QA, 0.54 and -1.76 V for QA-BT, and 0.45 and -1.68 V for QA-BTD. Uniform thin films can be generated from both single component molecular solutions and blend solutions of these molecules with [6,6]-phenyl C70-butyric acid methyl ester (PC70BM). The blend films exhibit space-charge limited current (SCLC) hole mobilities on the order of 1×10(-4) cm(2) V(-1) S(-1). Bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells using these soluble molecules as donors and PC70BM as the acceptor were fabricated. Power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) of up to 2.22% under AM 1.5 G simulated 1 sun solar illumination have been achieved and external quantum efficiencies (EQEs) reach as high as ∼45%.

  10. A Critique of Asphaltene Fluorescence Decay and Depolarization-Based Claims about Molecular Weight and Molecular Architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Strausz,O.; Safarik, I.; Lown, E.; Morales-Izquierdo, A.

    2008-01-01

    Relying on experimental and theoretical data available from the literature, it is shown that the conclusions derived from measurements of fluorescence decay and depolarization kinetic times as reported in a series of papers over the past decade are egregiously wrong. To start with, the decay time measurements were done with inappropriate instrumentation which resulted in misleading results. Misinterpretation of the results led to the mistaken conclusion that bichromophoric type molecules are absent from petroleum asphaltene and therefore the architecture of the asphaltene molecule features a single condensed cyclic core spiked with some alkyl chains, in spite of irrefutable chemical evidence to the contrary. It was further concluded that if the asphaltene core is a single condensed ring, then the fluorescence depolarization with rotational correlation time method is applicable for the molecular weight determination of asphaltene. This is definitely not so, since, regardless of any other considerations, asphaltene is a mixture of a plethora of different, unknown components, with unknown concentrations along with innumerable different, unknown and some known chromophores portraying widely different absorption coefficients, fluorescence quantum yields, and kinetic decay times. Consequently, asphaltene fluorescence is a highly complex function of the above attributes and as such it is a totally unsuitable property for its molecular weight determination. The injection of an incorrect, single condensed ring core architecture for asphaltene has caused some confusion in asphaltene chemistry that has now hopefully been settled.

  11. Molecular spintronics based on single-molecule magnets composed of multiple-decker phthalocyaninato terbium(III) complex.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Keiichi; Isshiki, Hironari; Komeda, Tadahiro; Yamashita, Masahiro

    2012-06-01

    Unlike electronics, which is based on the freedom of the charge of an electron whose memory is volatile, spintronics is based on the freedom of the charge, spin, and orbital of an electron whose memory is non-volatile. Although in most GMR, TMR, and CMR systems, bulk or classical magnets that are composed of transition metals are used, this Focus Review considers the growing use of single-molecule magnets (SMMs) that are composed of multinuclear metal complexes and nanosized magnets, which exhibit slow magnetic-relaxation processes and quantum tunneling. Molecular spintronics, which combines spintronics and molecular electronics, is an emerging field of research. Using molecules is advantageous because their electronic and magnetic properties can be manipulated under specific conditions. Herein, recent developments in [LnPc]-based multiple-decker SMMs on surfaces for molecular spintronic devices are presented. First, we discuss the strategies for preparing single-molecular-memory devices by using SMMs. Next, we focus on the switching of the Kondo signal of [LnPc]-based multiple-decker SMMs that are adsorbed onto surfaces, their characterization by using STM and STS, and the relationship between the molecular structure, the electronic structure, and the Kondo resonance of [TbPc(2)]. Finally, the field-effect-transistor (FET) properties of surface-adsorbed [LnPc(2)] and [Ln(2)Pc(3)] cast films are reported, which is the first step towards controlling SMMs through their spins for applications in single-molecular memory and spintronics devices.

  12. A distance-dependent metal-enhanced fluorescence sensing platform based on molecular beacon design.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhenpeng; Huang, Hongduan; Chen, Yang; Liu, Feng; Huang, Cheng Zhi; Li, Na

    2014-02-15

    A new metal-enhanced fluorescence (MEF) based platform was developed on the basis of distance-dependent fluorescence quenching-enhancement effect, which combined the easiness of Ag-thiol chemistry with the MEF property of noble-metal structures as well as the molecular beacon design. For the given sized AgNPs, the fluorescence enhancement factor was found to increase with a d(6) dependency in agreement with fluorescence resonance energy transfer mechanism at shorter distance and decrease with a d(-3) dependency in agreement with plasmonic enhancement mechanism at longer distance between the fluorophore and the AgNP surface. As a proof of concept, the platform was demonstrated by a sensitive detection of mercuric ions, using thymine-containing molecular beacon to tune silver nanoparticle (AgNP)-enhanced fluorescence. Mercuric ions were detected via formation of a thymine-mercuric-thymine structure to open the hairpin, facilitating fluorescence recovery and AgNP enhancement to yield a limit of detection of 1 nM, which is well below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulation of the Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (10nM) in drinking water. Since the AgNP functioned as not only a quencher to reduce the reagent blank signal but also an enhancement substrate to increase fluorescence of the open hairpin when target mercuric ions were present, the quenching-enhancement strategy can greatly improve the detection sensitivity and can in principle be a universal approach for various targets when combined with molecular beacon design.

  13. Potentiometric Sensors Based on Surface Molecular Imprinting: Detection of Cancer Biomarkers and Viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.; Zhang, Z; Jain, V; Yi, J; Mueller, S; Sokolov, J; Liu, Z; Levon, K; Rigas, B; Rafailovich, M

    2010-01-01

    The continuing discovery of cancer biomarkers necessitates improved methods for their detection. Molecular imprinting using artificial materials provides an alternative to the detection of a wide range of substances. We applied surface molecular imprinting using self-assembled monolayers to design sensing elements for the detection of cancer biomarkers and other proteins. These elements consist of a gold-coated silicon chip onto which hydroxyl-terminated alkanethiol molecules and template biomolecule are co-adsorbed, where the thiol molecules are chemically bound to the metal substrate and self-assembled into highly ordered monolayers, the biomolecules can be removed, creating the foot-print cavities in the monolayer matrix for this kind of template molecules. Re-adsorption of the biomolecules to the sensing chip changes its potential, which can be measured potentiometrically. We applied this method to the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in both solutions of purified CEA and in the culture medium of a CEA-producing human colon cancer cell line. The CEA assay, validated also against a standard immunoassay, was both sensitive (detection range 2.5-250 ng/mL) and specific (no cross-reactivity with hemoglobin; no response by a non-imprinted sensor). Similar results were obtained for human amylase. In addition, we detected virions of poliovirus in a specific manner (no cross-reactivity to adenovirus, no response by a non-imprinted sensor). Our findings demonstrate the application of the principles of molecular imprinting to the development of a new method for the detection of protein cancer biomarkers and to protein-based macromolecular structures such as the capsid of a virion. This approach has the potential of generating a general assay methodology that could be highly sensitive, specific, simple and likely inexpensive.

  14. Molecular modeling-based analysis of interactions in the RFC-dependent clamp-loading process.

    PubMed

    Venclovas, Ceslovas; Colvin, Michael E; Thelen, Michael P

    2002-10-01

    Replication and related processes in eukaryotic cells require replication factor C (RFC) to load a molecular clamp for DNA polymerase in an ATP-driven process, involving multiple molecular interactions. The detailed understanding of this mechanism is hindered by the lack of data regarding structure, mutual arrangement, and dynamics of the players involved. In this study, we analyzed interactions that take place during loading onto DNA of either the PCNA clamp or the Rad9-Rad1-Hus1 checkpoint complex, using computationally derived molecular models. Combining the modeled structures for each RFC subunit with known structural, biochemical, and genetic data, we propose detailed models of how two of the RFC subunits, RFC1 and RFC3, interact with the C-terminal regions of PCNA. RFC1 is predicted to bind PCNA similarly to the p21-PCNA interaction, while the RFC3-PCNA binding is proposed to be similar to the E. coli delta-beta interaction. Additional sequence and structure analysis, supported by experimental data, suggests that RFC5 might be the third clamp loader subunit to bind the equivalent PCNA region. We discuss functional implications stemming from the proposed model of the RFC1-PCNA interaction and compare putative clamp-interacting regions in RFC1 and its paralogs, Rad17 and Ctf18. Based on the individual intermolecular interactions, we propose RFC and PCNA arrangement that places three RFC subunits in association with each of the three C-terminal regions in PCNA. The two other RFC subunits are positioned at the two PCNA interfaces, with the third PCNA interface left unobstructed. In addition, we map interactions at the level of individual subunits between the alternative clamp loader/clamp system, Rad17-RFC(2-5)/Rad9-Rad1-Hus1. The proposed models of interaction between two clamp/clamp loader pairs provide both structural framework for interpretation of existing experimental data and a number of specific findings that can be subjected to direct experimental

  15. Characterization of molecular association of poly(2-oxazoline)s-based micelles with various epoxides and diols via the Flory-Huggins theory: a molecular dynamics simulation approach.

    PubMed

    Chun, Byeong Jae; Lu, Jie; Weck, Marcus; Jang, Seung Soon

    2015-11-21

    The hydrolytic kinetic resolution (HKR) of epoxides has been performed in a shell-crosslinked micellar (SCM) nanoreactor consisting of amphiphilic triblock copolymers based on poly(2-oxazline)s polymer derivatives with attached Co(iii)-salens to the micelle core. To investigate the effect of the molecular interaction of reactant/product molecules with the SCM nanoreactor on the rate of HKR, we calculated the Flory-Huggins interaction parameters (χ) using the molecular dynamics simulation method. For this, the blend systems were constructed with various compositions such as 15, 45, and 70 wt% of the reactant/product molecules with respect to the polymers such as poly(2-methyl-2-oxazoline) (PMOX), poly(2-(3-butinyl)2-oxazoline) (PBOX), and poly(methyl-3-oxazol-2-yl)pentanoate with Co(iii)-salen (PSCoX). From the χ parameters, we demonstrate that the miscibility of reactants/products with polymers has a strong correlation with the experimental reaction rate of the HKR: phenyl glycidyl ether (Reac-OPh) > epoxyhexane (Reac-C4) > styrene oxide (Reac-Ph) > epichlorohydrin (Reac-Cl). To validate this finding, we also conducted the potential of mean force analysis using steered molecular dynamics simulation for the molecular displacement of Reac-Cl and Reac-OPh through PMOX and PSCoX, revealing that the free energy reduction was greater when Reac-OPh molecule enters the polymer phase compared to Reac-Cl, which agrees with the findings from the χ parameters calculations.

  16. A WAO - ARIA - GA²LEN consensus document on molecular-based allergy diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Canonica, Giorgio Walter; Ansotegui, Ignacio J; Pawankar, Ruby; Schmid-Grendelmeier, Peter; van Hage, Marianne; Baena-Cagnani, Carlos E; Melioli, Giovanni; Nunes, Carlos; Passalacqua, Giovanni; Rosenwasser, Lanny; Sampson, Hugh; Sastre, Joaquin; Bousquet, Jean; Zuberbier, Torsten

    2013-10-03

    Molecular-based allergy (MA) diagnostics is an approach used to map the allergen sensitization of a patient at a molecular level, using purified natural or recombinant allergenic molecules (allergen components) instead of allergen extracts. Since its introduction, MA diagnostics has increasingly entered routine care, with currently more than 130 allergenic molecules commercially available for in vitro specific IgE (sIgE) testing.MA diagnostics allows for an increased accuracy in allergy diagnosis and prognosis and plays an important role in three key aspects of allergy diagnosis: (1) resolving genuine versus cross-reactive sensitization in poly-sensitized patients, thereby improving the understanding of triggering allergens; (2) assessing, in selected cases, the risk of severe, systemic versus mild, local reactions in food allergy, thereby reducing unnecessary anxiety for the patient and the need for food challenge testing; and (3) identifying patients and triggering allergens for specific immunotherapy (SIT).Singleplex and multiplex measurement platforms are available for MA diagnostics. The Immuno-Solid phase Allergen Chip (ISAC) is the most comprehensive platform currently available, which involves a biochip technology to measure sIgE antibodies against more than one hundred allergenic molecules in a single assay. As the field of MA diagnostics advances, future work needs to focus on large-scale, population-based studies involving practical applications, elucidation and expansion of additional allergenic molecules, and support for appropriate test interpretation. With the rapidly expanding evidence-base for MA diagnosis, there is a need for allergists to keep abreast of the latest information. The aim of this consensus document is to provide a practical guide for the indications, determination, and interpretation of MA diagnostics for clinicians trained in allergology.

  17. A WAO - ARIA - GA²LEN consensus document on molecular-based allergy diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Molecular-based allergy (MA) diagnostics is an approach used to map the allergen sensitization of a patient at a molecular level, using purified natural or recombinant allergenic molecules (allergen components) instead of allergen extracts. Since its introduction, MA diagnostics has increasingly entered routine care, with currently more than 130 allergenic molecules commercially available for in vitro specific IgE (sIgE) testing. MA diagnostics allows for an increased accuracy in allergy diagnosis and prognosis and plays an important role in three key aspects of allergy diagnosis: (1) resolving genuine versus cross-reactive sensitization in poly-sensitized patients, thereby improving the understanding of triggering allergens; (2) assessing, in selected cases, the risk of severe, systemic versus mild, local reactions in food allergy, thereby reducing unnecessary anxiety for the patient and the need for food challenge testing; and (3) identifying patients and triggering allergens for specific immunotherapy (SIT). Singleplex and multiplex measurement platforms are available for MA diagnostics. The Immuno-Solid phase Allergen Chip (ISAC) is the most comprehensive platform currently available, which involves a biochip technology to measure sIgE antibodies against more than one hundred allergenic molecules in a single assay. As the field of MA diagnostics advances, future work needs to focus on large-scale, population-based studies involving practical applications, elucidation and expansion of additional allergenic molecules, and support for appropriate test interpretation. With the rapidly expanding evidence-base for MA diagnosis, there is a need for allergists to keep abreast of the latest information. The aim of this consensus document is to provide a practical guide for the indications, determination, and interpretation of MA diagnostics for clinicians trained in allergology. PMID:24090398

  18. Structural changes in a Schiff base molecular assembly initiated by scanning tunneling microscopy tip.

    PubMed

    Tomak, A; Bacaksiz, C; Mendirek, G; Sahin, H; Hur, D; Görgün, K; Senger, R T; Birer, Ö; Peeters, F M; Zareie, H M

    2016-08-19

    We report the controlled self-organization and switching of newly designed Schiff base (E)-4-((4-(phenylethynyl) benzylidene) amino) benzenethiol (EPBB) molecules on a Au (111) surface at room temperature. Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM/STS) were used to image and analyze the conformational changes of the EPBB molecules. The conformational change of the molecules was induced by using the STM tip while increasing the tunneling current. The switching of a domain or island of molecules was shown to be induced by the STM tip during scanning. Unambiguous fingerprints of the switching mechanism were observed via STM/STS measurements. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering was employed, to control and identify quantitatively the switching mechanism of molecules in a monolayer. Density functional theory calculations were also performed in order to understand the microscopic details of the switching mechanism. These calculations revealed that the molecular switching behavior stemmed from the strong interaction of the EPBB molecules with the STM tip. Our approach to controlling intermolecular mechanics provides a path towards the bottom-up assembly of more sophisticated molecular machines.

  19. Multispectral excitation based multiple fluorescent targets resolving in fluorescence molecular tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yuan; Guang, Huizhi; Pu, Huangsheng; Zhang, Jiulou; Bai, Jing; Luo, Jianwen

    2016-04-01

    Fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) can visualize biological activities at cellular and molecular levels in vivo, and has been extensively used in drug delivery and tumor detection research of small animals. The ill-posedness of the FMT inverse problem makes it difficult to reconstruct and resolve multiple adjacent fluorescent targets that have different functional features but are labeled with the same fluorochrome. An algorithm based on independent component analysis (ICA) for multispectral excited FMT is proposed to resolve multiple fluorescent targets in this study. Fluorescent targets are excited by multispectral excitation, and the three-dimensional distribution of fluorescent yields under the excitation spectrum is reconstructed by an iterative Tikhonov regularization algorithm. Subsequently, multiple fluorescent targets are resolved from mixed fluorescence signals by employing ICA. Simulations were performed and the results demonstrate that multiple adjacent fluorescent targets can be resolved if the number of excitation wavelengths is not smaller than that of fluorescent targets with different concentrations. The algorithm obtains both independent components that provide spatial information of different fluorescent targets and spectral courses that reflect variation trends of fluorescent yields along with the excitation spectrum. By using this method, it is possible to visualize the metabolism status of drugs in different structure organs, and quantitatively depict the variation trends of fluorescent yields of each functional organ under the excitation spectrum. This method may provide a pattern for tumor detection, drug delivery and treatment monitoring in vivo.

  20. Single palindromic molecular beacon-based amplification for genetic analysis of cancers.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Zhao, Hui; Wang, Zheng-Yong; Wu, Zai-Sheng; Yang, Zhe; Li, Cong-Cong; Xu, Huo; Lyu, Jian-Xin; Shen, Zhi-Fa

    2017-05-15

    The detection of biomarkers is of crucial importance in reducing the morbidity and mortality of complex diseases. Thus, there is a great desire to develop highly efficient and simple sensing methods to fulfill the different diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. Herein, using tumor suppressor p53 gene as model target DNA, we developed a novel palindromic fragment-incorporated molecular beacon (P-MB) that can perform multiple functions, including recognition element, signal reporter, polymerization template and primer. Upon specific hybridization with target DNA, P-MBs can interact with each other and are extended by polymerase without any additional probes. As a result, hybridized targets are peeled off from P-MBs and initiate the next round of reactions, leading to the unique strand displacement amplification (SDA). The newly-proposed enzymatic amplification displays the detection limit as low as 100pM and excellent selectivity in distinguishing single-base mutation with the linear response range from 100pM to 75nM. This is the simplest SDA sensing system so far because of only involving one type of DNA probe. This impressive sensing paradigm is expected to provide new insight into developing new-type of DNA probes that hold tremendous potential with important applications in molecular biology research and clinical diagnosis.

  1. "Off-On"switching electrochemiluminescence biosensor for mercury(II) detection based on molecular recognition technology.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lin; Wei, BingGuo; He, Ling Ling; Mao, Ling; Zhang, Jie; Ceng, JinXiang; Kong, DeRong; Chen, ChaDan; Cui, HanFeng; Hong, Nian; Fan, Hao

    2017-02-01

    A novel "off-On" electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) biosensor has been developed for the detection of mercury(II) based on molecular recognition technology. The ECL mercury(II) biosensor comprises two main parts: an ECL substrate and an ECL intensity switch. The ECL substrate was made by modifying the complex of Ruthenium(II) tris-(bipyridine)(Ru(bpy)3(2+))/Cyclodextrins-Au nanoparticles(CD-AuNps)/Nafion on the surface of glass carbon electrode (GCE), and the ECL intensity switch is the single hairpin DNA probe designed according to the "molecular recognition" strategy which was functionalized with ferrocene tag at one end and attached to Cyclodextrins (CD) on modified GCE through supramolecular noncovalent interaction. We demonstrated that, in the absence of Hg(II) ion, the probe keeps single hairpin structure and resulted in a quenching of ECL of Ru(bpy)3(2+). Whereas, in the presence of Hg(II) ion, the probe prefers to form the T-Hg(II)-T complex and lead to an obvious recovery of ECL of Ru(bpy)3(2+), which provided a sensing platform for the detection of Hg(II) ion. Using this sensing platform, a simple, rapid and selective "off-On" ECL biosensor for the detection of mercury(II) with a detection limit of 0.1 nM has been developed.

  2. UV curable lens production using molecular weight controlled PEEK based acrylic oligomer (Ac-PEEK).

    PubMed

    İnan, Tulay Y; Yıldız, Emel; Karaca, Birsen; Dogan, Hacer; Vatansever, Alican; Nalbant, Muhammed; Eken, Koray

    2014-08-01

    We produced UV curable lenses with properties blocking short wave UV light. In the UV-curable formulations, we used an oligomer (Ac-PEEK) with another urethan oligomer (Mw = 2000). Radically active, molecular weight controlled Ac-PEEK was obtained by reacting 2-hydroxyl ethyl methacrylate with molecular- weight- controlled and isocyanate terminated PEEK (Mn = 4500). We characterized all synthesized monomer, oligomer and optical materials with UV/Vis spectrophotometer with interferogram, elemental analyser, mass spectrophotometer, proton nuclear magnetic resonance, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analyzer, differential scanning calorimeter, scanning electron microscopy and gas chromatography. Results suggested that newly synthesized oligomer with the structure of PEEK absorbs short wave UV-light. Ageing tests [ISO 11979-5, Ophthalmic implants-intraocular lenses (IOL)-Part 5: Biocompatibility] performed on the IOL materials were successful. High contact angle of the obtained lenses suggests that all lenses were hydrophobic and SEM results revealed that lenses are morphologically homogeneous. Based on all positive properties just mentioned, we safely conclude that the lenses produced in this study are very promising for IOL production.

  3. Molecular targets of Chinese herbs: a clinical study of hepatoma based on network pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Li; Wang, Xiao-dong; Niu, Yang-yang; Duan, Dan-dan; Yang, Xue; Hao, Jian; Zhu, Cui-hong; Chen, Dan; Wang, Ke-xin; Qin, Xue-mei; Wu, Xiong-zhi

    2016-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has been used to treat tumors for years and has been demonstrated to be effective. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of herbs remain unclear. This study aims to ascertain molecular targets of herbs prolonging survival time of patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) based on network pharmacology, and to establish a research method for accurate treatment of TCM. The survival benefit of TCM treatment with Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) was proved by Kaplan–Meier method and Cox regression analysis among 288 patients. The correlation between herbs and survival time was performed by bivariate correlation analysis. Network pharmacology method was utilized to construct the active ingredient-target networks of herbs that were responsible for the beneficial effects against HCC. Cox regression analysis showed CHM was an independent favorable prognostic factor. The median survival time was 13 months and the 5-year overall survival rates were 2.61% in the TCM group, while there were 6 months, 0 in the non-TCM group. Correlation analysis demonstrated that 8 herbs closely associated with prognosis. Network pharmacology analysis revealed that the 8 herbs regulated multiple HCC relative genes, among which the genes affected proliferation (KRAS, AKT2, MAPK), metastasis (SRC, MMP), angiogenesis (PTGS2) and apoptosis (CASP3) etc. PMID:27143508

  4. Molecular targets of Chinese herbs: a clinical study of hepatoma based on network pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Gao, Li; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Niu, Yang-Yang; Duan, Dan-Dan; Yang, Xue; Hao, Jian; Zhu, Cui-Hong; Chen, Dan; Wang, Ke-Xin; Qin, Xue-Mei; Wu, Xiong-Zhi

    2016-05-04

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has been used to treat tumors for years and has been demonstrated to be effective. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of herbs remain unclear. This study aims to ascertain molecular targets of herbs prolonging survival time of patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) based on network pharmacology, and to establish a research method for accurate treatment of TCM. The survival benefit of TCM treatment with Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) was proved by Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression analysis among 288 patients. The correlation between herbs and survival time was performed by bivariate correlation analysis. Network pharmacology method was utilized to construct the active ingredient-target networks of herbs that were responsible for the beneficial effects against HCC. Cox regression analysis showed CHM was an independent favorable prognostic factor. The median survival time was 13 months and the 5-year overall survival rates were 2.61% in the TCM group, while there were 6 months, 0 in the non-TCM group. Correlation analysis demonstrated that 8 herbs closely associated with prognosis. Network pharmacology analysis revealed that the 8 herbs regulated multiple HCC relative genes, among which the genes affected proliferation (KRAS, AKT2, MAPK), metastasis (SRC, MMP), angiogenesis (PTGS2) and apoptosis (CASP3) etc.

  5. Electrochemical sensor based on magnetic molecularly imprinted nanoparticles modified magnetic electrode for determination of Hb.

    PubMed

    Sun, Binghua; Ni, Xinjiong; Cao, Yuhua; Cao, Guangqun

    2017-05-15

    A fast and selective electrochemical sensor for determination of hemoglobin (Hb) was developed based on magnetic molecularly imprinted nanoparticles modified on the magnetic glassy carbon electrode. The nanoparticles Fe3O4@SiO2 with a magnetic core and a molecularly imprinted shell had regular structures and good monodispersity. Hb could be determined directly by electrochemical oxidization with the modified electrode. A magnetic field increased electrochemical response to Hb by two times. Imprinting Hb on the surface of Fe3O4@SiO2 shortened the response time within 7min. Under optimum conditions, the imprinting factor toward the non-imprinted sensor was 2.8, and the separation factor of Hb to horseradish peroxidase was 2.6. The oxidation peak current had a linear relationship with Hb concentration ranged from 0.005mg/ml to 0.1mg/ml with a detection limit (S/N =3) of 0.0010mg/ml. The sensors were successfully applied to analysis of Hb in whole blood samples with recoveries between 95.7% and 105%.

  6. DNA molecular beacon-based plastic biochip: a versatile and sensitive scanometric detection platform.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaoli; Wen, Jing; Li, Yunchao; Zheng, Yue; Zhou, Jianjun; Li, Xiaohong; Yu, Hua-Zhong

    2014-12-24

    In this paper, we report a novel DNA molecular beacon (MB)-based plastic biochip platform for scanometric detection of a range of analytical targets. Hairpin DNA strands, which are dually modified with amino and biotin groups at their two ends are immobilized on a disposable plastic (polycarbonate) substrate as recognition element and gold nanoparticle-assisted silver-staining as signal reading protocol. Initially, the immobilized DNA probes are in their folded forms; upon target binding the hairpin secondary structure of the probe strand is "forced" open (i.e., converted to the unfolded state). Nanogold-streptavidin conjugates can then bind the terminal biotin groups and promote the deposition of rather large silver particles which can be either directly visualized or quantified with a standard flatbed scanner. We demonstrate that with properly designed probe sequences and optimized preparation conditions, a range of molecular targets, such as DNA strands, proteins (thrombin) and heavy metal ions (Hg(2+)), can be detected with high sensitivity and excellent selectivity. The detection can be done in both standard physiological buffers and real world samples. This constitutes a platform technology for performing rapid, sensitive, cost-effective, and point-of-care (POC) chemical analysis and medical diagnosis.

  7. Analysis of low molecular weight metabolites in tea using mass spectrometry-based analytical methods.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Karl; Harrison, Scott J; Lane, Geoff A; Otter, Don E; Hemar, Yacine; Quek, Siew-Young; Rasmussen, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Tea is the second most consumed beverage in the world after water and there are numerous reported health benefits as a result of consuming tea, such as reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease and many types of cancer. Thus, there is much interest in the chemical composition of teas, for example; defining components responsible for contributing to reported health benefits; defining quality characteristics such as product flavor; and monitoring for pesticide residues to comply with food safety import/export requirements. Covered in this review are some of the latest developments in mass spectrometry-based analytical techniques for measuring and characterizing low molecular weight components of tea, in particular primary and secondary metabolites. The methodology; more specifically the chromatography and detection mechanisms used in both targeted and non-targeted studies, and their main advantages and disadvantages are discussed. Finally, we comment on the latest techniques that are likely to have significant benefit to analysts in the future, not merely in the area of tea research, but in the analytical chemistry of low molecular weight compounds in general.

  8. Anisotropy induced Kondo splitting in a mechanically stretched molecular junction: A first-principles based study

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaoli; Hou, Dong; Zheng, Xiao; Yan, YiJing

    2016-01-21

    The magnetic anisotropy and Kondo phenomena in a mechanically stretched magnetic molecular junction are investigated by combining the density functional theory (DFT) and hierarchical equations of motion (HEOM) approach. The system is comprised of a magnetic complex Co(tpy–SH){sub 2} sandwiched between adjacent gold electrodes, which is mechanically stretched in experiments done by Parks et al. [Science 328, 1370 (2010)]. The electronic structure and mechanical property of the stretched system are investigated via the DFT calculations. The HEOM approach is then employed to characterize the Kondo resonance features, based on the Anderson impurity model parameterized from the DFT results. It is confirmed that the ground state prefers the S = 1 local spin state. The structural properties, the magnetic anisotropy, and corresponding Kondo peak splitting in the axial stretching process are systematically evaluated. The results reveal that the strong electron correlations and the local magnetic properties of the molecule magnet are very sensitive to structural distortion. This work demonstrates that the combined DFT+HEOM approach could be useful in understanding and designing mechanically controlled molecular junctions.

  9. Anisotropy induced Kondo splitting in a mechanically stretched molecular junction: A first-principles based study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoli; Hou, Dong; Zheng, Xiao; Yan, YiJing

    2016-01-01

    The magnetic anisotropy and Kondo phenomena in a mechanically stretched magnetic molecular junction are investigated by combining the density functional theory (DFT) and hierarchical equations of motion (HEOM) approach. The system is comprised of a magnetic complex Co(tpy-SH)2 sandwiched between adjacent gold electrodes, which is mechanically stretched in experiments done by Parks et al. [Science 328, 1370 (2010)]. The electronic structure and mechanical property of the stretched system are investigated via the DFT calculations. The HEOM approach is then employed to characterize the Kondo resonance features, based on the Anderson impurity model parameterized from the DFT results. It is confirmed that the ground state prefers the S = 1 local spin state. The structural properties, the magnetic anisotropy, and corresponding Kondo peak splitting in the axial stretching process are systematically evaluated. The results reveal that the strong electron correlations and the local magnetic properties of the molecule magnet are very sensitive to structural distortion. This work demonstrates that the combined DFT+HEOM approach could be useful in understanding and designing mechanically controlled molecular junctions.

  10. Self-assembly formation of palm-based esters nano-emulsion: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul Rahman, Mohd. Basyaruddin; Huan, Qiu-Yi; Tejo, Bimo A.; Basri, Mahiran; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha Abdul

    2009-10-01

    Palm-oil esters (POEs) are unsaturated and non-ionic esters that can be prepared by enzymatic synthesis from palm oil. Their nano-emulsion properties possess great potential to act as drug carrier for transdermal drug delivery system. A ratio of 75:5:20 (water/POEs/Span20) was chosen from homogenous region in the phase diagram of our previous experimental work to undergo molecular dynamics simulation. A 15 ns molecular dynamics simulation of nano-emulsion system (water/POEs/Span20) was carried out using OPLS-AA force field. The aggregations of the oil and surfactant molecules are observed throughout the simulation. After 8 ns of simulation, the molecules start to aggregate to form one spherical micelle where the POEs molecules are surrounded by the non-ionic surfactant (Span20) molecules with an average size of 4.2 ± 0.05 nm. The size of the micelle and the ability of palm-based nano-emulsion to self-assemble suggest that this nano-emulsion can potentially use in transdermal drug delivery system.

  11. Terahertz spectra of biotin based on first principle, molecular mechanical, and hybrid simulations.

    PubMed

    Bykhovski, Alexei; Woolard, Dwight

    2013-07-01

    Terahertz (THz) absorption of biotin was simulated using the first principle and the density functional theory (DFT) both in the harmonic approximation and with corrections for the anharmonicity. Anharmonicity corrections were calculated using two different approaches. First, the perturbation theory-based first principle calculations were performed to include third- and fourth-order anharmonicity corrections in atomic displacements to harmonic vibrational states. Second, the atom-centered density matrix propagation molecular dynamics model that provides a good energy conservation was used to calculate the atomic trajectories, velocities, and a dipole moment time history of biotin at low and room temperatures. Predicted low-THz lines agree well with the experimental spectra. The influence of the polyethylene (PE) matrix embedment on the THz spectra of biotin at the nanoscale was studied using the developed hybrid DFT/molecular mechanical approach. While PE is almost transparent at THz frequencies, additional low-THz lines are predicted in the biotin/PE system, which reflects a dynamic interaction between biotin and a surrounding PE cavity.

  12. Phylogenetic reconstruction of Syntermitinae (Isoptera, Termitidae) based on morphological and molecular data

    PubMed Central

    Cuezzo, Carolina; Cancello, Eliana M.

    2017-01-01

    The subfamily Syntermitinae comprises a group of Neotropical termites with 18 genera and 101 species described. It has been considered a natural group, but relationships among the genera within the subfamily remain uncertain, and some genera appear to be non-monophyletic. Here, we provide a comprehensive phylogeny including six Neotropical species of Termitinae as outgroup, 42 Syntermitinae species as ingroup, 92 morphological characters (from external and internal anatomy of soldier and worker castes) and 117 molecular sequences (109 obtained for this study and 8 from GenBank) of 4 gene regions (41 and 22 from Cytochrome Oxidase I and II respectively, 19 from Cytochrome b, and 35 from 16S rDNA). Morphological and molecular data were analyzed in combination, with the Bayesian inference method, and the important aspects of termite biology, defense and feeding habits are discussed based on the resulting tree. Although useful for providing diagnostic characters, the morphology of the soldier caste reveals several cases of convergence; whereas the feeding habit shows indications of evolutionary significance. PMID:28329010

  13. Nanomaterials for diagnosis: challenges and applications in smart devices based on molecular recognition.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Osvaldo N; Iost, Rodrigo M; Siqueira, José R; Crespilho, Frank N; Caseli, Luciano

    2014-09-10

    Clinical diagnosis has always been dependent on the efficient immobilization of biomolecules in solid matrices with preserved activity, but significant developments have taken place in recent years with the increasing control of molecular architecture in organized films. Of particular importance is the synergy achieved with distinct materials such as nanoparticles, antibodies, enzymes, and other nanostructures, forming structures organized on the nanoscale. In this review, emphasis will be placed on nanomaterials for biosensing based on molecular recognition, where the recognition element may be an enzyme, DNA, RNA, catalytic antibody, aptamer, and labeled biomolecule. All of these elements may be assembled in nanostructured films, whose layer-by-layer nature is essential for combining different properties in the same device. Sensing can be done with a number of optical, electrical, and electrochemical methods, which may also rely on nanostructures for enhanced performance, as is the case of reporting nanoparticles in bioelectronics devices. The successful design of such devices requires investigation of interface properties of functionalized surfaces, for which a variety of experimental and theoretical methods have been used. Because diagnosis involves the acquisition of large amounts of data, statistical and computational methods are now in widespread use, and one may envisage an integrated expert system where information from different sources may be mined to generate the diagnostics.

  14. Molecular quantum spintronics: supramolecular spin valves based on single-molecule magnets and carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Urdampilleta, Matias; Nguyen, Ngoc-Viet; Cleuziou, Jean-Pierre; Klyatskaya, Svetlana; Ruben, Mario; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    We built new hybrid devices consisting of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) grown carbon nanotube (CNT) transistors, decorated with TbPc(2) (Pc = phthalocyanine) rare-earth based single-molecule magnets (SMMs). The drafting was achieved by tailoring supramolecular π-π interactions between CNTs and SMMs. The magnetoresistance hysteresis loop measurements revealed steep steps, which we can relate to the magnetization reversal of individual SMMs. Indeed, we established that the electronic transport properties of these devices depend strongly on the relative magnetization orientations of the grafted SMMs. The SMMs are playing the role of localized spin polarizer and analyzer on the CNT electronic conducting channel. As a result, we measured magneto-resistance ratios up to several hundred percent. We used this spin valve effect to confirm the strong uniaxial anisotropy and the superparamagnetic blocking temperature (T(B) ~ 1 K) of isolated TbPc(2) SMMs. For the first time, the strength of exchange interaction between the different SMMs of the molecular spin valve geometry could be determined. Our results introduce a new design for operable molecular spintronic devices using the quantum effects of individual SMMs.

  15. High-temperature molecular magnets based on cyanovanadate building blocks: spontaneous magnetization at 230 k.

    PubMed

    Entley, W R; Girolami, G S

    1995-04-21

    The molecular-based magnetic materials Cs(2)Mn(||)[V(||)(CN)(6)] (1) and (Et(4)N)(0.5)Mn(l.25)- [V(CN)(5)].2H(2)O (2) (where Et is ethyl) were prepared by the addition of manganese(II) triflate to aqueous solutions of the hexacyanovanadate(II) ion at 0 degrees C. Whereas 1 crystallizes in a face-centered cubic lattice, 2 crystallizes in a noncubic space group. The cesium salt (1) has features characteristic of a three-dimensional ferrimagnet with a Néel transition at 125 kelvin. The tetraethylammonium salt (2) also behaves as a three-dimensional ferrimagnet with a Néel temperature of 230 kelvin; only two other molecular magnets have higher magnetic ordering temperatures. Saturation magnetization measurements indicate that in both compounds the V(II) and high-spin Mn(II) centers are antiferromagnetically coupled. Both 1 and 2 exhibit hysteresis loops characteristic of soft magnets below their magnetic phase-transition temperatures. The high magnetic ordering temperatures of these cyano-bridged solids confirm that the incorporation of early transition elements into the lattice promotes stronger magnetic coupling by enhancing the backbonding into the cyanide pi* orbitals.

  16. Two-temperature model in molecular dynamics simulations of cascades in Ni-based alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Zarkadoula, Eva; Samolyuk, German; Weber, William J.

    2017-01-03

    In high-energy irradiation events, energy from the fast moving ion is transferred to the system via nuclear and electronic energy loss mechanisms. The nuclear energy loss results in the creation of point defects and clusters, while the energy transferred to the electrons results in the creation of high electronic temperatures, which can affect the damage evolution. In this paper, we perform molecular dynamics simulations of 30 keV and 50 keV Ni ion cascades in nickel-based alloys without and with the electronic effects taken into account. We compare the results of classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, where the electronic effects aremore » ignored, with results from simulations that include the electronic stopping only, as well as simulations where both the electronic stopping and the electron-phonon coupling are incorporated, as described by the two temperature model (2T-MD). Finally, our results indicate that the 2T-MD leads to a smaller amount of damage, more isolated defects and smaller defect clusters.« less

  17. Molecular Quantum Spintronics: Supramolecular Spin Valves Based on Single-Molecule Magnets and Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Urdampilleta, Matias; Nguyen, Ngoc-Viet; Cleuziou, Jean-Pierre; Klyatskaya, Svetlana; Ruben, Mario; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    We built new hybrid devices consisting of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) grown carbon nanotube (CNT) transistors, decorated with TbPc2 (Pc = phthalocyanine) rare-earth based single-molecule magnets (SMMs). The drafting was achieved by tailoring supramolecular π-π interactions between CNTs and SMMs. The magnetoresistance hysteresis loop measurements revealed steep steps, which we can relate to the magnetization reversal of individual SMMs. Indeed, we established that the electronic transport properties of these devices depend strongly on the relative magnetization orientations of the grafted SMMs. The SMMs are playing the role of localized spin polarizer and analyzer on the CNT electronic conducting channel. As a result, we measured magneto-resistance ratios up to several hundred percent. We used this spin valve effect to confirm the strong uniaxial anisotropy and the superparamagnetic blocking temperature (TB ~ 1 K) of isolated TbPc2 SMMs. For the first time, the strength of exchange interaction between the different SMMs of the molecular spin valve geometry could be determined. Our results introduce a new design for operable molecular spintronic devices using the quantum effects of individual SMMs. PMID:22072910

  18. Species identification in the genus Saprolegnia (Oomycetes): defining DNA-based molecular operational taxonomic units.

    PubMed

    Sandoval-Sierra, Jose Vladimir; Martín, María P; Diéguez-Uribeondo, Javier

    2014-07-01

    The lack of a robust taxonomy in the genus Saprolegnia is leading to the presence of incorrectly named isolates in culture collections and of an increasing number of misassigned sequences in DNA databases. Accurate species delimitation is critical for most biological disciplines. A recently proposed approach to solve species delimitation (taxonomic diagnosis system) of difficult organisms is the definition of molecular operational taxonomic units (MOTUs). We have used 961 sequences of nrDNA ITS from culture collections (461 sequences) and GenBank (500 sequences), to perform phylogenetic and clustering optimization analyses. As result, we have identified 29 DNA-based MOTUs in agreement with phylogenetic studies. The resulting molecular clusters support the validity of 18 species of Saprolegnia and identify 11 potential new ones. We have also listed a number of incorrectly named isolates in culture collections, misassigned species names to GenBank sequences, and reference sequences for the species. We conclude that GenBank represents the main source of errors for identifying Saprolegnia species since it possesses sequences with misassigned names and also sequencing errors. The presented taxonomic diagnosis system might help setting the basis for a suitable identification of species in this economically important genus.

  19. Enabling Metabolomics Based Biomarker Discovery Studies Using Molecular Phenotyping of Exosome-Like Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Altadill, Tatiana; Campoy, Irene; Lanau, Lucia; Gill, Kirandeep; Rigau, Marina; Gil-Moreno, Antonio; Reventos, Jaume; Byers, Stephen; Colas, Eva; Cheema, Amrita K.

    2016-01-01

    Identification of sensitive and specific biomarkers with clinical and translational utility will require smart experimental strategies that would augment expanding the breadth and depth of molecular measurements within the constraints of currently available technologies. Exosomes represent an information rich matrix to discern novel disease mechanisms that are thought to contribute to pathologies such as dementia and cancer. Although proteomics and transcriptomic studies have been reported using Exosomes-Like Vesicles (ELVs) from different sources, exosomal metabolome characterization and its modulation in health and disease remains to be elucidated. Here we describe methodologies for UPLC-ESI-MS based small molecule profiling of ELVs from human plasma and cell culture media. In this study, we present evidence that indeed ELVs carry a rich metabolome that could not only augment the discovery of low abundance biomarkers but may also help explain the molecular basis of disease progression. This approach could be easily translated to other studies seeking to develop predictive biomarkers that can subsequently be used with simplified targeted approaches. PMID:26974972

  20. A boosting approach for adapting the sparsity of risk prediction signatures based on different molecular levels.

    PubMed

    Sariyar, Murat; Schumacher, Martin; Binder, Harald

    2014-06-01

    Risk prediction models can link high-dimensional molecular measurements, such as DNA methylation, to clinical endpoints. For biological interpretation, often a sparse fit is desirable. Different molecular aggregation levels, such as considering DNA methylation at the CpG, gene, or chromosome level, might demand different degrees of sparsity. Hence, model building and estimation techniques should be able to adapt their sparsity according to the setting. Additionally, underestimation of coefficients, which is a typical problem of sparse techniques, should also be addressed. We propose a comprehensive approach, based on a boosting technique that allows a flexible adaptation of model sparsity and addresses these problems in an integrative way. The main motivation is to have an automatic sparsity adaptation. In a simulation study, we show that this approach reduces underestimation in sparse settings and selects more adequate model sizes than the corresponding non-adaptive boosting technique in non-sparse settings. Using different aggregation levels of DNA methylation data from a study in kidney carcinoma patients, we illustrate how automatically selected values of the sparsity tuning parameter can reflect the underlying structure of the data. In addition to that, prediction performance and variable selection stability is compared to the non-adaptive boosting approach.

  1. Molecular study of Trypanosoma caninum isolates based on different genetic markers.

    PubMed

    Barros, Juliana H S; Toma, Helena K; de Fatima Madeira, Maria

    2015-02-01

    Trypanosoma caninum is a parasite recently described in dogs, whose life cycle is rather unknown. Here, we performed a genetic study with T. caninum samples obtained in different Brazilian regions. The study was based on PCR assays target to small and large subunit ribosomal DNA (rDNA) (18S rDNA and 24Sα rDNA), cytochrome B (Cyt b), and internal transcribed spacer 1 rDNA (ITS1 rDNA) following by the sequence analysis. Additionally, we used primers for the variable regions of kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) minicircles and endonucleases restriction in the ITS1 rDNA amplification product. T. caninum samples displayed the same patterns. Tree construction confirmed the close relationship between T. caninum samples, regardless of the molecular target used and endonuclease restriction digestion revealed that all samples have the same restriction profile. Therefore, T. caninum seems to be a genetically homogeneous specie. In the kDNA assay, T. caninum possessed a different molecular size profile with respect to others trypanosomes, 330 and 350 bp. This study provides nucleotide sequences from different regions of the genome of T. caninum that certainly facilitate future studies.

  2. Validity of the bear tapeworm Diphyllobothrium ursi (Cestoda: Diphyllobothriidae) based on morphological and molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Hiroshi; Muto, Maki; Yamada, Minoru; Arizono, Naoki; Rausch, Robert L

    2012-12-01

    The bear tapeworm Diphyllobothrium ursi is described based upon the morphology of adult tapeworms recovered from the brown bear (Ursus arctos middendorffi) and larval plerocercoids found in sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) from Kodiak Island in Alaska in 1952. However, in 1987 D. ursi was synonymized with Diphyllobothrium dendriticum, and the taxonomic relationship between both species has not subsequently been revised. In this study mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 gene (cox1) sequences of holotype and paratype D. ursi specimens that had been preserved in a formalin-acetic acid-alcohol solution since the time the species was initially described approximately 60 yr ago were analyzed. Molecular and phylogenetic analysis of the cox1 sequences revealed that D. ursi is more closely related to D. dendriticum than it is to Diphyllobothrium nihonkaiense and Diphyllobothrium latum. In addition to molecular evidence, differences in the life cycle and ecology of the larval plerocercoids between D. ursi and D. dendriticum also suggest that D. ursi is a distinct species, separate from D. dendriticum and D. nihonkaiense, and also possibly from D. latum .

  3. Xanthine microsensor based on polypyrrole molecularly imprinted film modified carbon fiber microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Wang, Xiao-Li; Lian, Hui-Ting; Sun, Xiang-Ying

    2013-09-15

    A molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) microsensor was presented as a carbon fiber microelectrode (CFME) coating for specifically recognizing xanthine (Xan). The polymeric film was obtained based on the imprinted procedure of electropolymerization of pyrrole in the presence of the template molecule Xan by cyclic voltammetry, and template was removed by magnetic stirring. Under the optimum conditions, a satisfactory molecularly binding selectivity of Xan was obtained from the MIPs microsensor with an imprinting factor (IF) of 6.63 and a linear response to concentration in certain ranges. The ranges are from 4.0 × 10⁻⁶ to 6.0 × 10⁻⁵ M and from 8.0 × 10⁻⁵ to 2.0 × 10⁻³ M with a detection limit of 2.5 × 10⁻⁷ M. Meanwhile, good stability (relative standard deviation [RSD] = 3.2%, n = 10) and reproducibility (RSD = 2.0%, n = 10) were observed, and recoveries ranging from 96.9 to 102.5% were calculated when applied to Xan determination in real blood serum samples.

  4. Magnetic-graphene based molecularly imprinted polymer nanocomposite for the recognition of bovine hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Guo, Junxia; Wang, Yuzhi; Liu, Yanjin; Zhang, Cenjin; Zhou, Yigang

    2015-11-01

    The protein imprinted technique combining surface imprinting and nanomaterials has been an attractive strategy for recognition and rapid separation of proteins. In this work, magnetic-graphene (MG) was chosen as the supporting substrate for the magnetic nanomaterials, which served to absorb the targeting imprinting molecules, bovine hemoglobin (BHb). Acryl amide (AAm) with a high affinity to BHb and N,N'- methylenebisacrylamide (MBA) were selected as the functional monomer and cross-linking agent, respectively. After in-situ polymerization, the proposed magnetic-graphene based molecularly imprinted polymer (MG-MIP) was obtained with a further extraction step of imprinted BHb. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), raman spectroscopy(RS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) were employed to characterize the resulted MG-MIP. The maximum adsorption capability (Qmax) was determined by Langmuir Isotherm Plots and was 186.73 mg/g for imprinted nanomaterials (MIP) with an imprinting factor of 1.96. The selectivity of MG-MIP was investigated by using several proteins that are different in molecular mass and isoelectric points as the reference. The results showed that the shape memory effect of imprinted cavities, the size of proteins and the charge effect of proteins were the major factors for the selective recognition. The proposed method was also employed to specifically capture BHb from a binary protein mixture.

  5. Molecular systematics of Volvocales (Chlorophyceae, Chlorophyta) based on exhaustive 18S rRNA phylogenetic analyses.

    PubMed

    Nakada, Takashi; Misawa, Kazuharu; Nozaki, Hisayoshi

    2008-07-01

    The taxonomy of Volvocales (Chlorophyceae, Chlorophyta) was traditionally based solely on morphological characteristics. However, because recent molecular phylogeny largely contradicts the traditional subordinal and familial classifications, no classification system has yet been established that describes the subdivision of Volvocales in a manner consistent with the phylogenetic relationships. Towards development of a natural classification system at and above the generic level, identification and sorting of hundreds of sequences based on subjective phylogenetic definitions is a significant step. We constructed an 18S rRNA gene phylogeny based on 449 volvocalean sequences collected using exhaustive BLAST searches of the GenBank database. Many chimeric sequences, which can cause fallacious phylogenetic trees, were detected and excluded during data collection. The results revealed 21 strongly supported primary clades within phylogenetically redefined Volvocales. Phylogenetic classification following PhyloCode was proposed based on the presented 18S rRNA gene phylogeny along with the results of previous combined 18S and 26S rRNA and chloroplast multigene analyses.

  6. Electroanalysis of myoglobin based on electropolymerized molecularly imprinted polymer poly-o-phenylenediamine and carbon nanotubes/screen printed electrode.

    PubMed

    Shumyantseva, V V; Bulko, T V; Sigolaeva, L V; Kuzikov, A V; Archakov, A I

    2016-05-01

    Electroanalysis of myoglobin as a marker of acute myocardial infarction by means of screenprinted electrodes modified with multiwalled carbon nanotubes and polymeric artificial antibodies is developed. Plastic antibodies to myoglobin (molecularly imprinted polymers, MIPs) based on o-phenylenediamine were produced by electropolymerization. Molecular imprinting technology in biosensor analysis was used as alternative to natural receptors (namely, antibodies) and demonstrated high sensitivity (1.5 × 10(-2) A/nmol of myoglobin) and selectivity.

  7. A Nanosensor for Explosives Detection Based on Molecularly Imprinted Polymers (MIPs) and Surfaced-enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    Imprinted Polymers ( MIPs ) and Surfaced- enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) Ellen Holthoff and Dimitra Stratis-Cullum Sensors and Electron Devices...for target chemical analytes of interest. Essentially, one creates a molecular “memory” within the imprinted polymer matrix. In a sensor format, the...A Nanosensor for Explosives Detection Based on Molecularly Imprinted Polymers ( MIPs ) and Surfaced- enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) by Ellen

  8. Research Update: Comparison of salt- and molecular-based iodine treatments of PbS nanocrystal solids for solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jähnig, Fabian; Bozyigit, Deniz; Yarema, Olesya; Wood, Vanessa

    2015-02-01

    Molecular- and salt-based chemical treatments are believed to passivate electronic trap states in nanocrystal-based semiconductors, which are considered promising for solar cells but suffer from high carrier recombination. Here, we compare the chemical, optical, and electronic properties of PbS nanocrystal-based solids treated with molecular iodine and tetrabutylammonium iodide. Surprisingly, both treatments increase—rather than decrease—the number density of trap states; however, the increase does not directly influence solar cell performance. We explain the origins of the observed impact on solar cell performance and the potential in using different chemical treatments to tune charge carrier dynamics in nanocrystal-solids.

  9. Low molecular weight PEI-based biodegradable lipopolymers as gene delivery vectors.

    PubMed

    Xun, Miao-Miao; Zhang, Xue-Chao; Zhang, Ji; Jiang, Qian-Qian; Yi, Wen-Jing; Zhu, Wen; Yu, Xiao-Qi

    2013-02-21

    Non-viral gene vectors play an important role in the development of gene therapy. In this report, different hydrophobic chains were introduced into low molecular weight (LMW) PEI-based biodegradable oligomers to form a series of lipopolymers (LPs), and their structure-activity relationships were studied. Results revealed that the nine polymers can condense plasmid DNA well to form nanoparticles with appropriate sizes (120-250 nm) and positive zeta-potentials (+25-40 V). In vitro experiments were carried out and it was found that LP2 showed much higher transfection efficiency both in the presence and in the absence of serum under the polymer/DNA weight ratio of 0.8 in A549 cells.

  10. Molecular mechanisms of biofilm-based antibiotic resistance and tolerance in pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hall, Clayton W; Mah, Thien-Fah

    2017-03-25

    Biofilms are surface-attached groups of microbial cells encased in an extracellular matrix that are significantly less susceptible to antimicrobial agents than non-adherent, planktonic cells. Biofilm-based infections are, as a result, extremely difficult to cure. A wide range of molecular mechanisms contribute to the high degree of recalcitrance that is characteristic of biofilm communities. These mechanisms include, among others, interaction of antimicrobials with biofilm matrix components, reduced growth rates and the various actions of specific genetic determinants of antibiotic resistance and tolerance. Alone, each of these mechanisms only partially accounts for the increased antimicrobial recalcitrance observed in biofilms. Acting in concert, however, these defences help to ensure the survival of biofilm cells in the face of even the most aggressive antimicrobial treatment regimens. This review summarises both historical and recent scientific data in support of the known biofilm resistance and tolerance mechanisms. Additionally, suggestions for future work in the field are provided.

  11. Reconstruction for Limited-Projection Fluorescence Molecular Tomography Based on a Double-Mesh Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xu; Peng, Jinye; Zhao, Fengjun; Wang, Xiaodong; Hou, Yuqing

    2016-01-01

    Limited-projection fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) has short data acquisition time that allows fast resolving of the three-dimensional visualization of fluorophore within small animal in vivo. However, limited-projection FMT reconstruction suffers from severe ill-posedness because only limited projections are used for reconstruction. To alleviate the ill-posedness, a feasible region extraction strategy based on a double mesh is presented for limited-projection FMT. First, an initial result is rapidly recovered using a coarse discretization mesh. Then, the reconstructed fluorophore area in the initial result is selected as a feasible region to guide the reconstruction using a fine discretization mesh. Simulation experiments on a digital mouse and small animal experiment in vivo are performed to validate the proposed strategy. It demonstrates that the presented strategy provides a good distribution of fluorophore with limited projections of fluorescence measurements. Hence, it is suitable for reconstruction of limited-projection FMT. PMID:27830148

  12. Wilsonosiphonia gen. nov. (Rhodomelaceae, Rhodophyta) based on molecular and morpho-anatomical characters.

    PubMed

    Bustamante, Danilo E; Won, Boo Yeon; Miller, Kathy Ann; Cho, Tae Oh

    2017-01-12

    Morphological, anatomical, and molecular sequence data were used to assess the establishment and phylogenetic position of the genus Wilsonosiphonia gen. nov. Phylogenies based on rbcL and concatenated rbcL and cox1 loci support recognition of Wilsonosiphonia gen. nov., sister to Herposiphonia. Diagnostic features for Wilsonosiphonia are rhizoids located at distal ends of pericentral cells and taproot-shaped multicellular tips of rhizoids. Wilsonosiphonia includes three species with diagnostic rbcL and cox1 sequences, Wilsonosiphonia fujiae sp. nov. (the generitype), W. howei comb. nov., and W. indica sp. nov. These three species resemble each other in external morphology, but W. fujiae is distinguished by having two tetrasporangia per segment rather than one, W. indica by having abundant and persistent trichoblasts, and W. howei by having few and deciduous trichoblasts.

  13. Spin Dynamics and Low Energy Vibrations: Insights from Vanadyl-Based Potential Molecular Qubits.

    PubMed

    Atzori, Matteo; Tesi, Lorenzo; Benci, Stefano; Lunghi, Alessandro; Righini, Roberto; Taschin, Andrea; Torre, Renato; Sorace, Lorenzo; Sessoli, Roberta

    2017-03-15

    Here we report the investigation of the magnetization dynamics of a vanadyl complex with diethyldithiocarbamate (Et2dtc(-)) ligands, namely [VO(Et2dtc)2] (1), in both solid-state and frozen solution. This showed an anomalous and unprecedentedly observed field dependence of the relaxation time, which was modeled with three contributions to the relaxation mechanism. The temperature dependence of the weight of the two processes dominating at low fields was found to well correlate with the low energy vibrations as determined by THz spectroscopy. This detailed experimental comparative study represents a fundamental step to understand the spin dynamics of potential molecular quantum bits, and enriches the guidelines to design molecule-based systems with enhanced quantum coherence.

  14. EVA: A new theoretically based molecular descriptor for use in QSAR/QSPR analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, A. M.; Heritage, T.; Jonathon, P.; Pack, S. E.; Phillips, L.; Rogan, J.; Snaith, P. J.

    1997-03-01

    A new descriptor of molecular structure, EVA, for use in the derivation of robustly predictive QSAR relationships is described. It is based on theoretically derived normal coordinate frequencies, and has been used extensively and successfully in proprietary chemical discovery programmes within Shell Research. As a result of informal dissemination of the methodology, it is now being used successfully in related areas such as pharmaceutical drug discovery. Much of the experimental data used in development remain proprietary, and are not available for publication. This paper describes the method and illustrates its application to the calculation of nonproprietary data, log Pow, in both explanatory and predictive modes. It will be followed by other publications illustrating its application to a range of data derived from biological systems.

  15. Carbonization in polyacrylonitrile (PAN) based carbon fibers studied by ReaxFF molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Saha, Biswajit; Schatz, George C

    2012-04-19

    The carbonization mechanism in polyacrylonitrile (PAN) based carbon nanofibers is studied using ReaxFF molecular dynamics simulations. Simulations are performed at two carbonization temperatures, 2500 and 2800 K, and also at two densities, 1.6 and 2.1 g/cm(3), that are relevant to the experimental carbonization conditions. The results are analyzed by examining the evolution of species with time, including carbon-only ring structures and gaseous species. Formation mechanisms are proposed for species like N(2), H(2), NH(3), and HCN and five-, six-, and seven-membered carbon-only rings, along with polycyclic structures. Interestingly, the formation of five-membered rings follows N(2) formation and usually occurs as a precursor to six-membered rings. Elimination mechanisms for the gaseous molecules are found that are in agreement with previously proposed mechanisms; however, alternative mechanisms are also proposed.

  16. Synthesis and Bioconjugation of Gold Nanoparticles as Potential Molecular Probes for Light-Based Imaging Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Rayavarapu, Raja Gopal; Petersen, Wilma; Ungureanu, Constantin; Post, Janine N.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Manohar, Srirang

    2007-01-01

    We have synthesized and characterized gold nanoparticles (spheres and rods) with optical extinction bands within the “optical imaging window.” The intense plasmon resonant driven absorption and scattering peaks of these nanoparticles make them suitable as contrast agents for optical imaging techniques. Further, we have conjugated these gold nanoparticles to a mouse monoclonal antibody specific to HER2 overexpressing SKBR3 breast carcinoma cells. The bioconjugation protocol uses noncovalent modes of binding based on a combination of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions of the antibody and the gold surface. We discuss various aspects of the synthesis and bioconjugation protocols and the characterization results of the functionalized nanoparticles. Some proposed applications of these potential molecular probes in the field of biomedical imaging are also discussed. PMID:18354723

  17. Biological Activities of Natural and Engineered Cyclotides, a Novel Molecular Scaffold for Peptide-Based Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Angie E.; Camarero, Julio A.

    2012-01-01

    Cyclotides are a growing family of large plant-derived backbone-cyclized polypeptides (≈30 amino acids long) that share a disulfide-stabilized core characterized by an unusual knotted structure. Their unique circular backbone topology and knotted arrangement of three disulfide bonds makes them exceptionally stable to thermal, chemical, and enzymatic degradation compared to other peptides of similar size. Currently more than 100 sequences of different cyclotides have been characterized and the number is expected to increase dramatically in the coming years. Considering their stability, biological activities and ability to cross the cell membrane, cyclotides can be exploited to develop new peptide-based drugs with high potential for success. The cyclotide scaffold can be engineered or evolved using molecular evolution to inhibit protein-protein interactions implicated in cancer and other human diseases, or design new antimicrobial. The present review reports the biological diversity and therapeutic potential of natural and engineered cyclotides. PMID:20858197

  18. Molecular-based analysis of changes in indigenous milk microflora during the grazing period.

    PubMed

    Hagi, Tatsuro; Kobayashi, Miho; Nomura, Masaru

    2010-01-01

    Variations in milk microflora caused by changes in the cow feeding environment (from inside to outside grazing) were analyzed using a molecular-based approach comprising denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and real-time PCR. After 8 d of outside grazing, changes in milk microflora were observed. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis showed that the predominant bacterial group in the milk belonged to the Lactobacillus species during the experimental period, whereas the genus Staphylococcus gained in numbers during the outside grazing period in addition to Lactobacillus. To investigate the quantitative dynamics of staphylococci, real-time PCR was performed using staphylococcal-specific primers. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that the population of staphylococci increased during the outside grazing period. Our combined denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and real-time PCR approach enables precise monitoring of the dynamics of both total bacteria and specific bacterial species in milk. Our results provide information on grazing management and the manufacture of dairy products.

  19. Preparation and characterization of novel molecularly imprinted polymers based on thiourea receptors for nitrocompounds recognition.

    PubMed

    Athikomrattanakul, Umporn; Katterle, Martin; Gajovic-Eichelmann, Nenad; Scheller, Frieder W

    2011-04-15

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) for the recognition of nitro derivatives are prepared from three different (thio)urea-bearing functional monomers. The binding capability of the polymers is characterized by a batch binding experiment. The imprinting factors and affinity constants (K) of the imprinted polymers exhibit the same tendency as the binding constants (K(a)) of the functional monomers to the target substance in solution. Not only nitrofurantoin is efficiently bound by these MIPs but also a broad spectrum of other nitro compounds is bound with at the intermediate level, addressing that these (thio)urea-based monomers can be utilized to prepare a family of MIPs for various nitro compounds, which can be applied as recognition elements in separation and analytical application.

  20. A molecular marker-based linkage map of diploid bananas (Musa acuminata).

    PubMed

    Fauré, S; Noyer, J L; Horry, J P; Bakry, F; Lanaud, C; Gońzalez de León, D

    1993-12-01

    A partial molecular linkage map of the Musa acuminata diploid genome is presented. This map is based on 58 RFLP, four isozyme and 28 RAPD markers segregating in an F2 population of 92 individuals. A total of 90 loci was detected, 77 of which were placed on 15 linkage groups while 13 segregated independently. Segregation distortions were shown by 36% of all loci, mostly favoring the male parent. Chromosome structural rearrangements were believed to be one of the main causes of these distortions. The use of genetic linkage data to further the genetic and evolutionary knowledge of the genus Musa, as well as to help improve the design of breeding strategies, is discussed.

  1. Spin-dependent Otto quantum heat engine based on a molecular substance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hübner, Wolfgang; Lefkidis, Georgios; Dong, Chuanding; Chaudhuri, Debapriya; Chotorlishvili, Levan; Berakdar, Jamal

    2015-03-01

    We explore the potential of single molecules for thermodynamic cycles. To this end we propose two molecular heat engines based on the realistic Ni2 dimer: a quantum Otto engine and a modified quantum Otto engine for which laser-induced optical excitations substitute for one of the heat-exchange points. For reliable predictions and to inspect the role of spin and electronic correlations we perform fully correlated ab initio calculations of the electronic structure and the excited states. We analyze the efficiency and the word output of the derived engines and find an enhancement when the spin degree of freedom is included. We also use the von Neumann entropy to describe correlations and entanglement of the engines during the cycles. Furthermore, we link our results to previous results regarding an isobaric stroke and a magnetic quantum Diesel engine on the same substance.

  2. Paramagnetic molecule induced strong antiferromagnetic exchange coupling on a magnetic tunnel junction based molecular spintronics device.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Pawan; Baker, Collin; D'Angelo, Christopher

    2015-07-31

    This paper reports our Monte Carlo (MC) studies aiming to explain the experimentally observed paramagnetic molecule induced antiferromagnetic coupling between ferromagnetic (FM) electrodes. Recently developed magnetic tunnel junction based molecular spintronics devices (MTJMSDs) were prepared by chemically bonding the paramagnetic molecules between the FM electrodes along the tunnel junction's perimeter. These MTJMSDs exhibited molecule-induced strong antiferromagnetic coupling. We simulated the 3D atomic model analogous to the MTJMSD and studied the effect of molecule's magnetic couplings with the two FM electrodes. Simulations show that when a molecule established ferromagnetic coupling with one electrode and antiferromagnetic coupling with the other electrode, then theoretical results effectively explained the experimental findings. Our studies suggest that in order to align MTJMSDs' electrodes antiparallel to each other, the exchange coupling strength between a molecule and FM electrodes should be ∼50% of the interatomic exchange coupling for the FM electrodes.

  3. Molecularly imprinted polymer grafted paper-based method for the detection of 17β-estradiol.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Lei; Zhang, Zhen; Wu, Chuanchen; Han, Liying; Zhang, Hongyan

    2017-04-15

    17β-estradiol (17β-E2) usually is used to promote the growth of animal. Abuse of 17β-E2 has become a global food security problem, because the residues in foods can cause endocrine disorder through the food chain. A novel molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) grafted paper-based method for the sensitive and specific detection of 17β-E2 was reported in this work. Results showed that the MIP's optimum synthetic conditions were as follows: 12 mL of acetonitrile was chosen as the solvent; the molar ratio of template molecule, functional monomer and cross linker was 1:12:12. MIP synthesized had a good recognition ability, the limit of detection (LOD) of established detection method for milk and human urine samples could reach 0.25μgL(-1).

  4. XML-based approaches for the integration of heterogeneous bio-molecular data

    PubMed Central

    Mesiti, Marco; Jiménez-Ruiz, Ernesto; Sanz, Ismael; Berlanga-Llavori, Rafael; Perlasca, Paolo; Valentini, Giorgio; Manset, David

    2009-01-01

    Background The today's public database infrastructure spans a very large collection of heterogeneous biological data, opening new opportunities for molecular biology, bio-medical and bioinformatics research, but raising also new problems for their integration and computational processing. Results In this paper we survey the most interesting and novel approaches for the representation, integration and management of different kinds of biological data by exploiting XML and the related recommendations and approaches. Moreover, we present new and interesting cutting edge approaches for the appropriate management of heterogeneous biological data represented through XML. Conclusion XML has succeeded in the integration of heterogeneous biomolecular information, and has established itself as the syntactic glue for biological data sources. Nevertheless, a large variety of XML-based data formats have been proposed, thus resulting in a difficult effective integration of bioinformatics data schemes. The adoption of a few semantic-rich standard formats is urgent to achieve a seamless integration of the current biological resources. PMID:19828083

  5. Molecular simulation of electric double-layer capacitors based on carbon nanotube forests.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lu; Fishbine, Brian H; Migliori, Albert; Pratt, Lawrence R

    2009-09-02

    Described here are the first simulations of electric double-layer capacitors based on carbon nanotube forests modeled fully at a molecular level. The computations determine single-electrode capacitances in the neighborhood of 80 F/g, in agreement with experimental capacitances of electric double-layer capacitors utilizing carbon nanotube forests or carbide-derived carbons as electrode material. The capacitance increases modestly with the decrease of the pore size through radii greater than 1 nm, which is consistent with recent experiments on carbide-derived carbon electrodes. Because the various factors included in these simulations are precisely defined, these simulation data will help to disentangle distinct physical chemical factors that contribute to the performance of these materials, e.g., pore geometry, variable filling of the pores, pseudocapacitance, and electronic characteristics of the nanotubes.

  6. Car--Parrinello Molecular Dynamics Study of Base-Catalyzed Hydrolysis Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alnemrat, Sufian; Vasiliev, Igor; Wang, Haobin

    2011-03-01

    We apply the first principles metadynamics simulation technique implemented in the Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics package to study the base-catalyzed hydrolysis of N-methylacetamide in aqueous solution. Our calculations are carried out in the framework of density functional theory combined with the hybrid BLYP exchange-correlation functional The free energy surfaces and hydrolysis reaction pathways for N-methylacetamide are examined in the presence of a hydroxide ion, and 4, 32, and 64 water molecules. We find that at least 32 water molecules must be explicitly included in metadynamics simulations to accurately describe the mechanism of the hydrolysis reaction of N-Methylacetamide. Our theoretical estimate for the dissociation energy of N-Methylacetamide is in good agreement with the results of previous experimental and theoretical studies. Supported by LANL-NMSU MOU.

  7. Ab Initio Molecular Metadynamics Study of the Base-Catalyzed Hydrolysis of N-Methylacetamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alnemrat, Sufian; Vasiliev, Igor; Wang, Haobin

    2010-10-01

    We apply the first principles metadynamics simulation technique implemented in the Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics package to study the base-catalyzed hydrolysis of N-methylacetamide in aqueous solution. Our calculations are carried out in the framework of density functional theory combined with the hybrid BLYP exchange-correlation functional The free energy surfaces and hydrolysis reaction pathways for N-methylacetamide are examined in the presence of a hydroxide ion, and 4, 16, 32, and 64 water molecules. We find that at least 32 water molecules must be explicitly included in metadynamics simulations to accurately describe the mechanism of the hydrolysis reaction of N-Methylacetamide Our theoretical estimate for the dissociation energy of N-Methylacetamide is in good agreement with the results of previous experimental and theoretical studies.

  8. Titania-based molecularly imprinted polymer for sulfonic acid dyes prepared by sol-gel method.

    PubMed

    Li, Man; Li, Rong; Tan, Jin; Jiang, Zi-Tao

    2013-03-30

    A novel titania-based molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) was synthesized through sol-gel process with sunset yellow (Sun) as template, without use of functional monomer. MIP was used as a solid-phase extraction material for the isolation and enrichment of sulfonic acid dyes in beverages. The results showed that MIP exhibited better selectivity, higher recovery and adsorption capacity for the sulfonic acid dyes compared to the non-imprinted polymer (NIP). MIP presented highest extraction selectivity to Sun when pH less than or equal to 3. The adsorption capacity was 485.9 mg g(-1), which was larger than that of NIP (384.7 mg g(-1)). The better clean-up ability demonstrated the capability of MIP for the isolation and enrichment of sulfonic acid dyes in complicated food samples. The mean recoveries for the sulfonic acid dyes on MIP were from 81.9% to 97.2% in spiked soft drink.

  9. Molecular-based design and emerging applications of nanoporous carbon spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian; Wickramaratne, Nilantha P.; Qiao, Shi Zhang; Jaroniec, Mietek

    2015-08-01

    Over the past decade, considerable progress has been made in the synthesis and applications of nanoporous carbon spheres ranging in size from nanometres to micrometres. This Review presents the primary techniques for preparing nanoporous carbon spheres and the seminal research that has inspired their development, presented potential applications and uncovered future challenges. First we provide an overview of the synthesis techniques, including the Stöber method and those based on templating, self-assembly, emulsion and hydrothermal carbonization, with special emphasis on the design and functionalization of nanoporous carbon spheres at the molecular level. Next, we cover the key applications of these spheres, including adsorption, catalysis, separation, energy storage and biomedicine -- all of which might benefit from the regular geometry, good liquidity, tunable porosity and controllable particle-size distribution offered by nanoporous carbon spheres. Finally, we present the current challenges and opportunities in the development and commercial applications of nanoporous carbon spheres.

  10. Molecular-based design and emerging applications of nanoporous carbon spheres.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Wickramaratne, Nilantha P; Qiao, Shi Zhang; Jaroniec, Mietek

    2015-08-01

    Over the past decade, considerable progress has been made in the synthesis and applications of nanoporous carbon spheres ranging in size from nanometres to micrometres. This Review presents the primary techniques for preparing nanoporous carbon spheres and the seminal research that has inspired their development, presented potential applications and uncovered future challenges. First we provide an overview of the synthesis techniques, including the Stöber method and those based on templating, self-assembly, emulsion and hydrothermal carbonization, with special emphasis on the design and functionalization of nanoporous carbon spheres at the molecular level. Next, we cover the key applications of these spheres, including adsorption, catalysis, separation, energy storage and biomedicine — all of which might benefit from the regular geometry, good liquidity, tunable porosity and controllable particle-size distribution offered by nanoporous carbon spheres. Finally, we present the current challenges and opportunities in the development and commercial applications of nanoporous carbon spheres.

  11. Molecular Simulations of Graphene-Based Electric Double-Layer Capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalluri, Raja K.; Konatham, Deepthi; Striolo, Alberto

    2011-03-01

    Towards deploying renewable energy sources it is crucial to develop efficient and cost-effective technologies to store electricity. Traditional batteries are plagued by a number of practical problems that at present limit their widespread applicability. One possible solution is represented by electric double-layer capacitors (EDLCs). To deploy EDLCs at the large scale it is necessary to better understand how electrolytes pack and diffuse within narrow charged pores. We present here simulation results for the concentrated aqueous solutions of NaCl, CsCl, and NaI confined within charged graphene-based porous materials. We discuss how the structure of confined water, the salt concentration, the ions size, and the surface charge density determine the accumulation of electrolytes within the porous network. Our results, compared to data available for bulk systems, are critical for relating macroscopic observations to molecular-level properties of the confined working fluids. Research supported by the Department of Energy.

  12. Molecular detection with terahertz waves based on absorption-induced transparency metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    G. Rodrigo, Sergio; Martín-Moreno, L.

    2016-10-01

    A system for the detection of spectral signatures of chemical compounds at the Terahertz regime is presented. The system consists on a holey metal film whereby the presence of a given substance provokes the appearance of spectral features in transmission and reflection induced by the molecular specimen. These induced effects can be regarded as an extraordinary optical transmission phenomenon called absorption-induced transparency (AIT). The phenomenon consist precisely in the appearance of peaks in transmission and dips in reflection after sputtering of a chemical compound onto an initially opaque holey metal film. The spectral signatures due to AIT occur unexpectedly close to the absorption energies of the molecules. The presence of a target, a chemical compound, would be thus revealed as a strong drop in reflectivity measurements. We theoretically predict the AIT based system would serve to detect amounts of hydrocyanic acid (HCN) at low rate concentrations.

  13. Schiff bases or glycosylamines: crystal and molecular structures of four derivatives of D-mannose.

    PubMed

    Ojala, W H; Ostman, J M; Ojala, C R

    2000-06-02

    Crystal and molecular structures of four derivatives of D-mannose are described. Each could exist as either an open-chain Schiff base or as a glycosylamine in the solid state. The derivative formed upon reaction of D-mannose with hydroxylamine is an open-chain oxime, but those formed upon reaction with semicarbazide, aniline, and p-chloroaniline are glycosylamines. The oxime, which crystallizes as the syn-(E) isomer, has a fully extended carbon chain. The glycosylamines are all beta-pyranoses. The packing arrangement of the oxime involves 'head-to-tail' hydrogen bonding. The semicarbazide derivative, which crystallizes as a dihydrate, features a hydrogen-bonded intramolecular bridge formed by the two water molecules and linking O-6 to the carbonyl oxygen atom. The packing arrangements of the aniline and p-chloroaniline derivatives differ from each other but are nevertheless closely related by similar hydrogen-bonding interactions.

  14. Co-pyrolysis mechanism of seaweed polysaccharides and cellulose based on macroscopic experiments and molecular simulations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuang; Xia, Zhen; Hu, Yamin; He, Zhixia; Uzoejinwa, Benjamin Bernard; Wang, Qian; Cao, Bin; Xu, Shanna

    2017-03-01

    Co-pyrolysis conversion of seaweed (Enteromorpha clathrat and Sargassum fusiforme) polysaccharides and cellulose has been investigated. From the Py-GC/MS results, Enteromorpha clathrata (EN) polysaccharides pyrolysis mainly forms furans; while the products of Sargassum fusiforme (SA) polysaccharides pyrolysis are mainly acid esters. The formation mechanisms of H2O, CO2, and SO2 during the pyrolysis of seaweed polysaccharides were analyzed using the thermogravimetric-mass spectrometry. Meanwhile the pyrolysis of seaweed polysaccharide based on the Amber and the ReaxFF force fields, has also been proposed and simulated respectively. The simulation results coincided with the experimental results. During the fast pyrolysis, strong synergistic effects among cellulose and seaweed polysaccharide molecules have been simulated. By comparing the experimental and simulation value, it has been found that co-pyrolysis could increase the number of molecular fragments, increase the pyrolysis conversion rate, and increase gas production rate at the middle temperature range.

  15. Molecular dynamics-based virtual screening: accelerating the drug discovery process by high-performance computing.

    PubMed

    Ge, Hu; Wang, Yu; Li, Chanjuan; Chen, Nanhao; Xie, Yufang; Xu, Mengyan; He, Yingyan; Gu, Xinchun; Wu, Ruibo; Gu, Qiong; Zeng, Liang; Xu, Jun

    2013-10-28

    High-performance computing (HPC) has become a state strategic technology in a number of countries. One hypothesis is that HPC can accelerate biopharmaceutical innovation. Our experimental data demonstrate that HPC can significantly accelerate biopharmaceutical innovation by employing molecular dynamics-based virtual screening (MDVS). Without using HPC, MDVS for a 10K compound library with tens of nanoseconds of MD simulations requires years of computer time. In contrast, a state of the art HPC can be 600 times faster than an eight-core PC server is in screening a typical drug target (which contains about 40K atoms). Also, careful design of the GPU/CPU architecture can reduce the HPC costs. However, the communication cost of parallel computing is a bottleneck that acts as the main limit of further virtual screening improvements for drug innovations.

  16. Preparation of electrochemical sensor for lead(II) based on molecularly imprinted film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhihua; Qin, Yaxin; Wang, Chu; Sun, Lijun; Lu, Xiaole; Lu, Xiaoquan

    2012-01-01

    A high selective voltammetric sensor for Pb2+ was introduced. The feasibility of utilizing strong interactions between Schiff bases and metal ion to prepare the molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) electrochemical sensor for Pb2+ in aqueous solutions was studied. Some parameters affecting sensor response were optimized and then a calibration curve was plotted. A dynamic linear range of 3.00 × 10-7 to 5.00 × 10-5 mol/L was obtained. The redox process of Pb2+ on the imprinted electrode is controlled by surface reaction. The stability and the life of imprinted membrane were improved by storing into diluted Pb2+ ion solution. The proposed method was applied to determination of Pb2+ in the Yellow River.

  17. Treatment of Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy: From Molecular Bases to Practical Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Ripellino, Paolo; Fleetwood, Thomas; Cantello, Roberto; Comi, Cristoforo

    2014-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is an autoimmune disease of the peripheral nervous system, in which both cellular and humoral immune responses are involved. The disease is clinically heterogeneous with some patients displaying pure motor form and others also showing a variable degree of sensory dysfunction; disease evolution may also differ from patient to patient, since monophasic, progressive, and relapsing forms are reported. Underlying such clinical variability there is probably a broad spectrum of molecular dysfunctions that are and will be the target of therapeutic strategies. In this review we first explore the biological bases of current treatments and subsequently we focus on the practical management that must also take into account pharmacoeconomic issues. PMID:24527207

  18. Revisiting Previously Investigated Plants: A Molecular Networking-Based Study of Geissospermum laeve.

    PubMed

    Fox Ramos, Alexander E; Alcover, Charlotte; Evanno, Laurent; Maciuk, Alexandre; Litaudon, Marc; Duplais, Christophe; Bernadat, Guillaume; Gallard, Jean-François; Jullian, Jean-Christophe; Mouray, Elisabeth; Grellier, Philippe; Loiseau, Philippe M; Pomel, Sébastien; Poupon, Erwan; Champy, Pierre; Beniddir, Mehdi A

    2017-03-10

    Three new monoterpene indole alkaloids (1-3) have been isolated from the bark of Geissospermum laeve, together with the known alkaloids (-)-leuconolam (4), geissolosimine (5), and geissospermine (6). The structures of 1-3 were elucidated by analysis of their HRMS and NMR spectroscopic data. The absolute configuration of geissolaevine (1) was deduced from the comparison of experimental and theoretically calculated ECD spectra. The isolation workflow was guided by a molecular networking-based dereplication strategy using an in-house database of monoterpene indole alkaloids. In addition, five known compounds previously undescribed in the Geissospermum genus were dereplicated from the G. laeve alkaloid extract network and were assigned with various levels of identification confidence. The antiparasitic activities against Plasmodium falciparum and Leishmania donovani as well as the cytotoxic activity against the MRC-5 cell line were determined for compounds 1-5.

  19. Mapping variable ring polymer molecular dynamics: A path-integral based method for nonadiabatic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ananth, Nandini

    2013-09-01

    We introduce mapping-variable ring polymer molecular dynamics (MV-RPMD), a model dynamics for the direct simulation of multi-electron processes. An extension of the RPMD idea, this method is based on an exact, imaginary time path-integral representation of the quantum Boltzmann operator using continuous Cartesian variables for both electronic states and nuclear degrees of freedom. We demonstrate the accuracy of the MV-RPMD approach in calculations of real-time, thermal correlation functions for a range of two-state single-mode model systems with different coupling strengths and asymmetries. Further, we show that the ensemble of classical trajectories employed in these simulations preserves the Boltzmann distribution and provides a direct probe into real-time coupling between electronic state transitions and nuclear dynamics.

  20. Finding a Potential Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 (DPP-4) Inhibitor for Type-2 Diabetes Treatment Based on Molecular Docking, Pharmacophore Generation, and Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Meduru, Harika; Wang, Yeng-Tseng; Tsai, Jeffrey J. P.; Chen, Yu-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) is the vital enzyme that is responsible for inactivating intestinal peptides glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and Gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP), which stimulates a decline in blood glucose levels. The aim of this study was to explore the inhibition activity of small molecule inhibitors to DPP-4 following a computational strategy based on docking studies and molecular dynamics simulations. The thorough docking protocol we applied allowed us to derive good correlation parameters between the predicted binding affinities (pKi) of the DPP-4 inhibitors and the experimental activity values (pIC50). Based on molecular docking receptor-ligand interactions, pharmacophore generation was carried out in order to identify the binding modes of structurally diverse compounds in the receptor active site. Consideration of the permanence and flexibility of DPP-4 inhibitor complexes by means of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation specified that the inhibitors maintained the binding mode observed in the docking study. The present study helps generate new information for further structural optimization and can influence the development of new DPP-4 inhibitors discoveries in the treatment of type-2 diabetes. PMID:27304951

  1. A Multi-wavelength Study of Nearby Galaxies Based on Molecular Line Surveys: MIPS Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazio, Giovanni; Wang, Zhong; Bush, Stephanie; Cox, Thomas J.; Keto, Eric; Pahre, Michael; Rosolowsky, Erik; Smith, Howard

    2008-03-01

    Dense molecular gas, warm dust, and hot ionized gas are different components of the multi-step transformation of cold gas into stars and star clusters. While empirical laws on star formation in galaxies have been established based on global measurements of these components, substantial galaxy-to-galaxy variations still exist and remain unexplained. To understand the mechanisms that induce and regulate star formation and thus galaxy evolution, we need to study processes on the local scales of typical star forming regions and giant molecular clouds. In a set of pilot studies, we analyzed the Spitzer and Galex data of nearby giant spirals M31, M33 and M99, and compared with the new interferometric CO maps of matching angular resolution. We found evidence that variations in local condition, environmental effects, and viewing geometry may explain much of the large scatter in the empirical relationships. Based on the success of this initial investigation, we have collected high- resolution CO images of 63 late-type galaxies from several large surveys, and we are working on obtaining a complete set of Spitzer and Galex data for these galaxies. A companion Spitzer archival research program will re-examine the existing observations along with CO, HI, UV and optical data, focusing on correlations in spatially resolved, individual star-forming regions. Here we propose MIPS imaging of the 11 galaxies in our CO sample that have not already been observed by Spitzer. A GO proposal will request IRAC time for these galaxies, which are a significant addition to our study because they substantially increase the fraction of gas-rich late types in the full sample. Insight from this program will be applicable to not only nearby system, but also high red-shift galaxies for which only integrated quantities are measurable.

  2. Activatable molecular MRI nanoprobe for tumor cell imaging based on gadolinium oxide and iron oxide nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingjing; Wang, Shan; Wu, Chen; Dai, Yue; Hou, Pingfu; Han, Cuiping; Xu, Kai

    2016-12-15

    Activatable molecular MRI nanoprobe for intracellular GSH sensing was designed. As an alternative to "always on" nanoprobe, activatable imaging nanoprobes which are designed to amplify or boost imaging signals only in response to the targets have attracted more and more attention. In this paper, we designed a novel activatable molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) nanoprobe for tumor cell recognization based on a MRI signal variation induced by the distance change between T1 and T2 contrast agents (CAs) in the presence of glutathione (GSH). To achieve this aim, carboxyl group functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe3O4 NPs) and polyethylene glycol-coated gadolinium oxide (PEG-Gd2O3) NPs as T2 and T1 MRI CA were connected by cystamine which contains a disulfide linkage. Transmission electron microscopic (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), mass spectra and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H NMR) were introduced for their characterizations. The formation of Fe3O4-cystamine-Gd2O3 (Fe3O4-SS-Gd2O3) nanocomplex resulted in a quenched T1 signal due to the near proximity of PEG-Gd2O3 NPs to Fe3O4 NPs and a "light-up" T1 signal with the cleavage of disulfide bond in the presence of GSH. These results provide not only an easy way to realize MRI of tumor cells based on the overexpressed intracellular GSH level, but also a new insight for the design of activatable MRI nanoprobe.

  3. Molecular Biomarker-Based Biokinetic Modeling of a PCE-Dechlorinating and Methanogenic Mixed Culture

    SciTech Connect

    Heavner, Gretchen L. W.; Rowe, Annette R.; Mansfeldt, Cresten B.; Pan, Ju Khuan; Gossett, James M.; Richardson, Ruth E.

    2013-04-16

    Bioremediation of chlorinated ethenes via anaerobic reductive dechlorination relies upon the activity of specific microbial population-most notably Dehalococcoides (DHC) strains. In the lab and field Dehalococcoides grow most robustly in mixed communities which usually contain both fermenters and methanogens. Recently, researchers have been developing quantitative molecular biomarkers to aid in field site diagnostics and it is hoped that these biomarkers could aid in the modeling of anaerobic reductive dechlorination. A comprehensive biokinetic model of a community containing Dehalococcoides mccartyi (formerly D. ethenogenes) was updated to describe continuously fed reactors with specific biomass levels based on quantitative PCR (qPCR)-based population data (DNA and RNA). The model was calibrated and validated with subsets of chemical and molecular biological data from various continuous feed experiments (n = 24) with different loading rates of the electron acceptor (1.5 to 482 μeeq/L-h), types of electron acceptor (PCE, TCE, cis-DCE) and electron donor to electron acceptor ratios. The resulting model predicted the sum of dechlorination products vinyl chloride (VC) and ethene (ETH) well. However, VC alone was under-predicted and ETH was over predicted. Consequently, competitive inhibition among chlorinated ethenes was examined and then added to the model. Additionally, as 16S rRNA gene copy numbers did not provide accurate model fits in all cases, we examined whether an improved fit could be obtained if mRNA levels for key functional enzymes could be used to infer respiration rates. The resulting empirically derived mRNA “adjustment factors” were added to the model for both DHC and the main methanogen in the culture (a Methanosaeta species) to provide a more nuanced prediction of activity. Results of this study suggest that at higher feeding rates competitive inhibition is important and mRNA provides a more accurate indicator of a population’s instantaneous

  4. Enhancing 4-propylheptane dissociation with nickel nanocluster based on molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Ilyina, Margarita G; Khamitov, Edward M; Galiakhmetov, Rail N; Mustafin, Ildar A; Mustafin, Akhat G

    2017-03-01

    In the present work, a 0.4nm nickel cluster has been theoretically studied. Its equilibrium structural parameters have been calculated by the DFT method based on the PBEH1PBE hybrid functional and split-valence basis set Lanl2DZ including effective core potentials. We have systematically considered diverse spin states of this cluster and find out its ground state. The relative stability of these states depends on the HOMO-LUMO gap. The interaction of the Ni6 with 4-propylheptane С10Н22 has been studied to simulate the process of catalytic cracking of hydrocarbons. The optimization of this structure has been performed by the ωPBE/Lanl2DZ_ecp method (the TeraChem V.1.9 program package) with no symmetry restrictions; the electron shells of the metal were described by effective core pseudopotentials. For visualization and quantitative estimation of the bonding bonds between the nickel nanocluster and 4-propylheptane, the analysis of weak interactions based on RGD has been performed. To confirm the proposition about the formation of Ni-H bonds, we have scrutinized critical points of electronic density. Values of laplasian of electronic density and Bader atomic charge distribution in the global minimum of the total energy have been estimated by the AIMAll 15.05.18 program suite. Finally, we have simulated interaction of Ni6 with 4-propylheptane in terms of the Born-Oppenheimer ab initio molecular dynamics. The results of the molecular dynamics simulation provide pair radial distribution function CH at 1500°C and a detailed picture of the processes occurring in the system.

  5. Between algorithm and model: different Molecular Surface definitions for the Poisson-Boltzmann based electrostatic characterization of biomolecules in solution.

    PubMed

    Decherchi, Sergio; Colmenares, José; Catalano, Chiara Eva; Spagnuolo, Michela; Alexov, Emil; Rocchia, Walter

    2013-01-01

    The definition of a molecular surface which is physically sound and computationally efficient is a very interesting and long standing problem in the implicit solvent continuum modeling of biomolecular systems as well as in the molecular graphics field. In this work, two molecular surfaces are evaluated with respect to their suitability for electrostatic computation as alternatives to the widely used Connolly-Richards surface: the blobby surface, an implicit Gaussian atom centered surface, and the skin surface. As figures of merit, we considered surface differentiability and surface area continuity with respect to atom positions, and the agreement with explicit solvent simulations. Geometric analysis seems to privilege the skin to the blobby surface, and points to an unexpected relationship between the non connectedness of the surface, caused by interstices in the solute volume, and the surface area dependence on atomic centers. In order to assess the ability to reproduce explicit solvent results, specific software tools have been developed to enable the use of the skin surface in Poisson-Boltzmann calculations with the DelPhi solver. Results indicate that the skin and Connolly surfaces have a comparable performance from this last point of view.

  6. Between algorithm and model: different Molecular Surface definitions for the Poisson-Boltzmann based electrostatic characterization of biomolecules in solution

    PubMed Central

    Decherchi, Sergio; Colmenares, José; Catalano, Chiara Eva; Spagnuolo, Michela; Alexov, Emil; Rocchia, Walter

    2011-01-01

    The definition of a molecular surface which is physically sound and computationally efficient is a very interesting and long standing problem in the implicit solvent continuum modeling of biomolecular systems as well as in the molecular graphics field. In this work, two molecular surfaces are evaluated with respect to their suitability for electrostatic computation as alternatives to the widely used Connolly-Richards surface: the blobby surface, an implicit Gaussian atom centered surface, and the skin surface. As figures of merit, we considered surface differentiability and surface area continuity with respect to atom positions, and the agreement with explicit solvent simulations. Geometric analysis seems to privilege the skin to the blobby surface, and points to an unexpected relationship between the non connectedness of the surface, caused by interstices in the solute volume, and the surface area dependence on atomic centers. In order to assess the ability to reproduce explicit solvent results, specific software tools have been developed to enable the use of the skin surface in Poisson-Boltzmann calculations with the DelPhi solver. Results indicate that the skin and Connolly surfaces have a comparable performance from this last point of view. PMID:23519863

  7. Overdominance effect of the bovine ghrelin receptor (GHSR1a)-DelR242 locus on growth in Japanese Shorthorn weaner bulls: heterozygote advantage in bull selection and molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Masanori; Sato, Yoichi; Negami, Tatsuki; Terada, Tohru; Sasaki, Osamu; Yasuda, Jumpei; Arakawa, Aisaku; Yoshida, Chikara; Takahashi, Hideaki; Malau-Aduli, Aduli E O; Suzuki, Keiichi; Shimizu, Kentaro

    2014-12-23

    Ghrelin and the ghrelin receptor (GHSR1a) are involved in growth hormone secretion, food intake, and several other important functions. Ghrelin acts on GHSR1a and induces signal transduction via the Gαq subunit. In our previous study, we identified the DelR242 (3R) allele, a truncated 3-arginine residue (3R) [major type: 4 arginine residues (4R)] of the third intracellular loop of GHSR1a, with a high frequency in Japanese Shorthorn bulls (0.43) but with a low frequency in other cattle breeds (0.00-0.09). To further investigate the reasons for the higher frequency of the 3R allele, we performed several experiments. In this study, we found a significant sex difference in the frequency of the 3R allele. Statistical analysis revealed a significant overdominance effect of the DelR242 locus on growth in Japanese Shorthorn weaner bulls. However, additive/dominance/overdominance effects of the 3R allele on carcass traits in adult steers and dams were not significant. The mode of the overdominance effect was estimated to be solely controlled by the single DelR242 locus without any other linked loci using linkage disequilibrium analysis in GHSR1a. These results indicated that 4R/3R heterozygotes had a selective advantage in weaner bulls because of their higher average daily gain than homozygotes. We discussed possible molecular mechanisms involved in the overdominance effect of the DelR242 locus on these traits in weaner bulls using a structural model of the complex consisting of a GHSR1a dimer and Gαq.

  8. Molecular-Based Optical Measurement Techniques for Transition and Turbulence in High-Speed Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bathel, Brett F.; Danehy, Paul M.; Cutler, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    High-speed laminar-to-turbulent transition and turbulence affect the control of flight vehicles, the heat transfer rate to a flight vehicle's surface, the material selected to protect such vehicles from high heating loads, the ultimate weight of a flight vehicle due to the presence of thermal protection systems, the efficiency of fuel-air mixing processes in high-speed combustion applications, etc. Gaining a fundamental understanding of the physical mechanisms involved in the transition process will lead to the development of predictive capabilities that can identify transition location and its impact on parameters like surface heating. Currently, there is no general theory that can completely describe the transition-to-turbulence process. However, transition research has led to the identification of the predominant pathways by which this process occurs. For a truly physics-based model of transition to be developed, the individual stages in the paths leading to the onset of fully turbulent flow must be well understood. This requires that each pathway be computationally modeled and experimentally characterized and validated. This may also lead to the discovery of new physical pathways. This document is intended to describe molecular based measurement techniques that have been developed, addressing the needs of the high-speed transition-to-turbulence and high-speed turbulence research fields. In particular, we focus on techniques that have either been used to study high speed transition and turbulence or techniques that show promise for studying these flows. This review is not exhaustive. In addition to the probe-based techniques described in the previous paragraph, several other classes of measurement techniques that are, or could be, used to study high speed transition and turbulence are excluded from this manuscript. For example, surface measurement techniques such as pressure and temperature paint, phosphor thermography, skin friction measurements and

  9. Molecular Monolayers for Electrical Passivation and Functionalization of Silicon-Based Solar Energy Devices.

    PubMed

    Veerbeek, Janneke; Firet, Nienke J; Vijselaar, Wouter; Elbersen, Rick; Gardeniers, Han; Huskens, Jurriaan

    2017-01-11

    Silicon-based solar fuel devices require passivation for optimal performance yet at the same time need functionalization with (photo)catalysts for efficient solar fuel production. Here, we use molecular monolayers to enable electrical passivation and simultaneous functionalization of silicon-based solar cells. Organic monolayers were coupled to silicon surfaces by hydrosilylation in order to avoid an insulating silicon oxide layer at the surface. Monolayers of 1-tetradecyne were shown to passivate silicon micropillar-based solar cells with radial junctions, by which the efficiency increased from 8.7% to 9.9% for n(+)/p junctions and from 7.8% to 8.8% for p(+)/n junctions. This electrical passivation of the surface, most likely by removal of dangling bonds, is reflected in a higher shunt resistance in the J-V measurements. Monolayers of 1,8-nonadiyne were still reactive for click chemistry with a model catalyst, thus enabling simultaneous passivation and future catalyst coupling.

  10. Characterization of Metarhizium species and varieties based on molecular analysis, heat tolerance and cold activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fernandes, E.K.K.; Keyser, C.A.; Chong, J.P.; Rangel, D.E.N.; Miller, M.P.; Roberts, D.W.

    2010-01-01

    Aims: The genetic relationships and conidial tolerances to high and low temperatures were determined for isolates of several Metarhizium species and varieties. Methods and Results: Molecular-based techniques [AFLP and rDNA (ITS1, ITS2 and 5??8S) gene sequencing] were used to characterize morphologically identified Metarhizium spp. isolates from a wide range of sources. Conidial suspensions of isolates were exposed to wet heat (45 ?? 0??2??C) and plated on potato dextrose agar plus yeast extract (PDAY) medium. After 8-h exposure, the isolates divided clearly into two groups: (i) all isolates of Metarhizium anisopliae var. anisopliae (Ma-an) and Metarhizium from the flavoviride complex (Mf) had virtually zero conidial relative germination (RG), (ii) Metarhizium anisopliae var. acridum (Ma-ac) isolates demonstrated high heat tolerance (c. 70-100% RG). Conidial suspensions also were plated on PDAY and incubated at 5??C for 15 days, during which time RGs for Ma-an and Ma-ac isolates were virtually zero, whereas the two Mf were highly cold active (100% RG). Conclusions: Heat and cold exposures can be used as rapid tools to tentatively identify some important Metarhizium species and varieties. Significance and Impact of the Study: Identification of Metarhizium spp. currently relies primarily on DNA-based methods; we suggest a simple temperature-based screen to quickly obtain tentative identification of isolates as to species or species complexes. ?? 2009 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  11. The use of nanocrystal quantum dot as fluorophore reporters in molecular beacon-based assays.

    PubMed

    Adegoke, Oluwasesan; Park, Enoch Y

    2016-01-01

    The utilization of molecular beacon (MB) biosensor probes to detect nucleic acid targets has received enormous interest within the scientific community. This interest has been stimulated by the operational qualities of MB-based probes with respect to their unique sensitivity and specificity. The design of MB biosensors entails not only optimizing the sequence of the loop to hybridize with the nucleic acid target or optimization of the length of the stem to tune the sensitivity but also the selection of the appropriate fluorophore reporter to generate the signal transduction read-out upon hybridization of the probe with the target sequence. Traditional organic fluorescent dyes are mostly used for signal reporting in MB assays but their optical properties in comparison to semiconductor fluorescent quantum dot (Qdot) nanocrystals are at a disadvantage. This review highlights the progress made in exploiting Qdot as fluorophore reporters in MB-based assays with the aim of instigating further development in the field of Qdot-MB technology. The development reported to date indicates that unparalleled fluorescence signal reporting in MB-based assays can be achieved using well-constructed Qdot fluorophores.

  12. The use of nanocrystal quantum dot as fluorophore reporters in molecular beacon-based assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adegoke, Oluwasesan; Park, Enoch Y.

    2016-12-01

    The utilization of molecular beacon (MB) biosensor probes to detect nucleic acid targets has received enormous interest within the scientific community. This interest has been stimulated by the operational qualities of MB-based probes with respect to their unique sensitivity and specificity. The design of MB biosensors entails not only optimizing the sequence of the loop to hybridize with the nucleic acid target or optimization of the length of the stem to tune the sensitivity but also the selection of the appropriate fluorophore reporter to generate the signal transduction read-out upon hybridization of the probe with the target sequence. Traditional organic fluorescent dyes are mostly used for signal reporting in MB assays but their optical properties in comparison to semiconductor fluorescent quantum dot (Qdot) nanocrystals are at a disadvantage. This review highlights the progress made in exploiting Qdot as fluorophore reporters in MB-based assays with the aim of instigating further development in the field of Qdot-MB technology. The development reported to date indicates that unparalleled fluorescence signal reporting in MB-based assays can be achieved using well-constructed Qdot fluorophores.

  13. Supramolecular substitution reactions between hydrazide-based molecular duplex strands: complexation induced nonsymmetry and dynamic behavior.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong; Xiang, Jun-Feng; Xue, Min; Hu, Hai-Yu; Chen, Chuan-Feng

    2008-08-15

    Supramolecular substitution reactions between hydrazide-based oligomers 1a- c and 2a- c were systematically investigated. Each oligomer existed as hydrogen-bonding mediated molecular duplex strands or a polymeric zipper structure in apolar solvents. But when another oligomer with complementary hydrogen bonding sites was added, a heterodimer structure formed due to supramolecular substitution reaction driven by the formation of more hydrogen bonds, which was evidenced by NMR experiments, sometimes gel-sol transition. When a nonsymmetric oligomer and a symmetric oligomer were involved, complexation-induced nonsymmetry was observed. When two nonsymmetric oligomers were involved, two hydrogen-bonded isomers were observed in solution. Variable-temperature (1)H NMR experiments further revealed unique dynamic behavior for the individual oligomer and the complexes. When diacetyl-terminated oligomer 1c was involved, slides perpendicular to hydrogen bonds between two constituent molecules were observed, which led to complicated (1)H NMR spectra at lower temperature; otherwise, high selectivity was obtained. Combined with the results we reported previously, a detailed picture of the structure-property relationship for our hydrazide-based oligomers was depicted, which would provide guidelines for the design of hydrazide-based fine-tuning functional materials.

  14. Enhanced electrochemical properties of PEO-based composite polymer electrolyte with shape-selective molecular sieves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Jingyu; Qiu, Xinping; Cui, Mengzhong; Tang, Xiaozhen; Zhu, Wentao; Chen, Liquan

    ZSM-5 molecular sieves, usually known as shape-selective catalyst in a great deal of catalysis fields, due to its special pore size and two-dimensional interconnect channels. In this work, a novel PEO-based composite polymer electrolyte by using ZSM-5 as the filler has been developed. The interactions between ZSM-5 and PEO matrix are studied by DSC and SEM techniques. The effects of ZSM-5 on the electrochemical properties of the PEO-based electrolyte, such as ionic conductivity, lithium ion transference number, and interfacial stability with lithium electrode are studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and steady-state current method. The experiment results show that ZSM-5 can enhance the ionic conductivity and increase the lithium ion transference number of PEO-based electrolyte more effectively comparing with traditional ceramic fillers such as SiO 2 and Al 2O 3, resulting from its special framework topology structure. The excellent performances such as high ionic conductivity, good compatibility with lithium metal electrode, and broad electrochemical stability window suggesting that PEO-LiClO 4/ZSM-5 composite polymer electrolyte can be used as candidate electrolyte materials for lithium polymer batteries.

  15. Molecular dynamics simulations of RDX and RDX-based plastic-bonded explosives.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Xiao, Jijun; Zhu, Weihua; Xiao, Heming

    2009-05-30

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to investigate well-known energetic material cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX) crystal and RDX-based plastic-bonded explosives (PBXs) with four typical fluorine-polymers, polyvinylidenedifluoride (PVDF), polychlorotri-fluoroethylene (PCTFE), fluorine rubber (F(2311)), and fluorine resin (F(2314)). The elastic coefficients, mechanical properties, binding energies, and detonation performances are obtained for the RDX crystal and RDX-based PBXs. The results indicate that the mechanical properties of RDX can be effectively improved by blending with a small amount of fluorine polymers and the overall effect of fluorine polymers on the mechanical properties of the PBXs along three crystalline surfaces is (001)>(010) approximately (100) and PVDF is regarded to best improve the mechanical properties of the PBXs on three surfaces. The order of the improvement in the ductibility made by the fluorine polymers on different surfaces is (001) approximately (010)>(100). The average binding energies between different RDX crystalline surfaces and different polymer binders are obtained, and the sequence of the binding energies of the PBXs with the four fluorine polymers on the three different surfaces is varied. Among the polymer binders, PVDF is considered as best one for RDX-based PBXs. The detonation performances of the PBXs decrease in comparison with the pure crystal but are superior to those of TNT.

  16. Molecular dynamics simulation of DNA base-pair opening by sharp bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Peiwen; Dai, Liang; van der Maarel, Johan R. C.; Yan, Jie

    2013-03-01

    Many biological processes require sharp bending of DNA. According to worm-like chain model, the bending energy dominates the free energy cost of those processes containing DNA loops shorter than 40 nm, such as DNA wrapping around histones, Lac repressor looping and virus DNA packaging. However, several recent experimental observations suggest that the WLC model s not applicable under tight bending conditions. In full atom molecular dynamics simulations, a double stranded, 20 base-pairs DNA fragment is forced to bend by an external spring. It is found that one or two AT-rich regions are disrupted for sufficiently small end-to-end distance. The disrupted DNA base-pairs separate and usually stack with the neighbouring base-pairs to form a defect. It is shown that these defects are more bendable than the bending rigidity of the duplex in the regular B-form. The simulation suggests a curvature dependent, non-harmonic bending elasticity of the DNA backbone is necessary to describe the DNA conformation under tight bending conditions.

  17. Controlling molecular transport and sustained drug release in lipid-based liquid crystalline mesophases.

    PubMed

    Zabara, Alexandru; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2014-08-28

    Lipid-based lyotropic liquid crystals, also referred to as reversed liquid crystalline mesophases, such as bicontinuous cubic, hexagonal or micellar cubic phases, have attracted deep interest in the last few decades due to the possibility of observing these systems at thermodynamic equilibrium in excess water conditions. This becomes of immediate significance for applications in the colloidal environment, such as in the food, cosmetic and pharmaceutical arenas. One possible application regarded as very promising is that of controlled delivery of functional ingredients. Different crystallographic structures of the lipid mesophase give access to different diffusion coefficients and distinct diffusion modes. It becomes thus crucial to engineer the space group of the mesophase in a controlled way, and ideally, in a stimuli-responsive manner. In this article we review the state of the art on diffusion and molecular transport in lipid-based mesophases and we discuss recent contributions to the controlled delivery of molecules and colloids through these systems. In particular we focus on the different available strategies relying on either endogenous or exogenous stimuli to induce changes in the symmetry and transport properties of lipid-based mesophases and we discuss the impact and implications this may have on controlled drug delivery.

  18. Direct mapping of electrical noise sources in molecular wire-based devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Duckhyung; Lee, Hyungwoo; Shekhar, Shashank; Yang, Myungjae; Park, Jae Yeol; Hong, Seunghun

    2017-02-01

    We report a noise mapping strategy for the reliable identification and analysis of noise sources in molecular wire junctions. Here, different molecular wires were patterned on a gold substrate, and the current-noise map on the pattern was measured and analyzed, enabling the quantitative study of noise sources in the patterned molecular wires. The frequency spectra of the noise from the molecular wire junctions exhibited characteristic 1/f2 behavior, which was used to identify the electrical signals from molecular wires. This method was applied to analyze the molecular junctions comprising various thiol molecules on a gold substrate, revealing that the noise in the junctions mainly came from the fluctuation of the thiol bonds. Furthermore, we quantitatively compared the frequencies of such bond fluctuations in different molecular wire junctions and identified molecular wires with lower electrical noise, which can provide critical information for designing low-noise molecular electronic devices. Our method provides valuable insights regarding noise phenomena in molecular wires and can be a powerful tool for the development of molecular electronic devices.

  19. Direct mapping of electrical noise sources in molecular wire-based devices

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Duckhyung; Lee, Hyungwoo; Shekhar, Shashank; Yang, Myungjae; Park, Jae Yeol; Hong, Seunghun

    2017-01-01

    We report a noise mapping strategy for the reliable identification and analysis of noise sources in molecular wire junctions. Here, different molecular wires were patterned on a gold substrate, and the current-noise map on the pattern was measured and analyzed, enabling the quantitative study of noise sources in the patterned molecular wires. The frequency spectra of the noise from the molecular wire junctions exhibited characteristic 1/f2 behavior, which was used to identify the electrical signals from molecular wires. This method was applied to analyze the molecular junctions comprising various thiol molecules on a gold substrate, revealing that the noise in the junctions mainly came from the fluctuation of the thiol bonds. Furthermore, we quantitatively compared the frequencies of such bond fluctuations in different molecular wire junctions and identified molecular wires with lower electrical noise, which can provide critical information for designing low-noise molecular electronic devices. Our method provides valuable insights regarding noise phenomena in molecular wires and can be a powerful tool for the development of molecular electronic devices. PMID:28233821

  20. Supramolecular polymers constructed from macrocycle-based host-guest molecular recognition motifs.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shengyi; Zheng, Bo; Wang, Feng; Huang, Feihe

    2014-07-15

    CONSPECTUS: Supramolecular polymers, fabricated via the combination of supramolecular chemistry and polymer science, are polymeric arrays of repeating units held together by reversible, relatively weak noncovalent interactions. The introduction of noncovalent interactions, such as hydrogen bonding, aromatic stacking interactions, metal coordination, and host-guest interactions, endows supramolecular polymers with unique stimuli responsiveness and self-adjusting abilities. As a result, diverse monomer structures have been designed and synthesized to construct various types of supramolecular polymers. By changing the noncovalent interaction types, numbers, or chemical structures of functional groups in these monomers, supramolecular polymeric materials can be prepared with tailored chemical and physical properties. In recent years, the interest in supramolecular polymers has been extended from the preparation of intriguing topological structures to the discoveries of potential applications as functional materials. Compared with traditional polymers, supramolecular polymers show some advantages in the fabrication of reversible or responsive materials. The development of supramolecular polymers also offers a platform to construct complex and sophisticated materials with a bottom-up approach. Macrocylic hosts, including crown ethers, cyclodextrins, calixarenes, cucurbiturils, and pillararenes, are the most commonly used building blocks in the fabrication of host-guest interaction-based supramolecular polymers. With the introduction of complementary guest molecules, macrocylic hosts demonstrate selective and stimuli-responsive host-guest complexation behaviors. By elaborate molecular design, the resultant supramolecular polymers can exhibit diverse structures based on the self-selectivity of host-guest interactions. The introduction of reversible host-guest interactions can further endow these supramolecular polymers with interesting and fascinating chemical

  1. Bio-AIMS Collection of Chemoinformatics Web Tools based on Molecular Graph Information and Artificial Intelligence Models.

    PubMed

    Munteanu, Cristian R; Gonzalez-Diaz, Humberto; Garcia, Rafael; Loza, Mabel; Pazos, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    The molecular information encoding into molecular descriptors is the first step into in silico Chemoinformatics methods in Drug Design. The Machine Learning methods are a complex solution to find prediction models for specific biological properties of molecules. These models connect the molecular structure information such as atom connectivity (molecular graphs) or physical-chemical properties of an atom/group of atoms to the molecular activity (Quantitative Structure - Activity Relationship, QSAR). Due to the complexity of the proteins, the prediction of their activity is a complicated task and the interpretation of the models is more difficult. The current review presents a series of 11 prediction models for proteins, implemented as free Web tools on an Artificial Intelligence Model Server in Biosciences, Bio-AIMS (http://bio-aims.udc.es/TargetPred.php). Six tools predict protein activity, two models evaluate drug - protein target interactions and the other three calculate protein - protein interactions. The input information is based on the protein 3D structure for nine models, 1D peptide amino acid sequence for three tools and drug SMILES formulas for two servers. The molecular graph descriptor-based Machine Learning models could be useful tools for in silico screening of new peptides/proteins as future drug targets for specific treatments.

  2. Long-circulating PEGylated manganese ferrite nanoparticles for MRI-based molecular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pernia Leal, Manuel; Rivera-Fernández, Sara; Franco, Jaime M.; Pozo, David; de La Fuente, Jesús M.; García-Martín, María Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance based molecular imaging has emerged as a very promising technique for early detection and treatment of a wide variety of diseases, including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and vascular diseases. The limited sensitivity and specificity of conventional MRI are being overcome by the development of a new generation of contrast agents, using nanotechnology approaches, with improved magnetic and biological properties. In particular, for molecular imaging, high specificity, high sensitivity, and long blood circulation times are required. Furthermore, the lack of toxicity and immunogenicity together with low-cost scalable production are also necessary to get them into the clinics. In this work, we describe a facile, robust and cost-effective ligand-exchange method to synthesize dual T1 and T2 MRI contrast agents with long circulation times. These contrast agents are based on manganese ferrite nanoparticles (MNPs) between 6 and 14 nm in size covered by a 3 kDa polyethylene glycol (PEG) shell that leads to a great stability in aqueous media with high crystallinity and magnetization values, thus retaining the magnetic properties of the uncovered MNPs. Moreover, the PEGylated MNPs have shown different relaxivities depending on their size and the magnetic field applied. Thus, the 6 nm PEGylated MNPs are characterized by a low r2/r1 ratio of 4.9 at 1.5 T, hence resulting in good dual T1 and T2 contrast agents under low magnetic fields, whereas the 14 nm MNPs behave as excellent T2 contrast agents under high magnetic fields (r2 = 335.6 mM-1 s-1). The polymer core shell of the PEGylated MNPs minimizes their cytotoxicity, and allows long blood circulation times. This combination of cellular compatibility and excellent T2 and r2/r1 values under low magnetic fields, together with long circulation times, make these nanomaterials very promising contrast agents for molecular imaging.Magnetic resonance based molecular imaging has emerged as a very promising

  3. Isatin based Schiff bases as inhibitors of α-glucosidase: Synthesis, characterization, in vitro evaluation and molecular docking studies.

    PubMed

    Rahim, Fazal; Malik, Fazal; Ullah, Hayat; Wadood, Abdul; Khan, Fahad; Javid, Muhammad Tariq; Taha, Muhammad; Rehman, Wajid; Ur Rehman, Ashfaq; Khan, Khalid Mohammed

    2015-06-01

    Isatin base Schiff bases (1-20) were synthesized, characterized by (1)H NMR and EI/MS and evaluated for α-glucosidase inhibitory potential. Out of these twenty (20) compounds only six analogs showed potent α-glucosidase inhibitory potential with IC50 value ranging in between 2.2±0.25 and 83.5±1.0μM when compared with the standard acarbose (IC50=840±1.73μM). Among the series compound 2 having IC50 value (18.3±0.56μM), 9 (83.5±1.0μM), 11 (3.3±0.25μM), 12 (2.2±0.25μM), 14 (11.8±0.15μM), and 20 (3.0±0.15μM) showed excellent inhibitory potential many fold better than the standard acarbose. The binding interactions of these active analogs were confirmed through molecular docking.

  4. The Solvation Structure of Lithium Ions in an Ether Based Electrolyte Solution from First-Principles Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Callsen, Martin; Sodeyama, Keitaro; Futera, Zdeněk; Tateyama, Yoshitaka; Hamada, Ikutaro

    2017-01-12

    The solvation and desolvation of the Li ion play a crucial role in the electrolytes of Li based secondary batteries, and their understanding at the microscopic level is of great importance. Oligoether (glyme) based electrolytes have attracted much attention as electrolytes used in Li based secondary batteries, such as Li-ion, Li-S, and Li-O2 batteries. However, the solvation structure of the Li ion in glyme based electrolytes has not been fully clarified yet. We present a computational study on the solvation structure of lithium ions in the mixture of triglyme and lithium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)-amide (LiTFSA) by means of molecular orbital and molecular dynamics calculations based on density functional theory. We found that, in the electrolyte solution composed of the equimolar mixture of triglyme and LiTFSA, lithium ions are solvated mainly by crown-ether-like curled triglyme molecules and in direct contact with an TFSA anion. We also found the aggregate formed with Li ion and TFSA anions and/or triglyme molecule(s) is equally stable, which has not been reported in the previous classical molecular dynamics simulations, suggesting that in reality a small fraction of Li ions form aggregates and they might have a significant impact on the Li ion transport. Our results demonstrate the importance of performing electronic structure based molecular dynamics of electrolyte solution to clarify the detailed solvation structure of the Li ion.

  5. Molecular Corridor Based Approach for Description of Evolution of Secondary Organic Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y., Sr.; Poeschl, U.; Shiraiwa, M.

    2015-12-01

    Organic aerosol is ubiquitous in the atmosphere and its major component is secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Formation and evolution of SOA is a complex process involving coupled chemical reactions and mass transport in the gas and particle phases (Shiraiwa et al., 2014). Current air quality models do not embody the full spectrum of reaction and transport processes, nor do they identify the dominant rate-limiting steps in SOA formation, resulting in the significant underprediction of observed SOA concentrations, which precludes reliable quantitative predictions of aerosols and their environmental impacts. Recently, it has been suggested that the SOA chemical evolution can be represented well by "molecular corridor" with a tight inverse correlation between molar mass and volatility of SOA oxidation products (Shiraiwa et al., 2014). Here we further analyzed the structure, molar mass and volatility of 31,000 unique organic compounds. These compounds include oxygenated organic compounds as well as nitrogen- and sulfur-containing organics such as amines, organonitrates, and organosulfates. Results show that most of those compounds fall into this two-dimensional (2-D) space, which is constrained by two boundary lines corresponding to the volatility of n -alkanes CnH2n+2 and sugar alcohols CnH2n+2On. A method to predict the volatility of nitrogen- and sulfur- containing compounds is developed based on those 31,000 organic compounds. It is shown that the volatility can be well predicted as a function of chemical composition numbers, providing a way to apply this 2-D space to organic compounds observed in real atmosphere. A comprehensive set of observation data from laboratory experiments, field campaigns and indoor measurements is mapped to the molecular corridor. This 2-D space can successfully grasp the properties of organic compounds formed in different atmospheric conditions. The molecular corridor represents a new framework in which chemical and physical properties as

  6. Synthesis and characterization of sugar based low molecular weight gelators and the preparation of chiral sulfinamides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangunuru, Hari Prasad Reddy

    Low molecular weight gelators (LMWGs) have received considerable attention in the field of chemistry from last few decades. These compounds form self-assembled fibrous networks like micelles, cylindrical, sheets, fibers, layers and so on. The fibrous network entraps the solvent and forms gel, because of the self-assembly phenomenon and their demonstrated potential uses in a variety of areas, ranging from environmental to medicinal applications. Sugars are good starting materials to synthesize the new class of LMWG's, because these are different from some expensive materials, these are natural products. We have synthesized and characterized the LMGS's based on D-glucose and D-glucosamine. D-glucosamine is the versatile starting material to make different peptoids and triazoles. Several series of compounds were synthesized using compounds 1-3 as starting material and studied the gelation behavior all the compounds. We have studied the self-assembling properties of a new class of tripeptoids, synthesized by one-pot Ugi reaction from simple starting materials. Among the focused library of tripeptoids synthesized, we found that several efficient low molecular weight organogelators were obtained for aqueous DMSO and ethanol mixtures. We have also synthesized and characterized a series of monosaccharide triazole derivatives. These compounds were synthesized from N-acetyl glucosamine and D-glucose via a Cu(I) catalyzed azide/alkyne cycloaddition reaction (CuAAc). The compounds have been screened for their gelation properties and several efficient low molecular weight organo/hydro gelators were obtained, among these compounds, five per-acetyl glucosamine derivatives and one peracetyl glucose derivative were able to form gels in water. These new molecules are expected to be useful in drug delivery and tissue engineering.*. Asymmetric synthesis of chiral amines is a challenging in synthetic organic chemistry. The development of new catalysts for asymmetric organic

  7. X-ray and molecular modelling in fragment-based design of three small quinoline scaffolds for HIV integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Majerz-Maniecka, Katarzyna; Musiol, Robert; Skórska-Stania, Agnieszka; Tabak, Dominik; Mazur, Pawel; Oleksyn, Barbara J; Polanski, Jaroslaw

    2011-03-01

    Crystal structures of three small molecular scaffolds based on quinoline, 2-methylquinoline-5,8-dione, 5-hydroxy-quinaldine-6-carboxylic acid and 8-hydroxy-quinaldine-7-carboxylic acid, were characterised. 5-Hydroxy-quinaldine-6-carboxylic acid was co-crystallized with cobalt(II) chloride to form a model of divalent metal cation-ligand interactions for potential HIV integrase inhibitors. Molecular docking into active site of HIV IN was also performed on 1WKN PDB file. Selected ligand-protein interactions have been found specific for active compounds. Studied structures can be used as scaffolds in fragment-based design of new potent drugs.

  8. Molecular pharmacognosy.

    PubMed

    Huang, LuQi; Xiao, PeiGen; Guo, LanPing; Gao, WenYuan

    2010-06-01

    This article analyzes the background and significance of molecular pharmacognosy, including the molecular identification of medicinal raw materials, phylogenetic evolution of medicinal plants and animals, evaluation and preservation of germplasm resources for medicinal plants and animals, etiology of endangerment and protection of endangered medicinal plants and animals, biosynthesis and bioregulation of active components in medicinal plants, and characteristics and the molecular bases of top-geoherbs.

  9. Theragnosis-based combined cancer therapy using doxorubicin-conjugated microRNA-221 molecular beacon.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jonghwan; Choi, Kyung-Ju; Moon, Sung Ung; Kim, Soonhag

    2016-01-01

    Recently, microRNA (miRNA or miR) has emerged as a new cancer biomarker because of its high expression level in various cancer types and its role in the control of tumor suppressor genes. In cancer studies, molecular imaging and treatment based on target cancer markers have been combined to facilitate simultaneous cancer diagnosis and therapy. In this study, for combined therapy with diagnosis of cancer, we developed a doxorubicin-conjugated miR-221 molecular beacon (miR-221 DOXO MB) in a single platform composed of three different nucleotides: miR-221 binding sequence, black hole quencher 1 (BHQ1), and doxorubicin binding site. Imaging of endogenous miR-221 was achieved by specific hybridization between miR-221 and the miR-221 binding site in miR-221 DOXO MB. The presence of miR-221 triggered detachment of the quencher oligo and subsequent activation of a fluorescent signal of miR-221 DOXO MB. Simultaneous cancer therapy in C6 astrocytoma cells and nude mice was achieved by inhibition of miRNA-221 function that downregulates tumor suppressor genes. The detection of miR-221 expression and inhibition of miR-221 function by miR-221 DOXO MB provide the feasibility as a cancer theragnostic probe. Furthermore, a cytotoxic effect was induced by unloading of doxorubicin intercalated into miR-221 DOXO MB inside cells. Loss of miR-221 function and cytotoxicity induced by the miR-221 DOXO MB provides combined therapeutic efficacy against cancers. This method could be used as a new theragnostic probe with enhanced therapy to detect and inhibit many cancer-related miRNAs.

  10. Algorithms and novel applications based on the isokinetic ensemble. II. Ab initio molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minary, Peter; Martyna, Glenn J.; Tuckerman, Mark E.

    2003-02-01

    In this paper (Paper II), the isokinetic dynamics scheme described in Paper I is combined with the plane-wave based Car-Parrinello (CP) ab initio molecular dynamics (MD) method [R. Car and M. Parrinello, Phys. Rev. Lett. 55, 2471 (1985)] to enable the efficient study of chemical reactions and metallic systems. The Car-Parrinello approach employs "on the fly" electronic structure calculations as a means of generating accurate internuclear forces for use in a molecular dynamics simulation. This is accomplished by the introduction of an extended Lagrangian that contains the electronic orbitals as fictitious dynamical variables (often expressed directly in terms of the expansion coefficients of the orbitals in a particular basis set). Thus, rather than quench the expansion coefficients to obtain the ground state energy and nuclear forces at every time step, the orbitals are "propagated" under conditions that allow them to fluctuate rapidly around their global minimum and, hence, generate an accurate approximation to the nuclear forces as the simulation proceeds. Indeed, the CP technique requires the dynamics of the orbitals to be both fast compared to the nuclear degrees of freedom while keeping the fictitious kinetic energy that allows them to be propagated dynamically as small as possible. While these conditions can be easy to achieve in many types of systems, in metals and highly exothermic chemical reactions difficulties arise. (Note, the CP dynamics of metals is incorrect because the nuclear motion does not occur on the ground state electronic surface but it can, nonetheless, provide useful information.) In order to alleviate these difficulties the isokinetic methods of Paper I are applied to derive isokinetic CP equations of motion. The efficacy of the new isokinetic CPMD method is demonstrated on model and realistic systems. The latter include, metallic systems, liquid aluminum, a small silicon sample, the 2×1 reconstruction of the silicon 100 surface, and the

  11. Electrochemical microfluidic chip based on molecular imprinting technique applied for therapeutic drug monitoring.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiang; Zhang, Yu; Jiang, Min; Tian, Liping; Sun, Shiguo; Zhao, Na; Zhao, Feilang; Li, Yingchun

    2017-05-15

    In this work, a novel electrochemical detection platform was established by integrating molecularly imprinting technique with microfluidic chip and applied for trace measurement of three therapeutic drugs. The chip foundation is acrylic panel with designed grooves. In the detection cell of the chip, a Pt wire is used as the counter electrode and reference electrode, and a Au-Ag alloy microwire (NPAMW) with 3D nanoporous surface modified with electro-polymerized molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) film as the working electrode. Detailed characterization of the chip and the working electrode was performed, and the properties were explored by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Two methods, respectively based on electrochemical catalysis and MIP/gate effect were employed for detecting warfarin sodium by using the prepared chip. The linearity of electrochemical catalysis method was in the range of 5×10(-6)-4×10(-4)M, which fails to meet clinical testing demand. By contrast, the linearity of gate effect was 2×10(-11)-4×10(-9)M with remarkably low detection limit of 8×10(-12)M (S/N=3), which is able to satisfy clinical assay. Then the system was applied for 24-h monitoring of drug concentration in plasma after administration of warfarin sodium in rabbit, and the corresponding pharmacokinetic parameters were obtained. In addition, the microfluidic chip was successfully adopted to analyze cyclophosphamide and carbamazepine, implying its good versatile ability. It is expected that this novel electrochemical microfluidic chip can act as a promising format for point-of-care testing via monitoring different analytes sensitively and conveniently.

  12. Electrolyte Gradient-Based Modulation of Molecular Transport through Nanoporous Gold Membranes.

    PubMed

    McCurry, Daniel A; Bailey, Ryan C

    2017-02-14

    Nanopores, and nanoporous materials in general, are interesting for applications in chemical and biomolecular transport as pore sizes are on the same scale as the dimension of many (bio)chemical species. Many studies have focused on either single pores or small arrays of cylindrical pores, which are convenient in terms of their amenability toward computational modeling of transport phenomenon. However, the limited overall porosity may inhibit transport flux as well as the eventual implementation of these materials as active separation elements. Inspired by its relatively high porosity, we have explored nanoporous gold (NPG) as a membrane across which small molecular species can be transported. NPG offers a random, bicontinuous pore geometry, while also being inherently conductive and readily amenable to surface modification-attributes that may be enabling in the pursuit of size- and charge-based approaches to molecular separations. NPG was fabricated via a free-corrosion process whereby immersion of Au-containing alloys in concentrated nitric acid preferentially dissolves the less noble metals (e.g., Ni, Cu). Average pore diameters of 50 ± 20 nm were obtained as verified under scanning electron microscopy. NPG membranes were sandwiched between two reservoirs, and the selective transport of chemical species across the membrane in the presence of an ionic strength gradient was investigated. The flux of small molecules were monitored by UV-vis absorption spectrometry and found to be dependent upon the direction and magnitude of the ionic strength gradient. Moreover, transport trends underscored the effects of surface charge in a confined environment, considering that the pore diameters were on the same scale as the electrical double layer experienced by molecules transiting the membrane. Under such conditions, the transport of anions and cations through NPG was found to depend on an induced electric field as well as ion advection. Further electrical and surface

  13. A new near-infrared absorption and fluorescent probe based on bombesin for molecular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kujala, Naresh; Zhai, Huifang; Smith, Charles; Prasanphanich, Adam; Sieckman, Gary; Hoffman, Timothy; Volkert, Wynn; Ma, Lixin; Yu, Ping

    2009-02-01

    We have developed a series of new dye bombesin conjugates for site-specific absorption and fluorescence imaging of human prostate and breast cancers. Bombesin (BBN), an amphibian analog to the endogenous ligand, binds to the gastrin releasing peptide (GRP) receptors with high specificity and affinity. Previously, we developed an Alexa Fluor 680-GGG-BBN peptide conjugate which demonstrated high binding affinity and specificity for breast cancer cells in the in vitro and in vivo tests (Ref: Ma et al., Molecular Imaging, vol. 6, no. 3, 2007: 171-180). This probe can not be used as an absorption probe in near-infrared imaging because its absorption peak is in the visible wavelength range. In addition, site specific longer wavelength fluorescent probe is desired for in vivo molecular imaging because long wavelength photons penetrate deeper into tissue. The new absorption and fluorescent probe we developed is based on the last eight-residues of BBN, -Q-W-A-V-G-H-L-M-(NH2), and labeled with AlexaFluor750 through a chemical linker, beta-alanine. The new probe, Alexa Fluor 750-BetaAla-BBN(7-14)NH2, exhibits optimal pharmacokinetics for specific targeting and optical imaging of the GRP receptor over-expressing cancer cells. Absorption spectrum has been measured and showed absorption peaks at 690nm, 720nm and 735nm. Fluorescent band is located at 755nm. In vitro and in vivo investigations have demonstrated the effectiveness of the new conjugates to specifically target human cancer cells overexpressing GRP receptors and tumor xenografts in severely compromised immunodeficient mouse model.

  14. Silicon-based molecular nanotechnology: Fabrication and characterization with the scanning tunneling microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hersam, Mark Christopher

    2000-10-01

    The importance of molecular nanotechnology has recently been underscored by increased media, public, and government awareness of the subject. This thesis examines several nanotechnology issues on the technologically significant Si(100) surface with the ultra-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscope (UHV-STM). Nanoscale studies have revealed that the in situ H-passivated Si(100) surface remains atomically pristine even after exposure to ambient conditions. The robustness of this surface suggests its use as a chemically inert resist layer. Using feedback-controlled lithography (FCL), individual hydrogen atoms can be removed from the Si(100)-2x1:H surface. The remaining dangling bond patterns serve as atomically precise templates upon which other materials can spontaneously self-assemble. By utilizing this selective chemistry in situ, several organic molecules (e.g., norbornadiene (NBE), copper phthalocyanine (CuPc), and C60) have been isolated. The mechanical, chemical, and electronic properties of these individual adsorbed species are then immediately detected with the STM. For CuPc, the spatial extent of charge transfer from the substrate to the adsorbate is measured as a function of binding orientation. When the CuPc is reduced with ammonia, single molecule rotation is observed. STM spectroscopic measurements on C 60 reveal intramolecular variations in the electronic density of states. For electronic applications, the application of lateral electrical fields to individual molecules is crucial. A fully compatible electrical contacting scheme based on p-n junctions will be presented. Efficient STM potentiometric location of these p-n junctions suggests their additional use as alignment markers. Beyond outlining advances in molecular nanoelectronics, this thesis will also draw connections between fundamental silicon research and current technology.

  15. Effects of electronic coupling and electrostatic potential on charge transport in carbon-based molecular electronic junctions

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Summary Molecular junctions consisting of 2–20 nm thick layers of organic oligomers oriented between a conducting carbon substrate and a carbon/gold top contact have proven to be reproducible and reliable, and will soon enter commercial production in audio processing circuits. The covalent, conjugated bond between one or both sp2-hybridized carbon contacts and an aromatic molecular layer is distinct from the more common metal/molecule or silicon/molecule structures in many reported molecular junctions. Theoretical observations based on density functional theory are presented here, which model carbon-based molecular junctions as single molecules and oligomers between fragments of graphene. Electronic coupling between the molecules and the contacts is demonstrated by the formation of hybrid orbitals in the model structure, which have significant electron density on both the graphene and the molecule. The energies of such hybrid orbitals correlate with tunneling barriers determined experimentally, and electronic coupling between the two graphene fragments in the model correlates with experimentally observed attenuation of transport with molecular layer thickness. Electronic coupling is affected significantly by the dihedral angle between the planes of the graphene and the molecular π-systems, but is absent only when the two planes are orthogonal. Coupling also results in partial charge transfer between the graphene contacts and the molecular layer, which results in a shift in electrostatic potential which affects the observed tunneling barrier. Although the degree of partial charge transfer is difficult to calculate accurately, it does provide a basis for the “vacuum level shift” observed in many experiments, including transport and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy of molecular layers on conductors. PMID:26925350

  16. Molecular-scale Hydrophilicity Induced by Solute: Molecular-thick Charged Pancakes of Aqueous Salt Solution on Hydrophobic Carbon-based Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Guosheng; Shen, Yue; Liu, Jian; Wang, Chunlei; Wang, Ying; Song, Bo; Hu, Jun; Fang, Haiping

    2014-01-01

    We directly observed molecular-thick aqueous salt-solution pancakes on a hydrophobic graphite surface under ambient conditions employing atomic force microscopy. This observation indicates the unexpected molecular-scale hydrophilicity of the salt solution on graphite surfaces, which is different from the macroscopic wetting property of a droplet standing on the graphite surface. Interestingly, the pancakes spontaneously displayed strong positively charged behavior. Theoretical studies showed that the formation of such positively charged pancakes is attributed to cation–π interactions between Na+ ions in the aqueous solution and aromatic rings on the graphite surface, promoting the adsorption of water molecules together with cations onto the graphite surface; i.e., Na+ ions as a medium adsorbed to the graphite surface through cation–π interactions on one side while at the same time bonding to water molecules through hydration interaction on the other side at a molecular scale. These findings suggest that actual interactions regarding carbon-based graphitic surfaces including those of graphene, carbon nanotubes, and biochar may be significantly different from existing theory and they provide new insight into the control of surface wettability, interactions and related physical, chemical and biological processes. PMID:25348642

  17. Understanding the comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) in terms of molecular quantum similarity and DFT-based reactivity descriptors.

    PubMed

    Morales-Bayuelo, Alejandro; Matute, Ricardo A; Caballero, Julio

    2015-06-01

    The three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D QSAR) models have many applications, although the inherent complexity to understand the results coming from 3D-QSAR arises the necessity of new insights in the interpretation of them. Hence, the quantum similarity field as well as reactivity descriptors based on the density functional theory were used in this work as a consistent approach to better understand the 3D-QSAR studies in drug design. For this purpose, the quantification of steric and electrostatic effects on a series of bicycle [4.1.0] heptane derivatives as melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 antagonists were performed on the basis of molecular quantum similarity measures. The maximum similarity superposition and the topo-geometrical superposition algorithms were used as molecular alignment methods to deal with the problem of relative molecular orientation in quantum similarity. In addition, a chemical reactivity analysis using global and local descriptors such as chemical hardness, softness, electrophilicity, and Fukui functions, was developed. Overall, our results suggest that the application of this methodology in drug design can be useful when the receptor is known or even unknown.

  18. Genotoxicity and molecular response of silver nanoparticle (NP)-based hydrogel

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Since silver-nanoparticles (NPs) possess an antibacterial activity, they were commonly used in medical products and devices, food storage materials, cosmetics, various health care products, and industrial products. Various silver-NP based medical devices are available for clinical uses, such as silver-NP based dressing and silver-NP based hydrogel (silver-NP-hydrogel) for medical applications. Although the previous data have suggested silver-NPs induced toxicity in vivo and in vitro, there is lack information about the mechanisms of biological response and potential toxicity of silver-NP-hydrogel. Methods In this study, the genotoxicity of silver-NP-hydrogel was assayed using cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN). The molecular response was studied using DNA microarray and GO pathway analysis. Results and discussion The results of global gene expression analysis in HeLa cells showed that thousands of genes were up- or down-regulated at 48 h of silver-NP-hydrogel exposure. Further GO pathway analysis suggested that fourteen theoretical activating signaling pathways were attributed to up-regulated genes; and three signal pathways were attributed to down-regulated genes. It was discussed that the cells protect themselves against silver NP-mediated toxicity through up-regulating metallothionein genes and anti-oxidative stress genes. The changes in DNA damage, apoptosis and mitosis pathway were closely related to silver-NP-induced cytotoxicity and chromosome damage. The down-regulation of CDC14A via mitosis pathway might play a role in potential genotoxicity induced by silver-NPs. Conclusions The silver-NP-hydrogel induced micronuclei formation in cellular level and broad spectrum molecular responses in gene expression level. The results of signal pathway analysis suggested that the balances between anti-ROS response and DNA damage, chromosome instability, mitosis inhibition might play important roles in silver-NP induced toxicity. The inflammatory factors

  19. A bayesian mixed regression based prediction of quantitative traits from molecular marker and gene expression data.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Madhuchhanda; Sillanpää, Mikko J

    2011-01-01

    Both molecular marker and gene expression data were considered alone as well as jointly to serve as additive predictors for two pathogen-activity-phenotypes in real recombinant inbred lines of soybean. For unobserved phenotype prediction, we used a bayesian hierarchical regression modeling, where the number of possible predictors in the model was controlled by different selection strategies tested. Our initial findings were submitted for DREAM5 (the 5th Dialogue on Reverse Engineering Assessment and Methods challenge) and were judged to be the best in sub-challenge B3 wherein both functional genomic and genetic data were used to predict the phenotypes. In this work we further improve upon this previous work by considering various predictor selection strategies and cross-validation was used to measure accuracy of in-data and out-data predictions. The results from various model choices indicate that for this data use of both data types (namely functional genomic and genetic) simultaneously improves out-data prediction accuracy. Adequate goodness-of-fit can be easily achieved with more complex models for both phenotypes, since the number of potential predictors is large and the sample size is not small. We also further studied gene-set enrichment (for continuous phenotype) in the biological process in question and chromosomal enrichment of the gene set. The methodological contribution of this paper is in exploration of variable selection techniques to alleviate the problem of over-fitting. Different strategies based on the nature of covariates were explored and all methods were implemented under the bayesian hierarchical modeling framework with indicator-based covariate selection. All the models based in careful variable selection procedure were found to produce significant results based on permutation test.

  20. Raman spectroscopy based investigation of molecular changes associated with an early stage of dengue virus infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilal, Maria; Bilal, Muhammad; Saleem, Muhammad; Khurram, Muhammad; Khan, Saranjam; Ullah, Rahat; Ali, Hina; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Shahzada, Shaista; Ullah Khan, Ehsan

    2017-04-01

    Raman spectroscopy based investigations of the molecular changes associated with an early stage of dengue virus infection (DENV) using a partial least squares (PLS) regression model is presented. This study is based on non-structural protein 1 (NS1) which appears after three days of DENV infection. In total, 39 blood sera samples were collected and divided into two groups. The control group contained samples which were the negative for NS1 and antibodies and the positive group contained those samples in which NS1 is positive and antibodies were negative. Out of 39 samples, 29 Raman spectra were used for the model development while the remaining 10 were kept hidden for blind testing of the model. PLS regression yielded a vector of regression coefficients as a function of Raman shift, which were analyzed. Cytokines in the region 775–875 cm‑1, lectins at 1003, 1238, 1340, 1449 and 1672 cm‑1, DNA in the region 1040–1140 cm‑1 and alpha and beta structures of proteins in the region 933–967 cm‑1 have been identified in the regression vector for their role in an early stage of DENV infection. Validity of the model was established by its R-square value of 0.891. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 100% each and the area under the receiver operator characteristic curve was found to be 1.

  1. Toll-Like Receptor 7 Agonists: Chemical Feature Based Pharmacophore Identification and Molecular Docking Studies

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lidan; Zhang, Liangren; Sun, Gang; Wang, Zhanli; Yu, Yongchun

    2013-01-01

    Chemical feature based pharmacophore models were generated for Toll-like receptors 7 (TLR7) agonists using HypoGen algorithm, which is implemented in the Discovery Studio software. Several methods tools used in validation of pharmacophore model were presented. The first hypothesis Hypo1 was considered to be the best pharmacophore model, which consists of four features: one hydrogen bond acceptor, one hydrogen bond donor, and two hydrophobic features. In addition, homology modeling and molecular docking studies were employed to probe the intermolecular interactions between TLR7 and its agonists. The results further confirmed the reliability of the pharmacophore model. The obtained pharmacophore model (Hypo1) was then employed as a query to screen the Traditional Chinese Medicine Database (TCMD) for other potential lead compounds. One hit was identified as a potent TLR7 agonist, which has antiviral activity against hepatitis virus in vitro. Therefore, our current work provides confidence for the utility of the selected chemical feature based pharmacophore model to design novel TLR7 agonists with desired biological activity. PMID:23526932

  2. Active food packaging based on molecularly imprinted polymers: study of the release kinetics of ferulic acid.

    PubMed

    Otero-Pazos, Pablo; Rodríguez-Bernaldo de Quirós, Ana; Sendón, Raquel; Benito-Peña, Elena; González-Vallejo, Victoria; Moreno-Bondi, M Cruz; Angulo, Immaculada; Paseiro-Losada, Perfecto

    2014-11-19

    A novel active packaging based on molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) was developed for the controlled release of ferulic acid. The release kinetics of ferulic acid from the active system to food simulants (10, 20, and 50% ethanol (v/v), 3% acetic acid (w/v), and vegetable oil), substitutes (95% ethanol (v/v) and isooctane), and real food samples at different temperatures were studied. The key parameters of the diffusion process were calculated by using a mathematical modeling based on Fick's second law. The ferulic acid release was affected by the temperature as well as the percentage of ethanol of the simulant. The fastest release occurred in 95% ethanol (v/v) at 20 °C. The diffusion coefficients (D) obtained ranged between 1.8 × 10(-11) and 4.2 × 10(-9) cm(2)/s. A very good correlation between experimental and estimated data was obtained, and consequently the model could be used to predict the release of ferulic acid into food simulants and real food samples.

  3. Development of Dual Inhibitors against Alzheimer's Disease Using Fragment-Based QSAR and Molecular Docking

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Manisha; Dhanjal, Jaspreet Kaur; Goyal, Sukriti; Tyagi, Chetna; Hamid, Rabia; Grover, Abhinav

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's (AD) is the leading cause of dementia among elderly people. Considering the complex heterogeneous etiology of AD, there is an urgent need to develop multitargeted drugs for its suppression. β-amyloid cleavage enzyme (BACE-1) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE), being important for AD progression, have been considered as promising drug targets. In this study, a robust and highly predictive group-based QSAR (GQSAR) model has been developed based on the descriptors calculated for the fragments of 20 1,4-dihydropyridine (DHP) derivatives. A large combinatorial library of DHP analogues was created, the activity of each compound was predicted, and the top compounds were analyzed using refined molecular docking. A detailed interaction analysis was carried out for the top two compounds (EDC and FDC) which showed significant binding affinity for BACE-1 and AChE. This study paves way for consideration of these lead molecules as prospective drugs for the effective dual inhibition of BACE-1 and AChE. The GQSAR model provides site-specific clues about the molecules where certain modifications can result in increased biological activity. This information could be of high value for design and development of multifunctional drugs for combating AD. PMID:25019089

  4. Rice starch, amylopectin, and amylose: molecular weight and solubility in dimethyl sulfoxide-based solvents.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Fang; Yokoyama, Wallace; Wang, Qian; Shoemaker, Charles F

    2006-03-22

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), with either 50 mM LiBr, 10% water, or both, was used as solvent for multi-angle laser-light scattering (MALLS) batch mode analysis of rice starch, and amylopectin and amylose weight-average molecular weight (Mw). DMSO/50 mM LiBr was a better solvent for these measurements than was DMSO/10% water, based on this solvent's ability to dissolve starch and to reduce the size of starch aggregates. Starch concentration decreased and amylose:amylopectin ratio increased when starch suspended in DMSO was centrifuged or filtered prior to size-exclusion chromatography (SEC)-MALLS analysis. A higher amylose:amylopectin ratio made starch more soluble, and the higher this ratio, the lower the Mw of eluted amylopectin. For SEC analysis of Mw, fractions of starch amylopectin and amylose dispersed in DMSO-based solvents yielded better results than starch dispersed directly into the solvents, because dispersion of these fractions decreased starch aggregation. When these two starch components were fractionated and then dissolved separately in DMSO/50 mM LiBr, the Mw of dispersed amylopectin ranged from 40 to 50 million, and that of amylose was ca. 3 million, whereas starch from three rice varieties of varying amylose content ranged from 60 to 130 million. We recommend that SEC evaluation of amylopectin and amylose be accomplished with fractionated samples as in this study; such evaluations were superior to evaluations of natural mixtures of amylopectin and amylose.

  5. Molecular Simulation-Based Structural Prediction of Protein Complexes in Mass Spectrometry: The Human Insulin Dimer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jinyu; Rossetti, Giulia; Dreyer, Jens; Raugei, Simone; Ippoliti, Emiliano; Lüscher, Bernhard; Carloni, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Protein electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry (MS)-based techniques are widely used to provide insight into structural proteomics under the assumption that non-covalent protein complexes being transferred into the gas phase preserve basically the same intermolecular interactions as in solution. Here we investigate the applicability of this assumption by extending our previous structural prediction protocol for single proteins in ESI-MS to protein complexes. We apply our protocol to the human insulin dimer (hIns2) as a test case. Our calculations reproduce the main charge and the collision cross section (CCS) measured in ESI-MS experiments. Molecular dynamics simulations for 0.075 ms show that the complex maximizes intermolecular non-bonded interactions relative to the structure in water, without affecting the cross section. The overall gas-phase structure of hIns2 does exhibit differences with the one in aqueous solution, not inferable from a comparison with calculated CCS. Hence, care should be exerted when interpreting ESI-MS proteomics data based solely on NMR and/or X-ray structural information. PMID:25210764

  6. Analysis of Factors Influencing Hydration Site Prediction Based on Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Water contributes significantly to the binding of small molecules to proteins in biochemical systems. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation based programs such as WaterMap and WATsite have been used to probe the locations and thermodynamic properties of hydration sites at the surface or in the binding site of proteins generating important information for structure-based drug design. However, questions associated with the influence of the simulation protocol on hydration site analysis remain. In this study, we use WATsite to investigate the influence of factors such as simulation length and variations in initial protein conformations on hydration site prediction. We find that 4 ns MD simulation is appropriate to obtain a reliable prediction of the locations and thermodynamic properties of hydration sites. In addition, hydration site prediction can be largely affected by the initial protein conformations used for MD simulations. Here, we provide a first quantification of this effect and further indicate that similar conformations of binding site residues (RMSD < 0.5 Å) are required to obtain consistent hydration site predictions. PMID:25252619

  7. Development of a compact scintillator-based high-resolution Compton camera for molecular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimoto, A.; Kataoka, J.; Koide, A.; Sueoka, K.; Iwamoto, Y.; Taya, T.; Ohsuka, S.

    2017-02-01

    The Compton camera, which shows gamma-ray distribution utilizing the kinematics of Compton scattering, is a promising detector capable of imaging across a wide range of energy. In this study, we aim to construct a small-animal molecular imaging system in a wide energy range by using the Compton camera. We developed a compact medical Compton camera based on a Ce-doped Gd3Al2Ga3O12 (Ce:GAGG) scintillator and multi-pixel photon counter (MPPC). A basic performance confirmed that for 662 keV, the typical energy resolution was 7.4 % (FWHM) and the angular resolution was 4.5° (FWHM). We then used the medical Compton camera to conduct imaging experiments based on a 3-D imaging reconstruction algorithm using the multi-angle data acquisition method. The result confirmed that for a 137Cs point source at a distance of 4 cm, the image had a spatial resolution of 3.1 mm (FWHM). Furthermore, we succeeded in producing 3-D multi-color image of different simultaneous energy sources (22Na [511 keV], 137Cs [662 keV], and 54Mn [834 keV]).

  8. Molecular docking based screening of compounds against VP40 from Ebola virus

    PubMed Central

    M Alam El-Din, Hanaa; A. Loutfy, Samah; Fathy, Nasra; H Elberry, Mostafa; M Mayla, Ahmed; Kassem, Sara; Naqvi, Asif

    2016-01-01

    Ebola virus causes severe and often fatal hemorrhagic fevers in humans. The 2014 Ebola epidemic affected multiple countries. The virus matrix protein (VP40) plays a central role in virus assembly and budding. Since there is no FDA-approved vaccine or medicine against Ebola viral infection, discovering new compounds with different binding patterns against it is required. Therefore, we aim to identify small molecules that target the Arg 134 RNA binding and active site of VP40 protein. 1800 molecules were retrieved from PubChem compound database based on Structure Similarity and Conformers of pyrimidine-2, 4-dione. Molecular docking approach using Lamarckian Genetic Algorithm was carried out to find the potent inhibitors for VP40 based on calculated ligand-protein pairwise interaction energies. The grid maps representing the protein were calculated using auto grid and grid size was set to 60*60*60 points with grid spacing of 0.375 Ǻ. Ten independent docking runs were carried out for each ligand and results were clustered according to the 1.0 Ǻ RMSD criteria. The post-docking analysis showed that binding energies ranged from -8.87 to 0.6 Kcal/mol. We report 7 molecules, which showed promising ADMET results, LD-50, as well as H-bond interaction in the binding pocket. The small molecules discovered could act as potential inhibitors for VP40 and could interfere with virus assembly and budding process. PMID:28149054

  9. Molecular docking based screening of compounds against VP40 from Ebola virus.

    PubMed

    M Alam El-Din, Hanaa; A Loutfy, Samah; Fathy, Nasra; H Elberry, Mostafa; M Mayla, Ahmed; Kassem, Sara; Naqvi, Asif

    2016-01-01

    Ebola virus causes severe and often fatal hemorrhagic fevers in humans. The 2014 Ebola epidemic affected multiple countries. The virus matrix protein (VP40) plays a central role in virus assembly and budding. Since there is no FDA-approved vaccine or medicine against Ebola viral infection, discovering new compounds with different binding patterns against it is required. Therefore, we aim to identify small molecules that target the Arg 134 RNA binding and active site of VP40 protein. 1800 molecules were retrieved from PubChem compound database based on Structure Similarity and Conformers of pyrimidine-2, 4-dione. Molecular docking approach using Lamarckian Genetic Algorithm was carried out to find the potent inhibitors for VP40 based on calculated ligand-protein pairwise interaction energies. The grid maps representing the protein were calculated using auto grid and grid size was set to 60*60*60 points with grid spacing of 0.375 Ǻ. Ten independent docking runs were carried out for each ligand and results were clustered according to the 1.0 Ǻ RMSD criteria. The post-docking analysis showed that binding energies ranged from -8.87 to 0.6 Kcal/mol. We report 7 molecules, which showed promising ADMET results, LD-50, as well as H-bond interaction in the binding pocket. The small molecules discovered could act as potential inhibitors for VP40 and could interfere with virus assembly and budding process.

  10. Paper-based sample-to-answer molecular diagnostic platform for point-of-care diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jane Ru; Tang, Ruihua; Wang, ShuQi; Wan Abas, Wan Abu Bakar; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda; Xu, Feng

    2015-12-15

    Nucleic acid testing (NAT), as a molecular diagnostic technique, including nucleic acid extraction, amplification and detection, plays a fundamental role in medical diagnosis for timely medical treatment. However, current NAT technologies require relatively high-end instrumentation, skilled personnel, and are time-consuming. These drawbacks mean conventional NAT becomes impractical in many resource-limited disease-endemic settings, leading to an urgent need to develop a fast and portable NAT diagnostic tool. Paper-based devices are typically robust, cost-effective and user-friendly, holding a great potential for NAT at the point of care. In view of the escalating demand for the low cost diagnostic devices, we highlight the beneficial use of paper as a platform for NAT, the current state of its development, and the existing challenges preventing its widespread use. We suggest a strategy involving integrating all three steps of NAT into one single paper-based sample-to-answer diagnostic device for rapid medical diagnostics in the near future.

  11. Mathematical biology modules based on modern molecular biology and modern discrete mathematics.

    PubMed

    Robeva, Raina; Davies, Robin; Hodge, Terrell; Enyedi, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    We describe an ongoing collaborative curriculum materials development project between Sweet Briar College and Western Michigan University, with support from the National Science Foundation. We present a collection of modules under development that can be used in existing mathematics and biology courses, and we address a critical national need to introduce students to mathematical methods beyond the interface of biology with calculus. Based on ongoing research, and designed to use the project-based-learning approach, the modules highlight applications of modern discrete mathematics and algebraic statistics to pressing problems in molecular biology. For the majority of projects, calculus is not a required prerequisite and, due to the modest amount of mathematical background needed for some of the modules, the materials can be used for an early introduction to mathematical modeling. At the same time, most modules are connected with topics in linear and abstract algebra, algebraic geometry, and probability, and they can be used as meaningful applied introductions into the relevant advanced-level mathematics courses. Open-source software is used to facilitate the relevant computations. As a detailed example, we outline a module that focuses on Boolean models of the lac operon network.

  12. Detection of Variation in Long-Term Micropropagated Mature Pistachio via DNA-Based Molecular Markers.

    PubMed

    Akdemir, Hülya; Suzerer, Veysel; Tilkat, Engin; Onay, Ahmet; Çiftçi, Yelda Ozden

    2016-12-01

    Determination of genetic stability of in vitro-grown plantlets is needed for safe and large-scale production of mature trees. In this study, genetic variation of long-term micropropagated mature pistachio developed through direct shoot bud regeneration using apical buds (protocol A) and in vitro-derived leaves (protocol B) was assessed via DNA-based molecular markers. Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR), and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) were employed, and the obtained PIC values from RAPD (0.226), ISSR (0.220), and AFLP (0.241) showed that micropropagation of pistachio for different periods of time resulted in "reasonable polymorphism" among donor plant and its 18 clones. Mantel's test showed a consistence polymorphism level between marker systems based on similarity matrices. In conclusion, this is the first study on occurrence of genetic variability in long-term micropropagated mature pistachio plantlets. The obtained results clearly indicated that different marker approaches used in this study are reliable for assessing tissue culture-induced variations in long-term cultured pistachio plantlets.

  13. Molecular dynamics-based refinement and validation for sub-5 Å cryo-electron microscopy maps

    PubMed Central

    Singharoy, Abhishek; Teo, Ivan; McGreevy, Ryan; Stone, John E; Zhao, Jianhua; Schulten, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Two structure determination methods, based on the molecular dynamics flexible fitting (MDFF) paradigm, are presented that resolve sub-5 Å cryo-electron microscopy (EM) maps with either single structures or ensembles of such structures. The methods, denoted cascade MDFF and resolution exchange MDFF, sequentially re-refine a search model against a series of maps of progressively higher resolutions, which ends with the original experimental resolution. Application of sequential re-refinement enables MDFF to achieve a radius of convergence of ~25 Å demonstrated with the accurate modeling of β-galactosidase and TRPV1 proteins at 3.2 Å and 3.4 Å resolution, respectively. The MDFF refinements uniquely offer map-model validation and B-factor determination criteria based on the inherent dynamics of the macromolecules studied, captured by means of local root mean square fluctuations. The MDFF tools described are available to researchers through an easy-to-use and cost-effective cloud computing resource on Amazon Web Services. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16105.001 PMID:27383269

  14. Experimental and Theoretical Study of Molecular Response of Amine Bases in Organic Solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Kathmann, Shawn M.; Cho, Herman M.; Chang, Tsun-Mei; Schenter, Gregory K.; Parab, Kshitij K.; Autrey, Thomas

    2014-05-08

    Reorientational correlation times of various amine bases (viz., pyridine, 2,6-lutidene, 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine) and organic solvents (dichloromethane, toluene) were determined by solution-state NMR relaxation time measurements and compared with predictions from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The bases and solvents are reagents in complex reactions involving Frustrated Lewis Pairs (FLP), which display remarkable catalytic activity in metal-free H2 scission. The comparison of measured and simulated correlation times is a key test of the ability of recent MD and quantum electronic structure calculations to elucidate the mechanism of FLP activity. Correla- tion times were found to be in the range 1.4-3.4 ps (NMR) and 1.23-5.28 ps (MD) for the amines, and 0.9-2.3 ps (NMR) and 0.2-1.7 ps (MD) for the solvent molecules. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences. Pacic Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle.

  15. Novel nanodispersed coal liquefaction catalysts: Molecular design via microemulsion-based synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Osseo-Asare, K.; Boakye, E.; Vaidyanathan, N.; Radovic, L.R.

    1991-10-01

    The objective of this project is to pursue the development of highly dispersed and inexpensive catalysts for improved coal solubilization and upgrading of coal liquids. A novel study of the synthesis of liquefaction catalysts of nanometer size will be carried out. It is based on the molecular design of reverse micelles (microemulsions). These surfactant-stabilized, metalbearing microdrops offer unique opportunities for synthesizing very small particles by providing a cage-like effect that limits particle nucleation, growth and agglomeration. The emphasis will be on iron- and molybdenum-based catalysts, but the techniques to be developed should also be generally applicable. The size of these very small and monodispersed particles will be accurately determined both separately and after in situ and ex situ coal impregnation. The as-prepared nanoparticles as well as the catalyst-impregnated coal or char matrix will be characterized using the following techniques: dynamic light scattering, x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning and/or transmission electron microscopy, and selective chemisorption.

  16. Novel nanodispersed coal liquefaction catalysts: Molecular design via microemulsion-based synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Osseo-Asare, K.; Radovic, L.R.

    1991-04-01

    The objective of this project is to pursue the development of highly dispersed and inexpensive catalysts for improved coal solubilization and upgrading of coal liquids. A novel study of the synthesis of liquefaction catalysts of nanometer size will be carried out. It is based on the molecular design of reverse micelles (microemulsions). These surfactant-stabilized, metal bearing microdrops offer unique opportunities for synthesizing very small particles by providing a cage-like effect that limits particle nucleation, growth and agglomeration. The emphasis will be on iron- and molybdenum-based catalysts, but the techniques to be developed should also be generally applicable. The size of these very small and monodispersed particles will be accurately determined both separately and after in situ and ex situ coal impregnation. The as-prepared nanoparticles as well as the catalyst-impregnated coal or char matrix will be characterized using the following techniques: dynamic light scattering, x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning and/or transmission electron microscopy, and selective chemisorption.

  17. A novel antibody humanization method based on epitopes scanning and molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ding; Chen, Cai-Feng; Zhao, Bin-Bin; Gong, Lu-Lu; Jin, Wen-Jing; Liu, Jing-Jun; Wang, Jing-Fei; Wang, Tian-Tian; Yuan, Xiao-Hui; He, You-Wen

    2013-01-01

    1-17-2 is a rat anti-human DEC-205 monoclonal antibody that induces internalization and delivers antigen to dendritic cells (DCs). The potentially clinical application of this antibody is limited by its murine origin. Traditional humanization method such as complementarity determining regions (CDRs) graft often leads to a decreased or even lost affinity. Here we have developed a novel antibody humanization method based on computer modeling and bioinformatics analysis. First, we used homology modeling technology to build the precise model of Fab. A novel epitope scanning algorithm was designed to identify antigenic residues in the framework regions (FRs) that need to be mutated to human counterpart in the humanization process. Then virtual mutation and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation were used to assess the conformational impact imposed by all the mutations. By comparing the root-mean-square deviations (RMSDs) of CDRs, we found five key residues whose mutations would destroy the original conformation of CDRs. These residues need to be back-mutated to rescue the antibody binding affinity. Finally we constructed the antibodies in vitro and compared their binding affinity by flow cytometry and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) assay. The binding affinity of the refined humanized antibody was similar to that of the original rat antibody. Our results have established a novel method based on epitopes scanning and MD simulation for antibody humanization.

  18. Continuous high throughput molecular adhesion based cell sorting using ridged microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasadduq, Bushra; Wang, Gonghao; Alexeev, Alexander; Sarioglu, Ali Fatih; Sulchek, Todd

    2016-11-01

    Cell molecular interactions govern important physiological processes such as stem cell homing, inflammation and cancer metastasis. But due to a lack of effective separation technologies selective to these interactions it is challenging to specifically sort cells. Other label free separation techniques based on size, stiffness and shape do not provide enough specificity to cell type, and correlation to clinical condition. We propose a novel microfluidic device capable of high throughput molecule dependent separation of cells by flowing them through a microchannel decorated with molecule specific coated ridges. The unique aspect of this sorting design is the use of optimized gap size which is small enough to lightly squeeze the cells while flowing under the ridged part of the channel to increase the surface area for interaction between the ligand on cell surface and coated receptor molecule but large enough so that biomechanical markers, stiffness and viscoelasticity, do not dominate the cell separation mechanism. We are able to separate Jurkat cells based on its expression of PSGL-1ligand using ridged channel coated with P selectin at a flow rate of 0.045ml/min and achieve 2-fold and 5-fold enrichment of PSGL-1 positive and negative Jurkat cells respectively.

  19. Determination of Molecular Structure of Bisphenylene Homologues of BINOL-Based Phosphoramidites by Chiroptical Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julínek, Ondřej; Setnička, Vladimír; Miklášová, Natalia; Putala, Martin; Ruud, Kenneth; Urbanová, Marie

    2009-09-01

    Vibrational (VCD), electronic circular dichroism (ECD), and IR absorption spectra together with transparent spectral region optical rotation (OR) of two derivatives of bisphenylene 1,1'-binaphthyl-based phosphoramidites containing three stereogenic axes were measured and the results were compared with simulated data obtained by ab initio calculations with density functional theory. An excellent agreement between experimental and predicted B3LYP/6-31G** and BPW91/6-31G** VCD spectra enabled the assignment of all VCD bands in the experimental spectra, while the Gibbs free energy of all the conformers allowed the determination of their relative populations. The calculation of ECD spectra showed that CAM-B3LYP/6-311G** provided results superior to those of B3LYP/6-311G**. The theoretical results for the OR at the B3LYP/6-311G** and CAM-B3LYP/6-311G** levels were in good agreement with experimental optical rotations, but exhibited lower sensitivity in determining particular conformers than VCD and ECD. By a careful comparison of experimental VCD, IR, and ECD spectra and OR with calculated data, it was possible to assign the absolute configuration of all three stereogenic axes and to determine the molecular structure of the studied bisphenylene 1,1'-binaphthyl-based phosphoramidites in solution with a high degree of confidence.

  20. Molecular simulations of imidazolium-based tricyanomethanide ionic liquids using an optimized classical force field.

    PubMed

    Vergadou, Niki; Androulaki, Eleni; Hill, Jörg-Rüdiger; Economou, Ioannis G

    2016-03-07

    Imidazolium-based ionic liquids (ILs) incorporating the tricyanomethanide ([TCM(-)]) anion are studied using an optimized classical force field. These ILs are very promising candidates for use in a wide range of cutting-edge technologies and, to our knowledge, it is the first time that this IL family is subject to a molecular simulation study with the use of a classical atomistic force field. The [C4mim(+)][TCM(-)] ionic liquid at 298.15 K and at atmospheric pressure was used as the basis for force field optimization which primarily involved the determination of the Lennard-Jones parameters of [TCM(-)] and the implementation of three quantum mechanical schemes for the calculation of the partial charge distribution and the identification of the appropriate scaling factor for the re