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Sample records for battery explosion caused

  1. The Relation of Batteries to Explosives.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    aqueous systems was discussed for the mercury and lead acid systems. If initiation of an explosive reaction does not occur, these gases can 4-2 - ~W...Interfacial Electrochemistry, 53, (1974), 329-333. 2 5Mills, K. C., Therodynamic Data for Inorganic Sulphides , Selenides and Tellurides, 1974, p. 26

  2. Facial trauma caused by electronic cigarette explosion.

    PubMed

    Vaught, Brian; Spellman, Joseph; Shah, Anil; Stewart, Alexander; Mullin, David

    2017-03-01

    Electronic cigarettes are increasingly popular as a supposed safer alternative to tobacco cigarettes or a smoking cessation tool. Research and debate have focused primarily on possible adverse effects caused by the inhaled aerosol produced by electronic cigarettes and on smoking cessation efficacy. Few reports in the medical literature describe injuries secondary to device malfunction. We present a case of electronic cigarette explosion, with a projectile fracturing the patient's right naso-orbital-ethmoid complex and anterior and posterior frontal sinus tables, with frontal sinus outflow tract involvement. The patient underwent combined open and endoscopic repair, including open reduction internal fixation, with reconstitution and preservation of the frontal sinus and frontal sinus outflow tract. Additionally, we review the available data on electronic cigarette malfunction-including fires, explosions, associated injuries, and possible reasons for device malfunction-and discuss new 2016 U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulations pertaining to electronic cigarettes.

  3. Cause of Cambrian Explosion - Terrestrial or Cosmic?

    PubMed

    Steele, Edward J; Al-Mufti, Shirwan; Augustyn, Kenneth A; Chandrajith, Rohana; Coghlan, John P; Coulson, S G; Ghosh, Sudipto; Gillman, Mark; Gorczynski, Reginald M; Klyce, Brig; Louis, Godfrey; Mahanama, Kithsiri; Oliver, Keith R; Padron, Julio; Qu, Jiangwen; Schuster, John A; Smith, W E; Snyder, Duane P; Steele, Julian A; Stewart, Brent J; Temple, Robert; Tokoro, Gensuke; Tout, Christopher A; Unzicker, Alexander; Wainwright, Milton; Wallis, Jamie; Wallis, Daryl H; Wallis, Max K; Wetherall, John; Wickramasinghe, D T; Wickramasinghe, J T; Wickramasinghe, N Chandra; Liu, Yongsheng

    2018-08-01

    We review the salient evidence consistent with or predicted by the Hoyle-Wickramasinghe (H-W) thesis of Cometary (Cosmic) Biology. Much of this physical and biological evidence is multifactorial. One particular focus are the recent studies which date the emergence of the complex retroviruses of vertebrate lines at or just before the Cambrian Explosion of ∼500 Ma. Such viruses are known to be plausibly associated with major evolutionary genomic processes. We believe this coincidence is not fortuitous but is consistent with a key prediction of H-W theory whereby major extinction-diversification evolutionary boundaries coincide with virus-bearing cometary-bolide bombardment events. A second focus is the remarkable evolution of intelligent complexity (Cephalopods) culminating in the emergence of the Octopus. A third focus concerns the micro-organism fossil evidence contained within meteorites as well as the detection in the upper atmosphere of apparent incoming life-bearing particles from space. In our view the totality of the multifactorial data and critical analyses assembled by Fred Hoyle, Chandra Wickramasinghe and their many colleagues since the 1960s leads to a very plausible conclusion - life may have been seeded here on Earth by life-bearing comets as soon as conditions on Earth allowed it to flourish (about or just before 4.1 Billion years ago); and living organisms such as space-resistant and space-hardy bacteria, viruses, more complex eukaryotic cells, fertilised ova and seeds have been continuously delivered ever since to Earth so being one important driver of further terrestrial evolution which has resulted in considerable genetic diversity and which has led to the emergence of mankind. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Corneoscleral Laceration and Ocular Burns Caused by Electronic Cigarette Explosions

    PubMed Central

    Paley, Grace L.; Echalier, Elizabeth; Eck, Thomas W.; Hong, Augustine R.; Gregory, Darren G.; Lubniewski, Anthony J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To report cases of acute globe rupture and bilateral corneal burns from electronic cigarette (EC) explosions. Methods: Case series. Results: We describe a series of patients with corneal injury caused by EC explosions. Both patients suffered bilateral corneal burns and decreased visual acuity, and one patient sustained a unilateral corneoscleral laceration with prolapsed iris tissue and hyphema. A review of the scientific literature revealed no prior reported cases of ocular injury secondary to EC explosions; however, multiple media and government agency articles describe fires and explosions involving ECs, including at least 4 with ocular injuries. Conclusions: Given these cases and the number of recent media reports, ECs pose a significant public health risk. Users should be warned regarding the possibility of severe injury, including sight-threatening ocular injuries ranging from corneal burns to full-thickness corneoscleral laceration. PMID:27191672

  5. Could a nearby supernova explosion have caused a mass extinction?

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, J; Schramm, D N

    1995-01-01

    We examine the possibility that a nearby supernova explosion could have caused one or more of the mass extinctions identified by paleontologists. We discuss the possible rate of such events in the light of the recent suggested identification of Geminga as a supernova remnant less than 100 parsec (pc) away and the discovery of a millisecond pulsar about 150 pc away and observations of SN 1987A. The fluxes of gamma-radiation and charged cosmic rays on the Earth are estimated, and their effects on the Earth's ozone layer are discussed. A supernova explosion of the order of 10 pc away could be expected as often as every few hundred million years and could destroy the ozone layer for hundreds of years, letting in potentially lethal solar ultraviolet radiation. In addition to effects on land ecology, this could entail mass destruction of plankton and reef communities, with disastrous consequences for marine life as well. A supernova extinction should be distinguishable from a meteorite impact such as the one that presumably killed the dinosaurs at the "KT boundary." The recent argument that the KT event was exceedingly large and thus quite rare supports the need for other catastrophic events. PMID:11607506

  6. Could a nearby supernova explosion have caused a mass extinction?

    PubMed

    Ellis, J; Schramm, D N

    1995-01-03

    We examine the possibility that a nearby supernova explosion could have caused one or more of the mass extinctions identified by paleontologists. We discuss the possible rate of such events in the light of the recent suggested identification of Geminga as a supernova remnant less than 100 parsec (pc) away and the discovery of a millisecond pulsar about 150 pc away and observations of SN 1987A. The fluxes of gamma-radiation and charged cosmic rays on the Earth are estimated, and their effects on the Earth's ozone layer are discussed. A supernova explosion of the order of 10 pc away could be expected as often as every few hundred million years and could destroy the ozone layer for hundreds of years, letting in potentially lethal solar ultraviolet radiation. In addition to effects on land ecology, this could entail mass destruction of plankton and reef communities, with disastrous consequences for marine life as well. A supernova extinction should be distinguishable from a meteorite impact such as the one that presumably killed the dinosaurs at the "KT boundary." The recent argument that the KT event was exceedingly large and thus quite rare supports the need for other catastrophic events.

  7. Could a nearby supernova explosion have caused a mass extinction?

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, J.; Schramm, D.N.

    1995-01-03

    We examine the possibility that a nearby supernova explosion could have caused one or more of the mass extinctions identified by paleontologists. We discuss the possible rate of such events in the light of the recent suggested identification of Geminga as a supernova remnant less than 100 parsec (pc) away and the discovery of a millisecond pulsar about 150 pc away and observations of SN 1987A. The fluxes of {gamma}-radiation and charged cosmic rays on the Earth are estimated, and their effects on the Earth`s ozone layer are discussed. A supernova explosion of the order of 10 pc away couldmore » be expected as often as every few hundred million years and could destroy the ozone layer for hundreds of years, letting in potentially lethal solar ultraviolet radiation. In addition to effects on land ecology, this could entail mass destruction of plankton and reef communities, with disastrous consequences for marine life as well. A supernova extinction should be distinguishable from a meteorite impact such as the one that presumably killed the dinosaurs at the {open_quotes}KT boundary.{close_quotes} The recent argument that the KT event was exceedingly large and thus quite rare supports the need for other catastrophic events. 24 refs.« less

  8. Cannibal Stars Cause Giant Explosions in Fornax Cluster Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-07-01

    The VLT Observes Most Remote Novae Ever Seen About 70 million years ago, when dinosaurs were still walking on the Earth, a series of violent thermo-nuclear explosions took place in a distant galaxy. After a very long travel across vast reaches of virtually empty space (70 million light-years, or ~ 7 x 10 20 km), dim light carrying the message about these events has finally reached us. It was recorded by the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) at the Paranal Observatory (Chile) during an observing programme by a group of Italian astronomers [1]. The subsequent analysis has shown that the observers witnessed the most distant nova outbursts ever seen . They were caused by "stellar cannibalism" in binary systems in which one relatively cool star loses matter to its smaller and hotter companion. An instability results that leads to the ignition of a "hydrogen bomb" on the surface of the receiving star. The "Stella Nova" Phenomenon A stellar outburst of the type now observed with the VLT is referred to as a "Stella Nova" ("new star" in Latin), or just "Nova" . Novae caused by explosions in binary stars in our home galaxy, the Milky Way system, are relatively frequent and about every second or third year one of them is bright enough to be easily visible with the naked eye. For our ancestors, who had no means to see the faint binary star before the explosion, it looked as if a new star had been born in the sky, hence the name. The most common nova explosion occurs in a binary stellar system in which a white dwarf (a very dense and hot, compact star with a mass comparable to that of the Sun and a size like the Earth) accretes hydrogen from a cooler and larger red dwarf star [2]. As the hydrogen collects on the surface of the white dwarf star, it becomes progressively hotter until a thermonuclear explosion is ignited at the bottom of the collected gas. A huge amount of energy is released and causes a million-fold increase in the brightness of the binary system within a few hours

  9. Cause and Prevention of Explosions Involving DC Casting of Aluminum Sheet Ingot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Ray T.; Ekenes, J. Martin

    The casting of aluminum alloy sheet ingot and T-bar presents the potential for some of the most volatile situations that can occur in DC (direct chill) and EMC (Electromagnetic) casting processes. Aluminum Association explosion incident data from over 300 explosions spanning a twenty-year period were reviewed and analyzed looking for common factors and repetitive reasons for explosions. Analysis of explosions occurring during the three stages of sheet ingot casting, `start of cast', `steady state' and `end of cast', were examined and prioritized. Case studies illustrate the need for understanding both technical and non-technical factors contributing to explosions involving molten metal. This paper identifies the major causes of explosions involving DC casting of aluminum alloy sheet ingot and makes recommendations for how to prevent the recurrence of such events and minimize the risk of injury.

  10. Explosive detonation causes an increase in soil porosity leading to increased TNT transformation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Holly A; Nic Daeid, Niamh; Dawson, Lorna A; DeTata, David A; Lewis, Simon W

    2017-01-01

    Explosives are a common soil contaminant at a range of sites, including explosives manufacturing plants and areas associated with landmine detonations. As many explosives are toxic and may cause adverse environmental effects, a large body of research has targeted the remediation of explosives residues in soil. Studies in this area have largely involved spiking 'pristine' soils using explosives solutions. Here we investigate the fate of explosives present in soils following an actual detonation process and compare this to the fate of explosives spiked into 'pristine' undetonated soils. We also assess the effects of the detonations on the physical properties of the soils. Our scanning electron microscopy analyses reveal that detonations result in newly-fractured planes within the soil aggregates, and novel micro Computed Tomography analyses of the soils reveal, for the first time, the effect of the detonations on the internal architecture of the soils. We demonstrate that detonations cause an increase in soil porosity, and this correlates to an increased rate of TNT transformation and loss within the detonated soils, compared to spiked pristine soils. We propose that this increased TNT transformation is due to an increased bioavailability of the TNT within the now more porous post-detonation soils, making the TNT more easily accessible by soil-borne bacteria for potential biodegradation. This new discovery potentially exposes novel remediation methods for explosive contaminated soils where actual detonation of the soil significantly promotes subsequent TNT degradation. This work also suggests previously unexplored ramifications associated with high energy soil disruption.

  11. An explosion in the mouth caused by a firework.

    PubMed

    Di Benedetto, Giovanni; Grassetti, Luca; Forlini, William; Bertani, Aldo

    2009-06-01

    Explosion and gunshot mouth injuries represent a challenging problem with regard to restoring optimal oral function. These wounds exhibit a spectrum of complexity and mostly include extensive soft tissue trauma complicated by burns, foreign bodies, fractures and concomitant traumas. To gain maximal restoration of oral function, the use of reconstructive techniques, together with microsurgical techniques, such as grafting of nerves, vessels and soft tissue, as an acute free flap to cover a large defect, are immediately necessary. We report the case of a young Caucasian patient who destroyed the middle and lower thirds of the face when a firecracker blasted in his mouth. His clinical history is unusual in terms of the modality of injury, i.e. a Russian roulette game, and the lesions suffered, in the reconstruction of which we used both surgical and microsurgical techniques.

  12. Uncontacted tire explosion causing trauma to bilateral lower extremities: A case report.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ming-Yang; Su, Yun; Meng, Xiang-Jun; Luan, Bo-Wu; Gu, Gui-Shan; Sun, Qiang; Zhao, De-Wei

    2017-06-01

    It is uncommon for tire explosion related injuries on the lower extremity. The bilateral lower extremities were injured by tire explosion when the patient was seated in a bus. She sustained an open fracture with partial bone loss in the right calcaneus (a comminuted fracture in the right ankle joint) and a closed comminuted fracture in the left tibia and fibula. This damage was caused by uncontacted tire explosion, thanks to a thick floor between the exploded tire and the patient's feet. This type of injury on lower extremity caused by uncontacted tire explosion was uncommon. Copyright © 2017 Daping Hospital and the Research Institute of Surgery of the Third Military Medical University. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A short history of fires and explosions caused by anaesthetic agents.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, A G

    1994-06-01

    The first recorded fire resulting from the use of an anaesthetic agent occurred in 1850, when ether caught fire during a facial operation. Many subsequent fires and explosions have been reported, caused by ether, acetylene, ethylene and cyclopropane, and there has been one reported explosion involving halothane. Although some of the earlier incidents caused more consternation than injury, many of the later ones caused much death and destruction, particularly after the practice of administering oxygen, instead of air, became established. Many incidents have never been reported and many of those which have reached publication do not record essential details. The use of flammable agents has decreased significantly in recent years and although fires and explosions from nonanaesthetic causes, for example gastrointestinal gases, skin sterilizing agents and laser surgery, may continue to occur, those from gaseous and volatile anaesthetic agents may now be of historical interest only. This article reviews some of the more relevant and enlightening reports of the past 150 yr.

  14. Wheelbarrow tire explosion causing trauma to the forearm and hand: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Tire explosion injuries are rare, but they may result in a severe injury pattern. Case reports and statistics from injuries caused by exploded truck tires during servicing are established, but trauma from exploded small tires seems to be unknown. Case presentation A 47-year-old german man inflated a wheelbarrow tire. The tire exploded during inflation and caused an open, multiple forearm and hand injury. Conclusion Even small tires can cause severe injury patterns in the case of an explosion. High inflating pressures and low safety distances are the main factors responsible for this occurrence. Broad safety information and suitable filling devices are indispensable for preventing these occurrences. PMID:19946543

  15. Explosive detonation causes an increase in soil porosity leading to increased TNT transformation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Holly A.; Nic Daeid, Niamh; Dawson, Lorna A.; DeTata, David A.; Lewis, Simon W.

    2017-01-01

    Explosives are a common soil contaminant at a range of sites, including explosives manufacturing plants and areas associated with landmine detonations. As many explosives are toxic and may cause adverse environmental effects, a large body of research has targeted the remediation of explosives residues in soil. Studies in this area have largely involved spiking ‘pristine’ soils using explosives solutions. Here we investigate the fate of explosives present in soils following an actual detonation process and compare this to the fate of explosives spiked into ‘pristine’ undetonated soils. We also assess the effects of the detonations on the physical properties of the soils. Our scanning electron microscopy analyses reveal that detonations result in newly-fractured planes within the soil aggregates, and novel micro Computed Tomography analyses of the soils reveal, for the first time, the effect of the detonations on the internal architecture of the soils. We demonstrate that detonations cause an increase in soil porosity, and this correlates to an increased rate of TNT transformation and loss within the detonated soils, compared to spiked pristine soils. We propose that this increased TNT transformation is due to an increased bioavailability of the TNT within the now more porous post-detonation soils, making the TNT more easily accessible by soil-borne bacteria for potential biodegradation. This new discovery potentially exposes novel remediation methods for explosive contaminated soils where actual detonation of the soil significantly promotes subsequent TNT degradation. This work also suggests previously unexplored ramifications associated with high energy soil disruption. PMID:29281650

  16. The acoustic field in the ionosphere caused by an underground nuclear explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnov, V. M.; Drobzheva, Ya. V.

    2005-07-01

    The problem of describing the generation and propagation of an infrasonic wave emitted by a finite extended source in the inhomogeneous absorbing atmosphere is the focus of this paper. It is of interest since the role of infrasonic waves in the energy balance of the upper atmosphere remains largely unknown. We present an algorithm, which allows adaptation of a point source model for calculating the infrasonic field from an underground nuclear explosion at ionospheric altitudes. Our calculations appear to agree remarkably well with HF Doppler sounding data measured for underground nuclear explosions at the Semipalatinsk Test Site. We show that the temperature and ionospheric electron density perturbation caused by an acoustic wave from underground nuclear explosion can reach 10% of background levels.

  17. The ionospheric disturbances caused by the explosion of the Mount Tongariro volcano in 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Po Cheng, C.; Lin, C.; Chang, L. C.; Chen, C.

    2013-12-01

    Volcanic explosions are known to trigger acoustic waves that propagate in the atmosphere at infrasonic speeds. At ionospheric heights, coupling between neutral particles and free electrons induces variations of electron density detectable by dual-frequency Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements. In November 21 2012, the explosion of the Mount Tongariro volcano in New Zealand occurred at UT 0:20, when there were active synoptic waves passing over north New Zealand. The New Zealand dense array of Global Positioning System recorded ionospheric disturbances reflected in total electron content (TEC) ~10 minutes after the eruption, and the concentric spread of disturbances also can be observed this day. The velocity of disturbances varies from 130m/s to 700m/s. A spectral analysis of the rTEC time series shows two peaks. The larger amplitudes are centered at 800 and 1500 seconds, in the frequency range of acoustic waves and gravity waves. On the other hand, to model the rTEC perturbation created by the acoustic wave caused by the explosive eruption of the Mount Tongariro, we perform acoustic ray tracing and obtain sound speed at subionospheric height in a horizontally stratified atmosphere model (MSIS-E-90). The result show that the velocity of the disturbances is slower than sound speed range. Through using the MSIS-E-90 Atmosphere Model and Horizontal Wind Model(HWM), we obtain the vertical wave number and indicate that the gravity waves could propagate at subionospheric height for this event, suggesting that the ionospheric disturbances caused by the explosive eruption is gravity-wave type. This work demonstrates that GPS are useful for near real-time ionospheric disturbances monitoring, and help to understand the mechanism of the gravity wave caused by volcano eruption in the future.

  18. Esophageal rupture caused by explosion of an automobile tire tube: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yongkang; Ding, Sheng; Zheng, Yifeng; Li, Wei; Yang, Lie; Zheng, Xiushan; Liu, Xiaoyan; Jiang, Jianqing

    2013-08-23

    There have been no reports in the literature of esophageal rupture in adults resulting from an explosion of an automobile tire. We report the first case of just such an occurrence after an individual bit into a tire, causing it to explode in his mouth. A 47-year-old Han Chinese man presented with massive hemorrhage in his left eye after he accidentally bit an automobile tire tube which burst into his mouth. He was diagnosed with esophageal rupture based on a chest computed tomography scan and barium swallow examination. Drainage of empyema (right chest), removal of thoracic esophagus, exposure of cervical esophagus, cardiac ligation and gastrostomy were performed respectively. After that, esophagogastrostomy was performed. Successful anastomosis was obtained at the neck with no postoperative complications 3 months after the surgery. The patient was discharged with satisfactory outcomes. We present this case report to bring attention to esophageal rupture in adults during the explosion of an automobile tire tube in the mouth.

  19. An unusual burn injury caused by a car battery.

    PubMed

    Nisanci, Mustafa; Sengezer, Mustafa; Durmuş, Muzaffer

    2005-01-01

    In a car battery accident, a 21-year old man sustained a band of deep burn involving the dorsoradial aspect of the wrist. He was treated by excision and grafting on the third day after injury. A metal watchstrap that the patient was wearing, with evidence of the arching phenomenon on it, short-circuited the battery of the vehicle. Although the underlying etiology that triggered the events leading to thermal injury was an electrical accident, the current did not pass through any part of the patient's body, as what happens in an electrical injury. In our current understanding, the pathophysiology of electrical injury dictates the transmission of current through living tissues, leading to a specific type of tissue damage that should be distinguishable from the type that results from a usual thermal injury, as it happened in our case.

  20. Identifying the Cause of Rupture of Li-Ion Batteries during Thermal Runaway.

    PubMed

    Finegan, Donal P; Darcy, Eric; Keyser, Matthew; Tjaden, Bernhard; Heenan, Thomas M M; Jervis, Rhodri; Bailey, Josh J; Vo, Nghia T; Magdysyuk, Oxana V; Drakopoulos, Michael; Michiel, Marco Di; Rack, Alexander; Hinds, Gareth; Brett, Dan J L; Shearing, Paul R

    2018-01-01

    As the energy density of lithium-ion cells and batteries increases, controlling the outcomes of thermal runaway becomes more challenging. If the high rate of gas generation during thermal runaway is not adequately vented, commercial cell designs can rupture and explode, presenting serious safety concerns. Here, ultra-high-speed synchrotron X-ray imaging is used at >20 000 frames per second to characterize the venting processes of six different 18650 cell designs undergoing thermal runaway. For the first time, the mechanisms that lead to the most catastrophic type of cell failure, rupture, and explosion are identified and elucidated in detail. The practical application of the technique is highlighted by evaluating a novel 18650 cell design with a second vent at the base, which is shown to avoid the critical stages that lead to rupture. The insights yielded in this study shed new light on battery failure and are expected to guide the development of safer commercial cell designs.

  1. Hazardous behavior of lithium batteries. Case histories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marincic, N.

    1983-01-01

    Case histories were described of hazardous behavior for three different cell sizes ranging in nominal capacity from 300 mAh to 12,000 Ah. Design characteristics and other facts believed to have been responsible for the cell explosions, are presented. Obvious facts are discussed as causes for hazardous behavior of lithium batteries in general and oxyhalide batteries in particular.

  2. Gasoline-powered series hybrid cars cause lower life cycle carbon emissions than battery cars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinrenken, Christoph; Lackner, Klaus S.

    2012-02-01

    Battery cars powered by grid electricity promise reduced life cycle green house gas (GHG) emissions from the automotive sector. Such scenarios usually point to the much higher emissions from conventional, internal combustion engine cars. However, today's commercially available series hybrid technology achieves the well known efficiency gains in electric drivetrains (regenerative breaking, lack of gearbox) even if the electricity is generated onboard, from conventional fuels. Here, we analyze life cycle GHG emissions for commercially available, state-of the-art plug-in battery cars (e.g. Nissan Leaf) and those of commercially available series hybrid cars (e.g., GM Volt, at same size and performance). Crucially, we find that series hybrid cars driven on (fossil) gasoline cause fewer emissions (126g CO2eq per km) than battery cars driven on current US grid electricity (142g CO2eq per km). We attribute this novel finding to the significant incremental emissions from plug-in battery cars due to losses during grid transmission and battery dis-/charging, and manufacturing larger batteries. We discuss crucial implications for strategic policy decisions towards a low carbon automotive sector as well as relative land intensity when powering cars by biofuel vs. bioelectricity.

  3. Gasoline-powered serial hybrid cars cause lower life cycle carbon emissions than battery cars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinrenken, Christoph J.; Lackner, Klaus S.

    2011-04-01

    Battery cars powered by grid electricity promise reduced life cycle green house gas (GHG) emissions from the automotive sector. Such scenarios usually point to the much higher emissions from conventional, internal combustion engine cars. However, today's commercially available serial hybrid technology achieves the well known efficiency gains from regenerative breaking, lack of gearbox, and light weighting - even if the electricity is generated onboard, from conventional fuels. Here, we analyze emissions for commercially available, state-of the-art battery cars (e.g. Nissan Leaf) and those of commercially available serial hybrid cars (e.g., GM Volt, at same size and performance). Crucially, we find that serial hybrid cars driven on (fossil) gasoline cause fewer life cycle GHG emissions (126g CO2e per km) than battery cars driven on current US grid electricity (142g CO2e per km). We attribute this novel finding to the significant incremental life cycle emissions from battery cars from losses during grid transmission, battery dis-/charging, and larger batteries. We discuss crucial implications for strategic policy decisions towards a low carbon automotive sector as well as relative land intensity when powering cars by biofuel vs. bioelectricity.

  4. Identifying the Cause of Rupture of Li-Ion Batteries during Thermal Runaway

    DOE PAGES

    Finegan, Donal P.; Darcy, Eric; Keyser, Matthew; ...

    2017-10-27

    As the energy density of lithium-ion cells and batteries increases, controlling the outcomes of thermal runaway becomes more challenging. If the high rate of gas generation during thermal runaway is not adequately vented, commercial cell designs can rupture and explode, presenting serious safety concerns. Here, ultra-high-speed synchrotron X-ray imaging is used at >20 000 frames per second to characterize the venting processes of six different 18650 cell designs undergoing thermal runaway. For the first time, the mechanisms that lead to the most catastrophic type of cell failure, rupture, and explosion are identified and elucidated in detail. The practical application ofmore » the technique is highlighted by evaluating a novel 18650 cell design with a second vent at the base, which is shown to avoid the critical stages that lead to rupture. The insights yielded in this study shed new light on battery failure and are expected to guide the development of safer commercial cell designs.« less

  5. Identifying the Cause of Rupture of Li-Ion Batteries during Thermal Runaway

    SciTech Connect

    Finegan, Donal P.; Darcy, Eric; Keyser, Matthew

    As the energy density of lithium-ion cells and batteries increases, controlling the outcomes of thermal runaway becomes more challenging. If the high rate of gas generation during thermal runaway is not adequately vented, commercial cell designs can rupture and explode, presenting serious safety concerns. Here, ultra-high-speed synchrotron X-ray imaging is used at >20 000 frames per second to characterize the venting processes of six different 18650 cell designs undergoing thermal runaway. For the first time, the mechanisms that lead to the most catastrophic type of cell failure, rupture, and explosion are identified and elucidated in detail. The practical application ofmore » the technique is highlighted by evaluating a novel 18650 cell design with a second vent at the base, which is shown to avoid the critical stages that lead to rupture. The insights yielded in this study shed new light on battery failure and are expected to guide the development of safer commercial cell designs.« less

  6. Bilateral Deficit in Explosive Force Production Is Not Caused by Changes in Agonist Neural Drive

    PubMed Central

    Buckthorpe, Matthew W.; Pain, Matthew T. G.; Folland, Jonathan P.

    2013-01-01

    Bilateral deficit (BLD) describes the phenomenon of a reduction in performance during synchronous bilateral (BL) movements when compared to the sum of identical unilateral (UL) movements. Despite a large body of research investigating BLD of maximal voluntary force (MVF) there exist a paucity of research examining the BLD for explosive strength. Therefore, this study investigated the BLD in voluntary and electrically-evoked explosive isometric contractions of the knee extensors and assessed agonist and antagonist neuromuscular activation and measurement artefacts as potential mechanisms. Thirteen healthy untrained males performed a series of maximum and explosive voluntary contractions bilaterally (BL) and unilaterally (UL). UL and BL evoked twitch and octet contractions were also elicited. Two separate load cells were used to measure MVF and explosive force at 50, 100 and 150 ms after force onset. Surface EMG amplitude was measured from three superficial agonists and an antagonist. Rate of force development (RFD) and EMG were reported over consecutive 50 ms periods (0–50, 50–100 and 100–150 ms). Performance during UL contractions was compared to combined BL performance to measure BLD. Single limb performance during the BL contractions was assessed and potential measurement artefacts, including synchronisation of force onset from the two limbs, controlled for. MVF showed no BLD (P = 0.551), but there was a BLD for explosive force at 100 ms (11.2%, P = 0.007). There was a BLD in RFD 50–100 ms (14.9%, P = 0.004), but not for the other periods. Interestingly, there was a BLD in evoked force measures (6.3–9.0%, P<0.001). There was no difference in agonist or antagonist EMG for any condition (P≥0.233). Measurement artefacts contributed minimally to the observed BLD. The BLD in volitional explosive force found here could not be explained by measurement issues, or agonist and antagonist neuromuscular activation. The BLD in voluntary and evoked

  7. Investigation of Mechanism of Potential Aircraft Fuel Tank Vent Fires and Explosions Caused by Atmospheric Electricity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    The nature of the potential fuel tank vent fire and explosion hazard is discussed in relation to present vent exit design practice, available knowledge of atmospheric electricity as a source of ignition energy, and the vent system vapor space environment. Flammable mixtures and possible ignition sources may occur simultaneously as a rare phenomena according to existing knowledge. There is a need to extend the state of science in order to make possible vent design which is aimed specifically at minimizing fire and explosion hazards.

  8. Lower limb injuries caused by improvised explosive devices: proposed 'Bastion classification' and prospective validation.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, N; Rourke, K; Rutherford, J; Hicks, A; Smith, S R C; Templeton, P; Adams, S A; Jansen, J O

    2014-09-01

    Complex lower limb injury caused by improvised explosive devices (IEDs) has become the signature wounding pattern of the conflict in Afghanistan. Current classifications neither describe this injury pattern well, nor correlate with management. There is need for a new classification, to aid communication between clinicians, and help evaluate interventions and outcomes. We propose such a classification, and present the results of an initial prospective evaluation. The classification was developed by a panel of military surgeons whilst deployed to Camp Bastion, Afghanistan. Injuries were divided into five classes, by anatomic level. Segmental injuries were recognised as a distinct entity. Associated injuries to the intraperitoneal abdomen, genitalia and perineum, pelvic ring, and upper limbs, which impact on clinical management and resources, were also accounted for. Between 1 November 2010 and 20 February 2011, 179 IED-related lower limb injuries in 103 consecutive casualties were classified, and their subsequent vascular and musculoskeletal treatment recorded. 69% of the injuries were traumatic amputations, and the remainder segmental injuries. 49% of casualties suffered bilateral lower limb amputation. The most common injury was class 3 (involving proximal lower leg or thigh, permitting effective above-knee tourniquet application, 49%), but more proximal patterns (class 4 or 5, preventing effective tourniquet application) accounted for 18% of injuries. Eleven casualties had associated intraperitoneal abdominal injuries, 41 suffered genital or perineal injuries, 9 had pelvic ring fractures, and 66 had upper limb injuries. The classification was easy to apply and correlated with management. The 'Bastion classification' is a pragmatic yet clinically relevant injury categorisation, which describes current injury patterns well, and should facilitate communication between clinicians, and the evaluation of interventions and outcomes. The validation cohort confirms that

  9. The fluid dynamics of microjet explosions caused by extremely intense X-ray pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stan, Claudiu; Laksmono, Hartawan; Sierra, Raymond; Milathianaki, Despina; Koglin, Jason; Messerschmidt, Marc; Williams, Garth; Demirci, Hasan; Botha, Sabine; Nass, Karol; Stone, Howard; Schlichting, Ilme; Shoeman, Robert; Boutet, Sebastien

    2014-11-01

    Femtosecond X-ray scattering experiments at free-electron laser facilities typically requires liquid jet delivery methods to bring samples to the region of interaction with X-rays. We have imaged optically the damage process in water microjets due to intense hard X-ray pulses at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), using time-resolved imaging techniques to record movies at rates up to half a billion frames per second. For pulse energies larger than a few percent of the maximum pulse energy available at LCLS, the X-rays deposit energies much larger than the latent heat of vaporization in water, and induce a phase explosion that opens a gap in the jet. The LCLS pulses last a few tens of femtoseconds, but the full evolution of the broken jet is orders of magnitude slower - typically in the microsecond range - due to complex fluid dynamics processes triggered by the phase explosion. Although the explosion results in a complex sequence of phenomena, they lead to an approximately self-similar flow of the liquid in the jet.

  10. A brief historical review of non-anaesthetic causes of fires and explosions in the operating room.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, A G

    1994-12-01

    Fires and explosions have occurred in the operating theatre for many years. Flammable inhalation anaesthetic agents were responsible for many incidents in the past, but these are no longer available in many countries. Other causes of fires and explosions still exist in the operating theatre and, from time to time, result in serious and occasionally fatal injury. Flammable gastrointestinal gases have been the cause of injury to patients during gastric surgery, laparoscopy and during examination of the large bowel with electrical instrumentation. Gases formed in the bladder during urological procedures have ignited, causing rupture. Alcohol-based skin cleaning agents have resulted in severe burns to the skin. Equipment used for storage and delivery of oxygen to patients has caused fires in a variety of ways. Adhesive skin drapes have resulted recently in two tragic deaths. The increasing use of laser therapy, particularly in ear, nose and throat surgery, and in oral surgery, has brought about a renewed awareness of the risk of fire. The relevant factors which should be borne in mind and the precautions which should be adopted when laser therapy is to be used in the airway are discussed.

  11. Esophageal lesions following button-battery ingestion in children: Analysis of causes and proposals for preventive measures.

    PubMed

    Lahmar, J; Célérier, C; Garabédian, E N; Couloigner, V; Leboulanger, N; Denoyelle, F

    2018-04-01

    To study recent cases of esophageal injury due to button-battery ingestion in children presenting in pediatric ENT emergency departments of the Paris area of France (Île-de-France region), in order to propose appropriate preventive measures. A retrospective descriptive single-center study included all children under 15 years of age, presenting in pediatric ENT emergency departments between January 2008 and April 2014 for button-battery ingestion with esophageal impaction requiring emergency removal. Twenty-two boys and 4 girls, with a median age of 25 months, were included. Twenty-five of the 26 batteries had diameters of 20mm or more. Median esophageal impaction time was 7 hours 30 minutes (range, 2 to 72 hours). The complications rate was 23%. Mean hospital stay cost was €38,751 (range, €5130-119,737). The origin of the battery was known in 23 of the 26 cases: remote control without screw-secured compartment (42.3%), open battery pack (15.4%), children's toy (15.3%), camera (7.7%), watch (1 case) and hearing aid without screw-secured compartment (1 case). Esophageal lesions due to ingestion of button-batteries in children are almost always due to batteries larger than 20mm in diameter, mostly from devices with a poorly protected compartment, or batteries that are not individually packaged. These lesions cause serious complications in a quarter of cases and their management entails high health costs. Legislation requiring screw-secured compartments and individual blisters for batteries could have prevented 69.2% of the ingestions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. The world population explosion: causes, backgrounds and projections for the future

    PubMed Central

    Van Bavel, J.

    2013-01-01

    At the beginning of the nineteenth century, the total world population crossed the threshold of 1 billion people for the first time in the history of the homo sapiens sapiens. Since then, growth rates have been increasing exponentially, reaching staggeringly high peaks in the 20th century and slowing down a bit thereafter. Total world population reached 7 billion just after 2010 and is expected to count 9 billion by 2045. This paper first charts the differences in population growth between the world regions. Next, the mechanisms behind unprecedented population growth are explained and plausible scenarios for future developments are discussed. Crucial for the long term trend will be the rate of decline of the number of births per woman, called total fertility. Improvements in education, reproductive health and child survival will be needed to speed up the decline of total fertility, particularly in Africa. But in all scenarios, world population will continue to grow for some time due to population momentum. Finally, the paper outlines the debate about the consequences of the population explosion, involving poverty and food security, the impact on the natural environment, and migration flows. Key words: Fertility, family planning, world population, population growth, demographic transition, urbanization, population momentum, population projections. PMID:24753956

  13. Materials for lithium-ion battery safety.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai; Liu, Yayuan; Lin, Dingchang; Pei, Allen; Cui, Yi

    2018-06-01

    Lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) are considered to be one of the most important energy storage technologies. As the energy density of batteries increases, battery safety becomes even more critical if the energy is released unintentionally. Accidents related to fires and explosions of LIBs occur frequently worldwide. Some have caused serious threats to human life and health and have led to numerous product recalls by manufacturers. These incidents are reminders that safety is a prerequisite for batteries, and serious issues need to be resolved before the future application of high-energy battery systems. This Review aims to summarize the fundamentals of the origins of LIB safety issues and highlight recent key progress in materials design to improve LIB safety. We anticipate that this Review will inspire further improvement in battery safety, especially for emerging LIBs with high-energy density.

  14. Materials for lithium-ion battery safety

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kai

    2018-01-01

    Lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) are considered to be one of the most important energy storage technologies. As the energy density of batteries increases, battery safety becomes even more critical if the energy is released unintentionally. Accidents related to fires and explosions of LIBs occur frequently worldwide. Some have caused serious threats to human life and health and have led to numerous product recalls by manufacturers. These incidents are reminders that safety is a prerequisite for batteries, and serious issues need to be resolved before the future application of high-energy battery systems. This Review aims to summarize the fundamentals of the origins of LIB safety issues and highlight recent key progress in materials design to improve LIB safety. We anticipate that this Review will inspire further improvement in battery safety, especially for emerging LIBs with high-energy density. PMID:29942858

  15. Short Physical Performance Battery and all-cause mortality: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Pavasini, Rita; Guralnik, Jack; Brown, Justin C; di Bari, Mauro; Cesari, Matteo; Landi, Francesco; Vaes, Bert; Legrand, Delphine; Verghese, Joe; Wang, Cuiling; Stenholm, Sari; Ferrucci, Luigi; Lai, Jennifer C; Bartes, Anna Arnau; Espaulella, Joan; Ferrer, Montserrat; Lim, Jae-Young; Ensrud, Kristine E; Cawthon, Peggy; Turusheva, Anna; Frolova, Elena; Rolland, Yves; Lauwers, Valerie; Corsonello, Andrea; Kirk, Gregory D; Ferrari, Roberto; Volpato, Stefano; Campo, Gianluca

    2016-12-22

    The Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) is a well-established tool to assess lower extremity physical performance status. Its predictive ability for all-cause mortality has been sparsely reported, but with conflicting results in different subsets of participants. The aim of this study was to perform a meta-analysis investigating the relationship between SPPB score and all-cause mortality. Articles were searched in MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library, Google Scholar, and BioMed Central between July and September 2015 and updated in January 2016. Inclusion criteria were observational studies; >50 participants; stratification of population according to SPPB value; data on all-cause mortality; English language publications. Twenty-four articles were selected from available evidence. Data of interest (i.e., clinical characteristics, information after stratification of the sample into four SPPB groups [0-3, 4-6, 7-9, 10-12]) were retrieved from the articles and/or obtained by the study authors. The odds ratio (OR) and/or hazard ratio (HR) was obtained for all-cause mortality according to SPPB category (with SPPB scores 10-12 considered as reference) with adjustment for age, sex, and body mass index. Standardized data were obtained for 17 studies (n = 16,534, mean age 76 ± 3 years). As compared to SPPB scores 10-12, values of 0-3 (OR 3.25, 95%CI 2.86-3.79), 4-6 (OR 2.14, 95%CI 1.92-2.39), and 7-9 (OR 1.50, 95%CI 1.32-1.71) were each associated with an increased risk of all-cause mortality. The association between poor performance on SPPB and all-cause mortality remained highly consistent independent of follow-up length, subsets of participants, geographic area, and age of the population. Random effects meta-regression showed that OR for all-cause mortality with SPPB values 7-9 was higher in the younger population, diabetics, and men. An SPPB score lower than 10 is predictive of all-cause mortality. The systematic implementation of the SPPB in clinical practice

  16. Fire disaster caused by LPG tanker explosion at Lice in Diyarbakır (Turkey): July 21, 2014.

    PubMed

    Zengin, Yılmaz; Dursun, Recep; İçer, Mustafa; Gündüz, Ercan; Durgun, Hasan Mansur; Erbatur, Serkan; Damar, Ömer; Güloğlu, Cahfer

    2015-09-01

    A disaster can be defined as a situation where the affected society cannot overcome its own resources. Our aim was to present the case of a fire disaster caused by a liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) tanker-based explosion on the Diyarbakır-Bingöl road in Lice to determine the various kinds of challenges and patient groups that an emergency department faces and to discuss more effective interventions for similar disasters. This is a retrospective cross-sectional study. To find out the factors that affected mortality, we investigated the patient conditions presented at the time of admission. Among 69 patients included in the study, 62 were male (89.9%) and seven were female (10.1%). The average age of patients was 32.10±14.01 years, and the burn percentage was 51.1±32.2. One patient died during the first response, and a total of 34 patients (49.3%) died during the patient follow-up. Factors statistically related to mortality were determined to be inclusion in the severe burn group, presence of inhalation injuries, use of central venous catheter on patients, application of fasciotomy, presence of a tracheostomy opening, use of endotracheal intubation and sedoanalgesia, and transfer to centers outside the city (p-values <0.001, <0.001, <0.001, <0.001, <0.001, <0.001, 0.001, and 0.003, respectively). In conclusion, although fire disasters caused by LPG tanker explosions are rare, the frequency of such disasters will increase with the increase in LPG use. The factors affecting mortality should be determined to decrease mortality. We recommend that all personnel members who engage in work related to LPG from production to use, in addition to rescue and first-response personnel, be trained comprehensively and that advanced technological fire equipment be used to prevent such disasters. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  17. Successful management of esophageal perforation diagnosed 3 days after injury caused by an explosion in the workplace: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Shigeaki; Kusama, Akio; Shimakage, Naohiro; Tanabe, Tadashi; Okamura, Takanao; Uchida, Katsuyuki; Tsukada, Kazuhiro; Tajima, Kenzo

    2006-01-01

    We report a case of esophageal perforation caused by an explosion, but which was not diagnosed until 3 days after the injury. A 53-year-old worker sustained superficial dermal burns to his trachea, face, neck, and legs during an explosion. The burns were treated conservatively at a local hospital, but he was transferred to our hospital 3 days after the injury, when mediastinal emphysema and bilateral pleural effusion became evident. An esophagogram followed by computed tomography showed an esophageal perforation caused by the blast injury, and we performed an esophagectomy with recontruction of the gastric tube. After the operation, an X-ray showed a foreign body in the lower abdomen, which we found in the upper thoracic esophagus on the day of injury. We surmised that the patient had inadvertently swallowed a foreign body, which had been heated and scattered by the explosion, and it had melted the upper thoracic esophagus.

  18. Translation from Russian to English the Book Blast Effects Caused by Explosions Authored by B. Gelfand and M. Silnikov

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-04-01

    ingredients were freely b ought in the popular shops of chemicals. The following facts can serve as the evidence of wide use of mine -explosive...workshop rooms etc. The HE charges weight restrictions developed for conducting of blasting operations in open-cast mines and testing areas, are...Russian) 8. Silnikov M.V., Serdtsev N.I., Nelezin P.V. On the prospects of methods of explosion localization for the increase of safety of mine

  19. Severe extremity amputations in surviving Palestinian civilians caused by explosives fired from drones during the Gaza War.

    PubMed

    Heszlein-Lossius, Hanne; Al-Borno, Yahya; Shaqoura, Samar; Skaik, Nashwa; Giil, Lasse Melvær; Gilbert, Mads

    2018-02-21

    operations (p=0·0001). Weapons fired on the Gaza Strip from Israeli drones caused severe injuries in surviving Palestinian civilians. Drone-fired missiles resulted in major amputations in almost all victims who had limb losses. Substantially more severe injuries were inflicted by the drone-launched explosives than by other weapons used during the Gaza War. Traumatic amputations caused by drones were often immediately complete. One limitation of our study is that it does not elucidate injury patterns in victims with fatal injuries. None. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Prediction of ground motion and dynamic stress change in Baekdusan (Changbaishan) volcano caused by a North Korean nuclear explosion.

    PubMed

    Hong, Tae-Kyung; Choi, Eunseo; Park, Seongjun; Shin, Jin Soo

    2016-02-17

    Strong ground motions induce large dynamic stress changes that may disturb the magma chamber of a volcano, thus accelerating the volcanic activity. An underground nuclear explosion test near an active volcano constitutes a direct treat to the volcano. This study examined the dynamic stress changes of the magma chamber of Baekdusan (Changbaishan) that can be induced by hypothetical North Korean nuclear explosions. Seismic waveforms for hypothetical underground nuclear explosions at North Korean test site were calculated by using an empirical Green's function approach based on a source-spectral model of a nuclear explosion; such a technique is efficient for regions containing poorly constrained velocity structures. The peak ground motions around the volcano were estimated from empirical strong-motion attenuation curves. A hypothetical M7.0 North Korean underground nuclear explosion may produce peak ground accelerations of 0.1684 m/s(2) in the horizontal direction and 0.0917 m/s(2) in the vertical direction around the volcano, inducing peak dynamic stress change of 67 kPa on the volcano surface and ~120 kPa in the spherical magma chamber. North Korean underground nuclear explosions with magnitudes of 5.0-7.6 may induce overpressure in the magma chamber of several tens to hundreds of kilopascals.

  1. Prediction of ground motion and dynamic stress change in Baekdusan (Changbaishan) volcano caused by a North Korean nuclear explosion

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Tae-Kyung; Choi, Eunseo; Park, Seongjun; Shin, Jin Soo

    2016-01-01

    Strong ground motions induce large dynamic stress changes that may disturb the magma chamber of a volcano, thus accelerating the volcanic activity. An underground nuclear explosion test near an active volcano constitutes a direct treat to the volcano. This study examined the dynamic stress changes of the magma chamber of Baekdusan (Changbaishan) that can be induced by hypothetical North Korean nuclear explosions. Seismic waveforms for hypothetical underground nuclear explosions at North Korean test site were calculated by using an empirical Green’s function approach based on a source-spectral model of a nuclear explosion; such a technique is efficient for regions containing poorly constrained velocity structures. The peak ground motions around the volcano were estimated from empirical strong-motion attenuation curves. A hypothetical M7.0 North Korean underground nuclear explosion may produce peak ground accelerations of 0.1684 m/s2 in the horizontal direction and 0.0917 m/s2 in the vertical direction around the volcano, inducing peak dynamic stress change of 67 kPa on the volcano surface and ~120 kPa in the spherical magma chamber. North Korean underground nuclear explosions with magnitudes of 5.0–7.6 may induce overpressure in the magma chamber of several tens to hundreds of kilopascals. PMID:26884136

  2. Totally confined explosive welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, L. J. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    The undesirable by-products of explosive welding are confined and the association noise is reduced by the use of a simple enclosure into which the explosive is placed and in which the explosion occurs. An infrangible enclosure is removably attached to one of the members to be bonded at the point directly opposite the bond area. An explosive is completely confined within the enclosure at a point in close proximity to the member to be bonded and a detonating means is attached to the explosive. The balance of the enclosure, not occupied by explosive, is filled with a shaped material which directs the explosive pressure toward the bond area. A detonator adaptor controls the expansion of the enclosure by the explosive force so that the enclosure at no point experiences a discontinuity in expansion which causes rupture. The use of the technique is practical in the restricted area of a space station.

  3. Singlet oxygen generation as a major cause for parasitic reactions during cycling of aprotic lithium-oxygen batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahne, Nika; Schafzahl, Bettina; Leypold, Christian; Leypold, Mario; Grumm, Sandra; Leitgeb, Anita; Strohmeier, Gernot A.; Wilkening, Martin; Fontaine, Olivier; Kramer, Denis; Slugovc, Christian; Borisov, Sergey M.; Freunberger, Stefan A.

    2017-03-01

    Non-aqueous metal-oxygen batteries depend critically on the reversible formation/decomposition of metal oxides on cycling. Irreversible parasitic reactions cause poor rechargeability, efficiency, and cycle life, and have predominantly been ascribed to the reactivity of reduced oxygen species with cell components. These species, however, cannot fully explain the side reactions. Here we show that singlet oxygen forms at the cathode of a lithium-oxygen cell during discharge and from the onset of charge, and accounts for the majority of parasitic reaction products. The amount increases during discharge, early stages of charge, and charging at higher voltages, and is enhanced by the presence of trace water. Superoxide and peroxide appear to be involved in singlet oxygen generation. Singlet oxygen traps and quenchers can reduce parasitic reactions effectively. Awareness of the highly reactive singlet oxygen in non-aqueous metal-oxygen batteries gives a rationale for future research towards achieving highly reversible cell operation.

  4. 30 CFR 19.7 - Protection against explosion hazard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS ELECTRIC CAP LAMPS § 19.7 Protection against explosion hazard. Unless properly designed, electric cap lamps may present two sources of probable explosion hazards... of cap lamp batteries: 100 amperes for a 4-volt battery; 75 amperes for a 6-volt battery; 50 amperes...

  5. Explosive magnetic reconnection caused by an X-shaped current-vortex layer in a collisionless plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hirota, M.; Hattori, Y.; Morrison, P. J.

    2015-05-15

    A mechanism for explosive magnetic reconnection is investigated by analyzing the nonlinear evolution of a collisionless tearing mode in a two-fluid model that includes the effects of electron inertia and temperature. These effects cooperatively enable a fast reconnection by forming an X-shaped current-vortex layer centered at the reconnection point. A high-resolution simulation of this model for an unprecedentedly small electron skin depth d{sub e} and ion-sound gyroradius ρ{sub s}, satisfying d{sub e}=ρ{sub s}, shows an explosive tendency for nonlinear growth of the tearing mode, where it is newly found that the explosive widening of the X-shaped layer occurs locally aroundmore » the reconnection point with the length of the X shape being shorter than the domain length and the wavelength of the linear tearing mode. The reason for the onset of this locally enhanced reconnection is explained theoretically by developing a novel nonlinear and nonequilibrium inner solution that models the local X-shaped layer, and then matching it to an outer solution that is approximated by a linear tearing eigenmode with a shorter wavelength than the domain length. This theoretical model proves that the local reconnection can release the magnetic energy more efficiently than the global one and the estimated scaling of the explosive growth rate agrees well with the simulation results.« less

  6. Explosives tester

    DOEpatents

    Haas, Jeffrey S [San Ramon, CA; Howard, Douglas E [Livermore, CA; Eckels, Joel D [Livermore, CA; Nunes, Peter J [Danville, CA

    2011-01-11

    An explosives tester that can be used anywhere as a screening tool by non-technical personnel to determine whether a surface contains explosives. First and second explosives detecting reagent holders and dispensers are provided. A heater is provided for receiving the first and second explosives detecting reagent holders and dispensers.

  7. A Study on distinguishing seismic waves caused by natural earthquakes and underground nuclear explosion within North Korean Context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Premlet, B.; Sabu, S.; Kamarudheen, R.; Subair, S.

    2017-12-01

    Since the first nuclear test on 15 July 1945 , there have been over 2,051 other weapon tests around the world . The waveforms of a natural earthquake which generates strong S waves and an underground explosion which is dominated by P waves were distinguished from the analysis of data corresponding to a 2005 M5.0 Earthquake and a 2016 North Korean nuclear test , both at similar distances from seismometer . Further differences between the seismograms were evaluated and successfully distinguished between the origins of the elastic waves through the data using Moment Tensor Solution using stations BJT , HIA and INCN . North Korea has developed a nuclear fuel cycle capability and has both plutonium and enriched uranium programs at Pyongyang . Seismic recordings of vertical ground motion at Global Seismographic Network station IC.MDJ of the 4 seismic events at Punggye-ri , North Korea , which occurred on the 9th of October 2006 , 25th of May 2009, 12th of February 2013 and on the 6th of January and 9th of September , 2016 were examined and the P waves of these seismic waves , which show very similar wave form , were inspected and compared to the seismic data of the latest underground nuclear test on the 3rd of September 2017 at 03:30 UTC at the same site which is many times more powerful than the previous tests . The country , which is the only nation to have tested nuclear weapons in this millennium , has successfully prevented the release of radioactive isotopes and hampered data collection but further studies were done using acoustic data which was analysed from sonograms of the 4 North Korean tests at station MDJ. The latest explosion data from 3rd September was also compared to 42 presumed underground explosions which occurred in China , India , the U.S.S.R , Iran , Turkey and recorded at Arkansas Seismic Network.

  8. Explosively pumped laser light

    DOEpatents

    Piltch, Martin S.; Michelotti, Roy A.

    1991-01-01

    A single shot laser pumped by detonation of an explosive in a shell casing. The shock wave from detonation of the explosive causes a rare gas to luminesce. The high intensity light from the gas enters a lasing medium, which thereafter outputs a pulse of laser light to disable optical sensors and personnel.

  9. [Pest control in your garden - a case series of severe hand injuries caused by privately used explosives and shot traps].

    PubMed

    Könneker, S; Krezdorn, N; Vogt, P M; Altintas, M A; Hiller, M T; Ipaktchi, R; Radtke, C

    2016-10-01

    Booby traps and gun-like devices for vole control can lead to complex trauma requiring emergency medical care. We present a case series of patients who suffered severe hand and facial trauma through detonation of booby traps and paraphernalia (n = 9, Ø 60 years of age). All patients were admitted to the emergency department of Hannover Medical School for primary care. Between 2011 and 2015 we treated six patients with hand trauma due to gun-like devices, two patients with hand trauma due to booby traps, and one patient with injury to the face including eyes due to a gas cartridge explosion. All hand trauma patients (n = 8) showed injuries of the soft tissue. Six of these patients also presented fractures or lesions of capsular or tendon structures. Therapies included debridement as well as skin grafts or flaps for tissue defect coverage. We informed the Department for Commercial Safety (Gewerbeaufsicht Hannover) in 2014 because we believe that these traps pose a serious safety hazard.

  10. Microcantilever detector for explosives

    DOEpatents

    Thundat, Thomas G.

    1999-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for detecting the presence of explosives by analyzing a vapor sample from the suspect vicinity utilize at least one microcantilever. Explosive gas molecules which have been adsorbed onto the microcantilever are subsequently heated to cause combustion. Heat, along with momentum transfer from combustion, causes bending and a transient resonance response of the microcantilever which may be detected by a laser diode which is focused on the microcantilever and a photodetector which detects deflection of the reflected laser beam caused by heat-induced deflection and resonance response of the microcantilever.

  11. Microcantilever detector for explosives

    DOEpatents

    Thundat, T.G.

    1999-06-29

    Methods and apparatus for detecting the presence of explosives by analyzing a vapor sample from the suspect vicinity utilize at least one microcantilever. Explosive gas molecules which have been adsorbed onto the microcantilever are subsequently heated to cause combustion. Heat, along with momentum transfer from combustion, causes bending and a transient resonance response of the microcantilever which may be detected by a laser diode which is focused on the microcantilever and a photodetector which detects deflection of the reflected laser beam caused by heat-induced deflection and resonance response of the microcantilever. 2 figs.

  12. A single, improvised "Kassam" rocket explosion can cause a mass casualty incident: a potential threat for future international terrorism?

    PubMed

    Schwartz, D; Ostfeld, I; Bar-Dayan, Y

    2009-04-01

    Over 2000 improvised rockets (called "Kassam" rockets) have been targeted at the south of Israel from the Gaza strip since 2001. Most of them have injured relatively few people. The first known case of a multicasualty incident (MCI) caused by the landing of a single, improvised rocket is described. The event is described according to the disastrous incidents systematic analysis through components, interactions and results methodology (DISAST-CIR). The rocket hit a military training tent camp in the south of Israel at 01:18 hours. At that time, all soldiers were in bed and were not using any protective gear. A total of 76 soldiers was injured (three severe, eight moderate and 65 mild). The most prevalent types of injuries were upper extremity (33%) and lower extremity (30%) trauma, tinnitus (30%) and acute stress reactions (32%). A total of 67 casualties was evacuated to the nearest level two hospital, Barzilai, in a two-phase distribution characterised by different patterns of injury severity and type. All urgent casualties arrived at hospitals within 1 h 24 minutes, whereas most stress casualties arrived in the later phase. Seven casualties were secondarily transported to level one trauma centres. 42 of the casualties were hospitalised and 17 needed urgent surgery. None has died. A single low-tech mortar with poor accuracy and small warhead (estimated weight of 10 kg only) can cause a large-scale MCI. As international terrorist organisations can easily gain access to improvised rockets, the latter may become a threat in many countries. Emergency systems should thus be prepared for that adverse possibility.

  13. 20 mm lithium button battery causing an oesophageal perforation in a toddler: lessons in diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Soccorso, Giampiero; Grossman, Ole; Martinelli, Massimo; Marven, Sean S; Patel, Kirtik; Thomson, Mike; Roberts, Julian P

    2012-08-01

    Swallowed button batteries (BB) which remain lodged in the oesophagus are at risk of serious complications, particularly in young children. The authors report a 3-year-old child, who rapidly developed an oesophageal perforation, following the ingestion of a 20-mm lithium BB which was initially mistaken for a coin. A thoracotomy and T-tube management of the perforation led to a positive outcome. BBs (20 mm) in children should be removed quickly and close observation is required as the damage initiated by the battery can lead to a significant injury within a few hours.

  14. Impact of the AD 79 explosive eruption on Pompeii, II. Causes of death of the inhabitants inferred by stratigraphic analysis and areal distribution of the human casualties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luongo, Giuseppe; Perrotta, Annamaria; Scarpati, Claudio; De Carolis, Ernesto; Patricelli, Giovanni; Ciarallo, Annamaria

    2003-08-01

    Detailed descriptions of the effects of explosive eruptions on urban settlements available to volcanologists are relatively rare. Apart from disease and starvation, the largest number of human deaths caused by explosive eruptions in the twentieth century are due to pyroclastic flows. The relationship between the number of victims related to a specific hazard and the presence of urban settlements in the area covered by the eruption has been shown. However, pyroclastic falls are also extremely dangerous under certain conditions. These conclusions are based on archaeological and volcanological studies carried out on the victims of the well-known AD 79 eruption of Vesuvius that destroyed and buried the Roman city of Pompeii. The stratigraphic level in the pyroclastic deposit and the location of all the casualties found are described and discussed. The total number of victims recovered during the archaeological excavations amounts to 1150. Of these, 1044 well recognisable bodies plus an additional group of 100 individuals were identified based on the analysis of several groups of scattered bones. Of the former, 394 were found in the lower pumice lapilli fall deposit and 650 in the upper stratified ash and pumice lapilli pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) deposits. In addition, a tentative evaluation suggests that 464 corpses may still be buried in the unexcavated part of the city. According to the reconstruction presented in this paper, during the first phase of the eruption (August 24, AD 79) a huge quantity of pumice lapilli fell on Pompeii burying the city under 3 m of pyroclastic material. During this eruptive phase, most of the inhabitants managed to leave the city. However, 38% of the known victims were killed during this phase mainly as a consequence of roofs and walls collapsing under the increasing weight of the pumice lapilli deposit. During the second phase of the eruption (August 25, AD 79) 49% of the total victims were on the roadways and 51% inside

  15. A review of safety-focused mechanical modeling of commercial lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Juner; Wierzbicki, Tomasz; Li, Wei

    2018-02-01

    We are rapidly approaching an inflection point in the adoption of electric vehicles on the roads. All major automotive companies are having well-funded plans for mass market affordable branded EV product line models, which can open the floodgates. A rapid growth of battery energy density, accompanied by an aggressive progress of reduction of costs of lithium-ion batteries, brings safety concerns. While more energy stored in the battery pack of an EV translates to a longer range, the downside is that accidents will be more violent due to battery inevitable explosion. With today's technology, severe crashes involving intrusion into the battery pack will potentially result in a thermal runaway, fire, and explosion. Most of research on lithium-ion batteries have been concerned with the electrochemistry of cells. However, in most cases failure and thermal runaway is caused by mechanical loading due to crash events. There is a growing need to summarize the already published results on mechanical loading and response of batteries and offer a critical evaluation of work in progress. The objective of this paper is to present such review with a discussion of many outstanding issues and outline of a roadmap for future research.

  16. RADIOACTIVE BATTERY

    DOEpatents

    Birden, J.H.; Jordan, K.C.

    1959-11-17

    A radioactive battery which includes a capsule containing the active material and a thermopile associated therewith is presented. The capsule is both a shield to stop the radiations and thereby make the battery safe to use, and an energy conventer. The intense radioactive decay taking place inside is converted to useful heat at the capsule surface. The heat is conducted to the hot thermojunctions of a thermopile. The cold junctions of the thermopile are thermally insulated from the heat source, so that a temperature difference occurs between the hot and cold junctions, causing an electrical current of a constant magnitude to flow.

  17. In Situ Monitoring of Temperature inside Lithium-Ion Batteries by Flexible Micro Temperature Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chi-Yuan; Lee, Shuo-Jen; Tang, Ming-Shao; Chen, Pei-Chi

    2011-01-01

    Lithium-ion secondary batteries are commonly used in electric vehicles, smart phones, personal digital assistants (PDA), notebooks and electric cars. These lithium-ion secondary batteries must charge and discharge rapidly, causing the interior temperature to rise quickly, raising a safety issue. Over-charging results in an unstable voltage and current, causing potential safety problems, such as thermal runaways and explosions. Thus, a micro flexible temperature sensor for the in in-situ monitoring of temperature inside a lithium-ion secondary battery must be developed. In this work, flexible micro temperature sensors were integrated into a lithium-ion secondary battery using the micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) process for monitoring temperature in situ. PMID:22163735

  18. In situ monitoring of temperature inside lithium-ion batteries by flexible micro temperature sensors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chi-Yuan; Lee, Shuo-Jen; Tang, Ming-Shao; Chen, Pei-Chi

    2011-01-01

    Lithium-ion secondary batteries are commonly used in electric vehicles, smart phones, personal digital assistants (PDA), notebooks and electric cars. These lithium-ion secondary batteries must charge and discharge rapidly, causing the interior temperature to rise quickly, raising a safety issue. Over-charging results in an unstable voltage and current, causing potential safety problems, such as thermal runaways and explosions. Thus, a micro flexible temperature sensor for the in in-situ monitoring of temperature inside a lithium-ion secondary battery must be developed. In this work, flexible micro temperature sensors were integrated into a lithium-ion secondary battery using the micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) process for monitoring temperature in situ.

  19. Nanoengineered explosives

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, D.M.

    1996-04-09

    A complex modulated structure is described for reactive elements that have the capability of considerably more heat than organic explosives while generating a working fluid or gas. The explosive and method of fabricating same involves a plurality of very thin, stacked, multilayer structures, each composed of reactive components, such as aluminum, separated from a less reactive element, such as copper oxide, by a separator material, such as carbon. The separator material not only separates the reactive materials, but it reacts therewith when detonated to generate higher temperatures. The various layers of material, thickness of 10 to 10,000 angstroms, can be deposited by magnetron sputter deposition. The explosive detonates and combusts a high velocity generating a gas, such as CO, and high temperatures. 2 figs.

  20. Supernova explosions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, A. G. W.

    1971-01-01

    The recent history of theoretical investigations of the supernova mechanism is considered, giving attention also to a number of nuclear physical problems which have yet to be solved in connection with the thermonuclear detonation. A variety of different processes of nucleo-synthesis are expected to occur in association with the supernova explosions. Aspects of the chemical evolution of the galaxy are discussed including the cosmic ray production of lithium, beryllium, and boron in the interstellar medium. Various hypotheses to account for the very large amount of light that comes from a supernova explosion are also examined.

  1. Explosive laser

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, C.P.; Jensen, R.J.; Davis, W.C.; Sullivan, J.A.

    1975-09-01

    This patent relates to a laser system wherein reaction products from the detonation of a condensed explosive expand to form a gaseous medium with low translational temperature but high vibration population. Thermal pumping of the upper laser level and de-excitation of the lower laser level occur during the expansion, resulting in a population inversion. The expansion may be free or through a nozzle as in a gas-dynamic configuration. In one preferred embodiment, the explosive is such that its reaction products are CO$sub 2$ and other species that are beneficial or at least benign to CO$sub 2$ lasing. (auth)

  2. Explosion containment device

    DOEpatents

    Benedick, William B.; Daniel, Charles J.

    1977-01-01

    The disclosure relates to an explosives storage container for absorbing and containing the blast, fragments and detonation products from a possible detonation of a contained explosive. The container comprises a layer of distended material having sufficient thickness to convert a portion of the kinetic energy of the explosion into thermal energy therein. A continuous wall of steel sufficiently thick to absorb most of the remaining kinetic energy by stretching and expanding, thereby reducing the momentum of detonation products and high velocity fragments, surrounds the layer of distended material. A crushable layer surrounds the continuous steel wall and accommodates the stretching and expanding thereof, transmitting a moderate load to the outer enclosure. These layers reduce the forces of the explosion and the momentum of the products thereof to zero. The outer enclosure comprises a continuous pressure wall enclosing all of the layers. In one embodiment, detonation of the contained explosive causes the outer enclosure to expand which indicates to a visual observer that a detonation has occurred.

  3. Explosively separable casing

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, A.K.; Rychnovsky, R.E.; Visbeck, C.N.

    An explosively separable casing including a cylindrical afterbody and a circular cover for one end of the afterbody is disclosed. The afterbody has a cylindrical tongue extending longitudinally from one end which is matingly received in a corresponding groove in the cover. The groove is sized to provide a picket between the end of the tongue and the remainder of the groove so that an explosive can be located therein. A seal is also provided between the tongue and the groove for sealing the pocket from the atmosphere. A frangible holding device is utilized to hold the cover to the afterbody. When the explosive is ignited, the increase in pressure in the pocket causes the cover to be accelerated away from the afterbody. Preferably, the inner wall of the afterbody is in the same plane as the inner wall of the tongue to provide a maximum space for storage in the afterbody and the side wall of the cover is thicker than the side wall of the afterbody so as to provide a sufficiently strong surrounding portion for the pocket in which the explosion takes place. The detonator for the explosive is also located on the cover and is carried away with the cover during separation. The seal is preferably located at the longitudinal end of the tongue and has a chevron cross section.

  4. Explosively separable casing

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Albin K.; Rychnovsky, Raymond E.; Visbeck, Cornelius N.

    1985-01-01

    An explosively separable casing including a cylindrical afterbody and a circular cover for one end of the afterbody is disclosed. The afterbody has a cylindrical tongue extending longitudinally from one end which is matingly received in a corresponding groove in the cover. The groove is sized to provide a pocket between the end of the tongue and the remainder of the groove so that an explosive can be located therein. A seal is also provided between the tongue and the groove for sealing the pocket from the atmosphere. A frangible holding device is utilized to hold the cover to the afterbody. When the explosive is ignited, the increase in pressure in the pocket causes the cover to be accelerated away from the afterbody. Preferably, the inner wall of the afterbody is in the same plane as the inner wall of the tongue to provide a maximum space for storage in the afterbody and the side wall of the cover is thicker than the side wall of the afterbody so as to provide a sufficiently strong surrounding portion for the pocket in which the explosion takes place. The detonator for the explosive is also located on the cover and is carried away with the cover during separation. The seal is preferably located at the longitudinal end of the tongue and has a chevron cross section.

  5. Button batteries

    MedlinePlus

    Swallowing batteries ... These devices use button batteries: Calculators Cameras Hearing aids Penlights Watches ... If a person puts the battery up their nose and breathes it further in, ... problems Cough Pneumonia (if the battery goes unnoticed) ...

  6. Explosive cord

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Device, jetcord, is metal-clad linear explosive of sufficient flexibility to allow forming into intricate shapes. Total effect is termed ''cutting'' with jetcord consistently ''cutting'' a target of greater thickness than can be penetrated. Applications include sheet metal working, pipe cutting and fire-fighting.

  7. Explosive complexes

    DOEpatents

    Huynh, My Hang V [Los Alamos, NM

    2009-09-22

    Lead-free primary explosives of the formula [M.sup.II(A).sub.R(B.sup.X).sub.S](C.sup.Y).sub.T, where A is 1,5-diaminotetrazole, and syntheses thereof are described. Substantially stoichiometric equivalents of the reactants lead to high yields of pure compositions thereby avoiding dangerous purification steps.

  8. Explosive complexes

    DOEpatents

    Huynh, My Hang V [Los Alamos, NM

    2011-08-16

    Lead-free primary explosives of the formula [M.sup.II(A).sub.R(B.sup.X).sub.S](C.sup.Y).sub.T, where A is 1,5-diaminotetrazole, and syntheses thereof are described. Substantially stoichiometric equivalents of the reactants lead to high yields of pure compositions thereby avoiding dangerous purification steps.

  9. Catastrophic event modeling. [lithium thionyl chloride batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, H. A.

    1981-01-01

    A mathematical model for the catastrophic failures (venting or explosion of the cell) in lithium thionyl chloride batteries is presented. The phenomenology of the various processes leading to cell failure is reviewed.

  10. Use and Complications of Operative Control of Arterial Inflow in Combat Casualties with Traumatic Lower-extremity Amputations Caused by Improvised Explosive Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    explosive devices Henrietta Poon, MRCS, Jonathan J. Morrison, MRCS, Jon C. Clasper, DPhil, FRCSEd(Orth), Mark J. Midwinter, MD, FRCS, and Jan O. Jansen...the IP group, compared with the EP, although this does not achieve statistical significance, likely owing to a lack of power within the study. The war

  11. Microbial bioreporters of trace explosives.

    PubMed

    Shemer, Benjamin; Koshet, Ori; Yagur-Kroll, Sharon; Belkin, Shimshon

    2017-06-01

    Since its introduction as an explosive in the late 19th century, 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), along with other explosive compounds, has left numerous environmental marks. One of these is widespread soil and water pollution by trace explosives in military proving grounds, manufacturing facilities, or actual battlefields. Another dramatic impact is that exerted by the millions of landmines and other explosive devices buried in large parts of the world, causing extensive loss of life, injuries, and economical damage. In this review we highlight recent advances in the design and construction of microbial bioreporters, molecularly engineered to generate a quantifiable dose-dependent signal in the presence of trace amounts of explosives. Such sensor strains may be employed for monitoring environmental pollution as well as for the remote detection of buried landmines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Underground Explosions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-09

    AVC‐VTN‐15‐G06 “Underground  Explosions”  By  Vitaly  V. Adushkin and Alexander...Language Book "UNDERGROUND EXPLOSIONS" Drs. Vitaly V. Adushkin and Alexander A. Spivak Dr. Anastasia Stroujkova and Professor Paul Richards Weston...SAQMMA13M2475 DOS/AVC/MNA UNLIMITED “Underground Explosions”, a Russian language book authored by Drs. Vitaly V. Adushkin and Alexander A. Spivak has been

  13. Explosive simulants for testing explosive detection systems

    DOEpatents

    Kury, John W.; Anderson, Brian L.

    1999-09-28

    Explosives simulants that include non-explosive components are disclosed that facilitate testing of equipment designed to remotely detect explosives. The simulants are non-explosive, non-hazardous materials that can be safely handled without any significant precautions. The simulants imitate real explosives in terms of mass density, effective atomic number, x-ray transmission properties, and physical form, including moldable plastics and emulsions/gels.

  14. Certification Process for Commercial Batteries for Payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeevarajan, Judith

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph document reviews the use of electric batteries in space applications. Batteries are high energy devices that are used to power hardware for space applications The applications include IVA (Intra-Vehicular Activity) and EVA (Extra-Vehicular Activity) use. High energy batteries pose hazards such as cell/battery venting leading to electrolyte (liquid or gas) leakage, high temperatures, fire and explosion (shrapnel). It reviews the process of certifying of Commercial batteries for space applications in view of the multi-national purchasing for the International Space Station. The documentation used in the certification is reviewed.

  15. Batteries: Overview of Battery Cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Doeff, Marca M

    2010-07-12

    hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), and electric vehicles (EVs); a market predicted to be potentially ten times greater than that of consumer electronics. In fact, only Liion batteries can meet the requirements for PHEVs as set by the U.S. Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC), although they still fall slightly short of EV goals. In the case of Li-ion batteries, the trade-off between power and energy shown in Figure 1 is a function both of device design and the electrode materials that are used. Thus, a high power battery (e.g., one intended for an HEV) will not necessarily contain the same electrode materials as one designed for high energy (i.e., for an EV). As is shown in Figure 1, power translates into acceleration, and energy into range, or miles traveled, for vehicular uses. Furthermore, performance, cost, and abuse-tolerance requirements for traction batteries differ considerably from those for consumer electronics batteries. Vehicular applications are particularly sensitive to cost; currently, Li-ion batteries are priced at about $1000/kWh, whereas the USABC goal is $150/kWh. The three most expensive components of a Li-ion battery, no matter what the configuration, are the cathode, the separator, and the electrolyte. Reduction of cost has been one of the primary driving forces for the investigation of new cathode materials to replace expensive LiCoO{sub 2}, particularly for vehicular applications. Another extremely important factor is safety under abuse conditions such as overcharge. This is particularly relevant for the large battery packs intended for vehicular uses, which are designed with multiple cells wired in series arrays. Premature failure of one cell in a string may cause others to go into overcharge during passage of current. These considerations have led to the development of several different types of cathode materials, as will be covered in the next section. Because there is not yet one ideal material that can

  16. On the violence of thermal explosion in solid explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Chidester, S.K.; Tarver, C.M.; Green, L.G.

    Heavily confined cylinders of octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX) and triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB) were heated at rates varying from 2 C/min to 3.3 C/h. Fourteen of the cylinders were hollow, and inner metallic liners with small heaters attached were used to produce uniform temperatures just prior to explosion. A complex thermocouple pattern was used to measure the temperature history throughout the charge and to determine the approximate location where the runaway exothermic reaction first occurred. The violence of the resulting explosion was measured using velocity pin arrays placed inside and outside of the metal confinement cylinders, flash x-rays, overpressure gauges, and fragment collection techniques.more » Five cylinders were intentionally detonated for violence comparisons. The measured temperature histories, times to explosion, and the locations of first reaction agreed closely with those calculated by a two-dimensional heat transfer code using multistep chemical decomposition models. The acceleration of the confining metal cylinders by the explosion process was accurately simulated using a two-dimensional pressure dependent deflagration reactive flow hydrodynamic mode. The most violent HMX thermal explosions gradually accelerated their outer cases to velocities approaching those of intentional detonations approximately 120 {micro}m after the onset of explosion. The measured inner cylinder collapse velocities from thermal explosions were considerably lower than those produced by detonations. In contrast to the HMX thermal reactions, no violent thermal explosions were produced by the TATB-based explosive LX-17. A heavily confined, slowly heated LX-17 test produced sufficient pressure to cause a 0.1 cm bend in a 2 cm thick steel plate.« less

  17. Assessment of safety distance between components of nuclear plant and study of the vulnerabiliy of the damage caused by an explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismaila, Aminu; Md Kasmani, Rafiziana; Meng-Hock, Koh; Termizi Ramli, Ahmad

    2017-10-01

    This paper deals with the assessment of external explosion, resulting from accidental release of jet fuel from the large commercial airliner in the nuclear power plant (NPP). The study used three widely prediction methods such as Trinitrotoluene (TNT), multi energy (TNO) and Baker-strehow (BST) to determine the unconfined vapour cloud explosion (UVCE) overpressure within the distances of 100-1400 m from the first impact location. The containment building was taken as the reference position. The fatalities of persons and damage of structures was estimated using probit methodology. Analysis of the results shows that both reactor building and control-room will be highly damaged with risk consequences and probability, depending on the assumed position of the crash. The structures at the radial distance of 600 m may suffer major structural damage with probability ranging from 25 to 100%. The minor structural damage was observed throughout the bounds of the plant complex. The people working within 250 m radius may get affected with different fatality ranging from 28 to 100%. The findings of this study is valuable to evaluate the safety improvement needed on the NPP site and on the risk and consequences associated with the hydrocarbon fuel release/fires due to external hazards.

  18. Explosives Safety Requirements Manual

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1996-03-29

    This Manual describes the Department of Energy's (DOE's) explosives safety requirements applicable to operations involving the development, testing, handling, and processing of explosives or assemblies containing explosives. It is intended to reflect...

  19. Wireless sensor for detecting explosive material

    SciTech Connect

    Lamberti, Vincent E; Howell, Jr., Layton N; Mee, David K

    Disclosed is a sensor for detecting explosive devices. The sensor includes a ferromagnetic metal and a molecular recognition reagent coupled to the ferromagnetic metal. The molecular recognition reagent is operable to expand upon absorption of vapor from an explosive material such that the molecular recognition reagent changes a tensile stress upon the ferromagnetic metal. The explosive device is detected based on changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the ferromagnetic metal caused by the tensile stress.

  20. Electronic Cigarette Explosion Resulting in a C1 and C2 Fracture: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Norii, Tatsuya; Plate, Adam

    2017-01-01

    Electronic cigarettes have seen a drastic increase in use. A lithium-ion battery is often used as the rechargeable battery of the electronic cigarette device and has recently received much attention in terms of safety. There are several recent case reports in the scientific literature of injuries due to electronic cigarette explosions that involved soft-tissue injuries. We report a significant spinal fracture from an electronic-cigarette explosion in a 27-year-old male. The electronic cigarette exploded during use, sending the mouthpiece through the pharynx and into the first cervical vertebra and resulting in fractures of the first and second vertebrae. An x-ray study of the neck showed a foreign body in the neck at the level of C1. A computed tomography scan of the neck showed fractures of C1. The foreign body was removed in the operating room. The patient was discharged home without neurologic sequelae. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: Our case report is the first case of a cervical spine injury due to the explosion of an electronic cigarette. This case demonstrates that an electronic cigarette explosion can cause potentially serious penetrating neck injury. Emergency physicians should be aware of the potential danger of electronic cigarettes and have a low threshold to obtain radiographic tests and surgical consultation in the case of electronic cigarette explosion in the oral cavity. As the use of electronic cigarettes continue to increase, it is likely that injuries associated with them will also increase. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Chromospheric explosions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doschek, G. A.; theory. (3) Resolved: Most chromospheric h; theory. (3) Resolved: Most chromospheric h

    1986-01-01

    Three issues relative to chromospheric explosions were debated. (1) Resolved: The blue-shifted components of x-ray spectral lines are signatures of chromospheric evaporation. It was concluded that the plasma rising with the corona is indeed the primary source of thermal plasma observed in the corona during flares. (2) Resolved: The excess line broading of UV and X-ray lines is accounted for by a convective velocity distribution in evaporation. It is concluded that the hypothesis that convective evaporation produces the observed X-ray line widths in flares is no more than a hypothesis. It is not supported by any self-consistent physical theory. (3) Resolved: Most chromospheric heating is driven by electron beams. Although it is possible to cast doubt on many lines of evidence for electron beams in the chromosphere, a balanced view that debaters on both sides of the question might agree to is that electron beams probably heat the low corona and upper chromosphere, but their direct impact on evaporating the chromosphere is energetically unimportant when compared to conduction. This represents a major departure from the thick-target flare models that were popular before the Workshop.

  2. Extrusion cast explosive

    DOEpatents

    Scribner, Kenneth J.

    1985-01-01

    Improved, multiphase, high performance, high energy, extrusion cast explosive compositions, comprising, a crystalline explosive material; an energetic liquid plasticizer; a urethane prepolymer, comprising a blend of polyvinyl formal, and polycaprolactone; a polyfunctional isocyanate; and a catalyst are disclosed. These new explosive compositions exhibit higher explosive content, a smooth detonation front, excellent stability over long periods of storage, and lower sensitivity to mechanical stimulants.

  3. Optically detonated explosive device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, L. C.; Menichelli, V. J. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A technique and apparatus for optically detonating insensitive high explosives, is disclosed. An explosive device is formed by containing high explosive material in a house having a transparent window. A thin metallic film is provided on the interior surface of the window and maintained in contact with the high explosive. A laser pulse provided by a Q-switched laser is focussed on the window to vaporize the metallic film and thereby create a shock wave which detonates the high explosive. Explosive devices may be concurrently or sequentially detonated by employing a fiber optic bundle to transmit the laser pulse to each of the several individual explosive devices.

  4. Ammonium nitrate explosive systems

    DOEpatents

    Stinecipher, Mary M.; Coburn, Michael D.

    1981-01-01

    Novel explosives which comprise mixtures of ammonium nitrate and an ammonium salt of a nitroazole in desired ratios are disclosed. A preferred nitroazole is 3,5-dinitro-1,2,4-triazole. The explosive and physical properties of these explosives may readily be varied by the addition of other explosives and oxidizers. Certain of these mixtures have been found to act as ideal explosives.

  5. Failure Analysis of Short-Circuited Lithium-Ion Battery with Nickel-Manganese-Cobalt/Graphite Electrode.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Mi; Kim, Jea-Yeon; Byeon, Jai-Won

    2018-09-01

    Accidental failures and explosions of lithium-ion batteries have been reported in recent years. To determine the root causes and mechanisms of these failures from the perspective of material degradation, failure analysis was conducted for an intentionally shorted lithium-ion battery. The battery was subjected to electrical overcharging and mechanical pressing to simulate internal short-circuiting. After in situ measurement of the temperature increase during the short-circuiting of the electrodes, the disassembled battery components (i.e., the anode, cathode, and separator) were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Regardless of the simulated short-circuit method (mechanical or electrical), damage was observed in the shorted batteries. Numerous small cracks and chemical reaction products were observed on the electrode surface, along with pore shielding on the separator. The event of short-circuiting increased the surface temperature of the battery to approximately 90 °C, which prompted the deterioration and decomposition of the electrolyte, thus affecting the overall battery performance; this was attributed to the decomposition of the lithium salt at 60 °C. The gas generation due to the breakdown of the electrolyte causes pressure accumulation inside the cell; therefore, the electrolyte leaks.

  6. Explosive laser light initiation of propellants

    DOEpatents

    Piltch, Martin S.

    1993-01-01

    A improved initiator for artillery shell using an explosively generated laser light to uniformly initiate the propellent. A small quantity of a high explosive, when detonated, creates a high pressure and temperature, causing the surrounding noble gas to fluoresce. This fluorescence is directed into a lasing material, which lases, and directs laser light into a cavity in the propellant, uniformly initiating the propellant.

  7. Explosive laser light initiation of propellants

    DOEpatents

    Piltch, M.S.

    1993-05-18

    A improved initiator for artillery shell using an explosively generated laser light to uniformly initiate the propellent. A small quantity of a high explosive, when detonated, creates a high pressure and temperature, causing the surrounding noble gas to fluoresce. This fluorescence is directed into a lasing material, which lases, and directs laser light into a cavity in the propellant, uniformly initiating the propellant.

  8. Current balancing for battery strings

    DOEpatents

    Galloway, James H.

    1985-01-01

    A battery plant is described which features magnetic circuit means for balancing the electrical current flow through a pluraliircuitbattery strings which are connected electrically in parallel. The magnetic circuit means is associated with the battery strings such that the conductors carrying the electrical current flow through each of the battery strings pass through the magnetic circuit means in directions which cause the electromagnetic fields of at least one predetermined pair of the conductors to oppose each other. In an alternative embodiment, a low voltage converter is associated with each of the battery strings for balancing the electrical current flow through the battery strings.

  9. Whole cell bioreporter application for rapid detection and evaluation of crude oil spill in seawater caused by Dalian oil tank explosion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dayi; Ding, Aizhong; Cui, Shuangchao; Hu, Cheng; Thornton, Steven F; Dou, Junfeng; Sun, Yujiao; Huang, Wei E

    2013-03-01

    Accidents involving the release of crude oil to seawater pose serious threat to human and animal health, fisheries and marine ecosystems. A whole cell bioreporter detection method, which has unique advantages for the rapid evaluation on toxicity and bioavailability, is a useful tool to provide environmental risk assessments at crude oil-contaminated sites. Acinetobacter baylyi ADPWH_alk and ADPWH_recA are chromosomally-based alkane and genotoxicity bioreporters which can be activated to express bioluminescence in the presence of alkanes and genotoxic compounds. In this study, we applied Acinetobacter ADPWH_alk and ADPWH_recA bioreporters to examine six seawater and six sediment samples around the Dalian Bay four weeks after an oil tank explosion in Dalian, China in 2010, and compared the results with samples from the same sites one year after. The results of bioreporter detection suggest that seawater and sediments from five sites (DB, NT, JSB, XHP and FJZ) four weeks after the oil-spill were contaminated by the crude oil with various extents of genotoxicity. Among these six sites, DB and NT had high oil contents and genotoxicity, and JSB had high oil content but low genotoxicity in comparison with an uncontaminated site LSF, which is located at other side of the peninsula. These three sites (DB, NT and JSB) with detectable genotoxicity are within 30 km away from the oil spill point. The far-away two sites XHP (38.1 km) and FJZ (31.1 km) were lightly contaminated with oil but no genotoxicity suggesting that they are around the contamination boundary. Bioreporter detection also indicates that all six sites were clean one year after the oil-spill as the alkane and genotoxicity were below detection limit. This study demonstrates that bioreporter detection can be used as a rapid method to estimate the scale of a crude oil spill accident and to evaluate bioavailability and genotoxicity of contaminated seawater and sediments, which are crucial to risk assessment and

  10. Preliminary results: Root cause investigation of orbital anomalies and failures in NASA standard 50 ampere-hour nickel-cadmium batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toft, Mark R.

    1993-01-01

    Two lots of NASA standard 50 A.H. Ni-Cd battery cells, manufactured by Gates Aerospace Batteries and built into batteries by McDonnell Douglas, have experienced significant performance problems. The two lots were used on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory and the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite. Both of these satellites are Low Earth Orbital (LEO) satellites containing batteries on a parallel bus charged to NASA standard V/T curves using a NASA standard power regulator. The following preliminary conclusions were reached: (1) several plate and cell parameters have migrated within their spec limits over the years (in some cases, from one extreme to the other); (2) several parametric relationships, not generally monitored and therefore not under specification control, have also migrated over the years; (3) many of these changes appear to have taken place as a natural consequence of changes in GE/GAB materials and processes; (4) several of these factors may be 'conspiring' to aggravate known cell failure mechanisms (factors such as heavier plate, less teflon and/or less-uniform teflon, and less electrolyte) but all are still in spec (where specs exist); (5) the weight of the evidence collected to characterize the anomalies and to characterize the negative electrode itself, strongly suggests that alterations to the structure, composition, uniformity, and efficiency of the negative electrode are at the heart of the battery performance problems currently being experienced; and (6) further investigation at all levels (plate, cell, battery, and system) continues to be warranted.

  11. Fire-extinguishing organic electrolytes for safe batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianhui; Yamada, Yuki; Sodeyama, Keitaro; Watanabe, Eriko; Takada, Koji; Tateyama, Yoshitaka; Yamada, Atsuo

    2018-01-01

    Severe safety concerns are impeding the large-scale employment of lithium/sodium batteries. Conventional electrolytes are highly flammable and volatile, which may cause catastrophic fires or explosions. Efforts to introduce flame-retardant solvents into the electrolytes have generally resulted in compromised battery performance because those solvents do not suitably passivate carbonaceous anodes. Here we report a salt-concentrated electrolyte design to resolve this dilemma via the spontaneous formation of a robust inorganic passivation film on the anode. We demonstrate that a concentrated electrolyte using a salt and a popular flame-retardant solvent (trimethyl phosphate), without any additives or soft binders, allows stable charge-discharge cycling of both hard-carbon and graphite anodes for more than 1,000 cycles (over one year) with negligible degradation; this performance is comparable or superior to that of conventional flammable carbonate electrolytes. The unusual passivation character of the concentrated electrolyte coupled with its fire-extinguishing property contributes to developing safe and long-lasting batteries, unlocking the limit toward development of much higher energy-density batteries.

  12. Full and Partial Thickness Burns from Spontaneous Combustion of E-Cigarette Lithium-Ion Batteries with Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Treitl, Daniela; Solomon, Rachele; Davare, Dafney L; Sanchez, Rafael; Kiffin, Chauniqua

    2017-07-01

    In recent years, the use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) has increased worldwide. Most electronic nicotine delivery systems use rechargeable lithium-ion batteries, which are relatively safe, but in rare cases these batteries can spontaneously combust, leading to serious full and partial thickness burn injuries. Explosions from lithium-ion batteries can cause a flash fire and accelerant-related burn injuries. A retrospective chart review was conducted of 3 patients with lithium-ion battery burns seen at our Level I community-based trauma center. Clinical presentation, management, and outcome are presented. All 3 patients sustained burn injuries (total body surface area range 5-13%) from the spontaneous combustion of lithium-ion batteries used for e-cigarettes. All patients were treated with debridement and local wound care. All fully recovered without sequelae. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: Emergency physicians can expect to treat burn cases due to spontaneous lithium-ion battery combustion as e-cigarette use continues to increase. The cases presented here are intended to bring attention to lithium-ion battery-related burns, prepare physicians for the clinical presentation of this burn mechanism, and facilitate patient education to minimize burn risk. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Extrusion cast explosive

    DOEpatents

    Scribner, K.J.

    1985-01-29

    Improved, multiphase, high performance, high energy, extrusion cast explosive compositions, comprising, a crystalline explosive material; an energetic liquid plasticizer; a urethane prepolymer, comprising a blend of polyvinyl formal, and polycaprolactone; a polyfunctional isocyanate; and a catalyst are disclosed. These new explosive compositions exhibit higher explosive content, a smooth detonation front, excellent stability over long periods of storage, and lower sensitivity to mechanical stimulants. 1 fig.

  14. Extrusion cast explosive

    DOEpatents

    Scribner, K.J.

    1985-11-26

    Disclosed is an improved, multiphase, high performance, high energy, extrusion cast explosive compositions, comprising, a crystalline explosive material; an energetic liquid plasticizer; a urethane prepolymer, comprising a blend of polyvinyl formal, and polycaprolactone; a polyfunctional isocyanate; and a catalyst. These new explosive compositions exhibit higher explosive content, a smooth detonation front, excellent stability over long periods of storage, and lower sensitivity to mechanical stimulants. 1 fig.

  15. Inspection tester for explosives

    DOEpatents

    Haas, Jeffrey S.; Simpson, Randall L.; Satcher, Joe H.

    2007-11-13

    An inspection tester that can be used anywhere as a primary screening tool by non-technical personnel to determine whether a surface contains explosives. It includes a body with a sample pad. First and second explosives detecting reagent holders and dispensers are operatively connected to the body and the sample pad. The first and second explosives detecting reagent holders and dispensers are positioned to deliver the explosives detecting reagents to the sample pad. A is heater operatively connected to the sample pad.

  16. Inspection tester for explosives

    DOEpatents

    Haas, Jeffrey S.; Simpson, Randall L.; Satcher, Joe H.

    2010-10-05

    An inspection tester that can be used anywhere as a primary screening tool by non-technical personnel to determine whether a surface contains explosives. It includes a body with a sample pad. First and second explosives detecting reagent holders and dispensers are operatively connected to the body and the sample pad. The first and second explosives detecting reagent holders and dispensers are positioned to deliver the explosives detecting reagents to the sample pad. A is heater operatively connected to the sample pad.

  17. Managing traumatic brain injury secondary to explosions

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Paula; E Sullivent, Ernest; M Sasser, Scott; M Wald, Marlena; Ossmann, Eric; Kapil, Vikas

    2010-01-01

    Explosions and bombings are the most common deliberate cause of disasters with large numbers of casualties. Despite this fact, disaster medical response training has traditionally focused on the management of injuries following natural disasters and terrorist attacks with biological, chemical, and nuclear agents. The following article is a clinical primer for physicians regarding traumatic brain injury (TBI) caused by explosions and bombings. The history, physics, and treatment of TBI are outlined. PMID:20606794

  18. Managing traumatic brain injury secondary to explosions.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Paula; E Sullivent, Ernest; M Sasser, Scott; M Wald, Marlena; Ossmann, Eric; Kapil, Vikas

    2010-04-01

    Explosions and bombings are the most common deliberate cause of disasters with large numbers of casualties. Despite this fact, disaster medical response training has traditionally focused on the management of injuries following natural disasters and terrorist attacks with biological, chemical, and nuclear agents. The following article is a clinical primer for physicians regarding traumatic brain injury (TBI) caused by explosions and bombings. The history, physics, and treatment of TBI are outlined.

  19. Dry cell battery poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Batteries - dry cell ... Acidic dry cell batteries contain: Manganese dioxide Ammonium chloride Alkaline dry cell batteries contain: Sodium hydroxide Potassium hydroxide Lithium dioxide dry cell batteries ...

  20. NREL Blows Up Batteries to Make the World Safer (Text Version) | NREL

    Science.gov Websites

    World Safer (Text Version) Making lithium-ion batteries safer for earthlings and astronauts is something very large explosions] Not like that. Matt blows up lithium-ion batteries to test them for safety. Matt technology used by NASA in outer space. Matt and his team study battery failure using innovative technologies

  1. One-Dimensional Time to Explosion (Thermal Sensitivity) of ANPZ

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, P.; Hust, G.; McClelland, M.

    Incidents caused by fire and combat operations can heat energetic materials that may lead to thermal explosion and result in structural damage and casualty. Some explosives may thermally explode at fairly low temperatures (< 100 C) and the violence from thermal explosion may cause a significant damage. Thus it is important to understand the response of energetic materials to thermal insults. The One Dimensional Time to Explosion (ODTX) system at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has been used for decades to measure times to explosion, threshold thermal explosion temperature, and determine kinetic parameters of energetic materials. Samples of different configurationsmore » (pressed part, powder, paste, and liquid) can be tested in the system. The ODTX testing can also provide useful data for assessing the thermal explosion violence of energetic materials. This report summarizes the recent ODTX experimental data and modeling results for 2,6-diamino-3,5-dintropyrazine (ANPZ).« less

  2. Turbulent Combustion in SDF Explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, A L; Bell, J B; Beckner, V E

    2009-11-12

    A heterogeneous continuum model is proposed to describe the dispersion and combustion of an aluminum particle cloud in an explosion. It combines the gas-dynamic conservation laws for the gas phase with a continuum model for the dispersed phase, as formulated by Nigmatulin. Inter-phase mass, momentum and energy exchange are prescribed by phenomenological models. It incorporates a combustion model based on the mass conservation laws for fuel, air and products; source/sink terms are treated in the fast-chemistry limit appropriate for such gasdynamic fields, along with a model for mass transfer from the particle phase to the gas. The model takes intomore » account both the afterburning of the detonation products of the C-4 booster with air, and the combustion of the Al particles with air. The model equations were integrated by high-order Godunov schemes for both the gas and particle phases. Numerical simulations of the explosion fields from 1.5-g Shock-Dispersed-Fuel (SDF) charge in a 6.6 liter calorimeter were used to validate the combustion model. Then the model was applied to 10-kg Al-SDF explosions in a an unconfined height-of-burst explosion. Computed pressure histories are compared with measured waveforms. Differences are caused by physical-chemical kinetic effects of particle combustion which induce ignition delays in the initial reactive blast wave and quenching of reactions at late times. Current simulations give initial insights into such modeling issues.« less

  3. On the Violence of High Explosive Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Tarver, C M; Chidester, S K

    High explosive reactions can be caused by three general energy deposition processes: impact ignition by frictional and/or shear heating; bulk thermal heating; and shock compression. The violence of the subsequent reaction varies from benign slow combustion to catastrophic detonation of the entire charge. The degree of violence depends on many variables, including the rate of energy delivery, the physical and chemical properties of the explosive, and the strength of the confinement surrounding the explosive charge. The current state of experimental and computer modeling research on the violence of impact, thermal, and shock-induced reactions is reviewed.

  4. Relocatable explosives storage magazine

    SciTech Connect

    Liptak, R.E.; Keenan, W.A.

    A relocatable storage magazine apparatus for storing and retrieving explosives and ordnance and for partially containing and attenuating the blast, conflagration and flying debris from an accidental explosion is described comprising: (a) a container having an access hole; (b) a debris trap attached to the container, the debris trap communicating with said container via the access hole, said debris trap having vent holes for venting the pressure of an explosion from said debris trap to the atmosphere; (c) means for covering said access hole; (d) means for suspending explosives and ordnance from the covering means; (e) means for entering themore » storage magazine to store and retrieve explosives and ordnance; (f) means for retaining said covering means in a position above the access hole wherein said explosives and ordnance are accessible from the entering means.« less

  5. Free radical explosive composition

    DOEpatents

    Walker, Franklin E.; Wasley, Richard J.

    1979-01-01

    An improved explosive composition is disclosed and comprises a major portion of an explosive having a detonation velocity between about 1500 and 10,000 meters per second and a minor amount of a getter additive comprising a compound or mixture of compounds capable of capturing or deactivating free radicals or ions under mechanical or electrical shock conditions and which is not an explosive. Exemplary getter additives are isocyanates, olefins and iodine.

  6. Explosives tester with heater

    DOEpatents

    Del Eckels, Joel [Livermore, CA; Nunes, Peter J [Danville, CA; Simpson, Randall L [Livermore, CA; Whipple, Richard E [Livermore, CA; Carter, J Chance [Livermore, CA; Reynolds, John G [San Ramon, CA

    2010-08-10

    An inspection tester system for testing for explosives. The tester includes a body and a swab unit adapted to be removeably connected to the body. At least one reagent holder and dispenser is operatively connected to the body. The reagent holder and dispenser contains an explosives detecting reagent and is positioned to deliver the explosives detecting reagent to the swab unit. A heater is operatively connected to the body and the swab unit is adapted to be operatively connected to the heater.

  7. Circulating current battery heater

    DOEpatents

    Ashtiani, Cyrus N.; Stuart, Thomas A.

    2001-01-01

    A circuit for heating energy storage devices such as batteries is provided. The circuit includes a pair of switches connected in a half-bridge configuration. Unidirectional current conduction devices are connected in parallel with each switch. A series resonant element for storing energy is connected from the energy storage device to the pair of switches. An energy storage device for intermediate storage of energy is connected in a loop with the series resonant element and one of the switches. The energy storage device which is being heated is connected in a loop with the series resonant element and the other switch. Energy from the heated energy storage device is transferred to the switched network and then recirculated back to the battery. The flow of energy through the battery causes internal power dissipation due to electrical to chemical conversion inefficiencies. The dissipated power causes the internal temperature of the battery to increase. Higher internal temperatures expand the cold temperature operating range and energy capacity utilization of the battery. As disclosed, either fixed frequency or variable frequency modulation schemes may be used to control the network.

  8. Cell phone explosion.

    PubMed

    Atreya, Alok; Kanchan, Tanuj; Nepal, Samata; Pandey, Bhuwan Raj

    2016-03-01

    Cell phone explosions and resultant burn injuries are rarely reported in the scientific literature. We report a case of cell phone explosion that occurred when a young male was listening to music while the mobile was plugged in for charging. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Explosives detection system and method

    DOEpatents

    Reber, Edward L.; Jewell, James K.; Rohde, Kenneth W.; Seabury, Edward H.; Blackwood, Larry G.; Edwards, Andrew J.; Derr, Kurt W.

    2007-12-11

    A method of detecting explosives in a vehicle includes providing a first rack on one side of the vehicle, the rack including a neutron generator and a plurality of gamma ray detectors; providing a second rack on another side of the vehicle, the second rack including a neutron generator and a plurality of gamma ray detectors; providing a control system, remote from the first and second racks, coupled to the neutron generators and gamma ray detectors; using the control system, causing the neutron generators to generate neutrons; and performing gamma ray spectroscopy on spectra read by the gamma ray detectors to look for a signature indicative of presence of an explosive. Various apparatus and other methods are also provided.

  10. Battery resource assessment. Battery demands scenarios materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, D.

    1980-12-01

    Projections of demand for batteries and battery materials between 1980 and 2000 are presented. The estimates are based on existing predictions for the future of the electric vehicle, photovoltaic, utility load-leveling, and existing battery industry. Battery demand was first computed as kilowatt-hours of storage for various types of batteries. Using estimates for the materials required for each battery, the maximum demand that could be expected for each battery material was determined.

  11. Concussive brain injury from explosive blast

    PubMed Central

    de Lanerolle, Nihal C; Hamid, Hamada; Kulas, Joseph; Pan, Jullie W; Czlapinski, Rebecca; Rinaldi, Anthony; Ling, Geoffrey; Bandak, Faris A; Hetherington, Hoby P

    2014-01-01

    Objective Explosive blast mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is associated with a variety of symptoms including memory impairment and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Explosive shock waves can cause hippocampal injury in a large animal model. We recently reported a method for detecting brain injury in soldiers with explosive blast mTBI using magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI). This method is applied in the study of veterans exposed to blast. Methods The hippocampus of 25 veterans with explosive blast mTBI, 20 controls, and 12 subjects with PTSD but without exposure to explosive blast were studied using MRSI at 7 Tesla. Psychiatric and cognitive assessments were administered to characterize the neuropsychiatric deficits and compare with findings from MRSI. Results Significant reductions in the ratio of N-acetyl aspartate to choline (NAA/Ch) and N-acetyl aspartate to creatine (NAA/Cr) (P < 0.05) were found in the anterior portions of the hippocampus with explosive blast mTBI in comparison to control subjects and were more pronounced in the right hippocampus, which was 15% smaller in volume (P < 0.05). Decreased NAA/Ch and NAA/Cr were not influenced by comorbidities – PTSD, depression, or anxiety. Subjects with PTSD without blast had lesser injury, which tended to be in the posterior hippocampus. Explosive blast mTBI subjects had a reduction in visual memory compared to PTSD without blast. Interpretation The region of the hippocampus injured differentiates explosive blast mTBI from PTSD. MRSI is quite sensitive in detecting and localizing regions of neuronal injury from explosive blast associated with memory impairment. PMID:25493283

  12. Non-detonable explosive simulators

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, Randall L.; Pruneda, Cesar O.

    1994-01-01

    A simulator which is chemically equivalent to an explosive, but is not detonable. The simulator has particular use in the training of explosives detecting dogs and calibrating sensitive analytical instruments. The explosive simulants may be fabricated by different techniques, a first involves the use of standard slurry coatings to produce a material with a very high binder to explosive ratio without masking the explosive vapor, and the second involves coating inert beads with thin layers of explosive molecules.

  13. Non-detonable explosive simulators

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, R.L.; Pruneda, C.O.

    1994-11-01

    A simulator which is chemically equivalent to an explosive, but is not detonable. The simulator has particular use in the training of explosives detecting dogs and calibrating sensitive analytical instruments. The explosive simulants may be fabricated by different techniques, a first involves the use of standard slurry coatings to produce a material with a very high binder to explosive ratio without masking the explosive vapor, and the second involves coating inert beads with thin layers of explosive molecules. 5 figs.

  14. Isolator fragmentation and explosive initiation tests

    SciTech Connect

    Dickson, Peter; Rae, Philip John; Foley, Timothy J.

    2016-09-19

    Three tests were conducted to evaluate the effects of firing an isolator in proximity to a barrier or explosive charge. The tests with explosive were conducted without a barrier, on the basis that since any barrier will reduce the shock transmitted to the explosive, bare explosive represents the worst-case from an inadvertent initiation perspective. No reaction was observed. The shock caused by the impact of a representative plastic material on both bare and cased PBX 9501 is calculated in the worst-case, 1-D limit, and the known shock response of the HE is used to estimate minimum run-to-detonation lengths. The estimatesmore » demonstrate that even 1-D impacts would not be of concern and that, accordingly, the divergent shocks due to isolator fragment impact are of no concern as initiating stimuli.« less

  15. Isolator fragmentation and explosive initiation tests

    SciTech Connect

    Dickson, Peter; Rae, Philip John; Foley, Timothy J.

    2015-09-30

    Three tests were conducted to evaluate the effects of firing an isolator in proximity to a barrier or explosive charge. The tests with explosive were conducted without barrier, on the basis that since any barrier will reduce the shock transmitted to the explosive, bare explosive represents the worst-case from an inadvertent initiation perspective. No reaction was observed. The shock caused by the impact of a representative plastic material on both bare and cased PBX9501 is calculated in the worst-case, 1-D limit, and the known shock response of the HE is used to estimate minimum run-to-detonation lengths. The estimates demonstrate thatmore » even 1-D impacts would not be of concern and that, accordingly, the divergent shocks due to isolator fragment impact are of no concern as initiating stimuli.« less

  16. Electronic cigarette explosions involving the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Rebecca; Hicklin, David

    2016-11-01

    The use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) is a rapidly growing trend throughout the United States. E-cigarettes have been linked to the risk of causing explosion and fire. Data are limited on the associated health hazards of e-cigarette use, particularly long-term effects, and available information often presents conflicting conclusions. In addition, an e-cigarette explosion and fire can pose a unique treatment challenge to the dental care provider because the oral cavity may be affected heavily. In this particular case, the patient's injuries included intraoral burns, luxation injuries, and alveolar fractures. This case report aims to help clinicians gain an increased knowledge about e-cigarette design, use, and risks; discuss the risk of spontaneous failure and explosion of e-cigarettes with patients; and understand the treatment challenges posed by an e-cigarette explosion. Copyright © 2016 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Lithium use in batteries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goonan, Thomas G.

    2012-01-01

    Lithium has a number of uses but one of the most valuable is as a component of high energy-density rechargeable lithium-ion batteries. Because of concerns over carbon dioxide footprint and increasing hydrocarbon fuel cost (reduced supply), lithium may become even more important in large batteries for powering all-electric and hybrid vehicles. It would take 1.4 to 3.0 kilograms of lithium equivalent (7.5 to 16.0 kilograms of lithium carbonate) to support a 40-mile trip in an electric vehicle before requiring recharge. This could create a large demand for lithium. Estimates of future lithium demand vary, based on numerous variables. Some of those variables include the potential for recycling, widespread public acceptance of electric vehicles, or the possibility of incentives for converting to lithium-ion-powered engines. Increased electric usage could cause electricity prices to increase. Because of reduced demand, hydrocarbon fuel prices would likely decrease, making hydrocarbon fuel more desirable. In 2009, 13 percent of worldwide lithium reserves, expressed in terms of contained lithium, were reported to be within hard rock mineral deposits, and 87 percent, within brine deposits. Most of the lithium recovered from brine came from Chile, with smaller amounts from China, Argentina, and the United States. Chile also has lithium mineral reserves, as does Australia. Another source of lithium is from recycled batteries. When lithium-ion batteries begin to power vehicles, it is expected that battery recycling rates will increase because vehicle battery recycling systems can be used to produce new lithium-ion batteries.

  18. Bipolar battery

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1992-01-01

    A bipolar battery having a plurality of cells. The bipolar battery includes: a negative electrode; a positive electrode and a separator element disposed between the negative electrode and the positive electrode, the separator element electrically insulating the electrodes from one another; an electrolyte disposed within at least one of the negative electrode, the positive electrode and the separator element; and an electrode containment structure including a cup-like electrode holder.

  19. Explosion characteristics of flammable organic vapors in nitrous oxide atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Koshiba, Yusuke; Takigawa, Tomihisa; Matsuoka, Yusaku; Ohtani, Hideo

    2010-11-15

    Despite unexpected explosion accidents caused by nitrous oxide have occurred, few systematic studies have been reported on explosion characteristics of flammable gases in nitrous oxide atmosphere compared to those in air or oxygen. The objective of this paper is to characterize explosion properties of mixtures of n-pentane, diethyl ether, diethylamine, or n-butyraldehyde with nitrous oxide and nitrogen using three parameters: explosion limit, peak explosion pressure, and time to the peak explosion pressure. Then, similar mixtures of n-pentane, diethyl ether, diethylamine, or n-butyraldehyde with oxygen and nitrogen were prepared to compare their explosion characteristics with the mixtures containing nitrous oxide. The explosion experiments were performed in a cylindrical vessel at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. The measurements showed that explosion ranges of the mixtures containing nitrous oxide were narrow compared to those of the mixtures containing oxygen. On the other hand, the maximum explosion pressures of the mixtures containing nitrous oxide were higher than those of the mixtures containing oxygen. Moreover, our experiments revealed that these mixtures differed in equivalence ratios at which the maximum explosion pressures were observed: the pressures of the mixtures containing nitrous oxide were observed at stoichiometry; in contrast, those of the mixtures containing oxygen were found at fuel-rich area. Chemical equilibrium calculations confirmed these behaviors. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Facile kinetics of Li-ion intake causes superior rate capability in multiwalled carbon nanotube@TiO2 nanocomposite battery anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acevedo-Peña, Próspero; Haro, Marta; Rincón, Marina E.; Bisquert, Juan; Garcia-Belmonte, Germà

    2014-12-01

    Nanotechnology produces hybrids with superior properties than its individual constituents. Here MWCNT@TiO2 composites have been synthesized by controlled hydrolysis of titanium isopropoxide over MWCNT, to be incorporated into Li-ion battery electrodes. Outstanding rate capability of the coated nanotubes is observed in comparison to pristine TiO2. Specific storage capacity as high as 250 mAh g-1 is achieved for the nanocomposite electrode which doubles that encountered for TiO2-based anodes. The mechanism explaining the enhancement in power performance has been revealed by means of electrochemical impedance methods. Although both pristine TiO2 and MWCNT@TiO2 would potentially exhibit comparable specific capacity, the charge transfer resistance for the latter is reduced by a factor 10, implying a key role of MWCNTs to favor the interfacial Li+ ion intake from the electrolyte. MWCNT efficiently provides electrons to the nanostructure through the Ti-C bond which assists the Li+ ion incorporation. These findings provide access to the detailed lithiation kinetics of a broad class of nanocomposites for battery applications.

  1. DOE explosives safety manual

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-05-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) policy requires that all activities be conducted in a manner that protects the safety of the public and provides a safe and healthful workplace for employees. DOE has also prescribed that all personnel be protected in any explosives operation undertaken. The level of safety provided shall be at least equivalent to that of the best industrial practice. The risk of death or serious injury shall be limited to the lowest practicable minimum. DOE and contractors shall continually review their explosives operations with the aim of achieving further refinements and improvements in safety practices and protective features. This manual describes the Department's explosive safety requirements applicable to operations involving the development, testing, handling, and processing of explosives or assemblies containing explosives. It is intended to reflect the state-of-the-art in explosives safety. In addition, it is essential that applicable criteria and requirements for implementing this policy be readily available and known to those responsible for conducting DOE programs. This document shall be periodically reviewed and updated to establish new requirements as appropriate. Users are requested to submit suggestions for improving the DOE Explosives Safety Manual through their appropriate Operations Office to the Office of Quality Programs.

  2. Explosive events on the Sun.

    PubMed

    Harra, Louise K

    2002-12-15

    I describe two of the most dynamic and highly energetic phenomena in the Solar System--the explosive flares that can occur when plasma is confined by magnetic fields and the large-scale ejections of material known as 'coronal mass ejections'. These explosive events are poorly understood and yet occur in a variety of contexts in the Universe, ranging from planetary magnetospheres to active galactic nuclei. Understanding why flares and coronal mass ejections occur is a major goal across a wide range of space physics and astrophysics. Although explosive events from the Sun have dramatic effects on Earth, flares in other stars, for example, can be vastly more energetic and have an even more profound effect on their environment. We are now in the unprecedented position of having access to a number of space observatories dedicated to the Sun: the Yohkoh spacecraft, the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer and the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager. These cover a wide wavelength range from white light to gamma rays with both spectroscopy and imaging, and allow huge progress to be made in understanding the processes involved in such large explosions. The high-resolution data show dramatic and complex explosions of material on all spatial scales on the Sun. They have revealed that the Sun is constantly changing everywhere on its surface--something that was never imagined before. One of the mechanisms that has been proposed to account for the large energy release is magnetic reconnection. Recent observations from space increasingly support this view. This article will discuss those observations that support this model and also those that suggest different processes. The current space missions have given us an excellent insight into the actual explosive processes in the Sun. However, they have provided us with only a tantalizing glimpse of what causes the elusive trigger. Future missions such as Solar-B (the follow-on to

  3. Lithium niobate explosion monitor

    DOEpatents

    Bundy, Charles H.; Graham, Robert A.; Kuehn, Stephen F.; Precit, Richard R.; Rogers, Michael S.

    1990-01-01

    Monitoring explosive devices is accomplished with a substantially z-cut lithium niobate crystal in abutment with the explosive device. Upon impact by a shock wave from detonation of the explosive device, the crystal emits a current pulse prior to destruction of the crystal. The current pulse is detected by a current viewing transformer and recorded as a function of time in nanoseconds. In order to self-check the crystal, the crystal has a chromium film resistor deposited thereon which may be heated by a current pulse prior to detonation. This generates a charge which is detected by a charge amplifier.

  4. Lithium niobate explosion monitor

    DOEpatents

    Bundy, C.H.; Graham, R.A.; Kuehn, S.F.; Precit, R.R.; Rogers, M.S.

    1990-01-09

    Monitoring explosive devices is accomplished with a substantially z-cut lithium niobate crystal in abutment with the explosive device. Upon impact by a shock wave from detonation of the explosive device, the crystal emits a current pulse prior to destruction of the crystal. The current pulse is detected by a current viewing transformer and recorded as a function of time in nanoseconds. In order to self-check the crystal, the crystal has a chromium film resistor deposited thereon which may be heated by a current pulse prior to detonation. This generates a charge which is detected by a charge amplifier. 8 figs.

  5. Conventional Weapons Underwater Explosions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    Nitromethane," UCRL 52903, December 1980. 22 I >I I 20 0--0 AIcN 23 0 I0 0 0 c W * ’S * / 0 o ---. 0 / nEil~ 24 Unreacted explosive Shock front t t...1976. 57 7. B. M. Dobratz LLNL Explosives Handbook - Properties of Explosives and Ex- plosive Simulants, UCRL -52997, March 1981. 8. M. H. Rice and J...Canada (403) 549- 3701 Ext. 4787 39. Joel C. W. Rogers Dept. of Mathemantics Polytechnic University 333 Jay Street Brooklyn, NY 11201 (718) 260-3501 40

  6. Fast Equalization for Large Lithium Ion Batteries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    Lithium - ion batteries use an electrolyte that is flammable if exposed to high temperatures. Slight differences between the series-connected cells in a LiIon battery pack can produce imbalances in the cell voltages, and this greatly reduces the charge capacity. These batteries cannot be trickle charged like a lead acid battery because this would slightly overcharge some cells and would cause these cells to ignite. There are different methods used to ensure that the cells of a battery pack are not overcharged. The targeted equalizer (EQU) described here can

  7. What factors control superficial lava dome explosivity?

    PubMed

    Boudon, Georges; Balcone-Boissard, Hélène; Villemant, Benoît; Morgan, Daniel J

    2015-09-30

    Dome-forming eruption is a frequent eruptive style and a major hazard on numerous volcanoes worldwide. Lava domes are built by slow extrusion of degassed, viscous magma and may be destroyed by gravitational collapse or explosion. The triggering of lava dome explosions is poorly understood: here we propose a new model of superficial lava-dome explosivity based upon a textural and geochemical study (vesicularity, microcrystallinity, cristobalite distribution, residual water contents, crystal transit times) of clasts produced by key eruptions. Superficial explosion of a growing lava dome may be promoted through porosity reduction caused by both vesicle flattening due to gas escape and syn-eruptive cristobalite precipitation. Both processes generate an impermeable and rigid carapace allowing overpressurisation of the inner parts of the lava dome by the rapid input of vesiculated magma batches. The relative thickness of the cristobalite-rich carapace is an inverse function of the external lava dome surface area. Explosive activity is thus more likely to occur at the onset of lava dome extrusion, in agreement with observations, as the likelihood of superficial lava dome explosions depends inversely on lava dome volume. This new result is of interest for the whole volcanological community and for risk management.

  8. What factors control superficial lava dome explosivity?

    PubMed Central

    Boudon, Georges; Balcone-Boissard, Hélène; Villemant, Benoît; Morgan, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Dome-forming eruption is a frequent eruptive style and a major hazard on numerous volcanoes worldwide. Lava domes are built by slow extrusion of degassed, viscous magma and may be destroyed by gravitational collapse or explosion. The triggering of lava dome explosions is poorly understood: here we propose a new model of superficial lava-dome explosivity based upon a textural and geochemical study (vesicularity, microcrystallinity, cristobalite distribution, residual water contents, crystal transit times) of clasts produced by key eruptions. Superficial explosion of a growing lava dome may be promoted through porosity reduction caused by both vesicle flattening due to gas escape and syn-eruptive cristobalite precipitation. Both processes generate an impermeable and rigid carapace allowing overpressurisation of the inner parts of the lava dome by the rapid input of vesiculated magma batches. The relative thickness of the cristobalite-rich carapace is an inverse function of the external lava dome surface area. Explosive activity is thus more likely to occur at the onset of lava dome extrusion, in agreement with observations, as the likelihood of superficial lava dome explosions depends inversely on lava dome volume. This new result is of interest for the whole volcanological community and for risk management. PMID:26420069

  9. Saturn Hot Plasma Explosions

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-12-14

    This frame from an animation based on data obtained by NASA Cassini spacecraft shows how the explosions of hot plasma on the night side orange and white periodically inflate Saturn magnetic field white lines.

  10. Intermittent Explosive Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... explosive disorder have an increased risk of: Impaired interpersonal relationships. They're often perceived by others as ... logo are trademarks of Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. © 1998-2018 Mayo Foundation for Medical ...

  11. Polymeric binder for explosives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bissell, E. R.

    1972-01-01

    Chemical reaction for producing a polymer which can be mixed with explosives to produce a rigid material is discussed. Physical and chemical properties of polymers are described and chemical structure of the polymer is illustrated.

  12. Idaho Explosive Detection System

    ScienceCinema

    Klinger, Jeff

    2018-05-23

    Learn how INL researchers are making the world safer by developing an explosives detection system that can inspect cargo. For more information about INL security research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory

  13. Explosibility of Metal Powders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1964-01-01

    299 1832 - Copper ore, sulfide , Mexic.................................................- - 100 - - - 300 1873 - Iron ore, magnetite...100 - - - 302 2076.............................................. do...................................... - - 100 - - - 303 749 - Iron ore, sulfide ...9 Pyrophoricity ............................................................... 9 Prevention of ignition and explosion

  14. Explosion suppression system

    DOEpatents

    Sapko, Michael J.; Cortese, Robert A.

    1992-01-01

    An explosion suppression system and triggering apparatus therefor are provided for quenching gas and dust explosions. An electrically actuated suppression mechanism which dispenses an extinguishing agent into the path ahead of the propagating flame is actuated by a triggering device which is light powered. This triggering device is located upstream of the propagating flame and converts light from the flame to an electrical actuation signal. A pressure arming device electrically connects the triggering device to the suppression device only when the explosion is sensed by a further characteristic thereof beside the flame such as the pioneer pressure wave. The light powered triggering device includes a solar panel which is disposed in the path of the explosion and oriented between horizontally downward and vertical. Testing mechanisms are also preferably provided to test the operation of the solar panel and detonator as well as the pressure arming mechanism.

  15. Sensitivities of ionic explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Politzer, Peter; Lane, Pat; Murray, Jane S.

    2017-03-01

    We have investigated the relevance for ionic explosive sensitivity of three factors that have been demonstrated to be related to the sensitivities of molecular explosives. These are (1) the maximum available heat of detonation, (2) the amount of free space per molecule (or per formula unit) in the crystal lattice and (3) specific features of the electrostatic potential on the molecular or ionic surface. We find that for ionic explosives, just as for molecular ones, there is an overall tendency for impact sensitivity to increase as the maximum detonation heat release is greater. This means that the usual emphasis upon designing explosives with large heats of detonation needs to be tempered somewhat. We also show that a moderate detonation heat release does not preclude a high level of detonation performance for ionic explosives, as was already demonstrated for molecular ones. Relating the free space per formula unit to sensitivity may require a modified procedure for ionic explosives; this will continue to be investigated. Finally, an encouraging start has been made in linking impact sensitivities to the electrostatic potentials on ionic surfaces, although limited so far to ammonium salts.

  16. Blast overpressure after tire explosion: a fatal case.

    PubMed

    Pomara, Cristoforo; D'Errico, Stefano; Riezzo, Irene; Perilli, Gabriela; Volpe, Umberto; Fineschi, Vittorio

    2013-12-01

    Fatal blast injuries are generally reported in literature as a consequence of the detonation of explosives in war settings. The pattern of lesion depends on the position of the victim in relation to the explosion, on whether the blast tracks through air or water, and whether it happens in the open air or within an enclosed space and the distance from the explosion. Tire explosion-related injuries are rarely reported in literature. This study presents a fatal case of blast overpressure due to the accidental explosion of a truck tire occurring in a tire repair shop. A multidisciplinary approach to the fatality involving forensic pathologists and engineers revealed that the accidental explosion, which caused a series of primary and tertiary blast wave injuries, was due to tire deterioration.

  17. Modeling Explosion Induced Aftershocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroll, K.; Ford, S. R.; Pitarka, A.; Walter, W. R.; Richards-Dinger, K. B.

    2017-12-01

    Many traditional earthquake-explosion discrimination tools are based on properties of the seismic waveform or their spectral components. Common discrimination methods include estimates of body wave amplitude ratios, surface wave magnitude scaling, moment tensor characteristics, and depth. Such methods are limited by station coverage and noise. Ford and Walter (2010) proposed an alternate discrimination method based on using properties of aftershock sequences as a means of earthquakeexplosion differentiation. Previous studies have shown that explosion sources produce fewer aftershocks that are generally smaller in magnitude compared to aftershocks of similarly sized earthquake sources (Jarpe et al., 1994, Ford and Walter, 2010). It has also been suggested that the explosion-induced aftershocks have smaller Gutenberg- Richter b-values (Ryall and Savage, 1969) and that their rates decay faster than a typical Omori-like sequence (Gross, 1996). To discern whether these observations are generally true of explosions or are related to specific site conditions (e.g. explosion proximity to active faults, tectonic setting, crustal stress magnitudes) would require a thorough global analysis. Such a study, however, is hindered both by lack of evenly distributed explosion-sources and the availability of global seismicity data. Here, we employ two methods to test the efficacy of explosions at triggering aftershocks under a variety of physical conditions. First, we use the earthquake rate equations from Dieterich (1994) to compute the rate of aftershocks related to an explosion source assuming a simple spring-slider model. We compare seismicity rates computed with these analytical solutions to those produced by the 3D, multi-cycle earthquake simulator, RSQSim. We explore the relationship between geological conditions and the characteristics of the resulting explosion-induced aftershock sequence. We also test hypothesis that aftershock generation is dependent upon the frequency

  18. Non-detonable and non-explosive explosive simulators

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, R.L.; Pruneda, C.O.

    1997-07-15

    A simulator which is chemically equivalent to an explosive, but is not detonable or explodable is disclosed. The simulator is a combination of an explosive material with an inert material, either in a matrix or as a coating, where the explosive has a high surface ratio but small volume ratio. The simulator has particular use in the training of explosives detecting dogs, calibrating analytical instruments which are sensitive to either vapor or elemental composition, or other applications where the hazards associated with explosives is undesirable but where chemical and/or elemental equivalence is required. The explosive simulants may be fabricated by different techniques. A first method involves the use of standard slurry coatings to produce a material with a very high binder to explosive ratio without masking the explosive vapor, and a second method involves coating inert substrates with thin layers of explosive. 11 figs.

  19. Non-detonable and non-explosive explosive simulators

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, Randall L.; Pruneda, Cesar O.

    1997-01-01

    A simulator which is chemically equivalent to an explosive, but is not detonable or explodable. The simulator is a combination of an explosive material with an inert material, either in a matrix or as a coating, where the explosive has a high surface ratio but small volume ratio. The simulator has particular use in the training of explosives detecting dogs, calibrating analytical instruments which are sensitive to either vapor or elemental composition, or other applications where the hazards associated with explosives is undesirable but where chemical and/or elemental equivalence is required. The explosive simulants may be fabricated by different techniques. A first method involves the use of standard slurry coatings to produce a material with a very high binder to explosive ratio without masking the explosive vapor, and a second method involves coating inert substrates with thin layers of explosive.

  20. Solid electrolyte for solid-state batteries: Have lithium-ion batteries reached their technical limit?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartini, Evvy; Manawan, Maykel

    2016-02-01

    With increasing demand for electrical power on a distribution grid lacking storage capabilities, utilities and project developers must stabilize what is currently still intermittent energy production. In fact, over half of utility executives say "the most important emerging energy technology" is energy storage. Advanced, low-cost battery designs are providing promising stationary storage solutions that can ensure reliable, high-quality power for customers, but research challenges and questions lefts. Have lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) reached their technical limit? The industry demands are including high costs, inadequate energy densities, long recharge times, short cycle-life times and safety must be continually addressed. Safety is still the main problem on developing the lithium ion battery.The safety issue must be considered from several aspects, since it would become serious problems, such as an explosion in a Japan Airlines 787 Dreamliner's cargo hold, due to the battery problem. The combustion is mainly due to the leakage or shortcut of the electrodes, caused by the liquid electrolyte and polymer separator. For this reason, the research on solid electrolyte for replacing the existing liquid electrolyte is very important. The materials used in existing lithium ion battery, such as a separator and liquid electrolyte must be replaced to new solid electrolytes, solid materials that exhibits high ionic conductivity. Due to these reasons, research on solid state ionics materials have been vastly growing worldwide, with the main aim not only to search new solid electrolyte to replace the liquid one, but also looking for low cost materials and environmentally friendly. A revolutionary paradigm is also required to design new stable anode and cathode materials that provide electrochemical cells with high energy, high power, long lifetime and adequate safety at competitive manufacturing costs. Lithium superionic conductors, which can be used as solid electrolytes

  1. Solid electrolyte for solid-state batteries: Have lithium-ion batteries reached their technical limit?

    SciTech Connect

    Kartini, Evvy; Manawan, Maykel

    With increasing demand for electrical power on a distribution grid lacking storage capabilities, utilities and project developers must stabilize what is currently still intermittent energy production. In fact, over half of utility executives say “the most important emerging energy technology” is energy storage. Advanced, low-cost battery designs are providing promising stationary storage solutions that can ensure reliable, high-quality power for customers, but research challenges and questions lefts. Have lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) reached their technical limit? The industry demands are including high costs, inadequate energy densities, long recharge times, short cycle-life times and safety must be continually addressed. Safety is stillmore » the main problem on developing the lithium ion battery.The safety issue must be considered from several aspects, since it would become serious problems, such as an explosion in a Japan Airlines 787 Dreamliner’s cargo hold, due to the battery problem. The combustion is mainly due to the leakage or shortcut of the electrodes, caused by the liquid electrolyte and polymer separator. For this reason, the research on solid electrolyte for replacing the existing liquid electrolyte is very important. The materials used in existing lithium ion battery, such as a separator and liquid electrolyte must be replaced to new solid electrolytes, solid materials that exhibits high ionic conductivity. Due to these reasons, research on solid state ionics materials have been vastly growing worldwide, with the main aim not only to search new solid electrolyte to replace the liquid one, but also looking for low cost materials and environmentally friendly. A revolutionary paradigm is also required to design new stable anode and cathode materials that provide electrochemical cells with high energy, high power, long lifetime and adequate safety at competitive manufacturing costs. Lithium superionic conductors, which can be used as solid

  2. Ferroresonant Flux-Coupled Battery Charger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, C. W.

    1986-01-01

    Portable battery charger operates at about 20 kHz to take advantage of relatively low weight and low acoustical noise of ferroresonant circuits operating in this frequency range. Charger split into stationary unit connected to powerline and mobile unit connected to battery or other load. Power transferred to mobile unit by magnetic coupling between mating transformer halves. Advantage where sparking at electrical connection might pose explosion hazard or where operator disabled and cannot manipulate plug into wall outlet. Likely applications for charger include wheelchairs and robots.

  3. 49 CFR 172.522 - EXPLOSIVES 1.1, EXPLOSIVES 1.2 and EXPLOSIVES 1.3 placards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false EXPLOSIVES 1.1, EXPLOSIVES 1.2 and EXPLOSIVES 1.3... INFORMATION, TRAINING REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Placarding § 172.522 EXPLOSIVES 1.1, EXPLOSIVES 1.2 and EXPLOSIVES 1.3 placards. (a) Except for size and color, the EXPLOSIVES 1.1, EXPLOSIVES 1.2 and EXPLOSIVES 1.3...

  4. 49 CFR 172.522 - EXPLOSIVES 1.1, EXPLOSIVES 1.2 and EXPLOSIVES 1.3 placards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false EXPLOSIVES 1.1, EXPLOSIVES 1.2 and EXPLOSIVES 1.3... INFORMATION, TRAINING REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Placarding § 172.522 EXPLOSIVES 1.1, EXPLOSIVES 1.2 and EXPLOSIVES 1.3 placards. (a) Except for size and color, the EXPLOSIVES 1.1, EXPLOSIVES 1.2 and EXPLOSIVES 1.3...

  5. Battery tester

    SciTech Connect

    Poljak, M.D.

    1985-08-12

    This abstract discloses an improved battery tester for determining the acceptability of a Lithium Sulfur Dioxide (LiSO/sub 2/) storage battery at a given temperature and with one or more cells therein. The tester is generally made up of a first-comparison circuit having a series of series-interconnected components, namely a comparator, first and second flip-flops, and an AND gate. A first resistor is parallel connected to the first-comparison circuit. A second comparison circuit is also parallel connected to the first-comparison circuit and is generally made up of series-interconnected components, namely a second resistor, a capacitor, a buffer, and a second-comparator. Amore » first switch is connected to the first resistor and a second switch is parallel connected to the second-comparison circuit between the capacitor and the buffer. A logic control arrangement controls the operation of both switches, both comparators, and both flip-flops for testing a battery as to its start-up voltage and performance voltage characteristics all in a relatively short time period. In another embodiment of the tester, it is provided with an analog-to-digital converter, a memory, and a sensor arrangement for enhancing the versatility and reliability of the tester in determining the acceptability of a LiSO/sub 2/ battery.« less

  6. Lithium Batteries

    Science.gov Websites

    medical devices including electrocardiographs. In addition, new "textured" cathodes have been the potential medical uses of the batteries, including transdermal applications for heart regulation .' -Edited excerpt from Medical Applications of Non-medical Research Resources with Additional Information

  7. Hardware Architecture for Measurements for 50-V Battery Modules

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick Bald; Evan Juras; Jon P. Christophersen

    Energy storage devices, especially batteries, have become critical for several industries including automotive, electric utilities, military and consumer electronics. With the increasing demand for electric and hybrid electric vehicles and the explosion in popularity of mobile and portable electronic devices such as laptops, cell phones, e-readers, tablet computers and the like, reliance on portable energy storage devices such as batteries has likewise increased. Because many of the systems these batteries integrated into are critical, there is an increased need for an accurate in-situ method of monitoring battery state-of-health. Over the past decade the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Montana Tech ofmore » the University of Montana (Tech), and Qualtech Systems, Inc. (QSI) have been developing the Smart Battery Status Monitor (SBSM), an integrated battery management system designed to monitor battery health, performance and degradation and use this knowledge for effective battery management and increased battery life. Key to the success of the SBSM is an in-situ impedance measurement system called the Impedance Measurement Box (IMB). One of the challenges encountered has been development of a compact IMB system that will perform rapid accurate measurements of a battery impedance spectrum working with higher voltage batteries of up to 300 volts. This paper discusses the successful realization of a system that will work up to 50 volts.« less

  8. Resource recycling technique of abandoned TNT-RDX-AL mixed explosive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Siyang; Ding, Yukui

    2017-08-01

    TNT-RDX-AL mixed explosive is a kind of high energy mixed explosive. It has the detonation characteristics even when reaching the scrapping standard. Inappropriate disposal often causes serious accident. Employing the resource recycling technique, the abandoned TNT-RDX-AL mixed explosive can be recycled. This paper summarized the progress of recycling of abandoned mixed explosive. What's more, three kinds of technological process of resource recycling abandoned TNT-RDX-AL mixed explosives are introduced. The author analysis of the current recovery processes and provided a reference for the recycling of the other same type explosive.

  9. The Explosive Counterparts of Gravitational Waves

    SciTech Connect

    None

    Astronomy collaborations like the Dark Energy Survey, which Fermilab leads, can track down the visible sources of gravitational waves caused by binary neutron stars. This animation takes you through the collision of two neutron stars, and shows you the explosion of light and energy seen by the Dark Energy Camera on August 17, 2017.

  10. 77 FR 55108 - Explosive Siting Requirements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-07

    ... against hazardous fragments, which are defined as having a kinetic energy of 58 foot-pounds, which is a level of kinetic energy capable of causing a fatality. The probability of a person six feet tall and one.... Explosions are due to the sudden release of energy over a short period of time and may or may not involve...

  11. Closure device for lead-acid batteries

    DOEpatents

    Ledjeff, Konstantin

    1983-01-01

    A closure device for lead-acid batteries includes a filter of granulated activated carbon treated to be hydrophobic combined with means for preventing explosion of emitted hydrogen and oxygen gas. The explosion prevention means includes a vertical open-end tube within the closure housing for maintaining a liquid level above side wall openings in an adjacent closed end tube. Gases vent from the battery through a nozzle directed inside the closed end tube against an impingement surface to remove acid droplets. The gases then flow through the side wall openings and the liquid level to quench any possible ignition prior to entering the activated carbon filter. A wick in the activated carbon filter conducts condensed liquid back to the closure housing to replenish the liquid level limited by the open-end tube.

  12. Novel high explosive compositions

    DOEpatents

    Perry, D.D.; Fein, M.M.; Schoenfelder, C.W.

    1968-04-16

    This is a technique of preparing explosive compositions by the in-situ reaction of polynitroaliphatic compounds with one or more carboranes or carborane derivatives. One or more polynitroaliphatic reactants are combined with one or more carborane reactants in a suitable container and mixed to a homogeneous reaction mixture using a stream of inert gas or conventional mixing means. Ordinarily the container is a fissure, crack, or crevice in which the explosive is to be implanted. The ratio of reactants will determine not only the stoichiometry of the system, but will effect the quality and quantity of combustion products, the explosive force obtained as well as the impact sensitivity. The test values can shift with even relatively slight changes or modifications in the reaction conditions. Eighteen illustrative examples accompany the disclosure. (46 claims)

  13. Flexible separator for alkaline batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W.

    1977-01-01

    Device is fabricated from low-cost readily-available commercial-materials by automated methods utilizing conventional paper coating processes. Flexibility of unit prevents cracking and disintegration caused by electrode warpage and dendrite growth, major causes of early battery failure with present separators.

  14. An explosion in Tunguska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nistor, Ioan

    A detailed History of exploration of the place at Podkamennaya Tunguska, where a well known explosion has occured on 30 June 1908 is given with emphasys on the role by Leonid Kulik (1928-29). A short biography of Leonid Kulik is given. A review of subsequent expeditions is given. A review of existing theories concerning the explosion at Podkamennaya Tunguska on 30 June 1908 is given, including that of a meteor impact, asteroid impact, atomic explosion (F. Zigel and other), comet impact (V.G. Fesenkov and other). The theory sustained by author is that of a methan gas explosion initialazed by a meteor in a volume of about 0.25-2.5 billions m3 of methan. The shape of the place could be explained by few gaseous pouches, which could explode in a chain reaction. A review of similar explosions on the level of ground is given in the USSR as well as elsewhere. The soil fluidization is reviewed during earthquakes and similar phenomena. The original hypothesis by author was published in the "Lumea" N 41 magazin (Romania) on October 12 1989. The author disagree with atomic hypotesis enounced by F. Zigel, while the main factor of the explosion is the formation of one or few methan pouches above the soil. The programe of one of the most important international workshops (Tunguska 96 in Bologna on July 14-17) is attached. The site by Ioan Nistor gives a collection of informations about the event from elsewhere as well as the "gaseous pouches" hypothesis by the author.

  15. 14 CFR 1204.1005 - Unauthorized introduction of firearms or weapons, explosives, or other dangerous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... weapons, explosives, or other dangerous materials. 1204.1005 Section 1204.1005 Aeronautics and Space... Weapons or Dangerous Materials § 1204.1005 Unauthorized introduction of firearms or weapons, explosives... or causing to be introduced, or using firearms or other dangerous weapons, explosives or other...

  16. 14 CFR 1204.1005 - Unauthorized introduction of firearms or weapons, explosives, or other dangerous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... weapons, explosives, or other dangerous materials. 1204.1005 Section 1204.1005 Aeronautics and Space... Weapons or Dangerous Materials § 1204.1005 Unauthorized introduction of firearms or weapons, explosives... or causing to be introduced, or using firearms or other dangerous weapons, explosives or other...

  17. 14 CFR 1204.1005 - Unauthorized introduction of firearms or weapons, explosives, or other dangerous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... weapons, explosives, or other dangerous materials. 1204.1005 Section 1204.1005 Aeronautics and Space... Weapons or Dangerous Materials § 1204.1005 Unauthorized introduction of firearms or weapons, explosives... or causing to be introduced, or using firearms or other dangerous weapons, explosives or other...

  18. 14 CFR 1204.1005 - Unauthorized introduction of firearms or weapons, explosives, or other dangerous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... weapons, explosives, or other dangerous materials. 1204.1005 Section 1204.1005 Aeronautics and Space... Weapons or Dangerous Materials § 1204.1005 Unauthorized introduction of firearms or weapons, explosives... or causing to be introduced, or using firearms or other dangerous weapons, explosives or other...

  19. Laser initiation of explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Manpreet; Sethi, V. S.

    2002-09-01

    Through laser initiation of explosives offers many advantages like controlled threshold energy over wide range, replacement of complicated safety arming mechanisms to simple and better system, immunity to RF/EMI environment etc, but there is greater difficulty to build detonator for all purpose applications and regular field trials. The challenges are to understand the interaction of laser radiation or its induced plasma with explosives, launching and transmission of high power laser beam, coupling and focussing to desired target area. This paper looks into the details of those facts.

  20. Batteries for Electric Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conover, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    Report summarizes results of test on "near-term" electrochemical batteries - (batteries approaching commercial production). Nickel/iron, nickel/zinc, and advanced lead/acid batteries included in tests and compared with conventional lead/acid batteries. Batteries operated in electric vehicles at constant speed and repetitive schedule of accerlerating, coasting, and braking.

  1. Battery Safety Basics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Ken

    2010-01-01

    Batteries commonly used in flashlights and other household devices produce hydrogen gas as a product of zinc electrode corrosion. The amount of gas produced is affected by the batteries' design and charge rate. Dangerous levels of hydrogen gas can be released if battery types are mixed, batteries are damaged, batteries are of different ages, or…

  2. Managing the data explosion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hooper, Richard P.; Aulenbach, Brent T.

    1993-01-01

    The 'data explosion' brought on by electronic sensors and automatic samplers can strain the capabilities of existing water-quality data-management systems just when they're needed most to process the information. The U.S. Geological Survey has responded to the problem by setting up an innovative system that allows rapid data analysis.

  3. Liquid Explosive in Pipes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    Program: The Development and Manufacture of a Gelled Nitromethane Explosive for Project ESSEX." DNA PR 0004, UCRL -51536, October 1974. (AD A001343...STRBE-CFLO AITTN: T. Hater STRBE-NE (3 cys) Technical Library STRBE-ND, Spitzer 3701 North Fairfax Drive STRBE-NDM, Dillon Arlington, VA 22203-1714

  4. 75 FR 5545 - Explosives

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-03

    ... the Storage of Ammonium Nitrate. OSHA subsequently made several minor revisions to the standard (37 FR... explosives; storing ammonium nitrate; and storing small arms ammunition, small arms primers, and small arms... would the proposed rulemaking. III. Authority and Signature David Michaels, PhD MPH, Assistant Secretary...

  5. Explosive detection technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doremus, Steven; Crownover, Robin

    2017-05-01

    The continuing proliferation of improvised explosive devices is an omnipresent threat to civilians and members of military and law enforcement around the world. The ability to accurately and quickly detect explosive materials from a distance would be an extremely valuable tool for mitigating the risk posed by these devices. A variety of techniques exist that are capable of accurately identifying explosive compounds, but an effective standoff technique is still yet to be realized. Most of the methods being investigated to fill this gap in capabilities are laser based. Raman spectroscopy is one such technique that has been demonstrated to be effective at a distance. Spatially Offset Raman Spectroscopy (SORS) is a technique capable of identifying chemical compounds inside of containers, which could be used to detect hidden explosive devices. Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (CARS) utilized a coherent pair of lasers to excite a sample, greatly increasing the response of sample while decreasing the strength of the lasers being used, which significantly improves the eye safety issue that typically hinders laser-based detection methods. Time-gating techniques are also being developed to improve the data collection from Raman techniques, which are often hindered fluorescence of the test sample in addition to atmospheric, substrate, and contaminant responses. Ultraviolet based techniques have also shown significant promise by greatly improved signal strength from excitation of resonance in many explosive compounds. Raman spectroscopy, which identifies compounds based on their molecular response, can be coupled with Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) capable of characterizing the sample's atomic composition using a single laser.

  6. Big Explosives Experimental Facility - BEEF

    SciTech Connect

    None

    The Big Explosives Experimental Facility or BEEF is a ten acre fenced high explosive testing facility that provides data to support stockpile stewardship and other national security programs. At BEEF conventional high explosives experiments are safely conducted providing sophisticated diagnostics such as high speed optics and x-ray radiography.

  7. Big Explosives Experimental Facility - BEEF

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2018-01-16

    The Big Explosives Experimental Facility or BEEF is a ten acre fenced high explosive testing facility that provides data to support stockpile stewardship and other national security programs. At BEEF conventional high explosives experiments are safely conducted providing sophisticated diagnostics such as high speed optics and x-ray radiography.

  8. Analysis of thermohydraulic explosion energetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büttner, Ralf; Zimanowski, Bernd; Mohrholz, Chris-Oliver; Kümmel, Reiner

    2005-08-01

    Thermohydraulic explosion, caused by direct contact of hot liquids with cold water, represent a major danger of volcanism and in technical processes. Based on experimental observations and nonequilibrium thermodynamics we propose a model of heat transfer from the hot liquid to the water during the thermohydraulic fragmentation process. The model was validated using the experimentally observed thermal energy release. From a database of more than 1000 experimental runs, conducted during the last 20 years, a standardized entrapment experiment was defined, where a conversion of 1 MJ/kg of thermal energy to kinetic energy within 700μs is observed. The results of the model calculations are in good agreement with this value. Furthermore, the model was found to be robust with respect to the material properties of the hot melt, which also is observed in experiments using different melt compositions. As the model parameters can be easily obtained from size and shape properties of the products of thermohydraulic explosions and from material properties of the hot melt, we believe that this method will not only allow a better analysis of volcanic eruptions or technical accidents, but also significantly improve the quality of hazard assessment and mitigation.

  9. Supernova Explosions Stay In Shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-12-01

    At a very early age, children learn how to classify objects according to their shape. Now, new research suggests studying the shape of the aftermath of supernovas may allow astronomers to do the same. A new study of images from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory on supernova remnants - the debris from exploded stars - shows that the symmetry of the remnants, or lack thereof, reveals how the star exploded. This is an important discovery because it shows that the remnants retain information about how the star exploded even though hundreds or thousands of years have passed. "It's almost like the supernova remnants have a 'memory' of the original explosion," said Laura Lopez of the University of California at Santa Cruz, who led the study. "This is the first time anyone has systematically compared the shape of these remnants in X-rays in this way." Astronomers sort supernovas into several categories, or "types", based on properties observed days after the explosion and which reflect very different physical mechanisms that cause stars to explode. But, since observed remnants of supernovas are leftover from explosions that occurred long ago, other methods are needed to accurately classify the original supernovas. Lopez and colleagues focused on the relatively young supernova remnants that exhibited strong X-ray emission from silicon ejected by the explosion so as to rule out the effects of interstellar matter surrounding the explosion. Their analysis showed that the X-ray images of the ejecta can be used to identify the way the star exploded. The team studied 17 supernova remnants both in the Milky Way galaxy and a neighboring galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud. For each of these remnants there is independent information about the type of supernova involved, based not on the shape of the remnant but, for example, on the elements observed in it. The researchers found that one type of supernova explosion - the so-called Type Ia - left behind relatively symmetric, circular

  10. Optimized batteries for cars with dual electrical architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douady, J. P.; Pascon, C.; Dugast, A.; Fossati, G.

    During recent years, the increase in car electrical equipment has led to many problems with traditional starter batteries (such as cranking failure due to flat batteries, battery cycling etc.). The main causes of these problems are the double function of the automotive battery (starter and service functions) and the difficulties in designing batteries well adapted to these two functions. In order to solve these problems a new concept — the dual-concept — has been developed with two separate batteries: one battery is dedicated to the starter function and the other is dedicated to the service function. Only one alternator charges the two batteries with a separation device between the two electrical circuits. The starter battery is located in the engine compartment while the service battery is located at the rear of the car. From the analysis of new requirements, battery designs have been optimized regarding the two types of functions: (i) a small battery with high specific power for the starting function; for this function a flooded battery with lead-calcium alloy grids and thin plates is proposed; (ii) for the service function, modified sealed gas-recombinant batteries with cycling and deep-discharge ability have been developed. The various advantages of the dual-concept are studied in terms of starting reliability, battery weight, and voltage supply. The operating conditions of the system and several dual electrical architectures have also been studied in the laboratory and the car. The feasibility of the concept is proved.

  11. Polymers for new battery technologies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Mohit

    2009-03-01

    The chemical and electrochemical reactivity of the components comprising today's lithium batteries has severely limited their lifetime and stability, and attempts to push the limits on energy density have exacerbated these stability issues. The weakest link in terms of safety and stability of Li ion systems is the organic liquid electrolyte that facilitates the Li^+ ion transport between the electrodes. The electrolyte is flammable and electrochemically unstable against the graphitic anode. It is the continuous electrochemical degradation of the electrolyte at the electrodes that leads to poor cycle life of the batteries, and in some cases runaway reactions that lead to explosions. Dry polymer electrolytes alleviate the electrochemical stability problem by offering a stable electrode-electrolyte interface. The absence of flammable liquids prevents runaway reactions. The main hurdle that has prevented dry polymer electrolytes from being commercialized is low ionic conductivity, and challenges in interfacing with the electrode materials. We demonstrate a novel approach towards addressing these challenges that renders batteries with excellent cycle lives, and thermal stability.

  12. Flat battery

    SciTech Connect

    Waki, E.; Kobayashi, S.; Hashimoto, Y.

    A flat battery is described comprising: an electrically insulative sheathing film including a first film portion and a second film portion on opposite sides of a fold line, the film having an outer surface and an inner surface opposite the outer surface, on both of the first and the second film portions. The fold line divides the inner surface into a first inner surface portion on the first film portion and a second inner surface portion on the second film portion, the film being folded along the fold line so that the first inner surface portion faces the second innermore » surface portion. The first and second film portions are sealed to one another along the entire peripheries thereof except along the fold line, the first film portion having first a first terminal hole and a second terminal hole formed therein; a first collector formed in a plane on the first inner surface portion and having a first terminal portion covering the first terminal hole, the first terminal portion being exposed to the exterior of the battery through the first terminal hole so as to define a first terminal; and a second collector consisting of a first part formed on the first inner surface portion and a second part continuous to the first part formed on the second inner surface portion. The second collector extends across and is folded along the fold line, the second part having a second terminal portion covering the second terminal hole, the second terminal portion being exposed to the exterior of the battery through the second terminal hole so as to define a second terminal. The second part is formed in the plane in spaced non-overlapping relation to the first collector, one of the first and second collectors consisting of a positive collector, the other of the first and second collectors consisting of a negative collector.« less

  13. Piezonuclear battery

    DOEpatents

    Bongianni, Wayne L.

    1992-01-01

    A piezonuclear battery generates output power arising from the piezoelectric voltage produced from radioactive decay particles interacting with a piezoelectric medium. Radioactive particle energy may directly create an acoustic wave in the piezoelectric medium or a moderator may be used to generate collision particles for interacting with the medium. In one embodiment a radioactive material (.sup.252 Cf) with an output of about 1 microwatt produced a 12 nanowatt output (1.2% conversion efficiency) from a piezoelectric copolymer of vinylidene fluoride/trifluorethylene.

  14. 14 CFR 23.1353 - Storage battery design and installation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... take appropriate load shedding action. [Doc. No. 4080, 29 FR 17955, Dec. 18, 1964; 30 FR 258, Jan. 9... any probable charging and discharging condition. No uncontrolled increase in cell temperature may... temperatures and pressures presents no problem. (d) No explosive or toxic gases emitted by any battery in...

  15. Battery cell feedthrough apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1995-01-01

    A compact, hermetic feedthrough apparatus comprising interfitting sleeve portions constructed of chemically-stable materials to permit unique battery designs and increase battery life and performance.

  16. Investigation Of Vapor Explosion Mechanisms Using High Speed Photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Donn R.; Anderson, Richard P.

    1983-03-01

    The vapor explosion, a physical interaction between hot and cold liquids that causes the explosive vaporization of the cold liquid, is a hazard of concern in such diverse industries as metal smelting and casting, paper manufacture, and nuclear power generation. Intensive work on this problem worldwide, for the past 25 years has generated a number of theories and mechanisms proposed to explain vapor explosions. High speed photography has been the major instrument used to test the validity of the theories and to provide the observations that have lead to new theories. Examples are given of experimental techniques that have been used to investigate vapor explosions. Detailed studies of specific mechanisms have included microsecond flash photograph of contact boiling and high speed cinematography of shock driven breakup of liquid drops. Other studies looked at the explosivity of various liquid pairs using cinematography inside a pulsed nuclear reactor and x-ray cinematography of a thermite-sodium interaction.

  17. Pacemaker explosions in crematoria: problems and possible solutions

    PubMed Central

    Gale, Christopher P; Mulley, Graham P

    2002-01-01

    The number of artificial cardiac pacemakers is increasing, as is the number of bodies being cremated. Because of the explosive potential of pacemakers when heated, a statutory question on the cremation form asks whether the deceased has a pacemaker and if so whether it has been removed. We sent a questionnaire to all the crematoria in the UK enquiring about the frequency, consequences and prevention of pacemaker explosions. We found that about half of all crematoria in the UK experience pacemaker explosions, that pacemaker explosions may cause structural damage and injury and that most crematoria staff are unaware of the explosive potential of implantable cardiac defibrillators. Crematoria staff rely on the accurate completion of cremation forms, and doctors who sign cremation forms have a legal obligation to provide such information. PMID:12091510

  18. Development status of a sealed bipolar lead/acid battery for high-power battery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arias, J. L.; Rowlette, J. J.; Drake, E. D.

    A sealed bipolar lead/acid (SBLA) battery is being developed by Arias Research Associates (ARA) which will offer a number of important advantages in applications requiring high power densities. These applications include electric vehicles (EVs) and hybrid electric vehicles, uninterruptable power supplies (UPS), electrically-heated catalysts (EHCs) for automobiles, utility-power peak-shaving, and others. The advantages of the SBLA over other types of batteries will by significantly higher power density, together with good energy density, high cycle life, high voltage density, low production cost and zero maintenance. In addition, the lead/acid battery represents a technology which is familiar and accepted by Society, is recyclable within the existing infrastructure, and does not raise the safety concerns of many other new batteries (e.g., fire, explosion and toxic gases). This paper briefly reviews the basic design concepts and issues of the SBLA battery technology, various quasi-bipolar approaches and the results of ARA's development work during the past four years. Performance data are given based on both in-house and independent testing of ARA laboratory test batteries. In addition, performance projections and other characteristics are given for three ARA SBLA battery designs, which are compared with other batteries in three example applications: UPS, EHCs, and EVs. The most notable advantages of the SBLA battery are substantial reductions in product size and weight for the UPS, smaller packaging and longer life for the EHC, and higher vehicle performance and lower cost for the EV, compared to both existing and advanced EV batteries.

  19. Statistical Hotspot Model for Explosive Detonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, Albert

    2005-07-01

    The presence and need for energy localization in the ignition and detonation of high explosives is a corner stone in our understanding of explosive behavior. This energy localization, known as hot spots, provides the match that starts the energetic response that is integral to the detonation. In our model, we use the life cycle of a hot spot to predict explosive response. This life cycle begins with a random distribution of inhomogeneities in the explosive that we describe as a potential hot spot. A shock wave can transform these into hot spots that can then grow by consuming the explosive around them. The fact that the shock wave can collapse a potential hot spot without causing ignition is required in order to model phenomena like dead pressing. The burn rate of the hot spot is taken directly from experimental data. In our approach we do not assume that every hot spot is burning in an identical environment, but rather we take a statistical approach to the burning process. We also do not make a uniform temperature assumption in order to close the mixture equation of state, but track the flow of energy from reactant to product. Finally, we include both the hot spot burn model and a thermal decomposition path, required to explain certain long time behaviors. Building on work performed by Reaugh et. al., we have developed a set of reaction parameters for an HMX based heterogeneous explosive. These parameters have been determined from computer models on the micron scale, and experimental data. This model will be compared to experimental rate stick data. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract W-7405-Eng-48.

  20. Explosive fragmentation of liquids in spherical geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milne, A.; Longbottom, A.; Frost, D. L.; Loiseau, J.; Goroshin, S.; Petel, O.

    2017-05-01

    Rapid acceleration of a spherical shell of liquid following central detonation of a high explosive causes the liquid to form fine jets that are similar in appearance to the particle jets that are formed during explosive dispersal of a packed layer of solid particles. Of particular interest is determining the dependence of the scale of the jet-like structures on the physical parameters of the system, including the fluid properties (e.g., density, viscosity, and surface tension) and the ratio of the mass of the liquid to that of the explosive. The present paper presents computational results from a multi-material hydrocode describing the dynamics of the explosive dispersal process. The computations are used to track the overall features of the early stages of dispersal of the liquid layer, including the wave dynamics, and motion of the spall and accretion layers. The results are compared with new experimental results of spherical charges surrounded by a variety of different fluids, including water, glycerol, ethanol, and vegetable oil, which together encompass a significant range of fluid properties. The results show that the number of jet structures is not sensitive to the fluid properties, but primarily dependent on the mass ratio. Above a certain mass ratio of liquid fill-to-explosive burster ( F / B), the number of jets is approximately constant and consistent with an empirical model based on the maximum thickness of the accretion layer. For small values of F / B, the number of liquid jets is reduced, in contrast with explosive powder dispersal, where small F / B yields a larger number of particle jets. A hypothetical explanation of these features based on the nucleation of cavitation is explored numerically.

  1. Numerical Simulation on Smoke Spread and Temperature Distribution in a Corn Starch Explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, CherngShing; Hsu, JuiPei

    2018-01-01

    It is discovered from dust explosion accidents in recent years that deep causes of the accidents lies in insufficient cognition of dust explosion danger, and no understanding on danger and information of the dust explosion. In the study, Fire Dynamics Simulator (FDS) evaluation tool is used aiming at Taiwan Formosa Fun Coast explosion accidents. The calculator is used for rebuilding the explosion situation. The factors affecting casualties under explosion are studied. The injured personnel participating in the party are evaluated according to smoke diffusion and temperature distribution for numerical simulation results. Some problems noted in the fire disaster after actual explosion are proposed, rational site analysis is given, thereby reducing dust explosion risk grade.

  2. Explosion safety in industrial electrostatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabó, S. V.; Kiss, I.; Berta, I.

    2011-01-01

    Complicated industrial systems are often endangered by electrostatic hazards, both from atmospheric (lightning phenomenon, primary and secondary lightning protection) and industrial (technological problems caused by static charging and fire and explosion hazards.) According to the classical approach protective methods have to be used in order to remove electrostatic charging and to avoid damages, however no attempt to compute the risk before and after applying the protective method is made, relying instead on well-educated and practiced expertise. The Budapest School of Electrostatics - in close cooperation with industrial partners - develops new suitable solutions for probability based decision support (Static Control Up-to-date Technology, SCOUT) using soft computing methods. This new approach can be used to assess and audit existing systems and - using the predictive power of the models - to design and plan activities in industrial electrostatics.

  3. Explosive bulk charge

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Jacob Lee

    2015-04-21

    An explosive bulk charge, including: a first contact surface configured to be selectively disposed substantially adjacent to a structure or material; a second end surface configured to selectively receive a detonator; and a curvilinear side surface joining the first contact surface and the second end surface. The first contact surface, the second end surface, and the curvilinear side surface form a bi-truncated hemispherical structure. The first contact surface, the second end surface, and the curvilinear side surface are formed from an explosive material. Optionally, the first contact surface and the second end surface each have a substantially circular shape. Optionally, the first contact surface and the second end surface consist of planar structures that are aligned substantially parallel or slightly tilted with respect to one another. The curvilinear side surface has one of a smooth curved geometry, an elliptical geometry, and a parabolic geometry.

  4. Explosion of Leidenfrost Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, Florian; Colinet, Pierre; Dorbolo, Stephane

    2012-11-01

    When a drop is released on a plate heated above a given temperature, a thin layer of vapour can isolate the droplet so that it levitates over the plate. This effect was first reported by Leidenfrost in 1756. However, this fascinating subject remains an active field of research in both fundamental and applied researches. In this work, we focus on what happens when surfactant is added to the drop. The aim is to study the influence of a decrease of the surface tension. Surprisingly, as the droplet evaporates, suddenly it explodes. The evolution of the droplet and the resulting explosion are followed using a high speed camera. We show that when a critical concentration of surfactant is reached inside the drop, a shell of surfactant is formed leading to the explosion. The authors would like to thank FNRS for financial support. This work is financially supported by ODILE project (Contract No. FRFC 2.4623.11).

  5. Prediction of the explosion effect of aluminized explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qi; Xiang, Cong; Liang, HuiMin

    2013-05-01

    We present an approach to predict the explosion load for aluminized explosives using a numerical calculation. A code to calculate the species of detonation products of high energy ingredients and those of the secondary reaction of aluminum and the detonation products, velocity of detonation, pressure, temperature and JWL parameters of aluminized explosives has been developed in this study. Through numerical calculations carried out with this code, the predicted JWL parameters for aluminized explosives have been compared with those measured by the cylinder test. The predicted JWL parameters with this code agree with those measured by the cylinder test. Furthermore, the load of explosion for the aluminized explosive was calculated using the numerical simulation by using the JWL equation of state. The loads of explosion for the aluminized explosive obtained using the predicted JWL parameters have been compared with those using the measured JWL parameters. Both of them are almost the same. The numerical results using the predicted JWL parameters show that the explosion air shock wave is the strongest when the mass fraction of aluminum powder in the explosive mixtures is 30%. This result agrees with the empirical data.

  6. Combined Effects Aluminized Explosives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    1 4 5 AREA EXPANSIONS Figure 4 Cylinder velocities for PAX-3 (left) and an empirical PAX-30 JWL (right) THERMODYNAMIC EQUATIONS OF...STATE The JWLB and Jones-Wilkins-Lee ( JWL ) equations of state were parameterized for combined effects explosives using fairly conventional methodology...state. Such warning messages should be ignored when using these JWLB and JWL equations of state representing eigenvalue detonation behavior. Table 1

  7. High explosive compound

    DOEpatents

    Crawford, Theodore C.

    1976-01-01

    1. A low detonation velocity explosive consisting essentially of a particulate mixture of ortho-boric acid and trinitrotoluene, said mixture containing from about 25 percent to about 65 percent by weight of ortho-boric acid, said ortho-boric acid comprised of from 60 percent to 90 percent of spherical particles having a mean particle size of about 275 microns and 10 percent to 40 percent of spherical particles having a particle size less than about 44 microns.

  8. Ecotoxicology of Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Efroymson, Rebecca Ann; Giffen, Neil R; Morrill, Valerie

    Managing sites contaminated with munitions constituents is an international challenge. Although the choice of approach and the use of Ecological Risk Assessment (ERA) tools may vary from country to country, the assurance of quality and the direction of ecotoxicological research are universally recognized as shared concerns. Drawing on a multidisciplinary team of contributors, 'Ecotoxicology of Explosives' provides comprehensive and critical reviews available to date on fate, transport, and effects of explosives. The book delineates the state of the science of the ecotoxicology of explosives, past, present, and recently developed. It reviews the accessible fate and ecotoxicological data for energetic materialsmore » (EMs) and the methods for their development. The chapters characterize the fate of explosives in the environment, then provide information on their ecological effects in key environmental media, including aquatic, sedimentary, and terrestrial habitats. The book also discusses approaches for assembling these lines of evidence for risk assessment purposes. The chapter authors have critically examined the peer-reviewed literature to identify and prioritize the knowledge gaps and to recommend future areas of research. The editors include a review of the genotoxic effects of the EMs and the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the toxicity of these chemicals. They also discuss the transport, transformation, and degradation pathways of these chemicals in the environment that underlie the potential hazardous impact and bioaccumulation of EMs in different terrestrial and aquatic ecological receptors. This information translates into practical applications for the environmental risk assessment of EM-contaminated sites and into recommendations for the sustainable use of defense installations.« less

  9. Effect of Velocity of Detonation of Explosives on Seismic Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroujkova, A. F.; Leidig, M.; Bonner, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    We studied seismic body wave generation from four fully contained explosions of approximately the same yields (68 kg of TNT equivalent) conducted in anisotropic granite in Barre, VT. The explosions were detonated using three types of explosives with different velocities of detonation (VOD): Black Powder (BP), Ammonium Nitrate Fuel Oil/Emulsion (ANFO), and Composition B (COMP B). The main objective of the experiment was to study differences in seismic wave generation among different types of explosives, and to determine the mechanism responsible for these differences. The explosives with slow burn rate (BP) produced lower P-wave amplitude and lower corner frequency, which resulted in lower seismic efficiency (0.35%) in comparison with high burn rate explosives (2.2% for ANFO and 3% for COMP B). The seismic efficiency estimates for ANFO and COMP B agree with previous studies for nuclear explosions in granite. The body wave radiation pattern is consistent with an isotropic explosion with an added azimuthal component caused by vertical tensile fractures oriented along pre-existing micro-fracturing in the granite, although the complexities in the P- and S-wave radiation patterns suggest that more than one fracture orientation could be responsible for their generation. High S/P amplitude ratios and low P-wave amplitudes suggest that a significant fraction of the BP source mechanism can be explained by opening of the tensile fractures as a result of the slow energy release.

  10. Design optimization of Cassegrain telescope for remote explosive trace detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhavsar, Kaushalkumar; Eseller, K. E.; Prabhu, Radhakrishna

    2017-10-01

    The past three years have seen a global increase in explosive-based terror attacks. The widespread use of improvised explosives and anti-personnel landmines have caused thousands of civilian casualties across the world. Current scenario of globalized civilization threat from terror drives the need to improve the performance and capabilities of standoff explosive trace detection devices to be able to anticipate the threat from a safe distance to prevent explosions and save human lives. In recent years, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an emerging approach for material or elemental investigations. All the principle elements on the surface are detectable in a single measurement using LIBS and hence, a standoff LIBS based method has been used to remotely detect explosive traces from several to tens of metres distance. The most important component of LIBS based standoff explosive trace detection system is the telescope which enables remote identification of chemical constituents of the explosives. However, in a compact LIBS system where Cassegrain telescope serves the purpose of laser beam delivery and light collection, need a design optimization of the telescope system. This paper reports design optimization of a Cassegrain telescope to detect explosives remotely for LIBS system. A design optimization of Schmidt corrector plate was carried out for Nd:YAG laser. Effect of different design parameters was investigated to eliminate spherical aberration in the system. Effect of different laser wavelengths on the Schmidt corrector design was also investigated for the standoff LIBS system.

  11. Metallography of Battery Resistance Spot Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, J. E.; Johannes, L. B.; Gonzalez, D.; Yayathi, S.; Figuered, J. M.; Darcy, E. C.; Bilc, Z. M.

    2015-01-01

    Li-ion cells provide an energy dense solution for systems that require rechargeable electrical power. However, these cells can undergo thermal runaway, the point at which the cell becomes thermally unstable and results in hot gas, flame, electrolyte leakage, and in some cases explosion. The heat and fire associated with this type of event is generally violent and can subsequently cause damage to the surrounding system or present a dangerous risk to the personnel nearby. The space flight environment is especially sensitive to risks particularly when it involves potential for fire within the habitable volume of the International Space Station (ISS). In larger battery packs such as Robonaut 2 (R2), numerous Li-ion cells are placed in parallel-series configurations to obtain the required stack voltage and desired run-time or to meet specific power requirements. This raises a second and less obvious concern for batteries that undergo certification for space flight use: the joining quality at the resistance spot weld of battery cells to component wires/leads and battery tabs, bus bars or other electronic components and assemblies. Resistance spot welds undergo materials evaluation, visual inspection, conductivity (resistivity) testing, destructive peel testing, and metallurgical examination in accordance with applicable NASA Process Specifications. Welded components are cross-sectioned to ensure they are free of cracks or voids open to any exterior surface. Pore and voids contained within the weld zone but not open to an exterior surface, and are not determined to have sharp notch like characteristics, shall be acceptable. Depending on requirements, some battery cells are constructed of aluminum canisters while others are constructed of steel. Process specific weld schedules must be developed and certified for each possible joining combination. The aluminum canisters' positive terminals were particularly difficult to weld due to a bi-metal strip that comes ultrasonically

  12. Explosive Leidenfrost droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colinet, Pierre; Moreau, Florian; Dorbolo, Stéphane

    2017-11-01

    We show that Leidenfrost droplets made of an aqueous solution of surfactant undergo a violent explosion in a wide range of initial volumes and concentrations. This unexpected behavior turns out to be triggered by the formation of a gel-like shell, followed by a sharp temperature increase. Comparing a simple model of the radial surfactant distribution inside a spherical droplet with experiments allows highlighting the existence of a critical surface concentration for the shell to form. The temperature rise (attributed to boiling point elevation with surface concentration) is a key feature leading to the explosion, instead of the implosion (buckling) scenario reported by other authors. Indeed, under some conditions, this temperature increase is shown to be sufficient to trigger nucleation and growth of vapor bubbles in the highly superheated liquid bulk, stretching the surrounding elastic shell up to its rupture limit. The successive timescales characterizing this explosion sequence are also discussed. Funding sources: F.R.S. - FNRS (ODILE and DITRASOL projects, RD and SRA positions of P. Colinet and S. Dorbolo), BELSPO (IAP 7/38 MicroMAST project).

  13. Explosives signatures and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fountain, Augustus Way, III; Oyler, Jonathan M.; Ostazeski, Stanley A.

    2008-04-01

    The challenge of sampling explosive materials for various high threat military and civilian operational scenarios requires the community to identify and exploit other chemical compounds within the mixtures that may be available to support stand-off detection techniques. While limited surface and vapor phase characterization of IEDs exist, they are insufficient to guide the future development and evaluation of field deployable explosives detection (proximity and standoff) capabilities. ECBC has conducted a limited investigation of three artillery ammunition types to determine what chemical vapors, if any, are available for sensing; the relative composition of the vapors which includes the more volatile compounds in munitions, i.e., plastersizers and binders; and the sensitivity needed detect these vapors at stand-off. Also in partnership with MIT-Lincoln Laboratory, we performed a background measurement campaign at the National Training Center to determine the baseline ambient amounts and variability of nitrates and nitro-ester compounds as vapors, particulates, and on surfaces; as well as other chemical compounds related to non-energetic explosive additives. Environmental persistence studies in contexts relevant to counter-IED sensing operations, such as surface residues, are still necessary.

  14. Study of thermal sensitivity and thermal explosion violence of energetic materials in the LLNL ODTX system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, P. C.; Hust, G.; Zhang, M. X.; Lorenz, T. K.; Reynolds, J. G.; Fried, L.; Springer, H. K.; Maienschein, J. L.

    2014-05-01

    Incidents caused by fire and combat operations can heat energetic materials that may lead to thermal explosion and result in structural damage and casualty. Some explosives may thermally explode at fairly low temperatures (< 100 °C) and the violence from thermal explosion may cause significant damage. Thus it is important to understand the response of energetic materials to thermal insults. The One Dimensional Time to Explosion (ODTX) system at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has been used for decades to measure times to explosion, threshold thermal explosion temperature, and determine kinetic parameters of energetic materials. Samples of different configurations (pressed part, powder, paste, and liquid) can be tested in the system. The ODTX testing can also provide useful data for assessing the thermal explosion violence of energetic materials. Recent ODTX experimental data are reported in the paper.

  15. Primary and secondary battery consumption trends in Sweden 1996–2013: Method development and detailed accounting by battery type

    SciTech Connect

    Patrício, João, E-mail: joao.patricio@chalmers.se; Kalmykova, Yuliya; Berg, Per E.O.

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Developed MFA method was validated by the national statistics. • Exponential increase of EEE sales leads to increase in integrated battery consumption. • Digital convergence is likely to be a cause for primary batteries consumption decline. • Factors for estimation of integrated batteries in EE are provided. • Sweden reached the collection rates defined by European Union. - Abstract: In this article, a new method based on Material Flow Accounting is proposed to study detailed material flows in battery consumption that can be replicated for other countries. The method uses regularly available statistics on import, industrial production andmore » export of batteries and battery-containing electric and electronic equipment (EEE). To promote method use by other scholars with no access to such data, several empirically results and their trends over time, for different types of batteries occurrence among the EEE types are provided. The information provided by the method can be used to: identify drivers of battery consumption; study the dynamic behavior of battery flows – due to technology development, policies, consumers behavior and infrastructures. The method is exemplified by the study of battery flows in Sweden for years 1996–2013. The batteries were accounted, both in units and weight, as primary and secondary batteries; loose and integrated; by electrochemical composition and share of battery use between different types of EEE. Results show that, despite a fivefold increase in the consumption of rechargeable batteries, they account for only about 14% of total use of portable batteries. Recent increase in digital convergence has resulted in a sharp decline in the consumption of primary batteries, which has now stabilized at a fairly low level. Conversely, the consumption of integrated batteries has increased sharply. In 2013, 61% of the total weight of batteries sold in Sweden was collected, and for the particular case of alkaline

  16. Powdery Emulsion Explosive: A New Excellent Industrial Explosive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Ouqi; Zhang, Kaiming; Yu, Zhengquan; Tang, Shujuan

    2012-07-01

    Powdery emulsion explosive (PEE), a new powdery industrial explosive with perfect properties, has been made using an emulsification-spray drying technique. PEE is composed of 91-92.5 wt% ammonium nitrate (AN), 4.5-6 wt% organic fuels, and 1.5-1.8 wt% water. Due to its microstructure as a water-in-oil (W/O) emulsion and low water content, it has excellent detonation performance, outstanding water resistance, reliable safety, and good application compared with other industrial explosives, such as ammonite, emulsion explosives, and ANFO.

  17. Lithium Ion Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Lithium ion batteries, which use a new battery chemistry, are being developed under cooperative agreements between Lockheed Martin, Ultralife Battery, and the NASA Lewis Research Center. The unit cells are made in flat (prismatic) shapes that can be connected in series and parallel to achieve desired voltages and capacities. These batteries will soon be marketed to commercial original-equipment manufacturers and thereafter will be available for military and space use. Current NiCd batteries offer about 35 W-hr/kg compared with 110 W-hr/kg for current lithium ion batteries. Our ultimate target for these batteries is 200 W-hr/kg.

  18. Alkaline battery operational methodology

    DOEpatents

    Sholklapper, Tal; Gallaway, Joshua; Steingart, Daniel; Ingale, Nilesh; Nyce, Michael

    2016-08-16

    Methods of using specific operational charge and discharge parameters to extend the life of alkaline batteries are disclosed. The methods can be used with any commercial primary or secondary alkaline battery, as well as with newer alkaline battery designs, including batteries with flowing electrolyte. The methods include cycling batteries within a narrow operating voltage window, with minimum and maximum cut-off voltages that are set based on battery characteristics and environmental conditions. The narrow voltage window decreases available capacity but allows the batteries to be cycled for hundreds or thousands of times.

  19. Calibration methods for explosives detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Stephen J.; Rounbehler, David P.

    1992-05-01

    Airport security has become an important concern to cultures in every corner of the world. Presently, efforts to improve airport security have brought additional technological solutions, in the form of advanced instrumentation for the detection of explosives, into use at airport terminals in many countries. This new generation of explosives detectors is often used to augment existing security measures and provide a more encompassing screening capability for airline passengers. This paper describes two calibration procedures used for the Thermedics' EGIS explosives detectors. The systems were designed to screen people, electronic components, luggage, automobiles, and other objects for the presence of concealed explosives. The detectors have the ability to detect a wide range of explosives in both the vapor state or as surface adsorbed solids, therefore, calibrations were designed to challenge the system with explosives in each form.

  20. Explosion in boiler closes Arkansas utility

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-23

    A major boiler explosion Aug. 11 that seriously injured one worker at the Independence Unit 2 coal-fired powerplant in Newark, Ark., caused extensive damage that will keep the plant closed for several months. The plant is owned by Arkansas Power Light Co., Little Rock. Officials are still trying to determine cause and are assessing damage, though they expect the boiler can be repaired. Etienne Senac, plant manager, says the explosion [open quotes]puffed out[close quotes] but did not rupture the 271-ft-tall boiler and also buckled several buck stays, which hold the boiler to a steel superstructure. The accident took place atmore » 8:30 a.m. as the 842-Mw unit was operating close to full capacity. Senac says the concussion knocked down workers standing 50 ft from the boiler. The explosion pushed ash and molten material out of the bottom of the unit, causing a small fire. One contract worker was seriously burned and hospitalized. Four AP L workers received minor burns.« less

  1. Optical Pressure Measurements of Explosions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    near field detonation product gases can have a significant effect upon afterburn ignition times (4). The implication being that afterburning times...can be tuned to bring detonation product afterburning into proximity of the leading shock, influencing brisance, and explosive impulse on target. 3...R. Z.; McAndrew, B. A. Afterburn Ignition Delay and Shock Augmentation in Fuel Rich Solid Explosives. Propellants, Explosives, Pyrotechnics 2010

  2. Neutrino-Driven Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janka, Hans-Thomas

    The question why and how core-collapse supernovae (SNe) explode is one of the central and most long-standing riddles of stellar astrophysics. Solving this problem is crucial for deciphering the supernova (SN) phenomenon; for predicting its observable signals such as light curves and spectra, nucleosynthesis yields, neutrinos, and gravitational waves; for defining the role of SNe in the dynamical and chemo-dynamical evolution of galaxies; and for explaining the birth conditions and properties of neutron stars (NSs) and stellar-mass black holes. Since the formation of such compact remnants releases over hundred times more energy in neutrinos than the kinetic energy of the SN explosion, neutrinos can be the decisive agents for powering the SN outburst. According to the standard paradigm of the neutrino-driven mechanism, the energy transfer by the intense neutrino flux to the medium behind the stagnating core bounce shock, assisted by violent hydrodynamic mass motions (sometimes subsumed by the term "turbulence"), revives the outward shock motion and thus initiates the SN explosion. Because of the weak coupling of neutrinos in the region of this energy deposition, detailed, multidimensional hydrodynamic models including neutrino transport and a wide variety of physics are needed to assess the viability of the mechanism. Owing to advanced numerical codes and increasing supercomputer power, considerable progress has been achieved in our understanding of the physical processes that have to act in concert for the success of neutrino-driven explosions. First studies begin to reveal observational implications and avenues to test the theoretical picture by data from individual SNe and SN remnants but also from population-integrated observables. While models will be further refined, a real breakthrough is expected through the next galactic core-collapse SN, when neutrinos and gravitational waves can be used to probe the conditions deep inside the dying star.

  3. Blast injury from explosive munitions.

    PubMed

    Cernak, I; Savic, J; Ignjatovic, D; Jevtic, M

    1999-07-01

    To evaluate the effect of blast in common war injuries. One thousand three hundred and three patients injured by explosive munitions and demonstrating extremity wounds without other penetrating injuries were admitted to the Military Medical Academy in Belgrade between 1991 and 1994. Of these, 665 patients (51%) had symptoms and physical signs that were compatible with the clinical diagnosis of primary blast injury, whereas the remaining 658 patients did not. Random sampling of 65 patients in the blast group during the early posttraumatic period showed statistically significant elevations in blood thromboxane A2 (TxA2), prostacyclin (PGI2), and sulfidopeptide leukotrienes compared with the random sample of 62 patients in the nonblast group. This difference could not be accounted for by differing injury severity between the groups, because the severity of wounds as measured by both the Injury Severity Score and the Red Cross Wound Classification was similar in both groups. Amongst blast patients, 200 patients (30%) had long-term (1 year) symptoms and signs reflecting central nervous system disorders. These symptoms and signs were only sporadically found in 4% of the nonblast patients. These findings indicate that primary blast injury is more common in war injuries than previously thought and that of those affected by blast, a surprisingly high proportion retain long-term neurologic disability. The elevation in eicosanoids could be used to confirm and monitor blast injury. In relation to the immediate management of patients injured by explosive weapons, it follows that particular attention should be paid to the presence and/or development of blast injury. Our findings indicate that blast is more common in war injuries than previously thought. Eicosanoid changes after blast injury suggest that blast injury causes a major physiologic stress. A variety of effects on the central nervous system suggest that blast injury could be responsible for some aspects of what is now

  4. Process for treating ab5 nickel-metal hydride battery scrap

    SciTech Connect

    Lyman, J.W.; Palmer, G.R.

    1994-12-31

    A process for treating an AB5 Ni-MH battery to recover purified positive and negative electrode components of the battery is disclosed. An AB5 Ni-MH battery is placed in a mineral acid leach solution to cause the positive and negative electrode components of the battery to separate.

  5. Imaging Detonations of Explosives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-01

    made using a full-color single-camera pyrometer where wavelength resolution is achieved using the Bayer-type mask covering the sensor chip17 and a...many CHNO- based explosives (e.g., TNT [C7H5N3O6], the formulation C-4 [92% RDX, C3H6N6O6]), hot detonation products are mainly soot and permanent...unreferenced). Essentially, 2 light sensors (cameras), each filtered over a narrow wavelength region, observe an event over the same line of sight. The

  6. Gasdynamics of explosions today.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brode, H. L.; Glass, I. I.; Oppenheim, A. K.

    1971-01-01

    A brief review is given of blast and detonation wave phenomena and some of their uses in war and peace. It is concluded that great strides have been made over the last three decades toward the physical understanding, the analytical-numerical solution, and the measurement of dynamic and thermodynamic quantities, also taking into consideration severe environments and extremely short durations. Questions of internal ballistics are discussed together with hypervelocity launchers and shock tubes, collapsing cylindrical drivers, spherical implosions, explosive weapons, dynamic response, and equation of state data.

  7. Explosive scabbling of structural materials

    DOEpatents

    Bickes, Jr., Robert W.; Bonzon, Lloyd L.

    2002-01-01

    A new approach to scabbling of surfaces of structural materials is disclosed. A layer of mildly energetic explosive composition is applied to the surface to be scabbled. The explosive composition is then detonated, rubbleizing the surface. Explosive compositions used must sustain a detonation front along the surface to which it is applied and conform closely to the surface being scabbled. Suitable explosive compositions exist which are stable under handling, easy to apply, easy to transport, have limited toxicity, and can be reliably detonated using conventional techniques.

  8. Zirconium hydride containing explosive composition

    DOEpatents

    Walker, Franklin E.; Wasley, Richard J.

    1981-01-01

    An improved explosive composition is disclosed and comprises a major portion of an explosive having a detonation velocity between about 1500 and 10,000 meters per second and a minor amount of a donor additive comprising a non-explosive compound or mixture of non-explosive compounds which when subjected to an energy fluence of 1000 calories/cm.sup.2 or less is capable of releasing free radicals each having a molecular weight between 1 and 120. Exemplary donor additives are dibasic acids, polyamines and metal hydrides.

  9. Low voltage nonprimary explosive detonator

    DOEpatents

    Dinegar, Robert H.; Kirkham, John

    1982-01-01

    A low voltage, electrically actuated, nonprimary explosive detonator is disclosed wherein said detonation is achieved by means of an explosive train in which a deflagration-to-detonation transition is made to occur. The explosive train is confined within a cylindrical body and positioned adjacent to low voltage ignition means have electrical leads extending outwardly from the cylindrical confining body. Application of a low voltage current to the electrical leads ignites a self-sustained deflagration in a donor portion of the explosive train which then is made to undergo a transition to detonation further down the train.

  10. Controlled by Distant Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-03-01

    VLT Automatically Takes Detailed Spectra of Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows Only Minutes After Discovery A time-series of high-resolution spectra in the optical and ultraviolet has twice been obtained just a few minutes after the detection of a gamma-ray bust explosion in a distant galaxy. The international team of astronomers responsible for these observations derived new conclusive evidence about the nature of the surroundings of these powerful explosions linked to the death of massive stars. At 11:08 pm on 17 April 2006, an alarm rang in the Control Room of ESO's Very Large Telescope on Paranal, Chile. Fortunately, it did not announce any catastrophe on the mountain, nor with one of the world's largest telescopes. Instead, it signalled the doom of a massive star, 9.3 billion light-years away, whose final scream of agony - a powerful burst of gamma rays - had been recorded by the Swift satellite only two minutes earlier. The alarm was triggered by the activation of the VLT Rapid Response Mode, a novel system that allows for robotic observations without any human intervention, except for the alignment of the spectrograph slit. ESO PR Photo 17a/07 ESO PR Photo 17a/07 Triggered by an Explosion Starting less than 10 minutes after the Swift detection, a series of spectra of increasing integration times (3, 5, 10, 20, 40 and 80 minutes) were taken with the Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES), mounted on Kueyen, the second Unit Telescope of the VLT. "With the Rapid Response Mode, the VLT is directly controlled by a distant explosion," said ESO astronomer Paul Vreeswijk, who requested the observations and is lead-author of the paper reporting the results. "All I really had to do, once I was informed of the gamma-ray burst detection, was to phone the staff astronomers at the Paranal Observatory, Stefano Bagnulo and Stan Stefl, to check that everything was fine." The first spectrum of this time series was the quickest ever taken of a gamma-ray burst afterglow

  11. Earth Battery

    DOE PAGES

    Buscheck, Thomas A.

    2015-12-01

    It’s the bane of renewable energy. No matter how efficient photovoltaic cells become or how much power a wind turbine can capture, someone will counter with, “What happens when the sun goes down and wind doesn’t blow?” And the person who poses that question uses it as an argument in favor of traditional baseload power. While it’s true that the way the electrical grid has developed in North America and Europe doesn’t lend itself to the start-and-stop, opportunistic nature of wind and solar, there are ways to meet the challenge. Electricity can be stored in batteries or water pumped uphillmore » into reservoirs when power generation exceeds demand, to be tapped when needed. Unfortunately, utility-scale battery storage is prohibitively expensive, and pumped hydro is possible only in particular geographic locations. What is needed is a large-scale, distributed, dispatchable energy storage system that can smooth out a renewable energy generation profile that changes by the minute as well as over the course of the day or the season. Colleagues from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the Ohio State University (led by Jeffrey Bielicki), and the University of Minnesota (led by Jimmy Randolph), and I have developed a system that can do all that. What’s more, this system actually sequesters carbon dioxide—a gas implicated in global climate change—as part of its normal operation. Furthermore, we have modeled our system and found that, if it can be successfully demonstrated in the field, it could provide utility-scale diurnal and seasonal energy storage (many hundreds of MWe) and dispatchable power, while permanently sequestering CO 2 from industrial-scale fossil-energy power plants. Certainly, an energy storage system is only as clean or as green as the primary generation it’s working with. But it is going to be difficult to implement solar or wind power to a degree high enough to make a difference in global carbon dioxide emissions without utility

  12. Near-Source Scattering of Explosion-Generated Rg: Insight From Difference Spectrograms of NTS Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, I.; Chan, W.; Wagner, R.

    2005-12-01

    Several recent studies of the generation of low-frequency Lg from explosions indicate that the Lg wavetrain from explosions contains significant contributions from (1) the scattering of explosion-generated Rg into S and (2) direct S waves from the non-spherical spall source associated with a buried explosion. The pronounced spectral nulls observed in Lg spectra of Yucca Flats (NTS) and Semipalatinsk explosions (Patton and Taylor, 1995; Gupta et al., 1997) are related to Rg excitation caused by spall-related block motions in a conical volume over the shot point, which may be approximately represented by a compensated linear vector dipole (CLVD) source (Patton et al., 2005). Frequency-dependent excitation of Rg waves should be imprinted on all scattered P, S and Lg waves. A spectrogram may be considered as a three-dimensional matrix of numbers providing amplitude and frequency information for each point in the time series. We found difference spectrograms, derived from a normal explosion and a closely located over-buried shot recorded at the same common station, to be remarkably useful for an understanding of the origin and spectral contents of various regional phases. This technique allows isolation of source characteristics, essentially free from path and recording site effects, since the overburied shot acts as the empirical Green's function. Application of this methodology to several pairs of closely located explosions shows that the scattering of explosion-generated Rg makes significant contribution to not only Lg and its coda but also to the two other regional phases Pg (presumably by the scattering of Rg into P) and Sn. The scattered energy, identified by the presence of a spectral null at the appropriate frequency, generally appears to be more prominent in the somewhat later-arriving sections of Pg, Sn, and Lg than in the initial part. Difference spectrograms appear to provide a powerful new technique for understanding the mechanism of near-source scattering

  13. Laser machining of explosives

    DOEpatents

    Perry, Michael D.; Stuart, Brent C.; Banks, Paul S.; Myers, Booth R.; Sefcik, Joseph A.

    2000-01-01

    The invention consists of a method for machining (cutting, drilling, sculpting) of explosives (e.g., TNT, TATB, PETN, RDX, etc.). By using pulses of a duration in the range of 5 femtoseconds to 50 picoseconds, extremely precise and rapid machining can be achieved with essentially no heat or shock affected zone. In this method, material is removed by a nonthermal mechanism. A combination of multiphoton and collisional ionization creates a critical density plasma in a time scale much shorter than electron kinetic energy is transferred to the lattice. The resulting plasma is far from thermal equilibrium. The material is in essence converted from its initial solid-state directly into a fully ionized plasma on a time scale too short for thermal equilibrium to be established with the lattice. As a result, there is negligible heat conduction beyond the region removed resulting in negligible thermal stress or shock to the material beyond a few microns from the laser machined surface. Hydrodynamic expansion of the plasma eliminates the need for any ancillary techniques to remove material and produces extremely high quality machined surfaces. There is no detonation or deflagration of the explosive in the process and the material which is removed is rendered inert.

  14. Tenderizing Meat with Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustavson, Paul K.; Lee, Richard J.; Chambers, George P.; Solomon, Morse B.; Berry, Brad W.

    2001-06-01

    Investigators at the Food Technology and Safety Laboratory have had success tenderizing meat by explosively shock loading samples submerged in water. This technique, referred to as the Hydrodynamic Pressure (HDP) Process, is being developed to improve the efficiency and reproducibility of the beef tenderization processing over conventional aging techniques. Once optimized, the process should overcome variability in tenderization currently plaguing the beef industry. Additional benefits include marketing lower quality grades of meat, which have not been commercially viable due to a low propensity to tenderization. The simplest and most successful arrangement of these tests has meat samples (50 to 75 mm thick) placed on a steel plate at the bottom of a plastic water vessel. Reported here are tests which were instrumented by Indian Head investigators. Carbon-composite resistor-gauges were used to quantify the shock profile delivered to the surface of the meat. PVDF and resistor gauges (used later in lieu of PVDF) provided data on the pressure-time history at the meat/steel interface. Resulting changes in tenderization were correlated with increasing shock duration, which were provided by various explosives.

  15. Broadband Evaluation of DPRK Explosions, Collapse Event, and Induced Aftershocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayeda, K.; Roman-Nieves, J. I.; Wagner, G.; Jeon, Y. S.

    2017-12-01

    We report on the past 6 declared DPRK nuclear explosions, a collapse event, and recent associated induced shear dislocation sources using long-period waveform modeling, direct regional phases, and stable P-coda and S-coda spectral ratios. We find that the recent September 3rd, 2017 explosion is well modeled with an MM71 explosion source model at normal scale depth, but the previous 5 smaller yield explosions exhibit much larger relative high frequency radiation, strongly suggesting they are all over buried by varying amounts. The collapse event that occurred 8 minutes following the September 3rd DPRK explosion shares significant similarities with a number of NTS collapse events for explosions of comparable yield, both in absolute amplitude and spectral fall-off. A large number of smaller sources have been observed, which from stable coda spectral analysis and waveform modeling, are consistent with shallow shear dislocations likely caused by stress redistribution following the past nuclear explosions. We conclude with testing of a new discriminant that is specific to this region.

  16. Mass Extinctions and Supernova Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korschinek, Gunther

    A nearby supernova (SN) explosion could have negatively influenced life on Earth, maybe even been responsible for mass extinctions. Mass extinction poses a significant extinction of numerous species on Earth, as recorded in the paleontologic, paleoclimatic, and geological record of our planet. Depending on the distance between the Sun and the SN, different types of threats have to be considered, such as ozone depletion on Earth, causing increased exposure to the Sun's ultraviolet radiation or the direct exposure of lethal X-rays. Another indirect effect is cloud formation, induced by cosmic rays in the atmosphere which result in a drop in the Earth's temperature, causing major glaciations of the Earth. The discovery of highly intensive gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), which could be connected to SNe, initiated further discussions on possible life-threatening events in the Earth's history. The probability that GRBs hit the Earth is very low. Nevertheless, a past interaction of Earth with GRBs and/or SNe cannot be excluded and might even have been responsible for past extinction events.

  17. Volcano Inflation prior to Gas Explosions at Semeru Volcano, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, T.; Iguchi, M.; Kawaguchi, R.; Surono, S.; Hendrasto, M.; Rosadi, U.

    2010-12-01

    Semeru volcano in east Java, Indonesia, is well known to exhibit small vulcanian eruptions at the summit crater. Such eruptive activity stopped on April 2009, but volcanic earthquakes started to occur in August and a lava dome was found in the summit crater on November. Since then, lava sometimes flows downward on the slope and small explosions emitting steams from active crater frequently occur every a few to a few tens of minutes. Since the explosions repeatedly occur with short intervals and the active crater is located close to the summit with an altitude of 3676m, the explosions are considered to originate from the gas (steams) from magma itself in the conduit and not to be caused by interactions of magma with the underground water. We installed a tiltmeter at the summit on March 2010 to study the volcanic eruption mechanisms. The tiltmeter (Pinnacle hybrid type, accuracy of measurement is 1 nrad ) was set at a depth of about 1 m around the summit about 500 m north from the active crater. The data stored every 1 s in the internal memory was uploaded every 6 hours by a small data logger with GPS time correction function. More than one thousand gas explosion events were observed for about 2 weeks. We analyze the tilt records as well as seismic signals recorded at stations of CVGHM, Indonesia. The tilt records clearly show uplift of the summit about 20 to 30 seconds before each explosion. Uplifts before large explosions reach to about 20 - 30 n rad, which is almost equivalent to the volume increase of about 100 m^3 beneath the crater. To examine the eruption magnitude dependence on the uplift, we classify the eruptions into five groups based on the amplitudes of seismograms associated with explosions. We stack the tilt records for these groups to reduce noises in the signals and to get general characteristics of the volcano inflations. The results show that the amplitudes of uplifts are almost proportional to the amplitudes of explosion earthquakes while the

  18. Micro-explosion of compound drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chun-Kuei; Lin, Ta-Hui

    2014-08-01

    Introducing water into spray combustion systems, by either water-in-oil emulsification or supplementary water injection, is one of the major techniques for combustion improvement and NOx reduction. Plentiful researches are available on combustion of water-in-oil emulsion fuel drops. The emulsified liquid is a heterogeneous mixture of immiscible liquids. One component forms the continuous phase and the other component forms the discrete phase. The discrete phase consists of globules of the one fluid that are suspended in the continuous phase fluid. Water-in-oil emulsions are commonly considered for combustion applications because emulsions can result in micro-explosion, thereby reducing the average drop diameter to enhance liquid vaporization, and suppressing the formation of soot and NOx. However, the water addition generally does not exceed about 20% for smooth engine operations[!, 21. The combustion characteristics and micro-explosion of emulsion drop were studied by many researchers. The micro-explosion of water in fuel emulsion drops was caused by very fast growth of superheated water vapor bubbles, its superheat limits must be lower than the boiling point temperature of the fuel. These bubbles were primarily governed by the pressure difference between the superheated vapor and the liquid, and by the inertia imparted to the liquid by the motion of the bubble surface[3 6 In this study, we used a coaxial nozzle to generation the multi-component drop. The different type of water-in-oil fuel drops called the compound drops. Unlike an emulsion drop, a compound drop consists of a water core and a fuel shell, which can originate from the phase separation of emulsion[7, 81 or a water drop colliding with a fuel drop[9, 101 Burning and micro-explosion of compound drops have been found to be distinct from those of emulsion drops[9-111 Wang et al.[9 , 101 studied the combustion characteristics of collision merged alkane-water drops. The merged drops appeared in adhesive

  19. Phreatic and Hydrothermal Explosions: A Laboratory Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheu, B.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2010-12-01

    Phreatic eruptions are amongst the most common eruption types on earth. They might be precursory to another type of volcanic eruption but often they stand on their one. Despite being the most common eruption type, they also are one of the most diverse eruptions, in appearance as well as on eruption mechanism. Yet steam is the common fuel behind all phreatic eruptions. The steam-driven explosions occur when water beneath the ground or on the surface is heated by magma, lava, hot rocks, or fresh volcanic deposits (such as ignimbrites, tephra and pyroclastic-flow deposits) and result in crater, tuff rings and debris avalanches. The intense heat of such material may cause water to boil and flash to steam, thereby generating an explosion of steam, water, ash, blocks, and bombs. Another wide and important field affected by phreatic explosions are hydrothermal areas; here phreatic explosions occur every few months creating explosion craters and resemble a significant hazard to hydrothermal power plants. Despite of their hazard potential, phreatic explosions have so far been overlooked by the field of experimental volcanology. A part of their hazard potential in owned by the fact that phreatic explosions are hardly predictable in occurrence time and size as they have manifold triggers (variances in groundwater and heat systems, earthquakes, material fatigue, water level, etc..) A new set of experiments has been designed to focus on this phreatic type of steam explosion, whereas classical phreatomagmatic experiments use molten fuel-coolant interaction (e.g., Zimanowski, et al., 1991). The violent transition of the superheated water to vapour adds another degree of explosivity to the dry magmatic fragmentation, driven mostly by vesicle bursting due to internal gas overpressure. At low water fractions the fragmentation is strongly enforced by the mixture of these two effects and a large fraction of fine pyroclasts are produced, whereas at high water fraction in the sample the

  20. Global climatology of explosive cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2013-03-01

    Explosive cyclones, which have rapidly intensifying winds and heavy rain, can seriously threaten life and property. These "meteorological bombs" are difficult to forecast, in part because scientists need a better understanding of the physical mechanisms by which they form. In particular, the large-scale circulation conditions that may contribute to explosive cyclone formation are not well understood.

  1. Chemosensors for detection of nitroaromatic compounds (explosives)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zyryanov, G. V.; Kopchuk, D. S.; Kovalev, I. S.; Nosova, E. V.; Rusinov, V. L.; Chupakhin, O. N.

    2014-09-01

    The key types of low-molecular-mass chemosensors for the detection of nitroaromatic compounds representing energetic substances (explosives) are analyzed. The coordination and chemical properties of these chemosensors and structural features of their complexes with nitroaromatic compounds are considered. The causes and methods for attaining high selectivity of recognition are demonstrated. The primary attention is paid to the use of low-molecular-mass chemosensors for visual detection of explosives of this class by colorimetric and photometric methods. Examples of using photo- and chemiluminescence for this purpose are described. A separate section is devoted to electrochemical methods of detection of nitroaromatic compounds. Data published from 2000 to 2014 are mainly covered. The bibliography includes 245 references.

  2. Method and system for detecting explosives

    DOEpatents

    Reber, Edward L [Idaho Falls, ID; Jewell, James K [Idaho Falls, ID; Rohde, Kenneth W [Idaho Falls, ID; Seabury, Edward H [Idaho Falls, ID; Blackwood, Larry G [Idaho Falls, ID; Edwards, Andrew J [Idaho Falls, ID; Derr, Kurt W [Idaho Falls, ID

    2009-03-10

    A method of detecting explosives in a vehicle includes providing a first rack on one side of the vehicle, the rack including a neutron generator and a plurality of gamma ray detectors; providing a second rack on another side of the vehicle, the second rack including a neutron generator and a plurality of gamma ray detectors; providing a control system, remote from the first and second racks, coupled to the neutron generators and gamma ray detectors; using the control system, causing the neutron generators to generate neutrons; and performing gamma ray spectroscopy on spectra read by the gamma ray detectors to look for a signature indicative of presence of an explosive. Various apparatus and other methods are also provided.

  3. Diatremes and craters attributed to natural explosions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shoemaker, Eugene Merle

    1956-01-01

    Diatremes - volcanic pipes attributed to explosion - and craters have been studied to infer the ultimate causes and physical conditions attending natural explosive processes. Initial piercement of diatremes on the Navajo reservation, Arizona was probably along a fracture propagated by a high-pressure aqueous fluid. Gas rising at high velocity along the fracture would become converted to a gas-solid fluidized system by entrainment of wall- rock fragments. The first stages of widening of the vent are probably accomplished mainly by simple abrasion of the high-velocity fluidized system on the walls of the fracture. As the vent widens, its enlargement may be accelerated by inward spalling of the walls. The inferred mechanics of the Navajo-Hopi diatremes is used to illustrate the possibility of diatreme formation over a molten salt mass.

  4. Electrodics: mesoscale physicochemical interactions in lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Partha P.; Chen, Chien-Fan

    2014-06-01

    Recent years have witnessed an explosion of interest and research endeavor in lithium-ion batteries to enable vehicle electrification. In particular, a critical imperative is to accelerate innovation for improved performance, life and safety of lithium-ion batteries for electric drive vehicles. Lithium ion batteries are complex, dynamical systems which include a multitude of coupled physicochemical processes encompassing electronic/ionic/diffusive transport in solid/electrolyte phases, electrochemical and phase change reactions and diffusion induced stress generation in multi-scale porous electrode microstructures. While innovations in nanomaterials and nanostructures have spurred the recent advancements, fundamental understanding of the electrode processing - microstructure - performance interplay is of paramount importance. In this presentation, mesoscale physicochemical interactions in lithium-ion battery electrodes will be elucidated.

  5. Injuries from roadside improvised explosive devices.

    PubMed

    Ramasamy, Arul; Harrisson, Stuart E; Clasper, Jon C; Stewart, Michael P M

    2008-10-01

    After the invasion of Iraq in April 2003, coalition forces have remained in the country in a bid to maintain stability and support the local security forces. The improvised explosive device (IED) has been widely used by the insurgents and is the leading cause of death and injury among Coalition troops in the region. From January 2006, data were prospectively collected on 100 consecutive casualties who were either injured or killed in hostile action. Mechanism of injury, new Injury Severity Score (NISS), The International Classification of Disease-9th edition diagnosis, anatomic pattern of wounding, and operative management were recorded in a trauma registry. The weapon incident reports were analyzed to ascertain the type of IED employed. Of the 100 casualties injured in hostile action, 53 casualties were injured by IEDs in 23 incidents (mean 2.3 casualties per incident). Twenty-one of 23 (91.3%) of the IEDs employed were explosive formed projectile (EFP) type. Twelve casualties (22.6%) were either killed or died of wounds. Median NISS score of survivors was 3 (range, 1-50). All fatalities sustained unsurvivable injuries with a NISS score of 75. Primary blast injuries were seen in only 2 (3.8%) and thermal injuries in 8 casualties (15.1%). Twenty (48.7%) of survivors underwent surgery by British surgeons in the field hospital. At 18 months follow, all but one of the United Kingdom Service personnel had returned to military employment. The injury profile seen with EFP-IEDs does not follow the traditional pattern of injuries seen with conventional high explosives. Primary blast injuries were uncommon despite all casualties being in close proximity to the explosion. When the EFP-IED is detonated, the EFP produced results in catastrophic injuries to casualties caught in its path, but causes relatively minor injuries to personnel sited adjacent to its trajectory. Improvements in vehicle protection may prevent the EFP from entering the passenger compartments and thereby

  6. Detection of explosives by positive corona discharge ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tabrizchi, Mahmoud; Ilbeigi, Vahideh

    2010-04-15

    In this work, thermal decomposition has been used to detect explosives by IMS in positive polarity. Explosives including Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate (PETN), Cyclo-1,3,5-Trimethylene-2,4,6-Trinitramine (RDX), 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene (TNT), 2,4-Dihydro-5-nitro-3H-1,2,4-triazol-3-one (NTO), 1,3,5,7-Tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX), have been evaluated at temperatures between 150 and 250 degrees C in positive polarity in air. Explosives yield NO(x) which causes NO(+) peak to increase. Additional peaks may be used to identify the type of explosive. The limit of detection for RDX, HMX, PETN, NTO, and TNT were obtained to be 1, 10, 40, 1000, and 1000 ng, respectively. 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Direct imaging of explosives.

    PubMed

    Knapp, E A; Moler, R B; Saunders, A W; Trower, W P

    2000-01-01

    Any technique that can detect nitrogen concentrations can screen for concealed explosives. However, such a technique would have to be insensitive to metal, both encasing and incidental. If images of the nitrogen concentrations could be captured, then, since form follows function, a robust screening technology could be developed. However these images would have to be sensitive to the surface densities at or below that of the nitrogen contained in buried anti-personnel mines or of the SEMTEX that brought down Pan Am 103, approximately 200 g. Although the ability to image in three-dimensions would somewhat reduce false positives, capturing collateral images of carbon and oxygen would virtually assure that nitrogenous non-explosive material like fertilizer, Melmac dinnerware, and salami could be eliminated. We are developing such an instrument, the Nitrogen Camera, which has met experimentally these criteria with the exception of providing oxygen images, which awaits the availability of a sufficiently energetic light source. Our Nitrogen Camera technique uses an electron accelerator to produce photonuclear reactions whose unique decays it registers. Clearly if our Nitrogen Camera is made mobile, it could be effective in detecting buried mines, either in an active battlefield situation or in the clearing of abandoned military munitions. Combat operations require that a swathe the width of an armored vehicle, 5 miles deep, be screened in an hour, which is within our camera's scanning speed. Detecting abandoned munitions is technically easier as it is free from the onerous speed requirement. We describe here our Nitrogen Camera and show its 180 pixel intensity images of elemental nitrogen in a 200 g mine simulant and in a 125 g stick of SEMTEX. We also report on our progress in creating a lorry transportable 70 MeV electron racetrack microtron, the principal enabling technology that will allow our Nitrogen Camera to be deployed in the field.

  8. Handheld detector using NIR for bottled liquid explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itozaki, Hideo; Sato-Akaba, Hideo

    2014-10-01

    A handheld bottle checker for detection of liquid explosives is developed using near infrared technology. In order to make it compact, a LED light was used as a light source and a novel circuit board was developed for the device control instead of using a PC. This enables low power consumption and this handheld detector can be powered by a Li-ion battery without an AC power supply. This checker works well to analyze liquids, even using limited bandwidth of NIR by the LED. It is expected that it can be applied not only to airport security but also to wider applications because of its compactness and portability.

  9. Batteries: Widening voltage windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Kang; Wang, Chunsheng

    2016-10-01

    The energy output of aqueous batteries is largely limited by the narrow voltage window of their electrolytes. Now, a hydrate melt consisting of lithium salts is shown to expand such voltage windows, leading to a high-energy aqueous battery.

  10. A battery simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrell, S., Jr.; Lahr, N.

    1970-01-01

    Simulator verifies proper operation of a battery cell voltage-monitoring device. It also contains variable ac voltage to ascertain that a battery scanner will perform its function at all possible ac voltages.

  11. Battery cell feedthrough apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, T.D.

    1995-03-14

    A compact, hermetic feedthrough apparatus is described comprising interfitting sleeve portions constructed of chemically-stable materials to permit unique battery designs and increase battery life and performance. 8 figs.

  12. Optical detection of explosives: spectral signatures for the explosive bouquet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborn, Tabetha; Kaimal, Sindhu; Causey, Jason; Burns, William; Reeve, Scott

    2009-05-01

    Research with canines suggests that sniffer dogs alert not on the odor from a pure explosive, but rather on a set of far more volatile species present in an explosive as impurities. Following the explosive trained canine example, we have begun examining the vapor signatures for many of these volatile impurities utilizing high resolution spectroscopic techniques in several molecular fingerprint regions. Here we will describe some of these high resolution measurements and discuss strategies for selecting useful spectral signature regions for individual molecular markers of interest.

  13. Self-Organizing Batteries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-16

    of these principles to a lithium ion battery , resulting in the demonstration of the first self-organized rechargeable battery. These accomplishments...spherical graphite widely used as a lithium ion battery anode, was used as the high-index endmember and was attached to an AFM cantilever. Its...resulting junctions could be stable under electrochemical conditions typical of lithium ion battery systems. We used PEG + LiClO 4 as our model solid

  14. Micro Calorimeter for Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Santhanagopalan, Shriram

    2017-08-01

    As battery technology forges ahead and consumer demand for safer, more affordable, high-performance batteries grows, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has added a patented Micro Calorimeter to its existing family of R&D 100 Award-winning Isothermal Battery Calorimeters (IBCs). The Micro Calorimeter examines the thermal signature of battery chemistries early on in the design cycle using popular coin cell and small pouch cell designs, which are simple to fabricate and study.

  15. Action Replay of Powerful Stellar Explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-03-01

    Astronomers have made the best ever determination of the power of a supernova explosion that was visible from Earth long ago. By observing the remnant of a supernova and a light echo from the initial outburst, they have established the validity of a powerful new method for studying supernovas. Using data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, ESA's XMM-Newton Observatory, and the Gemini Observatory, two teams of researchers studied the supernova remnant and the supernova light echo that are located in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), a small galaxy about 160,000 light years from Earth. They concluded that the supernova occurred about 400 years ago (in Earth’s time frame), and was unusually bright and energetic. X-ray Image of SNR 0509-67.5 X-ray Image of SNR 0509-67.5 This result is the first time two methods - X-ray observations of a supernova remnant and optical observations of the expanding light echoes from the explosion - have both been used to estimate the energy of a supernova explosion. Up until now, scientists had only made such an estimate using the light seen soon after a star exploded, or using remnants that are several hundred years old, but not from both. "People didn't have advanced telescopes to study supernovas when they went off hundreds of years ago," said Armin Rest of Harvard University, who led the light echo observations using Gemini. "But we've done the next best thing by looking around the site of the explosion and constructing an action replay of it." People Who Read This Also Read... Milky Way's Super-efficient Particle Accelerators Caught in The Act Oldest Known Objects Are Surprisingly Immature Discovery of Most Recent Supernova in Our Galaxy NASA Unveils Cosmic Images Book in Braille for Blind Readers In 2004, scientists used Chandra to determine that a supernova remnant, known as SNR 0509-67.5 in the LMC, was a so-called Type Ia supernova, caused by a white dwarf star in a binary system that reaches a critical mass and explodes. In

  16. Molecular hydrodynamics of high explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Belak, J.

    1994-11-01

    High explosives release mechanical energy through chemical reactions. Applications of high explosives are vast in the mining and military industries and are beginning to see more civilian applications such as the deployment of airbags in modern automobiles. One of the central issues surrounding explosive materials is decreasing their sensitivity, necessary for their safe handling, while maintaining a high yield. Many practical tests have been devised to determine the sensitivity of explosive materials to shock, to impact, to spark, and to friction. These tests have great value in determining yield and setting precautions for safe handling but tell little of themore » mechanisms of initiation. How is the mechanical energy of impact or friction transformed into the chemical excitation that initiates explosion? The answer is intimately related to the structure of the explosive material, the size and distribution of grains, the size and presence of open areas such as voids and gas bubbles, and inevitably the bonding between explosive molecules.« less

  17. Detection of explosives in soils

    DOEpatents

    Chambers, William B.; Rodacy, Philip J.; Phelan, James M.; Woodfin, Ronald L.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method for detecting explosive-indicating compounds in subsurface soil. The apparatus has a probe with an adsorbent material on some portion of its surface that can be placed into soil beneath the ground surface, where the adsorbent material can adsorb at least one explosive-indicating compound. The apparatus additional has the capability to desorb the explosive-indicating compound through heating or solvent extraction. A diagnostic instrument attached to the probe detects the desorbed explosive-indicating compound. In the method for detecting explosive-indicating compounds in soil, the sampling probe with an adsorbent material on at least some portion of a surface of the sampling probe is inserted into the soil to contact the adsorbent material with the soil. The explosive-indicating compounds are then desorbed and transferred as either a liquid or gas sample to a diagnostic tool for analysis. The resulting gas or liquid sample is analyzed using at least one diagnostic tool selected from the group consisting of an ion-mobility spectrometer, a gas chromatograph, a high performance liquid chromatograph, a capillary electrophoresis chromatograph, a mass spectrometer, a Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer and a Raman spectrometer to detect the presence of explosive-indicating compounds.

  18. Electric Vehicle Battery Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2014-01-01

    A serious drawback to electric vehicles [batteries only] is the idle time needed to recharge their batteries. In this challenge, students can develop ideas and concepts for battery change-out at automotive service stations. Such a capability would extend the range of electric vehicles.

  19. Sodium sulfur battery seal

    DOEpatents

    Topouzian, Armenag

    1980-01-01

    This invention is directed to a seal for a sodium sulfur battery in which a flexible diaphragm sealing elements respectively engage opposite sides of a ceramic component of the battery which separates an anode compartment from a cathode compartment of the battery.

  20. Front to back ocular injury from a vaping-related explosion.

    PubMed

    Khairudin, Muhammad Najmi; Mohd Zahidin, Aida Zairani; Bastion, Mae-Lynn Catherine

    2016-04-05

    We describe a case of extensive ocular injury secondary to an electronic cigarette (e-cigarette)-related explosion. The explosion was the result of modifications made to a heating element of the e-cigarette device by a non-professional. Extensive ocular injuries that result from an explosion of an e-cigarette device can potentially cause significant and permanent visual impairment. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  1. Fire and explosion hazards to flora and fauna from explosives.

    PubMed

    Merrifield, R

    2000-06-30

    Deliberate or accidental initiation of explosives can produce a range of potentially damaging fire and explosion effects. Quantification of the consequences of such effects upon the surroundings, particularly on people and structures, has always been of paramount importance. Information on the effects on flora and fauna, however, is limited, with probably the weakest area lying with fragmentation of buildings and their effects on different small mammals. Information has been used here to gain an appreciation of the likely magnitude of the potential fire and explosion effects on flora and fauna. This is based on a number of broad assumptions and a variety of data sources including World War II bomb damage, experiments performed with animals 30-40 years ago, and more recent field trials on building break-up under explosive loading.

  2. 78 FR 64246 - Commerce in Explosives; List of Explosives Materials

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-28

    ... [2,2-dinitropropyl acrylate]. DNPD [dinitropentano nitrile]. Dynamite. E EDDN [ethylene diamine dinitrate]. EDNA [ethylenedinitramine]. Ednatol. EDNP [ethyl 4,4-dinitropentanoate]. EGDN [ethylene glycol.... Nitroglycol [ethylene glycol dinitrate, EGDN]. Nitroguanidine explosives. Nitronium perchlorate propellant...

  3. Donor free radical explosive composition

    DOEpatents

    Walker, Franklin E. [15 Way Points Rd., Danville, CA 94526; Wasley, Richard J. [4290 Colgate Way, Livermore, CA 94550

    1980-04-01

    An improved explosive composition is disclosed and comprises a major portion of an explosive having a detonation velocity between about 1500 and 10,000 meters per second and a minor amount of a donor additive comprising an organic compound or mixture of organic compounds capable of releasing low molecular weight free radicals or ions under mechanical or electrical shock conditions and which is not an explosive, or an inorganic compound or mixture of inorganic compounds capable of releasing low molecular weight free radicals or ions under mechanical or electrical shock conditions and selected from ammonium or alkali metal persulfates.

  4. Light metal explosives and propellants

    DOEpatents

    Wood, Lowell L.; Ishikawa, Muriel Y.; Nuckolls, John H.; Pagoria, Phillip F.; Viecelli, James A.

    2005-04-05

    Disclosed herein are light metal explosives, pyrotechnics and propellants (LME&Ps) comprising a light metal component such as Li, B, Be or their hydrides or intermetallic compounds and alloys containing them and an oxidizer component containing a classic explosive, such as CL-20, or a non-explosive oxidizer, such as lithium perchlorate, or combinations thereof. LME&P formulations may have light metal particles and oxidizer particles ranging in size from 0.01 .mu.m to 1000 .mu.m.

  5. Burn Injury and Explosions: An Australian Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, John E.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: Increasingly (but not exclusively), terrorist activity and the use of explosive devices have enjoyed the focus of the global media. This paper aims to bring a range of issues to attention, to highlight how burn injuries are sustained in such incidents and why burn injuries (and thus burn disasters) are so complicated to manage. Materials and Methods: The author's experience with burn injury caused during explosions and his involvement in burn disaster situations has been summarized to form the basis of the article. This has been expanded upon with discussion points which provide a strategy for planning for such events and by a broad sample of the literature. Results: Several strategies are suggested to facilitate planning for burn disasters and to illustrate to those not directly involved why forward planning is pivotal to success when these incidents occur. Conclusions: Disasters generating large numbers of burn-injured are relatively frequent. Explosive devices are widespread in their use both in military and increasingly in civilian fields. Encompassing a large range of aetiologies, geographical sites, populations, and resources; burn disaster management is difficult and planning essential. PMID:19834533

  6. TWA Flight 800, explosion airblast unexplained

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Jack W.

    2003-10-01

    TWA Flight 800 disintegrated off Long Island, NY, on 16 July 1996. Immediate reports from other flyers described what appeared as attacking missiles. Search for terrorists began quickly, with over 1000 FBI agents to collect debris, interview eyewitnesses, and analyze sightings to give a missile launch point. They found no evidence of criminal attack, and turned investigations over to the NTSB to find some accidental cause. The ``empty'' central fuel tank was determined to be the likely explosion source. On the other hand, early witnesses reported a ``loud'' bang after seeing a great fireball fall from the sky, but at 15 km or greater range, they saw and heard two different events. This acoustic discrepancy has not been adequately investigated. When finally released, FBI reports from more than 200 ``ear-witnesses'' give similar observations. Their loudness reports confirm that at least a ton of TNT equivalent explosion had occurred. NASA acousticians engaged by NTSB, however, through spectral analysis techniques for sonic booms, concluded that a 10-kg TNT explosion, from detonating fuel tank vapors, could be heard on Long Island. Evidence for a much larger yield is presented here, but its form remains a mystery.

  7. Testing of Confining Pressure Impacton Explosion Energy of Explosive Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drzewiecki, Jan; Myszkowski, Jacek; Pytlik, Andrzej; Pytlik, Mateusz

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents the results of testing the explosion effects of two explosive charges placed in an environment with specified values of confining pressure. The aim of this study is to determine the impact of variable environmental conditions on the suitability of particular explosives for their use in the prevention of natural hazards in hard coal mining. The research results will contribute to improving the efficiency of currently adopted technologies of natural hazard prevention and aid in raising the level of occupational safety. To carry out the subject matter measurements, a special test stand was constructed which allows the value of the initial pressure inside the chamber, which constitutes its integral part, to be altered before the detonation of the charge being tested. The obtained characteristics of the pressure changes during the explosion of the analysed charge helped to identify the work (energy) which was produced during the process. The test results are a valuable source of information, opening up new possibilities for the use of explosives, the development of innovative solutions for the construction of explosive charges and their initiation.

  8. Chemically rechargeable battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graf, James E. (Inventor); Rowlette, John J. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Batteries (50) containing oxidized, discharged metal electrodes such as an iron-air battery are charged by removing and storing electrolyte in a reservoir (98), pumping fluid reductant such as formalin (aqueous formaldehyde) from a storage tank (106) into the battery in contact with the surfaces of the electrodes. After sufficient iron hydroxide has been reduced to iron, the spent reductant is drained, the electrodes rinsed with water from rinse tank (102) and then the electrolyte in the reservoir (106) is returned to the battery. The battery can be slowly electrically charged when in overnight storage but can be quickly charged in about 10 minutes by the chemical procedure of the invention.

  9. Explosive actuated valve

    DOEpatents

    Byrne, Kenneth G.

    1983-01-01

    1. A device of the character described comprising the combination of a housing having an elongate bore and including a shoulder extending inwardly into said bore, a single elongate movable plunger disposed in said bore including an outwardly extending flange adjacent one end thereof overlying said shoulder, normally open conduit means having an inlet and an outlet perpendicularly piercing said housing intermediate said shoulder and said flange and including an intermediate portion intersecting and normally openly communicating with said bore at said shoulder, normally closed conduit means piercing said housing and intersecting said bore at a location spaced from said normally open conduit means, said elongate plunger including a shearing edge adjacent the other end thereof normally disposed intermediate both of said conduit means and overlying a portion of said normally closed conduit means, a deformable member carried by said plunger intermediate said flange and said shoulder and normally spaced from and overlying the intermediate portion of said normally open conduit means, and means on the housing communicating with the bore to retain an explosive actuator for moving said plunger to force the deformable member against the shoulder and extrude a portion of the deformable member out of said bore into portions of the normally open conduit means for plugging the same and to effect the opening of said normally closed conduit means by the plunger shearing edge substantially concomitantly with the plugging of the normally open conduit means.

  10. Explosive actuated valves

    DOEpatents

    Cobb, Jr., Lawrence L.

    1983-01-01

    1. A device of the character described comprising the combination of a generally tubular housing having an end portion forming a chamber to receive the sensitive portion of an explosive squib, a plunger within said housing having an end portion exposed to said chamber, squib retaining means for engaging said housing and a said squib to releasably maintain the squib in close proximity to said plunger end portion including a retaining ring of fusible material spaced outwardly from and encircling at least part of a said squib and part of its sensitive portion for reception of heat from an external source prior to appreciable reception thereof by the sensitive portion of the squib, an annular compression spring bearing at one end against said housing for urging at least a portion of the squib retaining means and a said squib away from said housing and from said plunger end portion upon subjection of the fusible material to heat sufficient to melt at least a portion thereof, and guide means for said spring to maintain even expansion thereof as a said squib is being urged away from said housing.

  11. Explosion-Induced Implosions of Cylindrical Shell Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, C. M.; Duncan, J. H.

    2010-11-01

    An experimental study of the explosion-induced implosion of cylindrical shell structures in a high-pressure water environment was performed. The shell structures are filled with air at atmospheric pressure and are placed in a large water-filled pressure vessel. The vessel is then pressurized to various levels P∞=αPc, where Pc is the natural implosion pressure of the model and α is a factor that ranges from 0.1 to 0.9. An explosive is then set off at various standoff distances, d, from the model center line, where d varies from R to 10R and R is the maximum radius of the explosion bubble. High-speed photography (27,000 fps) was used to observe the explosion and resulting shell structure implosion. High-frequency underwater blast sensors recorded dynamic pressure waves at 6 positions. The cylindrical models were made from aluminum (diameter D = 39.1 mm, wall thickness t = 0.89 mm, length L = 240 mm) and brass (D = 16.7 mm, t = 0.36 mm, L=152 mm) tubes. The pressure records are interpreted in light of the high-speed movies. It is found that the implosion is induced by two mechanisms: the shockwave generated by the explosion and the jet formed during the explosion-bubble collapse. Whether an implosion is caused by the shockwave or the jet depends on the maximum bubble diameter and the standoff distance.

  12. Alkaline quinone flow battery.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kaixiang; Chen, Qing; Gerhardt, Michael R; Tong, Liuchuan; Kim, Sang Bok; Eisenach, Louise; Valle, Alvaro W; Hardee, David; Gordon, Roy G; Aziz, Michael J; Marshak, Michael P

    2015-09-25

    Storage of photovoltaic and wind electricity in batteries could solve the mismatch problem between the intermittent supply of these renewable resources and variable demand. Flow batteries permit more economical long-duration discharge than solid-electrode batteries by using liquid electrolytes stored outside of the battery. We report an alkaline flow battery based on redox-active organic molecules that are composed entirely of Earth-abundant elements and are nontoxic, nonflammable, and safe for use in residential and commercial environments. The battery operates efficiently with high power density near room temperature. These results demonstrate the stability and performance of redox-active organic molecules in alkaline flow batteries, potentially enabling cost-effective stationary storage of renewable energy. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  13. Silicon Carbide Radioisotope Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rybicki, George C.

    2005-01-01

    The substantial radiation resistance and large bandgap of SiC semiconductor materials makes them an attractive candidate for application in a high efficiency, long life radioisotope battery. To evaluate their potential in this application, simulated batteries were constructed using SiC diodes and the alpha particle emitter Americium Am-241 or the beta particle emitter Promethium Pm-147. The Am-241 based battery showed high initial power output and an initial conversion efficiency of approximately 16%, but the power output decayed 52% in 500 hours due to radiation damage. In contrast the Pm-147 based battery showed a similar power output level and an initial conversion efficiency of approximately 0.6%, but no degradation was observed in 500 hours. However, the Pm-147 battery required approximately 1000 times the particle fluence as the Am-242 battery to achieve a similar power output. The advantages and disadvantages of each type of battery and suggestions for future improvements will be discussed.

  14. Explosive Spot Joining of Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, Laurence J. (Inventor); Perry, Ronnie B. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The invention is an apparatus and method for wire splicing using an explosive joining process. The apparatus consists of a prebend, U-shaped strap of metal that slides over prepositioned wires. A standoff means separates the wires from the strap before joining. An adhesive means holds two ribbon explosives in position centered over the U-shaped strap. A detonating means connects to the ribbon explosives. The process involves spreading strands of each wire to be joined into a flat plane. The process then requires alternating each strand in alignment to form a mesh-like arrangement with an overlapped area. The strap slides over the strands of the wires. and the standoff means is positioned between the two surfaces. The detonating means then initiates the ribbon explosives that drive the strap to accomplish a high velocity. angular collision between the mating surfaces. This collision creates surface melts and collision bonding resulting in electron-sharing linkups.

  15. The challenge of improvised explosives

    DOE PAGES

    Maienschein, Jon L.

    2012-06-14

    Energetic materials have been developed for decades, and indeed centuries, with a common set of goals in mind. Performance (as a detonating explosive, a propellant, or a pyrotechnic) has always been key, equally important have been the attributes of safety, stability, and reproducibility. Research and development with those goals has led to the set of energetic materials commonly used today. In the past few decades, the adoption and use of improvised explosives in attacks by terrorists or third-world parties has led to many questions about these materials, e.g., how they may be made, what threat they pose to the intendedmore » target, how to handle them safely, and how to detect them. The unfortunate advent of improvised explosives has opened the door for research into these materials, and there are active programs in many countries. I will discuss issues and opportunities facing research into improvised explosives.« less

  16. Explosives characterization in terahertz range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maestrojuán, I.; Palacios, I.; Etayo, D.; Iriarte, J. C.; Teniente, J.; Ederra, I.; Gonzalo, R.

    2011-11-01

    A Thz spectral characterization of the behaviour of different explosives is presented in this paper. This characterization will be done in the frequency range from 20 GHz to 4 THz using a Teraview Spectra 3000. This system has a capacity of measuring from 20 GHz to 4 THz fed by a laser source. With the Teraview Spectra 3000 equipment will be possible to calculate the refractive index, the absorbance and other important parameters of the explosive samples. With this study it will be possible to characterize some of the most common used explosives, i.e., gun explosive, gunpowder mine, pent, TNT, RDX, etc, and it will allow to determine their electromagnetic peculiarities in order to design a future imaging system that allow detecting them in security and defense sectors.

  17. Explosive plane-wave lens

    DOEpatents

    Marsh, S.P.

    1987-03-12

    An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Explosive plane-wave lens

    DOEpatents

    Marsh, S.P.

    1988-03-08

    An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive. 4 figs.

  19. An Explosion of Infrared Color

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-12-09

    This oddly colorful nebula is the supernova remnant IC 443 as seen by NASA Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer; the Jellyfish nebula is particularly interesting because it provides a look into how stellar explosions interact with their environment.

  20. Explosive plane-wave lens

    DOEpatents

    Marsh, Stanley P.

    1988-01-01

    An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive.

  1. Explosives mimic for testing, training, and monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Reynolds, John G.; Durban, Matthew M.; Gash, Alexander E.; Grapes, Michael D.; Kelley, Ryan S.; Sullivan, Kyle T.

    2018-02-13

    Additive Manufacturing (AM) is used to make mimics for explosives. The process uses mixtures of explosives and matrices commonly used in AM. The explosives are formulated into a mixture with the matrix and printed using AM techniques and equipment. The explosive concentrations are kept less than 10% by wt. of the mixture to conform to requirements of shipping and handling.

  2. 30 CFR 7.306 - Explosion tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Explosion tests. 7.306 Section 7.306 Mineral... MINING PRODUCTS TESTING BY APPLICANT OR THIRD PARTY Electric Motor Assemblies § 7.306 Explosion tests. (a) The following shall be used for conducting an explosion test: (1) An explosion test chamber designed...

  3. 30 CFR 7.306 - Explosion tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Explosion tests. 7.306 Section 7.306 Mineral... MINING PRODUCTS TESTING BY APPLICANT OR THIRD PARTY Electric Motor Assemblies § 7.306 Explosion tests. (a) The following shall be used for conducting an explosion test: (1) An explosion test chamber designed...

  4. 30 CFR 7.306 - Explosion tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Explosion tests. 7.306 Section 7.306 Mineral... MINING PRODUCTS TESTING BY APPLICANT OR THIRD PARTY Electric Motor Assemblies § 7.306 Explosion tests. (a) The following shall be used for conducting an explosion test: (1) An explosion test chamber designed...

  5. Surface Instabilities From Buried Explosives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-21

    interface between soil and air during buried explosions. The purpose of understanding this instability is to determine its effect on local vehicle loading...Except when the target is on the surface, e.g., a tank track, the most important loading mechanism from a buried charge is the impact of soil propelled...rising soil and the air. This unstable 15. SUBJECT TERMS Buried Explosions, Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability, Target Loading, Jetting, 16 SECURITY

  6. System for analysis of explosives

    DOEpatents

    Haas, Jeffrey S [San Ramon, CA

    2010-06-29

    A system for analysis of explosives. Samples are spotted on a thin layer chromatography plate. Multi-component explosives standards are spotted on the thin layer chromatography plate. The thin layer chromatography plate is dipped in a solvent mixture and chromatography is allowed to proceed. The thin layer chromatography plate is dipped in reagent 1. The thin layer chromatography plate is heated. The thin layer chromatography plate is dipped in reagent 2.

  7. Nuclear technologies for explosives detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Curtis J.

    1992-12-01

    This paper presents an exploration of several techniques for detection of Improvised Explosive Devices (IED) using interactions of specific nuclei with gammarays or fast neutrons. Techniques considered use these interactions to identify the device by measuring the densities and/or relative concentrations of the elemental constituents of explosives. These techniques are to be compared with selected other nuclear and non-nuclear methods. Combining of nuclear and non-nuclear techniques will also be briefly discussed.

  8. Computer simulation of explosion crater in dams with different buried depths of explosive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhichao; Ye, Longzhen

    2018-04-01

    Based on multi-material ALE method, this paper conducted a computer simulation on the explosion crater in dams with different buried depths of explosive using LS-DYNA program. The results turn out that the crater size increases with the increase of buried depth of explosive at first, but closed explosion cavity rather than a visible crater is formed when the buried depth of explosive increases to some extent. The soil in the explosion cavity is taken away by the explosion products and the soil under the explosion cavity is compressed with its density increased. The research can provide some reference for the anti-explosion design of dams in the future.

  9. Quantitative understanding of explosive stimulus transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schimmel, M. L.

    1973-01-01

    The mechanisms of detonation transfer across hermetically sealed interfaces created by necessary interruptions in high explosive trains, such as at detonators to explosive columns, field joints in explosive columns, and components of munitions fuse trains are demostrated. Reliability of detonation transfer is limited by minimizing explosive quantities, the use of intensitive explosives for safety, and requirements to propagate across gaps and angles dictated by installation and production restraints. The major detonation transfer variables studied were: explosive quanity, sensitivity, and thickness, and the separation distances between donor and acceptor explosives.

  10. The characterization and evaluation of accidental explosions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strehlow, R. A.; Baker, W. E.

    1975-01-01

    Accidental explosions are discussed from a number of viewpoints. First, all accidental explosions, intentional explosions and natural explosions are characterized by type. Second, the nature of the blast wave produced by an ideal (point source or HE) explosion is discussed to form a basis for describing how other explosion processes yield deviations from ideal blast wave behavior. The current status blast damage mechanism evaluation is also discussed. Third, the current status of our understanding of each different category of accidental explosions is discussed in some detail.

  11. Preventing battery ingestions: an analysis of 8648 cases.

    PubMed

    Litovitz, Toby; Whitaker, Nicole; Clark, Lynn

    2010-06-01

    Outcomes of pediatric button battery ingestions have worsened substantially, predominantly related to the emergence of the 20-mm-diameter lithium cell as a common power source for household products. Button batteries lodged in the esophagus can cause severe tissue damage in just 2 hours, with delayed complications such as esophageal perforation, tracheoesophageal fistulas, exsanguination after fistulization into a major blood vessel, esophageal strictures, and vocal cord paralysis. Thirteen deaths have been reported. The objective of this study was to explore button battery ingestion scenarios to formulate prevention strategies. A total of 8648 battery ingestions that were reported to the National Battery Ingestion Hotline were analyzed. Batteries that were ingested by children who were younger than 6 years were most often obtained directly from a product (61.8%), were loose (29.8%), or were obtained from battery packaging (8.2%). Of young children who ingested the most hazardous battery, the 20-mm lithium cell, 37.3% were intended for remote controls. Adults most often ingested batteries that were sitting out, loose, or discarded (80.8%); obtained directly from a product (4.2%); obtained from battery packaging (3.0%); or swallowed within a hearing aid (12.1%). Batteries that were intended for hearing aids were implicated in 36.3% of ingestions. Batteries were mistaken for pills in 15.5% of ingestions, mostly by older adults. Parents and child care providers should be taught to prevent battery ingestions. Because 61.8% of batteries that were ingested by children were obtained from products, manufacturers should redesign household products to secure the battery compartment, possibly requiring a tool to open it.

  12. Trace explosives sensor testbed (TESTbed)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Greg E.; Malito, Michael P.; Tamanaha, Cy R.; Hammond, Mark H.; Giordano, Braden C.; Lubrano, Adam L.; Field, Christopher R.; Rogers, Duane A.; Jeffries, Russell A.; Colton, Richard J.; Rose-Pehrsson, Susan L.

    2017-03-01

    A novel vapor delivery testbed, referred to as the Trace Explosives Sensor Testbed, or TESTbed, is demonstrated that is amenable to both high- and low-volatility explosives vapors including nitromethane, nitroglycerine, ethylene glycol dinitrate, triacetone triperoxide, 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene, pentaerythritol tetranitrate, and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine. The TESTbed incorporates a six-port dual-line manifold system allowing for rapid actuation between a dedicated clean air source and a trace explosives vapor source. Explosives and explosives-related vapors can be sourced through a number of means including gas cylinders, permeation tube ovens, dynamic headspace chambers, and a Pneumatically Modulated Liquid Delivery System coupled to a perfluoroalkoxy total-consumption microflow nebulizer. Key features of the TESTbed include continuous and pulseless control of trace vapor concentrations with wide dynamic range of concentration generation, six sampling ports with reproducible vapor profile outputs, limited low-volatility explosives adsorption to the manifold surface, temperature and humidity control of the vapor stream, and a graphical user interface for system operation and testing protocol implementation.

  13. Explosive Characteristics of Carbonaceous Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turkevich, Leonid; Fernback, Joseph; Dastidar, Ashok

    2013-03-01

    Explosion testing has been performed on 20 codes of carbonaceous particles. These include SWCNTs (single-walled carbon nanotubes), MWCNTs (multi-walled carbon nanotubes), CNFs (carbon nanofibers), graphene, diamond, fullerene, carbon blacks and graphites. Explosion screening was performed in a 20 L explosion chamber (ASTM E1226-10 protocol), at a (dilute) concentration of 500 g/m3, using a 5 kJ ignition source. Time traces of overpressure were recorded. Samples exhibited overpressures of 5-7 bar, and deflagration index KSt = V1/3 (dp/pt)max ~ 10 - 80 bar-m/s, which places these materials in European Dust Explosion Class St-1 (similar to cotton and wood dust). There was minimal variation between these different materials. The explosive characteristics of these carbonaceous powders are uncorrelated with particle size (BET specific surface area). Additional tests were performed on selected materials to identify minimum explosive concentration [MEC]. These materials exhibit MEC ~ 101 -102 g/m3 (lower than the MEC for coals). The concentration scans confirm that the earlier screening was performed under fuel-rich conditions (i.e. the maximum over-pressure and deflagration index exceed the screening values); e.g. the true fullerene KSt ~ 200 bar-m/s, placing it borderline St-1/St-2. Work supported through the NIOSH Nanotechnology Research Center (NTRC)

  14. Advanced intermediate temperature sodium copper chloride battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li-Ping; Liu, Xiao-Min; Zhang, Yi-Wei; Yang, Hui; Shen, Xiao-Dong

    2014-12-01

    Sodium metal chloride batteries, also called as ZEBRA batteries, possess many merits such as low cost, high energy density and high safety, but their high operation temperature (270-350 °C) may cause several issues and limit their applications. Therefore, decreasing the operation temperature is of great importance in order to broaden their usage. Using a room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) catholyte composed of sodium chloride buffered 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride-aluminum chloride and a dense β″-aluminates solid electrolyte film with 500 micron thickness, we report an intermediate temperature sodium copper chloride battery which can be operated at only 150 °C, therefore alleviating the corrosion issues, improving the material compatibilities and reducing the operating complexities associated with the conventional ZEBRA batteries. The RTIL presents a high ionic conductivity (0.247 S cm-1) at 150 °C and a wide electrochemical window (-2.6 to 2.18 vs. Al3+/Al). With the discharge plateau at 2.64 V toward sodium and the specific capacity of 285 mAh g-1, this intermediate temperature battery exhibits an energy density (750 mWh g-1) comparable to the conventional ZEBRA batteries (728-785 mWh g-1) and superior to commercialized Li-ion batteries (550-680 mWh g-1), making it very attractive for renewable energy integration and other grid related applications.

  15. Gelled-electrolyte batteries for electric vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuphorn, Hans

    Increasing problems of air pollution have pushed activities of electric vehicle projects worldwide and in spite of projects for developing new battery systems for high energy densities, today lead/acid batteries are almost the single system, ready for technical usage in this application. Valve-regulated lead/acid batteries with gelled electrolyte have the advantage that no maintenance is required and because the gel system does not cause problems with electrolyte stratification, no additional appliances for central filling or acid addition are required, which makes the system simple. Those batteries with high density active masses indicate high endurance results and field tests with 40 VW-CityStromers, equipped with 96 V/160 A h gel batteries with thermal management show good results during four years. In addition, gelled lead/acid batteries possess superior high rate performance compared with conventional lead/acid batteries, which guarantees good acceleration results of the car and which makes the system recommendable for application in electric vehicles.

  16. Caustic esophageal injury by impaction of cell batteries.

    PubMed

    García Fernández, Francisco José; León Montañés, Rafael; Bozada Garcia, Juan Manuel

    2016-12-01

    The ingestion of cell batteries can cause serious complications (fistula, perforation or stenosis) at the esophageal level. The damage starts soon after ingestion (approximately 2 hours) and is directly related to the amount of time the battery is lodged in said location, the amount of electrical charge remaining in the battery, and the size of the battery itself. Injury is produced by the combination of electrochemical and chemical mechanisms and pressure necrosis. The ingestion of multiple cells and a size > = 20 mm are related with more severe and clinically significant outcomes. A female patient, 39 years old, with a history of previous suicide attempts, was admitted to the Emergency Room with chest pain and dysphagia after voluntary ingestion of 2 cell batteries. Two cell batteries are easily detected in a routine chest X-ray, presenting a characteristic double-ring shadow, or peripheral halo. Urgent oral endoscopy was performed 10 hours after ingestion, showing a greenish-gray lumpy magma-like consistency due to leakage of battery contents. The 2 batteries were sequentially removed with alligator-jaw forceps. After flushing and aspiration of the chemical material, a broad and circumferential injury with denudation of the mucosa and two deep ulcerations with necrosis were observed where the batteries had been. The batteries' seals were eroded, releasing chemical contents. Despite the severity of the injuries, the patient progressed favorably and there was no esophageal perforation. Esophageal impaction of cell batteries should always be considered an endoscopic urgency.

  17. 29 CFR 1926.441 - Batteries and battery charging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Batteries and battery charging. 1926.441 Section 1926.441... for Special Equipment § 1926.441 Batteries and battery charging. (a) General requirements—(1) Batteries of the unsealed type shall be located in enclosures with outside vents or in well ventilated rooms...

  18. 29 CFR 1926.441 - Batteries and battery charging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Batteries and battery charging. 1926.441 Section 1926.441... for Special Equipment § 1926.441 Batteries and battery charging. (a) General requirements—(1) Batteries of the unsealed type shall be located in enclosures with outside vents or in well ventilated rooms...

  19. 29 CFR 1926.441 - Batteries and battery charging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Batteries and battery charging. 1926.441 Section 1926.441... for Special Equipment § 1926.441 Batteries and battery charging. (a) General requirements—(1) Batteries of the unsealed type shall be located in enclosures with outside vents or in well ventilated rooms...

  20. 29 CFR 1926.441 - Batteries and battery charging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Batteries and battery charging. 1926.441 Section 1926.441... for Special Equipment § 1926.441 Batteries and battery charging. (a) General requirements—(1) Batteries of the unsealed type shall be located in enclosures with outside vents or in well ventilated rooms...

  1. 29 CFR 1926.441 - Batteries and battery charging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Batteries and battery charging. 1926.441 Section 1926.441... for Special Equipment § 1926.441 Batteries and battery charging. (a) General requirements—(1) Batteries of the unsealed type shall be located in enclosures with outside vents or in well ventilated rooms...

  2. Tiny Electromagnetic Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Christopher

    2017-08-01

    This paper considers electromagnetic transients of a modest total energy ({ E }≳ {10}40 erg) and small initial size ({ R }≳ {10}-1 cm). They could be produced during collisions between relativistic field structures (e.g., macroscopic magnetic dipoles) that formed around or before cosmic electroweak symmetry breaking. The outflowing energy has a dominant electromagnetic component; a subdominant thermal component (temperature > 1 GeV) supplies inertia in the form of residual {e}+/- . A thin shell forms, expanding subluminally and attaining a Lorentz factor ˜ {10}6{--7} before decelerating. Drag is supplied by the reflection of an ambient magnetic field and deflection of ambient free electrons. Emission of low-frequency (GHz-THz) superluminal waves takes place through three channels: (I) reflection of the ambient magnetic field; (II) direct linear conversion of the embedded magnetic field into a superluminal mode; and (III) excitation outside the shell by corrugation of its surface. The escaping electromagnetic pulse is very narrow (a few wavelengths), so the width of the detected transient is dominated by propagation effects. GHz radio transients are emitted from (I) the dark matter halos of galaxies and (II) the near-horizon regions of supermassive black holes that formed via direct gas collapse and now accrete slowly. Brighter and much narrower 0.01-1 THz pulses are predicted at a rate at least comparable to fast radio bursts, experiencing weaker scattering and absorption. The same explosions also accelerate protons up to ˜ {10}19 eV, and heavier nuclei up to 1020-21 eV.

  3. Constraining the Energetics of Explosive Lava-Water Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitch, E. P.; Fagents, S. A.

    2017-12-01

    During volcanic eruptions, water, such as groundwater or melted ice or snow, may interact with magma within the conduit during eruption, generating explosions when the heat of the magma causes the water to rapidly turn to steam and expand, resulting in what we call a "phreatomagmatic" eruption. In 2010, the eruption of Eyjafjallajökull volcano in Iceland produced a plume of fine ash, through the interaction between magma and glacial melt water, which resulted in the closure of substantial airspace, ultimately costing a total of almost 5 billion dollars. Although an important area of study, it is difficult to quantify the effect of eternal water on eruption intensity when the gas inside of magma is also expanding and fragmenting the magma. In an attempt to understand the energetics of magma-water interactions, small-scale laboratory experiments have been performed. Explosion energy is found to depend mostly on kinetic energy, which is proportional to dispersal distance, and fragmentation energy, which is proportional to the mean grain size of the ejecta, and the mass percent of ash-sized grains. It is thought that in order to generate heat transfer rates sufficiently rapid to cause explosive detonation, the source melt must be finely fragmented, producing ash-sized grains. Those grains undergo brittle fragmentation due to rapid cooling and weak shock waves generated by the vaporization of superheated water. We take the novel approach of studying explosive interactions between lava and water to obtain additional explosion energy constraints. We identified and analyzed numerous beds of lava-water explosion ejecta of varying explosion energy, and we analyzed the ash-sized grains of these beds in detail. We verified that the mass of ash-sized grains increases with increasing explosion energy, and can form at the interface between lava and water. We found that brittle fragmentation occurs to a greater degree as grain size decreases and that the ash of highly

  4. 10 CFR 36.69 - Irradiation of explosive or flammable materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Irradiation of explosive or flammable materials. 36.69... IRRADIATORS Operation of Irradiators § 36.69 Irradiation of explosive or flammable materials. (a) Irradiation... cause radiation overexposures of personnel. (b) Irradiation of more than small quantities of flammable...

  5. 10 CFR 36.69 - Irradiation of explosive or flammable materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Irradiation of explosive or flammable materials. 36.69... IRRADIATORS Operation of Irradiators § 36.69 Irradiation of explosive or flammable materials. (a) Irradiation... cause radiation overexposures of personnel. (b) Irradiation of more than small quantities of flammable...

  6. 10 CFR 36.69 - Irradiation of explosive or flammable materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Irradiation of explosive or flammable materials. 36.69... IRRADIATORS Operation of Irradiators § 36.69 Irradiation of explosive or flammable materials. (a) Irradiation... cause radiation overexposures of personnel. (b) Irradiation of more than small quantities of flammable...

  7. 10 CFR 36.69 - Irradiation of explosive or flammable materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Irradiation of explosive or flammable materials. 36.69... IRRADIATORS Operation of Irradiators § 36.69 Irradiation of explosive or flammable materials. (a) Irradiation... cause radiation overexposures of personnel. (b) Irradiation of more than small quantities of flammable...

  8. 10 CFR 36.69 - Irradiation of explosive or flammable materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Irradiation of explosive or flammable materials. 36.69... IRRADIATORS Operation of Irradiators § 36.69 Irradiation of explosive or flammable materials. (a) Irradiation... cause radiation overexposures of personnel. (b) Irradiation of more than small quantities of flammable...

  9. The Quiet Explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-07-01

    A European-led team of astronomers are providing hints that a recent supernova may not be as normal as initially thought. Instead, the star that exploded is now understood to have collapsed into a black hole, producing a weak jet, typical of much more violent events, the so-called gamma-ray bursts. The object, SN 2008D, is thus probably among the weakest explosions that produce very fast moving jets. This discovery represents a crucial milestone in the understanding of the most violent phenomena observed in the Universe. Black Hole ESO PR Photo 23a/08 A Galaxy and two Supernovae These striking results, partly based on observations with ESO's Very Large Telescope, will appear tomorrow in Science Express, the online version of Science. Stars that were at birth more massive than about 8 times the mass of our Sun end their relatively short life in a cosmic, cataclysmic firework lighting up the Universe. The outcome is the formation of the densest objects that exist, neutron stars and black holes. When exploding, some of the most massive stars emit a short cry of agony, in the form of a burst of very energetic light, X- or gamma-rays. In the early afternoon (in Europe) of 9 January 2008, the NASA/STFC/ASI Swift telescope discovered serendipitously a 5-minute long burst of X-rays coming from within the spiral galaxy NGC 2770, located 90 million light-years away towards the Lynx constellation. The Swift satellite was studying a supernova that had exploded the previous year in the same galaxy, but the burst of X-rays came from another location, and was soon shown to arise from a different supernova, named SN 2008D. Researchers at the Italian National Institute for Astrophysics (INAF), the Max-Planck Institute for Astrophysics (MPA), ESO, and at various other institutions have observed the supernova at great length. The team is led by Paolo Mazzali of INAF's Padova Observatory and MPA. "What made this event very interesting," says Mazzali, "is that the X-ray signal was very

  10. Moment-Tensor Spectra of Source Physics Experiments (SPE) Explosions in Granite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Cleveland, M.

    2016-12-01

    We perform frequency-domain moment tensor inversions of Source Physics Experiments (SPE) explosions conducted in granite during Phase I of the experiment. We test the sensitivity of source moment-tensor spectra to factors such as the velocity model, selected dataset and smoothing and damping parameters used in the inversion to constrain the error bound of inverted source spectra. Using source moments and corner frequencies measured from inverted source spectra of these explosions, we develop a new explosion P-wave source model that better describes observed source spectra of these small and over-buried chemical explosions detonated in granite than classical explosion source models derived mainly from nuclear-explosion data. In addition to source moment and corner frequency, we analyze other features in the source spectra to investigate their physical causes.

  11. A review on several key problems of standoff trace explosives detection by optical-related technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhibin; Xiao, Cheng; Xiao, Wenjian; Qin, Mengze; Liu, Xianhong

    2016-01-01

    To prevent tragic disasters caused by terror acts and warfare threats, security check personnel must be capable of discovering, distinguishing and eliminating the explosives at multiple circumstances. Standoff technology for the remote detection of explosives and their traces on contaminated surfaces is a research field that has become a heightened priority in recent years for homeland security and counter-terrorism applications. There has been a huge increase in research within this area, the improvement of standoff trace explosives detection by optical-related technology. This paper provides a consolidation of information relating to recent advances in several key problems of, without being limited to one specific research area or explosive type. Working laser wavelength of detection system is discussed. Generation and collection of explosives spectra signal are summarized. Techniques for analysing explosives spectra signal are summed up.

  12. Solar-rechargeable battery based on photoelectrochemical water oxidation: Solar water battery.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gonu; Oh, Misol; Park, Yiseul

    2016-09-15

    As an alternative to the photoelectrochemical water splitting for use in the fuel cells used to generate electrical power, this study set out to develop a solar energy rechargeable battery system based on photoelectrochemical water oxidation. We refer to this design as a "solar water battery". The solar water battery integrates a photoelectrochemical cell and battery into a single device. It uses a water oxidation reaction to simultaneously convert and store solar energy. With the solar water battery, light striking the photoelectrode causes the water to be photo-oxidized, thus charging the battery. During the discharge process, the solar water battery reduces oxygen to water with a high coulombic efficiency (>90%) and a high average output voltage (0.6 V). Because the reduction potential of oxygen is more positive [E(0) (O2/H2O) = 1.23 V vs. NHE] than common catholytes (e.g., iodide, sulfur), a high discharge voltage is produced. The solar water battery also exhibits a superior storage ability, maintaining 99% of its specific discharge capacitance after 10 h of storage, without any evidence of self-discharge. The optimization of the cell design and configuration, taking the presence of oxygen in the cell into account, was critical to achieving an efficient photocharge/discharge.

  13. 1992 five year battery forecast

    SciTech Connect

    Amistadi, D.

    1992-12-01

    Five-year trends for automotive and industrial batteries are projected. Topic covered include: SLI shipments; lead consumption; automotive batteries (5-year annual growth rates); industrial batteries (standby power and motive power); estimated average battery life by area/country for 1989; US motor vehicle registrations; replacement battery shipments; potential lead consumption in electric vehicles; BCI recycling rates for lead-acid batteries; US average car/light truck battery life; channels of distribution; replacement battery inventory end July; 2nd US battery shipment forecast.

  14. The NASA Aerospace Battery Safety Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpert, Gerald; Subbarao, Surampudi; Rowlette, John J.

    1986-01-01

    This handbook has been written for the purpose of acquainting those involved with batteries with the information necessary for the safe handling, storage, and disposal of these energy storage devices. Included in the document is a discussion of the cell and battery design considerations and the role of the components within a cell. The cell and battery hazards are related to user- and/or manufacturer-induced causes. The Johnson Space Center (JSC) Payload Safety Guidelines for battery use in Shuttle applications are also provided. The electrochemical systems are divided into zinc anode and lithium anode primaries, secondary cells, and fuel cells. Each system is briefly described, typical applications are given, advantages and disadvantages are tabulated, and most importantly, safety hazards associated with its use are given.

  15. The effect of explosive percentage on underwater explosion energy release of hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane and octogen based aluminized explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Qingjie; Wang, Qiushi; Nie, Jianxin; Guo, Xueyong; Zhang, Wei; Fan, Wenqi

    2018-03-01

    To control the explosion energy output by optimizing explosive components is a key requirement in a number of different application areas. The effect of different Al/O Ratio on underwater explosion of aluminized explosives has been studied detailedly. However, the effect of explosive percentage in the same Al/O Ratio is rarely researched, especially for Hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane (CL-20) based aluminized explosives. In this study, we performed the underwater explosion experiments with 1.2-kilogram explosives in order to investigate the explosion energy released from CL-20 and Octogen (HMX) based aluminized explosives. The percentage of the explosive varied from 5% to 30% and it is shown that: the shockwave peak pressure (pm) grows gradually; shock wave energy (Es) continues increasing, bubble energy (Eb) increases then decreases peaking at 15% for both formulas, and the total energy (E) and energy release rate (η) peak at 20% for CL-20 and 15% for HMX. This paper outlines the physical mechanism of Eb change under the influence of an aluminium initial reaction temperature and reaction active detonation product percentage coupling. The result shows that CL-20 is superior as a new high explosive and has promising application prospects in the regulation of explosive energy output for underwater explosives.

  16. Molecular Outflows: Explosive versus Protostellar

    SciTech Connect

    Zapata, Luis A.; Rodríguez, Luis F.; Palau, Aina

    2017-02-10

    With the recent recognition of a second, distinctive class of molecular outflows, namely the explosive ones not directly connected to the accretion–ejection process in star formation, a juxtaposition of the morphological and kinematic properties of both classes is warranted. By applying the same method used in Zapata et al., and using {sup 12}CO( J = 2-1) archival data from the Submillimeter Array, we contrast two well-known explosive objects, Orion KL and DR21, to HH 211 and DG Tau B, two flows representative of classical low-mass protostellar outflows. At the moment, there are only two well-established cases of explosive outflows, butmore » with the full availability of ALMA we expect that more examples will be found in the near future. The main results are the largely different spatial distributions of the explosive flows, consisting of numerous narrow straight filament-like ejections with different orientations and in almost an isotropic configuration, the redshifted with respect to the blueshifted components of the flows (maximally separated in protostellar, largely overlapping in explosive outflows), the very-well-defined Hubble flow-like increase of velocity with distance from the origin in the explosive filaments versus the mostly non-organized CO velocity field in protostellar objects, and huge inequalities in mass, momentum, and energy of the two classes, at least for the case of low-mass flows. Finally, all the molecular filaments in the explosive outflows point back to approximately a central position (i.e., the place where its “exciting source” was located), contrary to the bulk of the molecular material within the protostellar outflows.« less

  17. The 1975 GSFC Battery Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The proceedings of the 1975 Goddard Space Flight Center Battery Workshop are presented. The major topics of discussion were nickel cadmium batteries and, to a lesser extent, nickel hydrogen batteries. Battery design, manufacturing techniques, testing programs, and electrochemical characteristics were considered. The utilization of these batteries for spacecraft power supplies was given particular attention.

  18. Sea water rope batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, M.

    1984-05-01

    This research demonstrated the feasibility of supplying approximately 1 watt of electrical power for one year on the sea bed with a novel battery, the rope battery. The proposed battery would look very much like a small diameter wire rope, possibly hundreds of feet long. This unusual shape permits the rope battery to take full advantage of the vastness of the ocean floor and permits at great pressure the steady diffusion of reaction products away from the battery itself. A sea water battery is described consisting of an inner bundle of coated wires which slowly corrode and an outer layer of fine wires which simultaneously provides strength, armor and surface area for slow hydrogen evolution. Two variations are examined. The fuse utilizes magnesium wires and burns slowly from the end. The rope utilizes lithium-zinc alloys and is slowly consumed along its entire length.

  19. A desalination battery.

    PubMed

    Pasta, Mauro; Wessells, Colin D; Cui, Yi; La Mantia, Fabio

    2012-02-08

    Water desalination is an important approach to provide fresh water around the world, although its high energy consumption, and thus high cost, call for new, efficient technology. Here, we demonstrate the novel concept of a "desalination battery", which operates by performing cycles in reverse on our previously reported mixing entropy battery. Rather than generating electricity from salinity differences, as in mixing entropy batteries, desalination batteries use an electrical energy input to extract sodium and chloride ions from seawater and to generate fresh water. The desalination battery is comprised by a Na(2-x)Mn(5)O(10) nanorod positive electrode and Ag/AgCl negative electrode. Here, we demonstrate an energy consumption of 0.29 Wh l(-1) for the removal of 25% salt using this novel desalination battery, which is promising when compared to reverse osmosis (~ 0.2 Wh l(-1)), the most efficient technique presently available. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  20. Potassium Secondary Batteries.

    PubMed

    Eftekhari, Ali; Jian, Zelang; Ji, Xiulei

    2017-02-08

    Potassium may exhibit advantages over lithium or sodium as a charge carrier in rechargeable batteries. Analogues of Prussian blue can provide millions of cyclic voltammetric cycles in aqueous electrolyte. Potassium intercalation chemistry has recently been demonstrated compatible with both graphite and nongraphitic carbons. In addition to potassium-ion batteries, potassium-O 2 (or -air) and potassium-sulfur batteries are emerging. Additionally, aqueous potassium-ion batteries also exhibit high reversibility and long cycling life. Because of potentially low cost, availability of basic materials, and intriguing electrochemical behaviors, this new class of secondary batteries is attracting much attention. This mini-review summarizes the current status, opportunities, and future challenges of potassium secondary batteries.

  1. Youngest Stellar Explosion in Our Galaxy Discovered

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-05-01

    Astronomers have found the remains of the youngest supernova, or exploded star, in our Galaxy. The supernova remnant, hidden behind a thick veil of gas and dust, was revealed by the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA) and NASA's Chandra X-Ray Observatory, which could see through the murk. The object is the first example of a "missing population" of young supernova remnants. 1985 and 2008 VLA Images Move cursor over image to blink. VLA Images of G1.9+0.3 in 1985 and 2008: Circle for size comparison. CREDIT: Green, et al., NRAO/AUI/NSF From observing supernovae in other galaxies, astronomers have estimated that about three such stellar explosions should occur in our Milky Way every century. However, the most recent one known until now occurred around 1680, creating the remnant called Cassiopeia A. The newly-discovered object is the remnant of an explosion only about 140 years ago. "If the supernova rate estimates are correct, there should be the remnants of about 10 supernova explosions in the Milky Way that are younger than Cassiopeia A," said David Green of the University of Cambridge in the UK, who led the VLA study. "It's great to finally track one of them down." Supernova explosions, which mark the violent death of a star, release tremendous amounts of energy and spew heavy elements such as calcium and iron into interstellar space. They thus seed the clouds of gas and dust from which new stars and planets are formed and, through their blast shocks, can even trigger such formation. The lack of evidence for young supernova remnants in the Milky Way had caused astronomers to wonder if our Galaxy, which appears otherwise normal, differed in some unknown way from others. Alternatively, scientists thought that the "missing" Milky Way supernovae perhaps indicated that their understanding of the relationship between supernovae and other galactic processes was in error. The astronomers made their discovery by measuring the expansion of the debris from

  2. Lithium battery management system

    DOEpatents

    Dougherty, Thomas J [Waukesha, WI

    2012-05-08

    Provided is a system for managing a lithium battery system having a plurality of cells. The battery system comprises a variable-resistance element electrically connected to a cell and located proximate a portion of the cell; and a device for determining, utilizing the variable-resistance element, whether the temperature of the cell has exceeded a predetermined threshold. A method of managing the temperature of a lithium battery system is also included.

  3. Viking lander spacecraft battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newell, D. R.

    1976-01-01

    The Viking Lander was the first spacecraft to fly a sterilized nickel-cadmium battery on a mission to explore the surface of a planet. The significant results of the battery development program from its inception through the design, manufacture, and test of the flight batteries which were flown on the two Lander spacecraft are documented. The flight performance during the early phase of the mission is also presented.

  4. Satellite battery testing status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haag, R.; Hall, S.

    1986-09-01

    Because of the large numbers of satellite cells currently being tested and anticipated at the Naval Weapons Support Center (NAVWPNSUPPCEN) Crane, Indiana, satellite cell testing is being integrated into the Battery Test Automation Project (BTAP). The BTAP, designed to meet the growing needs for battery testing at the NAVWPNSUPPCEN Crane, will consist of several Automated Test Stations (ATSs) which monitor batteries under test. Each ATS will interface with an Automation Network Controller (ANC) which will collect test data for reduction.

  5. Advanced Thermal Batteries.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    ADVANCED THERMAL BATTERIES NATIONAL UNION ELECTRIC CORPORATION ADVANCE SCIENCE DIVISION 1201 E. BELL STREET BLXXMINGTON, ILLINOIS 61701 JUNE 1981...December 1978 in: " Advanced Thermal Batteries " AFAPL-TR-78-114 Air Force Aero Propulsion Laboratory Air Force Wright Aeronautical Laboratories Air Force...March 1980 in: " Advanced Thermal Batteries " AFAPL-TR-80-2017 Air Force Aero Propulsion Laboratory Air Force Wright Aeronautical Laboratories Air Force

  6. Satellite battery testing status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haag, R.; Hall, S.

    1986-01-01

    Because of the large numbers of satellite cells currently being tested and anticipated at the Naval Weapons Support Center (NAVWPNSUPPCEN) Crane, Indiana, satellite cell testing is being integrated into the Battery Test Automation Project (BTAP). The BTAP, designed to meet the growing needs for battery testing at the NAVWPNSUPPCEN Crane, will consist of several Automated Test Stations (ATSs) which monitor batteries under test. Each ATS will interface with an Automation Network Controller (ANC) which will collect test data for reduction.

  7. Polyoxometalate flow battery

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Travis M.; Pratt, Harry D.

    2016-03-15

    Flow batteries including an electrolyte of a polyoxometalate material are disclosed herein. In a general embodiment, the flow battery includes an electrochemical cell including an anode portion, a cathode portion and a separator disposed between the anode portion and the cathode portion. Each of the anode portion and the cathode portion comprises a polyoxometalate material. The flow battery further includes an anode electrode disposed in the anode portion and a cathode electrode disposed in the cathode portion.

  8. Battery utilizing ceramic membranes

    DOEpatents

    Yahnke, Mark S.; Shlomo, Golan; Anderson, Marc A.

    1994-01-01

    A thin film battery is disclosed based on the use of ceramic membrane technology. The battery includes a pair of conductive collectors on which the materials for the anode and the cathode may be spin coated. The separator is formed of a porous metal oxide ceramic membrane impregnated with electrolyte so that electrical separation is maintained while ion mobility is also maintained. The entire battery can be made less than 10 microns thick while generating a potential in the 1 volt range.

  9. The Explosive Counterparts of Gravitational Waves (Silent Animation)

    SciTech Connect

    None

    Astronomy collaborations like the Dark Energy Survey, which Fermilab leads, can track down the visible sources of gravitational waves caused by binary neutron stars. This animation, presented here without sound, takes you through the collision of two neutron stars, and shows you the explosion of light and energy seen by the Dark Energy Camera on August 17, 2017.

  10. Thermodynamic States in Explosion Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, A L

    2009-10-16

    Here we investigate the thermodynamic states occurring in explosion fields from the detonation of condensed explosives in air. In typical applications, the pressure of expanded detonation products gases is modeled by a Jones-Wilkins-Lee (JWL) function: P{sub JWL} = f(v,s{sub CJ}); constants in that function are fit to cylinder test data. This function provides a specification of pressure as a function of specific volume, v, along the expansion isentrope (s = constant = s{sub CJ}) starting at the Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) state. However, the JWL function is not a fundamental equation of thermodynamics, and therefore gives an incomplete specification of states. Formore » example, explosions inherently involve shock reflections from surfaces; this changes the entropy of the products, and in such situations the JWL function provides no information on the products states. In addition, most explosives are not oxygen balanced, so if hot detonation products mix with air, they after-burn, releasing the heat of reaction via a turbulent combustion process. This raises the temperature of explosion products cloud to the adiabatic flame temperature ({approx}3,000K). Again, the JWL function provides no information on the combustion products states.« less

  11. Electromagnetic field effects in explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasker, Douglas

    2009-06-01

    Present and previous research on the effects of electromagnetic fields on the initiation and detonation of explosives and the electromagnetic properties of explosives are reviewed. Among the topics related to detonating explosives are: measurements of conductivity; enhancement of performance; and control of initiation and growth of reaction. Hayes...()^1 showed a strong correlation of peak electrical conductivity with carbon content of the detonation products. Ershov.......^2 linked detailed electrical conductivity measurements with reaction kinetics and this work was extended to enhance detonation performance electrically;...^3 for this, electrical power densities of the order of 100 TW/m^2 of explosive surface normal to the detonation front were required. However, small electrical powers are required to affect the initiation and growth of reaction.......^4,5 A continuation of this work will be reported. LA-UR 09-00873 .^1 B. Hayes, Procs. of 4th Symposium (International) on Detonation (1965), p. 595. ^2 A. Ershov, P. Zubkov, and L. Luk'yanchikov, Combustion, Explosion, and Shock Waves 10, 776-782 (1974). ^3 M. Cowperthwaite, Procs. 9th Detonation Symposium (1989), p. 388-395. ^4 M. A. Cook and T. Z. Gwyther, ``Influence of Electric Fields on Shock to Detonation Transition,'' (1965). ^5 D. Salisbury, R. Winter, and L. Biddle, Procs. of the APS Topical Conference on Shock Compression of Condensed Matter (2005) p. 1010-1013.

  12. An Advanced Battery Management System for Lithium Ion Batteries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    MINI-SYMPOSIUM AUGUST 9-11 DEARBORN, MICHIGAN AN ADVANCED BATTERY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM FOR LITHIUM ION BATTERIES Bruce Pilvelait, Ph.D...COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE An Advanced Battery Management System for Lithium Ion Batteries 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...Management System for Lithium Ion Batteries Page 2 of 7 Figure 1: BMS architecture for a 24 VDC lithium-ion Silent Watch battery pack

  13. US industrial battery forecast

    SciTech Connect

    Hollingsworth, V. III

    1996-09-01

    Last year was strong year for the US industrial battery market with growth in all segments. Sales of industrial batteries in North America grew 19.2% in 1995, exceeding last year`s forecasted growth rate of 11.6%. The results of the recently completed BCI Membership Survey forecast 1996 sales to be up 10.5%, and to continue to increase at a 10.4% compound annual rate through the year 2000. This year`s survey includes further detail on the stationary battery market with the inclusion of less than 25 Ampere-Hour batteries for the first time.

  14. Battery Thermal Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Keyser, Matthew A

    The operating temperature is critical in achieving the right balance between performance, cost, and life for both Li-ion batteries and ultracapacitors. The chemistries of advanced energy-storage devices - such as lithium-based batteries - are very sensitive to operating temperature. High temperatures degrade batteries faster while low temperatures decrease their power and capacity, affecting vehicle range, performance, and cost. Understanding heat generation in battery systems - from the individual cells within a module, to the inter-connects between the cells, and across the entire battery system - is imperative for designing effective thermal-management systems and battery packs. At NREL, we have developedmore » unique capabilities to measure the thermal properties of cells and evaluate thermal performance of battery packs (air or liquid cooled). We also use our electro-thermal finite element models to analyze the thermal performance of battery systems in order to aid battery developers with improved thermal designs. NREL's tools are used to meet the weight, life, cost, and volume goals set by the U.S. Department of Energy for electric drive vehicles.« less

  15. Nonleaking battery terminals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snider, W. E.; Nagle, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    Three different terminals were designed for usage in a 40 ampere/hour silver zinc battery which has a 45 percent KOH by weight electrolyte in a plastic battery case. Life tests, including thermal cycling, electrical charge and discharge for up to three years duration, were conducted on these three different terminal designs. Tests for creep rate and tensile strength were conducted on the polyphenylene oxide (PPO) plastic battery cases. Some cases were unused and others containing KOH electrolyte were placed on life tests. The design and testing of nonleaking battery terminals for use with a potassium hydroxide (KOH) electrolyte in a plastic case are discussed.

  16. Nonleaking battery terminals.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snider, W. E.; Nagle, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    Three different terminals were designed for usage in a 40 ampere/hour silver zinc battery which has a 45% KOH by weight electrolyte in a plastic battery case. Life tests, including thermal cycling, electrical charge and discharge for up to three years duration, were conducted on these three different terminal designs. Tests for creep rate and tensile strength were conducted on the polyphenylene oxide plastic battery cases. Some cases were unused and others containing KOH electrolyte were placed on life tests. The design and testing of nonleaking battery terminals for use with a KOH electrolyte in a plastic case are considered.

  17. Battery Thermal Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Keyser, Matthew; Saxon, Aron; Powell, Mitchell

    2016-06-07

    This poster shows the progress in battery thermal characterization over the previous year. NREL collaborated with U.S. DRIVE and USABC battery developers to obtain thermal properties of their batteries, obtained heat capacity and heat generation of cells under various power profiles, obtained thermal images of the cells under various drive cycles, and used the measured results to validate thermal models. Thermal properties are used for the thermal analysis and design of improved battery thermal management systems to support achieve life and performance targets.

  18. On high explosive launching of projectiles for shock physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swift, Damian C.; Forest, Charles A.; Clark, David A.; Buttler, William T.; Marr-Lyon, Mark; Rightley, Paul

    2007-06-01

    The hydrodynamic operation of the "Forest Flyer" type of explosive launching system for shock physics projectiles was investigated in detail using one and two dimensional continuum dynamics simulations. The simulations were numerically converged and insensitive to uncertainties in the material properties; they reproduced the speed of the projectile and the shape of its rear surface. The most commonly used variant, with an Al alloy case, was predicted to produce a slightly curved projectile, subjected to some shock heating and likely exhibiting some porosity from tensile damage. The curvature is caused by a shock reflected from the case; tensile damage is caused by the interaction of the Taylor wave pressure profile from the detonation wave with the free surface of the projectile. The simulations gave only an indication of tensile damage in the projectile, as damage is not understood well enough for predictions in this loading regime. The flatness can be improved by using a case of lower shock impedance, such as polymethyl methacrylate. High-impedance cases, including Al alloys but with denser materials improving the launching efficiency, can be used if designed according to the physics of oblique shock reflection, which indicates an appropriate case taper for any combination of explosive and case material. The tensile stress induced in the projectile depends on the relative thickness of the explosive, expansion gap, and projectile. The thinner the projectile with respect to the explosive, the smaller the tensile stress. Thus if the explosive is initiated with a plane wave lens, the tensile stress is lower than that for initiation with multiple detonators over a plane. The previous plane wave lens designs did, however, induce a tensile stress close to the spall strength of the projectile. The tensile stress can be reduced by changes in the component thicknesses. Experiments verifying the operation of explosively launched projectiles should attempt to measure

  19. The ODTX System for the Study of Thermal Sensitivity and Thermal Explosion Violence of Energetic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Peter; Hust, Gary; Reynolds, John; Springer, Keo; Fried, Larry; Maienschein, Jon

    2013-06-01

    Incidents caused by fire and combat operations in battlefields can expose energetic materials to unexpected heat that may cause thermal explosion, structural damage and casualty. Some explosives may thermally explode at fairly low temperatures (<100 C) and the violence from thermal explosion may cause a significant damage. Thus it is important to understand the response of energetic materials to thermal insults. The One Dimensional Time to Explosion (ODTX) system at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory can measure times to explosion, threshold thermal explosion temperature, and determine kinetic parameters of energetic materials. Samples of different configurations (pressed part, powder, paste, and liquid) can be tested in the system. The ODTX testing can also provide useful data for assessing the thermal explosion violence of energetic materials. In this paper, we will present some recent ODTX experimental data and compare thermal explosion violence of different energetic materials. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  20. Insensitive fuze train for high explosives

    DOEpatents

    Cutting, Jack L.; Lee, Ronald S.; Von Holle, William G.

    1994-01-01

    A generic insensitive fuze train to initiate insensitive high explosives, such as PBXW-124. The insensitive fuze train uses a slapper foil to initiate sub-gram quantities of an explosive, such as HNS-IV or PETN. This small amount of explosive drives a larger metal slapper onto a booster charge of an insensitive explosive, such as UF-TATB. The booster charge initiates a larger charge of an explosive, such as LX-17, which in turn, initiates the insensitive high explosive, such as PBXW-124.

  1. Insensitive fuze train for high explosives

    DOEpatents

    Cutting, J.L.; Lee, R.S.; Von Holle, W.G.

    1994-01-04

    A generic insensitive fuze train to initiate insensitive high explosives, such as PBXW-124 is described. The insensitive fuze train uses a slapper foil to initiate sub-gram quantities of an explosive, such as HNS-IV or PETN. This small amount of explosive drives a larger metal slapper onto a booster charge of an insensitive explosive, such as UF-TATB. The booster charge initiates a larger charge of an explosive, such as LX-17, which in turn, initiates the insensitive high explosive, such as PBXW-124. 3 figures.

  2. Atmospheric emission of NOx from mining explosives: A critical review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oluwoye, Ibukun; Dlugogorski, Bogdan Z.; Gore, Jeff; Oskierski, Hans C.; Altarawneh, Mohammednoor

    2017-10-01

    High-energy materials such as emulsions, slurries and ammonium-nitrate fuel-oil (ANFO) explosives play crucial roles in mining, quarrying, tunnelling and many other infrastructure activities, because of their excellent transport and blasting properties. These explosives engender environmental concerns, due to atmospheric pollution caused by emission of dust and nitrogen oxides (NOx) from blasts, the latter characterised by the average emission factor of 5 kg (t AN explosive)-1. This first-of-its-kind review provides a concise literature account of the formation of NOx during blasting of AN-based explosives, employed in surface operations. We estimate the total NOx emission rate from AN-based explosives as 0.05 Tg (i.e., 5 × 104 t) N per annum, compared to the total global annual anthropogenic NOx emissions of 41.3 × 106 t N y-1. Although minor in the global sense, the large localised plumes from blasting exhibit high NOx concentration (500 ppm) exceeding up to 3000 times the international standards. This emission has profound consequences at mining sites and for adjacent atmospheric environment, necessitating expensive management of exclusion zones. The review describes different types of AN energetic materials for civilian applications, and summarises the essential properties and terminologies pertaining to their use. Furthermore, we recapitulate the mechanisms that lead to the formation of the reactive nitrogen species in blasting of AN-based explosives, review their implications to atmospheric air pollution, and compare the mechanisms with those experienced in other thermal and combustion operations. We also examine the mitigation approaches, including guidelines and operational-control measures. The review discusses the abatement technologies such as the formulation of new explosive mixtures, comprising secondary fuels, spin traps and other additives, in light of their effectiveness and efficiency. We conclude the review with a summary of unresolved problems

  3. Ocular blast injuries related to explosive military ammunition.

    PubMed

    Gundogan, Fatih Cakir; Akay, F; Yolcu, U; Uzun, S; Ilhan, A; Toyran, S; Eyi, E; Diner, O

    2016-02-01

    To report the clinical features of ocular injuries associated with explosive military ammunition in insurgent attacks in Turkey. The medical records of 48 casualties who were treated for ocular injuries sustained in insurgent attacks at the Combat Region Hospitals in Turkey were retrospectively reviewed. The reviewed data included initial visual acuity, type of explosive military ammunition (ie, improvised explosive device, mine, hand grenade and rocket-propelled grenade), type of globe injury (open-globe vs closed-globe injury), traumatised globe zones, the presence/absence of an intraocular foreign body, medical interventions, status during the explosion and injuries to other parts of the body. The visual acuity differences between different explosive materials and between 'on-foot' and 'inside-vehicle' casualties were investigated. A total of 83 injured eyes were analysed. The mean patient age was 24.5±6.6 years. The mean initial logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution visual acuity was 0.60±0.63. The injuries were due to improvised explosive devices in 28 cases (58.3%), land mines in 16 cases (33.3%), and hand grenades and rocket-propelled grenades in 2 cases each (4.2%). Forty-seven eyes (56.6%) had open-globe injuries. The most frequently involved zones were zone 1 (50.0%) in closed-globe injuries and all zones (31.9%) in open-globe injuries. Intraocular foreign bodies were present in 45/47 (95.7%) eyes with open-globe injuries. Twelve (14.4%) eyes with no light perception were enucleated, and two (2.4%) eviscerated. The difference in the visual acuities between the on-foot and inside-vehicle casualties and between the injuries that were caused by the different types of explosive ammunitions was also insignificant (p=0.271 and 0.394, respectively). The clinical results for eye injuries caused by explosive military ammunition sustained during insurgent attacks in Turkey are disappointing irrespective of the explosive material. The use of protective

  4. Policies governing the use of lithium batteries in the Navy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bis, R. F.; Barnes, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    Lithium batteries offer many advantages for Navy systems but may also exhibit undesirable hazardous behavior. Safety problems have been traced to a variety of chemical and physical causes. The Navy has established a central safety office with responsibility for all lithium battery use. Before an item is approved for Navy use, it must pass both a design review and a set of end item tests. These reviews focus on complete systems which include a battery inside the end item. After system approval, specific regulations govern the transportation, storage, and disposal of the unit containing lithium batteries. Each of these areas is discussed in detail.

  5. Intravesical explosion during transurethral electrosurgery.

    PubMed

    Georgios, Kallinikas; Evangelos, Boulinakis; Helai, Habib; Ioannis, Gerzelis

    2015-05-01

    Intravesical explosion is a very rare complication of transurethral resection of prostate and transurethral resection of bladder tumour operations. In vitro studies have shown that the gases produced during the procedure could result in a blast once they are mixed with air from the atmosphere. A 79-year-old male experienced an explosion in his bladder while undergoing a transurethral resection of bladder tumour. The case is presented as well as the way that it was treated as an emergency. Precautions of such events are finally suggested. © The Author(s) 2015 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  6. Synthesis and Electrochemical Properties of Amorphous Carbon Coated Sn Anode Material for Lithium Ion Batteries and Sodium Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ji-Seub; Lee, Hoi-Jin; Ha, Jong-Keun; Cho, Kwon-Koo

    2018-09-01

    Sn is one of the promising anode material for lithium-ion and sodium-ion batteries because of Sn has many advantages such as a high theoretical capacity of 994 mAh/g, inexpensive, abundant and nontoxic. However, Sn-based anodes have a critical problem from pulverization of the particles due to large volume change (>300% in lithium-ion battery and 420% in the sodium-ion battery) during alloying/dealloying reaction. To overcome this problem, we fabricate Sn/C particle of core/shell structure. Sn powder was produced by pulsed wire explosion in liquid media, and amorphous carbon coating process was prepared by hydrothermal synthesis. The charge capacity of Sn electrode and amorphous carbon coated Sn electrode was 413 mAh/g and 452 mAh/g after 40 cycles in lithium half-cell test. The charge capacity of Sn electrode and amorphous carbon coated Sn electrode was 240 mAh/g and 487 mAh/g after 40 cycles in sodium half-cell test. Amorphous carbon coating contributed to the improvement of capacity in lithium and sodium battery systems. And the effect of amorphous carbon coating in sodium battery system was superior to that in lithium battery system.

  7. Explosively driven hypervelocity launcher: Second-stage augmentation techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baum, D. W.

    1973-01-01

    The results are described of a continuing study aimed at developing a two-stage explosively driven hypervelocity launcher capable of achieving projectile velocities between 15 and 20 km/sec. The testing and evaluation of a new cylindrical impact technique for collapsing the barrel of two-stage launcher are reported. Previous two-stage launchers have been limited in ultimate performance by incomplete barrel collapse behind the projectile. The cylindrical impact technique explosively collapses a steel tube concentric with and surrounding the barrel of the launcher. The impact of the tube on the barrel produces extremely high stresses which cause the barrel to collapse. The collapse rate can be adjusted by appropriate variation of the explosive charge and tubing parameters. Launcher experiments demonstrated that the technique did achieve complete barrel collapse and form a second-stage piston. However, jetting occurred in the barrel collapse process and was responsible for severe projectile damage.

  8. Are amino groups advantageous to insensitive high explosives (IHEs)?

    PubMed

    Cao, Xia; Wen, Yushi; Xiang, Bin; Long, Xinping; Zhang, Chaoyang

    2012-10-01

    There is usually a contradiction between increasing energy densities and reducing sensitivities of explosives. The explosives with both high energy densities and low sensitivities, or the so-called insensitive high explosives (IHEs), are desirable in most cases. It seems from applied explosives that amino groups are advantageous to IHE but the amount of amino groups contained IHEs is very limited. To make this clear, we present systemic examinations of the effects on the two properties stressed in IHEs after introducing amino groups to different molecular skeletons. As a result, the amino groups on resonant sites to nitro groups in conjugated systems can improve distinctly sensitivities and change energy densities in terms of oxygen balance; while the amino groups in unconjugated systems can hardly increase energy densities and usually cause increased sensitivities. It agrees well with a fact that almost all the molecules of applied amino group contained explosives possess conjugated skeletons. We therefore confirm that if amino groups are introduced resonantly to a nitro group in a conjugated system and the introduction improves OB, they are advantageous to IHEs.

  9. Explosives detection and identification using surface plasmon-coupled emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ja, Shiou-Jyh

    2012-06-01

    To fight against the explosives-related threats in defense and homeland security applications, a smarter sensing device that not only detects but differentiates multiple true threats from false positives caused by environmental interferents is essential. A new optical detection system is proposed to address these issues by using the temporal and spectroscopic information generated by the surface plasmon coupling emission (SPCE) effect. Innovative SPCE optics have been designed using Zemax software to project the fluorescence signal into clear "rainbow rings" on a CCD with subnanometer wavelength resolution. The spectroscopic change of the fluorescence signal and the time history of such changes due to the presence of a certain explosive analyte are unique and can be used to identify explosives. Thanks to high optical efficiency, reporter depositions as small as 160-μm in diameter can generate a sufficient signal, allowing a dense array of different reporters to be interrogated with wavelength multiplexing and detect a wide range of explosives. We have demonstrated detection and classification of explosives, such as TNT, NT, NM, RDX, PETN, and AN, with two sensing materials in a prototype.

  10. Improvised explosive devices: pathophysiology, injury profiles and current medical management.

    PubMed

    Ramasamy, A; Hill, A M; Clasper, J C

    2009-12-01

    The improvised explosive device (IED), in all its forms, has become the most significant threat to troops operating in Afghanistan and Iraq. These devices range from rudimentary home made explosives to sophisticated weapon systems containing high-grade explosives. Within this broad definition they may be classified as roadside explosives and blast mines, explosive formed pojectile (EFP) devices and suicide bombings. Each of these groups causeinjury through a number of different mechanisms and can result in vastly different injury profiles. The "Global War on Terror" has meant that incidents which were previously exclusively seen in conflict areas, can occur anywhere, and clinicians who are involved in emergency trauma care may be required to manage casualties from similar terrorist attacks. An understanding of the types of devices and their pathophysiological effects is necessary to allow proper planning of mass casualty events and to allow appropriate management of the complex poly-trauma casualties they invariably cause. The aim of this review article is to firstly describe the physics and injury profile from these different devices and secondly to present the current clinical evidence that underpins their medical management.

  11. Electric vehicle battery research and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, H. J.

    1973-01-01

    High energy battery technology for electric vehicles is reviewed. The state-of-the-art in conventional batteries, metal-gas batteries, alkali-metal high temperature batteries, and organic electrolyte batteries is reported.

  12. Turbulent mixing& combustion in TNT explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, A L; Ferguson, R E; Oppenheim, A K

    2000-12-12

    Effects of turbulent mixing induced by explosion of a 1-g spherical TNT charge in air are investigated. The detonation wave in the charge transforms the solid explosive (C{sub 7}H{sub 5}N{sub 3}O{sub 6}) to gaseous products, rich in C{sub (S)}, and CO. The detonation pressure ({approx}210 kb) causes the products to expand rapidly, driving a blast wave into the surrounding air (Brode, 1959). The interface between the products and air is unstable (Richtmyer, 1960; Meshkov, 1960; Anisimov & Zel'dovich, 1977). As shown in Collage Ia-c, this region rapidly transitions into a turbulent mixing layer (Kuhl, 1996). As the embedded shock, I,more » implodes, it draws the mixing structures (Taylor cavities) into the origin (Collage Id-e). In this way air becomes distributed throughout the hot detonation products gases. This process is enhanced by shock reflections from confining walls. In either case (confined or unconfined), rapid combustion takes place where the expanded detonation products play the role of fuel. This leads to a dramatic increase in chamber pressure (Fig. 1)-in contrast to a corresponding TNT explosion in nitrogen. The problem was modeled as turbulent combustion in an unmixed system at large Reynolds, Peclet and Damkohler numbers (Kuhl et al, 1997). The numerical solution was obtained by a high-order Godunov scheme (Colella & Glaz, 1985). Adaptive Mesh Refinement (Berger & Colella, 1989) was used to follow the turbulent mixing on the computational grid in as much detail as possible. The results reveal all the dynamic features (Fig. 2) of the exothermic process of combustion controlled by fluid-mechanic transport in a highly turbulent field (Kuhl & Oppenheim, 1997), in contrast to the conventional reaction-diffusion mechanism of Zel'dovich & Frank-Kamenetskii (1938).« less

  13. From Vulcanian explosions to sustained explosive eruptions: The role of diffusive mass transfer in conduit flow dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, R. M.; Starostin, A. B.; Melnik, O. E.; Sparks, R. S. J.

    2006-05-01

    Magmatic explosive eruptions are influenced by mass transfer processes of gas diffusion into bubbles caused by decompression. Melnik and Sparks [Melnik, O.E., Sparks, R.S.J. 2002, Modelling of conduit flow dynamic during explosive activity at Soufriere Hills Volcano, Montserrat. In: Druitt, T.H., Kokelaar, B.P. (eds). The Eruption of Soufriere Hills Volcano, Montserrat, from 1995 to 1999. Geological Society, London, Memoirs, 21, 307-317] proposed two end member cases corresponding to complete equilibrium and complete disequilibrium. In the first case, diffusion is fast enough to maintain the system near equilibrium and a long-lived explosive eruption develops. In the latter case, pre-existing bubbles expand under conditions of explosive eruption and decompression, but diffusive gas transfer is negligible. This leads to a much shorter eruption. Here we develop this model to consider the role of mass transfer by investigating transient flows at the start of an explosive eruption triggered by a sudden decompression. The simulations reveal a spectrum of behaviours from sustained to short-lived highly non-equilibrium Vulcanian-style explosions lasting a few tens of seconds, through longer lasting eruptions that can be sustained for tens of minutes and finally to eruptions that can last hours or even days. Behaviour is controlled by a mass-transfer parameter, ω, which equals n*2/3D, where n* is the bubble number density and D is the diffusivity. The parameter ω is expected to vary between 10 - 5 and 1 s - 1 in nature and reflects a time-scale for efficient diffusion. The spectrum of model behaviours is consistent with variations in styles of explosive eruptions of silicic volcanoes. In the initial stages peak discharges occur over 10-20 s and then decline to low discharges. If a critical bubble overpressure is assumed to be the criterion for fragmentation then fragmentation may stop and start several times in the declining period causing several pulses of high

  14. Battery thermal management unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Nicholas A.

    1989-03-01

    A battery warming device has been designed which uses waste heat from an operating internal combustion engine to warm a battery. A portion of the waste heat is stored in the sensible and latent heat of a phase change type material for use in maintaining the battery temperature after the engine is shut off. The basic design of the device consists of a Phase Change Material (PCM) reservoir and a simple heat exchanger connected to the engineer's cooling system. Two types of units were built, tested and field trialed. A strap-on type which was strapped to the side of an automotive battery and was intended for the automotive after-market and a tray type on which a battery or batteries sat. This unit was intended for the heavy duty truck market. It was determined that both types of units increased the average cranking power of the batteries they were applied to. Although there were several design problems with the units such as the need for an automatic thermostatically controlled bypass valve, the overall feeling is that there is a market opportunity for both the strap-on and tray type battery warming units.

  15. Hydrophobic, Porous Battery Boxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg, Bobby J.; Casey, John E., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Boxes made of porous, hydrophobic polymers developed to contain aqueous potassium hydroxide electrolyte solutions of zinc/air batteries while allowing air to diffuse in as needed for operation. Used on other types of batteries for in-cabin use in which electrolytes aqueous and from which gases generated during operation must be vented without allowing electrolytes to leak out.

  16. Aerospace applications of batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Habib, Shahid

    1993-01-01

    NASA has developed battery technology to meet the demanding requirements for aerospace applications; specifically, the space vacuum, launch loads, and high duty cycles. Because of unique requirements and operating environments associated with space applications, NASA has written its own standards and specifications for batteries.

  17. The GSFC Battery Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The proceedings of a conference on electric storage batteries are presented. The subjects discussed include the following: (1) a low cost/standardization program, (2) test and flight experience, (3) materials and cell components, and (4) new developments in the nickel/hydrogen system. The application of selected batteries in specific space vehicles is examined.

  18. Lithium Battery Diaper Ulceration.

    PubMed

    Maridet, Claire; Taïeb, Alain

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of lithium battery diaper ulceration in a 16-month-old girl. Gastrointestinal and ear, nose, and throat lesions after lithium battery ingestion have been reported, but skin involvement has not been reported to our knowledge. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Improving battery safety by early detection of internal shorting with a bifunctional separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hui; Zhuo, Denys; Kong, Desheng; Cui, Yi

    2014-10-01

    Lithium-based rechargeable batteries have been widely used in portable electronics and show great promise for emerging applications in transportation and wind-solar-grid energy storage, although their safety remains a practical concern. Failures in the form of fire and explosion can be initiated by internal short circuits associated with lithium dendrite formation during cycling. Here we report a new strategy for improving safety by designing a smart battery that allows internal battery health to be monitored in situ. Specifically, we achieve early detection of lithium dendrites inside batteries through a bifunctional separator, which offers a third sensing terminal in addition to the cathode and anode. The sensing terminal provides unique signals in the form of a pronounced voltage change, indicating imminent penetration of dendrites through the separator. This detection mechanism is highly sensitive, accurate and activated well in advance of shorting and can be applied to many types of batteries for improved safety.

  20. What Industry Is Saying About the Battery ISC Device (Text Version) |

    Science.gov Websites

    -Founder, Chairman and CEO, AllCell Technologies:"Lithium ion batteries today are actually state of really bad for the industry as a whole." Read On Graphic: Lithium-ion Batteries Power Cell Phones a potential fire." Read On Graphic: Rare Latent Defects in Lithium-ion Batteries Can Cause

  1. Three Dimensional Analysis of Induced Detonation of Cased Explosive

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-16

    hardness and ductility . RHA steel is largely used in military applications to manufacture armoured vehicles. The Johnson Cook (JC) constitutive...armour (RHA) steel were investigated through the LS-DYNA. The investigation focused on shock to detonation simulations of Composition B, with the... hot spots caused by the compression of the explosive from the initial shockwave. Detonation was also caused by pressure waves reflecting against the

  2. Battery Pack Thermal Design

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, Ahmad

    This presentation describes the thermal design of battery packs at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. A battery thermal management system essential for xEVs for both normal operation during daily driving (achieving life and performance) and off-normal operation during abuse conditions (achieving safety). The battery thermal management system needs to be optimized with the right tools for the lowest cost. Experimental tools such as NREL's isothermal battery calorimeter, thermal imaging, and heat transfer setups are needed. Thermal models and computer-aided engineering tools are useful for robust designs. During abuse conditions, designs should prevent cell-to-cell propagation in a module/pack (i.e., keep themore » fire small and manageable). NREL's battery ISC device can be used for evaluating the robustness of a module/pack to cell-to-cell propagation.« less

  3. 30 CFR 77.1301 - Explosives; magazines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... than 6 feet high. (h) Ammonium nitrate-fuel oil blasting agents shall be physically separated from... explosion hazard. (d) Box-type magazines used to store explosives or detonators in work areas shall be...

  4. Solar-rechargeable battery based on photoelectrochemical water oxidation: Solar water battery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Gonu; Oh, Misol; Park, Yiseul

    2016-01-01

    As an alternative to the photoelectrochemical water splitting for use in the fuel cells used to generate electrical power, this study set out to develop a solar energy rechargeable battery system based on photoelectrochemical water oxidation. We refer to this design as a “solar water battery”. The solar water battery integrates a photoelectrochemical cell and battery into a single device. It uses a water oxidation reaction to simultaneously convert and store solar energy. With the solar water battery, light striking the photoelectrode causes the water to be photo-oxidized, thus charging the battery. During the discharge process, the solar water battery reduces oxygen to water with a high coulombic efficiency (>90%) and a high average output voltage (0.6 V). Because the reduction potential of oxygen is more positive [E0 (O2/H2O) = 1.23 V vs. NHE] than common catholytes (e.g., iodide, sulfur), a high discharge voltage is produced. The solar water battery also exhibits a superior storage ability, maintaining 99% of its specific discharge capacitance after 10 h of storage, without any evidence of self-discharge. The optimization of the cell design and configuration, taking the presence of oxygen in the cell into account, was critical to achieving an efficient photocharge/discharge. PMID:27629362

  5. Soft container for explosive nuts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glenn, D. C.; Drummond, W. E.; Miller, G.

    1981-01-01

    Flexible fabric fits over variety of assembly shapes to contain debris produced by detonations or safety tests. Bag material is woven multifilament polyamide or aramid. Belt loops hold bag to clamp. Ring supports explosive nut structure and detonator wires, and after nut is mounted, bag and clamp are slipped over ring and fastened.

  6. Numerical Simulations of Thermobaric Explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, A L; Bell, J B; Beckner, V E

    2007-05-04

    A Model of the energy evolution in thermobaric explosions is presented. It is based on the two-phase formulation: conservation laws for the gas and particle phases along with inter-phase interaction terms. It incorporates a Combustion Model based on the mass conservation laws for fuel, air and products; source/sink terms are treated in the fast-chemistry limit appropriate for such gas dynamic fields. The Model takes into account both the afterburning of the detonation products of the booster with air, and the combustion of the fuel (Al or TNT detonation products) with air. Numerical simulations were performed for 1.5-g thermobaric explosions inmore » five different chambers (volumes ranging from 6.6 to 40 liters and length-to-diameter ratios from 1 to 12.5). Computed pressure waveforms were very similar to measured waveforms in all cases - thereby proving that the Model correctly predicts the energy evolution in such explosions. The computed global fuel consumption {mu}(t) behaved as an exponential life function. Its derivative {dot {mu}}(t) represents the global rate of fuel consumption. It depends on the rate of turbulent mixing which controls the rate of energy release in thermobaric explosions.« less

  7. Lead-free primary explosives

    DOEpatents

    Huynh, My Hang V.

    2010-06-22

    Lead-free primary explosives of the formula (cat).sub.Y[M.sup.II(T).sub.X(H.sub.2O).sub.6-X].sub.Z, where T is 5-nitrotetrazolate, and syntheses thereof are described. Substantially stoichiometric equivalents of the reactants lead to high yields of pure compositions thereby avoiding dangerous purification steps.

  8. Explosives for Lunar Seismic Profiling Experiment (LSPE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Explosive charges of various sizes were investigated for use in lunar seismic studies. Program logistics, and the specifications for procurement of bulk explosives are described. The differential analysis, thermal properties, and detonation velocity measurements on HNS/Teflon 7C 90/10 are reported along with the field tests of the hardware. It is concluded that nearly all large explosive charges crack after fabrication, from aging or thermal shock. The cracks do not affect the safety, or reliability of the explosives.

  9. The behavior limestone under explosive load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlov, M. Yu; Orlova, Yu N.; Bogomolov, G. N.

    2016-11-01

    Limestone behavior under explosive loading was investigated. The behavior of the limestone by the action of the three types of explosives, including granular, ammonite and emulsion explosives was studied in detail. The shape and diameter of the explosion craters were obtained. The observed fragments after the blast have been classified as large, medium and small fragments. Three full-scale experiments were carried out. The research results can be used as a qualitative test for the approbation of numerical methods.

  10. Portable SERS Instrument for Explosives Monitoring

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    groundwater monitoring from a cone penetrometer (CPT) platform (5) Demonstrate improved capability for discriminating explosives versus colorimetry ...interference, and better discrimination of individual explosives compared to colorimetry • Applicability to virtually any environmental water...chemicals such as nitroaromatics or nitramines. While this makes colorimetry more generally applicable at explosive sites, it also limits the ability to

  11. Scientific Support for NQR Explosive Detection Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 8 March 2004 - 7 March 2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Scientific Support for NQR Explosive Detection Development...Laboratory (NRL) to improve explosive detection using nuclear quadrupole resonance ( NQR ) is summarized. The work includes studies of the effects...superconducting coils for explosive detection. Additional studies involving slowly rotating NQR measurements were also pursued. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Nuclear

  12. Thermally stable, plastic-bonded explosives

    DOEpatents

    Benziger, Theodore M.

    1979-01-01

    By use of an appropriate thermoplastic rubber as the binder, the thermal stability and thermal stress characteristics of plastic-bonded explosives may be greatly improved. In particular, an HMX-based explosive composition using an oil-extended styrene-ethylenebutylene-styrene block copolymer as the binder exhibits high explosive energy and thermal stability and good handling safety and physical properties.

  13. Critical exponents of the explosive percolation transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Costa, R. A.; Dorogovtsev, S. N.; Goltsev, A. V.; Mendes, J. F. F.

    2014-04-01

    In a new type of percolation phase transition, which was observed in a set of nonequilibrium models, each new connection between vertices is chosen from a number of possibilities by an Achlioptas-like algorithm. This causes preferential merging of small components and delays the emergence of the percolation cluster. First simulations led to a conclusion that a percolation cluster in this irreversible process is born discontinuously, by a discontinuous phase transition, which results in the term "explosive percolation transition." We have shown that this transition is actually continuous (second order) though with an anomalously small critical exponent of the percolation cluster. Here we propose an efficient numerical method enabling us to find the critical exponents and other characteristics of this second-order transition for a representative set of explosive percolation models with different number of choices. The method is based on gluing together the numerical solutions of evolution equations for the cluster size distribution and power-law asymptotics. For each of the models, with high precision, we obtain critical exponents and the critical point.

  14. What factors control the superficial lava dome explosivity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudon, Georges; Balcone-Boissard, Hélène; Villemant, Benoit; Morgan, Daniel J.

    2015-04-01

    Dome-forming eruption is a frequent eruptive style; lava domes result from intermittent, slow extrusion of viscous lava. Most dome-forming eruptions produce highly microcrystallized and highly- to almost totally-degassed magmas which have a low explosive potential. During lava dome growth, recurrent collapses of unstable parts are the main destructive process of the lava dome, generating concentrated pyroclastic density currents (C-PDC) channelized in valleys. These C-PDC have a high, but localized, damage potential that largely depends on the collapsed volume. Sometimes, a dilute ash cloud surge develops at the top of the concentrated flow with an increased destructive effect because it may overflow ridges and affect larger areas. In some cases, large lava dome collapses can induce a depressurization of the magma within the conduit, leading to vulcanian explosions. By contrast, violent, laterally directed, explosions may occur at the base of a growing lava dome: this activity generates dilute and turbulent, highly-destructive, pyroclastic density currents (D-PDC), with a high velocity and propagation poorly dependent on the topography. Numerous studies on lava dome behaviors exist, but the triggering of lava dome explosions is poorly understood. Here, seven dome-forming eruptions are investigated: in the Lesser Antilles arc: Montagne Pelée, Martinique (1902-1905, 1929-1932 and 650 y. BP eruptions), Soufrière Hills, Montserrat; in Guatemala, Santiaguito (1929 eruption); in La Chaîne des Puys, France (Puy de Dome and Puy Chopine eruptions). We propose a new model of superficial lava-dome explosivity based upon a textural and geochemical study (vesicularity, microcrystallinity, cristobalite distribution, residual water contents, crystal transit times) of clasts produced by these key eruptions. Superficial explosion of a growing lava dome may be promoted through porosity reduction caused by both vesicle flattening due to gas escape and syn-eruptive cristobalite

  15. Seismic Methods of Identifying Explosions and Estimating Their Yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, W. R.; Ford, S. R.; Pasyanos, M.; Pyle, M. L.; Myers, S. C.; Mellors, R. J.; Pitarka, A.; Rodgers, A. J.; Hauk, T. F.

    2014-12-01

    Seismology plays a key national security role in detecting, locating, identifying and determining the yield of explosions from a variety of causes, including accidents, terrorist attacks and nuclear testing treaty violations (e.g. Koper et al., 2003, 1999; Walter et al. 1995). A collection of mainly empirical forensic techniques has been successfully developed over many years to obtain source information on explosions from their seismic signatures (e.g. Bowers and Selby, 2009). However a lesson from the three DPRK declared nuclear explosions since 2006, is that our historic collection of data may not be representative of future nuclear test signatures (e.g. Selby et al., 2012). To have confidence in identifying future explosions amongst the background of other seismic signals, and accurately estimate their yield, we need to put our empirical methods on a firmer physical footing. Goals of current research are to improve our physical understanding of the mechanisms of explosion generation of S- and surface-waves, and to advance our ability to numerically model and predict them. As part of that process we are re-examining regional seismic data from a variety of nuclear test sites including the DPRK and the former Nevada Test Site (now the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS)). Newer relative location and amplitude techniques can be employed to better quantify differences between explosions and used to understand those differences in term of depth, media and other properties. We are also making use of the Source Physics Experiments (SPE) at NNSS. The SPE chemical explosions are explicitly designed to improve our understanding of emplacement and source material effects on the generation of shear and surface waves (e.g. Snelson et al., 2013). Finally we are also exploring the value of combining seismic information with other technologies including acoustic and InSAR techniques to better understand the source characteristics. Our goal is to improve our explosion models

  16. Air Blasts from Cased and Uncased Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn, L. A.

    2016-04-12

    The problem of a spherical blast in air is solved using the STUN code. For bare charges, the calculations are shown to be in excellent agreement with previous published results. It is demonstrated that, for an unconfined (uncased) chemical explosive, both range and time to effect scale inversely as the cube root of the yield and directly as the cube root of the ambient air density. It is shown that the peak overpressure decays to roughly 1/10 of ambient pressure in a scaled range of roughly 10 m/kg 1/3 at sea level. At a height of 30 km, where themore » ambient density is a factor of 64 less, the range to the same decay increases to 40 m/kg 1/3 . As a direct result of the scaling a single calculation suffices for all charge sizes and altitudes. Although the close-in results are sensitive to the nature of the explosive source and the equation of state of the air, this sensitivity is shown to virtually disappear at scaled ranges > 0.5 m/kg 1/3 . For cased explosives the case thickness introduces an additional scale factor. Moreover, when the blast wave arrives at the inner case radius the case begins to expand. Fracture occurs when a critical value of the resulting hoop strain is reached, causing the case to shatter into fragments. A model is proposed to describe the size distribution of the fragments and their subsequent motion via drag interaction with the explosion products and ambient air. It is shown that a significant fraction of the charge energy is initially transmitted to the case fragments in the form of kinetic energy; for example, a 1 kg spherical charge with a 5 mm thick steel case has almost 29% of the total charge energy as initial kinetic energy of case fragments. This percentage increases with increasing case thickness and decreases with increasing charge size. The peak overpressure at a given range is 70-85% for cased explosives as compared with uncased and the peak impulse per unit area is 90-95%. The peak overpressure and impulse also decrease

  17. Underbody Blast Models of TBI Caused by Hyper-Acceleration and Secondary Head Impact

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-10-01

    brain injury (TBI), with most of these head injuries caused by explosive munitions such as bombs , land mines, improvised explosive devices and missiles...with most of these injuries caused by explosive munitions such as bombs , land mines, improvised explosive devices (IEDs), and missiles.1,2 Little is...Neurosurg. 2008;108: 124–131. 21. Richards EM , Fiskum G, Rosenthal RE, Hopkins I, McKenna MC. Hyperoxic reperfusion after global ischemia decreases

  18. Explosions within a Deep Crater: Detection from Land and Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worden, A. K.; Dehn, J.; De Angelis, S.

    2012-12-01

    Many volcanoes in the North Pacific exhibit small scale explosive activity. This activity is typified by small explosions throwing ash, blocks, and spatter out of a central vent located within a crater. This material can be thrown out onto the flanks of the volcano if the vent is near enough to the crater rim. However, at some volcanoes, the vent is tens to hundreds of meters below the crater rim. The crater walls constrain the erupted material, causing it to fall back into the vent. Infill of material clogs the vent and can cause future explosions to become muffled. The depth of the crater also inhibits clear views of the vent for satellite remote sensing. In order for a satellite to record an image of a very deep vent, it requires very near vertical pass angle (satellite zenith angle). This viewing geometry is rare, meaning that the majority of images at such volcanoes will show the flanks or the crater walls, not the actual vent or crater floor. A method was developed for using satellite data to monitor the frequency of small explosive activity at numerous volcanoes. By determining the frequency of small explosions seen as thermal features in satellite imagery, a baseline of activity was determined. Any changes from this baseline are then used to indicate possible changes in the volcanic system or eruptive activity of the volcano. This method was used on data collected at Mt. Chuginadak (Cleveland) in Alaska, Karymsky Volcano in Russia, and Stromboli Volcano in Italy with good results. The method was then applied to Shishaldin Volcano in Alaska but was not as useful in determining the activity of the volcano due to the depth of Shishaldin's central crater (400m). This highlights the importance of multi-disciplinary and multi-sensor research to determine the actual activity at a volcano. For this project, explosions at Shishaldin Volcano were counted in both satellite data (thermal anomalies) and seismic data (explosion signals) for a time period from 2008

  19. An introduction to lithium batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrard, W. N. C.

    1988-09-01

    Lithium batteries are being introduced into all three services in the Australian Defence Force. However, general information concerning lithium batteries is not available in a condensed form. This review examines various aspects of lithium batteries, including battery technology, safety aspects, purchasing, packaging, transport, storage and disposal.

  20. Mathematical Storage-Battery Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, C. P.; Aston, M.

    1985-01-01

    Empirical formula represents performance of electrical storage batteries. Formula covers many battery types and includes numerous coefficients adjusted to fit peculiarities of each type. Battery and load parameters taken into account include power density in battery, discharge time, and electrolyte temperature. Applications include electric-vehicle "fuel" gages and powerline load leveling.

  1. High energy density aluminum battery

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Gilbert M.; Parans Paranthaman, Mariappan; Dai, Sheng

    Compositions and methods of making are provided for a high energy density lithium-aluminum battery. The battery comprises an anode comprising aluminum metal. The battery further comprises a cathode comprising a lithium metal oxide. The battery further comprises an electrolyte capable of supporting reversible deposition and stripping of aluminum at the anode, and reversible intercalation and deintercalation of lithium at the cathode.

  2. Thermal characteristics of Lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauser, Dan

    2004-01-01

    Lithium-ion batteries have a very promising future for space applications. Currently they are being used on a few GEO satellites, and were used on the two recent Mars rovers Spirit and Opportunity. There are still problem that exist that need to be addressed before these batteries can fully take flight. One of the problems is that the cycle life of these batteries needs to be increased. battery. Research is being focused on the chemistry of the materials inside the battery. This includes the anode, cathode, and the cell electrolyte solution. These components can undergo unwanted chemical reactions inside the cell that deteriorate the materials of the battery. During discharge/ charge cycles there is heat dissipated in the cell, and the battery heats up and its temperature increases. An increase in temperature can speed up any unwanted reactions in the cell. Exothermic reactions cause the temperature to increase; therefore increasing the reaction rate will cause the increase of the temperature inside the cell to occur at a faster rate. If the temperature gets too high thermal runaway will occur, and the cell can explode. The material that separates the electrode from the electrolyte is a non-conducting polymer. At high temperatures the separator will melt and the battery will be destroyed. The separator also contains small pores that allow lithium ions to diffuse through during charge and discharge. High temperatures can cause these pores to close up, permanently damaging the cell. My job at NASA Glenn research center this summer will be to perform thermal characterization tests on an 18650 type lithium-ion battery. High temperatures cause the chemicals inside lithium ion batteries to spontaneously react with each other. My task is to conduct experiments to determine the temperature that the reaction takes place at, what components in the cell are reacting and the mechanism of the reaction. The experiments will be conducted using an accelerating rate calorimeter

  3. Thermal management of batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbard, H. F.; Chen, C.-C.

    Control of the internal temperature during high rate discharge or charge can be a major design problem for large, high energy density battery systems. A systematic approach to the thermal management of such systems is described for different load profiles based on: thermodynamic calculations of internal heat generation; calorimetric measurements of heat flux; analytical and finite difference calculations of the internal temperature distribution; appropriate system designs for heat removal and temperature control. Examples are presented of thermal studies on large lead-acid batteries for electrical utility load levelling and nickel-zinc and lithium-iron sulphide batteries for electric vehicle propulsion.

  4. THE SOLAR BATTERY

    SciTech Connect

    Shchekin, V.

    1958-01-01

    The maximum output capacity of silicon elements is 10 to 12 milliwatts/ cm/sup 2/ of photosensitive surface area. The efficiency of present-day silicon elements is 11 to 13% compared to 1% with other materials and the maximum efficiency of 22%. The Sputnik'' radio was powered from a solar battery of 5 v and fitted with a miniature TsNK-0.4 storage battery. It is calculated that to supply electricity for lighting a small flat or house at 110 v, 3 amp, a solar battery of 2 x 2 m would be sufficient. (W.D.M.)

  5. Synthetic battery cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaller, L. H.

    1981-01-01

    The use of interactive computer graphics is suggested as an aid in battery system development. Mathematical representations of simplistic but fully representative functions of many electrochemical concepts of current practical interest will permit battery level charge and discharge phenomena to be analyzed in a qualitative manner prior to the assembly and testing of actual hardware. This technique is a useful addition to the variety of tools available to the battery system designer as he bridges the gap between interesting single cell life test data and reliable energy storage subsystems.

  6. Advanced Thermal Batteries.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    A-AOB 13 EREAC BLONTOdLEUEAAVNESENEDV F 1/ ADVANCED THERMAL BATTERIES .(U) MAR 80 D M RYAN F33615-77-C-317 UNCLASSIFIED AFWAL-TR-80-2017...iii - -.... This report is for the second year of work. The first year of work was reported December 1978 in: " Advanced Thermal Batteries " AFAPL-TR-78...work. The first year of work was reported December 1978 in: " Advanced Thermal Batteries " AFAPL-TR-78-114 Air Force Aero Propulsion Laboratory Air

  7. Battery utilizing ceramic membranes

    DOEpatents

    Yahnke, M.S.; Shlomo, G.; Anderson, M.A.

    1994-08-30

    A thin film battery is disclosed based on the use of ceramic membrane technology. The battery includes a pair of conductive collectors on which the materials for the anode and the cathode may be spin coated. The separator is formed of a porous metal oxide ceramic membrane impregnated with electrolyte so that electrical separation is maintained while ion mobility is also maintained. The entire battery can be made less than 10 microns thick while generating a potential in the 1 volt range. 2 figs.

  8. Sealed nickel cadmium batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raudszus, W.; Kiehne, H. A.; Cloke, F. R.

    1982-10-01

    The design, manufacture, and application of maintenance-free sealed NiCd batteries are surveyed. The principles of electrochemical power supplies and the history of the development of NiCd cells are reviewed. The batteries produced by Varta Batterie AG are presented; topics discussed include design parameters, electrical and physical characteristics, performance under adverse conditions, type range, production, and quality control. Application techniques, including cell-type choice, charging units and charging circuits, and the construction of standby power supplies, are considered, with reference to national and international standards of performance and classification. No individual items are abstracted in this volume

  9. Synthetic battery cycling techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leibecki, H. F.; Thaller, L. H.

    1982-01-01

    Synthetic battery cycling makes use of the fast growing capability of computer graphics to illustrate some of the basic characteristics of operation of individual electrodes within an operating electrochemical cell. It can also simulate the operation of an entire string of cells that are used as the energy storage subsystem of a power system. The group of techniques that as a class have been referred to as Synthetic Battery Cycling is developed in part to try to bridge the gap of understanding that exists between single cell characteristics and battery system behavior.

  10. Bipolar battery construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Dean B. (Inventor); Rippel, Wally E. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A lightweight, bipolar battery construction for lead acid batteries in which a plurality of thin, rigid, biplates each comprise a graphite fiber thermoplastic composition in conductive relation to lead stripes plated on opposite flat surfaces of the plates, and wherein a plurality of nonconductive thermoplastic separator plates support resilient yieldable porous glass mats in which active material is carried, the biplates and separator plates with active material being contained and maintained in stacked assembly by axial compression of the stacked assembly. A method of assembling such a bipolar battery construction.

  11. HST Replacement Battery Initial Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krol, Stan; Waldo, Greg; Hollandsworth, Roger

    2009-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) original Nickel-Hydrogen (NiH2) batteries were replaced during the Servicing Mission 4 (SM4) after 19 years and one month on orbit.The purpose of this presentation is to highlight the findings from the assessment of the initial sm4 replacement battery performance. The batteries are described, the 0 C capacity is reviewed, descriptions, charts and tables reviewing the State Of Charge (SOC) Performance, the Battery Voltage Performance, the battery impedance, the minimum voltage performance, the thermal performance, the battery current, and the battery system recharge ratio,

  12. The Use of Explosive Forming for Fastening and Joining Structural and Pressure Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    Explosive expansion of tubes into tubesheets has been used for over 20 years in the fabrication and repair of shell and tube heat exchangers. The use of explosives to perform these expansions has offered several distinct advantages over other methods. First, the process is fast and economical and can be performed with minimal training of personnel. Secondly, explosive forming does not cause the deleterious metallurgical effects which often result from other forming operations. In addition, the process can be performed remotely without the need for sophisticated handling equipment. The expansion of tubes into tubesheets is only one of many possible fastening and joining applications for which explosive forming can be used to achieve highly successful results. The explosive forming process and where it has been used are described. In addition, some possible adaptations to other joining applications are identified and discussed.

  13. STUDY OF THERMAL SENSITIVITY AND THERMAL EXPLOSION VIOLENCE OF ENERGETIC MATERIALS IN THE LLNL ODTX SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    HSU, P C; Hust, G; May, C

    Some energetic materials may explode at fairly low temperatures and the violence from thermal explosion may cause a significant damage. Thus it is important to understand the response of energetic materials to thermal insults for safe handling and storage of energetic materials. The One Dimensional Time to Explosion (ODTX) system at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory can measure times to explosion, lowest explosion temperatures, and determine kinetic parameters of energetic materials. Samples of different configurations can be tested in the system. The ODTX testing can also generate useful data for determining thermal explosion violence of energetic materials. We also performedmore » detonation experiments of LX-10 in aluminum anvils to determine the detonation violence and validated the Zerilli Armstrong aluminum model. Results of the detonation experiments agreed well with the model prediction.« less

  14. Stress-induced activation of decomposition of organic explosives: a simple way to understand.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chaoyang

    2013-01-01

    We provide a very simply way to understand the stress-induced activation of decomposition of organic explosives by taking the simplest explosive molecule nitromethane (NM) as a prototype and constraining one or two NM molecules in a shell to represent the condensed phrase of NM against the stress caused by tension and compression, sliding and rotational shear, and imperfection. The results show that the stress loaded on NM molecule can always reduce the barriers of its decomposition. We think the origin of this stress-induced activation is due to the increased repulsive intra- and/or inter- molecular interaction potentials in explosives resulted from the stress, whose release is positive to accelerate the decomposition. Besides, by these models, we can understand that the explosives in gaseous state are easier to analyze than those in condensed state and the voids in condensed explosives make them more sensitive to external stimuli relative to the perfect crystals.

  15. Seismic explosive charge loader and anchor

    SciTech Connect

    Mcreynolds, O.B.

    1981-07-14

    An improved seismic explosive charge loader and anchor for loading and anchoring explosives in cylindrical containers in bore holes is disclosed, which includes a snap in spring band shaped anchor which effectively anchors the loader in the well bore against upward movement, one aspect of the invention includes a snap lock threaded connection for securing an explosive container having interrupted threads to the loader and anchor, and the loader and anchor is constructed and arranged to maintain a detonator in place in the explosive container thereby assuring detonation of the explosive.

  16. Hidden attraction: a menacing meal of magnets and batteries.

    PubMed

    Brown, Julie C; Murray, Karen F; Javid, Patrick J

    2012-08-01

    Magnet and button battery ingestions are increasingly common, and can result in significant morbidity. Timely identification of hazardous foreign body ingestions can be difficult in non-verbal and non-disclosing children. We aim to present a case that demonstrates some of the challenges around identifying and correctly locating magnets and batteries, and the importance of prompt identification and removal. We describe an older child with the covert ingestion of multiple magnets and batteries, with magnets that attracted across the stomach and a loop of jejunum. Mild symptoms and signs resulted in a delayed diagnosis and serious consequences. Radiographs suggested a gastric location of the foreign bodies. Health care workers should consider the possibility of battery or magnet ingestions in children with vomiting and abdominal pain, even when well-appearing. Like esophageal batteries, multiple gastrointestinal magnets and combined magnet-battery ingestions can cause significant morbidity, and prompt identification is important. Providers should ask verbal children for ingestion histories, and consider radiographs when symptoms are atypical or persistent. Like esophageal batteries, gastrointestinal magnet-battery ingestions should be removed promptly to prevent complications. Caregivers should supervise or limit the use of toys that include magnets and batteries. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Distribution of Ejecta in Analog Tephra Rings from Discrete Single and Multiple Subsurface Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graettinger, A. H.; Valentine, G. A.; Sonder, I.; Ross, P. S.; White, J. D. L.

    2015-12-01

    Buried-explosion experiments were used to investigate the spatial and volumetric distribution of extra-crater ejecta resulting from a range of explosion configurations with and without a crater present. Explosion configuration is defined in terms of scaled depth, the relationship between depth of burial and the cube root of explosion energy, where an optimal scaled depth explosion produces the largest crater diameter for a given energy. The multiple explosion experiments provide an analog for the formation of maar-diatreme ejecta deposits and the deposits of discrete explosions through existing conduits and hydrothermal systems. Experiments produced meter-sized craters with ejecta distributed between three major facies based on morphology and distance from the crater center. The proximal deposits form a constructional steep-sided ring that extends no more than two-times the crater radius away from center. The medial deposits form a low-angle continuous blanket that transitions with distance into the isolated clasts of the distal ejecta. Single explosion experiments produce a trend of increasing volume proportion of proximal ejecta as scaled depth increases (from 20-90% vol.). Multiple explosion experiments are dominated by proximal deposits (>90% vol.) for all but optimal scaled depth conditions (40-70% vol.). In addition to scaled depth, the presence of a crater influences jet shape and how the jet collapses, resulting in two end-member depositional mechanisms that produce distinctive facies. The experiments use one well-constrained explosion mechanism and, consequently, the variations in depositional facies and distribution are the result of conditions independent of that mechanism. Previous interpretations have invoked variations in fragmentation as the cause of this variability, but these experiments should help with a more complete reconstruction of the configuration and number of explosions that produce a tephra ring.

  18. Luck Reveals Stellar Explosion's First Moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-05-01

    -rays came from one of the galaxy's spiral arms. Soderberg led a 38-person international scientific team that quickly began an intensive effort to study the new object using both orbiting and ground-based telescopes. In order to conclude that they had, in fact, seen the predicted early burst of X-rays from a supernova, they needed to eliminate alternative explanations, such as a gamma-ray burst, and then to show that, as time went on, the object behaved like a normal supernova. The scientists scrutinized the object with Swift's gamma-ray instrument, the Chandra X-ray Observatory, and the Hubble Space Telescope. On the ground, they used the Gemini North telescope and the Keck I telescope in Hawaii, the 200-inch and 60-inch telescopes at Palomar Observatory in California, the 3.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory in New Mexico, and the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA) and Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) radio telescopes. The VLA and VLBA provided key information that showed the object evolving in a pattern similar to other supernovae. "The data from all these telescopes confirmed that what we were seeing is indeed a supernova and not some new type of object. That initial X-ray burst thus is the earliest observation ever of an exploding star," Soderberg said. The scientists are excited at the prospects of learning vital new details that will help them settle longstanding controversies about the mechanisms of supernova explosions. Stars much more massive than our Sun end their lives in supernova explosions, as they run out of fuel for the thermonuclear reactions that power them. With no more energy being released at the star's core, the core collapses. Further collapse of the star is thought to cause a violent rebound that blasts most of the stars's material into space. What remains is a superdense neutron star or a black hole. The details of this scenario, however, are not well understood, and astronomers differ over the exact mechanisms. Much of

  19. Battery Technology Stores Clean Energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Headquartered in Fremont, California, Deeya Energy Inc. is now bringing its flow batteries to commercial customers around the world after working with former Marshall Space Flight Center scientist, Lawrence Thaller. Deeya's liquid-cell batteries have higher power capability than Thaller's original design, are less expensive than lead-acid batteries, are a clean energy alternative, and are 10 to 20 times less expensive than nickel-metal hydride batteries, lithium-ion batteries, and fuel cell options.

  20. Spot test kit for explosives detection

    SciTech Connect

    Pagoria, Philip F; Whipple, Richard E; Nunes, Peter J

    An explosion tester system comprising a body, a lateral flow membrane swab unit adapted to be removeably connected to the body, a first explosives detecting reagent, a first reagent holder and dispenser operatively connected to the body, the first reagent holder and dispenser containing the first explosives detecting reagent and positioned to deliver the first explosives detecting reagent to the lateral flow membrane swab unit when the lateral flow membrane swab unit is connected to the body, a second explosives detecting reagent, and a second reagent holder and dispenser operatively connected to the body, the second reagent holder and dispensermore » containing the second explosives detecting reagent and positioned to deliver the second explosives detecting reagent to the lateral flow membrane swab unit when the lateral flow membrane swab unit is connected to the body.« less

  1. Sensitivity to friction for primary explosives.

    PubMed

    Matyáš, Robert; Šelešovský, Jakub; Musil, Tomáš

    2012-04-30

    The sensitivity to friction for a selection of primary explosives has been studied using a small BAM friction apparatus. The probit analysis was used for the construction of a sensitivity curve for each primary explosive tested. Two groups of primary explosives were chosen for measurement (a) the most commonly used industrially produced primary explosives (e.g. lead azide, tetrazene, dinol, lead styphnate) and (b) the most produced improvised primary explosives (e.g. triacetone triperoxide, hexamethylenetriperoxide diamine, mercury fulminate, acetylides of heavy metals). A knowledge of friction sensitivity is very important for determining manipulation safety for primary explosives. All the primary explosives tested were carefully characterised (synthesis procedure, shape and size of crystals). The sensitivity curves obtained represent a unique set of data, which cannot be found anywhere else in the available literature. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Technical trends in industrial lead/acid batteries in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, Masashi; Tagawa, Yahachiro

    1994-02-01

    Although there have been only a few major technological changes in stationary lead/acid batteries in the past, some rapid and remarkable developments have occurred recently. The latter have included the introduction of catalyst plugs and valve-regulated lead/acid batteries (VRBs). Catalyst plugs have been used to avoid water addition with stationary lead/acid batteries. By virtue of their advantages (i.e., the elements retain electrolyte and equalizing charging and water addition are unnecessary), VRBs are being developed up to a maximum capacity of 3000 Ah. These designs have now captured about 50% of the stationary lead/acid battery market. The VRB technology has excellent characteristics, such as plate construction that can accommodate grid growth, explosion-resistant plugs, good discharge characteristics, and minimal electrolyte stratification. In addition, by utilizing the benefits of VRBs, horizontal and multistoried systems can be assembled, though in early stages of development the construction was only for interchangeability with flooded-electrolyte type batteries.

  3. Metal pad instabilities in liquid metal batteries.

    PubMed

    Zikanov, Oleg

    2015-12-01

    A mechanical analogy is used to analyze the interaction between the magnetic field, electric current, and deformation of interfaces in liquid metal batteries. In the framework of a low-mode, nondissipative, linear stability model, it is found that, during charging or discharging, a sufficiently large battery is prone to instabilities of two types. One is similar to the metal pad instability known to exist in the aluminum reduction cells. Another type is new. It is related to the destabilizing effect of the Lorentz force formed by the azimuthal magnetic field induced by the base current, and the current perturbations caused by the local variations of the thickness of the electrolyte layer.

  4. Dynamics of explosively imploded pressurized tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szirti, Daniel; Loiseau, Jason; Higgins, Andrew; Tanguay, Vincent

    2011-04-01

    The detonation of an explosive layer surrounding a pressurized thin-walled tube causes the formation of a virtual piston that drives a precursor shock wave ahead of the detonation, generating very high temperatures and pressures in the gas contained within the tube. Such a device can be used as the driver for a high energy density shock tube or hypervelocity gas gun. The dynamics of the precursor shock wave were investigated for different tube sizes and initial fill pressures. Shock velocity and standoff distance were found to decrease with increasing fill pressure, mainly due to radial expansion of the tube. Adding a tamper can reduce this effect, but may increase jetting. A simple analytical model based on acoustic wave interactions was developed to calculate pump tube expansion and the resulting effect on the shock velocity and standoff distance. Results from this model agree quite well with experimental data.

  5. Theory and Modeling of Liquid Explosive Detonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarver, Craig M.; Urtiew, Paul A.

    2010-10-01

    The current understanding of the detonation reaction zones of liquid explosives is discussed in this article. The physical and chemical processes that precede and follow exothermic chemical reaction within the detonation reaction zone are discussed within the framework of the nonequilibrium Zeldovich-von Neumann-Doring (NEZND) theory of self-sustaining detonation. Nonequilibrium chemical and physical processes cause finite time duration induction zones before exothermic chemical energy release occurs. This separation between the leading shock wave front and the chemical energy release needed to sustain it results in shock wave amplification and the subsequent formation of complex three-dimensional cellular structures in all liquid detonation waves. To develop a practical Zeldovich-von Neumann-Doring (ZND) reactive flow model for liquid detonation, experimental data on reaction zone structure, confined failure diameter, unconfined failure diameter, and failure wave velocity in the Dremin-Trofimov test for detonating nitromethane are calculated using the ignition and growth reactive flow model.

  6. Photographic laboratory studies of explosions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamel, M. M.; Oppenheim, A. K.

    1973-01-01

    Description of a series of cinematographic studies of explosions made with a high-speed rotating-mirror streak camera which uses a high-frequency stroboscopic ruby laser as the light source. The results obtained mainly concern explosions initiated by focused laser irradiation from a pulsed neodymium laser in a detonating gas consisting essentially of an equimolar mixture of acetylene and oxygen at an initial pressure of 100 torr at room temperature. Among the most significant observations were observations of a spherical blast wave preceded by a Chapman-Jouguet detonation which is stabilized immediately after initiation, the merging of a spherical flame with a shock front of the blast wave in which the flame is propagating, the division of a spherical detonation front into a shock wave and flame, and the generation of shock waves by a network of spherical flames.

  7. Elasticity of crystalline molecular explosives

    DOE PAGES

    Hooks, Daniel E.; Ramos, Kyle J.; Bolme, C. A.; ...

    2015-04-14

    Crystalline molecular explosives are key components of engineered explosive formulations. In precision applications a high degree of consistency and predictability is desired under a range of conditions to a variety of stimuli. Prediction of behaviors from mechanical response and failure to detonation initiation and detonation performance of the material is linked to accurate knowledge of the material structure and first stage of deformation: elasticity. The elastic response of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX), and cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (HMX), including aspects of material and measurement variability, and computational methods are described in detail. Experimental determinations of elastic tensors are compared, andmore » an evaluation of sources of error is presented. Furthermore, computed elastic constants are also compared for these materials and for triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB), for which there are no measurements.« less

  8. Applying NASA's explosive seam welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, Laurence J.

    1991-01-01

    The status of an explosive seam welding process, which was developed and evaluated for a wide range of metal joining opportunities, is summarized. The process employs very small quantities of explosive in a ribbon configuration to accelerate a long-length, narrow area of sheet stock into a high-velocity, angular impact against a second sheet. At impact, the oxide films of both surface are broken up and ejected by the closing angle to allow atoms to bond through the sharing of valence electrons. This cold-working process produces joints having parent metal properties, allowing a variety of joints to be fabricated that achieve full strength of the metals employed. Successful joining was accomplished in all aluminum alloys, a wide variety of iron and steel alloys, copper, brass, titanium, tantalum, zirconium, niobium, telerium, and columbium. Safety issues were addressed and are as manageable as many currently accepted joining processes.

  9. Liquids and homemade explosive detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellenbogen, Michael; Bijjani, Richard

    2009-05-01

    Excerpt from the US Transportation Security Agency website: "The ban on liquids, aerosols and gels was implemented on August 10 after a terrorist plot was foiled. Since then, experts from around the government, including the FBI and our national labs have analyzed the information we now have and have conducted extensive explosives testing to get a better understanding of this specific threat." In order to lift the ban and ease the burden on the flying public, Reveal began an extensive effort in close collaboration with the US and several other governments to help identify these threats. This effort resulted in the successful development and testing of an automated explosive detection system capable of resolving these threats with a high probability of detection and a low false alarm rate. We will present here some of the methodology and approach we took to address this problem.

  10. Printable sensors for explosive detonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, Matthew J.; Cooling, Nathan A.; Elkington, Daniel C.; Muller, Elmar; Belcher, Warwick J.; Dastoor, Paul C.

    2014-10-01

    Here, we report the development of an organic thin film transistor (OTFT) based on printable solution processed polymers and employing a quantum tunnelling composite material as a sensor to convert the pressure wave output from detonation transmission tubing (shock tube) into an inherently amplified electronic signal for explosives initiation. The organic electronic detector allows detection of the signal in a low voltage operating range, an essential feature for sites employing live ordinances that is not provided by conventional electronic devices. We show that a 30-fold change in detector response is possible using the presented detector assembly. Degradation of the OTFT response with both time and repeated voltage scans was characterised, and device lifetime is shown to be consistent with the requirements for on-site printing and usage. The integration of a low cost organic electronic detector with inexpensive shock tube transmission fuse presents attractive avenues for the development of cheap and simple assemblies for precisely timed initiation of explosive chains.

  11. Parallel flow diffusion battery

    DOEpatents

    Yeh, H.C.; Cheng, Y.S.

    1984-01-01

    A parallel flow diffusion battery for determining the mass distribution of an aerosol has a plurality of diffusion cells mounted in parallel to an aerosol stream, each diffusion cell including a stack of mesh wire screens of different density.

  12. Parallel flow diffusion battery

    DOEpatents

    Yeh, Hsu-Chi; Cheng, Yung-Sung

    1984-08-07

    A parallel flow diffusion battery for determining the mass distribution of an aerosol has a plurality of diffusion cells mounted in parallel to an aerosol stream, each diffusion cell including a stack of mesh wire screens of different density.

  13. Sodium sulfur battery seal

    DOEpatents

    Mikkor, Mati

    1981-01-01

    This disclosure is directed to an improvement in a sodium sulfur battery construction in which a seal between various battery compartments is made by a structure in which a soft metal seal member is held in a sealing position by holding structure. A pressure applying structure is used to apply pressure on the soft metal seal member when it is being held in sealing relationship to a surface of a container member of the sodium sulfur battery by the holding structure. The improvement comprises including a thin, well-adhered, soft metal layer on the surface of the container member of the sodium sulfur battery to which the soft metal seal member is to be bonded.

  14. Joint optimisation of arbitrage profits and battery life degradation for grid storage application of battery electric vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kies, Alexander

    2018-02-01

    To meet European decarbonisation targets by 2050, the electrification of the transport sector is mandatory. Most electric vehicles rely on lithium-ion batteries, because they have a higher energy/power density and longer life span compared to other practical batteries such as zinc-carbon batteries. Electric vehicles can thus provide energy storage to support the system integration of generation from highly variable renewable sources, such as wind and photovoltaics (PV). However, charging/discharging causes batteries to degradate progressively with reduced capacity. In this study, we investigate the impact of the joint optimisation of arbitrage revenue and battery degradation of electric vehicle batteries in a simplified setting, where historical prices allow for market participation of battery electric vehicle owners. It is shown that the joint optimisation of both leads to stronger gains then the sum of both optimisation strategies and that including battery degradation into the model avoids state of charges close to the maximum at times. It can be concluded that degradation is an important aspect to consider in power system models, which incorporate any kind of lithium-ion battery storage.

  15. Thigh burns from exploding e-cigarette lithium ion batteries: First case series.

    PubMed

    Nicoll, K J; Rose, A M; Khan, M A A; Quaba, O; Lowrie, A G

    2016-06-01

    E-cigarette (EC) use has risen meteorically over the last decade. The majority of these devices are powered by re-chargeable lithium ion batteries, which can represent a fire hazard if damaged, over-heated, over-charged or stored inappropriately. There are currently no reports in the medical literature of lithium ion battery burns related to EC use and no guidance on the appropriate management of lithium ion battery associated injuries. We report two individual cases of burn resulting from explosion of EC re-chargeable lithium ion batteries. Both patients required in-patient surgical management. We provide evidence that lithium ion battery explosions can be associated with mixed thermal and alkali chemical burns, resulting from the significant discharge of thermal energy and the dispersal of corrosive lithium ion compounds. We would recommend, as with other elemental metal exposures, caution in exposing lithium ion battery burns to water irrigation. Early and thorough cleaning and debridement of such burns, to remove residual lithium contamination, may limit the risk of burn wound extension and potentially improve outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  16. Splicing Wires Permanently With Explosives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, Laurence J.; Kushnick, Anne C.

    1990-01-01

    Explosive joining process developed to splice wires by enclosing and metallurgically bonding wires within copper sheets. Joints exhibit many desirable characteristics, 100-percent conductivity and strength, no heat-induced annealing, no susceptibility to corrosion in contacts between dissimilar metals, and stability at high temperature. Used to join wires to terminals, as well as to splice wires. Applicable to telecommunications industry, in which millions of small wires spliced annually.

  17. Explosives Removal from Munitions Wastewaters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-01-01

    activated carbon columns. Waste water, for the study was drawn as needed from the effluent of the i diatomaceous earth filters and stored in an 800-gallon...explosive Laterials, such as DNT and nitrocresols, from waste streams. The loaded adsorbent can be regenerated with solvent. To minimize operating costs...most effective is fixed-bed adsorption followir.nI clarification and filtration to remove suspended j solids. Activated carbon adsorbent is used at a

  18. HIGH EXPLOSIVE CRATER STUDIES: TUFF

    SciTech Connect

    Murphey, B.F.

    1961-04-01

    Spherical charges of TNT, each weighing 256 pounds, were exploded at various depths in tuff to determine apparent crater dimensions in a soft rock. No craters were obtained for depths of burst equal to or greater than 13.3 feet. It was deduced that rock fragments were sufficiently large that charges of greater magnitude should be employed for crater experiments intended as models of nuclear explosions. (auth)

  19. Measuring explosive non-ideality

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P C

    1999-02-17

    The sonic reaction zone length may be measured by four methods: (1) size effect, (2) detonation front curvature, (3) crystal interface velocity and (4) in-situ gauges. The amount of data decreases exponentially from (1) to (4) with there being almost no gauge data for prompt detonation at steady state. The ease and clarity of obtaining the reaction zone length increases from (1) to (4). The method of getting the reaction zone length, , is described for the four methods. A measure of non-ideality is proposed: the reaction zone length divided by the cylinder radius. N = /R{sub o}.more » N = 0 for true ideality. It also decreases with increasing radius as it should. For N < 0.10, an equilibrium EOS like the JWL may be used. For N > 0.10, a time-dependent description is essential. The crystal experiment, which measures the particle velocity of an explosive-transparent material interface, is presently rising in importance. We examine the data from three experiments and apply: (1) an impedance correction that transfers the explosive C-J particle velocity to the corresponding value for the interface, and (2) multiplies the interface time by 3/4 to simulate the explosive speed of sound. The result is a reaction zone length comparable to those obtained by other means. A few explosives have reaction zones so small that the change of slope in the particle velocity is easily seen.« less

  20. Elaboration of the Charge Constructions of Explosives for the Structure of Facing Stone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khomeriki, Sergo; Mataradze, Edgar; Chikhradze, Nikoloz; Losaberidze, Marine; Khomeriki, Davit; Shatberashvili, Grigol

    2017-12-01

    Increased demand for high-strength facing material caused the enhancement of the volume of explosives use in modern technologies of blocks production. The volume of broken rocks and crushing quality depends on the rock characteristics and on the properties of the explosive, in particular on its brisance and serviceability. Therefore, the correct selection of the explosive for the specific massif is of a considerable practical importance. For efficient mining of facing materials by explosion method the solving of such problems as determination of the method of blasthole drilling as well as of the regime and charge values, selection of the explosive, blastholes distribution in the face and their order is necessary. This paper focuses on technical solutions for conservation of rock natural structure in the blocks of facing material, mined by the use of the explosives. It has been established that the efficient solving of mentioned problem is attained by reducing of shock pulse duration. In such conditions the rigidity of crystalline lattice increases in high pressure area. As a result, the hazard if crack formation in structural unites and the increases of natural cracks are excluded. Short-time action of explosion pulse is possible only by linear charges of the explosives, characterized by high detonation velocity which detonate by the velocity of 7-7.5 km/sec and are characterized by very small critical diameter.

  1. Battery packaging - Technology review

    SciTech Connect

    Maiser, Eric

    2014-06-16

    This paper gives a brief overview of battery packaging concepts, their specific advantages and drawbacks, as well as the importance of packaging for performance and cost. Production processes, scaling and automation are discussed in detail to reveal opportunities for cost reduction. Module standardization as an additional path to drive down cost is introduced. A comparison to electronics and photovoltaics production shows 'lessons learned' in those related industries and how they can accelerate learning curves in battery production.

  2. OAO battery data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaston, S.; Wertheim, M.; Orourke, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    Summary, consolidation and analysis of specifications, manufacturing process and test controls, and performance results for OAO-2 and OAO-3 lot 20 Amp-Hr sealed nickel cadmium cells and batteries are reported. Correlation of improvements in control requirements with performance is a key feature. Updates for a cell/battery computer model to improve performance prediction capability are included. Applicability of regression analysis computer techniques to relate process controls to performance is checked.

  3. Schottky barrier betavoltaic battery

    SciTech Connect

    Manasse, F.K.; Pinajian, J.J.; Tse, A.N.

    1976-02-01

    A new nuclear betavoltaic battery is described. It uses a Schottky barrier in place of the more standard p-n junction diode, along with $sup 147$Pm metal film rather than Pm$sub 2$O$sub 3$ oxide as in the commercially available Betacel. Design details of the battery including measurement of absorption, conversion efficiency, thickness etc. as functions of resistivity and other cell parameters are described. A prototype design is discussed and its performance assessed. (auth)

  4. Fuze for explosive magnetohydrodynamic generator

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, G.

    1976-12-23

    An apparatus is examined by which high explosive charges are propelled into and detonated at the center of an MHD-X generator. The high explosive charge units are engaged and propelled by a reciprocating ram device. Detonating in each instance is achieved by striking with a firing pin a detonator charge that is in register with a booster charge, the booster charge being in detonating communication with the high explosive charge. Various safety requirements are satisfied by a spring loaded slider operating in a channel transverse and adjacent to the booster charge. The slide retains the detonator charge out of registermore » with the booster charge until a safety pin that holds the slider in place is pulled by a lanyard attached between the reciprocating ram and the safety pin. Removal of the safety pin permits the detonator charge to slide into alignment with the booster charge. Firing pin actuation is initiated by the slider at the instant the detonator charge and the booster charge come into register.« less

  5. Thermodynamic States in Explosion Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, A L

    2010-03-12

    We investigate the thermodynamic states occurring in explosion fields from condensed explosive charges. These states are often modeled with a Jones-Wilkins-Lee (JWL) function. However, the JWL function is not a Fundamental Equation of Thermodynamics, and therefore cannot give a complete specification of such states. We use the Cheetah code of Fried to study the loci of states of the expanded detonation products gases from C-4 charges, and their combustion products air. In the Le Chatelier Plane of specific-internal-energy versus temperature, these loci are fit with a Quadratic Model function u(T), which has been shown to be valid for T explosive charges, and their reflections from surfaces.« less

  6. Fish kill from underwater explosions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stuart, David J.

    1962-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has used 23 different shotpoints during two seasons of field work in our seismic study of crustal structure in western United States. Without exception, it has been found that under-water shotpoints result in a more efficient conversion of explosive energy into seismic energy than do drilled-hole shotpoints. This experience, together with elimination of drilling costs, has led to the use of underwater shotpoints wherever possible. Three of the 23 shotpoints were in the Pacific Ocean, and for these we have no detailed information on the fish kill. Another six shotpoints were located in inland bodies of water. These are: * Soda Lake near Fallon, Nevada * Mono Lake near Lee Vining, California * Lake Mead near Boulder City, Nevada * Shasta Lake near Redding, California * C.J. Strike Reservoir near Bruneau, Idaho * Lucky Peak Reservoir near Boise, Idaho The 22 high-explosive charges, weighing a total of 95,100 pounds, that were fired in lakes containing fish life resulted in the known death of 2,413 game fish with a total weight of 759 pounds. The average mortality was 110 game fish or 34.5 pounds of game fish killed per average shot of 4,325 pounds of high-explosives.

  7. Ground Truth Collections for Explosions in Northern Fennoscandia and Russia

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, D B; Ringdal, F; Kremenetskaya, E

    2003-07-28

    This project is providing ground-truth information on explosions conducted at the principal mines within 500 kilometers of the ARCES station, and is assembling a seismic waveform database for these events from local and regional stations. The principal mines of interest are in northwest Russia (Khibiny Massif, Olenogorsk, Zapolyamy, and Kovdor groups) and Sweden (Malmberget, Kiruna). These mines form a natural laboratory for examining the variation of mining explosion observations with source type, since they include colocated surface and underground mines and mines conducting a variety of different shot types. In September 2002 we deployed two lines of temporary stations frommore » the Khibiny Massif through and to the north of the ARCES station. This deployment is producing data that will allow researchers to examine the variation of discriminants caused by varying source-receiver distance and the diversity of explosion types. To date, we have collected ground-truth information on 1,118 explosions in the Kola Peninsula, and have assembled waveform data for approximately 700 of these. The database includes waveforms from instruments temporarily deployed in the Khibiny Massif mines, from the Apatity network just outside of the Massif, from LVZ, KEV and ARCES, and from the stations deployed along the two lines into northern Norway. In this paper we present representative waveforms for several types of shots recorded at various regional distances. We have conducted a preliminary study of the variation of phase ratios as a function of source type. This study shows significant differences in Pd/Sn and Pd/Lg ratios for two types of mining explosions: surface ripple-fired explosions and compact underground explosions. Compact explosions are, typically, underground explosions of a few tons with only one or two short delays, and are the closest approximation to single, well-tamped explosions available in the Khibiny mines. The surface shots typically are much larger

  8. Solid-state Graft Copolymer Electrolytes for Lithium Battery Applications

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Qichao; Caputo, Antonio; Sadoway, Donald R.

    2013-01-01

    Battery safety has been a very important research area over the past decade. Commercially available lithium ion batteries employ low flash point (<80 °C), flammable, and volatile organic electrolytes. These organic based electrolyte systems are viable at ambient temperatures, but require a cooling system to ensure that temperatures do not exceed 80 °C. These cooling systems tend to increase battery costs and can malfunction which can lead to battery malfunction and explosions, thus endangering human life. Increases in petroleum prices lead to a huge demand for safe, electric hybrid vehicles that are more economically viable to operate as oil prices continue to rise. Existing organic based electrolytes used in lithium ion batteries are not applicable to high temperature automotive applications. A safer alternative to organic electrolytes is solid polymer electrolytes. This work will highlight the synthesis for a graft copolymer electrolyte (GCE) poly(oxyethylene) methacrylate (POEM) to a block with a lower glass transition temperature (Tg) poly(oxyethylene) acrylate (POEA). The conduction mechanism has been discussed and it has been demonstrated the relationship between polymer segmental motion and ionic conductivity indeed has a Vogel-Tammann-Fulcher (VTF) dependence. Batteries containing commercially available LP30 organic (LiPF6 in ethylene carbonate (EC):dimethyl carbonate (DMC) at a 1:1 ratio) and GCE were cycled at ambient temperature. It was found that at ambient temperature, the batteries containing GCE showed a greater overpotential when compared to LP30 electrolyte. However at temperatures greater than 60 °C, the GCE cell exhibited much lower overpotential due to fast polymer electrolyte conductivity and nearly the full theoretical specific capacity of 170 mAh/g was accessed. PMID:23963203

  9. Solid-state graft copolymer electrolytes for lithium battery applications.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qichao; Caputo, Antonio; Sadoway, Donald R

    2013-08-12

    Battery safety has been a very important research area over the past decade. Commercially available lithium ion batteries employ low flash point (< 80 °C), flammable, and volatile organic electrolytes. These organic based electrolyte systems are viable at ambient temperatures, but require a cooling system to ensure that temperatures do not exceed 80 °C. These cooling systems tend to increase battery costs and can malfunction which can lead to battery malfunction and explosions, thus endangering human life. Increases in petroleum prices lead to a huge demand for safe, electric hybrid vehicles that are more economically viable to operate as oil prices continue to rise. Existing organic based electrolytes used in lithium ion batteries are not applicable to high temperature automotive applications. A safer alternative to organic electrolytes is solid polymer electrolytes. This work will highlight the synthesis for a graft copolymer electrolyte (GCE) poly(oxyethylene) methacrylate (POEM) to a block with a lower glass transition temperature (Tg) poly(oxyethylene) acrylate (POEA). The conduction mechanism has been discussed and it has been demonstrated the relationship between polymer segmental motion and ionic conductivity indeed has a Vogel-Tammann-Fulcher (VTF) dependence. Batteries containing commercially available LP30 organic (LiPF6 in ethylene carbonate (EC):dimethyl carbonate (DMC) at a 1:1 ratio) and GCE were cycled at ambient temperature. It was found that at ambient temperature, the batteries containing GCE showed a greater overpotential when compared to LP30 electrolyte. However at temperatures greater than 60 °C, the GCE cell exhibited much lower overpotential due to fast polymer electrolyte conductivity and nearly the full theoretical specific capacity of 170 mAh/g was accessed.

  10. Injuries from combat explosions in Iraq: injury type, location, and severity.

    PubMed

    Eskridge, Susan L; Macera, Caroline A; Galarneau, Michael R; Holbrook, Troy L; Woodruff, Susan I; MacGregor, Andrew J; Morton, Deborah J; Shaffer, Richard A

    2012-10-01

    Explosions have caused a greater percentage of injuries in Iraq and Afghanistan than in any other large-scale conflict. Improvements in body armour and field medical care have improved survival and changed the injury profile of service personnel. This study's objective was to determine the nature, body region, and severity of injuries caused by an explosion episode in male service personnel. A descriptive analysis was conducted of 4623 combat explosion episodes in Iraq between March 2004 and December 2007. The Barell matrix was used to describe the nature and body regions of injuries due to a combat explosion. A total of 17,637 International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) codes were assigned to the 4623 explosion episodes, with an average of 3.8 ICD-9 codes per episode. The most frequent single injury type was a mild traumatic brain injury (TBI; 10.8%). Other frequent injuries were open wounds in the lower extremity (8.8%) and open wounds of the face (8.2%), which includes tympanic membrane rupture. The extremities were the body regions most often injured (41.3%), followed by head and neck (37.4%) and torso (8.8%). The results of this study support previous observations of TBI as a pre-eminent injury of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, with mild TBI as the most common single injury in this large cohort of explosion episodes. The extremities had the highest frequency of injuries for any one body region. The majority of the explosion episodes resulted in more than one injury, and the variety of injuries across nearly every body region and injury type suggests a complex nature of explosion injuries. Understanding the constellation of injuries commonly caused by explosions will assist in the mitigation, treatment, and rehabilitation of the effects of these injuries. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Strain measurement based battery testing

    DOEpatents

    Xu, Jeff Qiang; Steiber, Joe; Wall, Craig M.; Smith, Robert; Ng, Cheuk

    2017-05-23

    A method and system for strain-based estimation of the state of health of a battery, from an initial state to an aged state, is provided. A strain gauge is applied to the battery. A first strain measurement is performed on the battery, using the strain gauge, at a selected charge capacity of the battery and at the initial state of the battery. A second strain measurement is performed on the battery, using the strain gauge, at the selected charge capacity of the battery and at the aged state of the battery. The capacity degradation of the battery is estimated as the difference between the first and second strain measurements divided by the first strain measurement.

  12. Totally confined explosive welding. [apparatus to reduce noise level and protect personnel during explosive bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, L. J. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A method and associated apparatus for confining the undesirable by-products and limiting noise of explosive welding are discussed. The apparatus consists fo a simple enclosure into which the explosive is placed and within which the explosion occurs. The shape of the enclosure, the placement of the explosive, and the manner in which the enclosure is placed upon the material to be welded determine the force of the explosion transmitted to the proposed bond area. The explosion is totally confined within the enclosure thus reducing the noise level and preventing debris from being strewn about to contaminate the weld area or create personnel hazards.

  13. An explosively driven high-power microwave pulsed power system.

    PubMed

    Elsayed, M A; Neuber, A A; Dickens, J C; Walter, J W; Kristiansen, M; Altgilbers, L L

    2012-02-01

    The increased popularity of high power microwave systems and the various sources to drive them is the motivation behind the work to be presented. A stand-alone, self-contained explosively driven high power microwave pulsed power system has been designed, built, and tested at Texas Tech University's Center for Pulsed Power and Power Electronics. The system integrates four different sub-units that are composed of a battery driven prime power source utilizing capacitive energy storage, a dual stage helical flux compression generator as the main energy amplification device, an integrated power conditioning system with inductive energy storage including a fast opening electro-explosive switch, and a triode reflex geometry virtual cathode oscillator as the microwave radiating source. This system has displayed a measured electrical source power level of over 5 GW and peak radiated microwaves of about 200 MW. It is contained within a 15 cm diameter housing and measures 2 m in length, giving a housing volume of slightly less than 39 l. The system and its sub-components have been extensively studied, both as integrated and individual units, to further expand on components behavior and operation physics. This report will serve as a detailed design overview of each of the four subcomponents and provide detailed analysis of the overall system performance and benchmarks.

  14. An explosively driven high-power microwave pulsed power system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsayed, M. A.; Neuber, A. A.; Dickens, J. C.; Walter, J. W.; Kristiansen, M.; Altgilbers, L. L.

    2012-02-01

    The increased popularity of high power microwave systems and the various sources to drive them is the motivation behind the work to be presented. A stand-alone, self-contained explosively driven high power microwave pulsed power system has been designed, built, and tested at Texas Tech University's Center for Pulsed Power and Power Electronics. The system integrates four different sub-units that are composed of a battery driven prime power source utilizing capacitive energy storage, a dual stage helical flux compression generator as the main energy amplification device, an integrated power conditioning system with inductive energy storage including a fast opening electro-explosive switch, and a triode reflex geometry virtual cathode oscillator as the microwave radiating source. This system has displayed a measured electrical source power level of over 5 GW and peak radiated microwaves of about 200 MW. It is contained within a 15 cm diameter housing and measures 2 m in length, giving a housing volume of slightly less than 39 l. The system and its sub-components have been extensively studied, both as integrated and individual units, to further expand on components behavior and operation physics. This report will serve as a detailed design overview of each of the four subcomponents and provide detailed analysis of the overall system performance and benchmarks.

  15. Rapid laccolith intrusion driven by explosive volcanic eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Jonathan M.; Cordonnier, Benoit; Schipper, C. Ian; Tuffen, Hugh; Baumann, Tobias S.; Feisel, Yves

    2016-11-01

    Magmatic intrusions and volcanic eruptions are intimately related phenomena. Shallow magma intrusion builds subsurface reservoirs that are drained by volcanic eruptions. Thus, the long-held view is that intrusions must precede and feed eruptions. Here we show that explosive eruptions can also cause magma intrusion. We provide an account of a rapidly emplaced laccolith during the 2011 rhyolite eruption of Cordón Caulle, Chile. Remote sensing indicates that an intrusion began after eruption onset and caused severe (>200 m) uplift over 1 month. Digital terrain models resolve a laccolith-shaped body ~0.8 km3. Deformation and conduit flow models indicate laccolith depths of only ~20-200 m and overpressures (~1-10 MPa) that likely stemmed from conduit blockage. Our results show that explosive eruptions may rapidly force significant quantities of magma in the crust to build laccoliths. These iconic intrusions can thus be interpreted as eruptive features that pose unique and previously unrecognized volcanic hazards.

  16. Lead toxicity in battery workers.

    PubMed

    Qasim, Saeeda Fouzia; Baloch, Malka

    2014-11-01

    Lead poisoning is a medical condition caused by increased levels of lead in the body. Routes of exposure include contaminated air, water, soil, food and consumer products. Occupational exposure is the main cause of lead poisoning in the adults. Two cases of occupational lead poisoning in adult battery workers are hereby presented. Both male patients had initial non-specific symptoms of intermittent abdominal pain, fatigue and headache for 6 - 8 years. Later on, they developed psychosis, slurred speech, tremors of hands and initially underwent treatment for Parkinsonism and Wilson's disease because of clinical misdiagnosis. They were diagnosed with lead poisoning later and were treated successfully with lead chelator (CaNa2 EDTA).

  17. Development of satellite borne nickel hydrogen battery experiment equipment for ETS-6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwashima, Saburou; Kamimori, Norimitsu; Kusawake, Hiroaki; Takahashi, Kazumichi

    1992-08-01

    An overview of the support rendered for the Engineering Test Satellite-6 (ETS-6) system integration test and protoflight test by the ETS-6 borne experimental nickel hydrogen battery development part is presented. Articles in the ETS-6 specifications and procedures related to the experimental battery were prepared or supported in preparation because of the battery's special characteristics such as its automatic control dependency on the bus voltage, thermal sensitivity equivalent to that of other batteries and so forth. System tests were witnessed and the acquired data were evaluated. Charging characteristics from 0 V were verified at trickle charging rate, using a flight scale model of Nickel Hydrogen (Ni-H2) Battery (NHB) after long term storage and an engineering model of the Ni-H2 Battery Controller (NHC). Requests for approval were submitted to the related self governing bodies in accordance with the Explosives Control Law when NHB's were charged and discharged. Installation and calibration data acquisition of the inner pressure sensors for the Ni-H2 battery cells for the flight model NHB were conducted and the battery assembly was started.

  18. Electronic nicotine delivery system (ENDS) battery-related burns presenting to US emergency departments, 2016.

    PubMed

    Corey, Catherine G; Chang, Joanne T; Rostron, Brian L

    2018-03-05

    Currently, an estimated 7.9 million US adults use electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS). Although published reports have identified fires and explosions related to use of ENDS since 2009, these reports do not provide national estimates of burn injuries associated with ENDS batteries in the US. We analyzed nationally representative data provided in the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS) to estimate the number of US emergency department (ED) visits for burn injuries associated with ENDS batteries. We reviewed the case narrative field to gain additional insights into the circumstances of the burn injury. In 2016, 26 ENDS battery-related burn cases were captured by NEISS, which translates to a national estimate of 1007 (95%CI: 357-1657) injuries presenting in US EDs. Most of the burns were thermal burns (80.4%) and occurred to the upper leg/lower trunk (77.3%). Examination of the case narrative field indicated that at least 20 of the burn injuries occurred while ENDS batteries were in the user's pocket. Our study provides valuable information for understanding the current burden of ENDS battery-related burn injuries treated in US EDs. The nature and circumstances of the injuries suggest these incidents were unintentional and would potentially be prevented through battery design requirements, battery testing standards and public education related to ENDS battery safety.

  19. Lead-acid battery research and development—a vital key to winning new business

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullock, Kathryn R.

    Battery strings are operated in a partial-state-of-charge mode (PSoC) in several new and changing applications for lead-acid batteries, in which the battery is seldom, if ever, fully charged or discharged. The lead battery industry faces new challenges as additional failure modes become evident in these PSoC applications. Without overcharge, cell imbalances caused by variations in cell temperature will cause premature failures. Valve-regulated lead-acid batteries are especially susceptible because of the heat generated by oxygen recombination at the negative plate. Improved thermal properties are shown by a proprietary battery design that combines absorptive glass mat and gelled acid technologies. Well-designed power systems are also required to reduce cell-to-cell temperature variations and, thereby, increase battery life.

  20. Explosive response model evaluation using the explosive H6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, Gerrit T.; Burns, Joseph

    2000-04-01

    Reactive rate model parameters for a two term Lee Tarver [simplified ignition and growth (SIG)] model were obtained for the explosive H6 from modified gap test data. These model was used to perform simulations of the underwater sensitivity test (UST) using the CTH hydrocode. Reaction was predicted in the simulations for the same water gaps that reaction was observed in the UST. The expansions observed for the UST samples were not simulated correctly, and this is attributed to the density equilibrium conditions imposed between unreacted and reacted components in CTH for the Lee-Tarver model.

  1. Severity of button batteries ingestions: data from French Poison Control Centres between 1999 and 2015.

    PubMed

    Labadie, Magali; O'Mahony, Elisabeth; Capaldo, Lise; Courtois, Arnaud; Lamireau, Thierry; Nisse, Patrick; Blanc-Brisset, Ingrid; Puskarczyk, Emmanuel

    2017-12-13

    Although the ingestion of button batteries is an infrequent situation, it leads to a significant risk of causing serious damage. This study was carried out to describe all the cases of button battery ingestion recorded by the French Poison Control Centers over 16 years. All the cases of button battery ingestion were recorded from 1 January 1999 to the end of June 2015, analysed (age, sex, number of ingested button batteries, clinical signs and treatments) and graded for severity according to the poisoning severity score. The incidence of button batteries ingestions was constant over the 16-year period, with an average of 266±98.5 cases per year and a total of 4030 cases. Nevertheless, 21 cases were severe and two deaths occurred. Interestingly, for the two patients who died, the battery was stuck in the oesophagus and they presented anorexia and/or dysphagia, abdominal pain and fever and in one case, a melena 3 weeks after ingestion. Importantly, these symptoms were observed even if the battery was expelled in one fatal case. Ingestions of button batteries still occur and may cause serious damage, especially in children, and if the button battery is stuck in the oesophagus as it might cause severe symptoms. Patients who have ingested a button battery must be directed to the emergency department for medical evaluation, even if the button battery has been expelled from the body and even more if gastrointestinal symptoms are present.

  2. Two Sources of Nonisotropic Radiation From Underground Explosions in Granite

    SciTech Connect

    Vorobiev, O. Yu.

    Significant tangential ground motion observed during underground explosions makes it difficult to distinguish them from natural earthquakes. Such motion can be generated by the source geometry and emplacement conditions, by the heterogeneous nature of the rock mass (mechanical properties may vary in space due to the presence of cracks, joints, faults, and various geologic layers) and also by the nonuniform in situ stress state. The last mechanism is increasingly important with depth when the difference in main principal stresses becomes significant. This paper is focused on the role of material strength of the rock mass in generation of nonradial motionmore » during explosions in prestressed media. Numerical modeling of underground chemical explosions in granite at various depths has been conducted to compare two possible mechanisms of shear wave generation. The first, caused by rock mass anisotropy, is important at shallow depth. The second is related to elastic-plastic relaxation around the cavity created by the explosion. As a result, tangential motions for these two mechanisms have different signatures.« less

  3. Two Sources of Nonisotropic Radiation From Underground Explosions in Granite

    DOE PAGES

    Vorobiev, O. Yu.

    2017-10-23

    Significant tangential ground motion observed during underground explosions makes it difficult to distinguish them from natural earthquakes. Such motion can be generated by the source geometry and emplacement conditions, by the heterogeneous nature of the rock mass (mechanical properties may vary in space due to the presence of cracks, joints, faults, and various geologic layers) and also by the nonuniform in situ stress state. The last mechanism is increasingly important with depth when the difference in main principal stresses becomes significant. This paper is focused on the role of material strength of the rock mass in generation of nonradial motionmore » during explosions in prestressed media. Numerical modeling of underground chemical explosions in granite at various depths has been conducted to compare two possible mechanisms of shear wave generation. The first, caused by rock mass anisotropy, is important at shallow depth. The second is related to elastic-plastic relaxation around the cavity created by the explosion. As a result, tangential motions for these two mechanisms have different signatures.« less

  4. Primary zinc-air batteries for space power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg, Bobby J.; Bourland, Deborah S.; Merry, Glenn; Putt, Ron

    1992-01-01

    Prismatic HR and LC cells and batteries were built and tested, and they performed well with respect to the program goals of high capacity and high rate capability at specific energies. The HR batteries suffered reduced utilizations owing to dryout at the 2 and 3 A rates for the 50 C tests owing to the requirement for forced convection. The LC batteries suffered reduced utilizations under all conditions owing to the chimney effect at 1 G, although this effect would not occur at 0 G. An empirical model was developed which accurately predicted utilizations and average voltages for single cells, although thermal effects encountered during battery testing caused significant deviations, both positive and negative, from the model. Based on the encouraging results of the test program, we believe that the zinc-air primary battery of a flat, stackable configuration can serve as a high performance and safe power source for a range of space applications.

  5. Screening Li-Ion Batteries for Internal Shorts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darcy, Eric

    2006-01-01

    The extremely high cost of aerospace battery failures due to internal shorts makes it essential that their occurrence be very rare, if not eliminated altogether. With Li-ion cells/batteries, the potentially catastrophic safety hazard that some internal shorts present adds additional incentive for prevention. Prevention can be achieved by design, manufacturing measures, and testing. Specifically for NASA s spacesuit application, a Li-ion polymer pouch cell battery design is in its final stages of production. One of the 20 flight batteries fabricated and tested developed a cell internal short, which did not present a safety hazard, but has required revisiting the entire manufacturing and testing process. Herein are the details of the failure investigation that followed to get to root cause of the internal short and the corrective actions that will be taken. The resulting lessons learned are applicable to most Li-ion battery applications.

  6. Steam explosion pretreatment of softwood: the effect of the explosive decompression on enzymatic digestibility.

    PubMed

    Pielhop, Thomas; Amgarten, Janick; von Rohr, Philipp Rudolf; Studer, Michael H

    2016-01-01

    Steam explosion pretreatment has been examined in many studies for enhancing the enzymatic digestibility of lignocellulosic biomass and is currently the most common pretreatment method in commercial biorefineries. The information available about the effect of the explosive decompression on the biochemical conversion is, however, very limited, and no studies prove that the latter is actually enhanced by the explosion. Hence, it is of great value to discern between the effect of the explosion on the one hand and the steaming on the other hand, to identify their particular influences on enzymatic digestibility. The effect of the explosive decompression in the steam explosion pretreatment of spruce wood chips on their enzymatic cellulose digestibility was studied systematically. The explosion had a high influence on digestibility, improving it by up to 90 % compared to a steam pretreatment without explosion. Two factors were identified to be essentially responsible for the effect of the explosion on enzymatic digestibility: pretreatment severity and pressure difference of the explosion. A higher pretreatment severity can soften up and weaken the lignocellulose structure more, so that the explosion can better break up the biomass and decrease its particle size, which enhances its digestibility. In particular, increasing the pressure difference of the explosion leads to more defibration, a smaller particle size and a better digestibility. Though differences were found in the micro- and nanostructure of exploded and non-exploded biomass, the only influence of the explosion on digestibility was found to be the macroscopic particle size reduction. Steam explosion treatments with a high severity and a high pressure difference of the explosion lead to a comparatively high cellulose digestibility of the-typically very recalcitrant-softwood biomass. This is the first study to show that explosion can enhance the enzymatic digestibility of lignocellulosic biomass. If the

  7. Eigenvalue Detonation of Combined Effects Aluminized Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capellos, Christos; Baker, Ernest; Balas, Wendy; Nicolich, Steven; Stiel, Leonard

    2007-06-01

    This paper reports on the development of theory and performance for recently developed combined effects aluminized explosives. Traditional high energy explosives used for metal pushing incorporate high loading percentages of HMX or RDX, whereas blast explosives incorporate some percentage of aluminum. However, the high blast explosives produce increased blast energies, with reduced metal pushing capability due to late time aluminum reaction. Metal pushing capability refers to the early volume expansion work produced during the first few volume expansions associated with cylinder wall velocities and Gurney energies. Our Recently developed combined effects aluminized explosives (PAX-29C, PAX-30, PAX-42) are capable of achieving excellent metal pushing and high blast energies. Traditional Chapman-Jouguet detonation theory does not explain the observed detonation states achieved by these combined effects explosives. This work demonstrates, with the use of cylinder expansion data and thermochemical code calculations (JAGUAR and CHEETAH), that eigenvalue detonation theory explains the observed behavior.

  8. Explosives Detection: Exploitation of the Physical Signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, David

    2010-10-01

    Explosives based terrorism is an ongoing threat that is evolving with respect to implementation, configuration and materials used. There are a variety of devices designed to detect explosive devices, however, each technology has limitations and operational constraints. A full understanding of the signatures available for detection coupled with the array of detection choices can be used to develop a conceptual model of an explosives screening operation. Physics based sensors provide a robust approach to explosives detection, typically through the identification of anomalies, and are currently used for screening in airports around the world. The next generation of detectors for explosives detection will need to be more sensitive and selective, as well as integrate seamlessly with devices focused on chemical signatures. An appreciation for the details of the physical signature exploitation in cluttered environments with time, space, and privacy constraints is necessary for effective explosives screening of people, luggage, cargo, and vehicles.

  9. Battery Cell Balancing Optimisation for Battery Management System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusof, M. S.; Toha, S. F.; Kamisan, N. A.; Hashim, N. N. W. N.; Abdullah, M. A.

    2017-03-01

    Battery cell balancing in every electrical component such as home electronic equipment and electric vehicle is very important to extend battery run time which is simplified known as battery life. The underlying solution to equalize the balance of cell voltage and SOC between the cells when they are in complete charge. In order to control and extend the battery life, the battery cell balancing is design and manipulated in such way as well as shorten the charging process. Active and passive cell balancing strategies as a unique hallmark enables the balancing of the battery with the excellent performances configuration so that the charging process will be faster. The experimental and simulation covers an analysis of how fast the battery can balance for certain time. The simulation based analysis is conducted to certify the use of optimisation in active or passive cell balancing to extend battery life for long periods of time.

  10. Explosive genetic evidence for explosive human population growth

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Feng; Keinan, Alon

    2016-01-01

    The advent of next-generation sequencing technology has allowed the collection of vast amounts of genetic variation data. A recurring discovery from studying larger and larger samples of individuals had been the extreme, previously unexpected, excess of very rare genetic variants, which has been shown to be mostly due to the recent explosive growth of human populations. Here, we review recent literature that inferred recent changes in population size in different human populations and with different methodologies, with many pointing to recent explosive growth, especially in European populations for which more data has been available. We also review the state-of-the-art methods and software for the inference of historical population size changes that lead to these discoveries. Finally, we discuss the implications of recent population growth on personalized genomics, on purifying selection in the non-equilibrium state it entails and, as a consequence, on the genetic architecture underlying complex disease and the performance of mapping methods in discovering rare variants that contribute to complex disease risk. PMID:27710906

  11. Concepts of Ideal and Nonideal Explosives.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    Akst and J. Hershkowitz, "Explosive Performance Modification by Cosolidifaction of Ammonium Nitrate with Fuels ," Technical Report 4987, Picatinny...explosives Equations of state Diameter effect Ammonium nitrate 20. ASSrRACr (ca’mes r w re t N netwezy ad identity by block number) The purpose of...this report is to stimulate discussion on the nonideality of ammonium nitrate and its composite explosives. The concept of ideal and non- ideal

  12. Source Amplitudes of NTS Explosions Inferred from Rayleigh Waves at Albuquerque and Tucson

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-06-01

    explosions almost always cause spallation near the free surface (e.g., Eisler and Chilton, 1964). When the spalled material falls back to the surface...spall closure), some impulse is delivered and a large signal associated with spall closure can often be observed on near- field recordings (e.g., Eisler ...made for the extent of the spall region ( Eisler and Chilton, 1964; Viecelli, 1973; Sobel, 1978). Viecelli (1973) studied the data for six explosions

  13. Passivating Li-Ion Batteries in Orbit at the End of the Spacecraft's Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcindor, Peter; Kimber, Rick; Remy, Stephane; Prevot, Didier

    2014-08-01

    International focus on the "Clean Space Initiative", as discussed at the ESA workshop "EoL Electrical Passivation" held on October 11th 2013 identified new legislation (REACh, RoHS and LOS). This paper concerns itself with the prevention of Li-ion battery explosion post end of mission as the spacecraft systems remain active well beyond the initial design expectations and beyond classical reliability design predictions. The main risks to Li-ion energy storage battery systems is the prevention of over charging and over discharging, both these scenarios result in the build up of internal pressure ultimately resulting in venting of high pressure gas. To warrant against such risk legislation requires that batteries are "Passivated" within the predictable life of the spacecraft systems. This paper proposes a simple method for the passivation of Li-ion batteries that relies only on the normal systems that form part of most present day spacecraft heritage.

  14. Battery Vent Mechanism And Method

    DOEpatents

    Ching, Larry K. W.

    2000-02-15

    Disclosed herein is a venting mechanism for a battery. The venting mechanism includes a battery vent structure which is located on the battery cover and may be integrally formed therewith. The venting mechanism includes an opening extending through the battery cover such that the opening communicates with a plurality of battery cells located within the battery case. The venting mechanism also includes a vent manifold which attaches to the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes a first opening which communicates with the battery vent structure opening and second and third openings which allow the vent manifold to be connected to two separate conduits. In this manner, a plurality of batteries may be interconnected for venting purposes, thus eliminating the need to provide separate vent lines for each battery. The vent manifold may be attached to the battery vent structure by a spin-welding technique. To facilitate this technique, the vent manifold may be provided with a flange portion which fits into a corresponding groove portion on the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes an internal chamber which is large enough to completely house a conventional battery flame arrester and overpressure safety valve. In this manner, the vent manifold, when installed, lessens the likelihood of tampering with the flame arrester and safety valve.

  15. Battery venting system and method

    DOEpatents

    Casale, T.J.; Ching, L.K.W.; Baer, J.T.; Swan, D.H.

    1999-01-05

    Disclosed herein is a venting mechanism for a battery. The venting mechanism includes a battery vent structure which is located on the battery cover and may be integrally formed therewith. The venting mechanism includes an opening extending through the battery cover such that the opening communicates with a plurality of battery cells located within the battery case. The venting mechanism also includes a vent manifold which attaches to the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes a first opening which communicates with the battery vent structure opening and second and third openings which allow the vent manifold to be connected to two separate conduits. In this manner, a plurality of batteries may be interconnected for venting purposes, thus eliminating the need to provide separate vent lines for each battery. The vent manifold may be attached to the battery vent structure by a spin-welding technique. To facilitate this technique, the vent manifold may be provided with a flange portion which fits into a corresponding groove portion on the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes an internal chamber which is large enough to completely house a conventional battery flame arrester and overpressure safety valve. In this manner, the vent manifold, when installed, lessens the likelihood of tampering with the flame arrester and safety valve. 8 figs.

  16. Battery venting system and method

    DOEpatents

    Casale, Thomas J.; Ching, Larry K. W.; Baer, Jose T.; Swan, David H.

    1999-01-05

    Disclosed herein is a venting mechanism for a battery. The venting mechanism includes a battery vent structure which is located on the battery cover and may be integrally formed therewith. The venting mechanism includes an opening extending through the battery cover such that the opening communicates with a plurality of battery cells located within the battery case. The venting mechanism also includes a vent manifold which attaches to the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes a first opening which communicates with the battery vent structure opening and second and third openings which allow the vent manifold to be connected to two separate conduits. In this manner, a plurality of batteries may be interconnected for venting purposes, thus eliminating the need to provide separate vent lines for each battery. The vent manifold may be attached to the battery vent structure by a spin-welding technique. To facilitate this technique, the vent manifold may be provided with a flange portion which fits into a corresponding groove portion on the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes an internal chamber which is large enough to completely house a conventional battery flame arrester and overpressure safety valve. In this manner, the vent manifold, when installed, lessens the likelihood of tampering with the flame arrester and safety valve.

  17. Explosion Welding for Hermetic Containerization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolgin, Benjamin; Sanok, Joseph

    2003-01-01

    A container designed for storing samples of hazardous material features a double wall, part of which is sacrificed during an explosion-welding process in which the container is sealed and transferred to a clean environment. The major advantage of this container sealing process is that once the samples have been sealed inside, the outer wall of what remains of the container is a clean surface that has not come into contact with the environment from which the samples were taken. Thus, there is no need to devise a decontamination process capable of mitigating all hazards that might be posed by unanticipated radioactive, chemical, and/or biological contamination of the outside of the container. The container sealing method was originally intended to be used to return samples from Mars to Earth, but it could also be used to store samples of hazardous materials, without the need to decontaminate its outer surface. The process stages are shown. In its initial double-wall form, the volume between the walls is isolated from the environment; in other words, the outer wall (which is later sacrificed) initially serves to protect the inner container from contamination. The sample is placed inside the container through an opening at one end, then the container is placed into a transfer dock/lid. The surfaces that will be welded together under the explosive have been coated with a soft metallic sacrificial layer. During the explosion, the sacrificial layer is ejected, and the container walls are welded together, creating a strong metallic seal. The inner container is released during the same event and enters the clean environment.

  18. Stellar Explosions: Hydrodynamics and Nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jose, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Stars are the main factories of element production in the universe through a suite of complex and intertwined physical processes. Such stellar alchemy is driven by multiple nuclear interactions that through eons have transformed the pristine, metal-poor ashes leftover by the Big Bang into a cosmos with 100 distinct chemical species. The products of stellar nucleosynthesis frequently get mixed inside stars by convective transport or through hydrodynamic instabilities, and a fraction of them is eventually ejected into the interstellar medium, thus polluting the cosmos with gas and dust. The study of the physics of the stars and their role as nucleosynthesis factories owes much to cross-fertilization of different, somehow disconnected fields, ranging from observational astronomy, computational astrophysics, and cosmochemistry to experimental and theoretical nuclear physics. Few books have simultaneously addressed the multidisciplinary nature of this field in an engaging way suitable for students and young scientists. Providing the required multidisciplinary background in a coherent way has been the driving force for Stellar Explosions: Hydrodynamics and Nucleosynthesis. Written by a specialist in stellar astrophysics, this book presents a rigorous but accessible treatment of the physics of stellar explosions from a multidisciplinary perspective at the crossroads of computational astrophysics, observational astronomy, cosmochemistry, and nuclear physics. Basic concepts from all these different fields are applied to the study of classical and recurrent novae, type I and II supernovae, X-ray bursts and superbursts, and stellar mergers. The book shows how a multidisciplinary approach has been instrumental in our understanding of nucleosynthesis in stars, particularly during explosive events.

  19. Stellar Explosions: Hydrodynamics and Nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    José, Jordi

    2015-12-01

    Stars are the main factories of element production in the universe through a suite of complex and intertwined physical processes. Such stellar alchemy is driven by multiple nuclear interactions that through eons have transformed the pristine, metal-poor ashes leftover by the Big Bang into a cosmos with 100 distinct chemical species. The products of stellar nucleosynthesis frequently get mixed inside stars by convective transport or through hydrodynamic instabilities, and a fraction of them is eventually ejected into the interstellar medium, thus polluting the cosmos with gas and dust. The study of the physics of the stars and their role as nucleosynthesis factories owes much to cross-fertilization of different, somehow disconnected fields, ranging from observational astronomy, computational astrophysics, and cosmochemistry to experimental and theoretical nuclear physics. Few books have simultaneously addressed the multidisciplinary nature of this field in an engaging way suitable for students and young scientists. Providing the required multidisciplinary background in a coherent way has been the driving force for Stellar Explosions: Hydrodynamics and Nucleosynthesis. Written by a specialist in stellar astrophysics, this book presents a rigorous but accessible treatment of the physics of stellar explosions from a multidisciplinary perspective at the crossroads of computational astrophysics, observational astronomy, cosmochemistry, and nuclear physics. Basic concepts from all these different fields are applied to the study of classical and recurrent novae, type I and II supernovae, X-ray bursts and superbursts, and stellar mergers. The book shows how a multidisciplinary approach has been instrumental in our understanding of nucleosynthesis in stars, particularly during explosive events.

  20. 76 FR 64974 - Commerce in Explosives; List of Explosive Materials (2011R-18T)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-19

    ... [dinitropentano nitrile]. Dynamite. E EDDN [ethylene diamine dinitrate]. EDNA [ethylenedinitramine]. Ednatol. EDNP [ethyl 4,4-dinitropentanoate]. EGDN [ethylene glycol dinitrate]. Erythritol tetranitrate explosives..., trinitroglycerine]. Nitroglycide. Nitroglycol [ethylene glycol dinitrate, EGDN]. Nitroguanidine explosives...

  1. Explosive nephrolithopaxy: reality or fiction?

    PubMed

    Miller, R A; Wickham, J E; Reynolds, S E; Westcott, A; Bailey, A

    1984-05-01

    The use of silver and lead azide explosive charges for the percutaneous distintegration of renal calculi has been investigated. Charges of 10 mg or more reliably reduced calculi to fragments of extractable size; however, the concomitant tissue effects would preclude the use of such charges clinically. Smaller charges require multiple applications. High-speed flash photography demonstrated the unfocussed nature of these discharges. Considerable improvements are anticipated when the shock waves are focused. The use of Nonel tubing is described, and future developments are discussed.

  2. Fundamental Research in Explosive Magnetohydrodynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-02-01

    nearly 1 Torr. For repe- titive pulsing at the rate of several per second, a giant vacuum pumping system would be required to evacuate about 50 m of... pumping system. The need for a superccnductinq magnet arises from the desire to moke. the oxplosive charge a reasonable tticknass. The pulse duration...NDiTO *133 I WINDINGS S~EXPLOSIVE CHARGE S. 80 Kg REPLACEABLE~~DIAPHRA•M ! p I or OF IRON 500 COAXIAL V MAGNET CABLES TO PUMP YOKE FLASH LAMPS IRON

  3. Friction Sensitivity of Primary Explosives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    diffeomI from. Report) ISI. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES It. KEY WORDS (Contflnuo on rvotr.. oldo. it nec~oaoty and Identify by block ri,uobr) Friction...friction senisitivity. Primary explosives RD 1333 lead azide, dextrinated lead azide, polyvinyl-alcohol (PVA)-lead a~.ide, colloidal lead azide, nocrnal lead...results for dextrinated lead azide duPont 52-127 13 4 A comparison of friction data at 10% probability of initiation 14 FIGURES 1 Working surfaces of BAM

  4. Battery charging control methods, electric vehicle charging methods, battery charging apparatuses and rechargeable battery systems

    DOEpatents

    Tuffner, Francis K [Richland, WA; Kintner-Meyer, Michael C. W. [Richland, WA; Hammerstrom, Donald J [West Richland, WA; Pratt, Richard M [Richland, WA

    2012-05-22

    Battery charging control methods, electric vehicle charging methods, battery charging apparatuses and rechargeable battery systems. According to one aspect, a battery charging control method includes accessing information regarding a presence of at least one of a surplus and a deficiency of electrical energy upon an electrical power distribution system at a plurality of different moments in time, and using the information, controlling an adjustment of an amount of the electrical energy provided from the electrical power distribution system to a rechargeable battery to charge the rechargeable battery.

  5. Method and apparatus for detecting explosives

    DOEpatents

    Moore, David Steven [Santa Fe, NM

    2011-05-10

    A method and apparatus is provided for detecting explosives by thermal imaging. The explosive material is subjected to a high energy wave which can be either a sound wave or an electromagnetic wave which will initiate a chemical reaction in the explosive material which chemical reaction will produce heat. The heat is then sensed by a thermal imaging device which will provide a signal to a computing device which will alert a user of the apparatus to the possibility of an explosive device being present.

  6. A Chemical Monitoring Program of the Explosion Products in Underwater Explosion Tests

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-04-04

    CLASSIFICATION QF THIS PAGE- (When Date Entered) UNCLASSIFIED tL,URJTY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE(Then Data Entered) 20.and determination of various explosion...to institute a chemical monitoring program of the explosion products in underwater explosion tests, to determine monitoring parameters, and to...27 3.2.3 Samplers 28 3.2.4 Storage of Sediment Samples 32 IV. DETERMINATION OF EXPLOSION PRODUCTS 32 4.1 DESIGN OF MEASUREMENT SYSTEM 32 4.1.1

  7. Microfluidic redox battery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Wook; Goulet, Marc-Antoni; Kjeang, Erik

    2013-07-07

    A miniaturized microfluidic battery is proposed, which is the first membraneless redox battery demonstrated to date. This unique concept capitalizes on dual-pass flow-through porous electrodes combined with stratified, co-laminar flow to generate electrical power on-chip. The fluidic design is symmetric to allow for both charging and discharging operations in forward, reverse, and recirculation modes. The proof-of-concept device fabricated using low-cost materials integrated in a microfluidic chip is shown to produce competitive power levels when operated on a vanadium redox electrolyte. A complete charge/discharge cycle is performed to demonstrate its operation as a rechargeable battery, which is an important step towards providing sustainable power to lab-on-a-chip and microelectronic applications.

  8. Safe battery solvents

    DOEpatents

    Harrup, Mason K.; Delmastro, Joseph R.; Stewart, Frederick F.; Luther, Thomas A.

    2007-10-23

    An ion transporting solvent maintains very low vapor pressure, contains flame retarding elements, and is nontoxic. The solvent in combination with common battery electrolyte salts can be used to replace the current carbonate electrolyte solution, creating a safer battery. It can also be used in combination with polymer gels or solid polymer electrolytes to produce polymer batteries with enhanced conductivity characteristics. The solvents may comprise a class of cyclic and acyclic low molecular weight phosphazenes compounds, comprising repeating phosphorus and nitrogen units forming a core backbone and ion-carrying pendent groups bound to the phosphorus. In preferred embodiments, the cyclic phosphazene comprises at least 3 phosphorus and nitrogen units, and the pendent groups are polyethers, polythioethers, polyether/polythioethers or any combination thereof, and/or other groups preferably comprising other atoms from Group 6B of the periodic table of elements.

  9. 27 CFR 555.181 - Reporting of plastic explosives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Reporting of plastic..., FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE EXPLOSIVES COMMERCE IN EXPLOSIVES Marking of Plastic Explosives § 555.181 Reporting of plastic explosives. All persons, other than an agency of the United States...

  10. 27 CFR 70.445 - Commerce in explosives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Commerce in explosives. 70... Cartridges, and Explosives § 70.445 Commerce in explosives. Part 555 of title 27 CFR contains the regulations..., explosives, (b) Permits for users who buy or transport explosives in interstate or foreign commerce, (c...

  11. 27 CFR 70.445 - Commerce in explosives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Commerce in explosives. 70... Cartridges, and Explosives § 70.445 Commerce in explosives. Part 555 of title 27 CFR contains the regulations..., explosives, (b) Permits for users who buy or transport explosives in interstate or foreign commerce, (c...

  12. 27 CFR 70.445 - Commerce in explosives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Commerce in explosives. 70... Cartridges, and Explosives § 70.445 Commerce in explosives. Part 555 of title 27 CFR contains the regulations..., explosives, (b) Permits for users who buy or transport explosives in interstate or foreign commerce, (c...

  13. 27 CFR 70.445 - Commerce in explosives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Commerce in explosives. 70... Cartridges, and Explosives § 70.445 Commerce in explosives. Part 555 of title 27 CFR contains the regulations..., explosives, (b) Permits for users who buy or transport explosives in interstate or foreign commerce, (c...

  14. 27 CFR 70.445 - Commerce in explosives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Commerce in explosives. 70... Cartridges, and Explosives § 70.445 Commerce in explosives. Part 55 of title 27 CFR contains the regulations..., explosives, (b) Permits for users who buy or transport explosives in interstate or foreign commerce, (c...

  15. 27 CFR 555.181 - Reporting of plastic explosives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reporting of plastic..., FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE EXPLOSIVES COMMERCE IN EXPLOSIVES Marking of Plastic Explosives § 555.181 Reporting of plastic explosives. All persons, other than an agency of the United States...

  16. 27 CFR 555.181 - Reporting of plastic explosives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Reporting of plastic..., FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE EXPLOSIVES COMMERCE IN EXPLOSIVES Marking of Plastic Explosives § 555.181 Reporting of plastic explosives. All persons, other than an agency of the United States...

  17. 27 CFR 555.181 - Reporting of plastic explosives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Reporting of plastic..., FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE EXPLOSIVES COMMERCE IN EXPLOSIVES Marking of Plastic Explosives § 555.181 Reporting of plastic explosives. All persons, other than an agency of the United States...

  18. 27 CFR 555.181 - Reporting of plastic explosives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2012-04-01 2010-04-01 true Reporting of plastic..., FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE EXPLOSIVES COMMERCE IN EXPLOSIVES Marking of Plastic Explosives § 555.181 Reporting of plastic explosives. All persons, other than an agency of the United States...

  19. Pyroclast acceleration and energy partitioning in fake explosive eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudin, Damien; Taddeucci, Jacopo; Scheu, Bettina; Valentine, Greg; Capponi, Antonio; Kueppers, Ulrich; Graettiger, Allison; Sonder, Ingo

    2014-05-01

    Explosive eruptions are characterized by the fast release of energy, with gas expansion playing a lead role. An excess of pressure may be generated either by the exsolution and accumulation of volatiles (e.g., vulcanian and strombolian explosions) or by in situ vaporization of water (e.g., phreato-magmatic explosions). The release of pressurized gas ejects magma and country rock pyroclasts at velocities that can reach several hundred of meters per second. The amount and velocity of pyroclasts is determined not only by the total released energy, but also by the system-specific dynamics of the energy transfer from gas to pyroclasts. In this context, analogue experiments are crucial, since the amount of available energy is determined. Here, we analyze three different experiments, designed to reproduce different aspects of explosive volcanism, focusing on the acceleration phase of the pyroclasts, in order to compare how the potential energy is transferred to the pyroclasts in different systems. In the first, shock-tube-type experiment, salt crystals resting in a pressurized Plexiglas cylinder are accelerated when a diaphragm set is suddenly opened, releasing the gas. In the second experiment, a pressurized air bubble is released in a water-filled Plexiglas pipe; diaphragm opening causes sudden expansion and bursting of the bubble and ejection of water droplets. In the last experiment, specifically focusing on phreatomagmatic eruptions, buried explosive charges accelerate the overlying loose material. All experiments were monitored by multiple high speed cameras and a variety of sensors. Despite the largely differing settings and processes, particle ejection velocity above the vent from the three experiments share a non-linear decay over time. Fitting this decay allows to estimate a characteristic depth that is related to the specific acceleration processes. Given that the initial available energy is experimentally controlled a priori, the information on the

  20. IMPULSIVE SPOT HEATING AND THERMAL EXPLOSION OF INTERSTELLAR GRAINS REVISITED

    SciTech Connect

    Ivlev, A. V.; Röcker, T. B.; Vasyunin, A.

    The problem of the impulsive heating of dust grains in cold, dense interstellar clouds is revisited theoretically with the aim of better understanding the leading mechanisms of the explosive desorption of icy mantles. We rigorously show that if the heating of a reactive medium occurs within a sufficiently localized spot (e.g., the heating of mantles by cosmic rays (CRs)), then the subsequent thermal evolution is characterized by a single dimensionless number λ. This number identifies a bifurcation between two distinct regimes: when λ exceeds a critical value (threshold), the heat equation exhibits the explosive solution, i.e., the thermal (chemical) explosionmore » is triggered. Otherwise, thermal diffusion causes the deposited heat to spread over the entire grain—this regime is commonly known as whole-grain heating. The theory allows us to find a critical combination of physical parameters that govern the explosion of icy mantles due to impulsive spot heating. In particular, our calculations suggest that heavy CR species (e.g., iron ions) colliding with dust are able to trigger the explosion. Based on recently calculated local CR spectra, we estimate the expected rate of explosive desorption. The efficiency of the desorption, which in principle affects all solid species independent of their binding energy, is shown to be comparable to other CR desorption mechanisms typically considered in the literature. Also, the theory allows us to estimate the maximum abundances of reactive species that may be stored in the mantles, which provides important constraints on the available astrochemical models.« less

  1. Slim Battery Modelling Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borthomieu, Y.; Prevot, D.

    2011-10-01

    Saft has developed a life prediction model for VES and MPS cells and batteries. The Saft Li-ion Model (SLIM) is a macroscopic electrochemical model based on energy (global at cell level). The main purpose is to predict the battery performances during the life for GEO, MEO and LEO missions. This model is based on electrochemical characteristics such as Energy, Capacity, EMF, Internal resistance, end of charge voltage. It uses fading and calendar law effects on energy and internal impedance vs. time, temperature, End of Charge voltage. Based on the mission profile, satellite power system characteristics, the model proposes the various battery configurations. For each configuration, the model gives the battery performances using mission figures and profiles: power, duration, DOD, end of charge voltages, temperatures during eclipses and solstices, thermal dissipations and cell failures. For the GEO/MEO missions, eclipse and solstice periods can include specific profile such as plasmic propulsion fires and specific balancing operations. For LEO missions, the model is able to simulate high power peaks to predict radar pulses. Saft's main customers have been using the SLIM model available in house for two years. The purpose is to have the satellite builder power engineers able to perform by themselves in the battery pre-dimensioning activities their own battery simulations. The simulations can be shared with Saft engineers to refine the power system designs. This model has been correlated with existing life and calendar tests performed on all the VES and MPS cells. In comparing with more than 10 year lasting life tests, the accuracy of the model from a voltage point of view is less than 10 mV at end Of Life. In addition, thethe comparison with in-orbit data has been also done. b This paper will present the main features of the SLIM software and outputs comparison with real life tests. b0

  2. Electrospun core-shell microfiber separator with thermal-triggered flame-retardant properties for lithium-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Kai; Liu, Wei; Qiu, Yongcai

    Although the energy densities of batteries continue to increase, safety problems (for example, fires and explosions) associated with the use of highly flammable liquid organic electrolytes remain a big issue, significantly hindering further practical applications of the next generation of high-energy batteries. We have fabricated a novel “smart” nonwoven electrospun separator with thermal-triggered flame-retardant properties for lithium-ion batteries. The encapsulation of a flame retardant inside a protective polymer shell has prevented direct dissolution of the retardant agent into the electrolyte, which would otherwise have negative effects on battery performance. Furthermore, during thermal runaway of the lithium-ion battery, the protective polymermore » shell would melt, triggered by the increased temperature, and the flame retardant would be released, thus effectively suppressing the combustion of the highly flammable electrolytes.« less

  3. Electrospun core-shell microfiber separator with thermal-triggered flame-retardant properties for lithium-ion batteries

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Kai; Liu, Wei; Qiu, Yongcai; ...

    2017-01-13

    Although the energy densities of batteries continue to increase, safety problems (for example, fires and explosions) associated with the use of highly flammable liquid organic electrolytes remain a big issue, significantly hindering further practical applications of the next generation of high-energy batteries. We have fabricated a novel “smart” nonwoven electrospun separator with thermal-triggered flame-retardant properties for lithium-ion batteries. The encapsulation of a flame retardant inside a protective polymer shell has prevented direct dissolution of the retardant agent into the electrolyte, which would otherwise have negative effects on battery performance. Furthermore, during thermal runaway of the lithium-ion battery, the protective polymermore » shell would melt, triggered by the increased temperature, and the flame retardant would be released, thus effectively suppressing the combustion of the highly flammable electrolytes.« less

  4. Electrospun core-shell microfiber separator with thermal-triggered flame-retardant properties for lithium-ion batteries

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kai; Liu, Wei; Qiu, Yongcai; Kong, Biao; Sun, Yongming; Chen, Zheng; Zhuo, Denys; Lin, Dingchang; Cui, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Although the energy densities of batteries continue to increase, safety problems (for example, fires and explosions) associated with the use of highly flammable liquid organic electrolytes remain a big issue, significantly hindering further practical applications of the next generation of high-energy batteries. We have fabricated a novel “smart” nonwoven electrospun separator with thermal-triggered flame-retardant properties for lithium-ion batteries. The encapsulation of a flame retardant inside a protective polymer shell has prevented direct dissolution of the retardant agent into the electrolyte, which would otherwise have negative effects on battery performance. During thermal runaway of the lithium-ion battery, the protective polymer shell would melt, triggered by the increased temperature, and the flame retardant would be released, thus effectively suppressing the combustion of the highly flammable electrolytes. PMID:28097221

  5. Electrospun core-shell microfiber separator with thermal-triggered flame-retardant properties for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai; Liu, Wei; Qiu, Yongcai; Kong, Biao; Sun, Yongming; Chen, Zheng; Zhuo, Denys; Lin, Dingchang; Cui, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Although the energy densities of batteries continue to increase, safety problems (for example, fires and explosions) associated with the use of highly flammable liquid organic electrolytes remain a big issue, significantly hindering further practical applications of the next generation of high-energy batteries. We have fabricated a novel "smart" nonwoven electrospun separator with thermal-triggered flame-retardant properties for lithium-ion batteries. The encapsulation of a flame retardant inside a protective polymer shell has prevented direct dissolution of the retardant agent into the electrolyte, which would otherwise have negative effects on battery performance. During thermal runaway of the lithium-ion battery, the protective polymer shell would melt, triggered by the increased temperature, and the flame retardant would be released, thus effectively suppressing the combustion of the highly flammable electrolytes.

  6. Impact resistant battery enclosure systems

    DOEpatents

    Tsutsui, Waterloo; Feng, Yuezhong; Chen, Weinong Wayne; Siegmund, Thomas Heinrich

    2017-10-31

    Battery enclosure arrangements for a vehicular battery system. The arrangements, capable of impact resistance include plurality of battery cells and a plurality of kinetic energy absorbing elements. The arrangements further include a frame configured to encase the plurality of the kinetic energy absorbing elements and the battery cells. In some arrangements the frame and/or the kinetic energy absorbing elements can be made of topologically interlocked materials.

  7. High energy density aluminum battery

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Gilbert M.; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Dai, Sheng; Dudney, Nancy J.; Manthiram, Arumugan; McIntyre, Timothy J.; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Liu, Hansan

    2016-10-11

    Compositions and methods of making are provided for a high energy density aluminum battery. The battery comprises an anode comprising aluminum metal. The battery further comprises a cathode comprising a material capable of intercalating aluminum or lithium ions during a discharge cycle and deintercalating the aluminum or lithium ions during a charge cycle. The battery further comprises an electrolyte capable of supporting reversible deposition and stripping of aluminum at the anode, and reversible intercalation and deintercalation of aluminum or lithium at the cathode.

  8. Kurt Goldstein's test battery.

    PubMed

    Eling, Paul

    2015-02-01

    Kurt Goldstein was a founder of clinical neuropsychology. This thesis is illustrated with a description of Goldstein's test battery that he used as a screening instrument in a special clinic for soldiers in World War I. Parts of the battery were also used for neuropsychological rehabilitation. Goldstein's early work in Germany focused on both neuropsychological assessment and rehabilitation. He was interested in how individuals go about compensating for their deficits, The notion of ecological validity (Lebenswahr vs Lebensfremd), only becoming widely popular in the nineteen-eighties, played an important role in Goldstein's selection of test procedures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. CubeSat Batteries

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-01-11

    Daniel Perez, Ph.D., a graduate student from the University of Miami, displays a piece of the prototype structure for a new solid-state battery in the Prototype Laboratory at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The size of the battery is so small that it could be a prime candidate for use in microsatellites, including CubeSats. Researchers at Kennedy are collaborating with experts at the University of Miami. The university partnership is funded through the Small Spacecraft Technology Program, in NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate.

  10. CubeSat Batteries

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-01-11

    Daniel Perez, Ph.D., a graduate student from the University of Miami, prepares layers of the prototype structure for a new solid-state battery in the Prototype Laboratory at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The size of the battery is so small that it could be a prime candidate for use in microsatellites, including CubeSats. Researchers at Kennedy are collaborating with experts at the University of Miami. The university partnership is funded through the Small Spacecraft Technology Program, in NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate.

  11. Coronal Heating by Magnetic Explosions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Falconer, D. A.; Porter, Jason G.; Suess, Steven T.

    1998-01-01

    We build a case for the persistent strong coronal heating in active regions and the pervasive quasi-steady heating of the corona in quiet regions and coronal holes being driven in basically the same way as the intense transient heating in solar flares: by explosions of sheared magnetic fields in the cores of initially closed bipoles. We begin by summarizing the observational case for exploding sheared core fields being the drivers of a wide variety of flare events, with and without coronal mass ejections. We conclude that the arrangement of an event's flare heating, whether there is a coronal mass ejection, and the time and place of the ejection relative to the flare heating are all largely determined by four elements of the form and action the magnetic field: (1) the arrangement of the impacted, interacting bipoles participating in the event, (2) which of these bipoles are active (have sheared core fields that explode) and which are passive (are heated by injection from impacted active bipoles), (3) which core field explodes first, and (4) which core-field explosions are confined within the closed field of their bipoles and which ejectively open their bipoles.

  12. Explosive double salts and preparation

    DOEpatents

    Cady, Howard H.; Lee, Kien-yin

    1984-01-01

    Applicants have discovered a new composition of matter which is an explosive addition compound of ammonium nitrate (AN) and diethylenetriamine trinitrate (DETN) in a 50:50 molar ratio. The compound is stable over extended periods of time only at temperatures higher than 46.degree. C., decomposing to a fine-grained eutectic mixture (which is also believed to be new) of AN and DETN at temperatures lower than 46.degree. C. The compound of the invention has an x-ray density of 1.61 g/cm.sup.3, explodes to form essentially only gaseous products, has higher detonation properties (i.e., detonation velocity and pressure) than those of any mechanical mixture having the same density and composition as the compound of the invention, is a quite insensitive explosive material, can be cast at temperatures attainable by high pressure steam, and is prepared from inexpensive ingredients. Methods of preparing the compound of the invention and the fine-grained eutectic composition of the invention are given.

  13. The locations of cosmic explosions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fruchter, A. S.; Levan, A. J.; Strolger, L.; Vreeswijk, P. M.; Bersier, D.; Burud, I.; Castro-Ceron, J. M.; Consclice, C.; Dahlen, T.; Strolger, L.

    2005-01-01

    When massive stars exhaust their fuel they collapse and often produce the extraordinarily bright explosions known as core-collapse supernovae. Recently, it has become apparent that stellar collapse can power the even more brilliant relativistic explosions known as long-duration gamma-ray bursts. In some cases, a gamma-ray burst and a supernova have been observed from the same event. One would thus expect that gamma-ray bursts and supernovae should be found in similar environments. Here we show that this expectation is wrong. Using Hubble Space Telescope imaging of the host galaxies of long-duration gamma-ray bursts and core-collapse supernovae, we demonstrate that while the distribution of the supernovae in their hosts traces the blue light of young stars, the gamma-ray bursts are much more concentrated on the very brightest regions of their hosts. Furthermore, the host galaxies of the gamma-ray bursts are significantly fainter and more irregular than the hosts of the supernovae. Together these results suggest that long-duration gamma-ray bursts are associated with the very most massive stars and may be restricted to galaxies of limited chemical evolution. Our results directly imply that long-duration gamma-ray bursts are relatively rare in galaxies such as our own Milky Way.

  14. High temperature two component explosive

    DOEpatents

    Mars, James E.; Poole, Donald R.; Schmidt, Eckart W.; Wang, Charles

    1981-01-01

    A two component, high temperature, thermally stable explosive composition comprises a liquid or low melting oxidizer and a liquid or low melting organic fuel. The oxidizer and fuel in admixture are incapable of substantial spontaneous exothermic reaction at temperatures on the order of 475.degree. K. At temperatures on the order of 475.degree. K., the oxidizer and fuel in admixture have an activation energy of at least about 40 kcal/mol. As a result of the high activation energy, the preferred explosive compositions are nondetonable as solids at ambient temperature, and become detonable only when heated beyond the melting point. Preferable oxidizers are selected from alkali or alkaline earth metal nitrates, nitrites, perchlorates, and/or mixtures thereof. Preferred fuels are organic compounds having polar hydrophilic groups. The most preferred fuels are guanidinium nitrate, acetamide and mixtures of the two. Most preferred oxidizers are eutectic mixtures of lithium nitrate, potassium nitrate and sodium nitrate, of sodium nitrite, sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate, and of potassium nitrate, calcium nitrate and sodium nitrate.

  15. Cosmic Explosions in Three Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höflich, Peter; Kumar, Pawan; Wheeler, J. Craig

    2011-08-01

    Introduction: 3-D Explosions: a meditation on rotation (and magnetic fields) J. C. Wheeler; Part I. Supernovae: Observations Today: 1. Supernova explosions: lessons from spectropolarimetry L. Wang; 2. Spectropolarimetric observations of Supernovae A. Filippenko and D. C. Leonard; 3. Observed and physical properties of type II plateau supernovae M. Hamuy; 4. SN1997B and the different types of Type Ic Supernovae A. Clocchiatti, B. Leibundgut, J. Spyromilio, S. Benetti, E. Cappelaro, M. Turatto and M. Phillips; 5. Near-infrared spectroscopy of stripped-envelope Supernovae C. L. Gerardy, R. A. Fesen, G. H. Marion, P. Hoeflich and J. C. Wheeler; 6. Morphology of Supernovae remnants R. Fesen; 7. The evolution of Supernova remnants in the winds of massive stars V. Dwarkadas; 8. Types for the galactic Supernovae B. E. Schaefer; Part II. Theory of Thermonuclear Supernovae: 9. Semi-steady burning evolutionary sequences for CAL 83 and CAL 87: supersoft X-ray binaries are Supernovae Ia progenitors S. Starrfield, F. X. Timmes, W. R. Hix, E. M. Sion, W. M. Sparks and S. Dwyer; 10. Type Ia Supernovae progenitors: effects of the spin-up of the white dwarfs S.-C. Yoon and N. Langer; 11. Terrestrial combustion: feedback to the stars E. S. Oran; 12. Non-spherical delayed detonations E. Livne; 13. Numerical simulations of Type Ia Supernovae: deflagrations and detonations V. N. Gamezo, A. M. Khokhlov and E. S. Oran; 14. Type Ia Supernovae: spectroscopic surprises D. Branch; 15. Aspherity effects in Supernovae P. Hoeflich, C. Gerardy and R. Quimby; 16. Broad light curve SneIa: asphericity or something else? A. Howell and P. Nugent; 17. Synthetic spectrum methods for 3-D SN models R. Thomas; 18. A hole in Ia' spectroscopic and polarimetric signatures of SN Ia asymmetry due to a companion star D. Kasen; 19. Hunting for the signatures of 3-D explosions with 1-D synthetic spectra E. Lentz, E. Baron and P. H. Hauschildt; 20. On the variation of the peak luminosity of Type Ia J. W. Truran, E

  16. Low Frequency Electromagnetic Pulse and Explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, J J

    2011-02-01

    This paper reviews and summarizes prior work related to low frequency (< 100 Hz) EMP (ElectroMagnetic Pulse) observed from explosions. It focuses on how EMP signals might, or might not, be useful in monitoring underground nuclear tests, based on the limits of detection, and physical understanding of these signals. In summary: (1) Both chemical and nuclear explosions produce an EMP. (2) The amplitude of the EMP from underground explosions is at least two orders of magnitude lower than from above ground explosions and higher frequency components of the signal are rapidly attenuated due to ground conductivity. (3) In general, inmore » the near field, that is distances (r) of less than 10s of kilometers from the source, the amplitude of the EMP decays approximately as 1/r{sup 3}, which practically limits EMP applications to very close (<{approx}1km) distances. (4) One computational model suggests that the EMP from a decoupled nuclear explosion may be enhanced over the fully coupled case. This has not been validated with laboratory or field data. (5) The magnitude of the EMP from an underground nuclear explosion is about two orders of magnitude larger than that from a chemical explosion, and has a larger component of higher frequencies. In principle these differences might be used to discriminate a nuclear from a chemical explosion using sensors at very close (<{approx}1 km) distances. (6) Arming and firing systems (e.g. detonators, exploding bridge wires) can also produce an EMP from any type of explosion. (7) To develop the understanding needed to apply low frequency EMP to nuclear explosion monitoring, it is recommended to carry out a series of controlled underground chemical explosions with a variety of sizes, emplacements (e.g. fully coupled and decoupled), and arming and firing systems.« less

  17. Battery-Charge-State Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vivian, H. C.

    1985-01-01

    Charge-state model for lead/acid batteries proposed as part of effort to make equivalent of fuel gage for battery-powered vehicles. Models based on equations that approximate observable characteristics of battery electrochemistry. Uses linear equations, easier to simulate on computer, and gives smooth transitions between charge, discharge, and recuperation.

  18. Battery switch for downhole tools

    DOEpatents

    Boling, Brian E.

    2010-02-23

    An electrical circuit for a downhole tool may include a battery, a load electrically connected to the battery, and at least one switch electrically connected in series with the battery and to the load. The at least one switch may be configured to close when a tool temperature exceeds a selected temperature.

  19. Batteries, from Cradle to Grave

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Michael J.; Gray, Fiona M.

    2010-01-01

    As battery producers and vendors, legislators, and the consumer population become aware of the consequences of inappropriate disposal of batteries to landfill sites instead of responsible chemical neutralization and reuse, the topic of battery recycling has begun to appear on the environmental agenda. In the United Kingdom, estimates of annual…

  20. Seal for sodium sulfur battery

    DOEpatents

    Topouzian, Armenag; Minck, Robert W.; Williams, William J.

    1980-01-01

    This invention is directed to a seal for a sodium sulfur battery in which the sealing is accomplished by a radial compression seal made on a ceramic component of the battery which separates an anode compartment from a cathode compartment of the battery.

  1. Reliability of lead-calcium automotive batteries in practical operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burghoff, H.-G.; Richter, G.

    In order to reach a statistically sound conclusion on the suitability of maintenance-free, lead-calcium automotive batteries for practical operations, the failure behaviour of such batteries has been observed in a large-scale experiment carried out by Mercedes Benz AG and Robert Bosch GmbH in different climatic zones of North America. The results show that the average failure behaviour is not significantly different to that of batteries from other manufacturers using other grid alloy systems and operated under otherwise identical conditions; the cumulative failure probability after 30 months is 17%. The principal causes of failure are: (i) early failure: transport damage, filling errors, and short-circuits due to the outer plates being pushed up during plate-block assembly (manufacturing defect); (ii) statistical failure: short-circuits due to growth of positive plates caused by a reduction in the mechanical strength of the cast positive grid as a result of corrosion; (iii) late failure due to an increased occurrence of short-circuits, especially frequent in outer cell facing the engine of the vehicle (subjected to high temperature), and to defects caused by capacity decay. As expected, the batteries exhibit extremely low water loss in each cell. The poor cyclical performance of stationary batteries, caused by acid stratification and well-known from laboratory tests, has no detrimental effect on the batteries in use. After a thorough analysis of the corrosion process, the battery manufacturer changed the grid alloy and the method of its production, and thus limited the corrosion problem with cast lead-calcium grids and with it the possibility of plate growth. The mathematical methods used in this study, and in particular the characteristic factors derived from them, have proven useful for assessing the suitability of automotive batteries.

  2. Fault tree safety analysis of a large Li/SOCl(sub)2 spacecraft battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uy, O. Manuel; Maurer, R. H.

    1987-01-01

    The results of the safety fault tree analysis on the eight module, 576 F cell Li/SOCl2 battery on the spacecraft and in the integration and test environment prior to launch on the ground are presented. The analysis showed that with the right combination of blocking diodes, electrical fuses, thermal fuses, thermal switches, cell balance, cell vents, and battery module vents the probability of a single cell or a 72 cell module exploding can be reduced to .000001, essentially the probability due to explosion for unexplained reasons.

  3. Room Temperature Sulfur Battery Cathode Design and Processing Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Rachel

    As the population grows and energy demand increases, climate change threatens causing energy storage research to focus on fulfilling the requirements of two major energy sectors with next generation batteries: (1) portable energy and (2) stationary storage.1 Where portable energy can decrease transportation-related harmful emissions and enable advanced next-generation technologies,1 and stationary storage can facilitate widespread deployment of renewable energy sources, alleviating the demand on fossil fuels and lowering emissions. Portable energy can enable zero-emission transportation and can deploy portable power in advanced electronics across fields including medical and defense. Currently fully battery powered cars are limited in driving distance, which is dictated by the energy density and weight of the state-of-the-art Li-ion battery, and similarly advancement of portable electronics is significantly hindered by heavy batteries with short charge lives. In attempt to enable advanced portable energy, significant research is aiming to improve the conventional Li-ion batteries and explore beyond Li-ion battery chemistries with the primary goal of demonstrating higher energy density to enable lighter weight cells with longer battery life. Further, with the inherent intermittency challenges of our most prominent renewable energy sources, wind and solar, discovery of batteries capable of cost effectively and reliably balancing the generation of the renewable energy sources with the real-time energy demand is required for grid scale viability. Stationary storage will provide load leveling to renewable resources by storing excess energy at peak generation and delivering stored excess during periods of lower generation. This application demands highly abundant, low-cost active materials and long-term cycle stability, since infrastructure costs (combined with the renewable) must compete with burning natural gas. Development of a battery with these characteristics will

  4. Advancing Explosives Detection Capabilities: Vapor Detection

    ScienceCinema

    Atkinson, David

    2018-05-11

    A new, PNNL-developed method provides direct, real-time detection of trace amounts of explosives such as RDX, PETN and C-4. The method selectively ionizes a sample before passing the sample through a mass spectrometer to detect explosive vapors. The method could be used at airports to improve aviation security.

  5. Fragment and Debris Hazards from Accidental Explosions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-13

    region boundr’ a - fragment weight m - number of fragments with weight PAq . are determined using 9. the ever- age weight of fragments voeithing more than...34 Nineteenth Explosives Safety Seminar, Los Ang. es, CA, Sep 1980. Merz, Hans A., "The Effects of Explosions in Slightly Buried Concrete Structures

  6. High-explosive driven crowbar switch

    DOEpatents

    Dike, Robert S.; Kewish, Jr., Ralph W.

    1976-01-13

    The disclosure relates to a compact explosive driven switch for use as a low resistance, low inductance crowbar switch. A high-explosive charge extrudes a deformable conductive metallic plate through a polyethylene insulating layer to achieve a hard current contact with a supportive annular conductor.

  7. 33 CFR 401.67 - Explosive vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Dangerous Cargo § 401.67 Explosive vessels. A vessel carrying explosives, either Government or commercial, as defined in the Dangerous Cargo Act of the United States and in the International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code, Class 1, Divisions 1.1 to 1.5 inclusive...

  8. 33 CFR 401.67 - Explosive vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Dangerous Cargo § 401.67 Explosive vessels. A vessel carrying explosives, either Government or commercial, as defined in the Dangerous Cargo Act of the United States and in the International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code, Class 1, Divisions 1.1 to 1.5 inclusive...

  9. 33 CFR 401.67 - Explosive vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Dangerous Cargo § 401.67 Explosive vessels. A vessel carrying explosives, either Government or commercial, as defined in the Dangerous Cargo Act of the United States and in the International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code, Class 1, Divisions 1.1 to 1.5 inclusive...

  10. 46 CFR 188.10-25 - Explosive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Explosive. 188.10-25 Section 188.10-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 188.10-25 Explosive. This term means a chemical compound or...

  11. 46 CFR 188.10-25 - Explosive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Explosive. 188.10-25 Section 188.10-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 188.10-25 Explosive. This term means a chemical compound or...

  12. 46 CFR 188.10-25 - Explosive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Explosive. 188.10-25 Section 188.10-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 188.10-25 Explosive. This term means a chemical compound or...

  13. 46 CFR 188.10-25 - Explosive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Explosive. 188.10-25 Section 188.10-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 188.10-25 Explosive. This term means a chemical compound or...

  14. 46 CFR 188.10-25 - Explosive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Explosive. 188.10-25 Section 188.10-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 188.10-25 Explosive. This term means a chemical compound or...

  15. Advancing Explosives Detection Capabilities: Vapor Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Atkinson, David

    2012-10-15

    A new, PNNL-developed method provides direct, real-time detection of trace amounts of explosives such as RDX, PETN and C-4. The method selectively ionizes a sample before passing the sample through a mass spectrometer to detect explosive vapors. The method could be used at airports to improve aviation security.

  16. Method for laser machining explosives and ordnance

    DOEpatents

    Muenchausen, Ross E.; Rivera, Thomas; Sanchez, John A.

    2003-05-06

    Method for laser machining explosives and related articles. A laser beam is directed at a surface portion of a mass of high explosive to melt and/or vaporize the surface portion while directing a flow of gas at the melted and/or vaporized surface portion. The gas flow sends the melted and/or vaporized explosive away from the charge of explosive that remains. The method also involves splitting the casing of a munition having an encased explosive. The method includes rotating a munition while directing a laser beam to a surface portion of the casing of an article of ordnance. While the beam melts and/or vaporizes the surface portion, a flow of gas directed at the melted and/or vaporized surface portion sends it away from the remaining portion of ordnance. After cutting through the casing, the beam then melts and/or vaporizes portions of the encased explosive and the gas stream sends the melted/vaporized explosive away from the ordnance. The beam is continued until it splits the article, after which the encased explosive, now accessible, can be removed safely for recycle or disposal.

  17. Detection of Nuclear Explosions Using Infrasound Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    signal correlation between array elements in these arrays can seriously limit the reliable detection of infrasound generated ...goals of this investigation are to identify problems with the detection of explosion- generated infrasonic signals at stations in the global infrasound ...restricted to a thermospheric waveguide. The second part is focused on the limitations imposed on array detection of explosion- generated infrasound

  18. Surface waves generated by shallow underwater explosions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falade, A.; Holt, M.

    1978-01-01

    Surface water waves generated by surface and near surface point explosions are calculated. Taking the impulse distribution imparted at the water surface by the explosion as the overriding mechanism for transferring energy of the explosive to surface wave motion, the linearized theory of Kranzer and Keller is used to obtain the wave displacement in the far field. The impulse distribution is obtained by integrating the pressure wave over an appropriate time interval on a horizontal surface just beneath the undisturbed water surface. For surface explosions, a modified form of the similarity method first used by Collins and Holt is used to obtain the flow field. In the case of submerged explosions, the flow field is estimated by making necessary modifications to Sedov's similarity solution to account for the venting that accompanies the interaction of the leading (blast) wave with the ocean surface. Surface waves generated by a charge at six depths of placement (0.15 m, 0.30 m, 0.61 m, 0.91 m, 1.37 m, 3.05 m) are considered in addition to surface explosions. The results seem to support the existence of an upper critical depth phenomenon (of the type already established for chemical explosions) for point (nuclear) explosions.

  19. 30 CFR 7.100 - Explosion tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Explosion tests. 7.100 Section 7.100 Mineral... Underground Coal Mines Where Permissible Electric Equipment is Required § 7.100 Explosion tests. (a) Test procedures. (1) Prepare to test the diesel power package as follows: (i) Perform a detailed check of parts...

  20. 30 CFR 7.100 - Explosion tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Explosion tests. 7.100 Section 7.100 Mineral... Underground Coal Mines Where Permissible Electric Equipment is Required § 7.100 Explosion tests. (a) Test procedures. (1) Prepare to test the diesel power package as follows: (i) Perform a detailed check of parts...