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Sample records for basolateral membrane vesicles

  1. Sugar uptake by intestinal basolateral membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Wright, E M; van Os, C H; Mircheff, A K

    1980-03-27

    A high yield of membrane vesicles was prepared from the basolateral surface of rat intestinal cells using an N2 cavitation bomb and density gradient centrifugation. The membranes were enriched 10-fold and were free of significatn contamination by brush border membranes and mitochondria. The rate of D-E114C]glucose and L-E13H]glucose uptake into the vesicle was measured using a rapid filtration technique. D-Glucose equilibrated within the vesicles with a half-time 1/25th that for L-glucose. The stereospecific uptake exhibited saturation kinetics with a Km of approx. 44 mM and a V of approx. 110 nmol . mg-1 min-1 at 10 degrees C. The activation energy for the process was 14 kcal . mol-1 below 15 degrees C and it approached 3 kcal . mol-1 above 22 degrees C. Carrier-mediated uptake was eliminated in the presence of 1 mM HgCl2 and 0.5 mM phloretin. The rate of transport was unaffected by the absence or presence of sodium concentration gradients. Competition studies demonstrated that all sugars with the D-glucose pyranose ring chair conformation shared the transport system, and that, with the possible exception of the -OH group at carbon No. 1, there were no specific requirements for an equatorial -OH group at any position in the pyranose ring. In the case of alpha-methyl-D-glucoside its inability to share the D-glucose transport system may be due to steric hindrance posed by the -OCH3 group rather than by a specific requirement for a free hydroxyl group at the position in the ring. It is concluded that sugars are transported across the basolateral membrane of the intestinal epithelium by a facilitated diffusion system reminiscent of that in human red blood cells.

  2. Mechanisms of calcium transport in human colonic basolateral membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Saksena, Seema; Ammar, Mohammad S; Tyagi, Sangeeta; Elsharydah, Ahmed; Gill, Ravinder K; Ramaswamy, Krishnamurthy; Dudeja, Pradeep K

    2002-10-01

    Human colon has been suggested to play an important role in calcium absorption especially after extensive disease or resection of the small intestine. We have previously demonstrated the presence of a carrier-mediated calcium uptake mechanism in the human colonic luminal membrane vesicles. Current studies were, therefore, undertaken to investigate the mechanism(s) of calcium exit across the basolateral membrane domain of the human colon. Human colonic basolateral membrane vesicles (BLMVs) were isolated and purified from mucosal scrapings of organ donor colons, utilizing a technique developed in our laboratory. 45Ca uptake was measured by a rapid filtration technique. 45Ca uptake represented transport into the intravesicular space as evidenced by an osmolarity study and by the demonstration of Ca2' efflux from calcium preloaded vesicles by Ca2+ ionophore A23187. Calcium uptake was stimulated by Mg2+ ATP. The kinetic parameters for ATP-dependent Ca2+ uptake revealed saturation kinetics with Michaelis constant (Km) of 0.22 +/- 0.04 microM and a maximum rate of uptake (Vmax) of 0.38 +/- 0.12 nmol/mg protein/min. The Km of ATP concentration required for half maximal Ca2+ uptake was 0.39 +/- 0.04 mM. ATP-stimulated calcium uptake into these vesicles was further stimulated in the presence of calmodulin and was inhibited by calmodulin antagonist, trifluoperazine. Uptake of 45Ca into BLMVs was markedly inhibited by cis-Na+ but was significantly stimulated by trans-Na+ (40-50% stimulation). Our results demonstrate the presence of a Mg2+/ATP-dependent calmodulin-regulated Ca2+ transport system and a Na+-Ca2+ exchange process in the human colonic basolateral membranes.

  3. Phosphate transport by rat intestinal basolateral-membrane vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Ghishan, F K; Kikuchi, K; Arab, N

    1987-01-01

    The characteristics of phosphate transport across intestinal basolateral membranes of the rat were determined by using enriched preparations in which uphill Na+-dependent D-glucose transport could not be demonstrated, but ATP-dependent Ca2+ transport was present. Phosphate transport was saturable, Na+-dependent and exhibited Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Vmax. was 51.1 +/- 4.2 pmol/10 s per mg of protein and Km was 14 +/- 3.9 microM. The transport process was electroneutral. Tracer-exchange experiments and counter-transport studies confirmed the presence of a Na+-Pi carrier at the basolateral membrane. The presence of inside-positive membrane potential did not enhance phosphate uptake, indicating that the Na+ effect is secondary to the presence of the Na+-Pi carrier rather than an induction of positive membrane potential. The stoichiometry of this carrier at pH 7.4 was 2 Na+:1 phosphate, as shown by direct studies utilizing the static-head method. These studies are the first to determine the presence of a phosphate carrier at the basolateral membrane. PMID:3663094

  4. Riboflavin transport by rabbit renal basolateral membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Yanagawa, N; Jo, O D; Said, H M

    1998-12-09

    The present study examined riboflavin (RF) uptake by isolated rabbit renal basolateral membrane (BLM). RF uptake was linear during the initial 10 seconds and leveled off thereafter with longer incubation. Studies on RF uptake as a function of incubation medium osmolarity indicated that the BLM RF uptake was the results of transport (approximately 45%) into the intravesicular space as well as binding (approximately 55%) to membrane surfaces. The RF binding to BLM was Na+-dependent so that replacement of Na+ by other cations eliminated the binding component of RF uptake. The process of BLM RF uptake was saturable as a function of substrate concentration and was significantly inhibited by cis-addition of its structural analogs, lumiflavin and lumichrome, indicating the involvement of a carrier-mediated process. The BLM RF uptake was affected by changes in extravesicular pH so that, as compared to pH 7.5, RF uptake was lower at pH 6.5 and higher at pH 8.5. The effect of extravesicular pH persisted when the transmembrane H+ gradient was dissipated by FCCP, indicating the direct effect of pH on BLM RF uptake. The BLM RF uptake was not affected by alterations of the transmembrane electrical potential, induced by either the presence of anions with different membrane permeability (Cl-=NO-3>SO-4>gluconate-) or using nigericin (10 microg/mg protein) with an outwardly or inwardly directed transmembrane K+ gradient. The BLM RF uptake was, however, inhibited by probenecid and p-aminohippurate, and was enhanced by trans-RF. In summary, these results demonstrate the existence of a Na+-dependent BLM binding of RF and a membrane-associated carrier system for RF uptake by renal BLM.

  5. Calcium uptake by brush-border and basolateral membrane vesicles in chick duodenum

    SciTech Connect

    Takito, J.; Shinki, T.; Sasaki, T.; Suda, T. )

    1990-01-01

    Calcium uptake was compared between duodenal brush-border membrane vesicles (BBMV) and basolateral membrane vesicles (BLMV) isolated from vitamin D-deficient chicks and those injected with 625 ng of 1 alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1 alpha,25(OH)2D3). The uptake by BBMV in the 1 alpha,25-(OH)2D3-treated birds attained a maximum (280% of the control) at 12 h and was maintained at an elevated level (210%) at 24 h after the injection of the vitamin. In contrast, ATP-dependent calcium uptake by BLMV reached a maximum (185% of the control) at 6 h and decreased to the control level at 24 h. The kinetic analysis revealed that 1 alpha,25(OH)2D3 increased Vmax values without any changes in apparent Km values in both BBMV and BLMV. The activity of ATP-dependent calcium uptake was localized exclusively in the basolateral membrane, and the activity was inhibited by vanadate (IC50, 1 microM), but not by oligomycin, theophylline, calmodulin, trifluoperazine, or calbindin D28K. These results indicate that calcium transport through both the brush-border and basolateral membranes is involved in the 1 alpha,25(OH)2D3-dependent intestinal calcium absorption. The initiation of calcium absorption by 1 alpha,25(OH)2D3 appears to be due to an increase in the rate of calcium efflux at the basolateral membrane rather than the rate at the brush-border membrane.

  6. A carrier-mediated transport for folate in basolateral membrane vesicles of rat small intestine.

    PubMed Central

    Said, H M; Redha, R

    1987-01-01

    The mechanism of exit of folate from the enterocyte, i.e. transport across the basolateral membrane, is not known. In this study we examined, using basolateral membrane vesicles, the transport of folic acid across the basolateral membrane of rat intestine. Uptake of folic acid by these vesicles represents transport of the substrate into the intravesicular compartment and not binding to the membrane surface. The rate of folic acid transport was linear for the first 1 min of incubation but decreased thereafter, reaching equilibrium after 5 min of incubation. The transport of folic acid was: (1) saturable as a function of concentration with an apparent Km of 0.6 +/- 0.17 microM and Vmax. of 1.01 +/- 0.11 pmol/30 s per mg of protein; (2) inhibited in a competitive manner by the structural analogues 5-methyltetrahydrofolate and methotrexate (Ki = 2 and 1.4 microM, respectively); (4) electroneutral; (5) Na+-independent; (6) sensitive to the effect of the anion exchange inhibitor 4,4'-di-isothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid (DIDS). These data indicate the existence of a carrier-mediated transport system for folic acid in rat intestinal basolateral membrane and demonstrate that the transport process is electroneutral, Na+-independent and sensitive to the effect of anion exchange inhibition. PMID:3689340

  7. 65Zn2+ transport by lobster hepato-pancreatic baso-lateral membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Capo, J A; Mandal, P K; Eyyunni, S; Ahearn, G A

    2005-01-01

    The lobster (Homarus americanus) hepato-pancreatic epithelial baso-lateral cell membrane possesses three transport proteins that transfer calcium between the cytoplasm and hemolymph: an ATP-dependent calcium ATPase, a sodium-calcium exchanger, and a verapamil-sensitive cation channel. We used standard centrifugation methods to prepare purified hepato-pancreatic baso-lateral membrane vesicles and a rapid filtration procedure to investigate whether (65)Zn(2+) transfer across this epithelial cell border occurs by any of these previously described transporters for calcium. Baso-lateral membrane vesicles were osmotically reactive and exhibited a time course of uptake that was linear for 10-15 s and approached equilibrium by 120 s. In the absence of sodium, (65)Zn(2+) influx was a hyperbolic function of external zinc concentration and followed the Michaelis-Menten equation for carrier transport. This carrier transport was stimulated by the addition of 150 microM ATP (increase in K(m) and J(max)) and inhibited by the simultaneous presence of 150 micromol l(-1) ATP+250 micromol l(-1) vanadate (decrease in both K(m) and J(max)). In the absence of ATP, (65)Zn(2+) influx was a sigmoidal function of preloaded vesicular sodium concentration (0, 5, 10, 20, 30, 45, and 75 mmol l(-1)) and exhibited a Hill Coefficient of 4.03+/-1.14, consistent with the exchange of 3 Na(+)/1Zn(2+). Using Dixon analysis, calcium was shown to be a competitive inhibitor of baso-lateral membrane vesicle (65)Zn(2+) influx by both the ATP-dependent (K(i)=205 nmol l(-1) Ca(2+)) and sodium-dependent (K(i)=2.47 micromol l(-1) Ca(2+)) transport processes. These results suggest that zinc transport across the lobster hepato-pancreatic baso-lateral membrane largely occurred by the ATP-dependent calcium ATPase and sodium-calcium exchanger carrier proteins.

  8. Characterization of putrescine transport across the intestinal epithelium: study using isolated brush border and basolateral membrane vesicles of the enterocyte.

    PubMed

    Milovic, V; Stein, J; Piiper, A; Gerhard, R; Zeuzem, S; Caspary, W F

    1995-02-01

    Putrescine transport was investigated in isolated brush border and basolateral membrane vesicles prepared from the rabbit enterocyte. Brush border vesicles were oriented right-side-out and basolateral vesicles inside-out, forming a model representing uptake and extrusion across the intestinal epithelium. Putrescine transport across both membranes was initially rapid, and 66% of the equilibrium uptake was achieved within the first minute. According to osmoplots and measurements at 4 degrees C, 20% of total incorporation presented binding to the membrane. In order to estimate actual uptake into the vesicles, Km was calculated from the differences in putrescine incorporation at 37 degrees C and 4 degrees C, and was 12.7 mumol L-1 for brush border uptake and 38.2 mumol L-1 for basolateral extrusion. Putrescine uptake into brush border and basolateral membrane vesicles was not enhanced in the presence of an Na+ gradient. When Na+ was substituted with an uncharged solute, mannitol, putrescine incorporation was increased, indicating that putrescine uptake is not Na(+)-dependent and that cations might interfere with the carrier. Paraquat and methylglyoxalbis(guanylhydrazone), known to share the polyamine transport system, inhibited putrescine incorporation in both membrane vesicle preparations. Basolateral carrier showed significantly higher sensitivity to cations. We conclude that putrescine uptake across the apical membrane and extrusion across the basolateral membrane of the enterocyte are mediated by two different and independent carriers which differ in their electrical properties.

  9. Mechanisms of transport of nontransferrin-bound iron in basolateral and canalicular rat liver plasma membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, T.L.; Lake, J.R. )

    1990-09-01

    Although most iron in plasma is bound to transferrin, recent evidence suggests that the nontransferrin-bound fraction contributes to hepatic iron loading and toxicity seen in iron-overload disorders. Our studies of isolated perfused rat liver previously demonstrated saturable uptake of nontransferrin-bound iron that continues despite hepatic iron overload. To further characterize the mechanism of transport of this form of iron, we measured binding of 55Fe-labeled ferrous ascorbate to rat liver plasma membrane vesicles under varying conditions. Binding of 5 mumol/L iron by both basolateral and canalicular membranes was time-dependent and linear for the first 5 sec. Initial rate of binding of ferrous ascorbate to basolateral membrane vesicles was temperature dependent and increased by calcium but, in contrast to the perfused rat liver, was not inhibited by other divalent cations. Binding velocities by basolateral membrane vesicles were saturable at increasing iron concentration (Km = 33 mumol/L, Vmax = 16 pmol/mg protein/sec). Ferrous iron binding by canalicular membrane vesicles was also temperature dependent, but initial association rates were not saturable over the concentration range studied (2 to 20 mumol/L). We conclude that nontransferrin-bound iron associates with basolateral liver plasma membrane vesicles by a saturable mechanism sensitive to temperature and calcium and consistent with a membrane carrier. Other divalent cations do not inhibit membrane association but may compete for a subsequent cytosolic binding site.

  10. The basolateral vesicle sorting machinery and basolateral proteins are recruited to the site of enteropathogenic E. coli microcolony growth at the apical membrane

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Gitte A.; Jensen, Helene H.; Schelde, Anne-Sofie B.; Toft, Charlotte; Pedersen, Hans N.; Ulrichsen, Maj; Login, Frédéric H.; Amieva, Manuel R.

    2017-01-01

    Foodborne Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) infections of the small intestine cause diarrhea especially in children and are a major cause of childhood death in developing countries. EPEC infects the apical membrane of the epithelium of the small intestine by attaching, effacing the microvilli under the bacteria and then forming microcolonies on the cell surface. We first asked the question where on epithelial cells EPEC attaches and grows. Using models of polarized epithelial monolayers, we evaluated the sites of initial EPEC attachment to the apical membrane and found that EPEC preferentially attached over the cell-cell junctions and formed microcolonies preferentially where three cells come together at tricellular tight junctions. The ability of EPEC to adhere increased when host cell polarity was compromised yielding EPEC access to basolateral proteins. EPEC pedestals contain basolateral cytoskeletal proteins. Thus, we asked if attached EPEC causes reorganization the protein composition of the host cell plasma membrane at sites of microcolony formation. We found that EPEC microcolony growth at the apical membrane resulted in a local accumulation of basolateral plasma membrane proteins surrounding the microcolony. Basolateral marker protein aquaporin-3 localized to forming EPEC microcolonies. Components of the basolateral vesicle targeting machinery were re-routed. The Exocyst (Exo70) was recruited to individual EPEC as was the basolateral vesicle SNARE VAMP-3. Moreover, several Rab variants were also recruited to the infection site, and their dominant-negative equivalents were not. To quantitatively study the recruitment of basolateral proteins, we created a pulse of the temperature sensitive basolateral VSVG, VSVG3-SP-GFP, from the trans-Golgi Network. We found that after release from the TGN, significantly more VSVG3-SP-GFP accumulated at the site of microcolony growth than on equivalent membrane regions of uninfected cells. This suggests that

  11. The basolateral vesicle sorting machinery and basolateral proteins are recruited to the site of enteropathogenic E. coli microcolony growth at the apical membrane.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Gitte A; Jensen, Helene H; Schelde, Anne-Sofie B; Toft, Charlotte; Pedersen, Hans N; Ulrichsen, Maj; Login, Frédéric H; Amieva, Manuel R; Nejsum, Lene N

    2017-01-01

    Foodborne Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) infections of the small intestine cause diarrhea especially in children and are a major cause of childhood death in developing countries. EPEC infects the apical membrane of the epithelium of the small intestine by attaching, effacing the microvilli under the bacteria and then forming microcolonies on the cell surface. We first asked the question where on epithelial cells EPEC attaches and grows. Using models of polarized epithelial monolayers, we evaluated the sites of initial EPEC attachment to the apical membrane and found that EPEC preferentially attached over the cell-cell junctions and formed microcolonies preferentially where three cells come together at tricellular tight junctions. The ability of EPEC to adhere increased when host cell polarity was compromised yielding EPEC access to basolateral proteins. EPEC pedestals contain basolateral cytoskeletal proteins. Thus, we asked if attached EPEC causes reorganization the protein composition of the host cell plasma membrane at sites of microcolony formation. We found that EPEC microcolony growth at the apical membrane resulted in a local accumulation of basolateral plasma membrane proteins surrounding the microcolony. Basolateral marker protein aquaporin-3 localized to forming EPEC microcolonies. Components of the basolateral vesicle targeting machinery were re-routed. The Exocyst (Exo70) was recruited to individual EPEC as was the basolateral vesicle SNARE VAMP-3. Moreover, several Rab variants were also recruited to the infection site, and their dominant-negative equivalents were not. To quantitatively study the recruitment of basolateral proteins, we created a pulse of the temperature sensitive basolateral VSVG, VSVG3-SP-GFP, from the trans-Golgi Network. We found that after release from the TGN, significantly more VSVG3-SP-GFP accumulated at the site of microcolony growth than on equivalent membrane regions of uninfected cells. This suggests that

  12. Electrogenic sodium/bicarbonate cotransport in rabbit renal cortical basolateral membrane vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Akiba, T; Alpern, R J; Eveloff, J; Calamina, J; Warnock, D G

    1986-01-01

    The present studies examined the mechanism of bicarbonate transport across basolateral membrane vesicles prepared from rabbit renal cortex. Isotopic sodium uptake was stimulated by bicarbonate when compared with gluconate (2.5 nmol/mg protein per 5 s versus 1.4 nmol/mg protein per 5 s), and this process was inhibited by disulfonic stilbenes. Imposition of an interior-positive potassium diffusion potential further stimulated isotopic sodium uptake to 3.4 nmol/mg protein per 5 s, an effect that occurred only in the presence of bicarbonate and was blocked by disulfonic stilbenes. Kinetic analysis of the rate of bicarbonate-dependent sodium uptake as a function of sodium concentration revealed saturable stimulation with a Vmax of 2.7 nmol/mg protein per 2 s and a Km of 10.4 mM. The effect of bicarbonate concentration on bicarbonate-dependent sodium uptake was more complex. The present results demonstrate an electrogenic (negatively charged) sodium/bicarbonate cotransporter in basolateral membrane vesicles from the rabbit renal cortex. The electrogenicity implies a stoichiometry of at least two bicarbonate ions for each sodium ion. PMID:3782468

  13. Proton-stimulated Cl-HCO/sub 3/ antiport by basolateral membrane vesicles of lobster hepatopancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Ahearn, G.A.; Grover, M.L.; Tsuji, R.T.; Clay, L.P.

    1987-05-01

    Purified epithelial basolateral membrane vesicles were prepared from lobster hepatopancreas by sorbitol gradient centrifugation. Na+-K+-adenosinetriphosphatase, alkaline phosphatase, and cytochrome-c oxidase enzyme activities in the final membrane preparation were enriched 9.6-, 1.4-, and 0.4-fold, respectively, compared with their activities in the original tissue homogenate. Vesicle osmotic reactivity was demonstrated using 60-min equilibrium /sup 36/Cl uptake experiments at a variety of transmembrane osmotic gradients. /sup 36/Cl uptake into vesicles preloaded with HCO/sub 3/ was significantly greater than into vesicles lacking HCO/sub 3/. This exchange process was stimulated by a transmembrane proton gradient (internal pH greater than external pH). Proton-gradient-dependent Cl-HCO/sub 3/ exchange was potential sensitive and stimulated by an electrically negative vesicle interior. /sup 36/Cl influx (4-s exposures) into HCO/sub 3/-loaded vesicles occurred by the combination of 4-acetamido-4'-isothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid sensitive, carrier-mediated transfer and apparent diffusion. /sup 36/Cl influx was a hyperbolic function of both internal (HCO/sub 3/) and internal (Cl). The two internal anions displayed a 100-fold difference in apparent affinity constants with HCO/sub 3/ being strongly preferred. /sup 36/Cl influx was stimulated more by preloaded monovalent than by divalent anions. Na was an inhibitor of proton-dependent anion antiport, whereas K had no effect. A model for HCl-HCO/sub 3/ antiport is suggested that employs combined transmembrane concentration gradients of Cl and HCO/sub 3/ to power anion exchange and transfer protons against a concentration gradient.

  14. Effect of barium ion on p-aminohippurate transport in basolateral membrane vesicles isolated from rat kidney cortex.

    PubMed

    Hori, M; Gemba, M

    1985-06-01

    To clarify the cause of the stimulation of p-aminohippurate (PAH) accumulation in rat kidney cortical slices by barium, an experiment was carried out with basolateral membrane vesicles isolated from rat kidney cortex. The effect of barium on PAH uptake by the membrane vesicles was compared with that of verapamil which also stimulated PAH accumulation in the slices. The enzyme marker for basolateral membrane, (Na+ + K+)- ATPase, was enriched 15-fold and the brushborder enzyme marker, alkaline phosphatase, was 1.3-fold in our membrane preparation. Contamination in this preparation by lysosomes, mitochondria and cytosol was also low but that by endoplasmic reticulum was slightly high as judged by the enzyme markers. PAH uptake by the membrane vesicles possessed the usual characteristics, i.e., sodium-dependence and probenecid-sensitivity. PAH uptake by the membrane vesicles was enhanced by barium, but not by verapamil. On the other hand, barium did not affect tetraethylammonium (TEA) uptake by the vesicles, and verapamil strongly inhibited it. Manganese also stimulated PAH uptake to the same extent as did barium, but calcium and strontium did not affect the uptake. Barium did not act on sodium transport in the membrane vesicles. An 'anion-sensitively transported lipophilic cation', triphenylmethylphosphonium iodide (TPMP), uptake was depressed by barium. These results suggest that barium stimulates selectively PAH uptake in basolateral membrane vesicles. Its stimulatory action may contribute at least partly to an increase in PAH accumulation in rat kidney cortical slices by this ion and may prove useful in an analysis of the mechanism of PAH transport system in renal basolateral membranes.

  15. Thiamine outflow from the enterocyte: a study using basolateral membrane vesicles from rat small intestine.

    PubMed Central

    Laforenza, U; Gastaldi, G; Rindi, G

    1993-01-01

    1. Rat small intestinal basolateral membrane vesicles (BLMVs) were prepared and found to be 31% non-vesiculated and 69% vesiculated, 4.9% right side out and 63.8% inside out. 2. Thiamine uptake by BLMVs followed a hyperbolic time course reaching equilibrium after 60-90 min incubation. Uptake was not affected by the transmembrane potential or by the presence or absence of Na+ or K+ in the incubation medium. 3. At concentrations below 1.25 microM, [3H]thiamine was taken up mainly by a saturable mechanism with an apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) = 1.32 microM and maximal flux (Jmax) = 1.93 pmol (mg protein)-1 (4 s)-1. At higher concentrations, a non-saturable mechanism prevailed. 4. Only 29% of [3H]thiamine taken up by the vesicles was membrane bound, the remaining being translocated into the vesicular space. No thiamine phosphoesters could be detected inside the vesicles. 5. In the absence of ATP, the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase inhibitors ouabain, frusemide and vanadate reduced thiamine uptake by 35, 30 and 15% respectively. 6. In experiments conducted with K+ inside the vesicles and Na+, Mg2+ and ATP outside, the time course of thiamine uptake by BLMVs displayed an overshoot (80-90% increment) at 30 s incubation as compared to controls. When ATP was replaced with phosphocreatine, or when NaCl was replaced with isosmotic amounts of KCl, the overshoot disappeared. 7. The thiamine analogues pyrithiamine, amprolium and 4'-oxythiamine decreased the ATPase-dependent transport of [3H]thiamine by 100, 86 and 31% respectively. 8. These results provide evidence that the transport of thiamine by BLMVs is coupled directly to the hydrolysis of ATP (primary active transport). PMID:8254515

  16. NaCl reflection coefficients in proximal tubule apical and basolateral membrane vesicles. Measurement by induced osmosis and solvent drag.

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, D; Verkman, A S

    1989-01-01

    Two independent methods, induced osmosis and solvent drag, were used to determine the reflection coefficients for NaCl (sigma NaCl) in brush border and basolateral membrane vesicles isolated from rabbit proximal tubule. In the induced osmosis method, vesicles loaded with sucrose were subjected to varying inward NaCl gradients in a stopped-flow apparatus. sigma NaCl was determined from the osmolality of the NaCl solution required to cause no initial osmotic water flux as measured by light scattering (null point). By this method sigma NaCl was greater than 0.92 for both apical and basolateral membranes with best estimates of 1.0. sigma NaCl was determined by the solvent drag method using the Cl-sensitive fluorescent indicator, 6-methoxy-N-[3-sulfopropyl]quinolinium (SPQ), to detect the drag of Cl into vesicles by inward osmotic water movement caused by an outward osmotic gradient. sigma NaCl was determined by comparing experimental data with theoretical curves generated using the coupled flux equations of Kedem and Katchalsky. By this method we found that sigma NaCl was greater than 0.96 for apical and greater than 0.98 for basolateral membrane vesicles, with best estimates of 1.0 for both membranes. These results demonstrate that sigma NaCl for proximal tubule apical and basolateral membranes are near unity. Taken together with previous results, these data suggest that proximal tubule water channels are long narrow pores that exclude NaCl. PMID:2765660

  17. Electrogenic sulfate uptake by crustacean hepatopancreatic basolateral membrane vesicles. [Homarus americanus

    SciTech Connect

    Cattey, M.A.; Gerencser, G.A.; Aheam, G.A. Univ. of Florida, Gainesville )

    1990-02-26

    Basolateral membrane vesicles (BLMV) were isolated from Atlantic lobster (Homarus americanus) hepatopancreas and purified by discontinuous sucrose gradient centrifugation. BLMV prepared in this fashion were osmotically reactive exhibiting linear dependence of vesicular {sup 35}SO{sub 4}{sup {minus}2} uptake to increasing external osmotic pressure with negligible non-specific isotope binding. Under short circuited conditions (valinomycin/K{sup +}) BLMV responded to either a HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} gradient directed out or equilibrated HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} (10 mM) by displaying short term accumulation of sulfate above that of equilibrium. Uptake of divalent anion was unaffected by an inwardly directed transmembrane Na{sup +} or tetramethylammonium{sup +} gradient. {sup 35}SO{sub 4}{sup {minus}2}/HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} exchange in the presence of valinomycin was stimulated by transient inside positive K{sup +} diffusion potentials and inhibited by transient inside negative K{sup +} diffusion potentials. The role of electrogenic anion exchange by hepatopancreas BLMV in transcellular sulfate transport is discussed.

  18. Ammonium ion substitutes for K/sup +/ in ATP-dependent Na/sup +/ transport by basolateral membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Towle, D.W.; Hoelleland, T.

    1987-03-01

    Ion-transporting cells from posterior gills of blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus) acclimated to low salinity were used as starting material for the preparation of microsomal membrane vesicles by density gradient centrifugation. The Na/sup +/-K/sup +/-adenosinetriphosphatase (ATPase)-enriched basolateral vesicles were loaded with KCl- or NH/sub 4//sup +/-containing medium by dilution and centrifugation, and initial rates of /sup 22/Na/sup +/ uptake into the vesicles were measured by a rapid filtration procedure. Varying the extravesicular sucrose concentration altered equilibrium uptake of /sup 22/Na/sup +/, indicating the existence of osmotically sensitive vesicles. Monensin, a sodium-specific ionophore, enhanced passive uptake of /sup 22/Na/sup +/ across the vesicle membrane in the absence of ATP. With 100 mM KCl in the intravesicular medium, addition of ATP to the extravesicular medium increased initial rates of /sup 22/Na/sup +/ uptake 10- to 20-fold over levels measured without ATP. A nonhydrolyzable ATP analog failed to stimulate /sup 22/Na/sup +/ uptake. Intravesicular K/sup +/ could be replaced by NH/sub 4//sup +/ but not by choline. With NH/sub 4//sup +/ as counterion, Na/sup +/ transport was inhibited by digitoxin, but valinomycin had no effect. A study of the kinetic effects of intravesicular K/sup +/ and NH/sub 4//sup +/ on initial rates of /sup 22/Na/sup +/ uptake indicated the existence of two classes of binding sites, one responding to counterion concentrations in the millimolar range and a second class responding to counterion concentrations over 50 mM. The results indicate that ATP-dependent /sup 22/Na/sup +/ uptake by membrane vesicles from Callinectes sapidus gill, mediated by Na/sup +/-K/sup +/-ATPase, can utilize either K/sup +/ or NH/sub 4//sup +/ as counterion.

  19. pH gradient effects on chloride transport across basolateral membrane vesicles from guinea-pig jejunum.

    PubMed Central

    Touzani, K; Alvarado, F; Vasseur, M

    1997-01-01

    1. The effects of alkaline-inside pH gradients on 36Cl- uptake were quantified by using brush-border membrane (BBM) and basolateral membrane (BLM) vesicles from guinea-pig jejunum. 2. With BBM vesicles, a pHo/pHi gradient of 5.0/7.5 yielded fast overshoots involving a random, non-obligatory Cl(-)-H+ symport, strongly inhibited by CCCP. In contrast, BLM vesicles responded to similar pH gradients with much smaller, delayed overshoots, unaffected by CCCP. 3. The initial Cl- entry rates into BLM vesicles were a function of each pHo, pHi and delta pH value. They were stimulated by valinomycin in the presence of inward-directed K+ gradients. Short-circuiting the membrane potential with equilibrated K+ and valinomycin inhibited pH gradient-dependent Cl- uptake, but only partially. 4. Taken together, these results indicate that guinea-pig jejunal BLM vesicles possess both Cl- conductance and Cl(-)-H+ symport activities. 5. Even when different, the BBM and the BLM symporters are mechanistically similar. Neither of them involves a Cl(-)-OH- antiport, nor a simultaneous Cl(-)-anion exchange mechanism. Rather, for each membrane, all of these activities (symport, anion exchange) can be explained in terms of a single mobile carrier acting as a random, non-obligatory Cl(-)-H+ symporter where exchange occurs simply by counterflow. Net Cl- translocation via either the ternary (Cl(-)-C-H+) or the binary (Cl(-)-C) complexes accounts, respectively, for the existence of two, operationally distinct, electroneutral and rheogenic components. 6. The BBM symporter appears to involve an AE2 protein, but the molecular identity of the BLM one remains to be established. PMID:9147326

  20. Modulation of Na+/Mg²+ exchanger stoichiometry ratio by Cl⁻ ions in basolateral rat liver plasma membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Cefaratti, C; Romani, A

    2011-05-01

    The Na+/Mg²+ exchanger represents the main Mg²+ extrusion mechanism operating in mammalian cells including hepatocytes. We have previously reported that this exchanger, located in the basolateral domain of the hepatocyte, promotes the extrusion of intravesicular trapped Mg²+ for extravesicular Na+ with ratio 1. This electrogenic exchange is supported by the accumulation of tetraphenyl-phosphonium within the vesicles at the time when Mg²+ efflux occurs. In this present study, the role of extra- and intra-vesicular Cl⁻ on the Na+/Mg²+ exchange ratio was investigated. The results reported here suggest that Cl⁻ ions are not required for the Na+ to Mg²+ exchange to occur, but the stoichiometry ratio of the exchanger switches from electrogenic (1Na(in)+ :1Mg(out)²+) in the presence of intravesicular Cl⁻ to electroneutral (2Na(in)+ :1 Mg(out)²+) in their absence. In basolateral liver plasma membrane vesicles loaded with MgCl₂ labeled with ³⁶Cl⁻, a small but significant Cl⁻ efflux (~30 nmol Cl⁻/mg protein/1 min) is observed following addition of NaCl or Na-isethionate to the extravesicular medium. Both Cl⁻ and Mg²+ effluxes are inhibited by imipramine but not by amiloride, DIDS, niflumic acid, bumetanide, or furosemide. In vesicles loaded with Mg-gluconate and stimulated by Na-isethionate, an electroneutral Mg²+ extrusion is observed. Taken together, these results suggest that the Na+/Mg²+ exchanger can operate irrespective of the absence or the presence of Cl⁻ in the extracellular or intracellular environment. Changes in trans-cellular Cl⁻ content, however, can affect the modus operandi of the Na+/Mg²+ exchanger, and consequently impact "cellular" Na+ and Mg²+ homeostasis as well as the hepatocyte membrane potential.

  1. Structural and functional polarity of canalicular and basolateral plasma membrane vesicles isolated in high yield from rat liver

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    A method has been developed for routine high yield separation of canalicular (cLPM) from basolateral (blLPM) liver plasma membrane vesicles of rat liver. Using a combination of rate zonal floatation (TZ- 28 zonal rotor, Sorvall) and high speed centrifugation through discontinuous sucrose gradients, 9-16 mg of cLPM and 15-28 mg of blLPM protein can be isolated in 1 d. cLPM are free of the basolateral markers Na+/K+-ATPase and glucagon-stimulatable adenylate cyclase activities, but are highly enriched with respect to homogenate in the "canalicular marker" enzyme activities leucylnaphthylamidase (48-fold), gamma-glutamyl-transpeptidase (60-fold), 5'-nucleotidase (64-fold), alkaline phosphatase (71-fold), Mg++-ATPase (83-fold), and alkaline phosphodiesterase I (116-fold). In contrast, blLPM are 34-fold enriched in Na+/K+-ATPase activity, exhibit considerable glucagon-stimulatable adenylate cyclase activity, and demonstrate a 4- to 15-fold increase over homogenate in the various "canalicular markers." cLPM have a twofold higher content of sialic acids, cholesterol; and sphingomyelin compared with blLPM. At least three canalicular-(130,000, 100,000, and 58,000 mol wt) and several basolateral-specific protein bands have been detected after SDS PAGE of the two LPM subfractions. Specifically, the immunoglobin A-binding secretory component is restricted to blLPM as demonstrated by immunochemical techniques. These data indicate virtually complete separation of basolateral from canalicular LPM and demonstrate multiple functional and compositional polarity between the two surface domains of hepatocytes. PMID:6699096

  2. Characterization of ATP-dependent Ca2+ transport in the basolateral membrane vesicles from proximal and distal tubules of the rabbit kidney.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, C; Chan, M; Brunette, M G

    1991-01-01

    Basolateral membrane vesicles were prepared from purified proximal and distal tubules of the rabbit kidney. The properties of the ATP-dependent Ca2+ transport were investigated. In both membranes, there was a high affinity, ATP-dependent Ca2+ transport system (Km = 0.1 microM). The optimal concentration of Mg2+ was 0.5 mM and the optimal concentration of ATP was 1 mM. The nucleotide specificity and pH dependence of the Ca2+ transport in both membranes were similar. In basolateral membrane vesicles, calmodulin had no effect on Ca2+ transport. However, in basolateral membrane vesicles depleted of calmodulin, exogenous calmodulin increased the Ca2+ transport by increasing maximal velocity. There were no major differences in the properties of the ATP-dependent Ca2+ transport system in these two membranes. These findings are discussed in relation to why parathyroid hormone differentially modulates Ca2+ transport in these two segments of the nephron.

  3. Role of Organic Anion and Amino Acid Carriers in Transport of Inorganic Mercury in Rat Renal Basolateral Membrane Vesicles: Influence of Compensatory Renal Growth

    PubMed Central

    Lash, Lawrence H.; Hueni, Sarah E.; Putt, David A.; Zalups, Rudolfs K.

    2006-01-01

    Susceptibility to renal injury induced by inorganic mercury (Hg2+) increases significantly as a result of compensatory renal growth (following reductions of renal mass). We hypothesize that this phenomenon is related in part to increased basolateral uptake of Hg2+ by proximal tubular cells. To determine the mechanistic roles of various transporters, we studied uptake of Hg2+, in the form of biologically relevant Hg2+-thiol conjugates, using baso-lateral membrane (BLM) vesicles isolated from the kidney(s) of control and uninephrectomized (NPX) rats. Binding of Hg2+ to membranes, accounted for 52–86% of total Hg2+ associated with membrane vesicles exposed to HgCl2, decreased with increasing concentrations of HgCl2, and decreased slightly in the presence of sodium ions. Conjugation of Hg2+ with thiols (glutathione, l-cysteine (Cys), N-acetyl-l-cysteine) reduced binding by more than 50%. Under all conditions, BLM vesicles from NPX rats exhibited a markedly lower proportion of binding. Of the Hg2+-thiol conjugates studied, transport of Hg-(Cys)2 was fastest. Selective inhibition of BLM carriers implicated the involvement of organic anion transporter(s) (Oat1 and/or Oat3; Slc22a6 and Slc22a8), amino acid transporter system ASC (Slc7a10), the dibasic amino acid transporter (Slc3a1), and the sodium-dicarboxylate carrier (SDCT2 or NADC3; Slc13a3). Uptake of each mercuric conjugate, when factored by membrane protein content, was higher in BLM vesicles from uninephrectomized (NPX) rats, with specific increases in transport by the carriers noted above. These results support the hypothesis that compensatory renal growth is associated with increased uptake of Hg2+ in proximal tubular cells and we have identified specific transporters involved in the process. PMID:16162843

  4. Calcium transport by rat duodenal villus and crypt basolateral membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, J.R.F.; Weiser, M.M.

    1987-02-01

    Rat duodenal cells were isolated sequentially to give fractions enriched for villus and crypt cells. From each of these fractions, basolateral-enriched membrane vesicles were prepared and ATP-dependent calcium uptake was studied. Calcium uptake was sensitive to temperature, was inhibited by vanadate and by A23187, and was lower in vitamin D-deficient animals. In normal animals, (UVCa)-transport was approximately twofold greater in villus-tip than in crypt cell-fraction basolateral membranes though the affinity of the uptake for calcium was similar (K/sub m/ = 0.3 M). In vitamin D-deficient animals, the crypt-to-villus gradient was reduced, and in all fractions, calcium transport was similar to or lower than that in the crypts of normal animals. Six hours after vitamin D-deficient animals were repleted with 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol, a significant increase in calcium transport by everted gut sacs was present; however, basolateral calcium transport was significantly increased in only the mid-villus fractions, and no change was seen in the villus-tip fractions. Thus vitamin D appears necessary for the development of increased basolateral membrane calcium pump activity in duodenal villus cells, but not all cells in vitamin D-deficient rats are able to respond to 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol.

  5. Purification of basolateral integral membrane proteins by cationic colloidal silica-based apical membrane subtraction.

    PubMed

    Goode, Robert J A; Simpson, Richard J

    2009-01-01

    Epithelial cell polarity mediates many essential biological functions and perturbation of the apical/basolateral divide is a hallmark of epithelial to mesenchymal transition in carcinoma. Therefore, correct targeting of proteins to the apical and basolateral surfaces is essential to proper epithelial cell function. However, proteomic characterisation of apical/basolateral sorting has been largely ignored, due to ineffectual separation techniques and contamination of plasma-membrane preparations with housekeeping proteins. Here we describe a method that strips the apical membrane from the adherent cells and releases the intracellular contents, thereby leaving the basolateral membrane available for stringent washes and collection. Analysis of the basolateral membrane of an adherent colon adenocarcinoma cell line resulted in 66% of identified proteins being integral membrane proteins, which possessed either a transmembrane domain or lipid modification, including 35 CD antigens. Based on the abundance of peptides from basolateral marker proteins, this method efficiently captures basolateral integral membrane proteins, with minimal contamination from other membranes and basic proteins.

  6. Rotavirus interaction with isolated membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, M C; Alonso-Torre, S R; Charpilienne, A; Vasseur, M; Michelangeli, F; Cohen, J; Alvarado, F

    1994-06-01

    To gain information about the mechanism of epithelial cell infection by rotavirus, we studied the interaction of bovine rotavirus, RF strain, with isolated membrane vesicles from apical membrane of pig enterocytes. Vesicles were charged with high (quenching) concentrations of either carboxyfluorescein or calcein, and the rate of fluorophore release (dequenching) was monitored as a function of time after mixing with purified virus particles. Purified single-shelled particles and untrypsinized double-shelled ones had no effect. Trypsinized double-shelled virions induced carboxyfluorescein release according to sigmoid curves whose lag period and amplitude were a function of virus concentration and depended on both temperature and pH. The presence of 100 mM salts (Tris Cl, NaCl, or KCl) was required, since there was no reaction in isoosmotic salt-free sorbitol media. Other membrane vesicle preparations such as apical membranes of piglet enterocyte and rat placenta syncytiotrophoblasts, basolateral membranes of pig enterocytes, and the undifferentiated plasma membrane of cultured MA104 cells all gave qualitatively similar responses. Inhibition by a specific monoclonal antibody suggests that the active species causing carboxyfluorescein release is VP5*. Ca2+ (1 mM), but not Mg2+, inhibited the reaction. In situ solubilization of the outer capsid of trypsinized double-shelled particles changed release kinetics from sigmoidal to hyperbolic and was not inhibited by Ca2+. Our results indicate that membrane destabilization caused by trypsinized outer capsid proteins of rotavirus leads to fluorophore release. From the data presented here, a hypothetical model of the interaction of the various states of the viral particles with the membrane lipid phase is proposed. Membrane permeabilization induced by rotavirus may be related to the mechanism of entry of the virus into the host cell.

  7. Effect of sulfhydryl modification on rat kidney basolateral plasma membrane transport function.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Rais A; Rizvi, Syed A A; Husain, Kazim; Lymperopoulos, Anastasios; Berndt, William O

    2012-10-01

    Transport processes are the hallmark of functioning kidney. Various nephrotoxicants disrupt the transport processes to manifest nephrotoxicity. Of several nephrotoxicants, mercuric chloride (HgCl(2)) depletes the reduced glutathione (GSH) in kidney and has been observed to affect the in vitro p-aminohippurate (PAH) transport by basolateral (BL) membrane vesicles. The role of renal nonprotein sulfhydryls such as, reduced GSH has been demonstrated to affect the PAH transport by BL membrane vesicles. The role of protein sulfhydryls in transport process of PAH by BL membrane is not known. Due to mercury mediated effects on sulfhydryls, the effects of protein-sulfhydryls (-SH) modifying reagents in the current study were investigated on PAH transport by BL membrane. It was observed that modification of -SH by p-chloromercuribenzoate sulphate (pCMBS), and mercuric chloride (HgCl(2)) decreased while recovering the protein -SH with dithiothreitol treatment provided protection against the effects of pCMBS, and HgCl(2) on PAH transport by BL membrane vesicles.

  8. Cortisol-sensitive urea transport across the gill basolateral membrane of the gulf toadfish (Opsanus beta).

    PubMed

    Rodela, Tamara M; Gilmour, Kathleen M; Walsh, Patrick J; McDonald, M Danielle

    2009-08-01

    Gulf toadfish (Opsanus beta) use a unique pulsatile urea excretion mechanism that allows urea to be voided in large pulses via the periodic insertion or activation of a branchial urea transporter. The precise cellular and subcellular location of the facilitated diffusion mechanism(s) remains unclear. An in vitro basolateral membrane vesicle (BLMV) preparation was used to test the hypothesis that urea movement across the gill basolateral membrane occurs through a cortisol-sensitive carrier-mediated mechanism. Toadfish BLMVs demonstrated two components of urea uptake: a linear element at high external urea concentrations, and a phloretin-sensitive saturable constituent (K(m) = 0.24 mmol/l; V(max) = 6.95 micromol x mg protein(-1) x h(-1)) at low urea concentrations (<1 mmol/l). BLMV urea transport in toadfish was unaffected by in vitro treatment with ouabain, N-ethylmaleimide, or the absence of sodium, conditions that are known to inhibit sodium-coupled and proton-coupled urea transport in vertebrates. Transport kinetics were temperature sensitive with a Q(10) > 2, further suggestive of carrier-mediated processes. Our data provide evidence that a basolateral urea facilitated transporter accelerates the movement of urea between the plasma and gills to enable the pulsatile excretion of urea. Furthermore, in vivo infusion of cortisol caused a significant 4.3-fold reduction in BLMV urea transport capacity in lab-crowded fish, suggesting that cortisol inhibits the recruitment of urea transporters to the basolateral membrane, which may ultimately affect the size of the urea pulse event in gulf toadfish.

  9. ABCC6 is a Basolateral Plasma Membrane Protein

    PubMed Central

    Pomozi, Viola; Le Saux, Olivier; Brampton, Christopher; Apana, Ailea; Iliás, Attila; Szeri, Flóra; Martin, Ludovic; Monostory, Katalin; Paku, Sándor; Sarkadi, Balázs; Szakács, Gergely; Váradi, András

    2013-01-01

    Rationale ABCC6 plays a crucial role in ectopic calcification; mutations of the gene cause pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE) and general arterial calcification of infancy (GACI). To elucidate the role of ABCC6 in cellular physiology and disease, it is crucial to establish the exact subcellular localization of the native ABCC6 protein. Objective In a recent paper in Circulation Research, ABCC6 was reported to localize to the mitochondria-associated membrane (MAM) and not the plasma membrane. Since the suggested mitochondrial localization is inconsistent with published data and the presumed role of ABCC6, we performed experiments to determine the cellular localization of ABCC6 in its physiological environment. Methods and Results We performed immunofluorescent labeling of frozen mouse and human liver sections as well as primary hepatocytes. We used several different antibodies recognizing human and mouse ABCC6. Our results unequivocally show that ABCC6 is in the basolateral membrane of hepatocytes and is not associated with the mitochondria, MAM or the ER. Conclusion Our findings support the model that ABCC6 is in the basolateral membrane, mediating the sinusoidal efflux of a metabolite from the hepatocytes to the systemic circulation. PMID:23625951

  10. Hepatic taurine transport: a Na/sup +/-dependent carrier on the basolateral plasma membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Bucuvalas, J.C.; Goodrich, A.L.; Suchy, F.J.

    1987-09-01

    Highly purified rat basolateral liver plasma membrane vesicles were used examine the mechanism and the driving forces for hepatic uptake of the ..beta..-amino acid, taurine. An inwardly directed 100 mM NaCl gradient stimulated the initial rate of taurine uptake and energized a transient twofold accumulation of taurine above equilibrium (overshoot). In contrast, uptake was slower and no overshoot was detected in the presence of a KCl gradient. A negative intravesicular electrical potential generated by the presence of permeant anions or an outwardly directed K/sup +/ gradient with valinomycin increased Na/sup +/-stimulated taurine uptake. External Cl/sup -/ stimulated Na/sup +/-dependent taurine uptake independent of effects on the transmembrane electrical potential difference. Na/sup +/-dependent taurine uptake showed a sigmoidal dependence on extravesicular Na/sup +/ concentration, suggesting multiple Na/sup +/ ions are involved in the translocation of each taurine molecule. Na/sup +/-dependent taurine uptake demonstrated Michaelis-Menten kinetics with a maximum velocity of 0.537 nmol x mg protein/sup -1/ x min/sup -1/ and an apparent K/sub m/ of 174 ..mu..M. (/sup 3/H)taurine uptake was inhibited by the presence of excess unlabeled taurine, ..beta..-alanine, or hypotaurine but not by L-glutamine or L-alanine. In summary, using basolateral liver plasma membrane vesicles, the authors have shown that hepatic uptake of taurine occurs by a carrier-mediated, secondary active transport process specific for ..beta..-amino acids. Uptake is electrogenic, stimulated by external Cl/sup -/, and requires multiple Na/sup +/ ions for the translocation of each taurine molecule.

  11. Vesicle membrane fluctuations at nm resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kejia; Bae, Sung Chul; Min, Chang-Ki; Granick, Steve; Granick Group Team

    2011-03-01

    We measure membrane thermal fluctuations with nanometer spatial resolution and microsecond time resolution, extending a scattering technique used at the Curie Institute to study red blood cell dynamics (Timo Betz et al., Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA 106, 15320, 2009). A laser beam is focused at the leading edge of a phospholipid vesicle membrane and the forward scattered light is detected by a quadrant photodiode. The measurements over 4 orders of magnitude of frequency allow quantification of more complete fluctuation spectra than competing methods, and therefore fuller understanding of the vesicle membrane mechanics. As a proof of concept, we quantify how adsorbed nanoparticles stiffen giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs).

  12. Vesicle trafficking and cell surface membrane patchiness.

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Q; Edidin, M

    2001-01-01

    Membrane proteins and lipids often appear to be distributed in patches on the cell surface. These patches are often assumed to be membrane domains, arising from specific molecular associations. However, a computer simulation (Gheber and Edidin, 1999) shows that membrane patchiness may result from a combination of vesicle trafficking and dynamic barriers to lateral mobility. The simulation predicts that the steady-state patches of proteins and lipids seen on the cell surface will decay if vesicle trafficking is inhibited. To test this prediction, we compared the apparent sizes and intensities of patches of class I HLA molecules, integral membrane proteins, before and after inhibiting endocytic vesicle traffic from the cell surface, either by incubation in hypertonic medium or by expression of a dominant-negative mutant dynamin. As predicted by the simulation, the apparent sizes of HLA patches increased, whereas their intensities decreased after endocytosis and vesicle trafficking were inhibited. PMID:11423406

  13. Binding of IGF I and IGF I-stimulated phosphorylation in canine renal basolateral membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Hammerman, M.R.; Gavin, J.R. III

    1986-07-01

    To characterize the interaction of the renal proximal tubular cell with insulin like growth factor I (IGF I), we measured binding of /sup 125/I-IGF I to proximal tubular basolateral membranes from dog kidney and induced IGF I-stimulated phosphorylation of basolateral membranes. Specific binding of /sup 125/I-IGF I to basolateral membranes was observed that was half-maximal at between 10(-9) and 10(-8) M IGF I. /sup 125/I-IGF I was affinity cross-linked to a 135,000 Mr protein in basolateral membranes that was distinct from the alpha-subunit of the insulin receptor and from the IGF II receptor. IGF I-stimulated phosphorylation of a 92,000 Mr protein was effected in detergent-solubilized membranes incubated with 100 microM (gamma-/sup 32/P)ATP. The /sup 32/P-labeled protein was distinct from the beta-subunit of the insulin receptor, the /sup 32/P phosphorylation of which was stimulated by insulin. We conclude that specific receptors for IGF I are present in the basolateral membrane of the renal proximal tubular cell. Physiological actions of IGF I at this nephron site may occur through the binding of this peptide circulating in plasma, to specific basolateral membrane receptors, followed by IGF I stimulated phosphorylation.

  14. Fabrication of a Dual Substrate Display to Test Roles of Cell Adhesion Proteins in Vesicle Targeting to Plasma Membrane Domains

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Stephen J.; Nelson, W. James

    2009-01-01

    While much is known of the molecular machinery involved in protein sorting during exocytosis, less is known about the spatial regulation of exocytosis at the plasma membrane (PM). This study outlines a novel method, Dual Substrate Display, used to formally test the hypothesis that E-cadherin-mediated adhesion directs basolateral vesicle exocytosis to specific sites at the PM. We show that vesicles containing the basolateral marker protein VSV-G preferentially target to sites of adhesion to E-cadherin rather than collagen VI or a control peptide. These results support the hypothesis that E-cadherin adhesion initiates signaling at the PM resulting in targeted sites for exocytosis. PMID:17803993

  15. The coupled movements of sodium and chloride across the basolateral membrane of frog skin epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, P L; Ferreira, H G; Ferreira, K T

    1989-01-01

    1. When frog skin epithelium was exposed to a chloride-free solution bathing the basolateral side of the frog skin preparation the short-circuit current fell and there was a simultaneous loss of chloride and water from its cells. This effect was partially blocked by furosemide when this drug was added to the basolateral bathing solution. 2. Under control conditions and when added to the solution bathing the basolateral side of the preparation furosemide had no effect on the ion and water contents of the frog skin epithelium. 3. Furosemide but not SITS (4-acetamide-4'-isothiocyanate-stilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid) or amiloride blocked the recovery of short-circuit current and the reuptake of chloride and water by preparations pre-incubated with chloride-free solution on the basolateral side. The recovery of the short-circuit current was also blocked by the replacement of basolateral potassium by sodium. 4. The effect on the short-circuit current of graded replacements by impermeant ions of sodium or chloride did not show saturation for concentrations of these ions up to their control values. 5. Replacement of basolateral potassium by sodium inhibited the short-circuit current and the recovery observed when potassium was reintroduced in the basolateral bathing solution was blocked by furosemide. 6. The replacement of basolateral sodium or chloride by impermeant ions induced an immediate fall in the intracellular concentrations of both sodium and chloride suggesting that the transport system coupling the movements of the two ions across the basolateral membrane is operative under control conditions. 7. It is proposed that the coupled movements of sodium and chloride across the basolateral membrane of the frog skin epithelium are mediated by a sodium-potassium-2 chloride co-transport system which under control conditions is very near equilibrium. PMID:2607456

  16. Toroidal membrane vesicles in spherical confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouzar, Lila; Menas, Ferhat; Müller, Martin Michael

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the morphology of a toroidal fluid membrane vesicle confined inside a spherical container. The equilibrium shapes are assembled in a geometrical phase diagram as a function of scaled area and reduced volume of the membrane. For small area the vesicle can adopt its free form. When increasing the area, the membrane cannot avoid contact and touches the confining sphere along a circular contact line, which extends to a zone of contact for higher area. The elastic energies of the equilibrium shapes are compared to those of their confined counterparts of spherical topology to predict under which conditions a topology change is favored energetically.

  17. Toroidal membrane vesicles in spherical confinement.

    PubMed

    Bouzar, Lila; Menas, Ferhat; Müller, Martin Michael

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the morphology of a toroidal fluid membrane vesicle confined inside a spherical container. The equilibrium shapes are assembled in a geometrical phase diagram as a function of scaled area and reduced volume of the membrane. For small area the vesicle can adopt its free form. When increasing the area, the membrane cannot avoid contact and touches the confining sphere along a circular contact line, which extends to a zone of contact for higher area. The elastic energies of the equilibrium shapes are compared to those of their confined counterparts of spherical topology to predict under which conditions a topology change is favored energetically.

  18. Transport Mechanisms of Carnosine in SKPT Cells: Contribution of Apical and Basolateral Membrane Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Jappar, Dilara; Hu, Yongjun; Keep, Richard F.; Smith, David E.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate the transport properties of carnosine in kidney using SKPT cell cultures as a model of proximal tubular transport, and to isolate the functional activities of renal apical and basolateral transporters in this process. Methods The membrane transport kinetics of 10 µM [3H]carnosine was studied in SKPT cells as a function of time, pH, potential inhibitors and substrate concentration. A cellular compartment model was constructed in which the influx, efflux and transepithelial clearances of carnosine were determined. Peptide transporter expression was probed by RT-PCR. Results Carnosine uptake was 15-fold greater from the apical than basolateral surface of SKPT cells. However, the apical-to-basolateral transepithelial transport of carnosine was severely rate-limited by its cellular efflux across the basolateral membrane. The high-affinity, proton-dependence, concentration-dependence and inhibitor specificity of carnosine supports the contention that PEPT2 is responsible for its apical uptake. In contrast, the basolateral transporter is saturable, inhibited by PEPT2 substrates but non-concentrative, thereby, suggesting a facilitative carrier. Conclusions Carnosine is expected to have a substantial cellular accumulation in kidney but minimal tubular reabsorption in blood because of its high influx clearance across apical membranes by PEPT2 and very low efflux clearance across basolateral membranes. PMID:18820998

  19. Yeast membrane vesicles: isolation and general characteristics.

    PubMed

    Christensen, M S; Cirillo, V P

    1972-06-01

    Yeast membrane vesicles are formed when packed yeast are ground manually in a porcelain mortar and pestle with glass beads (0.2 mm diameter). These vesicles can be separated from the other components of the grinding mixture by a combination of centrifugation steps and elution from a column of the same glass beads (0.2 mm diameter). Isolated vesicles are osmotically sensitive, contain cytoplasmic components, and have energy-independent transport function. They are unable to metabolize glucose, but have respiratory function which is thought to be associated with intravesicular mitochondria. Invertase and oligomycin-insensitive adenosine triphosphatase are present in lysed vesicle preparations, and the appropriateness of these enzyme activities as membrane markers is discussed.

  20. Characterization of a voltage-dependent conductance in the basolateral membrane of leech skin epithelium.

    PubMed

    Schnizler, M; Clauss, W

    1998-05-01

    Voltage clamp studies were performed on the dorsal integument of Hirudo medicinalis. Under apical calcium-free conditions an inward-directed component of transepithelial current was activated by changes of transepithelial voltage. Depolarization caused up to 50% increase of the transepithelial sodium current. Hyperpolarization had no comparable effects. With calcium (1.8 mM) or amiloride (100 microM) in the apical solution and in sodium-free solutions the inward-directed current failed to increase after depolarization. Activation also occurred under chloride-free conditions. Permeabilization of the apical membrane by nystatin (5 microM) increased the current activation significantly. After nystatin, calcium as well as amiloride lost their inhibitory effects. This indicates a basolateral localization of the voltage-dependent conductance. Vesicle insertion or cytoskeletal structures are probably not involved in regulation, as seen by the lack of effects of brefeldin A and the cytochalasins B and D. However, serosal hyposmolar solutions (170 mosmol.1(-1)) caused a reinforced activation of the current. Our results indicate a voltage-dependent conductance in a tight sodium-absorbing epithelium.

  1. Cl sup minus -HCO sub 3 sup minus exchange is present with Na sup + -K sup + -Cl sup minus cotransport in rabbit parotid acinar basolateral membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, R.J.; George, J.N. )

    1988-03-01

    The presence of a sodium-independent electroneutral Cl{sup {minus}}-anion exchanger in a basolateral membrane vesicle preparation from the rabbit parotid is demonstrated. This exchanger is shared by HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, Br{sup {minus}}, F{sup {minus}}, and formate, but not by thiocyanate, acetate, methylsulfate, gluconate, or hydroxyl ions. In order of relative potency, the exchanger is inhibited by SITS {ge} phloretin > furosemide > bumetanide {ge} phlorizin. A Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-dependent component of chloride flux, presumably due to the Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-Cl{sup {minus}} cotransporter already characterized in this preparation, was also observed. {sup 36}Cl uptake into vesicles loaded with KCl exhibited an overshoot of intravesicular ({sup 36}Cl) due to {sup 36}Cl-Cl exchange. However, when vesicles were loaded with both KCl and NaCl the height of the overshoot was considerably decreased indicating a Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-dependent dissipation of the intravesicular to extravesicular chloride gradient. This experiment provides strong evidence that the Na{sup +}-K{sup +}Cl{sup {minus}} cotransporter and the Cl{sup {minus}} HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} exchange are present in the same membrane vesicles. These results indicate that Cl{sup {minus}}-HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} exchange is present in the basolateral membrane of parotid acinar cells and thus that this transporter may play a significant role in salivary secretion.

  2. Membrane fusion in vesicles of oligomerizable lipids.

    PubMed Central

    Ravoo, B J; Weringa, W D; Engberts, J B

    1999-01-01

    Membrane fusion has been examined in a model system of small unilamellar vesicles of synthetic lipids that can be oligomerized through the lipid headgroups. The oligomerization can be induced either in both bilayer leaflets or in the inner leaflet exclusively. Oligomerization leads to denser lipid headgroup packing, with concomitant reduction of lipid lateral diffusion and membrane permeability. As evidenced by lipid mixing assays, electron microscopy, and light scattering, calcium-induced fusion of the bilayer vesicles is strongly retarded and inhibited by oligomerization. Remarkably, oligomerization of only the inner leaflet of the bilayer is already sufficient to affect fusion. The efficiency of inhibition and retardation of fusion critically depend on the relative amount of oligomeric lipid present, on the concentration of calcium ions, and on temperature. Implications for the mechanism of bilayer membrane fusion are discussed in terms of lipid lateral diffusion and membrane curvature effects. PMID:9876149

  3. Sulfate transport by chick renal tubule brush-border and basolateral membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Renfro, J.L.; Clark, N.B.; Metts, R.E.; Lynch, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    Brush-border and basolateral membrane vesicles (BBMV and BLMV, respectively) were prepared from chick kidney by a calcium precipitation method and by centrifugation on an 8% Percoll self-generating gradient, respectively. In BBMV a 100-mM Na gluconate gradient, out>in, caused concentrative (/sup 35/S) sulfate uptake approximately fivefold greater at 1 min than at 60 min (equilibrium) whether or not the membranes were short-circuited with 100 mM K gluconate, in=out, plus 20 ..mu..g valinomycin/mg protein. A 48-mM HCO/sub 3//sup -/ gradient, in>out, stimulated a 2.5-fold higher uptake at 1 min than at 60 min, and short circuiting as above had no effect on the magnitude of this response. Imposition of a H/sup +/ gradient caused concentrative uptake fourfold higher at 1 min than at equilibrium. Short circuiting as above or addition of 0.1 mM carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) significantly inhibited the pH gradient effect. Creation of an inside positive electrical potential with 100 mM K gluconate, out>in, plus valinomycin, also caused concentrative sulfate uptake. Based on inhibitor/competitor effects, these are distinct sulfate transport processes. In chick BLMV, imposition of an HCO/sub 3//sup -/ gradient, in>out, produced concentrative sulfate uptake. 4-Acetamido-4'-isothiocyanostilbene 2,2'-disulfonic acid disodium at 0.1 mM was an effective inhibitor of BLMV bicarbonate-sulfate exchange.

  4. Carrier-mediated concentrative urate transport in rat renal membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Abramson, R G; Lipkowitz, M S

    1985-04-01

    [2-14C]Urate uptake and efflux were studied in brush border and basolateral membrane vesicles of rat renal cortex that were exposed to 20 microM copper chloride. In the presence of inwardly directed NaCl gradients urate uptake was maintained at levels in excess of chemical equilibrium. Comparison of glucose and chloride uptakes revealed that equilibrium glucose uptake was not affected by copper, but chloride failed to reach equilibrium in copper-exposed vesicles. It is suggested that the persistence of an electrolyte gradient could provide a driving force to raise the concentration of free intravesicular urate above that in the media. Preincubation of vesicles with unlabeled urate failed to diminish uptake of added urate; rather, urate uptake was trans stimulated. Uptake of labeled urate was also significantly accelerated when an outward gradient for unlabeled urate was created. Pyrazinoic and oxonic acids also trans stimulated urate uptake. The demonstration of accelerated homeo- and heteroexchange diffusion indicates that transport is carrier mediated in both brush border and basolateral vesicles. Outwardly directed hydroxyl gradients failed to influence urate uptake in either the presence or absence of copper or NaCl. Thus, this carrier, which is active only in the presence of trace amounts of copper, is distinct from a urate/anion exchanger.

  5. Carotenoids in DPPC vesicles: membrane dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socaciu, Carmen; Lausch, Carsten; Diehl, Horst A.

    1999-09-01

    Incorporation of carotenoids into membranes is supposed to change their physical properties with consequences to signal transduction and membrane protein activities. Here the physical parameters membrane fluidity, micropolarity and anisotropy are considered and measured in multilamellar and unilamellar vesicles of dipalmitoylphosphatidyicholine (DPPC) after incorporation of 1, 2.5 and 5 mol% β-carotene, lutein, zeaxanthin, canthaxanthin, or astaxhanthin using 4 mol% pyrene or 1 μM 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) as fluorescent labels. Contrary to other investigations, no significant change in membrane fluidity (as evaluated by the pyrene excimer method) can be found. But a change of micropolarity in the pyrene label environment is obtained from the pyrene monomer fluorescence emission fine structure after incorporation of carotenoids. The membrane anisotropy is enhanced significantly only by those carotenoids which incorporate worst into the membrane. This leads to the hypothesis that carotenoid incorporation into membranes is governed not only by carotenoid polarity hut also by their ability to change membrane anisotropy.

  6. Giant plasma membrane vesicles: models for understanding membrane organization.

    PubMed

    Levental, Kandice R; Levental, Ilya

    2015-01-01

    The organization of eukaryotic membranes into functional domains continues to fascinate and puzzle cell biologists and biophysicists. The lipid raft hypothesis proposes that collective lipid interactions compartmentalize the membrane into coexisting liquid domains that are central to membrane physiology. This hypothesis has proven controversial because such structures cannot be directly visualized in live cells by light microscopy. The recent observations of liquid-liquid phase separation in biological membranes are an important validation of the raft hypothesis and enable application of the experimental toolbox of membrane physics to a biologically complex phase-separated membrane. This review addresses the role of giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs) in refining the raft hypothesis and expands on the application of GPMVs as an experimental model to answer some of key outstanding problems in membrane biology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Identification and characterization of cell-bound membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qisheng; Zhang, Xiaojun; Zhang, Wendiao; Zhao, Siyuan; Chen, Yong

    2017-05-01

    In contrast to the released/circulating membrane vesicles (extracellular vesicles), cell-bound membrane vesicles are poorly identified and characterized. In this study, cell-bound membrane vesicles on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and human hepatoma HepG-2 cells were investigated. We identified that cell-bound membrane vesicles are not co-localized with the major markers for extracellular vesicles (e.g. phosphatidylserine, CD63, CD107α, CD31, and DNA fragments for the three well-known types of extracellular vesicles) and for intracellular organelles with similar sizes (e.g. MitoTracker and LAMP1/LAMP3 for mitochondria and multivesicular bodies or lysosomes, respectively). The data imply that cell-bound membrane vesicles are neither the precursors of extracellular vesicles nor a false structure pushed up by an intracellular organelle but probably a novel unknown structure in the plasma membrane. Moreover, we revealed that cell-bound membrane vesicles are resistant to various detergents including but probably not limited to Triton X-100, SDS, and saponin. We further characterized that these unique vesicles are soluble in organic solvents (e.g. chloroform-methanol mixture and ethanol) which can be prevented by a lipid-stabilizing fixative (e.g. OsO4) and that they are co-localized with, but do not monopolize, the major markers (e.g. caveolin-1 and GM1) for lipid rafts (a nano-sized detergent-resistant domains in the plasma membrane). The data imply that cell-bound membrane vesicles contain the lipid component and lipid rafts. Involvement of other specific unknown components might explain the detergent resistance of cell-bound membrane vesicles. Further research will mainly depend on the establishment of an effective approach for isolation/purification of these vesicles from the plasma membrane. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Ba2+-inhibitable /sup 86/Rb+ fluxes across membranes of vesicles from toad urinary bladder

    SciTech Connect

    Garty, H.; Civan, M.M.

    1987-01-01

    /sup 86/Rb+ fluxes have been measured in suspensions of vesicles prepared from the epithelium of toad urinary bladder. A readily measurable barium-sensitive, ouabain-insensitive component has been identified; the concentration of external Ba2+ required for half-maximal inhibition was 0.6 mM. The effects of externally added cations on /sup 86/Rb+ influx and efflux have established that this pathway is conductive, with a selectivity for K+, Rb+ and Cs+ over Na+ and Li+. The Rb+ uptake is inversely dependent on external pH, but not significantly affected by internal Ca2+ or external amiloride, quinine, quinidine or lidocaine. It is likely, albeit not yet certain, that the conductive Rb+ pathway is incorporated in basolateral vesicles oriented right-side-out. It is also not yet clear whether this pathway comprises the principle basolateral K+ channel in vivo, and that its properties have been unchanged during the preparative procedures. Subject to these caveats, the data suggest that the inhibition by quinidine of Na+ transport across toad bladder does not arise primarily from membrane depolarization produced by a direct blockage of the basolateral channels. It now seems more likely that the quinidine-induced elevation of intracellular Ca2+ activity directly blocks apical Na+ entry.

  9. Evidence for facilitated diffusion of urea across the gill basolateral membrane of the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    McDonald, M Danielle; Wood, Chris M

    2004-05-27

    Recent in vivo evidence suggests that the mechanism of branchial urea excretion in the ammoniotelic rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) is carrier-mediated. Further characterization of this proposed mechanism was achieved by using an in vitro isolated basolateral membrane vesicle (BLMV) preparation in which isolated gill membranes were used to determine a variety of physiological properties of the transporter. BLMV demonstrated two components of urea uptake, a linear component at concentrations up to 17.5 mmol x l(-1) and a saturable component (K(0.5)=0.35+/-0.01 mmol x l(-1); V(max)=0.14+/-0.02 micromol mg protein(-1) h(-1)) with a Hill constant of 1.35+/-0.18 at low, physiologically relevant urea concentrations (<2 mmol x l(-1)). Saturable uptake of urea at 1 mmol x l(-1) by BLMV was reduced by 88.5% when incubated with 0.25 mmol x l(-1) phloretin, a potent blocker of UT-type facilitated diffusion urea transport mechanisms. BLMV also demonstrated differential handling of urea versus urea analogues at 1 mmol x l(-1) concentrations and total analogue/total urea uptake ratios were 32% for acetamide and 84% for thiourea. Saturable urea uptake at 1 mmol x l(-1) was significantly reduced by almost 100% in the presence of 5 mmol x l(-1) thiourea but was not affected by 5 mmol x l(-1) acetamide or 5 mmol x l(-1) N-methylurea. Lastly, total urea uptake at 1 mmol x l(-1) by BLMV was sensitive to temperatures above and below the temperature of acclimation with a Q(10)>2 suggesting a protein carrier-mediated process. Combined, this evidence indicates that a facilitated diffusion urea transport mechanism is likely present in the basolateral membrane of the rainbow trout gill.

  10. Active and passive Na+ fluxes across the basolateral membrane of rabbit urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Eaton, D C; Frace, A M; Silverthorn, S U

    1982-01-01

    The apical membrane of rabbit urinary bladder can be functionally removed by application of nystatin at high concentration if the mucosal surface of the tissue is bathed in a saline which mimics intracellular ion concentrations. Under these conditions, the tissue is as far as the movement of univalent ions no more than a sheet of basolateral membrane with some tight junctional membrane in parallel. In this manner the Na+ concentration at the inner surface of the basolateral membrane can be varied by altering the concentration in the mucosal bulk solution. When this was done both mucosal-to-serosal 22Na flux and net change in basolateral current were measured. The flux and the current could be further divided into the components of each that were either blocked by ouabain or insensitive to ouabain. Ouabain-insensitive mucosal-to-serosal Na+ flux was a linear function of mucosal Na+ concentration. Ouabain-sensitive Na+ flux and ouabain-sensitive, Na+-induced current both display a saturating relationship which cannot be accounted for by the presence of unstirred layers. If the interaction of Na+ with the basolateral transport process is assumed to involve the interaction of some number of Na+ ions, n, with a maximal flux, MMAX, then the data can be fit by assuming 3.2 equivalent sites for interaction and a value for MMAX of 287.8 pM cm-2 sec-1 with an intracellular Na concentration of 2.0 mM Na+ at half-maximal saturation. By comparing these values with the ouabain-sensitive, Na+-induced current, we calculate a Na+ to K+ coupling ratio of 1.40 +/- 0.07 for the transport process.

  11. Characterization of salicylate uptake across the basolateral membrane of the malpighian tubules of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Sanchez, Esau; O'Donnell, Michael J

    2006-09-01

    The organic anion salicylate is a plant secondary metabolite that can protect plants against herbivores. Transport of salicylate across the basolateral membrane of the Malpighian tubules of Drosophila melanogaster was studied using a radioisotope tracer technique. The uptake of [(14)C]salicylate by the Malpighian tubules was active, saturable and Na(+)-dependent; the maximum uptake rate (J(max)) and the half saturation concentration (K(t)) were 12.6 pmoltubule(-1)min(-1) and 30.7micromoll(-1), respectively. In contrast to organic anion transport by vertebrate renal tissues, salicylate uptake was not trans-stimulated by glutarate (0.01-1.0 mmoll(-1)) or cis-inhibited by high concentrations (5 mmoll(-1)) of various alpha-keto acids (glutaric acid, alpha-ketoglutaric acid, succinic acid, and citric acid). Changes in basolateral membrane potential or physiologically relevant changes in bathing saline pH did not affect the rate of [(14)C]salicylate uptake. Ring-structure monocarboxylic acids (benzoic acid, nicotinic acid, gentisic acid, unlabelled salicylic acid, alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid, probenecid, fluorescein, and P-aminohippuric acid) strongly inhibited [(14)C]salicylate uptake rate. In contrast, short-chain monocarboxylic acids had little (butyric acid) or no effect (lactic acid, pyruvic acid, and propionic acid). Our results suggest that salicylate uptake across the basolateral membrane of D. melanogaster Malpighian tubules is mediated by a non-electrogenic, alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid-sensitive, Na(+):salicylate cotransport system.

  12. Growth hormone activates phospholipase C in proximal tubular basolateral membranes from canine kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, S.A.; Hammerman, M.R. )

    1989-08-01

    To delineate pathways for signal transduction by growth hormone (GH) in proximal tubule, the authors incubated basolateral membranes isolated from canine kidney with human growth hormone (hGH) or human prolactin (hPrl) and measured levels of inositol trisphosphate (InsP{sub 3}) in suspensions and of diacylglycerol extractable from the membranes. Incubation with hGH, but not hPrl, increased levels of InsP{sub 3} and diacylglycerol in a concentration-dependent manner. Half-maximal effects occurred between 0.1 and 1 nM hGH. Increased levels of InsP{sub 3} were measured after as little as 5 sec of incubation with 1 nM hGH, and increase was maximal after 15 sec. Increases were no longer detectable after 60 sec because of dephosphorylation of InsP{sub 3} in membrane suspensions. hGH did not affect rates of dephosphorylation. hGH-stimulated increases in InsP{sub 3} were detectable in membranes suspended in 0, 0.1, and 0.2 {mu}M calcium but not in 0.3 or 1.0 {mu}M calcium. {sup 125}I-labeled hGH-receptor complexes with M{sub r} values of 66,000 and 140,000 were identified in isolated basolateral membranes. The findings establish that GH activates phospholipase C in isolated canine renal proximal tubular basolateral membranes, potentially after binding to a specific receptor. This process could mediate signal transmission by GH across the plasma membrane of the proximal tubular cell and elsewhere.

  13. Phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate regulates the formation of the basolateral plasma membrane in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gassama-Diagne, Ama; Yu, Wei; ter Beest, Martin; Martin-Belmonte, Fernando; Kierbel, Arlinet; Engel, Joanne; Mostov, Keith

    2006-09-01

    Polarity is a central feature of eukaryotic cells and phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PtdIns(3,4,5)P3) has a central role in the polarization of neurons and chemotaxing cells. In polarized epithelial cells, PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 is stably localized at the basolateral plasma membrane, but excluded from the apical plasma membrane, as shown by localization of GFP fused to the PtdIns(3,4,5)P3-binding pleckstrin-homology domain of Akt (GFP-PH-Akt), a fusion protein that indicates the location of PtdIns(3,4,5)P3. Here, we ectopically inserted exogenous PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 into the apical plasma membrane of polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. Within 5 min many cells formed protrusions that extended above the apical surface. These protrusions contained basolateral plasma membrane proteins and excluded apical proteins, indicating that their plasma membrane was transformed from apical to basolateral. Addition of PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 to the basolateral surface of MDCK cells grown as cysts caused basolateral protrusions. MDCK cells grown in the presence of a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor had abnormally short lateral surfaces, indicating that PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 regulates the formation of the basolateral surface.

  14. EGFR controls IQGAP basolateral membrane localization and mitotic spindle orientation during epithelial morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bañón-Rodríguez, Inmaculada; Gálvez-Santisteban, Manuel; Vergarajauregui, Silvia; Bosch, Minerva; Borreguero-Pascual, Arantxa; Martín-Belmonte, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Establishing the correct orientation of the mitotic spindle is an essential step in epithelial cell division in order to ensure that epithelial tubules form correctly during organ development and regeneration. While recent findings have identified some of the molecular mechanisms that underlie spindle orientation, many aspects of this process remain poorly understood. Here, we have used the 3D-MDCK model system to demonstrate a key role for a newly identified protein complex formed by IQGAP1 and the epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR) in controlling the orientation of the mitotic spindle. IQGAP1 is a scaffolding protein that regulates many cellular pathways, from cell-cell adhesion to microtubule organization, and its localization in the basolateral membrane ensures correct spindle orientation. Through its IQ motifs, IQGAP1 binds to EGFR, which is responsible for maintaining IQGAP1 in the basolateral membrane domain. Silencing IQGAP1, or disrupting the basolateral localization of either IQGAP1 or EGFR, results in a non-polarized distribution of NuMA, mitotic spindle misorientation and defects in single lumen formation. PMID:24421325

  15. Transport of alpha-amylase across the basolateral membrane of the pancreatic acinar cell.

    PubMed Central

    Isenman, L D; Rothman, S S

    1977-01-01

    The flux of alpha-amylase (1,4-alpha-D-glucan glucanohydrolase; EC 3.2.1.1) across the basolateral membrane of the acinar cell was measured in the cell-to-bath direction using the whole rabbit pancreas in organ culture. This in vitro preparation is polarized so that apical and basolateral secretions can be collected separately. The unstimulated amylase flux from cell to bath was substantial at the initial rate (approximately three times the concurrent apical flux). With time, bath amylase approached a steady-state concentration, suggesting an equilbrating process. During the same time interval, ductal amylase secretion remained constant. At the steady state, the amylase concentration in the bath was at least an order of magnitude less than its ductal concentration. Hourly replacement of bathing medium reproduced the initial rate of amylase release into the bath for five consecutive hours. Pancreozymin (cholecystokinin), a peptide hormone, did not alter the steady-state bath amylase content, although it greatly augmented ductal amylase secretion. In contrast, a cholinergic agonist greatly increased both the flux from the cell to bath and the ductal secretion of amylase. Taken together, these results indicate a natural bidirectional permeability of the basolateral membrane to digestive enzyme and support evidence previously obtained suggesting that such a permeability might exist. PMID:302947

  16. Vesicle-membrane fusion. Observation of simultaneous membrane incorporation and content release.

    PubMed Central

    Woodbury, D J; Hall, J E

    1988-01-01

    Vesicle fusion, the central process of neurotransmitter release and hormonal secretion, is a complex process culminating in simultaneous incorporation of vesicle membrane into the plasma membrane and release of the vesicular contents extracellularly. This report describes simultaneous observation of membrane incorporation and content release using a model system composed of a planar bilayer and dye-filled vesicles. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:2462925

  17. Bacterial outer membrane vesicles and vaccine applications.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Reinaldo; Fernández, Sonsire; Zayas, Caridad; Acosta, Armando; Sarmiento, Maria Elena; Ferro, Valerie A; Rosenqvist, Einar; Campa, Concepcion; Cardoso, Daniel; Garcia, Luis; Perez, Jose Luis

    2014-01-01

    Vaccines based on outer membrane vesicles (OMV) were developed more than 20 years ago against Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B. These nano-sized structures exhibit remarkable potential for immunomodulation of immune responses and delivery of meningococcal antigens or unrelated antigens incorporated into the vesicle structure. This paper reviews different applications in OMV Research and Development (R&D) and provides examples of OMV developed and evaluated at the Finlay Institute in Cuba. A Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) process was developed at the Finlay Institute to produce OMV from N. meningitidis serogroup B (dOMVB) using detergent extraction. Subsequently, OMV from N. meningitidis, serogroup A (dOMVA), serogroup W (dOMVW), and serogroup X (dOMVX) were obtained using this process. More recently, the extraction process has also been applied effectively for obtaining OMV on a research scale from Vibrio cholerae (dOMVC), Bordetella pertussis (dOMVBP), Mycobacterium smegmatis (dOMVSM), and BCG (dOMVBCG). The immunogenicity of the OMV has been evaluated for specific antibody induction, and together with functional bactericidal and challenge assays in mice has shown their protective potential. dOMVB has been evaluated with non-neisserial antigens, including with a herpes virus type 2 glycoprotein, ovalbumin, and allergens. In conclusion, OMV are proving to be more versatile than first conceived and remain an important technology for development of vaccine candidates.

  18. Proteomics of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Outer Membrane Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Kieselbach, Thomas; Zijnge, Vincent; Granström, Elisabeth; Oscarsson, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an oral and systemic pathogen associated with aggressive forms of periodontitis and with endocarditis. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) released by this species have been demonstrated to deliver effector proteins such as cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) and leukotoxin (LtxA) into human host cells and to act as triggers of innate immunity upon carriage of NOD1- and NOD2-active pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). To improve our understanding of the pathogenicity-associated functions that A. actinomycetemcomitans exports via OMVs, we studied the proteome of density gradient-purified OMVs from a rough-colony type clinical isolate, strain 173 (serotype e) using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). This analysis yielded the identification of 151 proteins, which were found in at least three out of four independent experiments. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002509. Through this study, we not only confirmed the vesicle-associated release of LtxA, and the presence of proteins, which are known to act as immunoreactive antigens in the human host, but we also identified numerous additional putative virulence-related proteins in the A. actinomycetemcomitans OMV proteome. The known and putative functions of these proteins include immune evasion, drug targeting, and iron/nutrient acquisition. In summary, our findings are consistent with an OMV-associated proteome that exhibits several offensive and defensive functions, and they provide a comprehensive basis to further disclose roles of A. actinomycetemcomitans OMVs in periodontal and systemic disease.

  19. Bacterial Outer Membrane Vesicles and Vaccine Applications

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo, Reinaldo; Fernández, Sonsire; Zayas, Caridad; Acosta, Armando; Sarmiento, Maria Elena; Ferro, Valerie A.; Rosenqvist, Einar; Campa, Concepcion; Cardoso, Daniel; Garcia, Luis; Perez, Jose Luis

    2014-01-01

    Vaccines based on outer membrane vesicles (OMV) were developed more than 20 years ago against Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B. These nano-sized structures exhibit remarkable potential for immunomodulation of immune responses and delivery of meningococcal antigens or unrelated antigens incorporated into the vesicle structure. This paper reviews different applications in OMV Research and Development (R&D) and provides examples of OMV developed and evaluated at the Finlay Institute in Cuba. A Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) process was developed at the Finlay Institute to produce OMV from N. meningitidis serogroup B (dOMVB) using detergent extraction. Subsequently, OMV from N. meningitidis, serogroup A (dOMVA), serogroup W (dOMVW), and serogroup X (dOMVX) were obtained using this process. More recently, the extraction process has also been applied effectively for obtaining OMV on a research scale from Vibrio cholerae (dOMVC), Bordetella pertussis (dOMVBP), Mycobacterium smegmatis (dOMVSM), and BCG (dOMVBCG). The immunogenicity of the OMV has been evaluated for specific antibody induction, and together with functional bactericidal and challenge assays in mice has shown their protective potential. dOMVB has been evaluated with non-neisserial antigens, including with a herpes virus type 2 glycoprotein, ovalbumin, and allergens. In conclusion, OMV are proving to be more versatile than first conceived and remain an important technology for development of vaccine candidates. PMID:24715891

  20. Membrane-associated aquaporin-1 facilitates osmotically driven water flux across the basolateral membrane of the thick ascending limb

    PubMed Central

    Cabral, Pablo D.

    2012-01-01

    The thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle (TAL) reabsorbs ∼30% of filtered NaCl but is impermeable to water. The observation that little water traverses the TAL indicates an absence of water channels at the apical membrane. Yet TAL cells swell when peritubular osmolality decreases indicating that water channels must be present in the basolateral side. Consequently, we hypothesized that the water channel aquaporin-1 (AQP1) facilitates water flux across the basolateral membrane of TALs. Western blotting revealed AQP1 expression in microdissected rat and mouse TALs. Double immunofluorescence showed that 95 ± 2% of tubules positive for the TAL-specific marker Tamm-Horsfall protein were also positive for AQP1 (n = 6). RT-PCR was used to demonstrate presence of AQP1 mRNA and the TAL-specific marker NKCC2 in microdissected TALs. Cell surface biotinylation assays showed that 23 ± 3% of the total pool of AQP1 was present at the TAL basolateral membrane (n = 7). To assess the functional importance of AQP1 in the basolateral membrane, we measured the rate of cell swelling initiated by decreasing peritubular osmolality as an indicator of water flux in microdissected TALs. Water flux was decreased by ∼50% in Aqp1 knockout mice compared with wild-types (4.0 ± 0.8 vs. 8.9 ± 1.7 fluorescent U/s, P < 0.02; n = 7). Furthermore, arginine vasopressin increased TAL AQP1 expression by 135 ± 17% (glycosylated) and 41 ± 11% (nonglycosylated; P < 0.01; n =5). We conclude that 1) the TAL expresses AQP1, 2) ∼23% of the total pool of AQP1 is localized to the basolateral membrane, 3) AQP1 mediates a significant portion of basolateral water flux, and 4) AQP1 is upregulated in TALs of rats infused with dDAVP. AQP1 could play an important role in regulation of TAL cell volume during changes in interstitial osmolality, such as during a high-salt diet or water deprivation. PMID:22674028

  1. Bicarbonate-dependent transport of acetate and butyrate across the basolateral membrane of sheep rumen epithelium.

    PubMed

    Dengler, F; Rackwitz, R; Benesch, F; Pfannkuche, H; Gäbel, G

    2014-02-01

    This study aimed to assess the role of HCO₃⁻ in the transport of acetate and butyrate across the basolateral membrane of rumen epithelium and to identify transport proteins involved. The effects of basolateral variation in HCO₃⁻ concentrations on acetate and butyrate efflux out of the epithelium and the transepithelial flux of these short-chain fatty acids were tested in Ussing chamber experiments using (14)C-labelled substrates. HCO₃⁻-dependent transport mechanisms were characterized by adding specific inhibitors of candidate proteins to the serosal side. Effluxes of acetate and butyrate out of the epithelium were higher to the serosal side than to the mucosal side. Acetate and butyrate effluxes to both sides of rumen epithelium consisted of HCO₃⁻-independent and -dependent parts. HCO₃⁻-dependent transport across the basolateral membrane was confirmed in studies of transepithelial fluxes. Mucosal to serosal fluxes of acetate and butyrate decreased with lowering serosal HCO₃⁻ concentrations. In the presence of 25 mm HCO₃⁻, transepithelial flux of acetate was inhibited effectively by p-hydroxymercuribenzoic acid or α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid, while butyrate flux was unaffected by the blockers. Fluxes of both acetate and butyrate from the serosal to the mucosal side were diminished largely by the addition of NO₃⁻ to the serosal side, with this effect being more pronounced for acetate. Our results indicate the existence of a basolateral short-chain fatty acid/HCO₃⁻ exchanger, with monocarboxylate transporter 1 as a primary candidate for acetate transfer. © 2013 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Sodium-calcium ion exchange in cardiac membrane vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, J P; Sutko, J L

    1979-01-01

    Membrane vesicles isolated from rabbit ventricular tissue rapidly accumulated Ca2+ when an outwardly directed Na+ gradient was formed across the vesicle membrane. Vesicles loaded internally with K+ showed only 10% of the Ca2+ uptake activity observed with Na+-loaded vesicles. Dissipation of the Na+ gradient with the monovalent cation exchange ionophores nigericin or narasin caused a rapid decline in Ca2+ uptake activity. The Ca2+-ionophore A23187 inhibited Ca2+ uptake by Na+-loaded vesicles and enhanced the rate of Ca2+ loss from the vesicles after uptake. Efflux of preaccumulated Ca2+ from the vesicles was stimulated 30-fold by the presence of 50 mM Na+ in the external medium. Na+-dependent uptake and efflux of Ca2+ were both inhibited by La3+. The results indicate that cardiac membrane vesicles exhibit Na+-Ca2+ exchange activity. Fractionation of the vesicles by density gradient centrifugation revealed a close correspondence between Na+-Ca2+ exchange activity and specific ouabain-binding activity among the various fractions. This relationship suggests that the observed Na+-Ca2+ exchange activity derives from the sarcolemmal membranes within the vesicle preparation. PMID:284383

  3. Synaptic vesicle membrane proteins interact to form a multimeric complex

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Potential interactions between membrane components of rat brain synaptic vesicles were analyzed by detergent solubilization followed by size fractionation or immunoprecipitation. The behavior of six synaptic vesicle membrane proteins as well as a plasma membrane protein was monitored by Western blotting. Solubilization of synaptic vesicle membranes in CHAPS resulted in the recovery of a large protein complex that included SV2, p65, p38, vesicle-associated membrane protein, and the vacuolar proton pump. Solubilization in octylglucoside resulted in the preservation of interactions between SV2, p38, and rab3A, while solubilization of synaptic vesicles with Triton X-100 resulted in two predominant interactions, one involving p65 and SV2, and the other involving p38 and vesicle-associated membrane protein. The multicomponent complex preserved with CHAPS solubilization was partially reconstituted following octylglucoside solubilization and subsequent dialysis against CHAPS. Reduction of the CHAPS concentration by gel filtration chromatography resulted in increased recovery of the multicomponent complex. Examination of the large complex isolated from CHAPS-solubilized vesicles by negative stain EM revealed structures with multiple globular domains, some of which were specifically labeled with gold-conjugated antibodies directed against p65 and SV2. The protein interactions defined in this report are likely to underlie aspects of neurotransmitter secretion, membrane traffic, and the spatial organization of vesicles within the nerve terminal. PMID:1730776

  4. Ion channels in basolateral membrane of marginal cells dissociated from gerbil stria vascularis.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, S; Ando, M; Kozakura, K; Saito, H; Irimajiri, A

    1995-03-01

    The basolateral membrane of isolated strial marginal cells has been probed for conductive pathways by the patch-clamp technique. Two types of voltage-insensitive channels were identified in both cell-attached and excised patches. Of these, frequently (69% of excised patches) observed was a Ca(2+)-activated nonselective cation channel having a unit conductance of 24.9 +/- 0.5 pS (N = 16). Other characteristics of this type in excised patches include: 1) linear I-V relations with 150 mM K+ (pipette)/150 mM Na+ (bath), 2) a permeability sequence of NH4+ > Na+ = K+ = Rb+ > Li+, 3) a flickering block by quinine or quinidine (both 1 mM), and 4) a dose dependent block of its activity by ADP or ATP (IC50,ATP/IC50,ADP = 20-35), both from the cytosolic side. Channels with similar characteristics were found in the apical membrane of the same cell; however, the basolateral channels were 2-4 times more densely distributed than the apical counterparts. Also frequently (57%) detected was a Cl- channel of 80.0 +/- 0.5 pS (N = 6), whose activity was Ca2+ independent. Additionally, this Cl- channel had: 1) linear I-V relations with symmetric Cl-, 2) a permeability sequence of Cl- > Br- > I- > or = NO3- > or = gluconate-, and 3) a complete and reversible block by 1 mM diphenylamine-2-carboxylate. In contrast to the apical Cl- channels, the basolateral ones had a much higher density (57% vs. < 1%) as well as a higher unit conductance (80 pS vs. 50 pS) than the apical counterpart. The relative abundance of these two types as the major conductive pathways for Na+, K+, and Cl- in the basolateral region must be taken into account when addressing the role of strial marginal cells in generating the positive endocochlear potential. The Cl- channel may facilitate Cl- distribution across the basolateral membrane.

  5. Redox-Reactive Membrane Vesicles produced by Shewanella

    SciTech Connect

    Gorby, Yuri A.; McLean, Jeffrey S.; Korenevsky, Anton A.; Rosso, Kevin M.; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y.; Beveridge, Terrance J.

    2008-06-01

    Dissimilatory iron reducing bacteria produce and release membrane vesicles with diameters ranging from 50 to 250 nm. The vesicles, which arise from the outer membrane of these Gram-negative bacteria, lack DNA but contain proteins that catalyze the reduction of ferric iron and other multivalent heavy metals and radionuclides. This enzymatic process results in the formation of nano-size biogenic mineral assemblages that resemble nanofossils. Under low-shear conditions, membrane vesicles are commonly tethered to intact cells by electrically conductive filaments known as bacterial nanowires. The functional role of membrane vesicles and associated nanowires is not known, but the potential for mineralized vesicles that morphologically resemble nanofossils to serve as paleontological indicators of early life on earth and as biosignatures of like on other planets is recognized.

  6. Transmembrane flux and receptor desensitization measured with membrane vesicles. Homogeneity of vesicles investigated by computer simulation.

    PubMed Central

    Cash, D J; Langer, R M; Subbarao, K; Bradbury, J R

    1988-01-01

    The use of membrane vesicles to make quantitative studies of transmembrane transport and exchange processes involves an assumption of homogeneity of the membrane vesicles. In studies of 86Rb+ exchange mediated by acetylcholine receptor from the electric organ of Electrophorus electricus and of 36Cl- exchange mediated by GABA receptor from rat brain, measurements of ion exchange and receptor desensitization precisely followed first order kinetics in support of this assumption. In other measurements a biphasic decay of receptor activity was seen. To elucidate the molecular properties of receptors from such measurements it is important to appreciate what the requirements of vesicle monodispersity are for meaningful results and what the effect of vesicle heterogeneity would be. The experiments were simulated with single vesicle populations with variable defined size distributions as well as with mixtures of different populations of vesicles. The properties of the receptors and their density in the membrane could be varied. Different receptors could be present on the same or different membrane vesicles. The simulated measurements were not very sensitive to size dispersity. A very broad size distribution of a single vesicle population was necessary to give rise to detectable deviations from first order kinetics or errors in the determined kinetic constants. Errors could become significant with mixtures of different vesicle populations, where the dispersity in initial ion exchange rate constant, proportional to the receptor concentration per internal volume, became large. In this case the apparent rate of receptor desensitization would diverge in opposite directions from the input value when measured by two different methods, suggesting an experimental test for such kinetic heterogeneity. A biphasic decrease of receptor activity could not be attributed to vesicle heterogeneity and must be due to desensitization processes with different rates. Significant errors would not

  7. A simple and fast method for the isolation of basolateral plasma membranes from rat small-intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Scalera, V; Storelli, C; Storelli-Joss, C; Haase, W; Murer, H

    1980-01-01

    A method was developed for the analytical and preparative isolation of basolateral plasma membranes from rat small intestine. They were separated on a self-orientating Percoll (modified colloidal silica) gradient starting with a heavy microsomal-membrane fraction and involving centrifugation at 48,000 g for 1 h. (Na+ + K+)-stimulated ATPase activity, used as a marker enzyme for the basolateral plasma membrane, is enriched 20-fold compared with that found in the homogenate of isolated intestinal epithelial cells. Images PLATE 1 PMID:6245639

  8. Exocyst Is Involved in Cystogenesis and Tubulogenesis and Acts by Modulating Synthesis and Delivery of Basolateral Plasma Membrane and Secretory Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lipschutz, Joshua H.; Guo, Wei; O'Brien, Lucy E.; Nguyen, Yen H.; Novick, Peter; Mostov, Keith E.

    2000-01-01

    Epithelial cyst and tubule formation are critical processes that involve transient, highly choreographed changes in cell polarity. Factors controlling these changes in polarity are largely unknown. One candidate factor is the highly conserved eight-member protein complex called the exocyst. We show that during tubulogenesis in an in vitro model system the exocyst relocalized along growing tubules consistent with changes in cell polarity. In yeast, the exocyst subunit Sec10p is a crucial component linking polarized exocytic vesicles with the rest of the exocyst complex and, ultimately, the plasma membrane. When the exocyst subunit human Sec10 was exogenously expressed in epithelial Madin-Darby canine kidney cells, there was a selective increase in the synthesis and delivery of apical and basolateral secretory proteins and a basolateral plasma membrane protein, but not an apical plasma membrane protein. Overexpression of human Sec10 resulted in more efficient and rapid cyst formation and increased tubule formation upon stimulation with hepatocyte growth factor. We conclude that the exocyst plays a central role in the development of epithelial cysts and tubules. PMID:11102522

  9. TRPM7 facilitates cholinergic vesicle fusion with the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Brauchi, Sebastian; Krapivinsky, Grigory; Krapivinsky, Luba; Clapham, David E

    2008-06-17

    TRPM7, of the transient receptor potential (TRP) family, is both an ion channel and a kinase. Previously, we showed that TRPM7 is located in the membranes of acetylcholine (ACh)-secreting synaptic vesicles of sympathetic neurons, forms a molecular complex with proteins of the vesicular fusion machinery, and is critical for stimulated neurotransmitter release. Here, we targeted pHluorin to small synaptic-like vesicles (SSLV) in PC12 cells and demonstrate that it can serve as a single-vesicle plasma membrane fusion reporter. In PC12 cells, as in sympathetic neurons, TRPM7 is located in ACh-secreting SSLVs. TRPM7 knockdown by siRNA, or abolishing channel activity by expression of a dominant negative TRPM7 pore mutant, decreased the frequency of spontaneous and voltage-stimulated SSLV fusion events without affecting large dense core vesicle secretion. We conclude that the conductance of TRPM7 across the vesicle membrane is important in SSLV fusion.

  10. Permeability of human erythrocyte membrane vesicles to alkali cations.

    PubMed

    Sze, H; Solomon, A K

    1979-02-02

    The permeability of inside-out and right-side-out vesicles from erythrocyte membranes to inorganic cations was determined quantitatively. Using 86Rb as a K analog, we have measured the rate constant of 86Rb efflux from vesicles under equilibrium exchange conditions, using a dialysis procedure. The permeability coefficients of the vesicles to Rb are only about an order of magnitude greater than that of whole erythrocytes. Furthermore, we have measured many of the specialized transport systems known to exist in erythrocytes and have shown that glucose, sulfate, ATP-dependent Ca and ATP-dependent Na transport activities are retained by the vesicle membranes. These results suggest that inside-out and right-side-out vesicles can be used effectively to study transport properties of erythrocyte membranes.

  11. Chlorotrifluoroethylcysteine interaction with rabbit proximal tubule cell basolateral membrane organic anion transport and apical membrane amino acid transport.

    PubMed

    Groves, C E; Morales, M N

    1999-11-01

    The interaction of the cysteine conjugate S-(1-chloro-1,2,2, -trifluoroethyl)-L-cysteine (CTFC) with organic anion and amino acid transport in the basolateral and apical membranes was examined with rabbit renal proximal tubule suspensions and primary cultures of rabbit renal proximal tubule cells. The apparent K(i) for CTFC inhibition of the 1-min uptake of [(3)H]p-aminohippurate in tubule suspensions was 105+/-3 microM and suggests that CTFC interacts with basolateral organic anion transport. Also, the addition of 1 mM CTFC decreased the secretion and intracellular accumulation of fluorescein by approximately 70 to 75%. The addition of 1 mM CTFC to the apical compartment decreased the reabsorption and intracellular accumulation of the amino acid [(3)H]phenylalanine by approximately 60 to 70%. Similar to CTFC, saturating concentrations of the organic anion [(3)H]p-aminohippurate and the amino acid phenylalanine reduced by approximately 75% fluorescein secretion and [(3)H]phenylalanine reabsorption, respectively, by approximately 60 to 70%. Thus, the cysteine conjugate CTFC appears to be a potent inhibitor of basolateral organic anion and apical amino acid transepithelial transport. In contrast to its effects on apical phenylalanine uptake, CTFC had no effect on the basal uptake of [(3)H]phenylalanine by primary cultures. The presence of CTFC in the external bath did trans-stimulate the efflux of fluorescein and [(3)H]phenylalanine across the basal and apical membrane in tubule suspensions or primary cultures, respectively, grown on plastic. Collectively, these data demonstrate that CTFC interacts with, and is transported by, two anatomically and functionally distinct transporters, the basolateral organic anion and apical neutral amino acid pathways, in the rabbit renal proximal tubule cell.

  12. Oxidative interactions between the erythrocyte membrane and phosphatidylcholine vesicles.

    PubMed

    Yang, E; Huestis, W H

    1994-05-20

    Sonicated unilamellar phosphatidylcholine vesicles induce hemoglobin oxidation in erythrocytes and resealed membrane fragments (buds) at pH 5.5. No such oxidation was observed in vesicle-bud mixtures at pH 7.4, in cells or buds suspended in pH 5.5 buffer, or in cells incubated with multilamellar lipid vesicles at pH 5.5. In buds, vesicle-induced hemoglobin oxidation was accompanied by lipid peroxidation and formation of covalent high molecular weight protein aggregates. The causative relationships among the oxidative events were examined using selective antioxidants and membrane fragments in which the cytoplasmic domain of band 3 was cleaved. Protein cross-linking and lipid peroxidation were found to be independent events, but both were found only in concert with heme oxidation. Further, vesicle-induced hemoglobin oxidation was found to be correlated with quasi-stable adsorption of intact vesicles to cells; intercalation of foreign lipid into the cell bilayer was not required. The inability of multilamellar vesicles to induce these low pH oxidative effects suggests a steric limitation on this cell-vesicle association. The results suggest that membrane component reorganization and patching induced by low pH may enhance vesicle adsorption, which in turn initiates oxidative damage.

  13. Carrier-mediated γ-aminobutyric acid transport across the basolateral membrane of human intestinal Caco-2 cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Carsten Uhd; Carstensen, Mette; Brodin, Birger

    2012-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the transport of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) across the basolateral membrane of intestinal cells. The proton-coupled amino acid transporter, hPAT1, mediates the influx of GABA and GABA mimetic drug substances such as vigabatrin and gaboxadol and the anticancer prodrug δ-aminolevulinic acid across the apical membrane of small intestinal enterocytes. Little is however known about the basolateral transport of these substances. We investigated basolateral transport of GABA in mature Caco-2 cell monolayers using isotope studies. Here we report that, at least two transporters seem to be involved in the basolateral transport of GABA. The basolateral uptake consisted of a high-affinity system with a K(m) of 290 μM and V(max) of 75 pmol cm(-2) min(-1) and a low affinity system with a K(m) of approximately 64 mM and V(max) of 1.6 nmol cm(-2) min(-1). The high-affinity transporter is Na(+) and Cl(-) dependent. The substrate specificity of the high-affinity transporter was further studied and Gly-Sar, Leucine, gaboxadol, sarcosine, lysine, betaine, 5-hydroxythryptophan, proline and glycine reduced the GABA uptake to approximately 44-70% of the GABA uptake in the absence of inhibitor. Other substances such as β-alanine, GABA, 5-aminovaleric acid, taurine and δ-aminolevulinic acid reduced the basolateral GABA uptake to 6-25% of the uptake in the absence of inhibitor. Our results indicate that the distance between the charged amino- and acid-groups is particular important for inhibition of basolateral GABA uptake. Thus, there seems to be a partial substrate overlap between the basolateral GABA transporter and hPAT1, which may prove important for understanding drug interactions at the level of intestinal transport.

  14. Membrane trafficking: decoding vesicle identity with contrasting chemistries.

    PubMed

    Frost, Adam

    2011-10-11

    Proteins involved in membrane traffic must distinguish between different classes of vesicles. New work now shows that α-synuclein and ALPS motifs represent two extreme types of amphipathic helix that are tuned to detect both the curvature of transport vesicles as well as their bulk lipid content.

  15. Durable vesicles for reconstitution of membrane proteins in biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Sanobar; Muench, Stephen P.; Jeuken, Lars J.C.

    2017-01-01

    The application of membrane proteins in biotechnology requires robust, durable reconstitution systems that enhance their stability and support their functionality in a range of working environments. Vesicular architectures are highly desirable to provide the compartmentalisation to utilise the functional transmembrane transport and signalling properties of membrane proteins. Proteoliposomes provide a native-like membrane environment to support membrane protein function, but can lack the required chemical and physical stability. Amphiphilic block copolymers can also self-assemble into polymersomes: tough vesicles with improved stability compared with liposomes. This review discusses the reconstitution of membrane proteins into polymersomes and the more recent development of hybrid vesicles, which blend the robust nature of block copolymers with the biofunctionality of lipids. These novel synthetic vesicles hold great promise for enabling membrane proteins within biotechnologies by supporting their enhanced in vitro performance and could also contribute to fundamental biochemical and biophysical research by improving the stability of membrane proteins that are challenging to work with. PMID:28202656

  16. Outer membrane vesicles as platform vaccine technology

    PubMed Central

    Stork, Michiel; van der Ley, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are released spontaneously during growth by many Gram‐negative bacteria. They present a range of surface antigens in a native conformation and have natural properties like immunogenicity, self‐adjuvation and uptake by immune cells which make them attractive for application as vaccines against pathogenic bacteria. In particular with Neisseria meningitidis, they have been investigated extensively and an OMV‐containing meningococcal vaccine has recently been approved by regulatory agencies. Genetic engineering of the OMV‐producing bacteria can be used to improve and expand their usefulness as vaccines. Recent work on meningitis B vaccines shows that OMVs can be modified, such as for lipopolysaccharide reactogenicity, to yield an OMV product that is safe and effective. The overexpression of crucial antigens or simultaneous expression of multiple antigenic variants as well as the expression of heterologous antigens enable expansion of their range of applications. In addition, modifications may increase the yield of OMV production and can be combined with specific production processes to obtain high amounts of well‐defined, stable and uniform OMV particle vaccine products. Further improvement can facilitate the development of OMVs as platform vaccine product for multiple applications. PMID:26912077

  17. Coupling of bending and stretching deformations in vesicle membranes.

    PubMed

    Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2014-06-01

    Biomimetic membranes are fluid and can undergo two different elastic deformations, bending and stretching. The bending of a membrane is primarily governed by two elastic parameters: its spontaneous (or preferred) curvature m and its bending rigidity κ. These two parameters define an intrinsic tension scale, the spontaneous tension 2 κm². Membrane stretching and compression, on the other hand, are determined by the mechanical tension acting within the membrane. For vesicle membranes, the two elastic deformations are coupled via the enclosed vesicle volume even in the absence of mechanical forces as shown here by minimizing the combined bending and stretching energy with respect to membrane area for fixed vesicle volume. As a consequence, the mechanical tension within a vesicle membrane depends on the spontaneous curvature and on the bending rigidity. This interdependence, which is difficult to grasp intuitively, is then illustrated for a variety of simple vesicle shapes. Depending on the vesicle morphology, the magnitude of the mechanical tension can be comparable to or can be much smaller than the spontaneous tension. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Electro-hydrodynamic effects on lipid membranes in giant vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staykova, Margarita; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Dimova, Rumiana

    2009-11-01

    Electric fields are widely applied for cell manipulation in numerous micron-scale systems. Here, we show for the first time that alternating electric fields may cause pronounced flows in the membrane of giant lipid vesicles as well as in the surrounding fluid media.^ The lipid vesicles are not only biomimetic model for the cell membrane but also have many potential biotechnological applications, e.g. as drug-delivery systems and micro-reactors. The reported effects should be considered in electric micro-manipulation procedures on cells and vesicles. They might be useful for applications in microfluidic technologies, for lipid mixing, trapping and displacement, as will be demonstrated. We also believe that our method for visualization of the lipid flows by fluorescently labeled intra-membrane domains will be helpful for studies on membrane behavior in vesicles subjected to shear or mechanical stresses.

  19. Preparation of Artificial Plasma Membrane Mimicking Vesicles with Lipid Asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Qingqing; London, Erwin

    2014-01-01

    Lipid asymmetry, the difference in lipid distribution across the lipid bilayer, is one of the most important features of eukaryotic cellular membranes. However, commonly used model membrane vesicles cannot provide control of lipid distribution between inner and outer leaflets. We recently developed methods to prepare asymmetric model membrane vesicles, but facile incorporation of a highly controlled level of cholesterol was not possible. In this study, using hydroxypropyl-α-cyclodextrin based lipid exchange, a simple method was devised to prepare large unilamellar model membrane vesicles that closely resemble mammalian plasma membranes in terms of their lipid composition and asymmetry (sphingomyelin (SM) and/or phosphatidylcholine (PC) outside/phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylserine (PS) inside), and in which cholesterol content can be readily varied between 0 and 50 mol%. We call these model membranes “artificial plasma membrane mimicking” (“PMm”) vesicles. Asymmetry was confirmed by both chemical labeling and measurement of the amount of externally-exposed anionic lipid. These vesicles should be superior and more realistic model membranes for studies of lipid-lipid and lipid-protein interaction in a lipid environment that resembles that of mammalian plasma membranes. PMID:24489974

  20. Preparation of artificial plasma membrane mimicking vesicles with lipid asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qingqing; London, Erwin

    2014-01-01

    Lipid asymmetry, the difference in lipid distribution across the lipid bilayer, is one of the most important features of eukaryotic cellular membranes. However, commonly used model membrane vesicles cannot provide control of lipid distribution between inner and outer leaflets. We recently developed methods to prepare asymmetric model membrane vesicles, but facile incorporation of a highly controlled level of cholesterol was not possible. In this study, using hydroxypropyl-α-cyclodextrin based lipid exchange, a simple method was devised to prepare large unilamellar model membrane vesicles that closely resemble mammalian plasma membranes in terms of their lipid composition and asymmetry (sphingomyelin (SM) and/or phosphatidylcholine (PC) outside/phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylserine (PS) inside), and in which cholesterol content can be readily varied between 0 and 50 mol%. We call these model membranes "artificial plasma membrane mimicking" ("PMm") vesicles. Asymmetry was confirmed by both chemical labeling and measurement of the amount of externally-exposed anionic lipid. These vesicles should be superior and more realistic model membranes for studies of lipid-lipid and lipid-protein interaction in a lipid environment that resembles that of mammalian plasma membranes.

  1. Selective Sorting of Cargo Proteins into Bacterial Membrane Vesicles*

    PubMed Central

    Haurat, M. Florencia; Aduse-Opoku, Joseph; Rangarajan, Minnie; Dorobantu, Loredana; Gray, Murray R.; Curtis, Michael A.; Feldman, Mario F.

    2011-01-01

    In contrast to the well established multiple cellular roles of membrane vesicles in eukaryotic cell biology, outer membrane vesicles (OMV) produced via blebbing of prokaryotic membranes have frequently been regarded as cell debris or microscopy artifacts. Increasingly, however, bacterial membrane vesicles are thought to play a role in microbial virulence, although it remains to be determined whether OMV result from a directed process or from passive disintegration of the outer membrane. Here we establish that the human oral pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis has a mechanism to selectively sort proteins into OMV, resulting in the preferential packaging of virulence factors into OMV and the exclusion of abundant outer membrane proteins from the protein cargo. Furthermore, we show a critical role for lipopolysaccharide in directing this sorting mechanism. The existence of a process to package specific virulence factors into OMV may significantly alter our current understanding of host-pathogen interactions. PMID:21056982

  2. Membrane Transport in Isolated Vesicles from Sugarbeet Taproot 1

    PubMed Central

    Briskin, Donald P.; Thornley, W. Robert; Wyse, Roger E.

    1985-01-01

    Sealed membrane vesicles were isolated from homogenates of sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L.) taproot by a combination of differential centrifugation, extraction with KI, and dextran gradient centrifugation. Relative to the KI-extracted microsomes, the content of plasma membranes, mitochondrial membranes, and Golgi membranes was much reduced in the final vesicle fraction. A component of ATPase activity that was inhibited by nitrate co-enriched with the capacity of the vesicles to form a steady state pH gradient during the purification procedure. This suggests that the nitrate-sensitive ATPase may be involved in driving H+-transport, and this is consistent with the observation that H+-transport, in the final vesicle fraction was inhibited by nitrate. Proton transport in the sugarbeet vesicles was substrate specific for ATP, insensitive to sodium vanadate and oligomycin but was inhibited by diethylstilbestrol and N,N′-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. The formation of a pH gradient in the vesicles was enhanced by halide ions in the sequence I− > Br− > Cl− while F− was inhibitory. These stimulatory effects occur from both a direct stimulation of the ATPase by anions and a reduction in the vesicle membrane potential. In the presence of Cl−, alkali cations reduce the pH gradient relative to that observed with bis-tris-propane, possibly by H+/alkali cation exchange. Based upon the properties of the H+-transporting vesicles, it is proposed that they are most likely derived from the tonoplast so that this vesicle preparation would represent a convenient system for studying the mechanism of transport at this membrane boundary. PMID:16664342

  3. Activation of the basolateral membrane Cl− conductance essential for electrogenic K+ secretion suppresses electrogenic Cl− secretion

    PubMed Central

    He, Quanhua; Halm, Susan T.; Zhang, Jin; Halm, Dan R.

    2010-01-01

    Adrenaline activates transient Cl−-secretion and sustained K+-secretion across isolated distal colonic mucosa of guinea pig. The Ca++-activated Cl− channel inhibitor CaCCinh-A01 [30μM] significantly reduced electrogenic K+-secretion, detected as short-circuit current (Isc). This inhibition supported the cell model for K+-secretion in which basolateral membrane Cl− channels provide an exit pathway for Cl− entering the cell via Na+/K+/2Cl−-cotransporters. CaCCinh-A01 inhibited both Isc and transepithelial conductance in a concentration dependent manner, IC50 = 6.3μM. GlyH-101, another Cl− channel inhibitor, also reduced sustained adrenaline-activated Isc (IC50 = 9.4μM). Adrenaline activated whole-cell Cl− current in isolated intact colonic crypts, confirmed by ion substitution. This adrenaline-activated whole-cell Cl− current also was inhibited by CaCCinh-A01 or GlyH-101. In contrast to K+-secretion, CaCCinh-A01 augmented the electrogenic Cl−-secretion activated by adrenaline as well as that activated by PGE2. Synergistic Cl−-secretion activated by cholinergic/PGE2 stimulation was insensitive to CaCCinh-A01. Colonic expression of the Ca++-activated Cl− channel protein Tmem16A was supported by RT-PCR detection of Tmem16A-mRNA, by immuno-blot with a Tmem16A-antibody, and by immuno-fluorescence detection in lateral membranes of epithelial cells. Alternative splices of Tmem16A were detected for exons that are involved in channel activation. Inhibition of K+-secretion and augmentation of Cl−-secretion by CaCCinh-A01 supports a common colonic cell model for these two ion secretory processes, such that activation of basolateral membrane Cl− channels contributes to the production of electrogenic K+-secretion and limits the rate of Cl−-secretion. Maximal physiological Cl−-secretion occurs only for synergistic activation mechanisms that close these basolateral membrane Cl− channels. PMID:21169331

  4. Outer membrane vesicles as platform vaccine technology.

    PubMed

    van der Pol, Leo; Stork, Michiel; van der Ley, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are released spontaneously during growth by many Gram-negative bacteria. They present a range of surface antigens in a native conformation and have natural properties like immunogenicity, self-adjuvation and uptake by immune cells which make them attractive for application as vaccines against pathogenic bacteria. In particular with Neisseria meningitidis, they have been investigated extensively and an OMV-containing meningococcal vaccine has recently been approved by regulatory agencies. Genetic engineering of the OMV-producing bacteria can be used to improve and expand their usefulness as vaccines. Recent work on meningitis B vaccines shows that OMVs can be modified, such as for lipopolysaccharide reactogenicity, to yield an OMV product that is safe and effective. The overexpression of crucial antigens or simultaneous expression of multiple antigenic variants as well as the expression of heterologous antigens enable expansion of their range of applications. In addition, modifications may increase the yield of OMV production and can be combined with specific production processes to obtain high amounts of well-defined, stable and uniform OMV particle vaccine products. Further improvement can facilitate the development of OMVs as platform vaccine product for multiple applications. © 2015 The Authors. Biotechnology Journal published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non-commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made. The copyright line of the article for this article was changed on 23 February 2016 after original online publication.

  5. Lipid Bilayer Vesicles with Numbers of Membrane-Linking Pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ken-ichirou Akashi,; Hidetake Miyata,

    2010-06-01

    We report that phospholipid membranes spontaneously formed in aqueous medium giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) possessing many membranous wormhole-like structures (membrane-linking pores, MLPs). By phase contract microscopy and confocal fluorescence microscopy, the structures of the MLPs, consisting of lipid bilayer, were resolvable, and a variety of vesicular shapes having many MLPs (a high genus topology) were found. These vesicles were stable but easily deformed by micromanipulation with a microneedle. We also observed the size reduction of the MLPs with the increase in membrane tension, which was qualitatively consistent with a prediction from a simple dynamical model.

  6. In vitro fusion between Saccharomyces cerevisiae secretory vesicles and cytoplasmic-side-out plasma membrane vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Arrastua, Lorena; San Sebastian, Eider; Quincoces, Ana F; Antony, Claude; Ugalde, Unai

    2003-01-01

    The final step in the secretory pathway, which is the fusion event between secretory vesicles and the plasma membrane, was reconstructed using highly purified secretory vesicles and cytoplasmic-side-out plasma membrane vesicles from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Both organelle preparations were obtained from a sec 6-4 temperature-sensitive mutant. Fusion was monitored by means of a fluorescence assay based on the dequenching of the lipophilic fluorescent probe octadecylrhodamine B-chloride (R18). The probe was incorporated into the membrane of secretory vesicles, and it diluted in unlabelled cytoplasmic-side-out plasma membrane vesicles as the fusion process took place. The obtained experimental dequenching curves were found by mathematical analysis to consist of two independent but simultaneous processes. Whereas one of them reflected the fusion process between both vesicle populations as confirmed by its dependence on the assay conditions, the other represented a non-specific transfer of the probe. The fusion process may now be examined in detail using the preparation, validation and analytical methods developed in this study. PMID:12435271

  7. Asymmetric osmotic water permeation through a vesicle membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Jiaye; Zhao, Yunzhen; Fang, Chang; Shi, Yue

    2017-05-01

    Understanding the water permeation through a cell membrane is of primary importance for biological activities and a key step to capture its shape transformation in salt solution. In this work, we reveal the dynamical behaviors of osmotically driven transport of water molecules across a vesicle membrane by molecular dynamics simulations. Of particular interest is that the water transport in and out of vesicles is highly distinguishable given the osmotic force are the same, suggesting an asymmetric osmotic transportation. This asymmetric phenomenon exists in a broad range of parameter space such as the salt concentration, temperature, and vesicle size and can be ascribed to the similar asymmetric potential energy of lipid-ion, lipid-water, lipid-solution, lipid-lipid, and the lipid-lipid energy fluctuation. Specifically, the water flux has a linear increase with the salt concentration, similar to the prediction by Nernst-Planck equation or Fick's first law. Furthermore, due to the Arrhenius relation between the membrane permeability and temperature, the water flux also exhibits excellent Arrhenius dependence on the temperature. Meanwhile, the water flux shows a linear increase with the vesicle surface area since the flux amount across a unit membrane area should be a constant. Finally, we also present the anonymous diffusion behaviors for the vesicle itself, where transitions from normal diffusion at short times to subdiffusion at long times are identified. Our results provide significant new physical insights for the osmotic water permeation through a vesicle membrane and are helpful for future experimental studies.

  8. Inward and outward membrane tubes pulled from giant vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Raktim; Dimova, Rumiana

    2014-07-01

    Membrane nanotubes are extruded from giant unilamellar lipid vesicles using a controlled hydrodynamic flow and membrane-attached beads manipulated via optical tweezers. Within a single experiment, the technique can be used to assess various important mechanical and rheological characteristics of the membrane such as the bending rigidity, tension and intermonolayer slip. The application of small flow velocities leads to the extrusion of tubes with sufficiently large diameters conveniently measurable under an optical microscope. For the first time, we show that by suitably controlling the medium flow, inward tubes inside the vesicles can be formed. This approach offers great potential for studying tubulation mechanisms in membrane systems, exhibiting positive as well as negative spontaneous curvatures and should offer a more realistic model for biomembranes because the vesicle membrane tension can adapt freely.

  9. Functional Advantages Conferred by Extracellular Prokaryotic Membrane Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Manning, Andrew J.; Kuehn, Meta J.

    2015-01-01

    The absence of subcellular organelles is a characteristic typically used to distinguish prokaryotic from eukaryotic cells. But recent discoveries do not support this dogma. Over the past 50 years, researchers have begun to appreciate and characterize Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane derived vesicles and Gram-positive and archaeal membrane vesicles. These extracellular, membrane-bound organelles can perform a variety of functions, including binding and delivery of DNA, transport of virulence factors, protection of the cell from outer membrane targeting antimicrobials, and ridding the cell of toxic envelope proteins. Here we review the contributions of these extracellular organelles to prokaryotic physiology and compare these with the contributions of the bacterial interior membrane bound organelles responsible for harvesting light energy and for generating magnetic crystals of heavy metals. Understanding the roles of these multifunctional extracellular vesicle organelles as microbial tools will help us to better realize the diverse interactions that occur in our polymicrobial world. PMID:23615201

  10. Na sup + uptake into colonic enterocyte membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Bridges, R.J.; Garty, H.; Benos, D.J.; Rummel, W. Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham )

    1988-04-01

    Na{sup +} uptake was studied in colonic enterocyte membrane vesicles prepared from normal and dexamethasone-treated rats. Vesicles from rats treated with dexamethasone demonstrated a fivefold greater {sup 22}Na{sup +} uptake compared with vesicles from normal rats. Most of the tracer uptake in membranes derived from treated rats occurred through a conductive, amiloride-blockable pathway located in vesicles with low native K{sup +} permeability and high Cl{sup {minus}} permeability. Kinetic analysis of the amiloride inhibition curve revealed the presence of two amiloride-blockable pathways, one with a high affinity accounting for 85% of the uptake, and one with a low affinity accounting for only 12% of the uptake. Only the low-affinity pathway was detected with vesicles from normal rats. The high sensitivity to amiloride, the dependence on dexamethasone pretreatment, and the relative permeabilities to K{sup +} and Cl{sup {minus}} indicate that most of the {sup 22}Na{sup +} uptake in membranes derived from treated rats is through a Na{sup +}-specific channel located in apical membrane vesicles. Preincubation of the isolated cells from dexamethasone-treated rats at 37{degree}C in Ca{sup 2+}-free solutions before homogenization and membrane vesicle purification caused a 5- to 10-fold increase in amiloride-blockable {sup 22}Na{sup +} uptake compared with vesicles derived from cells maintained at 0{degree}C. The addition of Ca{sup 2+}, but not of Mg{sup 2+}, to the incubation solution markedly reduced this temperature-dependent enhancement in {sup 22}Na{sup +} uptake. These results suggest that Na{sup +} transport in colonic enterocytes from dexamethasone-treated rats is regulated by a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent, temperature-sensitive process which causes a sustained change in the apical membrane.

  11. Arachidonic acid inhibits K channels in basolateral membrane of the thick ascending limb.

    PubMed

    Gu, Rui-Min; Wang, Wen-Hui

    2002-09-01

    We have used the patch-clamp technique to study the effect of arachidonic acid (AA) on the basolateral K channels in the medullary thick ascending limb (mTAL) of rat kidney. An inwardly rectifying 50-pS K channel was identified in cell-attached and inside-out patches in the basolateral membrane of the mTAL. The channel open probability (P(o)) was 0.51 at the spontaneous cell membrane potential and decreased to 0.25 by 30 mV hyperpolarization. The addition of 5 microM AA decreased channel activity, identified as NP(o), from 0.58 to 0.08 in cell-attached patches. The effect of AA on the 50-pS K channel was specific because 10 microM cis-11,14,17-eicosatrienoic acid had no significant effect on channel activity. To determine whether the effect of AA was mediated by AA per se or by its metabolites, we examined the effect of AA on channel activity in the presence of indomethacin, an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase, or N-methylsulfonyl-12,12-dibromododec-11-enamide (DDMS), an inhibitor of cytochrome P-450 monooxygenase. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase increased channel activity from 0.54 to 0.9. However, indomethacin did not abolish the inhibitory effect of AA on the 50-pS K channel. In contrast, inhibition of cytochrome P-450 metabolism not only increased channel activity from 0.49 to 0.83 but also completely abolished the effect of AA. Moreover, addition of DDMS can reverse the inhibitory effect of AA on channel activity. The notion that the effect of AA was mediated by cytochrome P-450-dependent metabolites of AA is also supported by the observation that addition of 100 nM of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, a main metabolite of AA in the mTAL, can mimic the effect of AA. We conclude that AA inhibits the 50-pS K channel in the basolateral membrane of the mTAL and that the effect of AA is mainly mediated by cytochrome P-450-dependent metabolites of AA.

  12. Prokaryotic membrane vesicles: new insights on biogenesis and biological roles.

    PubMed

    Haurat, M Florencia; Elhenawy, Wael; Feldman, Mario F

    2015-02-01

    Biogenesis and trafficking of membrane vesicles are essential and well-studied processes in eukaryotes. In contrast, vesiculation in bacteria is not well understood. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are produced in Gram-negative bacteria by blebbing of the outer membrane. In addition to the roles in pathogenesis, cell-to-cell communication and stress response, recent work has suggested that OMVs play important roles in immunomodulation and the establishment and balance of the gut microbiota. In this review we discuss the known and novel roles of OMVs and the different biogenesis models proposed, and address the evidence for cargo selection into OMVs. We also discuss the growing evidence for the existence of membrane vesicles in Gram-positive bacteria and Archaea. Due to their biological importance and promising applications in vaccinology, the biogenesis of OMVs is an important topic in microbiology.

  13. Homopolymer vesicles with a gradient bilayer membrane as drug carriers.

    PubMed

    Fan, Lang; Lu, Hang; Zou, Kaidian; Chen, Jing; Du, Jianzhong

    2013-12-21

    We report an unusual homopolymer vesicle, which has a soft bilayer membrane composed of oligo(ethyleneoxy) side chains (OEs) with a gradually decreased packing density from the centre of the membrane to both margins, exhibiting thermo-responsive zeta potential and dispersibility and showing potential applications for anti-cancer drug delivery.

  14. Yeast Membrane Vesicles: Isolation and General Characteristics1

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Michael S.; Cirillo, Vincent P.

    1972-01-01

    Yeast membrane vesicles are formed when packed yeast are ground manually in a porcelain mortar and pestle with glass beads (0.2 mm diameter). These vesicles can be separated from the other components of the grinding mixture by a combination of centrifugation steps and elution from a column of the same glass beads (0.2 mm diameter). Isolated vesicles are osmotically sensitive, contain cytoplasmic components, and have energy-independent transport function. They are unable to metabolize glucose, but have respiratory function which is thought to be associated with intravesicular mitochondria. Invertase and oligomycin-insensitive adenosine triphosphatase are present in lysed vesicle preparations, and the appropriateness of these enzyme activities as membrane markers is discussed. Images PMID:4337848

  15. Diacylglycerol induces fusion of nuclear envelope membrane precursor vesicles.

    PubMed

    Barona, Teresa; Byrne, Richard D; Pettitt, Trevor R; Wakelam, Michael J O; Larijani, Banafshe; Poccia, Dominic L

    2005-12-16

    Purified membrane vesicles isolated from sea urchin eggs form nuclear envelopes around sperm nuclei following GTP hydrolysis in the presence of cytosol. A low density subfraction of these vesicles (MV1), highly enriched in phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns), is required for nuclear envelope formation. Membrane fusion of MV1 with a second fraction that contributes most of the nuclear envelope can be initiated without GTP by an exogenous bacterial PtdIns-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) which hydrolyzes PtdIns to form diacylglycerides and inositol 1-phosphate. This PI-PLC hydrolyzes a subset of sea urchin membrane vesicle PtdIns into diglycerides enriched in long chain, polyunsaturated species as revealed by a novel liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. Large unilammelar vesicles (LUVs) enriched in PtdIns can substitute for MV1 in PI-PLC induced nuclear envelope formation. Moreover, MV1 prehydrolyzed with PI-PLC and washed to remove inositols leads to spontaneous nuclear envelope formation with MV2 without further PI-PLC treatment. LUVs enriched in diacylglycerol mimic prehydrolyzed MV1. These results indicate that production of membrane-destabilizing diglycerides in membranes enriched in PtdIns may facilitate membrane fusion in a natural membrane system and suggest that MV1, which binds only to two places on the sperm nucleus, may initiate fusion locally.

  16. Membrane Transport in Isolated Vesicles from Sugarbeet Taproot

    PubMed Central

    Giannini, John L.; Miller, Gene W.; Briskin, Donald P.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of fluoride on the tonoplast type ATPase and transport activities associated with sealed membrane vesicles isolated from sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L.) storage tissue were examined. This anion had two distinct effects upon the proton-pumping vesicles. When ATP hydrolysis was measured in the presence of gramicidin D, significant inhibition (approximately 50%) only occurred when the fluoride concentration approached 50 millimolar. In contrast, the same degree of inhibition of proton transport occurred when the fluoride concentration was about 24 millimolar. Effects on proton pumping at this concentration of fluoride could be attributed to an inhibition of chloride movement which serves to dissipate the vesicle membrane potential. Valinomycin could partially restore ATPase activity in sealed vesicles which were inhibited by fluoride and this restoration occurred with a reduction in the membrane potential. Fluoride demonstrated a competitive interaction with chloride-stimulation of proton transport and inhibited the uptake of radioactive chloride into sealed vesicles. When the vesicles were allowed to develop a pH gradient in the absence of KCl, and KCl was subsequently added, fluoride reduced enhancement of the existing pH gradient by KCl. The results are consistent with a chloride carrier that is inhibited by fluoride. PMID:16665312

  17. Structural Basis of Vesicle Formation at the Inner Nuclear Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Christoph; Dent, Kyle C.; Zeev-Ben-Mordehai, Tzviya; Grange, Michael; Bosse, Jens B.; Whittle, Cathy; Klupp, Barbara G.; Siebert, C. Alistair; Vasishtan, Daven; Bäuerlein, Felix J.B.; Cheleski, Juliana; Werner, Stephan; Guttmann, Peter; Rehbein, Stefan; Henzler, Katja; Demmerle, Justin; Adler, Barbara; Koszinowski, Ulrich; Schermelleh, Lothar; Schneider, Gerd; Enquist, Lynn W.; Plitzko, Jürgen M.; Mettenleiter, Thomas C.; Grünewald, Kay

    2015-01-01

    Summary Vesicular nucleo-cytoplasmic transport is becoming recognized as a general cellular mechanism for translocation of large cargoes across the nuclear envelope. Cargo is recruited, enveloped at the inner nuclear membrane (INM), and delivered by membrane fusion at the outer nuclear membrane. To understand the structural underpinning for this trafficking, we investigated nuclear egress of progeny herpesvirus capsids where capsid envelopment is mediated by two viral proteins, forming the nuclear egress complex (NEC). Using a multi-modal imaging approach, we visualized the NEC in situ forming coated vesicles of defined size. Cellular electron cryo-tomography revealed a protein layer showing two distinct hexagonal lattices at its membrane-proximal and membrane-distant faces, respectively. NEC coat architecture was determined by combining this information with integrative modeling using small-angle X-ray scattering data. The molecular arrangement of the NEC establishes the basic mechanism for budding and scission of tailored vesicles at the INM. PMID:26687357

  18. Biogenesis and function of Porphyromonas gingivalis outer membrane vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Xie, H

    2015-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is one of the keystone pathogens associated with chronic periodontitis. All P. gingivalis strains examined thus far produce outer membrane vesicles. Recent studies have found that vesicles possess some well-known virulence factors of P. gingivalis such as adhesins, toxins and proteolytic enzymes. Carrying most of the characteristic features of their parent P. gingivalis cells, vesicles communicate with host cells and other members of microbial biofilms, resulting in the transmission of virulence factors into these host cells and the formation of pathogenic bacteria-dominated microbial communities. An in-depth understanding of both the nature and role of vesicles in the pathogenicity of P. gingivalis is both important and timely, particularly when speaking of periodontitis and its related systemic effects. PMID:26343879

  19. Transport properties of tomato fruit tonoplast membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Oleski, N.; Joyce, D.; Osteryoung, K.; Bennett, A.B.

    1986-04-01

    To study the role of the tonoplast in tomato fruit development, methods were developed to isolate sealed tonoplast membrane vesicles. Low density (approx. 1.23 g/cc) membrane vesicles they found to possess a NO/sub 3//sup -/-sensitive H/sup +/-translocating ATPase. The properties of this H/sup +/-ATPase are similar to those described for other tonoplast H/sup +/-ATPases. ATP-dependent Ca/sup + +/ transport into the vesicles proceeded by two mechanisms, one operative at low Ca/sup + +/ concentrations (1 ..mu..M) and inhibited by vanadate, and the other operative at high Ca/sup + +/ concentrations (10 ..mu..M) and inhibited by NO/sub 3//sup -/. Their present results indicate that the high affinity (vanadate-sensitive) Ca/sup + +/ transporter resides in E.R. membrane that contaminates the tonoplast preparation. Citrate uptake in tonoplast vesicles is stimulated by ATP and inhibited by NO/sub 3//sup -/ suggesting that citrate uptake is driven indirectly by the H/sup +/-ATPase. The substrate for sugar uptake is UDP-glucose resulting in the appearance of sucrose inside the tonoplast vesicle. No evidence for ATP stimulation of glucose, fructose, or sucrose uptake was observed.

  20. Durable vesicles for reconstitution of membrane proteins in biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Beales, Paul A; Khan, Sanobar; Muench, Stephen P; Jeuken, Lars J C

    2017-02-08

    The application of membrane proteins in biotechnology requires robust, durable reconstitution systems that enhance their stability and support their functionality in a range of working environments. Vesicular architectures are highly desirable to provide the compartmentalisation to utilise the functional transmembrane transport and signalling properties of membrane proteins. Proteoliposomes provide a native-like membrane environment to support membrane protein function, but can lack the required chemical and physical stability. Amphiphilic block copolymers can also self-assemble into polymersomes: tough vesicles with improved stability compared with liposomes. This review discusses the reconstitution of membrane proteins into polymersomes and the more recent development of hybrid vesicles, which blend the robust nature of block copolymers with the biofunctionality of lipids. These novel synthetic vesicles hold great promise for enabling membrane proteins within biotechnologies by supporting their enhanced in vitro performance and could also contribute to fundamental biochemical and biophysical research by improving the stability of membrane proteins that are challenging to work with. © 2017 The Author(s).

  1. Phospholipid flippases: building asymmetric membranes and transport vesicles.

    PubMed

    Sebastian, Tessy T; Baldridge, Ryan D; Xu, Peng; Graham, Todd R

    2012-08-01

    Phospholipid flippases in the type IV P-type ATPase family (P4-ATPases) are essential components of the Golgi, plasma membrane and endosomal system that play critical roles in membrane biogenesis. These pumps flip phospholipid across the bilayer to create an asymmetric membrane structure with substrate phospholipids, such as phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine, enriched within the cytosolic leaflet. The P4-ATPases also help form transport vesicles that bud from Golgi and endosomal membranes, thereby impacting the sorting and localization of many different proteins in the secretory and endocytic pathways. At the organismal level, P4-ATPase deficiencies are linked to liver disease, obesity, diabetes, hearing loss, neurological deficits, immune deficiency and reduced fertility. Here, we review the biochemical, cellular and physiological functions of P4-ATPases, with an emphasis on their roles in vesicle-mediated protein transport. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Lipids and Vesicular Transport. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Phospholipid flippases: building asymmetric membranes and transport vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Sebastian, Tessy T.; Baldridge, Ryan D.; Xu, Peng; Graham, Todd R.

    2012-01-01

    Phospholipid flippases in the type IV P-type ATPase family (P4-ATPases) are essential components of the Golgi, plasma membrane and endosomal system that play critical roles in membrane biogenesis. These pumps flip phospholipid across the bilayer to create an asymmetric membrane structure with substrate phospholipids, such as phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine, enriched within the cytosolic leaflet. The P4-ATPases also help form transport vesicles that bud from Golgi and endosomal membranes, thereby impacting the sorting and localization of many different proteins in the secretory and endocytic pathways. At the organismal level, P4-ATPase deficiencies are linked to liver disease, obesity, diabetes, hearing loss, neurological deficits, immune deficiency and reduced fertility. Here, we review the biochemical, cellular and physiological functions of P4-ATPases, with an emphasis on their roles in vesicle-mediated protein transport. PMID:22234261

  3. Membrane mechanical properties of synthetic asymmetric phospholipid vesicles.

    PubMed

    Lu, Li; Doak, William J; Schertzer, Jeffrey W; Chiarot, Paul R

    2016-09-13

    Synthetic lipid vesicles have served as important model systems to study cellular membrane biology. Research has shown that the mechanical properties of bilayer membranes significantly affects their biological behavior. The properties of a lipid bilayer are governed by lipid acyl chain length, headgroup type, and the presence of membrane proteins. However, few studies have explored how membrane architecture, in particular trans-bilayer lipid asymmetry, influences membrane mechanical properties. In this study, we investigated the effects of lipid bilayer architecture (i.e. asymmetry) on the mechanical properties of biological membranes. This was achieved using a customized micropipette aspiration system and a novel microfluidic technique previously developed by our team for building asymmetric phospholipid vesicles with tailored bilayer architecture. We found that the bending modulus and area expansion modulus of the synthetic asymmetric bilayers were up to 50% larger than the values acquired for symmetric bilayers. This was caused by the dissimilar lipid distribution in each leaflet of the bilayer for the asymmetric membrane. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the impact of trans-bilayer asymmetry on the area expansion modulus of synthetic bilayer membranes. Since the mechanical properties of bilayer membranes play an important role in numerous cellular processes, these results have significant implications for membrane biology studies.

  4. Sodium channels in membrane vesicles from cultured toad bladder cells

    SciTech Connect

    Asher, C.; Moran, A.; Rossier, B.C.; Garty, H. Ben Gurion Univ., Beer-Sheva Institut de Pharmacologie de l'Universite de Lausanne )

    1988-04-01

    Electrical potential-driven {sup 22}Na{sup +} fluxes were measured in membrane vesicles prepared from TBM-18(cl23) cells (a clone of the established cell line TB-M). Fifty to seventy percent of the tracer uptake in vesicles derived from cells that were cultivated on a porous support were blocked by the diuretic amiloride. The amiloride inhibition constant was <0.1 {mu}M, indicating that this flux is mediated by the apical Na{sup +}-specific channels. Vesicles prepared from cells that were not grown on a porous support exhibited much smaller amiloride-sensitive fluxes. Two Ca{sup 2+}-dependent processes that down-regulated the channel conductance and were previously identified in native epithelia were found in the cultured cells as well. Vesicles isolated from cells that were preincubated with 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} M aldosterone for 16-20 h exhibited higher amiloride-sensitive conductance than vesicles derived from control, steroid-depleted cells. Thus membrane derived from TBM-18(cl23) cells can be used to characterize the epithelial Na{sup +} channel and its hormonal regulation.

  5. Contribution of bacterial outer membrane vesicles to innate bacterial defense

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are constitutively produced by Gram-negative bacteria throughout growth and have proposed roles in virulence, inflammation, and the response to envelope stress. Here we investigate outer membrane vesiculation as a bacterial mechanism for immediate short-term protection against outer membrane acting stressors. Antimicrobial peptides as well as bacteriophage were used to examine the effectiveness of OMV protection. Results We found that a hyper-vesiculating mutant of Escherichia coli survived treatment by antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) polymyxin B and colistin better than the wild-type. Supplementation of E. coli cultures with purified outer membrane vesicles provided substantial protection against AMPs, and AMPs significantly induced vesiculation. Vesicle-mediated protection and induction of vesiculation were also observed for a human pathogen, enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC), challenged with polymyxin B. When ETEC with was incubated with low concentrations of vesicles concomitant with polymyxin B treatment, bacterial survival increased immediately, and the culture gained resistance to polymyxin B. By contrast, high levels of vesicles also provided immediate protection but prevented acquisition of resistance. Co-incubation of T4 bacteriophage and OMVs showed fast, irreversible binding. The efficiency of T4 infection was significantly reduced by the formation of complexes with the OMVs. Conclusions These data reveal a role for OMVs in contributing to innate bacterial defense by adsorption of antimicrobial peptides and bacteriophage. Given the increase in vesiculation in response to the antimicrobial peptides, and loss in efficiency of infection with the T4-OMV complex, we conclude that OMV production may be an important factor in neutralizing environmental agents that target the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:22133164

  6. Relative osmotic effects of raffinose, KCl, and NaCl across basolateral cell membrane.

    PubMed

    Welling, L W; Welling, D J; Ochs, T

    1990-10-01

    Lumen-collapsed segments of rabbit S2 proximal tubule were bathed in isotonic medium and then exposed acutely to a medium made hypertonic by the addition of raffinose, NaCl, KCl, Na gluconate, K gluconate, or choline Cl. The result was a rapid efflux of water and a shrinking of the tubule, which could be measured by video techniques within the first 0.1 s. After reequilibration in isotonic medium, each tubule was then exposed to a second hypertonic medium to provide a direct comparison between two different solutes, either NaCl vs. KCl or raffinose vs. any one of the other solutes. Because raffinose is impermeant across the basolateral cell membrane, the ratio of its effect to that of another solute is a measure of the reflection coefficient (sigma) of that other solute. The following results were obtained: sigma KCl = 0.70 +/- 0.02, sigma K gluconate = 0.97 +/- 0.07, sigma Na gluconate = 0.84 +/- 0.06, and sigma choline Cl = 0.75 +/- 0.06. We previously have reported sigma NaCl = 0.56 +/- 0.07. If sigma of each salt is considered to be the arithmetic average of its component parts, and if gluconate and choline are considered to be impermeant, we also obtain sigma Na+ = 0.68, sigma K+ = 0.94, and sigma Cl- = 0.50.

  7. Microemulsions, micelles, and vesicles as media for membrane mimetic photochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Fendler, J.H.

    1980-06-12

    Microemulsions, micelles, and vesicles are compared as media for membrane mimetic photochemistry. These systems solubilize, concentrate, compartmentalize, organize, and localize reactants; maintain proton and/or reactant gradients; alter quantum efficiencies; lower ionization potentials; change oxidation and reduction properties; change dissociation constants; affect vectorial electron displacements; alter photophysical pathways and rates; alter chemical pathways and rates; stabilize reactants, intermediates, and products; and separate products (charges). Formation of structures of microemulsions, micelles, and vesicles as well as substrate solubilization therein are summarized. Attention is focused on the utilization of microemulsions as reaction media. 72 references.

  8. Role for Mycobacterium tuberculosis Membrane Vesicles in Iron Acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Prados-Rosales, Rafael; Weinrick, Brian C.; Piqué, Daniel G.; Jacobs, William R.; Casadevall, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis releases membrane vesicles packed with molecules that can modulate the immune response. Because environmental conditions often influence the production and content of bacterial vesicles, this study examined M. tuberculosis microvesicles released under iron limitation, a common condition faced by pathogens inside the host. The findings indicate that M. tuberculosis increases microvesicle production in response to iron restriction and that these microvesicles contain mycobactin, which can serve as an iron donor and supports replication of iron-starved mycobacteria. Consequently, the results revealed a role of microvesicles in iron acquisition in M. tuberculosis, which can be critical for survival in the host. PMID:24415729

  9. Functional advantages conferred by extracellular prokaryotic membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Manning, Andrew J; Kuehn, Meta J

    2013-01-01

    The absence of subcellular organelles is a characteristic typically used to distinguish prokaryotic from eukaryotic cells. But recent discoveries do not support this dogma. Over the past 50 years, researchers have begun to appreciate and characterize Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane-derived vesicles and Gram-positive and archaeal membrane vesicles. These extracellular, membrane-bound organelles can perform a variety of functions, including binding and delivery of DNA, transport of virulence factors, protection of the cell from outer membrane targeting antimicrobials and ridding the cell of toxic envelope proteins. Here, we review the contributions of these extracellular organelles to prokaryotic physiology and compare these with the contributions of the bacterial interior membrane-bound organelles responsible for harvesting light energy and for generating magnetic crystals of heavy metals. Understanding the roles of these multifunctional extracellular vesicle organelles as microbial tools will help us to better realize the diverse interactions that occur in our polymicrobial world. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Structural lipid changes and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity of gill cells' basolateral membranes during saltwater acclimation in sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus, L.) juveniles.

    PubMed

    Lança, Maria João; Machado, Maria; Ferreira, Ana Filipa; Quintella, Bernardo Ruivo; de Almeida, Pedro Raposo

    2015-11-01

    Seawater acclimation is a critical period for anadromous species and a process yet to be understood in lampreys. Considering that changes in lipid composition of the gill cells' basolateral membranes may disrupt the major transporter Na(+)K(+)-ATPase, the goal of this study was to detect changes at this level during juvenile sea lamprey seawater acclimation. The results showed that saltwater acclimation has a direct effect on the fatty acid composition of gill cells basolateral membrane's phospholipids. When held in full-strength seawater, the fatty acid profile of basolateral membrane's phospholipids suffered a restructure by increasing either saturation or the ratio between oleic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid. Simultaneously, the activity of Na(+)K(+)-ATPase revealed a significant and positive correlation with basolateral membrane's cholesterol content in the presence of highest salinity. Our results pointed out for lipid adjustments involving the functional transporter present on the gill cell basolateral membranes to ensure the role played by branchial Na(+)K(+)-ATPase in ion transport during saltwater acclimation process. The responses observed contributed to the strategy adopted by gill cell's basolateral membranes to compensate for osmotic and ionic stressors, to ensure the success of the process of seawater acclimation associated with the downstream trophic migration of juvenile sea lamprey.

  11. Rab5a is a common component of the apical and basolateral endocytic machinery in polarized epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bucci, C; Wandinger-Ness, A; Lütcke, A; Chiariello, M; Bruni, C B; Zerial, M

    1994-01-01

    In nonpolarized cells, the small GTPase Rab5a is localized to the plasma membrane, clathrin-coated vesicles, and early endosomes. Rab5a is required for early endosome fusion in vitro and regulates transport between the plasma membrane and early endosomes, in vivo. In polarized epithelial cells endocytosis occurs from separate apical and basolateral plasma membrane domains. Internalized molecules are initially delivered to distinct apical or basolateral early endosomes. In vitro, apical early endosomes can readily fuse with one another but not with the basolateral endosomes and vice versa, thereby indicating that the apical and basolateral early endocytic pathways are controlled by distinct machineries. Here, we have investigated the localization and function of Rab5a in polarized epithelial cells. Confocal immunofluorescence microscopy on mouse kidney sections revealed association of the protein with the apical and basolateral plasma membrane domains and underlying structures. In polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney I cells, endogenous and overexpressed Rab5a have the same distribution. Moreover, overexpression of the protein causes a 2-fold increase in fluid-phase uptake from both domains of the cell, thus showing that Rab5a functions in apical and basolateral endocytosis. Our data indicate that the apical and basolateral endocytic machineries of epithelial cells share common regulatory components and that Rab5a per se is not sufficient to target endocytic vesicles to apical or basolateral early endosomes. Images PMID:8197185

  12. Iron supply determines apical/basolateral membrane distribution of intestinal iron transporters DMT1 and ferroportin 1.

    PubMed

    Núñez, Marco T; Tapia, Victoria; Rojas, Alejandro; Aguirre, Pabla; Gómez, Francisco; Nualart, Francisco

    2010-03-01

    Intestinal iron absorption comprises the coordinated activity of the influx transporter divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) and the efflux transporter ferroportin (FPN). In this work, we studied the movement of DMT1 and FPN between cellular compartments as a function of iron supply. In rat duodenum, iron gavage resulted in the relocation of DMT1 to basal domains and the internalization of basolateral FPN. Considerable FPN was also found in apical domains. In Caco-2 cells, the apical-to-basal movement of cyan fluorescent protein-tagged DMT1 was complete 90 min after the addition of iron. Steady-state membrane localization studies in Caco-2 cells revealed that iron status determined the apical/basolateral membrane distribution of DMT1 and FPN. In agreement with the membrane distribution of the transporters, (55)Fe flux experiments revealed inward and outward iron fluxes at both membrane domains. Antisense oligonucleotides targeted to DMT1 or FPN inhibited basolateral iron uptake and apical iron efflux, respectively, indicating the participation of DMT1 and FPN in these fluxes. The fluxes were regulated by the iron supply; increased iron reduced apical uptake and basal efflux and increased basal uptake and apical efflux. These findings suggest a novel mechanism of regulation of intestinal iron absorption based on inward and outward fluxes at both membrane domains, and repositioning of DMT1 and FPN between membrane and intracellular compartments as a function of iron supply. This mechanism should be complementary to those based in the transcriptional or translational regulation of iron transport proteins.

  13. Model cell membranes: Techniques to form complex biomimetic supported lipid bilayers via vesicle fusion

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, Gregory J.; Nayak, Rahul

    2013-01-01

    Vesicle fusion has long provided an easy and reliable method to form supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) from simple, zwitterionic vesicles on siliceous substrates. However, for complex compositions, such as vesicles with high cholesterol content and multiple lipid types, the energy barrier for the vesicle-to-bilayer transition is increased or the required vesicle-vesicle and vesicle-substrate interactions are insufficient for vesicle fusion. Thus, for vesicle compositions that more accurately mimic native membranes, vesicle fusion often fails to form SLBs. In this paper, we review three approaches to overcome these barriers to form complex, biomimetic SLBs via vesicle fusion: (i) optimization of experimental conditions (e.g., temperature, buffer ionic strength, osmotic stress, cation valency, and buffer pH), (ii) α-helical (AH) peptide-induced vesicle fusion, and (iii) bilayer edge-induced vesicle fusion. AH peptide-induced vesicle fusion can form complex SLBs on multiple substrate types without the use of additional equipment. Bilayer edge-induced vesicle fusion uses microfluidics to form SLBs from vesicles with complex composition, including vesicles derived from native cell membranes. Collectively, this review introduces vesicle fusion techniques that can be generalized for many biomimetic vesicle compositions and many substrate types, and thus will aid efforts to reliably create complex SLB platforms on a range of substrates. PMID:24031164

  14. Membrane damage-induced vesicle–vesicle fusion of dysferlin-containing vesicles in muscle cells requires microtubules and kinesin

    PubMed Central

    McDade, Joel R.; Michele, Daniel E.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the dysferlin gene resulting in dysferlin-deficiency lead to limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2B and Myoshi myopathy in humans. Dysferlin has been proposed as a critical regulator of vesicle-mediated membrane resealing in muscle fibers, and localizes to muscle fiber wounds following sarcolemma damage. Studies in fibroblasts and urchin eggs suggest that trafficking and fusion of intracellular vesicles with the plasma membrane during resealing requires the intracellular cytoskeleton. However, the contribution of dysferlin-containing vesicles to resealing in muscle and the role of the cytoskeleton in regulating dysferlin-containing vesicle biology is unclear. Here, we use live-cell imaging to examine the behavior of dysferlin-containing vesicles following cellular wounding in muscle cells and examine the role of microtubules and kinesin in dysferlin-containing vesicle behavior following wounding. Our data indicate that dysferlin-containing vesicles move along microtubules via the kinesin motor KIF5B in muscle cells. Membrane wounding induces dysferlin-containing vesicle–vesicle fusion and the formation of extremely large cytoplasmic vesicles, and this response depends on both microtubules and functional KIF5B. In non-muscle cell types, lysosomes are critical mediators of membrane resealing, and our data indicate that dysferlin-containing vesicles are capable of fusing with lysosomes following wounding which may contribute to formation of large wound sealing vesicles in muscle cells. Overall, our data provide mechanistic evidence that microtubule-based transport of dysferlin-containing vesicles may be critical for resealing, and highlight a critical role for dysferlin-containing vesicle–vesicle and vesicle–organelle fusion in response to wounding in muscle cells. PMID:24203699

  15. Outer membrane vesicle production by Escherichia coli is independent of membrane instability.

    PubMed

    McBroom, Amanda J; Johnson, Alexandra P; Vemulapalli, Sreekanth; Kuehn, Meta J

    2006-08-01

    It has been long noted that gram-negative bacteria produce outer membrane vesicles, and recent data demonstrate that vesicles released by pathogenic strains can transmit virulence factors to host cells. However, the mechanism of vesicle release has remained undetermined. This genetic study addresses whether these structures are merely a result of membrane instability or are formed by a more directed process. To elucidate the regulatory mechanisms and physiological basis of vesiculation, we conducted a screen in Escherichia coli to identify gene disruptions that caused vesicle over- or underproduction. Only a few low-vesiculation mutants and no null mutants were recovered, suggesting that vesiculation may be a fundamental characteristic of gram-negative bacterial growth. Gene disruptions were identified that caused differences in vesicle production ranging from a 5-fold decrease to a 200-fold increase relative to wild-type levels. These disruptions included loci governing outer membrane components and peptidoglycan synthesis as well as the sigma(E) cell envelope stress response. Mutations causing vesicle overproduction did not result in upregulation of the ompC gene encoding a major outer membrane protein. Detergent sensitivity, leakiness, and growth characteristics of the novel vesiculation mutant strains did not correlate with vesiculation levels, demonstrating that vesicle production is not predictive of envelope instability.

  16. Vesicle trafficking and membrane remodelling in cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    Neto, Hélia; Collins, Louise L; Gould, Gwyn W

    2011-07-01

    All cells complete cell division by the process of cytokinesis. At the end of mitosis, eukaryotic cells accurately mark the site of division between the replicated genetic material and assemble a contractile ring comprised of myosin II, actin filaments and other proteins, which is attached to the plasma membrane. The myosin-actin interaction drives constriction of the contractile ring, forming a cleavage furrow (the so-called 'purse-string' model of cytokinesis). After furrowing is completed, the cells remain attached by a thin cytoplasmic bridge, filled with two anti-parallel arrays of microtubules with their plus-ends interdigitating in the midbody region. The cell then assembles the abscission machinery required for cleavage of the intercellular bridge, and so forms two genetically identical daughter cells. We now know much of the molecular detail of cytokinesis, including a list of potential genes/proteins involved, analysis of the function of some of these proteins, and the temporal order of their arrival at the cleavage site. Such studies reveal that membrane trafficking and/or remodelling appears to play crucial roles in both furrowing and abscission. In the present review, we assess studies of vesicular trafficking during cytokinesis, discuss the role of the lipid components of the plasma membrane and endosomes and their role in cytokinesis, and describe some novel molecules implicated in cytokinesis. The present review covers experiments performed mainly on tissue culture cells. We will end by considering how this mechanistic insight may be related to cytokinesis in other systems, and how other forms of cytokinesis may utilize similar aspects of the same machinery.

  17. Synaptobrevin transmembrane domain influences exocytosis by perturbing vesicle membrane curvature.

    PubMed

    Chang, Che-Wei; Jackson, Meyer B

    2015-07-07

    Membrane fusion requires that nearly flat lipid bilayers deform into shapes with very high curvature. This makes membrane bending a critical force in determining fusion mechanisms. A lipid bilayer will bend spontaneously when material is distributed asymmetrically between its two monolayers, and its spontaneous curvature (C0) will influence the stability of curved fusion intermediates. Prior work on Ca(2+)-triggered exocytosis revealed that fusion pore lifetime (τ) varies with vesicle content (Q), and showed that this relation reflects membrane bending energetics. Lipids that alter C0 change the dependence of τ on Q. These results suggested that the greater stability of an initial exocytotic fusion pore associated with larger vesicles reflects the need to bend more membrane during fusion pore dilation. In this study, we explored the possibility of manipulating C0 by mutating the transmembrane domain (TMD) of the vesicle membrane protein synaptobrevin 2 (syb2). Amperometric measurements of exocytosis in mouse chromaffin cells revealed that syb2 TMD mutations altered the relation between τ and Q. The effects of these mutations showed a striking periodicity, changing sign as the structural perturbation moved through the inner and outer leaflets. Some glycine and charge mutations also influenced the dependence of τ on Q in a manner consistent with expected changes in C0. These results suggest that side chains in the syb2 TMD influence the kinetics of exocytosis by perturbing the packing of the surrounding lipids. The present results support the view that membrane bending occurs during fusion pore expansion rather than during fusion pore formation. This supports the view of an initial fusion pore through two relatively flat membranes formed by protein. Copyright © 2015 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Inside-out membrane vesicles isolated from spinach thylakoids.

    PubMed

    Andersson, B; Akerlund, H E

    1978-09-07

    Inside-out thylakoid vesicles have been separated from right-side-out material after press disruption of chloroplast lamellae. The sepration was obtained by partitionin an aqueous dextran-polyethylene glycol two-phase system, a method which utilizes differences in surface properties for separation of membrane particles. The isolated thylakoid vesicles showed the following inside-out properties: (1) light-induced reversible proton extrusion into the surrounding medium when supplied with the Photosystem II electron acceptor phenyl-p-benzoquinone; (2) a pH rise in the internal phase accompanying the external proton release, (3) sensitivity to trypsin treatment different from that of thylakoid membranes of normal orientation; (4) concave EF and convex PF freeze-fracture faces.

  19. Viscous instabilities of raft in vesicles or cell membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Amar, Martine

    2004-11-01

    Raft domains (ordered-liquid patch) on biological membranes or artificial vesicles are modelled as viscous blobs able to move in the membrane. These rafts show various in-plane and out-of-plane instabilities when proteins are added to the membrane. Here we consider the case of lipoproteins which act on the cholesterol of the rafts. Once added to the membrane, the experiment show that the size of the raft decreases while a border instability is observed, reminiscent of the suction mechanism of viscous blob observed in Hele-Shaw cell. I show that a model of suction of an inhomogeneous bilayer described as a viscous sheet plunged into a bath of water (following the Saffman model of the membrane) explained conveniently the experimental results of Angelova et al.

  20. Corneal endothelial cells possess an elaborate multipolar shape to maximize the basolateral to apical membrane area

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Theresa A.; He, Zhiguo; Boggs, Kristin; Thuret, Gilles; Liu, Hong-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The corneal endothelium is widely believed to consist of geometrically regular cells interconnected by junctional complexes. However, while en face visualization of the endothelial apical surface reveals characteristic polygonal borders, the overall form of the component cells has rarely been observed. Methods To visualize the shape of individual endothelial cells within the native monolayer, two independent Cre/LoxP-based cell labeling approaches were used. In the first, a P0-Cre mouse driver strain was bred to an R26-tdTomato reporter line to map neural crest–derived endothelial cells with cytosolic red fluorescent protein. In the second, HPRT-Cre induction of small numbers of green and red fluorescent protein–filled cells within a background of unlabeled cells was achieved using a dual-color reporter system, mosaic analysis with double markers (MADM). Selective imaging of the endothelial lateral membranes at different apicobasal levels was accomplished after staining with antibodies to ZO-1 and the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM). Results When viewed in their entirety in whole-mount preparations, fluorescent protein–filled cells appear star-shaped, extending multiple dendritic processes that radiate outward in the plane of the monolayer. Examination of rare cases where cells expressing different fluorescent proteins lie directly adjacent to one another reveals that these long processes undergo extensive interdigitation. The resulting overlap allows individual cells to extend over a greater area than if the cell boundaries were mutually exclusive. Anti-NCAM staining of these interlocking peripheral cell extensions reveals an elaborate system of lateral membrane folds that, when viewed in optical sections, increase in complexity from the apical to the basal pole. This not only produces a substantial increase in the basolateral, relative to the apical, membrane but also greatly extends the paracellular pathway as a highly convoluted space

  1. Corneal endothelial cells possess an elaborate multipolar shape to maximize the basolateral to apical membrane area.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Theresa A; He, Zhiguo; Boggs, Kristin; Thuret, Gilles; Liu, Hong-Xiang; Defoe, Dennis M

    2016-01-01

    The corneal endothelium is widely believed to consist of geometrically regular cells interconnected by junctional complexes. However, while en face visualization of the endothelial apical surface reveals characteristic polygonal borders, the overall form of the component cells has rarely been observed. To visualize the shape of individual endothelial cells within the native monolayer, two independent Cre/LoxP-based cell labeling approaches were used. In the first, a P0-Cre mouse driver strain was bred to an R26-tdTomato reporter line to map neural crest-derived endothelial cells with cytosolic red fluorescent protein. In the second, HPRT-Cre induction of small numbers of green and red fluorescent protein-filled cells within a background of unlabeled cells was achieved using a dual-color reporter system, mosaic analysis with double markers (MADM). Selective imaging of the endothelial lateral membranes at different apicobasal levels was accomplished after staining with antibodies to ZO-1 and the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM). When viewed in their entirety in whole-mount preparations, fluorescent protein-filled cells appear star-shaped, extending multiple dendritic processes that radiate outward in the plane of the monolayer. Examination of rare cases where cells expressing different fluorescent proteins lie directly adjacent to one another reveals that these long processes undergo extensive interdigitation. The resulting overlap allows individual cells to extend over a greater area than if the cell boundaries were mutually exclusive. Anti-NCAM staining of these interlocking peripheral cell extensions reveals an elaborate system of lateral membrane folds that, when viewed in optical sections, increase in complexity from the apical to the basal pole. This not only produces a substantial increase in the basolateral, relative to the apical, membrane but also greatly extends the paracellular pathway as a highly convoluted space. Our analysis indicates that, far

  2. Origin of life: LUCA and extracellular membrane vesicles (EMVs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, S.; Forterre, P.

    2016-01-01

    Cells from the three domains of life produce extracellular membrane vesicles (EMVs), suggesting that EMV production is an important aspect of cellular physiology. EMVs have been implicated in many aspects of cellular life in all domains, including stress response, toxicity against competing strains, pathogenicity, detoxification and resistance against viral attack. These EMVs represent an important mode of inter-cellular communication by serving as vehicles for transfer of DNA, RNA, proteins and lipids between cells. Here, we review recent progress in the understanding of EMV biology and their various roles. We focus on the role of membrane vesicles in early cellular evolution and how they would have helped shape the nature of the last universal common ancestor. A membrane-protected micro-environment would have been a key to the survival of spontaneous molecular systems and efficient metabolic reactions. Interestingly, the morphology of EMVs is strongly reminiscent of the morphology of some virions. It is thus tempting to make a link between the origin of the first protocell via the formation of vesicles and the origin of viruses.

  3. Phosphate transport in membrane vesicles from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Konings, W N; Rosenberg, H

    1978-04-04

    Escherichia coli strain AN710 possesses only the PIT system for phosphate transport. Membrane vesicles from this strain, which contain phosphate internally, perform exchange and active transport of phosphate. The energy for active transport is supplied by the respiratory chain with ascorbate phenazine methosulphate as electron donor. To a lesser extent also the oxidation of D-lactate energizes phosphate transport; the oxidation of succinate is only marginally effective. Phosphate transport is driven by the proton-motive force and in particular by the pH gradient across the membrane. This view is supported by the observation that phosphate transport is stimulated by valinomycin, inhibited by nigericin and abolished by the uncoupler carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone. Neither inhibitor affects phosphate exchange. The phosphate analogue arsenate inhibits both the exchange reaction and active transport. Both processes are stimulated by K+ and Mg2+, the highest activities being observed with both ions present. Membrane vesicles have also been isolated from Escherichia coli K10, a strain which possesses only a functional PST phosphate transport system. These vesicles perform neither exchange nor active transport of phosphate, although active transport of amino acids is observed in the presence of ascorbate-phenazine methosulphate or D-lactate.

  4. Absorption of surfactants by membranes: erythrocytes versus synthetic vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Binford, J S; Palm, W H

    1994-01-01

    Three surfactants (chlorpromazine hydrochloride, thioridazine hydrochloride, and sodium deoxycholate) are found to absorb just as strongly into the protein-containing membranes of erythrocytes as into the phospholipid bilayers of synthetic vesicles. In the concentration region where hemolysis occurs and the Langmuir adsorption isotherm is no longer valid, one may use a phase partition model in which the erythrocyte membrane is one of the phases. The partition coefficients, expressed as the ratio of mole fraction surfactant in the membrane lipid phase to concentration of surfactant in the aqueous phase, have been calculated at the point of saturation in the erythrocyte membrane. These values are Ky = 430 M-1 (chlorpromazine, pH 5.9), 550 M-1 (deoxycholate, pH 7.6), and 640 M-1 (thioridazine, pH 5.9), in isotonic buffer at 27 degrees C. Corresponding values for synthetic vesicles made from dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine are Kx = 230 M-1 (chlorpromazine, 0.12 M buffer/KCl pH 5.9), 440 M-1 (deoxycholate, 0.20 M buffer/NaCl pH 8.0) and 510 M-1 (thioridazine, 0.12 M buffer/KCl pH 5.9), at 27 degrees C. It appears that the surfactants become an integral part of the bilayer in both vesicles and natural membranes and that the absorption is not of a peripheral nature. There is no evidence that the presence of proteins in the natural membrane inhibits the absorption of these surfactants in any way. PMID:8075335

  5. Direct determination of the driving forces for taurocholate uptake into rat liver plasma membrane vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, M C; Blitzer, B L; Boyer, J L

    1983-01-01

    To determine directly the driving forces for bile acid entry into the hepatocyte, the uptake of [3H]taurocholic acid into rat liver plasma membrane vesicles was studied. The membrane preparation contained predominantly right-side-out vesicles, and was highly enriched in plasma membrane marker enzymes. The uptake of taurocholate at equilibrium was inversely related to medium osmolarity, indicating transport into an osmotically sensitive space. In the presence of an inwardly directed sodium gradient (NaCl or sodium gluconate), the initial rate of uptake was rapid and taurocholate was transiently accumulated at a concentration twice that at equilibrium (overshoot). Other inwardly directed cation gradients (K+, Li+, choline+) or the presence of sodium in the absence of a gradient (Na+ equilibrated) resulted in a slower initial uptake rate and did not sustain an overshoot. Bile acids inhibited sodium-dependent taurocholate uptake, whereas bromsulphthalein inhibited both sodium-dependent and sodium-independent uptake and D-glucose had no effect on uptake. Uptake was temperature dependent, with maximal overshoots occurring at 25 degrees C. Imposition of a proton gradient across the vesicle (pHo less than pHi) in the absence of a sodium gradient failed to enhance taurocholate uptake, indicating that double ion exchange (Na+-H+, OH- -anion) is unlikely. Creation of a negative intravesicular potential by altering accompanying anions or by valinomycin-induced K+-diffusion potentials did not enhance taurocholate uptake, suggesting an electroneutral transport mechanism. The kinetics of taurocholate uptake demonstrated saturability with a Michaelis constant at 52 microM and maximum velocity of 4.5 nmol X mg-1 X protein X min-1. These studies provide definitive evidence for a sodium gradient-dependent, carrier-mediated, electrically neutral transport mechanism for hepatic taurocholate uptake. These findings are consistent with a model for bile secretion in which the basolateral

  6. Protective role of E. coli outer membrane vesicles against antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Heramb M; Nagaraj, R; Jagannadham, Medicharla V

    2015-12-01

    The outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) from bacteria are known to posses both defensive and protective functions and thus participate in community related functions. In the present study, outer membrane vesicles have been shown to protect the producer bacterium and two other bacterial species from the growth inhibitory effects of some antibiotics. The OMVs isolated from E. coli MG1655 protected the bacteria against membrane-active antibiotics colistin, melittin. The OMVs of E. coli MG1655 could also protect P. aeruginosa NCTC6751 and A. radiodioresistens MMC5 against these membrane-active antibiotics. However, OMVs could not protect any of these bacteria against the other antibiotics ciprofloxacin, streptomycin and trimethoprim. Hence, OMVs appears to protect the bacterial community against membrane-active antibiotics and not other antibiotics, which have different mechanism of actions. The OMVs of E. coli MG1655 sequester the antibiotic colistin, whereas their protein components degrade the antimicrobial peptide melittin. Proteomic analysis of OMVs revealed the presence of proteases and peptidases which appear to be involved in this process. Thus, the protection of bacteria by OMVs against antibiotics is situation dependent and the mechanism differs for different situations. These studies suggest that OMVs of bacteria form a common defense for the bacterial community against specific antibiotics.

  7. Numerical computations of the dynamics of fluidic membranes and vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, John W.; Garcke, Harald; Nürnberg, Robert

    2015-11-01

    Vesicles and many biological membranes are made of two monolayers of lipid molecules and form closed lipid bilayers. The dynamical behavior of vesicles is very complex and a variety of forms and shapes appear. Lipid bilayers can be considered as a surface fluid and hence the governing equations for the evolution include the surface (Navier-)Stokes equations, which in particular take the membrane viscosity into account. The evolution is driven by forces stemming from the curvature elasticity of the membrane. In addition, the surface fluid equations are coupled to bulk (Navier-)Stokes equations. We introduce a parametric finite-element method to solve this complex free boundary problem and present the first three-dimensional numerical computations based on the full (Navier-)Stokes system for several different scenarios. For example, the effects of the membrane viscosity, spontaneous curvature, and area difference elasticity (ADE) are studied. In particular, it turns out, that even in the case of no viscosity contrast between the bulk fluids, the tank treading to tumbling transition can be obtained by increasing the membrane viscosity. Besides the classical tank treading and tumbling motions, another mode (called the transition mode in this paper, but originally called the vacillating-breathing mode and subsequently also called trembling, transition, and swinging mode) separating these classical modes appears and is studied by us numerically. We also study how features of equilibrium shapes in the ADE and spontaneous curvature models, like budding behavior or starfish forms, behave in a shear flow.

  8. Structural Basis of Vesicle Formation at the Inner Nuclear Membrane.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Christoph; Dent, Kyle C; Zeev-Ben-Mordehai, Tzviya; Grange, Michael; Bosse, Jens B; Whittle, Cathy; Klupp, Barbara G; Siebert, C Alistair; Vasishtan, Daven; Bäuerlein, Felix J B; Cheleski, Juliana; Werner, Stephan; Guttmann, Peter; Rehbein, Stefan; Henzler, Katja; Demmerle, Justin; Adler, Barbara; Koszinowski, Ulrich; Schermelleh, Lothar; Schneider, Gerd; Enquist, Lynn W; Plitzko, Jürgen M; Mettenleiter, Thomas C; Grünewald, Kay

    2015-12-17

    Vesicular nucleo-cytoplasmic transport is becoming recognized as a general cellular mechanism for translocation of large cargoes across the nuclear envelope. Cargo is recruited, enveloped at the inner nuclear membrane (INM), and delivered by membrane fusion at the outer nuclear membrane. To understand the structural underpinning for this trafficking, we investigated nuclear egress of progeny herpesvirus capsids where capsid envelopment is mediated by two viral proteins, forming the nuclear egress complex (NEC). Using a multi-modal imaging approach, we visualized the NEC in situ forming coated vesicles of defined size. Cellular electron cryo-tomography revealed a protein layer showing two distinct hexagonal lattices at its membrane-proximal and membrane-distant faces, respectively. NEC coat architecture was determined by combining this information with integrative modeling using small-angle X-ray scattering data. The molecular arrangement of the NEC establishes the basic mechanism for budding and scission of tailored vesicles at the INM. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Electrophysiological investigation of microdissected gastric glands of bullfrog. II. Basolateral membrane properties in the presence of histamine.

    PubMed

    Coppola, S; Caroppo, R; Frömter, E

    1994-12-01

    Following the technical approach described in the preceding publication we have investigated if, and how, stimulation of gastric HCl secretion affects the basolateral ion transport properties of oxyntopeptic cells of Rana catesbeiana stomach. To this end microdissected gastric glands were punctured with conventional or H(+)-sensitive glass microelectrodes and the effects of changing bath ion concentrations on the cell membrane potential (Vb) and cell pH (pHi) were determined. Except for a transient alkalinization, histamine (0.5 mmol/l) did not significantly affect Vb or pHi. The latter averaged 7.18 +/- 0.03 (mean +/- SEM, n = 5) under resting conditions (0.1 mmol/l cimetidine) and 7.21 +/- 0.07 (n = 5) in the presence of histamine. In addition, neither the initial velocity nor the final steady-state value of the cell alkalinization following a 10:1 reduction of bath Cl- concentration changed in the presence of histamine, and the same holds true for the cell acidification following a 10:1 reduction of bath HCO3- concentration. These observations indicate that the basolateral Cl-/HCO3- exchanger was not stimulated by histamine, and that no other base transporters were activated. By contrast, the Vb response to elevation of bath K+ concentration decreased, and so did the initial depolarizing Vb response to bath Cl- substitution, while the secondary hyperpolarizing response increased. The latter observations are compatible with the notion that stimulation by histamine reduced a pH-insensitive part of the basolateral K+ conductance and reduced also the basolateral Cl- conductance.

  10. LPS Remodeling Triggers Formation of Outer Membrane Vesicles in Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Elhenawy, Wael; Bording-Jorgensen, Michael; Valguarnera, Ezequiel; Haurat, M Florencia; Wine, Eytan; Feldman, Mario F

    2016-07-12

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMV) are proposed to mediate multiple functions during pathogenesis and symbiosis. However, the mechanisms responsible for OMV formation remain poorly understood. It has been shown in eukaryotic membranes that lipids with an inverted-cone shape favor the formation of positive membrane curvatures. Based on these studies, we formulated the hypothesis that lipid A deacylation might impose shape modifications that result in the curvature of the outer membrane (OM) and subsequent OMV formation. We tested the effect of lipid A remodeling on OMV biogenesis employing Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium as a model organism. Expression of the lipid A deacylase PagL resulted in increased vesiculation, without inducing an envelope stress response. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed profound differences in the patterns of lipid A in OM and OMV, with accumulation of deacylated lipid A forms exclusively in OMV. OMV biogenesis by intracellular bacteria upon macrophage infection was drastically reduced in a pagL mutant strain. We propose a novel mechanism for OMV biogenesis requiring lipid A deacylation in the context of a multifactorial process that involves the orchestrated remodeling of the outer membrane. The role of lipid remodeling in vesiculation is well documented in eukaryotes. Similarly, bacteria produce membrane-derived vesicles; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying their production are yet to be determined. In this work, we investigated the role of outer membrane remodeling in OMV biogenesis in S Typhimurium. We showed that the expression of the lipid A deacylase PagL results in overvesiculation with deacylated lipid A accumulation exclusively in OMV. An S Typhimurium ΔpagL strain showed a significant reduction in intracellular OMV secretion relative to the wild-type strain. Our results suggest a novel mechanism for OMV biogenesis that involves outer membrane remodeling through lipid A modification. Understanding how OMV are

  11. A chloride channel at the basolateral membrane of the distal-convoluted tubule: a candidate ClC-K channel.

    PubMed

    Lourdel, Stéphane; Paulais, Marc; Marvao, Pedro; Nissant, Antoine; Teulon, Jacques

    2003-04-01

    The distal-convoluted tubule (DCT) of the kidney absorbs NaCl mainly via an Na+-Cl- cotransporter located at the apical membrane, and Na+, K+ ATPase at the basolateral side. Cl- transport across the basolateral membrane is thought to be conductive, but the corresponding channels have not yet been characterized. In the present study, we investigated Cl- channels on microdissected mouse DCTs using the patch-clamp technique. A channel of approximately 9 pS was found in 50% of cell-attached patches showing anionic selectivity. The NPo in cell-attached patches was not modified when tubules were preincubated in the presence of 10-5 M forskolin, but the channel was inhibited by phorbol ester (10-6 M). In addition, NPo was significantly elevated when the calcium in the pipette was increased from 0 to 5 mM (NPo increased threefold), or pH increased from 6.4 to 8.0 (NPo increased 15-fold). Selectivity experiments conducted on inside-out patches showed that the Na+ to Cl- relative permeability was 0.09, and the anion selectivity sequence Cl(-)--I(-) > Br(-)--NO3(-) > F(-). Intracellular NPPB (10-4 M) and DPC (10-3 M) blocked the channel by 65% and 80%, respectively. The channel was inhibited at acid intracellular pH, but intracellular ATP and PKA had no effect. ClC-K Cl- channels are characterized by their sensitivity to the external calcium and to pH. Since immunohistochemical data indicates that ClC-K2, and perhaps ClC-K1, are present on the DCT basolateral membrane, we suggest that the channel detected in this study may belong to this subfamily of the ClC channel family.

  12. Active transport of calcium in Neurospora plasma membrane vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Stroobant, P; Scarborough, G A

    1979-01-01

    Functionally inverted plasma membrane vesicles isolated from the eukaryotic microorganism Neurospora crassa catalyze Mg2+/ATP-dependent Ca2+ uptake. Inhibitors induced efflux studies and isotope-exchange experiments indicate that the Ca2+ is accumulated inside the vesicles against a concentration gradient of about 40-fold, and that the majority of the transported Ca2+ is present essentially in free solution. Comparisons of Mg2+/ATP-driven 45Ca2+ uptake and [14C]SCN-uptake with respect to the Mg2+/ATP concentration dependence, the effects of inhibitors, and the nucleotide and divalent cation specificities indicate that the energy for Ca2+ accumulation is derived from ATP hydrolysis catalyzed by the electrogenic plasma membrane ATPase. Energized Ca2+ uptake is stimulated by the permeant anion SCN- to a degree that varies reciprocally with the ability of this anion to dissipate the membrane potential, and is inhibited by K+ in the presence of nigericin. All of these data point to the conclusion that the active transport of Ca2+ across the Neurospora plasma membrane takes place via a Ca2+/H+ antiporter, which functions to pump Ca2+ out of the intact cell. PMID:40223

  13. Pretransitional effects in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine vesicle membranes: optical dynamometry study.

    PubMed Central

    Dimova, R; Pouligny, B; Dietrich, C

    2000-01-01

    We used micron-sized latex spheres to probe the phase state and the viscoelastic properties of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayers as a function of temperature. One or two particles were manipulated and stuck to a DMPC giant vesicle by means of an optical trap. Above the fluid-gel main transition temperature, T(m) congruent with 23.4 degrees C, the particles could move on the surface of the vesicle, spontaneously (Brownian motion) or driven by an external force, either gravity or the laser beam's radiation pressure. From the analysis of the particle motions, we deduced the values of the membrane hydrodynamic shear viscosity, eta(s), and found that it would increase considerably near T(m). Below T(m), the long-distance motion of the particles was blocked. We performed experiments with two particles stuck on the membrane. By optical dynamometry, we measured the elastic resistance of the membrane to a variation in the interparticle distance and found that it would decrease considerably (down to zero) when the temperature was increased to T(m). We propose an interpretation relating the elastic response to the membrane curvature modulus, k(C). In this scheme, the two-bead dynamometry experiments provide a direct measurement of k(C) in the P'(beta) phase of lipid bilayers. PMID:10866960

  14. Use of inside-out chloroplast thylakoid membrane vesicles for studying electron transport and membrane structure

    SciTech Connect

    Atta-Asafo-Adjei, E.

    1987-01-01

    Inside-out and right-side-out thylakoid vesicles were isolated from spinach chloroplasts by aqueous-polymer two-phase partitioning following mechanical fragmentation of thylakoid membranes by Yeda press treatment. Externally added plastocyanin stimulated the whole-chain and PSI electron transport rates in the inside-out thylakoid vesicles by about 500 and 350%, respectively, compared to about 50% stimulation for both assays in the fraction enriched in right-side-out vesicles. The electron transport between PSII and PSI in inside-out thylakoid vesicles appears to be interrupted due to plastocyanin release from the thylakoids by the Yeda press treatment, but it was restored by externally added plastocyanin. Acetic anhydride chemical modification and uncoupler-induced proton release from dark-adapted membranes are probes for detecting the sequested proton domains in thylakoid membranes. Both assays were used to find out if inside-out membranes retain metastable, localized proton binding domains. Treatment of dark-maintained inside-out thylakoid membrane vesicles with ({sup 3}H)acetic anhydride showed no uncoupler-induced increase in acetylation of the 33, 24, and 18 kDa polypeptides of the oxygen-evolving-complex, indicating complete loss of the implicated proton domains in these polypeptides. The various steps in the inside-out preparation were studied to discern which steps(s) leads to the loss of the metastable domain proton pool.

  15. Binding of E. coli heat-stable enterotoxin to rat intestinal brush borders and to basolateral membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Guarino, A.; Cohen, M.B.; Overmann, G.; Thompson, M.R.; Giannella, R.A.

    1987-09-01

    We studied the binding of E. coli heat-stable enterotoxin (STa) to rat brush borders (BB) and to basolateral membranes (BLM) using a biologically active monoiodinated radioligand (( /sup 125/I)STa) and highly enriched BB and BLM preparations free of other significant organelle contamination. Binding of (/sup 125/I)STa to BB was specific; time-, temperature-, and pH-dependent; saturable; and partially reversible. Nonlabeled toxin competitively inhibited the binding of radioligand to BB in a dose-related manner. Scatchard analysis revealed a single class of receptors with an apparent affinity constant of 8.7 +/- 1.5 X 10(8) l/mol. Binding was not affected by amino acids, sugars, and lectins. Proteolytic enzymes significantly decreased binding, although several did so by modifying the radioligand. Trypsin inhibited binding without modifying the radioligand thus supporting the proteinaceous nature of the receptor. Since the enrichment in binding activity in the BB over the homogenate was significantly lower than the enrichment in sucrase activity, we concluded that binding activity is probably associated with other membranous domains, but direct examination revealed no binding activity on basolateral membranes.

  16. Purinergic receptor signaling at the basolateral membrane of macula densa cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruisheng; Bell, P Darwin; Peti-Peterdi, Janos; Kovacs, Gergly; Johansson, Alf; Persson, A Erik G

    2002-05-01

    Purinergic receptors are important in the regulation of renal hemodynamics; therefore, this study sought to determine if such receptors influence macula densa cell function. Isolated glomeruli containing macula densa cells, with and without the cortical thick ascending limb, were loaded with the Ca(2+) sensitive indicators, Fura Red (confocal microscopy) or fura 2 (conventional video image analysis). Studies were performed on an inverted microscope in a chamber with a flow-through perfusion system. Changes in cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) from exposed macula densa plaques were assessed upon addition of adenosine, ATP, UTP, ADP, or 2-methylthio-ATP (2- MeS-ATP) for 2 min added to the bathing solution. There was no change in [Ca(2+)](i) with addition of adenosine (10(-7) to 10(-3) M). UTP and ATP (10(-4) M) caused [Ca(2+)](i) to increase by 268 +/- 40 nM (n = 21) and 295 +/- 53 nM (n = 21), respectively, whereas in response to 2MesATP and ADP, [Ca(2+)](i) increased by only 67 +/- 13 nM (n = 8) and 93 +/- 36 nM (n = 14), respectively. Dose response curve for ATP (10(-7) to 10(-3) M) added in bath showed an EC(50) of 15 microM. No effect on macula densa [Ca(2+)](i) was seen when ATP was added from the lumen. ATP caused similar increases in macula densa [Ca(2+)](i) in the presence or absence of bath Ca(2+) and addition of 5 mM ethyleneglycotetraacetic acid (EGTA). Suramin (an antagonist of P2X and P2Y receptors) completely inhibited ATP-induced [Ca(2+)](i) dynamics. Also, ATP-Ca(2+) responsiveness was prevented by the phospholipase C inhibitor, U-73122, but not by its inactive analog, U-73343. These results suggest that macula densa cells possess P2Y(2) purinergic receptors on basolateral but not apical membranes and that activation of these receptors results in the mobilization of Ca(2+).

  17. Calcium and proton transport in membrane vesicles from barley roots

    SciTech Connect

    DuPont, F.M.; Windle, J.J. ); Bush, D.S.; Jones, R.L. )

    1990-09-01

    Ca{sup 2+} uptake by membrane fractions from barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv CM72) roots was characterized. Uptake of {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} was measured in membrane vesicles obtained from continuous and discontinuous sucrose gradients. A single, large peak of Ca{sup 2+} uptake coincided with the peak of proton transport by the tonoplast H{sup +}-ATPase. Depending on the concentration of Ca{sup 2+} in the assay, Ca{sup 2+} uptake was inhibited 50 to 75% by those combinations of ionophores and solutes that eliminated the pH gradient and membrane potential. However, 25 to 50% of the Ca{sup 2+} uptake in the tonoplast-enriched fraction was not sensitive to ionophores but was inhibited by vanadate. The results suggest that {sup 45}Ca uptake was driven by the low affinity, high capacity tonoplast Ca{sup 2+}/nH{sup +} antiporter and also by a high affinity, lower capacity Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase. The Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase may be associated with tonoplast, Golgi or contaminating vesicles of unknown origin. No Ca{sup 2+} transport was specifically associated with the distinct peak of endoplasmic reticulum that was identified by NADH cytochrome c reductase, choline phosphotransferase, and dolichol-P-mannosyl synthase activities. A small shoulder of Ca{sup 2+} uptake in the plasma membrane region of the gradient was inhibited by vanadate and erythrosin B and may represent the activity of a separate plasma membrane Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase. Vesicle volumes were estimated using electron spin resonance techniques, and intravesicular Ca{sup 2+} concentrations were estimated to be as high as 5 millimolar. ATP-driven uptake of Ca{sup 2+} created 800- to 2,000-fold concentration gradients within minutes. Problems in interpreting the effects of Ca{sup 2+} on ATP-generated pH gradients are discussed and the suggestion is made that Ca{sup 2+} dissipates pH gradients by a different mechanism than is responsible for Ca{sup 2+} uptake into tonoplast vesicles.

  18. Bacterial Outer Membrane Vesicles Induce Plant Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Bahar, Ofir; Mordukhovich, Gideon; Luu, Dee Dee; Schwessinger, Benjamin; Daudi, Arsalan; Jehle, Anna Kristina; Felix, Georg; Ronald, Pamela C

    2016-05-01

    Gram-negative bacteria continuously pinch off portions of their outer membrane, releasing membrane vesicles. These outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are involved in multiple processes including cell-to-cell communication, biofilm formation, stress tolerance, horizontal gene transfer, and virulence. OMVs are also known modulators of the mammalian immune response. Despite the well-documented role of OMVs in mammalian-bacterial communication, their interaction with plants is not well studied. To examine whether OMVs of plant pathogens modulate the plant immune response, we purified OMVs from four different plant pathogens and used them to treat Arabidopsis thaliana. OMVs rapidly induced a reactive oxygen species burst, medium alkalinization, and defense gene expression in A. thaliana leaf discs, cell cultures, and seedlings, respectively. Western blot analysis revealed that EF-Tu is present in OMVs and that it serves as an elicitor of the plant immune response in this form. Our results further show that the immune coreceptors BAK1 and SOBIR1 mediate OMV perception and response. Taken together, our results demonstrate that plants can detect and respond to OMV-associated molecules by activation of their immune system, revealing a new facet of plant-bacterial interactions.

  19. Comparative Analysis of Membrane Vesicles from Three Piscirickettsia salmonis Isolates Reveals Differences in Vesicle Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Tandberg, Julia I.; Lagos, Leidy X.; Langlete, Petter; Berger, Eva; Rishovd, Anne-Lise; Roos, Norbert; Varkey, Deepa; Paulsen, Ian T.; Winther-Larsen, Hanne C.

    2016-01-01

    Membrane vesicles (MVs) are spherical particles naturally released from the membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. Bacterial MV production is associated with a range of phenotypes including biofilm formation, horizontal gene transfer, toxin delivery, modulation of host immune responses and virulence. This study reports comparative profiling of MVs from bacterial strains isolated from three widely disperse geographical areas. Mass spectrometry identified 119, 159 and 142 proteins in MVs from three different strains of Piscirickettsia salmonis isolated from salmonids in Chile (LF-89), Norway (NVI 5692) and Canada (NVI 5892), respectively. MV comparison revealed several strain-specific differences related to higher virulence capability for LF-89 MVs, both in vivo and in vitro, and stronger similarities between the NVI 5692 and NVI 5892 MV proteome. The MVs were similar in size and appearance as analyzed by electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. The MVs from all three strains were internalized by both commercial and primary immune cell cultures, which suggest a potential role of the MVs in the bacterium’s utilization of leukocytes. When MVs were injected into an adult zebrafish infection model, an upregulation of several pro-inflammatory genes were observed in spleen and kidney, indicating a modulating effect on the immune system. The present study is the first comparative analysis of P. salmonis derived MVs, highlighting strain-specific vesicle characteristics. The results further illustrate that the MV proteome from one bacterial strain is not representative of all bacterial strains within one species. PMID:27764198

  20. Bacterial outer membrane vesicles suppress tumor by interferon-γ-mediated antitumor response.

    PubMed

    Kim, Oh Youn; Park, Hyun Taek; Dinh, Nhung Thi Hong; Choi, Seng Jin; Lee, Jaewook; Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Seung-Woo; Gho, Yong Song

    2017-09-20

    Gram-negative bacteria actively secrete outer membrane vesicles, spherical nano-meter-sized proteolipids enriched with outer membrane proteins, to the surroundings. Outer membrane vesicles have gained wide interests as non-living complex vaccines or delivery vehicles. However, no study has used outer membrane vesicles in treating cancer thus far. Here we investigate the potential of bacterial outer membrane vesicles as therapeutic agents to treat cancer via immunotherapy. Our results show remarkable capability of bacterial outer membrane vesicles to effectively induce long-term antitumor immune responses that can fully eradicate established tumors without notable adverse effects. Moreover, systematically administered bacterial outer membrane vesicles specifically target and accumulate in the tumor tissue, and subsequently induce the production of antitumor cytokines CXCL10 and interferon-γ. This antitumor effect is interferon-γ dependent, as interferon-γ-deficient mice could not induce such outer membrane vesicle-mediated immune response. Together, our results herein demonstrate the potential of bacterial outer membrane vesicles as effective immunotherapeutic agent that can treat various cancers without apparent adverse effects.Bacterial outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) contain immunogens but no study has yet examined their potential in treating cancer. Here, the authors demonstrate that OMVs can suppress established tumours and prevent tumour metastasis by an interferon-γ mediated antitumor response.

  1. AFM visualization of cortical filaments/network under cell-bound membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaojun; Tang, Qisheng; Wu, Li; Huang, Jie; Chen, Yong

    2015-10-01

    While circulating/plasma membrane vesicles have been extensively characterized, due to the lack of effective methods cell-bound membrane vesicles are poorly understood including their shape and correlation with the intracellular cytoskeleton. In this study, we focused on cell-bound membrane vesicles and individual vesicle-derived pits on endothelial cells by using confocal microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). For the first time, we found that cell-bound membrane vesicles are hemisphere-shaped and that the actin cortical filaments/network lies at the cytosolic opening of a vesicle instead of being closely attached to the inner side of the vesicle membrane. This structure of cell-bound membrane vesicles may be beneficial to their movement in, or release from, the plasma membrane of cells due to less membrane-cytoskeleton coupling to be broken therefore probably minimizing energy consumption and time usage. Further study indicates that TNF-α activation induced a significant increase in average number/size of cell-bound vesicles and the local disruption of the actin network at the cytosolic opening of cell-bound vesicles. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Orientation of membrane probes in giant unilamellar vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greeson, Jennifer N.; Raphael, Robert M.

    2005-03-01

    Many biological processes are accompanied by changes in the orientation of membrane-embedded molecules. Fluorescence polarization microscopy (FPM) is an optical technique that can be used to determine how the transition dipole of a fluorophore is oriented with respect to the membrane and therefore may detect these changes. The FPM experimental setup is essentially an anisotropy measurement executed on a microscope. A linear polarizer is placed in both the excitation and emission light paths of an inverted microscope, and images are taken with the polarizers parallel or orthogonal. Intensity measurements are recorded at regions on the sample and compared with theoretical predictions to validate a model of dye orientation. We have applied FPM to determine the orientation of 1,2-Dioleoyl-sn-Glycero-3-Phosphoethanolamine-N-(Lissamine Rhodamine B Sulfonyl) (PE-rhodamine) in pure 1-Stearoyl-2-Oleoyl-sn-Glycero-3-Phosphocholine (SOPC) giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs). Vesicles are widely used as model membranes, and GUVs are particularly useful as cellular models because of their large diameter size (~10-40 μm). A model for membrane dye orientation follows theory developed previously and indicates that PE-rhodamine molecules orient at ~31° with respect to the membrane. A computational routine was developed to minimize deviations between predicted and experimental results. We have also applied FPM to study the orientation of 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI) in GUVs. Preliminary results indicate that DiI is oriented at ~23°.

  3. SULFATE/BICARBONATE ANTIPORT BY LOBSTER HEPATOPANCREATIC BASOLATERAL MEMBRANE VESICLES. (R823068)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  4. SULFATE-OXALATE EXCHANGE IN LOBSTER HEPATOPANCRETIC BASOLATERAL MEMBRANE VESICLES. (R823068)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  5. SULFATE/BICARBONATE ANTIPORT BY LOBSTER HEPATOPANCREATIC BASOLATERAL MEMBRANE VESICLES. (R823068)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  6. SULFATE-OXALATE EXCHANGE IN LOBSTER HEPATOPANCRETIC BASOLATERAL MEMBRANE VESICLES. (R823068)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  7. The outer membrane vesicles: Secretion system type zero.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Mandujano, Andrea; Hernández-Cortez, Cecilia; Ibarra, Jose Antonio; Castro-Escarpulli, Graciela

    2017-07-01

    Gram-negative bacteria have mechanisms through which they can colonize and survive in different environments, such as the secretion systems types (1-6) that have been widely studied and characterized. Nowadays, some authors have proposed extracellular structures, such as the outer membrane vesicles (OMVs), to be considered as an additional and independent secretion system. The OMVs are spherical particles of 50-250 nm in diameter; they originate in the outer membrane, and therefore they have a very similar composition to the latter. These particles can transport an important variety of biomolecules: enzymes, toxins, antigenic determinants and even nucleic acids. Thus, it is of great interest to collect data describing the advantages of the transport of biomolecules through the OMVs and, thus, determine their role as a potential secretion system. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Association of Extracellular Membrane Vesicles with Cutaneous Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Than, Uyen Thi Trang; Guanzon, Dominic; Leavesley, David; Parker, Tony

    2017-05-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are membrane-enclosed vesicles that are released into the extracellular environment by various cell types, which can be classified as apoptotic bodies, microvesicles and exosomes. EVs have been shown to carry DNA, small RNAs, proteins and membrane lipids which are derived from the parental cells. Recently, several studies have demonstrated that EVs can regulate many biological processes, such as cancer progression, the immune response, cell proliferation, cell migration and blood vessel tube formation. This regulation is achieved through the release and transport of EVs and the transfer of their parental cell-derived molecular cargo to recipient cells. This thereby influences various physiological and sometimes pathological functions within the target cells. While intensive investigation of EVs has focused on pathological processes, the involvement of EVs in normal wound healing is less clear; however, recent preliminarily investigations have produced some initial insights. This review will provide an overview of EVs and discuss the current literature regarding the role of EVs in wound healing, especially, their influence on coagulation, cell proliferation, migration, angiogenesis, collagen production and extracellular matrix remodelling.

  9. LPS Remodeling Triggers Formation of Outer Membrane Vesicles in Salmonella

    PubMed Central

    Elhenawy, Wael; Bording-Jorgensen, Michael; Valguarnera, Ezequiel; Haurat, M. Florencia; Wine, Eytan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Outer membrane vesicles (OMV) are proposed to mediate multiple functions during pathogenesis and symbiosis. However, the mechanisms responsible for OMV formation remain poorly understood. It has been shown in eukaryotic membranes that lipids with an inverted-cone shape favor the formation of positive membrane curvatures. Based on these studies, we formulated the hypothesis that lipid A deacylation might impose shape modifications that result in the curvature of the outer membrane (OM) and subsequent OMV formation. We tested the effect of lipid A remodeling on OMV biogenesis employing Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium as a model organism. Expression of the lipid A deacylase PagL resulted in increased vesiculation, without inducing an envelope stress response. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed profound differences in the patterns of lipid A in OM and OMV, with accumulation of deacylated lipid A forms exclusively in OMV. OMV biogenesis by intracellular bacteria upon macrophage infection was drastically reduced in a pagL mutant strain. We propose a novel mechanism for OMV biogenesis requiring lipid A deacylation in the context of a multifactorial process that involves the orchestrated remodeling of the outer membrane. PMID:27406567

  10. Outer membrane vesicles of Tannerella forsythia: biogenesis, composition, and virulence.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, V; Gruber, C; Nimeth, I; Pabinger, S; Sekot, G; Posch, G; Altmann, F; Messner, P; Andrukhov, O; Schäffer, C

    2015-12-01

    Tannerella forsythia is the only 'red-complex' bacterium covered by an S-layer, which has been shown to affect virulence. Here, outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) enriched with putative glycoproteins are described as a new addition to the virulence repertoire of T. forsythia. Investigations of this bacterium are hampered by its fastidious growth requirements and the recently discovered mismatch of the available genome sequence (92A2 = ATCC BAA-2717) and the widely used T. forsythia strain (ATCC 43037). T. forsythia was grown anaerobically in serum-free medium and biogenesis of OMVs was analyzed by electron and atomic force microscopy. This revealed OMVs with a mean diameter of ~100 nm budding off from the outer membrane while retaining the S-layer. An LC-ESI-TOF/TOF proteomic analysis of OMVs from three independent biological replicates identified 175 proteins. Of these, 14 exhibited a C-terminal outer membrane translocation signal that directs them to the cell/vesicle surface, 61 and 53 were localized to the outer membrane and periplasm, respectively, 22 were predicted to be extracellular, and 39 to originate from the cytoplasm. Eighty proteins contained the Bacteroidales O-glycosylation motif, 18 of which were confirmed as glycoproteins. Release of pro-inflammatory mediators from the human monocytic cell line U937 and periodontal ligament fibroblasts upon stimulation with OMVs followed a concentration-dependent increase that was more pronounced in the presence of soluble CD14 in conditioned media. The inflammatory response was significantly higher than that caused by whole T. forsythia cells. Our study represents the first characterization of T. forsythia OMVs, their proteomic composition and immunogenic potential. © 2015 The Authors Molecular Oral Microbiology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Indirect coupling of urate and p-aminohippurate transport to sodium in human brush-border membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Roch-Ramel, F; Guisan, B; Schild, L

    1996-01-01

    [14C]urate and p-[14C]aminohippurate (PAH) uptake by human brush-border membrane vesicles (BBMV) were measured in the presence of an inwardly oriented sodium gradient. No direct sodium cotransport was observed. Indirect [14C]urate coupling to sodium transport was demonstrated by cis-stimulation of [14C]urate with nicotinate or pyrazinoate (PZA) in the extravesicular medium but not by adding lactate, alpha-ketoglutarate, or beta-hydroxybutyrate. Indirect sodium coupling of [14C]PAH uptake was observed only when alpha-ketoglutarate was added to the extravesicular medium, a mechanism similar to that of basolateral membranes. The ability for PZA (and nicotinate) to cis-stimulate urate uptake was correlated with a high apparent affinity for the urate/anion exchanger. In urate-loaded vesicles, for identical medium concentrations, [14C]PZA uptake via the urateanion exchanger was 10 times higher than [14C]lactate uptake. Such high PZA affinity for the urate exchanger, working in parallel with PZA sodium cotransport can account for the stimulation of urate reabsorption by PZA in vivo.

  12. Studying Factors Involved in Biogenesis of Lysobacter sp. XL1 Outer Membrane Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Kudryakova, I V; Suzina, N E; Vinokurova, N G; Shishkova, N A; Vasilyeva, N V

    2017-04-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Lysobacter sp. XL1 produces outer membrane vesicles that are heterogeneous in size, density, and protein composition. One of the subpopulations is secretory vesicles for lytic protease L5 of Lysobacter sp. XL1 (Kudryakova et al. (2015) FEMS Microbiol. Lett., 362, fnv137). Protein L5 was assumed to influence biogenesis of these secretory vesicles that contain it. Using a Pseudomonas fluorescens Q2-87/B expression system, it was shown that the recombinant L5 protein may act as a factor of vesicle biogenesis. This points to a possible involvement of L5 protein in Lysobacter sp. XL1 vesicle biogenesis. Furthermore, it was established that the main phospholipid of Lysobacter sp. XL1 vesicles is cardiolipin, and vesicles are formed predominantly of outer membrane regions enriched with this phospholipid. This indicates that cardiolipin participates in biogenesis of all vesicle subpopulations in Lysobacter sp. XL1.

  13. Binding and Fusion of Extracellular Vesicles to the Plasma Membrane of Their Cell Targets.

    PubMed

    Prada, Ilaria; Meldolesi, Jacopo

    2016-08-09

    Exosomes and ectosomes, extracellular vesicles of two types generated by all cells at multivesicular bodies and the plasma membrane, respectively, play critical roles in physiology and pathology. A key mechanism of their function, analogous for both types of vesicles, is the fusion of their membrane to the plasma membrane of specific target cells, followed by discharge to the cytoplasm of their luminal cargo containing proteins, RNAs, and DNA. Here we summarize the present knowledge about the interactions, binding and fusions of vesicles with the cell plasma membrane. The sequence initiates with dynamic interactions, during which vesicles roll over the plasma membrane, followed by the binding of specific membrane proteins to their cell receptors. Membrane binding is then converted rapidly into fusion by mechanisms analogous to those of retroviruses. Specifically, proteins of the extracellular vesicle membranes are structurally rearranged, and their hydrophobic sequences insert into the target cell plasma membrane which undergoes lipid reorganization, protein restructuring and membrane dimpling. Single fusions are not the only process of vesicle/cell interactions. Upon intracellular reassembly of their luminal cargoes, vesicles can be regenerated, released and fused horizontally to other target cells. Fusions of extracellular vesicles are relevant also for specific therapy processes, now intensely investigated.

  14. Continuous Microfluidic Fabrication of Synthetic Asymmetric Vesicles for Membrane Biology Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Li; Schertzer, Jeffrey; Chiarot, Paul

    2015-11-01

    Membrane vesicles are spherical structures comprised of a single lipid bilayer enclosing an aqueous lumen. In nature, vesicles carry out many important functions in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms. When preparing vesicles artificially, it is difficult to simultaneously control vesicle membrane asymmetry, size, unilamellarity, throughput, and monodispersity. Membrane asymmetry, where each leaflet of the lipid bilayer consists of a different lipid distribution, is of particular importance as it is a feature of nearly all natural membranes. In this study, we report on a novel microfluidic strategy to build monodisperse asymmetric vesicles with customized membrane composition, size, and luminal content at high-throughput. The microfluidic device consists of a triangular post region and two flow-focusing regions. The major steps of the vesicle fabrication process include: (1) assembly of the inner-leaflet, (2) continuous flow separation - replacing the inner-leaflet-lipid with the outer-leaflet-lipid, (3) assembly of the outer-leaflet, and (4) extraction of the intermediate oil layer. Membrane asymmetry and unilamellarity are confirmed using a fluorescence quenching assay and a membrane protein insertion assay, respectively. Our vesicle fabrication method can yield membrane asymmetries as high as 95%, which is maintained at a high-degree for over 30 hours. In addition, over 80% of the vesicles remain stable for at least 6 weeks. The effect of bilayer composition on the mechanical properties of the membrane and the role of small molecules on membrane architecture will be investigated.

  15. DNA Inversion Regulates Outer Membrane Vesicle Production in Bacteroides fragilis

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama-Imaohji, Haruyuki; Hirota, Katsuhiko; Yamasaki, Hisashi; Yoneda, Saori; Nariya, Hirofumi; Suzuki, Motoo; Secher, Thomas; Miyake, Yoichiro; Oswald, Eric; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Kuwahara, Tomomi

    2016-01-01

    Phase changes in Bacteroides fragilis, a member of the human colonic microbiota, mediate variations in a vast array of cell surface molecules, such as capsular polysaccharides and outer membrane proteins through DNA inversion. The results of the present study show that outer membrane vesicle (OMV) formation in this anaerobe is also controlled by DNA inversions at two distantly localized promoters, IVp-I and IVp-II that are associated with extracellular polysaccharide biosynthesis and the expression of outer membrane proteins. These promoter inversions are mediated by a single tyrosine recombinase encoded by BF2766 (orthologous to tsr19 in strain NCTC9343) in B. fragilis YCH46, which is located near IVp-I. A series of BF2766 mutants were constructed in which the two promoters were locked in different configurations (IVp-I/IVp-II = ON/ON, OFF/OFF, ON/OFF or OFF/ON). ON/ON B. fragilis mutants exhibited hypervesiculating, whereas the other mutants formed only a trace amount of OMVs. The hypervesiculating ON/ON mutants showed higher resistance to treatment with bile, LL-37, and human β-defensin 2. Incubation of wild-type cells with 5% bile increased the population of cells with the ON/ON genotype. These results indicate that B. fragilis regulates the formation of OMVs through DNA inversions at two distantly related promoter regions in response to membrane stress, although the mechanism underlying the interplay between the two regions controlled by the invertible promoters remains unknown. PMID:26859882

  16. DNA Inversion Regulates Outer Membrane Vesicle Production in Bacteroides fragilis.

    PubMed

    Nakayama-Imaohji, Haruyuki; Hirota, Katsuhiko; Yamasaki, Hisashi; Yoneda, Saori; Nariya, Hirofumi; Suzuki, Motoo; Secher, Thomas; Miyake, Yoichiro; Oswald, Eric; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Kuwahara, Tomomi

    2016-01-01

    Phase changes in Bacteroides fragilis, a member of the human colonic microbiota, mediate variations in a vast array of cell surface molecules, such as capsular polysaccharides and outer membrane proteins through DNA inversion. The results of the present study show that outer membrane vesicle (OMV) formation in this anaerobe is also controlled by DNA inversions at two distantly localized promoters, IVp-I and IVp-II that are associated with extracellular polysaccharide biosynthesis and the expression of outer membrane proteins. These promoter inversions are mediated by a single tyrosine recombinase encoded by BF2766 (orthologous to tsr19 in strain NCTC9343) in B. fragilis YCH46, which is located near IVp-I. A series of BF2766 mutants were constructed in which the two promoters were locked in different configurations (IVp-I/IVp-II = ON/ON, OFF/OFF, ON/OFF or OFF/ON). ON/ON B. fragilis mutants exhibited hypervesiculating, whereas the other mutants formed only a trace amount of OMVs. The hypervesiculating ON/ON mutants showed higher resistance to treatment with bile, LL-37, and human β-defensin 2. Incubation of wild-type cells with 5% bile increased the population of cells with the ON/ON genotype. These results indicate that B. fragilis regulates the formation of OMVs through DNA inversions at two distantly related promoter regions in response to membrane stress, although the mechanism underlying the interplay between the two regions controlled by the invertible promoters remains unknown.

  17. Origin and characterization of small membranous vesicles present in the venom of Crotalus durissus terrificus.

    PubMed

    Souza-Imberg, Andréia; Carneiro, Sylvia Mendes; Giannotti, Karina Cristina; Sant'Anna, Sávio Stefanini; Yamanouye, Norma

    2017-09-15

    Small membranous vesicles are small closed fragments of membrane. They are released from multivesicular bodies (exosomes) or shed from the surface membrane (microvesicles). They contains various bioactive molecules and their molecular composition varies depending on their cellular origin. Small membranous vesicles have been identified in snake venoms, but the origin of these small membranous vesicles in the venom is controversial. The aim of this study was to verify the origin of the small membranous vesicles in venom of Crotalus durissus terrificus by morphological analyses using electron microscopy. In addition, the protein composition of the vesicles was analyzed by using a proteome approach. The small membranous vesicles present in the venom were microvesicles, since they originated from microvilli on the apical membrane of secretory cells. They contained cytoplasmic proteins, and proteins from the plasma membrane, endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and Golgi membrane. The release of microvesicles may be a mechanism to control the size of the cell membrane of the secretory cells after intense exocytosis. Microvesicle components that may have a role in envenoming include ecto-5'-nucleotidase, a cell membrane protein that releases adenosine, and aminopeptidase N, a cell membrane protein that may modulate the action of many peptides. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Cell-sized asymmetric lipid vesicles facilitate the investigation of asymmetric membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiya, Koki; Kawano, Ryuji; Osaki, Toshihisa; Akiyoshi, Kazunari; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2016-09-01

    Asymmetric lipid giant vesicles have been used to model the biochemical reactions in cell membranes. However, methods for producing asymmetric giant vesicles lead to the inclusion of an organic solvent layer that affects the mechanical and physical characteristics of the membrane. Here we describe the formation of asymmetric giant vesicles that include little organic solvent, and use them to investigate the dynamic responses of lipid molecules in the vesicle membrane. We formed the giant vesicles via the inhomogeneous break-up of a lipid microtube generated by applying a jet flow to an asymmetric planar lipid bilayer. The asymmetric giant vesicles showed a lipid flip-flop behaviour in the membrane, superficially similar to the lipid flip-flop activity observed in apoptotic cells. In vitro synthesis of membrane proteins into the asymmetric giant vesicles revealed that the lipid asymmetry in bilayer membranes improves the reconstitution ratio of membrane proteins. Our asymmetric giant vesicles will be useful in elucidating lipid-lipid and lipid-membrane protein interactions involved in the regulation of cellular functions.

  19. Cell-sized asymmetric lipid vesicles facilitate the investigation of asymmetric membranes.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Koki; Kawano, Ryuji; Osaki, Toshihisa; Akiyoshi, Kazunari; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2016-09-01

    Asymmetric lipid giant vesicles have been used to model the biochemical reactions in cell membranes. However, methods for producing asymmetric giant vesicles lead to the inclusion of an organic solvent layer that affects the mechanical and physical characteristics of the membrane. Here we describe the formation of asymmetric giant vesicles that include little organic solvent, and use them to investigate the dynamic responses of lipid molecules in the vesicle membrane. We formed the giant vesicles via the inhomogeneous break-up of a lipid microtube generated by applying a jet flow to an asymmetric planar lipid bilayer. The asymmetric giant vesicles showed a lipid flip-flop behaviour in the membrane, superficially similar to the lipid flip-flop activity observed in apoptotic cells. In vitro synthesis of membrane proteins into the asymmetric giant vesicles revealed that the lipid asymmetry in bilayer membranes improves the reconstitution ratio of membrane proteins. Our asymmetric giant vesicles will be useful in elucidating lipid-lipid and lipid-membrane protein interactions involved in the regulation of cellular functions.

  20. Matching kinetics of synaptic vesicle recycling and enhanced neurotransmitter influx by Ca2+ in brain plasma membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Kovács, I; Szárics, E; Nyitrai, G; Blandl, T; Kardos, J

    1998-11-01

    Using native plasma membrane vesicle suspensions from the rat cerebral cortex under conditions designed to alter intravesicular [Ca2+], we found that Ca2+ induced 47 +/- 5% more influx of [3H]GABA, [3H]D-aspartate and [3H]glycine at 37 degrees C with half-times 1.7 +/- 0.5, 1.3 +/- 0.4 and 1.3 +/- 0.4 min, respectively. We labelled GABA transporter sites with the uptake inhibitor, [3H]-(R,S)-N-[4,4-bis(3-methyl-2-thienyl)but-3-en-1-yl]nipecotic acid and found that Ca2+ induced a partial dissociation of the bound inhibitor from GABA transporter sites with a similar half-time. By means of rapid kinetic techniques applied to native plasma membrane vesicle suspensions, containing synaptic vesicles stained with the amphipathic fluorescent styryl membrane probe N-(3-triethylammoniumpropyl)-4-[4-(dibutylamino)styryl]pyrid inium dibromide, we have measured the progress of the release and reuptake of synaptic vesicles in response to Ca2+ and high-[K+] depolarization in the 0.0004-100 s range of time. Synaptic vesicle exocytosis, strongly influenced by external [Ca2+], appeared with the kinetics accelerated by depolarization. These results are consistent with the potential involvement of Ca2+ in taking low-affinity transporters to the plasma membrane surface via exocytosis.

  1. Outer membrane vesicle: a macromolecule with multifunctional activity.

    PubMed

    Moshiri, Arfa; Dashtbani-Roozbehani, Abolfazl; Najar Peerayeh, Shahin; Siadat, Seyed Davar

    2012-07-01

    Nowadays adjuvants are extensively used as immuno-stimulatory and immuno-modulatory compounds as components of subunit and combination vaccine formulations. The adjuvants of microbial origin are more frequently used among currently used licensed or experimental adjuvants. The outer membrane vesicle (OMV) of Neisseria meningitidis is among the newly studied components of microbial origin, which could be applied as an adjuvant. Although the potency of OMV as a carrier (conjugated to a hapten) is now proven, the adjuvant properties of OMV have particular significance as a potential target for protective immunity. Since it has immune-stimulatory activity, OMV has been utilized in vaccine development. This commentary reviews the different applications of OMV as potential adjuvant in the field of vaccine development.

  2. Membrane vesicles released by Avibacterium paragallinarum contain putative virulence factors.

    PubMed

    Ramón Rocha, Marcela O; García-González, Octavio; Pérez-Méndez, Alma; Ibarra-Caballero, Jorge; Pérez-Márquez, Victor M; Vaca, Sergio; Negrete-Abascal, Erasmo

    2006-04-01

    Avibacterium paragallinarum, the causative agent of infectious coryza, releases extracellular membrane vesicles (MVs), containing immunogenic proteins, proteases, putative RTX proteins, haemagglutinin, and nucleic acids, into the medium. MVs ranging 50-300 nm in diameter were observed by electron microscopy. They contained immunogenic proteins in the range of 20-160 kDa, detected using vaccinated or experimentally infected chicken sera raised against Av. paragallinarum, but not in pooled sera from specific pathogen-free chickens. Proteolytic activity was not detected in MVs through zymograms; however, immune recognition of high molecular mass bands was observed by Western blotting using an antiprotease serum against Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 1 purified protease, suggesting its presence. MVs agglutinated glutaraldehyde-fixed chicken red blood cells indicating the presence of haemagglutinating antigens. Nucleic acids were also detected inside MVs. Avibacterium paragallinarum releases MVs containing putative virulence factors, which could be important in the pathogenesis of infectious coryza.

  3. Membrane vesicles: A simplified system for studying auxin transport

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, M.H.M.

    1989-01-01

    Indoleacetic acid (IAA), the auxin responsible for regulation of growth, is transported polarly in plants. Several different models have been suggested to account for IAA transport by cells and its accumulation by membrane vesicles. One model sees diffusion of IAA driven by a pH gradient. The anion of a lipophilic weak acid like IAA or butyrate accumulates in an alkaline compartment in accord with the size of the pH gradient The accumulation of IAA may be diminished by the permeability of its lipophilic anion. This anion leak may be blocked by NPA. With anion efflux blocked, a gradient of two pH units would support an IAA accumulation of less than 50-fold at equilibrium (2) Another model sees diffusion of IAA in parallel with a saturable symport (IAA[sup [minus

  4. Detection of outer membrane vesicles in Synechocystis PCC 6803

    PubMed Central

    Pardo, Yehudah A.; Florez, Catalina; Baker, Kristopher M.; Schertzer, Jeffrey W.; Mahler, Gretchen J.

    2015-01-01

    It has been well established that many species of Gram-negative bacteria release nanoscale outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) during normal growth. Furthermore, the roles of these structures in heterotrophic bacteria have been extensively characterized. However, little is known about the existence or function of OMVs in photoautotrophs. In the present study, we report for the first time the production of OMVs by the model photosynthetic organism Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, a species of biotechnological importance. We detected extracellular proteins and lipids in cell-free supernatants derived from Synechocystis culture, yet the cytoplasmic and thylakoid membrane markers NADH oxidase and chlorophyll were absent. This indicated that the extracellular proteins and lipids derived from the outer membrane, and not from cell lysis. Furthermore, we identified spherical structures within the expected size range of OMVs in Synechocystis culture using scanning electron microscopy. Taken together, these results suggest that the repertoire of Gram-negative bacteria that are known to produce OMVs may be expanded to include Synechocystis PCC6803. Because of the considerable genetic characterization of Synechocystis in particular, our discovery has the potential to support novel biotechnological applications as well. PMID:26363014

  5. Spheres of influence: Porphyromonas gingivalis outer membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Gui, M J; Dashper, S G; Slakeski, N; Chen, Y-Y; Reynolds, E C

    2016-10-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are asymmetrical single bilayer membranous nanostructures produced by Gram-negative bacteria important for bacterial interaction with the environment. Porphyromonas gingivalis, a keystone pathogen associated with chronic periodontitis, produces OMVs that act as a virulence factor secretion system contributing to its pathogenicity. Despite their biological importance, the mechanisms of OMV biogenesis have not been fully elucidated. The ~14 times more curvature of the OMV membrane than cell outer membrane (OM) indicates that OMV biogenesis requires energy expenditure for significant curvature of the OMV membrane. In P. gingivalis, we propose that this may be achieved by upregulating the production of certain inner or outer leaflet lipids, which causes localized outward curvature of the OM. This results in selection of anionic lipopolysaccharide (A-LPS) and associated C-terminal domain (CTD) -family proteins on the outer surface due to their ability to accommodate the curvature. Deacylation of A-LPS may further enable increased curvature leading to OMV formation. Porphyromonas gingivalis OMVs that are selectively enriched in CTD-family proteins, largely the gingipains, can support bacterial coaggregation, promote biofilm development and act as an intercessor for the transport of non-motile bacteria by motile bacteria. The P. gingivalis OMVs are also believed to contribute to host interaction and colonization, evasion of immune defense mechanisms, and destruction of periodontal tissues. They may be crucial for both micro- and macronutrient capture, especially heme and probably other assimilable compounds for its own benefit and that of the wider biofilm community. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Unique Lipid Chemistry of Synaptic Vesicle and Synaptosome Membrane Revealed Using Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Kenneth T; Maddipati, Krishna R; Naik, Akshata R; Jena, Bhanu P

    2017-03-02

    Synaptic vesicles measuring 30-50 nm in diameter containing neurotransmitters either completely collapse at the presynaptic membrane or dock and transiently fuse at the base of specialized 15 nm cup-shaped lipoprotein structures called porosomes at the presynaptic membrane of synaptosomes to release neurotransmitters. Recent study reports the unique composition of major lipids associated with neuronal porosomes. Given that lipids greatly influence the association and functions of membrane proteins, differences in lipid composition of synaptic vesicle and the synaptosome membrane was hypothesized. To test this hypothesis, the lipidome of isolated synaptosome, synaptosome membrane, and synaptic vesicle preparation were determined by using mass spectrometry in the current study. Results from the study demonstrate the enriched presence of triacyl glycerols and sphingomyelins in synaptic vesicles, as opposed to the enriched presence of phospholipids in the synaptosome membrane fraction, reflecting on the tight regulation of nerve cells in compartmentalization of membrane lipids at the nerve terminal.

  7. Actin dynamics provides membrane tension to merge fusing vesicles into the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Peter J.; Grenklo, Staffan; Arpino, Gianvito; Tan, Xinyu; Liao, Hsien-Shun; Heureaux, Johanna; Peng, Shi-Yong; Chiang, Hsueh-Cheng; Hamid, Edaeni; Zhao, Wei-Dong; Shin, Wonchul; Näreoja, Tuomas; Evergren, Emma; Jin, Yinghui; Karlsson, Roger; Ebert, Steven N.; Jin, Albert; Liu, Allen P.; Shupliakov, Oleg; Wu, Ling-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Vesicle fusion is executed via formation of an Ω-shaped structure (Ω-profile), followed by closure (kiss-and-run) or merging of the Ω-profile into the plasma membrane (full fusion). Although Ω-profile closure limits release but recycles vesicles economically, Ω-profile merging facilitates release but couples to classical endocytosis for recycling. Despite its crucial role in determining exocytosis/endocytosis modes, how Ω-profile merging is mediated is poorly understood in endocrine cells and neurons containing small ∼30–300 nm vesicles. Here, using confocal and super-resolution STED imaging, force measurements, pharmacology and gene knockout, we show that dynamic assembly of filamentous actin, involving ATP hydrolysis, N-WASP and formin, mediates Ω-profile merging by providing sufficient plasma membrane tension to shrink the Ω-profile in neuroendocrine chromaffin cells containing ∼300 nm vesicles. Actin-directed compounds also induce Ω-profile accumulation at lamprey synaptic active zones, suggesting that actin may mediate Ω-profile merging at synapses. These results uncover molecular and biophysical mechanisms underlying Ω-profile merging. PMID:27576662

  8. Polarized delivery of viral glycoproteins to the apical and basolateral plasma membranes of Madin-Darby canine kidney cells infected with temperature-sensitive viruses

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    The intracellular route followed by viral envelope glycoproteins in polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney cells was studied by using temperature-sensitive mutants of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and influenza, in which, at the nonpermissive temperature (39.5 degrees C), the newly synthesized glycoproteins (G proteins) and hemagglutinin (HA), respectively, are not transported out of the endoplasmic reticulum. After infection with VSV and incubation at 39.5 degrees C for 4-5 h, synchronous transfer of G protein to the plasma membrane was initiated by shifting to the permissive temperature (32.5 degrees C). Immunoelectron microscopy showed that under these conditions the protein moved to the Golgi apparatus and from there directly to a region of the lateral plasma membrane near this organelle. G protein then seemed to diffuse progressively to basal regions of the cell surface and, only after it had accumulated in the basolateral domain, it began to appear on the apical surface near the intercellular junctions. The results of these experiments indicate that the VSV G protein must be sorted before its arrival at the cell surface, and suggest that passage to the apical domain occurs only late in infection when tight junctions are no longer an effective barrier. In complementary experiments, using the temperature-sensitive mutant of influenza, cultures were first shifted from the nonpermissive temperature (39.5 degrees C) to 18.5 degrees C, to allow entrance of the glycoprotein into the Golgi apparatus (see Matlin, K.S., and K. Simons, 1983, Cell, 34:233-243). Under these conditions HA accumulated in Golgi stacks and vesicles but did not reach the plasma membrane. When the temperature was subsequently shifted to 32.5 degrees C, HA rapidly appeared in discrete regions of the apical surface near, and often directly above, the Golgi elements, and later diffused throughout this surface. To ensure that the anti-HA antibodies had access to lateral domains, monolayers were

  9. Immunogenicity of Pasteurella multocida and Mannheimia haemolytica outer membrane vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Roier, Sandro; Fenninger, Judith C.; Leitner, Deborah R.; Rechberger, Gerald N.; Reidl, Joachim; Schild, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida is able to cause disease in humans and in a wide range of animal hosts, including fowl cholera in birds, atrophic rhinitis in pigs, and snuffles in rabbits. Together with Mannheimia haemolytica, P. multocida also represents a major bacterial causative agent of bovine respiratory disease (BRD), which is one of the most important causes for economic losses for the cattle backgrounding and feedlot industry. Commercially available vaccines only partially prevent infections caused by P. multocida and M. haemolytica. Thus, this study characterized the immunogenicity of P. multocida and M. haemolytica outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) upon intranasal immunization of BALB/c mice. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) revealed that OMVs derived from P. multocida or M. haemolytica are able to induce robust humoral and mucosal immune responses against the respective donor strain. In addition, also significant cross-immunogenic potential was observed for both OMV types. Colonization studies showed that a potential protective immune response against P. multocida is not only achieved by immunization with P. multocida OMVs, but also by immunization with OMVs derived from M. haemolytica. Immunoblot and immunoprecipitation analyses demonstrated that M. haemolytica OMVs induce a more complex immune response compared to P. multocida OMVs. The outer membrane proteins OmpA, OmpH, and P6 were identified as the three major immunogenic proteins of P. multocida OMVs. Amongst others, the serotype 1-specific antigen, an uncharacterized outer membrane protein, as well as the outer membrane proteins P2 and OmpA were found to be the most important antigens of M. haemolytica OMVs. These findings are useful for the future development of broad-spectrum OMV based vaccines against BRD and other infections caused by P. multocida or M. haemolytica. PMID:23731905

  10. Selective flow-induced vesicle rupture to sort by membrane mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pommella, Angelo; Brooks, Nicholas J.; Seddon, John M.; Garbin, Valeria

    2015-08-01

    Vesicle and cell rupture caused by large viscous stresses in ultrasonication is central to biomedical and bioprocessing applications. The flow-induced opening of lipid membranes can be exploited to deliver drugs into cells, or to recover products from cells, provided that it can be obtained in a controlled fashion. Here we demonstrate that differences in lipid membrane and vesicle properties can enable selective flow-induced vesicle break-up. We obtained vesicle populations with different membrane properties by using different lipids (SOPC, DOPC, or POPC) and lipid:cholesterol mixtures (SOPC:chol and DOPC:chol). We subjected vesicles to large deformations in the acoustic microstreaming flow generated by ultrasound-driven microbubbles. By simultaneously deforming vesicles with different properties in the same flow, we determined the conditions in which rupture is selective with respect to the membrane stretching elasticity. We also investigated the effect of vesicle radius and excess area on the threshold for rupture, and identified conditions for robust selectivity based solely on the mechanical properties of the membrane. Our work should enable new sorting mechanisms based on the difference in membrane composition and mechanical properties between different vesicles, capsules, or cells.

  11. The lethal cargo of Myxococcus xanthus outer membrane vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Berleman, James E.; Allen, Simon; Danielewicz, Megan A.; Remis, Jonathan P.; Gorur, Amita; Cunha, Jack; Hadi, Masood Z.; Zusman, David R.; Northen, Trent R.; Witkowska, H. Ewa; Auer, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    Myxococcus xanthus is a bacterial micro-predator known for hunting other microbes in a wolf pack-like manner. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are produced in large quantities by M. xanthus and have a highly organized structure in the extracellular milieu, sometimes occurring in chains that link neighboring cells within a biofilm. OMVs may be a vehicle for mediating wolf pack activity by delivering hydrolytic enzymes and antibiotics aimed at killing prey microbes. Here, both the protein and small molecule cargo of the OMV and membrane fractions of M. xanthus were characterized and compared. Our analysis indicates a number of proteins that are OMV-specific or OMV-enriched, including several with putative hydrolytic function. Secondary metabolite profiling of OMVs identifies 16 molecules, many associated with antibiotic activities. Several hydrolytic enzyme homologs were identified, including the protein encoded by MXAN_3564 (mepA), an M36 protease homolog. Genetic disruption of mepA leads to a significant reduction in extracellular protease activity suggesting MepA is part of the long-predicted (yet to date undetermined) extracellular protease suite of M. xanthus. PMID:25250022

  12. Protein selection and export via outer membrane vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Bonnington, K. E.; Kuehn, M. J.

    2014-01-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are constitutively produced by all Gram-negative bacteria. OMVs form when buds from the outer membrane (OM) of cells encapsulate periplasmic material and pinch off from the OM to form spheroid particles approximately 10 to 300 nm in diameter. OMVs accomplish a diversity of functional roles yet the OMV’s utility is ultimately determined by its unique composition. Inclusion into OMVs may impart a variety of benefits to the protein cargo, including: protection from proteolytic degradation, enhancement of long-distance delivery, specificity in host-cell targeting, modulation of the immune response, coordinated secretion with other bacterial effectors, and/or exposure to a unique function-promoting environment. Many enriched OMV-associated components are virulence factors, aiding in host cell destruction, immune system evasion, host cell invasion, or antibiotic resistance. Although the mechanistic details of how proteins become enriched as OMV cargo remain elusive, recent data on OM biogenesis and relationships between LPS structure and OMV-cargo inclusion rates shed light on potential models for OM organization and consequent OMV budding. In this review, mechanisms based on pre-existing OM microdomains are proposed to explain how cargo may experience differing levels of enrichment in OMVs and degrees of association with OMVs during extracellular export. PMID:24370777

  13. Protein selection and export via outer membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Bonnington, K E; Kuehn, M J

    2014-08-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are constitutively produced by all Gram-negative bacteria. OMVs form when buds from the outer membrane (OM) of cells encapsulate periplasmic material and pinch off from the OM to form spheroid particles approximately 10 to 300nm in diameter. OMVs accomplish a diversity of functional roles yet the OMV's utility is ultimately determined by its unique composition. Inclusion into OMVs may impart a variety of benefits to the protein cargo, including: protection from proteolytic degradation, enhancement of long-distance delivery, specificity in host-cell targeting, modulation of the immune response, coordinated secretion with other bacterial effectors, and/or exposure to a unique function-promoting environment. Many enriched OMV-associated components are virulence factors, aiding in host cell destruction, immune system evasion, host cell invasion, or antibiotic resistance. Although the mechanistic details of how proteins become enriched as OMV cargo remain elusive, recent data on OM biogenesis and relationships between LPS structure and OMV-cargo inclusion rates shed light on potential models for OM organization and consequent OMV budding. In this review, mechanisms based on pre-existing OM microdomains are proposed to explain how cargo may experience differing levels of enrichment in OMVs and degrees of association with OMVs during extracellular export. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Protein trafficking and secretion in bacteria. Guest Editors: Anastassios Economou and Ross Dalbey. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Membrane Vesicles: an Overlooked Component of the Matrices of Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Schooling, Sarah R.; Beveridge, Terry J.

    2006-01-01

    The matrix helps define the architecture and infrastructure of biofilms and also contributes to their resilient nature. Although many studies continue to define the properties of both gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial biofilms, there is still much to learn, especially about how structural characteristics help bridge the gap between the chemistry and physical aspects of the matrix. Here, we show that membrane vesicles (MVs), structures derived from the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria, are a common particulate feature of the matrix of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Biofilms grown using different model systems and growth conditions were shown to contain MVs when thin sectioned for transmission electron microscopy, and mechanically disrupted biofilms revealed MVs in association with intercellular material. MVs were also isolated from biofilms by employing techniques for matrix isolation and a modified MV isolation protocol. Together these observations verified the presence and frequency of MVs and indicated that MVs were a definite component of the matrix. Characterization of planktonic and biofilm-derived MVs revealed quantitative and qualitative differences between the two and indicated functional roles, such as proteolytic activity and binding of antibiotics. The ubiquity of MVs was supported by observations of biofilms from a variety of natural environments outside the laboratory and established MVs as common biofilm constituents. MVs appear to be important and relatively unacknowledged particulate components of the matrix of gram-negative or mixed bacterial biofilms. PMID:16885463

  15. Outer membrane vesicles of Pasteurella multocida contain virulence factors

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Rojas, Miguel A; Vaca, Sergio; Reyes-López, Magda; de la Garza, Mireya; Aguilar-Romero, Francisco; Zenteno, Edgar; Soriano-Vargas, Edgardo; Negrete-Abascal, Erasmo

    2014-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida (Pm) is a gram-negative bacterium able to infect different animal species, including human beings. This bacterium causes economic losses to the livestock industry because of its high morbidity and mortality in animals. In this work, we report the characterization of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) released into the culture medium by different Pm serogroups. Purified OMVs in the range of 50–300 nm were observed by electron microscopy. Serum obtained from chickens infected with Pm recognized several proteins from Pm OMVs. Additionally, rabbit antiserum directed against a secreted protease from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae recognized a similar protein in the Pm OVMs, suggesting that OMVs from these bacterial species contain common immunogenic proteins. OmpA, a multifunctional protein, was identified in OMVs from different Pm serogroups, and its concentration was twofold higher in OMVs from Pm serogroups B and D than in OMVs from other serogroups. Three outer membrane proteins were also identified: OmpH, OmpW, and transferrin-binding protein. Three bands of 65, 110, and 250 kDa with proteolytic activity were detected in Pm OMVs of serogroups A and E. Additionally, β-lactamase activity was detected only in OMVs from Pm 12945 Ampr (serogroup A). Pm OMVs may be involved in different aspects of disease pathogenesis. PMID:25065983

  16. Outer membrane vesicles of Pasteurella multocida contain virulence factors.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Rojas, Miguel A; Vaca, Sergio; Reyes-López, Magda; de la Garza, Mireya; Aguilar-Romero, Francisco; Zenteno, Edgar; Soriano-Vargas, Edgardo; Negrete-Abascal, Erasmo

    2014-10-01

    Pasteurella multocida (Pm) is a gram-negative bacterium able to infect different animal species, including human beings. This bacterium causes economic losses to the livestock industry because of its high morbidity and mortality in animals. In this work, we report the characterization of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) released into the culture medium by different Pm serogroups. Purified OMVs in the range of 50-300 nm were observed by electron microscopy. Serum obtained from chickens infected with Pm recognized several proteins from Pm OMVs. Additionally, rabbit antiserum directed against a secreted protease from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae recognized a similar protein in the Pm OVMs, suggesting that OMVs from these bacterial species contain common immunogenic proteins. OmpA, a multifunctional protein, was identified in OMVs from different Pm serogroups, and its concentration was twofold higher in OMVs from Pm serogroups B and D than in OMVs from other serogroups. Three outer membrane proteins were also identified: OmpH, OmpW, and transferrin-binding protein. Three bands of 65, 110, and 250 kDa with proteolytic activity were detected in Pm OMVs of serogroups A and E. Additionally, β-lactamase activity was detected only in OMVs from Pm 12945 Amp(r) (serogroup A). Pm OMVs may be involved in different aspects of disease pathogenesis. © 2014 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Size-dependent, stochastic nature of lipid exchange between nano-vesicles and model membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabaei, Seyed R.; Gillissen, Jurriaan J. J.; Vafaei, Setareh; Groves, Jay T.; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2016-07-01

    The interaction of nanoscale lipid vesicles with cell membranes is of fundamental importance for the design and development of vesicular drug delivery systems. Here, we introduce a novel approach to study vesicle-membrane interactions whereby we are able to probe the influence of nanoscale membrane properties on the dynamic adsorption, exchange, and detachment of vesicles. Using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy, we monitor these processes in real-time upon the electrostatically tuned attachment of individual, sub-100 nm vesicles to a supported lipid bilayer. The observed exponential vesicle detachment rate depends strongly on the vesicle size, but not on the vesicle charge, which suggests that lipid exchange occurs during a single stochastic event, which is consistent with membrane stalk formation. The fluorescence microscopy assay developed in this work may enable measuring of the probability of stalk formation in a controlled manner, which is of fundamental importance in membrane biology, offering a new tool to understand nanoscale phenomena in the context of biological sciences.The interaction of nanoscale lipid vesicles with cell membranes is of fundamental importance for the design and development of vesicular drug delivery systems. Here, we introduce a novel approach to study vesicle-membrane interactions whereby we are able to probe the influence of nanoscale membrane properties on the dynamic adsorption, exchange, and detachment of vesicles. Using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy, we monitor these processes in real-time upon the electrostatically tuned attachment of individual, sub-100 nm vesicles to a supported lipid bilayer. The observed exponential vesicle detachment rate depends strongly on the vesicle size, but not on the vesicle charge, which suggests that lipid exchange occurs during a single stochastic event, which is consistent with membrane stalk formation. The fluorescence microscopy assay developed

  18. Na/Ca exchange in the basolateral membrane of the A6 cell monolayer: role in Cai homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Brochiero, E; Raschi, C; Ehrenfeld, J

    1995-05-01

    The presence of a Na/Ca exchanger in A6 cells was investigated by measuring intracellular calcium (Cai) fluctuations and the 45Ca fluxes through the basolateral membranes (blm) of the cell monolayer. Removal of Na+ from the medium produced a transient increase in Cai followed by a regulatory phase returning Cai to control levels in 3-4 min, this phase being greatly accelerated (< 60 s) by NaCl addition (apparent Km of approximately 5 mM Na+). The Cai increase was only found with the Na(+)-free medium on the basolateral side of the cell monolayer. A twofold increase in the 45Ca influx was observed under these conditions. In Ca(2+)- depleted cells, the initial Cai increase after Ca2+ addition to the medium was greater when the putative Na/Ca exchanger was not functioning (i.e. in a Na(+)-free medium). 45Ca effluxes through the blm of the monolayer were greatly and transiently increased by a Na(+)-free medium on the serosal side and blocked by orthovanadate (1 mM). The Cai increased induced by a hypo-osmotic shock was greater in cells bathed in a Na(+)-medium, conditions expected to block the activity of the Na/Ca exchanger. These findings support the hypothesis that a Na/Ca exchanger is present on the blm of A6 cells and affirm its role in Cai homeostasis in steady-state conditions and following osmotic shock. In addition, a Ca2+ pump also located on the blm and Ca2+ stores sensitive to inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate were found to be implicated in Cai homeostasis.

  19. Exploration of the shapes of double-walled vesicles with a confined inner membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Kunkun; Li, Jianfeng

    2011-07-01

    We investigate double-walled vesicles as a simple model system for multi-vesicular structures, where the inner membrane is confined within the outer membrane. Various shapes of double-walled vesicles in two dimensions are obtained by means of our recently-developed discrete space variation method, and the shapes of each layer are found to be interdependent. Confined within the outer membrane, an inner membrane with a larger surface area always shows a cristae shape. As previous simulations and theoretical analyses of a single-walled vesicle have been done before, the geometric properties of double-walled vesicles, including the mean square radius of gyration and volume within the vesicle membrane, are studied in detail as functions of the pressure and surface area. It is found that due to the inter-space restriction of each layer, double-walled vesicles exhibit different behaviors compared with the previously-observed scaling laws of single-walled vesicles. It is straightforward to extend this study to more complicated and realistic biological systems, such as those including electrostatic interactions between membranes and solvent, phase separation, and cooperative interactions between multicomponent membranes.

  20. Bilayer membrane permeability of ionic liquid-filled block copolymer vesicles in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Bai, Zhifeng; Zhao, Bin; Lodge, Timothy P

    2012-07-19

    The bilayer membrane permeability of block copolymer vesicles ("polymersomes") with ionic liquid interiors dispersed in water is quantified using fluorescence quenching. Poly((1,2-butadiene)-b-ethylene oxide) (PB-PEO) block copolymer vesicles in water with their interiors filled with a common hydrophobic ionic liquid, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide, were prepared containing a hydrophobic dye, Nile Red, by intact migration of dye-encapsulated vesicles from the ionic liquid to water at room temperature. A small quencher molecule, dichloroacetamide, was added to the aqueous solution of the dye-loaded vesicles, and the permeation of the quencher passing through the membrane into the interior was determined from the fluorescence quenching kinetics. Rapid permeation of the quencher across the nanoscale membrane was observed, consistent with the high fluidity of the liquid polybutadiene membrane. Two different PB-PEO copolymers were employed, in order to vary the thickness of the solvophobic membrane. A significant increase in membrane permeability was also observed with decreasing membrane thickness, which is tentatively attributable to differences in quencher solubility in the membranes. Quantitative migration of the vesicles from the aqueous phase back to an ionic liquid phase was achieved upon heating. These microscopically heterogeneous and thermoresponsive vesicles with permeable and robust membranes have potential as recyclable nanoreactors, in which the high viscosity and capital expense of an ionic liquid reaction medium can be mitigated, while retaining the desirable features of ionic liquids as reaction media, and facile catalyst recovery.

  1. Outer-inner membrane vesicles naturally secreted by gram-negative pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Cruz, Carla; Delgado, Lidia; López-Iglesias, Carmen; Mercade, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Outer-inner membrane vesicles (O-IMVs) were recently described as a new type of membrane vesicle secreted by the Antarctic bacterium Shewanella vesiculosa M7T. Their formation is characterized by the protrusion of both outer and plasma membranes, which pulls cytoplasmic components into the vesicles. To demonstrate that this is not a singular phenomenon in a bacterium occurring in an extreme environment, the identification of O-IMVs in pathogenic bacteria was undertaken. With this aim, a structural study by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Cryo-transmission electron microscopy (Cryo-TEM) was carried out, confirming that O-IMVs are also secreted by Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria such as Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and Acinetobacter baumannii AB41, in which they represent between 0.23% and 1.2% of total vesicles produced. DNA and ATP, which are components solely found in the cell cytoplasm, were identified within membrane vesicles of these strains. The presence of DNA inside the O-IMVs produced by N. gonorrhoeae was confirmed by gold DNA immunolabeling with a specific monoclonal IgM against double-stranded DNA. A proteomic analysis of N. gonorrhoeae-derived membrane vesicles identified proteins from the cytoplasm and plasma membrane. This confirmation of O-IMV extends the hitherto uniform definition of membrane vesicles in Gram-negative bacteria and explains the presence of components in membrane vesicles such as DNA, cytoplasmic and inner membrane proteins, as well as ATP, detected for the first time. The production of these O-IMVs by pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria opens up new areas of study related to their involvement in lateral gene transfer, the transfer of cytoplasmic proteins, as well as the functionality and role of ATP detected in these new vesicles.

  2. Structure formation of lipid membranes: Membrane self-assembly and vesicle opening-up to octopus-like micelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Hiroshi

    2013-02-01

    We briefly review our recent studies on self-assembly and vesicle rupture of lipid membranes using coarse-grained molecular simulations. For single component membranes, lipid molecules self-assemble from random gas states to vesicles via disk-shaped clusters. Clusters aggregate into larger clusters, and subsequently the large disks close into vesicles. The size of vesicles are determined by kinetics than by thermodynamics. When a vesicle composed of lipid and detergent types of molecules is ruptured, a disk-shaped micelle called bicelle can be formed. When both surfactants have negligibly low critical micelle concentration, it is found that bicelles connected with worm-like micelles are also formed depending on the surfactant ratio and spontaneous curvature of the membrane monolayer.

  3. Preparation of pure and intact Plasmodium falciparum plasma membrane vesicles and partial characterisation of the plasma membrane ATPase.

    PubMed

    Elandalloussi, Laurence M; Smith, Pete J

    2002-04-26

    In host erythrocytes, the malaria parasite must contend with ion and drug transport across three membranes; its own plasma membrane, the parasitophorous membrane and the host plasma membrane. Isolation of pure and intact Plasmodium falciparum plasma membrane would provide a suitable model to elucidate the possible role played by the parasite plasma membrane in ion balance and drug transport. This study describes a procedure for isolating parasite plasma membrane from P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes. With this method, the trophozoites released by saponin treatment were cleansed of erythrocyte membranes using anti-erythrocyte antibodies fixed to polystyrene beads. These trophozoites were then biotinylated and the parasite plasma membrane was disrupted by nitrogen cavitation. This process allows the membranes to reform into vesicles. The magnetic streptavidin beads bind specifically to the biotinylated parasite plasma membrane vesicles facilitating their recovery with a magnet. These vesicles can then be easily released from the magnetic beads by treatment with dithiotreithol. The parasite plasma membrane showed optimal ATPase activity at 2 mM ATP and 2 mM Mg2+. It was also found that Ca2+ could not substitute for Mg2+ ATPase activity in parasite plasma membranes whereas activity was completely preserved when Mn2+ was used instead of Mg2+. Other nucleoside triphosphates tested were hydrolysed as efficiently as ATP, while the nucleoside monophosphate AMP was not. We have described the successful isolation of intact P. falciparum plasma membrane vesicles free of contaminating organelles and determined the experimental conditions for optimum ATPase activity.

  4. Geometric conservation laws for cells or vesicles with membrane nanotubes or singular points.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yajun; Yin, Jie

    2006-07-12

    On the basis of the integral theorems about the mean curvature and Gauss curvature, geometric conservation laws for cells or vesicles are proved. These conservation laws may depict various special bionano structures discovered in experiments, such as the membrane nanotubes and singular points grown from the surfaces of cells or vesicles. Potential applications of the conservation laws to lipid nanotube junctions that interconnect cells or vesicles are discussed.

  5. Cell-Cell Communication Via Extracellular Membrane Vesicles and Its Role in the Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Inkyu

    2013-01-01

    The host immune response involves a variety of cell types, including specialized immune and non-immune cells. The delicate coordination among these cells via close communication is central for the proper operation of immune system. Cell-cell communication is mediated by a complex network that includes soluble factors such as cytokines, chemokines, and metabolites exported from cells, as well as membrane-bound receptors and their ligands. Cell-cell communication is also mediated by membrane vesicles (e.g., exosomes, ectosomes), which are either shed by distant cells or exchanged by cells that are making direct contact. Intercellular communication via extracellular membrane vesicles has drawn much attention recently, as they have been shown to carry various biomolecules that modulate the activities of recipient cells. In this review, I will discuss current views on cell-cell communication via extra-cellular membrane vesicles, especially shedded membrane vesicles, and their effects on the control of the immune system. PMID:23807045

  6. Production of outer membrane vesicles and outer membrane tubes by Francisella novicida.

    PubMed

    McCaig, William D; Koller, Antonius; Thanassi, David G

    2013-03-01

    Francisella spp. are highly infectious and virulent bacteria that cause the zoonotic disease tularemia. Knowledge is lacking for the virulence factors expressed by Francisella and how these factors are secreted and delivered to host cells. Gram-negative bacteria constitutively release outer membrane vesicles (OMV), which may function in the delivery of virulence factors to host cells. We identified growth conditions under which Francisella novicida produces abundant OMV. Purification of the vesicles revealed the presence of tube-shaped vesicles in addition to typical spherical OMV, and examination of whole bacteria revealed the presence of tubes extending out from the bacterial surface. Recently, both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells have been shown to produce membrane-enclosed projections, termed nanotubes, which appear to function in cell-cell communication and the exchange of molecules. In contrast to these previously characterized structures, the F. novicida tubes are produced in liquid as well as on solid medium and are derived from the OM rather than the cytoplasmic membrane. The production of the OMV and tubes (OMV/T) by F. novicida was coordinately regulated and responsive to both growth medium and growth phase. Proteomic analysis of purified OMV/T identified known Francisella virulence factors among the constituent proteins, suggesting roles for the vesicles in pathogenesis. In support of this, production of OM tubes by F. novicida was stimulated during infection of macrophages and addition of purified OMV/T to macrophages elicited increased release of proinflammatory cytokines. Finally, vaccination with purified OMV/T protected mice from subsequent challenge with highly lethal doses of F. novicida.

  7. Production of Outer Membrane Vesicles and Outer Membrane Tubes by Francisella novicida

    PubMed Central

    McCaig, William D.; Koller, Antonius

    2013-01-01

    Francisella spp. are highly infectious and virulent bacteria that cause the zoonotic disease tularemia. Knowledge is lacking for the virulence factors expressed by Francisella and how these factors are secreted and delivered to host cells. Gram-negative bacteria constitutively release outer membrane vesicles (OMV), which may function in the delivery of virulence factors to host cells. We identified growth conditions under which Francisella novicida produces abundant OMV. Purification of the vesicles revealed the presence of tube-shaped vesicles in addition to typical spherical OMV, and examination of whole bacteria revealed the presence of tubes extending out from the bacterial surface. Recently, both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells have been shown to produce membrane-enclosed projections, termed nanotubes, which appear to function in cell-cell communication and the exchange of molecules. In contrast to these previously characterized structures, the F. novicida tubes are produced in liquid as well as on solid medium and are derived from the OM rather than the cytoplasmic membrane. The production of the OMV and tubes (OMV/T) by F. novicida was coordinately regulated and responsive to both growth medium and growth phase. Proteomic analysis of purified OMV/T identified known Francisella virulence factors among the constituent proteins, suggesting roles for the vesicles in pathogenesis. In support of this, production of OM tubes by F. novicida was stimulated during infection of macrophages and addition of purified OMV/T to macrophages elicited increased release of proinflammatory cytokines. Finally, vaccination with purified OMV/T protected mice from subsequent challenge with highly lethal doses of F. novicida. PMID:23264574

  8. An AFM-based pit-measuring method for indirect measurements of cell-surface membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiaojun; Chen, Yuan; Chen, Yong

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Air drying induced the transformation of cell-surface membrane vesicles into pits. • An AFM-based pit-measuring method was developed to measure cell-surface vesicles. • Our method detected at least two populations of cell-surface membrane vesicles. - Abstract: Circulating membrane vesicles, which are shed from many cell types, have multiple functions and have been correlated with many diseases. Although circulating membrane vesicles have been extensively characterized, the status of cell-surface membrane vesicles prior to their release is less understood due to the lack of effective measurement methods. Recently, as a powerful, micro- or nano-scale imaging tool, atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been applied in measuring circulating membrane vesicles. However, it seems very difficult for AFM to directly image/identify and measure cell-bound membrane vesicles due to the similarity of surface morphology between membrane vesicles and cell surfaces. Therefore, until now no AFM studies on cell-surface membrane vesicles have been reported. In this study, we found that air drying can induce the transformation of most cell-surface membrane vesicles into pits that are more readily detectable by AFM. Based on this, we developed an AFM-based pit-measuring method and, for the first time, used AFM to indirectly measure cell-surface membrane vesicles on cultured endothelial cells. Using this approach, we observed and quantitatively measured at least two populations of cell-surface membrane vesicles, a nanoscale population (<500 nm in diameter peaking at ∼250 nm) and a microscale population (from 500 nm to ∼2 μm peaking at ∼0.8 μm), whereas confocal microscopy only detected the microscale population. The AFM-based pit-measuring method is potentially useful for studying cell-surface membrane vesicles and for investigating the mechanisms of membrane vesicle formation/release.

  9. Lipid vesicles in pulsed electric fields: Fundamental principles of the membrane response and its biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Perrier, Dayinta L; Rems, Lea; Boukany, Pouyan E

    2017-04-28

    The present review focuses on the effects of pulsed electric fields on lipid vesicles ranging from giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) to small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs), from both fundamental and applicative perspectives. Lipid vesicles are the most popular model membrane systems for studying biophysical and biological processes in living cells. Furthermore, as vesicles are made from biocompatible and biodegradable materials, they provide a strategy to create safe and functionalized drug delivery systems in health-care applications. Exposure of lipid vesicles to pulsed electric fields is a common physical method to transiently increase the permeability of the lipid membrane. This method, termed electroporation, has shown many advantages for delivering exogenous molecules including drugs and genetic material into vesicles and living cells. In addition, electroporation can be applied to induce fusion between vesicles and/or cells. First, we discuss in detail how research on cell-size GUVs as model cell systems has provided novel insight into the basic mechanisms of cell electroporation and associated phenomena. Afterwards, we continue with a thorough overview how electroporation and electrofusion have been used as versatile methods to manipulate vesicles of all sizes in different biomedical applications. We conclude by summarizing the open questions in the field of electroporation and possible future directions for vesicles in the biomedical field. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The syntaxin 4 N terminus regulates its basolateral targeting by munc18c-dependent and -independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Torres, Jacqueline; Funk, Holly M; Zegers, Mirjam M P; ter Beest, Martin B A

    2011-03-25

    To generate and maintain epithelial cell polarity, specific sorting of proteins into vesicles destined for the apical and basolateral domain is required. Syntaxin 3 and 4 are apical and basolateral SNARE proteins important for the specificity of vesicle fusion at the apical and basolateral plasma membrane domains, respectively, but how these proteins are specifically targeted to these domains themselves is unclear. Munc18/SM proteins are potential regulators of this process. Like syntaxins, they are crucial for exocytosis and vesicle fusion. However, how munc18c and syntaxin 4 regulate the function of each other is unclear. Here, we investigated the requirement of syntaxin 4 in the delivery of basolateral membrane and secretory proteins, the basolateral targeting of syntaxin 4, and the role of munc18c in this targeting. Depletion of syntaxin 4 resulted in significant reduction of basolateral targeting, suggesting no compensation by other syntaxin forms. Mutational analysis identified amino acids Leu-25 and to a lesser extent Val-26 as essential for correct localization of syntaxin 4. Recently, it was shown that the N-terminal peptide of syntaxin 4 is involved in binding to munc18c. A mutation in this region that affects munc18c binding shows that munc18c binding is required for stabilization of syntaxin 4 at the plasma membrane but not for its correct targeting. We conclude that the N terminus serves two functions in membrane targeting. First, it harbors the sorting motif, which targets syntaxin 4 basolaterally in a munc18c-independent manner and second, it allows for munc18c binding, which stabilizes the protein in a munc18c-dependent manner.

  11. [Vesicular intracellular transport in the digestive organs. Membrane vesicle--the universal mechanism of the functional transport].

    PubMed

    Morozov, I A

    2014-01-01

    , mediators by nerve cells. To clarify the problem of cell transport two types: homeostatic and functional transport should be distinguished. The first type is carried out mainly in relation to ions on basolateral membrane with the help of its ATPase systems and provides intracellular homeostasis and nutritive co- transportation, the second (functional) type defines the basic specific function by means of membrane vesicles.

  12. Membrane vesicles in sea water: heterogeneous DNA content and implications for viral abundance estimates.

    PubMed

    Biller, Steven J; McDaniel, Lauren D; Breitbart, Mya; Rogers, Everett; Paul, John H; Chisholm, Sallie W

    2017-02-01

    Diverse microbes release membrane-bound extracellular vesicles from their outer surfaces into the surrounding environment. Vesicles are found in numerous habitats including the oceans, where they likely have a variety of functional roles in microbial ecosystems. Extracellular vesicles are known to contain a range of biomolecules including DNA, but the frequency with which DNA is packaged in vesicles is unknown. Here, we examine the quantity and distribution of DNA associated with vesicles released from five different bacteria. The average quantity of double-stranded DNA and size distribution of DNA fragments released within vesicles varies among different taxa. Although some vesicles contain sufficient DNA to be visible following staining with the SYBR fluorescent DNA dyes typically used to enumerate viruses, this represents only a small proportion (<0.01-1%) of vesicles. Thus DNA is packaged heterogeneously within vesicle populations, and it appears that vesicles are likely to be a minor component of SYBR-visible particles in natural sea water compared with viruses. Consistent with this hypothesis, chloroform treatment of coastal and offshore seawater samples reveals that vesicles increase epifluorescence-based particle (viral) counts by less than an order of magnitude and their impact is variable in space and time.

  13. Riboflavin transport by rabbit renal brush border membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Yanagawa, N; Jo, O D; Said, H M

    1997-12-04

    The present study examined riboflavin (RF) uptake by isolated rabbit renal brush border membrane (BBM). RF uptake was linear for up to 30 s and leveled off thereafter reaching an equilibrium with longer incubation. Studies on RF uptake as a function of incubation medium osmolarity indicated that the uptake was the results of transport (61.4%) into the intravesicular space as well as binding (38.6%) to membrane surfaces. The process of RF uptake was saturable as a function of substrate concentration with an apparent Km of 25.7 +/- 7.6 microM and Vmax of 75.6 +/- 14.7 pmol/mg protein/10 s. cis-Addition of unlabeled RF and its structural analogues, lumiflavin and lumichrome, inhibited the uptake of [3H]RF significantly, indicating the involvement of a carrier-mediated process in RF uptake by renal BBM. RF uptake by renal BBM was partly Na+-dependent so that when Na+ was replaced by potassium, choline, lithium or tetramethylammonium, the RF uptake was reduced to ca. 60% of the control. This Na+-dependency was unlikely to be due to Na+-cotransport mechanism because RF uptake occurred without the characteristic 'overshoot' phenomenon as for other Na+-cotransport systems and the elimination of transmembrane Na+-gradient by preloading Na+ to the intravesicular space did not affect RF uptake. In contrast, removal of Na+ eliminated the binding component of RF uptake, suggesting the requirement of Na+ for RF binding to BBM. The RF uptake was not affected when extravesicular pH was varied within the physiological pH range of 6.5 to 8.5. No effect on BBM [3H]RF uptake was found when the transmembrane electrical potential was altered by either the presence of anions with different membrane permeability (Cl- = NO3- > SO4- > gluconate-) or by using nigericin (10 microg/mg protein) with an outwardly or inwardly directed transmembrane K+ gradient. The uptake of RF by BBM vesicles was, however, inhibited by probenecid and organic anion transport inhibitors, 4,4-diiso

  14. Membrane vesicle production by Chlamydia trachomatis as an adaptive response

    PubMed Central

    Frohlich, Kyla M.; Hua, Ziyu; Quayle, Alison J.; Wang, Jin; Lewis, Maria E.; Chou, Chau-wen; Luo, Miao; Buckner, Lyndsey R.; Shen, Li

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria have evolved specific adaptive responses to cope with changing environments. These adaptations include stress response phenotypes with dynamic modifications of the bacterial cell envelope and generation of membrane vesicles (MVs). The obligate intracellular bacterium, Chlamydia trachomatis, typically has a biphasic lifestyle, but can enter into an altered growth state typified by morphologically aberrant chlamydial forms, termed persistent growth forms, when induced by stress in vitro. How C. trachomatis can adapt to a persistent growth state in host epithelial cells in vivo is not well understood, but is an important question, since it extends the host-bacterial relationship in vitro and has thus been indicated as a survival mechanism in chronic chlamydial infections. Here, we review recent findings on the mechanistic aspects of bacterial adaptation to stress with a focus on how C. trachomatis remodels its envelope, produces MVs, and the potential important consequences of MV production with respect to host-pathogen interactions. Emerging data suggest that the generation of MVs may be an important mechanism for C. trachomatis intracellular survival of stress, and thus may aid in the establishment of a chronic infection in human genital epithelial cells. PMID:24959424

  15. Proteomic analysis of Vibrio cholerae outer membrane vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Altindis, Emrah; Fu, Yang; Mekalanos, John J.

    2014-01-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) produced by Gram-negative bacteria provide an interesting research material for defining cell-envelope proteins without experimental cell disruption. OMVs are also promising immunogenic platforms and may play important roles in bacterial survival and pathogenesis. We used in-solution trypsin digestion coupled to mass spectrometry to identify 90 proteins present in OMVs of Vibrio cholerae when grown under conditions that activate the TCP pilus virulence regulatory protein (ToxT) virulence regulon. The ToxT expression profile and potential contribution to virulence of these proteins were assessed using ToxT and in vivo RNA-seq, Tn-seq, and cholera stool proteomic and other genome-wide data sets. Thirteen OMV-associated proteins appear to be essential for cell growth, and therefore may represent antibacterial drug targets. Another 12 nonessential OMV proteins, including DegP protease, were required for intestinal colonization in rabbits. Comparative proteomics of a degP mutant revealed the importance of DegP in the incorporation of nine proteins into OMVs, including ones involved in biofilm matrix formation and various substrates of the type II secretion system. Taken together, these results suggest that DegP plays an important role in determining the content of OMVs and also affects phenotypes such as intestinal colonization, proper function of the type II secretion system, and formation of biofilm matrix. PMID:24706774

  16. Sulfate transport in apical membrane vesicles isolated from tracheal epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Elgavish, A.; DiBona, D.R.; Norton, P.; Meezan, E.

    1987-09-01

    Sulfate uptake in apical membrane vesicles isolated from bovine tracheal epithelium is shown to occur into an osmotically sensitive intravesicular space, via a carrier-mediated system. This conclusion is based on three lines of evidence: 1) saturation kinetics: 2) substrate specificity; and 3) inhibition by the anion transport inhibitors SITS and DIDS. The affinity of the transport system is highest in low ionic strength media and decreases in the presence of gluconate. Chloride appears to cis-inhibit sulfate uptake and to trans-stimulate sulfate efflux. Cis-inhibition and trans-stimulation studies with a variety of anions indicate that this exchange system may be shared by HCO/sub 3//sup -/, S/sub 2/O/sub 3//sup 2 -/, SeO/sub 4//sup 2 -/, and MoO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ but not by H/sub 2/PO/sub 4//sup -/ or HAsO/sub 4//sup 2/. Studies indicate that protons may play two distinct roles in sulfate transport in this system. These studies show that the carrier-mediated system can function in the absence of chloride. The overshoot observed in the presence of a proton gradient indicates that under those conditions the mechanism of transport may be a SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/-OH/sup -/ exchange.

  17. Vibrio fischeri-derived outer membrane vesicles trigger host development.

    PubMed

    Aschtgen, Marie-Stephanie; Wetzel, Keith; Goldman, William; McFall-Ngai, Margaret; Ruby, Edward

    2016-04-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMV) are critical elements in many host-cell/microbe interactions. Previous studies of the symbiotic association between Euprymna scolopes and Vibrio fischeri had shown that within 12 h of colonizing crypts deep within the squid's light organ, the symbionts trigger an irreversible programme of tissue development in the host. Here, we report that OMV produced by V. fischeri are powerful contributors to this process. The first detectable host response to the OMV is an increased trafficking of macrophage-like cells called haemocytes into surface epithelial tissues. We showed that exposing the squid to other Vibrio species fails to induce this trafficking; however, addition of a high concentration of their OMV, which can diffuse into the crypts, does. We also provide evidence that tracheal cytotoxin released by the symbionts, which can induce haemocyte trafficking, is not part of the OMV cargo, suggesting two distinct mechanisms to induce the same morphogenesis event. By manipulating the timing and localization of OMV signal delivery, we showed that haemocyte trafficking is fully induced only when V. fischeri, the sole species able to reach and grow in the crypts, succeeds in establishing a sustained colonization. Further, our data suggest that the host's detection of OMV serves as a symbiotic checkpoint prior to inducing irreversible morphogenesis. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Vibrio fischeri-derived outer membrane vesicles trigger host development

    PubMed Central

    Aschtgen, Marie-Stephanie; Wetzel, Keith; Goldman, William; McFall-Ngai, Margaret; Ruby, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMV) are critical elements in many host-cell/microbe interactions. Previous studies of the symbiotic association between Euprymna scolopes and Vibrio fischeri had shown that, within 12 h of colonizing crypts deep within the squid’s light organ, the symbionts trigger an irreversible program of tissue development in the host. Here, we report that OMV produced by V. fischeri are powerful contributors to this process. The first detectable host response to the OMV is an increased trafficking of macrophage-like cells called hemocytes into surface epithelial tissues. We showed that exposing the squid to other Vibrio species fails to induce this trafficking; however, addition of a high concentration of their OMV, which can diffuse into the crypts, does. We also provide evidence that tracheal cytotoxin (TCT) release by the symbionts, which can induce hemocyte trafficking, is not part of the OMV cargo, suggesting two distinct mechanisms to induce the same morphogenesis event. By manipulating the timing and localization of OMV signal delivery, we showed that hemocyte trafficking is fully induced only when V. fischeri, the sole species able to reach and grow in the crypts, succeeds in establishing a sustained colonization. Further, our data suggest that the host detection of OMV serves as a symbiotic checkpoint prior to inducing irreversible morphogenesis. PMID:26399913

  19. Mechanisms of outer membrane vesicle entry into host cells.

    PubMed

    O'Donoghue, Eloise J; Krachler, Anne Marie

    2016-11-01

    Bacterial outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are nano-sized compartments consisting of a lipid bilayer that encapsulates periplasm-derived, luminal content. OMVs, which pinch off of Gram-negative bacteria, are now recognized as a generalized secretion pathway which provides a means to transfer cargo to other bacterial cells as well as eukaryotic cells. Compared with other secretion systems, OMVs can transfer a chemically extremely diverse range of cargo, including small molecules, nucleic acids, proteins, and lipids to proximal cells. Although it is well recognized that OMVs can enter and release cargo inside host cells during infection, the mechanisms of host association and uptake are not well understood. This review highlights existing studies focusing on OMV-host cell interactions and entry mechanisms, and how these entry routes affect cargo processing within the host. It further compares the wide range of methods currently used to dissect uptake mechanisms, and discusses potential sources of discrepancy regarding the mechanism of OMV uptake across different studies. © 2016 The Authors Cellular Microbiology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Outer membrane vesicles – offensive weapons or good Samaritans?

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Ingar; Amano, Atsuo

    2015-01-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) from Gram-negative bacteria were first considered as artifacts and were followed with disbelief and bad reputation. Later, their existence was accepted and they became characterized as bacterial bombs, virulence bullets, and even decoys. Today, we know that OMVs also can be involved in cell–cell signaling/communication and be mediators of immune regulation and cause disease protection. Furthermore, OMVs represent a distinct bacterial secretion pathway selecting and protecting their cargo, and they can even be good Samaritans providing nutrients to the gut microbiota maintaining commensal homeostasis beneficial to the host. The versatility in functions of these nanostructures is remarkable and includes both defense and offense. The broad spectrum of usability does not stop with that, as it now seems that OMVs can be used as vaccines and adjuvants or vehicles engineered for drug treatment of emerging and new diseases not only caused by bacteria but also by virus. They may even represent new ways of selective drug treatment. PMID:25840612

  1. Extracellular Membrane Vesicles and Immune Regulation in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Cossetti, Chiara; Smith, Jayden A.; Iraci, Nunzio; Leonardi, Tommaso; Alfaro-Cervello, Clara; Pluchino, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    The brain is characterized by a complex and integrated network of interacting cells in which cell-to-cell communication is critical for proper development and function. Initially considered as an immune privileged site, the brain is now regarded as an immune specialized system. Accumulating evidence reveals the presence of immune components in the brain, as well as extensive bidirectional communication that takes place between the nervous and the immune system both under homeostatic and pathological conditions. In recent years the secretion of extracellular membrane vesicles (EMVs) has been described as a new and evolutionary well-conserved mechanism of cell-to-cell communication, with EMVs influencing the microenvironment through the traffic of bioactive molecules that include proteins and nucleic acids, such as DNA, protein coding, and non-coding RNAs. Increasing evidence suggests that EMVs are a promising candidate to study cross-boundary cell-to-cell communication pathways. Herein we review the role of EMVs secreted by neural cells in modulating the immune response(s) within the brain under physiological and pathological circumstances. PMID:22557978

  2. Mechanisms of outer membrane vesicle entry into host cells

    PubMed Central

    O'Donoghue, Eloise J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Bacterial outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are nano‐sized compartments consisting of a lipid bilayer that encapsulates periplasm‐derived, luminal content. OMVs, which pinch off of Gram‐negative bacteria, are now recognized as a generalized secretion pathway which provides a means to transfer cargo to other bacterial cells as well as eukaryotic cells. Compared with other secretion systems, OMVs can transfer a chemically extremely diverse range of cargo, including small molecules, nucleic acids, proteins, and lipids to proximal cells. Although it is well recognized that OMVs can enter and release cargo inside host cells during infection, the mechanisms of host association and uptake are not well understood. This review highlights existing studies focusing on OMV‐host cell interactions and entry mechanisms, and how these entry routes affect cargo processing within the host. It further compares the wide range of methods currently used to dissect uptake mechanisms, and discusses potential sources of discrepancy regarding the mechanism of OMV uptake across different studies. PMID:27529760

  3. Amiloride transport in rabbit renal brush-border membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, S.H.; Wunz, T.M.

    1989-03-01

    Rabbit renal brush-border membrane vesicles (BBMV) were used to study amiloride transport across the luminal membrane of proximal tubular cells. An outwardly directed H+ gradient (pHi 6.0; pHo 7.5) stimulated 8 microM (/sup 14/C)-amiloride uptake into BBMV and supported a transient active accumulation of substrate consistent with the presence of an amiloride-H+ exchange process. Uptake was inhibited, in the presence or absence of a pH gradient, by 1 mM unlabeled amiloride or 20 mM tetraethylammonium (TEA). Amiloride transport was not directly affected by the presence of 100 mM Na+ in the extravesicular medium, suggesting that Na-H exchange did not mediate amiloride flux. Amiloride transport was a saturable process with a maximal flux (under pH gradient conditions) of 3 nmol.mg-1.min-1 and an apparent Kt of 8 microM. TEA acted as a competitive inhibitor of this process with an apparent Ki of approximately 80 microM, similar to the Kt of TEA transport via the TEA-H+ exchanger. Likewise, amiloride acted as a competitive inhibitor of TEA uptake with an apparent Ki of approximately 11 microM. Preloading BBMV with 1-2 mM TEA stimulated the rate of amiloride uptake and supported a transient active accumulation of amiloride. We conclude that amiloride and TEA are transported by a common pathway in BBMV, which involves a carrier-mediated exchange with H+ and which may play a role in the tubular secretion of these compounds.

  4. Microtubule-dependent relocation of branchial V-H+-ATPase to the basolateral membrane in the Pacific spiny dogfish (Squalus acanthias): a role in base secretion.

    PubMed

    Tresguerres, Martin; Parks, Scott K; Katoh, Fumi; Goss, Greg G

    2006-02-01

    We have previously shown that continuous intravenous infusion of NaHCO3 for 24 h ( approximately 1000 micromol kg(-1) h(-1)) results in the relocation of V-H+-ATPase from the cytoplasm to the basolateral membrane in the gills of the Pacific dogfish. To further investigate this putative base-secretive process we performed similar experiments with the addition of colchicine, an inhibitor of cytoskeleton-dependent cellular trafficking processes. Blood pH and plasma total CO2 were significantly higher in the colchicines-treated, HCO3- -infused fish compared with fish infused with HCO3- alone. The effect of colchicine was highest after 24 h of infusion (8.33+/-0.06 vs 8.02+/-0.03 pH units, 15.72+/-3.29 vs 6.74+/-1.34 mmol CO2 l(-1), N=5). Immunohistochemistry and western blotting confirmed that colchicine blocked the transit of V-H+-ATPase to the basolateral membrane. Furthermore, western blotting analyses from whole gill and cell membrane samples suggest that the short-term (6 h) response to alkaline stress consists of relocation of V-H+-ATPases already present in the cell to the basolateral membrane, while in the longer term (24 h) there is both relocation of preexistent enzyme and upregulation in the synthesis of new units. Our results strongly suggest that cellular relocation of V-H+-ATPase is necessary for enhanced HCO3- secretion across the gills of the Pacific dogfish.

  5. Analytical characterization of plasma membrane-derived vesicles produced via osmotic and chemical vesiculation

    PubMed Central

    Sarabipour, Sarvenaz; Chan, Robin B.; Zhou, Bowen; Di Paolo, Gilbert; Hristova, Kalina

    2015-01-01

    Plasma membrane-derived vesicles are being used in biophysical and biochemical research as a simple, yet native-like model of the cellular membranes. Here we report on the characterization of vesicles produced via two different vesiculation methods from CHO and A431 cell lines. The first method is a recently developed method which utilizes chloride salts to induce osmotic vesiculation. The second is a well established chemical vesiculation method which uses DTT and formaldehyde. We show that both vesiculation methods produce vesicles which contain the lipid species previously reported in the plasma membrane of these cell lines. The two methods lead to small but statistically significant differences in two lipid species only; phosphatidylcholine (PC) and plasmalogen phosphatidylethanolamine (PEp). However, highly significant differences were observed in the degree of incorporation of a membrane receptor and in the degree of retention of soluble cytosolic proteins within the vesicles. PMID:25896659

  6. Basolateral membrane Na/base cotransport is dependent on CO2/HCO3 in the proximal convoluted tubule

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    The mechanism of basolateral membrane base transport was examined in the in vitro microperfused rabbit proximal convoluted tubule (PCT) in the absence and presence of ambient CO2/HCO3- by means of the microfluorometric measurement of cell pH. The buffer capacity of the cells measured using rapid NH3 washout was 42.8 +/- 5.6 mmol.liter-1.pH unit-1 in the absence and 84.6 +/- 7.3 mmol.liter-1.pH unit-1 in the presence of CO2/HCO3-. In the presence of CO2/HCO3-, lowering peritubular pH from 7.4 to 6.8 acidified the cell by 0.30 pH units and lowering peritubular Na from 147 to 0 mM acidified the cell by 0.25 pH units. Both effects were inhibited by peritubular 4-acetamido-4'- isothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonate (SITS). In the absence of exogenous CO2/HCO3-, lowering peritubular pH from 7.4 to 6.8 acidified the cell by 0.25 pH units and lowering peritubular Na from 147 to 0 mM decreased cell pH by 0.20 pH units. Lowering bath pH from 7.4 to 6.8 induced a proton flux of 643 +/- 51 pmol.mm-1.min-1 in the presence of exogenous CO2/HCO3- and 223 +/- 27 pmol.mm-1.min-1 in its absence. Lowering bath Na from 147 to 0 mM induced proton fluxes of 596 +/- 77 pmol.mm-1.min-1 in its absence. The cell acidification induced by lowering bath pH or bath Na in the absence of CO2/HCO3- was inhibited by peritubular SITS or by acetazolamide, whereas peritubular amiloride had no effect. In the absence of exogenous CO2/HCO3-, cyanide blocked the cell acidification induced by bath Na removal, but was without effect in the presence of exogenous CO2/HCO3-. We reached the following conclusions. (a) The basolateral Na/base n greater than 1 cotransporter in the rabbit PCT has an absolute requirement for CO2/HCO3-. (b) In spite of this CO2 dependence, in the absence of exogenous CO2/HCO3-, metabolically produced CO2/HCO3- is sufficient to keep the transporter running at 30% of its control rate in the presence of ambient CO2/HCO3- . (c) There is no apparent amiloride-sensitive Na/H antiporter on

  7. Biochemical characterization and membrane fluidity of membranous vesicles isolated from boar seminal plasma.

    PubMed

    Piehl, Lidia L; Cisale, Humberto; Torres, Natalia; Capani, Francisco; Sterin-Speziale, Norma; Hager, Alfredo

    2006-05-01

    Mammalian seminal plasma contains membranous vesicles (MV), which differ in composition and origin. Among these particles, human prostasomes and equine prostasome-like MV have been the most studied. The aim of the present work is to characterize the biochemical composition and membrane fluidity of MV isolated from boar seminal plasma. The MV from boar seminal plasma were isolated by ultracentrifugation and further purification by gel filtration on Sephadex G-200. The MV were examined by electron microscopy (EM), amount of cholesterol, total phospholipid, protein content, and phospholipid composition were analyzed. Membrane fluidity of MV and spermatozoa were estimated from the electron spin resonance (ESR) spectra of the 5-doxilstearic acid incorporated into the vesicle membranes by the order parameter (S). The S parameter gives a measure of degree of structural order in the membrane and is defined as the ratio of the spectral anisotropy in the membranes to the maximum anisotropy obtained in a rigidly oriented system. The S parameter takes into consideration that S = 1 for a rapid spin-label motion of about only one axis and S = 0 for a rapid isotropic motion. Intermediate S values between S = 0 and S = 1 represents the consequence of decreased membrane fluidity. The EM revealed the presence of bilaminar and multilaminar electron-dense vesicles. Cholesterol to phospholipid molar ratio from the isolated MV was 1.8. Phospholipid composition showed a predominance of sphingomyelin. The S parameter for porcine MV and for boar spermatozoa was 0.73 +/- 0.02 and 0.644 +/- 0.008, respectively, with the S for MV being greater (p < 0.001) than the S for spermatozoa. The high order for S found for boar MV was in agreement with the greater cholesterol/phospholipids ratio and the lesser ratio for phosphatidylcholine/sphingomyelin. Results obtained in the present work indicate that MV isolated from boar semen share many biochemical and morphological characteristics with equine

  8. Distinct effects of repeated restraint stress on basolateral amygdala neuronal membrane properties in resilient adolescent and adult rats.

    PubMed

    Hetzel, Andrea; Rosenkranz, J Amiel

    2014-08-01

    Severe and repeated stress has damaging effects on health, including initiation of depression and anxiety. Stress that occurs during development has long-lasting and particularly damaging effects on emotion. The basolateral amygdala (BLA) plays a key role in many affective behaviors, and repeated stress causes different forms of BLA hyperactivity in adolescent and adult rats. However, the mechanism is not known. Furthermore, not every individual is susceptible to the negative consequences of stress. Differences in the effects of stress on the BLA might contribute to determine whether an individual will be vulnerable or resilient to the effects of stress on emotion. The purpose of this study is to test the cellular underpinnings for age dependency of BLA hyperactivity after stress, and whether protective changes occur in resilient individuals. To test this, the effects of repeated stress on membrane excitability and other membrane properties of BLA principal neurons were compared between adult and adolescent rats, and between vulnerable and resilient rats, using in vitro whole-cell recordings. Vulnerability was defined by adrenal gland weight, and verified by body weight gain after repeated restraint stress, and fecal pellet production during repeated restraint sessions. We found that repeated stress increased the excitability of BLA neurons, but in a manner that depended on age and BLA subnucleus. Furthermore, stress resilience was associated with an opposite pattern of change, with increased slow afterhyperpolarization (AHP) potential, whereas vulnerability was associated with decreased medium AHP. The opposite outcomes in these two populations were further distinguished by differences of anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus maze that were correlated with BLA neuronal excitability and AHP. These results demonstrate a substrate for BLA hyperactivity after repeated stress, with distinct membrane properties to target, as well as age-dependent factors that

  9. Distinct Effects of Repeated Restraint Stress on Basolateral Amygdala Neuronal Membrane Properties in Resilient Adolescent and Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hetzel, Andrea; Rosenkranz, J Amiel

    2014-01-01

    Severe and repeated stress has damaging effects on health, including initiation of depression and anxiety. Stress that occurs during development has long-lasting and particularly damaging effects on emotion. The basolateral amygdala (BLA) plays a key role in many affective behaviors, and repeated stress causes different forms of BLA hyperactivity in adolescent and adult rats. However, the mechanism is not known. Furthermore, not every individual is susceptible to the negative consequences of stress. Differences in the effects of stress on the BLA might contribute to determine whether an individual will be vulnerable or resilient to the effects of stress on emotion. The purpose of this study is to test the cellular underpinnings for age dependency of BLA hyperactivity after stress, and whether protective changes occur in resilient individuals. To test this, the effects of repeated stress on membrane excitability and other membrane properties of BLA principal neurons were compared between adult and adolescent rats, and between vulnerable and resilient rats, using in vitro whole-cell recordings. Vulnerability was defined by adrenal gland weight, and verified by body weight gain after repeated restraint stress, and fecal pellet production during repeated restraint sessions. We found that repeated stress increased the excitability of BLA neurons, but in a manner that depended on age and BLA subnucleus. Furthermore, stress resilience was associated with an opposite pattern of change, with increased slow afterhyperpolarization (AHP) potential, whereas vulnerability was associated with decreased medium AHP. The opposite outcomes in these two populations were further distinguished by differences of anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus maze that were correlated with BLA neuronal excitability and AHP. These results demonstrate a substrate for BLA hyperactivity after repeated stress, with distinct membrane properties to target, as well as age-dependent factors that

  10. Selective production of sealed plasma membrane vesicles from red beet (Beta vulgaris L. ) storage tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Giannini, J.L.; Gildensoph, L.H.; Briskin, D.P.

    1987-05-01

    Modification of our previous procedure for the isolation of microsomal membrane vesicles from red beet (Beta vulgaris L.) storage tissue allowed the recovery of sealed membrane vesicles displaying proton transport activity sensitive to both nitrate and orthovanadate. In the absence of a high salt concentration in the homogenization medium, contributions of nitrate-sensitive (tonoplast) and vanadate-sensitive (plasma membrane) proton transport were roughly equal. The addition of 0.25 M KCl to the homogenization medium increased the relative amount of nitrate-inhibited proton transport activity while the addition of 0.25 M KI resulted in proton pumping vesicles displaying inhibition by vanadate but stimulation by nitrate. These effects appeared to result from selective sealing of either plasma membrane or tonoplast membrane vesicles during homogenization in the presence of the two salts. Following centrifugation on linear sucrose gradients it was shown that the nitrate-sensitive, proton-transporting vesicles banded at low density and comigrated with nitrate-sensitive ATPase activity while the vanadate-sensitive, proton-transporting vesicles banded at a much higher density and comigrated with vanadate-sensitive ATPase. The properties of the vanadate-sensitive proton pumping vesicles were further characterized in microsomal membrane fractions produced by homogenization in the presence of 0.25 M KI and centrifugation on discontinuous sucrose density gradients. Proton transport was substrate specific for ATP, displayed a sharp pH optimum at 6.5, and was insensitive to azide but inhibited by N'-N-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, diethylstilbestrol, and fluoride. The Km of proton transport for Mg:ATP was 0.67 mM and the K0.5 for vanadate inhibition was at about 50 microM. These properties are identical to those displayed by the plasma membrane ATPase and confirm a plasma membrane origin for the vesicles.

  11. A light-scattering characterization of membrane vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Selser, J C; Yeh, Y; Baskin, R J

    1976-01-01

    A technique has been developed in this paper which enables quasi-elastic laser light scattering to be used to accurately and quantitatively measure the average vesicle diffusion coefficient and the relative dispersion in the diffusion coefficient about this average for dilute polydisperse vesicle suspensions. This technique relies on a theoretical analysis of a modified form of the Z-averaged diffusion coefficient. This modified Z-averaged diffusion coefficient explicitly incorporates vesicle size, structure, and polydispersity in a description of the scattered light autocorrelation spectrum. Light-scattering experiments were performed on a dilute, lobster sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicle suspension and the measured average diffusion coefficient and the diffusion coefficient relative dispersion about this average were determined with accuracies of 2 and 10%, respectively. A comparison of vesicle size inferred from light-scattering results was made with size results from electron microscopic analysis of the same sample. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 PMID:1252585

  12. ATP-driven calcium transport in membrane vesicles of Streptococcus sanguis. [Streptococcus sanguis; Streptococcus faecalis; Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Houng, H.; Lynn, A.R.; Rosen, B.P.

    1986-11-01

    Calcium transport was investigated in membrane vesicles prepared from the oral bacterium Streptococcus sanguis. Procedures were devised for the preparation of membrane vesicles capable of accumulation /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/. Uptake was ATP dependent and did not require a proton motive force. Calcium transport in these vesicles was compared with /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ accumulation in membrane vesicles from Streptococcus faecalis and Escherichia coli. The data support the existence of an ATP-driven calcium pump in S. sanguis similar to that in S. faecalis. This pump, which catalyzes uptake into membrane vesicles, would be responsible for extrusion of calcium from intact cells.

  13. Behavioral and neural responses of toads to salt solutions correlate with basolateral membrane potential of epidermal cells of the skin.

    PubMed

    Hillyard, Stanley D; Baula, Victor; Tuttle, Wendy; Willumsen, Niels J; Larsen, Erik H

    2007-10-01

    Dehydrated toads initiated water absorption response (WR) behavior and absorbed water from dilute NaCl solutions. With 200-250 mM NaCl, WR behavior and water absorption were both suppressed. With 200-250 mM Na-gluconate, WR initiation was significantly greater than with NaCl but water loss was greater. Neural recordings from spinal nerve #6 showed a greater integrated response to 250 mM NaCl than to 250 mM Na-gluconate, whereas a larger rinse response was seen with Na-gluconate. Studies with isolated epithelium showed a large increase in conductance (G(t)) when 250 mM NaCl replaced NaCl Ringer's as the apical bathing solution that was accompanied by depolarization of the transepithelial potential (V(t)) and basolateral membrane potential (V(b)). Depolarization of V(b) corresponded with the neural response to 250 mM NaCl. When 250 mM Na-gluconate replaced Ringer's as the apical solution G(t) remained low, V(b) transiently hyperpolarized to values near the equilibrium potential for K(+) and corresponded with the reduced neural response. These results support the hypothesis that chemosensory function of the skin is analogous to that of mammalian taste cells but utilizes paracellular ion transport to a greater degree.

  14. The effect of vesicle shape, line tension, and lateral tension on membrane-binding proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchison, Jaime B.

    Model membranes allow for the exploration of complex biological phenomena with simple, controllable components. In this thesis we employ model membranes to determine the effect of vesicle properties such as line tension, lateral tension, and shape on membrane-binding proteins. We find that line tension at the boundary between domains in a phase separated vesicle can accumulate model membrane-binding proteins (green fluorescent protein with a histidine tag), and that those proteins can, in turn, alter vesicle shape. These results suggest that domains in biological membranes may enhance the local concentration of membrane-bound proteins and thus alter protein function. We also explore how membrane mechanical and chemical properties alter the function of the N-BAR domain of amphiphysin, a membrane-binding protein implicated in endocytosis. We find that negatively charged lipids are necessary for N-BAR binding to membranes at detectable levels, and that, at least for some lipid species, binding may be cooperative. Measurements of N-BAR binding as a function of vesicle tension reveal that modest membrane tension of around 2 mN/m, corresponding to a strain of around 1%, strongly increases N-BAR binding. We attribute this increase in binding with tension to the insertion of N-BAR's N-terminal amphipathic helix into the membrane which increases the membrane area. We propose that N-BAR, which was previously described as being able to sense membrane curvature, may be sensing strain instead. Measurements of membrane deformation by N-BAR as a function of membrane tension reveal that tension can hinder membrane deformation. Thus, tension may favor N-BAR binding yet suppress membrane deformation/tubulation, which requires work against tension. These results suggest that membrane tension, a parameter that is often not controlled in model membranes but is tightly controlled in biological cells, may be important in regulating protein binding and assembly and, hence, protein

  15. Outer membrane vesicles of Lysobacter sp. XL1: biogenesis, functions, and applied prospects.

    PubMed

    Kudryakova, Irina V; Shishkova, Nina A; Vasilyeva, Natalia V

    2016-06-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) produced by Gram-negative bacteria have been intensively investigated in recent times. Vesicle formation models have been proposed, some factors affecting the process were established, and important roles vesicles play in vital activities of their producing cells were determined. Studies of pathogenic bacterial vesicles contribute to understanding the causes of acute infection and developing drugs on their basis. Despite intensive research, issues associated with the understanding of vesicle biogenesis, the mechanisms of bacterium-bacterium and pathogen-host interactions with participation of vesicles, still remain unresolved. This review discusses some results obtained in the research into OMVs of Lysobacter sp. XL1 VKM B-1576. This bacterium secretes into the environment a spectrum of bacteriolytic enzymes that hydrolyze peptidoglycan of competing bacteria, thus leading to their lysis. One of these enzymes, lytic endopeptidase L5, has been shown not only to be secreted by means of vesicles but also to be involved in their formation. As part of vesicles, the antimicrobial potential of L5 enzyme has been found to be considerably expanded. Vesicles have been shown to have a therapeutic effect in respect of anthrax infection and staphylococcal sepsis modelled in mice. The scientific basis for constructing liposomal antimicrobial preparations from vesicle phospholipids and recombinant bacteriolytic enzyme L5 has been formed.

  16. Vesicles

    MedlinePlus

    ... the top of a pin or up to 5 millimeters wide. A larger blister is called a bulla. In many cases, vesicles break easily and release their fluid onto the skin. When this fluid dries, yellow crusts may remain on the skin surface.

  17. Electrogenic Transport of Protons Driven by the Plasma Membrane ATPase in Membrane Vesicles from Radish 1

    PubMed Central

    Rasi-Caldogno, Franca; Pugliarello, Maria Chiara; De Michelis, Maria Ida

    1985-01-01

    Mg:ATP-dependent H+ pumping has been studied in microsomal vesicles from 24-hour-old radish (Raphanus sativus L.) seedlings by monitoring both intravesicular acidification and the building up of an inside positive membrane potential difference (Δ ψ). ΔpH was measured as the decrease of absorbance of Acridine orange and Δ ψ as the shift of absorbance of bis(3-propyl-5-oxoisoxazol-4-yl)pentamethine oxonol. Both Mg:ATP-dependent Δ pH and Δ ψ generation are completely inhibited by vanadate and insensitive to oligomycin; moreover, Δ pH generation is not inhibited by NO3−. These findings indicate that this membrane preparation is virtually devoid of mitochondrial and tonoplast H+-ATPases. Both intravesicular acidification and Δ ψ generation are influenced by anions: Δ pH increases and Δ ψ decreases following the sequence SO42−, Cl−, Br−, NO3−. ATP-dependent H+ pumping strictly requires Mg2+. It is very specific for ATP (apparent Km 0.76 millimolar) compared to GTP, UTP, CTP, ITP. Δ pH generation is inhibited by CuSO4 and diethylstilbestrol as well as vanadate. Δ pH generation is specificially stimulated by K+ (+ 80%) and to a lesser extent by Na+ and choline (+28% and +14%, respectively). The characteristics of H+ pumping in these microsomal vesicles closely resemble those described for the plasma membrane ATPase partially purified from several plant materials. PMID:16664008

  18. Vesicular transport system in myotubes: ultrastructural study and signposting with vesicle-associated membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Tajika, Yuki; Takahashi, Maiko; Khairani, Astrid Feinisa; Ueno, Hitoshi; Murakami, Tohru; Yorifuji, Hiroshi

    2014-04-01

    Myofibers have characteristic membrane compartments in their cytoplasm and sarcolemma, such as the sarcoplasmic reticulum, T-tubules, neuromuscular junction, and myotendinous junction. Little is known about the vesicular transport that is believed to mediate the development of these membrane compartments. We determined the locations of organelles in differentiating myotubes. Electron microscopic observation of a whole myotube revealed the arrangement of Golgi apparatus, rough endoplasmic reticulum, autolysosomes, mitochondria, and smooth endoplasmic reticulum from the perinuclear region toward the end of myotubes and the existence of a large number of vesicles near the ends of myotubes. Vesicles in myotubes were further characterized using immunofluorescence microscopy to analyze expression and localization of vesicle-associated membrane proteins (VAMPs). VAMPs are a family of seven proteins that regulate post-Golgi vesicular transport via the fusion of vesicles to the target membranes. Myotubes express five VAMPs in total. Vesicles with VAMP2, VAMP3, or VAMP5 were found near the ends of the myotubes. Some of these vesicles are also positive for caveolin-3, suggesting their participation in the development of T-tubules. Our morphological analyses revealed the characteristic arrangement of organelles in myotubes and the existence of transport vesicles near the ends of the myotubes.

  19. Porin Loss Impacts the Host Inflammatory Response to Outer Membrane Vesicles of Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Kelli L.; Cahill, Bethaney K.; Dilello, Sarah K.; Gutel, Dedra; Brunson, Debra N.; Albertí, Sebastián

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae often exhibit porin loss. In this study, we investigated how porin loss impacted the composition of secreted outer membrane vesicles as well as their ability to trigger proinflammatory cytokine secretion by macrophages. We hypothesize that porin loss associated with antibiotic resistance will directly impact both the composition of outer membrane vesicles and their interactions with phagocytic cells. Using clonally related clinical isolates of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-positive Klebsiella pneumoniae with different patterns of porin expression, we demonstrated that altered expression of OmpK35 and OmpK36 results in broad alterations to the protein profile of secreted vesicles. Additionally, the level of OmpA incorporation was elevated in strains lacking a single porin. Porin loss significantly impacted macrophage inflammatory responses to purified vesicles. Outer membrane vesicles lacking both OmpK35 and OmpK36 elicited significantly lower levels of proinflammatory cytokine secretion than vesicles from strains expressing one or both porins. These data demonstrate that antibiotic resistance-associated porin loss has a broad and significant effect on both the composition of outer membrane vesicles and their interactions with phagocytic cells, which may impact bacterial survival and inflammatory reactions in the host. PMID:26666932

  20. Porin Loss Impacts the Host Inflammatory Response to Outer Membrane Vesicles of Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Turner, Kelli L; Cahill, Bethaney K; Dilello, Sarah K; Gutel, Dedra; Brunson, Debra N; Albertí, Sebastián; Ellis, Terri N

    2015-12-14

    Antibiotic-resistant strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae often exhibit porin loss. In this study, we investigated how porin loss impacted the composition of secreted outer membrane vesicles as well as their ability to trigger proinflammatory cytokine secretion by macrophages. We hypothesize that porin loss associated with antibiotic resistance will directly impact both the composition of outer membrane vesicles and their interactions with phagocytic cells. Using clonally related clinical isolates of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-positive Klebsiella pneumoniae with different patterns of porin expression, we demonstrated that altered expression of OmpK35 and OmpK36 results in broad alterations to the protein profile of secreted vesicles. Additionally, the level of OmpA incorporation was elevated in strains lacking a single porin. Porin loss significantly impacted macrophage inflammatory responses to purified vesicles. Outer membrane vesicles lacking both OmpK35 and OmpK36 elicited significantly lower levels of proinflammatory cytokine secretion than vesicles from strains expressing one or both porins. These data demonstrate that antibiotic resistance-associated porin loss has a broad and significant effect on both the composition of outer membrane vesicles and their interactions with phagocytic cells, which may impact bacterial survival and inflammatory reactions in the host. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Comparison of Physicochemical Membrane Properties of Vesicles Modified with Guanidinium Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Nozomi; Suga, Keishi; Umakoshi, Hiroshi

    2017-08-18

    Bilayer vesicles have garnered considerable research attention as molecular vehicles capable of noncovalent interaction with biomolecules via electrostatic and hydrophobic bonds, and van der Waals interactions. Guanidinium strongly interacts with phosphate groups. Thus, guanidinium modification of vesicles helps intensify the interaction between lipid membranes and nucleic acids. Here, two kinds of guanidinium derivatives, stearylguanidinium (SG) and myristoylarginine (MA), were synthesized and incorporated into 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (POPC) vesicles. Differences in their membrane properties were evaluated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and the fluorescent probes 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH), 6-lauroyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene (Laurdan), and 2-p-toluidinylnaphthalene-6-sulfonate (TNS). The increased SG ratio increased overall hydrophobicity and lipid packing density compared to POPC vesicles, and SG-modified vesicles successfully attracted and then denatured negatively charged transfer RNAs (tRNAs). In contrast, MA-modified vesicles did not affect the stiffness of POPC membranes, wherein no conformational change in tRNAs was observed in the presence of POPC/MA vesicles. Analyses of the pH-dependent fluorescence emission of TNS suggested that SG and MA molecules render the membrane surfaces cationic and anionic, respectively, which was also revealed by zeta potential measurements. Our results enabled the construction of a model of the head group orientation of zwitterionic POPC molecules controlled by modification with guanidinium derivatives. The results also indicate the possibility to regulate the interaction and conformation of biological molecules, such as nucleic acid.

  2. Outer membrane vesicles displaying engineered glycotopes elicit protective antibodies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Linxiao; Valentine, Jenny L; Huang, Chung-Jr; Endicott, Christine E; Moeller, Tyler D; Rasmussen, Jed A; Fletcher, Joshua R; Boll, Joseph M; Rosenthal, Joseph A; Dobruchowska, Justyna; Wang, Zhirui; Heiss, Christian; Azadi, Parastoo; Putnam, David; Trent, M Stephen; Jones, Bradley D; DeLisa, Matthew P

    2016-06-28

    The O-antigen polysaccharide (O-PS) component of lipopolysaccharides on the surface of gram-negative bacteria is both a virulence factor and a B-cell antigen. Antibodies elicited by O-PS often confer protection against infection; therefore, O-PS glycoconjugate vaccines have proven useful against a number of different pathogenic bacteria. However, conventional methods for natural extraction or chemical synthesis of O-PS are technically demanding, inefficient, and expensive. Here, we describe an alternative methodology for producing glycoconjugate vaccines whereby recombinant O-PS biosynthesis is coordinated with vesiculation in laboratory strains of Escherichia coli to yield glycosylated outer membrane vesicles (glycOMVs) decorated with pathogen-mimetic glycotopes. Using this approach, glycOMVs corresponding to eight different pathogenic bacteria were generated. For example, expression of a 17-kb O-PS gene cluster from the highly virulent Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis (type A) strain Schu S4 in hypervesiculating E. coli cells yielded glycOMVs that displayed F. tularensis O-PS. Immunization of BALB/c mice with glycOMVs elicited significant titers of O-PS-specific serum IgG antibodies as well as vaginal and bronchoalveolar IgA antibodies. Importantly, glycOMVs significantly prolonged survival upon subsequent challenge with F. tularensis Schu S4 and provided complete protection against challenge with two different F. tularensis subsp. holarctica (type B) live vaccine strains, thereby demonstrating the vaccine potential of glycOMVs. Given the ease with which recombinant glycotopes can be expressed on OMVs, the strategy described here could be readily adapted for developing vaccines against many other bacterial pathogens.

  3. Outer membrane vesicles displaying engineered glycotopes elicit protective antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Valentine, Jenny L.; Huang, Chung-Jr; Endicott, Christine E.; Moeller, Tyler D.; Rasmussen, Jed A.; Fletcher, Joshua R.; Boll, Joseph M.; Rosenthal, Joseph A.; Dobruchowska, Justyna; Wang, Zhirui; Heiss, Christian; Azadi, Parastoo; Putnam, David; Trent, M. Stephen; Jones, Bradley D.; DeLisa, Matthew P.

    2016-01-01

    The O-antigen polysaccharide (O-PS) component of lipopolysaccharides on the surface of gram-negative bacteria is both a virulence factor and a B-cell antigen. Antibodies elicited by O-PS often confer protection against infection; therefore, O-PS glycoconjugate vaccines have proven useful against a number of different pathogenic bacteria. However, conventional methods for natural extraction or chemical synthesis of O-PS are technically demanding, inefficient, and expensive. Here, we describe an alternative methodology for producing glycoconjugate vaccines whereby recombinant O-PS biosynthesis is coordinated with vesiculation in laboratory strains of Escherichia coli to yield glycosylated outer membrane vesicles (glycOMVs) decorated with pathogen-mimetic glycotopes. Using this approach, glycOMVs corresponding to eight different pathogenic bacteria were generated. For example, expression of a 17-kb O-PS gene cluster from the highly virulent Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis (type A) strain Schu S4 in hypervesiculating E. coli cells yielded glycOMVs that displayed F. tularensis O-PS. Immunization of BALB/c mice with glycOMVs elicited significant titers of O-PS–specific serum IgG antibodies as well as vaginal and bronchoalveolar IgA antibodies. Importantly, glycOMVs significantly prolonged survival upon subsequent challenge with F. tularensis Schu S4 and provided complete protection against challenge with two different F. tularensis subsp. holarctica (type B) live vaccine strains, thereby demonstrating the vaccine potential of glycOMVs. Given the ease with which recombinant glycotopes can be expressed on OMVs, the strategy described here could be readily adapted for developing vaccines against many other bacterial pathogens. PMID:27274048

  4. Stress-induced outer membrane vesicle production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Ian A; Kuehn, Meta J

    2013-07-01

    As an opportunistic Gram-negative pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa must be able to adapt and survive changes and stressors in its environment during the course of infection. To aid survival in the hostile host environment, P. aeruginosa has evolved defense mechanisms, including the production of an exopolysaccharide capsule and the secretion of a myriad of degradative proteases and lipases. The production of outer membrane-derived vesicles (OMVs) serves as a secretion mechanism for virulence factors as well as a general bacterial response to envelope-acting stressors. This study investigated the effect of sublethal physiological stressors on OMV production by P. aeruginosa and whether the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS) and the MucD periplasmic protease are critical mechanistic factors in this response. Exposure to some environmental stressors was determined to increase the level of OMV production as well as the activity of AlgU, the sigma factor that controls MucD expression. Overexpression of AlgU was shown to be sufficient to induce OMV production; however, stress-induced OMV production was not dependent on activation of AlgU, since stress caused increased vesiculation in strains lacking algU. We further determined that MucD levels were not an indicator of OMV production under acute stress, and PQS was not required for OMV production under stress or unstressed conditions. Finally, an investigation of the response of P. aeruginosa to oxidative stress revealed that peroxide-induced OMV production requires the presence of B-band but not A-band lipopolysaccharide. Together, these results demonstrate that distinct mechanisms exist for stress-induced OMV production in P. aeruginosa.

  5. Stress-Induced Outer Membrane Vesicle Production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, Ian A.

    2013-01-01

    As an opportunistic Gram-negative pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa must be able to adapt and survive changes and stressors in its environment during the course of infection. To aid survival in the hostile host environment, P. aeruginosa has evolved defense mechanisms, including the production of an exopolysaccharide capsule and the secretion of a myriad of degradative proteases and lipases. The production of outer membrane-derived vesicles (OMVs) serves as a secretion mechanism for virulence factors as well as a general bacterial response to envelope-acting stressors. This study investigated the effect of sublethal physiological stressors on OMV production by P. aeruginosa and whether the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS) and the MucD periplasmic protease are critical mechanistic factors in this response. Exposure to some environmental stressors was determined to increase the level of OMV production as well as the activity of AlgU, the sigma factor that controls MucD expression. Overexpression of AlgU was shown to be sufficient to induce OMV production; however, stress-induced OMV production was not dependent on activation of AlgU, since stress caused increased vesiculation in strains lacking algU. We further determined that MucD levels were not an indicator of OMV production under acute stress, and PQS was not required for OMV production under stress or unstressed conditions. Finally, an investigation of the response of P. aeruginosa to oxidative stress revealed that peroxide-induced OMV production requires the presence of B-band but not A-band lipopolysaccharide. Together, these results demonstrate that distinct mechanisms exist for stress-induced OMV production in P. aeruginosa. PMID:23625841

  6. Outer membrane vesicles displaying engineered glycotopes elicit protective antibodies

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Linxiao; Valentine, Jenny L.; Huang, Chung-Jr; ...

    2016-06-06

    The O-antigen polysaccharide (O-PS) component of lipopolysaccharides on the surface of gram-negative bacteria is both a virulence factor and a B-cell antigen. Antibodies elicited by O-PS often confer protection against infection; therefore, O-PS glycoconjugate vaccines have proven useful against a number of different pathogenic bacteria. However, conventional methods for natural extraction or chemical synthesis of O-PS are technically demanding, inefficient, and expensive. In this paper, we describe an alternative methodology for producing glycoconjugate vaccines whereby recombinant O-PS biosynthesis is coordinated with vesiculation in laboratory strains of Escherichia coli to yield glycosylated outer membrane vesicles (glycOMVs) decorated with pathogen-mimetic glycotopes. Usingmore » this approach, glycOMVs corresponding to eight different pathogenic bacteria were generated. For example, expression of a 17-kb O-PS gene cluster from the highly virulent Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis (type A) strain Schu S4 in hypervesiculating E. coli cells yielded glycOMVs that displayed F. tularensis O-PS. Immunization of BALB/c mice with glycOMVs elicited significant titers of O-PS–specific serum IgG antibodies as well as vaginal and bronchoalveolar IgA antibodies. Importantly, glycOMVs significantly prolonged survival upon subsequent challenge with F. tularensis Schu S4 and provided complete protection against challenge with two different F. tularensis subsp. holarctica (type B) live vaccine strains, thereby demonstrating the vaccine potential of glycOMVs. Finally, given the ease with which recombinant glycotopes can be expressed on OMVs, the strategy described here could be readily adapted for developing vaccines against many other bacterial pathogens.« less

  7. Endocytic proteins drive vesicle growth via instability in high membrane tension environment

    PubMed Central

    Walani, Nikhil; Torres, Jennifer; Agrawal, Ashutosh

    2015-01-01

    Clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) is a key pathway for transporting cargo into cells via membrane vesicles; it plays an integral role in nutrient import, signal transduction, neurotransmission, and cellular entry of pathogens and drug-carrying nanoparticles. Because CME entails substantial local remodeling of the plasma membrane, the presence of membrane tension offers resistance to bending and hence, vesicle formation. Experiments show that in such high-tension conditions, actin dynamics is required to carry out CME successfully. In this study, we build on these pioneering experimental studies to provide fundamental mechanistic insights into the roles of two key endocytic proteins—namely, actin and BAR proteins—in driving vesicle formation in high membrane tension environment. Our study reveals an actin force-induced “snap-through instability” that triggers a rapid shape transition from a shallow invagination to a highly invaginated tubular structure. We show that the association of BAR proteins stabilizes vesicles and induces a milder instability. In addition, we present a rather counterintuitive role of BAR depolymerization in regulating the shape evolution of vesicles. We show that the dissociation of BAR proteins, supported by actin–BAR synergy, leads to considerable elongation and squeezing of vesicles. Going beyond the membrane geometry, we put forth a stress-based perspective for the onset of vesicle scission and predict the shapes and composition of detached vesicles. We present the snap-through transition and the high in-plane stress as possible explanations for the intriguing direct transformation of broad and shallow invaginations into detached vesicles in BAR mutant yeast cells. PMID:25775509

  8. Binding proteins for linear renin-inhibiting peptides in basolateral plasma membranes of rat liver.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, K; Sänger, U

    1992-01-31

    A linear hydrophobic peptide, (Code no. EMD 55068), a synthetic renin-antagonist, competitively inhibits the uptake of taurocholate and of another linear peptide (EMD 51921) but not of oleic acid, serine or thiamin hydrochloride into isolated rat liver cells. EMD 55068 was attached to a gel matrix at a position that is not involved in the protein ligand interaction. The gel matrix used did not interact nonspecifically with solubilized proteins from rat liver. The quantity of bound ligand was determined to be 3.6 mg/ml of gel matrix. In the fraction of EDTA extracted hydrophilic membrane-associated proteins, no binding proteins were detected. Affinity chromatography of integral plasma membrane proteins resulted in four protein bands with molecular masses of 46, 49, 53 and 56 kDa in SDS-PAGE. In contrast, solubilized plasma membrane proteins from AS-30D ascites hepatoma cells, which are unable to transport bile acids and linear peptides, did not bind specifically to the affinity matrix.

  9. Evidence that electrostatic interactions between vesicle-associated membrane protein 2 and acidic phospholipids may modulate the fusion of transport vesicles with the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Williams, Dumaine; Vicôgne, Jérome; Zaitseva, Irina; McLaughlin, Stuart; Pessin, Jeffrey E

    2009-12-01

    The juxtamembrane domain of vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP) 2 (also known as synaptobrevin2) contains a conserved cluster of basic/hydrophobic residues that may play an important role in membrane fusion. Our measurements on peptides corresponding to this domain determine the electrostatic and hydrophobic energies by which this domain of VAMP2 could bind to the adjacent lipid bilayer in an insulin granule or other transport vesicle. Mutation of residues within the juxtamembrane domain that reduce the VAMP2 net positive charge, and thus its interaction with membranes, inhibits secretion of insulin granules in beta cells. Increasing salt concentration in permeabilized cells, which reduces electrostatic interactions, also results in an inhibition of insulin secretion. Similarly, amphipathic weak bases (e.g., sphingosine) that reverse the negative electrostatic surface potential of a bilayer reverse membrane binding of the positively charged juxtamembrane domain of a reconstituted VAMP2 protein and inhibit membrane fusion. We propose a model in which the positively charged VAMP and syntaxin juxtamembrane regions facilitate fusion by bridging the negatively charged vesicle and plasma membrane leaflets.

  10. Characterization of Membrane Protein Interactions in Plasma Membrane Derived Vesicles with Quantitative Imaging FRET

    PubMed Central

    Sarabipour, Sarvenaz; Del Piccolo, Nuala; Hristova, Kalina

    2016-01-01

    CONSPECTUS Here we describe an experimental tool, termed Quantitative Imaging Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (QI-FRET), which enables the quantitative characterization of membrane protein interactions. The QI-FRET methodology allows us to acquire binding curves and calculate association constants for complex membrane proteins in the native plasma membrane environment. The method utilizes FRET detection, and thus requires that the proteins of interest are labeled with florescent proteins, either FRET donors or FRET acceptors. Since plasma membranes of cells have complex topologies precluding the acquisition of two-dimensional binding curves, the FRET measurements are performed in plasma membrane derived vesicles which bud off cells as a result of chemical or osmotic stress. The results overviewed here are acquired in vesicles produced with an osmotic vesiculation buffer developed in our laboratory, which does not utilize harsh chemicals. The concentrations of the donor-labeled and the acceptor-labeled proteins are determined, along with the FRET efficiencies, in each vesicle. The experiments utilize transient transfection, such that a wide variety of concentrations is sampled. Then, data from hundreds of vesicles are combined to yield dimerization curves. Here we discuss recent findings about the dimerization of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), membrane proteins that control cell growth and differentiation via lateral dimerization in the plasma membrane. We focus on the dimerization of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3), an RTK that plays a critically important role in skeletal development. We study the role of different FGFR3 domains in FGFR3 dimerization in the absence of ligand, and we show that FGFR3 extracellular domains inhibit unliganded dimerization, while contacts between the juxtamembrane domains, which connect the transmembrane domains to the kinase domains, stabilize the unliganded FGFR3 dimers. Since FGFR3 has been documented to harbor

  11. Munc18-1 Protein Molecules Move between Membrane Molecular Depots Distinct from Vesicle Docking Sites*

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, Annya M.; Yang, Lei; Martin, Kirsty J.; Hamilton, Charlotte; Lu, Weiping; Cousin, Michael A.; Rickman, Colin; Duncan, Rory R.

    2013-01-01

    Four evolutionarily conserved proteins are required for mammalian regulated exocytosis: three SNARE proteins, syntaxin, SNAP-25, and synaptobrevin, and the SM protein, Munc18-1. Here, using single-molecule imaging, we measured the spatial distribution of large cohorts of single Munc18-1 molecules correlated with the positions of single secretory vesicles in a functionally rescued Munc18-1-null cellular model. Munc18-1 molecules were nonrandomly distributed across the plasma membrane in a manner not directed by mode of interaction with syntaxin1, with a small mean number of molecules observed to reside under membrane resident vesicles. Surprisingly, we found that the majority of vesicles in fully secretion-competent cells had no Munc18-1 associated within distances relevant to plasma membrane-vesicle SNARE interactions. Live cell imaging of Munc18-1 molecule dynamics revealed that the density of Munc18-1 molecules at the plasma membrane anticorrelated with molecular speed, with single Munc18-1 molecules displaying directed motion between membrane hotspots enriched in syntaxin1a. Our findings demonstrate that Munc18-1 molecules move between membrane depots distinct from vesicle morphological docking sites. PMID:23223447

  12. The reversibility of active sulphate transport in membrane vesicles of Paracoccus denitrificans.

    PubMed Central

    Burnell, J N; John, P; Whatley, F R

    1975-01-01

    An uncoupler-sensitive active transport of sulphate into membrane vesicles prepared from the plasma membrane of Paracoccus denitrificans (previously Micrococcus denitrificans) can be driven by respiration or by a trans-membrane pH gradient (alkaline inside) generated by the addition either of KCL ( in the presence of nigericin) or of NH4CL. Valinomycin does not substitute for nigericin. Respiration-driven transport is observed in right-side-out vesicles but not in inside-out vesicles, whereas transport driven by the addition of KCL (in the presence of nigericin) or of NH4CL is observed in both types of membrane vesicle. The active transport of sulphate into these vesicles is shown to be carrier-mediated by its sensitivity to thiol-group reagents. It is proposed that the sulphate carrier in the plasma membrane of P. denitrificans operates by a mechanism of electroneutral proton symport, and is capable of actively transporting sulphate in either direction across the plasma membrane, but that in whole cells respiration-driven proton expulsion drives the accumulative uptake of sulphate. PMID:1212205

  13. The reversibility of active sulphate transport in membrane vesicles of Paracoccus denitrificans.

    PubMed

    Burnell, J N; John, P; Whatley, F R

    1975-09-01

    An uncoupler-sensitive active transport of sulphate into membrane vesicles prepared from the plasma membrane of Paracoccus denitrificans (previously Micrococcus denitrificans) can be driven by respiration or by a trans-membrane pH gradient (alkaline inside) generated by the addition either of KCL ( in the presence of nigericin) or of NH4CL. Valinomycin does not substitute for nigericin. Respiration-driven transport is observed in right-side-out vesicles but not in inside-out vesicles, whereas transport driven by the addition of KCL (in the presence of nigericin) or of NH4CL is observed in both types of membrane vesicle. The active transport of sulphate into these vesicles is shown to be carrier-mediated by its sensitivity to thiol-group reagents. It is proposed that the sulphate carrier in the plasma membrane of P. denitrificans operates by a mechanism of electroneutral proton symport, and is capable of actively transporting sulphate in either direction across the plasma membrane, but that in whole cells respiration-driven proton expulsion drives the accumulative uptake of sulphate.

  14. Insulin and IGF-1 activate Kir4.1/5.1 channels in cortical collecting duct principal cells to control basolateral membrane voltage

    PubMed Central

    Zaika, Oleg; Palygin, Oleg; Tomilin, Viktor; Mamenko, Mykola

    2015-01-01

    Potassium Kir4.1/5.1 channels are abundantly expressed at the basolateral membrane of principal cells in the cortical collecting duct (CCD), where they are thought to modulate transport rates by controlling transepithelial voltage. Insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) stimulate apically localized epithelial sodium channels (ENaC) to augment sodium reabsorption in the CCD. However, little is known about their actions on potassium channels localized at the basolateral membrane. In this study, we implemented patch-clamp analysis in freshly isolated murine CCD to assess the effect of these hormones on Kir4.1/5.1 at both single channel and cellular levels. We demonstrated that K+-selective conductance via Kir4.1/5.1 is the major contributor to the macroscopic current recorded from the basolateral side in principal cells. Acute treatment with 10 μM amiloride (ENaC blocker), 100 nM tertiapin-Q (TPNQ; ROMK inhibitor), and 100 μM ouabain (Na+-K+-ATPase blocker) failed to produce a measurable effect on the macroscopic current. In contrast, Kir4.1 inhibitor nortriptyline (100 μM), but not fluoxetine (100 μM), virtually abolished whole cell K+-selective conductance. Insulin (100 nM) markedly increased the open probability of Kir4.1/5.1 and nortriptyline-sensitive whole cell current, leading to significant hyperpolarization of the basolateral membrane. Inhibition of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase cascade with LY294002 (20 μM) abolished action of insulin on Kir4.1/5.1. IGF-1 had similar stimulatory actions on Kir4.1/5.1-mediated conductance only when applied at a higher (500 nM) concentration and was ineffective at 100 nM. We concluded that both insulin and, to a lesser extent, IGF-1 activate Kir4.1/5.1 channel activity and open probability to hyperpolarize the basolateral membrane, thereby facilitating Na+ reabsorption in the CCD. PMID:26632606

  15. Release of outer membrane vesicles by Gram-negative bacteria is a novel envelope stress response

    PubMed Central

    McBroom, Amanda J; Kuehn, Meta J

    2007-01-01

    Conditions that impair protein folding in the Gram-negative bacterial envelope cause stress. The destabilizing effects of stress in this compartment are recognized and countered by a number of signal transduction mechanisms. Data presented here reveal another facet of the complex bacterial stress response, release of outer membrane vesicles. Native vesicles are composed of outer membrane and periplasmic material, and they are released from the bacterial surface without loss of membrane integrity. Here we demonstrate that the quantity of vesicle release correlates directly with the level of protein accumulation in the cell envelope. Accumulation of material occurs under stress, and is exacerbated upon impairment of the normal housekeeping and stress-responsive mechanisms of the cell. Mutations that cause increased vesiculation enhance bacterial survival upon challenge with stressing agents or accumulation of toxic misfolded proteins. Preferential packaging of a misfolded protein mimic into vesicles for removal indicates that the vesiculation process can act to selectively eliminate unwanted material. Our results demonstrate that production of bacterial outer membrane vesicles is a fully independent, general envelope stress response. In addition to identifying a novel mechanism for alleviating stress, this work provides physiological relevance for vesicle production as a protective mechanism. PMID:17163978

  16. A novel method to quantify H+-ATPase-dependent Na+ transport across plasma membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yongqing; Hu, Lei; Chen, Xuemei; Ottow, Eric A; Polle, Andrea; Jiang, Xiangning

    2007-09-01

    To prevent sodium toxicity in plants, Na(+) is excluded from the cytosol to the apoplast or the vacuole by Na(+)/H(+) antiporters. The secondary active transport of Na(+) to apoplast against its electrochemical gradient is driven by plasma membrane H(+)-ATPases that hydrolyze ATP and pump H(+) across the plasma membrane. Current methods to determine Na(+) flux rely either on the use of Na-isotopes ((22)Na) which require special working permission or sophisticated equipment or on indirect methods estimating changes in the H(+) gradient due to H(+)-ATPase in the presence or absence of Na(+) by pH-sensitive probes. To date, there are no methods that can directly quantify H(+)-ATPase-dependent Na(+) transport in plasma membrane vesicles. We developed a method to measure bidirectional H(+)-ATPase-dependent Na(+) transport in isolated membrane vesicle systems using atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). The experiments were performed using plasma membrane-enriched vesicles isolated by aqueous two-phase partitioning from leaves of Populus tomentosa. Since most of the plasma membrane vesicles have a sealed right-side-out orientation after repeated aqueous two-phase partitioning, the ATP-binding sites of H(+)-ATPases are exposed towards inner side. Leaky vesicles were preloaded with Na(+) sealed for the study of H(+)-ATPase-dependent Na(+) transport. Our data implicate that Na(+) movement across vesicle membranes is highly dependent on H(+)-ATPase activity requiring ATP and Mg(2+) and displays optimum rates of 2.50 microM Na(+) mg(-1) membrane protein min(-1) at pH 6.5 and 25 degrees C. In this study, for the first time, we establish new protocols for the preparation of sealed preloaded right-side-out vesicles for the study of H(+)-ATPase-dependent Na(+) transport. The results demonstrate that the Na(+) content of various types of plasma membrane vesicle can be directly quantified by AAS, and the results measured using AAS method were consistent with those determined by the

  17. Formation of polyhedral vesicles and polygonal membrane tubes induced by banana-shaped proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Hiroshi

    2015-12-01

    The shape transformations of fluid membranes induced by curved protein rods are studied using meshless membrane simulations. The rod assembly at low rod density induces a flat membrane tube and oblate vesicle. It is found that the polyhedral shapes are stabilized at high rod densities. The discrete shape transition between triangular and buckled discoidal tubes is obtained and their curvature energies are analyzed by a simple geometric model. For vesicles, triangular hosohedron and elliptic-disk shapes are formed in equilibrium, whereas tetrahedral and triangular prism shapes are obtained as metastable states.

  18. Trypsin digestion for determining orientation of ATPase in Halobacterium saccharovorum membrane vesicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kristjansson, H.; Hochstein, L. I.

    1986-01-01

    Membranes prepared by low pressure disruption of cells exhibited no ATPase activity in the absence of Triton X-100, although 43% of the total menadione reductase activity was detected. Trypsin digestion reduced menadione reductase activity by 45% whereas ATPase activity was not affected. Disruption of the membrane fraction at higher pressure solubilized about 45% of the ATPase activity. The soluble activity was still enhanced by Triton X-100, suggesting that the detergent, besides disrupting membrane vesicles, also activated the ATPase. The discrepancy in localization of menadione reductase and ATPase activities raised questions regarding the reliability of using a single marker enzyme as an indicator of vesicle orientation.

  19. Trypsin digestion for determining orientation of ATPase in Halobacterium saccharovorum membrane vesicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kristjansson, H.; Hochstein, L. I.

    1986-01-01

    Membranes prepared by low pressure disruption of cells exhibited no ATPase activity in the absence of Triton X-100, although 43% of the total menadione reductase activity was detected. Trypsin digestion reduced menadione reductase activity by 45% whereas ATPase activity was not affected. Disruption of the membrane fraction at higher pressure solubilized about 45% of the ATPase activity. The soluble activity was still enhanced by Triton X-100, suggesting that the detergent, besides disrupting membrane vesicles, also activated the ATPase. The discrepancy in localization of menadione reductase and ATPase activities raised questions regarding the reliability of using a single marker enzyme as an indicator of vesicle orientation.

  20. Towards fully automated Identification of Vesicle-Membrane Fusion Events in TIRF Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallotton, Pascal; James, David E.; Hughes, William E.

    2007-11-01

    Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy (TIRFM) is imposing itself as the tool of choice for studying biological activity in close proximity to the plasma membrane. For example, the exquisite selectivity of TIRFM allows monitoring the diffusion of GFP-phogrin vesicles and their recruitment to the plasma membrane in pancreatic β-cells. We present a novel computer vision system for automatically identifying the elusive fusion events of GFP-phogrin vesicles with the plasma membrane. Our method is based on robust object tracking and matched filtering. It should accelerate the quantification of TIRFM data and allow the extraction of more biological information from image data to support research in diabetes and obesity.

  1. Robust measurement of membrane bending moduli using light sheet fluorescence imaging of vesicle fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Loftus, Andrew F; Noreng, Sigrid; Hsieh, Vivian L; Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2013-11-26

    The mechanical rigidity of lipid membranes is a key determinant of the energetics of cellular membrane deformation. Measurements of membrane bending moduli remain rare, however, and show a large variance, a situation that can be addressed by the development of improved techniques and by comparisons between disparate techniques applied to the same systems. We introduce here the use of selective plane illumination microscopy (SPIM, also known as light sheet fluorescence microscopy) to image thermal fluctuations of giant vesicles. The optical sectioning of SPIM enables high-speed fluorescence imaging of freely suspended vesicles and quantification of edge localization precision, yielding robust fluctuation spectra and rigidity estimates. For both lipid-only membranes and membranes bound by the intracellular trafficking protein Sar1p, which lowers membrane rigidity in a concentration-dependent manner, we show that the resulting bending modulus values are in close agreement with those derived from an independent assay based on membrane tether pulling. We also show that the fluctuation spectra of vesicles bound by the mammalian Sar1A protein, which stiffens membranes at high concentrations, are not well fit by a model of homogeneous quasi-spherical vesicles, suggesting that SPIM-based analysis can offer insights into spatially inhomogeneous properties induced by protein assemblies.

  2. Membrane-elasticity model of Coatless vesicle budding induced by ESCRT complexes.

    PubMed

    Różycki, Bartosz; Boura, Evzen; Hurley, James H; Hummer, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    The formation of vesicles is essential for many biological processes, in particular for the trafficking of membrane proteins within cells. The Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport (ESCRT) directs membrane budding away from the cytosol. Unlike other vesicle formation pathways, the ESCRT-mediated budding occurs without a protein coat. Here, we propose a minimal model of ESCRT-induced vesicle budding. Our model is based on recent experimental observations from direct fluorescence microscopy imaging that show ESCRT proteins colocalized only in the neck region of membrane buds. The model, cast in the framework of membrane elasticity theory, reproduces the experimentally observed vesicle morphologies with physically meaningful parameters. In this parameter range, the minimum energy configurations of the membrane are coatless buds with ESCRTs localized in the bud neck, consistent with experiment. The minimum energy configurations agree with those seen in the fluorescence images, with respect to both bud shapes and ESCRT protein localization. On the basis of our model, we identify distinct mechanistic pathways for the ESCRT-mediated budding process. The bud size is determined by membrane material parameters, explaining the narrow yet different bud size distributions in vitro and in vivo. Our membrane elasticity model thus sheds light on the energetics and possible mechanisms of ESCRT-induced membrane budding.

  3. Enzymes of phosphoinositide synthesis in secretory vesicles destined for the plasma membrane in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kinney, A J; Carman, G M

    1990-07-01

    CDP-diacylglycerol synthase, phosphatidylinositol synthase, and phosphatidylinositol kinase activities were associated with post-Golgi apparatus secretory vesicles destined for the plasma membrane of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These results suggest that the plasma membrane is capable of synthesizing both CDP-diacylglycerol and phosphatidylinositol as well as phosphorylating phosphatidylinositol.

  4. Vesicle-associated membrane protein 2 mediates trafficking of {alpha}5{beta}1 integrin to the plasma membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Hasan, Nazarul; Hu, Chuan

    2010-01-01

    Integrins are major receptors for cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM). As transmembrane proteins, the levels of integrins at the plasma membrane or the cell surface are ultimately determined by the balance between two vesicle trafficking events: endocytosis of integrins at the plasma membrane and exocytosis of the vesicles that transport integrins. Here, we report that vesicle-associated membrane protein 2 (VAMP2), a SNARE protein that mediates vesicle fusion with the plasma membrane, is involved in the trafficking of {alpha}5{beta}1 integrin. VAMP2 was present on vesicles containing endocytosed {beta}1 integrin. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) silencing of VAMP2 markedly reduced cell surface {alpha}5{beta}1 and inhibited cell adhesion and chemotactic migration to fibronectin, the ECM ligand of {alpha}5{beta}1, without altering cell surface expression of {alpha}2{beta}1 integrin or {alpha}3{beta}1 integrin. By contrast, silencing of VAMP8, another SNARE protein, had no effect on cell surface expression of the integrins or cell adhesion to fibronectin. In addition, VAMP2-mediated trafficking is involved in cell adhesion to collagen but not to laminin. Consistent with disruption of integrin functions in cell proliferation and survival, VAMP2 silencing diminished proliferation and triggered apoptosis. Collectively, these data indicate that VAMP2 mediates the trafficking of {alpha}5{beta}1 integrin to the plasma membrane and VAMP2-dependent integrin trafficking is critical in cell adhesion, migration and survival.

  5. Bacterial Membrane Vesicles Mediate the Release of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Lipoglycans and Lipoproteins from Infected Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Athman, Jaffre J; Wang, Ying; McDonald, David J; Boom, W Henry; Harding, Clifford V; Wearsch, Pamela A

    2015-08-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is an intracellular pathogen that infects lung macrophages and releases microbial factors that regulate host defense. M. tuberculosis lipoproteins and lipoglycans block phagosome maturation, inhibit class II MHC Ag presentation, and modulate TLR2-dependent cytokine production, but the mechanisms for their release during infection are poorly defined. Furthermore, these molecules are thought to be incorporated into host membranes and released from infected macrophages within exosomes, 40-150-nm extracellular vesicles that derive from multivesicular endosomes. However, our studies revealed that extracellular vesicles released from infected macrophages include two distinct, largely nonoverlapping populations: one containing host cell markers of exosomes (CD9, CD63) and the other containing M. tuberculosis molecules (lipoglycans, lipoproteins). These vesicle populations are similar in size but have distinct densities, as determined by separation on sucrose gradients. Release of lipoglycans and lipoproteins from infected macrophages was dependent on bacterial viability, implicating active bacterial mechanisms in their secretion. Consistent with recent reports of extracellular vesicle production by bacteria (including M. tuberculosis), we propose that bacterial membrane vesicles are secreted by M. tuberculosis within infected macrophages and subsequently are released into the extracellular environment. Furthermore, extracellular vesicles released from M. tuberculosis-infected cells activate TLR2 and induce cytokine responses by uninfected macrophages. We demonstrate that these activities derive from the bacterial membrane vesicles rather than exosomes. Our findings suggest that bacterial membrane vesicles are the primary means by which M. tuberculosis exports lipoglycans and lipoproteins to impair effector functions of infected macrophages and circulate bacterial components beyond the site of infection to regulate immune responses by uninfected

  6. Chloride ion transport into pig jejunal brush-border membrane vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Forsyth, G W; Gabriel, S E

    1988-01-01

    1. This study was carried out to determine the types and activities of carrier proteins which transport the chloride ion in pig jejunal brush-border membranes, with an emphasis on studying the properties of chloride conductance activity in vesicles prepared from these membranes. 2. Sodium-chloride co-transport activity was not detected in this tissue. A sodium-proton antiport with typical amiloride sensitivity was present. An anion exchanger linking chloride to hydroxyl or bicarbonate ions was also found in the pig jejunal brush-border membrane vesicles. 3. Chloride conductance activity in this system was specifically dependent on the buffering agents used for vesicle preparation. Conductance activity could not be demonstrated in vesicles prepared in imidazolium acetate or in HEPES-Tris buffers. HEPES-tetramethylammonium buffering of vesicles in the chloride uptake system produced a significant conductance response to a potassium gradient plus valinomycin. 4. Chloride conductance showed saturable kinetics with respect to substrate concentration, with a Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) of approximately 116 mM and a maximum velocity (Vmax) of 132 nmol (mg protein)-1 min-1. 5. Preliminary screening of potential inhibitors of chloride conductance showed only minimal inhibitor effects of SITS (4-acetamido-4'-isothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-sulphonic acid), anthracene-9-carboxylate, N-phenylanthranilate and piretanide. 6. The conductance activity in pig jejunal vesicles appears to have stringent buffer requirements, and to be relatively insensitive to the effects of reported conductance inhibitors. PMID:2466986

  7. Proteomic analysis of plasma membrane and secretory vesicles from human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Jethwaney, Deepa; Islam, Md Rafiqul; Leidal, Kevin G; de Bernabe, Daniel Beltran-Valero; Campbell, Kevin P; Nauseef, William M; Gibson, Bradford W

    2007-01-01

    Background Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) constitute an essential cellular component of innate host defense against microbial invasion and exhibit a wide array of responses both to particulate and soluble stimuli. As the cells recruited earliest during acute inflammation, PMN respond rapidly and release a variety of potent cytotoxic agents within minutes of exposure to microbes or their products. PMN rely on the redistribution of functionally important proteins, from intracellular compartments to the plasma membrane and phagosome, as the means by which to respond quickly. To determine the range of membrane proteins available for rapid recruitment during PMN activation, we analyzed the proteins in subcellular fractions enriched for plasma membrane and secretory vesicles recovered from the light membrane fraction of resting PMN after Percoll gradient centrifugation and free-flow electrophoresis purification using mass spectrometry-based proteomics methods. Results To identify the proteins light membrane fractions enriched for plasma membrane vesicles and secretory vesicles, we employed a proteomic approach, first using MALDI-TOF (peptide mass fingerprinting) and then by HPLC-MS/MS using a 3D ion trap mass spectrometer to analyze the two vesicle populations from resting PMN. We identified several proteins that are functionally important but had not previously been recovered in PMN secretory vesicles. Two such proteins, 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein (FLAP) and dysferlin were further validated by immunoblot analysis. Conclusion Our data demonstrate the broad array of proteins present in secretory vesicles that provides the PMN with the capacity for remarkable and rapid reorganization of its plasma membrane after exposure to proinflammatory agents or stimuli. PMID:17692124

  8. A continuum model of docking of synaptic vesicle to plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tianshu; Singh, Pankaj; Jenkins, James T.; Jagota, Anand; Bykhovskaia, Maria; Hui, Chung-Yuen

    2015-01-01

    Neurotransmitter release from neuronal terminals is governed by synaptic vesicle fusion. Vesicles filled with transmitters are docked at the neuronal membrane by means of the SNARE machinery. After a series of events leading up to the fusion pore formation, neurotransmitters are released into the synaptic cleft. In this paper, we study the mechanics of the docking process. A continuum model is used to determine the deformation of a spherical vesicle and a plasma membrane, under the influence of SNARE-machinery forces and electrostatic repulsion. Our analysis provides information on the variation of in-plane stress in the membranes, which is known to affect fusion. Also, a simple model is proposed to study hemifusion. PMID:25551140

  9. ATP- and growth substance-dependent cell-free enlargement of plasma membrane vesicles from soybean.

    PubMed

    Auderset, Guy; Morré, D James

    2006-01-01

    Growth hormone-responsive and nucleoside triphosphate-dependent enlargement of inside-out vesicles of plasma membranes from soybeans prepared by aqueous two-phase partition and everted by freezing and thawing has been achieved in a cell-free system. In the presence of 100 microM ATP in 40 mM HEPES buffer, pH 7, enlargement of isolated plasma membrane vesicles was accelerated by the synthetic plant growth factor, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), compared to ATP alone, 2,4-D alone or no additions. After 20 min with 1 microM 2,4-D, vesicles increased in diameter, 20% on average. Although vesicle diameters in the presence or absence of 2,4-D overlapped, the means were clearly separated. The 20% increases in diameter corresponded to a doubling of vesicle volume. Both 100 microM ATP and 1 microM 2,4-D were necessary to stimulate the cell-free vesicle enlargement. In the presence of 1 microM 2,4-D, enlargement observed with 100 microM ATP was greater than with either 10 microM ATP or 500 microM ATP alone. In the presence of 100 microM ATP, vesicle enlargement was proportional to the logarithm of 2,4-D concentration. With the growth-inactive 2,4-D analog, 2,3-D, no vesicle enlargement was observed either alone or in the presence of 100 microM ATP. Right side-out vesicles did not enlarge in response to either ATP, 2,4-D or the two in combination suggesting that the responsible ATP site was on the inside of the cell.

  10. Bacterial Social Networks: Structure and composition of Myxococcus xanthus outer membrane vesicle chains

    PubMed Central

    Remis, Jonathan P.; Wei, Doug; Gorur, Amita; Zemla, Marcin; Haraga, Jessica; Allen, Simon; Witkowska, H. Ewa; Costerton, J. William; Berleman, James E.; Auer, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    Summary The social soil bacterium, Myxococcus xanthus, displays a variety of complex and highly coordinated behaviors, including social motility, predatory rippling and fruiting body formation. Here we show that M. xanthus cells produce a network of outer membrane extensions in the form of vesicles and vesicle chains that interconnect cells. We observed peritrichous display of vesicles and vesicle chains and increased abundance in biofilms compared to planktonic cultures. By applying a range of imaging techniques, including 3D Focused Ion Beam Scanning Electron Microscopy (FIB/SEM), we determined these structures to range between 30-60 nm in width and up to 5 μm in length. Purified vesicle chains consist of typical M. xanthus lipids, fucose, mannose, N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) and N-acetylgalactoseamine (GalNAc) carbohydrates and a small set of cargo protein. The protein content includes CglB and Tgl membrane proteins transferred in a contact-dependent manner. Most significantly, the 3D organization of cells within biofilms indicates that cells are connected via an extensive network of membrane extensions that may connect cells at the level of the periplasmic space. Such a network would allow the transfer of membrane proteins and other molecules between cells, and likely provides a mechanism for the coordination of social activities. PMID:23848955

  11. Outer membrane machinery and alginate synthesis regulators control membrane vesicle production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Tashiro, Yosuke; Sakai, Ryosuke; Toyofuku, Masanori; Sawada, Isao; Nakajima-Kambe, Toshiaki; Uchiyama, Hiroo; Nomura, Nobuhiko

    2009-12-01

    The opportunistic human bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces membrane vesicles (MVs) in its surrounding environment. Several features of the P. aeruginosa MV production mechanism are still unknown. We previously observed that depletion of Opr86, which has a role in outer membrane protein (OMP) assembly, resulted in hypervesiculation. In this study, we showed that the outer membrane machinery and alginate synthesis regulatory machinery are closely related to MV production in P. aeruginosa. Depletion of Opr86 resulted in increased expression of the periplasmic serine protease MucD, suggesting that the accumulation of misfolded OMPs in the periplasm is related to MV production. Indeed, the mucD mutant showed a mucoid phenotype and the mucD mutation caused increased MV production. Strains with the gene encoding alginate synthetic regulator AlgU, MucA, or MucB deleted also caused altered MV production. Overexpression of either MucD or AlgW serine proteases resulted in decreased MV production, suggesting that proteases localized in the periplasm repress MV production in P. aeruginosa. Deletion of mucD resulted in increased MV proteins, even in strains with mutations in the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS), which serves as a positive regulator of MV production. This study suggests that misfolded OMPs may be important for MV production, in addition to PQS, and that these regulators act in independent pathways.

  12. Acinetobacter baumannii Outer Membrane Vesicles Elicit a Potent Innate Immune Response via Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Jun, So Hyun; Lee, Jung Hwa; Kim, Bo Ra; Kim, Seung Il; Park, Tae In

    2013-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is increasingly becoming a major nosocomial pathogen. This opportunistic pathogen secretes outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) that interact with host cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of A. baumannii OMVs to elicit a pro-inflammatory response in vitro and the immunopathology in response to A. baumannii OMVs in vivo. OMVs derived from A. baumannii ATCC 19606T induced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6, and chemokine genes, IL-8, macrophage inflammatory protein-1α, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, in epithelial cells in a dose-dependent manner. Disintegration of OMV membrane with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid resulted in low expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes, as compared with the response to intact OMVs. In addition, proteinase K-treated A. baumannii OMVs did not induce significant increase in expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes above the basal level, suggesting that the surface-exposed membrane proteins in intact OMVs are responsible for pro-inflammatory response. Early inflammatory processes, such as vacuolization and detachment of epithelial cells and neutrophilic infiltration, were clearly observed in lungs of mice injected with A. baumannii OMVs. Our data demonstrate that OMVs produced by A. baumannii elicit a potent innate immune response, which may contribute to immunopathology of the infected host. PMID:23977136

  13. Acinetobacter baumannii outer membrane protein A modulates the biogenesis of outer membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Moon, Dong Chan; Choi, Chul Hee; Lee, Jung Hwa; Choi, Chi-Won; Kim, Hye-Yeon; Park, Jeong Soon; Kim, Seung Il; Lee, Je Chul

    2012-02-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii secretes outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) during both in vitro and in vivo growth, but the biogenesis mechanism by which A. baumannii produces OMVs remains undefined. Outer membrane protein A of A. baumannii (AbOmpA) is a major protein in the outer membrane and the C-terminus of AbOmpA interacts with diaminopimelate of peptidoglycan. This study investigated the role of AbOmpA in the biogenesis of A. baumannii OMVs. Quantitative and qualitative approaches were used to analyze OMV biogenesis in A. baumannii ATCC 19606T and an isogenic ΔAbOmpA mutant. OMV production was significantly increased in the ΔAbOmpA mutant compared to wild-type bacteria as demonstrated by quantitation of proteins and lipopolysaccharides (LPS) packaged in OMVs. LPS profiles prepared from OMVs from wild-type bacteria and the ΔAbOmpA mutant had identical patterns, but proteomic analysis showed different protein constituents in OMVs from wild-type bacteria compared to the ΔAbOmpA mutant. In conclusion, AbOmpA influences OMV biogenesis by controlling OMV production and protein composition.

  14. Kinetics of phloretin binding to phosphatidylcholine vesicle membranes

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    The submillisecond kinetics for phloretin binding to unilamellar phosphatidylcholine (PC) vesicles was investigated using the temperature-jump technique. Spectrophotometric studies of the equilibrium binding performed at 328 nm demonstrated that phloretin binds to a single set of independent, equivalent sites on the vesicle with a dissociation constant of 8.0 microM and a lipid/site ratio of 4.0. The temperature of the phloretin-vesicle solution was jumped by 4 degrees C within 4 microseconds producing a monoexponential, concentration-dependent relaxation process with time constants in the 30--200-microseconds time range. An analysis of the concentration dependence of relaxation time constants at pH 7.30 and 24 degrees C yielded a binding rate constant of 2.7 X 10(8) M-1 s-1 and an unbinding constant of 2,900 s-1; approximately 66 percent of total binding sites are exposed at the outer vesicle surface. The value of the binding rate constant and three additional observations suggest that the binding kinetics are diffusion limited. The phloretin analogue, naringenin, which has a diffusion coefficient similar to phloretin yet a dissociation constant equal to 24 microM, bound to PC vesicle with the same rate constant as phloretin did. In addition, the phloretin-PC system was studied in buffers made one to six times more viscous than water by addition of sucrose or glycerol to the differ. The equilibrium affinity for phloretin binding to PC vesicles is independent of viscosity, yet the binding rate constant decreases with the expected dependence (kappa binding alpha 1/viscosity) for diffusion-limited processes. Thus, the binding rate constant is not altered by differences in binding affinity, yet depends upon the diffusion coefficient in buffer. Finally, studies of the pH dependence of the binding rate constant showed a dependence (kappa binding alpha [1 + 10pH-pK]) consistent with the diffusion-limited binding of a weak acid. PMID:7391812

  15. Bacterial social networks: structure and composition of Myxococcus xanthus outer membrane vesicle chains.

    PubMed

    Remis, Jonathan P; Wei, Dongguang; Gorur, Amita; Zemla, Marcin; Haraga, Jessica; Allen, Simon; Witkowska, H Ewa; Costerton, J William; Berleman, James E; Auer, Manfred

    2014-02-01

    The social soil bacterium, Myxococcus xanthus, displays a variety of complex and highly coordinated behaviours, including social motility, predatory rippling and fruiting body formation. Here we show that M. xanthus cells produce a network of outer membrane extensions in the form of outer membrane vesicle chains and membrane tubes that interconnect cells. We observed peritrichous display of vesicles and vesicle chains, and increased abundance in biofilms compared with planktonic cultures. By applying a range of imaging techniques, including three-dimensional (3D) focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy, we determined these structures to range between 30 and 60 nm in width and up to 5 μm in length. Purified vesicle chains consist of typical M. xanthus lipids, fucose, mannose, N-acetylglucosamine and N-acetylgalactoseamine carbohydrates and a small set of cargo protein. The protein content includes CglB and Tgl outer membrane proteins known to be transferable between cells in a contact-dependent manner. Most significantly, the 3D organization of cells within biofilms indicates that cells are connected via an extensive network of membrane extensions that may connect cells at the level of the periplasmic space. Such a network would allow the transfer of membrane proteins and other molecules between cells, and therefore could provide a mechanism for the coordination of social activities.

  16. Physical Damage on Giant Vesicles Membrane as a Result of Methylene Blue Photoirradiation

    PubMed Central

    Mertins, Omar; Bacellar, Isabel O.L.; Thalmann, Fabrice; Marques, Carlos M.; Baptista, Maurício S.; Itri, Rosangela

    2014-01-01

    In this study we pursue a closer analysis of the photodamage promoted on giant unilamellar vesicles membranes made of dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) or 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC), by irradiating methylene blue present in the giant unilamellar vesicles solution. By means of optical microscopy and electro-deformation experiments, the physical damage on the vesicle membrane was followed and the phospholipids oxidation was evaluated in terms of changes in the membrane surface area and permeability. As expected, oxidation modifies structural characteristics of the phospholipids that lead to remarkable membrane alterations. By comparing DOPC- with POPC-made membranes, we observed that the rate of pore formation and vesicle degradation as a function of methylene blue concentration follows a diffusion law in the case of DOPC and a linear variation in the case of POPC. We attributed this scenario to the nucleation process of oxidized species following a diffusion-limited growth regime for DOPC and in the case of POPC a homogeneous nucleation process. On the basis of these premises, we constructed models based on reaction-diffusion equations that fit well with the experimental data. This information shows that the outcome of the photosensitization reactions is critically dependent on the type of lipid present in the membrane. PMID:24411248

  17. Vesicle Photonics

    SciTech Connect

    Vasdekis, Andreas E.; Scott, E. A.; Roke, Sylvie; Hubbell, J. A.; Psaltis, D.

    2013-04-03

    Thin membranes, under appropriate boundary conditions, can self-assemble into vesicles, nanoscale bubbles that encapsulate and hence protect or transport molecular payloads. In this paper, we review the types and applications of light fields interacting with vesicles. By encapsulating light-emitting molecules (e.g. dyes, fluorescent proteins, or quantum dots), vesicles can act as particles and imaging agents. Vesicle imaging can take place also under second harmonic generation from vesicle membrane, as well as employing mass spectrometry. Light fields can also be employed to transport vesicles using optical tweezers (photon momentum) or directly pertrurbe the stability of vesicles and hence trigger the delivery of the encapsulated payload (photon energy).

  18. Inhibition of Sendai virus fusion with phospholipid vesicles and human erythrocyte membranes by hydrophobic peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsey, D.R.; Flanagan, T.D.; Young, J.E.; Yeagle, P.L. )

    1991-06-01

    Hydrophobic di- and tripeptides which are capable of inhibiting enveloped virus infection of cells are also capable of inhibiting at least three different types of membrane fusion events. Large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) of N-methyl dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (N-methyl DOPE), containing encapsulated 1-aminonaphthalene-3,6,8-trisulfonic acid (ANTS) and/or p-xylene bis(pyridinium bromide) (DPX), were formed by extrusion. Vesicle fusion and leakage were then monitored with the ANTS/DPX fluorescence assay. Sendai virus fusion with lipid vesicles and Sendai virus fusion with human erythrocyte membranes were measured by following the relief of fluorescence quenching of virus labeled with octadecylrhodamine B chloride (R18). This study found that the effectiveness of the peptides carbobenzoxy-L-Phe-L-Phe (Z-L-Phe-L-Phe), Z-L-Phe, Z-D-Phe, and Z-Gly-L-Phe-L-Phe in inhibiting N-methyl DOPE LUV fusion or fusion of virus with N-methyl DOPE LUV also paralleled their reported ability to block viral infectivity. Furthermore, Z-D-Phe-L-PheGly and Z-Gly-L-Phe inhibited Sendai virus fusion with human erythrocyte membranes with the same relative potency with which they inhibited vesicle-vesicle and virus-vesicle fusion. The evidence suggests a mechanism by which these peptides exert their inhibition of plaque formation by enveloped viruses. This class of inhibitors apparently acts by inhibiting fusion of the viral envelope with the target cell membrane, thereby preventing viral infection. The physical pathway by which these peptides inhibit membrane fusion was investigated. {sup 31}P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of proposed intermediates in the pathway for membrane fusion in LUV revealed that the potent fusion inhibitor Z-D-Phe-L-PheGly selectively altered the structure (or dynamics) of the hypothesized fusion intermediates and that the poor inhibitor Z-Gly-L-Phe did not.

  19. Evidence for tripeptide/H+ co-transport in rabbit renal brush-border membrane vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Tiruppathi, C; Kulanthaivel, P; Ganapathy, V; Leibach, F H

    1990-01-01

    L-Phe-L-Pro-L-Ala is a tripeptide which is hydrolysable almost exclusively by dipeptidyl peptidase IV in rabbit renal brush-border membrane vesicles. In order to delineate the mechanism of the transport of an intact tripeptide across the brush-border membrane, we studied the characteristics of the uptake of [3H]Phe-Pro-Ala in membrane vesicles in which the activity of dipeptidylpeptidase IV was completely inhibited by treatment with di-isopropyl fluorophosphate. In these vesicles, uptake of radiolabel from the tripeptide was found to be Na(+)-independent, but was greatly stimulated by an inwardly directed H+ gradient. The H(+)-gradient-dependent radiolabel uptake appeared to be an active process, because the time course of uptake exhibited an overshoot phenomenon. The process was also electrogenic, being stimulated by an inside-negative membrane potential. Under the uptake-measurement conditions there was no detectable hydrolysis of [3H]Phe-Pro-Ala in the incubation medium when di-isopropyl fluorophosphate-treated membrane vesicles were used. Analysis of intravesicular contents revealed that the radiolabel inside the vesicles was predominantly (greater than 90%) in the form of intact tripeptide. These data indicate that the uptake of radiolabel from [3H]Phe-Pro-Ala in the presence of an inwardly directed H+ gradient represents almost exclusively uptake of intact tripeptide. Uphill transport of the tripeptide was also demonstrable in the presence of an inwardly directed Na+ or K+ gradient, but only if nigericin was added to the medium. Under these conditions, nigericin, an ionophore for Na+, K+ and H+, was expected to generate a transmembrane H+ gradient. Uptake of Phe-Pro-Ala in the presence of a H+ gradient was inhibited by di- and tri-peptides, but not by free amino acids. It is concluded that tripeptide/H+ co-transport is the mechanism of Phe-Pro-Ala uptake in rabbit renal brush-border membrane vesicles. PMID:2160811

  20. Evidence for tripeptide/H+ co-transport in rabbit renal brush-border membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Tiruppathi, C; Kulanthaivel, P; Ganapathy, V; Leibach, F H

    1990-05-15

    L-Phe-L-Pro-L-Ala is a tripeptide which is hydrolysable almost exclusively by dipeptidyl peptidase IV in rabbit renal brush-border membrane vesicles. In order to delineate the mechanism of the transport of an intact tripeptide across the brush-border membrane, we studied the characteristics of the uptake of [3H]Phe-Pro-Ala in membrane vesicles in which the activity of dipeptidylpeptidase IV was completely inhibited by treatment with di-isopropyl fluorophosphate. In these vesicles, uptake of radiolabel from the tripeptide was found to be Na(+)-independent, but was greatly stimulated by an inwardly directed H+ gradient. The H(+)-gradient-dependent radiolabel uptake appeared to be an active process, because the time course of uptake exhibited an overshoot phenomenon. The process was also electrogenic, being stimulated by an inside-negative membrane potential. Under the uptake-measurement conditions there was no detectable hydrolysis of [3H]Phe-Pro-Ala in the incubation medium when di-isopropyl fluorophosphate-treated membrane vesicles were used. Analysis of intravesicular contents revealed that the radiolabel inside the vesicles was predominantly (greater than 90%) in the form of intact tripeptide. These data indicate that the uptake of radiolabel from [3H]Phe-Pro-Ala in the presence of an inwardly directed H+ gradient represents almost exclusively uptake of intact tripeptide. Uphill transport of the tripeptide was also demonstrable in the presence of an inwardly directed Na+ or K+ gradient, but only if nigericin was added to the medium. Under these conditions, nigericin, an ionophore for Na+, K+ and H+, was expected to generate a transmembrane H+ gradient. Uptake of Phe-Pro-Ala in the presence of a H+ gradient was inhibited by di- and tri-peptides, but not by free amino acids. It is concluded that tripeptide/H+ co-transport is the mechanism of Phe-Pro-Ala uptake in rabbit renal brush-border membrane vesicles.

  1. Fimbriae-mediated outer membrane vesicle production and invasion of Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed

    Mantri, Chinmay K; Chen, Chin-Ho; Dong, Xinhong; Goodwin, Jeffery Shawn; Pratap, Siddharth; Paromov, Victor; Xie, Hua

    2015-02-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a keystone periopathogen that plays an essential role in the progress of periodontitis. Like other gram-negative bacteria, the ability of P. gingivalis to produce outer membrane vesicles is a strategy used to interact with, and survive within its biological niches. Here we compared the protein components associated with vesicles derived from a fimbriated strain (33277) and an afimbriated strain (W83) of P. gingivalis using proteomic analyses. Some well-known virulence factors were identified in vesicles from both strains, such as gingipains and hemagglutinin. In contrast, FimC, FimD, and FimE, minor components of long fimbriae were found exclusively in 33277 vesicles, while proteins with a tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain were unique to W83 vesicles. We found that significantly more 33277 than W83 vesicles were internalized into human oral keratinocytes and gingival fibroblasts. Interestingly, FimA, a well-known adhesin responsible for the attachment and invasion of P. gingivalis into host cells, was not essential for the invasive capabilities of P. gingivalis vesicles. Rather minor components of long fimbriae were required for an efficient invasive activity of vesicles. The most striking finding was that P. gingivalis strains lacking or having a reduced FimA expression showed a significant reduction in vesiculation. These results suggest that production and pathogenicity of P. gingivalis vesicles may largely depend on expression of the fim locus, and that the integration of vesicle production and pathogenicity with fimbrial expression may allow P. gingivalis to confer upon itself certain functional advantages. © 2014 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Fimbriae-mediated outer membrane vesicle production and invasion of Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Mantri, Chinmay K; Chen, Chin-Ho; Dong, Xinhong; Goodwin, Jeffery Shawn; Pratap, Siddharth; Paromov, Victor; Xie, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a keystone periopathogen that plays an essential role in the progress of periodontitis. Like other gram-negative bacteria, the ability of P. gingivalis to produce outer membrane vesicles is a strategy used to interact with, and survive within its biological niches. Here we compared the protein components associated with vesicles derived from a fimbriated strain (33277) and an afimbriated strain (W83) of P. gingivalis using proteomic analyses. Some well-known virulence factors were identified in vesicles from both strains, such as gingipains and hemagglutinin. In contrast, FimC, FimD, and FimE, minor components of long fimbriae were found exclusively in 33277 vesicles, while proteins with a tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain were unique to W83 vesicles. We found that significantly more 33277 than W83 vesicles were internalized into human oral keratinocytes and gingival fibroblasts. Interestingly, FimA, a well-known adhesin responsible for the attachment and invasion of P. gingivalis into host cells, was not essential for the invasive capabilities of P. gingivalis vesicles. Rather minor components of long fimbriae were required for an efficient invasive activity of vesicles. The most striking finding was that P. gingivalis strains lacking or having a reduced FimA expression showed a significant reduction in vesiculation. These results suggest that production and pathogenicity of P. gingivalis vesicles may largely depend on expression of the fim locus, and that the integration of vesicle production and pathogenicity with fimbrial expression may allow P. gingivalis to confer upon itself certain functional advantages. PMID:25524808

  3. Calcium uptake by intestinal brush border membrane vesicles. Comparison with in vivo calcium transport.

    PubMed Central

    Schedl, H P; Wilson, H D

    1985-01-01

    In prior studies, we examined kinetics of steady state in vivo transepithelial calcium transport in rat and hamster. The present studies related calcium uptake by the brush border to in vivo transport. We measured calcium uptake by brush border membrane vesicles from the two species. In the rat, our prior in vivo studies had shown that (a) calcium transport was mediated, (b) no nonmediated component was detectable, and (c) Vmax was 2.5 times greater in proximal than distal small intestine. In brush border membrane vesicles from the rat, Vmax for the saturable component of calcium uptake was again 2.5 times greater in proximal than distal intestine. Contrasting with in vivo studies, a major nonsaturable component was present in vesicles from proximal and distal small intestine. In the hamster, our previous in vivo studies had shown (1) both mediated and nonmediated components of calcium transport, (2) greater nonmediated transport in proximal than distal small intestines, and (3) Vmax for calcium transport twice as great in distal as in proximal small intestine. In the present study with brush border membrane vesicles from hamster, Vmax for saturable calcium transport was again twice as great in distal as in proximal small intestine. However, nonsaturable calcium transport rates relative to saturable rates were much greater with vesicles than in in vivo studies, and were greater in vesicles from distal than proximal small intestine. Since rates of saturable calcium uptake by brush border membrane vesicles parallel corresponding in vivo mediated transport rates, we conclude that the segmental rates of calcium transport in rat and hamster could be determined by brush border function. PMID:2997294

  4. Outer-membrane vesicles from Gram-negative bacteria: biogenesis and functions

    PubMed Central

    Schwechheimer, Carmen; Kuehn, Meta J.

    2017-01-01

    Outer-membrane vesicles (OMVs) are spherical buds of the outer membrane filled with periplasmic content and are commonly produced by Gram-negative bacteria. The production of OMVs allows bacteria to interact with their environment, and OMVs have been found to mediate diverse functions, including promoting pathogenesis, enabling bacterial survival during stress conditions and regulating microbial interactions within bacterial communities. Additionally, because of this functional versatility, researchers have begun to explore OMVs as a platform for bioengineering applications. In this Review, we discuss recent advances in the study of OMVs, focusing on new insights into the mechanisms of biogenesis and the functions of these vesicles. PMID:26373371

  5. Maltose transport in membrane vesicles of Escherichia coli is linked to ATP hydrolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Dean, D A; Davidson, A L; Nikaido, H

    1989-01-01

    We examined the energy requirement for maltose transport in right-side-out membrane vesicles derived from Escherichia coli. When membrane vesicles were made from strains producing tethered maltose-binding proteins by dilution of spheroplasts into phosphate buffer, those from an F0F1 ATPase-containing (unc+) strain transported maltose in the presence of an exogenous electron donor, such as ascorbate/phenazine methosulfate, at a rate of 1-5 nmol/min per mg of protein, whereas those from an isogenic unc- strain failed to transport maltose. Transport in vesicles obtained from the latter strain could be restored in the presence of electron donors if the vesicles were made to contain NAD+ and either ATP or an ATP-regenerating system. ATP hydrolysis was apparently required for transport, since nonhydrolyzable ATP analogues did not sustain transport. Maltose transport significantly increased ATP hydrolysis in ATP-containing vesicles from unc- cells. Finally, ATP-containing vesicles from unc- strains producing normal maltose-binding proteins could accumulate maltose in the absence of electron donors. These results provide convincing evidence that it is the hydrolysis of ATP that drives maltose transport, and probably also other periplasmic-binding-protein-dependent transport systems. PMID:2531894

  6. The Human Pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes Releases Lipoproteins as Lipoprotein-rich Membrane Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Biagini, Massimiliano; Garibaldi, Manuela; Aprea, Susanna; Pezzicoli, Alfredo; Doro, Francesco; Becherelli, Marco; Taddei, Anna Rita; Tani, Chiara; Tavarini, Simona; Mora, Marirosa; Teti, Giuseppe; D'Oro, Ugo; Nuti, Sandra; Soriani, Marco; Margarit, Immaculada; Rappuoli, Rino; Grandi, Guido; Norais, Nathalie

    2015-08-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are attractive vaccine candidates because they represent a major class of cell surface-exposed proteins in many bacteria and are considered as potential pathogen-associated molecular patterns sensed by Toll-like receptors with built-in adjuvanticity. Although Gram-negative lipoproteins have been extensively characterized, little is known about Gram-positive lipoproteins. We isolated from Streptococcus pyogenes a large amount of lipoproteins organized in vesicles. These vesicles were obtained by weakening the bacterial cell wall with a sublethal concentration of penicillin. Lipid and proteomic analysis of the vesicles revealed that they were enriched in phosphatidylglycerol and almost exclusively composed of lipoproteins. In association with lipoproteins, a few hypothetical proteins, penicillin-binding proteins, and several members of the ExPortal, a membrane microdomain responsible for the maturation of secreted proteins, were identified. The typical lipidic moiety was apparently not necessary for lipoprotein insertion in the vesicle bilayer because they were also recovered from the isogenic diacylglyceryl transferase deletion mutant. The vesicles were not able to activate specific Toll-like receptor 2, indicating that lipoproteins organized in these vesicular structures do not act as pathogen-associated molecular patterns. In light of these findings, we propose to name these new structures Lipoprotein-rich Membrane Vesicles. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. The Human Pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes Releases Lipoproteins as Lipoprotein-rich Membrane Vesicles*

    PubMed Central

    Biagini, Massimiliano; Garibaldi, Manuela; Aprea, Susanna; Pezzicoli, Alfredo; Doro, Francesco; Becherelli, Marco; Taddei, Anna Rita; Tani, Chiara; Tavarini, Simona; Mora, Marirosa; Teti, Giuseppe; D'Oro, Ugo; Nuti, Sandra; Soriani, Marco; Margarit, Immaculada; Rappuoli, Rino; Grandi, Guido; Norais, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are attractive vaccine candidates because they represent a major class of cell surface-exposed proteins in many bacteria and are considered as potential pathogen-associated molecular patterns sensed by Toll-like receptors with built-in adjuvanticity. Although Gram-negative lipoproteins have been extensively characterized, little is known about Gram-positive lipoproteins. We isolated from Streptococcus pyogenes a large amount of lipoproteins organized in vesicles. These vesicles were obtained by weakening the bacterial cell wall with a sublethal concentration of penicillin. Lipid and proteomic analysis of the vesicles revealed that they were enriched in phosphatidylglycerol and almost exclusively composed of lipoproteins. In association with lipoproteins, a few hypothetical proteins, penicillin-binding proteins, and several members of the ExPortal, a membrane microdomain responsible for the maturation of secreted proteins, were identified. The typical lipidic moiety was apparently not necessary for lipoprotein insertion in the vesicle bilayer because they were also recovered from the isogenic diacylglyceryl transferase deletion mutant. The vesicles were not able to activate specific Toll-like receptor 2, indicating that lipoproteins organized in these vesicular structures do not act as pathogen-associated molecular patterns. In light of these findings, we propose to name these new structures Lipoprotein-rich Membrane Vesicles. PMID:26018414

  8. Key Role of Polyphosphoinositides in Dynamics of Fusogenic Nuclear Membrane Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Zhendre, Vanessa; Grélard, Axelle; Garnier-LHomme, Marie; Buchoux, Sébastien; Larijani, Banafshé; Dufourc, Erick J.

    2011-01-01

    The role of phosphoinositides has been thoroughly described in many signalling and membrane trafficking events but their function as modulators of membrane structure and dynamics in membrane fusion has not been investigated. We have reconstructed models that mimic the composition of nuclear envelope precursor membranes with naturally elevated amounts of phosphoinositides. These fusogenic membranes (membrane vesicle 1(MV1) and nuclear envelope remnants (NER) are critical for the assembly of the nuclear envelope. Phospholipids, cholesterol, and polyphosphoinositides, with polyunsaturated fatty acid chains that were identified in the natural nuclear membranes by lipid mass spectrometry, have been used to reconstruct complex model membranes mimicking nuclear envelope precursor membranes. Structural and dynamic events occurring in the membrane core and at the membrane surface were monitored by solid-state deuterium and phosphorus NMR. “MV1-like” (PC∶PI∶PIP∶PIP2, 30∶20∶18∶12, mol%) membranes that exhibited high levels of PtdIns, PtdInsP and PtdInsP2 had an unusually fluid membrane core (up to 20% increase, compared to membranes with low amounts of phosphoinositides to mimic the endoplasmic reticulum). “NER-like” (PC∶CH∶PI∶PIP∶PIP2, 28∶42∶16∶7∶7, mol%) membranes containing high amounts of both cholesterol and phosphoinositides exhibited liquid-ordered phase properties, but with markedly lower rigidity (10–15% decrease). Phosphoinositides are the first lipids reported to counterbalance the ordering effect of cholesterol. At the membrane surface, phosphoinositides control the orientation dynamics of other lipids in the model membranes, while remaining unchanged themselves. This is an important finding as it provides unprecedented mechanistic insight into the role of phosphoinositides in membrane dynamics. Biological implications of our findings and a model describing the roles of fusogenic membrane vesicles are proposed. PMID:21931619

  9. Effect of physical constraints on the mechanisms of membrane fusion: bolaform lipid vesicles as model systems.

    PubMed Central

    Relini, A; Cassinadri, D; Fan, Q; Gulik, A; Mirghani, Z; De Rosa, M; Gliozzi, A

    1996-01-01

    Bolaform lipid vesicles were used to study the effect of physical constraints on membrane fusion. In these vesicles the membrane is organized in a single monolayer, because of the presence of covalent bonds in its middle plane. Therefore, the formation of fusion intermediates is subject to higher energy barriers and greater geometrical constraints than is usual in bilayer membranes. Bolaform lipids were extracted from the thermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus. These lipids can be divided into two classes, the monosubstituted molecules, in which one of the polar heads is glycerol, and the bisubstituted molecules, endowed with two complex polar heads. The fusion process in vesicles composed of different mixtures of monosubstituted/bisubstituted molecules was studied by means of fluorescence techniques. Ca2+ or poly(ethylene glycol) was employed as a fusogenic agent. We found that fusion of such constrained membranes is still possible, provided that molecules able to mediate a structural rearrangement of the membrane are present. This condition is fulfilled by monosubstituted molecules, which are able to partition the glycerol headgroup in the apolar moiety. In addition, the presence of traces (approximately 5%) of the monopolar compound diphytanylglycerol is an important factor for fusion to occur. On the contrary, vesicles formed by bisubstituted molecules are unable to fuse, irrespective of the fusogen employed. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:8889155

  10. A role for BARS at the fission step of COPI vesicle formation from Golgi membrane.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jia-Shu; Lee, Stella Y; Spanò, Stefania; Gad, Helge; Zhang, Leiliang; Nie, Zhongzhen; Bonazzi, Matteo; Corda, Daniela; Luini, Alberto; Hsu, Victor W

    2005-12-07

    The core complex of Coat Protein I (COPI), known as coatomer, is sufficient to induce coated vesicular-like structures from liposomal membrane. In the context of biological Golgi membrane, both palmitoyl-coenzyme A (p-coA) and ARFGAP1, a GTPase-activating protein (GAP) for ADP-Ribosylation Factor 1, also participate in vesicle formation, but how their roles may be linked remains unknown. Moreover, whether COPI vesicle formation from Golgi membrane requires additional factors also remains unclear. We now show that Brefeldin-A ADP-Ribosylated Substrate (BARS) plays a critical role in the fission step of COPI vesicle formation from Golgi membrane. This role of BARS requires its interaction with ARFGAP1, which is in turn regulated oppositely by p-coA and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, which act as cofactors of BARS. Our findings not only identify a new factor needed for COPI vesicle formation from Golgi membrane but also reveal a surprising mechanism by which the roles of p-coA and GAP are linked in this process.

  11. Multivalent ligand-receptor-mediated interaction of small filled vesicles with a cellular membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.

    2017-07-01

    The ligand-receptor-mediated contacts of small sub-100-nm-sized lipid vesicles (or nanoparticles) with the cellular membrane are of interest in the contexts of cell-to-cell communication, endocytosis of membrane-coated virions, and drug (RNA) delivery. In all these cases, the interior of vesicles is filled by biologically relevant content. Despite the diversity of such systems, the corresponding ligand-receptor interaction possesses universal features. One of them is that the vesicle-membrane contacts can be accompanied by the redistribution of ligands and receptors between the contact and contact-free regions. In particular, the concentrations of ligands and receptors may become appreciably higher in the contact regions and their composition may there be different compared to that in the suspended state in the solution. A statistical model presented herein describes the corresponding distribution of various ligands and receptors and allows one to calculate the related change of the free energy with variation of the vesicle-engulfment extent. The results obtained are used to clarify the necessary conditions for the vesicle-assisted pathway of drug delivery.

  12. Bioenergetics of serotonin transport by membrane vesicles derived from platelet dense granules.

    PubMed

    Fishkes, H; Rudnick, G

    1982-05-25

    A population of membrane vesicles derived from platelet-dense granules was isolated from platelet osmotic lysates by density gradient centrifugation. The preparation is relatively free from contamination by mitochondrial and soluble enzymatic activities and contains only traces of serotonin and adenine nucleotides, but retains significant amounts of Na+-dependent serotonin transport (plasma membrane) activity. In the presence of ATP and in the absence of Na+, these vesicles accumulate serotonin to intravesicular concentrations over 100 times that of the medium. Transport is a saturable process (Km = 1.15 microM) inhibited by reserpine, carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone, ammonia, and nigericin (in the presence of external potassium), but not by imipramine. When diluted into assay medium at pH 8.5, the interior of these vesicles remains relatively acidic. Addition of ATP further induced generation of a membrane potential (interior positive). The vesicles accumulate maximal concentrations of serotonin only when the vesicle interior is both acidic and positive with respect to the medium. These results are consistent with a transporter which catalyzes countertransport of at least two protons for each serotonin cation accumulated.

  13. ER arrival sites for COPI vesicles localize to hotspots of membrane trafficking.

    PubMed

    Schröter, Saskia; Beckmann, Sabrina; Schmitt, Hans Dieter

    2016-09-01

    COPI-coated vesicles mediate retrograde membrane traffic from the cis-Golgi to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in all eukaryotic cells. However, it is still unknown whether COPI vesicles fuse everywhere or at specific sites with the ER membrane. Taking advantage of the circumstance that the vesicles still carry their coat when they arrive at the ER, we have visualized active ER arrival sites (ERAS) by monitoring contact between COPI coat components and the ER-resident Dsl tethering complex using bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC). ERAS form punctate structures near Golgi compartments, clearly distinct from ER exit sites. Furthermore, ERAS are highly polarized in an actin and myosin V-dependent manner and are localized near hotspots of plasma membrane expansion. Genetic experiments suggest that the COPI•Dsl BiFC complexes recapitulate the physiological interaction between COPI and the Dsl complex and that COPI vesicles are mistargeted in dsl1 mutants. We conclude that the Dsl complex functions in confining COPI vesicle fusion sites. © 2016 The Authors.

  14. Membrane vesicle release in bacteria, eukaryotes, and archaea: a conserved yet underappreciated aspect of microbial life.

    PubMed

    Deatherage, Brooke L; Cookson, Brad T

    2012-06-01

    Interaction of microbes with their environment depends on features of the dynamic microbial surface throughout cell growth and division. Surface modifications, whether used to acquire nutrients, defend against other microbes, or resist the pressures of a host immune system, facilitate adaptation to unique surroundings. The release of bioactive membrane vesicles (MVs) from the cell surface is conserved across microbial life, in bacteria, archaea, fungi, and parasites. MV production occurs not only in vitro but also in vivo during infection, underscoring the influence of these surface organelles in microbial physiology and pathogenesis through delivery of enzymes, toxins, communication signals, and antigens recognized by the innate and adaptive immune systems. Derived from a variety of organisms that span kingdoms of life and called by several names (membrane vesicles, outer membrane vesicles [OMVs], exosomes, shedding microvesicles, etc.), the conserved functions and mechanistic strategies of MV release are similar, including the use of ESCRT proteins and ESCRT protein homologues to facilitate these processes in archaea and eukaryotic microbes. Although forms of MV release by different organisms share similar visual, mechanistic, and functional features, there has been little comparison across microbial life. This underappreciated conservation of vesicle release, and the resulting functional impact throughout the tree of life, explored in this review, stresses the importance of vesicle-mediated processes throughout biology.

  15. Uptake of Helicobacter pylori outer membrane vesicles by gastric epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Parker, Heather; Chitcholtan, Kenny; Hampton, Mark B; Keenan, Jacqueline I

    2010-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori bacteria colonize the human stomach where they stimulate a persistent inflammatory response. H. pylori is considered noninvasive; however, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-enriched outer membrane vesicles (OMV), continuously shed from the surface of this bacterium, are observed within gastric epithelial cells. The mechanism of vesicle uptake is poorly understood, and this study was undertaken to examine the roles of bacterial VacA cytotoxin and LPS in OMV binding and cholesterol and clathrin-mediated endocytosis in vesicle uptake by gastric epithelial cells. OMV association was examined using a fluorescent membrane dye to label OMV, and a comparison was made between the associations of vesicles from a VacA(+) strain and OMV from a VacA(-) isogenic mutant strain. Within 20 min, essentially all associated OMV were intracellular, and vesicle binding appeared to be facilitated by the presence of VacA cytotoxin. Uptake of vesicles from the VacA(+) strain was inhibited by H. pylori LPS (58% inhibition with 50 μg/ml LPS), while uptake of OMV from the VacA(-) mutant strain was less affected (25% inhibition with 50 μg/ml LPS). Vesicle uptake did not require cholesterol. However, uptake of OMV from the VacA(-) mutant strain was inhibited by a reduction in clathrin-mediated endocytosis (42% with 15 μg/ml chlorpromazine), while uptake of OMV from the VacA(+) strain was less affected (25% inhibition with 15 μg/ml chlorpromazine). We conclude that VacA toxin enhances the association of H. pylori OMV with cells and that the presence of the toxin may allow vesicles to exploit more than one pathway of internalization.

  16. Uptake of Helicobacter pylori Outer Membrane Vesicles by Gastric Epithelial Cells▿

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Heather; Chitcholtan, Kenny; Hampton, Mark B.; Keenan, Jacqueline I.

    2010-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori bacteria colonize the human stomach where they stimulate a persistent inflammatory response. H. pylori is considered noninvasive; however, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-enriched outer membrane vesicles (OMV), continuously shed from the surface of this bacterium, are observed within gastric epithelial cells. The mechanism of vesicle uptake is poorly understood, and this study was undertaken to examine the roles of bacterial VacA cytotoxin and LPS in OMV binding and cholesterol and clathrin-mediated endocytosis in vesicle uptake by gastric epithelial cells. OMV association was examined using a fluorescent membrane dye to label OMV, and a comparison was made between the associations of vesicles from a VacA+ strain and OMV from a VacA− isogenic mutant strain. Within 20 min, essentially all associated OMV were intracellular, and vesicle binding appeared to be facilitated by the presence of VacA cytotoxin. Uptake of vesicles from the VacA+ strain was inhibited by H. pylori LPS (58% inhibition with 50 μg/ml LPS), while uptake of OMV from the VacA− mutant strain was less affected (25% inhibition with 50 μg/ml LPS). Vesicle uptake did not require cholesterol. However, uptake of OMV from the VacA− mutant strain was inhibited by a reduction in clathrin-mediated endocytosis (42% with 15 μg/ml chlorpromazine), while uptake of OMV from the VacA+ strain was less affected (25% inhibition with 15 μg/ml chlorpromazine). We conclude that VacA toxin enhances the association of H. pylori OMV with cells and that the presence of the toxin may allow vesicles to exploit more than one pathway of internalization. PMID:20876296

  17. Protein-mediated Selective Enclosure of Early Replicators Inside of Membranous Vesicles: First Step Towards Cell Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laiterä, Tiina; Lehto, Kirsi

    2009-12-01

    Containment in cell membranes is essential for all contemporary life, and apparently even the earliest life forms had to be somehow contained. It has been postulated that random enclosure of replicating molecules inside of spontaneously assembled vesicles would have formed the initial cellular ancestors. However, completely random re-formation or division of such primitive vesicles would have abolished the heritability of their contents, nullifying any selective advantage to them. We propose that the containment of the early replicators in membranous vesicles was adopted only after the invention of genetically encoded proteins, and that selective enclosure of target molecules was mediated by specific proteins. A similar containment process is still utilised by various RNA- and retroviruses to isolate their replication complexes from the host’s intracellular environment. Such selective encapsulation would have protected the replicators against competitor and parasitic sequences, and provided a strong positive selection within the replicator communities.

  18. Positioning lipid membrane domains in giant vesicles by micro-organization of aqueous cytoplasm mimic.

    PubMed

    Cans, Ann-Sofie; Andes-Koback, Meghan; Keating, Christine D

    2008-06-11

    We report localization of lipid membrane microdomains to specific "poles" of asymmetric giant vesicles (GVs) in response to local internal composition. Interior aqueous microdomains were generated in a simple model cytoplasm composed of a poly(ethyleneglycol) (PEG)/dextran aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) encapsulated in the vesicles. The GV membrane composition used here was a modification of a DOPC/DPPC/cholesterol mixture known to form micrometer-scale liquid ordered and liquid disordered domains; we added lipids with PEG 2000 Da-modified headgroups. Osmotically induced budding of the ATPS-containing GVs led to structures where the PEG-rich and dextran-rich interior aqueous phases were in contact with different regions of the vesicle membrane. Liquid ordered (L o) membrane domains rich in PEG-terminated lipids preferentially coated the PEG-rich aqueous phase vesicle "body", while coexisting liquid disordered (L d) membrane domains coated the dextran-rich aqueous phase "bud". Membrane domain positioning resulted from interactions between lipid headgroups and the interior aqueous polymer solutions, e.g., PEGylated headgroups with PEG and dextran polymers. Heating resulted first in patchy membranes where L o and L d domains no longer showed any preference for coating the PEG-rich vs dextran-rich interior aqueous volumes, and eventually complete lipid mixing. Upon cooling lipid domains again coated their preferred interior aqueous microvolume. This work shows that nonspecific interactions between interior aqueous contents and the membrane that encapsulates them can drive local chemical heterogeneity, and offers a primitive experimental model for membrane and cytoplasmic polarity in biological cells.

  19. Bioinspired polymer vesicles and membranes for biological and medical applications.

    PubMed

    Palivan, Cornelia G; Goers, Roland; Najer, Adrian; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Car, Anja; Meier, Wolfgang

    2016-01-21

    Biological membranes play an essential role in living organisms by providing stable and functional compartments, preserving cell architecture, whilst supporting signalling and selective transport that are mediated by a variety of proteins embedded in the membrane. However, mimicking cell membranes - to be applied in artificial systems - is very challenging because of the vast complexity of biological structures. In this respect a highly promising strategy to designing multifunctional hybrid materials/systems is to combine biological molecules with polymer membranes or to design membranes with intrinsic stimuli-responsive properties. Here we present supramolecular polymer assemblies resulting from self-assembly of mostly amphiphilic copolymers either as 3D compartments (polymersomes, PICsomes, peptosomes), or as planar membranes (free-standing films, solid-supported membranes, membrane-mimetic brushes). In a bioinspired strategy, such synthetic assemblies decorated with biomolecules by insertion/encapsulation/attachment, serve for development of multifunctional systems. In addition, when the assemblies are stimuli-responsive, their architecture and properties change in the presence of stimuli, and release a cargo or allow "on demand" a specific in situ reaction. Relevant examples are included for an overview of bioinspired polymer compartments with nanometre sizes and membranes as candidates in applications ranging from drug delivery systems, up to artificial organelles, or active surfaces. Both the advantages of using polymer supramolecular assemblies and their present limitations are included to serve as a basis for future improvements.

  20. Multiple Membrane Interactions and Versatile Vesicle Deformations Elicited by Melittin

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Tomoyoshi; Nomura, Fumimasa; Yokoyama, Yasunori; Tanaka-Takiguchi, Yohko; Homma, Michio; Takiguchi, Kingo

    2013-01-01

    Melittin induces various reactions in membranes and has been widely studied as a model for membrane-interacting peptide; however, the mechanism whereby melittin elicits its effects remains unclear. Here, we observed melittin-induced changes in individual giant liposomes using direct real-time imaging by dark-field optical microscopy, and the mechanisms involved were correlated with results obtained using circular dichroism, cosedimentation, fluorescence quenching of tryptophan residues, and electron microscopy. Depending on the concentration of negatively charged phospholipids in the membrane and the molecular ratio between lipid and melittin, melittin induced the “increasing membrane area”, “phased shrinkage”, or “solubilization” of liposomes. In phased shrinkage, liposomes formed small particles on their surface and rapidly decreased in size. Under conditions in which the increasing membrane area, phased shrinkage, or solubilization were mainly observed, the secondary structure of melittin was primarily estimated as an α-helix, β-like, or disordered structure, respectively. When the increasing membrane area or phased shrinkage occurred, almost all melittin was bound to the membranes and reached more hydrophobic regions of the membranes than when solubilization occurred. These results indicate that the various effects of melittin result from its ability to adopt various structures and membrane-binding states depending on the conditions. PMID:23594437

  1. Chronic and selective inhibition of basolateral membrane Na-K-ATPase uniquely regulates brush border membrane Na absorption in intestinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Manoharan, Palanikumar; Gayam, Swapna; Arthur, Subha; Palaniappan, Balasubramanian; Singh, Soudamani; Dick, Gregory M.

    2015-01-01

    Na-K-ATPase, an integral membrane protein in mammalian cells, is responsible for maintaining the favorable intracellular Na gradient necessary to promote Na-coupled solute cotransport processes [e.g., Na-glucose cotransport (SGLT1)]. Inhibition of brush border membrane (BBM) SGLT1 is, at least in part, due to the diminished Na-K-ATPase in villus cells from chronically inflamed rabbit intestine. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of Na-K-ATPase inhibition on the two major BBM Na absorptive pathways, specifically Na-glucose cotransport and Na/H exchange (NHE), in intestinal epithelial (IEC-18) cells. Na-K-ATPase was inhibited using 1 mM ouabain or siRNA for Na-K-ATPase-α1 in IEC-18 cells. SGLT1 activity was determined as 3-O-methyl-d-[3H]glucose uptake. Na-K-ATPase activity was measured as the amount of inorganic phosphate released. Treatment with ouabain resulted in SGLT1 inhibition at 1 h but stimulation at 24 h. To further characterize this unexpected stimulation of SGLT1, siRNA silencing was utilized to inhibit Na-K-ATPase-α1. SGLT1 activity was significantly upregulated by Na-K-ATPase silencing, while NHE3 activity remained unaltered. Kinetics showed that the mechanism of stimulation of SGLT1 activity was secondary to an increase in affinity of the cotransporter for glucose without a change in the number of cotransporters. Molecular studies demonstrated that the mechanism of stimulation was not secondary to altered BBM SGLT1 protein levels. Chronic and direct silencing of basolateral Na-K-ATPase uniquely regulates BBM Na absorptive pathways in intestinal epithelial cells. Specifically, while BBM NHE3 is unaffected, SGLT1 is stimulated secondary to enhanced affinity of the cotransporter. PMID:25652450

  2. Bilayer vesicles of amphiphilic cyclodextrins: host membranes that recognize guest molecules.

    PubMed

    Falvey, Patrick; Lim, Choon Woo; Darcy, Raphael; Revermann, Tobias; Karst, Uwe; Giesbers, Marcel; Marcelis, Antonius T M; Lazar, Adina; Coleman, Anthony W; Reinhoudt, David N; Ravoo, Bart Jan

    2005-02-04

    A family of amphiphilic cyclodextrins (6, 7) has been prepared through 6-S-alkylation (alkyl=n-dodecyl and n-hexadecyl) of the primary side and 2-O-PEGylation of the secondary side of alpha-, beta-, and gamma-cyclodextrins (PEG=poly(ethylene glycol)). These cyclodextrins form nonionic bilayer vesicles in aqueous solution. The bilayer vesicles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, dye encapsulation, and capillary electrophoresis. The molecular packing of the amphiphilic cyclodextrins was investigated by using small-angle X-ray diffraction of bilayers deposited on glass and pressure-area isotherms obtained from Langmuir monolayers on the air-water interface. The bilayer thickness is dependent on the chain length, whereas the average molecular surface area scales with the cyclodextrin ring size. The alkyl chains of the cyclodextrins in the bilayer are deeply interdigitated. Molecular recognition of a hydrophobic anion (adamantane carboxylate) by the cyclodextrin vesicles was investigated by using capillary electrophoresis, thereby exploiting the increase in electrophoretic mobility that occurs when the hydrophobic anions bind to the nonionic cyclodextrin vesicles. It was found that in spite of the presence of oligo(ethylene glycol) substituents, the beta-cyclodextrin vesicles retain their characteristic affinity for adamantane carboxylate (association constant K(a)=7.1 x 10(3) M(-1)), whereas gamma-cyclodextrin vesicles have less affinity (K(a)=3.2 x 10(3) M(-1)), and alpha-cyclodextrin or non-cyclodextrin, nonionic vesicles have very little affinity (K(a) approximately 100 M(-1)). Specific binding of the adamantane carboxylate to beta-cyclodextrin vesicles was also evident in competition experiments with beta-cyclodextrin in solution. Hence, the cyclodextrin vesicles can function as host bilayer membranes that recognize small guest molecules by specific noncovalent interaction.

  3. Two-compartment behavior during transport of folate compounds in L1210 cell plasma membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, C.H.; Dembo, M.; Sirotnak, F.M.

    1982-01-01

    The transport of (/sup 3/H) 1,L 5-formyltetrahydrofolate, (/sup 3/H) folic acid, and (/sup 3/H)methotrexate by L1210 cell plasma membrane vesicles exhibited multicompartmental behavior. Two separate vesicular compartments (parallel relationship) of approximately equal volume were revealed during measurements of influx and efflux. Flux in one compartment was rapid, saturable, highly temperature-sensitive, and inhibited by pCMBS. Flux in the other compartment exhibited all of the characteristics of passive diffusion. These results imply that our plasma membrane vesicle preparations consist of a mixture of two functional species. Transport of folate into one of these species occurs by passive diffusion alone, whereas transport into the other kind of vesicle occurs by both passive diffusion and carrier-facilitated transport.

  4. How can nanotechnology help membrane vesicle-based cancer immunotherapy development?

    PubMed

    Tian, Xin; Zhu, Motao; Nie, Guangjun

    2013-01-01

    Exosomes are nanosized vesicles originating from endosomal compartments and secreted by most living cells. In the past decade, exosomes have emerged as potent tools for cancer immunotherapy due to their important roles in modulation of immune responses, and promising results have been achieved in exosome-based immunotherapy. The recent rapid progress of nanotechnology, especially on tailored design of nanocarriers for drug delivery based on both passive and active targeting strategies, sheds light on re-engineering native membrane vesicles for enhanced immune regulation and therapy. Applications of nanotechnology toolkits might provide new opportunity not only for value-added therapeutic or diagnostic strategies based on exosomes in cancer immunotherapy, but also new insights for biogenesis and biological relevance of membrane vesicles. This commentary focuses on the recent development and limitations of using exosomes in cancer immunotherapy and our perspectives on how nanomaterials with potential immune regulatory effects could be introduced into exosome-based immunotherapy.

  5. Resonance energy transfer imaging of phospholipid vesicle interaction with a planar phospholipid membrane: undulations and attachment sites in the region of calcium-mediated membrane--membrane adhesion

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Membrane fusion of a phospholipid vesicle with a planar lipid bilayer is preceded by an initial prefusion stage in which a region of the vesicle membrane adheres to the planar membrane. A resonance energy transfer (RET) imaging microscope, with measured spectral transfer functions and a pair of radiometrically calibrated video cameras, was used to determine both the area of the contact region and the distances between the membranes within this zone. Large vesicles (5-20 microns diam) were labeled with the donor fluorophore coumarin- phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), while the planar membrane was labeled with the acceptor rhodamine-PE. The donor was excited with 390 nm light, and separate images of donor and acceptor emission were formed by the microscope. Distances between the membranes at each location in the image were determined from the RET rate constant (kt) computed from the acceptor:donor emission intensity ratio. In the absence of an osmotic gradient, the vesicles stably adhered to the planar membrane, and the dyes did not migrate between membranes. The region of contact was detected as an area of planar membrane, coincident with the vesicle image, over which rhodamine fluorescence was sensitized by RET. The total area of the contact region depended biphasically on the Ca2+ concentration, but the distance between the bilayers in this zone decreased with increasing [Ca2+]. The changes in area and separation were probably related to divalent cation effects on electrostatic screening and binding to charged membranes. At each [Ca2+], the intermembrane separation varied between 1 and 6 nm within each contact region, indicating membrane undulation prior to adhesion. Intermembrane separation distances < or = 2 nm were localized to discrete sites that formed in an ordered arrangement throughout the contact region. The area of the contact region occupied by these punctate attachment sites was increased at high [Ca2+]. Membrane fusion may be initiated at these sites of

  6. Membrane Viscosity Determined from Shear-Driven Flow in Giant Vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honerkamp-Smith, Aurelia R.; Woodhouse, Francis G.; Kantsler, Vasily; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2013-07-01

    The viscosity of lipid bilayer membranes plays an important role in determining the diffusion constant of embedded proteins and the dynamics of membrane deformations, yet it has historically proven very difficult to measure. Here we introduce a new method based on quantification of the large-scale circulation patterns induced inside vesicles adhered to a solid surface and subjected to simple shear flow in a microfluidic device. Particle image velocimetry based on spinning disk confocal imaging of tracer particles inside and outside of the vesicle and tracking of phase-separated membrane domains are used to reconstruct the full three-dimensional flow pattern induced by the shear. These measurements show excellent agreement with the predictions of a recent theoretical analysis, and allow direct determination of the membrane viscosity.

  7. Circulation and turnover of synaptic vesicle membrane in cultured fetal mammalian spinal cord neurons

    PubMed Central

    1975-01-01

    Intact neurons in cultures of fetal rodent spinal cord explants show stimulation-dependent uptake of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) into many small vesicles and occasional tubules and multivesicular bodies (MVB) at presynaptic terminals. Presynaptic terminals were allowed to take up HRP during 1 h of strychnine-enhanced stimulation of synaptic transmitter release and then "chased" in tracer-free medium either with strychnine or with 10 mM Mg++ which depresses transmitter release. Tracer-containing vesicles are lost from terminals under both chase conditions; the loss is more rapid (4-8 h) with strychnine than with 10 mM Mg++ (8-16 h). There is a parallel decrease in the numbers of labeled MVB's at terminals. Loss of tracer with 10 mM Mg++ does not appear to be due to the membrane rearrangements (exocytosis coupled to endocytosis) that presumably lead to initial tracer uptake; terminals exposed to HRP and Mg++ for up to 16 h show little tracer uptake into vesicles. Nor is the decrease likely to the due to loss of HRP enzyme activity; HRP is very stable in solution. During the chases there is a striking accumulation of HRP in perikarya that is far more extensive in cultures initially exposed to tracer with strychnine than 10 mM Mg++ regardless of chase conditions. Much of the tracer ends up in large dense bodies. These findings suggest that synaptic vesicle membrane turnover involves retrograde axonal transport of membrane to neuronal perikarya for further processing, including lysosomal degradation. The more rapid (4-8 h) loss of tracer-containing vesicles with strychnine may reflect vesicle membrane reutilization for exocytosis. PMID:1176531

  8. Polymeric capsule-cushioned leukocyte cell membrane vesicles as a biomimetic delivery platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Changyong; Wu, Zhiguang; Lin, Zhihua; Lin, Xiankun; He, Qiang

    2016-02-01

    We report a biomimetic delivery of microsized capsule-cushioned leukocyte membrane vesicles (CLMVs) through the conversion of freshly reassembled leukocyte membrane vesicles (LMVs), including membrane lipids and membrane-bound proteins onto the surface of layer-by-layer assembled polymeric multilayer microcapsules. The leukocyte membrane coating was verified by using electron microscopy, a quartz crystal microbalance, dynamic light scattering, and confocal laser scanning microscopy. The resulting CLMVs have the ability to effectively evade clearance by the immune system and thus prolong the circulation time in mice. Moreover, we also show that the right-side-out leukocyte membrane coating can distinctly improve the accumulation of capsules in tumor sites through the molecular recognition of membrane-bound proteins of CLMVs with those of tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. The natural cell membrane camouflaged polymeric multilayer capsules with the immunosuppressive and tumor-recognition functionalities of natural leukocytes provide a new biomimetic delivery platform for disease therapy.We report a biomimetic delivery of microsized capsule-cushioned leukocyte membrane vesicles (CLMVs) through the conversion of freshly reassembled leukocyte membrane vesicles (LMVs), including membrane lipids and membrane-bound proteins onto the surface of layer-by-layer assembled polymeric multilayer microcapsules. The leukocyte membrane coating was verified by using electron microscopy, a quartz crystal microbalance, dynamic light scattering, and confocal laser scanning microscopy. The resulting CLMVs have the ability to effectively evade clearance by the immune system and thus prolong the circulation time in mice. Moreover, we also show that the right-side-out leukocyte membrane coating can distinctly improve the accumulation of capsules in tumor sites through the molecular recognition of membrane-bound proteins of CLMVs with those of tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. The natural

  9. Solid-supported block copolymer membranes through interfacial adsorption of charged block copolymer vesicles.

    PubMed

    Rakhmatullina, Ekaterina; Meier, Wolfgang

    2008-06-17

    The properties of amphiphilic block copolymer membranes can be tailored within a wide range of physical parameters. This makes them promising candidates for the development of new (bio)sensors based on solid-supported biomimetic membranes. Here we investigated the interfacial adsorption of polyelectrolyte vesicles on three different model substrates to find the optimum conditions for formation of planar membranes. The polymer vesicles were made from amphiphilic ABA triblock copolymers with short, positively charged poly(2,2-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) end blocks and a hydrophobic poly( n-butyl methacrylate) (PBMA) middle block. We observed reorganization of the amphiphilic copolymer chains from vesicular structures into a 1.5+/-0.04 nm thick layer on the hydrophobic HOPG surface. However, this film starts disrupting and dewetting upon drying. In contrast, adsorption of the vesicles on the negatively charged SiO2 and mica substrates induced vesicle fusion and formation of planar, supported block copolymer films. This process seems to be controlled by the surface charge density of the substrate and concentration of the block copolymers in solution. The thickness of the copolymer membrane on mica was comparable to the thickness of phospholipid bilayers.

  10. Vesicle fusion to planar membranes is enhanced by cholesterol and low temperature.

    PubMed

    Lee, David E; Lew, Matthew G; Woodbury, Dixon J

    2013-01-01

    Lipid composition and properties play an important role in many cellular properties such as fusion of vesicles to cell membranes, an essential process for exocytosis. Using a model system composed of artificial vesicles (liposomes) and artificial membranes (planar lipid bilayers), we observed that fusion is significantly affected by the lipid phase of the planar membrane. To determine the effect of lipid phases on fusion rates, we utilized the nystatin/ergosterol fusion assay and stimulated fusion with an osmotic gradient. Phase of the planar membrane was altered by changing cholesterol or temperature while the vesicular lipids were held constant. Liquid disordered (L(d) or L(α)) planar membranes were formed from phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine with unsaturated acyl chains. Addition of cholesterol shifts these membranes to the liquid ordered (L(o)) phase and increases liposome fusion. Planar membranes in the L(α) phase were also made from dipalmitoylphoshatidylcholine (DPPC) above the transition temperature (T(m)) of 41.5 ° C. Decreasing the temperature below T(m) shifts these membranes into the ripple phase (P(β')) and also increases liposome fusion. The cholesterol and temperature data are consistent with the hypothesis that fusion is promoted in membranes that have greater exposure of their lipid tails or in membranes which can form leaflet domains with negative curvature. The data are not consistent with the hypothesis that lipid mismatch drives fusion.

  11. Molecular devices: Caroviologens as an approach to molecular wires—synthesis and incorporation into vesicle membranes

    PubMed Central

    Arrhenius, Thomas S.; Blanchard-Desce, Mireille; Dvolaitzky, Maya; Lehn, Jean-Marie; Malthete, Jacques

    1986-01-01

    Molecular wires, which would allow electron flow to take place between different components, are important elements in the design of molecular devices. An approach to such species would be molecules possessing an electron-conducting conjugated chain, terminal electroactive polar groups, and a length sufficient to span a lipid membrane. To this end, bispyridinium polyenes of different lengths have been synthesized and their incorporation into the bilayer membrane of sodium dihexadecyl phosphate vesicles has been studied. Since they combine the features of carotenoids and of viologens, they may be termed caroviologens. Vesicles containing the caroviologen whose length approximately corresponds to the thickness of the sodium dihexadecyl phosphate bilayer display temperature-dependent changes of its absorption spectrum reflecting the gel → liquid-crystal phase transition of the membrane. The data agree with a structural model in which the caroviologens of sufficient length span the bilayer membrane, the pyridinium sites being close to the negatively charged outer and inner surfaces of the sodium dihexadecyl phosphate vesicles and the polyene chain crossing the lipidic interior of the membrane. These membranes may now be tested in processes in which the caroviologen would function as a continuous, transmembrane electron channel—i.e., as a molecular wire. Various further developments may be envisaged along these lines. PMID:16593731

  12. Molecular cloning and expression of a cDNA encoding the rabbit ileal villus cell basolateral membrane Na+/H+ exchanger.

    PubMed Central

    Tse, C M; Ma, A I; Yang, V W; Watson, A J; Levine, S; Montrose, M H; Potter, J; Sardet, C; Pouyssegur, J; Donowitz, M

    1991-01-01

    A cDNA clone encoding a rabbit ileal villus cell Na+/H+ exchanger was isolated and its complete nucleotide sequence was determined. The cDNA is 4 kb long and contains 322 bp of 5'-untranslated region, 2451 bp of open reading frame and 1163 bp of 3'-untranslated area, with 70%, 91% and 40% identity to the human sequence, respectively. Amino acid sequence deduced from the longest open reading frame indicated a protein of 816 residues (predicted Mr 90,716) which exhibits 95% amino acid identity to the human Na+/H+ exchanger. The two putative glycosylation sites in the human Na+/H+ exchanger are conserved in this protein, suggesting that it is a glycoprotein. Stable transfection of the cDNA into an Na+/H+ exchanger deficient fibroblast cell line, established Na+/H+ exchange. The Na+/H+ exchanger was stimulated by serum and a phorbol ester but not by 8-Br-cAMP. In Northern blot analysis, the cDNA hybridized to a 4.8 kb message in rabbit ileal villus cells, kidney cortex, kidney medulla, adrenal gland, brain and descending colon and to a 5.2 kb message in cultured human colonic cancer cell lines, HT29-18 and Caco-2. In immunoblotting, a polyclonal antibody raised against a fusion protein of beta-galactosidase and the C-terminal 158 amino acids of the human Na+/H+ exchanger identified a rabbit ileal basolateral membrane protein of 94 kd and only weakly interacted with the ileal brush border membrane. In immunocytochemical studies using ileal villus and crypt epithelial cells, the same antibody identified basolateral and not brush border epitopes. Restriction analysis of genomic DNA with a 462 bp PstI-AccI fragment of the rabbit Na+/H+ exchanger strongly suggests the existence of closely related Na+/H+ exchanger genes. The near identity of the basolateral Na+/H+ exchanger and the human Na+/H+ exchanger plus the ubiquitous expression of this message suggests that the ileal basolateral Na+/H+ exchanger is the 'housekeeping' Na+/H+ exchanger. Images PMID:1712287

  13. Raman spectroscopy of single extracellular vesicles reveals subpopulations with varying membrane content (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Zachary J.; Lee, Changwon; Rojalin, Tatu; Carney, Randy P.; Hazari, Sidhartha; Knudson, Alisha; Lam, Kit S.; Saari, Heikki; Lazaro Ibañez, Elisa; Viitala, Tapani; Laaksonen, Timo; Yliperttula, Marjo; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian

    2016-03-01

    Exosomes are small (~100nm) membrane bound vesicles excreted by cells as part of their normal biological processes. These extracellular vesicles are currently an area of intense research, since they were recently found to carry functional mRNA that allows transfer of proteins and other cellular instructions between cells. Exosomes have been implicated in a wide range of diseases, including cancer. Cancer cells are known to have increased exosome production, and may use those exosomes to prepare remote environments for metastasis. Therefore, there is a strong need to develop characterization methods to help understand the structure and function of these vesicles. However, current techniques, such as proteomics and genomics technologies, rely on aggregating a large amount of exosome material and reporting on chemical content that is averaged over many millions of exosomes. Here we report on the use of laser-tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS) to probe individual vesicles, discovering distinct heterogeneity among exosomes both within a cell line, as well as between different cell lines. Through principal components analysis followed by hierarchical clustering, we have identified four "subpopulations" of exosomes shared across seven cell lines. The key chemical differences between these subpopulations, as determined by spectral analysis of the principal component loadings, are primarily related to membrane composition. Specifically, the differences can be ascribed to cholesterol content, cholesterol to phospholipid ratio, and surface protein expression. Thus, we have shown LTRS to be a powerful method to probe the chemical content of single extracellular vesicles.

  14. MPP1 as a Factor Regulating Phase Separation in Giant Plasma Membrane-Derived Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Podkalicka, Joanna; Biernatowska, Agnieszka; Majkowski, Michał; Grzybek, Michał; Sikorski, Aleksander F.

    2015-01-01

    The existence of membrane-rafts helps to conceptually understand the spatiotemporal organization of membrane-associated events (signaling, fusion, fission, etc.). However, as rafts themselves are nanoscopic, dynamic, and transient assemblies, they cannot be directly observed in a metabolizing cell by traditional microscopy. The observation of phase separation in giant plasma membrane-derived vesicles from live cells is a powerful tool for studying lateral heterogeneity in eukaryotic cell membranes, specifically in the context of membrane rafts. Microscopic phase separation is detectable by fluorescent labeling, followed by cooling of the membranes below their miscibility phase transition temperature. It remains unclear, however, if this lipid-driven process is tuneable in any way by interactions with proteins. Here, we demonstrate that MPP1, a member of the MAGUK family, can modulate membrane properties such as the fluidity and phase separation capability of giant plasma membrane-derived vesicles. Our data suggest that physicochemical domain properties of the membrane can be modulated, without major changes in lipid composition, through proteins such as MPP1. PMID:25954878

  15. Fundamental Studies of Assembly and Mechanical Properties of Lipid Bilayer Membranes and Unilamellar Vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xi

    This dissertation work focuses on: (i) obtaining a phospholipid bilayer membrane (LBM)/conducting electrode system with low defect density and optimized rigidity; (ii) investigating vesicle stability and mechanical properties. LBM is a simplified yet representative cell membrane model. LBMs assembled on conductive surfaces can probe protein-LBM interactions activities electrochemically. Sterically stabilized vesicles could be used as cell models or for drug delivery. The main challenges for LBM assembly on gold are vesicles do not spontaneously rupture to form LBMs on gold and the roughness of the gold substrate has considerable influence on molecular film defect density. In this study, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) vesicles were functionalized with 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine- N-poly(ethylene glycol)-2000-N-[3-(2-pyridyldithio)propionate] (DSPE-PEG-PDP) to yield stable LBMs on gold without surface modification. A template-stripping method was used to obtain atomically flat and pristine gold surfaces. The critical force to initiate vesicle rupture decreases with increasing DSPE-PEG-PDP concentration, indicating that gold-thiolate bonding between DSPE-PEG-PDP and gold substrates promotes LBM formation. Mechanical properties of LBMs and vesicles were investigated as a function of DSPE-PEG-PDP concentration via Atomic Force Microscopy. The elastic moduli of LBMs were determined with DSPE-PEG-PDP concentration ranging from 0mol% to 24mol% and were found to depend on PEG chain conformation. Incorporating DSPE-PEG-PDP molecules with PEG in mushroom conformation results in a decrease of LBM rigidity, while incorporating PEG in brush conformation leads to LBM stiffening. Contrarily, mechanical properties of functionalized vesicles did not vary significantly by varying DSPE-PEG-PDP concentration. LBM with tunable rigidity by adjusting DSPE-PEG-PDP concentration provides a versatile cell membrane model for studying protein or

  16. Exchange of monooleoylphosphatidylcholine with single egg phosphatidylcholine vesicle membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Zhelev, D V

    1996-01-01

    In a previous paper we described the experiments and the framework of a model for the exchange of monooleoylphosphatidylcholine with a single egg phosphatidylcholine membrane. In the present paper a model is presented that relates the experimentally measured apparent characteristics of the overall kinetics of lysolipid exchange to the true rates of lysolipid exchange and interbilayer transfer. It is shown that the adsorption of the lysolipid follows two pathways: one through the adsorption of lipid monomers and other through the fusion of micelles. The desorption of lysolipid follows a single pathway, namely, the desorption of monomers. The overall rate of fast desorption under convective flow conditions gives the true rate of monomer desorption from the outer membrane monolayer. The overall rate of both slow lysolipid uptake and slow desorption gives the rate of interbilayer transfer. Because of the uneven distribution of lysolipid between the two monolayers during its uptake, one of the membrane monolayers is apparently extended relative to the other. This relative extension of one of the monolayers induces a monolayer tension. The induced monolayer tension can increase up to 7 mN.m-1, when most of the intercalated lysolipid only partitions into the monolayer facing the lysolipid solution. This value is similar to the measured value for the critical monolayer tension of membrane failure, which is on the order of 5 mN.m-1. The similarity of the magnitudes of the induced monolayer tension during monooleoylphosphatidylcholine exchange and the monolayer tension of membrane failure suggests that the interbilayer lipid transfer may be affected by the formation of short living membrane defects. Furthermore, the pH-induced interbilayer exchange of phosphatidylglycerol is considered. In this case, it is shown that the rate of interbilayer transfer is a function of the phosphatidylglycerol concentration in the membrane. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:8804609

  17. Antigen retrieval reveals widespread basolateral expression of syntaxin 3 in renal epithelia.

    PubMed

    Breton, Sylvie; Inoue, Takeaki; Knepper, Mark A; Brown, Dennis

    2002-03-01

    Soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins play a key role in docking and fusion of intracellular transport vesicles and may regulate apical and basolateral membrane protein delivery in epithelial cells. In a previous study, syntaxin 3 (a target SNARE) protein was detectable in the kidney only in intercalated cells. We now report a more widespread distribution of syntaxin 3 in a variety of renal epithelial cells after antigen retrieval. Sections of rat kidney were treated with SDS and incubated with antisyntaxin 3 antibodies. Strong basolateral membrane staining was seen in descending and ascending thin limbs of Henle, thick ascending limbs of Henle, the macula densa, distal and connecting tubules, and all cells of the collecting duct including A- and B-intercalated cells. The papillary surface epithelium and the transitional epithelium of the ureter were also stained, but proximal tubules were negative. Western blotting revealed a strong signal at 37 kDa in all regions, and the antigen was restricted to membrane fractions. SDS treatment was not necessary to reveal syntaxin 3 in intercalated cells. These data show that syntaxin 3 might be involved in basolateral trafficking pathways in most renal epithelial cell types. The exclusive basolateral location of syntaxin 3 in situ, however, contrasts with the apical location of this SNARE protein in some kidney epithelial cells in culture.

  18. Electron transport and electrochemical proton gradient in membrane vesicles of Clostridium thermoautotrophicum.

    PubMed Central

    Hugenholtz, J; Ljungdahl, L G

    1989-01-01

    Membrane vesicles of Clostridium thermoautotrophicum containing carbon monoxide dehydrogenase generated a proton motive force when exposed to CO. This proton motive force, with a value of -140 mV, consisted of only an electrical potential at pH 7.5 and above and of an electrical potential and pH gradient at a lower pH. The proton motive force drove the uptake of L-alanine by the vesicles to a concentration of 300 times that of the medium. PMID:2708323

  19. Interaction of quorum signals with outer membrane lipids: insights into prokaryotic membrane vesicle formation.

    PubMed

    Mashburn-Warren, Lauren; Howe, Jörg; Garidel, Patrick; Richter, Walter; Steiniger, Frank; Roessle, Manfred; Brandenburg, Klaus; Whiteley, Marvin

    2008-07-01

    Bacteria have evolved elaborate communication strategies to co-ordinate their group activities, a process termed quorum sensing (QS). Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that utilizes QS for diverse activities, including disease pathogenesis. P. aeruginosa has evolved a novel communication system in which the signal molecule 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-quinolone (Pseudomonas Quinolone Signal, PQS) is trafficked between cells via membrane vesicles (MVs). Not only is PQS packaged into MVs, it is required for MV formation. Although MVs are involved in important biological processes aside from signalling, the molecular mechanism of MV formation is unknown. To provide insight into the molecular mechanism of MV formation, we examined the interaction of PQS with bacterial lipids. Here, we show that PQS interacts strongly with the acyl chains and 4'-phosphate of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Using PQS derivatives, we demonstrate that the alkyl side-chain and third position hydroxyl of PQS are critical for these interactions. Finally, we show that PQS stimulated purified LPS to form liposome-like structures. These studies provide molecular insight into P. aeruginosa MV formation and demonstrate that quorum signals serve important non-signalling functions.

  20. F1FO ATPase vesicle preparation and technique for performing patch clamp recordings of submitochondrial vesicle membranes.

    PubMed

    Sacchetti, Silvio; Alavian, Kambiz N; Lazrove, Emma; Jonas, Elizabeth A

    2013-05-04

    Mitochondria are involved in many important cellular functions including metabolism, survival(1), development and, calcium signaling(2). Two of the most important mitochondrial functions are related to the efficient production of ATP, the energy currency of the cell, by oxidative phosphorylation, and the mediation of signals for programmed cell death(3). The enzyme primarily responsible for the production of ATP is the F1FO-ATP synthase, also called ATP synthase(4-5). In recent years, the role of mitochondria in apoptotic and necrotic cell death has received considerable attention. In apoptotic cell death, BCL-2 family proteins such as Bax enter the mitochondrial outer membrane, oligomerize and permeabilize the outer membrane, releasing pro-apoptotic factors into the cytosol(6). In classic necrotic cell death, such as that produced by ischemia or excitotoxicity in neurons, a large, poorly regulated increase in matrix calcium contributes to the opening of an inner membrane pore, the mitochondrial permeability transition pore or mPTP. This depolarizes the inner membrane and causes osmotic shifts, contributing to outer membrane rupture, release of pro-apoptotic factors, and metabolic dysfunction. Many proteins including Bcl-xL(7) interact with F1FO ATP synthase, modulating its function. Bcl-xL interacts directly with the beta subunit of F1FO ATP synthase, and this interaction decreases a leak conductance within the F1FOATPasecomplex, increasing the net transport of H+ by F1FO during F1FO ATPase activity(8) and thereby increasing mitochondrial efficiency. To study the activity and modulation of the ATP synthase, we isolated from rodent brain submitochondrial vesicles (SMVs) containing F1FO ATPase. The SMVs retain the structural and functional integrity of the F1FO ATPase as shown in Alavian et al. Here, we describe a method that we have used successfully for the isolation of SMVs from rat brain and we delineate the patch clamp technique to analyze channel activity (ion

  1. Genome-Wide Assessment of Outer Membrane Vesicle Production in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kulp, Adam J; Sun, Bo; Ai, Teresa; Manning, Andrew J; Orench-Rivera, Nichole; Schmid, Amy K; Kuehn, Meta J

    2015-01-01

    The production of outer membrane vesicles by Gram-negative bacteria has been well documented; however, the mechanism behind the biogenesis of these vesicles remains unclear. Here a high-throughput experimental method and systems-scale analysis was conducted to determine vesiculation values for the whole genome knockout library of Escherichia coli mutant strains (Keio collection). The resultant dataset quantitatively recapitulates previously observed phenotypes and implicates nearly 150 new genes in the process of vesiculation. Gene functional and biochemical pathway analyses suggest that mutations that truncate outer membrane structures such as lipopolysaccharide and enterobacterial common antigen lead to hypervesiculation, whereas mutants in oxidative stress response pathways result in lower levels. This study expands and refines the current knowledge regarding the cellular pathways required for outer membrane vesiculation in E. coli.

  2. Genome-Wide Assessment of Outer Membrane Vesicle Production in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kulp, Adam J.; Sun, Bo; Ai, Teresa; Manning, Andrew J.; Orench-Rivera, Nichole

    2015-01-01

    The production of outer membrane vesicles by Gram-negative bacteria has been well documented; however, the mechanism behind the biogenesis of these vesicles remains unclear. Here a high-throughput experimental method and systems-scale analysis was conducted to determine vesiculation values for the whole genome knockout library of Escherichia coli mutant strains (Keio collection). The resultant dataset quantitatively recapitulates previously observed phenotypes and implicates nearly 150 new genes in the process of vesiculation. Gene functional and biochemical pathway analyses suggest that mutations that truncate outer membrane structures such as lipopolysaccharide and enterobacterial common antigen lead to hypervesiculation, whereas mutants in oxidative stress response pathways result in lower levels. This study expands and refines the current knowledge regarding the cellular pathways required for outer membrane vesiculation in E. coli. PMID:26406465

  3. Membrane compression in tumbling and vacillating-breathing regimes for quasispherical vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guedda, M.

    2014-01-01

    We derive some analytical results of a well-known model for quasispherical vesicles in a linear shear flow at low deformability. Attention is focussed on the oscillatory regimes: the tumbling (TB) mode, vacillating-breathing (VB) mode, and the transition from vacillating-breathing to tumbling, depending on a control parameter Γ. It is shown that, during the VB-to-TB transition (Γ =1), the vesicle momentarily attains its maximal extension in the vorticity direction and transits through a circular profile in the shear plane for which the radius is exactly determined. In addition, we provide an explicit analytical expression for the effective membrane tension for different types of motions. We find a critical bending number below which the membrane undergoes compression at each instant and show that, during the VB-to-TB transition, a fourth-order membrane deformation is possible.

  4. Confining a fluid membrane vesicle of toroidal topology in an adhesive hard sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouzar, Lila; Menas, Ferhat; Müller, Martin Michael

    2017-03-01

    We discuss how the equilibrium shapes of a confined toroidal fluid membrane vesicle change when an adhesion between membrane and confining sphere is taken into account. The case without adhesion was studied in Ref. [1]. Different types of solution were found and assembled in a phase diagram as a function of area and reduced volume of the membrane. Depending on the degree of confinement the vesicle is either free, in contact along a circle (contact-circle solutions) or on a surface (contact-area solutions). All solutions without adhesion are up-down symmetric. When the container is adhesive, the phase diagram is altered and new kinds of solution without up-down symmetry are found. For increasing values of adhesion the region of contact-circle solutions shrinks until it vanishes completely from the phase diagram.

  5. Single vesicle observations of the cardiolipin-cytochrome C interaction: induction of membrane morphology changes.

    PubMed

    Beales, Paul A; Bergstrom, Chris L; Geerts, Nienke; Groves, John T; Vanderlick, T Kyle

    2011-05-17

    We present a novel platform for investigating the composition-specific interactions of proteins (or other biologically relevant molecules) with model membranes composed of compositionally distinct domains. We focus on the interaction between a mitochondrial-specific lipid, cardiolipin (CL), and a peripheral membrane protein, cytochrome c (cyt c). We engineer vesicles with compositions such that they phase separate into coexisting liquid phases and the lipid of interest, CL, preferentially localizes into one of the domains (the liquid disordered (L(d)) phase). The presence of CL-rich and CL-depleted domains within the same vesicle provides a built-in control experiment to simultaneously observe the behavior of two membrane compositions under identical conditions. We find that cyt c binds strongly to CL-rich domains and observe fascinating morphological transitions within these regions of membrane. CL-rich domains start to form small buds and eventually fold up into a collapsed state. We also observe that cyt c can induce a strong attraction between the CL-rich domains of adjacent vesicles as demonstrated by the development of large osculating regions between these domains. Qualitatively similar behavior is observed when other polycationic proteins or polymers of a similar size and net charge are used instead of cyt c. We argue that these striking phenomena can be simply understood by consideration of colloidal forces between the protein and the membrane. We discuss the possible biological implications of our observations in relation to the structure and function of mitochondria.

  6. Formation of Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Derived Protrusions and Vesicles in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Akihiro; Fujimoto, Masaru; Katayama, Kenta; Yamaoka, Shohei; Tsutsumi, Nobuhiro; Arimura, Shin-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles that have inner and outer membranes. In plants, the inner membrane has been well studied but relatively little is known about the outer membrane. Here we report that Arabidopsis cells have mitochondrial outer membrane-derived structures, some of which protrude from the main body of mitochondria (mitochondrial outer-membrane protrusions; MOPs), while others form vesicle-like structures without a matrix marker. The latter vesicle-like structures are similar to some mammalian MDVs (mitochondrial-derived vesicles). Live imaging demonstrated that a plant MDV budded off from the tip of a MOP. MDVs were also observed in the drp3a drp3b double mutant, indicating that they could be formed without the mitochondrial fission factors DRP3A and DRP3B. Double staining studies showed that the MDVs were not peroxisomes, endosomes, Golgi apparatus or trans-Golgi network (TGN). The numbers of MDVs and MOPs increased in senescent leaves and after dark treatment. Together, these results suggest that MDVs and MOPs are related to leaf senescence.

  7. Formation of Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Derived Protrusions and Vesicles in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Akihiro; Fujimoto, Masaru; Katayama, Kenta; Yamaoka, Shohei; Tsutsumi, Nobuhiro; Arimura, Shin-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles that have inner and outer membranes. In plants, the inner membrane has been well studied but relatively little is known about the outer membrane. Here we report that Arabidopsis cells have mitochondrial outer membrane-derived structures, some of which protrude from the main body of mitochondria (mitochondrial outer-membrane protrusions; MOPs), while others form vesicle-like structures without a matrix marker. The latter vesicle-like structures are similar to some mammalian MDVs (mitochondrial-derived vesicles). Live imaging demonstrated that a plant MDV budded off from the tip of a MOP. MDVs were also observed in the drp3a drp3b double mutant, indicating that they could be formed without the mitochondrial fission factors DRP3A and DRP3B. Double staining studies showed that the MDVs were not peroxisomes, endosomes, Golgi apparatus or trans-Golgi network (TGN). The numbers of MDVs and MOPs increased in senescent leaves and after dark treatment. Together, these results suggest that MDVs and MOPs are related to leaf senescence. PMID:26752045

  8. Aquaporin-6: An intracellular vesicle water channel protein in renal epithelia.

    PubMed

    Yasui, M; Kwon, T H; Knepper, M A; Nielsen, S; Agre, P

    1999-05-11

    All characterized mammalian aquaporins (AQPs) are localized to plasma membranes where they function chiefly to mediate water transport across cells. Here we show that AQP6 is localized exclusively in intracellular membranes in renal epithelia. By using a polyclonal antibody to the C terminus of AQP6, immunoblots revealed a major 30-kDa band in membranes from rat renal cortex and medulla. Endoglycosidase treatment demonstrated presence of an intracellular high mannose glycan on each subunit. Sequential ultracentrifugation of rat kidney homogenates confirmed that AQP6 resides predominantly in vesicular fractions, and immunohistochemical and immunoelectron microscopic studies confirmed that >98% of AQP6 is located in intracellular membrane vesicles. In glomeruli, AQP6 is present in membrane vesicles within podocyte cell bodies and foot processes. In proximal tubules, AQP6 is also abundant in membrane vesicles within the subapical compartment of segment 2 and segment 3 cells, but was not detected in the brush border or basolateral membranes. In collecting duct, AQP6 resides in intracellular membrane vesicles in apical, mid, and basolateral cytoplasm of type A intercalated cells, but was not observed in the plasma membrane. Unlike other members of the AQP family, the unique distribution in intracellular membrane vesicles in multiple types of renal epithelia indicates that AQP6 is not simply involved in transcellular fluid absorption. Moreover, our studies predict that AQP6 participates in distinct physiological functions such as glomerular filtration, tubular endocytosis, and acid-base metabolism.

  9. Aquaporin-6: An intracellular vesicle water channel protein in renal epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Yasui, Masato; Kwon, Tae-Hwan; Knepper, Mark A.; Nielsen, Søren; Agre, Peter

    1999-01-01

    All characterized mammalian aquaporins (AQPs) are localized to plasma membranes where they function chiefly to mediate water transport across cells. Here we show that AQP6 is localized exclusively in intracellular membranes in renal epithelia. By using a polyclonal antibody to the C terminus of AQP6, immunoblots revealed a major 30-kDa band in membranes from rat renal cortex and medulla. Endoglycosidase treatment demonstrated presence of an intracellular high mannose glycan on each subunit. Sequential ultracentrifugation of rat kidney homogenates confirmed that AQP6 resides predominantly in vesicular fractions, and immunohistochemical and immunoelectron microscopic studies confirmed that >98% of AQP6 is located in intracellular membrane vesicles. In glomeruli, AQP6 is present in membrane vesicles within podocyte cell bodies and foot processes. In proximal tubules, AQP6 is also abundant in membrane vesicles within the subapical compartment of segment 2 and segment 3 cells, but was not detected in the brush border or basolateral membranes. In collecting duct, AQP6 resides in intracellular membrane vesicles in apical, mid, and basolateral cytoplasm of type A intercalated cells, but was not observed in the plasma membrane. Unlike other members of the AQP family, the unique distribution in intracellular membrane vesicles in multiple types of renal epithelia indicates that AQP6 is not simply involved in transcellular fluid absorption. Moreover, our studies predict that AQP6 participates in distinct physiological functions such as glomerular filtration, tubular endocytosis, and acid-base metabolism. PMID:10318966

  10. Increased production of outer membrane vesicles by cultured freshwater bacteria in response to ultraviolet radiation.

    PubMed

    Gamalier, Juliana P; Silva, Thiago P; Zarantonello, Victor; Dias, Felipe F; Melo, Rossana C N

    2017-01-01

    Secretion of membrane vesicles is an important biological process of both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. This process has been characterized in pathogenic bacteria, but is less clear in non-pathogenic bacteria from aquatic ecosystems. Here, we investigated, for the first time, the process of formation of outer membranes vesicles (OMVs), nanoscale vesicles extruded from the outer membrane (OM) of gram-negative bacteria, in cultures of freshwater bacteria after exposure or not to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) as an environmental stressor. Non-axenic cultures of freshwater bacteria isolated from a Brazilian aquatic ecosystem (Funil reservoir) were exposed or not to UVR (UVA+UVB) over a 3h period, during which cell density, viability and ultrastructure were analyzed. First, we showed that UVR induce bacterial death. UVR triggered significant negative effect on cell density after 3h of UVR treatment. This decrease was directly associated with cell death as revealed by a cell viability fluorescent probe that enables the distinction of live/dead bacteria. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed changes indicative of cell death after 3h of UVR exposure, with significant increase of damaged cells compared to the control group. Second, we demonstrated that gram-negative bacteria release OMVs during normal growth and after UVR exposure. OMVs were clearly identified as round, membrane-bound vesicles budding off from the bacterial OM as isolated or clustered vesicles or free in the extracellular medium. Remarkably, quantitative TEM analyses showed that bacteria respond to UVR with increased formation of OMVs. Moreover, while OMVs numbers per intact or damaged cell did not differ in the untreated group, UVR led to a higher vesiculation by bacteria in process of death. This means that degenerating bacteria release OMVs before lysis and that this secretion might be an adaptive/protective response to rapid changes in environmental conditions such as UV radiation. Copyright

  11. Isolation of Chlamydia trachomatis and membrane vesicles derived from host and bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Frohlich, Kyla; Hua, Ziyu; Wang, Jin; Shen, Li

    2012-01-01

    The study of intracellular bacteria and nanometer-size membrane vesicles within infected host cells poses an important challenge as it is difficult to identify each distinct population in the context of the complex populations generated from active host-pathogen interactions. Here, suspension cultures of L929 cells infected with the prevalent obligate intracellular bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis strain F/Cal-IC-13 are utilized for the large scale preparation and isolation of natural membrane vesicles and bacterial forms. Cell lysis with nitrogen cavitation in combination with differential centrifugation, OptiPrep™ density gradient separation, and immunoenrichment using anti-chlamydial lipopolysaccharide antibodies and MagnaBind beads allows for the isolation of both productive and persistent bacterial forms, as well as membrane vesicles derived from the host and pathogen. We have evaluated these populations by electron microscopy and Western blot analysis for identification of biomarkers. In addition, purified persistent forms of C. trachomatis induced by ampicillin display adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) transport activity, suggesting that ampicillin-induced persistent C. trachomatis organisms, at least in part, rely upon host ATP as an energy source. Importantly, several chlamydial cytotoxic and/or secreted proteins are demonstrated to be associated with these vesicles, supporting the idea that membrane vesicles are generated by Chlamydia as a means of carrying and delivering virulence factors necessary for pathogenesis. The ability to produce large-scale infections and generate distinct bacteria and host-derived populations for biochemical analysis, while reducing the burdens of time and cost have implications in all areas of chlamydiology. These protocols can be applied to other strains of C. trachomatis or other intracellular bacteria. PMID:22960504

  12. Chloride Uptake by Brush Border Membrane Vesicles Isolated from Rabbit Renal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Warnock, David G.; Yee, Victoria J.

    1981-01-01

    Brush border membrane vesicles were isolated from rabbit renal cortex by Mg++-precipitation and differential centrifugation. 36Cl− and [3H]glucose uptakes were simultaneously determined by a rapid filtration technique. Lysis of the vesicles with distilled water abolished 90-95% of the radioactivity on the filters, suggesting that nearly all of the 36Cl− and [3H]glucose counts represented uptake into an osmotically reactive intravesicular space. Inwardly directed K+ gradients plus valinomycin stimulated 36Cl− uptake, demonstrating a conductive pathway for chloride uptake into brush-border membrane vesicles. 36Cl− uptake could also be stimulated by inwardly directed proton gradients (pHoutside < pHinside). This effect was seen in the absence of sodium, as well as in the presence of valinomycin when the vesicles had equal K+ concentrations inside and out. An “overshoot” phenomenon was observed when external 36Cl− was 2 mM and the external pH was lowered from 7.5 to 6.0 or to 4.5. The effect of the proton gradient was presumed to be different from the conductive mechanism because (a) the stimulation of 36Cl− uptake by inwardly directed K+ diffusion potentials was additive to the proton gradient effect, and (b) competition studies revealed statistically significant effects of thiocyanate on the conductive pathway, but not on the proton-driven pathway. HCl cotransport or anion exchange are electrically neutral mechanisms which could couple 36Cl− uptake to inwardly-directed proton gradients in a brush border membrane vesicle. If both electrically neutral and conductive path ways for chloride transport are present in the luminal membrane of the proximal tubule, then the mechanism as well as the direction of net chloride transport will be influenced by the nature of the accompanying cation transport process. PMID:7451645

  13. Cholesterol reduces membrane electroporation and electric deformation of small bilayer vesicles.

    PubMed

    Kakorin, Sergej; Brinkmann, Ute; Neumann, Eberhard

    2005-09-01

    Electric fields, similar in the order of magnitude of the natural membrane fields of cellular lipid/protein membranes, and chemical relaxation spectrometry can be used as tools to quantify the rigidifying effect of cholesterol in membranes. Small unilamellar vesicles of radius a=50+/-3 nm, prepared form phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylserine and phosphatidyl-glycerol in the molar ratio 1:1:1 and containing the optical lipid probe molecule 2-(3-diphenyl-hexatrienyl) propanoyl)-1-palmitoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphocholine (beta-DPH pPC), serve as examples for curved lipid membranes. The data of electrooptical turbidity and absorbance relaxations at the wavelength lambda=365 nm are analysed in terms of membrane bending rigidity kappa and membrane stretching modulus K. Both kappa and K increase with increasing mole fraction x of cholesterol up to x=0.5. The cholesterol induced denser packing of the lipids reduces the extent of both membrane electroporation (ME) and electroelongation of the vesicles. Further on, cholesterol in the lipid phase and sucrose in the aqueous suspension reduce the extent of membrane undulation and electro-stretching.

  14. Assessing the efficacy of vesicle fusion with planar membrane arrays using a mitochondrial porin as reporter

    SciTech Connect

    Pszon-Bartosz, Kamila; Hansen, Jesper S.; Stibius, Karin B.; Groth, Jesper S.; Helix-Nielsen, Claus

    2011-03-04

    Research highlights: {yields} We have established a vesicle fusion efficacy assay based on the major non-specific porin of Fusobacterium nucleatum (FomA). {yields} Maximal fusion obtained was almost 150,000 porin insertions during 20 min. {yields} Incorporation can be either first order or exponential kinetics which has implications for establishing protein delivery to biomimetic membranes. -- Abstract: Reconstitution of functionally active membrane protein into artificially made lipid bilayers is a challenge that must be overcome to create a membrane-based biomimetic sensor and separation device. In this study we address the efficacy of proteoliposome fusion with planar membrane arrays. We establish a protein incorporation efficacy assay using the major non-specific porin of Fusobacterium nucleatum (FomA) as reporter. We use electrical conductance measurements and fluorescence microscopy to characterize proteoliposome fusion with an array of planar membranes. We show that protein reconstitution in biomimetic membrane arrays may be quantified using the developed FomA assay. Specifically, we show that FomA vesicles are inherently fusigenic. Optimal FomA incorporation is obtained with a proteoliposome lipid-to-protein molar ratio (LPR) = 50 more than 10{sup 5} FomA proteins could be incorporated in a bilayer array with a total membrane area of 2 mm{sup 2} within 20 min. This novel assay for quantifying protein delivery into lipid bilayers may be a useful tool in developing biomimetic membrane applications.

  15. Tubular lipid membranes pulled from vesicles: Dependence of system equilibrium on lipid bilayer curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golushko, I. Yu.; Rochal, S. B.

    2016-01-01

    Conditions of joint equilibrium and stability are derived for a spherical lipid vesicle and a tubular lipid membrane (TLM) pulled from this vesicle. The obtained equations establish relationships between the geometric and physical characteristics of the system and the external parameters, which have been found to be controllable in recent experiments. In particular, the proposed theory shows that, in addition to the pressure difference between internal and external regions of the system, the variable spontaneous average curvature of the lipid bilayer (forming the TLM) also influences the stability of the lipid tube. The conditions for stability of the cylindrical phase of TLMs after switching off the external force that initially formed the TLM from a vesicle are discussed. The loss of system stability under the action of a small axial force compressing the TLM is considered.

  16. Tubular lipid membranes pulled from vesicles: Dependence of system equilibrium on lipid bilayer curvature

    SciTech Connect

    Golushko, I. Yu. Rochal, S. B.

    2016-01-15

    Conditions of joint equilibrium and stability are derived for a spherical lipid vesicle and a tubular lipid membrane (TLM) pulled from this vesicle. The obtained equations establish relationships between the geometric and physical characteristics of the system and the external parameters, which have been found to be controllable in recent experiments. In particular, the proposed theory shows that, in addition to the pressure difference between internal and external regions of the system, the variable spontaneous average curvature of the lipid bilayer (forming the TLM) also influences the stability of the lipid tube. The conditions for stability of the cylindrical phase of TLMs after switching off the external force that initially formed the TLM from a vesicle are discussed. The loss of system stability under the action of a small axial force compressing the TLM is considered.

  17. Porphyromonas gingivalis outer membrane vesicles exclusively contain outer membrane and periplasmic proteins and carry a cargo enriched with virulence factors.

    PubMed

    Veith, Paul D; Chen, Yu-Yen; Gorasia, Dhana G; Chen, Dina; Glew, Michelle D; O'Brien-Simpson, Neil M; Cecil, Jessica D; Holden, James A; Reynolds, Eric C

    2014-05-02

    Porphyromonas gingivalis, a keystone pathogen associated with chronic periodontitis, produces outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) that carry a cargo of virulence factors. In this study, the proteome of OMVs was determined by LC-MS/MS analyses of SDS-PAGE fractions, and a total of 151 OMV proteins were identified, with all but one likely to have originated from either the outer membrane or periplasm. Of these, 30 exhibited a C-terminal secretion signal known as the CTD that localizes them to the cell/vesicle surface, 79 and 27 were localized to the vesicle membrane and lumen respectively while 15 were of uncertain location. All of the CTD proteins along with other virulence factors were found to be considerably enriched in the OMVs, while proteins exhibiting the OmpA peptidoglycan-binding motif and TonB-dependent receptors were preferentially retained on the outer membrane of the cell. Cryo-transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed that an electron dense surface layer known to comprise CTD proteins accounted for a large proportion of the OMVs' volume providing an explanation for the enrichment of CTD proteins. Together the results show that P. gingivalis is able to specifically concentrate and release a large number of its virulence factors into the environment in the form of OMVs.

  18. Uptake of auxins into membrane vesicles isolated from pea stems: an in vitro auxin transport system

    SciTech Connect

    Slone, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this research was to test the applicability of the chemiosmotic theory of auxin transport to a subcellular system. Membrane vesicles were isolated from the basal portion of the third internode of etiolated pea plants (Pisum sativum L. var. Alaska) by differential centrifugation. Uptake of auxin was determined by adding /sup 14/C-labeled indoleacetic acid (IAA) to vesicles. Nigericin, a monovalent cation ionophore, and the electrogenic protonophore, carbonyl-cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), at micromolar concentrations abolished saturable uptake. Bursting vesicles by sonication, osmotic shock and freeze/thawing also eliminated saturable uptake. As the temperature increased from 0 to 30/sup 0/C, saturable uptake decreased markedly. Nonsaturable auxin uptake was less affected by these treatments. The pH gradient-dependent uptake of auxin appeared to be a transmembrane uptake of auxin into the vesicles rather than surface binding. Unlabeled IAA, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 2-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) at low concentrations reduced the saturable accumulation of (/sup 14/C)IAA in vesicles, while phenylacetic acid, benzoic acid, and 1-NAA were effective only at high concentrations. Kinetic analysis revealed two types of sites: a high affinity site with an uptake capacity of 25 to 40 pmoles/g tissue, and a low affinity site with an uptake capacity of 260 to 600 pmole/g tissue, fresh wt. In conclusion, several principal elements of an auxin transport system, as specific by the chemiosmotic theory of polar auxin transport, were present in membrane vesicles isolated from relatively mature pea stem tissue. However, one important aspect of the theory was not demonstrated in this in vitro system - a TIBA/NPA-sensitive auxin efflux. The kinetics and specificity of auxin uptake strongly suggested that this system was physiologically significant.

  19. The Lantibiotic Nisin Induces Lipid II Aggregation, Causing Membrane Instability and Vesicle Budding

    PubMed Central

    Scherer, Katharina M.; Spille, Jan-Hendrik; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Grein, Fabian; Kubitscheck, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    The antimicrobial peptide nisin exerts its activity by a unique dual mechanism. It permeates the cell membranes of Gram-positive bacteria by binding to the cell wall precursor Lipid II and inhibits cell wall synthesis. Binding of nisin to Lipid II induces the formation of large nisin-Lipid II aggregates in the membrane of bacteria as well as in Lipid II-doped model membranes. Mechanistic details of the aggregation process and its impact on membrane permeation are still unresolved. In our experiments, we found that fluorescently labeled nisin bound very inhomogeneously to bacterial membranes as a consequence of the strong aggregation due to Lipid II binding. A correlation between cell membrane damage and nisin aggregation was observed in vivo. To further investigate the aggregation process of Lipid II and nisin, we assessed its dynamics by single-molecule microscopy of fluorescently labeled Lipid II molecules in giant unilamellar vesicles using light-sheet illumination. We observed a continuous reduction of Lipid II mobility due to a steady growth of nisin-Lipid II aggregates as a function of time and nisin concentration. From the measured diffusion constants of Lipid II, we estimated that the largest aggregates contained tens of thousands of Lipid II molecules. Furthermore, we observed that the formation of large nisin-Lipid II aggregates induced vesicle budding in giant unilamellar vesicles. Thus, we propose a membrane permeation mechanism that is dependent on the continuous growth of nisin-Lipid II aggregation and probably involves curvature effects on the membrane. PMID:25762323

  20. Quantitative optical microscopy and micromanipulation studies on the lipid bilayer membranes of giant unilamellar vesicles.

    PubMed

    Bagatolli, Luis A; Needham, David

    2014-07-01

    This manuscript discusses basic methodological aspects of optical microscopy and micromanipulation methods to study membranes and reviews methods to generate giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs). In particular, we focus on the use of fluorescence microscopy and micropipet manipulation techniques to study composition-structure-property materials relationships of free-standing lipid bilayer membranes. Because their size (∼5-100 μm diameter) that is well above the resolution limit of regular light microscopes, GUVs are suitable membrane models for optical microscopy and micromanipulation experimentation. For instance, using different fluorescent reporters, fluorescence microscopy allows strategies to study membrane lateral structure/dynamics at the level of single vesicles of diverse compositions. The micropipet manipulation technique on the other hand, uses Hoffman modulation contrast microscopy and allows studies on the mechanical, thermal, molecular exchange and adhesive-interactive properties of compositionally different membranes under controlled environmental conditions. The goal of this review is to (i) provide a historical perspective for both techniques; (ii) present and discuss some of their most important contributions to our understanding of lipid bilayer membranes; and (iii) outline studies that would utilize both techniques simultaneously on the same vesicle thus bringing the ability to characterize structure and strain responses together with the direct application of well-defined stresses to a single membrane or observe the effects of adhesive spreading. Knowledge gained by these studies has informed several applications of lipid membranes including their use as lung surfactants and drug delivery systems for cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Nhe1 is a luminal Na+/H+ exchanger in mouse choroid plexus and is targeted to the basolateral membrane in Ncbe/Nbcn2-null mice.

    PubMed

    Damkier, Helle Hasager; Prasad, Vikram; Hübner, Christian Andreas; Praetorius, Jeppe

    2009-06-01

    The choroid plexus epithelium (CPE) secretes the major fraction of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The Na(+)-HCO(3)(-) transporter Ncbe/Nbcn2 in the basolateral membrane of CPE cells is important for Na(+)-dependent pH(i) increases and probably for CSF secretion. In the current study, the anion transport inhibitor DIDS had no effect on the residual pH(i) recovery in acidified CPE from Ncbe/Nbcn2 knockout mouse by 2',7'-bis(2-carboxyethyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF)-fluorescence microscopy in the presence of CO(2)/HCO(3)(-) (Ncbe/Nbcn2-ko+DIDS 109% of control, P = 0.76, n = 5). Thus Ncbe/Nbcn2 mediates the DIDS-sensitive Na(+)-dependent pH(i) recovery in the CPE. The Na(+)/H(+) exchanger-1 Nhe1 is proposed to mediate similar functions as Ncbe/Nbcn2 in CPE. Here, we immunolocalize the Nhe1 protein to the luminal membrane domain in mouse and human CPE. The Na(+)-dependent pH(i) recovery of Nhe1 wild-type (Nhe1-wt) mice in the absence of CO(2)/HCO(3)(-) was abolished in the Nhe1 knockout CPE (Nhe1-ko 0.37% of Nhe1-wt, P = 0.0007, n = 5). In Ncbe/Nbcn2-ko mice, Nhe1 was targeted to the basolateral membrane. Nevertheless, the luminal Na(+)-dependent pH(i) recovery was increased in Ncbe/Nbcn2-ko compared with wild-type littermates (Nhe1-ko 146% of Nhe1-wt, P = 0.007, n = 5). Whereas the luminal Nhe activity was inhibited by the Nhe blocker EIPA (10 microM) in the Ncbe/Nbcn2-wt, it was insensitive to the inhibitor in Ncbe/Nbcn2-ko (Ncbe/Nbcn2-ko+EIPA 100% of control, P = 0.98, n = 5). This indicates that a luminal EIPA-insensitive Nhe was induced in Ncbe/Nbcn2-ko CPE and that EIPA-sensitive Nhe activity was basolateral. The Nhe1 translocation in Ncbe/Nbcn2-ko CPE may reflect a compensatory response, which provides the cells with better means of regulating pH(i) or transporting Na(+) after Ncbe/Nbcn2 disruption.

  2. A Bcl-xL-Drp1 complex regulates synaptic vesicle membrane dynamics during endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongmei; Alavian, Kambiz N.; Lazrove, Emma; Mehta, Nabil; Jones, Adrienne; Zhang, Ping; Licznerski, Pawel; Graham, Morven; Uo, Takuma; Guo, Junhua; Rahner, Christoph; Duman, Ronald S.; Morrison, Richard S.; Jonas, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    Following exocytosis, the rate of recovery of neurotransmitter release is determined by vesicle retrieval from the plasma membrane and by recruitment of vesicles from reserve pools within the synapse, the latter of which is dependent on mitochondrial ATP. The Bcl-2 family protein Bcl-xL, in addition to its role in cell death, regulates neurotransmitter release and recovery in part by increasing ATP availability from mitochondria. We now find, however, that, Bcl-xL directly regulates endocytotic vesicle retrieval in hippocampal neurons through protein/protein interaction with components of the clathrin complex. Our evidence suggests that, during synaptic stimulation, Bcl-xL translocates to clathrin-coated pits in a calmodulin-dependent manner and forms a complex of proteins with the GTPase Drp1, Mff and clathrin. Depletion of Drp1 produces misformed endocytotic vesicles. Mutagenesis studies suggest that formation of the Bcl-xL-Drp1 complex is necessary for the enhanced rate of vesicle endocytosis produced by Bcl-xL, thus providing a mechanism for presynaptic plasticity. PMID:23792689

  3. Model Systems of Precursor Cellular Membranes: Long-Chain Alcohols Stabilize Spontaneously Formed Oleic Acid Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Rendón, Adela; Carton, David Gil; Sot, Jesús; García-Pacios, Marcos; Montes, Ruth; Valle, Mikel; Arrondo, José-Luis R.; Goñi, Felix M.; Ruiz-Mirazo, Kepa

    2012-01-01

    Oleic acid vesicles have been used as model systems to study the properties of membranes that could be the evolutionary precursors of more complex, stable, and impermeable phospholipid biomembranes. Pure fatty acid vesicles in general show high sensitivity to ionic strength and pH variation, but there is growing evidence that this lack of stability can be counterbalanced through mixtures with other amphiphilic or surfactant compounds. Here, we present a systematic experimental analysis of the oleic acid system and explore the spontaneous formation of vesicles under different conditions, as well as the effects that alcohols and alkanes may have in the process. Our results support the hypothesis that alcohols (in particular 10- to 14-C-atom alcohols) contribute to the stability of oleic acid vesicles under a wider range of experimental conditions. Moreover, studies of mixed oleic-acid-alkane and oleic-acid-alcohol systems using infrared spectroscopy and Langmuir trough measurements indicate that precisely those alcohols that increased vesicle stability also decreased the mobility of oleic acid polar headgroups, as well as the area/molecule of lipid. PMID:22339864

  4. Dynamics of Crowded Vesicles: Local and Global Responses to Membrane Composition

    PubMed Central

    Holdbrook, Daniel A.; Huber, Roland G.; Piggot, Thomas J.; Bond, Peter J.; Khalid, Syma

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial cell envelope is composed of a mixture of different lipids and proteins, making it an inherently complex organelle. The interactions between integral membrane proteins and lipids are crucial for their respective spatial localization within bacterial cells. We have employed microsecond timescale coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of vesicles of varying sizes and with a range of protein and lipid compositions, and used novel approaches to measure both local and global system dynamics, the latter based on spherical harmonics analysis. Our results suggest that both hydrophobic mismatch, enhanced by embedded membrane proteins, and curvature based sorting, due to different modes of undulation, may drive assembly in vesicular systems. Interestingly, the modes of undulation of the vesicles were found to be altered by the specific protein and lipid composition of the vesicle. Strikingly, lipid dynamics were shown to be coupled to proteins up to 6 nm from their surface, a substantially larger distance than has previously been observed, resulting in multi-layered annular rings enriched with particular types of phospholipid. Such large protein-lipid complexes may provide a mechanism for long-range communication. Given the complexity of bacterial membranes, our results suggest that subtle changes in lipid composition may have major implications for lipid and protein sorting under a curvature-based membrane-sorting model. PMID:27310814

  5. The structure of the COPII transport-vesicle coat assembled on membranes

    PubMed Central

    Zanetti, Giulia; Prinz, Simone; Daum, Sebastian; Meister, Annette; Schekman, Randy; Bacia, Kirsten; Briggs, John AG

    2013-01-01

    Coat protein complex II (COPII) mediates formation of the membrane vesicles that export newly synthesised proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum. The inner COPII proteins bind to cargo and membrane, linking them to the outer COPII components that form a cage around the vesicle. Regulated flexibility in coat architecture is essential for transport of a variety of differently sized cargoes, but structural data on the assembled coat has not been available. We have used cryo-electron tomography and subtomogram averaging to determine the structure of the complete, membrane-assembled COPII coat. We describe a novel arrangement of the outer coat and find that the inner coat can assemble into regular lattices. The data reveal how coat subunits interact with one another and with the membrane, suggesting how coordinated assembly of inner and outer coats can mediate and regulate packaging of vesicles ranging from small spheres to large tubular carriers. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00951.001 PMID:24062940

  6. The structure of the COPII transport-vesicle coat assembled on membranes.

    PubMed

    Zanetti, Giulia; Prinz, Simone; Daum, Sebastian; Meister, Annette; Schekman, Randy; Bacia, Kirsten; Briggs, John A G

    2013-09-17

    Coat protein complex II (COPII) mediates formation of the membrane vesicles that export newly synthesised proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum. The inner COPII proteins bind to cargo and membrane, linking them to the outer COPII components that form a cage around the vesicle. Regulated flexibility in coat architecture is essential for transport of a variety of differently sized cargoes, but structural data on the assembled coat has not been available. We have used cryo-electron tomography and subtomogram averaging to determine the structure of the complete, membrane-assembled COPII coat. We describe a novel arrangement of the outer coat and find that the inner coat can assemble into regular lattices. The data reveal how coat subunits interact with one another and with the membrane, suggesting how coordinated assembly of inner and outer coats can mediate and regulate packaging of vesicles ranging from small spheres to large tubular carriers. DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00951.001.

  7. Comparative Transport Activity of Intact Cells, Membrane Vesicles, and Mesosomes of Bacillus licheniformis

    PubMed Central

    MacLeod, Robert A.; Thurman, Paul; Rogers, H. J.

    1973-01-01

    Sodium ion was shown to stimulate strongly the transport of l-glutamic acid into cells of Bacillus licheniformis 6346 His−. Lithium ion had a slight capacity to replace Na+ in this capacity, but K+ was without effect. Three of five amino acids tested. l-glutamic acid, l-aspartic acid, and l-alanine, were concentrated against a gradient in the cells. Intracellular pools of these amino acids were extractable with 5% trichloroacetic acid. Pools of l-histidine and l-lysine could not be detected. No evidence of active transport of lysine into cells could be detected, and histidine was taken up in the absence of chloramphenicol but not in its presence. The uptake of glutamic acid by membrane vesicle preparations was strongly stimulated by reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and to a lesser extent by succinate. The presence of phenazine methosulfate increased uptake in the presence of succinate. Either l- or d-lactate and adenosine triphosphate were without effect. None of these compounds stimulated the uptake of glutamic acid by mesosomes, although some mesosome preparations contained separable membrane which was very active. NADH strongly stimulated the uptake of aspartic acid and alanine by membrane vesicles but had only a slight effect on the uptake of histidine and lysine. No evidence of active transport of any of the amino acids into mesosomes could be detected either in the presence or absence of NADH. NADH stimulation of the uptake of glutamic acid by membrane vesicles was destroyed by exposure to light of 360 nm; this inactivation was reversible by vitamin K2(5) or K2(10). Sodium ion stimulated transport of glutamic acid by membrane vesicles. PMID:4347247

  8. Direct Visualization of the Action of Triton X-100 on Giant Vesicles of Erythrocyte Membrane Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Casadei, Bruna R.; Domingues, Cleyton C.; de Paula, Eneida; Riske, Karin A.

    2014-01-01

    The raft hypothesis proposes that microdomains enriched in sphingolipids, cholesterol, and specific proteins are transiently formed to accomplish important cellular tasks. Equivocally, detergent-resistant membranes were initially assumed to be identical to membrane rafts, because of similarities between their compositions. In fact, the impact of detergents in membrane organization is still controversial. Here, we use phase contrast and fluorescence microscopy to observe giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) made of erythrocyte membrane lipids (erythro-GUVs) when exposed to the detergent Triton X-100 (TX-100). We clearly show that TX-100 has a restructuring action on biomembranes. Contact with TX-100 readily induces domain formation on the previously homogeneous membrane of erythro-GUVs at physiological and room temperatures. The shape and dynamics of the formed domains point to liquid-ordered/liquid-disordered (Lo/Ld) phase separation, typically found in raft-like ternary lipid mixtures. The Ld domains are then separated from the original vesicle and completely solubilized by TX-100. The insoluble vesicle left, in the Lo phase, represents around 2/3 of the original vesicle surface at room temperature and decreases to almost 1/2 at physiological temperature. This chain of events could be entirely reproduced with biomimetic GUVs of a simple ternary lipid mixture, 2:1:2 POPC/SM/chol (phosphatidylcholine/sphyngomyelin/cholesterol), showing that this behavior will arise because of fundamental physicochemical properties of simple lipid mixtures. This work provides direct visualization of TX-100-induced domain formation followed by selective (Ld phase) solubilization in a model system with a complex biological lipid composition. PMID:24896120

  9. Computational modelling of amino acid exchange and facilitated transport in placental membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Panitchob, N; Widdows, K L; Crocker, I P; Hanson, M A; Johnstone, E D; Please, C P; Sibley, C P; Glazier, J D; Lewis, R M; Sengers, B G

    2015-01-21

    Placental amino acid transport is required for fetal development and impaired transport has been associated with poor fetal growth. It is well known that placental amino acid transport is mediated by a broad array of specific membrane transporters with overlapping substrate specificity. However, it is not fully understood how these transporters function, both individually and as an integrated system. We propose that mathematical modelling could help in further elucidating the underlying mechanisms of how these transporters mediate placental amino acid transport. The aim of this work is to model the sodium independent transport of serine, which has been assumed to follow an obligatory exchange mechanism. However, previous amino acid uptake experiments in human placental microvillous plasma membrane vesicles have persistently produced results that are seemingly incompatible with such a mechanism; i.e. transport has been observed under zero-trans conditions, in the absence of internal substrates inside the vesicles to drive exchange. This observation raises two alternative hypotheses; (i) either exchange is not fully obligatory, or (ii) exchange is indeed obligatory, but an unforeseen initial concentration of amino acid substrate is present within the vesicle which could drive exchange. To investigate these possibilities, a mathematical model for tracer uptake was developed based on carrier mediated transport, which can represent either facilitated diffusion or obligatory exchange (also referred to as uniport and antiport mechanisms, respectively). In vitro measurements of serine uptake by placental microvillous membrane vesicles were carried out and the model applied to interpret the results based on the measured apparent Michaelis-Menten parameters Km and Vmax. In addition, based on model predictions, a new time series experiment was implemented to distinguish the hypothesised transporter mechanisms. Analysis of the results indicated the presence of a facilitated

  10. Subfractionation, characterization, and in-depth proteomic analysis of glomerular membrane vesicles in human urine.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Marie C; Johnson, Kenneth L; Zenka, Roman M; Charlesworth, M Cristine; Madden, Benjamin J; Mahoney, Doug W; Oberg, Ann L; Huang, Bing Q; Leontovich, Alexey A; Nesbitt, Lisa L; Bakeberg, Jason L; McCormick, Daniel J; Bergen, H Robert; Ward, Christopher J

    2014-05-01

    Urinary exosome-like vesicles (ELVs) are a heterogenous mixture (diameter 40-200 nm) containing vesicles shed from all segments of the nephron including glomerular podocytes. Contamination with Tamm-Horsfall protein (THP) oligomers has hampered their isolation and proteomic analysis. Here we improved ELV isolation protocols employing density centrifugation to remove THP and albumin, and isolated a glomerular membranous vesicle (GMV)-enriched subfraction from 7 individuals identifying 1830 proteins and in 3 patients with glomerular disease identifying 5657 unique proteins. The GMV fraction was composed of podocin/podocalyxin-positive irregularly shaped membranous vesicles and podocin/podocalyxin-negative classical exosomes. Ingenuity pathway analysis identified integrin, actin cytoskeleton, and Rho GDI signaling in the top three canonical represented signaling pathways and 19 other proteins associated with inherited glomerular diseases. The GMVs are of podocyte origin and the density gradient technique allowed isolation in a reproducible manner. We show many nephrotic syndrome proteins, proteases, and complement proteins involved in glomerular disease are in GMVs and some were only shed in the disease state (nephrin, TRPC6, INF2 and phospholipase A2 receptor). We calculated sample sizes required to identify new glomerular disease biomarkers, expand the ELV proteome, and provide a reference proteome in a database that may prove useful in the search for biomarkers of glomerular disease.

  11. Subfractionation, characterization and in-depth proteomic analysis of glomerular membrane vesicles in human urine

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Marie C.; Johnson, Kenneth L.; Zenka, Roman M.; Charlesworth, M. Cristine; Madden, Benjamin J.; Mahoney, Doug W.; Oberg, Ann L.; Huang, Bing Q.; Nesbitt, Lisa L.; Bakeberg, Jason L.; Bergen, H. Robert; Ward, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Urinary exosome-like vesicles (ELVs) are a heterogenous mixture (diameter 40–200nm) containing vesicles shed from all segments of the nephron including glomerular podocytes. Contamination with Tamm Horsfall protein (THP) oligomers has hampered their isolation and proteomic analysis. Here we improved ELV isolation protocols employing density centrifugation to remove THP and albumin, and isolated a glomerular membranous vesicle (GMV) enriched subfraction from 7 individuals identifying 1830 proteins and in 3 patients with glomerular disease identifying 5657 unique proteins. The GMV fraction was composed of podocin/podocalyxin positive irregularly shaped membranous vesicles and podocin/podocalyxin negative classical exosomes. Ingenuity pathway analysis identified integrin, actin cytoskeleton and RhoGDI signaling in the top three canonical represented signaling pathways and 19 other proteins associated with inherited glomerular diseases. The GMVs are of podocyte origin and the density gradient technique allowed isolation in a reproducible manner. We show many nephrotic syndrome proteins, proteases and complement proteins involved in glomerular disease are in GMVs and some were shed in the disease state (nephrin, TRPC6 and INF2 and PLA2R). We calculated sample sizes required to identify new glomerular disease biomarkers, expand the ELV proteome and provide a reference proteome in a database that may prove useful in the search for biomarkers of glomerular disease. PMID:24196483

  12. Outer Membrane Vesicle Production Facilitates LPS Remodeling and Outer Membrane Maintenance in Salmonella during Environmental Transitions

    PubMed Central

    Bonnington, Katherine E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The ability of Gram-negative bacteria to carefully modulate outer membrane (OM) composition is essential to their survival. However, the asymmetric and heterogeneous structure of the Gram-negative OM poses unique challenges to the cell’s successful adaption to rapid environmental transitions. Although mechanisms to recycle and degrade OM phospholipid material exist, there is no known mechanism by which to remove unfavorable lipopolysaccharide (LPS) glycoforms, except slow dilution through cell growth. As all Gram-negative bacteria constitutively shed OM vesicles (OMVs), we propose that cells may utilize OMV formation as a way to selectively remove environmentally disadvantageous LPS species. We examined the native kinetics of OM composition during physiologically relevant environmental changes in Salmonella enterica, a well-characterized model system for activation of PhoP/Q and PmrA/B two-component systems (TCSs). In response to acidic pH, toxic metals, antimicrobial peptides, and lack of divalent cations, these TCSs modify the LPS lipid A and core, lengthen the O antigen, and upregulate specific OM proteins. An environmental change to PhoP/Q- and PmrA/B-activating conditions simultaneously induced the addition of modified species of LPS to the OM, downregulation of previously dominant species of LPS, greater OMV production, and increased OMV diameter. Comparison of the relative abundance of lipid A species present in the OM and the newly budded OMVs following two sets of rapid environmental shifts revealed the retention of lipid A species with modified phosphate moieties in the OM concomitant with the selective loss of palmitoylated species via vesiculation following exposure to moderately acidic environmental conditions. PMID:27795394

  13. The Xylella fastidiosa PD1063 protein is secreted in association with outer membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Brittany K; Voegel, Tanja; Kirkpatrick, Bruce C

    2014-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a gram-negative, xylem-limited plant pathogenic bacterium that causes disease in a variety of economically important agricultural crops including Pierce's disease of grapevines. Xylella fastidiosa biofilms formed in the xylem vessels of plants play a key role in early colonization and pathogenicity by providing a protected niche and enhanced cell survival. Here we investigate the role of Xylella fastidiosa PD1063, the predicted ortholog of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae PXO_03968, which encodes an outer membrane protein. To assess the function of the Xylella fastidiosa ortholog, we created Xylella fastidiosa mutants deleted for PD1063 and then assessed biofilm formation, cell-cell aggregation and cell growth in vitro. We also assessed disease severity and pathogen titers in grapevines mechanically inoculated with the Xylella fastidiosa PD1063 mutant. We found a significant decrease in cell-cell aggregation among PD1063 mutants but no differences in cell growth, biofilm formation, disease severity or titers in planta. Based on the demonstration that Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae PXO_03968 encodes an outer membrane protein, secreted in association with outer membrane vesicles, we predicted that PD1063 would also be secreted in a similar manner. Using anti-PD1063 antibodies, we found PD1063 in the supernatant and secreted in association with outer membrane vesicles. PD1063 purified from the supernatant, outer membrane fractions and outer membrane vesicles was 19.2 kD, corresponding to the predicted size of the processed protein. Our findings suggest Xylella fastidiosa PD1063 is not essential for development of Pierce's disease in Vitis vinifera grapevines although further research is required to determine the function of the PD1063 outer membrane protein in Xylella fastidiosa.

  14. HOPS interacts with Apl5 at the vacuole membrane and is required for consumption of AP-3 transport vesicles.

    PubMed

    Angers, Cortney G; Merz, Alexey J

    2009-11-01

    Adaptor protein complexes (APs) are evolutionarily conserved heterotetramers that couple cargo selection to the formation of highly curved membranes during vesicle budding. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, AP-3 mediates vesicle traffic from the late Golgi to the vacuolar lysosome. The HOPS subunit Vps41 is one of the few proteins reported to have a specific role in AP-3 traffic, yet its function remains undefined. We now show that although the AP-3 delta subunit, Apl5, binds Vps41 directly, this interaction occurs preferentially within the context of the HOPS docking complex. Fluorescence microscopy indicates that Vps41 and other HOPS subunits do not detectably colocalize with AP-3 at the late Golgi or on post-Golgi (Sec7-negative) vesicles. Vps41 and HOPS do, however, transiently colocalize with AP-3 vesicles when these vesicles dock at the vacuole membrane. In cells with mutations in HOPS subunits or the vacuole SNARE Vam3, AP-3 shifts from the cytosol to a membrane fraction. Fluorescence microscopy suggests that this fraction consists of post-Golgi AP-3 vesicles that have failed to dock or fuse at the vacuole membrane. We propose that AP-3 remains associated with budded vesicles, interacts with Vps41 and HOPS upon vesicle docking at the vacuole, and finally dissociates during docking or fusion.

  15. H+ V-ATPase-Energized Transporters in Brush Border Membrane Vesicles from Whole Larvae of Aedes Aegypti

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Brush Border Membrane vesicles (BBMVs) from Whole larvae of Aedes aegypti (AeBBMVWs ) contain an H+ V-ATPase (V), a Na+/H+ antiporter, NHA1 (A) and a Na+-coupled, nutrient amino acid transporter, NAT8 (N), VAN for short. All V-ATPase subunits are present in the Ae. aegypti genome and in the vesicles...

  16. A bilayer-couple model of bacterial outer membrane vesicle biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Schertzer, Jeffrey W; Whiteley, Marvin

    2012-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria naturally produce outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) that arise through bulging and pinching off of the outer membrane. OMVs have several biological functions for bacteria, most notably as trafficking vehicles for toxins, antimicrobials, and signaling molecules. While their biological roles are now appreciated, the mechanism of OMV formation has not been fully elucidated. We recently demonstrated that the signaling molecule 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-quinolone (PQS) is required for OMV biogenesis in P. aeruginosa. We hypothesized that PQS stimulates OMV formation through direct interaction with the outer leaflet of the outer membrane. To test this hypothesis, we employed a red blood cell (RBC) model that has been used extensively to study small-molecule-membrane interactions. Our results revealed that addition of PQS to RBCs induced membrane curvature, resulting in the formation of membrane spicules (spikes), consistent with small molecules that are inserted stably into the outer leaflet of the membrane. Radiotracer experiments demonstrated that sufficient PQS was inserted into the membrane to account for this curvature and that curvature induction was specific to PQS structure. These data suggest that a low rate of interleaflet flip-flop forces PQS to accumulate in and expand the outer leaflet relative to the inner leaflet, thus inducing membrane curvature. In support of PQS-mediated outer leaflet expansion, the PQS effect was antagonized by chlorpromazine, a molecule known to be preferentially inserted into the inner leaflet. Based on these data, we propose a bilayer-couple model to describe P. aeruginosa OMV biogenesis and suggest that this is a general mechanism for bacterial OMV formation. Despite the ubiquity and importance of outer membrane vesicle (OMV) production in Gram-negative bacteria, the molecular details of OMV biogenesis are not fully understood. Early experiments showed that 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-quinolone (PQS) induces OMV formation

  17. Envelope control of outer membrane vesicle production in Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Schwechheimer, Carmen; Sullivan, Claretta J; Kuehn, Meta J

    2013-05-07

    All Gram-negative bacteria studied to date have been shown to produce outer membrane vesicles (OMVs), which are budded, released spheres of outer membrane with periplasmic content. OMVs have been implicated in the delivery of virulence factors in pathogenesis. However, OMVs also benefit nonpathogenic species by delivering degradative enzymes to defend an ecological niche against competing bacterial species, and they can serve as an envelope stress response. Despite these important roles, very little is known about the mechanism of production of OMVs. Here we review the advantage of vesiculation, particularly in a nonpathogenic context, as well as the hurdles that have to be overcome in Gram-negative envelope architecture before a vesicle can form and bud. Lastly, we address the question of whether OMV production is a stochastic or regulated process.

  18. Plesiomonas shigelloides exports a lethal cytotoxic-enterotoxin (LCE) by membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Ludovico, Marilucia Santos; Martins, Luciano Moura; Bianco, Juares Ednaldo Romero; Andrade, Célia Guadalupe Tardelli de Jesus; Falcon, Rosabel; Joazeiro, Paulo Pinto; Gatti, Maria Silvia Viccari; Yano, Tomomasa

    Plesiomonas shigelloides isolated from water in Brazil was previously described as a hemorrhagic heat-labile cytotoxic-enterotoxin producer. We purified this toxin from culture supernatants using ion metallic affinity chromatography (IMAC) followed by molecular exclusion chromatography. The pure toxin presented molecular mass of 50kDa and isoelectric point (pI) around 6.9 by 2D electrophoresis. When injected intravenously, the purified cytotoxic-enterotoxin induced also severe spasms followed by sudden death of mice. Hence, we entitled it as lethal cytotoxic-enterotoxin (LCE). The presence of membrane vesicles (MVs) on cell surfaces of P. shigelloides was observed by scan electron microscopy (SEM). From these MVs the LCE toxin was extracted and confirmed by biological and serological assays. These data suggest that P. shigelloides also exports this cytotoxic-enterotoxin by membrane vesicles, a different mechanism of delivering extra cellular virulence factors, so far not described in this bacterium.

  19. Interfacial effects on droplet electrohydrodynamics: particle vortices, patchy membranes, and vesicle drums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlahovska, Petia

    2014-11-01

    The analytical work by Acrivos group on drop dynamics in linear flows and rheology of dilute emulsions (papers with Frankel and Barthes-Biesel) have provided solid basis for more than 40 years of research on drops and capsules. These classical papers have inspired my research on drops with ``complex'' interfaces - surfactant-laden and particle-covered drops, and vesicles (drops encapsulated with lipid bilayer membranes). I will present some of our recent experimental observations on these systems in uniform DC and AC electric fields, where the coupling of the electric-field-induced flow and complex mechanics of the interface drives peculiar (and yet to be explained) behaviors: drum-like and asymmetric dumbbell shapes of vesicles; domains formation and motion in multicomponent membranes; particle assembly in dynamic vortices; drop kayaking. Possible implications of our findings to the design of patchy particles and electrorheology of emulsions will be discussed. Supported by NSF-CBET 1132614.

  20. Lipid binding and membrane penetration of polymyxin B derivatives studied in a biomimetic vesicle system.

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Marina; Tsubery, Haim; Kolusheva, Sofiya; Shames, Alex; Fridkin, Mati; Jelinek, Raz

    2003-01-01

    Understanding membrane interactions and cell-wall permeation of Gram-negative bacteria is of great importance, owing to increasing bacterial resistance to existing drugs and therapeutic treatments. Here we use biomimetic lipid vesicles to analyse membrane association and penetration by synthetic derivatives of polymyxin B (PMB), a potent naturally occurring antibacterial cyclic peptide. The PMB analogues studied were PMB nonapeptide (PMBN), in which the hydrophobic alkyl residue was cleaved, PMBN diastereomer containing D-instead of L-amino acids within the cyclic ring (dPMBN) and PMBN where the hydrophobic alkyl chain was replaced with an Ala6 repeat (Ala6-PMBN). Peptide binding measurements, colorimetric transitions induced within the vesicles, fluorescence quenching experiments and ESR spectroscopy were applied to investigate the structural parameters underlying the different membrane-permeation profiles and biological activities of the analogues. The experiments point to the role of negatively charged lipids in membrane binding and confirm the prominence of lipopolisaccharide (LPS) in promoting membrane association and penetration by the peptides. Examination of the lipid interactions of the PMB derivatives shows that the cyclic moiety of PMB is not only implicated in lipid attachment and LPS binding, but also affects penetration into the inner bilayer core. The addition of the Ala6 peptide moiety, however, does not significantly promote peptide insertion into the hydrophobic lipid environment. The data also indicate that the extent of penetration into the lipid bilayer is not related to the overall affinity of the peptides to the membrane. PMID:12848621

  1. Naturally Occurring DNA Transfer System Associated with Membrane Vesicles in Cellulolytic Ruminococcus spp. of Ruminal Origin

    PubMed Central

    Klieve, Athol V.; Yokoyama, Melvin T.; Forster, Robert J.; Ouwerkerk, Diane; Bain, Peter A.; Mawhinney, Erin L.

    2005-01-01

    A genetic transformation system with similarities to those reported for gram-negative bacteria was found to be associated with membrane vesicles of the ruminal cellulolytic genus Ruminococcus. Double-stranded DNA was recovered from the subcellular particulate fraction of all the cellulolytic ruminococci examined. Electron microscopy revealed that the only particles present resembled membrane vesicles. The likelihood that the DNA was associated with membrane vesicles (also known to contain cellulosomes) was further supported by the adherence of the particles associated with the subcellular DNA to cellulose powder added to culture filtrates. The particle-associated DNA comprised a population of linear molecules ranging in size from <20 kb to 49 kb (Ruminococcus sp. strain YE73) and from 23 kb to 90 kb (Ruminococcus albus AR67). Particle-associated DNA from R. albus AR67 represented DNA derived from genomic DNA of the host bacterium having an almost identical HindIII digestion pattern and an identical 16S rRNA gene. Paradoxically, particle-associated DNA was refractory to digestion with EcoRI, while the genomic DNA was susceptible to extensive digestion, suggesting that there is differential restriction modification of genomic DNA and DNA exported from the cell. Transformation using the vesicle-containing fraction of culture supernatant of Ruminococcus sp. strain YE71 was able to restore the ability to degrade crystalline cellulose to two mutants that were otherwise unable to do so. The ability was heritable and transferred to subsequent generations. It appears that membrane-associated transformation plays a role in lateral gene transfer in complex microbial ecosystems, such as the rumen. PMID:16085810

  2. Naturally occurring DNA transfer system associated with membrane vesicles in cellulolytic Ruminococcus spp. of ruminal origin.

    PubMed

    Klieve, Athol V; Yokoyama, Melvin T; Forster, Robert J; Ouwerkerk, Diane; Bain, Peter A; Mawhinney, Erin L

    2005-08-01

    A genetic transformation system with similarities to those reported for gram-negative bacteria was found to be associated with membrane vesicles of the ruminal cellulolytic genus Ruminococcus. Double-stranded DNA was recovered from the subcellular particulate fraction of all the cellulolytic ruminococci examined. Electron microscopy revealed that the only particles present resembled membrane vesicles. The likelihood that the DNA was associated with membrane vesicles (also known to contain cellulosomes) was further supported by the adherence of the particles associated with the subcellular DNA to cellulose powder added to culture filtrates. The particle-associated DNA comprised a population of linear molecules ranging in size from <20 kb to 49 kb (Ruminococcus sp. strain YE73) and from 23 kb to 90 kb (Ruminococcus albus AR67). Particle-associated DNA from R. albus AR67 represented DNA derived from genomic DNA of the host bacterium having an almost identical HindIII digestion pattern and an identical 16S rRNA gene. Paradoxically, particle-associated DNA was refractory to digestion with EcoRI, while the genomic DNA was susceptible to extensive digestion, suggesting that there is differential restriction modification of genomic DNA and DNA exported from the cell. Transformation using the vesicle-containing fraction of culture supernatant of Ruminococcus sp. strain YE71 was able to restore the ability to degrade crystalline cellulose to two mutants that were otherwise unable to do so. The ability was heritable and transferred to subsequent generations. It appears that membrane-associated transformation plays a role in lateral gene transfer in complex microbial ecosystems, such as the rumen.

  3. Gap junction turnover is achieved by the internalization of small endocytic double-membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Falk, Matthias M; Baker, Susan M; Gumpert, Anna M; Segretain, Dominique; Buckheit, Robert W

    2009-07-01

    Double-membrane-spanning gap junction (GJ) channels cluster into two-dimensional arrays, termed plaques, to provide direct cell-to-cell communication. GJ plaques often contain circular, channel-free domains ( approximately 0.05-0.5 mum in diameter) identified >30 y ago and termed nonjunctional membrane (NM) domains. We show, by expressing the GJ protein connexin43 (Cx43) tagged with green fluorescent protein, or the novel photoconvertible fluorescent protein Dendra2, that NM domains appear to be remnants generated by the internalization of small GJ channel clusters that bud over time from central plaque areas. Channel clusters internalized within seconds forming endocytic double-membrane GJ vesicles ( approximately 0.18-0.27 mum in diameter) that were degraded by lysosomal pathways. Surprisingly, NM domains were not repopulated by surrounding channels and instead remained mobile, fused with each other, and were expelled at plaque edges. Quantification of internalized, photoconverted Cx43-Dendra2 vesicles indicated a GJ half-life of 2.6 h that falls within the estimated half-life of 1-5 h reported for GJs. Together with previous publications that revealed continuous accrual of newly synthesized channels along plaque edges and simultaneous removal of channels from plaque centers, our data suggest how the known dynamic channel replenishment of functional GJ plaques can be achieved. Our observations may have implications for the process of endocytic vesicle budding in general.

  4. Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli OmpT regulates outer membrane vesicle biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Premjani, Veena; Tilley, Derek; Gruenheid, Samantha; Le Moual, Hervé; Samis, John A

    2014-06-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) infection from food or water often results in severe diarrheal disease and is a leading cause of death globally. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) secreted from E. coli induce lethality in mice. The omptin outer membrane protease OmpT from E. coli inactivates antimicrobial peptides and may enhance colonization of the uroepithelium, but its precise function remains unclear. Given OmpT is an outer membrane protease, we hypothesized it may have a role in OMV biogenesis. To further characterize the effect of OmpT on OMV production, a genetic approach using wild type, an ompT deletion mutant and an ompT overexpressing construct in EHEC were employed. ompT gene deletion markedly decreased OMV production and stainable lipid but increased vesicle diameter. Conversely, ompT overexpression profoundly increased OMV biogenesis but decreased stainable lipid, protein content, and vesicle diameter. Alterations in EHEC ompT gene expression have an impact on the biogenesis, composition, and size of OMVs. Changes in ompT gene expression may dynamically alter OMV formation, composition, and diameter in response to different host environments and contribute to cell-free intercellular communication to enhance bacterial growth and survival. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. MST1-dependent vesicle trafficking regulates neutrophil transmigration through the vascular basement membrane

    PubMed Central

    Kurz, Angela R.M.; Pruenster, Monika; Rohwedder, Ina; Ramadass, Mahalakshmi; Schäfer, Kerstin; Harrison, Ute; Nussbaum, Claudia; Immler, Roland; Wiessner, Johannes R.; Lim, Dae-Sik; Walzog, Barbara; Dietzel, Steffen; Moser, Markus; Klein, Christoph; Vestweber, Dietmar; Catz, Sergio D.

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils need to penetrate the perivascular basement membrane for successful extravasation into inflamed tissue, but this process is incompletely understood. Recent findings have associated mammalian sterile 20–like kinase 1 (MST1) loss of function with a human primary immunodeficiency disorder, suggesting that MST1 may be involved in immune cell migration. Here, we have shown that MST1 is a critical regulator of neutrophil extravasation during inflammation. Mst1-deficient (Mst1–/–) neutrophils were unable to migrate into inflamed murine cremaster muscle venules, instead persisting between the endothelium and the basement membrane. Mst1–/– neutrophils also failed to extravasate from gastric submucosal vessels in a murine model of Helicobacter pylori infection. Mechanistically, we observed defective translocation of VLA-3, VLA-6, and neutrophil elastase from intracellular vesicles to the surface of Mst1–/– neutrophils, indicating that MST1 is required for this crucial step in neutrophil transmigration. Furthermore, we found that MST1 associates with the Rab27 effector protein synaptotagmin-like protein 1 (JFC1, encoded by Sytl1 in mice), but not Munc13-4, thereby regulating the trafficking of Rab27-positive vesicles to the cellular membrane. Together, these findings highlight a role for MST1 in vesicle trafficking and extravasation in neutrophils, providing an additional mechanistic explanation for the severe immune defect observed in patients with MST1 deficiency. PMID:27701149

  6. Surfactant-Increased Glyphosate Uptake into Plasma Membrane Vesicles Isolated from Common Lambsquarters Leaves.

    PubMed

    Riechers, D. E.; Wax, L. M.; Liebl, R. A.; Bush, D. R.

    1994-08-01

    Plasma membrane vesicles were isolated from mature leaves of lambsquarters (Chenopodium album L.) to investigate whether this membrane is a barrier to glyphosate uptake and whether surfactants possess differential abilities to enhance glyphosate permeability. Amino acids representing several structural classes showed [delta]pH-dependent transport, indicating that the proteins necessary for active, proton-coupled amino acid transport were present and functional. Glyphosate uptake was very low compared to the acidic amino acid glutamate, indicating that glyphosate is not utilizing an endogenous amino acid carrier to enter the leaf cells and that the plasma membrane appears to be a significant barrier to cellular uptake. In addition, glyphosate flux was much lower than that measured for either bentazon or atrazine, both lipid-permeable herbicides that diffuse through the bilayer. Glyphosate uptake was stimulated by 0.01% (v:v) MON 0818, the cationic surfactant used in the commercial formulation of this herbicide for foliar application. This concentration of surfactant did not disrupt the integrity of the plasma membrane vesicles, as evidenced by the stability of imposed pH gradients and active amino acid transport. Nonionic surfactants that disrupt the cuticle but that do not promote glyphosate toxicity in the field also increased glyphosate transport into the membrane vesicles. Thus, no correlation was observed between whole plant toxicity and surfactant-aided uptake. Current data suggest that surfactant efficacy may be the result of charged surfactants' ability to diffuse away from the cuticle into the subtending apoplastic space, where they act directly on the plasma membrane to increase glyphosate uptake.

  7. The endoplasmic reticulum and casein-containing vesicles contribute to milk fat globule membrane

    PubMed Central

    Honvo-Houéto, Edith; Henry, Céline; Chat, Sophie; Layani, Sarah; Truchet, Sandrine

    2016-01-01

    During lactation, mammary epithelial cells secrete huge amounts of milk from their apical side. The current view is that caseins are secreted by exocytosis, whereas milk fat globules are released by budding, enwrapped by the plasma membrane. Owing to the number and large size of milk fat globules, the membrane surface needed for their release might exceed that of the apical plasma membrane. A large-scale proteomics analysis of both cytoplasmic lipid droplets and secreted milk fat globule membranes was used to decipher the cellular origins of the milk fat globule membrane. Surprisingly, differential analysis of protein profiles of these two organelles strongly suggest that, in addition to the plasma membrane, the endoplasmic reticulum and the secretory vesicles contribute to the milk fat globule membrane. Analysis of membrane-associated and raft microdomain proteins reinforces this possibility and also points to a role for lipid rafts in milk product secretion. Our results provide evidence for a significant contribution of the endoplasmic reticulum to the milk fat globule membrane and a role for SNAREs in membrane dynamics during milk secretion. These novel aspects point to a more complex model for milk secretion than currently envisioned. PMID:27535430

  8. Vesicle formation in the membrane of onion cells (Allium cepa) during rapid osmotic dehydration

    PubMed Central

    Assani, Akym; Moundanga, Sylvie; Beney, Laurent; Gervais, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Optimization of osmotic dehydration in different plant cells has been investigated through the variation of parameters such as the nature of the sugar used, the concentration of osmotic solutions and the processing time. In micro-organisms such as the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the exposure of a cell to a slow increase in osmotic pressure preserves cell viability after rehydration, while sudden dehydration involves a lower rate of cell viability, which could be due to membrane vesiculation. The aim of this work is to study cytoplasmic vesicle formation in onion epidermal cells (Allium cepa) as a function of the kinetics of osmotic pressure variation in the external medium. Methods Onion epidermal cells were submitted either to an osmotic shock or to a progressive osmotic shift from an osmotic pressure of 2 to 24 MPa to induce plasmolysis. After 30 min in the treatment solution, deplasmolysis was carried out. Cells were observed by microscopy during the whole cycle of dehydration–rehydration. Key Results The application of an osmotic shock to onion cells, from an initial osmotic pressure of 2 MPa to a final one of 24 MPa for <1 s, led to the formation of numerous exocytotic and osmocytic vesicles visualized through light and confocal microscopy. In contrast, after application of a progressive osmotic shift, from an initial osmotic pressure of 2 MPa to a final one of 24 MPa for 30 min, no vesicles were observed. Additionally, the absence of Hechtian strand connections led to the bursting of vesicles in the case of the osmotic shock. Conclusions It is concluded that the kinetics of osmotic dehydration strongly influence vesicle formation in onion cells, and that Hechtian strand connections between protoplasts and exocytotic vesicles are a prerequisite for successful deplasmolysis. These results suggest that a decrease in the area-to-volume ratio of a cell could cause cell death following an osmotic shock. PMID:19833611

  9. Membrane vesicles of Clostridium perfringens Type A strains induce innate and adaptive immunity

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yanlong; Kong, Qingke; Roland, Kenneth L.; Curtiss, Roy

    2014-01-01

    Vesicle shedding from bacteria is a universal process in most Gram-negative bacteria and a few Gram-positive bacteria. In this report, we isolate extracellular membrane vesicles (MVs) from the supernatants of Gram-positive pathogen Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens). We demonstrated vesicle production in a variety of virulent and nonvirulent type A strains. MVs did not contain alpha-toxin and NetB toxin demonstrated by negative reaction to specific antibody and absence of specific proteins identified by LC-MS/MS. C. perfringens MVs contained DNA components such as 16S ribosomal RNA gene (16S rRNA), alpha-toxin gene (plc) and the perfringolysin O gene (pfoA) demonstrated by PCR. We also identified a total of 431 proteins in vesicles by 1-D gel separation and LC-MS/MS analysis. In vitro studies demonstrated that vesicles could be internalized into murine macrophage RAW264.7 cells without direct cytotoxicity effects, causing release of inflammation cytokines including granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1 (IL-1), which could also be detected in mice injected with MVs through intraperitoneal (i.p.) route. Mice immunized with C. perfringens MVs produced high titer IgG, especially IgG1, antibodies against C. perfringens membrane proteins. However, this kind of antibody could not provide protection in mice following challenge, though it could slightly postpone the time of death. Our results indicate that release of MVs from C. perfringens could provide a previously unknown mechanism to induce release of inflammatory cytokines, especially TNF-α, these findings may contribute to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of C. perfringens infection. PMID:24631214

  10. Epoxide-mediated differential packaging of Cif and other virulence factors into outer membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Ballok, Alicia E; Filkins, Laura M; Bomberger, Jennifer M; Stanton, Bruce A; O'Toole, George A

    2014-10-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) that contain a number of secreted bacterial proteins, including phospholipases, alkaline phosphatase, and the CFTR inhibitory factor (Cif). Previously, Cif, an epoxide hydrolase, was shown to be regulated at the transcriptional level by epoxides, which serve as ligands of the repressor, CifR. Here, we tested whether epoxides have an effect on Cif levels in OMVs. We showed that growth of P. aeruginosa in the presence of specific epoxides but not a hydrolysis product increased Cif packaging into OMVs in a CifR-independent fashion. The outer membrane protein, OprF, was also increased under these conditions, but alkaline phosphatase activity was not significantly altered. Additionally, we demonstrated that OMV shape and density were affected by epoxide treatment, with two distinct vesicle fractions present when cells were treated with epibromohydrin (EBH), a model epoxide. Vesicles isolated from the two density fractions exhibited different protein profiles in Western blotting and silver staining. We have shown that a variety of clinically or host-relevant treatments, including antibiotics, also alter the proteins packaged in OMVs. Proteomic analysis of purified OMVs followed by an analysis of transposon mutant OMVs yielded mutants with altered vesicle packaging. Finally, epithelial cell cytotoxicity was reduced in the vesicles formed in the presence of EBH, suggesting that this epoxide alters the function of the OMVs. Our data support a model whereby clinically or host-relevant signals mediate differential packaging of virulence factors in OMVs, which results in functional consequences for host-pathogen interactions. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Epoxide-Mediated Differential Packaging of Cif and Other Virulence Factors into Outer Membrane Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Ballok, Alicia E.; Filkins, Laura M.; Bomberger, Jennifer M.; Stanton, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) that contain a number of secreted bacterial proteins, including phospholipases, alkaline phosphatase, and the CFTR inhibitory factor (Cif). Previously, Cif, an epoxide hydrolase, was shown to be regulated at the transcriptional level by epoxides, which serve as ligands of the repressor, CifR. Here, we tested whether epoxides have an effect on Cif levels in OMVs. We showed that growth of P. aeruginosa in the presence of specific epoxides but not a hydrolysis product increased Cif packaging into OMVs in a CifR-independent fashion. The outer membrane protein, OprF, was also increased under these conditions, but alkaline phosphatase activity was not significantly altered. Additionally, we demonstrated that OMV shape and density were affected by epoxide treatment, with two distinct vesicle fractions present when cells were treated with epibromohydrin (EBH), a model epoxide. Vesicles isolated from the two density fractions exhibited different protein profiles in Western blotting and silver staining. We have shown that a variety of clinically or host-relevant treatments, including antibiotics, also alter the proteins packaged in OMVs. Proteomic analysis of purified OMVs followed by an analysis of transposon mutant OMVs yielded mutants with altered vesicle packaging. Finally, epithelial cell cytotoxicity was reduced in the vesicles formed in the presence of EBH, suggesting that this epoxide alters the function of the OMVs. Our data support a model whereby clinically or host-relevant signals mediate differential packaging of virulence factors in OMVs, which results in functional consequences for host-pathogen interactions. PMID:25112474

  12. Reconstitution of lactate proton symport activity in plasma membrane vesicles from the yeast Candida utilis.

    PubMed

    Gerós, H; Cássio, F; Leão, C

    1996-09-30

    Lactic acid transport was studied in plasma membrane vesicles from the yeast Candida utilis IGC 3092 which were fused with liposomes containing cytochrome c oxidase. After the addition of an electron donor system, these hybrid membrane vesicles were able to generate a proton-motive force of about--150 mV, inside alkaline and negative. In vesicles prepared from lactic acid-grown cells, the uptake of labelled lactic acid, at pH 6.2, under energized conditions, was expressed by a kinetics consistent with the involvement of a mediated transport system. This carrier exhibited a substrate specificity pattern identical to the one found for the lactate-proton symport in intact cells. The transport of labelled lactic acid was accumulative and strongly sensitive to the effects of the protonophore carbonyl cyanide p-(trifluoromethoxy)phenylhydrazone, consistent with the involvement of the proton-motive force in acid uptake, hence with the presence of a proton symport for lactate. Dissipation of the transmembrane electric potential by valinomycin did not have a significant effect on lactate accumulation, whereas abolishing the transmembrane pH gradient (delta pH) by nigericin prevented the accumulation and led to a rapid efflux of the accumulated acid. The data support that the delta pH is the main component of the proton-motive force involved in the transport of the acid and its accumulation. The lactate-proton symport stoichiometry was 1:1, being independent of the pH. Vesicles prepared from glucose-grown cells did not display the capacity to transport and accumulate lactate. However, activity for the carrier was also reconstituted in vesicles obtained from glucose-grown cells after incubation in buffer containing lactic acid. These results were consistent with those obtained in intact cells, which demonstrated that the lactate-proton symport of the yeast C. utilis is inducible.

  13. Plasma membrane coat and a coated vesicle-associated reticulum of membranes: their structure and possible interrelationship in Chara corallina

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    Primary fixation with buffered glutaraldehyde plus 2.0 mM CaCl2 and 0.1% tannic acid results in the preservation of certain portions of the plasma membrane coat of Chara when seen with the electron microscope. Such a coat is not observable after fixation with glutaraldehyde alone. The coat appears to be present on all the above ground, vegetative cells of the male plant. Within complex invaginations of the plasma membrane, which are known as charasomes, the coat has two structural components, a central core that is either tubular or solid and a fibrous or granular peripheral region that surrounds the core. The coat material appears to be at least partially derived, via exocytosis, from the contents of single membrane-bound organelles known as glycosomes. Glycosomes seem to originate from within an assemblage of membranes and coated vesicles that can be described, in purely structural terms, as a partially coated reticulum. Such a reticulum is distinguishable from Golgi stacks because the reticulum (a) is not composed of stacked membranes, (b) is extensively involved with large, clearly detailed coated vesicles and coated invaginations, (c) is closely associated with glycosomes, and (d) is only slightly stained by the zinc-iodide- osmium tetraoxide reagent. PMID:6425304

  14. Asymmetric Requirements for a Rab Gtpase and Snare Proteins in Fusion of Copii Vesicles with Acceptor Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xiaochun; Barlowe, Charles

    2000-01-01

    Soluble NSF attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins are essential for membrane fusion in transport between the yeast ER and Golgi compartments. Subcellular fractionation experiments demonstrate that the ER/Golgi SNAREs Bos1p, Sec22p, Bet1p, Sed5p, and the Rab protein, Ypt1p, are distributed similarly but localize primarily with Golgi membranes. All of these SNARE proteins are efficiently packaged into COPII vesicles and suggest a dynamic cycling of SNARE machinery between ER and Golgi compartments. Ypt1p is not efficiently packaged into vesicles under these conditions. To determine in which membranes protein function is required, temperature-sensitive alleles of BOS1, BET1, SED5, SLY1, and YPT1 that prevent ER/Golgi transport in vitro at restrictive temperatures were used to selectively inactivate these gene products on vesicles or on Golgi membranes. Vesicles bearing mutations in Bet1p or Bos1p inhibit fusion with wild-type acceptor membranes, but acceptor membranes containing these mutations are fully functional. In contrast, vesicles bearing mutations in Sed5p, Sly1p, or Ypt1p are functional, whereas acceptor membranes containing these mutations block fusion. Thus, this set of SNARE proteins is symmetrically distributed between vesicle and acceptor compartments, but they function asymmetrically such that Bet1p and Bos1p are required on vesicles and Sed5p activity is required on acceptor membranes. We propose the asymmetry in SNARE protein function is maintained by an asymmetric distribution and requirement for the Ypt1p GTPase in this fusion event. When a transmembrane-anchored form of Ypt1p is used to restrict this GTPase to the acceptor compartment, vesicles depleted of Ypt1p remain competent for fusion. PMID:10747087

  15. Kinetics of the enzyme-vesicle interaction including the formation of rafts and membrane strain.

    PubMed

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P; Höök, Fredrik

    2012-01-01

    In cells, an appreciable part of enzymes is associated with lipid membranes. Academic experimental studies of the function of membrane enzymes (e.g., PLA(2) representing a prototype for interfacial enzymology) are often focused on the enzyme-vesicle interaction or, more specifically, on conversion of lipid forming the external leaflet of the vesicle membrane. The corresponding kinetics are complicated by many factors inherent to the interfacial physics and chemistry. The understanding of the relative role of such factors and how they should be quantitatively described is still limited. Here, we present the mean-field kinetic equations, taking the formation of rafts in the membrane and the product-induced membrane strain into account, and analyze various scenarios of lipid conversion. In particular, we scrutinize the conditions when the kinetics may exhibit a transition from a relatively long latency period to a steady-state regime with fast nearly constant reaction rate. Specifically, we discuss the likely role of the pore formation in the external lipid layer in this transition. The latter effect may be caused by the product-induced tensile strain in this layer.

  16. A membrane vesicle-based assay to enable prediction of human biliary excretion.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Federico; Poirier, Hugo; Rioux, Nathalie; Montecillo, Maria Arias; Duan, Jianmin; Ribadeneira, Maria D

    2013-10-01

    1. Prediction of biliary excretion is a challenge due to the lack of in vitro assays. Our laboratory previously demonstrated a highly significant correlation between in vitro IC50 values against mrp2 using rat canalicular liver plasma membrane vesicles and in vivo biliary excretion (Colombo et al., 2012). This study explores the possibility of predicting in vivo biliary excretion in human using membrane vesicles prepared from MDCKII cells transfected with human ABCC2. 2. In vitro MRP2 activity was determined by measuring the ATP-dependent uptake of 5(6)-carboxy-2',7'-dichlorofluorescein (CDCF) in inside-out membrane vesicles isolated from MDCK-ABCC2 cells. CDCF uptake was time- and concentration-dependent (Km of 4.0 ± 1.2 µM and a Vmax of 7.8 ± 0.9 pmol/mg/min) and inhibited by benzbromarone and MK-571 with IC50 values of 1.2 and 7.6 µM, respectively. 3. A significant linear correlation (r(2 )= 0.790) between the in vitro IC50 values from the described MRP2 assay and in vivo biliary excretion in humans was observed using 11 well-documented drugs covering low to high biliary excretions. 4. This study demonstrates, for the first time, that inhibition of CDCF uptake in MDCKII-ABCC2 vesicles not only provides a screening assay to assess MRP2 drug-drug interaction potential, but is also predictive of human MRP2-mediated biliary excretion.

  17. Mechanism of glucose and maltose transport in plasma-membrane vesicles from the yeast Candida utilis.

    PubMed Central

    van den Broek, P J; van Gompel, A E; Luttik, M A; Pronk, J T; van Leeuwen, C C

    1997-01-01

    Transport of glucose and maltose was studied in plasma-membrane vesicles from Candida utilis. The yeast was grown on a mixture of glucose and maltose in aerobic carbon-limited continuous cultures which enabled transport to be studied for both sugars with the same vesicles. Vesicles were prepared by fusion of isolated plasma membranes with proteoliposomes containing bovine heart cytochrome c oxidase as a proton-motive-force-generating system. Addition of reduced cytochrome c generated a proton-motive force, consisting of a membrane potential, negative inside, and a pH gradient, alkaline inside. Energization led to accumulation of glucose and maltose in these vesicles, reaching accumulation ratios of about 40-50. Accumulation also occurred in the presence of valinomycin or nigericin, but was prevented by a combination of the two ionophores or by uncoupler, showing that glucose and maltose transport are dependent on the proton-motive force. Comparison of sugar accumulation with quantitative data on the proton-motive force indicated a 1:1 H+/sugar stoichiometry for both transport systems. Efflux of accumulated glucose was observed on dissipation of the proton-motive force. Exchange and counterflow experiments confirmed the reversible character of the H+-glucose symporter. In contrast, uncoupler or a mixture of valinomycin plus nigericin induced only a slow efflux of accumulated maltose. Moreover under counterflow conditions, the expected transient accumulation was small. Thus the H+-maltose symporter has some characteristics of a carrier that is not readily reversible. It is concluded that in C. utilis the transport systems for glucose and maltose are both driven by the proton-motive force, but the mechanisms are different. PMID:9020885

  18. Mechanism of glucose and maltose transport in plasma-membrane vesicles from the yeast Candida utilis.

    PubMed

    van den Broek, P J; van Gompel, A E; Luttik, M A; Pronk, J T; van Leeuwen, C C

    1997-01-15

    Transport of glucose and maltose was studied in plasma-membrane vesicles from Candida utilis. The yeast was grown on a mixture of glucose and maltose in aerobic carbon-limited continuous cultures which enabled transport to be studied for both sugars with the same vesicles. Vesicles were prepared by fusion of isolated plasma membranes with proteoliposomes containing bovine heart cytochrome c oxidase as a proton-motive-force-generating system. Addition of reduced cytochrome c generated a proton-motive force, consisting of a membrane potential, negative inside, and a pH gradient, alkaline inside. Energization led to accumulation of glucose and maltose in these vesicles, reaching accumulation ratios of about 40-50. Accumulation also occurred in the presence of valinomycin or nigericin, but was prevented by a combination of the two ionophores or by uncoupler, showing that glucose and maltose transport are dependent on the proton-motive force. Comparison of sugar accumulation with quantitative data on the proton-motive force indicated a 1:1 H+/sugar stoichiometry for both transport systems. Efflux of accumulated glucose was observed on dissipation of the proton-motive force. Exchange and counterflow experiments confirmed the reversible character of the H+-glucose symporter. In contrast, uncoupler or a mixture of valinomycin plus nigericin induced only a slow efflux of accumulated maltose. Moreover under counterflow conditions, the expected transient accumulation was small. Thus the H+-maltose symporter has some characteristics of a carrier that is not readily reversible. It is concluded that in C. utilis the transport systems for glucose and maltose are both driven by the proton-motive force, but the mechanisms are different.

  19. Mixing Water, Transducing Energy, and Shaping Membranes: Autonomously Self-Regulating Giant Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Ho, James C S; Rangamani, Padmini; Liedberg, Bo; Parikh, Atul N

    2016-03-08

    Giant lipid vesicles are topologically closed compartments bounded by semipermeable flexible shells, which isolate femto- to picoliter quantities of the aqueous core from the surrounding bulk. Although water equilibrates readily across vesicular walls (10(-2)-10(-3) cm(3) cm(-2) s(-1)), the passive permeation of solutes is strongly hindered. Furthermore, because of their large volume compressibility (∼10(9)-10(10) N m(-2)) and area expansion (10(2)-10(3) mN m(-1)) moduli, coupled with low bending rigidities (10(-19) N m), vesicular shells bend readily but resist volume compression and tolerate only a limited area expansion (∼5%). Consequently, vesicles experiencing solute concentration gradients dissipate the available chemical energy through the osmotic movement of water, producing dramatic shape transformations driven by surface-area-volume changes and sustained by the incompressibility of water and the flexible membrane interface. Upon immersion in a hypertonic bath, an increased surface-area-volume ratio promotes large-scale morphological remodeling, reducing symmetry and stabilizing unusual shapes determined, at equilibrium, by the minimal bending-energy configurations. By contrast, when subjected to a hypotonic bath, walls of giant vesicles lose their thermal undulation, accumulate mechanical tension, and, beyond a threshold swelling, exhibit remarkable oscillatory swell-burst cycles, with the latter characterized by damped, periodic oscillations in vesicle size, membrane tension, and phase behavior. This cyclical pattern of the osmotic influx of water, pressure, membrane tension, pore formation, and solute efflux suggests quasi-homeostatic self-regulatory behavior allowing vesicular compartments produced from simple molecular components, namely, water, osmolytes, and lipids, to sense and regulate their microenvironment in a negative feedback loop.

  20. Transient outward K+ channels in vesicles derived from frog skeletal muscle plasma membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Camacho, J; Delay, M J; Vazquez, M; Argüello, C; Sánchez, J A

    1996-01-01

    Whole-cell voltage-clamp experiments were performed in vesicles derived from frog skeletal muscle plasma membranes. Capacitance measurements showed that these vesicles lack invaginations. In solutions containing K+, transient outward currents with reversal potentials close to EK were recorded with a maximum potassium conductance of 0.3 mS/cm2. These currents inactivated in a voltage-dependent manner with a time constant of decay that reached a limiting value of 26 ms at large depolarizations. The steady-state inactivation reached half-maximum values at -66 mV. Transient currents were completely blocked with 5 mM 4-aminopyridine. Single-channel recordings made in inside-out excised patches from the vesicles had ensemble averages with characteristics similar to those of the macroscopic currents, although with significantly faster inactivation time constants. The single-channel chord conductance was 21 pS when the pipette and bath solutions contained 2.5 mM and 120 mM KCl, respectively. It is concluded that these vesicles contain potassium channels that are very similar to A channels found in neurons and other cells. Images FIGURE 8 PMID:8804601

  1. Proteomic profiling of Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane vesicles: Current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaewook; Kim, Oh Youn; Gho, Yong Song

    2016-10-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are extracellular vesicles derived from Gram-negative bacteria. Recent progress in the studies of Gram-negative bacterial extracellular vesicles implies that OMVs may function as intercellular communicasomes in bacteria-bacteria and bacteria-host interactions. Current MS-based high-throughput proteomic analyses of Gram-negative bacterial OMVs have identified thousands of vesicular proteins and provided clues to reveal the biogenesis and pathophysiological functions of Gram-negative bacterial OMVs. The future directions of proteomics of Gram-negative bacterial OMVs may include the isolation strategy of Gram-negative bacterial OMVs to thoroughly exclude nonvesicular contaminants and proteomics of Gram-negative bacterial OMVs derived from diverse conditions as well as body fluids of bacterium-infected hosts. We hope this review will shed light on future research in this emerging field of proteomics of extracellular vesicles derived from Gram-negative bacteria and contribute to the development of OMV-based diagnostic tools and effective vaccines.

  2. Cimetidine transport in isolated brush border membrane vesicles from bovine choroid plexus

    SciTech Connect

    Whittico, M.T.; Gang, Y.A.; Giacomini, K.M. )

    1990-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate the mechanisms involved in the transport of cimetidine across the brush border membrane of choroid plexus epithelium. Brush border membrane vesicles were prepared from bovine choroid plexus and the uptake of (3H)cimetidine was studied using the methods of rapid vacuum filtration and scintillation counting. Cimetidine accumulated in the vesicles with time reaching equilibrium within 2 hr. The amount of cimetidine taken up by the vesicles at equilibrium decreased with increasing extravesicular media osmolarity suggesting that cimetidine accumulates in an osmotically reactive intravesicular space. Binding of cimetidine to the membrane was estimated to be less than 18%. Michaelis-Menten studies demonstrated that cimetidine transport involved both a saturable and a nonsaturable component. The Vmax and Km (mean +/- S.E.) were 16.7 +/- 5.9 pmol/sec/mg protein and 58.1 +/- 3.1 microM, respectively, suggesting that cimetidine is transported across the choroid plexus brush border membrane with a lower affinity and a higher capacity than across the renal brush border membrane. The organic cation, quinidine (0.1 mM), and the amino acid, histidine (20 mM), both significantly reduced the initial, but not the equilibrium, uptake of cimetidine. However, high concentrations (5 mM) of more polar organic cations including tetraethylammonium, as well as of several organic anions including salicylate did not inhibit cimetidine transport. Studies with unlabeled cimetidine revealed a countertransport phenomenon. Attempts to drive the concentrative uptake of cimetidine with various ion gradients were unsuccessful. Of note was the fact that an outwardly directed proton gradient could significantly accelerate the uptake of cimetidine.

  3. bSUM: A bead-supported unilamellar membrane system facilitating unidirectional insertion of membrane proteins into giant vesicles.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hui; Lee, Sungsoo; Llaguno, Marc C; Jiang, Qiu-Xing

    2016-01-01

    Fused or giant vesicles, planar lipid bilayers, a droplet membrane system, and planar-supported membranes have been developed to incorporate membrane proteins for the electrical and biophysical analysis of such proteins or the bilayer properties. However, it remains difficult to incorporate membrane proteins, including ion channels, into reconstituted membrane systems that allow easy control of operational dimensions, incorporation orientation of the membrane proteins, and lipid composition of membranes. Here, using a newly developed chemical engineering procedure, we report on a bead-supported unilamellar membrane (bSUM) system that allows good control over membrane dimension, protein orientation, and lipid composition. Our new system uses specific ligands to facilitate the unidirectional incorporation of membrane proteins into lipid bilayers. Cryo-electron microscopic imaging demonstrates the unilamellar nature of the bSUMs. Electrical recordings from voltage-gated ion channels in bSUMs of varying diameters demonstrate the versatility of the new system. Using KvAP as a model system, we show that compared with other in vitro membrane systems, the bSUMs have the following advantages: (a) a major fraction of channels are orientated in a controlled way; (b) the channels mediate the formation of the lipid bilayer; (c) there is one and only one bilayer membrane on each bead; (d) the lipid composition can be controlled and the bSUM size is also under experimental control over a range of 0.2-20 µm; (e) the channel activity can be recorded by patch clamp using a planar electrode; and (f) the voltage-clamp speed (0.2-0.5 ms) of the bSUM on a planar electrode is fast, making it suitable to study ion channels with fast gating kinetics. Our observations suggest that the chemically engineered bSUMs afford a novel platform for studying lipid-protein interactions in membranes of varying lipid composition and may be useful for other applications, such as targeted delivery and

  4. Rationally Separating the Corona and Membrane Functions of Polymer Vesicles for Enhanced T₂ MRI and Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jingya; Liu, Qiuming; Zhang, Junxue; Chen, Jing; Chen, Shuai; Zhao, Yao; Du, Jianzhong

    2015-07-01

    It is an important challenge to in situ grow ultrafine super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) in drug carriers such as polymer vesicles (also called polymersomes) while keeping their biodegradability for enhanced T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and drug delivery. Herein, we present a new strategy by rationally separating the corona and membrane functions of polymer vesicles to solve the above problem. We designed a poly(ethylene oxide)-block-poly(ε-caprolactone)-block-poly(acrylic acid) (PEO43-b-PCL98-b-PAA25) triblock copolymer and self-assembled it into polymer vesicle. The PAA chains in the vesicle coronas are responsible for the in situ nanoprecipitation of ultrafine SPIONs, while the vesicle membrane composed of PCL is biodegradable. The SPIONs-decorated vesicle is water-dispersible, biocompatible, and slightly cytotoxic to normal human cells. Dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, energy disperse spectroscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometer revealed the formation of ultrafine super-paramagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles (1.9 ± 0.3 nm) in the coronas of polymer vesicles. Furthermore, the CCK-8 assay revealed low cytotoxicity of vesicles against normal L02 liver cells without and with Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The in vitro and in vivo MRI experiments confirmed the enhanced T2-weighted MRI sensitivity and excellent metastasis in mice. The loading and release experiments of an anticancer drug, doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX·HCl), indicated that the Fe3O4-decorated magnetic vesicles have potential applications as a nanocarrier for anticancer drug delivery. Moreover, the polymer vesicle is degradable in the presence of enzyme such as Pseudomonas lipases, and the ultrafine Fe3O4 nanoparticles in the vesicle coronas are confirmed to be degradable under weakly acidic conditions. Overall, this decoration-in-vesicle-coronas strategy provides us with a new insight for preparing water-dispersible ultrafine super-paramagnetic Fe3O

  5. Outer Membrane Vesicle Production Facilitates LPS Remodeling and Outer Membrane Maintenance in Salmonella during Environmental Transitions.

    PubMed

    Bonnington, Katherine E; Kuehn, Meta J

    2016-10-18

    The ability of Gram-negative bacteria to carefully modulate outer membrane (OM) composition is essential to their survival. However, the asymmetric and heterogeneous structure of the Gram-negative OM poses unique challenges to the cell's successful adaption to rapid environmental transitions. Although mechanisms to recycle and degrade OM phospholipid material exist, there is no known mechanism by which to remove unfavorable lipopolysaccharide (LPS) glycoforms, except slow dilution through cell growth. As all Gram-negative bacteria constitutively shed OM vesicles (OMVs), we propose that cells may utilize OMV formation as a way to selectively remove environmentally disadvantageous LPS species. We examined the native kinetics of OM composition during physiologically relevant environmental changes in Salmonella enterica, a well-characterized model system for activation of PhoP/Q and PmrA/B two-component systems (TCSs). In response to acidic pH, toxic metals, antimicrobial peptides, and lack of divalent cations, these TCSs modify the LPS lipid A and core, lengthen the O antigen, and upregulate specific OM proteins. An environmental change to PhoP/Q- and PmrA/B-activating conditions simultaneously induced the addition of modified species of LPS to the OM, downregulation of previously dominant species of LPS, greater OMV production, and increased OMV diameter. Comparison of the relative abundance of lipid A species present in the OM and the newly budded OMVs following two sets of rapid environmental shifts revealed the retention of lipid A species with modified phosphate moieties in the OM concomitant with the selective loss of palmitoylated species via vesiculation following exposure to moderately acidic environmental conditions. All Gram-negative bacteria alter the structural composition of LPS present in their OM in response to various environmental stimuli. We developed a system to track the native dynamics of lipid A change in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

  6. A plasmid from an Antarctic haloarchaeon uses specialized membrane vesicles to disseminate and infect plasmid-free cells.

    PubMed

    Erdmann, Susanne; Tschitschko, Bernhard; Zhong, Ling; Raftery, Mark J; Cavicchioli, Ricardo

    2017-08-21

    The major difference between viruses and plasmids is the mechanism of transferring their genomic information between host cells. Here, we describe the archaeal plasmid pR1SE from an Antarctic species of haloarchaea that transfers via a mechanism similar to a virus. pR1SE encodes proteins that are found in regularly shaped membrane vesicles, and the vesicles enclose the plasmid DNA. The released vesicles are capable of infecting a plasmid-free strain, which then gains the ability to produce plasmid-containing vesicles. pR1SE can integrate and replicate as part of the host genome, resolve out with fragments of host DNA incorporated or portions of the plasmid left behind, form vesicles and transfer to new hosts. The pR1SE mechanism of transfer of DNA could represent the predecessor of a strategy used by viruses to pass on their genomic DNA and fulfil roles in gene exchange, supporting a strong evolutionary connection between plasmids and viruses.An archaeal plasmid that can be transported in membrane vesicles, similar to a virus, and encodes proteins that can insert into host membranes and membrane vesicles, provides insights into the evolutionary link between plasmids and viruses.

  7. Uptake mechanism of trientine by rat intestinal brush-border membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, R; Kobayashi, M; Sugawara, M; Iseki, K; Miyazaki, K

    1996-05-01

    The uptake characteristics of trientine by rat intestinal brush-border membrane vesicles were studied. The uptake characteristics of trientine were similar to those of the physiological polyamines with respect to the excessive accumulation in vesicles, the pH dependency, the temperature dependency and the ineffectiveness of K+ diffusion potential (inside negative). The initial uptake of trientine was saturable with a K(m) value of 1.13 mM, which was larger than that of spermine and spermidine. Furthermore, the uptake rate of trientine was dose-dependently inhibited by spermine and spermidine. Spermine competitively inhibited the uptake of trientine with a Ki value of 18.6 microM, and it was close to the K(m) value for spermine (30.4 microM). These data suggested that the uptake of trientine was similar to that of spermine and spermidine in rat small intestinal brush-border membrane vesicles, and these polyamines seem to inhibit the absorption of trientine from the gastrointestinal tract.

  8. Characterization of Ca2+ Transport in Purified Endoplasmic Reticulum Membrane Vesicles from Lepidium sativum L. Roots

    PubMed Central

    Buckhout, Thomas J.

    1984-01-01

    The characteristics of Ca2+ transport into endoplasmic reticulum vesicles isolated from roots of Lepidium sativum L. cv Krause have been investigated. The concentration of free Ca2+ and ATP needed for half-maximal activity were 2.5 and 73 micromolar, respectively, and the enzyme obeyed Michaelis-Menten-like kinetics. The pH maximum occurred at 7.5 and the activity was greatly reduced at either pH 7.0 or 8.0. The Ca2+-dependent modulation protein, calmodulin, was tested for its effect on Ca2+ transport into endoplasmic reticulum vesicles. Although the phenothiazine inhibitors chlorpromazine, fluphenazine, and trifluoperazine all inhibited Ca2+ transport activity with a half-maximal effect at approximately 35 micromolar, authentic bovine brain calmodulin did not alter the activity at concentrations of 0.5 to 8 micrograms per milliliter. Calmodulin also showed no influence on the time-dependent accumulation of Ca2+ into vesicles. The membranes did not contain endogenously bound calmodulin since washing with (ethylenebis[oxyethylenenitrile])tetraacetic acid or fluphenazine, treatments which disrupt calmodulin binding, did not alter Ca2+ transport activity. The inhibition of Ca2+ transport by phenothiazine drugs was likely related to their nonspecific interaction with the membrane. Thus, there was no indication that calmodulin regulated Ca2+ uptake into root endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:16663981

  9. Modulation of bacterial outer membrane vesicle production by envelope structure and content.

    PubMed

    Schwechheimer, Carmen; Kulp, Adam; Kuehn, Meta J

    2014-12-21

    Vesiculation is a ubiquitous secretion process of Gram-negative bacteria, where outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are small spherical particles on the order of 50 to 250 nm composed of outer membrane (OM) and lumenal periplasmic content. Vesicle functions have been elucidated in some detail, showing their importance in virulence factor secretion, bacterial survival, and biofilm formation in pathogenesis. Furthermore, OMVs serve as an envelope stress response, protecting the secreting bacteria from internal protein misfolding stress, as well as external envelope stressors. Despite their important functional roles very little is known about the regulation and mechanism of vesicle production. Based on the envelope architecture and prior characterization of the hypervesiculation phenotypes for mutants lacking the lipoprotein, Lpp, which is involved in the covalent OM-peptidoglycan (PG) crosslinks, it is expected that an inverse relationship exists between OMV production and PG-crosslinked Lpp. In this study, we found that subtle modifications of PG remodeling and crosslinking modulate OMV production, inversely correlating with bound Lpp levels. However, this inverse relationship was not found in strains in which OMV production is driven by an increase in "periplasmic pressure" resulting from the accumulation of protein, PG fragments, or lipopolysaccharide. In addition, the characterization of an nlpA deletion in backgrounds lacking either Lpp- or OmpA-mediated envelope crosslinks demonstrated a novel role for NlpA in envelope architecture. From this work, we conclude that OMV production can be driven by distinct Lpp concentration-dependent and Lpp concentration-independent pathways.

  10. Energy generation coupled to azoreduction by membranous vesicles from Shewanella decolorationis S12.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yi-Guo; Guo, Jun; Sun, Guo-Ping

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that Shewanella decolorationis S12 can grow on the azo compound amaranth as the sole electron acceptor. Thus, to explore the mechanism of energy generation in this metabolism, membranous vesicles (MVs) were prepared and the mechanism of energy generation investigated. The membrane, which was fragmentized during preparation, automatically formed vesicles ranging from 37.5-112.5 nm in diameter under electron micrograph observation. Energy was conserved when coupling the azoreduction by the MVs of an azo compound or Fe(III) as the sole electron acceptor with H2, formate, or lactate as the electron donor. The amaranth reduction by the vesicles was found to be inhibited by specific respiratory inhibitors, including Cu(2+) ions, dicumarol, stigmatellin, and metyrapone, indicating that the azoreduction was indeed a respiration reaction. This finding was further confirmed by the fact that the ATP synthesis was repressed by the ATPase inhibitor N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD). Therefore, this study offers solid evidence of a mechanism of microbial dissimilatory azoreduction on a subcell level.

  11. Influence of Glucose Deprivation on Membrane Potentials of Plasma Membranes, Mitochondria and Synaptic Vesicles in Rat Brain Synaptosomes.

    PubMed

    Hrynevich, Sviatlana V; Pekun, Tatyana G; Waseem, Tatyana V; Fedorovich, Sergei V

    2015-06-01

    Hypoglycemia can cause neuronal cell death similar to that of glutamate-induced cell death. In the present paper, we investigated the effect of glucose removal from incubation medium on changes of mitochondrial and plasma membrane potentials in rat brain synaptosomes using the fluorescent dyes DiSC3(5) and JC-1. We also monitored pH gradients in synaptic vesicles and their recycling by the fluorescent dye acridine orange. Glucose deprivation was found to cause an inhibition of K(+)-induced Ca(2+)-dependent exocytosis and a shift of mitochondrial and plasma membrane potentials to more positive values. The sensitivity of these parameters to the energy deficit caused by the removal of glucose showed the following order: mitochondrial membrane potential > plasma membrane potential > pH gradient in synaptic vesicles. The latter was almost unaffected by deprivation compared with the control. The pH-dependent dye acridine orange was used to investigate synaptic vesicle recycling. However, the compound's fluorescence was shown to be enhanced also by the mixture of mitochondrial toxins rotenone (10 µM) and oligomycin (5 µg/mL). This means that acridine orange can presumably be partially distributed in the intermembrane space of mitochondria. Glucose removal from the incubation medium resulted in a 3.7-fold raise of acridine orange response to rotenone + oligomycin suggesting a dramatic increase in the mitochondrial pH gradient. Our results suggest that the biophysical characteristics of neuronal presynaptic endings do not favor excessive non-controlled neurotransmitter release in case of hypoglycemia. The inhibition of exocytosis and the increase of the mitochondrial pH gradient, while preserving the vesicular pH gradient, are proposed as compensatory mechanisms.

  12. Vesicle formation by self-assembly of membrane-bound matrix proteins into a fluidlike budding domain

    PubMed Central

    Shnyrova, Anna V.; Ayllon, Juan; Mikhalyov, Ilya I.; Villar, Enrique; Zimmerberg, Joshua; Frolov, Vadim A.

    2007-01-01

    The shape of enveloped viruses depends critically on an internal protein matrix, yet it remains unclear how the matrix proteins control the geometry of the envelope membrane. We found that matrix proteins purified from Newcastle disease virus adsorb on a phospholipid bilayer and condense into fluidlike domains that cause membrane deformation and budding of spherical vesicles, as seen by fluorescent and electron microscopy. Measurements of the electrical admittance of the membrane resolved the gradual growth and rapid closure of a bud followed by its separation to form a free vesicle. The vesicle size distribution, confined by intrinsic curvature of budding domains, but broadened by their merger, matched the virus size distribution. Thus, matrix proteins implement domain-driven mechanism of budding, which suffices to control the shape of these proteolipid vesicles. PMID:18025300

  13. Association of Plasmodium berghei proteins with the host erythrocyte membrane: binding to inside-out vesicles.

    PubMed

    Wiser, M F; Sartorelli, A C; Patton, C L

    1990-01-01

    Two acidic phosphoproteins of Plasmodium berghei origin, of 65 and 46 kDa, are associated with the plasma membrane of the host mouse erythrocyte. The 65-kDa protein partitions between a soluble and particulate phase upon host cell lysis, whereas the 46-kDa protein is localized exclusively in the particulate fraction. Both proteins bind to inside-out vesicles derived from erythrocyte ghosts and the conditions of the reassociation reaction indicate that the binding is specific and that the proteins interact only with the cytoplasmic face of the erythrocyte membrane. The 65-kDa protein appears to exist in two membrane-associated states; one loosely bound, which readily dissociates from the membrane, and a more tightly associated state, which does not dissociate under non-denaturing conditions. The 46-kDa protein is tightly bound to the host erythrocyte membrane and does not dissociate. Cross-linking studies suggest that both of these parasite proteins interact with the submembrane cytoskeleton of the erythrocyte, and that the 65-kDa protein also appears to interact simultaneously with the lipid bilayer and erythrocyte membrane proteins. However, direct interaction between the malarial proteins and distinct erythrocyte membrane proteins could not be demonstrated. In summary, these findings indicate that the acidic phosphoproteins of the malarial parasite interact with the cytoplasmic face of the erythrocyte membrane both in vivo and in vitro.

  14. Atomic-level structural and functional model of a bacterial photosynthetic membrane vesicle.

    PubMed

    Sener, Melih K; Olsen, John D; Hunter, C Neil; Schulten, Klaus

    2007-10-02

    The photosynthetic unit (PSU) of purple photosynthetic bacteria consists of a network of bacteriochlorophyll-protein complexes that absorb solar energy for eventual conversion to ATP. Because of its remarkable simplicity, the PSU can serve as a prototype for studies of cellular organelles. In the purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides the PSU forms spherical invaginations of the inner membrane, approximately 70 nm in diameter, composed mostly of light-harvesting complexes, LH1 and LH2, and reaction centers (RCs). Atomic force microscopy studies of the intracytoplasmic membrane have revealed the overall spatial organization of the PSU. In the present study these atomic force microscopy data were used to construct three-dimensional models of an entire membrane vesicle at the atomic level by using the known structure of the LH2 complex and a structural model of the dimeric RC-LH1 complex. Two models depict vesicles consisting of 9 or 18 dimeric RC-LH1 complexes and 144 or 101 LH2 complexes, representing a total of 3,879 or 4,464 bacteriochlorophylls, respectively. The in silico reconstructions permit a detailed description of light absorption and electronic excitation migration, including computation of a 50-ps excitation lifetime and a 95% quantum efficiency for one of the model membranes, and demonstration of excitation sharing within the closely packed RC-LH1 dimer arrays.

  15. Bolaform surfactants with polyoxometalate head groups and their assembly into ultra-small monolayer membrane vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Landsmann, Steve; Luka, Martin; Polarz, Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    Surfactants are indispensable in established technologies as detergents or emulsification agents, and also in recent studies for controlling the growth of nanoparticles or for creating nanocarriers. Although the properties of conventional, organic surfactants are thoroughly explored, strong interest persists in surfactants that possess unique features inaccessible for ordinary systems. Here we present dipolar, bolaform surfactants with a head group comprising of 11 tungsten atoms. These novel compounds are characterized by an exceptionally low critical self-organization concentration, which leads to monolayer vesicles with a diameter of only 15 nm, that is, substantially smaller than for any other system. The membrane of the vesicles is impermeable for water-soluble and oil-soluble guests. Control over release kinetics, which can be followed via the quantitative fluorescence quenching of confined fluorophores, is gained by means of pH adjustments. PMID:23250429

  16. Physiopathological roles of spontaneously released outer membrane vesicles of Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed

    Gasperini, Gianmarco; Arato, Vanessa; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Aricò, Beatrice; Leuzzi, Rosanna

    2017-10-05

    Bordetella pertussis has been shown to release outer membrane vesicles (OMV) both in vitro and in vivo but little is known about their biological role during the initial phases of B. pertussis infection of the airways. We have demonstrated that OMV are released by B. pertussis in a human ciliated-airway cell model and purified vesicles can interact with host cells. Binding and uptake are strictly Bvg-regulated and OMV-associated. Pertussis toxin contributes to host-cell intoxication. Furthermore, we have shown that OMV act as iron-delivery systems complementing the B. pertussis growth defect in iron-limiting conditions. We have proved that OMV play different roles in B. pertussis physiopathology and we opened new perspectives to be further investigated.

  17. Gram-Negative Bacteria Produce Membrane Vesicles Which Are Capable of Killing Other Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zusheng; Clarke, Anthony J.; Beveridge, Terry J.

    1998-01-01

    Naturally produced membrane vesicles (MVs), isolated from 15 strains of gram-negative bacteria (Citrobacter, Enterobacter, Escherichia, Klebsiella, Morganella, Proteus, Salmonella, and Shigella strains), lysed many gram-positive (including Mycobacterium) and gram-negative cultures. Peptidoglycan zymograms suggested that MVs contained peptidoglycan hydrolases, and electron microscopy revealed that the murein sacculi were digested, confirming a previous modus operandi (J. L. Kadurugamuwa and T. J. Beveridge, J. Bacteriol. 174:2767–2774, 1996). MV-sensitive bacteria possessed A1α, A4α, A1γ, A2α, and A4γ peptidoglycan chemotypes, whereas A3α, A3β, A3γ, A4β, B1α, and B1β chemotypes were not affected. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 vesicles possessed the most lytic activity. PMID:9765585

  18. Effects of the cannabinoids on physical properties of brain membranes and phospholipid vesicles: fluorescence studies.

    PubMed

    Hillard, C J; Harris, R A; Bloom, A S

    1985-03-01

    The effects of four cannabinoids on the physical properties of brain synaptic plasma membranes (SPM), lipid extracts of SPM and phospholipid vesicles were evaluated using fluorescence probes. In vitro, the psychoactive cannabinoids, delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta 9-THC) and 11-hydroxyl-delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (11-OH-delta 9-THC) at concentrations of 1 and 3 microM decreased polarization of the fluorescence emission of 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) in SPM. At the same concentrations, cannabidiol (CBD) and cannabinol, cannabinoids devoid of marijuana-like psychoactivity, had no effect on DPH polarization. The effects of 11-OH-delta 9-THC and CBD on vesicles made from lipids extracted from SPM were identical to their effects on intact SPM. These changes in DPH polarization were not due to changes in fluorescence lifetime and indicate that, at low concentrations, the psychoactive cannabinoids increase the rotational mobility of DPH in the membrane core. In contrast, in SPM-extracted lipids, both 11-OH-delta 9-THC and CBD decreased the mobility of stearic acid with an anthroyloxy label at both the second (2-AS) and twelfth (12-AS) carbon atoms. Studies of DPH polarization in various phosphatidylcholines (PC) demonstrated that the actions of the cannabinoids were dependent on initial bilayer fluidity. 11-OH-delta 9-THC was less effective at decreasing polarization of trimethylammonium DPH (TMA-DPH), a probe of the bilayer surface, than of DPH whereas CBD affected mobility of the two probes equally. Neither CBD nor 11-OH-delta 9-THC altered DPH mobility in phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine vesicles. These findings indicate that the psychoactive cannabinoids increase fluidity in the hydrophobic core of brain membranes and support a membrane perturbant hypothesis of the mechanism of delta 9-THC action.

  19. FUSION OF PHOSPHOLIPID VESICLES ARRESTED BY QUICK-FREEZING THE QUESTION OF LIPIDIC PARTICLES AS INTERMEDIATES IN MEMBRANE FUSION

    PubMed Central

    BEARER, E.L.; DÜZGÜNEŞ, N.; FRIEND, D.S.; PAPAHADJOPOULOS, D.

    2015-01-01

    We have examined the early events in Cai2+-induced fusion of large (0.2 μm diameter) unilamellar cardiolipin/phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylserine/phosphatidylethanolamine vesicles by quick-freezing freeze-fracture electron microscopy, eliminating the necessity of using glycerol as a cryoprotectant. Freeze-fracture replicas of vesicle suspensions frozen after 1-2 s of stimulation revealed that the majority of vesicles had already undergone membrane fusion, as evidenced by dumbbeII-shaped structures and large vesicles. In the absence of glycerol, lipidic particles or the hexagonal H 11phase, which have been proposed to be intermediate structures in membrane fusion, were not observed at the sites of fusion. Lipidic particles were evident in less than 5% of the cardiolipin/phosphatidylcholine vesicles after long-term incubation with Ca2+, and the addition of glycerol produced more vesicles displaying the particles. We have also shown that rapid fusion occurred within seconds of Ca2+ addition by the time-course of fluorescence emission produced by the intermixing of aqueous contents of two separate vesicle populations. These studies therefore have produced no evidence that lipidic particles are necessary intermediates for membrane fusion. On the contrary, they indicate that lipidic particles are structures obtained at equilibrium long after fusion has occurred and they become particularly prevalent in the presence of glycerol. PMID:7150597

  20. Bead-based flow-cytometry for semi-quantitative analysis of complex membrane vesicle populations released by bacteria and host cells.

    PubMed

    Volgers, Charlotte; Benedikter, Birke J; Grauls, Gert E; Savelkoul, Paul H M; Stassen, Frank R M

    2017-07-01

    During infection, the release of nano-sized membrane vesicle is a process which is common both for bacteria and host cells. Host cell-derived membrane vesicles can be involved in innate and adaptive immunity whereas bacterial membrane vesicles can contribute to bacterial pathogenicity. To study the contribution of both membrane vesicle populations during infection is highly complicated as most vesicles fall within a similar size range of 30-300nm. Specialized techniques for purification are required and often no single technique complies on its own. Moreover, techniques for vesicle quantification are either complicated to use or do not distinguish between host cell-derived and bacterial membrane vesicle subpopulations. Here we demonstrate a bead-based platform that allows a semi-quantitatively analysis by flow-cytometry of bacterial and host-cell derived membrane vesicles. We show this method can be used to study heterogeneous and complex vesicle populations composed of bacterial and host-cell membrane vesicles. The easy accessible design of the protocol makes it also highly suitable for screening procedures to assess how intrinsic and environmental factors affect vesicle release. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Vaccinia virus interactions with the cell membrane studied by new chromatic vesicle and cell sensor assays.

    PubMed

    Orynbayeva, Z; Kolusheva, S; Groysman, N; Gavrielov, N; Lobel, L; Jelinek, R

    2007-02-01

    The potential danger of cross-species viral infection points to the significance of understanding the contributions of nonspecific membrane interactions with the viral envelope compared to receptor-mediated uptake as a factor in virus internalization and infection. We present a detailed investigation of the interactions of vaccinia virus particles with lipid bilayers and with epithelial cell membranes using newly developed chromatic biomimetic membrane assays. This analytical platform comprises vesicular particles containing lipids interspersed within reporter polymer units that emit intense fluorescence following viral interactions with the lipid domains. The chromatic vesicles were employed as membrane models in cell-free solutions and were also incorporated into the membranes of epithelial cells, thereby functioning as localized membrane sensors on the cell surface. These experiments provide important insight into membrane interactions with and fusion of virions and the kinetic profiles of these processes. In particular, the data emphasize the significance of cholesterol/sphingomyelin domains (lipid rafts) as a crucial factor promoting bilayer insertion of the viral particles. Our analysis of virus interactions with polymer-labeled living cells exposed the significant role of the epidermal growth factor receptor in vaccinia virus infectivity; however, the data also demonstrated the existence of additional non-receptor-mediated mechanisms contributing to attachment of the virus to the cell surface and its internalization.

  2. Evidence that membrane transduction of oligoarginine does not require vesicle formation

    SciTech Connect

    Zaro, Jennica L.; Shen Weichiang . E-mail: weishen@usc.edu

    2005-07-01

    The involvement of vesicular formation processes in the membrane transduction and nuclear transport of oligoarginine is currently a subject of controversy. In this report, a novel quantitative method which allows for the selective measurement of membrane transduction excluding concurrent endocytosis was used to determine the effects of temperature, endosomal acidification, endosomolysis, and several known inhibitors of endocytic pathways on the internalization of oligoarginine. The results show that, unlike endocytosis, transduction of oligoarginine was not affected by incubation at 16 deg. C as compared to the 37 deg. C control, and was only partially inhibited at 4 deg. C incubation. Additionally, membrane transduction was not inhibited to the same extent as endocytosis following treatment with ammonium chloride, hypertonic medium, amiloride, or filipin. The endosomolytic activity of oligoarginine was investigated by examining the leakage of FITC-dextran into the cytosolic compartment, which was not higher in the presence of oligoarginine. Furthermore, ammonium chloride showed no effect on the nuclear transport of oligoarginine. The data presented in this report indicate that membrane transduction is likely to occur at the plasma membrane without the formation of membrane vesicles, and the nuclear localization involves membrane transduction, rather than endocytosis of oligoarginine.

  3. Membrane-active peptides: binding, translocation, and flux in lipid vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Paulo F.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, new and improved methods have been developed to measure translocation of membrane-active peptides (antimicrobial, cytolytic, and amphipathic cell-penetrating peptides) across lipid bilayer membranes. The hypothesis that translocation of membrane-active peptides across a lipid bilayer is determined by the Gibbs energy of insertion of the peptide into the bilayer is re-examined in the light of new experimental tests. The original hypothesis and its motivation are first revisited, examining some specific predictions it generated and the results of initial tests. Translocation is understood as requiring two previous steps: binding and insertion in the membrane. The problem of peptide binding to membranes, its prediction, measurement, and calculation are addressed. Particular attention is given to understanding the reason for the need for amphipathic structures in the function of membrane-active peptides. Insertion into the membrane is then examined. Hydrophobicity scales are compared, and their influence on calculations is discussed. The relation between translocation and graded or all-or-none peptide-induced flux from or into lipid vesicles is also considered. Finally, the most recent work on translocation is examined, both experimental and from molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:24769436

  4. Context-dependent activation kinetics elicited by soluble versus outer membrane vesicle-associated heat-labile enterotoxin.

    PubMed

    Chutkan, Halima; Kuehn, Meta J

    2011-09-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is the leading cause of traveler's diarrhea and children's diarrhea worldwide. Among its virulence factors, ETEC produces heat-labile enterotoxin (LT). Most secreted LT is associated with outer membrane vesicles that are rich in lipopolysaccharide. The majority of prior studies have focused on soluble LT purified from ETEC periplasm. We investigated the hypothesis that the extracellular vesicle context of toxin presentation might be important in eliciting immune responses. We compared the polarized epithelial cell responses to apically applied soluble LT and LT-containing vesicles (LT(+) vesicles) as well as controls using a catalytically inactive mutant of LT and vesicles lacking LT. Although vesicle treatments with no or catalytically inactive LT induced a modest amount of interleukin-6 (IL-6), samples containing catalytically active LT elicited higher levels. A combination of soluble LT and LT-deficient vesicles induced significantly higher IL-6 levels than either LT or LT(+) vesicles alone. The responses to LT(+) vesicles were found to be independent of the canonical LT pathway, because the inhibition of cyclic AMP response element (CRE)-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation did not lead to a decrease in cytokine gene expression levels. Furthermore, soluble LT caused earlier phosphorylation of CREB and activation of CRE compared with LT(+) vesicles. Soluble LT also led to the activation of activator protein 1, whereas LT(+) vesicle IL-6 responses appeared to be mediated by NF-κB. In summary, the results demonstrate that soluble LT and vesicle-bound LT elicit ultimately similar cytokine responses through distinct different activation pathways.

  5. Water permeability and mechanical properties of unsaturated lipid membranes and sarcolemmal vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olbrich, Kevin Caddell

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the: (1) mechanical and failure properties of unsaturated lipid membranes, (2) water permeability of unsaturated lipid membranes, and (3) mechanical properties and contribution of the water channel AQP4 to the water permeability of sarcolemmal vesicles. The micropipet technique was used to determine the mechanical properties and water permeability of individual vesicles composed of unsaturated lipids. The lipids used were: stearoyloleoylphosphatidylcholine (18:0/1), oleoylstearoylphosphatdiylcholine (18:1/0), dioleoylphosphatidylcholine ((d18:1c9), dielaidoylphosphatidylcholine (d18:1t9), dipetroselinoylphosphatidylcholine (d18:1c6), stearoyllinoylphosphatidylcholine (18:0/2), and dilinoylphosphatidylcholine (d18:2). The area expansion moduli of the unsaturated lipids were within 10% of the mean value of 198-mN/m, regardless of the degree of unsaturation. The presence of one or more linoyl chains decreased the lysis tension from {˜}7-mN/m to {˜}4-mN/m. The presence of unsaturation in the 6-position (d18:1c6) increased the lysis tension to 9.6-mN/m. The area expansion modulus of sarcolemmal vesicles was 346-mN/m, similar to that for synthetic vesicles composed of a mixture of 18:0/1 and 30% cholesterol (323-mN/m). The area expansion modulus of the pure lipids did not vary with temperature. The area expansion modulus of the sarcolemmal vesicles and the lipid/cholesterol mixture decreased with temperature at the rate of 5.2-mN msp{-1}\\ sp° Csp{-1} and 2.4-mN msp{-1}\\ sp° Csp{-1}, respectively. The lysis tension of unsaturated lipids decreased (non-linearly) with temperature. The water permeability of unsaturated lipid vesicles increased with degree of unsaturation and temperature from 19.6-μm/sec in 18:0/1 at 15sp° C to 101.6-μm/sec in d18:2 at 25sp° C. Positioning the unsaturation in the 6-position and substituting transconformation double bonds decreased the water permeability from 46-μm/sec at 21sp° C

  6. Effect of vesicle size on the prodan fluorescence in diheptadecanoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer membrane under atmospheric and high pressures.

    PubMed

    Goto, Masaki; Sawaguchi, Hiroshi; Tamai, Nobutake; Matsuki, Hitoshi; Kaneshina, Shoji

    2010-08-17

    The bilayer phase behavior of diheptadecanoylphosphatidylcholine (C17PC) with different vesicle sizes (large multilamellar vesicle (LMV) and giant multilamellar vesicle (GMV)) was investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy using a polarity-sensitive fluorescent probe Prodan under atmospheric and high pressures. The difference in phase transitions and thermodynamic quantities of the transition was hardly observed between LMV and GMV used here. On the contrary, the Prodan fluorescence in the bilayer membranes changed depending on the size of vesicles as well as on the phase states. From the second derivative of fluorescence spectra, the three-dimensional image plots in which we can see the location of Prodan in the bilayer membrane as blue valleys were constructed for LMV and GMV under atmospheric pressure. The following characteristic behavior was found: (1) the Prodan molecules in GMV can be distributed to not only adjacent glycerol backbone region, but also near bulk-water region in the lamellar gel or ripple gel phase; (2) the blue valleys of GMV became deeper than those of LMV because of the greater surface density of the Prodan molecules per unit area of GMV than LMV; (3) the liquid crystalline phase of the bilayer excludes the Prodan molecules to a more hydrophilic region at the membrane surface with an increase in vesicle size; (4) the accurate information as to the phase transitions is gradually lost with increasing vesicle size. Under the high-pressure condition, the difference in Prodan fluorescence between LMV and GMV was essentially the same as the difference under atmospheric pressure except for the existence of the pressure-induced interdigitated gel phase. Further, we found that Prodan fluorescence spectra in the interdigitated gel phase were especially affected by the size of vesicles. This study revealed that the Prodan molecules can move around the headgroup region by responding not only to the phase state but also to the vesicle size, and they

  7. Large Plasma Membrane Disruptions Are Rapidly Resealed by Ca2+-dependent Vesicle–Vesicle Fusion Events

    PubMed Central

    Terasaki, Mark; Miyake, Katsuya; McNeil, Paul L.

    1997-01-01

    A microneedle puncture of the fibroblast or sea urchin egg surface rapidly evokes a localized exocytotic reaction that may be required for the rapid resealing that follows this breach in plasma membrane integrity (Steinhardt, R.A,. G. Bi, and J.M. Alderton. 1994. Science (Wash. DC). 263:390–393). How this exocytotic reaction facilitates the resealing process is unknown. We found that starfish oocytes and sea urchin eggs rapidly reseal much larger disruptions than those produced with a microneedle. When an ∼40 by 10 μm surface patch was torn off, entry of fluorescein stachyose (FS; 1,000 mol wt) or fluorescein dextran (FDx; 10,000 mol wt) from extracellular sea water (SW) was not detected by confocal microscopy. Moreover, only a brief (∼5–10 s) rise in cytosolic Ca2+ was detected at the wound site. Several lines of evidence indicate that intracellular membranes are the primary source of the membrane recruited for this massive resealing event. When we injected FS-containing SW deep into the cells, a vesicle formed immediately, entrapping within its confines most of the FS. DiI staining and EM confirmed that the barrier delimiting injected SW was a membrane bilayer. The threshold for vesicle formation was ∼3 mM Ca2+ (SW is ∼10 mM Ca2+). The capacity of intracellular membranes for sealing off SW was further demonstrated by extruding egg cytoplasm from a micropipet into SW. A boundary immediately formed around such cytoplasm, entrapping FDx or FS dissolved in it. This entrapment did not occur in Ca2+-free SW (CFSW). When egg cytoplasm stratified by centrifugation was exposed to SW, only the yolk platelet–rich domain formed a membrane, suggesting that the yolk platelet is a critical element in this response and that the ER is not required. We propose that plasma membrane disruption evokes Ca2+ regulated vesicle–vesicle (including endocytic compartments but possibly excluding ER) fusion reactions. The function in resealing of this cytoplasmic fusion

  8. Analysis and Characterization of Proteins Associated with Outer Membrane Vesicles Secreted by Cronobacter spp.

    PubMed Central

    Kothary, Mahendra H.; Gopinath, Gopal R.; Gangiredla, Jayanthi; Rallabhandi, Prasad V.; Harrison, Lisa M.; Yan, Qiong Q.; Chase, Hannah R.; Lee, Boram; Park, Eunbi; Yoo, YeonJoo; Chung, Taejung; Finkelstein, Samantha B.; Negrete, Flavia J.; Patel, Isha R.; Carter, Laurenda; Sathyamoorthy, Venugopal; Fanning, Séamus; Tall, Ben D.

    2017-01-01

    Little is known about secretion of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) by Cronobacter. In this study, OMVs isolated from Cronobacter sakazakii, Cronobacter turicensis, and Cronobacter malonaticus were examined by electron microscopy (EM) and their associated outer membrane proteins (OMP) and genes were analyzed by SDS-PAGE, protein sequencing, BLAST, PCR, and DNA microarray. EM of stained cells revealed that the OMVs are secreted as pleomorphic micro-vesicles which cascade from the cell's surface. SDS-PAGE analysis identified protein bands with molecular weights of 18 kDa to >100 kDa which had homologies to OMPs such as GroEL; OmpA, C, E, F, and X; MipA proteins; conjugative plasmid transfer protein; and an outer membrane auto-transporter protein (OMATP). PCR analyses showed that most of the OMP genes were present in all seven Cronobacter species while a few genes (OMATP gene, groEL, ompC, mipA, ctp, and ompX) were absent in some phylogenetically-related species. Microarray analysis demonstrated sequence divergence among the OMP genes that was not captured by PCR. These results support previous findings that OmpA and OmpX may be involved in virulence of Cronobacter, and are packaged within secreted OMVs. These results also suggest that other OMV-packaged OMPs may be involved in roles such as stress response, cell wall and plasmid maintenance, and extracellular transport. PMID:28232819

  9. Ypq3p-dependent histidine uptake by the vacuolar membrane vesicles of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Manabe, Kunio; Kawano-Kawada, Miyuki; Ikeda, Koichi; Sekito, Takayuki; Kakinuma, Yoshimi

    2016-06-01

    The vacuolar membrane proteins Ypq1p, Ypq2p, and Ypq3p of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are known as the members of the PQ-loop protein family. We found that the ATP-dependent uptake activities of arginine and histidine by the vacuolar membrane vesicles were decreased by ypq2Δ and ypq3Δ mutations, respectively. YPQ1 and AVT1, which are involved in the vacuolar uptake of lysine/arginine and histidine, respectively, were deleted in addition to ypq2Δ and ypq3Δ. The vacuolar membrane vesicles isolated from the resulting quadruple deletion mutant ypq1Δypq2Δypq3Δavt1Δ completely lost the uptake activity of basic amino acids, and that of histidine, but not lysine and arginine, was evidently enhanced by overexpressing YPQ3 in the mutant. These results suggest that Ypq3p is specifically involved in the vacuolar uptake of histidine in S. cerevisiae. The cellular level of Ypq3p-HA(3) was enhanced by depletion of histidine from culture medium, suggesting that it is regulated by the substrate.

  10. Predatory activity of Myxococcus xanthus outer-membrane vesicles and properties of their hydrolase cargo.

    PubMed

    Evans, Alun G L; Davey, Hazel M; Cookson, Alan; Currinn, Heather; Cooke-Fox, Gillian; Stanczyk, Paulina J; Whitworth, David E

    2012-11-01

    The deltaproteobacterium Myxococcus xanthus predates upon members of the soil microbial community by secreting digestive factors and lysing prey cells. Like other Gram-negative bacteria, M. xanthus produces outer membrane vesicles (OMVs), and we show here that M. xanthus OMVs are able to kill Escherichia coli cells. The OMVs of M. xanthus were found to contain active proteases, phosphatases, other hydrolases and secondary metabolites. Alkaline phosphatase activity was found to be almost exclusively associated with OMVs, implying that there is active targeting of phosphatases into OMVs, while other OMV components appear to be packaged passively. The kinetic properties of OMV alkaline phosphatase suggest that there may have been evolutionary adaptation of OMV enzymes to a relatively indiscriminate mode of action, consistent with a role in predation. In addition, the observed regulation of production, and fragility of OMV activity, may protect OMV-producing cells from exploitation by M. xanthus cheating genotypes and/or other competitors. Killing of E. coli by M. xanthus OMVs was enhanced by the addition of a fusogenic enzyme (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase; GAPDH), which triggers fusion of vesicles with target membranes within eukaryotic cells. This suggests that the mechanism of prey killing involves OMV fusion with the E. coli outer membrane. M. xanthus secretes GAPDH, which could potentially modulate the fusion of co-secreted OMVs with prey organisms in nature, enhancing their predatory activity.

  11. Vesicle-mediated phosphatidylcholine reapposition to the plasma membrane following hormone-induced phospholipase D activation.

    PubMed

    Coletti, D; Silvestroni, L; Naro, F; Molinaro, M; Adamo, S; Palleschi, S

    2000-04-10

    Phospholipase D (PLD) activation involved in signal transduction may lead to the hydrolysis of conspicuous amounts of phosphatidylcholine (PC). This study shows that PLD activation significantly alters the plasma membrane (PM) environment and the membrane exchange dynamics. PC-PLD activation in vasopressin (AVP)-stimulated L6 myogenic cells was accompanied by increased exocytosis and decreased membrane fluidity, as shown by transmission EM and fluorescence spectroscopy of trimethylammonium-diphenyl-hexatriene. AVP-induced exocytosis appeared to be brefeldin A-insensitive. PLD inhibition by Zn(2+) and PC de novo synthesis inhibition by hexadecylphosphocholine abolished AVP-induced vesicle traffic. Upon AVP stimulation, metabolically labeled PC decreased in PM, then transiently increased in microsomes, and returned to the prestimulus level in the PM within 5 min, a phenomenon requiring PC neosynthesis and microtubule functionality. Vesicle traffic with similar features was also observed after endothelin-1-induced PC-PLD activation in rat peritubular myoid cells. These results indicate that, in nonsecretory cells, exocytosis coupled to PC de novo synthesis restores PM-PC, conspicuously consumed during PLD-mediated signal transduction. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  12. L-canavanine inhibits L-arginine uptake by broiler chicken intestinal brush border membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Rueda, E; Michelangeli, C; Gonzalez-Mujica, F

    2003-09-01

    1. Intestinal brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) were prepared from 3-week-old broiler chickens. 2. Electron microscopy of the BBMV fraction showed single membrane vesicles of different sizes with no electron dense material inside. No other organelles were observed. The sucrase and maltase activities were enriched by factors of 16 and 18, respectively, in the BBMV fraction in comparison with the homogenate. On the other hand, the Na+/K+-ATPase sensitivity to ouabain was increased by a factor of 0.8. 3. The BBMV showed a maximum L-[14C]-arginine uptake (944.9 +/- 22.9 pmoles/mg protein) at 45 s and thereafter it declined slowly. In the presence of 0.5 mM L-canavanine, the L-[14C]-arginine uptake by BBMV was reduced by 43.6% at 45 s. 4. It is concluded that L-canavanine inhibits L-arginine Na+-dependent transport across the enterocyte apical membrane in a highly purified intestinal BBMV from broiler chickens.

  13. The electrochemical gradient of protons and its relationship to active transport in Escherichia coli membrane vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, S; Schuldiner, S; Kaback, H R

    1976-01-01

    Membrane vesicles isolated from E. coli generate a trans-membrane proton gradient of 2 pH units under appropriate conditions when assayed by flow dialysis. Using the distribution of weak acids to measure the proton gradient (deltapH) and the distribution of the lipophilic cation triphenyl-methylphosphonium to measure the electrical potential across the membrane (delta psi), the vesicles are shown to generate an electrochemical proton gradient (deltamuH+) of approximately-180 mV at pH 5.5 in the presence of ascorbate and phenazine methosulfate, the major component of which is a deltapH of about -110mV. As external pH is increased, deltapH decreases, reaching 0 at pH 7.5 and above, while delta psi remains at about-75 mV and internal pH remains at pH 7.5. Moreover, the ability of various electron donors to drive transport is correlated with their ability to generate deltamuH+. In addition, deltapH and delta psi can be varied reciprocally in the presence of valinomycin and nigericin. These data and others (manuscript in preparation) provide convincing support for the role of chemiosmotic phenomena in active transport. PMID:6961

  14. The electrochemical gradient of protons and its relationship to active transport in Escherichia coli membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Ramos, S; Schuldiner, S; Kaback, H R

    1976-06-01

    Membrane vesicles isolated from E. coli generate a trans-membrane proton gradient of 2 pH units under appropriate conditions when assayed by flow dialysis. Using the distribution of weak acids to measure the proton gradient (deltapH) and the distribution of the lipophilic cation triphenyl-methylphosphonium to measure the electrical potential across the membrane (delta psi), the vesicles are shown to generate an electrochemical proton gradient (deltamuH+) of approximately-180 mV at pH 5.5 in the presence of ascorbate and phenazine methosulfate, the major component of which is a deltapH of about -110mV. As external pH is increased, deltapH decreases, reaching 0 at pH 7.5 and above, while delta psi remains at about-75 mV and internal pH remains at pH 7.5. Moreover, the ability of various electron donors to drive transport is correlated with their ability to generate deltamuH+. In addition, deltapH and delta psi can be varied reciprocally in the presence of valinomycin and nigericin. These data and others (manuscript in preparation) provide convincing support for the role of chemiosmotic phenomena in active transport.

  15. Membrane penetration by synaptotagmin is required for coupling calcium binding to vesicle fusion in vivo.

    PubMed

    Paddock, Brie E; Wang, Zhao; Biela, Laurie M; Chen, Kaiyun; Getzy, Michael D; Striegel, Amelia; Richmond, Janet E; Chapman, Edwin R; Featherstone, David E; Reist, Noreen E

    2011-02-09

    The vesicle protein synaptotagmin I is the Ca(2+) sensor that triggers fast, synchronous release of neurotransmitter. Specifically, Ca(2+) binding by the C(2)B domain of synaptotagmin is required at intact synapses, yet the mechanism whereby Ca(2+) binding results in vesicle fusion remains controversial. Ca(2+)-dependent interactions between synaptotagmin and SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein attachment receptor) complexes and/or anionic membranes are possible effector interactions. However, no effector-interaction mutations to date impact synaptic transmission as severely as mutation of the C(2)B Ca(2+)-binding motif, suggesting that these interactions are facilitatory rather than essential. Here we use Drosophila to show the functional role of a highly conserved, hydrophobic residue located at the tip of each of the two Ca(2+)-binding pockets of synaptotagmin. Mutation of this residue in the C(2)A domain (F286) resulted in a ∼50% decrease in evoked transmitter release at an intact synapse, again indicative of a facilitatory role. Mutation of this hydrophobic residue in the C(2)B domain (I420), on the other hand, blocked all locomotion, was embryonic lethal even in syt I heterozygotes, and resulted in less evoked transmitter release than that in syt(null) mutants, which is more severe than the phenotype of C(2)B Ca(2+)-binding mutants. Thus, mutation of a single, C(2)B hydrophobic residue required for Ca(2+)-dependent penetration of anionic membranes results in the most severe disruption of synaptotagmin function in vivo to date. Our results provide direct support for the hypothesis that plasma membrane penetration, specifically by the C(2)B domain of synaptotagmin, is the critical effector interaction for coupling Ca(2+) binding with vesicle fusion.

  16. Membrane Penetration by Synaptotagmin is Required for Coupling Calcium Binding to Vesicle Fusion In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Paddock, Brie E.; Wang, Zhao; Biela, Laurie M.; Chen, Kaiyun; Getzy, Michael D.; Striegel, Amelia; Richmond, Janet E.; Chapman, Edwin R.; Featherstone, David E.; Reist, Noreen E.

    2011-01-01

    The vesicle protein, synaptotagmin I, is the Ca2+ sensor that triggers fast, synchronous release of neurotransmitter. Specifically, Ca2+ binding by the C2B domain of synaptotagmin is required at intact synapses. Yet the mechanism whereby Ca2+ binding results in vesicle fusion remains controversial. Ca2+-dependent interactions between synaptotagmin and SNARE complexes and/or anionic membranes are possible effector interactions. However, no effector-interaction mutations to date impact synaptic transmission as severely as mutation of the C2B Ca2+-binding motif suggesting that these interactions are facilitatory rather than essential. Here we use Drosophila to show the functional role of a highly-conserved, hydrophobic residue located at the tip of each of synaptotagmin’s two Ca2+-binding pockets. Mutation of this residue in the C2A domain (F286) resulted in a ~50% decrease in evoked transmitter release at an intact synapse, again indicative of a facilitatory role. Mutation of this hydrophobic residue in the C2B domain (I420), on the other hand, blocked all locomotion, was embryonic lethal even in syt I heterozygotes, and resulted in less evoked transmitter release than that in sytnull mutants, which is more severe than the phenotype of C2B Ca2+-binding mutants. Thus mutation of a single, C2B hydrophobic residue required for Ca2+-dependent penetration of anionic membranes, results in the most severe disruption of synaptotagmin function in vivo to date. Our results provide direct support for the hypothesis that plasma membrane penetration, specifically by synaptotagmin’s C2B domain, is the critical effector interaction for coupling Ca2+ binding with vesicle fusion. PMID:21307261

  17. Anion-Sensitive, H+-Pumping ATPase in Membrane Vesicles from Oat Roots 1

    PubMed Central

    Churchill, Kathleen A.; Sze, Heven

    1983-01-01

    H+-pumping ATPases were detected in microsomal vesicles of oat (Avena sativa L. var Lang) roots using [14C]methylamine distribution or quinacrine fluorescent quenching. Methylamine (MeA) accumulation into vesicles and quinacrine quench were specifically dependent on Mg,ATP. Both activities reflected formation of a proton gradient (ΔpH) (acid inside) as carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, nigericin (in the presence of K+), or gramicidin decreased MeA uptake or increased quinacrine fluorescence. The properties of H+ pumping as measured by MeA uptake were characterized. The Kmapp for ATP was about 0.1 millimolar. Mg,GTP and Mg, pyrophosphate were 19% and 30% as effective as Mg,ATP. MeA uptake was inhibited by N,N′-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide and was mostly insensitive to oligomycin, vanadate, or copper. ATP-dependent MeA was stimulated by anions with decreasing order of potency of Cl− > Br− > NO3− > SO42−, iminodiacetate, benzene sulfonate. Anion stimulation of H+ pumping was caused in part by the ability of permeant anions to dissipate the electrical potential and in part by a specific requirement of Cl− by a H+ -pumping ATPase. A pH gradient, probably caused by a Donnan potential, could be dissipated by K+ in the presence or absence of ATP. MeA uptake was enriched in vesicles of relatively low density and showed a parallel distribution with vanadate-insensitive ATPase activity on a continuous dextran gradient. ΔpH as measured by quinacrine quench was partially vanadate-sensitive. These results show that plant membranes have at least two types of H+ -pumping ATPases. One is vanadate-sensitive and probably enriched in the plasma membrane. One is vanadate-resistant, anion-sensitive and has many properties characteristic of a vacuolar ATPase. These results are consistent with the presence of electrogenic H+ pumps at the plasma membrane and tonoplast of higher plant cells. PMID:16662875

  18. Bacterial Outer Membrane Vesicles as a Delivery System for Virulence Regulation.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hyunjin

    2016-08-28

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are spherical nanostructures that are ubiquitously shed from gram-negative bacteria both in vitro and in vivo. Recent findings revealed that OMVs, which contain diverse components derived from the parent bacterium, play an important role in communication with neighboring bacteria and the environment. Furthermore, nanoscale proteoliposomes decorated with pathogen-associated molecules attract considerable attention as a non-replicative carrier for vaccines and drug materials. This review introduces recent advances in OMV biogenesis and discusses the roles of OMVs in the context of bacterial communication and virulence regulation. It also describes the remarkable accomplishments in OMV engineering for diverse therapeutic applications.

  19. Mechanism of basolateral membrane H+/OH-/HCO-3 transport in the rat proximal convoluted tubule. A sodium-coupled electrogenic process

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    In order to examine the mechanism of basolateral membrane H+/OH-/HCO-3 transport, a method was developed for the measurement of cell pH in the vivo doubly microperfused rat proximal convoluted tubule. A pH- sensitive fluorescein derivative, (2',7')-bis(carboxyethyl)-(5,6)- carboxyfluorescein, was loaded into cells and relative changes in fluorescence at two excitation wavelengths were followed. Calibration was accomplished using nigericin with high extracellular potassium concentrations. When luminal and peritubular fluids were pH 7.32, cell pH was 7.14 +/- 0.01. Decreasing peritubular pH from 7.32 to 6.63 caused cell pH to decrease from 7.16 +/- 0.02 to 6.90 +/- 0.03. This effect occurred at an initial rate of 2.4 +/- 0.3 pH units/min, and was inhibited by 0.5 mM SITS. Lowering the peritubular sodium concentration from 147 to 25 meq/liter caused cell pH to decrease from 7.20 +/- 0.03 to 6.99 +/- 0.01. The effect of peritubular sodium concentration on cell pH was inhibited by 0.5 mM SITS, but was unaffected by 1 mM amiloride. In addition, when peritubular pH was decreased in the total absence of luminal and peritubular sodium, the rate of cell acidification was 0.2 +/- 0.1 pH units/min, a greater than 90% decrease from that in the presence of sodium. Cell depolarization achieved by increasing the peritubular potassium concentration caused cell pH to increase, an effect that was blocked by peritubular barium or luminal and peritubular sodium removal. Lowering the peritubular chloride concentration from 128 to 0 meq/liter did not affect cell pH. These results suggest the existence of an electrogenic, sodium-coupled H+/OH- /HCO-3 transport mechanism on the basolateral membrane of the rat proximal convoluted tubule. PMID:2999293

  20. A comprehensive characterization of membrane vesicles released by autophagic human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Pallet, Nicolas; Sirois, Isabelle; Bell, Christina; Hanafi, Laïla-Aïcha; Hamelin, Katia; Dieudé, Mélanie; Rondeau, Christiane; Thibault, Pierre; Desjardins, Michel; Hebert, Marie-Josée

    2013-04-01

    The stress status of the apoptotic cell can promote phenotypic changes that have important consequences on the immunogenicity of the dying cell. Autophagy is one of the biological processes activated in response to a stressful condition. It is an important mediator of intercellular communications, both by regulating the unconventional secretion of molecules, including interleukin 1β, and by regulating the extracellular release of ATP from early stage apoptotic cells. Additionally, autophagic components can be released in a caspase-dependent manner by serum-starved human endothelial cells that have engaged apoptotic and autophagic processes. The nature and the components of the extracellular vesicles released by dying autophagic cells are not known. In this study, we have identified extracellular membrane vesicles that are released by human endothelial cells undergoing apoptosis and autophagy, and characterized their biochemical, ultrastructural, morphological properties as well as their proteome. These extracellular vesicles differ from classical apoptotic bodies because they do not contain nucleus components and are released independently of Rho-associated, coiled-coil containing protein kinase 1 activation. Instead, they are enriched with autophagosomes and mitochondria and convey various danger signals, including ATP, suggesting that they could be involved in the modulation of innate immunity. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Membrane vesicles nucleate mineralo-organic nanoparticles and induce carbonate apatite precipitation in human body fluids.

    PubMed

    Wu, Cheng-Yeu; Martel, Jan; Cheng, Wei-Yun; He, Chao-Chih; Ojcius, David M; Young, John D

    2013-10-18

    Recent studies indicate that membrane vesicles (MVs) secreted by various cells are associated with human diseases, including arthritis, atherosclerosis, cancer, and chronic kidney disease. The possibility that MVs may induce the formation of mineralo-organic nanoparticles (NPs) and ectopic calcification has not been investigated so far. Here, we isolated MVs ranging in size between 20 and 400 nm from human serum and FBS using ultracentrifugation and sucrose gradient centrifugation. The MV preparations consisted of phospholipid-bound vesicles containing the serum proteins albumin, fetuin-A, and apolipoprotein A1; the mineralization-associated enzyme alkaline phosphatase; and the exosome proteins TNFR1 and CD63. Notably, we observed that MVs induced mineral precipitation following inoculation and incubation in cell culture medium. The mineral precipitates consisted of round, mineralo-organic NPs containing carbonate hydroxyapatite, similar to previous descriptions of the so-called nanobacteria. Annexin V-immunogold staining revealed that the calcium-binding lipid phosphatidylserine (PS) was exposed on the external surface of serum MVs. Treatment of MVs with an anti-PS antibody significantly decreased their mineral seeding activity, suggesting that PS may provide nucleating sites for calcium phosphate deposition on the vesicles. These results indicate that MVs may represent nucleating agents that induce the formation of mineral NPs in body fluids. Given that mineralo-organic NPs represent precursors of calcification in vivo, our results suggest that MVs may initiate ectopic calcification in the human body.

  2. Extracellular membrane vesicles secreted by mycoplasma Acholeplasma laidlawii PG8 are enriched in virulence proteins.

    PubMed

    Chernov, Vladislav M; Mouzykantov, Alexey A; Baranova, Natalia B; Medvedeva, Elena S; Grygorieva, Tatiana Yu; Trushin, Maxim V; Vishnyakov, Innokentii E; Sabantsev, Anton V; Borchsenius, Sergei N; Chernova, Olga A

    2014-10-14

    Mycoplasmas (class Mollicutes), the smallest prokaryotes capable of self-replication, as well as Archaea, Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria constitutively produce extracellular vesicles (EVs). However, little is known regarding the content and functions of mycoplasma vesicles. Here, we present for the first time a proteomics-based characterisation of extracellular membrane vesicles from Acholeplasma laidlawii PG8. The ubiquitous mycoplasma is widespread in nature, found in humans, animals and plants, and is the causative agent of phytomycoplasmoses and the predominant contaminant of cell cultures. Taking a proteomics approach using LC-ESI-MS/MS, we identified 97 proteins. Analysis of the identified proteins indicated that A. laidlawii-derived EVs are enriched in virulence proteins that may play critical roles in mycoplasma-induced pathogenesis. Our data will help to elucidate the functions of mycoplasma-derived EVs and to develop effective methods to control infections and contaminations of cell cultures by mycoplasmas. In the present study, we have documented for the first time the proteins in EVs secreted by mycoplasma vesicular proteins identified in this study are likely involved in the adaptation of bacteria to stressors, survival in microbial communities and pathogen-host interactions. These findings suggest that the secretion of EVs is an evolutionally conserved and universal process that occurs in organisms from the simplest wall-less bacteria to complex organisms and indicate the necessity of developing new approaches to control infects.

  3. Time Resolved Neutron Reflectivity During Supported Membrane Formation by Vesicle Fusion.

    PubMed

    Koutsioubas, Alexandros; Appavou, Marie-Sousai; Lairez, Didier

    2017-09-05

    The formation of supported lipid bilayers (SLB) on hydrophilic substrates through the method of unilamelar vesicle fusion is used routinely in a wide range of biophysical studies. In an effort to control and better understand the fusion process on the substrate, many experimental studies employing different techniques have been devoted to the elucidation of the fusion mechanism. In the present work we follow the kinetics of membrane formation using time-resolved (TR) neutron reflectivity, focussing at the structural changes near the solid/liquid interface. A clear indication of stacked bilayer structure is observed during the intermediate phase of SLB formation. Adsorbed lipid mass decrease is also measured at the final stage of the process. We have found that it is essential for the analysis of the experimental results to treat theoretically the shape of adsorbed lipid vesicles on an attractive substrate. The overall findings are discussed in relation to proposed fusion mechanisms from previous literature, while we argue that our observations favour a model involving enhanced adhesion of incoming vesicles on the edges of already formed bilayer patches.

  4. LRRK2 Affects Vesicle Trafficking, Neurotransmitter Extracellular Level and Membrane Receptor Localization

    PubMed Central

    Spissu, Ylenia; Sanna, Giovanna; Xiong, Yulan; Dawson, Ted M.; Dawson, Valina L.; Galioto, Manuela; Rocchitta, Gaia; Biosa, Alice; Serra, Pier Andrea; Carri, Maria Teresa; Crosio, Claudia; Iaccarino, Ciro

    2013-01-01

    The leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene was found to play a role in the pathogenesis of both familial and sporadic Parkinson’s disease (PD). LRRK2 encodes a large multi-domain protein that is expressed in different tissues. To date, the physiological and pathological functions of LRRK2 are not clearly defined. In this study we have explored the role of LRRK2 in controlling vesicle trafficking in different cellular or animal models and using various readouts. In neuronal cells, the presence of LRRK2G2019S pathological mutant determines increased extracellular dopamine levels either under basal conditions or upon nicotine stimulation. Moreover, mutant LRRK2 affects the levels of dopamine receptor D1 on the membrane surface in neuronal cells or animal models. Ultrastructural analysis of PC12-derived cells expressing mutant LRRK2G2019S shows an altered intracellular vesicle distribution. Taken together, our results point to the key role of LRRK2 to control vesicle trafficking in neuronal cells. PMID:24167564

  5. Plant plasma membrane aquaporins in natural vesicles as potential stabilizers and carriers of glucosinolates.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Ballesta, Maria Del Carmen; Pérez-Sánchez, Horacio; Moreno, Diego A; Carvajal, Micaela

    2016-07-01

    Their biodegradable nature and ability to target cells make biological vesicles potential nanocarriers for bioactives delivery. In this work, the interaction between proteoliposomes enriched in aquaporins derived from broccoli plants and the glucosinolates was evaluated. The vesicles were stored at different temperatures and their integrity was studied. Determination of glucosinolates, showed that indolic glucosinolates were more sensitive to degradation in aqueous solution than aliphatic glucosinolates. Glucoraphanin was stabilized by leaf and root proteoliposomes at 25°C through their interaction with aquaporins. An extensive hydrogen bond network, including different aquaporin residues, and hydrophobic interactions, as a consequence of the interaction between the linear alkane chain of glucoraphanin and Glu31 and Leu34 protein residues, were established as the main stabilizing elements. Combined our results showed that plasma membrane vesicles from leaf and root tissues of broccoli plants may be considered as suitable carriers for glucosinolate which stabilization can be potentially attributed to aquaporins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Membrane Vesicles Nucleate Mineralo-organic Nanoparticles and Induce Carbonate Apatite Precipitation in Human Body Fluids*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Cheng-Yeu; Martel, Jan; Cheng, Wei-Yun; He, Chao-Chih; Ojcius, David M.; Young, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that membrane vesicles (MVs) secreted by various cells are associated with human diseases, including arthritis, atherosclerosis, cancer, and chronic kidney disease. The possibility that MVs may induce the formation of mineralo-organic nanoparticles (NPs) and ectopic calcification has not been investigated so far. Here, we isolated MVs ranging in size between 20 and 400 nm from human serum and FBS using ultracentrifugation and sucrose gradient centrifugation. The MV preparations consisted of phospholipid-bound vesicles containing the serum proteins albumin, fetuin-A, and apolipoprotein A1; the mineralization-associated enzyme alkaline phosphatase; and the exosome proteins TNFR1 and CD63. Notably, we observed that MVs induced mineral precipitation following inoculation and incubation in cell culture medium. The mineral precipitates consisted of round, mineralo-organic NPs containing carbonate hydroxyapatite, similar to previous descriptions of the so-called nanobacteria. Annexin V-immunogold staining revealed that the calcium-binding lipid phosphatidylserine (PS) was exposed on the external surface of serum MVs. Treatment of MVs with an anti-PS antibody significantly decreased their mineral seeding activity, suggesting that PS may provide nucleating sites for calcium phosphate deposition on the vesicles. These results indicate that MVs may represent nucleating agents that induce the formation of mineral NPs in body fluids. Given that mineralo-organic NPs represent precursors of calcification in vivo, our results suggest that MVs may initiate ectopic calcification in the human body. PMID:23990473

  7. Inhibition by Levorphanol and Related Drugs of Amino Acid Transport by Isolated Membrane Vesicles from Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Mary J. C.; Simon, Eric J.

    1975-01-01

    Levorphanol inhibits the transport of the amino acids proline and lysine by cytoplasmic membrane vesicles derived from Escherichia coli. The degree of inhibition increases with increasing levorphanol concentration and ranges from 26% at 10−6 M levorphanol to 92% at 10−3 M levorphanol. The effect is independent of the energy source, since levorphanol inhibits proline uptake to the same extent in the presence of 20 mM d-lactate or 20 mM succinate and in the absence of an exogenous energy source. Levorphanol does not irreversibly alter the ability of membrane vesicles to transport proline, since incubation of membrane vesicles for 15 min in the presence of 0.25 mM levorphanol, a concentration which inhibits proline transport by more than 75%, has no effect on the rate of proline transport by these vesicles once the drug is removed. Both the maximum velocity and the Km of proline transport are modified by levorphanol, hence, the type of inhibition produced by levorphanol is mixed. The inhibitor constant (Ki) for levorphanol inhibition of proline transport is approximately 3 × 10−4 M. Membrane vesicles incubated in the presence of levorphanol accumulate much less proline at the steady state than do control vesicles. Furthermore, the addition of levorphanol to membrane vesicles preloaded to the steady state with proline produces a marked net efflux of proline. Levorphanol does not block either temperature-induced efflux or exchange of external proline with [14C]proline present in the intravesicular pool. Dextrorphan, the enantiomorph of levorphanol, and levallorphan, the N-allyl analogue of levorphanol, inhibit proline and lysine transport in a similar manner. Possible mechanisms of the effects of these drugs on cell membranes are discussed. PMID:1096802

  8. Role of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Peptidoglycan-Associated Outer Membrane Proteins in Vesicle Formation

    PubMed Central

    Wessel, Aimee K.; Liew, Jean; Kwon, Taejoon; Marcotte, Edward M.

    2013-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria produce outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) that package and deliver proteins, small molecules, and DNA to prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. The molecular details of OMV biogenesis have not been fully elucidated, but peptidoglycan-associated outer membrane proteins that tether the outer membrane to the underlying peptidoglycan have been shown to be critical for OMV formation in multiple Enterobacteriaceae. In this study, we demonstrate that the peptidoglycan-associated outer membrane proteins OprF and OprI, but not OprL, impact production of OMVs by the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Interestingly, OprF does not appear to be important for tethering the outer membrane to peptidoglycan but instead impacts OMV formation through modulation of the levels of the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS), a quorum signal previously shown by our laboratory to be critical for OMV formation. Thus, the mechanism by which OprF impacts OMV formation is distinct from that for other peptidoglycan-associated outer membrane proteins, including OprI. PMID:23123904

  9. Role of Pseudomonas aeruginosa peptidoglycan-associated outer membrane proteins in vesicle formation.

    PubMed

    Wessel, Aimee K; Liew, Jean; Kwon, Taejoon; Marcotte, Edward M; Whiteley, Marvin

    2013-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria produce outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) that package and deliver proteins, small molecules, and DNA to prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. The molecular details of OMV biogenesis have not been fully elucidated, but peptidoglycan-associated outer membrane proteins that tether the outer membrane to the underlying peptidoglycan have been shown to be critical for OMV formation in multiple Enterobacteriaceae. In this study, we demonstrate that the peptidoglycan-associated outer membrane proteins OprF and OprI, but not OprL, impact production of OMVs by the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Interestingly, OprF does not appear to be important for tethering the outer membrane to peptidoglycan but instead impacts OMV formation through modulation of the levels of the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS), a quorum signal previously shown by our laboratory to be critical for OMV formation. Thus, the mechanism by which OprF impacts OMV formation is distinct from that for other peptidoglycan-associated outer membrane proteins, including OprI.

  10. Giant vesicles as models to study the interactions between membranes and proteins.

    PubMed

    Fischer, A; Oberholzer, T; Luisi, P L

    2000-07-31

    The interaction between polypeptides and membranes is a fundamental aspect of cell biochemistry. Liposomes have been used in this context as in vitro systems to study such interactions. We present here the case of giant vesicles (GVs), which, due to their size (radius larger than 10 microns), mimic more closely the situation observed in cell membranes and furthermore permit to study protein-membrane interactions by direct optical monitoring. It is shown that GVs formed from 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine by electroformation are permeable to certain low molecular weight molecules such as the nucleic acid dye YO-PRO-1 and fluorescein diphosphate whereas conventional liposomes (large or small unilamellar liposomes) are not. In addition, it is shown that non-membrane proteins, such as DNases or RNases, added to the selected GVs from the outside, are able to convert their substrate, which is strictly localized on the internal side of the membrane. This effect is only seen in GVs (also when they are removed from the original electroformation environment) and is absent in conventional liposomes. The fact that these effects are only present in GVs obtained by electroformation and not in conventional small liposomes is taken as an indication that certain physico-chemical properties of the bilayer are affected by the membrane curvature, although the mechanism underlying such differences could not be established as yet.

  11. Mechanism mediating basolateral transport of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid in rat kidney.

    PubMed

    Villalobos, A R; Dunnick, C A; Pritchard, J B

    1996-08-01

    The organic anions, p-aminohippurate (PAH) and fluorescein, are transported across the basolateral membrane of the renal proximal tubule in exchange for intracellular alpha-ketoglutarate (alpha KG), a mechanism indirectly coupled to sodium via Na+/alpha KG cotransport. To determine whether this mechanism mediates the basolateral transport of other organic anions, transport of the herbicide, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), was examined in rat renal cortical slices and basolateral membrane vesicles. In slices, uptake of 2,4-D increased steadily over time, approaching steady-state tissue/medium ratios of approximately 8 after 60 min. Probenecid, PAH and chlorophenol red inhibited steady-state uptake of 2,4-D. Accumulation of 10 microM 2,4-D was stimulated 2-fold by 60 microM glutarate; other dicarboxylic acids failed to stimulate uptake. In the presence of sodium, the addition of 5 mM LiCl or 2 mM ouabain to the bathing medium abolished glutarate stimulation. Removal of sodium from the bathing medium reversibly inhibited uptake as much as 75%. Furthermore, PAH inhibited 2,4-D uptake by slices in a dose-dependent manner, and increasing the external 2,4-D concentration decreased the inhibitory potency of PAH. In basolateral membrane vesicles, unlabeled 2,4-D inhibited sodium glutarate-coupled uptake of 3H-labeled PAH and 2,4-D in a concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, concentrative uptake of 2,4-D into vesicles could be driven by an outwardly directed gradient of glutarate or alpha KG that was generated by lithium-sensitive Na+/dicarboxylate cotransport or imposed experimentally. An outwardly directed gradient of unlabeled 2,4-D or PAH also stimulated uptake of 2,4-D. Based on these data, basolateral accumulation of 2,4-D by the renal proximal tubule is mediated by 2,4-D/alpha KG exchange, a mechanism energetically coupled to Na+/alpha KG cotransport and shared with PAH.

  12. Use of membrane vesicles as a simplified system for studying auxin transport of auxin: Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, M.H.M.

    1986-01-01

    Indoleacetic acid (IAA), the auxin regulating growth, is transported polarly in plants. IAA stimulates a rapid increase in the rate of electrogenic proton secretion by the plasma membrane. This not only increases the magnitude of the pH and electrical gradients providing the driving force for polar auxin transport and uptake of sugars, amino acids and inorganic ions, but, by acidifying the cell wall, also leads to growth. We find that auxin uptake by membrane vesicles isolated from actively growing plant tissues exhibits some of the same properties as by cells: the accumulation depends on the pH gradient, is saturable and specific for auxin, and enhanced by herbicides that inhibit polar auxin transport. We are using accumulation of a radioactive weak acid to quantify the pH gradient and distribution of fluorescent cyanine dyes to monitor the membrane potential. The magnitude of IAA accumulation exceeds that predicted from the pH gradient, and in the absence of a pH gradient, a membrane potential fails to support any auxin accumulation, leading to the conclusion that the transmembrane potential is not a significant driving force for auxin accumulation in this system. Since increasing the external ionic strength decreases saturable auxin accumulation, we are investigating how modifying the surface potential of the vesicles affects the interaction of the amphipathic IAA molecules with the membranes and whether protein modifying reagents affect the saturability and stimulation by NPA. These studies should provide information on the location and function of the auxin binding site and may enable us to identify the solubilized protein. 5 refs.

  13. In vitro study of interaction of synaptic vesicles with lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, S. K.; Castorph, S.; Konovalov, O.; Jahn, R.; Holt, M.; Salditt, T.

    2010-10-01

    The fusion of synaptic vesicles (SVs) with the plasma membrane in neurons is a crucial step in the release of neurotransmitters, which are responsible for carrying signals between nerve cells. While many of the molecular players involved in this fusion process have been identified, a precise molecular description of their roles in the process is still lacking. A case in point is the plasma membrane lipid phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2). Although PIP2 is known to be essential for vesicle fusion, its precise role in the process remains unclear. We have re-investigated the role of this lipid in membrane structure and function using the complementary experimental techniques of x-ray reflectivity, both on lipid monolayers at an air-water interface and bilayers on a solid support, and grazing incidence x-ray diffraction on lipid monolayers. These techniques provide unprecedented access to structural information at the molecular level, and detail the profound structural changes that occur in a membrane following PIP2 incorporation. Further, we also confirm and extend previous findings that the association of SVs with membranes is enhanced by PIP2 incorporation, and reveal the structural changes that underpin this phenomenon. Further, the association is further intensified by a physiologically relevant amount of Ca2+ ions in the subphase of the monolayer, as revealed by the increase in interfacial pressure seen with the lipid monolayer system. Finally, a theoretical calculation concerning the products arising from the fusion of these SVs with proteoliposomes is presented, with which we aim to illustrate the potential future uses of this system.

  14. A Bilayer-Couple Model of Bacterial Outer Membrane Vesicle Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Schertzer, Jeffrey W.; Whiteley, Marvin

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gram-negative bacteria naturally produce outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) that arise through bulging and pinching off of the outer membrane. OMVs have several biological functions for bacteria, most notably as trafficking vehicles for toxins, antimicrobials, and signaling molecules. While their biological roles are now appreciated, the mechanism of OMV formation has not been fully elucidated. We recently demonstrated that the signaling molecule 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-quinolone (PQS) is required for OMV biogenesis in P. aeruginosa. We hypothesized that PQS stimulates OMV formation through direct interaction with the outer leaflet of the outer membrane. To test this hypothesis, we employed a red blood cell (RBC) model that has been used extensively to study small-molecule–membrane interactions. Our results revealed that addition of PQS to RBCs induced membrane curvature, resulting in the formation of membrane spicules (spikes), consistent with small molecules that are inserted stably into the outer leaflet of the membrane. Radiotracer experiments demonstrated that sufficient PQS was inserted into the membrane to account for this curvature and that curvature induction was specific to PQS structure. These data suggest that a low rate of interleaflet flip-flop forces PQS to accumulate in and expand the outer leaflet relative to the inner leaflet, thus inducing membrane curvature. In support of PQS-mediated outer leaflet expansion, the PQS effect was antagonized by chlorpromazine, a molecule known to be preferentially inserted into the inner leaflet. Based on these data, we propose a bilayer-couple model to describe P. aeruginosa OMV biogenesis and suggest that this is a general mechanism for bacterial OMV formation. PMID:22415005

  15. Carbachol activates a K+ channel of very small conductance in the basolateral membrane of rat pancreatic acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Köttgen, M; Hoefer, A; Kim, S J; Beschorner, U; Schreiber, R; Hug, M J; Greger, R

    1999-10-01

    Secretion of Cl- requires the presence of a K+ conductance to hyperpolarize the cell, and to provide the driving force for Cl- exit via luminal Cl- channels. In the exocrine pancreas Cl- secretion is mediated by an increase in cytosolic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i). Two types of Ca2+-activated K+ channels could be shown in pancreatic acinar cells of different species. However, there are no data on Ca2+-activated K+ channels in rat pancreatic acini. Here we examine the basolateral K+ conductance of freshly isolated rat pancreatic acinar cells in cell-attached and cell-excised patch-clamp experiments. Addition of carbachol (CCH, 1 micromol/l) to the bath led to the activation of very small conductance K+ channels in cell-attached patches (n=27), producing a noisy macroscopic outward current. The respective outward conductance increased significantly by a factor of 2.1+/-0.1 (n=27). Noise analysis revealed a Lorentzian noise component with a corner frequency (f(c)) of 30.3+/-3.5 Hz (n=19), consistent with channel activity in these patches. The estimated single-channel conductance was 1.5+/-0.4 pS (n=19). In cell-excised patches (inside out) from cells previously stimulated with CCH, channel activity was only observed in the presence of K+ in the bath solution. Under these conditions f(c) was 47.6+/-11.9 Hz (estimated single-channel conductance 1.1+/-0.2 pS, n=20). The current/voltage relationship of the noise showed weak inward rectification and the reversal potential shifted towards E(K+) when Na+ in the bath was replaced by K+. Channel activity in cell-excised patches was slightly reduced by 10 mmol/l Ba2+ (23.6+/-2.1% of the total outward current) and was completely absent when K+ in the bath was replaced by Na+. Reduction of the [Ca2+]i from 1 mmol/l to 1 micromol/l in cell-excised experiments decreased the current by 52.3+/-12.3% (n=5). Expression of K(v)LQT1, one of the possible candidates for a small-conductance K+ channel in rat pancreatic acinar cells, was shown by reverse

  16. Vesicle Docking to the Spindle Pole Body Is Necessary to Recruit the Exocyst During Membrane Formation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Mathieson, Erin M.; Suda, Yasuyuki; Nickas, Mark; Snydsman, Brian; Davis, Trisha N.; Muller, Eric G. D.

    2010-01-01

    During meiosis II in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the cytoplasmic face of the spindle pole body, referred to as the meiosis II outer plaque (MOP), is modified in both composition and structure to become the initiation site for de novo formation of a membrane called the prospore membrane. The MOP serves as a docking complex for precursor vesicles that are targeted to its surface. Using fluorescence resonance energy transfer analysis, the orientation of coiled-coil proteins within the MOP has been determined. The N-termini of two proteins, Mpc54p and Spo21p, were oriented toward the outer surface of the structure. Mutations in the N-terminus of Mpc54p resulted in a unique phenotype: precursor vesicles loosely tethered to the MOP but did not contact its surface. Thus, these mpc54 mutants separate the steps of vesicle association and docking. Using these mpc54 mutants, we determined that recruitment of the Rab GTPase Sec4p, as well as the exocyst components Sec3p and Sec8p, to the precursor vesicles requires vesicle docking to the MOP. This suggests that the MOP promotes membrane formation both by localization of precursor vesicles to a particular site and by recruitment of a second tethering complex, the exocyst, that stimulates downstream events of fusion. PMID:20826607

  17. Maltose/proton co-transport in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Comparative study with cells and plasma membrane vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Van Leeuwen, C C; Weusthuis, R A; Postma, E; Van den Broek, P J; Van Dijken, J P

    1992-01-01

    Maltose/proton co-transport was studied in intact cells and in plasma membrane vesicles of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In order to determine uphill transport in vesicles, plasma membranes were fused with proteoliposomes containing cytochrome c oxidase as a proton-motive force-generating system. Maltose accumulation, dependent on the electrical and pH gradients, was observed. The initial uptake velocity and accumulation ratio in vesicles proved to be dependent on the external pH. Moreover, kinetic analysis of maltose transport showed that Vmax. values greatly decreased with increasing pH, whereas the Km remained virtually constant. These observations were in good agreement with results obtained with intact cells, and suggest that proton binding to the carrier proceeds with an apparent pK of 5.7. The observation with intact cells that maltose is co-transported with protons in a one-to-one stoichiometry was ascertained in the vesicle system by measuring the balance between proton-motive force and the chemical maltose gradient. These results show that maltose transport in vesicles prepared by fusion of plasma membranes with cytochrome c oxidase proteoliposomes behaves in a similar way as in intact cells. It is therefore concluded that this vesicle model system offers a wide range of new possibilities for the study of maltose/proton co-transport in more detail. PMID:1318030

  18. bSUM: A bead-supported unilamellar membrane system facilitating unidirectional insertion of membrane proteins into giant vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hui; Lee, Sungsoo; Llaguno, Marc C.

    2016-01-01

    Fused or giant vesicles, planar lipid bilayers, a droplet membrane system, and planar-supported membranes have been developed to incorporate membrane proteins for the electrical and biophysical analysis of such proteins or the bilayer properties. However, it remains difficult to incorporate membrane proteins, including ion channels, into reconstituted membrane systems that allow easy control of operational dimensions, incorporation orientation of the membrane proteins, and lipid composition of membranes. Here, using a newly developed chemical engineering procedure, we report on a bead-supported unilamellar membrane (bSUM) system that allows good control over membrane dimension, protein orientation, and lipid composition. Our new system uses specific ligands to facilitate the unidirectional incorporation of membrane proteins into lipid bilayers. Cryo–electron microscopic imaging demonstrates the unilamellar nature of the bSUMs. Electrical recordings from voltage-gated ion channels in bSUMs of varying diameters demonstrate the versatility of the new system. Using KvAP as a model system, we show that compared with other in vitro membrane systems, the bSUMs have the following advantages: (a) a major fraction of channels are orientated in a controlled way; (b) the channels mediate the formation of the lipid bilayer; (c) there is one and only one bilayer membrane on each bead; (d) the lipid composition can be controlled and the bSUM size is also under experimental control over a range of 0.2–20 µm; (e) the channel activity can be recorded by patch clamp using a planar electrode; and (f) the voltage-clamp speed (0.2–0.5 ms) of the bSUM on a planar electrode is fast, making it suitable to study ion channels with fast gating kinetics. Our observations suggest that the chemically engineered bSUMs afford a novel platform for studying lipid–protein interactions in membranes of varying lipid composition and may be useful for other applications, such as targeted

  19. Explosive cell lysis as a mechanism for the biogenesis of bacterial membrane vesicles and biofilms.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, Lynne; Toyofuku, Masanori; Hynen, Amelia L; Kurosawa, Masaharu; Pessi, Gabriella; Petty, Nicola K; Osvath, Sarah R; Cárcamo-Oyarce, Gerardo; Gloag, Erin S; Shimoni, Raz; Omasits, Ulrich; Ito, Satoshi; Yap, Xinhui; Monahan, Leigh G; Cavaliere, Rosalia; Ahrens, Christian H; Charles, Ian G; Nomura, Nobuhiko; Eberl, Leo; Whitchurch, Cynthia B

    2016-04-14

    Many bacteria produce extracellular and surface-associated components such as membrane vesicles (MVs), extracellular DNA and moonlighting cytosolic proteins for which the biogenesis and export pathways are not fully understood. Here we show that the explosive cell lysis of a sub-population of cells accounts for the liberation of cytosolic content in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Super-resolution microscopy reveals that explosive cell lysis also produces shattered membrane fragments that rapidly form MVs. A prophage endolysin encoded within the R- and F-pyocin gene cluster is essential for explosive cell lysis. Endolysin-deficient mutants are defective in MV production and biofilm development, consistent with a crucial role in the biogenesis of MVs and liberation of extracellular DNA and other biofilm matrix components. Our findings reveal that explosive cell lysis, mediated through the activity of a cryptic prophage endolysin, acts as a mechanism for the production of bacterial MVs.

  20. Explosive cell lysis as a mechanism for the biogenesis of bacterial membrane vesicles and biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Turnbull, Lynne; Toyofuku, Masanori; Hynen, Amelia L.; Kurosawa, Masaharu; Pessi, Gabriella; Petty, Nicola K.; Osvath, Sarah R.; Cárcamo-Oyarce, Gerardo; Gloag, Erin S.; Shimoni, Raz; Omasits, Ulrich; Ito, Satoshi; Yap, Xinhui; Monahan, Leigh G.; Cavaliere, Rosalia; Ahrens, Christian H.; Charles, Ian G.; Nomura, Nobuhiko; Eberl, Leo; Whitchurch, Cynthia B.

    2016-01-01

    Many bacteria produce extracellular and surface-associated components such as membrane vesicles (MVs), extracellular DNA and moonlighting cytosolic proteins for which the biogenesis and export pathways are not fully understood. Here we show that the explosive cell lysis of a sub-population of cells accounts for the liberation of cytosolic content in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Super-resolution microscopy reveals that explosive cell lysis also produces shattered membrane fragments that rapidly form MVs. A prophage endolysin encoded within the R- and F-pyocin gene cluster is essential for explosive cell lysis. Endolysin-deficient mutants are defective in MV production and biofilm development, consistent with a crucial role in the biogenesis of MVs and liberation of extracellular DNA and other biofilm matrix components. Our findings reveal that explosive cell lysis, mediated through the activity of a cryptic prophage endolysin, acts as a mechanism for the production of bacterial MVs. PMID:27075392

  1. Protein kinase A dependent membrane protein phosphorylation and chloride conductance in endosomal vesicles from kidney cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Reenstra, W.W.; Bae, H.R.; Verkman, A.S. Univ. of California, San Francisco ); Sabolic, I. Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA )

    1992-01-14

    Regulation of Cl conductance by protein kinase A action, cell-free measurements of Cl transport and membrane protein phosphorylation were carried out in apical endocytic vesicles from rabbit kidney proximal tubule. Cl transport was measured by a stopped-flow quenching assay in endosomes labeled in vivo with the fluorescent Cl indicator 6-methoxy-N-(3-sulfopropyl)quinolinium. Phosphorylation was studied in a purified endosomal preparation by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography of membrane proteins labeled by ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP. These results suggest that, in a cell-free system, protein kinase A increases Cl conductance in endosomes from kidney proximal tubule by a phosphorylation mechanism. The labeled protein has a size similar to that of the 64-kDa putative kidney Cl channel reported by Landry et al. but is much smaller than the {approximately}170-kDa cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulatory protein.

  2. Decoration of Outer Membrane Vesicles with Multiple Antigens by Using an Autotransporter Approach

    PubMed Central

    Felix, Tristan; Soprova, Zora; ten Hagen-Jongman, Corinne M.; Vikström, David; Majlessi, Laleh; Beskers, Joep; Follmann, Frank; de Punder, Karin; van der Wel, Nicole N.; Baumgarten, Thomas; Pham, Thang V.; Piersma, Sander R.; Jiménez, Connie R.; van Ulsen, Peter; de Gier, Jan-Willem; Leclerc, Claude; Jong, Wouter S. P.

    2014-01-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are spherical nanoparticles that naturally shed from Gram-negative bacteria. They are rich in immunostimulatory proteins and lipopolysaccharide but do not replicate, which increases their safety profile and renders them attractive vaccine vectors. By packaging foreign polypeptides in OMVs, specific immune responses can be raised toward heterologous antigens in the context of an intrinsic adjuvant. Antigens exposed at the vesicle surface have been suggested to elicit protection superior to that from antigens concealed inside OMVs, but hitherto robust methods for targeting heterologous proteins to the OMV surface have been lacking. We have exploited our previously developed hemoglobin protease (Hbp) autotransporter platform for display of heterologous polypeptides at the OMV surface. One, two, or three of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens ESAT6, Ag85B, and Rv2660c were targeted to the surface of Escherichia coli OMVs upon fusion to Hbp. Furthermore, a hypervesiculating ΔtolR ΔtolA derivative of attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium SL3261 was generated, enabling efficient release and purification of OMVs decorated with multiple heterologous antigens, exemplified by the M. tuberculosis antigens and epitopes from Chlamydia trachomatis major outer membrane protein (MOMP). Also, we showed that delivery of Salmonella OMVs displaying Ag85B to antigen-presenting cells in vitro results in processing and presentation of an epitope that is functionally recognized by Ag85B-specific T cell hybridomas. In conclusion, the Hbp platform mediates efficient display of (multiple) heterologous antigens, individually or combined within one molecule, at the surface of OMVs. Detection of antigen-specific immune responses upon vesicle-mediated delivery demonstrated the potential of our system for vaccine development. PMID:25038093

  3. Sulfate uptake by crustacean hepatopancreatic brush border membrane vesicles. [Homarus americanus

    SciTech Connect

    Gerencser, G.A.; Cattey, M.A; Ahearn, G.A. Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu )

    1990-02-26

    Purified brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) were prepared from Atlantic lobster (Homarus americanus) hepatopancreas using differential centrifugation and Mg{sup +2} precipitation techniques. Uptake of 0.1 mM {sup 35}SO{sub 4}{sup {minus}2} was stimulated by pre-loading vesicles with Cl{sup {minus}} leading to a transient accumulation of isotope more than twice that at equilibrium. Pre-loading with HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} or gluconate had no effect on sulfate uptake. No stimulation of {sup 35}SO{sub 4}{sup {minus}2} was observed in the presence of inwardly directed Na{sup +} or tetramethylammonium{sup +} gradients. Uptake of the divalent anion was strongly stimulated by inwardly directed proton gradients (pH{sub o} < pH{sub i}) and markedly inhibited by outwardly directed proton gradients (pH{sub o} > pH{sub i}). {sup 35}SO{sub 4}{sup {minus}2}/Cl{sup {minus}} exchange was enhanced by imposing a transmembrane inside positive K{sup +} diffusion potential and inhibited by a membrane potential of the opposite polarity (K{sup +}/valinomycin). Results suggest the presence of a proton-dependent, electrogenic anion antiport mechanism in BBMV isolated from the crustacean hepatopancreas.

  4. Vesicles between plasma membrane and cell wall prior to visible senescence of Iris and Dendrobium flowers.

    PubMed

    Kamdee, Channatika; Kirasak, Kanjana; Ketsa, Saichol; van Doorn, Wouter G

    2015-09-01

    Cut Iris flowers (Iris x hollandica, cv. Blue Magic) show visible senescence about two days after full opening. Epidermal cells of the outer tepals collapse due to programmed cell death (PCD). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed irregular swelling of the cell walls, starting prior to cell collapse. Compared to cells in flowers that had just opened, wall thickness increased up to tenfold prior to cell death. Fibrils were visible in the swollen walls. After cell death very little of the cell wall remained. Prior to and during visible wall swelling, vesicles (paramural bodies) were observed between the plasma membrane and the cell walls. The vesicles were also found in groups and were accompanied by amorphous substance. They usually showed a single membrane, and had a variety of diameters and electron densities. Cut Dendrobium hybrid cv. Lucky Duan flowers exhibited visible senescence about 14 days after full flower opening. Paramural bodies were also found in Dendrobium tepal epidermis and mesophyll cells, related to wall swelling and degradation. Although alternative explanations are well possible, it is hypothesized that paramural bodies carry enzymes involved in cell wall breakdown. The literature has not yet reported such bodies in association with senescence/PCD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. High throughput nanoparticle tracking analysis for monitoring outer membrane vesicle production.

    PubMed

    Gerritzen, Matthias J H; Martens, Dirk E; Wijffels, René H; Stork, Michiel

    2017-01-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are spherical membrane nanoparticles released by Gram-negative bacteria. OMVs can be quantified in complex matrices by nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA). NTA can be performed in static mode or with continuous sample flow that results in analysis of more particles in a smaller time-frame. Flow measurements must be performed manually despite the availability of a sample changer on the NanoSight system. Here we present a method for automated measurements in flow mode. OMV quantification in flow mode results in lower variance in particle quantification (coefficient of variation (CV) of 6%, CV static measurements of 14%). Sizing of OMVs was expected to be less favorable in flow mode due to the increased movement of the particles. However, we observed a CV of 3% in flow mode and a CV of 8% in static measurements. Flow rates of up to 5 µL/min displayed correct size and particle measurements, however, particle concentration was slightly lower than in static measurements. The automated method was used to assess OMV release of batch cultures of Neisseria meningitidis. The bacteria released more OMVs in stationary growth phase, while the size of the vesicles remained constant throughout the culture. Taken together, this study shows that automated measurements in flow mode can be established with advanced scripting to reduce the workload for the user.

  6. Outer Membrane Vesicle Biosynthesis in Salmonella: Is There More to Gram-Negative Bacteria?

    PubMed

    Reidl, Joachim

    2016-08-16

    Recent research has focused on the biological role of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs), which are derived from the outer membranes (OMs) of Gram-negative bacteria, and their potential exploitation as therapeutics. OMVs have been characterized in many ways and functions. Until recently, research focused on hypothetical and empirical models that addressed the molecular mechanisms of OMV biogenesis, such as vesicles bulging from the OM in various ways. The recently reported study by Elhenawy et al. (mBio 7:e00940-16, 2016, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/mBio.00940-16) provided further insights into OMV biogenesis of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. That study showed that deacylation of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) influences the level of OMV production and, furthermore, determines a sorting of high versus low acylated LPS in OMs and OMVs, respectively. Interestingly, deacylation may inversely correlate with other LPS modifications, suggesting some synergy toward optimized host resistance via best OM compositions for S Typhimurium. Copyright © 2016 Reidl.

  7. Coordinated recruitment of Spir actin nucleators and myosin V motors to Rab11 vesicle membranes

    PubMed Central

    Pylypenko, Olena; Welz, Tobias; Tittel, Janine; Kollmar, Martin; Chardon, Florian; Malherbe, Gilles; Weiss, Sabine; Michel, Carina Ida Luise; Samol-Wolf, Annette; Grasskamp, Andreas Till; Hume, Alistair; Goud, Bruno; Baron, Bruno; England, Patrick; Titus, Margaret A; Schwille, Petra; Weidemann, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    There is growing evidence for a coupling of actin assembly and myosin motor activity in cells. However, mechanisms for recruitment of actin nucleators and motors on specific membrane compartments remain unclear. Here we report how Spir actin nucleators and myosin V motors coordinate their specific membrane recruitment. The myosin V globular tail domain (MyoV-GTD) interacts directly with an evolutionarily conserved Spir sequence motif. We determined crystal structures of MyoVa-GTD bound either to the Spir-2 motif or to Rab11 and show that a Spir-2:MyoVa:Rab11 complex can form. The ternary complex architecture explains how Rab11 vesicles support coordinated F-actin nucleation and myosin force generation for vesicle transport and tethering. New insights are also provided into how myosin activation can be coupled with the generation of actin tracks. Since MyoV binds several Rab GTPases, synchronized nucleator and motor targeting could provide a common mechanism to control force generation and motility in different cellular processes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17523.001 PMID:27623148

  8. Vaccination with outer membrane vesicles from Francisella noatunensis reduces development of francisellosis in a zebrafish model.

    PubMed

    Brudal, Espen; Lampe, Elisabeth O; Reubsaet, Léon; Roos, Norbert; Hegna, Ida K; Thrane, Ida Marie; Koppang, Erling O; Winther-Larsen, Hanne C

    2015-01-01

    Infection of fish with the facultative intracellular bacterium Francisella noatunensis remains an unresolved problem for aquaculture industry worldwide as it is difficult to vaccinate against without using live attenuated vaccines. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are biological structures shed by Gram-negative bacteria in response to various environmental stimuli. OMVs have successfully been used to vaccinate against both intracellular and extracellular pathogens, due to an ability to stimulate innate, cell-mediated and humoral immune responses. We show by using atomic force and electron microscopy that the fish pathogenic bacterium F. noatunensis subspecies noatunensis (F.n.n.) shed OMVs both in vitro into culture medium and in vivo in a zebrafish infection model. The main protein constituents of the OMV are IglC, PdpD and PdpA, all known Francisella virulence factors, in addition to the outer membrane protein FopA and the chaperonin GroEL, as analyzed by mass spectrometry. The vesicles, when used as a vaccine, reduced proliferation of the bacterium and protected zebrafish when subsequently challenged with a high dose of F.n.n. without causing adverse effects for the host. Also granulomatous responses were reduced in F.n.n.-challenged zebrafish after OMV vaccination. Taken together, the data support the possible use of OMVs as vaccines against francisellosis in fish. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Characterization of the chloride conductance in porcine renal brush-border membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Krick, W; Dölle, A; Hagos, Y; Burckhardt, G

    1998-02-01

    The chloride conductance in brush-border membrane vesicles prepared from pig kidney cortex was investigated using a light-scattering assay, anion-diffusion-potential-dependent Na+-D-glucose cotransport and 36Cl- influx. K+-diffusion-potential-driven salt exit from, or entry into, the vesicles was slow in the presence of gluconate, SO42- and F-, intermediate with Cl- and Br-, and fast with I-, NO3-, and SCN-. Stimulation of Na+-D-glucose uptake followed a similar anion sequence. Conductive Cl- flux had a low activation energy and was inhibited by suphhydryl reagents, the stilbene disulphonates 4-acetamido-4'-isothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulphonate (SITS) and 4, 4'-diisothiocyanato-2,2'-