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Sample records for basin northern pikeminnow

  1. Early life history of the northern pikeminnow in the lower Columbia River basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gadomski, D.M.; Barfoot, C.A.; Bayer, J.M.; Poe, T.P.

    2001-01-01

    The northern pikeminnow Ptychocheilus oregonensis is a large, native cyprinid in the Columbia River basin that has persisted in spite of substantial habitat alterations. During the months of June to September 1993-1996, we investigated the temporal and spatial patterns of northern pikeminnow spawning, along with describing larval drift and characterizing larval and early juvenile rearing habitats in the lower Columbia River (the John Day and Dalles reservoirs and the free-flowing section downstream of Bonneville Dam) as well as in the lower sections of two major tributaries (the John Day and Deschutes rivers). The density of newly emerged drifting larvae was higher in dam tailraces (a mean of 7.7 larvae/100 m3 in surface tows) than in the lower reservoirs (0.3 larvae/100 m3), indicating that tailraces were areas of more intense spawning. Density was particularly high in the Bonneville Dam tailrace (15.1 larvae/100 m3), perhaps because adult northern pikeminnow are abundant below Bonneville Dam and this is the first tailrace and suitable main-stem spawning habitat encountered during upriver spawning migrations. Spawning also occurred in both of the tributaries sampled but not in a backwater. Spawning in the Columbia River primarily took place during the month of June in 1993 and 1994, when the water temperature rose from 14??C to 18??C, but occurred about 2 weeks later in 1995 and 1996, possibly because of cooler June water temperature (14-15??C) in these years. The period of drift was brief (about 1-3 d), with larvae recruiting to shallow, low-velocity shorelines of main-channel and backwater areas to rear. Larvae reared in greatest densities at sites with fine sediment or sand substrates and moderate- to high-density vegetation (a mean density of 92.1 larvae/10 m3). The success of northern pikeminnow in the Columbia River basin may be partly attributable to their ability to locate adequate spawning and rearing conditions in a variety of main-stem and tributary

  2. Report on the Predation Index, Predator Control Fisheries, and Program Evaluation for the Columbia River Basin Experimental Northern Pikeminnow Management Program, 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, Russell .

    2009-09-10

    This report presents results for year seventeen in the basin-wide Experimental Northern Pikeminnow Management Program to harvest northern pikeminnow1 (Ptychocheilus oregonensis) in the Columbia and Snake Rivers. This program was started in an effort to reduce predation by northern pikeminnow on juvenile salmonids during their emigration from natal streams to the ocean. Earlier work in the Columbia River Basin suggested predation by northern pikeminnow on juvenile salmonids might account for most of the 10-20% mortality juvenile salmonids experience in each of eight Columbia River and Snake River reservoirs. Modeling simulations based on work in John Day Reservoir from 1982 through 1988 indicated that, if predator-size northern pikeminnow were exploited at a 10-20% rate, the resulting restructuring of their population could reduce their predation on juvenile salmonids by 50%. To test this hypothesis, we implemented a sport-reward angling fishery and a commercial longline fishery in the John Day Pool in 1990. We also conducted an angling fishery in areas inaccessible to the public at four dams on the mainstem Columbia River and at Ice Harbor Dam on the Snake River. Based on the success of these limited efforts, we implemented three test fisheries on a system-wide scale in 1991 - a tribal longline fishery above Bonneville Dam, a sport-reward fishery, and a dam-angling fishery. Low catch of target fish and high cost of implementation resulted in discontinuation of the tribal longline fishery. However, the sport-reward and dam-angling fisheries were continued in 1992 and 1993. In 1992, we investigated the feasibility of implementing a commercial longline fishery in the Columbia River below Bonneville Dam and found that implementation of this fishery was also infeasible. Estimates of combined annual exploitation rates resulting from the sport-reward and dam-angling fisheries remained at the low end of our target range of 10-20%. This suggested the need for additional

  3. Development of a System-Wide Predator Control Program: Stepwise Implementation of a Predation Index, Predator Control Fisheries, and Evaluation Plan in the Columbia River Basin; Northern Pikeminnow Management Program, 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, Russell G.; Glaser, Bryce G.; Amren, Jennifer

    2003-03-01

    This report presents results for year ten in a basin-wide program to harvest northern pikeminnow (Ptychocheilus oregonensis). This program was started in an effort to reduce predation by northern pikeminnow on juvenile salmonids during their emigration from natal streams to the ocean. Earlier work in the Columbia River Basin suggested predation by northern pikeminnow on juvenile salmonids might account for most of the 10-20% mortality juvenile salmonids experience in each of eight Columbia River and Snake River reservoirs. Modeling simulations based on work in John Day Reservoir from 1982 through 1988 indicated that, if predator-size northern pikeminnow were exploited at a 10-20% rate, the resulting restructuring of their population could reduce their predation on juvenile salmonids by 50%. To test this hypothesis, we implemented a sport-reward angling fishery and a commercial longline fishery in the John Day Pool in 1990. We also conducted an angling fishery in areas inaccessible to the public at four dams on the mainstem Columbia River and at Ice Harbor Dam on the Snake River. Based on the success of these limited efforts, we implemented three test fisheries on a system-wide scale in 1991--a tribal longline fishery above Bonneville Dam, a sport-reward fishery, and a dam-angling fishery. Low catch of target fish and high cost of implementation resulted in discontinuation of the tribal longline fishery. However, the sport-reward and dam-angling fisheries were continued in 1992 and 1993. In 1992, we investigated the feasibility of implementing a commercial longline fishery in the Columbia River below Bonneville Dam and found that implementation of this fishery was also infeasible. Estimates of combined annual exploitation rates resulting from the sport-reward and damangling fisheries remained at the low end of our target range of 10-20%. This suggested the need for additional effective harvest techniques. During 1991 and 1992, we developed and tested a modified

  4. Development of a System-Wide Predator Control Program: Stepwise Implementation of a Predation Index, Predator Control Fisheries, and Evaluation Plan in the Columbia River Basin; Northern Pikeminnow Management Program, 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, Russell G.; Winther, Eric C.; Fox, Lyle G.

    2004-01-01

    This report presents results for year twelve in a basin-wide program to harvest northern pikeminnow1 (Ptychocheilus oregonensis). This program was started in an effort to reduce predation by northern pikeminnow on juvenile salmonids during their emigration from natal streams to the ocean. Earlier work in the Columbia River Basin suggested predation by northern pikeminnow on juvenile salmonids might account for most of the 10-20% mortality juvenile salmonids experience in each of eight Columbia River and Snake River reservoirs. Modeling simulations based on work in John Day Reservoir from 1982 through 1988 indicated that, if predator-size northern pikeminnow were exploited at a 10-20% rate, the resulting restructuring of their population could reduce their predation on juvenile salmonids by 50%. To test this hypothesis, we implemented a sport-reward angling fishery and a commercial longline fishery in the John Day Pool in 1990. We also conducted an angling fishery in areas inaccessible to the public at four dams on the mainstem Columbia River and at Ice Harbor Dam on the Snake River. Based on the success of these limited efforts, we implemented three test fisheries on a system-wide scale in 1991--a tribal longline fishery above Bonneville Dam, a sport-reward fishery, and a dam-angling fishery. Low catch of target fish and high cost of implementation resulted in discontinuation of the tribal longline fishery. However, the sport-reward and dam-angling fisheries were continued in 1992 and 1993. In 1992, we investigated the feasibility of implementing a commercial longline fishery in the Columbia River below Bonneville Dam and found that implementation of this fishery was also infeasible. Estimates of combined annual exploitation rates resulting from the sport-reward and damangling fisheries remained at the low end of our target range of 10-20%. This suggested the need for additional effective harvest techniques. During 1991 and 1992, we developed and tested a modified

  5. Development of a System-wide Predator Control Program: Stepwise Implementation of a Predation Index, Predator Control Fisheries, and Evaluation Plan in the Columbia River Basin; Northern Pikeminnow Management Program, 1998 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Franklin R.; Wachtel, Mark L.; Petersen, Marc R.

    2003-03-01

    We are reporting on the progress of the Northern Pikeminnow Sport-Reward Fishery (NPSRF) in the lower Columbia and Snake rivers for 1998. The objectives of this project were to (1) implement a sport fishery that rewards anglers who harvest northern pikeminnow Ptychocheilus oregonensis {ge}279 mm (11 inches) total length, (2) collect catch data on selected fish species caught by fishery participants while targeting northern pikeminnow, (3) monitor and report incidental catch of sensitive salmonid species by anglers targeting northern pikeminnow and, (4) collect, monitor and report data on angler participation, catch and catch per angler day of northern pikeminnow during the season. A total of 108,903 northern pikeminnow {ge}279 mm were harvested during the 1998 season and 21,959 angler days were spent harvesting these fish. Harvest was below the seven year average of 150,874 and participation was well below the seven-year average of 51,013 angler days. Catch per angler day for all anglers during the season was 4.96 and exceeded the seven-year average of 2.96 northern pikeminnow per angler day. Peamouth Mylocheilus caurinus, and white sturgeon Acipencer transmontanus, were the other species most often harvested by returning NPSRF anglers targeting northern pikeminnow. Harvest of salmonids Oncorhynchus spp. by NPSRF anglers targeting northern pikeminnow remained below limits established by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS).

  6. Development of a System-Wide Predator Control Program: Stepwise Implementation of a Predation Index, Predator Control Fisheries, and Evaluation Plan in the Columbia River Basin; Northern Pikeminnow Management Program, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, Russell G.; Winther, Eric C.; Fox, Lyle G.

    2003-03-01

    This report presents results for year eleven in a basin-wide program to harvest northern pikeminnow (Ptychocheilus oregonensis). This program was started in an effort to reduce predation by northern pikeminnow on juvenile salmonids during their emigration from natal streams to the ocean. Earlier work in the Columbia River Basin suggested predation by northern pikeminnow on juvenile salmonids might account for most of the 10-20% mortality juvenile salmonids experience in each of eight Columbia River and Snake River reservoirs. Modeling simulations based on work in John Day Reservoir from 1982 through 1988 indicated that, if predator-size northern pikeminnow were exploited at a 10-20% rate, the resulting restructuring of their population could reduce their predation on juvenile salmonids by 50%. To test this hypothesis, we implemented a sport-reward angling fishery and a commercial longline fishery in the John Day Pool in 1990. We also conducted an angling fishery in areas inaccessible to the public at four dams on the mainstem Columbia River and at Ice Harbor Dam on the Snake River. Based on the success of these limited efforts, we implemented three test fisheries on a system-wide scale in 1991--a tribal longline fishery above Bonneville Dam, a sport-reward fishery, and a dam-angling fishery. Low catch of target fish and high cost of implementation resulted in discontinuation of the tribal longline fishery. However, the sport-reward and dam-angling fisheries were continued in 1992 and 1993. In 1992, we investigated the feasibility of implementing a commercial longline fishery in the Columbia River below Bonneville Dam and found that implementation of this fishery was also infeasible.

  7. Persistence of identifiable remains of white sturgeon juveniles in digestive tracts of northern pikeminnow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gadomski, D.M.; Frost, C.N.

    2004-01-01

    Juvenile white sturgeon, Acipenser transmontanus, have not been commonly identified as prey items in digestive tracts of fishes collected in the wild. In particular, the diet of northern pikeminnow, Ptychocheilus oregonensis, an abundant Pacific Northwest freshwater predator which has been widely studied, has not included juvenile white sturgeon. To aid in interpreting these results and help in planning future feeding studies, we determined the persistence of identifiable remains of white sturgeon juveniles in this predator's digestive tract. Northern pikeminnow (mean total length = 476 mm), were force-fed meals of 2 or 3 juvenile white sturgeon (mean total length = 91 mm). After digestive periods of 4, 8, 16, 24, 28, and 32h at a water temperature of about 17 ??C, fish were sacrificed, digestive tracts removed, and contents examined. Our results indicate that juvenile white sturgeon would be readily discernable in digestive tracts of northern pikeminnow at least a day after feeding, with scutes remaining undigested and identifiable for 28 h.

  8. Development and corroboration of a bioenergetics model for northern pikeminnow (Ptychocheilus oregonensis) feeding on juvenile salmonids in the Columbia River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petersen, J.H.; Ward, D.L.

    1999-01-01

    A bioenergetics model was developed and corroborated for northern pikeminnow Ptychocheilus oregonensis, an important predator on juvenile salmonids in the Pacific Northwest. Predictions of modeled predation rate on salmonids were compared with field data from three areas of John Day Reservoir (Columbia River). To make bioenergetics model estimates of predation rate, three methods were used to approximate the change in mass of average predators during 30-d growth periods: observed change in mass between the first and the second month, predicted change in mass calculated with seasonal growth rates, and predicted change in mass based on an annual growth model. For all reservoir areas combined, bioenergetics model predictions of predation on salmon were 19% lower than field estimates based on observed masses, 45% lower than estimates based on seasonal growth rates, and 15% lower than estimates based on the annual growth model. For each growth approach, the largest differences in field-versus-model predation occurred at the midreservoir area (-84% to -67% difference). Model predictions of the rate of predation on salmonids were examined for sensitivity to parameter variation, swimming speed, sampling bias caused by gear selectivity, and asymmetric size distributions of predators. The specific daily growth rate of northern pikeminnow predicted by the model was highest in July and October and decreased during August. The bioenergetics model for northern pikeminnow performed well compared with models for other fish species that have been tested with field data. This model should be a useful tool for evaluating management actions such as predator removal, examining the influence of temperature on predation rates, and exploring interactions between predators in the Columbia River basin.

  9. Evacuation of Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) Tags from Northern Pikeminnow Consuming Tagged Juvenile Chinook Salmon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petersen, J.H.; Barfoot, C.A.

    2003-01-01

    Prey fish implanted with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags can be used in predation studies if the timing of tag evacuation from the predators is understood. Laboratory experiments were conducted to determine how PIT tags in juvenile Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were consumed by northern pikeminnow Ptychocheilus oregonensis were evacuated in relation to various parameters. The rate of evacuation was directly related to temperature, while predator size and the number of prey consumed had less effect on the timing of tag evacuation. A power model was fitted to predict the proportion of tags expected to be evacuated at different intervals after ingestion. These results could be used in planning field or laboratory predation experiments with PIT-tagged prey fish.

  10. Predation by Northern Pikeminnow and tiger muskellunge on juvenile salmonids in a high–head reservoir: Implications for anadromous fish reintroductions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sorel, Mark H.; Hansen, Adam G.; Connelly, Kristin A.; Wilson, Andrew C.; Lowery, Erin D.; Beauchamp, David A.

    2016-01-01

    The feasibility of reintroducing anadromous salmonids into reservoirs above high-head dams is affected by the suitability of the reservoir habitat for rearing and the interactions of the resident fish with introduced fish. We evaluated the predation risk to anadromous salmonids considered for reintroduction in Merwin Reservoir on the North Fork Lewis River in Washington State for two reservoir use-scenarios: year-round rearing and smolt migration. We characterized the role of the primary predators, Northern Pikeminnow Ptychocheilus oregonensis and tiger muskellunge (Northern Pike Esox lucius × Muskellunge E. masquinongy), by using stable isotopes and stomach content analysis, quantified seasonal, per capita predation using bioenergetics modeling, and evaluated the size and age structures of the populations. We then combined these inputs to estimate predation rates of size-structured population units. Northern Pikeminnow of FL ≥ 300 mm were highly cannibalistic and exhibited modest, seasonal, per capita predation on salmonids, but they were disproportionately much less abundant than smaller, less piscivorous, conspecifics. The annual predation on kokanee Oncorhynchus nerka (in biomass) by a size-structured unit of 1,000 Northern Pikeminnow having a FL ≥ 300 mm was analogous to 16,000–40,000 age-0 spring Chinook Salmon O. tshawytscha rearing year-round, or 400–1,000 age-1 smolts migrating April–June. The per capita consumption of salmonids by Northern Pikeminnow having a FL ≥ 200 mm was relatively low, due in large part to spatial segregation during the summer and the skewed size distribution of the predator population. Tiger muskellunge fed heavily on Northern Pikeminnow, other nonsalmonids, and minimally on salmonids. In addition to cannibalism within the Northern Pikeminnow population, predation by tiger muskellunge likely contributed to the low recruitment of larger (more piscivorous) Northern Pikeminnow, thereby decreasing the risk of predation to

  11. Development of a Systemwide Predator Control Program, Section I : Northern Squawfish Management Program - Implementation, 1997 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Franklin R.

    1998-10-01

    Report on results from the sixth year of a basin-wide program to harvest northern pikeminnow (Ptychocheilus oregonensis) in an effort to reduce mortality due to northern pikeminnow predation on juvenile salmonids during their emigration from natal streams to the ocean.

  12. Exploration potential of offshore northern California basins

    SciTech Connect

    Bachman, S.B.; Crouch, J.K.

    1988-01-01

    A series of exploratory wells was drilled in the northern California offshore basins in the 1960s following leasing of federal tracts off northern California, Oregon, and Washington. The drilling, although encountering numerous oil shows, was considered at the time to indicate low prospectivity in an area that extended as far south as the offshore Santa Maria basin. However, subsequent major discoveries in this decade in the offshore Santa Maria basin, such as the Point Arguello field, indicate that these offshore basins may be highly prospective exploration targets. Many of the key features of Monterey production in central and southern California are also present in the offshore basins of northern California. A new 5-year leasing plan has scheduled leasing in the northern California OCS starting in early 1989. The first basins on the schedule, the Point Arena and Eel River basins, differ in some respects. The Point Arena basin is more typical of a Monterey basin, with the potential for fractured chert reservoirs and organic-rich sections, deep burial of basinal sections to enhance the generation of higher gravity oils, and complex folding and faulting. The Eel River basin is more clastic-rich in its gas-producing, onshore extension. Key questions in the Eel River basin include whether the offshore, more distal stratigraphy will include Monterey-like biogenic sediments, and whether the basin has oil potential in addition to its proven gas potential. The Outer Santa Cruz basin shares a similar stratigraphy, structure, and hydrocarbon potential with the Point Arena basin. The Santa Cruz-Bodega basin, also with a similar stratigraphy, may have less exploration potential because erosion has thinned the Monterey section in parts of the basin.

  13. Late Cenozoic Basins of northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsen, Tor H.; Clarke, Samuel H.

    1989-12-01

    The late Cenozoic basins of northern California developed in response to both convergent tectonics associated with subduction of the Farallon plate (and its modern representatives, the Juan de Fuca and Gorda plates) and transform tectonics associated with northward migration of the Mendocino triple junction and formation of the San Andreas fault system. The modern Eel River basin north of the Mendocino triple junction is an active forearc basin located between the Cascade magmatic arc to the east and the trench at the foot of the continental slope of northern California and Oregon to the west. Five different types of late Cenozoic basins or fragments of basins are preserved in onshore northern California south of the Mendocino triple junction: (1) remnants of a formerly more extensive Neogene forearc basin preserved locally in downdropped blocks within the San Andreas fault system; (2) remnants of slightly older trench-slope basins that generally developed west of but which may locally structurally underlie the younger forearc basin; (3) younger strike-slip-related structural basins that have developed along active right-lateral faults of the San Andreas fault system; (4) broad shallow embayments, perhaps similar to the modern San Francisco Bay, that were connected to the deeper Pacific Ocean to the west; and (5) structurally emplaced remnants of oceanic crust and its overlying sedimentary cover (the King Range terrane). Our preliminary stratigraphic and sedimentologic studies suggest that much of northern California was covered during the Neogene by a forearc basin that may have extended as far south as the San Francisco Bay region and into the southern San Joaquin Valley. As the Mendocino triple junction migrated northward during the late Cenozoic, the southern margin of the forearc basin was uplifted, basin deposits were stripped off by erosion, and the locus of forearc sedimentation shifted progressively northward through time. Preserved but isolated fragments

  14. Caribbean basin framework, 2: Northern Central America

    SciTech Connect

    Tyburski, S.A.; Gordon, M.B.; Mann, P. )

    1991-03-01

    There are four Jurassic to Recent basin-forming periods in northern Central America (honduras, Honduran Borderlands, Belize, Guatemala, northern Nicaragua): (1) Middle Jurassic-Early Cretaceous rifting and subsidence along normal faults in Honduras and Guatemala; rifts are suggested but are not well defined in Honduras by the distribution of clastic sediments and associated volcanic rocks. Rifting is attributed to the separation of Central America from the southern margin of the North American plate; (2) Cretaceous subsidence recorded by the development of a Cretaceous carbonate platform in Honduras, Guatemala, and Belize; subsidence is attributed to thermal subsidence of the rifted margins of the various blocks; (3) Late Cretaceous-Recent development of a volcanic arc along the western margin of Middle America and the northern margin of Honduras; (4) Late Cretaceous large-scale folding in Honduras, ophiolite obduction, and formation of a foredeep basin in Guatemala (Sepur trough); deformation is attributed to the collision between a north-facing arc in northern Honduras and the Nicaraguan Rise and the passive margin of Guatemala and Belize; and (5) Eocene to Recent strike-slip faulting along the present-day North American-Caribbean plate boundary in Guatemala, northern Honduras, and Belize. Strike-slip faults and basins form a California-type borderlands characterized by elongate basins that appear as half-grabens in profile. Counterclockwise rotation of the central honduras plateau, a thicker and topographically higher-than-average block within the plate boundary zone, is accommodated by rifting or strike-slip faults at its edges.

  15. Megafans of the Northern Kalahari Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, M. J.; Miller, R. McG.; Eckardt, F.; Kreslavsky, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    We identify eleven megafans (partial cones of fluvial sediment, >80 km radius) in the northern Kalahari Basin, using several criteria based on VIS and IR remotely sensed data and SRTM-based surface morphology reconstructions. Two other features meet fewer criteria of the form which we class as possible megafans. The northern Kalahari megafans are located in a 1700 km arc around the southern and eastern flanks of the Angola's Bié Plateau, from northern Namibia through northwest Botswana to western Zambia. Three lie in the Owambo subbasin centered on the Etosha Pan, three in the relatively small Okavango rift depression, and five in the Upper Zambezi basin. The population includes the well-known Okavango megafan (150 km), Namibia's Cubango megafan, the largest megafan in the region (350 km long), and the largest nested group (the five major contiguous megafans on the west slopes of the upper Zambezi Valley). We use new, SRTM-based topographic roughness data to discriminate various depositional surfaces within the flat N. Kalahari landscapes. We introduce the concepts of divide megafans, derived megafans, and fan-margin rivers. Conclusions. (i) Eleven megafan cones total an area of 190,000 sq km. (ii) Different controls on megafan size operate in the three component basins: in the Okavango rift structural controls become the prime constraint on megafan length by controlling basin dimensions. Megafans in the other les constricted basins appear to conform to classic relationships fan area, slope, and feeder-basin area. (iii) Active fans occupy the Okavango rift depression with one in the Owambo basin. The rest of the population are relict but recently active fans (surfaces are relict with respect to activity by the feeder river). (iv) Avulsive behavior of the formative river-axiomatic for the evolution of megafans-has resulted in repeated rearrangements of regional drainage, with likely effects in the study area well back into the Neogene. Divide megafans comprise the

  16. Hydrothermal Activity in the Northern Guaymas Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berndt, C.; Hensen, C.; Mortera-Gutierrez, C. A.; Sarkar, S.; Geilert, S.; Schmidt, M.; Liebetrau, V.; Kipfer, R.; Scholz, F.; Doll, M.; Muff, S.; Karstens, J.; Böttner, C.; Chi, W. C.; Moser, M.; Behrendt, R.; Fiskal, A.; Evans, T.; Planke, S.; Lizarralde, D.; Lever, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Rift-related magmatism in the Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California induces hydrothermal activity within the basin sediments. Mobilized fluids migrate to the seafloor where they are emitted into the water column changing ocean chemistry and fuelling chemosynthetic ecosystems. New seismic and geochemical data from the northern rift arm of the Guaymas Basin document the variety of fluid expulsion phenomena from large-scale subsurface sediment mobilization related to contact metamorphosis to focused small-scale structures. The geochemical composition of emitted fluids depends largely on the age of the fluid escape structures with respect to the underlying intrusions. Whereas, old structures are dominated by methane emission, young vent sites are characterized by hot fluids that carry a wide range of minerals in solution. The overall high geothermal gradient within the basin (mainly between 160 and 260 °C/km) leads to a thin gas hydrate stability zone. Thus, deep hydrothermal fluid advection affects the gas hydrate system and makes it more dynamic than in colder sedimentary basins.

  17. Miocene tephrochronology in the northern Basin and Range

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, M.E.; Brown, F.H.; Nash, W.P. . Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

    1993-04-01

    Silicic air-fall tephra layers with unaltered glass shards preserved in Miocene basins of the northern Basin and Range Province (NBR) were sampled from well-exposed sections in the Goose Creek (GCB) and Ibapah (IB) basins in the northeastern NBR, and the El Pasco basin (EPB) in the southwestern NBR. Each basin may contain up to 50 tephras. Glass shards from individual tephras in any one basin are compositionally distinct, as shown by XRF and electron microprobe analysis. Seventeen tephra correlate between two or more basins; 12 of these are regionally important, providing precise stratigraphic ties across the NbR. Four regionally correlative tephras are white biotitic ashes from southern Nevada sources, whereas eight are gray vitric ashes from Yellowstone hot spot sources. Dates on tephra layers and lava flows in the basins, and on ashflow units correlated with four other tephra provide a preliminary chronology for the tephra in the all basins. In each section [Delta]h/[Delta]t appears constant on time scales [>=]1 Ma, but variation in [Delta]h/[Delta]t is demonstrated from IB, and is likely typical of all basins. Sedimentation in all five basins begins in the time interval of 14.5--12.5 Ma, which may represent the beginning of a phase of regional extension in the NBR. Post-[approximately]9.5 Ma deformation has affected all basins and likely contributed to the termination of sedimentation in the exposed areas of these basins.

  18. Timing of Cenozoic Basin Formation in Northern Sundaland, Southeast Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Liew, K.K. )

    1994-07-01

    The present shorelines of northern Sundaland show preferential northwest-southeast elongation. This trend is parallel for subparallel to major faults and suture in this region. Continental wrench/shear basins developed on the western portion of this region and back-arc basins developed on the western portion of this region and back-arc basins in the rest of the region are also aligned to this trend. Different basin geometries and structural patterns among Cenozoic basins in northern Sundaland indicate different origins and/or timing of basin formation. Wrench faulting has played a significant role in the formation of these Cenozoic basins. The continued collision of the Indian subplate with the Eurasian plate during early Cenozoic has caused a redistribution of stress within this region. Zones of weakness have been reactivated or created with large lateral displacements by these changes, thus initiating the subsidence of these basins. The episodic initiation of Cenozoic basins may have begun as early as Jurassic and continued till Oligocene.

  19. Basin modeling of the Parang (Socotra) Basin, northern East China Sea shelf: Implications for hydrocarbon potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H.; Moon, S.; Lee, G.; Yoon, Y.; Kim, H.

    2013-12-01

    The hydrocarbon potential of the Parang (Socotra) Basin in the northern East China Sea shelf has remained poorly understood. We performed one-dimensional basin modeling for a dummy well located in the depocenter of the northern part of the Parang Basin to investigate the timings of hydrocarbon generation and expulsion. First, a depth-converted seismic profile crossing the dummy well was restored by backstripping and decompaction for eight regional and subregional unconformities, including the top of the acoustic basement, to reconstruct the subsidence history and to determine the timing of trap formation. The basin modeling, assuming rifting heat-flow model and source rocks with type III kerogen, suggests that the main phase of hydrocarbon (mostly gas) expulsion peaked in the Late Eocene, predating the inversion that created traps in the early Middle to latest Middle Eocene. Thus, the potential for large hydrocarbon accumulations in the northern Parang Basin is probably limited.

  20. Somali Basin, Chain Ridge, and origin of the Northern Somali Basin gravity and geoid low

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, James R.

    1988-01-01

    Geophysical data are used to investigate the origin of the Northern Somali Basin and its relationship to surrounding tectonic elements. The results show the Northern Somali Basin to be the third of a series of oceanic basins separated by long transform faults created during movement between East and West Gondwanaland. The flexure resulting from differential subsidence across Chain Ridge along with the difference in lithospheric thermal structure on either side of it can account for the amplitude and shape of the observed geoid step and gravity anomalies across Chain Rige. It is suggested that the geoid and gravity low over the Northern Somali Basin may result from the superposition of a continental edge effect anomaly and the fracture zone edge effect anomaly.

  1. Geomorphological characterization of endorheic basins in northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorsaz, J.; Gironas, J. A.; Escauriaza, C. R.; Rinaldo, A.

    2011-12-01

    Quantitative geomorphology regroups a large number of interesting tools to characterize natural basins across scales. The application of these tools to several river basins allows the description and comparison of geomorphological properties at different spatial scales as oppose to more traditional descriptors that are typically applied at a single scale, meaning the catchment scale. Most of the recent research using these quantitative geomorphological tools has focused on open catchments and no specific attention has been given to endorheic basins, and the possibility of having particular features that distinguish them from exorheic catchments. The main objective of our study is to characterize endorheic basins and investigate whether these special geomorphological features can be identified. Because scaling invariance is a widely observed and relatively well quantified property of open basins, it provides a suitable tool to characterize differences between the geomorphology of closed and open basins. Our investigation focuses on three closed basins located in northern Chile which describe well the diversity in the geomorphology and geology of this arid region. Results show that endhoreic basins exhibit different slope-area and flow paths sinuosity regimes compared to those observed in open basins. These differences are in agreement with the particular self-similar behavior across spatial scales of the Euclidean length of subcatchments, as well as the Hack's law and Horton's ratios. These regimes imply different physical processes inside the channel network regardless of the basin area, and they seem to be related to the endorheic character of these basins. The analysis of the probability density functions of contributing areas and lengths to the lower region shows that the hypothesis of self-similarity can also be applied to closed basins. Theoretical expressions for these distributions were derived and validated by the data. Future research will focus on (1

  2. Evolution of the Basco-Cantabrian basin, northern Spain

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughan, O. )

    1988-08-01

    The Basco-Cantabrian basin (BCB) stretches for 150 km west from the Pyrenean system and displays a complex subsidence pattern through time, involving Triassic faulting, Jurassic quiescence, Cretaceous faulting and subsidence, followed by Tertiary compression. Its southern margin is rimmed by a narrow (40 km wide) Tertiary basin, deeper in places than the coeval Ebro basin in the southern Pyrenees, but lacking any driving load. This Tertiary Cantabrian basin may reflect the interaction between thermal subsidence phases at the southern margin of the BCB and uplift (inversion) of the Mesozoic basin to the north. In addition, the BCB shows a number of interactions between thin-skinned and thick-skinned styles of shortening. In the west, inversion has uplifted a major basement ridge between areas of vastly differing sedimentology and structural style. The southern thrust margin to the basin has no basement outcrops, even though it marks the southern margin of Mesozoic sedimentation. Balanced sections imply the reactivation of basement faults in controlling the geometry, position, and orientation of the thrust front. In the northern part of the BCB, around Bilbao, major monoclines and thrusts follow basement fault trends - trends which earlier strongly affected the distribution of the Mesozoic. The BCB has a stratigraphy and structure in common with eastern basins such as the Aquitaine and Ebro. Though it can be difficult to correlate individual structures, many features of basin dynamics are similar. It is valuable to study the less-deformed BCB in order to understand the basins of northern Spain and southern France.

  3. Annotated bibliography of the Black Warrior basin area, northern Alabama - northern Mississippi

    SciTech Connect

    Ward-McLemore, E.

    1983-01-01

    This bibliography contains 1964 records related to the geology of the Black Warrior basin of northern Alabama and northern Mississippi. Specific topics include, but are not limited to: coal, petroleum, and natural gas deposits; mineralogy; lithology; paleontology; petrology; stratigraphy; tectonics; bauxite; iron ores; geologic correlations; earthquakes; fossils; gold deposits; geological surveys; hydrology; and water resources. The subject index provides listings of records related to each county and the geologic ages covered by this area. Some of the items (54) are themselves bibliographies.

  4. Rejuvenation of the Kuqa foreland basin, northern flank of the Tarim basin, northwest China

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Huafu; Jia Dong; Cai Dongsheng

    1994-12-01

    The Kuqa depression along the northern flank of the Tarim basin is filled with a thick sequence of Neogene and Quaternary coarse elastic continental sediments. This structural depression is part of a large foreland basin that leads south of the Tianshan - an orogenic belt of intracontinental convergence resulting from the northward propagation of stress following the collision of India with the southern margin of Eurasia. 11 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Tamarugal basin exploration under way in northern Chile

    SciTech Connect

    Roos, M.

    1996-12-30

    The government of Chile has awarded an exploration contract to Cardinal Resources Inc., headquartered in White Plains, N.Y., to develop oil and natural gas for commercial production on a large inland tract in northern Chile. Recent geological/geophysical evaluations of the contract area by both Cardinal and Empresa Nacional del Petroleol (ENAP), the state energy company, have upgraded the hydrocarbon potential of this northern basin, making it an attractive exploration play. The paper describes the contract area, two oil seeps that have been discovered, structural history, Jurassic stratigraphy, and interpretation of the aeromagnetic and Landsat data.

  6. Cryopreservation of Sperm from the Endangered Colorado Pikeminnow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tiersch, T.R.; Figiel, C.R.; Wayman, W.R.; Williamson, J.H.; Gorman, O.T.; Carmichael, G.J.

    2004-01-01

    We developed methods for the cryopreservation of sperm of the endangered Colorado pikeminnow Ptychocheilus lucius. Sperm were collected from a captive broodstock population of Colorado pikeminnow reared and maintained at the Dexter National Fish Hatchery and Technology Center. Our objectives were to (1) evaluate the effects on sperm motility of 24-h storage in Hanks' balanced salt solution (HBSS); (2) characterize sperm motility and duration; (3) examine the relationship between sperm motility and osmotic pressure; (4) examine the effect of four cryoprotectants (dimethyl sulfoxide [DMSO], dimethyl acetamide [DMA], glycerol, and methanol [MeOH] at two concentrations [5% and 10%]) on postthaw motility; and (5) compare the effect of two cooling rates (40??C/ min and 4??C/min) on postthaw motility. The sperm samples diluted with HBSS retained higher motility (mean ??SD, 77 ?? 22%; n = 9) than did undiluted samples (12 ?? 30%; n = 9) after 24 h of storage. When exposed to HBSS at 274 mosmols/kg or more, few sperm became motile (???1%). Exposure to HBSS at 265 mosmols/kg elicited threshold activation (defined as 10% motility), and maximum motility (>95%) was observed at 93 mosmols/ kg. The maximum motility of sperm was observed within 10 s after activation with deionized water, and sperm remained motile for 57 s. The sperm that were cooled at a rate of 40??C/min and cryopreserved with 5% MeOH retained higher postthaw motility (56 ?? 13%) than did sperm cryopreserved with DMSO, DMA, or glycerol (at 5% and 10%). When the sperm samples were cooled at a rate of 4??C/min, sperm cryopreserved with MeOH (5% or 10%) or DMSO (5% or 10%) retained the highest postthaw motilities (???14%). The use of cryopreserved sperm can assist hatchery managers in the production of fish, provide for the long-term conservation of genetic resources, and assist in the recovery of endangered species such as the Colorado pikeminnow.

  7. Hydrocarbon maturation in Laramide basins - constraints from evolution of northern Big Horn basin, Wyoming and Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Hagen, E.S.; Furlong, K.P.; Surdam, R.C.

    1984-04-01

    Thermal and mechanical models were used to quantify the effects of Laramide uplifts and subsequent synorogenic deposition on the hydrocarbon maturation of Cretaceous source rocks in the Big Horn basin. Laramide deformation and resultant sedimentation has clearly affected hydrocarbon maturation of Cretaceous source rocks. (Thermopolis, Mowry, Frontier, Cody). Modified Lopatin-type reconstructions suggest that a significant region containing Cretaceous source rocks has been within the liquid hydrocarbon window. The earliest onset of hydrocarbon maturation in the northern Big Horn basin was latest Eocene, with some regions still containing immature Cretaceous source rocks as a consequence of Cenozoic erosion, uplift of the Pryor Mountains, and lack of burial. Regional geologic features indicate that the basin formed as a result of flexural compensation of an elastic lithosphere during emplacement of the Beartooth and Pryor Mountains, and possibly the Absaroka volcanics. This was determined by 2-dimensional models which predict sediment thickness caused by tectonic loading and subsequent sedimentation. Flexural rigidities of 10/sup 2/2exclamation-10/sup 22/ newton-meters adequately explain flexural subsidence in the northern Big Horn basin. The present basin configuration also was compared with a theoretical profile based on geologic constraints. Subsidence models for the present basin profile suggest the Paleocene thrusting of the Beartooth block contributes a majority of the tectonic loading and that Cenozoic erosion has drastically affected the resultant sedimentary sequence (Fort Union and Wasatch). These models, along with stratigraphic reconstructions, can be combined to pinpoint areas of potential hydrocarbon maturation within Laramide-type basins.

  8. Hydrogeologic data for the northern Rocky Mountains intermontane basins, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dutton, DeAnn M.; Lawlor, Sean M.; Briar, D.W.; Tresch, R.E.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey began a Regional Aquifer- System Analysis of the Northern Rocky Mountains Intermontane Basins of western Montana and central and central and northern Idaho in 1990 to establish a regional framework of information for aquifers in 54 intermontane basins in an area of about 77,500 square miles. Selected hydrogeologic data have been used as part of this analysis to define the hydro- logic systems. Records of 1,376 wells completed in 31 of the 34 intermontane basins in the Montana part of the study area are tabulated in this report. Data consist of location, alttiude of land surface, date well constructed, geologic unit, depth of well, diameter of casing, type of finish, top of open interval, primary use of water, water level, date water level measured, discharge, specific capacity, source of discharge data, type of log available, date water-quality parameters measured, specific conductance, pH, and temperature. Hydrographs for selected wells also are included. Locations of wells and basins are shown on the accompanying plate.

  9. Potential cretaceous play in the Rharb basin of northern Morocco

    SciTech Connect

    Jobidon, G.P. )

    1993-09-01

    The autochthonous Cretaceous in the Rharb basin of northern Morocco is located underneath a cover of neogene sediments and of the Prerif nappe olistostrome, which was emplaced during the Tortonian 7 m.y. The presence of infranappe Cretaceous sediments is documented in a few onshore wells in the Rharb basin and in the adjacent Prerif Rides area, as well as in the Rif Mountains. Their presence in the deeper portion of the Rharb basin is difficult to detail because of poor seismic resolution data beneath dispersive prerif nappe. A recent study of offshore seismic data acquired by PCIAC in 1987 indicates that the infranappe interval can be more than 1500 m thick in some of the offshore Kenitra area. These sediments have seismic signatures that would correspond to Middle Cretaceous transgressions, culminating with a Turonian highstand. Their deposition systems were located on the northern and western flanks of the Meseta and were followed by a hiatus lasting until the Miocene. Regional studies of gravity and magnetic data provide and additional understanding of the Rif province, its evolution, and the possible presence of autochthonous Cretaceous sediments below the prerif nappe cover. The infranappe of Rharb basin has a good potential to develop into a major hydrocarbon play with the presence of middle Cretaceous reservoir rocks, Turonian-Cenomanian black shale source rocks, as well as the timely combination of trap formation, source rock maturation, and hydrocarbon migration.

  10. Integrated Watershed Assessment: The Northern River Basins Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrona, F. J.; Gummer, W. D.

    2001-05-01

    Begun in 1991 and completed in 1996, the Northern River Basins Study (NRBS) was a \\$12 M initiative established by the governments of Canada, Alberta, and the Northwest Territories to assess the cumulative impacts of development, particularly pulp mill related effluent discharges, on the health of the Peace, Athabasca and Slave river basins. The NRBS was launched in response to concerns expressed by northern residents following the 1991 approval of the Alberta Pacific Pulp Mill in Athabasca. Although initiated by governments, the NRBS was set-up to be `arms-length' and was managed by a 25 member Study Board that represented the many interests in the basins, including industry, environmental groups, aboriginal peoples, health, agriculture, education, municipalities, and the federal, territorial and provincial governments. Overseen by an independent Science Advisory Committee, an integrated research program was designed covering eight scientific components: fate and distribution of contaminants, food chain impacts, nutrients, hydrology/hydraulics and sediment transport, uses of the water resources, drinking water quality, traditional knowledge, and synthesis/modeling. Using a 'weight of evidence' approach with a range of ecological and sociological indicators, cumulative impacts from pulp and paper-related discharges and other point and non-point sources of pollution were determined in relation to the health and contaminant levels of aquatic biota, nutrient and dissolved oxygen-related stress, hydrology and climate related changes, and human health and use of the river basins. Based on this assessment and Study Board deliberations, site-specific and basin-wide scientific and management-related recommendations were made to Ministers regarding regulatory and policy changes, basin management and monitoring options, and future research. The Study reinforces the importance of conducting ecosystem-based , interdisciplinary science and the need for public involvement in

  11. Tectonosedimentary history of the sedimentary basins in northern west Siberia

    SciTech Connect

    Kunin, N.Ya.; Segalovich, I.E. )

    1993-09-01

    Sedimentary basins of northern west Siberia belong to the Arctic tectonosedimentary province. This basin evolved dissimilarly compared to those in the Urengoy and more southern areas, which resulted in substantial differences in the geologic characteristics. Seismic surveys indicate that the basement surface in northern west Siberia occurs at great depths, in places exceeding 15 km. The depressions of the basement surfaces are filled with the thick Paleozoic and Mesozoic sequences. The paper discussed the results of seismostratigraphic analysis of more than 13,000 km of regional common-depth-point profiles. These profiles identified systems of east-west-trending and isometric structures in the region. Some of the structures are buried; others are mapped in the upper horizons of the sedimentary cover and decrease in magnitude with depth. Cretaceous marine sediments that were deposited under deep-water conditions and did not compensate for the tectonic subsidence are widely present in the region. Noncompensated sedimentation was the longest from the Late Jurassic to the Hauterivian-Barremian on the Gydan peninsula and in adjacent areas. The Jurassic section is dominate by ingressive marine sediments. Sediments that did not compensate for tectonic subsidence widely occurred in the Early Jurassic and resulted in deposition of petroleum source rocks. Triassic and Jurassic strata occur conformable in most of northern west Siberia. Significant deformation of the Triassic sediments are identified in the periphery of the Triassic marine basin. This indicates that surrounding structures were thrust against northern west Siberia at the Triassic and Jurassic time boundary. Isometric structures of high magnitude were formed during the Paleozoic structure stage and these structures continued to grow through the Triassic and Jurassic. These and other results of seismostratigraphic analysis suggest the high oil potential of the region.

  12. Basement structures in the northern Tularosa Basin, central New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Whitebread, M.W.; Adams, D.C. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-02-01

    A variety of geophysical data consisting of gravity and magnetic measurements, drill holes, and other geologic information have provided an analysis of basement structures within the northern Tularosa Basin of central New Mexico. Both the Laramide and Ancestral Rockies orogenies and the extension associated with the Rio Grande rift affected the structural development of this area. This area is significant in that it is the region in which the eastern boundary of the Rio Grande rift shifts 115 km eastward to the bounding fault between the Tularosa basin and the Sacramento uplift. The Tularosa basin is a large, complex structure consisting of two grabens and a horst block. At this latitude, it is probably the major Rio Grande rift structure. In fact, gravity modeling has determined that the thinnest crust (above 32 km) in the region lies beneath the north Tularosa basin. Analysis of gravity and magnetic anomaly maps identify gravity lows associated with Paleozoic or Precambrian basins. Gravity lows northeast of the Oscura uplift form a semi-continuous regional depression eastward to the late Paleozoic Pedernal uplift, a topographic feature believed to be a remnant of the Ancestral Rocky Mountains.

  13. New interpretation of Clarks Fork field, northern Bighorn basin, Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.S.; Lindsley-Griffin, N.

    1986-08-01

    Clarks Fork field is located at the northern edge of the Bighorn basin (T9S, R22E) in Carbon County, Montana. Production was first established in 1944 by General Petroleum Corporation in the Cretaceous Peay Sandstone (basal Frontier) and was later extended to the Cretaceous Greybull (1949) and Lakota (1956) sandstones by British American. Total cumulative hydrocarbons from this field are 1,1789,193 bbl of oil and 3,061,522 mcf of gas, with Lakota sandstones being most productive. Lakota production occurs from a structural-stratigraphic trap in an east-west-trending channel on the axis of Clarks Fork anticline, geographically near the center of the township. Our structural reinterpretation of Clarks Fork field suggests that Elk Basin anticline is a northwest extension of the Elk Basin field anticline. The Elk Basin thrust truncates the north limb of the fold and does not strike to the northwest, as shown by earlier interpretations. They interpret a northwest-striking thrust in the center of the township as a splay off the Elk Basin thrust, and have named it the Clarks Fork thrust. The Clarks Fork anticline is located on the hanging wall of Clarks Fork thrust. Subsurface maps indicate the Clarks Fork area has not been fully developed. Stratigraphic traps in the Lakota and Greybull sandstones are present in several areas of the township. Structural traps in the center and northwest portions of the township may also exist.

  14. Geoenvironmental Investigations of the Humboldt River Basin, Northern Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stillings, Lisa L.

    2003-01-01

    Northern Nevada is one of the world's foremost regions of gold production. The Humboldt River Basin (HRB) covers 43,500 km2 in northern Nevada (Crompton, 1995), and it is home to approximately 18 active gold and silver mines (Driesner and Coyner, 2001) among at least 55 significant metallic mineral deposits (Long and others, 1998). Many of the gold mines are along the Carlin trend in the east-central portion of the HRB, and together they have produced 50 million ounces of gold from 1962 (when the Carlin mine first opened) through April 2002 (Nevada Mining Association, 2002). Mining is not new to the region, however. Beginning in 1849, mining has taken place in numerous districts that cover 39 percent of the land area in the HRB (Tingley, 1998). In addition to gold and silver, As, Ba, Cu, Fe, Hg, Li, Mn, Mo, Pb, S, Sb, V, W, Zn, and industrial commodities such as barite, limestone, fluorite, sand and gravel, gypsum, gemstones, pumice, zeolites, and building stone, have been extracted from the HRB (McFaul and others, 2000). All papers within this series of investigations can be found as lettered chapters of USGS Bulletin 2210, Geoenvironmental Investigations of the Humboldt River Basin, Northern Nevada. Each chapter is available separately online. The data and software utilized in this product (Chapter F) permit the user to view and analyze the geographic relationships among chemistry of stream sediments and surface waters, geology, and various cartographic base information such as but not limited to cities, county boundaries, and land ownership. Data for this product were compiled and or produced as part of a mineral and environmental assessment of the Humboldt River basin conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey between 1995 - 2000.

  15. Transtensional Basin Forming Processes in the Quaternary of Northern Greece: The Mygdonia Pull-Apart Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venetikidis, A.; Schoenbohm, L. M.

    2014-12-01

    The geodynamic setting of the northern Aegean is governed by the superimposition of NE-SW strike-slip deformation, associated with the propagation of the North Anatolian fault zone towards the west, and N-S extension, caused by the suction of the Aegean realm towards the south due to deep seated processes of trench retreat and slab rollback. The Mygdonia basin sits at the westernmost termination of the Kavala-Xanthi-Komotini fault zone, a structure that is considered the northernmost splay of the North Anatolian fault system in the northern Aegean. It is one of the most seismically active regions in continental northern Greece, and it is herein interpreted, for the first time, as a transtensional pull-apart structure that has been progressively established since the Early Pleistocene by westward directed rupture of NW-SE and NE-SW trending oblique slip normal faults and E-W trending normal faults. The interaction of the two, separate, stress regimes in the basin demands decreasing accumulated displacement from west to east to accommodate clockwise rotation. The close correspondence between analogue models of transtensional basins and the observed spatial distribution of faulting in the Mygdonia basin attests to the importance of oblique deformation in the basin-forming processes. Detailed topographic profiles across the fault-bounded ranges confirm the decreasing trend of accrued displacement from east to west. Furthermore, topographic swaths reveal the scaling of faulting into discrete segments along the basin-bounding ranges, while calcrete maturity on abandoned hanging wall fans reveals a towards-the-west diachronous faulting with associated fan sedimentation. The Early Pleistocene age of the initial fill of the basin complex and fault displacements on the order of many hundreds of meters point to dramatic and rapid landscape forming processes in this tectonically active region. The increasing appreciation of the interaction of both strike-slip deformation and

  16. Geothermal resources of the northern gulf of Mexico basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, P.H.

    1970-01-01

    Published geothermal gradient maps for the northern Gulf of Mexico basin indicate little or no potential for the development of geothermal resources. Results of deep drilling, from 4000 to 7000 meters or more, during the past decade however, define very sharp increases in geothermal gradient which are associated with the occurrence of abnormally high interstitial fluid pressure (geopressure). Bounded by regional growth faults along the landward margin of the Gulf Basin, the geopressured zone extends some 1300 km from the Rio Grande (at the boundary between the United States and Mexico) to the mouth of the Mississippi river. Gulfward, it extends to an unknown distance across the Continental Shelf. Within geopressured deposits, geothermal gradients range upwards to 100 ??C/km, being greatest within and immediately below the depth interval in which the maximum pressure gradient change occurs. The 120 ??C isogeotherm ranges from about 2500 to 5000 m below sea level, and conforms in a general way with depth of occurrence of the top of the geopressured zone. Measured geostatic ratios range upward to 0.97; the maximum observed temperature is 273 ??C, at a depth of 5859 m. Dehydration of montmorillonite, which comprises 60 to 80 percent of clay deposited in the northern Gulf Basin during the Neogene, occurs at depths where temperature exceeds about 80 ??C, and is generally complete at depths where temperature exceeds 120 ??C. This process converts intracrystalline and bound water to free pore water, the volume produced being roughly equivalent to half the volume of montmorillonite so altered. Produced water is fresh, and has low viscosity and density. Sand-bed aquifers of deltaic, longshore, or marine origin form excellent avenues for drainage of geopressured deposits by wells, each of which may yield 10,000 m3 or more of superheated water per day from reservoirs having pressures up to 1000 bars at depths greater than 5000 m. ?? 1971.

  17. Helium, Carbon, and Helium Isotopes in the Northern Lau Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupton, J. E.; Butterfield, D. A.; Lilley, M. D.; Resing, J.; Embley, R. W.; Arculus, R. J.; Rubin, K. H.; Evans, L.; Greene, R.

    2009-12-01

    Helium isotope ratios in hydrothermal fluids and volcanic rocks in the northern Lau Basin show a complex pattern reflecting influences from diverse mantle sources, including the Samoan hotspot, the Tofua Arc, and mid-ocean ridge (MOR)-type upper mantle. The Samoan Islands represent a “high 3He” hotspot with 3He/4He ratios up to 38 Ra (where Ra is the 3He/4He ratio in air, 1.39 x 10-6) [Farley et al, 1992; Jackson et al., 2007]. In contrast to the 3He-rich helium in Samoa, typical back-arc spreading centers have MOR-type helium values of 7-9 Ra, while volcanic arcs have lower ratios of 5-7 Ra. In the northwestern part of the Lau Basin, basalt samples from the Northwest Lau Spreading Center and the Rochambeau Rifts have 3He/4He varying from 11 to 28 Ra, far above typical back-arc or MOR values. These elevated 3He/4He ratios indicate that the Samoan hotspot signal has somehow penetrated southward into the northern Lau Basin, presumably through a tear in the subducting Pacific Plate. In the northeastern Lau Basin, 3He/4He ratios in hydrothermal fluids from two sites on the Northeast Lau Spreading Center have 3He/4He of 8.0 and 8.7 Ra. These are MOR-type values typical for a back-arc spreading center. At the actively erupting West Mata volcano, vent fluids have 3He/4He of 7.3 Ra, while farther east at Volcano P analysis of water-column plume samples gave a value of 6.7 Ra for the estimated end-member 3He/4He value. This decrease in 3He/4He going toward the east indicates increasing arc influence with increasing proximity to the Tofua Arc. This interpretation is supported by the C/3He ratios in the hydrothermal fluids, which average 1-3 x 109 at vent sites on the NELSC (typical MOR values) and increase to a typical arc value of 2 x 1010 at West Mata. Analyses of volcanic rocks from the eruption sites on the NELSC and West Mata are in progress and should help to further define these variations.

  18. Hydrogeologic data from the northern Powder River Basin, southeastern Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slagle, Steven E.; Stimson, James R.

    1979-01-01

    Hydrologic and geologic data have been collected as part of energy-related projects conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in the northern Powder River basin of southeastern Montana. Records of 1924 stock, domestic, irrigation, public supply and test wells are tabulated in the report. The data include well location, depth of well, casing diameter, type of lift, type of power, use of water, principal aquifer, altitude of land surface , water level, discharge, field specific conductance, and water temperature. Locations of the inventoried wells are shown on a map at a scale of 1:500,000. Lighologic logs of 373 wells and test holes are also included. The geologic units considered range in age from Late Cretaceous to Holocene. (Kosco-USGS)

  19. Unusual Radar Backscatter along the Northern Rim of Imbrium Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Thomas W.; Campbell, Bruce A.; Ghent, Rebecca R.; Hawke, B. Ray; Leverington, David W.

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation of the unusual radar backscatter properties along the Northern Rim of Imbrium Basin is shown. The contents include: 1) Visual and Infrared Observations of Moon; 2) Radar Observations of Moon; 3) Lunar Orbiter Photographs Geologic Setting; 4) 70-cm Radar Data; 5) .70-cm Radar Dark Halo Craters; 6) 3.8-cm Radar Data; 7) 7.5-m Radar Data; 8) 70cm, 3.8 cm and 7.5-m Radar Data; 9) Optical and Infrared Data; 10) Plato Rilles; 11) Isopachs of Crater Ejecta; 12) Plato-like Craters; 13) Observation Summary; 14) Interpretation Matrix; 15) Dark Halo Diameters vs. Crater Size; and 16) Radar Geologic Column.

  20. Channeling in Paleocene coals, northern Powder River basin, Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, W.B.

    1983-08-01

    Interpretation of 1,200 geophysical logs in the northern Powder River basin, Montana, reveals the paleodrainages influencing coal deposition during the deposition of the Tongue River member (Paleocene, Fort Union Formation). Four channels with associated crevasse splay deposits are recognized: (1) an east-west rosebud drainage near Colstrip, (2) a north-south wall channel near Birney, (3) a north-south Dietz drainage near Tongue River Reservoir, and (4) a north-south Anderson channel in the vicinity of Moorhead. These channels support the concept of a major northeast-flowing drainage system during deposition of the Tongue River Member. Identification of these channels serves as a guide to future coal exploration.

  1. Transfer structures in the Northern Tarim Basin, Northwest China

    SciTech Connect

    Guang-Ya Zhang; Shi-Xia Gao

    1996-03-01

    The fold-thrust tectonics of the Northern Tarim Basin, oriented roughly parallel to the South Tianshan orogenic belt, consists of two large-scale tectonic regimes: (1) the foreland-basin, thin-skinned deformation belt; and (2) the foreland-craton, thick-skinned-dominated (i.e., basement-involved) deformation belt. Variations in the degree of deformation in these tectonic belts and style along the regional tectonic strike can be accounted for by longitudinal (progressive transfer or transverse (abrupt) transfer). Longitudinal transfer maintains the overall displacement or shortening within the fold-thrust belts as uniform or with gradual change along the tectonic strike. This includes the tectonic transfer between en echelon master thrusts and from the individual master thrust to terminal fold(s) or distributive thrusts. Transverse transfer resulted from an abrupt change in overall displacement or shortening along the tectonic strike. Within the transverse transfer zone, various tectonics-such as strike-slip faults, strike-slip thrusts, transverse anticlines, and en echelon folds-are developed. The development of longitudinal transfer zones can be attributed to the gradual variation of intrinsic and extrinsic and extrinsic deformational conditions along the tectonic strike. The initiation of transverse transfer may be related to variations in the thickness of sedimentary layers, detachment-layer distribution limits, and variation along strike of the degree and mode of the South Tianshan orogenic belt`s effect on the basin, as well as the variation of the boundary conditions of the deformation, such as in the geometry of plate margins. 15 refs., 8 figs.

  2. Regional Fluid Flow and Basin Modeling in Northern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelley, Karen D.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The foothills of the Brooks Range contain an enormous accumulation of zinc (Zn) in the form of zinc sulfide and barium (Ba) in the form of barite in Carboniferous shale, chert, and mudstone. Most of the resources and reserves of Zn occur in the Red Dog deposit and others in the Red Dog district; these resources and reserves surpass those of most deposits worldwide in terms of size and grade. In addition to zinc and lead sulfides (which contain silver, Ag) and barite, correlative strata host phosphate deposits. Furthermore, prolific hydrocarbon source rocks of Carboniferous and Triassic to Early Jurassic age generated considerable amounts of petroleum that may have contributed to the world-class petroleum resources of the North Slope. Deposits of Zn-Pb-Ag or barite as large as those in the Brooks Range are very rare on a global basis and, accordingly, multiple coincident favorable factors must be invoked to explain their origins. To improve our understanding of these factors and to contribute to more effective assessments of resources in sedimentary basins of northern Alaska and throughout the world, the Mineral Resources Program and the Energy Resources Program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) initiated a project that was aimed at understanding the petroleum maturation and mineralization history of parts of the Brooks Range that were previously poorly characterized. The project, titled ?Regional Fluid Flow and Basin Modeling in Northern Alaska,? was undertaken in collaboration with industry, academia, and other government agencies. This Circular contains papers that describe the results of the recently completed project. The studies that are highlighted in these papers have led to a better understanding of the following: *The complex sedimentary facies relationships and depositional settings and the geochemistry of the sedimentary rocks that host the deposits (sections 2 and 3). *The factors responsible for formation of the barite and zinc deposits

  3. Geochemical evolution of groundwater salinity at basin scale: a case study from Datong basin, Northern China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ya; Wang, Yanxin

    2014-05-01

    A hydrogeochemical investigation using integrated methods of stable isotopes ((18)O, (2)H), (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratios, Cl/Br ratios, chloride-mass balance, mass balance and hydrogeochemical modeling was conducted to interpret the geochemical evolution of groundwater salinity in Datong basin, northern China. The δ(2)H, δ(18)O ratios in precipitation exhibited a local meteoric water line of δ(2)H = 6.4 δ(18)O -5 (R(2) = 0.94), while those in groundwater suggested their meteoric origin in a historically colder climatic regime with a speculated recharge rate of less than 20.5 mm overall per year, in addition to recharge from a component of deep residual ancient lake water enriched with Br. According to the Sr isotope binary mixing model, the mixing of recharges from the Shentou karst springs (24%), the western margins (11%) and the eastern margins (65%) accounts for the groundwater from the deep aquifers of the down-gradient parts in the central basin is a possible mixing mechanism. In Datong, hydrolysis of silicate minerals is the most important hydrogeochemical process responsible for groundwater chemistry, in addition to dissolution of carbonate and evaporites. In the recharge areas, silicate chemical weathering is typically at the bisiallitization stage, while that in the central basin is mostly at the monosiallitization stage with limited evidence of being in equilibrium with gibbsite. Na exchange with bound Ca, Mg prevails at basin scale, and intensifies with groundwater salinity, while Ca, Mg exchange with bound Na locally occurs in the east pluvial and alluvial plains. Although groundwater salinity increases with the progress of water-rock/sediment interactions along the flow path, as a result of carbonate solubility control and continuous evapotranspiration, Na-HCO3 and Na-Cl-SO4 types of water are usually characterized respectively in the deep and the shallow aquifers of an inland basin with a silicate terrain in an arid climatic regime.

  4. Geochemical evolution of groundwater salinity at basin scale: a case study from Datong basin, Northern China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ya; Wang, Yanxin

    2014-05-01

    A hydrogeochemical investigation using integrated methods of stable isotopes ((18)O, (2)H), (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratios, Cl/Br ratios, chloride-mass balance, mass balance and hydrogeochemical modeling was conducted to interpret the geochemical evolution of groundwater salinity in Datong basin, northern China. The δ(2)H, δ(18)O ratios in precipitation exhibited a local meteoric water line of δ(2)H = 6.4 δ(18)O -5 (R(2) = 0.94), while those in groundwater suggested their meteoric origin in a historically colder climatic regime with a speculated recharge rate of less than 20.5 mm overall per year, in addition to recharge from a component of deep residual ancient lake water enriched with Br. According to the Sr isotope binary mixing model, the mixing of recharges from the Shentou karst springs (24%), the western margins (11%) and the eastern margins (65%) accounts for the groundwater from the deep aquifers of the down-gradient parts in the central basin is a possible mixing mechanism. In Datong, hydrolysis of silicate minerals is the most important hydrogeochemical process responsible for groundwater chemistry, in addition to dissolution of carbonate and evaporites. In the recharge areas, silicate chemical weathering is typically at the bisiallitization stage, while that in the central basin is mostly at the monosiallitization stage with limited evidence of being in equilibrium with gibbsite. Na exchange with bound Ca, Mg prevails at basin scale, and intensifies with groundwater salinity, while Ca, Mg exchange with bound Na locally occurs in the east pluvial and alluvial plains. Although groundwater salinity increases with the progress of water-rock/sediment interactions along the flow path, as a result of carbonate solubility control and continuous evapotranspiration, Na-HCO3 and Na-Cl-SO4 types of water are usually characterized respectively in the deep and the shallow aquifers of an inland basin with a silicate terrain in an arid climatic regime. PMID:24737419

  5. Base of fresh ground water, northern Louisiana Salt-Dome Basin and vicinity, northern Louisiana and southern Arkansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryals, G.N.

    1980-01-01

    The National Waste Terminal Storage Program is an effort by the U.S. Department of Energy to locate and develop sites for disposal or storage of commercially produced radioactive wastes. As part of this program, salt domes in the northern Louisiana salt-dome basin are being studied to determine their suitability as repositories. Part of the U.S. Geological Survey 's participation in the program has been to describe the regional geohydrology of the northern Louisiana salt-dome basin. A map based on a compilation of published data and the interpretation of electrical logs shows the altitude of the base of freshwater in aquifers in the northern Louisiana salt-dome basin. (USGS)

  6. Application Of A Dynamic Model to Assess Geomorphic and Hydrologic Controls on Age-0 Colorado Pikeminnow Distribution in the Green River, Colorado And Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, J. C.

    2005-05-01

    Analysis of field data and development and application of a dynamic model indicate that water releases from Flaming Gorge Dam have a large potential effect on larval drift and distribution of age-0 Colorado pikeminnow (Ptychocheilus lucius) in the middle Green River. The model predicts that high releases at the time of drift greatly increase the proportion of the population transported beyond the study area to unfavorable river environments. The model also predicts that channel simplification caused by flow regulation results in a more even longitudinal distribution of larval fish habitat. Colorado pikeminnow are a federally endangered species endemic to the Colorado River basin that utilize backwaters during their larval stage. The present agency-mandated field-sampling program for backwater habitats is probably inadequate, because it takes place at a time when the model predicts that most larval fish have drifted beyond the study area. Development of the model shows that the role of the geomorphic and hydraulic attributes that control larval drift and transport into backwaters, and that were parameterized in the model, are not well known.

  7. The central and northern Appalachian Basin-a frontier region for coalbed methane development

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lyons, P.C.

    1998-01-01

    The Appalachian basin is the world's second largest coalbed-methane (CBM) producing basin. It has nearly 4000 wells with 1996 annual production at 147.8 billion cubic feet (Bcf). Cumulative CBM production is close to 0.9 trillion cubic feet (Tcf). The Black Warrior Basin of Alabama in the southern Appalachian basin (including a very minor amount from the Cahaba coal field) accounts for about 75% of this annual production and about 75% of the wells, and the remainder comes from the central and northern Appalachian basin. The Southwest Virginia coal field accounts for about 95% of the production from the central and northern parts of the Appalachian basin. Production data and trends imply that several of the Appalachian basin states, except for Alabama and Virginia, are in their infancy with respect to CBM development. Total in-place CBM resources in the central and northern Appalachian basin have been variously estimated at 66 to 76 trillion cubic feet (Tcf), of which an estimated 14.55 Tcf (~ 20%) is technically recoverable according to a 1995 U.S. Geological Survey assessment. For comparison in the Black Warrior basin of the 20 Tcf in-place CBM resources, 2.30 Tcf (~ 12%) is technically recoverable. Because close to 0.9 Tcf of CBM has already been produced from the Black Warrior basin and the proved reserves are about 0.8 Tcf for 1996 [Energy Information Administration (EIA), 1997]. U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves, 1996 Annual Report. U.S. Department of Energy DOE/EIA-0216(96), 145 pp.], these data imply that the central and northern Appalachian basin could become increasingly important in the Appalachian basin CBM picture as CBM resources are depleted in the southern Appalachian basin (Black Warrior Basin and Cahaba Coal Field). CBM development in the Appalachian states could decrease the eastern U.S.A.'s dependence on coal for electricity. CBM is expected to provide over the next few decades a virtually untapped source of

  8. Reappraisal of the relationship between the northern Nevada rift and Miocene extension in the northern Basin and Range Province

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colgan, Joseph P.

    2013-01-01

    The northern Nevada rift is a prominent mafic dike swarm and magnetic anomaly in north-central Nevada inferred to record the Middle Miocene (16.5-15.0 Ma) extension direction in the northern Basin and Range province in the western United States. From the 245°-250° rift direction, Basin and Range extension is inferred to have shifted 45° clockwise to a modern direction of 290°-300° during the late Miocene. The region surrounding the northern Nevada rift was actively extending while the rift formed, and these domains are all characterized by extension oriented 280°-300°. This direction is distinctly different from the rift direction and nearly identical to the modern Basin and Range direction. Although the rate, structural style, and distribution of Basin and Range extension appear to have undergone a significant change in the late Miocene (ca. 10 Ma), the overall spreading direction does not. Middle Miocene extension was directed perpendicular to the axis of the thickest crust formed during Mesozoic shortening and this orientation may reflect gravitational collapse of this thick crust. Orientation of northern Nevada rift dikes may reflect a short-lived regional stress field related to the onset of Yellowstone hotspot volcanism.

  9. Melt anomalies of the northern Atlantic Ocean basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T.; Lin, J.; Tucholke, B. E.

    2009-12-01

    We investigated the melt anomalies and lithosphere dynamics of the northern Atlantic Ocean between 76°N and 8°S through combined analysis of seafloor bathymetry, shipboard and satellite-derived gravity, and sediment thickness. Residual mantle Bouguer anomaly (RMBA) was calculated by removing from free-air gravity anomaly the predicted attractions of water-sediment, sediment-crust, and crust-mantle interfaces as well as the effect of lithospheric plate cooling. Residual bathymetry anomaly (RBA) was obtained by subtracting from observed seafloor topography the predicted effects of plate cooling and the observed sediment load. Our analysis indicates that more than 50% of the seafloor has been affected by melt anomalies. The most prominent features that we observe include: (1) A pronounced negative RMBA associated with the Iceland hotspot, the Reykjanes Ridge, and the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) north of Iceland. The region of enhanced magma supply extends southward to the Charlie Gibbs F.Z., northward to the Jan Mayen F.Z., and to both the eastern and western basin margins. The strong negative RMBA associated with the submarine part of the Iceland hotspot reaches -450 mGal, corresponding to modeled crustal thickness of more than 22 km. (2) A widespread effect of the Azores hotspot on crustal accretion at the MAR since 40-50 Ma, as reflected in negative RMBA and positive RBA that extend southward to at least 26.5°N and northward to 44°N. The strongest RMBA anomaly associated with the Azores melt anomaly reaches about -230 mGal, corresponding to crustal thickening about half of that in Iceland. (3) A ~ 500 km wide corridor of negative RMBA is found along the west African margin between 40°N and 6°S, indicating that this region was influenced extensively by melt anomalies associated with the Horseshoe Seamounts, Madeira Islands, Canary Islands, and Cape Verde Islands. Negative RMBA of -100 to -180 mGal is also associated with the Bermuda Rise in the western Atlantic

  10. Paleogene palaeogeography and basin evolution of the Western Carpathians, Northern Pannonian domain and adjoining areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kováč, Michal; Plašienka, Dušan; Soták, Ján; Vojtko, Rastislav; Oszczypko, Nestor; Less, György; Ćosović, Vlasta; Fügenschuh, Bernhard; Králiková, Silvia

    2016-05-01

    The data about the Paleogene basin evolution, palaeogeography, and geodynamics of the Western Carpathian and Northern Pannonian domains are summarized, re-evaluated, supplemented, and newly interpreted. The presented concept is illustrated by a series of palinspastic and palaeotopographic maps. The Paleogene development of external Carpathian zones reflects gradual subduction of several oceanic realms (Vahic, Iňačovce-Kričevo, Szolnok, Magura, and Silesian-Krosno) and growth of the orogenic accretionary wedge (Pieniny Klippen Belt, Iňačovce-Kričevo Unit, Szolnok Belt, and Outer Carpathian Flysch Belt). Evolution of the Central Western Carpathians is characterized by the Paleocene-Early Eocene opening of several wedge-top basins at the accretionary wedge tip, controlled by changing compressional, strike-slip, and extensional tectonic regimes. During the Lutetian, the diverging translations of the northward moving Eastern Alpine and north-east to eastward shifted Western Carpathian segment generated crustal stretching at the Alpine-Carpathian junction with foundation of relatively deep basins. These basins enabled a marine connection between the Magura oceanic realm and the Northern Pannonian domain, and later also with the Dinaridic foredeep. Afterwards, the Late Eocene compression brought about uplift and exhumation of the basement complexes at the Alpine-Carpathian junction. Simultaneously, the eastern margin of the stretched Central Western Carpathians underwent disintegration, followed by opening of a fore-arc basin - the Central Carpathian Paleogene Basin. In the Northern Hungarian Paleogene retro-arc basin, turbidites covered a carbonate platform in the same time. During the Early Oligocene, the rock uplift of the Alpine-Carpathian junction area continued and the Mesozoic sequences of the Danube Basin basement were removed, along with a large part of the Eocene Hungarian Paleogene Basin fill, while the retro-arc basin depocentres migrated toward the east

  11. Cenozoic evolution of the northwestern Salar de Atacama Basin, northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pananont, P.; Mpodozis, C.; Blanco, N.; Jordan, T. E.; Brown, L. D.

    2004-12-01

    Since 90 Ma, the nonmarine Salar de Atacama Basin has been the largest, deepest, and most persistent sedimentary basin of northern Chile. Integration of 200 km of two-dimensional seismic reflection data with surface geological data clarifies Oligocene and Neogene evolution of the northern part of the basin. A normal fault with 6 ± 1 km of vertical separation controlled the western boundary of the basin during the accumulation of the Oligocene-lower Miocene Paciencia Group. The combination of this structure, a similar one in the Calama Basin, and regional structural data suggests that localized extension played an important role within a tectonic environment dominated by margin-perpendicular compression and margin-parallel strike-slip deformation. Seismic data substantiate the surface interpretation that much of the Cordillera de la Sal ridge resulted from diapiric flow of the Paciencia Group. Diapiric flow initiated during the late early Miocene or middle Miocene, associated with a deep reverse fault.

  12. Tectonic controls on rift basin morphology: Evolution of the northern Malawi (Nyasa) rift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebinger, C. J.; Deino, A. L.; Tesha, A. L.; Becker, T.; Ring, U.

    1993-01-01

    Radiometric (K-Ar and Ar-40/Ar-39) age determinations of volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks, combined with structural, gravity, and seismic reflection data, are used to constrain the age of sedimentary strata contained within the seismically and volcanically active northern Malawi (Nyasa) rift and to characterize changes in basin and flank morphologies with time. Faulting and volcanism within the Tukuyu-Karonga basin began at approximately 8.6 Ma, when sediments were deposited in abroad, initially asymmetric lake basin bounded on its northeastern side by a border fault system with minor topographic relief. Extensions, primarily by a slip along the border fault, and subsequent regional isostatic compensation led to the development of a 5-km-deep basin bounded by broad uplifted flanks. Along the low-relief basin margin opposite border fault, younger stratigraphic sequences commonly onlap older wedge-shaped sequences, although their internal geometry is often progradational. Intrabasinal faulting, flankuplift, and basaltic and felsic volcanism from centers at the northern end of the basin became more important at about 2.5 Ma when cross-rift transfer faults developed to link the Tukuyu-Karonga basin to the Rukwa basin. Local uplift and volcanic construction at the northern end of the basin led to a southeastward shift in the basin's depocenter. Sequence boundaries are commonly erosional along this low-relief (hanging wall) margin and conformable in the deep lake basin. The geometry of stratigraphic sequences and the distribution of the erosion indicate that horizontal and vertical crustal movements both across and along the length of the rift basin led to changes in levels of the lake, irrespective of paleoclimatic fluctuations.

  13. Lithospheric Instabilities within the Northern Basin and Range Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, R. C.; Fouch, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    Flat slab subduction and the subsequent removal of the subducting Farallon slab beneath the western United States has had a profound impact on the state of the North American lithosphere. In order to provide new constraints on the structure and evolution of the region's crust and upper mantle, we use surface wave tomography and receiver functions to image the earth beneath the Northern Basin and Range (NBR) and surrounding regions. We combine these results with published geophysical and geochemical data to further characterize lithospheric and asthenospheric processes and relate these to geological observations at the surface. Our initial results show high-velocity upper mantle, interpreted as lithosphere, beneath the center of the NBR and thinner lithosphere along its western, southern, and eastern margins. The zone of thickest lithosphere corresponds to areas with relatively thick crust, high elevations, and an absence of historic seismicity greater than magnitude 5.0. This region of thicker lithosphere also underlies a zone of reduced volcanic rock exposure relative to surrounding regions. Further, within the region there are no volcanic rocks in the NAVDAT database younger than 10 Ma, with the exception of Lunar Craters located in the south-central NBR. The shallow lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary observed along the margins of the NBR suggests that significant lithospheric thinning has occurred in these areas. This thinning is likely related to either extensional shear stresses or to the removal of lithospheric material, perhaps leading to accentuated strain along the margins of the Basin and Range. We interpret these data in the context of gravitational instabilities resulting in the removal of lithospheric material. A lithospheric downwelling has previously been identified within the center of the NBR based on high-velocity upper-mantle material observed in body wave tomography, a zone of weak or absent horizontal anisotropic fabric observed in shear

  14. Regional surficial geochemistry of the northern Great Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ludington, S.; Folger, H.; Kotlyar, B.; Mossotti, V.G.; Coombs, M.J.; Hildenbrand, T.G.

    2006-01-01

    The regional distribution of arsenic and 20 other elements in stream-sediment samples in northern Nevada and southeastern Oregon was studied in order to gain new insights about the geologic framework and patterns of hydrothermal mineralization in the area. Data were used from 10,261 samples that were originally collected during the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) program in the 1970s. The data are available as U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 02-0227. The data were analyzed using traditional dot maps and interpolation between data points to construct high-resolution raster images, which were correlated with geographic and geologic information using a geographic information system (GIS). Wavelength filters were also used to deconvolute the geochemical images into various textural components, in order to study features with dimensions of a few kilometers to dimensions of hundreds of kilometers. The distribution of arsenic, antimony, gold, and silver is different from distributions of the other elements in that they show a distinctive high background in the southeast part of the area, generally in areas underlain by the pre-Mesozoic craton. Arsenic is an extremely mobile element and can be used to delineate structures that served as conduits for the circulation of metal-bearing fluids. It was used to delineate large crustal structures and is particularly good for delineation of the Battle Mountain-Eureka mineral trend and the Steens lineament, which corresponds to a post-Miocene fault zone. Arsenic distribution patterns also delineated the Black Rock structural boundary, northwest of which the basement apparently consists entirely of Miocene and younger crust. Arsenic is also useful to locate district-sized hydrothermal systems an d clusters of systems. Most important types of hydrothermal mineral deposit in the northern Great Basin appear to be strongly associated with arsenic; this is less

  15. Selenium concentrations in the Colorado pikeminnow (Ptychocheilus lucius): relationship with flows in the upper Colorado River.

    PubMed

    Osmundson, B C; May, T W; Osmundson, D B

    2000-05-01

    A Department of the Interior (DOI) irrigation drainwater study of the Uncompahgre Project area and the Grand Valley in western Colorado revealed high selenium concentrations in water, sediment, and biota samples. The lower Gunnison River and the Colorado River in the study area are designated critical habitat for the endangered Colorado pikeminnow (Ptychocheilus lucius) and razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus). Because of the endangered status of these fish, sacrificing individuals for tissue residue analysis has been avoided; consequently, little information existed regarding selenium tissue residues. In 1994, muscle plugs were collected from a total of 39 Colorado pikeminnow captured at various Colorado River sites in the Grand Valley for selenium residue analysis. The muscle plugs collected from 16 Colorado pikeminnow captured at Walter Walker State Wildlife Area (WWSWA) contained a mean selenium concentration of 17 microg/g dry weight, which was over twice the recommended toxic threshold guideline concentration of 8 microg/g dry weight in muscle tissue for freshwater fish. Because of elevated selenium concentrations in muscle plugs in 1994, a total of 52 muscle plugs were taken during 1995 from Colorado pikeminnow staging at WWSWA. Eleven of these plugs were from fish previously sampled in 1994. Selenium concentrations in 9 of the 11 recaptured fish were significantly lower in 1995 than in 1994. Reduced selenium in fish may in part be attributed to higher instream flows in 1995 and lower water selenium concentrations in the Colorado River in the Grand Valley. In 1996, muscle plugs were taken from 35 Colorado squawfish captured at WWSWA, and no difference in mean selenium concentrations were detected from those sampled in 1995. Colorado River flows during 1996 were intermediate to those measured in 1994 and 1995. PMID:10787099

  16. Selenium concentrations in the Colorado pikeminnow (Ptychocheilus lucius): Relationship with flows in the upper Colorado River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Osmundson, B.C.; May, T.W.; Osmundson, D.B.

    2000-01-01

    A Department of the Interior (DOI) irrigation drainwater study of the Uncompahgre Project area and the Grand Valley in western Colorado revealed high selenium concentrations in water, sediment, and biota samples. The lower Gunnison River and the Colorado River in the study area are designated critical habitat for the endangered Colorado pikeminnow (Ptychocheilus lucius) and razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus). Because of the endangered status of these fish, sacrificing individuals for tissue residue analysis has been avoided; consequently, little information existed regarding selenium tissue residues. In 1994, muscle plugs were collected from a total of 39 Colorado pikeminnow captured at various Colorado River sites in the Grand Valley for selenium residue analysis. The muscle plugs collected from 16 Colorado pikeminnow captured at Walter Walker State Wildlife Area (WWSWA) contained a mean selenium concentration of 17 ??g/g dry weight, which was over twice the recommended toxic threshold guideline concentration of 8 ??g/g dry weight in muscle tissue for freshwater fish. Because of elevated selenium concentrations in muscle plugs in 1994, a total of 52 muscle plugs were taken during 1995 from Colorado pikeminnow staging at WWSWA. Eleven of these plugs were from fish previously sampled in 1994. Selenium concentrations in 9 of the 11 recaptured fish were significantly lower in 1995 than in 1994. Reduced selenium in fish may in part be attributed to higher instream flows in 1995 and lower water selenium concentrations in the Colorado River in the Grand Valley. In 1996, muscle plugs were taken from 35 Colorado squawfish captured at WWSWA, and no difference in mean selenium concentrations were detected from those sampled in 1995. Colorado River flows during 1996 were intermediate to those measured in 1994 and 1995.

  17. Seasonal distribution of zooplankton in the northern basin of Lake Chad

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, A.H.; Robinson, Patricia K.

    1971-01-01

    More than 300 pairs of fine and coarse mesh plankton net samples were collected in the northern basin of Lake Chad during an 18-month period, June 1967 to November 1968. The seasonal distribution and abundance of the dominant species of Rotifera and Crustacea are given in addition to a general description of the hydrology and circulation of the northern basin of the lake. The composition and abundance of the zooplankton varied considerably over the sampling period; a generalized seasonal cycle is suggested. Synoptic estimates of absolute abundance are presented and compared to those in the southeastern portion of the lake.

  18. Geochemical data for Jurassic diabase and basalt of the northern Culpeper basin, Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.Y.; Leavy, B.D.; Gottfried, D.

    1983-01-01

    The Culpeper basin is a north-northeast-trending faulted trough at the inner margin of the Piedmont geologic province along the east front of the Blue Ridge. Most of the Culpeper Group is intruded and locally metamorphosed by dikes, sills, and stocks of tholeiitic diabase. This report deals with a suite of samples from several diabase intrusives and basalt flows in the northern part of the Culpeper basin in Virginia. 22 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs. (ACR)

  19. Tectonoestratigraphic and Thermal Models of the Tiburon and Wagner Basins, northern Gulf of California Rift System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, J.; Ramirez Zerpa, N. A.; Negrete-Aranda, R.

    2014-12-01

    The northern Gulf of California Rift System consist sofa series faults that accommodate both normal and strike-slip motion. The faults formed a series of half-greens filled with more than 7 km of siliciclastic suc­cessions. Here, we present tectonostratigraphic and heat flow models for the Tiburón basin, in the southern part of the system, and the Wag­ner basin in the north. The models are constrained by two-dimensional seis­mic lines and by two deep boreholes drilled by PEMEX­-PEP. Analysis of the seismic lines and models' results show that: (i) subsidence of the basins is controlled by high-angle normal faults and by flow of the lower crust, (ii) basins share a common history, and (iii) there are significant differences in the way brittle strain was partitioned in the basins, a feature frequently observed in rift basins. On one hand, the bounding faults of the Tiburón basin have a nested geometry and became active following a west-to-east sequence of activation. The Tiburon half-graben was formed by two pulses of fault activity. One took place during the protogulf extensional phase in the Miocene and the other during the opening of Gulf of California in the Pleistocene. On the other hand, the Wagner basin is the result of two fault generations. During the late-to middle Miocene, the west-dipping Cerro Prieto and San Felipe faults formed a domino array. Then, during the Pleistocene the Consag and Wagner faults dissected the hanging-wall of the Cerro Prieto fault forming the modern Wagner basin. Thermal modeling of the deep borehole temperatures suggests that the heat flow in these basins in the order of 110 mW/m2 which is in agreement with superficial heat flow measurements in the northern Gulf of California Rift System.

  20. Hydrogeochemistry of the antrim shale northern michigan basin. Annual report, September 1, 1993-May 1, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, L.M.; Budai, J.M.; Abriola, L.M.; Stearns, C.H.; Martini, A.M.

    1996-01-12

    This study was intended to document gradients in fluid chemistry over the producing trend of the Antrim Shale in the northern Michigan Basin, relate these geochemical gradients to fracture networks or structures within the reservoir, and establish their signifcance relative to the hydrology of the Antrim and gas production potential of the unit.

  1. Unusual Radar Backscatter Properties Along the Northern Rim of Imbrium Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Thomas W.; Campbell, Bruce A.

    2005-01-01

    Earth-based radar backscatter from the lunar terrae is 2-4 times that of the maria. The largest (most conspicuous) exception is the terra along the northern rim of Imbrium Basin, where highlands that surround Sinus Iridium and crater Pluto have long wavelength (70-cm) radar backscatter that is comparable to (and sometimes weaker) the mare.

  2. Ecological Condition of Streams in Northern Nevada EPA R-MAP Humboldt Basin Project

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents stream data on the Humboldt River Basin in northern Nevada using the R-EMAP Program. Water is of primary importance to both the economy and the ecology of the region. Many of the waters of Nevada have previously received relatively little attention in regar...

  3. Assessment of coal geology, resources, and reserves in the northern Wyoming Powder River Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, David C.; Haacke, Jon E.; Osmonson, Lee M.; Luppens, James A.; Pierce, Paul E.; Rohrbacher, Timothy J.

    2010-01-01

    The abundance of new borehole data from recent coal bed natural gas development in the Powder River Basin was utilized by the U.S. Geological Survey for the most comprehensive evaluation to date of coal resources and reserves in the Northern Wyoming Powder River Basin assessment area. It is the second area within the Powder River Basin to be assessed as part of a regional coal assessment program; the first was an evaluation of coal resources and reserves in the Gillette coal field, adjacent to and south of the Northern Wyoming Powder River Basin assessment area. There are no active coal mines in the Northern Wyoming Powder River Basin assessment area at present. However, more than 100 million short tons of coal were produced from the Sheridan coal field between the years 1887 and 2000, which represents most of the coal production within the northwestern part of the Northern Wyoming Powder River Basin assessment area. A total of 33 coal beds were identified during the present study, 24 of which were modeled and evaluated to determine in-place coal resources. Given current technology, economic factors, and restrictions to mining, seven of the beds were evaluated for potential reserves. The restrictions included railroads, a Federal interstate highway, urban areas, and alluvial valley floors. Other restrictions, such as depth, thickness of coal beds, mined-out areas, and areas of burned coal, were also considered. The total original coal resource in the Northern Wyoming Powder River Basin assessment area for all 24 coal beds assessed, with no restrictions applied, was calculated to be 285 billion short tons. Available coal resources, which are part of the original coal resource that is accessible for potential mine development after subtracting all restrictions, are about 263 billion short tons (92.3 percent of the original coal resource). Recoverable coal, which is that portion of available coal remaining after subtracting mining and processing losses, was determined

  4. Implications for the formation of the Hollywood Basin from gravity interpretations of the northern Los Angeles Basin, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hildenbrand, Thomas G.; Davidson, Jeffrey G.; Ponti, Daniel J.; Langenheim, V.E.

    2001-01-01

    Gravity data provide insights on the complex tectonic history and structural development of the northern Los Angeles Basin region. The Hollywood basin appears to be a long (> 12 km), narrow (up to 2 km wide) trough lying between the Santa Monica Mountains and the Wilshire arch. In the deepest parts of the Hollywood basin, the modeled average thickness ranges from roughly 250 m if filled with only Quaternary sediments to approximately 600 m if Pliocene sediments are also present. Interpretations of conflicting drill hole data force us to consider both these scenarios. Because of the marked density contrast between the dense Santa Monica Mountains and the low-density sediments in the Los Angeles Basin, the gravity method is particularly useful in mapping the maximum displacement along the Santa Monica-Hollywood-Raymond fault zone. The gravity-defined Santa Monica–Hollywood fault zone deviates, in places, from the mapped active fault and fold scarps located with boreholes and trenching and by geomorphological mapping by Dolan and others (1997). Our models suggest that the Santa Monica–Hollywood fault zone dips northward approximately 63°. Three structural models are considered for the origin of the Hollywood basin: pull-apart basin, flexural basin, and a basin related to a back limb of a major fold. Although our preferred structural model involves flexure, the available geologic and geophysical data do not preclude contributions to the deepening of the basin from one or both of the other two models. Of particular interest is that the distribution of red-tagged buildings and structures damaged by the Northridge earthquake has a strong spatial correlation with the axis of the Hollywood basin defined by the gravity data. Several explanations for this correlation are explored, but two preferred geologic factors for the amplification of ground motion besides local site effects are (1) focussing of energy by a fault along the axis of the Hollywood basin and (2

  5. Comparison of geoelectric and seismic reflection models of the Zambezi Valley basins, northern Zimbabwe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, David; Whaler, Kathy; Zengeni, Teddy

    2000-09-01

    The Mana Pools and Lower Zambezi Karoo sedimentary basins lie within the Zambezi mobile belt in northern Zimbabwe. The subsurface apparent resistivities measured at both locations are extremely low. Magnetotelluric (MT) data along a profile across part of the Lower Zambezi basin have been inverted using Rapid Relaxation Inversion (Smith & Booker 1991) to find the minimum structure needed to fit the data and compare with an earlier forward model. The resistivity models of both the Mana Pools and the Lower Zambezi basins are then compared with their structure revealed from seismic reflection data. The resistivity structure of the Mana Pools basin is well modelled as a series of different resistivity layers whose boundaries are defined by the seismic data. However, the resistivity structure of the Lower Zambezi basin cannot be matched easily to the seismic structure; additional structure with no seismic expression is required. There is a conductive feature in the two basins in the Upper Karoo sandstone layer that extends below the seismic basement beneath the Lower Zambezi basin. This indicates that the conductors may represent different types of features in the two basins, consistent with their proposed different tectonic origins. A resistive unit is present within the sediments in the Lower Zambezi basin that may represent intercalated basalt dykes, giving an anisotropic MT response. It has been suggested that there might be similar thin basalt layers within the sediments of the Mana Pools basin, but these could not be resolved by MT methods. The low resistivity of the basement, particularly beneath the Lower Zambezi basin, is remarkable and may result from a high degree of either chemical or tectonic alteration to the underlying rocks due to metamorphic processes and tectonic disruption during rift formation. The presence of the Lower Zambezi basin conductor at depths greater than the seismic basement is consistent with observations to the west, in the adjacent

  6. Groundwater quality in the Northern Coast Ranges Basins, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mathany, Timothy M.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Recharge to the groundwater system is primarily from mixture of ambient sources, including direct percolation of precipitation and irrigation waters, infiltration of runoff from surrounding hills/areas, seepage from rivers and creeks, and subsurface inflow (from non-alluvial geologic units that bound the alluvial basins). The primary sources of discharge are evaporation, discharge to streams, and water pumped for municipal supply and irrigation.

  7. Palynology and organic/isotope geochemistry of the Mae Moh Basin, Northern Thailand

    SciTech Connect

    Minh, L.V.; Abrajano, T.; Burden, E.; Winsor, L. ); Ratanasthien, B. )

    1994-07-01

    The Mae Moh basin is one of several Tertiary intermontane basins in northern Thailand, whose evolution has been linked to the collision of the Indian plate with the Eurasian plate since the early Eocene. As in most of these basins, lacustrine/swamp sedimentation in the Mae Moh basin can be broadly divided into an Oligocene to Miocene synrift sequence and a Miocene to Quarternary postrift sequence. The dominance of swamp flora recognized from spore and pollen assemblages (e.g., Polypodiidites usmensis, Verrucatosporites, Cyrtostachys), as well as the abundance of macrophytes and woody debris, indicate overwhelming hot and humid swamp conditions, with lake development restricted to relatively small areas. The distribution of alkanes and their compound-specific carbon isotope compositions are used to further show climatic variations affecting the lake/swamp ecology during the deposition of the synrift sequence.

  8. Three-dimensional seismo-tectonics in the Po Valley basin, northern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turrini, Claudio; Angeloni, Pamela; Lacombe, Olivier; Ponton, Maurizio; Roure, Francois

    2015-04-01

    The Po Valley (Northern Italy) is a composite foreland-foredeep basin caught in between the Southern Alps and Northern Apennine mountain belts. By integrating the 3D structural model of the region and the public earthquake dataset, the three-dimensional seismo-tectonics of the basin is here illustrated for the first time at different scales of observation across the region. Despite the overall uncertainty due to the original data distribution-quality as well as the crustal scale model dimension, the positive correlation that structures and seismicity do show inside and around the study area, validate the performed 3D geo-volume while confirming the related active tectonic framework. The association of structures and earthquakes shows how deformation mainly develops at the front of the Southern Alps and the Northern Apennines, these being, at present, advancing onto their common Po Valley foreland-foredeep domain. Here the hypocentres are essentially concentrated in the eastern sector of the basin. While the 3D picture of a "living" tectonic system is visualized and analysed across the faulted structures of the entire Northern Italy, this study eventually indicates that the methodology can be a powerful tool for the understanding and validation of highly complex seismo-tectonic situations at both regional and local scale.

  9. Diagenesis of Coeymans (Lower Devonian) patch reefs, northern Appalachian basin

    SciTech Connect

    Precht, W.F.

    1984-12-01

    Fourteen Coeymans-age patch reefs and biotherms have been identified along the Silurian-Devonian outcrop belt in northeastern Pennsylvania, northwestern New Jersey, and central New York. Detailed petrographic analysis of samples from five reefs has led to development of a regional diagenetic model. The model developed in this study leads us to infer that Coeymans reefs found in the shallow subsurface would not be favorable hydrocarbon reservoirs. The possibility does exist that localized porosity development occurs in untested reefs within the deeper subsurface portions of the basin.

  10. Structural features of northern Tarim basin: Implications for regional tectonics and petroleum traps

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Jia; Juafu Lu; Dongsheng Cai

    1998-01-01

    The rhombus-shaped Tarim basin in northwestern China is controlled mainly by two left-lateral strike-slip systems: the northeast-trending Altun fault zone along its southeastern side and the northeast-trending Aheqi fault zone along its northwestern side. In this paper, we discuss the northern Tarim basin`s structural features, which include three main tectonic units: the Kalpin uplift, the Kuqa depression, and the North Tarim uplift along the northern margin of the Tarim basin. Structural mapping in the Kalpin uplift shows that a series of imbricated thrust sheets have been overprinted by strike-slip faulting. The amount of strike-slip displacement is estimated to be 148 km by restoration of strike-slip structures in the uplift. The Kuqa depression is a Mesozoic-Cenozoic foredeep depression with well-developed flat-ramp structures and fault-related folds. The Baicheng basin, a Quaternary pull-apart basin, developed at the center of the Kuqa depression. Subsurface structures in the North Tarim uplift can be divided into the Mesozoic-Cenozoic and the Paleozoic lithotectonic sequences in seismic profiles. The Paleozoic litho-tectonic sequence exhibits the interference of earlier left-lateral and later right-lateral strike-slip structures. Many normal faults in the Mesozoic-Cenozoic litho-tectonic sequence form the negative flower structures in the North Tarim uplift; these structures commonly directly overlie the positive flower structures in the Paleozoic litho-tectonic sequence. The interference regions of the northwest-trending and northeast-trending folds in the Paleozoic tectonic sequence have been identified to have the best trap structures. Our structural analysis indicates that the Tarim basin is a transpressional foreland basin rejuvenated during the Cenozoic.

  11. Diachronous pervasive remagnetization in northern Iberian basins during Cretaceous rotation and extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Z.; van Hinsbergen, D. J. J.; Dekkers, M. J.

    2009-07-01

    Northern Iberia exposes a series of Mesozoic sedimentary basins, whose final formation history is tied to a rotation episode of Iberia during the Aptian, related to the opening of the Bay of Biscay. Many of these basins experienced widespread remagnetization, previously loosely tied to a 'Mid-Cretaceous thermal event'. Here we make use of the improved apparent polar wander path (APWP) of Iberia to narrowly constrain the age of their remagnetization to show that several basins experienced a regional diachronous remagnetization. We apply the small circle intersection (SCI) method to reconstruct the paleomagnetic field direction during remagnetization in the Organyà Basin in the Southern Pyrenees, Spain, where the age of remagnetization is stratigraphically well-dated to around the Barremian-Aptian boundary, and where the paleomagnetic direction during remagnetization has been well-established. The resulting direction of D/ I = 316.8 ± 5.7°/54.8° ± 3.3° (where the uncertainty in declination is approximated by α95 / cos I and the error in inclination by α95) corresponds closely to a recently improved APWP of Iberia, providing support for the applicability of this method. Application of the SCI method allows us to show that the older portion of the remagnetized beds was already tilted by ~ 15-20° to the South during the remagnetization as a result of half-graben formation in the Organyà Basin. Moreover, the positive outcome of the SCI technique enables us to argue that previously published results from three other basins—the Cabuérniga and Cameros Basins and the Iberian Range—can be straightforwardly compared to the APWP. Hence, we show that the four pervasively remagnetized basins under consideration all acquired their remagnetization at different times. The remagnetization events were thus confined to these sedimentary basins on an individual 'per basin' scale—albeit occurring on a regional scale over a period of at least ~ 10-15 Myr. Therefore, we

  12. Changes in tectonic stress field in the northern Sunda Shelf Basins

    SciTech Connect

    Tjia, H.D.; Liew, K.K. )

    1994-07-01

    The Tertiary hydrocarbon basins of the northern Sunda Shelf are underlain by continental and attenuated continental crust characterized by moderate to high average geothermic gradients in excess of 5[degrees]C/100 m. In the Malay basin, Oligocene and younger sediments are more than 12 km thick. The smaller basins (which are commonly half grabens) and probably also the main Malay basin were developed as pull-apart depressions associated with regional north-to-northwest-striking wrench faults. Initial basin subsidence took place during the Oligocene, but at least one small basin may have developed as early as the Jurassic. Sense of movement of the regional wrench faults was reversed during middle to late Miocene and in some of these faults, evidence was found for yet a younger phase of lateral displacement. These offsets range up to 45 km right-laterally along north-trending fault zones. During most of the Cenozoic, succeeding wrench faulting with sense of movement in the opposite direction caused structural inversion of the basin-filling sediments, which became folded. The regional wrench faults act as domain boundaries, each tectonic domain being characterized by different stress fields. The evolving stress system can be attributed to varying degrees of interference of plate motions coupled with changes in movement directions and/or rates of the Pacific plate Indian Ocean-Australian plate and possible expulsion of southeast Asian crustal slabs following the collision of the Indian subplate with the Eurasian plate.

  13. Coal resources of selected coal beds and zones in the Northern and Central Appalachian Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruppert, Leslie; Tewalt, Susan; Bragg, Linda

    2002-01-01

    The Appalachian Basin is one of the most important coal-producing regions in the world. Bituminous coal has been mined in the basin for the last three centuries, and the cumulative production is estimated at 34.5 billion short tons. Annual production in 1998 was about 452 million short tons; the basin's production is mostly in the northern (32 percent) and central (63 percent) coal regions. The coal is used primarily within the Eastern United States for electric power generation, but some of it is suitable for metallurgical uses. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is completing a National Coal Resource Assessment of five coal-producing regions of the United States, including the Appalachian Basin. The USGS, in cooperation with the State geological surveys of Kentucky, Maryland, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia, has completed a digital coal resource assessment of five of the top-producing coal beds and coal zones in the northern and central Appalachian Basin coal regions -- the Pittsburgh coal bed, the Upper Freeport coal bed, the Fire Clay and Pond Creek coal zones, and the Pocahontas No. 3 coal bed. Of the 93 billion short tons of original coal in these units, about 66 billion short tons remain.

  14. Volcano-tectonic interpretations; An example from the Northern Basin and Range

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrall, C.C.

    1990-10-01

    This paper discusses a study of volcano-tectonic relationships in the Northern Basic and Range that suggest a temporal relationship between basin propagation and the inception of volcanism. The age relationships along the Yellowstone Hotspot limit reasonable tectonic models to explain ages of rhyolite domes across the High Lave Plains. Along-strike, west steeping tectonism and volcanism adequately models the observed data. In the southern Basin and Range, in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain, similar relationships are implied both with respect to the Death Valley - Owens Valley deformation and the Death alley-Pancake Range Volcanic Belt.

  15. Estimating flows in ungauged river basins in northern Mozambique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minihane, M.

    2011-12-01

    In many regions across the globe, there are limited streamflow observations and therefore limited knowledge of availability of surface water resources. In many cases, these rivers lie in countries that would benefit from economic development and improved access to water and sanitation services, both of which are linked to water resources. Additional information about streamflow in these watersheds is critical to water resources planning and economic development strategies. In southeastern Africa, the remote Rovuma River lies on the border between Mozambique and Tanzania. There are limited historic measurements in the main tributary and no recent observations. Improved knowledge of the water resource availability and inter-annual variability of the Rovuma River will enhance transboundary river basin management discussions for this river basin. While major rivers farther south in the country are more closely monitored, those in the north have gauging stations with only scattered observations and have not been active since the early 1980's. Reliable estimates of historic conditions are fundamental to water resources planning. This work aims to provide estimates in these rivers and to quantify uncertainty and bounds on those estimates. A combination of methods is used to estimate historic flows: simple index gauge methods such as the drainage area ratio method and mean flow ratio method, a statistical regression method, a combination of an index gauge method and global gridded runoff data, and a hydrological model. These results are compared to in-situ streamflow estimates based on stage measurements and rating curves for the basins and time frames for which data is available. The evaluation of the methods is based on an efficiency ratio, bias, and representation of seasonality and inter-annual variability. Use of gridded global datasets, either with the mean flow ratio method or a hydrological model, appears to provide improved estimates over use of local observations

  16. Paleotectonic controls on sedimentation in northern Williston basin area, Saskatchewan

    SciTech Connect

    Kent, D.M.

    1983-08-01

    The Williston basin lies within the so-called stable cratonic interior and would not be expected to have had the same intensity of tectonic activity as is generally considered to be characteristic of cratonic margin sedimentary basins. From time to time, however, other structural features appear to have been effective controls on sediment distribution patterns. In southern Saskatchewan, one of the most active of these was the Swift current platform. This feature appears to have been sufficiently positive during early Paleozoic time to have caused a distinct thinning of those sediments over it. The platform was mildly positive during other periods of sedimentation, as well as during periods of erosion. It was a site of widespread salt solution during Mesozoic time, which was also its time of major tectonic fluctuation, as well as being the period when it had the most significant influence on sedimentation. Southeastern Saskatchewan is the locale for some significant regional gravity and magnetic anomalies which appear related to exposed structural zones in the Precambrian Shield. A major gravity anomaly on the extreme eastern side of the province is on trend with the Nelson River zone of Manitoba and a magnetic anomaly (Camfield-Gough conductor zone) can be traced to the Wollaston trend in north-central Saskatchewan. The Camfield-Gough zone is particularly significant in that it lies along the axis of the Hummingbird trough, an area affected by basement-controlled early salt solution, and it extends southward into the United States, where it is flanked by a number of local multizone oil-producing structures in North Dakota and Montana.

  17. Spatial databases of the Humboldt Basin mineral resource assessment, northern Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mihalasky, Mark J.; Moyer, Lorre A.

    2004-01-01

    This report describes the origin, generation, and format of tract map databases for deposit types that accompany the metallic mineral resource assessment for the Humboldt River Basin, northern Nevada, (Wallace and others, 2004, Chapter 2). The deposit types include pluton-related polymetallic, sedimentary rock-hosted Au-Ag, and epithermal Au-Ag. The tract maps constitute only part of the assessment, which also includes new research and data for northern Nevada, discussions on land classification, and interpretation of the assessment maps. The purpose of the assessment was to identify areas that may have a greater favorability for undiscovered metallic mineral deposits, provide analysis of the mineral-resource favorability, and present the assessment of the Humboldt River basin and adjacent areas in a digital format using a Geographic Information System (GIS).

  18. Near-real-time cheatgrass percent cover in the Northern Great Basin, USA, 2015

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boyte, Stephen; Wylie, Bruce K.

    2016-01-01

    Cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum L.) dramatically changes shrub steppe ecosystems in the Northern Great Basin, United States.Current-season cheatgrass location and percent cover are difficult to estimate rapidly.We explain the development of a near-real-time cheatgrass percent cover dataset and map in the Northern Great Basin for the current year (2015), display the current year’s map, provide analysis of the map, and provide a website link to download the map (as a PDF) and the associated dataset.The near-real-time cheatgrass percent cover dataset and map were consistent with non-expedited, historical cheatgrass percent cover datasets and maps.Having cheatgrass maps available mid-summer can help land managers, policy makers, and Geographic Information Systems personnel as they work to protect socially relevant areas such as critical wildlife habitats.

  19. Flathead River Basin Hydrologic Observatory, Northern Rocky Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woessner, W. W.; Running, S. W.; Potts, D. F.; Kimball, J. S.; Deluca, T. H.; Fagre, D. B.; Makepeace, S.; Hendrix, M. S.; Lorang, M. S.; Ellis, B. K.; Lafave, J.; Harper, J.

    2004-12-01

    We are proposing the 22, 515 km2 glacially-sculpted Flathead River Basin located in Montana and British Columbia as a Hydrologic Observatory. This hydrologic landscape is diverse and includes large pristine watersheds, rapidly developing intermountain valleys, and a 95 km2 regulated reservoir and 510 km2 lake. The basin has a topographic gradient of over 2,339 m, and spans high alpine to arid climatic zones and a range of biomes. Stream flows are snow-melt dominated and underpinned by groundwater baseflow. The site headwaters contain 37 glaciers and thousands of square kilometers of watersheds in which fire and disease are the only disturbances. In contrast, the HO also contains watersheds at multiple scales that were dominated by glaciers within the last 100 years but are now glacier free, impacted by timber harvests and fires of varying ages to varying degrees, modified by water management practices including irrigation diversion and dams, and altered by development for homes, cities and agriculture. This Observatory provides a sensitive monitor of historic and future climatic shifts, air shed influences and impacts, and the consequences of land and water management practices on the hydrologic system. The HO watersheds are some of the only pristine watersheds left in the contiguous U.S.. They provide critical habitat for key species including the native threaten bull trout and lynx, and the listed western cutthroat trout, bald eagle, gray wolf and the grizzly bear. For the last several thousand years this system has been dominated by snow-melt runoff and moderated by large quantities of water stored in glacial ice. However, the timing and magnitude of droughts and summer flows have changed dramatically. With the information that can be gleaned from sediment cores and landscape records at different scales, this HO provides scientists with opportunities to establish baseline watershed conditions and data on natural hydrologic variability within the system. Such a

  20. Unusual Radar Backscatter Properties Along the Northern Rim of Imbrium Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, T. W.; Campbell, Bruce A.

    2005-01-01

    In general, radar backscatter from the lunar terrae is 2-4 times that of the maria. One exception to this is the terra terrain along the northern rim of Imbrium Basin. The highlands that surround Sinus Iridum and crater Plato have long-wavelength (70-cm) radar backscatter that is comparable to or lower than that from the adjacent maria. We are studying new 70-cm radar images and earlier multispectral data to better constrain the regional geology.

  1. Paleozoic unconformities favorable for uranium concentration in northern Appalachian basin

    SciTech Connect

    Dennison, J.M.

    1986-05-01

    Unconformities can redistribute uranium from protore rock as ground water moves through poorly consolidated strata beneath the erosion surface, or later moves along the unconformity. Groundwater could migrate farther than in present-day lithified Paleozoic strata in the Appalachian basin, now locally deformed by the Taconic and Allegheny orogenies. Several paleoaquifer systems could have developed uranium geochemical cells. Sandstone mineralogy, occurrences of fluvial strata, and reduzate facies are important factors. Other possibilities include silcrete developed during desert exposure, and uranium concentrated in paleokarst. Thirteen unconformities are evaluated to determine favorable areas for uranium concentration. Cambrian Potsdam sandstone (New York) contains arkoses and possible silcretes just above crystalline basement. Unconformities involving beveled sandstones and possible fluvial strata include Cambrian Hardyston sandstone (New Jersey), Cambrian Potsdam Sandstone (New York), Ordovician Oswego and Juniata formations (Pennsylvania and New York), Silurian Medina Group (New York), and Silurian Vernon, High Falls, and Longwood formations (New York and New Jersey). Devonian Catskill Formation is beveled by Pennsylvanian strata (New York and Pennsylvania). The pre-Pennsylvanian unconformity also bevels Lower Mississippian Pocono, Knapp, and Waverly strata (Pennsylvania, New York, and Ohio), truncates Upper Mississippian Mauch Chunk Formation (Pennsylvania), and forms paleokarst on Mississippian Loyalhanna Limestone (Pennsylvania) and Maxville Limestone (Ohio). Strata associated with these unconformities contain several reports of uranium. Unconformities unfavorable for uranium concentration occur beneath the Middle Ordovician (New York), Middle Devonian (Ohio and New York), and Upper Devonian (Ohio and New York); these involve marine strata overlying marine strata and probably much submarine erosion.

  2. Early Tertiary subsidence and sedimentary facies - Northern Sirte Basin, Libya

    SciTech Connect

    Gumati, Y.D.; Kanes, W.H.

    1985-12-01

    The subsidence curves and subsidence rate curves for the Sirte basin, constructed from the stratigraphic record, show that subsidence was continuous throughout Late Cretaceous and Tertiary times, reaching a maximum during the Paleocene and Eocene, when a major reactivation of faults occurred. Shales and carbonates were deposited during all of the Late Cretaceous and Tertiary. Abrupt lateral facies changes occur from the platform areas toward the deeper troughs along with steep downdip thickening. The absence of upper Paleozoic and lower Mesozoic sediments suggests that the area was domed, faulted, and eroded during the late Mesozoic. As a result of crustal extension during the Paleocene, a marked lithologic and structural change occurred. The Heira Shale succeeded the Kalash Limestone in the Marada trough. Reactivation of the earlier faults, accompanied by an increase in the sediment supply from the south, caused these lower Paleocene shales to cover the entire area, with the exception of the old highs where carbonate deposition continued. An intercalation of shales and carbonates provides a sensitive indicator of change of depth and sediment type. 14 figures.

  3. Early Tertiary subsidence and sedimentary facies - northern Sirte Basin, Libya

    SciTech Connect

    Gumati, Y.D.; Kanes, W.H.

    1985-01-01

    The subsidence curves and subsidence rate curves for the Sirte basin, constructed from the stratigraphic record, show that subsidence was continuous throughout Late Cretaceous and Tertiary times, reaching a maximum during the Paleocene and Eocene, when a major reactivation of faults occurred. Shales and carbonates were deposited during all of the Late Cretaceous and Tertiary. Abrupt lateral facies changes occur from the platform areas toward the deeper troughs along with steep downdip thickening. These conditions were probably assisted by contemporaneous faulting along structurally weak hinge lines where the dominant structural elements are normal step faults. The absence of upper Paleozoic and lower Mesozoic sediments suggests that the area was domed, faulted, and eroded during the late Mesozoic. As a result of crustal extension during the Paleocene, a marked lithologic and structural change occurred. The Heira Shale succeeded the Kalash Limestone in the Marada trough. Reactivation of the earlier faults, accompanied by an increase in the sediment supply from the south, caused these lower Paleocene shales to cover the entire area, with the exception of the old highs where carbonate deposition continued. An intercalation of shales and carbonates provides a sensitive indicator of change of depth and sediment type.

  4. 2000 resource assessment of selected coal beds and zones in the Northern and Central Appalachian Basin coal regions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Northern and Central Appalachian Basin Coal Regions Assessment Team

    2001-01-01

    This report includes results of a digital assessment of six coal beds or zones in the Northern and Central Appalachian Basin coal regions that produce over 15 percent of the Nation's coal. Other chapters include an executive summary, a report on geology and mining, a report summarizing other selected coal zones that were not assessed, and a report on USGS coal availability and recoverablity studies in the Northern and Central Appalachian Basin coal regions.

  5. Geochemical analysis of crude oil from northern Appalachian, eastern Illinois, and southern Michigan basins

    SciTech Connect

    Noel, J.A.; Cole, J.; Innes, C.; Juzwick, S.

    1987-09-01

    In May 1986, the Ohio Board of Regents awarded a research grant to Ashland College to investigate the basinal origin of crude oil through trace-element analysis. The major thrust of the project was to attempt to finger print crude oils of various ages and depths from the northern Appalachian, eastern Illinois, and southern Michigan basins, to learn if the oldest crudes may have migrated among the basins. This in turn might give a more definitive time for the separation of the three basins. Nickel to vanadium ratios, were chosen to be the discriminators. Nickel to vanadium ratios show that the Trenton oil from the fields at Lima, Ohio; Oak Harbor in Ottawa County, Ohio; Urbana, Indiana; Peru, Indiana; and Albion, Michigan, are all different. The Trempealeau oils in Harmony and Lincoln Townships, Morrow County, are similar but they are different from those in Peru and Bennington Townships. The Devonian oils of the Illinois and Appalachian basins are distinctly different. The Berea oil shows little or no variability along strike. The Mississippian oils of the Illinois basin are different from the Berea oils and the Salem oil is different from the Chester. The only thing consistent about the Clinton is its inconsistency.

  6. Diachronous fault array growth within continental rift basins: Quantitative analyses from the East Shetland Basin, northern North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claringbould, Johan; Bell, Rebecca; Jackson, Christopher; Gawthorpe, Robert; Odinsen, Tore

    2016-04-01

    The evolution of rift basins has been the subject of many studies, however, these studies have been mainly restricted to investigating the geometry of rift-related fault arrays. The relative timing of development of individual faults that make up the fault array is not yet well constrained. First-order tectono-stratigraphic models for rifts predict that normal faults develop broadly synchronously throughout the basin during a temporally distinct 'syn-rift' episode. However, largely due to the mechanical interaction between adjacent structures, distinctly diachronous activity is known to occur on the scale of individual fault segments and systems. Our limited understanding of how individual segments and systems contribute to array-scale strain largely reflects the limited dimension and resolution of the data available and methods applied. Here we utilize a regional extensive subsurface dataset comprising multiple 3D seismic MegaSurveys (10,000 km2), long (>75km) 2D seismic profiles, and exploration wells, to investigate the evolution of the fault array in the East Shetland Basin, North Viking Graben, northern North Sea. Previous studies propose this basin formed in response to multiphase rifting during two temporally distinct extensional phases in the Permian-Triassic and Middle-to-Late Jurassic, separated by a period of tectonic quiescence and thermal subsidence in the Early Jurassic. We document the timing of growth of individual structures within the rift-related fault array across the East Shetland Basin, constraining the progressive migration of strain from pre-Triassic-to-Late Jurassic. The methods used include (i) qualitative isochron map analysis, (ii) quantitative syn-kinematic deposit thickness difference across fault & expansion index calculations, and (iii) along fault throw-depth & backstripped displacement-length analyses. In contrast to established models, we demonstrate that the initiation, growth, and cessation of individual fault segments and

  7. Paleostress perturbations and salt tectonics in the Subhercynian Basin, northern Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandes, C.; Schmidt, C.; Tanner, D.; Winsemann, J.

    2012-04-01

    Paleostress field analysis provide valuable data about deformation phases of a sedimentary basin and are of particular interest to understand modern stress-field patterns. Salt domes commonly represent inhomogeneities in a basin-fill that can cause significant stress pertubations, which can seriously influence the choice of exploration targets and the course of drilling campaigns (Koupriantchik et al., 2007). The Subhercynian Basin, located between the Harz and Flechting basement highs in northern Germany, is an ideal natural laboratory to study the paleostress field in a structurally-complex, salt-dominated basin. The basin-fill is characterized by a set of alternating narrow and broad, NW-SE trending, salt-cored anticlines. We use a multi-scale approach that combines outcrop-scale observations with regional-scale deformation structures to analyse the central and northwestern part of the Subhercynian Basin. We determined paleostress data from the orientation of faults, slickensides, joints and stylolites. On a regional scale, the major normal paleo-stress vector was mainly horizontally NNE-SSW-oriented, which reflects the Late Creatceous inversion phase in Central Europe, but locally the paleostress field shows distinct perturbations that are related to the salt structures. In some cases, the maximum principle normal paleostress vector is deflected by up to 80° from the regional trend. Nevertheless, this deflection is predictable, because our dataset shows that the maximum principle normal paleostress is always perpendicular to the axes of the salt anticlines. Another perturbation occurs at the edges of the salt structures; towards the tips of anticlines, the maximum principle normal paleostress vector tends to rotate towards the trend of the anticline axis. Reference Koupriantchik, D., Hunt, S.P., Boult, P.J. & Meyers, A.G. (2007) Geomechanical modelling of salt diapirs: 3D salt structures from the Officer Basin, South Australia. In: Munson, T.J. and Ambrose, G

  8. Stratigraphic context of fossil hominids from the Omo group deposits: northern Turkana Basin, Kenya and Ethiopia

    SciTech Connect

    Feibel, C.S.; Brown, F.H.; McDougall, I.

    1989-04-01

    The chronometric framework developed for Plio-Pleistocene deposits of the northern Turkana Basin is reviewed in light of recent advances in lithostratigraphy, geochemical correlation, paleomagnetic stratigraphy, and isotopic dating. The sequence is tightly controlled by 20 precise ages on volcanic materials. These ages are internally consistent but are at variance with estimates for the boundaries of the magnetic polarity time scale by about 0.07 my. This discrepancy can be only partially resolved at present. Based on the established chronometric framework and stratigraphic sequences, depositional ages can be estimated for significant marker beds. These ages can in turn be used to constrain the 449 hominid specimens thus far reported from the basin. Ages for most hominid specimens can be estimated with a precision of +/- 0.05 my. In addition, the chronometric framework will be applicable to other paleontological collections, archeological excavations, and future discoveries in the basin.

  9. Stratigraphic context of fossil hominids from the Omo group deposits: northern Turkana Basin, Kenya and Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Feibel, C S; Brown, F H; McDougall, I

    1989-04-01

    The chronometric framework developed for Plio-Pleistocene deposits of the northern Turkana Basin is reviewed in light of recent advances in lithostratigraphy, geochemical correlation, paleomagnetic stratigraphy, and isotopic dating. The sequence is tightly controlled by 20 precise ages on volcanic materials. These ages are internally consistent but are at variance with estimates for the boundaries of the magnetic polarity time scale by about 0.07 my. This discrepancy can be only partially resolved at present. Based on the established chronometric framework and stratigraphic sequences, depositional ages can be estimated for significant marker beds. These ages can in turn be used to constrain the 449 hominid specimens thus far reported from the basin. Ages for most hominid specimens can be estimated with a precision of +/- 0.05 my. In addition, the chronometric framework will be applicable to other paleontological collections, archeological excavations, and future discoveries in the basin. PMID:2712166

  10. Reactive Transport of Nitrate in Northern California Groundwater basins: An Integrated Characterization and Modeling Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esser, B. K.; Moran, J. E.; Hudson, G. B.; Carle, S. F.; McNab, W.; Tompson, A. F.; Moore, K.; Beller, H.; Kane, S.; Eaton, G.

    2003-12-01

    More than 1/3 of active public drinking water supply wells in California produce water with nitrate-N levels indicative of anthropogenic inputs (> 4 mg/L). Understanding how the distribution of nitrate in California groundwater basins will evolve is vital to water supply and infrastructure planning. To address this need, we are studying the basin-scale reactive transport of nitrate in the Livermore and Llagas basins of Northern California. Both basins have increasingly urban populations heavily reliant on groundwater. A distinct nitrate "plume" exists in the Livermore Basin (Alameda County) whereas pervasive nitrate contamination exists in shallow groundwaters of the Llagas Basin (Santa Clara County). The sources and timing of nitrate contamination in these basins are not definitively known; septic systems, irrigated agriculture and livestock operations exist or have existed in both areas. The role of denitrification in controlling nitrate distribution is also unknown; dissolved oxygen levels are sufficiently low in portions of each basin as to indicate the potential for denitrification. We have collected water from 60 wells, and are determining both groundwater age (by the 3H/3He method) and the extent of denitrification (by the excess N2 method). Excess nitrogen is being determined by both membrane-inlet and noble gas mass spectrometry, using Ar and Ne content to account for atmospheric N2. We are also analyzing for stable istotopes of nitrate and water, nitrate co-contaminants, and general water quality parameters. Preliminary analysis of archival water district data from both basins suggests positive correlations of nitrate with Ca+2, Mg+2 and bicarbonate and negative correlation with pH. In the Llagas Basin, a negative correlation also exists between nitrate and temperature. Flow path-oriented reactive transport modeling is being explored as a tool to aid in the identification of both the sources of nitrate and evidence for denitrification in both basins

  11. MOLA Topography of Impact Basins in the Northern Hemisphere of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, Herbert; Sakimoto, S. E. H.; Roark, J. H.

    1998-01-01

    Coverage of the northern hemisphere of Mars by the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) during the aerobraking hiatus and the two Science Phasing Operation periods provides improved definition and characterization of large impact basins. Gridded MOLA data show the Utopia Basin has a pronounced bowl-like structure, as opposed to the interior rises suggested by the earlier USGS DEM. The elevation structure is concentric about the basin center as mapped by McGill. In particular, the proposed inner ring closely follows the -4 km contour over much of the southern, western and northwestern sides. Higher topography along portions of the dichotomy boundary aligns with the basin's outer ring. High topography in the polar region also occurs where the outer ring should lie, raising the possibility that perhaps some of the polar topography is due to basin structure as well as ice. Two MOLA passes near Phison Rupes provide evidence for a large "stealth" hole where Viking imagery show little evidence of any major structure. The 2 km deep, 600 km wide depression at 31OW, 3ON is as large as the Cassini impact basin 1000 km to the SW. While Cassini is easily recognized in image data, the "MOLA Hole" is not. If this depression is a deeply eroded and buried impact basin (as perhaps suggested by a decrease in the crater density and somewhat smoother terrain than in adjacent areas), it is not clear why it has managed to maintain its great depth. In Tempe at the dichotomy boundary a 300 km wide impact basin is revealed by pronounced bowl-like topography centered at 87W, 47N, even though only about 1/3 of the basin rim structure is obvious. The basin lies on a sloping boundary zone, with the more buried N rim up to 2 km below the rugged S rim. A similar N-S asymmetry in basin ring structure occurs for the much larger Isidis Basin, where the S rim rises 6 km but the subdued N rim rises barely 2 km above the floor. There is essentially no topographic expression of the main ring in the NE

  12. Holocene Deposition History of the Backarc-Opening Lanyang Basin, northern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Yu-Chang; Hsieh, Yu-Chung

    2015-04-01

    The Okinawa Trough is an actively opening backarc basin and its southernmost tip is located in the Lanyang Basin in northern Taiwan. The triangular Lanyang Basin has well-preserved sedimentary records which provide opportunities for understanding the subsidence and sedimentary processes at the tip of the Okinawa Trough. To better examine the deposition and tectonic history of the Lanyang Basin, we analyzed data from 13 boreholes and used C14 dates to reconstruct basin sedimentary layers during the Holocene time. The borehole depths and their correspondent C14 ages are used to reconstruct the overall age models in the Lanyang Basin. The sedimentation rates from the borehole locations vary significantly from 0.5 to 2.0 cm/yr. Age models were fitted using quadratic equations instead of linear equations. The linear age models, although commonly used by previous studies, may not be desirable because most age distributions show decreasing sedimentation rates, particularly after 6 ky BP. Six boreholes show very good fit using quadratic equations in the age models and five boreholes, mostly located along the coastal areas, show relatively linear relations. Two other boreholes do not have enough C14 dates and the reconstructed age models are less reliable in the two locations. Contour maps of sedimentation rates, including 3, 6, 9 and 12 ky BP, are derived from the interpolated sedimentation rates through the quadratic age models for the 13 boreholes. Based on our 3D reconstruction of age models, the pattern of sedimentary layers in the Lanyang Basin can be simply explained by the basin shape and the propagation of sediment fronts during the Holocene time. It also avoids unwarranted inference of local faults or inaccurate estimates of subsidence rates in the backarc-opening environment.

  13. Tectonic control on the Late Quaternary hydrography of the Upper Tiber Basin (Northern Apennines, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benvenuti, Marco; Bonini, Marco; Moroni, Adriana

    2016-09-01

    We examine the intramontane Upper Tiber Basin in the Northern Apennines (central Italy), where sub-orthogonal fault systems forced river deviation and the abandonment of alluvial fans since the late Middle Pleistocene. Archaeological material, spanning the Middle Palaeolithic-Iron Age, was collected mostly from the surface of the Late Quaternary alluvial landforms and related deposits (MUP and HOL units). This information contributed to the partial dating of seven major stages of drainage development. Normal faults parallel and transverse to the basin trend were active at different times and conditioned the valley pattern of the Middle (MUP1-2)-Late (MUP3) Pleistocene Tiber, Singerna, Sovara and Tignana rivers, which still flow today into the basin. The MUP1 and the MUP3 fans were beheaded by the displacement of their feeder valleys along the basin-transverse Carmine and Montedoglio faults. In some cases, the former feeder rivers underwent stream piracy but their courses mostly deviated in response of the topographic gradient created by faulting, as well as through the incision of new valleys that exploited the lithological contrast along the fault lines. The MUP3 Tignana fan was abandoned mostly due to the activity of the basin-parallel, dip-slip Sansepolcro fault. Subsidence driven by the basin-parallel Anghiari and Sansepolcro fault systems also provided the accommodation space for the MUP3 and HOl1-2 Afra fans between Late Pleistocene and early-mid Holocene. This study exemplifies the interplay between longitudinal and transverse fault systems, and the Late Quaternary hydrographic evolution of an extensional basin settled in the axial zone of an active fold-and-thrust belt. Although the faulting has interacted with the forcing exerted by the Late Quaternary climate fluctuations on the basin drainage systems, the tectonic rates are sufficiently high to represent the prime controller on base-level change and drainage routing patterns.

  14. The Earth's crust of the deep platform basins in the Northern Eurasia and their origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlenkova, N. I.; Kashubin, S. N.; Pavlenkova, G. A.

    2016-09-01

    Several large basins with a depth up to 15-20 km are revealed in the platform regions of Northern Eurasia—the Pre-Caspian, Vilyui, Pur-Gydan, and Kara-Barents platforms. All these basins have two structural features in common: they all have a rounded shape with steep walls and are marked with the reduced thickness of the Earth's crust. With the basins' depth of 15-20 km, the basement top is flat and has an almost horizontal surface. The basins differ by the average seismic velocities in the crystalline crust which vary from 6.2-64 to 6.8-7.0 km/s. Another distinction is the type of the crystalline crust ranging from continental with a thick granite-gneiss layer to suboceanic, represented by the basite layer. For explaining the formation of these basins, we suggest a combined petrophysical model which includes several geodynamical processes of different intensity: rifting, basification, and eclogitization of the Earth's crust.The model also takes into account the process of material outflow from beneath a basin through the midcrustal layer of increased porosity and fluid saturation. This accounts for the strong reduction of the granite-gneiss layer with the preservation of the basement's flat surface and for the formation of significant source areas of clastic material around the basin. The formation of these basins requires an extensive and sufficiently laterally uniform and longoperating energy source. The intrusion of the mantle material saturated with fluids into the bottom portions of the crust or, simply, the long-lasting inflow of the deep fluids are the most probable sources of this kind.

  15. Neotectonic of Dead Sea pull-apart basin. A new tectonic model for its northern closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Awabdeh, Mohammad; Pérez-Peña, J. Vicente; Azañón, J. Miguel; Booth-Rea, Guillermo

    2014-05-01

    The Dead Sea is a pull-apart basin formed by the relative motion of two active fault segments of the southern Dead Sea Transform Fault system (DSTF); the Wadi Araba Fault (WAF) and the Jordan Valley Fault (JVF) in northwest Jordan. Both of them are sinistral strike slip faults, however, the WAF has slightly faster slip-rate than the JVF. The northern termination of the Dead Sea basin is not well constrained, without clear transverse structures closing the basin. However, geophysical data suggest an abrupt thinning in this northern termination. Based on fieldwork and observations of recent tectonic structures, we suggest that the northern closure of this pull-apart basin corresponds to an active NW-SE normal fault system to the north of the Kafrain Dam (28 km southwest Amman; the capital of Jordan). These normal faults constitute a transtensional zone formed by the partial reactivation of two major structures; the Shueib and the Amman Hallabat structures (SHS and AHS). Normal faults dipping SW present low to moderate throws, lateral ramps coalescing in the SHS, and probably they merge into a low-dipping main plane. This fault system is also the responsible of the extension of the upper Cretaceous formations to the NE of Kafrain Dam and has associated colluvial wedges of Holocene sediments, indicating a seismic component with related small to medium earthquakes. This work reveals the Quaternary reactivation of tectonic structures that thought inactive in the Neogene and how they accommodate part of the stress in the region alongside with the DSFT.

  16. The Northern end of the Dead Sea Basin: Geometry from reflection seismic evidence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Al-Zoubi, A. S.; Heinrichs, T.; Qabbani, I.; ten Brink, U.S.

    2007-01-01

    Recently released reflection seismic lines from the Eastern side of the Jordan River north of the Dead Sea were interpreted by using borehole data and incorporated with the previously published seismic lines of the eastern side of the Jordan River. For the first time, the lines from the eastern side of the Jordan River were combined with the published reflection seismic lines from the western side of the Jordan River. In the complete cross sections, the inner deep basin is strongly asymmetric toward the Jericho Fault supporting the interpretation of this segment of the fault as the long-lived and presently active part of the Dead Sea Transform. There is no indication for a shift of the depocenter toward a hypothetical eastern major fault with time, as recently suggested. Rather, the north-eastern margin of the deep basin takes the form of a large flexure, modestly faulted. In the N-S-section along its depocenter, the floor of the basin at its northern end appears to deepen continuously by roughly 0.5??km over 10??km distance, without evidence of a transverse fault. The asymmetric and gently-dipping shape of the basin can be explained by models in which the basin is located outside the area of overlap between en-echelon strike-slip faults. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Advective and Conductive Heat Flow Budget Across the Wagner Basin, Northern Gulf of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, F.; Negrete-Aranda, R.; Contreras, J.; Müller, C.; Hutnak, M.; Gonzalez-Fernandez, A.; Harris, R. N.; Sclater, J. G.

    2015-12-01

    In May 2015, we conducted a cruise across the northern Gulf of California, an area of continental rift basin formation and rapid deposition of sediments. The cruise was undertaken aboard the R/V Alpha Helix; our goal was to study variation in superficial conductive heat flow, lateral changes in the shallow thermal conductivity structure, and advective transport of heat across the Wagner basin. We used a Fielax heat flow probe with 22 thermistors that can penetrate up to 6 m into the sediment cover. The resulting data set includes 53 new heat flow measurements collected along three profiles. The longest profile (42 km) contains 30 measurements spaced 1-2 km apart. The western part of the Wagner basin (hanging wall block) exhibit low to normal conductive heat flow whereas the eastern part of the basin (foot wall block) heat flow is high to very high (up to 2500 mWm-2). Two other short profiles (12 km long each) focused on resolving an extremely high heat flow anomaly up to 15 Wm-2 located near the intersection between the Wagner bounding fault system and the Cerro Prieto fault. We hypothesize that the contrasting heat flow values observed across the Wagner basin are due to horizontal water circulation through sand layers and fault pathways of high permeability. Circulation appears to be from west (recharge zone) to east (discharge zone). Additionally, our results reveal strong vertical advection of heat due to dehydration reactions and compaction of fine grained sediments.

  18. Late Miocene and Pliocene synorogenic sedimentation in northern Livermore basin, California

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacson, K.A.; Andersen, D.W.

    1987-05-01

    Late Tertiary synorogenic sedimentation in the northern Livermore basin, Contra Costa County, California, has recorded two major changes in provenance. Changes in clast composition of fluvial conglomerates reflect regional tectonic reorganization as the San Andreas fault system began to evolve at this latitude. Shallow marine deposition of Sierran andesitic sediment gave way at approximately 8 Ma to fluvially dominated deposition of sediment from a local, graywacke-rich, Coast Range source. Deposition of reworked andesitic material prior to 5.5 Ma records development of anticlinal uplifts along trends of the present Altamont Hills and Calaveras fault system. By 4 Ma, the areal extent of the subsiding basin had increased; the Altamont Hills continued to be uplifted, but the Calaveras fault region began to subside rapidly. Late Miocene and Pliocene deformation of the Livermore basin area extended over a broad zone east of the developing transform fault system. Structures that developed included broad synclinal basins and gentle anticlinal uplifts that had topographic expression but were not deeply incised. Intense deformation of the basin and uplift of Mount Diablo occurred after 3 Ma.

  19. Tectonic Subsidence Analysis of the Pearl River Mouth Basin, Northern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, X.; Huang, S. S. X. E. C.; Zhuang, W.; LIU, Z.; Duan, W.; Hu, S.

    2015-12-01

    The Pearl River Mouth Basin (PRMB hereafter) in the northern margin of the South China Sea has attracted great attention not only because of its special tectonic location but also for its abundant hydrocarbon resources. Tectonic evolution controls the petroleum geological condition of hydrocarbon-bearing basins. Efforts have been made to understand the tectonic evolution of this basin. However, many issues about the tectonic features and the evolution process of this basin, such as the age of the breakup unconformities and the anomalously accelerated subsidence during the post-rifting stage, remain controversial. Here we employ tectonic subsidence analysis of sedimentary basins, a technique of removing isostatic loading and compaction effects by back-stripping, to investigate the tectonic controls on the basin formation of the PRMB. We performed the analysis on 4 drill wells and 43 synthetic wells constructed based on recently acquired seismic profiles. The result shows that tectonic subsidence in the eastern sags of the PRMB began to decrease at ~30Ma while in the western sags the onset was ~23.8Ma. This suggests that the break-up time i.e. the end of rifting in the PRMB is earlier in the eastern sags than in the western sags. Abnormally accelerated tectonic subsidence occurred between 17.5-16.4Ma during the post-rifting stage, at an average subsidence rate as high as 301.9m/Ma. This phenomenon discriminates the PRMB from the category of classical Atlantic passive continental marginal basins, of which the tectonic subsidence during the post-rifting stage decays exponentially. The main objective of this paper is to provide insights into the geological and geodynamic evolution of the PRMB. The result bears significance to hydrocarbon exploration in this region.

  20. Tectonic fabric of northern North Fiji and Lau basins from GLORIA sidescan

    SciTech Connect

    Tiffin, D.L. ); Clarke, J.E.H.; Johnson, D. ); Jarvis, P. ); Hill, P. ); Huggett, Q.; Pearson, L. ); Price, R. )

    1990-06-01

    GLORIA mosaics, Seabeam, and seismic data over parts of the backarc New Hebrides arc, northwest and central North Fiji basin, Fiji Fracture Zone north of Fiji, Peggy Ridge, northeast Lau basin, northern Tonga arc, northwestern Tonga Trench, and Western Samoa reveal a complex tectonic framework for the region. Two triple junctions and several rifts are clearly delineated by outcrops and ridges of neovolcanic rocks. Backarc troughs in the New Hebrides Arc are commonly floored by volcanic rocks with little sediment cover. The locus of major faults are well defined in places by volcanic ridges and scarps. On the Fiji Fracture Zone north of Fiji, scarps indicate the trace, but west of Fiji it disappears for about 100 km, becoming well pronounced again near the central North Fiji basin triple junction. At Peggy Ridge a very extensive area of sheet-like volcanics indicates activity extends northeast from Peggy Ridge toward the western extension of the Tonga Trench passing west of Niuafo'ou Island, possibly marking a fault-to-trench transition. East of Niuafo'ou Island, backarc spreading close to the Tofua Arc is seen at a nascent triple junction, its northern arm approaching close to the western Tonga Trench. Long linear fault scarps in the trench result from bending of the crust. Only a few areas, including the seafloor north of Samoa, are mainly sediment covered. Two known hydrothermal deposits near the two triple junctions have been imaged, but other mapped areas of extensive neo-volcanics in the vicinity of propagators and pull-apart basins suggest sites for further investigation. The prevalence of ridge propagators and extensional basins suggests their significant role in the development of the region.

  1. Water quality in the Northern Rockies Intermontane basins, Idaho, Montana, and Washington, 1999-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Gregory M.; Caldwell, Rodney R.; Maret, Terry R.; Bowers, Craig L.; Dutton, DeAnn M.; Becksmith, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    This report contains the major findings of a 1999–2001 assessment of water quality in the Northern Rockies Intermontane Basins. It is one of a series of reports by the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program that present major findings in 51 major river basins and aquifer systems across the Nation. In these reports, water quality is discussed in terms of local, State, and regional issues. Conditions in a particular basin or aquifer system are compared to conditions found elsewhere and to selected national benchmarks, such as those for drinking-water quality and the protection of aquatic organisms. This report is intended for individuals working with water-resource issues in Federal, State, or local agencies, universities, public interest groups, or in the private sector. The information will be useful in addressing a number of current issues, such as the effects of agricultural and urban land use on water quality, human health, drinking water, source-water protection, hypoxia and excessive growth of algae and plants, pesticide registration, and monitoring and sampling strategies. This report is also for individuals who wish to know more about the quality of streams and ground water in areas near where they live, and how that water quality compares to the quality of water in other areas across the Nation. The water-quality conditions in the Northern Rockies Intermontane Basins summarized in this report are discussed in detail in other reports that can be accessed from (http://id.water.usgs.gov/nrok/index.html). Detailed technical information, data and analyses, collection and analytical methodology, models, graphs, and maps that support the findings presented in this report in addition to reports in this series from other basins can be accessed from the national NAWQA Web site (http://water.usgs.gov/nawqa).

  2. Diachronous Growth of Normal Fault Systems in Multiphase Rift Basins: Structural Evolution of the East Shetland Basin, Northern North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claringbould, Johan S.; Bell, Rebecca E.; A-L. Jackson, Christopher; Gawthorpe, Robert L.; Odinsen, Tore

    2015-04-01

    Our ability to determine the structural evolution and interaction of fault systems (kinematically linked group of faults that are in the km to 10s of km scale) within a rift basin is typically limited by the spatial extent and temporal resolution of the available data and methods used. Physical and numerical models provide predictions on how fault systems nucleate, grow and interact, but these models need to be tested with natural examples. Although field studies and individual 3D seismic surveys can provide a detailed structural evolution of individual fault systems, they are often spatially limited and cannot be used examine the interaction of fault systems throughout the entire basin. In contrast, regional subsurface studies, commonly conducted on widely spaced 2D seismic surveys, are able to capture the general structural evolution of a rift basin, but lack the spatial and temporal detail. Moreover, these studies typically describe the structural evolution of rifts as comprising multiple discrete tectonic stages (i.e. pre-, syn- and post-rift). This simplified approach does not, however, consider that the timing of activity can be strongly diachronous along and between faults that form part of a kinematically linked system within a rift basin. This study focuses on the East Shetland Basin (ESB), a multiphase rift basin located on the western margin of the North Viking Graben, northern North Sea. Most previous studies suggest the basin evolved in response to two discrete phases of extension in the Permian-Triassic and Middle-Late Jurassic, with the overall geometry of the latter rift to be the result of selective reactivation of faults associated with the former rift. Gradually eastwards thickening intra-rift strata (deposited between two rift phases) that form wedges between and within fault blocks have led to two strongly contrasting tectonic interpretations: (i) Early-Middle Jurassic differential thermal subsidence after Permian-Triassic rifting; or (ii

  3. Miocene woods from the Qaidam Basin on northern Qinghai-Tibet Plateau with implications for paleoenvironmental change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ye-Ming; Yang, Xiao-Nan

    2016-02-01

    The Qaidam Basin with the most complete Cenozoic sedimentary preservation in northern Qinghai-Tibet Plateau is a key area for studying uplift and environmental change of the plateau. Three types of woods, Ulmus (Ulmaceae), Leguminosae (?) (angiosperm) and Cupressaceae (gymnosperm) were recognized from the large-scale preservation of fossil woods in late Miocene Shang Youshashan Formation in northern Qaidam Basin on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. Both investigations of their Nearest Living Relatives (NLRs) and previous grassland mammal evidences suggest that there have been temperate deciduous broad-leaved forest and needle-leaved forest with grass in northern Qaidam Basin during the late Miocene in contrast to the desert vegetation found there nowadays. The presence of the ancient forest steppe further implies that the southern part of the plateau used to be adequately low, so that the Indian and East Asian monsoons could approach the northern area and to accommodate the vegetation in late Miocene.

  4. Early Eocene tectonics and sedimentation in Northern Fossil basin, Wyoming Overthrust Belt

    SciTech Connect

    Hurst, D.J.; Steidtmann, J.R.

    1984-07-01

    The Tunp Member of the early Eocene Wasatch Formation in southwestern Wyoming was shed from rising thrust sheets as debris flows containing abundant, very poorly sorted to unsorted, coarse clastic material in a mudstone matrix. Deposition occurred on the margins of the northern Fossil basin as coalesced alluvial fans and fan deltas. Small braided streams traversed the surface of these fans and reworked debris flow material, but the resultant fluvial deposits are volumetrically minor. Tunp Member deposits are preserved in three north-south-trending belts around the periphery of the northern Fossil basin. Each belt had a separate source in discrete highlands created by early Eocene motion on the Absaroka, Tunp, and Crawford thrust faults. These thrusts possessed unique characteristics of uplift style, provenance, and duration of in-situ weathering that are reflected by differences in clast lithology, size and rounding, as well as thickness and areal extent of the deposits resulting from each thrust. The results of this study have several important implications about thrust belt development: (1) passive rotation of older thrusts by younger ones can provide an uplifted source for syntectonic sediments, (2) the tenet that major thrusts young in the direction of tectonic transport may be violated by the Tunp and Crawford thrusts in the Fossil basin area, and (3) those heretical faults (i.e., Tunp and Crawford) possess a similar geometry that is distinct from other thrust faults in the area.

  5. Paleozoic stratigraphy and tectonics of northern Uncompahgre front, Paradox basin, Utah - an alternative view

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, G.M.; Powell, T.G.

    1986-08-01

    The Paradox basin is a complex pull-apart basin of major proportions that developed along intersecting basement fracture zones by strong east-west extensional pulses in the Middle Pennsylvanian. These stresses caused the Ancestral Rocky Mountains to emerge and the Paradox basin to subside. Oblique divergent strike-slip faulting along the Uncompahgre-San Luis uplifts allowed smaller subbasins to develop by orthogonal spreading along intersecting northeast-trending transform faults. The rate of basin-floor subsidence was related to combinations of normal reverse, and strike-slip faulting. The northernmost subbasin of the Paradox basin is bounded by the northwest-trending Uncompahgre uplift, the salt Valley diapiric feature, and the northeast-trending San Rafael and Cataract lineaments. Although generally straight on a regional scale, the Uncompahgre master fault system is complicated in detail. The zone consists of en echelon fault slices, thrust blocks, and detachment faults. Few Paleozoic tests have been drilled along the northern Uncompahgre front. Most structural interpretations have been based on seismic data that have disregarded empirical geologic data from the few deep tests in the area. Structural features such as the Thompson-Yellow Cat anticlines have been assumed to be salt bulges or pillow structures. Geologic and geophysical data strongly suggest these features may be low-angle detachment thrust sheets. The true economic potential of the area also remains unknown; however, the structural style, burial history, and sedimentary rock types suggest that sizable accumulations of untapped hydrocarbons may exist in this portion of the Paradox basin.

  6. Exploration of a lignite-bearing basin in Northern Ireland using ground magnetic and VLF-EM methods

    SciTech Connect

    McCaffrey, R.J.; McElroy, W.J.; Leslie, A.G.

    1995-03-01

    In an exploration technique feasibility study, a detailed magnetic and VLF-EM survey was carried out on the poorly exposed, lignite-bearing Crumlin subbasin within the Lough Neagh Basin, Co. Antrim, Northern Ireland. The faulted and onlapped margins of the basin, as well as lithological units and structures within the basin, were delineated by simple processing techniques applied to the data. The combination of the two methods overcomes the limitations of each method when it is used alone. These techniques could be successfully applied to other lignite-bearing basins sited on strongly magnetic basement worldwide.

  7. Holocene Vegetation and Climate History of the Northern Bighorn Basin, Southern Montana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyford, Mark E.; Betancourt, Julio L.; Jackson, Stephen T.

    2002-09-01

    Records of Holocene vegetation and climate change at low elevations (<2000 m) are rare in the central Rocky Mountain region. We developed a record of Holocene vegetation and climate change from 55 14C-dated woodrat middens at two low-elevation sites (1275 to 1590 m), currently vegetated by Juniperus osteosperma woodlands, in the northern Bighorn Basin. Macrofossil and pollen analyses show that the early Holocene was cooler than today, with warming and drying in the middle Holocene. During the Holocene, boreal ( Juniperus communis, J. horizontalis) and montane species ( J. scopulorum) were replaced by a Great Basin species ( J. osteosperma). J. osteosperma colonized the east side of the Pryor Mountains 4700 14C yr B.P. Downward movement of lower treeline indicates wetter conditions between 4400 and 2700 14C yr B.P. Increased aridity after 2700 14C yr B.P. initiated expansion of J. osteosperma from the east to west side of the Pryor Mountains.

  8. Triassic rift-related sedimentary basins in northern Chile (24° 29°S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez, M.; Bell, C. M.

    1992-10-01

    Triassic rocks in northern Chile (latitude 24°-29°S) include marine and continental rift-related sedimentary deposits, associated with basaltic, andesitic, and silicic volcanic rocks. Five main successions include the deposits of two marine basins (Profeta and San Félix) separated by three continental basins (Cifuncho, La Ternera, and La Coipa). The marine strata include turbidites and debris flow deposits interpreted as coarse-grained fan-delta sediments. The continental sediments include lacustrine fan delta, open lake, braided river, alluvial fan, and sabkha deposits. The widespread fan-delta systems (both marine and lacustrine), together with abrupt lateral and vertical facies discontinuities and large-scale depositional cycles, are indicative of rift-controlled sedimentation. The associated magmatic activity indicates that this rifting was the product of subduction-related extension or strike-slip movement on the active plate margin. Triassic rifting was followed in Late Triassic to Early Jurassic times by widespread thermotectonic subsidence.

  9. Federally owned coal and Federal lands in the Northern and Central Appalachian Basin coal regions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tewalt, S.J.

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) assessed five coal beds or coal zones in the northern and central Appalachian Basin coal regions for the National Coal Resource Assessment: the Pittsburgh coal bed, the Upper Freeport coal bed, the Fire Clay coal zone, the Pond Creek coal zone, and the Pocahontas No. 3 coal bed. The assessment produced stratigraphic and geochemical databases and digital coal maps, or models, which characterized the coal beds and coal zones. Using the assessment models, the USGS estimated original and remaining (unmined) resources for these coal beds or zones. The Appalachian Basin assessment was conducted in collaboration with the State geological surveys of West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Maryland, Kentucky, and Virginia.

  10. Latest Miocene to Quaternary deformation in the southern Chaiwopu Basin, northern Chinese Tian Shan foreland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Honghua; Wang, Zhen; Zhang, Tianqi; Zhao, Junxiang; Zheng, Xiangmin; Li, Youli

    2015-12-01

    Basinward propagation of fold and thrust belts is a crucial geological process accommodating Cenozoic crustal shortening within the India-Eurasia collision zone. Anticlinal growth strata in the southern Chaiwopu Basin (a piggyback basin) of the northern Chinese Tian Shan foreland record basinward encroachment of the Tian Shan along the Junggar Frontal Thrust Fault. A new magnetostratigraphic section constrains the onset of syntectonic growth strata at circa 6.4 Ma and suggests synchronous basinward thrusting and propagation of the Tian Shan. The intense alluviation in the southern Chaiwopu Basin ceased at circa 0.55 Ma due to significant anticlinal growth and its resultant river incision. More recent anticlinal growth and deformation during the late Quaternary are revealed by folded river terraces developing across the anticline. The terrace height profile indicates that terrace T1H has been vertically offset about 0.6 m by thrust faulting since its formation at about 7 Ka. The stratigraphic and geomorphic data presented in this work are helpful to understand the initiation of thrust-related folding, as well as aggradation and subsequent incision, in foreland basins of the Tian Shan in relation to the India-Asia collision.

  11. Ground-water quality in northern Ada County, lower Boise River basin, Idaho, 1985-96

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parliman, D.J.; Spinazola, Joseph M.

    1998-01-01

    In October 1992, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Idaho Division of Environmental Quality, Boise Regional Office (IDEQ-BRO), began a comprehensive study of ground-water quality in the lower Boise River Basin. The study in northern Ada County has been completed, and this report presents selected results of investigations in that area. Results and discussion presented herein are based on information in publications listed under “References Cited” on the last page of this Fact Sheet.

  12. Ground-water levels in intermontane basins of the northern Rocky Mountains, Montana and Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Briar, David W.; Lawlor, S.M.; Stone, M.A.; Parliman, D.J.; Schaefer, J.L.; Kendy, Eloise

    1996-01-01

    The Regional Aquifer-System Analysis (RASA) program is a series of studies by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to analyze regional ground-water systems that compose a major portion of the Nation's water supply (Sun, 1986). The Northern Rocky Mountains Intermontane Basins is one of the study regions in this national program. The main objectives of the RASA studies are to (1) describe the groundwater systems as they exist today, (2) analyze the known changes that have led to the systems present condition, (3) combine results of previous studies in a regional analysis, where possible, and (4) provide means by which effects of future ground-water development can be estimated.The purpose of this study, which began in 1990, was to increase understanding of the hydrogeology of the intermontane basins of the Northern Rocky Mountains area. This report is Chapter B of a three-part series and shows the general distribution of ground-water levels in basin-fill deposits in the study area. Chapter A (Tuck and others, 1996) describes the geologic history and generalized hydrogeologic units. Chapter C (Clark and Dutton, 1996) describes the quality of ground and surface waters in the study area.Ground-water levels shown in this report were measured primarily during summer 1991 and summer 1992; however, historical water levels were used for areas where more recent data could not be obtained. The information provided allows for the evaluation of general directions of ground-water flow, identification of recharge and discharge areas, and determination of hydraulic gradients within basin-fill deposits.

  13. Geologic history and hydrogeologic units of intermontane basins of the northern Rocky Mountains, Montana and Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tuck, L.K.; Briar, David W.; Clark, David W.

    1996-01-01

    The Regional Aquifer-System Analysis (RASA) program is a series of studies by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to analyze regional ground-water systems that compose a major portion of the Nation’s water supply (Sun, 1986). The Northern Rocky Mountains Intermontane Basins is one of the study regions in this national program. The main objectives of the RASA studies are to: (1) describe the ground-water systems as they exist today, (2) analyze the known changes that have led to the system's present condition, (3) combine results of previous studies in a regional analysis, where possible, and (4) provide means by which effects of future ground-water development can be estimated.The purpose of this study, which began in 1990, was to increase understanding of the hydrogeology of the intermontane basins of the Northern Rocky Mountains area. This report is Chapter Cofa three-part series and describes the quality of ground-water and surface water in the study area. Chapter A (Tück and others, 1996) describes the geologic history and generalized hydrogeologic units. Chapter B (Briar and others, 1996) describes the general distribution of ground-watcrlcwels in basin-fill deposits,Water-quality data illustrated in this report represent the distribution of concentrations and composition of dissolved solids in ground-water and surface water in the intermontane areas. The chemistry of ground and surface water in the intermontane areas is influenced by the chemical and physical nature of the rocks in the basin deposits of the valleys and surrounding bedrock in the mountains.

  14. Holocene faulting in the Bellingham forearc basin: upper-plate deformation at the northern end of the Cascadia subduction zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelsey, Harvey M.; Sherrod, Brian L.; Blakely, Richard J.; Haugerud, Ralph A.

    2013-01-01

    The northern Cascadia forearc takes up most of the strain transmitted northward via the Oregon Coast block from the northward-migrating Sierra Nevada block. The north-south contractional strain in the forearc manifests in upper-plate faults active during the Holocene, the northern-most components of which are faults within the Bellingham Basin. The Bellingham Basin is the northern of four basins of the actively deforming northern Cascadia forearc. A set of Holocene faults, Drayton Harbor, Birch Bay, and Sandy Point faults, occur within the Bellingham Basin and can be traced from onshore to offshore using a combination of aeromagnetic lineaments, paleoseismic investigations and scarps identified using LiDAR imagery. With the recognition of such Holocene faults, the northernmost margin of the actively deforming Cascadia forearc extends 60 km north of the previously recognized limit of Holocene forearc deformation. Although to date no Holocene faults are recognized at the northern boundary of the Bellingham Basin, which is 15 km north of the international border, there is no compelling tectonic reason to expect that Holocene faults are limited to south of the international border.

  15. Geophysical observations on northern part of Georges Bank and adjacent basins of Gulf of Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oldale, R.N.; Hathaway, J.C.; Dillon, William P.; Hendricks, J.D.; Robb, James M.

    1974-01-01

    Continuous-seismic-reflection and magnetic-intensity profiles provide data for inferences about the geology of the northern part of Georges Bank and the basins of the Gulf of Maine adjacent to the bank. Basement is inferred to be mostly sedimentary and volcanic rocks of Paleozoic age that were metamorphosed and intruded locally by felsic and mafic plutons near the end of the Paleozoic Era. During Late Triassic time, large fault basins formed within the Gulf of Maine and probably beneath Georges Bank. The fault basins and a possible major northeast-trending fault zone beneath the northern part of the bank probably formed as a result of the opening Atlantic during the Mesozoic. Nonmarine sediments, associated with mafic flows and intrusive rocks, were deposited in the fault basins as they formed. The upper surface of the Triassic and pre-Triassic rocks that comprise basement is an unconformity that makes up much of the bottom of the Gulf of Maine. Depth to the basement surface beneath the gulf differ greatly because of fluvial erosion in Tertiary time and glacial erosion in Pleistocene time. Beneath the northern part of Georges Bank the basement surface is smoother and slopes southward. Prominent valleys, cut before Late Cretaceous time, are present beneath this part of the bank. Cretaceous, Tertiary, and possibly Jurassic times were characterized by episodes of coastal-plain deposition and fluvial erosion. During this time a very thick wedge of sediment, mostly of Jurassic(?) and Cretaceous ages, was deposited on the shelf. Major periods of erosion took place at the close of the Cretaceous and during the Pliocene. Fluvial erosion during the Pliocene removed much of the coastal-plain sedimentary wedge and formed the Gulf of Maine. Pleistocene glaciers eroded all but a few remnants of the coastal-plain sediments within the gulf and deposited a thick section of drift against the north slope of Georges Bank and a thin veneer of outwash on the bank. Marine sediments were

  16. Paleozoic evolution of active margin basins in the southern Central Andes (northwestern Argentina and northern Chile)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahlburg, H.; Breitkreuz, C.

    The geodynamic evolution of the Paleozoic continental margin of Gondwana in the region of the southern Central Andes is characterized by the westward progression of orogenic basin formation through time. The Ordovician basin in the northwest Argentinian Cordillera Oriental and Puna originated as an Early Ordovician back-arc basin. The contemporaneous magmatic arc of an east-dipping subduction zone was presumably located in northern Chile. In the back-arc basin, a ca. 3500 meter, fining-up volcaniclastic apron connected to the arc formed during the Arenigian. Increased subsidence in the late Arenigian allowed for the accomodation of large volumes of volcaniclastic turbidites during the Middle Ordovician. Subsidence and sedimentation were caused by the onset of collision between the para-autochthonous Arequipa Massif Terrane (AMT) and the South American margin at the Arenigian-Llanvirnian transition. This led to eastward thrusting of the arc complex over its back-arc basin and, consequently, to its transformation into a marine foreland basin. As a result of thrusting in the west, a flexural bulge formed in the east, leading to uplift and emergence of the Cordillera Oriental shelf during the Guandacol Event at the Arenigian-Llanvirnian transition. The basin fill was folded during the terminal collision of the AMT during the Oclóyic Orogeny (Ashgillian). The folded strata were intruded post-tectonically by the presumably Silurian granitoids of the "Faja Eruptiva de la Puna Oriental." The orogeny led to the formation of the positive area of the Arco Puneño. West of the Arco Puneño, a further marine basin developed during the Early Devonian, the eastern shelf of which occupied the area of the Cordillera Occidental, Depresión Preandina, and Precordillera. The corresponding deep marine turbidite basin was located in the region of the Cordillera de la Costa. Deposition continued until the basin fill was folded in the early Late Carboniferous Toco Orogeny. The basin

  17. Recognition of relict Mesozoic Dongsha Basin in the northern margin, South China Sea and its implication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Pin; Wang, Yanlin

    2015-04-01

    The Pearl River Mouth Basin (PRMB) is dominated by NE-trending rift architecture produced mainly during Cenozoic Era. It comprises a series of grabens built up with thick Paleogene and thick Neogene sediments, up to 12000 m, and dividing basement highs composing Yanshanian granitic rocks. Though previously considered as one constituent part of PRMB in the southeast, Dongsha Basin displays major differences in sedimentary architecture and tectonic framework. Firstly, Dongsha Basin is characterized by a prominent angular unconformity, interpreted as a spectacular planation or rough erosion surface which separates the sediment column into two distinct parts. It is interpreted with accumulating seismic and drill data that the underlying strata comprise Early Cretaceous terrestrial, Jurassic marine and possibly Triassic sedimentary rocks totaling to 4~9 km thick, whereas the overlying strata are very thin (usually 0.5~1 km in whole) composing mainly Neogene sediments. The major sedimentary hiatus between them corresponds to the Late Cretaceous to mid-Miocene Epoch, well during the rifting to spreading process when the PRMB developed. Secondly, unlike the PRMB, the Dongsha Basin has suffered considerably less extension except its boundary areas, and actually remained as a relatively stable block though Cenozoic Era. Moreover, there are a few compressive open fold structures within the buried Mesozoic strata over the central Dongsha Basin. These folds trend in NNE and are characterized mostly by few minor growing upthrust faults with offsets in the order of few tens to hundreds meter. The upthrust faults dipped mostly southeastward against the northwestward subduction of paleo-Pacific plate as postulated in other previous study. The blind folds featured more like back-thrust growth tectonics, formed a broad NNE-SSW trending belt, obviously oblique to the trend of northern margin of the South China Sea and the PRMB as well. In a few recent models, the most prominent

  18. Geology, Streamflow, and Water Chemistry of the Talufofo Stream Basin, Saipan, Northern Mariana Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Izuka, Scot K.; Ewart, Charles J.

    1995-01-01

    A study of the geology, streamflow, and water chemistry of Talufofo Stream Basin, Saipan, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, was undertaken to determine the flow characteristics of Talufofo Stream and the relation to the geology of the drainage basin. The Commonwealth government is exploring the feasibility of using water from Talufofo Stream to supplement Saipan's stressed municipal water supply. Streamflow records from gaging stations on the principal forks of Talufofo Stream indicate that peak streamflows and long-term average flow are higher at the South Fork gaging station than at the Middle Fork gaging station because the drainage area of the South Fork gaging station is larger, but persistent base flow from ground-water discharge during dry weather is greater in the Middle Fork gaging station. The sum of the average flows at the Middle Fork and South Fork gaging stations, plus an estimate of the average flow at a point in the lower reaches of the North Fork, is about 2.96 cubic feet per second or 1.91 million gallons per day. Although this average represents the theoretical maximum long-term draft rate possible from the Talufofo Stream Basin if an adequate reservoir can be built, the actual amount of surface water available will be less because of evaporation, leaks, induced infiltration, and reservoir-design constraints. Base-flow characteristics, such as stream seepage and spring discharge, are related to geology of the basin. Base flow in the Talufofo Stream Basin originates as discharge from springs near the base of limestones located in the headwaters of Talufofo Stream, flows over low-permeability volcanic rocks in the middle reaches, and seeps back into the high-permeability limestones in the lower reaches. Water sampled from Talufofo Stream during base flow had high dissolved-calcium concentrations (between 35 and 98 milligrams per liter), characteristic of water from a limestone aquifer. Concentrations of potassium, sodium, and chloride

  19. Reservoir development in Brahaney northwest and Patricia fields, northern Midland basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzullo, L.J.

    1990-02-01

    Porous pay zones in the Silurian-Devonian section of the northern Midland basin, Texas, vary stratigraphically, as well as structurally, with their locations beneath the pre-Woodford unconformity. These variations are related to at least two major periods of widespread pre-Woodford tectonism and erosion. A major unconformable surface, present at the top of the Lower Silurian Fusselman formation, was later modified by tectonism and erosion immediately preceding deposition of the Woodford Shale. In places where the Fusselman subcrops beneath the Woodford, its capacity for reservoir development is dependent upon the severity of geologic events that affected the formation during the two major tectonic/erosional events. Where the Wristen and Thirtyone formations subcrop, their reservoir capacity depends upon the extent of structuring and subsequent erosion immediately prior to Woodford deposition. Two pre-Woodford oil fields in the northern Midland basin illustrate geologic complexity that bears on the successful application of subsurface mapping in defining potential pay zones. Brahaney Northwest field in Yoakum County is productive from fractured, coarse crystalline Silurian-Devonian dolomites on subtle, fault-bounded structures. These structures, defined seismically on the base of the Woodford, do not reveal the more complex structural and stratigraphic variations within the reservoir itself. Patricia field in Dawson County is productive from Fusselman carbonates where upper Fusselman structural and topographic relief coincides with post-Woodford faulting and low-relief anticlinal closure as defined at the base of the Woodford.

  20. Sequence stratigraphy and depositional systems of the Lower Silurian Medina Group, northern Appalachian basin

    SciTech Connect

    Castle, J.W. )

    1991-08-01

    Detailed sedimentological analysis of 3500 ft of continuous core from 44 wells in Pennsylvania, Ohio, Ontario, New York, and West Virginia, combined with regional study of geophysical logs, results in new interpretations of sequence stratigraphy and depositional systems in Lower Silurian siliciclastic rocks of the northern Appalachian basin. Above a type-1 sequence boundary at the base of the Medina Group are a lowstand systems tract and a transgressive systems tract that are represented, respectively, by the Whirlpool Sandstone and by the overlying Cabot Head Shale. The thickest sandstones in the Medina Group occur in the Grimsby Sandstone, which is interpreted as a highstand systems tract with basinward-prograding parasequences. Sea level rise after Grimsby parasequence deposition is represented by marine-shelf shale in the uppermost part of the Medina Group. Based on facies successions in the cores, four mappable depositional systems are interpreted for the Grimsby Sandstone and correlative sandstone units; (1) wave-dominated middle shelf, (2) wave- and tide-influenced inner shelf, (3) tide dominated shoreline, and (4) fluvial. The wave-dominated middle-shelf system, which includes very fine-grained shelf-ridge sandstones encased in marine shale, is the most basinward system, occurring from Ontario through parts of eastern Ohio. Shoreward, across the northern Appalachian basin, the influence of tidal processes relative to wave processes generally increased, which may have been related to distance across the shelf, water depth, and shoreline configuration. The shoreline may have been deltaic in some areas and straight in other areas.

  1. Evidence for Quaternary tectonism in the northern Bighorn Basin, Wyoming and Montana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reheis, Marith C.

    1985-05-01

    Irregularities in the reconstructed gradients of latest Pliocene and Quaternary terraces in the northern Bighorn Basin, northwest Wyoming and south-central Montana, suggest that Quaternary movements have occurred on the Frannie anticline, the Nye-Bowler Sage Creek fault zone, and the North Pryor fault. This area has been considered tectonically inactive. The timing of the interpreted movements is derived from age estimates of fluvial deposits determined from numerical ages and altitudes of associated deposits of volcanic ash. South of the Pryor Mountains, the 1.4 Ma Polecat Bench terrace of the Shoshone River rises 6 7 m over the axis of the Frannie anticline; this displacement may be related to folding or faulting since 1.4 Ma. Near the Nye-Bowler Sage Creek and North Pryor faults in the Pryor Mountains, bedrock is 25 and 55 m shallower than depths predicted from the projected 1.4 Ma gradient of the Shoshone River through Pryor Gap. The 2.0 Ma terrace of Rock Creek may have been offset up to 7 m by a splay of the Nye-Bowler fault zone between 2.0 and 0.6 Ma. The downstream divergence of terraces along Rock Creek suggests ongoing uplift of the northern Bighorn Basin, perhaps caused by crustal rebound due to post-Oligocene erosion.

  2. Near surface water balance in the Northern Murray-Darling Basin.

    PubMed

    Vervoort, R W; Silburn, M; Kirby, M

    2003-01-01

    The water balance allows the calculation of deep drainage from other components of the hydrological cycle. Deep drainage has been linked to outbreaks of dryland and irrigated salinity. Until recently, deep drainage was not considered to be an issue on the alluvial plains of the Northern Murray-Darling Basin. Recent simulation studies and calculations using the water balance suggest that substantial deep drainage occurs under irrigated agriculture. However, these estimates have large uncertainties due to possible errors in measurement, calculation and due to spatial variability. On a catchment scale the relative area under a certain land use as well as the connection to local groundwater and the influence of anomalies such as prior streams needs to be considered. This paper discusses the current state of knowledge on the water balance in the Northern Murray-Darling Basin and highlights the need for a concentrated effort to measure all the components of the water balance in this area, as well as the effect on shallow groundwater quality and levels.

  3. Extraordinarily thick-boned fish linked to the aridification of the Qaidam Basin (northern Tibetan Plateau)

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Meemann; Wang, Xiaoming; Liu, Huanzhang; Miao, Desui; Zhao, Quanhong; Wu, Guoxuan; Liu, Juan; Li, Qiang; Sun, Zhencheng; Wang, Ning

    2008-01-01

    Scattered with numerous salt lakes and ≈2,700–3,200 m above sea level, the giant Qaidam inland basin on the northern Tibetan Plateau has experienced continuing aridification since the beginning of the Late Cenozoic as a result of the India–Asia plate collision and associated uplift of the Tibetan Plateau. Previous evidence of aridification comes mainly from evaporite deposits and salinity-tolerant invertebrate fossils. Vertebrate fossils were rare until recent discoveries of abundant fish. Here, we report an unusual cyprinid fish, Hsianwenia wui, gen. et sp. nov., from Pliocene lake deposits of the Qaidam Basin, characterized by an extraordinarily thick skeleton that occupied almost the entire body. Such enormous skeletal thickening, apparently leaving little room for muscles, is unknown among extant fish. However, an almost identical condition occurs in the much smaller cyprinodontid Aphanius crassicaudus (Cyprinodonyiformes), collected from evaporites exposed along the northern margins of the Mediterranean Sea during the Messinian desiccation period. H. wui and A. crassicaudus both occur in similar deposits rich in carbonates (CaCO3) and sulfates (CaSO4), indicating that both were adapted to the extreme conditions resulting from the aridification in the two areas. The overall skeletal thickening was most likely formed through deposition of the oversaturated calcium and was apparently a normal feature of the biology and growth of these fish. PMID:18757732

  4. The Cenozoic on-shore basins of Northern Vietnam: Biostratigraphy, vertebrate and invertebrate faunas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhme, Madelaine; Prieto, Jérôme; Schneider, Simon; Hung, Nguyen Viet; Quang, Do Duc; Tran, Dang Ngoc

    2011-01-01

    A first account of paleontological data from three Cenozoic on-shore basins in Northern Vietnam, i.e. the Na Duong, Cao Bang, and Hang Mon basins, reveals a rich fossil fauna and flora of supposed Oligocene age, offering a great potential for taxonomic, paleoenvironmental, and paleobiogeographic studies. Two excavation campaigns unearthed well-preserved fossil remains of mammals, crocodiles, at least six turtle species, some 20 fish taxa, some other 20 mollusc species, and different plant remains. The majority of these taxa are regarded as new to science. However, close affinities to modern faunas of northern Southeast Asia demonstrate the importance of these fossils for an evaluation of the biological history of this modern biodiversity hot spot. Moreover, the fossil assemblages may help to disentangle the intricate Cenozoic tectonic evolution of Southeast Asia by application of paleobiogeographic modelling. Finally, the discovery of complex paleo-food-webs and the presence of several taxa indicative of certain ecological conditions provide a solid base for autecologic, synecologic and paleoclimatic studies. The potential biostratigraphic value of the macrofauna has to be demonstrated yet, as evolutionary concepts for most of the respective groups have not been proposed to date.

  5. Selective ingress of a Samoan plume component into the northern Lau backarc basin.

    PubMed

    Nebel, Oliver; Arculus, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    Intra-plate basalt isotopic trends require mixing between enriched mantle components (EM1, EM2, HIMU) and a primordial component with high (3)He/(4)He termed FOZO. However, proportions of components, geometric distributions within individual plumes, relative proportions of melting components and loci of mixing of melts and residues remain poorly understood. Here we present new Hf-Nd isotopic data of dredged sea floor basalts from the northern Lau backarc basin, ~250 km south of the subaerial and submerged Samoan chain, with high (3)He/(4)He, (20)Ne/(22)Ne and primordial (129)Xe/(130)Xe, characteristic of the FOZO component. Combined Hf-Nd-noble gas isotope systematics require mixing of refractory, sub-northwestern Lau backarc mantle only with a spatially restricted FOZO component, most plausibly sourced from part of the Samoan plume. Other geographically restricted and possibly volumetrically minor enriched Samoan plume components are not detectable in northern Lau backarc samples, consistent with selective plume ingress of the FOZO component beneath the basin. PMID:25761912

  6. Extraordinarily thick-boned fish linked to the aridification of the Qaidam Basin (northern Tibetan Plateau).

    PubMed

    Chang, Meemann; Wang, Xiaoming; Liu, Huanzhang; Miao, Desui; Zhao, Quanhong; Wu, Guoxuan; Liu, Juan; Li, Qiang; Sun, Zhencheng; Wang, Ning

    2008-09-01

    Scattered with numerous salt lakes and approximately 2,700-3,200 m above sea level, the giant Qaidam inland basin on the northern Tibetan Plateau has experienced continuing aridification since the beginning of the Late Cenozoic as a result of the India-Asia plate collision and associated uplift of the Tibetan Plateau. Previous evidence of aridification comes mainly from evaporite deposits and salinity-tolerant invertebrate fossils. Vertebrate fossils were rare until recent discoveries of abundant fish. Here, we report an unusual cyprinid fish, Hsianwenia wui, gen. et sp. nov., from Pliocene lake deposits of the Qaidam Basin, characterized by an extraordinarily thick skeleton that occupied almost the entire body. Such enormous skeletal thickening, apparently leaving little room for muscles, is unknown among extant fish. However, an almost identical condition occurs in the much smaller cyprinodontid Aphanius crassicaudus (Cyprinodonyiformes), collected from evaporites exposed along the northern margins of the Mediterranean Sea during the Messinian desiccation period. H. wui and A. crassicaudus both occur in similar deposits rich in carbonates (CaCO(3)) and sulfates (CaSO(4)), indicating that both were adapted to the extreme conditions resulting from the aridification in the two areas. The overall skeletal thickening was most likely formed through deposition of the oversaturated calcium and was apparently a normal feature of the biology and growth of these fish. PMID:18757732

  7. Extraordinarily thick-boned fish linked to the aridification of the Qaidam Basin (northern Tibetan Plateau).

    PubMed

    Chang, Meemann; Wang, Xiaoming; Liu, Huanzhang; Miao, Desui; Zhao, Quanhong; Wu, Guoxuan; Liu, Juan; Li, Qiang; Sun, Zhencheng; Wang, Ning

    2008-09-01

    Scattered with numerous salt lakes and approximately 2,700-3,200 m above sea level, the giant Qaidam inland basin on the northern Tibetan Plateau has experienced continuing aridification since the beginning of the Late Cenozoic as a result of the India-Asia plate collision and associated uplift of the Tibetan Plateau. Previous evidence of aridification comes mainly from evaporite deposits and salinity-tolerant invertebrate fossils. Vertebrate fossils were rare until recent discoveries of abundant fish. Here, we report an unusual cyprinid fish, Hsianwenia wui, gen. et sp. nov., from Pliocene lake deposits of the Qaidam Basin, characterized by an extraordinarily thick skeleton that occupied almost the entire body. Such enormous skeletal thickening, apparently leaving little room for muscles, is unknown among extant fish. However, an almost identical condition occurs in the much smaller cyprinodontid Aphanius crassicaudus (Cyprinodonyiformes), collected from evaporites exposed along the northern margins of the Mediterranean Sea during the Messinian desiccation period. H. wui and A. crassicaudus both occur in similar deposits rich in carbonates (CaCO(3)) and sulfates (CaSO(4)), indicating that both were adapted to the extreme conditions resulting from the aridification in the two areas. The overall skeletal thickening was most likely formed through deposition of the oversaturated calcium and was apparently a normal feature of the biology and growth of these fish.

  8. Imaging lithospheric structure in northern Scotland and the South Caspian Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asencio, Eugenio

    Passive- and active-source seismological studies of northern Scotland and the South Caspian Basin indicate: (1) pervasive and laterally heterogeneous velocity discontinuities within the upper mantle influenced by the localized tectonic and thermal history of northwest Scotland, and (2) growth fault-bend folds overriding a regional ductile detachment zone at a depth of about 13 to 16 km in response to a component of right-lateral simple shear of the underlying crust between the South Caspian Basin and the central and western Caucasus. Teleseismic earthquakes recorded by a small array of portable broadband stations and permanent short-period stations are used to ascertain the lateral extent of velocity discontinuities within the continental mantle lithosphere beneath Scotland. Radial receiver functions contain distinct P-to-S ( Ps) converted phases at about 3.1--3.2 s and at 4.5--5.2 s after the direct P-wave. These observations suggest that the upper mantle Ps phase originates from a high velocity and/or anisotropic layer within the upper mantle. At two stations, ORE and BACA, located along the northern shoreline of Scotland, these upper mantle phases can be correlated with the W-reflector, a bright, regionally extensive seismic reflector previously observed on marine deep seismic reflection and wide-angle refraction-reflection profiles. However, the variability in physical characteristics suggests the possibility that there may be multiple layered reflectors in the upper mantle beneath northern Scotland and revives debates on the regional and global significance of upper mantle layering. Deep seismic reflection profiles acquired in the deepwater of the South Caspian Sea, offshore Azerbaijan image a thick sequence of sediments (19--22 km thick) that structurally have been deformed into relatively symmetrical folds. These structures are interpreted as fault-bend growth folds overriding a regional ductile detachment zone at a depth of about 13 to 16 km. The analysis

  9. Sequence stratigraphy of the Pennsylvanian Morrow Formation, northern Delaware basin, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Bay, A.R.; Baltensperger, P.A. )

    1990-05-01

    Stratigraphic sequence analysis of the Pennsylvanian Morrow Formation is a new technique useful in predicting and understanding shifts in sand trends that can help locate Morrow gas reservoirs in the mature northern Delaware basin. Morrow sandstone reservoirs are fluvial deltaic channel fill and transgressive beach deposits that typically are 10-30 ft thick and consistently less than 1 mi wide. Detailed mapping and correlation within the systems tracts of each sequence can high-grade specific areas in the basin for exploration. Based on subsurface log correlations, the Morrow clastics and Atoka carbonates in the northern Delaware basin are interpreted as three stratigraphic sequences bounded by subregional type I unconformities. The post-Mississippian unconformity represents the oldest sequence boundary in the Morrow-to-Atoka succession and formed as the base level dropped and the shoreline shifted at least 50 mi basinward. The uplifted Pedernal Highlands supplied sediment to dip-trending lower Morrow channels that downcut into the exposed Mississippian carbonate ramp surface. The transgressive systems tract in this sequence consists of landward-stepping, wave-dominated deltaic deposit. The Morrow shale, a regionally correlatable organic-rich shale that separates the lower Morrow from the middle Morrow, represents the highstand deposits as base level that rose to a maximum. Another base level drop occurred at the end of Morrow shale deposition and resulted in dip-trending channel-fill sandstones and, stacked landward stepping transgressive beach and offshore ridge deposits oriented parallel to strike. The highstand progradational deposits of this sequence formed a terrace that supplied a shelf margin system of deltaic and slope-apron sediments during the succeeding third sequence. The shelf margin deposits are capped by highstand shelf carbonates of the upper Morrow and lower Atoka.

  10. Ellipticity of Rayleigh waves in basin and hard-rock sites in Northern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berbellini, Andrea; Morelli, Andrea; Ferreira, Ana M. G.

    2016-07-01

    We measure ellipticity of teleseismic Rayleigh waves at 95 seismic stations in Northern Italy, for wave period between 10 and 110 s, using an automatic technique and a large volume of high-quality seismic recordings from over 500 global earthquakes that occurred in 2008-2014. Northern Italy includes a wide range of crustal structures, from the wide and deep Po Plain sedimentary basin to outcropping sedimentary and crystalline rocks in the Northern Apennines and Alps. It thus provides an excellent case for studying the influence of shallow earth structure on polarization of surface waves. The ellipticity measurements show excellent spatial correlation with geological features in the region, such as high ellipticity associated with regions of low seismic velocity in the Po Plain and low ellipticity values in faster, hard rock regions in the Alps and Apennine mountains. Moreover, the observed ellipticity values also relate to the thickness of the basement, as highlighted by observed differences beneath the Alps and the Apennines. Comparison between observations and predicted ellipticity from a reference crustal model of the region show substantial fit, particularly for T ˜ 38 s data. Discrepancy for shorter wave period suggests that slight modifications of the model are needed, and that the ellipticity measurements could help to better constrain the shallow crustal structure of the region. Predictions for the Po Plain are larger than the observations by a factor of four or more and transition from retrograde to prograde Rayleigh wave motion at the surface for periods of T ˜ 10-13 s is predicted for seismic stations in the plain. Analysis of corresponding real data indicates a possible detection of teleseismic prograde particle motion, but the weak teleseismic earthquake signals are mixed with ambient noise signals at the predicted, short, transition periods. Detection of the period of polarity inversion from the joint analysis of earthquake and ambient noise

  11. Chemo- and biostratigraphy of the Late Jurassic from the Lower Saxony Basin, Northern Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erbacher, Jochen; Luppold, Friedrich Wilhelm; Heunisch, Carmen; Heldt, Matthias; Caesar, Sebastian

    2013-04-01

    The upper Jurassic (Oxfordian to Tithonian) sediments of the Lower Saxony Basin (Northern Germany) comprises a succession of limestones, marlstones and claystones deposited in a shallow marine to lacustrine epicontinental basin situated between the Tethys and the Sub-Boreal seas. Both, the depositional environment and the palaeogeographically isolated position strongly compromise a chronostratigraphic dating of the regional lithostratigraphical and biostratigraphical units. In order to obtain a stratigraphic standard section for the Late Jurassic of the Lower Saxony Basin we drilled a 325 m long core (Core Eulenflucht 1) covering the lower part of the Berriasian (Wealden 2-3 of the Bückeburg Formation) to the lower Oxfordian (Heersum Formation). A compilation with a section outcropping in an active quarry 2 km north of the drill site resulted in a 340 m long section reaching down to the late Callovian (Ornatenton Formation) . Ammonites have only been described in the lowermost, Callovian part of the section. Investigations of benthic foraminifers, ostracods as well as palynology, however, allowed for a rather detailed biozonation of the core. These data indicate the stratigrapical completeness of the section when compared to the regional stratigraphic data of the Lower Saxony Basin. Due to the lack of ammonites in Late Jurassic part of the section, which would have allowed for a correlation with Tethyan successions, high resolution stable carbon isotope data have been produced from bulk rock carbonate. Even though most of the data derive from shallow marine, rather coarse grained carbonates, such as ooliths and floatstones the resulting carbon isotope curve is surprisingly clean with only little "noise" in the upper part (early Tithonian?) of the measured succession. The curve clearly shows some distinctive features reported from biostratigraphically well-dated carbon isotope records of the Northern Tethys (e.g. Bartolini et al., 2003, Padden et al., 2002, Rais et

  12. Helium Isotope Variations in the Northern Lau and North Fiji Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupton, J. E.; Arculus, R. J.; Jenner, F. E.; Evans, L.; Greene, R.

    2012-12-01

    Recent measurements of submarine basalts from the Northern Lau Basin exhibit a fascinating pattern in the helium isotopes. In particular, basalts along the NW Lau Spreading Center and the Rochambeau Rifts (NWLSC-RR) all have elevated 3He/4He ratios ranging from 11 to 28 Ra, much higher than the MORB-like values of 7 - 9 Ra that might be expected for a typical back-arc spreading center (Lupton et al, GRL 2009) (R = 3He/4He and Ra = Rair = 1.39E-6). This has been interpreted as indicating the presence of a mantle plume component, possibly from the Samoan hotspot, which has somehow intruded into the northern Lau Basin. Furthermore, neon isotopes analyzed in this same suite of basalts exhibit enrichments in 21Ne/22Ne and 20Ne/22Ne distinct from MORB neon and similar to neon isotopes measured in Samoan lavas (Lupton et al., GRL, 2012), further evidence for intrusion of a Samoan plume component. Surprisingly, this hotspot component is only evident along the NWLSC-RR, while samples from seafloor basalts and submarine hydrothermal fluids in the NE Lau Basin have MORB-like values or lower, varying from 6.5 to 8.5 Ra. However, very few samples have been collected to the west of the NWLSC-RR, and the question thus remains as to the origin and extent of this 3He-rich component in the northern Lau Basin. Recently, expedition SS2012 of the R/V Southern Surveyor collected submarine rock samples from the volcanic zones in the northwestern Lau Basin and North Fiji Basin. These samples have 3He/4He ratios ranging from 9.0 up to 14.6 Ra, above the range for normal MORBs. Of particular interest is the zone immediately to the west of the Rochambeau Rifts. Samples from the SE Futuna Volcanic Zone and from the Futuna Spreading Center have 3He/4He varying from 9.2 to 10.6 Ra. Farther west, samples from the West Cikobia Volcanic Zone due north of the Fiji Islands have helium with 9.3 up to 12.2 Ra. Still farther west in the Fiji Basin at 17S, 174E, samples dredged from the NE Fiji Triple

  13. Alpine tectonics of granites in basement of Ysyk-Köl Basin, northern Tien Shan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonov, M. G.; Przhiyalgovsky, E. S.; Lavrushina, E. V.; Poleshchuk, A. V.; Rybin, A. K.

    2016-07-01

    The Ysyk-Köl Basin filled with Lower Jurassic-Quaternary sedimentary rocks is the largest intermontane negative structural unit of the northern Tien Shan. The basement of this basin is composed of Precambrian-Paleozoic rocks, largely of Ordovician and Silurian granitoids exposed in mountain ranges of the basin framework and as separate anticlinal domes situated in areas occupied by the Mesozoic-Cenozoic sedimentary cover. The postmagmatic tectonic internalstructure of the Chonkurchak (Chunkurchak), Kyzyl-Choku, Kyzyl-Bulak, and Prishib massifs emplaced in the basement, as well as their relationships to the sedimentary cover, are described in the paper. The study was carried out using the morphostructural method, detailed geological mapping, structural kinematic analysis, and petrographic examination of rocks. The internalstructure of Paleozoic granites in the basement and indications of their 3D tectonic flow are characterized. It is shown that granites underwent 3D deformation after their emplacement in the consolidated crust, and this process had a substantial influence on tectonic processes at the plate and orogenic stages of regional evolution.

  14. Reinterpretation of the Northern Terminus of the San Andreas Transform System: Implications for basin development and hydrocarbon exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Foland, S.S. ); Enzor, K.J. )

    1994-07-01

    The northern San Andreas transform system was studied to evaluate the tectonic history of offshore Point Arena basin, northern California. The Point Arena basin lies 250 km north of San Francisco and encompasses 8500 km[sup 2] on the outer continental shelf. It is a tertiary basin formed during Eocene subduction and overprinted by Pliocene-Pleistocene strike-slip motion of the San Andreas fault system. Interpretation of the data yields a new tectonic model for the northern San Andreas fault system and Point Arena basin. Previous models curved the fault system east parallel to the coast, intersecting faults exposed on Point Delgada, and then bending the fault sharply west to join the Mendocino triple junction. The new model projects the San Andreas fault system due northwest, straight into the offshore basin, as a series of parallel faults aligned with the onshore fault trace to directly intersect the triple junction. The new interpretation is supported by aeromagnetic data, which indicates the basin is divided by a major northwest-trending structural boundary and floored by two distinct basement types (Mesozoic Salinian granies and Jurassic Franciscan metasediments). The latest seismic data contain enough information to determine the genesis and orientation of the offshore fault system and associated folds. Basin modeling indicates hydrocarbon generation has occurred in the Miocene source beds. The model estimates the Point Arena basin contains multibillion barrel potential trapped in large antiforms associated with the through-going San Andreas system. Integration of all geotechnical data allowed reinterpretation of the tectonic history, and produced an enhanced understanding of Point Arena basin.

  15. Giant mudwaves in the Northern Argentine Basin: born and buried by bottom currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, Dmitrii; Murdmaa, Ivar; Ivanova, Elena; Levchenko, Oleg

    2014-05-01

    New sedimentary records and very high resolution seismic profiles collected during four cruises of the RV "Akademik Ioffe" (2011-2013) were correlated with seismic, multibeam and coring data obtained during cruises of the RV "Robert Conrad", "Knorr", "Meteor". A complex analysis of the geological-geophysical data revealed an extensive field of giant mudwaves (48 000 km2) in the northwestern Argentine Basin, South Atlantic. The symmetric waves up to 60 m in height and 4000 m in wavelength are oriented roughly parallel to contours. They partly cover the Santa Catarina Plateau and extend through the Santos Basin to the Sao Paulo Plateau. The mudwaves field is traced at the depth range from 3400 to 4000 m and divided into buried (northern) and non-buried (southern) parts. The non-buried sediment waves cover the surface of the huge drift in the Santa Catarina Plateau. The wave height increases from the drift summit to its flanks and decreases at the foot. Two cores retrieved from the drift top and its northern flank recovered muddy contourites with a greater amount of silt-size material in the core from the drift flank. The age of the recovered sediments is at least 130 ka. In the northern Santos basin, the sediment waves are buried under a large lens-like sediment body (drift?) inclined at the margins. Cores obtained from the buried part of the mudwaves field recovered an intercalation of hemipelagic clay and silty-clay contourite. The age of recovered sediments does not exceed 150 ka (Bleil et al., 1993). Contourites deposition in the study area is related to the activity of the Antarctic bottom water (AABW) contour current. The AABW flow is considered to be divided into two branches by the Santa Catarina Plateau. We suggest that this topographic obstacle causes a flow velocity increase. Wave height and grain-size variations indicate higher bottom current velocities at the plateau flanks and relative tranquil conditions at the flat summit of the plateau. The symmetric

  16. Petrofacies and provenance of late mesozoic forearc basin, northern and central California

    SciTech Connect

    Ingersoll, R.V.

    1983-07-01

    Data from the Great Valley Group (sequence) represent the most complete information regarding sandstone petrology of sediment derived from a magmatic arc. This information is useful in documenting tectonic and magmatic events within the arc and related terranes, and forms the basis for the establishment of petrostratigraphic units for mapping and correlation. Sandstone and conglomerate compositions are controlled by changes in provenance, many of which were basinwide and synchronous. Claymineral composition is controlled primarily by burial metamorphism. Careful attention to sample collection, sample preparation, and petrographic techniques is essential for uniform results. Seven petrographic parameters (P/F,Lv/L,M,Qp/Q,Q,F, and L-listed in decreasing importance to petrofacies discrimination) define eight petrofacies (Stony Creek, Platina, Lodoga, Grabast, Boxer, Cortina, Los Gatos and Rumsey-listed in approximate order of decreasing age). As the volcanic cover was stripped off, plutoniclastic and metamorphiclastic detritus from the underlying batholithic terranes was provided in abundance to the forearc basin. Crustal components were more ''continental'' in the southern Sierra Nevada and more ''oceanic'' in the northern Sierra Nevada, as demonstrated by the higher proportions of metamorphiclastic detritus and by the more felsic nature of volcaniclastic detritus to the south. By the middle of the Late Cretaceous, extensive batholithic terranes provided potassium-feldspar-rich arkosic detritus to the entire forearc basin. By the Paleogene, arc magmatism had migrated eastward sufficiently that deeper levels of the California part of the arc were exposed by erosion, tectonic activity decreased in the forearc basin, and the basin was filled to sea level in most parts.

  17. Petroleum evaluation of Ordovician black shale source rocks in northern Appalachian basin

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, L.G.; Roen, J.B.

    1988-08-01

    A preliminary appraisal of the Ordovician black shale source beds in the northern part of the Appalachian basin shows that the sequence is composed of the Upper Ordovician Utica Shale and its correlatives. The shales range in thickness from less than 200 ft in the west to more than 600 ft in the east along the Allegheny Front. Structure contours indicate that the shales plunge from 2,000 ft below sea level in central Ohio and to about 12,000 ft below sea level in central and northeastern Pennsylvania. Geochemical analyses of 175 samples indicate that the sequence has an average total organic carbon content (TOC) of 1.34%. Conodont alteration indices (CAI) and production indices indicate that the stages of maturation range from diagenetic in the less deeply buried western part of the basin, which probably produced mostly oil, to catagenetic in the more deeply buried eastern part of the basin, which probably produced mostly gas. Potential for continued hydrocarbon generation is poor in the east and fair to moderate in the western part of the basin. If the authors assume that these rocks have produced hydrocarbons, the hydrocarbons have since migrated. Using an average TOC of 1%, an organic carbon to hydrocarbon conversion factor of 10%, and a volume of rock within the oil and gas generation range as defined by CAI values of 1.5-4, the Ordovician shale could have generated 165 billion bbl of oil or equivalent. If only 1% of the 165 billion bbl was trapped after migration, then 1.65 billion bbl of oil or equivalent would be available for discovery.

  18. Detrital fission-track-compositional signature of an orogenic chain-hinterland basin system: The case of the late Neogene Quaternary Valdelsa basin (Northern Apennines, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balestrieri, M. L.; Benvenuti, M.; Tangocci, F.

    2013-05-01

    Detrital thermochronological data collected in syn-tectonic basin deposits are a promising tool for deciphering time and processes of the evolution of orogenic belts. Our study deals with the Valdelsa basin, one of the wider basins of central Tuscany, Italy. The Valdelsa basin is located at the rear of the Northern Apennines, a collisional orogen whose late Neogene Quaternary development is alternatively attributed to extensional and compressional regimes. These contrasting interpretations mostly rely on different reconstructions of the tectono-sedimentary evolution of several basins formed at the rear of the chain since the late Tortonian. Here, we explore the detrital thermochronological-compositional signature of tectonic and surface processes during the Valdelsa basin development. For this aim, detrital apatite fission-track analysis of 21 sand samples from the latest Messinian Gelasian fluvial to shallow marine basin deposits, has been accompanied by a clast composition analysis of 7 representative outcrops of the conglomerate facies. The grain-age distributions of the sediment samples are generally characterized by two distinct components, one younger peak (P1) varying between 5.5 ± 2.8 and 9.5 ± 1.0 Ma and one older peak (P2) varying from 15.0 ± 8.0 to 41.0 ± 10 Ma. By comparison with some bedrock ages obtained from the E-NE basin shoulder, we attributed the P2 peak to the Ligurian Units and the P1 peak to the Macigno Formation (Tuscan Units). These units are arranged one upon the other in the complex nappe pile forming the Northern Apennines orogen. While the gravel composition indicates a predominant feeding from the Ligurian units all along the sedimentary succession with a subordinate occurrence of Macigno pebbles slightly increasing upsection, the P1 peak is present even in the oldest collected sandy sediments. The early P1 occurrence reveals that the Macigno was exposed in the E-NE basin shoulder since at least the latest Messinian-early Zanclean

  19. Polyphase tectonic subsidence evolution of the Vienna Basin inferred from quantitative subsidence analysis of the northern and central parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eun Young; Wagreich, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The Vienna Basin is a tectonically complex Neogene basin situated at the Alpine-Carpathian transition. This study analyzes a detailed quantification of subsidence in the northern and central parts of the Vienna Basin to understand its tectonic subsidence evolution. About 200 wells were used to arrange stratigraphic setting, and wells reaching the pre-Neogene basement were analyzed for subsidence. To enhance the understanding of the regional subsidences, the wells were sorted into ten groups based on their position on major fault blocks. In the Early Miocene, subsidence was slow and along E-W to NE-SW trending axis, indicating the development of thrust-controlled piggyback basins. During the late Early Miocene data show abruptly increasing subsidence, making the initiation of the Vienna pull-apart basin system. From the Middle Miocene, the tectonic subsidence curves show regionally different patterns. The tectonic subsidence during the Middle Miocene varies laterally across the Vienna Basin, and the differential subsidence can be related to the changing tensional regime of weakening transtension and strengthening extension toward the late Middle Miocene. From the late Middle Miocene to the Late Miocene, the tectonic subsidence occurred dominantly along the regional active faults, and corresponds to the axis of E-W trending extension of the western parts of the Pannonian Basin system. In the Quaternary the Vienna Basin has been reactivated, and resulted in subsidence along the NE-SW trending Vienna Basin transfer fault system.

  20. Geodynamic evolution and sedimentary infill of the northern Levant Basin: A source to sink-perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawie, N.

    2013-12-01

    Nicolas Hawie a,b,c (nicolas.hawie@upmc.fr) Didier Granjeon c (didier.granjeon@ifpen.fr) Christian Gorini a,b (christian.gorini@upmc.fr) Remy Deschamps c (remy.deschamps@ifpen.fr) Fadi H. Nader c (fadi-henri.nader@ifpen.fr) Carla Müller Delphine Desmares f (delphine.desmares@upmc.fr) Lucien Montadert e (lucien.montadert@beicip.com) François Baudin a (francois.baudin@upmc.fr) a UMR 7193 Institut des Sciences de la Terre de Paris, Université Pierre et Marie Curie/ Univ. Paris 06, case 117. 4, place Jussieu 75252 Paris Cedex 05, France b iSTEP, UMR 7193, CNRS, F-75005, Paris, France c IFP Energies nouvelles, 1-4 avenue du Bois Préau 92852 Rueil Malmaison Cedex, France d UMR 7207, Centre de Recherche sur la Paleobiodiversité et les Paleoenvironnements. Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Tour 46-56 5ème. 4, place Jussieu 75252 Paris Cedex 05, France e Beicip Franlab, 232 Av. Napoléon Bonaparte, 95502 Rueil-Malmaison, France Sedimentological and biostratigraphic investigations onshore Lebanon coupled with 2D offshore reflection seismic data allowed proposing a new Mesozoic-Present tectono-stratigraphic framework for the northern Levant Margin and Basin. The seismic interpretation supported by in-depth facies analysis permitted to depict the potential depositional environments offshore Lebanon as no well has yet been drilled. The Levant region has been affected by successive geodynamic events that modified the architecture of its margin and basin from a Late Triassic to Middle Jurassic rift into a Late Cretaceous subduction followed by collision and Miocene-Present strike slip motion. The interplay between major geodynamic events as well as sea level fluctuations impacted on the sedimentary infill of the basin. During Jurassic and Cretaceous, the Levant Margin is dominated by the aggradation of a carbonate platform while deepwater mixed-systems prevailed in the basin. During the Oligo-Miocene, three major sedimentary pathways are expected to drive important

  1. Comparison of offshore and onshore gas occurrences, Eel River basin, northern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lorenson, T.D.; McLaughlin, Robert J.; Kvenvolden, Keith A.; Orange, Daniel L.; Davisson, M. Lee; Brewer, Peter G.; Martin, J.B.

    1998-01-01

    The Eel River basin of northern California is a upper Cenozoic depocenter containing more than 3,000 meters of sedimentary rock located near the Mendocino triple junction. Active tectonism has resulted in folding, faulting and rapid sedimentation. Both thermogenic and microbial hydrocarbons are known to be present in the sediments. In August 1997, we sampled two submarine gas seeps, one at a water depth of 520 m that supports a chemosynthetic-based ecosystem very near an area of previously recovered gas hydrate. Another vent site was sampled in sand covered with white bacterial mats at a water depth 41 m. We compared the hydrocarbon gas composition and methane isotopic composition of these seeps with land-based gas occurrences that include: 1) a gas seep and 2) gas from a 2360 m-deep gas well.

  2. Distribution of maximum burial temperatures across northern Appalachian Basin and implications for Carboniferous sedimentation patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Johnsson, M.J.

    1986-05-01

    Clay-mineral diagenesis and apatite fission-track age data indicate that the maximum burial temperatures to which the Middle Devonian Tioga metabentonite was exposed rise abruptly from low values in western New York State to higher values in the east. The highest temperatures, which approach 175/sup 0/C, were reached just west of Syracuse. Neither the pattern nor the magnitude of burial temperatures can be explained solely by burial of the metabentonite beneath Upper Devonian sediments. Although spatial variations in the geothermal gradient could have produced the observed pattern of burial temperatures, it is more likely that Carboniferous sediments, no longer preserved in the area, were responsible for the indicated burial. The inferred presence of thick Carboniferous sequences in western New York State suggests that the Allegheny orogeny had a stronger influence on sedimentation in the northern Appalachian Basin than has been previously recognized. 25 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  3. Prediction of the distribution of Glossina tachinoides (Diptera: Glossinidae) in the Volta basin of northern Ghana.

    PubMed

    Mahama, C I; Koné, A; de la Rocque, S; De Deken, R; Geerts, S

    2005-02-01

    The classification of a Landsat Thematic Mapper satellite image helped demonstrate prevailing habitat types and land use intensity in the Volta basin of the Northern Region of Ghana. A geo-referenced data layer comprising the capture results of a cross-sectional survey of Glossina tachinoides Westwood was over-laid on a data layer of habitat types within 500 m of either bank of the Volta river and its tributaries. An evaluation of the relationship between habitat types and the capture results of G. tachinoides suggested a strong preference of G. tachinoides for woodland, followed by shrubland, grassland and flood plains. The findings were used to classify the suitability of habitat types for G. tachinoides as 'high', 'medium' and 'low' and a prediction map for the distribution of G. tachinoides in the entire river network was produced. The usefulness of this method in estimating the potential distribution of G. tachinoides in an area of increasing agricultural expansion is discussed. PMID:15705216

  4. [Diversity of soil mesofauna in Northern Taiga biogeocenosises of the Kamennaya river basin (Karelia)].

    PubMed

    Rybalov, L B; Kamaev, I O

    2011-01-01

    The population of soil mesofauna in the basin of the small river subzone of the northern taiga (Karelia) has been investigated. It was shown that indexes of the number and mass of soil mesofauna in the landscape-ecological row ofbiogeocenosises are maximal in floodplain soils. The taxonomic composition and structure of domination of the soil mesofauna population depends on the location of biogeocenosis in the landscape: earthworms are dominants in riverine floodplain biogeocenosises, and larvae of elaterids and spiders prevail in the places outside of floodplains. The abundance of saprophytic invertebrates in floodplain biogeocenosises results in formation of humus of the mull type. A group of animals with mixed type of nutrition dominates in the places outside of floodplain soils that are related with humus of the moder-mor type. The population of rove beetles (Staphylinidae) allows the division of biogeocenosises into two groups according to their position in the landscape.

  5. Prediction of the distribution of Glossina tachinoides (Diptera: Glossinidae) in the Volta basin of northern Ghana.

    PubMed

    Mahama, C I; Koné, A; de la Rocque, S; De Deken, R; Geerts, S

    2005-02-01

    The classification of a Landsat Thematic Mapper satellite image helped demonstrate prevailing habitat types and land use intensity in the Volta basin of the Northern Region of Ghana. A geo-referenced data layer comprising the capture results of a cross-sectional survey of Glossina tachinoides Westwood was over-laid on a data layer of habitat types within 500 m of either bank of the Volta river and its tributaries. An evaluation of the relationship between habitat types and the capture results of G. tachinoides suggested a strong preference of G. tachinoides for woodland, followed by shrubland, grassland and flood plains. The findings were used to classify the suitability of habitat types for G. tachinoides as 'high', 'medium' and 'low' and a prediction map for the distribution of G. tachinoides in the entire river network was produced. The usefulness of this method in estimating the potential distribution of G. tachinoides in an area of increasing agricultural expansion is discussed.

  6. Miocene non-marine diatoms from the western Cordillera basins of northern Peru

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fourtanier, E.; Gasse, F.; Bellier, O.; Bonhomme, M.G.; Robles, I.

    1993-01-01

    Diatom assemblages are documented from diatomite layers of two Miocene fluvio-lacustrine units from the basins of the western Cordillera of northern Peru: the Namora Formation and the Cajabamba Formation. Emphasis is given to taxa of particular stratigraphic interest. The diatom assemblages indicate for the Namora Formation the occurrence of swampy conditions with very dilute, low alkalinity water. The diatom assemblages of the Cajabamba Formation reflect the occurrence of fresh, slightly alkaline, eutrophic lakes with deep water in some samples, and swampy conditions with relatively high salt content in other samples. The Namora formation is late Miocene in age based on the diatom assemblages and radiometric analyses. The diatom layers of the Cajabamba Formation are dated as late middle to early late Miocene. -from Authors

  7. Lunar impact basins: New data for the nearside northern high latitudes and eastern limb from the second Galileo flyby

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Head, J. W.; Belton, M.; Greeley, R.; Pieters, C.; Fischer, E.; Sunshine, J.; Klaasen, K.; Mcewen, A.; Becker, T.; Neukum, G.

    1993-01-01

    During the December 1992 Galileo Earth/Moon encounter the northern half of the nearside, the eastern limb, and parts of the western farside of the Moon were illuminated and in view, a geometry that was complementary to the first lunar encounter in December, 1990, which obtained images of the western limb and eastern farside. The Galileo Solid State Imaging System (SSI) obtained multispectral images for these regions during the second encounter and color ratio composite images were compiled using combinations of band ratios chosen on the basis of telescopic spectra and laboratory spectra of lunar samples. Ratios of images taken at 0.41 and 0.76 micron are sensitive to changes in the slope in the visible portion of the spectrum, and ratios of 0.99 and 0.76 micron relate to the strength of near-infrared absorptions due to iron-rich mafic minerals (0.76/0.99 ratio) such as olivine and pyroxene. Results of the analyses of the compositional diversity of the crust, maria, and Copernican craters are presented elsewhere. Primary objectives for lunar basin analysis for the second encounter include analysis of: the north polar region and the Humboldtianum basin; the characteristics of the Imbrium basin along its northern border and the symmetry of associated deposits; the origin of light plains north of Mare Frigoris and associated with several other basins; the nature and significance of pre-basin substrate; the utilization of the stereo capability to assess subtle basis structure; the identification of previously unrecognized ancient basins; basin deposits and structure for limb and farside basins; and assessment of evidence for proposed ancient basins. These data and results will be applied to addressing general problems of evaluation of the nature and origin of basin deposits, investigation of mode of ejecta emplacement and ejecta mixing, analysis of the origin of light plains deposits, analysis of basin deposit symmetry/asymmetry, investigation of basin depth of

  8. Mapping and monitoring cheatgrass dieoff in rangelands of the Northern Great Basin, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boyte, Stephen P.; Wylie, Bruce K.; Major, Donald J.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) dynamics in the Northern Great Basin rangelands, USA, is necessary to effectively manage the region’s lands. This study’s goal was to map and monitor cheatgrass performance to identify where and when cheatgrass dieoff occurred in the Northern Great Basin and to discover how this phenomenon was affected by climatic, topographic, and edaphic variables. We also examined how fire affected cheatgrass performance. Land managers and scientists are concerned by cheatgrass dieoff because it can increase land degradation, and its causes and effects are not fully known. To better understand the scope of cheatgrass dieoff, we developed multiple ecological models that integrated remote sensing data with geophysical and biophysical data. The models’ R2 ranged from 0.71 to 0.88, and their root mean squared errors (RMSEs) ranged from 3.07 to 6.95. Validation of dieoff data showed that 41% of pixels within independently developed dieoff polygons were accurately classified as dieoff, whereas 2% of pixels outside of dieoff polygons were classified as dieoff. Site potential, a long-term spatial average of cheatgrass cover, dominated the development of the cheatgrass performance model. Fire negatively affected cheatgrass performance 1 year postfire, but by the second year postfire performance exceeded prefire levels. The landscape-scale monitoring study presented in this paper helps increase knowledge about recent rangeland dynamics, including where cheatgrass dieoffs occurred and how cheatgrass responded to fire. This knowledge can help direct further investigation and/or guide land management activities that can capitalize on, or mitigate the effects of, cheatgrass dieoff.

  9. Density, topography, and regional, tensile stresses: Gravity-driven extension of the northern Basin and range

    SciTech Connect

    Unruh, J.R. )

    1993-04-01

    It has long been recognized that regional topographic gradients may give rise to tectonic (non-lithostatic) stresses in the lithosphere (Artyushkov, 1973). The elevation of a buoyantly-uplifted region represents a balance between these stresses and the strength of the lithosphere. This study uses existing data on crustal and lithospheric structure in the western United States to test the hypothesis that the topographically high (1.5--2.2 km) northern Basin and Range is spreading under it own weight. Following England and Jackson (1989), the total deviatoric tensile force (Fl) in the northern Basin and Range (NBR) due to the regional high topography is the difference between the vertically-integrated lithostatic stress in the NBR and in western California. Using available velocity models for the crust and upper mantle, and empirically-derived velocity-density relationships, calculated values of Fl range between 1--3 [times] 10[sup 12] N/m. Assuming a visco-elastic rheology for the lithosphere, an average heat flow of 90 m W/m[sup 2], and a crustal thickness of 35 km, values of Fl ranging from 1--3 [times] 10[sup 12] N/m may result in horizontal extension rates of approximately 10[sup [minus]15]/s to 10[sup [minus]15]/s to 10[sup [minus]16]/s. This is comparable to the rate of seismically-released strain in the NBR, and to extension rates of 8--9 mm/yr across the region determined from geologic and geodetic data. These results imply that shear tractions on the base of the lithosphere from mantle convection are not necessary to explain NBR extension. In addition to driving active extension, the weight of the topographically high NBR may exert a compressive force on surrounding lowlands. If so, this may account for some of the active shortening in western California, and the state of horizontal compressive stress in the western Great Plains.

  10. Sequence stratigraphy and depositional facies of the Silurian-Devonian interval of the northern Permian basin

    SciTech Connect

    Canter, K.L.; Geesaman, R.C. ); Wheeler, D. )

    1992-04-01

    The Silurian and Devonian intervals of the northern Central Basin platform area of west Texas and southeastern New Mexico include the Fusselman, Wristen, and Thirtyone formations and the Woodford Shale. The carbonate-rich Fusselman, Wristen, and Thirtyone formations record a transition from ramp to platform deposition. Oolite grainstones of the lower Fusselman Formation were deposited in a ramp setting during an Upper Ordovician/Lower Silurian transgression. The overlying crinoid packstones and grainstones represent shoals that developed along a break in slope separating the evolving platform from a southward-dipping starved basin. By the close of Fusselman deposition, the platform was well developed, with shallow peridtidal mudstones and wackestones, and high-energy grainstones deposited as near-parallel facies tracts over the platform area. The platform system became fully developed during the deposition of the Wristen Formation. Porous dolomitic peridtidal and platform margin facies grade downdip into nonporous, limy and argillaceous open-shelf facies. Platform facies are typified by numerous shallowing-upward parasequences that terminated at subaerial exposure surfaces. The rocks of the Lower Devonian Thirtyone Formation were deposited as a wedge that onlaps the exposed Silurian platform margin. This formation contains a porous, chert-rich, lowstand deposit; a transgressive disconformity; and variably porous, grain-rich highstand deposits representing an overall sea level rise. A major unconformity marks the contact between the karsted upper surface of the Thirtyone Formation and the overlying organic-rich, anoxic Woodford Shale.

  11. Holocene vegetation and climate history of the northern Bighorn Basin, southern Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lyford, M.E.; Betancourt, J.L.; Jackson, S.T.

    2002-01-01

    Records of Holocene vegetation and climate change at low elevations (<2000 m) are rare in the central Rocky Mountain region. We developed a record of Holocene vegetation and climate change from 55 14C-dated woodrat middens at two low-elevation sites (1275 to 1590 m, currently vegetated by Juniperus osteosperma woodlands, in the northern Bighorn Basin. Macrofossil and pollen analyses show that the early Holocene was cooler than today, with warming and drying in the middle Holocene. During the Holocene, boreal (Juniperus communis, J. horizontalis) and montane species (J. scopulorum) were replaced by a Great Basin species (J. osteosperma). J. osteosperma colonized the east side of the Pryor Mountains 4700 14C yr B.P. Downward movement of lower treeline indicates wetter conditions between 4400 and 2700 14C yr B.P. Increased aridity after 2700 14C yr B.P. initiated expansion of J. osteosperma from the east to west side of the Pryor Mountains. ?? 2002 University of Washington.

  12. Vertical movements of the crust: Case histories from the northern Appalachian Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Gerald M.

    1987-12-01

    Evidence of former deep burial of Ordovician to Devonian strata of the northern Appalachian Basin has been obtained from various techniques of study, including fluid-inclusion homogenization temperatures, δ18O, and vitrinite reflectance. Diagenetic minerals indicate paleotemperatures of 100 200 °C. Maximum depths of burial were calculated from the estimated paleotemperatures; a gradient of 26 °C/km was assumed. Silurian strata of the basin are interpreted to have reached maximum burial depths of 5.0 km; Devonian strata in the Catskill Mountains had former burial depths of ˜6.5 km; Lower Ordovician carbonate sequences were buried to >7 km; Middle Ordovician strata had paleodepths of ˜5 km; and Devonian carbonate strata had paleodepths from 4.5 to 5 km. If these strata were buried deeper than previously thought, unexpectedly large amounts of uplift and erosion, ranging from 4.3 to 7 km, must also have taken place to bring these strata to the present land surface. The occurrence of such large-scale vertical movements of the crust and lithosphere must be recognized in paleogeographic reconstructions. Such drastic changes represent isostatic unroofing, with widespread implications for paleogeography of a kind unrecognized at present.

  13. Hydrogeochemistry of high-fluoride groundwater at Yuncheng Basin, northern China.

    PubMed

    Li, Chengcheng; Gao, Xubo; Wang, Yanxin

    2015-03-01

    Hydrogeochemical and environmental isotope methods were integrated to delineate the spatial distribution and enrichment of fluoride in groundwater at Yuncheng Basin in northern China. One hundred groundwater samples and 10 Quaternary sediment samples were collected from the Basin. Over 69% of the shallow groundwater (with a F(-) concentration of up to 14.1mg/L), 44% of groundwater samples from the intermediate and 31% from the deep aquifers had F(-) concentrations above the WHO provisional drinking water guideline of 1.5mg/L. Groundwater with high F(-) concentrations displayed a distinctive major ion chemistry: Na-rich and Ca-poor with a high pH value and high HCO3(-) content. Hydrochemical diagrams and profiles and hydrogen and oxygen isotope compositions indicate that variations in the major ion chemistry and pH are controlled by mineral dissolution, cation exchange and evaporation in the aquifer systems, which are important for F(-) mobilization as well. Leakage of shallow groundwater and/or evaporite (gypsum and mirabilite) dissolution may be the major sources for F(-) in groundwater of the intermediate and deep aquifers.

  14. Arsenic release by indigenous bacteria Bacillus cereus from aquifer sediments at Datong Basin, northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zuoming; Wang, Yanxin; Duan, Mengyu; Xie, Xianjun; Su, Chunli

    2011-03-01

    Endemic arsenic poisoning due to long-term drinking of high arsenic groundwater has been reported in Datong Basin, northern China. To investigate the effects of microbial activities on arsenic mobilization in contaminated aquifers, Bacillus cereus ( B. cereus) isolated from high arsenic aquifer sediments of the basin was used in our microcosm experiments. The arsenic concentration in the treatment with both bacteria and sodium citrate or glucose had a rapid increase in the first 18 d, and then, it declined. Supplemented with bacteria only, the concentration could increase on the second day. By contrast, the arsenic concentration in the treatment supplemented with sodium citrate or glucose was kept very low. These results indicate that bacterial activities promoted the release of arsenic in the sediments. Bacterial activities also influenced other geochemical parameters of the aqueous phase, such as pH, Eh, and the concentrations of dissolved Fe, Mn, and Al that are important controls on arsenic release. The removal of Fe, Mn, and Al from sediment samples was observed with the presence of B. cereus. The effects of microbial activities on Fe, Mn, and Al release were nearly the same as those on As mobilization. The pH values of the treatments inoculated with bacteria were lower than those without bacteria, still at alkaline levels. With the decrease of Eh values in treatments inoculated with bacteria, the microcosms became more reducing and are thus favorable for arsenic release.

  15. Tertiary fluvial systems within the Bear Creek coal field, northern Big Horn basin, Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, J.N. ); Gruber, J.R. Jr. )

    1991-06-01

    The Bear Creek coal field contains the 250-m-thick coal-bearing Paludal Member of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation in the northern Big Horn Basin, Montana. Detailed field and subsurface data show two contrasting geometries in alluvial strata, each bounded by an economic coal bed. The lower 50 m of the Paludal Member is dominated by sheet and ribbon sandstones. The sheet sandstones are as long as 1.5 km and fine upwards from medium to fine grained. Some sandstones are multistory with sharp upoper and lower contacts. The upper portion has convolute bedding, ripple lamination, and some horizontal and tabular crossbeds. Stratigraphically higher is a 12-m-thick fine-grained sequence, containing large tree trunks in growth position and extensively rooted mud rocks. Sandstone bodies, 6 m thick and 10 m wide, are enclosed within mudstones and siltstones. The sandstones are primarily ripple laminated and have stepped bases and internal erosion surfaces. This interval has previously been interpreted as deposits of an anastomosed fluvial system. The sandstones show little evidence of significant lateral migration. In contrast to the lower interval, the environment here consisted of well-developed vegetated islands separating fluvial channels. Subsurface data show that the major coal beds are laterally continuous within the study area. The cyclic development of the coals reflects intermittent periods of long-term basin stability. Alternating dominance of the sandstones suggests that influx and distribution were controlled through episodic uplift of the nearby Beartooth Mountains.

  16. The spatial and temporal variability of groundwater recharge in a forested basin in northern Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dripps, W.R.; Bradbury, K.R.

    2010-01-01

    Recharge varies spatially and temporally as it depends on a wide variety of factors (e.g. vegetation, precipitation, climate, topography, geology, and soil type), making it one of the most difficult, complex, and uncertain hydrologic parameters to quantify. Despite its inherent variability, groundwater modellers, planners, and policy makers often ignore recharge variability and assume a single average recharge value for an entire watershed. Relatively few attempts have been made to quantify or incorporate spatial and temporal recharge variability into water resource planning or groundwater modelling efforts. In this study, a simple, daily soil-water balance model was developed and used to estimate the spatial and temporal distribution of groundwater recharge of the Trout Lake basin of northern Wisconsin for 1996-2000 as a means to quantify recharge variability. For the 5 years of study, annual recharge varied spatially by as much as 18 cm across the basin; vegetation was the predominant control on this variability. Recharge also varied temporally with a threefold annual difference over the 5-year period. Intra-annually, recharge was limited to a few isolated events each year and exhibited a distinct seasonal pattern. The results suggest that ignoring recharge variability may not only be inappropriate, but also, depending on the application, may invalidate model results and predictions for regional and local water budget calculations, water resource management, nutrient cycling, and contaminant transport studies. Recharge is spatially and temporally variable, and should be modelled as such. Copyright ?? 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Gravity analysis of the Precambrian basement topography associated with the northern boundary of Ghadames Basin (southern Tunisia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhaoui, Mohamed; Gabtni, Hakim; Jallouli, Chokri; Jleilia, Ali; Mickus, Kevin Lee; Turki, Mohamed Moncef

    2014-12-01

    Gravity data were analyzed to determine the structural development of the northern boundary of the Ghadames Basin in southern Tunisia. The Ghadames Basin which also occurs in eastern Algeria and northwestern Libya is one of the most prolific hydrocarbon producers in North Africa with several of the largest oil fields occurring along its northern boundary. The Ghadames Basin was formed during a series of tectonic events ranging from the Early Paleozoic to the Early Cenozoic. These tectonic events produced a basin in southern Tunisia that has a complex basement configuration which is not completely known. A residual gravity anomaly map constructed using polynomial trend surfaces, and vertical and horizontal gravity derivative maps indicate that the northern boundary contains a series of maxima and minima anomalies that trend in two prominent directions: northeast-southwest and east-west. The horizontal and vertical derivative gravity anomaly maps indicate that the width of the basement structures range between 10 and 20 km in width. Three-dimensional (3D) Euler deconvolution and 3D forward modeling constrained by well data, one seismic reflection profile and remote sensing data confirm the width of the basement structures and indicates that the depth of basin varies between 1.5 and 5 km, with deeper sections in general more numerous in the southern sections of the boundary. The gravity analysis constrained by the seismic reflection profile and well data implies that the basement topography may have been formed during the Pan African and/or late Mesozoic rifting. However, additional seismic reflection and well data are needed to confirm this conclusion. The discovery of the numerous basement structures suggests that there may exist additional hydrocarbon traps within the northern boundary of the Ghadames Basin.

  18. Mictomys borealis (northern bog lemming) and the Wisconsin paleoecology of the east-central Great Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mead, Jim I.; Bell, Christopher J.; Murray, Lyndon K.

    1992-03-01

    Teeth of northern bog lemming, Mictomys borealis, are reported from Cathedral and Smith Creek caves and represent the first Wisconsin remains of the genus from the Great Basin. Specimens from Cathedral Cave, Snake Range, are associated with U-series ages of 24,000 to 15,000 yr B.P. Previous work with pollen and packrat middens, dating to the same age as the Mictomys, indicate that Smith Creek Canyon contained a riparian, locally mesic community, including Picea engelmannii (spruce), Betula sp. (birch), Cercocarpus sp. (mountain mahogany), and Artemisia sp. (sagebrush) among other species. Exposed canyon slopes and the adjacent valley apparently contained a more xeric steppe community including sagebrush and Chenopodiineae species; rocky outcrop permitted Pinus flexilis (limber pine) and P. longaeva (bristlecone pine) to grow adjacent to Lake Bonneville or low in the canyon. The region apparently experienced a dry climate (not necessarily drier than today); however, Smith Creek Canyon was fed by glacial meltwater from Mt. Moriah. The northern bog lemming probably lived only in the riparian community and possibly on the north-facing slope below Cathedral Cave. Few canyons of the Snake Range would have had the unusually mesic conditions found in Smith Creek Canyon.

  19. Spatial distribution of pelagic fish larvae in the northern main basin of Lake Huron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roseman, Edward F.; O'Brien, Timothy P.

    2013-01-01

    Larval fish occurrence in inshore and offshore zones in the northern main basin of Lake Huron was assessed during 2007 as part of a larger ecological examination of Lake Huron foodwebs and habitats. Day and night collections using neuston and conical nets at inshore (1.5–15 m depths) and offshore (37 and 91 m depths) locations at De Tour and Hammond Bay to assess the abundance, phenology, and spatial distribution of pelagic ichthyoplankton during spring and early summer were made. In general, densities of larval fishes were higher at De Tour than Hammond Bay during daytime neuston net collections, with the exception of Longnose Sucker, which were only collected at Hammond Bay. Lake Whitefish, Burbot, and Rainbow Smelt dominated inshore catches in early spring with Cisco, Deepwater Sculpin, Emerald Shiner, Bloater, Slimy Sculpin, Ninespine Stickleback, and Yellow Perch larvae also collected. Nighttime nearshore and offshore sampling revealed that Rainbow Smelt and Burbot larvae were present in relatively high abundances compared to inshore densities. Concentrations of larvae of deepwater demersal fishes such as Lake Whitefish and Deepwater Sculpin suggest that inshore zones in northern Lake Huron are important nursery habitats emphasizing a critical production and recruitment linkage between inshore and deepwater zones.

  20. Provenance and tectonic-paleogeographic evolution: Constraints from detrital zircon U-Pb ages of Late Triassic-Early Jurassic deposits in the northern Sichuan basin, central China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Tongbin; Cheng, Nanfei; Song, Maoshuang

    2016-09-01

    U-Pb ages of 290 new detrital zircons from five Late Triassic-Early Jurassic sandstone samples in the northern Sichuan basin, along with other geological data, are used to constrain the sediment provenance and evaluate tectonic-paleogeographic evolution for the adjacent orogens through/from which these sediments were potentially derived. The Upper Triassic depocenter was located at the front of the Longmen Shan belt, and sediments in the western, southern and eastern Sichuan basin shared the southern North China block (NCB) and Qinling belt with the eastern Songpan-Ganzi terrane of Middle-Upper Triassic via the Longmen Shan belt, whereas the northern part of the basin was fed by dominant South Qinling belt (SQB) and northern Yangtze block and possibly subordinate southern NCB. Also, the youngest population in the northern Sichuan basin has a slightly younger age peak (∼235 Ma) than those (∼270 Ma) in other parts of the basin. During the Early Jurassic, the depocenter was still at the front of the Longmen Shan belt but only northern regions (e.g., SQB and northern Yangtze block) fed the basin. The northern Sichuan basin received less sediments from the southern NCB and more from the SQB and northern Yangtze block during the Early Jurassic than during the Late Triassic. The middle Mesoproterozoic detrital zircons, which likely originated from the North Qinling belt and northern Yangtze block where rocks with these zircons may be unexposed, occur more widely in the Lower Jurassic than in the Upper Triassic. These facts suggest that from the Late Triassic to Early Jurassic, it was increasingly difficult for sediments to transport from the NCB into the northern Sichuan basin and the provenance transferred progressively from the southern NCB to both the SQB and northern Yangtze block, implying the continuous South China block-NCB collision during that time.

  1. Assessing groundwater recharge mechanisms in the Pampa del Tamarugal Basin of northern Chile's Atacama Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayne, R., Jr.; Pollyea, R.; Dodd, J. P.; Olson, E. J.; Swanson, S.

    2015-12-01

    The hyper-arid Atacama Desert in northern Chile is one of the driest inhabited places on Earth receiving little to no rain (<5 mm/yr). Within the Tarapacá Region of the Atacama Desert, the Pampa del Tamarugal Aquifer (PTA) is the primary source of water for agriculture, industry, mining, and residential uses. The PTA covers 5,000 km2, and is located in the Pampa del Tamarugal Basin, which is situated between the Andes and the Coastal Cordillera, and is filled with ~1700m of Miocene and younger sediments. The source of recharge for the PTA originates as precipitation in the high Andes, which can receive up to 400 mm/yr of precipitation; however, the mechanisms and magnitude of recharge to the PTA are still poorly understood. Here, we present a regional scale, non-isothermal 2-D numerical groundwater model is developed to analyze the time scales and geological controls on fluid flow paths recharging the PTA. Results from this work suggest that (1) both shallow groundwater flow and deep (>1km) hydrothermal fluid circulation are responsible for recharging the PTA; (2) topography and geothermal gradients are the main driving factors for regional groundwater flow; (3) the Altos de Pica member 4, an ignimbrite layer in the sedimentary basin controls both heat and fluid flow in the western part of the basin, this is evident due to the presence of convection cells and meteoric water upwelling and presenting itself as surface water (salars); and (4) it takes meteoric water 100,000 years to travel from the high Andes to reach Pica and 1,000,000 years for salar formation. In addition, this work provides a theoretical basis for the spatial distribution of highly alkaline surface water bodies, known as salars in the western Atacama Desert.

  2. Structural style and petroleum prospects of the Kuqa depression, northern Tarim basin, northwest China

    SciTech Connect

    McKnight, C.L.; Hendrix, M.; Sobel, E.; Schulein, B.; Carroll, A.; Chu, J. )

    1990-05-01

    The Kuqa depression is a 400-km {times} 100-km, east-west-trending foredeep basin located on the northern margin of the Tarim craton in northwestern China. A 10-km-thick nonmarine Mesozoic and Cenozoic sedimentary section has accumulated in the basin as the Tian Shan range to the north and has been episodically uplifted and thrust southward, tectonically loading the craton margin and providing source areas for clastic sediments. Regional mapping from Landsat images and field reconnaissance reveal important details of the structural style of the Kuqa depression. The Kuqa depression is characterized by thin-skinned deformation resulting in a series of steep, faulted, elongate folds. Thick, mobile Tertiary shale sequences and an Upper Cretaceous-lower Tertiary evaporite section in the west form detachment horizons separating disharmonically deformed structural packages. At the southern margin of the depression, the Mesozoic-Cenozoic section overrides faulted Paleozoic strata of the North Tarim uplift. Here, the Neogene Qiulitage anticline extends 250 km along the basin margin. Beginning in 1984, several important oil discoveries have been made in the Paleozoic section on the North Tarim uplift. Analysis of an oil sample indicates its compatibility with a lower Paleozoic marine source. Other potential source rocks in the Kuqa depression include Jurassic oil shales and coals. Sandstone reservoir strata and structural trapping geometries are numerous, but exploration risks are complicated by the presence of the ductile evaporite and shale seals. If nonmarine source rocks are also present in the thick Cenozoic section, the Kuqa depression may be an attractive exploration target.

  3. Land cover changes associated with recent energy development in the Williston Basin; Northern Great Plains, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Preston, Todd M.; Kim, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    The Williston Basin in the Northern Great Plains has experienced rapid energy development since 2000. To evaluate the land cover changes resulting from recent (2000 – 2015) development, the area and previous land cover of all well pads (pads) constructed during this time was determined, the amount of disturbed and reclaimed land adjacent to pads was estimated, land cover changes were analyzed over time for three different well types, and the effects from future development were predicted. The previous land cover of the 12,990 ha converted to pads was predominately agricultural (49.5%) or prairie (47.4%) with lesser amounts of developed (2.3%), aquatic (0.5%), and forest (0.4%). Additionally, 12,121 ha have likely been disturbed and reclaimed. The area required per gas well remained constant through time while the land required per oil well increased initially and then decreased as development first shifted from conventional to unconventional drilling and then to multi-bore pads. For non-oil-and- gas wells (i.e. stratigraphic test wells, water wells, injection wells, etc.), the area per well increased through time likely due to increased produced water disposal requirements. Future land cover change is expected to be 2.7 times greater than recent development with much of the development occurring in five counties in the core Bakken development area. Direct land cover change and disturbance from recent and expected development are predicted to affect 0.4% of the landscape across the basin; however, in the core Bakken development area, 2.3% of the landscape will be affected including 2.1% of the remaining grassland. Although future development will result in significant land cover change, evolving industry practices and proactive siting decisions, such as development along energy corridors and placing pads in areas previously altered by human activity, have the potential to reduce the ecological effects of future energy development in the Williston Basin.

  4. Land cover changes associated with recent energy development in the Williston Basin; Northern Great Plains, USA.

    PubMed

    Preston, Todd M; Kim, Kevin

    2016-10-01

    The Williston Basin in the Northern Great Plains has experienced rapid energy development since 2000. To evaluate the land cover changes resulting from recent (2000-2015) development, the area and previous land cover of all well pads (pads) constructed during this time were determined, the amount of disturbed and reclaimed land adjacent to pads was estimated, land cover changes were analyzed over time for three different well types, and the effects from future development were predicted. The previous land cover of the 12,990ha converted to pads was predominately agricultural (49.5%) or prairie (47.4%) with lesser amounts of developed (2.3%), aquatic (0.5%), and forest (0.4%). Additionally, 12,121ha has likely been disturbed and reclaimed. The area required per gas well remained constant through time while the land required per oil well increased initially and then decreased as development first shifted from conventional to unconventional drilling and then to multi-bore pads. For non-oil-and-gas wells (i.e. stratigraphic test wells, water wells, and injection wells), the area per well increased through time likely due to increased produced water disposal requirements. Future land cover change is expected to be 2.7 times greater than recent development with much of the development occurring in five counties in the core Bakken development area. Direct land cover change and disturbance from recent and expected development are predicted to affect 0.4% of the landscape across the basin; however, in the core Bakken development area, 2.3% of the landscape will be affected including 2.1% of the remaining grassland. Although future development will result in significant land cover change, evolving industry practices and proactive siting decisions, such as development along energy corridors and placing pads in areas previously altered by human activity, have the potential to reduce the ecological effects of future energy development in the Williston Basin. PMID:27318516

  5. Land cover changes associated with recent energy development in the Williston Basin; Northern Great Plains, USA.

    PubMed

    Preston, Todd M; Kim, Kevin

    2016-10-01

    The Williston Basin in the Northern Great Plains has experienced rapid energy development since 2000. To evaluate the land cover changes resulting from recent (2000-2015) development, the area and previous land cover of all well pads (pads) constructed during this time were determined, the amount of disturbed and reclaimed land adjacent to pads was estimated, land cover changes were analyzed over time for three different well types, and the effects from future development were predicted. The previous land cover of the 12,990ha converted to pads was predominately agricultural (49.5%) or prairie (47.4%) with lesser amounts of developed (2.3%), aquatic (0.5%), and forest (0.4%). Additionally, 12,121ha has likely been disturbed and reclaimed. The area required per gas well remained constant through time while the land required per oil well increased initially and then decreased as development first shifted from conventional to unconventional drilling and then to multi-bore pads. For non-oil-and-gas wells (i.e. stratigraphic test wells, water wells, and injection wells), the area per well increased through time likely due to increased produced water disposal requirements. Future land cover change is expected to be 2.7 times greater than recent development with much of the development occurring in five counties in the core Bakken development area. Direct land cover change and disturbance from recent and expected development are predicted to affect 0.4% of the landscape across the basin; however, in the core Bakken development area, 2.3% of the landscape will be affected including 2.1% of the remaining grassland. Although future development will result in significant land cover change, evolving industry practices and proactive siting decisions, such as development along energy corridors and placing pads in areas previously altered by human activity, have the potential to reduce the ecological effects of future energy development in the Williston Basin.

  6. Neogene basins of the northern Rio Grande rift: Partitioning and asymmetry inherited from Laramide and older uplifts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kellogg, K.S.

    1999-01-01

    Three asymmetric Neogene basins in the northern Rio Grande rift of New Mexico and Colorado - the San Luis basin, the upper Arkansas River graben, and the Blue River graben - are tilted toward large flanking normal faults and lie astride the similarly asymmetric Late Cretaceous-early Tertiary (Laramide) San Juan-San Luis, Sawatch, and Front Range-Gore Range uplifts, respectively. The steep, thrust-faulted side of each uplift is on the same side as the down-rotated side of each of the Neogene basins. In addition, the direction of stratal tilt changes northward across the Villa Grove accommodation zone from east in the San Luis basin to west in the upper Arkansas River graben. This accommodation zone coincides approximately with the northward change from the east-directed San Juan-San Luis uplift to the west-directed Sawatch uplift. These observations, supported by seismic-reflection studies across the San Luis basin and studies of several other superimposed pairs of rift basins and Laramide uplifts, suggest that the basin-bounding normal faults are listric and merge at depth with the older thrusts, which are also listric and root into the crust at about 15-16 km. The Blue River graben is complicated by lack of basin fill and a thrust history along the west side of the Gore Range that is at least as old as late Paleozoic. Nonetheless, the Neogene valley is demonstrably tilted west and lies astride an overall west-directed thrust system, similar to other thrust-and-basin relationships in the northern Rio Grande rift.

  7. The structure of the Chañarcillo Basin: An example of tectonic inversion in the Atacama region, northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, F.; Arriagada, C.; Peña, M.; Del Real, I.; Deckart, K.

    2013-03-01

    The Chañarcillo Basin is an Early Cretaceous extensional basin in northern Chile (27-29°S). The folding style of the syn-rift successions along the eastern side of the basin reveals an architecture consisting of a NNE-trending anticline “Tierra Amarilla Anticlinorium”, associated with the inversion of the Elisa de Bordos Fault. A set of balanced cross sections and palinspastic restorations across the basin show that a partially inverted “domino-style” half-graben as the structural framework is most appropriate for reproducing the deformation observed at the surface. This inverted system provides a 9-14 km shortening in the basin. The ages of the synorogenic deposits preserved next to the frontal limb of the “Tierra Amarilla Anticlinorium” suggest that basin inversion occurred close to the “K-T” boundary (“K-T” phase of Andean deformation). We propose that tectonic inversion is the fundamental deformation mechanism, and that it emphasizes the regional importance of inherent Mesozoic extensional systems in the evolution of the northern Chilean Andes.

  8. Crustal structure beneath the Northern Transantarctic Mountains and Wilkes Subglacial Basin: Implications for tectonic origins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Samantha E.; Kenyon, Lindsey M.; Graw, Jordan H.; Park, Yongcheol; Nyblade, Andrew A.

    2016-02-01

    The Transantarctic Mountains (TAMs) are the largest noncollisional mountain range on Earth. Their origin, as well as the origin of the Wilkes Subglacial Basin (WSB) along the inland side of the TAMs, has been widely debated, and a key constraint to distinguish between competing models is the underlying crustal structure. Previous investigations have examined this structure but have primarily focused on a small region of the central TAMs near Ross Island, providing little along-strike constraint. In this study, we use data from the new Transantarctic Mountains Northern Network and from five stations operated by the Korea Polar Research Institute to investigate the crustal structure beneath a previously unexplored portion of the TAMs. Using S wave receiver functions and Rayleigh wave phase velocities, crustal thickness and average crustal shear velocity (V>¯s) are resolved within ±4 km and ±0.1 km/s, respectively. The crust thickens from ~20 km near the Ross Sea coast to ~46 km beneath the northern TAMs, which is somewhat thicker than that imaged in previous studies beneath the central TAMs. The crust thins to ~41 km beneath the WSB. V>¯s ranges from ~3.1-3.9 km/s, with slower velocities near the coast. Our findings are consistent with a flexural origin for the TAMs and WSB, where these features result from broad flexure of the East Antarctic lithosphere and uplift along its western edge due to thermal conduction from hotter mantle beneath West Antarctica. Locally, thicker crust may explain the ~1 km of additional topography in the northern TAMs compared to the central TAMs.

  9. Northern Basin and Range Ecoregion: Chapter 23 in Status and trends of land change in the Western United States--1973 to 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soulard, Christopher E.

    2012-01-01

    The Northern Basin and Range Ecoregion (Omernik, 1987; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1997) is located in eastern Oregon (58.7 percent), northern Nevada (20.6 percent), southwestern Idaho (14.8 percent), and northeastern California (5.9 percent), encompassing the northern extent of the hydrographic Great Basin (Grayson, 1993). The ecoregion, which covers approximately 110,039 km² (42,486 mi²) of land, is bordered on the west by the Eastern Cascades Slopes and Foothills and the Sierra Nevada Ecoregions, on the north by the Blue Mountains and the Snake River Basin Ecoregions, and on the south by the Central Basin and Range Ecoregion (fig. 1). Much like the other Basin and Range ecoregions in the western United States (for example, Central Basin and Range, Mojave Basin and Range, and Sonoran Basin and Range Ecoregions), the Northern Basin and Range Ecoregion is characterized by basin-and-range topography. The ecoregion contains several wide basins bordered by scattered low mountains. Big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata), the predominant vegetation, is intermixed with grasslands. Despite regional aridity, natural springs and spring-fed wetlands are scattered around the landscape, sustaining much of the region’s wildlife (Oregon Department of State Lands, 2000).

  10. Status and understanding of groundwater quality in the northern San Joaquin Basin, 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bennett, George L.; Fram, Miranda S.; Belitz, Kenneth; Jurgens, Bryant C.

    2010-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the 2,079 square mile Northern San Joaquin Basin (Northern San Joaquin) study unit was investigated from December 2004 through February 2005 as part of the Priority Basin Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA Priority Basin Project was developed in response to the Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001 that was passed by the State of California and is being conducted by the California State Water Resources Control Board in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The Northern San Joaquin study unit was the third study unit to be designed and sampled as part of the Priority Basin Project. Results of the study provide a spatially unbiased assessment of the quality of raw (untreated) groundwater, as well as a statistically consistent basis for comparing water quality throughout California. Samples were collected from 61 wells in parts of Alameda, Amador, Calaveras, Contra Costa, San Joaquin, and Stanislaus Counties; 51 of the wells were selected using a spatially distributed, randomized grid-based approach to provide statistical representation of the study area (grid wells), and 10 of the wells were sampled to increase spatial density and provide additional information for the evaluation of water chemistry in the study unit (understanding/flowpath wells). The primary aquifer systems (hereinafter, primary aquifers) assessed in this study are defined by the depth intervals of the wells in the California Department of Public Health database for each study unit. The quality of groundwater in shallow or deep water-bearing zones may differ from quality of groundwater in the primary aquifers; shallow groundwater may be more vulnerable to contamination from the surface. Two types of assessments were made: (1) status, assessment of the current quality of the groundwater resource; and (2) understanding, identification of the natural and human factors

  11. Landsat investigations of the northern Paradox basin, Utah and Colorado: implications for radioactive waste emplacement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, Jules D.; Simpson, Shirley L.

    1978-01-01

    The first stages of a remote-sensing project on the Paradox basin, part of the USGS (U.S. Geological Survey) radioactive waste-emplacement program, consisted of a review and selection of the best available satellite scanner images to use in geomorphologic and tectonic investigations of the region. High-quality Landsat images in several spectral bands (E-2260-17124 and E-5165-17030), taken under low sun angle October 9 and 10, 1975, were processed via computer for planimetric rectification, histogram analysis, linear transformation of radiance values, and edge enhancement. A lineament map of the northern Paradox basin was subsequently compiled at 1:400,000 using the enhanced Landsat base. Numerous previously unmapped northeast-trending lineaments between the Green River and Yellowcat dome; confirmatory detail on the structural control of major segments of the Colorado, Gunnison, and Dolores Rivers; and new evidence for late Phanerozoic reactivation of Precambrian basement structures are among the new contributions to the tectonics of the region. Lineament trends appear to be compatible with the postulated Colorado lineament zone, with geophysical potential-field anomalies, and with a northeast-trending basement fault pattern. Combined Landsat, geologic, and geophysical field evidence for this interpretation includes the sinuousity of the composite Salt Valley anticline, the transection of the Moab-Spanish Valley anticline on its southeastern end by northeast-striking faults, and possible transection (?) of the Moab diapir. Similarly, northeast-trending lineaments in Cottonwood Canyon and elsewhere are interpreted as manifestations of structures associated with northeasterly trends in the magnetic and gravity fields of the La Sal Mountains region. Other long northwesterly lineaments near the western termination of the Ryan Creek fault zone. may be associated with the fault zone separating the Uncompahgre horst uplift from the Paradox basin. Implications of the

  12. Petrophysical and Mechanical Properties of Fractured Aquifers in the Northern Newark Basin: Implications for Carbon Sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharova, N. V.; Goldberg, D.; Collins, D.; Olsen, P. E.

    2012-12-01

    One of the key factors in predicting the performance of low-permeability fractured reservoirs is a detailed understanding of the in-situ state of stress and the distribution and orientation of natural fractures and faults. In this study we analyze borehole geophysical data from a deep characterization well in the northern Newark Basin, a candidate CO2-storage site, and provide petrophysical and geomechanical characterization of fractured sedimentary and igneous formations. Previous studies in the northern Newark basin demonstrated no unique relationship between hydraulic conductivity and degree of fracturing, fracture apertures or orientation. Therefore, in the absence of hydraulic testing data predicting fracture behavior under CO2 injection condition presents a significant challenge for baseline formation characterization. Moreover, fluid injection in deep wells can cause reactivation of existing faults or new fracture initiation due to significant increase in the pore pressure. We analyze electrical resistivity images and full-wave sonic data to constrain the state of the current in-situ stress in the northern Newark basin, and to evaluate how the interaction between in-situ stress and the distribution and orientation of natural fractures influences their hydraulic properties. We then combine it with the full suite of wireline logs to describe petrophysical, hydraulic, and geomechanical properties of the fractured aquifers at the locality. The Sandia Technologies, LLC Tandem Lot #1 geologic characterization well (Rockland County, NY) is about 6,800 ft deep and transects Triassic terrestrial sediments and the Palisades diabase sill that are both characterized by abundant natural fractures. A suite of standard wireline logs, high-resolution electrical resistivity images and full-wave sonic data were collected in the borehole but no hydraulic data or in-situ stress estimates are available. Borehole breakouts are clearly observed in the resistivity images in

  13. Altered volcanic ash partings in Wasatch Formation coal beds of the northern Powder River basin: composition and geologic applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bohor, Bruce Forbes; Phillips, Richard E.; Pollastro, Richard M.

    1979-01-01

    In contrast to the coal-bearing rocks of the Appalachian and Eastern Interior Basins, those of the northern Powder River Basin exhibit more complex stratigraphic and facies relationships, and regional correlations of coal beds are, therefore, more difficult to establish. Recently, however, several coal beds in the Powder River Basin, as well as coal beds in several other coal basins of the Rocky Mountain region, have been found to contain thin but persist·ent layers. of altered volcanic ash described as kaolinitic bentonites (Bohor, 1976, 1977, 1978, Bohor and others, 1976, 1978, Bohor and Pillmore, 1976). These layers serve as isochronous marker horizons which aid in correlating coal beds over broad areas.

  14. Highly extended terrains, lateral segmentation of the substratum, and basin development: The middle-late Miocene Radicondoli Basin (inner northern Apennines, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brogi, Andrea; Liotta, Domenico

    2008-09-01

    This paper deals with the evolution of sedimentary basins not delimited by normal faults, with a substratum characterized by an upward concave shape and with infilling sediments synclinally deformed. We describe the middle-late Miocene Radicondoli Basin, representing an example of such bowl-shaped basins. Its tectonic origin is controversial, being related both to compression and extension; these opposite interpretations bear significant consequences on the geodynamic context in which the inner northern Apennines developed during the middle-late Miocene. The results of our structural studies, carried out in the substratum and infilling sediments, indicate that the Radicondoli Basin is an example of a hanging wall basin developed in an extensional setting. Extensional tectonics determined the lateral segmentation of the substratum competent levels (i.e., Tuscan Nappe and Verrucano Group) and the consequent collapse of overlying less competent levels (i.e., the Ligurian units) with the formation of a bowl-shaped tectonic depression. Here, the syntectonic sediments (Serravallian-late Messinian) are deformed in a large syncline, characterized by minor gravity-driven folds, with vergences toward the depocenter and traces of their axial planes parallel to the basin margins. This paper highlights the role of the competence contrast during the postcollisional tectonic evolution and the influence of substratum lateral segmentation for the accommodation of syntectonic sediments.

  15. Sedimentary response to orogenic exhumation in the northern rocky mountain basin and range province, flint creek basin, west-central Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Portner, R.A.; Hendrix, M.S.; Stalker, J.C.; Miggins, D.P.; Sheriff, S.D.

    2011-01-01

    Middle Eocene through Upper Miocene sedimentary and volcanic rocks of the Flint Creek basin in western Montana accumulated during a period of significant paleoclimatic change and extension across the northern Rocky Mountain Basin and Range province. Gravity modelling, borehole data, and geologic mapping from the Flint Creek basin indicate that subsidence was focused along an extensionally reactivated Sevier thrust fault, which accommodated up to 800 m of basin fill while relaying stress between the dextral transtensional Lewis and Clark lineament to the north and the Anaconda core complex to the south. Northwesterly paleocurrent indicators, foliated metamorphic lithics, 64 Ma (40Ar/39Ar) muscovite grains, and 76 Ma (U-Pb) zircons in a ca. 27 Ma arkosic sandstone are consistent with Oligocene exhumation and erosion of the Anaconda core complex. The core complex and volcanic and magmatic rocks in its hangingwall created an important drainage divide during the Paleogene shedding detritus to the NNW and ESE. Following a major period of Early Miocene tectonism and erosion, regional drainage networks were reorganized such that paleoflow in the Flint Creek basin flowed east into an internally drained saline lake system. Renewed tectonism during Middle to Late Miocene time reestablished a west-directed drainage that is recorded by fluvial strata within a Late Miocene paleovalley. These tectonic reorganizations and associated drainage divide explain observed discrepancies in provenance studies across the province. Regional correlation of unconformities and lithofacies mapping in the Flint Creek basin suggest that localized tectonism and relative base level fluctuations controlled lithostratigraphic architecture.

  16. Currents at the sills bounding Delfin Basin in the northern Gulf of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, M.; Candela, J.

    2013-05-01

    One-year-long currents at the two sills bounding Delfin basin (maximum depth ˜900 m), are analyzed. The Delfin (DEL) sill (˜400 m depth) has the largest mean velocities near the bottom in an overflow that discharges water into the Delfin Basin (roughly towards the head of the gulf), whereas the Ballenas Channel (BC) sill (˜600 m depth) has the largest mean velocities close to the surface which also flow towards the head of the gulf. The energy of the subinertial current fluctuations is also quite different. Most of the energy at the DEL sill is concentrated in the lowest frequencies (periods > 15 days). In the case of the BC sill, the spectra are not red and much of the energy is concentrated at periods ≤ 15 days except close to the surface, where most the energy is also concentrated in the lowest frequencies associated with the current fluctuations of the mean near-surface current towards the head of the gulf. Near-bottom current fluctuations towards the head of the gulf at the overflow of the DEL sill are well correlated with intermediate and deeper currents towards the mouth of the gulf, as well as with surface currents towards the head of the gulf at the BC sill for periods ≥ 20 days. Transport of the overflow also has the largest coherences with near-surface currents at the BC sill for periods ≥ 20 days, but there is also significant coherence with deeper currents at the same low frequencies. The relationship between the overflow and the exchange at the BC sill is also clearly borne out by the first empirical mode of currents at both locations. This is interpreted as part of the exchange of the northern gulf by which fluctuations of the near-bottom flow into the deepest basins are compensated by fluctuations of the near-surface flow out of the same basins. In addition, near-bottom transport and currents at the DEL sill are coherent with deep currents at the CB sill at the shorter periods of 10 and 3.2 days. At these periods, there is also good

  17. Late Cenozoic lacustrine and climatic environments at Tule Lake, northern Great Basin, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Platt, Bradbury J.

    1992-01-01

    Cores of lake sediment to a depth of 334 m in the town of Tulelake, Siskiyou County, northern California, document the late Cenozoic paleolimnologic and paleoclimatic history of the northwestern edge of the Great Basin. The cores have been dated by radiometric, tephrochronologic and paleomagnetic analyses. Lacustrine diatoms are abundant throughout the record and document a nearly continuous paleolimnologic history of the Tule Lake basin for the last 3 Myr. During most of this time, this basin (Tule Lake) was a relatively deep, extensive lake. Except for a drier (and cooler?) interval recorded by Fragilaria species about 2.4 Ma, the Pliocene is characterized by a dominance of planktonic Aulacoseira solida implying a warm monomictic lake under a climatic regime of low seasonality. Much of the Pleistocene is dominated by Stephanodiscus and Fragilaria species suggesting a cooler, often drier, and highly variable climate. Benthic diatoms typical of alkaline-enriched saline waters commonly appear after 1.0 Ma, and tephrochronology indicates slow deposition and possible hiatuses between about 0.6 and 0.2 Ma. The chronology of even-numbered oxygen isotope stages approximately matches fluctuations in the abundance of Fragilaria since 800 ka indicating that glacial periods were expressed as drier environments at Tule Lake. Glacial and interglacial environments since 150 ka were distinct from, and more variable than, those occurring earlier. The last full glacial period was very dry, but shortly thereafter Tule Lake became a deep, cool lacustrine system indicating a substantial increase in precipitation. Aulacoseira ambigua characterized the latest glacial and Holocene record of Tule Lake. Its distribution indicates that warmer and wetter climates began about 15 ka in this part of the Great Basin. Diatom concentration fluctuates at 41 000 year intervals between 3.0 and 2.5 Ma and at approximately 100 000 year intervals after 1.0 Ma. In the late Pliocene and early Pleistocene

  18. Low palaeoelevation of the northern Lhasa terrane during late Eocene: Fossil foraminifera and stable isotope evidence from the Gerze Basin

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yi; Zhang, Kexin; Garzione, Carmala N.; Xu, Yadong; Song, Bowen; Ji, Junliang

    2016-01-01

    The Lhasa terrane is a key region for understanding the paleoelevation of the southern Tibetan Plateau after India-Asia collision. The Gerze Basin, located in the northern part of the Lhasa terrane, is a shortening-related basin. We discovered Lagena laevis (Bandy) fossils in upper Eocene strata of the Gerze Basin. This type of foraminifera is associated with lagoon and estuarine environments, indicating that the northern part of the Lhasa terrane was near sea level during the late Eocene. We speculate that these foraminifera were transported inland by storm surges to low elevation freshwater lakes during times of marine transgressions. This inference is consistent with the relatively positive δ18O values in carbonate from the same deposits that indicate low palaeoelevations close to sea level. Considering the palaeoelevation results from the nearby Oligocene basins at a similar latitude and the volcanic history of the Lhasa terrane, we infer that large-magnitude surface uplift of the northern Lhasa terrane occurred between late Eocene and late Oligocene time. PMID:27272610

  19. Low palaeoelevation of the northern Lhasa terrane during late Eocene: Fossil foraminifera and stable isotope evidence from the Gerze Basin.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yi; Zhang, Kexin; Garzione, Carmala N; Xu, Yadong; Song, Bowen; Ji, Junliang

    2016-01-01

    The Lhasa terrane is a key region for understanding the paleoelevation of the southern Tibetan Plateau after India-Asia collision. The Gerze Basin, located in the northern part of the Lhasa terrane, is a shortening-related basin. We discovered Lagena laevis (Bandy) fossils in upper Eocene strata of the Gerze Basin. This type of foraminifera is associated with lagoon and estuarine environments, indicating that the northern part of the Lhasa terrane was near sea level during the late Eocene. We speculate that these foraminifera were transported inland by storm surges to low elevation freshwater lakes during times of marine transgressions. This inference is consistent with the relatively positive δ(18)O values in carbonate from the same deposits that indicate low palaeoelevations close to sea level. Considering the palaeoelevation results from the nearby Oligocene basins at a similar latitude and the volcanic history of the Lhasa terrane, we infer that large-magnitude surface uplift of the northern Lhasa terrane occurred between late Eocene and late Oligocene time. PMID:27272610

  20. Low palaeoelevation of the northern Lhasa terrane during late Eocene: Fossil foraminifera and stable isotope evidence from the Gerze Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yi; Zhang, Kexin; Garzione, Carmala N.; Xu, Yadong; Song, Bowen; Ji, Junliang

    2016-06-01

    The Lhasa terrane is a key region for understanding the paleoelevation of the southern Tibetan Plateau after India-Asia collision. The Gerze Basin, located in the northern part of the Lhasa terrane, is a shortening-related basin. We discovered Lagena laevis (Bandy) fossils in upper Eocene strata of the Gerze Basin. This type of foraminifera is associated with lagoon and estuarine environments, indicating that the northern part of the Lhasa terrane was near sea level during the late Eocene. We speculate that these foraminifera were transported inland by storm surges to low elevation freshwater lakes during times of marine transgressions. This inference is consistent with the relatively positive δ18O values in carbonate from the same deposits that indicate low palaeoelevations close to sea level. Considering the palaeoelevation results from the nearby Oligocene basins at a similar latitude and the volcanic history of the Lhasa terrane, we infer that large-magnitude surface uplift of the northern Lhasa terrane occurred between late Eocene and late Oligocene time.

  1. Oligocene-Miocene deformational and depositional history of the Andean hinterland basin in the northern Altiplano plateau, southern Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Nicholas D.; Horton, Brian K.

    2014-09-01

    Cenozoic basin fill of the northern Altiplano plateau records the tectonic development of the flanking Western Cordillera magmatic arc and Eastern Cordillera fold-thrust belt. The Ayaviri hinterland basin of southern Peru contains a ~2300 m thick succession of fluvial sandstones and overbank siltstones (upper Oligocene Puno Group and lower Miocene lower Tinajani Formation) capped by ~400 m of alluvial fan conglomerates (middle Miocene upper Tinajani Formation). New U-Pb zircon chronostratigraphic constraints from ~30 to 15 Ma yield sediment accumulation rates of 110-660 m/Myr. Newly dated growth strata highlight the genetic role played by thrust displacement in basin evolution. A several phase accumulation history derived from chronostratigraphic, provenance, and structural data reveals Oligocene basin filling by fluvial sand and mud that changes provenance from Western Cordillera Mesozoic-Cenozoic volcanic rocks to Paleozoic-Mesozoic Eastern Cordillera sedimentary rocks driven by deformation along the southwest directed, northeastern basin margin Ayaviri thrust at 28-26 Ma. Continued early Miocene fluvial deposition was sourced solely from the Eastern Cordillera. An abrupt middle Miocene shift to coarse alluvial fan deposition sourced from the Western Cordillera was driven by out-of-sequence deformation along the northeast directed, southwestern basin margin Pasani thrust at 18-16 Ma. This northern Altiplano out-of-sequence deformation was coincident with increased Eastern and Western Cordillera exhumation and thrusting and may be symptomatic of changes in critical wedge dynamics. The overall record of basin sedimentation and syndepositional fold-thrust deformation emphasizes the role of regional shortening in governing crustal thickening and basin evolution in the central Andes during the Oligocene to Miocene.

  2. Oligocene-miocene mammalian fossils from Hongyazi Basin and its bearing on tectonics of Danghe Nanshan in northern Tibetan plateau.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Wang, Xiaoming; Xie, Guangpu; Yin, An

    2013-01-01

    A shortage of Cenozoic vertebrate fossils in the Tibetan Plateau has been an obstacle in our understanding of biological evolution in response to changes in tectonism, topography, and environment. This is especially true for Paleogene records, so far known by only two sites along the northern rim of the Plateau. We report a Hongyazi Basin in northern Tibetan Plateau that produces at least three mammalian faunas that span Oligocene through late Miocene. Located at the foothills of the Danghe Nanshan and presently connected to the northern margin of the Suganhu Basin through the Greater Haltang River, the intermountain basin is controlled by the tectonics of the Danghe Nanshan to the north and Chahan'ebotu Mountain to the south, making the basin sediments well suited for inferring the evolutionary history of these two mountain ranges. At the bottom of the local section, the Oligocene Haltang Fauna is best compared to the early Oligocene Desmatolagus-Karakoromys decessus assemblage in the Dingdanggou Fauna in Tabenbuluk Basin. The Middle Miocene Ebotu Fauna from the middle Hongyazi section shares many taxa with the late Middle Miocene Tunggur mammal assemblage in Inner Mongolia, such as Heterosminthus orientalis, Megacricetodon sinensis, Democricetodon lindsayi, and Alloptox gobiensis. Toward the top of the section, the Hongyazi Fauna includes late Miocene elements typical of Hipparion faunas of North China. All three faunas are of typical North China-Central Asian characteristics, suggesting a lack of geographic barriers for faunal differentiation through the late Miocene. Sedimentary packages producing these faunas are arrayed from north to south in progressively younger strata, consistent with a compressive regime to accommodate shortening between Danghe Nanshan and Chahan'ebotu Mountain by thrust faults and folds. With additional constraints from vertebrate fossils along the northern flanks of the Danghe Nanshan, an eastward propagation of the Danghe Nanshan is

  3. Oligocene-Miocene Mammalian Fossils from Hongyazi Basin and Its Bearing on Tectonics of Danghe Nanshan in Northern Tibetan Plateau

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiang; Wang, Xiaoming; Xie, Guangpu; Yin, An

    2013-01-01

    A shortage of Cenozoic vertebrate fossils in the Tibetan Plateau has been an obstacle in our understanding of biological evolution in response to changes in tectonism, topography, and environment. This is especially true for Paleogene records, so far known by only two sites along the northern rim of the Plateau. We report a Hongyazi Basin in northern Tibetan Plateau that produces at least three mammalian faunas that span Oligocene through late Miocene. Located at the foothills of the Danghe Nanshan and presently connected to the northern margin of the Suganhu Basin through the Greater Haltang River, the intermountain basin is controlled by the tectonics of the Danghe Nanshan to the north and Chahan’ebotu Mountain to the south, making the basin sediments well suited for inferring the evolutionary history of these two mountain ranges. At the bottom of the local section, the Oligocene Haltang Fauna is best compared to the early Oligocene Desmatolagus-Karakoromys decessus assemblage in the Dingdanggou Fauna in Tabenbuluk Basin. The Middle Miocene Ebotu Fauna from the middle Hongyazi section shares many taxa with the late Middle Miocene Tunggur mammal assemblage in Inner Mongolia, such as Heterosminthus orientalis, Megacricetodon sinensis, Democricetodon lindsayi, and Alloptox gobiensis. Toward the top of the section, the Hongyazi Fauna includes late Miocene elements typical of Hipparion faunas of North China. All three faunas are of typical North China-Central Asian characteristics, suggesting a lack of geographic barriers for faunal differentiation through the late Miocene. Sedimentary packages producing these faunas are arrayed from north to south in progressively younger strata, consistent with a compressive regime to accommodate shortening between Danghe Nanshan and Chahan’ebotu Mountain by thrust faults and folds. With additional constraints from vertebrate fossils along the northern flanks of the Danghe Nanshan, an eastward propagation of the Danghe Nanshan

  4. Advances in ammonite biostratigraphy of the marine Atacama basin (Lower Cretaceous), northern Chile, and its relationship with the Neuquén basin, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourgues, Francisco Amaro

    2004-09-01

    Preliminary results about the Lower Cretaceous ammonite biostratigraphy of northern Chile reveal eight fossiliferous levels: Lower-Upper Valanginian neocomitid and olcostephanid faunas in the Punta del Cobre and Abundancia Formations and Upper Hauterivian-Barremian crioceratid in the Nantoco, Totoralillo, and Pabellón Formations. The faunal affinities with the Neuquén are strong during the Valanginian and Hauterivian. In contrast, during the Barremian and Aptian, the ammonites show affinities with Austral, California, and Tethys basinal faunas. The Lower Valanginian-lower Upper Aptian series in northern Chile comprises two sedimentary cycles separated by a regressive pulse of Upper Hauterivian-Lower Barremian age. This pulse may be equivalent to the regression that ended the Early Cretaceous marine cycle in central Chile and central west Argentina, where the second marine sedimentary cycle observed in northern Chile is not represented.

  5. Assessment of metallic mineral resources in the Humboldt River Basin, Northern Nevada, with a section on Platinum-Group-Element (PGE) Potential of the Humboldt Mafic Complex

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wallace, Alan R.; Ludington, Steve; Mihalasky, Mark J.; Peters, Stephen G.; Theodore, Ted G.; Ponce, David A.; John, David A.; and Berger, Byron R.; Zientek, Michael L.; Sidder, Gary B.; Zierenberg, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    The Humboldt River Basin is an arid to semiarid, internally drained basin that covers approximately 43,000 km2 in northern Nevada. The basin contains a wide variety of metallic and nonmetallic mineral deposits and occurrences, and, at various times, the area has been one of the Nation's leading or important producers of gold, silver, copper, mercury, and tungsten. Nevada currently (2003) is the third largest producer of gold in the world and the largest producer of silver in the United States. Current exploration for additional mineral deposits focuses on many areas in northern Nevada, including the Humboldt River Basin.

  6. ITCZ-monsoonal association during the last glacial (Cariaco Basin, Northern Arabian Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deplazes, G.; Haug, G. H.; Lueckge, A.

    2010-12-01

    The anoxic Cariaco Basin on the northern shelf of Venezuela preserves detailed records of past tropical climate variability. The sediment formation in this basin is controlled by the migration of the Atlantic Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) and the corresponding rain belt and trade winds. In the oxygen minimum zone off Pakistan in the northeastern Arabian Sea sediment archives of low-latitude monsoonal climate are preserved. In this study sediments from the two settings that cover the last 80,- to 110,000 years were analysed. Sediment color analysis resulted in reflectance records with a down to annual resolution. An age model was set up by correlation of these records to the δ18O record of Greenland ice (NGRIP). The major element chemistry of the sediments was analysed with X-ray fluorescence scanning. The new high resolution proxy records indicate an unbroken association between warm climate conditions over Greenland, a northerly position of the Atlantic Intertropical Convergence Zone, and a strong Indian summer monsoon since the last glacial. The tight coupling is explained by a dominant role of the North Atlantic that is communicated largely through the atmosphere. New insights of dynamical mechanisms arise from comparison of individual Dansgaard-Oeschger events. The tropical records and the Greenland δ18O record show both an abrupt change at the beginning of an interstadial. The δ18O of Greenland ice peaks early in the interstadials and then decreases more or less constantly toward stadial values. However, the tropical records have a tendency to maintain dark interstadial color on a similar level over several centuries. The following centennial-scale lightening toward the next stadial appears to be delayed compared to the δ18O ice record. This “resistance” of the tropics to the interstadial-stadial transitions suggests a threshold response of the tropics to North Atlantic cooling.

  7. Late cenozoic lacustrine and climatic environments at Tule Lake, northern Great Basin, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Bradbury, J.P.

    1992-01-01

    Cores of lake sediment to a depth of 334 m in the town of Tulelake, northern California, document the late Cenozic paleolimnologic and paleoclimatic history of the northwestern Great Basin. Lacustrine diatoms are abundant throughout the record documenting a nearly continuous paleolimnologic history of the Tule Lake basin. Except for a drier (and cooler?) interval recorded by Fragilaria species about 2.4 Ma, the Pliocene is characterized by a dominance of planktonic Aulacoseira solida implying a warm monomictic lake under a climatic regime of low seasonality. Much of the Pleistocene is dominated by Stephanodiscus and Fragilaria species suggesting a cooler, drier, and highly variable climate. Benthic diatoms typical of alkaline-enriched saline waters commonly appear after 1.0 Ma, and tephrochronology indicates slow deposition and possible hiatuses between about 0.6 and 0.2 Ma. The chronology of even-numbered oxygen isotope stages approximately matches fluctuations in the abundance of Fragilaria since 800 ka indicating that glacial periods were drier environments at Tule Lake. Glacial and interglacial environments since 150 ka were distinct from, and more variable than, those occurring earlier. The last full glacial period was very dry, but shortly Tule Lake became a deep, cool lacustrine system indicating a substantial increase in precipitation. Aulacoseira ambigua characterized the latest glacial and Holocene record of Tule Lake, indicating that warmer and wetter climates began about 15 ka. Diatom concentration fluctuates at 41000 year intervals between 3.0 and 2.5 Ma and at approximately 100000 year intervals after 1.0 Ma. In the late Pliocene and early Pleistocene, Aulacoseira solida percentages wax and wane in an approximately 400000 year cycle. The possible response of Tule Lake diatom communities to orbitally-induced insolation cycles underscores the importance of this record for the study of late Cenozoic paleoclimate change. 41 refs., 8 figs.

  8. Fine-grained suspended sediment source identification for the Kharaa River basin, northern Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rode, Michael; Theuring, Philipp; Collins, Adrian L.

    2015-04-01

    Fine sediment inputs into river systems can be a major source of nutrients and heavy metals and have a strong impact on the water quality and ecosystem functions of rivers and lakes, including those in semiarid regions. However, little is known to date about the spatial distribution of sediment sources in most large scale river basins in Central Asia. Accordingly, a sediment source fingerprinting technique was used to assess the spatial sources of fine-grained (<10 microns) sediment in the 15 000 km2 Kharaa River basin in northern Mongolia. Five field sampling campaigns in late summer 2009, and spring and late summer in both 2010 and 2011, were conducted directly after high water flows, to collect an overall total of 900 sediment samples. The work used a statistical approach for sediment source discrimination with geochemical composite fingerprints based on a new Genetic Algorithm (GA)-driven Discriminant Function Analysis, the Kruskal-Wallis H-test and Principal Component Analysis. The composite fingerprints were subsequently used for numerical mass balance modelling with uncertainty analysis. The contributions of the individual sub-catchment spatial sediment sources varied from 6.4% (the headwater sub-catchment of Sugnugur Gol) to 36.2% (the Kharaa II sub-catchment in the middle reaches of the study basin) with the pattern generally showing higher contributions from the sub-catchments in the middle, rather than the upstream, portions of the study area. The importance of riverbank erosion was shown to increase from upstream to midstream tributaries. The source tracing procedure provides results in reasonable accordance with previous findings in the study region and demonstrates the general applicability and associated uncertainties of an approach for fine-grained sediment source investigation in large scale semi-arid catchments. The combined application of source fingerprinting and catchment modelling approaches can be used to assess whether tracing estimates are

  9. High resolution sequence stratigraphic analysis of the Late Miocene Abu Madi Formation, Northern Nile Delta Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarhan, Mohammad Abdelfattah

    2015-12-01

    Abu Madi Formation represents the Upper Miocene Messinian age in the Nile Delta basin. It consists mainly of sandstones and shale intercalations and because of its richness in hydrocarbon, it has been subdivided by the petroleum companies into Level-I, Level-II and Level-III, respectively according to the increase in the sandstone to the shale ratio. The Miocene cycle in the northern subsurface section of the Nile Delta encompasses three main formations namely from the base; Sidi Salim formation, Qawasim Formation and Abu Madi Formation at the top. The high resolution sequence stratigraphic analysis, using gamma ray responses, has been done for the Late Miocene formation in the northern part of the Nile delta subsurface section. For this purpose, the gamma-ray logs of ten deep wells, arranged in four cross-sections trending in almost north-south direction throughout the northern region of the Nile Delta, were analyzed. The analysis has revealed that the interpreted 4th order depositional cycles within Abu Madi Formation display great variations in both number and gamma ray responses in each investigated well, and cannot be traced laterally, even in the nearest well. These variations in the interpreted 4th order depositional sequences could be attributed to the presence of normal faults buried in the inter-area laying between the investigated wells. This finding matches with the conclusion of that Abu Madi Formation represents a part of the Upper Miocene Nile Delta syn-rift megasequence, developed during the Upper Miocene rift phase of the Red Sea - Gulf of Suez province in Egypt. Accordingly, in the sequence stratigraphic approach, the depositional history of Abu Madi Formation was strongly overprinted by the tectonic controls rather than the relative sea-level changes which are assumed to be of a secondary influence. Regarding the hydrocarbon aspects of the Abu Madi Formation, the present work recommends to direct the drilling efforts into the stratigraphic traps

  10. Peat accumulation in drained thermokarst lake basins in continuous, ice-rich permafrost, northern Seward Peninsula, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Miriam C.; Grosse, Guido; Jones, Benjamin M.; Anthony, Katey Walter

    2012-01-01

    Thermokarst lakes and peat-accumulating drained lake basins cover a substantial portion of Arctic lowland landscapes, yet the role of thermokarst lake drainage and ensuing peat formation in landscape-scale carbon (C) budgets remains understudied. Here we use measurements of terrestrial peat thickness, bulk density, organic matter content, and basal radiocarbon age from permafrost cores, soil pits, and exposures in vegetated, drained lake basins to characterize regional lake drainage chronology, C accumulation rates, and the role of thermokarst-lake cycling in carbon dynamics throughout the Holocene on the northern Seward Peninsula, Alaska. Most detectable lake drainage events occurred within the last 4,000 years with the highest drainage frequency during the medieval climate anomaly. Peat accumulation rates were highest in young (50–500 years) drained lake basins (35.2 g C m−2 yr−1) and decreased exponentially with time since drainage to 9 g C m−2 yr−1 in the oldest basins. Spatial analyses of terrestrial peat depth, basal peat radiocarbon ages, basin geomorphology, and satellite-derived land surface properties (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI); Minimum Noise Fraction (MNF)) from Landsat satellite data revealed significant relationships between peat thickness and mean basin NDVI or MNF. By upscaling observed relationships, we infer that drained thermokarst lake basins, covering 391 km2 (76%) of the 515 km2 study region, store 6.4–6.6 Tg organic C in drained lake basin terrestrial peat. Peat accumulation in drained lake basins likely serves to offset greenhouse gas release from thermokarst-impacted landscapes and should be incorporated in landscape-scale C budgets.

  11. Preliminary study of the uranium potential of the northern part of the Durham Triassic Basin, North Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, W.B.; Thayer, P.A.

    1981-09-01

    This report presents results of a four-channel spectrometric survey of the northern part of the Durham Triassic basin and adjacent Piedmont, North Carolina. Gamma-ray spectrometric measurements were obtained at 112 localities from 136 different lithologies. The nominal sampling density in the Durham Basin is one site per 2 mi/sup 2/. Surface radiometric surveys reveal no anomalous radioactivity in the northern part of the Durham Basin. Uranium concentrations in Triassic rocks are from 0.6 to 9.7 ppM and average 2.9 ppM. Mudrocks contain from 1.3 to 9.7 ppM, and the average is 4.5 ppM. Sandstones contain from 0.6 to 8.8 ppM, and the average is 2.5 ppM. Fanglomerates contain the lowest concentrations of uranium, from 1.4 to 2.0 ppM, for an average of 1.8 ppM. Uranium/thorium ratios average 0.27 for Triassic rocks and are from 0.04 to 1.85. The mean log uranium/log thorium for Triassic rocks is 0.37. Mudrock has the highest average uranium/thorium ratio (0.32), and the range is 0.09 to 0.66. Sandstones have an average uranium/thorium ratio of 0.26, and the range is 0.04 to 1.85. Fanglomerates have the lowest range uranium/thorium ratio (0.19), and the range is 0.12 to 0.19. On the basis of surface radiometric surveys and geologic studies, it is believed that sedimentary strata in the northern part of the Durham Basin are poor targets for further uranium exploration. This conclusion is based on the lack of favorable characteristics commonly present in fluvial uranium deposits. Among these are: (1) carbonaceous material is absent in Triassic rocks of the northern basin, (2) indicators of a reduzate facies in sandstones are not present, and (3) no tuffaceous beds are associated with sediments in the northern Durham Basin.

  12. Joint Interpretation of Magnetotellurics and Airborne Electromagnetics in the Rathlin Basin, Northern Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delhaye, Robert; Rath, Volker; Jones, Alan G.; Reay, Derek; The Iretherm Team

    2015-04-01

    In this study we present results from geophysical investigation of the sedimentary Rathlin Basin in Northern Ireland in order to assess the potential for low-to-medium enthalpy geothermal aquifers within the porous Permian and Triassic sandstone groups. The area and groups were identified as a potential geothermal resource due to the presence of both an elevated geothermal gradient (observed in two deep boreholes onshore) and favourable hydraulic properties (measured on core samples in the offshore part of the basin). Previous seismic experiments were not able to fully characterise the sediments beneath the overlying flood basalt. Complementing these earlier results, magnetotelluric data were acquired on a grid of 56 sites across the north-eastern portion of the onshore Rathlin Basin, and an additional 12 sites on the nearby Rathlin Island, in order to image the thickness, depth, and lateral continuity of the target sediments. Analysis and 3D modelling, including the effects of the highly conducting ocean, has been successful in deriving a resistivity model that maps the variation in the top of the sediments (base of the basalts) and the truncation of the basin sediments against the Tow Valley Fault, and gives a reasonable estimate of the thickness of the sediment fill. However, the resulting models show significant effects from distortion caused by near-surface inhomogeneities in the responses that cannot be resolved using the given frequency range and site density. Fortunately, for the area of Rathlin Basin, airborne electromagnetic data from the TELLUS project (http://www.bgs.ac.uk/gsni/tellus/contact/index.html) are available. These data were measured at four frequencies between 0.9 kHz and 25 kHz in a verical-coplanar loop configuration, with the dipole axis in flight direction. The spatial sampling distance was less than 25 m, with about 200 m distance between flight lines. Survey altitudes vary between 56 m and 244 m. Thus, for the top ˜100 m penetrated by

  13. Thermal maturity of northern Appalachian Basin Devonian shales: Insights from sterane and terpane biomarkers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hackley, Paul C.; Ryder, Robert T.; Trippi, Michael H.; Alimi, Hossein

    2013-01-01

    To better estimate thermal maturity of Devonian shales in the northern Appalachian Basin, eleven samples of Marcellus and Huron Shale were characterized via multiple analytical techniques. Vitrinite reflectance, Rock–Eval pyrolysis, gas chromatography (GC) of whole rock extracts, and GC–mass spectrometry (GCMS) of extract saturate fractions were evaluated on three transects that lie across previously documented regional thermal maturity isolines. Results from vitrinite reflectance suggest that most samples are immature with respect to hydrocarbon generation. However, bulk geochemical data and sterane and terpane biomarker ratios from GCMS suggest that almost all samples are in the oil window. This observation is consistent with the presence of thermogenic gas in the study area and higher vitrinite reflectance values recorded from overlying Pennsylvanian coals. These results suggest that vitrinite reflectance is a poor predictor of thermal maturity in early mature areas of Devonian shale, perhaps because reported measurements often include determinations of solid bitumen reflectance. Vitrinite reflectance interpretations in areas of early mature Devonian shale should be supplanted by evaluation of thermal maturity information from biomarker ratios and bulk geochemical data.

  14. Geologic evolution and aspects of the petroleum geology of the northern East China Sea shelf basin

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, G.H.; Kim, B.Y.; Shin, K.S.; Sunwoo, D.

    2006-02-15

    Analysis of multichannel seismic reflection profiles reveals that the northern East China Sea shelf basin experienced two phases of rifting, followed by regional subsidence. The initial rifting in the Late Cretaceous created a series of grabens and half grabens, filled by alluvial and fluviolacustrine deposits. Regional uplift and folding (Yuquan movement) in the late Eocene-early Oligocene terminated the initial rifting. Rifting resumed in the early Oligocene, while alluvial and fluviolacustrine deposition continued to prevail. A second phase of uplift in the early Miocene terminated the rifting, marking the transition to the postrift phase. The early postrift phase (early Miocene-late Miocene) is characterized by regional subsidence and westward and northwestward marine transgression. Inversion (Longjing movement) in the late Miocene interrupted the postrift subsidence, resulting in an extensive thrust-fold belt in the eastern part of the area. The entire area entered a stage of regional subsidence again and has become a broad continental shelf. Source rocks include synrift lacustrine facies, fluvial shales, and coal beds. Synrift fluvial, lacustrine, and deltaic deposits, postrift littoral and/or shallow-marine sandstones, and fractured basement have the potential to provide reservoirs. Various types of hydrocarbon traps (e.g., faulted anticlines, overthrusts, rollover anticlines, faults, unconformity traps, combination structural-stratigraphic traps, weathered basement, and stratigraphic traps) are recognized, but many of these traps have not been tested.

  15. Lithologic variations and diagenesis of Lower Cretaceous Muddy Formation in northern Powder River basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, A.L.; Patterson, P.E.

    1986-08-01

    Regional facies studies show that sandstones in the Muddy Formation, northern Powder River basin, were deposited in fluvial and nearshore marine paleoenvironments. Most sandstones of the fluvial facies contain only minor amounts of clay matrix and are classified as quartzarenite or sublitharenite, whereas those of the shoreface facies contain appreciable clay and are classified as litharenite or arkose. The arkoses are concentrated along a narrow belt that trends northeastward, parallel to the inferred paleoshoreline. Both the fluvial and shoreface sandstones have been variably affected by postdepositional alteration. During early stages of diagenesis, matrix clay was formed predominantly within the shoreface sandstones, owing mainly to alteration of volcanic material. Later, quartz overgrowths and calcite cement were precipitated within the remaining pore spaces in both fluvial and shoreface sandstones. Calcite also replaced detrital framework grains and some of the previously formed matrix clay. During intermediate diagenetic stages, detrital feldspar grains, particularly those in the arkosic shoreface sandstones, were replaced by albite, which characteristically lacks twinning or displays distinctive chessboard texture. Microprobe analyses indicate that both forms are essentially pure albite. During later stages of diagenesis, following maximum burial, much of the calcite was dissolved, producing secondary porosity. Inasmuch as the calcite was precipitated early, i.e., prior to significant compaction, and inasmuch as it replaced both framework grains and authigenic matrix clay, the secondary pores exhibit a relatively high level of interconnection. It is this secondary porosity that has contributed to the migration and storage of hydrocarbons in the Muddy Formation.

  16. New palynological data from Karoo sediments, Mana Pools basin, northern Zimbabwe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Engelbronner, E. R.

    1996-07-01

    The palynological associations of 16 Karoo samples, collected in the Mana Pools basin, Northern Zimbabwe, were studied, and four zonal assemblages can be recognized. Assemblage I (Kondo Pools Formation) is dominated by monosaccate pollen grains and diverse alete bisaccate pollen grains occur frequently. Important but rare marker genera include Limitisporites, Vittatina and Weylandites. These indicate a middle to late Early Permian age (e.g. Late Sakmarian to Early Artinskian). The palynological assemblage, derived from the Massive Sandstone Member, Angwa Sandstone Formation, is characterized by a small number of smooth and apiculate spores, but is lacking any age significant marker taxa. Assemblages II and III, both from the Alternations Member (Angwa Sandstone Formation), and Assemblage IV (Pebbly Arkose Formation) are dominated by alete bisaccate and multitaeniate pollen grains. The rare occurrence of Vittatina, Weylandites lucifer and Guttulapollenites hannonicus indicates a Late Permian to Early Triassic age for Assemblage II. Based on sedimentological data and literature, a preliminary age of Early Triassic (Induan) can be given. A range from latest Fassanian (Ladinian) to Lacian (Norian) for Assemblage III is indicated by the occurrence of Asseretospora gyrata, Cadargasporites senectus, Eucommiidites, Infernopollenites, Minutosaccus crenulatus, Retisulcites perforatus and Samaropollenites speciosus. Small amounts of Asseretospora gyrata, Cadargasporites senectus, Cycadopites, Microcachryidites and Minutosaccus crenulatus indicate a slightly larger age range for Assemblage IV (e.g. Carnien to Rhaetian).

  17. Post-Laramide uplift and erosional history of northern Wind River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Conel, J.E.; Lang, H.R.; Paylor, E.D.

    1985-02-01

    Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) multispectral scanner images together with aerial photographs have been used to infer Laramide to Holocene tectonic events along the northern fringe of Wind River basin near Wind River Canyon, Wyoming. TM images reveal the presence of a large system of alluvial fans, terraces, and residual tongue-shaped debris deposits covering an area of 90 mi/sup 2/ at the base of Copper Mountain. The debris system contains predominantly dark metasedimentary clasts. Both Eocene (Wind River and Wagon Bed Formations) and Quaternary deposits are present, and some Eocene gravel has been reworked into the later units. These deposits contrast sharply in brightness and color with rocks in adjacent areas. Detailed topographic analysis of the terraces and fan remnants disclosed an episodic history of post-Wagon Bed (upper to middle Eocene) uplift and pediment cutting. At least 3 principal stages covering a vertical interval possibly as great as 1300 ft have been identified. Soil profiles in Quaternary gravels capping the pediments show increase in maturity consistent with age inferred from topographic elevations. These local erosional stages may record tectonic events of regional significance. Their absolute ages need to be determined.

  18. Provenance and accommodation pathways of late Quaternary sediments in the deep-water northern Ionian Basin, southern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perri, Francesco; Critelli, Salvatore; Dominici, Rocco; Muto, Francesco; Tripodi, Vincenzo; Ceramicola, Silvia

    2012-12-01

    The northern Calabria along the southeastern coast of Italy provides a favorable setting in which to study complete transects from continental to deep-marine environments. The present northern Ionian Calabrian Basin is a wedge-top basin within the modern foreland-basin system of southern Italy. The Ionian margin of northern Calabria consists of a moderately developed fluvial systems, the Crati and Neto rivers, and diverse smaller coastal drainages draining both the Calabria continental block (i.e., Sila Massif) and the southern Apennines thrust belt (i.e., Pollino Massif). The main-channel sand of the Crati and Neto rivers is quartzofeldspathic with abundant metamorphic and plutonic lithic fragments (granodiorite, granite, gneiss, phyllite and sedimentary lithic fragments). Sedimentary lithic fragments were derived from Jurassic sedimentary successions of the Longobucco Group. The mud samples contain mostly phyllosilicates, quartz, calcite, feldspars and dolomite. Traces of gypsum are present in some samples. The I-S mixed layers, 10 Å-minerals (illite and micas), chlorite and kaolinite are the most abundant phyllosilicates, whereas smectite and chlorite/smectite mixed layers are in small amounts. The geochemical signatures of the muds reflect a provenance characterized by both felsic and mafic rocks with a significant input from carbonate rocks. Furthermore, the degree of source-area weathering was most probably of low intensity rather than moderately intense because CIA values for the studied mud samples are low. Extrapolation of the mean erosion budget from 1 to 25 Ma suggests that at least 5 to 8 km of crust have been removed from the Calabrian orogenic belt and deposited in the marine basins. The Calabrian microplate played an important role in the dynamic evolution of southern Italian fossil and modern basins, representing the key tectonic element of the entire orogenic belt.

  19. Precipitation thresholds for triggering floods in Corgo hydrographic basin (Northern Portugal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Monica; Fragoso, Marcelo

    2016-04-01

    The precipitation is a major cause of natural hazards and is therefore related to the flood events (Borga et al., 2011; Gaál et al., 2014; Wilhelmi & Morss, 2013). The severity of a precipitation event and their potential damage is dependent on the total amount of rain but also on the intensity and duration event (Gaál et al., 2014). In this work, it was established thresholds based on critical combinations: amount / duration of flood events with daily rainfall data for Corgo hydrographic basin, in northern Portugal. In Corgo basin are recorded 31 floods events between 1865 and 2011 (Santos et al., 2015; Zêzere et al., 2014). We determined the minimum, maximum and pre-warning thresholds that define the boundaries so that an event may occur. Additionally, we applied these thresholds to different flood events occurred in the past in the study basin. The results show that the ratio between the flood events and precipitation events that occur above the minimum threshold has relatively low probability of a flood happen. These results may be related to the reduced number of floods events (only those that caused damage reported by the media and produced some type of damage). The maximum threshold is not useful for floods forecasting, since the majority of true positives are below this limit. The retrospective analysis of the thresholds defined suggests that the minimum and pre warning thresholds are well adjusted. The application of rainfall thresholds contribute to minimize possible situations of pre-crisis or immediate crisis, reducing the consequences and the resources involved in emergency response of flood events. References Borga, M., Anagnostou, E. N., Blöschl, G., & Creutin, J. D. (2011). Flash flood forecasting, warning and risk management: the HYDRATE project. Environmental Science & Policy, 14(7), 834-844. doi: 10.1016/j.envsci.2011.05.017 Gaál, L., Molnar, P., & Szolgay, J. (2014). Selection of intense rainfall events based on intensity thresholds and

  20. Sedimentology and hydrocarbon potential of Yager structural complex--possible paleogene source rocks in Eel River Basin, Northern California

    SciTech Connect

    Underwood, M.B.

    1985-07-01

    The Yager structural complex of coastal northern California is composed of Paleogene mudrocks, turbidites, and related deep marine deposits. The strata are folded but lack the severe and pervasive stratal disruption that characterizes surrounding accreted terranes, such as the Franciscan Coastal belt. Lithofacies associations and depositional cycles define three environmental settings: slope, feeder channel, and restricted basin. The rocks probably represent a sequence of trench-slope and slope-basin deposits that accumulated above a broadly coeval basement of accreted Coastal belt rocks. Yager strata are possible source beds for hydrocarbons within the late Cenozoic Eel River basin. Type III kerogen is dominant, and organic carbon content and hydrocarbon yield are relatively low. Nevertheless, the thermal maturity of Yager shales is well within the window of peak hydrocarbon generation. This level of maturation is attributed to a combination of middle Tertiary thrust faulting and subsequent depositional burial beneath the Neogene Wildcat Group.

  1. Timing, distribution, amount, and style of Cenozoic extension in the northern Great Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henry, Christopher D.; McGrew, Allen J.; Colgan, Joseph P.; Snoke, Arthur W.; Brueseke, Matthew E.

    2011-01-01

    This field trip examines contrasting lines of evidence bearing on the timing and structural style of Cenozoic (and perhaps late Mesozoic) extensional deformation in northeastern Nevada. Studies of metamorphic core complexes in this region report extension beginning in the early Cenozoic or even Late Cretaceous, peaking in the Eocene and Oligocene, and being largely over before the onset of “modern” Basin and Range extension in the middle Miocene. In contrast, studies based on low-temperature thermochronology and geologic mapping of Eocene and Miocene volcanic and sedimentary deposits report only minor, localized extension in the Eocene, no extension at all in the Oligocene and early Miocene, and major, regional extension in the middle Miocene. A wealth of thermochronologic and thermobarometric data indicate that the Ruby Mountains–East Humboldt Range metamorphic core complex (RMEH) underwent ~170 °C of cooling and 4 kbar of decompression between ca. 85 and ca. 50 Ma, and another 450 °C cooling and 4–5 kbar decompression between ca. 50 and ca. 21 Ma. These data require ~30 km of exhumation in at least two episodes, accommodated at least in part by Eocene to early Miocene displacement on the major west-dipping mylonitic zone and detachment fault bounding the RMEH on the west (the mylonitic zone may also have been active during an earlier phase of crustal extension). Meanwhile, Eocene paleovalleys containing 45–40 Ma ash-flow tuffs drained eastward from northern Nevada to the Uinta Basin in Utah, and continuity of these paleovalleys and infilling tuffs across the region indicate little, if any deformation by faults during their deposition. Pre–45 Ma deformation is less constrained, but the absence of Cenozoic sedimentary deposits and mappable normal faults older than 45 Ma is also consistent with only minor (if any) brittle deformation. The presence of ≤1 km of late Eocene sedimentary—especially lacustrine—deposits and a low-angle angular

  2. Selected geohydrologic data from a regional aquifer-system analysis of the Northern Rocky Mountains intermontane basins in Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stone, M.A.; Parliman, D.J.; Schaefer, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey began a regional aquifer-system analysis of the Northern Rocky Mountains of northern and central Idaho and western Montana in 1990. The analysis helped establish a regional framework of information for aquifers in about 70 ntermontane basins in an area of 80,000 square miles. In many areas, ground water is the only suitable source of supply, yet little information is available about this resource. Selected geohydrologic data from 1,004 wells in 19 intermontane basins in Idaho were compiled as part of the regional analysis. Data consist of basin name and well number, altitude of land surface, date of well construction, geologic unit, depth of well, diameter of casing, type of finish, top of open interval, primary use of water, date of water level measurement, water level, discharge, specific capacity, source of discharge data, type of log available, date of water-quality constituent measurement, specific conductance, pH, and temperature. A similar report for intermontane basins in Montana has been published by the U.S. Geologcial Survey in Montana. (USGS)

  3. Asynchronous timing of extension and basin formation in the South Rhodope core complex, SW Bulgaria, and northern Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stübner, Konstanze; Drost, Kerstin; Schoenberg, Ronny; Böhme, Madelaine; Starke, Jessica; Ehlers, Todd A.

    2016-01-01

    Upper crustal extensional structures range from steep normal faults to shallow-dipping detachments. The relationship between extension and formation of synkinematic hanging wall basins including their relative timing is not well understood. The South Rhodope core complex, Southern Balkans, has experienced extension for >40 Ma leading to a number of extensional structures and Cenozoic sedimentary basins. We present new bedrock and basin detrital zircon and apatite (U-Th-Sm)/He ages from the Pirin and Rila Mountains and the Sandanski basin. Results identify three episodes of Cenozoic extension in SW Bulgaria accommodated by (1) the Eocene/Oligocene Mesta detachment; (2) the early to middle Miocene Gorno Spanchevo fault (circa 18-15 Ma), which is the northern prolongation of the Strymon low-angle detachment; and (3) the late Miocene West Pirin fault (≤10 Ma). Detachment faulting on the Strymon fault accommodated tens of kilometers of ENE-WSW extension and created ~1500 m topographic relief, but because the resulting hillslopes were gentle (≤10°), extension did not lead to enhanced footwall erosion or formation of a hanging wall basin. In contrast, the West Pirin normal fault resulted in mostly vertical motion of its footwall causing steep topography, rapid erosion, and formation of the synrift Sandanski basin. Digital topographic analysis of river channel profiles identifies the latest episodes of deformation including westward tilting of the Sandanski and Strymon basins and Quaternary N-S extension. This study demonstrates that basin formation in the South Rhodope core complex is related to normal faulting postdating the main episode of crustal stretching by detachment faulting.

  4. Depositional and provenance record of the Paleogene transition from foreland to hinterland basin evolution during Andean orogenesis, northern Middle Magdalena Valley Basin, Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Christopher J.; Horton, Brian K.; Caballero, Victor; Mora, Andrés; Parra, Mauricio; Sierra, Jair

    2011-10-01

    The Central Cordillera and Eastern Cordillera of the northern Andes form the topographic flanks of the north-trending Magdalena Valley Basin. Constraining the growth of these ranges and intervening basin has implications for Andean shortening and the transformation from a foreland to hinterland basin configuration. We present sedimentological, paleocurrent, and sandstone petrographic results from Cenozoic type localities to provide insights into the tectonic history of the northern Middle Magdalena Valley Basin of Colombia. In the Nuevo Mundo Syncline, the mid-Paleocene transition from marine to nonmarine deposystems of the Lisama Formation corresponds with a paleocurrent shift from northward to eastward transport. These changes match detrital geochronological evidence for a contemporaneous shift from cratonic (Amazonian) to orogenic (Andean) provenance, suggesting initial shortening-related uplift of the Central Cordillera and foreland basin generation in the Magdalena Valley by mid-Paleocene time. Subsequent establishment of a meandering fluvial system is recorded in lower-middle Eocene strata of the lower La Paz Formation. Eastward paleocurrents in mid-Paleocene through uppermost Eocene fluvial deposits indicate a continuous influence of western sediment source areas. However, at the upper middle Eocene (˜40 Ma) boundary between the lower and upper La Paz Formation, sandstone compositions show a drastic decrease in lithic content, particularly lithic volcanic fragments. This change is accompanied by a facies shift from mixed channel and overbank facies to thick, amalgamated braided fluvial deposits of possible fluvial megafans, reflecting changes in both the composition and proximity of western sediment sources. We attribute these modifications to the growing influence of exhumed La Cira-Infantas paleohighs in the axial Magdalena Valley, features presently buried beneath upper Eocene-Quaternary basin fill along the western flank of the Nuevo Mundo Syncline. In

  5. California GAMA Program: Ground-Water Quality Data in the Northern San Joaquin Basin Study Unit, 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bennett, George L.; Belitz, Kenneth; Milby Dawson, Barbara J.

    2006-01-01

    Growing concern over the closure of public-supply wells because of ground-water contamination has led the State Water Board to establish the Ground-Water Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. With the aid of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the program goals are to enhance understanding and provide a current assessment of ground-water quality in areas where ground water is an important source of drinking water. The Northern San Joaquin Basin GAMA study unit covers an area of approximately 2,079 square miles (mi2) across four hydrologic study areas in the San Joaquin Valley. The four study areas are the California Department of Water Resources (CADWR) defined Tracy subbasin, the CADWR-defined Eastern San Joaquin subbasin, the CADWR-defined Cosumnes subbasin, and the sedimentologically distinct USGS-defined Uplands study area, which includes portions of both the Cosumnes and Eastern San Joaquin subbasins. Seventy ground-water samples were collected from 64 public-supply, irrigation, domestic, and monitoring wells within the Northern San Joaquin Basin GAMA study unit. Thirty-two of these samples were collected in the Eastern San Joaquin Basin study area, 17 in the Tracy Basin study area, 10 in the Cosumnes Basin study area, and 11 in the Uplands Basin study area. Of the 32 samples collected in the Eastern San Joaquin Basin, 6 were collected using a depth-dependent sampling pump. This pump allows for the collection of samples from discrete depths within the pumping well. Two wells were chosen for depth-dependent sampling and three samples were collected at varying depths within each well. Over 350 water-quality field parameters, chemical constituents, and microbial constituents were analyzed and are reported as concentrations and as detection frequencies, by compound classification as well as for individual constituents, for the Northern San Joaquin Basin study unit as a whole and for each individual study area

  6. Deglacial and postglacial evolution of the Pingualuit Crater Lake basin, northern Québec (Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desiage, Pierre-Arnaud; Lajeunesse, Patrick; St-Onge, Guillaume; Normandeau, Alexandre; Ledoux, Grégoire; Guyard, Hervé; Pienitz, Reinhard

    2015-11-01

    The Pingualuit Crater, located in the Ungava Peninsula (northern Québec, Canada) is a 1.4-Ma-old impact crater hosting a ~ 245-m-deep lake. The lake has a great potential to preserve unique paleoclimatic and paleoecological sedimentary records of the last glacial/interglacial cycles in the terrestrial Canadian Arctic. In order to investigate the stratigraphy in the lake and the late Quaternary glacial history of the Pingualuit Crater, this study compiles data from three expeditions carried out in May 2007 (~ 9-m-long sediment core), in August 2010 (~ 50 km of seismic lines), and in September 2012 (high-resolution terrestrial LiDAR topography of the inner slopes). Despite the weak penetration (~ 10 m) of the 3.5-kHz subbottom profiling caused by the presence of boulders in the sedimentary column, seismic data coupled with the stratigraphy established from the sediment core enabled the identification of two glaciolacustrine units deposited during the final stages of the Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS) retreat in the crater. Two episodes of postglacial mass wasting events were also identified on the slopes and in the deep basin of the crater. The high-resolution topography of the internal slopes of the crater generated from the LiDAR data permitted the confirmation of a paleolake level at 545 m and determination of the elevation of drainage outlets. Together with the mapping of glacial and deglacial landforms from air photographs, the LiDAR data allowed the development of a new deglaciation and drainage scenario for the Pingualuit Crater Lake and surrounding area. The model proposes three main phases of lake drainage, based on the activation of seven outlets following the retreat of the LIS front toward the southwest. Finally, as opposed to other high-latitude crater lake basins such as Lake El'gygytgyn or Laguna Potrok Aike where high-resolution paleoclimatic records were obtained owing to high sediment accumulation rates, the seismic data from the Pingualuit Crater Lake

  7. Neotectonic and paleoseismicity studies on the Urumaco Fault, northern Falcón Basin, northwestern Venezuela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audemard, Franck A.; Bousquet, Jean-Claude; Rodríguez, José A.

    1999-07-01

    The northern Falcón Basin in northwestern Venezuela is affected by several small active faults, subordinated to the major right-lateral east-west-trending Oca-Ancón Fault System. A set of prominent NW-SE right-lateral faults — synthetic shears — such as the Urumaco, Rı´o Seco, Lagarto and La Soledad faults, stands out among those. The Urumaco Fault, located between the Lagarto and Mitare rivers (in the Urumaco Trough, west of Coro), presents a rather complex active fault trace that comprises two NW-SE fault segments linked by an ENE-WSW reverse echelon, all showing a restraining stepover geometry. Its western segment seems to continue to the north at sea. Conversely, the eastern one dies out on land and its northern tip ends in a transtensive horse-tail structure, that disrupts an Early Pleistocene conglomerate. This same unit is flexed and upheaved some 30 m at the restraining overlap. The kinematics and present stress tensor, the latest activity and the seismogenic potential of the eastern segment of the Urumaco Fault, have been assessed at a set of three river cuts of an ephemeral tributary stream of the Urumaco River, 3 km north of the Urumaco village, where the Urumaco Formation is truncated by a Late Pleistocene terrace ( 14C date of 20,700±950 yr BP at the base) of the Urumaco River. On the one hand, one of these outcrops features the Urumaco Fault affecting the Late Miocene Urumaco Formation, which comprises two prominent fault planes disposed as a wedge. The southwestern bounding plane juxtaposes two different sequences whereas the northeastern one does not, implying different slip behavior. In fact, the northeastern plane shows oblique-slip striations (29°N, normal-dextral), whereas the other one shows perfectly horizontal striations (right-lateral). On the other hand, both updip plane prolongations in the overlying alluvial unit are not so sharp, if the 17-cm throw of the erosive bottom of such terrace measured at the lowermost part of the

  8. Upper Pliocene Diatom Record From Northern Basin, Ross Sea; Potential Correlation to Other Antarctic Continental Shelf Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjunneskog, C.; Bart, P.; Chow, J.; Winter, D.; Scherer, R.; Andrill Mis Project Science Team

    2007-12-01

    The Northern Basin seismic record suggests a dynamic East Antarctic Ice Sheet with at least eight Late Neogene glacial expansions. The seismic-stratigraphic record indicates relatively thick late Neogene sequences on the outer continental shelf and upper slope and possibly undisturbed interglacial sequences. In 2003 Nathaniel B. Palmer (NBP03-01) collected 10 piston and jumbo piston cores in a depth transect from Mawson Bank to Drygalski Basin. The sediment cores range from 46 cm to over 4 meters in length, only recovering the surface of upper seismic unit. The lithologies of the cores include diatom mud, bioclastic sediment, silt, sand, clay and diamicton. Diatom analyses reveals that two of these cores, NBP03-01 PC2 and NBP03-01 PC8, have penetrated into undisturbed Upper Pliocene sequences. Upper Pliocene diatomaceous units are also recovered in Prydz Bay ODP sites 742 age ca. 1.8-2.2 Ma, and 1166 ages ca 1.8-2.2 and 2.5-2.8, sandwiched between diamictons. Recovery of Pliocene and Pleistocene sediment records of interglacial events is rare on the Antarctic continental shelf and the obtained records have been difficult to correlate with any certainty. With the recent recovery of the ANDRILL MIS (AND-1 core) the potential for correlation of these records has improved significantly. The sediment record from ANDRILL MIS comprises 13 diatomaceous units, all with their own specific diatom assemblage and key species. Comparison of diatom assemblages using key taxa and PCA show a strong correlation between Northern Basin PC2 and PC8, ODP Site 742 and MIS diatom unit IV placed at the Gauss-Matuyama boundary. Continued multiproxy analyses and independent dating will be performed to further constrain the correlation. The initial results have implications for regional correlation of interglacial events, and suggest that other Pliocene sediment records may be preserved in the Northern Basin region.

  9. Calibration and use of integrated hydrological models in a large groundwater basin in Northern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandolfi, Claudio; Giudici, Mauro; Ponzini, Giansilvio; Agostani, Davide; Rienzner, Michele

    2010-05-01

    We present and discuss the main steps of the implementation and use of the ground water flow model of a large alluvial aquifer system underlying a densely settled and heavily irrigated territory, with a special focus on the estimation of the distributed recharge and on the calibration of the model. The 2500 km² grounwater basin lies in the Padana plain (Northern Italy), one of the most developed industrial and agricultural areas of Europe, and is bordered by the rivers Adda, Oglio and Po. The model implementation was urged by the water management and administration authorities in the area, which in the last years have been under increasing pressure for the release of pumping consents, especially from the irrigation sector. Indeed, the limitation to water withdrawal from rivers to ensure the minimum instream flow, along with a sequence of very dry years, pushed the farmers to seek new sources of irrigation water. On the other side the water authorities are trying to drive a process of transformation of the irrigation systems, towards an increase of their water use efficiency. The same authorities, however, are aware that this process must be carefully controlled in order to protect a number of groundwater dependent ecosystems, that are largely dependent on the distributed recharge due to irrigation. Therefore, the main practical goals of the model is to provide a tool for the assessment of both the sustainability of increased groundwater withdrawals and the effects of changes of the irrigation systems characteristics. Distributed recharge, mainly due to rainfall and irrigation, has been often treated in a simplified way in many applications of groundwater models, in spite of the fact that the unsaturated zone scientific community has achieved significant progresses in the modelling of soil-water-atmosphere interactions. Indeed, especially when irrigation systems are densely spread over a large area but poorly efficient, the distributed recharge term may represent

  10. Regional geohydrology of the northern Louisiana salt-dome basin; Part I, conceptual model and data needs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryals, G.N.

    1982-01-01

    As part of the National Waste Terminal Storage Program, the U.S. Geological Survey is conducting a regional study of the geohydrology of the northern Louisiana salt-dome basin and developing a regional multi-layered ground-water flow model to determine regional flow paths. In the salt-dome basin the Tokio Formation and Brownstown Marl (Austin aquifer in this report), and Nacatoch Sand of Late Cretaceous age and the Wilcox Group, Carrizo Sand, Sparta Sand, and Cockfield Formation of Tertiary age contain regional aquifers within the maximum potential repository depth of 3,000 feet. The Cretaceous units contain saltwater throughout the basin. The Tertiary units contain freshwater to varying distances downdip from outcrop areas in the basin. Natural flow directions and rates of movement of groundwater have been changed in the salt-dome basin by the withdrawl of freshwater and by the injection of wastes (principally oil-field brines) into saline aquifers. Except for the Sparta aquifer, ground-water flow directions are not well known because of a lack of potentiometric data. A regional test-drilling program, to collect the data needed to document concepts of the flow system and to quantify inputs to the planned ground-water flow model, has been proposed. The Sparta aquifer is being modeled because data are available for the unit. As regional test drilling provides data on other units, will be added to the model developed for the Sparta aquifer. (USGS)

  11. Palaeoenvironment and its control on the formation of Miocene marine source rocks in the Qiongdongnan Basin, northern South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenhao; Zhang, Zhihuan; Wang, Weiming; Lu, Shuangfang; Li, Youchuan; Fu, Ning

    2014-01-01

    The main factors of the developmental environment of marine source rocks in continental margin basins have their specificality. This realization, in return, has led to the recognition that the developmental environment and pattern of marine source rocks, especially for the source rocks in continental margin basins, are still controversial or poorly understood. Through the analysis of the trace elements and maceral data, the developmental environment of Miocene marine source rocks in the Qiongdongnan Basin is reconstructed, and the developmental patterns of the Miocene marine source rocks are established. This paper attempts to reveal the hydrocarbon potential of the Miocene marine source rocks in different environment and speculate the quality of source rocks in bathyal region of the continental slope without exploratory well. Our results highlight the palaeoenvironment and its control on the formation of Miocene marine source rocks in the Qiongdongnan Basin of the northern South China Sea and speculate the hydrocarbon potential of the source rocks in the bathyal region. This study provides a window for better understanding the main factors influencing the marine source rocks in the continental margin basins, including productivity, preservation conditions, and the input of terrestrial organic matter.

  12. Palaeoenvironment and Its Control on the Formation of Miocene Marine Source Rocks in the Qiongdongnan Basin, Northern South China Sea

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenhao; Zhang, Zhihuan; Wang, Weiming; Lu, Shuangfang; Li, Youchuan; Fu, Ning

    2014-01-01

    The main factors of the developmental environment of marine source rocks in continental margin basins have their specificality. This realization, in return, has led to the recognition that the developmental environment and pattern of marine source rocks, especially for the source rocks in continental margin basins, are still controversial or poorly understood. Through the analysis of the trace elements and maceral data, the developmental environment of Miocene marine source rocks in the Qiongdongnan Basin is reconstructed, and the developmental patterns of the Miocene marine source rocks are established. This paper attempts to reveal the hydrocarbon potential of the Miocene marine source rocks in different environment and speculate the quality of source rocks in bathyal region of the continental slope without exploratory well. Our results highlight the palaeoenvironment and its control on the formation of Miocene marine source rocks in the Qiongdongnan Basin of the northern South China Sea and speculate the hydrocarbon potential of the source rocks in the bathyal region. This study provides a window for better understanding the main factors influencing the marine source rocks in the continental margin basins, including productivity, preservation conditions, and the input of terrestrial organic matter. PMID:25401132

  13. Methane hydrate-bearing sediments in the Terrebonne basin, northern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meazell, K.; Flemings, P. B.

    2015-12-01

    We characterize the geological, geophysical, and thermodynamic state of three dipping, hydrate-bearing sands in the Terrebonne mini basin of the northern Gulf of Mexico, and describe three potential drilling locations to sample these hydrate reservoirs. Within the sand bodies, there is a prominent negative polarity seismic reflection (opposite phase to the seafloor reflector) that we interpret to record the boundary between gas hydrate above and free gas below. This anomaly is the Bottom Simulating Reflector (BSR) and the base of the Gas Hydrate Stability Zone (BGHSZ). Above the BSR, reflection seismic data record these reservoirs with a positive polarity while below it, they record the reservoirs with a negative polarity event. Within the sand bodies, seismic amplitudes are generally strongest immediately above and below the BSR and weaken in updip and downdip directions. Beneath the BSR, two of the reservoirs have a strong negative amplitude event that parallels structure that we interpret to record a gas-water contact, while the third reservoir does not clearly record this behavior. Much like the seafloor, the BSR is bowl-shaped, occurring at greatest depths in the northwest and rising near salt bodies in the south and east. In the north east area of previous exploration, the BSR is found at a depth of 2868 meters below sealevel, implying a geothermal gradient of 20.1oC/km for type I hydrates. Logging while drilling data reveal that the sands are composed of numerous thin, hydrocarbon-charged, coarse-grained sediments. Hydrate saturation in these sands is greatest near the BGHSZ. Pressure coring is proposed for three wells that will penetrate the reservoirs at different structural elevations in order to further elucidate reservoir conditions of the sands.

  14. Palaeoclimatic oscillations in the Pliensbachian (Early Jurassic) of the Asturian Basin (Northern Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, Juan J.; Comas-Rengifo, María J.; Goy, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    One of the main controversial themes in palaeoclimatology involves elucidating whether climate during the Jurassic was warmer than the present day and if it was the same over Pangaea, with no major latitudinal gradients. There has been an abundance of evidence of oscillations in seawater temperature throughout the Jurassic. The Pliensbachian (Early Jurassic) constitutes a distinctive time interval for which several seawater temperature oscillations, including an exceptional cooling event, have been documented. To constrain the timing and magnitude of these climate changes, the Rodiles section of the Asturian Basin (Northern Spain), a well exposed succession of the uppermost Sinemurian, Pliensbachian and Lower Toarcian deposits, has been studied. A total of 562 beds were measured and sampled for ammonites, for biochronostratigraphical purposes, and for belemnites, to determine the palaeoclimatic evolution through stable isotope studies. Comparison of the recorded latest Sinemurian, Pliensbachian and Early Toarcian changes in seawater palaeotemperature with other European sections allows characterization of several climatic changes that are likely of a global extent. A warming interval partly coinciding with a δ13Cbel negative excursion was recorded at the Late Sinemurian. After a "normal" temperature interval, with temperatures close to average values of the Late Sinemurian-Early Toarcian period, a new warming interval containing a short-lived positive δ13Cbel peak, developed during the Early-Late Pliensbachian transition. The Late Pliensbachian represents an outstanding cooling interval containing a δ13Cbel positive excursion interrupted by a small negative δ13Cbel peak. Finally, the Early Toarcian represented an exceptional warming period, which has been pointed out as being responsible for the prominent Early Toarcian mass extinction.

  15. Palaeoclimatic oscillations in the Pliensbachian (Lower Jurassic) of the Asturian Basin (Northern Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, J. J.; Comas-Rengifo, M. J.; Goy, A.

    2015-08-01

    One of the main controversial items in palaeoclimatology is to elucidate if climate during the Jurassic was warmer than present day, with no ice caps, or if ice caps were present in some specific intervals. The Pliensbachian Cooling event (Lower Jurassic) has been pointed out as one of the main candidates to have developed ice caps on the poles. To constrain the timing of this cooling event, including the palaeoclimatic evolution before and after cooling, as well as the calculation of the seawater palaeotemperatures are of primary importance to find arguments on this subject. For this purpose, the Rodiles section of the Asturian Basin (Northern Spain), a well exposed succession of the uppermost Sinemurian, Pliensbachian and Lower Toarcian deposits, has been studied. A total of 562 beds were measured and sampled for ammonites, for biostratigraphical purposes and for belemnites, to determine the palaeoclimatic evolution through stable isotope studies. Comparison of the recorded uppermost Sinemurian, Pliensbachian and Lower Toarcian changes in seawater palaeotemperature with other European sections allows characterization of several climatic changes of probable global extent. A warming interval which partly coincides with a negative δ13Cbel excursion was recorded at the Upper Sinemurian. After a "normal" temperature interval, a new warming interval that contains a short lived positive δ13Cbel peak, was developed at the Lower-Upper Pliensbachian transition. The Upper Pliensbachian represents an outstanding cooling interval containing a positive δ13Cbel excursion interrupted by a small negative δ13Cbel peak. Finally, the Lower Toarcian represented an exceptional warming period pointed as the main responsible for the prominent Lower Toarcian mass extinction.

  16. Northern Powder River basin coal, Montana. Final environmental statement, regional analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    This environmental statement is in two parts: a regional analysis and a site-specific analysis of coal development in the northern Powder River basin region of Montana. The regional analysis addresses cumulative impacts of coal development in the region by 1990, with emphasis on industry proposals that now require or have recently required action by Federal and state authorities. A site-specific analysis of the proposed mining and reclamation plan for the Pearl mine makes up volumes 2 and 4 of this FES. Total annual coal production from the designated region of southeastern Montana is estimated at about 39 million tons by 1980, 50 million tons by 1985, and 53 million tons by 1990. The Big Sky, Pearl, and Spring Creek mines would collectively produce approximately 15% of the total by 1980, 26.5% by 1985, and 25% by 1990. Three impacts were determined to be locally significant. The National Ambient Air Quality Standards for total suspended particulates would frequently be exceeded near all three minesites during mine life. Degradation of air quality would cause subtle injury to vegetation within about 1 mile of the mines and about 4 miles of the generating units, slightly reducing vegetative productivity. Wildlife populations, primarily antelope, mule deer, and sage grouse, would be significantly reduced during mine life and probably for several decades after mining. No threatened or endangered species would be adversely affected.Social impacts would be significant in Colstrip and Forsyth - comparable to those experienced during the construction of Colstrip units 1 and 2. At least during the 2 or 3 years of most rapid growth, local governments, formal and informal institutions, and social networks in Colstrip and Forsyth would not be able to meet the demands placed on them. Comment letters and responses are included.

  17. A review of tectonics and sedimentation in a forearc setting: Hellenic Thrace Basin, North Aegean Sea and Northern Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maravelis, A. G.; Boutelier, D.; Catuneanu, O.; Seymour, K. St.; Zelilidis, A.

    2016-04-01

    Exposure of the forearc region of the North Aegean Sea, Greece, offers insight into evolving convergent margins. The sedimentary fill of the Thrace Basin during the Late Eocene to Oligocene time provides a record of subduction-driven processes, such as growth of magmatic arcs and construction of accretionary complexes. This large sediment repository received sediment from two sources. The southern (outboard) basin margin reflects the active influence of the exhumed accretionary prism (e.g. Pindic Cordillera or Biga peninsula), while the northern (inboard) margin records the effect of the magmatic arc in the Rhodope region. The forearc basin sedimentary fills shoal upward into shallow-marine strata but are dominated mainly by deep-marine facies. The depositional trend and stacking pattern are dominated by progradational patterns. This trend, which is observed in both basin margins, is related to tectonic deformation rather than sea-level fluctuations. Additional evidence for this tectonic uplift comes from the backstripping analysis. The accretionary complex provided material into the forearc basin. This material was transported northeast and formed a sand-rich turbidity system that evolved upslope into shallow-marine deposits. Stratigraphic data indicate that this turbidity system exhibits a successive landward (inboard) migration of the depocenter. Provenance data utilizing sandstone petrography, conglomerate clast composition, and bulk-rock geochemistry suggest that this system reflects an increased influx of mafic material into the basin. Volcanic arc-derived material was transported south and east and accumulated in deep-marine settings. Both stratigraphic and provenance data indicate a seaward (outboard) migration of the basin depocenter and a significant increase in felsic detritus into the forearc.

  18. Is long range transport of pollen in the NW Mediterranean basin influenced by Northern Hemisphere teleconnection patterns?

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, Rebeca; Alarcon, Marta; Periago, Cristina; Belmonte, Jordina

    2015-11-01

    Climatic oscillations triggered by the atmospheric modes of the Northern Hemisphere teleconnection patterns have an important influence on the atmospheric circulation at synoptic scale in Western Mediterranean Basin. Simultaneously, this climate variability could affect a variety of ecological processes. This work provides a first assessment of the effect of North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), Arctic Oscillation (AO) and Western Mediterranean Oscillation (WeMO) on the atmospheric long-range pollen transport episodes in the North-Eastern Iberian Peninsula for the period 1994-2011. Alnus, Ambrosia, Betula, Corylus and Fagus have been selected as allergenic pollen taxa with potential long-range transport associated to the Northern Hemisphere teleconnection patterns in the Western Mediterranean Basin. The results showed an increase of long range pollen transport episodes of: (1) Alnus, Corylus and Fagus from Western and Central Europe during the negative phase of annual NAO and AO; (2) Ambrosia, Betula and Fagus from Europe during the negative phase of winter WeMO; (3) Corylus and Fagus from Mediterranean area during the positive phase of the annual AO; and (4) Ambrosia from France and Northern Europe during the positive phase of winter WeMO. Conversely, the positive phase of annual NAO and AO are linked with the regional transport of Alnus, Betula and Corylus from Western Iberian Peninsula. The positive phase of annual WeMO was also positively correlated with regional transport of Corylus from this area. PMID:26125408

  19. Apatite fission track evidence for Miocene extensional faulting east-central Nevada, northern Basin and Range province

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, E.L.; Dumitru, T.A. . Geology Dept.); Gans, P.B. . Geological Sciences Dept.); Brown, R.W. . Geology Dept.)

    1993-04-01

    Apatite fission track ages indicates that a large component of motion along many of the present range-bounding faults occurred in the Early to Middle Miocene, tilting and uplifting rocks through the apatite annealing zone (120--60 C) between 18--13 Ma (n = 20, Deep Creeks), 18--15 Ma (northern Snake Range, n = 20), 25--17 Ma (n = 7, southern Snake Range), 24--15 Ma (Egan Range, n = 6), 23--18 Ma (Kern Mts., n = 2) and 28--16 ma (Schell Creek Range, n = 2). Long track length distributions indicate rapid cooling through the 120--60 C interval followed by residence at low, near surface temperatures. The data set also indicates that the combined Deep Creek-Kern Mountains-northern and southern Snake Range constitutes a single coherent footwall crustal block beneath a > 150 km-long system of east-dipping Miocene faults which includes at least the eastern portions of faults that have been mapped as the Snake Range decollement (NSRD). Conglomerates deposited in hanging wall basins along this fault system contain metamorphic and granitic boulders whose FT ages are coeval with footwall unroofing. The deposits themselves are now known to be younger than previously reported (Oligocene) as ages from boulders are Miocene. The thick (> 2 km) sequences of synorogenic conglomerate indicates rapid unroofing; large slide blocks attest to generation of steep, fault-controlled topography. Faults that cut this sequence are now known to be younger than 15 Ma. Thus, protracted extensional faulting affected the region, beginning in the Early Oligocene and continuing to the Recent, but a significant part of this extension, including a large component of the slip on the NSRD, was accomplished in the Early to Middle Miocene. Data from this region is compatible with a growing base of apatite fission track data from elsewhere in the northern Basin and Range, which, together with geologic relationships, suggest an important episode of Miocene extension and Basin and Range development.

  20. Cheatgrass percent cover change: Comparing recent estimates to climate change − Driven predictions in the Northern Great Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boyte, Stephen P.; Wylie, Bruce K.; Major, Donald J.

    2016-01-01

    Cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum L.) is a highly invasive species in the Northern Great Basin that helps decrease fire return intervals. Fire fragments the shrub steppe and reduces its capacity to provide forage for livestock and wildlife and habitat critical to sagebrush obligates. Of particular interest is the greater sage grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus), an obligate whose populations have declined so severely due, in part, to increases in cheatgrass and fires that it was considered for inclusion as an endangered species. Remote sensing technologies and satellite archives help scientists monitor terrestrial vegetation globally, including cheatgrass in the Northern Great Basin. Along with geospatial analysis and advanced spatial modeling, these data and technologies can identify areas susceptible to increased cheatgrass cover and compare these with greater sage grouse priority areas for conservation (PAC). Future climate models forecast a warmer and wetter climate for the Northern Great Basin, which likely will force changing cheatgrass dynamics. Therefore, we examine potential climate-caused changes to cheatgrass. Our results indicate that future cheatgrass percent cover will remain stable over more than 80% of the study area when compared with recent estimates, and higher overall cheatgrass cover will occur with slightly more spatial variability. The land area projected to increase or decrease in cheatgrass cover equals 18% and 1%, respectively, making an increase in fire disturbances in greater sage grouse habitat likely. Relative susceptibility measures, created by integrating cheatgrass percent cover and temporal standard deviation datasets, show that potential increases in future cheatgrass cover match future projections. This discovery indicates that some greater sage grouse PACs for conservation could be at heightened risk of fire disturbance. Multiple factors will affect future cheatgrass cover including changes in precipitation timing and totals and

  1. Depositional Record of the Bagua Basin, Northern Peru: Implications for Climate and Tectonic Evolution of Tropical South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, F.; George, S. W. M.; Williams, L. A.; Horton, B. K.; Garzione, C. N.

    2015-12-01

    The Andes Mountains exert critical controls on the climate, hydrology, and biodiversity of South America. The Bagua Basin, a low elevation (400-600 m) intermontane basin in northern Peru, offers a unique opportunity to study the ecological, climatic, and structural evolution of the western topographic boundary of the Amazonian foreland. Situated between the Marañon fold-thrust belt of the Western Cordillera and basement block uplifts of the Eastern Cordillera, the Bagua region contains a protracted, semi-continuous record of Triassic through Pleistocene sedimentation. Whereas Triassic-Cretaceous marine deposits were potentially related to extension and regional thermal subsidence, a Paleocene-Eocene shift to shallow marine and fluvial systems marks the onset of foreland basin conditions. Oligocene-Miocene sedimentation corresponds to a braided-meandering fluvial system with exceptional development of paleosols. In this study, we use new detrital zircon U-Pb geochronologic and oxygen stable isotopic datasets to establish a chronology of pre-Andean and Andean processes within the Bagua Basin. Detrital zircon geochronology provides constraints on when the Western and Eastern cordilleras shed sediments into the basin. Syndepositional zircons within Eocene, Oligocene and Miocene strata provide key age control for a previously poorly constrained depositional chronology. Preliminary results suggest a dramatic provenance shift in which Paleocene deposits contain almost exclusively cratonic populations (500-1600 Ma) whereas Eocene deposits show a mix of syndepositional zircons from the magmatic arc, recycled Mesozoic zircons, and cratonic zircon populations. Oxygen stable isotopes (δ18O) of carbonate nodules from Neogene paleosols will help elucidate when the Eastern Cordillera became an orographic barrier intercepting moisture from the Amazon basin to the east. Together, these records will help uncover the history of tectonics and climate interaction in tropical South

  2. A new genus of aplodontid rodent (Mammalia, Rodentia) from the late Oligocene of northern Junggar Basin, China.

    PubMed

    Bi, Shundong; Meng, Jin; McLean, Sarah; Wu, Wenyu; Ni, Xijun; Ye, Jie

    2013-01-01

    A new genus and species of aplodontid rodent, Proansomys dureensis, from the late Oligocene of the northern Junggar Basin of China is described. The new genus is referred to as Ansomyinae because the ectoloph on the upper cheek teeth, although not fully crested, has attained the same characteristic bucket-handle-shaped configuration as other members of the subfamily. It represents the earliest record of the subfamily yet discovered in Asia and is more plesiomorphic than species of the genus Ansomys in having a partly crested ectoloph, a lower degree of lophodonty, and less complex tooth basins (lacking accessory lophules). Proansomys has transitional features between Prosciurus and Ansomys, suggesting that the Ansomyinae derived from a group of aplodontids related to Prosciurus, as did other advanced aplodontid rodents. This provides new light on the paleobiogeography of the Ansomyinae.

  3. On the origin of graben and ridges within and near volcanically buried craters and basins in Mercury's northern plains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freed, Andrew M.; Blair, David M.; Watters, Thomas R.; Klimczak, Christian; Byrne, Paul K.; Solomon, Sean C.; Zuber, Maria T.; Melosh, H. J.

    2012-10-01

    Images of Mercury's northern volcanic plains taken by the MESSENGER spacecraft reveal a large number of buried impact craters and basins discernible by wrinkle-ridge rings that overlie their rims. Many of these “ghost” craters and basins contain interior graben of diverse widths and orientations. Here we use finite element models to test a variety of mechanisms for the formation of these graben and ridges. Results show that graben are best explained by cooling of large thicknesses of flood lavas within the craters and basins; conservation of surface area during cooling induces the required extensional stress state. In contrast, the development of wrinkle-ridge rings is best explained as the result of cooling and contraction of Mercury's interior, during which a reduction in Mercury's surface area led to a compressional state of stress. The critical factor in determining where large graben form is the thickness of the youngest cooling unit, the topmost sequence of lavas that cooled coevally. A thicker cooling unit leads to a deeper initiation of normal faulting (wider graben floors). Consistent with observations, the widest graben are predicted to occur where pooled lavas were thickest, and no graben are predicted within generally thinner plains outside of major craters. Observed concentrically oriented graben can be explained by variations in the thickness of the youngest cooling unit. In contrast, none of the basin uplift mechanisms considered, including isostatic response to crater topography, inward flow of the lower crust, or exterior loading by volcanic plains, can account for concentrically oriented graben.

  4. Late paleozoic tectonic amalgamation of northwestern China. Sedimentary record of the northern Tarim, northwestern Turpan, and southern Junggar basins

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, A.R.; Graham, S.A.; Hendrix, M.S.; Ying, D.; Zhou, D.

    1995-05-01

    This study focuses on areas adjacent to the Tian Shan (shan is Chinese for mountains) in Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, northwestern China, and provides new field data on Carboniferous and Permian outcrop exposures of sedimentary rocks of the southern Junggar, northwestern Turpan, and northern Tarim basins that bear directly on the history of late Paleozoic tectonic amalgamation. We present here a multifaceted sedimentary basin analysis, including sedimentary facies, paleocurrent, and sandstone provenance analyses, and reconstructions of late Paleozoic basin subsidence. These data provide a unique record not only of the basins themselves, but also of the evolution of the adjacent orogenic belts. This study is based on fieldwork during the summers of 1987, 1988, 1991, and 1992 by workers from Stanford University, the Chinese Academy of Geological Sciences, and the Xinjiang Bureau of Geology and Mineral Resources. Although reconnaissance in nature, the data presented here provide a basis for evaluating alternative hypotheses for the evolution of northwestern China and provide a starting point for more comprehensive future studies. 72 refs., 18 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Water resources of the northern Uinta Basin area, Utah and Colorado, with special emphasis on ground water supply

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hood, J.W.; Fields, F.K.

    1978-01-01

    The northern Uinta Basin area covers about 5,200 square miles (13,470 square kilometers) in northeastern Utah and northwestern Colorado. Much of the lowlands are arid to semiarid, but the highest parts of the Uinta Mountains have a humid climate. During 1941-70, the average annual precipitation ranged from less than 8 inches (203 millimeters) in the lowest part of the area at the Green River to more than 38 inches (965 millimeters) in the high west-central Uinta Mountains.

  6. Geologic assessment of natural gas from coal seams in the Northern Appalachian Coal Basin. Topical report, September 1986-September 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Kelafant, J.R.; Wicks, D.E.; Kuuskraa, V.A.

    1988-03-01

    Based on a geologic assessment of the Northern Appalachian Coal Basin, natural gas in place is estimated at 61 trillion cubic feet (Tcf), contained in 352,000 billion tons of coal. Over one third of the gas in place is in the deep, areally extensive Kittanning group (24.0 Tcf), although the Freeport (15.5 Tcf), Brookville/Clarion (11.0 Tcf), and Pittsburgh (7.0 Tcf) groups also hold considerable potential for coalbed gas. Five regional cross sections correlating the six major coal groups are included along with areal extent, overburden (depth of burial), coal isopach, and coal-rank maps.

  7. Past, present and future formation of groundwater resources in northern part of Baltic Artesian Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marandi, A.; Vallner, L.; Vaikmae, R.; Raidla, V.

    2012-04-01

    Cambrian-Vendian Aquifer System (CVAS) is the deepest confined aquifer system used for water consumption in northern part of Baltic Artesian Basin (BAB). A regional groundwater flow and transport model (Visual Modflow) was used to investigate the paleohydrogeological scientific and contemporary management problems of CVAS. The model covers the territory of Estonia and its close surrounding, all together 88,000 km2 and includes all main aquifers and aquitards from ground surface to as low as the impermeable part of the crystalline basement. Three-dimensional distribution of groundwater heads, flow directions, velocities, and rates as well as transport and budget characteristics were simulated by the model. Water composition was changed significantly during the last glaciations.Strongly depleted O and H stable isotope composition, absence of 3H and low radiocarbon concentration are the main indicators of glacial origin of groundwater in the Cambrian-Vendian aquifer in northern Estonia. The noble gas analyses allowed concluding, that palaeorecharge took place at temperatures around the freezing point. While in North Estonia, most of water was changed by glacial melt water, high salinity water is till preserved in Southern part of Estonia.First results of modeling suggest that during the intrusion period lasting 7.3-9.3 ka the front of glacial thaw water movement had southeast direction and reachedto 180-220 kmfrom CVAS outcrop in Baltic Sea. Confining layer of CVAS is cut through by deep buried valleys in several places in North Estonia making possible for modern precipitation to infiltrate into aquifer system in present day. In case of natural conditions, the water pressure of CVAS is few meters above sea level and most of valleys act as discharge areas for aquifers system. Two regional depression ones have formed in North Estonia as a result of groundwater use from CVAS. Water consumption changes the natural groundwater gradient, flow direction and thereforerecharge

  8. Quality of ground water and surface water in intermontane basins of the northern Rocky Mountains, Montana and Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, David W.; Dutton, DeAnn M.

    1996-01-01

    The Regional Aquifer-System Analysis (RASA) program is a series of studies by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to analyze regional ground-water systems that compose a major portion of the Nations water supply (Sun, 1986). The Northern Rocky Mountains Intermontane Basins is one of the study regions in this national program. The main objectives of the RASA studies are to: (1) describe the ground-water systems as they exist today, (2) analyze the known changes that have led to the system's present condition, (3) combine results of previous studies in a regional analysis, where possible, and (4) provide means by which effects of future ground-water development can be estimated.The purpose of this study, which began in 1990, was to increase understanding of the hydrogeology of the intermontane basins of the Northern Rocky Mountains area. This report is Chapter C of a three-part series and describes the quality of ground water and surface water in the study area. Chapter A (Tuck and others, 1996) describes the geologic history and generalized hydrogeologic units. Chapter B (Briar and others, 1996) describes the general distribution of ground-water levels in basin-fill deposits.Water-quality data illustrated in this report represent the distribution of concentrations and composition of dissolved solids in ground water and surface water in the intermontane areas. The chemistry of ground and surface water in the intermontane areas is influenced by the chemical and physical nature of the rocks in the basin deposits of the valleys and surrounding bedrock in the mountains.

  9. Radar Probing of Planetary Regoliths: An Example from the Northern Rim of Imbrium Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Thomas W.; Campbell, Bruce A.; Ghent, Rebecca R.; Hawke, B. Ray; Leverington, David W.

    2006-01-01

    Imaging radar measurements at long wavelengths (e.g., >30 cm) allow deep (up to tens of meters) probing of the physical structure and dielectric properties of planetary regoliths. We illustrate a potential application for a Mars orbital synthetic aperture radar (SAR) using new Earth-based 70-cm wavelength radar data for the Moon. The terrae on the northern margin of Mare Imbrium, the Montes Jura region, have diffuse radar backscatter echoes that are 2-4 times weaker at 3.8-cm, 70-cm, and 7.5-m wavelengths than most other lunar nearside terrae. Possible geologic explanations are (1) a pyroclastic deposit associated with sinuous rilles in this region, (2) buried mare basalt or a zone of mixed highland/basaltic debris (cryptomaria), or (3) layers of ejecta associated with the Iridum and Plato impacts that have fewer meter-sized rocks than typical highlands regolith. While radar data at 3.8-cm to 7.5-m wavelengths suggest significant differences between the Montes Jura region and typical highlands, the surface geochemistry and rock abundance inferred from Clementine UV-VIS data and eclipse thermal images are consistent with other lunar terrae. There is no evidence for enhanced iron abundance, expected for basaltic pyroclastic deposits, near the source vents of the sinuous rilles radial to Plato. The regions of low 70-cm radar return are consistent with overlapping concentric ''haloes'' about Iridum and Plato and do not occur referentially in topographically low areas, as is observed for radar-mapped cryptomaria. Thus we suggest that the extensive radar-dark area associated with the Montes Jura region is due to overlapping, rock-poor ejecta deposits from Iridum and Plato craters. Comparison of the radial extent of low-radar-return crater haloes with a model for ejecta thickness shows that these rock-poor layers are detected by 70-cm radar where they are on the order of 10 m and thicker. A SAR in orbit about Mars could use similar deep probing to reveal the nature of

  10. Trace Perchlorate in Background Ground Water and Local Precipitation, Northern Rio Grande Basin, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dale, M.; Longmire, P.; Granzow, K. P.; Englert, D.; Yanicak, S.; Larson, T.; Rearick, M.; Heikoop, J.; Perkins, G.

    2007-12-01

    Perchlorate occurs at detectable concentrations of 0.07 to 0.45 parts per billion (ppb) in ground water of background quality within the northern Rio Grande basin, New Mexico. Ground-water samples were collected from 47 wells and springs near Los Alamos, Santa Fe, and Taos, New Mexico. Analytical methods consisted of liquid and ion chromatography-mass spectrometry mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS and IC/MS/MS). An upper tolerance limit (mean plus two standard deviations) of 0.40 ppb was calculated from 184 analytical results for the background samples. Six distinguishable ground-water zones were sampled based on location, age, and hydrochemistry. In the Los Alamos area, ground water within the mountain-front and mountain-block region is mostly young or modern (less than 50 years). The regional aquifer including the White Rock Canyon springs are of sub-modern age (greater than 50 years). Tritium data from springs north of Taos indicate ground water of modern and sub-modern ages. Background perchlorate concentrations within the Los Alamos area were consistently higher than those measured in the Taos area. Ground water from the Taos area contains less perchlorate and has lower δ18O and δ2H values than ground water from the Los Alamos area. The elevation at which precipitation occurs with respect to recharge and/or the amount of evapotranspiration may play a role in perchlorate concentration in ground water. Natural variability, hydrogeology, and atmospheric inputs may also affect perchlorate concentration in ground water. A linear regression through perchlorate and chloride concentrations for all stations resulted in an r2 = 0. However, the r2 value of the Los Alamos regional aquifer for perchlorate versus chloride was 0.66. Thirteen precipitation samples were collected in the Los Alamos area. Results from eleven of these samples showed no perchlorate greater than 0.05 and 0.009 ppb, the method detection limit (MDL). Two precipitation samples analyzed using the IC

  11. Biomarkers of contaminant exposure in northern pike (Esox lucius) from the Yukon River Basin, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinck, J.E.; Blazer, V.S.; Denslow, N.D.; Myers, M.S.; Gross, T.S.; Tillitt, D.E.

    2007-01-01

    As part of a larger investigation, northern pike (n = 158; Esox lucius) were collected from ten sites in the Yukon River Basin (YRB), Alaska, to document biomarkers and their correlations with organochlorine pesticide (total p,p'-DDT, total chlordane, dieldrin, and toxaphene), total polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and elemental contaminant (arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, total mercury, selenium, and zinc) concentrations. A suite of biomarkers including somatic indices, hepatic 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) activity, vitellogenin concentrations, steroid hormone (17B- ustradiol and 16-kebtestosteront) concentrations, splenic macrophage aggregates (MAs), oocyte atresia, and other microscopic anomalies in various tissues were documented in YRB pike. Mean condition factor (0.50 to 0.68), hepatosomatic index (1.00% to 3.56%), and splenosomatic index (0.09% to 0.18%) were not anomalous at any site nor correlated with any contaminant concentration. Mean EROD activity (0.71 to 17.51 pmol/min/mg protein) was similar to basal activity levels previously measured in pike and was positively correlated with selenium concentrations (r = 0.88, P < 0.01). Vitellogenin concentrations in female (0.09 to 5.32 mg/mL) and male (0.01 mg/mL in male pike from multiple sites indicated exposure to estrogenic compounds. Mean steroid hormone concentrations and percent oocyte atresia were not anomalous in pike from any YRB site. Few site differences were significant for mean MA density (1.86 to 6.42 MA/mm2), size (812 to 1481 ??m2), and tissue occupied (MA-%; 0.24% to 0.75%). A linear regression between MA-% and total PCBs was significant, although PCB concentrations were generally low in YRB pike (???63 ng/g), and MA-% values in female pike (0.24% to 0.54%) were lower than in male pike (0.32% to 0.75%) at similar PCB concentrations. Greater numbers of MAs were found as zinc concentrations increased in YRB female pike, but it is unlikely that this is a causative relationship

  12. Aeromagnetic legacy for a diffuse intraplate boundary between northern Victoria Land and the Wilkes Subglacial Basin (East Antarctica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraccioli, F.; Armadillo, E.; Bozzo, E.

    2012-04-01

    Major terrane bounding faults and intra-terrane faults that were active during early Paleozoic subduction and accretion stages of the Ross Orogen have been subject to intense research over the northern Victoria Land sector of East Antarctica. However, the paucity of outcrop, coupled with incomplete geophysical data coverage, has limited the ability to trace the inland extent and architecture of these basement fault systems and has hampered efforts to assess their controls on later Cenozoic intraplate faulting within the Transantarctic Mountains and the eastern margin of the Wilkes Subglacial Basin. Here we compile and analyse new enhanced aeromagnetic anomaly images that help constrain regional-scale crustal architecture and tectonic evolution over northern Victoria Land and the eastern margin of the Wilkes Subglacial Basin. Long-wavelength magnetic lows are modelled as reflecting several-km thick sedimentary basins of inferred early Cambrian age that were inverted along major thrust faults during the late stages of the Ross Orogen to form a major pop-up structure within the Wilson Terrane. A residual Bouguer gravity high in the central Wilson Terrane corresponds to a broad magnetic low and images the ~500 Ma old high-grade granulite-facies core of the pop-up. Arrays of NNW trending magnetic lineaments reveal thin sheared sheets of mylonitic granitoids emplaced along the late Ross (~480 Ma old) Exiles Thrust fault system within the western Wilson Terrane, which is also marked by a prominent deep electrical conductivity anomaly. In contrast, much thicker magmatic arc intrusions are modelled along the Prince Albert Fault System that fringes the eastern margin of the Wilkes Subglacial Basin. Recent zircon U-Pb dating over exposures of gabbro-diorites within the Prince Albert Mountains further south suggest that these intrusions may have been emplaced during an earlier stage of subduction (~520 Ma or older?), likely in a transtensional setting. Our magnetic models

  13. Invasions and impacts of alligatorweed in the upper Xiaoqing River basin of northern China

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alligatorweed (Alternanthera philoxeroides (Mart.) Griseb), is a problematic and difficult to manage invasive weed. The recent invasion in the upper Xiaoqing River, northern China extends its range northwards through almost five degrees latitude and 500 km from the northern limit and main invasion a...

  14. Is the Neogene series of the Northern Foreland Basin of the Tian Shan Range indicative of tectonic or climatic change?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armitage, J. J.; Barrier, L.

    2013-12-01

    In the Junggar Basin - the northern foreland basin of the Tian Shan Range in Central Asia - there are striking transitions in depositional style during the Cenozoic, from fine grain to coarse gravel deposits. There is continued debate as to if this coarsening is due to a change in surface run-off and frequent shifts in climatic conditions, or increased tectonic uplift. To explore the causes of these sedimentological changes, we compare the results of a model of erosion and deposition linked to flexure of the lithosphere, against the exposed sections of the transitions in deposition across the southern margin of the basin. An increase in tectonic uplift causes an temporary reduction in grain size followed by progradation of coarser material into the basin. The initial retrogradation is caused by the ratio of accommodation space to sediment supply being transiently high, as catchment erosion responds to the change in slope. In contrast, when the system is subject to an increase in surface run-off, there is a rapid increase in sediment delivery to the basin but little change in the down-system fining of gravel deposits. There is no retrogradation in this scenario due to erosion of the upper few km of previous deposits. The general lack of basin wide change in gravel deposition is due to the interplay between flexure and loading: the mass deposited increases accommodation space and balances the ratio of accommodation to supply. If instead flexure where ignored, sediment supply would temporarily exceed accommodation space, leading to the deposition of a conglomeratic sheet. In the south of the Junggar Basin, the Cenozoic series display two retrogradation-progradation cycles. Within these cycles, the progradation trends from fine to coarse grains is oldest closest to the mountain belt and much more younger in the distal regions. This time-transgressive behaviour is more easily explained through a change in tectonic driven uplift, where the progradation of coarse material

  15. Hydrogeochemistry and stable isotopes of ground and surface waters from two adjacent closed basins, Atacama Desert, northern Chile

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alpers, C.N.; Whittemore, D.O.

    1990-01-01

    The geochemistry and stable isotopes of groundwaters, surface waters, and precipitation indicate different sources of some dissolved constituents, but a common source of recharge and other constituents in two adjacent closed basins in the Atacama Desert region of northern Chile (24??15???-24??45???S). Waters from artesian wells, trenches, and ephemeral streams in the Punta Negra Basin are characterized by concentrations of Na>Ca>Mg and Cl ???SO4, with TDS Mg ??? Ca and SO4 > Cl, with TDS also Mg ??? Ca and SO4 > Cl, but with TDS up to 40 g/l. The deep mine waters have pH between 3.2 and 3.9, and are high in dissolved CO2 (??13 C = -4.8%PDB), indicating probable interaction with oxidizing sulfides. The deep mine waters have ??18O values of ???-1.8%.compared with values < -3.5??? for other Hamburgo Basin waters; thus the mine waters may represent a mixture of meteoric waters with deeper "metamorphic" waters, which had interacted with rocks and exchanged oxygen isotopes at elevated temperatures. Alternatively, the deep mine waters may represent fossil meteoric waters which evolved isotopically along an evaporative trend starting from values quite depleted in ??18O and ??Dd relative to either precipitation or shallow groundwaters. High I/Br ratios in the Hamburgo Basin waters and La Escondida mine waters are consistent with regionally high I in surficial deposits in the Atacama Desert region and may represent dissolution of a wind-blown evaporite component. Rain and snow collected during June 1984, indicate systematic ??18O and ??D fractionation with increasing elevation between 3150 and 4180 m a.s.l. (-0.21??.??18O and -1.7??.??D per 100 m). Excluding the deep mine waters from La Escondida, the waters from the Hamburgo and Punta Negra Basins have similar ??D and ??18O values and together show a distinct evaporative trend (??D = 5.0 ??18O - 20.2). Snowmelt from the central Andes Cordillera to the east is the most likely source of recharge to both basins. Some of the

  16. Petroleum systems of the Po Basin Province of northern Italy and the northern Adriatic Sea; Porto Garibaldi (biogenic), Meride/Riva di Solto (thermal), and Marnoso Arenacea (thermal)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindquist, Sandra J.

    1999-01-01

    The Porto Garibaldi total petroleum system dominates the Po Basin Province of onshore northern Italy and offshore Italy and Croatia in the northern Adriatic Sea. Porto Garibaldi contains Pliocene (primarily) and Pleistocene (secondarily) biogenic gas ? approximately 16 TCF (2.66 BBOE) ultimately recoverable ? accumulated in co-eval siliciclastic reservoirs. This area was the northwestern edge of the Gondwanan (African) continental plate in pre-Hercynian time until the assembly of Pangea, a dominantly carbonate passive continental margin during the Mesozoic breakup of Pangea, and a Cenozoic collision zone with siliciclastic foredeep and foreland regions surrounded by thrust belts. At least two other petroleum systems, with Triassic (Meride / Riva di Solto) and Miocene (Marnoso Arenacea) source rocks, contribute oil and thermal gas reserves (nearly 1 BBOE) to the province. The major time of hydrocarbon expulsion of the thermal systems was Late Neogene during the Alpine and Apennine orogenies. Local Mesozoic oil expulsion from Triassic rocks also occurred, but those oils either were not trapped or were leaked from faulty traps through time.

  17. Physics-Based Long-Period Ground Motion Scenarios in and Around the Po Plain Sedimentary Basin (Northern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinari, I.; Morelli, A.; Casarotti, E.

    2014-12-01

    Unexpected large and prolonged shaking (> 80s) associated with long-period ground motion has been observed inside the Po Plain sedimentary basin (Northern Italy) during the two M~6, May 20-29, 2012, earthquakes. Long-period ground motion impacts on the seismic response of taller structures. It is hence important to understand the characteristics of long-period ground motion associated with the 3D structure and finite fault properties, in particular in those regions with deep sedimentary basins and a complex geological context. We implement a recent high resolution model of the Po basin (MAMBo), derived from geological constraints, in spectral-element code SPECFEM3D_cartesian (Peter et al., 2012). The simulations are numerically accurate for periods of 2 sec and longer, and incorporate complex 3D basin structure and topography as well as the spatial and temporal heterogeneity of source rupture. The response of our basin model has been evaluated for several instrumental earthquakes. Synthetics seismograms reproduce well amplitude and long duration, as well as envelope and coda, observed in paths that travel through sediments. We also evaluate ground motion produced by plausible earthquakes inferred from historical data, such as the Modena (1501) and Verona (1117) events that caused well-documented strong effects in a unusually wide areas with lengths of hundreds of kilometers. We test different representations of the seismic source, from point source to finite sources with different rupture histories, evaluating the impact on shaking amplitude. We compare our results with damage maps (when available) and with the GMPEs currently adopted for this area, evaluating the effects of finite fault and 3D propagation on ground shaking. We show that deterministic ground motion calculation can indeed provide information to be actively used to mitigate the effects of destructive earthquakes on critical infrastructures.

  18. Geographic, geologic, and hydrologic summaries of intermontane basins of the northern Rocky Mountains, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kendy, Eloise; Tresch, R.E.

    1996-01-01

    This report combines a literature review with new information to provide summaries of the geography, geology, and hydrology of each of 32 intermontane basins in western Montana. The summary of each intermontane basin includes concise descriptions of topography, areal extent, altitude, climate, 1990 population, land and water use, geology, surface water, aquifer hydraulic characteristics, ground-water flow, and ground-water quality. If present, geothermal features are described. Average annual and monthly temperature and precipitation are reported from one National Weather Service station in each basin. Streamflow data, including the drainage area, period of record, and average, minimum, and maximum historical streamflow, are reported for all active and discontinued USGS streamflow-gaging stations in each basin. Monitoring-well data, including the well depth, aquifer, period of record, and minimum and maximum historical water levels, are reported for all long-term USGS monitoring wells in each basin. Brief descriptions of geologic, geophysical, and potentiometric- surface maps available for each basin also are included. The summary for each basin also includes a bibliography of hydrogeologic literature. When used alone or in conjunction with regional RASA reports, this report provides a practical starting point for site-specific hydrogeologic investigations.

  19. A modern analogue for tectonic, eustatic, and climatic processes in cratonic basins: Gulf of Carpentaria, northern Australia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edgar, N. Terence; Cecil, C. Blaine; Mattick, R.E.; de Deckker, Patrick; Djajadihardja, Yusuf S.

    2003-01-01

    The Gulf of Carpentaria is a tropical, silled epicontinental sea and may be a modern analogue for ancient cratonic basins. For the purpose of this study, the Gulf of Carpentaria is compared to Pennsylvanian cratonic basins of the United States. During the Pennsylvanian, the North American continent moved from the Southern Hemisphere, through the Equator, into the Northern Hemisphere. Today, the Gulf of Carpentaria–New Guinea region is a few degrees south of the Equator and is moving towards it. During the Pennsylvanian, the world was subjected to major glaciations and associated sea-level changes. The island of New Guinea and the Gulf of Carpentaria have undergone similar processes during the Quaternary. A reconnaissance seismic survey of the gulf conducted by the USGS and the Australian National University (ANU), combined with oil-exploration well data, provided the first step in a systematic evaluation of a modern tropical epicontinental system. During the Cenozoic, the region was dominated by terrestrial sedimentation in a temperate climate. At the same time, carbonates were being deposited on the northern shelf edge of the Australian Plate. During the Miocene, carbonate deposition expanded southward into the gulf region. Then in the Late Miocene, carbonate sedimentation was replaced by terrigenous clastics derived from the developing Central Range of the island of New Guinea, which developed a wetter climate while moving northwards into the tropics. At least 14 basin-wide transgressive–regressive cycles are identified by channels that were eroded under subaerial conditions since about the Miocene. Comparison of the modern Gulf of Carpentaria sequences with those of the Pennsylvanian reveals many similarities.

  20. Geomorphological signature of the Pleistocene thin-skinned tectonics in the northern Maturín Foreland Basin, Eastern Venezuela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fajardo, Atiria; Nivière, Bertrand; Aubourg, Charles; Hervouët, Yves; Wagner, Roberto; Regard, Vincent; Callot, Jean-Paul

    2013-04-01

    The Eastern Venezuela foreland basin and the Serranía del Interior fold-thrust-belt were formed as a consequence of the oblique collision between Caribbean and South American plates. The foreland basin is divided into the Guárico sub-basin in the west and the Maturín sub-basin in the east. The Maturín sub-basin is geologically well known due to geological survey and structural-stratigraphic modeling motived by the hydrocarbon exploration. We focus here on Plio-Pleistocene deformations of the area that remain poorly understood. The study area stands on the northern edge of the Maturín sub-basin, in an area limited by the foothills of the Serranía del Interior to the north, and by the right lateral crustal Urica and San Francisco Faults to the west and east respectively. Between them, from the mountain to the deformation front, the thin-skinned tectonic wedge is mainly structured above the Pirital and Furrial thrust faults. The Pirital thrust fault involves a thick lithographic section that includes presumably pre-Cretaceous rocks whereas the Furrial Thrust is shallower and is associated with fault-bend-folds structures. We support that the Maturín sub-basin remains an area of active continental shortening in which a post-Pliocene peneplain surface has been deformed by folds, which are developed above buried reverse faults. We use the drainage patterns in this region to show active deformations that would be difficult to identify by other means. In particular we show how uplifts and tilts associated to fault activity alter the drainage pattern and the geometry of remnant terraces near Tarragona, San Felix, Punta de Mata, El Tejero and Jusepín zones. Given age, dip angles of the faults, and the vertical throw determined from the offset of the terrace and peneplain surfaces across the surface fault traces, we aim to estimate the cumulative shortening along the direction of tectonic transport and slip rates. Industrial seismic lines show that superficial

  1. Analysis of subsurface temperature data to quantify groundwater recharge rates in a closed Altiplano basin, northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, C. P.; Ferré, T. P. A.

    2016-09-01

    Quantifying groundwater recharge is a fundamental part of groundwater resource assessment and management, and is requisite to determining the safe yield of an aquifer. Natural groundwater recharge in arid and semi-arid regions comprises several mechanisms: in-place, mountain-front, and mountain-block recharge. A field study was undertaken in a high-plain basin in the Altiplano region of northern Chile to quantify the magnitude of in-place and mountain-front recharge. Water fluxes corresponding to both recharge mechanisms were calculated using heat as a natural tracer. To quantify in-place recharge, time-series temperature data in cased boreholes were collected, and the annual fluctuation at multiple depths analyzed to infer the water flux through the unsaturated zone. To quantify mountain-front recharge, time-series temperature data were collected in perennial and ephemeral stream channels. Streambed thermographs were analyzed to determine the onset and duration of flow in ephemeral channels, and the vertical water fluxes into both perennial and ephemeral channels. The point flux estimates in streambeds and the unsaturated zone were upscaled to channel and basin-floor areas to provide comparative estimates of the range of volumetric recharge rates corresponding to each recharge mechanism. The results of this study show that mountain-front recharge is substantially more important than in-place recharge in this basin. The results further demonstrate the worth of time-series subsurface temperature data to characterize both in-place and mountain-front recharge processes.

  2. Structural characteristics of an active fold-and-thrust system in the southeastern Atacama Basin, northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yen-Sheng; Chuang, Yi-Rung; Shyu, J. Bruce H.; González, Gabriel; Shen, Chuan-Chou; Lo, Ching-Hua; Liou, Ya-Hsuan

    2016-08-01

    The western South American margin is one of the most active plate boundaries in the world. Using various remote sensing data sets, we mapped the neotectonic characteristics of an area at the southeastern corner of the Atacama Basin, northern Chile, in the Andean forearc. There, one major N-S trending ridge is clearly visible both in the satellite images and in the field. This ridge reaches 250 m above the basin floor in its middle part and is asymmetrical, with a steep eastern slope and a much gentler western slope. The geometry of the ridge indicates that it formed as an asymmetrical anticline. This anticline is likely formed as a shear fault-bend fold, with a major décollement at a depth of about 2.5 km in the Naranja Formation. We suggest that this décollement is a major structure of the Atacama Basin area. From the ages of the ignimbrites and lake deposits that were deformed by this anticline, we obtained a long-term shortening rate of the major underlying structure at about 0.2 mm/yr. This thin-skinned fold-and-thrust system appears to be active since at least about 3 Ma, and could be as long as since middle Miocene. Therefore, crustal structures may play important roles in the Neogene development of the western Andean margin.

  3. Sedimentology and sequence stratigraphy of Lower Shihezi Formation in Shenguhao area, northern Ordos basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lin; Lu, Yongchao; Lin, Zi

    2015-04-01

    The structural location of Shenguhao area locates at the transition zone of Yimeng uplift and Yishan slope of northern Ordos basin, China. The study area is in erosion condition until Late Carboniferous and has deposited Taiyuan Formation (C2t), Shanxi Formation (P1s), Lower Shihezi Formation (P1x), Upper Shihezi Formation (P2s) and Shiqianfeng Formation (P2sh) in succession during Late Paleozoic, which mainly develops transition facies and alluvial plain facies. The fluvial sandstone of Lower Shihezi Formation is the major target layer of gas exploration and development in this area. This study is based on the interpretation of 38 wells and 113 sesmic reflection profiles. Three significant lithofacies were identified with sedimentological analysis of cores from the Shenguhao area: fluvial conglomerates, fluvial sandstone and floodplain mudstone, which represent fluvial depositional environment. Based on sequence stratigraphy methodology, well log patterns and lithofacies analysis, Lower Shihezi Formation can be divided into four depositional sequence cycles (1-4) bounded by fluvial scouring erosional surfaces. Each sequence succession shows the trend of base level rising and overall performs fining-upward feature, which characterized by coarsening-upward lower to upper fluvial sandstone and floodplain mudstone. In ascending order, sequence 1 records the transition from the underlying braided river delta plain fine-grained sediments of Shanxi Formation into the overlying fluvial sandstone of Lower Shihezi Formation and develops scouring erosional unconformity at the base, representing a regression. Sequence 1 consists of a package of progradting thick layer of amalgamated fluvial sandstone at the lower part passing into aggrading thin layer of floodplain mudstone at the upper part, suggesting that accommodation growing rate is gradually greater than deposition supply rate under the background of base level gradual increase. Sequence 2 and 3 record similar

  4. Genetic structure of lake whitefish, Coregonus clupeaformis, populations in the northern main basin of Lake Huron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stott, Wendylee; Ebener, Mark P.; Mohr, Lloyd; Schaeffer, Jeff; Roseman, Edward F.; Harford, William J.; Johnson, James E.; Fietsch, Cherie-Lee

    2012-01-01

    Genetic analysis of spawning lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) from six sites in the main basin of Lake Huron was conducted to determine population structure. Samples from fisheryindependent assessment surveys in the northwest main basin were analyzed to determine the relative contributions of lake whitefish genetic populations. Genetic population structure was identified using data from seven microsatellite DNA loci. One population was identified at Manitoulin Island, one to two were observed in the east-central main basin (Fishing Island and Douglas Point), and one to two populations were found in the northwest (Thunder Bay and Duncan Bay). The genetic identity of collections from Duncan Bay and Thunder Bay was not consistent among methods used to analyze population structure. Low genetic distances suggested that they comprised one population, but genic differences indicated that they may constitute separate populations. Simulated data indicated that the genetic origins of samples from a mixed-fishery could be accurately identified, but accuracy could be improved by incorporating additional microsatellite loci. Mixture analysis and individual assignment tests performed on mixed-stock samples collected from the western main basin suggested that genetic populations from the east-central main basin contributed less than those from the western main basin and that the proportional contribution of each baseline population was similar in each assessment sample. Analysis of additional microsatellite DNA loci may be useful to help improve the precision of the estimates, thus increasing our ability to manage and protect this valuable resource.

  5. The linkage between longitudinal sediment routing systems and basin types in the northern South China Sea in perspective of source-to-sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Ming; Hsiung, Kan-Hsi; Zhang, Cuimei; Xie, Xinong; Yu, Ho-Shing; Wang, Zhenfeng

    2015-11-01

    Using bathymetric and seismic data, this study describes the morpho-sedimentary features in Qiongdongnan basin and southwest Taiwan collision basin, northern South China Sea and reveals the linkages between sediment routing system and basin types. The modern Central Canyon in the Qiongdongnan basin is located along the rift margin, and subparallel to the shelf-break southeast of Hainan Island. The modern Central Canyon develops along the basin axis (i.e., Xisha Trough) and longitudinally transports sediments eastward which are mainly supplied by northern continental slope. The Penghu Canyon in the southwest Taiwan collision basin is located along the collision boundary parallel to the strike of the adjacent uplifted Taiwan orogen. The Penghu Canyon develops along the tilting basin axis transporting sediments longitudinally southward to the deep-sea basin and Manila Trench. The Penghu Canyon is supplied with sediments from both flank Kaoping and South China Sea slopes where tributary canyons and channels transport sediments down-slope and feed the axial canyon. The certain basin types may be occupied by particular styles of sediment routing system. By comparing the morpho-sedimentary features and basin characteristics associated with the modern Central Canyon to that of the Valencia Channel in NW Mediterranean Sea, the longitudinal sediment routing system in rift basin type can be determined. In contrast, the longitudinal sediment routing systems in collision setting can be represented by the comparable examples of Penghu Canyon in southwest Taiwan collision basin and Markham Canyon in western Solomon Sea. The rift type sediment routing system is characterized by an axial canyon with a single sediment supply from land drainage margin. In contrast, sediment routing system in collision type basins consists of an axial canyon and dual sediment supplies from flank adjacent slopes. The axial canyons in collision basins are more active than that of the rift basin due to

  6. Gravity and Magnetotelluric Modeling of the Santo Domingo Basin, Northern New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamudio, K. D.; Keithline, N.; Blum, C.; Cunningham, E.; Fromont, A.; Jorgensen, M.; Lee, R.; McBride, K.; Saez Berrios, P.; Harper, C.; Pellerin, L.; McPhee, D.; Ferguson, J. F.

    2015-12-01

    The Santo Domingo Basin, one of a series of basins within the Rio Grande Rift, is located between Santa Fe and Albuquerque, NM, and has been the focus of research by the Summer of Geophysical Experience (SAGE) program since 2000. Gravity, magnetotelluric (MT), and seismic data have been collected throughout the region, although we are concentrating on gravity and MT data collected during SAGE 2014 and 2015. The study area is located in the center of the Santo Domingo basin, an extensional, Miocene age, rift basin, in an area that was minimally involved in the preceding local Laramide orogenic activity. Rift sediments (~3.5 km thick) are underlain by Eocene age sediments that were shed from adjacent uplifts. Up to 3 km of Mesozoic and Paleozoic sediments are preserved above the Precambrian basement. Geologic outcrop, borehole and seismic reflection data, and known density values were used in the construction of a ~100 km-long, generalized geologic cross section from which a gravity response was calculated. The modeled gravity response makes fairly definitive predictions about the geometry of the basin as well as the stratigraphy and faulting within and bounding the basin. MT data was collected at ten stations within the basin. The MT sounding curves exhibit one-dimensional behavior at short periods (<10 s), not surprisingly considering the relatively flat local structure in the area. Layered-earth MT models, without geologic constraints, show a conductive (<10 ohm-m) layer at ~1.5 km above a more resistive layer (>1000 ohm-m) at ~ 3.5-4 km. Conductivities of the major stratigraphic units have been determined from well logs and previous MT modeling. Forward and inverse MT models constrained by the gravity-modeled geologic cross section are used to develop a conductivity model consistent with the geology, and are a step towards a better unified treatment of MT, seismic and gravity data.

  7. A tectogenetic mechanism controlling the evolution of the Texel-IJsselmeer High (northern Netherlands) and adjacent basins

    SciTech Connect

    Rijkers, R.; Geluk, M. )

    1993-09-01

    Geological studies around the Texel-IJsselmeer High have been carried out for the regional subsurface mapping project of the Geological Survey of The Netherlands. The Texel-IJsselmeer High, in the northern part of the Netherlands, is a northwest-southeast-trending structural unit, slightly tilted to the northeast. The geological evolution of the Texel-IJsselmeer High and the adjacent areas can be linked to an extensional tectonic regime during which several Jurassic basins in the Netherlands originated. During the Late Jurassic, the southern border of the Texel-IJsselmeer High was characterized by normal faulting. Main faults are dipping southwest and are generally part of a half-graben structure. Faulting is accompanied by subsidence of the hanging wall (Jurassic basin area), while the footwall (the Texel-IJsselmeer High) is isostatically uplifted and eroded. The proposed model is based on thinning of the lower crust beneath the basins during Jurassic extension by pure shear. This mechanism is coupled locally with shear zones (simple shear) as a result of lower crustal failure. The model is supported by observations on deep regional seismics at the southern margin of the basin area. During the Late Cretaceous/early Tertiary, transpressional intraplate stresses reactivated the structural weakness zones in the lower and upper crust in a reversed way (inversion). During this tectonic inversion the northwest-southeast-trending Texel-IJsselmeer High acted as a buffer zone perpendicular to the direction of maximum principal stress. Paleogeographical studies and geohistory analysis support the proposed tectogenetic model of the Texel-IJsselmeer High.

  8. Architecture and subsidence history of the intracratonic Hudson Bay Basin, northern Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinet, Nicolas; Lavoie, Denis; Dietrich, Jim; Hu, Kezhen; Keating, Pierre

    2013-10-01

    The Phanerozoic Hudson Bay Basin is a large intracratonic basin that is almost completely encircled by Precambrian rocks of the Canadian Shield. The preserved sedimentary succession is up to 2500 m thick and consists mainly of Upper Ordovician to Upper Devonian limestones, dolostones, evaporites and minor siliciclastics that were deposited in shallow marine conditions. Backstripping, based on new paleontological data and well correlations, reveals an irregular subsidence history marked by several periods of exhumation. In seismic data, the Hudson Bay Basin appears to have a relatively simple geometry, characterized by a lower sedimentary package cut by high-angle faults, overlain by a saucer-shape, essentially underformed upper sedimentary package. Normal (or transtensional) faults imaged on seismic reflection profiles provide clear evidence for crustal extension during deposition of the older sedimentary packages or slightly later, indicating that the basin is, at least partly, extensional in nature. However, significant changes in the depocenter location during the Paleozoic and variable exhumation values required by new maturation data indicate that other mechanisms influenced the subsidence/exhumation history of the basin. In particular, the influence of far-field events and dynamic topography transmitted by large-scale mantle flow in the continental interior (creating long-wavelength tilting and unconformities) is suspected but not yet proven.

  9. Evolution of the Lower Cretaceous Coqen basin in northern Lhasa, central Tibet Plateau: stratigraphy, sedimentology, and detrital zircon geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Gaoyuan; Hu, Xiumian; Sinclair, Hugh; BouDagher-Fadel, Marcelle

    2016-04-01

    potential sources, the Zelong volcanic rocks and the pre-Carboniferous strata within the northern part of the Lhasa terrane are the most possible sources for the Duoni Formation. The evolution of the Early Cretaceous Coqen basin can be indivied into two stags. During Aptian time (~123-115 Ma), the Duoni Formation received materials southward from the Zelong volcanic rocks and the sedimentary basement rocks in the central Lhasa terrane. The basin developed in a retro-arc setting related to the northward subduction of Neo-tethyan oceanic lithosphere, resulting in the occurrence of the Zelong volcanics arc meanwhile. Our data are inconsistent with the foreland basin related to the Lhasa-Qiangtang collision in the north as previous interpreted. During latest Aptian-earliest Cenomanian (~115-98 Ma), the Coqen basin was prevailed by the shallow marine Langshan limestone, developed in a sag basin that developed in the retro side of the Neo-tethyan oceanic lithosphere subduction. The mechinism of this sag basin was the dynamic subsidence resulted from the low-angle or flatted subduction of the Neo-tethyan oceanic lithosphere during this time interval.

  10. A digital resource model of the Upper Pennsylvanian Pittsburgh coal bed, Monongahela Group, northern Appalachian basin coal region, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruppert, L.F.; Tewalt, S.J.; Bragg, L.J.; Wallack, R.N.

    1999-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey is currently conducting a coal resource assessment of the coal beds and zones that are expected to provide the bulk of the Nation's coal resources for the next few decades. The Pittsburgh coal bed is the first bed in the northern and central Appalachian basin coal region to undergo a fully-digital assessment. The bed-specific assessment is being carried out in partnership with the state geologic surveys of West Virginia (WV), Pennsylvania (PA), Ohio (OH), and Maryland (MD). Comprehensive stratigraphic and geochemical databases have been developed for the Pittsburgh coal bed, and areal extent, mined areas, structure contour, isopach, overburden thickness maps of the bed have been released as United States Geological Survey (USGS) Open-File Reports. The resulting resource model indicates that of the original 34 billion short tons (31 billion tonnes) of Pittsburgh coal, 16 billion short tons (14 billion tonnes) remain. Although most of the remaining coal is thinner, deeper, and higher in ash and sulfur (S) than the original resource, there are blocks of extensive thick (6-8 ft or 1.8-2.4 m) coal in southwestern PA and the northern panhandle of WV.The U.S. Geological Survey is currently conducting a coal resource assessment of the coal beds and zones that are expected to provide the bulk of the Nation's coal resources for the next few decades. The Pittsburgh coal bed is the first bed in the northern and central Appalachian basin coal region to undergo a fully-digital assessment. The bed-specific assessment is being carried out in partnership with the state geologic surveys of West Virginia (WV), Pennsylvania (PA), Ohio (OH), and Maryland (MD). Comprehensive stratigraphic and geochemical databases have been developed for the Pittsburgh coal bed, and areal extent, mined areas, structure contour, isopach, overburden thickness maps of the bed have been released as United States Geological Survey (USGS) Open-File Reports. The resulting resource

  11. National Account Energy Alliance Final Report for the Basin Electric Project at Northern Border Pipeline Company's Compressor Station #7, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect

    Sweetzer, Richard; Leslie, Neil

    2008-02-01

    A field research test and verification project was conducted at the recovered energy generation plant at Northern Border Pipeline Company Compressor Station #7 (CS#7) near St. Anthony. Recovered energy generation plant equipment was supplied and installed by ORMAT Technologies, Inc. Basin Electric is purchasing the electricity under a purchase power agreement with an ORMAT subsidiary, which owns and operates the plant.

  12. Recently active reverse faulting in the Atacama Basin area, northern Chile: Implications for the distribution of convergence across the western South America plate boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shyu, J. H.; Gonzalez, G.; Simons, M.; Aron, F.; Veloso, A.

    2007-12-01

    The western South American margin is one of the most active continental plate boundaries in the world. The ongoing convergence between the Nazca plate, or formerly the Farallon plate, and the South American plate produced the wide deformation belt of the Andes. In order to obtain more information about the active deformations in the central Andean belt to better understand the current distribution of convergence across the orogen, we attempted to map major structures that appear to be active recently by their topographic expressions using SRTM DEM and Landsat satellite images, followed by field observations. Results of our mapping show that there are many reverse faults that may be recently active in the area surrounding the Atacama Basin, in the Preandean Depression in northern Chile. These include a series of active reverse faults and related folds at the southeastern corner of the Atacama Basin, a major fold system that may be produced by an underlying fault just east of the basin, and a series of folds that forms the Cordillera de la Sal in the northern and western part of the basin. At the southeastern corner of the Atacama Basin, several geomorphic features indicate that at least some of the structures there have been active quite recently, including small drainages that cut through the folds and form active alluvial fans. Similar features of active river incision across folds are also present in the northern part of the basin. The fold system east of the basin may be one of the most important structures in the area. Deformed lava flows and deflected drainages indicate that this structure has been active recently, and growth strata near the fold suggest that it has been active for several myr. If so, the structure may be a major reverse fault system that defines the eastern boundary of the Atacama Basin, and may thus be an important onland structure that is responsible for absorbing part of the plate convergence.

  13. The northern and central Appalachian basin coal region -- The Upper Freeport and Pond Creek coal bed assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Ruppert, L.; Tewalt, S.; Bragg, L.; Wallack, R.; Freeman, P.; Tully, J.

    1999-07-01

    The Upper Freeport and Pond Creek coal beds are two of six coal beds being assessed by the US Geological Survey (USGS) in the northern and central Appalachian basin coal region. The coal resource assessments were designed to provide up-to-date, concise data on the location, quantity, and quality of US coals for Federal agencies, the public, industry and academia. Assessment products are fully digital and include original and remaining resource estimates; maps depicting areal extent, mined areas, geologic structure contour, isopach, overburden thickness, ash yield, sulfur content, calorific value, and selected trace-element contents; and public domain geochemical and stratigraphic databases. The assessment methodology and a few results are presented.

  14. Magnetic fabrics on syn-diapiric overburden rocks: The Bakio diapir (Basque-Cantabrian basin, Northern Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, Ruth; Beamud, Elisabet; Carola, Eloi; Almar, Ylenia; Roca, Eduard

    2016-04-01

    We present the results of anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) analyses carried out on Aptian-Albian rocks (marls, marly limestones and fine sandstones) from the well-exposed syn-kinematic overburden of the Bakio diapir. The Bakio diapir (Basque-Cantabrian basin, Northern Spain), cored by upper Triassic rocks, presents a NNE-elongated orientation, developed during Lower Cretaceous rifting linked to the Bay of Biscay opening and was after reactivated during the Upper Cretaceous-Miocene Pyrenean compression. Oblate magnetic ellipsoids with a well-defined NNE-oriented magnetic lineation of tectonic origin are found in some sites sampled on the syn-diapiric overburden suggesting the diapiric growth influence on the magnetic fabric acquisition.

  15. Innovative Methodology for Detection of Fracture-Controlled Sweet Spots in the Northern Appalachian Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobi, Rober

    2007-03-31

    This Topical Report (#6 of 9) consists of the figures 3.6-13 to (and including) 3.6-18 (and appropriate figure captions) that accompany the Final Technical Progress Report entitled: "Fracture-Controlled Sweet Spots in the Northern Appalachian Basin” for DOE/NETL Award DE-AC26-00NT40698.

  16. Innovative Methodology For Detection of Fracture-Controlled Sweet Spots in the Northern Appalachian Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobi, Rober

    2007-03-28

    This Topical Report (#6 of 9) consists of the figures 3.6-13 to (and including) 3.6-18 (and appropriate figure captions) that accompany the Final Technical Progress Report entitled: “Innovative Methodology for Detection of Fracture-Controlled Sweet Spots in the Northern Appalachian Basin” for DOE/NETL Award DE-AC26-00NT40698.

  17. Fission track evidence for widespread early to Middle miocene extension in the northern Basin and Range province

    SciTech Connect

    Dumitru, T.; Miller, E.; Savage, C. . Geological Dept.); Gans, P. . Geological Science Dept.); Brown, R. . Geology Dept.)

    1993-04-01

    The northern Basin and Range province has experienced multiple periods of extension but the precise timing and relative importance of the various periods is poorly known. Geologic data in many areas suggest inception of extension was closely tied with the southward sweep in earliest magmatism, which is Eocene in southern Idaho, Oligocene in east-central Nevada, and Miocene in southern Nevada. Ar/Ar ages suggest that extension continued into the Early Miocene in areas such as the Raft River, Albion, Ruby, and Snake Range metamorphic core complexes. Youthful topography and recent faulting have been taken as indicating that faulting leading to present physiography is commonly younger than [approximately]10 Ma. New apatite fission track cooling age and track length data, supplemented by other information, point to the Early to Middle Miocene as an additional time of very significant extension-induced uplift and range formation. Many ranges in a 700-km-long north-south corridor from the Utah-Nevada-Idaho border to southernmost Nevada experience extension and major exhumation in Early to Middle Miocene time. Whether extension of Early to Middle Miocene age is restricted to this corridor or is more widespread is unclear due to the paucity of similar data to the east and west. Reconnaissance apatite ages from the Toiyabe Range and environs (NV) are [approximately]15 Ma and geologic data indicate Early to Middle Miocene extension at Yerington NV (Proffet and Dillis, 1984). Thus, it appears from the available data that the Early to Middle Miocene was an important, and previously little recognized, period of major extension over broad areas of the northern Basin and Range.

  18. New insights into lithology and hydrogeology of the northern Newark Rift Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharova, N. V.; Goldberg, D. S.; Olsen, P. E.; Kent, D. V.; Morgan, S.; Yang, Q.; Stute, M.; Matter, J. M.

    2016-06-01

    The marginal facies of the Triassic rift basins in the eastern United States are poorly documented, particularly on the hinge or hanging wall margins. This study presents a lithological description and multiscale petrophysical analysis of basement rocks, overlying marginal facies of the early synrift strata, and the basal contact of the Palisade Sill that were drilled and cored in the northeastern part of the Newark Basin, near its terminus. The expression of the Stockton Formation differs from that in the central basin in having thinner layers, with uncertain temporal relationship to the type area. The bottom 50 m is lithologically distinct with brick-red to dark-purple mudstones and sandstones, abundant gypsum-filled fractures, and a thin zone with anomalously high uranium concentration, not associated with organic-rich mudstones as other occurrences in the basin. The crystalline basement is apparently Fordham gneiss, overlain by a thin sandstone layer and a dark-purple hydrophilic mudstone. Despite the abundance of coarse-grained strata and multiple sets of tectonic fractures, hydraulically transmissive zones are sparse, and do not uniquely correlate to fracture and/or matrix characteristics. Enhanced transmissivity may exist along intrusion boundaries due to enhanced thermal fracturing, but more hydraulic data are needed to verify it. Comparison of petrophysical data in two boreholes ˜210 m apart shows no direct correlation of individual lithological units and their hydraulic properties, although the overall formation characteristics are similar. The results highlight challenges for outcrop correlation at the marginal edges of the rift basins and estimating reservoir properties of these heterogeneous formations.

  19. Mass transport-dominated sedimentation in a foreland basin, the Hidaka Trough, northern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, Atsushi; TuZino, Taqumi; Joshima, Masato; Goto, Shusaku

    2013-08-01

    Mass transport is an important process of sediment redistribution from shallow to deep sea basins. It is vital to understand this process for disaster prevention and protection of economic interests in coastal and offshore areas. We describe mass transport-dominated sedimentation in an active foreland basin, the Hidaka Trough, which developed from collision between the northeastern Japan arc and the Kuril arc. The basin is deformed by east-west compression associated with large, frequent earthquakes. The trough is filled with thick (>4.5 km) sediments, ranging from coal-bearing Cretaceous terrestrial strata to modern diatomaceous hemipelagic mud and volcanic ash. Bottom-simulating reflectors and the distribution of mud volcanoes, pockmarks, and acoustic wipe-out zones on the seismic records suggest the presence of subsurface gases in the sediments. The basin features stacked mass transport deposits (MTDs), but no channel-levee systems have developed. The MTDs are relatively thin (<30 m) and are derived from three sides of the basin margin. Initiation of submarine slope failure in this area may be controlled by multiple factors that increase driving forces and decrease resistance of the slopes. The driving forces include oversteepening of the margin slope as a resul`t of thrusting and folding, and additional downslope gravitational acceleration caused by cyclic shaking during earthquakes. Decreased resistance in the slopes may be caused by the accumulation of excess pore-water pressure driven by a high-sedimentation rate, gas hydrate dissociation accompanying changes in sea level or seawater temperature, and liquefaction in coarse-grained beds during earthquakes.

  20. Interaction between regional and local tectonic forcing along a complex Quaternary extensional basin: Upper Tiber Valley, Northern Apennines, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pucci, S.; Mirabella, F.; Pazzaglia, F.; Barchi, M. R.; Melelli, L.; Tuccimei, P.; Soligo, M.; Saccucci, L.

    2014-10-01

    In extending areas undergoing regional tectonic uplift, the persistence of subsidence at a normal-fault hanging-wall depends on the competition between regional and local tectonic effects. When regional uplift exceeds the subsidence of the hanging-wall block, denudation prevails at both the hanging-wall and the foot-wall. When local tectonic subsidence exceeds regional uplift, sedimentation occurs over the hanging-wall block, supplied by foot-wall erosion. We analyzed a Pliocene-Quaternary continental basin, currently crossed by the Tiber River in Italy. The tectono-sedimentary evolution of the basin developed at the hanging-wall of a regional low-angle extensional detachment, the Alto Tiberina Fault, in the axial region of the Northern Apennines of Italy. This area is affected by regional uplift on the order of 0.5-1.0 mm/yr. The present-day activity of the fault is revealed by both microseismicity and geodetic (GPS) data. We investigated the mid- (10-100 ka) and long-term (0.5-3.0 Ma) evolution of the three depocenters by studying the continental Pleistocene succession infilling the basin as well as fluvial terraces and higher paleosurfaces carved into the Pleistocene deposits. By using surficial geologic data and an interpretation of a set of seismic reflection profiles, we show that the three depocenters experienced a fairly similar evolution during the Pliocene-Early Pleistocene, when a 1000-m-thick continental succession was deposited. On the contrary, geomorphological observations indicate that, at the beginning of the Middle Pleistocene, a switch occurred in the evolution of the three depocenters. In the northernmost Sansepolcro sub-basin, bounding normal faults are active and hanging-wall subsidence outpaces regional uplift. Concurrently, in the Umbertide and Ponte Pattoli sub-basins uplift dominates over the hanging-wall subsidence, promoting river incision and exhumation of the Pleistocene deposits. For these two depocenters, by means of terrace

  1. Active tectonics of the Atacama Basin area, northern Chile: Implications for distribution of convergence across the central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Yi-Rung; Lin, Yen-Sheng; Shyu, J. Bruce H.

    2013-04-01

    The central Andes in South America is formed as the Nazca plate subducts northeastward beneath the South American plate along the Peru-Chile trench, parallel to the coastline. It has been shown that the convergence rate between the two plates is ~70-80 mm/yr, and about 10-15 mm/yr of the convergence is absorbed in the sub-Andean belt, east of the active volcanic arc. However, the convergence in the forearc region is still not well constrained. In order to understand how much convergence is absorbed in the forearc region, we analyzed the active tectonic characteristics of the Atacama Basin, just west of the active volcanic arc. With the help of various remote sensing datasets such as 30-m and 90-m resolution digital elevation models (DEM) produced from SRTM data, thermal infrared radiometer (TIR) ASTER images, Landsat, and Google Earth images, we identified many N-S trending compressional structures around the Atacama Basin. The active structures are found mainly in the northern and southern part of the basin. The structures in the north deformed many volcanic rocks at the surface, such as ignimbrites and several lava flows. Structures may extend southward to San Pedro de Atacama, the largest town in the Atacama Basin, and produced tectonic scarps inside the town. River terraces also formed in the hanging-wall block of the structures, north of San Pedro. From field surveys, we measured the offset amount of the structures and collected volcanic rocks in order to constrain the age of the deformation. These results enabled us to calculate the long-term deformation rate of the structures. Our results indicate that the long-term slip rate of the structures in the southern part of the basin is quite low, in the order of 10-1 mm/yr. Furthermore, we obtained detailed topographic profiles across the structures. In the south, the profiles were surveyed by using real-time kinematic (RTK) GPS. Together with the attitudes of bedding planes, we constructed the subsurface geometry

  2. High-resolution shallow reflection seismic image and surface evidence of the Upper Tiber Basin active faults (Northern Apennines, Italy)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donne, D.D.; Plccardi, L.; Odum, J.K.; Stephenson, W.J.; Williams, R.A.

    2007-01-01

    Shallow seismic reflection prospecting has been carried out in order to investigate the faults that bound to the southwest and northeast the Quaternary Upper Tiber Basin (Northern Apennines, Italy). On the northeastern margin of the basin a ??? 1 km long reflection seismic profile images a fault segment and the associated up to 100 meters thick sediment wedge. Across the southwestern margin a 0.5 km-long seismic profile images a 50-55??-dipping extensional fault, that projects to the scarp at the base of the range-front, and against which a 100 m thick syn-tectonic sediment wedge has formed. The integration of surface and sub-surface data allows to estimate at least 190 meters of vertical displacement along the fault and a slip rate around 0.25 m/kyr. Southwestern fault might also be interpreted as the main splay structure of regional Alto Tiberina extensional fault. At last, the 1917 Monterchi earthquake (Imax=X, Boschi et alii, 2000) is correlable with an activation of the southwestern fault, and thus suggesting the seismogenic character of this latter.

  3. A Systematic Regional Trend in Helium Isotopes Across the NorthernBasin and Range Province, Western North America

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, B. Mack; van Soest, Matthijs C.

    2005-03-22

    An extensive study of helium isotopes in fluids collectedfrom surface springs, fumaroles and wells across the northern Basin andRange Province reveals a systematic trend of decreasing 3He/4He ratiosfrom west to east. The western margin of the Basin and Range ischaracterized by mantle-like ratios (6-8 Ra) associated with active orrecently active crustal magma systems (e.g. Coso, Long Valley, Steamboat,and the Cascade volcanic complex). Moving towards the east, the ratiosdecline systematically to a background value of ~;0.1 Ra. The regionaltrend is consistent with extensive mantle melting concentrated along thewestern margin and is coincident with an east-to-west increase in themagnitude of northwest strain. The increase in shear strain enhancescrustal permeability resulting in high vertical fluid flow rates thatpreserve the high helium isotope ratios at the surface. Superimposed onthe regional trend are "helium spikes", local anomalies in the heliumisotope composition. These "spikes" reflect either local zones of mantlemelting or locally enhanced crustal permeability. In the case of theDixie Valley hydrothermal system, it appears to be a combination ofboth.

  4. Enigmatic uppermost Permian-lowermost Triassic stratigraphic relations in the northern Bighorn basin of Wyoming and Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Paull, R.A.; Paull, R.K. )

    1991-06-01

    Eighteen measured sections in the northern Bighorn basin of Wyoming and Montana provide the basis for an analysis of Permian-Triassic stratigraphic relations. This boundary is well defined to the south where gray calcareous siltstones of the Lower Triassic Dinwoody disconformably overlie the Upper Permian Ervay Member of the Park City Formation with little physical evidence of a significant hiatus. The Dinwoody is gradationally overlain by red beds of the Red Peak Formation. The Dinwoody this to zero near the state line. Northward, the erathem boundary is enigmatic because fossils are absent and there is no evidence of an unconformity. Poor and discontinuous exposures contribute to the problem. Up to 20 m of Permian or Triassic rocks or both overlie the Pennsylvanian Tensleep Sandstone in the westernmost surface exposures on the eastern flank of the Bighorn basin with physical evidence of an unconformity. East of the exposed Tensleep, Ervay-like carbonates are overlain by about 15 m of Dinwoody-like siltstones interbedded with red beds and thin dolomitic limestone. In both areas, they are overlain by the Red Peak Formation. Thin carbonates within the Dinwoody are silty, coarse algal laminates with associated peloidal micrite. Carbonates north of the Dinwoody termination and above probably Ervay are peloidal algal laminates with fenestral fabric and sparse coated shell fragments with pisoids. These rocks may be Dinwoody equivalents or they may be of younger Permian age than the Ervay. Regardless, revision of stratigraphic nomenclature in this area may bed required.

  5. Flood-tracking chart for the Withlacoochee and Little River Basins in south-central Georgia and northern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gotvald, Anthony J.; McCallum, Brian E.; Painter, Jaime A.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with other Federal, State, and local agencies, operates a flood-monitoring system in the Withlacoochee and Little River Basins. This system is a network of automated river stage stations (ten are shown on page 2 of this publication) that transmit stage data through satellite telemetry to the USGS in Atlanta, Georgia and the National Weather Service (NWS) in Peachtree City, Georgia. During floods, the public and emergency response agencies use this information to make decisions about road closures, evacuations, and other public safety issues. This Withlacoochee and Little River Basins flood-tracking chart can be used by local citizens and emergency response personnel to record the latest river stage and predicted flood-crest information along the Withlacoochee River, Little River, and Okapilco Creek in south-central Georgia and northern Florida. By comparing the current stage (water-surface level above a datum) and predicted flood crest to the recorded peak stages of previous floods, emergency response personnel and residents can make informed decisions concerning the threat to life and property.

  6. Age and tectonic significance of volcanic rocks in the northern Los Angeles Basin, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCulloh, Thane H.; Fleck, Robert J.; Denison, Rodger E.; Beyer, Larry A.; Stanley, Richard G.

    2002-01-01

    Volcanic rocks, mostly basalts and some andesites, are interbedded with middle Miocene strata and are overlain by younger rocks throughout the greater part of the Los Angeles Basin, California. Roughly correlative flows, previously dated radiometrically (or paleontologically) at about 16.4 to 10.7 Ma, crop out in five separate regions around the basin perimeter. Los Angeles Basin volcanic rocks have special meaning because they offer clues to tectonomagmatic events associated with onset of clockwise transrotation of the western Transverse Ranges region and to the timing and locus of the initial basin opening. Whole-rock 40Ar/39Ar dating of near-tholeiitic olivine basalts of the Topanga Formation (Hoots, 1931) from three sites in the easternmost Santa Monica Mountains, combined with 87Sr/86Sr dating of fossil carbonates from interstratified marine beds at nine sites, establish a new age of 17.4 Ma for these oldest known Topanga-age volcanics of the Los Angeles Basin. We also record three new 40Ar/39Ar ages (15.3 Ma) from andesitic flows of the lower Glendora Volcanics at the northeast edge of the basin, 70 km east of the Santa Monica Mountains. A whole-rock determination of 17.2±0.5 Ma for nearby altered olivine basalt in the unfossiliferous Glendora volcanic sequence is questionable because of a complex 40Ar/39Ar age spectrum suggestive of 39Ar recoil, but it may indicate an older volcanic unit in this eastern area. We hypothesize that the 17.4-Ma volcanics in the eastern Santa Monica Mountains are an early expression of deep crustal magmatism accompanying the earliest extensional tectonism associated with rifting. The extremely thick younger volcanic pile in the western and central parts of the range may suggest that this early igneous activity in the eastern area was premonitory. Paleomagnetic declination data are needed to determine the pre-transrotational orientation of the eastern Santa Monica Mountains volcanic sequence. The new age determinations do not

  7. Bathymetric characterization of tectonically active basins in the northern Gulf of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prol-Ledesma, R. M.; Canet, C.; Dando, P. R.

    2009-04-01

    The Wagner Basin can be considered a "nascent spreading centre" that evolved from a half graben with a thick sediment cover that may mask magmatic activity at depth. The 200-210 m deep Wagner and Consag Basins are the northernmost of the 8 active extensional basins within the Gulf of California rift system and have been assumed to be mostly hydrothermally inactive; however, bathymetric data show dense deep faulting, mainly on the SE edge of the basins; additionally, the presence of extensive gas venting and heated sediments along the Wagner Fault was observed. Detailed bathymetry of the Wagner and Consag Basins shows the steep eastern edge of the basins bordered by the Wagner Fault. Bathymetry and profiler data revealed large vertical displacements due to faulting that disrupted the sedimentary column. More than 246 bubble plumes were mapped on the echo-sounder profiles, many rising to the surface from 65 -150 m depth and the area affected by low bottom pH, due to CO2 discharge, was in excess of 365 km2. Bubbles were observed breaking the sea surface from some large plumes. Only a minority of the vents present were mapped with the echo-sounders, since the closest survey lines were 1km apart. Based on the bottom coverage of the acoustic beam we estimate that there are at least 15,000 individual gas vents along the Wagner fault. Profiler images showed gas channels and chimneys associated with sedimentary layers. The gas plumes originated from sites of intense disruptions of the upper sediments (synsedimentary faults, pockmarks, mud domes and diapirs and raised irregular hard reflectors). Beneath the plumes, there were enhanced sedimentary reflectors and acoustic blanking indicative of subsurface gas accumulation. One of the strongest vents was associated with a mud diapir. Cemented sediments were common inside pockmarks and around gas outlets; 13 (22%) of grab and box core samples in the outgassing area contained these but in many cases the grab was empty after

  8. Geohydrologic feasibility study of the Northern and Central Appalachian basin areas for the potential application of a production process patented by Jack W. McIntyre

    SciTech Connect

    Kvasnicka, D.

    1994-03-01

    Geraghty & Miller, Inc. of Midland, Texas conducted geologic and hydrologic feasibility studies of the potential applicability of a patented (US Patent Office No. 4,766,957) process developed by Jack W. McIntyre for the recovery of natural gas from coalbed/sand formations in the Northern and Central Appalachian basin areas. General research, based on a review of published literature from both public and private sources, indicates that the generally thin, but numerous coalbeds found in the greater Appalachian Basin area do exhibit some potential for the application of this patented process. Estimates of total gas reserves in-place (Gas Research Institute, July 1991) for coalbeds in the Central and Northern Appalachian Basin areas are 5 trillion cubic feet (TCF) and 61 TCF respectively. Produced waters associated with coal deposits in the greater Appalachian Basin area can be characterized on the basis of established but limited production of coalbed methane. Central Appalachian coals generally produce small quantities of water (less than 50 barrels of water per day for the average producing well) which is high in total dissolved solids (TDS), greater than 30,000 parts per million (ppM). The chemical quality of water produced from these coal seams represents a significant disposal challenge to the operators of methane-producing wells in the Central Appalachian Basin. By contrast, water associated with the production of coalbed methane in the Northern Appalachian Basin is generally fair to good quality, and daily production volumes are low. However, the relatively slow desorption of methane gas from Northern Appalachian coals may result in a greater net volume of produced water over the economic life of the well. The well operator must respond to long-term disposal needs.

  9. Selected hydrologic data from the vicinity of Rayburns and Vacherie salt domes, northern Louisiana salt-dome basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryals, G.N.; Hosman, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is considering salt domes in northern Louisiana as possible sites for storage of nuclear waste. As part of this National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) Program, the U.S. Geological Survey is conducting a regional study of the geohydrology of the northern Louisiana salt-dome basin. Field studies involving the collection of data began in 1977. Data-collection networks were established for both ground- and surface- water sources, primarily in the vicinity of two salt domes, Rayburns and Vacherie. Groundwater data collection involved measuring water levels and sampling existing production wells and test wells drilled by the Louisiana State University for Environmental Studies. Samples were analyzed for one or more of the following categories of chemical constituents: inorganic, trace metal, and radiochemical. A network of surface-water stations was set up for measuring discharge and collecting periodic samples. Initial sampling was for analysis for inorganic chemical constituents and radioactive elements. Subsequent sampling has been for inorganic chemical constituents. (USGS)

  10. Spatial assessment and source identification of trace metal pollution in stream sediments of Oued El Maadene basin, northern Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Ayari, J; Agnan, Y; Charef, A

    2016-07-01

    An extensive spatial survey was conducted on trace metal content in stream sediments from Oued El Maadene basin, northern Tunisia. Our objectives were to evaluate the level of trace metal pollution and associated ecological risk and identify the major sources of metal pollution. A total of 116 stream sediment samples were collected and analysed for total As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, V, Zn, and Zr concentrations. The results showed that concentrations of Cr, Ni, V, and Zr were close to natural levels. In contrast, As, Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn had elevated concentrations and enrichment factors compared to other contaminated regions in northern Tunisia. Ecological risk to aquatic ecosystems was highlighted in most areas. Principal component analysis showed that Cr, Ni, V, and Zr mainly derived from local soil and bedrock weathering, whilst As, Cd, Pb, and Zn originated from mining wastes. Trace metals could be dispersed downstream of tailings, possibly due to surface runoff during the short rainy season. Surprisingly, Cu, and to a lesser extent As, originated from agricultural activities, related to application of Cu-based fungicides in former vineyards and orchards. This study showed that, despite the complete cessation of mining activities several decades ago, metal pollution still impacts the local environment. This large pollution, however, did not mask other additional sources, such as local agricultural applications of fungicides. PMID:27270485

  11. Technique for the long-term projections of water balance components for northern river basins of Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, Yeugeniy; Nasonova, Olga

    2014-05-01

    The goal of the present work is a development of a technique for a long-term projection of changes in water resources of northern rivers of Russia caused by climate change. The technique is based on the land surface model SWAP and information on the land surface parameters taken from global data sets. SWAP is a physically-based model. A good accuracy of simulating different characteristics of the water and energy regimes under different conditions and on different spatial scales was confirmed by numerous validation of the model against measured data. As a result, it was concluded that SWAP can be a good tool for simulation of water balance components for various river basins both for the current climatic conditions and for the future ones. The northern river basins of Russia are covered with a sparse network of meteorological stations and poorly provided with land surface parameters. The latter was overcome by application of global data sets on land surface characteristics. Evidently, that direct application of such information leads to a low accuracy of model simulations. To improve the quality of river runoff modeling the main land surface parameters were calibrated using the SCE-UA algorithm and river runoff measurements. Optimization of model parameters has significantly improved the agreement between measured and simulated streamflow of northern rivers. The Nash-Satcliffe efficiency for the modeled daily streamflow varied from 0.70 to 0.85 and the absolute bias values reached 1-10 %. That allowed us to use the SWAP model for hydrological projections. In order to make sure that the land surface parameters, obtained for the modern period, remain valid in projection periods, the following investigation was carried out. For the Northern Dvina River, model transposability in time under contracted climate conditions was analyzed. In so doing, model calibration and validation was performed for contrasted climatic conditions in terms of temperature and precipitation

  12. The geology of Northern Sabah, Malaysia: Its relationship to the opening of the South China Sea Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tongkul, F.

    1994-07-01

    The northern part of Sabah, consisting of sedimentary and igneous rocks of Early Cretaceous to Pliocene age, has experienced three major episodes of deformation associated with NW-SE and N-S oriented compressions. The earliest episode deformed and uplifted an oceanic basement (Chert-Spilite Formation) to form an elongate basin, trending approximately NE-SW, during the Late Cretaceous to Early Eocene. This elongate basin became the site for the deposition of middle Eocene to Early Miocene quartzose sediments of the Crocker and Kudat formations, sourced from continental basement towards the southwest and north, respectively. These sediments were subsequently deformed by a second episode of deformation associated with NW-SE and N-S oriented compressions, during the latter part of the late Oligocene and the early Middle Miocene, to form a series of imbricate thrust slices. The N-S trending compressive direction controlled the development of approximately E-W trending basins during the deposition of the Upper Miocene sediments of the South Banggi and Bongaya formations. The continuation of N-S compression, which represents the third episode of deformation, gently deformed these sediments. The three episodes of deformation were related to the differential southward movements of continental blocks separated from the southern margin of China during the intermittent opening of the South China Sea subbasins. The first episode was related to the opening of the Southwest Subbasin, while the second episode was related to both the opening of the Southwest and East subbasins. The third episode was related to continued opening in the East Subbasins.

  13. The tectonic evolution of the Transbrasiliano Lineament in northern Paraná Basin, Brazil, as inferred from aeromagnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curto, Julia B.; Vidotti, Roberta M.; Fuck, Reinhardt A.; Blakely, Richard J.; Alvarenga, Carlos J. S.; Dantas, Elton L.

    2014-03-01

    Data from six airborne magnetic surveys were compiled and analyzed to develop a structural interpretation for the Transbrasiliano Lineament in northern Paraná Basin, Brazil. Magnetic lineaments, interpreted to reflect geologic contacts and structures at different depths, were illuminated using the matched-filter technique applied to aeromagnetic anomalies. Field-based structural measurements generally support our magnetic analysis. We estimated three primary magnetic zones: (i) a zone of deep magnetic sources at 20 km depth, (ii) an intermediate basement zone at 6 km depth, and (iii) a shallow zone of near-surface geological features at 1.5 km depth. The deepest zone exhibits three major NE trending crustal discontinuities related to the Transbrasiliano Lineament, dividing the region into four geotectonic blocks. Anomalies associated with the intermediate zone indicate directional divergence of subsidiary structures away from the main Transbrasiliano Fault, which strikes N30°E. The shallow magnetic zone includes near-surface post-Brasiliano orogenic granites. Our analysis identified NE trending sigmoidal lineaments around these intrusions, indicating intense zones of deformation associated with probable shear structures. At the shallow depth zone, magnetic anomalies caused by Cretaceous alkaline intrusive bodies and basalts of the Serra Geral Formation are enhanced by the matched-filter method. These igneous bodies are related to extensional NW striking lineaments and seismicity aligned along these lineaments suggests that they currently are reactivated. Prior to flexural subsidence of the Paraná Basin, reactivation processes along transcurrent elements of the Transbrasiliano Lineament promoted extensional processes and formed initial Paraná Basin depocenters. Cretaceous and more recent sedimentation also correlate with reactivations of NE striking structures.

  14. Subsurface images of the northern Newark basin, New York, USA and their implications for carbon sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, P. E.; Withjack, M. O.; Schlische, R. W.; Goldberg, D.; Kent, D. V.; Tamulonis, K.; Couëslan, M.; Collins, D. J.

    2011-12-01

    The Triassic-Jurassic Newark rift, a large onshore sedimentary basin close to northeast US metropolitan areas, may have potential for safe geological storage of CO2 in a suitably deep formation overlain by appropriate confining units. Filled with continental synrift sedimentary rocks and CAMP (Central Atlantic Magmatic Province) basaltic intrusions and flows, the basin is bounded on the NW by the NE-striking, SE-dipping Ramapo fault. Funded by the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory's (NETL) Carbon Sequestration Program's portion of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) and NYSERDA, the TriCarb Consortium for Carbon Sequestration acquired two seismic-reflection profiles in Rockland County, NY that were processed to obtain depth-migrated images of the basin's subsurface geometry. The E-trending dip profile crosses most of the basin, while the shorter N-trending profile provides a strike-view. Five seismic facies are present: (1) shallow continuous, closely spaced, W-dipping reflections suggestive of lacustrine deposits; (2) short, non-coherent reflections suggestive of conglomeritic fluvial strata; (3) high-amplitude parallel reflections, locally exhibiting reverse separation, suggestive of prerift early Paleozoic strata Cambro-Ordovician carbonates; (4) a facies at the bottom of both lines and the western end of the ESE-trending line that lacks reflections, suggestive of prerift metamorphic rocks such as Precambrian gneiss, and/or highly deformed Taconic (Ordovician) phyllites; and (5) a seismically transparent band commonly bounded by high-amplitude reflections that cuts across the stratigraphy of facies 1-3, suggestive of a scoop-shaped intrusive diabase sheet that projects to the surface to outcrops of the CAMP-related Palisade sill. Basin geometry is well-imaged conforming to a deeply eroded half graben. Reflections of facies 3 are truncated by facies 2 marking the angular pre-rift unconformity. Distinct

  15. Hydrologic effects of pumpage from the Denver basin bedrock aquifers of northern El Paso County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Banta, E.R.

    1989-01-01

    The Denver groundwater basin underlies a 6,700 sq-mi area in eastern Colorado. To assess current conditions of the four bedrock aquifers in the basin, water levels, streamflow gain and loss, and other data were collected. Current aquifer conditions in the southern part of the basin and likely response to various 100-year pumping scenarios were analyzed using a digital finite-difference model. Simulated predevelopment flow through the bedrock aquifers was about 59 cu ft/sec. Water level changes between 1978 and 1985, likely caused by variations in precipitation and in pumping and by lowering of the water table in the overlying Black Squirrel Creek alluvial aquifer, ranged from rises of more than 40 ft to declines of as much as 80 ft. In 1985, pumping from the bedrock aquifers was about 56 cu ft/sec. Simulations indicate that 43% of the pumpage came from a decrease in volume of groundwater in storage; 37% came from induced recharge and captured discharge. The remaining 20% came from a transient high rate of recharge from precipitation. A baseline 100-yr simulation, beginning in 1985, indicated minimal drawdowns for constant pumping at 1985 rates in the southern part of the basin. Other simulations indicated that the pumpage required to supply the needs of the projected population would be accompanied by drawdowns of as much as 1,300 ft and by large decreases in amount of groundwater in storage. Pumpage from a hypothetical well field, located where the aquifers are thickest , and from the aquifers underlying Colorado Springs also was simulated. (USGS)

  16. Carbonate and lignite cycles in the Ptolemais Basin: Orbital control and suborbital variability (Late Neogene, northern Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, M. E.; Tougiannidis, N.; Ricken, W.; Rolf, C.; Kleineder, M.; Bertram, N.; Antoniadis, P.

    2009-04-01

    We recently commenced a project to investigate deep drillings as well as outcrops in the Ptolemais Basin, northern Greece, for paleoenvironmental and paleoclimate change. Specific attention is paid to mining sites Achlada, Vevi, Vegora, Amynteon, North Field, South Field, and Lava. The sediment archive comprises Upper Miocene to Quaternary continental lake deposits (up to 800 m thick) with an extended Lower Pliocene section. The Upper Miocene sections are composed of diatomaceous mud and gray marls. Pliocene lake sediments commence with the Kyrio member (lignite/grey marl), followed by the Theodoxus member (beige marl/lignite), and the Notio member (marl with intercalated sand /lignite). The limnic deposits show striking rhythmic bedding of (mostly) carbonates and lignites, reflecting orbital-induced humidity and temperature changes in this small NW-SE elongated continental basin. First, we retrieved chronometric information by determining magnetic polarity changes on three sites as independent stratigraphic ground-truth in combination with palynological evidence and published data. Then we conducted a number of high-resolution (1 - 6 cm increment), non-destructive measurements to obtain paleoclimate proxies: photospectrometry (colors L, a, b), magnetic susceptibility, and natural gamma. Accordingly, we achieved a multi-proxy insight into paleoclimate and paleoenvironmental evolution at unprecedented temporal resolution (up to a few decades!) over long time series and at a number of key sites. Using the newly-developed ESALab software, we conducted spectral and evolutionary spectral analysis to evaluate the cyclo-stratigraphic development. As for orbital variability, spectral power is concentrated on precession, hemi-precession, and eccentricity, with only minor impact of orbital tilt. We used this information to increase the temporal resolution of our age models by tuning as many precession (insolation) maxima as possible to carbonate minima (lignite maxima

  17. Temporal and spatial distribution of landslides in the Redwood Creek Basin, Northern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madej, Mary Ann; Medley, C. Nicholas; Patterson, Glenn; Parker, Melanie J.

    2011-01-01

    Mass movement processes are a dominant means of supplying sediment to mountainous rivers of north coastal California, but the episodic nature of landslides represents a challenge to interpreting patterns of slope instability. This study compares two major landslide events occurring in 1964-1975 and in 1997 in the Redwood Creek basin in north coastal California. In 1997, a moderate-intensity, long-duration storm with high antecedent precipitation triggered 317 landslides with areas greater than 400 m2 in the 720-km2 Redwood Creek basin. The intensity-duration threshold for landslide initiation in 1997 was consistent with previously published values. Aerial photographs (1:6,000 scale) taken a few months after the 1997 storm facilitated the mapping of shallow debris slides, debris flows, and bank failures. The magnitude and location of the 1997 landslides were compared to the distributions of landslides generated by larger floods in 1964, 1972, and 1975. The volume of landslide material produced by the 1997 storm was an order of magnitude less than that generated in the earlier period. During both periods, inner gorge hillslopes produced many landslides, but the relative contribution of tributary basins to overall landslide production differed. Slope stability models can help identify areas susceptible to failure. The 22 percent of the watershed area classified as moderately to highly unstable by the SHALSTAB slope stability model included locations that generated almost 90 percent of the landslide volume during the 1997 storm.

  18. Hydrogeochemical studies of historical mining areas in the Humboldt River basin and adjacent areas, northern Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nash, J. Thomas

    2005-01-01

    The study area comprises the Humboldt River Basin and adjacent areas, with emphasis on mining areas relatively close to the Humboldt River. The basin comprises about 16,840 mi2 or 10,800,000 acres. The mineral resources of the Humboldt Basin have been investigated by many scientists over the past 100 years, but only recently has our knowledge of regional geology and mine geology been applied to the understanding and evaluation of mining effects on water and environmental quality. The investigations reported here apply some of the techniques and perspectives developed in the Abandoned Mine Lands Initiative (AMLI) of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), a program of integrated geological-hydrological-biological-chemical studies underway in the Upper Animas River watershed in Colorado and the Boulder River watershed in, Montana. The goal of my studies of sites and districts is to determine the character of mining-related contamination that is actively or potentially a threat to water quality and to estimate the potential for natural attenuation of that contamination. These geology-based studies and recommendations differ in matters of emphasis and data collection from the biology-based assessments that are the cornerstone of environmental regulations.

  19. Water resources: the prerequisite for ecological restoration of rivers in the Hai River Basin, northern China.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wenzhong; Mao, Zhanpo; Zhang, Hong; Shan, Baoqing; Zhao, Yu; Ding, Yuekui

    2015-01-01

    The competition for water resources between humans and river ecosystems is becoming ever more intense worldwide, especially in developing countries. In China, with rapid socioeconomic development, water resources to maintain river ecosystems are progressively decreasing, especially in the Hai River Basin (HRB), which has attracted much attention from the Chinese government. In the past 56 years, water resources have continuously decreased in the basin, such that there is 54.2 % less surface water now compared with then. Water shortages, mainly due to local anthropogenic activities, have emerged as the main limiting factor to river ecological restoration in the HRB. However, the South-to-North Water Diversion Project, the largest such project in the world, presents a good opportunity for ecological restoration of rivers in this basin. Water diverted from the Danjiangkou Reservoir will restore surface water resources in the HRB to levels of 30 years ago and will amount to more than 20 billion m(3). Our findings highlight the fact that water resources are crucial for river ecological restoration.

  20. Heavy Metal Accumulation by Periphyton Is Related to Eutrophication in the Hai River Basin, Northern China

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Wenzhong; Cui, Jingguo; Shan, Baoqing; Wang, Chao; Zhang, Wenqiang

    2014-01-01

    The Hai River Basin (HRB) is one of the most polluted river basins in China. The basin suffers from various types of pollutants including heavy metals and nutrients due to a high population density and rapid economic development in this area. We assessed the relationship between heavy metal accumulation by periphyton playing an important role in fluvial food webs and eutrophication in the HRB. The concentrations of the unicellular diatoms (type A), filamentous algae with diatoms (type B), and filamentous algae (type C) varied along the river, with type A dominating upstream, and types B then C increasing in concentration further downstream, and this was consistent with changes in the trophic status of the river. The mean heavy metal concentrations in the type A, B and C organisms were Cr: 18, 18 and 24 mg/kg, respectively, Ni: 9.2, 10 and 12 mg/kg, respectively, Cu: 8.4, 19 and 29 mg/kg, respectively, and Pb: 11, 9.8 and 7.1 mg/kg respectively. The bioconcentration factors showed that the abilities of the organisms to accumulate Cr, Ni and Pb decreased in the order type A, type B, then type C, but their abilities to accumulate Cu increased in that order. The Ni concentration was a good predictor of Cr, Cu and Pb accumulation by all three periphyton types. Our study shows that heavy metal accumulation by periphyton is associated with eutrophication in the rivers in the HRB. PMID:24482681

  1. Heavy metal accumulation by periphyton is related to eutrophication in the Hai River Basin, Northern China.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wenzhong; Cui, Jingguo; Shan, Baoqing; Wang, Chao; Zhang, Wenqiang

    2014-01-01

    The Hai River Basin (HRB) is one of the most polluted river basins in China. The basin suffers from various types of pollutants including heavy metals and nutrients due to a high population density and rapid economic development in this area. We assessed the relationship between heavy metal accumulation by periphyton playing an important role in fluvial food webs and eutrophication in the HRB. The concentrations of the unicellular diatoms (type A), filamentous algae with diatoms (type B), and filamentous algae (type C) varied along the river, with type A dominating upstream, and types B then C increasing in concentration further downstream, and this was consistent with changes in the trophic status of the river. The mean heavy metal concentrations in the type A, B and C organisms were Cr: 18, 18 and 24 mg/kg, respectively, Ni: 9.2, 10 and 12 mg/kg, respectively, Cu: 8.4, 19 and 29 mg/kg, respectively, and Pb: 11, 9.8 and 7.1 mg/kg respectively. The bioconcentration factors showed that the abilities of the organisms to accumulate Cr, Ni and Pb decreased in the order type A, type B, then type C, but their abilities to accumulate Cu increased in that order. The Ni concentration was a good predictor of Cr, Cu and Pb accumulation by all three periphyton types. Our study shows that heavy metal accumulation by periphyton is associated with eutrophication in the rivers in the HRB.

  2. Timing of Cenozoic volcanism and Basin and Range extension in northwestern Nevada: New constraints from the northern Pine Forest Range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colgan, J.P.; Dumitru, T.A.; McWilliams, M.; Miller, E.L.

    2006-01-01

    Eocene-middle Miocene volcanic rocks in the northern Pine Forest Range, Nevada, are ideally situated for reconstructing the timing and style of volcanism and extensional faulting in the northwesternmost part of the Basin and Range province. A conformable sequence of Cenozoic volcanic and sedimentary strata in the northern Pine Forest Range dips ???30??W, and 11 new 40Ar/39Ar ages from this sequence define 3 major episodes of volcanic activity. Pre-Tertiary basement and older (ca. 38 Ma) Tertiary intrusive rocks are overlain unconformably by Oligocene (ca. 30-23 Ma) basalt flows and dacitic to rhyolitic ash-flow tuffs interbedded with fine-grained tuffaceous sedimentary rocks. Oligocene rocks are overlain by ???550 m of ca. 17-16 Ma basalt flows equivalent to the Steens Basalt in southern Oregon, and basalt flows are capped by a thin 16.3 Ma ignimbrite that likely is correlative with either the Idaho Canyon Tuff or the Tuff of Oregon Canyon. The northern Pine Forest Range is bounded to the east by a major down-to-the-east normal fault that dips ???40??E with well-developed fault striations indicative of dip-slip motion. This fault initiated at an angle of ???70?? and was rotated ???30?? during uplift of the range. A suite of 17 apatite fission-track ages from the Pine Forest footwall block demonstrates that exhumation, uplift, and slip on the range-bounding fault began ca. 12-11 Ma and continued until at least 7 Ma, with moderate slip since then. The Pine Forest Range did not undergo significant extension before or during peak Oligocene and Miocene volcanism, and similar geologic relationships in nearby ranges suggest that a larger region of northwestern Nevada was also little extended during this interval. Basin and Range faulting in northwestern Nevada appears to have begun no earlier than 12 Ma, making it distinctly younger than deformation in much of central and southern Nevada, where peak extension occurred in the middle Miocene or earlier. ?? 2006 Geological

  3. Mid-Pleistocene to present stratigraphic responses in a tectonically-driven depositional setting: Eel River Basin, Northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, Robert Lawrence

    The Eel River Basin of northern California is an actively deforming forearc basin, affected today by Gorda-North America Plate convergence, northward migration of the Mendocino Triple Junction, glacioeustatic sea-level fluctuations that periodically exposed the continental shelf, and high rates of sediment input. A high-resolution multichannel seismic reflection survey of the shelf and upper slope has been conducted as part of the Office of Naval Research STRATAFORM initiative, with the goal of understanding processes affecting sediment dispersal and preservation in this complex continental margin setting. Interpretations of the seismic images indicate that, although tectonism strongly overprints preserved sequence morphologies, glacioeustacy is of primary importance in the distribution and preservation of sediments along this margin. On the shelf, stacked sequences dominated by interpreted highstand marine sediment are separated by prominent ravinement surfaces formed during sea-level transgressions. Folding and faulting locally modify sequence morphologies. At the south end of the seismic grid, localized uplift attributed to Mendocino Triple Junction encroachment overrides the glacioeustatic stacking pattern dominant over the rest of the shelf, inducing shelf incision and preferential preservation of vertically stacked channel-fills. An abrupt shift in shelf sequence morphology ˜500 ka suggests that the triple junction began to affect the southern basin at that time, by decreasing accommodation space marginwide. On the adjacent slope, effects of tectonism and glacioeustacy can also be discerned. In the south, the Humboldt Slide is identified as a long-lived masswasting feature, likely triggered by triple junction-related uplift and associated seismicity ˜450--500 ka. However, a cyclical succession of contrasting lithologies is also apparent in the deformed slide sequences, which I attribute to glacioeustatic cyclicity. To the north, effects of regional

  4. Late Cenozoic pollen records and paleoclimate in the western Qaidam Basin, Northern Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Y. F. Miao1, X. M. Fang2*, F. L. Wu2, M. T. Cai2, C. H. Song3, Q. Q. Meng3 1 Key Laboratory of Desert and Desertification, Cold and Arid Regions Environmental and Engineering Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou, 730000, China 2 Key Laboratory of Continental Collision and Plateau Uplift, Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100085, China 3 School of Earth Science, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, 730000, China * Corresponding author, E-mail address: fangxm@itpcas.ac.cn (X.M. Fang). Abstract: Cenozoic climate changes in inner Asia provide a basis for understanding linkages between global cooling, the Tibetan Plateau uplift, and possibly the development of the East Asian monsoon. Based on a compilation of palynological results from the western Qaidam Basin, this study reconstructed a 15 million years (Ma) record of changing vegetation and paleoclimates spanning the middle Miocene to present (comprising two series: ~18-5 Ma and ~3.1-0 Ma, respectively). The thermophilic percentages were highest between 18 and 14 Ma, and decreased after 14 Ma, closely corresponding to the Middle Miocene Climatic Optimum (MMCO) between 18 and 14 Ma and the following global climatic cooling between 14 and 5 Ma. At the same time, decreases in the xerophytic and coniferous taxa percentages, and the increasing logarithmic ratio of non-arboreal pollen to arboreal pollen (ln (NAP/AP)), reveal the continuous aridification across both the basin and surrounding mountains. Between ~3.1-0 Ma, the percentages of the thermophilic, xerophytic and coniferous pollen as well as the ln (NAP/AP) imply further cooling and drying in this region since 3.1 Ma. We argue that these vegetation and climate patterns during the late Cenozoic western Qaidam Basin are primarily a result of the global cooling, with the Tibetan Plateau uplift and East Asian summer monsoon having contributions of lesser importance.

  5. Study of Ground-Water Recharge Rates in the Northern Powder River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healy, R. W.; Bartos, T. T.

    2003-12-01

    Coal-bed methane (CBM) production in the Powder River Basin is growing rapidly. The Bureau of Land Management estimates that by the year 2010 there may be as many as 50,000 producing wells in the Wyoming part of the Basin alone. Development of CBM requires the pumping of water from coal seams. As water pressure in the seam is lowered, methane is released from storage. The pumped water is usually discharged into streams, channels, or impoundments. With a typical well producing about 48 cubic meters of water per day, the rate of discharge for the Basin could exceed 2.4 million cubic meters per day by 2010. The fate of that water and its impact on the environment are topics of some concern. Relevant issues include the rate at which water infiltrates and percolates to the water table, the eventual discharge of infiltrated water to surface water, and chemical changes that occur as water moves through the system. An adequate understanding of these issues requires knowledge of local and regional hydrology. This study is investigating rates of ground-water recharge under natural conditions and as impacted be CBM development. Natural recharge within the Powder River Basin occurs by both diffuse mechanisms (infiltration of precipitation and subsequent travel of water through the unsaturated zone to the water table) and focused mechanisms (infiltration from line and point sources, such as streams and ponds). Under natural conditions, the relative importance of each is difficult to assess. Discharged CBM water should substantially enhance the rate of focused recharge, with less effect expected on diffuse recharge. Objectives of this study are to estimate rates of diffuse recharge, naturally occurring focused recharge, and enhanced focused recharge due to the discharge of CBM water. Multiple approaches are being employed: chloride mass balance; tracer methods based on tritium, stable isotopes, and other compounds; Darcy/unit hydraulic gradient; water budget; water

  6. Transpression, transtension and reactivation during basin evolution: a case study from northern Scotland and Orkney

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dichiarante, Anna Maria; Holdsworth, Robert; McCaffrey, Ken; Dempsey, Edward; Selby, Dave; De Paola, Nicola; Conway, Andy; Wilson, Woody; Ogilvie, Steven

    2014-05-01

    The onshore Devonian sedimentary rocks of the Orcadian basin host significant amounts of fracturing, faulting and some localized folding. Most published accounts have assumed Devonian ages for the supposedly extensional faulting in the Orcadian Basin, with some limited inversion and reactivation proposed during the Carboniferous. More recently, however, regional studies, palaeomagnetic dating of fracture fills and structural studies in the adjacent basement rocks suggest that significant amounts of faulting may be related to the development of the contiguous offshore West Orkney Basin (WOB) during the Mesozoic. New field and microstructural analyses of the structures found within the Devonian cover sequences in Scotland and Orkney reveal 3 main groups of structures based on orientation, kinematics and infill. All are transtensional or transpressional on local to regional scales mainly due to reactivation of pre-existing structures: Group 1 faults trend ENE-WSW, N-S and NW-SE and display predominantly sinistral strike-slip to dip-slip extensional movements. They form the dominant structures in the eastern part of Caithness, and to a lesser extent Orkney. Gouges/breccias associated with these faults display little or no mineralization or veining. Group 2 structures are closely associated systems of metre- to kilometre-scale N-S trending folds and thrusts related to a highly heterogenous regional inversion event recognized locally throughout the field area, but especially on Orkney. Once again, fault rocks associated with these structures display little or no mineralization or veining. Group 3 structures are dextral oblique NE-SW trending faults and sinistral E-W trending faults with widespread syn-deformational carbonate mineralisation (± pyrite and bitumen) both along faults and in associated mineral veins. In a few localities (e.g. Dunnet Head, Scarfskerry, E. Scapa Fault) strike-slip inversion events have occurred at this time leading to localized transpression

  7. Two new species of Pseudancistrus (Siluriformes, Loricariidae) from the Amazon basin, northern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Silva, Gabriel S C; Roxo, Fábio F; Oliveira, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Two new species of Pseudancistrus, a genus diagnosed by non-evertible cheek plates and hypertrophied odontodes along the snout margin, are described from two drainages of the Brazilian Shield: Pseudancistruskayabi from the rio Teles Pires (rio Tapajós basin) and Pseudancistrusasurini from the rio Xingu. The new species are distinguished from congeners (Pseudancistrusbarbatus, Pseudancistruscorantijniensis, Pseudancistrusdepressus, Pseudancistrusnigrescens, Pseudancistrusreus, and Pseudancistruszawadzkii) by the coloration pattern. Pseudancistruskayabi has dark bars on the dorsal and caudal fins which are similar to that of Pseudancistrusreus from the Caroní River, Venezuela. Pseudancistrusasurini is unique among Pseudancistrus in having whitish tips of the dorsal and caudal fins in juveniles to medium-sized adults.

  8. Climatic and Tectonic Controls on Topography in the Northern Basin and Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, D.; Brocklehurst, S. H.; Gawthorpe, R. L.

    2006-12-01

    This study takes advantage of the relatively simple tectonics of the normal fault-bounded Lost River and Lemhi Ranges and the Beaverhead Mountains, eastern Idaho, USA, to assess the roles of climate, erosion, and tectonics in topographic evolution through a combination of digital topographic analyses and field observations. These ranges transect the southern limit of Quaternary glaciation, and drainage basins record a range of glacial extents and histories, allowing for comparisons between climatic and tectonic controls. At a catchment scale, topography is controlled by both the degree of glaciation, and the response of the drainage system to range-front faulting. The range-bounding normal faults are segmented along-strike, and fault uplift rates vary systematically, being greatest at the fault centres. Here catchments predominantly drain normal to the range-front fault, although the trend of some catchments is influenced by pre-existing tectonic fabrics related to Cretaceous (northeast-southwest trending) and early Miocene (northwest-southeast trending) extension. For catchments that drain through fault segment boundaries, one of two general morphologies occurs. Either large drainage basins form, capturing drainage area from neighbouring basins, or, when fault segment boundaries are en echelon, a series of small drainage basins may form as catchments as the inboard- and outboard- footwalls interact and respond to fault linkage. Quaternary glaciation affected all but the southern portions of each of the ranges, most extensively at the north-eastern range flank. Increased extent of glaciation within a catchment results in wider valley floors, steeper valley walls, and greater relief at elevations close to the ELA. Cirque formation occurs preferentially on the north-eastern range flank, where glaciers are sheltered from both solar radiation and snow re-distribution by the prevailing winds. Snow accumulation is promoted in this setting by the increased influx of wind

  9. Multielement geochemical dataset of surficial materials for the northern Great Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coombs, Mary Jane; Kotlyar, Boris B.; Ludington, Steve; Folger, Helen W.; Mossotti, Victor G.

    2002-01-01

    This report presents geochemical data generated during mineral and environmental assessments for the Bureau of Land Management in northern Nevada, northeastern California, southeastern Oregon, and southwestern Idaho, along with metadata and map representations of selected elements. The dataset presented here is a compilation of chemical analyses of over 10,200 stream-sediment and soil samples originally collected during the National Uranium Resource Evaluation's (NURE) Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) program of the Department of Energy and its predecessors and reanalyzed to support a series of mineral-resource assessments by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The dataset also includes the analyses of additional samples collected by the USGS in 1992. The sample sites are in southeastern Oregon, southwestern Idaho, northeastern California, and, primarily, in northern Nevada. These samples were collected from 1977 to 1983, before the development of most of the present-day large-scale mining infrastructure in northern Nevada. As such, these data may serve as an important baseline for current and future geoenvironmental studies. Largely because of the very diverse analytical methods used by the NURE HSSR program, the original NURE analyses in this area yielded little useful geochemical information. The Humboldt, Malheur-Jordan-Andrews, and Winnemucca-Surprise studies were designed to provide useful geochemical data via improved analytical methods (lower detection levels and higher precision) and, in the Malheur-Jordan-Andrews and Winnemucca Surprise areas, to collect additional stream-sediment samples to increase sampling coverage. The data are provided in *.xls (Microsoft Excel) and *.csv (comma-separated-value) format. We also present graphically 35 elements, interpolated ("gridded") in a geographic information system (GIS) and overlain by major geologic trends, so that users may view the variation in elemental concentrations over the

  10. Helium isotope, C/3He, and Ba-Nb-Ti signatures in the northern Lau Basin: Distinguishing arc, back-arc, and hotspot affinities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupton, John; Rubin, Ken H.; Arculus, Richard; Lilley, Marvin; Butterfield, David; Resing, Joseph; Baker, Edward; Embley, Robert

    2015-04-01

    The northern Lau Basin hosts a complicated pattern of volcanism, including Tofua Arc volcanoes, several back-arc spreading centers, and individual "rear-arc" volcanoes not associated with these structures. Elevated 3He/4He ratios in lavas of the NW Lau Spreading Center suggest the influence of a mantle plume, possibly from Samoa. We show that lavas from mid-ocean ridges, volcanic arcs, and hotspots occupy distinct, nonoverlapping fields in a 3He/4He versus C/3He plot. Applied to the northern Lau Basin, this approach shows that most of Lau back-arc spreading systems have mid-ocean ridge 3He/4He-C/3He characteristics, except the NW Lau spreading center, which has 3He/4He-C/3He similar to "high 3He" hotspots such as Loihi, Kilauea, and Yellowstone, but with slightly lower C/3He. Niua seamount, on the northern extension of the Tofua Arc, falls squarely in the arc field. All the NE Lau rear-arc volcanoes, including the recently erupting West Mata, also have arc-like 3He/4He-C/3He characteristics. Ba-Nb-Ti contents of the lavas, which are more traditional trace element indicators of mantle source enrichment, depletion, and subduction input, likewise indicate arc and hot spot influences in the lavas of the northern Lau Basin, but in a more ambiguous fashion because of a complex prior history. This verifies that 3He/4He-C/3He systematics are useful for differentiating between mid-ocean ridge, arc, and hotspot affinities in submarine volcanic systems, that all three of these affinities are expressed in the northern Lau Basin, and provides additional support for the Samoan plume influence in the region.

  11. Snow cover dynamics and hydrological regime of the Hunza River basin, Karakoram Range, Northern Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, A. A.; Chevallier, P.; Arnaud, Y.; Ahmad, B.

    2011-03-01

    A major proportion of flow in the Indus River is contributed by its snow- and glacier-fed river catchments situated in the Himalaya, Karakoram and Hindukush ranges. It is therefore essential to understand the cryosphere dynamics in this area for water resource management. The MODIS MOD10A2 remote-sensing database of snow cover products from March 2000 to December 2009 was selected to analyse the snow cover changes in the Hunza River basin (the snow- and glacier-fed sub-catchment of the Indus River). A database of daily flows for the Hunza River at Dainyor Bridge over a period of 40 years and climate data (precipitation and temperature) for 10 years from three meteorological stations within the catchment was made available to investigate the hydrological regime in the area. Analysis of remotely sensed cryosphere (snow and ice cover) data showed a slight expansion of snow cover in the area in contrast to most of the regions in the world where glaciers are melting rapidly. This increase in snow cover may be the result of an increase in winter precipitation caused by westerly circulation. The impact of global warming is not effective because a large part of the basin area lies under high altitudes where the temperature remains negative throughout most of the year.

  12. Snow cover dynamics and hydrological regime of the Hunza River basin, Karakoram Range, Northern Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, A. A.; Chevallier, P.; Arnaud, Y.; Ahmad, B.

    2011-07-01

    A major proportion of flow in the Indus River is contributed by its snow- and glacier-fed river catchments situated in the Himalaya, Karakoram and Hindukush ranges. It is therefore essential to understand the cryosphere dynamics in this area for water resource management. The MODIS MOD10A2 remote-sensing database of snow cover products from March 2000 to December 2009 was selected to analyse the snow cover changes in the Hunza River basin (the snow- and glacier-fed sub-catchment of the Indus River). A database of daily flows for the Hunza River at Dainyor Bridge over a period of 40 yr and climate data (precipitation and temperature) for 10 yr from three meteorological stations within the catchment was made available to investigate the hydrological regime in the area. Analysis of remotely sensed cryosphere (snow and ice cover) data during the last decade (2000-2009) suggest a rather slight expansion of cryosphere in the area in contrast to most of the regions in the world where glaciers are melting rapidly. This increase in snow cover may be the result of an increase in winter precipitation caused by westerly circulation. The impact of global warming is not effective because a large part of the basin area lies under high altitudes where the temperature remains negative throughout most of the year.

  13. Evolution of the Rodgers Creek–Maacama right-lateral fault system and associated basins east of the northward-migrating Mendocino Triple Junction, northern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLaughlin, Robert J.; Sarna-Wojcicki, Andrei M.; Wagner, David L.; Fleck, Robert J.; Langenheim, V.E.; Jachens, Robert C.; Clahan, Kevin; Allen, James R.

    2012-01-01

    The Rodgers Creek–Maacama fault system in the northern California Coast Ranges (United States) takes up substantial right-lateral motion within the wide transform boundary between the Pacific and North American plates, over a slab window that has opened northward beneath the Coast Ranges. The fault system evolved in several right steps and splays preceded and accompanied by extension, volcanism, and strike-slip basin development. Fault and basin geometries have changed with time, in places with younger basins and faults overprinting older structures. Along-strike and successional changes in fault and basin geometry at the southern end of the fault system probably are adjustments to frequent fault zone reorganizations in response to Mendocino Triple Junction migration and northward transit of a major releasing bend in the northern San Andreas fault. The earliest Rodgers Creek fault zone displacement is interpreted to have occurred ca. 7 Ma along extensional basin-forming faults that splayed northwest from a west-northwest proto-Hayward fault zone, opening a transtensional basin west of Santa Rosa. After ca. 5 Ma, the early transtensional basin was compressed and extensional faults were reactivated as thrusts that uplifted the northeast side of the basin. After ca. 2.78 Ma, the Rodgers Creek fault zone again splayed from the earlier extensional and thrust faults to steeper dipping faults with more north-northwest orientations. In conjunction with the changes in orientation and slip mode, the Rodgers Creek fault zone dextral slip rate increased from ∼2–4 mm/yr 7–3 Ma, to 5–8 mm/yr after 3 Ma. The Maacama fault zone is shown from several data sets to have initiated ca. 3.2 Ma and has slipped right-laterally at ∼5–8 mm/yr since its initiation. The initial Maacama fault zone splayed northeastward from the south end of the Rodgers Creek fault zone, accompanied by the opening of several strike-slip basins, some of which were later uplifted and compressed

  14. Water-quality assessment of the Central Arizona Basins, Arizona and northern Mexico; environmental setting and overview of water quality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cordy, Gail E.; Rees, Julie A.; Edmonds, Robert J.; Gebler, Joseph B.; Wirt, Laurie; Gellenbeck, Dorinda J.; Anning, David W.

    1998-01-01

    The Central Arizona Basins study area in central and southern Arizona and northern Mexico is one of 60 study units that are part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment program. The purpose of this report is to describe the physical, chemical, and environmental characteristics that may affect water quality in the Central Arizona Basins study area and present an overview of water quality. Covering 34,700 square miles, the study area is characterized by generally north to northwestward-trending mountain ranges separated by broad, gently sloping alluvial valleys. Most of the perennial rivers and streams are in the northern part of the study area. Rivers and streams in the south are predominantly intermittent or ephemeral and flow in response to precipitation such as summer thunderstorms. Effluent-dependent streams do provide perennial flow in some reaches. The major aquifers in the study area are in the basin-fill deposits that may be as much as 12,000 feet thick. The 1990 population in the study area was about 3.45 million, and about 61 percent of the total was in Maricopa County (Phoenix and surrounding cities). Extensive population growth over the past decade has resulted in a twofold increase in urban land areas and increased municipal water use; however, agriculture remains the major water use. Seventy-three percent of all water with drawn in the study area during 1990 was used for agricultural purposes. The largest rivers in the study area-the Gila, Salt, and Verde-are perennial near their headwaters but become intermittent downstream because of impoundments and artificial diversions. As a result, the Central Arizona Basins study area is unique compared to less arid basins because the mean surface-water outflow is only 528 cubic feet per second from a total drainage area of 49,650 square miles. Peak flows in the northern part of the study area are the result of snowmelt runoff; whereas, summer thunderstorms account for the peak flows in

  15. INNOVATIVE METHODOLOGY FOR DETECTION OF FRACTURE-CONTROLLED SWEET SPOTS IN THE NORTHERN APPALACHIAN BASIN

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Jacobi; John Fountain

    2001-02-28

    In the structure task, we completed a N-S transect east of Seneca Lake that indicated a N-striking fault near the southeastern shore of Seneca Lake, and also indicated NE and ENE-trending FIDs and faults north of Valois. The orientation and existence of the NE-striking FIDs and faults are thought to be controlled by basement faults, rather than thrust ramps above the Salina salt controlled only by a far-field Alleghanian stress field. Structure contour maps based on well log analyses have been constructed but not interpreted. Soil gas data displayed a number of ethane-charged soil gas ''spikes'' on a N-S transect from Ovid south to near Valois. The soil gas team found a larger number of spikes in the northern half of the survey, suggesting more open fractures (and faults) in the northern half of the survey. Seismic data has been purchased and reprocessed. Several grabens observed in the Trenton reflector are consistent with surface structure, soil gas, and aeromagnetic anomalies. The aeromagnetic survey is completed and the data is processed. Prominent magnetic anomalies suggest that faults in the Precambrian basement are located beneath regions where grabens in the Trenton are located.

  16. Spatio-temporal snow cover change and hydrological characteristics of the Astore, Gilgit and Hunza river basins (western Himalayas, Hindukush and Karakoram region) - Northern Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, Adnan Ahmad; Chevallier, Pierre; Arnaud, Yves; Lane, Stuart; Terzago, Silvia; Adamowski, Jan Franklin

    2015-04-01

    A large proportion of Pakistan's irrigation water supply is drawn from the Upper Indus River Basin (UIB) situated in the Himalaya-Karakoram-Hindukush (HKH) ranges. More than half of the annual flow in the UIB is contributed by five of its high-altitude snow and glacier-fed sub-basins including the Astore (Western Himalaya - southern part of the UIB), Gilgit (Hindukush - western part of the UIB) and Hunza (Central Karakoram - northern part of the UIB) River basins. Studying the snow cover, its spatio-temporal evolution and the hydrological response of these sub-basins is important so as to better manage water resources. This study compares data from the Astore, Gilgit and Hunza River basins (mean catchment elevation, 4100, 4250 and 4650 m ASL, respectively), obtained using MODIS satellite snow cover images. The hydrological regime of these sub-catchments was analyzed using hydrological and climate data available at different altitudes from the basin areas. The results suggest that the UIB is a region undergoing a stable or slightly increasing trend of snow cover in the southern (Western Himalayas), western (Hindukush) and northern (Central Karakoram) parts. Discharge from the UIB is a combination of snow and glacier melt with rainfall-runoff in the southern part, but snow and glacier melt is dominant in the northern and western parts of the catchment. Despite similar snow cover trends (stable or slightly increasing), different river flow trends (increasing in Astore and Gilgit, decreasing in Hunza) suggest that a sub-catchment level study of the UIB is needed to understand thoroughly its hydrological behavior for better flood forecasting and water resources management and to quantify how the system is being forced by changing climate.

  17. BOLIVAR and GULFREX MCS Data Constrain Closure of the Grenada Backarc Basin During Oblique Collision Between the Lesser Antilles Arc System and Northern South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitken, T. J.; Mann, P.; Christeson, G.

    2004-12-01

    The Lesser Antilles evolved from the mid-Cretaceous as an extensional arc system formed above a steeply dipping slab of Atlantic oceanic crust. The arc became extensional during the Paleocene - early Eocene along normal faults at the eastern edge of the basin as the present-day Lesser Antilles chain rifted away from the Aves Ridge. Backarc rifting ceased during the early Eocene, leaving the 140 km wide 3 km deep Grenada backarc basin. Sediment accumulation reached nearly 8 km during the Paleogene with another 1.5 km of sediments accumulating during the Neogene. In this presentation, we combine newly acquired MCS lines from the BOLIVAR study with existing GULFREX data collected in 1975 to document the structural and stratigraphic effects of closure of the Grenada backarc basin because of the progressive, oblique collision between the Lesser Antilles arc system and northern South America. The southern end of the Grenada basin has been narrowed from an undeformed width of approximately 100 km to a deformed width of 30 km, and rotated nearly 90 degrees to the west as the arc system obliquely collides with the South American margin. Shortening of the colliding backarc basin is mainly accommodated by inversion of Paleogene normal faults on the eastern edge of the basin, folding, low-angle thrust faults, and possibly shale diapirism. We propose that this closure in the area is a backthrusting response during Oligocene - late Miocene closure along the leading edge of the oblique arc-continent collision in the Eastern Venezuelan basin.

  18. U-Pb Geochronology, Geochemistry and Kinematic Analyses of Subduction-Related Late Triassic Basins in Northern Chile (24.5º-26ºS).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinoza, M. E.

    2015-12-01

    In northern Chile (24.5°-26°S) two Pre-Andean depocenters crop out: the Cifuncho basin in the Coastal Cordillera and the Profeta basin in the Precordillera. These basins have been classically interpreted as a continental rifting unrelated to subduction during the period prior to the Andean orogenic cycle. However, recent petrographic and geochemical data suggest the development of these basins in an active subduction system. In order to test this hypothesis and to establish the geologic evolution of the basins and the strain field during the rifting process, we present preliminary U-Pb geochronological and geochemical data together with structural analyses of synrift structures. The geochronological data along the Cifuncho and Profeta basins, show a main continental sedimentary deposition during the Norian to Raethian. Volcanosedimentary rocks show a main detrital supply of Early Permian age (~297-283 Ma). This input can be associated with the volcanic La Tabla Formation and/or the exhumation of Permian granitoids. A minor supply close to ~478 Ma is related to a source from the Lower Ordovician arc (~480 Ma), suggesting the tectonic exhumation of this source to the east of the Profeta basin during the Late Triassic. On the other hand, structural analysis was carried in third and four order extensional faults (<10 m of slip) along the Profeta basin. Most of the faults show a clear synrift character with the development of fault controlled growing strata. The kinematic analyses evidence a variability in the orientation of the maximum strain axes from a main northwest to a subordinate northeast direction of extension. Thus, the intimate relation between the continental sedimentary deposition and a proximal volcanism of intermediate composition and calk-alkaline affinity, suggests the development of these basins in a supra-subduction setting during the Late Triassic. Structural data probably reflect local variation in the strain field across the basins.

  19. The effect of plate movements in the northern region of South America on tectonics and sedimentation in the Eastern Llanos Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Pena, L.E. )

    1993-02-01

    The geological configuration of the Eastern Llanos pericratonic mega-basin has been directly affected by the overall tectonic regime experienced in the Northern part of South America. Interaction between the Pacific (Cocos), South American and Caribbean Plates generated a regional compressional dextral rotational force expressed as a regional North-South striking structural trend in the southern part of the basin and an east-west striking trend in portion nearest the Caribbean Plate Boundary. Nearly 90% of the strike-slip faults in this northern area show right lateral displacement. The majority of the structures in the East Llanos basin are related to the Late Miocene uplift of the Eastern Andes. Nevertheless we can subdivide the structures into two major groups: pre-Miocene and post-Miocene. By being able to recognize pre-Miocene Cretaceous age structures, much altered by later movements, we can envision remigration of hydrocarbons out of early traps into those created more recently. Plate tectonic events in the north of South America have produced a general regional structure strike directional through time. Sedimentary-tectonic relationships depend upon regional phenomena which, if interpreted correctly, help to sub-divide the mega-basin into genetically related parts. By understanding the mechanism that creates large scale structural features, the geologist is thus provided with an important tool that can aid him in exploring the Eastern Llanos basin.

  20. Assessment of undiscovered conventional oil and gas resources, onshore Claiborne Group, United Statespart of the northern Gulf of Mexico Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hackley, P.C.; Ewing, T.E.

    2010-01-01

    The middle Eocene Claiborne Group was assessed for undiscovered conventional hydrocarbon resources using established U.S. Geological Survey assessment methodology. This work was conducted as part of a 2007 assessment of Paleogene-Neogene strata of the northern Gulf of Mexico Basin, including the United States onshore and state waters (Dubiel et al., 2007). The assessed area is within the Upper Jurassic-CretaceousTertiary composite total petroleum system, which was defined for the assessment. Source rocks for Claiborne oil accumulations are interpreted to be organic-rich, downdip, shaley facies of the Wilcox Group and the Sparta Sand of the Claiborne Group; gas accumulations may have originated from multiple sources, including the Jurassic Smackover Formation and the Haynesville and Bossier shales, the Cretaceous Eagle Ford and Pearsall (?) formations, and the Paleogene Wilcox Group and Sparta Sand. Hydrocarbon generation in the basin started prior to deposition of Claiborne sediments and is currently ongoing. Primary reservoir sandstones in the Claiborne Group include, from oldest to youngest, the Queen City Sand, Cook Mountain Formation, Sparta Sand, Yegua Formation, and the laterally equivalent Cockfield Formation. A geologic model, supported by spatial analysis of petroleum geology data, including discovered reservoir depths, thicknesses, temperatures, porosities, permeabilities, and pressures, was used to divide the Claiborne Group into seven assessment units (AUs) with three distinctive structural and depositional settings. The three structural and depositional settings are (1) stable shelf, (2) expanded fault zone, and (3) slope and basin floor; the seven AUs are (1) lower Claiborne stable-shelf gas and oil, (2) lower Claiborne expanded fault-zone gas, (3) lower Claiborne slope and basin-floor gas, (4) lower Claiborne Cane River, (5) upper Claiborne stable-shelf gas and oil, (6) upper Claiborne expanded fault-zone gas, and (7) upper Claiborne slope and basin

  1. Sedimentological and geochronological evidences of anthropogenic impacts on river basins in the Northern Latium coastal area (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piazzolla, Daniele; Paladini de Mendoza, Francesco; Scanu, Sergio; Marcelli, Marco

    2015-04-01

    In this work we aimed to compare sedimentological and geochronological data from three sediment core samples (MIG50, MRT50, and GRT50) taken in the Northern Latium (Italy) coastal area, at -50 m depth, to data regarding rainfall, river flows and the land use in the three most important hydrographic basins (Mignone, Marta and Fiora) and in the coastal area. Different trends of sediment mass accumulation rate (MAR) are detected in the three cores: a strongly increasing trend was identified in MIG50 and MRT50 cores while GRT50 doesn't show significant variation. Data from the sedimentological analysis of GRT50 core identify a progressive decrease in the sandy component, which declined from about 30% to the current level of 7% over the last 36 years, while MRT50 and MIG50 cores (mainly composed by pelitic fraction > 95%) showed slight variations of textural ratio between silt and clay. According to the general decrease of pluviometric trend observed in Italy, related to teleconnection pattern tendency (NAO), the statistical analysis of rain identified significative decrease only in the Fiora river basin, whereas in the other two locations the decrease was not as significant. Regarding the Fiora river flow, a significative decreasing trend of average flow is detected, while the flood regime remained unaffected over the past 30 years. The analysis of the land use shows that the human activities are increased of 6-10% over the available time steps (1990 - 2006) in Fiora and Mignone river basins, while the Marta river basin has a strong human impact since 1990 highligting more than 80% of artificial soil covering. The largest variation is observed on the Fiora basin (10%) where the antrhopic activities have expanded to an area of about 85 Km2. Moreover, in the last ten years a large beach nourishment in 2004 (570000 m3) and dredging activities in the early second half of 2000s (1000000 m3 moved) were performed in Marina di Tarquinia beach and in front of the Torrevaldaliga

  2. Pliocene and Quaternary Deposits in the Northern Part of the San Juan Basin in Southwestern Colorado and Northwestern New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, Glenn R.; Moore, David W.

    2007-01-01

    Unconsolidated late Cenozoic deposits in the northern part of the San Juan Basin range in age from late Pliocene to Holocene. Most of the deposits are alluvial gravel composed of resistant quartzite, sandstone, and igneous, metamorphic, and volcanic rocks derived from the uplifted central core of the San Juan Mountains 20-50 miles (32-80 kilometers) north of the basin. Alluvial deposits are most voluminous in the Animas Valley, but deposits of gravel of the same general age are present in the La Plata, Florida, Los Pinos, and Piedra River valleys as well. Alluvial gravel forms tabular deposits, generally about 20 feet (6 meters) thick, that are exposed beneath a sequence of terraces at many levels above the rivers. Gravel layers 360 feet (110 meters) or less above the Animas River are glacial outwash. The gravel layers begin at the south toes of end moraines and extend discontinuously downvalley at least 10-20 miles (16-32 kilometers). Farther south, distinction between outwash and nonglacial alluvium is problematical. Alluvial gravel beneath higher terraces does not grade to end moraines. Glacial till forms a series of end moraines at the north edge of the town of Durango. The oldest moraines are farthest downvalley, are higher above the river, and have more mature surficial soils than do moraines farther north. The two youngest moraines, the Animas City moraines, are interpreted to be Pinedale in age. They have narrow, ridgelike crests and form nearly unbroken arcs across the valley floor. Small segments of still more weathered moraines, the Spring Creek moraines, are 170-230 feet (52-70 meters) above the river and are 660-990 feet (200-300 meters) farther downvalley. The oldest moraines, the Durango moraines, are on the north end of the unnamed mesa on which Fort Lewis College is located. The base is about 180 feet (55 meters) above the river. These oldest moraines may be of Bull Lake age. Alluvial fans, pediment gravel, and landslides are scattered at several

  3. Seismic interpretation of the post-Middle Miocene section of the northeastern Northern South Sea Yellow Basin, Yellow Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyeonju; Lee, Gwang H.; Kim, Han J.; Yi, BoYeon

    2016-04-01

    The Yellow Sea is a very shallow (< 90 m), semi-enclosed epicontinental sea, lying between China and the Korean Peninsula. The Yellow Sea has undergone gradual, regional subsidence since the Middle Miocene when the major plate reorganization in East Asia led to regional uplift and subsequent erosion in many parts of the marginal basins of the western Pacific, including the Yellow Sea. In this study, we analyzed about 2500 km of 2-D multi-channel seismic data from the northeastern part of the Northern South Yellow Sea Basin to investigate the post-Middle Miocene geologic history of the area. We identified and mapped the Middle Miocene unconformity (MMU) and two horizons (H1 and H2) which are correlatable over much of the area. H1 and H2 were inferred to be of the early Late Miocene (ca. 10 Ma) and of the late Late Miocene (ca. 6.7 Ma), respectively, assuming a constant sediment accumulation rate. MMU forms the top of the basement except for the southwestern corner of the area and is interrupted by numerous volcanic bodies, suggesting active post-Middle Miocene volcanism. The volcanic bodies are oriented largely parallel to the basement faults. H1 and H2 are also affected by volcanic bodies in the northern part of the area, suggesting continued volcanism until the late Late Miocene. The depth of MMU increases southwestward from about 250 m to over 750 m, indicating progressive tilting (i.e., differential subsidence) of the basement toward the depocenter in the southwest. The depths of H1 and H2 increase west- and southwestward from about 200 m to over 450 m and from about 150 m to over 300 m, respectively. Detailed seismic facies were not analyzed due to poor data quality; nevertheless, continuous reflectors, suggesting uniform and thus marine deposition, appear to increase upward and northeastward. This, together with the amount of subsidence estimated from the depth of MMU, strongly suggests that subsidence has been dominant in the area over the global sea

  4. Two new species of Pseudancistrus (Siluriformes, Loricariidae) from the Amazon basin, northern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Gabriel S. C.; Roxo, Fábio F.; Oliveira, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Two new species of Pseudancistrus, a genus diagnosed by non-evertible cheek plates and hypertrophied odontodes along the snout margin, are described from two drainages of the Brazilian Shield: Pseudancistrus kayabi from the rio Teles Pires (rio Tapajós basin) and Pseudancistrus asurini from the rio Xingu. The new species are distinguished from congeners (Pseudancistrus barbatus, Pseudancistrus corantijniensis, Pseudancistrus depressus, Pseudancistrus nigrescens, Pseudancistrus reus, and Pseudancistrus zawadzkii) by the coloration pattern. Pseudancistrus kayabi has dark bars on the dorsal and caudal fins which are similar to that of Pseudancistrus reus from the Caroní River, Venezuela. Pseudancistrus asurini is unique among Pseudancistrus in having whitish tips of the dorsal and caudal fins in juveniles to medium-sized adults. PMID:25709528

  5. Two new species of Pseudancistrus (Siluriformes, Loricariidae) from the Amazon basin, northern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Silva, Gabriel S C; Roxo, Fábio F; Oliveira, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Two new species of Pseudancistrus, a genus diagnosed by non-evertible cheek plates and hypertrophied odontodes along the snout margin, are described from two drainages of the Brazilian Shield: Pseudancistruskayabi from the rio Teles Pires (rio Tapajós basin) and Pseudancistrusasurini from the rio Xingu. The new species are distinguished from congeners (Pseudancistrusbarbatus, Pseudancistruscorantijniensis, Pseudancistrusdepressus, Pseudancistrusnigrescens, Pseudancistrusreus, and Pseudancistruszawadzkii) by the coloration pattern. Pseudancistruskayabi has dark bars on the dorsal and caudal fins which are similar to that of Pseudancistrusreus from the Caroní River, Venezuela. Pseudancistrusasurini is unique among Pseudancistrus in having whitish tips of the dorsal and caudal fins in juveniles to medium-sized adults. PMID:25709528

  6. Occurrence, behavior and distribution of high levels of uranium in shallow groundwater at Datong basin, northern China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ya; Wang, Yanxin; Xie, Xianjun

    2014-02-15

    Geochemical investigations of uranium (U) occurrence in the environments were conducted at Datong basin of northern China. The results suggest that U contents were generally <1mg/kg for the igneous and metamorphic rocks, typically 2-5mg/kg for the Carboniferous and Permian sedimentary rocks and around 3mg/kg for sediments and topsoil, respectively. U in the Quaternary aquifer sediments may be primarily associated with carnotite from the Carboniferous and Permian coal-bearing clastic rocks around the basin. Shallow groundwater had U concentrations of <0.02-288 μg/L (average 24 μg/L), with 24% of the investigated boreholes above the WHO provisional guideline of 30 μg/L for U in drinking water. Average U concentration for surface water was 5.8 μg/L. In oxidizing waters, uranyl (UO2(2+)) species is dominant and strongly adsorbed onto iron (hydro)xides, while it would be preferentially complexed with carbonate in the alkaline groundwater, forming highly soluble uranyl-carbonate complexes at Datong. Under reducing conditions, uranous (U(IV)) species is ready to precipitate or bind to organic matter, therefore having a low mobility. At the study area, high U groundwater (>30 μg/L) occurs at the alluvial plains due to intermediate redox and enhanced alkaline conditions. The abnormally high levels of U in groundwater (>100 μg/L) are locally found at the west alluvial plains. By contrast, U co-precipitation with secondary carbonate minerals like Ca2UO2(CO3)3 in the dominant Ca-Mg-Na-HCO3 type groundwater may prevail at the east alluvial plains. Besides, bedrocks such as Carboniferous and Permian sedimentary rocks, especially the coal-bearing strata which have higher U contents at the west mountain areas may also account for the abnormally high levels of U in groundwater.

  7. Late Cretaceous and Early Tertiary depositional environments of the northern Sacramento basin revealed by seismic-stratigraphic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Damuth, J.E.; Link, M.H.; Gabay, S.H. )

    1990-05-01

    Seismic-stratigraphic analysis of regional seismic data across the Willows-Beehive Bend gas field reveals a prograding shelf-slope depositional sequence, including basic submarine-fan, slope, and shelf deltaic deposits, that progressively infilled the northern Sacramento forearc basin during the Campanian. The base of the Forbes Formation and the base of the Princeton Gorge fill form the lower and upper boundaries, respectively, of this sequence. Upper Cretaceous submarine-fan and basin-plain deposit form the strata between the Sierran basement and the base of the Forbes and progressively onlap the basement from west to east. The lower to middle Forbes Formation is characterized by high-amplitude discontinuous reflections and consists of mud-rich submarine-fan deposit with laterally restricted, sand-prone channel/levee complexes and broader depositional lobes. In contrast the upper Forbes consist of mud-rich slope deposits characterized by broad, southward-dipping clinoforms. Submarine-canyon/gully fills are common and return discordant hummocky to chaotic reflections. The overlying Kione Formation consists of sand-rich, delta-front deposits that return high amplitude, gently dipping subparallel reflections and are transitional into the slope deposits of the uppermost Forbes. The Kione was partially eroded during cutting of the Princeton Gorge submarine canyon in the early Tertiary. The lower (Eocene) Princeton Gorge fill shows highly variable reflection character and seismic facies that suggest multiple episodes of submarine erosion and deposition. At least three northwest-southeast-striking fault zones, including the Willows fault, disrupt these formations and appear to have strike-slip components.

  8. The importance of diverse data types to calibrate a watershed model of the Trout Lake Basin, Northern Wisconsin, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunt, R.J.; Feinstein, D.T.; Pint, C.D.; Anderson, M.P.

    2006-01-01

    As part of the USGS Water, Energy, and Biogeochemical Budgets project and the NSF Long-Term Ecological Research work, a parameter estimation code was used to calibrate a deterministic groundwater flow model of the Trout Lake Basin in northern Wisconsin. Observations included traditional calibration targets (head, lake stage, and baseflow observations) as well as unconventional targets such as groundwater flows to and from lakes, depth of a lake water plume, and time of travel. The unconventional data types were important for parameter estimation convergence and allowed the development of a more detailed parameterization capable of resolving model objectives with well-constrained parameter values. Independent estimates of groundwater inflow to lakes were most important for constraining lakebed leakance and the depth of the lake water plume was important for determining hydraulic conductivity and conceptual aquifer layering. The most important target overall, however, was a conventional regional baseflow target that led to correct distribution of flow between sub-basins and the regional system during model calibration. The use of an automated parameter estimation code: (1) facilitated the calibration process by providing a quantitative assessment of the model's ability to match disparate observed data types; and (2) allowed assessment of the influence of observed targets on the calibration process. The model calibration required the use of a 'universal' parameter estimation code in order to include all types of observations in the objective function. The methods described in this paper help address issues of watershed complexity and non-uniqueness common to deterministic watershed models. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Clay mineralogical and geochemical constraints on late Pleistocene weathering processes of the Qaidam Basin, northern Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, WeiLiang; Fan, QiShun; Wei, HaiCheng; Zhang, XiYing; Ma, HaiZhou

    2016-09-01

    At the Qarhan Salt Lake (QSL) on the central-eastern Qaidam Basin, northern Tibetan Plateau, Quaternary lacustrine sediments have a thickness of over 3000 m and mainly composed of organic-rich clay and silty clay with some silt halite and halite. In this study, a 102-m-long sediment core (ISL1A) was obtained from the QSL. Combining with AMS 14C and 230Th dating, clay minerals and major-element concentrations of ISL1A were used to reconstruct the weathering process and trend of the QSL since late Pleistocene. The results reveal that the clay mineral from <2 μm fraction in ISL1A is composed of illite (47-77%), chlorite (8-27%), smectite (including illite-smectite mixed layers, 3-29%) and kaolinite (2-11%). Such clay mineral assemblages in ISL1A derived primarily from felsic igneous rocks, gneisses and schists of Eastern Kunlun Mountains on the south of the QSL. The abundance of illite mineral displays an opposite fluctuation trending with that of smectite, chlorite and kaolinite mineral in ISL1A, which is significantly different from the monsoon-controlled regions. Moreover, higher values of illite, kaolinite/chlorite and illite/chlorite ratios, and lower values of smectite, chlorite and kaolinite minerals occurred in 83-72.5 ka, 68.8-54 ka, 32-24 ka, corresponding to late MIS 5, late MIS 4, early MIS 3 and late MIS 3, respectively. These three phases were almost similarly changed with oxygen isotopes of authigenic carbonates and pollen records in ISL1A, which implies that stronger chemical weathering corresponds to higher effective moisture periods of source region in the Qaidam Basin. Based on chemical weathering index and (Al2O3-(CaO + Na2O)-K2O) diagram, chemical weathering degree in this study area takes a varying process from low to intermediate on the whole.

  10. Siliciclastic Progradation Within a Neogene Carbonate Passive Margin - Northern Carnarvon Basin of the Northwest Shelf of Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, C. M.; Fulthorpe, C. S.; Austin, J. A.

    2008-12-01

    Interpretations of extensive industry subsurface data (3D and 2D seismic data, wireline logs and completion reports) and results from previous studies suggest that relative sea level changes and ocean currents controlled observed variations in carbonate vs. siliciclastic sediment type and stratal architecture in the Northern Carnarvon Basin, Northwest Shelf of Australia, during the Neogene. The basin has been a site of predominantly carbonate sedimentation since the late Paleogene. However, significant (at least 30-70 km) siliciclastic progradation on top of this carbonate shelf started in the late middle Miocene. Carbonate- dominated sedimentation resumed in the late Miocene/Pliocene. Siliciclastic-rich seismic packages show dip- oriented progradation northwestward, as well as strike-oriented progradation northeastward. Clinoform heights, up to approx. 140 m, and a dip-elongated lobe morphology suggest deposition by a long-lived (approx. 6 My) deltaic system which is no longer active on this margin. Consistent northeastward switching of these interpreted delta lobes and their progradation over the preexisting carbonate shelf sediments suggest wave-dominated conditions, with strong northeastward long-shore currents, for this delta system during a time of relative base level fall. During this siliciclastic progradation event, carbonate sedimentation continued in the updrift direction southwest of the delta, but carbonates were not accumulated downdrift or northeast, where progressively younger deltaic siliciclastics filled available accommodation space. By the beginning of the Pliocene, siliciclastic sedimentation had retreated towards the Australian coast, allowing widespread carbonate production to resume; interpreted shallow-water carbonate platforms then developed over subtle topographic highs created by the underlying deltaic lobes.

  11. Organic geochemical characterisation of shallow marine Cretaceous formations from Yola Sub-basin, Northern Benue Trough, NE Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarki Yandoka, Babangida M.; Abdullah, Wan Hasiah; Abubakar, M. B.; Hakimi, Mohammed Hail; Jauro, Aliyu; Adegoke, Adebanji Kayode

    2016-05-01

    The shallow marine shales of the Cretaceous formations namely Yolde, Dukul, Jessu, Sekuliye and Numanha ranging in age from Cenomanian to Coniacian within the Yola Sub-basin in the Northern Benue Trough, northeastern Nigeria were analysed to provide an overview on their hydrocarbon generation potential. This study is based on pyrolysis analysis, total organic carbon content (TOC), extractable organic matter (EOM), biomarker distributions and measured vitrinite reflectance. The present-day TOC contents range between 0.24 and 0.71 wt. % and Hydrogen Index (HI) values between 8.7 and 113 mg HC/g TOC with Type III/IV kerogens. Based on the present-day kerogen typing, the shale sediments are expected to generate mainly gas. Biomarker compositions indicates deposition in a marine environment under suboxic conditions with prevalent contribution of aquatic organic matter and a significant amount of terrigenous organic matter input. Organic matter that is dominated by marine components contains kerogens of Type II and Type II-III. This study shows that the organic matter has been affected by volcanic intrusion and consequently, have reached post-mature stage of oil generation. These higher thermal maturities levels are consistent with the vitrinite reflectance ranging from 0.85 to 2.35 Ro % and high Tmax (440-508 °C) values as supported by biomarker maturity ratios. Based on this study, a high prospect for major gas and minor oil generation potential is anticipated from the shallow marine Cretaceous formations from Yola Sub-basin.

  12. Occurrence, behavior and distribution of high levels of uranium in shallow groundwater at Datong basin, northern China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ya; Wang, Yanxin; Xie, Xianjun

    2014-02-15

    Geochemical investigations of uranium (U) occurrence in the environments were conducted at Datong basin of northern China. The results suggest that U contents were generally <1mg/kg for the igneous and metamorphic rocks, typically 2-5mg/kg for the Carboniferous and Permian sedimentary rocks and around 3mg/kg for sediments and topsoil, respectively. U in the Quaternary aquifer sediments may be primarily associated with carnotite from the Carboniferous and Permian coal-bearing clastic rocks around the basin. Shallow groundwater had U concentrations of <0.02-288 μg/L (average 24 μg/L), with 24% of the investigated boreholes above the WHO provisional guideline of 30 μg/L for U in drinking water. Average U concentration for surface water was 5.8 μg/L. In oxidizing waters, uranyl (UO2(2+)) species is dominant and strongly adsorbed onto iron (hydro)xides, while it would be preferentially complexed with carbonate in the alkaline groundwater, forming highly soluble uranyl-carbonate complexes at Datong. Under reducing conditions, uranous (U(IV)) species is ready to precipitate or bind to organic matter, therefore having a low mobility. At the study area, high U groundwater (>30 μg/L) occurs at the alluvial plains due to intermediate redox and enhanced alkaline conditions. The abnormally high levels of U in groundwater (>100 μg/L) are locally found at the west alluvial plains. By contrast, U co-precipitation with secondary carbonate minerals like Ca2UO2(CO3)3 in the dominant Ca-Mg-Na-HCO3 type groundwater may prevail at the east alluvial plains. Besides, bedrocks such as Carboniferous and Permian sedimentary rocks, especially the coal-bearing strata which have higher U contents at the west mountain areas may also account for the abnormally high levels of U in groundwater. PMID:24342086

  13. Adaptive transitions and environmental change in the northern Great Basin: A view from Diamond Swamp

    SciTech Connect

    Musil, R.R.

    1992-01-01

    The presence of sedentary prehistoric occupations in association with wetland settings in the Great Basin has been the focus of continued debate. Theoretical discussions concerning the nature of hunter-gatherer adaptations to wetland environments have been based on two models: (1) Stress-based or push models, which argue that hunter-gatherer populations would reduce mobility as a response to less favorable conditions, and (2) abundance-based or pull models, which argue that hunter-gatherers would have been attracted to localized environments of diverse and plentiful resources. Archaeological evidence from Diamond Swamp provides insight into human adaptive transitions in wetland environments. Archaeological data from Diamond Swamp revealed a series of cultural components representing significant portions of the Holocene. The components at the Dunn and McCoy Creek sites consist of collections of artifactual, faunal, and floral materials, in association with semi-subterranean pithouse features dated between 3500 and 900 BP. These occupations correspond to periods of increased moisture and higher water tables. During periods of climatic amelioration semi-sedentary occupations occurred with the expansion of highly productive marsh and juniper grassland vegetation zones. The component at the McCoy Creek Site corresponds to a period of decreasing moisture punctuated by periodic drought, evidenced by the presence of a less substantial wickiup occupation dated at 500 BP. This occupation is indicative of a transition to a more mobile, less intensive occupational episode. The study provides evidence that transitions to sedentary pithouse villages in Diamond Swamp are best accounted for by the abundance-based model. A shift towards a less substantial, more mobile, occupation occurred with a decline in effective moisture. The research reflects adaptations made by local hunter-gatherer populations to long term environmental change within a typical Great Basin wetlands setting.

  14. Late Quaternary tectonics in the inner Northern Apennines (Siena Basin, southern Tuscany, Italy) and their seismotectonic implication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brogi, Andrea; Capezzuoli, Enrico; Martini, Ivan; Picozzi, Matteo; Sandrelli, Fabio

    2014-05-01

    Defining the most recent Quaternary tectonics represents a challenging task for neotectonic, palaeoseismological and seismotectonic studies. This paper focuses on an integrated approach to reconstructing the latest Quaternary deformation affecting the northern part of the Siena Basin (inner Northern Apennines, i.e., southern Tuscany, Italy) near the town of Siena, and to discuss the seismological implications. Field work and structural and stratigraphic analyses, coupled with the interpretation of reflection seismic lines, have been combined to define the geometry, kinematics and age of mesoscopic to map-scale faults which have affected the mainly Quaternary continental and Pliocene marine deposits. The resulting dataset describes a tectonic setting characterized by coeval SW- and NW-trending transtensional and normal faults, respectively, dissecting alluvial sediments younger than 23.9 ± 0.23 ka. Seismic interpretation sheds light on the geometrical setting of the faults at deeper levels, down to 1-2 km, and provides support for the presence of a wide brittle shear zone defined by conjugated fault segments, locally giving rise to an asymmetrical negative flower-like structure. Faults and their damage zones have controlled (and still control) the discharge of gas vents (mainly CO2 and H2S) and hydrothermal circulation (which deposits travertine) since at least 23.216 ± 0.124 ka. The resulting complete data set provides support for our description of the Neogene-Quaternary tectonics which were active until the late Quaternary, providing additional information about the seismotectonic framework of an area characterized by low seismicity and generally low-magnitude earthquakes (M < 4), but having experienced significant seismic events over the last few centuries.

  15. Did Oligocene crustal thickening precede basin development in northern Thailand? A geochronological reassessment of Doi Inthanon and Doi Suthep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardiner, Nicholas J.; Roberts, Nick M. W.; Morley, Christopher K.; Searle, Michael P.; Whitehouse, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    The Doi Inthanon and Doi Suthep metamorphic core complexes in northern Thailand are comprised of amphibolite-grade migmatitic gneisses mantled by lower-grade mylonites and metasedimentary sequences, thought to represent Cordilleran-style core complexes exhumed through the mobilization of a low-angle detachment fault. Previous studies have interpreted two metamorphic events (Late Triassic and Late Cretaceous), followed by ductile extension between the late Eocene and late Oligocene, a model which infers movement on the detachment at ca. 40 Ma, and which culminates in a rapid unroofing of the complexes in the early Miocene. The Chiang Mai Basin, the largest such Cenozoic Basin in the region, lies immediately to the east. Its development is related to the extension observed at Doi Inthanon and Doi Suthep, however it is not definitively dated, and models for its development have difficulty reconciling Miocene cooling ages with Eocene detachment movement. Here we present new in-situ LA-ICP-MS and SIMS U-Pb age data of zircon and monazite grains from gneiss and leucogranite samples taken from Doi Inthanon and Doi Suthep. Our new zircon data exhibit an older age range of 221-210 Ma, with younger ages of ca. 72 Ma, and 32-26 Ma. Our monazite data imply an older age cluster at 83-67 Ma, and a younger age cluster of 34-24 Ma. While our data support the view of Indosinian basement being reworked in the Cretaceous, they also indicate a late Eocene-Oligocene tectonothermal event, resulting in prograde metamorphism and anatexis. We suggest that this later event is related to localized transpressional thickening associated with sinistral movement on the Mae Ping Fault, coupled with thickening at the restraining bend of the Mae Yuan Fault to the immediate west of Doi Inthanon. Further, this upper Oligocene age limit from our zircon and monazite data would imply a younger Miocene constraint on movement of the detachment, which, when combined with the previously recorded Miocene

  16. Hydrology of mountainous areas in the upper Indus Basin, Northern Pakistan with the perspective of climate change.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Zulfiqar; Hafeez, Mohsin; Ahmad, Iftikhar

    2012-09-01

    Mountainous areas in the northern Pakistan are blessed by numerous rivers that have great potential in water resources and hydropower production. Many of these rivers are unexploited for their water resource potential. If the potential of these rivers are explored, hydropower production and water supplies in these areas may be improved. The Indus is the main river originating from mountainous area of the Himalayas of Baltistan, Pakistan in which most of the smaller streams drain. In this paper, the hydrology of the mountainous areas in northern Pakistan is studied to estimate flow pattern, long-term trend in river flows, characteristics of the watersheds, and variability in flow and water resource due to impact of climate change. Eight watersheds including Gilgit, Hunza, Shigar, Shyok, Astore, Jhelum, Swat, and Chitral, Pakistan have been studied from 1960 to 2005 to monitor hydrological changes in relation to variability in precipitation, temperature and mean monthly flows, trend of snow melt runoff, analysis of daily hydrographs, water yield and runoff relationship, and flow duration curves. Precipitation from ten meteorological stations in mountainous area of northern Pakistan showed variability in the winter and summer rains and did not indicate a uniform distribution of rains. Review of mean monthly temperature of ten stations suggested that the Upper Indus Basin can be categorized into three hydrological regimes, i.e., high-altitude catchments with large glacierized parts, middle-altitude catchments south of Karakoram, and foothill catchments. Analysis of daily runoff data (1960-2005) of eight watersheds indicated nearly a uniform pattern with much of the runoff in summer (June-August). Impact of climate change on long-term recorded annual runoff of eight watersheds showed fair water flows at the Hunza and Jhelum Rivers while rest of the rivers indicated increased trends in runoff volumes. The study of the water yield availability indicated a minimum trend in

  17. Growth of the Zagros Fold-Thrust Belt and Foreland Basin, Northern Iraq, Kurdistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshnaw, Renas; Horton, Brian; Stockli, Daniel; Barber, Douglas; Ghalib, Hafidh; Dara, Rebwar

    2016-04-01

    The Zagros orogenic belt in the Middle Eastern segment of the Alpine-Himalayan system is among the youngest seismically active continental collision zones on Earth. However, due to diachronous and incremental collision, the precise ages and kinematics of shortening and deposition remain poorly understood. The Kurdistan region of the Zagros fold-thrust belt and foreland basin contains well-preserved Neogene wedge-top and foredeep deposits that include clastic nonmarine fill of the Upper Fars, Lower Bakhtiari, and Upper Bakhtiari Formations. These deposits record significant information about orogenic growth, fold-thrust dynamics, and advance of the deformation front. Thermochronologic and geochronologic data from thrust sheets and stratigraphic archives combined with local earthquake data provide a unique opportunity to address the linkages between surface and subsurface geologic relationships. This research seeks to constrain the timing and geometry of exhumation and deformation by addressing two key questions: (1) Did the northwestern Zagros fold-thrust belt evolve from initial thin-skinned shortening to later thick-skinned deformation or vice-versa? (2) Did the fold-thrust belt advance steadily under critical/supercritical wedge conditions involving in-sequence thrusting or propagate intermittently under subcritical conditions with out-of-sequence deformation? From north to south, apatite (U-Th)/He ages from the Main Zagros Thrust, the Mountain Front Flexure (MFF), and additional frontal thrusts suggest rapid exhumation by ~10 Ma, ~5 Ma, and ~8 Ma respectively. Field observations and seismic sections indicate progressive tilting and development of growth strata within the Lower Bakhtiari Formation adjacent to the frontal thrusts and within the Upper Bakhtiari Formation near the MFF. In the Kurdistan region of Iraq, a regional balanced cross section constrained by new thermochronometric results, proprietary seismic reflection profiles, and earthquake hypocenters

  18. GIS-based RUSLE modelling of Leça River Basin, Northern Portugal, in two different grid scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petan, S.; Barbosa, J. L. P.; Mikoš, M.; Pinto, F. T.

    2009-04-01

    Soil erosion is the mechanical degradation caused by the natural forces and it is also influenced by human activities. The biggest threats are the related loss of fertile soil for food production and disturbances of aquatic ecosystems which could unbalance the environment in a wider range. Thus, precise predictions of the soil erosion processes are of a major importance for preventing any kind of environmental degradations. Spatial GIS modelling and erosion maps greatly support the policymaking for land planning and environmental management. Leça River Basin, with a surface of 187 km2, is located in the Northern part of Portugal and it was chosen for testing RUSLE methodology for soil loss prediction and identifying areas with high potential erosion. The model involves daily rainfall data for rainfall erosivity estimation, topographic data for slope length and steepness factor calculation, soil type data, CORINE land cover and land use data. The raster layer model was structured in two different scales: with a grid cell size of 10 and 30 meters. The similarities and differences between the model results of both scales were evaluated.

  19. Model of the development of the Rif/Prerif basin and implications for the hydrocarbon prospectivity of northern Morocco

    SciTech Connect

    Munro, S.E. )

    1988-08-01

    The geology of northern Morocco is dominated by the mountainous areas of the Rif and the Prerif. These mountains form the southern half of the Rif-Betic arc. The surface geology of the Prerif area is characterized by the allochthonous mass of the Prerif nappe, which is variously described as a tectonic melange, an olistostrome, or a combination of the two. It is structurally extremely complex and this fact has, in the past, deterred international companies from exploring for oil in the area. Recently acquired seismic data shed some light on the structure within the Prerif nappe; it tends to support a tectonic origin rather than one based on gravity drive. In this framework, a model is proposed for the tectonic development of the Rif/Prerif in particular and the Rif/Betic arc in general, based upon the interaction of the Iberian, Moroccan, and Alboran plates from the Triassic to the Neogene. The seismic data also show, however, that a sizeable Mesozoic trough exists beneath the mass of the Prerif nappe. In addition, several piggyback basins are developed above the nappe. Therefore, considerable potential for oil and gas discoveries exists both above and below the nappe.

  20. [Monitoring of soil salinization in Northern Tarim Basin, Xinjiang of China in dry and wet seasons based on remote sensing].

    PubMed

    Yao, Yuan; Ding, Jian-Li; Zhang, Fang; Wang, Gang; Jiang, Hong-Nan

    2013-11-01

    Soil salinization is one of the most important eco-environment problems in arid area, which can not only induce land degradation, inhibit vegetation growth, but also impede regional agricultural production. To accurately and quickly obtain the information of regional saline soils by using remote sensing data is critical to monitor soil salinization and prevent its further development. Taking the Weigan-Kuqa River Delta Oasis in the northern Tarim River Basin of Xinjiang as test object, and based on the remote sensing data from Landsat-TM images of April 15, 2011 and September 22, 2011, in combining with the measured data from field survey, this paper extracted the characteristic variables modified normalized difference water index (MNDWI), normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), and the third principal component from K-L transformation (K-L-3). The decision tree method was adopted to establish the extraction models of soil salinization in the two key seasons (dry and wet seasons) of the study area, and the classification maps of soil salinization in the two seasons were drawn. The results showed that the decision tree method had a higher discrimination precision, being 87.2% in dry season and 85.3% in wet season, which was able to be used for effectively monitoring the dynamics of soil salinization and its spatial distribution, and to provide scientific basis for the comprehensive management of saline soils in arid area and the rational utilization of oasis land resources. PMID:24564152

  1. A water-resources data-network evaluation for Monterey County, California; Phase 3, Northern Salinas River drainage basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Templin, W.E.; Schluter, R.C.

    1990-01-01

    This report evaluates existing data collection networks and possible additional data collection to monitor quantity and quality of precipitation, surface water, and groundwater in the northern Salinas River drainage basin, California. Of the 34 precipitation stations identified, 20 were active and are concentrated in the northwestern part of the study area. No precipitation quality networks were identified, but possible data collection efforts include monitoring for acid rain and pesticides. Six of ten stream-gaging stations are active. Two surface water quality sites are sampled for suspended sediment, specific conductance, and chloride; one U.S. Geological Survey NASOAN site and one site operated by California Department of Water Resources make up the four active sampling locations; reactivation of 45 inactive surface water quality sites might help to achieve objectives described in the report. Three local networks measure water levels in 318 wells monthly, during peak irrigation, and at the end of the irrigation season. Water quality conditions are monitored in 379 wells; samples are collected in summer to monitor saltwater intrusion near Castroville and are also collected annually throughout the study area for analysis of chloride, specific conductance, and nitrate. An ideal baseline network would be an evenly spaced grid of index wells with a density of one per section. When baseline conditions are established, representative wells within the network could be monitored periodically according to specific data needs. (USGS)

  2. Reconsidering the taxonomy of the Black-Faced Uacaris, Cacajao melanocephalus group (Mammalia: Pitheciidae), from the northern Amazon Basin.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Stephen F; Guedes, Patrícia G; Figueiredo-Ready, Wilsea M B; Barnett, Adrian A

    2014-09-24

    The black-faced uacaris are a poorly known group of platyrrhine monkeys from the Rio Negro basin in northwestern Amazonia. Originally described as two distinct species-Cacajao melanocephalus (Humboldt 1812) and Cacajao ouakary (Spix 1823)-from opposite banks of the Negro, they were treated as a single species until the end of the twentieth century, when molecular studies reconfirmed their status as true species. One of these studies not only nominated a third (northern) species, Cacajao ayresi Boubli et al. 2008, but also identified C. ouakary as a junior synonym of C. melanocephalus, resulting in the introduction of a new nomen, Cacajao hosomi Boubli et al. 2008. In the present study, additional evidence on morphological and zoogeographic variables is analyzed, which indicates that C. ouakary should be reinstated, and supports the nomination of a neotype of C. melanocephalus. The molecular and zoogeographic data on the species status of the ayresi form are also re-assessed, leading to the conclusion that, on the basis of the evidence available at the present time, this form should be considered a subspecies of C. melanocephalus. A new taxonomic arrangement is proposed, which recognizes two species, C. ouakary and C. melanocephalus, the latter with two subspecies, C. m. melanocephalus and C. m. ayresi.

  3. [Monitoring of soil salinization in Northern Tarim Basin, Xinjiang of China in dry and wet seasons based on remote sensing].

    PubMed

    Yao, Yuan; Ding, Jian-Li; Zhang, Fang; Wang, Gang; Jiang, Hong-Nan

    2013-11-01

    Soil salinization is one of the most important eco-environment problems in arid area, which can not only induce land degradation, inhibit vegetation growth, but also impede regional agricultural production. To accurately and quickly obtain the information of regional saline soils by using remote sensing data is critical to monitor soil salinization and prevent its further development. Taking the Weigan-Kuqa River Delta Oasis in the northern Tarim River Basin of Xinjiang as test object, and based on the remote sensing data from Landsat-TM images of April 15, 2011 and September 22, 2011, in combining with the measured data from field survey, this paper extracted the characteristic variables modified normalized difference water index (MNDWI), normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), and the third principal component from K-L transformation (K-L-3). The decision tree method was adopted to establish the extraction models of soil salinization in the two key seasons (dry and wet seasons) of the study area, and the classification maps of soil salinization in the two seasons were drawn. The results showed that the decision tree method had a higher discrimination precision, being 87.2% in dry season and 85.3% in wet season, which was able to be used for effectively monitoring the dynamics of soil salinization and its spatial distribution, and to provide scientific basis for the comprehensive management of saline soils in arid area and the rational utilization of oasis land resources.

  4. Quantification and multivariate analysis of water erosion in the Mediterranean region. A case study of the Isser basin. northern Algeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeggane, Houari; Boutoutaou, Djamel

    2016-07-01

    In the Mediterranean region, the specifisity of erosion stems from a particularly contrasted climate, drought, and from summer and autumn severe thunderstorms. The process of erosion generates substantial loss of soil and affects any kind of crop. The adopted approach aims to establish regression models in order to highlight the relationship between solid and liquid flows at four measurement stations in the Isser catchement area, northern Ageria. The Power Model seems to explain this relationship. The quantification and temporal analysis of solid matter transport showed that the rates of erosion are high along the study area. The annual mean solid matter transport for the whole basin is about 2 200 t/km2.year, of which the main part is recorded in autumn during peak flows. The different factors involved in the process of water erosion are determined in advance in order to establish a model between the predictand variable, which is the specific erosion, and other predictors. Besides, a functional relationship has been highlighted between water erosion and the mean slope, the drainage density and the lithology index.

  5. Hydrogeochemistry of co-occurring geogenic arsenic, fluoride and iodine in groundwater at Datong Basin, northern China.

    PubMed

    Pi, Kunfu; Wang, Yanxin; Xie, Xianjun; Su, Chunli; Ma, Teng; Li, Junxia; Liu, Yaqing

    2015-12-30

    Abnormal levels of co-occurring arsenic (As), fluorine (F) and iodine (I) in groundwater at Datong Basin, northern China are geochemically unique. Hydrochemical, (18)O and (2)H characteristics of groundwater were analyzed to elucidate their mobilization processes. Aqueous As, F and I ranged from 5.6 to 2680 μg/L, 0.40 to 3.32 mg/L and 10.1 to 186 μg/L, respectively. High As, F and I groundwater was characterized by moderately alkaline, high HCO3(-), Fe(II), HS(-) and DOC concentrations with H3AsO3, F(-) and I(-) as the dominant species. The plots of δ(18)O values and Cl/Br ratios versus Cl(-) concentration demonstrate build-up of more oxidizing conditions and precipitation of carbonate minerals induced by vertical recharge and intensive evaporation facilitate As retention to Fe (hydr) oxides, but enhance F and I mobilization from host minerals. Under reducing conditions, As and I can be simultaneously released via reductive dissolution of Fe (hydr) oxides and reduction of As(V) and I(V) while F migration may be retarded due to effects of dissolution-precipitation equilibria between carbonate minerals and fluorite. With the prevalence of sulfate-reducing condition and lowering of HCO3(-) concentration, As and I may be sequestered by Fe(II) sulfides and F is retained to fluorite and on clay mineral surfaces. PMID:26282220

  6. Geohydrology of the northern Louisiana salt-dome basin pertinent to the storage of radioactive wastes; a progress report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hosman, R.L.

    1978-01-01

    Salt domes in northern Louisiana are being considered as possible storage sites for nuclear wastes. The domes are in an area that received regional sedimentation through early Tertiary (Eocene) time with lesser amounts of Quaternary deposits. The Cretaceous-Tertiary accumulation is a few thousand feet thick; the major sands are regional aquifers that extend far beyond the boundaries of the salt-dome basin. Because of multiple aquifers, structural deformation, and variations in the hydraulic characteristics of cap rock, the ground-water hydrology around a salt dome may be highly complex. The Sparta Sand is the most productive and heavily used regional aquifer. It is either penetrated by or overlies most of the domes. A fluid entering the Sparta flow system would move toward one of the pumping centers, all at or near municipalities that pump from the Sparta. Movement could be toward surface drainage where local geologic and hydrologic conditions permit leakage to the surface or to a surficial aquifer. (Woodard-USGS)

  7. 26Al/10Be burial dating of Xujiayao-Houjiayao site in Nihewan Basin, northern China.

    PubMed

    Tu, Hua; Shen, Guanjun; Li, Haixu; Xie, Fei; Granger, Darryl E

    2015-01-01

    The Xujiayao-Houjiayao site in Nihewan Basin is among the most important Paleolithic sites in China for having provided a rich collection of hominin and mammalian fossils and lithic artifacts. Based on biostratigraphical correlation and exploratory results from a variety of dating methods, the site has been widely accepted as early Upper Pleistocene in time. However, more recent paleomagnetic analyses assigned a much older age of ∼500 ka (thousand years). This paper reports the application of 26Al/10Be burial dating as an independent check. Two quartz samples from a lower cultural horizon give a weighted mean age of 0.24 ± 0.05 Ma (million years, 1σ). The site is thus younger than 340 ka at 95% confidence, which is at variance with the previous paleomagnetic results. On the other hand, our result suggests an age of older than 140 ka for the site's lower cultural deposits, which is consistent with recent post-infrared infrared stimulated luminescence (pIR-IRSL) dating at 160-220 ka.

  8. Retrogressive failures recorded in mass transport deposits in the Ursa Basin, Northern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawyer, Derek E.; Flemings, Peter B.; Dugan, Brandon; Germaine, John T.

    2009-10-01

    Clay-rich mass transport deposits (MTDs) in the Ursa Basin, Gulf of Mexico, record failures that mobilized along extensional failure planes and transformed into long runout flows. Failure proceeded retrogressively: scarp formation unloaded adjacent sediment causing extensional failure that drove successive scarp formation updip. This model is developed from three-dimensional seismic reflection data, core and log data from Integrated Ocean Drilling Project (IODP) Expedition 308, and triaxial shear experiments. MTDs are imaged seismically as low-amplitude zones above continuous, grooved, high-amplitude basal reflections and are characterized by two seismic facies. A Chaotic facies typifies the downdip interior, and a Discontinuous Stratified facies typifies the headwalls/sidewalls. The Chaotic facies contains discontinuous, high-amplitude reflections that correspond to flow-like features in amplitude maps: it has higher bulk density, resistivity, and shear strength, than bounding sediment. In contrast, the Discontinuous Stratified facies contains relatively dim reflections that abut against intact pinnacles of parallel-stratified reflections: it has only slightly higher bulk density, resistivity, and shear strength than bounding sediment, and deformation is limited. In both facies, densification is greatest at the base, resulting in a strong basal reflection. Undrained shear tests document strain weakening (sensitivity = 3). We estimate that failure at 30 meters below seafloor will occur when overpressure = 70% of the hydrostatic effective stress: under these conditions soil will liquefy and result in long runout flows.

  9. 26Al/10Be Burial Dating of Xujiayao-Houjiayao Site in Nihewan Basin, Northern China

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Hua; Shen, Guanjun; Li, Haixu; Xie, Fei; Granger, Darryl E.

    2015-01-01

    The Xujiayao-Houjiayao site in Nihewan Basin is among the most important Paleolithic sites in China for having provided a rich collection of hominin and mammalian fossils and lithic artifacts. Based on biostratigraphical correlation and exploratory results from a variety of dating methods, the site has been widely accepted as early Upper Pleistocene in time. However, more recent paleomagnetic analyses assigned a much older age of ∼500 ka (thousand years). This paper reports the application of 26Al/10Be burial dating as an independent check. Two quartz samples from a lower cultural horizon give a weighted mean age of 0.24 ± 0.05 Ma (million years, 1σ). The site is thus younger than 340 ka at 95% confidence, which is at variance with the previous paleomagnetic results. On the other hand, our result suggests an age of older than 140 ka for the site’s lower cultural deposits, which is consistent with recent post-infrared infrared stimulated luminescence (pIR-IRSL) dating at 160–220 ka. PMID:25706272

  10. Mesozoic deformation in the Chaoshan Depression of the Pearl River Mouth Basin, northern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiangyang; Sun, Zhen; Zhang, Yunfan; Li, Fucheng

    2016-05-01

    Newly collected, high resolution multi-beam sonar data are combined with previous bathymetry data to produce an improved bathymetric map of Shatsky Rise oceanic plateau. Bathymetry data show that two massifs within Shatsky Rise are immense central volcanoes with gentle flank slopes declining from a central summit. Tamu Massif is a slightly elongated, dome-like volcanic edifice; Ori Massif is square shaped and smaller in area. Several down-to-basin normal faults are observed on the western flank of the massifs but they do not parallel the magnetic lineations, indicating that these faults are probably not related to spreading ridge faulting. Moreover, the faults are observed only on one side of the massifs, which is contrary to expectations from a mechanism of differential subsidence around the massif center. Multi-beam data show many small secondary cones with different shapes and sizes that are widely-distributed on Shatsky Rise massifs, which imply small late-stage magma sources scattered across the surface of the volcanoes in the form of lava flows or explosive volcanism. Erosional channels occur on the flanks of Shatsky Rise volcanoes due to mass wasting and display evidence of down-slope sediment movement. These channels are likely formed by sediments spalling off the edges of summit sediment cap.

  11. INNOVATIVE METHODOLOGY FOR DETECTION OF FRACTURE-CONTROLLED SWEET SPOTS IN THE NORTHERN APPALACHIAN BASIN

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Jacobi

    2005-05-31

    The primary goal was to enter Phase 2 by analyzing geophysical logs and sidewall cores from a verification well drilled into the Trenton/Black River section along lineaments. However, the well has not yet been drilled; Phase 2 has therefore not been accomplished. We have switched oil and gas exploration and production companies, and are now in continued negotiations with Fortuna concerning a plan to retrieve 18 m of horizontal core across a gas-charged zone in the Trenton/Black River in central New York State, the ''hottest'' play in the Appalachian Basin. We completed analysis of remote sensing images to determine, by using the weights-of-evidence method, which images and processing techniques result in lineaments that best reflect the fractures found in outcrop. The conclusions do not differ from the preliminary conclusions reported in the previous progress report. These data continue to demonstrate that integration of aeromagnetic and remote sensing lineaments, surface structure, and soil gas and seismic allows us to extrapolate Trenton-Black River trends away from confirmatory seismic lines.

  12. Structural architecture and tectonic evolution of the Maghara inverted basin, Northern Sinai, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustafa, Adel R.

    2014-05-01

    Large NE-SW oriented asymmetric inversion anticlines bounded on their southeastern sides by reverse faults affect the exposed Mesozoic and Cenozoic sedimentary rocks of the Maghara area (northern Sinai). Seismic data indicate an earlier Jurassic rifting phase and surface structures indicate Late Cretaceous-Early Tertiary inversion phase. The geometry of the early extensional fault system clearly affected the sense of slip of the inverted faults and the geometry of the inversion anticlines. Rift-parallel fault segments were reactivated by reverse slip whereas rift-oblique fault segments were reactivated as oblique-slip faults or lateral/oblique ramps. New syn-inversion faults include two short conjugate strike-slip sets dissecting the forelimbs of inversion anticlines and the inverted faults as well as a set of transverse normal faults dissecting the backlimbs. Small anticline-syncline fold pairs ornamenting the steep flanks of the inversion anticlines are located at the transfer zones between en echelon segments of the inverted faults.

  13. Preliminary Paleomagnetic Results From Tertiary Rocks of Sedimentary Basins in Northern Vietnam and Tectonic Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, X.; Liu, Z.; Le, K.; Zhao, Y.; Hoang, V.; Phan, D.

    2013-12-01

    The South China Sea (SCS) is a classical representative of western Pacific marginal seas and contains records of Cenozoic tectonic events of SE Asia. The SCS has been at the center stage of many first-order tectonic and paleoclimatic events since the Mesozoic. One clear way to evaluate the relationship between tectonic uplift and climate is to study the resulting changes in marginal sea strata. To this end, we will conduct an integrated paleomagnetic and stratigraphic investigation on Tertiary strata from Phu Tho and Yen Bai provinces, northern Vietnam to help understand the causal linkages among geological and tectonic events and their consequences related to the SCS evolution. We will collect paleomagnetic samples at sections where the most continuous, complete, and best preserved Eocene-Miocene successions. Standard paleomagnetic field tests, such as the fold, reversal, and conglomerate tests will be used to determine the relative age of the magnetization. In addition to detailed thermal and alternating field demagnetization and analysis, selected samples will also be subjected to several rock magnetic analyses to identify magnetic carriers in the rocks. In particular, the hysteresis parameters Jrs/Js and Hcr /Hc ratios will enable us to apply techniques for detecting low-temperature remagnetization of sedimentary rocks. Preliminary finding of this ongoing project will be presented.

  14. The Manciano Sandstone: a shoreface deposit of Miocene basins of the Northern Apennines, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martini, I. P.; Cascella, A.; Rau, A.

    1995-09-01

    Well exposed, diamond-line cut, quarry-exposures of the Manciano Sandstone allow a detailed analysis of sandy, fossiliferous, nearshore deposits of the shelf of the Northern Apennines. The Manciano Sandstone is characterized by medium to very coarse, washed, fairly well sorted, lithic sandstone, with thin interlayers of sandy conglomerates. It displays two principal, rhythmically alternating sandy facies: (a) slightly burrowed (mostly Macaronichnus, Ophiomorpha, Skolithos) units, trough cross-bedded, locally showing possible tidal bundles with few whole Scutella (echinoid) shells reworked on foresets, or occasional large-scale (approximately 2 m) planar cross-bedded, bar-accretion units; and (b) slightly finer, darker-coloured reddish-brown sandstone units, heavily bioturbated ( Cruziana-Skolithos) ichnofauna) representing slightly more sheltered settings. Large oysters are present in near-living position in a few thin layers and, more commonly, as reworked, comminuted fragments in sandy layers. Many calcareous pebbles and oyster fragments are bored. Other fossils consist of echinoids ( Scutella), some balanids and reworked foraminifera and bryozoa. The Manciano sands were deposited primarily in a wave-dominated shoreface, containing migrating bars/ridges and affected by wave-induced, possibly tidal-enhanced currents. This tidal influence confirms the opening of the Miocene Apenninic Sea to oceans, both the developing Atlantic Ocean to the west and, through a long, narrow seaway, the Asian portion of the Tethys Sea to the east.

  15. Rayleigh-wave ellipticity and shallow structure in sedimentary basins: the Po Plain (northern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berbellini, A.; Morelli, A.; Ferreira, A. M. G.

    2015-12-01

    The amplitude ratio between horizontal and vertical components of Rayleigh waves (also known as ellipticity) is in principle uniquely sensitive to local earth structure beneath each recording station. Rayleigh wave ellipticity is mostly influenced by the shallowest layers, so it can be effectively used to infer the structure of the uppermost crust, with particular relevance for sedimentary environments. We implement an automatic method to measure Rayleigh wave ellipticity, and extensively apply it to teleseismic records from the northern part of Italy, for a period range between 10s and 130s. As expected, no appreciable correlation with epicenter distance or azimuth can be seen, but rather a strong correlation with local structure: generally high horizontal to vertical amplitude ratios are seen in sedimentary settings, with respect to Alpine and Apenninic crystalline-rock terrains. We verify that shortest usable period may be limited by very low shear-wave velocity in shallow sediments, when the assumed retrograde elliptical particle motion polarisation for the fundamental mode breaks off. The highly non-linear sensitivity of frequency-dependent ellipticity curves can then be inverted using a direct search method to infer shear wave velocity profiles below stations. By comparing our results with local a priori geological information we show that robust information can indeed be retrieved.

  16. Technological improvements in the field-based monitoring of glaciers in the Huasco basin, Northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cisternas, Sebastián; Uribe, José; Carrión, Daniela; Rivera, Andrés; Corripio, Javier

    2014-05-01

    Difficulties with the terrain, weather conditions and accessibility makes high altitude field-based glacier monitoring (>4000 m.a.s.l) particularly challenging. Due to this field measurements are often incomplete and temporally limited when available. Given the importance of temporal analyses when monitoring glacierised environments (especially those that are directly influenced by human activities such as mining) the development and improvement of field-based monitoring techniques is thus essential. Here a series of field technologies are presented that are intended to improve the monitoring of glaciers in the Pascua Lama mining project, Northern Chile (29º18'S , 70º03'W). Efforts focus on monitoring changes in the energy balance and the spatial distribution of albedo variation over glacier surfaces. Technological innovations are described in the use of: (1) meteorological networks (automatic weather stations) - improved for better transmission in unfavourable weather conditions through the use of high frequency portions of the electromagnetic spectrum; (2) Non-metric fixed camera systems - improved to allow continuous monitoring of glacier albedo variations by using high frequency transmission over the Industrial, Scientific and Medical (ISM) band and low power servers based on ARM architecture. The implementation of these technologies has so far successfully improved data acquisition were applied and offers a robust alternative to the traditional field-based glacier monitoring methods used previously.

  17. Small valley glaciers and the effectiveness of the glacial buzzsaw in the northern Basin and Range, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, David; Brocklehurst, Simon H.; Gawthorpe, Rob L.

    2008-12-01

    The glacial buzzsaw hypothesis suggests that efficient erosion limits topographic elevations in extensively glaciated orogens. Studies to date have largely focussed on regions where large glaciers (tens of kilometres long) have been active. In light of recent studies emphasising the importance of lateral glacial erosion in lowering peaks and ridgelines, we examine the effectiveness of small glaciers in limiting topography under both relatively slow and rapid rock uplift conditions. Four ranges in the northern Basin and Range, Idaho, Montana, and Wyoming, USA, were chosen for this analysis. Estimates of maximum Pleistocene slip rates along normal faults bounding the Beaverhead-Bitterroot Mountains (~ 0.14 mm y - 1 ), Lemhi Range (~ 0.3 mm y - 1 ) and Lost River Range (~ 0.3 mm y - 1 ) are an order of magnitude lower than those on the Teton Fault (~ 2 mm y - 1 ). We compare the distribution of glacial erosion (estimated from cirque floor elevations and last glacial maximum (LGM) equilibrium line altitude (ELA) reconstructions) and fault slip rate with three metrics of topography in each range: the along-strike maximum elevation swath profile, hypsometry, and slope-elevation profiles. In the slowly uplifting Beaverhead-Bitterroot Mountains, and Lemhi and Lost River Ranges, trends in maximum elevation parallel ELAs, independent of variations in fault slip rate. Maximum elevations are offset ~ 500 m from LGM ELAs in the Lost River Range, Lemhi Range, and northern Beaverhead-Bitterroot Mountains, and by ~ 350 m in the southern Beaverhead-Bitterroot Mountains, where glacial extents were less. The offset between maximum topography and mean Quaternary ELAs, inferred from cirque floor elevations, is ~ 350 m in the Lost River and Lemhi Ranges, and 200-250 m in the Beaverhead-Bitterroot Mountains. Additionally, slope-elevation profiles are flattened and hypsometry profiles show a peak in surface areas close to the ELA in the Lemhi Range and Beaverhead-Bitterroot Mountains

  18. The opening of the Woodlark Basin, subduction of the Woodlark spreading system, and the evolution of Northern Melanesia since mid-pliocene time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weissel, Jeffrey K.; Taylor, Brian; Karner, Garry D.

    1982-08-01

    Magnetic anomaly and seismological data define segments of active seafloor spreading and associated magnetic lineations trending ENE in the Woodlark Basin. The total opening rate has been approximately 6 cm/yr for the last 1 m.y. Spreading rates diminish by over 10% from east to west along the Woodlark spreading system implying a pole of current opening 15°-20° to the west. Commencement of seafloor spreading in the basin has apparently been time-transgressive, beginning prior to 3.5 m.y. in the east, and at successively later times to the west. Earthquake focal mechanisms and geological evidence suggest that the land areas bounding the western end of the Woodlark Basin are undergoing tensional deformation. We believe that eventually the Woodlark Basin plate boundary will propagate westward through the d'Entrecasteaux Islands into the Papuan peninsula. Hitherto unreported shallow seismicity associated with the northern margin of the NE-trending section of the Woodlark Rise probably reflects partial decoupling of the Woodlark and Solomon basins, possibly due to mechanical difficulties in subducting the young Woodlark lithosphere. Analysis of the relative motions between the Solomon, Indo-Australian, and Pacific plates shows that the Woodlark spreading system has been subducted at high rates (> 10 cm/yr) beneath the Solomon Islands during the opening of the Woodlark Basin. Several tectonic and geological features limited to the region of interaction of the Woodlark Basin with the Solomon Trench and arc may be symptomatic of ridge subduction. These features include high heat flow in the Solomon Trench, which shoals to 4 km; low levels of seismicity and only shallow hypocenters; and voluminous eruptions of high {K 2O }/{TiO 2} olivine basalts and basaltic andesites extremely close to the trench axis. This close association in space and time of an unusual volcanic suite with ridge subduction implies a strong dependence of the petrogenesis on the tectonic regime. A

  19. Analyses of infrequent (quasi-decadal) large groundwater recharge events in the northern Great Basin: Their importance for groundwater availability, use, and management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gangopadhyay, Subhrendu; Masbruch, Melissa D.; Pruitt, Tom; Rumsey, Christine; Susong, David D.

    2016-01-01

    There has been a considerable amount of research linking climatic variability to hydrologic responses in the western United States. Although much effort has been spent to assess and predict changes in surface water resources, little has been done to understand how climatic events and changes affect groundwater resources. This study focuses on characterizing and quantifying the effects of large, multiyear, quasi-decadal groundwater recharge events in the northern Utah portion of the Great Basin for the period 1960–2013. Annual groundwater level data were analyzed with climatic data to characterize climatic conditions and frequency of these large recharge events. Using observed water-level changes and multivariate analysis, five large groundwater recharge events were identified with a frequency of about 11–13 years. These events were generally characterized as having above-average annual precipitation and snow water equivalent and below-average seasonal temperatures, especially during the spring (April through June). Existing groundwater flow models for several basins within the study area were used to quantify changes in groundwater storage from these events. Simulated groundwater storage increases per basin from a single recharge event ranged from about 115 to 205 million cubic meters. Extrapolating these amounts over the entire northern Great Basin indicates that a single large quasi-decadal recharge event could result in billions of cubic meters of groundwater storage. Understanding the role of these large quasi-decadal recharge events in replenishing aquifers and sustaining water supplies is crucial for long-term groundwater management.

  20. Lower Permian stems as fluvial paleocurrent indicators of the Parnaíba Basin, northern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capretz, Robson Louiz; Rohn, Rosemarie

    2013-08-01

    A comprehensive biostratinomic study was carried out with abundant stems from the Lower Permian Motuca Formation of the intracratonic Parnaíba Basin, central-north Brazil. The fossils represent a rare tropical to subtropical paleofloristic record in north Gondwana. Tree ferns dominate the assemblages (mainly Tietea, secondarily Psaronius), followed by gymnosperms, sphenophytes, other ferns and rare lycophytes. They are silica-permineralized, commonly reach 4 m length (exceptionally more than 10 m), lie loosely on the ground or are embedded in the original sandstone or siltstone matrix, and attract particular attention because of their frequent parallel attitudes. Many tree fern stems present the original straight cylindrical to slightly conical forms, other are somewhat flattened, and the gymnosperm stems are usually more irregular. Measurements of stem orientations and dimensions were made in three sites approximately aligned in a W-E direction in a distance of 27.3 km at the conservation unit "Tocantins Fossil Trees Natural Monument". In the eastern site, rose diagrams for 54 stems indicate a relatively narrow azimuthal range to SE. These stems commonly present attached basal bulbous root mantles and thin cylindrical sandstone envelopes, which sometimes hold, almost adjacent to the lateral stem surface, permineralized fern pinnae and other small plant fragments. In the more central site, 82 measured stems are preferentially oriented in the SW-NE direction, the proportion of gymnosperms is higher and cross-stratification sets of sandstones indicate paleocurrents mainly to NE and secondarily to SE. In the western site, most of the 42 measured stems lie in E-W positions. The predominantly sandy succession, where the fossil stems are best represented, evidences a braided fluvial system under semiarid conditions. The low plant diversity, some xeromorphic features and the supposedly almost syndepositional silica impregnation of the plants are coherent with marked dry

  1. Geochemistry and petrogenesis of the Belmont diabase sheet, northern Culpeper Basin, Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    Mihm, K.A.; Nielsen, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    The Belmont diabase sheet (BDS) is one of numerous hypabyssal tholeiitic intrusions common to the early Mesozoic rift valleys of the mid-Atlantic states. Petrographic, microprobe and whole rock major and trace element analyses in conjunction with limited field and geophysical evidence indicate that the BDS is a westward dipping, irregular basin-shaped intrusive sheet of high-TiO/sub 2/ quartz-normative type diabase. The bulk of the exposed portion of the BDS is fractionated relative to the chill zone composition. A semi-circular outcrop pattern of relatively high MgO rocks surrounds the main body of the BDS. These high-MgO rocks share a distinctive petrography characterized by large, anhedral OPX grains often mantled by inverted pigeonite and are interpreted as a basal cumulate zone. Drill core samples collected from the western portion of the sheet penetrate 500' of fractionated diabase without intersecting the high-MgO layer or a lower chill margin, however,subhedral grains of inverted pigeonite appear in the lowermost core samples. This suggests that the cumulate layer underlies the sheet of >500' depth on the W side and crops out up-dip to the E, N and S where the sheet margins are turned upward. Mass balance calculations indicate that the exposed high-MgO rocks may be derived from the chill margin composition by accumulation of 13% OPX + 2% CPX + 5% PLAG (AN52) and the remaining rocks of the BDS are derived through fractional crystallization of varying amounts of CPX, OPX and PLAG. Magmatic features characteristic of similar tholeiitic intrusions such as rhythmic layering and a Mg-olivine layer were not observed. However, examination of the BDS and other hypabyssal intrusions offers insight into the limitations and circumstances under which these features may be developed.

  2. Assessment of River Habitat Quality in the Hai River Basin, Northern China.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yuekui; Shan, Baoqing; Zhao, Yu

    2015-09-17

    We applied a river habitat quality (RHQ) assessment method to the Hai River Basin (HRB); an important economic centre in China; to obtain baseline information for water quality improvement; river rehabilitation; and watershed management. The results of the assessment showed that the river habitat in the HRB is seriously degraded. Specifically; 42.41% of the sites; accounting for a river length of 3.31 × 10⁴ km; were designated poor and bad. Habitat in the plain areas is seriously deteriorated; and nearly 50% of the sites; accounting for a river length of 1.65 × 10⁴ km; had either poor or bad habitats. River habitat degradation was attributable to the limited width of the riparian zone (≤5 m); lower coverage of riparian vegetation (≤40%); artificial land use patterns (public and industrial land); frequent occurrence of farming on the river banks and high volumes of solid waste (nearly 10 m³); single flow channels; and rare aquatic plants (≤1 category). At the regional scale; intensive artificial land use types caused by urbanization had a significant impact on the RHQ in the HRB. RHQ was significantly and negatively correlated with farmland (r = 1.000; p < 0.01) and urban land (r = 0.998; p < 0.05); and was significantly and positively correlated with grassland and woodland (r = 1.000; p < 0.01). Intensive artificial land use; created through urbanization processes; has led to a loss of the riparian zone and its native vegetation; and has disrupted the lateral connectivity of the rivers. The degradation of the already essentially black rivers is exacerbated by poor longitudinal connectivity (index of connectivity is 2.08-16.56); caused by reservoirs and sluices. For river habitat rehabilitation to be successful; land use patterns need to be changed and reservoirs and sluices will have to be regulated.

  3. Assessment of River Habitat Quality in the Hai River Basin, Northern China

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yuekui; Shan, Baoqing; Zhao, Yu

    2015-01-01

    We applied a river habitat quality (RHQ) assessment method to the Hai River Basin (HRB); an important economic centre in China; to obtain baseline information for water quality improvement; river rehabilitation; and watershed management. The results of the assessment showed that the river habitat in the HRB is seriously degraded. Specifically; 42.41% of the sites; accounting for a river length of 3.31 × 104 km; were designated poor and bad. Habitat in the plain areas is seriously deteriorated; and nearly 50% of the sites; accounting for a river length of 1.65 × 104 km; had either poor or bad habitats. River habitat degradation was attributable to the limited width of the riparian zone (≤5 m); lower coverage of riparian vegetation (≤40%); artificial land use patterns (public and industrial land); frequent occurrence of farming on the river banks and high volumes of solid waste (nearly 10 m3); single flow channels; and rare aquatic plants (≤1 category). At the regional scale; intensive artificial land use types caused by urbanization had a significant impact on the RHQ in the HRB. RHQ was significantly and negatively correlated with farmland (r = 1.000; p < 0.01) and urban land (r = 0.998; p < 0.05); and was significantly and positively correlated with grassland and woodland (r = 1.000; p < 0.01). Intensive artificial land use; created through urbanization processes; has led to a loss of the riparian zone and its native vegetation; and has disrupted the lateral connectivity of the rivers. The degradation of the already essentially black rivers is exacerbated by poor longitudinal connectivity (index of connectivity is 2.08–16.56); caused by reservoirs and sluices. For river habitat rehabilitation to be successful; land use patterns need to be changed and reservoirs and sluices will have to be regulated. PMID:26393628

  4. Assessment of River Habitat Quality in the Hai River Basin, Northern China.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yuekui; Shan, Baoqing; Zhao, Yu

    2015-09-01

    We applied a river habitat quality (RHQ) assessment method to the Hai River Basin (HRB); an important economic centre in China; to obtain baseline information for water quality improvement; river rehabilitation; and watershed management. The results of the assessment showed that the river habitat in the HRB is seriously degraded. Specifically; 42.41% of the sites; accounting for a river length of 3.31 × 10⁴ km; were designated poor and bad. Habitat in the plain areas is seriously deteriorated; and nearly 50% of the sites; accounting for a river length of 1.65 × 10⁴ km; had either poor or bad habitats. River habitat degradation was attributable to the limited width of the riparian zone (≤5 m); lower coverage of riparian vegetation (≤40%); artificial land use patterns (public and industrial land); frequent occurrence of farming on the river banks and high volumes of solid waste (nearly 10 m³); single flow channels; and rare aquatic plants (≤1 category). At the regional scale; intensive artificial land use types caused by urbanization had a significant impact on the RHQ in the HRB. RHQ was significantly and negatively correlated with farmland (r = 1.000; p < 0.01) and urban land (r = 0.998; p < 0.05); and was significantly and positively correlated with grassland and woodland (r = 1.000; p < 0.01). Intensive artificial land use; created through urbanization processes; has led to a loss of the riparian zone and its native vegetation; and has disrupted the lateral connectivity of the rivers. The degradation of the already essentially black rivers is exacerbated by poor longitudinal connectivity (index of connectivity is 2.08-16.56); caused by reservoirs and sluices. For river habitat rehabilitation to be successful; land use patterns need to be changed and reservoirs and sluices will have to be regulated. PMID:26393628

  5. Debris flows on Belding Creek, Salmonberry River basin, northern Oregon Coast Range

    SciTech Connect

    Burris, L.M. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    Belding Creek, a tributary of the Salmonberry River, has experienced repeated debris flow episodes. The Salmonberry River flows through Paleocene Tillamook Basalt and is located at longitude 45[degree]43 minutes in the Northern Oregon Coast Range. On January 9, 1990, a debris flow initiated on a first order tributary of Belding Creek during a heavy precipitation event. A month later another debris flow initiated on a different first order stream under similar conditions. Both debris flows traveled for a distance of approximately 2.1 km and poured into the main Belding Creek channel washing out Belding Road which crosses the stream. Numerical data was obtained from the youngest flow deposit. The debris flow material density is 2.5 g/cm[sup 3]. It traveled at an average velocity of 2.9 m/s with a shear strength of 2.5 [times] 10[sup 4] dn/cm[sup 2], a friction angle of 4[degree], and a cohesion value of 1.4 [times] 10[sup 4] dn/cm[sup 3]. Less than 3% of the fine sediments deposited are clay and silt. Deposits from previous, older debris flow events are in and adjacent to the Belding Creek stream channel. Similar processes are evident in other major tributaries of the Salmonberry River, although these other stream channels have not shown recent activity. Each stream in the area that has experienced past debris flows similar to Belding Creek has a landslide feature at the top and follows regional lineation patterns.

  6. Lacustrine sedimentation and origin of the Upper Pennsylvanian Redstone limestone, northern Appalachian basin

    SciTech Connect

    Eggleston, J.R. )

    1993-03-01

    The Redstone limestone occurs in a 7- to 12-m interval between the underlying Pittsburgh and overlying Redstone coal beds. The thickness of the Redstone limestone, which is up to 12 m, varies laterally. The Redstone is sometimes partially or totally replaced by a fluvial siliciclastic unit, which formed either penecontemporaneous or just prior to the limestone. Two cores and an outcrop of Redstone limestone in northern West Virginia were studied in detail. X-ray mineralogical analyses indicate that the limestone is predominantly calcite, ankerite, and quartz, with minor amounts of dolomite, chert, pyrite, feldspar, and clay minerals. Six carbonate facies were identified. The predominant facies is a pedogenic breccia facies that contains typical paleosol features, such as peds and root traces, and represents periods of subaerial exposure of the sediment. A fossiliferous facies contains an abundance of ostracod and mollusk fossilized shells; nested ostracod shells and the occurrence of a shallow-water gastropod, Anthracopupa sp., suggest a shallow-water origin. A bioturbated facies exhibits disrupted bedding and burrows filled with detrital material. The micritic facies contains predominantly calcite and ankerite grains less than 30 microns in diameter and exhibits no apparent bedding. A laminated facies is characterized by two distinct types of lamination: one type is created by interbedding of quartz, clay minerals, plant material, and calcite and/or ankerite and could be caused by periodic storms; the other type contains interbeds of rhombohedral ankerite within predominantly micritic calcite, which could be caused by changes in climate or lake conditions. In summary, petrographic and sedimentological analyses indicate that the Redstone limestone probably formed in a shallow, widespread lake or series of lakes.

  7. Preliminary nannofossil and geochemical data from Jurassic black shales from the Qiangtang Basin, northern Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lan; Jenkyns, Hugh C.; Xu, Guiwen; Mattioli, Emanuela; Da, Xuejuan; Yi, Haisheng; Xia, Minquan; Zhu, Zhangxiong; Huang, Zhaohui

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents new biostratigraphic and geochemical data from the Biluo Co section in northern Tibet, which exposes Jurassic black organic-rich shales, locally containing abundant coccoliths. Because of a general lack of macrofossils, the stratigraphic ages have been a matter of debate. However, coccoliths suggest an Early Bajocian through Bathonian to possibly Early Callovian age (Middle Jurassic) for the middle-upper part of the section. In this study, a range of trace-metal paleoredox proxies is used to assess how seawater oxygen levels varied both locally and globally during the deposition of these shales. The redox-sensitive elements V, Cr, U, Ni, Cu, Mo, Co, Cd and Zn exhibit relatively high concentrations and element/Al ratios. In particular, the Ni compositions fluctuate between ∼75 ppm and ∼106 ppm and Mo between ∼1 ppm and ∼7 ppm: values that are higher than those of the post-Archean Average Shale. Palaeoproductivity proxies, such as Zn, P and Cd, which can be fixed in elevated concentrations in sediments deposited under generally reducing conditions, are also relatively enriched. Furthermore, the U-Mo concentrations and Enrichment Factors (EFs) are consistent with deposition under predominantly suboxic to weakly anoxic conditions. Scattered bivalves, however, point to at least intermittent oxic conditions on the sea floor. Based on the redox-sensitive trace-element concentrations, together with ratios (V/(V + Ni), Ni/Co and V/Cr), the formation of the Biluo Co black shales, in Tibet was probably caused by increased productivity and organic-matter flux, leading to enhanced preservation of organic material under low-oxygen conditions.

  8. Subsurface structure and stratigraphy of the northwest end of the Turkana Basin, Northern Kenya Rift, as revealed by magnetotellurics and gravity joint inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelfettah, Yassine; Tiercelin, Jean-Jacques; Tarits, Pascal; Hautot, Sophie; Maia, Marcia; Thuo, Peter

    2016-07-01

    In order to understand the subsurface stratigraphy and structure of the northwest end of the Turkana Basin, Northern Kenya Rift, we used 2-D joint inversion of magnetotelluric (MT) and gravity data acquired along 3 profiles perpendicular to the main Murua Rith-Lapur Rift Border Fault. The regional geology is characterized by a basement of Precambrian age overlain by a ≤500-m thick sandstone formation named the Lapur Sandstone of upper Cretaceous-lower Eocene in age, covered by thick rhyolitic and basaltic lavas of late Eocene-middle Miocene age, known as the "Turkana Volcanics". Final interpretation of the resistivity and density models, until 5 km depth, obtained by the joint inversion approach confirms the previous general knowledge about the half-graben geometry of the northern part of the Turkana Basin. The main Murua Rith-Lapur Rift Border Fault is well identified by both gravity and MT. At least, two other important secondary faults without surface expression are also identified. A new small half-graben basin, named the Kachoda Basin, parallel to the main Turkana Basin and filled by 1.5 km of sediments, has been also characterized. This study also highlights strong thickness variations of the three main geological units that could be expected in the subsurface of the Turkana Basin. For example, the sedimentary Nachukui and Kibish Formations reach up to >3 km in thickness at the eastern end of the north and central profiles. Lateral variations of the topography of the Precambrian basement are also evidenced. Conceptual geological models, which result from the combination of the obtained density and resistivity models as well as from geological and reflection seismic data, are proposed. In such an area of intensive and promising oil exploration, these models are essential in terms of identification of reservoirs, source rocks and trapping mechanisms.

  9. Subsurface structure and stratigraphy of the northwest end of the Turkana Basin, Northern Kenya Rift, as revealed by magnetotellurics and gravity joint inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelfettah, Yassine; Tiercelin, Jean-Jacques; Tarits, Pascal; Hautot, Sophie; Maia, Marcia; Thuo, Peter

    2016-07-01

    In order to understand the subsurface stratigraphy and structure of the northwest end of the Turkana Basin, Northern Kenya Rift, we used 2-D joint inversion of magnetotelluric (MT) and gravity data acquired along 3 profiles perpendicular to the main Murua Rith-Lapur Rift Border Fault. The regional geology is characterized by a basement of Precambrian age overlain by a ≤500-m thick sandstone formation named the Lapur Sandstone of upper Cretaceous-lower Eocene in age, covered by thick rhyolitic and basaltic lavas of late Eocene-middle Miocene age, known as the "Turkana Volcanics". Final interpretation of the resistivity and density models, until 5 km depth, obtained by the joint inversion approach confirms the previous general knowledge about the half-graben geometry of the northern part of the Turkana Basin. The main Murua Rith-Lapur Rift Border Fault is well identified by both gravity and MT. At least, two other important secondary faults without surface expression are also identified. A new small half-graben basin, named the Kachoda Basin, parallel to the main Turkana Basin and filled by 1.5 km of sediments, has been also characterized. This study also highlights strong thickness variations of the three main geological units that could be expected in the subsurface of the Turkana Basin. For example, the sedimentary Nachukui and Kibish Formations reach up to >3 km in thickness at the eastern end of the north and central profiles. Lateral variations of the topography of the Precambrian basement are also evidenced. Conceptual geological models, which result from the combination of the obtained density and resistivity models as well as from geological and reflection seismic data, are proposed. In such an area of intensive and promising oil exploration, these models are essential in terms of identification of reservoirs, source rocks and trapping mechanisms.

  10. Controls of oil family distribution and composition in nonmarine petroleum systems: A case study from Inner Mongolia Erlian basin, Northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhelong; Liu, Guangdi; Huang, Zhilong; Lu, Xuejun; Luo, Qiang; Ding, Xiujian

    2014-10-01

    The Erlian basin is a continental rift basin located in Inner Mongolia, Northern China. It is a typical representative of Cretaceous Northeast Asian Rift System, which includes many small petroliferous basins in Mongolia Republic and Northern China. Although Lower Cretaceous source rocks are understood to be most important in the Erlian petroleum systems, the precise identification of these source rock intervals and their determination on oil families distribution and composition are poorly understood in this tectonically complicated, nonmarine basin. New bulk data have been gathered from source rock intervals, oil sands and crude oil samples in eight main oil-producing subbasins. Geochemical analyses indicate that Lower Cretaceous Aershan formation (K1ba) and Tengger 1 formation (K1bt1) are two main source intervals in the Erlian basin and their source rock facies vary from profundal lacustrine to marginal lacustrine according to biomarker and trace elements calibration, the profundal lacustrine facies is characterised by brackish water and anoxic environment, which is similar to their correlative oils (Family 1 oils). The marginal lacustrine facies is characterised by freshwater and suboxic environment, which sourced the most common Family 2 oils. Meanwhile, different maturation processes exercise the second control on oil groups and their compositions, the profundal lacustrine source rocks characterised by their sulphur-rich kerogens lead to two oil groups (group 1 and group 2 oils), whose maturity range from low to normal; while, the marginal lacustrine source rock only lead to normal-maturity oils. At last, biodegradation affected the composition of a certain oils and formed group 4 heavy oils. In addition, short migration distance in small subbasins made the contamination or fractionation less notable in the Erlian basin.

  11. A high 87Sr 86Sr mantle source for low alkali tholeiite, northern Great Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mark, R.K.; Lee, Hu C.; Bowman, H.R.; Asaro, F.; McKee, E.H.; Coats, R.R.

    1975-01-01

    Olivine tholeiites, the youngest Tertiary units (about 8-11 m.y. old) at five widely spaced localities in northeastern Nevada, are geologically related to the basalts of the Snake River Plain, Idaho, to the north and are similar in major element and alkali chemistry to mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB) and island arc tholeiites. The measured K (1250-3350 ppm), Rb (1??9-6??2 ppm) and Sr (140-240 ppm) concentrations overlap the range reported for MORB. Three of the five samples have low, unfractionated rare earth element (REE) patterns, the other two show moderate light-REE enrichment. Barium concentration is high and variable (100-780 ppm) and does not correlate with the other LIL elements. The rocks have 87Sr/86Sr = 0??7052-0??7076, considerably higher than MORB (~0??702-0??703). These samples are chemically distinct (i.e. less alkalic) from the olivine tholeiites from the adjacent Snake River Plain, but their Sr isotopic compositions are similar. They contain Sr that is distinctly more radiogenic than the basalts from the adjacent Great Basin. About 10 b.y. would be required for the mean measured Rb/Sr (~ 0??02) of these samples to generate, in a closed system, the radiogenic Sr they contain. The low alkali content of these basalts makes crustal contamination an unlikely mechanism. If the magma is uncontaminated, the time-averaged Rb/Sr of the source material must have been ~0??04. A significant decrease in Rb/Sr of the source material (a factor 2??) thus most probably occurred in the relatively recent (1??09 yr) past. Such a decrease of Rb/Sr in the mantle could accompany alkali depletion produced by an episode of partial melting and magma extraction. In contrast, low 87Sr 86Sr ratios indicate that the source material of the mid-ocean ridge basalts may have been depleted early in the Earth's history. ?? 1975.

  12. INNOVATIVE METHODOLOGY FOR DETECTION OF FRACTURE-CONTROLLED SWEET SPOTS IN THE NORTHERN APPALACHIAN BASIN

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Jacobi; John Fountain

    2005-03-01

    The primary goal was to enter Phase 2 by analyzing geophysical logs and sidewall cores from a verification well drilled into the Trenton/Black River section along lineaments. However, the well has not yet been drilled; Phase 2 has therefore not been accomplished. We have switched oil and gas exploration and production companies, and are now, in conjunction with Fortuna, planning to retrieve 18 m of horizontal core across a gas-charged zone in the Trenton/Black River in central New York State, the ''hottest'' play in the Appalachian Basin. Secondary goals in Phase I were also completed in previous reporting period. Although new structural data were collected and analyzed for a few regions where we had no data, the results did not change the previous conclusions. We have also continued analyzing remote sensing images to determine, by using the weights-of-evidence method, which images and processing techniques result in lineaments that best reflect the fractures found in outcrop. We have tested the lineaments from EarthSat (1997), as well as lineaments we identified on Landsat and ASTER images. For fracture intensification domains (FIDs) along Seneca Lake, we found that lineaments identified on a fused image of Landsat and ASTER images produced better correlation to FIDs than lineaments from EarthSat (1997) and ASTER alone. This relationship held true for all orientations of FIDs except E-striking FIDs, which showed a better correlation with lineaments observed on ASTER lineaments than on the fused Landsat and ASTER image lineaments. For Cayuga Lake FIDs, lineaments identified on a fused image of Landsat and ASTER images also produced significantly better correlation to FIDs than lineaments from ASTER alone for NW- and NNW-striking FIDs. However, for NE-, ENE- and E-striking FIDs, ASTER lineaments generally showed the closest match. These data continue to demonstrate that integration of aeromagnetic and remote sensing lineaments, surface structure, soil gas and

  13. RECONNAISSANCE ASSESSMENT OF CO2 SEQUESTRATION POTENTIAL IN THE TRIASSIC AGE RIFT BASIN TREND OF SOUTH CAROLINA, GEORGIA, AND NORTHERN FLORIDA

    SciTech Connect

    Blount, G.; Millings, M.

    2011-08-01

    A reconnaissance assessment of the carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration potential within the Triassic age rift trend sediments of South Carolina, Georgia and the northern Florida Rift trend was performed for the Office of Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). This rift trend also extends into eastern Alabama, and has been termed the South Georgia Rift by previous authors, but is termed the South Carolina, Georgia, northern Florida, and eastern Alabama Rift (SGFAR) trend in this report to better describe the extent of the trend. The objectives of the study were to: (1) integrate all pertinent geologic information (literature reviews, drilling logs, seismic data, etc.) to create an understanding of the structural aspects of the basin trend (basin trend location and configuration, and the thickness of the sedimentary rock fill), (2) estimate the rough CO{sub 2} storage capacity (using conservative inputs), and (3) assess the general viability of the basins as sites of large-scale CO{sub 2} sequestration (determine if additional studies are appropriate). The CO{sub 2} estimates for the trend include South Carolina, Georgia, and northern Florida only. The study determined that the basins within the SGFAR trend have sufficient sedimentary fill to have a large potential storage capacity for CO{sub 2}. The deeper basins appear to have sedimentary fill of over 15,000 feet. Much of this fill is likely to be alluvial and fluvial sedimentary rock with higher porosity and permeability. This report estimates an order of magnitude potential capacity of approximately 137 billion metric tons for supercritical CO{sub 2}. The pore space within the basins represent hundreds of years of potential storage for supercritical CO{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} stored in aqueous form. There are many sources of CO{sub 2} within the region that could use the trend for geologic storage. Thirty one coal fired power plants are located within 100 miles of the deepest portions of

  14. Determining the source and genetic fingerprint of natural gases using noble gas geochemistry: a northern Appalachian Basin case study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunt, Andrew G.; Darrah, Thomas H.; Poreda, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Silurian and Devonian natural gas reservoirs present within New York state represent an example of unconventional gas accumulations within the northern Appalachian Basin. These unconventional energy resources, previously thought to be noneconomically viable, have come into play following advances in drilling (i.e., horizontal drilling) and extraction (i.e., hydraulic fracturing) capabilities. Therefore, efforts to understand these and other domestic and global natural gas reserves have recently increased. The suspicion of fugitive mass migration issues within current Appalachian production fields has catalyzed the need to develop a greater understanding of the genetic grouping (source) and migrational history of natural gases in this area. We introduce new noble gas data in the context of published hydrocarbon carbon (C1,C2+) (13C) data to explore the genesis of thermogenic gases in the Appalachian Basin. This study includes natural gases from two distinct genetic groups: group 1, Upper Devonian (Marcellus shale and Canadaway Group) gases generated in situ, characterized by early mature (13C[C1  C2][13C113C2]: –9), isotopically light methane, with low (4He) (average, 1  103 cc/cc) elevated 4He/40Ar and 21Ne/40Ar (where the asterisk denotes excess radiogenic or nucleogenic production beyond the atmospheric ratio), and a variable, atmospherically (air-saturated–water) derived noble gas component; and group 2, a migratory natural gas that emanated from Lower Ordovician source rocks (i.e., most likely, Middle Ordovician Trenton or Black River group) that is currently hosted primarily in Lower Silurian sands (i.e., Medina or Clinton group) characterized by isotopically heavy, mature methane (13C[C1 – C2] [13C113C2]: 3), with high (4He) (average, 1.85  103 cc/cc) 4He/40Ar and 21Ne/40Ar near crustal production levels and elevated crustal noble gas content (enriched 4He,21Ne, 40Ar). Because the release of each crustal noble gas (i.e., He, Ne, Ar

  15. Lake level and climate records of the last 90 ka from the Northern Basin of Lake Van, eastern Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çağatay, M. N.; Öğretmen, N.; Damcı, E.; Stockhecke, M.; Sancar, Ü.; Eriş, K. K.; Özeren, S.

    2014-11-01

    Sedimentary, geochemical and mineralogical analyses of the ICDP cores recovered from the Northern Basin (NB) of Lake Van provide evidence of lake level and climatic changes related to orbital and North Atlantic climate system over the last 90 ka. High lake levels are generally observed during the interglacial and interstadial periods, which are marked by deposition of varved sediments with high total organic carbon (TOC), total inorganic carbon (TIC), low detrital influx (high Ca/F) and high δ18O and δ13C values of authigenic carbonate. During the glacial and stadial periods of 71-58 ka BP (Marine Isotope Stage 4, MIS4) and end of last glaciation-deglaciation (30-14.5 ka BP; MIS3) relatively low lake levels prevailed, and grey homogeneous to faintly laminated clayey silts were deposited at high sedimentation and low organic productivity rates. Millennial-scale variability of the proxies during 60-30 ka BP (MIS3 is correlated with the Dansgaard-Oeschger (D-O)) and Holocene abrupt climate events in the Atlantic. These events are characterized by laminated sediments, with high TOC, TIC, Ca/Fe, δ18O and δ13C values. The Lake Van NB records correlate well in the region with the climate records from the lakes Zeribar and Urmia in Iran and the Sofular Cave in NW Anatolia, but are in general in anti-phase to those from the Dead Sea Basin (Lake Lisan) in the Levant. The relatively higher δ18O values (0 to -0.4‰) for the interglacial and interstadial periods in the Lake Van NB section are due to the higher temperature and seasonality of precipitation and higher evaporation, whereas the lower values (-0.8 to -2‰) during the glacial and stadial periods are caused mainly by relative decrease in both temperature and seasonality of precipitation. The high δ18O values (up to 4.2‰) during the Younger Dryas, together with the presence of dolomite and low TOC contents, supports evaporative conditions and low lake level. A gradual decrease in the δ18O values from an

  16. A slow-slipping active fold and thrust system at the SE corner of the Atacama basin, northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y.; Shyu, J. H.; González, G.

    2009-12-01

    The western South American offshore is one of the major active convergent plate boundaries in the world, where the Nazca plate is subducting northeastward beneath the South American plate at a rate of about 84 mm/yr. Despite of this rapid plate convergence, the forearc region of western Andes does not seem to undergo large deformation at present. In order to understand the characteristics and mechanisms of active forearc deformation related to the plate convergence, we investigated tectono-geomorphic features in the area of Tilocalar, near the SE margin of the Atacama Basin in northern Chile, where active structures have been previously identified. To map topographic features produced by active structures, we used a combination of several remote-sensing data sets, including digital elevation models (DEM) made from Shuttle Radar Topographic Mission (SRTM), as well as higher resolution ASTER and QuickBird satellite images. Detailed geomorphic surveys using real time kinematic (RTK) GPS are carried out in the field to obtain high-resolution topographic profiles across these features. We also performed 40Ar/39Ar dating of deformed volcanic rocks in order to determine the long-term slip rates of the active structures. The hyper-aridity of the Atacama Basin results in extremely low erosion and sedimentation rates in the area. As a result, the present relief of land surface is mostly produced by neotectonic activity, and can be used as deformation marker. In the Tilocalar area, several N-S trending ridges are present. These ridges, generally several tens of meters high, are likely formed by asymmetric anticlines or monoclines with steep forelimbs facing east, and these folds are likely fault-propagation folds produced by underlying thrust faults. We suggest that these faults merge at depth to become a major active thrust system. From 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages, we found that the surface ignimbrites mostly deposited in latest Pliocene (2.3~4.3 Ma). If the structures have been

  17. Ground-water resources and potential hydrologic effects of surface coal mining in the northern Powder River basin, southeastern Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slagle, Steven E.; Lewis, Barney D.; Lee, Roger W.

    1985-01-01

    The shallow ground-water system in the northern Powder River Basin consists of Upper Cretaceous to Holocene aquifers overlying the Bearpaw Shale--namely, the Fox Hills Sandstone; Hell Creek, Fort Union, and Wasatch Formations; terrace deposits; and alluvium. Ground-water flow above the Bearpaw Shale can be divided into two general flow patterns. An upper flow pattern occurs in aquifers at depths of less than about 200 feet and occurs primarily as localized flow controlled by the surface topography. A lower flow pattern occurs in aquifers at depths from about 200 to 1,200 feet and exhibits a more regional flow, which is generally northward toward the Yellowstone River with significant flow toward the Powder and Tongue Rivers. The chemical quality of water in the shallow ground-water system in the study area varies widely, and most of the ground water does not meet standards for dissolved constituents in public drinking water established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Water from depths less than 200 feet generally is a sodium sulfate type having an average dissolved-solids concentration of 2,100 milligrams per liter. Sodium bicarbonate water having an average dissolved-solids concentration of 1,400 milligrams per liter is typical from aquifers in the shallow ground-water system at depths between 200 and 1,200 feet. Effects of surface coal mining on the water resources in the northern Powder River Basin are dependent on the stratigraphic location of the mine cut. Where the cut lies above the water-yielding zone, the effects will be minimal. Where the mine cut intersects a water-ielding zone, effects on water levels and flow patterns can be significant locally, but water levels and flow patterns will return to approximate premining conditions after mining ceases. Ground water in and near active and former mines may become more mineralized, owing to the placement of spoil material from the reducing zone in the unsaturated zone where the minerals are

  18. Low Angle Normal Fault System Controls the Structure Evolution of Baiyun Deepwater Basin and Its Lithosphere Thinning, Northern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.; Ren, J.; Yang, L.

    2015-12-01

    The discovery of the transition area from ~30 km to weakly thinned continental crust (<12 km) in Baiyun deepwater basin, Northern South China Sea leads to two questions: What controls extreme crustal thinning and what is the nature of Baiyun basin. The 3D seismic data newly acquired show that Baiyun basin is an asymmetric half graben mainly controlled by a set of north-dipping normal faults converging in deep. By employing the principle of back-stripping, we estimate the fault dips and slip amount would be in the absence of post-rift sediments and seawater loading. Results show these Middle Eocene faults were extremely active, with a high accumulation horizontal displacement (> 10 km) and an initial very low angle (<7°), followed by a rotated into sub-horizontal. A general scenario for extension of the uppermost continental crust probably includes simultaneous operation of low angle normal fault (F1) as well as parallel arrays of step-faults (domino-faults, f2-f9). Under such a scenario, it shows no obvious extension discrepancy in Baiyun basin. Our results indicate that Baiyun sag preserves information recording the continent thinning before the seafloor spreading, and it could be an abandoned inner rifted basin.

  19. Delineation of ground-water basins and recharge areas for municipal water-supply springs in a karst aquifer system in the Elizabethtown area, northern Kentucky

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, C.J.

    1997-01-01

    Ground-water basins and recharge areas for municipal water-supply springs for the Elizabethtown area, northern Kentucky, were delineated using a hydrogeologic-mapping approach, potentiometric map interpretation, anddye-tracing tests. Five distinct ground-water basins drained by major karst springs are present in the Elizabethtown area. These basins are composed of networks of hydraulically interconnected solution conduits and fractures. The boundaries of the basins for Elizabethtown and Dyers Springs-the primary sources of water for the city of Elizabethtown-weredelineated by the positions of inferred ground-water divides on an existing potentiometric contour map. The results of dye-tracing tests, plotted as straight- line flowpaths, were used to confirm the presence and location of inferred ground-water divides and to adjust the position of the basin boundaries. Recharge areas of 4.8 and 2.7 square miles weredelineated for Elizabethtown and Dyers Springs, respectively. Swallets that drain concentrated stormwater runoff from major highways are presentin the recharge areas for both municipal-supply springs. Each spring is therefore potentially vulnerable to stormwater-runoff contaminants oraccidental spills and releases of toxic or hazardous materials into certain highway drainage culverts.

  20. Basin structure beneath the Santa Rosa Plain, Northern California: Implications for damage caused by the 1969 Santa Rosa and 1906 San Francisco earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McPhee, D.K.; Langenheim, V.E.; Hartzell, S.; McLaughlin, R.J.; Aagaard, B.T.; Jachens, R.C.; McCabe, C.

    2007-01-01

    Regional gravity data in the northern San Francisco Bay region reflect a complex basin configuration beneath the Santa Rosa plain that likely contributed to the significant damage to the city of Santa Rosa caused by the 1969 M 5.6, 5.7 Santa Rosa earthquakes and the 1906 M 7.9 San Francisco earthquake. Inversion of these data indicates that the Santa Rosa plain is underlain by two sedimentary basins about 2 km deep separated by the Trenton Ridge, a shallow west-northwest-striking bedrock ridge west of Santa Rosa. The city of Santa Rosa is situated above the 2- km-wide protruding northeast corner of the southern basin where damage from both the 1969 and 1906 earthquakes was concentrated. Ground-motion simulations of the 1969 and 1906 earthquakes, two events with opposing azimuths, using the gravity- defined basin surface, show enhanced ground motions along the northeastern edge of this corner, suggesting that basin-edge effects contributed to the concentration of shaking damage in this area in the past and may also contribute to strong shaking during future earthquakes.

  1. Development of Paleogene depressions and deposition of Lacustrine source rocks in the Pearl River Mouth basin, northern margin of the South China Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chunxiu; Sun, Yuxiao

    1994-11-01

    A more accurate, integrated chronostratigraphic framework is applied to the analysis of the development of Paleogene depressions in the Pearl River Mouth basin. The results of our study show that the development of these depressions was characterized by at least three rifting or basin-forming phases occurring during these periods: late Paleocene (Late Cretaceous?)-middle Eocene, late Eocene-early Oligocene, and middle-Oligocene-late Oligocene. The transition from rifting stage to postrifting stage in the basin is about 10 m.y. later than the initial spreading of the South China Sea. The prologue of the spreading of the South China Sea began as early as the end of the middle Eocene. Lacustrine source rocks deposited during the basin`s first rifting phase are thick and of good quality; source rocks deposited during the last two phases, which had a sharp increase in sedimentation rate, are of lesser quality, with the exception being those areas where deposits were out of reach of sediment from the northern mainland.

  2. Yield Responses of Ruderal Plants to Sucrose in Invasive-Dominated Sagebrush Steppe of the Northern Great Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brunson, J.L.; Pyke, D.A.; Perakis, S.S.

    2010-01-01

    Restoration of sagebrush-steppe plant communities dominated by the invasive ruderals Bromus tectorum (cheatgrass) and Taeniatherum caput-medusae (medusahead) can be facilitated by adding carbon (C) to the soil, stimulating microbes to immobilize nitrogen (N) and limit inorganic N availability. Our objectives were to determine responses in (1) cheatgrass and medusahead biomass and seed production; (2) soil microbial biomass C and N; and (3) inorganic soil N to a range of C doses and to calculate the lowest dose that yielded a significant response. In November 2005, we applid 12 C doses ranging from 0 to 2,400 kg C/ha as sucrose to plots sown with cheatgrass and medusahead at two sites in the northern Great Basin. Other ruderal plants established in our plots, and this entire ruderal community was negatively affected by C addition. End-of-year biomass of the ruderal community decreased approximately by approximately 6% at each site for an increase in C dose of 100 kg C/ha. For the same increase in C, microbial biomass C increased by 2-4 mg/kg in November 2005 and March 2006, but not in July 2006. There was little, if any, microbial soil N uptake, as microbial biomass N increased by 0.3 mg/kg at only one site at the earliest date, in November 2005. Soil nitrate (NO3-) measured via resin capsules placed in situ for the study duration decreased at both sites with increasing C. Although we found no threshold dose of C, for a significant reduction in ruderal biomass, we calculated lowest significant doses of 240-640 kg C/ha. ?? 2010 Society for Ecological Restoration International.

  3. A longitudinal epidemiological survey of bovine trypanosomosis and its vectors in the White Volta river basin of Northern Ghana.

    PubMed

    Mahama, C I; Desquesnes, M; Dia, M L; Losson, B; De Deken, R; Speybroeck, N; Geerts, S

    2005-03-31

    A longitudinal epidemiological survey of bovine trypanosomosis and its vectors was carried out in the Volta river basin of Northern Ghana to determine the relationship between cattle management and the incidence of bovine trypanosomosis. Two groups of sentinel cattle under different systems of management, classified as "fully-sedentary" and "partially-sedentary" (depending on the type of management) were followed over a 1-year period starting from March 2003 onwards. Cattle were screened at intervals of 3 months using the buffy coat technique (BCT). Buffy coat specimen from animals that were positive for the BCT and those that were negative, but with a packed cell volume (PCV) of less than 21% were further tested using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Plasma from all animals were tested for antibody using the indirect antibody enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Trypanosomosis challenge was determined in tandem with the epidemiological survey with watering sites of sentinel cattle being the foci of interest. The parasitological prevalence at the start of the survey was higher in the fully-sedentary group (9%) than in the partially-sedentary group (3%). In subsequent visits, however, the parasitological incidence was consistently higher in the partially-sedentary group than in the fully-sedentary group. The mean seroprevalence (ELISA) of both groups increased from 3% in March to 54% in December. Statistical analysis of the serological results using a random effect logistic regression, showed a significant difference in incidence of bovine trypanosomosis between the two groups. There was also a significant effect of time. The influence of cattle herding on host-vector-parasite interface and its consequence on the incidence of trypanosomosis are discussed. PMID:15740857

  4. Natural resources and their prospects in the closed basins of rift valley marginal grabens in northern Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meaza, Hailemariam; Frankl, Amaury; Poesen, Jean; Zenebe, Amanuel; Deckers, Jozef; Vaneetvelde, Veerle; Lanckriet, Sil; Nyssen, Jan

    2016-04-01

    With increasing population, producing more food and fibers has led to an expansion of the area under cultivation. For this, much attention is given to low-lying flat areas in search of suitable agricultural lands. The objectives of this paper are therefore: (1) to review the opportunities and challenges of natural resources in the marginal grabens for rural development; (2) to highlight the knowledge gaps and priorities in research and development in the marginal grabens, and (3) to supplement the literature review through repeat transect walks, focus group discussions and interviews across the western rift valley of northern Ethiopia. The paper shows that marginal grabens along the rift valleys are rich both in blue and green water resources due to their topographical and geological characteristics. Spate irrigation has been a growing water management practice to respond to soil moisture deficit. Besides, marginal grabens are fertile plains as a result of alluvial deposition that could be suitable for agricultural development. However, rainfall variability and groundwater withdrawal lead to graben basin closure and salinization. Notably, riverbed incisions and sediment deposition affects drainage systems and water supply in the marginal grabens. As a result, socioeconomic and natural capital of the marginal graben farmers are continuously threatened. Thus, the benefits of natural resources for rural development in the marginal grabens along the rift valley can be optimized if the current bottlenecks are converted into opportunities. A better understanding of the complex marginal graben system via a robust land evaluation framework will improve livelihoods of the communities that live in the (closed) marginal grabens. Keywords: population pressure, marginal grabens, endorheic lakes, salinization, Ethiopia

  5. A longitudinal epidemiological survey of bovine trypanosomosis and its vectors in the White Volta river basin of Northern Ghana.

    PubMed

    Mahama, C I; Desquesnes, M; Dia, M L; Losson, B; De Deken, R; Speybroeck, N; Geerts, S

    2005-03-31

    A longitudinal epidemiological survey of bovine trypanosomosis and its vectors was carried out in the Volta river basin of Northern Ghana to determine the relationship between cattle management and the incidence of bovine trypanosomosis. Two groups of sentinel cattle under different systems of management, classified as "fully-sedentary" and "partially-sedentary" (depending on the type of management) were followed over a 1-year period starting from March 2003 onwards. Cattle were screened at intervals of 3 months using the buffy coat technique (BCT). Buffy coat specimen from animals that were positive for the BCT and those that were negative, but with a packed cell volume (PCV) of less than 21% were further tested using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Plasma from all animals were tested for antibody using the indirect antibody enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Trypanosomosis challenge was determined in tandem with the epidemiological survey with watering sites of sentinel cattle being the foci of interest. The parasitological prevalence at the start of the survey was higher in the fully-sedentary group (9%) than in the partially-sedentary group (3%). In subsequent visits, however, the parasitological incidence was consistently higher in the partially-sedentary group than in the fully-sedentary group. The mean seroprevalence (ELISA) of both groups increased from 3% in March to 54% in December. Statistical analysis of the serological results using a random effect logistic regression, showed a significant difference in incidence of bovine trypanosomosis between the two groups. There was also a significant effect of time. The influence of cattle herding on host-vector-parasite interface and its consequence on the incidence of trypanosomosis are discussed.

  6. Meltwater palaeohydrology of the Baker River basin (Chile/Argentina) during Late Pleistocene deglaciation of the Northern Patagonia Icefield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorndycraft, Varyl; Bendle, Jacob; Benito, Gerardo; Sancho, Carlos; Palmer, Adrian; Rodríguez, Xavier

    2016-04-01

    The Late Pleistocene deglaciation of the Northern Patagonia Icefield (NPI) was characterised by rapid ice sheet thinning and retreat, and the development of large proglacial lake systems characterised by continental scale drainage reversals. In this region, research has focused primarily on the identification of former ice-limits (e.g. moraine ridges) for geochronological analyses, with little attention given to the meltwater palaeohydrology of major river valleys. The Baker River catchment drains the majority of the eastern ice shed of the NPI, with a basin area of 29,000 km2 that includes the large transboundary lakes of General Carrera/Buenos Aires and Cochrane/Puerreydón. The Baker River valley is aligned north to south, crossing the east-west valleys of the main NPI outflow glaciers, and thus represents an important aspect of regional Late Pleistocene palaeogeography. The Baker River valley therefore has the potential to refine regional models of deglaciation through better understanding of relationships between glacier dynamics, ice dammed lakes and meltwater pathways. Here we present geomorphological mapping from the Atlantic-Pacific drainage divide (over 150 km east of the Cordillera) to the lower Baker valley, in order to reconstruct Late Pleistocene palaeohydrology. We provide new mapping of palaeolake shoreline elevations and evidence for glacial lake outburst flood (GLOF) pathways that require a re-evaluation of the currently accepted palaeogeographic models. For example, the palaeohydrological evidence does not support existing models of a unified Buenos Aires/Puerreydón mega-lake at ca. 400m elevation. We propose a relative chronology of palaeohydrological events that help refine the published moraine chronology derived from cosmogenic nuclide exposure dating. Controls on Late Pleistocene meltwater palaeohydrology of the Baker catchment are discussed, including the interplay of glacial processes and regional tectonics, in particular, dynamic

  7. Formation of hydrothermal deposits at Kings Triple Junction, northern Lau back-arc basin, SW Pacific: The geochemical perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paropkari, Anil L.; Ray, Durbar; Balaram, V.; Surya Prakash, L.; Mirza, Imran H.; Satyanarayana, M.; Gnaneshwar Rao, T.; Kaisary, Sujata

    2010-04-01

    An inactive hydrothermal field was discovered near Kings Triple Junction (KTJ) in northern Lau back-arc basin during 19th cruise of R/V Akademik Mstislav Keldysh in 1990. The field consisted of a large elongated basal platform 'the pedestal' with several 'small' chimneys on its periphery and one 'main mound' superposed over it. The surrounding region is carpeted with lava pillows having ferromanganese 'precipitate' as infillings. The adjoining second field consisted of small chimney like growths termed as 'Christmas Tree' Field. The basal pedestal, the peripheral chimneys and small 'Christmas Tree' like growths (samples collected by MIR submersibles), though parts of the same hydrothermal field, differ significantly in their mineralogy and elemental composition indicating different history of formation. The pedestal slab consisting of chalcopyrite and pyrite as major minerals and rich in Cu is likely to have formed at higher temperatures than sphalerite dominated peripheral chimney. Extremely low concentration of high field strength elements (e.g. Zr, Hf, Nb and Ta) and enrichment of light REE in these sulfides indicate prominent influence of aqueous arc-magma, rich in subduction components. The oxide growths in the 'Christmas Tree' Field have two distinct layers, Fe rich orange-red basal part which seems to have formed at very low temperature as precipitates from diffused hydrothermal flows from the seafloor whereas Mn rich black surface coating is formed from hydrothermal fluids emanated from the seafloor during another episode of hydrothermal activity. Perhaps this is for the first time such unique hydrothermal oxide growths are being reported in association with hydrothermal system. Here, we discuss the possible processes responsible for the formation of these different hydrothermal deposits based on their mineralogy and geochemistry.

  8. Seismic hazards astride the boundary between the eastern Snake River Plain and northern Basin and Range Province Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, I.G.; Hemphill-Haley, M.A.; Sawyer, T.L. ); Coppersmith, K.J.; Youngs, R.R. ); Smith, R.P.; Jackson, S.M.; Hackett, W.R. ); Silva, W.J.; Stark, C.M. ); Knuepfer, P.L.K. . Dept. of Geological Sciences); Bruhn, R.L.; Wu, D. . Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

    1993-04-01

    The occurrence of the damaging 1983 M[sub w] 6.8 Borah Peak, Idaho earthquake, which ruptured a central segment of the Lost River fault, has increased the awareness of seismic hazards in this portion of the Northern Basin and Range Province (NBR). As a result, comprehensive deterministic and probabilistic seismic hazard analyses were performed for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) which is located within the eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP) but adjacent to the NBR. In this region, the most significant seismic sources are three late-Quaternary NBR normal faults, the Lost River, Lemhi and Beaverhead faults, and ESRP volcanic zones. For each source, the maximum earthquake, source geometry, recurrence and their uncertainties were estimated and incorporated into the probabilistic analysis through the use of logic trees. Recent paleoseismic trenching of the Lost River and Lemhi faults and volcanic mapping in the ESRP provided much of the data necessary to characterize the most significant seismic sources. Issues such as fault segmentation, temporal clustering, the nature of fault termination, and the maximum magnitude and recurrence of volcanic zone earthquakes were evaluated in the hazard analyses. Deterministic and probabilistic ground motions were computed using both empirical and stochastic approaches. In the deterministic analysis, the southern segments of the Lemhi fault controlled the hazard at the INEL due to their proximity and potential to generate M[sub w] [approximately]7 earthquakes. In the estimation of deterministic ground motions, potential rupture scenarios were evaluated for a Lemhi earthquake. In the probabilistic analysis, the hazard is dominated by the ESRP random earthquake, and the Lemhi and Lost River faults. The difference in the results of the two analyses points out the uncertainties in assessing seismic hazards due to random earthquakes and in regions of large but infrequent earthquakes.

  9. Innovative Methodology for Detection of Fracture-Controlled Sweet Spots in the Northern Appalachian Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Jacobi; John Fountain; Stuart Loewenstein; Edward DeRidder; Bruce Hart

    2007-03-31

    For two consecutive years, 2004 and 2005, the largest natural gas well (in terms of gas flow/day) drilled onshore USA targeted the Ordovician Trenton/Black River (T/BR) play in the Appalachian Basin of New York State (NYS). Yet, little data were available concerning the characteristics of the play, or how to recognize and track T/BR prospects across the region. Traditional exploration techniques for entry into a hot play were of limited use here, since existing deep well logs and public domain seismic were almost non-existent. To help mitigate this problem, this research project was conceived with two objectives: (1) to demonstrate that integrative traditional and innovative techniques could be used as a cost-effective reconnaissance exploration methodology in this, and other, areas where existing data in targeted fracture-play horizons are almost non-existent, and (2) determine critical characteristics of the T/BR fields. The research region between Seneca and Cayuga lakes (in the Finger Lakes of NYS) is on strike and east of the discovery fields, and the southern boundary of the field area is about 8 km north of more recently discovered T/BR fields. Phase I, completed in 2004, consisted of integrating detailed outcrop fracture analyses with detailed soil gas analyses, lineaments, stratigraphy, seismic reflection data, well log data, and aeromagnetics. In the Seneca Lake region, Landsat lineaments (EarthSat, 1997) were coincident with fracture intensification domains (FIDs) and minor faults observed in outcrop and inferred from stratigraphy. Soil gas anomalies corresponded to ENE-trending lineaments and FIDs. N- and ENE-trending lineaments were parallel to aeromagnetic anomalies, whereas E-trending lineaments crossed aeromagnetic trends. 2-D seismic reflection data confirmed that the E-trending lineaments and FIDs occur where shallow level Alleghanian salt-cored thrust-faulted anticlines occur. In contrast, the ENE-trending FIDs and lineaments occur where Iapetan

  10. Eocene to late Oligocene history of crustal shortening within the Hoh Xil Basin and implications for the uplift history of the northern Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staisch, Lydia M.; Niemi, Nathan A.; Clark, Marin K.; Chang, Hong

    2016-04-01

    The timing and magnitude of deformation across the northern Tibetan Plateau are poorly constrained but feature prominently in geodynamic models of the plateau's evolution. The Fenghuoshan fold and thrust belt, located in the Hoh Xil Basin, provides a valuable record of the Cenozoic deformation history of the northern Tibetan Plateau. Here we integrate fault gouge geochronology, low-temperature thermochronology, geologic mapping, and a balanced cross section to resolve the deformation history of Hoh Xil Basin. Chronologic data suggest that deformation initiated in the mid-Eocene continued until at least 34 Ma and ceased by 27 Ma. The balanced cross section resolves 34 ± 12 km upper crustal shortening (24 ± 9%). We explore whether the observed Cenozoic shortening can account for the modern elevation and lithospheric thickness in the northern Tibetan Plateau. For a range of reasonable preshortening conditions, we conclude that the observed shortening alone cannot achieve modern crustal and mantle lithospheric thicknesses or modern elevation without either the removal of lithospheric mantle, the influx of lower crustal material, or some combination of these processes. Our results, along with previous studies, suggest that crustal shortening propagated into the northern Tibetan Plateau shortly after the onset of the Indo-Asian collision. The small magnitude of shortening and the late Oligocene cessation of deformation in the northern Tibetan Plateau raise questions of how and where the remaining Indo-Asian convergence was accommodated between Eocene to mid-Miocene time, prior to the approximately late Miocene establishment of the deformation patterns observed in the present day.

  11. Identifying key climate and environmental factors affecting rates of post-fire big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) recovery in the northern Columbia Basin, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shinneman, Douglas; McIlroy, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Sagebrush steppe of North America is considered highly imperilled, in part owing to increased fire frequency. Sagebrush ecosystems support numerous species, and it is important to understand those factors that affect rates of post-fire sagebrush recovery. We explored recovery of Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp.wyomingensis) and basin big sagebrush (A. tridentata ssp. tridentata) communities following fire in the northern Columbia Basin (Washington, USA). We sampled plots across 16 fires that burned in big sagebrush communities from 5 to 28 years ago, and also sampled nearby unburned locations. Mixed-effects models demonstrated that density of large–mature big sagebrush plants and percentage cover of big sagebrush were higher with time since fire and in plots with more precipitation during the winter immediately following fire, but were lower when precipitation the next winter was higher than average, especially on soils with higher available water supply, and with greater post-fire mortality of mature big sagebrush plants. Bunchgrass cover 5 to 28 years after fire was predicted to be lower with higher cover of both shrubs and non-native herbaceous species, and only slightly higher with time. Post-fire recovery of big sagebrush in the northern Columbia Basin is a slow process that may require several decades on average, but faster recovery rates may occur under specific site and climate conditions.

  12. Tectonic Evolution of the Northern Malawi rift, East Africa: Structural Controls on Sediment Dispersal in a Large Lake Basin.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortimer, E.; Paton, D.; Scholz, C.; Strecker, M.

    2005-12-01

    The Malawi Rift is an integral part of the East African Rift system (EARs), the type example of a rift system in its youthful stages of development. Understanding the spatio-temporal evolution of this rift system provides insights into the past histories and controls on more ancient rift basins. Fundamental questions remain regarding the structural styles, partitioning, and sediment dispersal patterns within large lacustrine basins that are common to young rifts. Such basins are particularly useful recorders of climatic fluctuations. In areas with pronounced climatic variability and high evaporation/precipitation ratios this may lead to, often transient, basin isolation that may dramatically affect sediment and facies distribution. We investigate the structural evolution and sedimentation patterns of the North basin, Malawi Rift. We utilise two seismic reflection data sets: the first, collected by project PROBE, records the entire basin-fill (Sequences 1-3) at medium resolution; the second provides a closely-spaced high-resolution survey of the past ~1 Ma (Sequence 3). These data document the development of the basin-bounding and intra-basin faults. Throughout its history, the basin-bounding fault has accommodated the greatest strain and therefore exerted the fundamental control on the distribution of sediment within the rift. Present-day sediments enter the basin axially, although there is evidence that transverse supply was also important in the past. We identify 11 intra-basin structures that strike parallel or sub-parallel to this border fault. These intra-basin faults, active from the earliest stages, have initial segment lengths of ~30 km, but rapidly reach lengths in excess of 80 km in the north of the basin, and 60 km in the south. Much of the sedimentation along the faults occurred during Sequence 2 (~2.7-1.6 Ma), a period of relative over-filling of the basin. While the basin-bounding fault controls the overall sediment architecture, all 11 intra-basin

  13. Spatial variation in total element concentration in soil within the Northern Great Plains coal region, and regional soil chemistry in Bighorn and Wind River basins, Wyoming and Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Severson, R.C.; Tidball, R.R.

    1979-01-01

    PART A: To objectively determine the changes in chemical character of an area subjected to mining and reclamation, prior information is needed. This study represents a broadscale inventory of total chemical composition of the surficial materials of the Northern Great Plains coal region (western North and South Dakota, eastern Montana, and northeastern Wyoming); data are given for 41 elements in A and C soil horizons. An unbalanced, nested, analysis-of-variance design was used to quantify variation in total content of elements between glaciated and unglaciated terrains, for four increasingly smaller geographic scales, and to quantify variation due to sample preparation and analysis. From this statistical study, reliable maps on a regional basis (>100 km) were prepared for C, K, and Rb in A and C soil horizons; for N a, Si, Th, D, and Zn in A-horizon soil; and for As, Ca, Ge, and Mg in C-horizon soil. The distribution of variance components for the remaining 29 elements did not permit the construction of reliable maps. Therefore, a baseline value for each of these elements is given as a measure of the total element concentration in the soils of the Northern Great Plains coal region. The baseline is expressed as the 95-percent range in concentration to be expected in samples of natural soils. PART B: A reconnaissance study of total concentrations of 38 elements in samples of soils (0-40 cm deep, composite) from the Bighorn and Wind River Basins of Montana and Wyoming indicates that the geographic variation for most elements occurs locally (5 km or less). However, in the Bighorn Basin, Zn exhibits significant regional variation (between geologic units); and in the Wind River Basin, AI, Cr, K, Mn, Mo, Ni, U, and V exhibit similar variation. For the remaining elements, the lack of regional variation suggests that a single summary statistic can be used to estimate a baseline value that reflects the range in concentration to be expected in samples of soils in each basin

  14. A regional view of urban sedimentary basins in Northern California based on oil industry compressional-wave velocity and density logs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brocher, T.M.

    2005-01-01

    Compressional-wave (sonic) and density logs from 119 oil test wells provide knowledge of the physical properties and impedance contrasts within urban sedimentary basins in northern California, which is needed to better understand basin amplification. These wire-line logs provide estimates of sonic velocities and densities for primarily Upper Cretaceous to Pliocene clastic rocks between 0.1 - and 5.6-km depth to an average depth of 1.8 km. Regional differences in the sonic velocities and densities in these basins largely 1reflect variations in the lithology, depth of burial, porosity, and grain size of the strata, but not necessarily formation age. For example, Miocene basin filling strata west of the Calaveras Fault exhibit higher sonic velocities and densities than older but finer-grained and/or higher-porosity rocks of the Upper Cretaceous Great Valley Sequence. As another example, hard Eocene sandstones west of the San Andreas Fault have much higher impedances than Eocene strata, mainly higher-porosity sandstones and shales, located to the east of this fault, and approach those expected for Franciscan Complex basement rocks. Basement penetrations define large impedence contrasts at the sediment/basement contact along the margins of several basins, where Quaternary, Pliocene, and even Miocene deposits directly overlie Franciscan or Salinian basement rocks at depths as much as 1.7 km. In contrast, in the deepest, geographic centers of the basins, such logs exhibit only a modest impedance contrast at the sediment/basement contact at depths exceeding 2 km. Prominent (up to 1 km/sec) and thick (up to several hundred meters) velocity and density reversals in the logs refute the common assumption that velocities and densities increase monotonically with depth.

  15. Three climatic cycles recorded in a loess-palaeosol sequence at Semlac (Romania) - implications for dust accumulation in the Carpathian Basin and the northern Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeeden, Christian; Hambach, Ulrich; Kels, Holger; Schulte, Philipp; Eckmeier, Eileen; Marković, Slobodan; Klasen, Nicole; Lehmkuhl, Frank

    2016-04-01

    Recent investigations of the Semlac loess section in the Southeastern Carpathian Basin, which is situated at the Mureş River in its lower reaches (Banat region, western Romanian), are presented. Dating back to marine isotope stage (MIS) 10, the more than 10 m thick loess sequence includes four fossil sol-complexes developed in homogenous relatively fine silty loess. Because good preservation and sedimentation of fine silt Semlac is regarded as a key section for the Carpathian Basin, which offers possibilities to a) improve the understanding of the type and composition of the lowland loess sequences in the Carpathian Basin also beyond the last interglacial palaeosol complex, b) to reconstruct the temporal evolution of the local loess-palaeosol successions and c) to compare the loess of the region to loess-sequences in adjacent and dust proxy data in the northern hemisphere. A strikingly sinusoidal course of physical property data with depth/time point to relatively homogenous, quasi-continuous background sedimentation of dust, interpreted as long-range transport (LRT). An integrated age model based on correlation to reference records and luminescence dating is compiled. Applying this age model we compare climate proxy data from Semlac to both global data and to data from the very southeast of the Carpathian Basin (Vojvodina, Serbia). The obtained results provide new insight into the dust accumulation regime in the Carpathian Basin and offer new palaeoenvironmental information for the region and are an important step towards establishing a catena from the thin loess-like sediments of the Banat foothills in the East towards the thicker and seemingly more complete loess sections of the southeastern and central Carpathian Basin. Disentangling grain size data from soil formation proxies gives quantitative estimates for the contribution of original sediment and weathering (through soil formation) to the present clay fraction. Patterns of clay from direct sedimentation

  16. {open_quotes}Black Gold{close_quotes} leads to new structural interpretation, Northern Sangre de Cristo Mountains/Northeast San Luis Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, T.A.; Belcher, J.S.; Gries, R.

    1995-06-01

    In the course of exploring for gold along the east margin of the Rio Grande Rift (northern Sangre de Cristo Mountains and northeastern San Luis Basin) live Cretaceous oil was discovered in fractured Precambrian gneiss in 25 of 42 shallow drill holes. Geologic mapping located two outcrops of Mesozoic sediments along the west flank of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains. Mancos Shale, Dakota Group and Morrison Formation sediments were identified from 17 drill holes. These are the first known occurrences of Mesozoic sediments in the area. Previous investigations had concluded that the Mesozoic section eroded from the San Luis uplift during the Laramide. Surface and subsurface geologic data was integrated with gravity, magnetic and seismic surveys for a new structural interpretation. The San Luis Basin is separated from the mountains by an intermediate block and the main basin-bounding fault is three miles west-southwest of the mountain front. A major low-angle, normal fault or detachment fault is related to Miocene rifting. A thick section of Mesozoic sediments are interpreted to be present in the hanging wall of this low angle fault. Buried and thermally matured in a Laramide intermountane basin, these sediments are likely the source of the present day oil found in Precambrian rocks.

  17. Numerical investigation of salinity in controlling ore-forming fluid transport in sedimentary basins: example of the HYC deposit, Northern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jianwen; Bull, Stuart; Large, Ross

    2004-10-01

    This paper presents the first hydrogeological model that fully couples transient fluid flow, heat and solute transport associated with the formation of the HYC SEDEX deposit in the McArthur Basin, northern Australia. Numerical results reveal that salinity plays an important role in controlling hydrothermal fluid migration. In particular, it appears that it is the distribution of evaporitic units within a given basin, rather than their absolute abundance, that controls the development of free convection. Relatively saline conditions at the seafloor strengthen the thermally-induced buoyancy force and hence promote free convection of basinal solutions; whereas high salinities at the bottom counteract the thermal function of natural geothermal gradient and suppress the development of convective hydrothermal fluid circulation. In the latter case, higher thermal gradients are required to initiate substantial free convective fluid flow. Numerical experiments also suggest the position of an ore body with respect to its vent system may be controlled by the spatial and temporal salinity distributions in the basin. Vent-distal ore formation, a result of exhalation of brines that are denser than seawater and hence can flow away from the vent region, is promoted by moderate salinity at the seafloor and higher salinity in the aquifer. Vent-proximal ore accumulation, a result of pluming upon exhalation of brines less dense than seawater, is favored by the highest salinity conditions occurring near the level of the seafloor.

  18. Application of the authigenic 10Be/9Be dating method to Late Miocene-Pliocene sequences in the northern Danube Basin (Pannonian Basin System): Confirmation of heterochronous evolution of sedimentary environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šujan, Michal; Braucher, Régis; Kováč, Michal; Bourlès, Didier L.; Rybár, Samuel; Guillou, Valéry; Hudáčková, Natália

    2016-02-01

    Authigenic 10Be/9Be dating method was applied to lacustrine, deltaic and alluvial sequences of the northern Danube Basin (Pannonian Basin System), to bridge the insufficiency of geochronological data for the Late Miocene to Pliocene period. The measurements of 51 samples (both lacustrine and floodplain), ranging from 11.6 to 0.95 Ma are consistent with the existing magnetostratigraphic and biostratigraphic data standing mainly on the evolution degree of endemic mollusk fauna, mammals and dinocysts. This agreement confirms our assumption that the incoming beryllium fluxes remained constant over the studied time period and thus that the two initial 10Be/9Be ratios determined in actual Holocene/Late Pleistocene sediments (lacustrine and floodplain) are valid for these environments. The obtained ages indicate gradual progradation of the deltaic depositional systems across the Danube Basin with a clear time-transgressional character, replacing basin floor and shelfal environments. Deltaic sedimentation occurred firstly in the north at foothills of the Western Carpathians from 11.0 Ma, and changed to the alluvial environment after 10.5 Ma. At the same time (~ 10.5 Ma), the paleo-Danube deltaic system draining the Eastern Alps entered the study area from the Vienna Basin situated on the West. Later, the deltaic systems were merged in the central part of the basin and reached its southeastern margin at ~ 9.4 Ma. Regression of the Lake Pannon from the southernmost part of the study area is evidenced after 8.7 Ma. Alluvial deposition of meandering rivers lasting until 6.0-5.0 Ma followed and was interrupted by the early Pliocene basin inversion. Sedimentation of braided streams took place during the late Pliocene and Pleistocene, reflecting uplift of mountains surrounding the basin margins. This study documents the powerful potential of the authigenic 10Be/9Be dating method and its reliability in a basin with complicated tectonic and sedimentary history. It demonstrates that

  19. Rock magnetic properties and paleoenvironmental implications of an 8-Ma Late Cenozoic terrigenous succession from the northern Tian Shan foreland basin, northwestern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Honghua; Zhang, Weiguo; Li, Youli; Dong, Chenyin; Zhang, Tianqi; Zhou, Zuyi; Zheng, Xiangmin

    2013-12-01

    In the northern Tian Shan foreland basin, northwestern China, the thick Cenozoic terrigenous succession is crucial for paleoclimate-environmental reconstruction of the Asian interior. Here we present a detailed rock magnetic investigation on 245 samples from the ~ 1200-m-thick Neogene Taxi He section with a magnetostratigraphic age span of ca. 8.0 to 2.0 Ma in the northern Tian Shan foreland basin. Our rock magnetic results indicate that the significant variations in composition, concentration and grain size of magnetic minerals occurred at ca. 6.0, 3.7 and 2.7 Ma. The comparable compositions of rare earth elements (REEs) throughout the Neogene Taxi He section suggest no significant modification of the source materials during the interval between ca. 8.0 and 2.0 Ma, and thus sediment provenance is not regarded as responsible for these observed variations in rock magnetic properties. Our further analyses show that the variations in magnetic properties of the Taxi He section are casually linked mainly with lithofacies transition due to range encroachment into foreland basin as well as climate aridification. Identified enhancement of aridification was chronologically constrained at ca. 6.0 and 2.7 Ma. Such climate events are important archives for reconstructing the Late Cenozoic paleoclimatic history of the Asian interior. Further comparison between different paleoclimate records clearly indicates that magnetic parameters such as S- 100mT are potentially effective proxy indices for paleoclimate-environmental reconstruction in the Tian Shan foreland basins and the nearby areas.

  20. Palynology, petrography and geochemistry of the Sewickley coal bed (Monongahela Group, Late Pennsylvanian), Northern Appalachian Basin, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eble, C.F.; Pierce, B.S.; Grady, W.C.

    2003-01-01

    Forty-two bench samples of the Sewickley coal bed were collected from seven localities in the northern Appalachian Basin and analyzed palynologically, petrographically, and geochemically. The Sewickley coal bed occurs in the middle of the Pittsburgh Formation (Monongahela Group) and is of Late Pennsylvanian age. Palynologically, it is dominated by spores of tree ferns. Tree fern spore taxa in the Sewickley include Punctatisporites minutus, Punctatosporites minutus, Laevigatosporites minimus, Spinosporites exiguus, Apiculatasporites saetiger, and Thymospora spp. In fact, Punctatisporites minutus was so abundant that it had to be removed from the standard counts and recorded separately (average 73.2%). Even when Punctatisporites minutus is removed from the counts, tree fern spores still dominate a majority of the assemblages, averaging 64.4%. Among the tree fern spores identified in the Sewickley coal, Thymospora exhibits temporal and spatial abundance variation. Thymospora usually increases in abundance from the base to the top of the bed. Thymospora is also more abundant in columns that are thick (>100 cm) and low in ash yield (< 12.0%, dry basis). Calamite spores (e.g. Calamospora spp., Laevigatosporites minor, and L. vulgaris) are the next most abundant plant group represented in the Sewickley coal, averaging 20%. Contributions from all other plant groups are minor in comparison. Petrographically, the Sewickley coal contains high percentages of vitrinite (average 82.3%, mineral matter-free (mmf)), with structured forms being more common than unstructured forms. In contrast, liptinite and inertinite macerals both occur in low percentages (average 7.7% and 10.0%, respectively). Geochemically, the Sewickley coal has a moderate ash yield (average 12.4%) and high total sulfur content (average 3.4%). Four localities contained a high ash or carbonaceous shale bench. These benches, which may be coeval, are strongly dominated by tree fern spores. Unlike the lower ash

  1. Genesis of Middle Miocene Yellowstone hotspot-related bonanza epithermal Au-Ag deposits, Northern Great Basin, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, J. A.; Unger, D. L.; Kamenov, G. D.; Fayek, M.; Hames, W. E.; Utterback, W. C.

    2008-09-01

    Epithermal deposits with bonanza Au-Ag veins in the northern Great Basin (NGB) are spatially and temporally associated with Middle Miocene bimodal volcanism that was related to a mantle plume that has now migrated to the Yellowstone National Park area. The Au-Ag deposits formed between 16.5 and 14 Ma, but exhibit different mineralogical compositions, the latter due to the nature of the country rocks hosting the deposits. Where host rocks were primarily of meta-sedimentary or granitic origin, adularia-rich gold mineralization formed. Where glassy rhyolitic country rocks host veins, colloidal silica textures and precious metal-colloid aggregation textures resulted. Where basalts are the country rocks, clay-rich mineralization (with silica minerals, adularia, and carbonate) developed. Oxygen isotope data from quartz (originally amorphous silica and gels) from super-high-grade banded ores from the Sleeper deposit show that ore-forming solutions had δ 18O values up to 10‰ heavier than mid-Miocene meteoric water. The geochemical signature of the ores (including their Se-rich nature) is interpreted here to reflect a mantle source for the “epithermal suite” elements (Au, Ag, Se, Te, As, Sb, Hg) and that signature is preserved to shallow crustal levels because of the similar volatility and aqueous geochemical behavior of the “epithermal suite” elements. A mantle source for the gold in the deposits is further supported by the Pb isotopic signature of the gold ores. Apparently the host rocks control the mineralization style and gangue mineralogy of ores. However, all deposits are considered to have derived precious metals and metalloids from mafic magmas related to the initial emergence of the Yellowstone hotspot. Basalt-derived volatiles and metal(loid)s are inferred to have been absorbed by meteoric-water-dominated geothermal systems heated by shallow rhyolitic magma chambers. Episodic discharge of volatiles and metal(loid)s from deep basaltic magmas mixed with

  2. Selection of flooded agricultural fields and other landscapes by female northern pintails wintering in Tulare Basin, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleskes, Joseph P.; Jarvis, Robert L.; Gilmer, David S.

    2003-01-01

    Habitat selection and use are measures of relative importance of habitats to wildlife and necessary information for effective wildlife conservation. To measure the relative impor- tance of flooded agricultural fields and other landscapes to northern pintails (Anas acuta) wintering in Tulare Basin (TB), California, we radiotagged female pintails during late August-early October, 1991-1993 in TB and other San Joaquin Valley areas and deter- mined use and selection of these TB landscapes through March each year. Availability of landscape and field types in TB changed within and among years. Pintail use and selec- tion (based upon use-to-availability log ratios) of landscape and field types differed among seasons, years, and diel periods. Fields flooded after harvest and before planting (i.e., pre-irrigated) were the most available, used, and selected landscape type before the hunting season (Prehunt). Safflower was the most available, used, and-except in 1993, when pre-irrigated fallow was available-selected pre-irrigated field type during Prehunt. Pre-irrigated barley-wheat received 19-22% of use before hunting season, but selection varied greatly among years and diel periods. During and after hunting season, managed marsh was the most available, used, and, along with floodwater areas, selected landscape type; pre-irrigated cotton and alfalfa were the least selected field types and accounted for <13% of pintail use. Agricultural drainwater evaporation ponds, sewage treatment ponds, and reservoirs accounted for 42-48% of flooded landscape available but were lit- tle used and least selected. Exodus of pintails from TB coincided with drying of pre-irri- gated fallow, safflower, and barley-wheat fields early in winter, indicating that preferred habitats were lacking in TB during late winter. Agriculture conservation programs could improve TB for pintails by increasing flooding of fallow and harvested safflower and grain fields. Conservation of remaining wetlands should

  3. Status and understanding of groundwater quality in the Northern Coast Ranges study unit, 2009: California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mathany, Timothy M.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Chloroform, simazine, and perchlorate were observed in the Interior Basins and Coastal Basins study areas, predominantly at shallow sites with top-of-perforation depths ≤70 feet below land surface, with modern water (post-1950s), and with oxic groundwater conditions.

  4. Tectono-sedimentary evolution of an extensional basin revealed by a combined photo-geological and field-mapping approach. The Montefalco Basin (Northern Apennines, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucci, Francesco; Mirabella, Francesco; Santangelo, Michele; Cardinali, Mauro; Guzzetti, Fausto

    2016-04-01

    Active extensional basins are important since their sedimentary infills and bounding tectonic structures provide: i) sinks with preservation potential for sedimentary and fossil records of past changes in climate and sediment/water supply, ii) information on the growth, activity, decay and death of normal faults, iii) vast economic reserves of hydrocarbons, water and minerals. Unfortunately, quaternary extensional basins, especially if located in humid and temperate climate environments, are often characterized by extensively cultivated areas, homogeneous terrains and quite flat morphologies. Furthermore, they commonly host human settlements, together with roads, economic and industrial infrastructures, with a consequent limited availability of good outcrops. Such a limitation can (often severely) hamper an adequate mapping of the sedimentary infill. Therefore alternative methodological approaches (such as aerial photographs interpretation, API) are needed to integrate heterogeneous and incomplete datasets. This contribution presents an updated photo-geological map of a Quaternary extensional basin in Central Italy, the Montefalco Basin. This basin developed in a continental environment characterized by clayey-sandy lacustrine and fluvial sequences (late Pliocene - early Pleistocene) underlying more recent coarse grained deposits related to alluvial fan environment (early-to-late Pleistocene) and younger palustrine deposits (late Pleistocene). Since the late Pleistocene, regional uplift and local tectonics led to the end of deposition in the Montefalco basin, which experienced a diffuse incision and the modification of the drainage network, in response to the W-to-E migration of active faulting and tectonic subsidence. The new photo-geological map represents an important improvement compared to the existing data, since it provides unprecedented and spatially distributed information on the geometry of the continental deposits and on the tectonic structures affecting

  5. Late Mesozoic to Paleogene stratigraphy of the Salar de Atacama Basin, Antofagasta, Northern Chile: Implications for the tectonic evolution of the Central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mpodozis, Constantino; Arriagada, César; Basso, Matilde; Roperch, Pierrick; Cobbold, Peter; Reich, Martin

    2005-04-01

    The Salar de Atacama basin, the largest "pre-Andean" basin in Northern Chile, was formed in the early Late Cretaceous as a consequence of the tectonic closure and inversion of the Jurassic-Early Cretaceous Tarapacá back arc basin. Inversion led to uplift of the Cordillera de Domeyko (CD), a thick-skinned basement range bounded by a system of reverse faults and blind thrusts with alternating vergence along strike. The almost 6000-m-thick, upper Cretaceous to lower Paleocene sequences (Purilactis Group) infilling the Salar de Atacama basin reflects rapid local subsidence to the east of the CD. Its oldest outcropping unit (Tonel Formation) comprises more than 1000 m of continental red sandstones and evaporites, which began to accumulate as syntectonic growth strata during the initial stages of CD uplift. Tonel strata are capped by almost 3000 m of sandstones and conglomerates of western provenance, representing the sedimentary response to renewed pulses of tectonic shortening, which were deposited in alluvial fan, fluvial and eolian settings together with minor lacustrine mudstone (Purilactis Formation). These are covered by 500 m of coarse, proximal alluvial fan conglomerates (Barros Arana Formation). The top of the Purilactis Group consists of Maastrichtian-Danian alkaline lava and minor welded tuffs and red beds (Cerro Totola Formation: 70-64 Ma K/Ar) deposited during an interval of tectonic quiescence when the El Molino-Yacoraite Late Cretaceous sea covered large tracts of the nearby Altiplano-Puna domain. Limestones interbedded with the Totola volcanics indicate that this marine incursion advanced westwards to reach the eastern CD slope. CD shortening in the Late Cretaceous was accompanied by volcanism and continental sedimentation in fault bounded basins associated to strike slip along the north Chilean magmatic arc to the west of the CD domain, indicating that oblique plate convergence prevailed during the Late Cretaceous. Oblique convergence seems to have

  6. Late Quaternary landscape evolution in the Kunlun Mountains and Qaidam Basin, Northern Tibet: A framework for examining the links between glaciation, lake level changes and alluvial fan formation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Owen, L.A.; Finkel, R.C.; Haizhou, M.; Barnard, P.L.

    2006-01-01

    The Qaidam Basin in Northern Tibet is one of the largest hyper-arid intermontane basins on Earth. Alluvial fans, pediment surfaces, shorelines and a thick succession of sediments within the basin, coupled with moraines and associated landforms in the adjacent high mountain catchments of the Kunlun Mountains, record a complex history of Late Quaternary paleoenvironmental change and landscape evolution. The region provides an ideal natural laboratory to examine the interaction between tectonics and climate within a continent-continent collision zone, and to quantify rates of landscape evolution as controlled by climate and the associated glacial and hydrological changes in hyper-arid and adjacent high-altitude environments. Geomorphic mapping, analysis of landforms and sediments, and terrestrial cosmogenic radionuclide surface exposure and optically stimulated luminescence dating serve to define the timing of formation of Late Quaternary landforms along the southern and northwestern margins of the Qaidam Basin, and in the Burhan Budai Shan of the Kunlun Mountains adjacent to the basin on the south. These dates provide a framework that suggests links between climatic amelioration, deglaciation, lake desiccation and alluvial fan evolution. At least three glacial advances are defined in the Burham Budai Shan of the Kunlun Mountains. On the northern side of this range these occurred in the penultimate glacial cycle or early in the last glacial cycle, during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM)/Lateglacial and during the Holocene. On the south side of the range, advances occurred during the penultimate glacial cycle, MIS-3, and possibly the LGM, Lateglacial or Holocene. Several distinct phases of alluvial fan sedimentation are likewise defined. Alluvial fans formed on the southern side of the Kunlun Mountains prior to 200 ka. Ice-contact alluvial fans formed during the penultimate glacial and during MIS-3. Extensive incised alluvial fans that form the main valley fills north of

  7. The onset of flood basalt volcanism, Northern Paraná Basin, Brazil: A precise U-Pb baddeleyite/zircon age for a Chapecó-type dacite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janasi, Valdecir de Assis; de Freitas, Vivian Azor; Heaman, Larry H.

    2011-02-01

    We report the first U-Pb baddeleyite/zircon date for a felsic volcanic rock from the Paraná Large Igneous Province in south Brazil. The new date of 134.3 ± 0.8 Ma for a hypocrystalline Chapecó-type dacite from Ourinhos (northern Paraná basin) is an important regional time marker for the onset of flood basalt volcanism in the northern and western portion of the province. The dated dacite was erupted onto basement rocks and is overlain by a high-Ti basalt sequence, interpreted to be correlative with Pitanga basalts elsewhere. This new U-Pb date for the Ourinhos dacite is consistent with the local stratigraphy being slightly older than the few reliable step-heating 40Ar/39Ar dates currently available for overlying high-Ti basalts (133.6-131.5 Ma). This indicates an ~ 3 Ma time span for the building of the voluminous high-Ti lava sequence of the Paraná basin. On the other hand, it overlaps the 40Ar/39Ar dates (134.8-134.1 Ma) available for the stratigraphically older low-Ti basalt (Gramado + Esmeralda types) and dacite-rhyolite (Palmas type) sequences from South Brazil, which is consistent with the short-lived character of this volcanism and its rapid succession by the high-Ti sequence.

  8. Longitudinal evolution of the tectonic style along the Cyprus Arc, northern margin of the Levant and Herodotus Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symeou, Vasilis; Homberg, Catherine; Nader, Fadi; Darnault, Romain; Lecomte, Jean-Claude

    2016-04-01

    The Levant Basin is bounded to the north by the Cyprus Arc zone which was created by the northward movement of the African plate with respect to the Eurasian plate since Late Cretaceous time. The westward movement of the Anatolian micro-plate since Late Miocene created an additional strike-slip component along the plate boundary. The main objective of this contribution is to portray the structural architecture and features offshore Cyprus by analyzing available 2D seismic data in order to investigate the transition in tectonic style from compression to strike slip along the Cyprus Arc zone. We identified three different crustal domains offshore Cyprus that are from east to west: the eastern domain which belongs to the Levant Basin, the South-central domain which includes the Eratosthenes Seamount, and the South-West domain of Cyprus which corresponds to the Herodotus Basin. In the Levant Basin, the sequences identified are from Base Pliocene extending until the Senonian unconformity. The same sequences in the Cyprus Basin are offset and less thick due to the movement of the Latakia Ridge, which is identified as a steeply dipping sub-vertical fault on our data. In the central domain, the horizons identified on the Eratosthenes Seamount indicate that the Seamount is a Mesozoic carbonate platform covered by thin Miocene/Plio-Pleistocene sediments. A subdivision of the sedimentary sequence in the Herodotus Basin is proposed down to the Paleocene-Eocene basis. A major change in the structural style of the deformation is observed form west to east. Whereas the Levant Basin is almost undeformed south of the Latakia Ridge, several structures were mapped in the central domain, like flexural basin, pop-up structures and back-thrusts. South-verging thrusts were also, identified in the Cyprus Basin. All these structures show a Pliocene activity. Our data suggest that the heterogeneity of the crustal structure played a major role in the longitudinal evolution of the plate

  9. Latest Miocene-earliest Pliocene evolution of the ancestral Rio Grande at the Española-San Luis Basin boundary, northern New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Daniel J. Koning,; Scott Aby,; Grauch, V. J.; Matthew J. Zimmerer,

    2016-01-01

    We use stratigraphic relations, paleoflow data, and 40Ar/39Ar dating to interpret net aggradation, punctuated by at least two minor incisional events, along part of the upper ancestral Rio Grande fluvial system between 5.5 and 4.5 Ma (in northern New Mexico). The studied fluvial deposits, which we informally call the Sandlin unit of the Santa Fe Group, overlie a structural high between the San Luis and Española Basins. The Sandlin unit was deposited by two merging, west- to southwest-flowing, ancestral Rio Grande tributaries respectively sourced in the central Taos Mountains and southern Taos Mountains-northeastern Picuris Mountains. The river confluence progressively shifted southwestward (downstream) with time, and the integrated river (ancestral Rio Grande) flowed southwards into the Española Basin to merge with the ancestral Rio Chama. Just prior to the end of the Miocene, this fluvial system was incised in the southern part of the study area (resulting in an approximately 4–7 km wide paleovalley), and had sufficient competency to transport cobbles and boulders. Sometime between emplacement of two basalt flows dated at 5.54± 0.38 Ma and 4.82±0.20 Ma (groundmass 40Ar/39Ar ages), this fluvial system deposited 10–12 m of sandier sediment (lower Sandlin subunit) preserved in the northern part of this paleovalley. The fluvial system widened between 4.82±0.20 and 4.50±0.07 Ma, depositing coarse sand and fine gravel up to 14 km north of the present-day Rio Grande. This 10–25 m-thick sediment package (upper Sandlin unit) buried earlier south- to southeast-trending paleovalleys (500–800 m wide) inferred from aeromagnetic data. Two brief incisional events are recognized. The first was caused by the 4.82±0.20 Ma basalt flow impounding south-flowing paleodrainages, and the second occurred shortly after emplacement of a 4.69±0.09 Ma basalt flow in the northern study area. Drivers responsible for Sandlin unit aggradation may include climate

  10. The appearance of an oxygen-depleted condition on the Capitanian disphotic slope/basin in South China: Middle-Upper Permian stratigraphy at Chaotian in northern Sichuan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitoh, Masafumi; Isozaki, Yukio; Yao, Jianxin; Ji, Zhansheng; Ueno, Yuichiro; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2013-06-01

    The global environmental changes related to the end-Guadalupian (Permian) extinction have been recently studied in various shallow-marine sections in the world; however, no previous stratigraphic research focused on the sequence deposited in a relatively deep disphotic zone. In order to investigate the environmental changes in the disphotic zone during that interval, lithostratigraphy and secular changes in the sedimentary environment were analyzed for the ca. 150 m thick Guadalupian-Lopingian (Middle-Upper Permian) carbonates at Chaotian in northern Sichuan, South China. The upper Guadalupian Maokou Formation and the Lower Lopingian Wujiaping Formation are mostly composed of bioclastic limestone of a euphotic shelf facies and contain abundant shallow marine fossils, such as algae, corals, and fusulines. The topmost Maokou Formation (ca. 11 m thick) is unique in this section because it is composed of thinly bedded black mudstone/chert of a disphotic slope/basin facies with abundant radiolarians and ammonoids. The stratigraphic changes in litho- and bio-facies suggest a two-stepped transgression in the Capitanian followed by a great regression around the Guadalupian-Lopingian boundary (G-LB). Moreover, the stratigraphic changes in bioturbation, total organic carbon (TOC) content, and occurrence of framboidal pyrite suggest that the redox of the sedimentary environment at Chaotian changed drastically in accordance with newly clarified rapid sea-level fluctuations. In association with the Capitanian sea-level rise, the sedimentary environment shifted from an oxic shelf to an oxygen-depleted slope/basin, and again returned to an oxic shelf during the following great regression. The appearance of the oxygen-depleted condition on the Capitanian disphotic slope/basin in northern Sichuan is particularly important because it occurred clearly before the end-Guadalupian extinction event. It is also noteworthy that the oxygen-depleted seawater appeared for the first time on a

  11. Large-scale thrusting along the northern margin of the Tibetan Plateau and the southwest Tarim basin: 230 km long active Hotian thrust sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suppe, J.; Wang, X.; He, D.; Liang, H.

    2015-12-01

    We present the geometry, kinematics and mechanics of large-scale active thrusting in the western Kunlunshan and southwest Tarim basin, which accounts for ~130-165km total shortening of Tarim crust at the northern margin of Tibet. The great frontal structure is the ~230km long bedding-parallel Hotian thrust sheet, which is perhaps the longest active intact thrust sheet in the world, composed of flat-lying strata of the Tarim basin sliding northward on a regional gypsum detachment at the base of the Cenozoic sequence. The toe of the Hotian thrust ramps to the surface two thirds of the way across the Tarim basin, forming the Selibuya-Mazartag hills in the Taklamakan sand desert. At the southern edge of the Tarim basin in the Kunlunshan foothills, a set of high-amplitude anticlines are growing by complex break-forward ramping and wedging in the Hotian thrust sheet as it steps up to the Cenozoic gypsum detachment from a regional Cambrian evaporate detachment that extends under Tibet. More interior structures such as the Tiklik thrust bring older strata and Proterozoic basement to the surface, together with their Cenozoic Tarim cover in the Buya basin. The Cambrian detachment also extends northward under the Tarim basin with minor hanging-wall deformation that locally warps the overlying Hotian thrust sheet, producing a complete syntectonic record in seismically imaged growth strata of its northward motion over these warps. Seismic profiles in the southwest Tarim foothill belt also reveal widespread growth strata that record much of the structural history beginning in the early Pliocene Atushi Formation. Ages of seismic reflectors are calibrated to a surface magnetostratigraphic sequence (Zheng et al., 2000). The beginning of thrusting and folding in the southwest Tarim basin north of the Tiklik thrust is dated at 3.6Ma with shortening >25km and a progressive northward propagation toward the Selibuya-Mazartag hills. The overall shortening rate is ~10 mm/yr. The gypsum

  12. Testing 3D fault configuration in the northern Los Angeles basin, California via patterns of rock uplift the since 2.9 Ma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, M.; Meigs, A.; Marshall, S.

    2004-12-01

    Competing models of three-dimensional fault topology, starting from the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) Community Fault Model (CFM), were tested for viability using numerical Boundary Element Method (BEM) models and patterns of rock uplift by folds in the northern Los Angeles basin Los Angeles basin. Thirteen structural cross-sections constrained by well and outcrop data were used to compile a structure contour map of the base of the Pico Formation (2.9 Ma) across about 50 km of the northern Los Angeles basin from the Coyote Hills on the east to Pacific Palisades on the west. A map of rock uplift rate was constructed from these data by measuring the structural relief relative to the central trough of the Los Angeles basin, a long-lived northwest-trending structural low that lies to the northeast of the Newport-Inglewood fault. BEM models of 3D fault topology were used to generate uplift rates over the same region using North-South contraction at 100 nanostrain/year. A suite of models investigate the sensitivity of uplift patterns to 1) dip of blind thrust faults (e.g. Las Cienegas and Elysian Park), 2) presence of low-angle (20 degree) thrust ramp below 10 km depths 3) regional extent of this low-angle ramp and 4) inclusion of near surface splays of the Santa Monica fault. Model-data compatibility was evaluated on the basis of structural trend, spatial variation in rates and location of major structures (i.e. key near surface folds). All models are consistent with the location and uplift pattern of the Coyote Hills and Santa Fe Springs structures, the location and orientation of the central trough, and a North-trending structure separating Santa Fe Springs on the east from Montebello to the northwest. Incorporation of the low-angle ramp below 10 km depth that is regionally extensive (i.e. many faults sole into this fault) improves model and geologic uplift compatibility. Furthermore, steepening the Las Cienegas and Elysian Park faults to 60 degrees

  13. Non-seismic geophysics compared and integrated with seismic in a frontier oil play: Northern Sangre de Cristo Mountains/Northeast San Luis Basin, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Longacre, M.B.; Christopherson, K.R.; Gries, R.

    1995-06-01

    Four non-seismic geophysical tools have made a significant contribution to a new geological interpretation of the northern Sangre de Cristo Mountains/northeast San Luis Basin of south-central Colorado. Gravity, aeromagnetic, magnetotelluric, (MT) and time domain electromagnetic (TDEM) data were acquired and interpreted during the early stages of exploration. Two-dimensional modeling of the gravity and magnetics placed the main, basin-bounding fault three miles southwest of the mountain front, identified an intermediate fault block at the basin margin and identified a thick sequence of non-magnetic, intermediate density rocks on top of this block. A thick section of Mesozoic sediments is interpreted, supported by the discovery of outcrops of Cretaceous sediments and live Cretaceous oil. Magnetotelluric data was acquired to confirm the presence of Mesozoic sediments and depth to basement. Detailed TDEM data has been useful in correlating the MT with surface geology. Integration of the gravity, magnetic and MT data with seismic resulted in minor modifications to the new geological model.

  14. Development of an integrated water resources management plan for the Lake Manyara sub-basin, Northern Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngana, J. O.; Mwalyosi, R. B. B.; Madulu, N. F.; Yanda, P. Z.

    Water resources management in Lake Manyara sub-basin is an issue of very high significance as the sub-basin hosts a number of national and global assets of great socio-cultural, ecological and economic values. The sub-basin comprise of a Biosphere Reserve with boosting tourism from Lake Manyara National Park with a variety of wildlife population, large livestock population and highly fertile land for agricultural production. The prevailing system of uncoordinated water resources management in the sub-basin cannot sustain the ever increasing water needs of the various expanding sectors, therefore a strategy must be sought to integrate the various sectoral needs against the available water resources in order to attain both economic and ecological sustainability. Through participatory approach with the stakeholders, the study has established key issues, demonstrated considerable experience in water resources management in the sub-basin including existence of water boards, water committees in some districts as well as land resources management practices However, a number of constraints were noted which inhibit sustainable water resources management including ignorance of water policies, conflicting sectoral policies, lack of coordination between sectors, high in migration rates into the basin, heavy in migration of livestock, conflicts between sectors, poor land use resulting in soil erosion and sedimentation, lack of comprehensive data base on water resources and water needs for : domestic, tourism, livestock, irrigation, wild life and environmental flows. As a way forward it was recommended that a basin wide legally mandated body (involving all levels) be established to oversee water use in the sub-basin. Other strategies include capacity building of stakeholders on water natural resources management policies, water rights and enforcement of laws. This progress report paper highlights the wealth of knowledge that stakeholders possess on water resources management and

  15. Pre- to syncollisional sedimentation in the Middle Jurassic to Cretaceous Methow-Tyaughton Basin, northern Washington, southwestern British Columbia

    SciTech Connect

    Garver, J.I. ); Umhoefer, P.J. ); McGroder, M.F. ); Bourgeois, J. )

    1990-05-01

    Palinspastic reconstruction of Cretaceous to Tertiary dextral-slip faults restores the Methow-Tyaughton basin to a 300+ km-long basin that contains Middle Jurassic to middle Cretaceous strata. Sedimentary rocks and structures within the basin record a transition from sedimentation on the western margin of the intermontane terrane to sedimentation within an actively deforming collision zone along the Intermontane and Insular terrane boundary in the middle Cretaceous. Following Middle Jurassic terrane amalgamation, the Methow-Tyaughton was a short-lived fore-arc basin in the Callovian. Oxfordian-Valanginian sedimentation was marked by low depositional rates of volcanic and plutonic debris, probably along a transform-rift margin. Hauterivian-Aptian sedimentary rocks are generally fine-grained turbidite packages with minor interbedded tuffs, and volcanic rocks are interbedded at the western basin margin. Hauterivian rocks reflect a change to a back-arc basin setting. Albian contraction within the basement Bridge River and Cadwallader terranes resulted in an intrabasinal uplift that supplied chert-rich detritus to two flanking subbasins. At the same time, west-derived, volcanic detritus shed off the volcanic cover to the Insular terrane, and east-derived arkosic sediment shed off the Omineca Crystalline belt. Tectonic subsidence and basin infilling occurred from about 110 to 95 Ma, capped by a thick sequence of nonmarine clastic rocks and andesites. Intrabasin deformation occurred from about 100 to 85 ma. After the termination of andesitic volcanism and contractional deformation the basin was cut by dextral-slip faults (post 85 Ma) that likely were driven by oblique Kula-North America interaction.

  16. Stratigraphic and tectonic studies in the central Aquitaine Basin, northern Pyrenees: Constraints on the subsidence and deformation history of a retro-foreland basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rougier, Géraldine; Ford, Mary; Christophoul, Frédéric; Bader, Anne-Gaëlle

    2016-03-01

    The central North-Pyrenean retrowedge developed on a thinned lithosphere, rich in Keuper evaporites. The behavior of this retro-foreland system is studied using subsidence analyses and a sequentially restored cross-section (120 km, Saint-Gaudens to Castelsarrasin) constrained by new chrono- and lithostratigraphy, surface and subsurface data. During the Late Cretaceous, a first episode of foreland subsidence (E1) produced a narrow marine depocenter (Comminges Basin, 30 km wide), supplied from the east. A synchronous early deformation involved inversion of basement faults and gentle shortening (4.5 km) of the Mesozoic strata above a Keuper decoupling layer. A tectonically quiet period (Q, Paleocene), characterized by a condensed succession (marine and continental), was followed by a second episode of subsidence (E2), basin migration and gentle thick- and thin-skinned shortening (8 km). Continental sedimentation, supplied by the uplifting orogen, first filled a narrow flexural basin (E2, M-L Eocene), then expanded across the Aquitaine Platform (E3, Oligocene-Miocene).

  17. Pockmark development in the Petrel Sub-basin, Timor Sea, Northern Australia: Seabed habitat mapping in support of CO2 storage assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholas, W. A.; Nichol, S. L.; Howard, F. J. F.; Picard, K.; Dulfer, H.; Radke, L. C.; Carroll, A. G.; Tran, M.; Siwabessy, P. J. W.

    2014-07-01

    The extent to which fluids may leak from sedimentary basins to the seabed is a critical issue for assessing the potential of a basin for carbon capture and storage. The Petrel Sub-basin, located beneath central and eastern Joseph Bonaparte Gulf in tropical northern Australia, was identified as potentially suitable for the geological storage of CO2 because of its geological characteristics and proximity to offshore gas and petroleum resources. In May 2012, a multidisciplinary marine survey (SOL5463) was undertaken to collect data in two targeted areas of the Petrel Sub-basin to facilitate an assessment of its CO2 storage potential. This paper focuses on Area 1 of that survey, a 471 km2 area of sediment-starved shelf (water depths of 78 to 102 m), characterised by low-gradient plains, low-lying ridges, palaeo-channels and shallow pockmarks. Three pockmark types are recognised: small shallow unit pockmarks 10-20 m in diameter (generally <1 m, rarely to 2 m deep), composite pockmarks of 150-300 m diameter formed from the co-location of several cross-cutting pockmarks forming a broad shallow depression (<1 m deep), and pockmark clusters comprised of shallow unit pockmarks co-located side by side (150-300 m width overall, <1 m deep). Pockmark distribution is non-random, focused within and adjacent to palaeo-channels, with pockmark clusters also located adjacent to ridges. Pockmark formation is constrained by AMS 14C dating of in situ mangrove deposits and shells to have begun after 15.5 cal ka BP when a rapid marine transgression of Bonaparte Shelf associated with meltwater pulse 1A drowned coastal mangrove environments. Pockmark development is likely an ongoing process driven by fluid seepage at the seabed, and sourced from CO2 produced in the shallow sub-surface (<2 m) sediment. No evidence for direct connection to deeper features was observed.

  18. Detection of detached forced-regressive nearshore wedges: a case study from the central-southern Siena Basin (Northern Apennines, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martini, Ivan; Arragoni, Simone; Aldinucci, Mauro; Foresi, Luca Maria; Bambini, Anna Maria; Sandrelli, Fabio

    2013-07-01

    The detection of detached nearshore wedges formed in response to relative sea-level drops is considered one of the hottest topics in sequence stratigraphic analysis due to their importance as reservoir analogues. In fact, they usually constitute sandy and porous bodies generally encased in impermeable clay, thus presenting a good potential as traps for fluids. This paper focuses on the sequence stratigraphic analysis of the Pliocene deposits cropping out in the central-southern sector of the Siena Basin (Tuscany, Italy), a post-collisional basin of the Northern Apennines. The exposed sedimentary succession was investigated through a detailed sedimentological and stratigraphic approach, integrated by biostratigraphic analyses, aimed at a better characterization of the infilling history of this sector of the basin. Specifically, this study revealed the occurrence of repeated facies shifts that allowed the identification of two depositional sequences. In detail, a thick sand-rich body far from the basin margins, and previously considered as a turbiditic lobe, has been reinterpreted as formed in a nearshore setting during a fall in relative sea level. This body is totally encased in offshore clay, and due to the lack of physical connection with the related HST deposits, it has to be considered as a detached forced-regressive wedge. The present work led to the recognition of some sedimentological and stratigraphic features typical of falling stage systems tract deposits (e.g. presence of intrabasinal recycled materials, sedimentological evidence of a pre-existing fluvial network subsequently eroded) that can provide useful clues for the identification of detached forced-regressive nearshore wedges in core studies and poorly exposed settings.

  19. Fluoride enrichment mechanism and geospatial distribution in the volcanic aquifers of the Middle Awash basin, Northern Main Ethiopian Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furi, Wakgari; Razack, Moumtaz; Abiye, Tamiru Alemayehu; Ayenew, Tenalem; Legesse, Dagnachew

    2011-07-01

    Considering the anomalous concentration of fluoride in the ground waters of the Middle Awash basin, a comprehensive survey of the enrichment mechanism as well as its association with common hydrochemical variables was conducted using multivariate statistical methods, Hierarchal Cluster Analysis (HCA) and Principal Component Analysis (PCA). The HCA results indicate a marked heterogeneous spatial distribution of the fluoride concentration, the magnitude of which varies more gradually in the SSW-NNE direction along the Wonji Fault Belt (WFB) than it does in the E-W direction away from this belt. This is strongly associated with the geothermal anomaly that is prominent in the basin interior area. Furthermore, the PCA results show that the magnitude of the fluoride concentration is higher in the groundwater derived from non-calcium bearing aquifers, which are widely distributed in the rift floor. Hydrochemical processes involving a cation exchange reaction cause a systematic Ca 2+ removal from solution from highland towards the rift floor. This geochemical reaction enhances the fluoride enrichment of groundwater along the same flow direction. In this regard, the geothermal belt of the basin interior area is a hydrogeological block marked by high loads of fluoride whereas the plateau areas are low-fluoride zones. The geospatial distribution of fluoride at the basin scale was estimated using the kriging procedure. Appropriate discrimination between local and regional aquifers is important in order to secure low-fluoride water supply for the community in the basin.

  20. Long-Term Ground-Water Levels and Transmissivity in the Blackstone River Basin, Northern Rhode Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eggleston, Jack R.; Church, Peter E.; Barbaro, Jeffrey R.

    2007-01-01

    Ground water provides about 7.7 million gallons per day, or 28 percent of total water use in the Rhode Island part of the Blackstone River Basin. Primary aquifers in the basin are stratified glacial deposits, composed mostly of sand and gravel along valley bottoms. The ground-water and surface-water system in the Blackstone River Basin is under stress due to population growth, out-of-basin water transfers, industrialization, and changing land-use patterns. Streamflow periodically drops below the Aquatic Base Flow standard, and ground-water withdrawals add to stress on aquatic habitat during low-flow periods. Existing hydrogeologic data were reviewed to examine historical water-level trends and to generate contour maps of water-table altitudes and transmissivity of the sand and gravel aquifer in the Blackstone River Basin in Rhode Island. On the basis of data from four long-term observation wells, water levels appear to have risen slightly in the study area during the past 55 years. Analysis of available data indicates that increased rainfall during the same period is a likely contributor to the water-level rise. Spatial patterns of transmissivity are shown over larger areas and have been refined on the basis of more detailed data coverage as compared to previous mapping studies.

  1. Lateglacial and Early Holocene vegetation history of the northern Wetterau and the Amöneburger Basin (Hessen), central-west Germany.

    PubMed

    Bos, J A.A.

    2001-06-01

    The Lateglacial and Early Holocene vegetation history of the northern Wetterau and Amöneburger Basin, two intra-montane basins in Hessen, central-west Germany, is reconstructed by means of pollen and macrofossil analyses. Regional pollen assemblage zones are defined for the Lateglacial and Early Holocene. After calibration of the radiocarbon dates and establishment of age/depth relationships, the ages of the pollen zone boundaries are calculated. The regional vegetation changes correlate closely with the major fluctuations in the delta18O curve of the Greenland ice cores spanning the same time period. During the early Lateglacial, the open herbaceous vegetation with dwarf shrubs in the northern Wetterau was replaced by woodlands. Initially these woodlands consisted of birch, but after the immigration of pine, mixed forests of pine and birch developed. Soon after its immigration pine became dominant and pine woodlands largely replaced the birch forests. Only on the locally wetter substrates of the river floodplain did Betula stands persist. Gradually the importance of herbaceous communities declined and the pine woodlands lost their open character. During the Lateglacial two regressive phases in the vegetation succession are reflected in the data which are equated with the Older- and Younger Dryas biozones. At the beginning of the Younger Dryas, the forest-limit was lowered and the importance of herbaceous communities increased. Later, pine woodlands thinned and Ericales became part of the vegetation, indicating the development of more acid, nutrient-poor soils. A subdivision of the Younger Dryas biozone into a wetter, colder first part and a drier, warmer second part is suggested. At the beginning of the Early Holocene, pine woodlands became more closed and soils more stabilised. The transition between the Younger Dryas and Preboreal biozones is indicated by a lithological change to organic (-rich) deposits. Betula stands persisted on the locally wetter substrates

  2. Alkali element enrichments on the BABBs at the IODP Expedition 333 Site C0012 in the northern Shikoku Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haraguchi, S.; Nakamura, K.; Fujinaga, K.

    2015-12-01

    The Shikoku Basin is a back arc basin located westside of the Izu-Ogasawara (Bonin) arc, spreading was from 25 to 15 Ma. The drilling of the DSDP, ODP and IODP recovered the backarc basin basalt (BABB) of the Shikoku Basin. Site C0012, south of the Kii Peninsula, was operated during the IODP Exp 333, and BABB was recovered 100m thickness under the 520m of sediment. This BABB is divided into upper aphyric pillow (Unit 1) and lower massive flow (Unit 2) divided at the 560 mbsf, and show variable degree of alteration, clay mineral and zeolite depositions. SiO2 and MgO contents of these basalts are 47-55 and 5-8 wt%. These basalts show wide variation of enrichment of alkali elements, 2.3-7.5 and 0.4-4.2 wt% of Na2O and K2O. Na2O+K2O contents show 3.2-8.0 wt%, and 2 wt% higher trends than other BABBs in the Shikoku Basin at the same SiO2 contents. Na2O and K2O show proportional and anti-proportional trends with increasing LOI. Therefore, both alkali element enrichments in these rocks are caused by secondary mineralization, and host phase of Na2O is hydrous and that of K2O is anhydrous minerals. Secondary mineral phases was mainly identified by XRD. The identified host phases of Na are analcime and thomsonite. Analcime is observed in rocks of more than 4 wt% of Na2O. Chlorite and smectite are identified to clay minerals. This mineral assemblage indicates the high-temperature zeolite facies alteration. The host phases of K are mainly identified into K-feldspar. We assume that secondary mineralization of K-fd is associated with low-temperature albitization. Compared to the lithostratigraphy, the Na enrichment is prominent in the Unit 1 and upper 20 m of the Unit 2, and the K enrichment is prominent in lower part of the Unit 2. We consider that the Na enrichment associated with zeolite depositions occurred under high water/rock ratio with active hydrothermal circulation because of high water permeability of pillow lava, and K enrichment associated with albitization occurred

  3. Paleomagnetism and anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility of Eocene and Miocene sediments in the Qaidam Basin, Northwest China: Implication for the Cenozoic tectonic transition and development of the northern Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, X.; Guo, Z.; Huang, B.; Yin, A.; Guan, S.; Zhou, S.; Qiao, Q.; Cheng, F.; Cheng, X.; Zhang, T.

    2013-12-01

    Paleomagnetism and AMS (Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility) results are reported from the middle to late Eocene Xiaganchaigou Formation and the early to middle Miocene Xiayoushashan Formation sediments at eight locations (Xichagou, Gansen, Eboliang, Heishiqiu, Luluohe, Kushuiquan, Hong Shan and Gahai), covering most outcrop regions of these two formations within the Qaidam Basin, Northwest China. These paleomagnetic data indicate that the Qaidam basin has not undergone wholesale tectonic vertical axis rotation relative to Eurasia and North China since at least middle and late Eocene. Local clockwise rotation only took place at some special locations such as Gahai. According to AMS results, 12 of 16 AMS ellipsoids belong to embryonic deformation magnetic fabric, which can be applied to reconstruct tectonic strain. Two epochs of compressive strain have been identified in the Qaidam basin during the Cenozoic: an early N-S strain no later than the Oligocene and a late NE-SW strain mainly after the early to middle Miocene. Further analysis shows that the early N-S compression in northern Qaidam basin is much more intense than that in western Qaidam basin, while the late NE-SW compression, which dominates the NW-SE-trending folds in the modern Qaidam basin, is more intense in western Qaidam basin than that in northern Qaidam basin. The stress concentration transition provides a reasonable explanation of the southeastwards migration of the deposition center in the Qaidam basin during the Cenozoic. The uniform paleomagnetic and AMS results at different localities reveal that the Qaidam basin is a relatively rigid plate, obviously different from the surrounding regions. Moreover, the appearance of E-component stress may be in close relationship with the beginning of the left-lateral Kunlun Fault or the eastwards channel flow south to the Kunlun Fault, implying that the south side of the Kunlun Fault is the active side.

  4. Regional Survey of Structural Properties and Cementation Patterns of Fault Zones in the Northern Part of the Albuquerque Basin, New Mexico - Implications for Ground-Water Flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Minor, Scott A.; Hudson, Mark R.

    2006-01-01

    Motivated by the need to document and evaluate the types and variability of fault zone properties that potentially affect aquifer systems in basins of the middle Rio Grande rift, we systematically characterized structural and cementation properties of exposed fault zones at 176 sites in the northern Albuquerque Basin. A statistical analysis of measurements and observations evaluated four aspects of the fault zones: (1) attitude and displacement, (2) cement, (3) lithology of the host rock or sediment, and (4) character and width of distinctive structural architectural components at the outcrop scale. Three structural architectural components of the fault zones were observed: (1) outer damage zones related to fault growth; these zones typically contain deformation bands, shear fractures, and open extensional fractures, which strike subparallel to the fault and may promote ground-water flow along the fault zone; (2) inner mixed zones composed of variably entrained, disrupted, and dismembered blocks of host sediment; and (3) central fault cores that accommodate most shear strain and in which persistent low- permeability clay-rich rocks likely impede the flow of water across the fault. The lithology of the host rock or sediment influences the structure of the fault zone and the width of its components. Different grain-size distributions and degrees of induration of the host materials produce differences in material strength that lead to variations in width, degree, and style of fracturing and other fault-related deformation. In addition, lithology of the host sediment appears to strongly control the distribution of cement in fault zones. Most faults strike north to north-northeast and dip 55? - 77? east or west, toward the basin center. Most faults exhibit normal slip, and many of these faults have been reactivated by normal-oblique and strike slip. Although measured fault displacements have a broad range, from 0.9 to 4,000 m, most are <100 m, and fault zones appear to

  5. Seasonal concentrations of organic contaminants at the fall line of the Susquehanna River basin and estimated fluxes to northern Chesapeake Bay, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, G.D.; Lippa, K.A.; Miller, C.V.

    2000-01-01

    Riverine fluxes of several pesticides and other organic contaminants from above the fall line of the Susquehanna River basin to northern Chesapeake Bay, USA, were quantified in 1994. Base flow and storm flow samples collected at the fall line of the river from February to December 1994 were analyzed for both dissolved and particulate phase contaminants. Measured concentrations of the organonitrogen and organophosphorus pesticides varied mainly in response to the timing of their application to agricultural fields. Conversely, the concentrations of the more particle-sorptive contaminants such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organochlorine (OC) insecticides, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were more directly correlated with river flow throughout the year. Annual fluxes were almost entirely in the dissolved phase for the organonitrogen and organophosphorus pesticides, distributed between the dissolved and particulate phases for the PCBs and OC insecticides, and primarily in the particulate phase for the PAHs.

  6. Baltazor KGRA and vicinity, Nevada: geothermal reservoir assessment case study, northern Basin and Range province. Final report, 1 October 1978-31 January 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, T.C.

    1983-01-01

    The Baltazor KGRA and McGee/Painted Hills geothermal prospects are located in northern Humboldt County, Nevada along the northwestern margin of the Basin and Range province. Exploration work other than drilling has included groundwater sampling, a microearthquake study, a geologic literature search and photogeologic mapping, compilation of aeromagnetic and gravity mapping, soil mercury surveying, electrical resistivity and self-potential surveys and detailed hydrothermal alteration mapping. Exploration drilling included 27 shallow temperature gradient holes, four intermediate-depth gradient wells and one 3703-foot deep test, Baltazor 45-14. The deep test penetrated Miocene rhyolite, andesite, basalt and andesitic basalt flows before excessive hold deviation forced an end to drilling and completion as a deep temperature observation well. A temperature survey two weeks after completion obtained a 119.7/sup 0/C (247.4/sup 0/F) reading at survey total depth, 1110 m (3640 feet).

  7. Numerical Simulation of Inter-basin Groundwater Flow into Northern Yucca Flat, Nevada National Security Site, Using the Death Valley Regional Flow System Model

    SciTech Connect

    Pohlmann Karl,Ye Ming

    2012-03-01

    Models of groundwater flow for the Yucca Flat area of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) are under development by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for corrective action investigations of the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine Corrective Action Unit (CAU). One important aspect of these models is the quantity of inter-basin groundwater flow from regional systems to the north. This component of flow, together with its uncertainty, must be properly accounted for in the CAU flow models to provide a defensible regional framework for calculations of radionuclide transport that will support determinations of the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine contaminant boundary. Because characterizing flow boundary conditions in northern Yucca Flat requires evaluation to a higher level of detail than the scale of the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine CAU model can efficiently provide, a study more focused on this aspect of the model was required.

  8. Seasonal concentrations of organic contaminants at the fall line of the Susquehanna River basin and estimated fluxes to northern Chesapeake Bay, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, G.D.; Lippa, K.A.; Miller, C.V.

    2000-04-01

    Riverine fluxes of several pesticides and other organic contaminants from above the fall line of the Susquehanna River basin to northern Chesapeake Bay, USA, were quantified in 1994. Base flow and storm flow samples collected at the fall line of the river from February to December 1994 were analyzed for both dissolved and particulate phase contaminants. Measured concentrations of the organonitrogen and organophosphorus pesticides varied mainly in response to the timing of their application to agricultural fields. Conversely, the concentrations of the more particle-sorptive contaminants such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organochlorine (OC) insecticides, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were more directly correlated with river flow throughout the year. Annual fluxes were almost entirely in the dissolved phase for the organonitrogen and organophosphorus pesticides, distributed between the dissolved and particulate phases for the PCBs and OC insecticides, and primarily in the particulate phase for the PAHs.

  9. Holocene soft-sediment deformation of the Santa Fe-Sopetrán Basin, northern Colombian Andes: Evidence for pre-Hispanic seismic activity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suter, F.; Martínez, J. I.; Vélez, M. I.

    2011-04-01

    The detailed study of four deformed intervals from the Holocene fluvio-lacustrine deposits of the Santa Fe-Sopetrán Basin in northern Colombia shows 17 types of soft-sediment deformation (SSD) structures. Evidence indicates that seismic activity was responsible for the SSD structures, a conclusion reached after considering the environmental conditions at the time of sediment deposition and shortly after, and the detailed analysis of the driving force systems. Other triggers (i.e. overloading and rapid sedimentation), however, are not discarded. Intervals showing SSD structures occurred at centennial frequencies and apparently resulted from Mw 6-7 earthquakes. The Holocene age of these major shaking events should be seriously considered when evaluating the seismic hazard and risk for the middle Cauca Valley and the nearby city of Medellín with 3 million inhabitants.

  10. Early Cretaceous shelf-edge deltas of the Baltimore Canyon Trough: principal sources for sediment gravity deposits of the northern Hatteras Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poag, C. Wylie; Swift, B. Ann; Schlee, John S.; Ball, Mahlon M.; Sheetz, Linda L.

    1990-01-01

    We present evidence that the principal sources for Early Cretaceous (Berriasian-Valanginian) gravity-flow deposits of the northern Hatteras Basin were three large shelf-edge deltas located along the outer margin of the Baltimore Canyon Trough, ∼ 100 km southeast of Cape Charles, Virginia, Ocean City, Maryland, and Long Branch, New Jersey. Sedimentary detritus from the central Appalachian highlands and the Maryland-Virginia coastal plain was transported across the Early Cretaceous continental shelf to form the Cape Charles and Ocean City deltas, whereas deposits of the Long Branch delta came chiefly from the Adirondack and New England highlands. Each delta supplied sediment gravity flows to large slope aprons and submarine-fan complexes on the Early Cretaceous continental slope and rise. The most conspicuous distributary of sediment on the Early Cretaceous continental rise extends 500 km basinward from the Ocean City delta, where its distal deposits were cored at Deep Sea Drilling Project Site 603.

  11. Holocene environmental changes inferred from biological and sedimentological proxies in a high elevation Great Basin lake in the northern Ruby Mountains, Nevada, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wahl, David B.; Starratt, Scott W.; Anderson, Lysanna; Kusler, Jennifer E.; Fuller, Christopher C.; Addison, Jason A.; Wan, Elmira

    2015-01-01

    Multi-proxy analyses were conducted on a sediment core from Favre Lake, a high elevation cirque lake in the northern Ruby Mountains, Nevada, and provide a ca. 7600 year record of local and regional environmental change. Data indicate that lake levels were lower from 7600-5750 cal yr BP, when local climate was warmer and/or drier than today. Effective moisture increased after 5750 cal yr BP and remained relatively wet, and possibly cooler, until ca. 3750 cal yr BP. Results indicate generally dry conditions but also enhanced climatic variability from 3750-1750 cal yr BP, after which effective moisture increased. The timing of major changes in the Favre Lake proxy data are roughly coeval and in phase with those recorded in several paleoclimate studies across the Great Basin, suggesting regional climatic controls on local conditions and similar responses at high and low altitudes.

  12. Geographic Distribution of QCDs Around the Northern Plains Basins of Mars and the Relationship to Lowland Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buczkowski, D. L.; Frey, H. V.; McGill, G. E.

    2005-01-01

    It has been suggested that quasicircular depressions (QCDs) without a structural representation in Viking and MOC visible imagery represent buried impact craters [1,2,3,4]. Topographic depressions will form over impact craters buried by a differentially compacting cover material because total cover thickness, and thus total compaction, is greater over the center of completely buried impact craters than their rims [5]. If this is the process by which QCDs form, then only areas of differentially compacting materials should have QCDs. Previous work has established that there is a relationship of surface relief to diameter for QCDs around the Utopia Basin [6]. The slope of the trend of this relationship varies depending on cover thickness, becoming steeper with decreasing thickness [7]. Comparing trendslopes of QCDs around different lowland basins might give us insight into the relative thickness of the cover material in these areas. We explore the geographic distribution of QCDs around the Utopia, Isidis and Acidalia basins and compare their location to geologic units and materials. We also compare evidence for relative thickness of cover material at the three basins.

  13. Groundwater flow in a closed basin with a saline shallow lake in a volcanic area: Laguna Tuyajto, northern Chilean Altiplano of the Andes.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Christian; Custodio, Emilio; Chong, Guillermo; Lambán, Luis Javier; Riquelme, Rodrigo; Wilke, Hans; Jódar, Jorge; Urrutia, Javier; Urqueta, Harry; Sarmiento, Alvaro; Gamboa, Carolina; Lictevout, Elisabeth

    2016-01-15

    Laguna Tuyajto is a small, shallow saline water lake in the Andean Altiplano of northern Chile. In the eastern side it is fed by springs that discharge groundwater of the nearby volcanic aquifers. The area is arid: rainfall does not exceed 200mm/year in the rainiest parts. The stable isotopic content of spring water shows that the recharge is originated mainly from winter rain, snow melt, and to a lesser extent from some short and intense sporadic rainfall events. Most of the spring water outflowing in the northern side of Laguna Tuyajto is recharged in the Tuyajto volcano. Most of the spring water in the eastern side and groundwater are recharged at higher elevations, in the rims of the nearby endorheic basins of Pampa Colorada and Pampa Las Tecas to the East. The presence of tritium in some deep wells in Pampa Colorada and Pampa Las Tecas indicates recent recharge. Gas emission in recent volcanoes increase the sulfate content of atmospheric deposition and this is reflected in local groundwater. The chemical composition and concentration of spring waters are the result of meteoric water evapo-concentration, water-rock interaction, and mainly the dissolution of old and buried evaporitic deposits. Groundwater flow is mostly shallow due to a low permeability ignimbrite layer of regional extent, which also hinders brine spreading below and around the lake. High deep temperatures near the recent Tuyajto volcano explain the high dissolved silica contents and the δ(18)O shift to heavier values found in some of the spring waters. Laguna Tuyajto is a terminal lake where salts cumulate, mostly halite, but some brine transfer to the Salar de Aguas Calientes-3 cannot be excluded. The hydrogeological behavior of Laguna Tuyajto constitutes a model to understand the functioning of many other similar basins in other areas in the Andean Altiplano.

  14. Groundwater flow in a closed basin with a saline shallow lake in a volcanic area: Laguna Tuyajto, northern Chilean Altiplano of the Andes.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Christian; Custodio, Emilio; Chong, Guillermo; Lambán, Luis Javier; Riquelme, Rodrigo; Wilke, Hans; Jódar, Jorge; Urrutia, Javier; Urqueta, Harry; Sarmiento, Alvaro; Gamboa, Carolina; Lictevout, Elisabeth

    2016-01-15

    Laguna Tuyajto is a small, shallow saline water lake in the Andean Altiplano of northern Chile. In the eastern side it is fed by springs that discharge groundwater of the nearby volcanic aquifers. The area is arid: rainfall does not exceed 200mm/year in the rainiest parts. The stable isotopic content of spring water shows that the recharge is originated mainly from winter rain, snow melt, and to a lesser extent from some short and intense sporadic rainfall events. Most of the spring water outflowing in the northern side of Laguna Tuyajto is recharged in the Tuyajto volcano. Most of the spring water in the eastern side and groundwater are recharged at higher elevations, in the rims of the nearby endorheic basins of Pampa Colorada and Pampa Las Tecas to the East. The presence of tritium in some deep wells in Pampa Colorada and Pampa Las Tecas indicates recent recharge. Gas emission in recent volcanoes increase the sulfate content of atmospheric deposition and this is reflected in local groundwater. The chemical composition and concentration of spring waters are the result of meteoric water evapo-concentration, water-rock interaction, and mainly the dissolution of old and buried evaporitic deposits. Groundwater flow is mostly shallow due to a low permeability ignimbrite layer of regional extent, which also hinders brine spreading below and around the lake. High deep temperatures near the recent Tuyajto volcano explain the high dissolved silica contents and the δ(18)O shift to heavier values found in some of the spring waters. Laguna Tuyajto is a terminal lake where salts cumulate, mostly halite, but some brine transfer to the Salar de Aguas Calientes-3 cannot be excluded. The hydrogeological behavior of Laguna Tuyajto constitutes a model to understand the functioning of many other similar basins in other areas in the Andean Altiplano. PMID:26410705

  15. Public perception of an ecological rehabilitation project in inland river basins in northern China: Success or failure.

    PubMed

    Feng, Qi; Miao, Zheng; Li, Zongxing; Li, Jianguo; Si, Jianhua; S, Yonghong; Chang, Zongqiang

    2015-05-01

    The need for environmental protection challenges societies to deal with difficult problems because strategies designed by scientists to protect the environment often create negative effects on impoverished local residents. We investigated the effects of China's national and regional policies related to environmental protection and rehabilitation projects in inland river basins, by studying the effect of projects in the Heihe and Shiyang river basins, in northwest China. Interviews and surveys were conducted at 30 sites in the lower reaches of these two arid basins, an area that has experienced severe ecological degradation. The survey results show the ecological rehabilitation projects adversely affected the livelihoods of 70.35% of foresters, 64.89% of farmers and 62.24% of herders in the Minqing region in the lower Shiyang River Basin; also, the projects negatively affected 51.9% of residents in the Ejin Qi in the lower Heihe River Basin. This caused 16.33% of foresters, 39.90% of farmers and 45.32% of herders in the Minqing region to not support the project and 37.5% of residents in the Ejin Qi region said they will deforest and graze again after the project ends. The negative impacts of the policies connected to the projects cause these attitudes. The projects prohibit felling and grazing and require residents to give up groundwater mining; this results in a great amount of uncompensated economic loss to them. Extensive survey data document the concerns of local residents, concerns that are supported by the calculation of actual incomes. In addition, the surveys results show poorer interviewees believe the projects greatly affected their livelihoods. While citizens in this region support environment protection work, the poor require considerable assistance if one expects them to support this type of work. Governmental assistance can greatly improve their living conditions, and hence encourage them to participate in and support the implementation of the projects

  16. Two distinct episodes of Cenozoic extension in the northern Basin and Range Province, as indicated by magmatic and structural characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.M. )

    1993-04-01

    Although some workers in the central and southern Great Basin, Nevada and Utah, hold that Cenozoic crustal extension took place as a single, protracted episode that continues today, many studies indicate that two episodes took place. The distinction between episodes is especially clear in the northeastern Great Basin, where initial extension took place about 40--36 Ma, and extension was renewed from about 18 Ma to present. It appears that the early episode of extension was characterized by WSW hyperextension in north-trending linear zones, now about 130 km apart. Extension took place at the time of voluminous calc-alkaline intermediate to felsic magmatism, but magmatism was regional and not limited to the zones of extension. The first episode began later to the south, paralleling the southward progression of Great Basin magmatism as well as arc magmatism near the west coast. Later extension (Basin and Range sensu stricto) was WNW-directed and was initiated between 17 and 13 Ma region wide; it was accompanied by fundamentally basaltic magmatism throughout the region. Striking differences between the two extensional episodes indicates fundamentally different causes. Extensional zones of the early event were not localized by formerly thickened lithosphere, but rather appear to represent a periodic instability with characteristic wavelength of 80--100 km. The Basin and Range event was initiated during reorganization of the former subduction zone at the North American margin into lengthy transform margin, and coincided with the start of the eastern Snake River and Rio Grande rifts. Magmatism involved the crust less than in the early event.

  17. Public perception of an ecological rehabilitation project in inland river basins in northern China: Success or failure.

    PubMed

    Feng, Qi; Miao, Zheng; Li, Zongxing; Li, Jianguo; Si, Jianhua; S, Yonghong; Chang, Zongqiang

    2015-05-01

    The need for environmental protection challenges societies to deal with difficult problems because strategies designed by scientists to protect the environment often create negative effects on impoverished local residents. We investigated the effects of China's national and regional policies related to environmental protection and rehabilitation projects in inland river basins, by studying the effect of projects in the Heihe and Shiyang river basins, in northwest China. Interviews and surveys were conducted at 30 sites in the lower reaches of these two arid basins, an area that has experienced severe ecological degradation. The survey results show the ecological rehabilitation projects adversely affected the livelihoods of 70.35% of foresters, 64.89% of farmers and 62.24% of herders in the Minqing region in the lower Shiyang River Basin; also, the projects negatively affected 51.9% of residents in the Ejin Qi in the lower Heihe River Basin. This caused 16.33% of foresters, 39.90% of farmers and 45.32% of herders in the Minqing region to not support the project and 37.5% of residents in the Ejin Qi region said they will deforest and graze again after the project ends. The negative impacts of the policies connected to the projects cause these attitudes. The projects prohibit felling and grazing and require residents to give up groundwater mining; this results in a great amount of uncompensated economic loss to them. Extensive survey data document the concerns of local residents, concerns that are supported by the calculation of actual incomes. In addition, the surveys results show poorer interviewees believe the projects greatly affected their livelihoods. While citizens in this region support environment protection work, the poor require considerable assistance if one expects them to support this type of work. Governmental assistance can greatly improve their living conditions, and hence encourage them to participate in and support the implementation of the projects

  18. The potential of pesticides to contaminate the groundwater resources of the Axios river basin in Macedonia, Northern Greece. Part I. Monitoring study in the north part of the basin.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulou-Mourkidou, E; Karpouzas, D G; Patsias, J; Kotopoulou, A; Milothridou, A; Kintzikoglou, K; Vlachou, P

    2004-04-01

    The Axios river basin is an area of high agricultural importance for Macedonia, Northern Greece. High priced crops such as cotton, corn, sugarbeets, vegetables and rice are rotated with cereals and alfalfa and thus a great variety of pesticides are used annually for the control of pests and diseases. Moreover, the groundwater resources of the specific area constitute the main source of potable water for the surrounding cities and villages. Therefore, a study was initiated to investigate the probable risks of groundwater contamination with pesticides. The leaching of pesticides from agricultural soils was monitored in the phreatic horizon as well as in soil water samples collected with suction lysimeters. In parallel studies, the presence of pesticides in the irrigation water and the water of Axios river was also monitored. Pesticides like carbofuran, atrazine, alachlor and prometryne, which were regularly applied in the northern part of the basin during 1992-1994 were detected at concentrations occasionally exceeding 1 microg/l in soil water from the deeper soil layers and in the phreatic horizon. Residues of pesticides others than the ones applied in the studied area like propanil, terbufos and paraoxon-methyl were also detected at the deeper soil layers and in the phreatic horizon. The latter pesticides were also detected at significant concentrations in the irrigation water which mainly consisted of riverine water. The lack of an independent soil draining system and the use of riverine water for irrigation purposes resulted in the redistribution of residual amounts of these pesticides in the phreatic horizon beneath the agricultural area.

  19. Tectonic inversion and magmatism in the Lautaro Basin, northern Chile, Central Andes: A comparative approach from field data and analog models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, Fernando; Bonini, Marco; Montanari, Domenico; Corti, Giacomo

    2016-03-01

    We present the results of a series of analog models addressing the relationships between tectonic inversion and magmatism, taking the Lautaro Basin in northern Chile (27-28° S), Central Andes as a natural case. The experiments consisted of extension and orthogonal shortening of sand-silicone models to reproduce the tectonic inversion of a previous extensional system synchronous with the emplacement of analog magma. We analyzed how the variation in the rate of magma intrusion, shortening, and syn-compressive sedimentation may affect the final configuration of an inverted system, and the results were compared with field observations. Our results showed that (i) folding of syn-rift deposits and increased steepness of the master faults accommodate the shortening of the extensional system, (ii) magmatic intrusions condition the final geometries (top view and cross-section) of inverted normal faults in the models and in the Lautaro Basin, (iii) magma tends to migrate preferentially along the inverted faults, and accumulates beneath the faults and in the core of the inversion anticlines, (iv) the syn-inversion magmatism may indicate the migration pathways, which favor major lubrication and slip on the structures during their reactivation.

  20. Regional geohydrology of the northern Louisiana salt-dome basin; Part II, Geohydrologic maps of the Tertiary aquifers and related confining layers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryals, G.N.

    1984-01-01

    Regional geohydrologic maps show the altitude of the base and the thickness of the aquifers of Tertiary age and related confining layers in the northern Louisiana salt-dome basin. The limit of freshwater in aquifers is also shown. The basin has an area of about 3,000 square miles, and four geologic units of Tertiary age contain regional aquifers. From oldest (deepest) to youngest, the aquifers are in the Wilcox Group, Carrizo Sand, Sparta Sand, and Cockfield Formation. As the Wilcox is hydraulically interconnected with the overlying Carrizo, they are treated as one hydrologic unit, the Wilcox-Carrizo aquifer. The aquifers are separated by confining layers that retard water movement. In the northwestern part of the area, the Wilcox-Carrizo aquifer is separated from the underlying sand facies of the Nacatoch Sand (Cretaceous age) by a confining layer composed of the Midway Group (Tertiary age) and the underlying Arkadelphia Marl and an upper clay and marl facies of the Nacatoch Sand (both of Cretaceous age). In the remainder of the area, the Wilcox-Carrizo aquifer is separated from an underlying Cretaceous aquifer comprised of the Tokio Formation and Brownstown Marl by the Midway Group and several underlying Cretaceous units which in order of increasing age are the Arkadelphia Maril, Nacatoch Sand, Saratoga Chalk, Marlbrook Marl , and Annona Chalk. The Wilcox-Carrizo aquifer is separated from the Sparta aquifer by the overyling Cane River Formation. The Sparta aquifer is separated from the Cockfield aquifer by the overlying Cook Mountain Formation. (USGS)

  1. Facies analysis of a Toarcian-Bajocian shallow marine/coastal succession (Bardas Blancas Formation) in northern Neuquén Basin, Mendoza province, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bressan, Graciela S.; Kietzmann, Diego A.; Palma, Ricardo M.

    2013-04-01

    Strata of the Bardas Blancas Formation (lower Toarcian-lower Bajocian) are exposed in northern Neuquén Basin. Five sections have been studied in this work. Shoreface/delta front to offshore deposits predominate in four of the sections studied exhibiting a high abundance of hummocky cross-stratified, horizontally bedded and massive sandstones, as well as massive and laminated mudstones. Shell beds and trace fossils of the mixed Skolithos-Cruziana ichnofacies appear in sandstone beds, being related with storm event deposition. Gravel deposits are frequent in only one of these sections, with planar cross-stratified, normal graded and massive orthoconglomerates characterizing fan deltas interstratified with shoreface facies. A fifth outcrop exhibiting planar cross-stratified orthoconglomerates, pebbly sandstones with low-angle stratification and laminated mudstones have been interpreted as fluvial channel deposits and overbank facies. The analysis of the vertical distribution of facies and the recognition of stratigraphic surfaces in two sections in Río Potimalal area let recognized four transgressive-regressive sequences. Forced regressive events are recognized in the regressive intervals. Comparison of vertical distribution of facies also shows differences in thickness in the lower interval among the sections studied. This would be related to variations in accommodation space by previous half-graben structures. The succession shows a retrogradational arrangement of facies related with a widespread transgressive period. Lateral variation of facies let recognize the deepening of the basin through the southwest.

  2. Spatial distribution of Hydrocarbon Reservoirs in the West Korea Bay Basin in the northern part of the Yellow Sea, estimated by 3D gravity forward modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sungchan; Ryu, In-Chang; Götze, H.-J.; Chae, Y.

    2016-10-01

    Although an amount of hydrocarbon has been discovered in the West Korea Bay Basin (WKBB), located in the North Korean offshore area, geophysical investigations associated with these hydrocarbon reservoirs are not permitted because of the current geopolitical situation. Interpretation of satellite- derived potential field data can be alternatively used to image the three-dimensional (3D) density distribution in the sedimentary basin associated with hydrocarbon deposits. We interpreted the TRIDENT satellite-derived gravity field data to provide detailed insights into the spatial distribution of sedimentary density structures in the WKBB. We used 3D forward density modeling for the interpretation that incorporated constraints from existing geological and geophysical information. The gravity data interpretation and the 3D forward modeling showed that there are two modeled areas in the central subbasin that are characterized by very low density structures, with a maximum density of about 2000 kg/m3, indicating some type of hydrocarbon reservoir. One of the anticipated hydrocarbon reservoirs is located in the southern part of the central subbasin with a volume of about 250 km3 at a depth of about 3000 m in the Cretaceous/Jurassic layer. The other hydrocarbon reservoir should exist in the northern part of the central subbasin, with an average volume of about 300 km3 at a depth of about 2500 m.

  3. [Karyological differences of the Northern Dolly Varden Salvelinus malma malma and the white char Salvelinus albus from the Kamchatka River basin].

    PubMed

    Frolov, S V

    2001-03-01

    The karyotypes of northern Dolly Varden and white char, sympathrically inhabiting the Kamchatka River basin, were studied. The karyotype of Dolly Varden was stable: 2n = 78 and NF = 98 + 2, while in white char, polymorphism and mosaicism for the chromosome number were revealed: 2n = 76-79, NF = 98 + 2. Using a routine chromosome staining technique, the karyotype of white char (2n = 78) was shown to be identical to that of Dolly Varden. In both karyotypes, similar sets of marker chromosomes were present: two pairs of submetacentric (SM), one pair of submeta-subtelocentric (SM-ST), one pair of large acrocentric (A), and one pair of large sub-telocentric (ST) chromosomes. However, the karyotypes of Dolly Varden and white char differed in the number and location of nucleolus organizer regions (NORs). In Dolly Varden, single NORs located in the telomeric regions of the marker SM-ST chromosomes were observed. In white char, NORs were multiple and located both in the telomeric regions of the marker SM-ST chromosomes and on the short and long arms of large ST chromosomes. The identical marker chromosomes indicate considerable phylogenetic relatedness between Dolly Varden and white char from the Kamchatka River basin. Variation in NORs provides evidence for the reproductive isolation of these chars and their species status.

  4. An investigation of the genus Mesacanthus (Chordata: Acanthodii) from the Orcadian Basin and Midland Valley areas of Northern and Central Scotland using traditional morphometrics.

    PubMed

    Baron, Matthew G

    2015-01-01

    Mesacanthus is a common and speciose genus of acanthodian fish from Lower Old Red Sandstone and Middle Old Red Sandstone assemblages (representing the Lower Devonian and Middle Devonian respectively) and is well represented in many palaeoichthyology collections in the UK. Based upon descriptions given during the 19th century, specimens of the genus Mesacanthus from the Orcadian Basin and Midland Valley areas of Northern and Central Scotland have historically been referred to a number of different species; of these, the most frequently discussed in the literature are M. mitchelli, M. peachi and M. pusillus. In order to test the validity of these three species, traditional morphometric analyses were carried out on over 100 specimens of Mesacanthus, from both the Lower Devonian and the Middle Devonian, that cover the full range of known localities for these taxa in Northern and Central Scotland. Based upon morphological and morphometric comparisons, this investigation has found that at least two species of Mesacanthus are valid (M. mitchelli and M. pusillus) as specimens from the Lower Devonian and Middle Devonian have been shown to differ significantly in a number of important ways. However, no evidence has been found for the validity of the second and distinct Middle Devonian species, M. peachi.

  5. An investigation of the genus Mesacanthus (Chordata: Acanthodii) from the Orcadian Basin and Midland Valley areas of Northern and Central Scotland using traditional morphometrics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mesacanthus is a common and speciose genus of acanthodian fish from Lower Old Red Sandstone and Middle Old Red Sandstone assemblages (representing the Lower Devonian and Middle Devonian respectively) and is well represented in many palaeoichthyology collections in the UK. Based upon descriptions given during the 19th century, specimens of the genus Mesacanthus from the Orcadian Basin and Midland Valley areas of Northern and Central Scotland have historically been referred to a number of different species; of these, the most frequently discussed in the literature are M. mitchelli, M. peachi and M. pusillus. In order to test the validity of these three species, traditional morphometric analyses were carried out on over 100 specimens of Mesacanthus, from both the Lower Devonian and the Middle Devonian, that cover the full range of known localities for these taxa in Northern and Central Scotland. Based upon morphological and morphometric comparisons, this investigation has found that at least two species of Mesacanthus are valid (M. mitchelli and M. pusillus) as specimens from the Lower Devonian and Middle Devonian have been shown to differ significantly in a number of important ways. However, no evidence has been found for the validity of the second and distinct Middle Devonian species, M. peachi. PMID:26539330

  6. Hydrogeology, groundwater levels, and generalized potentiometric-surface map of the Green River Basin lower Tertiary aquifer system, 2010–14, in the northern Green River structural basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartos, Timothy T.; Hallberg, Laura L.; Miller, Cheryl E.

    2015-07-14

    The groundwater-level measurements were used to construct a generalized potentiometric-surface map of the Green River Basin lower Tertiary aquifer system. Groundwater-level altitudes measured in nonflowing and flowing wells used to construct the potentiometric-surface map ranged from 6,451 to 7,307 feet (excluding four unmeasured flowing wells used for contour construction purposes). The potentiometric-surface map indicates that groundwater in the study area generally moves from north to south, but this pattern of flow is altered locally by groundwater divides, groundwater discharge to the Green River, and possibly to a tributary river (Big Sandy River) and two reservoirs (Fontenelle and Big Sandy Reservoirs).

  7. Winters-Domengine Total Petroleum System—Northern Nonassociated Gas Assessment Unit of the San Joaquin Basin Province: Chapter 21 in Petroleum systems and geologic assessment of oil and gas in the San Joaquin Basin Province, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hosford Scheirer, Allegra; Magoon, Leslie B.

    2008-01-01

    The Northern Nonassociated Gas Assessment Unit (AU) of the Winters-Domengine Total Petroleum System of the San Joaquin Basin Province consists of all nonassociated gas accumulations in Cretaceous, Eocene, and Miocene sandstones located north of township 15 South in the San Joaquin Valley. The northern San Joaquin Valley forms a northwest-southeast trending asymmetrical trough. It is filled with an alternating sequence of Cretaceous-aged sands and shales deposited on Franciscan Complex, ophiolitic, and Sierran basement. Eocene-aged strata unconformably overlie the thick Cretaceous section, and in turn are overlain unconformably by nonmarine Pliocene-Miocene sediments. Nonassociated gas accumulations have been discovered in the sands of the Panoche, Moreno, Kreyenhagen, andDomengine Formations and in the nonmarine Zilch formation of Loken (1959) (hereafter referred to as Zilch formation). Most hydrocarbon accumulations occur in low-relief, northwest-southeast trending anticlines formed chiefly by differential compaction of sediment and by northeast southwest directed compression during the Paleogene (Bartow, 1991) and in stratigraphic traps formed by pinch out of submarine fan sands against slope shales. To date, 176 billion cubic feet (BCF) of nonassociated recoverable gas has been found in fields within the assessment unit (table 21.1). A small amount of biogenic gas forms near the surface of the AU. Map boundaries of the assessment unit are shown in figures 21.1 and 21.2; in plan view, this assessment unit is identical to the Northern Area Nonassociated Gas play 1007 considered by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in its 1995 National Assessment (Beyer, 1996). The AU is bounded on the east by the mapped limits of Cretaceous sandstone reservoir rocks and on the west by the east flank of the Diablo Range. The southern limit of the AU is the southernmost occurrence of nonassociated thermogenic-gas accumulations. The northern limit of the AU corresponds to the

  8. Nitrogen Budget in a Lowland Coastal Area Within the Po River Basin (Northern Italy): Multiple Evidences of Equilibrium Between Sources and Internal Sinks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castaldelli, Giuseppe; Soana, Elisa; Racchetti, Erica; Pierobon, Enrica; Mastrocicco, Micol; Tesini, Enrico; Fano, Elisa Anna; Bartoli, Marco

    2013-09-01

    Detailed studies on pollutants genesis, path and transformation are needed in agricultural catchments facing coastal areas. Here, loss of nutrients should be minimized in order to protect valuable aquatic ecosystems from eutrophication phenomena. A soil system N budget was calculated for a lowland coastal area, the Po di Volano basin (Po River Delta, Northern Italy), characterized by extremely flat topography and fine soil texture and bordering a network of lagoon ecosystems. Main features of this area are the scarce relevance of livestock farming, the intense agriculture, mainly sustained by chemical fertilizers, and the developed network of artificial canals with long water residence time. Average nitrogen input exceeds output terms by ~60 kg N ha-1 year-1, a relatively small amount if compared to sub-basins of the same hydrological system. Analysis of dissolved inorganic nitrogen in groundwater suggests limited vertical loss and no accumulation of this element, while a nitrogen mass balance in surface waters indicates a net and significant removal within the watershed. Our data provide multiple evidences of efficient control of the nitrogen excess in this geographical area and we speculate that denitrification in soil and in the secondary drainage system performs this ecosystemic function. Additionally, the significant difference between nitrogen input and nitrogen output loads associated to the irrigation system, which is fed by the N-rich Po River, suggests that this basin metabolizes part of the nitrogen excess produced upstream. The traditionally absent livestock farming practices and consequent low use of manure as fertilizer pose the risk of excess soil mineralization and progressive loss of denitrification capacity in this area.

  9. Combining numerical modeling and stable isotope values to quantify groundwater recharge from the Chilean Andes to the Pampa del Tamarugal Basin, Atacama Desert, northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodd, J. P.; Pollyea, R.

    2014-12-01

    The Atacama Desert of northern Chile is one of the driest regions on Earth and receives less than 5mm of precipitation annually. The Pampa del Tamarugal (PdT) Basin contains the largest aquifer system in the region, yet the mechanisms and timing of aquifer recharge and continental-scale groundwater flux are poorly understood. Although there is little debate that the source of groundwater recharge is the higher elevation regions of the Andean Altiplano to the east of the PdT Basin, there remains much uncertainty surrounding the mechanisms and timing of aquifer recharge and continental-scale groundwater flux. Most recharge models of the PdT focus on surface water runoff and alluvial fan recharge on shorter time scales, but many of these models explicitly neglect deep flow pathways. Previous investigators have combined the thermal aquifer profile and 14C groundwater ages to propose an alternative conceptual model in which cold meteoric water infiltrates deep into the Cordillera before circulating upward into the PdT by thermal convection through fault-controlled migration pathways. Although this conceptual model provides a convincing theoretical argument for deep fluid circulation, it cannot constrain the magnitude of this deep recharge flux. In this work, we revisit deep-flow conceptual model by combining the spatial distribution of hydrogen and oxygen isotope values as groundwater tracers with a non-isothermal model of continental scale groundwater flow through a two-dimensional transect from the Chilean Andes to the PdT Basin. This work provides first-order estimates on the contribution of deep groundwater circulation within the PdT Aquifer, while providing a framework for (1) quantifying boundary conditions for high resolution models of groundwater resources within the PdT Aquifer, (2) assessing the influence of variable future climate scenarios for groundwater availability in the region, and (3) further integrating conservative tracers and numerical models for

  10. Nitrogen budget in a lowland coastal area within the Po River basin (northern Italy): multiple evidences of equilibrium between sources and internal sinks.

    PubMed

    Castaldelli, Giuseppe; Soana, Elisa; Racchetti, Erica; Pierobon, Enrica; Mastrocicco, Micol; Tesini, Enrico; Fano, Elisa Anna; Bartoli, Marco

    2013-09-01

    Detailed studies on pollutants genesis, path and transformation are needed in agricultural catchments facing coastal areas. Here, loss of nutrients should be minimized in order to protect valuable aquatic ecosystems from eutrophication phenomena. A soil system N budget was calculated for a lowland coastal area, the Po di Volano basin (Po River Delta, Northern Italy), characterized by extremely flat topography and fine soil texture and bordering a network of lagoon ecosystems. Main features of this area are the scarce relevance of livestock farming, the intense agriculture, mainly sustained by chemical fertilizers, and the developed network of artificial canals with long water residence time. Average nitrogen input exceeds output terms by ~60 kg N ha(-1) year(-1), a relatively small amount if compared to sub-basins of the same hydrological system. Analysis of dissolved inorganic nitrogen in groundwater suggests limited vertical loss and no accumulation of this element, while a nitrogen mass balance in surface waters indicates a net and significant removal within the watershed. Our data provide multiple evidences of efficient control of the nitrogen excess in this geographical area and we speculate that denitrification in soil and in the secondary drainage system performs this ecosystemic function. Additionally, the significant difference between nitrogen input and nitrogen output loads associated to the irrigation system, which is fed by the N-rich Po River, suggests that this basin metabolizes part of the nitrogen excess produced upstream. The traditionally absent livestock farming practices and consequent low use of manure as fertilizer pose the risk of excess soil mineralization and progressive loss of denitrification capacity in this area.

  11. The evolution of a terrace sequence along the Manas River in the northern foreland basin of Tian Shan, China, as inferred from optical dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Zhijun; Li, Sheng-Hua; Li, Bo

    2014-05-01

    The Tian Shan range lies in the actively deforming part of the India-Asia collision zone. The uplift rate and deformation pattern of the Tian Shan are important for understanding the dynamics of crustal deformation in the region. The river terraces in northern Tian Shan provide key records of past changes in climate and/or regional tectonics. In this study, a terrace sequence along the Manas River in a tectonically active zone in the northern foreland basin of Tian Shan is investigated. Six river terraces were identified and dated using optically stimulated luminescence (OSL). The results show that the six terraces were abandoned at ~ 0.5 ka, ~ 1.4 ka, ~ 3.1 ka, ~ 4.0 ka, ~ 12.4 ka and ~ 19.9 ka, respectively. Together with high resolution Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements on the terrace treads, the fluvial history of Manas River is reconstructed. From ~ 20 ka to ~ 4.8 ka, the height of the fluvial bed of Manas River decreased at an average rate of 2.2 ± 0.6 mm/yr. From ~ 4.8 ka to the present, the height of the fluvial bed decreased at an average rate of 13.5 ± 0.6 mm/yr, corresponding to intensified incision of Manas River during the late Holocene. This accelerated incision is very likely caused by the tectonic forces rather than climatic influences alone, suggesting that the tectonic uplift activity was significantly intensified since ~ 4.8 ka in the northern piedmont of Tian Shan. Other controlling factors on the incision of Manas River are also discussed.

  12. Evidence for intercontinental parasite exchange through molecular detection and characterization of haematozoa in northern pintails (Anas acuta) sampled throughout the North Pacific Basin

    PubMed Central

    Ramey, Andrew M.; Schmutz, Joel A.; Reed, John A.; Fujita, Go; Scotton, Bradley D.; Casler, Bruce; Fleskes, Joseph P.; Konishi, Kan; Uchida, Kiyoshi; Yabsley, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Empirical evidence supports wild birds as playing a role in the interhemispheric exchange of bacteria and viruses; however, data supporting the redistribution of parasites among continents are limited. In this study, the hypothesis that migratory birds contribute to the redistribution of parasites between continents was tested by sampling northern pintails (Anas acuta) at locations throughout the North Pacific Basin in North America and East Asia for haemosporidian infections and assessing the genetic evidence for parasite exchange. Of 878 samples collected