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Sample records for baylor operating room

  1. Improving operating room safety

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Despite the introduction of the Universal Protocol, patient safety in surgery remains a daily challenge in the operating room. This present study describes one community health system's efforts to improve operating room safety through human factors training and ultimately the development of a surgical checklist. Using a combination of formal training, local studies documenting operating room safety issues and peer to peer mentoring we were able to substantially change the culture of our operating room. Our efforts have prepared us for successfully implementing a standardized checklist to improve operating room safety throughout our entire system. Based on these findings we recommend a multimodal approach to improving operating room safety. PMID:19930577

  2. Operating Room Fire Safety

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Stuart R.; Yajnik, Amit; Ashford, Jeffrey; Springer, Randy; Harvey, Sherry

    2011-01-01

    Operating room fires are a rare but preventable danger in modern healthcare operating rooms. Optimal outcomes depend on all operating room personnel being familiar with their roles in fire prevention and fire management. Despite the recommendations of major safety institutes, this familiarity is not the current practice in many healthcare facilities. Members of the anesthesiology and the surgery departments are commonly not actively involved in fire safety programs, fire drills, and fire simulations that could lead to potential delays in prevention and management of intraoperative fires. PMID:21603334

  3. Operating room design and its impact on operating room economics.

    PubMed

    Krupka, Dan C; Sandberg, Warren S

    2006-04-01

    Operating rooms are high-cost/high-revenue environments. In an era of rising costs and declining reimbursement, it is essential to optimize the effectiveness of the operating room suite, maximizing throughput of profitable cases while minimizing the costs of necessary, but unprofitable, procedures. Operating room management focuses on reducing wasted time in order to perform more cases in regular business hours, reduce overtime, or provide a better experience for staff and patients. It has been difficult to improve perioperative efficiency enough to reliably add cases during regular hours because the required time savings are so large, while most interventions can save only a few minutes per case. Recent work, however, has changed the basic paradigms for turning over operating rooms, dramatically reducing nonproductive time and increasing operating room throughput. In some situations, the additional expense required to achieve throughput improvements is more than offset by financial gains. Redesigning perioperative systems can increase operating room throughput, but not all case mixes benefit from the required additional resources. Thus hospitals should choose judiciously if, and to what degree, high throughput environments are implemented. Once implemented, access to these environments can be used as an incentive for improved surgical performance.

  4. Interior of Room 126, looking southsoutheast in Tactical Operations Room ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior of Room 126, looking south-southeast in Tactical Operations Room - Over-the-Horizon Backscatter Radar Network, Bangor Air National Guard Base Operations Building, At the end of Maine Road, Bangor, Penobscot County, ME

  5. Trends in operating room devices.

    PubMed

    Laufman, H

    1976-01-01

    Although trends in the use of operating room devices have generally followed advances in technology, the trends are not always influenced as much by surgical need as they are by industrial expediency and commercial promotion. Nonetheless, a broad view of trends in OR devices definitely points to efforts at greater compatibility between devices made by different manufacturers. To mention a few examples, operating tables are being made more compatible with OR X-ray equipment; surgical lighting is being designed for greater compatibility with air-handling systems and video equipment; power consoles have reduced the clutter of tubes, hoses, and wires in complicated operations, and have become more functional in keeping with the trend away from electrical power and toward nitrogen power for driving surgical tools; cabinetry is being designed to employ clean-air principles; and surgical apparel and barrier materials are undergoing close scrutiny for their effectiveness against moist bacterial strike-through in lengthy wet operations. Operating room devices form an important segment of the devices classified by the FDA, and are expected to benefit by the application of standards in performance and safety. This trend will affect not only the devices themselves, but all other facets of operating room design and engineering.

  6. DETAIL VIEW OF OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT ROOM, FIRING ROOM NO. 4, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT ROOM, FIRING ROOM NO. 4, FACING WEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Launch Control Center, LCC Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  7. DETAIL VIEW OF OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT ROOM, FIRING ROOM NO. 3, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT ROOM, FIRING ROOM NO. 3, FACING EAST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Launch Control Center, LCC Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  8. DETAIL VIEW OF OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT ROOM, FIRING ROOM NO. 3, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT ROOM, FIRING ROOM NO. 3, FACING SOUTHEAST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Launch Control Center, LCC Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  9. DETAIL VIEW OF OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT ROOM, FIRING ROOM NO. 3, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT ROOM, FIRING ROOM NO. 3, FACING NORTH - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Launch Control Center, LCC Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  10. [Hybrid operating room: For what?

    PubMed

    Benoit, M; Bouvier, A; Bigot, P

    2017-08-31

    Hybrid operating rooms (HOR) are rooms that mix interventional radiology and surgical equipments. They are usually used in heart, vascular, orthopedic and neurosurgery, and make it possible to consider new minimally invasive procedures in urology. Thanks to these, we developed a new partial nephrectomy technique without renal pedicle clamping and without ischemia. Renal cancer is now diagnosed at localized stage in most of the cases, and its treatment is mostly based on nephron sparing surgery. However, the hemorrhagic character of this intervention requires a renal pedicle clamping whose long-term consequences on renal function are discussed. It also exposes to a classical complication: the renal artery pseudoaneurysm. Therefore, we developed a new laparoscopic partial nephrectomy technique without clamping or approach of renal pedicle, by a selective embolization of tumor vessels through an endovascular route, immediately before the surgery. HOR allowed the combination of the two procedures in the same time and space unit. Tumor staining by Bleu Patenté also aids the surgeon in its spotting. HOR allow a new approach in localized renal cancer management, and should be used in many other urologic surgeries in years to come. They represent a technological advancement by combining interventional radiologists and surgeons' expertise. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Design Criteria for Shipboard Dental Spaces: Operation Room (General, Compact); Operating Room (Oral Surgery); Operating Room (Radial Concept).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The Design Criteria for Shipboard Dental Spaces, August 1973, present in drawings and text the functional design requirements of the Bureau of...Medicine and Surgery for the following types of shipboard dental spaces: dental operating room (general, compact); dental operating room (oral surgery... dental operating room (radial concept). These design criteria are intended to assist the Naval Ship Systems Command in designing and building shipboard

  12. Scheduling A Multiple Operating Room System

    PubMed Central

    Barnoon, Shlomo; Wolfe, Harvey

    1968-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of various schedules for operating rooms are determined by the use of a Simscript simulation program. Input variables consist of actual data or are generated from their probability distributions by the Monte Carlo technique. The simulator assigns operating rooms, anesthetists, and nurses for each case when they are available. A report of the performance of the system, which may be obtained at any desired periodic cycle, includes idle time and waiting time for facilities and personnel. The simulator, applied here to a suite of operating rooms in a specialty hospital for elective surgery, can, with minor modifications, be used to describe a general system of operating rooms. PMID:5700370

  13. Operating room management and operating room productivity: the case of Germany.

    PubMed

    Berry, Maresi; Berry-Stölzle, Thomas; Schleppers, Alexander

    2008-09-01

    We examine operating room productivity on the example of hospitals in Germany with independent anesthesiology departments. Linked to anesthesiology group literature, we use the ln(Total Surgical Time/Total Anesthesiologists Salary) as a proxy for operating room productivity. We test the association between operating room productivity and different structural, organizational and management characteristics based on survey data from 87 hospitals. Our empirical analysis links improved operating room productivity to greater operating room capacity, appropriate scheduling behavior and management methods to realign interests. From this analysis, the enforcing jurisdiction and avoiding advance over-scheduling appear to be the implementable tools for improving operating room productivity.

  14. Operating room fires in periocular surgery.

    PubMed

    Connor, Michael A; Menke, Anne M; Vrcek, Ivan; Shore, John W

    2017-05-20

    A survey of ophthalmic plastic and reconstructive surgeons as well as seven-year data regarding claims made to the Ophthalmic Mutual Insurance Company (OMIC) is used to discuss operating room fires in periocular surgery. A retrospective review of all closed claim operating room fires submitted to OMIC was performed. A survey soliciting personal experiences with operating room fires was distributed to all American Society of Oculoplastic and Reconstructive Surgeons. Over the last 2 decades, OMIC managed 7 lawsuits resulting from an operating room fire during periocular surgery. The mean settlement per lawsuit was $145,285 (range $10,000-474,994). All six patients suffered burns to the face, and three required admission to a burn unit. One hundred and sixty-eight surgeons participated in the online survey. Approximately 44% of survey respondents have experienced at least one operating room fire. Supplemental oxygen was administered in 88% of these cases. Most surgical fires reported occurred in a hospital-based operating room (59%) under monitored anesthesia care (79%). Monopolar cautery (41%) and thermal, high-temperature cautery (41%) were most commonly reported as the inciting agents. Almost half of the patients involved in a surgical fire experienced a complication from the fire (48%). Sixty-nine percent of hospital operating rooms and 66% of ambulatory surgery centers maintain an operating room fire prevention policy. An intraoperative fire can be costly for both the patient and the surgeon. Ophthalmic surgeons operate in an oxygen rich and therefore flammable environment. Proactive measures can be undertaken to reduce the incidence of surgical fires periocular surgery; however, a fire can occur at any time and the entire operating room team must be constantly vigilant to prevent and manage operating room fires.

  15. Development of the NASA/Baylor VAD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aber, G. S.; Akkerman, J. W.; Bozeman, R. J., Jr.; Saucler, D. R.; Bacak, J. W.; Svejkovsky, P. A.; Damm, G. A.; Mizuguchi, K.; Noon, G. P.; Nose, Y.

    1994-01-01

    A cooperative effort between the NASA/Johnson Space Center (JSC) and the Baylor College of Medicine (BCM) has been underway since 1988 to develop a long-term implantable Ventricular Assist Device (VAD). The VAD is intended to boost the cardiac output of patients with deteriorated cardiac function. For many of these patients, the best alternative is heart transplantation. Heart transplantation is a complex and expensive procedure and usually requires a long waiting period for a donor heart. The condition of the patient often deteriorates during this waiting period which complicates the pre and post-operative care. Because of these factors, the need for a long-term implantable VAD for use as a bridge-to-transplant device or as a permanent assist device has become the focus of much research. The need for a VAD has been estimated at 50,000 to 60,000 patients per year in the United States alone. A device which satisfies all the system performance and reliability requirements has yet to be achieved. However, the development of the NASA/Baylor VAD has progressed to a state in which commercial viability can being to be considered. The device is small, simple, efficient and reliable which meets all requirements for a totally implantable VAD.

  16. Hygiene and room climate in the operating room.

    PubMed

    Scherrer

    2003-11-01

    The ventilation system is not the most important source to cause surgical site infections via the air. More important is the skin of both staff and patients. The literature did not reveal any reduction of the risk of surgical site infections resulting from the employment of ultra-clean air-systems during surgical procedures, the one exception being high risk operations such as orthopaedic implant surgery. Both ultra-clean air and antimicrobial prophylaxis can reduce the incidence of surgical site infections. If HEPA filters are used, they are only necessary directly in the operating rooms. Other rooms such as the washroom, the anaesthesia preparation room or corridors which are connected to the OR do not have to be treated with HEPA filters. If a laminar air-flow system is installed, there are some factors which have to be considered. The number of operating lamps and the heads of the operating team affect the function of the air ceiling as they form thermic and air-flow resistance and create turbulences. Also, forced air-warming systems, which are used to maintain normal body temperatures for patients during surgery, disturb the ultra-clean field through the air emitted from the blankets used. Moreover, any medical equipment which is cooled by integrated cooling blowers can influence an ultra-clean air system. Existing ventilation systems are not able to create good room conditions for all persons inside the OR. Therefore new ways have to be found to create a room climate taking into account the level of activity.

  17. Rethinking theatre in modern operating rooms.

    PubMed

    Riley, Robin; Manias, Elizabeth

    2005-03-01

    Metaphor is a means through which a widely accepted meaning of a word is used in a different context to add understanding that would otherwise be difficult to conceive. Through etymological and metaphorical associations, we contend that aspects of "theatre" are still relevant in the modern operating rooms and that the use of dramaturgical metaphors can add another layer of understanding about the social reality in this setting. We begin by exploring the historical roots and derivation of the word theatre as it applied to anatomical dissection and surgery. Briefly, we touch on the work of Erving Goffman and examine how his work has been used by others to explore aspects of operating room nursing. Then, drawing on data from a postmodern ethnographic study that has been used to examine communication in operating room nursing, four dramaturgical metaphors are used to illustrate the argument. They are drama, the script and learning the lines, the show must go on, and changing between back stage and front stage. To conclude, the small amount of previously published literature on this topic is compared and contrasted, and the relevance of using dramaturgical metaphors to understand modern operating rooms is discussed. Being able to distinguish between the inherent drama in operating room work and the dramatic realisation of individuals who work within, can help operating room nurses to think differently about, and perhaps re-evaluate their social situation and how they function within it.

  18. Elementary Particle Physics at Baylor (Final Report)

    SciTech Connect

    Dittmann, J.R.

    2012-08-25

    This report summarizes the activities of the Baylor University Experimental High Energy Physics (HEP) group on the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) experiment from August 15, 2005 to May 31, 2012. Led by the Principal Investigator (Dr. Jay R. Dittmann), the Baylor HEP group has actively pursued a variety of cutting-edge measurements from proton-antiproton collisions at the energy frontier.

  19. 27. View east of operator's room, west operator's house, showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. View east of operator's room, west operator's house, showing bascule control panel center and gate control panel left. - Yellow Mill Bridge, Spanning Yellow Mill Channel at Stratford Avenue, Bridgeport, Fairfield County, CT

  20. Accelerating best care at baylor dallas.

    PubMed

    Haydar, Ziad; Cox, Marsha; Stafford, Pam; Rodriguez, Vera; Ballard, David J

    2009-10-01

    A culture of quality improvement (QI) is needed to bridge the gap between possible STEEEP (safe, timely, effective, efficient, equitable, and patient-centered) care and actual usual care. Baylor Health Care System (BHCS) developed Accelerating Best Care at Baylor (ABC Baylor), an innovative educational program that teaches health care leaders the theory and techniques of rapid-cycle QI. Course participants learn general principles of continuous QI, as well as health care-specific QI techniques, and finish the course by designing and implementing their own QI project. ABC Baylor has been employed in a variety of settings and has spread its success to other organizations, especially small and rural hospitals. These hospitals, like BHCS, have demonstrated sustained improvements that are due in part to the use of ABC Baylor and its reliance on specific modules that focus on health care safety, service, equity, and chronic disease management. The role of ABC Baylor training and consulting is part of the overall culture and infrastructure that have allowed BHCS to achieve success in its improvement journey, including the receipt of several national awards and the achievement of high reliability in compliance with Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services core measures of processes of care related to heart failure, acute myocardial infarction, community-acquired pneumonia, and surgical care. The culture of rapid-cycle QI facilitated by ABC Baylor serves to link BHCS's vision and goals to practical execution.

  1. New operating room suite for hospital

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkin, C.W.

    1996-07-01

    Hospital renovation always is a sensitive issue. The needs of patients and staff are prime concerns in the planning and design processes. One of the most difficult areas to renovate is the operating room suite. This article describes the HVAC portion of the renovation of the OR suite for the Columbia LaGrange Memorial Hospital, LaGrange, Ill.

  2. The Baylor pediatric nutrition handbook for residents

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Baylor Pediatric Nutrition Handbook for Residents provides basic resource information about the assessment of growth, the nutritional status assessment and feeding guidelines, biochemical evaluation of nutritional status, infant nutrition, enteral nutrition, parenteral nutrition, nutritional man...

  3. [The endoscopic operating room OR 1].

    PubMed

    Dubuisson, J B; Chapron, C

    2003-04-01

    During the last few years, the development of surgical laparoscopy has been the major turning point, and the most important progress in the field of surgery. The specific installation requirements of surgical laparoscopy, as well as the technological progress proper to this surgical technique, justify the need of a new organization of the operating theatre. The new operating room OR 1 is especially designed to fit and satisfy the requirements of a modern operating theatre, where surgical laparoscopy plays a major role. The organization and the design of this new operating room (OR 1) rely on 2 main concepts: architectural, and computerized, through 2 PC systems SCB and AIDA. The main objectives of this new concept are: allowing the surgeon to control and command all the functions and the instruments, as well as the lighting of the room and the operating field; managing the surgical data and images required for medical files; establishing a communication network either from the inside or outside the sterile zone.

  4. Advance Directives and Operating: Room for Improvement?

    PubMed Central

    Hadler, Rachel A.; Neuman, Mark D.; Raper, Steven; Fleisher, Lee A.

    2016-01-01

    Anesthesiologists and surgeons are frequently called on to perform procedures on critically ill patients with advanced directives. We assessed the attitudes of attending and resident surgeons and anesthesiologists at our institution regarding their understanding of and practice around the application of consenting critically ill patients with advance directives in the operating room. To do so, we deployed a survey after interdepartmental grand rounds, featuring a panel discussion of ethically complex cases featuring end-of-life issues. PMID:26599738

  5. Anesthesia services outside of the operating room.

    PubMed

    Adams, Kendall; Pennock, Natalie; Phelps, Becky; Rose, Wendy; Peters, Matthew

    2007-01-01

    In January 2000, Primary Children's Medical Center (PCMC) nurses and physicians of specific disciplines including hematology/oncology, surgery, Emergency Department (ED), and anesthesia, identified a need to provide general anesthesia for children undergoing procedures outside of the operating room. This need was based upon two factors: (a) limited availability of the operating room, and (b) lack of proper monitoring of children receiving conscious sedation for painful procedures in PCMC clinics. In September 2000, the Rapid Treatment Unit (RTU) service was developed to provide cost-effective, efficient, patient/family-centered care for a variety of procedures. With limited literature on the subject of anesthesia services outside of the operating room, many hours of planning, education, and organizing occurred to develop this unique service. Parents have reported satisfaction with the service verbally and through an anonymous survey. Increasing numbers of patients seeking services from Utah, Idaho, Nevada, Wyoming, and Montana indicate a need for service expansion within the five-state region surrounding Salt Lake City. The RTU Anesthesia service is an important asset to PCMC and continues to expand to provide safe, efficient health care for children.

  6. Operating Room Fires and Surgical Skin Preparation.

    PubMed

    Jones, Edward L; Overbey, Douglas M; Chapman, Brandon C; Jones, Teresa S; Hilton, Sarah A; Moore, John T; Robinson, Thomas N

    2017-07-01

    Operating room fires are "never events" that remain an under-reported source of devastating complications. One common set-up that promotes fires is the use of surgical skin preparations combined with electrosurgery and oxygen. Limited data exist examining the incidence of fires and surgical skin preparations. A standardized, ex vivo model was created with a 15 × 15 cm section of clipped porcine skin. An electrosurgical "Bovie" pencil was activated for 2 seconds on 30 Watts coagulation mode in 21% oxygen (room air), both immediately and 3 minutes after skin preparation application. Skin preparations with and without alcohol were tested, and were applied with and without pooling. Alcohol-based skin preparations included 70% isopropyl alcohol (IPA) with 2% chlorhexidine gluconate, 74% IPA with 0.7% iodine povacrylex, and plain 70% IPA. No fires occurred with nonalcohol-based preparations (p < 0.001 vs alcohol-based preparations). Alcohol-based preparations caused flash flames at 0 minutes in 22% (13 of 60) and at 3 minutes in 10% (6 of 60) of tests. When examining pooling of alcohol-based preparations, fires occurred in 38% (23 of 60) at 0 minutes and 27% (16 of 60) at 3 minutes. Alcohol-based skin preparations fuel operating room fires in common clinical scenarios. Following manufacturer guidelines and allowing 3 minutes for drying, surgical fires were still created in 1 in 10 cases without pooling and more than one-quarter of cases with pooling. Surgeons can decrease the risk of an operating room fire by using nonalcohol-based skin preparations or avoiding pooling of the preparation solution. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Tritium Room Air Monitor Operating Experience Review

    SciTech Connect

    L. C. Cadwallader; B. J. Denny

    2008-09-01

    Monitoring the breathing air in tritium facility rooms for airborne tritium is a radiological safety requirement and a best practice for personnel safety. Besides audible alarms for room evacuation, these monitors often send signals for process shutdown, ventilation isolation, and cleanup system actuation to mitigate releases and prevent tritium spread to the environment. Therefore, these monitors are important not only to personnel safety but also to public safety and environmental protection. This paper presents an operating experience review of tritium monitor performance on demand during small (1 mCi to 1 Ci) operational releases, and intentional airborne inroom tritium release tests. The tritium tests provide monitor operation data to allow calculation of a statistical estimate for the reliability of monitors annunciating in actual tritium gas airborne release situations. The data show a failure to operate rate of 3.5E-06/monitor-hr with an upper bound of 4.7E-06, a failure to alarm on demand rate of 1.4E-02/demand with an upper bound of 4.4E-02, and a spurious alarm rate of 0.1 to 0.2/monitor-yr.

  8. Closing emergency operating rooms improves efficiency.

    PubMed

    Wullink, Gerhard; Van Houdenhoven, Mark; Hans, Erwin W; van Oostrum, Jeroen M; van der Lans, Marieke; Kazemier, Geert

    2007-12-01

    Long waiting times for emergency operations increase a patient's risk of postoperative complications and morbidity. Reserving Operating Room (OR) capacity is a common technique to maximize the responsiveness of an OR in case of arrival of an emergency patient. This study determines the best way to reserve OR time for emergency surgery. In this study two approaches of reserving capacity were compared: (1) concentrating all reserved OR capacity in dedicated emergency ORs, and (2) evenly reserving capacity in all elective ORs. By using a discrete event simulation model the real situation was modelled. Main outcome measures were: (1) waiting time, (2) staff overtime, and (3) OR utilisation were evaluated for the two approaches. Results indicated that the policy of reserving capacity for emergency surgery in all elective ORs led to an improvement in waiting times for emergency surgery from 74 (+/-4.4) minutes to 8 (+/-0.5) min. Working in overtime was reduced by 20%, and overall OR utilisation can increase by around 3%. Emergency patients are operated upon more efficiently on elective Operating Rooms instead of a dedicated Emergency OR. The results of this study led to closing of the Emergency OR in the Erasmus MC (Rotterdam, The Netherlands).

  9. Surgeons and operating rooms: underutilized resources.

    PubMed Central

    Gil, A V; Galarza, M T; Guerrero, R; de Velez, G P; Peterson, O L; Bloom, B L

    1983-01-01

    A classification of surgical procedures, based on degree of complexity and the need for facilities and personnel, was applied to all 50,782 surgical interventions performed in the Valle del Cauca, Colombia during 1974. Three-fourths of all operations were of low levels of complexity, and most could be performed on an ambulatory basis with immediate discharge after recovery from anesthesia. Mean numbers of operations per year for surgical specialists and other physicians were 119.7 and 18.1, respectively. The 76 existing operating rooms were utilized only 41.6 per cent of the time. The implications of underutilization of personnel and facilities and low productivity of surgeons are discussed. PMID:6638228

  10. Surgeon Awareness of Operating Room Supply Costs

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Christopher R.; Eavey, Roland D.; Francis, David O.

    2016-01-01

    Background The extent to which surgeons understand costs associated with expensive operative procedures remains unclear. The goal of the study was to better understand surgeon cost awareness of operating room supplies and implants. Methods This was a cross-sectional study of faculty (n=24) and trainees (fellow and residents [n=27]) in the Department of Otolaryngology. Participants completed surveys to assess opinions on importance of cost, ease in accessing cost data, and asked to estimate the costs of operating room (OR) supplies and implants. Estimates within 20% of actual cost were considered correct. Analyses were stratified into faculty and trainee surgeons. Results Cost estimates varied widely, with a low percentage of correct estimations (25% for faculty, 12% for trainees). Surgeons tended to underestimate the cost of high-cost items (55%) and overestimate the cost of low-cost items (77%). Attending surgeons were more accurate at correctly estimating costs within their own sub-specialty (33% vs. 16%, p<0.001). Self-rated cost knowledge and years in practice did not correlate with cost accuracy (p<0.05). Conclusions A majority of surgeons were unable to correctly estimate the costs of items/implants used in their OR. An opportunity exists to improve the mechanisms by which cost data is fed back to physicians to help promote value-based decision-making. PMID:26522468

  11. Local anaesthesia outside the operating room.

    PubMed

    Chan, S K; Karmakar, M K; Chui, P T

    2002-04-01

    An increasing number of minor surgical procedures are performed under local anaesthesia in clinical settings outside the operating room, where monitoring and resuscitation equipment--as well as personnel skilled in resuscitation--may not be readily available. Serious adverse effects and even fatalities may result from the use of local anaesthetic agents, arising from a variety of causes such as systemic toxicity, allergy, vasovagal syncope, and reaction to additives present in the local anaesthetic. This article briefly reviews the pharmacology of local anaesthetic agents, and describes various techniques commonly used for local anaesthesia, with special emphasis on safety. Clinical features of toxicity, and its differential diagnosis and management, are also discussed.

  12. The dedicated orthopedic trauma operating room.

    PubMed

    Min, William; Wolinsky, Philip R

    2011-08-01

    The development and implementation of a dedicated orthopedic trauma operating room (OTOR) that is used for the treatment of orthopedic trauma patients has changed and improved the practice of orthopedic trauma surgery. Advantages noted with OTOR implementation include improvements in morbidity and complication rates, enhancements in the professional and personal lifestyles of the on-call surgeon, and increased physician recruitment and retention in orthopedic traumatology. However, the inappropriate use of the OTOR, which can waste valuable resources and delay the treatment of emergent cases, must be monitored and avoided.

  13. Prepare to protect: Operating and maintaining a tornado safe room.

    PubMed

    Herseth, Andrew; Goldsmith-Grinspoon, Jennifer; Scott, Pataya

    2017-06-01

    Operating and maintaining a tornado safe room can be critical to the effective continuity of business operations because a firm's most valuable asset is its people. This paper describes aspects of operations and maintenance (O&M) for existing tornado safe rooms as well as a few planning and design aspects that affect the ultimate operation of a safe room for situations where a safe room is planned, but not yet constructed. The information is based on several Federal Emergency Management Agency safe room publications that provide guidance on emergency management and operations, as well as the design and construction of tornado safe rooms.

  14. Designing an Alternate Mission Operations Control Room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Patty; Reeves, A. Scott

    2014-01-01

    The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) is a multi-project facility that is responsible for 24x7 real-time International Space Station (ISS) payload operations management, integration, and control and has the capability to support small satellite projects and will provide real-time support for SLS launches. The HOSC is a service-oriented/ highly available operations center for ISS payloads-directly supporting science teams across the world responsible for the payloads. The HOSC is required to endure an annual 2-day power outage event for facility preventive maintenance and safety inspection of the core electro-mechanical systems. While complete system shut-downs are against the grain of a highly available sub-system, the entire facility must be powered down for a weekend for environmental and safety purposes. The consequence of this ground system outage is far reaching: any science performed on ISS during this outage weekend is lost. Engineering efforts were focused to maximize the ISS investment by engineering a suitable solution capable of continuing HOSC services while supporting safety requirements. The HOSC Power Outage Contingency (HPOC) System is a physically diversified compliment of systems capable of providing identified real-time services for the duration of a planned power outage condition from an alternate control room. HPOC was designed to maintain ISS payload operations for approximately three continuous days during planned HOSC power outages and support a local Payload Operations Team, International Partners, as well as remote users from the alternate control room located in another building.

  15. [Controlling systems for operating room managers].

    PubMed

    Schüpfer, G; Bauer, M; Scherzinger, B; Schleppers, A

    2005-08-01

    Management means developing, shaping and controlling of complex, productive and social systems. Therefore, operating room managers also need to develop basic skills in financial and managerial accounting as a basis for operative and strategic controlling which is an essential part of their work. A good measurement system should include financial and strategic concepts for market position, innovation performance, productivity, attractiveness, liquidity/cash flow and profitability. Since hospitals need to implement a strategy to reach their business objectives, the performance measurement system has to be individually adapted to the strategy of the hospital. In this respect the navigation system developed by Gälweiler is compared to the "balanced score card" system of Kaplan and Norton.

  16. Thoracic robotics at the Heart Hospital Baylor Plano: the first 20 cases.

    PubMed

    Jett, G Kimble

    2012-10-01

    A da Vinci Robotic Surgical System was purchased for The Heart Hospital Baylor Plano in fall 2011 and a program for robotic-assisted thoracic surgery commenced at the facility. Successive thoracic patients were offered and accepted a robotic-assisted operation. No patient was excluded because of age, height, weight, or comorbidities. The first 20 patients are summarized herein. Of the first 10 operations, only one was a lobectomy. As the program staff gained experience, seven of the latter 10 procedures were lobectomies. The average length of stay was 2.6 days (longest, 4 days). The average operating room time was 147 minutes overall and 200 minutes for lobectomies. The longest operating room time was 337 minutes in a patient who underwent a right middle lobectomy that was converted to a video-assisted thoracic surgery. Two patients developed atrial fibrillation, one of whom had a pacemaker and a history of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. One patient developed a bronchopleural fistula on the first postoperative day, following a coughing episode. One patient was readmitted 6 days after hospital discharge with a pneumothorax, which was successfully treated with a small-bore catheter. In conclusion, robotic-assisted thoracic surgery has many advantages. Decreased complications can lead to improved outcomes, and hospitals can achieve cost savings as a result of reduced length of stay.

  17. Thoracic robotics at the Heart Hospital Baylor Plano: the first 20 cases

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A da Vinci Robotic Surgical System was purchased for The Heart Hospital Baylor Plano in fall 2011 and a program for robotic-assisted thoracic surgery commenced at the facility. Successive thoracic patients were offered and accepted a robotic-assisted operation. No patient was excluded because of age, height, weight, or comorbidities. The first 20 patients are summarized herein. Of the first 10 operations, only one was a lobectomy. As the program staff gained experience, seven of the latter 10 procedures were lobectomies. The average length of stay was 2.6 days (longest, 4 days). The average operating room time was 147 minutes overall and 200 minutes for lobectomies. The longest operating room time was 337 minutes in a patient who underwent a right middle lobectomy that was converted to a video-assisted thoracic surgery. Two patients developed atrial fibrillation, one of whom had a pacemaker and a history of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. One patient developed a bronchopleural fistula on the first postoperative day, following a coughing episode. One patient was readmitted 6 days after hospital discharge with a pneumothorax, which was successfully treated with a small-bore catheter. In conclusion, robotic-assisted thoracic surgery has many advantages. Decreased complications can lead to improved outcomes, and hospitals can achieve cost savings as a result of reduced length of stay. PMID:23077378

  18. An Ethogram to Quantify Operating Room Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Laura K.; Jennings, Bonnie Mowinski; Goelz, Ryan M.; Haythorn, Kent W.; Zivot, Joel B.; de Waal, Frans B. M.

    2017-01-01

    Background The operating room (OR) is a highly social and hierarchical setting where interprofessional team members must work interdependently under pressure. Due primarily to methodological challenges, the social and behavioral sciences have had trouble offering insight into OR dynamics. Purpose We adopted a method from the field of ethology for observing and quantifying the interpersonal interactions of OR team members. Methods We created and refined an ethogram, a catalog of all our subjects’ observable social behaviors. The ethogram was then assessed for its feasibility and interobserver reliability. Results It was feasible to use an ethogram to gather data in the OR. The high interobserver reliability (Cohen’s Kappa coefficients of 81 % and higher) indicates its utility for yielding largely objective, descriptive, quantitative data on OR behavior. Conclusions The method we propose has potential for social research conducted in healthcare settings as complex as the OR. PMID:26813263

  19. Physician communication in the operating room.

    PubMed

    Kirschbaum, Kristin A; Rask, John P; Fortner, Sally A; Kulesher, Robert; Nelson, Michael T; Yen, Tony; Brennan, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    In this study, communication research was conducted with multidisciplinary groups of operating-room physicians. Theoretical frameworks from intercultural communication and rhetoric were used to (a) measure latent cultural communication variables and (b) conduct communication training with the physicians. A six-step protocol guided the research with teams of physicians from different surgical specialties: anesthesiologists, general surgeons, and obstetrician-gynecologists (n = 85). Latent cultural communication variables were measured by surveys administered to physicians before and after completion of the protocol. The centerpiece of the 2-hour research protocol was an instructional session that informed the surgical physicians about rhetorical choices that support participatory communication. Post-training results demonstrated scores increased on communication variables that contribute to collaborative communication and teamwork among the physicians. This study expands health communication research through application of combined intercultural and rhetorical frameworks, and establishes new ways communication theory can contribute to medical education.

  20. Workplace culture among operating room nurses.

    PubMed

    Eskola, Suvi; Roos, Mervi; McCormack, Brendan; Slater, Paul; Hahtela, Nina; Suominen, Tarja

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the workplace culture in the Operating Room (OR) environment and the factors associated with it. In health care, the workplace culture affects the delivery and experience of care. The OR can be a stressful practice environment, where nurses might have occasionally either job stress or job satisfaction based on their competence. A quantitative cross-sectional approach was used. The study consisted of 96 Finnish OR nurses. A Nursing Context Index instrument was used to obtain data by way of an electronic questionnaire. The primary role and working unit of respondents were the main components relating to workplace culture, and especially to job stress. Nurse anaesthetists were found to be slightly more stressed than scrub nurses. In local hospitals, job stress related to workload was perceived less than in university hospitals (P = 0.001). In addition, OR nurses in local hospitals were more satisfied with their profession (P = 0.007), particularly around issues concerning adequate staffing and resources (P = 0.001). It is essential that nurse managers learn to recognise the different expressions of workplace culture. In particular, this study raises a need to recognise the factors that cause job stress to nurse anaesthetists. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Safety status system for operating room devices.

    PubMed

    Guédon, Annetje C P; Wauben, Linda S G L; Overvelde, Marlies; Blok, Joleen H; van der Elst, Maarten; Dankelman, Jenny; van den Dobbelsteen, John J

    2014-01-01

    Since the increase of the number of technological aids in the operating room (OR), equipment-related incidents have come to be a common kind of adverse events. This underlines the importance of adequate equipment management to improve the safety in the OR. A system was developed to monitor the safety status (periodic maintenance and registered malfunctions) of OR devices and to facilitate the notification of malfunctions. The objective was to assess whether the system is suitable for use in an busy OR setting and to analyse its effect on the notification of malfunctions. The system checks automatically the safety status of OR devices through constant communication with the technical facility management system, informs the OR staff real-time and facilitates notification of malfunctions. The system was tested for a pilot period of six months in four ORs of a Dutch teaching hospital and 17 users were interviewed on the usability of the system. The users provided positive feedback on the usability. For 86.6% of total time, the localisation of OR devices was accurate. 62 malfunctions of OR devices were reported, an increase of 12 notifications compared to the previous year. The safety status system was suitable for an OR complex, both from a usability and technical point of view, and an increase of reported malfunctions was observed. The system eases monitoring the safety status of equipment and is a promising tool to improve the safety related to OR devices.

  2. Science Support Room Operations During Desert RATS 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lofgren, G. E.; Hörz, F.; D-Rats Ssr; Bell, M. S.; Cohen, B. A.; Eppler, D. B.; Evans, C. A.; Hodges, K. V.; Hynek, B. M.; Gruener, J. E.; Kring, D. A.; Hurtado, J. M.; Lee, P.; Ming, D. W.; Rice, J. W.

    2010-03-01

    The DRATS 2009 field exercise provided operational experience that will help define science requirements for a science support room for future lunar surface operations. Lessons learned emphasize the continued collaboration between science, engineering, and operations.

  3. Door Opening Affects Operating Room Pressure During Joint Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Mears, Simon C; Blanding, Renee; Belkoff, Stephen M

    2015-11-01

    Many resources are expended to ensure a sterile operating room environment. Efforts are made to prevent exposure of patients to personnel and to achieve positive room pressure to keep out airborne contaminants. Foot traffic into and out of the operating room during surgery can undermine these efforts. The authors investigated the number and duration of operating room door openings during hip and knee arthroplasty procedures and the effect of the door openings on room pressure. They tested the hypothesis that door openings defeat positive pressure, permitting air flow into the room. Room pressure and door status were monitored electronically during 191 hip and knee arthroplasty procedures. Operating room staff were unaware that data were being collected. The authors evaluated the data with regression analysis to determine whether the number and duration of door openings had an effect on room pressure. Significance was set at P<.05. Doors were open, on average, 9.5 minutes per case. In 77 of 191 cases, positive pressure was defeated, allowing air flow to reverse into the operating room. Total time with the door open significantly affected the minimum pressure recorded in the room (P<.02), but did not significantly affect average room pressure (P=.7). This finding suggested that the loss of positive pressure was a transient event from which the room recovered. The number and duration of door openings showed a significant association with length of surgery. Door openings threaten positive pressure, potentially jeopardizing operating room sterility. The causes of excessive operating room traffic must be evaluated to identify ways to reduce this traffic and the associated risks.

  4. A Learning Needs Assessment of Operating Room Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pounds, Elizabeth; Littlefield, John H.

    Operating room nursing is not a formal part of the generic nursing curriculum. A learning needs assessment can serve to identify inservice education needs of operating nurses. In this study, a factor analysis was performed on the responses of 1,201 practicing operating room nurses to a list of 24 behaviorally-stated learning needs. Four factors,…

  5. Foucault could have been an operating room nurse.

    PubMed

    Riley, Robin; Manias, Elizabeth

    2002-08-01

    Operating room nursing is an under-researched area of nursing practice. The stereotypical image of operating room nursing is one of task- and technically-orientated aspects of practice, where nurses work in a medical model and are dominated by constraints from outside their sphere of influence. This paper explores the possibility of understanding operating room nursing in a different way. Using the work of Michel Foucault to analyse the work of operating room nursing, this paper argues the relevance of the framework for a more in-depth analysis of this specialty area of practice. The concepts of power, discipline and subjectivity are used to demonstrate how operating room nursing is constructed as a discipline and how operating room nurses act to govern and construct the specialty. Exemplars are drawn from extensive professional experience, from guidelines of professional operating room nursing associations, as well as published texts. The focus is predominantly on the regulation of space and time to maintain the integrity of the sterile surgical field and issues of management, as well as the use of the ethical concept of the 'surgical conscience'. This form of analysis provides a level and depth of inquiry that has rarely been undertaken in operating room nursing. As such, it has the potential to provide a much needed, different view of operation room nursing that can only help to strengthen its professional foundations and development.

  6. Operating room fires: a closed claims analysis.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Sonya P; Bhananker, Sanjay M; Posner, Karen L; Domino, Karen B

    2013-05-01

    To assess patterns of injury and liability associated with operating room (OR) fires, closed malpractice claims in the American Society of Anesthesiologists Closed Claims Database since 1985 were reviewed. All claims related to fires in the OR were compared with nonfire-related surgical anesthesia claims. An analysis of fire-related claims was performed to identify causative factors. There were 103 OR fire claims (1.9% of 5,297 surgical claims). Electrocautery was the ignition source in 90% of fire claims. OR fire claims more frequently involved older outpatients compared with other surgical anesthesia claims (P < 0.01). Payments to patients were more often made in fire claims (P < 0.01), but payment amounts were lower (median $120,166) compared to nonfire surgical claims (median $250,000, P < 0.01). Electrocautery-induced fires (n = 93) increased over time (P < 0.01) to 4.4% claims between 2000 and 2009. Most (85%) electrocautery fires occurred during head, neck, or upper chest procedures (high-fire-risk procedures). Oxygen served as the oxidizer in 95% of electrocautery-induced OR fires (84% with open delivery system). Most electrocautery-induced fires (n = 75, 81%) occurred during monitored anesthesia care. Oxygen was administered via an open delivery system in all high-risk procedures during monitored anesthesia care. In contrast, alcohol-containing prep solutions and volatile compounds were present in only 15% of OR fires during monitored anesthesia care. Electrocautery-induced fires during monitored anesthesia care were the most common cause of OR fires claims. Recognition of the fire triad (oxidizer, fuel, and ignition source), particularly the critical role of supplemental oxygen by an open delivery system during use of the electrocautery, is crucial to prevent OR fires. Continuing education and communication among OR personnel along with fire prevention protocols in high-fire-risk procedures may reduce the occurrence of OR fires.

  7. Virtual Reality Training Improves Operating Room Performance

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, Neal E.; Gallagher, Anthony G.; Roman, Sanziana A.; O’Brien, Michael K.; Bansal, Vipin K.; Andersen, Dana K.; Satava, Richard M.

    2002-01-01

    Objective To demonstrate that virtual reality (VR) training transfers technical skills to the operating room (OR) environment. Summary Background Data The use of VR surgical simulation to train skills and reduce error risk in the OR has never been demonstrated in a prospective, randomized, blinded study. Methods Sixteen surgical residents (PGY 1–4) had baseline psychomotor abilities assessed, then were randomized to either VR training (MIST VR simulator diathermy task) until expert criterion levels established by experienced laparoscopists were achieved (n = 8), or control non-VR-trained (n = 8). All subjects performed laparoscopic cholecystectomy with an attending surgeon blinded to training status. Videotapes of gallbladder dissection were reviewed independently by two investigators blinded to subject identity and training, and scored for eight predefined errors for each procedure minute (interrater reliability of error assessment r > 0.80). Results No differences in baseline assessments were found between groups. Gallbladder dissection was 29% faster for VR-trained residents. Non-VR-trained residents were nine times more likely to transiently fail to make progress (P < .007, Mann-Whitney test) and five times more likely to injure the gallbladder or burn nontarget tissue (chi-square = 4.27, P < .04). Mean errors were six times less likely to occur in the VR-trained group (1.19 vs. 7.38 errors per case;P < .008, Mann-Whitney test). Conclusions The use of VR surgical simulation to reach specific target criteria significantly improved the OR performance of residents during laparoscopic cholecystectomy. This validation of transfer of training skills from VR to OR sets the stage for more sophisticated uses of VR in assessment, training, error reduction, and certification of surgeons. PMID:12368674

  8. [Operating Room Nurses' Experiences of Securing for Patient Safety].

    PubMed

    Park, Kwang Ok; Kim, Jong Kyung; Kim, Myoung Sook

    2015-10-01

    This study was done to evaluate the experience of securing patient safety in hospital operating rooms. Experiential data were collected from 15 operating room nurses through in-depth interviews. The main question was "Could you describe your experience with patient safety in the operating room?". Qualitative data from the field and transcribed notes were analyzed using Strauss and Corbin's grounded theory methodology. The core category of experience with patient safety in the operating room was 'trying to maintain principles of patient safety during high-risk surgical procedures'. The participants used two interactional strategies: 'attempt continuous improvement', 'immersion in operation with sharing issues of patient safety'. The results indicate that the important factors for ensuring the safety of patients in the operating room are manpower, education, and a system for patient safety. Successful and safe surgery requires communication, teamwork and recognition of the importance of patient safety by the surgical team.

  9. Predictors of operating room extubation in adult cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Kathirvel; DeAndrade, Diana S; Mandell, Daniel R; Althouse, Andrew D; Manmohan, Rajan; Esper, Stephen A; Varga, Jeffrey M; Badhwar, Vinay

    2017-06-13

    The primary objective of the study was to identify perioperative factors associated with successful immediate extubation in the operating room after adult cardiac surgery. The secondary objective was to derive a simplified predictive scoring system to guide clinicians in operating room extubation. All 1518 patients in this retrospective cohort study underwent standardized fast-track cardiac anesthetic protocol during adult cardiac surgery. Perioperative variables between patients who had successful extubation in the operating room versus in the intensive care unit were retrospectively analyzed using both univariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses. A predictive score of successful operating room extubation was constructed from the multivariable results of 800 patients (derivation set), and the scoring system was further tested using a validation set of 398 patients. Younger age, lower body mass index, higher preoperative serum albumin, absence of chronic lung disease and diabetes, less-invasive surgical approach, isolated coronary bypass surgery, elective surgery, and lower doses of intraoperative intravenous fentanyl were independently associated with higher probability of operating room extubation. The extubation prediction score created in a derivation set of patients performed well in the validation set. Patient scores less than 0 had a minimal probability of successful operating room extubation. Operating room extubation was highly predicted with scores of 5 or greater. Perioperative factors that are independently associated with successful operating room extubation after adult cardiac operations were identified, and an operating room extubation prediction scoring system was validated. This scoring system may be used to guide safe operating room extubation after cardiac operations. Copyright © 2017 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Optically Pumped Subwavelength Lasers Operated at Room Temperature

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-06

    REPORT NACHOS Project Final Report_University of Michigan Optically pumped subwavelength lasers operated at room temperature 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY...28-Feb-2011 NACHOS Project Final Report_University of Michigan Optically pumped subwavelength lasers operated at room temperature Report Title

  11. The operating room of the future: a view from Europe.

    PubMed

    Feussner, H

    2003-09-01

    The Operating Room of the Future will be characterized by meticulous preoperative planning, full integration of the operating room into the general flow of information, more comprehensive intraoperative diagnostic imaging procedures, and the use of sophisticated visualization processes including augmented reality. Mechatronic support (partially autonomous robots) enhances safety and allows reduction of staff. Integrated operating room systems will allow the wide spectrum of new devices and functionalities to be easily controlled by the operating team. The Operating Room of the Future will no longer be isolated from the rest of the clinical endeavor. Intraoperative teleconsultation and telepresence will help to promote and teach safer evidence-based endoscopic therapeutic surgery. Traditional surgical intervention will expand its definitions by procedures via an interdisciplinary, cooperative approach that will replace the sequential therapeutic process of today.

  12. [Performance development of a university operating room after implementation of a central operating room management].

    PubMed

    Waeschle, R M; Sliwa, B; Jipp, M; Pütz, H; Hinz, J; Bauer, M

    2016-08-01

    The difficult financial situation in German hospitals requires measures for improvement in process quality. Associated increases in revenues in the high income field "operating room (OR) area" are increasingly the responsibility of OR management but it has not been shown that the introduction of an efficiency-oriented management leads to an increase in process quality and revenues in the operating theatre. Therefore the performance in the operating theatre of the University Medical Center Göttingen was analyzed for working days in the core operating time from 7.45 a.m. to 3.30 p.m. from 2009 to 2014. The achievement of process target times for the morning surgery start time and the turnover times of anesthesia and OR-nurses were calculated as indicators of process quality. The number of operations and cumulative incision-suture time were also analyzed as aggregated performance indicators. In order to assess the development of revenues in the operating theatre, the revenues from diagnosis-related groups (DRG) in all inpatient and occupational accident cases, adjusted for the regional basic case value from 2009, were calculated for each year. The development of revenues was also analyzed after deduction of revenues resulting from altered economic case weighting. It could be shown that the achievement of process target values for the morning surgery start time could be improved by 40 %, the turnover times for anesthesia reduced by 50 % and for the OR-nurses by 36 %. Together with the introduction of central planning for reallocation, an increase in operation numbers of 21 % and cumulative incision-suture times of 12% could be realized. Due to these additional operations the DRG revenues in 2014 could be increased to 132 % compared to 2009 or 127 % if the revenues caused by economic case weighting were excluded. The personnel complement in anesthesia (-1.7 %) and OR-nurses (+2.6 %) as well as anesthetists (+6.7 %) increased less compared to the

  13. 19. VIEW OF PROCESSING ROOM. AFTER 1957, BUILDING 771 OPERATIONS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. VIEW OF PROCESSING ROOM. AFTER 1957, BUILDING 771 OPERATIONS CONSISTED PRIMARILY OF AQUEOUS PLUTONIUM RECOVERY FROM SCRAP METAL. (6/20/60) - Rocky Flats Plant, Plutonium Recovery & Fabrication Facility, North-central section of plant, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  14. Simulating environmental and psychological acoustic factors of the operating room.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Christopher L; Dudaryk, Roman; Ayers, Andrew L; McNeer, Richard R

    2015-12-01

    In this study, an operating room simulation environment was adapted to include quadraphonic speakers, which were used to recreate a composed clinical soundscape. To assess validity of the composed soundscape, several acoustic parameters of this simulated environment were acquired in the presence of alarms only, background noise only, or both. These parameters were also measured for comparison from size-matched operating rooms at Jackson Memorial Hospital. The parameters examined included sound level, reverberation time, and predictive metrics of speech intelligibility in quiet and noise. It was found that the sound levels and acoustic parameters were comparable between the simulated environment and the actual operating rooms. The impact of the background noise on the perception of medical alarms was then examined, and was found to have little impact on the audibility of the alarms. This study is a first in kind report of a comparison between the environmental and psychological acoustical parameters of a hospital simulation environment and actual operating rooms.

  15. 6. INTERIOR VIEW OF TYPICAL OPERATING ROOM; NOTE APPARATUS SUSPENDED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. INTERIOR VIEW OF TYPICAL OPERATING ROOM; NOTE APPARATUS SUSPENDED FROM CEILING & REMAINING COPPER STRIPS IN FLOOR - Fort McCoy, Building No. T-1032, North side of South Tenth Avenue, Block 10, Sparta, Monroe County, WI

  16. Suggested bacteriological standards for air in ultraclean operating rooms.

    PubMed

    Whyte, W; Lidwell, O M; Lowbury, E J; Blowers, R

    1983-06-01

    Bacteriological standards for the air in ultraclean operating rooms are needed since physical tests alone cannot guarantee satisfactory results. 10 m-3 is suggested as the highest acceptable value for an ultraclean system. Methods are described for determining this.

  17. Trauma Pod/Operating Room of the Future

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-01

    TITLE: Trauma Pod /Operating Room of the Future PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Delbert Tesar, Ph.D. Chetan Kapoor, Ph.D...14 Jan 2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Trauma Pod /Operating Room of the Future 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-05-2-0012 5c. PROGRAM...plates: ALL DTIC reproductions will be in black and white. 14. ABSTRACT The University of Texas (UTA) has played a central role in the trauma pod

  18. Noise Levels in the Operating Room

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-01

    59-63. Hodge, B., & Thompson , J . F . (1990). Noise pollution in the operating theatre. The Lancet, 335, 891-894. Noise Levels 41...Kam, P. C. A., Kam A. C., & Thompson , J . F . (1994). Noise pollution in the anaesthetic and intensive care environment. Anaesthesia, 49, 982-986

  19. Development of the Baylor-Nikkiso centrifugal pump with a purging system for circulatory support.

    PubMed

    Naito, K; Miyazoe, Y; Aizawa, T; Mizuguchi, K; Tasai, K; Ohara, Y; Orime, Y; Glueck, J; Takatani, S; Noon, G P

    1993-07-01

    The Baylor-Nikkiso centrifugal pump is a magnetically coupled system with a V-ring seal separating the pump and the actuator chamber. To prevent thrombus formation behind the impeller and to extend the life of the pump to 2 weeks of continuous operation, we incorporated a purging chamber behind the V-ring seal. An external pump connected to this purging chamber infused fluid at a constant rate to wash the shaft-seal area. To evaluate the effectiveness of the purging system, we have carried out biventricular bypass experiments using calves. The purging system was successful in reducing the level of thrombus formation after 2 weeks of operation. The results of these studies confirmed that the Baylor-Nikkiso centrifugal pump with this purging system is suitable for at least 2 weeks of continuous operation as a circulatory support system.

  20. Operating Room Utilization at Frederick Memorial Hospital

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-01

    method of care while improving quality of care. Efficient delivery is continuously important as reimbursement rates are under extreme scrutiny by managed ...outputs. Variability is inherent in all healthcare systems as patients, provider experiences, management , and quality are not homogeneous and varies...model. Operations Research. 48(3), 490-497. Litvak, E., Long, M. (2000). Cost and quality under managed care: Irreconcilable differences?. The

  1. Structured alarm systems for the operating room.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, P J; Schreiber, J

    1989-07-01

    The administration of anesthesia may be viewed as a closed-loop control system consisting of three major components: the anesthesia system, the patient, and the system operator. A monitoring and alarm system during anesthesia should not be limited to only one of the three major components but must include monitoring of the patient, the performance of the anesthesia system, and the action of the system operator. For an alarm system to be successful when an adverse condition occurs, an alarm must be generated and identified, the problem identified and corrected, and the patient stabilized before injury results. The authors describe the characteristics of a structured alarm system that maximizes the time available to correct a potential problem before injury begins, that clearly identifies the cause of the problem, and that prioritizes alarms according to the urgency of the required response. Alarms should be easy to temporarily silence, have built-in alarm default settings to prevent the inadvertant use of settings meant for a previous patient, and have a graphic display that enables the operator to detect problems or trends before an alarm sounds.

  2. Buoyancy driven acceleration in a hospital operating room indoor environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeill, James; Hertzberg, Jean; Zhai, John

    2011-11-01

    In hospital operating rooms, centrally located non-isothermal ceiling jets provide sterile air for protecting the surgical site from infectious particles in the room air as well as room cooling. Modern operating rooms are requiring larger temperature differences to accommodate increasing cooling loads for heat gains from medical equipment. This trend may lead to significant changes in the room air distribution patterns that may sacrifice the sterile air field across the surgical table. Quantitative flow visualization experiments using laser sheet illumination and RANS modeling of the indoor environment were conducted to demonstrate the impact of the indoor environment thermal conditions on the room air distribution. The angle of the jet shear layer was studied as function of the area of the vena contracta of the jet, which is in turn dependent upon the Archimedes number of the jet. Increases in the buoyancy forces cause greater air velocities in the vicinity of the surgical site increasing the likelihood of deposition of contaminants in the flow field. The outcome of this study shows the Archimedes number should be used as the design parameter for hospital operating room air distribution in order to maintain a proper supply air jet for covering the sterile region. This work is supported by ASHRAE.

  3. Before operating room nursing journals: operating room nursing in the pages of the Canadian Nurse 1940-1960.

    PubMed

    Moszczynski, Alice

    2010-09-01

    The Canadian Nurses Association (CNA) values learning from nursing history to provide a contextual perspective in understanding how past events have shaped current nursing practice. Until the publication of operating room nursing journals, Canada's national nursing journal, The Canadian Nurse, served as an educational and professional resource for those nurses working in the operating room and for nurses whose work was related to, or connected with, the operating room. A historical review of early issues of The Canadian Nurse (first published in 1905) reveals a substantial amount of content related to operating room nursing in the twenty year period, beginning in the 1940s, that predated the existence of OR specialty journals. The content was, for the time, both detailed and informative. It was through this journal that operating room nurses, indeed all Canadian nurses, learned about new advances, employment opportunities, educational programs, professional associations, and the achievements of those in the profession. Operating Room Nursing, as an isolated and quickly emerging specialty, was introduced to other nurses via items in The Canadian Nurse journal.

  4. Managing transition to a hybrid operating room.

    PubMed

    Odle, Teresa G

    2011-01-01

    Managers of interventional radiology departments and medical imaging personnel who work in surgical suites deal with regular technical innovations in their work, but large-scale innovations seldom come along that transform markets and require massive architectural, training, and technological changes. The hybrid interventional/operating suite is one such massive change. This article presents an overview of the transition to hybrid procedures and designs, the benefits and challenges of the new delivery method, and change management issues for managers of cardiovascular and vascular interventional departments.

  5. Operating room nursing directors' influence on anesthesia group operating room productivity.

    PubMed

    Masursky, Danielle; Dexter, Franklin; Nussmeier, Nancy A

    2008-12-01

    Implementation of initiatives to increase anesthesia group productivity depends not just on anesthesia groups, but on operating room (OR) nursing administration. OR nursing directors may encourage organizational change based on the needs of their hospitals and nurses. These changes may differ from those that would increase the anesthesia group's productivity. We assessed reward structures using (A) letters of nomination for the "OR Manager of the Year" award offered annually by the publication OR Manager, and (B) data from a salary/career survey of OR directors by the same publication. (A) There were 164 nomination letters submitted from 2004 through 2007 for 45 nominees. The letters contained n = 2659 full sentences and n = 50,821 words. We systematically created a list of 36 terms related to finance, profit, and productivity. We also analyzed the frequency of use of these terms relative to the use of the 15 most common relationship-oriented terms (e.g., compassion, encourage, mentor, and respect). (B) The salary/career survey's questions relevant to anesthesia group productivity had responses from 303 US OR directors, 97% of whom were nurses. We tested the strength of the relationship between the budget responsibility of the OR nursing director and his or her annual salary. (A) 2.6% of sentences in the nomination letters included at least one term related to profit and productivity (95% confidence interval 2.0%-3.2%). Relationship-oriented terms were 9.0 times more prevalent (95% confidence interval 7.1-11.4). (B) There was statistically significant positive proportionality between the OR nursing director's operational budget (including personnel) and his or her salary (Pearson r = 0.64, P < 0.001). The 10th percentile of the operational budget was $1 million and the 90th percentile was $36 million. The budget of $1 million was associated with a salary 22% less than the median and the budget of $36 million was associated with a salary 22% larger than the median

  6. Environmental control: operating room air quality.

    PubMed

    Bartley, J M

    1993-01-01

    1. OR staff members should familiarize themselves with basic air handling system terminology to better manage their own environment (eg, HVAC, air changes, air balancing, HEPA filtration). A working relationship with building engineers is an important skill for the OR nurse. 2. Knowledge of the standards on which air quality in the OR is based should assist in the process of planning for improved design--as well as in monitoring existing air quality. 3. Current standards balance energy savings with air changes and high levels of filtration to achieve optimum outcomes. Recommendations from design and engineering authorities (even for implant surgery) are based on average air changes and HEPA filtration, not laminar air flow. 4. The daily, operational role of the OR staff in maintaining high air quality includes managing traffic, using low-lint barrier materials, monitoring air quality indicators, and investigating unusual variances with the engineering staff for appropriate follow-up (eg, filter changes).

  7. [Fire and explosion hazard during oxygen use in operating rooms].

    PubMed

    Kalkman, C J; Romijn, C; van Rheineck Leyssius, A T

    2008-06-07

    In both 2006 and 2007 a large operating room fire occurred in the Netherlands. One patient died as a result of a sudden intense flash fire caused by a leaking oxygen connection. Smaller operating room fires can cause severe burn injuries and inhalation trauma in patients. An oxygen-enriched atmosphere is an important causative factor in most surgical fires. Inflammable substances and ignition sources, such as a diathermic knife or laser, may be present in the operating theatre and environs. The combination of these 3 components (fuel, oxygen and ignition) increases the risk of operation room fires. Prevention and control of this hazard depends on removal of one or more of the 3 components.

  8. High-tech tools transform the operating room.

    PubMed

    Haugh, Richard

    2005-01-01

    This installment of our quarterly Clinical Management series examines how the hospital operating room is becoming a safer place for patients. Thanks to such technological breakthroughs as 3-D images, virtual patients and robots, surgeons can operate with more accuracy and efficiency.

  9. 76. MEDICAL DEPARTMENT OPERATING ROOM STARBOARD LOOKING TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    76. MEDICAL DEPARTMENT - OPERATING ROOM - STARBOARD LOOKING TO PORT FORWARD TO AFT SHOWING OPERATING TABLE, CABINETS, LOCKERS, X-RAY VIEWING SCREEN, LIGHTS AND EMERGENCY LIGHTING. - U.S.S. HORNET, Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Sinclair Inlet, Bremerton, Kitsap County, WA

  10. Risk of blood contamination and injury to operating room personnel.

    PubMed Central

    Quebbeman, E J; Telford, G L; Hubbard, S; Wadsworth, K; Hardman, B; Goodman, H; Gottlieb, M S

    1991-01-01

    The potential for transmission of deadly viral diseases to health care workers exists when contaminated blood is inoculated through injury or when blood comes in contact with nonintact skin. Operating room personnel are at particularly high risk for injury and blood contamination, but data on the specifics of which personnel are at greater risk and which practices change risk in this environment are almost nonexistent. To define these risk factors, experienced operating room nurses were employed solely to observe and record the injuries and blood contaminations that occurred during 234 operations involving 1763 personnel. Overall 118 of the operations (50%) resulted in at least one person becoming contaminated with blood. Cuts or needlestick injuries occurred in 15% of the operations. Several factors were found to significantly alter the risk of blood contamination or injury: surgical specialty, role of each person, duration of the procedure, amount of blood loss, number of needles used, and volume of irrigation fluid used. Risk calculations that use average values to include all personnel in the operating room or all operations performed substantially underestimate risk for surgeons and first assistants, who accounted for 81% of all body contamination and 65% of the injuries. The area of the body contaminated also changed with the surgical specialty. These data should help define more appropriate protection for individuals in the operating room and should allow refinements of practices and techniques to decrease injury. Images Fig. 1. PMID:1953115

  11. Anesthesia and sedation outside of the operating room

    PubMed Central

    Youn, Ann Misun; Kim, Yoon-Hee

    2015-01-01

    Due to rapid evolution and technological advancements, medical personnel now require special training outside of their safe zones. Anesthesiologists face challenges in practicing in locations beyond the operating room. New locations, inadequate monitoring devices, poor assisting staff, unfamiliarity of procedures, insufficient knowledge of basic standards, and lack of experience compromise the quality of patient care. Therefore, anesthesiologists must recognize possible risk factors during anesthesia in nonoperating rooms and familiarize themselves with standards to improve safe practice. This review article emphasizes the need for standardizing hospitals and facilities requiring nonoperating room anesthesia, and encourages anesthesiologists to take the lead in applying these practice guidelines to improve patient outcomes and reduce adverse events. PMID:26257843

  12. A survey of anesthesiologists' views of operating room recycling.

    PubMed

    McGain, Forbes; White, Stuart; Mossenson, Simone; Kayak, Eugenie; Story, David

    2012-05-01

    Operating rooms contribute significantly to the increasing volumes and costs of hospital waste. Little is known, however, about doctors' views of hospital waste recycling despite their potential influence in improving recycling programs. We surveyed the waste recycling views held by anesthesiologists in Australia, New Zealand, and England in regional or metropolitan and public or private practice. We asked the following: (1) What proportion of anesthesiologists consider recycling operating room waste to be important? (2) What do respondents consider to be identifiable barriers preventing operating room recycling? We performed a Web-based survey of 11 questions of attitudes to operating room waste recycling held by anesthesiologists. After piloting, the survey was e-mailed to 500 randomly selected Fellows of the Australian and New Zealand College of Anesthetists. All anesthetic departments of the National Health Service of England also received the e-mail with a request that English consultant anesthesiologists complete the survey. We received 780 responses from anesthesiologists, 210 (41% response rate) from Australia and New Zealand and 570 (11% response rate at worst) from England. Regardless of location or type of practice, most (725, 93%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 91% to 95%) responding anesthesiologists would like to increase recycling of operating room waste and would commit their time, but not their money to doing so. Only 87 (11%; 95% CI: 9% to 14%) respondents agreed/strongly agreed that waste recycling occurred in their operating rooms already. Survey respondents thought that the greatest barriers to recycling waste were (1) inadequate recycling facilities, 381 (49%); (2) negative staff attitudes, 133 (17%); and (3) inadequate information on how to recycle waste, 121 (16%). Time, safety, inadequate space for recycling receptacles, and cost were each thought by <5% of respondents to be the greatest barrier to recycling. Most responding

  13. Teamwork in the operating room: frontline perspectives among hospitals and operating room personnel.

    PubMed

    Sexton, J Bryan; Makary, Martin A; Tersigni, Anthony R; Pryor, David; Hendrich, Ann; Thomas, Eric J; Holzmueller, Christine G; Knight, Andrew P; Wu, Yun; Pronovost, Peter J

    2006-11-01

    The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations is proposing that hospitals measure culture beginning in 2007. However, a reliable and widely used measurement tool for the operating room (OR) setting does not currently exist. OR personnel in 60 US hospitals were surveyed using the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire. The teamwork climate domain of the survey uses six items about difficulty speaking up, conflict resolution, physician-nurse collaboration, feeling supported by others, asking questions, and heeding nurse input. To justify grouping individual-level responses to a single score at each hospital OR level, the authors used a multilevel confirmatory factor analysis, intraclass correlations, within-group interrater reliability, and Cronbach's alpha. To detect differences at the hospital OR level and by caregiver type, the authors used multivariate analysis of variance (items) and analysis of variance (scale). The response rate was 77.1%. There was robust evidence for grouping individual-level respondents to the hospital OR level using the diverse set of statistical tests, e.g., Comparative Fit Index = 0.99, root mean squared error of approximation = 0.05, and acceptable intraclasss correlations, within-group interrater reliability values, and Cronbach's alpha = 0.79. Teamwork climate differed significantly by hospital (F59, 1,911 = 4.06, P < 0.001) and OR caregiver type (F4, 1,911 = 9.96, P < 0.001). Rigorous assessment of teamwork climate is possible using this psychometrically sound teamwork climate scale. This tool and initial benchmarks allow others to compare their teamwork climate to national means, in an effort to focus more on what excellent surgical teams do well.

  14. 12. VIEW OF OPERATING ROOMRCA COMMUNICATION REC STATION (THIS ROOM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. VIEW OF OPERATING ROOM-RCA COMMUNICATION REC STATION (THIS ROOM WAS ORIGINALLY A MOTOR GENERATOR FACILITY AND SUPPLIED DC POWER TO AN EARLIER GENERATION OF POINT-TO-POINT RECEIVERS ON SECOND FLOOR). VIEW SHOWS TRANSMITTER CONTROL STATION AND AUDIO CONTROL STATION (LEFT, WATKINS-JOHNSON WJ-8718-23. HP RECEIVERS AND KENWOOD R-5000 COMMUNICATIONS RECEIVERS (220 DEGREES). - Marconi Radio Sites, Receiving, Point Reyes Station, Marin County, CA

  15. Operating room myths: what is the evidence for common practices.

    PubMed

    Pada, Surinder; Perl, Trish M

    2015-08-01

    In order to ensure patient safety and prevent surgical site infections (SSIs), operating theaters/rooms have evolved into complex, highly technical environments. Prevention of healthcare-associated infections, and strategies to limit patient harm, have gained momentum over the last decade. This article aims to examine and dispute some commonly held beliefs with specific reference to: laminar airflow, noise and operating theater door openings and how these impact SSI. Laminar airflow may not be necessary for prosthetic implant surgery. Some recent data suggest that there may be patient harm. With the development of better surgical techniques and perioperative care, such costly systems may not be needed. Operating rooms with a high number of door openings have also been shown to experience higher SSI rates, as have operating rooms with high noise levels. These may serve as surrogate markers for operating room discipline. Initiatives which target these areas may be worth considering when devising strategies to reduce SSIs. Improved surveillance systems for SSIs are needed and should include operating theater airflow type. This will allow further analysis of the effect of laminar air flow on SSIs and provide evidence for a decisive recommendation. Cultivating a culture of good operating theater discipline may also reduce SSIs.

  16. Baylor, Univ. of North Texas Students Win EPA Fellowship Grant

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    DALLAS - (April 1, 2015) One undergraduate student at Baylor University and another at the University of North Texas were both awarded research fellowship grants by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The grants were given to students pu

  17. The Case for Using Computers in the Operating Room

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Marion J.; Douglas, Judith V.; Warnock-Matheron, Ann; Hannah, Kathryn J.

    1986-01-01

    The largest cost center and revenue generator in most hospitals, the operating room is subject to demands for increased cost accountability and quality assurance. Information technology tools can be incorporated into the operating room and have the potential to positively affect practices there through addressing nursing, administrative/financial and medical needs. Microcomputer-based operating room systems now on the market can provide functions from scheduling and case costing to medical records and market analysis. Of 21 functions identified, 10 can be characterized as mandatory and the remaining as optional. Individual systems offer varied configurations, providing from 0 to 21 functions. These enhanced capabilities for data collection, monitoring and analysis enable health care professionals to provide both better and more cost-effective care for surgical patients. PMID:3811351

  18. Flow analysis of airborne particles in a hospital operating room

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faeghi, Shiva; Lennerts, Kunibert

    2016-06-01

    Preventing airborne infections during a surgery has been always an important issue to deliver effective and high quality medical care to the patient. One of the important sources of infection is particles that are distributed through airborne routes. Factors influencing infection rates caused by airborne particles, among others, are efficient ventilation and the arrangement of surgical facilities inside the operating room. The paper studies the ventilation airflow pattern in an operating room in a hospital located in Tehran, Iran, and seeks to find the efficient configurations with respect to the ventilation system and layout of facilities. This study uses computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and investigates the effects of different inflow velocities for inlets, two pressurization scenarios (equal and excess pressure) and two arrangements of surgical facilities in room while the door is completely open. The results show that system does not perform adequately when the door is open in the operating room under the current conditions, and excess pressure adjustments should be employed to achieve efficient results. The findings of this research can be discussed in the context of design and controlling of the ventilation facilities of operating rooms.

  19. A new operating room concept for minimal invasive surgery.

    PubMed

    Abri, P D; Szabó, Z; Gal, I

    2000-01-01

    Since 1990 new developments have found their way into almost every area of minimally invasive surgery (MIS), and nowadays, 90% of all gynecological operations and 80% of all abdominal operations can be performed by this approach. In contrast to surgical development, operating room (OR) design has not progressed much over the past half century. While a number of surgical suites have been designed for specific specialties, more commonplace is the flexible OR concept.

  20. A New Operating Room Concept For Minimal Invasive Surgery.

    PubMed

    Abri, Prof Dr Med Omid; Szabó, Zoltán; Gal, Istvan

    2000-10-01

    Since 1990 new developments have found their way into almost every area of minimally invasive surgery (MIS), and nowadays, 90% of all gynecological operations and 80% of all abdominal operations can be performed by this approach. In contrast to surgical development, operating room (OR) design has not progressed much over the past half century. While a number of surgical suites have been designed for specific specialties, more commonplace is the flexible OR concept.

  1. The operating room charge nurse: coordinator and communicator.

    PubMed Central

    Moss, J.; Xiao, Y.; Zubaidah, S.

    2001-01-01

    To achieve the potential inherent in the use of computer applications in distributed environments, we need to understand the information needs of users. The purpose of this descriptive study was to document the communication of an operating room charge nurse to inform the design of technological communication applications for operating room coordination. A data collection tool was developed to record: 1) the purpose of the communication, 2) mode of communication, 3) the target individual, and 4) the length of time taken for each occurrence. The chosen data collection categories provided a functional structure for data collection and analysis involving communication. Study findings are discussed within the context of application design. PMID:11825234

  2. Eyewear contamination levels in the operating room: infection risk.

    PubMed

    Lange, Victor R

    2014-04-01

    We investigated eyewear contamination levels in the operating room to assess infection risk and inform protocol development. Microbial contamination after use was found in 37.7% of disposable and 94.9% of reusable eyewear pieces. After disinfection, 74.4% of reusable eyewear also cultured positive. Disposable eyewear may reduce intercase contamination risk. Reusable eyewear may carry ongoing bioburden and, thus, contribute to operating room environment risk. Eyewear with antimicrobial material or components could reduce risk. Alternative decontamination methods for reusable eyewear should be evaluated.

  3. [Comprehensive system integration and networking in operating rooms].

    PubMed

    Feußner, H; Ostler, D; Kohn, N; Vogel, T; Wilhelm, D; Koller, S; Kranzfelder, M

    2016-12-01

    A comprehensive surveillance and control system integrating all devices and functions is a precondition for realization of the operating room of the future. Multiple proprietary integrated operation room systems are currently available with a central user interface; however, they only cover a relatively small part of all functionalities. Internationally, there are at least three different initiatives to promote a comprehensive systems integration and networking in the operating room: the Japanese smart cyber operating theater (SCOT), the American medical device plug-and-play interoperability program (MDPnP) and the German secure and dynamic networking in operating room and hospital (OR.NET) project supported by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research. Within the framework of the internationally advanced OR.NET project, prototype solution approaches were realized, which make short-term and mid-term comprehensive data retrieval systems probable. An active and even autonomous control of the medical devices by the surveillance and control system (closed loop) is expected only in the long run due to strict regulatory barriers.

  4. [A project to promote patient positioning accuracy in operating rooms].

    PubMed

    Huang, Jui-Chen; Pan, Shu-Pan; Huang, Yi-Tzu; Chen, Shu-Hua

    2011-12-01

    Inappropriate patient positioning during surgery causes respiratory pattern changes, inadequate gaseous exchange, tissue hypoperfusion and disruption of skin integrity. Inadvertent loosening of positioning devices on a patient in our ward during surgery caused surgical field contamination. We thus proposed a project to promote patient positioning accuracy in operating rooms to improve patient safety. This project was intended to promote accurate patient positioning by operating room nurses, raise nursing professionalism, ensure patient safety, and avoid unnecessary patient injury. Under the project, we held educational training programs, developed patient positioning standard operating procedures (SOPs) and check lists, inspected all positioning assistance devices, purchased additional belt restraint straps, and conducted periodic monitoring. Patient positioning execution accuracy increased from 80% to 100%; cognition of patient positioning increased from 88% to 100%. The operating room committee adopted the proposed procedures and they are now SOPs in all operating rooms at our hospital. We suggest including the SOPs developed in this project in continuous education programs and urge making well-designed positioning assistance devices available to protect patient safety during surgery.

  5. Control Room operations: an investigation of the task of the operator in a Colliery Control Room. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, G.C.; Best, C.F.; Ferguson, C.A.; Graveling, R.A.; Nicholl, A.G.M.

    1982-09-01

    A detailed study of the ergonomics aspects of four representative Colliery Control Rooms was carried out. Numerous ergonomics limitations, many common to each of the control rooms studied, were identified particularly in relation to workspace dimensions, console layout and lighting. In order to overcome these limitations in future designs, a report detailing the Ergonomics Principles of Colliery Control Room design and Layout was prepared on the basis of the information obtained. Task analysis carried out during the studies revealed that control room operators could have a direct effect on production and that ergonomics aspects were involved in these situations. Indications of potential ergonomics problems in the wider sphere of job design were also identified particularly in relation to information handling.

  6. 42. View of CSMR room equipment status board and operators ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. View of CSMR room equipment status board and operators console with two phone links to MWOC in transmitter building no. 102. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  7. Delays in the operating room: signs of an imperfect system

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Janice; Khu, Kathleen Joy; Kaderali, Zul; Bernstein, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Background Delays in the operating room have a negative effect on its efficiency and the working environment. In this prospective study, we analyzed data on perioperative system delays. Methods One neurosurgeon prospectively recorded all errors, including perioperative delays, for consecutive patients undergoing elective procedures from May 2000 to February 2009. We analyzed the prevalence, causes and impact of perioperative system delays that occurred in one neurosurgeon’s practice. Results A total of 1531 elective surgical cases were performed during the study period. Delays were the most common type of error (33.6%), and more than half (51.4%) of all cases had at least 1 delay. The most common cause of delay was equipment failure. The first cases of the day and cranial cases had more delays than subsequent cases and spinal cases, respectively. A delay in starting the first case was associated with subsequent delays. Conclusion Delays frequently occur in the operating room and have a major effect on patient flow and resource utilization. Thorough documentation of perioperative delays provides a basis for the development of solutions for improving operating room efficiency and illustrates the principles underlying the causes of operating room delays across surgical disciplines. PMID:20507792

  8. Working posture and its predictors in hospital operating room nurses

    PubMed Central

    Abdollahzade, Farahnaz; Mohammadi, Fariba; Dianat, Iman; Asghari, Elnaz; Asghari-Jafarabadi, Mohammad; Sokhanvar, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study was conducted to evaluate working posture of operating room nurses and its relationship with demographic and job details of this group. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted among 147 operating room nurses in Tabriz, Iran using a questionnaire and the Rapid Entire Body Assessment (REBA) checklist. The data were analyzed with SPSS.16 using t test, Pearson correlation coefficient and analysis of variance (ANOVA) tests for univariate analysis and the linear regression test for multivariate analysis. Results: The mean (SD) of REBA score was 7.7 (1.9), which means a high risk level and highlights an urgent need to change the working postures of the studied nurses. There was significant relationship between working posture and age (P = 0.003), gender (P = 0.003), regular daily exercise (P = 0.048), work experience (P = 0.003), number of shifts per month (P = 0.006) and type of operating rooms (P < 0.001) in univariate analyses. Gender and type of operating room were the predictors of working posture of nurses in multivariate analysis. Conclusion: The findings highlight the need for ergonomic interventions and educational programs to improve working posture of this study population, which can consequently lead to promotion of health and well-being of this group. PMID:27123432

  9. Mission Operations Control Room (MOCR) activities during STS-6 mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1983-04-05

    Astronauts Roy D. Bridges (left) and RIchard O. Covey serve as spacecraft communicators (CAPCOM) for STS-6. They are seated at the CAPCOM console in the mission operations control room (MOCR) of JSC's mission control center (30119); Flight Director Jay H. Greene communicates with a nearby flight controller in the MOCR just after launch of the Challenger (30120).

  10. Delays in the operating room: signs of an imperfect system.

    PubMed

    Wong, Janice; Khu, Kathleen Joy; Kaderali, Zul; Bernstein, Mark

    2010-06-01

    Delays in the operating room have a negative effect on its efficiency and the working environment. In this prospective study, we analyzed data on perioperative system delays. One neurosurgeon prospectively recorded all errors, including perioperative delays, for consecutive patients undergoing elective procedures from May 2000 to February 2009. We analyzed the prevalence, causes and impact of perioperative system delays that occurred in one neurosurgeon's practice. A total of 1531 elective surgical cases were performed during the study period. Delays were the most common type of error (33.6%), and more than half (51.4%) of all cases had at least 1 delay. The most common cause of delay was equipment failure. The first cases of the day and cranial cases had more delays than subsequent cases and spinal cases, respectively. A delay in starting the first case was associated with subsequent delays. Delays frequently occur in the operating room and have a major effect on patient flow and resource utilization. Thorough documentation of perioperative delays provides a basis for the development of solutions for improving operating room efficiency and illustrates the principles underlying the causes of operating room delays across surgical disciplines.

  11. SECOND FLOOR OF OPERATOR'S ROOM, WITH THROTTLE LEVER ABOVE TORQUE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SECOND FLOOR OF OPERATOR'S ROOM, WITH THROTTLE LEVER ABOVE TORQUE CONVERTER SWITCH, AT LEFT. MAGNETIC SOLENOID IS IN CENTER, HYDRAULIC BRAKE PUMP IS IN UPPER RIGHT, LOOKING WEST. - Mad River Glen, Single Chair Ski Lift, 62 Mad River Glen Resort Road, Fayston, Washington County, VT

  12. 101. ARAIII. View of control room with operators during attempted ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    101. ARA-III. View of control room with operators during attempted 500-hour run of ML-1 reactor. April 21, 1964. Ineel photo no. 64-2185. Photographer: Benson. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  13. Silence, power and communication in the operating room

    PubMed Central

    Gardezi, Fauzia; Lingard, Lorelei; Espin, Sherry; Whyte, Sarah; Orser, Beverley; Baker, G Ross

    2009-01-01

    Title. Silence, power and communication in the operating room Aim This paper is a report of a study conducted to explore whether a 1- to 3-minute preoperative interprofessional team briefing with a structured checklist was an effective way to support communication in the operating room. Background Previous research suggests that nurses often feel constrained in their ability to communicate with physicians. Previous research on silence and power suggests that silence is not only a reflection of powerlessness or passivity, and that silence and speech are not opposites, but closely interrelated. Methods We conducted a retrospective study of silences observed in communication between nurses and surgeons in a multi-site observational study of interprofessional communication in the operating room. Over 700 surgical procedures were observed from 2005–2007. Instances of communication characterized by unresolved or unarticulated issues were identified in field notes and analysed from a critical ethnography perspective. Findings We identified three forms of recurring ‘silences’: absence of communication; not responding to queries or requests; and speaking quietly. These silences may be defensive or strategic, and they may be influenced by larger institutional and structural power dynamics as well as by the immediate situational context. Conclusions There is no single answer to the question of why ‘nobody said anything’. Exploring silences in relation to power suggests that there are multiple and complex ways that constrained communication is produced in the operating room, which are essential to understand in order to improve interprofessional communication and collaboration.

  14. Mission Operations Control Room (MOCR) activities during STS-6 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Vice President George Bush talks to the STS-6 astronauts from the spacecraft communicators (CAPCOM) console in the mission operations control room (MOCR) of JSC's mission control center. Astronauts Bryan D. O'Connor, second left and Roy D. Bridges, center, are the on-duty CAPCOMS. Standing near the console are (left) JSC Director Gerald D. Griffin and NASA Administrator James Beggs. Eugene F. Kranz, Director of Mission Operations, is at the back console near the glass.

  15. Control of the Environment in the Operating Room.

    PubMed

    Katz, Jonathan D

    2017-10-01

    There is a direct relationship between the quality of the environment of a workplace and the productivity and efficiency of the work accomplished. Components such as temperature, humidity, ventilation, drafts, lighting, and noise each contribute to the quality of the overall environment and the sense of well-being of those who work there.The modern operating room is a unique workplace with specific, and frequently conflicting, environmental requirements for each of the inhabitants. Even minor disturbances in the internal environment of the operating room can have serious ramifications on the comfort, effectiveness, and safety of each of the inhabitants. A cool, well-ventilated, and dry climate is optimal for many members of the surgical team. Any significant deviation from these objectives raises the risk of decreased efficiency and productivity and adverse surgical outcomes. A warmer, more humid, and quieter environment is necessary for the patient. If these requirements are not met, the risk of surgical morbidity and mortality is increased. An important task for the surgical team is to find the correct balance between these 2 opposed requirements. Several of the components of the operating room environment, especially room temperature and airflow patterns, are easily manipulated by the members of the surgical team. In the following discussion, we will examine these elements to better understand the clinical ramifications of adjustments and accommodations that are frequently made to meet the requirements of both the surgical staff and the patient.

  16. Operator experiences on working in screen-based control rooms

    SciTech Connect

    Salo, L.; Laarni, J.; Savioja, P.

    2006-07-01

    This paper introduces the results of two interview studies carried out in Finland in four conventional power plants and one nuclear power plant. The aim of the studies was to gather data on user experiences on the effects of control room modernization and digital control room technology on operator work Since the number of completed digitalization projects in nuclear power plants is small supplementary information was gathered by interviewing operators in conventional power plants. Our results suggest that even though the modernization processes have been success stories, they have created new challenges for operator personnel. Examples of these challenges are increased requirements for competence and collaboration, problems in trust calibration and development of awareness of the process state. Some major differences in the digitalization of human-system interfaces between conventional and nuclear power plants were discussed. (authors)

  17. Radiation safety for anaesthesia providers in the orthopaedic operating room.

    PubMed

    Rhea, E B; Rogers, T H; Riehl, J T

    2016-04-01

    In many orthopaedic operating rooms, anaesthesia providers routinely wear lead aprons for protection from radiation, but some studies have questioned whether this is needed. We conducted a systematic review to identify studies that measured the amount of radiation that anaesthetists were exposed to in the orthopaedic operating room. Multiple studies have shown that at 1.5 m from the source of radiation, anaesthetists received no radiation, or amounts so small that a person would have to be present in an unreasonable number of operations to receive cumulative doses of any significance. Radiation doses at this distance were often at the limits of the sensitivity of the measuring dosimeter. We question the need to wear lead protection for anaesthesia providers who are routinely at 1.5 m or a greater distance from standard fluoroscopy units. © 2016 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  18. Nuclear power plant control room operator control and monitoring tasks

    SciTech Connect

    Bovell, C.R.; Beck, M.G.; Carter, R.J.

    1998-07-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory is conducting a research project the purpose of which is to develop the technical bases for regulatory review criteria for use in evaluating the safety implications of human factors associated with the use of artificial intelligence and expert systems, and with advanced instrumentation and control (I and C) systems in nuclear power plants (NPP). This report documents the results from Task 8 of that project. The primary objectives of the task was to identify the scope and type of control and monitoring tasks now performed by control-room operators. Another purpose was to address the types of controls and safety systems needed to operate the nuclear plant. The final objective of Task 8 was to identify and categorize the type of information and displays/indicators required to monitor the performance of the control and safety systems. This report also discusses state-of-the-art controls and advanced display devices which will be available for use in control-room retrofits and in control room of future plants. The fundamental types of control and monitoring tasks currently conducted by operators can be divided into four classifications: function monitoring tasks, control manipulation tasks, fault diagnostic tasks, and administrative tasks. There are three general types of controls used in today`s NPPs, switches, pushbuttons, and analog controllers. Plant I and C systems include components to achieve a number of safety-related functions: measuring critical plant parameters, controlling critical plant parameters within safety limits, and automatically actuating protective devices if safe limits are exceeded. The types of information monitored by the control-room operators consist of the following parameters: pressure, fluid flow and level, neutron flux, temperature, component status, water chemistry, electrical, and process and area radiation. The basic types of monitoring devices common to nearly all NPP control rooms include: analog meters

  19. Operating room environment and surgical site infections in arthroplasty procedures.

    PubMed

    Cristina, M L; Sartini, M; Schinca, E; Ottria, G; Spagnolo, A M

    2016-09-01

    The rate of surgical site infections (SSI) is strongly influenced by operating room quality, which is determined by the structural features of the facility and its systems and by the management and behavior of healthcare workers. The aim of the present study was to assess microbial contamination in the operating room during hip- and knee-replacement procedures, the behavior of operating room staff and the incidence of SSI through postdischarge surveillance. Microbial contamination was evaluated by active and passive sampling at rest and in operating conditions. Organizational and behavioral characteristics were collected through observational assessment. The incidence of SSI was evaluated in 255 patients, and follow-up examinations were carried out 30 and 365 days after the procedure. The mean values of the airborne and sedimenting microbial loads were 12.90 CFU/m(3) and 0.02 CFU/cm2/h, respectively. With regard to outcome, the infection rate proved to be 0.89% and was associated with knee-replacement procedures. The microorganism responsible for this superficial infection was Staphylococcus aureus. Clinical outcomes proved to be satisfactory, owing to the limited microbial load (in both at-rest and operating conditions), the appropriate behavior of the staff, compliance with the guidelines on preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis, and efficient management of the ventilation system.

  20. Photodynamic research at Baylor University Medical Center Dallas, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulliya, Kirpal S.; Matthews, James Lester; Sogandares-Bernal, Franklin M.; Aronoff, Billie L.; Judy, Millard M.

    1993-03-01

    We received our first CO2 laser at Baylor University Medical Center in December 1974, following a trip to Israel in January of that year. Discussion with the customs office of the propriety of charging an 18% import tax lasted for nine months. We lost that argument. Baylor has been using lasers of many types for many procedures since that time. About ten years ago, through the kindness of Tom Dougherty and Roswell Park, we started working with photodynamic therapy, first with hematoporphyrin I and later with dihematoporphyrin ether (II). In February 1984, we were invited to a conference at Los Alamos, New Mexico, U.S.A. on medical applications of the free electron laser as part of the Star Wars Program. A grant application from Baylor was approved that November, but funding did not start for many months. This funding contributed to the development of a new research center as part of Baylor Research Institute. Many of the projects investigated at Baylor dealt with applications of the free electron laser (FEL), after it became available. A staff was assembled and many projects are still ongoing. I would like to outline those which are in some way related to photodynamic therapy.

  1. Economic and quality scheduling for effective utilization of operating rooms.

    PubMed

    Jeang, Angus; Chiang, An-Jen

    2012-06-01

    Under the constraints of limited medical resources and severe competition among hospitals, administrators have begun to pay attention to the opportunities of cost reduction and quality improvement in hospital management, in order to find methods to increase hospital revenue and improve service quality. The operating room should be one of the most important sources of hospital income, yet it is both costly to run and constrictive to inpatient flow. Successful hospital management necessitates the construction of cost-effective and quality operating room scheduling. This paper attempts to model the scheduling problem in the form of mathematical programming with the objective being to minimize the deviation between the total operation time and the total available time in operating rooms. Urgent revisions to the model in consideration of such factors as doctor's availability, outpatient consulting hours and unfavorable surgery hours can be achieved in a timely manner. With the present approach, surgical procedures can start punctually, inpatient waiting time for surgery and length of stay can be reduced, and staff morale can be enhanced. These improvements will result in cost reduction, and increased hospital revenue without sacrificing the quality of medical care.

  2. Operating Room Delays: Meaningful Use in Electronic Health Record.

    PubMed

    Van Winkle, Rachelle A; Champagne, Mary T; Gilman-Mays, Meri; Aucoin, Julia

    2016-06-01

    Perioperative areas are the most costly to operate and account for more than 40% of expenses. The high costs prompted one organization to analyze surgical delays through a retrospective review of their new electronic health record. Electronic health records have made it easier to access and aggregate clinical data; 2123 operating room cases were analyzed. Implementing a new electronic health record system is complex; inaccurate data and poor implementation can introduce new problems. Validating the electronic health record development processes determines the ease of use and the user interface, specifically related to user compliance with the intent of the electronic health record development. The revalidation process after implementation determines if the intent of the design was fulfilled and data can be meaningfully used. In this organization, the data fields completed through automation provided quantifiable, meaningful data. However, data fields completed by staff that required subjective decision making resulted in incomplete data nearly 24% of the time. The ease of use was further complicated by 490 permutations (combinations of delay types and reasons) that were built into the electronic health record. Operating room delay themes emerged notwithstanding the significant complexity of the electronic health record build; however, improved accuracy could improve meaningful data collection and a more accurate root cause analysis of operating room delays. Accurate and meaningful use of data affords a more reliable approach in quality, safety, and cost-effective initiatives.

  3. The positive impact of structured teaching in the operating room.

    PubMed

    Leung, Yee; Salfinger, Stuart; Mercer, Annette

    2015-12-01

    A survey of obstetric and gynaecology trainees in Australia found the trainee's opinion of the consultants' teaching ability for laparoscopic procedures and procedures dealing with complications as 'poor' in 21.2% and 23.4% of responses, respectively (Aust NZ J Obstet Gynaecol 2009; 49: 84). Surgical caseload per trainee is falling for a variety of reasons. Strategies need to be adopted to enhance the surgical learning experience of trainees in the operating room. We describe the use of a structured encounter template to facilitate the teaching of surgery in the operating room and report the response of the trainees to this intervention. Trainees attached to a gynaecologic surgery unit all underwent surgical training using a set format based on the surgical encounter template, including briefing, goal setting and intra-operative teaching aims as well as debriefing. Data on the trainees' experience and perception of their learning experience were then collected and analysed as quantitative and qualitative data sets. The trainees reported satisfaction with the use of a structured encounter template to facilitate the surgical teaching in the operating room. Some trainees had not received such clarity of feedback or the opportunity to complete a procedure independently prior to using the structured encounter template. A structured surgical encounter template based on andragogy principles to focus consultant teaching in the operating room is highly acceptable to obstetric and gynaecology trainees in Australia. Allowing the trainee the opportunity to set objectives and receive feedback empowers the trainee and enhances their educational experience. © 2015 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  4. Feasibility of touch-less control of operating room lights.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Florian; Schlaefer, Alexander

    2013-03-01

    Today's highly technical operating rooms lead to fairly complex surgical workflows where the surgeon has to interact with a number of devices, including the operating room light. Hence, ideally, the surgeon could direct the light without major disruption of his work. We studied whether a gesture tracking-based control of an automated operating room light is feasible. So far, there has been little research on control approaches for operating lights. We have implemented an exemplary setup to mimic an automated light controlled by a gesture tracking system. The setup includes a articulated arm to position the light source and an off-the-shelf RGBD camera to detect the user interaction. We assessed the tracking performance using a robot-mounted hand phantom and ran a number of tests with 18 volunteers to evaluate the potential of touch-less light control. All test persons were comfortable with using the gesture-based system and quickly learned how to move a light spot on flat surface. The hand tracking error is direction-dependent and in the range of several centimeters, with a standard deviation of less than 1 mm and up to 3.5 mm orthogonal and parallel to the finger orientation, respectively. However, the subjects had no problems following even more complex paths with a width of less than 10 cm. The average speed was 0.15 m/s, and even initially slow subjects improved over time. Gestures to initiate control can be performed in approximately 2 s. Two-thirds of the subjects considered gesture control to be simple, and a majority considered it to be rather efficient. Implementation of an automated operating room light and touch-less control using an RGBD camera for gesture tracking is feasible. The remaining tracking error does not affect smooth control, and the use of the system is intuitive even for inexperienced users.

  5. A Web-Based Operating Room Management Educational Tool.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Mitchell H; Haddad, Daniel J; Friend, Alexander F; Bender, S Patrick; Davidson, Melissa L

    2016-08-01

    In 2010, our department instituted a nonclinical, administrative rotation in operating room management for anesthesiology residents. Subsequently, we mandated the rotation for all senior anesthesiology residents in 2013. In 2014, under the auspices of the American Society of Anesthesiologists, we developed a web-based module covering the basics of finance, accounting, and operating room management. A multiple-choice test was given to residents at the beginning and end of the rotation, and we compared the mean scores between residents who took the traditional course and residents who took the web-based module. We found no significant difference between the groups of residents, suggesting that the web-based module is as effective as traditional didactics.

  6. [Design, equipment, and management for air conditioning in operating room].

    PubMed

    Fuji, Kumiko; Mizuno, Ju

    2011-11-01

    In order to maintain air cleanliness in the operating room (OR) permanently, air exchange rate in the OR should be more than 15 times x hr(-1), the laminar air flow should be kept, and the numbers of the persons in the OR and the numbers of opening and closing OR door should be limited. High efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter is effective in collection and removal of airborne microbes, and is used in the biological clean room. We need to design, equip, and manage the OR environment according to Guideline for Design and Operation of Hospital HVAC Systems HEAS-02-2004 established by Healthcare Engineering Association of Japan and Guideline for Prevention of Surgical Site Infection (SSI) established by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in the USA.

  7. The utilization of magnetic resonance imaging in the operating room.

    PubMed

    Ménard, C; Pambrun, J-F; Kadoury, S

    Online image guidance in the operating room using ultrasound imaging led to the resurgence of prostate brachytherapy in the 1980s. Here we describe the evolution of integrating MRI technology in the brachytherapy suite or operating room. Given the complexity, cost, and inherent safety issues associated with MRI system integration, first steps focused on the computational integration of images rather than systems. This approach has broad appeal given minimal infrastructure costs and efficiencies comparable with standard care workflows. However, many concerns remain regarding accuracy of registration through the course of a brachytherapy procedure. In selected academic institutions, MRI systems have been integrated in or near the brachytherapy suite in varied configurations to improve the precision and quality of treatments. Navigation toolsets specifically adapted to prostate brachytherapy are in development and are reviewed. Copyright © 2017 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Operating Room Personnel Viewpoints About Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists.

    PubMed

    Hensel, Desiree; Cooper, Rachel; Craney, Neil

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this project was to explore what attitudes physicians, nurses, and operating room technicians had about working with Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs) to better understand practice barriers and facilitators. This Q methodology study used a purposive sample of operating room personnel from four institutions in the Midwestern United States. Participants completed a -4 to +4 rank-ordering of their level of agreement with 34 attitude statements representing a wide range of beliefs about nurse anesthetists. Centroid factor analysis with varimax rotation was used to analyze 24 returned Q sorts. Three distinct viewpoints emerged that explained 66% of the variance: favoring unrestricted practice, favoring anesthesiologist supervision, and favoring anesthesiologist practice. Research is needed on how to develop workplace attitudes that support autonomous nurse anesthetist practice and to understand preferences for restricted practice in team members other than physicians.

  9. Sedation of infants and children outside of the operating room.

    PubMed

    Tobias, Joseph D

    2015-08-01

    Although adults may be able to tolerate procedures without sedation, developmental and cognitive issues often mandate the use of sedation in infants and children. There has been a shift in the philosophy regarding sedation with an increasing recognition of the negative psychological and physiological aspects of inadequate sedation. The expansion of our technology continues to result in an increasing number of techniques, which require sedation outside of the operating room environment. These factors have contributed to an ever growing number of pediatric patients presenting themselves for procedural sedation. This chapter will discuss issues regarding the provision of anesthesia outside of the operating room for pediatric patients including current guidelines for patient assessment prior to procedural, monitoring during sedation, and a discussion of some of the more commonly utilized sedative and analgesic agents within the pediatric population.

  10. Management of a fire in the operating room.

    PubMed

    Kaye, Alan David; Kolinsky, Daniel; Urman, Richard D

    2014-04-01

    Operating room (OR) fires remain a significant source of liability for anesthesia providers and injury for patients, despite existing practice guidelines and other improvements in operating room safety. Factors contributing to OR fires are well understood and these occurrences are generally preventable. OR personnel must be familiar with the fire triad which consists of a fuel supply, an oxidizing agent, and an ignition source. Existing evidence shows that OR-related fires can result in significant patient complications and malpractice claims. Steps to reduce fires include taking appropriate safety measures before a patient is brought to the OR, taking proper preventive measures during surgery, and effectively managing fire and patient complications when they occur. Decreasing the incidence of fires should be a team effort involving the entire OR personnel, including surgeons, anesthesia providers, nurses, scrub technologists, and administrators. Communication and coordination among members of the OR team is essential to creating a culture of safety.

  11. OR2020: The Operating Room of the Future

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-05-01

    Surgical Division Karl Storz Endoscopy Siemens Corporate Research MedStar Health/Georgetown University Hospital Stryker Endoscopy OR2020: Operating Room of...Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering at the National Institutes of Health. Corporate sponsors were GE Medical Systems, Karl Storz Endoscopy , MedStar Health...Georgetown University Hospital, Olympus Surgical Division, Siemens Corporate Research, and Stryker Endoscopy . This chapter begins by summarizing the

  12. The July Spike in Operating Room Management: Reality or Perception?

    PubMed

    Sanford, Joseph A; Tsai, Mitchell H; Kadry, Bassam; Mayhew, Christopher R; Adams, David C

    2016-05-01

    Background Some research has found increased incidence of medical errors in teaching hospitals at the beginning of the academic year and have termed this the "July Phenomenon." Objective Our primary hypothesis was that the "July Phenomenon" for anesthesiology and surgical residents might manifest itself as operational inefficiency, measured by monthly total operating room (OR) minutes. Secondary measures were monthly elective overutilized minutes (OR workload minus OR allocated time, after 5:30 pm at our institution), 80th percentile number of ORs running at 7:00 pm, and mean last room end time. Methods Data were collected retrospectively from a 525-bed academic tertiary care hospital from January 2010 to September 2014 and were deconstructed to assess for a seasonal component using local regression (Loess). Variable month length was addressed by transforming the monthly totals to average daily minutes and overutilized minutes. Linear regression quantified significance for all primary and secondary analyses. Results In the regressions, monthly average minutes showed no significant difference in July (P = .65) compared to the baseline month of April. There were no significant differences for any month for overutilized minutes or 80th percentile number ORs working at 7:00 pm. Only August was significant (P = .005) for mean last room end time. Conclusions Data from a single institution study did not show a "July Phenomenon" in the number of operating minutes, overutilized minutes, or the number of ORs working late in July.

  13. Medical errors and patient safety in the operating room.

    PubMed

    Ugur, Esra; Kara, Sevim; Yildirim, Songul; Akbal, Elif

    2016-05-01

    To investigate medical errors in the operating room, attitudes of healthcare professionals in case of errors and educational needs of professionals. The descriptive study was conducted at a university hospital in Turkey from January 25 to February 14, 2011, and comprised operating room staff, including physicians, nurses, anaesthesia technicians and perfusion technicians. Data was obtained using a questionnaire. Of the 69 respondents, 45(65.2%) had experienced medical errors and 29(42%) had verbally warned the person who caused the error. The main cause of the medical errors was a lack of healthcare professionals and their inadequate qualifications, 51(73.9%); and insufficient communication, 41(59.4%). Coping with stress and communication 45(65.2%) and radiation safety 28(40.6%) were the most common educational needs. Patient safety applications in the operating room can be improved by offering educational programmes, designing an easy reporting system, encouraging reporting of medical errors and active participation of healthcare professionals in decisions that might affect patient safety.

  14. Auditing Operating Room Recycling: A Management Case Report.

    PubMed

    McGain, Forbes; Jarosz, Katherine Maria; Nguyen, Martin Ngoc Hoai Huong; Bates, Samantha; O'Shea, Catherine Jane

    2015-08-01

    Much waste arises from operating rooms (ORs). We estimated the practical and financial feasibility of an OR recycling program, weighing all waste from 6 ORs in Melbourne, Australia. Over 1 week, 237 operations produced 1265 kg in total: general waste 570 kg (45%), infectious waste 410 kg (32%), and recyclables 285 kg (23%). The achieved recycling had no infectious contamination. The achieved recycling/potential recycling rate was 285 kg/517 kg (55%). The average waste disposal costs were similar for general waste and recycling. OR recycling rates of 20%-25% total waste were achievable without compromising infection control or financial constraints.

  15. Non-Operating Room Anesthesia in the Endoscopy Unit.

    PubMed

    Bhavani, Sekar

    2016-07-01

    The term, non-operating room anesthesia, describes a location remote from the main operating suites and closer to the patient, including areas that offer specialized procedures, like endoscopy suites, cardiac catheterization laboratories, bronchoscopy suites, and invasive radiology suites. There has been an exponential growth in such procedures and they present challenges in both organizational aspects and administration of anesthesia. This article explores the requirements for the location, preoperative evaluation and patient selection, monitoring, anesthesia technique, and postoperative management at these sites. There is a need to better define the role of the anesthesia personnel at these remote sites. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Mission Operations Control Room (MOCR) activities during STS-6 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Flight director Jay H. Greene (center) talks with Eugene F. Kranz, director of mission operations, in the mission operations control room (MOCR) of JSC's mission control center. Challenger was beginning to fly over Africa in Day 3 of this mission (30136); Flight director Brock R. (Randy) Stone, at the FD console in the MOCR studies the list of activities scheduled for the Challenger on that day (30137); Granvil A. (Al) Pennington waits for the launch of STS-6 as he begins his duties as ascent team integrated communication system officer (INCO) at the INCO console in the MOCR (30138).

  17. Mission Operations Control Room (MOCR) activities during STS-6 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Flight director Jay H. Greene (center) talks with Eugene F. Kranz, director of mission operations, in the mission operations control room (MOCR) of JSC's mission control center. Challenger was beginning to fly over Africa in Day 3 of this mission (30136); Flight director Borck R. (Randy) Stone, at the FD console in the MOCR studies the list of activities scheduled for the Challenger on that day (30137); Granvil A. (Al) Pennington waits for the launch of STS-6 as he begins his duties as ascent team integrated communication system officer (INCO) at the INCO console in the MOCR (30138).

  18. Bariatric surgery operating room time--size matters.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Joseph A; Kadry, Bassam; Brodsky, Jay B; Macario, Alex

    2015-06-01

    The goal of this study was to document the relationship between BMI and the components of bariatric surgical operating room (OR) time. The Stanford Translational Research Integrated Database Environment identified all patients who underwent laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass procedures at Stanford University Medical Center between May 2008 and November 2013. The 434 patients were divided into 3 groups: group 1 (n = 213) BMI ≥35 to <45 kg/m(2), group 2 (n = 188) BMI ≥45.0 to <60 kg/m(2), and group 3 (n = 33) BMI ≥60 kg/m(2). The primary variable measured was total operating room time, defined as beginning when the patient entered the OR until the moment the patient physically left the OR. Secondary variables were anesthetic induction time, nursing preparation time, operation time, time for emergence from anesthesia, and total length of hospital stay. Increasing BMI was associated with increased total OR time (group 1 = 202 min, group 2 = 215 min, group 3 = 235 min), mainly due to longer operation time (group 1 = 147 min, group 2 = 154 min, group 3 = 163 min). Anesthetic induction (group 1 = 17 min, group 2 = 18 min, group 3 = 23 min) and emergence times (group 1 = 12 min, group 2 = 12 min, group 3 = 22 min) were also significantly longer in the largest patients. Operating room schedules and plans for resource utilization should recognize that the same bariatric procedure will require more time for patients with BMI >60 kg/m(2) than for smaller bariatric patients.

  19. Resident Autonomy in the Operating Room: Expectations Versus Reality.

    PubMed

    Meyerson, Shari L; Sternbach, Joel M; Zwischenberger, Joseph B; Bender, Edward M

    2017-09-01

    There is concern about graduating thoracic trainees' independent operative skills due to limited autonomy in training. This study compared faculty and trainee expected levels of autonomy with intraoperative measurements of autonomy for common cardiothoracic operations. Participants underwent frame-of-reference training on the 4-point Zwisch scale of operative autonomy (show and tell → active help → passive help → supervision only) and evaluated autonomy in actual cases using the Zwisch Me!! mobile application. A separate "expected autonomy" survey elicited faculty and resident perceptions of how much autonomy a resident should have for six common operations: decortication, wedge resection, thoracoscopic lobectomy, coronary artery bypass grafting, aortic valve replacement, and mitral valve repair. Thirty-three trainees from 7 institutions submitted evaluations of 596 cases over 18 months (March 2015 to September 2016). Thirty attendings subsequently provided their evaluation of 476 of those cases (79.9% response rate). Expected autonomy surveys were completed by 21 attendings and 19 trainees from 5 institutions. The six operations included in the survey constituted 47% (226 of 476) of the cases evaluated. Trainee and attending expectations did not differ significantly for senior trainees. Both groups expected significantly higher levels of autonomy than observed in the operating room for all six types of cases. Although faculty and trainees both expect similar levels of autonomy in the operating room, real-time measurements of autonomy show a gap between expectations and reality. Decreasing this gap will require a concerted effort by both faculty and residents to focus on the development of independent operative skills. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Monitored anesthesia care in and outside the operating room

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Hye-min

    2016-01-01

    Monitored anesthesia care (MAC) is an anesthesia technique combining local anesthesia with parenteral drugs for sedation and analgesia. The use of MAC is increasing for a variety of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in and outside of the operating room due to the rapid postoperative recovery with the use of relatively small amounts of sedatives and analgesics compared to general anesthesia. The purposes of MAC are providing patients with safe sedation, comfort, pain control and satisfaction. Preoperative evaluation for patients with MAC is similar to those of general or regional anesthesia in that patients should be comprehensively assessed. Additionally, patient cooperation with comprehension of the procedure is an essential component during MAC. In addition to local anesthesia by operators or anesthesiologists, systemic sedatives and analgesics are administered to provide patients with comfort during procedures performed with MAC. The discretion and judgment of an experienced anesthesiologist are required for the safety and efficacy profiles because the airway of the patients is not secured. The infusion of sedatives and analgesics should be individualized during MAC. Many procedures in and outside of the operating room, including eye surgery, otolaryngologic surgery, cardiovascular procedures, pain procedures, and endoscopy are performed with MAC to increase patient and operator satisfaction. PMID:27482307

  1. Advanced visualization platform for surgical operating room coordination: distributed video board system.

    PubMed

    Hu, Peter F; Xiao, Yan; Ho, Danny; Mackenzie, Colin F; Hu, Hao; Voigt, Roger; Martz, Douglas

    2006-06-01

    One of the major challenges for day-of-surgery operating room coordination is accurate and timely situation awareness. Distributed and secure real-time status information is key to addressing these challenges. This article reports on the design and implementation of a passive status monitoring system in a 19-room surgical suite of a major academic medical center. Key design requirements considered included integrated real-time operating room status display, access control, security, and network impact. The system used live operating room video images and patient vital signs obtained through monitors to automatically update events and operating room status. Images were presented on a "need-to-know" basis, and access was controlled by identification badge authorization. The system delivered reliable real-time operating room images and status with acceptable network impact. Operating room status was visualized at 4 separate locations and was used continuously by clinicians and operating room service providers to coordinate operating room activities.

  2. Auditing of operating room times: a quality improvement project.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Jonathan N; Chiang, Tendy; Ruiz, Amanda G; Prager, Jeremy D

    2014-05-01

    A quality improvement project to evaluate operating room efficiency and utilization and to identify areas for improvement. A retrospective assessment of a single surgeon's surgical cases over a 6-month period at a tertiary children's hospital. Primary outcomes included case timing defined as T1, T2, T3 and T4. (T1)-Patient enters OR-to-procedure start. (T2)-Procedure start-to-procedure end. (T3)-Procedure end-to-patient exits OR. (T4)-Patient exits OR-to-next patient enters OR (turnover). Comparison to existing literature was performed and results were presented to stakeholders. A total of 180 surgical cases were reviewed, 92 adenotonsillectomies (T&A), 33 Bilateral Pressure Equalization Tube Placement (PET) and 55 microlaryngoscopies and bronchoscopies (MLB). All outcomes were calculated by case type, except T4, and compared to available published data. T2 was compared to published benchmarks for otolaryngology demonstrating favorable operative times for T&A and PET. However, T4 was considerably longer at our institution (average 31.09). Overall OR efficiency was 20.58%. The operating room represents one of a hospital's most costly resources. Ensuring that this resource is designed, staffed and utilized efficiently is of major importance to both the quality of patient care and financial productivity. Surgeons are key components of operating room efficiency, utilization and other measurements of institutional performance. How surgeons schedule and perform cases directly impacts, and is impacted by, these measurements of performance. For fields dominated by high volume, short duration procedures such as pediatric otolaryngology, T4 may be the most important variable in determining OR efficiency. By utilizing modern electronic medical records, surgeons can easily track OR time points thereby determining the potential causes of and solutions for OR inefficiency. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Operators in the Plum Brook Reactor Facility Control Room

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1970-03-21

    Donald Rhodes, left, and Clyde Greer, right, monitor the operation of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Plum Brook Reactor Facility from the control room. The 60-megawatt test reactor, NASA’s only reactor, was the eighth largest test reactor in the world. The facility was built by the Lewis Research Center in the late 1950s to study the effects of radiation on different materials that could be used to construct nuclear propulsion systems for aircraft or rockets. The reactor went critical for the first time in 1961. For the next two years, two operators were on duty 24 hours per day working on the fission process until the reactor reached its full-power level in 1963. Reactor Operators were responsible for monitoring and controlling the reactor systems. Once the reactor was running under normal operating conditions, the work was relatively uneventful. Normally the reactor was kept at a designated power level within certain limits. Occasionally the operators had to increase the power for a certain test. The shift supervisor and several different people would get together and discuss the change before boosting the power. All operators were required to maintain a Reactor Operator License from the Atomic Energy Commission. The license included six months of training, an eight-hour written exam, a four-hour walkaround, and testing on the reactor controls.

  4. The July Spike in Operating Room Management: Reality or Perception?

    PubMed Central

    Sanford, Joseph A.; Tsai, Mitchell H.; Kadry, Bassam; Mayhew, Christopher R.; Adams, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Some research has found increased incidence of medical errors in teaching hospitals at the beginning of the academic year and have termed this the “July Phenomenon.” Objective Our primary hypothesis was that the “July Phenomenon” for anesthesiology and surgical residents might manifest itself as operational inefficiency, measured by monthly total operating room (OR) minutes. Secondary measures were monthly elective overutilized minutes (OR workload minus OR allocated time, after 5:30 pm at our institution), 80th percentile number of ORs running at 7:00 pm, and mean last room end time. Methods Data were collected retrospectively from a 525-bed academic tertiary care hospital from January 2010 to September 2014 and were deconstructed to assess for a seasonal component using local regression (Loess). Variable month length was addressed by transforming the monthly totals to average daily minutes and overutilized minutes. Linear regression quantified significance for all primary and secondary analyses. Results In the regressions, monthly average minutes showed no significant difference in July (P = .65) compared to the baseline month of April. There were no significant differences for any month for overutilized minutes or 80th percentile number ORs working at 7:00 pm. Only August was significant (P = .005) for mean last room end time. Conclusions Data from a single institution study did not show a “July Phenomenon” in the number of operating minutes, overutilized minutes, or the number of ORs working late in July. PMID:27168896

  5. Virtual reality in the operating room of the future.

    PubMed

    Müller, W; Grosskopf, S; Hildebrand, A; Malkewitz, R; Ziegler, R

    1997-01-01

    In cooperation with the Max-Delbrück-Centrum/Robert-Rössle-Klinik (MDC/RRK) in Berlin, the Fraunhofer Institute for Computer Graphics is currently designing and developing a scenario for the operating room of the future. The goal of this project is to integrate new analysis, visualization and interaction tools in order to optimize and refine tumor diagnostics and therapy in combination with laser technology and remote stereoscopic video transfer. Hence, a human 3-D reference model is reconstructed using CT, MR, and anatomical cryosection images from the National Library of Medicine's Visible Human Project. Applying segmentation algorithms and surface-polygonization methods a 3-D representation is obtained. In addition, a "fly-through" the virtual patient is realized using 3-D input devices (data glove, tracking system, 6-DOF mouse). In this way, the surgeon can experience really new perspectives of the human anatomy. Moreover, using a virtual cutting plane any cut of the CT volume can be interactively placed and visualized in realtime. In conclusion, this project delivers visions for the application of effective visualization and VR systems. Commonly known as Virtual Prototyping and applied by the automotive industry long ago, this project shows, that the use of VR techniques can also prototype an operating room. After evaluating design and functionality of the virtual operating room, MDC plans to build real ORs in the near future. The use of VR techniques provides a more natural interface for the surgeon in the OR (e.g., controlling interactions by voice input). Besides preoperative planning future work will focus on supporting the surgeon in performing surgical interventions. An optimal synthesis of real and synthetic data, and the inclusion of visual, aural, and tactile senses in virtual environments can meet these requirements. This Augmented Reality could represent the environment for the surgeons of tomorrow.

  6. Effects of Intervention and Team Culture on Operating Room Traffic.

    PubMed

    Pulido, Ricardo W; Kester, Benjamin; Schwarzkopf, Ran

    How changes in the surgical team's culture can potentially reduce operating room (OR) traffic. Excessive OR traffic during surgical procedures can present a risk to the patient's safety and recovery. Data suggest that limiting the number of OR personnel during the intraoperative period can reduce excessive OR traffic. However, it is unclear whether the surgeon's verbal intervention can also successfully reduce intraoperative OR traffic. This study compares traffic rates in hip and knee arthroplasty cases against traffic rates during nonarthroplasty cases to examine the effects of verbal interventions implemented by the surgeon to reduce intraoperative traffic. The study consisted of 16 orthopedic surgeons in a noninterventional group and 1 orthopedic surgeon in the interventional group. The surgeon in the interventional group implemented verbal protocols to OR staff to limit excessive intraoperative traffic. Operating room traffic was monitored for 3 consecutive months (January-March 2015) with the use of infrared automated door counters that tracked door openings when someone entered or left the OR. A total of 50 hip and knee arthroplasties cases and 157 nonarthroplasty cases were tracked during the study period. A total of 134 hours and 4482 movements were collected for the hip and knee arthroplasty cases. A total of 498 hours and 22 902 movements were collected for the nonarthroplasty cases. Comparing the 2 groups, the interventional group averaged 33 movements per hour while the noninterventional group averaged 46 movements per hour (P < .001). These results suggest that operative room traffic can be reduced through simple verbal protocols established by the surgical team.

  7. Implications of Perioperative Team Setups for Operating Room Management Decisions.

    PubMed

    Doll, Dietrich; Kauf, Peter; Wieferich, Katharina; Schiffer, Ralf; Luedi, Markus M

    2017-01-01

    Team performance has been studied extensively in the perioperative setting, but the managerial impact of interprofessional team performance remains unclear. We hypothesized that the interplay between anesthesiologists and surgeons would affect operating room turnaround times, and teams that worked together over time would become more efficient. We analyzed 13,632 surgical cases at our hospital that involved 64 surgeons and 48 anesthesiologists. We detrended and adjusted the data for potential confounders including age, American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status, and surgical list (scheduled cases of specific surgical specialties). The surgical lists were categorized as ear, nose, and throat surgery; trauma surgery; general surgery; and gynecology. We assessed the relationship between turnaround times and assignment of different anesthesiologists to specific surgeons using a Monte Carlo simulation. We found significant differences in team performances among the different surgical lists but no team learning. We constructed managerial decision tables for the assignment of anesthesiologists to specific surgeons at our hospital. We defined a decision algorithm based on these tables. Our analysis indicated that had this algorithm been used in staffing the operating room for the surgical cases represented in our data, median turnaround times would have a reduction potential of 6.8% (95% confidence interval 6.3% to 7.1%). A surgeon is usually predefined for scheduled surgeries (surgical list). Allocation of the right anesthesiologist to a list and to a surgeon can affect the team performance; thus, this assignment has managerial implications regarding the operating room efficiency affecting turnaround times and thus potentially overutilized time of a list at our hospital.

  8. Safety culture in the gynecology robotics operating room.

    PubMed

    Zullo, Melissa D; McCarroll, Michele L; Mendise, Thomas M; Ferris, Edward F; Roulette, G D; Zolton, Jessica; Andrews, Stephen J; von Gruenigen, Vivian E

    2014-01-01

    To measure the safety culture in the robotics surgery operating room before and after implementation of the Robotic Operating Room Computerized Checklist (RORCC). Prospective study. Gynecology surgical staff (n = 32). An urban community hospital. The Safety Attitudes Questionnaire domains examined were teamwork, safety, job satisfaction, stress recognition, perceptions of management, and working conditions. Questions and domains were described using percent agreement and the Cronbach alpha. Paired t-tests were used to describe differences before and after implementation of the checklist. Mean (SD) staff age was 46.7 (9.5) years, and most were women (78%) and worked full-time (97%). Twenty respondents (83% of nurses, 80% of surgeons, 66% of surgical technicians, and 33% of certified registered nurse anesthetists) completed the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire; 6 were excluded because of non-matching identifiers. Before RORCC implementation, the highest quality of communication and collaboration was reported by surgeons and surgical technicians (100%). Certified registered nurse anesthetists reported only adequate levels of communication and collaboration with other positions. Most staff reported positive responses for teamwork (48%; α = 0.81), safety (47%; α = 0.75), working conditions (37%; α = 0.55), stress recognition (26%; α = 0.71), and perceptions of management (32%; α = 0.52). No differences were observed after RORCC implementation. Quality of communication and collaboration in the gynecology robotics operating room is high between most positions; however, safety attitude responses are low overall. No differences after RORCC implementation and low response rates may highlight lack of staff support. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Initial clinical experience with the Baylor-Nikkiso centrifugal pump.

    PubMed

    Ohtsubo, S; Naito, K; Matsuura, M; Kawahito, K; Shimono, T; Makinouchi, K; Tasai, K; Ohara, Y; Damm, G; Glueck, J

    1995-07-01

    Recently, a newly developed centrifugal pump, the Baylor-Nikkiso pump, was approved for clinical use in the United States. This pump is the most compact centrifugal pump with a priming volume of only 25 ml. Although it is small, this pump can provide a flow of 4 L/min against a total pressure head of 300 mm Hg at 3,000 rpm. In vitro and in vivo validation of the Baylor-Nikkiso pump has proved that this pump could effectively reduce blood trauma even under high total head pressure. In addition, 48-h durability tests with biventricular bypass using calves verified the reliability of shaft sealing and antithrombogenicity. Clinical trials of the Baylor-Nikkiso pumps have been initiated in our department. This pump provides flows of 60-70 ml/kg/min with stable hemodynamic conditions. No leakage of thrombus formation was observed. The results of the initial clinical experience of the Baylor-Nikkiso pump suggest that it is suitable for cardiopulmonary bypass surgery.

  10. Common Bibliographic Standards for Baylor University Libraries. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Sharon; And Others

    Developed by a Baylor University (Texas) Task Force, the revised policies of bibliographic standards for the university libraries provide formats for: (1) archives and manuscript control; (2) audiovisual media; (3) books; (4) machine-readable data files; (5) maps; (6) music scores; (7) serials; and (8) sound recordings. The task force assumptions…

  11. Medical robotics and the operating room of the future.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Kevin

    2005-01-01

    Medical robotics is an evolving field with a relatively short history and limited market penetration, although some recent systems have shown some commercial success. Nevertheless, medical robotics shows great promise for improving patient care and may become a key component in the Operating Room of the Future (ORF), where high technology equipment will be integrated with medical imaging. This paper gives an overview of the medical robotics field and summarizes a recent ORF workshop in which participants concluded that standards are critical for an integrated approach.

  12. INFLIGHT (MISSION OPERATIONS CONTROL ROOM [MOCR]) - STS-7 - JSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1983-06-18

    S83-34270 (18 June 1983) --- Astronaut C. Gordon Fullerton supplies helpful consultation for Edward I. Fendell (seated) at the Integrated Communications System (INCO) console in the Mission Operations Control Room (MOCR) of the Johnson Space Center's (JSC) Mission Control Center (MCC). Fendell had control over the TV systems during a brief television transmission that featured the opening of the payload bay doors and the revealing of the cargo in the space shuttle Challenger's 18-meter (60-feet) long payload bay. The door-opening was the first of a series of many TV sessions planned for this six-day flight. Photo credit: NASA

  13. Fire in the Operating Room During Hypospadias Repair.

    PubMed

    Boscarelli, Alessandro; Frediani, Simone; Ceccanti, Silvia; Cervellone, Alice; Pesce, Maria Vittoria; Cozzi, Denis A

    2017-11-01

    Fire in the operating room (OR) is a very distressful and shocking occurrence with potential dramatic consequences. Despite safety rules and rigorous recommendations, such unintentional events do occur every so often. Notably, the vast majority of cases have been reported in the adult population, with very few pediatric cases described to date. Herein, we report on a 16-month-old boy undergoing reconstructive surgery for penoscrotal hypospadias, who experienced an OR fire most likely related to the use of alcohol-based solution ignited by monopolar electrocautery.

  14. Complementing Operating Room Teaching With Video-Based Coaching.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yue-Yung; Mazer, Laura M; Yule, Steven J; Arriaga, Alexander F; Greenberg, Caprice C; Lipsitz, Stuart R; Gawande, Atul A; Smink, Douglas S

    2017-04-01

    Surgical expertise demands technical and nontechnical skills. Traditionally, surgical trainees acquired these skills in the operating room; however, operative time for residents has decreased with duty hour restrictions. As in other professions, video analysis may help maximize the learning experience. To develop and evaluate a postoperative video-based coaching intervention for residents. In this mixed methods analysis, 10 senior (postgraduate year 4 and 5) residents were videorecorded operating with an attending surgeon at an academic tertiary care hospital. Each video formed the basis of a 1-hour one-on-one coaching session conducted by the operative attending; although a coaching framework was provided, participants determined the specific content collaboratively. Teaching points were identified in the operating room and the video-based coaching sessions; iterative inductive coding, followed by thematic analysis, was performed. Teaching points made in the operating room were compared with those in the video-based coaching sessions with respect to initiator, content, and teaching technique, adjusting for time. Among 10 cases, surgeons made more teaching points per unit time (63.0 vs 102.7 per hour) while coaching. Teaching in the video-based coaching sessions was more resident centered; attendings were more inquisitive about residents' learning needs (3.30 vs 0.28, P = .04), and residents took more initiative to direct their education (27% [198 of 729 teaching points] vs 17% [331 of 1977 teaching points], P < .001). Surgeons also more frequently validated residents' experiences (8.40 vs 1.81, P < .01), and they tended to ask more questions to promote critical thinking (9.30 vs 3.32, P = .07) and set more learning goals (2.90 vs 0.28, P = .11). More complex topics, including intraoperative decision making (mean, 9.70 vs 2.77 instances per hour, P = .03) and failure to progress (mean, 1.20 vs 0.13 instances per hour, P = .04) were

  15. Bacterial dispersion in relation to operating room clothing.

    PubMed Central

    Whyte, W.; Vesley, D.; Hodgson, R.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of operating clothing on the dispersal of bacterial particles from the wearers was studied in a dispersal chamber. A comparison was made of six gowns as well as four types of trousers. The gowns were of three basic types, namely a conventional cotton type, disposable types made of non-woven fabric and those of the total-body exhaust system (Charnley type). The dispersal chamber could simulate conditions as expected both in down-flow unidirectional ultra-clean systems and in a conventional turbulent plenum-ventilated system. It was found that the disposable gowns would reduce the dispersal rate by about 30% in the simulated conventionally ventilated system and about 65% in the laminar flow system. The total-body exhaust system (Charnley) would reduce the count by 10-fold in the conventional ventilated system and by 66-fold in the laminar-flow system. The poor performance of the gowns in conventionally ventilated systems was caused by the dispersal of bacterial particles from underneath the gown (about 80%). This was not reduced by the disposable gown and only partially by the Charnley type. This small drop would be further decreased in a conventionally ventilated operating-room as only scrubbed staff would wear the gown. In order to overcome this poor performance in conventionally ventilated operating-rooms impervious trousers would be required. Four types were studied and it was demonstrated that those made either from Ventile or non-woven fabric would reduce the bacterial dispersion fourfold. As these tests had been carried out in an artificial environment checks were carried out in the unidirectional-flow operating-room during total-hip arthroplasty. This was done by comparing conventional cotton gowns with non-woven gowns and total-body exhaust gowns. The results showed good correlation between the operating room and the chamber with the non-woven fabric gown but the total-body exhaust system did not perform as well in the operating room (12-fold

  16. Specialized operating room for cesarean section in the perinatal care unit: a review of the opening process and operating room management.

    PubMed

    Kasagi, Yoshihiro; Okutani, Ryu; Oda, Yutaka

    2015-02-01

    We have opened an operating room in the perinatal care unit (PNCU), separate from our existing central operating rooms, to be used exclusively for cesarean sections. The purpose is to meet the increasing need for both emergency cesarean sections and non-obstetric surgeries. It is equipped with the same surgical instruments, anesthesia machine, monitoring system, rapid infusion system and airway devices as the central operating rooms. An anesthesiologist and a nurse from the central operating rooms trained the nurses working in the new operating room, and discussed solutions to numerous problems that arose before and after its opening. Currently most of the elective and emergency cesarean sections carried out during the daytime on weekdays are performed in the PNCU operating room. A total of 328 and 347 cesarean sections were performed in our hospital during 2011 and 2012, respectively, of which 192 (55.5 %) and 254 (73.2 %) were performed in the PNCU operating room. The mean occupancy rate of the central operating rooms also increased from 81 % in 2011 to 90 % in 2012. The PNCU operating room was built with the support of motivated personnel and multidisciplinary teamwork, and has been found to be beneficial for both surgeons and anesthesiologists, while it also contributes to hospital revenue.

  17. Surgical Cost Disclosure May Reduce Operating Room Expenditures.

    PubMed

    Austin, Luke S; Tjoumakaris, Fotios P; Ong, Alvin C; Lombardi, Nicholas J; Wowkanech, Charles D; Mehnert, Michael J

    2017-03-01

    Health care expenditures are rising in the United States. Recent policy changes are attempting to reduce spending through the development of value-based payment systems that rely heavily on cost transparency. This study was conducted to investigate whether cost disclosure influences surgeons to reduce operating room expenditures. Beginning in 2012, surgeon scorecards were distributed at a regional health care system. The scorecard reported the actual direct supply cost per case for a specific procedure and compared each surgeon's data with those of other surgeons in the same subspecialty. Rotator cuff repair was chosen for analysis. Actual direct supply cost per case was calculated quarterly and collected over a 2-year period. Surgeons were given a questionnaire to determine their interest in the scorecard. Actual direct supply cost per rotator cuff repair procedure decreased by $269 during the study period. A strong correlation (R(2)=0.77) between introduction of the scorecards and cost containment was observed. During the study period, a total of $39,831 was saved. Of the surgeons who were queried, 89% were interested in the scorecard and 56% altered their practice as a result. Disclosure of surgical costs may be an effective way to control operating room spending. The findings suggest that providing physicians with knowledge about their surgical charges can alter per-case expenditures. [Orthopedics. 2017; 40(2):e269-e274.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. [Patient safety recommendations for out of operating room procedure sedation].

    PubMed

    Arnal Velasco, D; Romero García, E; Martínez Palli, G; Muñoz Corsini, L; Rey Martínez, M; Postigo Morales, S

    There is an increasing and more complex demand for sedation for procedures out of the operating room. For different reasons, nowadays the administration of sedation varies considerably. We believe that a patient safety approach rather an approach out of corporate or economic interests is desirable. We created a working group of experts within the Spanish Anaesthesia and Reanimation Incident Reporting System (SENSAR) to prepare a series of recommendations through a non-systematic review. These recommendations were validated by an expert panel of 31 anaesthesiologists through two rounds of an adaptation of the Delphi Method where more than 70% agreement was required. The resulting recommendations include previous evaluation, material and staffing needs for sedation for procedures, post-sedation recommendations and activity and quality control advice. We present patient centred recommendations for the safe use of sedation for out of the operating room procedures from the point of view of the professionals with the most experience in its administration. We believe that these can be used as a guide to reduce variability and increase patient safety in the organisation of healthcare. Copyright © 2016 SECA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Patient safety recommendations for out of operating room procedure sedation.

    PubMed

    Arnal Velasco, D; Romero García, E; Martínez Palli, G; Muñoz Corsini, L; Rey Martínez, M; Postigo Morales, S

    2016-12-01

    There is an increasing and more complex demand for sedation for procedures out of the operating room. For different reasons, nowadays the administration of sedation varies considerably. We believe that a patient safety approach rather an approach out of corporate or economic interests is desirable. We created a working group of experts within the Spanish Anaesthesia and Reanimation Incident Reporting System (SENSAR) to prepare a series of recommendations through a non-systematic review. These recommendations were validated by an expert panel of 31 anaesthesiologists through two rounds of an adaptation of the Delphi Method where more than 70% agreement was required. The resulting recommendations include previous evaluation, material and staffing needs for sedation for procedures, post-sedation recommendations and activity and quality control advice. We present patient centred recommendations for the safe use of sedation for out of the operating room procedures from the point of view of the professionals with the most experience in its administration. We believe that these can be used as a guide to reduce variability and increase patient safety in the organisation of healthcare. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. In Situ Operating Room-Based Simulation: A Review.

    PubMed

    Owei, Lily; Neylan, Christopher J; Rao, Raghavendra; Caskey, Robert C; Morris, Jon B; Sensenig, Richard; Brooks, Ari D; Dempsey, Daniel T; Williams, Noel N; Atkins, Joshua H; Baranov, Dimitry Y; Dumon, Kristoffel R

    To systematically review the literature surrounding operating room-based in situ training in surgery. A systematic review was conducted of MEDLINE. The review was conducted based on the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) methodology, and employed the Population, Intervention, Comparator, Outcome (PICO) structure to define inclusion/exclusion criteria. The Kirkpatrick model was used to further classify the outcome of in situ training when possible. The search returned 308 database hits, and ultimately 19 articles were identified that met the stated PICO inclusion criteria. Operating room-based in situ simulation is used for a variety of purposes and in a variety of settings, and it has the potential to offer unique advantages over other types of simulation. Only one randomized controlled trial was conducted comparing in situ simulation to off-site simulation, which found few significant differences. One large-scale outcome study showed improved perinatal outcomes in obstetrics. Although in situ simulation theoretically offers certain advantages over other types of simulation, especially in addressing system-wide or environmental threats, its efficacy has yet to be clearly demonstrated. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A Case of a Power Failure in the Operating Room

    PubMed Central

    Yasny, Jeffrey; Soffer, Robert

    2005-01-01

    In the operating room, safely administering anesthesia amidst a major power failure can instantly present one with a formidable challenge. A case is presented involving a 23-year-old healthy woman who underwent a complex oral and maxillofacial surgery to correct a dentofacial deformity. Three hours into the case and with the patient's maxilla downfractured, the overhead surgical lights blacked out, and there was an apparent loss of the anesthesia machine's ability to function. Providing adequate oxygenation, ventilation, anesthesia levels, monitoring of vital signs, and transportation of the patient were some of the challenges faced, and the response to this unexpected event is recounted. The importance of one's familiarity with an anesthesia machine's backup battery supply, routinely checking machinery, ensuring that appropriate and sufficient supplies are readily available, exercising calm leadership with clear communication, and formulating a clear plan with backup alternatives are discussed. Various recommendations are proposed with respect to the preparation for and the prevention of a power failure in the operating room. This report's account of events is aimed to “shed some light” on this topic, serve as a check of one's own preparedness, and facilitate the optimal management of a similarly unexpected incident. PMID:16048154

  2. Bacterial burden in the operating room: impact of airflow systems.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Tobias; Hubert, Helmine; Fischer, Sebastian; Lahmer, Armin; Lehnhardt, Marcus; Steinau, Hans-Ulrich; Steinstraesser, Lars; Seipp, Hans-Martin

    2012-09-01

    Wound infections present one of the most prevalent and frequent complications associated with surgical procedures. This study analyzes the impact of currently used ventilation systems in the operating room to reduce bacterial contamination during surgical procedures. Four ventilation systems (window-based ventilation, supported air nozzle canopy, low-turbulence displacement airflow, and low-turbulence displacement airflow with flow stabilizer) were analyzed. Two hundred seventy-seven surgical procedures in 6 operating rooms of 5 different hospitals were analyzed for this study. Window-based ventilation showed the highest intraoperative contamination (13.3 colony-forming units [CFU]/h) followed by supported air nozzle canopy (6.4 CFU/h; P = .001 vs window-based ventilation) and low-turbulence displacement airflow (3.4 and 0.8 CFU/h; P < .001 vs window-based ventilation and supported air nozzle canopy). The highest protection was provided by the low-turbulence displacement airflow with flow stabilizer (0.7 CFU/h), which showed a highly significant difference compared with the best supported air nozzle canopy theatre (3.9 CFU/h; P < .001). Furthermore, this system showed no increase of contamination in prolonged durations of surgical procedures. This study shows that intraoperative contamination can be significantly reduced by the use of adequate ventilation systems. Copyright © 2012 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Mission Operations Control Room Activities during STS-2 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Mission Operations Control Room (MOCR) activities during STS-2 mission. President Ronald Reagan is briefed by Dr. Christopher C. Kraft, Jr., JSC Director, who points toward the orbiter spotter on the projection plotter at the front of the MOCR (39499); President Reagan joking with STS-2 astronauts during space to ground conversation (39500); Mission Specialist/Astronaut Sally K. Ride communicates with the STS-2 crew from the spacecraft communicator console (39501); Charles R. Lewis, bronze team Flight Director, monitors activity from the STS-2 crew. He is seated at the flight director console in MOCR (39502); Eugene F. Kranz, Deputy Director of Flight Operations at JSC answers a question during a press conference on Nov. 13, 1981. He is flanked by Glynn S. Lunney, Manager, Space Shuttle Program Office, JSC; and Dr. Christopher C. Kraft, Jr., Director of JSC (39503).

  4. Mission Operations Control Room (MOCR) activities during STS-6 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Vice president George Bush talks to the STS-6 astronauts from the spacecraft communicators (CAPCOM) console in the mission operations control room (MOCR) of JSC's mission control center. Astronaut Roy D. Bridges, left, is one of the CAPCOM personnel on duty (30190,30192); Vice president Bush recieves instructions from Bridges at the CAPCOM console prior to talking to the STS-6 crew. The two are flanked by JSC Director Gerald D. Griffin, left, and NASA Administrator James Beggs. Mission Operations Director Eugene F. Kranz is in center background (30191); Vice President Bush, left, is briefed by JSC Director Griffin, right, during a visit to the MOCR. NASA Administrator Beggs, center, accompanied the Vice President on his visit (30193).

  5. 21 CFR 113.87 - Operations in the thermal processing room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Operations in the thermal processing room. 113.87... CONTAINERS Production and Process Controls § 113.87 Operations in the thermal processing room. (a) Operating... Food and Drug Administration. (b) A system for product traffic control in the retort room shall...

  6. Dedicated operating room for emergency surgery improves access and efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Heng, Marilyn; Wright, James G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Scheduling emergency cases among elective surgeries often results in prolonged waits for emergency surgery and delays or cancellation of elective cases. We evaluated the benefits of a dedicated operating room (OR) for emergency procedures available to all surgical services at a large children’s hospital. Methods We compared a 6-month period (January 2009 to June 2009) preimplementation with a 6-month period (January 2010 to June 2010) postimplementation of a dedicated OR. We evaluated OR use, wait times, percentage of cases done within and outside of access targets, off-hours surgery, cancellations, overruns and length of stay. Results Preimplementation, 1069 of the 5500 surgeries performed were emergency cases. Postimplementation, 1084 of the 5358 surgeries performed were emergency cases. Overall use of the dedicated OR was 53% (standard deviation 25%) postimplementation. Excluding outliers, the average wait time for priority 3 emergency patients decreased from 11 hours 8 minutes to 10 hours 5 minutes (p = 0.004). An increased proportion of priority 3 patients, from 52% to 58%, received surgery within 12 hours (p = 0.020). There was a 9% decrease in the proportion of priority 3 cases completed during the evening and night (p < 0.001). The elective surgical schedule benefited from the dedicated OR, with a significant decrease in cancellations (1.5% v. 0.7%, p < 0.001) and an accumulated decrease of 5211 minutes in overrun minutes in elective rooms. The average hospital stay after emergency surgery decreased from 16.0 days to 14.7 days (p = 0.12) following implementation of the dedicated OR. Conclusion A dedicated OR for emergency cases improved quality of care by decreasing cancellations and overruns in elective rooms and increasing the proportion of priority 3 patients who accessed care within the targeted time. PMID:23706847

  7. How do strategic decisions and operative practices affect operating room productivity?

    PubMed

    Peltokorpi, Antti

    2011-12-01

    Surgical operating rooms are cost-intensive parts of health service production. Managing operating units efficiently is essential when hospitals and healthcare systems aim to maximize health outcomes with limited resources. Previous research about operating room management has focused on studying the effect of management practices and decisions on efficiency by utilizing mainly modeling approach or before-after analysis in single hospital case. The purpose of this research is to analyze the synergic effect of strategic decisions and operative management practices on operating room productivity and to use a multiple case study method enabling statistical hypothesis testing with empirical data. 11 hypotheses that propose connections between the use of strategic and operative practices and productivity were tested in a multi-hospital study that included 26 units. The results indicate that operative practices, such as personnel management, case scheduling and performance measurement, affect productivity more remarkably than do strategic decisions that relate to, e.g., units' size, scope or academic status. Units with different strategic positions should apply different operative practices: Focused hospital units benefit most from sophisticated case scheduling and parallel processing whereas central and ambulatory units should apply flexible working hours, incentives and multi-skilled personnel. Operating units should be more active in applying management practices which are adequate for their strategic orientation.

  8. Tilamsik: bringing the hospital operating room to the barrio.

    PubMed

    Navarro, R C

    1983-01-01

    Tilamsik, organized by the Mary Johnston Hospital's Fertility Care Center, answers numerous requests for vasectomy and laparoscopic sterilization in the remote areas of the Philippines. Literally, Tilamsik means "spark" or "splatter." As the name suggests, the project reaches out to patients who want to be sterilized but cannont come to the center in Tondo. Once the center receives a request, the Tilamsik Outreach Team (composed of 2 doctors, 1 nurse, 1 interviewer, and 1 orderly) immediately scedules the visit. It takes about 2-3 days to pack the sensitive equipment and supplies needed for the trip. The team works closely with the requesting or coordinating agency to make sure that patients are initially screened and properly motivated. Upon reaching its destination, the team can turn any setting into instant operation rooms where the surgical procedure can be performed safely and efficiently. Turover of patients is fast, thanks to the wonders of laparoscpy, a type of endoscopic procedure for tubal ligation. After the operation, the patient rests in a recovery room and waits for the preoperative sedation to wear off, In babout 2 hours she can go home. In the towns and barrios where Tilamsik operates, patients are brought to an improvised recovery room where they lie down on the floor with their own beddings. Traveling in the remote areas is 1 of the major difficulties of Tilamsik. Financial constrants have forced the center to limit the team's trips to places within driving distance form the Tondo center. Tilamsik's services are now made available only up to as far as Lucena and adjacent towns and barrios. With the growing popularity of laparoscopy as a female sterilization technique, the more recent requests for Tilamsik's services are for groups of acceptors numbering from 100-150. To avid duplication of family planning activities, the Tilasik project director has identified areas in the country with laaroscopic sterilization expertise. Project Tilamsik was

  9. Gender, patient comfort and the neurosurgical operating room.

    PubMed

    Zener, Rebecca; Bernstein, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Neurosurgical patients may be unaware of components of their intra-operative care. The relationship between patient gender and comfort level in the neurosurgical operating room (OR) has not been previously studied. Our objective was to gain insight into patients' perspective of the OR environment, including staffing and observers, the role of medical students, catheterization, exposure, and verbiage, using a qualitative needs assessment. Face-to-face semi-structured interviews were conducted with 20 patients (14 female, six male) who had a neurosurgical operation under general anesthetic within the previous two years. The majority underwent craniotomy for benign tumours. Interviews were transcribed and subjected to modified thematic analysis. Nine themes emerged: 1) perception of the intra-operative environment varies between men and women; 2) lacking awareness about observers is anxiety-provoking for women; 3) being unaware of the hands-on involvement of students is a concern for all patients; 4) disclosure of implantation of foreign and permanent materials into patients is important; 5) catheterization is anxiety provoking for women; 6) pre-operative menstruation screening may minimize embarrassment for women; 7) patients perceive extraneous conversation as a distraction for surgeons; 8) patients trust their surgeon; 9) a relationship exists between interviewer gender and patient comfort in the interview. Although most male and female patients are unaware of OR activities, they are generally not fearful since they trust their surgeon. Women appear to have greater information needs. Patients' information needs must be met without provoking anxiety and yet preserving their personal sense of modesty in the intra-operative environment.

  10. To the point: teaching the obstetrics and gynecology medical student in the operating room.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Brittany S; Craig, LaTasha B; Abbott, Jodi F; Buery-Joyner, Samantha D; Dalrymple, John L; Forstein, David A; Hopkins, Laura; McKenzie, Margaret L; Page-Ramsey, Sarah M; Pradhan, Archana; Wolf, Abigail; Graziano, Scott C

    2015-10-01

    This article, from the "To the Point" series that is prepared by the Association of Professors of Gynecology and Obstetrics Undergraduate Medical Education Committee, is a review of considerations for teaching the medical student in the operating room during the obstetrics/gynecology clerkship. The importance of the medical student operating room experience and barriers to learning in the operating room are discussed. Specific considerations for the improvement of medical student learning and operating room experience, which include the development of operating room objectives and specific curricula, an increasing awareness regarding role modeling, and faculty development, are reviewed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Exploring how surgeon teachers motivate residents in the operating room.

    PubMed

    Dath, Deepak; Hoogenes, Jen; Matsumoto, Edward D; Szalay, David A

    2013-02-01

    Motivation in teaching, mainly studied in disciplines outside of surgery, may also be an important part of intraoperative teaching. We explored techniques surgeons use to motivate learners in the operating room (OR). Forty-four experienced surgeon teachers from multiple specialties participated in 9 focus groups about teaching in the OR. Focus groups were transcribed and subjected to qualitative thematic analysis by 3 reviewers through an iterative, rigorous process. Analysis revealed 8 motivational techniques. Surgeons used motivation techniques tacitly, describing multiple ways that they facilitate resident motivation while teaching. Two major categories of motivational techniques emerged: (1) the facilitation of intrinsic motivation; and (2) the provision of factors to stimulate extrinsic motivation. Surgeons unknowingly but tacitly and commonly use motivation in intraoperative teaching and use a variety of techniques to foster learners' intrinsic and extrinsic motivation. Motivating learners is 1 vital role that surgeon teachers play in nontechnical intraoperative teaching. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Music in the operating room: is it a safety hazard?

    PubMed

    Shambo, Lyda; Umadhay, Tony; Pedoto, Alessia

    2015-02-01

    Noise is a health hazard and a source of stress, and it impairs concentration and communication. Since 1960, hospital noise levels have risen around the world. Nowhere in the healthcare setting is noise more prevalent than in the operating room (OR). The genetic makeup of humans does not evolve at the rate of technology. Noise exposure, sensory overload, and the capacity to adapt without physical and psychological consequences are absent from the human condition. The World Health Organization has recognized environmental noise as harmful pollution that causesadverse effects on health. Although noise in the OR is unavoidable, music is a choice. The purpose of this literature review is to provide further insight into the ramifications of the presence of music in the OR, evaluate its appropriateness in relation to care and safety for the patient and staff, and provide information for future research.

  13. Improving pharmacy supply-chain management in the operating room.

    PubMed

    Thomas, J A; Martin, V; Frank, S

    2000-12-01

    Anesthesia services can account for a significant portion of a healthcare organization's costs. Deaconess Hospital of Evansville, Indiana, used a collaborative, multidisciplinary effort to implement process improvements that yielded significant cost savings while improving patient care. Shifting responsibility for drug distribution from the operating room (OR) nurses to a pharmacist, the hospital established a satellite pharmacy service for the OR. As a result, the hospital was able to improve control of drug distribution and record-keeping, reduce turnaround time for medication preparation, lower its medication charge error rate, and increase the percentage of surgeries that start on time. The success of the OR satellite pharmacy led the hospital to expand satellite pharmacy services to labor and delivery, the cardiac cath laboratory, and the intensive care units.

  14. [Musculoskeletal system load in operating room nurses and its determinants].

    PubMed

    Kułagowska, Ewa

    2009-01-01

    The aims of the survey was to analyze the musculoskeletal system load during work performed by operating room nurses, and to identify the most loading activities along with their causes. The observation of work process and the Ovako Working posture Analysing System (OWAS) method for analyzing and evaluating work postures were used as major tools of this survey. Altogether 170 observations of work process were made and also seven basic work activities and 101,320 work postures were selected. The results of the survey show: a) average proportion of time spent by nurses on individual tasks during the shift were: preparation for operative procedure--16%, instrumentation nurse tasks--16%, circulating nurse tasks--13%, cleaning after operative procedure--4%, cleaning and preparation of surgical instruments--4%, breaks at work--43% and other tasks--4%; b) average proportion of time spent by nurses in OWAS posture categories were: category 1--89%, category 2--10%, category 3 and 4--1%. The collected data revealed that the main causes of the musculoskeletal system load in all tasks were: time spent by nurses on awkward postures during the shift (inability to change postures), awkward postures with a hard load (manual lifting or transporting the equipment, more than 10 kg and also above 20 kg). It should be emphasized that the identified causes of loading activities resulted from poor work organization and technical working conditions.

  15. Feasibility Assessment of Performing Surgery in a Deployable Medical System Operating Room

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-05-01

    instance, frequent hand washing has been shown to significantly lessen the incidence of nosocomial infections . In addition, improved operating room...Room Nurse : A registered nurse who works in an operating room. Responsible for the clinical and technical knowledge of both scrub and circulating...risk management. 26 Criteria included the following: noise exposure, nosocomial infections , environmental controls, air exchanges, and electrical

  16. A comparison of inhalational inductions for children in the operating room vs the induction room.

    PubMed

    Varughese, Anna M; Hagerman, Nancy; Patino, Mario; Wittkugel, Eric; Schnell, Beverly; Salisbury, Shelia; Kurth, Dean

    2012-04-01

    There has been debate about the use of an induction room (IR) compared with an operating room (OR) for inhalational induction in children. The quality of the anesthesia induction between these two physical environments has not been studied previously. We sought to compare child distress, OR utilization and efficiency, and parental satisfaction and safety, between an IR and an OR. In a prospective observational study, we studied 501 developmentally appropriate children ages 1-14 years, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status I-III, presenting for the inhalational induction of anesthesia, undergoing outpatient or outpatient-admit ENT surgery. Inductions were performed in an IR (IR group) or OR (OR group) with parent(s) present. Child behavioral compliance was assessed using the Induction Compliance Checklist (ICC), a validated observational scale from 0 to 10 consisting of 10 behaviors; an ICC score ≥4 was considered poor behavioral compliance. Times for transport, anesthesia start, ready for surgery, surgery finish, out of OR, and total case process times were recorded. OR utilization and OR efficiency was derived using these times. Data on number and experience of clinical providers were also collected. Parent satisfaction with the induction was measured using a satisfaction survey. Safety was measured by recording respiratory complications during induction. The chi-squared test was conducted to determine whether induction location was associated with level of behavioral compliance. A multivariable proportional odds model was used to control for risk factors. OR utilization and efficiency were analyzed using the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test. There were no significant differences in ICC scores between the groups (P-value = 0.12). Anesthesia, nonoperative, and transport time were statistically less in the OR group when compared with the IR group, although total case process times were similar in both groups. While OR efficiency was significantly

  17. Surgical team turnover and operative time: An evaluation of operating room efficiency during pulmonary resection.

    PubMed

    Azzi, Alain Joe; Shah, Karan; Seely, Andrew; Villeneuve, James Patrick; Sundaresan, Sudhir R; Shamji, Farid M; Maziak, Donna E; Gilbert, Sebastien

    2016-05-01

    Health care resources are costly and should be used judiciously and efficiently. Predicting the duration of surgical procedures is key to optimizing operating room resources. Our objective was to identify factors influencing operative time, particularly surgical team turnover. We performed a single-institution, retrospective review of lobectomy operations. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to evaluate the impact of different factors on surgical time (skin-to-skin) and total procedure time. Staff turnover within the nursing component of the surgical team was defined as the number of instances any nurse had to leave the operating room over the total number of nurses involved in the operation. A total of 235 lobectomies were performed by 5 surgeons, most commonly for lung cancer (95%). On multivariate analysis, percent forced expiratory volume in 1 second, surgical approach, and lesion size had a significant effect on surgical time. Nursing turnover was associated with a significant increase in surgical time (53.7 minutes; 95% confidence interval, 6.4-101; P = .026) and total procedure time (83.2 minutes; 95% confidence interval, 30.1-136.2; P = .002). Active management of surgical team turnover may be an opportunity to improve operating room efficiency when the surgical team is engaged in a major pulmonary resection. Copyright © 2016 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Overutilization and underutilization of operating rooms - insights from behavioral health care operations management.

    PubMed

    Fügener, Andreas; Schiffels, Sebastian; Kolisch, Rainer

    2017-03-01

    The planning of surgery durations is crucial for efficient usage of operating theaters. Both planning too long and too short durations for surgeries lead to undesirable consequences, e.g. idle time, overtime, or rescheduling of surgeries. We define these consequences as operating room inefficiency. The overall objective of planning surgery durations is to minimize expected operating room inefficiency, since surgery durations are stochastic. While most health care studies assume economically rational behavior of decision makers, experimental studies have shown that decision makers often do not act according to economic incentives. Based on insights from health care operations management, medical decision making, behavioral operations management, as well as empirical observations, we derive hypotheses that surgeons' behavior deviates from economically rational behavior. To investigate this, we undertake an experimental study where experienced surgeons are asked to plan surgeries with uncertain durations. We discover systematic deviations from optimal decision making and offer behavioral explanations for the observed biases. Our research provides new insights to tackle a major problem in hospitals, i.e. low operating room utilization going along with staff overtime.

  19. Potential Operating Room Fire Hazard of Bone Cement.

    PubMed

    Sibia, Udai S; Connors, Kevin; Dyckman, Sarah; Zahiri, Hamid R; George, Ivan; Park, Adrian E; MacDonald, James H

    Approximately 600 cases of operating room (OR) fires are reported annually. Despite extensive fire safety education and training, complete elimination of OR fires still has not been achieved. Each fire requires an ignition source, a fuel source, and an oxidizer. In this case report, we describe the potential fire hazard of bone cement in the OR. A total knee arthroplasty was performed with a standard medial parapatellar arthrotomy. Tourniquet control was used. After bone cement was applied to the prepared tibial surface, the surgeon used an electrocautery device to resect residual lateral meniscus tissue-and started a fire in the operative field. The surgeon suffocated the fire with a dry towel and prevented injury to the patient. We performed a PubMed search with a cross-reference search for relevant papers and found no case reports outlining bone cement as a potential fire hazard in the OR. To our knowledge, this is the first case report identifying bone cement as a fire hazard. OR fires related to bone cement can be eliminated by correctly assessing the setting time of the cement and avoiding application sites during electrocautery.

  20. [Hybrid operating rooms: only for advanced endovascular procedures?].

    PubMed

    Verhoeven, E; Katsargyris, A; Töpel, I; Steinbauer, M

    2013-10-01

    The evolution of endovascular techniques has led to the concept of the "hybrid operating room" (hybrid OR). A hybrid OR combines the sterility of an OR in an operating theatre environment with a high-quality fixed imaging system. On the basis of these advantages it would be desirable that an angio-hybrid OR becomes a standard requirement for endovascular surgery. In Great Britain guidelines have already been published that require a hybrid OR even for normal endovascular management of the infrarenal aorta. However, in Germany there are no guidelines from professional societies or formal rules from the federal joint committee, thus in this article a classification of endovascular procedures according to their complexity and the necessary infrastructures are proposed in order to define particular procedures that should only be performed in an angio-hybrid OR. According to our experience, endovascular procedures can be classified into four categories based on their complexity and the requirements regarding fluoroscopy: level 1: standard EVAR, TEVAR, iliac and popliteal artery procedures; level 2: iliac branched (IBD) and standard (2 fenestrations for the renal arteries and a scallop for the superior mesenteric artery) fenestrated stent-grafting; level 3: more complex fenestrated procedures (three or four fenestrations); and level 4: branched stent-grafting for TAAA. At this moment it is still acceptable to perform level 1 and level 2 procedures outside of a hybrid OR. In our opinion, it is not recommended to perform level 3 and level 4 endovascular procedures without a hybrid OR.

  1. Mission Operations Control Room Activities during STS-2 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Mission Operations Control Room (MOCR) activities during STS-2 mission. Overall view of the MOCR in the Johnson Space Center's Mission Control Center. At far right is Eugene F. Kranz, Deputy Director of Flight Operations. At the flight director console in front of Kranz's FOD console are Flight Directors M.P. Frank, Neil B. Hutchinson and Donald R. Puddy as well as others (39506); Wide-angle view of flight controllers in the MOCR. Clifford E. Charlesworth, JSC Deputy Director, huddles with several flight directors for STS-2 at the flight director console. Kranz, is at far right of frame (39507); Dr. Christopher C. Kraft, Jr., JSC Director, center, celebrates successful flight and landing of STS-2 with a cigar in the MOCR. He is flanked by Dr. Maxime A Faget, left, Director of Engineering and Development, and Thomas L. Moser, of the Structures and Mechanics Division (39508); Flight Director Donald R. Puddy, near right, holds replica of the STS-2 insignia. Insignias on the opposite wall

  2. [Does ultraclean air in the operating room provide greater safety?].

    PubMed

    van Tiel, Frank H; Buiting, Anton G; Meessen, Nico E L; Voss, Andreas; Vos, Margreet C

    2010-01-01

    The Dutch quality control plan for climatisation of the operating room (OR), which was published in 2005, describes the management and maintenance of the air conditioning system. This management plan proposes a standard for air quality in class 1 ORs. This has been adopted by the Dutch Orthopaedic Society, but not by other surgical societies. The British study which underlies the proposed norm for air quality in class 1 ORs, a study on the infection preventive effect of ultraclean air, dates from 1982 and is inadequately controlled for prophylactic use of antibiotics. Antibiotic prophylaxis in itself already reduces the number of surgical site infections.-More recent studies fail to show an infection preventive effect of ultraclean air in the OR. The Dutch Working Party for Infection Prevention (WIP) ought to take the initiative, together with the medical Scientific Societies and the Society of Infection Prevention and Control in the health care setting (VHIG), to establish enforceable norms for microbiological air quality and to set criteria as to which types of operations are allowed to be performed in which class of OR.

  3. Preoperative planning and designing of a fluorocompatible endourology operating room.

    PubMed

    Sabnis, Ravindra B; Mishra, Shashikant; Sharma, Rajan; Desai, Mahesh R

    2009-10-01

    A dedicated fluoroscopic-compatible operating room (OR) for endourologic procedures, such as percutaneous nephrolithotomy and ureteroscopy, is structurally and functionally different from the general OR. Publications with practical details are scarce, imposing a challenge in construction of such an OR. We outline a practical approach for the design and construction of a modern flourocompatible endourology OR. There were no publications related to a dedicated endourology OR in Medline. A search was then performed for English language articles on OR designing, fluoroscopy in the OR, data archiving, and data relay. We also surveyed the existing endourology OR in different hospitals and analyzed the available technology for audiovisual capture and relay in surgery. This article was then prepared, covering the relevant areas on designing a dedicated flourocompatible endourology OR. Close cooperation and interaction between an architect and expert construction manager for designing, development, and construction of an OR are necessary. Strategic equipment placement with booms is essential to increase the efficiency and safety within the surgical space. Distinct features of an endourology OR are thickness of the walls for radiation protection, wide OR gate, central floor water exit drain, flourocompatible rotatable OR table, C-arm unit, minimum three hanging thin-film transistor (TFT) screen monitors, and endoscopic equipment supported on a boom. The anesthetic boom should be retractable and movable from one end of the OR table to other. The OR should have an electronic workstation strategically located at one corner for data capture, archiving, and telementoring. Data relay of the OR procedure is facilitated by a control room located in the vicinity of the OR. Designing the layout of the OR is extremely important, necessitating thoughtful planning to provide hassle-free movement, comfort to the surgeon, and efficient data archiving and transmission during a surgical

  4. Evaluation of potential distractors in the urology operating room.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jason Y; Lantz, Andrea G; McDougall, Elspeth M; Landman, Jaime; Gettman, Matthew; Sweet, Robert; Sundaram, Chandru P; Zorn, Kevin C

    2013-09-01

    Surgical outcomes depend on patient and disease-related factors, as well as the technical skill of the surgeon. Various distractions in the operating room (OR) environment have been shown to negatively impact a surgeon's performance. A survey was conducted with the objective to evaluate and characterize distractions during urologic surgery. An Internet-based survey was distributed to 2057 international urologists via email between April and October 2011; questions focused on a variety of disruptive factors postulated to have a negative impact on surgical performance. Of the 523 (25%) respondents, 58% practiced in North America, 42% were from an academic institution, and 68% had completed a clinical fellowship. In an average year, 83% reported having operated at least once while sleep deprived, 84% when significantly ill, 55% with a musculoskeletal injury, and 65% under significant social stress. Up to 38% reported that on at least one occasion, such "internal distractions" had significantly affected surgical performance and 14% perceived that at least one surgical complication was caused mainly by an internal distraction. Less than 50% had ever cancelled surgery because of an internal distraction. Music was routinely played in the OR by 57% of respondents, >67% reported answering pages and discussing consults while operating, and 25% reported "commonly" working with scrub nurses/techs that were unfamiliar with the procedure and/or instruments. Only 44% had consistent individual(s) assisting, and 27% reported that the scrub nurse/tech would "commonly" scrub out during a critical portion of the procedure. Overall, 14.5% reported that at least one complication had occurred mainly because of such "external" or "interactive" distractions. Urologists face various distractions in the OR that can negatively impact surgical performance, potentially compromising patient outcomes and safety. Further studies are needed to elucidate the true impact of such distractions and to

  5. Psychophysical workload in the operating room: primary surgeon versus assistant.

    PubMed

    Rieger, Annika; Fenger, Sebastian; Neubert, Sebastian; Weippert, Matthias; Kreuzfeld, Steffi; Stoll, Regina

    2015-07-01

    Working in the operating room is characterized by high demands and overall workload of the surgical team. Surgeons often report that they feel more stressed when operating as a primary surgeon than in the function as an assistant which has been confirmed in recent studies. In this study, intra-individual workload was assessed in both intraoperative functions using a multidimensional approach that combined objective and subjective measures in a realistic work setting. Surgeons' intraoperative psychophysiologic workload was assessed through a mobile health system. 25 surgeons agreed to take part in the 24-hour monitoring by giving their written informed consent. The mobile health system contained a sensor electronic module integrated in a chest belt and measuring physiological parameters such as heart rate (HR), breathing rate (BR), and skin temperature. Subjective workload was assessed pre- and postoperatively using an electronic version of the NASA-TLX on a smartphone. The smartphone served as a communication unit and transferred objective and subjective measures to a communication server where data were stored and analyzed. Working as a primary surgeon did not result in higher workload. Neither NASA-TLX ratings nor physiological workload indicators were related to intraoperative function. In contrast, length of surgeries had a significant impact on intraoperative physical demands (p < 0.05; η(2) = 0.283), temporal demands (p < 0.05; η(2) = 0.260), effort (p < 0.05; η(2) = 0.287), and NASA-TLX sum score (p < 0.01; η(2) = 0.287). Intra-individual workload differences do not relate to intraoperative role of surgeons when length of surgery is considered as covariate. An intelligent operating management that considers the length of surgeries by implementing short breaks could contribute to the optimization of intraoperative workload and the preservation of surgeons' health, respectively. The value of mobile health systems for continuous psychophysiologic workload

  6. Surgeons' Leadership Styles and Team Behavior in the Operating Room.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yue-Yung; Parker, Sarah Henrickson; Lipsitz, Stuart R; Arriaga, Alexander F; Peyre, Sarah E; Corso, Katherine A; Roth, Emilie M; Yule, Steven J; Greenberg, Caprice C

    2016-01-01

    The importance of leadership is recognized in surgery, but the specific impact of leadership style on team behavior is not well understood. In other industries, leadership is a well-characterized construct. One dominant theory proposes that transactional (task-focused) leaders achieve minimum standards and transformational (team-oriented) leaders inspire performance beyond expectations. We videorecorded 5 surgeons performing complex operations. Each surgeon was scored on the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire, a validated method for scoring transformational and transactional leadership style, by an organizational psychologist and a surgeon researcher. Independent coders assessed surgeons' leadership behaviors according to the Surgical Leadership Inventory and team behaviors (information sharing, cooperative, and voice behaviors). All coders were blinded. Leadership style (Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire) was correlated with surgeon behavior (Surgical Leadership Inventory) and team behavior using Poisson regression, controlling for time and the total number of behaviors, respectively. All surgeons scored similarly on transactional leadership (range 2.38 to 2.69), but varied more widely on transformational leadership (range 1.98 to 3.60). Each 1-point increase in transformational score corresponded to 3 times more information-sharing behaviors (p < 0.0001) and 5.4 times more voice behaviors (p = 0.0005) among the team. With each 1-point increase in transformational score, leaders displayed 10 times more supportive behaviors (p < 0.0001) and displayed poor behaviors 12.5 times less frequently (p < 0.0001). Excerpts of representative dialogue are included for illustration. We provide a framework for evaluating surgeons' leadership and its impact on team performance in the operating room. As in other fields, our data suggest that transformational leadership is associated with improved team behavior. Surgeon leadership development, therefore, has the potential to

  7. Association Between Surgeon Scorecard Use and Operating Room Costs.

    PubMed

    Zygourakis, Corinna C; Valencia, Victoria; Moriates, Christopher; Boscardin, Christy K; Catschegn, Sereina; Rajkomar, Alvin; Bozic, Kevin J; Soo Hoo, Kent; Goldberg, Andrew N; Pitts, Lawrence; Lawton, Michael T; Dudley, R Adams; Gonzales, Ralph

    2017-03-01

    Despite the significant contribution of surgical spending to health care costs, most surgeons are unaware of their operating room costs. To examine the association between providing surgeons with individualized cost feedback and surgical supply costs in the operating room. The OR Surgical Cost Reduction (OR SCORE) project was a single-health system, multihospital, multidepartmental prospective controlled study in an urban academic setting. Intervention participants were attending surgeons in orthopedic surgery, otolaryngology-head and neck surgery, and neurological surgery (n = 63). Control participants were attending surgeons in cardiothoracic surgery, general surgery, vascular surgery, pediatric surgery, obstetrics/gynecology, ophthalmology, and urology (n = 186). From January 1 to December 31, 2015, each surgeon in the intervention group received standardized monthly scorecards showing the median surgical supply direct cost for each procedure type performed in the prior month compared with the surgeon's baseline (July 1, 2012, to November 30, 2014) and compared with all surgeons at the institution performing the same procedure at baseline. All surgical departments were eligible for a financial incentive if they met a 5% cost reduction goal. The primary outcome was each group's median surgical supply cost per case. Secondary outcome measures included total departmental surgical supply costs, case mix index-adjusted median surgical supply costs, patient outcomes (30-day readmission, 30-day mortality, and discharge status), and surgeon responses to a postintervention study-specific health care value survey. The median surgical supply direct costs per case decreased 6.54% in the intervention group, from $1398 (interquartile range [IQR], $316-$5181) (10 637 cases) in 2014 to $1307 (IQR, $319-$5037) (11 820 cases) in 2015. In contrast, the median surgical supply direct cost increased 7.42% in the control group, from $712 (IQR, $202-$1602) (16 441 cases

  8. One year orthopaedic trauma experience using an advanced interdisciplinary hybrid operating room.

    PubMed

    Richter, Peter H; Yarboro, Seth; Kraus, Michael; Gebhard, Florian

    2015-10-01

    Hybrid operating rooms have been used successfully in several surgical specialties, but no data have been published for orthopaedic trauma. We present our one-year orthopaedic trauma experience using a hybrid operating room, which incorporates 3D fluoroscopic imaging as well as navigation capabilities. Data were compiled for a series of 92 cases performed in an advanced hybrid operating room at the level one trauma center in Ulm, Germany. All patients who had surgery performed using this operating room during the first year were included. Setup time and surgical complications using hybrid operating room were recorded and analysed. The hybrid operating room resulted in no higher rate of complication than expected from the same cases in a conventional operating room. The hybrid room did however allow the surgeon to confidently place implants for orthopaedic trauma cases, and was most advantageous for spine and pelvis cases, both minimally invasive and conventional. Further, appropriate reduction and implant position was confirmed with 3D imaging prior to leaving the operating room and obviated the need for postoperative CT scan. Based on our one-year experience, the hybrid operating room is a useful and safe tool for orthopaedic trauma surgery.

  9. Anaesthetists' role in computer keyboard contamination in an operating room.

    PubMed

    Fukada, T; Iwakiri, H; Ozaki, M

    2008-10-01

    To store anaesthetic records in computers, anaesthetists usually input data while still wearing dirty wet gloves. No studies have explored computer contamination in the operating room (OR) or anaesthetists' awareness of the importance of handwashing or hand hygiene. We investigated four components of keyboard contamination: (1) degree of contamination, (2) effect of cleaning with ethyl alcohol, (3) bacterial transmission between gloves and keyboards by tapping keys, and (4) frequency of anaesthetists' performing hand hygiene. Most of the bacteria on keyboards were coagulase-negative staphylococci and Bacillus spp.; however, meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was also found. Cleaning keyboards with ethyl alcohol effectively reduced bacterial counts. Wet contaminated gloves and keyboards transmitted meticillin-susceptible Staphylococcus epidermidis from one to the other more readily than dry contaminated gloves and keyboards. Only 17% of anaesthetists performed hand hygiene before anaesthesia, although 64% or 69% of anaesthetists performed hand hygiene after anaesthesia or before lunch. To prevent cross-contamination, keyboards should be routinely cleaned according to the manufacturer's instructions and disinfected once daily, or, when visibly soiled with blood or secretions. Moreover, anaesthetists should be aware that they could spread microbes that might cause healthcare-associated infection in the OR. Anaesthetists should perform hand hygiene before and after anaesthesia and remove gloves after each procedure and before using the computer.

  10. Thermal cycling can extend tool life in orthopaedic operating rooms.

    PubMed

    Katchky, Ryan N; McLachlin, Stewart D; Wong, Edwin K Y; Finkelstein, Joel; Kreder, Hans J; Whyne, Cari M

    2016-03-01

    Thermal cycling is a temperature modulation process developed to improve the performance, durability and longevity of materials. This process has been successfully utilized in the automotive, aeronautic and manufacturing industries. Surgical cutting tools undergo cyclical loading and generally fail by dulling, suggesting that thermal cycling may improve their performance and longevity. Ten 2.5 mm orthopaedic drill bits were randomized, with five undergoing thermal cycling within their sterile packaging and five serving as untreated controls. Using a servohydraulic testing machine, 100 drilling cycles were performed with each drill bit into the diaphyseal region of bovine femurs. After every 25 cycles, data was collected by performing identical drilling cycles into simulated human cortical bone material. Maximum force, maximum normalized torque and drilling work were measured, and a scanning electron microscope was used to measure outer corner wear. After 100 drilling cycles, the maximum drilling force, maximum normalized torque, drilling work and microscopic outer corner wear were all significantly lower for the treated drill bits (p < 0.05). Thermal cycling has the potential to decrease operating room costs and thermal necrosis associated with dull cutting tools. Application of this technology may also be relevant to surgical cutting tools such as saw blades, burrs and reamers. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. EVALUATING THE USE OF CEILING LIFTS IN THE OPERATING ROOM.

    PubMed

    Thomas-Olson, Leah; Gee, Melanie; Harrison, Deanna; Helal, Nermin

    2015-03-01

    Healthcare workers make up 11% of British Columbia's workforce and, on an annual basis, they account for over 7,500 time-loss claims, 300,000 days of work lost, and a cost of more than $50 million in health claims as a result of musculo-skeletal injuries (MSIs) that occur in the workplace relating to patient care, over-exertion, slips, trips and violence. A new acute care hospital was constructed in Abbotsford, BC and opened in 2008. During this construction, extensive ceiling lift coverage was provided throughout the facility including in the operating room (OR). Given a lack of literature and research, around this important ergonomic engineering control in the OR environment, a staff survey was administered to capture information on the familiarity, usage, and perception of the ceiling lifts. Findings were positive and showed that the staff felt ceiling lifts were a practical and useful ergonomic engineering control, for the OR environment, and that key patient handling tasks were now being carried out with the use of ceiling lifts.

  12. A miracle that accelerates operating room functionality: sugammadex.

    PubMed

    Dogan, Erdal; Akdemir, Mehmet Salim; Guzel, Abdulmenap; Yildirim, Mehmet Besir; Yildirim, Zeynep Baysal; Kuyumcu, Mahir; Gümüş, Abdurrahman; Akelma, Hakan

    2014-01-01

    Sugammadex offers a good alternative to the conventional decurarisation process currently performed with cholinesterase inhibitors. Sugammadex, which was developed specifically for the aminosteroid-structured rocuronium and vecuronium neuromuscular blockers, is a modified cyclodextrin made up of 8 glucose monomers arranged in a cylindrical shape. In this study, the goal was to investigate the efficacy of sugammadex. Sugammadex was used when there was insufficient decurarisation following neostigmine. This study was performed on 14 patients who experienced insufficient decurarisation (TOF <0.9) with neostigmine after general anaesthesia in the operating rooms of a university and a state hospital between June, 2012, and January, 2014. A dose of 2 mg/kg of sugammadex was administered. Time elapsed until sugammadex administration following neostigmine 37 ± 6 min, following sugammadex it took 2.1 ± 0.9 min to reach TOF ≥0.9, and the extubation time was 3.2 ± 1.4 min. No statistically significant differences were detected in the hemodynamic parameters before and after sugammadex application. From the time of administration of sugammadex to the second postoperative hour, no side effects or complications occurred. None of the patients experienced acute respiratory failure or residual block during this time period. Sugammadex was successfully used to reverse rocuronium-induced neuromuscular block in patients where neostigmine was insufficient.

  13. A Miracle That Accelerates Operating Room Functionality: Sugammadex

    PubMed Central

    Dogan, Erdal; Akdemir, Mehmet Salim; Guzel, Abdulmenap; Yildirim, Mehmet Besir; Baysal Yildirim, Zeynep; Kuyumcu, Mahir; Gümüş, Abdurrahman; Akelma, Hakan

    2014-01-01

    Background. Sugammadex offers a good alternative to the conventional decurarisation process currently performed with cholinesterase inhibitors. Sugammadex, which was developed specifically for the aminosteroid-structured rocuronium and vecuronium neuromuscular blockers, is a modified cyclodextrin made up of 8 glucose monomers arranged in a cylindrical shape. Methods. In this study, the goal was to investigate the efficacy of sugammadex. Sugammadex was used when there was insufficient decurarisation following neostigmine. This study was performed on 14 patients who experienced insufficient decurarisation (TOF <0.9) with neostigmine after general anaesthesia in the operating rooms of a university and a state hospital between June, 2012, and January, 2014. A dose of 2 mg/kg of sugammadex was administered. Results. Time elapsed until sugammadex administration following neostigmine 37 ± 6 min, following sugammadex it took 2.1 ± 0.9 min to reach TOF ≥0.9, and the extubation time was 3.2 ± 1.4 min. No statistically significant differences were detected in the hemodynamic parameters before and after sugammadex application. From the time of administration of sugammadex to the second postoperative hour, no side effects or complications occurred. None of the patients experienced acute respiratory failure or residual block during this time period. Conclusion. Sugammadex was successfully used to reverse rocuronium-induced neuromuscular block in patients where neostigmine was insufficient. PMID:25202709

  14. Decision support system for the operating room rescheduling problem.

    PubMed

    van Essen, J Theresia; Hurink, Johann L; Hartholt, Woutske; van den Akker, Bernd J

    2012-12-01

    Due to surgery duration variability and arrivals of emergency surgeries, the planned Operating Room (OR) schedule is disrupted throughout the day which may lead to a change in the start time of the elective surgeries. These changes may result in undesirable situations for patients, wards or other involved departments, and therefore, the OR schedule has to be adjusted. In this paper, we develop a decision support system (DSS) which assists the OR manager in this decision by providing the three best adjusted OR schedules. The system considers the preferences of all involved stakeholders and only evaluates the OR schedules that satisfy the imposed resource constraints. The decision rules used for this system are based on a thorough analysis of the OR rescheduling problem. We model this problem as an Integer Linear Program (ILP) which objective is to minimize the deviation from the preferences of the considered stakeholders. By applying this ILP to instances from practice, we determined that the given preferences mainly lead to (i) shifting a surgery and (ii) scheduling a break between two surgeries. By using these changes in the DSS, the performed simulation study shows that less surgeries are canceled and patients and wards are more satisfied, but also that the perceived workload of several departments increases to compensate this. The system can also be used to judge the acceptability of a proposed initial OR schedule.

  15. Control room crew operations research project. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Parry, G.W.; Mosleh, A.

    1995-12-01

    This report presents an assessment of the current state of the art in human reliability analysis (HRA) and highlights the principal shortcomings of current approaches. Issues that should be addressed in an improved HRA approach as well as the constraints imposed by current methodologies used to perform Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSAs) are identified. A generalized conceptual model for estimating the probabilities of the human failure events that are included in a PSA logic model is presented. The model is expressed as a sum over error modes and error causes. The report emphasizes the importance of understanding the causality of error and suggests one approach to the representation of error causes. An example approach to the qualitative screening of errors of commission is presented. The second part of the report describes an alternative approach to modeling accident scenarios that explicitly considers the dynamic interactions of the various elements and provides the needed environment for implementation of advanced human reliability models. This approach has been incorporated into the Accident Dynamic Simulator (ADS), a computer tool that removes the main roadblock to implementation of this methodology by handling the computational complexities of an integrated model of a large system, its physical processes, and the human behavior of the control room operators. ADS runs on a personal computer and is designed to facilitate the PSA of nuclear power plants. The application of the code to a SGTR initiating event at a Westinghouse PWR is presented.

  16. Learning about teamwork in operating room clinical placement.

    PubMed

    Silén-Lipponen, Marja; Tossavainen, Kerttu; Turunen, Hannele; Smith, Ann

    The aim of nursing students' operating room (OR) clinical practice is to gain experience of the perioperative nursing process and to develop skills related to the practice within OR teams in a variety of situations. However, it has previously been problematic to get enough practical experience within OR teams because of the general urgency, e.g. rapid turnover and flow of emergency cases, and preceptors' multiple responsibilities related to their simultaneous need to work as team members. This study describes how Finnish, British and American nursing students (n = 30) experienced learning about teamwork during their OR placement period. The critical incident technique was used for data collection, and data were analysed using a descriptive phenomenological method. Three types of teamwork emerged based on the students' perceptions: functional manifestation of OR teamwork, gaining OR team membership and technical orientation of OR teamwork. The findings are discussed in relation to OR practice, education and research on ways to improve teamwork while maintaining a satisfactory OR learning context and stimulating interest in perioperative nursing.

  17. Technologies and solutions for data display in the operating room.

    PubMed

    Bitterman, Noemi

    2006-06-01

    Recent advances in technology have led to the introduction of a variety of innovative devices, each with their own platform for data display, into the operating room (OR). While these innovative applications are expanding the traditional boundaries of the surgical space and enhancing treatment capabilities, the introduction of additional screens and displays is placing an ever-increasing load on the OR team. This review describes the main data display platforms currently available in ORs: computer monitors with CRT (cathode ray tube) or LCD (liquid crystal display) screens, suspended imaging displays, wearable computers (WC), auditory displays and tactile (haptic) displays. The different display platforms are evaluated according to their compatibility with the characteristics of the working environment (OR), the monitoring task, and the users (the surgical team). No single display configuration provides an ultimate solution for presenting patient data in the OR. A multi-sensory data display including visual, acoustic and haptic manipulation is suggested as a promising configuration for data display in the OR.

  18. Improving operating room productivity via parallel anesthesia processing.

    PubMed

    Brown, Michael J; Subramanian, Arun; Curry, Timothy B; Kor, Daryl J; Moran, Steven L; Rohleder, Thomas R

    2014-01-01

    Parallel processing of regional anesthesia may improve operating room (OR) efficiency in patients undergoes upper extremity surgical procedures. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate whether performing regional anesthesia outside the OR in parallel increases total cases per day, improve efficiency and productivity. Data from all adult patients who underwent regional anesthesia as their primary anesthetic for upper extremity surgery over a one-year period were used to develop a simulation model. The model evaluated pure operating modes of regional anesthesia performed within and outside the OR in a parallel manner. The scenarios were used to evaluate how many surgeries could be completed in a standard work day (555 minutes) and assuming a standard three cases per day, what was the predicted end-of-day time overtime. Modeling results show that parallel processing of regional anesthesia increases the average cases per day for all surgeons included in the study. The average increase was 0.42 surgeries per day. Where it was assumed that three cases per day would be performed by all surgeons, the days going to overtime was reduced by 43 percent with parallel block. The overtime with parallel anesthesia was also projected to be 40 minutes less per day per surgeon. Key limitations include the assumption that all cases used regional anesthesia in the comparisons. Many days may have both regional and general anesthesia. Also, as a case study, single-center research may limit generalizability. Perioperative care providers should consider parallel administration of regional anesthesia where there is a desire to increase daily upper extremity surgical case capacity. Where there are sufficient resources to do parallel anesthesia processing, efficiency and productivity can be significantly improved. Simulation modeling can be an effective tool to show practice change effects at a system-wide level.

  19. The operating room: architectural conditions and potential hazards.

    PubMed

    Koneczny, Sonja

    2009-01-01

    Ergonomics is still not fully implemented in the design of operation rooms (ORs). The OR staff has to deal with various ergonomic deficiencies which may be associated with potential hazards for the patient and/or the OR team.Three surveys were conducted among German OR staff at major conferences. Two of them dealt with the working conditions in the OR and were conducted among surgeons and OR nurses. The third survey queried OR nurses about the electrical safety in the OR.In addition, a specially developed checklist was used to evaluate the work place OR in five German OR units and the staff of these OR units were queried with questionnaires adapted from the surveys. For this article a few of the deficiencies found in the ORs were chosen to serve as examples for the plethora of results gathered.Findings showed that there was a high potential for ergonomic improvement and therefore an increase in safety and comfort. Many of these deficiencies may be eased by simple means such as the reduction of the number of different devices and mandatory training in the use of the devices since device operation is one of the main causes leading to potential hazards in the OR. Other deficiencies, such as the cable routing in the OR, require more extensive intervention and/or the implementation of new techniques, for example the "wireless" OR. All these deficiencies demonstrate the need for better implementation of ergonomics into the OR and for individual solutions, as there is no such thing as an 'one-size-fits-all' solution for OR units.

  20. Enhancement opportunities in operating room utilization; with a statistical appendix.

    PubMed

    van Veen-Berkx, Elizabeth; Elkhuizen, Sylvia G; van Logten, Sanne; Buhre, Wolfgang F; Kalkman, Cor J; Gooszen, Hein G; Kazemier, Geert

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the direct and indirect relationships between first-case tardiness (or "late start"), turnover time, underused operating room (OR) time, and raw utilization, as well as to determine which indicator had the most negative impact on OR utilization to identify improvement potential. Furthermore, we studied the indirect relationships of the three indicators of "nonoperative" time on OR utilization, to recognize possible "trickle down" effects during the day. (Multiple) linear regression analysis and mediation effect analysis were applied to a data set from all eight University Medical Centers in the Netherlands. This data set consisted of 190,071 OR days (on which 623,871 surgical cases were performed). Underused OR time at the end of the day had the strongest influence on raw utilization, followed by late start and turnover time. The relationships between the three "nonoperative" time indicators were negligible. The impact of the partial indirect effects of "nonoperative" time indicators on raw utilization were statistically significant, but relatively small. The "trickle down" effect that late start can cause resulting in an increased delay as the day progresses, was not supported by our results. The study findings clearly suggest that OR utilization can be improved by focusing on the reduction of underused OR time at the end of the day. Improving the prediction of total procedure time, improving OR scheduling by, for example, altering the sequencing of operations, changing patient cancellation policies, and flexible staffing of ORs adjusted to patient needs, are means to reduce "nonoperative" time. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Incorrect surgical procedures within and outside of the operating room.

    PubMed

    Neily, Julia; Mills, Peter D; Eldridge, Noel; Dunn, Edward J; Samples, Carol; Turner, James R; Revere, Audrey; DePalma, Ralph G; Bagian, James P

    2009-11-01

    To describe incorrect surgical procedures reported from Veterans Health Administration (VHA) Medical Centers from 2001 to mid-2006 and provide proposed solutions for preventing such events. Descriptive study. Veterans Health Administration Medical Centers. Veterans of the US Armed Forces. The VHA instituted an initial directive, "Ensuring Correct Surgery and Invasive Procedures," in January 2003. The directive was updated in 2004 to include non-operating room (OR) invasive procedures and incorporated requirements of The Joint Commission Universal Protocol for preventing wrong-site operations. The categories included 5 incorrect event types (wrong patient, side, site, procedure, or implant), major or minor surgical procedures, location in or out of the OR, therapeutic or diagnostic events, adverse event or close call, inpatient or ambulatory events, specialty department, body segment, and severity and probability of harm. We reviewed 342 reported events (212 adverse events and 130 close calls). Of these, 108 adverse events (50.9%) occurred in an OR, and 104 (49.1%) occurred elsewhere. When examining adverse events only, ophthalmology and invasive radiology were the specialties associated with the most reports (45 [21.2%] each), whereas orthopedics was second to ophthalmology for number of reported adverse events occurring in the OR. Pulmonary medicine cases (such as wrong-side thoracentesis) and wrong-site cases (such as wrong spinal level) were associated with the most harm. The most common root cause of events was communication (21.0%). Incorrect ophthalmic and orthopedic surgical procedures appear to be overrepresented among adverse events occurring in ORs. Outside the OR, adverse events by invasive radiology were most frequently reported. Incorrect surgical procedures are not only an OR challenge but also a challenge for events occurring outside of the OR. We support earlier communication based on crew resource management to prevent surgical adverse events.

  2. Factors determining the smooth flow and the non-operative time in a one-induction room to one-operating room setting

    PubMed Central

    Mulier, Jan P; De Boeck, Liesje; Meulders, Michel; Beliën, Jeroen; Colpaert, Jan; Sels, Annabel

    2015-01-01

    Rationale, aims and objectives What factors determine the use of an anaesthesia preparation room and shorten non-operative time? Methods A logistic regression is applied to 18 751 surgery records from AZ Sint-Jan Brugge AV, Belgium, where each operating room has its own anaesthesia preparation room. Surgeries, in which the patient's induction has already started when the preceding patient's surgery has ended, belong to a first group where the preparation room is used as an induction room. Surgeries not fulfilling this property belong to a second group. A logistic regression model tries to predict the probability that a surgery will be classified into a specific group. Non-operative time is calculated as the time between end of the previous surgery and incision of the next surgery. A log-linear regression of this non-operative time is performed. Results It was found that switches in surgeons, being a non-elective surgery as well as the previous surgery being non-elective, increase the probability of being classified into the second group. Only a few surgery types, anaesthesiologists and operating rooms can be found exclusively in one of the two groups. Analysis of variance demonstrates that the first group has significantly lower non-operative times. Switches in surgeons, anaesthesiologists and longer scheduled durations of the previous surgery increases the non-operative time. A switch in both surgeon and anaesthesiologist strengthens this negative effect. Only a few operating rooms and surgery types influence the non-operative time. Conclusion The use of the anaesthesia preparation room shortens the non-operative time and is determined by several human and structural factors. PMID:25496600

  3. Improving operating room turnover time: a systems based approach.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Ankeet S; Carlson, Grant W; Deckers, Peter J

    2014-12-01

    Operating room (OR) turnover time (TT) has a broad and significant impact on hospital administrators, providers, staff and patients. Our objective was to identify current problems in TT management and implement a consistent, reproducible process to reduce average TT and process variability. Initial observations of TT were made to document the existing process at a 511 bed, 24 OR, academic medical center. Three control groups, including one consisting of Orthopedic and Vascular Surgery, were used to limit potential confounders such as case acuity/duration and equipment needs. A redesigned process based on observed issues, focusing on a horizontally structured, systems-based approach has three major interventions: developing consistent criteria for OR readiness, utilizing parallel processing for patient and room readiness, and enhancing perioperative communication. Process redesign was implemented in Orthopedics and Vascular Surgery. Comparisons of mean and standard deviation of TT were made using an independent 2-tailed t-test. Using all surgical specialties as controls (n = 237), mean TT (hh:mm:ss) was reduced by 0:20:48 min (95 % CI, 0:10:46-0:30:50), from 0:44:23 to 0:23:25, a 46.9 % reduction. Standard deviation of TT was reduced by 0:10:32 min, from 0:16:24 to 0:05:52 and frequency of TT≥30 min was reduced from 72.5to 11.7 %. P < 0.001 for each. Using Vascular and Orthopedic surgical specialties as controls (n = 13), mean TT was reduced by 0:15:16 min (95 % CI, 0:07:18-0:23:14), from 0:38:51 to 0:23:35, a 39.4 % reduction. Standard deviation of TT reduced by 0:08:47, from 0:14:39 to 0:05:52 and frequency of TT≥30 min reduced from 69.2 to 11.7 %. P < 0.001 for each. Reductions in mean TT present major efficiency, quality improvement, and cost-reduction opportunities. An OR redesign process focusing on parallel processing and enhanced communication resulted in greater than 35 % reduction in TT. A systems-based focus should drive OR TT design.

  4. Changing Operating Room Culture: Implementation of a Post-Operative Debrief and Improved Safety Culture.

    PubMed

    Magill, Stephen T; Wang, Doris D; Rutledge, W Caleb; Lau, Darryl; Berger, Mitchel S; Sankaran, Sujatha; Lau, Catherine Y; Imershein, Sarah G

    2017-08-23

    Patient safety is foundational to neurosurgical care. Post-procedural "debrief" checklists have been proposed to improve patient safety, but there is limited data about their use in neurosurgery. Here, we implemented an initiative to routinely perform post-operative debriefs and evaluated the impact of debriefing on operating room (OR) safety culture. A 10-question safety attitude questionnaire (SAQ) was sent to neurosurgical operating room staff at a major academic medical center before and 18-months after implementation of a post-operative debriefing initiative. Rates of debrief compliance and changes in attitudes before and after the survey were evaluated. The survey utilized a Likert scale and analyzed with standard statistical methods. After the debrief initiative, the rate of debriefing increased from 51% to 86% of cases for the neurosurgery service. Baseline SAQ responses found that neurosurgeons had a more favorable perception of OR safety than anesthesiologists and nurses. Following implementation of the post-operative debriefing process, perceptions of OR safety significantly improved for neurosurgeons, anesthesiologists and nurses. Furthermore, the disparity between nurses and surgeons was no longer significant. After debrief implementation, neurosurgical OR staff had improved perceptions of patient safety compared to surgical services that did not commonly perform debriefing. Debriefing identified OR efficiency concerns in 26.9% of cases and prevention of potential adverse events/near misses were reported in 8% of cases. Post-operative debriefing can be effectively introduced into the operating room and improves the safety culture after implementation. Debriefing is an effective tool to identify OR inefficiencies and potential adverse events. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Burn center management of operating room fire injuries.

    PubMed

    Haith, Linwood R; Santavasi, Wil; Shapiro, Tyler K; Reigart, Cynthia L; Patton, Mary Lou; Guilday, Robert E; Ackerman, Bruce H

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 100 operating room (OR) fires occur per year in the United States, with 15% resulting in serious injuries. Intraoperative cautery was frequently associated with OR fires before 1994; however, use of supplemental oxygen (O(2)), ethanol-based products, and disposable drapes have been more frequently associated with OR fires. Fires resulting from cosmetic and other small procedures involving use of nasal canula O(2) and electrocautery have been described in six published reports. We report five thermal injury cases admitted to our burn treatment center because of fires during surgical procedures over a 5-year period. Two patients undergoing supraorbital excision experienced 2.5 and 3% TBSA involvement burns; in a third patient surgical excision of a nasal polyp resulted in a 1% TBSA burn; in a fourth patient an excisional biopsy of a lymph node resulted in a 2.75% TBSA burn; and the last patient was burned during placement of a pacemaker, with resulting TBSA of 10.5%. Two of the five patients required intubation for inhalational injury. Two patients required tangential excision and grafting of their thermal injuries. All patients had received local or parenteral anesthesia with supplemental O(2)/nitrous oxide (N(2)O) for surgical procedure. There are a number of ignition sources in the OR, including electrocautery, lasers, and faulty OR equipment. The risk of OR fires increases with surgical procedures involving the face and neck, including tracheostomy and tracheobronchial surgery. The common use of O(2)/N(2)O mixtures or enriched O(2) for minimally complex surgical procedures and disposable drapes adds to the risk of an OR fire: the O(2)/N(2)O provides a fuel source, and the disposable drapes trap thedelivered gas. Electrocautery near an O(2)/N(2)O source resulted in the five thermal injuries and warrants careful reconsideration of technique for surgical procedures.

  6. Healthcare personnel attire in non-operating-room settings.

    PubMed

    Bearman, Gonzalo; Bryant, Kristina; Leekha, Surbhi; Mayer, Jeanmarie; Munoz-Price, L Silvia; Murthy, Rekha; Palmore, Tara; Rupp, Mark E; White, Joshua

    2014-02-01

    Healthcare personnel (HCP) attire is an aspect of the medical profession steeped in culture and tradition. The role of attire in cross-transmission remains poorly established, and until more definitive information exists priority should be placed on evidence-based measures to prevent healthcare-associated infections (HAIs). This article aims to provide general guidance to the medical community regarding HCP attire outside the operating room. In addition to the initial guidance statement, the article has 3 major components: (1) a review and interpretation of the medical literature regarding (a) perceptions of HCP attire (from both HCP and patients) and (b) evidence for contamination of attire and its potential contribution to cross-transmission; (2) a review of hospital policies related to HCP attire, as submitted by members of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) Guidelines Committee; and (3) a survey of SHEA and SHEA Research Network members that assessed both institutional HCP attire policies and perceptions of HCP attire in the cross-transmission of pathogens. Recommendations for HCP attire should attempt to balance professional appearance, comfort, and practicality with the potential role of apparel in the cross-transmission of pathogens. Although the optimal choice of HCP attire for inpatient care remains undefined, we provide recommendations on the use of white coats, neckties, footwear, the bare-below-the-elbows strategy, and laundering. Institutions considering these optional measures should introduce them with a well-organized communication and education effort directed at both HCP and patients. Appropriately designed studies are needed to better define the relationship between HCP attire and HAIs.

  7. Protective lung ventilation in operating room: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Futier, E; Constantin, J M; Jaber, S

    2014-06-01

    Postoperative pulmonary and extrapulmonary complications adversely affect clinical outcomes and healthcare utilization, so that prevention has become a measure of the quality of perioperative care. Mechanical ventilation is an essential support therapy to maintain adequate gas exchange during general anesthesia for surgery. Mechanical ventilation using high tidal volume (VT) (between 10 and 15 mL/kg) has been historically encouraged to prevent hypoxemia and atelectasis formation in anesthetized patients undergoing abdominal and thoracic surgery. However, there is accumulating evidence from both experimental and clinical studies that mechanical ventilation, especially the use of high VT and plateau pressure, may potentially aggravate or even initiate lung injury. Ventilator-associated lung injury can result from cyclic alveolar overdistension of non-dependent lung tissue, and repetitive opening and closing of dependent lung tissue resulting in ultrastructural damage at the junction of closed and open alveoli. Lung-protective ventilation, which refers to the use of lower VT and limited plateau pressure to minimize overdistension, and positive end-expiratory pressure to prevent alveolar collapse at end-expiration, was shown to improve outcome in critically ill patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). It has been recently suggested that this approach might also be beneficial in a broader population, especially in critically ill patients without ARDS at the onset of mechanical ventilation. There is, however, little evidence regarding a potential beneficial effect of lung protective ventilation during surgery, especially in patients with healthy lungs. Although surgical patients are frequently exposed to much shorter periods of mechanical ventilation, this is an important gap in knowledge given the number of patients receiving mechanical ventilation in the operating room. This review developed the benefits of lung protective ventilation during surgery

  8. [Conflict matrix : Risk management tool in the operating room].

    PubMed

    Andel, D; Markstaller, K; Andel, H

    2017-05-01

    In business conflicts have long been known to have a negative effect on costs and team performance. In medicine this aspect has been widely neglected, especially when optimizing processes for operating room (OR) management. In the multidisciplinary setting of OR management, shortcomings in rules for decision making and lack of communication result in members perceiving themselves as competitors in the patient's environment rather than acting as art of a multiprofessional team. This inevitably leads to the emergence and escalation of conflicts. We developed a conflict matrix to provide an inexpensive and objective way for evaluating the level of escalation of conflicts in a multiprofessional working environment, such as an OR. The senior members of all involved disciplines were asked to estimate the level of conflict escalation between the individual professional groups on a scale of 0-9. By aggregating the response data, an overview of the conflict matrix within this OR section was created. No feedback was received from 1 of the 11 contacted occupational groups. By color coding the median, minimum and maximum values of the retrieved data, an intuitive overview of the escalation levels of conflict could be provided. The value range of all feedbacks was between 0 and 6. Estimation of the escalation levels differed widely within one category, showing a range of up to 6 (out of 6) levels. The presented assessment using a conflict matrix is a simple and cost-effective method to assess the conflict landscape, especially in multidisciplinary environments, such as OR management. The chance of conflict prevention or the early recognition of existing conflicts represents an enormous potential for cost and risk saving and might have positive long-term effects by building a culture of conflict prevention at the workplace and a positive influence on interdisciplinary cooperation in this working environment.

  9. Operating room fires in otolaryngology: risk factors and prevention.

    PubMed

    Smith, Lee P; Roy, Soham

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to characterize the causes of operating room (OR) fires in otolaryngology. A questionnaire was designed to elicit the characteristics of OR fires experienced by otolaryngologists. The survey was advertised to 8523 members of the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery. Three hundred forty-nine questionnaires were completed. Eighty-eight surgeons (25.2%) witnessed at least one OR fire in their career, 10 experienced 2 fires each, and 2 reported 5 fires each. Of 106 reported fires, details were available for 100. The most common ignition sources were an electrosurgical unit (59%), a laser (32%), and a light cord (7%). Twenty-seven percent of fires occurred during endoscopic airway surgery, 24% during oropharyngeal surgery, 23% during cutaneous or transcutaneous surgery of the head and neck, and 18% during tracheostomy; 7% were related to a light cord, and 1% was related to an anesthesia machine. Eighty-one percent of fires occurred while supplemental oxygen was in use. Common fuels included an endotracheal tube (31%), OR drapes/towels (18%), and flash fire (where no substrate burned) (11%). Less common fuels included alcohol-based preparation solution, gauze sponges, patient's hair or skin, electrosurgical unit with retrofitted insulation over the tip, tracheostomy tube, tonsil sponge, suction tubing, a cottonoid pledget, and a red rubber catheter. OR fire may occur in a wide variety of clinical settings; endoscopic airway surgery, oropharyngeal surgery, cutaneous surgery, and tracheostomy present the highest risk for otolaryngologists. Electrosurgical devices and lasers are the most likely to produce ignition. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Operating room waste reduction in plastic and hand surgery

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Mark G; Rothkopf, Douglas M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Operating rooms (ORs), combined with labour and delivery suites, account for approximately 70% of hospital waste. Previous studies have reported that recycling can have a considerable financial impact on a hospital-wide basis; however, its importance in the OR has not been demonstrated. OBJECTIVE: To propose a method of decreasing cost through judicious selection of instruments and supplies, and initiation of recycling in plastic and hand surgery. METHODS: The authors identified disposable supplies and instruments that are routinely opened and wasted in common plastic and hand surgery procedures, and calculated the savings that can result from eliminating extraneous items. A cost analysis was performed, which compared the expense of OR waste versus single-stream recycling and the benefit of recycling HIPAA documents and blue wrap. RESULTS: Fifteen total items were removed from disposable plastic packs and seven total items from hand packs. A total of US$17,381.05 could be saved per year from these changes alone. Since initiating single-stream recycling, the authors’ institution has saved, on average, US$3,487 per month at the three campuses. After extrapolating at the current savings rate, one would expect to save a minimum of US$41,844 per year. DISCUSSION: OR waste reduction is an effective method of decreasing cost in the surgical setting. By revising the contents of current disposable packs and instrument sets designated for plastic and hand surgery, hospitals can reduce the amount of opened and unused material. CONCLUSIONS: Significant financial savings and environmental benefit can result from this judicious supply and instrument selection, as well as implementation of recycling. PMID:26665137

  11. Operating room waste: disposable supply utilization in neurosurgical procedures.

    PubMed

    Zygourakis, Corinna C; Yoon, Seungwon; Valencia, Victoria; Boscardin, Christy; Moriates, Christopher; Gonzales, Ralph; Lawton, Michael T

    2017-02-01

    OBJECTIVE Disposable supplies constitute a large portion of operating room (OR) costs and are often left over at the end of a surgical case. Despite financial and environmental implications of such waste, there has been little evaluation of OR supply utilization. The goal of this study was to quantify the utilization of disposable supplies and the costs associated with opened but unused items (i.e., "waste") in neurosurgical procedures. METHODS Every disposable supply that was unused at the end of surgery was quantified through direct observation of 58 neurosurgical cases at the University of California, San Francisco, in August 2015. Item costs (in US dollars) were determined from the authors' supply catalog, and statistical analyses were performed. RESULTS Across 58 procedures (36 cranial, 22 spinal), the average cost of unused supplies was $653 (range $89-$3640, median $448, interquartile range $230-$810), or 13.1% of total surgical supply cost. Univariate analyses revealed that case type (cranial versus spinal), case category (vascular, tumor, functional, instrumented, and noninstrumented spine), and surgeon were important predictors of the percentage of unused surgical supply cost. Case length and years of surgical training did not affect the percentage of unused supply cost. Accounting for the different case distribution in the 58 selected cases, the authors estimate approximately $968 of OR waste per case, $242,968 per month, and $2.9 million per year, for their neurosurgical department. CONCLUSIONS This study shows a large variation and significant magnitude of OR waste in neurosurgical procedures. At the authors' institution, they recommend price transparency, education about OR waste to surgeons and nurses, preference card reviews, and clarification of supplies that should be opened versus available as needed to reduce waste.

  12. Effect of Individual Surgeons and Anesthesiologists on Operating Room Time.

    PubMed

    van Eijk, Ruben P A; van Veen-Berkx, Elizabeth; Kazemier, Geert; Eijkemans, Marinus J C

    2016-08-01

    Variability in operating room (OR) time causes overutilization and underutilization of the available ORs. There is evidence that for a given type of procedure, the surgeon is the major source of variability in OR time. The primary aim was to quantify the variability between surgeons and anesthesiologists. As illustration, the value of modeling the individual surgeons and anesthesiologist for OR time prediction was estimated. OR data containing 16,480 cases were obtained from a general surgery department. The total amount of variability in OR time accounted for by the type of procedure, first and second surgeon, and the anesthesiologist was determined with the use of linear mixed models. The effect on OR time prediction was evaluated as reduction in overtime and idle time per case. Differences between first surgeons can account for only 2.9% (2.0%-4.2%) of the variability in OR time. Differences between anesthesiologists can account for 0.1% (0.0%-0.3%) of the variability in OR time. Incorporating the individual surgeons and anesthesiologists led to an average reduction of overtime and idle time of 1.8 (95% confidence interval, 1.7-2.0, 10.5% reduction) minutes and 3.0 (95% confidence interval, 2.8%-3.2, 17.0% reduction) minutes, respectively. In comparison with the type of procedure, differences between surgeons account for a small part of OR time variability. The impact of differences between anesthesiologists on OR time is negligible. A prediction model incorporating the individual surgeons and anesthesiologists has an increased precision, but improvements are likely too marginal to have practical consequences for OR scheduling.

  13. 9 CFR 590.522 - Breaking room operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... breaking room and prior to receiving clean equipment after breaking an inedible egg. (c) Paper towels or tissues shall be used at breaking tables, and shall not be reused. Cloth towels are not permitted. (d...

  14. 9 CFR 590.522 - Breaking room operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... breaking room and prior to receiving clean equipment after breaking an inedible egg. (c) Paper towels or tissues shall be used at breaking tables, and shall not be reused. Cloth towels are not permitted. (d...

  15. 9 CFR 590.522 - Breaking room operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... breaking room and prior to receiving clean equipment after breaking an inedible egg. (c) Paper towels or tissues shall be used at breaking tables, and shall not be reused. Cloth towels are not permitted. (d...

  16. 9 CFR 590.522 - Breaking room operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... breaking room and prior to receiving clean equipment after breaking an inedible egg. (c) Paper towels or tissues shall be used at breaking tables, and shall not be reused. Cloth towels are not permitted. (d...

  17. Operating room efficiency improvement after implementation of a postoperative team assessment.

    PubMed

    Porta, Christopher R; Foster, Andrew; Causey, Marlin W; Cordier, Patricia; Ozbirn, Roger; Bolt, Stephen; Allison, Dennis; Rush, Robert

    2013-03-01

    Operating room time is highly resource intensive, and delays can be a source of lost revenue and surgeon frustration. Methods to decrease these delays are important not only for patient care, but to maximize operating room resource utilization. The purpose of this study was to determine the root cause of operating room delays in a standardized manner to help improve overall operating room efficiency. We performed a single-center prospective observational study analyzing operating room utilization and efficiency after implementing an executive-driven standardized postoperative team debriefing system from January 2010 to December 2010. A total of 11,342 procedures were performed over the 1-y study period (elective 86%, urgent 11%, and emergent 3%), with 1.3 million min of operating room time, 865,864 min of surgeon operative time (62.5%), and 162,958 min of anesthesia time (11.8%). Overall, the average operating room delay was 18 min and varied greatly based on the surgical specialty. The longest delays were due to need for radiology (40 min); other significant delays were due to supply issues (22.7 min), surgeon issues (18 min), nursing issues (14 min), and room turnover (14 min). Over the 1-y period, there was a decrease in mean delay duration, averaging a decrease in delay of 0.147 min/mo with an overall 9% decrease in the mean delay times. With regard to overall operating room utilization, there was a 39% decrease in overall un-utilized available OR time that was due to delays, improving efficiency by 2334 min (212 min/mo). During this study interval no sentinel events occurred in the operating room. A standardized postoperative debrief tracking system is highly beneficial in identifying and reducing overall operative delays and improving operating room utilization. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Impact of changed management policies on operating room efficiency.

    PubMed

    Sandbaek, Birgithe E; Helgheim, Berit I; Larsen, Odd I; Fasting, Sigurd

    2014-05-20

    To increase operating room (OR) efficiency, a new resource allocation strategy, a new policy for patient urgency classification, and a new system for OR booking was implemented at a tertiary referral hospital. We investigated the impact of these interventions. We carried out a before-and-after study using OR data. A total of 23,515 elective (planned) and non-elective (unplanned) orthopaedic and general surgeries were conducted during calendar year 2007 (period 1) and July 2008 to July 2009 (period 2). The Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test was used to calculate statistical significance. An increased amount of case time (7.1%, p < 0.05) was conducted without any increase in out-of-hours case time. Despite having three fewer ORs for electives, slightly more elective case time was handled with 26% less use of overtime (p < 0.05). Mean OR utilization was 56% for the 17 mixed ORs, 60% for the 14 elective ORs, and 62% for the 3 dedicated ORs. A 20% growth (p < 0.05) of non-elective case time was primarily absorbed through enhanced daytime surgery, which increased over 48% (p < 0.05). As a result, the proportions of case time on evenings and nights decreased. Specifically, case time at night decreased by 26% (p < 0.05), and the number of nights without surgery increased from 55 to 112 (out of 315 and 316, respectively). Median waiting time for the middle urgencies increased with 1.2 hours, but over 90% received treatment within maximum acceptable waiting time (MAWT) in both periods. Median waiting time for the lowest urgencies was reduced with 12 hours, and the proportion of cases treated within MAWT increased from 70% to 89%. The proportion of high urgency patients (as a proportion of the total) was reduced from 20% to 12%. Consequently, almost 90% of the operations could be planned at least 24 hours in advance. The redesign facilitated effective daytime surgery and a more selective use of the ORs for high urgency patients out of hours. The synergistic effect

  19. Operator's Manual, Boiler Room Operations and Maintenance. Supplement A, Air Pollution Training Institute Self-Instructional Course SI-466.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC. Air Pollution Training Inst.

    This Operator's Manual is a supplement to a self-instructional course prepared for the United States Environmental Protection Agency. This publication is the Boiler Room Handbook for operating and maintaining the boiler and the boiler room. As the student completes this handbook, he is putting together a manual for running his own boiler. The…

  20. Operating Room Traffic: Is There Any Role of Monitoring It?

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Shital N.; Grice, Salih S.; Schnell, Beverly M.; Salisbury, Shelia R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Operating room (OR) human traffic has been implicated as a cause of surgical site infection. We first observed the normal human traffic pattern in our Pediatric Orthopaedic ORs, then examined the effect of surveillance on that traffic pattern. Methods This study consisted of two phases: phase I sought to observe the OR traffic pattern (number of door swings, maximum and minimum number of OR personnel, number of OR personnel at 30 minute intervals, or changes in nursing, anesthesia or surgeon staff) during surgical cases without OR personnel being notified, and for phase II, the same traffic pattern was monitored with their knowledge. Results 2442 minutes of surgical time were observed in phase I, and 1908 minutes were observed in phase II. There was no difference (p=0.06) in the time between door swings between phase I (1.39 minutes) and phase II (1.70), no difference (p=1.000) in the maximum number of people in the OR between phase I (11.5 people, range: 7–15 people) and phase II (11.5 people, range: 8–20 people), no difference (p=1.000) in the minimum number of people in the OR between phase I (4.67 people, range: 4–6 people) and phase II (4.71 people, range: 3–6 people). There was a difference in the time between door swings (p=0.03) and maximum number of people in the OR (p=0.005) based on length of surgery (less or more than120 minutes). There was no difference in the time between door swings (p=0.11), but there was a difference in the maximum number of people in the OR (p=0.002) based on type of surgery (spine vs. others). Conclusion There was no role of surveillance of human traffic in the OR. To achieve any change in the OR traffic pattern, monitoring alone may not be sufficient; other novel techniques or incentives may need to be considered. PMID:20733430

  1. Operating room clinicians' ratings of workload: a vignette simulation study.

    PubMed

    Wallston, Kenneth A; Slagle, Jason M; Speroff, Ted; Nwosu, Sam; Crimin, Kimberly; Feurer, Irene D; Boettcher, Brent; Weinger, Matthew B

    2014-06-01

    Increased clinician workload is associated with medical errors and patient harm. The Quality and Workload Assessment Tool (QWAT) measures anticipated (pre-case) and perceived (post-case) clinical workload during actual surgical procedures using ratings of individual and team case difficulty from every operating room (OR) team member. The purpose of this study was to examine the QWAT ratings of OR clinicians who were not present in the OR but who read vignettes compiled from actual case documentation to assess interrater reliability and agreement with ratings made by clinicians involved in the actual cases. Thirty-six OR clinicians (13 anesthesia providers, 11 surgeons, and 12 nurses) used the QWAT to rate 6 cases varying from easy to moderately difficult based on actual ratings made by clinicians involved with the cases. Cases were presented and rated in random order. Before rating anticipated individual and team difficulty, the raters read prepared clinical vignettes containing case synopses and much of the same written case information that was available to the actual clinicians before the onset of each case. Then, before rating perceived individual and team difficulty, they read part 2 of the vignette consisting of detailed role-specific intraoperative data regarding the anesthetic and surgical course, unusual events, and other relevant contextual factors. Surgeons had higher interrater reliability on the QWAT than did OR nurses or anesthesia providers. For the anticipated individual and team workload ratings, there were no statistically significant differences between the actual ratings and the ratings obtained from the vignettes. There were differences for the 3 provider types in perceived individual workload for the median difficulty cases and in the perceived team workload for the median and more difficult cases. The case difficulty items on the QWAT seem to be sufficiently reliable and valid to be used in other studies of anticipated and perceived clinical

  2. 21 CFR 878.5070 - Air-handling apparatus for a surgical operating room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Air-handling apparatus for a surgical operating room. 878.5070 Section 878.5070 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND....5070 Air-handling apparatus for a surgical operating room. (a) Identification. Air-handling apparatus...

  3. 21 CFR 878.5070 - Air-handling apparatus for a surgical operating room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Air-handling apparatus for a surgical operating room. 878.5070 Section 878.5070 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND....5070 Air-handling apparatus for a surgical operating room. (a) Identification. Air-handling apparatus...

  4. Student Registered Nurse Anesthetists' Atittudes toward and Perceptions of Teamwork in the Operating Room

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heiner, Jeremy S.

    2013-01-01

    Student registered nurse anesthetists are an important part of an operating room team, yet little research has investigated how they perceive teamwork or approach team related issues specific to the operating room. This mixed methods study evaluated junior and senior student registered nurse anesthetists' attitudes toward and perceptions of…

  5. 9 CFR 590.508 - Candling and transfer-room operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Candling and transfer-room operations. 590.508 Section 590.508 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF..., Processing, and Facility Requirements § 590.508 Candling and transfer-room operations. (a) Candling...

  6. 9 CFR 590.508 - Candling and transfer-room operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Candling and transfer-room operations. 590.508 Section 590.508 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF..., Processing, and Facility Requirements § 590.508 Candling and transfer-room operations. (a) Candling...

  7. 9 CFR 590.508 - Candling and transfer-room operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Candling and transfer-room operations. 590.508 Section 590.508 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF..., Processing, and Facility Requirements § 590.508 Candling and transfer-room operations. (a) Candling...

  8. Student Registered Nurse Anesthetists' Atittudes toward and Perceptions of Teamwork in the Operating Room

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heiner, Jeremy S.

    2013-01-01

    Student registered nurse anesthetists are an important part of an operating room team, yet little research has investigated how they perceive teamwork or approach team related issues specific to the operating room. This mixed methods study evaluated junior and senior student registered nurse anesthetists' attitudes toward and perceptions of…

  9. Morbid Obesity and Congestive Heart Failure Increase Operative Time and Room Time in Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Gholson, J Joseph; Shah, Apurva S; Gao, Yubo; Noiseux, Nicolas O

    2016-04-01

    Obesity is increasingly common in patients having total hip arthroplasty, and previous studies have shown a correlation with increased operative time in total hip arthroplasty. Decreasing operative time and room time is essential to meeting the increased demand for total hip arthroplasty, and factors that influence these metrics should be quantified to allow for targeted reduction in time and adjusted reimbursement models. This is the first study to use a multivariate approach to identify which factors increase operative time and room time in total hip arthroplasty. The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database was used to identify a cohort of 30,361 patients having total hip arthroplasty between 2006 and 2012. Patient demographics, comorbidities including body mass index, and anesthesia type were used to create generalized linear models identifying independent predictors of increased operative time and room time. Morbid obesity (body mass index >40) independently increased operative time by 13 minutes and room time 18 by minutes. Congestive heart failure led to the greatest increase in overall room time, resulting in a 20-minute increase. Anesthesia method further influenced room time, with general anesthesia resulting in an increased room time of 18 minutes compared with spinal or regional anesthesia. Obesity is the major driver of increased operative time in total hip arthroplasty. Congestive heart failure, general anesthesia, and morbid obesity each lead to substantial increases in overall room time, with congestive heart failure leading to the greatest increase in overall room time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Flashlamp Pumped, Room Temperature, Nd:YAG Laser Operating at 0.946 Micrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P.; Murray, Keith E.; Walsh, Brian M.

    1998-01-01

    Room temperature operation of flashlamp pumped Nd:YAG at 0.946 micrometers was achieved with a laser rod having undoped ends. Performance was characterized and compared with 1.064 micrometer operation and other quasi four level lasers.

  11. The pivot wash in two impeller modes for the Baylor/Miwatec centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Yamane, Takashi; Kodama, Takayuki; Nishida, Masahiro; Maruyama, Osamu; Yamamoto, Yoshiro; Shinohara, Toshiyuki; Motomura, Tadashi; Nosé, Yukihiko

    2006-01-01

    A centrifugal blood pump with a double pivot impeller and an eccentric inlet port is being developed as an implantable artificial heart by the Baylor College of Medicine and Miwatec Co. Ltd. Flow visualization measurements were conducted to compare the flow around the pivot for two impeller operational modes: the top and the bottom contact modes. In the top contact mode, one-way flow in the pivot gap due to the eccentric vortex was observed, and sufficient wall shear rate to prevent thrombus formation was attained around the bottom pivot for over 1,400 rpm. Computational fluid dynamic analyses confirmed that the causes of the eccentric vortex were the inlet eccentricity and the pressure imbalance in the volute.

  12. 9 CFR 590.522 - Breaking room operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... breaking room and prior to receiving clean equipment after breaking an inedible egg. (c) Paper towels or... eggs or every 15 minutes. (l) Edible leakers as defined in § 590.510(c)(2) and checks which are liable... kits shall be provided and used to determine the strength of the sanitizing solution. (See §§...

  13. Attitudes to teamwork and safety among Italian surgeons and operating room nurses.

    PubMed

    Prati, Gabriele; Pietrantoni, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that surgical team members' attitudes about safety and teamwork in the operating theatre may play a role in patient safety. The aim of this study was to assess attitudes about teamwork and safety among Italian surgeons and operating room nurses. Fifty-five surgeons and 48 operating room nurses working in operating theatres at one hospital in Italy completed the Operating Room Management Attitudes Questionnaire (ORMAQ). Results showed several discrepancies in attitudes about teamwork and safety between surgeons and operating room nurses. Surgeons had more positive views on the quality of surgical leadership, communication, teamwork, and organizational climate in the theatre than operating room nurses. Operating room nurses reported that safety rules and procedures were more frequently disregarded than the surgeons. The results are only partially aligned with previous ORMAQ surveys of surgical teams in other countries. The differences emphasize the influence of national culture, as well as the particular healthcare system. This study shows discrepancies on many aspects in attitudes to teamwork and safety between surgeons and operating room nurses. The findings support implementation and use of team interventions and human factor training. Finally, attitude surveys provide a method for assessing safety culture in surgery, for evaluating the effectiveness of training initiatives, and for collecting data for a hospital's quality assurance programme.

  14. Anesthesia and sedation outside the operating room: how to prevent risk and maintain good quality.

    PubMed

    Melloni, Claudio

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this review is to define risks for anesthesia and sedation outside the operating room, and to suggest how to prevent these risks and maintain quality of care. There are no recent data on risk for anesthesia outside the operating room, except information derived from the American Society of Anesthesia Closed Claims project, which indicates there is a higher risk for office-based anesthesia. Complications of anesthesia outside the operating room are not well studied, although a few closed claims are appearing in the literature suggesting there is a higher risk. Topics discussed focus on MRI and surgical procedures, principally dental, plastic, and gastrointestinal endoscopy. Risk factors for these procedures are identified and quantified and measures to reduce them discussed, with emphasis on full oxygenation and end-tidal carbon dioxide monitoring. Nonoperating room anesthesia requires skills, experience and organization. Quality can only be assured by ensuring all alternative locations adhere to operating room standards.

  15. [Standard operating procedures and operating room management: Improvement of patient safety and the efficiency of processes].

    PubMed

    Bleyl, Jörg U; Heller, Axel R

    2008-01-01

    Financial pressures have led the way more efficiency in health care management. To decrease hospital costs a more proficient use of personal resources is required. The drive to increase efficiency with the concomitant increase in workload can cause a reduction in quality of patient care and of patient security. A professional operating room (OR) management and the introduction of standard operating procedures (SOP) have helped to optimise workflow in and around the OR. OR management can control an efficient workflow and generate data concerning performance, costs and quality. SOPs lead to a standardisation of workflow in the OR and in patient treatment modalities. This guaranties a high quality in patient care and more safety despite an increase in work-load.

  16. The operating room as a clinical learning environment: An exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Rhoda; Van Schalkwyk, Susan C; Prakaschandra, Rosaley

    2016-05-01

    Students undertake their clinical placement in various clinical settings for the exposure to and acquisition of skills related to that particular context. The operating room is a context that offers the opportunity to develop critical skills related to the perioperative care of the patient. Despite numerous studies that have been undertaken in this field, few have investigated the operating room as a clinical learning environment in the South African private healthcare context. The aim of this study was to determine nursing students' perceptions of the operating room as a clinical learning environment. An exploratory, interpretive and descriptive design generating qualitative data was utilized. Eight nursing students completed an open-ended questionnaire, and twelve nursing students participated in the focus group discussion. Four themes emerged, namely, 'interpersonal factors', 'educational factors', 'private operating room context', and 'recommendations'. The opinion that the operating room offers an opportunity to gain skills unique to this context was expressed. However, despite the potential learning opportunities, the key findings of this study reveal negative perceptions of nursing students regarding learning experiences in the operating room. Exploration into the preparatory needs of students specific to learning outcomes before operating room placement should be considered. It will also be necessary to improve collaboration between lecturers, mentors and theatre managers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Workflow in the operating room: review of Arrowhead 2004 seminar on imaging and informatics (Invited Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemke, Heinz U.; Ratib, Osman M.; Horii, Steven C.

    2005-04-01

    This review paper is based on the 2004 UCLA Seminar on Imaging and Informatics (http://www.radnet.ucla.edu/Arrowhead2004/) which is a joint endeavour between the UCLA and the CARS organization, focussing on workflow analysis tools and the digital operating room. Eleven specific presentations of the Arrowhead Seminar have been summarized in this review referring to redesigning perioperative care for a high velocity OR, intraoperative ultrasound process and model, surgical workflow and surgical PACS, an integrated view , interactions in the surgical OR, workflow automation strategies and target applications, visualisation solutions for the operating room, navigating the fifth dimension, and design of digital operating rooms and interventional suites

  18. Nursing in a technological environment: nursing care in the operating room.

    PubMed

    Bull, Rosalind; FitzGerald, Mary

    2006-02-01

    Operating room nurses continue to draw criticism regarding the appropriateness of a nursing presence in the operating room. The technological focus of the theatre and the ways in which nurses in the theatre have shaped and reshaped their practice in response to technological change have caused people within and outside the nursing profession to question whether operating room nursing is a technological rather than nursing undertaking. This paper reports findings from an ethnographic study that was conducted in an Australian operating department. The study examined the contribution of nurses to the work of the operating room through intensive observation and ethnographic interviews. This paper uses selected findings from the study to explore the ways in which nurses in theatre interpret their role in terms of caring in a technological environment.

  19. Allocation of surgeries to operating rooms by goal programing.

    PubMed

    Ozkarahan, I

    2000-12-01

    High usage rate in a surgical suite is extremely important in meeting the increasing demand for health care services and reducing costs to improve quality of care. In this paper a goal programming model which can produce schedules that best serve the needs of the hospital, i.e., by minimizing idle time and overtime, and increasing satisfaction of surgeons, patients, and staff, is described. The approach involves sorting the requests for a particular day on the basis of block restrictions, room utilization, surgeon preferences and intensive care capabilities. The model is tested using the data obtained during field studies at Dokuz Eylul University Hospital. The model is also tested for alternative achievement functions to examine the model's ability to satisfy abstract goals.

  20. Operating room metrics score card-creating a prototype for individualized feedback.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Rodney A; Gimlich, Robert; Ehrenfeld, Jesse M; Urman, Richard D

    2014-11-01

    The balance between reducing costs and inefficiencies with that of patient safety is a challenging problem faced in the operating room suite. An ongoing challenge is the creation of effective strategies that reduce these inefficiencies and provide real-time personalized metrics and electronic feedback to anesthesia practitioners. We created a sample report card structure, utilizing existing informatics systems. This system allows to gather and analyze operating room metrics for each anesthesia provider and offer personalized feedback. To accomplish this task, we identified key metrics that represented time and quality parameters. We collected these data for individual anesthesiologists and compared performance to the overall group average. Data were presented as an electronic score card and made available to individual clinicians on a real-time basis in an effort to provide effective feedback. These metrics included number of cancelled cases, average turnover time, average time to operating room ready and patient in room, number of delayed first case starts, average induction time, average extubation time, average time to recovery room arrival to discharge, performance feedback from other providers, compliance to various protocols, and total anesthetic costs. The concept we propose can easily be generalized to a variety of operating room settings, types of facilities and OR health care professionals. Such a scorecard can be created using content that is important for operating room efficiency, research, and practice improvement for anesthesia providers.

  1. Auto identification technology and its impact on patient safety in the Operating Room of the Future.

    PubMed

    Egan, Marie T; Sandberg, Warren S

    2007-03-01

    Automatic identification technologies, such as bar coding and radio frequency identification, are ubiquitous in everyday life but virtually nonexistent in the operating room. User expectations, based on everyday experience with automatic identification technologies, have generated much anticipation that these systems will improve readiness, workflow, and safety in the operating room, with minimal training requirements. We report, in narrative form, a multi-year experience with various automatic identification technologies in the Operating Room of the Future Project at Massachusetts General Hospital. In each case, the additional human labor required to make these ;labor-saving' technologies function in the medical environment has proved to be their undoing. We conclude that while automatic identification technologies show promise, significant barriers to realizing their potential still exist. Nevertheless, overcoming these obstacles is necessary if the vision of an operating room of the future in which all processes are monitored, controlled, and optimized is to be achieved.

  2. Computerized control of the procedure for detecting and removing airborne particles in operating rooms.

    PubMed

    Bay, Omer Faruk; Ergül, Nesip

    2004-04-01

    Surgical-site infections are still a major problem in modern medicine. Normal skin fora of patients or healthcare workers causes more than half of all infections following clean surgery, but the importance of airborne particles in this setting remains controversial. The use of ultraclean air in operating rooms has been shown to reduce infection rates significantly. High efficiency particlulate air (HEPA) filters are used in some modern operating rooms. Although the uses of HEPA filters, the air quality should be controlled by another device to make safe the air in operating rooms and intensive care units. In this study, a computerized system was established to control the cleanliness of the air by measuring the presence of airborne particles of varying sizes and numbers in operating rooms. When the maximum values are exceeded, the system warns the authorized people by phone, sound, or displays.

  3. Science Support Room Operations During Desert RATS 2009

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lofgren, Gary E.; Hoerz, F.; Bell, M. S.; Cohen, B. A.; Eppler, D. B.; Evans,C. A.; Hodges, K. V.; Hynek, B. M.; Gruener, J. E.; Kring, D. A.; Hurtado, J. M.; Lee, P.; Ming, D. W.; Rice, J. W.

    2009-01-01

    NASA s Desert Research and Technology Studies (D-RATS) field test is a demonstration that combines operations development, technology advances and science in analog planetary surface conditions. The focus is testing preliminary operational concepts for extravehicular activity (EVA) systems by providing hands-on experience with simulated surface operations and EVA hardware and procedures. The DRATS activities also develop technical skills and experience for the engineers, scientists, technicians, and astronauts responsible for realizing the goals of the Lunar Surface Systems Program. The 2009 test is the twelfth for the D-RATS team.

  4. Science Support Room Operations During Desert RATS 2009

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lofgren, G. E.; Horz, F.; Bell, M. S.; Cohen, B. A.; Eppler,D. B.; Evans, C. a.; Hodges, K. V.; Hynek, B. M.; Gruener, J. E.; Kring, D. A.; Hurtado, J. M.; Lee, P.; Ming, D. W.; Rice, J. W.

    2010-01-01

    NASA's Desert Research and Technology Studies (D-RATS) field test is a demonstration that combines operations development, technology advances and science in analog planetary surface conditions. The focus is testing preliminary operational concepts for extravehicular activity (EVA) systems by providing hands-on experience with simulated surface operations and EVA hardware and procedures. The DRATS activities also develop technical skills and experience for the engineers, scientists, technicians, and astronauts responsible for realizing the goals of the Lunar Surface Systems Program. The 2009 test is the twelfth for the D-RATS team.

  5. Advanced Technologies in Safe and Efficient Operating Rooms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    how using post-operative destination information during the process of surgery scheduling can influence congestion in post- operative units such as...guidance and assistance. 5 The surgery scheduling process has been carefully studied to understand the different organizations and persons who...distributions for different types of surgeries . Currently, data about cardiac surgeries from two years is being analyzed to develop a methodology for

  6. Conflict in the operating room: fight and flight or growth and communication.

    PubMed

    Stella, Cheryl

    2010-06-01

    Conflict is partial to no one. It ranges from within an individual and spirals in a ripple effect to others. Conflict among Registered Nurses (RNs) and Operating Room Technicians (ORTs) and between fellow RNs is prevalent in the operation room. The OR environment is filled with a number of personalities, each possessing varying methods for the implementation of patient care. Effective communication is key to preventing, and resolving, conflict situations.

  7. Estimation of Blood Loss: Comparing the Accuracy of Operating Room Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-02-01

    Operating Room Services to reserve an unutilized room for the day of the experiment . The experimental period was on June 14, 1990, from 8:30 AM to 12:00...moderate loss he may experience a decrease in pulse pressure, tachycardia, tachypnea, and postural hypotension. A major blood loss may constitute...during the procedure. In discussing his experience with 3,000 transfusions, Blain (1929) emphasized that the amount of blood lost during operations

  8. [Interface interconnection and data integration in implementing of digital operating room].

    PubMed

    Feng, Jingyi; Chen, Hua; Liu, Jiquan

    2011-10-01

    The digital operating-room, with highly integrated clinical information, is very important for rescuing lives of patients and improving quality of operations. Since equipments in domestic operating-rooms have diversified interface and nonstandard communication protocols, designing and implementing an integrated data sharing program for different kinds of diagnosing, monitoring, and treatment equipments become a key point in construction of digital operating room. This paper addresses interface interconnection and data integration for commonly used clinical equipments from aspects of hardware interface, interface connection and communication protocol, and offers a solution for interconnection and integration of clinical equipments in heterogeneous environment. Based on the solution, a case of an optimal digital operating-room is presented in this paper. Comparing with the international solution for digital operating-room, the solution proposed in this paper is more economical and effective. And finally, this paper provides a proposal for the platform construction of digital perating-room as well as a viewpoint for standardization of domestic clinical equipments.

  9. Rule-based medical device adaptation for the digital operating room.

    PubMed

    Franke, Stefan; Neumuth, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    A workflow-driven cooperative operating room needs to be established in order to successfully unburden the surgeon and the operating room staff very time-consuming information-seeking and configuration tasks. We propose an approach towards the integration of intraoperative surgical workflow management and integration technologies. The concept of rule-based behavior is adapted to situation-aware medical devices. A prototype was implemented and experiments with sixty recorded brain tumor removal procedures were conducted to test the proposed approach. An analysis of the recordings indicated numerous applications, such as automatic display configuration, room light adaptation and pre-configuration of medical devices and systems.

  10. [Legal aspects of video registration during operations--the digital operating room assistant: opportunity or threat?].

    PubMed

    Blaauw, Claire B; van den Dobbelsteen, John J; Hubben, Joep H

    2011-01-01

    Video registration in hospitals is becoming increasingly frequent and an increasing number of surgical procedures are performed with the help of video imaging. The Technical University of Delft is developing a safety system that will use video images to directly inform medical staff of technical problems during surgery so that necessary adjustments can be made in time: the digital operating room assistant. However, the saving of video images is legally considered to be processing of personal data. Dutch privacy legislation requires that certain legal demands are taken into consideration. From legal point of view three situations can be distinguished where video images are being used: (a) as an essential part of treatment (endoscopic surgery, for example), (b) to enhance the quality of the procedure, and (c) for the purposes of peer assessment or education. To whom and in which way consent has to be asked, differs per situation. We recommend that video recordings of crucial points in the operation are included in the patient file. The same counts for incidental findings or complications if, according to the standard of a good caregiver, this is necessary for the further treatment of the patient. In addition to the doctor and the patient, in certain circumstances, access to the video recordings may also be granted to the Health Care Inspectorate and, to the Public Prosecutor. Covert video recording of an employee is a breach of privacy and essentially punishable by law. Video recordings may not themselves be used to assess the performance of the surgeon involved.

  11. [General anesthesia outside the operating room in patients with Pierre-Robin syndrome].

    PubMed

    Kamitani, Junko; Toda, Yuichiro; Nakatsuka, Hideki; Sato, Kenji; Morimatsu, Hiroshi; Taga, Naoyuki; Takeuchi, Mamoru; Morita, Kiyoshi

    2005-06-01

    Anesthesiologists are increasingly asked to involve in administering general anesthesia outside the operating room for such procedures as computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging or angiography. Especially, pediatric patients require some kind of sedation or general anesthesia during these procedures. We report general anesthesia outside the operating room in patients with Pierre-Robin syndrome, who are expected to have possible difficult airway. A one-year-old girl and a 16-year-old boy were anesthetized for cardiac catheterization. General anesthesia was given at the angiography room which was located outside the operating room. Anesthesia was induced with oxygen, nitrous oxide and sevoflurane while portable storage unit for difficult airway was prepared including various types and size of laryngoscopes, laryngeal mask airway, fiberoptic intubation equipment and surgical airway access. Fortunately, tracheas were successfully intubated without using special devices, although cautious care during induction was taken. According to development of medical and surgical procedures, it is readily presumed that anesthesiologists will be more often involved in the sedation or anesthesia conducted outside the operating room in future. Anesthesiologists should always ensure enough staffing, proper monitoring and equipment when sedation or anesthesia is conducted outside the operating room, particularly if patients have anesthetic risks.

  12. Gestalt operating room display design for perioperative team situation awareness.

    PubMed

    Lai, Fuji; Spitz, Gabriel; Brzezinski, Philip

    2006-01-01

    The perioperative environment is a complex, high risk environment that requires real-time coordination by all perioperative team members and accurate, up-to-date information for situation assessment and decision-making. There is the need for a "Gestalt" holistic awareness of the perioperative environment to enable synthesis and contextualization of the salient information such as: patient information, case and procedure information, staff information, operative site view, physiological data, resource availability. One potential approach is to augment the medical toolkit with a large screen wall display that integrates and makes accessible information that currently resides in different data systems and care providers. The objectives are to promote safe workflows, team coordination and communication, and to enable diagnosis, anticipation of events, and information flow from upstream to downstream care providers. We used the human factors engineering design process to design and develop a display that provides a common operational picture for shared virtual perioperative team situation awareness to enhance patient safety.

  13. Interdisciplinary work flow assessment and redesign decreases operating room turnover time and allows for additional caseload.

    PubMed

    Cendán, Juan C; Good, Mike

    2006-01-01

    Operating room turnover time (TOT) and daily caseload can be improved by analyzing the routine tasks of the operating team and minimizing inefficiencies. In this prospective study, the assigned tasks and work flow patterns of the anesthesiologist, circulating nurse, and surgical technologist during operations and operating room turnover were studied and changes were implemented where inefficiencies were observed. A brief pilot followed by a broader-scale study was conducted. Tertiary care center. Circulating nurses and surgical technicians were routinely assigned to work with one anesthesiologist and one surgeon during the pilot study; 4 surgeons and 32 anesthesiologists participated in the follow-up study. The work flow diagram of each individual was redrawn, and changes were implemented. Critical moments were identified, in which brief assistance from other personnel was needed to improve efficiency. Operative TOT and number of daily operations were the main outcomes. A 2-tailed t test was used to compare the TOTs; chi(2) analysis was used to compare the number of cases completed. Significance was defined as P<.05. A total of 401 operations and 253 turnovers were evaluated. Redesign decreased operating room TOT from 43.7 to 27.7 minutes (P<.001). The mean number of cases completed per day increased from 1.78 to 2.34 (P<.001). Interdisciplinary work flow assessment and redesign resulted in decreased operating room TOTs and additional cases being completed each day for 4 different surgeons.

  14. Cost-benefit analysis of different air change rates in an operating room environment.

    PubMed

    Gormley, Thomas; Markel, Troy A; Jones, Howard; Greeley, Damon; Ostojic, John; Clarke, James H; Abkowitz, Mark; Wagner, Jennifer

    2017-09-08

    Hospitals face growing pressure to meet the dual but often competing goals of providing a safe environment while controlling operating costs. Evidence-based data are needed to provide insight for facility management practices to support these goals. The quality of the air in 3 operating rooms was measured at different ventilation rates. The energy cost to provide the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning to the rooms was estimated to provide a cost-benefit comparison of the effectiveness of different ventilation rates currently used in the health care industry. Simply increasing air change rates in the operating rooms tested did not necessarily provide an overall cleaner environment, but did substantially increase energy consumption and costs. Additionally, and unexpectedly, significant differences in microbial load and air velocity were detected between the sterile fields and back instrument tables. Increasing the ventilation rates in operating rooms in an effort to improve clinical outcomes and potentially reduce surgical site infections does not necessarily provide cleaner air, but does typically increase operating costs. Efficient distribution or management of the air can improve quality indicators and potentially reduce the number of air changes required. Measurable environmental quality indicators could be used in lieu of or in addition to air change rate requirements to optimize cost and quality for an operating room and other critical environments. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Conflicts in operating room: Focus on causes and resolution.

    PubMed

    Attri, Joginder Pal; Sandhu, Gagandeep Kaur; Mohan, Brij; Bala, Neeru; Sandhu, Kulwinder Singh; Bansal, Lipsy

    2015-01-01

    The operation theater (OT) environment is the most complex and volatile workplace where two coequal physicians share responsibility of one patient. Difference in information, opinion, values, experience and interests between a surgeon and anesthesiologist may arise while working in high-pressure environments like OT, which may trigger conflict. Quality of patient care depends on effective teamwork for which multidisciplinary communication is an essential part. Troubled relationships leads to conflicts and conflicts leads to stressful work environment which hinders the safe discharge of patient care. Unresolved conflicts can harm the relationship but when handled in a positive way it provides an opportunity for growth and ultimately strengthening the bond between two people. By learning the skills to resolve conflict, we can keep our professional relationship healthy and strong which is an important component of good patient care.

  16. Towards communication requirements in the operating room and clinic IT.

    PubMed

    Pahontu, Raluca; Will, Armin; Bergh, Björn

    2015-01-01

    Today, connecting medical devices to the hospital network becomes a priority for many hospitals. User and operator requirements for communication must be considered in order to develop an adequate interoperable integration approach. This paper conducts a requirement study using questionnaires and working groups investigating 16 clinical communication requirements for connecting medical devices with each other and with clinical IT systems. Six German Hospitals order the communication requirements by their clinical relevance and categorize those into four main clusters. Communication requirements regarding accurate data transfer and processing for patients and devices have top priority, while communication requirements regarding remote manipulation of medical devices have low rank. Connecting medical devices to clinical IT systems improves clinical documentation and with it patient care processes.

  17. Conflicts in operating room: Focus on causes and resolution

    PubMed Central

    Attri, Joginder Pal; Sandhu, Gagandeep Kaur; Mohan, Brij; Bala, Neeru; Sandhu, Kulwinder Singh; Bansal, Lipsy

    2015-01-01

    The operation theater (OT) environment is the most complex and volatile workplace where two coequal physicians share responsibility of one patient. Difference in information, opinion, values, experience and interests between a surgeon and anesthesiologist may arise while working in high-pressure environments like OT, which may trigger conflict. Quality of patient care depends on effective teamwork for which multidisciplinary communication is an essential part. Troubled relationships leads to conflicts and conflicts leads to stressful work environment which hinders the safe discharge of patient care. Unresolved conflicts can harm the relationship but when handled in a positive way it provides an opportunity for growth and ultimately strengthening the bond between two people. By learning the skills to resolve conflict, we can keep our professional relationship healthy and strong which is an important component of good patient care. PMID:26543468

  18. Surgeons' Leadership Styles and Team Behavior in the Operating Room

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yue-Yung; Parker, Sarah Henrickson; Lipsitz, Stuart R; Arriaga, Alexander F; Peyre, Sarah E; Corso, Katherine A; Roth, Emilie M; Yule, Steven J; Greenberg, Caprice C

    2016-01-01

    Background The importance of leadership is recognized in surgery, but the specific impact of leadership style on team behavior is not well understood. In other industries, leadership is a well-characterized construct. One dominant theory proposes that transactional (task-focused) leaders achieve minimum standards, whereas transformational (team-oriented) leaders inspire performance beyond expectations. Study Design We video-recorded 5 surgeons performing complex operations. Each surgeon was scored on the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire, a validated method for scoring transformational and transactional leadership style, by an organizational psychologist and a surgeon-researcher. Independent coders assessed surgeons' leadership behaviors according to the Surgical Leadership Inventory and team behaviors (information-sharing, cooperative, and voice behaviors). All coders were blinded. Leadership style (MLQ) was correlated with surgeon behavior (SLI) and team behavior using Poisson regression, controlling for time and the total number of behaviors, respectively. Results All surgeons scored similarly on transactional leadership (2.38-2.69), but varied more widely on transformational leadership (1.98-3.60). Each 1-point increase in transformational score corresponded to 3× more information-sharing behaviors (p<0.0001) and 5.4× more voice behaviors (p=0.0005) amongst the team. With each 1-point increase in transformational score, leaders displayed 10× more supportive behaviors (p<0.0001) and 12.5× less frequently displayed poor behaviors (p<0.0001). Excerpts of representative dialogue are included for illustration. Conclusions We provide a framework for evaluating surgeons' leadership and its impact on team performance in the OR. As in other fields, our data suggest that transformational leadership is associated with improved team behavior. Surgeon leadership development therefore has the potential to improve the efficiency and safety of operative care. PMID

  19. Mobile devices in the operating room: Intended and unintended consequences for nurses' work.

    PubMed

    Sergeeva, Anastasia; Aij, Kjeld; van den Hooff, Bart; Huysman, Marleen

    2016-12-01

    This article reports the results of a case study of the consequences of mobile device use for the work practices of operating room nurses. The study identifies different patterns of mobile technology use by operating room nurses, including both work-related and non-work-related use. These patterns have multiple consequences for nurses, such as improvements in information access, e-learning and work-related communication, as well as a perceived increase in distractions from the collaborative work. We conceptualize these consequences in terms of three level effects and explain how we find both positive and negative consequences on the third level. On the positive side, improvements were found in how nurses spent their unoccupied time during the stable parts of operations, contributing to their well-being and job satisfaction. A negative consequence was the perceived increase in distraction from the collaborative operating room work practices.

  20. Application of an Online Reference for Reviewing Basic Statistical Principles of Operating Room Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dexter, Franklin; Masursky, Danielle; Wachtel, Ruth E.; Nussmeier, Nancy A.

    2010-01-01

    Operating room (OR) management differs from clinical anesthesia in that statistical literacy is needed daily to make good decisions. Two of the authors teach a course in operations research for surgical services to anesthesiologists, anesthesia residents, OR nursing directors, hospital administration students, and analysts to provide them with the…

  1. Red-light-emitting laser diodes operating CW at room temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kressel, H.; Hawrylo, F. Z.

    1976-01-01

    Heterojunction laser diodes of AlGaAs have been prepared with threshold current densities substantially below those previously achieved at room temperature in the 7200-8000-A spectral range. These devices operate continuously with simple oxide-isolated stripe contacts to 7400 A, which extends CW operation into the visible (red) portion of the spectrum.

  2. Application of an Online Reference for Reviewing Basic Statistical Principles of Operating Room Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dexter, Franklin; Masursky, Danielle; Wachtel, Ruth E.; Nussmeier, Nancy A.

    2010-01-01

    Operating room (OR) management differs from clinical anesthesia in that statistical literacy is needed daily to make good decisions. Two of the authors teach a course in operations research for surgical services to anesthesiologists, anesthesia residents, OR nursing directors, hospital administration students, and analysts to provide them with the…

  3. Proposing a syllabus for the operation room B.S. courses in Iran.

    PubMed

    Zare, Zahra; Irani, Mehri Doosti; Aarabi, Akram; Motlagh, Farzaneh Gholami; Farahmand, Hassan; Naji, Homayoun; Mashhadizadeh, Ahmad; Rafiian, Mohsen

    2010-12-01

    Education is based upon the knowledge, skills, and attitudes that are required for an occupation, and the changes occurring in the occupations and duties as well as in the ideals and values necessitate constant needs analysis. Furthermore, owing to the transformations in sciences, especially medical sciences, the current syllabus for the operation room courses at associate level will not meet the requirements for operation room personnel in future. Therefore, the syllabus for operation room B.S. was developed and proposed in a research project entitled "Study of the international syllabus for the operation room courses and proposing an appropriate syllabus for the courses in Iran." Since the operation room courses at B.S. level are supposed to be introduced in Iranian universities, we intended to learn about the opinions of other people related to this subject in Iran. In this research, a questionnaire was used that contained the syllabus proposed for the operation room B.S. courses, which was the result of a research project entitled "Study of the international syllabus for the operation room courses and proposing an appropriate syllabus for the courses in Iran." To develop this syllabus, 12 heads of the operation room departments in universities across Iran in which the subject matter was being taught at associate level were consulted. The study showed that 14 out of the 53 courses proposed in the syllabus had a desirability level of 100%, 22 courses were desirable at levels of 91-100%, 19 were 75-90% desirable, and no courses had a desirability level less than 75%. After carrying out some modifications to the syllabus, the problems were resolved and the opinions were again asked. When a consensus of greater than 70% was reached, the syllabus for the operation room courses at B.S. level was finalized and proposed. The regulations from the Development, Planning, and Evaluation Office of the Ministry of Health were also followed. Although all the courses showed a

  4. Staff planning for operating rooms with different surgical services lines.

    PubMed

    Villarreal, Monica C; Keskinocak, Pinar

    2016-06-01

    We present a two-phase model for a staff planning problem in a surgical department. We consider the setting where staff, in particular nurse circulators and surgical scrub technicians, are assigned to one of different service lines, and while they can be 'pooled' and temporally assigned to other service line if needed, these re-assignments should belimited. In Phase I, we decide on the number of staff hours to budget for each service line, considering policies limiting staff pooling and overtime, and different demand scenarios. In Phase II, we determine how these budgeted staff hours should be allocated across potential work days and shifts, given estimated staff requirements and shift-related scheduling restrictions. We propose a heuristic to speed the model's Phase II solution time. We implement the model using a hospital's surgical data and compare the model's results with the hospital's current practices. Using a simulation model for the surgical operations, we find that our two-phase model reduces the delays caused by staff unavailability as well as staff pooling, without increasing the workforce size. Finally, we briefly describe a decision-support tool we developed with the objective of fine-tuning staff planning decisions.

  5. [Handling modern imaging procedures in a high-tech operating room].

    PubMed

    Hüfner, T; Citak, M; Imrecke, J; Krettek, C; Stübig, T

    2012-03-01

    Operating rooms are the central unit in the hospital network in trauma centers. In this area, high costs but also high revenues are generated. Modern operating theater concepts as an integrated model have been offered by different companies since the early 2000s. Our hypothesis is that integrative concepts for operating rooms, in addition to improved operating room ergonomics, have the potential for measurable time and cost savings. In our clinic, an integrated operating room concept (I-Suite, Stryker, Duisburg) was implemented after analysis of the problems. In addition to the ceiling-mounted arrangement, the system includes an endoscopy unit, a navigation system, and a voice control system. In the first 6 months (9/2005 to 2/2006), 112 procedures were performed in the integrated operating room: 34 total knee arthroplasties, 12 endoscopic spine surgeries, and 66 inpatient arthroscopic procedures (28 shoulder and 38 knee reconstructions). The analysis showed a daily saving of 22-45 min, corresponding to 15-30% of the daily changeover times, calculated to account for potential savings in the internal cost allocation of 225-450 EUR. A commercial operating room concept was evaluated in a pilot phase in terms of hard data, including time and cost factors. Besides the described effects further savings might be achieved through the effective use of voice control and the benefit of the sterile handle on the navigation camera, since waiting times for an additional nurse are minimized. The time of the procedure of intraoperative imaging is also reduced due to the ceiling-mounted concept, as the C-arm can be moved freely in the operating theater without hindering cables. By these measures and ensuing improved efficiency, the initial high costs for the implementation of the system may be cushioned over time.

  6. [The role of the pharmacist in the management of the operating room].

    PubMed

    Kihira, Kenji

    2012-03-01

    Pharmacy services have traditionally consisted of dispensing, provision of drug information and inventory management practices. Pharmacist's impact on the implementation of medication safety standards, drug therapy optimization, and other clinical interventions has been adequately reviewed in settings of general wards and considered as standard practice; however, these activities in the operating room have not become the standard practice. In this article, we reviewed the clinical interventions by pharmacists working in the operating room. The five main duties or obligations required of the pharmacists are appropriate drug management, achieving medical economic benefits, mixing injectable drugs, risk management, and provision of drug information. The major information provided to physicians and nurses is on usage, dosage, stability, incompatibility, pharmacological effects and adverse effects. Physicians and nurses require the drug information provided by the pharmacist in the operating room. Furthermore, their requirement for the stationing of pharmacist is extremely high. It is suggested that these services might be quite important in optimizing drug therapy and preventing adverse effects. Additionally, pharmacist can contribute on rational use of drug, safety management, reduction of works of other medical staff, and also the medical economics through pharmaceutical care in operating room as well as in general wards. It is suggested that stationing pharmacists in the operating room might be indispensable for hospital administration in view of the medication safety and cost reduction.

  7. Quality of inguinal hernia operative reports: room for improvement

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Grace W.; Pooni, Amandeep; Forbes, Shawn S.; Eskicioglu, Cagla; Pearsall, Emily; Brenneman, Fred D.; McLeod, Robin S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Operative reports (ORs) serve as the official documentation of surgical procedures. They are essential for optimal patient care, physician accountability and billing, and direction for clinical research and auditing. Nonstandardized narrative reports are often of poor quality and lacking in detail. We sought to audit the completeness of narrative inguinal hernia ORs. Methods A standardized checklist for inguinal hernia repair (IHR) comprising 33 variables was developed by consensus of 4 surgeons. Five high-volume IHR surgeons categorized items as essential, preferable or nonessential. We audited ORs for open IHR at 6 academic hospitals. Results We audited 213 ORs, and we excluded 7 femoral hernia ORs. Tension-free repairs were the most common (82.5%), and the plug-and-patch technique was the most frequent (52.9%). Residents dictated 59% of ORs. Of 33 variables, 15 were considered essential and, on average, 10.8 ± 1.3 were included. Poorly reported elements included first occurrence versus recurrent repair (8.3%), small bowel viability in incarcerated hernias (10.7%) and occurrence of intraoperative complications (32.5%). Of 18 nonessential elements, deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis, preoperative antibiotics and urgency were reported in 1.9%, 11.7% and 24.3% of ORs, respectively. Repair-specific details were reported in 0 to 97.1% of ORs, including patch sutured to tubercle (55.1%) and location of plug (67.0%). Conclusion Completeness of IHR ORs varied with regards to essential and nonessential items but were generally incomplete, suggesting there is opportunity for improvement, including implementation of a standardized synoptic OR. PMID:24284146

  8. Modes of mechanical ventilation for the operating room.

    PubMed

    Ball, Lorenzo; Dameri, Maddalena; Pelosi, Paolo

    2015-09-01

    Most patients undergoing surgical procedures need to be mechanically ventilated, because of the impact of several drugs administered at induction and during maintenance of general anaesthesia on respiratory function. Optimization of intraoperative mechanical ventilation can reduce the incidence of post-operative pulmonary complications and improve the patient's outcome. Preoxygenation at induction of general anaesthesia prolongs the time window for safe intubation, reducing the risk of hypoxia and overweighs the potential risk of reabsorption atelectasis. Non-invasive positive pressure ventilation delivered through different interfaces should be considered at the induction of anaesthesia morbidly obese patients. Anaesthesia ventilators are becoming increasingly sophisticated, integrating many functions that were once exclusive to intensive care. Modern anaesthesia machines provide high performances in delivering the desired volumes and pressures accurately and precisely, including assisted ventilation modes. Therefore, the physicians should be familiar with the potential and pitfalls of the most commonly used intraoperative ventilation modes: volume-controlled, pressure-controlled, dual-controlled and assisted ventilation. Although there is no clear evidence to support the advantage of any one of these ventilation modes over the others, protective mechanical ventilation with low tidal volume and low levels of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) should be considered in patients undergoing surgery. The target tidal volume should be calculated based on the predicted or ideal body weight rather than on the actual body weight. To optimize ventilation monitoring, anaesthesia machines should include end-inspiratory and end-expiratory pause as well as flow-volume loop curves. The routine administration of high PEEP levels should be avoided, as this may lead to haemodynamic impairment and fluid overload. Higher PEEP might be considered during surgery longer than 3 h

  9. Ergonomic design in the operating room: information technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, Mark M.; Ratib, Osman

    2005-04-01

    The ergonomic design in the Surgical OR of information technology systems has been and continues to be a large problem. Numerous disparate information systems with unique hardware and display configurations create an environment similar to the chaotic environments of air traffic control. Patient information systems tend to show all available statistics making it difficult to isolate the key, relevant vitals for the patient. Interactions in this sterile environment are still being done with the traditional keyboard and mouse designed for cubicle office workflows. This presentation will address the shortcomings of the current design paradigm in the Surgical OR that relate to Information Technology systems. It will offer a perspective that addresses the ergonomic deficiencies and predicts how future technological innovations will integrate into this vision. Part of this vision includes a Surgical OR PACS prototype, developed by GE Healthcare Technologies, that addresses ergonomic challenges of PACS in the OR that include lack of portability, sterile field integrity, and UI targeted for diagnostic radiologists. GWindows (gesture control) developed by Microsoft Research and Voice command will allow for the surgeons to navigate and review diagnostic imagery without using the conventional keyboard and mouse that disrupt the integrity of the sterile field. This prototype also demonstrates how a wireless, battery powered, self contained mobile PACS workstation can be optimally positioned for a surgeon to reference images during an intervention as opposed to the current pre-operative review. Lessons learned from the creation of the Surgical OR PACS Prototype have demonstrated that PACS alone is not the end all solution in the OR. Integration of other disparate information systems and presentation of this information in simple, easy to navigate information packets will enable smoother interactions for the surgeons and other healthcare professionals in the OR. More intuitive

  10. From the operating room of the present to the operating room of the future. Human-factors lessons learned from the minimally invasive surgery revolution.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Anthony G; Smith, C Daniel

    2003-09-01

    The minimally invasive surgical revolution has changed the way surgery is practiced. It has also helped surgical innovators to break the tethers that anchored the practice of surgery in an early 20th century operating room environment. To some in surgery, the Operating Room of the Future will be seen as a revolution but to others, an inevitable evolution of the changes ushered in by the adoption of minimally invasive surgery. Although minimally invasive surgery has conferred considerable advantages on the patient, it has imposed significant difficulties on the surgeon, which in turn, have impacted outcomes. These difficulties were primarily human factor in nature and were poorly understood by critical groups such as device manufacturers, surgeons, and surgery educators and trainers. This article details what these human factors were, how they related to the practice of minimally invasive surgery, and how they will impact on the practice of surgery in the Operating Room of the Future. Much of the technology for the Operating Room of the Future currently exists (eg, surgical robotics, virtual reality, and telemedicine). However, for it to function optimally it must be integrated in a fashion that takes on board the human factor strengths and limitations of the surgeon. These advanced technologies should then be harnessed to optimize surgical practice. In some cases, this will involve rethinking existing technologies (ie, three-dimensional camera systems), applying technologies that currently exist in a manner that is more systematic and better managed (ie, surgical robots and virtual reality), and a reconsideration of who should be applying these technologies for the practice of surgery in the 21st century. In all cases, there will be education and training implications for the practitioner. Lastly, there must be unequivocal demonstration that these changes bring about positive benefits for patients in terms of better outcomes and for surgeons in terms of ability and

  11. [Design and Implementation of a Mobile Operating Room Information Management System Based on Electronic Medical Record].

    PubMed

    Liu, Baozhen; Liu, Zhiguo; Wang, Xianwen

    2015-06-01

    A mobile operating room information management system with electronic medical record (EMR) is designed to improve work efficiency and to enhance the patient information sharing. In the operating room, this system acquires the information from various medical devices through the Client/Server (C/S) pattern, and automatically generates XML-based EMR. Outside the operating room, this system provides information access service by using the Browser/Server (B/S) pattern. Software test shows that this system can correctly collect medical information from equipment and clearly display the real-time waveform. By achieving surgery records with higher quality and sharing the information among mobile medical units, this system can effectively reduce doctors' workload and promote the information construction of the field hospital.

  12. Developing a culture of collaboration in the operating room: more than effective communication.

    PubMed

    Wade, Patricia

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this literature review was to examine the current state of knowledge on successful collaborative practice in the operating room. Using the determinants of successful collaborative practice, developed by San-Martin-Rodriguez, Beaulieu, D'Amour, & Ferrada-Videla, the current literature on collaboration in the operating room was reviewed in order to identify the gaps in knowledge and identify future research avenues. The review highlighted that communication patterns among operating room team members was the most extensively researched aspect of teamwork. Other aspects, such as the willingness to engage in collaborative practice, trust, respect, societal factors, and cultural factors, were absent from the literature. Future research will need to focus on these gaps in knowledge in order to maximize our limited research resources and improve patient safety.

  13. [Present status of critical hemorrhage and its management in the operating room].

    PubMed

    Irita, Kazuo

    2014-12-01

    Hemorrhage is a major cause of cardiac arrest in the operating room. Many human factors, including surgical procedures, transfusion practices, blood supply, and anesthetic management, are involved in the process that leads to hemorrhage developing into a critical situation. It is desirable for hospital transfusion committees to prepare hospital-based regulations on 'actions to be taken to manage critical hemorrhage', and practice the implementation of these regulations with simulated drills. If intraoperative hemorrhage may become critical, a state of emergency should immediately be declared to the operating room staff, the blood transfusion service staff, and blood bank staff in order to organize a systematic approach to the ongoing problem and keep all responsible staff working outside the operating room informed of events developing in the room. To rapidly deal with critical hemorrhage, not only cooperation between anesthesiologists and surgeons but also linkage of operating rooms with blood transfusion services and a blood bank are important. When time is short, cross-matching tests are omitted, and ABO-identical red blood cells are used. When supplies of ABO-identical red blood cells are not available, ABO-compatible, non-identical red blood cells are used. Because a systematic, not individual, approach is required to prevent and manage critical hemorrhage, whether or not a hospital can establish a procedure to deal with it depends on the overall capability of critical and crisis management of the hospital. (Review).

  14. Patient safety in the operating room: an intervention study on latent risk factors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Patient safety is one of the greatest challenges in healthcare. In the operating room errors are frequent and often consequential. This article describes an approach to a successful implementation of a patient safety program in the operating room, focussing on latent risk factors that influence patient safety. We performed an intervention to improve these latent risk factors (LRFs) and increase awareness of patient safety issues amongst OR staff. Methods Latent risk factors were studied using a validated questionnaire applied to the OR staff before and after an intervention. A pre-test/post-test control group design with repeated measures was used to evaluate the effects of the interventions. The staff from one operating room of an university hospital acted as the intervention group. Controls consisted of the staff of the operating room in another university hospital. The outcomes were the changes in LRF scores, perceived incident rate, and changes in incident reports between pre- and post-intervention. Results Based on pre-test scores and participants’ key concerns about organizational factors affecting patient safety in their department the intervention focused on the following LRFs: Material Resources, Training and Staffing Recourses. After the intervention, the intervention operating room - compared to the control operating room - reported significantly fewer problems on Material Resources and Staffing Resources and a significantly lower score on perceived incident rate. The contribution of technical factors to incident causation decreased significantly in the intervention group after the intervention. Conclusion The change of state of latent risk factors can be measured using a patient safety questionnaire aimed at these factors. The change of the relevant risk factors (Material and Staffing resources) concurred with a decrease in perceived and reported incident rates in the relevant categories. We conclude that interventions aimed at unfavourable

  15. Measuring surgical trainee perceptions to assess the operating room educational environment.

    PubMed

    Diwadkar, Gouri B; Jelovsek, J Eric

    2010-01-01

    To determine measurable differences in the perception of learning between junior and senior residents in the operating rooms of an obstetrics and gynecology (OBGYN) residency program. Using a cross-sectional design, the Operating Room Educational Environment Measure (OREEM), a 40-item educational environment inventory, was administered to 28 OBGYN residents from 1 training program, who train at 3 hospital sites. The OREEM measures a trainee's perceptions of the teaching surgeon, learning opportunities, operating room atmosphere, and workload. The primary outcome was total OREEM scores and secondary outcomes were OREEM subscale scores, global impression of education, and internal consistency and validity of the OREEM scale. Group sample sizes of 10 and 10 achieved 80% power to detect a 10% difference between group mean OREEM scores +/- 10% with a significance level of 0.05. Twenty-four residents including 11 junior (postgraduate years 1 and 2) and 13 senior (postgraduate years 3 and 4) residents were included in the analysis. Total OREEM scores, learning opportunities, and workload/support subscale scores were significantly lower for junior residents compared with senior residents across all sites. Perceptions of learning at a multispecialty tertiary referral hospital were lower than the community and regional hospitals. This was secondary to complexity of cases, subspecialty fellows, and decreased opportunities to first-assist in the operating room. The OREEM demonstrated acceptable reliability and construct validity. There are measurable differences in perception of the operating room educational environment between junior and senior OBGYN residents using the reliable and valid Operating Room Educational Environment Measure. Copyright 2010 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [Course of central body temperature in the laminar airflow operating room in various anesthesia procedures].

    PubMed

    Kochs, E; Blanc, I; Pfeifer, G

    1986-08-01

    The oesophageal body temperature of 130 patients was measured pre- and intraoperatively. 92% (n = 116) of the operations (implantation or replacement of hip prostheses) were performed in an operating room having a laminar air flow system with horizontal air flow. 9% (n = 14) of the operations (laparotomies) were performed in a room of identical design without an air circulation system. Three different forms of anesthesia were investigated with regard to their influence on interior body temperature: 1) general anesthesia with a volatile anesthetic (INH); 2) peridural anesthesia with additional general anesthesia (KPDA+ITN); and 3) neuroleptic anesthesia (NLA). A drop in temperature during the operation was found in all patients. In the conventional operating room the mean drop was 0.3 degrees C/h. In the operating room with laminar air flow the INH-patients sustained the greatest decrease in temperature; the mean value in the first hour was 1.1 degrees C/h, and up to 4.6 degrees C/3 h toward the end of the operation. There was a comparable drop in temperature in the first hour in patients anesthetized with KPDA+ITN, but the rate slowed down toward the end of the investigation (2.2 degrees C/3 h). NLA caused a characteristic temperature behavior, with an initial fall in temperature, plateau phase, and subsequent rise (total: -1.0 degrees C/3 h) Temperature regulation was influenced least by NLA in the operating room with laminar air flow; thus, in this context, NLA proved to be a favourable form of anesthesia.

  17. Room temperature operation of GaSb-based resonant tunneling diodes by prewell injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfenning, Andreas; Knebl, Georg; Hartmann, Fabian; Weih, Robert; Bader, Andreas; Emmerling, Monika; Kamp, Martin; Höfling, Sven; Worschech, Lukas

    2017-01-01

    We present room temperature resonant tunneling of GaSb/AlAsSb double barrier resonant tunneling diodes with pseudomorphically grown prewell emitter structures comprising the ternary compound semiconductors GaInSb and GaAsSb. At room temperature, resonant tunneling is absent for diode structures without prewell emitters. The incorporation of Ga0.84In0.16Sb and GaAs0.05Sb0.95 prewell emitters leads to room temperature resonant tunneling with peak-to-valley current ratios of 1.45 and 1.36 , respectively. The room temperature operation is attributed to the enhanced Γ-L-valley energy separation and consequently depopulation of L-valley states in the conduction band of the ternary compound emitter prewell with respect to bulk GaSb.

  18. Interruptions and distractions in the trauma operating room: understanding the threat of human error.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Bruno Monteiro Tavares; Pereira, Alexandre Monteiro Tavares; Correia, Clarissa Dos Santos; Marttos, Antonio Carlos; Fiorelli, Rossano Kepler Alvim; Fraga, Gustavo Pereira

    2011-01-01

    To understand the human factor as a threat to the security of trauma patients in the operating room, bringing to the operating room some important rules already applied in the field of aviation. The sample included 50 cases of surgical trauma patients prospectively collected by observers in shifts of 12 hours, for six months in a Level I trauma center in the United States of America. Information regarding the type of trauma, severity score and mortality were collected, as well as determinants of distractions / interruptions and the volume of noise in the operating room during surgery. There was an average of 60 interruptions or distractions during surgery, most often triggered by the movement of people in the room. In more severe patients (ISS> 45), subjected to damage control, the incidence of distractions was even greater. The average noise in the trauma surgery room was very high, close to the noise of a hair dryer. Interruptions and distractions are frequent and should be studied by the trauma surgeon to develop prevention strategies and lines of defense to minimize them and reduce their effects.

  19. Development of an operating room pharmacy substation on a restricted budget.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, E C; Gaither, M W

    1986-07-01

    Pharmaceutical services implemented in an operating room (OR) pharmacy substation without addition of staff in a 764-bed teaching hospital with 22 operating rooms are described. In 1984 an interdepartmental task force recommended that pharmacy take control of responsibility for controlled drugs used in anesthesia. The anesthesia department contributed space for a pharmacy substation and some of the necessary equipment. Two technicians staff the substation (1.5 full-time equivalent positions); pharmacy contributed 0.5 FTE and the additional FTE was obtained through staffing adjustments in other departments. Anesthesiologists and nurse anesthetists obtain controlled drugs directly from the technicians, and records of drug disposition are compared with inventory twice daily. The substation also handles exchange carts for noncontrolled drugs for anesthesia and for other drugs used in the operating rooms. Total cost (additional cost to pharmacy and other departments) for operating the substation for its first year was +2161, and there were no unresolved discrepancies in controlled drug accounting. Undocumented use of noncontrolled drugs has been reduced by 67%, and cooperation and communication between the pharmacy and anesthesia departments has improved. Substation personnel do not prepare intravenous admixtures or provide clinical services. An operating room substation staffed by technicians 10.5 hours daily Monday through Friday provided cost-effective pharmacy control of drugs used in the OR.

  20. A novel interactive educational system in the operating room--the IE system.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Takayuki; Numao, Noboru; Yoshida, Soichiro; Ishioka, Junichiro; Matsuoka, Yoh; Saito, Kazutaka; Fujii, Yasuhisa; Kihara, Kazunori

    2016-02-02

    The shortage of surgeon is one of the serious problems in Japan. To solve the problem, various efforts have been undertaken to improve surgical education and training. However, appropriate teaching methods in the operating room have not been well established. The aim of this study is to assess the utility of a novel interactive educational (IE) system for surgical education on urologic surgeries in the operating room. A total of 20 Japanese medical students were educated on urologic surgery using the IE system in the operating room. The IE system consists of two parts. The first is three-dimensional (3D) magnified vision of the operative field using a 3D head-mounted display and a 3D endoscope. The second is interactive educative communication between medical students and surgeons using a small-sized wireless communication device. The satisfaction level with the IE system and the physical burden on medical students was examined via questionnaire. All students utilized the IE system in urologic surgery and responded to the survey. Most students were satisfied with the IE system. They also felt more welcomed by the surgeon when using the IE system than when not using it. No major unpleasant symptoms were observed but five students (25 %) experienced mild eye fatigue as a result of viewing the medical images. The IE system has the potential to motivate students to become interested in surgery and could be an efficient method of surgical education in the operating room.

  1. Factors related to teamwork performance and stress of operating room nurses.

    PubMed

    Sonoda, Yukio; Onozuka, Daisuke; Hagihara, Akihito

    2017-07-25

    To evaluate operating room nurses' perception of teamwork performance and their level of mental stress and to identify related factors. Little is known about the factors affecting teamwork and the mental stress of surgical nurses, although the performance of the surgical team is essential for patient safety. The questionnaire survey for operation room nurses consisted of simple questions about teamwork performance and mental stress. Multivariate analyses were used to identify factors causing a sense of teamwork performance or mental stress. A large number of surgical nurses had a sense of teamwork performance, but 30-40% of operation room nurses were mentally stressed during surgery. Neither the patient nor the operation factors were related to the sense of teamwork performance in both types of nurses. Among scrub nurses, endoscopic and abdominal surgery, body mass index, blood loss and the American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status class were related to their mental stress. Conversely, circulating nurses were stressed about teamwork performance. The factors related to teamwork performance and mental stress during surgery differed between scrub and circulating nurses. Increased support for operation room nurses is necessary. The increased support leads to safer surgical procedures and better patient outcomes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Shielding considerations for an operating room based intraoperative electron radiotherapy unit.

    PubMed

    Mills, M D; Almond, P R; Boyer, A L; Ochran, T G; Madigan, W; Rich, T A; Dally, E B

    1990-05-01

    The leakage radiation characteristics of a dedicated intraoperative radiotherapy linear accelerator have been measured on a machine designed to minimize the shielding required to allow it to be placed in an operating room suite. The scattering foil design was optimized to produce a flat beam for the field sizes employed while generating minimal bremsstrahlung contamination over the available energy range. More lead shielding was used in the treatment head than is used in conventional accelerators. A small amount of borated polyethylene shielding was also employed since neutron production was present at measurable levels. The room shielding installed in the operating room was demonstrated to be adequate to treat at least 20 patients each month to an average dose of 20 Gy. The worst case exposure was found to be 73% maximum permissible exposure. Administrative control was required for adjoining areas when calibrations and maintenance were performed.

  3. Device- and system-independent personal touchless user interface for operating rooms : One personal UI to control all displays in an operating room.

    PubMed

    Ma, Meng; Fallavollita, Pascal; Habert, Séverine; Weidert, Simon; Navab, Nassir

    2016-06-01

    In the modern day operating room, the surgeon performs surgeries with the support of different medical systems that showcase patient information, physiological data, and medical images. It is generally accepted that numerous interactions must be performed by the surgical team to control the corresponding medical system to retrieve the desired information. Joysticks and physical keys are still present in the operating room due to the disadvantages of mouses, and surgeons often communicate instructions to the surgical team when requiring information from a specific medical system. In this paper, a novel user interface is developed that allows the surgeon to personally perform touchless interaction with the various medical systems, switch effortlessly among them, all of this without modifying the systems' software and hardware. To achieve this, a wearable RGB-D sensor is mounted on the surgeon's head for inside-out tracking of his/her finger with any of the medical systems' displays. Android devices with a special application are connected to the computers on which the medical systems are running, simulating a normal USB mouse and keyboard. When the surgeon performs interaction using pointing gestures, the desired cursor position in the targeted medical system display, and gestures, are transformed into general events and then sent to the corresponding Android device. Finally, the application running on the Android devices generates the corresponding mouse or keyboard events according to the targeted medical system. To simulate an operating room setting, our unique user interface was tested by seven medical participants who performed several interactions with the visualization of CT, MRI, and fluoroscopy images at varying distances from them. Results from the system usability scale and NASA-TLX workload index indicated a strong acceptance of our proposed user interface.

  4. Mathematical modeling to define optimum operating room staffing for pediatric patients in trauma centers.

    PubMed

    Tuggle, David; Lucas, Charles E; Coscia, Robert L; Hurst, James M; Meredith, John W; Middleton, John D; Rinker, Charles R; Vlahos, Angie L; Wilberger, Jack

    2010-12-01

    Adult trauma centers (TCs) in the United States may be verified with an on-call operating room team if the performance improvement program shows no adverse outcome. Using queuing and simulation methodology, this study attempts to add a volume guideline for injured children. Data from 63 verified TCs identified demographic factors including specific information regarding the first pediatric trauma-related operation done between 11 pm and 7 am each month for 1 year. The annual pediatric admits correlated with the number of operations (383) done from 11 pm to 7 am (P < .001). The probability of operation within 30 minutes of arrival varies with the number of admits and the percent of penetrating vs blunt injuries. This likely number of operations from 11 pm to 7 am beginning within 30 minutes of patient arrival would be 3.45, 4.21, and 4.95 for TCs admitting 150, 250, and 350 injured children per year, respectively. The probability that 2 rooms would be occupied simultaneously is 0.074 and 0.109 for centers with 160 and 260 pediatric trauma admissions, respectively. Trauma centers performing less than 6 pediatric trauma operations per year from 11 pm to 7 am could conserve resources by using an on-call operating room team. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Operating room teamwork among physicians and nurses: teamwork in the eye of the beholder.

    PubMed

    Makary, Martin A; Sexton, J Bryan; Freischlag, Julie A; Holzmueller, Christine G; Millman, E Anne; Rowen, Lisa; Pronovost, Peter J

    2006-05-01

    Teamwork is an important component of patient safety. In fact, communication errors are the most common cause of sentinel events and wrong-site operations in the US. Although efforts to improve patient safety through improving teamwork are growing, there is no validated tool to scientifically measure teamwork in the surgical setting. Operating room personnel in 60 hospitals were surveyed using the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire. Surgeons, anesthesiologists, certified registered nurse anesthetists, and operating room nurses rated their own peers and each other using a 5-point Likert scale (1 = very low, 5 = very high). Overall response rate was 77.1% (2,135 of 2,769). Ratings of teamwork differed substantially by operating room caregiver type, with the greatest differences in ratings shown by physicians: surgeons (F[4, 2058] = 41.73, p < 0.001), and anesthesiologists (F[4, 1990] = 53.15, p < 0.001). The percent of operating room caregivers rating the quality of collaboration and communication as "high" or "very high" was different by caregiver role and whether they were rating a peer or another type of caregiver: surgeons rated other surgeons "high" or "very high" 85% of the time, and nurses rated their collaboration with surgeons "high" or "very high" only 48% of the time. Considerable discrepancies in perceptions of teamwork exist in the operating room, with physicians rating the teamwork of others as good, but at the same time, nurses perceive teamwork as mediocre. Given the importance of communication and collaboration in patient safety, health care organizations should measure teamwork using a scientifically valid method. The Safety Attitudes Questionnaire can be used to measure teamwork, identify disconnects between or within disciplines, and evaluate interventions aimed at improving patient safety.

  6. Operating Room Clinicians' Attitudes and Perceptions of a Pediatric Surgical Safety Checklist at 1 Institution.

    PubMed

    Norton, Elizabeth K; Singer, Sara J; Sparks, William; Ozonoff, Al; Baxter, Jessica; Rangel, Shawn

    2016-03-01

    Despite mounting evidence that use of surgical checklists improves patient morbidity and mortality, compliance among surgical teams in executing required elements of checklists has been low. Recognizing that clinicians' receptivity is a major determinant of checklist use, we conducted a survey to investigate how mandated use of a surgical checklist impacts its operating room clinicians' attitudes about and perceptions of operating room safety, efficiency, teamwork, and prevention of medical errors. Operating room clinicians at 1 pediatric hospital were surveyed on their attitudes and perception of the novel Pediatric Surgical Safety Checklist and the impact the checklist had on efficiency, teamwork, and prevention of medical errors 1 year after its implementation. The survey responses were compared and classified by multidisciplinary perioperative clinical staff. Most responses reflected positive attitudes toward checklist use. The respondents felt that the checklist reduced complications and errors and improved patient safety, communication among team members, teamwork in complex procedures, and efficiency in the operating room. Many operating room staff also reported that checklist use had prevented or averted an error or a complication. Perceptions varied according to perioperative clinical discipline, reflecting differences in perspectives. For example, the nurses perceived a higher rate of consent-related errors and site marking errors than did the physicians; the surgeons reported more antibiotic timing and equipment errors than did others. The surgical staff at 1 pediatric hospital who responded viewed the novel Pediatric Surgical Safety Checklist as potentially beneficial to operative patient safety by improving teamwork and communication, reducing errors, and improving efficiency. Responses varied by discipline, indicating that team members view the checklist from different perspectives.

  7. Making meaning from sensory cues: a qualitative investigation of postgraduate learning in the operating room.

    PubMed

    Cope, Alexandra C; Mavroveli, Stella; Bezemer, Jeff; Hanna, George B; Kneebone, Roger

    2015-08-01

    The authors aimed to map and explicate what surgeons perceive they learn in the operating room. The researchers used a grounded theory method in which data were iteratively collected through semistructured one-to-one interviews in 2010 and 2011 at four participating hospital sites. A four-person data analysis team from differing academic backgrounds qualitatively analyzed the content of the transcripts employing an immersion/crystallization approach. Participants were 22 UK surgeons, some of whom were in training at the time of the study and some of whom were attending surgeons. Major themes of learning in the operating room were perceived to be factual knowledge, motor skills, sensory semiosis, adaptive strategies, team working and management, and attitudes and behaviors. The analysis team classified 277 data points (short paragraphs or groups of sentences conveying meaning) under these major themes and subthemes. A key component of learning in the operating room that emerged from these data was sensory semiosis, defined as learning to make sense of visual and haptic cues. Although the authors found that learning in the operating room occurred across a wide range of domains, sensory semiosis was found to be an important theme that has not previously been fully acknowledged or discussed in the surgical literature. The discussion draws on the wider literature from the social sciences and cognitive psychology literature to examine how professionals learn to make meaning from "signs" making parallels with other medical specialties.

  8. 21 CFR 878.5070 - Air-handling apparatus for a surgical operating room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Air-handling apparatus for a surgical operating room. 878.5070 Section 878.5070 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices §...

  9. 21 CFR 878.5070 - Air-handling apparatus for a surgical operating room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Air-handling apparatus for a surgical operating room. 878.5070 Section 878.5070 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices §...

  10. 21 CFR 878.5070 - Air-handling apparatus for a surgical operating room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Air-handling apparatus for a surgical operating room. 878.5070 Section 878.5070 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices §...

  11. Laparoscopic assistance by operating room nurses: Results of a virtual-reality study.

    PubMed

    Paschold, M; Huber, T; Maedge, S; Zeissig, S R; Lang, H; Kneist, W

    2017-04-01

    Laparoscopic assistance is often entrusted to a less experienced resident, medical student, or operating room nurse. Data regarding laparoscopic training for operating room nurses are not available. The aim of the study was to analyse the initial performance level and learning curves of operating room nurses in basic laparoscopic surgery compared with medical students and surgical residents to determine their ability to assist with this type of procedure. The study was designed to compare the initial virtual reality performance level and learning curves of user groups to analyse competence in laparoscopic assistance. The study subjects were operating room nurses, medical students, and first year residents. Participants performed three validated tasks (camera navigation, peg transfer, fine dissection) on a virtual reality laparoscopic simulator three times in 3 consecutive days. Laparoscopic experts were enrolled as a control group. Participants filled out questionnaires before and after the course. Nurses and students were comparable in their initial performance (p>0.05). Residents performed better in camera navigation than students and nurses and reached the expert level for this task. Residents, students, and nurses had comparable bimanual skills throughout the study; while, experts performed significantly better in bimanual manoeuvres at all times (p<0.05). The included user groups had comparable skills for bimanual tasks. Residents with limited experience reached the expert level in camera navigation. With training, nurses, students, and first year residents are equally capable of assisting in basic laparoscopic procedures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Activity-based costing in the operating room at Valley View Hospital.

    PubMed

    Baker, J J; Boyd, G F

    1997-01-01

    This article presents an example of how one hospital reports the results of activity-based costing (ABC). It examines the composition and supporting assumptions of an ABC report for a particular procedure in the operating room (OR). It describes management uses of the information generated. It comments upon how the continuous quality improvement (CQI) is synchronized with the ABC reporting.

  13. A Portable Fluorescence Camera for Testing Surgical Specimens in the Operating Room: Description and Early Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Kakareka, John W.; McCann, Thomas E.; Kosaka, Nobuyuki; Mitsunaga, Makoto; Morgan, Nicole Y.; Pohida, Thomas J.; Choyke, Peter L.; Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Clinical translation of novel optical probes requires testing of human specimens ex vivo to ensure efficacy. However, it may be difficult to remove human tissue from the operating room due to regulatory/privacy issues. Therefore, we designed a portable fluorescence camera to test targeted optical imaging probes on human specimens in the operating room. Procedures A compact benchtop fluorescence camera was designed and built in-house. A mouse xenograft model of ovarian cancer with an activatable imaging probe based on rhodamine green was used to test the device. Comparison was made to commercially available imaging systems. Results The prototype camera produced images comparable to images acquired with commercially available, non-portable imaging systems. Conclusion We demonstrate the feasibility of a specimen-based portable fluorescence camera for use in the operating room. Its small size ensures that tissue excised from patients can be tested promptly for fluorescence within the operating room environment, thus expediting the testing of novel imaging probes. PMID:20960235

  14. Interactions between anesthesiologists and the environment while providing anesthesia care in the operating room.

    PubMed

    Munoz-Price, L Silvia; Lubarsky, David A; Arheart, Kristopher L; Prado, Guillermo; Cleary, Timothy; Fajardo-Aquino, Yovanit; Depascale, Dennise; Eber, Scott; Carling, Philip; Birnbach, David J

    2013-10-01

    We describe 1,132 contacts between anesthesiologists and the operating room. Objects most commonly touched included anesthesia machines and keyboards. Only 13 hand hygiene events were witnessed during 8 hours of observations. Line insertions, bronchoscopies, or blood exposures were not followed by hand hygiene. Stopcocks were accessed 66 times and only disinfected on 10 (15%) of these occasions.

  15. 62. (Credit CBF) Operating floor of filter room, c1912. The ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    62. (Credit CBF) Operating floor of filter room, c1912. The remodeled New York horizontal pressure filters (now gravity filters) are in the foreground; the remodelled Hyatt tub filters are in the background. - McNeil Street Pumping Station, McNeil Street & Cross Bayou, Shreveport, Caddo Parish, LA

  16. Natural rubber latex hypersensitivity with skin prick test in operating room personnel.

    PubMed

    Nabavizadeh, Seyed Hessamedin; Anushiravani, Amir; Amin, Reza

    2009-12-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions to natural rubber latex have increased recently, especially among people with high exposure to latex allergens. Hypersensitivity reactions to latex are related to many conditions like occupational asthma. Our study was performed to determine the prevalence of hypersensitivity to natural rubber latex and potential food cross reactions in operation room personnel in Shiraz hospitals. In this cross-sectional, descriptive study, 580 operation room personnel filled out our questionnaire which included data about their personal history, symptoms of latex hypersensitivity, and other related allergies such as food hypersensitivity. An informed consent was obtained and skin prick tests were performed for natural rubber latex and potential food cross reactions (kiwi, banana, and potato). The obtained data were analyzed by SPSS and Chi-square test. 104 (17.9%) of the operating room personnel showed positive latex skin tests. We revealed a significant correlation between those with positive skin tests to latex with atopia, urthicaria, and food hypersensitivity. The prevalence did not vary by sex, age, education, surgical and non-surgical gloves users, or history of contact dermatitis. Latex hypersensitivity is common among operation room personnel. Evaluation of symptoms and prediction of future diseases necessitate screening tests in individuals at risk.

  17. Emotional intelligence in the operating room: analysis from the Boston Marathon bombing.

    PubMed

    Chang, Beverly P; Vacanti, Joshua C; Michaud, Yvonne; Flanagan, Hugh; Urman, Richard D

    2014-01-01

    The Boston Marathon terrorist bombing that occurred on April 15, 2013 illustrates the importance of a cohesive, efficient management for the operating room and perioperative services. Conceptually, emotional intelligence (EI) is a form of social intelligence used by individuals in leadership positions to monitor the feelings and emotions of their team while implementing a strategic plan. To describe the experience of caring for victims of the bombing at a large tertiary care center and provide examples demonstrating the importance of EI and its role in the management of patient flow and overall care. A retrospective review of trauma data was performed. Data regarding patient flow, treatment types, treatment times, and outcomes were gathered from the hospital's electronic tracking system and subsequently analyzed. Analyses were performed to aggregate the data, identify trends, and describe the medical care. Immediately following the bombing, a total of 35 patients were brought to the emergency department (ED) with injuries requiring immediate medical attention. 10 of these patients went directly to the operating room on arrival to the hospital. The first victim was in an operating room within 21 minutes after arrival to the ED. The application of EI in managerial decisions helped to ensure smooth transitions for victims throughout all stages of their perioperative care. EI provided the fundamental groundwork that allowed the operating room manager and nurse leaders to establish the calm and coordinated leadership that facilitated patient care and teamwork.

  18. Integrating medical devices in the operating room using service-oriented architectures.

    PubMed

    Ibach, Bastian; Benzko, Julia; Schlichting, Stefan; Zimolong, Andreas; Radermacher, Klaus

    2012-08-01

    Abstract With the increasing documentation requirements and communication capabilities of medical devices in the operating room, the integration and modular networking of these devices have become more and more important. Commercial integrated operating room systems are mainly proprietary developments using usually proprietary communication standards and interfaces, which reduce the possibility of integrating devices from different vendors. To overcome these limitations, there is a need for an open standardized architecture that is based on standard protocols and interfaces enabling the integration of devices from different vendors based on heterogeneous software and hardware components. Starting with an analysis of the requirements for device integration in the operating room and the techniques used for integrating devices in other industrial domains, a new concept for an integration architecture for the operating room based on the paradigm of a service-oriented architecture is developed. Standardized communication protocols and interface descriptions are used. As risk management is an important factor in the field of medical engineering, a risk analysis of the developed concept has been carried out and the first prototypes have been implemented.

  19. Sensitivity of Ion Absorption of Room Temperature Operating Single Electron Transistors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    Kumar Karre, Paul L. Bergstrom, Govind Mallick, and Shashi P. Karna, “Room Temperature Operational Single Electron Transistor Fabricated by Focused...Ion Beam Deposition,” J. Appl. Phys. 102, 024316 (2007). P. Santosh Kumar Karre, Manoranjan Acharya, William R . Knudsen, and Paul L. Bergstrom

  20. Modulation of Coulomb Blockade Behavior of Room Temperature Operational Single Electron Transistors by Tunnel Junction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-01

    Aditya Kapoor2, Govind Mallick3, Shashi P. Karna3, Senior Member IEEE and Paul L. Bergstrom1*, Member, IEEE 978-1-4244-2104-6/08/$25.00 ©2008 IEEE...1999). [6] P. Santosh Kumar Karre, Paul L. Bergstrom, Govind Mallick, and Shashi P. Karna, “Room Temperature Operational Single Electron

  1. Exposure of hospital operating room personnel to potentially harmful environmental agents

    SciTech Connect

    Sass-Kortsak, A.M.; Purdham, J.T.; Bozek, P.R.; Murphy, J.H. )

    1992-03-01

    Epidemiologic studies of risk to reproductive health arising from the operating room environment have been inconclusive and lack quantitative exposure information. This study was undertaken to quantify exposure of operating room (OR) personnel to anesthetic agents, x-radiation, methyl methacrylate, and ethylene oxide and to determine how exposure varies with different operating room factors. Exposures of anesthetists and nurses to these agents were determined in selected operating rooms over three consecutive days. Each subject was asked to wear an x-radiation dosimeter for 1 month. Exposure to anesthetic agents was found to be influenced by the age of the OR facility, type of surgical service, number of procedures carried out during the day, type of anesthetic circuitry, and method of anesthesia delivery. Anesthetists were found to have significantly greater exposures than OR nurses. Exposure of OR personnel to ethylene oxide, methyl methacrylate, and x-radiation were well within existing standards. Exposure of anesthetists and nurses to anesthetic agents, at times, was in excess of Ontario exposure guidelines, despite improvements in the control of anesthetic pollution.

  2. American ASTP crewmen briefed on operation of consoles in main control room

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1975-04-25

    S75-25619 (25 April 1975) --- A group of American ASTP crewmen is briefed on the operation of the consoles in the main control room at the ASTP flight control center at the Cosmonaut Training Center (Star City) near Moscow. The astronauts were in the Soviet Union for ASTP joint crew training with the Soviet ASTP crewmen. PHOTO COURTESY: USSR ACADEMY OF SCIENCES

  3. Implications of Surgical Training on Operating Room Throughput at Wilford Hall Medical Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-26

    the same (Cromwell, Adamache, & Drozd, 2006; Laszewski , 2003). In this cost-conscious, competitive environment, the operating room (OR) is...is_3_26/ai_nl3478910. Laszewski , R. (1993). Conditions for consensus. Health Management Quarterly 15, 2-7. Manchikanti, L. (2008). Health care reform in

  4. Room-temperature operation of a Co:MgF2 laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welford, D.; Moulton, P. F.

    1988-01-01

    A normal-mode, pulsed Co:MgF2 laser has been operated at room temperature for the first time. Continuous tuning from 1750 to 2500 nm with pulse energies up to 70 mJ and 46-percent slope efficiency was obtained with a 1338-nm Nd:YAG pump laser.

  5. 61. (Credit CBF) Operating floor of filter room, c1912. A ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    61. (Credit CBF) Operating floor of filter room, c1912. A remodeled Hyatt pressure filter, now operating as a tub, gravity, rapid sand filter, is in the foreground (the remodeling took place c1908-1909). The remodeled New York horizontal pressure filters (installed 01900, remodeled c1908-1909) are in the background. - McNeil Street Pumping Station, McNeil Street & Cross Bayou, Shreveport, Caddo Parish, LA

  6. Methodology for analyzing environmental quality indicators in a dynamic operating room environment.

    PubMed

    Gormley, Thomas; Markel, Troy A; Jones, Howard W; Wagner, Jennifer; Greeley, Damon; Clarke, James H; Abkowitz, Mark; Ostojic, John

    2017-04-01

    Sufficient quantities of quality air and controlled, unidirectional flow are important elements in providing a safe building environment for operating rooms. To make dynamic assessments of an operating room environment, a validated method of testing the multiple factors influencing the air quality in health care settings needed to be constructed. These include the following: temperature, humidity, particle load, number of microbial contaminants, pressurization, air velocity, and air distribution. The team developed the name environmental quality indicators (EQIs) to describe the overall air quality based on the actual measurements of these properties taken during the mock surgical procedures. These indicators were measured at 3 different hospitals during mock surgical procedures to simulate actual operating room conditions. EQIs included microbial assessments at the operating table and the back instrument table and real-time analysis of particle counts at 9 different defined locations in the operating suites. Air velocities were measured at the face of the supply diffusers, at the sterile field, at the back table, and at a return grille. The testing protocol provided consistent and comparable measurements of air quality indicators between institutions. At 20 air changes per hour (ACH), and an average temperature of 66.3°F, the median of the microbial contaminants for the 3 operating room sites ranged from 3-22 colony forming units (CFU)/m(3) at the sterile field and 5-27 CFU/m(3) at the back table. At 20 ACH, the median levels of the 0.5-µm particles at the 3 sites were 85,079, 85,325, and 912,232 in particles per cubic meter, with a predictable increase in particle load in the non-high-efficiency particulate air-filtered operating room site. Using a comparison with cleanroom standards, the microbial and particle counts in all 3 operating rooms were equivalent to International Organization for Standardization classifications 7 and 8 during the mock surgical

  7. History and Highlights of Cardiothoracic Surgery at Baylor College of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Coselli, Joseph S

    2016-01-01

    The history of cardiothoracic surgery at Baylor College of Medicine begins in 1948, when Michael E. DeBakey was recruited as chair of the Department of Surgery. With the addition of Denton A. Cooley, E. Stanley Crawford, and other surgical legends, Baylor College of Medicine quickly rose to the forefront of cardiothoracic surgery. Highlights in its history include treatment of aortic aneurysm and dissection, development of synthetic aortic substitutes, early experience with cardiac replacement valves, the first successful use of coronary artery bypass grafts to revascularize the heart, and the cardiac transplantation and total artificial heart program, which led to the creation of the left ventricular assist device. Baylor's Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery continues to build on its history and legacy to remain a vital contributor to the specialty in the 21st century. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Abstracts from the First Annual Baylor Scott and White Surgery Research Day

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The First Annual Baylor Scott and White Surgery Research Day was held on May 2, 2014, in Temple, Texas. The program built on the tradition of eight previous research days for the Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine and Scott & White Memorial Hospital and this year included the Department of Surgery at Baylor University Medical Center at Dallas. The forum is open to all Baylor Scott and White surgery fellows, residents, and medical students and includes a variety of basic science, clinical, and educational research projects with a focus on trainees’ research. The 2014 forum was organized by Dr. J. Scott Thomas and Dr. Raman C. Mahabir, under the guidance of Dr. Harry T. Papaconstantinou. This article highlights the top 16 abstracts selected from the submissions for presentation from the podium. PMID:25484497

  9. Factors Affecting Acoustics and Speech Intelligibility in the Operating Room: Size Matters

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Christopher L.; Horn, Danielle Bodzin; Dudaryk, Roman

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Noise in health care settings has increased since 1960 and represents a significant source of dissatisfaction among staff and patients and risk to patient safety. Operating rooms (ORs) in which effective communication is crucial are particularly noisy. Speech intelligibility is impacted by noise, room architecture, and acoustics. For example, sound reverberation time (RT60) increases with room size, which can negatively impact intelligibility, while room objects are hypothesized to have the opposite effect. We explored these relationships by investigating room construction and acoustics of the surgical suites at our institution. METHODS: We studied our ORs during times of nonuse. Room dimensions were measured to calculate room volumes (VR). Room content was assessed by estimating size and assigning items into 5 volume categories to arrive at an adjusted room content volume (VC) metric. Psychoacoustic analyses were performed by playing sweep tones from a speaker and recording the impulse responses (ie, resulting sound fields) from 3 locations in each room. The recordings were used to calculate 6 psychoacoustic indices of intelligibility. Multiple linear regression was performed using VR and VC as predictor variables and each intelligibility index as an outcome variable. RESULTS: A total of 40 ORs were studied. The surgical suites were characterized by a large degree of construction and surface finish heterogeneity and varied in size from 71.2 to 196.4 m3 (average VR = 131.1 [34.2] m3). An insignificant correlation was observed between VR and VC (Pearson correlation = 0.223, P = .166). Multiple linear regression model fits and β coefficients for VR were highly significant for each of the intelligibility indices and were best for RT60 (R2 = 0.666, F(2, 37) = 39.9, P < .0001). For Dmax (maximum distance where there is <15% loss of consonant articulation), both VR and VC β coefficients were significant. For RT60 and Dmax, after controlling for VC

  10. Factors Affecting Acoustics and Speech Intelligibility in the Operating Room: Size Matters.

    PubMed

    McNeer, Richard R; Bennett, Christopher L; Horn, Danielle Bodzin; Dudaryk, Roman

    2017-06-01

    Noise in health care settings has increased since 1960 and represents a significant source of dissatisfaction among staff and patients and risk to patient safety. Operating rooms (ORs) in which effective communication is crucial are particularly noisy. Speech intelligibility is impacted by noise, room architecture, and acoustics. For example, sound reverberation time (RT60) increases with room size, which can negatively impact intelligibility, while room objects are hypothesized to have the opposite effect. We explored these relationships by investigating room construction and acoustics of the surgical suites at our institution. We studied our ORs during times of nonuse. Room dimensions were measured to calculate room volumes (VR). Room content was assessed by estimating size and assigning items into 5 volume categories to arrive at an adjusted room content volume (VC) metric. Psychoacoustic analyses were performed by playing sweep tones from a speaker and recording the impulse responses (ie, resulting sound fields) from 3 locations in each room. The recordings were used to calculate 6 psychoacoustic indices of intelligibility. Multiple linear regression was performed using VR and VC as predictor variables and each intelligibility index as an outcome variable. A total of 40 ORs were studied. The surgical suites were characterized by a large degree of construction and surface finish heterogeneity and varied in size from 71.2 to 196.4 m (average VR = 131.1 [34.2] m). An insignificant correlation was observed between VR and VC (Pearson correlation = 0.223, P = .166). Multiple linear regression model fits and β coefficients for VR were highly significant for each of the intelligibility indices and were best for RT60 (R = 0.666, F(2, 37) = 39.9, P < .0001). For Dmax (maximum distance where there is <15% loss of consonant articulation), both VR and VC β coefficients were significant. For RT60 and Dmax, after controlling for VC, partial correlations were 0.825 (P

  11. Room temperature operational single electron transistor fabricated by focused ion beam deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karre, P. Santosh Kumar; Bergstrom, Paul L.; Mallick, Govind; Karna, Shashi P.

    2007-07-01

    We present the fabrication and room temperature operation of single electron transistors using 8nm tungsten islands deposited by focused ion beam deposition technique. The tunnel junctions are fabricated using oxidation of tungsten in peracetic acid. Clear Coulomb oscillations, showing charging and discharging of the nanoislands, are seen at room temperature. The device consists of an array of tunnel junctions; the tunnel resistance of individual tunnel junction of the device is calculated to be as high as 25.13GΩ. The effective capacitance of the array of tunnel junctions was found to be 0.499aF, giving a charging energy of 160.6meV.

  12. Job satisfaction or production? How staff and leadership understand operating room efficiency: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Arakelian, E; Gunningberg, L; Larsson, J

    2008-11-01

    How to increase efficiency in operating departments has been widely studied. However, there is no overall definition of efficiency. Supervisors urging staff to work efficiently may meet strong reactions due to staff believing that demands for efficiency means just stress at work. Differences in how efficiency is understood may constitute an obstacle to supervisors' efforts to promote it. This study aimed to explore how staff and leadership understand operating room efficiency. Twenty-one members of staff and supervisors in an operating department in a Swedish county hospital were interviewed. The analysis was performed with a phenomenographic approach that aims to discover the variations in how a phenomenon is understood by a group of people. Six categories were found in the understanding of operation room efficiency: (A) having the right qualifications; (B) enjoying work; (C) planning and having good control and overview; (D) each professional performing the correct tasks; (E) completing a work assignment; and (F) producing as much as possible per time unit. The most significant finding was that most of the nurses and assistant nurses understood efficiency as individual knowledge and experience emphasizing the importance of the work process, whereas the supervisors and physicians understood efficiency in terms of production per time unit or completing an assignment. The concept 'operating room efficiency' is understood in different ways by leadership and staff members. Supervisors who are aware of this variation will have better prerequisites for defining the concept and for creating a common platform towards becoming efficient.

  13. A novel NO2 gas sensor based on Hall effect operating at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J. Y.; Xie, W. M.; He, X. L.; Wang, H. C.

    2016-09-01

    Tungsten trioxide nanoparticles were obtained by a simple thermal oxidation approach. The structural and morphological properties of these nanoparticles are investigated using XRD, SEM and TEM. A WO3 thick film was deposited on the four Au electrodes to be a WO3 Hall effect sensor. The sensor was tested between magnetic field in a plastic test chamber. Room-temperature nitrogen dioxide sensing characteristics of Hall effect sensor were studied for various concentration levels of nitrogen dioxide at dry air and humidity conditions. A typical room-temperature response of 3.27 was achieved at 40 ppm of NO2 with a response and recovery times of 36 and 45 s, respectively. NO2 gas sensing mechanism of Hall effect sensor was also studied. The room-temperature operation, with the low deposition cost of the sensor, suggests suitability for developing a low-power cost-effective nitrogen dioxide sensor.

  14. HYBRID ALARM SYSTEMS: COMBINING SPATIAL ALARMS AND ALARM LISTS FOR OPTIMIZED CONTROL ROOM OPERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald L. Boring; J.J. Persensky

    2012-07-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring research, development, and deployment on Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS), in which the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is working closely with nuclear utilities to develop technologies and solutions to help ensure the safe operational life extension of current nuclear power plants. One of the main areas of focus is control room modernization. Within control room modernization, alarm system upgrades present opportunities to meet the broader goals of the LWRS project in demonstrating the use and safety of the advanced instrumentation and control (I&C) technologies and the short-term and longer term objectives of the plant. In this paper, we review approaches for and human factors issues behind upgrading alarms in the main control room of nuclear power plants.

  15. Obesity increases operating room time for lobectomy in the society of thoracic surgeons database.

    PubMed

    St Julien, Jamii B; Aldrich, Melinda C; Sheng, Shubin; Deppen, Stephen A; Burfeind, William R; Putnam, Joe B; Lambright, Eric S; Nesbitt, Jonathan C; Grogan, Eric L

    2012-12-01

    Obesity has become a major epidemic in the United States. Although research suggests obesity does not increase major morbidity or mortality after thoracic operations, it likely results in greater use of health care resources. We examined all patients in The Society of Thoracic Surgeons General Thoracic Surgery database with primary lung cancer who underwent lobectomy from 2006 to 2010. We investigated the impact of body mass index (BMI) on total operating room time using a linear mixed-effects regression model and multiple imputations to account for missing data. Secondary outcomes included postoperative length of stay and 30-day mortality. Covariates included age, sex, race, forced expiratory volume, smoking status, Zubrod score, prior chemotherapy or radiation, steroid use, number of comorbidities, surgical approach, hospital lobectomy volume, hospital percent obesity, and the addition of mediastinoscopy or wedge resection. A total of 19,337 patients were included. The mean BMI was 27.3 kg/m2, with 4,898 patients (25.3%) having a BMI of 30 kg/m2 or greater. The mean total operating room time, length of stay, and 30-day mortality were 240 minutes, 6.7 days, and 1.8%, respectively. For every 10-unit increase in BMI, mean operating room time increased by 7.2 minutes (range, 4.8 to 8.4 minutes; p<0.0001). Higher hospital lobectomy volume and hospital percentage of obese patients did not affect the association between BMI and operative time. Body mass index was not associated with 30-day mortality or increased length of stay. Increased BMI is associated with increased total operating room time, regardless of institutional experience with obese patients. Copyright © 2012 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. History of the biomedical studies PhD program: a joint graduate program of the Baylor Health Care system and Baylor University

    PubMed Central

    Morel, Christine R.; Horton, Joshua M.; Peng, Han; Xu, Kangling; Batra, Sushil K.; Miles, Jonathan P.

    2008-01-01

    On a sweltering summer morning, throngs of people filed into Jones Theatre at Baylor University in Waco for the graduate student orientation. One could look around and notice the diversity of not only the student population, but also the disciplines being represented. Many students had stepped off planes only hours prior, but even those who had been traveling for days could not contain their excitement. As for me, I was nowhere near any of this. I was still 40 miles north of Waco in Waxahachie, having been pulled over for speeding. After 4 days of traveling with my life in my Volkswagon Jetta, all the way from San Francisco, on one of the most important days of my life, I was late. When I finally arrived at the Hooper Schafer Fine Arts Auditorium, out of breath from running all the way from the parking structure, all of the graduate students were quietly listening to the first introductory speech. I snuck into the back and sat down. My mind was racing, as I knew very little about Waco and Baylor University except for the growing accomplishments of the biomedical studies program. What little I did know about Baylor seemed so different from my very liberal upbringing in California. What would this experience be like for me? But, as I listened to the talks, met with other students, and finally met the entire biomedical studies entering class of 2007, I knew that I had made the right decision in coming to Baylor. This would be an experience unlike any other, and I was wholeheartedly open to embracing it. —Christine Morel, PhD candidate, Institute of Biomedical Studies PMID:18982085

  17. Improving environmental quality in an operating room: clinical outcomes and economic implications.

    PubMed

    Sartini, M; Spagnolo, A M; Panatto, D; Perdelli, F; Cristina, M L

    2013-06-01

    An experimental study was conducted in a hospital in Liguria (northern Italy) on two groups of patients with the same disease severity who were undergoing the same type of surgery (primary hemiarthroplasty). Our aim was to assessing the results of a quality-improvement scheme implemented in the operating room. The quality-improvement protocol involved analyzing a set of parameters concerning the operating team's behavior and environmental conditions that could be attributed to the operating team itself A program of training and sanitary education was carried to rectify any improper behavior of the operating staff Two hundred and six hip-joint replacement operations (primary hip hemiarthroplasty--ICD9-CM 81.51) all conducted in the same operating room were studied: 103 patients, i.e. operations performed before the quality-improvement scheme and 103 patients, i.e. operations performed after the quality improvement scheme; all were comparable in terms of type of surgery and severity. The scheme resulted in an improvement in both behavioral and environmental parameters and an 80% reduction in the level of microbial air contamination (p < 0.001). Patient outcomes improved in terms of average postoperative hospitalization time, the occurrence and duration of fever (> 37.5 degrees C) and microbiological contamination of surgical wounds. From an economic point of view, facility efficiency increased by 28.57%, average hospitalization time decreased (p < 0.001) and a theoretical increase of Euro 1,441,373.58 a year in revenues was achieved.

  18. [Simulation-based analysis of novel therapy principles. Effects on the efficiency of operating room processes].

    PubMed

    Baumgart, A; Denz, C; Bender, H; Bauer, M; Hunziker, S; Schüpfer, G; Schleppers, A

    2009-02-01

    The introduction of innovative drugs in anesthesiological treatment has the potential to improve perioperative efficiency. This article examines the impact of the new muscle relaxant encapsulator Bridion on emergence from anesthesia and on the efficiency of the perioperative organization. To analyze the effects of medical innovations, computer simulation was used as an experimental frame. The simulation was based on a realistic model of an operating room setting and used historical data to study the effect of innovation on the operational performance and the economic outcomes. The use of medical innovations in anesthesiological emergence yields new potentials for a hospital under certain conditions. Due to shorter block times and anesthesia-controlled times, additional benefits for the operating room could be realized. This results in an increase of up to 2.4% additional cases during similar working hours and planning periods. The introduction of innovative medicines may reveal more efficient and economical conditions in operating rooms. The overall result depends, for example, on the rate of application of the patient's portfolio or the organization and access rules of the surgical suite. Based on the anesthesia-controlled time no general a priori statement about the economic potentials can be confirmed. Future empirical studies should investigate the impact on quality and economic benefits for the entire patient pathway.

  19. [A proposal to improve operating room nursing personnel adherence to mandated X-ray protection measures].

    PubMed

    Huang, Jui-Chen; Wu, Tsan-Mei; Chen, Chi-Hsing; Chen, Shu-Hwa

    2010-04-01

    Cognition of and attitudes toward personal radiation protection amongst operating room nurses have been shown to be inappropriate and insufficient. Research has shown that adherence to full radiation protection measures in the operating room is at only 64 percent. Improvements targeting radiation protection measure compliance were thus developed in order to enhance employee welfare and working environment safety. Raise the rate at which radiation protection measures are properly executed in order to provide a safe, high quality working environment for nursing staff and to establish a safe working environment. The following were identified as able to influence positively the proper implementation of radiation protection measures: (1) hold programs and training courses on radiation protection; (2) ensure adequate rack space in the operating room for lead-lined vests, install warning signals to indicate when a radiation source is active, and mandate that all personnel wear radiation monitoring badges; (3) edit and update radiation protection manuals; and (4) set up standard operation procedures for maintenance and radiation facility cleaning. Correct execution of radiation protection measures rose from 64% to 100%; cognition of radiation hazards and protection increased from 68.4 to 100 (on a scale of 0 to 100); and correct radiation facility maintenance and cleaning rose from 43% to 100%. Enhancement of radiation protection cognition through in-service-training courses and the provision of appropriate protection facilities can raise radiation protection and self-protection abilities amongst medical staff. We strongly recommend that a course on radiation protection be included in the continuing nursing education curriculum for operating room staff. Enhancing radiation protection cognition further is necessary.

  20. Context dependent memory in two learning environments: the tutorial room and the operating theatre.

    PubMed

    Coveney, Andrew P; Switzer, Timothy; Corrigan, Mark A; Redmond, Henry P

    2013-09-01

    Psychologists have previously demonstrated that information recall is context dependent. However, how this influences the way we deliver medical education is unclear. This study aimed to determine if changing the recall context from the learning context affects the ability of medical students to recall information. Using a free recall experimental model, fourteen medical student participants were administered audio lists of 30 words in two separate learning environments, a tutorial room and an operating theatre. They were then asked to recall the words in both environments. While in the operating theatre participants wore appropriate surgical clothing and assembled around an operating table. While in the tutorial room, participants dressed casually and were seated around a table. Students experienced the same duration (15 minutes) and disruption in both environments. The mean recall score from the 28 tests performed in the same environment was 12.96 +/- 3.93 (mean, SD). The mean recall score from the 28 tests performed in an alternative environment to the learning episode was 13.5 +/- 5.31(mean, SD), indicating that changing the recall environment from the learning environment does not cause any statistical difference (p=0.58). The average recall score of participants who learned and recalled in the tutorial room was 13.0 +/- 3.84 (mean, SD). The average recall score of participants who learnt and recalled in the operating theatre was 12.92 +/- 4.18 (mean, SD), representing no significant difference between the two environments for learning (p=0.4792). The results support the continued use of tutorial rooms and operating theatres as appropriate environments in which to teach medical students, with no significant difference in information recall seen either due to a same context effect or specific context effect.

  1. Context dependent memory in two learning environments: the tutorial room and the operating theatre

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Psychologists have previously demonstrated that information recall is context dependent. However, how this influences the way we deliver medical education is unclear. This study aimed to determine if changing the recall context from the learning context affects the ability of medical students to recall information. Methods Using a free recall experimental model, fourteen medical student participants were administered audio lists of 30 words in two separate learning environments, a tutorial room and an operating theatre. They were then asked to recall the words in both environments. While in the operating theatre participants wore appropriate surgical clothing and assembled around an operating table. While in the tutorial room, participants dressed casually and were seated around a table. Students experienced the same duration (15 minutes) and disruption in both environments. Results The mean recall score from the 28 tests performed in the same environment was 12.96 +/− 3.93 (mean, SD). The mean recall score from the 28 tests performed in an alternative environment to the learning episode was 13.5 +/− 5.31(mean, SD), indicating that changing the recall environment from the learning environment does not cause any statistical difference (p=0.58). The average recall score of participants who learned and recalled in the tutorial room was 13.0 +/− 3.84 (mean, SD). The average recall score of participants who learnt and recalled in the operating theatre was 12.92 +/− 4.18 (mean, SD), representing no significant difference between the two environments for learning (p=0.4792). Conclusions The results support the continued use of tutorial rooms and operating theatres as appropriate environments in which to teach medical students, with no significant difference in information recall seen either due to a same context effect or specific context effect. PMID:24127650

  2. Undergraduate surgical nursing preparation and guided operating room experience: A quantitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Foran, Paula

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research was to determine if guided operating theatre experience in the undergraduate nursing curricula enhanced surgical knowledge and understanding of nursing care provided outside this specialist area in the pre- and post-operative surgical wards. Using quantitative analyses, undergraduate nurses were knowledge tested on areas of pre- and post-operative surgical nursing in their final semester of study. As much learning occurs in nurses' first year of practice, participants were re-tested again after their Graduate Nurse Program/Preceptorship year. Participants' results were compared to the model of operating room education they had participated in to determine if there was a relationship between the type of theatre education they experienced (if any) and their knowledge of surgical ward nursing. Findings revealed undergraduates nurses receiving guided operating theatre experience had a 76% pass rate compared to 56% with non-guided or no experience (p < 0.001). Graduates with guided operating theatre experience as undergraduates or graduate nurses achieved a 100% pass rate compared to 53% with non-guided or no experience (p < 0.001). The research informs us that undergraduate nurses achieve greater learning about surgical ward nursing via guided operating room experience as opposed to surgical ward nursing experience alone.

  3. Determinants, associations, and psychometric properties of resident assessments of anesthesiologist operating room supervision.

    PubMed

    Hindman, Bradley J; Dexter, Franklin; Kreiter, Clarence D; Wachtel, Ruth E

    2013-06-01

    A study by de Oliveira Filho et al. reported a validated set of 9 questions by which Brazilian anesthesia residents assessed faculty supervision in the operating room. The aim of this study was to use this question set to determine whether faculty operating room supervision scores were associated with residents' year of clinical anesthesia training and/or number of specific resident-faculty interactions. We also characterized associations between faculty operating room supervision scores and resident assessments of: (1) faculty supervision in settings other than operating rooms, (2) faculty clinical ability (family choice), and (3) faculty teaching effectiveness. Finally, we characterized the psychometric properties of the de Oliveira Filho etal. question set in an United States anesthesia residency program. All 39 residents in the Department of Anesthesia of the University of Iowa in their first (n = 14), second (n = 13), or third (n = 12) year of clinical anesthesia training evaluated the supervision provided by all anesthesia faculty who staffed in at least 1 of 3 clinical settings (operating room [n = 49], surgical intensive care unit [n = 10], pain clinic [n = 6]). For all resident-faculty pairs, departmental billing data were used to quantitate the number of resident-faculty interactions and the interval between the last interaction and the assessment. A generalizability study was performed to determine the minimum number of resident evaluations needed for high reliability and dependability. There were no significant associations between faculty mean operating room supervision scores and: (1) resident-faculty patient encounters (Kendall τb = 0.01; 95% confidence interval [CI], -0.02 to +0.04; P = 0.71), (2) resident-faculty days of interaction (τb = -0.01; 95% CI, -0.05 to +0.02; P = 0.46), and (3) days since last resident-faculty interaction (τb = 0.01; 95% CI, -0.02 to 0.05; P = 0.49). Supervision scores for the operating room and surgical intensive care

  4. Learning gestures for customizable human-computer interaction in the operating room.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Loren Arthur; Bigdelou, Ali; Navab, Nassir

    2011-01-01

    Interaction with computer-based medical devices in the operating room is often challenging for surgeons due to sterility requirements and the complexity of interventional procedures. Typical solutions, such as delegating the interaction task to an assistant, can be inefficient. We propose a method for gesture-based interaction in the operating room that surgeons can customize to personal requirements and interventional workflow. Given training examples for each desired gesture, our system learns low-dimensional manifold models that enable recognizing gestures and tracking particular poses for fine-grained control. By capturing the surgeon's movements with a few wireless body-worn inertial sensors, we avoid issues of camera-based systems, such as sensitivity to illumination and occlusions. Using a component-based framework implementation, our method can easily be connected to different medical devices. Our experiments show that the approach is able to robustly recognize learned gestures and to distinguish these from other movements.

  5. [Design of an anesthesia and micro-environment information management system in mobile operating room].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xianwen; Liu, Zhiguo; Zhang, Wenchang; Wu, Qingfu; Tan, Shulin

    2013-08-01

    We have designed a mobile operating room information management system. The system is composed of a client and a server. A client, consisting of a PC, medical equipments, PLC and sensors, provides the acquisition and processing of anesthesia and micro-environment data. A server is a powerful computer that stores the data of the system. The client gathers the medical device data by using the C/S mode, and analyzes the obtained HL7 messages through the class library call. The client collects the micro-environment information with PLC, and finishes the data reading with the OPC technology. Experiment results showed that the designed system could manage the patient anesthesia and micro-environment information well, and improve the efficiency of the doctors' works and the digital level of the mobile operating room.

  6. High-density magnetoresistive random access memory operating at ultralow voltage at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jia-Mian; Li, Zheng; Chen, Long-Qing; Nan, Ce-Wen

    2011-01-01

    The main bottlenecks limiting the practical applications of current magnetoresistive random access memory (MRAM) technology are its low storage density and high writing energy consumption. Although a number of proposals have been reported for voltage-controlled memory device in recent years, none of them simultaneously satisfy the important device attributes: high storage capacity, low power consumption and room temperature operation. Here we present, using phase-field simulations, a simple and new pathway towards high-performance MRAMs that display significant improvements over existing MRAM technologies or proposed concepts. The proposed nanoscale MRAM device simultaneously exhibits ultrahigh storage capacity of up to 88 Gb inch−2, ultralow power dissipation as low as 0.16 fJ per bit and room temperature high-speed operation below 10 ns. PMID:22109527

  7. Single-use surgical clothing system for reduction of airborne bacteria in the operating room.

    PubMed

    Tammelin, A; Ljungqvist, B; Reinmüller, B

    2013-07-01

    It is desirable to maintain a low bacterial count in the operating room air to prevent surgical site infection. This can be achieved by ventilation or by all staff in the operating room wearing clothes made from low-permeable material (i.e. clean air suits). We investigated whether there was a difference in protective efficacy between a single-use clothing system made of polypropylene and a reusable clothing system made of a mixed material (cotton/polyester) by testing both in a dispersal chamber and during surgical procedures. Counts of colony-forming units (cfu)/m(3) air were significantly lower when using the single-use clothing system in both settings. Copyright © 2013 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. High-density magnetoresistive random access memory operating at ultralow voltage at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jia-Mian; Li, Zheng; Chen, Long-Qing; Nan, Ce-Wen

    2011-11-22

    The main bottlenecks limiting the practical applications of current magnetoresistive random access memory (MRAM) technology are its low storage density and high writing energy consumption. Although a number of proposals have been reported for voltage-controlled memory device in recent years, none of them simultaneously satisfy the important device attributes: high storage capacity, low power consumption and room temperature operation. Here we present, using phase-field simulations, a simple and new pathway towards high-performance MRAMs that display significant improvements over existing MRAM technologies or proposed concepts. The proposed nanoscale MRAM device simultaneously exhibits ultrahigh storage capacity of up to 88 Gb inch(-2), ultralow power dissipation as low as 0.16 fJ per bit and room temperature high-speed operation below 10 ns.

  9. Traffic in the operating room: a review of factors influencing air flow and surgical wound contamination.

    PubMed

    Pokrywka, Marian; Byers, Karin

    2013-06-01

    Surgical wound contamination leading to surgical site infection can result from disruption of the intended airflow in the operating room (OR). When personnel enter and exit the OR, or create unnecessary movement and traffic during the procedure, the intended airflow in the vicinity of the open wound becomes disrupted and does not adequately remove airborne contaminants from the sterile field. An increase in the bacterial counts of airborne microorganisms is noted during increased activity levels within the OR. Researchers have studied OR traffic and door openings as a determinant of air contamination. During a surgical procedure the door to the operating room may be open as long as 20 minutes out of each surgical hour during critical procedures involving implants. Interventions into limiting excessive movement and traffic in the OR may lead to reductions in surgical site infections in select populations.

  10. Crew resource management: using aviation techniques to improve operating room safety.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Michael A; Brumsted, John R

    2012-04-01

    Since the publication of the Institute of Medicine report estimating nearly 100,000 deaths per year from medical errors, hospitals and physicians have a renewed focus upon error reduction. We implemented a surgical crew resource management (CRM) program for all operating room (OR) personnel. In our academic medical center, 19,000 procedures per year are performed in 27 operating rooms. Mandatory CRM training was implemented for all peri-operative personnel. Aviation techniques introduced included a pre-operative checklist and brief, post-operative debrief, read and initial files, and various other aviation-based techniques. Compliance with conduct of the brief/debrief was monitored as well as wrong-site surgeries and retained foreign body events. The malpractice insurance database for claims was also queried for the period prior to and after training. Initial training was accomplished for 517 people, including all anesthesiologists, surgeons, nurses, technicians, and OR assistants. Pre-operative briefing increased from 6.7 to 99% within 4 mo. Wrong site surgeries and retained foreign bodies decreased from a high of seven in 2007 to none in 2008, but, after 14 mo without additional training, these rose to five in 2009. Malpractice expenses (payouts and legal fees) totaled $793,000 (2003-2007), but have been zero since 2008. CRM training and implementation had an impact on reducing the incidence of wrong site surgery and retained foreign bodies in our operating rooms. However, constant reinforcement and refresher training is necessary for sustained results. Though no one technique can prevent all errors, CRM can effect culture change, producing a safer environment.

  11. [Surgery training of gynecologic residents: master and student in the operating room].

    PubMed

    Rathat, G; Hoa, D; Gagnayre, R; Hoffet, M; Mares, P

    2008-02-01

    Describe the surgical training of gynecologic residents in the operating room, by collecting the opinion of French gynecologists. A questionnaire investigating this subject was put on a web site. Every French gynecologist could answer the questionnaire from a duration of six months. The data of the inquiry were studied by comparing five groups: residents (group 1), fellows (group 2), seniors of public hospital (group 3), and seniors of private hospitals (group 4), or, groups 2, 3 and 4 together, as Group A. Six hundred and fifty-seven gynecologists answered the inquiry. For the residents, lack of time and senior's weak educational motivation are the explanations most frequently retained in order to explain that residents do not operate. For group A, it is rather the residents' skills which is the most important fact to have residents operate. Residents more often practice surgery in general public hospital that in faculty hospital. For 31% of all the referees, heads of departments do not incite their teams to have residents operate. Nearly 25% of all the investigated believe that a man operates more than a woman in resident curriculum. Besides, by analyzing the answers of groups 1 and 2, we were able to correlate resident seniority at their first practice of 13 surgical operations. For 26% of the group A, residents operate less than they do during their own studies. Finally, all the investigated confirm the lack of surgical assessment in the resident curriculum. Decision to let the resident operate remains too dependent on senior personal appreciation and does not seem to join a strategy of training. Opinions of surgical training in the operating room is different between residents and seniors. Operating time increases when residents operate but there is no effect on quality of care. These results show again the necessity of a formal teaching and assessment, in a resident program with objectives, collecting every resident's surgery volume. These educational

  12. Optically Tunable Long Wavelength Infrared Quantum Cascade Laser Operated at Room Temperature

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-09

    dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4774267] Rapidly tunable quantum cascade lasers ( QCLs ) is a key element for the recently proposed long-wavelength infrared (LWIR...is the signal data bandwidth.1,2 QCLs are the only semiconductor lasers that can operate continuous-wave (CW) at room temperature in LWIR. Cur- rently...frequency-tuning of the distributed feedback (DFB) QCLs is typically achieved by temperature control over effective refractive index using pump

  13. Implementing skin-to-skin contact in the operating room following cesarean birth.

    PubMed

    Grassley, Jane S; Jones, Judith

    2014-12-01

    Immediate skin-to-skin contact (SSC) after birth benefits the health of mothers and newborns by increasing breastfeeding rates, stabilizing the newborn's temperature, and encouraging bonding (Moore, Anderson, Bergman, & Dowswell, 2012). Although immediate SSC after a vaginal birth was common practice at our hospital, it was rare in the operating room (OR) following a cesarean birth. To address this practice problem, we conducted a project to evaluate the feasibility of implementing SSC in the OR. © 2014 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  14. A comprehensive operating room information system using the Kinect sensors and RFID.

    PubMed

    Nouei, Mahyar Taghizadeh; Kamyad, Ali Vahidian; Soroush, Ahmad Reza; Ghazalbash, Somayeh

    2015-04-01

    Occasionally, surgeons do need various types of information to be available rapidly, efficiently and safely during surgical procedures. Meanwhile, they need to free up hands throughout the surgery to necessarily access the mouse to control any application in the sterility mode. In addition, they are required to record audio as well as video files, and enter and save some data. This is an attempt to develop a comprehensive operating room information system called "Medinav" to tackle all mentioned issues. An integrated and comprehensive operating room information system is introduced to be compatible with Health Level 7 (HL7) and digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM). DICOM is a standard for handling, storing, printing, and transmitting information in medical imaging. Besides, a natural user interface (NUI) is designed specifically for operating rooms where touch-less interactions with finger and hand tracking are in use. Further, the system could both record procedural data automatically, and view acquired information from multiple perspectives graphically. A prototype system is tested in a live operating room environment at an Iranian teaching hospital. There are also contextual interviews and usability satisfaction questionnaires conducted with the "MediNav" system to investigate how useful the proposed system could be. The results reveal that integration of these systems into a complete solution is the key to not only stream up data and workflow but maximize surgical team usefulness as well. It is now possible to comprehensively collect and visualize medical information, and access a management tool with a touch-less NUI in a rather quick, practical, and harmless manner.

  15. Case Study: Review of Operating Room Utilization at Mayo Clinic Arizona (MCA)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-01

    offers. The premier programs of the hospital are cancer treatment and solid organ /bone marrow transplant . (Mayo Clinic, 2007) Problem Statement In...improve revenue streams (Overdyl, Harvey, Fishman , & Shippey, 1998). Organizations have seen reduced revenues from operating room care because of lower...TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) RESIDENCY SITE ADDRESS Mayo Clinic Arizona 5777 East Mayo

  16. Violence in the workplace: violence prevention strategies in the operating room.

    PubMed

    Fairbourne, C L

    2000-01-01

    Violence in the workplace has escalated, becoming a growing occupational hazard for health care workers today. Training and education strategies to de-escalate and prevent the rise in violent assaults in the health care setting are needed. A violence prevention program was developed at William Beaumont Army Medical Center to educate the operating room (OR) staff about prevention and intervention strategies to de-escalate or prevent violent assaults in their workplace.

  17. The effect of mentoring on clinical perioperative competence in operating room nursing students.

    PubMed

    Mirbagher Ajorpaz, Neda; Zagheri Tafreshi, Mansoureh; Mohtashami, Jamileh; Zayeri, Farid; Rahemi, Zahra

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of mentoring on the clinical perioperative competence of nursing operating room students in Iran. Mentoring is an essential part of clinical education, which has been studied in different populations of students. However, there is a need to assess its effectiveness in operating room students' competence. A randomised controlled trial was performed. Sixty nursing operating room students were randomly assigned to experimental and control groups. Both the control and experimental groups had routine training in the form of faculty supervision. The experimental group had an additional mentoring program. Using the Persian Perceived Perioperative Competence Scale-Revised, clinical competence was compared between the two groups, before and after the intervention. Using SPSS 19, descriptive and inferential statistics, including chi-square and t-tests, were conducted. In the experimental group, the difference between the mean scores of clinical competence before (19·43 ± 2·80) and after (27·86 ± 1·87) the intervention was significant (p ≤ 0·001). After intervention, the difference between the mean scores of the control (3·9 ± 0·15) and experimental (8·61 ± 0·68) groups was significant (p ≤ 0·003). Findings affirmed the positive effect of mentorship programmes on clinical competence in nursing operating room students. Mentoring is an effective method for preparing nursing students in practice. Health care systems may improve as a result of staff-student relationships that ultimately increase the quality care for patients. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. A Simulation Study of the Effects of Operating Room Noise on the Performance of Anesthesia Providers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-10-01

    has on humans. Physiologic as well as psychological effects have been examined. Anesthesia providers are exposed to operating room noise daily and...subjects to respond to different problems based on actual cases of anesthesia Noise levels 19 mishaps. The simulator successfully reproduces most aspects of...250. Moerman , N., Bonke, B. & Oosting, J. (1993). Awareness and recall during Noise levels 42 general anesthesia . Anesthesiology: 79, 454-464. Schwid

  19. Prediction of Preventive Behaviors of the Needlestick Injuries during Surgery among Operating Room Personnel: Application of the Health Belief Model.

    PubMed

    Fathi, Yadollah; Barati, Majid; Zandiyeh, Mitra; Bashirian, Saeed

    2017-10-01

    Operating room personnel are at high risk of needlestick injuries (NSIs) and exposure to blood and body fluids. To investigate the predictors of NSIs preventive behaviors during surgery among operating room personnel based on a health belief model (HBM). This cross-sectional study was conducted on 128 operating room personnel in Hamadan, western Iran. Participants were selected, by census sampling, from teaching hospitals, completed a self-reported questionnaire including demographic characteristics, knowledge and HBM constructs. The levels of knowledge and perceived self-efficacy for the NSIs preventive behaviors among operating room personnel were not satisfactory. However, the levels of perceived benefits, susceptibility and severity were reported to be relatively good. The results showed that the perceived susceptibility (β ‑0.627) and cues to action (β 0.695) were the most important predictors of the NSIs preventive behaviors. The framework of the HBM is useful to predict the NSIs preventive behaviors among operating room personnel.

  20. Baylor SBIRT Medical Residency Training Program: Model Description and Initial Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bray, James H.; Kowalchuk, Alicia; Waters, Vicki; Laufman, Larry; Shilling, Elizabeth H.

    2012-01-01

    The Baylor College of Medicine SBIRT Medical Residency Training Program is a multilevel project that trains residents and faculty in evidenced-based screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) methods for alcohol and substance use problems. This paper describes the training program and provides initial evaluation after the…

  1. Baylor SBIRT Medical Residency Training Program: Model Description and Initial Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bray, James H.; Kowalchuk, Alicia; Waters, Vicki; Laufman, Larry; Shilling, Elizabeth H.

    2012-01-01

    The Baylor College of Medicine SBIRT Medical Residency Training Program is a multilevel project that trains residents and faculty in evidenced-based screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) methods for alcohol and substance use problems. This paper describes the training program and provides initial evaluation after the…

  2. The Core Course in Medical Microbiology at Baylor College of Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Vernon; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Principal features of Baylor's course are annually-revised lecture handouts, medically-oriented laboratory sessions with a manual written especially for the course, and clinical demonstrations of infectious disease. Improvement in student performance seems to be related to the course format, increased teaching proficiency, and allocations of hours…

  3. The Core Course in Medical Microbiology at Baylor College of Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Vernon; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Principal features of Baylor's course are annually-revised lecture handouts, medically-oriented laboratory sessions with a manual written especially for the course, and clinical demonstrations of infectious disease. Improvement in student performance seems to be related to the course format, increased teaching proficiency, and allocations of hours…

  4. Control-room operator alertness and performance in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, T.l.; Campbell, S.C.; Linder, K.D.; Moore-Ede, M.C . )

    1990-02-01

    All industries requiring round-the-clock operation must deal with the potential problem of impaired alertness, especially among those who work night shifts. In the nuclear power industry, maintaining optimal alertness and performance of control room operators at all times of day is critical. Many of the toot causes of reduced alertness are straightforward and can be easily remedied with tangible solutions; this manual both discusses the reasons for the problem and suggests solutions. The manual surveys factors that influence operator alertness and performance, including shift schedules, caffeine and alcohol use, diet and family lifestyle factors, the control room enviornment, staffing and overtime practices, and work task design. Specific recommendations are made in each of these areas. The project team, consisting of experts on managing round-the-clock operations and scientists who study human alertness and performance, prepared this manual using the latest scientific research and direct input from shift supervisors and operators via interviews, on-site observation, and questionnaires distributed to every nuclear power station. The material contained within is relevant to shiftwork managers, shift supervisors, and operators, each of whom plays a vital role in maintaining optimal alertness and performance on the job. 90 refs., 35 figs.

  5. Assessment of nursing students' stress levels and coping strategies in operating room practice.

    PubMed

    Yildiz Findik, Ummu; Ozbas, Ayfer; Cavdar, Ikbal; Yildizeli Topcu, Sacide; Onler, Ebru

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the stress levels and stress coping strategies of nursing students in their first operating room experience. This descriptive study was done with 126 nursing students who were having an experience in an operating room for the first time. Data were collected by using Personal Information Form, Clinical Stress Questionnaire, and Styles of Coping Inventory. The nursing students mostly had low clinical stress levels (M = 27.56, SD = 10.76) and adopted a self-confident approach in coping with stress (M = 14.3, SD = 3.58). The nursing students generally employed a helpless/self-accusatory approach among passive patterns as their clinical stress levels increased, used a self-confident and optimistic approach among active patterns as their average age increased, and those who had never been to an operating room previously used a submissive approach among passive patterns. The results showed that low levels of stress caused the nursing students to use active patterns in coping with stress, whereas increasing levels of stress resulted in employing passive patterns in stress coping. The nursing students should be ensured to maintain low levels of stress and use active patterns in stress coping. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Reducing risk of fire in the operating room using coblation technology.

    PubMed

    Matt, Bruce H; Cottee, Lauren A

    2010-09-01

    Operating room fires are rare, but when they occur, they have potentially devastating and deadly consequences. Coblation (ArthroCare ENT, Austin, TX) technology has become popular for many otolaryngology procedures and seems to have the advantage of reducing fire risk. Our objective was to test the Coblator II on various flammable materials commonly found and used in the operating room. We placed the active Coblator II at the highest settings, in direct contact with flammable operating room equipment and materials, and made the environment even more volatile by introducing oxygen into the testing environment. We found that the Coblator II did not produce fire when in contact with any of the materials. This finding is very important in otolaryngology because airway procedures often take place in environments with high concentrations of oxygen. Our testing shows that the Coblator II is safe to use in these types of environments. Copyright 2010 American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Transfer of bacteria between biomaterials surfaces in the operating room--an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Knobben, Bas A S; van der Mei, Henny C; van Horn, Jim R; Busscher, Henk J

    2007-03-15

    Bacterial adhesion to and transfer between surfaces is a complicated process. With regard to the success of biomaterials implants, studies on bacterial adhesion and transfer should not be confined to biomaterials surfaces in the human body, but also encompass surfaces in the operating room, where the origin of many biomaterials related infections is found. The purpose of this study was to quantify the transfer of Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Propionibacterium acnes from one operating room material to another, while accounting for surface hydrophobicity and roughness, moistness and application of friction during transfer. The tested operating room materials were gloves, broaches (orthopaedic drills), theatre gowns, and light handles. As a possible clinical intervention method to prevent transfer, it was investigated whether dipping the gloves in a chlorhexidine splash-basin affected the viability of the transferred bacteria. Transfer (moist and without friction) was demonstrated to some extent with all bacterial strains and with every material, ranging from 17% to 71%, and was influenced by the bacterial strain, moistness of the inoculum, the application of friction, and the characteristics of both the donating and the receiving surface. Dipping the glove material in 4% or 0.4% chlorhexidine solutions killed all bacteria present, regardless of whether surfaces were dried or moist and thus prevented transfer.

  8. Application of Lean Methodology for Improved Quality and Efficiency in Operating Room Instrument Availability.

    PubMed

    Farrokhi, Farrokh R; Gunther, Maria; Williams, Barbara; Blackmore, Christopher Craig

    2015-01-01

    Advances in surgical instrumentation allow surgeons to treat patients with less morbidity and shorter recovery time. However, the increasing complexity also adds to surgical risk, and to operating room supply chain burden. To improve the quality and efficiency of operating room instrument availability, we developed and validated a Lean 5S approach consisting of sort (determining instrument usage and waste), simplify (removing unnecessary instruments), sweep (confirm availability of needed instruments), standardize (all trays the same for a given procedure), and self-discipline (monitor success). The primary outcome was reduction in unnecessary instruments delivered to the operating room. As a secondary analysis, we evaluated the effect of the Lean instrument intervention on surgery times. We reduced the number of instruments for minimally invasive spine surgery by 70% (from 197 to 58), and setup time decreased 37% (13.1-8.2 min, p = .0015). We also report subsequent validation of the approach on deep brain stimulator cases. We conclude that complex surgical procedures offer opportunities for substantial waste reduction, simplification, and quality improvement, with potential institutional annual cost savings of $2.8 million. We demonstrate that Lean methodology can improve quality at lower cost.

  9. What Orthopaedic Operating Room Surfaces Are Contaminated With Bioburden? A Study Using the ATP Bioluminescence Assay.

    PubMed

    Richard, Raveesh Daniel; Bowen, Thomas R

    2017-07-01

    Contaminated operating room surfaces can increase the risk of orthopaedic infections, particularly after procedures in which hardware implantation and instrumentation are used. The question arises as to how surgeons can measure surface cleanliness to detect increased levels of bioburden. This study aims to highlight the utility of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) bioluminescence technology as a novel technique in detecting the degree of contamination within the sterile operating room environment. What orthopaedic operating room surfaces are contaminated with bioburden? When energy is required for cellular work, ATP breaks down into adenosine biphosphate (ADP) and phosphate (P) and in that process releases energy. This process is inherent to all living things and can be detected as light emission with the use of bioluminescence assays. On a given day, six different orthopaedic surgery operating rooms (two adult reconstruction, two trauma, two spine) were tested before surgery with an ATP bioluminescence assay kit. All of the cases were considered clean surgery without infection, and this included the previously performed cases in each sampled room. These rooms had been cleaned and prepped for surgery but the patients had not been physically brought into the room. A total of 13 different surfaces were sampled once in each room: the operating room (OR) preparation table (both pre- and postdraping), OR light handles, Bovie machine buttons, supply closet countertops, the inside of the Bair Hugger™ hose, Bair Hugger™ buttons, right side of the OR table headboard, tourniquet machine buttons, the Clark-socket attachment, and patient positioners used for total hip and spine positioning. The relative light units (RLUs) obtained from each sample were recorded and data were compiled and averaged for analysis. These values were compared with previously published ATP benchmark values of 250 to 500 RLUs to define cleanliness in both the hospital and restaurant industries. All

  10. Executive competencies in healthcare administration: preceptors of the Army-Baylor University Graduate Program.

    PubMed

    Finstuen, Kenn; Mangelsdorff, A David

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to identify the mentoring and executive competencies required among preceptors of the Army-Baylor University Graduate Program in Health and Business Administration, and to specify the requisite skills, knowledge, and abilities (SKAs) needed to achieve those competencies. In the first wave of inquiry, a list of 123 competencies and associated SKAs was elicited from a network of 80 current and past preceptor executives employing a Delphi methodology using e-mail. An expert panel, which consisted of seven past program directors, examined and sorted the list into four preceptor content domains, viz., Health Systems Management (HS Management), Leadership, Residency Administration, and Community Involvement. Frequency analyses showed that the HS Management domain constituted over half of the competencies, with particular emphasis on strategic thinking, planning, billing, finance, manpower, and contracting. In the second wave, the preceptor Delphi network reviewed the expertpanel list and made 7-pointSKA importance ratings on an 80-item structured questionnaire representative of the four domains. Findings indicated thataverage SKA ratings were reliable and agreed upon to a high degree among preceptors. Results, rank ordered by SKA item means within preceptor content domains and overall, suggested that the most important rated items centered on teamwork, negotiation, interpersonal skills, communication, leadership vision, and customer and healthcare business operations. Outcomes from the competency list are expected to be useful for preceptor mentoring, self-assessment, and for professional development. Additionally, specific SKAs can provide a means for developing job requirements and career performance criteria at a behavioral task level, and can contribute information for identifying continuing education and conference topical needs.

  11. Investigation of cell phones as a potential source of bacterial contamination in the operating room.

    PubMed

    Shakir, Irshad A; Patel, Nirav H; Chamberland, Robin R; Kaar, Scott G

    2015-02-04

    Cell phone use has become common in areas of the hospital, including the operating room. The purpose of this study was to document the frequency of bacterial contamination on the cell phones of orthopaedic surgeons in the operating room and to determine whether a standardized disinfecting protocol decreased the rate of bacterial contamination and the amount of organic material. Orthopaedic attending and resident cell phones were swabbed on the front and back in the operating room with adenosine triphosphate bioluminescence to quantify organic material contamination and culture swabs to evaluate bacterial contamination. Adenosine triphosphate was quantified with use of relative light units. One photon of light was emitted for each molecule of adenosine triphosphate. Thresholds of 250 and 500 relative light units were used. The phones were cleaned with a cleaning wipe and were retested. One week later, a final set of studies was obtained. Fifty-three participants were enrolled in this study. Pathogenic bacteria were defined as those commonly causing surgical site infections. Of fifty-three cell phones, 83% (forty-four cell phones) had pathogenic bacteria at initial testing, 8% (four cell phones) had pathogenic bacteria after disinfection, and 75% (forty cell phones) had pathogenic bacteria one week later. The mean result (and standard deviation) at initial testing was 3488 ± 2998 relative light units, which reduced after disinfection to 200 ± 123 relative light units, indicating a cleaned surface, but increased one week later to 1825 ± 1699 relative light units, indicating a poorly cleaned surface. The cell phones of orthopaedic surgeons had a high rate of pathogenic bacteria and organic material contamination. Both were decreased after a single disinfecting process. However, recontamination occurred. It seems prudent to routinely disinfect them or avoid their use in the operating room. The current study investigates orthopaedic surgeons' cell phones as a

  12. Hybrid simulation: bringing motivation to the art of teamwork training in the operating room.

    PubMed

    Kjellin, A; Hedman, L; Escher, C; Felländer-Tsai, L

    2014-12-01

    Crew resource management-based operating room team training will be an evident part of future surgical training. Hybrid simulation in the operating room enables the opportunity for trainees to perform higher fidelity training of technical and non-technical skills in a realistic context. We focus on situational motivation and self-efficacy, two important factors for optimal learning in light of a prototype course for teams of residents in surgery and anesthesiology and nurses. Authentic operating room teams consisting of residents in anesthesia (n = 2), anesthesia nurses (n = 3), residents in surgery (n = 2), and scrub nurses (n = 6) were, during a one-day course, exposed to four different scenarios. Their situational motivation was self-assessed (ranging from 1 = does not correspond at all to 7 = corresponds exactly) immediately after training, and their self-efficacy (graded from 1 to 7) before and after training. Training was performed in a mock-up operating theater equipped with a hybrid patient simulator (SimMan 3G; Laerdal) and a laparoscopic simulator (Lap Mentor Express; Simbionix). The functionality of the systematic hybrid procedure simulation scenario was evaluated by an exit questionnaire (graded from 1 = disagree entirely to 5 = agree completely). The trainees were mostly intrinsically motivated, engaged for their own sake, and had a rather great degree of self-determination toward the training situation. Self-efficacy among the team members improved significantly from 4 to 6 (median). Overall evaluation showed very good result with a median grading of 5. We conclude that hybrid simulation is feasible and has the possibility to train an authentic operating team in order to improve individual motivation and confidence. © The Finnish Surgical Society 2014.

  13. Multi-color tunneling quantum dot infrared photodetectors operating at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariyawansa, G.; Perera, A. G. U.; Su, X. H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Bhattacharya, P.

    2007-04-01

    Quantum dot structures designed for multi-color infrared detection and high temperature (or room temperature) operation are demonstrated. A novel approach, tunneling quantum dot (T-QD), was successfully demonstrated with a detector that can be operated at room temperature due to the reduction of the dark current by blocking barriers incorporated into the structure. Photoexcited carriers are selectively collected from InGaAs quantum dots by resonant tunneling, while the dark current is blocked by AlGaAs/InGaAs tunneling barriers placed in the structure. A two-color tunneling-quantum dot infrared photodetector (T-QDIP) with photoresponse peaks at 6 μm and 17 μm operating at room temperature will be discussed. Furthermore, the idea can be used to develop terahertz T-QD detectors operating at high temperatures. Successful results obtained for a T-QDIP designed for THz operations are presented. Another approach, bi-layer quantum dot, uses two layers of InAs quantum dots (QDs) with different sizes separated by a thin GaAs layer. The detector response was observed at three distinct wavelengths in short-, mid-, and far-infrared regions (5.6, 8.0, and 23.0 μm). Based on theoretical calculations, photoluminescence and infrared spectral measurements, the 5.6 and 23.0 μm peaks are connected to the states in smaller QDs in the structure. The narrow peaks emphasize the uniform size distribution of QDs grown by molecular beam epitaxy. These detectors can be employed in numerous applications such as environmental monitoring, spectroscopy, medical diagnosis, battlefield-imaging, space astronomy applications, mine detection, and remote-sensing.

  14. [Surgical safety cheklist at the management of the hybrid operating room].

    PubMed

    Cherkashin, M A; Berezina, N A; Kuplevatsky, V I; Serov, A V; Mefodovsky, A A

    2016-01-01

    An essential aspect of the work of the operating room is the provision of safety of both the patient and staff. The organization of the activity of the surgical service requires serious elaboration of each of its stage, as well as standardization in using various validated instruments. When speaking of a hybrid operating room with the use of intraoperative magnetic resonance tomography, such an approach becomes not merely a recommendation but rather forced and justified necessity. Simultaneous use of various technologies of imaging and treatment with the engagement of physicians of various specialties requires especially thorough control. A generally accepted international standard of the work of the operating block is the use of checklists, and since 2008 the initiative of the World Health Organization "Safe Surgery Saves Lives" has globally been working to promote implementation of the WHO Surgical Safety Checklists (SSCL) to the real clinical practice. The intraoperative MR-diagnostic stage dictates rigid requirements for proper inventory of ferromagnetic and nonmagnetic surgical tools, verified logistics, and routing of the patient in the conditions of high and extremely high (1.5-3.0 T) magnetic field. A separate and not less important problem is anaesthesiological support during MRT. In order to optimise the patient's movements and adequate monitoring of his/her safety inside the operating department, the authors have modified the standard WHO Surgical Safety Checklist. Implementation of the modified checklist for the MRT-equipped hybrid operating room should improve the control over the processes, as well as increase safety of both the patient and personnel.

  15. [Air conditioning units and warm air blankets in the operating room].

    PubMed

    Kerwat, Klaus; Piechowiak, Karolin; Wulf, Hinnerk

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays almost all operating rooms are equipped with air conditioning (AC units). Their main purpose is climatization, like ventilation, moisturizing, cooling and also the warming of the room in large buildings. In operating rooms they have an additional function in the prevention of infections, especially the avoidance of postoperative wound infections. This is achieved by special filtration systems and by the creation of specific air currents. Since hypothermia is known to be an unambiguous factor for the development of postoperative wound infections, patients are often actively warmed intraoperatively using warm air blankets (forced-air warming units). In such cases it is frequently discussed whether such warm air blankets affect the performance of AC units by changing the air currents or whether, in contrast, have exactly the opposite effect. However, it has been demonstrated in numerous studies that warm air blankets do not have any relevant effect on the functioning of AC units. Also there are no indications that their use increases the rate of postoperative wound infections. By preventing the patient from experiencing hypothermia, the rate of postoperative wound infections can even be decreased thereby. © Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Defining the autonomy gap: when expectations do not meet reality in the operating room.

    PubMed

    Meyerson, Shari L; Teitelbaum, Ezra N; George, Brian C; Schuller, Mary C; DaRosa, Debra A; Fryer, Jonathan P

    2014-01-01

    To develop operative independence with essential procedures by the end of their training, residents need graded autonomy as they progress through training. This study compares autonomy expectations, as defined by faculty and residents, with autonomy measured in the operating room. Operative procedures performed by general surgery residents between November 2012 and June 2013 were each assigned an autonomy score by the operating attending physician using a previously described rating scale (Zwisch). Scores range from minimum autonomy, "show and tell," to maximum autonomy, "supervision only." Autonomy expectations were defined by a survey asking faculty and residents what autonomy-level residents should achieve during each year of training for each of the 10 most commonly performed procedures. Faculty expectations, resident expectations, and actual operating room autonomy data were compared using analysis of variance with post hoc analysis by Tukey honestly significant difference test. A total of 1467 operative cases were scored using the Zwisch scale over the period of the study. The 10 most common procedures accounted for 56.3% (827) of the cases. Resident and faculty expectations of resident operative autonomy were similar. For only laparoscopic cholecystectomy, residents expected significantly more autonomy than the faculty did during the junior years but they agreed with the faculty for the chief year. When expectations were compared with actual performance, the resident autonomy level achieved was significantly less than that expected by residents or faculty or both for all 10 procedures in at least one postgraduate level. For every procedure performed more than 5 times during the study period by postgraduate years 3 to 5 residents, autonomy was significantly less than expected. Surgical faculty and residents had similar expectations for resident operative autonomy, yet actual resident performance failed to achieve those shared expectations for even the most

  17. Surgeons managing conflict in the operating room: defining the educational need and identifying effective behaviors.

    PubMed

    Rogers, David A; Lingard, Lorelei; Boehler, Margaret L; Espin, Sherry; Mellinger, John D; Schindler, Nancy; Klingensmith, Mary

    2013-02-01

    Developing an operating room conflict management educational program for surgeons requires a formal needs assessment and information about behaviors that represent effective conflict management. Focus groups of circulating room nurses and surgeons were conducted at 5 participating centers. Participants responded to queries about conflict management training, conflict consequences, and effective conflict management behaviors. Transcripts of these sessions served as the data for this study. Educational preparation for conflict management was inadequate consisting of trial and error with observed behaviors. Conflict and conflict mismanagement had negative consequences for team members and team performance. Four behaviors emerge as representing effective ways for surgeons to manage conflict. There is a clear educational need for conflict management education. Target behaviors have now been identified that can provide the basis for a theoretically grounded and contextually adapted instruction and assessment of surgeon conflict management. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Green monolithic II-VI vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser operating at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruse, C.; Ulrich, S. M.; Alexe, G.; Roventa, E.; Kröger, R.; Brendemühl, B.; Michler, P.; Gutowski, J.; Hommel, D.

    2004-02-01

    The realization of a monolithic all II-VI-based vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) for the green spectral region is reported. Optically pumped lasing operation was achieved up to room temperature using a planar VCSEL structure. Taking advantage of distributed Bragg-reflectors based on MgS/Zn(Cd)Se superlattices as the low-refractive index material and ZnS0.06Se0.94 layers as the high-index material with a refractive index contrast of n = 0.6, a quality factor exceeding Q = 2000 is reached by using only 18 Bragg periods for the bottom DBR and 15 Bragg periods for the top DBR. The threshold power density is 0.32 MW/cm2 at a temperature of 10 K (emission wavelength 498.5 nm) and 1.9 MW/cm2 at room temperature (emission wavelength 502.3 nm).

  19. Accidental exposures to blood and body fluid in the operation room and the issue of underreporting.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Miki; Iinuma, Yoshitsugu; Igawa, Junko; Matsumura, Yasufumi; Shirano, Michinori; Matsushima, Aki; Saito, Takashi; Takakura, Shunji; Ichiyama, Satoshi

    2009-09-01

    A retrospective review of all exposure injuries affecting members of the operative care line at a single university hospital between January 2000 and December 2007 was performed. A questionnaire survey on current status of adherence to barrier precautions was also completed by 164 staff members. Of 136 exposure injuries, 87 (64.0%) were in surgeons, and 49 (36.0%) were in scrub nurses. Surgeons were most commonly injured during suturing (49, 56%), followed by "handing over sharps" (7, 8%), whereas scrub nurses were most commonly injured during "counting and sorting of sharps" (15, 41%), followed by "handing over sharps," and "splash." The questionnaire survey revealed that compliance with goggles, face shields, and double gloving was poor, and only 9% of respondents routinely used the hands-free technique. Only 22% of staff who had experienced exposure injuries reported every incident. Because circumstances of exposure injuries in operating rooms differ by profession, appropriate preventive measures should address individual situations. To reduce exposure injuries in the operating room, further efforts are required including education, mentoring, and competency training for operation personnel.

  20. Performance of simulated laparoscopic incisional hernia repair correlates with operating room performance.

    PubMed

    Ghaderi, Iman; Vaillancourt, Marilou; Sroka, Gideon; Kaneva, Pepa A; Seagull, F Jacob; George, Ivan; Sutton, Erica; Park, Adrian E; Vassiliou, Melina C; Fried, Gerald M; Feldman, Liane S

    2011-01-01

    the role of simulation for training in procedures such as laparoscopic incisional hernia repair (LIHR) is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine whether performance in simulated LIHR correlates with operating room (OR) performance. subjects performed LIHR in the University of Maryland Surgical Abdominal Wall (SAW) simulator and the OR. Trained observers used a LIHR-specific global rating scale (Global Operative Assessment of Laparoscopic Skills-Incisional Hernia) to assess performance. Global Operative Assessment of Laparoscopic Skills-Incisional Hernia includes 7 domains (trocar placement, adhesiolysis, mesh sizing, mesh positioning, mesh fixation, knowledge and autonomy in instrument use, and overall competence). The correlation between simulator and OR performance was assessed using the Pearson coefficient. fourteen surgeons from 2 surgical departments participated. Experienced surgeons (n = 9) were defined as attending surgeons and minimally invasive surgury (MIS) fellows, and novice surgeons (n = 5) were general surgery residents (postgraduate years 3-5). The correlation between performance in the OR and the simulator for the entire group was .87 (95% confidence interval, .63-.96; P < .001). there was an excellent correlation between LIHR performance in the simulator and clinical LIHR. This suggests that performance in the SAW simulator may predict performance in the operating room. 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Human factors in surgery: from Three Mile Island to the operating room.

    PubMed

    D'Addessi, Alessandro; Bongiovanni, Luca; Volpe, Andrea; Pinto, Francesco; Bassi, PierFrancesco

    2009-01-01

    Human factors is a definition that includes the science of understanding the properties of human capability, the application of this understanding to the design and development of systems and services, the art of ensuring their successful applications to a program. The field of human factors traces its origins to the Second World War, but Three Mile Island has been the best example of how groups of people react and make decisions under stress: this nuclear accident was exacerbated by wrong decisions made because the operators were overwhelmed with irrelevant, misleading or incorrect information. Errors and their nature are the same in all human activities. The predisposition for error is so intrinsic to human nature that scientifically it is best considered as inherently biologic. The causes of error in medical care may not be easily generalized. Surgery differs in important ways: most errors occur in the operating room and are technical in nature. Commonly, surgical error has been thought of as the consequence of lack of skill or ability, and is the result of thoughtless actions. Moreover the 'operating theatre' has a unique set of team dynamics: professionals from multiple disciplines are required to work in a closely coordinated fashion. This complex environment provides multiple opportunities for unclear communication, clashing motivations, errors arising not from technical incompetence but from poor interpersonal skills. Surgeons have to work closely with human factors specialists in future studies. By improving processes already in place in many operating rooms, safety will be enhanced and quality increased.

  2. Impact of a pediatric anesthesiologist on operating room efficiency during pediatric tonsillectomies and adenotonsillectomies.

    PubMed

    Dewyer, Nicholas A; Kram, Yoseph A; Long, Stephen; Russell, Marika D

    2017-06-01

    We conducted a retrospective case review to determine if the presence of an Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) fellowship-trained pediatric anesthesiologist improves efficiency during pediatric tonsillectomies and adenotonsillectomies in hospitals that do not have dedicated pediatric operating rooms and, if so, to determine which specific anesthesia practices might account for such a difference. We reviewed the charts of all patients aged 12 years and younger who had undergone a tonsillectomy or adenotonsillectomy from Jan. 1, 2008, through Aug. 1, 2013, at San Francisco General Hospital. A total of 75 cases met our eligibility criteria. We compiled information on patient demographics, surgical time, anesthesia time, and anesthesia practices. Our primary study outcome was the amount of anesthesia-controlled time (ACT), which is the sum of time spent in induction and emergence. Cases were grouped according to whether the operation was staffed by an ACGME fellowship-trained pediatric anesthesiologist or a general anesthesiologist. Data were analyzed for 1 pediatric anesthesiologist and 23 general anesthesiologists. We found that ACT was significantly shorter during the cases staffed by the ACGME fellowship-trained pediatric anesthesiologist, although there were no major differences in anesthesia practices between the types of anesthesiologist. We suggest that staffing pediatric tonsillectomy operations with a fellowship-trained pediatric anesthesiologist may be an effective strategy for increasing operating room efficiency.

  3. A survey of static and dynamic work postures of operating room staff.

    PubMed

    Kant, I J; de Jong, L C; van Rijssen-Moll, M; Borm, P J

    1992-01-01

    Work in health care units is associated with considerable physical strain and many musculoskeletal complaints. Most investigations have concentrated on the work of general hospital nurses; little is known about the physical stress load on other health care workers. We therefore carried out an ergonomic study amongst operating room staff in order to (i) determine the work (posture) stress load on this particular group of health care workers and the effect of static posture on this stress, (ii) identify activities involving poor work postures, and (iii) determine differences between specialties in regard to work posture stress load. The work postures and related work activities of four different groups of staff in operating rooms (surgeons, assistant anaesthesists, instrumentation nurses and circulating nurses) were recorded and evaluated using the specified Ovako Working posture Analysing System (OWAS). Observation during the course of 18 daily surgical programmes (total number of observations: 3714) in the specialties general surgery and ear-nose-throat (ENT) surgery revealed that the work-load according to OWAS for circulating nurses and assistant anaesthesists was not harmful. Some work postures seen among instrumentation nurses and surgeons, however, need improvement. The work posture stress load in these groups is mainly due to the high prevalence of static work postures during the activities "surgery" (surgeons) and "assisting surgery" (instrumentation nurses). Significant differences in ergonomic stress load were observed between general surgeons and ENT surgeons. This survey in operating theatres relates work postures to basic activities and can be used as a starting point from which to improve work conditions in order to reduce or eliminate physical complaints among operating room staff.

  4. Use of face masks by non-scrubbed operating room staff: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Webster, Joan; Croger, Sarah; Lister, Carolyn; Doidge, Michelle; Terry, Michael J; Jones, Ian

    2010-03-01

    Ambiguity remains about the effectiveness of wearing surgical face masks. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact on surgical site infections (SSIs) when non-scrubbed operating room staff did not wear surgical face masks. Eight hundred twenty-seven participants undergoing elective or emergency obstetric, gynecological, general, orthopaedic, breast or urological surgery in an Australian tertiary hospital were enrolled. Complete follow-up data were available for 811 patients (98.1%). Operating room lists were randomly allocated to a 'Mask group' (all non-scrubbed staff wore a mask) or 'No Mask group' (none of the non-scrubbed staff wore masks). The primary end point, SSI was identified using in-patient surveillance; post discharge follow-up and chart reviews. The patient was followed for up to six weeks. Overall, 83 (10.2%) surgical site infections were recorded; 46/401 (11.5%) in the Masked group and 37/410 (9.0%) in the No Mask group; odds ratio (OR) 0.77 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.49 to 1.21), p = 0.151. Independent risk factors for surgical site infection included: any pre-operative stay (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 0.43 (95% CI, 0.20; 0.95), high BMI aOR, 0.38 (95% CI, 0.17; 0.87), and any previous surgical site infection aOR, 0.40 (95% CI, 0.17; 0.89). Surgical site infection rates did not increase when non-scrubbed operating room personnel did not wear a face mask.

  5. Analysis of verbal communication during teaching in the operating room and the potentials for surgical training.

    PubMed

    Blom, E M; Verdaasdonk, E G G; Stassen, L P S; Stassen, H G; Wieringa, P A; Dankelman, J

    2007-09-01

    Verbal communication in the operating room during surgical procedures affects team performance, reflects individual skills, and is related to the complexity of the operation process. During the procedural training of surgeons (residents), feedback and guidance is given through verbal communication. A classification method based on structural analysis of the contents was developed to analyze verbal communication. This study aimed to evaluate whether a classification method for the contents of verbal communication in the operating room could provide insight into the teaching processes. Eight laparoscopic cholecystectomies were videotaped. Two entire cholecystectomies and the dissection phase of six additional procedures were analyzed by categorization of the communication in terms of type (4 categories: commanding, explaining, questioning, and miscellaneous) and content (9 categories: operation method, location, direction, instrument handling, visualization, anatomy and pathology, general, private, undefinable). The operation was divided into six phases: start, dissection, clipping, separating, control, closing. Classification of the communication during two entire procedures showed that each phase of the operation was dominated by different kinds of communication. A high percentage of explaining anatomy and pathology was found throughout the whole procedure except for the control and closing phases. In the dissection phases, 60% of verbal communication concerned explaining. These explaining communication events were divided as follows: 27% operation method, 19% anatomy and pathology, 25% location (positioning of the instrument-tissue interaction), 15% direction (direction of tissue manipulation), 11% instrument handling, and 3% other nonclassified instructions. The proposed classification method is feasible for analyzing verbal communication during surgical procedures. Communication content objectively reflects the interaction between surgeon and resident. This

  6. Factors predicting the increased risk for return to the operating room in bariatric patients: a NSQIP database study.

    PubMed

    Nandipati, Kalyana; Lin, Edward; Husain, Farah; Perez, Sebastian; Srinivasan, Jahnavi; Sweeney, John F; Davis, S Scott

    2013-04-01

    The objective of the study was to assess the risk factors associated with return to the operating room in bariatric surgery patients. Using the American College of Surgeons-National Surgical Quality Improvement Project's participant-use file, patients who underwent laparoscopic gastric bypass (LRYGB) and adjustable gastric band (LAGB) procedures for morbid obesity were identified. Several pre-, peri-, and postoperative variables, including 30 day morbidity and mortality, were collected. The study population was divided into two groups: patients returning to the operating room (group 1), and patients not returning to the operating room (group 2). Variables analyzed included postoperative complications, overall morbidity, and mortality. Relationships between preoperative and perioperative factors leading to the return to the operating room also were analyzed. Of 28,241 (LRYGB = 18,671, LAGB = 9,570) patients included in the study, 644 (2.3 %) patients returned to the operating room. Of the study population, 30 day mortality rate was 0.13 % (37/28,241) and morbidity was 4.1 % (1,155/28,241). Patients returning to the operating room had a higher mortality [14/644 (2.2 %) vs. 23/27,597 (0.01 %); P < 0.001], and morbidity [258/644 (40 %) vs. 897/27,579 (3.3 %); P < 0.001] compared with those who did not return to the operating room. Postoperative complications (superficial wound infection, deep surgical site infection, organ space infection, pneumonia, pulmonary embolism, renal insufficiency, renal failure, septic shock, and length of stay) were significantly higher for patients who required reoperation. On multivariate logistic regression analysis, the bypass operation, bleeding disorder, patients on dialysis, preoperative hematocrit, preoperative low albumin, and length of operation were associated with increased risk of return to the operating room. In the bariatric population, return to the operating room is associated with significantly higher morbidity and

  7. Two loose screws: near-miss fall of a morbidly obese patient after an operating room table failure.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Russell K; Booth, Robert T; Bittenbinder, Timothy M

    2016-09-01

    Operating room surgical table failure is a rare event but can lead to a dangerous situation when it does occur. The dangers can be compounded in the presence of obesity, especially in the anesthetized or sedated patient. We present a case of a near-miss fall of a morbidly obese patient while turning the patient in preparation to transfer from the operating room table to the hospital bed when 2 fractured bolts in the tilt cylinder mechanism led to an operating room table failure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Marine Corps Operational Medicine: An Analysis of Medical Supply Requirements for the Surgical Company Operating Room

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-06-18

    6515003669200 Forceps Bone Cutting Bethune 13.5" Lg Cupped Screw Lock Crs 1 EA 6515003333700 Forceps Dressing 10" Lg Straight & Serrated Rd Tip Heavy...34 Jaw 2 EA 6515003352900 Forceps Intestinal Babcock 7.75" O/A Lg Straight Box Lock Crs 4 EA 6515003355800 Forceps Kidney Pedicle Guyon-Pean...6515012045394 Resuscitator Hand Operated Ipp High O2 Small & Med Adult Face Masks W/Case 1 EA 6515012080576 Stimulator Nerve High/Low Output

  9. Views of the Mission Operations Control room (MOCR) during STS-5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Hans Mark, NASA Deputy Administrator, and Daniel M. Germany, Assistant Manager, Orbiter Project Office, monitor activity from STS-5 in the mission operations control room (MOCR) of JSC's mission control center. Arnold D. Aldrich, Manager of the Orbiter Project Office, can be seen at left background (27153); Gerald D. Griffin, JSC Director, stands near the flight director console in the MOCR. Astronaut Robert L. Stewart, STS-5 spacecraft communicator, mans the CAPCOM console at left. Others in the background include M.P. Frank, Chief of the Flight Operations Integration Office (back row); Eugene F. Kranz, Deputy Director of Flight Operations; Tommy W. Holloway, flight director (right of Griffin) (27154); Flight directors during STS-5 posed at the flight directors console are from left to right: Lawrence S. Bourgeois, Brock R. Stone, Jay H. Greene, Tommy W. Holloway, John T. Cox and Gary E. Coen. Other flight controllers are pictured in the background of the MOCR (27155).

  10. 9 CFR 355.15 - Inedible material operating and storage rooms; outer premises, docks, driveways, etc.; fly...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... storage rooms; outer premises, docks, driveways, etc.; fly-breeding material; nuisances. 355.15 Section...-breeding material; nuisances. All operating and storage rooms and departments of inspected plants used for... any material in which flies may breed, or the maintenance of any nuisance on the premises shall not...

  11. 9 CFR 355.15 - Inedible material operating and storage rooms; outer premises, docks, driveways, etc.; fly...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... storage rooms; outer premises, docks, driveways, etc.; fly-breeding material; nuisances. 355.15 Section...-breeding material; nuisances. All operating and storage rooms and departments of inspected plants used for... any material in which flies may breed, or the maintenance of any nuisance on the premises shall not...

  12. 9 CFR 355.15 - Inedible material operating and storage rooms; outer premises, docks, driveways, etc.; fly...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... storage rooms; outer premises, docks, driveways, etc.; fly-breeding material; nuisances. 355.15 Section...-breeding material; nuisances. All operating and storage rooms and departments of inspected plants used for... any material in which flies may breed, or the maintenance of any nuisance on the premises shall not...

  13. 9 CFR 355.15 - Inedible material operating and storage rooms; outer premises, docks, driveways, etc.; fly...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...-breeding material; nuisances. All operating and storage rooms and departments of inspected plants used for... storage rooms; outer premises, docks, driveways, etc.; fly-breeding material; nuisances. 355.15 Section... premises of every inspected plant shall be kept in clean and orderly condition. All catchbasins on the...

  14. 9 CFR 355.15 - Inedible material operating and storage rooms; outer premises, docks, driveways, etc.; fly...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...-breeding material; nuisances. All operating and storage rooms and departments of inspected plants used for... storage rooms; outer premises, docks, driveways, etc.; fly-breeding material; nuisances. 355.15 Section... premises of every inspected plant shall be kept in clean and orderly condition. All catchbasins on the...

  15. Difficulties and challenges associated with literature searches in operating room management, complete with recommendations.

    PubMed

    Wachtel, Ruth E; Dexter, Franklin

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to teach operating room managers, financial analysts, and those with a limited knowledge of search engines, including PubMed, how to locate articles they need in the areas of operating room and anesthesia group management. Many physicians are unaware of current literature in their field and evidence-based practices. The most common source of information is colleagues. Many people making management decisions do not read published scientific articles. Databases such as PubMed are available to search for such articles. Other databases, such as citation indices and Google Scholar, can be used to uncover additional articles. Nevertheless, most people who do not know how to use these databases are reluctant to utilize help resources when they do not know how to accomplish a task. Most people are especially reluctant to use on-line help files. Help files and search databases are often difficult to use because they have been designed for users already familiar with the field. The help files and databases have specialized vocabularies unique to the application. MeSH terms in PubMed are not useful alternatives for operating room management, an important limitation, because MeSH is the default when search terms are entered in PubMed. Librarians or those trained in informatics can be valuable assets for searching unusual databases, but they must possess the domain knowledge relative to the subject they are searching. The search methods we review are especially important when the subject area (e.g., anesthesia group management) is so specific that only 1 or 2 articles address the topic of interest. The materials are presented broadly enough that the reader can extrapolate the findings to other areas of clinical and management issues in anesthesiology.

  16. Forced-air warming: a source of airborne contamination in the operating room?

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Mark; Gauthier, Robert; Leaper, David

    2009-10-10

    Forced-air-warming (FAW) is an effective and widely used means for maintaining surgical normothermia, but FAW also has the potential to generate and mobilize airborne contamination in the operating room.We measured the emission of viable and non-viable forms of airborne contamination from an arbitrary selection of FAW blowers (n=25) in the operating room. A laser particle counter measured particulate concentrations of the air near the intake filter and in the distal hose airstream. Filtration efficiency was calculated as the reduction in particulate concentration in the distal hose airstream relative to that of the intake. Microbial colonization of the FAW blower's internal hose surfaces was assessed by culturing the microorganisms recovered through swabbing (n=17) and rinsing (n=9) techniques.Particle counting revealed that 24% of FAW blowers were emitting significant levels of internally generated airborne contamination in the 0.5 to 5.0 µm size range, evidenced by a steep decrease in FAW blower filtration efficiency for particles 0.5 to 5.0 µm in size. The particle size-range-specific reduction in efficiency could not be explained by the filtration properties of the intake filter. Instead, the reduction was found to be caused by size-range-specific particle generation within the FAW blowers. Microorganisms were detected on the internal air path surfaces of 94% of FAW blowers.The design of FAW blowers was found to be questionable for preventing the build-up of internal contamination and the emission of airborne contamination into the operating room. Although we did not evaluate the link between FAW and surgical site infection rates, a significant percentage of FAW blowers with positive microbial cultures were emitting internally generated airborne contamination within the size range of free floating bacteria and fungi (<4 µm) that could, conceivably, settle onto the surgical site.

  17. Forced-air warming: a source of airborne contamination in the operating room?

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, Mark; Gauthier, Robert; Leaper, David

    2009-01-01

    Forced-air-warming (FAW) is an effective and widely used means for maintaining surgical normothermia, but FAW also has the potential to generate and mobilize airborne contamination in the operating room. We measured the emission of viable and non-viable forms of airborne contamination from an arbitrary selection of FAW blowers (n=25) in the operating room. A laser particle counter measured particulate concentrations of the air near the intake filter and in the distal hose airstream. Filtration efficiency was calculated as the reduction in particulate concentration in the distal hose airstream relative to that of the intake. Microbial colonization of the FAW blower's internal hose surfaces was assessed by culturing the microorganisms recovered through swabbing (n=17) and rinsing (n=9) techniques. Particle counting revealed that 24% of FAW blowers were emitting significant levels of internally generated airborne contamination in the 0.5 to 5.0 µm size range, evidenced by a steep decrease in FAW blower filtration efficiency for particles 0.5 to 5.0 µm in size. The particle size-range-specific reduction in efficiency could not be explained by the filtration properties of the intake filter. Instead, the reduction was found to be caused by size-range-specific particle generation within the FAW blowers. Microorganisms were detected on the internal air path surfaces of 94% of FAW blowers. The design of FAW blowers was found to be questionable for preventing the build-up of internal contamination and the emission of airborne contamination into the operating room. Although we did not evaluate the link between FAW and surgical site infection rates, a significant percentage of FAW blowers with positive microbial cultures were emitting internally generated airborne contamination within the size range of free floating bacteria and fungi (<4 µm) that could, conceivably, settle onto the surgical site. PMID:21808690

  18. The operating room case-mix problem under uncertainty and nurses capacity constraints.

    PubMed

    Yahia, Zakaria; Eltawil, Amr B; Harraz, Nermine A

    2016-12-01

    Surgery is one of the key functions in hospitals; it generates significant revenue and admissions to hospitals. In this paper we address the decision of choosing a case-mix for a surgery department. The objective of this study is to generate an optimal case-mix plan of surgery patients with uncertain surgery operations, which includes uncertainty in surgery durations, length of stay, surgery demand and the availability of nurses. In order to obtain an optimal case-mix plan, a stochastic optimization model is proposed and the sample average approximation method is applied. The proposed model is used to determine the number of surgery cases to be weekly served, the amount of operating rooms' time dedicated to each specialty and the number of ward beds dedicated to each specialty. The optimal case-mix selection criterion is based upon a weighted score taking into account both the waiting list and the historical demand of each patient category. The score aims to maximizing the service level of the operating rooms by increasing the total number of surgery cases that could be served. A computational experiment is presented to demonstrate the performance of the proposed method. The results show that the stochastic model solution outperforms the expected value problem solution. Additional analysis is conducted to study the effect of varying the number of ORs and nurses capacity on the overall ORs' performance.

  19. Teaching techniques in the operating room: the importance of perceptual motor teaching.

    PubMed

    Skoczylas, Laura C; Littleton, Eliza B; Kanter, Steven L; Sutkin, Gary

    2012-03-01

    To identify sucessful teaching techniques in the operating room environment through examining the teaching of the midurethral sling (MUS) surgery. The authors distributed questionnaires with open-ended questions about teaching and learning MUS to 5 urogynecology attendings and 16 obstetrics-gynecology residents in spring 2010. In an effort to identify qualities of an effective sling teacher, the authors used grounded theory to determine common themes and to code participant responses for examples. Of 21 potential respondents, 14 (67%) returned questionnaires. The authors analyzed these and identified seven commonalities among effective sling teachers: they (1) emphasize anatomical landmarks (as determined by 64 total comments); (2) use perceptual-motor teaching (PMT; 38 comments); (3) encourage repetition (28); (4) promote early independence (34); (5) demonstrate confident competence (23); (6) maintain a calm demeanor in the operating room (20); and (7) exhibit a willingness to accept responsibility for mistakes and consequences (9). The second-most common attribute, using PMT, requires the teaching attending to emphasize the motor and tactile aspects of operating and involves incorporating not only what learners see but also what they feel. The authors report seven qualities or techniques fundamental to good teaching practice in a high-stress, high-technology surgical environment, and they have identified the use of PMT, which to their knowledge has not been previously described. Teachers and learners in this study characterized PMT, which is likely generalizable to surgical procedures other than the MUS, as important. Future research should focus on exploring this technique in other surgeries.

  20. An evaluation of the feasibility, validity, and reliability of laparoscopic skills assessment in the operating room.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Rajesh; Grantcharov, Teodor; Moorthy, Krishna; Milland, Thor; Papasavas, Pavlos; Dosis, Aristotelis; Bello, Fernando; Darzi, Ara

    2007-06-01

    To assess the use of a synchronized video-based motion tracking device for objective, instant, and automated assessment of laparoscopic skill in the operating room. The assessment of technical skills is fundamental to recognition of proficient surgical practice. It is necessary to demonstrate the validity, reliability, and feasibility of any tool to be applied for objective measurement of performance. Nineteen subjects, divided into 13 experienced (performed >100 laparoscopic cholecystectomies) and 6 inexperienced (performed <10 LCs) surgeons completed LCs on 53 patients who all had a diagnosis of biliary colic. Each procedure was recorded with the ROVIMAS video-based motion tracking device to provide an objective measure of the surgeon's dexterity. Each video was also rated by 2 experienced observers on a previously validated operative assessment scale. There were significant differences for motion tracking parameters between the 2 groups of surgeons for the Calot triangle dissection part of procedure for time taken (P = 0.002), total path length (P = 0.026), and number of movements (P = 0.005). Both motion tracking and video-based assessment displayed intertest reliability, and there were good correlations between the 2 modes of assessment (r = 0.4 to 0.7, P < 0.01). An instant, objective, valid, and reliable mode of assessment of laparoscopic performance in the operating room has been defined. This may serve to reduce the time taken for technical skills assessment, and subsequently lead to accurate and efficient audit and credentialing of surgeons for independent practice.

  1. Don't break the chain: importance of supply chain management in the operating room setting.

    PubMed

    Bilyk, Candis

    2008-09-01

    Management of supplies within the operating room (OR) has considerable implications for decreasing healthcare costs while maintaining high-quality patient care. This area of healthcare therefore requires more monitoring by end-users including OR management, physicians, and nursing staff. This article is based on understanding supply chain management in the OR setting. Information provided throughout the article can be applied to small or large health care centers. It defines supply chain management and contains a brief overview of supply chain processes. It reviews the benefits of following these processes. The article also includes recommendations for improving the supply chain in the OR.

  2. Accuracy of computer-assisted iliosacral screw placement using a hybrid operating room.

    PubMed

    Richter, P H; Gebhard, F; Dehner, C; Scola, A

    2016-02-01

    In recent years hybrid operating rooms were established all over the world. In our setting we combined a 3D flat-panel c-arm (Artis zeego, Siemens) with a navigation system (BrainLab curve, BrainLab). This worldwide unique combination enables the surgeon to visualise an entire pelvis in CT-like image quality with a single 3D-scan. The aim of our study was to investigate, if utilisation of a hybrid operating room increases the accuracy of SI-screws in comparison to standard 3D-navigation. Retrospective, not randomised single centre case series at a level I trauma centre. Inclusion criterion was insertion of a percutaneous iliosacral screw using image-guidance in the hybrid operating room. 61 patients (35 female, 26 male) were included from June 2012 till October 2014. 65 iliosacral screws were inserted. Intraoperative 3D-scans and postoperative scans were examined to investigate screw placement. The results were compared to a preceding study performed in 2012 using conventional 3D-navigation. Statistical calculations were performed with Microsoft Excel 2011 and SPSS. 65 iliosacral screws were implanted. Two different types of screws were implanted: 1. "Standard" iliosacral screws stabilizing one joint/a unilateral fracture. 2. Single SI-screws stabilizing both SI-joints and if present a bilateral fracture. Forty one patients were included in group 1 (screws n=45). There was no perforation in 43 screws, grade 1 perforation in 2 screws. There was no grade 2 or 3 perforation in this group. Compared to the conventional 3D-navigated screws there was a highly significant difference (p<0.001). Twenty patients could be included in group 2. Eleven screws showed a complete intraosseous position. There was grade 1 perforation in 2 screws, grade 2 perforation in 5 screws and grade 3 perforation in 2 screws. Improvements in image quality and enlargement of the display window lead to better intraoperative visualisation of the entire dorsal pelvis. Thereby the accuracy of computer

  3. Surgical PACS for the digital operating room. Systems engineering and specification of user requirements.

    PubMed

    Korb, Werner; Bohn, Stefan; Burgert, Oliver; Dietz, Andreas; Jacobs, Stephan; Falk, Volkmar; Meixensberger, Jürgen; Strauss, Gero; Trantakis, Christos; Lemke, Heinz U

    2006-01-01

    For better integration of surgical assist systems into the operating room, a common communication and processing plattform that is based on the users needs is needed. The development of such a system, a Surgical Picture Aquisition and Communication System (S-PACS), according the systems engineering cycle is oulined in this paper. The first two steps (concept and specification) for the engineering of the S-PACS are discussed.A method for the systematic integration of the users needs', the Quality Function Deployment (QFD), is presented. The properties of QFD for the underlying problem and first results are discussed. Finally, this leads to a first definition of an S-PACS system.

  4. A room-temperature semiconductor spaser operating near 1.5 μm.

    PubMed

    Flynn, R A; Kim, C S; Vurgaftman, I; Kim, M; Meyer, J R; Mäkinen, A J; Bussmann, K; Cheng, L; Choa, F-S; Long, J P

    2011-04-25

    Room temperature spasing of surface plasmon polaritons at 1.46 μm wavelength has been demonstrated by sandwiching a gold-film plasmonic waveguide between optically pumped InGaAs quantum-well gain media. The spaser exhibits gain narrowing, the expected transverse-magnetic polarization, and mirror feedback provided by cleaved facets in a 1-mm long cavity fabricated with a flip-chip approach. The 1.06-μm pump-threshold of ~60 kW/cm2 is in good agreement with calculations. The architecture is readily adaptable to all-electrical operation on an integrated microchip.

  5. Coordination Challenges in Operating-Room Management: An In-Depth Field Study

    PubMed Central

    Plasters, Cheryl L.; Seagull, F. Jacob; Xiao, Yan

    2003-01-01

    Dynamic settings possess complex information needs all requiring attention in order to be managed effectively. The following study describes the multi-faceted information exchanges essential for an operating room suite to be managed within the context of efficient, cost effective, safe practice. Through the combined use of observation, the Critical Incident Technique, and interviews, this study analyzed information issues that impact coordination. Results demonstrate how distributed team planning is inherent to the efficacy of the system, and discuss implications for information tools to support coordination within in a complex setting. PMID:14728228

  6. Coordination challenges in operating-room management: an in-depth field study.

    PubMed

    Plasters, Cheryl L; Seagull, F Jacob; Xiao, Yan

    2003-01-01

    Dynamic settings possess complex information needs all requiring attention in order to be managed effectively. The following study describes the multi-faceted information exchanges essential for an operating room suite to be managed within the context of efficient, cost effective, safe practice. Through the combined use of observation, the Critical Incident Technique, and interviews, this study analyzed information issues that impact coordination. Results demonstrate how distributed team planning is inherent to the efficacy of the system, and discuss implications for information tools to support coordination within in a complex setting.

  7. Facilitating skin-to-skin contact in the operating room after cesarean birth.

    PubMed

    Stone, Susan; Prater, Lyn; Spencer, Rebecca

    2014-12-01

    We implemented an evidence-based practice change to provide early skin-to-skin contact (SSC) in non-emergent, full-term cesarean surgical births among low-risk healthy women. There were three aims of this project: (1) To develop a protocol for health care professionals' roles in providing SSC in the operating room; (2) To implement the protocol; and (3) To evaluate the process of implementation of the evidence-based intervention. The "champion team" concept was crucial to the project's success.

  8. Human factors analysis of workstation design: Earth Radiation Budget Satellite Mission Operations Room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, L. J.; Murphy, E. D.; Mitchell, C. M.

    1982-01-01

    A human factors analysis addressed three related yet distinct issues within the area of workstation design for the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) mission operation room (MOR). The first issue, physical layout of the MOR, received the most intensive effort. It involved the positioning of clusters of equipment within the physical dimensions of the ERBS MOR. The second issue for analysis was comprised of several environmental concerns, such as lighting, furniture, and heating and ventilation systems. The third issue was component arrangement, involving the physical arrangement of individual components within clusters of consoles, e.g., a communications panel.

  9. Remotely operated MR-guided neurosurgical device in MR operating room

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haiying; Hall, Walter A.; Truwit, Charles L.

    2001-05-01

    A robust near real-time MRI based surgical guidance and navigation scheme has been developed, validated and used. The key concept of the method is to use intra-operative MRI to facilitate the trajectory alignment process of a biopsy needle in neurobiopsy. Since the trajectory corresponding to the biopsy needle pivoted at an entry point on patient skull has two degrees of freedom, the orientation of the needle can be tracked using a 2D imaging plane placed perpendicular to the desired trajectory. Using a near real- time visual feedback during the adjustment of an alignment guidance device, the required trajectory alignment was translated into a simple in-plane targeting task on computer monitor. The orientation adjustment was achieved remotely via a set of MR-compatible strings, which were connected to a joystick. The concept of MR-guided targeting was successfully validated on a phantom set-up. This MR based guidance technique has practically allowed neurosurgeons to accomplish the required needle alignment to an arbitrary trajectory remotely in a straight forward procedure on any conventional MR scanner. Before needle insertion, the trajectory can be validated. Two successful biopsy cases using the new methodology and device have shown that the remotely operated device under MR-guidance is both effective and accurate for neurosurgery.

  10. Human Factors Guidance for Control Room and Digital Human-System Interface Design and Modification, Guidelines for Planning, Specification, Design, Licensing, Implementation, Training, Operation and Maintenance

    SciTech Connect

    R. Fink, D. Hill, J. O'Hara

    2004-11-30

    Nuclear plant operators face a significant challenge designing and modifying control rooms. This report provides guidance on planning, designing, implementing and operating modernized control rooms and digital human-system interfaces.

  11. Air quality monitoring of the post-operative recovery room and locations surrounding operating theaters in a medical center in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chin-Sheng; Wan, Gwo-Hwa

    2013-01-01

    To prevent surgical site infection (SSI), the airborne microbial concentration in operating theaters must be reduced. The air quality in operating theaters and nearby areas is also important to healthcare workers. Therefore, this study assessed air quality in the post-operative recovery room, locations surrounding the operating theater area, and operating theaters in a medical center. Temperature, relative humidity (RH), and carbon dioxide (CO2), suspended particulate matter (PM), and bacterial concentrations were monitored weekly over one year. Measurement results reveal clear differences in air quality in different operating theater areas. The post-operative recovery room had significantly higher CO2 and bacterial concentrations than other locations. Bacillus spp., Micrococcus spp., and Staphylococcus spp. bacteria often existed in the operating theater area. Furthermore, Acinetobacter spp. was the main pathogen in the post-operative recovery room (18%) and traumatic surgery room (8%). The mixed effect models reveal a strong correlation between number of people in a space and high CO2 concentration after adjusting for sampling locations. In conclusion, air quality in the post-operative recovery room and operating theaters warrants attention, and merits long-term surveillance to protect both surgical patients and healthcare workers.

  12. Air Quality Monitoring of the Post-Operative Recovery Room and Locations Surrounding Operating Theaters in a Medical Center in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Chin-Sheng; Wan, Gwo-Hwa

    2013-01-01

    To prevent surgical site infection (SSI), the airborne microbial concentration in operating theaters must be reduced. The air quality in operating theaters and nearby areas is also important to healthcare workers. Therefore, this study assessed air quality in the post-operative recovery room, locations surrounding the operating theater area, and operating theaters in a medical center. Temperature, relative humidity (RH), and carbon dioxide (CO2), suspended particulate matter (PM), and bacterial concentrations were monitored weekly over one year. Measurement results reveal clear differences in air quality in different operating theater areas. The post-operative recovery room had significantly higher CO2 and bacterial concentrations than other locations. Bacillus spp., Micrococcus spp., and Staphylococcus spp. bacteria often existed in the operating theater area. Furthermore, Acinetobacter spp. was the main pathogen in the post-operative recovery room (18%) and traumatic surgery room (8%). The mixed effect models reveal a strong correlation between number of people in a space and high CO2 concentration after adjusting for sampling locations. In conclusion, air quality in the post-operative recovery room and operating theaters warrants attention, and merits long-term surveillance to protect both surgical patients and healthcare workers. PMID:23573296

  13. Operating Room Efficiency: Benefits of an Orthopaedic Traumatologist at a Level II Trauma Center.

    PubMed

    Althausen, Peter L; Kauk, Justin R; Shannon, Steven; Lu, Minggen; O'Mara, Timothy J; Bray, Timothy J

    2016-12-01

    Fellowship-trained orthopaedic traumatologists are presumably taught skill sets leading to "best practice" outcomes and more efficient use of hospital resources. This should result in more favorable economic opportunities when compared with general orthopaedic surgeons (GOSs) providing similar clinical services. The purpose of our study was to compare the operating room utilization and financial data of traumatologists versus GOSs at a level II trauma center. Retrospective review. Level II community-based trauma hospital. Patients who presented to the emergency room at our institution with fractures and orthopaedic conditions requiring surgical intervention from January 1, 2010, to December 31, 2011. Operative fracture fixation by members of our orthopaedic trauma panel, including fellowship and nontrauma fellowship-trained orthopaedic surgeons. Our institutional database was queried to determine operative times, surgical supply and implant costs, and surgery labor expenses. Patients were stratified according to those treated by our trauma panel's 3 traumatologists and those treated by the 15 GOSs on our trauma panel. These 2 groups were then compared using standard statistical methods. A total of 6449 orthopedic cases were identified and 2076 of these involved fracture care. One thousand one hundred ninety-nine patients were treated by traumatologists and 877 by GOSs. There was no statistical difference detected in American Society of Anesthesiologists score between trauma and nontrauma groups. Overall, the traumatologist group demonstrated significantly decreased procedure times when compared with the GOS group (55.6 vs. 75.8 minutes, P , 0.0001). In 16 of 18 most common procedure types, traumatologists were more efficient. This led to significantly decreased surgical labor costs ($381.4 vs. $484.8; P < 0.0001) and surgical supply and implant costs ($2567 vs. $3003; P < 0.0001). This study demonstrates that in our communitybased trauma system, fracture care

  14. Design, operation, and safety of single-room interventional MRI suites: practical experience from two centers.

    PubMed

    White, Mark J; Thornton, John S; Hawkes, David J; Hill, Derek L G; Kitchen, Neil; Mancini, Laura; McEvoy, Andrew W; Razavi, Reza; Wilson, Sally; Yousry, Tarek; Keevil, Stephen F

    2015-01-01

    The design and operation of a facility in which a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner is incorporated into a room used for surgical or endovascular cardiac interventions presents several challenges. MR safety must be maintained in the presence of a much wider variety of equipment than is found in a diagnostic unit, and of staff unfamiliar with the MRI environment, without compromising the safety and practicality of the interventional procedure. Both the MR-guided cardiac interventional unit at Kings College London and the intraoperative imaging suite at the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery are single-room interventional facilities incorporating 1.5 T cylindrical-bore MRI scanners. The two units employ similar strategies to maintain MR safety, both in original design and day-to-day operational workflows, and between them over a decade of incident-free practice has been accumulated. This article outlines these strategies, highlighting both similarities and differences between the units, as well as some lessons learned and resulting procedural changes made in both units since installation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Improving operating room efficiency in academic children's hospital using Lean Six Sigma methodology.

    PubMed

    Tagge, Edward P; Thirumoorthi, Arul S; Lenart, John; Garberoglio, Carlos; Mitchell, Kenneth W

    2017-06-01

    Lean Six Sigma (LSS) is a process improvement methodology that utilizes a collaborative team effort to improve performance by systematically identifying root causes of problems. Our objective was to determine whether application of LSS could improve efficiency when applied simultaneously to all services of an academic children's hospital. In our tertiary academic medical center, a multidisciplinary committee was formed, and the entire perioperative process was mapped, using fishbone diagrams, Pareto analysis, and other process improvement tools. Results for Children's Hospital scheduled main operating room (OR) cases were analyzed, where the surgical attending followed themselves. Six hundred twelve cases were included in the seven Children's Hospital operating rooms (OR) over a 6-month period. Turnover Time (interval between patient OR departure and arrival of the subsequent patient) decreased from a median 41min in the baseline period to 32min in the intervention period (p<0.0001). Turnaround Time (interval between surgical dressing application and subsequent surgical incision) decreased from a median 81.5min in the baseline period to 71min in the intervention period (p<0.0001). These results demonstrate that a coordinated multidisciplinary process improvement redesign can significantly improve efficiency in an academic Children's Hospital without preselecting specific services, removing surgical residents, or incorporating new personnel or technology. Prospective comparative study, Level II. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Health risks associated with exposure to surgical smoke for surgeons and operation room personnel.

    PubMed

    Okoshi, Kae; Kobayashi, Katsutoshi; Kinoshita, Koichi; Tomizawa, Yasuko; Hasegawa, Suguru; Sakai, Yoshiharu

    2015-08-01

    Although surgical smoke contains potentially hazardous substances, such as cellular material, blood fragments, microorganisms, toxic gases and vapors, many operating rooms (ORs) do not provide protection from exposure to it. This article reviews the hazards of surgical smoke and the means of protecting OR personnel. Our objectives are to promote surgeons' acceptance to adopt measures to minimize the hazards. Depending on its components, surgical smoke can increase the risk of acute and chronic pulmonary conditions, cause acute headaches; irritation and soreness of the eyes, nose and throat; dermatitis and colic. Transmission of infectious disease may occur if bacterial or viral fragments present in the smoke are inhaled. The presence of carcinogens in surgical smoke and their mutagenic effects are also of concern. This review summarizes previously published reports and data regarding the toxic components of surgical smoke, the possible adverse effects on the health of operating room personnel and measures that can be used to minimize exposure to prevent respiratory problems. To reduce the hazards, surgical smoke should be removed by an evacuation system. Surgeons should assess the potential dangers of surgical smoke and encourage the use of evacuation devices to minimize potential health hazards to both themselves and other OR personnel.

  17. Operating room nurses' perceptions of the effects of physician-perpetrated abuse.

    PubMed

    Higgins, B L; MacIntosh, J

    2010-09-01

    Operating room (OR) nurses experience abuse perpetrated by physicians; however, little research has been conducted to examine nurses' perceptions of the effects of such abuse. The aim of this research was to understand participants' perceptions of physician-perpetrated abuse on their health and ability to provide patient care. In this qualitative descriptive study, ten operating room nurses working in Eastern Canada participated in open-ended, individual audiotaped interviews that were transcribed for analysis using Boyatzis' method for code development. Three categories of factors contributing to abuse were developed. The first, culture of the OR, included environment and hierarchy. The second, catalysts of abuse, included nurses' positions and experience as well as non-nurse factors such as resources and interpersonal relationships among physicians. The third category, perceived effects, included psychological, physical and social health consequences for nurses. Effects on patient care consisted of safety and potential challenges to access. Nursing practice implications included mentoring, support and accountability for action. Educational implications related to interdisciplinary education and increased education on communication, assertiveness, and awareness of abuse. Implications for research included studying perceptions of other health-care providers including physicians, studying recruitment and retention in relation to abuse, and studying other abuse in health care such as horizontal violence. We suggest a proactive approach for empowering OR nurses to address abuse and an increased focus on interdisciplinary roles.

  18. A professional and cost effective digital video editing and image storage system for the operating room.

    PubMed

    Scollato, A; Perrini, P; Benedetto, N; Di Lorenzo, N

    2007-06-01

    We propose an easy-to-construct digital video editing system ideal to produce video documentation and still images. A digital video editing system applicable to many video sources in the operating room is described in detail. The proposed system has proved easy to use and permits one to obtain videography quickly and easily. Mixing different streams of video input from all the devices in use in the operating room, the application of filters and effects produces a final, professional end-product. Recording on a DVD provides an inexpensive, portable and easy-to-use medium to store or re-edit or tape at a later time. From stored videography it is easy to extract high-quality, still images useful for teaching, presentations and publications. In conclusion digital videography and still photography can easily be recorded by the proposed system, producing high-quality video recording. The use of firewire ports provides good compatibility with next-generation hardware and software. The high standard of quality makes the proposed system one of the lowest priced products available today.

  19. Improved scores for observed teamwork in the clinical environment following a multidisciplinary operating room simulation intervention.

    PubMed

    Weller, Jennifer M; Cumin, David; Civil, Ian D; Torrie, Jane; Garden, Alexander; MacCormick, Andrew D; Gurusinghe, Nishanthi; Boyd, Matthew J; Frampton, Christopher; Cokorilo, Martina; Tranvik, Magnus; Carlsson, Lisa; Lee, Tracey; Ng, Wai Leap; Crossan, Michael; Merry, Alan F

    2016-08-05

    We ran a Multidisciplinary Operating Room Simulation (MORSim) course for 20 complete general surgical teams from two large metropolitan hospitals. Our goal was to improve teamwork and communication in the operating room (OR). We hypothesised that scores for teamwork and communication in the OR would improve back in the workplace following MORSim. We used an extended Behavioural Marker Risk Index (BMRI) to measure teamwork and communication, because a relationship has previously been documented between BMRI scores and surgical patient outcomes. Trained observers scored general surgical teams in the OR at the two study hospitals before and after MORSim, using the BMRI. Analysis of BMRI scores for the 224 general surgical cases before and 213 cases after MORSim showed BMRI scores improved by more than 20% (0.41 v 0.32, p<0.001). Previous research suggests that this improved teamwork score would translate into a clinically important reduction in complications and mortality in surgical patients. We demonstrated an improvement in scores for teamwork and communication in general surgical ORs following our intervention. These results support the use of simulation-based multidisciplinary team training for OR staff to promote better teamwork and communication, and potentially improve outcomes for general surgical patients.

  20. Example of cost calculations for an operating room and a post-anaesthesia care unit.

    PubMed

    Raft, J; Millet, F; Meistelman, C

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the cost of an operating room using data from our hospital. Using an accounting-based method helped us. Over the year 2012, the sum of direct and indirect expenses with cost sharing expenses allowed us to calculate the cost of the operating room (OR) and of the post-anaesthesia care unit (PACU). The cost of the OR and PACU was €10.8 per minute of time offered. Two thirds of the direct expenses were allocated to surgery and one third to anaesthesia. Indirect expenses were 25% of the direct expenses. The cost of medications and single use medical devises was €111.45 per anaesthesia. The total cost of anaesthesia (taking into account wages and indirect expenses) was €753.14 per anaesthesia as compared to the total cost of the anaesthesia. The part of medications and single use devices for anaesthesia was 14.8% of the total cost. Despite the difficulties facing cost evaluation, this model of calculation, assisted by the cost accounting controller, helped us to have a concrete financial vision. It also shows that a global reflexion is necessary during financial decision-making. Copyright © 2015 Société française d’anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Threats to safety during sedation outside of the operating room and the death of Michael Jackson.

    PubMed

    Webster, Craig S; Mason, Keira P; Shafer, Steven L

    2016-03-01

    From an understanding of human psychology and the reliability of high-technology systems, this review considers critical threats to the safety of patients undergoing sedation outside of the operating room, and will stratify these threats along what we define as the 'Patient Risk Continuum'. We then consider interventions suitable for addressing identified risks. The technology, organization and delivery of healthcare continue to become more complex, highlighting the importance of maintaining the safety of patients. Sedation outside of the operating room is known to be associated with higher rates of adverse events. However, a number of recent safety initiatives have shown benefit in improving patient safety. The following threats to patients undergoing sedation, in increasing order of risk, are discussed: equipment and environmental factors, known patient risks, poor team performance, combinatorial problems and egregious violations. To address these threats, we discuss a number of approaches consistent with the systems approach to safety, namely: encouraging functions, forcing functions, cognitive safety nets, information sharing, recovery strategies and regulatory change. Demonstrating improvement with any safety initiative relies critically on quality data collected on the problem area in question.

  2. Crew resource management improved perception of patient safety in the operating room.

    PubMed

    Gore, Dennis C; Powell, Jennifer M; Baer, Jennifer G; Sexton, Karen H; Richardson, C Joan; Marshall, David R; Chinkes, David L; Townsend, Courtney M

    2010-01-01

    To improve safety in the operating theater, a company of aviation pilots was employed to guide implementation of preprocedural briefings. A 5-point Likert scale survey that assessed the attitudes of operating room personnel toward patient safety was distributed before and 6 months following implementation of the briefings. Using Mann-Whitney analysis, the survey showed a significant (P < .05) improvement in 2 questions (of 13) involving reporting error and 2 questions (of 11) involving patient safety climate. When analyzed by occupation, there were no significant changes for faculty physicians; for resident physicians, there was a significant improvement in 1 question (of 13) regarding error reporting. For nurses, there were significant improvements in 3 questions (of 4) involving teamwork, 1 question (of 13) involving reporting error, and 3 questions (of 11) regarding patient safety climate. These results suggest that aviation-based crew resource management initiatives lead to an improved perception of patient safety, which was largely demonstrated by nursing personnel.

  3. Room-temperature operation of a titanium supersaturated silicon-based infrared photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Hemme, E.; García-Hernansanz, R.; Olea, J.; Pastor, D.; del Prado, A.; Mártil, I.; González-Díaz, G.

    2014-05-01

    We report room-temperature operation of 1 × 1 cm2 infrared photoconductive photodetectors based on silicon supersaturated with titanium. We have fabricated these Si-based infrared photodetectors devices by means of ion implantation followed by a pulsed laser melting process. A high sub-band gap responsivity of 34 mV W-1 has been obtained operating at the useful telecommunication applications wavelength of 1.55 μm (0.8 eV). The sub-band gap responsivity shows a cut-off frequency as high as 1.9 kHz. These Si-based devices exhibit a non-previous reported specific detectivity of 1.7 × 104 cm Hz1/2 W-1 at 660 Hz, under a 1.55 μm wavelength light. This work shows the potential of Ti supersaturated Si as a fully CMOS-compatible material for the infrared photodetection technology.

  4. [The application of operating room quality backward system in instrument place management].

    PubMed

    Du, Hui; He, Anjie; Zeng, Leilei

    2010-09-01

    Improvement of the surgery instrument's clean quality, the optimized preparation way, reasonable arrangement in groups, raising the working efficiency. We use the quality backward system into the instrument clean, the pack and the preparation way's question, carry on the analysis and the optimization, and appraise the effect after trying out 6 months. After finally the way optimized, instrument clean quality distinct enhancement; The flaws in the instrument clean, the pack way and the total operating time reduce; the contradictory between nurses and the cleans arising from the unclear connection reduces, the satisfaction degree of nurse and doctor to the instrument enhances. Using of operating room quality backward system in the management of the instrument clean, the pack and the preparation way optimized, may reduce flaws in the work and the waste of human resources, raise the working efficiency.

  5. Surfacing safety hazards using standardized operating room briefings and debriefings at a large regional medical center.

    PubMed

    Bandari, Jathin; Schumacher, Kathy; Simon, Michelle; Cameron, Danielle; Goeschel, Christine A; Holzmueller, Christine G; Makary, Martin A; Welsh, Robert J; Berenholtz, Sean M

    2012-04-01

    Briefings and debriefings, previously shown to be a practical and feasible strategy to improve interdisciplinary communication and teamwork in the operating room (OR), was then assessed as a strategy to prospectively surface clinical and operational defects in surgical care--and thereby prevent patient harm. A one-page, double-sided briefing and debriefing tool was used by surgical teams during cases at the William Beaumont Hospital Royal Oak (Royal Oak, Michigan) campus to surface clinical and operational defects during the study period (October 2006-May 2010). Defects were coded into six categories (with each category stratified by briefing or debriefing period) during the first six months, and refinement of coding resulted in expansion to 16 defect categories and no further stratification. A provider survey was used in January 2008 to interview a sample of 40 caregivers regarding the perceived effectiveness of the tool in surfacing defects. The teams identified a total of 6,202 defects--an average of 141 defects per month--during the entire study period. Of 2,760 defects identified during the six-defect coding period, 1,265 (46%) surfaced during briefings, and the remaining 1,495 (54%) during debriefings. Equipment (48%) and communication (31%) issues were most prominent. Of 3,442 defects identified during the 16-defect coding period, the most common were Central Processing Department (CPD) instrumentation (22%) and Communication/Safety (15%). Overall, 70 (87%) of the 80 responses were in agreement that briefings were effective for surfacing defects, as were 59 (76%) of the 78 responses for debriefings. Briefings and debriefings were a practical and effective strategy to surface potential surgical defects in the operating rooms of a large medical center.

  6. Dry lab practice leads to improved laparoscopic performance in the operating room.

    PubMed

    Stelzer, Marie K; Abdel, Matthew P; Sloan, Michael P; Gould, Jon C

    2009-06-01

    Research has demonstrated that practice in surgical simulators leads to improved performance in that simulator. Our hypothesis is that skills acquired in simulators are transferable to the operating room. Twenty-three laparoscopically naïve surgical interns performed two standardized tasks in a simulator: pegboard transfer and intracorporeal knot tying. Performance was measured using a validated scoring system. On the same day as this initial assessment, subjects were videotaped performing two tasks in a live porcine model: running the small bowel and intracorporeal knot tying. Performance in the porcine model was measured using a modified version of a validated skills assessment tool by two blinded experts. Following a 6-wk proficiency-based dry lab laparoscopic training course, task performance was re-evaluated. No interval live operative laparoscopic experience occurred between the first and second assessment. After training, mean pegboard transfer scores increased from 118.7 to 181.8 (theoretical maximum = 300; P < 0.01). Dry lab knot tying scores increased from 294.7 to 459.0 (theoretical maximum = 600, P < 0.01). In the porcine model, scores for the bowel running task increased from 8.5 to 13.5 (maximum score = 20 for both porcine tasks, P < 0.01). Knot tying scores increased from 7.3 to 14.3 (P < 0.01). Practice in a simulator leads to improved performance in that simulator and in a live operative model. We believe that this is evidence that laparoscopic skills developed in a dry laboratory setting are transferable to the operating room.

  7. Mitigating operating room fires: development of a carbon dioxide fire prevention device.

    PubMed

    Culp, William C; Kimbrough, Bradly A; Luna, Sarah; Maguddayao, Aris J

    2014-04-01

    Operating room fires are sentinel events that present a real danger to surgical patients and occur at least as frequently as wrong-sided surgery. For fire to occur, the 3 points of the fire triad must be present: an oxidizer, an ignition source, and fuel source. The electrosurgical unit (ESU) pencil triggers most operating room fires. Carbon dioxide (CO2) is a gas that prevents ignition and suppresses fire by displacing oxygen. We hypothesize that a device can be created to reduce operating room fires by generating a cone of CO2 around the ESU pencil tip. One such device was created by fabricating a divergent nozzle and connecting it to a CO2 source. This device was then placed over the ESU pencil, allowing the tip to be encased in a cone of CO2 gas. The device was then tested in 21%, 50%, and 100% oxygen environments. The ESU was activated at 50 W cut mode while placing the ESU pencil tip on a laparotomy sponge resting on an aluminum test plate for up to 30 seconds or until the sponge ignited. High-speed videography was used to identify time of ignition. Each test was performed in each oxygen environment 5 times with the device activated (CO2 flow 8 L/min) and with the device deactivated (no CO2 flow-control). In addition, 3-dimensional spatial mapping of CO2 concentrations was performed with a CO2 sampling device. The median ± SD [range] ignition time of the control group in 21% oxygen was 2.9 s ± 0.44 [2.3-3.0], in 50% oxygen 0.58 s ± 0.12 [0.47-0.73], and in 100% oxygen 0.48 s ± 0.50 [0.03-1.27]. Fires were ignited with each control trial (15/15); no fires ignited when the device was used (0/15, P < 0.0001). The CO2 concentration at the end of the ESU pencil tip was 95%, while the average CO2 concentration 1 to 1.4 cm away from the pencil tip on the bottom plane was 64%. In conclusion, an operating room fire prevention device can be created by using a divergent nozzle design through which CO2 passes, creating a cone of fire suppressant. This device as

  8. Which algorithm for scheduling add-on elective cases maximizes operating room utilization? Use of bin packing algorithms and fuzzy constraints in operating room management.

    PubMed

    Dexter, F; Macario, A; Traub, R D

    1999-11-01

    The algorithm to schedule add-on elective cases that maximizes operating room (OR) suite utilization is unknown. The goal of this study was to use computer simulation to evaluate 10 scheduling algorithms described in the management sciences literature to determine their relative performance at scheduling as many hours of add-on elective cases as possible into open OR time. From a surgical services information system for two separate surgical suites, the authors collected these data: (1) hours of open OR time available for add-on cases in each OR each day and (2) duration of each add-on case. These empirical data were used in computer simulations of case scheduling to compare algorithms appropriate for "variable-sized bin packing with bounded space." "Variable size" refers to differing amounts of open time in each "bin," or OR. The end point of the simulations was OR utilization (time an OR was used divided by the time the OR was available). Each day there were 0.24 +/- 0.11 and 0.28 +/- 0.23 simulated cases (mean +/- SD) scheduled to each OR in each of the two surgical suites. The algorithm that maximized OR utilization, Best Fit Descending with fuzzy constraints, achieved OR utilizations 4% larger than the algorithm with poorest performance. We identified the algorithm for scheduling add-on elective cases that maximizes OR utilization for surgical suites that usually have zero or one add-on elective case in each OR. The ease of implementation of the algorithm, either manually or in an OR information system, needs to be studied.

  9. Reorganizing patient care and workflow in the operating room: a cost-effectiveness study.

    PubMed

    Stahl, James E; Sandberg, Warren S; Daily, Bethany; Wiklund, Richard; Egan, Marie T; Goldman, Julian M; Isaacson, Keith B; Gazelle, Scott; Rattner, David W

    2006-06-01

    Many surgeons believe that long turnover times between cases are a major impediment to their productivity. We hypothesized that redesigning the operating room (OR) and perioperative-staffing system to take advantage of parallel processing would improve throughput and lower the cost of care. A state of the art high tech OR suite equipped with augmented data collection systems served as a living laboratory to evaluate both new devices and perioperative systems of care. The OR suite and all the experimental studies carried out in this setting were designated as the OR of the Future Project (ORF). Before constructing the ORF, modeling studies were conducted to inform the architectural and staffing design and estimate their benefit. In phase I a small prospective trial tested the main hypothesized benefits of the ORF: reduced patient intra-operative flow-time, wait-time and operative procedure time. In phase II a larger retrospective study was conducted to explore factors influencing these effects. A modified process costing method was used to estimate costs based on nationally derived data. Cost-effectiveness was evaluated using standard methods. There were 385 cases matched by surgeon and procedure type in the retrospective dataset (182 ORF, 193 standard operating room [SOR]). The median Wait Time (12.5 m ORF vs 23.8 m SOR), Operative Procedure Time (56.1 m ORF vs 70.5 m SOR), Emergence Time (10.9 m ORF vs 14.5 m SOR) and Total Patient OR Flowtime (79.5 m ORF vs 108.9 m SOR) were all shorter in the ORF (P < .05 for all comparisons). The median cost/patient was $3,165 in the ORF (interquartile range, $1,978 to $4,426) versus $2,645 in SORs (interquartile range, $1,823 to $3,908) (P = ns). The potential change in patient throughput for the ORF was 2 additional patients/day. This improved throughput was primarily attributable to a marked reduction in the non-operative time (ie, those activities commonly accounting for "turnover time") rather than facilitation of faster

  10. Human Error in Medicine: Change in Cardiac Operating Rooms through the FOCUS Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Spiess, Bruce D.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract: Human error in medicine is a significant cause of patient mortality. While there has been increased attention to safety in medicine since the Institute of Medicine publication To Err is Human, the profession at large has not progressed to the same degree as other highly complex industries such as aviation and nuclear power. The Flawless Operative Cardiovascular Unified Systems initiative (FOCUS) is a multi-year study/intervention to learn about and to improve human error in cardiac surgery. FOCUS has developed into an ongoing re-focusing through prospective interventional research schemes designed to effect positive change for improved patient care in cardiac surgery. The program was developed in conjunction with the Johns Hopkins University Quality and Safety Research Group using an approach termed Locating Errors through Network Surveillance (LENS). The LENS process was undertaken at Johns Hopkins University and another five centers where three major areas were examined observationally: interactions (communication) between operating room cardiac team members, clinical performance of known quality and safety dependent processes, and ergonomics/safety or human-machine interfaces. While collected data is currently being analyzed, preliminary results reveal over 800 human errors noted in the 40 cases observed. The errors observed are being categorized and taxonomy of errors is being created. Categories used in the FOCUS analysis include: teamwork and communication, compliance with existing protocols, knowledge or supervision, vigilance or situational awareness, equipment failure/design, poor operating room design/ergonomics, handoffs and transport problems, lack of professionalism, and ambiguity of responsibility. FOCUS is an initiative to change practice driven by science. Interventions based upon the observations already underway include efforts to decrease infection, adoption of the aviation concept of the “sterile cockpit”, briefing and debriefing

  11. Multidisciplinary teamwork improves use of the operating room: a multicenter study.

    PubMed

    van Veen-Berkx, Elizabeth; Bitter, Justin; Kazemier, Geert; Scheffer, Gert J; Gooszen, Hein G

    2015-06-01

    Poor inter-professional collaboration might negatively influence adequate planning of operative procedures. Interventions capable of improving inter-professional collaboration will positively impact professional practice and health care outcomes. Radboud University Medical Center (UMC) redesigned their operating room (OR) scheduling method by implementing cross-functional teams (CFTs). In this center, positive effects of CFTs were already demonstrated in a mono-center study. This study aims to confirm these effects by comparing the Radboud data with data from 6 other similar centers using a nationwide OR benchmark collaborative. The effect of CFTs was measured by the performance indicator "raw utilization." The Kruskal-Wallis one-way ANOVA was applied to compare OR performance among all 7 centers. The Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test was used to determine differences in OR performance between Radboud UMC and the control group. Operating room performance differed significantly among all 7 centers (p<0.0005). Radboud UMC demonstrated the highest median raw utilization of 94% vs 85% in the control group (p<0.0005). Box-and-whisker plots validated the reduced variation during the years, indicating an organizational learning effect. Therefore, not only a better performance than the control group, but also a gradual improvement of this performance during the years. This study shows that multidisciplinary collaboration in CFTs during the perioperative phase has a positive influence on OR scheduling and use of OR time. Other national databases considering mortality rates also support the idea that introducing CFTs is not only an important condition for improving OR performance, but also for improving quality of care. Copyright © 2015 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. An Evaluation of the Feasibility, Validity, and Reliability of Laparoscopic Skills Assessment in the Operating Room

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Rajesh; Grantcharov, Teodor; Moorthy, Krishna; Milland, Thor; Papasavas, Pavlos; Dosis, Aristotelis; Bello, Fernando; Darzi, Ara

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To assess the use of a synchronized video-based motion tracking device for objective, instant, and automated assessment of laparoscopic skill in the operating room. Summary Background Data: The assessment of technical skills is fundamental to recognition of proficient surgical practice. It is necessary to demonstrate the validity, reliability, and feasibility of any tool to be applied for objective measurement of performance. Methods: Nineteen subjects, divided into 13 experienced (performed >100 laparoscopic cholecystectomies) and 6 inexperienced (performed <10 LCs) surgeons completed LCs on 53 patients who all had a diagnosis of biliary colic. Each procedure was recorded with the ROVIMAS video-based motion tracking device to provide an objective measure of the surgeon's dexterity. Each video was also rated by 2 experienced observers on a previously validated operative assessment scale. Results: There were significant differences for motion tracking parameters between the 2 groups of surgeons for the Calot triangle dissection part of procedure for time taken (P = 0.002), total path length (P = 0.026), and number of movements (P = 0.005). Both motion tracking and video-based assessment displayed intertest reliability, and there were good correlations between the 2 modes of assessment (r = 0.4 to 0.7, P < 0.01). Conclusions: An instant, objective, valid, and reliable mode of assessment of laparoscopic performance in the operating room has been defined. This may serve to reduce the time taken for technical skills assessment, and subsequently lead to accurate and efficient audit and credentialing of surgeons for independent practice. PMID:17522527

  13. Human error in medicine: change in cardiac operating rooms through the FOCUS initiative.

    PubMed

    Spiess, Bruce D

    2011-03-01

    Human error in medicine is a significant cause of patient mortality. While there has been increased attention to safety in medicine since the Institute of Medicine publication To Err is Human, the profession at large has not progressed to the same degree as other highly complex industries such as aviation and nuclear power. The Flawless Operative Cardiovascular Unified Systems initiative (FOCUS) is a multi-year study/intervention to learn about and to improve human error in cardiac surgery. FOCUS has developed into an ongoing re-focusing through prospective interventional research schemes designed to effect positive change for improved patient care in cardiac surgery. The program was developed in conjunction with the Johns Hopkins University Quality and Safety Research Group using an approach termed locating errors through network surveillance (LENS). The LENS process was undertaken at Johns Hopkins University and another five centers where three major areas were examined observationally: interactions (communication) between operating room cardiac team members, clinical performance of known quality and safety dependent processes, and ergonomics/safety or human-machine interfaces. While collected data is currently being analyzed, preliminary results reveal over 800 human errors noted in the 40 cases observed. The errors observed are being categorized and taxonomy of errors is being created. Categories used in the FOCUS analysis include: teamwork and communication, compliance with existing protocols, knowledge or supervision, vigilance or situational awareness, equipment failure/design, poor operating room design/ergonomics, handoffs and transport problems, lack of professionalism, and ambiguity of responsibility. FOCUS is an initiative to change practice driven by science. Interventions based upon the observations already underway include efforts to decrease infection, adoption of the aviation concept of the "sterile cockpit", briefing and debriefing, reduction of

  14. Application of Mathematical Models in Combination with Monte Carlo Simulation for Prediction of Isoflurane Concentration in an Operation Room Theater

    PubMed Central

    ZARE SAKHVIDI, Mohammad Javad; BARKHORDARI, Abolfazl; SALEHI, Maryam; BEHDAD, Shekoofeh; FALLAHZADEH, Hossein

    2013-01-01

    Applicability of two mathematical models in inhalation exposure prediction (well mixed room and near field-far field model) were validated against standard sampling method in one operation room for isoflurane. Ninety six air samples were collected from near and far field of the room and quantified by gas chromatography-flame ionization detector. Isoflurane concentration was also predicted by the models. Monte Carlo simulation was used to incorporate the role of parameters variability. The models relatively gave more conservative results than the measurements. There was no significant difference between the models and direct measurements results. There was no difference between the concentration prediction of well mixed room model and near field far field model. It suggests that the dispersion regime in room was close to well mixed situation. Direct sampling showed that the exposure in the same room for same type of operation could be up to 17 times variable which can be incorporated by Monte Carlo simulation. Mathematical models are valuable option for prediction of exposure in operation rooms. Our results also suggest that incorporating the role of parameters variability by conducting Monte Carlo simulation can enhance the strength of prediction in occupational hygiene decision making. PMID:23912206

  15. Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (POCC) Control Room During STS-35 Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The primary objective of the STS-35 mission was round the clock observation of the celestial sphere in ultraviolet and X-Ray astronomy with the Astro-1 observatory which consisted of four telescopes: the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT); the Wisconsin Ultraviolet Photo-Polarimeter Experiment (WUPPE); the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT); and the Broad Band X-Ray Telescope (BBXRT). The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was the air/ground communication channel used between the astronauts and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. Teams of controllers and researchers directed on-orbit science operations, sent commands to the spacecraft, received data from experiments aboard the Space Shuttle, adjusted mission schedules to take advantage of unexpected science opportunities or unexpected results, and worked with crew members to resolve problems with their experiments. Due to loss of data used for pointing and operating the ultraviolet telescopes, MSFC ground teams were forced to aim the telescopes with fine tuning by the flight crew. This photo is an overview of the MSFC Payload Control Room (PCR).

  16. Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (POCC) Control Room During STS-35 Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The primary objective of the STS-35 mission was round the clock observation of the celestial sphere in ultraviolet and X-Ray astronomy with the Astro-1 observatory which consisted of four telescopes: the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT); the Wisconsin Ultraviolet Photo-Polarimeter Experiment (WUPPE); the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT); and the Broad Band X-Ray Telescope (BBXRT). The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was the air/ground communication channel used between the astronauts and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. Teams of controllers and researchers directed on-orbit science operations, sent commands to the spacecraft, received data from experiments aboard the Space Shuttle, adjusted mission schedules to take advantage of unexpected science opportunities or unexpected results, and worked with crew members to resolve problems with their experiments. Due to loss of data used for pointing and operating the ultraviolet telescopes, MSFC ground teams were forced to aim the telescopes with fine tuning by the flight crew. This photo is an overview of the MSFC Payload Control Room (PCR).

  17. STS-35 Mission Manager Actions Room at the Marshall Space Flight Center Spacelab Payload Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The primary objective of the STS-35 mission was round the clock observation of the celestial sphere in ultraviolet and X-Ray astronomy with the Astro-1 observatory which consisted of four telescopes: the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT); the Wisconsin Ultraviolet Photo-Polarimeter Experiment (WUPPE); the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT); and the Broad Band X-Ray Telescope (BBXRT). The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was the air/ground communication channel used between the astronauts and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. Teams of controllers and researchers directed on-orbit science operations, sent commands to the spacecraft, received data from experiments aboard the Space Shuttle, adjusted mission schedules to take advantage of unexpected science opportunities or unexpected results, and worked with crew members to resolve problems with their experiments. Due to loss of data used for pointing and operating the ultraviolet telescopes, MSFC ground teams were forced to aim the telescopes with fine tuning by the flight crew. This photo captures the activities at the Mission Manager Actions Room during the mission.

  18. An Analysis of Pediatric Dentistry Residents' Productivity in the Operating Room.

    PubMed

    Arevalo, Oscar; Saman, Daniel M; Roldan, Rosie; Ballard, Andre; Suta, Adi; Brocha, Gabriel

    2017-01-15

    To analyze productivity of pediatric dental residents (PDRs) in the operating room (OR) and to determine predictors of case length. Service-mix for OR cases completed between 2010 and 2013 were converted to relative value units (RVUs). Additional information, including patients' age, gender, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) status, number of teeth, and operation time was retrieved. Analysis entailed descriptive, correlational, and multivariable techniques. Eight PDRs completed 893 OR cases. First-year residents (FYRs) completed more complex cases than second-year residents (SYRs), as determined by total RVUs and number of teeth. However, SYRs were more productive, as determined by RVUs per minute. Productivity for all PDRs increased on average by 33 percent during the program, with an average of 0.39 versus 0.59 RVUs per minute during the first versus the last quarters. Case complexity - measured in total RVUs per case - was associated with number of teeth and operation time, while patients' age and ASA status were not significantly associated with case complexity in the final regression model. Clinical productivity of PDRs increased over the two-year period, with a wide variation demonstrating a differential learning curve on different individuals. A significant association between case complexity, number of teeth, and operation time was found.

  19. [Possible Instrument Contamination in the Operating Room During Implantation of Knee and Hip Arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Quint, U; Benen, T

    2016-04-01

    Integrated ventilation systems with low turbulence displacement flow (TAV) are generally legally required in the architectural structure of operating theatres. However, it seems that the instruments laid out on sterile covered tables do not have the best possible protection from bacteria. Within an operating theatre, different bacteria counts are possible on the instruments. This prospective controlled study was conducted to demonstrate the influence of instrument tables with integrated horizontal flow on contamination with pathogens in comparison with conventional tables. In an operating theatre (OT) with a ceiling legally appropriate for TAV (2.40 m × 1.20 m), microbiological samples were placed on a table with integrated TAV flow (n = 100) and on a conventional instrument table (n = 100). The routine qualification of the OT was on an ongoing basis and was in accordance with DIN 1946-4: 1999 standards (in accordance with DIN measurement of recovery time 1946-4: 12-2008). This corresponds to the OT of the room class Ib. The results show significant differences between the two tables. The bacteria count and the percentage of contamination were many times higher on the conventional table. It is important to understand that the instruments are not completely protected against contamination after opening the pack and during the operation. Remedial measures are possible to optimise the sterility the instrument table.

  20. [Intelligent operating room suite : From passive medical devices to the self-thinking cognitive surgical assistant].

    PubMed

    Kenngott, H G; Wagner, M; Preukschas, A A; Müller-Stich, B P

    2016-12-01

    Modern operating room (OR) suites are mostly digitally connected but until now the primary focus was on the presentation, transfer and distribution of images. Device information and processes within the operating theaters are barely considered. Cognitive assistance systems have triggered a fundamental rethinking in the automotive industry as well as in logistics. In principle, tasks in the OR, some of which are highly repetitive, also have great potential to be supported by automated cognitive assistance via a self-thinking system. This includes the coordination of the entire workflow in the perioperative process in both the operating theater and the whole hospital. With corresponding data from hospital information systems, medical devices and appropriate models of the surgical process, intelligent systems could optimize the workflow in the operating theater in the near future and support the surgeon. Preliminary results on the use of device information and automatically controlled OR suites are already available. Such systems include, for example the guidance of laparoscopic camera systems. Nevertheless, cognitive assistance systems that make use of knowledge about patients, processes and other pieces of information to improve surgical treatment are not yet available in the clinical routine but are urgently needed in order to automatically assist the surgeon in situation-related activities and thus substantially improve patient care.

  1. Fundamental Use of Surgical Energy (FUSE): An Essential Educational Program for Operating Room Safety.

    PubMed

    Jones, Stephanie B; Munro, Malcolm G; Feldman, Liane S; Robinson, Thomas N; Brunt, L Michael; Schwaitzberg, Steven D; Jones, Daniel B; Fuchshuber, Pascal R

    2017-01-01

    Operating room (OR) safety has become a major concern in patient safety since the 1990s. Improvement of team communication and behavior is a popular target for safety programming at the institutional level. Despite these efforts, essential safety gaps remain in the OR and procedure rooms. A prime example is the use of energy-based devices in ORs and procedural areas. The lack of fundamental understanding of energy device function, design, and application contributes to avoidable injury and harm at a rate of approximately 1 to 2 per 1000 patients in the US. Hundreds of OR fires occur each year in the US, some causing severe injury and even death. Most of these fires are associated with the use of energy-based surgical devices.In response to this safety issue, the Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons (SAGES) developed the Fundamental Use of Surgical Energy (FUSE) program. This program includes a standardized curriculum targeted to surgeons, other physicians, and allied health care professionals and a psychometrically designed and validated certification test. A successful FUSE certification documents acquisition of the basic knowledge needed to safely use energy-based devices in the OR. By design FUSE fills a void in the curriculum and competency assessment for surgeons and other procedural specialists in the use of energy-based devices in patients.

  2. A waterjet mining machine for use in room and pillar mining operations. [Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, D.A.

    1990-06-01

    A new mining machine is constructed for use in room and pillar mining operations. This machine uses the action of computer controlled, centrally located high pressure cutting lances to cut deep slots in a coal face. These slots stress relieve the coal ahead of the machine and outline blocks of coal. The movement forward of the machine then wedges up the lower block of coal. This wedging action is assisted by the gathering arms of the loader section of the machine, and by underlying oscillating waterjets which create a slot ahead of the loading wedge as it advances. Finally the top section of coal is brought down by the sequential advance of wedge faced roof support members, again assisted by the waterjet action from the central cutting arms. The machine is designed to overcome major disadvantages of existing room and pillar mining machines in regard to a reduction in respirable dust, the creation of an immediate roof support, and an increase in product size, with concomitant reduction in cleaning costs.

  3. A waterjet mining machine for use in room and pillar mining operations

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, D.A.

    1990-06-01

    A new mining machine is constructed for use in room and pillar mining operations. This machine uses the action of computer controlled, centrally located high pressure cutting lances to cut deep slots in a coal face. These slots stress relieve the coal ahead of the machine and outline blocks of coal. The movement forward of the machine then wedges up the lower block of coal. This wedging action is assisted by the gathering arms of the loader section of the machine, and by underlying oscillating waterjets which create a slot ahead of the loading wedge as it advances. Finally the top section of coal is brought down by the sequential advance of wedge faced roof support members, again assisted by the waterjet action from the central cutting arms. The machine is designed to overcome major disadvantages of existing room and pillar mining machines in regard to a reduction in respirable dust, the creation of an immediate roof support, and an increase in product size, with concomitant reduction in cleaning costs.

  4. Fabrication of room temperature continuous-wave operation GaN-based ultraviolet laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Degang; Yang, Jing; Liu, Zongshun; Chen, Ping; Zhu, Jianjun; Jiang, Desheng; Shi, Yongsheng; Wang, Hai; Duan, Lihong; Zhang, Liqun; Yang, Hui

    2017-06-01

    Two kinds of continuous-wave GaN-based ultraviolet laser diodes (LDs) operated at room temperature and with different emission wavelengths are demonstrated. The LDs epitaxial layers are grown on GaN substrate by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition, with a 10 × 600 μm2 ridge waveguide structure. The electrical and optical characteristics of the ultraviolet LDs are investigated under direct-current injection at room temperature. The stimulated emission peak wavelength of first LD is 392.9 nm, the threshold current density and voltage is 1.5 kA/cm2 and 5.0 V, respectively. The output light power is 80 mW under the 4.0 kA/cm2 injection current density. The stimulated emission peak wavelength of second LD is 381.9 nm, the threshold current density the voltage is 2.8 kA/cm2 and 5.5 V, respectively. The output light power is 14 mW under a 4.0 kA/cm2 injection current density. Projects the supported by the National Key R&D Program of China (Nos. 2016YFB0401801, 2016YFB0400803), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61674138, 61674139, 61604145, 61574135, 61574134, 61474142, 61474110, 61377020, 61376089), the Science Challenge Project (No. JCKY2016212A503), and the One Hundred Person Project of the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  5. Fundamental Use of Surgical Energy (FUSE): An Essential Educational Program for Operating Room Safety

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Stephanie B; Munro, Malcolm G; Feldman, Liane S; Robinson, Thomas N; Brunt, L Michael; Schwaitzberg, Steven D; Jones, Daniel B; Fuchshuber, Pascal R

    2017-01-01

    Operating room (OR) safety has become a major concern in patient safety since the 1990s. Improvement of team communication and behavior is a popular target for safety programming at the institutional level. Despite these efforts, essential safety gaps remain in the OR and procedure rooms. A prime example is the use of energy-based devices in ORs and procedural areas. The lack of fundamental understanding of energy device function, design, and application contributes to avoidable injury and harm at a rate of approximately 1 to 2 per 1000 patients in the US. Hundreds of OR fires occur each year in the US, some causing severe injury and even death. Most of these fires are associated with the use of energy-based surgical devices. In response to this safety issue, the Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons (SAGES) developed the Fundamental Use of Surgical Energy (FUSE) program. This program includes a standardized curriculum targeted to surgeons, other physicians, and allied health care professionals and a psychometrically designed and validated certification test. A successful FUSE certification documents acquisition of the basic knowledge needed to safely use energy-based devices in the OR. By design FUSE fills a void in the curriculum and competency assessment for surgeons and other procedural specialists in the use of energy-based devices in patients. PMID:28241913

  6. Surgical teams: role perspectives and role dynamics in the operating room.

    PubMed

    Leach, Linda Searle; Myrtle, Robert C; Weaver, Fred A

    2011-05-01

    Observations of surgical teams in the operating room (OR) and interviews with surgeons, circulating registered nurses (RNs), anaesthesiologists and surgical technicians reveal the importance of leadership, team member competencies and an enacted environment that encourages feelings of competence and cooperation. Surgical teams are more loosely coupled than intact and bounded. Team members tend to rely on expected role behaviours to bridge lack of familiarity. While members of the surgical team identified technical competence and preparation as critical factors affecting team performance, they had differing views over the role behaviours of other members of the surgical team that lead to surgical team performance. Observations revealed that the work climate in the OR can shape interpersonal relations and begins to be established when the room is being set up for the surgical case, and evolves as the surgical procedure progresses. The leadership and supervisory competencies of the circulating RNs establish the initial work environment. Both influenced the degree of cooperation and support that was observed, which had an effect on the interactions and relationships between other members of the surgical team. As the surgery unfolds, the surgeon's behaviours and interpersonal relations modify this environment and ultimately influence the degree of team work, team satisfaction and team performance.

  7. The Effect of Gender on Resident Autonomy in the Operating room.

    PubMed

    Meyerson, Shari L; Sternbach, Joel M; Zwischenberger, Joseph B; Bender, Edward M

    2017-06-29

    Discrimination against women training in medicine and surgery has been subjectively described for decades. This study objectively documents gender differences in the degree of autonomy given to thoracic surgery trainees in the operating room. Thoracic surgery residents and faculty underwent frame of reference training on the use of the 4-point Zwisch scale to measure operative autonomy. Residents and faculty then submitted evaluations of their perception of autonomy granted for individual operations as well as operative difficulty on a real-time basis using the "Zwisch Me!!" mobile application. Differences in autonomy given to male and female residents were elucidated using chi-square analysis and ordered logistic regression. Seven academic medical centers with thoracic surgery training programs. Volunteer thoracic surgery residents in both integrated and traditional training pathways and their affiliated cardiothoracic faculty. Residents (n = 33, female 18%) submitted a total of 596 evaluations to faculty (n = 48, female 12%). Faculty gave less autonomy to female residents with only 56 of 184 evaluations (30.3%) showing meaningful autonomy (passive help or supervision only) compared to 107 of 292 evaluations (36.7%) at those levels for male residents (p = 0.02). Resident perceptions of autonomy showed even more pronounced differences with female residents receiving only 38 of 197 evaluations (19.3%) with meaningful autonomy compared to 133 of 399 evaluations (33.3%) for male residents (p < 0.001). Potential influencing factors explored included attending gender and specialty, case type and difficulty, and resident level of training. In multivariate analysis, only case difficultly, resident gender, and level of training were significantly related to autonomy granted to residents. Evaluations of operative autonomy reveal a significant bias against female residents. Faculty education is needed to encourage allowing female residents more operative autonomy. Copyright

  8. Leadership in surgery for public sector hospitals in Jamaica: strategies for the operating room.

    PubMed

    Cawich, Shamir O; Harding, Hyacinth E; Crandon, Ivor W; McGaw, Clarence D; Barnett, Alan T; Tennant, Ingrid; Evans, Necia R; Martin, Allie C; Simpson, Lindberg K; Johnson, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The barriers to health care delivery in developing nations are many: underfunding, limited support services, scarce resources, suboptimal health care worker attitudes, and deficient health care policies are some of the challenges. The literature contains little information about health care leadership in developing nations. This discursive paper examines the impact of leadership on the delivery of operating room (OR) services in public sector hospitals in Jamaica.Delivery of OR services in Jamaica is hindered by many unique cultural, financial, political, and environmental barriers. We identify six leadership goals adapted to this environment to achieve change. Effective leadership must adapt to the environment. Delivery of OR services in Jamaica may be improved by addressing leadership training, workplace safety, interpersonal communication, and work environment and by revising existing policies. Additionally, there should be regular practice audits and quality control surveys.

  9. Leadership in Surgery for Public Sector Hospitals in Jamaica: Strategies for the Operating Room

    PubMed Central

    Cawich, Shamir O; Harding, Hyacinth E; Crandon, Ivor W; McGaw, Clarence D; Barnett, Alan T; Tennant, Ingrid; Evans, Necia R; Martin, Allie C; Simpson, Lindberg K; Johnson, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The barriers to health care delivery in developing nations are many: underfunding, limited support services, scarce resources, suboptimal health care worker attitudes, and deficient health care policies are some of the challenges. The literature contains little information about health care leadership in developing nations. This discursive paper examines the impact of leadership on the delivery of operating room (OR) services in public sector hospitals in Jamaica. Delivery of OR services in Jamaica is hindered by many unique cultural, financial, political, and environmental barriers. We identify six leadership goals adapted to this environment to achieve change. Effective leadership must adapt to the environment. Delivery of OR services in Jamaica may be improved by addressing leadership training, workplace safety, interpersonal communication, and work environment and by revising existing policies. Additionally, there should be regular practice audits and quality control surveys. PMID:24355903

  10. Birth wind and fire: raising awareness to operating room fires during delivery.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Omer; Weissman, Oren; Harats, Moti; Farber, Nimrod; Stavrou, Demetris; Tessone, Ariel; Zilinsky, Isaac; Winkler, Eyal; Haik, Josef

    2013-09-01

    We researched whether the obstetric operating room (OR) qualified as a fire-risk environment so as to take preventive measures accordingly. We analyzed a series of iatrogenic burns inflicted during birth by collecting clinical data and comparing it with known OR fire risk factors and with other factors that repeated in all cases in search of unique characteristics of the obstetric OR. All three cases shared in common the same type of oxygen-rich open ventilation system, alcohol-based prepping solution, and the hastiness of cesarean delivery while spontaneous vaginal delivery was already in progress. The obstetric OR is, as suspected, a fire-prone zone in more ways than the regular OR. Therefore, preventive measures should be undertaken and awareness for the possibility for such occurrences should be raised.

  11. A Case Report of Malignant Hyperthermia in a Dental Clinic Operating Room

    PubMed Central

    Fukami, M. Cynthia; Ganzberg, Steven I

    2005-01-01

    A healthy 5-year-old boy presented for arch bar placement under general anesthesia in an operating room in a dental school. The patient had previously undergone general anesthesia without complication, and no family history of anesthetic problems were reported. Halothane mask induction, intravenous catheter placement, and nasal intubation proceeded uneventfully without the aid of a muscle relaxant. Halfway through the procedure, signs and symptoms of malignant hyperthermia, including muscle rigidity, hypercarbia, tachypnea, and tachycardia were noted. Immediate treatment, including discontinuation of the triggering agent, dantrolene administration, and cooling measures were applied, and once stable, the child was transferred to Columbus Children's Hospital for further management. The patient experienced no postoperative complications. Further discussion regarding the pathophysiology and management of malignant hyperthermia is provided. PMID:15859446

  12. Nitrous oxide pollution in the operating room. A comparison of two modes of ventilation.

    PubMed

    Noorddin, Y; Raha, A R; Jaafar, M Z; Rozaidi, S H W; Muraly, S; Marlizan, M Y

    2007-06-01

    The use of laryngeal mask airway (LMA) as an alternative to the endotracheal tube (ETT) is becoming more popular in the practice of anesthesia. It is undeniable that this device has numerous advantages over endotracheal tube, however it does not provide an airtight seal between the airway and atmospheric gases. This may lead to pollution of the operating room environment with nitrous oxide. One hundreds adult patients undergoing general anaesthesia were divided into two groups. The airway in Group I was maintained with LMA with spontaneous ventilation and ETT with intermittent positive pressure ventilation (IPPV) was used for Group II. The result demonstrated that the ETT group recorded concentrations of nitrous oxide that were well above the NIOSH recommended eight hour time weighted average of 25ppm throughout the duration of surgery when compared to patients using LMA.

  13. The effect of surgical handwashing routines on the microbial counts of operating room nurses.

    PubMed

    Pereira, L J; Lee, G M; Wade, K J

    1990-12-01

    Many factors may affect the efficiency of handwashing techniques. This study examined two interdependent factors: the time taken to wash the hands and the type of antiseptic solution used. A 3-minute initial scrub and 30-second consecutive scrub regimen was compared with a current standard regimen of a 5-minute initial scrub and a 3-minute consecutive scrub. Chlorhexidine gluconate 4% and povidone-iodine 7.5% were the antiseptics used in the two regimens. The sample (n = 34) was drawn from nurses employed in the operating room suite of a 950-bed hospital. Chlorhexidine gluconate was found to be responsible for lower numbers of colony-forming units of bacteria than povidone-iodine. The duration of the scrub had no significant effect on the numbers of bacteria when povidone-iodine was used. The optimal regimen was found to be the 5-minute initial and 3-minute consecutive scrubs with chlorhexidine gluconate.

  14. Computer based guidance in the modern operating room: a historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Bova, Frank

    2010-01-01

    The past few decades have seen the introduction of many different and innovative approaches aimed at enhancing surgical technique. As microprocessors have decreased in size and increased in processing power, more sophisticated systems have been developed. Some systems have attempted to provide enhanced instrument control while others have attempted to provide tools for surgical guidance. These systems include robotics, image enhancements, and frame-based and frameless guidance procedures. In almost every case the system's design goals were achieved and surgical outcomes were enhanced, yet a vast majority of today's surgical procedures are conducted without the aid of these advances. As new tools are developed and existing tools refined, special attention to the systems interface and integration into the operating room environment will be required before increased utilization of these technologies can be realized.

  15. Augmented-reality visualization in iMRI operating room: system description and preclinical testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, Frank; Khamene, Ali; Bascle, Benedicte; Vogt, Sebastian; Rubino, Gregory

    2002-05-01

    We developed an augmented reality system targeting image guidance for surgical procedures. The surgeon wears a video- see-through head mounted display that provides him with a stereo video view of the patient. The live video images are augmented with graphical representations of anatomical structures that are segmented from medical image data. The surgeon can see, e.g., a tumor in its actual location inside the patient. This in-situ visualization, where the computer maps the image information onto the patient, promises the most direct, intuitive guidance for surgical procedures. In this paper, we describe technical details of the system and its installation in UCLA's iMRI operating room. We added instrument tracking to the capabilities of our system to prepare it for minimally invasive procedures. We discuss several pre-clinical phantom experiments that support the potential clinical usefulness of augmented reality guidance.

  16. Designing User Interfaces for Smart-Applications for Operating Rooms and Intensive Care Units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kindsmüller, Martin Christof; Haar, Maral; Schulz, Hannes; Herczeg, Michael

    Today’s physicians and nurses working in operating rooms and intensive care units have to deal with an ever increasing amount of data. More and more medical devices are delivering information, which has to be perceived and interpreted in regard to patient status and the necessity to adjust therapy. The combination of high information load and insufficient usability creates a severe challenge for the health personnel with respect to proper monitoring of these devices respective to acknowledging alarms and timely reaction to critical incidents. Smart Applications are a new kind of decision support systems that incorporate medical expertise in order to help health personnel in regard to diagnosis and therapy. By means of a User Centered Design process of two Smart Applications (anaesthesia monitor display, diagnosis display), we illustrate which approach should be followed and which processes and methods have been successfully applied in fostering the design of usable medical devices.

  17. [Rules of decontamination and disinfection of medicosurgical instruments in the operating room].

    PubMed

    Dumartin, C; Brücker, G

    1995-01-01

    Nosocomial infections may result from the reuse of surgical devices if adequate disinfection or sterilization measures are not employed. The first step of reprocessing occurs immediately after use in the operating room. This consists of cleaning and decontamination to eliminate organic material and to reduce the number of microorganisms, in order to protect personnel who subsequently manipulate these instruments and to facilitate the ultimate process of sterilization or disinfection. Instruments that cannot be sterilized must be submitted to "high level disinfection" to remove undesirable microorganisms. In order to guarantee the desired results of disinfection, it is very important to adopt reliable and effective protocols, chemical products with good germicidal properties and with minimal adverse effects on the personnel and the environment. The personnel involved in this delicate and important task must be thoroughly trained. If the above conditions are met, the infectious risk associated with reuse of surgical devices can be controlled.

  18. Investigation of room ventilation for improved operation of a downdraft table

    SciTech Connect

    Jayaraman, B.; Kristoffersen, A.; Finlayson, E.; Gadgil, A.

    2004-05-01

    We report a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study on containment of airborne hazardous materials in a ventilated room containing a downdraft table. Specifically, we investigate the containment of hazardous airborne material obtainable under a range of ventilation configurations. The desirable ventilation configuration should ensure excellent containment of the hazardous material released from the workspace above the downdraft table. However, increased airflow raises operation costs, so the airflow should be as low as feasible without compromising containment. The airflow is modeled using Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes equations with a high Reynolds number k-epsilon turbulence model. CFD predictions are examined for several ventilation configurations. Based on this study, we find that substantial improvements in containment are possible concurrent with a significant reduction in airflow, compared to the existing design of ventilation configuration.

  19. Impact of computerized information systems on workload in operating room and intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Bosman, R J

    2009-03-01

    The number of operating rooms and intensive care departments equipped with a clinical information system (CIS) is rapidly expanding. Amongst the putative advantages of such an installation, reduction in workload for the clinician is one of the most appealing. The scarce studies looking at workload variations associated with the implementation of a CIS, only focus on direct workload discarding indirect changes in workload. Descriptions of the various methods to quantify workload are provided. The hypothesis that a third generation CIS can reduce documentation time for ICU nurses and increase time they spend on patient care, is supported by recent literature. Though it seems obvious to extrapolate these advantages of a CIS to the anesthesiology department or physicians in the intensive care, studies examining this assumption are scarce.

  20. Bacterial contamination of propofol vials used in operating rooms of a third-level hospital.

    PubMed

    Zorrilla-Vaca, Andrés; Escandón-Vargas, Kevin; Brand-Giraldo, Vanessa; León, Tatiana; Herrera, Mónica; Payán, Andrey

    2016-01-01

    We found a 6.1% bacterial contamination rate among 198 propofol vials collected after clinical use in 12 operating rooms of a high-complexity hospital in Cali, Colombia. Some propofol vials were used for extended periods (up to 72 hours), and only 26.1% of vials were punctured once. Median time of use, although not statistically significant, was higher in positive samples (7.2 vs 3.5 hours, P = .08). Education on the topic should stress that vials are single-patient use and must be immediately discarded after use. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Continuous operation of a monolithic semiconductor terahertz source at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Q. Y.; Bandyopadhyay, N.; Slivken, S.; Bai, Y.; Razeghi, M.

    2014-06-02

    We demonstrate room temperature continuous wave THz sources based on intracavity difference-frequency generation from mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers. Buried ridge, buried composite distributed-feedback waveguide with Čerenkov phase-matching scheme is used to reduce the waveguide loss and enhance the heat dissipation for continuous wave operation. Continuous emission at 3.6 THz with a side-mode suppression ratio of 20 dB and output power up to 3 μW are achieved, respectively. THz peak power is further scaled up to 1.4 mW in pulsed mode by increasing the mid-infrared power through increasing the active region doping and device area.

  2. Use of an operating microscope during spine surgery is associated with minor increases in operating room times and no increased risk of infection.

    PubMed

    Basques, Bryce A; Golinvaux, Nicholas S; Bohl, Daniel D; Yacob, Alem; Toy, Jason O; Varthi, Arya G; Grauer, Jonathan N

    2014-10-15

    Retrospective database review. To evaluate whether microscope use during spine procedures is associated with increased operating room times or increased risk of infection. Operating microscopes are commonly used in spine procedures. It is debated whether the use of an operating microscope increases operating room time or confers increased risk of infection. The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database, which includes data from more than 370 participating hospitals, was used to identify patients undergoing elective spinal procedures with and without the use of an operating microscope for the years 2011 and 2012. Bivariate and multivariate linear regressions were used to test the association between microscope use and operating room times. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regressions were similarly conducted to test the association between microscope use and infection occurrence within 30 days of surgery. A total of 23,670 elective spine procedures were identified, of which 2226 (9.4%) used an operating microscope. The average patient age was 55.1±14.4 years. The average operative time (incision to closure) was 125.7±82.0 minutes.Microscope use was associated with minor increases in preoperative room time (+2.9 min, P=0.013), operative time (+13.2 min, P<0.001), and total room time (+18.6 min, P<0.001) on multivariate analysis.A total of 328 (1.4%) patients had an infection within 30 days of surgery. Multivariate analysis revealed no significant difference between the microscope and nonmicroscope groups for occurrence of any infection, superficial surgical site infection, deep surgical site infection, organ space infection, or sepsis/septic shock, regardless of surgery type. We did not find operating room times or infection risk to be significant deterrents for use of an operating microscope during spine surgery. 3.

  3. Use of an operating microscope during spine surgery is associated with minor increases in operating room times and no increased risk of infection

    PubMed Central

    Basques, Bryce A.; Golinvaux, Nicholas S.; Bohl, Daniel D.; Yacob, Alem; Toy, Jason O.; Varthi, Arya G.; Grauer, Jonathan N.

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective database review. Objective To evaluate whether microscope use during spine procedures is associated with increased operating room times or increased risk of infection. Summary of Background Data Operating microscopes are commonly used in spine procedures. It is debated whether the use of an operating microscope increases operating room time or confers increased risk of infection. Methods The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) database, which includes data from over 370 participating hospitals, was used to identify patients undergoing elective spinal procedures with and without an operating microscope for the years 2011 and 2012. Bivariate and multivariate linear regressions were used to test the association between microscope use and operating room times. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regressions were similarly conducted to test the association between microscope use and infection occurrence within 30 days of surgery. Results A total of 23,670 elective spine procedures were identified, of which 2,226 (9.4%) used an operating microscope. The average patient age was 55.1 ± 14.4 years. The average operative time (incision to closure) was 125.7 ± 82.0 minutes. Microscope use was associated with minor increases in preoperative room time (+2.9 minutes, p=0.013), operative time (+13.2 minutes, p<0.001), and total room time (+18.6 minutes, p<0.001) on multivariate analysis. A total of 328 (1.4%) patients had an infection within 30 days of surgery. Multivariate analysis revealed no significant difference between the microscope and non-microscope groups for occurrence of any infection, superficial surgical site infection (SSI), deep SSI, organ space infection, or sepsis/septic shock, regardless of surgery type. Conclusions We did not find operating room times or infection risk to be significant deterrents for use of an operating microscope during spine surgery. PMID:25188600

  4. The green operating room: simple changes to reduce cost and our carbon footprint.

    PubMed

    Wormer, Blair A; Augenstein, Vedra A; Carpenter, Christin L; Burton, Patrick V; Yokeley, William T; Prabhu, Ajita S; Harris, Beth; Norton, Sujatha; Klima, David A; Lincourt, Amy E; Heniford, B Todd

    2013-07-01

    Generating over four billion pounds of waste each year, the healthcare system in the United States is the second largest contributor of trash with one-third produced by operating rooms. Our objective is to assess improvement in waste reduction and recycling after implementation of a Green Operating Room Committee (GORC) at our institution. A surgeon and nurse-initiated GORC was formed with members from corporate leadership, nursing, anesthesia, and OR staff. Initiatives for recycling opportunities, reduction of energy and water use as well as solid waste were implemented and the results were recorded. Since formation of GORC in 2008, our OR has diverted 6.5 tons of medical waste. An effort to recycle all single-use devices was implemented with annual solid waste reduction of approximately 12,860 lbs. Disposable OR foam padding was replaced with reusable gel pads at greater than $50,000 per year savings. Over 500 lbs of previously discarded batteries were salvaged from the OR and donated to charity or redistributed in the hospital ($9,000 annual savings). A "Power Down" initiative to turn off all anesthesia and OR lights and equipment not in use resulted in saving $33,000 and 234.3 metric tons of CO2 emissions reduced per year. Converting from soap to alcohol-based waterless scrub demonstrated a potential saving of 2.7 million liters of water annually. Formation of an OR committee dedicated to ecological initiatives can provide a significant opportunity to improve health care's impact on the environment and save money.

  5. Operating room fire prevention: creating an electrosurgical unit fire safety device.

    PubMed

    Culp, William C; Kimbrough, Bradly A; Luna, Sarah; Maguddayao, Aris J

    2014-08-01

    To reduce the incidence of surgical fires. Operating room fires represent a potentially life-threatening hazard and are triggered by the electrosurgical unit (ESU) pencil. Carbon dioxide is a fire suppressant and is a routinely used medical gas. We hypothesize that a shroud of protective carbon dioxide covering the tip of the ESU pencil displaces oxygen, thereby preventing fire ignition. Using 3-dimensional modeling techniques, a polymer sleeve was created and attached to an ESU pencil. This sleeve was connected to a carbon dioxide source and directed the gas through multiple precisely angled ports, generating a cone of fire-suppressive carbon dioxide surrounding the active pencil tip. This device was evaluated in a flammability test chamber containing 21%, 50%, and 100% oxygen with sustained ESU activation. The sleeve was tested with and without carbon dioxide (control) until a fuel was ignited or 30 seconds elapsed. Time to ignition was measured by high-speed videography. Fires were ignited with each control trial (15/15 trials). The control group median ± SD ignition time in 21% oxygen was 3.0 ± 2.4 seconds, in 50% oxygen was 0.1 ± 1.8 seconds, and in 100% oxygen was 0.03 ± 0.1 seconds. No fire was observed when the fire safety device was used in all concentrations of oxygen (0/15 trials; P < 0.0001). The exact 95% confidence interval for absolute risk reduction of fire ignition was 76% to 100%. A sleeve creating a cone of protective carbon dioxide gas enshrouding the sparks from an ESU pencil effectively prevents fire in a high-flammability model. Clinical application of this device may reduce the incidence of operating room fires.

  6. Improved Operating Room Efficiency via Constraint Management: Experience of a Tertiary-Care Academic Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Kimbrough, Charles W; McMasters, Kelly M; Canary, Jeff; Jackson, Lisa; Farah, Ian; Boswell, Mark V; Kim, Daniel; Scoggins, Charles R

    2015-07-01

    Suboptimal operating room (OR) efficiency is a universal complaint among surgeons. Nonetheless, maximizing efficiency is critical to institutional success. Here, we report improvement achieved from low-cost, low-technology measures instituted within a tertiary-care academic medical center/Level I trauma center. Improvements in preadmission testing and OR scheduling, including appointing a senior nurse anesthetist to help direct OR use, were instituted in March 2012. A retrospective review of prospectively maintained OR case data was performed to evaluate time periods before and after program implementation, as well as to assess trends over time. Operating room performance metrics were compared using Mann-Whitney and chi-squared tests. Changes over time were analyzed using linear regression. Data including all surgical cases were available for a 36-month period; 10 months (6,581 cases) before program implementation and 26 months afterward (17,574 cases). Dramatic improvement was seen in first-case on-time starts, which increased from 39.3% to 83.8% (p < 0.0001). Additionally, the percent utilization of available OR time demonstrated a steady increase (p < 0.001). After an initial lag, case volume also improved, evident by an increase observed in the 12-month rolling average of cases per month (p < 0.001). The increase in case volume occurred during peak OR time (7 am to 5 pm), and did not result from adding cases after hours (5 pm to 11 pm). After many years of what seemed an insoluble problem, simple changes fostering collaboration among services, including active management of the OR schedule and transparent data, have resulted in substantial improvement in OR efficiency and case volume. Copyright © 2015 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. "Delay to operating room" fails to identify adverse outcomes at a Level I trauma center.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Paul R; Badiee, Jayraan; Sise, Michael J; Calvo, Richard Y; Brill, Jason B; Wallace, James D; Shackford, Steven R; Dunne, Casey E; Bansal, Vishal; Sise, C Beth

    2017-02-01

    The American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma devised process audit filters to identify opportunities for improvement (OFI), prevent adverse outcomes, and improve quality. Delay to the operating room for primary trauma laparotomy is a process audit filter that has not been definitively associated with improved outcomes. We sought to evaluate the effectiveness of delay to the operating room of greater than 2 hours (DOR) to independently identify an adverse outcome or an OFI at our Level I trauma center. Trauma patients who underwent primary exploratory laparotomy from July 2006 to March 2015 were reviewed. Those with DOR were identified and compared with those without DOR. To analyze the ability of DOR to independently identify an adverse outcome or an OFI, DOR patients were further divided into those with isolated DOR and those with DOR in conjunction with one or more other process audit filter. Primary outcome was the presence of a complication. Secondary outcome was an identified OFI. Medical records of patients with either outcome were reviewed to determine if the outcome resulted directly from DOR. Of 472 patients, 109 (23%) had DOR and 363 (77%) did not. There were no significant differences in age, sex, or injury severity between the two groups. The rates of complications among DOR patients and those without DOR were not significantly different (35% vs. 38%, p = 0.59). The DOR was the only process audit filter flagged in 31(28%) patients in the DOR group. This subgroup had no identified complications but incurred two OFIs; neither OFI was associated with an adverse outcome. In trauma patients undergoing primary exploratory laparotomy, DOR fails to independently identify adverse outcomes. These findings suggest that DOR, as a routinely collected process audit filter, is not an effective indicator of suboptimal care or adverse outcomes at a Level I trauma center. Therapeutic study, level IV; prognostic study, level III.

  8. Risk Factors for Return to the Operating Room after Resident-Performed Cataract Surgery.

    PubMed

    Menda, Shivali A; Driver, Todd H; Neiman, Alexandra E; Blumberg, Seth; Naseri, Ayman; Stewart, Jay M

    2016-09-29

    Investigate risk factors for unplanned return to the operating room after resident-performed cataract surgery. Retrospective case-control study. Institutional. Study population: All patients with reoperation within 90 days of resident-performed phacoemulsification were matched to four control eyes which had surgery within 30 days of the reoperation at the same institution. Billing codes were used to identify all patients who underwent resident-performed intended phacoemulsification with intraocular lens placement from January 2005 to December 2010. Investigated risk factors for reoperation included cataract characteristics and preexisting ocular co-morbidities, including diabetic retinopathy, retinal detachment history, glaucoma, corneal pathology, and uveitis. Additional preoperative risk factors studied included resident training year, history of tamsulosin use, phacodonesis, pupillary dilation, presence of pseudoexfoliation, myopia, history of trauma, visual acuity, and monocular status. Intraoperative variables were the use of iris expansion devices, use of capsular stain, attending type, incision type, use of sutures, vitreous loss, anesthesia type, and phacoemulsification technique. There were 67 returns to the operating room (i.e., cases) over five years that were assigned to 268 control eyes. In preoperative multivariate analysis, phacoemulsification done by a first- or second-year resident (OR 3.2, 95% CI: 1.7-6.0, p < 0.001) was associated with an increased risk of reoperation. In postoperative multivariate analysis, only the use of the divide-and-conquer technique (OR 4.0, 95% CI:1.7-9.2, p = 0.001) was associated with an increased risk of reoperation. Phacoemulsification done by a junior resident or using the divide-and-conquer technique had the highest risk of reoperation.

  9. Global public health impact of recovered supplies from operating rooms: a critical analysis with national implications.

    PubMed

    Wan, Eric L; Xie, Li; Barrett, Miceile; Baltodano, Pablo A; Rivadeneira, Andres F; Noboa, Jonathan; Silver, Maya; Zhou, Richard; Cho, Suzy; Tam, Tammie; Yurter, Alp; Gentry, Carol; Palacios, Jorge; Rosson, Gedge D; Redett, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    In modern operating rooms, clean and unused medical supplies are routinely discarded and can be effectively recovered and redistributed abroad to alleviate the environmental burden of donor hospitals and to generate substantial health benefits at resource-poor recipient institutions. We established a recovery and donation program to collect clean and unused supplies for healthcare institutions in developing nations. We analyzed items donated over a 3-year period (September 2010-November 2013) by quantity and weight, and estimated the projected value of the program under potential nationwide participation. To capture the health benefits attributable to the donated supplies at recipient institutions, we partnered with two tertiary-care centers in Guayaquil, Ecuador and conducted a pilot study on the utility of the donated supplies at the recipient institutions (October 2013). We determined the disability-adjusted life years (DALY) averted for all patients undergoing procedures involving donated items and estimated the annual attributable DALY as well as the cost per DALY averted both by supply and by procedure. Approximately, 2 million lbs (907,185 kg) per year of medical supplies are recoverable from large non-rural US academic medical centers. Of these supplies, 19 common categories represent a potential for donation worth US $15 million per year, at a cost-utility of US $2.14 per DALY averted. Hospital operating rooms continue to represent a large source of recoverable surgical supplies that have demonstrable health benefits in the recipient communities. Cost-effective recovery and need-based donation programs can significantly alleviate the global burden of surgical diseases.

  10. [Failure to perform auto-test of anaesthesia machine at the opening of the operating room].

    PubMed

    Suria, S; Puizillout, J-M; Baguenard, P; Bourgain, J-L

    2010-12-01

    controls performed at the opening of the operating room include the anesthesia machine auto-test. Omitting the preoperative checklist is unsafe for the patient and increases the risk of possible breakdowns. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the incidence and the situations in which the auto-test of the machine was not performed at the opening of the operative room. from a database including 55 195 cases between 1st January 2002 and 31st July 2009, a query identified cases in which the auto-test of the anaesthesia machine was omitted and the cases in which anaesthesia was made in spite of the failure of this test. Clinical circumstances were analyzed and anaesthetist and/or nurse anaesthetist were identified from the computerized anaesthesia record. one hundred and ninety cases (1.24%) were identified. Seventy-three percent of the omissions of the auto-test occurred while on duty whereas 85% of the failures of the auto-test took place at the beginning of the scheduled program. Individual factor was identified since three anaesthesiologists out of 22 were responsible for 49% of omissions on duty and one nurse anesthetist was responsible for 18% of the use of a failed machine and 30% of the omission of the auto-test. the auto-test of the anesthesia machine was correctly made in most cases but there are still situations where the checklist wasn't carried out. Therefore, the human factor seems important and justifies to be taken into account. 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Wearing lead aprons in surgical operating rooms: ergonomic injuries evidenced by infrared thermography.

    PubMed

    Alexandre, Dominique; Prieto, Marc; Beaumont, Fabien; Taiar, Redha; Polidori, Guillaume

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to quantify the impact of the weight of radiation protection lead aprons on the discomfort and the fatigue of the medical staff within an operating room of interventional gastroenterology. To quantify this fatigue, we analyzed variations of the physiological parameters, including heart rate, blood pressure, and cutaneous temperature; we compared two situations: the first within the classic endoscopy department (without apron) and the second within the operating room with apron. A follow-up study with lighter lead aprons was also conducted. We used infrared thermography as the principal method of analysis in our study. This technique permits us to obtain data, without body contact, of the spatial and temporal orientation of temperatures on subject skin. This method proves to be beneficial in the evaluation of the posture of users. The symmetry of the temperature evolution among the different body zones can contribute to the body balance analysis. Our results of the cutaneous temperatures obtained by infrared camera show significant differences in the muscular activity. All the muscular groups studied were revealed significant temperature increases. The temperature curve T2-T1 reveals the actual influence of carrying heavy apron loads. Regardless of the muscular group, this temperature increase varies on the range between 0.55°C and 0.95°C. The muscular groups most recruited are the trapezoids and pectorals. The muscles least recruited are those of the lower limbs. The study shows the impact of load bearing on the body mechanics of medical staff during work. It will be beneficial to develop this study to predict changes in skin temperature because of the various types of aprons and to determine the possible correlation between the thermal distribution and users' sense of comfort. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Influence of the operating room schedule on tardiness from scheduled start times.

    PubMed

    Wachtel, Ruth E; Dexter, Franklin

    2009-06-01

    Tardiness from scheduled start times in a surgical suite is a common source of frustration for both operating room personnel and patients. Data from two surgical suites were used to investigate the relative importance of various factors that contribute to tardiness, including average case duration, time of day, prolonged turnovers, whether a surgeon follows himself or another surgeon, the potential for starting cases early, concurrency (e.g., number of residents supervised simultaneously), expected under-utilized or over-utilized time, and case duration bias. Average tardiness per case did not depend on the individual durations of preceding cases or on the relative numbers of long and short cases. In contrast, the total duration of preceding cases was important in determining tardiness. Tardiness per case grew larger as the day progressed because the total duration of preceding cases increased, but began to decline for cases scheduled to commence 6 h after the start of the workday. Tardiness was not affected by prolonged turnovers, differences in average case duration among services, or whether a surgeon followed himself or another surgeon in the same operating room. Tardiness was affected by expected under-utilized or over-utilized time at the end of the workday and by case duration bias. Factors associated with the largest numbers of cases had the biggest influence on tardiness. Greater understanding of these factors aided in the development of several mathematical interventions to reduce tardiness in the two surgical suites. These interventions and their applicability for reducing tardiness are described in a companion article. At two surgical suites, tardiness from scheduled start times did not depend on average case duration or prolonged turnovers. Tardiness did depend on the total duration of preceding cases, expected under-utilized or over-utilized time at the end of the day, and case duration bias.

  13. [Chemical risk in operating rooms and technical progress: the obligations and responsibilities of law].

    PubMed

    Oddo, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    We are going to consider the specific applications of the new legal system and of the most recent body of laws to those work environments of particular risk, such as healthcare facilities and in particular operating rooms. In such environments, volatile chemicals classified as "dangerous" are used with consequent exposure to "chemical risk", both of those persons professionally involved, depending on the type of activity, and of the patients to whom such activities are addressed in the same environment. Once the chemical risk is framed in the existing regulatory system, it must be specifically evaluated the application of the same principle to the particular chemical risk arising from the use of anesthetic agents in the operating room, for example sevoflurane and desflurane, being careful to test wether and how much this risk can be eliminated or reduced to minimum in relation to the new achievements of the technical progress. So, as soon as the quality of "dangerous chemical agent" of the "volatile chemicals" and of the "volatile liquid anesthetic" (sevoflurane and desflurane) as well--which are characterized by a lower degree of toxicity and for this reason are mostly used in current chemical practice, preferable to some anesthetic gases such as nitrous oxide--is legally verified, it is necessary to relate the scientific and technical data which result from the current "state of art" also to the other binding regulations that are imposed for the "prevention and protection from chemical agents", according to the relative Title IX of the TUSL (Unique text for Safety and Health at Work).

  14. [The 'Surgical Deck': a new generation of integrated operational rooms for ENT].

    PubMed

    Strauss, G; Gollnick, I; Neumuth, T; Meixensberger, J; Lueth, T C

    2013-02-01

    Existing operating room concepts do not meet modern technological opportunities anymore. The "Surgical Deck" is supposed to represent a prototype for a new operating room generation. The objective of the project is to achieve a better integration of functions and to develop an innovative concept for a highly developed surgical workstation. 3 working areas are defined: Surgical, Airway and Technical Cockpit. The evaluation was conducted on 284 surgeries carried out from 01.08. 2011 to 31.01. 2012. The evaluation team consisted of 6 surgeons, 3 surgery nurses, 3 anesthesiologists and 4 anesthesia nurses. Within a detailed analysis, the data of 50 FESS surgeries were compared to those of a control group. Within the FESS group, the average slot time was reduced by 13%. 88.2% of those questioned assessed ergonomics as being better than in the conventional OR. 71.5% stated that the Surgical Deck provided an added value with regard to the surgical procedure. 91.3% confirmed that the system control required additional training. 79.3% described the cost-benefit-ratio as appropriate. For 96% of the surgeries, respondents said that they were feeling adequately supported by the technology. The results show a clear advantage of the system architecture. The Surgical Deck may present a solid foundation with regard to the transfer of the system into the clinical practice. This is relevant for new assistance functions such as process control software or navigation-based collision warning systems. It is to be expected that the project will significantly contribute to further develop the future surgical workstation and its standardization. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Spacelab Operations Support Room Space Engineering Support Team in the SL POCC During the IML-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The primary payload for Space Shuttle Mission STS-42, launched January 22, 1992, was the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1), a pressurized manned Spacelab module. The goal of IML-1 was to explore in depth the complex effects of weightlessness of living organisms and materials processing. Around-the-clock research was performed on the human nervous system's adaptation to low gravity and effects of microgravity on other life forms such as shrimp eggs, lentil seedlings, fruit fly eggs, and bacteria. Materials processing experiments were also conducted, including crystal growth from a variety of substances such as enzymes, mercury iodide, and a virus. The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was the air/ground communication channel used between the astronauts and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. Featured is the Spacelab Operations Support Room Space Engineering Support team in the SL POCC during STS-42, IML-1 mission.

  16. [Operation room management in quality control certification of a mainstream hospital].

    PubMed

    Leidinger, W; Meierhofer, J N; Schüpfer, G

    2006-11-01

    We report the results of our study concerning the organisation of operating room (OR) capacity planned 1 year in advance. The use of OR is controlled using 2 global controlling numbers: a) the actual time difference between the expected optimal and previously calculated OR running time and b) the punctuality of starting the first operation in each OR. The focal point of the presented OR management concept is a consensus-oriented decision-making and steering process led by a coordinator who achieves a high degree of acceptance by means of comprehensive transparency. Based on the accepted running time, the optimal productivity of OR's (OP_A(%) can be calculated. In this way an increase of the overall capacity (actual running time) of ORs was from 40% to over 55% was achieved. Nevertheless, enthusiasm and teamwork from all persons involved in the system are vital for success as well as a completely independent operating theatre manager. Using this concept over 90% of the requirements for the new certification catalogue for hospitals in Germany was achieved.

  17. Augmented reality in neurovascular surgery: feasibility and first uses in the operating room.

    PubMed

    Kersten-Oertel, Marta; Gerard, Ian; Drouin, Simon; Mok, Kelvin; Sirhan, Denis; Sinclair, David S; Collins, D Louis

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this report is to present a prototype augmented reality (AR) intra-operative brain imaging system. We present our experience of using this new neuronavigation system in neurovascular surgery and discuss the feasibility of this technology for aneurysms, arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), and arteriovenous fistulae (AVFs). We developed an augmented reality system that uses an external camera to capture the live view of the patient on the operating room table and to merge this view with pre-operative volume-rendered vessels. We have extensively tested the system in the laboratory and have used the system in four surgical cases: one aneurysm, two AVMs and one AVF case. The developed AR neuronavigation system allows for precise patient-to-image registration and calibration of the camera, resulting in a well-aligned augmented reality view. Initial results suggest that augmented reality is useful for tailoring craniotomies, localizing vessels of interest, and planning resection corridors. Augmented reality is a promising technology for neurovascular surgery. However, for more complex anomalies such as AVMs and AVFs, better visualization techniques that allow one to distinguish between arteries and veins and determine the absolute depth of a vessel of interest are needed.

  18. Creating impact with operations research in health: making room for practice in academia.

    PubMed

    Brandeau, Margaret L

    2016-12-01

    Operations research (OR)-based analyses have the potential to improve decision making for many important, real-world health care problems. However, junior scholars often avoid working on practical applications in health because promotion and tenure processes tend to value theoretical studies more highly than applied studies. This paper discusses the author's experiences in using OR to inform and influence decisions in health and provides a blueprint for junior researchers who wish to find success by taking a similar path. This involves selecting good problems to study, forming productive collaborations with domain experts, developing appropriate models, identifying the most salient results from an analysis, and effectively disseminating findings to decision makers. The paper then suggests how journals, funding agencies, and senior academics can encourage such work by taking a broader and more informed view of the potential role and contributions of OR to solving health care problems. Making room in academia for the application of OR in health follows in the tradition begun by the founders of operations research: to work on important real-world problems where operations research can contribute to better decision making.

  19. Spacelab Operations Support Room Space Engineering Support Team in the SL POCC During the IML-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The primary payload for Space Shuttle Mission STS-42, launched January 22, 1992, was the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1), a pressurized manned Spacelab module. The goal of IML-1 was to explore in depth the complex effects of weightlessness of living organisms and materials processing. Around-the-clock research was performed on the human nervous system's adaptation to low gravity and effects of microgravity on other life forms such as shrimp eggs, lentil seedlings, fruit fly eggs, and bacteria. Materials processing experiments were also conducted, including crystal growth from a variety of substances such as enzymes, mercury iodide, and a virus. The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was the air/ground communication channel used between the astronauts and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. Featured is the Spacelab Operations Support Room Space Engineering Support team in the SL POCC during STS-42, IML-1 mission.

  20. Tactical increases in operating room block time for capacity planning should not be based on utilization.

    PubMed

    Wachtel, Ruth E; Dexter, Franklin

    2008-01-01

    When a decision has been made to expand operating room (OR) capacity, the choice of surgical subspecialties to receive additional block time and fill the additional OR capacity is a tactical decision. Such decisions are made approximately once a year. Afterwards, typically a few months before the day of surgery, a second stage occurs in which operational decisions allocate OR time and determine the hours of staffing for each specialty based on its expected workload. In practice, cases are not scheduled into block time that has been planned tactically, but instead are scheduled during the second stage into the staffed time that is allocated operationally. This article reviews the literature on tactical decision-making for expansion of OR capacity. When additional OR capacity is available, it should be planned for those subspecialties that have the greatest contribution margin per OR hour, that have the potential for growth, and that have minimal need for limited resources such as intensive care unit beds. Numerous reasons are presented to explain why tactical planning of additional block time should not be based on current or past utilization of block time.

  1. Use of a Hybrid Operating Room to Improve Reduction of Syndesmotic Injuries in Ankle Fractures: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Cancienne, Jourdan M; Crosen, Matelin P; Yarboro, Seth R

    2016-01-01

    Ankle fractures are one of the most common orthopedic injuries requiring operative treatment, and approximately 1 in 4 ankle fractures will have an associated distal tibiofibular syndesmosis disruption. Syndesmotic reduction is crucial to restoring ankle function and preventing the development of arthritis. The hybrid operating room provides 3-dimensional intraoperative imaging capabilities that can enable the surgeon to ensure the syndesmosis is appropriately reduced, particularly by comparing it with the contralateral ankle. By confirming the syndesmosis reduction intraoperatively, the risk of a return to the operating room for revision surgery is decreased.

  2. Late Operating Room Start Times Impact Mortality and Cost for Nonemergent Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Yount, Kenan W; Lau, Christine L; Yarboro, Leora T; Ghanta, Ravi K; Kron, Irving L; Kern, John A; Ailawadi, Gorav

    2015-01-01

    Background There is growing concern over the effect of starting non-emergent cardiac surgery later in the day on clinical outcomes and resource utilization. Our objective was to determine the differences in patient outcomes for starting non-emergent cardiac surgery after 3pm. Methods All non-emergent cardiac operations performed at a single institution from July 2008 to 2013 were reviewed. Cases were stratified based on “early start” or “late start,” defined by incision time before or after 3pm. Rates of observed and risk-adjusted mortality, major complications, and costs were compared on a univariate basis for all patients and via multivariable linear and logistic regression for patients with a valid Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) Predicted Risk of Mortality (PROM). Results A total of 3,395 non-emergent cardiac operations were reviewed, including 368 late start cases. Compared to cases starting earlier, mortality was significantly higher for patients undergoing late operations (5.2% vs. 3.5%, p=0.046) despite similar preoperative risk (STS PROM 3.8% vs. 3.3%) and major complication rates (18.2% vs. 18.3%). Costs were 8% higher with late start cases ($51,576 vs. $47,641, p<0.001). After controlling for case type, surgeon, year, and risk, late cases resulted in higher mortality (odds ratio 2.04, p=0.041) despite shorter operative duration (16 min, p<0.001). Conclusions Starting non-emergent cardiac cases later in the day is associated with 2× higher absolute and risk-adjusted mortality. These data should be carefully considered—not only by surgeons and patients but also in the context of the operating room system—when scheduling non-emergent cardiac cases. PMID:26209491

  3. Real-time observations of stressful events in the operating room

    PubMed Central

    Sami, AlNassar; Waseem, Hajjar; Nourah, AlSubaie; Areej, AlHummaid; Afnan, AlMarshedi; Ghadeer, Al-Shaikh; Abdulaziz, AlSaif; Arthur, Isnani

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To identify and quantify factors causing stress in the operating room (OR) and evaluate the relationship between these factors and surgeons’ stress level. Methods: This is a prospective observational study from 32 elective surgical procedures conducted in the OR of King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Before each operation, each surgeon was asked of stressors. Two interns observed 16 surgeries each, separately. The interns watched and took notes during the entire surgical procedure. During each operation, the observer recorded anxiety-inducing activities and events that occurred in real time by means of a checklist of 8 potential stressors: technical, patient problems, teamwork problems, time and management issues, distractions and interruptions, equipment problems, personal problems, and teaching. After each operation, surgeons were asked to answer the validated State-Trait Anxiety Inventory questionnaire and self-report on their stress level from the 8 sources using a scale of 1–8 (1: stress free, 8: extremely stressful). The observer also recorded perceived stress levels experienced by the surgeons during the operation. Results: One hundred ten stressors were identified. Technical problems most frequently caused stress (16.4%) and personal issues the least often (6.4%). Frequently encountered stressors (teaching and distractions/interruptions) caused less stress to the surgeons. Technical factors, teamwork, and equipment problems occurred frequently and were also a major contributor to OR stress. All patients were discharged in good health and within 1 week of surgery. Conclusion: Certain stressful factors do occur among surgeons in the OR and can increase the potential for errors. Further research is required to determine the impact of stress on performance and the outcome of surgery. PMID:22754439

  4. Real-time observations of stressful events in the operating room.

    PubMed

    Sami, Alnassar; Waseem, Hajjar; Nourah, Alsubaie; Areej, Alhummaid; Afnan, Almarshedi; Ghadeer, Al-Shaikh; Abdulaziz, Alsaif; Arthur, Isnani

    2012-04-01

    To identify and quantify factors causing stress in the operating room (OR) and evaluate the relationship between these factors and surgeons' stress level. This is a prospective observational study from 32 elective surgical procedures conducted in the OR of King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Before each operation, each surgeon was asked of stressors. Two interns observed 16 surgeries each, separately. The interns watched and took notes during the entire surgical procedure. During each operation, the observer recorded anxiety-inducing activities and events that occurred in real time by means of a checklist of 8 potential stressors: technical, patient problems, teamwork problems, time and management issues, distractions and interruptions, equipment problems, personal problems, and teaching. After each operation, surgeons were asked to answer the validated State-Trait Anxiety Inventory questionnaire and self-report on their stress level from the 8 sources using a scale of 1-8 (1: stress free, 8: extremely stressful). The observer also recorded perceived stress levels experienced by the surgeons during the operation. One hundred ten stressors were identified. Technical problems most frequently caused stress (16.4%) and personal issues the least often (6.4%). Frequently encountered stressors (teaching and distractions/interruptions) caused less stress to the surgeons. Technical factors, teamwork, and equipment problems occurred frequently and were also a major contributor to OR stress. All patients were discharged in good health and within 1 week of surgery. Certain stressful factors do occur among surgeons in the OR and can increase the potential for errors. Further research is required to determine the impact of stress on performance and the outcome of surgery.

  5. Time to Operating Room for Cholecystitis Decreases with a Mature Emergency General Surgery Service.

    PubMed

    Davis, Patrick T; Palilonis, Molly A; Miller, Preston R; Hildreth, Amy N

    2017-01-01

    Emergency general surgery (EGS) services are designed to increase the availability of timely, high-quality care to patients with urgent surgical problems. One of the most commonly performed operations on such services is cholecystectomy. Improved outcomes have recently been described in early cholecystectomy for cholecystitis. We hypothesized that, as our EGS service matured, time from imaging to operating room (OR) for cholecystectomy would decrease. At an academic referral center, we identified patients undergoing inpatient cholecystectomy for acute cholecystitis during three time periods: before the formation of an EGS service from 2005 to 2007, during the first years of the service from 2008 to 2010, and five years after its development from 2013 to 2014. Charts were reviewed for patient demographics, operative events, and findings. The time of radiologic diagnosis and operation start time were recorded, and time between diagnosis and operation was calculated. A total of 217 patients who met the study criteria were identified, 88 in 2005 to 2007, 84 in 2008 to 2010, and 45 in 2013 to 2014. Time from radiologic diagnosis to OR decreased over the study period, from a median of 48.4 hours in 2005 to 2007 to 32.4 hours in 2008 to 2010 during the early years of the EGS service. Time to OR further decreased to a median of 16.6 hours during 2013 to 2014. The formation and maturation of an EGS service was associated with decreased time to OR after radiologic diagnosis of acute cholecystitis at this institution. This decrease in preoperative time may lead to lower costs and improved outcomes.

  6. Defining the optimal time to the operating room may salvage early trauma deaths.

    PubMed

    Remick, Kyle N; Schwab, C William; Smith, Brian P; Monshizadeh, Amir; Kim, Patrick K; Reilly, Patrick M

    2014-05-01

    Early trauma deaths have the potential for salvage with immediate surgery. We studied time from injury to death in this group to qualify characteristics and quantify time to the operating room, yielding the greatest opportunity for salvage. The Pennsylvania Trauma Outcomes Study (PTOS) is a comprehensive registry including all Pennsylvania trauma centers. PTOS was queried for adult trauma patients from 1999 to 2010 dying within 4 hours of injury. The distribution of time to death (TD) was examined for subgroups according to mechanism of injury, hypotension (defined as systolic blood pressure ≤ 90 mm Hg), and operation required. The 5th percentile (TD5) and the 50th percentile (TD50) were calculated from the distributions and compared using the Mann-Whitney U-test. The PTOS yielded 6,547 deaths within 4 hours of injury. The overall TD5 and TD50 were 0:23 (hour:minute) and 0:59, respectively. Median penetrating injury times were significantly shorter than blunt injury times (TD5/TD50, 0:19/0:43 vs. 0:29/1:10). Median time was significantly shorter for hypotensive versus normotensive patients (TD5/TD50, 0:22/0:52 vs. 0:43/2:18). Operative subgroups had different TD5/TD50 (abdominal surgery [n = 607], 1:07/2:26; thoracic surgery [n = 756] 0:25/1:25; vascular surgery [n = 156], 0:35/2:15; and cranial surgery [n = 18], 1:20/2:42). Early trauma deaths have the potential for salvage with immediate surgery. We found TD to vary based on mechanism of injury, presence of hypotension, and type of surgery needed. With the use of TD5 and TD50 benchmarks in these subgroups, a trauma system may determine if decreased time to the operating room decreases mortality. Trauma systems can use these data to further improve prehospital and initial hospital phases of care for this subset of early death trauma patients. Epidemiologic study, level III.

  7. Coaching Non-technical Skills Improves Surgical Residents' Performance in a Simulated Operating Room.

    PubMed

    Yule, Steven; Parker, Sarah Henrickson; Wilkinson, Jill; McKinley, Aileen; MacDonald, Jamie; Neill, Adrian; McAdam, Tim

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effect of coaching on non-technical skills and performance during laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a simulated operating room (OR). Non-technical skills (situation awareness, decision making, teamwork, and leadership) underpin technical ability and are critical to the success of operations and the safety of patients in the OR. The rate of developing assessment tools in this area has outpaced development of workable interventions to improve non-technical skills in surgical training and beyond. A randomized trial was conducted with senior surgical residents (n = 16). Participants were randomized to receive either non-technical skills coaching (intervention) or to self-reflect (control) after each of 5 simulated operations. Coaching was based on the Non-Technical Skills For Surgeons (NOTSS) behavior observation system. Surgeon-coaches trained in this method coached participants in the intervention group for 10 minutes after each simulation. Primary outcome measure was non-technical skills, assessed from video by a surgeon using the NOTSS system. Secondary outcomes were time to call for help during bleeding, operative time, and path length of laparoscopic instruments. Non-technical skills improved in the intervention group from scenario 1 to scenario 5 compared with those in the control group (p = 0.04). The intervention group was faster to call for help when faced with unstoppable bleeding in the final scenario (no. 5; p = 0.03). Coaching improved residents' non-technical skills in the simulated OR compared with those in the control group. Important next steps are to implement non-technical skills coaching in the real OR and assess effect on clinically important process measures and patient outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Operating Room Performance Improves after Proficiency-Based Virtual Reality Cataract Surgery Training.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Ann Sofia Skou; Bach-Holm, Daniella; Kjærbo, Hadi; Højgaard-Olsen, Klavs; Subhi, Yousif; Saleh, George M; Park, Yoon Soo; la Cour, Morten; Konge, Lars

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the effect of virtual reality proficiency-based training on actual cataract surgery performance. The secondary purpose of the study was to define which surgeons benefit from virtual reality training. Multicenter masked clinical trial. Eighteen cataract surgeons with different levels of experience. Cataract surgical training on a virtual reality simulator (EyeSi) until a proficiency-based test was passed. Technical performance in the operating room (OR) assessed by 3 independent, masked raters using a previously validated task-specific assessment tool for cataract surgery (Objective Structured Assessment of Cataract Surgical Skill). Three surgeries before and 3 surgeries after the virtual reality training were video-recorded, anonymized, and presented to the raters in random order. Novices (non-independently operating surgeons) and surgeons having performed fewer than 75 independent cataract surgeries showed significant improvements in the OR-32% and 38%, respectively-after virtual reality training (P = 0.008 and P = 0.018). More experienced cataract surgeons did not benefit from simulator training. The reliability of the assessments was high with a generalizability coefficient of 0.92 and 0.86 before and after the virtual reality training, respectively. Clinically relevant cataract surgical skills can be improved by proficiency-based training on a virtual reality simulator. Novices as well as surgeons with an intermediate level of experience showed improvement in OR performance score. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Workflow management in the operating room. Analysis of potentials for optimizing efficiency at a university hospital].

    PubMed

    Welker, A; Wolcke, B; Schleppers, A; Schmeck, S B; Focke, U; Gervais, H W; Schmeck, J

    2010-10-01

    The introduction of the diagnosis-related groups reimbursement system has increased cost pressures. Due to the interaction of many different professional groups, analysis and optimization of internal coordination and scheduling in the operating room (OR) is mandatory. The aim of this study was to analyze the processes at a university hospital in order to optimize strategies by identifying potential weak points. Over a period 6 weeks before and 4 weeks after intervention processes time intervals in the OR of a tertiary care hospital (university hospital) were documented in a structured data collection sheet. The main reason for lack of efficiency of labor was underused OR utilization. Multifactorial reasons, particularly in the management of perioperative interfaces, led to vacant ORs. A significant deficit was in the use of OR capacity at the end of the daily OR schedule. After harmonization of working hours of different staff groups and implementation of several other changes an increase in efficiency could be verified. These results indicate that optimization of perioperative processes considerably contribute to the success of OR organization. Additionally, the implementation of standard operating procedures and a generally accepted OR statute are mandatory. In this way an efficient OR management can contribute to the economic success of a hospital.

  10. [Artificial lighting and blue light in the operating room: what risks for the surgeon?].

    PubMed

    Lembo, M; Cannatà, V; Militello, A; Ritrovato, M; Zaffina, S; Derrico, P; Borra, MassimoM

    2015-09-09

    Lighting in operating rooms must ensure conditions of visual comfort, wellbeing and safety when procedures are being carried out, so as to preserve  the health of both workers and patients. In this study we attempted to develop a methodology for specifically assessing the risk for surgeons of exposure to blue light, simulating the surgeon's real working conditions. Visual comfort was also assessed by measuring maintained illuminance (Em) and the luminance levels in the visual task area within the operating field. Blue light exposure was measured by an OCEAN OPTICS-QE65000 spectroradiometer and a LSI-Lastem model Z-Lux radiometer, while for lighting measurements, a videophotometer and luxmeter were used. Results show that the surgeons were exposed to blue light values lower than the limit of effective radiance LB= 100 W m-2 sr-1 foreseen by European Directive 2006/25/EC. For visual comfort, significant differences in illumination were observed between surrounding areas and the visual task areas, with very high luminance values measured in most of the observation points. In this case the measured values confirm that the workers were daily exposed to unsuitable luminance contrasts that can cause eyestrain. Given such results and considering the task analysis, we proposed to extend health surveillance to workers performing activities such as precision surgery for prolonged periods.

  11. Telementoring systems in the operating room: a new approach in medical training.

    PubMed

    Wachs, Juan P; Gomez, Gerardo

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses the challenges and innovations related to the use of telementoring systems in the operating room. Most of the systems presented leverage on three types of interaction channels: audio, visual and physical. The audio channel enables the mentor to verbally instruct the trainee, and allows the trainee to ask questions. The visual channel is used to deliver annotations, alerts and other messages graphically to the trainee during the surgery. These visual representations are often displayed through a telestrator. The physical channel has been used in laparoscopic procedures by partially controlling the laparoscope through force-feedback. While in face to face instruction, the mentor produces gestures to convey certain aspects of the surgical instruction, there is not equivalent of this form of physical interaction between the mentor and trainee in open surgical procedures in telementoring systems. Even that the trend is to perform more minimally invasive surgery (MIS), trauma surgeries are still necessary, where initial resuscitation and stabilization of the patient in a timely manner is crucial. This paper presents a preliminary study conducted at the Indiana University Medical School and Purdue University, where initial lexicons of surgical instructive gestures (SIGs) were determined through systematic observation when mentor and trainee operate together. The paper concludes with potential ways to convey gestural information through surgical robots.

  12. Development of efficiency indicators of operating room management for multi-institutional comparisons.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Masayuki; Lee, Jason; Ikai, Hiroshi; Imanaka, Yuichi

    2013-04-01

    The efficiency of a hospital's operating room (OR) management can affect its overall profitability. However, existing indicators that assess OR management efficiency do not take into account differences in hospital size, manpower and functional characteristics, thereby rendering them unsuitable for multi-institutional comparisons. The aim of this study was to develop indicators of OR management efficiency that would take into account differences in hospital size and manpower, which may then be applied to multi-institutional comparisons. Using administrative data from 224 hospitals in Japan from 2008 to 2010, we performed four multiple linear regression analyses at the hospital level, in which the dependent variables were the number of operations per OR per month, procedural fees per OR per month, total utilization times per OR per month and total fees per OR per month for each of the models. The expected values of these four indicators were produced using multiple regression analysis results, adjusting for differences in hospital size and manpower, which are beyond the control of process owners' management. However, more than half of the variations in three of these four indicators were shown to be explained by differences in hospital size and manpower. Using the ratio of observed to expected values (OE ratio), as well as the difference between the two values (OE difference) allows hospitals to identify weaknesses in efficiency with more validity when compared to unadjusted indicators. The new indicators may support the improvement and sustainment of a high-quality health care system. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. [Unexpected atrial fibrillation when monitoring in operating room. Case of the trimester].

    PubMed

    2014-05-01

    A real case reported to the SENSAR database of incidents is presented. In a patient scheduled for nose fracture repair surgery an unexpected atrial fibrillation was found when monitored in the operating room. The operation was not delayed. After induction of general anaesthesia heart rate suddenly increased and hemodinamic situation was impaired. Cardioversion was required. Two electric countershocks were given but sinus rhythm was not restored. Heart rate was controlled with amiodarone infusion. Optimal defibrillation characteristics are described in these cases. Increased risk of thromboembolism (1-2%) following cardioversion is present even if atrial thrombi are ruled out. The mainstay therapies of are rhythm and rate control and prevention of thromboembolic complications. We describe recommendations on the management of these critical situations with emphasis in learning through the creation of protocols and training practice in simulation. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  14. Above room temperature continuous wave operation of a broad-area quantum-cascade laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semtsiv, M. P.; Masselink, W. T.

    2016-11-01

    We describe the design and implementation of a broad-area (w ≈ 30 μm) quantum-cascade laser operating in a continuous wave mode up to heat-sink temperatures beyond +100 °C. The room-temperature emission wavelength is 4.6 μm. The temperature gradient in the active region of such a wide laser stripe is essentially perpendicular to the epitaxial layers and the resulting steady-state active region temperature offset scales approximately with the square of the number of cascades. With only 10 cascades in the active region, the threshold electrical power density in the current quantum-cascade laser in the continuous-wave mode is as low as Vth × Ith = 3.8 V × 0.9 kA/cm2 = 3.4 kW/cm2 at room temperature for 2 mm-long two-side high-reflectivity coated laser stripe. A 4 mm-long one-side high-reflectivity coated laser stripe delivers in continuous-wave mode above 0.6 W at +20 °C and above 1.3 W at -27 °C (cooled with a single-stage Peltier element). A 2 mm-long two-side high-reflectivity coated laser stripe demonstrates continuous-wave lasing up to at least +102 °C (375 K). The thermal conductance, Gth, ranges between 235 W/K cm2 and 140 W/K cm2 for temperatures between -33 °C and +102 °C. This demonstration opens the route for continuous-wave power scaling of quantum-cascade lasers via broad-area laser ridges.

  15. Time-Motion Analysis of Clinical Nursing Documentation During Implementation of an Electronic Operating Room Management System for Ophthalmic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Read-Brown, Sarah; Sanders, David S.; Brown, Anna S.; Yackel, Thomas R.; Choi, Dongseok; Tu, Daniel C.; Chiang, Michael F.

    2013-01-01

    Efficiency and quality of documentation are critical in surgical settings because operating rooms are a major source of revenue, and because adverse events may have enormous consequences. Electronic health records (EHRs) have potential to impact surgical volume, quality, and documentation time. Ophthalmology is an ideal domain to examine these issues because procedures are high-throughput and demand efficient documentation. This time-motion study examines nursing documentation during implementation of an EHR operating room management system in an ophthalmology department. Key findings are: (1) EHR nursing documentation time was significantly worse during early implementation, but improved to a level near but slightly worse than paper baseline, (2) Mean documentation time varied significantly among nurses during early implementation, and (3) There was no decrease in operating room turnover time or surgical volume after implementation. These findings have important implications for ambulatory surgery departments planning EHR implementation, and for research in system design. PMID:24551402

  16. Time-motion analysis of clinical nursing documentation during implementation of an electronic operating room management system for ophthalmic surgery.

    PubMed

    Read-Brown, Sarah; Sanders, David S; Brown, Anna S; Yackel, Thomas R; Choi, Dongseok; Tu, Daniel C; Chiang, Michael F

    2013-01-01

    Efficiency and quality of documentation are critical in surgical settings because operating rooms are a major source of revenue, and because adverse events may have enormous consequences. Electronic health records (EHRs) have potential to impact surgical volume, quality, and documentation time. Ophthalmology is an ideal domain to examine these issues because procedures are high-throughput and demand efficient documentation. This time-motion study examines nursing documentation during implementation of an EHR operating room management system in an ophthalmology department. Key findings are: (1) EHR nursing documentation time was significantly worse during early implementation, but improved to a level near but slightly worse than paper baseline, (2) Mean documentation time varied significantly among nurses during early implementation, and (3) There was no decrease in operating room turnover time or surgical volume after implementation. These findings have important implications for ambulatory surgery departments planning EHR implementation, and for research in system design.

  17. [The importance of the airborne microorganisms evaluation in the operating rooms: the biological risk for health care workers].

    PubMed

    Gioffrè, A; Dragone, M; Ammoscato, I; Iannò, A; Marramao, A; Samele, P; Sorrentino, D

    2007-01-01

    The operating room is a complex environment, traditionally considered at high infectious risk, for both the patients and the health care workers, they can contract diseases, because of the exposure for relatively long times to various dangerous chemical, physical and biological factors. The biological contamination in the operating rooms is mostly imputable to airborne and bloodborne microorganisms, whose primary source represent the staff: patients and operating team, while either secondary sources are the contaminate air introduced from the VCCC system and the use of the infect instruments. About 10% of the hospital infections are determined by airborne bacteria and a variable fraction of these, not only in immunocompromised patients but also in healthy people, may cause the respirators pathologies. The aim of this paper was to estimate the microbial contamination, in 20 hospitals located in three regions of the South Italy, for a total 81 operating rooms. The results show that 17 of the 20 operating units and 45 out of 81 operating rooms examined are contaminated. Periodic inspections should be carried out in order to control and lower the biological risk for both the patients and the health care workers.

  18. Dissecting Attending Surgeons' Operating Room Guidance: Factors That Affect Guidance Decision Making.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaodong Phoenix; Williams, Reed G; Smink, Douglas S

    2015-01-01

    The amount of guidance provided by the attending surgeon in the operating room (OR) is a key element in developing residents' autonomy. The purpose of this study is to explore factors that affect attending surgeons' decision making regarding OR guidance provided to the resident. We used video-stimulated recall interviews (VSRI) throughout this 2-phase study. In Phase 1, 3 attending surgeons were invited to review separately 30 to 45 minute video segments of their prerecorded surgical operations to explore factors that influenced their OR guidance decision making. In Phase 2, 3 attending surgeons were observed and documented in the OR (4 operations, 341min). Each operating surgeon reviewed their videotaped surgical performance within 5 days of the operation to reflect on factors that affected their decision making during the targeted guidance events. All VSRI were recorded. Thematic analysis and manual coding were used to synthesize and analyze data from VSRI transcripts, OR observation documents, and field notes. A total of 255 minutes of VSRI involving 6 surgeons and 7 surgical operations from 5 different procedures were conducted. A total of 13 guidance decision-making influence factors from 4 categories were identified (Cohen's κ = 0.674): Setting (case schedule and patient morbidity), content (procedure attributes and case progress), resident (current competency level, trustworthiness, self-confidence, and personal traits), and attending surgeon (level of experience, level of comfort, preferred surgical technique, OR training philosophy, and responsibility as surgeon). A total of 5 factors (case schedule, patient morbidity, procedure attributes, resident current competency level, and trustworthiness) influenced attending surgeons' pre-OR guidance plans. "OR training philosophy" and "responsibility as surgeon" were anchor factors that affected attending surgeons' OR guidance decision-making patterns. Surgeons' OR guidance decision making is a dynamic process

  19. Baylor SBIRT Medical Residency Training Program: model description and initial evaluation.

    PubMed

    Bray, James H; Kowalchuk, Alicia; Waters, Vicki; Laufman, Larry; Shilling, Elizabeth H

    2012-01-01

    The Baylor College of Medicine SBIRT Medical Residency Training Program is a multilevel project that trains residents and faculty in evidenced-based screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) methods for alcohol and substance use problems. This paper describes the training program and provides initial evaluation after the first year of the project. The program was successfully incorporated into the residency curricula in family medicine, internal medicine, and psychiatry. Initial evaluations indicate a high degree of satisfaction with the program and, despite a slight decrease in satisfaction scores, participants remained satisfied with the program after 30 days. Implementation barriers, solutions, and future directions of the program are discussed.

  20. Operating Room Time Savings with the Use of Splint Packs: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Tyler A.; Bluman, Eric M.; Palms, David; Smith, Jeremy T.; Chiodo, Christopher P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The most expensive variable in the operating room (OR) is time. Lean Process Management is being used in the medical field to improve efficiency in the OR. Streamlining individual processes within the OR is crucial to a comprehensive time saving and cost-cutting health care strategy. At our institution, one hour of OR time costs approximately $500, exclusive of supply and personnel costs. Commercially prepared splint packs (SP) contain all components necessary for plaster-of-Paris short-leg splint application and have the potential to decrease splint application time and overall costs by making it a more lean process. We conducted a randomized controlled trial comparing OR time savings between SP use and bulk supply (BS) splint application. Methods: Fifty consecutive adult operative patients on whom post-operative short-leg splint immobilization was indicated were randomized to either a control group using BS or an experimental group using SP. One orthopaedic surgeon (EMB) prepared and applied all of the splints in a standardized fashion. Retrieval time, preparation time, splint application time, and total splinting time for both groups were measured and statistically analyzed. Results: The retrieval time, preparation time and total splinting time were significantly less (p<0.001) in the SP group compared with the BS group. There was no significant difference in application time between the SP group and BS group. Conclusion: The use of SP made the process of splinting more lean. This has resulted in an average of 2 minutes 52 seconds saved in total splinting time compared to BS, making it an effective cost-cutting and time saving technique. For high volume ORs, use of splint packs may contribute to substantial time and cost savings without impacting patient safety. PMID:26894212

  1. [Nursing professionals and health care assistants' perception of patient safety culture in the operating room].

    PubMed

    Bernalte-Martí, Vicente; Orts-Cortés, María Isabel; Maciá-Soler, Loreto

    2015-01-01

    To assess nursing professionals and health care assistants' perceptions, opinions and behaviours on patient safety culture in the operating room of a public hospital of the Spanish National Health Service. To describe strengths and weaknesses or opportunities for improvement according to the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality criteria, as well as to determine the number of events reported. A descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted using the Spanish version of the questionnaire Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture. The sample consisted of nursing professionals, who agreed to participate voluntarily in this study and met the selection criteria. A descriptive and inferential analysis was performed depending on the nature of the variables and the application conditions of statistical tests. Significance if p < .05. In total, 74 nursing professionals responded (63.2%). No strengths were found in the operating theatre, and improvements are needed concerning staffing (64.0%), and hospital management support for patient safety (52.9%). A total of 52.3% (n = 65) gave patient safety a score from 7 to 8.99 (on a 10 point scale); 79.7% (n = 72) reported no events last year. The total variance explained by the regression model was 0.56 for "Frequency of incident reporting" and 0.26 for "Overall perception of safety". There was a more positive perception of patient safety culture at unit level. Weaknesses have been identified, and they can be used to design specific intervention activities to improve patient safety culture in other nearby operating theatres. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Traffic in the operating room during joint replacement is a multidisciplinary problem

    PubMed Central

    Bédard, Martin; Pelletier-Roy, Rémi; Angers-Goulet, Mathieu; Leblanc, Pierre-Alexandre; Pelet, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    Background Door openings disrupt the laminar air flow and increase the bacterial count in the operating room (OR). We aimed to define the incidence of door openings in the OR during primary total joint arthroplasty (TJA) surgeries and determine whether measures were needed and/or possible to reduce OR staff traffic. Methods We recorded the number of door openings during 100 primary elective TJA surgeries; the OR personnel were unaware of the observer’s intention. Operating time was divided into the preincision period, defined as the time from the opening of surgical trays to skin incision, and the postincision period, defined as time from incision to dressing application. Results The mean number of door openings during primary TJA was 71.1 (range 35–176) with a mean operative time of 111.9 (range 53–220) minutes, for an average of 0.64 (range 0.36–1.05) door openings/min. Nursing staff were responsible for 52.2% of total door openings, followed by anesthesia staff at 23.9% and orthopedic staff at 12.7%. In the preincision period, we observed an average of 0.84 door openings/min, with nursing and orthopedic personnel responsible for most of the door openings. The postincision period yielded an average of 0.54 door openings/min, with nursing and anesthesia personnel being responsible for most of the door openings. Conclusion There is a high incidence of door openings during TJA. Because we observed a range in the number of door openings per surgery, we believe it is possible to reduce this number during TJA. PMID:26022153

  3. The endovascular operating room as an extension of the intensive care unit: changing strategies in the management of neurovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Bell, Randy S; Vo, Alexander H; Veznedaroglu, Erol; Armonda, Rocco A

    2006-11-01

    Technological advances within the field of endovascular neurosurgery have influenced the management of the neurovascular patient within the intensive care unit (ICU). The endovascular operating room has, in fact, become an extension of the ICU in certain cases. Given the rapid development of new endovascular technologies, it is more important than ever for neurosurgeons to remain intimately involved with the care of their patients within the ICU. This article offers an overview of the evolution in ICU management of neurovascular disease and provides a framework for the incorporation of the endovascular operating room in the intensive care management of patients with this disease.

  4. [Impact of The Netherlands Health Care Inspectorate report on patient safety in operating rooms: teamwork is better than bureaucracy].

    PubMed

    Lange, J F

    2008-10-18

    The Netherlands Health Care Inpectorate recently concluded that patient safety in operating rooms should improve. One example of improvement is the implementation of the time out procedure, which consists of a preoperative briefing and a postoperative debriefing in the operating room. There is, however, a risk of bureaucray and pro forma procedures, due to the time pressure the inspectorate has imposed. Sustainable improvement in patient safety requires teamwork and training of all members of surgical teams in non-technical skills such as communication. Crew resource management has been implemented in the intensive care departments in The Netherlands and is now being adapted for the training of integrated surgical teams.

  5. Assessment of an innovative antimicrobial surface disinfectant in the operating room environment using adenosine triphosphate bioluminescence assay.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Brian D; Spencer, Maureen; Rossi, Peter J; Lee, Cheong J; Brown, Kellie R; Malinowski, Michael; Seabrook, Gary R; Edmiston, Charles E

    2015-03-01

    Terminal cleaning in the operating room is a critical step in preventing the transmission of health care-associated pathogens. The persistent disinfectant activity of a novel isopropyl alcohol/organofunctional silane solution (ISO) was evaluated in 4 operating rooms after terminal cleaning. Adenosine triphosphate bioluminescence documented a significant difference (P < .048) in surface bioburden on IOS-treated surfaces versus controls. RODAC plate cultures revealed a significant (P < .001) reduction in microbial contamination on IOS-treated surfaces compared with controls. Further studies are warranted to validate the persistent disinfectant activity of ISO within selective health care settings.

  6. Consequences and potential problems of operating room outbursts and temper tantrums by surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, George B.; Wille, Rosanne L.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Anecdotal tales of colorful temper tantrums and outbursts by surgeons directed at operating room nurses and at times other health care providers, like residents and fellows, are part of the history of surgery and include not only verbal abuse but also instrument throwing and real harassment. Our Editor-in-Chief, Dr. Nancy Epstein, has made the literature review of “Are there truly any risks and consequences when spine surgeons mistreat their predominantly female OR nursing staff/colleagues, and what can we do about it?,” an assigned topic for members of the editorial board as part of a new category entitled Ethical Note for our journal. This is a topic long overdue and I chose to research it. Methods: There is no medical literature to review dealing with nurse abuse. To research this topic, one has to involve business, industry, educational institutions, compliance standards and practices, and existing state and federal laws. I asked Dr. Rosanne Wille to co-author this paper since, as the former Dean of Nursing and then Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs at a major higher educational institution, she had personal experience with compliance regulations and both sexual harassment and employment discrimination complaints, to make this review meaningful. Results: A review of the existing business practices and both state and federal laws strongly suggests that although there has not been any specific legal complaint that is part of the public record, any surgeon who chooses to act out his or her frustration and nervous energy demands by abusing co-workers on the health care team, and in this case specifically operating room personnel, is taking a chance of making legal history with financial outcomes which only an actual trial can predict or determine. Even more serious outcomes of an out-of-control temper tantrum and disruptive behavior can terminate, after multiple hearings and appeals, in adverse decisions affecting hospital

  7. U.S. Army-Baylor University Health Care Administration Program: evidenced-based outcomes in the military health system.

    PubMed

    Mangelsdorff, A David; Rogers, Jody; Finstuen, Kenn; Pryor, Rene

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to assess the impact of an educational program on the Military Health System on some of the evidence-based educational outcomes for the Individual (student) and the Society (all Army Medical Treatment Facilities). The U.S. Army-Baylor University HCA program provides a unique opportunity to assess the impact of an educational program on the Military Health System (MHS). Since the majority of the graduate students are military officers who serve in military medical treatment facilities (MTFs), tracking their career progression allows assessing the value added of the U.S. Army-Baylor University HCA experience from 1951 to 2001 (n = 2234). The context of Society outcomes includes all the Army MTFs where U.S. Army-Baylor University HCA graduates execute their leadership skills. During the time from 1994 to 2001, all of the Army MTFs in the MHS (n = 38) were examined by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO). In a similar but shorter time frame (1997-2001), DoD patient satisfaction assessments were conducted. The Individual outcomes (career advancement, increase in status, higher professional association membership) demonstrate that the selection criteria used for program admission appear to be successful. The Society outcomes showed higher JCAHO scores and satisfied consumers in Army facilities with Baylor graduates as the Deputy Commander for Administration (DCA). Continued internal program assessments (curriculum reviews) and external reviews (Accrediting Commission on Education for Health Services Administration accreditations of 5 years in 1987, 8 years in 1993 and 7 years in 2001, and 7 ACHE student chapter awards) attest to the strengths of the U.S. Army-Baylor University HCA program. Educating the MHS shareholders (patients, beneficiaries, professional and support staff, senior leaders) and leveraging technology to. share best practices for all administrators (including non-Baylor graduates) will

  8. [Who is suited as operation room manager? Evaluation process for hospitals and candidates].

    PubMed

    Schüpfer, G; Bauer, M

    2011-03-01

    Operation room (OR) management is not an end in itself. The challenge is more to organize the complex, inhomogeneous and interference-prone machinery of intraoperative service provision according to business objectives. Although business objectives may differ in some details the ultimate consequence is always to assure the quality of medical care along with adhering to the general economic conditions. The narrower the economic framework the smaller the company's tolerance to unprofessional OR management. Consequently, it can be noticed that OR management has become of age. An internal socialization as frontline leader is no longer sufficient for taking over a job profile which, regarding the risks of revenues and costs belongs to the top management of a company. Prior to looking for a future OR manager it is mandatory to develop a profile of qualifications tailored to the company. In the following selection process the important thing is to identify the candidate who fits best to the developed profile. This paper sees itself as an assistance in the development of such a company-specific qualification profile for an OR manager. On the basis of knowledge, skills and characteristics, different manager typologies are developed, facilitating the successful evaluation in a selection process for both the company and the candidate.

  9. Applied patent RFID systems for building reacting HEPA air ventilation system in hospital operation rooms.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jesun; Pai, Jar-Yuan; Chen, Chih-Cheng

    2012-12-01

    RFID technology, an automatic identification and data capture technology to provide identification, tracing, security and so on, was widely applied to healthcare industry in these years. Employing HEPA ventilation system in hospital is a way to ensure healthful indoor air quality to protect patients and healthcare workers against hospital-acquired infections. However, the system consumes lots of electricity which cost a lot. This study aims to apply the RFID technology to offer a unique medical staff and patient identification, and reacting HEPA air ventilation system in order to reduce the cost, save energy and prevent the prevalence of hospital-acquired infection. The system, reacting HEPA air ventilation system, contains RFID tags (for medical staffs and patients), sensor, and reacting system which receives the information regarding the number of medical staff and the status of the surgery, and controls the air volume of the HEPA air ventilation system accordingly. A pilot program was carried out in a unit of operation rooms of a medical center with 1,500 beds located in central Taiwan from Jan to Aug 2010. The results found the air ventilation system was able to function much more efficiently with less energy consumed. Furthermore, the indoor air quality could still keep qualified and hospital-acquired infection or other occupational diseases could be prevented.

  10. Time accuracy of a radio frequency identification patient tracking system for recording operating room timestamps.

    PubMed

    Marjamaa, Riitta A; Torkki, Paulus M; Torkki, Markus I; Kirvelä, Olli A

    2006-04-01

    A patient tracking system is a promising tool for managing patient flow and improving efficiency in the operating room. Wireless location systems, using infrared or radio frequency transmitters, can automatically timestamp key events, thereby decreasing the need for manual data input. In this study, we measured the accuracy and precision of automatically documented timestamps compared with manual recording. Each patient scheduled for urgent surgery was given an active radio frequency/infrared transmitter. The prototype software tracked the patient throughout the perioperative process, automatically documenting the timestamps. Both automatic and traditional data entry were compared with the reference data. The absolute value of median error was 64% smaller (P < 0.01), and the average quartile deviation of error was 69% smaller in automatic documentation. The average delay between an activity and the documentation was 80 seconds in automatic documentation and 735 seconds in manual documentation. Both the accuracy and the precision were better in automatic documentation and the data were immediately available. Automatic documentation with the Indoor Positioning System can help in managing patient flow and in increasing transparency with faster availability and better accuracy of data.

  11. Improving operating room efficiency by applying bin-packing and portfolio techniques to surgical case scheduling.

    PubMed

    Van Houdenhoven, Mark; van Oostrum, Jeroen M; Hans, Erwin W; Wullink, Gerhard; Kazemier, Geert

    2007-09-01

    An operating room (OR) department has adopted an efficient business model and subsequently investigated how efficiency could be further improved. The aim of this study is to show the efficiency improvement of lowering organizational barriers and applying advanced mathematical techniques. We applied advanced mathematical algorithms in combination with scenarios that model relaxation of various organizational barriers using prospectively collected data. The setting is the main inpatient OR department of a university hospital, which sets its surgical case schedules 2 wk in advance using a block planning method. The main outcome measures are the number of freed OR blocks and OR utilization. Lowering organizational barriers and applying mathematical algorithms can yield a 4.5% point increase in OR utilization (95% confidence interval 4.0%-5.0%). This is obtained by reducing the total required OR time. Efficient OR departments can further improve their efficiency. The paper shows that a radical cultural change that comprises the use of mathematical algorithms and lowering organizational barriers improves OR utilization.

  12. Perceptions of communication in the operating room: a pilot survey study.

    PubMed

    Wyche, Melville Q; Lemay, Allyson C; Tiemann, Dawn D; Billeaud, Craig B; Ma, John G; Elhassan, Amir O; Fox, Mary E; Diaz, James H; Bell, Laura J; Beutler, Sascha S; Urman, Richard D; Kaye, Alan David

    2015-01-01

    An operating room (OR) environment is challenging and complicated. At any given time, several vital tasks are being performed by skilled individuals, including physicians, nurses, and ancillary staff. There is a potential for multifactorial mistakes; many arise because of communication issues. To evaluate the current state of perceptions of interdisciplinary communication in an OR setting, a survey was developed and administered to four academic residency training departments of anesthesiology in a single U.S. state. The results of this survey show that perceived poor communication within the OR leads to a lack of emphasis on a multidisciplinary approach to patient care in the OR. Survey data can be used internally to identify shortcomings in communication at a facility, to stress the importance of communication, and to serve as a powerful education tool to potentially improve patient care. Through this type of survey, which emphasizes communication in the OR, stakeholders can work more effectively to improve patient care and decrease adverse outcomes in the hospital environment.

  13. Monolithically integrated mid-IR interband cascade laser and photodetector operating at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotfi, Hossein; Li, Lu; Shazzad Rassel, S. M.; Yang, Rui Q.; Corrége, Cédric J.; Johnson, Matthew B.; Larson, Preston R.; Gupta, James A.

    2016-10-01

    We report on the demonstration of a monolithically integrated mid-IR interband cascade (IC) laser and photodetector operating at room temperature. The base structure for the integrated laser and detector is a six-stage type-I IC laser with GaInAsSb quantum well active regions. The laser/detector pair was defined using focused ion beam milling. The laser section lased in cw mode with an emission wavelength of ˜3.1 μm at 20 °C and top-illuminated photodetectors fabricated from the same wafer had Johnson-noise-limited detectivity of 1.05 × 109 cm Hz1/2/W at this wavelength and temperature. Under the same condition, the detectivity for the edge illumination configuration for the monolithically integrated laser/photodetector pairs is projected to be as high as 1.85 × 1010 cm Hz1/2/W, as supported by experimentally observed high photocurrent and open-circuit voltage. These high performance characteristics for monolithically integrated IC devices show great prospects for on-chip integration of mid-IR photonic devices for miniaturized sensors and on-chip optical communication systems.

  14. Segregation for reduction of regulated medical waste in the operating room: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Shinn, Helen Ki; Kim, Byung-Gun; Yang, Chunwoo; Na, WonJu; Song, Jang-Ho

    2017-01-01

    One-third of all hospital-regulated medical waste (RMW) comes from the operating room (OR), and it considerably consists of disposable packaging and wrapping materials for the sterilization of surgical instruments. This study sought to identify the amount and type of waste produced by ORs in order to reduce the RMW so as to achieve environmentally-friendly waste management in the OR. We performed an initial waste segregation of 4 total knee replacement arthroplasties (TKRAs) and 1 total hip replacement arthroplasty, and later of 1 extra TKRA, 1 laparoscopic anterior resection of the colon, and 1 pelviscopy (with radical vaginal hysterectomy), performed at our OR. The total mass of non-regulated medical waste (non-RMW) and blue wrap amounted to 30.5 kg (24.9%), and that of RMW to 92.1 kg (75.1%). In the course of the study, we noted that the non-RMW included recyclables, such as papers, plastics, cardboards, and various wrapping materials. The study showed that a reduction in RMW generation can be achieved through the systematic segregation of OR waste. PMID:28184276

  15. Operating Room Efficiency before and after Entrance in a Benchmarking Program for Surgical Process Data.

    PubMed

    Pedron, Sara; Winter, Vera; Oppel, Eva-Maria; Bialas, Enno

    2017-08-23

    Operating room (OR) efficiency continues to be a high priority for hospitals. In this context the concept of benchmarking has gained increasing importance as a means to improve OR performance. The aim of this study was to investigate whether and how participation in a benchmarking and reporting program for surgical process data was associated with a change in OR efficiency, measured through raw utilization, turnover times, and first-case tardiness. The main analysis is based on panel data from 202 surgical departments in German hospitals, which were derived from the largest database for surgical process data in Germany. Panel regression modelling was applied. Results revealed no clear and univocal trend of participation in a benchmarking and reporting program for surgical process data. The largest trend was observed for first-case tardiness. In contrast to expectations, turnover times showed a generally increasing trend during participation. For raw utilization no clear and statistically significant trend could be evidenced. Subgroup analyses revealed differences in effects across different hospital types and department specialties. Participation in a benchmarking and reporting program and thus the availability of reliable, timely and detailed analysis tools to support the OR management seemed to be correlated especially with an increase in the timeliness of staff members regarding first-case starts. The increasing trend in turnover time revealed the absence of effective strategies to improve this aspect of OR efficiency in German hospitals and could have meaningful consequences for the medium- and long-run capacity planning in the OR.

  16. Role of communication systems in coordinating supervising anesthesiologists' activities outside of operating rooms.

    PubMed

    Smallman, Bettina; Dexter, Franklin; Masursky, Danielle; Li, Fenghua; Gorji, Reza; George, Dave; Epstein, Richard H

    2013-04-01

    Theoretically, communication systems have the potential to increase the productivity of anesthesiologists supervising anesthesia providers. We evaluated the maximal potential of communication systems to increase the productivity of anesthesia care by enhancing anesthesiologists' coordination of care (activities) among operating rooms (ORs). At hospital A, data for 13,368 pages were obtained from files recorded in the internal alphanumeric text paging system. Pages from the postanesthesia care unit were processed through a numeric paging system and thus not included. At hospital B, in a different US state, 3 of the authors categorized each of 898 calls received using the internal wireless audio system (Vocera(®)). Lower and upper 95% confidence limits for percentages are the values reported. At least 45% of pages originated from outside the ORs (e.g., 20% from holding area) at hospital A and at least 56% of calls (e.g., 30% administrative) at hospital B. In contrast, requests from ORs for urgent presence of the anesthesiologist were at most 0.2% of pages at hospital A and 1.8% of calls at hospital B. Approximately half of messages to supervising anesthesiologists are for activity originating outside the ORs being supervised. To use communication tools to increase anesthesia productivity on the day of surgery, their use should include a focus on care coordination outside ORs (e.g., holding area) and among ORs (e.g., at the control desk).

  17. Photodetector development at Fraunhofer IAF: From LWIR to SWIR operating from cryogenic close to room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daumer, V.; Gramich, V.; Müller, R.; Schmidt, J.; Rutz, F.; Stadelmann, T.; Wörl, A.; Rehm, R.

    2017-02-01

    Photodetectors in the non-visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum are essential for security, defense and space science as well as industrial and scientific applications. The research activities at Fraunhofer IAF cover a broad range in the infrared (IR) regime. Whereas short-wavelength IR (SWIR, <1.7 μm) detectors are realized by InGaAs/InP structures, InAs/GaSb type-II superlattice (T2SL) infrared detectors are developed for the spectral bands from mid- (MWIR, 3-5 μm) to long-wavelength IR (LWIR, 8-12 μm). We report on the extension of the superlattice empirical pseudopotential method (SEPM) to 300 K for the design of LWIR heterostructures for operation near room temperature. Recently, we have also adapted heterostructure concepts to our well established bi-spectral T2SL MWIR detector resulting in a dark current density below 2 × 10-9 A/cm2 for a cut-off wavelength close to 5 μm. Finally, we present first results obtained with a gated viewing system based on our InGaAs/InAlAs/InP avalanche photodiode arrays.

  18. Hemodynamic Parameters during Laryngoscopic Procedures in the Office and in the Operating Room.

    PubMed

    Tierney, William S; Chota, Rebecca L; Benninger, Michael S; Nowacki, Amy S; Bryson, Paul C

    2016-09-01

    Previous research has shown that office-based laryngoscopic procedures can induce hemodynamic changes, including tachycardia and severe hypertension, calling into question the safety of these procedures. However, comparison between office and operating room (OR) procedures has not been carried out. Therefore, we prospectively measured hemodynamic variables in both settings to compare hemodynamic changes between office and OR procedures. Prospective cohort study. Single academic center. Subjects undergoing office and OR laryngoscopic procedures were prospectively identified, and 92 OR and 70 office subjects were included. Heart rate and blood pressure were measured at established time points before, during, and after the procedures. Descriptive and comparative statistical analyses were conducted. Severe hemodynamic events, either tachycardia or severe hypertension (blood pressure >180 mm Hg systolic or >110 mm Hg diastolic), occurred significantly more frequently in OR than office procedures (41% vs 20%; P = .006). OR severe hemodynamic events occurred more commonly than previously reported rates in the office (41% vs 28%; P = .012). Regression analyses showed that the odds of having a severe hemodynamic event were 3.66 times higher in OR versus office procedures. Severe hemodynamic events are more likely to occur in the OR than in the office during laryngologic procedures. While larger studies will be required to establish rates of dangerous cardiovascular events in laryngoscopic procedures, hemodynamic parameters indicate that office-based procedures have a safety benefit for procedures that can be conducted in either setting. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2016.

  19. The lack of benefit of tracheal extubation in the operating room after coronary artery bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    Montes, F R; Sanchez, S I; Giraldo, J C; Rincón, J D; Rincón, I E; Vanegas, M V; Charris, H

    2000-10-01

    Although early tracheal extubation in cardiac anesthesia is safe and cost beneficial, questions still remain regarding how early after cardiac surgery patients should be tracheally extubated (TE). Our objective was to determine the effects on resource use if patients scheduled for coronary artery bypass grafting have TE in the operating room (OR). We studied 100 consecutive patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass grafting, requiring extracorporeal circulation, and those eligible for a fast-track pathway. At the end of the procedure, the patients were evaluated for TE in the OR if they were hemodynamically stable, were without significant bleeding, and fulfilled clinical and blood gas analysis variables. Patients who did not meet the requirements had TE in the intensive care unit (ICU). Fifty patients had TE in the OR and 50 patients in the ICU. Time in the OR after skin closure, ICU length of stay, and postoperative length of stay were similar between the groups. Four patients (8%) in the OR group were tracheally reintubated secondary to respiratory depression (P = 0.11). Three patients (6%) in the OR group had postoperative myocardial infarction, and one postoperative myocardial infarction (2%) occurred in the ICU group (P = 0.61). All four patients recovered satisfactorily. The incidences of other complications were similar between groups.

  20. The effects of general anesthesia legislation on operating room visits by preschool children undergoing dental treatment.

    PubMed

    White, Halley R; Lee, Jessica Y; Rozier, R Gary

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of state-level general anesthesia (GA) legislation on operating room visits for the treatment of dental caries on preschool-aged children. The North Carolina Ambulatory Surgery Discharge Database was used to observe GA visits for fiscal years (FY) 1997 to 2001. A pretest/post-test design with concurrent comparison groups was used for 2 analyses: (1) all children treated for dental caries were compared to those treated for otitis media; and (2) those whose treatment for dental caries was reimbursed by Medicaid were compared to those whose treatment for dental caries was not reimbursed by Medicaid. In the prelegislation period (FY 1997 and 1998), there were 3,857 GA visits for dental core and 21,038 for otitis media. Postlegislation (FY 2000 and 2001) dental visits increased to 5,511(43%), and otitis media visits increased to 22,279 (6%)-a statistically significant difference (P<.05). Before the legislation, there were 1,370 non-Medicaid dental visits and 2,487 Medicaid dental visits. Non-Medicaid and Medicaid dental visits postlegislation increased to 2,195 (60%) and 3,316 (33%), respectively. This difference was significant (P<.05). General anesthesia legislation resulted in an increase in access to care for children needing dental care in North Carolina.

  1. Computed tomography to operating room in less than 3 hours minimizes complications from appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Laura A; Davis, Matthew L; Jupiter, Daniel C; Frazee, Richard C; Regner, Justin L

    2016-08-01

    The aim of our study is to select patients with nonperforated appendicitis verified by computed tomography (CT) scan and to determine if there is a temporal component to perforation. A retrospective cohort study of patients with CT scan evidence of nonperforated appendicitis from 2007 to 2012. 411 patients, aged 39.7 ± 16.25 years (47.5% male) were included in the study. 330 patients (80.3%) were nonperforated at surgery. Analysis of 3-hour intervals from CT scan to operating room (OR) revealed an absolute reduction in the rate of perforation from 27% at the 6- to 9-hour interval, to 17% and 10% at the 3- to 6-hour and 0- to 3-hour intervals, respectively, (P < .04). All organ space infections occurred in patients who were delayed to the OR greater than 3 hours. Mean length of hospitalization was .93 days and 2.81 days, respectively, in nonperforated and perforated appendicitis patients (P < .001). Delays to the OR were associated with increased risk of perforation. Patients with uncomplicated appendicitis had shorter hospitalization and fewer postoperative wound infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Music and ambient operating room noise in patients undergoing spinal anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Ayoub, Chakib M; Rizk, Laudi B; Yaacoub, Chadi I; Gaal, Dorothy; Kain, Zeev N

    2005-05-01

    Previous studies have indicated that music decreases intraoperative sedative requirements in patients undergoing surgical procedures under regional anesthesia. In this study we sought to determine whether this decrease in sedative requirements results from music or from eliminating operating room (OR) noise. A secondary aim of the study was to examine the relationship of response to intraoperative music and participants' culture (i.e., American versus Lebanese). Eighty adults (36 American and 54 Lebanese) undergoing urological procedures with spinal anesthesia and patient-controlled IV propofol sedation were randomly assigned to intraoperative music, white noise, or OR noise. We found that, controlling for ambient OR noise, intraoperative music decreases propofol requirements (0.004 +/- 0.002 mg . kg(-1) . min(-1) versus 0.014 +/- 0.004 mg . kg(-1) . min(-1) versus 0.012 +/- 0.002 mg . kg(-1) . min(-1); P = 0.026). We also found that, regardless of group assignment, Lebanese patients used less propofol as compared with American patients (0.005 +/- 0.001 mg . kg(-1) . min(-1) versus 0.017 +/- 0.003 mg . kg(-1) . min(-1); P = 0.001) and that, in both sites, patients in the music group required less propofol (P < 0.05). We conclude that when controlling for ambient OR noise, intraoperative music decreases propofol requirements of both Lebanese and American patients who undergo urological surgery under spinal anesthesia.

  3. The Effect of Instructional Supervision by an Operating Room Assistant on First-Case Starts.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaohua; Zhang, Jun; Dai, Chen; Si, Yibing

    2017-02-01

    Delays in starting first cases of the day are a common topic associated with high economic costs. This study aimed to determine if an operating room (OR) assistant using an instructional supervision program could reduce the tardiness of first-case starts. A prospective study was conducted. Data from four ORs were used to compare the effectiveness of an instructional intervention to reduce delays in starting first cases of the day. The first cases in two ORs received instructional supervision by an OR. The primary endpoint was the percentage of first cases that started on time. Other endpoints were the percentage of the team work score of OR staff and the percentage of patient satisfaction score. Over 48 weeks, the effect of instructional supervision was evaluated in 960 first-case starts. In the instructional supervision group (n = 480), the percentage of first cases that started on time increased significantly (92.1% vs 71.7%; P < .001), and there was a higher percentage of the team work score (84.4% vs 76.7%; P < .01) and patient satisfaction score (88.3% vs 79.4%; P < .001). Instructional supervision by an OR assistant can make a potential improvement in our on-time first-case starts per day. Copyright © 2016 American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [Evaluation of Radiation Dose during Stent-graft Treatment Using a Hybrid Operating Room System].

    PubMed

    Haga, Yoshihiro; Chida, Kouichi; Kaga, Yuji; Saitou, Kazuhisa; Arai, Takeshi; Suzuki, Shinichi; Iwaya, Yoshimi; Kumasaka, Eriko; Kataoka, Nozomi; Satou, Naoto; Abe, Mitsuya

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, aortic aneurysm treatment with stent graft grafting in the X-ray fluoroscopy is increasing. This is an endovascular therapy, because it is a treatment which includes the risk of radiation damage, having to deal with radiation damage, to know in advance is important. In this study, in order to grasp the trend of exposure stent graft implantation in a hybrid operating room (OR) system, focusing on clinical data (entrance skin dose and fluoroscopy time), was to count the total. In TEVAR and EVAR, fluoroscopy time became 13.40 ± 7.27 minutes, 23.67 ± 11.76 minutes, ESD became 0.87 ± 0.41 mGy, 1.11 ± 0.57 mGy. (fluoroscopy time of EVAR was 2.0 times than TEVAR. DAP of EVAR was 1.2 times than TEVAR.) When using the device, adapted lesions and usage are different. This means that care changes in exposure-related factors. In this study, exposure trends of the stent graft implantation was able to grasp. It can be a helpful way to reduce/optimize the radiation dose in a hybrid OR system.

  5. Financial Implications of Different Interpretations of ACGME Anesthesiology Program Requirements for Rotations in the Operating Room

    PubMed Central

    Backeris, Mark E.; Forte, Patrick J.; Beaman, Shawn T.; Metro, David G.

    2013-01-01

    Background The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) standards for resident education in anesthesiology mandate required rotations including rotations inside the operating room (OR). When residents complete rotations outside the OR, other providers must be used to maintain the OR's clinical productivity. Objective We quantified and compared the costs of replacing residents by using two different working patterns that are compliant with the ACGME anesthesiology program requirements: (1) the minimum amount of time in the OR, and (2) working the maximum amount of time permitted in the OR. Methods We calculated resident replacement costs over a 36-month residency period in both a minimum and maximum OR time model. We used a range of Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist (CRNA) pay scales determined by a local market analysis for cost comparisons. Results Depending on CRNA pay rates, the cost differentials to replace a resident in the OR between the minimum and maximum OR time models ranged from $236,000 to $581,876, assuming a 50-hour resident work week, and $373,400 to $931,001, assuming an 80-hour resident work week. This cost was per resident over the entire 3 years of their residency. Conclusions Varying the amount of time residents work in the OR (as allowed under ACGME program requirements) has significant financial implications over a 36-month anesthesiology residency. The larger the residency, the more significant will be the impact on the department and sponsoring institution. PMID:24404280

  6. Dedicated operating room for emergency surgery generates more utilization, less overtime, and less cancellations.

    PubMed

    van Veen-Berkx, Elizabeth; Elkhuizen, Sylvia G; Kuijper, Bart; Kazemier, Geert

    2016-01-01

    Two approaches prevail for reserving operating room (OR) capacity for emergency surgery: (1) dedicated emergency ORs and (2) evenly allocating capacity to all elective ORs, thereby creating a virtual emergency team. Previous studies contradict which approach leads to the best performance in OR utilization. Quasi-experimental controlled time-series design with empirical data from 3 university medical centers. Four different time periods were compared with analysis of variance with contrasts. Performance was measured based on 467,522 surgical cases. After closing the dedicated emergency OR, utilization slightly increased; overtime also increased. This was in contrast to earlier simulated results. The 2 control centers, maintaining a dedicated emergency OR, showed a higher increase in utilization and a decrease in overtime, along with a smaller ratio of case cancellations because of emergency surgery. This study shows that in daily practice a dedicated emergency OR is the preferred approach in performance terms regarding utilization, overtime, and case cancellations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Gestonurse: a robotic surgical nurse for handling surgical instruments in the operating room.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Mithun; Li, Yu-Ting; Akingba, George; Wachs, Juan P

    2012-03-01

    While surgeon-scrub nurse collaboration provides a fast, straightforward and inexpensive method of delivering surgical instruments to the surgeon, it often results in "mistakes" (e.g. missing information, ambiguity of instructions and delays). It has been shown that these errors can have a negative impact on the outcome of the surgery. These errors could potentially be reduced or eliminated by introducing robotics into the operating room. Gesture control is a natural and fundamentally sound alternative that allows interaction without disturbing the normal flow of surgery. This paper describes the development of a robotic scrub nurse Gestonurse to support surgeons by passing surgical instruments during surgery as required. The robot responds to recognized hand signals detected through sophisticated computer vision and pattern recognition techniques. Experimental results show that 95% of the gestures were recognized correctly. The gesture recognition algorithm presented is robust to changes in scale and rotation of the hand gestures. The system was compared to human task performance and was found to be only 0.83 s slower on average.

  8. Surgical clothing systems in laminar airflow operating room: a numerical assessment.

    PubMed

    Sadrizadeh, Sasan; Holmberg, Sture

    2014-01-01

    This study compared two different laminar airflow distribution strategies - horizontal and vertical - and investigated the effectiveness of both ventilation systems in terms of reducing the sedimentation and distribution of bacteria-carrying particles. Three different staff clothing systems, which resulted in source strengths of 1.5, 4 and 5 CFU/s per person, were considered. The exploration was conducted numerically using a computational fluid dynamics technique. Active and passive air sampling methods were simulated in addition to recovery tests, and the results were compared. Model validation was performed through comparisons with measurement data from the published literature. The recovery test yielded a value of 8.1 min for the horizontal ventilation scenario and 11.9 min for the vertical ventilation system. Fewer particles were captured by the slit sampler and in sedimentation areas with the horizontal ventilation system. The simulated results revealed that under identical conditions in the examined operating room, the horizontal laminar ventilation system performed better than the vertical option. The internal constellation of lamps, the surgical team and objects could have a serious effect on the movement of infectious particles and therefore on postoperative surgical site infections. Copyright © 2014 King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. [The environmental monitoring of the exposure to chemical contamination in operating rooms].

    PubMed

    Desogus, G F

    2007-01-01

    The medical staff which works in an operating room is exposed to danger due to the chemical contamination found in the air. The results of this research depend to hormonal and haematochemical variations. The chemical contamination can be the cause of pathologies of the respiratory organs, the skin, the mucosa and the immune system. After a preventive evaluation of the production processes and the working procedures, some researchers have estimated the environmental risk caused by low concentrations of chemical products. In order to control the levels of the chemical agents, they have used an integrated system set up by a gaschromatography-mass spectrometer that has found some levels of chemical agents peculiar to a low pollution, characterized by the low concentration under the levels of the so-called ACGIH (2006) of hesane, toluene, ethylbenzene, o-xylene and naphthalene. According to the latest studies is very important to develop working methods and scientific knowledges direct to environmental, medical and toxicological problems. They are necessary to guarantee a greater protection of the human health and the safety at work.

  10. Using human factors engineering to improve patient safety in the cardiovascular operating room.

    PubMed

    Gurses, Ayse P; Martinez, Elizabeth A; Bauer, Laura; Kim, George; Lubomski, Lisa H; Marsteller, Jill A; Pennathur, Priyadarshini R; Goeschel, Chris; Pronovost, Peter J; Thompson, David

    2012-01-01

    Despite significant medical advances, cardiac surgery remains a high risk procedure. Sub-optimal work system design characteristics can contribute to the risks associated with cardiac surgery. However, hazards due to work system characteristics have not been identified in the cardiovascular operating room (CVOR) in sufficient detail to guide improvement efforts. The purpose of this study was to identify and categorize hazards (anything that has the potential to cause a preventable adverse patient safety event) in the CVOR. An interdisciplinary research team used prospective hazard identification methods including direct observations, contextual inquiry, and photographing to collect data in 5 hospitals for a total 22 cardiac surgeries. We performed thematic analysis of the qualitative data guided by a work system model. 60 categories of hazards such as practice variations, high workload, non-compliance with evidence-based guidelines, not including clinicians' in medical device purchasing decisions were found. Results indicated that hazards are common in cardiac surgery and should be eliminated or mitigated to improve patient safety. To improve patient safety in the CVOR, efforts should focus on creating a culture of safety, increasing compliance with evidence based infection control practices, improving communication and teamwork, and designing better tools and technologies through partnership among all stakeholders.

  11. Attending Surgeons' Leadership Style in the Operating Room: Comparing Junior Residents' Experiences and Preferences.

    PubMed

    Kissane-Lee, Nicole A; Yule, Steven; Pozner, Charles N; Smink, Douglas S

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have focused on surgeons' nontechnical skills in the operating room (OR), especially leadership. In an attempt to identify trainee preferences, we explored junior residents' opinions about the OR leadership style of teaching faculty. Overall, 20 interns and 20 mid-level residents completed a previously validated survey on the style of leadership they encountered, the style they preferred to receive, and the style they personally employed in the OR. In all, 4 styles were explored; authoritative: leader makes decisions and communicates them firmly; explanatory: leader makes decisions promptly, but explains them fully; consultative: leader consults with trainees when important decisions are made, and delegative: leader puts the problem before the group and makes decisions by majority opinion. Comparisons were completed using chi-square analysis. Junior resident preference for leadership style of attending surgeons in the OR differed from what they encountered. Overall, 62% of residents encountered an authoritative leadership style; however, only 9% preferred this (p < 0.001). Instead, residents preferred explanatory (53%) or consultative styles (41%). Preferences differed by postgraduate year. Although 40% of interns preferred a consultative style, 50% of mid-level residents preferred explanatory leadership. Junior resident preference of leadership style in the OR differs from what they actually encounter. This has the potential to create unwanted tension and may erode team performance. Awareness of this difference provides an opportunity for an educational intervention directed at both attendings and trainees. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Costs and Utilization of Operating Rooms in a Public Hospital in Trinidad, West Indies

    PubMed Central

    Hariharan, Seetharaman; Chen, Deryk

    2015-01-01

    Context: A top-down evaluation of the costs of operating rooms (ORs) is not commonly done because it is relevant mostly in a publicly funded system. Objective: This study was conducted to determine the costs and utilization of ORs in a public hospital in Trinidad, West Indies, for two one-year periods using a top-down model. Design: Quantitative observational study. Main Outcome Measures: A “cost-block” model suggested for evaluation of intensive care unit costs was adapted to suit ORs. Data were obtained from personal interviews, records, and surveys from the appropriate hospital departments. Adjusted OR utilization times also were recorded for both years. Results: The total annual costs of 4 ORs for the years 2006 and 2009 were approximately US $2.2 and $3.2 million, respectively. Capital expenditure contributed to 70% of the costs, followed by consumables (15%) and medical staff salary (8%). The daily cost of running the ORs was US $6242 in 2006, which rose to $8873 in 2009. The cost of unutilized OR time was approximately US $298,342 in 2006 and was reduced to $198,315 during 2009. Conclusion: The adapted cost-block model was useful to evaluate the costs of ORs in a public hospital in Trinidad and can be used from the government’s expenditure perspective. Because the cost of running the ORs was high, efficiency must be improved to minimize waste. PMID:26828072

  13. Advertised sustainability practices among suppliers to a university hospital operating room.

    PubMed

    Schieble, Thomas M

    2008-01-01

    The present study aimed to identify firms supplying products to our university operating room (OR) that promote sustainable manufacturing methods. Results show that 72% of our suppliers, or 152 of 211 companies, do not promote sustainability practices in a salient manner. Multi-national firms document sustainability methods significantly more than U.S. divisions of multi-nationals or U.S. firms with chi-square = 157.93 (p < 0.001). Although the current study did not evaluate real manufacturing methods, sustainability promotion is an important marketing tool through which purchasers may begin the process of due diligence for product selection. Lack of sustainability information among suppliers in this study suggests that hospital procurement departments likely focus solely on issues like price or quality when making purchase decisions. These results also suggest an opportunity for healthcare administrators to evaluate more fully the products involved in the healthcare supply chain; the intrinsic, intangible value added to hospital products through sustainable manufacturing is consistent with responsible patient care and has the potential to create marketing and public relations value.

  14. Segregation for reduction of regulated medical waste in the operating room: a case report.

    PubMed

    Shinn, Helen Ki; Hwang, Youngyoen; Kim, Byung-Gun; Yang, Chunwoo; Na, WonJu; Song, Jang-Ho; Lim, Hyun Kyoung

    2017-02-01

    One-third of all hospital-regulated medical waste (RMW) comes from the operating room (OR), and it considerably consists of disposable packaging and wrapping materials for the sterilization of surgical instruments. This study sought to identify the amount and type of waste produced by ORs in order to reduce the RMW so as to achieve environmentally-friendly waste management in the OR. We performed an initial waste segregation of 4 total knee replacement arthroplasties (TKRAs) and 1 total hip replacement arthroplasty, and later of 1 extra TKRA, 1 laparoscopic anterior resection of the colon, and 1 pelviscopy (with radical vaginal hysterectomy), performed at our OR. The total mass of non-regulated medical waste (non-RMW) and blue wrap amounted to 30.5 kg (24.9%), and that of RMW to 92.1 kg (75.1%). In the course of the study, we noted that the non-RMW included recyclables, such as papers, plastics, cardboards, and various wrapping materials. The study showed that a reduction in RMW generation can be achieved through the systematic segregation of OR waste.

  15. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Operator Performance Metrics for Control Room Modernization: A Practical Guide for Early Design Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald Boring; Roger Lew; Thomas Ulrich; Jeffrey Joe

    2014-03-01

    As control rooms are modernized with new digital systems at nuclear power plants, it is necessary to evaluate the operator performance using these systems as part of a verification and validation process. There are no standard, predefined metrics available for assessing what is satisfactory operator interaction with new systems, especially during the early design stages of a new system. This report identifies the process and metrics for evaluating human system interfaces as part of control room modernization. The report includes background information on design and evaluation, a thorough discussion of human performance measures, and a practical example of how the process and metrics have been used as part of a turbine control system upgrade during the formative stages of design. The process and metrics are geared toward generalizability to other applications and serve as a template for utilities undertaking their own control room modernization activities.

  16. Surgical technology and operating-room safety failures: a systematic review of quantitative studies.

    PubMed

    Weerakkody, Ruwan A; Cheshire, Nicholas J; Riga, Celia; Lear, Rachael; Hamady, Mohammed S; Moorthy, Krishna; Darzi, Ara