Science.gov

Sample records for basolateral membrane vesicles

  1. Sugar uptake by intestinal basolateral membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Wright, E M; van Os, C H; Mircheff, A K

    1980-03-27

    A high yield of membrane vesicles was prepared from the basolateral surface of rat intestinal cells using an N2 cavitation bomb and density gradient centrifugation. The membranes were enriched 10-fold and were free of significatn contamination by brush border membranes and mitochondria. The rate of D-E114C]glucose and L-E13H]glucose uptake into the vesicle was measured using a rapid filtration technique. D-Glucose equilibrated within the vesicles with a half-time 1/25th that for L-glucose. The stereospecific uptake exhibited saturation kinetics with a Km of approx. 44 mM and a V of approx. 110 nmol . mg-1 min-1 at 10 degrees C. The activation energy for the process was 14 kcal . mol-1 below 15 degrees C and it approached 3 kcal . mol-1 above 22 degrees C. Carrier-mediated uptake was eliminated in the presence of 1 mM HgCl2 and 0.5 mM phloretin. The rate of transport was unaffected by the absence or presence of sodium concentration gradients. Competition studies demonstrated that all sugars with the D-glucose pyranose ring chair conformation shared the transport system, and that, with the possible exception of the -OH group at carbon No. 1, there were no specific requirements for an equatorial -OH group at any position in the pyranose ring. In the case of alpha-methyl-D-glucoside its inability to share the D-glucose transport system may be due to steric hindrance posed by the -OCH3 group rather than by a specific requirement for a free hydroxyl group at the position in the ring. It is concluded that sugars are transported across the basolateral membrane of the intestinal epithelium by a facilitated diffusion system reminiscent of that in human red blood cells.

  2. Mechanisms of calcium transport in human colonic basolateral membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Saksena, Seema; Ammar, Mohammad S; Tyagi, Sangeeta; Elsharydah, Ahmed; Gill, Ravinder K; Ramaswamy, Krishnamurthy; Dudeja, Pradeep K

    2002-10-01

    Human colon has been suggested to play an important role in calcium absorption especially after extensive disease or resection of the small intestine. We have previously demonstrated the presence of a carrier-mediated calcium uptake mechanism in the human colonic luminal membrane vesicles. Current studies were, therefore, undertaken to investigate the mechanism(s) of calcium exit across the basolateral membrane domain of the human colon. Human colonic basolateral membrane vesicles (BLMVs) were isolated and purified from mucosal scrapings of organ donor colons, utilizing a technique developed in our laboratory. 45Ca uptake was measured by a rapid filtration technique. 45Ca uptake represented transport into the intravesicular space as evidenced by an osmolarity study and by the demonstration of Ca2' efflux from calcium preloaded vesicles by Ca2+ ionophore A23187. Calcium uptake was stimulated by Mg2+ ATP. The kinetic parameters for ATP-dependent Ca2+ uptake revealed saturation kinetics with Michaelis constant (Km) of 0.22 +/- 0.04 microM and a maximum rate of uptake (Vmax) of 0.38 +/- 0.12 nmol/mg protein/min. The Km of ATP concentration required for half maximal Ca2+ uptake was 0.39 +/- 0.04 mM. ATP-stimulated calcium uptake into these vesicles was further stimulated in the presence of calmodulin and was inhibited by calmodulin antagonist, trifluoperazine. Uptake of 45Ca into BLMVs was markedly inhibited by cis-Na+ but was significantly stimulated by trans-Na+ (40-50% stimulation). Our results demonstrate the presence of a Mg2+/ATP-dependent calmodulin-regulated Ca2+ transport system and a Na+-Ca2+ exchange process in the human colonic basolateral membranes.

  3. Phosphate transport by rat intestinal basolateral-membrane vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Ghishan, F K; Kikuchi, K; Arab, N

    1987-01-01

    The characteristics of phosphate transport across intestinal basolateral membranes of the rat were determined by using enriched preparations in which uphill Na+-dependent D-glucose transport could not be demonstrated, but ATP-dependent Ca2+ transport was present. Phosphate transport was saturable, Na+-dependent and exhibited Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Vmax. was 51.1 +/- 4.2 pmol/10 s per mg of protein and Km was 14 +/- 3.9 microM. The transport process was electroneutral. Tracer-exchange experiments and counter-transport studies confirmed the presence of a Na+-Pi carrier at the basolateral membrane. The presence of inside-positive membrane potential did not enhance phosphate uptake, indicating that the Na+ effect is secondary to the presence of the Na+-Pi carrier rather than an induction of positive membrane potential. The stoichiometry of this carrier at pH 7.4 was 2 Na+:1 phosphate, as shown by direct studies utilizing the static-head method. These studies are the first to determine the presence of a phosphate carrier at the basolateral membrane. PMID:3663094

  4. Calcium uptake by brush-border and basolateral membrane vesicles in chick duodenum

    SciTech Connect

    Takito, J.; Shinki, T.; Sasaki, T.; Suda, T. )

    1990-01-01

    Calcium uptake was compared between duodenal brush-border membrane vesicles (BBMV) and basolateral membrane vesicles (BLMV) isolated from vitamin D-deficient chicks and those injected with 625 ng of 1 alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1 alpha,25(OH)2D3). The uptake by BBMV in the 1 alpha,25-(OH)2D3-treated birds attained a maximum (280% of the control) at 12 h and was maintained at an elevated level (210%) at 24 h after the injection of the vitamin. In contrast, ATP-dependent calcium uptake by BLMV reached a maximum (185% of the control) at 6 h and decreased to the control level at 24 h. The kinetic analysis revealed that 1 alpha,25(OH)2D3 increased Vmax values without any changes in apparent Km values in both BBMV and BLMV. The activity of ATP-dependent calcium uptake was localized exclusively in the basolateral membrane, and the activity was inhibited by vanadate (IC50, 1 microM), but not by oligomycin, theophylline, calmodulin, trifluoperazine, or calbindin D28K. These results indicate that calcium transport through both the brush-border and basolateral membranes is involved in the 1 alpha,25(OH)2D3-dependent intestinal calcium absorption. The initiation of calcium absorption by 1 alpha,25(OH)2D3 appears to be due to an increase in the rate of calcium efflux at the basolateral membrane rather than the rate at the brush-border membrane.

  5. A carrier-mediated transport for folate in basolateral membrane vesicles of rat small intestine.

    PubMed Central

    Said, H M; Redha, R

    1987-01-01

    The mechanism of exit of folate from the enterocyte, i.e. transport across the basolateral membrane, is not known. In this study we examined, using basolateral membrane vesicles, the transport of folic acid across the basolateral membrane of rat intestine. Uptake of folic acid by these vesicles represents transport of the substrate into the intravesicular compartment and not binding to the membrane surface. The rate of folic acid transport was linear for the first 1 min of incubation but decreased thereafter, reaching equilibrium after 5 min of incubation. The transport of folic acid was: (1) saturable as a function of concentration with an apparent Km of 0.6 +/- 0.17 microM and Vmax. of 1.01 +/- 0.11 pmol/30 s per mg of protein; (2) inhibited in a competitive manner by the structural analogues 5-methyltetrahydrofolate and methotrexate (Ki = 2 and 1.4 microM, respectively); (4) electroneutral; (5) Na+-independent; (6) sensitive to the effect of the anion exchange inhibitor 4,4'-di-isothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid (DIDS). These data indicate the existence of a carrier-mediated transport system for folic acid in rat intestinal basolateral membrane and demonstrate that the transport process is electroneutral, Na+-independent and sensitive to the effect of anion exchange inhibition. PMID:3689340

  6. 65Zn2+ transport by lobster hepato-pancreatic baso-lateral membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Capo, J A; Mandal, P K; Eyyunni, S; Ahearn, G A

    2005-01-01

    The lobster (Homarus americanus) hepato-pancreatic epithelial baso-lateral cell membrane possesses three transport proteins that transfer calcium between the cytoplasm and hemolymph: an ATP-dependent calcium ATPase, a sodium-calcium exchanger, and a verapamil-sensitive cation channel. We used standard centrifugation methods to prepare purified hepato-pancreatic baso-lateral membrane vesicles and a rapid filtration procedure to investigate whether (65)Zn(2+) transfer across this epithelial cell border occurs by any of these previously described transporters for calcium. Baso-lateral membrane vesicles were osmotically reactive and exhibited a time course of uptake that was linear for 10-15 s and approached equilibrium by 120 s. In the absence of sodium, (65)Zn(2+) influx was a hyperbolic function of external zinc concentration and followed the Michaelis-Menten equation for carrier transport. This carrier transport was stimulated by the addition of 150 microM ATP (increase in K(m) and J(max)) and inhibited by the simultaneous presence of 150 micromol l(-1) ATP+250 micromol l(-1) vanadate (decrease in both K(m) and J(max)). In the absence of ATP, (65)Zn(2+) influx was a sigmoidal function of preloaded vesicular sodium concentration (0, 5, 10, 20, 30, 45, and 75 mmol l(-1)) and exhibited a Hill Coefficient of 4.03+/-1.14, consistent with the exchange of 3 Na(+)/1Zn(2+). Using Dixon analysis, calcium was shown to be a competitive inhibitor of baso-lateral membrane vesicle (65)Zn(2+) influx by both the ATP-dependent (K(i)=205 nmol l(-1) Ca(2+)) and sodium-dependent (K(i)=2.47 micromol l(-1) Ca(2+)) transport processes. These results suggest that zinc transport across the lobster hepato-pancreatic baso-lateral membrane largely occurred by the ATP-dependent calcium ATPase and sodium-calcium exchanger carrier proteins.

  7. Mechanisms of transport of nontransferrin-bound iron in basolateral and canalicular rat liver plasma membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, T.L.; Lake, J.R. )

    1990-09-01

    Although most iron in plasma is bound to transferrin, recent evidence suggests that the nontransferrin-bound fraction contributes to hepatic iron loading and toxicity seen in iron-overload disorders. Our studies of isolated perfused rat liver previously demonstrated saturable uptake of nontransferrin-bound iron that continues despite hepatic iron overload. To further characterize the mechanism of transport of this form of iron, we measured binding of 55Fe-labeled ferrous ascorbate to rat liver plasma membrane vesicles under varying conditions. Binding of 5 mumol/L iron by both basolateral and canalicular membranes was time-dependent and linear for the first 5 sec. Initial rate of binding of ferrous ascorbate to basolateral membrane vesicles was temperature dependent and increased by calcium but, in contrast to the perfused rat liver, was not inhibited by other divalent cations. Binding velocities by basolateral membrane vesicles were saturable at increasing iron concentration (Km = 33 mumol/L, Vmax = 16 pmol/mg protein/sec). Ferrous iron binding by canalicular membrane vesicles was also temperature dependent, but initial association rates were not saturable over the concentration range studied (2 to 20 mumol/L). We conclude that nontransferrin-bound iron associates with basolateral liver plasma membrane vesicles by a saturable mechanism sensitive to temperature and calcium and consistent with a membrane carrier. Other divalent cations do not inhibit membrane association but may compete for a subsequent cytosolic binding site.

  8. Proton-stimulated Cl-HCO/sub 3/ antiport by basolateral membrane vesicles of lobster hepatopancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Ahearn, G.A.; Grover, M.L.; Tsuji, R.T.; Clay, L.P.

    1987-05-01

    Purified epithelial basolateral membrane vesicles were prepared from lobster hepatopancreas by sorbitol gradient centrifugation. Na+-K+-adenosinetriphosphatase, alkaline phosphatase, and cytochrome-c oxidase enzyme activities in the final membrane preparation were enriched 9.6-, 1.4-, and 0.4-fold, respectively, compared with their activities in the original tissue homogenate. Vesicle osmotic reactivity was demonstrated using 60-min equilibrium /sup 36/Cl uptake experiments at a variety of transmembrane osmotic gradients. /sup 36/Cl uptake into vesicles preloaded with HCO/sub 3/ was significantly greater than into vesicles lacking HCO/sub 3/. This exchange process was stimulated by a transmembrane proton gradient (internal pH greater than external pH). Proton-gradient-dependent Cl-HCO/sub 3/ exchange was potential sensitive and stimulated by an electrically negative vesicle interior. /sup 36/Cl influx (4-s exposures) into HCO/sub 3/-loaded vesicles occurred by the combination of 4-acetamido-4'-isothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid sensitive, carrier-mediated transfer and apparent diffusion. /sup 36/Cl influx was a hyperbolic function of both internal (HCO/sub 3/) and internal (Cl). The two internal anions displayed a 100-fold difference in apparent affinity constants with HCO/sub 3/ being strongly preferred. /sup 36/Cl influx was stimulated more by preloaded monovalent than by divalent anions. Na was an inhibitor of proton-dependent anion antiport, whereas K had no effect. A model for HCl-HCO/sub 3/ antiport is suggested that employs combined transmembrane concentration gradients of Cl and HCO/sub 3/ to power anion exchange and transfer protons against a concentration gradient.

  9. Effect of barium ion on p-aminohippurate transport in basolateral membrane vesicles isolated from rat kidney cortex.

    PubMed

    Hori, M; Gemba, M

    1985-06-01

    To clarify the cause of the stimulation of p-aminohippurate (PAH) accumulation in rat kidney cortical slices by barium, an experiment was carried out with basolateral membrane vesicles isolated from rat kidney cortex. The effect of barium on PAH uptake by the membrane vesicles was compared with that of verapamil which also stimulated PAH accumulation in the slices. The enzyme marker for basolateral membrane, (Na+ + K+)- ATPase, was enriched 15-fold and the brushborder enzyme marker, alkaline phosphatase, was 1.3-fold in our membrane preparation. Contamination in this preparation by lysosomes, mitochondria and cytosol was also low but that by endoplasmic reticulum was slightly high as judged by the enzyme markers. PAH uptake by the membrane vesicles possessed the usual characteristics, i.e., sodium-dependence and probenecid-sensitivity. PAH uptake by the membrane vesicles was enhanced by barium, but not by verapamil. On the other hand, barium did not affect tetraethylammonium (TEA) uptake by the vesicles, and verapamil strongly inhibited it. Manganese also stimulated PAH uptake to the same extent as did barium, but calcium and strontium did not affect the uptake. Barium did not act on sodium transport in the membrane vesicles. An 'anion-sensitively transported lipophilic cation', triphenylmethylphosphonium iodide (TPMP), uptake was depressed by barium. These results suggest that barium stimulates selectively PAH uptake in basolateral membrane vesicles. Its stimulatory action may contribute at least partly to an increase in PAH accumulation in rat kidney cortical slices by this ion and may prove useful in an analysis of the mechanism of PAH transport system in renal basolateral membranes.

  10. Electrogenic sulfate uptake by crustacean hepatopancreatic basolateral membrane vesicles. [Homarus americanus

    SciTech Connect

    Cattey, M.A.; Gerencser, G.A.; Aheam, G.A. Univ. of Florida, Gainesville )

    1990-02-26

    Basolateral membrane vesicles (BLMV) were isolated from Atlantic lobster (Homarus americanus) hepatopancreas and purified by discontinuous sucrose gradient centrifugation. BLMV prepared in this fashion were osmotically reactive exhibiting linear dependence of vesicular {sup 35}SO{sub 4}{sup {minus}2} uptake to increasing external osmotic pressure with negligible non-specific isotope binding. Under short circuited conditions (valinomycin/K{sup +}) BLMV responded to either a HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} gradient directed out or equilibrated HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} (10 mM) by displaying short term accumulation of sulfate above that of equilibrium. Uptake of divalent anion was unaffected by an inwardly directed transmembrane Na{sup +} or tetramethylammonium{sup +} gradient. {sup 35}SO{sub 4}{sup {minus}2}/HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} exchange in the presence of valinomycin was stimulated by transient inside positive K{sup +} diffusion potentials and inhibited by transient inside negative K{sup +} diffusion potentials. The role of electrogenic anion exchange by hepatopancreas BLMV in transcellular sulfate transport is discussed.

  11. pH gradient effects on chloride transport across basolateral membrane vesicles from guinea-pig jejunum.

    PubMed Central

    Touzani, K; Alvarado, F; Vasseur, M

    1997-01-01

    1. The effects of alkaline-inside pH gradients on 36Cl- uptake were quantified by using brush-border membrane (BBM) and basolateral membrane (BLM) vesicles from guinea-pig jejunum. 2. With BBM vesicles, a pHo/pHi gradient of 5.0/7.5 yielded fast overshoots involving a random, non-obligatory Cl(-)-H+ symport, strongly inhibited by CCCP. In contrast, BLM vesicles responded to similar pH gradients with much smaller, delayed overshoots, unaffected by CCCP. 3. The initial Cl- entry rates into BLM vesicles were a function of each pHo, pHi and delta pH value. They were stimulated by valinomycin in the presence of inward-directed K+ gradients. Short-circuiting the membrane potential with equilibrated K+ and valinomycin inhibited pH gradient-dependent Cl- uptake, but only partially. 4. Taken together, these results indicate that guinea-pig jejunal BLM vesicles possess both Cl- conductance and Cl(-)-H+ symport activities. 5. Even when different, the BBM and the BLM symporters are mechanistically similar. Neither of them involves a Cl(-)-OH- antiport, nor a simultaneous Cl(-)-anion exchange mechanism. Rather, for each membrane, all of these activities (symport, anion exchange) can be explained in terms of a single mobile carrier acting as a random, non-obligatory Cl(-)-H+ symporter where exchange occurs simply by counterflow. Net Cl- translocation via either the ternary (Cl(-)-C-H+) or the binary (Cl(-)-C) complexes accounts, respectively, for the existence of two, operationally distinct, electroneutral and rheogenic components. 6. The BBM symporter appears to involve an AE2 protein, but the molecular identity of the BLM one remains to be established. PMID:9147326

  12. Structural and functional polarity of canalicular and basolateral plasma membrane vesicles isolated in high yield from rat liver

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    A method has been developed for routine high yield separation of canalicular (cLPM) from basolateral (blLPM) liver plasma membrane vesicles of rat liver. Using a combination of rate zonal floatation (TZ- 28 zonal rotor, Sorvall) and high speed centrifugation through discontinuous sucrose gradients, 9-16 mg of cLPM and 15-28 mg of blLPM protein can be isolated in 1 d. cLPM are free of the basolateral markers Na+/K+-ATPase and glucagon-stimulatable adenylate cyclase activities, but are highly enriched with respect to homogenate in the "canalicular marker" enzyme activities leucylnaphthylamidase (48-fold), gamma-glutamyl-transpeptidase (60-fold), 5'-nucleotidase (64-fold), alkaline phosphatase (71-fold), Mg++-ATPase (83-fold), and alkaline phosphodiesterase I (116-fold). In contrast, blLPM are 34-fold enriched in Na+/K+-ATPase activity, exhibit considerable glucagon-stimulatable adenylate cyclase activity, and demonstrate a 4- to 15-fold increase over homogenate in the various "canalicular markers." cLPM have a twofold higher content of sialic acids, cholesterol; and sphingomyelin compared with blLPM. At least three canalicular-(130,000, 100,000, and 58,000 mol wt) and several basolateral-specific protein bands have been detected after SDS PAGE of the two LPM subfractions. Specifically, the immunoglobin A-binding secretory component is restricted to blLPM as demonstrated by immunochemical techniques. These data indicate virtually complete separation of basolateral from canalicular LPM and demonstrate multiple functional and compositional polarity between the two surface domains of hepatocytes. PMID:6699096

  13. Modulation of Na+/Mg²+ exchanger stoichiometry ratio by Cl⁻ ions in basolateral rat liver plasma membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Cefaratti, C; Romani, A

    2011-05-01

    The Na+/Mg²+ exchanger represents the main Mg²+ extrusion mechanism operating in mammalian cells including hepatocytes. We have previously reported that this exchanger, located in the basolateral domain of the hepatocyte, promotes the extrusion of intravesicular trapped Mg²+ for extravesicular Na+ with ratio 1. This electrogenic exchange is supported by the accumulation of tetraphenyl-phosphonium within the vesicles at the time when Mg²+ efflux occurs. In this present study, the role of extra- and intra-vesicular Cl⁻ on the Na+/Mg²+ exchange ratio was investigated. The results reported here suggest that Cl⁻ ions are not required for the Na+ to Mg²+ exchange to occur, but the stoichiometry ratio of the exchanger switches from electrogenic (1Na(in)+ :1Mg(out)²+) in the presence of intravesicular Cl⁻ to electroneutral (2Na(in)+ :1 Mg(out)²+) in their absence. In basolateral liver plasma membrane vesicles loaded with MgCl₂ labeled with ³⁶Cl⁻, a small but significant Cl⁻ efflux (~30 nmol Cl⁻/mg protein/1 min) is observed following addition of NaCl or Na-isethionate to the extravesicular medium. Both Cl⁻ and Mg²+ effluxes are inhibited by imipramine but not by amiloride, DIDS, niflumic acid, bumetanide, or furosemide. In vesicles loaded with Mg-gluconate and stimulated by Na-isethionate, an electroneutral Mg²+ extrusion is observed. Taken together, these results suggest that the Na+/Mg²+ exchanger can operate irrespective of the absence or the presence of Cl⁻ in the extracellular or intracellular environment. Changes in trans-cellular Cl⁻ content, however, can affect the modus operandi of the Na+/Mg²+ exchanger, and consequently impact "cellular" Na+ and Mg²+ homeostasis as well as the hepatocyte membrane potential.

  14. Calcium transport by rat duodenal villus and crypt basolateral membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, J.R.F.; Weiser, M.M.

    1987-02-01

    Rat duodenal cells were isolated sequentially to give fractions enriched for villus and crypt cells. From each of these fractions, basolateral-enriched membrane vesicles were prepared and ATP-dependent calcium uptake was studied. Calcium uptake was sensitive to temperature, was inhibited by vanadate and by A23187, and was lower in vitamin D-deficient animals. In normal animals, (UVCa)-transport was approximately twofold greater in villus-tip than in crypt cell-fraction basolateral membranes though the affinity of the uptake for calcium was similar (K/sub m/ = 0.3 M). In vitamin D-deficient animals, the crypt-to-villus gradient was reduced, and in all fractions, calcium transport was similar to or lower than that in the crypts of normal animals. Six hours after vitamin D-deficient animals were repleted with 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol, a significant increase in calcium transport by everted gut sacs was present; however, basolateral calcium transport was significantly increased in only the mid-villus fractions, and no change was seen in the villus-tip fractions. Thus vitamin D appears necessary for the development of increased basolateral membrane calcium pump activity in duodenal villus cells, but not all cells in vitamin D-deficient rats are able to respond to 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol.

  15. Purification of basolateral integral membrane proteins by cationic colloidal silica-based apical membrane subtraction.

    PubMed

    Goode, Robert J A; Simpson, Richard J

    2009-01-01

    Epithelial cell polarity mediates many essential biological functions and perturbation of the apical/basolateral divide is a hallmark of epithelial to mesenchymal transition in carcinoma. Therefore, correct targeting of proteins to the apical and basolateral surfaces is essential to proper epithelial cell function. However, proteomic characterisation of apical/basolateral sorting has been largely ignored, due to ineffectual separation techniques and contamination of plasma-membrane preparations with housekeeping proteins. Here we describe a method that strips the apical membrane from the adherent cells and releases the intracellular contents, thereby leaving the basolateral membrane available for stringent washes and collection. Analysis of the basolateral membrane of an adherent colon adenocarcinoma cell line resulted in 66% of identified proteins being integral membrane proteins, which possessed either a transmembrane domain or lipid modification, including 35 CD antigens. Based on the abundance of peptides from basolateral marker proteins, this method efficiently captures basolateral integral membrane proteins, with minimal contamination from other membranes and basic proteins.

  16. Rotavirus interaction with isolated membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, M C; Alonso-Torre, S R; Charpilienne, A; Vasseur, M; Michelangeli, F; Cohen, J; Alvarado, F

    1994-06-01

    To gain information about the mechanism of epithelial cell infection by rotavirus, we studied the interaction of bovine rotavirus, RF strain, with isolated membrane vesicles from apical membrane of pig enterocytes. Vesicles were charged with high (quenching) concentrations of either carboxyfluorescein or calcein, and the rate of fluorophore release (dequenching) was monitored as a function of time after mixing with purified virus particles. Purified single-shelled particles and untrypsinized double-shelled ones had no effect. Trypsinized double-shelled virions induced carboxyfluorescein release according to sigmoid curves whose lag period and amplitude were a function of virus concentration and depended on both temperature and pH. The presence of 100 mM salts (Tris Cl, NaCl, or KCl) was required, since there was no reaction in isoosmotic salt-free sorbitol media. Other membrane vesicle preparations such as apical membranes of piglet enterocyte and rat placenta syncytiotrophoblasts, basolateral membranes of pig enterocytes, and the undifferentiated plasma membrane of cultured MA104 cells all gave qualitatively similar responses. Inhibition by a specific monoclonal antibody suggests that the active species causing carboxyfluorescein release is VP5*. Ca2+ (1 mM), but not Mg2+, inhibited the reaction. In situ solubilization of the outer capsid of trypsinized double-shelled particles changed release kinetics from sigmoidal to hyperbolic and was not inhibited by Ca2+. Our results indicate that membrane destabilization caused by trypsinized outer capsid proteins of rotavirus leads to fluorophore release. From the data presented here, a hypothetical model of the interaction of the various states of the viral particles with the membrane lipid phase is proposed. Membrane permeabilization induced by rotavirus may be related to the mechanism of entry of the virus into the host cell.

  17. Cortisol-sensitive urea transport across the gill basolateral membrane of the gulf toadfish (Opsanus beta).

    PubMed

    Rodela, Tamara M; Gilmour, Kathleen M; Walsh, Patrick J; McDonald, M Danielle

    2009-08-01

    Gulf toadfish (Opsanus beta) use a unique pulsatile urea excretion mechanism that allows urea to be voided in large pulses via the periodic insertion or activation of a branchial urea transporter. The precise cellular and subcellular location of the facilitated diffusion mechanism(s) remains unclear. An in vitro basolateral membrane vesicle (BLMV) preparation was used to test the hypothesis that urea movement across the gill basolateral membrane occurs through a cortisol-sensitive carrier-mediated mechanism. Toadfish BLMVs demonstrated two components of urea uptake: a linear element at high external urea concentrations, and a phloretin-sensitive saturable constituent (K(m) = 0.24 mmol/l; V(max) = 6.95 micromol x mg protein(-1) x h(-1)) at low urea concentrations (<1 mmol/l). BLMV urea transport in toadfish was unaffected by in vitro treatment with ouabain, N-ethylmaleimide, or the absence of sodium, conditions that are known to inhibit sodium-coupled and proton-coupled urea transport in vertebrates. Transport kinetics were temperature sensitive with a Q(10) > 2, further suggestive of carrier-mediated processes. Our data provide evidence that a basolateral urea facilitated transporter accelerates the movement of urea between the plasma and gills to enable the pulsatile excretion of urea. Furthermore, in vivo infusion of cortisol caused a significant 4.3-fold reduction in BLMV urea transport capacity in lab-crowded fish, suggesting that cortisol inhibits the recruitment of urea transporters to the basolateral membrane, which may ultimately affect the size of the urea pulse event in gulf toadfish.

  18. Vesicle membrane fluctuations at nm resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kejia; Bae, Sung Chul; Min, Chang-Ki; Granick, Steve; Granick Group Team

    2011-03-01

    We measure membrane thermal fluctuations with nanometer spatial resolution and microsecond time resolution, extending a scattering technique used at the Curie Institute to study red blood cell dynamics (Timo Betz et al., Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA 106, 15320, 2009). A laser beam is focused at the leading edge of a phospholipid vesicle membrane and the forward scattered light is detected by a quadrant photodiode. The measurements over 4 orders of magnitude of frequency allow quantification of more complete fluctuation spectra than competing methods, and therefore fuller understanding of the vesicle membrane mechanics. As a proof of concept, we quantify how adsorbed nanoparticles stiffen giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs).

  19. Vesicle trafficking and cell surface membrane patchiness.

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Q; Edidin, M

    2001-01-01

    Membrane proteins and lipids often appear to be distributed in patches on the cell surface. These patches are often assumed to be membrane domains, arising from specific molecular associations. However, a computer simulation (Gheber and Edidin, 1999) shows that membrane patchiness may result from a combination of vesicle trafficking and dynamic barriers to lateral mobility. The simulation predicts that the steady-state patches of proteins and lipids seen on the cell surface will decay if vesicle trafficking is inhibited. To test this prediction, we compared the apparent sizes and intensities of patches of class I HLA molecules, integral membrane proteins, before and after inhibiting endocytic vesicle traffic from the cell surface, either by incubation in hypertonic medium or by expression of a dominant-negative mutant dynamin. As predicted by the simulation, the apparent sizes of HLA patches increased, whereas their intensities decreased after endocytosis and vesicle trafficking were inhibited. PMID:11423406

  20. The coupled movements of sodium and chloride across the basolateral membrane of frog skin epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, P L; Ferreira, H G; Ferreira, K T

    1989-01-01

    1. When frog skin epithelium was exposed to a chloride-free solution bathing the basolateral side of the frog skin preparation the short-circuit current fell and there was a simultaneous loss of chloride and water from its cells. This effect was partially blocked by furosemide when this drug was added to the basolateral bathing solution. 2. Under control conditions and when added to the solution bathing the basolateral side of the preparation furosemide had no effect on the ion and water contents of the frog skin epithelium. 3. Furosemide but not SITS (4-acetamide-4'-isothiocyanate-stilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid) or amiloride blocked the recovery of short-circuit current and the reuptake of chloride and water by preparations pre-incubated with chloride-free solution on the basolateral side. The recovery of the short-circuit current was also blocked by the replacement of basolateral potassium by sodium. 4. The effect on the short-circuit current of graded replacements by impermeant ions of sodium or chloride did not show saturation for concentrations of these ions up to their control values. 5. Replacement of basolateral potassium by sodium inhibited the short-circuit current and the recovery observed when potassium was reintroduced in the basolateral bathing solution was blocked by furosemide. 6. The replacement of basolateral sodium or chloride by impermeant ions induced an immediate fall in the intracellular concentrations of both sodium and chloride suggesting that the transport system coupling the movements of the two ions across the basolateral membrane is operative under control conditions. 7. It is proposed that the coupled movements of sodium and chloride across the basolateral membrane of the frog skin epithelium are mediated by a sodium-potassium-2 chloride co-transport system which under control conditions is very near equilibrium. PMID:2607456

  1. Toroidal membrane vesicles in spherical confinement.

    PubMed

    Bouzar, Lila; Menas, Ferhat; Müller, Martin Michael

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the morphology of a toroidal fluid membrane vesicle confined inside a spherical container. The equilibrium shapes are assembled in a geometrical phase diagram as a function of scaled area and reduced volume of the membrane. For small area the vesicle can adopt its free form. When increasing the area, the membrane cannot avoid contact and touches the confining sphere along a circular contact line, which extends to a zone of contact for higher area. The elastic energies of the equilibrium shapes are compared to those of their confined counterparts of spherical topology to predict under which conditions a topology change is favored energetically.

  2. Toroidal membrane vesicles in spherical confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouzar, Lila; Menas, Ferhat; Müller, Martin Michael

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the morphology of a toroidal fluid membrane vesicle confined inside a spherical container. The equilibrium shapes are assembled in a geometrical phase diagram as a function of scaled area and reduced volume of the membrane. For small area the vesicle can adopt its free form. When increasing the area, the membrane cannot avoid contact and touches the confining sphere along a circular contact line, which extends to a zone of contact for higher area. The elastic energies of the equilibrium shapes are compared to those of their confined counterparts of spherical topology to predict under which conditions a topology change is favored energetically.

  3. Characterization of a voltage-dependent conductance in the basolateral membrane of leech skin epithelium.

    PubMed

    Schnizler, M; Clauss, W

    1998-05-01

    Voltage clamp studies were performed on the dorsal integument of Hirudo medicinalis. Under apical calcium-free conditions an inward-directed component of transepithelial current was activated by changes of transepithelial voltage. Depolarization caused up to 50% increase of the transepithelial sodium current. Hyperpolarization had no comparable effects. With calcium (1.8 mM) or amiloride (100 microM) in the apical solution and in sodium-free solutions the inward-directed current failed to increase after depolarization. Activation also occurred under chloride-free conditions. Permeabilization of the apical membrane by nystatin (5 microM) increased the current activation significantly. After nystatin, calcium as well as amiloride lost their inhibitory effects. This indicates a basolateral localization of the voltage-dependent conductance. Vesicle insertion or cytoskeletal structures are probably not involved in regulation, as seen by the lack of effects of brefeldin A and the cytochalasins B and D. However, serosal hyposmolar solutions (170 mosmol.1(-1)) caused a reinforced activation of the current. Our results indicate a voltage-dependent conductance in a tight sodium-absorbing epithelium.

  4. Carrier-mediated concentrative urate transport in rat renal membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Abramson, R G; Lipkowitz, M S

    1985-04-01

    [2-14C]Urate uptake and efflux were studied in brush border and basolateral membrane vesicles of rat renal cortex that were exposed to 20 microM copper chloride. In the presence of inwardly directed NaCl gradients urate uptake was maintained at levels in excess of chemical equilibrium. Comparison of glucose and chloride uptakes revealed that equilibrium glucose uptake was not affected by copper, but chloride failed to reach equilibrium in copper-exposed vesicles. It is suggested that the persistence of an electrolyte gradient could provide a driving force to raise the concentration of free intravesicular urate above that in the media. Preincubation of vesicles with unlabeled urate failed to diminish uptake of added urate; rather, urate uptake was trans stimulated. Uptake of labeled urate was also significantly accelerated when an outward gradient for unlabeled urate was created. Pyrazinoic and oxonic acids also trans stimulated urate uptake. The demonstration of accelerated homeo- and heteroexchange diffusion indicates that transport is carrier mediated in both brush border and basolateral vesicles. Outwardly directed hydroxyl gradients failed to influence urate uptake in either the presence or absence of copper or NaCl. Thus, this carrier, which is active only in the presence of trace amounts of copper, is distinct from a urate/anion exchanger.

  5. Carotenoids in DPPC vesicles: membrane dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socaciu, Carmen; Lausch, Carsten; Diehl, Horst A.

    1999-09-01

    Incorporation of carotenoids into membranes is supposed to change their physical properties with consequences to signal transduction and membrane protein activities. Here the physical parameters membrane fluidity, micropolarity and anisotropy are considered and measured in multilamellar and unilamellar vesicles of dipalmitoylphosphatidyicholine (DPPC) after incorporation of 1, 2.5 and 5 mol% β-carotene, lutein, zeaxanthin, canthaxanthin, or astaxhanthin using 4 mol% pyrene or 1 μM 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) as fluorescent labels. Contrary to other investigations, no significant change in membrane fluidity (as evaluated by the pyrene excimer method) can be found. But a change of micropolarity in the pyrene label environment is obtained from the pyrene monomer fluorescence emission fine structure after incorporation of carotenoids. The membrane anisotropy is enhanced significantly only by those carotenoids which incorporate worst into the membrane. This leads to the hypothesis that carotenoid incorporation into membranes is governed not only by carotenoid polarity hut also by their ability to change membrane anisotropy.

  6. Ba2+-inhibitable /sup 86/Rb+ fluxes across membranes of vesicles from toad urinary bladder

    SciTech Connect

    Garty, H.; Civan, M.M.

    1987-01-01

    /sup 86/Rb+ fluxes have been measured in suspensions of vesicles prepared from the epithelium of toad urinary bladder. A readily measurable barium-sensitive, ouabain-insensitive component has been identified; the concentration of external Ba2+ required for half-maximal inhibition was 0.6 mM. The effects of externally added cations on /sup 86/Rb+ influx and efflux have established that this pathway is conductive, with a selectivity for K+, Rb+ and Cs+ over Na+ and Li+. The Rb+ uptake is inversely dependent on external pH, but not significantly affected by internal Ca2+ or external amiloride, quinine, quinidine or lidocaine. It is likely, albeit not yet certain, that the conductive Rb+ pathway is incorporated in basolateral vesicles oriented right-side-out. It is also not yet clear whether this pathway comprises the principle basolateral K+ channel in vivo, and that its properties have been unchanged during the preparative procedures. Subject to these caveats, the data suggest that the inhibition by quinidine of Na+ transport across toad bladder does not arise primarily from membrane depolarization produced by a direct blockage of the basolateral channels. It now seems more likely that the quinidine-induced elevation of intracellular Ca2+ activity directly blocks apical Na+ entry.

  7. Active and passive Na+ fluxes across the basolateral membrane of rabbit urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Eaton, D C; Frace, A M; Silverthorn, S U

    1982-01-01

    The apical membrane of rabbit urinary bladder can be functionally removed by application of nystatin at high concentration if the mucosal surface of the tissue is bathed in a saline which mimics intracellular ion concentrations. Under these conditions, the tissue is as far as the movement of univalent ions no more than a sheet of basolateral membrane with some tight junctional membrane in parallel. In this manner the Na+ concentration at the inner surface of the basolateral membrane can be varied by altering the concentration in the mucosal bulk solution. When this was done both mucosal-to-serosal 22Na flux and net change in basolateral current were measured. The flux and the current could be further divided into the components of each that were either blocked by ouabain or insensitive to ouabain. Ouabain-insensitive mucosal-to-serosal Na+ flux was a linear function of mucosal Na+ concentration. Ouabain-sensitive Na+ flux and ouabain-sensitive, Na+-induced current both display a saturating relationship which cannot be accounted for by the presence of unstirred layers. If the interaction of Na+ with the basolateral transport process is assumed to involve the interaction of some number of Na+ ions, n, with a maximal flux, MMAX, then the data can be fit by assuming 3.2 equivalent sites for interaction and a value for MMAX of 287.8 pM cm-2 sec-1 with an intracellular Na concentration of 2.0 mM Na+ at half-maximal saturation. By comparing these values with the ouabain-sensitive, Na+-induced current, we calculate a Na+ to K+ coupling ratio of 1.40 +/- 0.07 for the transport process.

  8. Phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate regulates the formation of the basolateral plasma membrane in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gassama-Diagne, Ama; Yu, Wei; ter Beest, Martin; Martin-Belmonte, Fernando; Kierbel, Arlinet; Engel, Joanne; Mostov, Keith

    2006-09-01

    Polarity is a central feature of eukaryotic cells and phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PtdIns(3,4,5)P3) has a central role in the polarization of neurons and chemotaxing cells. In polarized epithelial cells, PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 is stably localized at the basolateral plasma membrane, but excluded from the apical plasma membrane, as shown by localization of GFP fused to the PtdIns(3,4,5)P3-binding pleckstrin-homology domain of Akt (GFP-PH-Akt), a fusion protein that indicates the location of PtdIns(3,4,5)P3. Here, we ectopically inserted exogenous PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 into the apical plasma membrane of polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. Within 5 min many cells formed protrusions that extended above the apical surface. These protrusions contained basolateral plasma membrane proteins and excluded apical proteins, indicating that their plasma membrane was transformed from apical to basolateral. Addition of PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 to the basolateral surface of MDCK cells grown as cysts caused basolateral protrusions. MDCK cells grown in the presence of a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor had abnormally short lateral surfaces, indicating that PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 regulates the formation of the basolateral surface.

  9. EGFR controls IQGAP basolateral membrane localization and mitotic spindle orientation during epithelial morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bañón-Rodríguez, Inmaculada; Gálvez-Santisteban, Manuel; Vergarajauregui, Silvia; Bosch, Minerva; Borreguero-Pascual, Arantxa; Martín-Belmonte, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Establishing the correct orientation of the mitotic spindle is an essential step in epithelial cell division in order to ensure that epithelial tubules form correctly during organ development and regeneration. While recent findings have identified some of the molecular mechanisms that underlie spindle orientation, many aspects of this process remain poorly understood. Here, we have used the 3D-MDCK model system to demonstrate a key role for a newly identified protein complex formed by IQGAP1 and the epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR) in controlling the orientation of the mitotic spindle. IQGAP1 is a scaffolding protein that regulates many cellular pathways, from cell-cell adhesion to microtubule organization, and its localization in the basolateral membrane ensures correct spindle orientation. Through its IQ motifs, IQGAP1 binds to EGFR, which is responsible for maintaining IQGAP1 in the basolateral membrane domain. Silencing IQGAP1, or disrupting the basolateral localization of either IQGAP1 or EGFR, results in a non-polarized distribution of NuMA, mitotic spindle misorientation and defects in single lumen formation. PMID:24421325

  10. Proteomics of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Outer Membrane Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Kieselbach, Thomas; Zijnge, Vincent; Granström, Elisabeth; Oscarsson, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an oral and systemic pathogen associated with aggressive forms of periodontitis and with endocarditis. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) released by this species have been demonstrated to deliver effector proteins such as cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) and leukotoxin (LtxA) into human host cells and to act as triggers of innate immunity upon carriage of NOD1- and NOD2-active pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). To improve our understanding of the pathogenicity-associated functions that A. actinomycetemcomitans exports via OMVs, we studied the proteome of density gradient-purified OMVs from a rough-colony type clinical isolate, strain 173 (serotype e) using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). This analysis yielded the identification of 151 proteins, which were found in at least three out of four independent experiments. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002509. Through this study, we not only confirmed the vesicle-associated release of LtxA, and the presence of proteins, which are known to act as immunoreactive antigens in the human host, but we also identified numerous additional putative virulence-related proteins in the A. actinomycetemcomitans OMV proteome. The known and putative functions of these proteins include immune evasion, drug targeting, and iron/nutrient acquisition. In summary, our findings are consistent with an OMV-associated proteome that exhibits several offensive and defensive functions, and they provide a comprehensive basis to further disclose roles of A. actinomycetemcomitans OMVs in periodontal and systemic disease.

  11. Bacterial outer membrane vesicles and vaccine applications.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Reinaldo; Fernández, Sonsire; Zayas, Caridad; Acosta, Armando; Sarmiento, Maria Elena; Ferro, Valerie A; Rosenqvist, Einar; Campa, Concepcion; Cardoso, Daniel; Garcia, Luis; Perez, Jose Luis

    2014-01-01

    Vaccines based on outer membrane vesicles (OMV) were developed more than 20 years ago against Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B. These nano-sized structures exhibit remarkable potential for immunomodulation of immune responses and delivery of meningococcal antigens or unrelated antigens incorporated into the vesicle structure. This paper reviews different applications in OMV Research and Development (R&D) and provides examples of OMV developed and evaluated at the Finlay Institute in Cuba. A Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) process was developed at the Finlay Institute to produce OMV from N. meningitidis serogroup B (dOMVB) using detergent extraction. Subsequently, OMV from N. meningitidis, serogroup A (dOMVA), serogroup W (dOMVW), and serogroup X (dOMVX) were obtained using this process. More recently, the extraction process has also been applied effectively for obtaining OMV on a research scale from Vibrio cholerae (dOMVC), Bordetella pertussis (dOMVBP), Mycobacterium smegmatis (dOMVSM), and BCG (dOMVBCG). The immunogenicity of the OMV has been evaluated for specific antibody induction, and together with functional bactericidal and challenge assays in mice has shown their protective potential. dOMVB has been evaluated with non-neisserial antigens, including with a herpes virus type 2 glycoprotein, ovalbumin, and allergens. In conclusion, OMV are proving to be more versatile than first conceived and remain an important technology for development of vaccine candidates.

  12. Bacterial Outer Membrane Vesicles and Vaccine Applications

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo, Reinaldo; Fernández, Sonsire; Zayas, Caridad; Acosta, Armando; Sarmiento, Maria Elena; Ferro, Valerie A.; Rosenqvist, Einar; Campa, Concepcion; Cardoso, Daniel; Garcia, Luis; Perez, Jose Luis

    2014-01-01

    Vaccines based on outer membrane vesicles (OMV) were developed more than 20 years ago against Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B. These nano-sized structures exhibit remarkable potential for immunomodulation of immune responses and delivery of meningococcal antigens or unrelated antigens incorporated into the vesicle structure. This paper reviews different applications in OMV Research and Development (R&D) and provides examples of OMV developed and evaluated at the Finlay Institute in Cuba. A Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) process was developed at the Finlay Institute to produce OMV from N. meningitidis serogroup B (dOMVB) using detergent extraction. Subsequently, OMV from N. meningitidis, serogroup A (dOMVA), serogroup W (dOMVW), and serogroup X (dOMVX) were obtained using this process. More recently, the extraction process has also been applied effectively for obtaining OMV on a research scale from Vibrio cholerae (dOMVC), Bordetella pertussis (dOMVBP), Mycobacterium smegmatis (dOMVSM), and BCG (dOMVBCG). The immunogenicity of the OMV has been evaluated for specific antibody induction, and together with functional bactericidal and challenge assays in mice has shown their protective potential. dOMVB has been evaluated with non-neisserial antigens, including with a herpes virus type 2 glycoprotein, ovalbumin, and allergens. In conclusion, OMV are proving to be more versatile than first conceived and remain an important technology for development of vaccine candidates. PMID:24715891

  13. Membrane-associated aquaporin-1 facilitates osmotically driven water flux across the basolateral membrane of the thick ascending limb

    PubMed Central

    Cabral, Pablo D.

    2012-01-01

    The thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle (TAL) reabsorbs ∼30% of filtered NaCl but is impermeable to water. The observation that little water traverses the TAL indicates an absence of water channels at the apical membrane. Yet TAL cells swell when peritubular osmolality decreases indicating that water channels must be present in the basolateral side. Consequently, we hypothesized that the water channel aquaporin-1 (AQP1) facilitates water flux across the basolateral membrane of TALs. Western blotting revealed AQP1 expression in microdissected rat and mouse TALs. Double immunofluorescence showed that 95 ± 2% of tubules positive for the TAL-specific marker Tamm-Horsfall protein were also positive for AQP1 (n = 6). RT-PCR was used to demonstrate presence of AQP1 mRNA and the TAL-specific marker NKCC2 in microdissected TALs. Cell surface biotinylation assays showed that 23 ± 3% of the total pool of AQP1 was present at the TAL basolateral membrane (n = 7). To assess the functional importance of AQP1 in the basolateral membrane, we measured the rate of cell swelling initiated by decreasing peritubular osmolality as an indicator of water flux in microdissected TALs. Water flux was decreased by ∼50% in Aqp1 knockout mice compared with wild-types (4.0 ± 0.8 vs. 8.9 ± 1.7 fluorescent U/s, P < 0.02; n = 7). Furthermore, arginine vasopressin increased TAL AQP1 expression by 135 ± 17% (glycosylated) and 41 ± 11% (nonglycosylated; P < 0.01; n =5). We conclude that 1) the TAL expresses AQP1, 2) ∼23% of the total pool of AQP1 is localized to the basolateral membrane, 3) AQP1 mediates a significant portion of basolateral water flux, and 4) AQP1 is upregulated in TALs of rats infused with dDAVP. AQP1 could play an important role in regulation of TAL cell volume during changes in interstitial osmolality, such as during a high-salt diet or water deprivation. PMID:22674028

  14. Vesicle-membrane fusion. Observation of simultaneous membrane incorporation and content release.

    PubMed Central

    Woodbury, D J; Hall, J E

    1988-01-01

    Vesicle fusion, the central process of neurotransmitter release and hormonal secretion, is a complex process culminating in simultaneous incorporation of vesicle membrane into the plasma membrane and release of the vesicular contents extracellularly. This report describes simultaneous observation of membrane incorporation and content release using a model system composed of a planar bilayer and dye-filled vesicles. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:2462925

  15. Ion channels in basolateral membrane of marginal cells dissociated from gerbil stria vascularis.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, S; Ando, M; Kozakura, K; Saito, H; Irimajiri, A

    1995-03-01

    The basolateral membrane of isolated strial marginal cells has been probed for conductive pathways by the patch-clamp technique. Two types of voltage-insensitive channels were identified in both cell-attached and excised patches. Of these, frequently (69% of excised patches) observed was a Ca(2+)-activated nonselective cation channel having a unit conductance of 24.9 +/- 0.5 pS (N = 16). Other characteristics of this type in excised patches include: 1) linear I-V relations with 150 mM K+ (pipette)/150 mM Na+ (bath), 2) a permeability sequence of NH4+ > Na+ = K+ = Rb+ > Li+, 3) a flickering block by quinine or quinidine (both 1 mM), and 4) a dose dependent block of its activity by ADP or ATP (IC50,ATP/IC50,ADP = 20-35), both from the cytosolic side. Channels with similar characteristics were found in the apical membrane of the same cell; however, the basolateral channels were 2-4 times more densely distributed than the apical counterparts. Also frequently (57%) detected was a Cl- channel of 80.0 +/- 0.5 pS (N = 6), whose activity was Ca2+ independent. Additionally, this Cl- channel had: 1) linear I-V relations with symmetric Cl-, 2) a permeability sequence of Cl- > Br- > I- > or = NO3- > or = gluconate-, and 3) a complete and reversible block by 1 mM diphenylamine-2-carboxylate. In contrast to the apical Cl- channels, the basolateral ones had a much higher density (57% vs. < 1%) as well as a higher unit conductance (80 pS vs. 50 pS) than the apical counterpart. The relative abundance of these two types as the major conductive pathways for Na+, K+, and Cl- in the basolateral region must be taken into account when addressing the role of strial marginal cells in generating the positive endocochlear potential. The Cl- channel may facilitate Cl- distribution across the basolateral membrane.

  16. Transmembrane flux and receptor desensitization measured with membrane vesicles. Homogeneity of vesicles investigated by computer simulation.

    PubMed Central

    Cash, D J; Langer, R M; Subbarao, K; Bradbury, J R

    1988-01-01

    The use of membrane vesicles to make quantitative studies of transmembrane transport and exchange processes involves an assumption of homogeneity of the membrane vesicles. In studies of 86Rb+ exchange mediated by acetylcholine receptor from the electric organ of Electrophorus electricus and of 36Cl- exchange mediated by GABA receptor from rat brain, measurements of ion exchange and receptor desensitization precisely followed first order kinetics in support of this assumption. In other measurements a biphasic decay of receptor activity was seen. To elucidate the molecular properties of receptors from such measurements it is important to appreciate what the requirements of vesicle monodispersity are for meaningful results and what the effect of vesicle heterogeneity would be. The experiments were simulated with single vesicle populations with variable defined size distributions as well as with mixtures of different populations of vesicles. The properties of the receptors and their density in the membrane could be varied. Different receptors could be present on the same or different membrane vesicles. The simulated measurements were not very sensitive to size dispersity. A very broad size distribution of a single vesicle population was necessary to give rise to detectable deviations from first order kinetics or errors in the determined kinetic constants. Errors could become significant with mixtures of different vesicle populations, where the dispersity in initial ion exchange rate constant, proportional to the receptor concentration per internal volume, became large. In this case the apparent rate of receptor desensitization would diverge in opposite directions from the input value when measured by two different methods, suggesting an experimental test for such kinetic heterogeneity. A biphasic decrease of receptor activity could not be attributed to vesicle heterogeneity and must be due to desensitization processes with different rates. Significant errors would not

  17. Redox-Reactive Membrane Vesicles produced by Shewanella

    SciTech Connect

    Gorby, Yuri A.; McLean, Jeffrey S.; Korenevsky, Anton A.; Rosso, Kevin M.; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y.; Beveridge, Terrance J.

    2008-06-01

    Dissimilatory iron reducing bacteria produce and release membrane vesicles with diameters ranging from 50 to 250 nm. The vesicles, which arise from the outer membrane of these Gram-negative bacteria, lack DNA but contain proteins that catalyze the reduction of ferric iron and other multivalent heavy metals and radionuclides. This enzymatic process results in the formation of nano-size biogenic mineral assemblages that resemble nanofossils. Under low-shear conditions, membrane vesicles are commonly tethered to intact cells by electrically conductive filaments known as bacterial nanowires. The functional role of membrane vesicles and associated nanowires is not known, but the potential for mineralized vesicles that morphologically resemble nanofossils to serve as paleontological indicators of early life on earth and as biosignatures of like on other planets is recognized.

  18. TRPM7 facilitates cholinergic vesicle fusion with the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Brauchi, Sebastian; Krapivinsky, Grigory; Krapivinsky, Luba; Clapham, David E

    2008-06-17

    TRPM7, of the transient receptor potential (TRP) family, is both an ion channel and a kinase. Previously, we showed that TRPM7 is located in the membranes of acetylcholine (ACh)-secreting synaptic vesicles of sympathetic neurons, forms a molecular complex with proteins of the vesicular fusion machinery, and is critical for stimulated neurotransmitter release. Here, we targeted pHluorin to small synaptic-like vesicles (SSLV) in PC12 cells and demonstrate that it can serve as a single-vesicle plasma membrane fusion reporter. In PC12 cells, as in sympathetic neurons, TRPM7 is located in ACh-secreting SSLVs. TRPM7 knockdown by siRNA, or abolishing channel activity by expression of a dominant negative TRPM7 pore mutant, decreased the frequency of spontaneous and voltage-stimulated SSLV fusion events without affecting large dense core vesicle secretion. We conclude that the conductance of TRPM7 across the vesicle membrane is important in SSLV fusion.

  19. Permeability of human erythrocyte membrane vesicles to alkali cations.

    PubMed

    Sze, H; Solomon, A K

    1979-02-02

    The permeability of inside-out and right-side-out vesicles from erythrocyte membranes to inorganic cations was determined quantitatively. Using 86Rb as a K analog, we have measured the rate constant of 86Rb efflux from vesicles under equilibrium exchange conditions, using a dialysis procedure. The permeability coefficients of the vesicles to Rb are only about an order of magnitude greater than that of whole erythrocytes. Furthermore, we have measured many of the specialized transport systems known to exist in erythrocytes and have shown that glucose, sulfate, ATP-dependent Ca and ATP-dependent Na transport activities are retained by the vesicle membranes. These results suggest that inside-out and right-side-out vesicles can be used effectively to study transport properties of erythrocyte membranes.

  20. Carrier-mediated γ-aminobutyric acid transport across the basolateral membrane of human intestinal Caco-2 cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Carsten Uhd; Carstensen, Mette; Brodin, Birger

    2012-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the transport of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) across the basolateral membrane of intestinal cells. The proton-coupled amino acid transporter, hPAT1, mediates the influx of GABA and GABA mimetic drug substances such as vigabatrin and gaboxadol and the anticancer prodrug δ-aminolevulinic acid across the apical membrane of small intestinal enterocytes. Little is however known about the basolateral transport of these substances. We investigated basolateral transport of GABA in mature Caco-2 cell monolayers using isotope studies. Here we report that, at least two transporters seem to be involved in the basolateral transport of GABA. The basolateral uptake consisted of a high-affinity system with a K(m) of 290 μM and V(max) of 75 pmol cm(-2) min(-1) and a low affinity system with a K(m) of approximately 64 mM and V(max) of 1.6 nmol cm(-2) min(-1). The high-affinity transporter is Na(+) and Cl(-) dependent. The substrate specificity of the high-affinity transporter was further studied and Gly-Sar, Leucine, gaboxadol, sarcosine, lysine, betaine, 5-hydroxythryptophan, proline and glycine reduced the GABA uptake to approximately 44-70% of the GABA uptake in the absence of inhibitor. Other substances such as β-alanine, GABA, 5-aminovaleric acid, taurine and δ-aminolevulinic acid reduced the basolateral GABA uptake to 6-25% of the uptake in the absence of inhibitor. Our results indicate that the distance between the charged amino- and acid-groups is particular important for inhibition of basolateral GABA uptake. Thus, there seems to be a partial substrate overlap between the basolateral GABA transporter and hPAT1, which may prove important for understanding drug interactions at the level of intestinal transport.

  1. Outer membrane vesicles as platform vaccine technology

    PubMed Central

    Stork, Michiel; van der Ley, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are released spontaneously during growth by many Gram‐negative bacteria. They present a range of surface antigens in a native conformation and have natural properties like immunogenicity, self‐adjuvation and uptake by immune cells which make them attractive for application as vaccines against pathogenic bacteria. In particular with Neisseria meningitidis, they have been investigated extensively and an OMV‐containing meningococcal vaccine has recently been approved by regulatory agencies. Genetic engineering of the OMV‐producing bacteria can be used to improve and expand their usefulness as vaccines. Recent work on meningitis B vaccines shows that OMVs can be modified, such as for lipopolysaccharide reactogenicity, to yield an OMV product that is safe and effective. The overexpression of crucial antigens or simultaneous expression of multiple antigenic variants as well as the expression of heterologous antigens enable expansion of their range of applications. In addition, modifications may increase the yield of OMV production and can be combined with specific production processes to obtain high amounts of well‐defined, stable and uniform OMV particle vaccine products. Further improvement can facilitate the development of OMVs as platform vaccine product for multiple applications. PMID:26912077

  2. Membrane trafficking: decoding vesicle identity with contrasting chemistries.

    PubMed

    Frost, Adam

    2011-10-11

    Proteins involved in membrane traffic must distinguish between different classes of vesicles. New work now shows that α-synuclein and ALPS motifs represent two extreme types of amphipathic helix that are tuned to detect both the curvature of transport vesicles as well as their bulk lipid content.

  3. Durable vesicles for reconstitution of membrane proteins in biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Sanobar; Muench, Stephen P.; Jeuken, Lars J.C.

    2017-01-01

    The application of membrane proteins in biotechnology requires robust, durable reconstitution systems that enhance their stability and support their functionality in a range of working environments. Vesicular architectures are highly desirable to provide the compartmentalisation to utilise the functional transmembrane transport and signalling properties of membrane proteins. Proteoliposomes provide a native-like membrane environment to support membrane protein function, but can lack the required chemical and physical stability. Amphiphilic block copolymers can also self-assemble into polymersomes: tough vesicles with improved stability compared with liposomes. This review discusses the reconstitution of membrane proteins into polymersomes and the more recent development of hybrid vesicles, which blend the robust nature of block copolymers with the biofunctionality of lipids. These novel synthetic vesicles hold great promise for enabling membrane proteins within biotechnologies by supporting their enhanced in vitro performance and could also contribute to fundamental biochemical and biophysical research by improving the stability of membrane proteins that are challenging to work with. PMID:28202656

  4. Electro-hydrodynamic effects on lipid membranes in giant vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staykova, Margarita; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Dimova, Rumiana

    2009-11-01

    Electric fields are widely applied for cell manipulation in numerous micron-scale systems. Here, we show for the first time that alternating electric fields may cause pronounced flows in the membrane of giant lipid vesicles as well as in the surrounding fluid media.^ The lipid vesicles are not only biomimetic model for the cell membrane but also have many potential biotechnological applications, e.g. as drug-delivery systems and micro-reactors. The reported effects should be considered in electric micro-manipulation procedures on cells and vesicles. They might be useful for applications in microfluidic technologies, for lipid mixing, trapping and displacement, as will be demonstrated. We also believe that our method for visualization of the lipid flows by fluorescently labeled intra-membrane domains will be helpful for studies on membrane behavior in vesicles subjected to shear or mechanical stresses.

  5. Membrane Transport in Isolated Vesicles from Sugarbeet Taproot 1

    PubMed Central

    Briskin, Donald P.; Thornley, W. Robert; Wyse, Roger E.

    1985-01-01

    Sealed membrane vesicles were isolated from homogenates of sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L.) taproot by a combination of differential centrifugation, extraction with KI, and dextran gradient centrifugation. Relative to the KI-extracted microsomes, the content of plasma membranes, mitochondrial membranes, and Golgi membranes was much reduced in the final vesicle fraction. A component of ATPase activity that was inhibited by nitrate co-enriched with the capacity of the vesicles to form a steady state pH gradient during the purification procedure. This suggests that the nitrate-sensitive ATPase may be involved in driving H+-transport, and this is consistent with the observation that H+-transport, in the final vesicle fraction was inhibited by nitrate. Proton transport in the sugarbeet vesicles was substrate specific for ATP, insensitive to sodium vanadate and oligomycin but was inhibited by diethylstilbestrol and N,N′-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. The formation of a pH gradient in the vesicles was enhanced by halide ions in the sequence I− > Br− > Cl− while F− was inhibitory. These stimulatory effects occur from both a direct stimulation of the ATPase by anions and a reduction in the vesicle membrane potential. In the presence of Cl−, alkali cations reduce the pH gradient relative to that observed with bis-tris-propane, possibly by H+/alkali cation exchange. Based upon the properties of the H+-transporting vesicles, it is proposed that they are most likely derived from the tonoplast so that this vesicle preparation would represent a convenient system for studying the mechanism of transport at this membrane boundary. PMID:16664342

  6. Activation of the basolateral membrane Cl− conductance essential for electrogenic K+ secretion suppresses electrogenic Cl− secretion

    PubMed Central

    He, Quanhua; Halm, Susan T.; Zhang, Jin; Halm, Dan R.

    2010-01-01

    Adrenaline activates transient Cl−-secretion and sustained K+-secretion across isolated distal colonic mucosa of guinea pig. The Ca++-activated Cl− channel inhibitor CaCCinh-A01 [30μM] significantly reduced electrogenic K+-secretion, detected as short-circuit current (Isc). This inhibition supported the cell model for K+-secretion in which basolateral membrane Cl− channels provide an exit pathway for Cl− entering the cell via Na+/K+/2Cl−-cotransporters. CaCCinh-A01 inhibited both Isc and transepithelial conductance in a concentration dependent manner, IC50 = 6.3μM. GlyH-101, another Cl− channel inhibitor, also reduced sustained adrenaline-activated Isc (IC50 = 9.4μM). Adrenaline activated whole-cell Cl− current in isolated intact colonic crypts, confirmed by ion substitution. This adrenaline-activated whole-cell Cl− current also was inhibited by CaCCinh-A01 or GlyH-101. In contrast to K+-secretion, CaCCinh-A01 augmented the electrogenic Cl−-secretion activated by adrenaline as well as that activated by PGE2. Synergistic Cl−-secretion activated by cholinergic/PGE2 stimulation was insensitive to CaCCinh-A01. Colonic expression of the Ca++-activated Cl− channel protein Tmem16A was supported by RT-PCR detection of Tmem16A-mRNA, by immuno-blot with a Tmem16A-antibody, and by immuno-fluorescence detection in lateral membranes of epithelial cells. Alternative splices of Tmem16A were detected for exons that are involved in channel activation. Inhibition of K+-secretion and augmentation of Cl−-secretion by CaCCinh-A01 supports a common colonic cell model for these two ion secretory processes, such that activation of basolateral membrane Cl− channels contributes to the production of electrogenic K+-secretion and limits the rate of Cl−-secretion. Maximal physiological Cl−-secretion occurs only for synergistic activation mechanisms that close these basolateral membrane Cl− channels. PMID:21169331

  7. In vitro fusion between Saccharomyces cerevisiae secretory vesicles and cytoplasmic-side-out plasma membrane vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Arrastua, Lorena; San Sebastian, Eider; Quincoces, Ana F; Antony, Claude; Ugalde, Unai

    2003-01-01

    The final step in the secretory pathway, which is the fusion event between secretory vesicles and the plasma membrane, was reconstructed using highly purified secretory vesicles and cytoplasmic-side-out plasma membrane vesicles from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Both organelle preparations were obtained from a sec 6-4 temperature-sensitive mutant. Fusion was monitored by means of a fluorescence assay based on the dequenching of the lipophilic fluorescent probe octadecylrhodamine B-chloride (R18). The probe was incorporated into the membrane of secretory vesicles, and it diluted in unlabelled cytoplasmic-side-out plasma membrane vesicles as the fusion process took place. The obtained experimental dequenching curves were found by mathematical analysis to consist of two independent but simultaneous processes. Whereas one of them reflected the fusion process between both vesicle populations as confirmed by its dependence on the assay conditions, the other represented a non-specific transfer of the probe. The fusion process may now be examined in detail using the preparation, validation and analytical methods developed in this study. PMID:12435271

  8. Lipid Bilayer Vesicles with Numbers of Membrane-Linking Pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ken-ichirou Akashi,; Hidetake Miyata,

    2010-06-01

    We report that phospholipid membranes spontaneously formed in aqueous medium giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) possessing many membranous wormhole-like structures (membrane-linking pores, MLPs). By phase contract microscopy and confocal fluorescence microscopy, the structures of the MLPs, consisting of lipid bilayer, were resolvable, and a variety of vesicular shapes having many MLPs (a high genus topology) were found. These vesicles were stable but easily deformed by micromanipulation with a microneedle. We also observed the size reduction of the MLPs with the increase in membrane tension, which was qualitatively consistent with a prediction from a simple dynamical model.

  9. Functional Advantages Conferred by Extracellular Prokaryotic Membrane Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Manning, Andrew J.; Kuehn, Meta J.

    2015-01-01

    The absence of subcellular organelles is a characteristic typically used to distinguish prokaryotic from eukaryotic cells. But recent discoveries do not support this dogma. Over the past 50 years, researchers have begun to appreciate and characterize Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane derived vesicles and Gram-positive and archaeal membrane vesicles. These extracellular, membrane-bound organelles can perform a variety of functions, including binding and delivery of DNA, transport of virulence factors, protection of the cell from outer membrane targeting antimicrobials, and ridding the cell of toxic envelope proteins. Here we review the contributions of these extracellular organelles to prokaryotic physiology and compare these with the contributions of the bacterial interior membrane bound organelles responsible for harvesting light energy and for generating magnetic crystals of heavy metals. Understanding the roles of these multifunctional extracellular vesicle organelles as microbial tools will help us to better realize the diverse interactions that occur in our polymicrobial world. PMID:23615201

  10. Functional advantages conferred by extracellular prokaryotic membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Manning, Andrew J; Kuehn, Meta J

    2013-01-01

    The absence of subcellular organelles is a characteristic typically used to distinguish prokaryotic from eukaryotic cells. But recent discoveries do not support this dogma. Over the past 50 years, researchers have begun to appreciate and characterize Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane-derived vesicles and Gram-positive and archaeal membrane vesicles. These extracellular, membrane-bound organelles can perform a variety of functions, including binding and delivery of DNA, transport of virulence factors, protection of the cell from outer membrane targeting antimicrobials and ridding the cell of toxic envelope proteins. Here, we review the contributions of these extracellular organelles to prokaryotic physiology and compare these with the contributions of the bacterial interior membrane-bound organelles responsible for harvesting light energy and for generating magnetic crystals of heavy metals. Understanding the roles of these multifunctional extracellular vesicle organelles as microbial tools will help us to better realize the diverse interactions that occur in our polymicrobial world.

  11. Na sup + uptake into colonic enterocyte membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Bridges, R.J.; Garty, H.; Benos, D.J.; Rummel, W. Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham )

    1988-04-01

    Na{sup +} uptake was studied in colonic enterocyte membrane vesicles prepared from normal and dexamethasone-treated rats. Vesicles from rats treated with dexamethasone demonstrated a fivefold greater {sup 22}Na{sup +} uptake compared with vesicles from normal rats. Most of the tracer uptake in membranes derived from treated rats occurred through a conductive, amiloride-blockable pathway located in vesicles with low native K{sup +} permeability and high Cl{sup {minus}} permeability. Kinetic analysis of the amiloride inhibition curve revealed the presence of two amiloride-blockable pathways, one with a high affinity accounting for 85% of the uptake, and one with a low affinity accounting for only 12% of the uptake. Only the low-affinity pathway was detected with vesicles from normal rats. The high sensitivity to amiloride, the dependence on dexamethasone pretreatment, and the relative permeabilities to K{sup +} and Cl{sup {minus}} indicate that most of the {sup 22}Na{sup +} uptake in membranes derived from treated rats is through a Na{sup +}-specific channel located in apical membrane vesicles. Preincubation of the isolated cells from dexamethasone-treated rats at 37{degree}C in Ca{sup 2+}-free solutions before homogenization and membrane vesicle purification caused a 5- to 10-fold increase in amiloride-blockable {sup 22}Na{sup +} uptake compared with vesicles derived from cells maintained at 0{degree}C. The addition of Ca{sup 2+}, but not of Mg{sup 2+}, to the incubation solution markedly reduced this temperature-dependent enhancement in {sup 22}Na{sup +} uptake. These results suggest that Na{sup +} transport in colonic enterocytes from dexamethasone-treated rats is regulated by a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent, temperature-sensitive process which causes a sustained change in the apical membrane.

  12. Yeast Membrane Vesicles: Isolation and General Characteristics1

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Michael S.; Cirillo, Vincent P.

    1972-01-01

    Yeast membrane vesicles are formed when packed yeast are ground manually in a porcelain mortar and pestle with glass beads (0.2 mm diameter). These vesicles can be separated from the other components of the grinding mixture by a combination of centrifugation steps and elution from a column of the same glass beads (0.2 mm diameter). Isolated vesicles are osmotically sensitive, contain cytoplasmic components, and have energy-independent transport function. They are unable to metabolize glucose, but have respiratory function which is thought to be associated with intravesicular mitochondria. Invertase and oligomycin-insensitive adenosine triphosphatase are present in lysed vesicle preparations, and the appropriateness of these enzyme activities as membrane markers is discussed. Images PMID:4337848

  13. Structural Basis of Vesicle Formation at the Inner Nuclear Membrane.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Christoph; Dent, Kyle C; Zeev-Ben-Mordehai, Tzviya; Grange, Michael; Bosse, Jens B; Whittle, Cathy; Klupp, Barbara G; Siebert, C Alistair; Vasishtan, Daven; Bäuerlein, Felix J B; Cheleski, Juliana; Werner, Stephan; Guttmann, Peter; Rehbein, Stefan; Henzler, Katja; Demmerle, Justin; Adler, Barbara; Koszinowski, Ulrich; Schermelleh, Lothar; Schneider, Gerd; Enquist, Lynn W; Plitzko, Jürgen M; Mettenleiter, Thomas C; Grünewald, Kay

    2015-12-17

    Vesicular nucleo-cytoplasmic transport is becoming recognized as a general cellular mechanism for translocation of large cargoes across the nuclear envelope. Cargo is recruited, enveloped at the inner nuclear membrane (INM), and delivered by membrane fusion at the outer nuclear membrane. To understand the structural underpinning for this trafficking, we investigated nuclear egress of progeny herpesvirus capsids where capsid envelopment is mediated by two viral proteins, forming the nuclear egress complex (NEC). Using a multi-modal imaging approach, we visualized the NEC in situ forming coated vesicles of defined size. Cellular electron cryo-tomography revealed a protein layer showing two distinct hexagonal lattices at its membrane-proximal and membrane-distant faces, respectively. NEC coat architecture was determined by combining this information with integrative modeling using small-angle X-ray scattering data. The molecular arrangement of the NEC establishes the basic mechanism for budding and scission of tailored vesicles at the INM.

  14. Structural Basis of Vesicle Formation at the Inner Nuclear Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Christoph; Dent, Kyle C.; Zeev-Ben-Mordehai, Tzviya; Grange, Michael; Bosse, Jens B.; Whittle, Cathy; Klupp, Barbara G.; Siebert, C. Alistair; Vasishtan, Daven; Bäuerlein, Felix J.B.; Cheleski, Juliana; Werner, Stephan; Guttmann, Peter; Rehbein, Stefan; Henzler, Katja; Demmerle, Justin; Adler, Barbara; Koszinowski, Ulrich; Schermelleh, Lothar; Schneider, Gerd; Enquist, Lynn W.; Plitzko, Jürgen M.; Mettenleiter, Thomas C.; Grünewald, Kay

    2015-01-01

    Summary Vesicular nucleo-cytoplasmic transport is becoming recognized as a general cellular mechanism for translocation of large cargoes across the nuclear envelope. Cargo is recruited, enveloped at the inner nuclear membrane (INM), and delivered by membrane fusion at the outer nuclear membrane. To understand the structural underpinning for this trafficking, we investigated nuclear egress of progeny herpesvirus capsids where capsid envelopment is mediated by two viral proteins, forming the nuclear egress complex (NEC). Using a multi-modal imaging approach, we visualized the NEC in situ forming coated vesicles of defined size. Cellular electron cryo-tomography revealed a protein layer showing two distinct hexagonal lattices at its membrane-proximal and membrane-distant faces, respectively. NEC coat architecture was determined by combining this information with integrative modeling using small-angle X-ray scattering data. The molecular arrangement of the NEC establishes the basic mechanism for budding and scission of tailored vesicles at the INM. PMID:26687357

  15. Phospholipid flippases: building asymmetric membranes and transport vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Sebastian, Tessy T.; Baldridge, Ryan D.; Xu, Peng; Graham, Todd R.

    2012-01-01

    Phospholipid flippases in the type IV P-type ATPase family (P4-ATPases) are essential components of the Golgi, plasma membrane and endosomal system that play critical roles in membrane biogenesis. These pumps flip phospholipid across the bilayer to create an asymmetric membrane structure with substrate phospholipids, such as phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine, enriched within the cytosolic leaflet. The P4-ATPases also help form transport vesicles that bud from Golgi and endosomal membranes, thereby impacting the sorting and localization of many different proteins in the secretory and endocytic pathways. At the organismal level, P4-ATPase deficiencies are linked to liver disease, obesity, diabetes, hearing loss, neurological deficits, immune deficiency and reduced fertility. Here, we review the biochemical, cellular and physiological functions of P4-ATPases, with an emphasis on their roles in vesicle-mediated protein transport. PMID:22234261

  16. Sodium channels in membrane vesicles from cultured toad bladder cells

    SciTech Connect

    Asher, C.; Moran, A.; Rossier, B.C.; Garty, H. Ben Gurion Univ., Beer-Sheva Institut de Pharmacologie de l'Universite de Lausanne )

    1988-04-01

    Electrical potential-driven {sup 22}Na{sup +} fluxes were measured in membrane vesicles prepared from TBM-18(cl23) cells (a clone of the established cell line TB-M). Fifty to seventy percent of the tracer uptake in vesicles derived from cells that were cultivated on a porous support were blocked by the diuretic amiloride. The amiloride inhibition constant was <0.1 {mu}M, indicating that this flux is mediated by the apical Na{sup +}-specific channels. Vesicles prepared from cells that were not grown on a porous support exhibited much smaller amiloride-sensitive fluxes. Two Ca{sup 2+}-dependent processes that down-regulated the channel conductance and were previously identified in native epithelia were found in the cultured cells as well. Vesicles isolated from cells that were preincubated with 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} M aldosterone for 16-20 h exhibited higher amiloride-sensitive conductance than vesicles derived from control, steroid-depleted cells. Thus membrane derived from TBM-18(cl23) cells can be used to characterize the epithelial Na{sup +} channel and its hormonal regulation.

  17. Contribution of bacterial outer membrane vesicles to innate bacterial defense

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are constitutively produced by Gram-negative bacteria throughout growth and have proposed roles in virulence, inflammation, and the response to envelope stress. Here we investigate outer membrane vesiculation as a bacterial mechanism for immediate short-term protection against outer membrane acting stressors. Antimicrobial peptides as well as bacteriophage were used to examine the effectiveness of OMV protection. Results We found that a hyper-vesiculating mutant of Escherichia coli survived treatment by antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) polymyxin B and colistin better than the wild-type. Supplementation of E. coli cultures with purified outer membrane vesicles provided substantial protection against AMPs, and AMPs significantly induced vesiculation. Vesicle-mediated protection and induction of vesiculation were also observed for a human pathogen, enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC), challenged with polymyxin B. When ETEC with was incubated with low concentrations of vesicles concomitant with polymyxin B treatment, bacterial survival increased immediately, and the culture gained resistance to polymyxin B. By contrast, high levels of vesicles also provided immediate protection but prevented acquisition of resistance. Co-incubation of T4 bacteriophage and OMVs showed fast, irreversible binding. The efficiency of T4 infection was significantly reduced by the formation of complexes with the OMVs. Conclusions These data reveal a role for OMVs in contributing to innate bacterial defense by adsorption of antimicrobial peptides and bacteriophage. Given the increase in vesiculation in response to the antimicrobial peptides, and loss in efficiency of infection with the T4-OMV complex, we conclude that OMV production may be an important factor in neutralizing environmental agents that target the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:22133164

  18. Role for Mycobacterium tuberculosis Membrane Vesicles in Iron Acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Prados-Rosales, Rafael; Weinrick, Brian C.; Piqué, Daniel G.; Jacobs, William R.; Casadevall, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis releases membrane vesicles packed with molecules that can modulate the immune response. Because environmental conditions often influence the production and content of bacterial vesicles, this study examined M. tuberculosis microvesicles released under iron limitation, a common condition faced by pathogens inside the host. The findings indicate that M. tuberculosis increases microvesicle production in response to iron restriction and that these microvesicles contain mycobactin, which can serve as an iron donor and supports replication of iron-starved mycobacteria. Consequently, the results revealed a role of microvesicles in iron acquisition in M. tuberculosis, which can be critical for survival in the host. PMID:24415729

  19. Microemulsions, micelles, and vesicles as media for membrane mimetic photochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Fendler, J.H.

    1980-06-12

    Microemulsions, micelles, and vesicles are compared as media for membrane mimetic photochemistry. These systems solubilize, concentrate, compartmentalize, organize, and localize reactants; maintain proton and/or reactant gradients; alter quantum efficiencies; lower ionization potentials; change oxidation and reduction properties; change dissociation constants; affect vectorial electron displacements; alter photophysical pathways and rates; alter chemical pathways and rates; stabilize reactants, intermediates, and products; and separate products (charges). Formation of structures of microemulsions, micelles, and vesicles as well as substrate solubilization therein are summarized. Attention is focused on the utilization of microemulsions as reaction media. 72 references.

  20. Structural lipid changes and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity of gill cells' basolateral membranes during saltwater acclimation in sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus, L.) juveniles.

    PubMed

    Lança, Maria João; Machado, Maria; Ferreira, Ana Filipa; Quintella, Bernardo Ruivo; de Almeida, Pedro Raposo

    2015-11-01

    Seawater acclimation is a critical period for anadromous species and a process yet to be understood in lampreys. Considering that changes in lipid composition of the gill cells' basolateral membranes may disrupt the major transporter Na(+)K(+)-ATPase, the goal of this study was to detect changes at this level during juvenile sea lamprey seawater acclimation. The results showed that saltwater acclimation has a direct effect on the fatty acid composition of gill cells basolateral membrane's phospholipids. When held in full-strength seawater, the fatty acid profile of basolateral membrane's phospholipids suffered a restructure by increasing either saturation or the ratio between oleic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid. Simultaneously, the activity of Na(+)K(+)-ATPase revealed a significant and positive correlation with basolateral membrane's cholesterol content in the presence of highest salinity. Our results pointed out for lipid adjustments involving the functional transporter present on the gill cell basolateral membranes to ensure the role played by branchial Na(+)K(+)-ATPase in ion transport during saltwater acclimation process. The responses observed contributed to the strategy adopted by gill cell's basolateral membranes to compensate for osmotic and ionic stressors, to ensure the success of the process of seawater acclimation associated with the downstream trophic migration of juvenile sea lamprey.

  1. Rab5a is a common component of the apical and basolateral endocytic machinery in polarized epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bucci, C; Wandinger-Ness, A; Lütcke, A; Chiariello, M; Bruni, C B; Zerial, M

    1994-01-01

    In nonpolarized cells, the small GTPase Rab5a is localized to the plasma membrane, clathrin-coated vesicles, and early endosomes. Rab5a is required for early endosome fusion in vitro and regulates transport between the plasma membrane and early endosomes, in vivo. In polarized epithelial cells endocytosis occurs from separate apical and basolateral plasma membrane domains. Internalized molecules are initially delivered to distinct apical or basolateral early endosomes. In vitro, apical early endosomes can readily fuse with one another but not with the basolateral endosomes and vice versa, thereby indicating that the apical and basolateral early endocytic pathways are controlled by distinct machineries. Here, we have investigated the localization and function of Rab5a in polarized epithelial cells. Confocal immunofluorescence microscopy on mouse kidney sections revealed association of the protein with the apical and basolateral plasma membrane domains and underlying structures. In polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney I cells, endogenous and overexpressed Rab5a have the same distribution. Moreover, overexpression of the protein causes a 2-fold increase in fluid-phase uptake from both domains of the cell, thus showing that Rab5a functions in apical and basolateral endocytosis. Our data indicate that the apical and basolateral endocytic machineries of epithelial cells share common regulatory components and that Rab5a per se is not sufficient to target endocytic vesicles to apical or basolateral early endosomes. Images PMID:8197185

  2. Corneal endothelial cells possess an elaborate multipolar shape to maximize the basolateral to apical membrane area

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Theresa A.; He, Zhiguo; Boggs, Kristin; Thuret, Gilles; Liu, Hong-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The corneal endothelium is widely believed to consist of geometrically regular cells interconnected by junctional complexes. However, while en face visualization of the endothelial apical surface reveals characteristic polygonal borders, the overall form of the component cells has rarely been observed. Methods To visualize the shape of individual endothelial cells within the native monolayer, two independent Cre/LoxP-based cell labeling approaches were used. In the first, a P0-Cre mouse driver strain was bred to an R26-tdTomato reporter line to map neural crest–derived endothelial cells with cytosolic red fluorescent protein. In the second, HPRT-Cre induction of small numbers of green and red fluorescent protein–filled cells within a background of unlabeled cells was achieved using a dual-color reporter system, mosaic analysis with double markers (MADM). Selective imaging of the endothelial lateral membranes at different apicobasal levels was accomplished after staining with antibodies to ZO-1 and the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM). Results When viewed in their entirety in whole-mount preparations, fluorescent protein–filled cells appear star-shaped, extending multiple dendritic processes that radiate outward in the plane of the monolayer. Examination of rare cases where cells expressing different fluorescent proteins lie directly adjacent to one another reveals that these long processes undergo extensive interdigitation. The resulting overlap allows individual cells to extend over a greater area than if the cell boundaries were mutually exclusive. Anti-NCAM staining of these interlocking peripheral cell extensions reveals an elaborate system of lateral membrane folds that, when viewed in optical sections, increase in complexity from the apical to the basal pole. This not only produces a substantial increase in the basolateral, relative to the apical, membrane but also greatly extends the paracellular pathway as a highly convoluted space

  3. Origin of life: LUCA and extracellular membrane vesicles (EMVs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, S.; Forterre, P.

    2016-01-01

    Cells from the three domains of life produce extracellular membrane vesicles (EMVs), suggesting that EMV production is an important aspect of cellular physiology. EMVs have been implicated in many aspects of cellular life in all domains, including stress response, toxicity against competing strains, pathogenicity, detoxification and resistance against viral attack. These EMVs represent an important mode of inter-cellular communication by serving as vehicles for transfer of DNA, RNA, proteins and lipids between cells. Here, we review recent progress in the understanding of EMV biology and their various roles. We focus on the role of membrane vesicles in early cellular evolution and how they would have helped shape the nature of the last universal common ancestor. A membrane-protected micro-environment would have been a key to the survival of spontaneous molecular systems and efficient metabolic reactions. Interestingly, the morphology of EMVs is strongly reminiscent of the morphology of some virions. It is thus tempting to make a link between the origin of the first protocell via the formation of vesicles and the origin of viruses.

  4. Absorption of surfactants by membranes: erythrocytes versus synthetic vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Binford, J S; Palm, W H

    1994-01-01

    Three surfactants (chlorpromazine hydrochloride, thioridazine hydrochloride, and sodium deoxycholate) are found to absorb just as strongly into the protein-containing membranes of erythrocytes as into the phospholipid bilayers of synthetic vesicles. In the concentration region where hemolysis occurs and the Langmuir adsorption isotherm is no longer valid, one may use a phase partition model in which the erythrocyte membrane is one of the phases. The partition coefficients, expressed as the ratio of mole fraction surfactant in the membrane lipid phase to concentration of surfactant in the aqueous phase, have been calculated at the point of saturation in the erythrocyte membrane. These values are Ky = 430 M-1 (chlorpromazine, pH 5.9), 550 M-1 (deoxycholate, pH 7.6), and 640 M-1 (thioridazine, pH 5.9), in isotonic buffer at 27 degrees C. Corresponding values for synthetic vesicles made from dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine are Kx = 230 M-1 (chlorpromazine, 0.12 M buffer/KCl pH 5.9), 440 M-1 (deoxycholate, 0.20 M buffer/NaCl pH 8.0) and 510 M-1 (thioridazine, 0.12 M buffer/KCl pH 5.9), at 27 degrees C. It appears that the surfactants become an integral part of the bilayer in both vesicles and natural membranes and that the absorption is not of a peripheral nature. There is no evidence that the presence of proteins in the natural membrane inhibits the absorption of these surfactants in any way. PMID:8075335

  5. Direct determination of the driving forces for taurocholate uptake into rat liver plasma membrane vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, M C; Blitzer, B L; Boyer, J L

    1983-01-01

    To determine directly the driving forces for bile acid entry into the hepatocyte, the uptake of [3H]taurocholic acid into rat liver plasma membrane vesicles was studied. The membrane preparation contained predominantly right-side-out vesicles, and was highly enriched in plasma membrane marker enzymes. The uptake of taurocholate at equilibrium was inversely related to medium osmolarity, indicating transport into an osmotically sensitive space. In the presence of an inwardly directed sodium gradient (NaCl or sodium gluconate), the initial rate of uptake was rapid and taurocholate was transiently accumulated at a concentration twice that at equilibrium (overshoot). Other inwardly directed cation gradients (K+, Li+, choline+) or the presence of sodium in the absence of a gradient (Na+ equilibrated) resulted in a slower initial uptake rate and did not sustain an overshoot. Bile acids inhibited sodium-dependent taurocholate uptake, whereas bromsulphthalein inhibited both sodium-dependent and sodium-independent uptake and D-glucose had no effect on uptake. Uptake was temperature dependent, with maximal overshoots occurring at 25 degrees C. Imposition of a proton gradient across the vesicle (pHo less than pHi) in the absence of a sodium gradient failed to enhance taurocholate uptake, indicating that double ion exchange (Na+-H+, OH- -anion) is unlikely. Creation of a negative intravesicular potential by altering accompanying anions or by valinomycin-induced K+-diffusion potentials did not enhance taurocholate uptake, suggesting an electroneutral transport mechanism. The kinetics of taurocholate uptake demonstrated saturability with a Michaelis constant at 52 microM and maximum velocity of 4.5 nmol X mg-1 X protein X min-1. These studies provide definitive evidence for a sodium gradient-dependent, carrier-mediated, electrically neutral transport mechanism for hepatic taurocholate uptake. These findings are consistent with a model for bile secretion in which the basolateral

  6. Protective role of E. coli outer membrane vesicles against antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Heramb M; Nagaraj, R; Jagannadham, Medicharla V

    2015-12-01

    The outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) from bacteria are known to posses both defensive and protective functions and thus participate in community related functions. In the present study, outer membrane vesicles have been shown to protect the producer bacterium and two other bacterial species from the growth inhibitory effects of some antibiotics. The OMVs isolated from E. coli MG1655 protected the bacteria against membrane-active antibiotics colistin, melittin. The OMVs of E. coli MG1655 could also protect P. aeruginosa NCTC6751 and A. radiodioresistens MMC5 against these membrane-active antibiotics. However, OMVs could not protect any of these bacteria against the other antibiotics ciprofloxacin, streptomycin and trimethoprim. Hence, OMVs appears to protect the bacterial community against membrane-active antibiotics and not other antibiotics, which have different mechanism of actions. The OMVs of E. coli MG1655 sequester the antibiotic colistin, whereas their protein components degrade the antimicrobial peptide melittin. Proteomic analysis of OMVs revealed the presence of proteases and peptidases which appear to be involved in this process. Thus, the protection of bacteria by OMVs against antibiotics is situation dependent and the mechanism differs for different situations. These studies suggest that OMVs of bacteria form a common defense for the bacterial community against specific antibiotics.

  7. Pretransitional effects in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine vesicle membranes: optical dynamometry study.

    PubMed Central

    Dimova, R; Pouligny, B; Dietrich, C

    2000-01-01

    We used micron-sized latex spheres to probe the phase state and the viscoelastic properties of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayers as a function of temperature. One or two particles were manipulated and stuck to a DMPC giant vesicle by means of an optical trap. Above the fluid-gel main transition temperature, T(m) congruent with 23.4 degrees C, the particles could move on the surface of the vesicle, spontaneously (Brownian motion) or driven by an external force, either gravity or the laser beam's radiation pressure. From the analysis of the particle motions, we deduced the values of the membrane hydrodynamic shear viscosity, eta(s), and found that it would increase considerably near T(m). Below T(m), the long-distance motion of the particles was blocked. We performed experiments with two particles stuck on the membrane. By optical dynamometry, we measured the elastic resistance of the membrane to a variation in the interparticle distance and found that it would decrease considerably (down to zero) when the temperature was increased to T(m). We propose an interpretation relating the elastic response to the membrane curvature modulus, k(C). In this scheme, the two-bead dynamometry experiments provide a direct measurement of k(C) in the P'(beta) phase of lipid bilayers. PMID:10866960

  8. Purinergic receptor signaling at the basolateral membrane of macula densa cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruisheng; Bell, P Darwin; Peti-Peterdi, Janos; Kovacs, Gergly; Johansson, Alf; Persson, A Erik G

    2002-05-01

    Purinergic receptors are important in the regulation of renal hemodynamics; therefore, this study sought to determine if such receptors influence macula densa cell function. Isolated glomeruli containing macula densa cells, with and without the cortical thick ascending limb, were loaded with the Ca(2+) sensitive indicators, Fura Red (confocal microscopy) or fura 2 (conventional video image analysis). Studies were performed on an inverted microscope in a chamber with a flow-through perfusion system. Changes in cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) from exposed macula densa plaques were assessed upon addition of adenosine, ATP, UTP, ADP, or 2-methylthio-ATP (2- MeS-ATP) for 2 min added to the bathing solution. There was no change in [Ca(2+)](i) with addition of adenosine (10(-7) to 10(-3) M). UTP and ATP (10(-4) M) caused [Ca(2+)](i) to increase by 268 +/- 40 nM (n = 21) and 295 +/- 53 nM (n = 21), respectively, whereas in response to 2MesATP and ADP, [Ca(2+)](i) increased by only 67 +/- 13 nM (n = 8) and 93 +/- 36 nM (n = 14), respectively. Dose response curve for ATP (10(-7) to 10(-3) M) added in bath showed an EC(50) of 15 microM. No effect on macula densa [Ca(2+)](i) was seen when ATP was added from the lumen. ATP caused similar increases in macula densa [Ca(2+)](i) in the presence or absence of bath Ca(2+) and addition of 5 mM ethyleneglycotetraacetic acid (EGTA). Suramin (an antagonist of P2X and P2Y receptors) completely inhibited ATP-induced [Ca(2+)](i) dynamics. Also, ATP-Ca(2+) responsiveness was prevented by the phospholipase C inhibitor, U-73122, but not by its inactive analog, U-73343. These results suggest that macula densa cells possess P2Y(2) purinergic receptors on basolateral but not apical membranes and that activation of these receptors results in the mobilization of Ca(2+).

  9. Use of inside-out chloroplast thylakoid membrane vesicles for studying electron transport and membrane structure

    SciTech Connect

    Atta-Asafo-Adjei, E.

    1987-01-01

    Inside-out and right-side-out thylakoid vesicles were isolated from spinach chloroplasts by aqueous-polymer two-phase partitioning following mechanical fragmentation of thylakoid membranes by Yeda press treatment. Externally added plastocyanin stimulated the whole-chain and PSI electron transport rates in the inside-out thylakoid vesicles by about 500 and 350%, respectively, compared to about 50% stimulation for both assays in the fraction enriched in right-side-out vesicles. The electron transport between PSII and PSI in inside-out thylakoid vesicles appears to be interrupted due to plastocyanin release from the thylakoids by the Yeda press treatment, but it was restored by externally added plastocyanin. Acetic anhydride chemical modification and uncoupler-induced proton release from dark-adapted membranes are probes for detecting the sequested proton domains in thylakoid membranes. Both assays were used to find out if inside-out membranes retain metastable, localized proton binding domains. Treatment of dark-maintained inside-out thylakoid membrane vesicles with ({sup 3}H)acetic anhydride showed no uncoupler-induced increase in acetylation of the 33, 24, and 18 kDa polypeptides of the oxygen-evolving-complex, indicating complete loss of the implicated proton domains in these polypeptides. The various steps in the inside-out preparation were studied to discern which steps(s) leads to the loss of the metastable domain proton pool.

  10. Comparative Analysis of Membrane Vesicles from Three Piscirickettsia salmonis Isolates Reveals Differences in Vesicle Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Tandberg, Julia I.; Lagos, Leidy X.; Langlete, Petter; Berger, Eva; Rishovd, Anne-Lise; Roos, Norbert; Varkey, Deepa; Paulsen, Ian T.; Winther-Larsen, Hanne C.

    2016-01-01

    Membrane vesicles (MVs) are spherical particles naturally released from the membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. Bacterial MV production is associated with a range of phenotypes including biofilm formation, horizontal gene transfer, toxin delivery, modulation of host immune responses and virulence. This study reports comparative profiling of MVs from bacterial strains isolated from three widely disperse geographical areas. Mass spectrometry identified 119, 159 and 142 proteins in MVs from three different strains of Piscirickettsia salmonis isolated from salmonids in Chile (LF-89), Norway (NVI 5692) and Canada (NVI 5892), respectively. MV comparison revealed several strain-specific differences related to higher virulence capability for LF-89 MVs, both in vivo and in vitro, and stronger similarities between the NVI 5692 and NVI 5892 MV proteome. The MVs were similar in size and appearance as analyzed by electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. The MVs from all three strains were internalized by both commercial and primary immune cell cultures, which suggest a potential role of the MVs in the bacterium’s utilization of leukocytes. When MVs were injected into an adult zebrafish infection model, an upregulation of several pro-inflammatory genes were observed in spleen and kidney, indicating a modulating effect on the immune system. The present study is the first comparative analysis of P. salmonis derived MVs, highlighting strain-specific vesicle characteristics. The results further illustrate that the MV proteome from one bacterial strain is not representative of all bacterial strains within one species. PMID:27764198

  11. SULFATE-OXALATE EXCHANGE IN LOBSTER HEPATOPANCRETIC BASOLATERAL MEMBRANE VESICLES. (R823068)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  12. SULFATE/BICARBONATE ANTIPORT BY LOBSTER HEPATOPANCREATIC BASOLATERAL MEMBRANE VESICLES. (R823068)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  13. LPS Remodeling Triggers Formation of Outer Membrane Vesicles in Salmonella

    PubMed Central

    Elhenawy, Wael; Bording-Jorgensen, Michael; Valguarnera, Ezequiel; Haurat, M. Florencia; Wine, Eytan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Outer membrane vesicles (OMV) are proposed to mediate multiple functions during pathogenesis and symbiosis. However, the mechanisms responsible for OMV formation remain poorly understood. It has been shown in eukaryotic membranes that lipids with an inverted-cone shape favor the formation of positive membrane curvatures. Based on these studies, we formulated the hypothesis that lipid A deacylation might impose shape modifications that result in the curvature of the outer membrane (OM) and subsequent OMV formation. We tested the effect of lipid A remodeling on OMV biogenesis employing Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium as a model organism. Expression of the lipid A deacylase PagL resulted in increased vesiculation, without inducing an envelope stress response. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed profound differences in the patterns of lipid A in OM and OMV, with accumulation of deacylated lipid A forms exclusively in OMV. OMV biogenesis by intracellular bacteria upon macrophage infection was drastically reduced in a pagL mutant strain. We propose a novel mechanism for OMV biogenesis requiring lipid A deacylation in the context of a multifactorial process that involves the orchestrated remodeling of the outer membrane. PMID:27406567

  14. Outer membrane vesicles of Tannerella forsythia: biogenesis, composition, and virulence.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, V; Gruber, C; Nimeth, I; Pabinger, S; Sekot, G; Posch, G; Altmann, F; Messner, P; Andrukhov, O; Schäffer, C

    2015-12-01

    Tannerella forsythia is the only 'red-complex' bacterium covered by an S-layer, which has been shown to affect virulence. Here, outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) enriched with putative glycoproteins are described as a new addition to the virulence repertoire of T. forsythia. Investigations of this bacterium are hampered by its fastidious growth requirements and the recently discovered mismatch of the available genome sequence (92A2 = ATCC BAA-2717) and the widely used T. forsythia strain (ATCC 43037). T. forsythia was grown anaerobically in serum-free medium and biogenesis of OMVs was analyzed by electron and atomic force microscopy. This revealed OMVs with a mean diameter of ~100 nm budding off from the outer membrane while retaining the S-layer. An LC-ESI-TOF/TOF proteomic analysis of OMVs from three independent biological replicates identified 175 proteins. Of these, 14 exhibited a C-terminal outer membrane translocation signal that directs them to the cell/vesicle surface, 61 and 53 were localized to the outer membrane and periplasm, respectively, 22 were predicted to be extracellular, and 39 to originate from the cytoplasm. Eighty proteins contained the Bacteroidales O-glycosylation motif, 18 of which were confirmed as glycoproteins. Release of pro-inflammatory mediators from the human monocytic cell line U937 and periodontal ligament fibroblasts upon stimulation with OMVs followed a concentration-dependent increase that was more pronounced in the presence of soluble CD14 in conditioned media. The inflammatory response was significantly higher than that caused by whole T. forsythia cells. Our study represents the first characterization of T. forsythia OMVs, their proteomic composition and immunogenic potential.

  15. Indirect coupling of urate and p-aminohippurate transport to sodium in human brush-border membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Roch-Ramel, F; Guisan, B; Schild, L

    1996-01-01

    [14C]urate and p-[14C]aminohippurate (PAH) uptake by human brush-border membrane vesicles (BBMV) were measured in the presence of an inwardly oriented sodium gradient. No direct sodium cotransport was observed. Indirect [14C]urate coupling to sodium transport was demonstrated by cis-stimulation of [14C]urate with nicotinate or pyrazinoate (PZA) in the extravesicular medium but not by adding lactate, alpha-ketoglutarate, or beta-hydroxybutyrate. Indirect sodium coupling of [14C]PAH uptake was observed only when alpha-ketoglutarate was added to the extravesicular medium, a mechanism similar to that of basolateral membranes. The ability for PZA (and nicotinate) to cis-stimulate urate uptake was correlated with a high apparent affinity for the urate/anion exchanger. In urate-loaded vesicles, for identical medium concentrations, [14C]PZA uptake via the urateanion exchanger was 10 times higher than [14C]lactate uptake. Such high PZA affinity for the urate exchanger, working in parallel with PZA sodium cotransport can account for the stimulation of urate reabsorption by PZA in vivo.

  16. DNA Inversion Regulates Outer Membrane Vesicle Production in Bacteroides fragilis

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama-Imaohji, Haruyuki; Hirota, Katsuhiko; Yamasaki, Hisashi; Yoneda, Saori; Nariya, Hirofumi; Suzuki, Motoo; Secher, Thomas; Miyake, Yoichiro; Oswald, Eric; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Kuwahara, Tomomi

    2016-01-01

    Phase changes in Bacteroides fragilis, a member of the human colonic microbiota, mediate variations in a vast array of cell surface molecules, such as capsular polysaccharides and outer membrane proteins through DNA inversion. The results of the present study show that outer membrane vesicle (OMV) formation in this anaerobe is also controlled by DNA inversions at two distantly localized promoters, IVp-I and IVp-II that are associated with extracellular polysaccharide biosynthesis and the expression of outer membrane proteins. These promoter inversions are mediated by a single tyrosine recombinase encoded by BF2766 (orthologous to tsr19 in strain NCTC9343) in B. fragilis YCH46, which is located near IVp-I. A series of BF2766 mutants were constructed in which the two promoters were locked in different configurations (IVp-I/IVp-II = ON/ON, OFF/OFF, ON/OFF or OFF/ON). ON/ON B. fragilis mutants exhibited hypervesiculating, whereas the other mutants formed only a trace amount of OMVs. The hypervesiculating ON/ON mutants showed higher resistance to treatment with bile, LL-37, and human β-defensin 2. Incubation of wild-type cells with 5% bile increased the population of cells with the ON/ON genotype. These results indicate that B. fragilis regulates the formation of OMVs through DNA inversions at two distantly related promoter regions in response to membrane stress, although the mechanism underlying the interplay between the two regions controlled by the invertible promoters remains unknown. PMID:26859882

  17. Cell-sized asymmetric lipid vesicles facilitate the investigation of asymmetric membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiya, Koki; Kawano, Ryuji; Osaki, Toshihisa; Akiyoshi, Kazunari; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2016-09-01

    Asymmetric lipid giant vesicles have been used to model the biochemical reactions in cell membranes. However, methods for producing asymmetric giant vesicles lead to the inclusion of an organic solvent layer that affects the mechanical and physical characteristics of the membrane. Here we describe the formation of asymmetric giant vesicles that include little organic solvent, and use them to investigate the dynamic responses of lipid molecules in the vesicle membrane. We formed the giant vesicles via the inhomogeneous break-up of a lipid microtube generated by applying a jet flow to an asymmetric planar lipid bilayer. The asymmetric giant vesicles showed a lipid flip-flop behaviour in the membrane, superficially similar to the lipid flip-flop activity observed in apoptotic cells. In vitro synthesis of membrane proteins into the asymmetric giant vesicles revealed that the lipid asymmetry in bilayer membranes improves the reconstitution ratio of membrane proteins. Our asymmetric giant vesicles will be useful in elucidating lipid-lipid and lipid-membrane protein interactions involved in the regulation of cellular functions.

  18. Membrane vesicles: A simplified system for studying auxin transport

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, M.H.M.

    1989-01-01

    Indoleacetic acid (IAA), the auxin responsible for regulation of growth, is transported polarly in plants. Several different models have been suggested to account for IAA transport by cells and its accumulation by membrane vesicles. One model sees diffusion of IAA driven by a pH gradient. The anion of a lipophilic weak acid like IAA or butyrate accumulates in an alkaline compartment in accord with the size of the pH gradient The accumulation of IAA may be diminished by the permeability of its lipophilic anion. This anion leak may be blocked by NPA. With anion efflux blocked, a gradient of two pH units would support an IAA accumulation of less than 50-fold at equilibrium (2) Another model sees diffusion of IAA in parallel with a saturable symport (IAA[sup [minus

  19. Detection of outer membrane vesicles in Synechocystis PCC 6803

    PubMed Central

    Pardo, Yehudah A.; Florez, Catalina; Baker, Kristopher M.; Schertzer, Jeffrey W.; Mahler, Gretchen J.

    2015-01-01

    It has been well established that many species of Gram-negative bacteria release nanoscale outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) during normal growth. Furthermore, the roles of these structures in heterotrophic bacteria have been extensively characterized. However, little is known about the existence or function of OMVs in photoautotrophs. In the present study, we report for the first time the production of OMVs by the model photosynthetic organism Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, a species of biotechnological importance. We detected extracellular proteins and lipids in cell-free supernatants derived from Synechocystis culture, yet the cytoplasmic and thylakoid membrane markers NADH oxidase and chlorophyll were absent. This indicated that the extracellular proteins and lipids derived from the outer membrane, and not from cell lysis. Furthermore, we identified spherical structures within the expected size range of OMVs in Synechocystis culture using scanning electron microscopy. Taken together, these results suggest that the repertoire of Gram-negative bacteria that are known to produce OMVs may be expanded to include Synechocystis PCC6803. Because of the considerable genetic characterization of Synechocystis in particular, our discovery has the potential to support novel biotechnological applications as well. PMID:26363014

  20. Unique Lipid Chemistry of Synaptic Vesicle and Synaptosome Membrane Revealed Using Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Kenneth T; Maddipati, Krishna R; Naik, Akshata R; Jena, Bhanu P

    2017-03-02

    Synaptic vesicles measuring 30-50 nm in diameter containing neurotransmitters either completely collapse at the presynaptic membrane or dock and transiently fuse at the base of specialized 15 nm cup-shaped lipoprotein structures called porosomes at the presynaptic membrane of synaptosomes to release neurotransmitters. Recent study reports the unique composition of major lipids associated with neuronal porosomes. Given that lipids greatly influence the association and functions of membrane proteins, differences in lipid composition of synaptic vesicle and the synaptosome membrane was hypothesized. To test this hypothesis, the lipidome of isolated synaptosome, synaptosome membrane, and synaptic vesicle preparation were determined by using mass spectrometry in the current study. Results from the study demonstrate the enriched presence of triacyl glycerols and sphingomyelins in synaptic vesicles, as opposed to the enriched presence of phospholipids in the synaptosome membrane fraction, reflecting on the tight regulation of nerve cells in compartmentalization of membrane lipids at the nerve terminal.

  1. Polarized delivery of viral glycoproteins to the apical and basolateral plasma membranes of Madin-Darby canine kidney cells infected with temperature-sensitive viruses

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    The intracellular route followed by viral envelope glycoproteins in polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney cells was studied by using temperature-sensitive mutants of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and influenza, in which, at the nonpermissive temperature (39.5 degrees C), the newly synthesized glycoproteins (G proteins) and hemagglutinin (HA), respectively, are not transported out of the endoplasmic reticulum. After infection with VSV and incubation at 39.5 degrees C for 4-5 h, synchronous transfer of G protein to the plasma membrane was initiated by shifting to the permissive temperature (32.5 degrees C). Immunoelectron microscopy showed that under these conditions the protein moved to the Golgi apparatus and from there directly to a region of the lateral plasma membrane near this organelle. G protein then seemed to diffuse progressively to basal regions of the cell surface and, only after it had accumulated in the basolateral domain, it began to appear on the apical surface near the intercellular junctions. The results of these experiments indicate that the VSV G protein must be sorted before its arrival at the cell surface, and suggest that passage to the apical domain occurs only late in infection when tight junctions are no longer an effective barrier. In complementary experiments, using the temperature-sensitive mutant of influenza, cultures were first shifted from the nonpermissive temperature (39.5 degrees C) to 18.5 degrees C, to allow entrance of the glycoprotein into the Golgi apparatus (see Matlin, K.S., and K. Simons, 1983, Cell, 34:233-243). Under these conditions HA accumulated in Golgi stacks and vesicles but did not reach the plasma membrane. When the temperature was subsequently shifted to 32.5 degrees C, HA rapidly appeared in discrete regions of the apical surface near, and often directly above, the Golgi elements, and later diffused throughout this surface. To ensure that the anti-HA antibodies had access to lateral domains, monolayers were

  2. Actin dynamics provides membrane tension to merge fusing vesicles into the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Peter J.; Grenklo, Staffan; Arpino, Gianvito; Tan, Xinyu; Liao, Hsien-Shun; Heureaux, Johanna; Peng, Shi-Yong; Chiang, Hsueh-Cheng; Hamid, Edaeni; Zhao, Wei-Dong; Shin, Wonchul; Näreoja, Tuomas; Evergren, Emma; Jin, Yinghui; Karlsson, Roger; Ebert, Steven N.; Jin, Albert; Liu, Allen P.; Shupliakov, Oleg; Wu, Ling-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Vesicle fusion is executed via formation of an Ω-shaped structure (Ω-profile), followed by closure (kiss-and-run) or merging of the Ω-profile into the plasma membrane (full fusion). Although Ω-profile closure limits release but recycles vesicles economically, Ω-profile merging facilitates release but couples to classical endocytosis for recycling. Despite its crucial role in determining exocytosis/endocytosis modes, how Ω-profile merging is mediated is poorly understood in endocrine cells and neurons containing small ∼30–300 nm vesicles. Here, using confocal and super-resolution STED imaging, force measurements, pharmacology and gene knockout, we show that dynamic assembly of filamentous actin, involving ATP hydrolysis, N-WASP and formin, mediates Ω-profile merging by providing sufficient plasma membrane tension to shrink the Ω-profile in neuroendocrine chromaffin cells containing ∼300 nm vesicles. Actin-directed compounds also induce Ω-profile accumulation at lamprey synaptic active zones, suggesting that actin may mediate Ω-profile merging at synapses. These results uncover molecular and biophysical mechanisms underlying Ω-profile merging. PMID:27576662

  3. Selective flow-induced vesicle rupture to sort by membrane mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pommella, Angelo; Brooks, Nicholas J.; Seddon, John M.; Garbin, Valeria

    2015-08-01

    Vesicle and cell rupture caused by large viscous stresses in ultrasonication is central to biomedical and bioprocessing applications. The flow-induced opening of lipid membranes can be exploited to deliver drugs into cells, or to recover products from cells, provided that it can be obtained in a controlled fashion. Here we demonstrate that differences in lipid membrane and vesicle properties can enable selective flow-induced vesicle break-up. We obtained vesicle populations with different membrane properties by using different lipids (SOPC, DOPC, or POPC) and lipid:cholesterol mixtures (SOPC:chol and DOPC:chol). We subjected vesicles to large deformations in the acoustic microstreaming flow generated by ultrasound-driven microbubbles. By simultaneously deforming vesicles with different properties in the same flow, we determined the conditions in which rupture is selective with respect to the membrane stretching elasticity. We also investigated the effect of vesicle radius and excess area on the threshold for rupture, and identified conditions for robust selectivity based solely on the mechanical properties of the membrane. Our work should enable new sorting mechanisms based on the difference in membrane composition and mechanical properties between different vesicles, capsules, or cells.

  4. The lethal cargo of Myxococcus xanthus outer membrane vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Berleman, James E.; Allen, Simon; Danielewicz, Megan A.; Remis, Jonathan P.; Gorur, Amita; Cunha, Jack; Hadi, Masood Z.; Zusman, David R.; Northen, Trent R.; Witkowska, H. Ewa; Auer, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    Myxococcus xanthus is a bacterial micro-predator known for hunting other microbes in a wolf pack-like manner. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are produced in large quantities by M. xanthus and have a highly organized structure in the extracellular milieu, sometimes occurring in chains that link neighboring cells within a biofilm. OMVs may be a vehicle for mediating wolf pack activity by delivering hydrolytic enzymes and antibiotics aimed at killing prey microbes. Here, both the protein and small molecule cargo of the OMV and membrane fractions of M. xanthus were characterized and compared. Our analysis indicates a number of proteins that are OMV-specific or OMV-enriched, including several with putative hydrolytic function. Secondary metabolite profiling of OMVs identifies 16 molecules, many associated with antibiotic activities. Several hydrolytic enzyme homologs were identified, including the protein encoded by MXAN_3564 (mepA), an M36 protease homolog. Genetic disruption of mepA leads to a significant reduction in extracellular protease activity suggesting MepA is part of the long-predicted (yet to date undetermined) extracellular protease suite of M. xanthus. PMID:25250022

  5. Membrane Vesicles: an Overlooked Component of the Matrices of Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Schooling, Sarah R.; Beveridge, Terry J.

    2006-01-01

    The matrix helps define the architecture and infrastructure of biofilms and also contributes to their resilient nature. Although many studies continue to define the properties of both gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial biofilms, there is still much to learn, especially about how structural characteristics help bridge the gap between the chemistry and physical aspects of the matrix. Here, we show that membrane vesicles (MVs), structures derived from the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria, are a common particulate feature of the matrix of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Biofilms grown using different model systems and growth conditions were shown to contain MVs when thin sectioned for transmission electron microscopy, and mechanically disrupted biofilms revealed MVs in association with intercellular material. MVs were also isolated from biofilms by employing techniques for matrix isolation and a modified MV isolation protocol. Together these observations verified the presence and frequency of MVs and indicated that MVs were a definite component of the matrix. Characterization of planktonic and biofilm-derived MVs revealed quantitative and qualitative differences between the two and indicated functional roles, such as proteolytic activity and binding of antibiotics. The ubiquity of MVs was supported by observations of biofilms from a variety of natural environments outside the laboratory and established MVs as common biofilm constituents. MVs appear to be important and relatively unacknowledged particulate components of the matrix of gram-negative or mixed bacterial biofilms. PMID:16885463

  6. Outer membrane vesicles of Pasteurella multocida contain virulence factors

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Rojas, Miguel A; Vaca, Sergio; Reyes-López, Magda; de la Garza, Mireya; Aguilar-Romero, Francisco; Zenteno, Edgar; Soriano-Vargas, Edgardo; Negrete-Abascal, Erasmo

    2014-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida (Pm) is a gram-negative bacterium able to infect different animal species, including human beings. This bacterium causes economic losses to the livestock industry because of its high morbidity and mortality in animals. In this work, we report the characterization of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) released into the culture medium by different Pm serogroups. Purified OMVs in the range of 50–300 nm were observed by electron microscopy. Serum obtained from chickens infected with Pm recognized several proteins from Pm OMVs. Additionally, rabbit antiserum directed against a secreted protease from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae recognized a similar protein in the Pm OVMs, suggesting that OMVs from these bacterial species contain common immunogenic proteins. OmpA, a multifunctional protein, was identified in OMVs from different Pm serogroups, and its concentration was twofold higher in OMVs from Pm serogroups B and D than in OMVs from other serogroups. Three outer membrane proteins were also identified: OmpH, OmpW, and transferrin-binding protein. Three bands of 65, 110, and 250 kDa with proteolytic activity were detected in Pm OMVs of serogroups A and E. Additionally, β-lactamase activity was detected only in OMVs from Pm 12945 Ampr (serogroup A). Pm OMVs may be involved in different aspects of disease pathogenesis. PMID:25065983

  7. Size-dependent, stochastic nature of lipid exchange between nano-vesicles and model membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabaei, Seyed R.; Gillissen, Jurriaan J. J.; Vafaei, Setareh; Groves, Jay T.; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2016-07-01

    The interaction of nanoscale lipid vesicles with cell membranes is of fundamental importance for the design and development of vesicular drug delivery systems. Here, we introduce a novel approach to study vesicle-membrane interactions whereby we are able to probe the influence of nanoscale membrane properties on the dynamic adsorption, exchange, and detachment of vesicles. Using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy, we monitor these processes in real-time upon the electrostatically tuned attachment of individual, sub-100 nm vesicles to a supported lipid bilayer. The observed exponential vesicle detachment rate depends strongly on the vesicle size, but not on the vesicle charge, which suggests that lipid exchange occurs during a single stochastic event, which is consistent with membrane stalk formation. The fluorescence microscopy assay developed in this work may enable measuring of the probability of stalk formation in a controlled manner, which is of fundamental importance in membrane biology, offering a new tool to understand nanoscale phenomena in the context of biological sciences.The interaction of nanoscale lipid vesicles with cell membranes is of fundamental importance for the design and development of vesicular drug delivery systems. Here, we introduce a novel approach to study vesicle-membrane interactions whereby we are able to probe the influence of nanoscale membrane properties on the dynamic adsorption, exchange, and detachment of vesicles. Using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy, we monitor these processes in real-time upon the electrostatically tuned attachment of individual, sub-100 nm vesicles to a supported lipid bilayer. The observed exponential vesicle detachment rate depends strongly on the vesicle size, but not on the vesicle charge, which suggests that lipid exchange occurs during a single stochastic event, which is consistent with membrane stalk formation. The fluorescence microscopy assay developed

  8. Bilayer membrane permeability of ionic liquid-filled block copolymer vesicles in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Bai, Zhifeng; Zhao, Bin; Lodge, Timothy P

    2012-07-19

    The bilayer membrane permeability of block copolymer vesicles ("polymersomes") with ionic liquid interiors dispersed in water is quantified using fluorescence quenching. Poly((1,2-butadiene)-b-ethylene oxide) (PB-PEO) block copolymer vesicles in water with their interiors filled with a common hydrophobic ionic liquid, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide, were prepared containing a hydrophobic dye, Nile Red, by intact migration of dye-encapsulated vesicles from the ionic liquid to water at room temperature. A small quencher molecule, dichloroacetamide, was added to the aqueous solution of the dye-loaded vesicles, and the permeation of the quencher passing through the membrane into the interior was determined from the fluorescence quenching kinetics. Rapid permeation of the quencher across the nanoscale membrane was observed, consistent with the high fluidity of the liquid polybutadiene membrane. Two different PB-PEO copolymers were employed, in order to vary the thickness of the solvophobic membrane. A significant increase in membrane permeability was also observed with decreasing membrane thickness, which is tentatively attributable to differences in quencher solubility in the membranes. Quantitative migration of the vesicles from the aqueous phase back to an ionic liquid phase was achieved upon heating. These microscopically heterogeneous and thermoresponsive vesicles with permeable and robust membranes have potential as recyclable nanoreactors, in which the high viscosity and capital expense of an ionic liquid reaction medium can be mitigated, while retaining the desirable features of ionic liquids as reaction media, and facile catalyst recovery.

  9. Geometric conservation laws for cells or vesicles with membrane nanotubes or singular points.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yajun; Yin, Jie

    2006-07-12

    On the basis of the integral theorems about the mean curvature and Gauss curvature, geometric conservation laws for cells or vesicles are proved. These conservation laws may depict various special bionano structures discovered in experiments, such as the membrane nanotubes and singular points grown from the surfaces of cells or vesicles. Potential applications of the conservation laws to lipid nanotube junctions that interconnect cells or vesicles are discussed.

  10. Structure formation of lipid membranes: Membrane self-assembly and vesicle opening-up to octopus-like micelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Hiroshi

    2013-02-01

    We briefly review our recent studies on self-assembly and vesicle rupture of lipid membranes using coarse-grained molecular simulations. For single component membranes, lipid molecules self-assemble from random gas states to vesicles via disk-shaped clusters. Clusters aggregate into larger clusters, and subsequently the large disks close into vesicles. The size of vesicles are determined by kinetics than by thermodynamics. When a vesicle composed of lipid and detergent types of molecules is ruptured, a disk-shaped micelle called bicelle can be formed. When both surfactants have negligibly low critical micelle concentration, it is found that bicelles connected with worm-like micelles are also formed depending on the surfactant ratio and spontaneous curvature of the membrane monolayer.

  11. Cell-Cell Communication Via Extracellular Membrane Vesicles and Its Role in the Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Inkyu

    2013-01-01

    The host immune response involves a variety of cell types, including specialized immune and non-immune cells. The delicate coordination among these cells via close communication is central for the proper operation of immune system. Cell-cell communication is mediated by a complex network that includes soluble factors such as cytokines, chemokines, and metabolites exported from cells, as well as membrane-bound receptors and their ligands. Cell-cell communication is also mediated by membrane vesicles (e.g., exosomes, ectosomes), which are either shed by distant cells or exchanged by cells that are making direct contact. Intercellular communication via extracellular membrane vesicles has drawn much attention recently, as they have been shown to carry various biomolecules that modulate the activities of recipient cells. In this review, I will discuss current views on cell-cell communication via extra-cellular membrane vesicles, especially shedded membrane vesicles, and their effects on the control of the immune system. PMID:23807045

  12. The syntaxin 4 N terminus regulates its basolateral targeting by munc18c-dependent and -independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Torres, Jacqueline; Funk, Holly M; Zegers, Mirjam M P; ter Beest, Martin B A

    2011-03-25

    To generate and maintain epithelial cell polarity, specific sorting of proteins into vesicles destined for the apical and basolateral domain is required. Syntaxin 3 and 4 are apical and basolateral SNARE proteins important for the specificity of vesicle fusion at the apical and basolateral plasma membrane domains, respectively, but how these proteins are specifically targeted to these domains themselves is unclear. Munc18/SM proteins are potential regulators of this process. Like syntaxins, they are crucial for exocytosis and vesicle fusion. However, how munc18c and syntaxin 4 regulate the function of each other is unclear. Here, we investigated the requirement of syntaxin 4 in the delivery of basolateral membrane and secretory proteins, the basolateral targeting of syntaxin 4, and the role of munc18c in this targeting. Depletion of syntaxin 4 resulted in significant reduction of basolateral targeting, suggesting no compensation by other syntaxin forms. Mutational analysis identified amino acids Leu-25 and to a lesser extent Val-26 as essential for correct localization of syntaxin 4. Recently, it was shown that the N-terminal peptide of syntaxin 4 is involved in binding to munc18c. A mutation in this region that affects munc18c binding shows that munc18c binding is required for stabilization of syntaxin 4 at the plasma membrane but not for its correct targeting. We conclude that the N terminus serves two functions in membrane targeting. First, it harbors the sorting motif, which targets syntaxin 4 basolaterally in a munc18c-independent manner and second, it allows for munc18c binding, which stabilizes the protein in a munc18c-dependent manner.

  13. An AFM-based pit-measuring method for indirect measurements of cell-surface membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiaojun; Chen, Yuan; Chen, Yong

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Air drying induced the transformation of cell-surface membrane vesicles into pits. • An AFM-based pit-measuring method was developed to measure cell-surface vesicles. • Our method detected at least two populations of cell-surface membrane vesicles. - Abstract: Circulating membrane vesicles, which are shed from many cell types, have multiple functions and have been correlated with many diseases. Although circulating membrane vesicles have been extensively characterized, the status of cell-surface membrane vesicles prior to their release is less understood due to the lack of effective measurement methods. Recently, as a powerful, micro- or nano-scale imaging tool, atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been applied in measuring circulating membrane vesicles. However, it seems very difficult for AFM to directly image/identify and measure cell-bound membrane vesicles due to the similarity of surface morphology between membrane vesicles and cell surfaces. Therefore, until now no AFM studies on cell-surface membrane vesicles have been reported. In this study, we found that air drying can induce the transformation of most cell-surface membrane vesicles into pits that are more readily detectable by AFM. Based on this, we developed an AFM-based pit-measuring method and, for the first time, used AFM to indirectly measure cell-surface membrane vesicles on cultured endothelial cells. Using this approach, we observed and quantitatively measured at least two populations of cell-surface membrane vesicles, a nanoscale population (<500 nm in diameter peaking at ∼250 nm) and a microscale population (from 500 nm to ∼2 μm peaking at ∼0.8 μm), whereas confocal microscopy only detected the microscale population. The AFM-based pit-measuring method is potentially useful for studying cell-surface membrane vesicles and for investigating the mechanisms of membrane vesicle formation/release.

  14. [Vesicular intracellular transport in the digestive organs. Membrane vesicle--the universal mechanism of the functional transport].

    PubMed

    Morozov, I A

    2014-01-01

    , mediators by nerve cells. To clarify the problem of cell transport two types: homeostatic and functional transport should be distinguished. The first type is carried out mainly in relation to ions on basolateral membrane with the help of its ATPase systems and provides intracellular homeostasis and nutritive co- transportation, the second (functional) type defines the basic specific function by means of membrane vesicles.

  15. Mechanisms of outer membrane vesicle entry into host cells

    PubMed Central

    O'Donoghue, Eloise J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Bacterial outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are nano‐sized compartments consisting of a lipid bilayer that encapsulates periplasm‐derived, luminal content. OMVs, which pinch off of Gram‐negative bacteria, are now recognized as a generalized secretion pathway which provides a means to transfer cargo to other bacterial cells as well as eukaryotic cells. Compared with other secretion systems, OMVs can transfer a chemically extremely diverse range of cargo, including small molecules, nucleic acids, proteins, and lipids to proximal cells. Although it is well recognized that OMVs can enter and release cargo inside host cells during infection, the mechanisms of host association and uptake are not well understood. This review highlights existing studies focusing on OMV‐host cell interactions and entry mechanisms, and how these entry routes affect cargo processing within the host. It further compares the wide range of methods currently used to dissect uptake mechanisms, and discusses potential sources of discrepancy regarding the mechanism of OMV uptake across different studies. PMID:27529760

  16. Outer membrane vesicles – offensive weapons or good Samaritans?

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Ingar; Amano, Atsuo

    2015-01-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) from Gram-negative bacteria were first considered as artifacts and were followed with disbelief and bad reputation. Later, their existence was accepted and they became characterized as bacterial bombs, virulence bullets, and even decoys. Today, we know that OMVs also can be involved in cell–cell signaling/communication and be mediators of immune regulation and cause disease protection. Furthermore, OMVs represent a distinct bacterial secretion pathway selecting and protecting their cargo, and they can even be good Samaritans providing nutrients to the gut microbiota maintaining commensal homeostasis beneficial to the host. The versatility in functions of these nanostructures is remarkable and includes both defense and offense. The broad spectrum of usability does not stop with that, as it now seems that OMVs can be used as vaccines and adjuvants or vehicles engineered for drug treatment of emerging and new diseases not only caused by bacteria but also by virus. They may even represent new ways of selective drug treatment. PMID:25840612

  17. Extracellular Membrane Vesicles and Immune Regulation in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Cossetti, Chiara; Smith, Jayden A.; Iraci, Nunzio; Leonardi, Tommaso; Alfaro-Cervello, Clara; Pluchino, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    The brain is characterized by a complex and integrated network of interacting cells in which cell-to-cell communication is critical for proper development and function. Initially considered as an immune privileged site, the brain is now regarded as an immune specialized system. Accumulating evidence reveals the presence of immune components in the brain, as well as extensive bidirectional communication that takes place between the nervous and the immune system both under homeostatic and pathological conditions. In recent years the secretion of extracellular membrane vesicles (EMVs) has been described as a new and evolutionary well-conserved mechanism of cell-to-cell communication, with EMVs influencing the microenvironment through the traffic of bioactive molecules that include proteins and nucleic acids, such as DNA, protein coding, and non-coding RNAs. Increasing evidence suggests that EMVs are a promising candidate to study cross-boundary cell-to-cell communication pathways. Herein we review the role of EMVs secreted by neural cells in modulating the immune response(s) within the brain under physiological and pathological circumstances. PMID:22557978

  18. Membrane vesicle production by Chlamydia trachomatis as an adaptive response

    PubMed Central

    Frohlich, Kyla M.; Hua, Ziyu; Quayle, Alison J.; Wang, Jin; Lewis, Maria E.; Chou, Chau-wen; Luo, Miao; Buckner, Lyndsey R.; Shen, Li

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria have evolved specific adaptive responses to cope with changing environments. These adaptations include stress response phenotypes with dynamic modifications of the bacterial cell envelope and generation of membrane vesicles (MVs). The obligate intracellular bacterium, Chlamydia trachomatis, typically has a biphasic lifestyle, but can enter into an altered growth state typified by morphologically aberrant chlamydial forms, termed persistent growth forms, when induced by stress in vitro. How C. trachomatis can adapt to a persistent growth state in host epithelial cells in vivo is not well understood, but is an important question, since it extends the host-bacterial relationship in vitro and has thus been indicated as a survival mechanism in chronic chlamydial infections. Here, we review recent findings on the mechanistic aspects of bacterial adaptation to stress with a focus on how C. trachomatis remodels its envelope, produces MVs, and the potential important consequences of MV production with respect to host-pathogen interactions. Emerging data suggest that the generation of MVs may be an important mechanism for C. trachomatis intracellular survival of stress, and thus may aid in the establishment of a chronic infection in human genital epithelial cells. PMID:24959424

  19. Sulfate transport in apical membrane vesicles isolated from tracheal epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Elgavish, A.; DiBona, D.R.; Norton, P.; Meezan, E.

    1987-09-01

    Sulfate uptake in apical membrane vesicles isolated from bovine tracheal epithelium is shown to occur into an osmotically sensitive intravesicular space, via a carrier-mediated system. This conclusion is based on three lines of evidence: 1) saturation kinetics: 2) substrate specificity; and 3) inhibition by the anion transport inhibitors SITS and DIDS. The affinity of the transport system is highest in low ionic strength media and decreases in the presence of gluconate. Chloride appears to cis-inhibit sulfate uptake and to trans-stimulate sulfate efflux. Cis-inhibition and trans-stimulation studies with a variety of anions indicate that this exchange system may be shared by HCO/sub 3//sup -/, S/sub 2/O/sub 3//sup 2 -/, SeO/sub 4//sup 2 -/, and MoO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ but not by H/sub 2/PO/sub 4//sup -/ or HAsO/sub 4//sup 2/. Studies indicate that protons may play two distinct roles in sulfate transport in this system. These studies show that the carrier-mediated system can function in the absence of chloride. The overshoot observed in the presence of a proton gradient indicates that under those conditions the mechanism of transport may be a SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/-OH/sup -/ exchange.

  20. Proteomic analysis of Vibrio cholerae outer membrane vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Altindis, Emrah; Fu, Yang; Mekalanos, John J.

    2014-01-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) produced by Gram-negative bacteria provide an interesting research material for defining cell-envelope proteins without experimental cell disruption. OMVs are also promising immunogenic platforms and may play important roles in bacterial survival and pathogenesis. We used in-solution trypsin digestion coupled to mass spectrometry to identify 90 proteins present in OMVs of Vibrio cholerae when grown under conditions that activate the TCP pilus virulence regulatory protein (ToxT) virulence regulon. The ToxT expression profile and potential contribution to virulence of these proteins were assessed using ToxT and in vivo RNA-seq, Tn-seq, and cholera stool proteomic and other genome-wide data sets. Thirteen OMV-associated proteins appear to be essential for cell growth, and therefore may represent antibacterial drug targets. Another 12 nonessential OMV proteins, including DegP protease, were required for intestinal colonization in rabbits. Comparative proteomics of a degP mutant revealed the importance of DegP in the incorporation of nine proteins into OMVs, including ones involved in biofilm matrix formation and various substrates of the type II secretion system. Taken together, these results suggest that DegP plays an important role in determining the content of OMVs and also affects phenotypes such as intestinal colonization, proper function of the type II secretion system, and formation of biofilm matrix. PMID:24706774

  1. Membrane vesicles in sea water: heterogeneous DNA content and implications for viral abundance estimates.

    PubMed

    Biller, Steven J; McDaniel, Lauren D; Breitbart, Mya; Rogers, Everett; Paul, John H; Chisholm, Sallie W

    2017-02-01

    Diverse microbes release membrane-bound extracellular vesicles from their outer surfaces into the surrounding environment. Vesicles are found in numerous habitats including the oceans, where they likely have a variety of functional roles in microbial ecosystems. Extracellular vesicles are known to contain a range of biomolecules including DNA, but the frequency with which DNA is packaged in vesicles is unknown. Here, we examine the quantity and distribution of DNA associated with vesicles released from five different bacteria. The average quantity of double-stranded DNA and size distribution of DNA fragments released within vesicles varies among different taxa. Although some vesicles contain sufficient DNA to be visible following staining with the SYBR fluorescent DNA dyes typically used to enumerate viruses, this represents only a small proportion (<0.01-1%) of vesicles. Thus DNA is packaged heterogeneously within vesicle populations, and it appears that vesicles are likely to be a minor component of SYBR-visible particles in natural sea water compared with viruses. Consistent with this hypothesis, chloroform treatment of coastal and offshore seawater samples reveals that vesicles increase epifluorescence-based particle (viral) counts by less than an order of magnitude and their impact is variable in space and time.

  2. Microtubule-dependent relocation of branchial V-H+-ATPase to the basolateral membrane in the Pacific spiny dogfish (Squalus acanthias): a role in base secretion.

    PubMed

    Tresguerres, Martin; Parks, Scott K; Katoh, Fumi; Goss, Greg G

    2006-02-01

    We have previously shown that continuous intravenous infusion of NaHCO3 for 24 h ( approximately 1000 micromol kg(-1) h(-1)) results in the relocation of V-H+-ATPase from the cytoplasm to the basolateral membrane in the gills of the Pacific dogfish. To further investigate this putative base-secretive process we performed similar experiments with the addition of colchicine, an inhibitor of cytoskeleton-dependent cellular trafficking processes. Blood pH and plasma total CO2 were significantly higher in the colchicines-treated, HCO3- -infused fish compared with fish infused with HCO3- alone. The effect of colchicine was highest after 24 h of infusion (8.33+/-0.06 vs 8.02+/-0.03 pH units, 15.72+/-3.29 vs 6.74+/-1.34 mmol CO2 l(-1), N=5). Immunohistochemistry and western blotting confirmed that colchicine blocked the transit of V-H+-ATPase to the basolateral membrane. Furthermore, western blotting analyses from whole gill and cell membrane samples suggest that the short-term (6 h) response to alkaline stress consists of relocation of V-H+-ATPases already present in the cell to the basolateral membrane, while in the longer term (24 h) there is both relocation of preexistent enzyme and upregulation in the synthesis of new units. Our results strongly suggest that cellular relocation of V-H+-ATPase is necessary for enhanced HCO3- secretion across the gills of the Pacific dogfish.

  3. A light-scattering characterization of membrane vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Selser, J C; Yeh, Y; Baskin, R J

    1976-01-01

    A technique has been developed in this paper which enables quasi-elastic laser light scattering to be used to accurately and quantitatively measure the average vesicle diffusion coefficient and the relative dispersion in the diffusion coefficient about this average for dilute polydisperse vesicle suspensions. This technique relies on a theoretical analysis of a modified form of the Z-averaged diffusion coefficient. This modified Z-averaged diffusion coefficient explicitly incorporates vesicle size, structure, and polydispersity in a description of the scattered light autocorrelation spectrum. Light-scattering experiments were performed on a dilute, lobster sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicle suspension and the measured average diffusion coefficient and the diffusion coefficient relative dispersion about this average were determined with accuracies of 2 and 10%, respectively. A comparison of vesicle size inferred from light-scattering results was made with size results from electron microscopic analysis of the same sample. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 PMID:1252585

  4. Biochemical characterization and membrane fluidity of membranous vesicles isolated from boar seminal plasma.

    PubMed

    Piehl, Lidia L; Cisale, Humberto; Torres, Natalia; Capani, Francisco; Sterin-Speziale, Norma; Hager, Alfredo

    2006-05-01

    Mammalian seminal plasma contains membranous vesicles (MV), which differ in composition and origin. Among these particles, human prostasomes and equine prostasome-like MV have been the most studied. The aim of the present work is to characterize the biochemical composition and membrane fluidity of MV isolated from boar seminal plasma. The MV from boar seminal plasma were isolated by ultracentrifugation and further purification by gel filtration on Sephadex G-200. The MV were examined by electron microscopy (EM), amount of cholesterol, total phospholipid, protein content, and phospholipid composition were analyzed. Membrane fluidity of MV and spermatozoa were estimated from the electron spin resonance (ESR) spectra of the 5-doxilstearic acid incorporated into the vesicle membranes by the order parameter (S). The S parameter gives a measure of degree of structural order in the membrane and is defined as the ratio of the spectral anisotropy in the membranes to the maximum anisotropy obtained in a rigidly oriented system. The S parameter takes into consideration that S = 1 for a rapid spin-label motion of about only one axis and S = 0 for a rapid isotropic motion. Intermediate S values between S = 0 and S = 1 represents the consequence of decreased membrane fluidity. The EM revealed the presence of bilaminar and multilaminar electron-dense vesicles. Cholesterol to phospholipid molar ratio from the isolated MV was 1.8. Phospholipid composition showed a predominance of sphingomyelin. The S parameter for porcine MV and for boar spermatozoa was 0.73 +/- 0.02 and 0.644 +/- 0.008, respectively, with the S for MV being greater (p < 0.001) than the S for spermatozoa. The high order for S found for boar MV was in agreement with the greater cholesterol/phospholipids ratio and the lesser ratio for phosphatidylcholine/sphingomyelin. Results obtained in the present work indicate that MV isolated from boar semen share many biochemical and morphological characteristics with equine

  5. Selective production of sealed plasma membrane vesicles from red beet (Beta vulgaris L. ) storage tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Giannini, J.L.; Gildensoph, L.H.; Briskin, D.P.

    1987-05-01

    Modification of our previous procedure for the isolation of microsomal membrane vesicles from red beet (Beta vulgaris L.) storage tissue allowed the recovery of sealed membrane vesicles displaying proton transport activity sensitive to both nitrate and orthovanadate. In the absence of a high salt concentration in the homogenization medium, contributions of nitrate-sensitive (tonoplast) and vanadate-sensitive (plasma membrane) proton transport were roughly equal. The addition of 0.25 M KCl to the homogenization medium increased the relative amount of nitrate-inhibited proton transport activity while the addition of 0.25 M KI resulted in proton pumping vesicles displaying inhibition by vanadate but stimulation by nitrate. These effects appeared to result from selective sealing of either plasma membrane or tonoplast membrane vesicles during homogenization in the presence of the two salts. Following centrifugation on linear sucrose gradients it was shown that the nitrate-sensitive, proton-transporting vesicles banded at low density and comigrated with nitrate-sensitive ATPase activity while the vanadate-sensitive, proton-transporting vesicles banded at a much higher density and comigrated with vanadate-sensitive ATPase. The properties of the vanadate-sensitive proton pumping vesicles were further characterized in microsomal membrane fractions produced by homogenization in the presence of 0.25 M KI and centrifugation on discontinuous sucrose density gradients. Proton transport was substrate specific for ATP, displayed a sharp pH optimum at 6.5, and was insensitive to azide but inhibited by N'-N-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, diethylstilbestrol, and fluoride. The Km of proton transport for Mg:ATP was 0.67 mM and the K0.5 for vanadate inhibition was at about 50 microM. These properties are identical to those displayed by the plasma membrane ATPase and confirm a plasma membrane origin for the vesicles.

  6. ATP-driven calcium transport in membrane vesicles of Streptococcus sanguis. [Streptococcus sanguis; Streptococcus faecalis; Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Houng, H.; Lynn, A.R.; Rosen, B.P.

    1986-11-01

    Calcium transport was investigated in membrane vesicles prepared from the oral bacterium Streptococcus sanguis. Procedures were devised for the preparation of membrane vesicles capable of accumulation /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/. Uptake was ATP dependent and did not require a proton motive force. Calcium transport in these vesicles was compared with /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ accumulation in membrane vesicles from Streptococcus faecalis and Escherichia coli. The data support the existence of an ATP-driven calcium pump in S. sanguis similar to that in S. faecalis. This pump, which catalyzes uptake into membrane vesicles, would be responsible for extrusion of calcium from intact cells.

  7. Behavioral and neural responses of toads to salt solutions correlate with basolateral membrane potential of epidermal cells of the skin.

    PubMed

    Hillyard, Stanley D; Baula, Victor; Tuttle, Wendy; Willumsen, Niels J; Larsen, Erik H

    2007-10-01

    Dehydrated toads initiated water absorption response (WR) behavior and absorbed water from dilute NaCl solutions. With 200-250 mM NaCl, WR behavior and water absorption were both suppressed. With 200-250 mM Na-gluconate, WR initiation was significantly greater than with NaCl but water loss was greater. Neural recordings from spinal nerve #6 showed a greater integrated response to 250 mM NaCl than to 250 mM Na-gluconate, whereas a larger rinse response was seen with Na-gluconate. Studies with isolated epithelium showed a large increase in conductance (G(t)) when 250 mM NaCl replaced NaCl Ringer's as the apical bathing solution that was accompanied by depolarization of the transepithelial potential (V(t)) and basolateral membrane potential (V(b)). Depolarization of V(b) corresponded with the neural response to 250 mM NaCl. When 250 mM Na-gluconate replaced Ringer's as the apical solution G(t) remained low, V(b) transiently hyperpolarized to values near the equilibrium potential for K(+) and corresponded with the reduced neural response. These results support the hypothesis that chemosensory function of the skin is analogous to that of mammalian taste cells but utilizes paracellular ion transport to a greater degree.

  8. The effect of vesicle shape, line tension, and lateral tension on membrane-binding proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchison, Jaime B.

    Model membranes allow for the exploration of complex biological phenomena with simple, controllable components. In this thesis we employ model membranes to determine the effect of vesicle properties such as line tension, lateral tension, and shape on membrane-binding proteins. We find that line tension at the boundary between domains in a phase separated vesicle can accumulate model membrane-binding proteins (green fluorescent protein with a histidine tag), and that those proteins can, in turn, alter vesicle shape. These results suggest that domains in biological membranes may enhance the local concentration of membrane-bound proteins and thus alter protein function. We also explore how membrane mechanical and chemical properties alter the function of the N-BAR domain of amphiphysin, a membrane-binding protein implicated in endocytosis. We find that negatively charged lipids are necessary for N-BAR binding to membranes at detectable levels, and that, at least for some lipid species, binding may be cooperative. Measurements of N-BAR binding as a function of vesicle tension reveal that modest membrane tension of around 2 mN/m, corresponding to a strain of around 1%, strongly increases N-BAR binding. We attribute this increase in binding with tension to the insertion of N-BAR's N-terminal amphipathic helix into the membrane which increases the membrane area. We propose that N-BAR, which was previously described as being able to sense membrane curvature, may be sensing strain instead. Measurements of membrane deformation by N-BAR as a function of membrane tension reveal that tension can hinder membrane deformation. Thus, tension may favor N-BAR binding yet suppress membrane deformation/tubulation, which requires work against tension. These results suggest that membrane tension, a parameter that is often not controlled in model membranes but is tightly controlled in biological cells, may be important in regulating protein binding and assembly and, hence, protein

  9. Porin Loss Impacts the Host Inflammatory Response to Outer Membrane Vesicles of Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Kelli L.; Cahill, Bethaney K.; Dilello, Sarah K.; Gutel, Dedra; Brunson, Debra N.; Albertí, Sebastián

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae often exhibit porin loss. In this study, we investigated how porin loss impacted the composition of secreted outer membrane vesicles as well as their ability to trigger proinflammatory cytokine secretion by macrophages. We hypothesize that porin loss associated with antibiotic resistance will directly impact both the composition of outer membrane vesicles and their interactions with phagocytic cells. Using clonally related clinical isolates of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-positive Klebsiella pneumoniae with different patterns of porin expression, we demonstrated that altered expression of OmpK35 and OmpK36 results in broad alterations to the protein profile of secreted vesicles. Additionally, the level of OmpA incorporation was elevated in strains lacking a single porin. Porin loss significantly impacted macrophage inflammatory responses to purified vesicles. Outer membrane vesicles lacking both OmpK35 and OmpK36 elicited significantly lower levels of proinflammatory cytokine secretion than vesicles from strains expressing one or both porins. These data demonstrate that antibiotic resistance-associated porin loss has a broad and significant effect on both the composition of outer membrane vesicles and their interactions with phagocytic cells, which may impact bacterial survival and inflammatory reactions in the host. PMID:26666932

  10. Outer membrane vesicles displaying engineered glycotopes elicit protective antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Valentine, Jenny L.; Huang, Chung-Jr; Endicott, Christine E.; Moeller, Tyler D.; Rasmussen, Jed A.; Fletcher, Joshua R.; Boll, Joseph M.; Rosenthal, Joseph A.; Dobruchowska, Justyna; Wang, Zhirui; Heiss, Christian; Azadi, Parastoo; Putnam, David; Trent, M. Stephen; Jones, Bradley D.; DeLisa, Matthew P.

    2016-01-01

    The O-antigen polysaccharide (O-PS) component of lipopolysaccharides on the surface of gram-negative bacteria is both a virulence factor and a B-cell antigen. Antibodies elicited by O-PS often confer protection against infection; therefore, O-PS glycoconjugate vaccines have proven useful against a number of different pathogenic bacteria. However, conventional methods for natural extraction or chemical synthesis of O-PS are technically demanding, inefficient, and expensive. Here, we describe an alternative methodology for producing glycoconjugate vaccines whereby recombinant O-PS biosynthesis is coordinated with vesiculation in laboratory strains of Escherichia coli to yield glycosylated outer membrane vesicles (glycOMVs) decorated with pathogen-mimetic glycotopes. Using this approach, glycOMVs corresponding to eight different pathogenic bacteria were generated. For example, expression of a 17-kb O-PS gene cluster from the highly virulent Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis (type A) strain Schu S4 in hypervesiculating E. coli cells yielded glycOMVs that displayed F. tularensis O-PS. Immunization of BALB/c mice with glycOMVs elicited significant titers of O-PS–specific serum IgG antibodies as well as vaginal and bronchoalveolar IgA antibodies. Importantly, glycOMVs significantly prolonged survival upon subsequent challenge with F. tularensis Schu S4 and provided complete protection against challenge with two different F. tularensis subsp. holarctica (type B) live vaccine strains, thereby demonstrating the vaccine potential of glycOMVs. Given the ease with which recombinant glycotopes can be expressed on OMVs, the strategy described here could be readily adapted for developing vaccines against many other bacterial pathogens. PMID:27274048

  11. Electrogenic Transport of Protons Driven by the Plasma Membrane ATPase in Membrane Vesicles from Radish 1

    PubMed Central

    Rasi-Caldogno, Franca; Pugliarello, Maria Chiara; De Michelis, Maria Ida

    1985-01-01

    Mg:ATP-dependent H+ pumping has been studied in microsomal vesicles from 24-hour-old radish (Raphanus sativus L.) seedlings by monitoring both intravesicular acidification and the building up of an inside positive membrane potential difference (Δ ψ). ΔpH was measured as the decrease of absorbance of Acridine orange and Δ ψ as the shift of absorbance of bis(3-propyl-5-oxoisoxazol-4-yl)pentamethine oxonol. Both Mg:ATP-dependent Δ pH and Δ ψ generation are completely inhibited by vanadate and insensitive to oligomycin; moreover, Δ pH generation is not inhibited by NO3−. These findings indicate that this membrane preparation is virtually devoid of mitochondrial and tonoplast H+-ATPases. Both intravesicular acidification and Δ ψ generation are influenced by anions: Δ pH increases and Δ ψ decreases following the sequence SO42−, Cl−, Br−, NO3−. ATP-dependent H+ pumping strictly requires Mg2+. It is very specific for ATP (apparent Km 0.76 millimolar) compared to GTP, UTP, CTP, ITP. Δ pH generation is inhibited by CuSO4 and diethylstilbestrol as well as vanadate. Δ pH generation is specificially stimulated by K+ (+ 80%) and to a lesser extent by Na+ and choline (+28% and +14%, respectively). The characteristics of H+ pumping in these microsomal vesicles closely resemble those described for the plasma membrane ATPase partially purified from several plant materials. PMID:16664008

  12. Release of outer membrane vesicles by Gram-negative bacteria is a novel envelope stress response

    PubMed Central

    McBroom, Amanda J; Kuehn, Meta J

    2007-01-01

    Conditions that impair protein folding in the Gram-negative bacterial envelope cause stress. The destabilizing effects of stress in this compartment are recognized and countered by a number of signal transduction mechanisms. Data presented here reveal another facet of the complex bacterial stress response, release of outer membrane vesicles. Native vesicles are composed of outer membrane and periplasmic material, and they are released from the bacterial surface without loss of membrane integrity. Here we demonstrate that the quantity of vesicle release correlates directly with the level of protein accumulation in the cell envelope. Accumulation of material occurs under stress, and is exacerbated upon impairment of the normal housekeeping and stress-responsive mechanisms of the cell. Mutations that cause increased vesiculation enhance bacterial survival upon challenge with stressing agents or accumulation of toxic misfolded proteins. Preferential packaging of a misfolded protein mimic into vesicles for removal indicates that the vesiculation process can act to selectively eliminate unwanted material. Our results demonstrate that production of bacterial outer membrane vesicles is a fully independent, general envelope stress response. In addition to identifying a novel mechanism for alleviating stress, this work provides physiological relevance for vesicle production as a protective mechanism. PMID:17163978

  13. Formation of polyhedral vesicles and polygonal membrane tubes induced by banana-shaped proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Hiroshi

    2015-12-01

    The shape transformations of fluid membranes induced by curved protein rods are studied using meshless membrane simulations. The rod assembly at low rod density induces a flat membrane tube and oblate vesicle. It is found that the polyhedral shapes are stabilized at high rod densities. The discrete shape transition between triangular and buckled discoidal tubes is obtained and their curvature energies are analyzed by a simple geometric model. For vesicles, triangular hosohedron and elliptic-disk shapes are formed in equilibrium, whereas tetrahedral and triangular prism shapes are obtained as metastable states.

  14. Trypsin digestion for determining orientation of ATPase in Halobacterium saccharovorum membrane vesicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kristjansson, H.; Hochstein, L. I.

    1986-01-01

    Membranes prepared by low pressure disruption of cells exhibited no ATPase activity in the absence of Triton X-100, although 43% of the total menadione reductase activity was detected. Trypsin digestion reduced menadione reductase activity by 45% whereas ATPase activity was not affected. Disruption of the membrane fraction at higher pressure solubilized about 45% of the ATPase activity. The soluble activity was still enhanced by Triton X-100, suggesting that the detergent, besides disrupting membrane vesicles, also activated the ATPase. The discrepancy in localization of menadione reductase and ATPase activities raised questions regarding the reliability of using a single marker enzyme as an indicator of vesicle orientation.

  15. Towards fully automated Identification of Vesicle-Membrane Fusion Events in TIRF Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallotton, Pascal; James, David E.; Hughes, William E.

    2007-11-01

    Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy (TIRFM) is imposing itself as the tool of choice for studying biological activity in close proximity to the plasma membrane. For example, the exquisite selectivity of TIRFM allows monitoring the diffusion of GFP-phogrin vesicles and their recruitment to the plasma membrane in pancreatic β-cells. We present a novel computer vision system for automatically identifying the elusive fusion events of GFP-phogrin vesicles with the plasma membrane. Our method is based on robust object tracking and matched filtering. It should accelerate the quantification of TIRFM data and allow the extraction of more biological information from image data to support research in diabetes and obesity.

  16. Robust measurement of membrane bending moduli using light sheet fluorescence imaging of vesicle fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Loftus, Andrew F; Noreng, Sigrid; Hsieh, Vivian L; Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2013-11-26

    The mechanical rigidity of lipid membranes is a key determinant of the energetics of cellular membrane deformation. Measurements of membrane bending moduli remain rare, however, and show a large variance, a situation that can be addressed by the development of improved techniques and by comparisons between disparate techniques applied to the same systems. We introduce here the use of selective plane illumination microscopy (SPIM, also known as light sheet fluorescence microscopy) to image thermal fluctuations of giant vesicles. The optical sectioning of SPIM enables high-speed fluorescence imaging of freely suspended vesicles and quantification of edge localization precision, yielding robust fluctuation spectra and rigidity estimates. For both lipid-only membranes and membranes bound by the intracellular trafficking protein Sar1p, which lowers membrane rigidity in a concentration-dependent manner, we show that the resulting bending modulus values are in close agreement with those derived from an independent assay based on membrane tether pulling. We also show that the fluctuation spectra of vesicles bound by the mammalian Sar1A protein, which stiffens membranes at high concentrations, are not well fit by a model of homogeneous quasi-spherical vesicles, suggesting that SPIM-based analysis can offer insights into spatially inhomogeneous properties induced by protein assemblies.

  17. Membrane-elasticity model of Coatless vesicle budding induced by ESCRT complexes.

    PubMed

    Różycki, Bartosz; Boura, Evzen; Hurley, James H; Hummer, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    The formation of vesicles is essential for many biological processes, in particular for the trafficking of membrane proteins within cells. The Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport (ESCRT) directs membrane budding away from the cytosol. Unlike other vesicle formation pathways, the ESCRT-mediated budding occurs without a protein coat. Here, we propose a minimal model of ESCRT-induced vesicle budding. Our model is based on recent experimental observations from direct fluorescence microscopy imaging that show ESCRT proteins colocalized only in the neck region of membrane buds. The model, cast in the framework of membrane elasticity theory, reproduces the experimentally observed vesicle morphologies with physically meaningful parameters. In this parameter range, the minimum energy configurations of the membrane are coatless buds with ESCRTs localized in the bud neck, consistent with experiment. The minimum energy configurations agree with those seen in the fluorescence images, with respect to both bud shapes and ESCRT protein localization. On the basis of our model, we identify distinct mechanistic pathways for the ESCRT-mediated budding process. The bud size is determined by membrane material parameters, explaining the narrow yet different bud size distributions in vitro and in vivo. Our membrane elasticity model thus sheds light on the energetics and possible mechanisms of ESCRT-induced membrane budding.

  18. Vesicle-associated membrane protein 2 mediates trafficking of {alpha}5{beta}1 integrin to the plasma membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Hasan, Nazarul; Hu, Chuan

    2010-01-01

    Integrins are major receptors for cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM). As transmembrane proteins, the levels of integrins at the plasma membrane or the cell surface are ultimately determined by the balance between two vesicle trafficking events: endocytosis of integrins at the plasma membrane and exocytosis of the vesicles that transport integrins. Here, we report that vesicle-associated membrane protein 2 (VAMP2), a SNARE protein that mediates vesicle fusion with the plasma membrane, is involved in the trafficking of {alpha}5{beta}1 integrin. VAMP2 was present on vesicles containing endocytosed {beta}1 integrin. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) silencing of VAMP2 markedly reduced cell surface {alpha}5{beta}1 and inhibited cell adhesion and chemotactic migration to fibronectin, the ECM ligand of {alpha}5{beta}1, without altering cell surface expression of {alpha}2{beta}1 integrin or {alpha}3{beta}1 integrin. By contrast, silencing of VAMP8, another SNARE protein, had no effect on cell surface expression of the integrins or cell adhesion to fibronectin. In addition, VAMP2-mediated trafficking is involved in cell adhesion to collagen but not to laminin. Consistent with disruption of integrin functions in cell proliferation and survival, VAMP2 silencing diminished proliferation and triggered apoptosis. Collectively, these data indicate that VAMP2 mediates the trafficking of {alpha}5{beta}1 integrin to the plasma membrane and VAMP2-dependent integrin trafficking is critical in cell adhesion, migration and survival.

  19. Chloride ion transport into pig jejunal brush-border membrane vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Forsyth, G W; Gabriel, S E

    1988-01-01

    1. This study was carried out to determine the types and activities of carrier proteins which transport the chloride ion in pig jejunal brush-border membranes, with an emphasis on studying the properties of chloride conductance activity in vesicles prepared from these membranes. 2. Sodium-chloride co-transport activity was not detected in this tissue. A sodium-proton antiport with typical amiloride sensitivity was present. An anion exchanger linking chloride to hydroxyl or bicarbonate ions was also found in the pig jejunal brush-border membrane vesicles. 3. Chloride conductance activity in this system was specifically dependent on the buffering agents used for vesicle preparation. Conductance activity could not be demonstrated in vesicles prepared in imidazolium acetate or in HEPES-Tris buffers. HEPES-tetramethylammonium buffering of vesicles in the chloride uptake system produced a significant conductance response to a potassium gradient plus valinomycin. 4. Chloride conductance showed saturable kinetics with respect to substrate concentration, with a Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) of approximately 116 mM and a maximum velocity (Vmax) of 132 nmol (mg protein)-1 min-1. 5. Preliminary screening of potential inhibitors of chloride conductance showed only minimal inhibitor effects of SITS (4-acetamido-4'-isothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-sulphonic acid), anthracene-9-carboxylate, N-phenylanthranilate and piretanide. 6. The conductance activity in pig jejunal vesicles appears to have stringent buffer requirements, and to be relatively insensitive to the effects of reported conductance inhibitors. PMID:2466986

  20. Proteomic analysis of plasma membrane and secretory vesicles from human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Jethwaney, Deepa; Islam, Md Rafiqul; Leidal, Kevin G; de Bernabe, Daniel Beltran-Valero; Campbell, Kevin P; Nauseef, William M; Gibson, Bradford W

    2007-01-01

    Background Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) constitute an essential cellular component of innate host defense against microbial invasion and exhibit a wide array of responses both to particulate and soluble stimuli. As the cells recruited earliest during acute inflammation, PMN respond rapidly and release a variety of potent cytotoxic agents within minutes of exposure to microbes or their products. PMN rely on the redistribution of functionally important proteins, from intracellular compartments to the plasma membrane and phagosome, as the means by which to respond quickly. To determine the range of membrane proteins available for rapid recruitment during PMN activation, we analyzed the proteins in subcellular fractions enriched for plasma membrane and secretory vesicles recovered from the light membrane fraction of resting PMN after Percoll gradient centrifugation and free-flow electrophoresis purification using mass spectrometry-based proteomics methods. Results To identify the proteins light membrane fractions enriched for plasma membrane vesicles and secretory vesicles, we employed a proteomic approach, first using MALDI-TOF (peptide mass fingerprinting) and then by HPLC-MS/MS using a 3D ion trap mass spectrometer to analyze the two vesicle populations from resting PMN. We identified several proteins that are functionally important but had not previously been recovered in PMN secretory vesicles. Two such proteins, 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein (FLAP) and dysferlin were further validated by immunoblot analysis. Conclusion Our data demonstrate the broad array of proteins present in secretory vesicles that provides the PMN with the capacity for remarkable and rapid reorganization of its plasma membrane after exposure to proinflammatory agents or stimuli. PMID:17692124

  1. Vesicle Photonics

    SciTech Connect

    Vasdekis, Andreas E.; Scott, E. A.; Roke, Sylvie; Hubbell, J. A.; Psaltis, D.

    2013-04-03

    Thin membranes, under appropriate boundary conditions, can self-assemble into vesicles, nanoscale bubbles that encapsulate and hence protect or transport molecular payloads. In this paper, we review the types and applications of light fields interacting with vesicles. By encapsulating light-emitting molecules (e.g. dyes, fluorescent proteins, or quantum dots), vesicles can act as particles and imaging agents. Vesicle imaging can take place also under second harmonic generation from vesicle membrane, as well as employing mass spectrometry. Light fields can also be employed to transport vesicles using optical tweezers (photon momentum) or directly pertrurbe the stability of vesicles and hence trigger the delivery of the encapsulated payload (photon energy).

  2. Bacterial Social Networks: Structure and composition of Myxococcus xanthus outer membrane vesicle chains

    PubMed Central

    Remis, Jonathan P.; Wei, Doug; Gorur, Amita; Zemla, Marcin; Haraga, Jessica; Allen, Simon; Witkowska, H. Ewa; Costerton, J. William; Berleman, James E.; Auer, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    Summary The social soil bacterium, Myxococcus xanthus, displays a variety of complex and highly coordinated behaviors, including social motility, predatory rippling and fruiting body formation. Here we show that M. xanthus cells produce a network of outer membrane extensions in the form of vesicles and vesicle chains that interconnect cells. We observed peritrichous display of vesicles and vesicle chains and increased abundance in biofilms compared to planktonic cultures. By applying a range of imaging techniques, including 3D Focused Ion Beam Scanning Electron Microscopy (FIB/SEM), we determined these structures to range between 30-60 nm in width and up to 5 μm in length. Purified vesicle chains consist of typical M. xanthus lipids, fucose, mannose, N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) and N-acetylgalactoseamine (GalNAc) carbohydrates and a small set of cargo protein. The protein content includes CglB and Tgl membrane proteins transferred in a contact-dependent manner. Most significantly, the 3D organization of cells within biofilms indicates that cells are connected via an extensive network of membrane extensions that may connect cells at the level of the periplasmic space. Such a network would allow the transfer of membrane proteins and other molecules between cells, and likely provides a mechanism for the coordination of social activities. PMID:23848955

  3. Bacterial social networks: structure and composition of Myxococcus xanthus outer membrane vesicle chains.

    PubMed

    Remis, Jonathan P; Wei, Dongguang; Gorur, Amita; Zemla, Marcin; Haraga, Jessica; Allen, Simon; Witkowska, H Ewa; Costerton, J William; Berleman, James E; Auer, Manfred

    2014-02-01

    The social soil bacterium, Myxococcus xanthus, displays a variety of complex and highly coordinated behaviours, including social motility, predatory rippling and fruiting body formation. Here we show that M. xanthus cells produce a network of outer membrane extensions in the form of outer membrane vesicle chains and membrane tubes that interconnect cells. We observed peritrichous display of vesicles and vesicle chains, and increased abundance in biofilms compared with planktonic cultures. By applying a range of imaging techniques, including three-dimensional (3D) focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy, we determined these structures to range between 30 and 60 nm in width and up to 5 μm in length. Purified vesicle chains consist of typical M. xanthus lipids, fucose, mannose, N-acetylglucosamine and N-acetylgalactoseamine carbohydrates and a small set of cargo protein. The protein content includes CglB and Tgl outer membrane proteins known to be transferable between cells in a contact-dependent manner. Most significantly, the 3D organization of cells within biofilms indicates that cells are connected via an extensive network of membrane extensions that may connect cells at the level of the periplasmic space. Such a network would allow the transfer of membrane proteins and other molecules between cells, and therefore could provide a mechanism for the coordination of social activities.

  4. Acinetobacter baumannii Outer Membrane Vesicles Elicit a Potent Innate Immune Response via Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Jun, So Hyun; Lee, Jung Hwa; Kim, Bo Ra; Kim, Seung Il; Park, Tae In

    2013-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is increasingly becoming a major nosocomial pathogen. This opportunistic pathogen secretes outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) that interact with host cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of A. baumannii OMVs to elicit a pro-inflammatory response in vitro and the immunopathology in response to A. baumannii OMVs in vivo. OMVs derived from A. baumannii ATCC 19606T induced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6, and chemokine genes, IL-8, macrophage inflammatory protein-1α, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, in epithelial cells in a dose-dependent manner. Disintegration of OMV membrane with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid resulted in low expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes, as compared with the response to intact OMVs. In addition, proteinase K-treated A. baumannii OMVs did not induce significant increase in expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes above the basal level, suggesting that the surface-exposed membrane proteins in intact OMVs are responsible for pro-inflammatory response. Early inflammatory processes, such as vacuolization and detachment of epithelial cells and neutrophilic infiltration, were clearly observed in lungs of mice injected with A. baumannii OMVs. Our data demonstrate that OMVs produced by A. baumannii elicit a potent innate immune response, which may contribute to immunopathology of the infected host. PMID:23977136

  5. Acinetobacter baumannii outer membrane protein A modulates the biogenesis of outer membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Moon, Dong Chan; Choi, Chul Hee; Lee, Jung Hwa; Choi, Chi-Won; Kim, Hye-Yeon; Park, Jeong Soon; Kim, Seung Il; Lee, Je Chul

    2012-02-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii secretes outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) during both in vitro and in vivo growth, but the biogenesis mechanism by which A. baumannii produces OMVs remains undefined. Outer membrane protein A of A. baumannii (AbOmpA) is a major protein in the outer membrane and the C-terminus of AbOmpA interacts with diaminopimelate of peptidoglycan. This study investigated the role of AbOmpA in the biogenesis of A. baumannii OMVs. Quantitative and qualitative approaches were used to analyze OMV biogenesis in A. baumannii ATCC 19606T and an isogenic ΔAbOmpA mutant. OMV production was significantly increased in the ΔAbOmpA mutant compared to wild-type bacteria as demonstrated by quantitation of proteins and lipopolysaccharides (LPS) packaged in OMVs. LPS profiles prepared from OMVs from wild-type bacteria and the ΔAbOmpA mutant had identical patterns, but proteomic analysis showed different protein constituents in OMVs from wild-type bacteria compared to the ΔAbOmpA mutant. In conclusion, AbOmpA influences OMV biogenesis by controlling OMV production and protein composition.

  6. Inhibition of Sendai virus fusion with phospholipid vesicles and human erythrocyte membranes by hydrophobic peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsey, D.R.; Flanagan, T.D.; Young, J.E.; Yeagle, P.L. )

    1991-06-01

    Hydrophobic di- and tripeptides which are capable of inhibiting enveloped virus infection of cells are also capable of inhibiting at least three different types of membrane fusion events. Large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) of N-methyl dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (N-methyl DOPE), containing encapsulated 1-aminonaphthalene-3,6,8-trisulfonic acid (ANTS) and/or p-xylene bis(pyridinium bromide) (DPX), were formed by extrusion. Vesicle fusion and leakage were then monitored with the ANTS/DPX fluorescence assay. Sendai virus fusion with lipid vesicles and Sendai virus fusion with human erythrocyte membranes were measured by following the relief of fluorescence quenching of virus labeled with octadecylrhodamine B chloride (R18). This study found that the effectiveness of the peptides carbobenzoxy-L-Phe-L-Phe (Z-L-Phe-L-Phe), Z-L-Phe, Z-D-Phe, and Z-Gly-L-Phe-L-Phe in inhibiting N-methyl DOPE LUV fusion or fusion of virus with N-methyl DOPE LUV also paralleled their reported ability to block viral infectivity. Furthermore, Z-D-Phe-L-PheGly and Z-Gly-L-Phe inhibited Sendai virus fusion with human erythrocyte membranes with the same relative potency with which they inhibited vesicle-vesicle and virus-vesicle fusion. The evidence suggests a mechanism by which these peptides exert their inhibition of plaque formation by enveloped viruses. This class of inhibitors apparently acts by inhibiting fusion of the viral envelope with the target cell membrane, thereby preventing viral infection. The physical pathway by which these peptides inhibit membrane fusion was investigated. {sup 31}P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of proposed intermediates in the pathway for membrane fusion in LUV revealed that the potent fusion inhibitor Z-D-Phe-L-PheGly selectively altered the structure (or dynamics) of the hypothesized fusion intermediates and that the poor inhibitor Z-Gly-L-Phe did not.

  7. Calcium uptake by intestinal brush border membrane vesicles. Comparison with in vivo calcium transport.

    PubMed Central

    Schedl, H P; Wilson, H D

    1985-01-01

    In prior studies, we examined kinetics of steady state in vivo transepithelial calcium transport in rat and hamster. The present studies related calcium uptake by the brush border to in vivo transport. We measured calcium uptake by brush border membrane vesicles from the two species. In the rat, our prior in vivo studies had shown that (a) calcium transport was mediated, (b) no nonmediated component was detectable, and (c) Vmax was 2.5 times greater in proximal than distal small intestine. In brush border membrane vesicles from the rat, Vmax for the saturable component of calcium uptake was again 2.5 times greater in proximal than distal intestine. Contrasting with in vivo studies, a major nonsaturable component was present in vesicles from proximal and distal small intestine. In the hamster, our previous in vivo studies had shown (1) both mediated and nonmediated components of calcium transport, (2) greater nonmediated transport in proximal than distal small intestines, and (3) Vmax for calcium transport twice as great in distal as in proximal small intestine. In the present study with brush border membrane vesicles from hamster, Vmax for saturable calcium transport was again twice as great in distal as in proximal small intestine. However, nonsaturable calcium transport rates relative to saturable rates were much greater with vesicles than in in vivo studies, and were greater in vesicles from distal than proximal small intestine. Since rates of saturable calcium uptake by brush border membrane vesicles parallel corresponding in vivo mediated transport rates, we conclude that the segmental rates of calcium transport in rat and hamster could be determined by brush border function. PMID:2997294

  8. Outer-membrane vesicles from Gram-negative bacteria: biogenesis and functions

    PubMed Central

    Schwechheimer, Carmen; Kuehn, Meta J.

    2017-01-01

    Outer-membrane vesicles (OMVs) are spherical buds of the outer membrane filled with periplasmic content and are commonly produced by Gram-negative bacteria. The production of OMVs allows bacteria to interact with their environment, and OMVs have been found to mediate diverse functions, including promoting pathogenesis, enabling bacterial survival during stress conditions and regulating microbial interactions within bacterial communities. Additionally, because of this functional versatility, researchers have begun to explore OMVs as a platform for bioengineering applications. In this Review, we discuss recent advances in the study of OMVs, focusing on new insights into the mechanisms of biogenesis and the functions of these vesicles. PMID:26373371

  9. The Human Pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes Releases Lipoproteins as Lipoprotein-rich Membrane Vesicles*

    PubMed Central

    Biagini, Massimiliano; Garibaldi, Manuela; Aprea, Susanna; Pezzicoli, Alfredo; Doro, Francesco; Becherelli, Marco; Taddei, Anna Rita; Tani, Chiara; Tavarini, Simona; Mora, Marirosa; Teti, Giuseppe; D'Oro, Ugo; Nuti, Sandra; Soriani, Marco; Margarit, Immaculada; Rappuoli, Rino; Grandi, Guido; Norais, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are attractive vaccine candidates because they represent a major class of cell surface-exposed proteins in many bacteria and are considered as potential pathogen-associated molecular patterns sensed by Toll-like receptors with built-in adjuvanticity. Although Gram-negative lipoproteins have been extensively characterized, little is known about Gram-positive lipoproteins. We isolated from Streptococcus pyogenes a large amount of lipoproteins organized in vesicles. These vesicles were obtained by weakening the bacterial cell wall with a sublethal concentration of penicillin. Lipid and proteomic analysis of the vesicles revealed that they were enriched in phosphatidylglycerol and almost exclusively composed of lipoproteins. In association with lipoproteins, a few hypothetical proteins, penicillin-binding proteins, and several members of the ExPortal, a membrane microdomain responsible for the maturation of secreted proteins, were identified. The typical lipidic moiety was apparently not necessary for lipoprotein insertion in the vesicle bilayer because they were also recovered from the isogenic diacylglyceryl transferase deletion mutant. The vesicles were not able to activate specific Toll-like receptor 2, indicating that lipoproteins organized in these vesicular structures do not act as pathogen-associated molecular patterns. In light of these findings, we propose to name these new structures Lipoprotein-rich Membrane Vesicles. PMID:26018414

  10. Key Role of Polyphosphoinositides in Dynamics of Fusogenic Nuclear Membrane Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Zhendre, Vanessa; Grélard, Axelle; Garnier-LHomme, Marie; Buchoux, Sébastien; Larijani, Banafshé; Dufourc, Erick J.

    2011-01-01

    The role of phosphoinositides has been thoroughly described in many signalling and membrane trafficking events but their function as modulators of membrane structure and dynamics in membrane fusion has not been investigated. We have reconstructed models that mimic the composition of nuclear envelope precursor membranes with naturally elevated amounts of phosphoinositides. These fusogenic membranes (membrane vesicle 1(MV1) and nuclear envelope remnants (NER) are critical for the assembly of the nuclear envelope. Phospholipids, cholesterol, and polyphosphoinositides, with polyunsaturated fatty acid chains that were identified in the natural nuclear membranes by lipid mass spectrometry, have been used to reconstruct complex model membranes mimicking nuclear envelope precursor membranes. Structural and dynamic events occurring in the membrane core and at the membrane surface were monitored by solid-state deuterium and phosphorus NMR. “MV1-like” (PC∶PI∶PIP∶PIP2, 30∶20∶18∶12, mol%) membranes that exhibited high levels of PtdIns, PtdInsP and PtdInsP2 had an unusually fluid membrane core (up to 20% increase, compared to membranes with low amounts of phosphoinositides to mimic the endoplasmic reticulum). “NER-like” (PC∶CH∶PI∶PIP∶PIP2, 28∶42∶16∶7∶7, mol%) membranes containing high amounts of both cholesterol and phosphoinositides exhibited liquid-ordered phase properties, but with markedly lower rigidity (10–15% decrease). Phosphoinositides are the first lipids reported to counterbalance the ordering effect of cholesterol. At the membrane surface, phosphoinositides control the orientation dynamics of other lipids in the model membranes, while remaining unchanged themselves. This is an important finding as it provides unprecedented mechanistic insight into the role of phosphoinositides in membrane dynamics. Biological implications of our findings and a model describing the roles of fusogenic membrane vesicles are proposed. PMID:21931619

  11. Effect of physical constraints on the mechanisms of membrane fusion: bolaform lipid vesicles as model systems.

    PubMed Central

    Relini, A; Cassinadri, D; Fan, Q; Gulik, A; Mirghani, Z; De Rosa, M; Gliozzi, A

    1996-01-01

    Bolaform lipid vesicles were used to study the effect of physical constraints on membrane fusion. In these vesicles the membrane is organized in a single monolayer, because of the presence of covalent bonds in its middle plane. Therefore, the formation of fusion intermediates is subject to higher energy barriers and greater geometrical constraints than is usual in bilayer membranes. Bolaform lipids were extracted from the thermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus. These lipids can be divided into two classes, the monosubstituted molecules, in which one of the polar heads is glycerol, and the bisubstituted molecules, endowed with two complex polar heads. The fusion process in vesicles composed of different mixtures of monosubstituted/bisubstituted molecules was studied by means of fluorescence techniques. Ca2+ or poly(ethylene glycol) was employed as a fusogenic agent. We found that fusion of such constrained membranes is still possible, provided that molecules able to mediate a structural rearrangement of the membrane are present. This condition is fulfilled by monosubstituted molecules, which are able to partition the glycerol headgroup in the apolar moiety. In addition, the presence of traces (approximately 5%) of the monopolar compound diphytanylglycerol is an important factor for fusion to occur. On the contrary, vesicles formed by bisubstituted molecules are unable to fuse, irrespective of the fusogen employed. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:8889155

  12. A role for BARS at the fission step of COPI vesicle formation from Golgi membrane.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jia-Shu; Lee, Stella Y; Spanò, Stefania; Gad, Helge; Zhang, Leiliang; Nie, Zhongzhen; Bonazzi, Matteo; Corda, Daniela; Luini, Alberto; Hsu, Victor W

    2005-12-07

    The core complex of Coat Protein I (COPI), known as coatomer, is sufficient to induce coated vesicular-like structures from liposomal membrane. In the context of biological Golgi membrane, both palmitoyl-coenzyme A (p-coA) and ARFGAP1, a GTPase-activating protein (GAP) for ADP-Ribosylation Factor 1, also participate in vesicle formation, but how their roles may be linked remains unknown. Moreover, whether COPI vesicle formation from Golgi membrane requires additional factors also remains unclear. We now show that Brefeldin-A ADP-Ribosylated Substrate (BARS) plays a critical role in the fission step of COPI vesicle formation from Golgi membrane. This role of BARS requires its interaction with ARFGAP1, which is in turn regulated oppositely by p-coA and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, which act as cofactors of BARS. Our findings not only identify a new factor needed for COPI vesicle formation from Golgi membrane but also reveal a surprising mechanism by which the roles of p-coA and GAP are linked in this process.

  13. Membrane vesicle release in bacteria, eukaryotes, and archaea: a conserved yet underappreciated aspect of microbial life.

    PubMed

    Deatherage, Brooke L; Cookson, Brad T

    2012-06-01

    Interaction of microbes with their environment depends on features of the dynamic microbial surface throughout cell growth and division. Surface modifications, whether used to acquire nutrients, defend against other microbes, or resist the pressures of a host immune system, facilitate adaptation to unique surroundings. The release of bioactive membrane vesicles (MVs) from the cell surface is conserved across microbial life, in bacteria, archaea, fungi, and parasites. MV production occurs not only in vitro but also in vivo during infection, underscoring the influence of these surface organelles in microbial physiology and pathogenesis through delivery of enzymes, toxins, communication signals, and antigens recognized by the innate and adaptive immune systems. Derived from a variety of organisms that span kingdoms of life and called by several names (membrane vesicles, outer membrane vesicles [OMVs], exosomes, shedding microvesicles, etc.), the conserved functions and mechanistic strategies of MV release are similar, including the use of ESCRT proteins and ESCRT protein homologues to facilitate these processes in archaea and eukaryotic microbes. Although forms of MV release by different organisms share similar visual, mechanistic, and functional features, there has been little comparison across microbial life. This underappreciated conservation of vesicle release, and the resulting functional impact throughout the tree of life, explored in this review, stresses the importance of vesicle-mediated processes throughout biology.

  14. Multiple Membrane Interactions and Versatile Vesicle Deformations Elicited by Melittin

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Tomoyoshi; Nomura, Fumimasa; Yokoyama, Yasunori; Tanaka-Takiguchi, Yohko; Homma, Michio; Takiguchi, Kingo

    2013-01-01

    Melittin induces various reactions in membranes and has been widely studied as a model for membrane-interacting peptide; however, the mechanism whereby melittin elicits its effects remains unclear. Here, we observed melittin-induced changes in individual giant liposomes using direct real-time imaging by dark-field optical microscopy, and the mechanisms involved were correlated with results obtained using circular dichroism, cosedimentation, fluorescence quenching of tryptophan residues, and electron microscopy. Depending on the concentration of negatively charged phospholipids in the membrane and the molecular ratio between lipid and melittin, melittin induced the “increasing membrane area”, “phased shrinkage”, or “solubilization” of liposomes. In phased shrinkage, liposomes formed small particles on their surface and rapidly decreased in size. Under conditions in which the increasing membrane area, phased shrinkage, or solubilization were mainly observed, the secondary structure of melittin was primarily estimated as an α-helix, β-like, or disordered structure, respectively. When the increasing membrane area or phased shrinkage occurred, almost all melittin was bound to the membranes and reached more hydrophobic regions of the membranes than when solubilization occurred. These results indicate that the various effects of melittin result from its ability to adopt various structures and membrane-binding states depending on the conditions. PMID:23594437

  15. Bioinspired polymer vesicles and membranes for biological and medical applications.

    PubMed

    Palivan, Cornelia G; Goers, Roland; Najer, Adrian; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Car, Anja; Meier, Wolfgang

    2016-01-21

    Biological membranes play an essential role in living organisms by providing stable and functional compartments, preserving cell architecture, whilst supporting signalling and selective transport that are mediated by a variety of proteins embedded in the membrane. However, mimicking cell membranes - to be applied in artificial systems - is very challenging because of the vast complexity of biological structures. In this respect a highly promising strategy to designing multifunctional hybrid materials/systems is to combine biological molecules with polymer membranes or to design membranes with intrinsic stimuli-responsive properties. Here we present supramolecular polymer assemblies resulting from self-assembly of mostly amphiphilic copolymers either as 3D compartments (polymersomes, PICsomes, peptosomes), or as planar membranes (free-standing films, solid-supported membranes, membrane-mimetic brushes). In a bioinspired strategy, such synthetic assemblies decorated with biomolecules by insertion/encapsulation/attachment, serve for development of multifunctional systems. In addition, when the assemblies are stimuli-responsive, their architecture and properties change in the presence of stimuli, and release a cargo or allow "on demand" a specific in situ reaction. Relevant examples are included for an overview of bioinspired polymer compartments with nanometre sizes and membranes as candidates in applications ranging from drug delivery systems, up to artificial organelles, or active surfaces. Both the advantages of using polymer supramolecular assemblies and their present limitations are included to serve as a basis for future improvements.

  16. Protein-mediated Selective Enclosure of Early Replicators Inside of Membranous Vesicles: First Step Towards Cell Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laiterä, Tiina; Lehto, Kirsi

    2009-12-01

    Containment in cell membranes is essential for all contemporary life, and apparently even the earliest life forms had to be somehow contained. It has been postulated that random enclosure of replicating molecules inside of spontaneously assembled vesicles would have formed the initial cellular ancestors. However, completely random re-formation or division of such primitive vesicles would have abolished the heritability of their contents, nullifying any selective advantage to them. We propose that the containment of the early replicators in membranous vesicles was adopted only after the invention of genetically encoded proteins, and that selective enclosure of target molecules was mediated by specific proteins. A similar containment process is still utilised by various RNA- and retroviruses to isolate their replication complexes from the host’s intracellular environment. Such selective encapsulation would have protected the replicators against competitor and parasitic sequences, and provided a strong positive selection within the replicator communities.

  17. Positioning lipid membrane domains in giant vesicles by micro-organization of aqueous cytoplasm mimic.

    PubMed

    Cans, Ann-Sofie; Andes-Koback, Meghan; Keating, Christine D

    2008-06-11

    We report localization of lipid membrane microdomains to specific "poles" of asymmetric giant vesicles (GVs) in response to local internal composition. Interior aqueous microdomains were generated in a simple model cytoplasm composed of a poly(ethyleneglycol) (PEG)/dextran aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) encapsulated in the vesicles. The GV membrane composition used here was a modification of a DOPC/DPPC/cholesterol mixture known to form micrometer-scale liquid ordered and liquid disordered domains; we added lipids with PEG 2000 Da-modified headgroups. Osmotically induced budding of the ATPS-containing GVs led to structures where the PEG-rich and dextran-rich interior aqueous phases were in contact with different regions of the vesicle membrane. Liquid ordered (L o) membrane domains rich in PEG-terminated lipids preferentially coated the PEG-rich aqueous phase vesicle "body", while coexisting liquid disordered (L d) membrane domains coated the dextran-rich aqueous phase "bud". Membrane domain positioning resulted from interactions between lipid headgroups and the interior aqueous polymer solutions, e.g., PEGylated headgroups with PEG and dextran polymers. Heating resulted first in patchy membranes where L o and L d domains no longer showed any preference for coating the PEG-rich vs dextran-rich interior aqueous volumes, and eventually complete lipid mixing. Upon cooling lipid domains again coated their preferred interior aqueous microvolume. This work shows that nonspecific interactions between interior aqueous contents and the membrane that encapsulates them can drive local chemical heterogeneity, and offers a primitive experimental model for membrane and cytoplasmic polarity in biological cells.

  18. Bilayer vesicles of amphiphilic cyclodextrins: host membranes that recognize guest molecules.

    PubMed

    Falvey, Patrick; Lim, Choon Woo; Darcy, Raphael; Revermann, Tobias; Karst, Uwe; Giesbers, Marcel; Marcelis, Antonius T M; Lazar, Adina; Coleman, Anthony W; Reinhoudt, David N; Ravoo, Bart Jan

    2005-02-04

    A family of amphiphilic cyclodextrins (6, 7) has been prepared through 6-S-alkylation (alkyl=n-dodecyl and n-hexadecyl) of the primary side and 2-O-PEGylation of the secondary side of alpha-, beta-, and gamma-cyclodextrins (PEG=poly(ethylene glycol)). These cyclodextrins form nonionic bilayer vesicles in aqueous solution. The bilayer vesicles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, dye encapsulation, and capillary electrophoresis. The molecular packing of the amphiphilic cyclodextrins was investigated by using small-angle X-ray diffraction of bilayers deposited on glass and pressure-area isotherms obtained from Langmuir monolayers on the air-water interface. The bilayer thickness is dependent on the chain length, whereas the average molecular surface area scales with the cyclodextrin ring size. The alkyl chains of the cyclodextrins in the bilayer are deeply interdigitated. Molecular recognition of a hydrophobic anion (adamantane carboxylate) by the cyclodextrin vesicles was investigated by using capillary electrophoresis, thereby exploiting the increase in electrophoretic mobility that occurs when the hydrophobic anions bind to the nonionic cyclodextrin vesicles. It was found that in spite of the presence of oligo(ethylene glycol) substituents, the beta-cyclodextrin vesicles retain their characteristic affinity for adamantane carboxylate (association constant K(a)=7.1 x 10(3) M(-1)), whereas gamma-cyclodextrin vesicles have less affinity (K(a)=3.2 x 10(3) M(-1)), and alpha-cyclodextrin or non-cyclodextrin, nonionic vesicles have very little affinity (K(a) approximately 100 M(-1)). Specific binding of the adamantane carboxylate to beta-cyclodextrin vesicles was also evident in competition experiments with beta-cyclodextrin in solution. Hence, the cyclodextrin vesicles can function as host bilayer membranes that recognize small guest molecules by specific noncovalent interaction.

  19. How can nanotechnology help membrane vesicle-based cancer immunotherapy development?

    PubMed

    Tian, Xin; Zhu, Motao; Nie, Guangjun

    2013-01-01

    Exosomes are nanosized vesicles originating from endosomal compartments and secreted by most living cells. In the past decade, exosomes have emerged as potent tools for cancer immunotherapy due to their important roles in modulation of immune responses, and promising results have been achieved in exosome-based immunotherapy. The recent rapid progress of nanotechnology, especially on tailored design of nanocarriers for drug delivery based on both passive and active targeting strategies, sheds light on re-engineering native membrane vesicles for enhanced immune regulation and therapy. Applications of nanotechnology toolkits might provide new opportunity not only for value-added therapeutic or diagnostic strategies based on exosomes in cancer immunotherapy, but also new insights for biogenesis and biological relevance of membrane vesicles. This commentary focuses on the recent development and limitations of using exosomes in cancer immunotherapy and our perspectives on how nanomaterials with potential immune regulatory effects could be introduced into exosome-based immunotherapy.

  20. Two-compartment behavior during transport of folate compounds in L1210 cell plasma membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, C.H.; Dembo, M.; Sirotnak, F.M.

    1982-01-01

    The transport of (/sup 3/H) 1,L 5-formyltetrahydrofolate, (/sup 3/H) folic acid, and (/sup 3/H)methotrexate by L1210 cell plasma membrane vesicles exhibited multicompartmental behavior. Two separate vesicular compartments (parallel relationship) of approximately equal volume were revealed during measurements of influx and efflux. Flux in one compartment was rapid, saturable, highly temperature-sensitive, and inhibited by pCMBS. Flux in the other compartment exhibited all of the characteristics of passive diffusion. These results imply that our plasma membrane vesicle preparations consist of a mixture of two functional species. Transport of folate into one of these species occurs by passive diffusion alone, whereas transport into the other kind of vesicle occurs by both passive diffusion and carrier-facilitated transport.

  1. Resonance energy transfer imaging of phospholipid vesicle interaction with a planar phospholipid membrane: undulations and attachment sites in the region of calcium-mediated membrane--membrane adhesion

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Membrane fusion of a phospholipid vesicle with a planar lipid bilayer is preceded by an initial prefusion stage in which a region of the vesicle membrane adheres to the planar membrane. A resonance energy transfer (RET) imaging microscope, with measured spectral transfer functions and a pair of radiometrically calibrated video cameras, was used to determine both the area of the contact region and the distances between the membranes within this zone. Large vesicles (5-20 microns diam) were labeled with the donor fluorophore coumarin- phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), while the planar membrane was labeled with the acceptor rhodamine-PE. The donor was excited with 390 nm light, and separate images of donor and acceptor emission were formed by the microscope. Distances between the membranes at each location in the image were determined from the RET rate constant (kt) computed from the acceptor:donor emission intensity ratio. In the absence of an osmotic gradient, the vesicles stably adhered to the planar membrane, and the dyes did not migrate between membranes. The region of contact was detected as an area of planar membrane, coincident with the vesicle image, over which rhodamine fluorescence was sensitized by RET. The total area of the contact region depended biphasically on the Ca2+ concentration, but the distance between the bilayers in this zone decreased with increasing [Ca2+]. The changes in area and separation were probably related to divalent cation effects on electrostatic screening and binding to charged membranes. At each [Ca2+], the intermembrane separation varied between 1 and 6 nm within each contact region, indicating membrane undulation prior to adhesion. Intermembrane separation distances < or = 2 nm were localized to discrete sites that formed in an ordered arrangement throughout the contact region. The area of the contact region occupied by these punctate attachment sites was increased at high [Ca2+]. Membrane fusion may be initiated at these sites of

  2. Polymeric capsule-cushioned leukocyte cell membrane vesicles as a biomimetic delivery platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Changyong; Wu, Zhiguang; Lin, Zhihua; Lin, Xiankun; He, Qiang

    2016-02-01

    We report a biomimetic delivery of microsized capsule-cushioned leukocyte membrane vesicles (CLMVs) through the conversion of freshly reassembled leukocyte membrane vesicles (LMVs), including membrane lipids and membrane-bound proteins onto the surface of layer-by-layer assembled polymeric multilayer microcapsules. The leukocyte membrane coating was verified by using electron microscopy, a quartz crystal microbalance, dynamic light scattering, and confocal laser scanning microscopy. The resulting CLMVs have the ability to effectively evade clearance by the immune system and thus prolong the circulation time in mice. Moreover, we also show that the right-side-out leukocyte membrane coating can distinctly improve the accumulation of capsules in tumor sites through the molecular recognition of membrane-bound proteins of CLMVs with those of tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. The natural cell membrane camouflaged polymeric multilayer capsules with the immunosuppressive and tumor-recognition functionalities of natural leukocytes provide a new biomimetic delivery platform for disease therapy.We report a biomimetic delivery of microsized capsule-cushioned leukocyte membrane vesicles (CLMVs) through the conversion of freshly reassembled leukocyte membrane vesicles (LMVs), including membrane lipids and membrane-bound proteins onto the surface of layer-by-layer assembled polymeric multilayer microcapsules. The leukocyte membrane coating was verified by using electron microscopy, a quartz crystal microbalance, dynamic light scattering, and confocal laser scanning microscopy. The resulting CLMVs have the ability to effectively evade clearance by the immune system and thus prolong the circulation time in mice. Moreover, we also show that the right-side-out leukocyte membrane coating can distinctly improve the accumulation of capsules in tumor sites through the molecular recognition of membrane-bound proteins of CLMVs with those of tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. The natural

  3. Solid-supported block copolymer membranes through interfacial adsorption of charged block copolymer vesicles.

    PubMed

    Rakhmatullina, Ekaterina; Meier, Wolfgang

    2008-06-17

    The properties of amphiphilic block copolymer membranes can be tailored within a wide range of physical parameters. This makes them promising candidates for the development of new (bio)sensors based on solid-supported biomimetic membranes. Here we investigated the interfacial adsorption of polyelectrolyte vesicles on three different model substrates to find the optimum conditions for formation of planar membranes. The polymer vesicles were made from amphiphilic ABA triblock copolymers with short, positively charged poly(2,2-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) end blocks and a hydrophobic poly( n-butyl methacrylate) (PBMA) middle block. We observed reorganization of the amphiphilic copolymer chains from vesicular structures into a 1.5+/-0.04 nm thick layer on the hydrophobic HOPG surface. However, this film starts disrupting and dewetting upon drying. In contrast, adsorption of the vesicles on the negatively charged SiO2 and mica substrates induced vesicle fusion and formation of planar, supported block copolymer films. This process seems to be controlled by the surface charge density of the substrate and concentration of the block copolymers in solution. The thickness of the copolymer membrane on mica was comparable to the thickness of phospholipid bilayers.

  4. Vesicle fusion to planar membranes is enhanced by cholesterol and low temperature.

    PubMed

    Lee, David E; Lew, Matthew G; Woodbury, Dixon J

    2013-01-01

    Lipid composition and properties play an important role in many cellular properties such as fusion of vesicles to cell membranes, an essential process for exocytosis. Using a model system composed of artificial vesicles (liposomes) and artificial membranes (planar lipid bilayers), we observed that fusion is significantly affected by the lipid phase of the planar membrane. To determine the effect of lipid phases on fusion rates, we utilized the nystatin/ergosterol fusion assay and stimulated fusion with an osmotic gradient. Phase of the planar membrane was altered by changing cholesterol or temperature while the vesicular lipids were held constant. Liquid disordered (L(d) or L(α)) planar membranes were formed from phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine with unsaturated acyl chains. Addition of cholesterol shifts these membranes to the liquid ordered (L(o)) phase and increases liposome fusion. Planar membranes in the L(α) phase were also made from dipalmitoylphoshatidylcholine (DPPC) above the transition temperature (T(m)) of 41.5 ° C. Decreasing the temperature below T(m) shifts these membranes into the ripple phase (P(β')) and also increases liposome fusion. The cholesterol and temperature data are consistent with the hypothesis that fusion is promoted in membranes that have greater exposure of their lipid tails or in membranes which can form leaflet domains with negative curvature. The data are not consistent with the hypothesis that lipid mismatch drives fusion.

  5. Molecular cloning and expression of a cDNA encoding the rabbit ileal villus cell basolateral membrane Na+/H+ exchanger.

    PubMed Central

    Tse, C M; Ma, A I; Yang, V W; Watson, A J; Levine, S; Montrose, M H; Potter, J; Sardet, C; Pouyssegur, J; Donowitz, M

    1991-01-01

    A cDNA clone encoding a rabbit ileal villus cell Na+/H+ exchanger was isolated and its complete nucleotide sequence was determined. The cDNA is 4 kb long and contains 322 bp of 5'-untranslated region, 2451 bp of open reading frame and 1163 bp of 3'-untranslated area, with 70%, 91% and 40% identity to the human sequence, respectively. Amino acid sequence deduced from the longest open reading frame indicated a protein of 816 residues (predicted Mr 90,716) which exhibits 95% amino acid identity to the human Na+/H+ exchanger. The two putative glycosylation sites in the human Na+/H+ exchanger are conserved in this protein, suggesting that it is a glycoprotein. Stable transfection of the cDNA into an Na+/H+ exchanger deficient fibroblast cell line, established Na+/H+ exchange. The Na+/H+ exchanger was stimulated by serum and a phorbol ester but not by 8-Br-cAMP. In Northern blot analysis, the cDNA hybridized to a 4.8 kb message in rabbit ileal villus cells, kidney cortex, kidney medulla, adrenal gland, brain and descending colon and to a 5.2 kb message in cultured human colonic cancer cell lines, HT29-18 and Caco-2. In immunoblotting, a polyclonal antibody raised against a fusion protein of beta-galactosidase and the C-terminal 158 amino acids of the human Na+/H+ exchanger identified a rabbit ileal basolateral membrane protein of 94 kd and only weakly interacted with the ileal brush border membrane. In immunocytochemical studies using ileal villus and crypt epithelial cells, the same antibody identified basolateral and not brush border epitopes. Restriction analysis of genomic DNA with a 462 bp PstI-AccI fragment of the rabbit Na+/H+ exchanger strongly suggests the existence of closely related Na+/H+ exchanger genes. The near identity of the basolateral Na+/H+ exchanger and the human Na+/H+ exchanger plus the ubiquitous expression of this message suggests that the ileal basolateral Na+/H+ exchanger is the 'housekeeping' Na+/H+ exchanger. Images PMID:1712287

  6. Raman spectroscopy of single extracellular vesicles reveals subpopulations with varying membrane content (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Zachary J.; Lee, Changwon; Rojalin, Tatu; Carney, Randy P.; Hazari, Sidhartha; Knudson, Alisha; Lam, Kit S.; Saari, Heikki; Lazaro Ibañez, Elisa; Viitala, Tapani; Laaksonen, Timo; Yliperttula, Marjo; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian

    2016-03-01

    Exosomes are small (~100nm) membrane bound vesicles excreted by cells as part of their normal biological processes. These extracellular vesicles are currently an area of intense research, since they were recently found to carry functional mRNA that allows transfer of proteins and other cellular instructions between cells. Exosomes have been implicated in a wide range of diseases, including cancer. Cancer cells are known to have increased exosome production, and may use those exosomes to prepare remote environments for metastasis. Therefore, there is a strong need to develop characterization methods to help understand the structure and function of these vesicles. However, current techniques, such as proteomics and genomics technologies, rely on aggregating a large amount of exosome material and reporting on chemical content that is averaged over many millions of exosomes. Here we report on the use of laser-tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS) to probe individual vesicles, discovering distinct heterogeneity among exosomes both within a cell line, as well as between different cell lines. Through principal components analysis followed by hierarchical clustering, we have identified four "subpopulations" of exosomes shared across seven cell lines. The key chemical differences between these subpopulations, as determined by spectral analysis of the principal component loadings, are primarily related to membrane composition. Specifically, the differences can be ascribed to cholesterol content, cholesterol to phospholipid ratio, and surface protein expression. Thus, we have shown LTRS to be a powerful method to probe the chemical content of single extracellular vesicles.

  7. MPP1 as a Factor Regulating Phase Separation in Giant Plasma Membrane-Derived Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Podkalicka, Joanna; Biernatowska, Agnieszka; Majkowski, Michał; Grzybek, Michał; Sikorski, Aleksander F.

    2015-01-01

    The existence of membrane-rafts helps to conceptually understand the spatiotemporal organization of membrane-associated events (signaling, fusion, fission, etc.). However, as rafts themselves are nanoscopic, dynamic, and transient assemblies, they cannot be directly observed in a metabolizing cell by traditional microscopy. The observation of phase separation in giant plasma membrane-derived vesicles from live cells is a powerful tool for studying lateral heterogeneity in eukaryotic cell membranes, specifically in the context of membrane rafts. Microscopic phase separation is detectable by fluorescent labeling, followed by cooling of the membranes below their miscibility phase transition temperature. It remains unclear, however, if this lipid-driven process is tuneable in any way by interactions with proteins. Here, we demonstrate that MPP1, a member of the MAGUK family, can modulate membrane properties such as the fluidity and phase separation capability of giant plasma membrane-derived vesicles. Our data suggest that physicochemical domain properties of the membrane can be modulated, without major changes in lipid composition, through proteins such as MPP1. PMID:25954878

  8. Exchange of monooleoylphosphatidylcholine with single egg phosphatidylcholine vesicle membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Zhelev, D V

    1996-01-01

    In a previous paper we described the experiments and the framework of a model for the exchange of monooleoylphosphatidylcholine with a single egg phosphatidylcholine membrane. In the present paper a model is presented that relates the experimentally measured apparent characteristics of the overall kinetics of lysolipid exchange to the true rates of lysolipid exchange and interbilayer transfer. It is shown that the adsorption of the lysolipid follows two pathways: one through the adsorption of lipid monomers and other through the fusion of micelles. The desorption of lysolipid follows a single pathway, namely, the desorption of monomers. The overall rate of fast desorption under convective flow conditions gives the true rate of monomer desorption from the outer membrane monolayer. The overall rate of both slow lysolipid uptake and slow desorption gives the rate of interbilayer transfer. Because of the uneven distribution of lysolipid between the two monolayers during its uptake, one of the membrane monolayers is apparently extended relative to the other. This relative extension of one of the monolayers induces a monolayer tension. The induced monolayer tension can increase up to 7 mN.m-1, when most of the intercalated lysolipid only partitions into the monolayer facing the lysolipid solution. This value is similar to the measured value for the critical monolayer tension of membrane failure, which is on the order of 5 mN.m-1. The similarity of the magnitudes of the induced monolayer tension during monooleoylphosphatidylcholine exchange and the monolayer tension of membrane failure suggests that the interbilayer lipid transfer may be affected by the formation of short living membrane defects. Furthermore, the pH-induced interbilayer exchange of phosphatidylglycerol is considered. In this case, it is shown that the rate of interbilayer transfer is a function of the phosphatidylglycerol concentration in the membrane. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:8804609

  9. Fundamental Studies of Assembly and Mechanical Properties of Lipid Bilayer Membranes and Unilamellar Vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xi

    This dissertation work focuses on: (i) obtaining a phospholipid bilayer membrane (LBM)/conducting electrode system with low defect density and optimized rigidity; (ii) investigating vesicle stability and mechanical properties. LBM is a simplified yet representative cell membrane model. LBMs assembled on conductive surfaces can probe protein-LBM interactions activities electrochemically. Sterically stabilized vesicles could be used as cell models or for drug delivery. The main challenges for LBM assembly on gold are vesicles do not spontaneously rupture to form LBMs on gold and the roughness of the gold substrate has considerable influence on molecular film defect density. In this study, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) vesicles were functionalized with 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine- N-poly(ethylene glycol)-2000-N-[3-(2-pyridyldithio)propionate] (DSPE-PEG-PDP) to yield stable LBMs on gold without surface modification. A template-stripping method was used to obtain atomically flat and pristine gold surfaces. The critical force to initiate vesicle rupture decreases with increasing DSPE-PEG-PDP concentration, indicating that gold-thiolate bonding between DSPE-PEG-PDP and gold substrates promotes LBM formation. Mechanical properties of LBMs and vesicles were investigated as a function of DSPE-PEG-PDP concentration via Atomic Force Microscopy. The elastic moduli of LBMs were determined with DSPE-PEG-PDP concentration ranging from 0mol% to 24mol% and were found to depend on PEG chain conformation. Incorporating DSPE-PEG-PDP molecules with PEG in mushroom conformation results in a decrease of LBM rigidity, while incorporating PEG in brush conformation leads to LBM stiffening. Contrarily, mechanical properties of functionalized vesicles did not vary significantly by varying DSPE-PEG-PDP concentration. LBM with tunable rigidity by adjusting DSPE-PEG-PDP concentration provides a versatile cell membrane model for studying protein or

  10. Electron transport and electrochemical proton gradient in membrane vesicles of Clostridium thermoautotrophicum.

    PubMed Central

    Hugenholtz, J; Ljungdahl, L G

    1989-01-01

    Membrane vesicles of Clostridium thermoautotrophicum containing carbon monoxide dehydrogenase generated a proton motive force when exposed to CO. This proton motive force, with a value of -140 mV, consisted of only an electrical potential at pH 7.5 and above and of an electrical potential and pH gradient at a lower pH. The proton motive force drove the uptake of L-alanine by the vesicles to a concentration of 300 times that of the medium. PMID:2708323

  11. Genome-Wide Assessment of Outer Membrane Vesicle Production in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kulp, Adam J.; Sun, Bo; Ai, Teresa; Manning, Andrew J.; Orench-Rivera, Nichole

    2015-01-01

    The production of outer membrane vesicles by Gram-negative bacteria has been well documented; however, the mechanism behind the biogenesis of these vesicles remains unclear. Here a high-throughput experimental method and systems-scale analysis was conducted to determine vesiculation values for the whole genome knockout library of Escherichia coli mutant strains (Keio collection). The resultant dataset quantitatively recapitulates previously observed phenotypes and implicates nearly 150 new genes in the process of vesiculation. Gene functional and biochemical pathway analyses suggest that mutations that truncate outer membrane structures such as lipopolysaccharide and enterobacterial common antigen lead to hypervesiculation, whereas mutants in oxidative stress response pathways result in lower levels. This study expands and refines the current knowledge regarding the cellular pathways required for outer membrane vesiculation in E. coli. PMID:26406465

  12. Confining a fluid membrane vesicle of toroidal topology in an adhesive hard sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouzar, Lila; Menas, Ferhat; Müller, Martin Michael

    2017-03-01

    We discuss how the equilibrium shapes of a confined toroidal fluid membrane vesicle change when an adhesion between membrane and confining sphere is taken into account. The case without adhesion was studied in Ref. [1]. Different types of solution were found and assembled in a phase diagram as a function of area and reduced volume of the membrane. Depending on the degree of confinement the vesicle is either free, in contact along a circle (contact-circle solutions) or on a surface (contact-area solutions). All solutions without adhesion are up-down symmetric. When the container is adhesive, the phase diagram is altered and new kinds of solution without up-down symmetry are found. For increasing values of adhesion the region of contact-circle solutions shrinks until it vanishes completely from the phase diagram.

  13. Formation of Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Derived Protrusions and Vesicles in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Akihiro; Fujimoto, Masaru; Katayama, Kenta; Yamaoka, Shohei; Tsutsumi, Nobuhiro; Arimura, Shin-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles that have inner and outer membranes. In plants, the inner membrane has been well studied but relatively little is known about the outer membrane. Here we report that Arabidopsis cells have mitochondrial outer membrane-derived structures, some of which protrude from the main body of mitochondria (mitochondrial outer-membrane protrusions; MOPs), while others form vesicle-like structures without a matrix marker. The latter vesicle-like structures are similar to some mammalian MDVs (mitochondrial-derived vesicles). Live imaging demonstrated that a plant MDV budded off from the tip of a MOP. MDVs were also observed in the drp3a drp3b double mutant, indicating that they could be formed without the mitochondrial fission factors DRP3A and DRP3B. Double staining studies showed that the MDVs were not peroxisomes, endosomes, Golgi apparatus or trans-Golgi network (TGN). The numbers of MDVs and MOPs increased in senescent leaves and after dark treatment. Together, these results suggest that MDVs and MOPs are related to leaf senescence. PMID:26752045

  14. Single vesicle observations of the cardiolipin-cytochrome C interaction: induction of membrane morphology changes.

    PubMed

    Beales, Paul A; Bergstrom, Chris L; Geerts, Nienke; Groves, John T; Vanderlick, T Kyle

    2011-05-17

    We present a novel platform for investigating the composition-specific interactions of proteins (or other biologically relevant molecules) with model membranes composed of compositionally distinct domains. We focus on the interaction between a mitochondrial-specific lipid, cardiolipin (CL), and a peripheral membrane protein, cytochrome c (cyt c). We engineer vesicles with compositions such that they phase separate into coexisting liquid phases and the lipid of interest, CL, preferentially localizes into one of the domains (the liquid disordered (L(d)) phase). The presence of CL-rich and CL-depleted domains within the same vesicle provides a built-in control experiment to simultaneously observe the behavior of two membrane compositions under identical conditions. We find that cyt c binds strongly to CL-rich domains and observe fascinating morphological transitions within these regions of membrane. CL-rich domains start to form small buds and eventually fold up into a collapsed state. We also observe that cyt c can induce a strong attraction between the CL-rich domains of adjacent vesicles as demonstrated by the development of large osculating regions between these domains. Qualitatively similar behavior is observed when other polycationic proteins or polymers of a similar size and net charge are used instead of cyt c. We argue that these striking phenomena can be simply understood by consideration of colloidal forces between the protein and the membrane. We discuss the possible biological implications of our observations in relation to the structure and function of mitochondria.

  15. Isolation of Chlamydia trachomatis and membrane vesicles derived from host and bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Frohlich, Kyla; Hua, Ziyu; Wang, Jin; Shen, Li

    2012-01-01

    The study of intracellular bacteria and nanometer-size membrane vesicles within infected host cells poses an important challenge as it is difficult to identify each distinct population in the context of the complex populations generated from active host-pathogen interactions. Here, suspension cultures of L929 cells infected with the prevalent obligate intracellular bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis strain F/Cal-IC-13 are utilized for the large scale preparation and isolation of natural membrane vesicles and bacterial forms. Cell lysis with nitrogen cavitation in combination with differential centrifugation, OptiPrep™ density gradient separation, and immunoenrichment using anti-chlamydial lipopolysaccharide antibodies and MagnaBind beads allows for the isolation of both productive and persistent bacterial forms, as well as membrane vesicles derived from the host and pathogen. We have evaluated these populations by electron microscopy and Western blot analysis for identification of biomarkers. In addition, purified persistent forms of C. trachomatis induced by ampicillin display adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) transport activity, suggesting that ampicillin-induced persistent C. trachomatis organisms, at least in part, rely upon host ATP as an energy source. Importantly, several chlamydial cytotoxic and/or secreted proteins are demonstrated to be associated with these vesicles, supporting the idea that membrane vesicles are generated by Chlamydia as a means of carrying and delivering virulence factors necessary for pathogenesis. The ability to produce large-scale infections and generate distinct bacteria and host-derived populations for biochemical analysis, while reducing the burdens of time and cost have implications in all areas of chlamydiology. These protocols can be applied to other strains of C. trachomatis or other intracellular bacteria. PMID:22960504

  16. Plant plasma membrane aquaporins in natural vesicles as potential stabilizers and carriers of glucosinolates.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Ballesta, Maria Del Carmen; Pérez-Sánchez, Horacio; Moreno, Diego A; Carvajal, Micaela

    2016-07-01

    Their biodegradable nature and ability to target cells make biological vesicles potential nanocarriers for bioactives delivery. In this work, the interaction between proteoliposomes enriched in aquaporins derived from broccoli plants and the glucosinolates was evaluated. The vesicles were stored at different temperatures and their integrity was studied. Determination of glucosinolates, showed that indolic glucosinolates were more sensitive to degradation in aqueous solution than aliphatic glucosinolates. Glucoraphanin was stabilized by leaf and root proteoliposomes at 25°C through their interaction with aquaporins. An extensive hydrogen bond network, including different aquaporin residues, and hydrophobic interactions, as a consequence of the interaction between the linear alkane chain of glucoraphanin and Glu31 and Leu34 protein residues, were established as the main stabilizing elements. Combined our results showed that plasma membrane vesicles from leaf and root tissues of broccoli plants may be considered as suitable carriers for glucosinolate which stabilization can be potentially attributed to aquaporins.

  17. Role of vesicle tethering factors in the ER-Golgi membrane traffic

    PubMed Central

    Sztul, Elizabeth; Lupashin, Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    Tethers are a diverse group of loosely related proteins and protein complexes grouped into 3 families based on structural and functional similarities. A well-accepted role for tethering factors is the initial attachment of transport carriers to acceptor membranes prior to fusion. However, accumulating evidence indicates that tethers are more than static bridges. Tethers have been shown to interact with components of the fusion machinery and with components involved in vesicle formation. Tethers belonging to the 3 families act at the same stage of traffic, suggesting that they mediate distinct events during vesicle tethering. Thus, multiple tether-facilitated events are required to provide selectivity to vesicle fusion. In this review, we highlight findings that support this model. PMID:19887069

  18. Nhe1 is a luminal Na+/H+ exchanger in mouse choroid plexus and is targeted to the basolateral membrane in Ncbe/Nbcn2-null mice.

    PubMed

    Damkier, Helle Hasager; Prasad, Vikram; Hübner, Christian Andreas; Praetorius, Jeppe

    2009-06-01

    The choroid plexus epithelium (CPE) secretes the major fraction of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The Na(+)-HCO(3)(-) transporter Ncbe/Nbcn2 in the basolateral membrane of CPE cells is important for Na(+)-dependent pH(i) increases and probably for CSF secretion. In the current study, the anion transport inhibitor DIDS had no effect on the residual pH(i) recovery in acidified CPE from Ncbe/Nbcn2 knockout mouse by 2',7'-bis(2-carboxyethyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF)-fluorescence microscopy in the presence of CO(2)/HCO(3)(-) (Ncbe/Nbcn2-ko+DIDS 109% of control, P = 0.76, n = 5). Thus Ncbe/Nbcn2 mediates the DIDS-sensitive Na(+)-dependent pH(i) recovery in the CPE. The Na(+)/H(+) exchanger-1 Nhe1 is proposed to mediate similar functions as Ncbe/Nbcn2 in CPE. Here, we immunolocalize the Nhe1 protein to the luminal membrane domain in mouse and human CPE. The Na(+)-dependent pH(i) recovery of Nhe1 wild-type (Nhe1-wt) mice in the absence of CO(2)/HCO(3)(-) was abolished in the Nhe1 knockout CPE (Nhe1-ko 0.37% of Nhe1-wt, P = 0.0007, n = 5). In Ncbe/Nbcn2-ko mice, Nhe1 was targeted to the basolateral membrane. Nevertheless, the luminal Na(+)-dependent pH(i) recovery was increased in Ncbe/Nbcn2-ko compared with wild-type littermates (Nhe1-ko 146% of Nhe1-wt, P = 0.007, n = 5). Whereas the luminal Nhe activity was inhibited by the Nhe blocker EIPA (10 microM) in the Ncbe/Nbcn2-wt, it was insensitive to the inhibitor in Ncbe/Nbcn2-ko (Ncbe/Nbcn2-ko+EIPA 100% of control, P = 0.98, n = 5). This indicates that a luminal EIPA-insensitive Nhe was induced in Ncbe/Nbcn2-ko CPE and that EIPA-sensitive Nhe activity was basolateral. The Nhe1 translocation in Ncbe/Nbcn2-ko CPE may reflect a compensatory response, which provides the cells with better means of regulating pH(i) or transporting Na(+) after Ncbe/Nbcn2 disruption.

  19. Uptake of auxins into membrane vesicles isolated from pea stems: an in vitro auxin transport system

    SciTech Connect

    Slone, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this research was to test the applicability of the chemiosmotic theory of auxin transport to a subcellular system. Membrane vesicles were isolated from the basal portion of the third internode of etiolated pea plants (Pisum sativum L. var. Alaska) by differential centrifugation. Uptake of auxin was determined by adding /sup 14/C-labeled indoleacetic acid (IAA) to vesicles. Nigericin, a monovalent cation ionophore, and the electrogenic protonophore, carbonyl-cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), at micromolar concentrations abolished saturable uptake. Bursting vesicles by sonication, osmotic shock and freeze/thawing also eliminated saturable uptake. As the temperature increased from 0 to 30/sup 0/C, saturable uptake decreased markedly. Nonsaturable auxin uptake was less affected by these treatments. The pH gradient-dependent uptake of auxin appeared to be a transmembrane uptake of auxin into the vesicles rather than surface binding. Unlabeled IAA, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 2-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) at low concentrations reduced the saturable accumulation of (/sup 14/C)IAA in vesicles, while phenylacetic acid, benzoic acid, and 1-NAA were effective only at high concentrations. Kinetic analysis revealed two types of sites: a high affinity site with an uptake capacity of 25 to 40 pmoles/g tissue, and a low affinity site with an uptake capacity of 260 to 600 pmole/g tissue, fresh wt. In conclusion, several principal elements of an auxin transport system, as specific by the chemiosmotic theory of polar auxin transport, were present in membrane vesicles isolated from relatively mature pea stem tissue. However, one important aspect of the theory was not demonstrated in this in vitro system - a TIBA/NPA-sensitive auxin efflux. The kinetics and specificity of auxin uptake strongly suggested that this system was physiologically significant.

  20. Model Systems of Precursor Cellular Membranes: Long-Chain Alcohols Stabilize Spontaneously Formed Oleic Acid Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Rendón, Adela; Carton, David Gil; Sot, Jesús; García-Pacios, Marcos; Montes, Ruth; Valle, Mikel; Arrondo, José-Luis R.; Goñi, Felix M.; Ruiz-Mirazo, Kepa

    2012-01-01

    Oleic acid vesicles have been used as model systems to study the properties of membranes that could be the evolutionary precursors of more complex, stable, and impermeable phospholipid biomembranes. Pure fatty acid vesicles in general show high sensitivity to ionic strength and pH variation, but there is growing evidence that this lack of stability can be counterbalanced through mixtures with other amphiphilic or surfactant compounds. Here, we present a systematic experimental analysis of the oleic acid system and explore the spontaneous formation of vesicles under different conditions, as well as the effects that alcohols and alkanes may have in the process. Our results support the hypothesis that alcohols (in particular 10- to 14-C-atom alcohols) contribute to the stability of oleic acid vesicles under a wider range of experimental conditions. Moreover, studies of mixed oleic-acid-alkane and oleic-acid-alcohol systems using infrared spectroscopy and Langmuir trough measurements indicate that precisely those alcohols that increased vesicle stability also decreased the mobility of oleic acid polar headgroups, as well as the area/molecule of lipid. PMID:22339864

  1. A Bcl-xL-Drp1 complex regulates synaptic vesicle membrane dynamics during endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongmei; Alavian, Kambiz N.; Lazrove, Emma; Mehta, Nabil; Jones, Adrienne; Zhang, Ping; Licznerski, Pawel; Graham, Morven; Uo, Takuma; Guo, Junhua; Rahner, Christoph; Duman, Ronald S.; Morrison, Richard S.; Jonas, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    Following exocytosis, the rate of recovery of neurotransmitter release is determined by vesicle retrieval from the plasma membrane and by recruitment of vesicles from reserve pools within the synapse, the latter of which is dependent on mitochondrial ATP. The Bcl-2 family protein Bcl-xL, in addition to its role in cell death, regulates neurotransmitter release and recovery in part by increasing ATP availability from mitochondria. We now find, however, that, Bcl-xL directly regulates endocytotic vesicle retrieval in hippocampal neurons through protein/protein interaction with components of the clathrin complex. Our evidence suggests that, during synaptic stimulation, Bcl-xL translocates to clathrin-coated pits in a calmodulin-dependent manner and forms a complex of proteins with the GTPase Drp1, Mff and clathrin. Depletion of Drp1 produces misformed endocytotic vesicles. Mutagenesis studies suggest that formation of the Bcl-xL-Drp1 complex is necessary for the enhanced rate of vesicle endocytosis produced by Bcl-xL, thus providing a mechanism for presynaptic plasticity. PMID:23792689

  2. Dynamics of Crowded Vesicles: Local and Global Responses to Membrane Composition

    PubMed Central

    Holdbrook, Daniel A.; Huber, Roland G.; Piggot, Thomas J.; Bond, Peter J.; Khalid, Syma

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial cell envelope is composed of a mixture of different lipids and proteins, making it an inherently complex organelle. The interactions between integral membrane proteins and lipids are crucial for their respective spatial localization within bacterial cells. We have employed microsecond timescale coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of vesicles of varying sizes and with a range of protein and lipid compositions, and used novel approaches to measure both local and global system dynamics, the latter based on spherical harmonics analysis. Our results suggest that both hydrophobic mismatch, enhanced by embedded membrane proteins, and curvature based sorting, due to different modes of undulation, may drive assembly in vesicular systems. Interestingly, the modes of undulation of the vesicles were found to be altered by the specific protein and lipid composition of the vesicle. Strikingly, lipid dynamics were shown to be coupled to proteins up to 6 nm from their surface, a substantially larger distance than has previously been observed, resulting in multi-layered annular rings enriched with particular types of phospholipid. Such large protein-lipid complexes may provide a mechanism for long-range communication. Given the complexity of bacterial membranes, our results suggest that subtle changes in lipid composition may have major implications for lipid and protein sorting under a curvature-based membrane-sorting model. PMID:27310814

  3. The structure of the COPII transport-vesicle coat assembled on membranes

    PubMed Central

    Zanetti, Giulia; Prinz, Simone; Daum, Sebastian; Meister, Annette; Schekman, Randy; Bacia, Kirsten; Briggs, John AG

    2013-01-01

    Coat protein complex II (COPII) mediates formation of the membrane vesicles that export newly synthesised proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum. The inner COPII proteins bind to cargo and membrane, linking them to the outer COPII components that form a cage around the vesicle. Regulated flexibility in coat architecture is essential for transport of a variety of differently sized cargoes, but structural data on the assembled coat has not been available. We have used cryo-electron tomography and subtomogram averaging to determine the structure of the complete, membrane-assembled COPII coat. We describe a novel arrangement of the outer coat and find that the inner coat can assemble into regular lattices. The data reveal how coat subunits interact with one another and with the membrane, suggesting how coordinated assembly of inner and outer coats can mediate and regulate packaging of vesicles ranging from small spheres to large tubular carriers. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00951.001 PMID:24062940

  4. Comparative Transport Activity of Intact Cells, Membrane Vesicles, and Mesosomes of Bacillus licheniformis

    PubMed Central

    MacLeod, Robert A.; Thurman, Paul; Rogers, H. J.

    1973-01-01

    Sodium ion was shown to stimulate strongly the transport of l-glutamic acid into cells of Bacillus licheniformis 6346 His−. Lithium ion had a slight capacity to replace Na+ in this capacity, but K+ was without effect. Three of five amino acids tested. l-glutamic acid, l-aspartic acid, and l-alanine, were concentrated against a gradient in the cells. Intracellular pools of these amino acids were extractable with 5% trichloroacetic acid. Pools of l-histidine and l-lysine could not be detected. No evidence of active transport of lysine into cells could be detected, and histidine was taken up in the absence of chloramphenicol but not in its presence. The uptake of glutamic acid by membrane vesicle preparations was strongly stimulated by reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and to a lesser extent by succinate. The presence of phenazine methosulfate increased uptake in the presence of succinate. Either l- or d-lactate and adenosine triphosphate were without effect. None of these compounds stimulated the uptake of glutamic acid by mesosomes, although some mesosome preparations contained separable membrane which was very active. NADH strongly stimulated the uptake of aspartic acid and alanine by membrane vesicles but had only a slight effect on the uptake of histidine and lysine. No evidence of active transport of any of the amino acids into mesosomes could be detected either in the presence or absence of NADH. NADH stimulation of the uptake of glutamic acid by membrane vesicles was destroyed by exposure to light of 360 nm; this inactivation was reversible by vitamin K2(5) or K2(10). Sodium ion stimulated transport of glutamic acid by membrane vesicles. PMID:4347247

  5. Direct Visualization of the Action of Triton X-100 on Giant Vesicles of Erythrocyte Membrane Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Casadei, Bruna R.; Domingues, Cleyton C.; de Paula, Eneida; Riske, Karin A.

    2014-01-01

    The raft hypothesis proposes that microdomains enriched in sphingolipids, cholesterol, and specific proteins are transiently formed to accomplish important cellular tasks. Equivocally, detergent-resistant membranes were initially assumed to be identical to membrane rafts, because of similarities between their compositions. In fact, the impact of detergents in membrane organization is still controversial. Here, we use phase contrast and fluorescence microscopy to observe giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) made of erythrocyte membrane lipids (erythro-GUVs) when exposed to the detergent Triton X-100 (TX-100). We clearly show that TX-100 has a restructuring action on biomembranes. Contact with TX-100 readily induces domain formation on the previously homogeneous membrane of erythro-GUVs at physiological and room temperatures. The shape and dynamics of the formed domains point to liquid-ordered/liquid-disordered (Lo/Ld) phase separation, typically found in raft-like ternary lipid mixtures. The Ld domains are then separated from the original vesicle and completely solubilized by TX-100. The insoluble vesicle left, in the Lo phase, represents around 2/3 of the original vesicle surface at room temperature and decreases to almost 1/2 at physiological temperature. This chain of events could be entirely reproduced with biomimetic GUVs of a simple ternary lipid mixture, 2:1:2 POPC/SM/chol (phosphatidylcholine/sphyngomyelin/cholesterol), showing that this behavior will arise because of fundamental physicochemical properties of simple lipid mixtures. This work provides direct visualization of TX-100-induced domain formation followed by selective (Ld phase) solubilization in a model system with a complex biological lipid composition. PMID:24896120

  6. The Xylella fastidiosa PD1063 protein is secreted in association with outer membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Brittany K; Voegel, Tanja; Kirkpatrick, Bruce C

    2014-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a gram-negative, xylem-limited plant pathogenic bacterium that causes disease in a variety of economically important agricultural crops including Pierce's disease of grapevines. Xylella fastidiosa biofilms formed in the xylem vessels of plants play a key role in early colonization and pathogenicity by providing a protected niche and enhanced cell survival. Here we investigate the role of Xylella fastidiosa PD1063, the predicted ortholog of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae PXO_03968, which encodes an outer membrane protein. To assess the function of the Xylella fastidiosa ortholog, we created Xylella fastidiosa mutants deleted for PD1063 and then assessed biofilm formation, cell-cell aggregation and cell growth in vitro. We also assessed disease severity and pathogen titers in grapevines mechanically inoculated with the Xylella fastidiosa PD1063 mutant. We found a significant decrease in cell-cell aggregation among PD1063 mutants but no differences in cell growth, biofilm formation, disease severity or titers in planta. Based on the demonstration that Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae PXO_03968 encodes an outer membrane protein, secreted in association with outer membrane vesicles, we predicted that PD1063 would also be secreted in a similar manner. Using anti-PD1063 antibodies, we found PD1063 in the supernatant and secreted in association with outer membrane vesicles. PD1063 purified from the supernatant, outer membrane fractions and outer membrane vesicles was 19.2 kD, corresponding to the predicted size of the processed protein. Our findings suggest Xylella fastidiosa PD1063 is not essential for development of Pierce's disease in Vitis vinifera grapevines although further research is required to determine the function of the PD1063 outer membrane protein in Xylella fastidiosa.

  7. Outer Membrane Vesicle Production Facilitates LPS Remodeling and Outer Membrane Maintenance in Salmonella during Environmental Transitions

    PubMed Central

    Bonnington, Katherine E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The ability of Gram-negative bacteria to carefully modulate outer membrane (OM) composition is essential to their survival. However, the asymmetric and heterogeneous structure of the Gram-negative OM poses unique challenges to the cell’s successful adaption to rapid environmental transitions. Although mechanisms to recycle and degrade OM phospholipid material exist, there is no known mechanism by which to remove unfavorable lipopolysaccharide (LPS) glycoforms, except slow dilution through cell growth. As all Gram-negative bacteria constitutively shed OM vesicles (OMVs), we propose that cells may utilize OMV formation as a way to selectively remove environmentally disadvantageous LPS species. We examined the native kinetics of OM composition during physiologically relevant environmental changes in Salmonella enterica, a well-characterized model system for activation of PhoP/Q and PmrA/B two-component systems (TCSs). In response to acidic pH, toxic metals, antimicrobial peptides, and lack of divalent cations, these TCSs modify the LPS lipid A and core, lengthen the O antigen, and upregulate specific OM proteins. An environmental change to PhoP/Q- and PmrA/B-activating conditions simultaneously induced the addition of modified species of LPS to the OM, downregulation of previously dominant species of LPS, greater OMV production, and increased OMV diameter. Comparison of the relative abundance of lipid A species present in the OM and the newly budded OMVs following two sets of rapid environmental shifts revealed the retention of lipid A species with modified phosphate moieties in the OM concomitant with the selective loss of palmitoylated species via vesiculation following exposure to moderately acidic environmental conditions. PMID:27795394

  8. Plesiomonas shigelloides exports a lethal cytotoxic-enterotoxin (LCE) by membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Ludovico, Marilucia Santos; Martins, Luciano Moura; Bianco, Juares Ednaldo Romero; Andrade, Célia Guadalupe Tardelli de Jesus; Falcon, Rosabel; Joazeiro, Paulo Pinto; Gatti, Maria Silvia Viccari; Yano, Tomomasa

    Plesiomonas shigelloides isolated from water in Brazil was previously described as a hemorrhagic heat-labile cytotoxic-enterotoxin producer. We purified this toxin from culture supernatants using ion metallic affinity chromatography (IMAC) followed by molecular exclusion chromatography. The pure toxin presented molecular mass of 50kDa and isoelectric point (pI) around 6.9 by 2D electrophoresis. When injected intravenously, the purified cytotoxic-enterotoxin induced also severe spasms followed by sudden death of mice. Hence, we entitled it as lethal cytotoxic-enterotoxin (LCE). The presence of membrane vesicles (MVs) on cell surfaces of P. shigelloides was observed by scan electron microscopy (SEM). From these MVs the LCE toxin was extracted and confirmed by biological and serological assays. These data suggest that P. shigelloides also exports this cytotoxic-enterotoxin by membrane vesicles, a different mechanism of delivering extra cellular virulence factors, so far not described in this bacterium.

  9. Lipid binding and membrane penetration of polymyxin B derivatives studied in a biomimetic vesicle system.

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Marina; Tsubery, Haim; Kolusheva, Sofiya; Shames, Alex; Fridkin, Mati; Jelinek, Raz

    2003-01-01

    Understanding membrane interactions and cell-wall permeation of Gram-negative bacteria is of great importance, owing to increasing bacterial resistance to existing drugs and therapeutic treatments. Here we use biomimetic lipid vesicles to analyse membrane association and penetration by synthetic derivatives of polymyxin B (PMB), a potent naturally occurring antibacterial cyclic peptide. The PMB analogues studied were PMB nonapeptide (PMBN), in which the hydrophobic alkyl residue was cleaved, PMBN diastereomer containing D-instead of L-amino acids within the cyclic ring (dPMBN) and PMBN where the hydrophobic alkyl chain was replaced with an Ala6 repeat (Ala6-PMBN). Peptide binding measurements, colorimetric transitions induced within the vesicles, fluorescence quenching experiments and ESR spectroscopy were applied to investigate the structural parameters underlying the different membrane-permeation profiles and biological activities of the analogues. The experiments point to the role of negatively charged lipids in membrane binding and confirm the prominence of lipopolisaccharide (LPS) in promoting membrane association and penetration by the peptides. Examination of the lipid interactions of the PMB derivatives shows that the cyclic moiety of PMB is not only implicated in lipid attachment and LPS binding, but also affects penetration into the inner bilayer core. The addition of the Ala6 peptide moiety, however, does not significantly promote peptide insertion into the hydrophobic lipid environment. The data also indicate that the extent of penetration into the lipid bilayer is not related to the overall affinity of the peptides to the membrane. PMID:12848621

  10. MST1-dependent vesicle trafficking regulates neutrophil transmigration through the vascular basement membrane

    PubMed Central

    Kurz, Angela R.M.; Pruenster, Monika; Rohwedder, Ina; Ramadass, Mahalakshmi; Schäfer, Kerstin; Harrison, Ute; Nussbaum, Claudia; Immler, Roland; Wiessner, Johannes R.; Lim, Dae-Sik; Walzog, Barbara; Dietzel, Steffen; Moser, Markus; Klein, Christoph; Vestweber, Dietmar; Catz, Sergio D.

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils need to penetrate the perivascular basement membrane for successful extravasation into inflamed tissue, but this process is incompletely understood. Recent findings have associated mammalian sterile 20–like kinase 1 (MST1) loss of function with a human primary immunodeficiency disorder, suggesting that MST1 may be involved in immune cell migration. Here, we have shown that MST1 is a critical regulator of neutrophil extravasation during inflammation. Mst1-deficient (Mst1–/–) neutrophils were unable to migrate into inflamed murine cremaster muscle venules, instead persisting between the endothelium and the basement membrane. Mst1–/– neutrophils also failed to extravasate from gastric submucosal vessels in a murine model of Helicobacter pylori infection. Mechanistically, we observed defective translocation of VLA-3, VLA-6, and neutrophil elastase from intracellular vesicles to the surface of Mst1–/– neutrophils, indicating that MST1 is required for this crucial step in neutrophil transmigration. Furthermore, we found that MST1 associates with the Rab27 effector protein synaptotagmin-like protein 1 (JFC1, encoded by Sytl1 in mice), but not Munc13-4, thereby regulating the trafficking of Rab27-positive vesicles to the cellular membrane. Together, these findings highlight a role for MST1 in vesicle trafficking and extravasation in neutrophils, providing an additional mechanistic explanation for the severe immune defect observed in patients with MST1 deficiency. PMID:27701149

  11. The endoplasmic reticulum and casein-containing vesicles contribute to milk fat globule membrane

    PubMed Central

    Honvo-Houéto, Edith; Henry, Céline; Chat, Sophie; Layani, Sarah; Truchet, Sandrine

    2016-01-01

    During lactation, mammary epithelial cells secrete huge amounts of milk from their apical side. The current view is that caseins are secreted by exocytosis, whereas milk fat globules are released by budding, enwrapped by the plasma membrane. Owing to the number and large size of milk fat globules, the membrane surface needed for their release might exceed that of the apical plasma membrane. A large-scale proteomics analysis of both cytoplasmic lipid droplets and secreted milk fat globule membranes was used to decipher the cellular origins of the milk fat globule membrane. Surprisingly, differential analysis of protein profiles of these two organelles strongly suggest that, in addition to the plasma membrane, the endoplasmic reticulum and the secretory vesicles contribute to the milk fat globule membrane. Analysis of membrane-associated and raft microdomain proteins reinforces this possibility and also points to a role for lipid rafts in milk product secretion. Our results provide evidence for a significant contribution of the endoplasmic reticulum to the milk fat globule membrane and a role for SNAREs in membrane dynamics during milk secretion. These novel aspects point to a more complex model for milk secretion than currently envisioned. PMID:27535430

  12. Membrane vesicles of Clostridium perfringens Type A strains induce innate and adaptive immunity

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yanlong; Kong, Qingke; Roland, Kenneth L.; Curtiss, Roy

    2014-01-01

    Vesicle shedding from bacteria is a universal process in most Gram-negative bacteria and a few Gram-positive bacteria. In this report, we isolate extracellular membrane vesicles (MVs) from the supernatants of Gram-positive pathogen Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens). We demonstrated vesicle production in a variety of virulent and nonvirulent type A strains. MVs did not contain alpha-toxin and NetB toxin demonstrated by negative reaction to specific antibody and absence of specific proteins identified by LC-MS/MS. C. perfringens MVs contained DNA components such as 16S ribosomal RNA gene (16S rRNA), alpha-toxin gene (plc) and the perfringolysin O gene (pfoA) demonstrated by PCR. We also identified a total of 431 proteins in vesicles by 1-D gel separation and LC-MS/MS analysis. In vitro studies demonstrated that vesicles could be internalized into murine macrophage RAW264.7 cells without direct cytotoxicity effects, causing release of inflammation cytokines including granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1 (IL-1), which could also be detected in mice injected with MVs through intraperitoneal (i.p.) route. Mice immunized with C. perfringens MVs produced high titer IgG, especially IgG1, antibodies against C. perfringens membrane proteins. However, this kind of antibody could not provide protection in mice following challenge, though it could slightly postpone the time of death. Our results indicate that release of MVs from C. perfringens could provide a previously unknown mechanism to induce release of inflammatory cytokines, especially TNF-α, these findings may contribute to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of C. perfringens infection. PMID:24631214

  13. Epoxide-mediated differential packaging of Cif and other virulence factors into outer membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Ballok, Alicia E; Filkins, Laura M; Bomberger, Jennifer M; Stanton, Bruce A; O'Toole, George A

    2014-10-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) that contain a number of secreted bacterial proteins, including phospholipases, alkaline phosphatase, and the CFTR inhibitory factor (Cif). Previously, Cif, an epoxide hydrolase, was shown to be regulated at the transcriptional level by epoxides, which serve as ligands of the repressor, CifR. Here, we tested whether epoxides have an effect on Cif levels in OMVs. We showed that growth of P. aeruginosa in the presence of specific epoxides but not a hydrolysis product increased Cif packaging into OMVs in a CifR-independent fashion. The outer membrane protein, OprF, was also increased under these conditions, but alkaline phosphatase activity was not significantly altered. Additionally, we demonstrated that OMV shape and density were affected by epoxide treatment, with two distinct vesicle fractions present when cells were treated with epibromohydrin (EBH), a model epoxide. Vesicles isolated from the two density fractions exhibited different protein profiles in Western blotting and silver staining. We have shown that a variety of clinically or host-relevant treatments, including antibiotics, also alter the proteins packaged in OMVs. Proteomic analysis of purified OMVs followed by an analysis of transposon mutant OMVs yielded mutants with altered vesicle packaging. Finally, epithelial cell cytotoxicity was reduced in the vesicles formed in the presence of EBH, suggesting that this epoxide alters the function of the OMVs. Our data support a model whereby clinically or host-relevant signals mediate differential packaging of virulence factors in OMVs, which results in functional consequences for host-pathogen interactions.

  14. Asymmetric Requirements for a Rab Gtpase and Snare Proteins in Fusion of Copii Vesicles with Acceptor Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xiaochun; Barlowe, Charles

    2000-01-01

    Soluble NSF attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins are essential for membrane fusion in transport between the yeast ER and Golgi compartments. Subcellular fractionation experiments demonstrate that the ER/Golgi SNAREs Bos1p, Sec22p, Bet1p, Sed5p, and the Rab protein, Ypt1p, are distributed similarly but localize primarily with Golgi membranes. All of these SNARE proteins are efficiently packaged into COPII vesicles and suggest a dynamic cycling of SNARE machinery between ER and Golgi compartments. Ypt1p is not efficiently packaged into vesicles under these conditions. To determine in which membranes protein function is required, temperature-sensitive alleles of BOS1, BET1, SED5, SLY1, and YPT1 that prevent ER/Golgi transport in vitro at restrictive temperatures were used to selectively inactivate these gene products on vesicles or on Golgi membranes. Vesicles bearing mutations in Bet1p or Bos1p inhibit fusion with wild-type acceptor membranes, but acceptor membranes containing these mutations are fully functional. In contrast, vesicles bearing mutations in Sed5p, Sly1p, or Ypt1p are functional, whereas acceptor membranes containing these mutations block fusion. Thus, this set of SNARE proteins is symmetrically distributed between vesicle and acceptor compartments, but they function asymmetrically such that Bet1p and Bos1p are required on vesicles and Sed5p activity is required on acceptor membranes. We propose the asymmetry in SNARE protein function is maintained by an asymmetric distribution and requirement for the Ypt1p GTPase in this fusion event. When a transmembrane-anchored form of Ypt1p is used to restrict this GTPase to the acceptor compartment, vesicles depleted of Ypt1p remain competent for fusion. PMID:10747087

  15. Kinetics of the enzyme-vesicle interaction including the formation of rafts and membrane strain.

    PubMed

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P; Höök, Fredrik

    2012-01-01

    In cells, an appreciable part of enzymes is associated with lipid membranes. Academic experimental studies of the function of membrane enzymes (e.g., PLA(2) representing a prototype for interfacial enzymology) are often focused on the enzyme-vesicle interaction or, more specifically, on conversion of lipid forming the external leaflet of the vesicle membrane. The corresponding kinetics are complicated by many factors inherent to the interfacial physics and chemistry. The understanding of the relative role of such factors and how they should be quantitatively described is still limited. Here, we present the mean-field kinetic equations, taking the formation of rafts in the membrane and the product-induced membrane strain into account, and analyze various scenarios of lipid conversion. In particular, we scrutinize the conditions when the kinetics may exhibit a transition from a relatively long latency period to a steady-state regime with fast nearly constant reaction rate. Specifically, we discuss the likely role of the pore formation in the external lipid layer in this transition. The latter effect may be caused by the product-induced tensile strain in this layer.

  16. A membrane vesicle-based assay to enable prediction of human biliary excretion.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Federico; Poirier, Hugo; Rioux, Nathalie; Montecillo, Maria Arias; Duan, Jianmin; Ribadeneira, Maria D

    2013-10-01

    1. Prediction of biliary excretion is a challenge due to the lack of in vitro assays. Our laboratory previously demonstrated a highly significant correlation between in vitro IC50 values against mrp2 using rat canalicular liver plasma membrane vesicles and in vivo biliary excretion (Colombo et al., 2012). This study explores the possibility of predicting in vivo biliary excretion in human using membrane vesicles prepared from MDCKII cells transfected with human ABCC2. 2. In vitro MRP2 activity was determined by measuring the ATP-dependent uptake of 5(6)-carboxy-2',7'-dichlorofluorescein (CDCF) in inside-out membrane vesicles isolated from MDCK-ABCC2 cells. CDCF uptake was time- and concentration-dependent (Km of 4.0 ± 1.2 µM and a Vmax of 7.8 ± 0.9 pmol/mg/min) and inhibited by benzbromarone and MK-571 with IC50 values of 1.2 and 7.6 µM, respectively. 3. A significant linear correlation (r(2 )= 0.790) between the in vitro IC50 values from the described MRP2 assay and in vivo biliary excretion in humans was observed using 11 well-documented drugs covering low to high biliary excretions. 4. This study demonstrates, for the first time, that inhibition of CDCF uptake in MDCKII-ABCC2 vesicles not only provides a screening assay to assess MRP2 drug-drug interaction potential, but is also predictive of human MRP2-mediated biliary excretion.

  17. Mechanism of glucose and maltose transport in plasma-membrane vesicles from the yeast Candida utilis.

    PubMed Central

    van den Broek, P J; van Gompel, A E; Luttik, M A; Pronk, J T; van Leeuwen, C C

    1997-01-01

    Transport of glucose and maltose was studied in plasma-membrane vesicles from Candida utilis. The yeast was grown on a mixture of glucose and maltose in aerobic carbon-limited continuous cultures which enabled transport to be studied for both sugars with the same vesicles. Vesicles were prepared by fusion of isolated plasma membranes with proteoliposomes containing bovine heart cytochrome c oxidase as a proton-motive-force-generating system. Addition of reduced cytochrome c generated a proton-motive force, consisting of a membrane potential, negative inside, and a pH gradient, alkaline inside. Energization led to accumulation of glucose and maltose in these vesicles, reaching accumulation ratios of about 40-50. Accumulation also occurred in the presence of valinomycin or nigericin, but was prevented by a combination of the two ionophores or by uncoupler, showing that glucose and maltose transport are dependent on the proton-motive force. Comparison of sugar accumulation with quantitative data on the proton-motive force indicated a 1:1 H+/sugar stoichiometry for both transport systems. Efflux of accumulated glucose was observed on dissipation of the proton-motive force. Exchange and counterflow experiments confirmed the reversible character of the H+-glucose symporter. In contrast, uncoupler or a mixture of valinomycin plus nigericin induced only a slow efflux of accumulated maltose. Moreover under counterflow conditions, the expected transient accumulation was small. Thus the H+-maltose symporter has some characteristics of a carrier that is not readily reversible. It is concluded that in C. utilis the transport systems for glucose and maltose are both driven by the proton-motive force, but the mechanisms are different. PMID:9020885

  18. Adhesion-induced phase behavior of two-component membranes and vesicles.

    PubMed

    Rouhiparkouhi, Tahereh; Weikl, Thomas R; Discher, Dennis E; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2013-01-22

    The interplay of adhesion and phase separation is studied theoretically for two-component membranes that can phase separate into two fluid phases such as liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered phases. Many adhesion geometries provide two different environments for these membranes and then partition the membranes into two segments that differ in their composition. Examples are provided by adhering vesicles, by hole- or pore-spanning membranes, and by membranes supported by chemically patterned surfaces. Generalizing a lattice model for binary mixtures to these adhesion geometries, we show that the phase behavior of the adhering membranes depends, apart from composition and temperature, on two additional parameters, the area fraction of one membrane segment and the affinity contrast between the two segments. For the generic case of non-vanishing affinity contrast, the adhering membranes undergo two distinct phase transitions and the phase diagrams in the composition/temperature plane have a generic topology that consists of two two-phase coexistence regions separated by an intermediate one-phase region. As a consequence, phase separation and domain formation is predicted to occur separately in each of the two membrane segments but not in both segments simultaneously. Furthermore, adhesion is also predicted to suppress the phase separation process for certain regions of the phase diagrams. These generic features of the adhesion-induced phase behavior are accessible to experiment.

  19. Proteomic profiling of Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane vesicles: Current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaewook; Kim, Oh Youn; Gho, Yong Song

    2016-10-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are extracellular vesicles derived from Gram-negative bacteria. Recent progress in the studies of Gram-negative bacterial extracellular vesicles implies that OMVs may function as intercellular communicasomes in bacteria-bacteria and bacteria-host interactions. Current MS-based high-throughput proteomic analyses of Gram-negative bacterial OMVs have identified thousands of vesicular proteins and provided clues to reveal the biogenesis and pathophysiological functions of Gram-negative bacterial OMVs. The future directions of proteomics of Gram-negative bacterial OMVs may include the isolation strategy of Gram-negative bacterial OMVs to thoroughly exclude nonvesicular contaminants and proteomics of Gram-negative bacterial OMVs derived from diverse conditions as well as body fluids of bacterium-infected hosts. We hope this review will shed light on future research in this emerging field of proteomics of extracellular vesicles derived from Gram-negative bacteria and contribute to the development of OMV-based diagnostic tools and effective vaccines.

  20. Transient outward K+ channels in vesicles derived from frog skeletal muscle plasma membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Camacho, J; Delay, M J; Vazquez, M; Argüello, C; Sánchez, J A

    1996-01-01

    Whole-cell voltage-clamp experiments were performed in vesicles derived from frog skeletal muscle plasma membranes. Capacitance measurements showed that these vesicles lack invaginations. In solutions containing K+, transient outward currents with reversal potentials close to EK were recorded with a maximum potassium conductance of 0.3 mS/cm2. These currents inactivated in a voltage-dependent manner with a time constant of decay that reached a limiting value of 26 ms at large depolarizations. The steady-state inactivation reached half-maximum values at -66 mV. Transient currents were completely blocked with 5 mM 4-aminopyridine. Single-channel recordings made in inside-out excised patches from the vesicles had ensemble averages with characteristics similar to those of the macroscopic currents, although with significantly faster inactivation time constants. The single-channel chord conductance was 21 pS when the pipette and bath solutions contained 2.5 mM and 120 mM KCl, respectively. It is concluded that these vesicles contain potassium channels that are very similar to A channels found in neurons and other cells. Images FIGURE 8 PMID:8804601

  1. Cimetidine transport in isolated brush border membrane vesicles from bovine choroid plexus

    SciTech Connect

    Whittico, M.T.; Gang, Y.A.; Giacomini, K.M. )

    1990-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate the mechanisms involved in the transport of cimetidine across the brush border membrane of choroid plexus epithelium. Brush border membrane vesicles were prepared from bovine choroid plexus and the uptake of (3H)cimetidine was studied using the methods of rapid vacuum filtration and scintillation counting. Cimetidine accumulated in the vesicles with time reaching equilibrium within 2 hr. The amount of cimetidine taken up by the vesicles at equilibrium decreased with increasing extravesicular media osmolarity suggesting that cimetidine accumulates in an osmotically reactive intravesicular space. Binding of cimetidine to the membrane was estimated to be less than 18%. Michaelis-Menten studies demonstrated that cimetidine transport involved both a saturable and a nonsaturable component. The Vmax and Km (mean +/- S.E.) were 16.7 +/- 5.9 pmol/sec/mg protein and 58.1 +/- 3.1 microM, respectively, suggesting that cimetidine is transported across the choroid plexus brush border membrane with a lower affinity and a higher capacity than across the renal brush border membrane. The organic cation, quinidine (0.1 mM), and the amino acid, histidine (20 mM), both significantly reduced the initial, but not the equilibrium, uptake of cimetidine. However, high concentrations (5 mM) of more polar organic cations including tetraethylammonium, as well as of several organic anions including salicylate did not inhibit cimetidine transport. Studies with unlabeled cimetidine revealed a countertransport phenomenon. Attempts to drive the concentrative uptake of cimetidine with various ion gradients were unsuccessful. Of note was the fact that an outwardly directed proton gradient could significantly accelerate the uptake of cimetidine.

  2. Rationally Separating the Corona and Membrane Functions of Polymer Vesicles for Enhanced T₂ MRI and Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jingya; Liu, Qiuming; Zhang, Junxue; Chen, Jing; Chen, Shuai; Zhao, Yao; Du, Jianzhong

    2015-07-01

    It is an important challenge to in situ grow ultrafine super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) in drug carriers such as polymer vesicles (also called polymersomes) while keeping their biodegradability for enhanced T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and drug delivery. Herein, we present a new strategy by rationally separating the corona and membrane functions of polymer vesicles to solve the above problem. We designed a poly(ethylene oxide)-block-poly(ε-caprolactone)-block-poly(acrylic acid) (PEO43-b-PCL98-b-PAA25) triblock copolymer and self-assembled it into polymer vesicle. The PAA chains in the vesicle coronas are responsible for the in situ nanoprecipitation of ultrafine SPIONs, while the vesicle membrane composed of PCL is biodegradable. The SPIONs-decorated vesicle is water-dispersible, biocompatible, and slightly cytotoxic to normal human cells. Dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, energy disperse spectroscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometer revealed the formation of ultrafine super-paramagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles (1.9 ± 0.3 nm) in the coronas of polymer vesicles. Furthermore, the CCK-8 assay revealed low cytotoxicity of vesicles against normal L02 liver cells without and with Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The in vitro and in vivo MRI experiments confirmed the enhanced T2-weighted MRI sensitivity and excellent metastasis in mice. The loading and release experiments of an anticancer drug, doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX·HCl), indicated that the Fe3O4-decorated magnetic vesicles have potential applications as a nanocarrier for anticancer drug delivery. Moreover, the polymer vesicle is degradable in the presence of enzyme such as Pseudomonas lipases, and the ultrafine Fe3O4 nanoparticles in the vesicle coronas are confirmed to be degradable under weakly acidic conditions. Overall, this decoration-in-vesicle-coronas strategy provides us with a new insight for preparing water-dispersible ultrafine super-paramagnetic Fe3O

  3. bSUM: A bead-supported unilamellar membrane system facilitating unidirectional insertion of membrane proteins into giant vesicles.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hui; Lee, Sungsoo; Llaguno, Marc C; Jiang, Qiu-Xing

    2016-01-01

    Fused or giant vesicles, planar lipid bilayers, a droplet membrane system, and planar-supported membranes have been developed to incorporate membrane proteins for the electrical and biophysical analysis of such proteins or the bilayer properties. However, it remains difficult to incorporate membrane proteins, including ion channels, into reconstituted membrane systems that allow easy control of operational dimensions, incorporation orientation of the membrane proteins, and lipid composition of membranes. Here, using a newly developed chemical engineering procedure, we report on a bead-supported unilamellar membrane (bSUM) system that allows good control over membrane dimension, protein orientation, and lipid composition. Our new system uses specific ligands to facilitate the unidirectional incorporation of membrane proteins into lipid bilayers. Cryo-electron microscopic imaging demonstrates the unilamellar nature of the bSUMs. Electrical recordings from voltage-gated ion channels in bSUMs of varying diameters demonstrate the versatility of the new system. Using KvAP as a model system, we show that compared with other in vitro membrane systems, the bSUMs have the following advantages: (a) a major fraction of channels are orientated in a controlled way; (b) the channels mediate the formation of the lipid bilayer; (c) there is one and only one bilayer membrane on each bead; (d) the lipid composition can be controlled and the bSUM size is also under experimental control over a range of 0.2-20 µm; (e) the channel activity can be recorded by patch clamp using a planar electrode; and (f) the voltage-clamp speed (0.2-0.5 ms) of the bSUM on a planar electrode is fast, making it suitable to study ion channels with fast gating kinetics. Our observations suggest that the chemically engineered bSUMs afford a novel platform for studying lipid-protein interactions in membranes of varying lipid composition and may be useful for other applications, such as targeted delivery and

  4. Characterization of Ca2+ Transport in Purified Endoplasmic Reticulum Membrane Vesicles from Lepidium sativum L. Roots

    PubMed Central

    Buckhout, Thomas J.

    1984-01-01

    The characteristics of Ca2+ transport into endoplasmic reticulum vesicles isolated from roots of Lepidium sativum L. cv Krause have been investigated. The concentration of free Ca2+ and ATP needed for half-maximal activity were 2.5 and 73 micromolar, respectively, and the enzyme obeyed Michaelis-Menten-like kinetics. The pH maximum occurred at 7.5 and the activity was greatly reduced at either pH 7.0 or 8.0. The Ca2+-dependent modulation protein, calmodulin, was tested for its effect on Ca2+ transport into endoplasmic reticulum vesicles. Although the phenothiazine inhibitors chlorpromazine, fluphenazine, and trifluoperazine all inhibited Ca2+ transport activity with a half-maximal effect at approximately 35 micromolar, authentic bovine brain calmodulin did not alter the activity at concentrations of 0.5 to 8 micrograms per milliliter. Calmodulin also showed no influence on the time-dependent accumulation of Ca2+ into vesicles. The membranes did not contain endogenously bound calmodulin since washing with (ethylenebis[oxyethylenenitrile])tetraacetic acid or fluphenazine, treatments which disrupt calmodulin binding, did not alter Ca2+ transport activity. The inhibition of Ca2+ transport by phenothiazine drugs was likely related to their nonspecific interaction with the membrane. Thus, there was no indication that calmodulin regulated Ca2+ uptake into root endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:16663981

  5. Energy generation coupled to azoreduction by membranous vesicles from Shewanella decolorationis S12.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yi-Guo; Guo, Jun; Sun, Guo-Ping

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that Shewanella decolorationis S12 can grow on the azo compound amaranth as the sole electron acceptor. Thus, to explore the mechanism of energy generation in this metabolism, membranous vesicles (MVs) were prepared and the mechanism of energy generation investigated. The membrane, which was fragmentized during preparation, automatically formed vesicles ranging from 37.5-112.5 nm in diameter under electron micrograph observation. Energy was conserved when coupling the azoreduction by the MVs of an azo compound or Fe(III) as the sole electron acceptor with H2, formate, or lactate as the electron donor. The amaranth reduction by the vesicles was found to be inhibited by specific respiratory inhibitors, including Cu(2+) ions, dicumarol, stigmatellin, and metyrapone, indicating that the azoreduction was indeed a respiration reaction. This finding was further confirmed by the fact that the ATP synthesis was repressed by the ATPase inhibitor N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD). Therefore, this study offers solid evidence of a mechanism of microbial dissimilatory azoreduction on a subcell level.

  6. Association of Plasmodium berghei proteins with the host erythrocyte membrane: binding to inside-out vesicles.

    PubMed

    Wiser, M F; Sartorelli, A C; Patton, C L

    1990-01-01

    Two acidic phosphoproteins of Plasmodium berghei origin, of 65 and 46 kDa, are associated with the plasma membrane of the host mouse erythrocyte. The 65-kDa protein partitions between a soluble and particulate phase upon host cell lysis, whereas the 46-kDa protein is localized exclusively in the particulate fraction. Both proteins bind to inside-out vesicles derived from erythrocyte ghosts and the conditions of the reassociation reaction indicate that the binding is specific and that the proteins interact only with the cytoplasmic face of the erythrocyte membrane. The 65-kDa protein appears to exist in two membrane-associated states; one loosely bound, which readily dissociates from the membrane, and a more tightly associated state, which does not dissociate under non-denaturing conditions. The 46-kDa protein is tightly bound to the host erythrocyte membrane and does not dissociate. Cross-linking studies suggest that both of these parasite proteins interact with the submembrane cytoskeleton of the erythrocyte, and that the 65-kDa protein also appears to interact simultaneously with the lipid bilayer and erythrocyte membrane proteins. However, direct interaction between the malarial proteins and distinct erythrocyte membrane proteins could not be demonstrated. In summary, these findings indicate that the acidic phosphoproteins of the malarial parasite interact with the cytoplasmic face of the erythrocyte membrane both in vivo and in vitro.

  7. Atomic-level structural and functional model of a bacterial photosynthetic membrane vesicle.

    PubMed

    Sener, Melih K; Olsen, John D; Hunter, C Neil; Schulten, Klaus

    2007-10-02

    The photosynthetic unit (PSU) of purple photosynthetic bacteria consists of a network of bacteriochlorophyll-protein complexes that absorb solar energy for eventual conversion to ATP. Because of its remarkable simplicity, the PSU can serve as a prototype for studies of cellular organelles. In the purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides the PSU forms spherical invaginations of the inner membrane, approximately 70 nm in diameter, composed mostly of light-harvesting complexes, LH1 and LH2, and reaction centers (RCs). Atomic force microscopy studies of the intracytoplasmic membrane have revealed the overall spatial organization of the PSU. In the present study these atomic force microscopy data were used to construct three-dimensional models of an entire membrane vesicle at the atomic level by using the known structure of the LH2 complex and a structural model of the dimeric RC-LH1 complex. Two models depict vesicles consisting of 9 or 18 dimeric RC-LH1 complexes and 144 or 101 LH2 complexes, representing a total of 3,879 or 4,464 bacteriochlorophylls, respectively. The in silico reconstructions permit a detailed description of light absorption and electronic excitation migration, including computation of a 50-ps excitation lifetime and a 95% quantum efficiency for one of the model membranes, and demonstration of excitation sharing within the closely packed RC-LH1 dimer arrays.

  8. Influence of Glucose Deprivation on Membrane Potentials of Plasma Membranes, Mitochondria and Synaptic Vesicles in Rat Brain Synaptosomes.

    PubMed

    Hrynevich, Sviatlana V; Pekun, Tatyana G; Waseem, Tatyana V; Fedorovich, Sergei V

    2015-06-01

    Hypoglycemia can cause neuronal cell death similar to that of glutamate-induced cell death. In the present paper, we investigated the effect of glucose removal from incubation medium on changes of mitochondrial and plasma membrane potentials in rat brain synaptosomes using the fluorescent dyes DiSC3(5) and JC-1. We also monitored pH gradients in synaptic vesicles and their recycling by the fluorescent dye acridine orange. Glucose deprivation was found to cause an inhibition of K(+)-induced Ca(2+)-dependent exocytosis and a shift of mitochondrial and plasma membrane potentials to more positive values. The sensitivity of these parameters to the energy deficit caused by the removal of glucose showed the following order: mitochondrial membrane potential > plasma membrane potential > pH gradient in synaptic vesicles. The latter was almost unaffected by deprivation compared with the control. The pH-dependent dye acridine orange was used to investigate synaptic vesicle recycling. However, the compound's fluorescence was shown to be enhanced also by the mixture of mitochondrial toxins rotenone (10 µM) and oligomycin (5 µg/mL). This means that acridine orange can presumably be partially distributed in the intermembrane space of mitochondria. Glucose removal from the incubation medium resulted in a 3.7-fold raise of acridine orange response to rotenone + oligomycin suggesting a dramatic increase in the mitochondrial pH gradient. Our results suggest that the biophysical characteristics of neuronal presynaptic endings do not favor excessive non-controlled neurotransmitter release in case of hypoglycemia. The inhibition of exocytosis and the increase of the mitochondrial pH gradient, while preserving the vesicular pH gradient, are proposed as compensatory mechanisms.

  9. Gram-Negative Bacteria Produce Membrane Vesicles Which Are Capable of Killing Other Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zusheng; Clarke, Anthony J.; Beveridge, Terry J.

    1998-01-01

    Naturally produced membrane vesicles (MVs), isolated from 15 strains of gram-negative bacteria (Citrobacter, Enterobacter, Escherichia, Klebsiella, Morganella, Proteus, Salmonella, and Shigella strains), lysed many gram-positive (including Mycobacterium) and gram-negative cultures. Peptidoglycan zymograms suggested that MVs contained peptidoglycan hydrolases, and electron microscopy revealed that the murein sacculi were digested, confirming a previous modus operandi (J. L. Kadurugamuwa and T. J. Beveridge, J. Bacteriol. 174:2767–2774, 1996). MV-sensitive bacteria possessed A1α, A4α, A1γ, A2α, and A4γ peptidoglycan chemotypes, whereas A3α, A3β, A3γ, A4β, B1α, and B1β chemotypes were not affected. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 vesicles possessed the most lytic activity. PMID:9765585

  10. Effects of the cannabinoids on physical properties of brain membranes and phospholipid vesicles: fluorescence studies.

    PubMed

    Hillard, C J; Harris, R A; Bloom, A S

    1985-03-01

    The effects of four cannabinoids on the physical properties of brain synaptic plasma membranes (SPM), lipid extracts of SPM and phospholipid vesicles were evaluated using fluorescence probes. In vitro, the psychoactive cannabinoids, delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta 9-THC) and 11-hydroxyl-delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (11-OH-delta 9-THC) at concentrations of 1 and 3 microM decreased polarization of the fluorescence emission of 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) in SPM. At the same concentrations, cannabidiol (CBD) and cannabinol, cannabinoids devoid of marijuana-like psychoactivity, had no effect on DPH polarization. The effects of 11-OH-delta 9-THC and CBD on vesicles made from lipids extracted from SPM were identical to their effects on intact SPM. These changes in DPH polarization were not due to changes in fluorescence lifetime and indicate that, at low concentrations, the psychoactive cannabinoids increase the rotational mobility of DPH in the membrane core. In contrast, in SPM-extracted lipids, both 11-OH-delta 9-THC and CBD decreased the mobility of stearic acid with an anthroyloxy label at both the second (2-AS) and twelfth (12-AS) carbon atoms. Studies of DPH polarization in various phosphatidylcholines (PC) demonstrated that the actions of the cannabinoids were dependent on initial bilayer fluidity. 11-OH-delta 9-THC was less effective at decreasing polarization of trimethylammonium DPH (TMA-DPH), a probe of the bilayer surface, than of DPH whereas CBD affected mobility of the two probes equally. Neither CBD nor 11-OH-delta 9-THC altered DPH mobility in phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine vesicles. These findings indicate that the psychoactive cannabinoids increase fluidity in the hydrophobic core of brain membranes and support a membrane perturbant hypothesis of the mechanism of delta 9-THC action.

  11. Evidence that membrane transduction of oligoarginine does not require vesicle formation

    SciTech Connect

    Zaro, Jennica L.; Shen Weichiang . E-mail: weishen@usc.edu

    2005-07-01

    The involvement of vesicular formation processes in the membrane transduction and nuclear transport of oligoarginine is currently a subject of controversy. In this report, a novel quantitative method which allows for the selective measurement of membrane transduction excluding concurrent endocytosis was used to determine the effects of temperature, endosomal acidification, endosomolysis, and several known inhibitors of endocytic pathways on the internalization of oligoarginine. The results show that, unlike endocytosis, transduction of oligoarginine was not affected by incubation at 16 deg. C as compared to the 37 deg. C control, and was only partially inhibited at 4 deg. C incubation. Additionally, membrane transduction was not inhibited to the same extent as endocytosis following treatment with ammonium chloride, hypertonic medium, amiloride, or filipin. The endosomolytic activity of oligoarginine was investigated by examining the leakage of FITC-dextran into the cytosolic compartment, which was not higher in the presence of oligoarginine. Furthermore, ammonium chloride showed no effect on the nuclear transport of oligoarginine. The data presented in this report indicate that membrane transduction is likely to occur at the plasma membrane without the formation of membrane vesicles, and the nuclear localization involves membrane transduction, rather than endocytosis of oligoarginine.

  12. Vaccinia virus interactions with the cell membrane studied by new chromatic vesicle and cell sensor assays.

    PubMed

    Orynbayeva, Z; Kolusheva, S; Groysman, N; Gavrielov, N; Lobel, L; Jelinek, R

    2007-02-01

    The potential danger of cross-species viral infection points to the significance of understanding the contributions of nonspecific membrane interactions with the viral envelope compared to receptor-mediated uptake as a factor in virus internalization and infection. We present a detailed investigation of the interactions of vaccinia virus particles with lipid bilayers and with epithelial cell membranes using newly developed chromatic biomimetic membrane assays. This analytical platform comprises vesicular particles containing lipids interspersed within reporter polymer units that emit intense fluorescence following viral interactions with the lipid domains. The chromatic vesicles were employed as membrane models in cell-free solutions and were also incorporated into the membranes of epithelial cells, thereby functioning as localized membrane sensors on the cell surface. These experiments provide important insight into membrane interactions with and fusion of virions and the kinetic profiles of these processes. In particular, the data emphasize the significance of cholesterol/sphingomyelin domains (lipid rafts) as a crucial factor promoting bilayer insertion of the viral particles. Our analysis of virus interactions with polymer-labeled living cells exposed the significant role of the epidermal growth factor receptor in vaccinia virus infectivity; however, the data also demonstrated the existence of additional non-receptor-mediated mechanisms contributing to attachment of the virus to the cell surface and its internalization.

  13. Large Plasma Membrane Disruptions Are Rapidly Resealed by Ca2+-dependent Vesicle–Vesicle Fusion Events

    PubMed Central

    Terasaki, Mark; Miyake, Katsuya; McNeil, Paul L.

    1997-01-01

    A microneedle puncture of the fibroblast or sea urchin egg surface rapidly evokes a localized exocytotic reaction that may be required for the rapid resealing that follows this breach in plasma membrane integrity (Steinhardt, R.A,. G. Bi, and J.M. Alderton. 1994. Science (Wash. DC). 263:390–393). How this exocytotic reaction facilitates the resealing process is unknown. We found that starfish oocytes and sea urchin eggs rapidly reseal much larger disruptions than those produced with a microneedle. When an ∼40 by 10 μm surface patch was torn off, entry of fluorescein stachyose (FS; 1,000 mol wt) or fluorescein dextran (FDx; 10,000 mol wt) from extracellular sea water (SW) was not detected by confocal microscopy. Moreover, only a brief (∼5–10 s) rise in cytosolic Ca2+ was detected at the wound site. Several lines of evidence indicate that intracellular membranes are the primary source of the membrane recruited for this massive resealing event. When we injected FS-containing SW deep into the cells, a vesicle formed immediately, entrapping within its confines most of the FS. DiI staining and EM confirmed that the barrier delimiting injected SW was a membrane bilayer. The threshold for vesicle formation was ∼3 mM Ca2+ (SW is ∼10 mM Ca2+). The capacity of intracellular membranes for sealing off SW was further demonstrated by extruding egg cytoplasm from a micropipet into SW. A boundary immediately formed around such cytoplasm, entrapping FDx or FS dissolved in it. This entrapment did not occur in Ca2+-free SW (CFSW). When egg cytoplasm stratified by centrifugation was exposed to SW, only the yolk platelet–rich domain formed a membrane, suggesting that the yolk platelet is a critical element in this response and that the ER is not required. We propose that plasma membrane disruption evokes Ca2+ regulated vesicle–vesicle (including endocytic compartments but possibly excluding ER) fusion reactions. The function in resealing of this cytoplasmic fusion

  14. L-canavanine inhibits L-arginine uptake by broiler chicken intestinal brush border membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Rueda, E; Michelangeli, C; Gonzalez-Mujica, F

    2003-09-01

    1. Intestinal brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) were prepared from 3-week-old broiler chickens. 2. Electron microscopy of the BBMV fraction showed single membrane vesicles of different sizes with no electron dense material inside. No other organelles were observed. The sucrase and maltase activities were enriched by factors of 16 and 18, respectively, in the BBMV fraction in comparison with the homogenate. On the other hand, the Na+/K+-ATPase sensitivity to ouabain was increased by a factor of 0.8. 3. The BBMV showed a maximum L-[14C]-arginine uptake (944.9 +/- 22.9 pmoles/mg protein) at 45 s and thereafter it declined slowly. In the presence of 0.5 mM L-canavanine, the L-[14C]-arginine uptake by BBMV was reduced by 43.6% at 45 s. 4. It is concluded that L-canavanine inhibits L-arginine Na+-dependent transport across the enterocyte apical membrane in a highly purified intestinal BBMV from broiler chickens.

  15. Analysis and Characterization of Proteins Associated with Outer Membrane Vesicles Secreted by Cronobacter spp.

    PubMed Central

    Kothary, Mahendra H.; Gopinath, Gopal R.; Gangiredla, Jayanthi; Rallabhandi, Prasad V.; Harrison, Lisa M.; Yan, Qiong Q.; Chase, Hannah R.; Lee, Boram; Park, Eunbi; Yoo, YeonJoo; Chung, Taejung; Finkelstein, Samantha B.; Negrete, Flavia J.; Patel, Isha R.; Carter, Laurenda; Sathyamoorthy, Venugopal; Fanning, Séamus; Tall, Ben D.

    2017-01-01

    Little is known about secretion of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) by Cronobacter. In this study, OMVs isolated from Cronobacter sakazakii, Cronobacter turicensis, and Cronobacter malonaticus were examined by electron microscopy (EM) and their associated outer membrane proteins (OMP) and genes were analyzed by SDS-PAGE, protein sequencing, BLAST, PCR, and DNA microarray. EM of stained cells revealed that the OMVs are secreted as pleomorphic micro-vesicles which cascade from the cell's surface. SDS-PAGE analysis identified protein bands with molecular weights of 18 kDa to >100 kDa which had homologies to OMPs such as GroEL; OmpA, C, E, F, and X; MipA proteins; conjugative plasmid transfer protein; and an outer membrane auto-transporter protein (OMATP). PCR analyses showed that most of the OMP genes were present in all seven Cronobacter species while a few genes (OMATP gene, groEL, ompC, mipA, ctp, and ompX) were absent in some phylogenetically-related species. Microarray analysis demonstrated sequence divergence among the OMP genes that was not captured by PCR. These results support previous findings that OmpA and OmpX may be involved in virulence of Cronobacter, and are packaged within secreted OMVs. These results also suggest that other OMV-packaged OMPs may be involved in roles such as stress response, cell wall and plasmid maintenance, and extracellular transport. PMID:28232819

  16. Ypq3p-dependent histidine uptake by the vacuolar membrane vesicles of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Manabe, Kunio; Kawano-Kawada, Miyuki; Ikeda, Koichi; Sekito, Takayuki; Kakinuma, Yoshimi

    2016-06-01

    The vacuolar membrane proteins Ypq1p, Ypq2p, and Ypq3p of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are known as the members of the PQ-loop protein family. We found that the ATP-dependent uptake activities of arginine and histidine by the vacuolar membrane vesicles were decreased by ypq2Δ and ypq3Δ mutations, respectively. YPQ1 and AVT1, which are involved in the vacuolar uptake of lysine/arginine and histidine, respectively, were deleted in addition to ypq2Δ and ypq3Δ. The vacuolar membrane vesicles isolated from the resulting quadruple deletion mutant ypq1Δypq2Δypq3Δavt1Δ completely lost the uptake activity of basic amino acids, and that of histidine, but not lysine and arginine, was evidently enhanced by overexpressing YPQ3 in the mutant. These results suggest that Ypq3p is specifically involved in the vacuolar uptake of histidine in S. cerevisiae. The cellular level of Ypq3p-HA(3) was enhanced by depletion of histidine from culture medium, suggesting that it is regulated by the substrate.

  17. Anion-Sensitive, H+-Pumping ATPase in Membrane Vesicles from Oat Roots 1

    PubMed Central

    Churchill, Kathleen A.; Sze, Heven

    1983-01-01

    H+-pumping ATPases were detected in microsomal vesicles of oat (Avena sativa L. var Lang) roots using [14C]methylamine distribution or quinacrine fluorescent quenching. Methylamine (MeA) accumulation into vesicles and quinacrine quench were specifically dependent on Mg,ATP. Both activities reflected formation of a proton gradient (ΔpH) (acid inside) as carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, nigericin (in the presence of K+), or gramicidin decreased MeA uptake or increased quinacrine fluorescence. The properties of H+ pumping as measured by MeA uptake were characterized. The Kmapp for ATP was about 0.1 millimolar. Mg,GTP and Mg, pyrophosphate were 19% and 30% as effective as Mg,ATP. MeA uptake was inhibited by N,N′-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide and was mostly insensitive to oligomycin, vanadate, or copper. ATP-dependent MeA was stimulated by anions with decreasing order of potency of Cl− > Br− > NO3− > SO42−, iminodiacetate, benzene sulfonate. Anion stimulation of H+ pumping was caused in part by the ability of permeant anions to dissipate the electrical potential and in part by a specific requirement of Cl− by a H+ -pumping ATPase. A pH gradient, probably caused by a Donnan potential, could be dissipated by K+ in the presence or absence of ATP. MeA uptake was enriched in vesicles of relatively low density and showed a parallel distribution with vanadate-insensitive ATPase activity on a continuous dextran gradient. ΔpH as measured by quinacrine quench was partially vanadate-sensitive. These results show that plant membranes have at least two types of H+ -pumping ATPases. One is vanadate-sensitive and probably enriched in the plasma membrane. One is vanadate-resistant, anion-sensitive and has many properties characteristic of a vacuolar ATPase. These results are consistent with the presence of electrogenic H+ pumps at the plasma membrane and tonoplast of higher plant cells. PMID:16662875

  18. Extracellular membrane vesicles secreted by mycoplasma Acholeplasma laidlawii PG8 are enriched in virulence proteins.

    PubMed

    Chernov, Vladislav M; Mouzykantov, Alexey A; Baranova, Natalia B; Medvedeva, Elena S; Grygorieva, Tatiana Yu; Trushin, Maxim V; Vishnyakov, Innokentii E; Sabantsev, Anton V; Borchsenius, Sergei N; Chernova, Olga A

    2014-10-14

    Mycoplasmas (class Mollicutes), the smallest prokaryotes capable of self-replication, as well as Archaea, Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria constitutively produce extracellular vesicles (EVs). However, little is known regarding the content and functions of mycoplasma vesicles. Here, we present for the first time a proteomics-based characterisation of extracellular membrane vesicles from Acholeplasma laidlawii PG8. The ubiquitous mycoplasma is widespread in nature, found in humans, animals and plants, and is the causative agent of phytomycoplasmoses and the predominant contaminant of cell cultures. Taking a proteomics approach using LC-ESI-MS/MS, we identified 97 proteins. Analysis of the identified proteins indicated that A. laidlawii-derived EVs are enriched in virulence proteins that may play critical roles in mycoplasma-induced pathogenesis. Our data will help to elucidate the functions of mycoplasma-derived EVs and to develop effective methods to control infections and contaminations of cell cultures by mycoplasmas. In the present study, we have documented for the first time the proteins in EVs secreted by mycoplasma vesicular proteins identified in this study are likely involved in the adaptation of bacteria to stressors, survival in microbial communities and pathogen-host interactions. These findings suggest that the secretion of EVs is an evolutionally conserved and universal process that occurs in organisms from the simplest wall-less bacteria to complex organisms and indicate the necessity of developing new approaches to control infects.

  19. LRRK2 Affects Vesicle Trafficking, Neurotransmitter Extracellular Level and Membrane Receptor Localization

    PubMed Central

    Spissu, Ylenia; Sanna, Giovanna; Xiong, Yulan; Dawson, Ted M.; Dawson, Valina L.; Galioto, Manuela; Rocchitta, Gaia; Biosa, Alice; Serra, Pier Andrea; Carri, Maria Teresa; Crosio, Claudia; Iaccarino, Ciro

    2013-01-01

    The leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene was found to play a role in the pathogenesis of both familial and sporadic Parkinson’s disease (PD). LRRK2 encodes a large multi-domain protein that is expressed in different tissues. To date, the physiological and pathological functions of LRRK2 are not clearly defined. In this study we have explored the role of LRRK2 in controlling vesicle trafficking in different cellular or animal models and using various readouts. In neuronal cells, the presence of LRRK2G2019S pathological mutant determines increased extracellular dopamine levels either under basal conditions or upon nicotine stimulation. Moreover, mutant LRRK2 affects the levels of dopamine receptor D1 on the membrane surface in neuronal cells or animal models. Ultrastructural analysis of PC12-derived cells expressing mutant LRRK2G2019S shows an altered intracellular vesicle distribution. Taken together, our results point to the key role of LRRK2 to control vesicle trafficking in neuronal cells. PMID:24167564

  20. Role of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Peptidoglycan-Associated Outer Membrane Proteins in Vesicle Formation

    PubMed Central

    Wessel, Aimee K.; Liew, Jean; Kwon, Taejoon; Marcotte, Edward M.

    2013-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria produce outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) that package and deliver proteins, small molecules, and DNA to prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. The molecular details of OMV biogenesis have not been fully elucidated, but peptidoglycan-associated outer membrane proteins that tether the outer membrane to the underlying peptidoglycan have been shown to be critical for OMV formation in multiple Enterobacteriaceae. In this study, we demonstrate that the peptidoglycan-associated outer membrane proteins OprF and OprI, but not OprL, impact production of OMVs by the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Interestingly, OprF does not appear to be important for tethering the outer membrane to peptidoglycan but instead impacts OMV formation through modulation of the levels of the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS), a quorum signal previously shown by our laboratory to be critical for OMV formation. Thus, the mechanism by which OprF impacts OMV formation is distinct from that for other peptidoglycan-associated outer membrane proteins, including OprI. PMID:23123904

  1. Inhibition by Levorphanol and Related Drugs of Amino Acid Transport by Isolated Membrane Vesicles from Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Mary J. C.; Simon, Eric J.

    1975-01-01

    Levorphanol inhibits the transport of the amino acids proline and lysine by cytoplasmic membrane vesicles derived from Escherichia coli. The degree of inhibition increases with increasing levorphanol concentration and ranges from 26% at 10−6 M levorphanol to 92% at 10−3 M levorphanol. The effect is independent of the energy source, since levorphanol inhibits proline uptake to the same extent in the presence of 20 mM d-lactate or 20 mM succinate and in the absence of an exogenous energy source. Levorphanol does not irreversibly alter the ability of membrane vesicles to transport proline, since incubation of membrane vesicles for 15 min in the presence of 0.25 mM levorphanol, a concentration which inhibits proline transport by more than 75%, has no effect on the rate of proline transport by these vesicles once the drug is removed. Both the maximum velocity and the Km of proline transport are modified by levorphanol, hence, the type of inhibition produced by levorphanol is mixed. The inhibitor constant (Ki) for levorphanol inhibition of proline transport is approximately 3 × 10−4 M. Membrane vesicles incubated in the presence of levorphanol accumulate much less proline at the steady state than do control vesicles. Furthermore, the addition of levorphanol to membrane vesicles preloaded to the steady state with proline produces a marked net efflux of proline. Levorphanol does not block either temperature-induced efflux or exchange of external proline with [14C]proline present in the intravesicular pool. Dextrorphan, the enantiomorph of levorphanol, and levallorphan, the N-allyl analogue of levorphanol, inhibit proline and lysine transport in a similar manner. Possible mechanisms of the effects of these drugs on cell membranes are discussed. PMID:1096802

  2. In vitro study of interaction of synaptic vesicles with lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, S. K.; Castorph, S.; Konovalov, O.; Jahn, R.; Holt, M.; Salditt, T.

    2010-10-01

    The fusion of synaptic vesicles (SVs) with the plasma membrane in neurons is a crucial step in the release of neurotransmitters, which are responsible for carrying signals between nerve cells. While many of the molecular players involved in this fusion process have been identified, a precise molecular description of their roles in the process is still lacking. A case in point is the plasma membrane lipid phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2). Although PIP2 is known to be essential for vesicle fusion, its precise role in the process remains unclear. We have re-investigated the role of this lipid in membrane structure and function using the complementary experimental techniques of x-ray reflectivity, both on lipid monolayers at an air-water interface and bilayers on a solid support, and grazing incidence x-ray diffraction on lipid monolayers. These techniques provide unprecedented access to structural information at the molecular level, and detail the profound structural changes that occur in a membrane following PIP2 incorporation. Further, we also confirm and extend previous findings that the association of SVs with membranes is enhanced by PIP2 incorporation, and reveal the structural changes that underpin this phenomenon. Further, the association is further intensified by a physiologically relevant amount of Ca2+ ions in the subphase of the monolayer, as revealed by the increase in interfacial pressure seen with the lipid monolayer system. Finally, a theoretical calculation concerning the products arising from the fusion of these SVs with proteoliposomes is presented, with which we aim to illustrate the potential future uses of this system.

  3. Use of membrane vesicles as a simplified system for studying auxin transport of auxin: Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, M.H.M.

    1986-01-01

    Indoleacetic acid (IAA), the auxin regulating growth, is transported polarly in plants. IAA stimulates a rapid increase in the rate of electrogenic proton secretion by the plasma membrane. This not only increases the magnitude of the pH and electrical gradients providing the driving force for polar auxin transport and uptake of sugars, amino acids and inorganic ions, but, by acidifying the cell wall, also leads to growth. We find that auxin uptake by membrane vesicles isolated from actively growing plant tissues exhibits some of the same properties as by cells: the accumulation depends on the pH gradient, is saturable and specific for auxin, and enhanced by herbicides that inhibit polar auxin transport. We are using accumulation of a radioactive weak acid to quantify the pH gradient and distribution of fluorescent cyanine dyes to monitor the membrane potential. The magnitude of IAA accumulation exceeds that predicted from the pH gradient, and in the absence of a pH gradient, a membrane potential fails to support any auxin accumulation, leading to the conclusion that the transmembrane potential is not a significant driving force for auxin accumulation in this system. Since increasing the external ionic strength decreases saturable auxin accumulation, we are investigating how modifying the surface potential of the vesicles affects the interaction of the amphipathic IAA molecules with the membranes and whether protein modifying reagents affect the saturability and stimulation by NPA. These studies should provide information on the location and function of the auxin binding site and may enable us to identify the solubilized protein. 5 refs.

  4. Carbachol activates a K+ channel of very small conductance in the basolateral membrane of rat pancreatic acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Köttgen, M; Hoefer, A; Kim, S J; Beschorner, U; Schreiber, R; Hug, M J; Greger, R

    1999-10-01

    Secretion of Cl- requires the presence of a K+ conductance to hyperpolarize the cell, and to provide the driving force for Cl- exit via luminal Cl- channels. In the exocrine pancreas Cl- secretion is mediated by an increase in cytosolic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i). Two types of Ca2+-activated K+ channels could be shown in pancreatic acinar cells of different species. However, there are no data on Ca2+-activated K+ channels in rat pancreatic acini. Here we examine the basolateral K+ conductance of freshly isolated rat pancreatic acinar cells in cell-attached and cell-excised patch-clamp experiments. Addition of carbachol (CCH, 1 micromol/l) to the bath led to the activation of very small conductance K+ channels in cell-attached patches (n=27), producing a noisy macroscopic outward current. The respective outward conductance increased significantly by a factor of 2.1+/-0.1 (n=27). Noise analysis revealed a Lorentzian noise component with a corner frequency (f(c)) of 30.3+/-3.5 Hz (n=19), consistent with channel activity in these patches. The estimated single-channel conductance was 1.5+/-0.4 pS (n=19). In cell-excised patches (inside out) from cells previously stimulated with CCH, channel activity was only observed in the presence of K+ in the bath solution. Under these conditions f(c) was 47.6+/-11.9 Hz (estimated single-channel conductance 1.1+/-0.2 pS, n=20). The current/voltage relationship of the noise showed weak inward rectification and the reversal potential shifted towards E(K+) when Na+ in the bath was replaced by K+. Channel activity in cell-excised patches was slightly reduced by 10 mmol/l Ba2+ (23.6+/-2.1% of the total outward current) and was completely absent when K+ in the bath was replaced by Na+. Reduction of the [Ca2+]i from 1 mmol/l to 1 micromol/l in cell-excised experiments decreased the current by 52.3+/-12.3% (n=5). Expression of K(v)LQT1, one of the possible candidates for a small-conductance K+ channel in rat pancreatic acinar cells, was shown by reverse

  5. Explosive cell lysis as a mechanism for the biogenesis of bacterial membrane vesicles and biofilms.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, Lynne; Toyofuku, Masanori; Hynen, Amelia L; Kurosawa, Masaharu; Pessi, Gabriella; Petty, Nicola K; Osvath, Sarah R; Cárcamo-Oyarce, Gerardo; Gloag, Erin S; Shimoni, Raz; Omasits, Ulrich; Ito, Satoshi; Yap, Xinhui; Monahan, Leigh G; Cavaliere, Rosalia; Ahrens, Christian H; Charles, Ian G; Nomura, Nobuhiko; Eberl, Leo; Whitchurch, Cynthia B

    2016-04-14

    Many bacteria produce extracellular and surface-associated components such as membrane vesicles (MVs), extracellular DNA and moonlighting cytosolic proteins for which the biogenesis and export pathways are not fully understood. Here we show that the explosive cell lysis of a sub-population of cells accounts for the liberation of cytosolic content in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Super-resolution microscopy reveals that explosive cell lysis also produces shattered membrane fragments that rapidly form MVs. A prophage endolysin encoded within the R- and F-pyocin gene cluster is essential for explosive cell lysis. Endolysin-deficient mutants are defective in MV production and biofilm development, consistent with a crucial role in the biogenesis of MVs and liberation of extracellular DNA and other biofilm matrix components. Our findings reveal that explosive cell lysis, mediated through the activity of a cryptic prophage endolysin, acts as a mechanism for the production of bacterial MVs.

  6. Protein kinase A dependent membrane protein phosphorylation and chloride conductance in endosomal vesicles from kidney cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Reenstra, W.W.; Bae, H.R.; Verkman, A.S. Univ. of California, San Francisco ); Sabolic, I. Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA )

    1992-01-14

    Regulation of Cl conductance by protein kinase A action, cell-free measurements of Cl transport and membrane protein phosphorylation were carried out in apical endocytic vesicles from rabbit kidney proximal tubule. Cl transport was measured by a stopped-flow quenching assay in endosomes labeled in vivo with the fluorescent Cl indicator 6-methoxy-N-(3-sulfopropyl)quinolinium. Phosphorylation was studied in a purified endosomal preparation by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography of membrane proteins labeled by ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP. These results suggest that, in a cell-free system, protein kinase A increases Cl conductance in endosomes from kidney proximal tubule by a phosphorylation mechanism. The labeled protein has a size similar to that of the 64-kDa putative kidney Cl channel reported by Landry et al. but is much smaller than the {approximately}170-kDa cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulatory protein.

  7. Explosive cell lysis as a mechanism for the biogenesis of bacterial membrane vesicles and biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Turnbull, Lynne; Toyofuku, Masanori; Hynen, Amelia L.; Kurosawa, Masaharu; Pessi, Gabriella; Petty, Nicola K.; Osvath, Sarah R.; Cárcamo-Oyarce, Gerardo; Gloag, Erin S.; Shimoni, Raz; Omasits, Ulrich; Ito, Satoshi; Yap, Xinhui; Monahan, Leigh G.; Cavaliere, Rosalia; Ahrens, Christian H.; Charles, Ian G.; Nomura, Nobuhiko; Eberl, Leo; Whitchurch, Cynthia B.

    2016-01-01

    Many bacteria produce extracellular and surface-associated components such as membrane vesicles (MVs), extracellular DNA and moonlighting cytosolic proteins for which the biogenesis and export pathways are not fully understood. Here we show that the explosive cell lysis of a sub-population of cells accounts for the liberation of cytosolic content in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Super-resolution microscopy reveals that explosive cell lysis also produces shattered membrane fragments that rapidly form MVs. A prophage endolysin encoded within the R- and F-pyocin gene cluster is essential for explosive cell lysis. Endolysin-deficient mutants are defective in MV production and biofilm development, consistent with a crucial role in the biogenesis of MVs and liberation of extracellular DNA and other biofilm matrix components. Our findings reveal that explosive cell lysis, mediated through the activity of a cryptic prophage endolysin, acts as a mechanism for the production of bacterial MVs. PMID:27075392

  8. Calcium transport in sealed vesicles from red beet (Beta vulgaris L. ) storage tissue. II. Characterization of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake into plasma membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Giannini, J.L.; Ruiz-Cristin, J.; Briskin, D.P.

    1987-12-01

    Calcium uptake was examined in sealed plasma membrane vesicles isolated from red beet (Beta vulgaris L.) storage tissue using /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/. Uptake of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ by the vesicles was ATP-dependent and radiotracer accumulated by the vesicles could be released by the addition of the calcium ionophore A23187. The uptake was stimulated by gramicidin D but slightly inhibited by carbonylcyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone. Although the latter result might suggest some degree of indirect coupling of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake to ATP utilization via ..delta mu..H/sup +/, no evidence for a secondary H/sup +//Ca/sup 2 +/ antiport in this vesicle system could be found. Following the imposition of an acid-interior pH gradient, proton efflux from the vesicle was not enhanced by the addition of Ca/sup 2 +/ and an imposed pH gradient could not drive /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake. Optimal uptake of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ occurred broadly between pH 7.0 and 7.5 and the transport was inhibited by orthovanadate, N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, and diethylstilbestrol but insensitive to nitrate and azide. The dependence of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake on both calcium and Mg:ATP concentration demonstrated saturation kinetics with K/sub m/ values of 6 micromolar and 0.37 millimolar, respectively. While ATP was the preferred substrate for driving /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake, GTP could drive transport at about 50% of the level observed for ATP. The results of this study demonstrate the presence of a unique primary calcium transport system associated with the plasma membrane which could drive calcium efflux from the plant cell.

  9. bSUM: A bead-supported unilamellar membrane system facilitating unidirectional insertion of membrane proteins into giant vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hui; Lee, Sungsoo; Llaguno, Marc C.

    2016-01-01

    Fused or giant vesicles, planar lipid bilayers, a droplet membrane system, and planar-supported membranes have been developed to incorporate membrane proteins for the electrical and biophysical analysis of such proteins or the bilayer properties. However, it remains difficult to incorporate membrane proteins, including ion channels, into reconstituted membrane systems that allow easy control of operational dimensions, incorporation orientation of the membrane proteins, and lipid composition of membranes. Here, using a newly developed chemical engineering procedure, we report on a bead-supported unilamellar membrane (bSUM) system that allows good control over membrane dimension, protein orientation, and lipid composition. Our new system uses specific ligands to facilitate the unidirectional incorporation of membrane proteins into lipid bilayers. Cryo–electron microscopic imaging demonstrates the unilamellar nature of the bSUMs. Electrical recordings from voltage-gated ion channels in bSUMs of varying diameters demonstrate the versatility of the new system. Using KvAP as a model system, we show that compared with other in vitro membrane systems, the bSUMs have the following advantages: (a) a major fraction of channels are orientated in a controlled way; (b) the channels mediate the formation of the lipid bilayer; (c) there is one and only one bilayer membrane on each bead; (d) the lipid composition can be controlled and the bSUM size is also under experimental control over a range of 0.2–20 µm; (e) the channel activity can be recorded by patch clamp using a planar electrode; and (f) the voltage-clamp speed (0.2–0.5 ms) of the bSUM on a planar electrode is fast, making it suitable to study ion channels with fast gating kinetics. Our observations suggest that the chemically engineered bSUMs afford a novel platform for studying lipid–protein interactions in membranes of varying lipid composition and may be useful for other applications, such as targeted

  10. Coordinated recruitment of Spir actin nucleators and myosin V motors to Rab11 vesicle membranes

    PubMed Central

    Pylypenko, Olena; Welz, Tobias; Tittel, Janine; Kollmar, Martin; Chardon, Florian; Malherbe, Gilles; Weiss, Sabine; Michel, Carina Ida Luise; Samol-Wolf, Annette; Grasskamp, Andreas Till; Hume, Alistair; Goud, Bruno; Baron, Bruno; England, Patrick; Titus, Margaret A; Schwille, Petra; Weidemann, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    There is growing evidence for a coupling of actin assembly and myosin motor activity in cells. However, mechanisms for recruitment of actin nucleators and motors on specific membrane compartments remain unclear. Here we report how Spir actin nucleators and myosin V motors coordinate their specific membrane recruitment. The myosin V globular tail domain (MyoV-GTD) interacts directly with an evolutionarily conserved Spir sequence motif. We determined crystal structures of MyoVa-GTD bound either to the Spir-2 motif or to Rab11 and show that a Spir-2:MyoVa:Rab11 complex can form. The ternary complex architecture explains how Rab11 vesicles support coordinated F-actin nucleation and myosin force generation for vesicle transport and tethering. New insights are also provided into how myosin activation can be coupled with the generation of actin tracks. Since MyoV binds several Rab GTPases, synchronized nucleator and motor targeting could provide a common mechanism to control force generation and motility in different cellular processes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17523.001 PMID:27623148

  11. Sulfate uptake by crustacean hepatopancreatic brush border membrane vesicles. [Homarus americanus

    SciTech Connect

    Gerencser, G.A.; Cattey, M.A; Ahearn, G.A. Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu )

    1990-02-26

    Purified brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) were prepared from Atlantic lobster (Homarus americanus) hepatopancreas using differential centrifugation and Mg{sup +2} precipitation techniques. Uptake of 0.1 mM {sup 35}SO{sub 4}{sup {minus}2} was stimulated by pre-loading vesicles with Cl{sup {minus}} leading to a transient accumulation of isotope more than twice that at equilibrium. Pre-loading with HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} or gluconate had no effect on sulfate uptake. No stimulation of {sup 35}SO{sub 4}{sup {minus}2} was observed in the presence of inwardly directed Na{sup +} or tetramethylammonium{sup +} gradients. Uptake of the divalent anion was strongly stimulated by inwardly directed proton gradients (pH{sub o} < pH{sub i}) and markedly inhibited by outwardly directed proton gradients (pH{sub o} > pH{sub i}). {sup 35}SO{sub 4}{sup {minus}2}/Cl{sup {minus}} exchange was enhanced by imposing a transmembrane inside positive K{sup +} diffusion potential and inhibited by a membrane potential of the opposite polarity (K{sup +}/valinomycin). Results suggest the presence of a proton-dependent, electrogenic anion antiport mechanism in BBMV isolated from the crustacean hepatopancreas.

  12. Vesicles between plasma membrane and cell wall prior to visible senescence of Iris and Dendrobium flowers.

    PubMed

    Kamdee, Channatika; Kirasak, Kanjana; Ketsa, Saichol; van Doorn, Wouter G

    2015-09-01

    Cut Iris flowers (Iris x hollandica, cv. Blue Magic) show visible senescence about two days after full opening. Epidermal cells of the outer tepals collapse due to programmed cell death (PCD). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed irregular swelling of the cell walls, starting prior to cell collapse. Compared to cells in flowers that had just opened, wall thickness increased up to tenfold prior to cell death. Fibrils were visible in the swollen walls. After cell death very little of the cell wall remained. Prior to and during visible wall swelling, vesicles (paramural bodies) were observed between the plasma membrane and the cell walls. The vesicles were also found in groups and were accompanied by amorphous substance. They usually showed a single membrane, and had a variety of diameters and electron densities. Cut Dendrobium hybrid cv. Lucky Duan flowers exhibited visible senescence about 14 days after full flower opening. Paramural bodies were also found in Dendrobium tepal epidermis and mesophyll cells, related to wall swelling and degradation. Although alternative explanations are well possible, it is hypothesized that paramural bodies carry enzymes involved in cell wall breakdown. The literature has not yet reported such bodies in association with senescence/PCD.

  13. Coordinated recruitment of Spir actin nucleators and myosin V motors to Rab11 vesicle membranes.

    PubMed

    Pylypenko, Olena; Welz, Tobias; Tittel, Janine; Kollmar, Martin; Chardon, Florian; Malherbe, Gilles; Weiss, Sabine; Michel, Carina Ida Luise; Samol-Wolf, Annette; Grasskamp, Andreas Till; Hume, Alistair; Goud, Bruno; Baron, Bruno; England, Patrick; Titus, Margaret A; Schwille, Petra; Weidemann, Thomas; Houdusse, Anne; Kerkhoff, Eugen

    2016-09-13

    There is growing evidence for a coupling of actin assembly and myosin motor activity in cells. However, mechanisms for recruitment of actin nucleators and motors on specific membrane compartments remain unclear. Here we report how Spir actin nucleators and myosin V motors coordinate their specific membrane recruitment. The myosin V globular tail domain (MyoV-GTD) interacts directly with an evolutionarily conserved Spir sequence motif. We determined crystal structures of MyoVa-GTD bound either to the Spir-2 motif or to Rab11 and show that a Spir-2:MyoVa:Rab11 complex can form. The ternary complex architecture explains how Rab11 vesicles support coordinated F-actin nucleation and myosin force generation for vesicle transport and tethering. New insights are also provided into how myosin activation can be coupled with the generation of actin tracks. Since MyoV binds several Rab GTPases, synchronized nucleator and motor targeting could provide a common mechanism to control force generation and motility in different cellular processes.

  14. Characterization of the chloride conductance in porcine renal brush-border membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Krick, W; Dölle, A; Hagos, Y; Burckhardt, G

    1998-02-01

    The chloride conductance in brush-border membrane vesicles prepared from pig kidney cortex was investigated using a light-scattering assay, anion-diffusion-potential-dependent Na+-D-glucose cotransport and 36Cl- influx. K+-diffusion-potential-driven salt exit from, or entry into, the vesicles was slow in the presence of gluconate, SO42- and F-, intermediate with Cl- and Br-, and fast with I-, NO3-, and SCN-. Stimulation of Na+-D-glucose uptake followed a similar anion sequence. Conductive Cl- flux had a low activation energy and was inhibited by suphhydryl reagents, the stilbene disulphonates 4-acetamido-4'-isothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulphonate (SITS) and 4, 4'-diisothiocyanato-2,2'-disulphonate (DIDS), and the arylaminobenzoates diphenylamine-2-carboxylic acid (DPC) and 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)benzoic acid (NPPB). Intravesicular Ca2+ and extravesicular nucleotides were without effect on conductive Cl- flux. These characteristics tentatively exclude some known Cl- channels and leave members of the ClC family as possible candidates responsible for the Cl- conductance in brush-border membranes.

  15. Synthetic Effect between Envelope Stress and Lack of Outer Membrane Vesicle Production in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Schwechheimer, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are composed of outer membrane and periplasmic components and are ubiquitously secreted by Gram-negative bacteria. OMVs can disseminate virulence factors for pathogenic bacteria as well as serve as an envelope stress response. From a transposon mutant screen for OMV phenotypes, it was discovered that an nlpA mutant of Escherichia coli produces fewer OMVs than the wild type, whereas a degP mutant produces higher levels of OMVs. NlpA is an inner-membrane-anchored lipoprotein that has a minor role in methionine import. DegP is a periplasmic chaperone/protease for misfolded envelope proteins that is critical when cells are heat shocked. To reveal how these proteins contribute to OMV production, the mutations were combined and the double mutant analyzed. The ΔnlpA ΔdegP strain displayed a high-temperature growth defect that corresponded to the production of fewer OMVs than produced by the ΔdegP strain. This phenotype also pertained to other undervesiculation mutations in a ΔdegP background. The hypovesiculation phenotype of ΔnlpA in the wild-type strain as well as in the degP deletion strain was found to be a stationary-phase phenomenon. The periplasm of the ΔnlpA ΔdegP strain was determined to contain significantly more protein in stationary phase than the wild type. Additionally, misfolded DegP substrate outer membrane porins were detected in ΔdegP mutant-derived OMVs. These data suggest that an accumulation of envelope proteins resulting from decreased vesiculation was toxic and contributed to the growth defect. We conclude that OMV production contributes to relieve the envelope of accumulated toxic proteins and that NlpA plays an important role in the production of vesicles in stationary phase. PMID:23852867

  16. An analysis of membrane fusion between mitochondrial double membranes and MITO-Porter, mitochondrial fusogenic vesicles.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yuma; Fukuda, Yutaka; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2015-09-01

    To achieve mitochondrial gene therapy, therapeutic molecules need to be transported through the outer and inner membranes of mitochondria into the innermost space (mitochondrial matrix), which contains the mtDNA pool. We previously reported on the construction of a MITO-Porter with a high fusogenic activity for the mitochondrial outer membrane for delivering molecules to the mitochondria of human cells. Here, we report on an investigation of a fusogenic lipid composition for the inner membrane, and an analysis of the fusogenic compositions for the outer and inner membranes. A significant relationship was found between fusion activity and the mitochondrial delivery of nucleic acids.

  17. VAT-1 from Torpedo electric organ forms a high-molecular-mass protein complex within the synaptic vesicle membrane.

    PubMed

    Linial, M

    1993-08-15

    VAT-1 is an abundant 41-kDa protein from Torpedo cholinergic synaptic vesicles. Most of VAT-1 immunoreactivity (70%) is localized to the synaptic vesicle membrane while the rest (30%) copurifies with larger membranous fragments. VAT-1 forms a high-molecular-mass complex within the synaptic vesicle membrane. The Stokes radius of the VAT-1 complex is 4.85 nm and the sedimentation coefficient is 8.0 x 10(-13) S. Using these values, the calculated apparent mass of the VAT-1 complex is 176 kDa and the friction coefficient is consistent with that for a globular protein. Electrophoresis of solubilized synaptic vesicle proteins following cross-linking resulted in a 40-kDa ladder which was detected by VAT-1 antibodies. This is in accord with VAT-1 protein complex being composed primarily of VAT-1 subunits. The hydrodynamic characteristics of the VAT-1 protein complex suggest that it is composed of three or four VAT-1 subunits. Synaptophysin, an abundant component of Torpedo synaptic vesicle membranes, which has a similar apparent size as VAT-1, is not part of the VAT-1 protein complex. Interactions between the subunits within the protein complex do not depend on disulfide bonds or on lowering the ionic strength. However, partial dissociation of VAT-1 subunits from the complex occurs by chelating calcium ions.

  18. Multiscale modeling of mechanosensing channels on vesicles and cell membranes in 3D constricted flows and shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhangli; Pak, On Shun; Young, Yuan-Nan; Liu, Allen; Stone, Howard

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the gating of mechanosensing channels (Mscls) on vesicles and cell membranes under different flow conditions using a multiscale approach. At the cell level (microns), the membrane tension is calculated using a 3D two-component whole-cell membrane model based on dissipative particle dynamics (DPD), including the cortex cytoskeleton and its interactions with the lipid bilayer. At the Mscl level (nanometers), we predict the relation between channel gating and the membrane tension obtained from a cell-level model using a semi-analytical model based on the bilayer hydrophobic mismatch energy. We systematically study the gating of Mscls of vesicles and cell membranes in constricted channel flows and shear flows, and explore the dependence of the gating on flow rate, cell shape and size. The results provide guidance for future experiments in inducing Mscl opening for various purposes such as drug delivery.

  19. Membrane Vesicles of Group B Streptococcus Disrupt Feto-Maternal Barrier Leading to Preterm Birth

    PubMed Central

    Sthanam, Lakshmi Kavitha; Srivastava, Rohit; Basu, Bhakti; Dutta, Suryendu; Sen, Shamik; Modi, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Infection of the genitourinary tract with Group B Streptococcus (GBS), an opportunistic gram positive pathogen, is associated with premature rupture of amniotic membrane and preterm birth. In this work, we demonstrate that GBS produces membrane vesicles (MVs) in a serotype independent manner. These MVs are loaded with virulence factors including extracellular matrix degrading proteases and pore forming toxins. Mice chorio-decidual membranes challenged with MVs ex vivo resulted in extensive collagen degradation leading to loss of stiffness and mechanical weakening. MVs when instilled vaginally are capable of anterograde transport in mouse reproductive tract. Intra-amniotic injections of GBS MVs in mice led to upregulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines and inflammation mimicking features of chorio-amnionitis; it also led to apoptosis in the chorio-decidual tissue. Instillation of MVs in the amniotic sac also resulted in intrauterine fetal death and preterm delivery. Our findings suggest that GBS MVs can independently orchestrate events at the feto-maternal interface causing chorio-amnionitis and membrane damage leading to preterm birth or fetal death. PMID:27583406

  20. Membrane vesicles: A simplified system for studying auxin transport. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, M.H.M.

    1989-12-31

    Indoleacetic acid (IAA), the auxin responsible for regulation of growth, is transported polarly in plants. Several different models have been suggested to account for IAA transport by cells and its accumulation by membrane vesicles. One model sees diffusion of IAA driven by a pH gradient. The anion of a lipophilic weak acid like IAA or butyrate accumulates in an alkaline compartment in accord with the size of the pH gradient The accumulation of IAA may be diminished by the permeability of its lipophilic anion. This anion leak may be blocked by NPA. With anion efflux blocked, a gradient of two pH units would support an IAA accumulation of less than 50-fold at equilibrium (2) Another model sees diffusion of IAA in parallel with a saturable symport (IAA{sup {minus}} + nH{sup +}), driven by both the pH gradient and membrane voltage. Such a symport should be highly accumulative, however, with a lipophilic weak acid such as IAA, net diffusive efflux of IAAH whenever IAAHI{sub i} > IAAH{sub o} would constitute a leak. (3) A third model sees a pH change driven IAA uptake and saturable symport enhanced by internal binding sites. Following pH gradient-driven accumulation of IAA, the anion may bind to an intravesicular site, permitting further uptake of IAA. NPA, by blocking anion efflux, enhances this binding. We have reported that membrane vesicles isolated from actively growing plant tissues are a good system for studying the mechanisms involved in the transport and accumulation of auxin.

  1. Bacterial outer membrane vesicle biogenesis: a new mechanism and its implications

    PubMed Central

    Roier, Sandro; Zingl, Franz G.; Cakar, Fatih; Schild, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Outer membrane vesicle (OMV) release by Gram-negative bacteria has been observed and studied for decades. First considered as a by-product of cell lysis, it soon became evident that OMVs are actively secreted from the outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria. Accordingly, these small particles (~ 10-300 nm in diameter) consist mainly of OM components like phospholipids (PLs), OM proteins, and lipopolysaccharides or lipooligosaccharides. However, OMVs may also comprise periplasmic, inner membrane, or cytoplasmic components. Since the shedding of substantial amounts of OM material represents a significant energy cost to the bacterial cell, OMV production must have some vital biological functions for Gram-negative bacteria. Indeed, intense research on that topic revealed that OMVs play important roles in bacterial physiology and pathogenesis, ranging from secretion and delivery of biomolecules (for example, toxins, DNA, or quorum sensing molecules) over stress response and biofilm formation to immunomodulation and adherence to host cells. Only recently researchers have begun to elucidate the mechanistic aspects of OMV formation, but a general mechanism for the biogenesis of these vesicles is still lacking. Here we review the findings and implications of our recent study published in Nature Communications (Roier S, et al. (2016) Nat. Commun. 7:10515), where we propose a novel and highly conserved bacterial OMV biogenesis mechanism based on PL accumulation in the outer leaflet of the OM. This mechanism might not only have important pathophysiological roles in vivo, but also represents the first general mechanism of OMV formation applicable to all Gram-negative bacteria.

  2. Analysis of Arf1 GTPase-dependent membrane binding and remodeling using the exomer secretory vesicle cargo adaptor

    PubMed Central

    Paczkowski, Jon E.; Fromme, J. Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Summary Protein-protein and protein-membrane interactions play a critical role in shaping biological membranes through direct physical contact with the membrane surface. This is particularly evident in many steps of membrane trafficking, in which proteins deform the membrane and induce fission to form transport carriers. The small GTPase Arf1 and related proteins have the ability to remodel membranes by insertion of an amphipathic helix into the membrane. Arf1 and the exomer cargo adaptor coordinate cargo sorting into subset of secretory vesicle carriers in the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we detail the assays we used to explore the cooperative action of Arf1 and exomer to bind and remodel membranes. We expect these methods are broadly applicable to other small GTPase/effector systems where investigation of membrane binding and remodeling is of interest. PMID:27632000

  3. Proline transport by brush-border membrane vesicles of lobster antennal glands

    SciTech Connect

    Behnke, R.D.; Wong, R.K.; Huse, S.M.; Reshkin, S.J.; Ahearn, G.A. )

    1990-02-01

    Purified brush-border membrane vesicles (BBMV) of lobster antennal gland labyrinth and bladder were separately formed by a magnesium precipitation technique. L-(3H)proline uptake was stimulated by a transmembrane NaCl gradient (outside (o) greater than inside (i)) to a greater extent in BBMV from labyrinth than those from the bladder. Detailed study of the labyrinth proline-transport processes revealed a specific dependence on NaCl, with negligible stimulatory effects by NaSCN, Na-gluconate, or KCl. A transmembrane proton gradient (o greater than i) was without stimulatory effect on proline transport. A transmembrane potential difference alone, in the presence of equilibrated NaCl and L-(3H)proline, led to net influx of the labeled amino acid, suggesting that the uptake process was electrogenic and capable of bringing about the net transfer of positive charge to the vesicle interior. Although a transmembrane Na gradient alone, in the presence of equilibrated Cl and L-(3H)proline, was able to bring about the net influx of the amino acid, a transmembrane Cl gradient alone under Na- and L-(3H)proline-equilibrated conditions was not, suggesting that only the Na gradient could energize the carrier process through cotransport, while the anion served an essential activating role. Proline influx by these vesicles occurred by the combination of at least one saturable Michaelis-Menten carrier system (apparent Kt = 0.37 mM; apparent JM = 1.19 nmol.mg protein-1.10 s-1) and apparent diffusion (P = 0.33 nmol.mg protein-1.10 s-1.mM-1). Static head analysis of the transport process suggested a cotransport stoichiometry of 2 Na:1 proline with essential activation by Cl ion.

  4. Multidrug Resistance-Associated Protein 2 (MRP2) Mediated Transport of Oxaliplatin-Derived Platinum in Membrane Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Myint, Khine; Li, Yan; Paxton, James; McKeage, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The platinum-based anticancer drug oxaliplatin is important clinically in cancer treatment. However, the role of multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2) in controlling oxaliplatin membrane transport, in vivo handling, toxicity and therapeutic responses is unclear. In the current study, preparations of MRP2-expressing and control membrane vesicles, containing inside-out orientated vesicles, were used to directly characterise the membrane transport of oxaliplatin-derived platinum measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Oxaliplatin inhibited the ATP-dependent accumulation of the model MRP2 fluorescent probe, 5(6)-carboxy-2,'7'-dichlorofluorescein, in MRP2-expressing membrane vesicles. MRP2-expressing membrane vesicles accumulated up to 19-fold more platinum during their incubation with oxaliplatin and ATP as compared to control membrane vesicles and in the absence of ATP. The rate of ATP-dependent MRP2-mediated active transport of oxaliplatin-derived platinum increased non-linearly with increasing oxaliplatin exposure concentration, approaching a plateau value (Vmax) of 2680 pmol Pt/mg protein/10 minutes (95%CI, 2010 to 3360 pmol Pt/mg protein/10 minutes), with the half-maximal platinum accumulation rate (Km) at an oxaliplatin exposure concentration of 301 μM (95% CI, 163 to 438 μM), in accordance with Michaelis-Menten kinetics (r2 = 0.954). MRP2 inhibitors (myricetin and MK571) reduced the ATP-dependent accumulation of oxaliplatin-derived platinum in MRP2-expressing membrane vesicles in a concentration-dependent manner. To identify whether oxaliplatin, or perhaps a degradation product, was the likely substrate for this active transport, HPLC studies were undertaken showing that oxaliplatin degraded slowly in membrane vesicle incubation buffer containing chloride ions and glutathione, with approximately 95% remaining intact after a 10 minute incubation time and a degradation half-life of 2.24 hours (95%CI, 2.08 to 2.43 hours). In

  5. Complete Budding and Asymmetric Division of Primitive Model Cells To Produce Daughter Vesicles with Different Interior and Membrane Compositions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Asymmetric cell division is common in biology and plays critical roles in differentiation and development. Unicellular organisms are often used as model systems for understanding the origins and consequences of asymmetry during cell division. Although basic as compared to mammalian cells, these are already quite complex. We report complete budding and asymmetric fission of very simple nonliving model cells to produce daughter vesicles that are chemically distinct in both interior and membrane compositions. Our model cells are based on giant lipid vesicles (GVs, 10–30 μm) encapsulating a polyethylene glycol (PEG)/dextran aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) as a crowded and compartmentalized cytoplasm mimic. Ternary lipid compositions were used to provide coexisting micrometer-scale liquid disordered (Ld) and liquid ordered (Lo) domains in the membranes. ATPS-containing vesicles formed buds when sucrose was added externally to provide increased osmotic pressure, such that they became not only morphologically asymmetric but also asymmetric in both their interior and their membrane compositions. Further increases in osmolality drove formation of two chemically distinct daughter vesicles, which were in some cases connected by a lipid nanotube (complete budding), and in others were not (fission). In all cases, separation occurred at the aqueous–aqueous phase boundary, such that one daughter vesicle contained the PEG-rich aqueous phase and the other contained the dextran-rich aqueous phase. PEGylated lipids localized in the Lo domain resulted in this membrane domain preferentially coating the PEG-rich bud prior to division, and subsequently the PEG-rich daughter vesicle. Varying the mole ratio of lipids resulted in excess surface area of Lo or Ld membrane domains such that, upon division, this excess portion was inherited by one of the daughter vesicles. In some cases, a second “generation” of aqueous phase separation and budding could be induced in these daughter

  6. Cimetidine transport in rabbit renal cortical brush-border membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    McKinney, T.D.; Kunnemann, M.E.

    1987-03-01

    Cimetidine is an organic cation and commonly prescribed drug that is eliminated primarily by proximal renal tubular secretion. The present studies evaluated cimetidine transport in rabbit renal cortical brush-border membrane vesicles (BBMV). (/sup 3/H)Cimetidine uptake varied inversely with media osmolarity and was stimulated with uphill transport above equilibrium values (overshoot) produced by an initial proton gradient directed from the vesicle interior outwardly. Uphill transport occurred earlier and was of greater magnitude at 25/sup 0/C than at 5/sup 0/C. pH-stimulated (/sup 3/H)cimetidine uptake was inhibited by excess nonradiolabeled cimetidine, quinidine, and procainamide but was affected little by probenecid. Tetraethylammonium inhibited cimetidine uptake in the presence and absence of an initial proton gradient, indicating that nonionic diffusion and simple diffusion cannot totally account for cimetidine transport in BBMV. Preloading BBMV with an excess of procainamide enhanced cimetidine uptake. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that cimetidine is transported across BBMV by organic cation-proton exchange.

  7. Klebsiella pneumoniae secretes outer membrane vesicles that induce the innate immune response.

    PubMed

    Lee, Je Chul; Lee, Eun Jeoung; Lee, Jung Hwa; Jun, So Hyun; Choi, Chi Won; Kim, Seung Il; Kang, Sang Sun; Hyun, Sunghee

    2012-06-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) derived from pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria are an important vehicle for delivery of effector molecules to host cells, but the production of OMVs from Klebsiella pneumoniae, an opportunistic pathogen of both nosocomial and community-acquired infections, and their role in bacterial pathogenesis have not yet been determined. In the present study, we examined the production of OMVs from K. pneumoniae and determined the induction of the innate immune response against K. pneumoniae OMVs. Klebsiella pneumoniae ATCC 13883 produced and secreted OMVs during in vitro culture. Proteomic analysis revealed that 159 different proteins were associated with K. pneumoniae OMVs. Klebsiella pneumoniae OMVs did not inhibit cell growth or induce cell death. However, these vesicles induced expression of proinflammatory cytokine genes such as interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-8 in epithelial cells. An intratracheal challenge of K. pneumoniae OMVs in neutropenic mice resulted in severe lung pathology similar to K. pneumoniae infection. In conclusion, K. pneumoniae produces OMVs like other pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria and K. pneumoniae OMVs are a molecular complex that induces the innate immune response.

  8. Brefeldin A sensitive mechanisms contribute to endocytotic membrane retrieval and vesicle recycling in cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Rampérez, Alberto; Sánchez-Prieto, José; Torres, Magdalena

    2017-03-11

    The recycling of synaptic vesicle (SV) proteins and transmitter release both occur at multiple sites along the axon. These processes are sensitive to inhibition of the small GTP binding protein ARF1, which regulates the AP-1/AP-3 complex. As the axon matures, SV recycling becomes restricted to the presynaptic bouton, and its machinery undergoes a complex process of maturation. We used the styryl dye FM1-43 to highlight differences in the efficiency of membrane recycling at different sites in cerebellar granule cells cultured for 7 days in vitro. We used Brefeldin A (BFA) to inhibit AP-1/AP-3-mediated recycling and to test the contribution of this pathway to the heterogeneity of the responses when these cells are strongly stimulated. Combining imaging techniques and ultrastructural analyses, we found a significant decrease in the density of functional boutons and an increase in the presence of endosome-like structures within the boutons of cells incubated with BFA prior to FM1-43 loading. Such effects were not observed when BFA was added 5 minutes after the end of the loading step, when endocytosis was almost fully completed. In this situation, vesicles were found closer to the active zone (AZ) in boutons exposed to BFA. Together, these data suggest that the AP-1/AP-3 pathway contributes to SV recycling, affecting different steps in all boutons but not equally, and thus being partly responsible for the heterogeneity of the different recycling efficiencies. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Apigenin and quercetin promote. Delta. pH-dependent accumulation of IAA in membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Woolard, D.D.; Clark, K.A. )

    1990-05-01

    Flavonoids may act as regulators of polar auxin transport. In the presence of a pH gradient (pH 8{sub in}/6{sub out}) the flavonoids quercetin and apigenin, as well as the synthetic herbicide napthylphthalamic acid (NPA), promote the accumulation of IAA in membrane vesicles from dark-grown zucchini hypocotyls. Simultaneous accumulation of {sup 3}H-IAA (10 nM) and {sup 14}C-butyric acid (5 {mu}M; included as a pH probe) was determined by a filtration assay after incubating the vesicles with 3 nM to 100 {mu}M quercetin, apigenin, NPA or unlabeled IAA. Maximal stimulation (% of Control) was observed with 3 {mu}M NPA (130%), 1 {mu}M quercetin (120%), or 3 {mu}M apigenin (115%); {Delta}pH was not affected by these concentrations. As reported by others, IAA uptake was saturable: 1 {mu}M unlabeled IAA eliminated {Delta}pH-dependent uptake of {sup 3}H-IAA without altering {Delta}pH. However, at 30 to 100 {mu}M, every compound tested collapsed the imposed pH gradient and therefore abolished specific {sup 3}H-IAA uptake.

  10. A naturally derived outer-membrane vesicle vaccine protects against lethal pulmonary Burkholderia pseudomallei infection.

    PubMed

    Nieves, Wildaliz; Asakrah, Saja; Qazi, Omar; Brown, Katherine A; Kurtz, Jonathan; Aucoin, David P; McLachlan, James B; Roy, Chad J; Morici, Lisa A

    2011-10-26

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, and other members of the Burkholderia, are among the most antibiotic-resistant bacterial species encountered in human infection. Mortality rates associated with severe B. pseudomallei infection approach 50% despite therapeutic treatment. A protective vaccine against B. pseudomallei would dramatically reduce morbidity and mortality in endemic areas and provide a safeguard for the U.S. and other countries against biological attack with this organism. In this study, we investigated the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of B. pseudomallei-derived outer membrane vesicles (OMVs). Vesicles are produced by Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria and contain many of the bacterial products recognized by the host immune system during infection. We demonstrate that subcutaneous (SC) immunization with OMVs provides significant protection against an otherwise lethal B. pseudomallei aerosol challenge in BALB/c mice. Mice immunized with B. pseudomallei OMVs displayed OMV-specific serum antibody and T-cell memory responses. Furthermore, OMV-mediated immunity appears species-specific as cross-reactive antibody and T cells were not generated in mice immunized with Escherichia coli-derived OMVs. These results provide the first compelling evidence that OMVs represent a non-living vaccine formulation that is able to produce protective humoral and cellular immunity against an aerosolized intracellular bacterium. This vaccine platform constitutes a safe and inexpensive immunization strategy against B. pseudomallei that can be exploited for other intracellular respiratory pathogens, including other Burkholderia and bacteria capable of establishing persistent infection.

  11. The development of a meningococcal disease vaccine based on Neisseria lactamica outer membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Gorringe, Andrew; Halliwell, Denise; Matheson, Mary; Reddin, Karen; Finney, Michelle; Hudson, Michael

    2005-03-18

    Serogroup B meningococcal disease remains a serious problem in many countries and no effective vaccine is currently available. Immunological and epidemiological evidence suggests that carriage of commensal Neisseria species is involved in the development of natural immunity against meningococcal disease. Neisseria lactamica has many surface structures in common with Neisseria meningitidis and may be the most important of these species. We have produced extensive pre-clinical data, which indicate that N. lactamica outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) may provide a vaccine effective against diverse disease-causing meningococcal strains. Immunisation with N. lactamica OMVs protected against lethal challenge with diverse meningococcal isolates in a mouse intraperitoneal challenge model of meningococcal disease and we are developing this vaccine for use in a phase I safety and immunogenicity study in adult volunteers. We have shown that OMVs produced from bacteria grown under iron-limited or iron-rich conditions provide equivalent protection in the mouse infection model and thus OMVs produced from iron-rich will be used. Sterile filtration of N. lactamica OMVs has proved difficult but this has been improved by resuspending the vesicles in a buffer, which increases their surface zeta potential. The vaccine is currently being manufactured and validated ELISA protocols have been developed for the analysis of serological responses.

  12. Interspecies Communication between Pathogens and Immune Cells via Bacterial Membrane Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Jurkoshek, Katerina S.; Wang, Ying; Athman, Jaffre J.; Barton, Marian R.; Wearsch, Pamela A.

    2016-01-01

    The production of extracellular vesicles is a universal mechanism for intercellular communication that is conserved across kingdoms. Prokaryotes secrete 50–250 nm membrane vesicles (MVs) in a manner that is regulated by environmental stress and is thought to promote survival. Since many types of host-derived stress are encountered during infection, this implies an important role for MV secretion in bacterial pathogenesis. Accordingly, MVs produced by gram-positive and gram-negative pathogens contain toxins, virulence factors, and other molecules that promote survival in the host. However, recent studies have also shown that bacterial MVs are enriched for molecules that stimulate innate and adaptive immune responses. As an example, MVs may serve multiple, important roles in regulating the host response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), an intracellular pathogen that infects lung macrophages and resides within modified phagosomes. Previously, we demonstrated that Mtb secretes MVs during infection that may modulate infected and uninfected immune cells. Our present data demonstrates that Mtb MVs inhibit the functions of macrophages and T cells, but promote Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class II antigen presentation by dendritic cells. We conclude that bacterial MVs serve dual and opposing roles in the activation of and defense against host immune responses to Mtb and other bacterial pathogens. We also propose that MV secretion is a central mechanism for interspecies communication between bacteria and host cells during infection. PMID:27891500

  13. Novel cationic vesicle platform derived from vernonia oil for efficient delivery of DNA through plant cuticle membranes.

    PubMed

    Wiesman, Zeev; Dom, Naomi Ben; Sharvit, Efrat; Grinberg, Sarina; Linder, Charles; Heldman, Eli; Zaccai, Michele

    2007-05-31

    Novel cationic amphiphilic compounds were prepared from vernonia oil, a natural epoxidized triglyceride, and studied with respect to vesicle formation, encapsulation of biomaterials such as DNA, and their physical stability and transport through isolated plant cuticle membranes. The amphiphiles studied were a single-headed compound III (a quaternary ammonium head group with two alkyl chains) and a triple-headed compound IV, which is essentially three molecules of compound III bound together through a glycerol moiety. Vesicles of the two amphiphiles, prepared by sonication in water and solutions of uranyl acetate or the herbicide 2,4-D (2,4-dichloropenoxy acetic acid), were examined by TEM, SEM, AFM, and confocal laser systems and had a spherical shape which encapsulated the solutes with diameters between 40 and 110 nm. Vesicles from amphiphile IV could be made large enough to encapsulate a condensed 5.2kb DNA plasmid (pJD328). Vesicles of amphiphile IV were also shown to pass intact across isolated plant cuticle membranes and the rate of delivery of encapsulated radio-labeled 2,4-D through isolated plant cuticle membranes obtained with these vesicles was clearly greater in comparison to liposomes prepared from dipalmitopyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and the control, nonencapsulated 2,4-D. Vesicles from amphiphiles III and IV were found to be more stable than those of liposomes from DPPC. The data indicate the potential of vesicles prepared from the novel amphiphile IV to be a relatively efficient nano-scale delivery system to transport DNA and other bioactive agents through plant biological barriers. This scientific approach may open the way for further development of efficient in vivo plant transformation systems.

  14. Rotation of Vibrio fischeri Flagella Produces Outer Membrane Vesicles That Induce Host Development

    PubMed Central

    Aschtgen, Marie-Stephanie; Lynch, Jonathan B.; Koch, Eric; Schwartzman, Julia; McFall-Ngai, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Using the squid-vibrio association, we aimed to characterize the mechanism through which Vibrio fischeri cells signal morphogenesis of the symbiotic light-emitting organ. The symbiont releases two cell envelope molecules, peptidoglycan (PG) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) that, within 12 h of light organ colonization, act in synergy to trigger normal tissue development. Recent work has shown that outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) produced by V. fischeri are sufficient to induce PG-dependent morphogenesis; however, the mechanism(s) of OMV release by these bacteria has not been described. Like several genera of both beneficial and pathogenic bacteria, V. fischeri cells elaborate polar flagella that are enclosed by an extension of the outer membrane, whose function remains unclear. Here, we present evidence that along with the well-recognized phenomenon of blebbing from the cell's surface, rotation of this sheathed flagellum also results in the release of OMVs. In addition, we demonstrate that most of the development-inducing LPS is associated with these OMVs and that the presence of the outer membrane protein OmpU but not the LPS O antigen on these OMVs is important in triggering normal host development. These results also present insights into a possible new mechanism of LPS release by pathogens with sheathed flagella. IMPORTANCE Determining the function(s) of sheathed flagella in bacteria has been challenging, because no known mutation results only in the loss of this outer membrane-derived casing. Nevertheless, the presence of a sheathed flagellum in such host-associated genera as Vibrio, Helicobacter, and Brucella has led to several proposed functions, including physical protection of the flagella and masking of their immunogenic flagellins. Using the squid-vibrio light organ symbiosis, we demonstrate another role, that of V. fischeri cells require rotating flagella to induce apoptotic cell death within surface epithelium, which is a normal step in the organ

  15. Voltage-dependent calcium channels in skeletal muscle transverse tubules. Measurements of calcium efflux in membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, S.M. )

    1989-07-05

    Transverse tubule membranes isolated from rabbit skeletal muscle consist mainly of sealed vesicles that are oriented primarily inside out. These membranes contain a high density of binding sites for 1,4-dihydropyridine calcium channel antagonists. The presence of functional voltage-dependent calcium channels in these membranes has been demonstrated by their ability to mediate {sup 45}Ca2+ efflux in response to changes in membrane potential. Fluorescence changes of the voltage-sensitive dye, 3,3'-dipropyl-2,2'-thiadicarbocyanine, have shown that transverse tubule vesicles may generate and maintain membrane potentials in response to establishing potassium gradients across the membrane in the presence of valinomycin. A two-step procedure has been developed to measure voltage-dependent calcium fluxes. Vesicles loaded with {sup 45}Ca2+ are first diluted into a buffer designed to generate a membrane potential mimicking the resting state of the cell and to reduce the extravesicular Ca2+ to sub-micromolar levels. {sup 45}Ca2+ efflux is then measured upon subsequent depolarization. Flux responses are modulated with appropriate pharmacological specificity by 1,4-dihydropyridines and are inhibited by other calcium channel antagonists such as lanthanum and verapamil.

  16. Effect of surface and membrane potentials on IAA (indoleactic acid) uptake and binding by zucchini membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, K.A.; Goldsmith, M.H.M.

    1986-08-01

    The polar transport of the endogenous hormone controlling extension growth of plant cells, indoleacetic acid (IAA), is thought to depend on transmembrane pH and electrical gradients resulting in part from the action of proton ATPases in the plasma membrane. Elements of this transport process are permeation of the membrane by the undissociated lipophilic indoleacetic acid (IAAH) from the acidic apoplast, followed by dissociation of the weak acid and accumulation of the IAA anion (IAA/sup -/) in the alkaline cytoplasm; a saturable symport of IAA/sup -/ with one or more protons; a carrier-mediated efflux of IAA/sup -/ down a considerable electrochemical gradient. The efflux is greater from the basal than the apical end of cells and is thought to be responsible for the overall polarity of the process. This step is also the site of action of napthylphthalamic acid (NPA) and herbicides that inhibit polar transport but stimulate net accumulation of auxin by tissues and cells. We are using membrane vesicles as a simplified system for studying the mechanisms involved in the transport and accumulation of auxin. In particular, we are interested in determining the involvement of the transmembrane pH (pH/sub o/ < pH/sub i/) and voltage gradients (K/sup +/ diffusion potential, (K/sup +/)/sub in/ > (K/sup +/)/sub out/) in IAA uptake. 19 refs., 6 figs.

  17. Fusion of Legionella pneumophila outer membrane vesicles with eukaryotic membrane systems is a mechanism to deliver pathogen factors to host cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Jens; Keese, Susanne; Roessle, Manfred; Steinert, Michael; Schromm, Andra B

    2015-05-01

    The formation and release of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) is a phenomenon observed in many bacteria, including Legionella pneumophila. During infection, this human pathogen primarily invades alveolar macrophages and replicates within a unique membrane-bound compartment termed Legionella-containing vacuole. In the current study, we analysed the membrane architecture of L. pneumophila OMVs by small-angle X-ray scattering and biophysically characterized OMV membranes. We investigated the interaction of L. pneumophila OMVs with model membranes by Förster resonance energy transfer and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. These experiments demonstrated the incorporation of OMV membrane material into liposomes composed of different eukaryotic phospholipids, revealing an endogenous property of OMVs to fuse with eukaryotic membranes. Cellular co-incubation experiments showed a dose- and time-dependent binding of fluorophore-labelled OMVs to macrophages. Trypan blue quenching experiments disclosed a rapid internalization of OMVs into macrophages at 37 and 4 °C. Purified OMVs induced tumour necrosis factor-α production in human macrophages at concentrations starting at 300 ng ml(-1). Experiments on HEK293-TLR2 and TLR4/MD-2 cell lines demonstrated a dominance of TLR2-dependent signalling pathways. In summary, we demonstrate binding, internalization and biological activity of L. pneumophila OMVs on human macrophages. Our data support OMV membrane fusion as a mechanism for the remote delivery of virulence factors to host cells.

  18. Affinity purification of bacterial outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) utilizing a His-tag mutant.

    PubMed

    Alves, Nathan J; Turner, Kendrick B; DiVito, Kyle A; Daniele, Michael A; Walper, Scott A

    To facilitate the rapid purification of bacterial outer membrane vesicles (OMVs), we developed two plasmid constructs that utilize a truncated, transmembrane protein to present an exterior histidine repeat sequence. We chose OmpA, a highly abundant porin protein, as the protein scaffold and utilized the lac promoter to allow for inducible control of the epitope-presenting construct. OMVs containing mutant OmpA-His6 were purified directly from Escherichia coli culture media on an immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) Ni-NTA resin. This enabling technology can be combined with other molecular tools directed at OMV packaging to facilitate the separation of modified/cargo-loaded OMV from their wt counterparts. In addition to numerous applications in the pharmaceutical and environmental remediation industries, this technology can be utilized to enhance basic research capabilities in the area of elucidating endogenous OMV function.

  19. Proteomic analysis of Neisseria lactamica and N eisseria meningitidis outer membrane vesicle vaccine antigens.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Thomas E; Skipp, Paul J; O'Connor, C David; Hudson, Michael J; Vipond, Richard; Elmore, Michael J; Gorringe, Andrew R

    2006-06-19

    Vaccines to prevent meningococcal disease have been developed from the outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) of Neisseria meningitidis and the related commensal organism Neisseria lactamica. In addition to lipopolysaccharide and the major porins, these vaccines contain a large number of proteins that are incompletely characterised. Here we describe comparative proteomic analyses of the N. lactamica OMV vaccine and OMVs from a serogroup B strain of N. meningitidis. Tandem mass-spectrometry data for trypsinised N. lactamica OMV vaccine were matched to an incompletely assembled genome sequence from the same strain to give 65 robust protein identifications and a further 122 single- or two-peptide matches. Fifty-seven N. meningitidis K454 proteins were identified robustly (and a further 68 from single- or two-peptide matches) by inference from the N. meningitidis MC58 genome. The results suggest that OMVs have a hitherto unappreciated complexity and pinpoint novel candidate antigens for further characterisation.

  20. The Role of the Cytoskeleton and Myosin-Vc in the Targeting of KCa3.1 to the Basolateral Membrane of Polarized Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Farquhar, Rachel E.; Rodrigues, Ely; Hamilton, Kirk L.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the targeting of KCa3.1 to the basolateral membrane (BLM) of polarized epithelial cells is still emerging. Here, we examined the role of the cytoskeleton (microtubules and microfilaments) and Myosin-Vc (Myo-Vc) in the targeting of KCa3.1 in Fischer rat thyroid epithelial cells. We used a pharmacological approach with immunoblot (for the BLM expression of KCa3.1), Ussing chamber (functional BLM expression of KCa3.1) and siRNA experiments. The actin cytoskeleton inhibitors cytochalasin D (10 μM, 5 h) and latrunculin A (10 μM, 5 h) reduced the targeting of KCa3.1 to the BLM by 88 ± 4 and 70 ± 5%, respectively. Colchicine (10 μM, 5 h) a microtubule inhibitor reduced targeting of KCa3.1 to the BLM by 63 ± 7% and decreased 1-EBIO-stimulated KCa3.1 K+ current by 46 ± 18%, compared with control cells. ML9 (10 μM, 5 h), an inhibitor of myosin light chain kinase, decreased targeting of the channel by 83 ± 2% and reduced K+ current by 54 ± 8% compared to control cells. Inhibiting Myo-V with 2,3-butanedione monoxime (10 mM, 5 h) reduced targeting of the channel to the BLM by 58 ± 5% and decreased the stimulated current of KCa3.1 by 48 ± 12% compared with control cells. Finally, using siRNA for Myo-Vc, we demonstrated that knockdown of Myo-Vc reduced the BLM expression of KCa3.1 by 44 ± 7% and KCa3.1 K+ current by 1.04 ± 0.14 μA compared with control cells. These data suggest that the microtubule and microfilament cytoskeleton and Myo-Vc are critical for the targeting of KCa3.1. PMID:28101059

  1. Cytotoxic effects of Kingella kingae outer membrane vesicles on human cells

    PubMed Central

    Maldonado, R; Wei, R; Kachlany, SC; Kazi, M; Balashova, NV

    2011-01-01

    Kingella kingae is an emerging pathogen causing osteoarticular infections in pediatric patients. Electron microscopy of K. kingae clinical isolates revealed the heterogeneously-sized membranous structures blebbing from the outer membrane that were classified as outer membrane vesicles (OMVs). OMVs purified from the secreted fraction of a septic arthritis K. kingae isolate were characterized. Among several major proteins, K. kingae OMVs contained virulence factors RtxA toxin and PilC2 pilus adhesin. RtxA was also found secreted as a soluble protein in the extracellular environment indicating that the bacterium may utilize different mechanisms for the toxin delivery. OMVs were shown to be hemolytic and possess some leukotoxic activity while high leukotoxicity was detected in the non-hemolytic OMV-free component of the secreted fraction. OMVs were internalized by human osteoblasts and synovial cells. Upon interaction with OMVs, the cells produced increased levels of human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleuskin 6 (IL-6) suggesting that these cytokines might be involved in the signaling response of infected joint and bone tissues during natural K. kingae infection. This study is the first report of OMV production by K. kingae and demonstrates that OMVs are a complex virulence factor of the organism causing cytolytic and inflammatory effects on host cells. PMID:21443941

  2. Cytotoxic effects of Kingella kingae outer membrane vesicles on human cells.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, R; Wei, R; Kachlany, S C; Kazi, M; Balashova, N V

    2011-01-01

    Kingella kingae is an emerging pathogen causing osteoarticular infections in pediatric patients. Electron microscopy of K. kingae clinical isolates revealed the heterogeneously-sized membranous structures blebbing from the outer membrane that were classified as outer membrane vesicles (OMVs). OMVs purified from the secreted fraction of a septic arthritis K. kingae isolate were characterized. Among several major proteins, K. kingae OMVs contained virulence factors RtxA toxin and PilC2 pilus adhesin. RtxA was also found secreted as a soluble protein in the extracellular environment indicating that the bacterium may utilize different mechanisms for the toxin delivery. OMVs were shown to be hemolytic and possess some leukotoxic activity while high leukotoxicity was detected in the non-hemolytic OMV-free component of the secreted fraction. OMVs were internalized by human osteoblasts and synovial cells. Upon interaction with OMVs, the cells produced increased levels of human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) suggesting that these cytokines might be involved in the signaling response of infected joint and bone tissues during natural K. kingae infection. This study is the first report of OMV production by K. kingae and demonstrates that OMVs are a complex virulence factor of the organism causing cytolytic and inflammatory effects on host cells.

  3. The fusion of membranes and vesicles: pathway and energy barriers from dissipative particle dynamics.

    PubMed

    Grafmüller, Andrea; Shillcock, Julian; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2009-04-08

    The fusion of lipid bilayers is studied with dissipative particle dynamics simulations. First, to achieve control over membrane properties, the effects of individual simulation parameters are studied and optimized. Then, a large number of fusion events for a vesicle and a planar bilayer are simulated using the optimized parameter set. In the observed fusion pathway, configurations of individual lipids play an important role. Fusion starts with individual lipids assuming a splayed tail configuration with one tail inserted in each membrane. To determine the corresponding energy barrier, we measure the average work for interbilayer flips of a lipid tail, i.e., the average work to displace one lipid tail from one bilayer to the other. This energy barrier is found to depend strongly on a certain dissipative particle dynamics parameter, and, thus, can be adjusted in the simulations. Overall, three subprocesses have been identified in the fusion pathway. Their energy barriers are estimated to lie in the range 8-15 k(B)T. The fusion probability is found to possess a maximum at intermediate tension values. As one decreases the tension, the fusion probability seems to vanish before the tensionless membrane state is attained. This would imply that the tension has to exceed a certain threshold value to induce fusion.

  4. Osmotic and Chill Activation of Glycine Betaine Porter II in Listeria monocytogenes Membrane Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Gerhardt, Paul N. M.; Tombras Smith, Linda; Smith, Gary M.

    2000-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen known for its tolerance to conditions of osmotic and chill stress. Accumulation of glycine betaine has been found to be important in the organism's tolerance to both of these stresses. A procedure was developed for the purification of membranes from L. monocytogenes cells in which the putative ATP-driven glycine betaine permease glycine betaine porter II (Gbu) is functional. As is the case for the L. monocytogenes sodium-driven glycine betaine uptake system (glycine betaine porter I), uptake in this vesicle system was dependent on energization by ascorbate-phenazine methosulfate. Vesicles lacking the gbu gene product had no uptake activity. Transport by this porter did not require sodium ion and could be driven only weakly by artificial gradients. Uptake rates could be manipulated under conditions not affecting secondary transport but known to affect ATPase activity. The system was shown to be both osmotically activated and cryoactivated. Under conditions of osmotic activation, the system exhibited Arrhenius-type behavior although the uptake rates were profoundly affected by the physical state of the membrane, with breaks in Arrhenius curves at approximately 10 and 18°C. In the absence of osmotic activation, the permease could be activated by decreasing temperature within the range of 15 to 4°C. Kinetic analyses of the permease at 30°C revealed Km values for glycine betaine of 1.2 and 2.9 μM with Vmax values of 2,200 and 3,700 pmol/min · mg of protein under conditions of optimal osmotic activation as mediated by KCl and sucrose, respectively. PMID:10762257

  5. Bacterial division proteins FtsZ and ZipA induce vesicle shrinkage and cell membrane invagination.

    PubMed

    Cabré, Elisa J; Sánchez-Gorostiaga, Alicia; Carrara, Paolo; Ropero, Noelia; Casanova, Mercedes; Palacios, Pilar; Stano, Pasquale; Jiménez, Mercedes; Rivas, Germán; Vicente, Miguel

    2013-09-13

    Permeable vesicles containing the proto-ring anchoring ZipA protein shrink when FtsZ, the main cell division protein, polymerizes in the presence of GTP. Shrinkage, resembling the constriction of the cytoplasmic membrane, occurs at ZipA densities higher than those found in the cell and is modulated by the dynamics of the FtsZ polymer. In vivo, an excess of ZipA generates multilayered membrane inclusions within the cytoplasm and causes the loss of the membrane function as a permeability barrier. Overproduction of ZipA at levels that block septation is accompanied by the displacement of FtsZ and two additional division proteins, FtsA and FtsN, from potential septation sites to clusters that colocalize with ZipA near the membrane. The results show that elementary constriction events mediated by defined elements involved in cell division can be evidenced both in bacteria and in vesicles.

  6. Bacterial Division Proteins FtsZ and ZipA Induce Vesicle Shrinkage and Cell Membrane Invagination*

    PubMed Central

    Cabré, Elisa J.; Sánchez-Gorostiaga, Alicia; Carrara, Paolo; Ropero, Noelia; Casanova, Mercedes; Palacios, Pilar; Stano, Pasquale; Jiménez, Mercedes; Rivas, Germán; Vicente, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Permeable vesicles containing the proto-ring anchoring ZipA protein shrink when FtsZ, the main cell division protein, polymerizes in the presence of GTP. Shrinkage, resembling the constriction of the cytoplasmic membrane, occurs at ZipA densities higher than those found in the cell and is modulated by the dynamics of the FtsZ polymer. In vivo, an excess of ZipA generates multilayered membrane inclusions within the cytoplasm and causes the loss of the membrane function as a permeability barrier. Overproduction of ZipA at levels that block septation is accompanied by the displacement of FtsZ and two additional division proteins, FtsA and FtsN, from potential septation sites to clusters that colocalize with ZipA near the membrane. The results show that elementary constriction events mediated by defined elements involved in cell division can be evidenced both in bacteria and in vesicles. PMID:23921390

  7. On-chip light sheet illumination enables diagnostic size and concentration measurements of membrane vesicles in biofluids.

    PubMed

    Deschout, Hendrik; Raemdonck, Koen; Stremersch, Stephan; Maoddi, Pietro; Mernier, Guillaume; Renaud, Philippe; Jiguet, Sébastien; Hendrix, An; Bracke, Marc; Van den Broecke, Rudy; Röding, Magnus; Rudemo, Mats; Demeester, Jo; De Smedt, Stefaan C; Strubbe, Filip; Neyts, Kristiaan; Braeckmans, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Cell-derived membrane vesicles that are released in biofluids, like blood or saliva, are emerging as potential non-invasive biomarkers for diseases, such as cancer. Techniques capable of measuring the size and concentration of membrane vesicles directly in biofluids are urgently needed. Fluorescence single particle tracking microscopy has the potential of doing exactly that by labelling the membrane vesicles with a fluorescent label and analysing their Brownian motion in the biofluid. However, an unbound dye in the biofluid can cause high background intensity that strongly biases the fluorescence single particle tracking size and concentration measurements. While such background intensity can be avoided with light sheet illumination, current set-ups require specialty sample holders that are not compatible with high-throughput diagnostics. Here, a microfluidic chip with integrated light sheet illumination is reported, and accurate fluorescence single particle tracking size and concentration measurements of membrane vesicles in cell culture medium and in interstitial fluid collected from primary human breast tumours are demonstrated.

  8. Characterization of GTP-binding proteins in Golgi-associated membrane vesicles from rat adipocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Schürmann, A; Rosenthal, W; Schultz, G; Joost, H G

    1992-01-01

    We have previously reported that guanine nucleotides inhibit glucose transport activity reconstituted from adipocyte membrane fractions. In order to further investigate the hypothetical involvement of guanine-nucleotide-binding proteins (GTP-binding proteins) in the regulation of insulin-sensitive glucose transport activity, we studied their subcellular distribution in adipocytes treated or not with insulin. Adipocytes were homogenized and fractionated to yield plasma membranes (PM) and a Golgi-enriched fraction of intracellular membranes (low-density microsomes, LDM). In these membrane fractions, total guanosine 5'-[gamma-[35S]thio]triphosphate ([35S]GTP[S]) binding, alpha- and beta-subunits of heterotrimeric G-proteins, proto-oncogenes Ha-ras and K-ras, and 23-28 kDa GTP-binding proteins were assayed. The levels of alpha s and alpha i (the alpha-subunits of Gs and Gi) were approx. 8-fold lower in LDM than in PM; beta-subunits, Ha-ras and K-ras were not detectable in LDM. Total GTP[S]-binding sites and 23-28 kDa GTP-binding proteins were present in LDM in approximately the same concentrations as in PM. Insulin gave rise to the characteristic translocation of glucose transporters, but failed to alter the subcellular distribution of any of the GTP-binding proteins. Fractionation of the LDM on a discontinuous sucrose gradient revealed that alpha s and alpha i, as detected with antiserum against a common peptide sequence (alpha common), and the bulk of the 23-28 kDa G-proteins sedimented at different sucrose densities. None of the GTP-binding proteins co-sedimented with glucose transporters. Furthermore, the inhibitory effect of GTP[S] on the reconstituted transport activity was lost in the peak fractions of glucose transporters partially purified on the sucrose gradient. These data indicate that LDM from adipocytes contain several GTP-binding proteins in discrete vesicle populations. However, the intracellular GTP-binding proteins are not tightly associated with the

  9. Preferential packing of acidic glycosidases and proteases into Bacteroides outer membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Elhenawy, Wael; Debelyy, Mykhaylo O; Feldman, Mario F

    2014-03-11

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMV) are spherical membranous structures released from the outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria. OMV have been proposed to play several different roles during both pathogenesis and symbiosis. Despite the fact that OMV were described several decades ago, their biogenesis is a poorly characterized process. Whether OMV are produced by an active mechanism or by passive disintegration of the OM is a still matter of controversy. Bacteroides fragilis and Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron are important members of the human microbiota. In this work, we determined and compared the protein compositions of OM and OMV from B. fragilis and B. thetaiotaomicron. SDS-PAGE analysis of both fractions revealed dramatically different protein profiles. Proteomic analysis of OM and OMV in B. fragilis identified more than 40 proteins found exclusively in OMV and more than 30 proteins detectable only in the OM. The OMV-specific proteome showed a high prevalence of glycosidases and proteases, some of which were shown to be active in vitro. Similar results were obtained for B. thetaiotaomicron. Most of the OMV-exclusive proteins were acidic. Based on these results, we propose that these species possess machinery devoted to selectively pack acidic proteins into the OMV. These OMV equipped with hydrolytic enzymes could help in securing nutrients for the benefit of the whole bacterial community present in the microbiota, uncovering a novel function for bacterial OMV. IMPORTANCE The members of genus Bacteroides are key players in the symbiosis between the human host and the gut microbiota. It is known for its ability to degrade a wide variety of glycans that are not substrates for human glycosidases. The cleaved glycans can be utilized by Bacteroides and other microbiota members, resulting in the production of short-chain fatty acids that are beneficial for the host. Although members of the genus Bacteroides are known to secrete different hydrolases, their secretion

  10. H+-Pumping Driven by the Plasma Membrane ATPase in Membrane Vesicles from Radish: Stimulation by Fusicoccin 1

    PubMed Central

    Rasi-Caldogno, Franca; De Michelis, Maria I.; Pugliarello, Maria C.; Marrè, Erasmo

    1986-01-01

    The effect of fusicoccin on Mg:ATP-dependent H+-pumping in microsomal vesicles from 24-hour-old radish (Raphanus sativus L.) seedlings was investigated by measuring the initial rate of decrease in the absorbance of the ΔpH probe acridine orange. Fusicoccin stimulated Mg:ATP-dependent H+-pumping when the pH of the assay medium was in the range 7.0 to 7.6 while no effect of fusicoccin was detected between pH 6.6 and pH 6.0. Both basal and fusicoccin-stimulated H+-pumping were completely inhibited by vanadate and almost unaffected by nitrate. Fusicoccin did not change membrane permeability to protons and fusicoccin-induced stimulation of Mg:ATP-dependent H+-pumping was not affected by changes in the buffer capacity of the incubation medium. Deacetylfusicoccin stimulated H+-pumping as much as fusicoccin, while the physiologically inactive derivative 8-oxo-9-epideacetylfusicoccin did not. Stimulation of H+-pumping was saturated by 100 nanomolar fusicoccin. These data indicate that fusicoccin activates the plasma membrane H+-ATPase by acting at the membrane level independently of the involvement of other cell components. The percent stimulation by fusicoccin was the same at all ATP concentrations tested (0.5-5.0 millimolar), thus suggesting that with fusicoccin there is an increase in Vmax of the plasma membrane H+-ATPase rather than a decrease in its apparent Km for Mg:ATP. PMID:16664978

  11. Activation of Immune and Defense Responses in the Intestinal Mucosa by Outer Membrane Vesicles of Commensal and Probiotic Escherichia coli Strains

    PubMed Central

    Fábrega, María José; Aguilera, Laura; Giménez, Rosa; Varela, Encarna; Alexandra Cañas, María; Antolín, María; Badía, Josefa

    2016-01-01

    The influence of microbiota in human health is well-known. Imbalances in microbiome structure have been linked to several diseases. Modulation of microbiota composition through probiotic therapy is an attempt to harness the beneficial effects of commensal microbiota. Although, there is wide knowledge of the responses induced by gut microbiota, the microbial factors that mediate these effects are not well-known. Gram-negative bacteria release outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) as a secretion mechanism of microbial factors, which have an important role in intercellular communication. Here, we investigated whether OMVs from the probiotic Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 (EcN) or the commensal E. coli strain ECOR12 trigger immune responses in various cellular models: (i) peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) as a model of intestinal barrier disruption, (ii) apical stimulation of Caco-2/PMBCs co-culture as a model of intact intestinal mucosa, and (iii) colonic mucosa explants as an ex vivo model. Stimulations with bacterial lysates were also performed. Whereas, both OMVs and lysates activated expression and secretion of several cytokines and chemokines in PBMCs, only OMVs induced basolateral secretion and mRNA upregulation of these mediators in the co-culture model. We provide evidence that OMVs are internalized in polarized Caco-2 cells. The activated epithelial cells elicit a response in the underlying immunocompetent cells. The OMVs effects were corroborated in the ex vivo model. This experimental study shows that OMVs are an effective strategy used by beneficial gut bacteria to communicate with and modulate host responses, activating signaling events through the intestinal epithelial barrier. PMID:27242727

  12. Proteomic analysis of brush-border membrane vesicles isolated from purified proximal convoluted tubules

    PubMed Central

    Walmsley, Scott J.; Broeckling, Corey; Hess, Ann; Prenni, Jessica

    2010-01-01

    The renal proximal convoluted tubule is the primary site of water, electrolyte and nutrient reabsorption and of active secretion of selected molecules. Proteins in the apical brush-border membrane facilitate these functions and initiate some of the cellular responses to altered renal physiology. The current study uses two-dimensional liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry to compare brush border membrane vesicles isolated from rat renal cortex (BBMVCTX) and from purified proximal convoluted tubules (BBMVPCT). Both proteomic data and Western blot analysis indicate that the BBMVCTX contain apical membrane proteins from cortical cells other than the proximal tubule. This heterogeneity was greatly reduced in the BBMVPCT. Proteomic analysis identified 193 proteins common to both samples, 21 proteins unique to BBMVCTX, and 57 proteins unique to BBMVPCT. Spectral counts were used to quantify relative differences in protein abundance. This analysis identified 42 and 50 proteins that are significantly enriched (p values ≤0.001) in the BBMVCTX and BBMVPCT, respectively. These data were validated by measurement of γ-glutamyltranspeptidase activity and by Western blot analysis. The combined results establish that BBMVPCT are primarily derived from the proximal convoluted tubule (S1 and S2 segments), whereas BBMVCTX include proteins from the proximal straight tubule (S3 segment). Analysis of functional annotations indicated that BBMVPCT are enriched in mitochondrial proteins and enzymes involved in glucose and organic acid metabolism. Thus the current study reports a detailed proteomic analysis of the brush-border membrane of the rat renal proximal convoluted tubule and provides a database for future hypothesis-driven research. PMID:20219825

  13. Characterization and vaccine potential of outer membrane vesicles produced by Haemophilus parasuis

    SciTech Connect

    McCaig, William D.; Loving, Crystal L.; Hughes, Holly R.; Brockmeier, Susan L.; Charbit, Alain

    2016-03-01

    Haemophilus parasuis is a Gram-negative bacterium that colonizes the upper respiratory tract of swine and is capable of causing a systemic infection, resulting in high morbidity and mortality. H. parasuis isolates display a wide range of virulence and virulence factors are largely unknown. Commercial bacterins are often used to vaccinate swine against H. parasuis, though strain variability and lack of cross-reactivity can make this an ineffective means of protection. Outer membrane vesicles (OMV) are spherical structures naturally released from the membrane of bacteria and OMV are often enriched in toxins, signaling molecules and other bacterial components. Examination of OMV structures has led to identification of virulence factors in a number of bacteria and they have been successfully used as subunit vaccines. We have isolated OMV from both virulent and avirulent strains of H. parasuis, have examined their protein content and assessed their ability to induce an immune response in the host. Lastly, vaccination with purified OMV derived from the virulent H. parasuis Nagasaki strain provided protection against challenge with a lethal dose of the bacteria.

  14. Characterization and vaccine potential of outer membrane vesicles produced by Haemophilus parasuis

    DOE PAGES

    McCaig, William D.; Loving, Crystal L.; Hughes, Holly R.; ...

    2016-03-01

    Haemophilus parasuis is a Gram-negative bacterium that colonizes the upper respiratory tract of swine and is capable of causing a systemic infection, resulting in high morbidity and mortality. H. parasuis isolates display a wide range of virulence and virulence factors are largely unknown. Commercial bacterins are often used to vaccinate swine against H. parasuis, though strain variability and lack of cross-reactivity can make this an ineffective means of protection. Outer membrane vesicles (OMV) are spherical structures naturally released from the membrane of bacteria and OMV are often enriched in toxins, signaling molecules and other bacterial components. Examination of OMV structuresmore » has led to identification of virulence factors in a number of bacteria and they have been successfully used as subunit vaccines. We have isolated OMV from both virulent and avirulent strains of H. parasuis, have examined their protein content and assessed their ability to induce an immune response in the host. Lastly, vaccination with purified OMV derived from the virulent H. parasuis Nagasaki strain provided protection against challenge with a lethal dose of the bacteria.« less

  15. Heparin blocks /sup 125/I-calmodulin internalization by isolated rat renal brush border membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Meezan, E.; Elgavish, A.; Roden, L.; Wallace, R.W.

    1986-03-05

    /sup 125/I-Calmodulin is internalized by isolated rat renal brush border membrane vesicles (BBV) in a time, temperature and calcium dependent manner. Internalization of /sup 125/I-calmodulin into the osmotically sensitive space of BBV was distinguished from binding of the ligand to the outer BBV surface by examining the interaction of ligand and BBV at different medium osmolarities (300-1100 mosm), uptake was inversely proportional to medium osmolarity. Internalized /sup 125/I-calmodulin was intact and Western blots of solubilized BBV with /sup 125/I-calmodulin demonstrated the presence of several calmodulin-binding proteins of 143, 118, 50, 47.5, 46.5 and 35 kilodaltons which could represent potential intravesicular binding sites for the ligand. Heparin and the related glycosaminoglycan heparin sulfate both showed a dose-dependent inhibition (0.5-50 ..mu..g/ml) of /sup 125/I-calmodulin uptake by BBV, but other sulfated and nonsulfated glycosaminoglycans including chondroitin sulfates, keratan sulfate and hyaluronic acid showed little or no inhibitory effect. Desulfation of heparin virtually abolished the inhibition of uptake while depolymerization reduced it. Heparin did not block the binding of /sup 125/I-calmodulin to BBV proteins as assessed by Western blotting technique suggesting its effect was on internalization of the ligand rather than on its association with internal membrane proteins.

  16. A basis for vaccine development: Comparative characterization of Haemophilus influenzae outer membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Roier, Sandro; Blume, Thomas; Klug, Lisa; Wagner, Gabriel E; Elhenawy, Wael; Zangger, Klaus; Prassl, Ruth; Reidl, Joachim; Daum, Günther; Feldman, Mario F; Schild, Stefan

    2015-05-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are spherical and bilayered particles that are naturally released from the outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria. They have been proposed to possess several biological roles in pathogenesis and interbacterial interactions. Additionally, OMVs have been suggested as potential vaccine candidates against infections caused by pathogenic bacteria like Haemophilus influenzae, a human pathogen of the respiratory tract. Unfortunately, there is still a lack of fundamental knowledge regarding OMV biogenesis, protein sorting into OMVs, OMV size and quantity, as well as OMV composition in H. influenzae. Thus, this study comprehensively characterized and compared OMVs and OMs derived from heterologous encapsulated as well as nonencapsulated H. influenzae strains. Semiquantitative immunoblot analysis revealed that certain OM proteins are enriched or excluded in OMVs suggesting the presence of regulated protein sorting mechanisms into OMVs as well as interconnected OMV biogenesis mechanisms in H. influenzae. Nanoparticle tracking analysis, transmission electron microscopy, as well as protein and lipooligosaccharide quantifications demonstrated that heterologous H. influenzae strains differ in their OMV size and quantity. Lipidomic analyses identified palmitic acid as the most abundant fatty acid, while phosphatidylethanolamine was found to be the most dominant phospholipid present in OMVs and the OM of all strains tested. Proteomic analysis confirmed that H. influenzae OMVs contain vaccine candidate proteins as well as important virulence factors. These findings contribute to the understanding of OMV biogenesis as well as biological roles of OMVs and, in addition, may be important for the future development of OMV based vaccines against H. influenzae infections.

  17. Hydrophobic ion interactions with membranes. Thermodynamic analysis of tetraphenylphosphonium binding to vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Flewelling, R F; Hubbell, W L

    1986-01-01

    The thermodynamic properties for the interaction of the hydrophobic ion tetraphenylphosphonium (TPP+) with egg phosphatidylcholine vesicles were studied in detail by equilibrium dialysis and spin label techniques. A partition coefficient of beta = 4.2 + 0.4 x 10(-6) cm (K congruent to 100) was determined. Electrostatic saturation sets in at approximately 600 microM (about one absorbed TPP+ molecule per 100 lipids), and is not screened by salt. The temperature dependence of binding was determined, which reveals that the binding is entropy-driven with a positive (repulsive) enthalpy of binding, a result to be compared with hydrophobic anions in which the binding enthalpy is negative. The membrane dipole potential may be responsible for this binding difference. Activity coefficients are determined and shown to be significantly different from those of most common salts, an important result that should be considered in all hydrophobic ion studies. Comparison of the TPP+ results with those of its anionic structural analogue, tetraphenylboron (TPB-), permits a general analysis of hydrophobic ion interactions with membranes. A theoretical model consistent with the entire set of data is developed in an accompanying article. PMID:3006814

  18. A novel mechanism for the biogenesis of outer membrane vesicles in Gram-negative bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Roier, Sandro; Zingl, Franz G.; Cakar, Fatih; Durakovic, Sanel; Kohl, Paul; Eichmann, Thomas O.; Klug, Lisa; Gadermaier, Bernhard; Weinzerl, Katharina; Prassl, Ruth; Lass, Achim; Daum, Günther; Reidl, Joachim; Feldman, Mario F.; Schild, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) have important biological roles in pathogenesis and intercellular interactions, but a general mechanism of OMV formation is lacking. Here we show that the VacJ/Yrb ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transport system, a proposed phospholipid transporter, is involved in OMV formation. Deletion or repression of VacJ/Yrb increases OMV production in two distantly related Gram-negative bacteria, Haemophilus influenzae and Vibrio cholerae. Lipidome analyses demonstrate that OMVs from VacJ/Yrb-defective mutants in H. influenzae are enriched in phospholipids and certain fatty acids. Furthermore, we demonstrate that OMV production and regulation of the VacJ/Yrb ABC transport system respond to iron starvation. Our results suggest a new general mechanism of OMV biogenesis based on phospholipid accumulation in the outer leaflet of the outer membrane. This mechanism is highly conserved among Gram-negative bacteria, provides a means for regulation, can account for OMV formation under all growth conditions, and might have important pathophysiological roles in vivo. PMID:26806181

  19. Effect of alpha interferon on glucose and alanine transport by rat renal brush border membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Batuman, V.; Chadha, I. New Jersey Medical School, Newark )

    1990-01-01

    To investigate the pathogenetic mechanisms of interferon nephrotoxicity, we studied the effect of recombinant interferon alfa-2b on the uptake of {sup 14}C-D-glucose and {sup 14}C-L-alanine by rat renal brush-border-membrane vesicles. Interferon significantly inhibited 20 sec. sodium-dependent and 5 and 10 min. equilibrium uptake of both glucose and alanine. The inhibitory effect was dose dependent with maximum effect achieved at interferon concentration of 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}8}M in the uptake media. The half-maximal inhibitory concentrations, IC{sub 50}, of interferon on glucose uptake was 1.8 {times} 10{sup {minus}8}M, and 5.4 {times} 10{sup {minus}9}M on alanine uptake. Dixon plot analysis of uptake data was consistent with pure non-competitive inhibition. The inhibition constants, K{sub i}, 1.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}8}M for glucose uptake, and 7.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}9}M for alanine uptake, derived from Dixon plots were in close agreement with the IC{sub 50}s calculated from the semilog dose response curves. These observations reveal that direct interactions at the proximal tubule cell membrane are involved in the pathogenesis of interferon nephrotoxicity, and that its mechanism of nephrotoxicity is similar to that of other low molecular weight proteins.

  20. Disassembly of the reconstituted synaptic vesicle membrane fusion complex in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, T; Yamasaki, S; Nauenburg, S; Binz, T; Niemann, H

    1995-01-01

    The interaction of the presynaptic membrane proteins SNAP-25 and syntaxin with the synaptic vesicle protein synaptobrevin (VAMP) plays a key role in the regulated exocytosis of neurotransmitters. Clostridial neurotoxins, which proteolyze these polypeptides, are potent inhibitors of neurotransmission. The cytoplasmic domains of the three membrane proteins join into a tight SDS-resistant complex (Hayashi et al., 1994). Here, we show that this reconstituted complex, as well as heterodimers composed of syntaxin and SNAP-25, can be disassembled by the concerted action of the N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor, NSF, and the soluble NSF attachment protein, alpha-SNAP. alpha-SNAP binds to predicted alpha-helical coiled-coil regions of syntaxin and SNAP-25, shown previously to be engaged in their direct interaction. Synaptobrevin, although incapable of binding alpha-SNAP individually, induced a third alpha-SNAP binding site when associated with syntaxin and SNAP-25 into heterotrimers. NSF released prebound alpha-SNAP from full-length syntaxin but not from a syntaxin derivative truncated at the N-terminus. Disassembly of complexes containing this syntaxin mutant was impaired, indicating a critical role for the N-terminal domain in the alpha-SNAP/NSF-mediated dissociation process. Complexes containing C-terminally deleted SNAP-25 derivatives, as generated by botulinal toxins type A and E, were dissociated more efficiently. In contrast, the N-terminal fragment generated from synaptobrevin by botulinal toxin type F produced an SDS-sensitive complex that was poorly dissociated. Images PMID:7774590

  1. Characterization and Vaccine Potential of Outer Membrane Vesicles Produced by Haemophilus parasuis

    PubMed Central

    McCaig, William D.; Loving, Crystal L.; Hughes, Holly R.; Brockmeier, Susan L.

    2016-01-01

    Haemophilus parasuis is a Gram-negative bacterium that colonizes the upper respiratory tract of swine and is capable of causing a systemic infection, resulting in high morbidity and mortality. H. parasuis isolates display a wide range of virulence and virulence factors are largely unknown. Commercial bacterins are often used to vaccinate swine against H. parasuis, though strain variability and lack of cross-reactivity can make this an ineffective means of protection. Outer membrane vesicles (OMV) are spherical structures naturally released from the membrane of bacteria and OMV are often enriched in toxins, signaling molecules and other bacterial components. Examination of OMV structures has led to identification of virulence factors in a number of bacteria and they have been successfully used as subunit vaccines. We have isolated OMV from both virulent and avirulent strains of H. parasuis, have examined their protein content and assessed their ability to induce an immune response in the host. Vaccination with purified OMV derived from the virulent H. parasuis Nagasaki strain provided protection against challenge with a lethal dose of the bacteria. PMID:26930282

  2. Cercospora beticola Toxin Inhibits Vanadate-Sensitive H+ Transport in Corn Root Membrane Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Blein, Jean-Pierre; Bourdil, Isabelle; Rossignol, Michel; Scalla, René

    1988-01-01

    The effect of Cercospora beticola toxin on the transport of protons by vanadate-sensitive ATPase was studied with corn (Zea mays) root microsomal vesicles prepared by differential centrifugation, sedimentation through a sucrose cushion, and washing with Triton X-100 plus KBr. In these preparations, addition of ATP induced intravesicular H+-accumulation as evidenced by a rapid quenching of the fluorescence of 9-amino-6-chloro-2-methoxy acridine. This quenching was relatively unaffected by inhibitors of mitochondrial and tonoplast-type ATPases, but was strongly reduced by inhibitors of plasma membrane H+-ATPase. C. beticola toxin markedly inhibited ATP dependent H+-transport, and this effect increased with the length of preincubation with the toxin. The same observations were made concerning ATPase activity. Inhibition of H+-transport was greater at pH 7.3 than at pH 5.7. Lineweaver-Burk plot analysis showed that inhibition kinetics were competitive with respect to ATP. These data suggest a direct effect of C. beticola toxin on vanadate-sensitive ATPase presumed to be associated with the plasma membrane. PMID:16666321

  3. Aboral changes in D-glucose transport by human intestinal brush-border membrane vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Bluett, M K; Abumrad, N N; Arab, N; Ghishan, F K

    1986-01-01

    D-Glucose transport was investigated in isolated brush-border membrane vesicles from human small intestine. Characteristics of D-glucose transport from the jejunum were compared with that in the mid and terminal ileum. Jejunal and mid-ileal D-glucose transport was Na+-dependent and electrogenic. The transient overshoot of jejunal D-glucose transport was significantly greater than corresponding values in mid-ileum. The terminal ileum did not exhibit Na+-dependent D-glucose transport, but did exhibit Na+-dependent taurocholate transport. Na+-glucose co-transport activity as measured by tracer-exchange experiments was greatest in the jejunum, and diminished aborally. We conclude that D-glucose transport in man is Na+-dependent and electrogenic in the proximal intestine and directly related to the activity of D-glucose-Na+ transporters present in the brush-border membranes. D-Glucose transport in the terminal ileum resembles colonic transport of D-glucose. PMID:3800877

  4. Effect of chronic (4 weeks) ingestion of ethanol on transport of proline into intestinal brush border membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Beesley, R.C.; Jones, T.D.

    1986-03-01

    Hamsters were separated into two groups and fed liquid diets ad lib. Controls were given a diet similar to that described by DeCarli and Lieber while alcoholics received the same diet containing 5% ethanol isocalorically substituted for sucrose. The volume of diet consumed daily and the gain in body weights of alcoholics were not significantly different from those of controls. After four weeks the animals were sacrificed and the upper third of the small intestine was used to prepare brush border membrane vesicles. In the presence of a Na/sup +/ gradient, uptake of proline into vesicles prepared from both groups was rapid, reaching a maximum accumulation in 1 to 2 min and then decreasing to the equilibrium level. To normalize the results, the amount of proline take up at each time point was divided by the amount present at equilibrium. From the normalized data it was concluded that both the rate of uptake and the maximum accumulation of proline into brush border membrane vesicles isolated from alcoholics were significantly less than those obtained with vesicles from controls. These results suggest that chronic ingestion of ethanol results in a reduction in Na/sup +/-dependent transport of proline across the brush border membrane and, thus, may contribute to the malnutrition which is frequently associated with chronic alcoholism.

  5. Calcium reduces the sodium permeability of luminal membrane vesicles from toad bladder. Studies using a fast-reaction apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, H.S. Jr.; Al-Awqati, Q.

    1983-05-01

    Regulation of the sodium permeability of the luminal membrane is the major mechanism by which the net rate of sodium transport across tight epithelia is varied. Previous evidence has suggested that the permeability of the luminal membrane might be regulated by changes in intracellular sodium or calcium activities. To test this directly, we isolated a fraction of the plasma membrane from the toad urinary bladder, which contains a fast, amiloride-sensitive sodium flux with characteristics similar to those of the native luminal membrane. Using a flow-quench apparatus to measure the initial rate of sodium efflux from these vesicles in the millisecond time range, we have demonstrated that the isotope exchange permeability of these vesicles is very sensitive to calcium. Calcium reduces the sodium permeability, and the half-maximal inhibitory concentration is 0.5 microM, well within the range of calcium activity found in cells. Also, the permeability of the luminal membrane vesicles is little affected by the ambient sodium concentration. These results, when taken together with studies on whole tissue, suggest that cell calcium may be an important regulator of transepithelial sodium transport by its effect on luminal sodium permeability. The effect of cell sodium on permeability may be mediated by calcium rather than by sodium itself.

  6. Gene Transfer Potential of Outer Membrane Vesicles of Acinetobacter baylyi and Effects of Stress on Vesiculation

    PubMed Central

    Fulsundar, Shweta; Harms, Klaus; Flaten, Gøril E.; Johnsen, Pål J.; Chopade, Balu Ananda

    2014-01-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are continually released from a range of bacterial species. Numerous functions of OMVs, including the facilitation of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) processes, have been proposed. In this study, we investigated whether OMVs contribute to the transfer of plasmids between bacterial cells and species using Gram-negative Acinetobacter baylyi as a model system. OMVs were extracted from bacterial cultures and tested for the ability to vector gene transfer into populations of Escherichia coli and A. baylyi, including naturally transformation-deficient mutants of A. baylyi. Anti-double-stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA) antibodies were used to determine the movement of DNA into OMVs. We also determined how stress affected the level of vesiculation and the amount of DNA in vesicles. OMVs were further characterized by measuring particle size distribution (PSD) and zeta potential. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and immunogold labeling were performed using anti-fluorescein isothiocyanate (anti-FITC)-conjugated antibodies and anti-dsDNA antibodies to track the movement of FITC-labeled and DNA-containing OMVs. Exposure to OMVs isolated from plasmid-containing donor cells resulted in HGT to A. baylyi and E. coli at transfer frequencies ranging from 10−6 to 10−8, with transfer efficiencies of approximately 103 and 102 per μg of vesicular DNA, respectively. Antibiotic stress was shown to affect the DNA content of OMVs as well as their hydrodynamic diameter and zeta potential. Morphological observations suggest that OMVs from A. baylyi interact with recipient cells in different ways, depending on the recipient species. Interestingly, the PSD measurements suggest that distinct size ranges of OMVs are released from A. baylyi. PMID:24657872

  7. Discovery of Salmonella Virulence Factors Translocated via Outer Membrane Vesicles to Murine Macrophages.

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Hyunjin; Ansong, Charles; Adkins, Joshua N.; Heffron, Fred

    2011-06-01

    We have previously shown that the regulators SpvR, FruR, IHF, PhoP/PhoQ, SsrA/SsrB, SlyA, Hnr, RpoE, SmpB, CsrA, RpoS, Crp, OmpR/EnvZ, and Hfq are essential for Salmonella Typhimurium virulence in mice. Here we use quantitative LC-MS-based proteomics profiling of in-frame deletion mutants of these 14 regulators to identify proteins that are coordinately regulated by these virulence regulators and are thus presumably novel factors contributing to Salmonella pathogenesis. Putative candidate proteins from proteomics analysis were determined, which exhibited similar abundance profiles to those of Salmonella pathogenicity island (SPI)-2 type III secretion system (TTSS) proteins. A subset of 5 proteins including STM0082, STM1548, PdgL, STM1633, and STM3595 was selected for further analysis. All 5 proteins were expressed inside macrophage cells and STM0082 (SrfN) was secreted into host cytoplasm. Furthermore, deletion of STM0082 attenuated virulence in mice when administered intraperitoneally as determined by competitive index. srfN transcription was positively regulated by SsrAB, however, secretion was independent of SPI-2 TTSS as well as SPI-1 TTSS and flagella. Proteins including PagK and STM2585A, which are positively regulated by PhoP/PhoQ, have sec signal peptides as predicted for SrfN and were secreted into macrophage cytoplasm regardless of SPI-2 TTSS. Isolation of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) revealed the presence of SrfN, PagK, and STM2585A inside vesicle compartments. This result is the first case showing delivery of virulence effectors via OMVs in S. Typhimurium. Moreover, Hfq regulation of SrfN translation suggests that small non-coding RNAs may be responsible for regulating effector protein expression.

  8. Effects of uricosuric and antiuricosuric agents on urate transport in human brush-border membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Roch-Ramel, F; Guisan, B; Diezi, J

    1997-02-01

    Inhibition of [14C]-urate uptake by uricosuric and antiuricosuric agents was investigated in human brush-border membrane vesicles, urate being transported either by anion exchange mechanisms or by voltage sensitive pathway. The IC50 for drugs on [14C]-urate uptake in vesicles loaded with 1 mM cold urate or with 5 mM lactate was, respectively: 0.7 and 0.3 microM for benzbromarone; 6 and 4 microM for salicylate; 133 and 13 microM for losartan; 520 and 190 microM for sulfinpyrazone and 807 and 150 microM, for probenecid. The IC50 ratio for [14C]-urate uptake in exchange for cold urate or for lactate varied from about 1 for salicylate to 10 for losartan, supporting the hypothesis that two distinct anion exchangers are involved in urate transport. Application of Hill equation revealed that urate/anion exchangers have more than one binding site, possibly two binding sites with high cooperativity, for benzbromarone and sulfinpyrazone, but only one for probenecid, salicylate and losartan. The uricosuric diuretic, tienilic acid was 10 to 50 times more potent than hydrochlorothiazide, chlorothiazide and furosemide, for inhibiting [14C]-urate uptake in exchange for cold urate. This higher potency is the reason of its uricosuric properties. All uricosuric agents, as well as the antiuricosuric agents, pyrazinoate and ethambutol, had a much lower potency for inhibiting [14C]-urate uptake through the voltage sensitive pathway (apical secretory step) than through the urate/anion exchangers. This suggests that antiuricosuria, induced by pyrazinoate and ethambutol, as well as by low concentrations of uricosuric agents, does not result from an inhibition of the apical voltage sensitive pathway.

  9. Release of Membrane-Bound Vesicles and Inhibition of Tumor Cell Adhesion by the Peptide Neopetrosiamide A

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Pamela; Heller, Markus; Williams, David E.; McIntosh, Lawrence P.; Vogl, A. Wayne; Foster, Leonard J.; Andersen, Raymond J.; Roberge, Michel; Roskelley, Calvin D.

    2010-01-01

    Background Neopetrosiamide A (NeoA) is a 28-amino acid tricyclic peptide originally isolated from a marine sponge as a tumor cell invasion inhibitor whose mechanism of action is unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings We show that NeoA reversibly inhibits tumor cell adhesion, disassembles focal adhesions in pre-attached cells, and decreases the level of β1 integrin subunits on the cell surface. NeoA also induces the formation of dynamic, membrane-bound protrusions on the surface of treated cells and the release of membrane-bound vesicles into the culture medium. Proteomic analysis indicates that the vesicles contain EGF and transferrin receptors as well as a number of proteins involved in adhesion and migration including: β1 integrin and numerous α integrin subunits; actin and actin-binding proteins such as cofilin, moesin and myosin 1C; and membrane modulating eps15 homology domain (EHD) proteins. Surface labeling, trafficking inhibition, and real-time imaging experiments all suggest that β1 integrin-containing vesicles are released directly from NeoA-induced cell surface protrusions rather than from vesicles generated intracellularly. The biological activity of NeoA is dependent on its disulfide bond pattern and NMR spectroscopy indicates that the peptide is globular with a continuous ridge of hydrophobic groups flanked by charged amino acid residues that could facilitate a simultaneous interaction with lipids and proteins in the membrane. Conclusions/Significance NeoA is an anti-adhesive peptide that decreases cell surface integrin levels through a novel, yet to be elucidated, mechanism that involves the release of adhesion molecule-containing vesicles from the cell surface. PMID:20520768

  10. Radiation-inactivation studies on brush-border-membrane vesicles. General considerations, and application to the glucose and phosphate carriers.

    PubMed Central

    Béliveau, R; Demeule, M; Ibnoul-Khatib, H; Bergeron, M; Beauregard, G; Potier, M

    1988-01-01

    Radiation-inactivation studies were performed on brush-border-membrane vesicles purified from rat kidney cortex. No alteration of the structural integrity of the vesicles was apparent in electron micrographs of irradiated and unirradiated vesicles. The size distributions of the vesicles were also similar for both populations. The molecular sizes of two-brush-border-membrane enzymes, alkaline phosphatase and 5'-nucleotidase, estimated by the radiation-inactivation technique, were 104800 +/- 3500 and 89,400 +/- 1800 Da respectively. Polyacrylamide-gel-electrophoresis patterns of membrane proteins remained unaltered by the radiation treatment, except in the region of higher-molecular-mass proteins, where destruction of the proteins was visible. The molecular size of two of these proteins was estimated from their mobilities in polyacrylamide gels and was similar to the target size, estimated from densitometric scanning of the gel. Intravesicular volume, estimated by the uptake of D-glucose at equilibrium, was unaffected by irradiation. Uptake of Na+, D-glucose and phosphate were measured in initial-rate conditions to avoid artifacts arising from a decrease in the driving force caused by a modification of membrane permeability. Na+-independent D-glucose and phosphate uptakes were totally unaffected in the dose range used (0-9 Mrad). The Na+-dependent uptake of D-glucose was studied in irradiated vesicles, and the molecular size of the transporter was found to be 288,000 Da. The size of the Na+-dependent phosphate carrier was also estimated, and a value of 234,000 Da was obtained. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 4. PMID:3421923

  11. Flagella proteins contribute to the production of outer membrane vesicles from Escherichia coli W3110.

    PubMed

    Manabe, Takayuki; Kato, Mayu; Ueno, Takayuki; Kawasaki, Kiyoshi

    2013-11-08

    Gram-negative bacteria, including Escherichia coli, release outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) that are derived from the bacterial outer membrane. OMVs contribute to bacterial cell-cell communications and host-microbe interactions by delivering components to locations outside the bacterial cell. In order to explore the molecular machinery involved in OMV biogenesis, the role of a major OMV protein was examined in the production of OMVs from E. coli W3110, which is a widely used standard E. coli K-12 strain. In addition to OmpC and OmpA, which are used as marker proteins for OMVs, an analysis of E. coli W3110 OMVs revealed that they also contain abundant levels of FliC, which is also known as flagellin. A membrane-impermeable biotin-labeling reagent did not label FliC in intact OMVs, but labeled FliC in sonically disrupted OMVs, suggesting that FliC is localized in the lumen of OMV. Compared to the parental strain expressing wild-type fliC, an E. coli strain with a fliC-null mutation produced reduced amounts of OMVs based on both protein and phosphate levels. In addition, an E. coli W3110-derived strain with a null-mutation in flgK, which encodes flagellar hook-associated protein that is essential along with FliC for flagella synthesis, also produced fewer OMVs than the parental strain. Taken together, these results indicate that the ability to form flagella, including the synthesis of flagella proteins, affects the production of E. coli W3110 OMVs.

  12. Common channels for water and protons at apical and basolateral cell membranes of frog skin and urinary bladder epithelia. Effects of oxytocin, heavy metals, and inhibitors of H(+)-adenosine triphosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, B.; Lacoste, I.; Ehrenfeld, J. )

    1991-04-01

    We have compared the response of proton and water transport to oxytocin treatment in isolated frog skin and urinary bladder epithelia to provide further insights into the nature of water flow and H+ flux across individual apical and basolateral cell membranes. In isolated spontaneous sodium-transporting frog skin epithelia, lowering the pH of the apical solution from 7.4 to 6.4, 5.5, or 4.5 produced a fall in pHi in principal cells which was completely blocked by amiloride, indicating that apical Na+ channels are permeable to protons. When sodium transport was blocked by amiloride, the H+ permeability of the apical membranes of principal cells was negligible but increased dramatically after treatment with antidiuretic hormone (ADH). In the latter condition, lowering the pH of the apical solution caused a voltage-dependent intracellular acidification, accompanied by membrane depolarization, and an increase in membrane conductance and transepithelial current. These effects were inhibited by adding Hg2+ (100 microM) or dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD, 10(-5) M) to the apical bath. Net titratable H+ flux across frog skin was increased from 30 +/- 8 to 115 +/- 18 neq.h-1.cm-2 (n = 8) after oxytocin treatment (at apical pH 5.5 and serosal pH 7.4) and was completely inhibited by DCCD (10(-5) M). The basolateral membranes of the principal cells in frog skin epithelium were found to be spontaneously permeable to H+ and passive electrogenic H+ transport across this membrane was not affected by oxytocin. Lowering the pH of the basolateral bathing solution (pHb) produced an intracellular acidification and membrane depolarization (and an increase in conductance when the normal dominant K+ conductance of this membrane was abolished by Ba2+ 1 mM). These effects of low pHb were blocked by micromolar concentrations of heavy metals (Zn2+, Ni2+, Co2+, Cd2+, and Hg2+).

  13. Alkaline phosphatase and OmpA protein can be translocated posttranslationally into membrane vesicles of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, L; Rhoads, D; Tai, P C

    1985-01-01

    We previously described a system for translocating the periplasmic enzyme alkaline phosphatase and the outer membrane protein OmpA into inverted membrane vesicles of Escherichia coli. We have now optimized and substantially improved the translocation system by including polyamines and by reducing the amount of membrane used. Under these conditions, efficient translocation was seen even posttranslationally, i.e., when vesicles were not added until after protein synthesis was stopped. This was the case not only with the OmpA protein, which is synthesized by free polysomes and hence is presumably exported posttranslationally in the cell, but also with alkaline phosphatase, which is synthesized only by membrane-bound polysomes and has been shown to be secreted cotranslationally in the cells. Prolonged incubation rendered the precursors inactive for subsequent translocation. Posttranslational translocation was impaired, like cotranslational translocation, by inhibitors of the proton motive force and by treatment of the vesicles with protease. Since it appears that E. coli can translocate the same proteins either cotranslationally or posttranslationally, the cotranslational mode may perhaps be more efficient, but not obligatory, for the secretion of bacterial proteins. Images PMID:3882674

  14. Basolateral membrane H/OH/HCO3 transport in the rat cortical thick ascending limb. Evidence for an electrogenic Na/HCO3 cotransporter in parallel with a Na/H antiporter.

    PubMed Central

    Krapf, R

    1988-01-01

    Mechanisms involved in basolateral H/OH/HCO3 transport in the in vitro microperfused rat cortical thick ascending limb were examined by the microfluorometric determination of cell pH using (2',7')-bis-(carboxyethyl)-(5,6)-carboxyfluorescein. The mean cell pH in this segment perfused with 147 mM sodium and 25 mM HCO3 at pH 7.4 was 7.13 +/- 0.02 (n = 30). Lowering bath HCO3 from 25 to 5 mM (constant PCO2 of 40 mmHg) acidified the cells by 0.31 +/- 0.02 pH units at a rate of 0.56 +/- 0.08 pH units/min. Removal of bath sodium acidified the cells by 0.28 +/- 0.03 pH units at a rate of 0.33 +/- 0.04 pH units/min. The cell acidification was stilbene inhibitable and independent of chloride. There was no effect of bath sodium removal on cell pH in the absence of CO2/HCO3. Depolarization of the basolateral membrane (step increase in bath potassium) independent of the presence of chloride. Cell acidification induced by bath sodium removal persisted when the basolateral membrane was voltage clamped by high potassium/valinomycin. Although these results are consistent with a Na/(HCO3)n greater than 1 cotransporter, a Na/H antiporter was also suggested: 1 mM bath amiloride inhibited the cell pH defense against an acid load (rapid ammonia washout), both in the presence and absence of CO2/HCO3, and inhibited the cell acidification induced by bath sodium reduction from 50 to 0 mM. In conclusion, an electrogenic Na/(HCO3)n greater than 1 cotransporter in parallel with a Na/H antiporter exist on the basolateral membrane of the rat cortical thick ascending limb. PMID:2839547

  15. Vectorial transport of nucleoside analogs from the apical to the basolateral membrane in double-transfected cells expressing the human concentrative nucleoside transporter hCNT3 and the export pump ABCC4.

    PubMed

    Rius, Maria; Keller, Daniela; Brom, Manuela; Hummel-Eisenbeiss, Johanna; Lyko, Frank; Keppler, Dietrich

    2010-07-01

    The identification of the transport proteins responsible for the uptake and the efflux of nucleosides and their metabolites enables the characterization of their vectorial transport and a better understanding of their absorption, distribution, and elimination. Human concentrative nucleoside transporters (hCNTs/SLC28A) are known to mediate the transport of natural nucleosides and some nucleoside analogs into cells in a sodium-dependent and unidirectional manner. On the other hand, several human multidrug resistance proteins [human ATP-binding cassette transporter, subfamily C (ABCC)] cause resistance against nucleoside analogs and mediate transport of phosphorylated nucleoside derivatives out of the cells in an ATP-dependent manner. For the integrated analysis of uptake and efflux of these compounds, we established a double-transfected Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) II cell line stably expressing the human uptake transporter hCNT3 in the apical membrane and the human efflux pump ABCC4 in the basolateral membrane. The direction of transport was from the apical to the basolateral compartment, which is in line with the unidirectional transport and the localization of both recombinant proteins in the MDCKII cells. Recombinant hCNT3 mediated the transport of several known nucleoside substrates, and we identified 5-azacytidine as a new substrate for hCNT3. It is of interest that coexpression of both transporters was confirmed in pancreatic adenocarcinomas, which represent an important clinical indication for the therapeutic use of nucleoside analogs. Thus, our results establish a novel cell system for studies on the vectorial transport of nucleosides and their analogs from the apical to the basolateral compartment. The results contribute to a better understanding of the cellular transport characteristics of nucleoside drugs.

  16. Sodium/proton antiport in brush-border-membrane vesicles isolated from rat small intestine and kidney.

    PubMed

    Murer, H; Hopfer, U; Kinne, R

    1976-03-15

    Studies on proton and Na+ transport by isolated intestinal and renal brush-border-membrane vesicles were carried out to test for the presence of an Na+/H+-exchange system. Proton transport was evaluated as proton transfer from the intravesicular space to the incubation medium by monitoring pH changes in the membrane suspension induced by sudden addition of cations. Na+ transport was determined as Na+ uptake into the vesicles by filtration technique. A sudden addition of sodium salts (but not choline) to the membrane suspension provokes an acidification of the incubation medium which is abolished by the addition of 0.5% Triton X-100. Pretreatment of the membranes with Triton X-100 prevents the acidification. The acidification is also not observed if the [K+] and proton conductance of the membranes have been increased by the simultaneous addition of valinomycin and carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone to the K+-rich incubation medium. Either valinomycin or carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone when added alone do not alter the response of the membranes to the addition of Na+. Na+ uptake by brush-border microvilli is enhanced in the presence of a proton gradient directed from the intravesicular space to the incubation medium. Under these conditions a transient accumulation of Na+ inside the vesicles is observed. It is concluded that intestinal and renal brush-border membranes contain a NA+/H+ antiport system which catalyses an electroneutral exchange of Na+ against protons and consequently can produce a proton gradient in the presence of a concentration difference for Na+. This system might be involved in the active proton secretion of the small intestine and the proximal tubule of the kidney.

  17. Differential Responses of Pattern Recognition Receptors to Outer Membrane Vesicles of Three Periodontal Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Cecil, Jessica D; O'Brien-Simpson, Neil M; Lenzo, Jason C; Holden, James A; Chen, Yu-Yen; Singleton, William; Gause, Katelyn T; Yan, Yan; Caruso, Frank; Reynolds, Eric C

    2016-01-01

    Highly purified outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) of the periodontal pathogens, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola and Tannerella forsythia were produced using tangential flow ultrafiltration, ultracentrifugation and Optiprep density gradient separation. Cryo-TEM and light scattering showed OMVs to be single lipid-bilayers with modal diameters of 75 to 158 nm. Enumeration of OMVs by nanoparticle flow-cytometry at the same stage of late exponential culture indicated that P. gingivalis was the most prolific OMV producer. P. gingivalis OMVs induced strong TLR2 and TLR4-specific responses and moderate responses in TLR7, TLR8, TLR9, NOD1 and NOD2 expressing-HEK-Blue cells. Responses to T. forsythia OMVs were less than those of P. gingivalis and T. denticola OMVs induced only weak responses. Compositional analyses of OMVs from the three pathogens demonstrated differences in protein, fatty acids, lipopolysaccharide, peptidoglycan fragments and nucleic acids. Periodontal pathogen OMVs induced differential pattern recognition receptor responses that have implications for their role in chronic periodontitis.

  18. Protecting enzymatic function through directed packaging into bacterial outer membrane vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Nathan J.; Turner, Kendrick B.; Medintz, Igor L.; Walper, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria possess innate machinery to transport extracellular cargo between cells as well as package virulence factors to infect host cells by secreting outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) that contain small molecules, proteins, and genetic material. These robust proteoliposomes have evolved naturally to be resistant to degradation and provide a supportive environment to extend the activity of encapsulated cargo. In this study, we sought to exploit bacterial OMV formation to package and maintain the activity of an enzyme, phosphotriesterase (PTE), under challenging storage conditions encountered for real world applications. Here we show that OMV packaged PTE maintains activity over free PTE when subjected to elevated temperatures (>100-fold more activity after 14 days at 37 °C), iterative freeze-thaw cycles (3.4-fold post four-cycles), and lyophilization (43-fold). We also demonstrate how lyophilized OMV packaged PTE can be utilized as a cell free reagent for long term environmental remediation of pesticide/chemical warfare contaminated areas. PMID:27117743

  19. Differential Responses of Pattern Recognition Receptors to Outer Membrane Vesicles of Three Periodontal Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Lenzo, Jason C.; Holden, James A.; Chen, Yu-Yen; Singleton, William; Gause, Katelyn T.; Yan, Yan; Caruso, Frank; Reynolds, Eric C.

    2016-01-01

    Highly purified outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) of the periodontal pathogens, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola and Tannerella forsythia were produced using tangential flow ultrafiltration, ultracentrifugation and Optiprep density gradient separation. Cryo-TEM and light scattering showed OMVs to be single lipid-bilayers with modal diameters of 75 to 158 nm. Enumeration of OMVs by nanoparticle flow-cytometry at the same stage of late exponential culture indicated that P. gingivalis was the most prolific OMV producer. P. gingivalis OMVs induced strong TLR2 and TLR4-specific responses and moderate responses in TLR7, TLR8, TLR9, NOD1 and NOD2 expressing-HEK-Blue cells. Responses to T. forsythia OMVs were less than those of P. gingivalis and T. denticola OMVs induced only weak responses. Compositional analyses of OMVs from the three pathogens demonstrated differences in protein, fatty acids, lipopolysaccharide, peptidoglycan fragments and nucleic acids. Periodontal pathogen OMVs induced differential pattern recognition receptor responses that have implications for their role in chronic periodontitis. PMID:27035339

  20. A Pseudomonas T6SS effector recruits PQS-containing outer membrane vesicles for iron acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jinshui; Zhang, Weipeng; Cheng, Juanli; Yang, Xu; Zhu, Kaixiang; Wang, Yao; Wei, Gehong; Qian, Pei-Yuan; Luo, Zhao-Qing; Shen, Xihui

    2017-01-01

    Iron sequestration by host proteins contributes to the defence against bacterial pathogens, which need iron for their metabolism and virulence. A Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutant lacking all three known iron acquisition systems retains the ability to grow in media containing iron chelators, suggesting the presence of additional pathways involved in iron uptake. Here we screen P. aeruginosa mutants defective in growth in iron-depleted media and find that gene PA2374, proximal to the type VI secretion system H3 (H3-T6SS), functions synergistically with known iron acquisition systems. PA2374 (which we have renamed TseF) appears to be secreted by H3-T6SS and is incorporated into outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) by directly interacting with the iron-binding Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS), a cell–cell signalling compound. TseF facilitates the delivery of OMV-associated iron to bacterial cells by engaging the Fe(III)-pyochelin receptor FptA and the porin OprF. Our results reveal links between type VI secretion, cell–cell signalling and classic siderophore receptors for iron acquisition in P. aeruginosa. PMID:28348410

  1. Characterization of Outer Membrane Vesicles from Brucella melitensis and Protection Induced in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Avila-Calderón, Eric Daniel; Lopez-Merino, Ahidé; Jain, Neeta; Peralta, Humberto; López-Villegas, Edgar Oliver; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; Boyle, Stephen M.; Witonsky, Sharon; Contreras-Rodríguez, Araceli

    2012-01-01

    The outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) from smooth B. melitensis 16 M and a derived rough mutant, VTRM1 strain, were purified and characterized with respect to protein content and induction of immune responses in mice. Proteomic analysis showed 29 proteins present in OMVs from B. melitensis 16 M; some of them are well-known Brucella immunogens such as SOD, GroES, Omp31, Omp25, Omp19, bp26, and Omp16. OMVs from a rough VTRM1 induced significantly higher expression of IL-12, TNFα, and IFNγ genes in bone marrow dendritic cells than OMVs from smooth strain 16 M. Relative to saline control group, mice immunized intramuscularly with rough and smooth OMVs were protected from challenge with virulent strain B. melitensis 16 M just as well as the group immunized with live strain B. melitensis Rev1 (P < 0.005). Additionally, the levels of serum IgG2a increased in mice vaccinated with OMVs from rough strain VTRM1 consistent with the induction of cell-mediated immunity. PMID:22242036

  2. Isolation, Characterization and Biological Properties of Membrane Vesicles Produced by the Swine Pathogen Streptococcus suis

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Bruno; Grenier, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus suis, more particularly serotype 2, is a major swine pathogen and an emerging zoonotic agent worldwide that mainly causes meningitis, septicemia, endocarditis, and pneumonia. Although several potential virulence factors produced by S. suis have been identified in the last decade, the pathogenesis of S. suis infections is still not fully understood. In the present study, we showed that S. suis produces membrane vesicles (MVs) that range in diameter from 13 to 130 nm and that appear to be coated by capsular material. A proteomic analysis of the MVs revealed that they contain 46 proteins, 9 of which are considered as proven or suspected virulence factors. Biological assays confirmed that S. suis MVs possess active subtilisin-like protease (SspA) and DNase (SsnA). S. suis MVs degraded neutrophil extracellular traps, a property that may contribute to the ability of the bacterium to escape the host defense response. MVs also activated the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signaling pathway in both monocytes and macrophages, inducing the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines, which may in turn contribute to increase the permeability of the blood brain barrier. The present study brought evidence that S. suis MVs may play a role as a virulence factor in the pathogenesis of S. suis infections, and given their composition be an excellent candidate for vaccine development. PMID:26110524

  3. Immunization with outer membrane vesicles displaying designer glycotopes yields class-switched, glycan-specific antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Valentine, Jenny L.; Chen, Linxiao; Perregaux, Emily C.; Weyant, Kevin B.; Rosenthal, Joseph A.; Heiss, Christian; Azadi, Parastoo; Fisher, Adam C.; Putnam, David; Moe, Gregory R.; Merritt, Judith H.; DeLisa, Matthew P.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The development of antibodies against specific glycan epitopes poses a significant challenge due to difficulties obtaining desired glycans at sufficient quantity and purity, and the fact that glycans are usually weakly immunogenic. To address this challenge, we leveraged the potent immunostimulatory activity of bacterial outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) to deliver designer glycan epitopes to the immune system. This approach involved heterologous expression of two clinically important glycans, namely polysialic acid (PSA) and Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen (T antigen) in hypervesiculating strains of non-pathogenic Escherichia coli. The resulting glycOMVs displayed structural mimics of PSA or T antigen on their surfaces, and induced high titers of glycan-specific IgG antibodies following immunization in mice. In the case of PSA glycOMVs, serum antibodies potently killed Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B (MenB), whose outer capsule is PSA, in a serum bactericidal assay. These findings demonstrate the potential of glycOMVs for inducing class-switched, humoral immune responses against glycan antigens. PMID:27341433

  4. Outer membrane vesicles of Neisseria lactamica as a potential mucosal adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Sardiñas, Gretel; Reddin, Karen; Pajon, Rolando; Gorringe, Andrew

    2006-01-12

    The muscosal delivery of vaccines has many advantages including ease of administration and the induction of a mucosal immune response at the natural site of infection for many pathogens. Mice were immunised with outer membrane vesicles (OMV) prepared from Neisseria lactamica or Neisseria meningitidis by subcutaneous (SC) or intranasal (IN) routes, or live cells of N. lactamica given IN or by SC injection. A systemic IgG and mucosal IgA response was demonstrated and N. lactamica OMV induced antibodies cross-reactive with N. meningitidis; however, a cross-reactive response following IN administration was only evident after three doses of vaccine. OMV from both organisms were also an effective intranasal adjuvant for a co-administered model antigen, hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), inducing systemic IgG against HBsAg and IgA in lung and vaginal washes. IN administration of N. meningitidis OMV elicited serum antibodies that were bactericidal for meningococci and provided passive protection in an infant rat model of meningococcal bacteraemia. The antibody response to N. lactamica OMV given IN was only weakly bactericidal but still afforded passive protection. Thus, OMV from N. lactamica given IN elicit immune responses cross-reactive with N. meningitidis and act as an effective mucosal adjuvant.

  5. A 2D-ELDOR study of the liquid ordered phase in multilamellar vesicle membranes.

    PubMed

    Costa-Filho, Antonio J; Shimoyama, Yuhei; Freed, Jack H

    2003-04-01

    2D-ELDOR spectroscopy has been employed to study the dynamic structure of the liquid-ordered (Lo) phase versus that of the liquid-crystalline (Lc) phase in multibilayer phospholipid vesicles without (Lc) and with (Lo) cholesterol, using end-chain and headgroup labels and spin-labeled cholestane. The spectra are in most cases found to be dramatically different for these two phases. Thus, visual inspection of the 2D-ELDOR spectra provides a convenient way to distinguish the two phases in membranes. Detailed analysis shows these observations are due to increased ordering in the Lo phase and modified reorientation rates. In the Lo phase, acyl chains undergo a faster rotational diffusion and higher ordering than in the Lc phase, whereas spin-labeled cholestane exhibits slower rotational diffusion and higher ordering. On the other hand, the choline headgroup in the Lo phase exhibits faster motion and reduced but realigned ordering versus the Lc phase. The microscopic translational diffusion rates in the Lo phase are significantly reduced in the presence of cholesterol. These results are compared with previous studies, and a consistent model is provided for interpreting them in terms of the differences in the dynamic structure of the Lo and Lc phases.

  6. Gut microbiota-derived outer membrane vesicles: under-recognized major players in health and disease?

    PubMed

    Muraca, Maurizio; Putignani, Lorenza; Fierabracci, Alessandra; Teti, Anna; Perilongo, Giorgio

    2015-05-01

    The role of gut microbiota both in human health and in disease is the subject of intense investigation. The interactions between gut microbiota and the host involve a complex network of metabolic pathways and of biologically active molecules secreted by intestinal bacteria, some of which are packed into nanoparticles known as outer membrane vesicles (OMVs). OMVs can enter the systemic circulation and be delivered to different organs including the brain, eliciting a variety of immunological and metabolic responses. The resulting acute and chronic effects are largely unknown. However, recent studies suggest that OMVs could play a critical role in immune homeostasis and in acute inflammatory reactions. Moreover, the "leaky gut" hypothesis has recently emphasized the role of the brain-gut axis in the pathogenesis of major depressive disorders, pointing to the importance of bacteria and of bacterial products delivered into the circulation in eliciting the low-grade inflammatory response associated with this syndrome. Interestingly, experimental evidence suggests that OMVs can also affect the permeability of the blood-brain barrier. This review also highlights the importance of investigating possible influences of OMVs on the development of the immune system.

  7. Modulation of GABA-stimulated chloride influx into membrane vesicles from rat cerebral cortex by triazolobenzodiazepines

    SciTech Connect

    Obata, T.; Yamamura, H.I.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of triazolobenzodiazepines of GABA-stimulated /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ uptake by membrane vesicles from rat cerebral cortex were examined. Triazolam and alprazolam showed a significant enhancement of GABA-stimulated /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ uptake at 0.01-10 uM. On the other hand, adinazolam showed a small enhancement at 0.1-1 uM followed by a significant inhibition of GABA-stimulated /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ uptake at 100 uM. The enhancement of GABA-stimulated /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ uptake by 1 uM alprazolam was antagonized by Ro15-1788, a benzodiazepine antagonist, but the inhibition of this response by 30 uM adinazolam was not antagonized by Ro15-1788. These results indicate that triazolobenzodiazepines enhanced GABA-stimulated /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ uptake through benzodiazepine receptors. High concentrations of adinazolam inhibit GABA-stimulated /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ uptake which may be due to the direct blockade of GABA-gated chloride channel. 23 references, 4 figures.

  8. Long-Distance Delivery of Bacterial Virulence Factors by Pseudomonas aeruginosa Outer Membrane Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Bomberger, Jennifer M.; MacEachran, Daniel P.; Coutermarsh, Bonita A.; Ye, Siying; O'Toole, George A.; Stanton, Bruce A.

    2009-01-01

    Bacteria use a variety of secreted virulence factors to manipulate host cells, thereby causing significant morbidity and mortality. We report a mechanism for the long-distance delivery of multiple bacterial virulence factors, simultaneously and directly into the host cell cytoplasm, thus obviating the need for direct interaction of the pathogen with the host cell to cause cytotoxicity. We show that outer membrane–derived vesicles (OMV) secreted by the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa deliver multiple virulence factors, including β-lactamase, alkaline phosphatase, hemolytic phospholipase C, and Cif, directly into the host cytoplasm via fusion of OMV with lipid rafts in the host plasma membrane. These virulence factors enter the cytoplasm of the host cell via N-WASP–mediated actin trafficking, where they rapidly distribute to specific subcellular locations to affect host cell biology. We propose that secreted virulence factors are not released individually as naked proteins into the surrounding milieu where they may randomly contact the surface of the host cell, but instead bacterial derived OMV deliver multiple virulence factors simultaneously and directly into the host cell cytoplasm in a coordinated manner. PMID:19360133

  9. Potential Usefulness of Streptococcus pneumoniae Extracellular Membrane Vesicles as Antibacterial Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Chi-Won; Park, Edmond Changkyun; Yun, Sung Ho; Lee, Sang-Yeop

    2017-01-01

    The secretion of extracellular membrane vesicles (EMVs) is a common phenomenon that occurs in archaea, bacteria, and mammalian cells. The EMVs of bacteria play important roles in their virulence, biogenesis mechanisms, and host cell interactions. Bacterial EMVs have recently become the focus of attention because of their potential as highly effective vaccines that cause few side effects. Here, we isolated the EMVs of Streptococcus pneumoniae and examined their potential as new vaccine candidates. Although the S. pneumoniae bacteria were highly pathogenic in a mouse model, the EMVs purified from these bacteria showed low pathological activity both in cell culture and in mice. When mice were injected intraperitoneally with S. pneumoniae EMVs and then challenged, they were protected from both the homologous strain and another pathogenic serotype of S. pneumoniae. We also identified a number of proteins that may have immunogenic activity and may be responsible for the immune responses by the hosts. These results suggest that S. pneumoniae EMVs or their individual immunogenic antigens may be useful as new vaccine agents. PMID:28210633

  10. A 2D-ELDOR Study of the Liquid Ordered Phase in Multilamellar Vesicle Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Costa-Filho, Antonio J.; Shimoyama, Yuhei; Freed, Jack H.

    2003-01-01

    2D-ELDOR spectroscopy has been employed to study the dynamic structure of the liquid-ordered (Lo) phase versus that of the liquid-crystalline (Lc) phase in multibilayer phospholipid vesicles without (Lc) and with (Lo) cholesterol, using end-chain and headgroup labels and spin-labeled cholestane. The spectra are in most cases found to be dramatically different for these two phases. Thus, visual inspection of the 2D-ELDOR spectra provides a convenient way to distinguish the two phases in membranes. Detailed analysis shows these observations are due to increased ordering in the Lo phase and modified reorientation rates. In the Lo phase, acyl chains undergo a faster rotational diffusion and higher ordering than in the Lc phase, whereas spin-labeled cholestane exhibits slower rotational diffusion and higher ordering. On the other hand, the choline headgroup in the Lo phase exhibits faster motion and reduced but realigned ordering versus the Lc phase. The microscopic translational diffusion rates in the Lo phase are significantly reduced in the presence of cholesterol. These results are compared with previous studies, and a consistent model is provided for interpreting them in terms of the differences in the dynamic structure of the Lo and Lc phases. PMID:12668470

  11. Dataset of the proteome of purified outer membrane vesicles from the human pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomintans.

    PubMed

    Kieselbach, Thomas; Oscarsson, Jan

    2017-02-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an oral and systemic pathogen, which is linked to aggressive forms of periodontitis and can be associated with endocarditis. The outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) of this species contain effector proteins such as cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) and leukotoxin (LtxA), which they can deliver into human host cells. The OMVs can also activate innate immunity through NOD1- and NOD2-active pathogen-associated molecular patterns. This dataset provides a proteome of highly purified OMVs from A. actinomycetemcomitans serotype e strain 173. The experimental data do not only include the raw data of the LC-MS/MS analysis of four independent preparations of purified OMVs but also the mass lists of the processed data and the Mascot.dat files from the database searches. In total 501 proteins are identified, of which 151 are detected in at least three of four independent preparations. In addition, this dataset contains the COG definitions and the predicted subcellular locations (PSORTb 3.0) for the entire genome of A. actinomycetemcomitans serotype e strain SC1083, which is used for the evaluation of the LC-MS/MS data. These data are deposited in ProteomeXchange in the public dataset PXD002509. In addition, a scientific interpretation of this dataset by Kieselbach et al. (2015) [2] is available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0138591.

  12. Xylella fastidiosa outer membrane vesicles modulate plant colonization by blocking attachment to surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ionescu, Michael; Zaini, Paulo A; Baccari, Clelia; Tran, Sophia; da Silva, Aline M; Lindow, Steven E

    2014-09-16

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) of Gram-negative bacteria have been studied intensively in recent years, primarily in their role in delivering virulence factors and antigens during pathogenesis. However, the near ubiquity of their production suggests that they may play other roles, such as responding to envelope stress or trafficking various cargoes to prevent dilution or degradation by other bacterial species. Here we show that OMVs produced by Xylella fastidiosa, a xylem-colonizing plant pathogenic bacterium, block its interaction with various surfaces such as the walls of xylem vessels in host plants. The release of OMVs was suppressed by the diffusible signal factor-dependent quorum-sensing system, and a X. fastidiosa ΔrpfF mutant in which quorum signaling was disrupted was both much more virulent to plants and less adhesive to glass and plant surfaces than the WT strain. The higher virulence of the ΔrpfF mutant was associated with fivefold higher numbers of OMVs recovered from xylem sap of infected plants. The frequency of attachment of X. fastidiosa to xylem vessels was 20-fold lower in the presence of OMVs than in their absence. OMV production thus is a strategy used by X. fastidiosa cells to adjust attachment to surfaces in its transition from adhesive cells capable of insect transmission to an "exploratory" lifestyle for systemic spread within the plant host which would be hindered by attachment. OMV production may contribute to the movement of other bacteria in porous environments by similarly reducing their contact with environmental constituents.

  13. Auxin regulation of a proton translocating ATPase in pea root plasma membrane vesicles. [Pisum sativum. L

    SciTech Connect

    Gabathuler, R.; Cleland, R.E.

    1985-12-01

    Pea root microsomal vesicles have been fractionated on a Dextran step gradient to give three fractions, each of which carries out ATP-dependent proton accumulation as measured by fluorescence quenching of quinacrine. The fraction at the 4/6% Dextran interface is enriched in plasma membrane, as determined by UDPG sterol glucosyltransferase and vanadate-inhibited ATPase. The vanadate-sensitive phosphohydrolase is not specific for ATP, has a K/sub m/ of about 0.23 millimolar for MgATP, is only slightly affected by K/sup +/ or Cl/sup -/ and is insensitive to auxin. Proton transport, on the other hand, is more specific for ATP, enhanced by anions (NO/sub 3//sup -/ > Cl/sup -/) and has a K/sub m/ of about 0.7 millimolar. Auxins decrease the K/sub m/ to about 0.35 millimolar, with no significant effect on the V/sub max/, while antiauxins or weak acids have no such effect. It appears that auxin has the ability to alter the efficiency of the ATP-driven proton transport.

  14. Flocculation of Escherichia coli Cells in Association with Enhanced Production of Outer Membrane Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Minh Hong; Yajima, Reiki; Taya, Masahito

    2015-01-01

    Microbial flocculation is a phenomenon of aggregation of dispersed bacterial cells in the form of flocs or flakes. In this study, the mechanism of spontaneous flocculation of Escherichia coli cells by overexpression of the bcsB gene was investigated. The flocculation induced by overexpression of bcsB was consistent among the various E. coli strains examined, including the K-12, B, and O strains, with flocs that resembled paper scraps in structure being about 1 to 2 mm. The distribution of green fluorescent protein-labeled E. coli cells within the floc structure was investigated by three-dimensional confocal laser scanning microscopy. Flocs were sensitive to proteinase K, indicating that the main component of the flocs was proteinous. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and nano-liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry analyses of the flocs strongly suggested the involvement of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) in E. coli flocculation. The involvement of OMVs in flocculation was supported by transmission electron microscopy observation of flocs. Furthermore, bcsB-induced E. coli flocculation was greatly suppressed in strains with hypovesiculation phenotypes (ΔdsbA and ΔdsbB strains). Thus, our results demonstrate the strong correlation between spontaneous flocculation and enhanced OMV production of E. coli cells. PMID:26092467

  15. Improved Production Process for Native Outer Membrane Vesicle Vaccine against Neisseria meningitidis

    PubMed Central

    van de Waterbeemd, Bas; Zomer, Gijsbert; Kaaijk, Patricia; Ruiterkamp, Nicole; Wijffels, René H.; van den Dobbelsteen, Germie P. J. M.; van der Pol, Leo A.

    2013-01-01

    An improved detergent-free process has been developed to produce vaccine based on native outer membrane vesicles (NOMV) against Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B. Performance was evaluated with the NonaMen vaccine concept, which provides broad coverage based on nine distinct PorA antigens. Scalable aseptic equipment was implemented, replacing undesirable steps like ultracentrifugation, inactivation with phenol, and the use of preservatives. The resulting process is more consistent and gives a higher yield than published reference processes, enabling NOMV production at commercial scale. Product quality met preliminary specifications for 9 consecutive batches, and an ongoing study confirmed real-time stability up to 12 months after production. As the NOMV had low endotoxic activity and induced high bactericidal titres in mice, they are expected to be safe and effective in humans. The production process is not limited to NonaMen and may be applicable for other N. meningitidis serogroups and other gram-negative pathogens. The current results therefore facilitate the late-stage development and clinical evaluation of NOMV vaccines. PMID:23741478

  16. Possible degradative process of cholecystokinin analogs in rabbit jejunum brush-border membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Su, Sheng-Fang; Amidon, Gordon L; Lee, Hye J

    2002-11-22

    Our recent work on the intestinal metabolism and absorption of cholecystokinin analogs, sulfated C-terminal octapeptide (CCK8; Asp-Tyr(SO(3)H)-Met-Gly-Trp-Met-Asp-Phe(NH(2)) = DY(SO(3)H)MGWMDF(NH(2))) and tetrapeptide (CCK4; Trp-Met-Asp-Phe(NH(2)) = WMDF(NH(2))), was extended to investigate the degradative process of these analogs using rabbit jejunum brush-border membrane vesicles and to find a better enzyme-inhibitor system for intestinal absorption of peptide drugs. Various enzyme inhibitors and a lower pH buffer were applied to discover the major enzyme(s) involved in each process. Metabolic pathways showing degradative processes were proposed for both analogs. The major cleavage site occurs at the W(1)-M(2) for CCK4. At least three metabolic pathways occur independently for CCK8 and appear at peptides bonds between G(4)-W(5), M(6)-D(7), and D(7)-F(NH(2))(8). Many different enzymes of aminopeptidase, endopeptidase, angiotensin-converting enzyme, metalloenzyme, and others were involved in each process. Identification of more specific yet safe enzyme inhibitors and co-administration of various these inhibitors may lead to further enhancement in intestinal peptide absorption when administered orally.

  17. Further characterization of ATP-initiated calcification by matrix vesicles isolated from rachitic rat cartilage. Membrane perturbation by detergents and deposition of calcium pyrophosphate by rachitic matrix vesicles.

    PubMed

    Hsu, H H; Camacho, N P; Anderson, H C

    1999-01-12

    Although membrane associated enzymes such as ATPase, alkaline phosphatase, and NTP pyrophosphohydrolase in matrix vesicles (MVs) may underlie the mechanisms of ATP-promoted calcification, prior to the current investigation, the role of the MV membrane in calcification had not been addressed. In this study, various perturbations were introduced to the MV membrane in in vitro calcification systems to determine ideal conditions for ATP-initiated calcification by MVs isolated from rachitic rat epiphyseal cartilage. Membrane integrity appears to be required, since the rupture of the vesicular membrane by vigorously mixing with 10% butanol abolished calcification. In contrast, a mild treatment of MVs with low concentrations (e.g., 0.01%, which is much below the critical concentration for micelle formation) of either neutral Triton X-100 or anionic deoxycholate stimulated calcification by >2-fold, without inducing obvious changes in vesicular appearance. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic studies were done to identify the mineral phase formed in these experiments. For the first time, rachitic MVs were shown to induce the formation of a calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate-like phase after their exposure to calcifying medium with 1 mM ATP. The integration of spectral areas indicated that calcification was enhanced by Triton X-100. The detergent effect was reversible and appeared to be not mediated through activation of ATPase, alkaline phosphatase, or ATP pyrophosphohydrolase. In contrast to neutral Triton X-100 and anionic deoxycholate, cationic cetyltrimethylammonium bromide inhibited both ATPase activity (I50=10 microM) and ATP-initiated calcification. These observations suggest that membrane perturbations can affect calcification and that the presence of NTP-pyrophosphohydrolase in MVs may play a role in the deposition of CaPPi in rachitic cartilage.

  18. Oriented reconstitution of a membrane protein in a giant unilamellar vesicle: experimental verification with the potassium channel KcsA.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Miho; Iwamoto, Masayuki; Kato, Ayako; Yoshikawa, Kenichi; Oiki, Shigetoshi

    2011-08-03

    We report a method for the successful reconstitution of the KcsA potassium channel with either an outside-out or inside-out orientation in giant unilamellar vesicles, using the droplet-transfer technique. The procedure is rather simple. First, we prepared water-in-oil droplets lined with a lipid monolayer. When solubilized KcsA was encapsulated in the droplet, it accumulated at monolayers of phosphatidylglycerol (PG) and phosphoethanolamine (PE) but not at a monolayer of phosphatidylcholine (PC). The droplet was then transferred through an oil/water interface having a preformed monolayer. The interface monolayer covered the droplet so as to generate a bilayer vesicle. By creating chemically different lipid monolayers at the droplet and oil/water interface, we obtained vesicles with asymmetric lipid compositions in the outer and inner leaflets. KcsA was spontaneously inserted into vesicles from the inside or outside, and this was accelerated in vesicles that contained PE or PG. Integrated insertion into the vesicle membrane and the KcsA orientation were examined by functional assay, exploiting the pH sensitivity of the opening of the KcsA when the pH-sensitive cytoplasmic domain (CPD) faces toward acidic media. KcsA loaded from the inside of the PG-containing vesicles becomes permeable only when the intravesicular pH is acidic, and the KcsA loaded from the outside becomes permeable when the extravesicular pH is acidic. Therefore, the internal or external insertion of KcsA leads to an outside-out or inside-out configuration so as to retain its hydrophilic CPD in the added aqueous side. The CPD-truncated KcsA exhibited a random orientation, supporting the idea that the CPD determines the orientation. Further application of the droplet-transfer method is promising for the reconstitution of other types of membrane proteins with a desired orientation into cell-sized vesicles with a targeted lipid composition of the outer and inner leaflets.

  19. Visualization of lipid domains in giant unilamellar vesicles using an environment-sensitive membrane probe based on 3-hydroxyflavone.

    PubMed

    Klymchenko, Andrey S; Oncul, Sule; Didier, Pascal; Schaub, Emmanuel; Bagatolli, Luis; Duportail, Guy; Mély, Yves

    2009-02-01

    We characterized the recently introduced environment-sensitive fluorescent membrane probe based on 3-hydroxyflavone, F2N12S, in model lipid membranes displaying liquid disordered (Ld) phase, liquid ordered (Lo) phase, or their coexistence. Steady-state fluorescence studies in large unilamellar vesicles show that the probe dual emission drastically changes with the lipid bilayer phase, which can be correlated with the difference in their hydration. Using two-photon excitation microscopy on giant unilamellar vesicles, the F2N12S probe was found to bind both Ld and Lo phases, allowing visualization of the individual phases from the fluorescence intensity ratio of its two emission bands. By using a linearly polarized excitation light, a strong photoselection was observed for F2N12S in the Lo phase, indicating that its fluorophore is nearly parallel to the lipid chains of the bilayer. In contrast, the absence of the photoselection with the Ld phase indicated no predominant orientation of the probe in the Ld phase. Comparison of the present results with those reported previously for F2N12S in living cells suggests a high content of the Lo phase in the outer leaflet of the cell plasma membranes. Taking into account the high selectivity of F2N12S for the cell plasma membranes and its suitability for both single- and two-photon excitation, applications of this probe to study membrane lateral heterogeneity in biological membranes are foreseen.

  20. Membrane Vesicles Released by Intestinal Epithelial Cells Infected with Rotavirus Inhibit T-Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Barreto, Alfonso; Rodríguez, Luz-Stella; Rojas, Olga Lucía; Wolf, Marie; Greenberg, Harry B.; Franco, Manuel A.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Rotavirus (RV) predominantly replicates in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC), and “danger signals” released by these cells may modulate viral immunity. We have recently shown that human model IEC (Caco-2 cells) infected with rhesus-RV release a non-inflammatory group of immunomodulators that includes heat shock proteins (HSPs) and TGF-β1. Here we show that both proteins are released in part in association with membrane vesicles (MV) obtained from filtrated Caco-2 supernatants concentrated by ultracentrifugation. These MV express markers of exosomes (CD63 and others), but not of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) or nuclei. Larger quantities of proteins associated with MV were released by RV-infected cells than by non-infected cells. VP6 co-immunoprecipitated with CD63 present in these MV, and VP6 co-localized with CD63 in RV-infected cells, suggesting that this viral protein is associated with the MV, and that this association occurs intracellularly. CD63 present in MV preparations from stool samples from 36 children with gastroenteritis due or not due to RV were analyzed. VP6 co-immunoprecipitated with CD63 in 3/8 stool samples from RV-infected children, suggesting that these MV are released by RV-infected cells in vivo. Moreover, fractions that contained MV from RV-infected cells induced death and inhibited proliferation of CD4+ T cells to a greater extent than fractions from non-infected cells. These effects were in part due to TGF-β, because they were reversed by treatment of the T cells with the TGF-β-receptor inhibitor ALK5i. MV from RV-infected and non-infected cells were heterogeneous, with morphologies and typical flotation densities described for exosomes (between 1.10 and 1.18 g/mL), and denser vesicles (>1.24 g/mL). Both types of MV from RV-infected cells were more efficient at inhibiting T-cell function than were those from non-infected cells. We propose that RV infection of IEC releases MV that modulate viral immunity. PMID:21142445

  1. Klebsiella pneumoniae O antigen loss alters the outer membrane protein composition and the selective packaging of proteins into secreted outer membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Cahill, Bethaney K; Seeley, Kent W; Gutel, Dedra; Ellis, Terri N

    2015-11-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a nosocomial pathogen which naturally secretes lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and cell envelope associated proteins into the environment through the production of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs). The loss of the LPS O antigen has been demonstrated in other bacterial species to significantly alter the composition of OMVs. Therefore, this study aimed to comprehensively analyze the impact of O antigen loss on the sub-proteomes of both the outer membrane and secreted OMVs from K. pneumoniae. As determined by LC-MS/MS, OMVs were highly enriched with outer membrane proteins involved in cell wall, membrane, and envelope biogenesis as compared to the source cellular outer membrane. Deletion of wbbO, the enzyme responsible for O antigen attachment to LPS, decreased but did not eliminate this enrichment effect. Additionally, loss of O antigen resulted in OMVs with increased numbers of proteins involved in post-translational modification, protein turnover, and chaperones as compared to secreted vesicles from the wild type. This alteration of OMV composition may be a compensatory mechanism to deal with envelope stress. This comprehensive analysis confirms the highly distinct protein composition of OMVs as compared to their source membrane, and provides evidence for a selective sorting mechanism that involves LPS polysaccharides. These data support the hypothesis that modifications to LPS alters both the mechanics of protein sorting and the contents of secreted OMVs and significantly impacts the protein composition of the outer membrane.

  2. The Structure of the Synaptic Vesicle-Plasma Membrane Interface Constrains SNARE Models of Rapid, Synchronous Exocytosis at Nerve Terminals

    PubMed Central

    Gundersen, Cameron B.

    2017-01-01

    Contemporary models of neurotransmitter release invoke direct or indirect interactions between the Ca2+ sensor, synaptotagmin and the incompletely zippered soluble, N-ethyl-maleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complex. However, recent electron microscopic (EM) investigations have raised pragmatic issues concerning the mechanism by which SNAREs trigger membrane fusion at nerve terminals. The first issue is related to the finding that the area of contact between a “fully primed” synaptic vesicle and the plasma membrane can exceed 600 nm2. Approximately four-thousands lipid molecules can inhabit this contact zone. Thus, renewed efforts will be needed to explain how the zippering of as few as two SNARE complexes mobilizes these lipids to achieve membrane fusion. The second issue emerges from the finding that “docking filaments” are sandwiched within the area of vesicle-plasma membrane contact. It is challenging to reconcile the location of these filaments with SNARE models of exocytosis. Instead, this commentary outlines how these data are more compatible with a model in which a cluster of synaptotagmins catalyzes exocytotic membrane fusion. PMID:28280457

  3. Melanosome transfer to keratinocyte in the chicken embryonic skin is mediated by vesicle release associated with Rho-regulated membrane blebbing

    PubMed Central

    Tadokoro, Ryosuke; Murai, Hidetaka; Sakai, Ken-ichiro; Okui, Takahiro; Yokota, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Yoshiko

    2016-01-01

    During skin pigmentation in amniotes, melanin synthesized in the melanocyte is transferred to keratinocytes by a particle called the melanosome. Previous studies, mostly using dissociated cultured cells, have proposed several different models that explain how the melanosome transfer is achieved. Here, using a technique that labels the plasma membrane of melanocytes within a three-dimensional system that mimics natural tissues, we have visualized the plasma membrane of melanocytes with EGFP in chicken embryonic skin. Confocal time-lapse microscopy reveals that the melanosome transfer is mediated, at least in part, by vesicles produced by plasma membrane. Unexpectedly, the vesicle release is accompanied by the membrane blebbing of melanocytes. Blebs that have encapsulated a melanosome are pinched off to become vesicles, and these melanosome-containing vesicles are finally engulfed by neighboring keratinocytes. For both the membrane blebbing and vesicle release, Rho small GTPase is essential. We further show that the membrane vesicle-mediated melanosome transfer plays a significant role in the skin pigmentation. Given that the skin pigmentation in inter-feather spaces in chickens is similar to that in inter-hair spaces of humans, our findings should have important consequences in cosmetic medicine. PMID:27910904

  4. Planar Supported Membranes with Mobile SNARE Proteins and Quantitative Fluorescence Microscopy Assays to Study Synaptic Vesicle Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Kiessling, Volker; Liang, Binyong; Kreutzberger, Alex J. B.; Tamm, Lukas K.

    2017-01-01

    Synaptic vesicle membrane fusion, the process by which neurotransmitter gets released at the presynaptic membrane is mediated by a complex interplay between proteins and lipids. The realization that the lipid bilayer is not just a passive environment where other molecular players like SNARE proteins act, but is itself actively involved in the process, makes the development of biochemical and biophysical assays particularly challenging. We summarize in vitro assays that use planar supported membranes and fluorescence microscopy to address some of the open questions regarding the molecular mechanisms of SNARE-mediated membrane fusion. Most of the assays discussed in this mini-review were developed in our lab over the last 15 years. We emphasize the sample requirements that we found are important for the successful application of these methods. PMID:28360838

  5. Kinetics of Bacillus thuringiensis toxin binding with brush border membrane vesicles from susceptible and resistant larvae of Plutella xylostella.

    PubMed

    Masson, L; Mazza, A; Brousseau, R; Tabashnik, B

    1995-05-19

    An optical biosensor technology based on surface plasmon resonance was used to determine the kinetic rate constants for interactions between the CryIA(c) toxin from Bacillus thuringiensis and brush border membrane vesicles purified from susceptible and resistant larvae of diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella). CryIA(c) association and dissociation rate constants for vesicles from susceptible larvae were determined to be 4.5 x 10(3) M-1 s-1 and 3.2 x 10(-5) s-1, respectively, resulting in a calculated affinity constant of 7 nM. CryIE toxin did not kill susceptible or resistant larvae and did not bind to brush border vesicles. Contrary to expectations based on previous studies of binding in resistant P. xylostella, the binding kinetics for CryIA(c) did not differ significantly between susceptible larvae and those that were resistant to CryIA(c). Determination of the number of CryIA(c) receptors revealed an approximately 3-fold decrease in total CryIA(c) receptor numbers for resistant vesicles. These results suggest that factors other than binding may be altered in our resistant diamondback moth strain. They also support the view that binding is not sufficient for toxicity.

  6. Outer membrane vesicles of Gallibacterium anatis induce protective immunity in egg-laying hens.

    PubMed

    Pors, Susanne E; Pedersen, Ida J; Skjerning, Ragnhild Bager; Thøfner, Ida C N; Persson, Gry; Bojesen, Anders M

    2016-11-15

    Gallibacterium anatis causes infections in the reproductive tract of egg-laying hens and induce increased mortality and decreased egg production. New prophylactic measures are needed in order to improve animal welfare and production efficiency. Bacterial outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) have previously shown promising results in protection against infections and we hypothesized that OMVs could serve as an immunogen to protect egg-laying hens against G. anatis. To investigate the immunogenic potential of G. anatis OMVs, two in vivo studies in egg-laying hens were made. The trials assessedthe degree of protection provided by immunization with G. anatis OMV against challenge and the IgY responses in serum after immunization and challenge, respectively. A total of 64 egg-laying hens were included in the trials. OMVs for immunization were produced and purified from a high-producing G. anatis ΔtolR mutant. Challenge was done with G. anatis 12656-12 and evaluated by scoring lesions and bacterial re-isolation rates from peritoneum. Finally, levels of OMV-specific IgY in sera were assayed by ELISA. Immunization with OMVs decreased the lesions scores significantly, while the bacterial re-isolation remained unchanged. Furthermore, a high OMV-specific IgY response was induced by immunization and subsequent challenge of the hens. The results strongly indicate that immunization with G. anatis OMVs provides significant protection against G. anatis challenge and induces specific antibody responses with high titers of OMV-specific IgY in serum. The results therefore show great promise for OMV based vaccines aiming at providing protecting against G. anatis in egg-laying hens.

  7. Comparative proteomic analysis of outer membrane vesicles from Shigella flexneri under different culture conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yong; Liu, Liguo; Fu, Hua; Wei, Candong Jin, Qi

    2014-10-31

    Highlights: • We utilized mTRAQ-based quantification to study protein changes in Congo red-induced OMVs. • A total of 148 proteins were identified in S. flexneri-derived OMVs. • Twenty-eight and five proteins are significantly up- and down-regulated in the CR-induced OMV, respectively. • The result implied that a special sorting mechanism of particular proteins into OMVs may exist. • Key node proteins in the protein interaction network might be important for pathogenicity. - Abstract: The production of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) is a common and regulated process of gram-negative bacteria. Nonetheless, the processes of Shigella flexneri OMV production still remain unclear. S. flexneri is the causative agent of endemic shigellosis in developing countries. The Congo red binding of strains is associated with increased infectivity of S. flexneri. Therefore, understanding the modulation pattern of OMV protein expression induced by Congo red will help to elucidate the bacterial pathogenesis. In the present study, we investigated the proteomic composition of OMVs and the change in OMV protein expression induced by Congo red using mTRAQ-based quantitative comparative proteomics. mTRAQ labelling increased the confidence in protein identification, and 148 total proteins were identified in S. flexneri-derived OMVs. These include a variety of important virulence factors, including Ipa proteins, TolC family, murein hydrolases, and members of the serine protease autotransporters of Enterobacteriaceae (SPATEs) family. Among the identified proteins, 28 and five proteins are significantly up- and down-regulated in the Congo red-induced OMV, respectively. Additionally, by comprehensive comparison with previous studies focused on DH5a-derived OMV, we identified some key node proteins in the protein–protein interaction network that may be involved in OMV biogenesis and are common to all gram-negative bacteria.

  8. A combined vaccine approach against Vibrio cholerae and ETEC based on outer membrane vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Leitner, Deborah R.; Lichtenegger, Sabine; Temel, Philipp; Zingl, Franz G.; Ratzberger, Desiree; Roier, Sandro; Schild-Prüfert, Kristina; Feichter, Sandra; Reidl, Joachim; Schild, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Enteric infections induced by pathogens like Vibrio cholerae and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) remain a massive burden in developing countries with increasing morbidity and mortality rates. Previously, we showed that the immunization with genetically detoxified outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) derived from V. cholerae elicits a protective immune response based on the generation of O antigen antibodies, which effectively block the motility by binding to the sheathed flagellum. In this study, we investigated the potential of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-modified and toxin negative OMVs isolated from V. cholerae and ETEC as a combined OMV vaccine candidate. Our results indicate that the immunization with V. cholerae or ETEC OMVs induced a species-specific immune response, whereas the combination of both OMV species resulted in a high-titer, protective immune response against both pathogens. Interestingly, the immunization with V. cholerae OMVs alone resulted in a so far uncharacterized and cholera toxin B-subunit (CTB) independent protection mechanism against an ETEC colonization. Furthermore, we investigated the potential use of V. cholerae OMVs as delivery vehicles for the heterologously expression of the ETEC surface antigens, CFA/I, and FliC. Although we induced a detectable immune response against both heterologously expressed antigens, none of these approaches resulted in an improved protection compared to a simple combination of V. cholerae and ETEC OMVs. Finally, we expanded the current protection model from V. cholerae to ETEC by demonstrating that the inhibition of motility via anti-FliC antibodies represents a relevant protection mechanism of an OMV-based ETEC vaccine candidate in vivo. PMID:26322032

  9. A Burkholderia pseudomallei outer membrane vesicle vaccine provides protection against lethal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Nieves, Wildaliz; Petersen, Hailey; Judy, Barbara M; Blumentritt, Carla A; Russell-Lodrigue, Kasi; Roy, Chad J; Torres, Alfredo G; Morici, Lisa A

    2014-05-01

    The environmental Gram-negative encapsulated bacillus Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis, a disease associated with high morbidity and mortality rates in areas of Southeast Asia and northern Australia in which the disease is endemic. B. pseudomallei is also classified as a tier I select agent due to the high level of lethality of the bacterium and its innate resistance to antibiotics, as well as the lack of an effective vaccine. Gram-negative bacteria, including B. pseudomallei, secrete outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) which are enriched with multiple protein, lipid, and polysaccharide antigens. Previously, we demonstrated that immunization with multivalent B. pseudomallei-derived OMVs protects highly susceptible BALB/c mice against an otherwise lethal aerosol challenge. In this work, we evaluated the protective efficacy of OMV immunization against intraperitoneal challenge with a heterologous strain because systemic infection with phenotypically diverse environmental B. pseudomallei strains poses another hazard and a challenge to vaccine development. We demonstrated that B. pseudomallei OMVs derived from strain 1026b afforded significant protection against septicemic infection with B. pseudomallei strain K96243. OMV immunization induced robust OMV-, lipopolysaccharide-, and capsular polysaccharide-specific serum IgG (IgG1, IgG2a, and IgG3) and IgM antibody responses. OMV-immune serum promoted bacterial killing in vitro, and passive transfer of B. pseudomallei OMV immune sera protected naive mice against a subsequent challenge. These results indicate that OMV immunization provides antibody-mediated protection against acute, rapidly lethal sepsis in mice. B. pseudomallei-derived OMVs may represent an efficacious multivalent vaccine strategy against melioidosis.

  10. Legionella pneumophila-Derived Outer Membrane Vesicles Promote Bacterial Replication in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Anna Lena; Stoiber, Cornelia; Herkt, Christina E.; Schulz, Christine; Bertrams, Wilhelm; Schmeck, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    The formation and release of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) is a phenomenon of Gram-negative bacteria. This includes Legionella pneumophila (L. pneumophila), a causative agent of severe pneumonia. Upon its transmission into the lung, L. pneumophila primarily infects and replicates within macrophages. Here, we analyzed the influence of L. pneumophila OMVs on macrophages. To this end, differentiated THP-1 cells were incubated with increasing doses of Legionella OMVs, leading to a TLR2-dependent classical activation of macrophages with the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Inhibition of TLR2 and NF-κB signaling reduced the induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, treatment of THP-1 cells with OMVs prior to infection reduced replication of L. pneumophila in THP-1 cells. Blocking of TLR2 activation or heat denaturation of OMVs restored bacterial replication in the first 24 h of infection. With prolonged infection-time, OMV pre-treated macrophages became more permissive for bacterial replication than untreated cells and showed increased numbers of Legionella-containing vacuoles and reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine induction. Additionally, miRNA-146a was found to be transcriptionally induced by OMVs and to facilitate bacterial replication. Accordingly, IRAK-1, one of miRNA-146a’s targets, showed prolonged activation-dependent degradation, which rendered THP-1 cells more permissive for Legionella replication. In conclusion, L. pneumophila OMVs are initially potent pro-inflammatory stimulators of macrophages, acting via TLR2, IRAK-1, and NF-κB, while at later time points, OMVs facilitate L. pneumophila replication by miR-146a-dependent IRAK-1 suppression. OMVs might thereby promote spreading of L. pneumophila in the host. PMID:27105429

  11. Aldosterone induction of electrogenic sodium transport in the apical membrane vesicles of rat distal colon

    SciTech Connect

    Rajendran, V.M.; Kashgarian, M.; Binder, H.J. )

    1989-11-05

    Na-H exchange is present in apical membrane vesicles (AMV) isolated from distal colon of normal rats. Because in intact tissue aldosterone both induces amiloride-sensitive electrogenic sodium transport and inhibits electroneutral sodium absorption, these studies with AMV were designed to establish the effect of aldosterone on sodium transport. An outward-directed proton gradient stimulated 22Na uptake in AMV isolated from distal colon of normal and dietary sodium depleted (with elevated aldosterone levels) experimental rats. Unlike normal AMV, proton gradient-dependent 22Na uptake in experimental AMV was inhibited when uptake was measured under voltage-clamped conditions. 10 microM amiloride inhibited the initial rate of proton gradient-dependent 22Na uptake in AMV of normal and experimental rats by 30 and 75%, respectively. In contrast, 1 mM amiloride produced comparable inhibition (90 and 80%) of 22Na uptake in normal and experimental AMV. Intravesicular-negative potential stimulated 22Na uptake in experimental but not in normal AMV. This increase was inhibited by 90% by 10 microM amiloride. An analogue of amiloride, 5-(N-ethylisopropyl) amiloride (1 microM), a potent inhibitor of electroneutral Na-H exchange in AMV of normal rat distal colon, did not alter potassium diffusion potential-dependent 22Na uptake. Increasing sodium concentration saturated proton gradient-dependent 22Na uptake in normal AMV. However, in experimental AMV, 22Na uptake stimulated by both proton gradient and potassium diffusion potential did not saturate as a function of increasing sodium concentration. We conclude from these results that an electrically sensitive conductive channel, not electroneutral Na-H exchange, mediates 22Na uptake in AMV isolated from the distal colon of aldosterone rats.

  12. Analysis of AQP4 Trafficking Vesicle Dynamics Using a High-Content Approach

    PubMed Central

    Mazzaferri, Javier; Costantino, Santiago; Lefrancois, Stephane

    2013-01-01

    Aquaporin-4 (AQP4) is found on the basolateral plasma membrane of a variety of epithelial cells, and it is widely accepted that microtubules play an important role in protein trafficking to the plasma membrane. In the particular case of polarized trafficking, however, most evidence on the involvement of microtubules has been obtained via biochemistry experiments and single-shot microscopy. These approaches have provided essential information, even though they neglect the dynamical details of microtubule transport. In this work, we present a high-content framework in which time-lapse imaging, and single-particle-tracking algorithms were used to study a large number (∼104) of GFP-AQP4-carrying vesicles on a large number of cells (∼170). By analyzing several descriptors in this large sample of trajectories, we were able to obtain highly statistically significant results. Our results support the hypothesis that AQP4 is transported along microtubules, but to our surprise, this transport is not directed straight to the basolateral plasma membrane. On the contrary, these vesicles move stochastically along microtubules, changing direction repeatedly. We propose that the role of microtubules in the basolateral trafficking of AQP4 is to increase the efficiency, rather than determine the specificity of the target. PMID:23870254

  13. A vacuolar-type proton pump in a vesicle fraction enriched with potassium transporting plasma membranes from tobacco hornworm midgut

    SciTech Connect

    Wieczorek, H.; Weerth, S.; Schindlbeck, M.; Klein, U.

    1989-07-05

    Mg-ATP dependent electrogenic proton transport, monitored with fluorescent acridine orange, 9-aminoacridine, and oxonol V, was investigated in a fraction enriched with potassium transporting goblet cell apical membranes of Manduca sexta larval midgut. Proton transport and the ATPase activity from the goblet cell apical membrane exhibited similar substrate specificity and inhibitor sensitivity. ATP and GTP were far better substrates than UTP, CTP, ADP, and AMP. Azide and vanadate did not inhibit proton transport, whereas 100 microM N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide and 30 microM N-ethylmaleimide were inhibitors. The pH gradient generated by ATP and limiting its hydrolysis was 2-3 pH units. Unlike the ATPase activity, proton transport was not stimulated by KCl. In the presence of 20 mM KCl, a proton gradient could not be developed or was dissipated. Monovalent cations counteracted the proton gradient in an order of efficacy like that for stimulation of the membrane-bound ATPase activity: K+ = Rb+ much greater than Li+ greater than Na+ greater than choline (chloride salts). Like proton transport, the generation of an ATP dependent and azide- and vanadate-insensitive membrane potential (vesicle interior positive) was prevented largely by 100 microM N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide and 30 microM N-ethylmaleimide. Unlike proton transport, the membrane potential was not affected by 20 mM KCl. In the presence of 150 mM choline chloride, the generation of a membrane potential was suppressed, whereas the pH gradient increased 40%, indicating an anion conductance in the vesicle membrane. Altogether, the results led to the following new hypothesis of electrogenic potassium transport in the lepidopteran midgut. A vacuolar-type electrogenic ATPase pumps protons across the apical membrane of the goblet cell, thus energizing electroneutral proton/potassium antiport. The result is a net active and electrogenic potassium flux.

  14. Uptake and binding of /sup 125/I-calmodulin by isolated rat renal brush border membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Meezan, E.; Elgavish, A.; Wallace, R.W.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have investigated the interaction of /sup 125/I-calmodulin with isolated rat renal brush border membrane vesicles (BBV) using an experimental protocol which allows us to distinguish between ligand binding to the outside of the vesicles vs. uptake and possible binding to the vesicle interior. By examining the association of /sup 125/I-calmodulin with BBV as a function of medium osmolarity (300-1100 mosm) to alter intravesicular space, virtually all ligand interaction with BBV was found to represent uptake of intact /sup 125/I-calmodulin into the intravesicular space. Uptake appeared specific by the following criteria: (1) it was largely calcium dependent (2) it was inhibited in a dose dependent fashion by calmodulin and the homologous protein troponin C, but not by unrelated proteins (lysozyme, cytochrome C, insulin) (3) it was inhibited by known calmodulin antagonists (calmidazolium, mellitin, trifluoperazine). Calmodulin uptake may be followed by binding of /sup 125/I-calmodulin to intravesicular BBV proteins; calmodulin-binding proteins in BBV with molecular weights of 143K, 118K, 50K, 47.5K, 46.5K and 35K were identified by Western blotting techniques. The specific association of /sup 125/I-calmodulin with isolated BBV is of interest in regard to the possible role of this calcium regulatory protein in the protein reabsorptive and ion transport functions of this renal tubular membrane fraction.

  15. Automatically Identifying Fusion Events between GLUT4 Storage Vesicles and the Plasma Membrane in TIRF Microscopy Image Sequences.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian; Xu, Yingke; Feng, Zhouyan; Zheng, Xiaoxiang

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of the dynamic behavior about membrane-bound secretory vesicles has proven to be important in biological research. This paper proposes a novel approach to automatically identify the elusive fusion events between VAMP2-pHluorin labeled GLUT4 storage vesicles (GSVs) and the plasma membrane. The differentiation is implemented to detect the initiation of fusion events by modified forward subtraction of consecutive frames in the TIRFM image sequence. Spatially connected pixels in difference images brighter than a specified adaptive threshold are grouped into a distinct fusion spot. The vesicles are located at the intensity-weighted centroid of their fusion spots. To reveal the true in vivo nature of a fusion event, 2D Gaussian fitting for the fusion spot is used to derive the intensity-weighted centroid and the spot size during the fusion process. The fusion event and its termination can be determined according to the change of spot size. The method is evaluated on real experiment data with ground truth annotated by expert cell biologists. The evaluation results show that it can achieve relatively high accuracy comparing favorably to the manual analysis, yet at a small fraction of time.

  16. Local membrane length conservation in two-dimensional vesicle simulation using a multicomponent lattice Boltzmann equation method.

    PubMed

    Halliday, I; Lishchuk, S V; Spencer, T J; Pontrelli, G; Evans, P C

    2016-08-01

    We present a method for applying a class of velocity-dependent forces within a multicomponent lattice Boltzmann equation simulation that is designed to recover continuum regime incompressible hydrodynamics. This method is applied to the problem, in two dimensions, of constraining to uniformity the tangential velocity of a vesicle membrane implemented within a recent multicomponent lattice Boltzmann simulation method, which avoids the use of Lagrangian boundary tracers. The constraint of uniform tangential velocity is carried by an additional contribution to an immersed boundary force, which we derive here from physical arguments. The result of this enhanced immersed boundary force is to apply a physically appropriate boundary condition at the interface between separated lattice fluids, defined as that region over which the phase-field varies most rapidly. Data from this enhanced vesicle boundary method are in agreement with other data obtained using related methods [e.g., T. Krüger, S. Frijters, F. Günther, B. Kaoui, and J. Harting, Eur. Phys. J. 222, 177 (2013)10.1140/epjst/e2013-01834-y] and underscore the importance of a correct vesicle membrane condition.

  17. Local membrane length conservation in two-dimensional vesicle simulation using a multicomponent lattice Boltzmann equation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, I.; Lishchuk, S. V.; Spencer, T. J.; Pontrelli, G.; Evans, P. C.

    2016-08-01

    We present a method for applying a class of velocity-dependent forces within a multicomponent lattice Boltzmann equation simulation that is designed to recover continuum regime incompressible hydrodynamics. This method is applied to the problem, in two dimensions, of constraining to uniformity the tangential velocity of a vesicle membrane implemented within a recent multicomponent lattice Boltzmann simulation method, which avoids the use of Lagrangian boundary tracers. The constraint of uniform tangential velocity is carried by an additional contribution to an immersed boundary force, which we derive here from physical arguments. The result of this enhanced immersed boundary force is to apply a physically appropriate boundary condition at the interface between separated lattice fluids, defined as that region over which the phase-field varies most rapidly. Data from this enhanced vesicle boundary method are in agreement with other data obtained using related methods [e.g., T. Krüger, S. Frijters, F. Günther, B. Kaoui, and J. Harting, Eur. Phys. J. 222, 177 (2013), 10.1140/epjst/e2013-01834-y] and underscore the importance of a correct vesicle membrane condition.

  18. Taurocholate transport by brush-border membrane vesicles from the developing rabbit ileum: Structure/function relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, S.M.; Watkins, J.B.; Ling, S.C. )

    1990-05-01

    To examine the ontogenesis of bile acid transport in the rabbit ileum, brush-border membrane vesicles (12- to 20-fold purified) were prepared from 14- to 49-day-old animals. Taurocholate uptake was characterized by the emergence of secondary active, Na(+)-dependent transport at the start of weaning (21 days). Transient intravesicular accumulation (overshoot) of taurocholate occurred at 5-10 s of incubation, and the overshoot maximum increased significantly from 21 days (349.2 +/- 22.4 nmol/mg protein) to 35 days (569.0 +/- 84.3 nmol/mg protein; p less than 0.001), without further increase at maturity (49 days, not equal to 607.6 +/- 136.7 nmol/mg protein). No significant taurocholate active uptake component was noted at 14 days; however, ileal vesicles from sucklings showed carrier-mediated, Na+ D-glucose cotransport. In greater than or equal to 35-day-old rabbits, osmolarity studies at 20 s of incubation showed that only approximately 12% of (14C)taurocholate uptake was secondary to bile acid-to-membrane binding. Conversely, at 20 min, greater than 95% of radiolabel incorporation represented solute bound to the external and/or internal membrane surface. Arrhenius plots establish brush-border membrane taurocholate uptake as an intrinsic, lipid-dependent process, with a slope discontinuity between 24 and 28 degrees C, similar to the membrane lipid thermotropic transition region. Steady-state fluorescence polarization studies (1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene) demonstrate a temporal association between the maturation of taurocholate uptake and age-related decreases in ileal brush-border membrane fluidity. These data indicate that maturation of bile acid secondary active transport in the rabbit ileum may be regulated, at least in part, by changes in brush-border membrane lipid dynamics.

  19. Active auxin uptake by zucchini membrane vesicles: quantitation using ESR volume and delta pH determinations

    SciTech Connect

    Lomax, T.L.; Mehlhorn, R.J.; Briggs, W.R.

    1985-10-01

    Closed and pH-tight membrane vesicles prepared from hypocotyls of 5-day-old dark-grown seedlings of Cucurbita pepo accumulate the plant growth hormone indole-3-acetic acid along an imposed proton gradient (pH low outside, high inside). The use of electron paramagnetic spin probes permitted quantitation both of apparent vesicle volume and magnitude of the pH gradient. Under the experimental conditions used, hormone accumulation was at minimum 20-fold, a value 4 times larger than what one would predict if accumulation reflected only diffusional equilibrium at the measured pH gradient. It is concluded that hormone uptake is an active process, with each protonated molecule of hormone accompanied by an additional proton. Experiments with ionophores confirm that it is the pH gradient itself which drives the uptake.

  20. Formation of lens-like vesicles induced via microphase separations on a sorbitan monoester membrane with different headgroups.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Keita; Iwai, Hideka; Shimanouchi, Toshinori; Umakoshi, Hiroshi; Iwasaki, Tomoyuki; Kato, Ayako; Nakamura, Hidemi

    2015-11-01

    The microphase separation of lipid molecules on a vesicle membrane can be induced, depending on the difference in the geometric structures of their headgroups. Through cryo-transmission-electron-microscopy analysis, a lens-like vesicle was prepared by mixing 50 wt% Span 40 (sorbitan monopalmitate) and 50 wt% Tween 40 [polyoxyethylene (20) sorbitan monopalmitate]. Considering the molecular structures of Span 40 and Tween 40, the high-curvature region was mainly formed by Tween 40. As determined by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, dielectric-dispersion analysis, and differential scanning calorimetry, a hydration layer was likely formed because polyoxyethylene conjugates with the headgroups of Tween 40. These investigations of the obtained self-assembled aggregates of nonionic surfactants with heterogeneous surfaces could contribute to the development of new types of biomaterials.

  1. Pannexin2 oligomers localize in the membranes of endosomal vesicles in mammalian cells while Pannexin1 channels traffic to the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Boassa, Daniela; Nguyen, Phuong; Hu, Junru; Ellisman, Mark H.; Sosinsky, Gina E.

    2015-01-01

    Pannexin2 (Panx2) is the largest of three members of the pannexin proteins. Pannexins are topologically related to connexins and innexins, but serve different functional roles than forming gap junctions. We previously showed that pannexins form oligomeric channels but unlike connexins and innexins, they form only single membrane channels. High levels of Panx2 mRNA and protein in the Central Nervous System (CNS) have been documented. Whereas Pannexin1 (Panx1) is fairly ubiquitous and Pannexin3 (Panx3) is found in skin and connective tissue, both are fully glycosylated, traffic to the plasma membrane and have functions correlated with extracellular ATP release. Here, we describe trafficking and subcellular localizations of exogenous Panx2 and Panx1 protein expression in MDCK, HeLa, and HEK 293T cells as well as endogenous Panx1 and Panx2 patterns in the CNS. Panx2 was found in intracellular localizations, was partially N-glycosylated, and localizations were non-overlapping with Panx1. Confocal images of hippocampal sections immunolabeled for the astrocytic protein GFAP, Panx1 and Panx2 demonstrated that the two isoforms, Panx1 and Panx2, localized at different subcellular compartments in both astrocytes and neurons. Using recombinant fusions of Panx2 with appended genetic tags developed for correlated light and electron microscopy and then expressed in different cell lines, we determined that Panx2 is localized in the membrane of intracellular vesicles and not in the endoplasmic reticulum as initially indicated by calnexin colocalization experiments. Dual immunofluorescence imaging with protein markers for specific vesicle compartments showed that Panx2 vesicles are early endosomal in origin. In electron tomographic volumes, cross-sections of these vesicles displayed fine structural details and close proximity to actin filaments. Thus, pannexins expressed at different subcellular compartments likely exert distinct functional roles, particularly in the nervous system

  2. Fluorescent Probe Study of AOT Vesicle Membranes and Their Alteration upon Addition of Aniline or the Aniline Dimer p-Aminodiphenylamine (PADPA).

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Fumihiko; Luginbühl, Sandra; Suga, Keishi; Walde, Peter; Umakoshi, Hiroshi

    2017-02-28

    Artificial vesicles formed from sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT) in aqueous solution are used successfully as additives for enzymatic oligomerizations or polymerizations of aniline or the aniline dimer p-aminodiphenylamine (PADPA) under slightly acidic conditions (e.g., pH 4.3 with horseradish peroxidase and hydrogen peroxide as oxidants). In these systems, the reactions occur membrane surface-confined. Therefore, (i) the physicochemical properties of the vesicle membrane and (ii) the interaction of aniline or PADPA with the AOT membrane play crucial roles in the progress and final outcome of the reactions. For this reason, the properties of AOT vesicles with and without added aniline or PADPA were investigated by using two fluorescent membrane probes: 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) and 6-lauroyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene (Laurdan). DPH and Laurdan were used as "sensors" of the membrane fluidity, surface polarity, and membrane phase state. Moreover, the effect of hexanol, alone or in combination with aniline or PADPA, as a possible modifier of the AOT membrane, was also studied with the aim of evaluating whether the membrane fluidity and surface polarity is altered significantly by hexanol, which, in turn, may have an influence on the mentioned types of reactions. The data obtained indicate that the AOT vesicle membrane at room temperature and pH 4.3 (0.1 M NaH2PO4) is more fluid and has a more polar surface than in the case of fluid phospholipid vesicle membranes formed from 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC). Furthermore, the fluorescence measurements indicate that mixed AOT-hexanol membranes are less fluid than pure AOT membranes and that they have a lower surface polarity than pure AOT membranes. PADPA strongly binds to AOT and to mixed AOT/hexanol membranes and leads to drastic changes in the membrane properties (decrease in fluidity and surface polarity), resulting in Laurdan fluorescence spectra, which are characteristic for

  3. Dissecting docking and tethering of secretory vesicles at the target membrane

    PubMed Central

    Toonen, Ruud F; Kochubey, Olexiy; de Wit, Heidi; Gulyas-Kovacs, Attila; Konijnenburg, Bas; Sørensen, Jakob B; Klingauf, Jurgen; Verhage, Matthijs

    2006-01-01

    Secretory vesicles dock at their target in preparation for fusion. Using single-vesicle total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy in chromaffin cells, we show that most approaching vesicles dock only transiently, but that some are captured by at least two different tethering modes, weak and strong. Both vesicle delivery and tethering depend on Munc18-1, a known docking factor. By decreasing the amount of cortical actin by Latrunculin A application, morphological docking can be restored artificially in docking-deficient munc18-1 null cells, but neither strong tethering nor fusion, demonstrating that morphological docking is not sufficient for secretion. Deletion of the t-SNARE and Munc18-1 binding partner syntaxin, but not the v-SNARE synaptobrevin/VAMP, also reduces strong tethering and fusion. We conclude that docking vesicles either undock immediately or are captured by minimal tethering machinery and converted in a munc18-1/syntaxin-dependent, strongly tethered, fusion-competent state. PMID:16902411

  4. Calmodulin binding proteins of the cholinergic electromotor synapse: synaptosomes, synaptic vesicles, receptor-enriched membranes, and cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Walker, J H; Stadler, H; Witzemann, V

    1984-02-01

    Calmodulin binding proteins (CBPs) have been identified using a gel overlay technique for fractions isolated from Torpedo electromotor nerve endings. Different fractions possessed characteristic patterns of CBPs. Synaptosomes showed five major CBPs--Mr 220,000, 160,000, 125,000, 55,000, and 51,000. Polypeptides of Mr 55,000 and 51,000 were found in the cytoplasm and the others are membrane-associated. The Triton X-100-insoluble cytoskeleton of synaptosomes was isolated in the presence or absence of calcium. The major CBPs had Mr of 19,000, 18,000, and 16,000. In the presence of calcium, no other CBPs were seen. In the absence of calcium, an Mr 160,000 polypeptide was present in the Triton cytoskeleton. Synaptic vesicles showed CBPs of Mr 160,000, 25,000, and 20,000. Membrane fragments enriched in acetylcholine receptors contained two major CBPs, Mr 160,000 and 125,000, together with a less prominent protein at Mr 26,000. A protein of Mr similar to that of fodrin was present in synaptosomes and acetylcholine receptor membrane fragments, but only in small amounts relative to the other polypeptides observed. The heavy and light chains of clathrin-coated vesicles from pig brain did not bind calmodulin, although strong labelling of an Mr 47,000 polypeptide was found. Results showed that calelectrin does not bind calmodulin. The possible identity of the calmodulin binding proteins is discussed.

  5. Role of Tetanus Neurotoxin Insensitive Vesicle-Associated Membrane Protein (Ti-Vamp) in Vesicular Transport Mediating Neurite Outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Arca, Sonia; Alberts, Philipp; Zahraoui, Ahmed; Louvard, Daniel; Galli, Thierry

    2000-01-01

    How vesicular transport participates in neurite outgrowth is still poorly understood. Neurite outgrowth is not sensitive to tetanus neurotoxin thus does not involve synaptobrevin-mediated vesicular transport to the plasma membrane of neurons. Tetanus neurotoxin-insensitive vesicle-associated membrane protein (TI-VAMP) is a vesicle-SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein [NSF] attachment protein [SNAP] receptor), involved in transport to the apical plasma membrane in epithelial cells, a tetanus neurotoxin-resistant pathway. Here we show that TI-VAMP is essential for vesicular transport-mediating neurite outgrowth in staurosporine-differentiated PC12 cells. The NH2-terminal domain, which precedes the SNARE motif of TI-VAMP, inhibits the association of TI-VAMP with synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kD (SNAP25). Expression of this domain inhibits neurite outgrowth as potently as Botulinum neurotoxin E, which cleaves SNAP25. In contrast, expression of the NH2-terminal deletion mutant of TI-VAMP increases SNARE complex formation and strongly stimulates neurite outgrowth. These results provide the first functional evidence for the role of TI-VAMP in neurite outgrowth and point to its NH2-terminal domain as a key regulator in this process. PMID:10811829

  6. Damage in spherical cellular membrane generated by the shock waves: Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation of lipid vesicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sliozberg, Yelena; Chantawansri, Tanya

    2014-11-01

    Traumatic Brain Injury is a major health issue that is hard to diagnose since it often occurs without signs of external injuries. While it is well known that exposure of biological cells to shock waves causes damage to the cell membrane, it is currently unknown by which mechanisms damage is caused, and how it depends on physical parameters such as shock wave velocity, shock pulse duration, or shock pulse shape. In this computational study, we use a coarse-grained model of the lipid vesicle as a generic model of a cell membrane to elucidate the general principles of the cellular damage induced by the shock wave direct passage through the cranium. Results indicate that the extent of the liposome compression does not strongly depend on the pressure pulse and that liposome extension is very sensitive to the change in the negative pressure phase. The structural integrity of the vesicle is altered as pores form in the lipid membrane at overall pressure impulses generated by supersonic shock waves, which are greater than 5 Pa.s at single or repetitive exposure. Consequently, these permeability changes may lead to changes in the influx of sodium, potassium, and calcium ions.

  7. The single-giant unilamellar vesicle method reveals lysenin-induced pore formation in lipid membranes containing sphingomyelin.

    PubMed

    Alam, Jahangir Md; Kobayashi, Toshihide; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2012-06-26

    Lysenin is a sphingomyelin (SM)-binding pore-forming toxin. To reveal the interaction of lysenin with lipid membranes, we investigated lysenin-induced membrane permeation of a fluorescent probe, calcein, through dioleoylphosphatidylcholine(DOPC)/SM, DOPC/SM/cholesterol(chol), and SM/chol membranes, using the single-giant unilamellar vesicle (GUV) method. The results clearly show that lysenin formed pores in all the membranes, through which membrane permeation of calcein occurred without disruption of GUVs. The membrane permeation began stochastically, and the membrane permeability coefficient increased over time to reach a maximum, steady value, Ps, which persisted for a long time(100--500 s), indicating that the pore concentration increases over time and finally reaches its steady value, NP s . The Ps values increased as the SM/lysenin ratio decreased, and at low concentrations of lysenin, the Ps values of SM/DOPC/chol (42/30/28)GUVs were much larger than those of SM/DOPC (58/42) GUVs. The dependence of Ps on the SM/lysenin ratio for these membranes was almost the same as that of the fraction of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-resistant lysenin oligomers, indicating that NP s increases as the SDS-resistant oligomer fraction increases. On the other hand, lysenin formed pores in GUVs of SM/chol(60/40) membrane, which is in a homogeneous liquid-ordered phase, indicating that the phase boundary is not necessary for pore formation. The Ps values of SM/chol (60/40) GUVs were smaller than those of SM/DOPC/chol (42/30/28) GUVs even though the SDS-resistant oligomer fractions were similar for both membranes, suggesting that not all of the oligomers can convert into a pore. On the basis of these results, we discuss the elementary processes of lysenin-induced pore formation.

  8. High affinity 3H-Phe uptake by brush border membrane vesicles from whole larvae of Aedes aegypti (AaBMVw)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Brush border membrane vesicles from whole Aedes aegypti larvae (AaBBMVw) are confirmed to be valid preparations for membrane transport studies. The Abdul-Rauf and Ellar method was used to isolate AaBBMVw that were frozen, stored for several months, transported to a distant site, thawed and used to s...

  9. Use of membrane vesicles as a simplified system for studying transport of auxin. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, M.H.

    1985-01-01

    The accumulation of indoleacetic acid (IAA) inside microsomal vesicles depends on the presence of a pH gradient and is reversible when the ..delta..pH is collapsed by ionosphores. Accumulation is stimulated by either napthylphthalamic acid or TIBA. The accumulation of IAA by the vesicles can be saturated. At concentrations of 1 ..mu..M or less, IAA, synthetic auxins, or auxin antagonists do not affect the pH gradient, but decrease the accumulation of /sup 3/H-IAA, and therefore compete specifically for uptake. Concentrations of 10 ..mu..M and above, uptake of either the auxins or weak acids is sufficient to overcome the buffering capacity of the solution within the vesicles. The collapse of the pH gradient by such high concentrations affects uptake of either /sup 3/H-IAA or /sup 14/C-BA to similar extents and thus is nonspecific. 3 refs.

  10. Ordered and Disordered Phases Coexist in Plasma Membrane Vesicles of RBL-2H3 Mast Cells. An ESR Study

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Mingtao; Gidwani, Arun; Brown, H. Alex; Holowka, David; Baird, Barbara; Freed, Jack H.

    2003-01-01

    Four chain spin labels and a spin-labeled cholestane were used to study the dynamic structure of plasma membrane vesicles (PMV) prepared from RBL-2H3 mast cells at temperatures ranging from 22°C to 45°C. Analysis shows that the spectra from most labels consist of two components. The abundant spectral components exhibit substantial ordering that is intermediate between that of a liquid-ordered (Lo) phase, and that of a liquid-crystalline (Lc) phase as represented by model membranes. Also, rotational diffusion rates of the spin labels are comparable to those in the Lo phase. In contrast, the ordering for the less abundant components is much lower. These results indicate that a Lo-like region or phase (the abundant component) and an Lc-like region or phase (the less abundant component) coexist in the PMV. In contrast, membranes reconstituted from extracted lipids exhibit the more ordered phase only. This suggests that membrane-associated proteins are important for the coexistence of Lo-like and Lc-like regions in the plasma membrane. In addition, binding of the myristoylated protein, ARF6 to PMV, leads to a new spectral component for a headgroup lipid spin label that indicates the formation of plasma membrane defects by this low molecular weight GTPase. PMID:12885671

  11. Rab6 Is Required for Multiple Apical Transport Pathways but Not the Basolateral Transport Pathway in Drosophila Photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Iwanami, Nozomi; Nakamura, Yuri; Satoh, Takunori; Liu, Ziguang; Satoh, Akiko K

    2016-02-01

    Polarized membrane trafficking is essential for the construction and maintenance of multiple plasma membrane domains of cells. Highly polarized Drosophila photoreceptors are an excellent model for studying polarized transport. A single cross-section of Drosophila retina contains many photoreceptors with 3 clearly differentiated plasma membrane domains: a rhabdomere, stalk, and basolateral membrane. Genome-wide high-throughput ethyl methanesulfonate screening followed by precise immunohistochemical analysis identified a mutant with a rare phenotype characterized by a loss of 2 apical transport pathways with normal basolateral transport. Rapid gene identification using whole-genome resequencing and single nucleotide polymorphism mapping identified a nonsense mutation of Rab6 responsible for the apical-specific transport deficiency. Detailed analysis of the trafficking of a major rhabdomere protein Rh1 using blue light-induced chromophore supply identified Rab6 as essential for Rh1 to exit the Golgi units. Rab6 is mostly distributed from the trans-Golgi network to a Golgi-associated Rab11-positive compartment that likely recycles endosomes or transport vesicles going to recycling endosomes. Furthermore, the Rab6 effector, Rich, is required for Rab6 recruitment in the trans-Golgi network. Moreover, a Rich null mutation phenocopies the Rab6 null mutant, indicating that Rich functions as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Rab6. The results collectively indicate that Rab6 and Rich are essential for the trans-Golgi network-recycling endosome transport of cargoes destined for 2 apical domains. However, basolateral cargos are sorted and exported from the trans-Golgi network in a Rab6-independent manner.

  12. Phosphorylation of adenosine in renal brush-border membrane vesicles by an exchange reaction catalysed by adenosine kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Sayós, J; Solsona, C; Mallol, J; Lluis, C; Franco, R

    1994-01-01

    Uptake of [3H]adenosine in brush-border membrane (BBM) vesicles from either rat or pig kidney leads to an accumulation of intravesicular [3H]AMP. The lack of significant levels of ATP and the presence of AMP in BBM indicated that a phosphotransfer between [3H]adenosine and AMP occurs. The phosphotransfer activity is inhibited by iodotubercidin, which suggests that it is performed by adenosine kinase acting in an ATP-independent manner. The existence of a similar phosphotransferase activity was demonstrated in membrane-free extracts from pig kidney. From the compounds tested it was shown that a variety of mononucleotides could act as phosphate donors. The results suggest that phosphotransfer reactions may be physiologically relevant in kidney. PMID:8110185

  13. Interaction of Bacteroides fragilis Toxin with Outer Membrane Vesicles Reveals New Mechanism of Its Secretion and Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zakharzhevskaya, Natalya B.; Tsvetkov, Vladimir B.; Vanyushkina, Anna A.; Varizhuk, Anna M.; Rakitina, Daria V.; Podgorsky, Victor V.; Vishnyakov, Innokentii E.; Kharlampieva, Daria D.; Manuvera, Valentin A.; Lisitsyn, Fedor V.; Gushina, Elena A.; Lazarev, Vassili N.; Govorun, Vadim M.

    2017-01-01

    The only recognized virulence factor of enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF) that accompanies bloodstream infections is the zinc-dependent non-lethal metalloprotease B. fragilis toxin (BFT). The isolated toxin stimulates intestinal secretion, resulting in epithelial damage and necrosis. Numerous publications have focused on the interrelation of BFT with intestinal inflammation and colorectal neoplasia, but nothing is known about the mechanism of its secretion and delivery to host cells. However, recent studies of gram-negative bacteria have shown that outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) could be an essential mechanism for the spread of a large number of virulence factors. Here, we show for the first time that BFT is not a freely secreted protease but is associated with OMVs. Our findings indicate that only outer surface-exposed BFT causes epithelial cell contact disruption. According to our in silico models confirmed by Trp quenching assay and NMR, BFT has special interactions with outer membrane components such as phospholipids and is secreted during vesicle formation. Moreover, the strong cooperation of BFT with polysaccharides is similar to the behavior of lectins. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of BFT secretion provides new perspectives for investigating intestinal inflammation pathogenesis and its prevention. PMID:28144586

  14. Cephalosporinases associated with outer membrane vesicles released by Bacteroides spp. protect gut pathogens and commensals against β-lactam antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Stentz, Régis; Horn, Nikki; Cross, Kathryn; Salt, Louise; Brearley, Charles; Livermore, David M.; Carding, Simon R.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To identify β-lactamase genes in gut commensal Bacteroides species and to assess the impact of these enzymes, when carried by outer membrane vesicles (OMVs), in protecting enteric pathogens and commensals. Methods A deletion mutant of the putative class A β-lactamase gene (locus tag BT_4507) found in the genome of the human commensal Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron was constructed and a phenotypic analysis performed. A phylogenetic tree was built from an alignment of nine Bacteroides cephalosporinase protein sequences, using the maximum likelihood method. The rate of cefotaxime degradation after incubation with OMVs produced by different Bacteroides species was quantified using a disc susceptibility test. The resistance of Salmonella Typhimurium and Bifidobacterium breve to cefotaxime in liquid culture in the presence of B. thetaiotaomicron OMVs was evaluated by measuring bacterial growth. Results The B. thetaiotaomicron BT_4507 gene encodes a β-lactamase related to the CepA cephalosporinase of Bacteroides fragilis. OMVs produced by B. thetaiotaomicron and several other Bacteroides species, except Bacteroides ovatus, carried surface-associated β-lactamases that could degrade cefotaxime. β-Lactamase-harbouring OMVs from B. thetaiotaomicron protected Salmonella Typhimurium and B. breve from an otherwise lethal dose of cefotaxime. Conclusions The production of membrane vesicles carrying surface-associated β-lactamases by Bacteroides species, which constitute a major part of the human colonic microbiota, may protect commensal bacteria and enteric pathogens, such as Salmonella Typhimurium, against β-lactam antibiotics. PMID:25433011

  15. Characterization and pathogenic role of outer membrane vesicles produced by the fish pathogen Piscirickettsia salmonis under in vitro conditions.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Cristian; Valenzuela, Karla; Hernández, Mauricio; Sandoval, Rodrigo; Haro, Ronie E; Avendaño-Herrera, Ruben; Cárcamo, Juan G; Villar, Maite T; Artigues, Antonio; Garduño, Rafael; Yáñez, Alejandro J

    2016-02-29

    Piscirickettsia salmonis is one of the major fish pathogens affecting Chilean aquaculture. This Gram-negative bacterium is highly infectious and is the etiological agent of Piscirickettsiosis. Little is currently known about how the virulence factors expressed by P. salmonis are delivered to host cells. However, it is known that several Gram-negative microorganisms constitutively release outer membrane vesicles (OMVs), which have been implicated in the delivery of virulence factors to host cells. In this study, OMVs production by P. salmonis was observed during infection in CHSE-214 cells and during normal growth in liquid media. The OMVs were spherical vesicles ranging in size between 25 and 145 nm. SDS-PAGE analysis demonstrated that the protein profile of the OMVs was similar to the outer membrane protein profile of P. salmonis. Importantly, the bacterial chaperonin Hsp60 was found in the OMVs of P. salmonis by Western-blot and LC-MS/MS analyses. Finally, in vitro infection assays showed that purified OMVs generated a cytopathic effect on CHSE-214 cells, suggesting a role in pathogenesis. Therefore, OMVs might be an important vehicle for delivering effector molecules to host cells during P. salmonis infection.

  16. H+-Pumping Driven by the Vanadate-Sensitive ATPase in Membrane Vesicles from Corn Roots 1

    PubMed Central

    De Michelis, Maria I.; Spanswick, Roger M.

    1986-01-01

    The initial rate of quenching of quinacrine fluorescence was used to monitor Mg:ATP-dependent H+-pumping in membrane vesicles from corn (Zea mays L. cv WF9 × MO17) roots and obtain a preparation in which vanadate-sensitive H+-pumping could be observed. Separation of membranes on a linear sucrose density gradient resulted in two distinct peaks of H+-pumping activity: a major one, at density 1.11 grams per cubic centimeter, was sensitive to NO3− and resistant to vanadate, while a minor one, at density 1.17 grams per cubic centimeter, was substantially resistant to NO3− and sensitive to vanadate. A membrane fraction enriched in the vanadate-sensitive H+-pump could be obtained by washing microsomes prepared in the presence of 10% glycerol with 0.25 molar KI. The kinetics of inhibition of H+-pumping by vanadate in this membrane preparation indicated that most of the H+-pumping activity in this fraction is sensitive to inhibition by vanadate, 50% inhibition being reached at about 60 micromolar vanadate. This value is fairly close to that observed for inhibition by vanadate of the ATPase activity in similar experimental conditions (40 micromolar). The inhibitor sensitivity, divalent cation dependence, pH optimum (6.5), and Km for ATP (0.7 millimolar) of the H+-pumping activity match quite closely those reported for the plasma membrane ATPase of corn roots and other plant materials. PMID:16664853

  17. Organic cation transporter 3 (OCT3) is localized to intracellular and surface membranes in select glial and neuronal cells within the basolateral amygdaloid complex of both rats and mice.

    PubMed

    Gasser, Paul J; Hurley, Matthew M; Chan, June; Pickel, Virginia M

    2016-09-22

    Organic cation transporter 3 (OCT3) is a high-capacity, low-affinity transporter that mediates corticosterone-sensitive uptake of monoamines including norepinephrine, epinephrine, dopamine, histamine and serotonin. OCT3 is expressed widely throughout the amygdaloid complex and other brain regions where monoamines are key regulators of emotional behaviors affected by stress. However, assessing the contribution of OCT3 to the regulation of monoaminergic neurotransmission and monoamine-dependent regulation of behavior requires fundamental information about the subcellular distribution of OCT3 expression. We used immunofluorescence and immuno-electron microscopy to examine the cellular and subcellular distribution of the transporter in the basolateral amygdaloid complex of the rat and mouse brain. OCT3-immunoreactivity was observed in both glial and neuronal perikarya in both rat and mouse amygdala. Electron microscopic immunolabeling revealed plasma membrane-associated OCT3 immunoreactivity on axonal, dendritic, and astrocytic processes adjacent to a variety of synapses, as well as on neuronal somata. In addition to plasma membrane sites, OCT3 immunolabeling was also observed associated with neuronal and glial endomembranes, including Golgi, mitochondrial and nuclear membranes. Particularly prominent labeling of the outer nuclear membrane was observed in neuronal, astrocytic, microglial and endothelial perikarya. The localization of OCT3 to neuronal and glial plasma membranes adjacent to synaptic sites is consistent with an important role for this transporter in regulating the amplitude, duration, and physical spread of released monoamines, while its localization to mitochondrial and outer nuclear membranes suggests previously undescribed roles for the transporter in the intracellular disposition of monoamines.

  18. Preparation of sealed tonoplast and plasma-membrane vesicles from Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don. cells by free-flow electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Canut, H; Baudracco, S; Cabané, M; Boudet, A M; Marigo, G

    1991-07-01

    Highly purified tonoplast and plasmamembrane vesicles were isolated from microsomes of Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don. by preparative free-flow electrophoresis. The relative amounts of tonoplast and plasma-membrane vesicles in the total microsomes varied with the pH of the grinding medium. The most electronegative fractions were identified as tonoplast using nitrate-inhibited, azide-resistant Mg(2+)-ATPase and pyrophosphatase activities as enzyme markers. The least electronegative fractions were identified as plasma membrane using glucan-synthase-II and UDPG:sterolglucosyl-transferase activities as enzyme markers. Other membrane markers, latent inosine-5'-diphosphatase (Golgi), NADPH-cytochrome-c reductase (ER) and cytochrome-c oxidase (mitochondria) were recovered in the fractions intermediate between tonoplast and plasma membrane and did not contaminate either the tonoplast or the plasma-membrane fractions. In the course of searching for a reliable marker for tonoplast, the pyrophosphatase activity was found to be essentially associated with the tonoplast fractions purified by free-flow electrophoresis from C. roseus and other plant materials. The degree of sealing of the tonoplast and plasmamembrane vesicles was probed by their ability to pump protons (measurements of quinacrine quenching) and to generate a membrane potential (absorption spectroscopy of Oxonol VI). A critical evaluation of vesicles sidedness is presented.

  19. K⁺-dependent ³H-D-glucose transport by hepatopancreatic brush border membrane vesicles of a marine shrimp.

    PubMed

    Obi, Ijeoma E; Sterling, Kenneth M; Ahearn, Gregory A

    2013-01-01

    The effects of sodium, potassium, sugar inhibitors, and membrane potential on ³H-D-glucose uptake by hepatopancreatic epithelial brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) of the Atlantic marine shrimp, Litopenaeus setiferus, were investigated. Brush border membrane vesicles were prepared using a MgCl₂/EGTA precipitation method and uptake experiments were conducted using a high speed filtration technique. ³H-D-Glucose uptake was stimulated by both sodium and potassium and these transport rates were almost doubled in the presence of an inside-negative-induced membrane potential. Kinetics of ³H-D-glucose influx were hyperbolic functions of both external Na⁺ or K⁺, and an induced membrane potential increased influx J(max) and lowered K(m) in both salts. ³H-D-Glucose influx versus [glucose] in both Na⁺ or K⁺ media also displayed Michaelis-Menten properties that were only slightly affected by induced membrane potential. Phloridzin was a poor inhibitor of 0.5 mM ³H-D-glucose influx, requiring at least 5 mM in NaCl and 10 mM in KCl to significantly reduce hexose transport. Several sugars (D-galactose, α-methyl-D-gluco-pyranoside, unlabeled D-glucose, D-fructose, and D-mannose) were used at 75 mM as potential inhibitors of 0.1 mM ³H-D-glucose influx. Only unlabeled D-glucose, D-fructose, and D-mannose significantly (p < 0.05) reduced labeled glucose transport. An additional experiment using increasing concentrations of D-mannose (0, 10, 25, 75, and 100 mM) showed this hexose to be an effective inhibitor of 0.1 mM ³H-D-glucose uptake at concentrations of 75 mM and higher. As a whole these results suggest that ³H-D-glucose transport by hepatopancreatic BBMV occurs by a carrier system that is able to use both Na⁺ and K⁺ as drivers, is enhanced by membrane potential, is relatively refractory to phloridzin, and is only inhibited by itself, D-fructose, and D-mannose. These properties are similar to those exhibited by the mammalian SLC5A9/SGLT4 transporter

  20. Heat shock 70 protein interaction with Turnip mosaic virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase within virus-induced membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Dufresne, Philippe J.; Thivierge, Karine; Cotton, Sophie; Beauchemin, Chantal; Ide, Christine; Ubalijoro, Eliane; Laliberte, Jean-Francois Fortin, Marc G.

    2008-04-25

    Tandem affinity purification was used in Arabidopsis thaliana to identify cellular interactors of Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp). The heat shock cognate 70-3 (Hsc70-3) and poly(A)-binding (PABP) host proteins were recovered and shown to interact with the RdRp in vitro. As previously shown for PABP, Hsc70-3 was redistributed to nuclear and membranous fractions in infected plants and both RdRp interactors were co-immunoprecipitated from a membrane-enriched extract using RdRp-specific antibodies. Fluorescently tagged RdRp and Hsc70-3 localized to the cytoplasm and the nucleus when expressed alone or in combination in Nicotiana benthamiana. However, they were redistributed to large perinuclear ER-derived vesicles when co-expressed with the membrane binding 6K-VPg-Pro protein of TuMV. The association of Hsc70-3 with the RdRp could possibly take place in membrane-derived replication complexes. Thus, Hsc70-3 and PABP2 are potentially integral components of the replicase complex and could have important roles to play in the regulation of potyviral RdRp functions.

  1. Coordinated binding of Vps4 to ESCRT-III drives membrane neck constriction during MVB vesicle formation.

    PubMed

    Adell, Manuel Alonso Y; Vogel, Georg F; Pakdel, Mehrshad; Müller, Martin; Lindner, Herbert; Hess, Michael W; Teis, David

    2014-04-14

    Five endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRTs) mediate the degradation of ubiquitinated membrane proteins via multivesicular bodies (MVBs) in lysosomes. ESCRT-0, -I, and -II interact with cargo on endosomes. ESCRT-II also initiates the assembly of a ringlike ESCRT-III filament consisting of Vps20, Snf7, Vps24, and Vps2. The AAA-adenosine triphosphatase Vps4 disassembles and recycles the ESCRT-III complex, thereby terminating the ESCRT pathway. A mechanistic role for Vps4 in intraluminal vesicle (ILV) formation has been unclear. By combining yeast genetics, biochemistry, and electron tomography, we find that ESCRT-III assembly on endosomes is required to induce or stabilize the necks of growing MVB ILVs. Yet, ESCRT-III alone is not sufficient to complete ILV biogenesis. Rather, binding of Vps4 to ESCRT-III, coordinated by interactions with Vps2 and Snf7, is coupled to membrane neck constriction during ILV formation. Thus, Vps4 not only recycles ESCRT-III subunits but also cooperates with ESCRT-III to drive distinct membrane-remodeling steps, which lead to efficient membrane scission at the end of ILV biogenesis in vivo.

  2. Distribution of adenylate cyclase and GTP-binding proteins in hepatic plasma membranes.

    PubMed

    Dixon, B S; Sutherland, E; Alexander, A; Nibel, D; Simon, F R

    1993-10-01

    Hepatic membrane subfractions prepared from control rats demonstrated forskolin (FSK)-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in the basolateral (sinusoidal) but not apical (canalicular) plasma membrane. After bile duct ligation (BDL) for 12 or 24 h, there was an increase in FSK-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in the apical membrane (54.2 +/- 3.9 pmol.mg-1 x min-1). The mechanism for this increase was explored further. ATP hydrolysis was found to be much higher in the apical than the basolateral membrane. Increasing the ATP levels in the assay enhanced apical membrane adenylate cyclase activity (10.5 +/- 0.2 pmol.mg-l.min-1); however, total adenosinetriphosphatase (ATPase) activity was not altered after BDL. Extraction of the apical membrane with bile acids or other detergents resulted in a two- to threefold increase in adenylate cyclase activity (30.6 +/- 3.6 pmol.mg-1 x min-1; detergent C12E8) This suggested that bile duct ligation was acting via the detergent-like action of bile acids to uncover latent adenylate cyclase activity on apical membranes. Further studies demonstrated that both BDL and detergent extraction also enhanced toxin-directed ADP-ribosylation of Gs alpha (cholera toxin) and Gi alpha (pertussis toxin) in the apical but not the basolateral membrane. After BDL, Gi alpha was found to be twofold greater in the apical membrane than the basolateral membrane. Immunoblotting using specific G protein antibodies further confirmed that apical membranes from control rats had a higher concentration of Gi1, 2 alpha and beta and slightly elevated levels of Gi3 alpha and Gs alpha compared with the basolateral membrane. The results demonstrate that adenylate cyclase and heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins are present on the apical membrane, but measurement of their functional activity requires detergent permeabilization of apical membrane vesicles and is limited by the presence of high ATPase activity.

  3. Lst1p and Sec24p Cooperate in Sorting of the Plasma Membrane Atpase into Copii Vesicles in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Shimoni, Yuval; Kurihara, Tatsuo; Ravazzola, Mariella; Amherdt, Mylène; Orci, Lelio; Schekman, Randy

    2000-01-01

    Formation of ER-derived protein transport vesicles requires three cytosolic components, a small GTPase, Sar1p, and two heterodimeric complexes, Sec23/24p and Sec13/31p, which comprise the COPII coat. We investigated the role of Lst1p, a Sec24p homologue, in cargo recruitment into COPII vesicles in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A tagged version of Lst1p was purified and eluted as a heterodimer complexed with Sec23p comparable to the Sec23/24p heterodimer. We found that cytosol from an lst1-null strain supported the packaging of α-factor precursor into COPII vesicles but was deficient in the packaging of Pma1p, the essential plasma membrane ATPase. Supplementation of mutant cytosol with purified Sec23/Lst1p restored Pma1p packaging into the vesicles. When purified COPII components were used in the vesicle budding reaction, Pma1p packaging was optimal with a mixture of Sec23/24p and Sec23/Lst1p; Sec23/Lst1p did not replace Sec23/24p. Furthermore, Pma1p coimmunoprecipitated with Lst1p and Sec24p from vesicles. Vesicles formed with a mixture of Sec23/Lst1p and Sec23/24p were similar morphologically and in their buoyant density, but larger than normal COPII vesicles (87-nm vs. 75-nm diameter). Immunoelectronmicroscopic and biochemical studies revealed both Sec23/Lst1p and Sec23/24p on the membranes of the same vesicles. These results suggest that Lst1p and Sec24p cooperate in the packaging of Pma1p and support the view that biosynthetic precursors of plasma membrane proteins must be sorted into ER-derived transport vesicles. Sec24p homologues may comprise a more complex coat whose combinatorial subunit composition serves to expand the range of cargo to be packaged into COPII vesicles. By changing the geometry of COPII coat polymerization, Lst1p may allow the transport of bulky cargo molecules, polymers, or particles. PMID:11086000

  4. Transmembrane electron transport in sealed and NAD(P)H-loaded right-side-out plasma membrane vesicles isolated from maize (Zea mays L.) roots.

    PubMed

    Menckhoff, Mathias; Lüthje, Sabine

    2004-06-01

    Electron transport across plasma membranes has been observed in vivo in several plant species and tissues after the application of ferricyanide (hexacyanoferrate III, HCF III). In the present work, a transmembrane electron flow was demonstrated in sealed and NAD(P)H-loaded right-side-out (apoplastic-side-out) plasma membrane vesicles isolated from maize (Zea mays L.) roots. HCF III was reduced at a rate of up to 126 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) protein by NADPH-loaded vesicles, while reduction rates with NADH-loaded vesicles were several-fold lower. Coincident with the reduction of HCF III, NAD(P)H oxidation was observed inside the vesicles. The dependence of reduction on K+ indicated an electrogenic transmembrane electron flow. Application of 100 microM calcium decreased HCF III reduction up to 66%, while pre-incubation with 200 microM warfarin or diphenylene iodonium inhibited transmembrane electron transport only weakly. Fe(3+)-EDTA was not reduced significantly by NADPH-loaded plasma membrane vesicles, whereas XTT was reduced at a rate of 765 pmol min(-1) mg(-1) protein. The results suggested a major function for NADPH in transmembrane electron flow and were discussed in conjunction with in vivo experiments.

  5. Endothelial Cell-Surface Gp60 Activates Vesicle Formation and Trafficking via Gi-Coupled Src Kinase Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Minshall, Richard D.; Tiruppathi, Chinnaswamy; Vogel, Stephen M.; Niles, Walter D.; Gilchrist, Annette; Hamm, Heidi E.; Malik, Asrar B.

    2000-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the albumin-docking protein gp60, which is localized in caveolae, couples to the heterotrimeric GTP binding protein Gi, and thereby activates plasmalemmal vesicle formation and the directed migration of vesicles in endothelial cells (ECs). We used the water-soluble styryl pyridinium dye N-(3-triethylaminopropyl)-4-(p-dibutylaminostyryl) pyridinium dibromide (FM 1-43) to quantify vesicle trafficking by confocal and digital fluorescence microscopy. FM 1-43 and fluorescently labeled anti-gp60 antibody (Ab) were colocalized in endocytic vesicles within 5 min of gp60 activation. Vesicles migrated to the basolateral surface where they released FM 1-43, the fluid phase styryl probe. FM 1-43 fluorescence disappeared from the basolateral EC surface without the loss of anti-gp60 Ab fluorescence. Activation of cell-surface gp60 by cross-linking (using anti-gp60 Ab and secondary Ab) in EC grown on microporous filters increased transendothelial 125I-albumin permeability without altering liquid permeability (hydraulic conductivity), thus, indicating the dissociation of hydraulic conductivity from the albumin permeability pathway. The findings that the sterol-binding agent, filipin, prevented gp60-activated vesicle formation and that caveolin-1 and gp60 were colocalized in vesicles suggest the caveolar origin of endocytic vesicles. Pertussis toxin pretreatment and expression of the dominant negative construct encoding an 11–amino acid Gαi carboxyl-terminal peptide inhibited endothelial 125I-albumin endocytosis and vesicle formation induced by gp60 activation. Expression of dominant negative Src (dn-Src) and overexpression of wild-type caveolin-1 also prevented gp60-activated endocytosis. Caveolin-1 overexpression resulted in the sequestration of Gαi with the caveolin-1, whereas dn-Src inhibited Gαi binding to caveolin-1. Thus, vesicle formation induced by gp60 and migration of vesicles to the basolateral membrane requires the interaction of gp60

  6. S-Layered Aneurinibacillus and Bacillus spp. Are Susceptible to the Lytic Action of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Membrane Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Kadurugamuwa, J. L.; Mayer, A.; Messner, P.; Sára, M.; Sleytr, U. B.; Beveridge, T. J.

    1998-01-01

    When S-layered strains of Bacillus stearothermophilus and Aneurinibacillus thermoaerophilus, possessing S-layers of different lattice type and lattice constant as well as S-(glyco)protein chemistry, and isogenic S-layerless variants were subjected to membrane vesicles (MVs) from P. aeruginosa during plaque assays on plates or CFU measurements on cell suspensions, all bacterial types lysed. Electron microscopy of negative stains, thin sections, and immunogold-labelled MV preparations revealed that the vesicles adhered to all bacterial surfaces, broke open, and digested the underlying peptidoglycan-containing cell wall of all cell types. Reassembled S-layer did not appear to be affected by MVs, and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis showed that the S-(glyco)proteins remained intact. meso-Diaminopimelic acid, as a peptidoglycan breakdown product, was found in all culture supernatants after MV attack. These results suggest that even though MVs are much larger than the channels which penetrate these proteinaceous arrays, S-layers on gram-positive bacteria do not form a defensive barrier against the lytic action of MVs. The primary mode of attack is by the liberation from the MVs of a peptidoglycan hydrolase, which penetrates through the S-layer to digest the underlying peptidoglycan-containing cell wall. The S-layer is not affected by MV protease. PMID:9573179

  7. A calmodulin-stimulated Ca2+ pump in plasma-membrane vesicles from Trypanosoma brucei; selective inhibition by pentamidine.

    PubMed Central

    Benaim, G; Lopez-Estraño, C; Docampo, R; Moreno, S N

    1993-01-01

    Despite previous reports [McLaughlin (1985) Mol. Biochem. Parasitol. 15, 189-201; Ghosh, Ray, Sarkar and Bhaduri (1990) J. Biol. Chem. 265, 11345-11351; Mazumder, Mukherjee, Ghosh, Ray and Bhaduri (1992) J. Biol. Chem. 267, 18440-18446] that the plasma membrane of different trypanosomatids only contains Ca(2+)-ATPase that does not show any demonstrable dependence on Mg2+, a high-affinity (Ca(2+)-Mg2+)-ATPase was demonstrated in the plasma membrane of Trypanosoma brucei. The enzyme became saturated with micromolar amounts of Ca2+, reaching a Vmax. of 3.45 +/- 0.66 nmol of ATP/min per mg of protein. The Km,app. for Ca2+ was 0.52 +/- 0.03 microM. This was decreased to 0.23 +/- 0.05 microM, and the Vmax. was increased to 6.36 +/- 0.22 nmol of ATP/min per mg of protein (about 85%), when calmodulin was present. T. brucei plasma-membrane vesicles accumulated Ca2+ on addition of ATP only when Mg2+ was present, and released it to addition of the Ca2+ ionophore A23187. In addition, this Ca2+ transport was stimulated by calmodulin. Addition of NaCl to Ca(2+)-loaded T. brucei plasma-membrane vesicles did not result in Ca2+ release, thus suggesting the absence of a Na+/Ca2+ exchanger in these parasites. Therefore the (Ca(2+)-Mg2+)-ATPase would be the only mechanism so far described that is responsible for the long-term fine tuning of the intracellular Ca2+ concentration of these parasites. The trypanocidal drug pentamidine inhibited the T. brucei plasma-membrane (Ca(2+)-Mg2+)-ATPase and Ca2+ transport at concentrations that had no effect on the Ca(2+)-ATPase activity of human or pig erythrocytes. In this latter case, pentamidine behaved as a weak calmodulin antagonist, since it inhibited the stimulation of the erythrocyte Ca(2+)-ATPase by calmodulin. PMID:8280074

  8. Elicitation of Epithelial Cell-Derived Immune Effectors by Outer Membrane Vesicles of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Sharpe, Samantha W.; Kuehn, Meta J.; Mason, Kevin M.

    2011-01-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are produced by all Gram-negative microorganisms studied to date. The contributions of OMVs to biological processes are diverse and include mediation of bacterial stress responses, selective packaging and secretion of virulence determinants, modulation of the host immune response, and contributions to biofilm formation and stability. First characterized as transformasomes in Haemophilus, these membranous blebs facilitate transfer of DNA among bacteria. Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI), an opportunistic pathogen of the upper and lower respiratory tracts, produces OMVs in vivo, but there is a paucity of information regarding both the composition and role of OMVs during NTHI colonization and pathogenesis. We demonstrated that purified NTHI vesicles are 20 to 200 nm in diameter and contain DNA, adhesin P5, IgA endopeptidase, serine protease, and heme utilization protein, suggesting a multifaceted role in virulence. NTHI OMVs can bind to human pharyngeal epithelial cells, resulting in a time- and temperature-dependent aggregation on the host cell surface, with subsequent internalization. OMVs colocalize with the endocytosis protein caveolin, indicating that internalization is mediated by caveolae, which are cholesterol-rich lipid raft domains. Upon interaction with epithelial cells, NTHI OMVs stimulate significant release of the immunomodulatory cytokine interleukin-8 (IL-8) as well as the antimicrobial peptide LL-37. Thus, we demonstrated that NTHI OMVs contain virulence-associated proteins that dynamically interact with and invade host epithelial cells. Beyond their ability to mediate DNA transfer in Haemophilus, OMV stimulation of host immunomodulatory cytokine and antimicrobial peptide release supports a dynamic role for vesiculation in NTHI pathogenesis and clinically relevant disease progression. PMID:21875967

  9. A filtration-based protocol to isolate human plasma membrane-derived vesicles and exosomes from blood plasma.

    PubMed

    Grant, Ryan; Ansa-Addo, Ephraim; Stratton, Dan; Antwi-Baffour, Samuel; Jorfi, Samireh; Kholia, Sharad; Krige, Lizelle; Lange, Sigrun; Inal, Jameel

    2011-08-31

    The methods of Plasma Membrane-derived Vesicle (PMV) isolation and quantification vary considerably in the literature and a new standard needs to be defined. This study describes a novel filtration method to isolate PMVs in plasma, which avoids high speed centrifugation, and to quantify them using a Becton Dickinson (BD) FACS Calibur™ flow cytometer, as annexin V-positive vesicles, larger than 0.2 μm in diameter. Essentially microvesicles (which comprise a mixture of PMVs and exosomes) from citrate plasma were sonicated to break up clumped exosomes, and filtered using Millipore 0.1 μm pore size Hydrophilic Durapore membranes in Swinnex 13 mm filter holders. Phosphatidylserine-positive PMVs detected with annexin V-PE were quantified using combined labelling and gating strategies in conjunction with Polysciences Polybead Microspheres (0.2 μm) and BDTrucount tubes. The PMV absolute count was calculated on the analysis template using the Trucount tube lot number information and expressed in PMV count/ml. Having estimated a normal reference range (0.51×10(5)-2.82×10(5) PMVs/ml) from a small sample of human donors, using the developed method, the effect of certain variables was investigated. Variations such as freezing of samples and gender status did not significantly alter the PMV absolute count, and with age plasma PMV levels were only marginally reduced. Smokers appeared to have reduced PMV levels. Nicotine, as for calpeptin was shown to dose-dependently (from 10 up to 50 μM) reduce levels of early apoptosis in THP-1 monocytes and to decrease the level of PMV release. Fasting individuals had 2-3 fold higher PMV absolute counts compared to non-fasting subjects.

  10. Host cell interactions of outer membrane vesicle-associated virulence factors of Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157: intracellular delivery, trafficking and mechanisms of cell injury

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are important tools in bacterial virulence but their role in the pathogenesis of infections caused by enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157, the leading cause of life-threatening hemolytic uremic syndrome, is poorly understood. Using proteomics, confocal laser...

  11. Size-selective permeation of water-soluble polymers through the bilayer membrane of cyclodextrin vesicles investigated by PFG-NMR.

    PubMed

    Himmelein, Sabine; Sporenberg, Nora; Schönhoff, Monika; Ravoo, Bart Jan

    2014-04-15

    Cyclodextrin vesicles (CDVs) consist of a bilayer of amphiphilic cyclodextrins (CDs). CDVs exhibit CD cavities at their surface that are able to recognize and bind hydrophobic guest molecules via size-selective inclusion. In this study, the permeability of α- and β-CDVs is investigated by pulsed field gradient-stimulated echo (PFG-STE) nuclear magnetic resonance. Diffusion experiments with water and two types of water-soluble polymers, polyethylene glycol (PEG) and polypropylene glycol (PPG), revealed three main factors that influence the exchange rate and permeability of CDVs. First, the length of the hydrophobic chain of the CD amphiphile plays a crucial role. Reasonably, vesicles consisting of amphiphiles with a longer aliphatic chain are less permeable since both membrane thickness and melting temperature T(m) increase. Second, the exchange rate through the bilayer membrane depends on the molecular weight of the polymer and decreases with increasing weight of the polymer. Most interestingly, a size-selective distinction of permeation due to the embedded CDs in the bilayer membrane was found. The mechanism of permeation is shown to occur through the CD cavity, such that depending on the size of the cavity, permeation of polymers with different cross-sectional diameters takes place. Whereas PPG permeates through the membrane of β-CD vesicles, it does not permeate α-CD vesicles.

  12. Basolateral to apical transcytosis in polarized cells is indirect and involves BFA and trimeric G protein sensitive passage through the apical endosome

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    We have used temperature and nocodazole blocks in an in vivo basolateral to apical transcytosis assay to dissociate the early transcytotic steps occurring during the formation of transcytotic vesicles and their microtubule-dependent translocation into the apical region, from the late steps when transcytotic cargo is delivered into the apical media. We found that polarized MDCK cells transfected with rabbit polymeric IgA receptor (pIgA-R) internalize basolaterally added pIgA-R ligand ([Fab]2 fragment of IgG against the receptor's ectodomain) at 17 degrees C but do not deliver it to the apical PM. Instead, the ligand accumulates in an apically localized transcytotic compartment, distal to the basolateral endosome and the microtubule- requiring translocation step. We have characterized this compartment and show that it is distinct from basolateral transferrin recycling endosomes, basolateral early endosomes or late endosomes or lysosomes. The apical transcytotic compartment colocalizes with the compartment containing apically recycling membrane markers (ricin and apically internalized pIgA-R ligand) but is distinct from the compartment receiving apically internalized fluid phase marker (BSA). This compartment is an intermediate station of the overall pathway since transcytotic ligand can exit the compartment and be released into the apical medium when cells preloaded at 17 degrees C are subsequently incubated at 37 degrees C. We have used this system to examine the effect of Brefeldin A (BFA) and the involvement of trimeric GTPases in the late (post apical transcytotic compartment) steps of the transcytotic pathway. We found that addition of BFA or cholera toxin, a known activator of Gs alpha, to cells preloaded with transcytotic ligand at 17 degrees C significantly inhibits the exit of ligand from the apical transcytotic compartment. General structure and function of the apical endosome are not affected since neither BFA nor cholera toxin inhibit the recycling of

  13. Membrane interactions of fusogenic coiled-coil peptides: implications for lipopeptide mediated vesicle fusion.

    PubMed

    Rabe, Martin; Schwieger, Christian; Zope, Harshal R; Versluis, Frank; Kros, Alexander

    2014-07-08

    Fusion of lipid membranes is an important natural process for the intra- and intercellular exchange of molecules. However, little is known about the actual fusion mechanism at the molecular level. In this study we examine a system that models the key features of this process. For the molecular recognition between opposing membranes two membrane anchored heterodimer coiled-coil forming peptides called 'E' (EIAALEK)3 and 'K' (KIAALKE)3 were used. Lipid monolayers and IR reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) revealed the interactions of the peptides 'E', 'K', and their parallel coiled-coil complex 'E/K' with the phospholipid membranes and thereby mimicked the pre- and postfusion states, respectively. The peptides adopted α-helical structures and were incorporated into the monolayers with parallel orientation. The strength of binding to the monolayer differed for the peptides and tethering them to the membrane increased the interactions even further. Remarkably, these interactions played a role even in the postfusion state. These findings shed light on important mechanistic details of the membrane fusion process in this model system. Furthermore, their implications will help to improve the rational design of new artificial membrane fusion systems, which have a wide range of potential applications in supramolecular chemistry and biomedicine.

  14. Interaction of n-octyl β,D-glucopyranoside with giant magnetic-fluid-loaded phosphatidylcholine vesicles: direct visualization of membrane curvature fluctuations as a function of surfactant partitioning between water and lipid bilayer.

    PubMed

    Ménager, Christine; Guemghar, Dihya; Cabuil, Valérie; Lesieur, Sylviane

    2010-10-05

    The present study deals with the morphological modifications of giant dioleoyl phosphatidylcholine vesicles (DOPC GUVs) induced by the nonionic surfactant n-octyl β,D-glucopyranoside at sublytic levels, i.e., in the first steps of the vesicle-to-micelle transition process, when surfactant inserts into the vesicle bilayer without disruption. Experimental conditions were perfected to exactly control the surfactant bilayer composition of the vesicles, in line with former work focused on the mechanical properties of the membrane of magnetic-fluid-loaded DOPC GUVs submitted to a magnetic field. The purpose here was to systematically examine, in the absence of any external mechanical constraint, the dynamics of giant vesicle shape and membrane deformations as a function of surfactant partitioning between the aqueous phase and the lipid membrane, beforehand established by turbidity measurements from small unilamellar vesicles.

  15. Comparison between calcium transport and adenosine triphosphatase activity in membrane vesicles derived from rabbit kidney proximal tubules.

    PubMed

    Vieyra, A; Nachbin, L; de Dios-Abad, E; Goldfeld, M; Meyer-Fernandes, J R; de Moraes, L

    1986-03-25

    Characteristics of Ca2+ uptake were studied in a vesicular preparation of proximal tubule plasma membranes from rabbit kidney and compared with the properties of both membrane-bound and solubilized Ca2+-ATPase activities. Calcium uptake required both ATP and MgCl2 and revealed two kinetic components with respect to Ca2+ concentration requirements, one with a high affinity for Ca2+ (1.8 microM), operative in the range of cytosolic Ca2+ activity, and one with a low affinity for Ca2+ (250 microM) which may become active only at abnormally high cytosolic Ca2+ concentrations. The high- and low-affinity components were stimulated to similar extents by phosphate, and required similar concentrations of ATP (0.6 mM) for half-maximal activity. The amount of membrane-bound phosphoenzyme formed from ATP in the presence of Ca2+ was the same regardless of whether only one or both sites were saturated, suggesting that occupancy of the second Ca2+ binding site accelerates the enzyme turnover. Inhibition of Ca2+ transport by Na+ was reversed by the addition of ouabain or an ATP-regenerating system, indicating that this inhibitory effect of Na+ on Ca2+ uptake may be due to the accumulation of ADP in the medium as a result of Na+ pump activity. Low concentrations of carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone and valinomycin (2.5 and 1 microM, respectively) were without effect on Ca2+ uptake in the presence of phosphate, whereas higher concentrations of the ionophores (200 and 100 microM, respectively) reduced uptake by 60% or more. The calmodulin antagonist 48/80 also reduced Ca2+ uptake with half-maximal effectiveness at 100 micrograms/ml. None of these drugs affected either ATPase activity or the EGTA-induced Ca2+ efflux from preloaded vesicles. The Ca2+ dependence of ATP hydrolysis by the membrane-bound enzyme preparation was similar to that observed for Ca2+ uptake by the vesicles. However, with solubilized enzyme, concentrations of Ca2+ similar to that found in the

  16. Linking microfilaments to intracellular membranes: the actin-binding and vesicle-associated protein comitin exhibits a mannose-specific lectin activity.

    PubMed Central

    Jung, E; Fucini, P; Stewart, M; Noegel, A A; Schleicher, M

    1996-01-01

    Comitin is a 24 kDa actin-binding protein from Dictyostelium discoideum that is located primarily on Golgi and vesicle membranes. We have probed the molecular basis of comitin's interaction with both actin and membranes using a series of truncation mutants obtained by expressing the appropriate cDNA in Escherichia coli. Comitin dimerizes in solution; its principle actin-binding activity is located between residues 90 and 135. The N-terminal 135 'core' residues of comitin contain a 3-fold sequence repeat that is homologous to several monocotyledon lectins and which retains key residues that determine these lectins' three-dimensional structure and mannose binding. These repeats of comitin appear to mediate its interaction with mannose residues in glycoproteins or glycolipids on the cytoplasmic surface of membrane vesicles from D.discoideum, and comitin can be released from membranes with mannose. Our data indicate that comitin binds to vesicle membranes via mannose residues and, by way of its interaction with actin, links these membranes to the cytoskeleton. Images PMID:8635456

  17. Hydration and molecular motions in synthetic phytanyl-chained glycolipid vesicle membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Baba, T; Minamikawa, H; Hato, M; Handa, T

    2001-01-01

    Proton permeation rates across membranes of a synthetic branch-chained glycolipid, 1,3-di-O-phytanyl-2-O-(beta-D-maltotriosyl)glycerol (Mal3(Phyt)2) as well as a branch-chained phospholipid, diphytanoylphosphatidylcholine (DPhPC) were lower than those of straight-chained lipids such as egg yolk phosphatidylcholine (EPC) by a factor of approximately 4 at pH 7.0 and 25 degrees C. To examine whether degrees of water penetration and molecular motions in Mal3(Phyt)2 membranes can account for the lower permeability, nanosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy was applied to various membranes of branch-chained lipids (Mal3(Phyt)2, DPhPC, and a tetraether lipid from an extremely thermoacidophilic archaeon Thermoplasma acidophilum), as well as straight-chained lipids (EPC, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC), and digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG)) using several fluorescent lipids. Degrees of hydration of glycolipids, Mal3(Phyt)2, and DGDG were lower than those of phospholipids, EPC, POPC, and DPhPC at the membrane-water interfaces. DPhPC showed the highest hydration among the lipids examined. Meanwhile, rotational and lateral diffusive motions of the fluorescent phospholipid in branch-chained lipid membranes were more restricted than those in straight-chained ones. The results suggest that the restricted motion of chain segments rather than the lower hydration accounts for the lower proton permeability of branch-chained lipid membranes. PMID:11721000

  18. Modulation of membrane mechanical properties by Sar1, a vesicle trafficking protein.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2009-03-01

    The trafficking of cargo in cells involves dramatic changes in membrane shape and topology. Though trafficking is widely studied and the identities and interactions of the responsible proteins are well mapped, remarkably little is known about the mechanics involved. We focus on Sar1, the key regulator of the coat protein complex II (COPII) family that ferries newly synthesized proteins from the ER to the Golgi. Sar1 is the only member of the COPII coat that interacts directly with the ER lipid bilayer membrane. It has an amphipathic N-terminal helix; when Sar1 is GTP-bound, the helix is exposed and the hydrophobic hemi-cylinder can insert into the bilayer. To investigate whether Sar1 has a role beyond merely localizing the other COPII proteins, we directly measure the force involved in membrane deformation as a function of its presence or absence, using optically trapped microspheres to pull tethers from lipid membranes whose composition and large surface area mimic the composition and geometry of the ER. Tether measurements allow extraction of the membrane bending modulus, the parameter that governs the energetics of deformation. We find that the bending modulus measured in the presence of Sar1 with a non-hydrolyzable GTP analogue is half that measured without Sar1 or with Sar1-GDP. These results reveal a paradigm-altering insight into COPII trafficking: Sar1 actively alters the material properties of the membranes it binds to, lowering the energetic cost of curvature generation.

  19. SHIP2 Regulates Lumen Generation, Cell Division, and Ciliogenesis through the Control of Basolateral to Apical Lumen Localization of Aurora A and HEF 1.

    PubMed

    Hamze-Komaiha, Ola; Sarr, Sokavuth; Arlot-Bonnemains, Yannick; Samuel, Didier; Gassama-Diagne, Ama

    2016-12-06

    Lumen formation during epithelial morphogenesis requires the creation of a luminal space at cell interfaces named apical membrane-initiation sites (AMISs). This is dependent upon integrated signaling from mechanical and biochemical cues, vesicle trafficking, cell division, and processes tightly coupled to ciliogenesis. Deciphering relationships between polarity determinants and lumen or cilia generation remains a fundamental issue. Here, we report that Src homology 2 domain-containing inositol 5-phosphatase 2 (SHIP2), a basolateral determinant of polarity, regulates RhoA-dependent actin contractility and cell division to form AMISs. SHIP2 regulates mitotic spindle alignment. SHIP2 is expressed in G1 phase, whereas Aurora A kinase is enriched in mitosis. SHIP2 binds Aurora A kinase and the scaffolding protein HEF1 and promotes their basolateral localization at the expense of their luminal expression connected with cilia resorption. Furthermore, SHIP2 expression increases cilia length. Thus, our findings offer new insight into the relationships among basolateral proteins, lumen generation, and ciliogenesis.

  20. Membrane-active metabolites produced by soil actinomycetes using chromatic phospholipid/polydiacetylene vesicles.

    PubMed

    Mehravar, Maryam; Sardari, Soroush; Owlia, Parviz

    2011-12-01

    Increased resistance of pathogens toward existing antibiotics has compelled the research efforts to introduce new antimicrobial substances. Drugs with new and less resistant-prone targets to antimicrobial activity have a high priority for drug development activities. Cell membrane seems to be a potential target for new antibiotic agent development to overcome resistance. In this study, A total number of 67 actinomycetes were isolated from the soil samples collected from desert, farming and mineral parts of Iran. We used a chromatic sensor as a membrane model that was set up for the target of antimicrobial metabolites of actinomycetes isolated from the soil. The sensors particles were composed of phospholipid and polymerized polydiacetylene (PDA) lipids. These polymers exhibited color change following interaction with membrane-active metabolites. The color change was due to structural disorder in the lipids following their interaction with membrane-active metabolites. The resultant color change was recorded by fluorescent microscope and easily recognizable by naked eye as well. Sixteen strains were isolated which produced antimicrobial metabolites and were effective against test microorganisms (Escherichia coli, Candida albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae ). A total number of 3 out of 16 strains produced membrane-active metabolites. These 3 strains were identified using 16s rRNA as Streptomyces sp and submitted to GenBank (accession no. JN180853; JN180854; JN180855).

  1. Lack of Outer Membrane Protein A Enhances the Release of Outer Membrane Vesicles and Survival of Vibrio cholerae and Suppresses Viability of Acanthamoeba castellanii

    PubMed Central

    Valeru, Soni Priya; Shanan, Salah; Alossimi, Haifa; Sandström, Gunnar

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of the diarrhoeal disease cholera, survives in aquatic environments. The bacterium has developed a survival strategy to grow and survive inside Acanthamoeba castellanii. It has been shown that V. cholerae expresses outer membrane proteins as virulence factors playing a role in the adherence to interacted host cells. This study examined the role of outer membrane protein A (OmpA) and outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) in survival of V. cholerae alone and during its interaction with A. castellanii. The results showed that an OmpA mutant of V. cholerae survived longer than wild-type V. cholerae when cultivated alone. Cocultivation with A. castellanii enhanced the survival of both bacterial strains and OmpA protein exhibited no effect on attachment, engulfment, and survival inside the amoebae. However, cocultivation of the OmpA mutant of V. cholerae decreased the viability of A. castellanii and this bacterial strain released more OMVs than wild-type V. cholerae. Surprisingly, treatment of amoeba cells with OMVs isolated from the OmpA mutant significantly decreased viable counts of the amoeba cells. In conclusion, the results might highlight a regulating rule for OmpA in survival of V. cholerae and OMVs as a potent virulence factor for this bacterium towards eukaryotes in the environment. PMID:24799908

  2. Employing Escherichia coli-derived outer membrane vesicles as an antigen delivery platform elicits protective immunity against Acinetobacter baumannii infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Weiwei; Wang, Shijie; Yao, Yufeng; Xia, Ye; Yang, Xu; Li, Kui; Sun, Pengyan; Liu, Cunbao; Sun, Wenjia; Bai, Hongmei; Chu, Xiaojie; Li, Yang; Ma, Yanbing

    2016-11-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) have proven to be highly immunogenic and induced an immune response against bacterial infection in human clinics and animal models. We sought to investigate whether engineered OMVs can be a feasible antigen-delivery platform for efficiently inducing specific antibody responses. In this study, Omp22 (an outer membrane protein of A. baumannii) was displayed on E. coli DH5α-derived OMVs (Omp22-OMVs) using recombinant gene technology. The morphological features of Omp22-OMVs were similar to those of wild-type OMVs (wtOMVs). Immunization with Omp22-OMVs induced high titers of Omp22-specific antibodies. In a murine sepsis model, Omp22-OMV immunization significantly protected mice from lethal challenge with a clinically isolated A. baumannii strain, which was evidenced by the increased survival rate of the mice, the reduced bacterial burdens in the lung, spleen, liver, kidney, and blood, and the suppressed serum levels of inflammatory cytokines. In vitro opsonophagocytosis assays showed that antiserum collected from Omp22-OMV-immunized mice had bactericidal activity against clinical isolates, which was partly specific antibody-dependent. These results strongly indicated that engineered OMVs could display a whole heterologous protein (~22 kDa) on the surface and effectively induce specific antibody responses, and thus OMVs have the potential to be a feasible vaccine platform.

  3. A Two-Component Regulatory System Impacts Extracellular Membrane-Derived Vesicle Production in Group A Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Resch, Ulrike; Tsatsaronis, James Anthony; Le Rhun, Anaïs; Stübiger, Gerald; Rohde, Manfred; Kasvandik, Sergo; Holzmeister, Susanne; Tinnefeld, Philip; Wai, Sun Nyunt

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Export of macromolecules via extracellular membrane-derived vesicles (MVs) plays an important role in the biology of Gram-negative bacteria. Gram-positive bacteria have also recently been reported to produce MVs; however, the composition and mechanisms governing vesiculogenesis in Gram-positive bacteria remain undefined. Here, we describe MV production in the Gram-positive human pathogen group A streptococcus (GAS), the etiological agent of necrotizing fasciitis and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. M1 serotype GAS isolates in culture exhibit MV structures both on the cell wall surface and in the near vicinity of bacterial cells. A comprehensive analysis of MV proteins identified both virulence-associated protein substrates of the general secretory pathway in addition to “anchorless surface proteins.” Characteristic differences in the contents, distributions, and fatty acid compositions of specific lipids between MVs and GAS cell membrane were also observed. Furthermore, deep RNA sequencing of vesicular RNAs revealed that GAS MVs contained differentially abundant RNA species relative to bacterial cellular RNA. MV production by GAS strains varied in a manner dependent on an intact two-component system, CovRS, with MV production negatively regulated by the system. Modulation of MV production through CovRS was found to be independent of both GAS cysteine protease SpeB and capsule biosynthesis. Our data provide an explanation for GAS secretion of macromolecules, including RNAs, lipids, and proteins, and illustrate a regulatory mechanism coordinating this secretory response. PMID:27803183

  4. Employing Escherichia coli-derived outer membrane vesicles as an antigen delivery platform elicits protective immunity against Acinetobacter baumannii infection

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Weiwei; Wang, Shijie; Yao, Yufeng; Xia, Ye; Yang, Xu; Li, Kui; Sun, Pengyan; Liu, Cunbao; Sun, Wenjia; Bai, Hongmei; Chu, Xiaojie; Li, Yang; Ma, Yanbing

    2016-01-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) have proven to be highly immunogenic and induced an immune response against bacterial infection in human clinics and animal models. We sought to investigate whether engineered OMVs can be a feasible antigen-delivery platform for efficiently inducing specific antibody responses. In this study, Omp22 (an outer membrane protein of A. baumannii) was displayed on E. coli DH5α-derived OMVs (Omp22-OMVs) using recombinant gene technology. The morphological features of Omp22-OMVs were similar to those of wild-type OMVs (wtOMVs). Immunization with Omp22-OMVs induced high titers of Omp22-specific antibodies. In a murine sepsis model, Omp22-OMV immunization significantly protected mice from lethal challenge with a clinically isolated A. baumannii strain, which was evidenced by the increased survival rate of the mice, the reduced bacterial burdens in the lung, spleen, liver, kidney, and blood, and the suppressed serum levels of inflammatory cytokines. In vitro opsonophagocytosis assays showed that antiserum collected from Omp22-OMV-immunized mice had bactericidal activity against clinical isolates, which was partly specific antibody-dependent. These results strongly indicated that engineered OMVs could display a whole heterologous protein (~22 kDa) on the surface and effectively induce specific antibody responses, and thus OMVs have the potential to be a feasible vaccine platform. PMID:27849050

  5. Mycobacterial Membrane Vesicles Administered Systemically in Mice Induce a Protective Immune Response to Surface Compartments of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Carreño, Leandro J.; Batista-Gonzalez, Ana; Baena, Andres; Venkataswamy, Manjunatha M.; Xu, Jiayong; Yu, Xiaobo; Wallstrom, Garrick; Magee, D. Mitchell; LaBaer, Joshua; Achkar, Jacqueline M.; Jacobs, William R.; Chan, John; Porcelli, Steven A.; Casadevall, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pathogenic and nonpathogenic species of bacteria and fungi release membrane vesicles (MV), containing proteins, polysaccharides, and lipids, into the extracellular milieu. Previously, we demonstrated that several mycobacterial species, including bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, release MV containing lipids and proteins that subvert host immune response in a Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2)-dependent manner (R. Prados-Rosales et al., J. Clin. Invest. 121:1471–1483, 2011, doi:10.1172/JCI44261). In this work, we analyzed the vaccine potential of MV in a mouse model and compared the effects of immunization with MV to those of standard BCG vaccination. Immunization with MV from BCG or M. tuberculosis elicited a mixed humoral and cellular response directed to both membrane and cell wall components, such as lipoproteins. However, only vaccination with M. tuberculosis MV was able to protect as well as live BCG immunization. M. tuberculosis MV boosted BCG vaccine efficacy. In summary, MV are highly immunogenic without adjuvants and elicit immune responses comparable to those achieved with BCG in protection against M. tuberculosis. PMID:25271291

  6. Ca sup 2+ transport in membrane vesicles from pinto bean leaves and its alteration after ozone exposure. [Phaseolus vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Castillo, F.J.; Heath, R.L. )

    1990-10-01

    The influence of ozone on Ca{sup 2+} transport in plant membranes from pinto bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. var Pinto) leaves was investigated in vitro by means of a filtration method using purified vesicles. Two transport mechanisms located at the plasma membrane are involved in a response to ozone: (a) passive Ca{sup 2+} influx into the cell and (b) active Ca{sup 2+} efflux driven by an ATP-dependent system, which has two components: a primary Ca{sup 2+} transport directly linked to ATP which is partially activated by calmodulin and a H{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+} antiport coupled to activity of a H{sup +}-ATPase. The passive Ca{sup 2+} permeability is increased by ozone. A triangular pulse of ozone stimulates a higher influx of Ca{sup 2+} than does a square wave, even though the total dose with the same (0.6 microliter per liter {times} hour). Leaves exposed to a square wave did not exhibit visible injury and were still able to recover from oxidant stress by activation of calmodulin-dependent Ca{sup 2+} extrusion mechanisms. On the other hand, leaves exposed to a triangular wave of ozone, exhibit visible injury and lost the ability of extruding Ca{sup 2+} out of the cell.

  7. A heteronuclear and homonuclear filtering strategy for studying the structure of membrane peptides in non-deuterated phospholipid vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doan, B. T.; Nezry, C.; Rene, L.; Badet, B.; Beloeil, J. C.

    1998-02-01

    NMR study of membrane biomolecules comes up against a poor solubility in classical solvents. A strategy was elaborated to obtain structural information of peptides in non deuterated phospholipids vesicles. It is based on isotopic (HSQC-NOESY) and homonuclear selective filters, both using a fine water suppression. The method is illustrated with the substance P, a 11-residue membrane neuropeptide. L'étude par RMN des biomolécules membranaires est délicate en raison de leur faible solubilité. Une stratégie d'étude a été élaborée pour obtenir des informations structurales de peptides dans un environnement de vésicules de phospholipides non deutérés. Elle repose sur des filtres isotopiques de type HSQC-NOESY et des filtres homonucléaires avec impulsion sélective, avec une suppression fine de l'eau. Un exemple est donné sur un neuropeptide membranaire de 11 résidus : la substance P.

  8. Tannerella forsythia Outer Membrane Vesicles Are Enriched with Substrates of the Type IX Secretion System and TonB-Dependent Receptors.

    PubMed

    Veith, Paul D; Chen, Yu-Yen; Chen, Dina; O'Brien-Simpson, Neil M; Cecil, Jessica D; Holden, James A; Lenzo, Jason C; Reynolds, Eric C

    2015-12-04

    Tannerella forsythia, a Gram-negative oral bacterium closely associated with chronic periodontitis, naturally produces outer membrane vesicles (OMVs). In this study, OMVs were purified by gradient centrifugation, and the proteome was investigated together with cellular fractions using LC-MS/MS analyses of SDS-PAGE fractions, resulting in the identification of 872 proteins including 297 OMV proteins. Comparison of the OMV proteome with the subcellular proteomes led to the localization of 173 proteins to the vesicle membrane and 61 proteins to the vesicle lumen, while 27 substrates of the type IX secretion system were assigned to the vesicle surface. These substrates were generally enriched in OMVs; however, the stoichiometry of the S-layer proteins, TfsA and TfsB, was significantly altered, potentially to accommodate the higher curvature required of the S-layer around OMVs. A vast number of TonB-dependent receptors related to SusC, together with their associated SusD-like lipoproteins, were identified, and these were also relatively enriched in OMVs. In contrast, other lipoproteins were significantly depleted from the OMVs. This study identified the highest number of membrane-associated OMV proteins to date in any bacterium and conclusively demonstrates cargo sorting of particular classes of proteins, which may have significant impact on the virulence of OMVs.

  9. Binding of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1 Toxins to the Midgut Brush Border Membrane Vesicles of Chilo suppressalis (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae): Evidence of Shared Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Fiuza, L.; Nielsen-Leroux, C.; Goze, E.; Frutos, R.; Charles, J.

    1996-01-01

    Binding and competition among Cry1Aa, Cry1Ac, and Cry1Ba toxins were analyzed quantitatively in vitro by using (sup125)I-labeled activated toxins and brush border membrane vesicles isolated from Chilo suppressalis larval midguts. The three toxins bound specifically to the midgut brush border membrane vesicles. Direct binding experiments showed that Cry1Aa and Cry1Ba recognized a single class of binding sites with different affinities, whereas Cry1Aa recognized two classes of binding sites, one with a high affinity and a low concentration and the other with a lower affinity but higher concentration. Competition experiments showed that toxins Cry1Ac and Cry1Ba shared a binding site in the C. suppressalis midgut membranes and that this site was also the low-affinity binding site for Cry1Aa. PMID:16535306

  10. Na(+)-I- symport activity is present in membrane vesicles from thyrotropin-deprived non-I(-)-transporting cultured thyroid cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kaminsky, S M; Levy, O; Salvador, C; Dai, G; Carrasco, N

    1994-01-01

    The active accumulation of I- in the thyroid gland is mediated by the Na(+)-I- symporter and driven by the Na+ gradient generated by the Na+/K(+)-ATPase. Thyrotropin (TSH) stimulates thyroidal I- accumulation. Rat thyroid-derived FRTL-5 cells require TSH to accumulate I-. TSH withdrawal for over 7 days results in complete loss of Na(+)-I-symport activity in these cells [Weiss, S. J., Philp, N. J. and Grollman, E. F. (1984) Endocrinology 114, 1090-1098]. Surprisingly, membrane vesicles prepared from FRTL-5 cells maintained in TSH-free medium [TSH(-)cells]accumulate I-, suggesting that the absence of Na(+)-I- symport activity in TSH(-) cells cannot be due solely to a decrease in the biosynthesis of either the symporter or a putative activating factor. This finding indicates that the Na(+)-I- symporter is present, probably in an inactive state, in TSH(-) cells despite their lack of Na(+)-I- symport activity. Na(+)-I- symport activity in thyroid membrane vesicles is enhanced when conditions for vesicle preparation favor proteolysis. Subcellular fractionation studies in both TSH(+) and TSH(-) cells show that Na(+)-I- symport activity is mostly associated with fractions enriched in plasma membrane rather than in intracellular membranes, suggesting that the Na(+)-I- symporter may constitutively reside in the plasma membrane and may be activated by TSH. Images PMID:8170988

  11. Targeting of Salmonella typhimurium to vesicles containing lysosomal membrane glycoproteins bypasses compartments with mannose 6-phosphate receptors

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Salmonella typhimurium is an intracellular bacterial pathogen that remains enclosed in vacuoles (SCV) upon entry into the host cell. In this study we have examined the intracellular trafficking route of S. typhimurium within epithelial cells. Indirect immunofluorescence analysis showed that bacteria initiated fusion with lysosomal membrane glycoprotein (lgp)-containing compartments approximately 15 min after bacterial internalization. This process was completed approximately 75 min later and did not require microtubules. Cation-independent (CI)- or cation-dependent (CD)-mannose 6-phosphate receptors (M6PRs) were not observed at detectable levels in SCV. Lysosomal enzymes showed a different distribution in SCV: lysosomal-acid phosphatase (LAP) was incorporated into these vacuoles with the same kinetics as lgps, while cathepsin D was present in a low proportion (approximately 30%) of SCV. Uptake experiments with fluid endocytic tracers such as fluorescein- dextran sulphate (F-DX) or horseradish-peroxidase (HRP) showed that after 2 h of uptake, F-DX was present in approximately 75% of lgp- containing vesicles in uninfected cells, while only approximately 15% of SCV contained small amounts of the tracer during the same uptake period. SCV also showed only partial fusion with HRP-preloaded secondary lysosomes, with approximately 30% of SCV having detectable amounts of HRP at 6 h after infection. These results indicate that SCV show limited accessibility to fluid endocytic tracers and mature lysosomes, and are therefore functionally separated from the endocytic route. Moreover, the unusual intracellular trafficking route of S. typhimurium inside epithelial cells has allowed us to establish the existence of two different lgp-containing vesicles in Salmonella- infected cells: one population is separated from the endocytic route, fusogenic with incoming SCV and may arise from a secretory pathway, while the second involves the classical secondary or mature lysosomes. PMID

  12. Poly-l-lysines and poly-l-arginines induce leakage of negatively charged phospholipid vesicles and translocate through the lipid bilayer upon electrostatic binding to the membrane.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Marcel; Schwieger, Christian; Meister, Annette; Karlsson, Göran; Blume, Alfred

    2009-09-01

    Poly-l-lysines (PLL) and poly-l-arginines (PLA) of different polymer chain lengths interact strongly with negatively charged phospholipid vesicles mainly due to their different electrical charges. 1-Palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (POPG), 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (DPPG) and their mixtures (1/1 mol/mol) with the respective phosphatidylcholines of equivalent chain length were chosen as model membrane systems that form at room temperature either the fluid L(alpha) or the gel phase L(beta) lipid bilayer membranes, respectively. Leakage experiments revealed that the fluid POPG membranes are more perturbed compared to the gel phase DPPG membranes upon peptide binding. Furthermore, it was found that pure PG membranes are more prone to release the vesicle contents as a result of pore formation than the lipid mixtures POPG/POPC and DPPG/DPPC. For the longer polymers (>or=44 amino acids) maximal dye-release was observed when the molar ratio of the concentrations of amino acid residues to charged lipid molecules reached a value of R(P)=0.5, i.e. when the outer membrane layer was theoretically entirely covered by the polymer. At ratios lower or higher than 0.5 leakage dropped significantly. Furthermore, PLL and PLA insertions and/or translocations through lipid membranes were analyzed by using FITC-labeled polymers by monitoring their fluorescence intensity upon membrane binding. Short PLL molecules and PLA molecules of all lengths seemed to translocate through both fluid and gel phase lipid bilayers. Comparison of the PLL and PLA fluorescence assay results showed that PLA interacts stronger with phospholipid membranes compared to PLL. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) measurements were performed to give further insight into these mechanisms and to support the findings obtained by fluorescence assays. Cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) was used to visualize changes in the vesicles' morphology after addition of the

  13. Identification and cloning of the gene encoding BmpC: an outer-membrane lipoprotein associated with Brachyspira pilosicoli membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Trott, Darren J; Alt, David P; Zuerner, Richard L; Bulach, Dieter M; Wannemuehler, Michael J; Stasko, Judi; Townsend, Kirsty M; Stanton, Thaddeus B

    2004-04-01

    The intestinal spirochaete Brachyspira pilosicoli causes colitis in a wide variety of host species. Little is known about the structure or protein constituents of the B. pilosicoli outer membrane (OM). To identify surface-exposed proteins in this species, membrane vesicles were isolated from B. pilosicoli strain 95-1000 cells by osmotic lysis in dH(2)O followed by isopycnic centrifugation in sucrose density gradients. The membrane vesicles were separated into a high-density fraction (HDMV; rho=1.18 g cm(-3)) and a low-density fraction (LDMV; rho=1.12 g cm(-3)). Both fractions were free of flagella and soluble protein contamination. LDMV contained predominantly OM markers (lipo-oligosaccharide and a 29 kDa B. pilosicoli OM protein) and was used as a source of antigens to produce mAbs. Five B. pilosicoli-specific mAbs reacting with proteins with molecular masses of 23, 24, 35, 61 and 79 kDa were characterized. The 23 kDa protein was only partially soluble in Triton X-114, whereas the 24 and 35 kDa proteins were enriched in the detergent phase, implying that they were integral membrane proteins or lipoproteins. All three proteins were localized to the B. pilosicoli OM by immunogold labelling using specific mAbs. The gene encoding the abundant, surface-exposed 23 kDa protein was identified by screening a B. pilosicoli 95-1000 genome library with the mAb and was expressed in Escherichia coli. Sequence analysis showed that it encoded a unique lipoprotein, designated BmpC. Recombinant BmpC partitioned predominantly in the OM fraction of E. coli strain SOLR. The mAb to BmpC was used to screen a collection of 13 genetically heterogeneous strains of B. pilosicoli isolated from five different host species. Interestingly, only strain 95-1000 was reactive with the mAb, indicating that either the surface-exposed epitope on BmpC is variable between strains or that the protein is restricted in its distribution within B. pilosicoli.

  14. Characterization and Vaccine Potential of Membrane Vesicles Produced by Francisella noatunensis sup. orientalis in an Adult Zebrafish Model.

    PubMed

    Lagos, Leidy; Tandberg, Julia I; Repnik, Urska; Boysen, Preben; Ropstad, Erik; Varkey, Deepa; Paulsen, Ian T; Winther-Larsen, Hanne C

    2017-03-22

    Vaccine development against extracellular bacteria has been important for the sustainability of the aquaculture industry. In contrast, infections with intracellular pathogens remain largely an unresolved problem. Francisella noatunensis subspecies orientalis (Fno) are Gram-negative, facultative intracellular bacteria that cause the disease francisellosis in fish. Francisellosis is commonly characterized as a chronic granulomatous disease with high morbidity and can result in high mortality depending on the host. In this study, we explored the potential of bacterial membrane vesicles (MVs) as a vaccine agent against Fno Bacterial MVs are spherical structures naturally released from the membrane of bacteria and are often enriched with selected bacterial components such as toxins and signaling molecules. In the present work, MVs were isolated from broth-cultured Fno and proteomic analysis by mass spectrometry revealed that MVs contained a variety of immunogenic factors, including the intracellular growth proteins IglC and IglB, known to be part of a Francisella Pathogenicity Island (FPI), as well as outer membrane protein OmpA, chaperonin GroEL and chaperone ClpB. By using flow cytometry and electron microscopy, we observed that Fno mainly infect myelomonocytic cells, both in vivo and in vitro. Immunization with MVs isolated from Fno protect zebrafish from subsequent challenge with a lethal dose of Fno To determine if MVs induce a typical acute inflammatory response, mRNA expression level were assessed by quantitative real-time PCR. The expression of tnfa, il1b, ifng, as well as mhcii, mpeg1.1 and ighm was upregulated, thus confirming the immunogenic properties of Fno derived MVs.

  15. Syntaxin 4, VAMP2, and/or VAMP3/cellubrevin are functional target membrane and vesicle SNAP receptors for insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation in adipocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Olson, A L; Knight, J B; Pessin, J E

    1997-01-01

    Introduction of the cytoplasmic domain of syntaxin 4, using either recombinant vaccinia virus or single-cell microinjection, resulted in an inhibition of insulin-stimulated GLUT4 but not GLUT1 translocation to the plasma membrane. This was specific for syntaxin 4, since neither the expression of syntaxin 3 nor the expression of a syntaxin 4 mutant in which the vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP) binding site was deleted had any significant effect. Consistent with the requirement for a functional VAMP binding site, expression of the cytoplasmic domains of VAMP2 or VAMP3/cellubrevin also resulted in an inhibition of insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation. In addition, immunoprecipitation of the expressed syntaxin 4 cytoplasmic domain resulted in an insulin-stimulated increase in the coimmunoprecipitation of GLUT4-containing vesicles. Together, these data demonstrate that syntaxin 4, VAMP2, and/or VAMP3/cellubrevin can function as target membrane and vesicle SNAP receptors, respectively, for insulin-responsive GLUT4 translocation to the plasma membrane. PMID:9111311

  16. Munc13-4 Is a Rab11-binding Protein That Regulates Rab11-positive Vesicle Trafficking and Docking at the Plasma Membrane*

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jennifer L.; He, Jing; Ramadass, Mahalakshmi; Pestonjamasp, Kersi; Kiosses, William B.; Zhang, Jinzhong; Catz, Sergio D.

    2016-01-01

    The small GTPase Rab11 and its effectors control trafficking of recycling endosomes, receptor replenishment and the up-regulation of adhesion and adaptor molecules at the plasma membrane. Despite recent advances in the understanding of Rab11-regulated mechanisms, the final steps mediating docking and fusion of Rab11-positive vesicles at the plasma membrane are not fully understood. Munc13-4 is a docking factor proposed to regulate fusion through interactions with SNAREs. In hematopoietic cells, including neutrophils, Munc13-4 regulates exocytosis in a Rab27a-dependent manner, but its possible regulation of other GTPases has not been explored in detail. Here, we show that Munc13-4 binds to Rab11 and regulates the trafficking of Rab11-containing vesicles. Using a novel Time-resolved Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (TR-FRET) assay, we demonstrate that Munc13-4 binds to Rab11a but not to dominant negative Rab11a. Immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed the specificity of the interaction between Munc13-4 and Rab11, and super-resolution microscopy studies support the interaction of endogenous Munc13-4 with Rab11 at the single molecule level in neutrophils. Vesicular dynamic analysis shows the common spatio-temporal distribution of Munc13-4 and Rab11, while expression of a calcium binding-deficient mutant of Munc13-4 significantly affected Rab11 trafficking. Munc13-4-deficient neutrophils showed normal endocytosis, but the trafficking, up-regulation, and retention of Rab11-positive vesicles at the plasma membrane was significantly impaired. This correlated with deficient NADPH oxidase activation at the plasma membrane in response to Rab11 interference. Our data demonstrate that Munc13-4 is a Rab11-binding partner that regulates the final steps of Rab11-positive vesicle docking at the plasma membrane. PMID:26637356

  17. Munc13-4 Is a Rab11-binding Protein That Regulates Rab11-positive Vesicle Trafficking and Docking at the Plasma Membrane.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jennifer L; He, Jing; Ramadass, Mahalakshmi; Pestonjamasp, Kersi; Kiosses, William B; Zhang, Jinzhong; Catz, Sergio D

    2016-02-12

    The small GTPase Rab11 and its effectors control trafficking of recycling endosomes, receptor replenishment and the up-regulation of adhesion and adaptor molecules at the plasma membrane. Despite recent advances in the understanding of Rab11-regulated mechanisms, the final steps mediating docking and fusion of Rab11-positive vesicles at the plasma membrane are not fully understood. Munc13-4 is a docking factor proposed to regulate fusion through interactions with SNAREs. In hematopoietic cells, including neutrophils, Munc13-4 regulates exocytosis in a Rab27a-dependent manner, but its possible regulation of other GTPases has not been explored in detail. Here, we show that Munc13-4 binds to Rab11 and regulates the trafficking of Rab11-containing vesicles. Using a novel Time-resolved Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (TR-FRET) assay, we demonstrate that Munc13-4 binds to Rab11a but not to dominant negative Rab11a. Immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed the specificity of the interaction between Munc13-4 and Rab11, and super-resolution microscopy studies support the interaction of endogenous Munc13-4 with Rab11 at the single molecule level in neutrophils. Vesicular dynamic analysis shows the common spatio-temporal distribution of Munc13-4 and Rab11, while expression of a calcium binding-deficient mutant of Munc13-4 significantly affected Rab11 trafficking. Munc13-4-deficient neutrophils showed normal endocytosis, but the trafficking, up-regulation, and retention of Rab11-positive vesicles at the plasma membrane was significantly impaired. This correlated with deficient NADPH oxidase activation at the plasma membrane in response to Rab11 interference. Our data demonstrate that Munc13-4 is a Rab11-binding partner that regulates the final steps of Rab11-positive vesicle docking at the plasma membrane.

  18. Involvement of cytoskeletal proteins in the barrier function of the human erythrocyte membrane. III. Permeability of spectrin-depleted inside-out membrane vesicles to hydrophilic nonelectrolytes. Formation of leaks by chemical or enzymatic modification of membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Klonk, S; Deuticke, B

    1992-04-29

    Spectrin-depleted inside-out vesicles (IOV's) prepared from human erythrocyte membranes were characterized in terms of size, ground permeability to hydrophilic nonelectrolytes and their sensitivity to modification by SH reagents, DIDS and trypsin. IOV's proved to have the same permeability of their lipid domain to erythritol as native erythrocytes, in contrast to resealed ghosts (Klonk, S. and Deuticke, B. (1992) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1106, 126-136 (Part I in this series)), which have a residual leak. On the other hand, IOV's have a slightly elevated permeability for mannitol and sucrose, nonelectrolytes which are almost (mannitol) or fully (sucrose) impermeant in the native membrane. These increased fluxes, which have a high activation energy and can be stimulated by phloretin, are, however, also much smaller than the corresponding leak fluxes observed in resealed ghosts. In view of these differences, formation of IOV's can be concluded to go along with partial annealing of barrier defects persisting in the erythrocyte membrane after preparation of resealed ghosts. Oxidation of SH groups of the IOV membrane by diamide produces an enhancement of permeability for hydrophilic nonelectrolytes which is much less pronounced than that induced by a similar treatment of erythrocytes or ghosts (Klonk, S. and Deuticke, B. (1992) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1106, 126-136 (Part I in this series)). Moreover, proteolytic treatment of the vesicle membrane, although leading to a marked digestion of integral membrane proteins, only induces a minor, saturating increase of permeability, much lower than that in trypsinized resealed ghosts (Klonk, S. and Deuticke, B. (1992) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1106, 137-142 (Part II of this series)). Since absence of the cytoskeletal proteins, spectrin and actin, is the major difference between IOV's and resealed ghosts, these results may be taken as further evidence for a dependence of the barrier properties of the erythrocyte membrane bilayer domain

  19. Outer membrane vesicles are vehicles for the delivery of Vibrio tasmaniensis virulence factors to oyster immune cells.

    PubMed

    Vanhove, Audrey Sophie; Duperthuy, Marylise; Charrière, Guillaume M; Le Roux, Frédérique; Goudenège, David; Gourbal, Benjamin; Kieffer-Jaquinod, Sylvie; Couté, Yohann; Wai, Sun Nyunt; Destoumieux-Garzón, Delphine

    2015-04-01

    Vibrio tasmaniensis LGP32, a facultative intracellular pathogen of oyster haemocytes, was shown here to release outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) both in the extracellular milieu and inside haemocytes. Intracellular release of OMVs occurred inside phagosomes of intact haemocytes having phagocytosed few vibrios as well as in damaged haemocytes containing large vacuoles heavily loaded with LGP32. The OMV proteome of LGP32 was shown to be rich in hydrolases (25%) including potential virulence factors such as proteases, lipases, phospholipases, haemolysins and nucleases. One major caseinase/gelatinase named Vsp for vesicular serine protease was found to be specifically secreted through OMVs in which it is enclosed. Vsp was shown to participate in the virulence phenotype of LGP32 in oyster experimental infections. Finally, OMVs were highly protective against antimicrobial peptides, increasing the minimal inhibitory concentration of polymyxin B by 16-fold. Protection was conferred by OMV titration of polymyxin B but did not depend on the activity of Vsp or another OMV-associated protease. Altogether, our results show that OMVs contribute to the pathogenesis of LGP32, being able to deliver virulence factors to host immune cells and conferring protection against antimicrobial peptides.

  20. Exploring the midgut transcriptome and brush border membrane vesicle proteome of the rice stem borer, Chilo suppressalis (Walker).

    PubMed

    Ma, Weihua; Zhang, Zan; Peng, Chuanhua; Wang, Xiaoping; Li, Fei; Lin, Yongjun

    2012-01-01

    The rice stem borer, Chilo suppressalis (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), is one of the most detrimental pests affecting rice crops. The use of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins has been explored as a means to control this pest, but the potential for C. suppressalis to develop resistance to Bt toxins makes this approach problematic. Few C. suppressalis gene sequences are known, which makes in-depth study of gene function difficult. Herein, we sequenced the midgut transcriptome of the rice stem borer. In total, 37,040 contigs were obtained, with a mean size of 497 bp. As expected, the transcripts of C. suppressalis shared high similarity with arthropod genes. Gene ontology and KEGG analysis were used to classify the gene functions in C. suppressalis. Using the midgut transcriptome data, we conducted a proteome analysis to identify proteins expressed abundantly in the brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV). Of the 100 top abundant proteins that were excised and subjected to mass spectrometry analysis, 74 share high similarity with known proteins. Among these proteins, Western blot analysis showed that Aminopeptidase N and EH domain-containing protein have the binding activities with Bt-toxin Cry1Ac. These data provide invaluable information about the gene sequences of C. suppressalis and the proteins that bind with Cry1Ac.

  1. Immunity Provided by an Outer Membrane Vesicle Cholera Vaccine Is Due to O-Antigen-Specific Antibodies Inhibiting Bacterial Motility.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhu; Lazinski, David W; Camilli, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    An outer membrane vesicle (OMV)-based cholera vaccine is highly efficacious in preventing intestinal colonization in the suckling mouse model. Immunity from OMVs comes from immunoglobulin (Ig), particularly IgG, in the milk of mucosally immunized dams. Anti-OMV IgG renders Vibrio cholerae organisms immotile, thus they pass through the small intestine without colonizing. However, the importance of motility inhibition for protection and the mechanism by which motility is inhibited remain unclear. By using both in vitro and in vivo experiments, we found that IgG inhibits motility by specifically binding to the O-antigen of V. cholerae We demonstrate that the bivalent structure of IgG, although not required for binding to the O-antigen, is required for motility inhibition. Finally, we show using competition assays in suckling mice that inhibition of motility appears to be responsible for most, if not all, of the protection engendered by OMV vaccination, thus providing insight into the mechanism of immune protection.

  2. HlyF Produced by Extraintestinal Pathogenic Escherichia coli Is a Virulence Factor That Regulates Outer Membrane Vesicle Biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Murase, Kazunori; Martin, Patricia; Porcheron, Gaëlle; Houle, Sébastien; Helloin, Emmanuelle; Pénary, Marie; Nougayrède, Jean-Philippe; Dozois, Charles M; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Oswald, Eric

    2016-03-01

    Escherichia coli can cause extraintestinal infections in humans and animals. The hlyF gene is epidemiologically associated with virulent strains of avian pathogenic E. coli and human neonatal meningitis-associated E. coli. We demonstrated that culture supernatants of E. coli expressing HlyF induced autophagy in eukaryotic cells. This phenotype coincided with an enhanced production of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) by bacteria expressing HlyF. The HlyF protein displays a predicted catalytic domain of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily. This conserved domain was involved the ability of HlyF to promote the production of OMVs. The increased production of OMVs was associated with the release of toxins. hlyF was shown to be expressed during extraintestinal infection and to play a role in the virulence of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli in a chicken model of colibacillosis. This is the first evidence that pathogenic bacteria produce a virulence factor directly involved in the production of OMVs.

  3. Phase I safety and immunogenicity study of a candidate meningococcal disease vaccine based on Neisseria lactamica outer membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Gorringe, Andrew R; Taylor, Stephen; Brookes, Charlotte; Matheson, Mary; Finney, Michelle; Kerr, Moyra; Hudson, Michael; Findlow, Jamie; Borrow, Ray; Andrews, Nick; Kafatos, George; Evans, Cariad M; Read, Robert C

    2009-08-01

    Natural immunity to meningococcal disease in young children is associated epidemiologically with carriage of commensal Neisseria species, including Neisseria lactamica. We have previously demonstrated that outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) from N. lactamica provide protection against lethal challenge in a mouse model of meningococcal septicemia. We evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of an N. lactamica OMV vaccine in a phase I placebo-controlled, double-blinded clinical trial. Ninety-seven healthy young adult male volunteers were randomized to receive three doses of either an OMV vaccine or an Alhydrogel control. Subsequently, some subjects who had received the OMV vaccine also received a fourth dose of OMV vaccine, 6 months after the third dose. Injection site reactions were more frequent in the OMV-receiving group, but all reactions were mild or moderate in intensity. The OMV vaccine was immunogenic, eliciting rises in titers of immunoglobulin G (IgG) against the vaccine OMVs, together with a significant booster response, as determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Additionally, the vaccine induced modest cross-reactive immunity to six diverse strains of serogroup B Neisseria meningitidis, including IgG against meningococcal OMVs, serum bactericidal antibodies, and opsonophagocytic activity. The percentages of subjects showing > or =4-fold rises in bactericidal antibody titer obtained were similar to those previously reported for the Norwegian meningococcal OMV vaccine against the same heterologous meningococcal strain panel. In conclusion, this N. lactamica OMV vaccine is safe and induces a weak but broad humoral immune response to N. meningitidis.

  4. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa extracellular secondary metabolite, Paerucumarin, chelates iron and is not localized to extracellular membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Qaisar, Uzma; Kruczek, Cassandra J; Azeem, Muhammed; Javaid, Nasir; Colmer-Hamood, Jane A; Hamood, Abdul N

    2016-08-01

    Proteins encoded by the Pseudomonas aeruginosa pvcA-D operon synthesize a novel isonitrile functionalized cumarin termed paerucumarin. The pvcA-D operon enhances the expression of the P. aeruginosa fimbrial chaperone/usher pathway (cup) genes and this effect is mediated through paerucumarin. Whether pvcA-D and/or paerucumarin affect the expression of other P. aeruginosa genes is not known. In this study, we examined the effect of a mutation in pvcA-D operon the global transcriptome of the P. aeruginosa strain PAO1-UW. The mutation reduced the expression of several ironcontrolled genes including pvdS, which is essential for the expression of the pyoverdine genes. Additional transcriptional studies showed that the pvcA-D operon is not regulated by iron. Exogenously added paerucumarin enhanced pyoverdine production and pvdS expression in PAO1-UW. Iron-chelation experiments revealed that purified paerucumarin chelates iron. However, exogenously added paerucumarin significantly reduced the growth of a P. aeruginosa mutant defective in pyoverdine and pyochelin production. In contrast to other secondary metabolite, Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS), paerucumarin is not localized to the P. aeruginosa membrane vesicles. These results suggest that paerucumarin enhances the expression of iron-controlled genes by chelating iron within the P. aeruginosa extracellular environment. Although paerucumarin chelates iron, it does not function as a siderophore. Unlike PQS, paerucumarin is not associated with the P. aeruginosa cell envelope.

  5. Specific binding of activated Vip3Aa10 to Helicoverpa armigera brush border membrane vesicles results in pore formation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing-Guo; Yang, Ai-Zhen; Shen, Xiao-Hong; Hua, Bao-Guang; Shi, Guang-Lu

    2011-10-01

    Helicoverpa armigera is one of the most harmful pests in China. Although it had been successfully controlled by Cry1A toxins, some H. armigera populations are building up resistance to Cry1A toxins in the laboratory. Vip3A, secreted by Bacillus thuringiensis, is another potential toxin against H. armigera. Previous reports showed that activated Vip3A performs its function by inserting into the midgut brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) of susceptible insects. To further investigate the binding of Vip3A to BBMV of H. armigera, the full-length Vip3Aa10 toxin expressed in Escherichia coli was digested by trypsin or midgut juice extract, respectively. Among the fragments of digested Vip3Aa10, only a 62kDa fragment (Vip3Aa10-T) exhibited binding to BBMV of H. armigera and has insecticidal activity. Moreover, this interaction was specific and was not affected by the presence of Cry1Ab toxin. Binding of Vip3Aa10-T to BBMV resulted in the formation of an ion channel. Unlike Cry1A toxins, Vip3Aa10-T was just slightly associated with lipid rafts of BBMV. These data suggest that although activated Vip3Aa10 specifically interacts with BBMV of H. armigera and forms an ion channel, the mode of action of it may be different from that of Cry1A toxins.

  6. Exploring the Midgut Transcriptome and Brush Border Membrane Vesicle Proteome of the Rice Stem Borer, Chilo suppressalis (Walker)

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Chuanhua; Wang, Xiaoping; Li, Fei; Lin, Yongjun

    2012-01-01

    The rice stem borer, Chilo suppressalis (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), is one of the most detrimental pests affecting rice crops. The use of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins has been explored as a means to control this pest, but the potential for C. suppressalis to develop resistance to Bt toxins makes this approach problematic. Few C. suppressalis gene sequences are known, which makes in-depth study of gene function difficult. Herein, we sequenced the midgut transcriptome of the rice stem borer. In total, 37,040 contigs were obtained, with a mean size of 497 bp. As expected, the transcripts of C. suppressalis shared high similarity with arthropod genes. Gene ontology and KEGG analysis were used to classify the gene functions in C. suppressalis. Using the midgut transcriptome data, we conducted a proteome analysis to identify proteins expressed abundantly in the brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV). Of the 100 top abundant proteins that were excised and subjected to mass spectrometry analysis, 74 share high similarity with known proteins. Among these proteins, Western blot analysis showed that Aminopeptidase N and EH domain-containing protein have the binding activities with Bt-toxin Cry1Ac. These data provide invaluable information about the gene sequences of C. suppressalis and the proteins that bind with Cry1Ac. PMID:22666467

  7. Influence of O polysaccharides on biofilm development and outer membrane vesicle biogenesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Kathleen; Park, Amber J; Hao, Youai; Brewer, Dyanne; Lam, Joseph S; Khursigara, Cezar M

    2014-04-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common opportunistic human pathogen known for its ability to adapt to changes in its environment during the course of infection. These adaptations include changes in the expression of cell surface lipopolysaccharide (LPS), biofilm development, and the production of a protective extracellular exopolysaccharide matrix. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) have been identified as an important component of the extracellular matrix of P. aeruginosa biofilms and are thought to contribute to the development and fitness of these bacterial communities. The goal of this study was to examine the relationships between changes in the cell surface expression of LPS O polysaccharides, biofilm development, and OMV biogenesis in P. aeruginosa. We compared wild-type P. aeruginosa PAO1 with three chromosomal knockouts. These knockouts have deletions in the rmd, wbpM, and wbpL genes that produce changes in the expression of common polysaccharide antigen (CPA), O-specific antigen (OSA), or both. Our results demonstrate that changes in O polysaccharide expression do not significantly influence OMV production but do affect the size and protein content of OMVs derived from both CPA(-) and OSA(-) cells; these mutant cells also exhibited different physical properties from wild-type cells. We further examined biofilm growth of the mutants and determined that CPA(-) cells could not develop into robust biofilms and exhibit changes in cell morphology and biofilm matrix production. Together these results demonstrate the importance of O polysaccharide expression on P. aeruginosa OMV composition and highlight the significance of CPA expression in biofilm development.

  8. Pluronic P85 enhances the efficacy of outer membrane vesicles as a subunit vaccine against Brucella melitensis challenge in mice.

    PubMed

    Jain-Gupta, Neeta; Contreras-Rodriguez, Araceli; Vemulapalli, Ramesh; Witonsky, Sharon G; Boyle, Stephen M; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar

    2012-12-01

    Brucellosis is the most common zoonotic disease worldwide, and there is no vaccine for human use. Brucella melitensis Rev1, a live attenuated strain, is the commercial vaccine for small ruminants to prevent B. melitensis infections but has been associated with abortions in animals. Moreover, strain Rev1 is known to cause disease in humans and cannot be used for human vaccination. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) obtained from B. melitensis have been shown to provide protection similar to strain Rev1 in mice against B. melitensis challenge. In the present work, we tested the efficacy of Pluronic P85 as an adjuvant to enhance the efficacy of Brucella OMVs as a vaccine. P85 enhanced the in vitro secretion of TNF-α by macrophages induced with OMVs and P85. Further, P85 enhanced the protection provided by OMVs against B. melitensis challenge. This enhanced protection was associated with higher total IgG antibody production but not increased IFN-γ or IL-4 cytokine levels. Moreover, P85 alone provided significantly better clearance of B. melitensis compared to saline-vaccinated mice. Further studies are warranted to find the mechanism of action of P85 that provides nonspecific protection and enhances the efficacy of OMVs as a vaccine against B. melitensis.

  9. A Novel Mechanism of Host-Pathogen Interaction through sRNA in Bacterial Outer Membrane Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Koeppen, Katja; Hampton, Thomas H.; Jarek, Michael; Scharfe, Maren; Gerber, Scott A.; Mielcarz, Daniel W.; Demers, Elora G.; Dolben, Emily L.; Hammond, John H.; Hogan, Deborah A.; Stanton, Bruce A.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial outer membrane vesicle (OMV)-mediated delivery of proteins to host cells is an important mechanism of host-pathogen communication. Emerging evidence suggests that OMVs contain differentially packaged short RNAs (sRNAs) with the potential to target host mRNA function and/or stability. In this study, we used RNA-Seq to characterize differentially packaged sRNAs in Pseudomonas aeruginosa OMVs, and to show transfer of OMV sRNAs to human airway cells. We selected one sRNA for further study based on its stable secondary structure and predicted mRNA targets. Our candidate sRNA (sRNA52320), a fragment of a P. aeruginosa methionine tRNA, was abundant in OMVs and reduced LPS-induced as well as OMV-induced IL-8 secretion by cultured primary human airway epithelial cells. We also showed that sRNA52320 attenuated OMV-induced KC cytokine secretion and neutrophil infiltration in mouse lung. Collectively, these findings are consistent with the hypothesis that sRNA52320 in OMVs is a novel mechanism of host-pathogen interaction whereby P. aeruginosa reduces the host immune response. PMID:27295279

  10. Recombinant outer membrane vesicles carrying Chlamydia muridarum HtrA induce antibodies that neutralize chlamydial infection in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Bartolini, Erika; Ianni, Elvira; Frigimelica, Elisabetta; Petracca, Roberto; Galli, Giuliano; Berlanda Scorza, Francesco; Norais, Nathalie; Laera, Donatello; Giusti, Fabiola; Pierleoni, Andrea; Donati, Manuela; Cevenini, Roberto; Finco, Oretta; Grandi, Guido; Grifantini, Renata

    2013-01-01

    Background Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are spheroid particles released by all Gram-negative bacteria as a result of the budding out of the outer membrane. Since they carry many of the bacterial surface-associated proteins and feature a potent built-in adjuvanticity, OMVs are being utilized as vaccines, some of which commercially available. Recently, methods for manipulating the protein content of OMVs have been proposed, thus making OMVs a promising platform for recombinant, multivalent vaccines development. Methods Chlamydia muridarum DO serine protease HtrA, an antigen which stimulates strong humoral and cellular responses in mice and humans, was expressed in Escherichia coli fused to the OmpA leader sequence to deliver it to the OMV compartment. Purified OMVs carrying HtrA (CM rHtrA-OMV) were analyzed for their capacity to induce antibodies capable of neutralizing Chlamydia infection of LLC-MK2 cells in vitro. Results CM rHtrA-OMV immunization in mice induced antibodies that neutralize Chlamydial invasion as judged by an in vitro infectivity assay. This was remarkably different from what observed with an enzymatically functional recombinant HtrA expressed in, and purified from the E. coli cytoplasm (CM rHtrA). The difference in functionality between anti-CM rHtrA and anti-CM rHtrA-OMV antibodies was associated to a different pattern of protein epitopes recognition. The epitope recognition profile of anti-CM HtrA-OMV antibodies was similar to that induced in mice during Chlamydial infection. Conclusions When expressed in OMVs HtrA appears to assume a conformation similar to the native one and this results in the elicitation of functional immune responses. These data further support the potentiality of OMVs as vaccine platform. PMID:24009891

  11. Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli Hemolysin Employs Outer Membrane Vesicles to Target Mitochondria and Cause Endothelial and Epithelial Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Kunsmann, Lisa; Greune, Lilo; Bauwens, Andreas; Zhang, Wenlan; Kuczius, Thorsten; Kim, Kwang Sik; Mellmann, Alexander; Schmidt, M. Alexander; Karch, Helge

    2013-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) strains cause diarrhea and hemolytic uremic syndrome resulting from toxin-mediated microvascular endothelial injury. EHEC hemolysin (EHEC-Hly), a member of the RTX (repeats-in-toxin) family, is an EHEC virulence factor of increasingly recognized importance. The toxin exists as free EHEC-Hly and as EHEC-Hly associated with outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) released by EHEC during growth. Whereas the free toxin is lytic towards human endothelium, the biological effects of the OMV-associated EHEC-Hly on microvascular endothelial and intestinal epithelial cells, which are the major targets during EHEC infection, are unknown. Using microscopic, biochemical, flow cytometry and functional analyses of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) and Caco-2 cells we demonstrate that OMV-associated EHEC-Hly does not lyse the target cells but triggers their apoptosis. The OMV-associated toxin is internalized by HBMEC and Caco-2 cells via dynamin-dependent endocytosis of OMVs and trafficked with OMVs into endo-lysosomal compartments. Upon endosome acidification and subsequent pH drop, EHEC-Hly is separated from OMVs, escapes from the lysosomes, most probably via its pore-forming activity, and targets mitochondria. This results in decrease of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential and translocation of cytochrome c to the cytosol, indicating EHEC-Hly-mediated permeabilization of the mitochondrial membranes. Subsequent activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3 leads to apoptotic cell death as evidenced by DNA fragmentation and chromatin condensation in the intoxicated cells. The ability of OMV-associated EHEC-Hly to trigger the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in human microvascular endothelial and intestinal epithelial cells indicates a novel mechanism of EHEC-Hly involvement in the pathogenesis of EHEC diseases. The OMV-mediated intracellular delivery represents a newly recognized mechanism for a bacterial toxin to enter host cells in

  12. RAB-5- and RAB-11-dependent vesicle-trafficking pathways are required for plasma membrane repair after attack by bacterial pore-forming toxin.

    PubMed

    Los, Ferdinand C O; Kao, Cheng-Yuan; Smitham, Jane; McDonald, Kent L; Ha, Christine; Peixoto, Christina A; Aroian, Raffi V

    2011-02-17

    Pore-forming toxins (PFTs) secreted by pathogenic bacteria are the most common bacterial protein toxins and are important virulence factors for infection. PFTs punch holes in host cell plasma membranes, and although cells can counteract the resulting membrane damage, the underlying mechanisms at play remain unclear. Using Caenorhabditis elegans as a model, we demonstrate in vivo and in an intact epithelium that intestinal cells respond to PFTs by increasing levels of endocytosis, dependent upon RAB-5 and RAB-11, which are master regulators of endocytic and exocytic events. Furthermore, we find that RAB-5 and RAB-11 are required for protection against PFT and to restore integrity to the plasma membrane. One physical mechanism involved is the RAB-11-dependent expulsion of microvilli from the apical side of the intestinal epithelial cells. Specific vesicle-trafficking pathways thus protect cells against an attack by PFTs on plasma membrane integrity, via altered plasma membrane dynamics.

  13. Membrane burdens of chlorinated benzenes lower the main phase transition temperature in dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine vesicles: Implications for toxicity by narcotic chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Wezel, A.P. van; Cornelissen, G.; Miltenburg, J.K. van; Opperhuizen, A.

    1996-02-01

    In the membrane of an organism that dies due to exposure to narcotic chemicals, the main phase transition temperature (T{sub tr}) of the phospholipids is decreased and the fluidity is increased. The decrease in T{sub tr} depends on the molar concentration of narcotics in the membrane (membrane burden) and is irrespective of the physicochemical properties of the chemicals. If membrane-water partition coefficients, exposure concentrations, and the amount of lipid in the system are known, membrane burdens of narcotic chemicals can be calculated and compared to membrane burdens that yield toxicity. The partition coefficients of a series of chlorobenzenes between phospholipid vesicles and water (K{sub mw}) were measured at different temperatures in a new experimental set-up. K{sub mw}`s were higher in the liquid-crystalline phase than in the gel phase. Partitioning into the el phase was entropy driven, partitioning into the liquid-crystalline phase was driven by entropy and enthalpy. The fluidity change in phospholipid vesicles, after accumulation of chlorobenzenes, was measured from the change in T{sub tr}. The membrane burdens of various chlorobenzenes needed for a lowering of T{sub tr} were comparable (e.g., 20--60 mmol/kg for a decrease of 1.0 C). The membrane burden needed in vivo for lethality by narcotic chemicals such as chlorobenzenes was calculated to be 40--160 mmol/kg membrane. By combining the in vivo and in vitro data, it can be concluded that in organisms that die due to exposure to narcotic chemicals, the fluidity of the membrane is increased.

  14. Inhibition by mercuric chloride of Na-K-2Cl cotransport activity in rectal gland plasma membrane vesicles isolated from Squalus acanthias.

    PubMed

    Kinne-Saffran, E; Kinne, R K

    2001-02-09

    The rectal gland of the dogfish shark is a model system for active transepithelial transport of chloride. It has been shown previously that mercuric chloride, one of the toxic environmental pollutants, inhibits chloride secretion in this organ. In order to investigate the mechanism of action of HgCl(2) at a membrane-molecular level, plasma membrane vesicles were isolated from the rectal gland and the effect of mercury on the activity of the Na-K-2Cl cotransporter was investigated in isotope flux studies. During a 30 s exposure HgCl(2) inhibited cotransport activity in a dose-dependent manner with an apparent K(i) of approx. 50 microM. The inhibition was complete after 15 s, partly reversible by dilution of the incubation medium and completely attenuated upon addition of reduced glutathione. The extent of inhibition by mercury depended on the ionic composition of the medium. The sensitivity of the cotransporter was highest when only the high affinity binding sites for sodium and chloride were saturated. Organic mercurials such as p-chloromercuribenzoic acid and p-chloromercuriphenylsulfonic acid at 100 microM did not inhibit the cotransporter, similarly exposure of the vesicles to 10 mM H(2)O(2) or 1 mM dithiothreitol for 30 min at 15 degrees C did not change cotransport activity. Transport activity was, however, reduced by 45.9+/-2.5% after an incubation with 3 mM N-ethylmaleimide for 20 min. Blocking free amino groups by N-hydroxysuccinimide or biotinamidocapronate-N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide had no effect. Investigations on the sidedness of the plasma membrane vesicles, employing the asymmetry of the (Na+K)-ATPase, demonstrated a right-side-out orientation in which the former extracellular face of the membrane is exposed to the incubation medium. In addition, extracellular mercury (5x10(-5) M) inhibited bumetanide-sensitive rubidium uptake into T84 cells by 48.5+/-7.1% after a 2 min incubation period. This inhibition was reversible in a manner similar to that

  15. Rab10 delivers GLUT4 storage vesicles to the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    2013-05-01

    The glucose transporter, GLUT4, redistributes to the plasma membrane (PM) upon insulin stimulation, but also recycles through endosomal compartments. Different Rab proteins control these transport itineraries of GLUT4. However, the specific roles played by different Rab proteins in GLUT4 trafficking has been difficult to assess, primarily due to the complexity of endomembrane organization and trafficking. To address this problem, we recently performed advanced live cell imaging using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy, which images objects ~150 nm from the PM, directly visualizing GLUT4 trafficking in response to insulin stimulation. Using IRAP-pHluorin to selectively label GSVs undergoing PM fusion in response to insulin, we identified Rab10 as the only Rab protein that binds this compartment. Rab14 was found to label transferrin-positive, endosomal compartments containing GLUT4. These also could fuse with the PM in response to insulin, albeit more slowly. Several other Rab proteins, including Rab4A, 4B and 8A, were found to mediate GLUT4 intra-endosomal recycling, serving to internalize surface-bound GLUT4 into endosomal compartments for ultimate delivery to GSVs. Thus, multiple Rab proteins regulate the circulation of GLUT4 molecules within the endomembrane system, maintaining optimal insulin responsiveness within cells.

  16. A Novel Approach for Purification and Selective Capture of Membrane Vesicles of the Periodontopathic Bacterium, Porphyromonas gingivalis: Membrane Vesicles Bind to Magnetic Beads Coated with Epoxy Groups in a Noncovalent, Species-Specific Manner

    PubMed Central

    Nakao, Ryoma; Kikushima, Kenji; Higuchi, Hideo; Obana, Nozomu; Nomura, Nobuhiko; Bai, Dongying; Ohnishi, Makoto; Senpuku, Hidenobu

    2014-01-01

    Membrane vesicles (MVs) of Porphyromonas gingivalis are regarded as an offensive weapon of the bacterium, leading to tissue deterioration in periodontal disease. Therefore, isolation of highly purified MVs is indispensable to better understand the pathophysiological role of MVs in the progression of periodontitis. MVs are generally isolated by a conventional method based on ultracentrifugation of the bacterial culture supernatant. However, the resulting MVs are often contaminated with co-precipitating bacterial appendages sheared from the live bacteria. Here, we report an intriguing property of P. gingivalis MVs–their ability to bind superparamagnetic beads coated with epoxy groups (SB-Epoxy). Analysis of fractions collected during the purification revealed that all MVs of five tested P. gingivalis stains bound to SB-Epoxy. In contrast, free fimbriae in the crude MV preparation did not bind to the SB-Epoxy. The SB-Epoxy-bound MVs were easily dissociated from the SB-Epoxy using a mild denaturation buffer. These results suggest that the surface chemistry conferred by epoxy on the beads is responsible for the binding, which is mediated by noncovalent bonds. Both the structural integrity and purity of the isolated MVs were confirmed by electron microscopy. The isolated MVs also caused cell detachment from culture dishes at a physiologically relevant concentration. Assays of competitive binding between the SB-Epoxy and mixtures of MVs from five bacterial species demonstrated that only P. gingivalis MVs could be selectively eliminated from the mixtures. We suggest that this novel approach enables efficient purification and selective elimination of P. gingivalis MVs. PMID:24830438

  17. 2D-ELDOR study of heterogeneity and domain structure changes in plasma membrane vesicles upon cross-linking of receptors.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Yun-Wei; Costa-Filho, Antonio J; Baird, Barbara; Freed, Jack H

    2011-09-08

    2D electron-electron double resonance (2D-ELDOR) with the "full Sc-" method of analysis is applied to the study of plasma membrane vesicles. Membrane structural changes upon antigen cross-linking of IgE receptors (IgE-FcεRI) in plasma membrane vesicles (PMVs) isolated from RBL-2H3 mast cells are investigated, for the first time, by means of these 2D-ELDOR techniques. Spectra of 1-palmitoyl-2-(16-doxyl stearoyl) phosphatidylcholine (16-PC) from PMVs before and after this stimulation at several temperatures are reported. The results demonstrate a coexistence of liquid-ordered (L(o)) and liquid-disordered (L(d)) components. We find that upon cross-linking, the membrane environment is remodeled to become more disordered, as shown by a moderate increase in the population of the L(d) component. This change in the relative amount of the L(o) versus L(d) components upon cross-linking is consistent with a model wherein the IgE receptors, which when clustered by antigen to cause cell stimulation, lead to more disordered lipids, and their dynamic and structural properties are slightly altered. This study demonstrates that 2D-ELDOR, analyzed by the full Sc- method, is a powerful approach for capturing the molecular dynamics in biological membranes. This is a particular case showing how 2D-ELDOR can be applied to study physical processes in complex systems that yield subtle changes.

  18. Limited intermixing of synaptic vesicle components upon vesicle recycling.

    PubMed

    Opazo, Felipe; Punge, Annedore; Bückers, Johanna; Hoopmann, Peer; Kastrup, Lars; Hell, Stefan W; Rizzoli, Silvio O

    2010-06-01

    Synaptic vesicles recycle repeatedly in order to maintain synaptic transmission. We have previously proposed that upon exocytosis the vesicle components persist as clusters, which would be endocytosed as whole units. It has also been proposed that the vesicle components diffuse into the plasma membrane and are then randomly gathered into new vesicles. We found here that while strong stimulation (releasing the entire recycling pool) causes the diffusion of the vesicle marker synaptotagmin out of synaptic boutons, moderate stimulation (releasing approximately 19% of all vesicles) is followed by no measurable diffusion. In agreement with this observation, synaptotagmin molecules labeled with different fluorescently tagged antibodies did not appear to mix upon vesicle recycling, when investigated by subdiffraction resolution stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy. Finally, as protein diffusion from vesicles has been mainly observed using molecules tagged with pH-sensitive green fluorescent protein (pHluorin), we have also investigated the membrane patterning of several native and pHluorin-tagged proteins. While the native proteins had a clustered distribution, the GFP-tagged ones were diffused in the plasma membrane. We conclude that synaptic vesicle components intermix little, at least under moderate stimulation, possibly because of the formation of clusters in the plasma membrane. We suggest that several pHluorin-tagged vesicle proteins are less well integrated in clusters.

  19. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans outer membrane vesicles are internalized in human host cells and trigger NOD1- and NOD2-dependent NF-κB activation.

    PubMed

    Thay, Bernard; Damm, Anna; Kufer, Thomas A; Wai, Sun Nyunt; Oscarsson, Jan

    2014-10-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an oral and systemic pathogen associated with aggressive forms of periodontitis and with endocarditis. We recently demonstrated that outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) disseminated by A. actinomycetemcomitans could deliver multiple proteins, including biologically active cytolethal distending toxin (CDT), into the cytosol of HeLa cells and human gingival fibroblasts (HGF). In the present work, we have used immunoelectron and confocal microscopy analysis and fluorescently labeled vesicles to further investigate mechanisms for A. actinomycetemcomitans OMV-mediated delivery of bacterial antigens to these host cells. Our results supported that OMVs were internalized into the perinuclear region of HeLa cells and HGF. Colocalization analysis revealed that internalized OMVs colocalized with the endoplasmic reticulum and carried antigens, detected using an antibody specific to whole A. actinomycetemcomitans serotype a cells. Consistent with OMV internalization mediating intracellular antigen exposure, the vesicles acted as strong inducers of cytoplasmic peptidoglycan sensor NOD1- and NOD2-dependent NF-κB activation in human embryonic kidney cells. Moreover, NOD1 was the main sensor of OMV-delivered peptidoglycan in myeloid THP1 cells, contributing to the overall inflammatory responses induced by the vesicles. This work reveals a role of A. actinomycetemcomitans OMVs as a trigger of innate immunity via carriage of NOD1- and NOD2-active pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs).

  20. Characterization of Innate Immune Responses of Human Endothelial Cells Induced by Porphyromonas gingivalis and Their Derived Outer Membrane Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Meng-Hsuan; Guo, Zhong-Mao; Chunga, Julio; Goodwin, J. Shawn; Xie, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, a chronic inflammatory disease of the blood vessels, is one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality world-wide. Involvement of Porphyromonas gingivalis in atherosclerosis is supported by observations from epidemiological, clinical, immunological, and molecular studies. Previously we reported that P. gingivalis vesicles have a much higher invasive efficiency than their originating cells. Here, we further compare the role of P. gingivalis cells and their vesicles in expression of chemoattractant proteins including CXCL1, CXCL2, and CXCL8, and adhesive molecules such as E-selectin in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Both P. gingivalis 33277 cells and vesicles were able to up-regulate expression of these molecules, while the vesicles acted as more potent inducers of the inflammatory response associated with the development of atherosclerosis, consequently resulting in significant monocyte adhesion to a monolayer of HUVECs. Interestingly, we found that elevated expression of CXCL8 and E-selectin in endothelial cells induced by P. gingivalis correlated with the invasive ability of P. gingivalis cells and vesicles. Non-invasive bacterial cells and vesicles had no effect on expression of these genes. This study highlights the potential risk of P. gingivalis cells and vesicles in initiation of atherosclerosis and provides a potential target for the development of novel therapeutics against bacteria-associated atherosclerosis. PMID:27826542

  1. Cellular Immune Responses in Humans Induced by Two Serogroup B Meningococcal Outer Membrane Vesicle Vaccines Given Separately and in Combination

    PubMed Central

    Korsvold, Gro Ellen; Aase, Audun; Næss, Lisbeth M.

    2016-01-01

    MenBvac and MeNZB are safe and efficacious outer membrane vesicle (OMV) vaccines against serogroup B meningococcal disease. Antibody responses have previously been investigated in a clinical trial with these two OMV vaccines given separately (25 μg/dose) or in combination (12.5 and 12.5 μg/dose) in three doses administered at 6-week intervals. Here, we report the results from analyzing cellular immune responses against MenBvac and MeNZB OMVs in terms of antigen-specific CD4+ T cell proliferation and secretion of cytokines. The proliferative CD4+ T cell responses to the combined vaccine were of the same magnitude as the homologous responses observed for each individual vaccine. The results also showed cross-reactivity in the sense that both vaccine groups receiving separate vaccines responded to both homologous and heterologous OMV antigen when assayed for antigen-specific cellular proliferation. In addition, a multiplex bead array assay was used to analyze the presence of Th1 and Th2 cytokines in cell culture supernatants. The results showed that gamma interferon, interleukin-4 (IL-4), and IL-10 responses could be detected as a result of vaccination with both the MenBvac and the MeNZB vaccines given separately, as well as when given in combination. With respect to cross-reactivity, the cytokine results paralleled the observations made for proliferation. In conclusion, the results demonstrate that cross-reactive cellular immune responses involving both Th1 and Th2 cytokines can be induced to the same extent by different tailor-made OMV vaccines given either separately or in combination with half the dose of each vaccine. PMID:26865595

  2. Zinc uptake by human placental microvillous membrane vesicles: effects of gestational age and maternal serum zinc levels.

    PubMed

    Vargas Zapata, C L; Trugo, N M; Donangelo, C M

    2000-02-01

    Zinc uptake by syncytiotrophoblast microvillous membrane vesicles (SMMV) from human placentas was characterized and the effects of maternal serum zinc levels at term and of gestational age on kinetic parameters were evaluated. Zinc uptake at pH 7.2 was rapid for the first 2 min, followed by a slower increase, approaching equilibrium after 30 min. Uptake was saturable at a zinc concentration of 30 micromol/L, higher than the upper range of the physiological serum zinc level. Kinetic analysis of uptake at 1 min in SMMV from term placenta showed similar Km values (mean: 6.9+/-0.6 micromol/L) for different levels of maternal serum zinc. However, Vmax was higher (p < 0.05) in SMMV from mothers with serum zinc lower than 7.6 micromol/L compared to those with higher serum zinc levels (35.8+/-1.6 and 26.6+/-1.6 nmol 65Zn/mg protein/min, respectively). Km values were similar in term (>37 wk of gestation) and preterm (20-25 wk of gestation) placentas, whereas Vmax was higher (p < 0.05) in the preterm (34.3+/-1.6 nmol Zn/mg protein/min) compared to term placentas from mothers with serum zinc levels above 7.6 micromol/L. These results suggest that whereas afffinity for zinc was not altered with gestational age or maternal serum zinc levels, zinc-uptake capacity in human placenta is influenced both by gestational age and by low levels of maternal serum zinc in order to ensure an adequate maternal-fetal zinc transfer.

  3. Effect of dietary fatty acids on jejunal and ileal oleic acid uptake by rat brush border membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Prieto, R M; Stremmel, W; Sales, C; Tur, J A

    1996-04-18

    To test the effect of dietary fatty acids on fatty acid uptake, the influx kinetics of a representative long-chain fatty acid, 3H-oleic acid, in both the jejunum and ileum of rats has been studied using brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV). Animals were fed with semipurified diets containing 5 g fat/100 g diet, as corn oil (control group), safflower oil (unsaturated group) and coconut oil hydrogenated (saturated group). With increasing unbound oleate concentration in the medium, the three dietary groups showed saturable kinetics in both jejunal and ileal BBMV (controls: Vmax = 0.15 +/- 0.01 nmol x mg protein-1 x 5 min-1 and Km = 136 +/- 29.1 nmol for jejunum, and Vmax = 0.23 +/- 0.03 nmol x mg protein-1 x 5 min-1 and Km = 196 +/- 50.3 nmol for ileum; unsaturated: Vmax = 0.28 +/- 0.05 nmol x mg protein-1 x 5 min-1 and Km = 242.7 +/- 91.8 nmol for jejunum, and Vmax = 1.29 +/- 0.06 nmol x mg protein-1 x 5 min-1 and Km = 509.8 +/- 97.5 nmol for ileum; saturated: Vmax = 0.03 +/- 0.01 nmol x mg protein-1 x 5 min-1 and Km = 124.5 +/- 72.6 nmol for jejunum, and Vmax = 0.04 +/- 0.01 nmol x mg protein -1.5 min-1 and Km = 205.6 +/- 85.3 nmol for ileum). These results support the theory that feeding an isocaloric diet containing only unsaturated fatty acids enhanced oleic acid uptake, and feeding an isocaloric diet containing only saturated fatty acids decreased oleic acid uptake. The results obtained in the present work also show the adaptative ability of jejunum and ileum to the type of dietary fat.

  4. Outer membrane vesicles from Brucella abortus promote bacterial internalization by human monocytes and modulate their innate immune response.

    PubMed

    Pollak, Cora N; Delpino, M Victoria; Fossati, Carlos A; Baldi, Pablo C

    2012-01-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) released by some gram-negative bacteria have been shown to exert immunomodulatory effects that favor the establishment of the infection. The aim of the present study was to assess the interaction of OMVs from Brucella abortus with human epithelial cells (HeLa) and monocytes (THP-1), and the potential immunomodulatory effects they may exert. Using confocal microscopy and flow cytometry, FITC-labeled OMVs were shown to be internalized by both cell types. Internalization was shown to be partially mediated by clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Pretreatment of THP-1 cells with Brucella OMVs inhibited some cytokine responses (TNF-α and IL-8) to E. coli LPS, Pam3Cys or flagellin (TLR4, TLR2 and TLR5 agonists, respectively). Similarly, pretreatment with Brucella OMVs inhibited the cytokine response of THP-1 cells to B. abortus infection. Treatment of THP-1 cells with OMVs during IFN-γ stimulation reduced significantly the inducing effect of this cytokine on MHC-II expression. OMVs induced a dose-dependent increase of ICAM-1 expression on THP-1 cells and an increased adhesion of these cells to human endothelial cells. The addition of OMVs to THP-1 cultures before the incubation with live B. abortus resulted in increased numbers of adhered and internalized bacteria as compared to cells not treated with OMVs. Overall, these results suggest that OMVs from B. abortus exert cellular effects that promote the internalization of these bacteria by human monocytes, but also downregulate the innate immune response of these cells to Brucella infection. These effects may favor the persistence of Brucella within host cells.

  5. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Outer Membrane Vesicles Triggered by Human Mucosal Fluid and Lysozyme Can Prime Host Tissue Surfaces for Bacterial Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Metruccio, Matteo M. E.; Evans, David J.; Gabriel, Manal M.; Kadurugamuwa, Jagath L.; Fleiszig, Suzanne M. J.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a leading cause of human morbidity and mortality that often targets epithelial surfaces. Host immunocompromise, or the presence of indwelling medical devices, including contact lenses, can predispose to infection. While medical devices are known to accumulate bacterial biofilms, it is not well understood why resistant epithelial surfaces become susceptible to P. aeruginosa. Many bacteria, including P. aeruginosa, release outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) in response to stress that can fuse with host cells to alter their function. Here, we tested the hypothesis that mucosal fluid can trigger OMV release to compromise an epithelial barrier. This was tested using tear fluid and corneal epithelial cells in vitro and in vivo. After 1 h both human tear fluid, and the tear component lysozyme, greatly enhanced OMV release from P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 compared to phosphate buffered saline (PBS) controls (∼100-fold). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and SDS-PAGE showed tear fluid and lysozyme-induced OMVs were similar in size and protein composition, but differed from biofilm-harvested OMVs, the latter smaller with fewer proteins. Lysozyme-induced OMVs were cytotoxic to human corneal epithelial cells in vitro and murine corneal epithelium in vivo. OMV exposure in vivo enhanced Ly6G/C expression at the corneal surface, suggesting myeloid cell recruitment, and primed the cornea for bacterial adhesion (∼4-fold, P < 0.01). Sonication disrupted OMVs retained cytotoxic activity, but did not promote adhesion, suggesting the latter required OMV-mediated events beyond cell killing. These data suggest that mucosal fluid induced P. aeruginosa OMVs could contribute to loss of epithelial barrier function during medical device-related infections. PMID:27375592

  6. Heterogeneity of L-alanine transport systems in brush-border membrane vesicles from rat placenta during late gestation.

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Torre, S R; Serrano, M A; Medina, J M; Alvarado, F

    1992-01-01

    The placental uptake of L-alanine was studied by using purified brush-border membrane vesicles from rat trophoblasts. Saturation curves were carried out at 37 degrees C in buffers containing 100 mM (zero-trans)-NaSCN, -NaCl, -KSCN, -KCl, or -N-methyl-D-glucamine gluconate. The uncorrected uptake results were fitted by non-linear regression analysis to an equation involving one diffusional component either one or two saturable Michaelian transport terms. In the presence of NaCl, two distinct L-alanine transport systems were distinguished, named respectively System 1 (S-1; Vm1 about 760 pmol/s per mg of protein; KT1 = 0.5 mM) and System 2 (S-2; Vm2 about 1700 pmol/s per mg; KT2 = 9 mM). In contrast, in the presence of K+ (KCl = KSCN) or in the absence of any alkali-metal ions (N-methyl-D-glucamine gluconate), only one saturable system was apparent, which we identify as S-2. When Na+ is present, S-1, but not S-2, appears to be rheogenic, since its maximal transport capacity significantly increases in the presence of an inside-negative membrane potential, created either by replacing Cl- with the permeant anion thiocyanate (NaSCN > NaCl) or by applying an appropriate K+ gradient and valinomycin. alpha-(Methylamino)isobutyrate (methyl-AIB) appears to be a substrate of S-1, but not of S-2. For reasons that remain to be explained, however, methyl-AIB inhibits S-2. We conclude that S-1 represents a truly Na(+)-dependent mechanism, where Na+ behaves as an obligatory activator, whereas S-2 cannot discriminate between Na+ and K+, although its activity is higher in the presence of alkali-metal ions than in their absence (Na+ = K+ > N-methyl-D-glucammonium ion). S-2 appears to be fully developed 2 days before birth, whereas S-1 undergoes a capacity-type activation between days 19.5 and 21.5 of gestation, i.e. its apparent Vmax. nearly doubles, whereas its KT remains constant. PMID:1445280

  7. Volume-sensitive K-Cl cotransport in inside-out vesicles made from erythrocyte membranes from sheep of low-K phenotype.

    PubMed Central

    Kracke, G R; Dunham, P B

    1990-01-01

    Unidirectional K ion effluxes were measured from inside-out vesicles prepared from erythrocyte membranes from sheep of the low-K phenotype. Total K efflux was 150 nmol per mg of protein per hr in a Cl medium of 295 mosmol/kg (with the Na/K pump inhibited). Cl-dependent K efflux (determined with methanesulfonate replacing Cl) was 54 nmol/(mg.hr). Cl-dependent K efflux (K-Cl cotransport) increased to 77 nmol/(mg.hr) with osmotic swelling of approximately 30% in 230-mosmol/kg medium and decreased to 13 nmol/(mg.hr) after shrinkage of approximately 60% in 430-mosmol/kg medium. Osmotically induced changes in transport and vesicle volume were reversible. K-Cl cotransport was enhanced by ATP. Nonhydrolyzable ATP analogues failed to substitute for ATP, indicating that phosphorylation is involved. However, in the absence of added ATP there was significant K-Cl cotransport, suggesting that phosphorylation is not essential for function. The results provide clues about the nature of the signals detected by the sensor of cell volume changes and demonstrate that inside-out vesicles from sheep erythrocyte membranes provide an advantageous experimental system for investigation of the volume sensor. PMID:2236068

  8. Membrane Fluidity and Lipid Order in Ternary Giant Unilamellar Vesicles Using a New Bodipy-Cholesterol Derivative

    PubMed Central

    Ariola, Florly S.; Li, Zaiguo; Cornejo, Christine; Bittman, Robert; Heikal, Ahmed A.

    2009-01-01

    Cholesterol-rich, liquid-ordered (Lo) domains are believed to be biologically relevant, and yet detailed knowledge about them, especially in live cells under physiological conditions, is elusive. Although these domains have been observed in model membranes, understanding cholesterol-lipid interactions at the molecular level, under controlled lipid mixing, remains a challenge. Further, although there are a number of fluorescent lipid analogs that partition into liquid-disordered (Ld) domains, the number of such analogs with a high affinity for biologically relevant Lo domains is limited. Here, we use a new Bodipy-labeled cholesterol (Bdp-Chol) derivative to investigate membrane fluidity, lipid order, and partitioning in various lipid phases in giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) as a model system. GUVs were prepared from mixtures of various molar fractions of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine, cholesterol, and egg sphingomyelin. The Ld phase domains were also labeled with 1,1′-didodecyl-3,3,3′,3′-tetramethylindocarbocyanine (DiI-C12) for comparison. Two-photon fluorescence lifetime and anisotropy imaging of Bdp-Chol are sensitive to lipid phase domains in GUVs. The fluorescence lifetime of Bdp-Chol in liquid-disordered, single-phase GUVs is 5.50 ± 0.08 ns, compared with 4.1 ± 0.4 ns in the presence of DiI-C12. The observed reduction of fluorescence lifetime is attributed to Förster resonance energy transfer between Bdp-Chol (a donor) and DiI-C12 (an acceptor) with an estimated efficiency of 0.25 and donor-acceptor distance of 2.6 ± 0.2 nm. These results also indicate preferential partitioning (Kp = 1.88) of Bdp-Chol into the Lo phase. One-photon, time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy of Bdp-Chol decays as a triexponential in the lipid bilayer with an average rotational diffusion coefficient, lipid order parameter, and membrane fluidity that are sensitive to phase domains. The translational diffusion coefficient of Bdp-Chol, as measured using fluorescence

  9. Streptococcus mutans extracellular DNA is upregulated during growth in biofilms, actively released via membrane vesicles, and influenced by components of the protein secretion machinery.

    PubMed

    Liao, Sumei; Klein, Marlise I; Heim, Kyle P; Fan, Yuwei; Bitoun, Jacob P; Ahn, San-Joon; Burne, Robert A; Koo, Hyun; Brady, L Jeannine; Wen, Zezhang T

    2014-07-01

    Streptococcus mutans, a major etiological agent of human dental caries, lives primarily on the tooth surface in biofilms. Limited information is available concerning the extracellular DNA (eDNA) as a scaffolding matrix in S. mutans biofilms. This study demonstrates that S. mutans produces eDNA by multiple avenues, including lysis-independent membrane vesicles. Unlike eDNAs from cell lysis that were abundant and mainly concentrated around broken cells or cell debris with floating open ends, eDNAs produced via the lysis-independent pathway appeared scattered but in a structured network under scanning electron microscopy. Compared to eDNA production of planktonic cultures, eDNA production in 5- and 24-h biofilms was increased by >3- and >1.6-fold, respectively. The addition of DNase I to growth medium significantly reduced biofilm formation. In an in vitro adherence assay, added chromosomal DNA alone had a limited effect on S. mutans adherence to saliva-coated hydroxylapatite beads, but in conjunction with glucans synthesized using purified glucosyltransferase B, the adherence was significantly enhanced. Deletion of sortase A, the transpeptidase that covalently couples multiple surface-associated proteins to the cell wall peptidoglycan, significantly reduced eDNA in both planktonic and biofilm cultures. Sortase A deficiency did not have a significant effect on membrane vesicle production; however, the protein profile of the mutant membrane vesicles was significantly altered, including reduction of adhesin P1 and glucan-binding proteins B and C. Relative to the wild type, deficiency of protein secretion and membrane protein insertion machinery components, including Ffh, YidC1, and YidC2, also caused significant reductions in eDNA.

  10. Basolateral Cl channels in primary airway epithelial cultures.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Horst; Illek, Beate; Finkbeiner, Walter E; Widdicombe, Jonathan H

    2007-06-01

    Salt and water absorption and secretion across the airway epithelium are important for maintaining the thin film of liquid lining the surface of the airway epithelium. Movement of Cl across the apical membrane involves the CFTR Cl channel; however, conductive pathways for Cl movement across the basolateral membrane have been little studied. Here, we determined the regulation and single-channel properties of the Cl conductance (G(Cl)) in airway surface epithelia using epithelial cultures from human or bovine trachea and freshly isolated ciliated cells from the human nasal epithelium. In Ussing chamber studies, a swelling-activated basolateral G(Cl) was found, which was further stimulated by forskolin and blocked by N-phenylanthranilic acid (DPC) = sucrose > flufenamic acid = niflumic acid = glibenclamide > CdCl(2) = 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)benzoic acid (NPPB) = DIDS = ZnCl(2) > tamoxifen > 4,4'-dinitro-2,2'-stilbene-disulfonate disodium salt (DNDS). In whole cell patch-clamp experiments, three types of G(Cl) were identified: 1) a voltage-activated, DIDS- (but not Cd-) blockable and osmosensitive G(Cl); 2) an inwardly rectifying, hyperpolarization-activated and Cd-sensitive G(Cl); and 3) a forskolin-activated, linear G(Cl), which was insensitive to Cd and DIDS. In cell-attached patch-clamp recordings, the basolateral pole of isolated ciliated cells expressed three types of Cl channels: 1) an outwardly rectifying, swelling-activated Cl channel; 2) a strongly inwardly rectifying Cl channel; and 3) a forskolin-activated, low-conductance channel. We propose that, depending on the driving force for Cl across the apical membrane, basolateral Cl channels confine Cl(-) secretion or support transcellular Cl(-) absorption.

  11. Mutant Native Outer Membrane Vesicles Combined with a Serogroup A Polysaccharide Conjugate Vaccine for Prevention of Meningococcal Epidemics in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Pajon, Rolando; Fergus, Andrew M.; Granoff, Dan M.

    2013-01-01

    Background The meningococcal serogroup A (MenA) polysaccharide conjugate vaccine used in Sub-Saharan Africa does not prevent disease caused by MenW or MenX strains, which also cause epidemics in the region. We investigated the vaccine-potential of native outer membrane vesicles with over-expressed factor H-binding protein (NOMV-fHbp), which targeted antigens in African meningococcal strains, and was combined with a MenA polysaccharide conjugate vaccine. Methodology/Principal Findings The NOMV-fHbp vaccine was prepared from a mutant African MenW strain with PorA P1.5,2, attenuated endotoxin (ΔLpxL1), deleted capsular genes, and over-expressed fHbp in variant group 1. The NOMV-fHbp was adsorbed with Al(OH)3 and used to reconstitute a lyophilized MenA conjugate vaccine, which normally is reconstituted with liquid MenC, Y and W conjugates in a meningococcal quadrivalent conjugate vaccine (MCV4-CRM, Novartis). Mice immunized with the NOMV-fHbp vaccine alone developed serum bactericidal (human complement) activity against 13 of 15 African MenA strains tested; 10 of 10 African MenX strains, 7 of 7 African MenW strains, and 6 of 6 genetically diverse MenB strains with fHbp variant group 1 (including 1 strain from The Gambia). The combination NOMV-fHbp/MenA conjugate vaccine elicited high serum bactericidal titers against the two MenA strains tested that were resistant to bactericidal antibodies elicited by the NOMV-fHbp alone; the combination elicited higher titers against the MenA and MenW strains than those elicited by a control MCV4-CRM vaccine (P<0.05); and high titers against MenX and MenB strains. For most strains, the titers elicited by a control NOMV-fHbp knock out vaccine were <1∶10 except when the strain PorA matched the vaccine (titers >1∶000). Conclusion/Significance The NOMV-fHbp/MenA conjugate vaccine provided similar or higher coverage against MenA and MenW strains than a quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine, and extended protection against Men

  12. The Antitoxin Protein of a Toxin-Antitoxin System from Xylella fastidiosa Is Secreted via Outer Membrane Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, André da Silva; Mendes, Juliano S.; dos Santos, Clelton A.; de Toledo, Marcelo A. S.; Beloti, Lilian L.; Crucello, Aline; Horta, Maria A. C.; Favaro, Marianna T. de Pinho; Munar, Duber M. M.; de Souza, Alessandra A.; Cotta, Mônica A.; de Souza, Anete P.

    2016-01-01

    The Xylella fastidiosa subsp pauca strain 9a5c is a Gram-negative, xylem-limited bacterium that is able to form a biofilm and affects citrus crops in Brazil. Some genes are considered to be involved in biofilm formation, but the specific mechanisms involved in this process remain unknown. This limited understanding of how some bacteria form biofilms is a major barrier to our comprehension of the progression of diseases caused by biofilm-producing bacteria. Several investigations have shown that the toxin-antitoxin (TA) operon is related to biofilm formation. This operon is composed of a toxin with RNAse activity and its cognate antitoxin. Previous reports have indicated that the antitoxin is able to inhibit toxin activity and modulate the expression of the operon as well as other target genes involved in oxidative stress and mobility. In this study, we characterize a toxin-antitoxin system consisting of XfMqsR and XfYgiT, respectively, from X. fastidiosa subsp. pauca strain 9a5c. These proteins display a high similarity to their homologs in X. fastidiosa strain Temecula and a predicted tridimensional structure that is similar to MqsR-YgiT from Escherichia coli. The characterization was performed using in vitro assays such as analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC), size exclusion chromatography, isothermal titration calorimetry, and Western blotting. Using a fluorometric assay to detect RNAses, we demonstrated that XfMqsR is thermostable and can degrade RNA. XfMqsR is inhibited by XfYgiT, which interacts with its own promoter. XfYgiT is known to be localized in the intracellular compartment; however, we provide strong evidence that X. fastidiosa secretes wild-type XfYgiT into the extracellular environment via outer membrane vesicles, as confirmed by Western blotting and specific immunofluorescence labeling visualized by fluorescence microscopy. Taken together, our results characterize the TA system from X. fastidiosa strain 9a5c, and we also discuss the possible

  13. Neisserial outer membrane vesicles bind the coinhibitory receptor carcinoembryonic antigen-related cellular adhesion molecule 1 and suppress CD4+ T lymphocyte function.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hannah S W; Boulton, Ian C; Reddin, Karen; Wong, Henry; Halliwell, Denise; Mandelboim, Ofer; Gorringe, Andrew R; Gray-Owen, Scott D

    2007-09-01

    Pathogenic Neisseria bacteria naturally liberate outer membrane "blebs," which are presumed to contribute to pathology, and the detergent-extracted outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) from Neisseria meningitidis are currently employed as meningococcal vaccines in humans. While the composition of these vesicles reflects the bacteria from which they are derived, the functions of many of their constituent proteins remain unexplored. The neisserial colony opacity-associated Opa proteins function as adhesins, the majority of which mediate bacterial attachment to human carcinoembryonic antigen-related cellular adhesion molecules (CEACAMs). Herein, we demonstrate that the Opa proteins within OMV preparations retain the capacity to bind the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif-containing coinhibitory receptor CEACAM1. When CD4(+) T lymphocytes were exposed to OMVs from Opa-expressing bacteria, their activation and proliferation in response to a variety of stimuli were effectively halted. This potent immunosuppressive effect suggests that localized infection will generate a "zone of inhibition" resulting from the diffusion of membrane blebs into the surrounding tissues. Moreover, it demonstrates that OMV-based vaccines must be developed from strains that lack CEACAM1-binding Opa variants.

  14. Antibody-producing cell responses to an isolated outer membrane protein and to complexes of this antigen with lipopolysaccharide or with vesicles of phospholipids from Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed Central

    Karch, H; Nixdorff, K

    1981-01-01

    Antibody-producing cell responses of mice to a protein isolated from the outer membrane of Proteus mirabilis were typical of the responses to a thymus-dependent antigen. The immunoglobulin G antibody-producing cell responses to the protein were increased after administration of the antigen complexed with either lipopolysaccharide or with vesicles of phospholipids extracted from P. mirabilis. The protein in turn significantly increased the immune response to lipopolysaccharide and also converted this response from predominantly immunoglobulin M to predominantly immunoglobulin G. PMID:6164651

  15. [Effect of natural or synthetic detergents on the transport of D-glucose in the membranes of vesicles of the brush border of the intestine of the rabbit].

    PubMed

    Favilli, F; Iantomasi, T; Stio, M; Treves, C; Vanni, P; Vincenzini, M T

    1988-01-01

    We describe here the effects of natural and synthetic detergents on the D-glucose transport into brush-border membranes of vesicles of rabbit's intestine. Two synthetic detergents: Triton X-100 and dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide have been found very strong inhibitors (more than 50 p. 100 of inhibition of maximal D-glucose uptake). Kinetic studies showed that these detergents behaved as mixed type inhibitors. The Na+-dependent transport of amino acids (aspartic acid, lysine, phenylalanine) is only poorly affected by dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide, while Triton X-100 inhibits unspecifically all the transport studied.

  16. Vesicles with a double bilayer.

    PubMed

    Zawada, Zygmunt H

    2004-01-01

    A modified reverse phase evaporation method was used to prepare intermediate unilamellar vesicles coated with an additional membrane, or large vesicles in which several vesicles were coated with a common membrane. In both kinds of vesicle, the outer and inner membranes are usually of different phospholipid composition. The preparation involves the formation of a double emulsion: vesicles in a buffer are emerged in a low-boiling point organic solution of phospholipids. Then the organic solvent is evaporated during the heating and mixing process. As result large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs), about 100 nm in diameter, were coated with an additional membrane from egg lecithin or dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and cholesterol. The highest yield of the coating was about 50%. When DPPC was used for coating above the phase transition temperature Tm, the data suggested the formation of vesicles that were slightly larger than the starting LUVs. It might be concluded that many of these had a double bilayer. If the coating was done below Tm, the micrographs suggested the formation of structures resembling multi-vesicular vesicles. They looked like LUV clusters coated with a common membrane.

  17. Alignment of Synaptic Vesicle Macromolecules with the Macromolecules in Active Zone Material that Direct Vesicle Docking

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jing; Jung, Jae Hoon; Marshall, Robert M.; McMahan, Uel J.

    2013-01-01

    Synaptic vesicles dock at active zones on the presynaptic plasma membrane of a neuron’s axon terminals as a precondition for fusing with the membrane and releasing their neurotransmitter to mediate synaptic impulse transmission. Typically, docked vesicles are next to aggregates of plasma membrane-bound macromolecules called active zone material (AZM). Electron tomography on tissue sections from fixed and stained axon terminals of active and resting frog neuromuscular junctions has led to the conclusion that undocked vesicles are directed to and held at the docking sites by the successive formation of stable connections between vesicle membrane proteins and proteins in different classes of AZM macromolecules. Using the same nanometer scale 3D imaging technology on appropriately stained frog neuromuscular junctions, we found that ∼10% of a vesicle’s luminal volume is occupied by a radial assembly of elongate macromolecules attached by narrow projections, nubs, to the vesicle membrane at ∼25 sites. The assembly’s chiral, bilateral shape is nearly the same vesicle to vesicle, and nubs, at their sites of connection to the vesicle membrane, are linked to macromolecules that span the membrane. For docked vesicles, the orientation of the assembly’s shape relative to the AZM and the presynaptic membrane is the same vesicle to vesicle, whereas for undocked vesicles it is not. The connection sites of most nubs on the membrane of docked vesicles are paired with the connection sites of the different classes of AZM macromolecules that regulate docking, and the membrane spanning macromolecules linked to these nubs are also attached to the AZM macromolecules. We conclude that the luminal assembly of macromolecules anchors in a particular arrangement vesicle membrane macromolecules, which contain the proteins that connect the vesicles to AZM macromolecules during docking. Undocked vesicles must move in a way that aligns this arrangement with the AZM macromolecules for

  18. Size and CT density of iodine-containing ethosomal vesicles obtained by membrane extrusion: potential for use as CT contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Na, Bomin; Choi, Byoung Wook; Kim, Bumsang

    2013-11-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is the primary non-invasive imaging technique used for most patients with suspected liver disease. In order to improve liver-specific imaging properties and prevent toxic effects in patients with compromised renal function, we investigated the encapsulation of iodine within ethosomal vesicles. As a first step in the development of novel contrast agents using ethosomes for CT imaging applications, iodine was entrapped within ethosomes and iodine-containing ethosomes of the desired size were obtained by extrusion using a polycarbonate membrane with a defined pore size. Ethosomes containing iodine showed a relatively high CT density, which decreased when they were extruded, due to the rupture and re-formation of the lipid bilayer of the ethosome. However, when a solution with a high iodine concentration was used as a dispersion media during the extrusion process, the decrease in CT density could be prevented. In addition, ethosomes containing iodine were taken up efficiently by macrophages, which are abundant in the liver, and these ethosomes exhibited no cellular toxicity. These results demonstrate that iodine could be entrapped within ethosomal vesicles, giving the ethosomes a relatively high CT density, and that the extrusion technique used in this study could conveniently and reproducibly produce ethosomal vesicles with a desired size. Therefore, ethosomes containing iodine, as prepared in this study, have potential as contrast agents with applications in CT imaging.

  19. Membrane Vesicles Released by a hypervesiculating Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 tolR Mutant Are Highly Heterogeneous and Show Reduced Capacity for Epithelial Cell Interaction and Entry

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Cruz, Carla; Cañas, María-Alexandra; Giménez, Rosa; Badia, Josefa; Mercade, Elena; Aguilera, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Membrane vesicles (MVs) produced by Gram-negative bacteria are being explored for novel clinical applications due to their ability to deliver active molecules to distant host cells, where they can exert immunomodulatory properties. MVs released by the probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN) are good candidates for testing such applications. However, a drawback for such studies is the low level of MV isolation from in vitro culture supernatants, which may be overcome by the use of mutants in cell envelope proteins that yield a hypervesiculation phenotype. Here, we confirm that a tolR mutation in EcN increases MV production, as determined by protein, LPS and fluorescent lipid measurements. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of negatively stained MVs did not reveal significant differences with wild type EcN MVs. Conversely, TEM observation after high-pressure freezing followed by freeze substitution of bacterial samples, together with cryo-TEM observation of plunge-frozen hydrated isolated MVs showed considerable structural heterogeneity in the EcN tolR samples. In addition to common one-bilayer vesicles (OMVs) and the recently described double-bilayer vesicles (O-IMVs), other types of MVs were observed. Time-course experiments of MV uptake in Caco-2 cells using rhodamine- and DiO-labelled MVs evidenced that EcN tolR MVs displayed reduced internalization levels compared to the wild-type MVs. The low number of intracellular MVs was due to a lower cell binding capacity of the tolR-derived MVs, rather than a different entry pathway or mechanism. These findings indicate that heterogeneity of MVs from tolR mutants may have a major impact on vesicle functionality, and point to the need for conducting a detailed structural analysis when MVs from hypervesiculating mutants are to be used for biotechnological applications. PMID:28036403

  20. Vesicle extrusion in nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joóos, B. Éla; Bertrand, Martin; Ouellet, S. Ébastien

    2010-03-01

    Monodisperse vesicles of nearly circular shape or liposomes are used as drug delivery systems. Their fabrication involves repeated passage of large vesicles through small pores. At each passage the vesicle ruptures and the fragments reform into smaller vesicles. We report on the last stages of the process where small liposomes are pushed by pressure differences into nano-sized pores, and we study the stress distribution along the lipid bilayer to determine the rupture lines. This is done by performing coarse grained Molecular Dynamics simulations. We have developed a technique to measure the stress in the membrane based on a tessellation of the surface which allows us to monitor the local area per lipid fluctuations. The results show subtle and complex flow phenomena. We can predict the final size distribution after many passages. Comparisons will be made with existing experimental data.

  1. DMSO Enhances TGF-β Activity by Recruiting the Type II TGF-β Receptor From Intracellular Vesicles to the Plasma Membrane.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shuan Shian; Chen, Chun-Lin; Huang, Franklin W; Hou, Wei-Hsien; Huang, Jung San

    2016-07-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is used to treat many diseases/symptoms. The molecular basis of the pharmacological actions of DMSO has been unclear. We hypothesized that DMSO exerts some of these actions by enhancing TGF-β activity. Here we show that DMSO enhances TGF-β activity by ∼3-4-fold in Mv1Lu and NMuMG cells expressing Smad-dependent luciferase reporters. In Mv1Lu cells, DMSO enhances TGF-β-stimulated expression of P-Smad2 and PAI-1. It increases cell-surface expression of TGF-β receptors (TβR-I and/or TβR-II) by ∼3-4-fold without altering their cellular levels as determined by (125) I-labeled TGF-β-cross-linking/Western blot analysis, suggesting the presence of large intracellular pools in these cells. Sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation/Western blot analysis reveals that DMSO induces recruitment of TβR-II (but not TβR-I) from its intracellular pool to plasma-membrane microdomains. It induces more recruitment of TβR-II to non-lipid raft microdomains than to lipid rafts/caveolae. Mv1Lu cells transiently transfected with TβR-II-HA plasmid were treated with DMSO and analyzed by indirect immunofluoresence staining using anti-HA antibody. In these cells, TβR-II-HA is present as a vesicle-like network in the cytoplasm as well as in the plasma membrane. DMSO causes depletion of TβR-II-HA-containing vesicles from the cytoplasm and co-localization of TβR-II-HA and cveolin-1 at the plasma membrane. These results suggest that DMSO, a fusogenic substance, enhances TGF-β activity presumably by inducing fusion of cytoplasmic vesicles (containing TβR-II) and the plasma membrane, resulting in increased localization of TβR-II to non-lipid raft microdomains where canonical signaling occurs. Fusogenic activity of DMSO may play a pivotal role in its pharmacological actions involving membrane proteins with large cytoplasmic pools. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1568-1579, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Calcium and glucose uptake in rat small intestinal brush-border membrane vesicles. Modulation by exogenous hypercortisolism and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D-3.

    PubMed

    Braun, H J; Birkenhäger, J C; De Jonge, H R

    1984-07-11

    The effect of exogenous hypercortisolism and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D-3 on small-intestinal calcium and glucose transport in the rat was studied at the level of brush-border membrane vesicles generated from isolated villous cells by a freeze-thaw procedure. At 5 X 10(-5) M extravesicular calcium, initial uptake rates in vesicles prepared from triamcinolone-treated adult rats were decreased by 30% after 5 days. Since calcium ionophore A23187 virtually abolished the difference in calcium uptake, triamcinolone appeared to affect calcium channel density or activity rather than intravesicular binding capacity. Kinetic analysis showed that a decrease in Vmax of a saturable calcium transport system could entirely account for the diminished rate of vesicular calcium uptake. Calcium transport rates could be partially restored by in vivo administration of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D-3 at a dosage which did not affect vesicular calcium uptake in control animals. Conversely, sodium-driven glucose accumulation in brush-border vesicles from triamcinolone-treated rats was stimulated by 50-70% after 36 h and appeared insensitive to vitamin D. A specific triamcinolone action on the glucose carrier itself rather than on the driving force of the sodium gradient was indicated by (i) a similar stimulation of glucose transport under equilibrium exchange conditions and (ii) an opposite effect of triamcinolone on sodium-driven alanine transport. The triamcinolone-induced changes in calcium and glucose uptake were not accompanied by a gross alteration of membrane integrity in vitro or by major alterations in vesicular protein composition, intravesicular glucose space and sucrase or alkaline phosphatase activity. The modification of vesicular transport properties is discussed in relation to the vitamin D-antagonized inhibition of intestinal calcium uptake and the stimulation of glucose absorption in response to supraphysiologic amounts of glucocorticoids observed in intact epithelium.

  3. Effect of electroneutral luminal and basolateral lactate transport on intracellular pH in salamander proximal tubules

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    We used microelectrodes to examine the effects of organic substrates, particularly lactate (Lac-), on the intracellular pH (pHi) and basolateral membrane potential (Vbl) in isolated, perfused proximal tubules of the tiger salamander. Exposure of the luminal and basolateral membranes to 3.6 mM Lac- caused pHi to increase by approximately 0.2, opposite to the decrease expected from nonionic diffusion of lactic acid (HLac) into the cell. Addition of Lac- to only the lumen also caused alkalinization, but only if Na+ was present. This alkalinization was not accompanied by immediate Vbl changes, which suggests that it involves luminal, electroneutral Na/Lac cotransport. Addition of Lac- to only the basolateral solution caused pHi to decrease by approximately 0.08. The initial rate of this acidification was a saturable function of [Lac-], was not affected by removal of Na+, and was reversibly reduced by alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate (CHC). Thus, the pHi decrease induced by basolateral Lac- appears to be due to the basolateral entry of H+ and Lac-, mediated by an H/Lac cotransporter (or a Lac-base exchanger). Our data suggest that this transporter is electroneutral and is not present at the luminal membrane. A key question is how the addition of Lac- to the lumen increases pHi. We found that inhibition of basolateral H/Lac cotransport by basolateral CHC reduced the initial rate of pHi increase caused by luminal Lac-. On the other hand, luminal CHC had no effect on the luminal Lac(-)-induced alkalinization. These data suggest that when Lac- is present in the lumen, it enters the cell from the lumen via electroneutral Na/Lac cotransport and then exists with H+ across the basolateral membrane via electroneutral H/Lac cotransport. The net effect is transepithelial Lac- reabsorption, basolateral acid extrusion, and intracellular alkalinization. PMID:3440860

  4. Myosin IIA participates in docking of Glut4 storage vesicles with the plasma membrane in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Le Thi Kim; Hosaka, Toshio; Harada, Nagakatsu; Jambaldorj, Bayasgalan; Fukunaga, Keiko; Nishiwaki, Yuka; Teshigawara, Kiyoshi; Sakai, Tohru; Nakaya, Yutaka; Funaki, Makoto

    2010-01-01

    In adipocytes and myocytes, insulin stimulation translocates glucose transporter 4 (Glut4) storage vesicles (GSVs) from their intracellular storage sites to the plasma membrane (PM) where they dock with the PM. Then, Glut4 is inserted into the PM and initiates glucose uptake into these cells. Previous studies using chemical inhibitors demonstrated that myosin II participates in fusion of GSVs and the PM and increase in the intrinsic activity of Glut4. In this study, the effect of myosin IIA on GSV trafficking was examined by knocking down myosin IIA expression. Myosin IIA knockdown decreased both glucose uptake and exposures of myc-tagged Glut4 to the cell surface in insulin-stimulated cells, but did not affect insulin signal transduction. Interestingly, myosin IIA knockdown failed to decrease insulin-dependent trafficking of Glut4 to the PM. Moreover, in myosin IIA knockdown cells, insulin-stimulated binding of GSV SNARE protein, vesicle-associated membrane protein 2 (VAMP2) to PM SNARE protein, syntaxin 4 was inhibited. These data suggest that myosin IIA plays a role in insulin-stimulated docking of GSVs to the PM in 3T3-L1 adipocytes through SNARE complex formation.

  5. Alkanols and chlorophenols cause different physiological adaptive responses on the level of cell surface properties and membrane vesicle formation in Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E.

    PubMed

    Baumgarten, Thomas; Vazquez, José; Bastisch, Christian; Veron, Wilfried; Feuilloley, Marc G J; Nietzsche, Sandor; Wick, Lukas Y; Heipieper, Hermann J

    2012-01-01

    In order to cope with the toxicity imposed by the exposure to environmental hydrocarbons, many bacteria have developed specific adaptive responses such as modifications in the cell envelope. Here we compared the influence of n-alkanols and chlorophenols on the surface properties of the solvent-tolerant bacterium Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E. In the presence of toxic concentrations of n-alkanols, this strain significantly increased its cell surface charge and hydrophobicity with changes depending on the chain length of the added n-alkanols. The adaptive response occurred within 10 min after the addition of the solvent and was demonstrated to be of physiological nature. Contrary to that, chlorophenols of similar hydrophobicity and potential toxicity as the corresponding alkanols caused only minor effects in the surface properties. To our knowledge, this is the first observation of differences in the cellular adaptive response of bacteria to compound classes of quasi equal hydrophobicity and toxicity. The observed adaptation of the physico-chemical surface properties of strain DOT-T1E to the presence of alkanols was reversible and correlated with changes in the composition of the lipopolysaccharide content of the cells. The reaction is explained by previously described reactions allowing the release of membrane vesicles that was demonstrated for cells affected by 1-octanol and heat shock, whereas no membrane vesicles were released after the addition of chlorophenols.

  6. pH-dependent vesicle fusion induced by the ectodomain of the human immunodeficiency virus membrane fusion protein gp41: Two kinetically distinct processes and fully-membrane-associated gp41 with predominant β sheet fusion peptide conformation.

    PubMed

    Ratnayake, Punsisi U; Sackett, Kelly; Nethercott, Matthew J; Weliky, David P

    2015-01-01

    The gp41 protein of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) catalyzes fusion between HIV and host cell membranes. The ~180-residue ectodomain of gp41 is outside the virion and is the most important gp41 region for membrane fusion. The ectodomain consists of an apolar fusion peptide (FP) region hypothesized to bind to the host cell membrane followed by N-heptad repeat (NHR), loop, and C-heptad repeat (CHR) regions. The present study focuses on the large gp41 ectodomain constructs "Hairpin" (HP) containing NHR+loop+CHR and "FP-Hairpin" (FP-HP) containing FP+NHR+loop+CHR. Both proteins induce rapid and extensive fusion of anionic vesicles at pH4 where the protein is positively-charged but do not induce fusion at pH7 where the protein is negatively charged. This observation, along with lack of fusion of neutral vesicles at either pH supports the significance of attractive protein/membrane electrostatics in fusion. There are two kinetically distinct fusion processes at pH4: (1) a faster ~100 ms⁻¹ process with rate strongly positively correlated with vesicle charge; and (2) a slower ~5 ms⁻¹ process with extent strongly inversely correlated with this charge. The slower process may be more physiologically relevant because HIV/host cell fusion occurs at physiologic pH with gp41 restricted to the narrow region between the two membranes. Previous solid-state NMR (SSNMR) of membrane-associated FP-HP has supported protein oligomers with FP's in an intermolecular antiparallel sheet. There was an additional population of molecules with α helical FPs and the samples likely contained a mixture of membrane-bound and -unbound proteins. For the present study, samples were prepared with fully membrane-bound FP-HP and subsequent SSNMR showed dominant β FP conformation at both low and neutral pH. SSNMR also showed close contact of the FP with the lipid headgroups at both low and neutral pH whereas the NHR+CHR regions had contact at low pH and were more distant at neutral p

  7. Apical Polarity of N-CAM and EMMPRIN in Retinal Pigment Epithelium Resulting from Suppression of Basolateral Signal Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Marmorstein, Alan D.; Gan, Yunbo C.; Bonilha, Vera L.; Finnemann, Silvia C.; Csaky, Karl G.; Rodriguez-Boulan, Enrique

    1998-01-01

    Retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells apically polarize proteins that are basolateral in other epithelia. This reversal may be generated by the association of RPE with photoreceptors and the interphotoreceptor matrix, postnatal expansion of the RPE apical surface, and/or changes in RPE sorting machinery. We compared two proteins exhibiting reversed, apical polarities in RPE cells, neural cell adhesion molecule (N-CAM; 140-kD isoform) and extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN), with the cognate apical marker, p75-neurotrophin receptor (p75-NTR). N-CAM and p75-NTR were apically localized from birth to adulthood, contrasting with a basolateral to apical switch of EMMPRIN in developing postnatal rat RPE. Morphometric analysis demonstrated that this switch cannot be attributed to expansion of the apical surface of maturing RPE because the basolateral membrane expanded proportionally, maintaining a 3:1 apical/basolateral ratio. Kinetic analysis of polarized surface delivery in MDCK and RPE-J cells showed that EMMPRIN has a basolateral signal in its cytoplasmic tail recognized by both cell lines. In contrast, the basolateral signal of N-CAM is recognized by MDCK cells but not RPE-J cells. Deletion of N-CAM's basolateral signal did not prevent its apical localization in vivo. The data demonstrate that the apical polarity of EMMPRIN and N-CAM in mature RPE results from suppressed decoding of specific basolateral signals resulting in randomized delivery to the cell surface. PMID:9700159

  8. Characterization of basolateral chloride/bicarbonate exchange in macula densa cells.

    PubMed

    Komlosi, Peter; Frische, Sebastian; Fuson, Amanda L; Fintha, Attila; Zsembery, Akos; Peti-Peterdi, Janos; Bell, P Darwin

    2005-02-01

    Functional and immunohistological studies were performed to identify basolateral chloride/bicarbonate exchange in macula densa cells. Using the isolated, perfused thick ascending limb with attached glomerulus preparation dissected from rabbit kidney, macula densa intracellular pH (pH(i)) was measured with fluorescence microscopy and BCECF. For these experiments, basolateral chloride was reduced, resulting in reversible macula densa cell alkalinization. Anion exchange activity was assessed by measuring the maximal net base efflux on readdition of bath chloride. Anion exchange activity required the presence of bicarbonate, was independent of changes in membrane potential, did not require the presence of sodium, and was inhibited by high concentrations of DIDS. Inhibition of macula densa anion exchange activity by basolateral DIDS increased luminal NaCl concentration-induced elevations in pH(i). Immunohistochemical studies using antibodies against AE2 demonstrated expression of AE2 along the basolateral membrane of macula densa cells of rabbit kidney. These results suggest that macula densa cells functionally and immunologically express a chloride/bicarbonate exchanger at the basolateral membrane. This transporter likely participates in the regulation of pH(i) and might be involved in macula densa signaling.

  9. Studying calcium triggered vesicle fusion in a single vesicle-vesicle content/lipid mixing system

    PubMed Central

    Kyoung, Minjoung; Zhang, Yunxiang; Diao, Jiajie; Chu, Steven; Brunger, Axel T.

    2013-01-01

    This Protocol describes a single vesicle-vesicle microscopy system to study Ca2+-triggered vesicle fusion. Donor vesicles contain reconstituted synaptobrevin and synaptotagmin-1. Acceptor vesicles contain reconstituted syntaxin and SNAP-25, and are tethered to a PEG-coated glass surface. Donor vesicles are mixed with the tethered acceptor vesicles and incubated for several minutes at zero Ca2+-concentration, resulting in a collection of single interacting vesicle pairs. The donor vesicles also contain two spectrally distinct fluorophores that allow simultaneous monitoring of temporal changes of the content and membrane. Upon Ca2+-injection into the sample chamber, our system therefore differentiates between hemifusion and complete fusion of interacting vesicle pairs and determines the temporal sequence of these events on a sub-hundred millisecond timescale. Other factors, such as complexin, can be easily added. Our system is unique by monitoring both content and lipid mixing, and by starting from a metastable state of interacting vesicle pairs prior to Ca2+-injection. PMID:23222454

  10. Shapes of Mixed Phospholipid Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Aranda-Espinoza, Helim; Maldonado, Amir

    2006-01-01

    We studied the shape of phospholipid vesicles prepared by hydration of a mixture of phosphatidylcholine (SOPC) and phosphatidylserine (SOPS) in different proportions. The aim of the work is to obtain some insight into the influence of the chemical composition of a biomembrane on its shape. The optical microscopy results show that the shape of the vesicles depend on the SOPC:SOPS composition. For low SOPS contents, coiled cylindrical vesicles are observed. The results suggest that specific compositions of the SOPC:SOPS vesicles produce some spontaneous curvature on the membrane and then a coiling instability. PMID:19669461

  11. Cation Activation of the Basolateral Sodium-Potassium Pump in Turtle Colon

    PubMed Central

    Halm, D R; Dawson, D C

    1983-01-01

    The current generated by electrogenic sodium-potassium exchange at the basolateral membrane of the turtle colon can be measured directly in tissues that have been treated with serosal barium (to block the basolateral potassium conductance) and mucosal amphotericin B (to reduce the cation selectivity of the apical membrane). We studied the activation of this pump current by mucosal sodium and serosal potassium, rubidium, cesium, and ammonium. The kinetics of sodium activation were consistent with binding to three independent sites on the cytoplasmic side of the pump. The pump was not activated by cellular lithium ions. The kinetics of serosal cation activation were consistent with binding to two independent sites with the selectivity Rb > K > Cs > NH4. The properties and kinetics of the basolateral Na/K pump in the turtle colon are at least qualitatively similar to those ofthe well-characterized Na/K-ATPase of the human red blood cell . PMID:24244010

  12. Gas vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Walsby, A E

    1994-01-01

    The gas vesicle is a hollow structure made of protein. It usually has the form of a cylindrical tube closed by conical end caps. Gas vesicles occur in five phyla of the Bacteria and two groups of the Archaea, but they are mostly restricted to planktonic microorganisms, in which they provide buoyancy. By regulating their relative gas vesicle content aquatic microbes are able to perform vertical migrations. In slowly growing organisms such movements are made more efficiently than by swimming with flagella. The gas vesicle is impermeable to liquid water, but it is highly permeable to gases and is normally filled with air. It is a rigid structure of low compressibility, but it collapses flat under a certain critical pressure and buoyancy is then lost. Gas vesicles in different organisms vary in width, from 45 to > 200 nm; in accordance with engineering principles the narrower ones are stronger (have higher critical pressures) than wide ones, but they contain less gas space per wall volume and are therefore less efficient at providing buoyancy. A survey of gas-vacuolate cyanobacteria reveals that there has been natural selection for gas vesicles of the maximum width permitted by the pressure encountered in the natural environment, which is mainly determined by cell turgor pressure and water depth. Gas vesicle width is genetically determined, perhaps through the amino acid sequence of one of the constituent proteins. Up to 14 genes have been implicated in gas vesicle production, but so far the products of only two have been shown to be present in the gas vesicle: GvpA makes the ribs that form the structure, and GvpC binds to the outside of the ribs and stiffens the structure against collapse. The evolution of the gas vesicle is discussed in relation to the homologies of these proteins. Images PMID:8177173

  13. The Effect of Hydrophilic Substitutions and Anionic Lipids Upon the Transverse Positioning of the Transmembrane Helix of the Erb b2 (neu) Protein Incorporated into Model Membrane Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Shahidullah, Khurshida; Krishnakumar, Shyam S.; London, Erwin

    2009-01-01

    The sequence of the transmembrane (TM) helix of Erb b2, a member of the epidermal growth factor receptor family, can influence its activity. In this report, the sequence and lipid dependence of the transverse position of a model membrane-inserted peptide containing the Erb b2 TM helix and juxtamembrane (JM) residues was studied. For the Erb b2 TM helix inserted into phosphatidylcholine vesicles, the activating V664E mutation was found to induce a transverse shift involving the movement of the E residue towards the membrane surface. This shortened the effective length of the TM spanning portion of the sequence. The transverse shift was observed with both the E664 residue in the uncharged and charged state, but the extent of the shift was larger when the E residue was charged. When a series of hydrophilic residues was substituted for V664 the resulting transverse shifts at pH 7 decreased in the order D,H>E>Q>K>G>V. Except for His, this order is strongly correlated to that reported for the degree to which these substitutions induce cellular transformation when introduced into full length Erb b2. To examine the effect of lipid on transverse shift, the uncharged V664Q mutation was studied. The presence of 20% of the anionic lipid dioleoylphosphatidylserine (DOPS) in the model membrane vesicles, which introduces a physiologically relevant level of anionic lipid, did not affect the degree of transverse shift. However, in the case of a peptide containing a V674Q substitution, in which the Q is closer to the C-terminal of the Erb b2 TM helix than the N-terminal, transverse shift was suppressed in vesicles containing 20% DOPS. This suggests that the interaction of the cationic JM residues flanking the C-terminus of the Erb b2 TM helix interact with anionic lipids to anchor the C-terminal end of the TM helix. This anchoring site may act as a pivot which amplifies transverse movements of the Erb b2 TM segment to induce a large swinging-type motion in the extracellular domain

  14. Helicobacter pylori ATCC 43629/NCTC 11639 Outer Membrane Vesicles (OMVs) from Biofilm and Planktonic Phase Associated with Extracellular DNA (eDNA)

    PubMed Central

    Grande, Rossella; Di Marcantonio, Maria C.; Robuffo, Iole; Pompilio, Arianna; Celia, Christian; Di Marzio, Luisa; Paolino, Donatella; Codagnone, Marilina; Muraro, Raffaella; Stoodley, Paul; Hall-Stoodley, Luanne; Mincione, Gabriella

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori persistence is associated with its capacity to develop biofilms as a response to changing environmental conditions and stress. Extracellular DNA (eDNA) is a component of H. pylori biofilm matrix but the lack of DNase I activity supports the hypothesis that eDNA might be protected by other extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and/or Outer Membrane Vesicles (OMVs), which bleb from the bacteria surface during growth. The aim of the present study was to both identify the eDNA presence on OMVs segregated from H. pylori ATCC 43629/NCTC 11639 biofilm (bOMVs) and its planktonic phase (pOMVs) and to characterize the physical-chemical properties of the OMVs. The presence of eDNA in bOMVs and pOMVs was initially carried out using DNase I-gold complex labeling and Transmission Electron Microscope analysis (TEM). bOMVs and pOMVs were further isolated and physical-chemical characterization carried out using dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis. eDNA associated with OMVs was detected and quantified using a PicoGreen spectrophotometer assay, while its extraction was performed with a DNA Kit. TEM images showed that eDNA was mainly associated with the OMV membrane surfaces; while PicoGreen staining showed a four-fold increase of dsDNA in bOMVs compared with pOMVs. The eDNA extracted from OMVs was visualized using gel electrophoresis. DLS analysis indicated that both planktonic and biofilm H. pylori phenotypes generated vesicles, with a broad distribution of sizes on the nanometer scale. The DLS aggregation assay suggested that eDNA may play a role in the aggregation of OMVs, in the biofilm phenotype. Moreover, the eDNA associated with vesicle membrane may impede DNase I activity on H. pylori biofilms. These results suggest that OMVs derived from the H. pylori biofilm phenotype may play a structural role by preventing eDNA degradation by nucleases, providing a bridging function between eDNA strands on OMV surfaces and promoting aggregation. PMID:26733944

  15. Clostridium difficile-derived membrane vesicles induce the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes and cytotoxicity in colonic epithelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Asiimwe; Jeon, Hyejin; Selasi, Gati Noble; Na, Seok Hyeon; Kwon, Hyo Il; Kim, Yoo Jeong; Choi, Chi Won; Kim, Seung Il; Lee, Je Chul

    2017-03-09

    Clostridium difficile is the most common etiological agent of antibiotic-associated diarrhea in hospitalized and non-hospitalized patients. This study investigated the secretion of membrane vesicles (MVs) from C. difficile and determined the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes and cytotoxicity of C. difficile MVs in epithelial cells in vitro. C. difficile ATCC 43255 and two clinical isolates secreted spherical MVs during in vitro culture. Proteomic analysis revealed that MVs of C. difficile ATCC 43255 contained a total of 262 proteins. Translation-associated proteins were the most commonly identified in C. difficile MVs, whereas TcdA and TcdB toxins were not detected. C. difficile ATCC 43255-derived MVs stimulated the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes, including interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in human colorectal epithelial Caco-2 cells. Moreover, these extracellular vesicles induced cytotoxicity in Caco-2 cells. In conclusion, C. difficile MVs are important nanocomplexes that elicit a pro-inflammatory response and induce cytotoxicity in colonic epithelial cells, which may contribute, along with toxins, to intestinal mucosal injury during C. difficile infection.

  16. Basolateral potassium (IKCa) channel inhibition prevents increased colonic permeability induced by chemical hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Loganathan, A; Linley, J E; Rajput, I; Hunter, M; Lodge, J P A; Sandle, G I

    2011-01-01

    Major liver resection is associated with impaired intestinal perfusion and intestinal ischemia, resulting in decreased mucosal integrity, increased bacterial translocation, and an increased risk of postoperative sepsis. However, the mechanism by which ischemia impairs intestinal mucosal integrity is unclear. We therefore evaluated the role of Ca(2+)-sensitive, intermediate-conductance (IK(Ca)) basolateral potassium channels in enhanced intestinal permeability secondary to chemical hypoxia. The effects of chemical hypoxia induced by 100 μM dinitrophenol (DNP) and 5 mM deoxyglucose (DG) on basolateral IK(Ca) channel activity and whole cell conductance in intact human colonic crypts, and paracellular permeability (G(S)) in isolated colonic sheets, were determined by patch-clamp recording and transepithelial electrical measurements, respectively. DNP and DG rapidly stimulated IK(Ca) channels in cell-attached basolateral membrane patches and elicited a twofold increase (P = 0.004) in whole cell conductance in amphotericin B-permeabilized membrane patches, changes that were inhibited by the specific IK(Ca) channel blockers TRAM-34 (100 nM) and clotrimazole (CLT; 10 μM). In colonic sheets apically permeabilized with nystatin, DNP elicited a twofold increase (P = 0.005) in G(S), which was largely inhibited by the serosal addition of 50 μM CLT. We conclude that, in intestinal epithelia, chemical hypoxia increases G(S) through a mechanism involving basolateral IK(Ca) channel activation. Basolateral IK(Ca) channel inhibition may prevent or limit increased intestinal permeability during liver surgery.

  17. Cell-permeable ceramides preferentially inhibit coated vesicle formation and exocytosis in Chinese hamster ovary compared with Madin-Darby canine kidney cells by preventing the membrane association of ADP-ribosylation factor.

    PubMed Central

    Abousalham, Abdelkarim; Hobman, Tom C; Dewald, Jay; Garbutt, Michael; Brindley, David N

    2002-01-01

    Differential effects of acetyl(C2-) ceramide (N-acetylsphingosine) were studied on coated vesicle formation from Golgi-enriched membranes of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. C2-ceramide blocked the translocation of ADP-ribosylation factor-1 (ARF-1) and protein kinase C-alpha (PKC-alpha) to the membranes from CHO cells, but not those of MDCK cells. Consequently, C2-ceramide blocked the stimulation of phospholipase D1 (PLD1) by the cytosol and guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate (GTP[S]) in membranes from CHO cells. Basal specific activity of PLD1 and the concentration of ARF-1 were 3-4 times higher in Golgi-enriched membranes from MDCK cells compared with CHO cells. Moreover, PLD1 activity in MDCK cells was stimulated less by cytosol and GTP[S]. PLD2 was not detectable in the Golgi-enriched membranes. Incubation of intact CHO cells or their Golgi-enriched membranes with C2-ceramide also inhibited COP1 vesicle formation by membranes from CHO, but not MDCK, cells. Specificity was demonstrated, since dihydro-C2-ceramide had no significant effect on ARF-1 translocation, PLD1 activation or vesicle formation in membranes from both cell types. C2-ceramide also decreased the secretion of virus-like particles to a greater extent in CHO compared with MDCK cells, whereas dihydro-C2-ceramide had no significant effect. The results demonstrate a biological effect of C2-ceramide in CHO cells by decreasing ARF-1 and PKC-alpha binding to Golgi-enriched membranes, thereby preventing COP1 vesicle formation. PMID:11802796

  18. Dynamin self-assembly and the vesicle scission mechanism: how dynamin oligomers cleave the membrane neck of clathrin-coated pits during endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Pawlowski, Nikolaus

    2010-12-01

    Recently, Gao et al. and Chappie et al. elucidated the crystal structures of the polytetrameric stalk domain of the dynamin-like virus resistance protein, MxA, and of the G-domain dimer of the large, membrane-deforming GTPase, dynamin, respectively. Combined, they provide a hypothetical oligomeric structure for the complete dynamin protein. Here, it is discussed how the oligomers are expected to form and how they participate in dynamin mediated vesicle fission during the process of endocytosis. The proposed oligomeric structure is compared with the novel mechanochemical model of dynamin function recently proposed by Bashkirov et al. and Pucadyil and Schmid. In conclusion, the new model of the dynamin oligomer has the potential to explain how short self-limiting fissogenic dynamin assemblies are formed and how concerted GTP hydrolysis is achieved. The oligomerisation of two other dynamin superfamily proteins, the guanylate binding proteins (GBPs) and the immunity-related GTPases (IRGs), is addressed briefly.

  19. The 4p16.3 Parkinson Disease Risk Locus Is Associated with GAK Expression and Genes Involved with the Synaptic Vesicle Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Nagle, Michael W.; Latourelle, Jeanne C.; Labadorf, Adam; Dumitriu, Alexandra; Hadzi, Tiffany C.; Beach, Thomas G.; Myers, Richard H.

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified the GAK/DGKQ/IDUA region on 4p16.3 among the top three risk loci for Parkinson’s disease (PD), but the specific gene and risk mechanism are unclear. Here, we report transcripts containing the 3’ clathrin-binding domain of GAK identified by RNA deep-sequencing in post-mortem human brain tissue as having increased expression in PD. Furthermore, carriers of 4p16.3 PD GWAS risk SNPs show decreased expression of one of these transcripts, GAK25 (Gencode Transcript 009), which correlates with the expression of genes functioning in the synaptic vesicle membrane. Together, these findings provide strong evidence for GAK clathrin-binding- and J-domain transcripts’ influence on PD pathogenicity, and for a role for GAK in regulating synaptic function in PD. PMID:27508417

  20. The 4p16.3 Parkinson Disease Risk Locus Is Associated with GAK Expression and Genes Involved with the Synaptic Vesicle Membrane.

    PubMed

    Nagle, Michael W; Latourelle, Jeanne C; Labadorf, Adam; Dumitriu, Alexandra; Hadzi, Tiffany C; Beach, Thomas G; Myers, Richard H

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified the GAK/DGKQ/IDUA region on 4p16.3 among the top three risk loci for Parkinson's disease (PD), but the specific gene and risk mechanism are unclear. Here, we report transcripts containing the 3' clathrin-binding domain of GAK identified by RNA deep-sequencing in post-mortem human brain tissue as having increased expression in PD. Furthermore, carriers of 4p16.3 PD GWAS risk SNPs show decreased expression of one of these transcripts, GAK25 (Gencode Transcript 009), which correlates with the expression of genes functioning in the synaptic vesicle membrane. Together, these findings provide strong evidence for GAK clathrin-binding- and J-domain transcripts' influence on PD pathogenicity, and for a role for GAK in regulating synaptic function in PD.

  1. Disruption of Membranes of Extracellular Vesicles Is Necessary for ELISA Determination of Urine AQP2: Proof of Disruption and Epitopes of AQP2 Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Nameta, Masaaki; Saijo, Yoko; Ohmoto, Yasukazu; Katsuragi, Kiyonori; Yamamoto, Keiko; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Ishibashi, Kenichi; Sasaki, Sei

    2016-01-01

    Aquaporin-2 (AQP2) is present in urine extracellular vesicles (EVs) and is a useful biomarker for water balance disorders. We previously found that pre-treatment of urine with alkali/detergent or storage at −25 °C is required for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) measurement. We speculated that disruptions of EVs membranes are necessary to allow for the direct contact of antibodies with their epitopes. Human urine EVs were prepared using an ultracentrifugation method. Urine EV samples were stored at different temperatures for a week. Electron microscopy showed abundant EVs with diameters of 20–100 nm, consistent with those of exosomes, in normal urine, whereas samples from alkali/detergent pre-treated urine showed fewer EVs with large swollen shapes and frequent membrane disruptions. The abundance and structures of EVs were maintained during storage at −80 °C, but were severely damaged at −25 °C. Binding and competitive inhibition assays showed that epitopes of monoclonal antibody and polyclonal antibody were the hydrophilic Loop D and C-terminus of AQP2, respectively, both of which are present on the inner surface of EVs. Thus, urine storage at −25 °C or pre-treatment with alkali/detergent disrupt EVs membranes and allow AQP2 antibodies to bind to their epitopes located inside EVs. PMID:27681727

  2. Modulation of plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase by neutral phospholipids: effect of the micelle-vesicle transition and the bilayer thickness.

    PubMed

    Pignataro, María Florencia; Dodes-Traian, Martín M; González-Flecha, F Luis; Sica, Mauricio; Mangialavori, Irene C; Rossi, Juan Pablo F C

    2015-03-06

    The effects of lipids on membrane proteins are likely to be complex and unique for each membrane protein. Here we studied different detergent/phosphatidylcholine reconstitution media and tested their effects on plasma membrane Ca(2+) pump (PMCA). We found that Ca(2+)-ATPase activity shows a biphasic behavior with respect to the detergent/phosphatidylcholine ratio. Moreover, the maximal Ca(2+)-ATPase activity largely depends on the length and the unsaturation degree of the hydrocarbon chain. Using static light scattering and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, we monitored the changes in hydrodynamic radius of detergent/phosphatidylcholine particles during the micelle-vesicle transition. We found that, when PMCA is reconstituted in mixed micelles, neutral phospholipids increase the enzyme turnover. The biophysical changes associated with the transition from mixed micelles to bicelles increase the time of residence of the phosphorylated intermediate (EP), decreasing the enzyme turnover. Molecular dynamics simulations analysis of the interactions between PMCA and the phospholipid bilayer in which it is embedded show that in the 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine bilayer, charged residues of the protein are trapped in the hydrophobic core. Conversely, in the 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine bilayer, the overall hydrophobic-hydrophilic requirements of the protein surface are fulfilled the best, reducing the thermodynamic cost of exposing charged residues to the hydrophobic core. The apparent mismatch produced by a 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine thicker bilayer could be a structural foundation to explain its functional effect on PMCA.

  3. Outer membrane vesicles derived from Salmonella Typhimurium mutants with truncated LPS induce cross-protective immune responses against infection of Salmonella enterica serovars in the mouse model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiong; Liu, Qing; Yi, Jie; Liang, Kang; Liu, Tian; Roland, Kenneth L; Jiang, Yanlong; Kong, Qingke

    2016-12-01

    Salmonella enterica cause diarrheal and systemic diseases and are of considerable concern worldwide. Vaccines that are cross-protective against multiple serovars could provide effective control of Salmonella-mediated diseases. Bacteria-derived outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are highly immunogenic and are capable of eliciting protective immune responses. Alterations in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) length can result in outer membrane remodeling and composition of outer membrane proteins (OMPs) changing. In this study, we investigated the impact of truncated LPS on both the production and immunogenicity of Salmonella OMVs, including the ability of OMVs to elicit cross-protection against challenge by heterologous Salmonella strains. We found that mutations in waaJ and rfbP enhanced vesiculation, while mutations in waaC, waaF and waaG inhibited this process. Animal experiments indicated that OMVs from waaC, rfaH and rfbP mutants induced stronger serum immune responses compared to OMVs from the parent strain, while all elicited protective responses against the wild-type S. Typhimurium challenge. Furthermore, intranasal or intraperitoneal immunization with OMVs derived from the waaC and rfbP mutants elicited significantly higher cross-reactive IgG responses and provided enhanced cross-protection against S. Choleraesuis and S. Enteritidis challenge than the wild-type OMVs. These results indicate that truncated-LPS OMVs are capable of conferring cross protection against multiple serotypes of Salmonella infection.

  4. Secretory carrier membrane protein SCAMP2 and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate interactions in the regulation of dense core vesicle exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Liao, Haini; Ellena, Jeff; Liu, Lixia; Szabo, Gabor; Cafiso, David; Castle, David

    2007-09-25

    Secretory carrier membrane protein 2 (SCAMP2) functions in late steps of membrane fusion in calcium-dependent granule exocytosis. A basic/hydrophobic peptide segment within SCAMP2 (SCAMP2 E: CWYRPIYKAFR) has been implicated in this function and shown to bind and sequester phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2 or PIP2] within membranes through an electrostatic mechanism. We now show that alanine substitution of tryptophan W2 within SCAMP2 E substantially weakens peptide binding to negatively charged liposomes; other substitutions for arginine R4 and lysine K8 have only lim