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Sample records for bcr loci relative

  1. Expression of BCR-ABL1 oncogene relative to ABL1 gene changes overtime in chronic myeloid leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Manu; Milani, Lili; Hermansson, Monica; Simonsson, Bengt; Markevaern, Berit; Syvaenen, Ann Christine; Barbany, Gisela

    2008-02-15

    Using a quantitative single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assay we have investigated the changes in the expression of the BCR-ABL1 oncogene relative to the wild-type ABL1 and BCR alleles in cells from chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients not responding to therapy. The results show a progressive increase in the BCR-ABL1 oncogene expression at the expense of decreased expression of the ABL1 allele, not involved in the fusion. No relative changes in the expression of the two BCR alleles were found. These results demonstrate that allele-specific changes in gene expression, with selective, progressive silencing of the wild-type ABL1 allele in favor of the oncogenic BCR-ABL1 allele occur in CML patients with therapy-resistant disease.

  2. Seven New Loci Associated with Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common cause of blindness in older individuals. To accelerate understanding of AMD biology and help design new therapies, we executed a collaborative genomewide association study, examining >17,100 advanced AMD cases and >60,000 controls of European and Asian ancestry. We identified 19 genomic loci associated with AMD with p<5×10−8 and enriched for genes involved in regulation of complement activity, lipid metabolism, extracellular matrix remodeling and angiogenesis. Our results include 7 loci reaching p<5×10−8 for the first time, near the genes COL8A1/FILIP1L, IER3/DDR1, SLC16A8, TGFBR1, RAD51B, ADAMTS9/MIR548A2, and B3GALTL. A genetic risk score combining SNPs from all loci displayed similar good ability to distinguish cases and controls in all samples examined. Our findings provide new directions for biological, genetic and therapeutic studies of AMD. PMID:23455636

  3. Thousands of microsatellite loci from the venomous coralsnake (Micrurus fulvius) and variability of select loci across populations and related species

    PubMed Central

    Castoe, Todd A.; Streicher, Jeffrey W.; Meik, Jesse M.; Ingrasci, Matthew J.; Poole, Alexander W.; de Koning, A.P. Jason; Campbell, Jonathan A.; Parkinson, Christopher L.; Smith, Eric N.; Pollock, David D.

    2012-01-01

    Studies of population genetics increasingly use next-generation DNA sequencing to identify microsatellite loci in non-model organisms. There are, however, relatively few studies that validate the feasibility of transitioning from marker development to experimental application across populations and species. North American coralsnakes of the Micrurus fulvius species complex occur in the United States and Mexico, and little is known about their population structure and phylogenetic relationships. This absence of information and population genetics markers is particularly concerning because they are highly venomous and have important implications on human health. To alleviate this problem in coralsnakes, we investigated the feasibility of using 454 shotgun sequences for microsatellite marker development. First, a genomic shotgun library from a single individual was sequenced (~7.74 megabases; 26,831 reads) to identify potentially amplifiable microsatellite loci (PALs). We then hierarchically sampled 76 individuals from throughout the geographic distribution of the species complex and examined whether PALs were amplifiable and polymorphic. Approximately half of the loci tested were readily amplifiable from all individuals, and 80% of the loci tested for variation were variable and thus informative as population genetic markers. To evaluate the repetitive landscape characteristics across multiple snakes, we also compared microsatellite content between the coralsnake and two other previously sampled snakes, the venomous copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix) and Burmese python (Python molurus). PMID:22938699

  4. Thousands of microsatellite loci from the venomous coralsnake Micrurus fulvius and variability of select loci across populations and related species.

    PubMed

    Castoe, Todd A; Streicher, Jeffrey W; Meik, Jesse M; Ingrasci, Matthew J; Poole, Alexander W; de Koning, A P Jason; Campbell, Jonathan A; Parkinson, Christopher L; Smith, Eric N; Pollock, David D

    2012-11-01

    Studies of population genetics increasingly use next-generation DNA sequencing to identify microsatellite loci in nonmodel organisms. There are, however, relatively few studies that validate the feasibility of transitioning from marker development to experimental application across populations and species. North American coralsnakes of the Micrurus fulvius species complex occur in the United States and Mexico, and little is known about their population structure and phylogenetic relationships. This absence of information and population genetics markers is particularly concerning because they are highly venomous and have important implications on human health. To alleviate this problem in coralsnakes, we investigated the feasibility of using 454 shotgun sequences for microsatellite marker development. First, a genomic shotgun library from a single individual was sequenced (approximately 7.74 megabases; 26,831 reads) to identify potentially amplifiable microsatellite loci (PALs). We then hierarchically sampled 76 individuals from throughout the geographic distribution of the species complex and examined whether PALs were amplifiable and polymorphic. Approximately half of the loci tested were readily amplifiable from all individuals, and 80% of the loci tested for variation were variable and thus informative as population genetic markers. To evaluate the repetitive landscape characteristics across multiple snakes, we also compared microsatellite content between the coralsnake and two other previously sampled snakes, the venomous copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix) and Burmese python (Python molurus).

  5. Thousands of microsatellite loci from the venomous coralsnake Micrurus fulvius and variability of select loci across populations and related species.

    PubMed

    Castoe, Todd A; Streicher, Jeffrey W; Meik, Jesse M; Ingrasci, Matthew J; Poole, Alexander W; de Koning, A P Jason; Campbell, Jonathan A; Parkinson, Christopher L; Smith, Eric N; Pollock, David D

    2012-11-01

    Studies of population genetics increasingly use next-generation DNA sequencing to identify microsatellite loci in nonmodel organisms. There are, however, relatively few studies that validate the feasibility of transitioning from marker development to experimental application across populations and species. North American coralsnakes of the Micrurus fulvius species complex occur in the United States and Mexico, and little is known about their population structure and phylogenetic relationships. This absence of information and population genetics markers is particularly concerning because they are highly venomous and have important implications on human health. To alleviate this problem in coralsnakes, we investigated the feasibility of using 454 shotgun sequences for microsatellite marker development. First, a genomic shotgun library from a single individual was sequenced (approximately 7.74 megabases; 26,831 reads) to identify potentially amplifiable microsatellite loci (PALs). We then hierarchically sampled 76 individuals from throughout the geographic distribution of the species complex and examined whether PALs were amplifiable and polymorphic. Approximately half of the loci tested were readily amplifiable from all individuals, and 80% of the loci tested for variation were variable and thus informative as population genetic markers. To evaluate the repetitive landscape characteristics across multiple snakes, we also compared microsatellite content between the coralsnake and two other previously sampled snakes, the venomous copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix) and Burmese python (Python molurus). PMID:22938699

  6. BCR-ABL1: Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... called p190), which is most frequently associated with Ph chromosome-positive ALL. The quantitative BCR-ABL1 molecular test measures either of the breakpoints in the fusion gene. It is used to establish a baseline value and then to monitor the person's response to ...

  7. Ku-related antigens are associated with transcriptionally active loci in Chironomus polytene chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Gorab, E; Botella, L M; Quinn, J P; Amabis, J M; Díez, J L

    1996-09-01

    Antigens of Chironomus reactive with human sera containing anti-Ku antibodies and also with specific antibodies to each Ku subunit were characterized by immunoblot analysis. Three main antigen species were identified in nuclear-enriched extracts from salivary gland cells of Chironomus thummi, ranging in Mr from 55000 to 67000. The nuclear localization of Ku-related antigens in the dipteran Chironomus was studied by immunofluorescent labeling in polytene chromosomes of the salivary glands. Balbiani rings, loci highly active in transcription, were found to be strongly labeled by anti-Ku antibodies. Sugar-induced changes in the activity of the Balbiani ring genes were accompanied by the redistribution of Ku-related antigens as visualized by their absence in regressed Balbiani ring loci, and continued presence only in those that were transcriptionally active. A drastic change in the distribution of Ku-related antigens was also observed when C. thummi larvae underwent heat treatment as the immunofluorescent staining was restricted to previously described heat shock puffs. Anti-Ku sera reacted in addition with several chromosomal bands in which the presence of RNA polymerase II was also immunologically detected. The results show that Chironomus antigens reactive with anti-Ku antibodies are related to transcription in polytene chromosomes.

  8. SPR Detection and Discrimination of the Oligonucleotides Related to the Normal and the Hybrid bcr-abl Genes by Two Stringency Control Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsishin, M. J.; Ushenin, Iu. V.; Rachkov, A. E.; Solatkin, A. P.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we applied two stringency control strategies for surface plasmon resonance (SPR) detection of DNA hybridization and discrimination of completely and partially complementary 24-mer sequences. These sequences are specific to the human normal bcr and the hybrid bcr-abl genes, protein products of which are responsible for some leukemia. SPR sensors based on resonance phenomena in nanoscale gold films are well suited for label-free, real-time investigations of the macromolecule interactions. Thermodynamic parameters obtained using the web server DINAMelt allowed supposing the possibility for realization (a) stringency control based on the ionic strength of the hybridization buffer and (b) stringency control based on the temperature elevation. The first one resulted in that the discrimination index of completely complementary and partially complementary oligonucleotides depending on the target concentration varied from 1.3 to 1.8 in 2 × SSC and from 2.0 to 2.9 in 0.5 × SSC. For implementation of the second stringency control strategy, SPR spectrometer measuring flow cell with built-in high-precision temperature control and regulation as well as corresponding software was created. It is shown that the duplexes formed by the immobilized probes mod-Ph and completely complementary oligonucleotides P1 remained without significant changes until ~50 °C, while the duplexes formed with partially complementary oligonucleotide Bcrex14 almost entirely disrupted at 40 °C. Thus, the absolutely effective thermodiscrimination of this pair of oligonucleotides was achieved in this temperature range (40-50 °C).

  9. Five Nuclear Loci Resolve the Polyploid History of Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) and Relatives

    PubMed Central

    Triplett, Jimmy K.; Wang, Yunjing; Zhong, Jinshun; Kellogg, Elizabeth A.

    2012-01-01

    Polyploidy poses challenges for phylogenetic reconstruction because of the need to identify and distinguish between homoeologous loci. This can be addressed by use of low copy nuclear markers. Panicum s.s. is a genus of about 100 species in the grass tribe Paniceae, subfamily Panicoideae, and is divided into five sections. Many of the species are known to be polyploids. The most well-known of the Panicum polyploids are switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) and common or Proso millet (P. miliaceum). Switchgrass is in section Virgata, along with P. tricholaenoides, P. amarum, and P. amarulum, whereas P. miliaceum is in sect. Panicum. We have generated sequence data from five low copy nuclear loci and two chloroplast loci and have clarified the origin of P. virgatum. We find that all members of sects. Virgata and Urvilleana are the result of diversification after a single allopolyploidy event. The closest diploid relatives of switchgrass are in sect. Rudgeana, native to Central and South America. Within sections Virgata and Urvilleana, P. tricholaenoides is sister to the remaining species. Panicum racemosum and P. urvilleanum form a clade, which may be sister to P. chloroleucum. Panicum amarum, P. amarulum, and the lowland and upland ecotypes of P. virgatum together form a clade, within which relationships are complex. Hexaploid and octoploid plants are likely allopolyploids, with P. amarum and P. amarulum sharing genomes with P. virgatum. Octoploid P. virgatum plants are formed via hybridization between disparate tetraploids. We show that polyploidy precedes diversification in a complex set of polyploids; our data thus suggest that polyploidy could provide the raw material for diversification. In addition, we show two rounds of allopolyploidization in the ancestry of switchgrass, and identify additional species that may be part of its broader gene pool. This may be relevant for development of the crop for biofuels. PMID:22719924

  10. Obesity-Related Genomic Loci Are Associated with Type 2 Diabetes in a Han Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qi; He, Jiang; Chen, Li; Zhao, Zhigang; Li, Qiang; Ge, Jiapu; Chen, Gang; Guo, Xiaohui; Lu, Juming; Weng, Jianping; Jia, Weiping; Ji, Linong; Xiao, Jianzhong; Shan, Zhongyan; Liu, Jie; Tian, Haoming; Ji, Qiuhe; Zhu, Dalong; Zhou, Zhiguang; Shan, Guangliang; Yang, Wenying

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Obesity is a well-known risk factor for type 2 diabetes. Genome-wide association studies have identified a number of genetic loci associated with obesity. The aim of this study is to examine the contribution of obesity-related genomic loci to type 2 diabetes in a Chinese population. Methods We successfully genotyped 18 obesity-related single nucleotide polymorphisms among 5338 type 2 diabetic patients and 4663 controls. Both individual and joint effects of these single nucleotide polymorphisms on type 2 diabetes and quantitative glycemic traits (assessing β-cell function and insulin resistance) were analyzed using logistic and linear regression models, respectively. Results Two single nucleotide polymorphisms near MC4R and GNPDA2 genes were significantly associated with type 2 diabetes before adjusting for body mass index and waist circumference (OR (95% CI) = 1.14 (1.06, 1.22) for the A allele of rs12970134, P = 4.75×10−4; OR (95% CI) = 1.10 (1.03, 1.17) for the G allele of rs10938397, P = 4.54×10−3). When body mass index and waist circumference were further adjusted, the association of MC4R with type 2 diabetes remained significant (P = 1.81×10−2) and that of GNPDA2 was attenuated (P = 1.26×10−1), suggesting the effect of the locus including GNPDA2 on type 2 diabetes may be mediated through obesity. Single nucleotide polymorphism rs2260000 within BAT2 was significantly associated with type 2 diabetes after adjusting for body mass index and waist circumference (P = 1.04×10−2). In addition, four single nucleotide polymorphisms (near or within SEC16B, BDNF, MAF and PRL genes) showed significant associations with quantitative glycemic traits in controls even after adjusting for body mass index and waist circumference (all P values<0.05). Conclusions This study indicates that obesity-related genomic loci were associated with type 2 diabetes and glycemic traits in the Han Chinese population. PMID:25093408

  11. Genetic dissection of fruiting body-related traits using quantitative trait loci mapping in Lentinula edodes.

    PubMed

    Gong, Wen-Bing; Li, Lei; Zhou, Yan; Bian, Yin-Bing; Kwan, Hoi-Shan; Cheung, Man-Kit; Xiao, Yang

    2016-06-01

    To provide a better understanding of the genetic architecture of fruiting body formation of Lentinula edodes, quantitative trait loci (QTLs) mapping was employed to uncover the loci underlying seven fruiting body-related traits (FBRTs). An improved L. edodes genetic linkage map, comprising 572 markers on 12 linkage groups with a total map length of 983.7 cM, was constructed by integrating 82 genomic sequence-based insertion-deletion (InDel) markers into a previously published map. We then detected a total of 62 QTLs for seven target traits across two segregating testcross populations, with individual QTLs contributing 5.5 %-30.2 % of the phenotypic variation. Fifty-three out of the 62 QTLs were clustered in six QTL hotspots, suggesting the existence of main genomic regions regulating the morphological characteristics of fruiting bodies in L. edodes. A stable QTL hotspot on MLG2, containing QTLs for all investigated traits, was identified in both testcross populations. QTLs for related traits were frequently co-located on the linkage groups, demonstrating the genetic basis for phenotypic correlation of traits. Meta-QTL (mQTL) analysis was performed and identified 16 mQTLs with refined positions and narrow confidence intervals (CIs). Nine genes, including those encoding MAP kinase, blue-light photoreceptor, riboflavin-aldehyde-forming enzyme and cyclopropane-fatty-acyl-phospholipid synthase, and cytochrome P450s, were likely to be candidate genes controlling the shape of fruiting bodies. The study has improved our understanding of the genetic architecture of fruiting body formation in L. edodes. To our knowledge, this is the first genome-wide QTL detection of FBRTs in L. edodes. The improved genetic map, InDel markers and QTL hotspot regions revealed here will assist considerably in the conduct of future genetic and breeding studies of L. edodes.

  12. M2SG: mapping human disease-related genetic variants to protein sequences and genomic loci

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Renkai; Cong, Qian; Li, Wenlin; Grishin, Nick V.

    2013-01-01

    Summary: Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) is a manually curated compendium of human genetic variants and the corresponding phenotypes, mostly human diseases. Instead of directly documenting the native sequences for gene entries, OMIM links its entries to protein and DNA sequences in other databases. However, because of the existence of gene isoforms and errors in OMIM records, mapping a specific OMIM mutation to its corresponding protein sequence is not trivial. Combining computer programs and extensive manual curation of OMIM full-text descriptions and original literature, we mapped 98% of OMIM amino acid substitutions (AASs) and all SwissProt Variant (SwissVar) disease-related AASs to reference sequences and confidently mapped 99.96% of all AASs to the genomic loci. Based on the results, we developed an online database and interactive web server (M2SG) to (i) retrieve the mapped OMIM and SwissVar variants for a given protein sequence; and (ii) obtain related proteins and mutations for an input disease phenotype. This database will be useful for analyzing sequences, understanding the effect of mutations, identifying important genetic variations and designing experiments on a protein of interest. Availability and implementation: The database and web server are freely available at http://prodata.swmed.edu/M2S/mut2seq.cgi. Contact: grishin@chop.swmed.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:24002112

  13. Genetic Loci Associated With Atrial Fibrillation: Relation to Left Atrial Structure in the Framingham Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Magnani, Jared W.; Yin, Xiaoyan; McManus, David D.; Chuang, Michael L.; Cheng, Susan; Lubitz, Steven A.; Arora, Garima; Manning, Warren J.; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Benjamin, Emelia J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation (AF) results in significant morbidity and mortality. Genome‐wide association studies (GWAS) have identified genetic variants associated with AF. Whether genetic variants associated with AF are also associated with atrial structure, an intermediate phenotype for AF, has had limited investigation. We sought to investigate associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and atrial structure obtained by cardiovascular imaging in the Framingham Heart Study. Methods and Results We selected 11 SNPs that have been associated with AF in GWAS. We examined the SNPs' relations to cross‐sectional left atrial (LA) dimensions (determined by transthoracic echocardiography) and LA volume (determined by cardiovascular magnetic resonance [CMR]) employing linear regression. The total sample included 1555 participants with CMR LA volume (age 60±9 years, 53% women) and 6861 participants with echocardiographic LA diameter (age 48±13 years, 52% women) measured. We employed a significance threshold of P<0.0023 to account for multiple testing of the 11 SNPs and 2 LA measures. In a primary analysis, no SNPs were significantly related to the LA measures. Likewise, in secondary analyses excluding individuals with prevalent AF (n=77, CMR sample; n=105, echocardiography sample) no SNPs were related to LA volume or diameter. Conclusion In a community‐based cohort, we did not identify a statistically significant association between selected SNPs associated with AF and measures of LA anatomy. Further investigations with larger longitudinally assessed samples and a broader array of SNPs may be necessary to determine the relation between genetic loci associated with AF and atrial structure. PMID:24695651

  14. BCR-ABL-positive acute myeloid leukemia: a new entity? Analysis of clinical and molecular features.

    PubMed

    Neuendorff, Nina Rosa; Burmeister, Thomas; Dörken, Bernd; Westermann, Jörg

    2016-08-01

    BCR-ABL-positive acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a rare subtype of AML that is now included as a provisional entity in the 2016 revised WHO classification of myeloid malignancies. Since a clear distinction between de novo BCR-ABL+ AML and chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) blast crisis is challenging in many cases, the existence of de novo BCR-ABL+ AML has been a matter of debate for a long time. However, there is increasing evidence suggesting that BCR-ABL+ AML is in fact a distinct subgroup of AML. In this study, we analyzed all published cases since 1975 as well as cases from our institution in order to present common clinical and molecular features of this rare disease. Our analysis shows that BCR-ABL predominantly occurs in AML-NOS, CBF leukemia, and AML with myelodysplasia-related changes. The most common BCR-ABL transcripts (p190 and p210) are nearly equally distributed. Based on the analysis of published data, we provide a clinical algorithm for the initial differential diagnosis of BCR-ABL+ AML. The prognosis of BCR-ABL+ AML seems to depend on the cytogenetic and/or molecular background rather than on BCR-ABL itself. A therapy with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) such as imatinib, dasatinib, or nilotinib is reasonable, but-due to a lack of systematic clinical data-their use cannot be routinely recommended in first-line therapy. Beyond first-line treatment of AML, the use of TKI remains an individual decision, both in combination with intensive chemotherapy and/or as a bridge to allogeneic stem cell transplantation. In each single case, potential benefits have to be weighed against potential risks. PMID:27297971

  15. Susceptibility Loci for Pigmentation and Melanoma in Relation to Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Nalls, Michael; Gao, Xiang; Huang, Xuemei; Han, Jiali; Singleton, Andrew B.; Chen, Honglei

    2014-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients have a lower risk for most types of cancer except for melanoma, which has a modest positive association with PD. Pigmentation genes has been hypothesized to contribute to this association. We therefore examined whether genetic susceptibility loci for pigmentation or melanoma were associated with PD risk in two large independent datasets. In the Parkinson’s Genes and Environment (PAGE) Study, we examined 11 SNPs identified from previous GWAS studies of pigmentation or melanoma in relation to PD among 808 PD cases and 1,623 controls; further, we also examined the colors of hair, eye, or skin, and melanoma in relation to PD. In the International Parkinson’s Disease Genomic Consortium (IPDGC), we examined a broader selection of 360 pigmentation or melanoma GWAS SNPs in relation to PD among 5,333 PD cases and 12,019 controls. All participants were non-Hispanic Whites. As expected, in the PAGE study, most SNPs were associated with one or more pigmentation phenotypes. However, neither these SNPs nor pigmentation phenotypes were associated with PD risk after Bonferroni correction with the exception of rs4911414 at the ASIP gene (P=0.001). A total of 18 PD cases (2.2%) and 26 controls (1.6%) had a diagnosis of melanoma with an odds ratio of 1.3 (95% confidence interval: 0.7-2.4). In the IPDGC analysis, none of the 360 SNPs, including rs4911414, were associated with PD risk after adjusting for multiple comparisons. In conclusion, we did not find significant associations between GWAS SNPs of pigmentation or melanoma and the risk for PD. PMID:24439955

  16. Susceptibility loci for pigmentation and melanoma in relation to Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jing; Gao, Jianjun; Nalls, Michael; Gao, Xiang; Huang, Xuemei; Han, Jiali; Singleton, Andrew B; Chen, Honglei

    2014-06-01

    Growing evidence suggests that Parkinson's disease (PD) patients have a lower risk for most types of cancer except for melanoma, which has a modest positive association with PD. Pigmentation genes have been hypothesized to contribute to this association. We therefore examined whether genetic susceptibility loci for pigmentation or melanoma was associated with PD risk in 2 large independent datasets. In the Parkinson's Genes and Environment (PAGE) study, we examined 11 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified from previous genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of pigmentation or melanoma in relation to PD among 808 PD cases and 1623 controls; furthermore, we also examined the colors of hair, eye, or skin and melanoma in relation to PD. In the International Parkinson's Disease Genomic Consortium (IPDGC), we examined a broader selection of 360 pigmentation or melanoma GWAS SNPs in relation to PD among 5,333 PD cases and 12,019 controls. All participants were non-Hispanic Whites. As expected, in the PAGE study, most SNPs were associated with 1 or more pigmentation phenotypes. However, neither these SNPs nor pigmentation phenotypes were associated with PD risk after Bonferroni correction with the exception of rs4911414 at the ASIP gene (p = .001). A total of 18 PD cases (2.2%) and 26 controls (1.6%) had a diagnosis of melanoma with an odds ratio of 1.3 (95% confidence interval: 0.7-2.4). In the IPDGC analysis, none of the 360 SNPs, including rs4911414, were associated with PD risk after adjusting for multiple comparisons. In conclusion, we did not find significant associations between GWAS SNPs of pigmentation or melanoma and the risk for PD.

  17. Quantitative trait loci identification and meta-analysis for rice panicle-related traits.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yahui; Huang, Ming; Tao, Xingxing; Guo, Tao; Chen, Zhiqiang; Xiao, Wuming

    2016-10-01

    Rice yield is a complex trait controlled by quantitative trait loci (QTLs). In the past three decades, thousands of QTLs for rice yield traits have been detected, but only a very small percentage has been cloned to date, as identifying the QTL genes requires a substantial investment of time and money. Meta-analysis provides a simple, reliable, and economical method for integrating information from multiple QTL studies across various environmental and genetic backgrounds, detecting consistent QTLs powerfully and estimating their genetic positions precisely. In this study, we aimed to locate consistent QTL regions associated with rice panicle traits by applying a genome-wide QTL meta-analysis approach. We first conducted a QTL analysis of 5 rice panicle traits using 172 plants in 2011 and 138 plants in 2012 from an F2 population derived from a cross between Nipponbare and H71D rice cultivators. A total of 54 QTLs were detected, and these were combined with 1085 QTLs collected from 82 previous studies to perform a meta-analysis using BioMercator v4.2. The integration of 82 maps resulted in a consensus map with 6970 markers and a total map length of 1823.1 centimorgan (cM), on which 837 QTLs were projected. These QTLs were then integrated into 87 meta-quantitative trait loci (MQTLs) by meta-analysis, and the 95 % confidence intervals (CI) of them were smaller than the mean value of the original QTLs. Also, 30 MQTLs covered 47 of the 54 QTLs detected from the cross between Nipponbare and H71D in this study. Among them, the two major and stable QTLs, spp10.1 and sd10.1, were found to be included in MQTL10.4. The three other major QTLs, pl3.1, sb2.1, and sb10.1, were included in MQTL3.3, MQTL2.2, and MQTL10.3, respectively. A total of 21 of the 87 MQTLs' phenotypic variation were >20 %. In total, 24 candidate genes were found in 15 MQTLs that spanned physical intervals <0.2 Mb, including genes that have been cloned previously, e.g., EP3, LP, MIP1, HTD1, DSH1, and Os

  18. Synthetic antigens reveal dynamics of BCR endocytosis during inhibitory signaling.

    PubMed

    Courtney, Adam H; Bennett, Nitasha R; Zwick, Daniel B; Hudon, Jonathan; Kiessling, Laura L

    2014-01-17

    B cells detect foreign antigens through their B cell antigen receptor (BCR). The BCR, when engaged by antigen, initiates a signaling cascade. Concurrent with signaling is endocytosis of the BCR complex, which acts to downregulate signaling and facilitate uptake of antigen for processing and display on the cell surface. The relationship between signaling and BCR endocytosis is poorly defined. Here, we explore the interplay between BCR endocytosis and antigens that either promote or inhibit B cell activation. Specifically, synthetic antigens were generated that engage the BCR alone or both the BCR and the inhibitory co-receptor CD22. The lectin CD22, a member of the Siglec family, binds sialic acid-containing glycoconjugates found on host tissues, inhibiting BCR signaling to prevent erroneous B cell activation. At low concentrations, antigens that can cocluster the BCR and CD22 promote rapid BCR endocytosis; whereas, slower endocytosis occurs with antigens that bind only the BCR. At higher antigen concentrations, rapid BCR endocytosis occurs upon treatment with either stimulatory or inhibitory antigens. Endocytosis of the BCR, in response to synthetic antigens, results in its entry into early endocytic compartments. Although the CD22-binding antigens fail to activate key regulators of antigen presentation (e.g., Syk), they also promote BCR endocytosis, indicating that inhibitory antigens can be internalized. Together, our observations support a functional role for BCR endocytosis in downregulating BCR signaling. The reduction of cell surface BCR levels in the absence of B cell activation should raise the threshold for BCR subsequent activation. The ability of the activating synthetic antigens to trigger both signaling and entry of the BCR into early endosomes suggests strategies for targeted antigen delivery.

  19. [Alleles at storage protein loci in Triticum spelta L. accessions and their occurrence in related wheats].

    PubMed

    Kozub, N A; Boguslavskiĭ, R L; Sozinov, I A; Tverdokhleb, E V; Ksinias, I N; Blium, Ia B; Sozinov, A A

    2014-01-01

    Variation at eight storage protein loci was analyzed in the collection of T. spelta accessions from the National Centre of Plant Genetic Resources of Ukraine, most of which are European spelts. The analysis allowed identification of seven alleles at the Gli-B1 locus, five alleles at the Gli-A1 and Glu-B1 loci, three alleles at the Gli-A3 locus, two at the Gli-D1, Gli-B5, Glu-A1, and Glu-D1 loci. The majority of alleles are encountered among common wheat cultivars, only five alleles were specific for spelts. The high frequency of the alleles Gli-B1hs* and h encoding the 45-type gamma-gliadin in European spelts and durum wheat cultivars, as well as the occurrence of these alleles in T. dicoccum, in particular, in accessions from Switzerland and Germany, supports von Büren's hypothesis that European spelt resulted from hybridization between a tetraploid wheat with the 45-type y-gliadin and a hexaploid wheat. Analysis of genetic distances based on the genotypes at eight storage protein loci permitted differentiation of the Asian spelt accession from European spelts.

  20. Meta-analysis identifies multiple loci associated with kidney function-related traits in east Asian populations.

    PubMed

    Okada, Yukinori; Sim, Xueling; Go, Min Jin; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Gu, Dongfeng; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Takahashi, Atsushi; Maeda, Shiro; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Chen, Peng; Lim, Su-Chi; Wong, Tien-Yin; Liu, Jianjun; Young, Terri L; Aung, Tin; Seielstad, Mark; Teo, Yik-Ying; Kim, Young Jin; Lee, Jong-Young; Han, Bok-Ghee; Kang, Daehee; Chen, Chien-Hsiun; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Chang, Li-Ching; Fann, S-J Cathy; Mei, Hao; Rao, Dabeeru C; Hixson, James E; Chen, Shufeng; Katsuya, Tomohiro; Isono, Masato; Ogihara, Toshio; Chambers, John C; Zhang, Weihua; Kooner, Jaspal S; Albrecht, Eva; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Kubo, Michiaki; Nakamura, Yusuke; Kamatani, Naoyuki; Kato, Norihiro; He, Jiang; Chen, Yuan-Tsong; Cho, Yoon Shin; Tai, E-Shyong; Tanaka, Toshihiro

    2012-08-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD), impairment of kidney function, is a serious public health problem, and the assessment of genetic factors influencing kidney function has substantial clinical relevance. Here, we report a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies for kidney function-related traits, including 71,149 east Asian individuals from 18 studies in 11 population-, hospital- or family-based cohorts, conducted as part of the Asian Genetic Epidemiology Network (AGEN). Our meta-analysis identified 17 loci newly associated with kidney function-related traits, including the concentrations of blood urea nitrogen, uric acid and serum creatinine and estimated glomerular filtration rate based on serum creatinine levels (eGFRcrea) (P < 5.0 × 10(-8)). We further examined these loci with in silico replication in individuals of European ancestry from the KidneyGen, CKDGen and GUGC consortia, including a combined total of ∼110,347 individuals. We identify pleiotropic associations among these loci with kidney function-related traits and risk of CKD. These findings provide new insights into the genetics of kidney function. PMID:22797727

  1. Association of HDL-Related Loci with Age-Related Macular Degeneration and Plasma Lutein and Zeaxanthin: the Alienor Study

    PubMed Central

    Merle, Bénédicte M. J.; Maubaret, Cécilia; Korobelnik, Jean-François; Delyfer, Marie-Noëlle; Rougier, Marie-Bénédicte; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Amouyel, Philippe; Malet, Florence; Le Goff, Mélanie; Dartigues, Jean-François; Barberger-Gateau, Pascale; Delcourt, Cécile

    2013-01-01

    Background Several genes implicated in high-density lipoprotein (HDL) metabolism have been reported to be associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Furthermore, HDL transport the two carotenoids, lutein and zeaxanthin, which are highly suspected to play a key-role in the protection against AMD. The objective is to confirm the associations of HDL-related loci with AMD and to assess their associations with plasma lutein and zeaxanthin concentrations. Methods Alienor study is a prospective population-based study on nutrition and age-related eye diseases performed in 963 elderly residents of Bordeaux, France. AMD was graded according to the international classification, from non-mydriatic colour retinal photographs. Plasma lutein and zeaxanthin were determined by normal-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The following polymorphisms were studied: rs493258 and rs10468017 (LIPC), rs3764261 (CETP), rs12678919 (LPL) and rs1883025 (ABCA1). Results After multivariate adjustment, the TT genotype of the LIPC rs493258 variant was significantly associated with a reduced risk for early and late AMD (OR=0.64, 95%CI: 0.41-0.99; p=0.049 and OR=0.26, 95%CI: 0.08-0.85; p=0.03, respectively), and with higher plasma zeaxanthin concentrations (p=0.03), while plasma lipids were not significantly different according to this SNP. Besides, the LPL variant was associated with early AMD (OR=0.67, 95%CI: 0.45-1.00; p=0.05) and both with plasma lipids and plasma lutein (p=0.047). Associations of LIPC rs10468017, CETP and ABCA1 polymorphisms with AMD did not reach statistical significance. Conclusion These findings suggest that LIPC and LPL genes could both modify the risk for AMD and the metabolism of lutein and zeaxanthin. PMID:24223199

  2. Bcr-Abl stabilizes β-catenin in chronic myeloid leukemia through its tyrosine phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Coluccia, Addolorata Maria Luce; Vacca, Angelo; Duñach, Mireia; Mologni, Luca; Redaelli, Sara; Bustos, Victor H; Benati, Daniela; Pinna, Lorenzo A; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo

    2007-01-01

    Self-renewal of Bcr-Abl+ chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cells is sustained by a nuclear activated serine/threonine-(S/T) unphosphorylated β-catenin. Although β-catenin can be tyrosine (Y)-phosphorylated, the occurrence and biological relevance of this covalent modification in Bcr-Abl-associated leukemogenesis is unknown. Here we show that Bcr-Abl levels control the degree of β-catenin protein stabilization by affecting its Y/S/T-phospho content in CML cells. Bcr-Abl physically interacts with β-catenin, and its oncogenic tyrosine kinase activity is required to phosphorylate β-catenin at Y86 and Y654 residues. This Y-phospho β-catenin binds to the TCF4 transcription factor, thus representing a transcriptionally active pool. Imatinib, a Bcr-Abl antagonist, impairs the β-catenin/TCF-related transcription causing a rapid cytosolic retention of Y-unphosphorylated β-catenin, which presents an increased binding affinity for the Axin/GSK3β complex. Although Bcr-Abl does not affect GSK3β autophosphorylation, it prevents, through its effect on β-catenin Y phosphorylation, Axin/GSK3β binding to β-catenin and its subsequent S/T phosphorylation. Silencing of β-catenin by small interfering RNA inhibited proliferation and clonogenicity of Bcr-Abl+ CML cells, in synergism with Imatinib. These findings indicate the Bcr-Abl triggered Y phosphorylation of β-catenin as a new mechanism responsible for its protein stabilization and nuclear signalling activation in CML. PMID:17318191

  3. Increased BCR responsiveness in B cells from patients with chronic GVHD

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Jessica L.; Tata, Prasanthi V.; Fore, Matthew S.; Wooten, Jenna; Rudra, Sharmistha; Deal, Allison M.; Sharf, Andrew; Hoffert, Todd; Roehrs, Philip A.; Shea, Thomas C.; Serody, Jonathan S.; Richards, Kristy L.; Jagasia, Madan; Lee, Stephanie J.; Rizzieri, David; Horwitz, Mitchell E.; Chao, Nelson J.

    2014-01-01

    Although B cells have emerged as important contributors to chronic graft-versus-host-disease (cGVHD) pathogenesis, the mechanisms responsible for their sustained activation remain unknown. We previously showed that patients with cGVHD have significantly increased B cell–activating factor (BAFF) levels and that their B cells are activated and resistant to apoptosis. Exogenous BAFF confers a state of immediate responsiveness to antigen stimulation in normal murine B cells. To address this in cGVHD, we studied B-cell receptor (BCR) responsiveness in 48 patients who were >1 year out from allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We found that B cells from cGVHD patients had significantly increased proliferative responses to BCR stimulation along with elevated basal levels of the proximal BCR signaling components B cell linker protein (BLNK) and Syk. After initiation of BCR signaling, cGVHD B cells exhibited increased BLNK and Syk phosphorylation compared with B cells from patients without cGVHD. Blocking Syk kinase activity prevented relative post-HSCT BCR hyper-responsiveness of cGVHD B cells. These data suggest that a lowered BCR signaling threshold in cGVHD associates with increased B-cell proliferation and activation in response to antigen. We reveal a mechanism underpinning aberrant B-cell activation in cGVHD and suggest that therapeutic inhibition of the involved kinases may benefit these patients. PMID:24532806

  4. Discovery and Fine-Mapping of Glycaemic and Obesity-Related Trait Loci Using High-Density Imputation.

    PubMed

    Horikoshi, Momoko; Mӓgi, Reedik; van de Bunt, Martijn; Surakka, Ida; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Mahajan, Anubha; Marullo, Letizia; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Hӓgg, Sara; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ladenvall, Claes; Ried, Janina S; Winkler, Thomas W; Willems, Sara M; Pervjakova, Natalia; Esko, Tõnu; Beekman, Marian; Nelson, Christopher P; Willenborg, Christina; Wiltshire, Steven; Ferreira, Teresa; Fernandez, Juan; Gaulton, Kyle J; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Hamsten, Anders; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Willemsen, Gonneke; Milaneschi, Yuri; Robertson, Neil R; Groves, Christopher J; Bennett, Amanda J; Lehtimӓki, Terho; Viikari, Jorma S; Rung, Johan; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Perola, Markus; Heid, Iris M; Herder, Christian; Grallert, Harald; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Roden, Michael; Hypponen, Elina; Isaacs, Aaron; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M; Karssen, Lennart C; Mihailov, Evelin; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J; de Craen, Anton J M; Deelen, Joris; Havulinna, Aki S; Blades, Matthew; Hengstenberg, Christian; Erdmann, Jeanette; Schunkert, Heribert; Kaprio, Jaakko; Tobin, Martin D; Samani, Nilesh J; Lind, Lars; Salomaa, Veikko; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Slagboom, P Eline; Metspalu, Andres; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Eriksson, Johan G; Peters, Annette; Gieger, Christian; Jula, Antti; Groop, Leif; Raitakari, Olli T; Power, Chris; Penninx, Brenda W J H; de Geus, Eco; Smit, Johannes H; Boomsma, Dorret I; Pedersen, Nancy L; Ingelsson, Erik; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Stefansson, Kari; Ripatti, Samuli; Prokopenko, Inga; McCarthy, Mark I; Morris, Andrew P

    2015-07-01

    Reference panels from the 1000 Genomes (1000G) Project Consortium provide near complete coverage of common and low-frequency genetic variation with minor allele frequency ≥0.5% across European ancestry populations. Within the European Network for Genetic and Genomic Epidemiology (ENGAGE) Consortium, we have undertaken the first large-scale meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS), supplemented by 1000G imputation, for four quantitative glycaemic and obesity-related traits, in up to 87,048 individuals of European ancestry. We identified two loci for body mass index (BMI) at genome-wide significance, and two for fasting glucose (FG), none of which has been previously reported in larger meta-analysis efforts to combine GWAS of European ancestry. Through conditional analysis, we also detected multiple distinct signals of association mapping to established loci for waist-hip ratio adjusted for BMI (RSPO3) and FG (GCK and G6PC2). The index variant for one association signal at the G6PC2 locus is a low-frequency coding allele, H177Y, which has recently been demonstrated to have a functional role in glucose regulation. Fine-mapping analyses revealed that the non-coding variants most likely to drive association signals at established and novel loci were enriched for overlap with enhancer elements, which for FG mapped to promoter and transcription factor binding sites in pancreatic islets, in particular. Our study demonstrates that 1000G imputation and genetic fine-mapping of common and low-frequency variant association signals at GWAS loci, integrated with genomic annotation in relevant tissues, can provide insight into the functional and regulatory mechanisms through which their effects on glycaemic and obesity-related traits are mediated.

  5. Discovery and Fine-Mapping of Glycaemic and Obesity-Related Trait Loci Using High-Density Imputation

    PubMed Central

    van de Bunt, Martijn; Surakka, Ida; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Mahajan, Anubha; Marullo, Letizia; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Hӓgg, Sara; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ladenvall, Claes; Ried, Janina S.; Winkler, Thomas W.; Willems, Sara M.; Pervjakova, Natalia; Esko, Tõnu; Beekman, Marian; Nelson, Christopher P.; Willenborg, Christina; Ferreira, Teresa; Fernandez, Juan; Gaulton, Kyle J.; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Hamsten, Anders; Magnusson, Patrik K. E.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Milaneschi, Yuri; Robertson, Neil R.; Groves, Christopher J.; Bennett, Amanda J.; Lehtimӓki, Terho; Viikari, Jorma S.; Rung, Johan; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Perola, Markus; Heid, Iris M.; Herder, Christian; Grallert, Harald; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Roden, Michael; Hypponen, Elina; Isaacs, Aaron; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M.; Karssen, Lennart C.; Mihailov, Evelin; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J.; de Craen, Anton J. M.; Deelen, Joris; Havulinna, Aki S.; Blades, Matthew; Hengstenberg, Christian; Erdmann, Jeanette; Schunkert, Heribert; Kaprio, Jaakko; Tobin, Martin D.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Lind, Lars; Salomaa, Veikko; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Slagboom, P. Eline; Metspalu, Andres; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Eriksson, Johan G.; Peters, Annette; Gieger, Christian; Jula, Antti; Groop, Leif; Raitakari, Olli T.; Power, Chris; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; de Geus, Eco; Smit, Johannes H.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Ingelsson, Erik; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Stefansson, Kari; Ripatti, Samuli; Prokopenko, Inga; McCarthy, Mark I.; Morris, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Reference panels from the 1000 Genomes (1000G) Project Consortium provide near complete coverage of common and low-frequency genetic variation with minor allele frequency ≥0.5% across European ancestry populations. Within the European Network for Genetic and Genomic Epidemiology (ENGAGE) Consortium, we have undertaken the first large-scale meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS), supplemented by 1000G imputation, for four quantitative glycaemic and obesity-related traits, in up to 87,048 individuals of European ancestry. We identified two loci for body mass index (BMI) at genome-wide significance, and two for fasting glucose (FG), none of which has been previously reported in larger meta-analysis efforts to combine GWAS of European ancestry. Through conditional analysis, we also detected multiple distinct signals of association mapping to established loci for waist-hip ratio adjusted for BMI (RSPO3) and FG (GCK and G6PC2). The index variant for one association signal at the G6PC2 locus is a low-frequency coding allele, H177Y, which has recently been demonstrated to have a functional role in glucose regulation. Fine-mapping analyses revealed that the non-coding variants most likely to drive association signals at established and novel loci were enriched for overlap with enhancer elements, which for FG mapped to promoter and transcription factor binding sites in pancreatic islets, in particular. Our study demonstrates that 1000G imputation and genetic fine-mapping of common and low-frequency variant association signals at GWAS loci, integrated with genomic annotation in relevant tissues, can provide insight into the functional and regulatory mechanisms through which their effects on glycaemic and obesity-related traits are mediated. PMID:26132169

  6. Lead-Related Genetic Loci, Cumulative Lead Exposure and Incident Coronary Heart Disease: The Normative Aging Study

    PubMed Central

    Weisskopf, Marc G.; Sparrow, David; Schwartz, Joel; Hu, Howard; Park, Sung Kyun

    2016-01-01

    Background Cumulative exposure to lead is associated with cardiovascular outcomes. Polymorphisms in the δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD), hemochromatosis (HFE), heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1), vitamin D receptor (VDR), glutathione S-transferase (GST) supergene family (GSTP1, GSTT1, GSTM1), apolipoprotein E (APOE),angiotensin II receptor-1 (AGTR1) and angiotensinogen (AGT) genes, are believed to alter toxicokinetics and/or toxicodynamics of lead. Objectives We assessed possible effect modification by genetic polymorphisms in ALAD, HFE, HMOX1, VDR, GSTP1, GSTT1, GSTM1, APOE, AGTR1 and AGT individually and as the genetic risk score (GRS) on the association between cumulative lead exposure and incident coronary heart disease (CHD) events. Methods We used K-shell-X-ray fluorescence to measure bone lead levels. GRS was calculated on the basis of 22 lead-related loci. We constructed Cox proportional hazard models to compute adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for incident CHD. We applied inverse probability weighting to account for potential selection bias due to recruitment into the bone lead sub-study. Results Significant effect modification was found by VDR, HMOX1, GSTP1, APOE, and AGT genetic polymorphisms when evaluated individually. Further, the bone lead-CHD associations became larger as GRS increases. After adjusting for potential confounders, a HR of CHD was 2.27 (95%CI: 1.50–3.42) with 2-fold increase in patella lead levels, among participants in the top tertile of GRS. We also detected an increasing trend in HRs across tertiles of GRS (p-trend = 0.0063). Conclusions Our findings suggest that lead-related loci as a whole may play an important role in susceptibility to lead-related CHD risk. These findings need to be validated in a separate cohort containing bone lead, lead-related genetic loci and incident CHD data. PMID:27584680

  7. Variability with altitude of major histocompatibility complex-related microsatellite loci in goats from Southwest China.

    PubMed

    E, G X; Huang, Y F; Zhao, Y J; Na, R S

    2015-11-19

    We aimed to use microsatellite BM1258 loci of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) as an indicator of the influence of genetic diversity of immunity in goats (Dazu Black, Hechuan White, Meigu, and Tibetan goat). In total, 132 animals comprising 50 Dazu Black goats, 24 Hechuan White goats, 34 Meigu goats, and 24 Tibetan goats were examined. Collectively, 18 different alleles and 42 genotypes were found. The overall observed levels of heterozygosity showed large divergence from the expected levels in the four breeds, and an increase in the mean number of alleles of BM1258 accompanied decreasing altitude of the livestock's habitat. Our results indicate that low-altitude regions or plains were more conducive to genetic material exchange and gene flow between different populations. In addition, it seems that the breeds from low-altitude regions were less susceptible to problems introduced by commercial animals.

  8. Variability with altitude of major histocompatibility complex-related microsatellite loci in goats from Southwest China.

    PubMed

    E, G X; Huang, Y F; Zhao, Y J; Na, R S

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to use microsatellite BM1258 loci of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) as an indicator of the influence of genetic diversity of immunity in goats (Dazu Black, Hechuan White, Meigu, and Tibetan goat). In total, 132 animals comprising 50 Dazu Black goats, 24 Hechuan White goats, 34 Meigu goats, and 24 Tibetan goats were examined. Collectively, 18 different alleles and 42 genotypes were found. The overall observed levels of heterozygosity showed large divergence from the expected levels in the four breeds, and an increase in the mean number of alleles of BM1258 accompanied decreasing altitude of the livestock's habitat. Our results indicate that low-altitude regions or plains were more conducive to genetic material exchange and gene flow between different populations. In addition, it seems that the breeds from low-altitude regions were less susceptible to problems introduced by commercial animals. PMID:26600522

  9. BCR-ABL1-Associated Reduction of Beta Catenin Antagonist Chibby1 in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Aluigi, Michela; Luatti, Simona; Castagnetti, Fausto; Testoni, Nicoletta; Soverini, Simona; Santucci, Maria Alessandra; Martinelli, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Beta Catenin signaling is critical for the self-renewal of leukemic stem cells in chronic myeloid leukemia. It is driven by multiple events, enhancing beta catenin stability and promoting its transcriptional co-activating function. We investigated the impact of BCR-ABL1 on Chibby1, a beta catenin antagonist involved in cell differentiation and transformation. Relative proximity of the Chibby1 encoding gene (C22orf2) on chromosome 22q12 to the BCR breakpoint (22q11) lets assume its involvement in beta catenin activation in chronic myeloid leukemia as a consequence of deletions of distal BCR sequences encompassing one C22orf2 allele. Forty patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase were analyzed for C22orf2 relocation and Chibby1 expression. Fluorescent in situ hybridization analyses established that the entire C22orf2 follows BCR regardless of chromosomes involved in the translocation. In differentiated hematopoietic progenitors (bone marrow mononuclear cell fractions) of 30/40 patients, the expression of Chibby1 protein was reduced below 50% of the reference value (peripheral blood mononuclear cell fractions of healthy persons). In such cell context, Chibby1 protein reduction is not dependent on C22orf2 transcriptional downmodulation; however, it is strictly dependent upon BCR-ABL1 expression because it was not observed at the moment of major molecular response under tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy. Moreover, it was not correlated with the disease prognosis or response to therapy. Most importantly, a remarkable Chibby1 reduction was apparent in a putative BCR-ABL1+ leukemic stem cell compartment identified by a CD34+ phenotype compared to more differentiated hematopoietic progenitors. In CD34+ cells, Chibby1 reduction arises from transcriptional events and is driven by C22orf2 promoter hypermethylation. These results advance low Chibby1 expression associated with BCR-ABL1 as a component of beta catenin signaling in leukemic stem cells. PMID:24339928

  10. PI3 Kinase signals BCR dependent mature B cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Lakshmi; Sasaki, Yoshiteru; Calado, Dinis Pedro; Zhang, Baochun; Paik, Ji Hye; DePinho, Ronald A.; Kutok, Jeffrey L.; Kearney, John F.; Otipoby, Kevin L.; Rajewsky, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    Summary Previous work has shown that mature B cells depend upon survival signals delivered to the cells by their antigen receptor (BCR). To identify the molecular nature of this survival signal, we have developed a genetic approach in which ablation of the BCR is combined with the activation of specific, BCR dependent signaling cascades in mature B cells in vivo. Using this system, we provide evidence that the survival of BCR deficient mature B cells can be rescued by a single signaling pathway downstream of the BCR, namely PI3K signaling, with the FOXO1 transcription factor playing a central role. PMID:19879843

  11. Analysis of immune-related loci identifies 48 new susceptibility variants for multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Beecham, Ashley H; Patsopoulos, Nikolaos A; Xifara, Dionysia K; Davis, Mary F; Kemppinen, Anu; Cotsapas, Chris; Shahi, Tejas S; Spencer, Chris; Booth, David; Goris, An; Oturai, Annette; Saarela, Janna; Fontaine, Bertrand; Hemmer, Bernhard; Martin, Claes; Zipp, Frauke; D’alfonso, Sandra; Martinelli-Boneschi, Filippo; Taylor, Bruce; Harbo, Hanne F; Kockum, Ingrid; Hillert, Jan; Olsson, Tomas; Ban, Maria; Oksenberg, Jorge R; Hintzen, Rogier; Barcellos, Lisa F; Agliardi, Cristina; Alfredsson, Lars; Alizadeh, Mehdi; Anderson, Carl; Andrews, Robert; Søndergaard, Helle Bach; Baker, Amie; Band, Gavin; Baranzini, Sergio E; Barizzone, Nadia; Barrett, Jeffrey; Bellenguez, Céline; Bergamaschi, Laura; Bernardinelli, Luisa; Berthele, Achim; Biberacher, Viola; Binder, Thomas M C; Blackburn, Hannah; Bomfim, Izaura L; Brambilla, Paola; Broadley, Simon; Brochet, Bruno; Brundin, Lou; Buck, Dorothea; Butzkueven, Helmut; Caillier, Stacy J; Camu, William; Carpentier, Wassila; Cavalla, Paola; Celius, Elisabeth G; Coman, Irène; Comi, Giancarlo; Corrado, Lucia; Cosemans, Leentje; Cournu-Rebeix, Isabelle; Cree, Bruce A C; Cusi, Daniele; Damotte, Vincent; Defer, Gilles; Delgado, Silvia R; Deloukas, Panos; di Sapio, Alessia; Dilthey, Alexander T; Donnelly, Peter; Dubois, Bénédicte; Duddy, Martin; Edkins, Sarah; Elovaara, Irina; Esposito, Federica; Evangelou, Nikos; Fiddes, Barnaby; Field, Judith; Franke, Andre; Freeman, Colin; Frohlich, Irene Y; Galimberti, Daniela; Gieger, Christian; Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine; Graetz, Christiane; Graham, Andrew; Grummel, Verena; Guaschino, Clara; Hadjixenofontos, Athena; Hakonarson, Hakon; Halfpenny, Christopher; Hall, Gillian; Hall, Per; Hamsten, Anders; Harley, James; Harrower, Timothy; Hawkins, Clive; Hellenthal, Garrett; Hillier, Charles; Hobart, Jeremy; Hoshi, Muni; Hunt, Sarah E; Jagodic, Maja; Jelčić, Ilijas; Jochim, Angela; Kendall, Brian; Kermode, Allan; Kilpatrick, Trevor; Koivisto, Keijo; Konidari, Ioanna; Korn, Thomas; Kronsbein, Helena; Langford, Cordelia; Larsson, Malin; Lathrop, Mark; Lebrun-Frenay, Christine; Lechner-Scott, Jeannette; Lee, Michelle H; Leone, Maurizio A; Leppä, Virpi; Liberatore, Giuseppe; Lie, Benedicte A; Lill, Christina M; Lindén, Magdalena; Link, Jenny; Luessi, Felix; Lycke, Jan; Macciardi, Fabio; Männistö, Satu; Manrique, Clara P; Martin, Roland; Martinelli, Vittorio; Mason, Deborah; Mazibrada, Gordon; McCabe, Cristin; Mero, Inger-Lise; Mescheriakova, Julia; Moutsianas, Loukas; Myhr, Kjell-Morten; Nagels, Guy; Nicholas, Richard; Nilsson, Petra; Piehl, Fredrik; Pirinen, Matti; Price, Siân E; Quach, Hong; Reunanen, Mauri; Robberecht, Wim; Robertson, Neil P; Rodegher, Mariaemma; Rog, David; Salvetti, Marco; Schnetz-Boutaud, Nathalie C; Sellebjerg, Finn; Selter, Rebecca C; Schaefer, Catherine; Shaunak, Sandip; Shen, Ling; Shields, Simon; Siffrin, Volker; Slee, Mark; Sorensen, Per Soelberg; Sorosina, Melissa; Sospedra, Mireia; Spurkland, Anne; Strange, Amy; Sundqvist, Emilie; Thijs, Vincent; Thorpe, John; Ticca, Anna; Tienari, Pentti; van Duijn, Cornelia; Visser, Elizabeth M; Vucic, Steve; Westerlind, Helga; Wiley, James S; Wilkins, Alastair; Wilson, James F; Winkelmann, Juliane; Zajicek, John; Zindler, Eva; Haines, Jonathan L; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Ivinson, Adrian J; Stewart, Graeme; Hafler, David; Hauser, Stephen L; Compston, Alastair; McVean, Gil; De Jager, Philip; Sawcer, Stephen; McCauley, Jacob L

    2013-01-01

    Using the ImmunoChip custom genotyping array, we analysed 14,498 multiple sclerosis subjects and 24,091 healthy controls for 161,311 autosomal variants and identified 135 potentially associated regions (p-value < 1.0 × 10-4). In a replication phase, we combined these data with previous genome-wide association study (GWAS) data from an independent 14,802 multiple sclerosis subjects and 26,703 healthy controls. In these 80,094 individuals of European ancestry we identified 48 new susceptibility variants (p-value < 5.0 × 10-8); three found after conditioning on previously identified variants. Thus, there are now 110 established multiple sclerosis risk variants in 103 discrete loci outside of the Major Histocompatibility Complex. With high resolution Bayesian fine-mapping, we identified five regions where one variant accounted for more than 50% of the posterior probability of association. This study enhances the catalogue of multiple sclerosis risk variants and illustrates the value of fine-mapping in the resolution of GWAS signals. PMID:24076602

  12. High-density genotyping of immune-related loci identifies new SLE risk variants in individuals with Asian ancestry.

    PubMed

    Sun, Celi; Molineros, Julio E; Looger, Loren L; Zhou, Xu-Jie; Kim, Kwangwoo; Okada, Yukinori; Ma, Jianyang; Qi, Yuan-Yuan; Kim-Howard, Xana; Motghare, Prasenjeet; Bhattarai, Krishna; Adler, Adam; Bang, So-Young; Lee, Hye-Soon; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Kang, Young Mo; Suh, Chang-Hee; Chung, Won Tae; Park, Yong-Beom; Choe, Jung-Yoon; Shim, Seung Cheol; Kochi, Yuta; Suzuki, Akari; Kubo, Michiaki; Sumida, Takayuki; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Lee, Shin-Seok; Kim, Young Jin; Han, Bok-Ghee; Dozmorov, Mikhail; Kaufman, Kenneth M; Wren, Jonathan D; Harley, John B; Shen, Nan; Chua, Kek Heng; Zhang, Hong; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Nath, Swapan K

    2016-03-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has a strong but incompletely understood genetic architecture. We conducted an association study with replication in 4,478 SLE cases and 12,656 controls from six East Asian cohorts to identify new SLE susceptibility loci and better localize known loci. We identified ten new loci and confirmed 20 known loci with genome-wide significance. Among the new loci, the most significant locus was GTF2IRD1-GTF2I at 7q11.23 (rs73366469, Pmeta = 3.75 × 10(-117), odds ratio (OR) = 2.38), followed by DEF6, IL12B, TCF7, TERT, CD226, PCNXL3, RASGRP1, SYNGR1 and SIGLEC6. We identified the most likely functional variants at each locus by analyzing epigenetic marks and gene expression data. Ten candidate variants are known to alter gene expression in cis or in trans. Enrichment analysis highlights the importance of these loci in B cell and T cell biology. The new loci, together with previously known loci, increase the explained heritability of SLE to 24%. The new loci share functional and ontological characteristics with previously reported loci and are possible drug targets for SLE therapeutics.

  13. Genome-wide enrichment analysis between endometriosis and obesity-related traits reveals novel susceptibility loci

    PubMed Central

    Rahmioglu, Nilufer; Macgregor, Stuart; Drong, Alexander W.; Hedman, Åsa K.; Harris, Holly R.; Randall, Joshua C.; Prokopenko, Inga; Nyholt, Dale R.; Morris, Andrew P.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Missmer, Stacey A.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Zondervan, Krina T.

    2015-01-01

    Endometriosis is a chronic inflammatory condition in women that results in pelvic pain and subfertility, and has been associated with decreased body mass index (BMI). Genetic variants contributing to the heritable component have started to emerge from genome-wide association studies (GWAS), although the majority remain unknown. Unexpectedly, we observed an intergenic locus on 7p15.2 that was genome-wide significantly associated with both endometriosis and fat distribution (waist-to-hip ratio adjusted for BMI; WHRadjBMI) in an independent meta-GWAS of European ancestry individuals. This led us to investigate the potential overlap in genetic variants underlying the aetiology of endometriosis, WHRadjBMI and BMI using GWAS data. Our analyses demonstrated significant enrichment of common variants between fat distribution and endometriosis (P = 3.7 × 10−3), which was stronger when we restricted the investigation to more severe (Stage B) cases (P = 4.5 × 10−4). However, no genetic enrichment was observed between endometriosis and BMI (P = 0.79). In addition to 7p15.2, we identify four more variants with statistically significant evidence of involvement in both endometriosis and WHRadjBMI (in/near KIFAP3, CAB39L, WNT4, GRB14); two of these, KIFAP3 and CAB39L, are novel associations for both traits. KIFAP3, WNT4 and 7p15.2 are associated with the WNT signalling pathway; formal pathway analysis confirmed a statistically significant (P = 6.41 × 10−4) overrepresentation of shared associations in developmental processes/WNT signalling between the two traits. Our results demonstrate an example of potential biological pleiotropy that was hitherto unknown, and represent an opportunity for functional follow-up of loci and further cross-phenotype comparisons to assess how fat distribution and endometriosis pathogenesis research fields can inform each other. PMID:25296917

  14. Quantitative trait loci for yield and related traits in the wheat population Ning7840 x Clark.

    PubMed

    Marza, F; Bai, G-H; Carver, B F; Zhou, W-C

    2006-02-01

    Grain yield and associated agronomic traits are important factors in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) improvement. Knowledge regarding the number, genomic location, and effect of quantitative trait loci (QTL) would facilitate marker-assisted selection and the development of cultivars with desirable characteristics. Our objectives were to identify QTLs directly and indirectly affecting grain yield expression. A population of 132 F12 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) was derived by single-seed descent from a cross between the Chinese facultative wheat Ning7840 and the US soft red winter wheat Clark. Phenotypic data were collected for 15 yield and other agronomic traits in the RILs and parental lines from three locations in Oklahoma from 2001 to 2003. Twenty-nine linkage groups, consisting of 363 AFLP and 47 SSR markers, were identified. Using composite interval mapping (CIM) analysis, 10, 16, 30, and 14 QTLs were detected for yield, yield components, plant adaptation (shattering and lodging resistance, heading date, and plant height), and spike morphology traits, respectively. The QTL effects ranged from 7 to 23%. Marker alleles from Clark were associated with a positive effect for the majority of QTLs for yield and yield components, but gene dispersion was the rule rather than the exception for this RIL population. Often, QTLs were detected in proximal positions for different traits. Consistent, co-localized QTLs were identified in linkage groups 1AL, 1B, 4B, 5A, 6A, and 7A, and less consistent but unique QTLs were identified on 2BL, 2BS, 2DL, and 6B. Results of this study provide a benchmark for future efforts on QTL identification for yield traits. PMID:16369760

  15. Detection of quantitative trait loci (QTL) related to grilsing and late sexual maturation in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar).

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Alejandro P; Lubieniecki, Krzysztof P; Fukui, Steve; Withler, Ruth E; Swift, Bruce; Davidson, William S

    2014-02-01

    In Atlantic salmon aquaculture, early sexual maturation represents a major problem for producers. This is especially true for grilse, which mature after one sea winter before reaching a desirable harvest weight, rather than after two sea winters. Salmon maturing as grilse have a much lower market value than later maturing individuals. For this reason, most companies desire fish that grow fast and mature late. Marker-assisted selection has the potential to improve the efficiency of selection against early maturation and for late sexual maturation; however, studies identifying age of sexual maturation-related genetic markers are lacking for Atlantic salmon. Therefore, we used a 6.5K single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array to genotype five families from the Mainstream Canada broodstock program and search for SNPs associated with early (grilsing) or late sexual maturation. There were 529 SNP loci that were variable across all five families, and this was the set that was used for quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis. GridQTL identified two chromosomes, Ssa10 and Ssa21, containing QTL related to grilsing. In contrast, only one QTL, on Ssa18, was found linked to late maturation in Atlantic salmon. Our previous work on these five families did not identify genome-wide significant growth-related QTL on Ssa10, Ssa21, or Ssa18. Therefore, taken together, these results suggest that both grilsing and late sexual maturation are controlled independently of one another and also from growth-related traits. The identification of genomic regions associated with grilsing or late sexual maturation provide an opportunity to incorporate this information into selective breeding programs that will enhance Atlantic salmon farming. PMID:23912817

  16. Regulation of Synaptic Rac1 Activity, Long-Term Potentiation Maintenance, and Learning and Memory by BCR and ABR Rac GTPase-Activating Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Daeyoung; Han, Seungnam; Seo, Jinsoo; Lee, Jae-Ran; Choi, Jeonghoon; Groffen, John; Kim, Karam; Cho, Yi Sul; Choi, Han-Saem; Shin, Hyewon; Woo, Jooyeon; Won, Hyejung; Park, Soon Kwon; Kim, Soo-Young; Jo, Jihoon; Whitcomb, Daniel J.; Cho, Kwangwook; Kim, Hyun; Bae, Yong Chul; Heisterkamp, Nora; Choi, Se-Young; Kim, Eunjoon

    2016-01-01

    Rho family small GTPases are important regulators of neuronal development. Defective Rho regulation causes nervous system dysfunctions including mental retardation and Alzheimer’s disease. Rac1, a member of the Rho family, regulates dendritic spines and excitatory synapses, but relatively little is known about how synaptic Rac1 is negatively regulated. Breakpoint cluster region (BCR) is a Rac GTPase-activating protein known to form a fusion protein with the c-Abl tyrosine kinase in Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia. Despite the fact that BCR mRNAs are abundantly expressed in the brain, the neural functions of BCR protein have remained obscure. We report here that BCR and its close relative active BCR-related (ABR) localize at excitatory synapses and directly interact with PSD-95, an abundant postsynaptic scaffolding protein. Mice deficient for BCR or ABR show enhanced basal Rac1 activity but only a small increase in spine density. Importantly, mice lacking BCR or ABR exhibit a marked decrease in the maintenance, but not induction, of long-term potentiation, and show impaired spatial and object recognition memory. These results suggest that BCR and ABR have novel roles in the regulation of synaptic Rac1 signaling, synaptic plasticity, and learning and memory, and that excessive Rac1 activity negatively affects synaptic and cognitive functions. PMID:20962234

  17. The Interface between BCR-ABL-Dependent and -Independent Resistance Signaling Pathways in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Nestal de Moraes, Gabriela; Souza, Paloma Silva; Costas, Fernanda Casal de Faria; Vasconcelos, Flavia Cunha; Reis, Flaviana Ruade Souza; Maia, Raquel Ciuvalschi

    2012-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a clonal hematopoietic disorder characterized by the presence of the Philadelphia chromosome which resulted from the reciprocal translocation between chromosomes 9 and 22. The pathogenesis of CML involves the constitutive activation of the BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase, which governs malignant disease by activating multiple signal transduction pathways. The BCR-ABL kinase inhibitor, imatinib, is the front-line treatment for CML, but the emergence of imatinib resistance and other tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) has called attention for additional resistance mechanisms and has led to the search for alternative drug treatments. In this paper, we discuss our current understanding of mechanisms, related or unrelated to BCR-ABL, which have been shown to account for chemoresistance and treatment failure. We focus on the potential role of the influx and efflux transporters, the inhibitor of apoptosis proteins, and transcription factor-mediated signals as feasible molecular targets to overcome the development of TKIs resistance in CML. PMID:23259070

  18. Effects of established BMI-associated loci on obesity-related traits in a French representative population sample

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Genome-wide association studies have identified variants associated with obesity-related traits, such as the body mass index (BMI). We sought to determine how the combination of 31 validated, BMI-associated loci contributes to obesity- and diabetes-related traits in a French population sample. The MONA LISA Lille study (1578 participants, aged 35–74) constitutes a representative sample of the population living in Lille (northern France). Genetic variants were considered both individually and combined into a genetic predisposition score (GPS). Results Individually, 25 of 31 SNPs showed directionally consistent effects on BMI. Four loci (FTO, FANCL, MTIF3 and NUDT3) reached nominal significance (p ≤ 0.05) for their association with anthropometric traits. When considering the combined effect of the 31 SNPs, each additional risk allele of the GPS was significantly associated with an increment in the mean [95% CI] BMI of 0.13 [0.07-0.20] kg/m2 (p = 6.3x10-5) and a 3% increase in the risk of obesity (p = 0.047). The GPS explained 1% of the variance in the BMI. Furthermore, the GPS was associated with higher fasting glycaemia (p = 0.04), insulinaemia (p = 0.008), HbA1c levels (p = 0.01) and HOMA-IR scores (p = 0.0003) and a greater risk of type 2 diabetes (OR [95% CI] = 1.06 [1.00-1.11], p = 0.03). However, these associations were no longer statistically significant after adjustment for BMI. Conclusion Our results show that the GPS was associated with a higher BMI and an insulin-resistant state (mediated by BMI) in a population in northern France. PMID:24885863

  19. High-density genotyping of immune-related loci identifies new SLE risk variants in individuals with Asian ancestry

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Celi; Molineros, Julio E.; Looger, Loren L.; Zhou, Xu-jie; Kim, Kwangwoo; Okada, Yukinori; Ma, Jianyang; Qi, Yuan-yuan; Kim-Howard, Xana; Motghare, Prasenjeet; Bhattarai, Krishna; Adler, Adam; Bang, So-Young; Lee, Hye-Soon; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Kang, Young Mo; Suh, Chang-Hee; Chung, Won Tae; Park, Yong-Beom; Choe, Jung-Yoon; Shim, Seung Cheol; Kochi, Yuta; Suzuki, Akari; Kubo, Michiaki; Sumida, Takayuki; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Lee, Shin-Seok; Kim, Young Jin; Han, Bok-Ghee; Dozmorov, Mikhail; Kaufman, Kenneth M.; Wren, Jonathan D.; Harley, John B.; Shen, Nan; Chua, Kek Heng; Zhang, Hong; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Nath, Swapan K.

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has a strong but incompletely understood genetic architecture. We conducted an association study with replication in 4,492 SLE cases and 12,675 controls from six East-Asian cohorts, to identify novel and better localize known SLE susceptibility loci. We identified 10 novel loci as well as 20 known loci with genome-wide significance. Among the novel loci, the most significant was GTF2IRD1-GTF2I at 7q11.23 (rs73366469, Pmeta=3.75×10−117, OR=2.38), followed by DEF6, IL12B, TCF7, TERT, CD226, PCNXL3, RASGRP1, SYNGR1 and SIGLEC6. We localized the most likely functional variants for each locus by analyzing epigenetic marks and gene regulation data. Ten putative variants are known to alter cis- or trans-gene expression. Enrichment analysis highlights the importance of these loci in B- and T-cell biology. Together with previously known loci, the explained heritability of SLE increases to 24%. Novel loci share functional and ontological characteristics with previously reported loci, and are possible drug targets for SLE therapeutics. PMID:26808113

  20. Identification of multiple risk variants for ankylosing spondylitis through high-density genotyping of immune-related loci.

    PubMed

    Cortes, Adrian; Hadler, Johanna; Pointon, Jenny P; Robinson, Philip C; Karaderi, Tugce; Leo, Paul; Cremin, Katie; Pryce, Karena; Harris, Jessica; Lee, Seunghun; Joo, Kyung Bin; Shim, Seung-Cheol; Weisman, Michael; Ward, Michael; Zhou, Xiaodong; Garchon, Henri-Jean; Chiocchia, Gilles; Nossent, Johannes; Lie, Benedicte A; Førre, Øystein; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Laiho, Kari; Jiang, Lei; Liu, Yu; Wu, Xin; Bradbury, Linda A; Elewaut, Dirk; Burgos-Vargas, Ruben; Stebbings, Simon; Appleton, Louise; Farrah, Claire; Lau, Jonathan; Kenna, Tony J; Haroon, Nigil; Ferreira, Manuel A; Yang, Jian; Mulero, Juan; Fernandez-Sueiro, Jose Luis; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A; Lopez-Larrea, Carlos; Deloukas, Panos; Donnelly, Peter; Bowness, Paul; Gafney, Karl; Gaston, Hill; Gladman, Dafna D; Rahman, Proton; Maksymowych, Walter P; Xu, Huji; Crusius, J Bart A; van der Horst-Bruinsma, Irene E; Chou, Chung-Tei; Valle-Oñate, Raphael; Romero-Sánchez, Consuelo; Hansen, Inger Myrnes; Pimentel-Santos, Fernando M; Inman, Robert D; Videm, Vibeke; Martin, Javier; Breban, Maxime; Reveille, John D; Evans, David M; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Wordsworth, Bryan Paul; Brown, Matthew A

    2013-07-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a common, highly heritable inflammatory arthritis affecting primarily the spine and pelvis. In addition to HLA-B*27 alleles, 12 loci have previously been identified that are associated with ankylosing spondylitis in populations of European ancestry, and 2 associated loci have been identified in Asians. In this study, we used the Illumina Immunochip microarray to perform a case-control association study involving 10,619 individuals with ankylosing spondylitis (cases) and 15,145 controls. We identified 13 new risk loci and 12 additional ankylosing spondylitis-associated haplotypes at 11 loci. Two ankylosing spondylitis-associated regions have now been identified encoding four aminopeptidases that are involved in peptide processing before major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I presentation. Protective variants at two of these loci are associated both with reduced aminopeptidase function and with MHC class I cell surface expression.

  1. Identification of multiple risk variants for ankylosing spondylitis through high-density genotyping of immune-related loci

    PubMed Central

    Cortes, Adrian; Hadler, Johanna; Pointon, Jenny P; Robinson, Philip C; Karaderi, Tugce; Leo, Paul; Cremin, Katie; Pryce, Karena; Harris, Jessica; lee, Seunghun; Joo, Kyung Bin; Shim, Seung-Cheol; Weisman, Michael; Ward, Michael; Zhou, Xiaodong; Garchon, Henri-Jean; Chiocchia, Gilles; Nossent, Johannes; Lie, Benedicte A; Førre, Øystein; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Laiho, Kari; Jiang, Lei; Liu, Yu; Wu, Xin; Bradbury, Linda A; Elewaut, Dirk; Burgos-Vargas, Ruben; Stebbings, Simon; Appleton, Louise; Farrah, Claire; Lau, Jonathan; Kenna, Tony J; Haroon, Nigil; Ferreira, Manuel A; Yang, Jian; Mulero, Juan; Fernandez-Sueiro, Jose Luis; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A; lopez-Larrea, Carlos; Deloukas, Panos; Donnelly, Peter; Bowness, Paul; Gafney, Karl; Gaston, Hill; Gladman, Dafna D; Rahman, Proton; Maksymowych, Walter P; Xu, Huji; Crusius, J Bart A; van der Horst-Bruinsma, Irene E; Chou, Chung-Tei; Valle-Oñate, Raphael; Romero-Sánchez, Consuelo; Hansen, Inger Myrnes; Pimentel-Santos, Fernando M; Inman, Robert D; Videm, Vibeke; Martin, Javier; Breban, Maxime; Reveille, John D; Evans, David M; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Wordsworth, Bryan Paul; Brown, Matthew A

    2013-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a common, highly heritable inflammatory arthritis affecting primarily the spine and pelvis. In addition to HLA-B*27 alleles, 12 loci have previously been identified that are associated with ankylosing spondylitis in populations of European ancestry, and 2 associated loci have been identified in Asians. In this study, we used the Illumina Immunochip microarray to perform a case-control association study involving 10,619 individuals with ankylosing spondylitis (cases) and 15,145 controls. We identified 13 new risk loci and 12 additional ankylosing spondylitis–associated haplotypes at 11 loci. Two ankylosing spondylitis–associated regions have now been identified encoding four aminopeptidases that are involved in peptide processing before major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I presentation. Protective variants at two of these loci are associated both with reduced aminopeptidase function and with MHC class I cell surface expression. PMID:23749187

  2. Identification of chloroplast genome loci suitable for high-resolution phylogeographic studies of Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott (Araceae) and closely related taxa.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Ibrar; Matthews, Peter J; Biggs, Patrick J; Naeem, Muhammad; McLenachan, Patricia A; Lockhart, Peter J

    2013-09-01

    Recently, we reported the chloroplast genome-wide association of oligonucleotide repeats, indels and nucleotide substitutions in aroid chloroplast genomes. We hypothesized that the distribution of oligonucleotide repeat sequences in a single representative genome can be used to identify mutational hotspots and loci suitable for population genetic, phylogenetic and phylogeographic studies. Using information on the location of oligonucleotide repeats in the chloroplast genome of taro (Colocasia esculenta), we designed 30 primer pairs to amplify and sequence polymorphic loci. The primers have been tested in a range of intra-specific to intergeneric comparisons, including ten taro samples (Colocasia esculenta) from diverse geographical locations, four other Colocasia species (C. affinis, C. fallax, C. formosana, C. gigantea) and three other aroid genera (represented by Remusatia vivipara, Alocasia brisbanensis and Amorphophallus konjac). Multiple sequence alignments for the intra-specific comparison revealed nucleotide substitutions (point mutations) at all 30 loci and microsatellite polymorphisms at 14 loci. The primer pairs reported here reveal levels of genetic variation suitable for high-resolution phylogeographic and evolutionary studies of taro and other closely related aroids. Our results confirm that information on repeat distribution can be used to identify loci suitable for such studies, and we expect that this approach can be used in other plant groups.

  3. Identification of chloroplast genome loci suitable for high-resolution phylogeographic studies of Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott (Araceae) and closely related taxa.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Ibrar; Matthews, Peter J; Biggs, Patrick J; Naeem, Muhammad; McLenachan, Patricia A; Lockhart, Peter J

    2013-09-01

    Recently, we reported the chloroplast genome-wide association of oligonucleotide repeats, indels and nucleotide substitutions in aroid chloroplast genomes. We hypothesized that the distribution of oligonucleotide repeat sequences in a single representative genome can be used to identify mutational hotspots and loci suitable for population genetic, phylogenetic and phylogeographic studies. Using information on the location of oligonucleotide repeats in the chloroplast genome of taro (Colocasia esculenta), we designed 30 primer pairs to amplify and sequence polymorphic loci. The primers have been tested in a range of intra-specific to intergeneric comparisons, including ten taro samples (Colocasia esculenta) from diverse geographical locations, four other Colocasia species (C. affinis, C. fallax, C. formosana, C. gigantea) and three other aroid genera (represented by Remusatia vivipara, Alocasia brisbanensis and Amorphophallus konjac). Multiple sequence alignments for the intra-specific comparison revealed nucleotide substitutions (point mutations) at all 30 loci and microsatellite polymorphisms at 14 loci. The primer pairs reported here reveal levels of genetic variation suitable for high-resolution phylogeographic and evolutionary studies of taro and other closely related aroids. Our results confirm that information on repeat distribution can be used to identify loci suitable for such studies, and we expect that this approach can be used in other plant groups. PMID:23718317

  4. Quantitative trait loci analysis of flowering time related traits identified in recombinant inbred lines of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata).

    PubMed

    Andargie, Mebeasealassie; Pasquet, Remy S; Muluvi, Geoffrey M; Timko, Michael P

    2013-05-01

    Flowering time is a major adaptive trait in plants and an important selection criterion in the breeding for genetic improvement of crop species. QTLs for the time of flower opening and days to flower were identified in a cross between a short duration domesticated cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.) variety, 524B, and a relatively long duration wild accession, 219-01. A set of 159 F7 lines was grown under greenhouse conditions and scored for the flowering time associated phenotypes of time of flower opening and days to flower. Using a LOD threshold of 2.0, putative QTLs were identified and placed on a linkage map consisting of 202 SSR markers and four morphological loci. A total of five QTLs related to the time of flower opening were identified, accounting for 8.8%-29.8% of the phenotypic variation. Three QTLs for days to flower were detected, accounting for 5.7%-18.5% of the phenotypic variation. The major QTL of days to flower and time of flower opening were both mapped on linkage group 1. The QTLs identified in this study provide a strong foundation for further validation and fine mapping for developing an efficient way to restrain the gene flow between the cultivated and wild plants.

  5. Phenome-Wide Association Study to Explore Relationships between Immune System Related Genetic Loci and Complex Traits and Diseases.

    PubMed

    Verma, Anurag; Basile, Anna O; Bradford, Yuki; Kuivaniemi, Helena; Tromp, Gerard; Carey, David; Gerhard, Glenn S; Crowe, James E; Ritchie, Marylyn D; Pendergrass, Sarah A

    2016-01-01

    We performed a Phenome-Wide Association Study (PheWAS) to identify interrelationships between the immune system genetic architecture and a wide array of phenotypes from two de-identified electronic health record (EHR) biorepositories. We selected variants within genes encoding critical factors in the immune system and variants with known associations with autoimmunity. To define case/control status for EHR diagnoses, we used International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) diagnosis codes from 3,024 Geisinger Clinic MyCode® subjects (470 diagnoses) and 2,899 Vanderbilt University Medical Center BioVU biorepository subjects (380 diagnoses). A pooled-analysis was also carried out for the replicating results of the two data sets. We identified new associations with potential biological relevance including SNPs in tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and ankyrin-related genes associated with acute and chronic sinusitis and acute respiratory tract infection. The two most significant associations identified were for the C6orf10 SNP rs6910071 and "rheumatoid arthritis" (ICD-9 code category 714) (pMETAL = 2.58 x 10-9) and the ATN1 SNP rs2239167 and "diabetes mellitus, type 2" (ICD-9 code category 250) (pMETAL = 6.39 x 10-9). This study highlights the utility of using PheWAS in conjunction with EHRs to discover new genotypic-phenotypic associations for immune-system related genetic loci. PMID:27508393

  6. Phenome-Wide Association Study to Explore Relationships between Immune System Related Genetic Loci and Complex Traits and Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Anurag; Basile, Anna O.; Bradford, Yuki; Kuivaniemi, Helena; Tromp, Gerard; Carey, David; Gerhard, Glenn S.; Crowe, James E.; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Pendergrass, Sarah A.

    2016-01-01

    We performed a Phenome-Wide Association Study (PheWAS) to identify interrelationships between the immune system genetic architecture and a wide array of phenotypes from two de-identified electronic health record (EHR) biorepositories. We selected variants within genes encoding critical factors in the immune system and variants with known associations with autoimmunity. To define case/control status for EHR diagnoses, we used International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) diagnosis codes from 3,024 Geisinger Clinic MyCode® subjects (470 diagnoses) and 2,899 Vanderbilt University Medical Center BioVU biorepository subjects (380 diagnoses). A pooled-analysis was also carried out for the replicating results of the two data sets. We identified new associations with potential biological relevance including SNPs in tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and ankyrin-related genes associated with acute and chronic sinusitis and acute respiratory tract infection. The two most significant associations identified were for the C6orf10 SNP rs6910071 and “rheumatoid arthritis” (ICD-9 code category 714) (pMETAL = 2.58 x 10−9) and the ATN1 SNP rs2239167 and “diabetes mellitus, type 2” (ICD-9 code category 250) (pMETAL = 6.39 x 10−9). This study highlights the utility of using PheWAS in conjunction with EHRs to discover new genotypic-phenotypic associations for immune-system related genetic loci. PMID:27508393

  7. Molecular Detection of BCR-ABL in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Qin, Ya-Zhen; Huang, Xiao-Jun

    2016-01-01

    All chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients have the BCR-ABL fusion gene. The constitutively activated BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase is a critical pathogenetic event in CML. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), such as imatinib, are synthesized small molecules that primarily target BCR-ABL tyrosine kinases and have become a first-line treatment for CML. Detection of BCR-ABL transcript level by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RQ-PCR) is a clinical routine for evaluating TKI treatment efficacy and predicting long-term response. Furthermore, because they are a main TKI resistance mechanism, the BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase domain (TKD) point mutations that are detected by Sanger sequencing can help clinicians make decisions on subsequent treatment selections. Here, we present protocols for the two abovementioned molecular methods for CML analysis. PMID:27581134

  8. QTL Mapping in Eggplant Reveals Clusters of Yield-Related Loci and Orthology with the Tomato Genome

    PubMed Central

    Portis, Ezio; Barchi, Lorenzo; Toppino, Laura; Lanteri, Sergio; Acciarri, Nazzareno; Felicioni, Nazzareno; Fusari, Fabio; Barbierato, Valeria; Cericola, Fabio; Valè, Giampiero; Rotino, Giuseppe Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    In spite of its widespread cultivation and nutritional and economic importance, the eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) genome has not been extensively explored. A lack of knowledge of the patterns of inheritance of key agronomic traits has hindered the exploitation of marker technologies to accelerate its genetic improvement. An already established F2 intraspecific population of eggplant bred from the cross ‘305E40’ x ‘67/3’ was phenotyped for 20 agronomically relevant traits at two sites. Up to seven quantitative trait loci (QTL) per trait were identified and the percentage of the phenotypic variance (PV) explained per QTL ranged from 4 to 93%. Not all the QTL were detectable at both sites, but for each trait at least one major QTL (PV explained ≥10%) was identified. Although no detectable QTL x environment interaction was found, some QTL identified were location-specific. Many of the fruit-related QTL clustered within specific chromosomal regions, reflecting either linkage and/or pleiotropy. Evidence for putative tomato orthologous QTL/genes was obtained for several of the eggplant QTL. Information regarding the inheritance of key agronomic traits was obtained. Some of the QTL, along with their respective linked markers, may be useful in the context of marker-assisted breeding. PMID:24586828

  9. Electrical and chemical stimulation of the same hypothalamic loci in relation to agressive behaviour in cats: a comparison study.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, S C; Manchanda, S K; Kapoor, B K; Aneja, I S

    1995-10-01

    Chemitrodes which permit electrical and chemical stimulation of the same hypothalamic loci were implanted in anterior hypothalamic and preoptic regions. These sites were stimulated electrically using biphasic square wave pulse (1 ms, 60 Hz) at a current strength ranging from 150-800 microA to evoke an aggressive response. At lower current strength of 150-200 micro A, defence response, a sort of non-specific response can be elicited from these regions. Increasing the current strength to 400 microA led to the recruitment of affective and somatic components and changed the response pattern either to affective attack or flight. The loci producing affective attack response were localized more laterally and ventrally while the loci producing flight response were located in the dorsomedial regions of the hypothalamus. In this response the animal made a goal-directed attempt to escape through an escape route. Increasing the current strength to 500 microA in the dorsomedial regions changed the flight response to violent flight, which involved vigorous running with unsheathed claws and attacking objects if obstructed. Similar increase in current strength at loci producing affective attack only led to a decrease in the latency of response and made the attack more vigorous. Microinfusion of carbachol in graded doses of 2-15 microgram at all these loci produced a profound affective display. At lower doses of 2 and 5 microgram, only some components of affective display like alertness, pupillary dilation and ear flatness were exhibited. Increasing the dose to 10 micrograms and 15 micrograms led to the recruitment of other affective components like piloerection, salivation, hissing and baring of teeth. Microinfusion of carbachol at all loci producing affective attack on electrical stimulation produced a prononced affective display while microinfusion of carbachol at loci producing flight response led to the development of defence posture. At six loci a typical flight response was

  10. Dense genotyping of immune-related disease regions identifies 14 new susceptibility loci for juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hinks, Anne; Cobb, Joanna; Marion, Miranda C.; Prahalad, Sampath; Sudman, Marc; Bowes, John; Martin, Paul; Comeau, Mary E.; Sajuthi, Satria; Andrews, Robert; Brown, Milton; Chen, Wei-Min; Concannon, Patrick; Deloukas, Panos; Edkins, Sarah; Eyre, Stephen; Gaffney, Patrick M.; Guthery, Stephen L.; Guthridge, Joel M.; Hunt, Sarah E.; James, Judith A.; Keddache, Mehdi; Moser, Kathy L.; Nigrovic, Peter A.; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Onslow, Mitchell L.; Rosé, Carlos D.; Rich, Stephen S.; Steel, Kathryn J.A.; Wakeland, Edward K.; Wallace, Carol A.; Wedderburn, Lucy R.; Woo, Patricia; Bohnsack, John F.; Haas, Johannes Peter; Glass, David N.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Thomson, Wendy; Thompson, Susan D.

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of the ImmunoChip single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array in 2816 individuals, comprising the most common subtypes (oligoarticular and RF negative polyarticular) of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and 13056 controls strengthens the evidence for association to three known JIA-risk loci (HLA, PTPN22 and PTPN2) and has identified fourteen risk loci reaching genome-wide significance (p < 5 × 10-8) for the first time. Eleven additional novel regions showed suggestive evidence for association with JIA (p < 1 × 10-6). Dense-mapping of loci along with bioinformatic analysis has refined the association to one gene for eight regions, highlighting crucial pathways, including the IL-2 pathway, in JIA disease pathogenesis. The entire ImmunoChip loci, HLA region and the top 27 loci (p < 1 × 10-6) explain an estimated 18%, 13% and 6% risk of JIA, respectively. Analysis of the ImmunoChip dataset, the largest cohort of JIA cases investigated to date, provides new insight in understanding the genetic basis for this childhood autoimmune disease. PMID:23603761

  11. Isolation and Characterization of Microsatellite Loci for Stys's Bush-Cricket, Isophya stysi, and Cross-Species Amplification in Closely Related Species from the Phaneropteridae Family

    PubMed Central

    Iorgu, Elena I.; Popa, Oana P.; Krapal, Ana-Maria; Popa, Luis O.

    2013-01-01

    Ten microsatellite loci were isolated and characterized for Stys's bush-cricket, Isophya stysi Cejchan (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae), an endemic Orthoptera species to the Carpathian Basin, using an enriched genomic library procedure. The polymorphism of these loci were tested in two populations of I. stysi, and the number of alleles per locus varied from 4 to 16. The expected and observed heterozygosities ranged from 0.612 to 0.925 and from 0.625 to 1.000, respectively. The interspecific applicability of these microsatellites was evaluated by amplification in 20 related species: Isophya camptoxypha, Isophya sicula, Isophya ciucasi, Isophya pienensis, Isophya harzi, Isophya kraussii, Isophya zubovskii, Isophya rectipennis, Isophya modesta, Isophya longicaudata, Isophya dobrogensis, Isophya hospodar, Isophya speciosa, Isophya modestior, Poecilimon fussii, Poecilimon affinis, Polysarcus denticauda, Barbitistes constrictus, Leptophyes discoidalis, Phaneroptera falcata. All primer pairs for the 10 loci yielded successful amplifications in at least one other taxon from the Isophya genus. This set of microsatellite loci would be useful for genetic studies in I. stysi and other species of the genus Isophya. PMID:23906094

  12. Targeting Hedgehog signaling pathway and autophagy overcomes drug resistance of BCR-ABL-positive chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xian; Zhao, Hui; Li, Yubin; Fan, Jiajun; Sun, Yun; Wang, Shaofei; Wang, Ziyu; Song, Ping; Ju, Dianwen

    2015-01-01

    The frontline tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) imatinib has revolutionized the treatment of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). However, drug resistance is the major clinical challenge in the treatment of CML. The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway and autophagy are both related to tumorigenesis, cancer therapy, and drug resistance. This study was conducted to explore whether the Hh pathway could regulate autophagy in CML cells and whether simultaneously regulating the Hh pathway and autophagy could induce cell death of drug-sensitive or -resistant BCR-ABL(+) CML cells. Our results indicated that pharmacological or genetic inhibition of Hh pathway could markedly induce autophagy in BCR-ABL(+) CML cells. Autophagic inhibitors or ATG5 and ATG7 silencing could significantly enhance CML cell death induced by Hh pathway suppression. Based on the above findings, our study demonstrated that simultaneously inhibiting the Hh pathway and autophagy could markedly reduce cell viability and induce apoptosis of imatinib-sensitive or -resistant BCR-ABL(+) cells. Moreover, this combination had little cytotoxicity in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Furthermore, this combined strategy was related to PARP cleavage, CASP3 and CASP9 cleavage, and inhibition of the BCR-ABL oncoprotein. In conclusion, this study indicated that simultaneously inhibiting the Hh pathway and autophagy could potently kill imatinib-sensitive or -resistant BCR-ABL(+) cells, providing a novel concept that simultaneously inhibiting the Hh pathway and autophagy might be a potent new strategy to overcome CML drug resistance.

  13. Candidate genes in quantitative trait loci associated with absolute and relative kidney weight in rats with Inherited Stress Induced Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The kidney mass is significantly increased in hypertensive ISIAH rats with Inherited Stress Induced Arterial Hypertension as compared with normotensive WAG rats. The QTL/microarray approach was carried out to determine the positional candidate genes in the QTL for absolute and relative kidney weight. Results Several known and predicted genes differentially expressed in ISIAH and WAG kidney were mapped to genetic loci associated with the absolute and relative kidney weight in 6-month old F2 hybrid (ISIAHxWAG) males. The knowledge-driven filtering of the list of candidates helped to suggest several positional candidate genes, which may be related to the structural and mass changes in hypertensive ISIAH kidney. In the current study, we showed that all loci found for absolute and relative kidney weight didn't overlap with significant or suggestive loci for arterial blood pressure level. So, the genes differentially expressed in ISIAH and WAG kidneys and located in these QTL regions associated with absolute and relative kidney weight shouldn't substantially influence the BP level in the 6 month-old ISIAH rats. However, in some cases, small effects may be suggested. Conclusions The further experimental validation of causative genes and detection of polymorphisms will provide opportunities to advance our understanding of the underlying nature of structural and mass changes in hypertensive ISIAH kidney. PMID:25707311

  14. Differential expression of miR-17~92 identifies BCL2 as a therapeutic target in BCR-ABL-positive B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Scherr, M; Elder, A; Battmer, K; Barzan, D; Bomken, S; Ricke-Hoch, M; Schröder, A; Venturini, L; Blair, H J; Vormoor, J; Ottmann, O; Ganser, A; Pich, A; Hilfiker-Kleiner, D; Heidenreich, O; Eder, M

    2014-03-01

    Despite advances in allogeneic stem cell transplantation, BCR-ABL-positive acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) remains a high-risk disease, necessitating the development of novel treatment strategies. As the known oncomir, miR-17~92, is regulated by BCR-ABL fusion in chronic myeloid leukaemia, we investigated its role in BCR-ABL translocated ALL. miR-17~92-encoded miRNAs were significantly less abundant in BCR-ABL-positive as compared to -negative ALL-cells and overexpression of miR-17~19b triggered apoptosis in a BCR-ABL-dependent manner. Stable isotope labelling of amino acids in culture (SILAC) followed by liquid chromatography and mass spectroscopy (LC-MS) identified several apoptosis-related proteins including Bcl2 as potential targets of miR-17~19b. We validated Bcl2 as a direct target of this miRNA cluster in mice and humans, and, similar to miR-17~19b overexpression, Bcl2-specific RNAi strongly induced apoptosis in BCR-ABL-positive cells. Furthermore, BCR-ABL-positive human ALL cell lines were more sensitive to pharmacological BCL2 inhibition than negative ones. Finally, in a xenograft model using patient-derived leukaemic blasts, real-time, in vivo imaging confirmed pharmacological inhibition of BCL2 as a new therapeutic strategy in BCR-ABL-positive ALL. These data demonstrate the role of miR-17~92 in regulation of apoptosis, and identify BCL2 as a therapeutic target of particular relevance in BCR-ABL-positive ALL. PMID:24280866

  15. Dense genotyping of immune-related disease regions identifies 14 new susceptibility loci for juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Hinks, Anne; Cobb, Joanna; Marion, Miranda C; Prahalad, Sampath; Sudman, Marc; Bowes, John; Martin, Paul; Comeau, Mary E; Sajuthi, Satria; Andrews, Robert; Brown, Milton; Chen, Wei-Min; Concannon, Patrick; Deloukas, Panos; Edkins, Sarah; Eyre, Stephen; Gaffney, Patrick M; Guthery, Stephen L; Guthridge, Joel M; Hunt, Sarah E; James, Judith A; Keddache, Mehdi; Moser, Kathy L; Nigrovic, Peter A; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Onslow, Mitchell L; Rosé, Carlos D; Rich, Stephen S; Steel, Kathryn J A; Wakeland, Edward K; Wallace, Carol A; Wedderburn, Lucy R; Woo, Patricia; Bohnsack, John F; Haas, Johannes Peter; Glass, David N; Langefeld, Carl D; Thomson, Wendy; Thompson, Susan D

    2013-06-01

    We used the Immunochip array to analyze 2,816 individuals with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), comprising the most common subtypes (oligoarticular and rheumatoid factor-negative polyarticular JIA), and 13,056 controls. We confirmed association of 3 known JIA risk loci (the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region, PTPN22 and PTPN2) and identified 14 loci reaching genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10(-8)) for the first time. Eleven additional new regions showed suggestive evidence of association with JIA (P < 1 × 10(-6)). Dense mapping of loci along with bioinformatics analysis refined the associations to one gene in each of eight regions, highlighting crucial pathways, including the interleukin (IL)-2 pathway, in JIA disease pathogenesis. The entire Immunochip content, the HLA region and the top 27 loci (P < 1 × 10(-6)) explain an estimated 18, 13 and 6% of the risk of JIA, respectively. In summary, this is the largest collection of JIA cases investigated so far and provides new insight into the genetic basis of this childhood autoimmune disease. PMID:23603761

  16. Dense genotyping of immune-related susceptibility loci reveals new insights into the genetics of psoriatic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Bowes, John; Budu-Aggrey, Ashley; Huffmeier, Ulrike; Uebe, Steffen; Steel, Kathryn; Hebert, Harry L.; Wallace, Chris; Massey, Jonathan; Bruce, Ian N.; Bluett, James; Feletar, Marie; Morgan, Ann W.; Marzo-Ortega, Helena; Donohoe, Gary; Morris, Derek W.; Helliwell, Philip; Ryan, Anthony W.; Kane, David; Warren, Richard B.; Korendowych, Eleanor; Alenius, Gerd-Marie; Giardina, Emiliano; Packham, Jonathan; McManus, Ross; FitzGerald, Oliver; McHugh, Neil; Brown, Matthew A.; Ho, Pauline; Behrens, Frank; Burkhardt, Harald; Reis, Andre; Barton, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a chronic inflammatory arthritis associated with psoriasis and, despite the larger estimated heritability for PsA, the majority of genetic susceptibility loci identified to date are shared with psoriasis. Here, we present results from a case–control association study on 1,962 PsA patients and 8,923 controls using the Immunochip genotyping array. We identify eight loci passing genome-wide significance, secondary independent effects at three loci and a distinct PsA-specific variant at the IL23R locus. We report two novel loci and evidence of a novel PsA-specific association at chromosome 5q31. Imputation of classical HLA alleles, amino acids and SNPs across the MHC region highlights three independent associations to class I genes. Finally, we find an enrichment of associated variants to markers of open chromatin in CD8+ memory primary T cells. This study identifies key insights into the genetics of PsA that could begin to explain fundamental differences between psoriasis and PsA. PMID:25651891

  17. Dense genotyping of immune-related susceptibility loci reveals new insights into the genetics of psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bowes, John; Budu-Aggrey, Ashley; Huffmeier, Ulrike; Uebe, Steffen; Steel, Kathryn; Hebert, Harry L; Wallace, Chris; Massey, Jonathan; Bruce, Ian N; Bluett, James; Feletar, Marie; Morgan, Ann W; Marzo-Ortega, Helena; Donohoe, Gary; Morris, Derek W; Helliwell, Philip; Ryan, Anthony W; Kane, David; Warren, Richard B; Korendowych, Eleanor; Alenius, Gerd-Marie; Giardina, Emiliano; Packham, Jonathan; McManus, Ross; FitzGerald, Oliver; McHugh, Neil; Brown, Matthew A; Ho, Pauline; Behrens, Frank; Burkhardt, Harald; Reis, Andre; Barton, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a chronic inflammatory arthritis associated with psoriasis and, despite the larger estimated heritability for PsA, the majority of genetic susceptibility loci identified to date are shared with psoriasis. Here, we present results from a case-control association study on 1,962 PsA patients and 8,923 controls using the Immunochip genotyping array. We identify eight loci passing genome-wide significance, secondary independent effects at three loci and a distinct PsA-specific variant at the IL23R locus. We report two novel loci and evidence of a novel PsA-specific association at chromosome 5q31. Imputation of classical HLA alleles, amino acids and SNPs across the MHC region highlights three independent associations to class I genes. Finally, we find an enrichment of associated variants to markers of open chromatin in CD8(+) memory primary T cells. This study identifies key insights into the genetics of PsA that could begin to explain fundamental differences between psoriasis and PsA. PMID:25651891

  18. Genomewide meta-analysis identifies loci associated with IGF-I and IGFBP-3 levels with impact on age-related traits.

    PubMed

    Teumer, Alexander; Qi, Qibin; Nethander, Maria; Aschard, Hugues; Bandinelli, Stefania; Beekman, Marian; Berndt, Sonja I; Bidlingmaier, Martin; Broer, Linda; Cappola, Anne; Ceda, Gian Paolo; Chanock, Stephen; Chen, Ming-Huei; Chen, Tai C; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Chung, Jonathan; Del Greco Miglianico, Fabiola; Eriksson, Joel; Ferrucci, Luigi; Friedrich, Nele; Gnewuch, Carsten; Goodarzi, Mark O; Grarup, Niels; Guo, Tingwei; Hammer, Elke; Hayes, Richard B; Hicks, Andrew A; Hofman, Albert; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J; Hu, Frank; Hunter, David J; Husemoen, Lise L; Isaacs, Aaron; Jacobs, Kevin B; Janssen, Joop A M J L; Jansson, John-Olov; Jehmlich, Nico; Johnson, Simon; Juul, Anders; Karlsson, Magnus; Kilpelainen, Tuomas O; Kovacs, Peter; Kraft, Peter; Li, Chao; Linneberg, Allan; Liu, Yongmei; Loos, Ruth J F; Lorentzon, Mattias; Lu, Yingchang; Maggio, Marcello; Magi, Reedik; Meigs, James; Mellström, Dan; Nauck, Matthias; Newman, Anne B; Pollak, Michael N; Pramstaller, Peter P; Prokopenko, Inga; Psaty, Bruce M; Reincke, Martin; Rimm, Eric B; Rotter, Jerome I; Saint Pierre, Aude; Schurmann, Claudia; Seshadri, Sudha; Sjögren, Klara; Slagboom, P Eline; Strickler, Howard D; Stumvoll, Michael; Suh, Yousin; Sun, Qi; Zhang, Cuilin; Svensson, Johan; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tare, Archana; Tönjes, Anke; Uh, Hae-Won; van Duijn, Cornelia M; van Heemst, Diana; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Völker, Uwe; Willems, Sara M; Ohlsson, Claes; Wallaschofski, Henri; Kaplan, Robert C

    2016-10-01

    The growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor (IGF) axis can be manipulated in animal models to promote longevity, and IGF-related proteins including IGF-I and IGF-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) have also been implicated in risk of human diseases including cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and cancer. Through genomewide association study of up to 30 884 adults of European ancestry from 21 studies, we confirmed and extended the list of previously identified loci associated with circulating IGF-I and IGFBP-3 concentrations (IGF1, IGFBP3, GCKR, TNS3, GHSR, FOXO3, ASXL2, NUBP2/IGFALS, SORCS2, and CELSR2). Significant sex interactions, which were characterized by different genotype-phenotype associations between men and women, were found only for associations of IGFBP-3 concentrations with SNPs at the loci IGFBP3 and SORCS2. Analyses of SNPs, gene expression, and protein levels suggested that interplay between IGFBP3 and genes within the NUBP2 locus (IGFALS and HAGH) may affect circulating IGF-I and IGFBP-3 concentrations. The IGF-I-decreasing allele of SNP rs934073, which is an eQTL of ASXL2, was associated with lower adiposity and higher likelihood of survival beyond 90 years. The known longevity-associated variant rs2153960 (FOXO3) was observed to be a genomewide significant SNP for IGF-I concentrations. Bioinformatics analysis suggested enrichment of putative regulatory elements among these IGF-I- and IGFBP-3-associated loci, particularly of rs646776 at CELSR2. In conclusion, this study identified several loci associated with circulating IGF-I and IGFBP-3 concentrations and provides clues to the potential role of the IGF axis in mediating effects of known (FOXO3) and novel (ASXL2) longevity-associated loci. PMID:27329260

  19. Altered BCR and TLR signals promote enhanced positive selection of autoreactive transitional B cells in Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kolhatkar, Nikita S; Brahmandam, Archana; Thouvenel, Christopher D; Becker-Herman, Shirly; Jacobs, Holly M; Schwartz, Marc A; Allenspach, Eric J; Khim, Socheath; Panigrahi, Anil K; Luning Prak, Eline T; Thrasher, Adrian J; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Candotti, Fabio; Torgerson, Troy R; Sanz, Ignacio; Rawlings, David J

    2015-09-21

    Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is an X-linked immunodeficiency disorder frequently associated with systemic autoimmunity, including autoantibody-mediated cytopenias. WAS protein (WASp)-deficient B cells have increased B cell receptor (BCR) and Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling, suggesting that these pathways might impact establishment of the mature, naive BCR repertoire. To directly investigate this possibility, we evaluated naive B cell specificity and composition in WASp-deficient mice and WAS subjects (n = 12). High-throughput sequencing and single-cell cloning analysis of the BCR repertoire revealed altered heavy chain usage and enrichment for low-affinity self-reactive specificities in murine marginal zone and human naive B cells. Although negative selection mechanisms including deletion, anergy, and receptor editing were relatively unperturbed, WASp-deficient transitional B cells showed enhanced proliferation in vivo mediated by antigen- and Myd88-dependent signals. Finally, using both BCR sequencing and cell surface analysis with a monoclonal antibody recognizing an intrinsically autoreactive heavy chain, we show enrichment in self-reactive cells specifically at the transitional to naive mature B cell stage in WAS subjects. Our combined data support a model wherein modest alterations in B cell-intrinsic, BCR, and TLR signals in WAS, and likely other autoimmune disorders, are sufficient to alter B cell tolerance via positive selection of self-reactive transitional B cells. PMID:26371186

  20. Altered BCR and TLR signals promote enhanced positive selection of autoreactive transitional B cells in Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kolhatkar, Nikita S.; Brahmandam, Archana; Thouvenel, Christopher D.; Becker-Herman, Shirly; Jacobs, Holly M.; Schwartz, Marc A.; Allenspach, Eric J.; Khim, Socheath; Panigrahi, Anil K.; Luning Prak, Eline T.; Thrasher, Adrian J.; Notarangelo, Luigi D.; Candotti, Fabio; Torgerson, Troy R.; Sanz, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is an X-linked immunodeficiency disorder frequently associated with systemic autoimmunity, including autoantibody-mediated cytopenias. WAS protein (WASp)–deficient B cells have increased B cell receptor (BCR) and Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling, suggesting that these pathways might impact establishment of the mature, naive BCR repertoire. To directly investigate this possibility, we evaluated naive B cell specificity and composition in WASp-deficient mice and WAS subjects (n = 12). High-throughput sequencing and single-cell cloning analysis of the BCR repertoire revealed altered heavy chain usage and enrichment for low-affinity self-reactive specificities in murine marginal zone and human naive B cells. Although negative selection mechanisms including deletion, anergy, and receptor editing were relatively unperturbed, WASp-deficient transitional B cells showed enhanced proliferation in vivo mediated by antigen- and Myd88-dependent signals. Finally, using both BCR sequencing and cell surface analysis with a monoclonal antibody recognizing an intrinsically autoreactive heavy chain, we show enrichment in self-reactive cells specifically at the transitional to naive mature B cell stage in WAS subjects. Our combined data support a model wherein modest alterations in B cell–intrinsic, BCR, and TLR signals in WAS, and likely other autoimmune disorders, are sufficient to alter B cell tolerance via positive selection of self-reactive transitional B cells. PMID:26371186

  1. Flow Cytometric Immunobead Assay for Detection of BCR-ABL1 Fusion Proteins in Chronic Myleoid Leukemia: Comparison with FISH and PCR Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Recchia, Anna Grazia; Caruso, Nadia; Bossio, Sabrina; Pellicanò, Mariavaleria; De Stefano, Laura; Franzese, Stefania; Palummo, Angela; Abbadessa, Vincenzo; Lucia, Eugenio; Gentile, Massimo; Vigna, Ernesto; Caracciolo, Clementina; Agostino, Antolino; Galimberti, Sara; Levato, Luciano; Stagno, Fabio; Molica, Stefano; Martino, Bruno; Vigneri, Paolo; Di Raimondo, Francesco; Morabito, Fortunato

    2015-01-01

    Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) is characterized by a balanced translocation juxtaposing the Abelson (ABL) and breakpoint cluster region (BCR) genes. The resulting BCR-ABL1 oncogene leads to increased proliferation and survival of leukemic cells. Successful treatment of CML has been accompanied by steady improvements in our capacity to accurately and sensitively monitor therapy response. Currently, measurement of BCR-ABL1 mRNA transcript levels by real-time quantitative PCR (RQ-PCR) defines critical response endpoints. An antibody-based technique for BCR-ABL1 protein recognition could be an attractive alternative to RQ-PCR. To date, there have been no studies evaluating whether flow-cytometry based assays could be of clinical utility in evaluating residual disease in CML patients. Here we describe a flow-cytometry assay that detects the presence of BCR-ABL1 fusion proteins in CML lysates to determine the applicability, reliability, and specificity of this method for both diagnosis and monitoring of CML patients for initial response to therapy. We show that: i) CML can be properly diagnosed at onset, (ii) follow-up assessments show detectable fusion protein (i.e. relative mean fluorescent intensity, rMFI%>1) when BCR-ABL1IS transcripts are between 1–10%, and (iii) rMFI% levels predict CCyR as defined by FISH analysis. Overall, the FCBA assay is a rapid technique, fully translatable to the routine management of CML patients. PMID:26111048

  2. Altered BCR signalling quality predisposes to autoimmune disease and a pre-diabetic state.

    PubMed

    Königsberger, Sebastian; Prodöhl, Jan; Stegner, David; Weis, Vanessa; Andreas, Martin; Stehling, Martin; Schumacher, Theresa; Böhmer, Ruben; Thielmann, Ina; van Eeuwijk, Judith M M; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Kiefer, Friedemann

    2012-08-01

    The spleen tyrosine kinase family members Syk and Zap-70 are pivotal signal transducers downstream of antigen receptors and exhibit overlapping expression patterns at early lymphocytic developmental stages. To assess their differential kinase fitness in vivo, we generated mice, which carry a Zap-70 cDNA knock-in controlled by intrinsic Syk promoter elements that disrupts wild-type Syk expression. Kinase replacement severely compromised Erk1/2-mediated survival and proper selection of developing B cells at central and peripheral checkpoints, demonstrating critical dependence on BCR signalling quality. Furthermore, ITAM- and hemITAM-mediated activation of platelets and neutrophils was completely blunted, while surprisingly FcγR-mediated phagocytosis in macrophages was retained. The alteration in BCR signalling quality resulted in preferential development and survival of marginal zone B cells and prominent autoreactivity, causing the generation of anti-insulin antibodies and age-related glomerulonephritis. Development of concomitant fasting glucose intolerance in knock-in mice highlights aberrant B cell selection as a potential risk factor for type 1 diabetes, and suggests altered BCR signalling as a mechanism to cause biased cellular and Ig repertoire selection, ultimately contributing to B cell-mediated autoimmune predisposition. PMID:22728826

  3. Genetic basis of delay discounting in frequent gamblers: examination of a priori candidates and exploration of a panel of dopamine-related loci

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Joshua C; MacKillop, James

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Delay discounting is a behavioral economic index of impulsivity that reflects preferences for small immediate rewards relative to larger delayed rewards. It has been consistently linked to pathological gambling and other forms of addictive behavior, and has been proposed to be a behavioral characteristic that may link genetic variation and risk of developing addictive disorders (i.e., an endophenotype). Studies to date have revealed significant associations with polymorphisms associated with dopamine neurotransmission. The current study examined associations between delay discounting and both previously linked variants and a novel panel of dopamine-related variants in a sample of frequent gamblers. Methods Participants were 175 weekly gamblers of European ancestry who completed the Monetary Choice Questionnaire to assess delay discounting preferences and provided a DNA via saliva. Results In a priori tests, two loci previously associated with delayed reward discounting (rs1800497 and rs4680) were not replicated, however, the long form of DRD4 VNTR was significantly associated with lower discounting of delayed rewards. Exploratory analysis of the dopamine-related panel revealed 11 additional significant associations in genes associated with dopamine synthesis, breakdown, reuptake, and receptor function (DRD3, SLC6A3, DDC, DBH, and SLC18A2). An aggregate genetic risk score from the nominally significant loci accounted for 17% of the variance in discounting. Mediational analyses largely supported the presence of indirect effects between the associated loci, delay discounting, and pathological gambling severity. Conclusions These findings do not replicate previously reported associations but identify several novel candidates and provide preliminary support for a systems biology approach to understand the genetic basis of delay discounting. PMID:25365808

  4. A genome-wide association study identifies susceptibility loci of silica-related pneumoconiosis in Han Chinese.

    PubMed

    Chu, Minjie; Ji, Xiaoming; Chen, Weihong; Zhang, Ruyang; Sun, Chongqi; Wang, Ting; Luo, Chen; Gong, Jianhang; Zhu, Meng; Fan, Jingjing; Hou, Zhiguo; Dai, Juncheng; Jin, Guangfu; Wu, Tangchun; Chen, Feng; Hu, Zhibin; Ni, Chunhui; Shen, Hongbing

    2014-12-01

    Pneumoconiosis is the most serious occupational disease in China and its leading cause is occupational silica exposure. Pneumoconiosis takes several years to develop depending on the exposure level of silica. However, individual variation in the susceptibility to pneumoconiosis has been observed among the subjects with similar exposure. We conducted a genome-wide screening with 710,999 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a cohort of 400 coal workers (202 cases and 198 exposed controls) for pneumoconiosis susceptible loci. Seven promising variants were evaluated in an independent cohort of 568 coal workers (323 cases and 245 exposed controls), followed by a second replication on 463 iron ore workers (167 cases and 296 exposed controls). By pooling all of the genome-wide association studies and replication stages together, we found a genome-wide significant (P < 5.0 × 10(-8)) association for rs73329476 (P = 1.74 × 10(-8), OR = 2.17, 95% CI = 1.66-2.85) and two additional replicated associations for rs4320486 (P < 0.05) and rs117626015 (P < 0.05) with combined P-values of 4.29 × 10(-6) and 5.05 × 10(-6), respectively. In addition, the risk allele T of rs73329476 was significantly associated with lower mRNA expression levels of carboxypeptidase M (CPM) in total cellular RNA from whole blood of 156 healthy individuals (P = 0.0252). The identified pneumoconiosis susceptibility loci may provide new insights into the pathogenesis of pneumoconiosis, and may also have some clinical utility for risk prediction for pneumoconiosis and high-risk population screening for workers with occupational silica exposure.

  5. Practical management of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia who develop tyrosine kinase inhibitor-resistant BCR-ABL1 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Five BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), imatinib, nilotinib, dasatinib, bosutinib, and ponatinib, are currently approved for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Standard treatment of CML with TKIs is highly effective in reducing disease burden, delaying disease progression, and prolonging overall survival of patients; however, resistance to TKI treatment has become an increasingly important cause of treatment failure. The emergence of mutations in the BCR-ABL1 kinase domain is a common mechanism of TKI resistance, and laboratory testing to detect these mutations is currently available for clinical use. Patients who do not respond or have lost their response to TKI therapy should be considered for mutational testing. Despite clinical practice guidelines that recommend testing for BCR-ABL1 mutations in patients with clinical signs of TKI resistance, many oncologists and hematologists managing patients with CML do not perform such testing. This review addresses outstanding questions related to when testing should be conducted, what type of testing should be done, and how testing results should be applied to subsequent therapeutic decisions. It describes how BCR-ABL1 kinase domain mutations confer resistance, outlines the prevalence of mutations in patients with resistance to TKIs, summarizes the common and investigational methods used in mutational testing, and presents an algorithm reflecting a clinical perspective on how and when to conduct mutational testing, and what to do with test results. PMID:25360237

  6. Integrated analysis of phenome, genome, and transcriptome of hybrid rice uncovered multiple heterosis-related loci for yield increase

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dayong; Huang, Zhiyuan; Song, Shuhui; Xin, Yeyun; Mao, Donghai; Lv, Qiming; Zhou, Ming; Tian, Dongmei; Tang, Mingfeng; Wu, Qi; Liu, Xue; Chen, Tingting; Song, Xianwei; Fu, Xiqin; Zhao, Bingran; Liang, Chengzhi; Li, Aihong; Liu, Guozhen; Li, Shigui; Hu, Songnian; Cao, Xiaofeng; Yu, Jun; Yuan, Longping; Chen, Caiyan; Zhu, Lihuang

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid rice is the dominant form of rice planted in China, and its use has extended worldwide since the 1970s. It offers great yield advantages and has contributed greatly to the world’s food security. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying heterosis have remained a mystery. In this study we integrated genetics and omics analyses to determine the candidate genes for yield heterosis in a model two-line rice hybrid system, Liang-you-pei 9 (LYP9) and its parents. Phenomics study revealed that the better parent heterosis (BPH) of yield in hybrid is not ascribed to BPH of all the yield components but is specific to the BPH of spikelet number per panicle (SPP) and paternal parent heterosis (PPH) of effective panicle number (EPN). Genetic analyses then identified multiple quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for these two components. Moreover, a number of differentially expressed genes and alleles in the hybrid were mapped by transcriptome profiling to the QTL regions as possible candidate genes. In parallel, a major QTL for yield heterosis, rice heterosis 8 (RH8), was found to be the DTH8/Ghd8/LHD1 gene. Based on the shared allelic heterozygosity of RH8 in many hybrid rice cultivars, a common mechanism for yield heterosis in the present commercial hybrid rice is proposed. PMID:27663737

  7. Role of inhibitory BCR co-receptors in immunity.

    PubMed

    Tsubata, Takeshi

    2012-06-01

    B lymphocytes (B cells) express a variety of membrane molecules containing immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motifs (ITIMs) in the cytoplasmic region such as FcγRIIB, FCRLs, CD22, mouse Siglec-G/human Siglec-10, PECAM-1, mouse PIR-B/human LIRB1 and LIRB2PD-1 and CD72. When phosphorylated, ITIMs in these molecules recruit and activate phosphatases such as SH2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase 1 (SHP-1), SHP-2, SH2 domain- containing inositol 5-phosphatase 1 (SHIP1) and SHIP2 depending on receptors. These phosphatases then negatively regulate B cell antigen receptor (BCR) signaling. Because of their ability to inhibit BCR signaling, these ITIMcontaining molecules are called inhibitory BCR co-receptors. Studies on mice deficient in an inhibitory co-receptor have demonstrated that the inhibitory co-receptors regulate B cell development, antibody responses and development of autoimmune diseases. Moreover, polymorphisms in some inhibitory co-receptors such as FcγRIIB, FCRL3 and CD72 are associated with autoimmune diseases, suggesting a crucial role of inhibitory co-receptor polymorphisms in the regulation of autoimmune diseases. The ligands for inhibitory co-receptors regulate their inhibitory activity by inducing co-ligation of the co-receptors with BCR or some other regulatory mechanisms. Inhibitory co-receptors and their ligands are therefore good targets for controlling antibody responses and autoimmune diseases. PMID:22394175

  8. Detection of Growth-Related Quantitative Trait Loci and High-Resolution Genetic Linkage Maps Using Simple Sequence Repeat Markers in the Kelp Grouper (Epinephelus bruneus).

    PubMed

    Kessuwan, Kanonkporn; Kubota, Satoshi; Liu, Qi; Sano, Motohiko; Okamoto, Nobuaki; Sakamoto, Takashi; Yamashita, Hirofumi; Nakamura, Yoji; Ozaki, Akiyuki

    2016-02-01

    To initiate breeding programs for kelp grouper (Epinephelus bruneus), the establishment of genetic linkage maps becomes essential accompanied by the search for quantitative trait loci that may be utilized in selection programs. We constructed a high-resolution genetic linkage map using 1055 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers in an F1 family. Genome-wide and chromosome-wide significances of growth-related quantitative trait loci (QTLs) (body weight (BW) and total length (TL)) were detected using non-parametric mapping, Kruskal-Wallis (K-W) analysis, simple interval mapping (IM) and a permutation test (PT). Two stages and two families of fish were used to confirm the QTL regions. Ultimately, 714 SSR markers were matched that evenly covered the 24 linkage groups. In total, 509 and 512 markers were localized to the female and male maps, respectively. The genome lengths were approximately 1475.95 and 1370.39 cM and covered 84.68 and 83.21% of the genome, with an average interval of 4.1 and 4.0 cM, in females and males, respectively. One major QTL affecting BW and TL was found on linkage group EBR 17F that identified for 1% of the genome-wide significance and accounted for 14.6-18.9 and 14.7-18.5% of the phenotypic variance, and several putative QTL with 5% chromosome-wide significance were detected on eight linkage groups. Furthermore, the confirmed results of the regions harboring the major and putative QTLs showed consistent significant experiment-wide values of 1 and 5% as well as a chromosome-wide value of 5%. We identified growth-related QTLs that could be applied to find candidate genes for growth traits in further studies, and potentially useful in MAS breeding. PMID:26511529

  9. Detection of Growth-Related Quantitative Trait Loci and High-Resolution Genetic Linkage Maps Using Simple Sequence Repeat Markers in the Kelp Grouper (Epinephelus bruneus).

    PubMed

    Kessuwan, Kanonkporn; Kubota, Satoshi; Liu, Qi; Sano, Motohiko; Okamoto, Nobuaki; Sakamoto, Takashi; Yamashita, Hirofumi; Nakamura, Yoji; Ozaki, Akiyuki

    2016-02-01

    To initiate breeding programs for kelp grouper (Epinephelus bruneus), the establishment of genetic linkage maps becomes essential accompanied by the search for quantitative trait loci that may be utilized in selection programs. We constructed a high-resolution genetic linkage map using 1055 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers in an F1 family. Genome-wide and chromosome-wide significances of growth-related quantitative trait loci (QTLs) (body weight (BW) and total length (TL)) were detected using non-parametric mapping, Kruskal-Wallis (K-W) analysis, simple interval mapping (IM) and a permutation test (PT). Two stages and two families of fish were used to confirm the QTL regions. Ultimately, 714 SSR markers were matched that evenly covered the 24 linkage groups. In total, 509 and 512 markers were localized to the female and male maps, respectively. The genome lengths were approximately 1475.95 and 1370.39 cM and covered 84.68 and 83.21% of the genome, with an average interval of 4.1 and 4.0 cM, in females and males, respectively. One major QTL affecting BW and TL was found on linkage group EBR 17F that identified for 1% of the genome-wide significance and accounted for 14.6-18.9 and 14.7-18.5% of the phenotypic variance, and several putative QTL with 5% chromosome-wide significance were detected on eight linkage groups. Furthermore, the confirmed results of the regions harboring the major and putative QTLs showed consistent significant experiment-wide values of 1 and 5% as well as a chromosome-wide value of 5%. We identified growth-related QTLs that could be applied to find candidate genes for growth traits in further studies, and potentially useful in MAS breeding.

  10. Transforming and Tumorigenic Activity of JAK2 by Fusion to BCR: Molecular Mechanisms of Action of a Novel BCR-JAK2 Tyrosine-Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Ormazábal, Cristina; Santos-Roncero, Matilde; Galán-Díez, Marta; Steegmann, Juan Luis; Figuera, Ángela; Arranz, Eva; Vizmanos, José Luis; Bueren, Juan A.; Río, Paula; Fernández-Ruiz, Elena

    2012-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations in tumors frequently produce fusion genes coding for chimeric proteins with a key role in oncogenesis. Recent reports described a BCR-JAK2 fusion gene in fatal chronic and acute myeloid leukemia, but the functional behavior of the chimeric protein remains uncharacterized. We used fluorescence in situ hybridization and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays to describe a BCR-JAK2 fusion gene from a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The patient has been in complete remission for six years following treatment and autologous transplantation, and minimal residual disease was monitored by real-time RT-PCR. BCR-JAK2 codes for a protein containing the BCR oligomerization domain fused to the JAK2 tyrosine-kinase domain. In vitro analysis of transfected cells showed that BCR-JAK2 is located in the cytoplasm. Transduction of hematopoietic Ba/F3 cells with retroviral vectors carrying BCR-JAK2 induced IL-3-independent cell growth, constitutive activation of the chimeric protein as well as STAT5 phosphorylation and translocation to the nuclei, where Bcl-xL gene expression was elicited. Primary mouse progenitor cells transduced with BCR-JAK2 also showed increased proliferation and survival. Treatment with the JAK2 inhibitor TG101209 abrogated BCR-JAK2 and STAT5 phosphorylation, decreased Bcl-xL expression and triggered apoptosis of transformed Ba/F3 cells. Therefore, BCR-JAK2 is a novel tyrosine-kinase with transforming activity. It deregulates growth factor-dependent proliferation and cell survival, which can be abrogated by the TG101209 inhibitor. Moreover, transformed Ba/F3 cells developed tumors when injected subcutaneously into nude mice, thus proving the tumorigenic capacity of BCR-JAK2 in vivo. Together these findings suggest that adult and pediatric patients with BCR-ABL-negative leukemia and JAK2 overexpression may benefit from targeted therapies. PMID:22384256

  11. Quantitative trait loci for leaf chlorophyll fluorescence parameters, chlorophyll and carotenoid contents in relation to biomass and yield in bread wheat and their chromosome deletion bin assignments.

    PubMed

    Czyczyło-Mysza, I; Tyrka, M; Marcińska, I; Skrzypek, E; Karbarz, M; Dziurka, M; Hura, T; Dziurka, K; Quarrie, S A

    2013-06-01

    Relatively little is known of the genetic control of chlorophyll fluorescence (CF) and pigment traits important in determining efficiency of photosynthesis in wheat and its association with biomass productivity. A doubled haploid population of 94 lines from the wheat cross Chinese Spring × SQ1 was trialled under optimum glasshouse conditions for 4 years to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) for CF traits including, for the first time in wheat, JIP-test parameters per excited cross section (CSm): ABS/CSm, DIo/CSm, TRo/CSm, RC/CSm and ETo/CSm, key parameters determining efficiency of the photosynthetic apparatus, as well as chlorophyll and carotenoid contents to establish associations with biomass and grain yield. The existing genetic map was extended to 920 loci by adding Diversity Arrays Technology markers. Markers and selected genes for photosynthetic light reactions, pigment metabolism and biomass accumulation were located to chromosome deletion bins. Across all CF traits and years, 116 QTL for CF were located on all chromosomes except 7B, and 39 QTL were identified for pigments on the majority of chromosomes, excluding 1A, 2A, 4A, 3B, 5B, 1D, 2D, 5D, 6D and 7D. Thirty QTL for plant productivity traits were mapped on chromosomes 3A, 5A, 6A, 7A, 1B, 2B, 4B, 6B, 7B, 3D and 4D. A region on chromosome 6B was identified where 14 QTL for CF parameters coincided with QTL for chlorophyll content and grain weight per ear. Thirty-five QTL regions were coincident with candidate genes. The environment was shown to dominate in determining expression of genes for those traits.

  12. Systems-wide analysis of BCR signalosomes and downstream phosphorylation and ubiquitylation

    PubMed Central

    Satpathy, Shankha; Wagner, Sebastian A; Beli, Petra; Gupta, Rajat; Kristiansen, Trine A; Malinova, Dessislava; Francavilla, Chiara; Tolar, Pavel; Bishop, Gail A; Hostager, Bruce S; Choudhary, Chunaram

    2015-01-01

    B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling is essential for the development and function of B cells; however, the spectrum of proteins involved in BCR signaling is not fully known. Here we used quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics to monitor the dynamics of BCR signaling complexes (signalosomes) and to investigate the dynamics of downstream phosphorylation and ubiquitylation signaling. We identify most of the previously known components of BCR signaling, as well as many proteins that have not yet been implicated in this system. BCR activation leads to rapid tyrosine phosphorylation and ubiquitylation of the receptor-proximal signaling components, many of which are co-regulated by both the modifications. We illustrate the power of multilayered proteomic analyses for discovering novel BCR signaling components by demonstrating that BCR-induced phosphorylation of RAB7A at S72 prevents its association with effector proteins and with endo-lysosomal compartments. In addition, we show that BCL10 is modified by LUBAC-mediated linear ubiquitylation, and demonstrate an important function of LUBAC in BCR-induced NF-κB signaling. Our results offer a global and integrated view of BCR signaling, and the provided datasets can serve as a valuable resource for further understanding BCR signaling networks. PMID:26038114

  13. Heterosis for Biomass-Related Traits in Arabidopsis Investigated by Quantitative Trait Loci Analysis of the Triple Testcross Design With Recombinant Inbred Lines

    PubMed Central

    Kusterer, Barbara; Piepho, Hans-Peter; Utz, H. Friedrich; Schön, Chris C.; Muminovic, Jasmina; Meyer, Rhonda C.; Altmann, Thomas; Melchinger, Albrecht E.

    2007-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana has emerged as a leading model species in plant genetics and functional genomics including research on the genetic causes of heterosis. We applied a triple testcross (TTC) design and a novel biometrical approach to identify and characterize quantitative trait loci (QTL) for heterosis of five biomass-related traits by (i) estimating the number, genomic positions, and genetic effects of heterotic QTL, (ii) characterizing their mode of gene action, and (iii) testing for presence of epistatic effects by a genomewide scan and marker × marker interactions. In total, 234 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) of Arabidopsis hybrid C24 × Col-0 were crossed to both parental lines and their F1 and analyzed with 110 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers. QTL analyses were conducted using linear transformations Z1, Z2, and Z3 calculated from the adjusted entry means of TTC progenies. With Z1, we detected 12 QTL displaying augmented additive effects. With Z2, we mapped six QTL for augmented dominance effects. A one-dimensional genome scan with Z3 revealed two genomic regions with significantly negative dominance × additive epistatic effects. Two-way analyses of variance between marker pairs revealed nine digenic epistatic interactions: six reflecting dominance × dominance effects with variable sign and three reflecting additive × additive effects with positive sign. We conclude that heterosis for biomass-related traits in Arabidopsis has a polygenic basis with overdominance and/or epistasis being presumably the main types of gene action. PMID:18039885

  14. Subcellular localization of Bcr, Abl, and Bcr-Abl proteins in normal and leukemic cells and correlation of expression with myeloid differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Wetzler, M; Talpaz, M; Van Etten, R A; Hirsh-Ginsberg, C; Beran, M; Kurzrock, R

    1993-01-01

    We used specific antisera and immunohistochemical methods to investigate the subcellular localization and expression of Bcr, Abl, and Bcr-Abl proteins in leukemic cell lines and in fresh human leukemic and normal samples at various stages of myeloid differentiation. Earlier studies of the subcellular localization of transfected murine type IV c-Abl protein in fibroblasts have shown that this molecule resides largely in the nucleus, whereas transforming deletion variants are localized exclusively in the cytoplasm. Here, we demonstrate that the murine type IV c-Abl protein is also found in the nucleus when overexpressed in a mouse hematopoietic cell line. However, in both normal and leukemic human hematopoietic cells, c-Abl is discerned predominantly in the cytoplasm, with nuclear staining present, albeit at a lower level. In contrast, normal endogenous Bcr protein, as well as the aberrant p210BCR-ABL and p190BCR-ABL proteins consistently localize to the cytoplasm in both cell lines and fresh cells. The results with p210BCR-ABL were confirmed in a unique Ph1-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cell line, KBM5, which lacks the normal chromosome 9 and hence the normal c-Abl product. Because the p210BCR-ABL protein appears cytoplasmic in both chronic phase and blast crisis CML cells, as does the p190BCR-ABL in Ph1-positive acute leukemia, a change in subcellular location of Bcr-Abl proteins between cytoplasm and nucleus cannot explain the different spectrum of leukemias associated with p210 and p190, nor the transition from the chronic to the acute leukemia phenotype seen in CML. Further analysis of fresh CML and normal hematopoietic bone marrow cells reveals that p210BCR-ABL, as well as the normal Bcr and Abl proteins, are expressed primarily in the early stages of myeloid maturation, and that levels of expression are reduced significantly as the cells mature to polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Similarly, a decrease in Bcr and Abl levels occurs in HL-60 cells

  15. Transgenic expression of Spi-C impairs B-cell development and function by affecting genes associated with BCR signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiang; Schweitzer, Brock L; Romer, Eric J; Sulentic, Courtney E W; DeKoter, Rodney P

    2008-09-01

    Spi-C is an Ets family transcription factor closely related to PU.1 and Spi-B. Expression of Spi-C is developmentally regulated in the B-cell lineage, but its function remains unknown. To determine the function of Spi-C in B-cell development, we generated mice expressing a B-cell-specific Spi-C transgene under the control of the IgH intronic enhancer. Spi-C transgenic mice had 50% fewer B cells than wild-type littermates. Flow cytometric analyses showed that splenic transitional B cells and bone marrow pre-B or immature B cells from transgenic mice were dramatically reduced compared with those of wild type. Both nonspecific and Ag-specific serum IgM levels were significantly increased in transgenic mice, while serum IgG levels were significantly decreased compared with wild type. Spi-C transgenic B cells proliferated poorly after stimulation by anti-IgM or anti-CD40 in vitro, although they responded normally to LPS stimulation. Using real-time RT-PCR, we found that several BCR signaling-related mediators were downregulated at pre-B-cell and mature B-cell stages in transgenic mice, while an inhibitor of BCR signaling was upregulated. Taken together, these data indicate that ectopic expression of Spi-C can impair B-cell development and function by affecting genes associated with BCR signaling.

  16. Coexpression network analysis in abdominal and gluteal adipose tissue reveals regulatory genetic loci for metabolic syndrome and related phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Min, Josine L; Nicholson, George; Halgrimsdottir, Ingileif; Almstrup, Kristian; Petri, Andreas; Barrett, Amy; Travers, Mary; Rayner, Nigel W; Mägi, Reedik; Pettersson, Fredrik H; Broxholme, John; Neville, Matt J; Wills, Quin F; Cheeseman, Jane; Allen, Maxine; Holmes, Chris C; Spector, Tim D; Fleckner, Jan; McCarthy, Mark I; Karpe, Fredrik; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Zondervan, Krina T

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) is highly prevalent and has considerable public health impact, but its underlying genetic factors remain elusive. To identify gene networks involved in MetS, we conducted whole-genome expression and genotype profiling on abdominal (ABD) and gluteal (GLU) adipose tissue, and whole blood (WB), from 29 MetS cases and 44 controls. Co-expression network analysis for each tissue independently identified nine, six, and zero MetS-associated modules of coexpressed genes in ABD, GLU, and WB, respectively. Of 8,992 probesets expressed in ABD or GLU, 685 (7.6%) were expressed in ABD and 51 (0.6%) in GLU only. Differential eigengene network analysis of 8,256 shared probesets detected 22 shared modules with high preservation across adipose depots (D(ABD-GLU) = 0.89), seven of which were associated with MetS (FDR P<0.01). The strongest associated module, significantly enriched for immune response-related processes, contained 94/620 (15%) genes with inter-depot differences. In an independent cohort of 145/141 twins with ABD and WB longitudinal expression data, median variability in ABD due to familiality was greater for MetS-associated versus un-associated modules (ABD: 0.48 versus 0.18, P = 0.08; GLU: 0.54 versus 0.20, P = 7.8×10(-4)). Cis-eQTL analysis of probesets associated with MetS (FDR P<0.01) and/or inter-depot differences (FDR P<0.01) provided evidence for 32 eQTLs. Corresponding eSNPs were tested for association with MetS-related phenotypes in two GWAS of >100,000 individuals; rs10282458, affecting expression of RARRES2 (encoding chemerin), was associated with body mass index (BMI) (P = 6.0×10(-4)); and rs2395185, affecting inter-depot differences of HLA-DRB1 expression, was associated with high-density lipoprotein (P = 8.7×10(-4)) and BMI-adjusted waist-to-hip ratio (P = 2.4×10(-4)). Since many genes and their interactions influence complex traits such as MetS, integrated analysis of genotypes and coexpression

  17. Tyrosinase and tyrosinase related protein 1 alleles specify domestic cat coat color phenotypes of the albino and brown loci.

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Küntzel, A; Eizirik, E; O'Brien, S J; Menotti-Raymond, M

    2005-01-01

    The genes encoding enzymes of the tyrosinase family are strong candidates for coat color variation in mammals. To investigate their influence in domestic cat coat color, we determined the complete nucleotide coding sequence of the domestic cat genes tyrosinase (TYR)--a plausible candidate gene for the albino (C) locus, and tyrosinase related protein 1 (TYRP1)--a candidate gene for the brown (B) locus. Sequence variants between individuals exhibiting variation in pigmentation were submitted to association studies. In TYR, two nonsynonymous substitutions encoding TYR-G301R and TYR-G227W were associated with the siamese and burmese phenotypes of the albino locus, respectively. TYRP1 was mapped on chromosome D4 within 5 cM of a highly polymorphic microsatellite, previously found to be fixed in a cat breed selected for the chocolate (b) allele of the B locus, which reinforced TYRP1 as a candidate gene for the B locus in the domestic cat. Two DNA polymorphisms, one leading to a TYRP1-A3G substitution in the signal peptide and another to an in-frame insertion TYRP1-421ins17/18 caused by a donor splice site mutation in intron 6, were associated with the chocolate (b) allele. A premature UAG stop codon at position 100 of TYRP1 was associated with a second allele of the B locus, cinnamon (b(l)). The results provide very strong evidence that the specific nucleotide variants of feline TYR (chromosome D1) are causative of the siamese (c(s)) and burmese (c(b)) alleles of the albino locus, as well as nucleotide variants of TYRP1 (chromosome D4) as specifying the chocolate (b) and cinnamon (b(l)) alleles of the B locus.

  18. 9;22 translocation and bcr rearrangements in chronic myelocytic leukemia patients among atomic bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, K; Takechi, M; Hong, J; Shigeta, C; Oguma, N; Kamada, N; Takimoto, Y; Kuramoto, A; Dohy, H; Kyo, T

    1989-12-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of leukemia induced by radiation, we studied both chromosome abnormalities and bcr rearrangements of seven CML patients with a history of atomic bomb exposure and 14 CML patients without the exposure. All patients, irrespective of radiation exposure, had 9;22 translocation and rearrangement of the bcr gene in the leukemic cells. Further analysis of breakpoints within the bcr gene demonstrated no distinct difference between the exposed and the non-exposed groups. The present study suggests that formation of the chimeric bcr-abl gene and its genetic products may play an important role in the development of leukemia in either radiation-induced or de novo CML.

  19. A Genome-Wide Association Study Suggests Novel Loci Associated with a Schizophrenia-Related Brain-Based Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Hass, Johanna; Walton, Esther; Kirsten, Holger; Liu, Jingyu; Priebe, Lutz; Wolf, Christiane; Karbalai, Nazanin; Gollub, Randy; White, Tonya; Roessner, Veit; Müller, Kathrin U.; Paus, Tomas; Smolka, Michael N.; Schumann, Gunter; Scholz, Markus; Cichon, Sven; Calhoun, Vince; Ehrlich, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Patients with schizophrenia and their siblings typically show subtle changes of brain structures, such as a reduction of hippocampal volume. Hippocampal volume is heritable, may explain a variety of cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia and is thus considered an intermediate phenotype for this mental illness. The aim of our analyses was to identify single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) related to hippocampal volume without making prior assumptions about possible candidate genes. In this study, we combined genetics, imaging and neuropsychological data obtained from the Mind Clinical Imaging Consortium study of schizophrenia (n = 328). A total of 743,591 SNPs were tested for association with hippocampal volume in a genome-wide association study. Gene expression profiles of human hippocampal tissue were investigated for gene regions of significantly associated SNPs. None of the genetic markers reached genome-wide significance. However, six highly correlated SNPs (rs4808611, rs35686037, rs12982178, rs1042178, rs10406920, rs8170) on chromosome 19p13.11, located within or in close proximity to the genes NR2F6, USHBP1, and BABAM1, as well as four SNPs in three other genomic regions (chromosome 1, 2 and 10) had p-values between 6.75×10−6 and 8.3×10−7. Using existing data of a very recently published GWAS of hippocampal volume and additional data of a multicentre study in a large cohort of adolescents of European ancestry, we found supporting evidence for our results. Furthermore, allelic differences in rs4808611 and rs8170 were highly associated with differential mRNA expression in the cis-acting region. Associations with memory functioning indicate a possible functional importance of the identified risk variants. Our findings provide new insights into the genetic architecture of a brain structure closely linked to schizophrenia. In silico replication, mRNA expression and cognitive data provide additional support for the relevance of our findings. Identification of

  20. Molecular dynamics reveal BCR-ABL1 polymutants as a unique mechanism of resistance to PAN-BCR-ABL1 kinase inhibitor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, Don L.; Pricl, Sabrina; Posocco, Paola; Laurini, Erik; Fermeglia, Maurizio; Sun, Hanshi; Talpaz, Moshe; Donato, Nicholas; Quintás-Cardama, Alfonso

    2014-01-01

    The acquisition of mutations within the BCR-ABL1 kinase domain is frequently associated with tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) failure in chronic myeloid leukemia. Sensitive sequencing techniques have revealed a high prevalence of compound BCR-ABL1 mutations (polymutants) in patients failing TKI therapy. To investigate the molecular consequences of such complex mutant proteins with regards to TKI resistance, we determined by cloning techniques the presence of polymutants in a cohort of chronic-phase patients receiving imatinib followed by dasatinib therapy. The analysis revealed a high frequency of polymutant BCR-ABL1 alleles even after failure of frontline imatinib, and also the progressive exhaustion of the pool of unmutated BCR-ABL1 alleles over the course of sequential TKI therapy. Molecular dynamics analyses of the most frequent polymutants in complex with TKIs revealed the basis of TKI resistance. Modeling of BCR-ABL1 in complex with the potent pan-BCR-ABL1 TKI ponatinib highlighted potentially effective therapeutic strategies for patients carrying these recalcitrant and complex BCR-ABL1 mutant proteins while unveiling unique mechanisms of escape to ponatinib therapy. PMID:24550512

  1. Quantitative Trait Loci for Yield and Yield-Related Traits in Spring Barley Populations Derived from Crosses between European and Syrian Cultivars.

    PubMed

    Mikołajczak, Krzysztof; Ogrodowicz, Piotr; Gudyś, Kornelia; Krystkowiak, Karolina; Sawikowska, Aneta; Frohmberg, Wojciech; Górny, Andrzej; Kędziora, Andrzej; Jankowiak, Janusz; Józefczyk, Damian; Karg, Grzegorz; Andrusiak, Joanna; Krajewski, Paweł; Szarejko, Iwona; Surma, Maria; Adamski, Tadeusz; Guzy-Wróbelska, Justyna; Kuczyńska, Anetta

    2016-01-01

    In response to climatic changes, breeding programmes should be aimed at creating new cultivars with improved resistance to water scarcity. The objective of this study was to examine the yield potential of barley recombinant inbred lines (RILs) derived from three cross-combinations of European and Syrian spring cultivars, and to identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for yield-related traits in these populations. RILs were evaluated in field experiments over a period of three years (2011 to 2013) and genotyped with simple sequence repeat (SSR) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers; a genetic map for each population was constructed and then one consensus map was developed. Biological interpretation of identified QTLs was achieved by reference to Ensembl Plants barley gene space. Twelve regions in the genomes of studied RILs were distinguished after QTL analysis. Most of the QTLs were identified on the 2H chromosome, which was the hotspot region in all three populations. Syrian parental cultivars contributed alleles decreasing traits' values at majority of QTLs for grain weight, grain number, spike length and time to heading, and numerous alleles increasing stem length. The phenomic and molecular approaches distinguished the lines with an acceptable grain yield potential combining desirable features or alleles from their parents, that is, early heading from the Syrian breeding line (Cam/B1/CI08887//CI05761) and short plant stature from the European semidwarf cultivar (Maresi). PMID:27227880

  2. Quantitative Trait Loci for Yield and Yield-Related Traits in Spring Barley Populations Derived from Crosses between European and Syrian Cultivars

    PubMed Central

    Krystkowiak, Karolina; Sawikowska, Aneta; Frohmberg, Wojciech; Górny, Andrzej; Kędziora, Andrzej; Jankowiak, Janusz; Józefczyk, Damian; Karg, Grzegorz; Andrusiak, Joanna; Krajewski, Paweł; Szarejko, Iwona; Surma, Maria; Adamski, Tadeusz; Guzy-Wróbelska, Justyna; Kuczyńska, Anetta

    2016-01-01

    In response to climatic changes, breeding programmes should be aimed at creating new cultivars with improved resistance to water scarcity. The objective of this study was to examine the yield potential of barley recombinant inbred lines (RILs) derived from three cross-combinations of European and Syrian spring cultivars, and to identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for yield-related traits in these populations. RILs were evaluated in field experiments over a period of three years (2011 to 2013) and genotyped with simple sequence repeat (SSR) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers; a genetic map for each population was constructed and then one consensus map was developed. Biological interpretation of identified QTLs was achieved by reference to Ensembl Plants barley gene space. Twelve regions in the genomes of studied RILs were distinguished after QTL analysis. Most of the QTLs were identified on the 2H chromosome, which was the hotspot region in all three populations. Syrian parental cultivars contributed alleles decreasing traits' values at majority of QTLs for grain weight, grain number, spike length and time to heading, and numerous alleles increasing stem length. The phenomic and molecular approaches distinguished the lines with an acceptable grain yield potential combining desirable features or alleles from their parents, that is, early heading from the Syrian breeding line (Cam/B1/CI08887//CI05761) and short plant stature from the European semidwarf cultivar (Maresi). PMID:27227880

  3. Measurement of adherence to BCR-ABL inhibitor therapy in chronic myeloid leukemia: current situation and future challenges

    PubMed Central

    Noens, Lucien; Hensen, Marja; Kucmin-Bemelmans, Izabela; Lofgren, Christina; Gilloteau, Isabelle; Vrijens, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    BCR-ABL inhibitors for treating chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase have transformed a previously incurable malignancy into a manageable condition. However, suboptimal medication adherence has been observed with these agents affecting clinical outcomes and healthcare costs. In order to raise awareness of the problem of adherence, and before developing pragmatic strategies to enhance medication adherence, a deep understanding of the best approaches for measuring adherence in chronic myeloid leukemia patients and identifying non-adherence is required. A systematic literature review on the prevalence, measurement methods, consequences and risk factors for non-adherence to BCR-ABL inhibitors and adherence-enhancing interventions was performed and critically appraised. Of the 19 included articles, 9 were retrospective. Average adherence varied from 19% to almost 100% of the proportion of prescribed drug taken, but it was measured through various different methods and within different study groups. Suboptimal adherence was associated with a negative impact on both clinical and economic outcomes. There is a lack of supportive evidence demonstrating a difference in adherence across BCR-ABL inhibitors and even contradictory results between the 2nd generation inhibitors. Drug-related adverse events and forgetfulness were common reasons for intentional and unintentional non-adherence, respectively, but further research is required to identify additional reasons behind non-adherence or patients at risk of non-adherence. Non-adherence in chronic myeloid leukemia patients treated with BCR-ABL inhibitors is common and associated with critical outcomes. However, this review highlights important existing gaps, reveals inconsistent definitions, and a lack of standardized methods for measuring adherence in chronic myeloid leukemia. All require further investigation. PMID:24598855

  4. UAP56 is a novel interacting partner of Bcr in regulating vascular smooth muscle cell DNA synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Sahni, Abha; Wang, Nadan; Alexis, Jeffrey D.

    2012-04-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UAP56 is an important regulator of DNA synthesis in vascular smooth muscle cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UAP56 binds to Bcr. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interaction between Bcr and UAP56 is critical for Bcr induced DNA synthesis. -- Abstract: Bcr is a serine/threonine kinase that is a critical regulator of vascular smooth muscle cell inflammation and proliferation. We have previously demonstrated that Bcr acts in part via phosphorylation and inhibition of PPAR{gamma}. We have identified the RNA helicase UAP56 as another substrate of Bcr. In this report we demonstrate that knockdown of UAP56 blocks Bcr induced DNA synthesis in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). We also found that over expression of Bcr increased the expression of cyclin E and decreased the expression of p27. Knockdown of UAP56 reversed the effect of Bcr on cyclin E and p27 expression. Furthermore, we found that Bcr binds to UAP56 and demonstrate that binding of UAP56 to Bcr is critical for Bcr induced DNA synthesis in VSMC. Our data identify UAP56 as an important binding partner of Bcr and a novel target for inhibiting vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation.

  5. Prostaglandin EP4 receptor enhances BCR-induced apoptosis of immature B cells.

    PubMed

    Prijatelj, Matevz; Celhar, Teja; Mlinaric-Rascan, Irena

    2011-08-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is emerging as an important co-modulator of B cell responses. Using a pharmacological approach, we aimed to delineate the role of PGE2 in B cell receptor (BCR) induced apoptosis of immature B cells. Gene and protein expression analyses showed that, of the four PGE2 receptors subtypes, only EP4 receptor is upregulated upon BCR cross-linking, leading to sensitization of WEHI 231 cells towards PGE2 mediated inhibitory effects. EP4 receptor antagonist ONO-AE3-208, was able to completely revert the observed effects of PGE2. The engagement of EP4 receptor promotes BCR-induced G0/G1 arrest of WEHI 231 cells, resulting in enhanced caspase mediated, BCR-induced apoptosis. We addressed, mechanistically, the interplay between BCR and EP4 receptor signaling components. Prostaglandin1-alcohol (Pge1-OH), a selective EP4 receptor agonist inhibits BCR-induced activation of NF-κB by suppression of BCR-induced IκBα phosphorylation. Disruption of prosurvival pathways is a possible mechanism by which PGE2 enhances BCR-induced apoptosis in immature B lymphocytes.

  6. Beneficial effects of combining nilotinib and imatinib in preclinical models of BCR-ABL+ leukemias

    PubMed Central

    Weisberg, Ellen; Catley, Laurie; Wright, Renee D.; Moreno, Daisy; Banerji, Lolita; Ray, Arghya; Manley, Paul W.; Mestan, Juergen; Fabbro, Doriano; Jiang, Jingrui; Hall-Meyers, Elizabeth; Callahan, Linda; DellaGatta, Jamie L.; Kung, Andrew L.

    2007-01-01

    Drug resistance resulting from emergence of imatinib-resistant BCR-ABL point mutations is a significant problem in advanced-stage chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). The BCR-ABL inhibitor, nilotinib (AMN107), is significantly more potent against BCR-ABL than imatinib, and is active against many imatinib-resistant BCR-ABL mutants. Phase 1/2 clinical trials show that nilotinib can induce remissions in patients who have previously failed imatinib, indicating that sequential therapy with these 2 agents has clinical value. However, simultaneous, rather than sequential, administration of 2 BCR-ABL kinase inhibitors is attractive for many reasons, including the theoretical possibility that this could reduce emergence of drug-resistant clones. Here, we show that exposure of a variety of BCR-ABL+ cell lines to imatinib and nilotinib results in additive or synergistic cytotoxicity, including testing of a large panel of cells expressing BCR-ABL point mutations causing resistance to imatinib in patients. Further, using a highly quantifiable bioluminescent in vivo model, drug combinations were at least additive in antileukemic activity, compared with each drug alone. These results suggest that despite binding to the same site in the same target kinase, the combination of imatinib and nilotinib is highly efficacious in these models, indicating that clinical testing of combinations of BCR-ABL kinase inhibitors is warranted. PMID:17068153

  7. Expression Quantitative Trait Loci for CARD8 Contributes to Risk of Two Infection-Related Cancers—Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hang, Dong; Han, Jing; Jiang, Jie; Song, Ci; Liu, Yao; Liu, Jibin; Liu, Li; Zhu, Liguo; Chen, Jianguo; Zhai, Xiangjun; Xie, Shuanghua; Hu, Zhibin; Shen, Hongbing; Dai, Min; Li, Ni

    2015-01-01

    Caspase recruitment domain family, member 8 (CARD8) can coordinate innate and adaptive immune responses and sensitize cells to apoptosis, which may participate in tumorigenesis of virus-induced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and cervical cancer. By bioinformatics analyses, we identified several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within a new identified long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) as expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) for CARD8. In this study, we therefore hypothesized that CARD8 eQTLs SNPs within lncRNA may influence the risk of HCC and cervical cancer. We performed two independent case-control studies of 1,300 cases with HBV-positive HCC and 1,344 normal controls, together with 1,486 cervical cancer patients and 1,536 control subjects to test the association between eQTLs SNP (rs7248320) for CARD8 and the risk of HCC and cervical cancer. The variant genotype of rs7248320 was significantly associated with increased risk of HCC and cervical cancer [GG vs. AA/GA: adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 1.28, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.03–1.61, P = 0.028 for HCC; adjusted OR = 1.34, 95% CI = 1.09–1.66, P = 0.006 for cervical cancer]. Moreover, the effect of rs7248320 on cervical cancer risk was more prominent in premenopausal women. Further interactive analysis detected a significantly multiplicative interaction between rs7248320 and menopausal status on cervical cancer risk (P = 0.018). These findings suggest that CARD8 eQTLs SNP may serve as a susceptibility marker for virus-related HCC and cervical cancer. PMID:26147888

  8. Anaerobic Biochemical Reactor (BCR) Treatment Of Mining-Influenced Water (MIW) - Investigation Of Metal Removal Efficiency and Ecotoxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    BCR have been successful at removing a high percentage of metals from MIW, while BCR effluent toxicity has not been examined previously in the field. This study examined 4 active pilot BCR systems for removal of metals and toxicity. Removal efficiency for Al, As, Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb...

  9. Grouper (Epinephelus coioides) BCR signaling pathway was involved in response against Cryptocaryon irritans infection.

    PubMed

    Mo, Ze-Quan; Yang, Man; Wang, Hai-Qing; Xu, Yang; Huang, Mian-Zhi; Lao, Guo-Feng; Li, Yan-Wei; Li, An-Xing; Luo, Xiao-Chun; Dan, Xue-Ming

    2016-10-01

    B cell antigen receptor (BCR) plays a crucial role in B cell development and antibody production. It comprises membrane immunoglobulin non-covalently associated with CD79a/CD79b heterodimer. After B cell activation, initial extracellular signals are transduced by BCR complex and amplified by two protein tyrosine kinases, LYN and SYK, which then trigger various pathways. In the present study, we cloned grouper genes for BCR accessory molecules, EcCD79a (669 bp) and EcCD79b (639 bp), as well as two protein tyrosine kinases, EcLYN (1482 bp) and EcSYK (1854 bp). Homology analysis showed that all four molecules had a relatively high amino acid identity compared with those in other animals. Among them, they all shared the highest identity with Takifugu rubripes (EcCD79a 49%, EcCD79b 52%, EcLYN 82% and EcSYK 77%). The conserved features and important functional residues were analyzed. Together with IgM and IgT, tissue distribution analysis showed that all six molecules were mainly expressed in immune organs, particularly systematic immune organs. In groupers infected with Cryptocaryon irritans, up-regulation of EcCD79a and b, EcIgM and EcIgT were not seen in the early stage skin and gill until 14-21 days. Up-regulation of EcCD79a was seen in head kidney at most time points, while EcCD79a and b were only significantly up-regulated in day 14 spleen. Significant up-regulation of EcIgT were seen in day 21 head kidney and day 1, day14 spleen. Significant up-regulation of EcIgM were seen in day 1 head kidney and 12 h spleen. In addition, two protein kinase genes, EcLYN and EcSYK, were up-regulated in the skin at most time points, which suggested that B cells may be activated at the skin local infection site. PMID:27514788

  10. Characterization of microsatellite loci isolated in trumpeter swan (Cygnus buccinator)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    John, J. St; Ransler, F.A.; Quinn, T.W.; Oyler-McCance, S.J.

    2006-01-01

    Primers for 16 microsatellite loci were developed for the trumpeter swan (Cygnus buccinator), a species recovering from a recent population bottleneck. In a screen of 158 individuals, the 16 loci were found to have levels of variability ranging from two to seven alleles. No loci were found to be linked, although two loci repeatedly revealed significant departures from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Amplification in the closely related tundra swan (Cygnus columbianus) was successful for all except one locus. These microsatellite loci will be applicable for population genetic analyses and ultimately aid in management efforts. ?? 2006 The Authors.

  11. Nine susceptibility loci for hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma identified by a pilot two-stage genome-wide association study

    PubMed Central

    QU, LI-SHUAI; JIN, FEI; GUO, YAN-MEI; LIU, TAO-TAO; XUE, RU-YI; HUANG, XIAO-WU; XU, MIN; CHEN, TAO-YANG; NI, ZHENG-PING; SHEN, XI-ZHONG

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that complex interactions among viral, environmental and genetic factors lead to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). To identify susceptibility alleles for hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related HCC, the present study conducted a pilot two-phase genome-wide association study (GWAS) in 660 Han Chinese individuals. In phase 1, a total of 500,447 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped in 50 HCC cases and 50 controls using Affymetrix GeneChip 500k Array Set. In phase 2, 1,152 SNPs were selected from phase 1 and genotyped in 282 cases and 278 controls using the Illumina GoldenGate platform. The prior probability of HCC in control subjects was assigned at 0.01, and false-positive report probability (FPRP) was utilized to evaluate the statistical significance. In phase 1, one SNP (rs2212522) showed a significant association with HCC (Pallele=5.23×10−8; ORallele=4.96; 95% CI, 2.72–9.03). In phase 2, among 27 SNPs with unadjusted Pallele<0.05, 9 SNPs were associated with HCC based on FPRP criteria (FPRP <0.20). The strongest statistical evidence for an association signal was with rs2120243 (combined ORallele=1.76; 95% CI, 1.39–2.22; P=2.00×10−6), which maps within the fourth intron of VEPH1. The second strongest statistical evidence for an association was identified for rs1350171 (combined ORallele=1.66; 95% CI, 1.33–2.07; P=6.48×10−6), which maps to the region downstream of the FZD4 gene. The other potential susceptibility genes included PCDH9, PRMT6, LHX1, KIF2B and L3MBTL4. In conclusion, this pilot two-phase GWAS provides the evidence for the existence of common susceptibility loci for HCC. These genes involved various signaling pathways, including those associated with transforming growth factor β, insulin/phosphoinositide 3 kinase, Wnt and epidermal growth factor receptor. These associations must be replicated and validated in larger studies. PMID:26870257

  12. BCR-JAK2 fusion in a myeloproliferative neoplasm with associated eosinophilia.

    PubMed

    He, Rong; Greipp, Patricia T; Rangan, Aruna; Mai, Ming; Chen, Dong; Reichard, Kaaren K; Nelsen, Laura L; Pardanani, Animesh; Hanson, Curtis A; Viswanatha, David S

    2016-05-01

    Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) is located on chromosome 9 at band p24 and JAK2V617F is the most common mutation in Philadelphia chromosome-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (Ph-MPN). However, rearrangement of JAK2 is a rare event. We report a case of myeloproliferative neoplasm, unclassifiable (MPN-U) with BCR-JAK2 fusion confirmed by molecular studies. Conventional chromosome analysis (CC) revealed t(9;22)(p24;q11.2) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) showed a JAK2 gene rearrangement in 88% of interphase nuclei. The BCR-JAK2 fusion was confirmed by multiplex reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and demonstrated two in-frame 5'BCR/3'JAK2 transcripts with BCR exon 1 juxtaposed to JAK2 exon 15 and exon 17, respectively. Our results, together with literature review, reveal BCR-JAK2 fusions as oncogenic genetic alterations that are associated with myeloid or lymphoid neoplasms and are frequently characterized by eosinophilia. Further, patients with BCR-JAK2 are candidates for JAK2 inhibitor therapy. Given the distinct clinical and pathological characteristics, we believe that hematological neoplasms harboring BCR-JAK2 should be included as an additional distinct entity to the current WHO category of "myeloid and lymphoid neoplasms with eosinophilia and abnormalities of PDGFRA, PDGFRB, or FGFR", and testing for a JAK2 fusion should be pursued in neoplasms with a karyotypic 9p24 abnormality. PMID:27134074

  13. Multilevel selection of bcrABDR-mediated bacitracin resistance in Enterococcus faecalis from chicken farms

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mu-Ya; Lira, Felipe; Liang, Hua-Qing; Wu, Rui-Ting; Duan, Jia-Hong; Liao, Xiao-Ping; Martínez, José L.; Liu, Ya-Hong; Sun, Jian

    2016-01-01

    In this study we isolated 109 Enterococcus faecalis from chicken faecal samples in 6 provinces of China to investigate the prevalence and transmission mechanism of the bacitracin resistance locus bcrABDR in E. faecalis. Thirty-seven bcrABDR-positive E. faecalis were detected with 26 different PFGE clusters. The MLST of 14 positive strains belonged to ST16 and we also detected three new sequence types. S1-PFGE analysis indicated that the locus was located on plasmids presenting different sizes, with the most prevalent size being ~50 kb (13/37). Sequence analysis revealed that 17 out of the 37 strains harbored a 5400-bp central region, in which locus bcrABDR was bracketed by two ISEnfa1 of the same orientation. Two types of bcrABDR alleles, differing in around 10% of their sequence were found. In silico analysis showed that bcrABDR is present in a variety of bacteria including the chicken commensal Enterococcus cecorum. Our results indicate that the use of bacitracin at farms might trigger the emergence and spread of the bacitracin resistance determinant bcrABDR among human bacterial pathogens. The finding of bcrABDR in the chicken commensal E. cecorum indicates that farm animals microbiota can be an important reservoir of resistance genes with relevance for human health. PMID:27731342

  14. BCR/ABL stimulates WRN to promote survival and genomic instability

    PubMed Central

    Slupianek, Artur; Poplawski, Tomasz; Jozwiakowski, Stanislaw K.; Cramer, Kimberly; Pytel, Dariusz; Stoczynska, Ewelina; Nowicki, Michal O.; Blasiak, Janusz; Skorski, Tomasz

    2010-01-01

    BCR/ABL-transformed chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cells accumulate numerous DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and genotoxic agents. To repair these lesions BCR/ABL stimulate unfaithful DSB repair pathways, homologous recombination repair (HRR), non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) and single-strand annealing (SSA). Here we show that BCR/ABL enhances the expression and increase nuclear localization of WRN (mutated in Werner syndrome), which is required for processing DSB ends during the repair. Other fusion tyrosine kinases (FTKs) such as TEL/ABL, TEL/JAK2, TEL/PDGFβR, and NPM/ALK also elevate WRN. BCR/ABL induces WRN mRNA and protein expression in part by c-MYC -mediated activation of transcription and Bcl-xL –dependent inhibition of caspase-dependent cleavage, respectively. WRN is in complex with BCR/ABL resulting in WRN tyrosine phosphorylation and stimulation of its helicase and exonuclease activities. Activated WRN protects BCR/ABL-positive cells from the lethal effect of oxidative and genotoxic stresses, which causes DSBs. In addition, WRN promotes unfaithful recombination-dependent repair mechanisms HRR and SSA, and enhances the loss of DNA bases during NHEJ in leukemia cells. In summary, we postulate that BCR/ABL-mediated stimulation of WRN modulates the efficiency and fidelity of major DSB repair mechanisms to protect leukemia cells from apoptosis and to facilitate genomic instability. PMID:21123451

  15. BCR/ABL stimulates WRN to promote survival and genomic instability.

    PubMed

    Slupianek, Artur; Poplawski, Tomasz; Jozwiakowski, Stanislaw K; Cramer, Kimberly; Pytel, Dariusz; Stoczynska, Ewelina; Nowicki, Michal O; Blasiak, Janusz; Skorski, Tomasz

    2011-02-01

    BCR/ABL-transformed chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cells accumulate numerous DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and genotoxic agents. To repair these lesions BCR/ABL stimulate unfaithful DSB repair pathways, homologous recombination repair (HRR), nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ), and single-strand annealing (SSA). Here, we show that BCR/ABL enhances the expression and increase nuclear localization of WRN (mutated in Werner syndrome), which is required for processing DSB ends during the repair. Other fusion tyrosine kinases (FTK), such as TEL/ABL, TEL/JAK2, TEL/PDGFβR, and NPM/ALK also elevate WRN. BCR/ABL induces WRN mRNA and protein expression in part by c-MYC-mediated activation of transcription and Bcl-xL-dependent inhibition of caspase-dependent cleavage, respectively. WRN is in complex with BCR/ABL resulting in WRN tyrosine phosphorylation and stimulation of its helicase and exonuclease activities. Activated WRN protects BCR/ABL-positive cells from the lethal effect of oxidative and genotoxic stresses, which causes DSBs. In addition, WRN promotes unfaithful recombination-dependent repair mechanisms HRR and SSA, and enhances the loss of DNA bases during NHEJ in leukemia cells. In summary, we postulate that BCR/ABL-mediated stimulation of WRN modulates the efficiency and fidelity of major DSB repair mechanisms to protect leukemia cells from apoptosis and to facilitate genomic instability.

  16. Measurements of plutonium, 237Np, and 137Cs in the BCR 482 lichen reference material

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lavelle, Kevin B.; Miller, Jeffrey L.; Hanson, Susan K.; Connick, William B.; Spitz, Henry B.; Glover, Samuel E.; Oldham, Warren J.

    2015-10-01

    Select anthropogenic radionuclides were measured in lichen reference material, BCR 482. This material was originally collected in Axalp, Switzerland in 1991 and is composed of the epiphytic lichen Pseudevernia furfuracea. Samples from three separate bottles of BCR 482 were analyzed for uranium, neptunium, and plutonium isotopes by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and analyzed for cesium-137 by gamma-ray spectrometry. The isotopic composition of the radionuclides measured in BCR 482 suggests contributions from both global fallout resulting from historical nuclear weapons testing and more volatile materials released following the Chernobyl accident.

  17. A case of acute myelogenous leukaemia characterised by the BCR-FGFR1 translocation

    PubMed Central

    Matikas, Alexios; Tzannou, Ifigeneia; Oikonomopoulou, Dimitra; Bakiri, Maria

    2013-01-01

    The 8p11 myeloproliferative syndrome is a rare atypical disorder defined by the presence of rearrangements between the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) and 1 of 13 partner genes described to date, including the BCR gene on chromosome 22. The disease characterised by the BCR-FGFR1 fusion gene has distinct biological and clinical features, with significant diversity among the published cases. We report a case of BCR-FGFR1 disease which was presented as acute myeloid leukaemia with an aggressive clinical course and we review all the adult cases published in the literature. PMID:23519513

  18. Differential expression of Toll-like receptor (TLR) and B cell receptor (BCR) signaling molecules in primary diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Akhter, Ariz; Masir, Noraidah; Elyamany, Ghaleb; Phang, Kean-Chang; Mahe, Etienne; Al-Zahrani, Ali Matar; Shabani-Rad, Meer-Taher; Stewart, Douglas Allan; Mansoor, Adnan

    2015-01-01

    Primary diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the central nervous system (CNS DLBCL) is a distinct and aggressive lymphoma that is confined to CNS. Since, central nervous system is barrier-protected and immunologically silent; role of TLR/BCR signaling in pathogenesis and biology of CNS DLBCL is intriguing. Genomic mutations in key regulators of TLR/BCR signaling pathway (MYD88/CD79B/CARD11) have recently been reported in this disease. These observations raised possible implications in novel targeted therapies; however, expression pattern of molecules related to TLR/BCR pathways in this lymphoma remains unknown. We have analyzed the expression of 19 genes encoding TLR/BCR pathways and targets in CNS DLBCLs (n = 20) by Nanostring nCounter™ analysis and compared it with expression patterns in purified reactive B-lymphocytes and systemic diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) (n = 20). Relative expression of TLR4, TLR5, TLR9, CD79B and BLNK was higher in CNS DLBCLs than in control B-lymphocytes; where as TLR7, MALT1, BCL10, CD79A and LYN was lower in CNS DLBCLs (P < 0.0001). When compared with systemic DLBCL samples, higher expression of TLR9, CD79B, CARD11, LYN and BLNK was noted in CNS DLBCL (>1.5 fold change; P < 0.01). The B cell receptor molecules like BLNK and CD79B were also associated with higher expression of MYD88 dependent TLRs (TLR4/5/9). In conclusion, we have shown over expression of TLR/BCR related genes or their targets, where genomic mutations have commonly been identified in CNS DLBCL. We have also demonstrated that TLR over expression closely relate with up regulation of genes associated with BCR pathway like CD79B/BLNK and CARD11, which play an important role in NF-kB pathway activation. Our results provide an important insight into the possibility of TLR and/or B-cell receptor signaling molecules as possible therapeutic targets in CNS DLBCL. PMID:25391967

  19. Quantifying Missing Heritability at Known GWAS Loci

    PubMed Central

    Gusev, Alexander; Bhatia, Gaurav; Zaitlen, Noah; Vilhjalmsson, Bjarni J.; Diogo, Dorothée; Stahl, Eli A.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Worthington, Jane; Klareskog, Lars; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Plenge, Robert M.; Pasaniuc, Bogdan; Price, Alkes L.

    2013-01-01

    Recent work has shown that much of the missing heritability of complex traits can be resolved by estimates of heritability explained by all genotyped SNPs. However, it is currently unknown how much heritability is missing due to poor tagging or additional causal variants at known GWAS loci. Here, we use variance components to quantify the heritability explained by all SNPs at known GWAS loci in nine diseases from WTCCC1 and WTCCC2. After accounting for expectation, we observed all SNPs at known GWAS loci to explain more heritability than GWAS-associated SNPs on average (). For some diseases, this increase was individually significant: for Multiple Sclerosis (MS) () and for Crohn's Disease (CD) (); all analyses of autoimmune diseases excluded the well-studied MHC region. Additionally, we found that GWAS loci from other related traits also explained significant heritability. The union of all autoimmune disease loci explained more MS heritability than known MS SNPs () and more CD heritability than known CD SNPs (), with an analogous increase for all autoimmune diseases analyzed. We also observed significant increases in an analysis of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) samples typed on ImmunoChip, with more heritability from all SNPs at GWAS loci () and more heritability from all autoimmune disease loci () compared to known RA SNPs (including those identified in this cohort). Our methods adjust for LD between SNPs, which can bias standard estimates of heritability from SNPs even if all causal variants are typed. By comparing adjusted estimates, we hypothesize that the genome-wide distribution of causal variants is enriched for low-frequency alleles, but that causal variants at known GWAS loci are skewed towards common alleles. These findings have important ramifications for fine-mapping study design and our understanding of complex disease architecture. PMID:24385918

  20. Possible correlation of b3-a2-type bcr-abl messenger RNA defined by semiquantitative RT-PCR to platelet and megakaryocyte counts in Philadelphia-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Inokuchi, K; Futaki, M; Dan, K; Nomura, T

    1994-04-01

    Thirty-five patients with Philadelphia chromosome (Ph1)-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) were classified on the basis of the fusion pattern of bcr-abl mRNA determined by the reverse-transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method. Semiquantitative assay of the bcr exon 2/abl exon 2 fused mRNA (b2-a2) and bcr exon 3/abl exon 2 fused mRNA (b3-a2) resulted in 21 patients showing b3-a2 type mRNA, seven showing b2-a2 type and seven showing coexpression. Quantification of the autoradiographic signals of amplified products was estimated using an MCID image analysis system. The relative intensity was defined as the ratio of bcr-abl signal to that of beta-actin. The relationship between the semiquantified bcr-abl mRNA and the platelet/megakaryocyte counts was analyzed. A possible correlation was found between the semiquantified b3-a2 type mRNA and the platelet (p < .05, N = 28) and megakaryocyte (p < .05, N = 13) counts of these patients. This finding suggests the possibility that b3-a2 mRNA may affect the thrombopoietic activity in Ph1-positive CML in a dose-response manner. PMID:7520786

  1. New alternative splicing BCR/ABL-OOF shows an oncogenic role by lack of inhibition of BCR GTPase activity and an increased of persistence of Rac activation in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Panuzzo, Cristina; Volpe, Gisella; Cibrario Rocchietti, Elisa; Casnici, Claudia; Crotta, Katia; Crivellaro, Sabrina; Carrà, Giovanna; Lorenzatti, Roberta; Peracino, Barbara; Torti, Davide; Morotti, Alessandro; Camacho-Leal, Maria Pilar; Defilippi, Paola; Marelli, Ornella; Saglio, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    In Chronic Myeloid Leukemia 80% of patients present alternative splice variants involving BCR exons 1, 13 or 14 and ABL exon 4, with a consequent impairment in the reading frame of the ABL gene. Therefore BCR/ABL fusion proteins (BCR/ABL-OOF) are characterized by an in-frame BCR portion followed by an amino acids sequence arising from the out of frame (OOF) reading of the ABL gene. The product of this new transcript contains the characteristic BCR domains while lacking the COOH-terminal Rho GTPase GAP domain. The present work aims to characterize the protein functionality in terms of cytoskeleton (re-)modelling, adhesion and activation of canonical oncogenic signalling pathways. Here, we show that BCR/ABL-OOF has a peculiar endosomal localization which affects EGF receptor activation and turnover. Moreover, we demonstrate that BCR/ABL-OOF expression leads to aberrant cellular adhesion due to the activation of Rac GTPase, increase in cellular proliferation, migration and survival. When overexpressed in a BCR/ABL positive cell line, BCR/ABL-OOF induces hyperactivation of Rac signaling axis offering a therapeutic window for Rac-targeted therapy. Our data support a critical role of BCR/ABL-OOF in leukemogenesis and identify a subset of patients that may benefit from Rac-targeted therapies. PMID:26682280

  2. New alternative splicing BCR/ABL-OOF shows an oncogenic role by lack of inhibition of BCR GTPase activity and an increased of persistence of Rac activation in chronic myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Panuzzo, Cristina; Volpe, Gisella; Rocchietti, Elisa Cibrario; Casnici, Claudia; Crotta, Katia; Crivellaro, Sabrina; Carrà, Giovanna; Lorenzatti, Roberta; Peracino, Barbara; Torti, Davide; Morotti, Alessandro; Camacho-Leal, Maria Pilar; Defilippi, Paola; Marelli, Ornella; Saglio, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    In Chronic Myeloid Leukemia 80% of patients present alternative splice variants involving BCR exons 1, 13 or 14 and ABL exon 4, with a consequent impairment in the reading frame of the ABL gene. Therefore BCR/ABL fusion proteins (BCR/ABL-OOF) are characterized by an in-frame BCR portion followed by an amino acids sequence arising from the out of frame (OOF) reading of the ABL gene. The product of this new transcript contains the characteristic BCR domains while lacking the COOH-terminal Rho GTPase GAP domain. The present work aims to characterize the protein functionality in terms of cytoskeleton (re-)modelling, adhesion and activation of canonical oncogenic signalling pathways. Here, we show that BCR/ABL-OOF has a peculiar endosomal localization which affects EGF receptor activation and turnover. Moreover, we demonstrate that BCR/ABL-OOF expression leads to aberrant cellular adhesion due to the activation of Rac GTPase, increase in cellular proliferation, migration and survival. When overexpressed in a BCR/ABL positive cell line, BCR/ABL-OOF induces hyperactivation of Rac signaling axis offering a therapeutic window for Rac-targeted therapy. Our data support a critical role of BCR/ABL-OOF in leukemogenesis and identify a subset of patients that may benefit from Rac-targeted therapies. PMID:26682280

  3. Discovery of allosteric BCR-ABL inhibitors from phenotypic screen to clinical candidate.

    PubMed

    Gray, Nathanael S; Fabbro, Doriano

    2014-01-01

    The development of imatinib, an ATP-competitive inhibitor of the BCR-ABL oncoprotein, has revolutionized the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). Unfortunately, the leukemia eventually becomes resistant imatinib as a result of emergence of cells expressing drug insensitive BCR-ABL mutant proteins. This has motivated the development of several next-generation ATP-competitive drugs. This chapter describes the discovery and development of a complementary strategy involving inhibiting BCR-ABL by targeting an allosteric binding site. Compounds that bind to the myristate-binding pocket of BCR-ABL are able to induce formation of an "inactive" state and are able to overcome resistance mutations located in the ATP-binding pocket including the recalcitrant T315I "gatekeeper" mutation. Myristate-pocket inhibitors are also able to function synergistically with ATP-competitive inhibitors in cellular and murine models of CML and this dual inhibitory strategy is currently being investigated in the clinic.

  4. IMPROVED COILED-COIL DESIGN ENHANCES INTERACTION WITH BCR-ABL AND INDUCES APOPTOSIS

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Andrew S.; Miller, Geoffrey D.; Bruno, Benjamin J.; Constance, Jonathan E.; Woessner, David W.; Fidler, Trevor P.; Robertson, James C.; Cheatham, Thomas E.; Lim, Carol S.

    2012-01-01

    The oncoprotein Bcr-Abl drives aberrant downstream activity through trans-autophosphorylation of homo-oligomers in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML).1,2 The formation of Bcr-Abl oligomers is achieved through the coiled-coil domain at the N-terminus of Bcr.3, 4 We have previously reported a modified version of this coiled-coil domain, CCmut2, which exhibits disruption of Bcr-Abl oligomeric complexes and results in decreased proliferation of CML cells and induction of apoptosis.5 A major contributing factor to these enhanced capabilities is the destabilization of the CCmut2 homo-dimers, increasing the availability to interact with and inhibit Bcr-Abl. Here, we included an additional mutation (K39E) that could in turn further destabilize the mutant homo-dimer. Incorporation of this modification into CCmut2 (C38A, S41R, L45D, E48R, Q60E) generated what we termed CCmut3, and resulted in further improvements in the binding properties with the wild-type coiled-coil domain representative of Bcr-Abl. A separate construct containing one revert mutation, CCmut4, did not demonstrate improved oligomeric properties and indicated the importance of the L45D mutation. CCmut3 demonstrated improved oligomerization via a two-hybrid assay as well as through colocalization studies, in addition to showing similar biologic activity as CCmut2. The improved binding between CCmut3 and the Bcr-Abl coiled-coil may be used to redirect Bcr-Abl to alternative subcellular locations with interesting therapeutic implications. PMID:22136227

  5. BCR-ABL fusion peptides and cytotoxic T cells in chronic myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Clark, R E; Christmas, S E

    2001-01-01

    The BCR-ABL gene that arises in chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) is a neoantigen. Peptides derived from the BCR-ABL fusion junction may therefore be immunogenic, if appropriately presented to the immune system. This article reviews data demonstrating that certain junctional peptides will bind to HLA molecules, and that these peptides will elicit specific T-lymphocyte responses in vitro, in both normal subjects and in CML patients. The clinical relevance of these observations is discussed.

  6. Role of Bcr1-activated genes Hwp1 and Hyr1 in Candida albicans oral mucosal biofilms and neutrophil evasion.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Prabhat; Thompson, Angela; Xie, Zhihong; Kashleva, Helena; Ganguly, Shantanu; Mitchell, Aaron P; Dongari-Bagtzoglou, Anna

    2011-01-25

    Candida albicans triggers recurrent infections of the oropharyngeal mucosa that result from biofilm growth. Prior studies have indicated that the transcription factor Bcr1 regulates biofilm formation in a catheter model, both in vitro and in vivo. We thus hypothesized that Bcr1 plays similar roles in the formation of oral mucosal biofilms and tested this hypothesis in a mouse model of oral infection. We found that a bcr1/bcr1 mutant did not form significant biofilm on the tongues of immunocompromised mice, in contrast to reference and reconstituted strains that formed pseudomembranes covering most of the tongue dorsal surface. Overexpression of HWP1, which specifies an epithelial adhesin that is under the transcriptional control of Bcr1, partly but significantly rescued the bcr1/bcr1 biofilm phenotype in vivo. Since HWP1 overexpression only partly reversed the biofilm phenotype, we investigated whether additional mechanisms, besides adhesin down-regulation, were responsible for the reduced virulence of this mutant. We discovered that the bcr1/bcr1 mutant was more susceptible to damage by human leukocytes when grown on plastic or on the surface of a human oral mucosa tissue analogue. Overexpression of HYR1, but not HWP1, significantly rescued this phenotype. Furthermore a hyr1/hyr1 mutant had significantly attenuated virulence in the mouse oral biofilm model of infection. These discoveries show that Bcr1 is critical for mucosal biofilm infection via regulation of epithelial cell adhesin and neutrophil function.

  7. miRNA143 Induces K562 Cell Apoptosis Through Downregulating BCR-ABL

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Bing; Song, Yanbin; Zheng, Wenling; Ma, Wenli

    2016-01-01

    Background Leukemia seriously threats human health and life. MicroRNA regulates cell growth, proliferation, apoptosis, and cell cycle. Whether microRNA could be treated as a target for leukemia is still unclear and the mechanism by which microRNA143 regulates K562 cells needs further investigation. Material/Methods miRNA143 and its scramble miRNA were synthesized and transfected to K562 cells. MTT assay was used to detect K562 cell proliferation. Flow cytometry and a caspase-3 activity detection kit were used to test K562 cell apoptosis. Western blot analysis was performed to determine breakpoint cluster region-Abelson (BCR-ABL) expression. BCR-ABL overexpression and siRNA were used to change BCR-ABL level, and cell apoptosis was detected again after lipofection transfection. Results miRNA143 transfection inhibited K562 cell growth and induced its apoptosis. miRNA143 transfection decreased BCR-ABL expression. BCR-ABL overexpression suppressed miRNA143-induced K562 cell apoptosis, while its reduction enhanced miRNA143-induced apoptosis. Conclusions miRNA143 induced K562 cell apoptosis through downregulating BCR-ABL. miRNA143 might be a target for a new leukemia therapy. PMID:27492780

  8. Pharmacogenetics of BCR/ABL Inhibitors in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Polillo, Marialuisa; Galimberti, Sara; Baratè, Claudia; Petrini, Mario; Danesi, Romano; Di Paolo, Antonello

    2015-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia was the first haematological neoplasia that benefited from a targeted therapy with imatinib nearly 15 years ago. Since then, several studies have investigated the role of genes, their variants (i.e., polymorphisms) and their encoded proteins in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase activity inhibitors (TKIs). Transmembrane transporters seem to influence in a significant manner the disposition of TKIs, especially that of imatinib at both cellular and systemic levels. In particular, members of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family (namely ABCB1 and ABCG2) together with solute carrier (SLC) transporters (i.e., SLC22A1) are responsible for the differences in drug pharmacokinetics. In the case of the newer TKIs, such as nilotinib and dasatinib, the substrate affinity of these drugs for transporters is variable but lower than that measured for imatinib. In this scenario, the investigation of genetic variants as possible predictive markers has led to some discordant results. With the partial exception of imatinib, these discrepancies seem to limit the application of discovered biomarkers in the clinical settings. In order to overcome these issues, larger prospective confirmative trials are needed. PMID:26402671

  9. Pharmacogenetics of BCR/ABL Inhibitors in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Polillo, Marialuisa; Galimberti, Sara; Baratè, Claudia; Petrini, Mario; Danesi, Romano; Di Paolo, Antonello

    2015-09-21

    Chronic myeloid leukemia was the first haematological neoplasia that benefited from a targeted therapy with imatinib nearly 15 years ago. Since then, several studies have investigated the role of genes, their variants (i.e., polymorphisms) and their encoded proteins in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase activity inhibitors (TKIs). Transmembrane transporters seem to influence in a significant manner the disposition of TKIs, especially that of imatinib at both cellular and systemic levels. In particular, members of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family (namely ABCB1 and ABCG2) together with solute carrier (SLC) transporters (i.e., SLC22A1) are responsible for the differences in drug pharmacokinetics. In the case of the newer TKIs, such as nilotinib and dasatinib, the substrate affinity of these drugs for transporters is variable but lower than that measured for imatinib. In this scenario, the investigation of genetic variants as possible predictive markers has led to some discordant results. With the partial exception of imatinib, these discrepancies seem to limit the application of discovered biomarkers in the clinical settings. In order to overcome these issues, larger prospective confirmative trials are needed.

  10. The L-amino acid oxidase from Calloselasma rhodostoma snake venom modulates apoptomiRs expression in Bcr-Abl-positive cell lines.

    PubMed

    Burin, Sandra Mara; Berzoti-Coelho, Maria Gabriela; Cominal, Juçara Gastaldi; Ambrosio, Luciana; Torqueti, Maria Regina; Sampaio, Suely Vilela; de Castro, Fabíola Attié

    2016-09-15

    Anti-apoptotic genes and apoptomiRs deregulated expression contribute to apoptosis resistance in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) Bcr-Abl(+) cells. Here, the L-amino acid oxidase from Calloselasma rhodostoma (CR-LAAO) venom altered the apoptotic machinery regulation by modulating the expression of the miR-145, miR-26a, miR-142-3p, miR-21, miR-130a, and miR-146a, and of the apoptosis-related proteins Bid, Bim, Bcl-2, Ciap-2, c-Flip, and Mcl-1 in Bcr-Abl(+) cells. CR-LAAO is a potential tool to instigate apoptomiRs regulation that contributes to drive CML therapy. PMID:27421670

  11. The mating-related loci sexM and sexP of the zygomycetous fungus Mucor mucedo and their transcriptional regulation by trisporoid pheromones.

    PubMed

    Wetzel, Jana; Burmester, Anke; Kolbe, Melanie; Wöstemeyer, Johannes

    2012-04-01

    The putative mating type locus of mucoralean fungi consists of a single high mobility group (HMG)-domain transcription factor gene, sexM or sexP, flanked by genes for an RNA helicase and a triosephosphate transporter. We used degenerate primers derived from the amino acid sequence of the RNA helicase to sequence a fragment of this gene from Mucor mucedo. This fragment was extended by inverse PCR to obtain the complete sequences of the sex loci from both mating types of M. mucedo. The sex loci in M. mucedo reflect the general picture obtained previously for Phycomyces blakesleeanus, presenting a single HMG-domain transcription factor gene, sexM and sexP in the minus and plus mating types, respectively. These are located next to a gene for RNA helicase. Transcriptional analysis by quantitative real-time PCR showed that only transcription of sexM is considerably stimulated by adding trisporoid pheromones, thus mimicking sexual stimulation, whereas sexP is only slightly affected. These differences in regulation between sexM and sexP are supported by the observation that the promoter sequences controlling these genes show no similarities. The protein structures themselves are considerably different. The SexM, but not the SexP protein harbours a nuclear localization sequence. The SexM protein is indeed transported to nuclei. This was shown by means of a GFP fusion construct that was used to study the localization of SexM in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The fusion protein is highly enriched in nuclei.

  12. Multiple Novel Loci, Including Those Related to Crohn’s Disease, Psoriasis and Inflammation, Identified in a Genome-Wide Association Study of Fibrinogen in 17,686 Women: the Women’s Genome Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Danik, Jacqueline S.; Pare, Guillaume; Chasman, Daniel I.; Zee, Robert Y.L.; Kwiatkowski, David J.; Parker, Alex; Miletich, Joseph P.; Ridker, Paul M

    2009-01-01

    Background Fibrinogen is a multifunctional circulating glycoprotein involved in wound-healing, thrombosis, platelet aggregation and inflammation, and elevated levels predict vascular disease. Despite evidence of such crucial biological functions and moderate heritability, comprehensive analysis of the influence of genetic variation on fibrinogen is not available. Methods and Results To address this issue, we undertook a genome-wide association study evaluating the potential relationships between 337,343 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and plasma fibrinogen levels among 17,686 apparently healthy women participating in the Women’s Genome Health Study (WGHS). As C-reactive protein is also an inflammatory marker known to predict cardiovascular diseases, we compared the determinants of fibrinogen levels with those of C-reactive protein. Four novel loci were identified, in addition to the fibrinogen gene cluster, which were associated with fibrinogen levels at genome-wide levels of significance (range of P-values from 8.82×10-09 to 8.04×10-39). Two of the loci related to common chronic inflammatory diseases: the first, at locus 5q31.1 (SLC22A5, SLC22A4, IRF1) lies immediately adjacent to a locus linked to Crohn’s disease (P-value for lead SNP 1.24 × 10-12) and the second, at locus 17q25.1 (CD300LF, SLC9A3R1, NAT9) has been associated with psoriasis (P-value for lead SNP 7.72×10-11). A third locus at 1q21.3 (IL6R) lies within the interleukin 6 receptor gene, a critical component of the inflammatory cascade (P-value for lead SNP 1.80×10-11). A novel locus at 2q34 (CPS1) participates in the urea cycle (P-value 8.82×10-09). The majority of implicated SNPs showed little evidence of dual association with C-reactive protein levels. Conclusions An agnostic survey of the human genome identifies novel loci related to common chronic inflammatory diseases as genetic determinants of fibrinogen levels, in addition to loci that relate to the inflammatory cascade, the

  13. Modeling the influence of stromal microenvironment in the selection of ENU-induced BCR-ABL1 mutants by tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Aggoune, Djamel; Tosca, Lucie; Sorel, Nathalie; Bonnet, Marie-Laure; Dkhissi, Fatima; Tachdjian, Gérard; Bennaceur-Griscelli, Annelise; Chomel, Jean-Claude; Turhan, Ali G

    2014-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have profoundly changed the natural history of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). However, acquired resistance to imatinib, dasatinib or nilotinib (1st and 2nd generation TKIs), due in part to BCR-ABL1 kinase mutations, has been largely described. These drugs are ineffective on the T315I gatekeeper substitution, which remains sensitive to 3rd generation TKI ponatinib. It has recently been suggested that the hematopoietic niche could protect leukemic cells from targeted therapy. In order to investigate the role of a stromal niche in mutation-related resistance, we developed a niche-based cell mutagenesis assay. For this purpose, ENU (N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea)-exposed UT-7 cells expressing non-mutated or T315I-mutated BCR-ABL1 were cultured with or without murine MS-5 stromal cells and in the presence of imatinib, dasatinib, nilotinib, or ponatinib. In the assays relative to 1st and 2nd generation TKIs, which were performed on non-mutated BCR-ABL1 cells, our data highlighted the increasing efficacy of the latter, but did not reveal any substantial effect of the niche. In ponatinib assays performed on both non-mutated and T315I–mutated BCR-ABL1 cells, an increased number of resistant clones were observed in the presence of MS-5. Present data suggested that T315I mutants need either compound mutations (e.g. E255K/T315I) or a stromal niche to escape from ponatinib. Using array-comparative genomic hybridization experiments, we found an increased number of variations (involving some recurrent chromosome regions) in clones cultured on MS-5 feeder. Overall, our study suggests that the hematopoietic niche could play a crucial role in conferring resistance to ponatinib, by providing survival signals and favoring genetic instability. PMID:25593988

  14. Modeling the influence of stromal microenvironment in the selection of ENU-induced BCR-ABL1 mutants by tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Aggoune, Djamel; Tosca, Lucie; Sorel, Nathalie; Bonnet, Marie-Laure; Dkhissi, Fatima; Tachdjian, Gérard; Bennaceur-Griscelli, Annelise; Chomel, Jean-Claude; Turhan, Ali G

    2014-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have profoundly changed the natural history of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). However, acquired resistance to imatinib, dasatinib or nilotinib (1(st) and 2(nd) generation TKIs), due in part to BCR-ABL1 kinase mutations, has been largely described. These drugs are ineffective on the T315I gatekeeper substitution, which remains sensitive to 3(rd) generation TKI ponatinib. It has recently been suggested that the hematopoietic niche could protect leukemic cells from targeted therapy. In order to investigate the role of a stromal niche in mutation-related resistance, we developed a niche-based cell mutagenesis assay. For this purpose, ENU (N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea)-exposed UT-7 cells expressing non-mutated or T315I-mutated BCR-ABL1 were cultured with or without murine MS-5 stromal cells and in the presence of imatinib, dasatinib, nilotinib, or ponatinib. In the assays relative to 1(st) and 2(nd) generation TKIs, which were performed on non-mutated BCR-ABL1 cells, our data highlighted the increasing efficacy of the latter, but did not reveal any substantial effect of the niche. In ponatinib assays performed on both non-mutated and T315I-mutated BCR-ABL1 cells, an increased number of resistant clones were observed in the presence of MS-5. Present data suggested that T315I mutants need either compound mutations (e.g. E255K/T315I) or a stromal niche to escape from ponatinib. Using array-comparative genomic hybridization experiments, we found an increased number of variations (involving some recurrent chromosome regions) in clones cultured on MS-5 feeder. Overall, our study suggests that the hematopoietic niche could play a crucial role in conferring resistance to ponatinib, by providing survival signals and favoring genetic instability.

  15. Efficacy and safety of radotinib in chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia patients with resistance or intolerance to BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Hyun; Menon, Hari; Jootar, Saengsuree; Saikia, Tapan; Kwak, Jae-Yong; Sohn, Sang-Kyun; Park, Joon Seong; Jeong, Seong Hyun; Kim, Hyeoung Joon; Kim, Yeo-Kyeoung; Oh, Suk Joong; Kim, Hawk; Zang, Dae Young; Chung, Joo Seop; Shin, Ho Jin; Do, Young Rok; Kim, Jeong-A; Kim, Dae-Young; Choi, Chul Won; Park, Sahee; Park, Hye Lin; Lee, Gong Yeal; Cho, Dae Jin; Shin, Jae Soo; Kim, Dong-Wook

    2014-01-01

    Radotinib (IY5511HCL), a novel and selective BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitor, has shown pre-clinical and phase I activity and safety in chronic myeloid leukemia. This phase II study investigated the efficacy and safety of radotinib in Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic phase-chronic myeloid leukemia patients with resistance and/or intolerance to BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Patients received radotinib 400 mg twice daily for 12 cycles based on results from the phase I trial. The primary end point was rate of major cytogenetic response by 12 months. A total of 77 patients were enrolled. Major cytogenetic response was achieved in 50 (65%; cumulative 75%) patients, including 36 (47%) patients with complete cytogenetic response by 12 months. Median time to major cytogenetic response and complete cytogenetic response were 85 days and 256 days, respectively. Major cytogenetic response and complete cytogenetic response rates were similar between imatinib-resistant and imatinib-intolerant patients, but were higher in patients without BCR-ABL1 mutations. Overall and progression-free survival rates at 12 months were 96.1% and 86.3%, respectively. All newly-occurring or worsening grade 3/4 hematologic abnormalities included thrombocytopenia (24.7%) and anemia (5.2%); grade 3/4 drug-related non-hematologic adverse events included fatigue (3.9%), asthenia (3.9%), and nausea (2.6%). The most common biochemistry abnormality was hyperbilirubinemia (grade 3/4 23.4%), and 12 of 18 cases were managed with dose modification. Study findings suggest radotinib is effective and well tolerated in chronic phase-chronic myeloid leukemia patients with resistance and/or intolerance to BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors and may represent a promising alternative for these patients. (clinicaltrials.gov identifier: 01602952) PMID:24705186

  16. UV Differentially Induces Oxidative Stress, DNA Damage and Apoptosis in BCR-ABL1-Positive Cells Sensitive and Resistant to Imatinib.

    PubMed

    Synowiec, Ewelina; Hoser, Grazyna; Wojcik, Katarzyna; Pawlowska, Elzbieta; Skorski, Tomasz; Błasiak, Janusz

    2015-08-05

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cells express the active BCR-ABL1 protein, which has been targeted by imatinib in CML therapy, but resistance to this drug is an emerging problem. BCR-ABL1 induces endogenous oxidative stress promoting genomic instability and imatinib resistance. In the present work, we investigated the extent of oxidative stress, DNA damage, apoptosis and expression of apoptosis-related genes in BCR-ABL1 cells sensitive and resistant to imatinib. The resistance resulted either from the Y253H mutation in the BCR-ABL1 gene or incubation in increasing concentrations of imatinib (AR). UV irradiation at a dose rate of 0.12 J/(m2 · s) induced more DNA damage detected by the T4 pyrimidine dimers glycosylase and hOGG1, recognizing oxidative modifications to DNA bases in imatinib-resistant than -sensitive cells. The resistant cells displayed also higher susceptibility to UV-induced apoptosis. These cells had lower native mitochondrial membrane potential than imatinib-sensitive cells, but UV-irradiation reversed that relationship. We observed a significant lowering of the expression of the succinate dehydrogenase (SDHB) gene, encoding a component of the complex II of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, which is involved in apoptosis sensing. Although detailed mechanism of imatinib resistance in AR cells in unknown, we detected the presence of the Y253H mutation in a fraction of these cells. In conclusion, imatinib-resistant cells may display a different extent of genome instability than their imatinib-sensitive counterparts, which may follow their different reactions to both endogenous and exogenous DNA-damaging factors, including DNA repair and apoptosis.

  17. A derivative of epigallocatechin-3-gallate induces apoptosis via SHP-1-mediated suppression of BCR-ABL and STAT3 signalling in chronic myelogenous leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ji Hoon; Yun, Miyong; Choo, Eun-Jeong; Kim, Sun-Hee; Jeong, Myoung-Seok; Jung, Deok-Beom; Lee, Hyemin; Kim, Eun-Ok; Kato, Nobuo; Kim, Bonglee; Srivastava, Sanjay K; Kaihatsu, Kunihiro; Kim, Sung-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) is a component of green tea known to have chemo-preventative effects on several cancers. However, EGCG has limited clinical application, which necessitates the development of a more effective EGCG prodrug as an anticancer agent. Experimental Approach Derivatives of EGCG were evaluated for their stability and anti-tumour activity in human chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) K562 and KBM5 cells. Key Results EGCG-mono-palmitate (EGCG-MP) showed most prolonged stability compared with other EGCG derivatives. EGCG-MP exerted greater cytotoxicity and apoptosis in K562 and KBM5 cells than the other EGCG derivatives. EGCG-MP induced Src-homology 2 domain-containing tyrosine phosphatase 1 (SHP-1) leading decreased oncogenic protein BCR-ABL and STAT3 phosphorylation in CML cells, compared with treatment with EGCG. Furthermore, EGCG-MP reduced phosphorylation of STAT3 and survival genes in K562 cells, compared with EGCG. Conversely, depletion of SHP-1 or application of the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor pervanadate blocked the ability of EGCG-MP to suppress phosphorylation of BCR-ABL and STAT3, and the expression of survival genes downstream of STAT3. In addition, EGCG-MP treatment more effectively suppressed tumour growth in BALB/c athymic nude mice compared with untreated controls or EGCG treatment. Immunohistochemistry revealed increased caspase 3 and SHP-1 activity and decreased phosphorylation of BCR-ABL in the EGCG-MP-treated group relative to that in the EGCG-treated group. Conclusions and Implications EGCG-MP induced SHP-1-mediated inhibition of BCR-ABL and STAT3 signalling in vitro and in vivo more effectively than EGCG. This derivative may be a potent chemotherapeutic agent for CML treatment. PMID:25825203

  18. Fas-associated Phosphatase 1 (Fap1) Influences βCatenin Activity in Myeloid Progenitor Cells Expressing the Bcr-abl Oncogene

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Weiqi; Bei, Ling; Eklund, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    Increased βcatenin activity correlates with leukemia stem cell expansion and disease progression in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). We found previously that expression of the CML-related Bcr-abl oncoprotein in myeloid progenitor cells increases expression of Fas-associated phosphatase 1 (Fap1). This resulted in Fap1-dependent resistance to Fas-induced apoptosis in these cells. Fap1 also interacts with the adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc) protein, but the functional significance of this interaction is unknown. Apc participates in a complex that includes glycogen synthase kinase β (Gsk3β) and βcatenin. Assembly of this complex results in phosphorylation of βcatenin by Gsk3β, which facilitates βcatenin ubiquitination and degradation by the proteasome. In this study, we found increased association of Fap1 with the Apc complex in Bcr-abl+ myeloid progenitor cells. We also found Fap1-dependent inactivation of Gsk3β and consequent stabilization of βcatenin in these cells. Consistent with this, Bcr-abl+ cells exhibited a Fap1-dependent increase in βcatenin activity. Our studies identified Fap1-dependent Gsk3β inactivation as a molecular mechanism for increased βcatenin activity in CML. PMID:23519466

  19. A novel pyridopyrimidine inhibitor of abl kinase is a picomolar inhibitor of Bcr-abl-driven K562 cells and is effective against STI571-resistant Bcr-abl mutants.

    PubMed

    Huron, David R; Gorre, Mercedes E; Kraker, Alan J; Sawyers, Charles L; Rosen, Neal; Moasser, Mark M

    2003-04-01

    Inhibition of the constitutively active Bcr-abl tyrosine kinase(TK) by STI571 has proven to be a highly effective treatment for chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). However, STI571 is only transiently effective in blast crisis, and drug resistance emerges by amplification of or development of mutational changes in Bcr-abl. We have screened a family of TK inhibitors of the pyrido [2,3-d]pyrimidine class, unrelated to STI571, and describe here a compound with substantial activity against STI-resistant mutant Bcr-abl proteins. This compound, PD166326, is a dual specificity TK inhibitor and inhibits src and abl in vitro with IC(50)s of 6 and 8 nM respectively. PD166326 inhibits the growth of K562 cells with IC(50) of 300 pM, leading to apoptotic G(1) arrest, whereas non-Bcr-abl cell types require >1000 times higher concentrations. We tested the effects of PD166326 on two of the clinically observed STI571-resistant Bcr-abl mutants. PD166326 potently inhibits the E255K mutant Bcr-abl protein and the growth of Bcr-ablE255K-driven cells. The T315I mutant Bcr-abl protein, which is mutated within the ATP-binding pocket, is resistant to PD166326; however, the growth of Bcr-ablT315I-driven cells is partially sensitive to this compound, likely through the inhibition of Bcr-abl effector pathways. These findings show that TK drug resistance is a structure-specific phenomenon and can be overcome by TK inhibitors of other structural classes, suggesting new approaches for future anticancer drug development. PD166326 is a prototype of a new generation of anti-Bcr-abl compounds with picomolar potency and substantial activity against STI571-resistant mutants.

  20. Targeting the SH2-Kinase Interface in Bcr-Abl Inhibits Leukemogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Grebien, Florian; Hantschel, Oliver; Wojcik, John; Kaupe, Ines; Kovacic, Boris; Wyrzucki, Arkadiusz M.; Gish, Gerald D.; Cerny-Reiterer, Sabine; Koide, Akiko; Beug, Hartmut; Pawson, Tony; Valent, Peter; Koide, Shohei; Superti-Furga, Giulio

    2012-10-25

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is caused by the constitutively active tyrosine kinase Bcr-Abl and treated with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) imatinib. However, emerging TKI resistance prevents complete cure. Therefore, alternative strategies targeting regulatory modules of Bcr-Abl in addition to the kinase active site are strongly desirable. Here, we show that an intramolecular interaction between the SH2 and kinase domains in Bcr-Abl is both necessary and sufficient for high catalytic activity of the enzyme. Disruption of this interface led to inhibition of downstream events critical for CML signaling and, importantly, completely abolished leukemia formation in mice. Furthermore, disruption of the SH2-kinase interface increased sensitivity of imatinib-resistant Bcr-Abl mutants to TKI inhibition. An engineered Abl SH2-binding fibronectin type III monobody inhibited Bcr-Abl kinase activity both in vitro and in primary CML cells, where it induced apoptosis. This work validates the SH2-kinase interface as an allosteric target for therapeutic intervention.

  1. S6K1 determines the metabolic requirements for BCR-ABL survival.

    PubMed

    Barger, J F; Gallo, C A; Tandon, P; Liu, H; Sullivan, A; Grimes, H L; Plas, D R

    2013-01-24

    In chronic myelogenous leukemia, the constitutive activation of the BCR-ABL kinase transforms cells to an addicted state that requires glucose metabolism for survival. We investigated S6K1, a protein kinase that drives glycolysis in leukemia cells, as a target for counteracting glucose-dependent survival induced by BCR-ABL. BCR-ABL potently activated S6K1-dependent signaling and glycolysis. Although S6K1 knockdown or rapamycin treatment suppressed glycolysis in BCR-ABL-transformed cells, these treatments did not induce cell death. Instead, loss of S6K1 triggered compensatory activation of fatty-acid oxidation, a metabolic program that can support glucose-independent cell survival. Fatty-acid oxidation in response to S6K1 inactivation required the expression of the fatty-acid transporter carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1c, which was recently linked to rapamycin resistance in cancer. Finally, addition of an inhibitor of fatty-acid oxidation significantly enhanced cytotoxicity in response to S6K1 inactivation. These data indicate that S6K1 dictates the metabolic requirements mediating BCR-ABL survival and provide a rationale for combining targeted inhibitors of signal transduction, with strategies to interrupt oncogene-induced metabolism. PMID:22391570

  2. Microbiological screening method for indication of irradiation of spices and herbs: a BCR collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Wirtanen, G; Sjöberg, A M; Boisen, F; Alanko, T

    1993-01-01

    A BCR1 collaborative study was conducted with a microbiological screening method based on the combined use of the direct epifluorescent filter technique (DEFT) and the conventional aerobic plate count method (APC) for detection of irradiation of spices and herbs. Collaborative samples of whole allspice, whole and powdered black peppers, whole white pepper, paprika powder, cut basil, cut marjoram, and crushed cardamom irradiated with doses of 0, 5, and 10 kGy were analyzed by 8 laboratories. The total number of the collaborative samples, with arbitrarily labeled codes, was 192. The percentage of acceptable results was 95.5%. The identification of irradiated from nonirradiated spices and herbs was analyzed statistically by using explorative techniques. The average values of the differences between DEFT and APC in samples irradiated with doses of 5 and 10 kGy were 5.1 and 6.1 logarithmic units, respectively. The differences between DEFT and APC generally increased to at least 3.5 logarithmic units, whereas the difference in the case of unirradiated spices was insignificant. However, conclusive evidence of irradiation relies on the knowledge that the sample was not fumigated or heat treated. The reproducibility relative standard deviations for the differences were 12.3, 19.9, and 20.7% with the doses of 10 and 5 kGy and for unirradiated samples, respectively, indicating acceptable variabilities among laboratories.

  3. Isolation and characterization of eight novel microsatellite loci in the double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mercer, Dacey; Haig, Susan; Mullins, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    We describe the isolation and characterization of eight microsatellite loci from the double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus). Genetic variability was assessed using 60 individuals from three populations. All loci were variable with the number of alleles ranging from two to 17 per locus, and observed heterozygosity varying from 0.05 to 0.89. No loci showed signs of linkage disequilibrium and all loci conformed to Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium frequencies. Further, all loci amplified and were polymorphic in two related Phalacrocorax species. These loci should prove useful for population genetic studies of the double-crested cormorant and other pelecaniform species.

  4. Identifying quantitative trait loci and determining closely related stalk traits for rind penetrometer resistance in a high-oil maize population.

    PubMed

    Hu, Haixiao; Meng, Yujie; Wang, Hongwu; Liu, Hai; Chen, Shaojiang

    2012-05-01

    Stalk lodging in maize causes annual yield losses between 5 and 20% worldwide. Many studies have indicated that maize stalk strength significantly negatively correlates with lodging observed in the field. Rind penetrometer resistance (RPR) measurements can be used to effectively evaluate maize stalk strength, but little is known about the genetic basis of this parameter. The objective of this study was to explore a genetic model and detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) of RPR and determine relationships between RPR and other stalk traits, especially cell wall chemical components. RPR is quantitative trait in nature, and both additive and non-additive effects may be important to consider for the improvement of RPR. Nine additive-effect QTLs covering nine chromosomes, except chromosome 5, and one pair of epistatic QTLs were detected for RPR. CeSA11 involved in cellulose synthesis and colorless2 involved in lignin synthesis were identified as possible candidate genes for RPR. Internode diameter (InD), fresh weight of internode (FreW), dry weight of internode (DryW), fresh weight and dry weight as well as cell wall components per unit volume significantly positively correlated with RPR. The internode water content (InW) significantly negatively correlated with RPR. Notably, these traits significantly correlated with RPR, and the QTLs of these traits co-localized with those of RPR. The corresponding results obtained from correlation analysis and QTL mapping suggested the presence of pleitropism or linkage between genes and indicated that these different approaches may be used for cross authentication of relationships between different traits. PMID:22314785

  5. Essential role for telomerase in chronic myeloid leukemia induced by BCR-ABL in mice

    PubMed Central

    Vicente-Dueñas, Carolina; Barajas-Diego, Marcos; Romero-Camarero, Isabel; González-Herrero, Inés; Flores, Teresa; Sánchez-García, Isidro

    2012-01-01

    The telomerase protein is constitutively activated in malignant cells from many patients with cancer, including the chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), but whether telomerase is essential for the pathogenesis of this disease is not known. Here, we used telomerase deficient mice to determine the requirement for telomerase in CML induced by BCR-ABL in mouse models of CML. Loss of one telomerase allele or complete deletion of telomerase prevented the development of leukemia induced by BCR-ABL. However, BCR-ABL was expressed and active in telomerase heterozygous and null leukemic hematopoietic stem cells. These results demonstrate that telomerase is essential for oncogene-induced reprogramming of hematopoietic stem cells in CML development and validate telomerase and the genes it regulates as targets for therapy in CML. PMID:22408137

  6. BCR-ABL Translocation in Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Southern India.

    PubMed

    Sugapriya, D; Preethi, S; Shanthi, P; Chandra, N; Jeyaraman, G; Sachdanandam, P; Thilagavathy, S; Venkatadesilalu, S

    2012-03-01

    Cytogenetics and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based assays provide important information regarding biologically defined and prognostically relevant subgroups in acute leukemias. We utilized karyotyping and molecular analysis by reverse transcriptase PCR for the BCR-ABL translocation, in addition to morphological study, cytochemistry and immunophenotyping, to study 24 cases of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Our objective was to determine the frequency of the BCRABL translocation in childhood ALL from southern India. Karyotyping showed one case of hyperdiploidy, one case of t (12; 21) translocation and one case of 46, XY-21+mar. The BCR-ABL translocation was found in 8.3% of these cases. One of these was a cryptic translocation, the karyotype being normal. BCR-ABL positivity in ALL is associated with aggressive disease and has been shown to be a poor prognostic factor, especially in children. PMID:23449388

  7. A rapid RT-PCR based method for the detection of BCR-ABL translocation.

    PubMed Central

    Sidorova JYu; Saltykova, L B; Lyschov, A A; Zaritskey AYu; Abdulkadyrov, K M; Blinov, M N

    1997-01-01

    AIMS: To optimise a one step reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) protocol for BCR-ABL chimaera detection. METHODS: Compared with published RT-PCR procedures, this novel approach has at least two advantages. First, the same enzyme is used for both reverse transcription and PCR. Second, amplification of the target (BCR-ABL chimaera) and control gene (ABL) is performed simultaneously in the same tube. RESULTS: On testing 40 chronic myelogenous leukaemia patients and 10 healthy donors there was a specificity for the newly developed technique. In addition, dilution experiments demonstrated that the protocol was highly sensitive. CONCLUSIONS: The suggested one step PCR strategy is a simple and reliable way to reveal BCR-ABL chimaeras. Images PMID:9497918

  8. A Coiled-Coil Mimetic Intercepts BCR-ABL1 Dimerization in Native and Kinase-Mutant Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Woessner, David W.; Eiring, Anna M.; Bruno, Benjamin J.; Zabriskie, Matthew S.; Reynolds, Kimberly R.; Miller, Geoffrey D.; O’Hare, Thomas; Deininger, Michael W.; Lim, Carol S.

    2015-01-01

    Targeted therapy of chronic myeloid leukemia is currently based on small-molecule inhibitors that directly bind the tyrosine kinase domain of BCR-ABL1. This strategy has generally been successful, but is subject to drug resistance due to point mutations in the kinase domain. Kinase activity requires transactivation of BCR-ABL1 following an oligomerization event, which is mediated by the coiled-coil (CC) domain at the N-terminus of the protein. Here, we describe a rationally engineered mutant version of the CC domain, called CCmut3, which interferes with BCR-ABL1 oligomerization and promotes apoptosis in BCR-ABL1-expressing cells, regardless of kinase domain mutation status. CCmut3 exhibits strong pro-apoptotic and anti-proliferative activity in cell lines expressing native BCR-ABL1, single kinase domain mutant BCR-ABL1 (E255V and T315I) or compound mutant BCR-ABL1 (E255V/T315I). Moreover, CCmut3 inhibits colony formation by primary CML CD34+ cells ex vivo, including a sample expressing the T315I mutant. These data suggest that targeting BCR-ABL1 with CC mutants may provide a novel alternative strategy for treating patients with resistance to current targeted therapies. PMID:25721898

  9. Remote Symbolic Computation of Loci

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abanades, Miguel A.; Escribano, Jesus; Botana, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a web-based tool designed to compute certified equations and graphs of geometric loci specified using standard Dynamic Geometry Systems (DGS). Complementing the graphing abilities of the considered DGS, the equations of the loci produced by the application are remotely computed using symbolic algebraic techniques from the…

  10. Efficacy and pharmacologic data of second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor nilotinib in BCR-ABL-positive leukemia patients with central nervous system relapse after allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Reinwald, Mark; Schleyer, Eberhard; Kiewe, Philipp; Blau, Igor Wolfgang; Burmeister, Thomas; Pursche, Stefan; Neumann, Martin; Notter, Michael; Thiel, Eckhard; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Kolb, Hans-Jochem; Burdach, Stefan; Bender, Hans-Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) involvement is a severe complication of BCR-ABL-positive leukemia after allogenic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT) associated with fatal outcome. Although second-generation tyrosine-kinase inhibitors (TKI) such as nilotinib have shown activity in systemic BCR-ABL(+) disease, little data exists on their penetration and efficacy within the CNS. Four patients (3 male, 1 female; age 15-49) with meningeal relapse after alloSCT and subsequent treatment with nilotinib were identified. A total of 17 cerebrospinal fluid (csf) and serum samples were assessed for nilotinib concentration and patient outcome was recorded. Nilotinib concentrations showed a low median csf/plasma ratio of 0.53% (range 0.23-1.5%), yet pronounced clinical efficacy was observed with long-lasting responses (>1 year) in three patients. Comparison with historical data showed a trend towards superior efficacy of nilotinib versus imatinib. Despite poor csf penetration, nilotinib showed significant clinical activity in CNS relapse of BCR-ABL(+) leukemias. As nilotinib has a high protein-binding affinity, the low-protein concentration in csf could translate into a relatively higher amount of free and therefore active nilotinib in csf as compared to blood, possibly explaining the observed efficacy. Thus, treatment with a 2nd generation TKI warrants further investigation and should be considered in cases of CNS relapse of BCR-ABL-positive leukemia after alloSCT.

  11. [The regulation of the activation in BCR signaling by ZIP9 transporter].

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Masanari; Enomoto, Shuichi; Hiromura, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    Zinc is the essential trace element and important for all living organisms. Zinc functions not only as a nutritional factor, but also as a second messenger. However, the effects of intracellular zinc on the B cell-receptor (BCR) signaling pathway are not poorly understood. Here, we indicate that the ZIP9 induces increase in intracellular zinc level and plays an important role in the phosphorylation of Akt and Erk in response to BCR activation. In DT40 cells, the enhancement of Akt and Erk phosphorylation requires intracellular zinc. To clarify this event, we used chicken Zip9-knockout DT40 (cZip9KO) cells. The levels of Akt and Erk phosphorylation significantly decreased in cZip9KO cells treated with zinc pyrithione (ZnPy), and overexpressing the human Zip9 gene restored these biochemical events. Moreover, we found that the increase in intracellular zinc level depends on the expression of ZIP9. Additionally, intracellular zinc was localized at the Golgi, even if it was treated with ZnPy in cZip9KO cells. We concluded that ZIP9 regulates cytosolic zinc level, resulting in the enhancement of Akt and Erk phosphorylation. Our observations provide new mechanistic insights into the BCR signaling pathway underlying the regulation of intracellular zinc level by ZIP9 in response to the BCR activation. PMID:24989471

  12. Frequency of BCR-ABL Transcript Types in Syrian CML Patients.

    PubMed

    Farhat-Maghribi, Sulaf; Habbal, Wafa; Monem, Fawza

    2016-01-01

    Background. In Syria, CML patients are started on tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and monitored until complete molecular response is achieved. BCR-ABL mRNA transcript type is not routinely identified, contrary to the recommendations. In this study we aimed to identify the frequency of different BCR-ABL transcripts in Syrian CML patients and highlight their significance on monitoring and treatment protocols. Methods. CML patients positive for BCR-ABL transcripts by quantitative RT-PCR were enrolled. BCR-ABL transcript types were investigated using a home-made PCR method that was adapted from published protocols and optimized. The transcript types were then confirmed using a commercially available research kit. Results. Twenty-four transcripts were found in 21 patients. The most common was b2a2, followed by b3a2, b3a3, and e1a3 present solely in 12 (57.1%), 3 (14.3%), 2 (9.5%), and 1 (4.8%), respectively. Three samples (14.3%) contained dual transcripts. While b3a2 transcript was apparently associated with warning molecular response to imatinib treatment, b2a2, b3a3, and e1a3 transcripts collectively proved otherwise (P = 0.047). Conclusion. It might be advisable to identify the BCR-ABL transcript type in CML patients at diagnosis, using an empirically verified method, in order to link the detected transcript with the clinical findings, possible resistance to treatment, and appropriate monitoring methods. PMID:27313614

  13. Genome-Wide Mapping of Growth-Related Quantitative Trait Loci in Orange-Spotted Grouper (Epinephelus coioides) Using Double Digest Restriction-Site Associated DNA Sequencing (ddRADseq)

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hui; You, Xinxin; Li, Jia; Liu, Hankui; Meng, Zining; Xiao, Ling; Zhang, Haifa; Lin, Hao-Ran; Zhang, Yong; Shi, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    Mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTL) is essential for the discovery of genetic structures that related to complex quantitative traits. In this study, we identified 264,072 raw SNPs (single-nucleotide polymorphisms) by double digest restriction site associated DNA sequencing (ddRADseq), and utilized 3029 of these SNPs to construct a genetic linkage map in orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) using a regression mapping algorithm. The genetic map contained 24 linkage groups (LGs) spanning a total genetic distance of 1231.98 cM. Twenty-seven significant growth-related QTLs were identified. Furthermore, we identified 17 genes (fez2, alg3, ece2, arvcf, sla27a4, sgk223, camk2, prrc2b, mchr1, sardh, pappa, syk, tert, wdrcp91, ftz-f1, mate1 and notch1) including three (tert, ftz-f1 and notch1) that have been reported to be involved in fish growth. To summarize, we mapped growth-related QTLs in the orange-spotted grouper. These QTLs will be useful in marker-assisted selection (MAS) efforts to improve growth-related traits in this economically important fish. PMID:27058532

  14. Genome-Wide Mapping of Growth-Related Quantitative Trait Loci in Orange-Spotted Grouper (Epinephelus coioides) Using Double Digest Restriction-Site Associated DNA Sequencing (ddRADseq).

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui; You, Xinxin; Li, Jia; Liu, Hankui; Meng, Zining; Xiao, Ling; Zhang, Haifa; Lin, Hao-Ran; Zhang, Yong; Shi, Qiong

    2016-04-06

    Mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTL) is essential for the discovery of genetic structures that related to complex quantitative traits. In this study, we identified 264,072 raw SNPs (single-nucleotide polymorphisms) by double digest restriction site associated DNA sequencing (ddRADseq), and utilized 3029 of these SNPs to construct a genetic linkage map in orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) using a regression mapping algorithm. The genetic map contained 24 linkage groups (LGs) spanning a total genetic distance of 1231.98 cM. Twenty-seven significant growth-related QTLs were identified. Furthermore, we identified 17 genes (fez2, alg3, ece2, arvcf, sla27a4, sgk223, camk2, prrc2b, mchr1, sardh, pappa, syk, tert, wdrcp91, ftz-f1, mate1 and notch1) including three (tert, ftz-f1 and notch1) that have been reported to be involved in fish growth. To summarize, we mapped growth-related QTLs in the orange-spotted grouper. These QTLs will be useful in marker-assisted selection (MAS) efforts to improve growth-related traits in this economically important fish.

  15. MicroRNA-320a acts as a tumor suppressor by targeting BCR/ABL oncogene in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Xishan, Zhu; Ziying, Lin; Jing, Du; Gang, Liu

    2015-07-31

    Accumulating evidences demonstrated that the induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and aberrant expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) are associated with tumorigenesis, tumor progression, metastasis and relapse in cancers, including chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). We found that miR-320a expression was reduced in K562 and in CML cancer stem cells. Moreover, we found that miR-320a inhibited K562 cell migration, invasion, proliferation and promoted apoptosis by targeting BCR/ABL oncogene. As an upstream regulator of BCR/ABL, miR-320a directly targets BCR/ABL. The enhanced expression of miR-320a inhibited the phosphorylation of PI3K, AKT and NF-κB; however, the expression of phosphorylated PI3K, AKT and NF-κB were restored by the overexpression of BCR/ABL. In K562, infected with miR-320a or transfected with SiBCR/ABL, the protein levels of fibronectin, vimentin, and N-cadherin were decreased, but the expression of E-cadherin was increased. The expression of mesenchymal markers in miR-320a-expressing cells was restored to normal levels by the restoration of BCR/ABL expression. Generally speaking, miR-320a acts as a novel tumor suppressor gene in CML and miR-320a can decrease migratory, invasive, proliferative and apoptotic behaviors, as well as CML EMT, by attenuating the expression of BCR/ABL oncogene.

  16. Enhanced and selective killing of chronic myelogenous leukemia cells with an engineered BCR-ABL binding protein and imatinib.

    PubMed

    Constance, Jonathan E; Woessner, David W; Matissek, Karina J; Mossalam, Mohanad; Lim, Carol S

    2012-11-01

    The oncoprotein Bcr-Abl stimulates prosurvival pathways and suppresses apoptosis from its exclusively cytoplasmic locale, but when targeted to the mitochondrial compartment of leukemia cells, Bcr-Abl was potently cytotoxic. Therefore, we designed a protein construct to act as a mitochondrial chaperone to move Bcr-Abl to the mitochondria. The chaperone (i.e., the 43.6 kDa intracellular cryptic escort (iCE)) contains an EGFP tag and two previously characterized motifs: (1) an optimized Bcr-Abl binding motif that interacts with the coiled-coil domain of Bcr (ccmut3; 72 residues), and (2) a cryptic mitochondrial targeting signal (cMTS; 51 residues) that selectively targets the mitochondria in oxidatively stressed cells (i.e., Bcr-Abl positive leukemic cells) via phosphorylation at a key residue (T193) by protein kinase C. While the iCE colocalized with Bcr-Abl, it did not relocalize to the mitochondria. However, the iCE was selectively toxic to Bcr-Abl positive K562 cells as compared to Bcr-Abl negative Cos-7 fibroblasts and 1471.1 murine breast cancer cells. The toxicity of the iCE to leukemic cells was equivalent to 10 μM imatinib at 48 h and the iCE combined with imatinib potentiated cell death beyond imatinib or the iCE alone. Substitution of either the ccmut3 or the cMTS with another Bcr-Abl binding domain (derived from Ras/Rab interaction protein 1 (RIN1; 295 residues)) or MTS (i.e., the canonical IMS derived from Smac/Diablo; 49 residues) did not match the cytotoxicity of the iCE. Additionally, a phosphorylation null mutant of the iCE also abolished the killing effect. The mitochondrial toxicity of Bcr-Abl and the iCE in Bcr-Abl positive K562 leukemia cells was confirmed by flow cytometric analysis of 7-AAD, TUNEL, and annexin-V staining. DNA segmentation and cell viability were assessed by microscopy. Subcellular localization of constructs was determined using confocal microscopy (including statistical colocalization analysis). Overall, the iCE was highly

  17. Relative number of cells projecting from contralateral and ipsilateral nucleus isthmi to loci in the optic tectum is dependent on visuotopic location: horseradish peroxidase study in the leopard frog.

    PubMed

    Dudkin, E A; Gruberg, E R

    1999-11-15

    The leopard frog optic tectum is the principal target of the contralateral retina. The retinal terminals form a topographic map of the visual field. The tectum also receives bilateral topographic input from a midbrain structure called nucleus isthmi. In this study we determined the relative strength of n. isthmi projections to different loci in the tectum. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was applied at single superficial tectal locations in a series of leopard frogs. The application sites were distributed across the tectum. Retrogradely filled cells were counted in ipsilateral and contralateral nucleus isthmi. Although all regions of the tectum receive input from both n. isthmi, the relative number of labeled cells in the two n. isthmi is dependent on visuotopic location. Input to the rostromedial tectum representing the visual field ipsilateral to the labeled tectum comes primarily from the contralateral n. isthmi. Input to the caudolateral tectum representing the visual field contralateral to the labeled tectum originates mostly from the ipsilateral n. isthmi. Tectal application sites representing the visual midline had approximately equal numbers of labeled cells in the two n. isthmi. The results are similar at postapplication survival times ranging from 2 to 14 days. Using application of HRP to rostral tectum and application of nuclear yellow to caudal tectum, we show that the anisotropy in isthmi labeling is not due to take up of these labels by isthmotectal fibers passing through the application sites that terminate elsewhere.

  18. Analysis of genetic polymorphism of the HLA-B and HLA-DR loci in patients with dermatophytic onychomycosis and in their first-degree relatives.

    PubMed

    García-Romero, M T; Granados, J; Vega-Memije, M E; Arenas, R

    2012-01-01

    Onychomycosis is known to have predisposing factors and a high prevalence within families that cannot be explained by within-family transmission. We determined the frequency of HLA-B and HLA-DR haplotypes in 25 families of Mexican patients with onychomycosis in order to define the role of the class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in genetic susceptibility to this infection. Seventy-eight subjects participated in the study, 47 with onychomycosis and 31 healthy individuals. The frequencies of the HLA-B and HLA-DR haplotypes were compared with those found in first-degree relatives without onychomycosis and in a historic control group of healthy individuals. The frequencies in the controls were similar to those of the healthy relatives of the patients. However, on comparison of the patients with historic controls, we detected a higher frequency of the HLA-DR8 haplotype (P=.03; odds ratio, 1.89; 95% confidence interval, 0.98-36). These findings suggest that there are polymorphisms in genes of the MHC that increase susceptibility to onychomycosis, particularly haplotype HLA-DR8.

  19. [Analysis of genetic polymorphism of the HLA-B and HLA-DR loci in patients with dermatophytic onychomycosis and in their first-degree relatives].

    PubMed

    García-Romero, M T; Granados, J; Vega-Memije, M E; Arenas, R

    2012-01-01

    Onychomycosis is known to have predisposing factors and a high prevalence within families that cannot be explained by within-family transmission. We determined the frequency of HLA-B and HLA-DR haplotypes in 25 families of Mexican patients with onychomycosis in order to define the role of the class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in genetic susceptibility to this infection. Seventy-eight subjects participated in the study, 47 with onychomycosis and 31 healthy individuals. The frequencies of the HLA-B and HLA-DR haplotypes were compared with those found in first-degree relatives without onychomycosis and in a historic control group of healthy individuals. The frequencies in the controls were similar to those of the healthy relatives of the patients. However, on comparison of the patients with historic controls, we detected a higher frequency of the HLA-DR8 haplotype (P=.03; odds ratio, 1.89; 95% confidence interval, 0.98-36). These findings suggest that there are polymorphisms in genes of the MHC that increase susceptibility to onychomycosis, particularly haplotype HLA-DR8.

  20. Chromosomal structure of the human TYRP1 and TYRP2 loci and comparison of the tyrosinase-related protein gene family

    SciTech Connect

    Sturm, R.A.; Smith, A.G.; Smit, S.E.

    1995-09-01

    The structures of the human tyrosinase-related protein genes TYRP1 and TYRP2 have been determined and compared with that of the tyrosinase gene (TYR). The TYRP1 protein is encoded in 7 exons spread over 24 kb of genomic DNA. Characterization of a 55-kb contig encompassing the human TYRP2 locus reveals that the protein coding region is divided into 8 exons. All three members of the TYRP gene family share a common C-terminal membrane spanning exon. Examination of the position of other intron junctions suggests that TYRP1 was derived from a TYR duplication and then was itself duplicated to give rise to the TYRP2 gene. The evidence also suggests that at least some of the introns within the TYR, TYRP1, and TYRP2 coding regions were gained after duplication and that intron slippage is unlikely to have occurred. 51 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Common genetic variants in the CLDN2 and PRSS1-PRSS2 loci alter risk for alcohol-related and sporadic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Whitcomb, David C.; LaRusch, Jessica; Krasinskas, Alyssa M.; Klei, Lambertus; Smith, Jill P.; Brand, Randall E.; Neoptolemos, John P.; Lerch, Markus M.; Tector, Matt; Sandhu, Bimaljit S.; Guda, Nalini M.; Orlichenko, Lidiya; Alkaade, Samer; Amann, Stephen T.; Anderson, Michelle A.; Baillie, John; Banks, Peter A.; Conwell, Darwin; Coté, Gregory A.; Cotton, Peter B.; DiSario, James; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Forsmark, Chris E.; Johnstone, Marianne; Gardner, Timothy B.; Gelrud, Andres; Greenhalf, William; Haines, Jonathan L.; Hartman, Douglas J.; Hawes, Robert A.; Lawrence, Christopher; Lewis, Michele; Mayerle, Julia; Mayeux, Richard; Melhem, Nadine M.; Money, Mary E.; Muniraj, Thiruvengadam; Papachristou, Georgios I.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Sherman, Stuart; Simon, Peter; Singh, Vijay K.; Slivka, Adam; Stolz, Donna; Sutton, Robert; Weiss, Frank Ulrich; Wilcox, C. Mel; Zarnescu, Narcis Octavian; Wisniewski, Stephen R.; O'Connell, Michael R.; Kienholz, Michelle L.; Roeder, Kathryn; Barmada, M. Michael; Yadav, Dhiraj; Devlin, Bernie; Albert, Marilyn S.; Albin, Roger L.; Apostolova, Liana G.; Arnold, Steven E.; Baldwin, Clinton T.; Barber, Robert; Barnes, Lisa L.; Beach, Thomas G.; Beecham, Gary W.; Beekly, Duane; Bennett, David A.; Bigio, Eileen H.; Bird, Thomas D.; Blacker, Deborah; Boxer, Adam; Burke, James R.; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Cairns, Nigel J.; Cantwell, Laura B.; Cao, Chuanhai; Carney, Regina M.; Carroll, Steven L.; Chui, Helena C.; Clark, David G.; Cribbs, David H.; Crocco, Elizabeth A.; Cruchaga, Carlos; DeCarli, Charles; Demirci, F. Yesim; Dick, Malcolm; Dickson, Dennis W.; Duara, Ranjan; Ertekin-Taner, Nilufer; Faber, Kelley M.; Fallon, Kenneth B.; Farlow, Martin R.; Ferris, Steven; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Frosch, Matthew P.; Galasko, Douglas R.; Ganguli, Mary; Gearing, Marla; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Gilbert, John R.; Gilman, Sid; Glass, Jonathan D.; Goate, Alison M.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Green, Robert C.; Growdon, John H.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Hamilton-Nelson, Kara L.; Hamilton, Ronald L.; Harrell, Lindy E.; Head, Elizabeth; Honig, Lawrence S.; Hulette, Christine M.; Hyman, Bradley T.; Jicha, Gregory A.; Jin, Lee-Way; Jun, Gyungah; Kamboh, M. Ilyas; Karydas, Anna; Kaye, Jeffrey A.; Kim, Ronald; Koo, Edward H.; Kowall, Neil W.; Kramer, Joel H.; Kramer, Patricia; Kukull, Walter A.; LaFerla, Frank M.; Lah, James J.; Leverenz, James B.; Levey, Allan I.; Li, Ge; Lin, Chiao-Feng; Lieberman, Andrew P.; Lopez, Oscar L.; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Lyketsos, Constantine G.; Mack, Wendy J.; Marson, Daniel C.; Martin, Eden R.; Martiniuk, Frank; Mash, Deborah C.; Masliah, Eliezer; McKee, Ann C.; Mesulam, Marsel; Miller, Bruce L.; Miller, Carol A.; Miller, Joshua W.; Montine, Thomas J.; Morris, John C.; Murrell, Jill R.; Naj, Adam C.; Olichney, John M.; Parisi, Joseph E.; Peskind, Elaine; Petersen, Ronald C.; Pierce, Aimee; Poon, Wayne W.; Potter, Huntington; Quinn, Joseph F.; Raj, Ashok; Raskind, Murray; Reiman, Eric M.; Reisberg, Barry; Reitz, Christiane; Ringman, John M.; Roberson, Erik D.; Rosen, Howard J.; Rosenberg, Roger N.; Sano, Mary; Saykin, Andrew J.; Schneider, Julie A.; Schneider, Lon S.; Seeley, William W.; Smith, Amanda G.; Sonnen, Joshua A.; Spina, Salvatore; Stern, Robert A.; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Troncoso, Juan C.; Tsuang, Debby W.; Valladares, Otto; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M.; Van Eldik, Linda J.; Vardarajan, Badri N.; Vinters, Harry V.; Vonsattel, Jean Paul; Wang, Li-San; Weintraub, Sandra; Welsh-Bohmer, Kathleen A.; Williamson, Jennifer; Woltjer, Randall L.; Wright, Clinton B.; Younkin, Steven G.; Yu, Chang-En; Yu, Lei

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatitis is a complex, progressively destructive inflammatory disorder. Alcohol was long thought to be the primary causative agent, but genetic contributions have been of interest since the discovery that rare PRSS1, CFTR, and SPINK1 variants were associated with pancreatitis risk. We now report two significant genome-wide associations identified and replicated at PRSS1-PRSS2 (1×10-12) and x-linked CLDN2 (p < 1×10-21) through a two-stage genome-wide study (Stage 1, 676 cases and 4507 controls; Stage 2, 910 cases and 4170 controls). The PRSS1 variant affects susceptibility by altering expression of the primary trypsinogen gene. The CLDN2 risk allele is associated with atypical localization of claudin-2 in pancreatic acinar cells. The homozygous (or hemizygous male) CLDN2 genotype confers the greatest risk, and its alleles interact with alcohol consumption to amplify risk. These results could partially explain the high frequency of alcohol-related pancreatitis in men – male hemizygous frequency is 0.26, female homozygote is 0.07. PMID:23143602

  2. A genome-wide linkage and association study of musical aptitude identifies loci containing genes related to inner ear development and neurocognitive functions.

    PubMed

    Oikkonen, J; Huang, Y; Onkamo, P; Ukkola-Vuoti, L; Raijas, P; Karma, K; Vieland, V J; Järvelä, I

    2015-02-01

    Humans have developed the perception, production and processing of sounds into the art of music. A genetic contribution to these skills of musical aptitude has long been suggested. We performed a genome-wide scan in 76 pedigrees (767 individuals) characterized for the ability to discriminate pitch (SP), duration (ST) and sound patterns (KMT), which are primary capacities for music perception. Using the Bayesian linkage and association approach implemented in program package KELVIN, especially designed for complex pedigrees, several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) near genes affecting the functions of the auditory pathway and neurocognitive processes were identified. The strongest association was found at 3q21.3 (rs9854612) with combined SP, ST and KMT test scores (COMB). This region is located a few dozen kilobases upstream of the GATA binding protein 2 (GATA2) gene. GATA2 regulates the development of cochlear hair cells and the inferior colliculus (IC), which are important in tonotopic mapping. The highest probability of linkage was obtained for phenotype SP at 4p14, located next to the region harboring the protocadherin 7 gene, PCDH7. Two SNPs rs13146789 and rs13109270 of PCDH7 showed strong association. PCDH7 has been suggested to play a role in cochlear and amygdaloid complexes. Functional class analysis showed that inner ear and schizophrenia-related genes were enriched inside the linked regions. This study is the first to show the importance of auditory pathway genes in musical aptitude.

  3. A genome-wide linkage and association study of musical aptitude identifies loci containing genes related to inner ear development and neurocognitive functions.

    PubMed

    Oikkonen, J; Huang, Y; Onkamo, P; Ukkola-Vuoti, L; Raijas, P; Karma, K; Vieland, V J; Järvelä, I

    2015-02-01

    Humans have developed the perception, production and processing of sounds into the art of music. A genetic contribution to these skills of musical aptitude has long been suggested. We performed a genome-wide scan in 76 pedigrees (767 individuals) characterized for the ability to discriminate pitch (SP), duration (ST) and sound patterns (KMT), which are primary capacities for music perception. Using the Bayesian linkage and association approach implemented in program package KELVIN, especially designed for complex pedigrees, several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) near genes affecting the functions of the auditory pathway and neurocognitive processes were identified. The strongest association was found at 3q21.3 (rs9854612) with combined SP, ST and KMT test scores (COMB). This region is located a few dozen kilobases upstream of the GATA binding protein 2 (GATA2) gene. GATA2 regulates the development of cochlear hair cells and the inferior colliculus (IC), which are important in tonotopic mapping. The highest probability of linkage was obtained for phenotype SP at 4p14, located next to the region harboring the protocadherin 7 gene, PCDH7. Two SNPs rs13146789 and rs13109270 of PCDH7 showed strong association. PCDH7 has been suggested to play a role in cochlear and amygdaloid complexes. Functional class analysis showed that inner ear and schizophrenia-related genes were enriched inside the linked regions. This study is the first to show the importance of auditory pathway genes in musical aptitude. PMID:24614497

  4. Accessible DNA and Relative Depletion of H3K9me2 at Maize Loci Undergoing RNA-Directed DNA Methylation[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Gent, Jonathan I.; Madzima, Thelma F.; Bader, Rechien; Kent, Matthew R.; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Stam, Maike; McGinnis, Karen M.; Dawe, R. Kelly

    2014-01-01

    RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) in plants is a well-characterized example of RNA interference-related transcriptional gene silencing. To determine the relationships between RdDM and heterochromatin in the repeat-rich maize (Zea mays) genome, we performed whole-genome analyses of several heterochromatic features: dimethylation of lysine 9 and lysine 27 (H3K9me2 and H3K27me2), chromatin accessibility, DNA methylation, and small RNAs; we also analyzed two mutants that affect these processes, mediator of paramutation1 and zea methyltransferase2. The data revealed that the majority of the genome exists in a heterochromatic state defined by inaccessible chromatin that is marked by H3K9me2 and H3K27me2 but that lacks RdDM. The minority of the genome marked by RdDM was predominantly near genes, and its overall chromatin structure appeared more similar to euchromatin than to heterochromatin. These and other data indicate that the densely staining chromatin defined as heterochromatin differs fundamentally from RdDM-targeted chromatin. We propose that small interfering RNAs perform a specialized role in repressing transposons in accessible chromatin environments and that the bulk of heterochromatin is incompatible with small RNA production. PMID:25465407

  5. Two novel susceptibility loci for non-small cell lung cancer map to low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Zhang, Yongjun; Fang, Meiyu; Bao, Wenglong; Deng, Dehou

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) on the risk of developing non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A total of 500 NSCLC patients and 500 healthy controls were recruited for genotyping of 11 SNPs of LRP5. The association between genotype and NSCLC risk was evaluated by computing the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) from multivariate unconditional logistic regression analyses. Eleven Tag SNPs were detected. The frequency of the LRP5 rs3736228 T allele (18.9% in male NSCLC cases and 23.9% in male controls) was statistically different between male NSCLCs and male controls (P=0.03), and the T allele was associated with a lower risk of NSCLC (OR=0.74; 95% CI, 0.56–0.67), whereas the C/C homozygous genotype and the LRP5 rs64843 T/T genotype were associated with an increased risk of NSCLC and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), respectively (OR=1.43 and 1.77, respectively). Using Haploview software, the frequency of the haplotypes of rs312009/rs3120015/rs3120014 CCC was was significantly higher in female SCC cases compared with female controls (0.064 vs. 0.009, P=0.04). LRP5 rs3736228 and rs64843 SNPs were significantly associated with an increased risk of NSCLC and SCC, respectively. Further studies are required to investigate the functional changes in LRP5 expression and activity in NSCLC in vitro.

  6. Two novel susceptibility loci for non-small cell lung cancer map to low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Zhang, Yongjun; Fang, Meiyu; Bao, Wenglong; Deng, Dehou

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) on the risk of developing non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A total of 500 NSCLC patients and 500 healthy controls were recruited for genotyping of 11 SNPs of LRP5. The association between genotype and NSCLC risk was evaluated by computing the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) from multivariate unconditional logistic regression analyses. Eleven Tag SNPs were detected. The frequency of the LRP5 rs3736228 T allele (18.9% in male NSCLC cases and 23.9% in male controls) was statistically different between male NSCLCs and male controls (P=0.03), and the T allele was associated with a lower risk of NSCLC (OR=0.74; 95% CI, 0.56–0.67), whereas the C/C homozygous genotype and the LRP5 rs64843 T/T genotype were associated with an increased risk of NSCLC and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), respectively (OR=1.43 and 1.77, respectively). Using Haploview software, the frequency of the haplotypes of rs312009/rs3120015/rs3120014 CCC was was significantly higher in female SCC cases compared with female controls (0.064 vs. 0.009, P=0.04). LRP5 rs3736228 and rs64843 SNPs were significantly associated with an increased risk of NSCLC and SCC, respectively. Further studies are required to investigate the functional changes in LRP5 expression and activity in NSCLC in vitro. PMID:27698794

  7. Detection of BCR-ABL using one step reverse transcriptase- polymerase chain reaction and microchip electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xuexia; Wu, Jing; Liu, Wu; Li, Haifang; Wang, Zhihua; Lin, Jin-Ming

    2013-12-15

    One-step reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) coupled with microchip electrophoresis (MCE) was established to analyze BCR-ABL fusion gene. The use of one-step RT-PCR could simplify the RT-PCR procedure and thus reduced the risk of contamination and sample consumption. This method also enhanced the sensitivity for amplified target DNA and dramatically shorted the analysis time. Moreover, this assay can simultaneously identify b2a2 and b3a2. Orthogonal array design, which can investigated mutual effects of PCR parameters, was used to optimize the reaction system. This approach was highly effective, reproducible and sensitive, and would be suitable for the determination of BCR-ABL in clinic diagnosis.

  8. Detection of BCR-ABL Fusion mRNA Using Reverse Transcriptase Loop-mediated Isothermal Amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Dugan, L C; Hall, S; Kohlgruber, A; Urbin, S; Torres, C; Wilson, P

    2011-12-08

    RT-PCR is commonly used for the detection of Bcr-Abl fusion transcripts in patients diagnosed with chronic myelogenous leukemia, CML. Two fusion transcripts predominate in CML, Br-Abl e13a2 and e14a2. They have developed reverse transcriptase isothermal loop-mediated amplification (RT-LAMP) assays to detect these two fusion transcripts along with the normal Bcr transcript.

  9. MAPK15 mediates BCR-ABL1-induced autophagy and regulates oncogene-dependent cell proliferation and tumor formation

    PubMed Central

    Colecchia, David; Rossi, Matteo; Sasdelli, Federica; Sanzone, Sveva; Strambi, Angela; Chiariello, Mario

    2015-01-01

    A reciprocal translocation of the ABL1 gene to the BCR gene results in the expression of the oncogenic BCR-ABL1 fusion protein, which characterizes human chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), a myeloproliferative disorder considered invariably fatal until the introduction of the imatinib family of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI). Nonetheless, insensitivity of CML stem cells to TKI treatment and intrinsic or acquired resistance are still frequent causes for disease persistence and blastic phase progression experienced in patients after initial successful therapies. Here, we investigated a possible role for the MAPK15/ERK8 kinase in BCR-ABL1-dependent autophagy, a key process for oncogene-induced leukemogenesis. In this context, we showed the ability of MAPK15 to physically recruit the oncogene to autophagic vesicles, confirming our hypothesis of a biologically relevant role for this MAP kinase in signal transduction by this oncogene. Indeed, by modeling BCR-ABL1 signaling in HeLa cells and taking advantage of a physiologically relevant model for human CML, i.e. K562 cells, we demonstrated that BCR-ABL1-induced autophagy is mediated by MAPK15 through its ability to interact with LC3-family proteins, in a LIR-dependent manner. Interestingly, we were also able to interfere with BCR-ABL1-induced autophagy by a pharmacological approach aimed at inhibiting MAPK15, opening the possibility of acting on this kinase to affect autophagy and diseases depending on this cellular function. Indeed, to support the feasibility of this approach, we demonstrated that depletion of endogenous MAPK15 expression inhibited BCR-ABL1-dependent cell proliferation, in vitro, and tumor formation, in vivo, therefore providing a novel “druggable” link between BCR-ABL1 and human CML. PMID:26291129

  10. Death by a thousand knives: Multiple BH3-only proteins are required for maximal apoptosis triggered through the BCR.

    PubMed

    Carter, Matthew J; Cragg, Mark S

    2016-03-01

    The B-cell receptor (BCR) represents a key driver of B-cell development. Consequently, multiple mechanisms link inappropriate BCR signaling to apoptosis. Recently, we characterized the molecular regulators involved in lymphoma cells, confirming a major role for Bcl-2 interacting mediator of cell death (Bim) and supplementary roles for Bcl-2 interacting killer (Bik) and Noxa, and showing that all 3 proteins are required for maximal apoptosis. PMID:27308607

  11. Targeted insertions of two exogenous collagen genes into both alleles of their endogenous loci in cultured human cells: the insertions are directed by relatively short fragments containing the promoters and the 5' ends of the genes.

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, A; Smelt, S; Mewar, R; Fertala, A; Sieron, A L; Overhauser, J; Prockop, D J

    1994-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that type II procollagen is synthesized by HT-1080 cells that are stably transfected with constructs of the human COL2A1 gene that contain the promoter and 5' end of either the COL2A1 gene or the human COL1A1 gene. Since the host HT-1080 cells were from a human tumor line that synthesizes type IV collagen but not type II or type I procollagen, the results suggested that the constructs were integrated near active enhancers or promoters. Here, however, we demonstrate that a 33-kb construct of the COL2A1 gene containing a 5' fragment from the same gene was inserted into both alleles of the endogenous COL2A1 gene on chromosome 12, apparently by homologous recombination by a nonconservative pathway. In contrast, a similar construct of the COL2A1 gene in which the 5' end was replaced with a 1.9-kb fragment from the 5' end of the COL1A1 gene was inserted into both alleles of the locus for the COL1A1 gene on chromosome 17. Therefore, targeted insertion of the gene construct was not directed by the degree of sequence homology. Instead, it was directed by the relatively short 5' fragment from the COL1A1 gene that contained the promoter and the initially transcribed sequences of the gene. After insertion, both gene constructs were expressed from previously inactive loci. Images PMID:8041796

  12. Real-time quantification assay to monitor BCR-ABL1 transcripts in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Foskett, Pierre; Gerrard, Gareth; Foroni, Letizia

    2014-01-01

    The BCR-ABL1 fusion gene, the causative lesion of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in >95 % of newly presenting patients, offers both a therapeutic and diagnostic target. Reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction technology (RT-qPCR), utilizing primer-probe combinations directed to exons flanking the breakpoint junctional region, offers very high levels of both specificity and sensitivity, in a scalable, robust, and cost-effective assay.

  13. Speciation of heavy metals in untreated domestic wastewater sludge by time saving BCR sequential extraction method.

    PubMed

    Jamali, Mohammad K; Kazi, Tasneem G; Afridi, Hassan I; Arain, Mohammad B; Jalbani, Nusrat; Memon, Attique R

    2007-04-01

    In this work the modified three-stage sequential extraction procedure developed within the Standards, Measurement and Testing Programme (formally the Community Bureau of Reference BCR) of the European Commission, was applied for the fractionation of Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn in the untreated domestic wastewater sludge (DWS) collected from the Hyderabad city of Pakistan. The aim of our study was to evaluate the impact of different time intervals for shaking, and sample mass of sewage sludge on optimal recovery of all metals under study. Analyses of the extracts were performed by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). The precision and accuracy of the proposed procedure was evaluated by using a certified reference material of soil amended with sewage sludge BCR 483. The maximum recoveries for Cd and Zn were observed for all three steps of BCR protocol at 26 hours (h) total shaking period, while Cr, Cu, Ni and Pb were achieved at 32 hours instead of previously reported 51 hours, with (p < 0.05). The maximum level of all heavy metals was achieved in samples mass 0.2-0.4 g, where as the extractant-sample mass ratio was kept according to the optimized BCR method. The results of the sequential extraction study of untreated DWS indicates that more easily mobilized forms (acid exchangeable) were found to be 31.0, 3.1, 2.5, 7.6, 2.6 and 8.4% of total contents of Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn, respectively. The oxidizable fraction is dominant for all the heavy metals, except Cd. The lixiviation tests (DIN 38414-S4) were used to evaluate the leaching of heavy metals from sewage sludge used for agricultural purposes. PMID:17454372

  14. Molecular Imaging of Bcr-Abl Phosphokinase in a Xenograft Model*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ji Yuan; Yang, David J.; Angelo, Laura S.; Kohanim, Saady; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the Bcr-Abl tyrosine kinase can be assessed by gamma imaging using an 111Indium-labeled anti-phosphotyrosine antibody, and if the response to treatment with imatinib could be detected using this imaging technique. Anti-phosphotyrosine antibody (APT) was labeled with indium (111In) using ethylenedicysteine (EC) as a chelator. To determine if 111In-EC-APT could assess a non-receptor tyrosine kinase, xenografts of the human chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cell line K562 were used. Gamma scintigraphy of the tumor-bearing mice, before and after imatinib treatment, was obtained 1, 24, and 48 hours after they were given 111In-EC-APT (100 uCi/mouse, i.v.). 111In-EC-APT is preferentially taken up by Bcr-Abl-bearing tumor cells when compared to 111In-EC-BSA or 111In-EC-IgG1 controls, and comparable to the level of uptake of 111In-EC-Bcr-Abl. Imatinib treatment resulted in decreased expression of phosphorylated Bcr-Abl by Western blot analysis, which correlated with early (four days after starting imatinib) kinase down-regulation as assessed by imaging using 111In-EC-APT. The optimal time to imaging was 24 and 48 hours after injection of 111In-EC-APT. Although tumor regression was insignificant on day 4 after starting imatinib treatment, it was marked by day 14. 111In-EC-APT can assess intracellular phosphokinase activity, and down-regulation of phosphokinase activity predates tumor regression. This technique may therefore be useful in the clinic to detect the presence of phosphokinase activity, and for early prediction of response. PMID:19258427

  15. Hypoxia-Like Signatures Induced by BCR-ABL Potentially Alter the Glutamine Uptake for Maintaining Oxidative Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Sontakke, Pallavi; Koczula, Katarzyna M; Jaques, Jennifer; Wierenga, Albertus T J; Brouwers-Vos, Annet Z; Pruis, Maurien; Günther, Ulrich L; Vellenga, Edo; Schuringa, Jan Jacob

    2016-01-01

    The Warburg effect is probably the most prominent metabolic feature of cancer cells, although little is known about the underlying mechanisms and consequences. Here, we set out to study these features in detail in a number of leukemia backgrounds. The transcriptomes of human CB CD34+ cells transduced with various oncogenes, including BCR-ABL, MLL-AF9, FLT3-ITD, NUP98-HOXA9, STAT5A and KRASG12V were analyzed in detail. Our data indicate that in particular BCR-ABL, KRASG12V and STAT5 could impose hypoxic signaling under normoxic conditions. This coincided with an upregulation of glucose importers SLC2A1/3, hexokinases and HIF1 and 2. NMR-based metabolic profiling was performed in CB CD34+ cells transduced with BCR-ABL versus controls, both cultured under normoxia and hypoxia. Lactate and pyruvate levels were increased in BCR-ABL-expressing cells even under normoxia, coinciding with enhanced glutaminolysis which occurred in an HIF1/2-dependent manner. Expression of the glutamine importer SLC1A5 was increased in BCR-ABL+ cells, coinciding with an increased susceptibility to the glutaminase inhibitor BPTES. Oxygen consumption rates also decreased upon BPTES treatment, indicating a glutamine dependency for oxidative phosphorylation. The current study suggests that BCR-ABL-positive cancer cells make use of enhanced glutamine metabolism to maintain TCA cell cycle activity in glycolytic cells. PMID:27055152

  16. Inhibition of isoprenylcysteine carboxylmethyltransferase augments BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibition-induced apoptosis in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wen Tian; Xiang, Wei; Ng, Bee Ling; Asari, Kartini; Bunte, Ralph M; Casey, Patrick J; Wang, Mei; Chuah, Charles

    2016-03-01

    Despite the success of BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors remains a therapeutic challenge. One strategy used to overcome resistance is combination of existing BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors with agents that target alternative pathways. We report that inhibition of isoprenylcysteine carboxylmethyltransferase (Icmt), a key enzyme in the protein prenylation pathway, with the selective inhibitor cysmethynil enhances the effect of BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors in killing CML cells. Cysmethynil augments tyrosine kinase inhibitor-induced apoptosis in both BCR-ABL1 wild type and BCR-ABL1 kinase domain mutant-expressing cell lines. Importantly, the enhanced apoptosis observed with the combination of cysmethynil and imatinib is significant only in primary CML CD34+ progenitor cells, not normal cord blood progenitor cells. The combination was also selective in inhibiting colony formation in CML CD34+ cells. The enhanced apoptosis appears to be due to combination of immediate and persistent inhibition of MAPK signaling. Consistent with in vitro studies, cysmethynil and imatinib, in combination, enhance the in vivo effects of either drug used alone. We found that simultaneous inhibition of BCR-ABL1 and Icmt may represent a potential therapeutic strategy for CML. PMID:26706195

  17. Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia with a rare b3a3 type BCR/ABL1 fusion transcript.

    PubMed

    Kurita, Daisuke; Hatta, Yoshihiro; Hojo, Atsuko; Kura, Yoshimasa; Sawada, Umihiko; Kanda, Yoshinobu; Takei, Masami

    2016-04-01

    The Philadelphia chromosome (Ph) is the most frequent chromosomal abnormality detected in adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). This chromosome forms the BCR/ABL1 fusion gene; thus, ABL1 exon a2 is generally used as a primer-binding region for the detection of the fusion transcript via reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). We observed a rare case of adult Ph-positive (Ph(+)) ALL, in which the BCR/ABL1 fusion transcript was not detected using the ABL1 exon a2 region primer. However, we were able to isolate a PCR product by RT-PCR with the BCR exon 13 (b2) and ABL1 exon a3 primers. Analysis of the sequence of the RT-PCR product revealed that the fusion point was between BCR exon 14 (b3) and ABL1 exon a3, and that the transcript lacked ABL1 exon a2. The patient achieved cytogenetic remission through combination chemotherapies, but relapse occurred before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and the patient died 11 months after the initialization of chemotherapies. If the BCR/ABL1 fusion transcript is undetected with the ABL1 exon a2 region primer in Ph(+) ALL cases, an RT-PCR analysis that can detect the b3a3 type BCR/ABL1 fusion transcript should be considered to improve diagnosis. PMID:26854094

  18. Hypoxia-Like Signatures Induced by BCR-ABL Potentially Alter the Glutamine Uptake for Maintaining Oxidative Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Sontakke, Pallavi; Koczula, Katarzyna M.; Jaques, Jennifer; Wierenga, Albertus T. J.; Brouwers-Vos, Annet Z.; Pruis, Maurien; Günther, Ulrich L.; Vellenga, Edo; Schuringa, Jan Jacob

    2016-01-01

    The Warburg effect is probably the most prominent metabolic feature of cancer cells, although little is known about the underlying mechanisms and consequences. Here, we set out to study these features in detail in a number of leukemia backgrounds. The transcriptomes of human CB CD34+ cells transduced with various oncogenes, including BCR-ABL, MLL-AF9, FLT3-ITD, NUP98-HOXA9, STAT5A and KRASG12V were analyzed in detail. Our data indicate that in particular BCR-ABL, KRASG12V and STAT5 could impose hypoxic signaling under normoxic conditions. This coincided with an upregulation of glucose importers SLC2A1/3, hexokinases and HIF1 and 2. NMR-based metabolic profiling was performed in CB CD34+ cells transduced with BCR-ABL versus controls, both cultured under normoxia and hypoxia. Lactate and pyruvate levels were increased in BCR-ABL-expressing cells even under normoxia, coinciding with enhanced glutaminolysis which occurred in an HIF1/2-dependent manner. Expression of the glutamine importer SLC1A5 was increased in BCR-ABL+ cells, coinciding with an increased susceptibility to the glutaminase inhibitor BPTES. Oxygen consumption rates also decreased upon BPTES treatment, indicating a glutamine dependency for oxidative phosphorylation. The current study suggests that BCR-ABL-positive cancer cells make use of enhanced glutamine metabolism to maintain TCA cell cycle activity in glycolytic cells. PMID:27055152

  19. BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitors in the treatment of Philadelphia chromosome positive chronic myeloid leukemia: a review.

    PubMed

    An, Xin; Tiwari, Amit K; Sun, Yibo; Ding, Pei-Rong; Ashby, Charles R; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2010-10-01

    Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) is a clonal disease characterized by the presence of the Philadelphia (Ph+) chromosome and its oncogenic product, BCR-ABL, a constitutively active tyrosine kinase, that is present in >90% of the patients. Epidemiologic data indicates that almost 5000 new cases are reported every year and 10% of these patients eventually succumb to the disease. The treatment of CML was revolutionized by the introduction of imatinib mesylate (IM, Gleevec), a BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI). The clinical use of specific BCR-ABL inhibitors has resulted in a significantly improved prognosis, response rate, overall survival, and patient outcome in CML patients compared to previous therapeutic regimens. However, the complete eradication of CML in patients receiving imatinib was limited by the emergence of resistance mostly due to mutations in the ABL kinase domain and to a lesser extent by molecular residual disease after treatment. The second-generation BCR-ABL TKIs nilotinib (Tasigna) and dasatinib (Sprycel), showed significant activity in clinical trials in patients intolerant or resistant to imatinib therapy, except in those patients with the T315I BCR-ABL mutation. Identifying key components involved in the CML pathogenesis may lead to the exploration of new approaches that might eventually overcome resistance mediated to the BCR-ABL TKIs. Here, we present an overview about the current treatment of Ph+ CML patients with the TKIs and the obstacles to successful treatment with these drugs.

  20. A solid-phase Bcr-Abl kinase assay in 96-well hydrogel plates.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ding; Mand, Michael R; Veach, Darren R; Parker, Laurie L; Clarkson, Bayard; Kron, Stephen J

    2008-04-01

    Regulated phosphorylation by protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs), such as c-Abl, is critical to cellular homeostasis. In turn, once deregulated as in the chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) fusion protein Bcr-Abl, PTKs can promote cancer onset and progression. The dramatic success of the Bcr-Abl inhibitor imatinib as therapy for CML has inspired interest in other PTKs as targets for cancer drug discovery. Here we report a novel PTK activity and inhibition screening method using hydrogel-immobilized peptide substrates. Using acrylate crosslinkers, we tether peptides via terminal cysteines to thiol-presenting hydrogels in 96-well plates. These surfaces display low background and high reproducibility, allowing semiquantitative detection of peptide phosphorylation by recombinant c-Abl or by Bcr-Abl activity in cell extracts using traditional anti-phosphotyrosine immunodetection and chemifluorescence. The capabilities of this assay are demonstrated by performing model screens for inhibition with several commercially available PTK inhibitors and a collection of pyridopyrimidine Src/Abl dual inhibitors. This assay provides a practical method to measure the activity of a single kinase present in a whole cell lysate with high sensitivity and specificity as a valuable means for efficient small molecule screening.

  1. Stat5 is indispensable for the maintenance of bcr/abl-positive leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Hoelbl, Andrea; Schuster, Christian; Kovacic, Boris; Zhu, Bingmei; Wickre, Mark; Hoelzl, Maria A; Fajmann, Sabine; Grebien, Florian; Warsch, Wolfgang; Stengl, Gabriele; Hennighausen, Lothar; Poli, Valeria; Beug, Hartmut; Moriggl, Richard; Sexl, Veronika

    2010-01-01

    Tumourigenesis caused by the Bcr/Abl oncoprotein is a multi-step process proceeding from initial to tumour-maintaining events and finally results in a complex tumour-supporting network. A key to successful cancer therapy is the identification of critical functional nodes in an oncogenic network required for disease maintenance. So far, the transcription factors Stat3 and Stat5a/b have been implicated in bcr/abl-induced initial transformation. However, to qualify as a potential drug target, a signalling pathway must be required for the maintenance of the leukaemic state. Data on the roles of Stat3 or Stat5a/b in leukaemia maintenance are elusive. Here, we show that both, Stat3 and Stat5 are necessary for initial transformation. However, Stat5- but not Stat3-deletion induces G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of imatinib-sensitive and imatinib-resistant stable leukaemic cells in vitro. Accordingly, Stat5-abrogation led to effective elimination of myeloid and lymphoid leukaemia maintenance in vivo. Hence, we identified Stat5 as a vulnerable point in the oncogenic network downstream of Bcr/Abl representing a case of non-oncogene addiction (NOA). PMID:20201032

  2. Heat shock protein-70 neutralizes apoptosis inducing factor in Bcr/Abl expressing cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Dai, An-Ya; Tao, Kun; Xiao, Qing; Huang, Zheng-Lan; Gao, Miao; Li, Hui; Wang, Xin; Cao, Wei-Xi; Feng, Wen-Li

    2015-10-01

    Bcr/Abl fusion protein is a hallmark of human chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). The protein can activate various signaling pathways to make normal cells transform malignantly and thus to facilitate tumorigenesis. It has been reported that heat shock protein-70 (HSP-70) can be served as an anti-apoptotic protein that suppresses Bax and Apo-2L/TRAIL. But it is unclear whether HSP-70 affects AIF-initiated apoptosis in Bcr/Abl expressing cells considering that HSP-70 is coincidentally over-regulated in these cells. Our findings supported that abundant HSP-70 in Bcr/Abl cells neutralizes AIF by segregating it from nucleus via direct interaction, leading to the failure of AIF initiating cell death and the silence of caspase-independent apoptotic pathway upon apoptotic induction. Moderate inhibition of HSP-70 expression by siRNA leads to Vp-16 triggered re-distribution of AIF in nucleus. In addition, AIF bears a HSP-70 binding domain allowing association with HSP-70. Therefore, disruption of the association using an AIF mutant lacking this domain can restore the potential of AIF importing into nucleus, and finally triggers cell death in a time dependent manner.

  3. Design of substrate-based BCR-ABL kinase inhibitors using the cyclotide scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yen-Hua; Henriques, Sónia T.; Wang, Conan K.; Thorstholm, Louise; Daly, Norelle L.; Kaas, Quentin; Craik, David J.

    2015-01-01

    The constitutively active tyrosine kinase BCR-ABL is the underlying cause of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Current CML treatments rely on the long-term use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), which target the ATP binding site of BCR-ABL. Over the course of treatment, 20–30% of CML patients develop TKI resistance, which is commonly attributed to point mutations in the drug-binding region. We design a new class of peptide inhibitors that target the substrate-binding site of BCR-ABL by grafting sequences derived from abltide, the optimal substrate of Abl kinase, onto a cell-penetrating cyclotide MCoTI-II. Three grafted cyclotides show significant Abl kinase inhibition in vitro in the low micromolar range using a novel kinase inhibition assay. Our work also demonstrates that a reengineered MCoTI-II with abltide sequences grafted in both loop 1 and 6 inhibits the activity of [T315I]Abl in vitro, a mutant Abl kinase harboring the “gatekeeper” mutation which is notorious for being multidrug resistant. Results from serum stability and cell internalization studies confirm that the MCoTI-II scaffold provides enzymatic stability and cell-penetrating properties to the lead molecules. Taken together, our study highlights that reengineered cyclotides incorporating abltide-derived sequences are promising substrate-competitive inhibitors for Abl kinase and the T315I mutant. PMID:26264857

  4. Tonic BCR signaling represses receptor editing via Raf- and calcium-dependent signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Laura B; Vegoe, Amanda L; Miller, Andrew T; Cooke, Michael P; Farrar, Michael A

    2011-03-30

    Light chain receptor editing is an important mechanism that prevents B cell self-reactivity. We have previously shown that tonic signaling through the BCR represses RAG expression at the immature B cell stage, and that initiation of light chain rearrangements occurs in the absence of these tonic signals in an in vitro model of B cell development. To further test our hypothesis we studied the effect of itpkb deficiency (itpkb(-/-) mice) or Raf hyper-activation (Raf-CAAX transgenic mice), two mutations that enhance BCR signaling, on receptor editing in an in vivo model. This model relies on transferring bone marrow from wild-type or mutant mice into mice expressing an anti-kappa light chain transgene. The anti-kappa transgene induces receptor editing of all kappa light chain expressing B cells, leading to a high frequency of lambda light chain expressing B cells. Anti-κ transgenic recipients of bone marrow from itpkb(-/-) or Raf-CAAX mice showed lower levels of editing to λ light chain than did non-transgenic control recipients. These results provide evidence in an in vivo model that enhanced BCR signaling at the immature B cell stage of development suppresses light chain receptor editing.

  5. Loci related to metabolic-syndrome pathways including LEPR,HNF1A, IL6R, and GCKR associate with plasma C-reactive protein: the Women's Genome Health Study.

    PubMed

    Ridker, Paul M; Pare, Guillaume; Parker, Alex; Zee, Robert Y L; Danik, Jacqueline S; Buring, Julie E; Kwiatkowski, David; Cook, Nancy R; Miletich, Joseph P; Chasman, Daniel I

    2008-05-01

    Although elevated levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) independently predict increased risk of development of metabolic syndrome, diabetes, myocardial infarction, and stroke, comprehensive analysis of the influence of genetic variation on CRP is not available. To address this issue, we performed a genome-wide association study among 6345 apparently healthy women in which we evaluated 336,108 SNPs as potential determinants of plasma CRP concentration. Overall, seven loci that associate with plasma CRP at levels achieving genome-wide statistical significance were found (range of p values for lead SNPs within the seven loci: 1.9 x 10(-)(8) to 6.2 x 10(-)(28)). Two of these loci (GCKR and HNF1A) are suspected or known to be associated with maturity-onset diabetes of the young, one is a gene-desert region on 12q23.2, and the remaining four loci are in or near the leptin receptor protein gene, the apolipoprotein E gene, the interleukin-6 receptor protein gene, or the CRP gene itself. The protein products of six of these seven loci are directly involved in metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance, beta cell function, weight homeostasis, and/or premature atherothrombosis. Thus, common variation in several genes involved in metabolic and inflammatory regulation have significant effects on CRP levels, consistent with CRP's identification as a useful biomarker of risk for incident vascular disease and diabetes. PMID:18439548

  6. Loci Related to Metabolic-Syndrome Pathways Including LEPR,HNF1A, IL6R, and GCKR Associate with Plasma C-Reactive Protein: The Women's Genome Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Ridker, Paul M.; Pare, Guillaume; Parker, Alex; Zee, Robert Y.L.; Danik, Jacqueline S.; Buring, Julie E.; Kwiatkowski, David; Cook, Nancy R.; Miletich, Joseph P.; Chasman, Daniel I.

    2008-01-01

    Although elevated levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) independently predict increased risk of development of metabolic syndrome, diabetes, myocardial infarction, and stroke, comprehensive analysis of the influence of genetic variation on CRP is not available. To address this issue, we performed a genome-wide association study among 6345 apparently healthy women in which we evaluated 336,108 SNPs as potential determinants of plasma CRP concentration. Overall, seven loci that associate with plasma CRP at levels achieving genome-wide statistical significance were found (range of p values for lead SNPs within the seven loci: 1.9 × 10−8 to 6.2 × 10−28). Two of these loci (GCKR and HNF1A) are suspected or known to be associated with maturity-onset diabetes of the young, one is a gene-desert region on 12q23.2, and the remaining four loci are in or near the leptin receptor protein gene, the apolipoprotein E gene, the interleukin-6 receptor protein gene, or the CRP gene itself. The protein products of six of these seven loci are directly involved in metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance, beta cell function, weight homeostasis, and/or premature atherothrombosis. Thus, common variation in several genes involved in metabolic and inflammatory regulation have significant effects on CRP levels, consistent with CRP's identification as a useful biomarker of risk for incident vascular disease and diabetes. PMID:18439548

  7. Physical Modeling of Dynamic Coupling between Chromosomal Loci.

    PubMed

    Lampo, Thomas J; Kennard, Andrew S; Spakowitz, Andrew J

    2016-01-19

    The motion of chromosomal DNA is essential to many biological processes, including segregation, transcriptional regulation, recombination, and packaging. Physical understanding of these processes would be dramatically enhanced through predictive, quantitative modeling of chromosome dynamics of multiple loci. Using a polymer dynamics framework, we develop a prediction for the correlation in the velocities of two loci on a single chromosome or otherwise connected by chromatin. These predictions reveal that the signature of correlated motion between two loci can be identified by varying the lag time between locus position measurements. In general, this theory predicts that as the lag time interval increases, the dual-loci dynamic behavior transitions from being completely uncorrelated to behaving as an effective single locus. This transition corresponds to the timescale of the stress communication between loci through the intervening segment. This relatively simple framework makes quantitative predictions based on a single timescale fit parameter that can be directly compared to the in vivo motion of fluorescently labeled chromosome loci. Furthermore, this theoretical framework enables the detection of dynamically coupled chromosome regions from the signature of their correlated motion.

  8. Physical Modeling of Dynamic Coupling between Chromosomal Loci.

    PubMed

    Lampo, Thomas J; Kennard, Andrew S; Spakowitz, Andrew J

    2016-01-19

    The motion of chromosomal DNA is essential to many biological processes, including segregation, transcriptional regulation, recombination, and packaging. Physical understanding of these processes would be dramatically enhanced through predictive, quantitative modeling of chromosome dynamics of multiple loci. Using a polymer dynamics framework, we develop a prediction for the correlation in the velocities of two loci on a single chromosome or otherwise connected by chromatin. These predictions reveal that the signature of correlated motion between two loci can be identified by varying the lag time between locus position measurements. In general, this theory predicts that as the lag time interval increases, the dual-loci dynamic behavior transitions from being completely uncorrelated to behaving as an effective single locus. This transition corresponds to the timescale of the stress communication between loci through the intervening segment. This relatively simple framework makes quantitative predictions based on a single timescale fit parameter that can be directly compared to the in vivo motion of fluorescently labeled chromosome loci. Furthermore, this theoretical framework enables the detection of dynamically coupled chromosome regions from the signature of their correlated motion. PMID:26789757

  9. AP24534, a Pan-BCR-ABL Inhibitor for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, Potently Inhibits the T315I Mutant and Overcomes Mutation-Based Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    O’Hare, Thomas; Shakespeare, William C.; Zhu, Xiaotian; Eide, Christopher A.; Rivera, Victor M.; Wang, Frank; Adrian, Lauren T.; Zhou, Tianjun; Huang, Wei-Sheng; Xu, Qihong; Metcalf, III, Chester A.; Tyner, Jeffrey W.; Loriaux, Marc M.; Corbin, Amie S.; Wardwell, Scott; Ning, Yaoyu; Keats, Jeffrey A.; Wang, Yihan; Sundaramoorthi, Raji; Thomas, Mathew; Zhou, Dong; Snodgrass, Joseph; Commodore, Lois; Sawyer, Tomi K.; Dalgarno, David C.; Deininger, Michael W.N.; Druker, Brian J.; Clackson, Tim

    2010-09-07

    Inhibition of BCR-ABL by imatinib induces durable responses in many patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), but resistance attributable to kinase domain mutations can lead to relapse and a switch to second-line therapy with nilotinib or dasatinib. Despite three approved therapeutic options, the cross-resistant BCR-ABL{sup T315I} mutation and compound mutants selected on sequential inhibitor therapy remain major clinical challenges. We report design and preclinical evaluation of AP24534, a potent, orally available multitargeted kinase inhibitor active against T315I and other BCR-ABL mutants. AP24534 inhibited all tested BCR-ABL mutants in cellular and biochemical assays, suppressed BCR-ABL{sup T315I}-driven tumor growth in mice, and completely abrogated resistance in cell-based mutagenesis screens. Our work supports clinical evaluation of AP24534 as a pan-BCR-ABL inhibitor for treatment of CML.

  10. Acute promyelocytic leukaemia in patients originating in Latin America is associated with an increased frequency of the bcr1 subtype of the PML/RARalpha fusion gene.

    PubMed

    Douer, Dan; Santillana, Sergio; Ramezani, Laleh; Samanez, Cesar; Slovak, Marilyn L; Lee, Ming S; Watkins, Kristy; Williams, Tony; Vallejos, Carlos

    2003-08-01

    The PML/RARalpha fusion gene in acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL) has three subtypes based on the breakpoint site of the PML gene: long (bcr1), short (bcr3) and variable (bcr2) subtypes. The PML/RARalpha fusion protein is involved in the pathogenesis of APL and the breakpoint site of the PML gene might be associated with aetiological factor(s). Because APL is over-represented in patients that originate in Latin America (Latinos), we evaluated whether the distribution of the PML/RARalpha fusion mRNA in this population is different to that reported in non-Latinos. Among 52 APL patients (28 from Mexico and Central America diagnosed in Los Angeles and 24 from Peru, South America), bcr1, bcr2 and bcr3 expression was 75%, 10% and 15% respectively. However, bcr1 breakpoints were significantly higher compared with non-Latino patients (340/654, 52%) reported in four studies. Often bcr1 and bcr2 are reported together; 862 (60%) of 1429 non-Latino APL patients reported in nine studies were either bcr1 or bcr2, compared with 44 (85%) in our 52 Latino patients. This difference was also statistically significant when our patients were compared to each of the individual studies from USA and Europe, but not for a small series from China and Japan. These results suggest that the overrepresentation of APL among Latin American patients can be accounted for by an increase of a single subtype--bcr1, and the breakage sites in the PML gene may not be random but possibly influenced by genetic and/or environmental factor(s).

  11. Ikaros6 is associated with BCR-ABL1 and myeloid-associated antigens but indicates poor prognosis independently in Chinese adult B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Na; Li, Chunrui; Xu, Danmei; Liu, Yanan; Ding, Xiaoyi; Shen, Kefeng; Zhou, Jianfeng; Xiao, Min

    2015-01-01

    Ikaros6 was specifically associated with clinical and genetic features of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and could be used for prediction of inferior survival. The present study aimed to further investigate the correlation between Ikaros6 and other prognostic factors, and to explore the novel prognosis prediction function by combining Ikaros6 and other factors in Chinese adult B-ALL. We examined the expression of Ikaros6 in 108 patients by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and confirmed the results by sequencing, gene scanning and real-time PCR. Ikaros6 was associated with BCR-ABL1 (P=0.010) and myeloid-associated antigens (P=0.009), but had an independent negative impact on survival. In multivariable Cox analysis, Ikaros6 was an independent prognostic marker for overall survival (P=0.013, HR=2.140), event-free survival (P=0.016, HR=1.972) and relapse-free survival (P=0.002, HR=3.636). This study indicated closed relation between BCR-ABL1, myeloid-associated antigens and Ikaros6.These three risk factors played an important role in evaluation of prognosis in Chinese adult B-ALL. Furthermore, Ikaros6 is more beneficial for the disease recurrence prediction. PMID:26309501

  12. MicroRNA-320a acts as a tumor suppressor by targeting BCR/ABL oncogene in chronic myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Xishan, Zhu; Ziying, Lin; Jing, Du; Gang, Liu

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidences demonstrated that the induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and aberrant expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) are associated with tumorigenesis, tumor progression, metastasis and relapse in cancers, including chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). We found that miR-320a expression was reduced in K562 and in CML cancer stem cells. Moreover, we found that miR-320a inhibited K562 cell migration, invasion, proliferation and promoted apoptosis by targeting BCR/ABL oncogene. As an upstream regulator of BCR/ABL, miR-320a directly targets BCR/ABL. The enhanced expression of miR-320a inhibited the phosphorylation of PI3K, AKT and NF-κB; however, the expression of phosphorylated PI3K, AKT and NF-κB were restored by the overexpression of BCR/ABL. In K562, infected with miR-320a or transfected with SiBCR/ABL, the protein levels of fibronectin, vimentin, and N-cadherin were decreased, but the expression of E-cadherin was increased. The expression of mesenchymal markers in miR-320a-expressing cells was restored to normal levels by the restoration of BCR/ABL expression. Generally speaking, miR-320a acts as a novel tumor suppressor gene in CML and miR-320a can decrease migratory, invasive, proliferative and apoptotic behaviors, as well as CML EMT, by attenuating the expression of BCR/ABL oncogene. PMID:26228085

  13. Targeting BCR tyrosine177 site with novel SH2-DED causes selective leukemia cell death in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Peng, Zhi; Yuan, Ying; Li, Ya-Juan; Wang, Hai-Xia; Shi, Jing; Cao, Wei-Xi; Luo, Hong-Wei; Deng, Jing-Rong; Feng, Wen-Li

    2012-06-01

    Emergence of resistance to imatinib mesylate complicates the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors are capable to overcome resistance mediated by most mutations except T315I. As this mutation is causative for 20% of clinically observed resistances, the need for novel treatment strategies becomes obvious and urgent. The autophosphorylated BCR/ABL Tyr177 recruits Grb2 via its SH2 domain, which is required for efficient induction of the myeloproliferative disease by BCR/ABL. The death effector domain (DED) is the critical factor for activation of caspase-8 induced apoptosis signal. We thus speculated that transduction of an exogenous SH2-DED (SD) fragment into the CML cells may inhibit the binding of BCR/ABL Tyr177 and Grb2, activate caspase-8 induced apoptosis and serve as a novel CML treatment strategy. The infection of the recombinant adenovirus Ad5/F35-SD was verified to show both cell proliferation-inhibitory and apoptosis-inducing effect. Further exploration into the underlying mechanisms revealed that Ad5/F35-SD exerted its function by binding to the phospho-BCR/ABL Tyr177 site, reducing Ras, MAPK and AKT kinase activities, and activating caspase-8 induced apoptosis signal by DED protein binding to DED domain of precursor caspase-8. Moreover, high anti-proliferative activity of Ad5/F35-SD was observed in nude mice and its leukemia-protective effect was evident in chronic myeloid leukemia model mice injected with BCR/ABL(+) BaF3 cells. In conclusion, Ad5/F35-SD exhibits anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activity on BCR/ABL positive leukemia cells in vitro and in vivo through disruption of Grb2 SH2-phospho-BCR/ABL Tyr177 complex formation and induction of caspase-8 activation.

  14. TAT-CC fusion protein depresses the oncogenicity of BCR-ABL in vitro and in vivo through interrupting its oligomerization.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zheng-Lan; Gao, Miao; Ji, Mao-Sheng; Tao, Kun; Xiao, Qing; Zhong, Liang; Zeng, Jian-Ming; Feng, Wen-Li

    2013-02-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a clonal hematologic malignancy characterized by the BCR-ABL protein. BCR-ABL is a constitutively active tyrosine kinase and plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of CML. Imatinib mesylate, a selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is effective in CML, but drug resistance and relapse occur. The coiled-coil (CC) domain located in BCR(1-72) mediates BCR-ABL tetramerization, which is essential for the activation of tyrosine kinase and transformation potential of BCR-ABL. CC domain is supposed to be a therapeutic target for CML. We purified a TAT-CC protein competively binding with the endogenous CC domain to reduce BCR-ABL kinase activity. We found that TAT-CC co-located and interacted with BCR-ABL in Ba/F3-p210 and K562 cells. It induced apoptosis and inhibited proliferation in these cells. It increased the sensitivity of these cells to imatinib and reduced the phosphorylation of BCR-ABL, CRKL and STAT5. We confirmed that TAT-CC could attenuate the oncogenicity of Ba/F3-p210 cells and diminish the volume of K562 solid tumor in mice. We conclude targeting the CC may provide a complementary therapy to inhibit BCR-ABL oncogenicity.

  15. SGX393 inhibits the CML mutant Bcr-Abl[superscript T315I] and preempts in vitro resistance when combined with nilotinib or dasatinib

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hare, Thomas; Eide, Christopher A.; Tyner, Jeffrey W.; Corbin, Amie S.; Wong, Matthew J.; Buchanan, Sean; Holme, Kevin; Jessen, Katayoun A.; Tang, Crystal; Lewis, Hal A.; Romero, Richard D.; Burley, Stephen K.; Deininger, Michael W.

    2010-01-12

    Imatinib inhibits Bcr-Abl, the oncogenic tyrosine kinase that causes chronic myeloid leukemia. The second-line inhibitors nilotinib and dasatinib are effective in patients with imatinib resistance resulting from Bcr-Abl kinase domain mutations. Bcr-Abl{sup T315I}, however, is resistant to all Abl kinase inhibitors in clinical use and is emerging as the most frequent cause of salvage therapy failure. SGX393 is a potent inhibitor of native and T315I-mutant Bcr-Abl kinase that blocks the growth of leukemia cell lines and primary hematopoietic cells expressing Bcr-Abl{sup T315I}, with minimal toxicity against Bcr-Abl-negative cell lines or normal bone marrow. A screen for Bcr-Abl mutants emerging in the presence of SGX393 revealed concentration-dependent reduction in the number and range of mutations. Combining SGX393 with nilotinib or dasatinib preempted emergence of resistant subclones, including Bcr-Abl{sup T315I}. These findings suggest that combination of a T315I inhibitor with the current clinically used inhibitors may be useful for reduction of Bcr-Abl mutants in Philadelphia chromosome-positive leukemia.

  16. A long noncoding RNA critically regulates Bcr-Abl-mediated cellular transformation by acting as a competitive endogenous RNA.

    PubMed

    Guo, G; Kang, Q; Zhu, X; Chen, Q; Wang, X; Chen, Y; Ouyang, J; Zhang, L; Tan, H; Chen, R; Huang, S; Chen, J-L

    2015-04-01

    Aberrant expression of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) is associated with various human cancers. However, the role of lncRNAs in Bcr-Abl-mediated chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is unknown. In this study, we performed a comprehensive analysis of lncRNAs in human CML cells using an lncRNA cDNA microarray and identified an lncRNA termed lncRNA-BGL3 that acted as a key regulator of Bcr-Abl-mediated cellular transformation. Notably, we observed that lncRNA-BGL3 was highly induced in response to disruption of Bcr-Abl expression or by inhibiting Bcr-Abl kinase activity in K562 cells and leukemic cells derived from CML patients. Ectopic expression of lncRNA-BGL3 sensitized leukemic cells to undergo apoptosis and inhibited Bcr-Abl-induced tumorigenesis. Furthermore, transgenic (TG) mice expressing lncRNA-BGL3 were generated. We found that TG expression of lncRNA-BGL3 alone in mice was sufficient to impair primary bone marrow transformation by Bcr-Abl. Interestingly, we identified that lncRNA-BGL3 was a target of miR-17, miR-93, miR-20a, miR-20b, miR-106a and miR-106b, microRNAs that repress mRNA of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN). Further experiments demonstrated that lncRNA-BGL3 functioned as a competitive endogenous RNA for binding these microRNAs to cross-regulate PTEN expression. Additionally, our experiments have begun to address the mechanism of how lncRNA-BGL3 is regulated in the leukemic cells and showed that Bcr-Abl repressed lncRNA-BGL3 expression through c-Myc-dependent DNA methylation. Taken together, these results reveal that Bcr-Abl-mediated cellular transformation critically requires silence of tumor-suppressor lncRNA-BGL3 and suggest a potential strategy for the treatment of Bcr-Abl-positive leukemia.

  17. Characterization of CLL exosomes reveals a distinct microRNA signature and enhanced secretion by activation of BCR signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Yuh-Ying; Ozer, Hatice Gulcin; Lehman, Amy M.; Maddocks, Kami; Yu, Lianbo; Byrd, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple studies show that chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells are heavily dependent on their microenvironment for survival. Communication between CLL cells and the microenvironment is mediated through direct cell contact, soluble factors, and extracellular vesicles. Exosomes are small particles enclosed with lipids, proteins, and small RNAs that can convey biological materials to surrounding cells. Our data herein demonstrate that CLL cells release significant amounts of exosomes in plasma that exhibit abundant CD37, CD9, and CD63 expression. Our work also pinpoints the regulation of B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling in the release of CLL exosomes: BCR activation by α-immunoglobulin (Ig)M induces exosome secretion, whereas BCR inactivation via ibrutinib impedes α-IgM-stimulated exosome release. Moreover, analysis of serial plasma samples collected from CLL patients on an ibrutinib clinical trial revealed that exosome plasma concentration was significantly decreased following ibrutinib therapy. Furthermore, microRNA (miR) profiling of plasma-derived exosomes identified a distinct exosome microRNA signature, including miR-29 family, miR-150, miR-155, and miR-223 that have been associated with CLL disease. Interestingly, expression of exosome miR-150 and miR-155 increases with BCR activation. In all, this study successfully characterized CLL exosomes, demonstrated the control of BCR signaling in the release of CLL exosomes, and uncovered a disease-relevant exosome microRNA profile. PMID:25833959

  18. Development and evaluation of a secondary reference panel for BCR-ABL1 quantification on the International Scale.

    PubMed

    Cross, N C P; White, H E; Ernst, T; Welden, L; Dietz, C; Saglio, G; Mahon, F-X; Wong, C C; Zheng, D; Wong, S; Wang, S-S; Akiki, S; Albano, F; Andrikovics, H; Anwar, J; Balatzenko, G; Bendit, I; Beveridge, J; Boeckx, N; Cerveira, N; Cheng, S-M; Colomer, D; Czurda, S; Daraio, F; Dulucq, S; Eggen, L; El Housni, H; Gerrard, G; Gniot, M; Izzo, B; Jacquin, D; Janssen, J J W M; Jeromin, S; Jurcek, T; Kim, D-W; Machova-Polakova, K; Martinez-Lopez, J; McBean, M; Mesanovic, S; Mitterbauer-Hohendanner, G; Mobtaker, H; Mozziconacci, M-J; Pajič, T; Pallisgaard, N; Panagiotidis, P; Press, R D; Qin, Y-Z; Radich, J; Sacha, T; Touloumenidou, T; Waits, P; Wilkinson, E; Zadro, R; Müller, M C; Hochhaus, A; Branford, S

    2016-09-01

    Molecular monitoring of chronic myeloid leukemia patients using robust BCR-ABL1 tests standardized to the International Scale (IS) is key to proper disease management, especially when treatment cessation is considered. Most laboratories currently use a time-consuming sample exchange process with reference laboratories for IS calibration. A World Health Organization (WHO) BCR-ABL1 reference panel was developed (MR(1)-MR(4)), but access to the material is limited. In this study, we describe the development of the first cell-based secondary reference panel that is traceable to and faithfully replicates the WHO panel, with an additional MR(4.5) level. The secondary panel was calibrated to IS using digital PCR with ABL1, BCR and GUSB as reference genes and evaluated by 44 laboratories worldwide. Interestingly, we found that >40% of BCR-ABL1 assays showed signs of inadequate optimization such as poor linearity and suboptimal PCR efficiency. Nonetheless, when optimized sample inputs were used, >60% demonstrated satisfactory IS accuracy, precision and/or MR(4.5) sensitivity, and 58% obtained IS conversion factors from the secondary reference concordant with their current values. Correlation analysis indicated no significant alterations in %BCR-ABL1 results caused by different assay configurations. More assays achieved good precision and/or sensitivity than IS accuracy, indicating the need for better IS calibration mechanisms. PMID:27109508

  19. The BTK Inhibitor Ibrutinib (PCI-32765) Blocks Hairy Cell Leukaemia Survival, Proliferation and BCR Signalling: A New Therapeutic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Sivina, Mariela; Kreitman, Robert J.; Arons, Evgeny; Ravandi, Farhad; Burger, Jan A.

    2014-01-01

    B cell receptor (BCR) signalling plays a critical role in the progression of several B-cell malignancies, but its role in hairy cell leukaemia (HCL) is ambiguous. Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK), a key player in BCR signalling, migration and adhesion, can be targeted with ibrutinib, a selective, irreversible BTK inhibitor. We analysed BTK expression and function in HCL and analysed the effects of ibrutinib on HCL cells. We demonstrated uniform BTK protein expression in HCL cells. Ibrutinib significantly inhibited HCL proliferation and cell cycle progression. Accordingly, ibrutinib also reduced HCL cell survival after BCR triggering with anti-immunoglobulins (A, G, and M) and abrogated the activation of kinases downstream of the BCR (PI3K and MAPK). Ibrutinib also inhibited BCR-dependent secretion of the chemokines CCL3 and CCL4 by HCL cells. Interestingly, ibrutinib inhibited CXCL12-induced signalling, a key pathway for bone marrow homing. Collectively, our data support the clinical development of ibrutinib in patients with HCL. PMID:24697238

  20. Expression of bcr-abl mRNA in individual chronic myelogenous leukaemia cells as determined by in situ amplification.

    PubMed

    Pachmann, K; Zhao, S; Schenk, T; Kantarjian, H; El-Naggar, A K; Siciliano, M J; Guo, J Q; Arlinghaus, R B; Andreeff, M

    2001-03-01

    We present the results of a novel method developed for evaluation of in situ amplification, a molecular genetic method at the cellular level. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to study bcr-abl transcript levels in individual cells from patients with chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML). After hybridizing a fluorochrome-labelled probe to the cell-bound RT-PCR product, bcr-abl mRNA-positive cells were determined using image analysis. A dilution series of bcr-abl-positive BV173 into normal cells showed a good correlation between expected and actual values. In 25 CML samples, the percentage of in situ PCR-positive cells showed an excellent correlation with cytogenetic results (r = 0.94, P < 0.0001), interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) (r = 0.95, P = 0.001) and hypermetaphase FISH (r = 0.81, P < 0.001). The fluorescence intensity was higher in residual CML cells after interferon (IFN) treatment than in newly diagnosed patients (P = 0.004), and was highest in late-stage CML resistant to IFN therapy and lowest in CML blast crisis (P = 0.001). Mean fluorescence values correlated with bcr-abl protein levels, as determined by Western blot analysis (r = 0.62). Laser scanning cytometry allowing automated analysis of large numbers of cells confirmed the results. Thus, fluorescence in situ PCR provides a novel and quantitative approach for monitoring tumour load and bcr-abl transcript levels in CML.

  1. The Rac-GAP Bcr is a novel regulator of the Par complex that controls cell polarity

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Anjana S.; Reyes, Steve B.; Um, Kyongmi; McCarty, Joseph H.; Tolias, Kimberley F.

    2013-01-01

    Cell polarization is essential for many biological processes, including directed cell migration, and loss of polarity contributes to pathological conditions such as cancer. The Par complex (Par3, Par6, and PKCζ) controls cell polarity in part by recruiting the Rac-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor T-lymphoma invasion and metastasis 1 (Tiam1) to specialized cellular sites, where Tiam1 promotes local Rac1 activation and cytoskeletal remodeling. However, the mechanisms that restrict Par-Tiam1 complex activity to the leading edge to maintain cell polarity during migration remain unclear. We identify the Rac-specific GTPase-activating protein (GAP) breakpoint cluster region protein (Bcr) as a novel regulator of the Par-Tiam1 complex. We show that Bcr interacts with members of the Par complex and inhibits both Rac1 and PKCζ signaling. Loss of Bcr results in faster, more random migration and striking polarity defects in astrocytes. These polarity defects are rescued by reducing PKCζ activity or by expressing full-length Bcr, but not an N-terminal deletion mutant or the homologous Rac-GAP, Abr, both of which fail to associate with the Par complex. These results demonstrate that Bcr is an integral member of the Par-Tiam1 complex that controls polarized cell migration by locally restricting both Rac1 and PKCζ function. PMID:24152735

  2. BCR-ABL1 kinase inhibits uracil DNA glycosylase UNG2 to enhance oxidative DNA damage and stimulate genomic instability

    PubMed Central

    Slupianek, Artur; Falinski, Rafal; Znojek, Pawel; Stoklosa, Tomasz; Flis, Sylwia; Doneddu, Valentina; Pytel, Dariusz; Synowiec, Ewelina; Blasiak, Janusz; Bellacosa, Alfonso; Skorski, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) revolutionized the treatment of CML-CP. Unfortunately, 25% of TKI-naive patients and 50–90% of TKI-responding patients carry CML clones expressing TKI resistant BCR-ABL1 kinase mutants. We reported that CML-CP leukemia stem and progenitor cell populations accumulate high amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which may result in accumulation of uracil derivatives in genomic DNA. Unfaithful and/or inefficient repair of these lesions generates TKI resistant point mutations in BCR-ABL1 kinase. Using an array of specific substrates and inhibitors/blocking antibodies we found that uracil-DNA glycosylase UNG2 were inhibited in BCR-ABL1 –transformed cell lines and CD34+ CML cells. The inhibitory effect was not accompanied by downregulation of nuclear expression and/or chromatin association of UNG2. The effect was BCR-ABL1 kinase-specific because several other fusion tyrosine kinases did not reduce UNG2 activity. Using UNG2-specific inhibitor UGI we found that reduction of UNG2 activity increased the number of uracil derivatives in genomic DNA detected by modified comet assay and facilitated accumulation of ouabain-resistant point mutations in reporter gene Na+/K+ATPase. In conclusion, we postulate that BCR-ABL1 kinase-mediated inhibition of UNG2 contributes to accumulation of point mutations responsible for TKI-resistance causing the disease relapse, and perhaps also other point mutations facilitating malignant progression of CML. PMID:23047475

  3. The presence of the Rb c-box peptide in the cytoplasm inhibits p210bcr-abl transforming function.

    PubMed

    Guo, X Y; Balague, C; Wang, T; Randhawa, G; Yuan, Z; Bachier, C; Greenberger, J; Arlinghaus, R; Kufe, D; Deisseroth, A B

    1999-02-25

    In order to test if the carboxyl terminal polypeptide of the Retinoblastoma (Rb) tumor suppressor protein, could be used to suppress the growth factor-independent growth phenotype of p210bcr-abl positive myeloid cells, we introduced a truncated form of the 3' end of the Rb cDNA encoding its last 173 amino acid residues (Rb C-box) which localize into the cytoplasm where the p210bcr-abl transforming protein is found, into myeloid cells (32D) which depends on the p210bcr-abl protein for IL3 growth factor-independent growth (32D-p210). The expression of the plasmid vectors carrying the Rb C-box cDNAs was shown to inhibit the abl tyrosine specific protein kinase activity of the p210(bcr-abl) oncoprotein and to suppress the IL3-independent growth phenotype of the 32D-p210 cells. The Rb C-box polypeptides did not suppress the growth of the untransfected 32D parental cell line in methylcellulose in the presence of IL3-conditioned medium. These results suggest that the cytoplasmic localization of the p210(bcr-abl) allows it to escape the effect of intranuclear proteins such as Rb which negatively regulate the p145(c-abl) kinase. PMID:10102629

  4. The impact of multiple low-level BCR-ABL1 mutations on response to ponatinib

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, David T. O.; Yeoman, Alexandra L.; Altamura, Haley K.; Jamison, Bronte A.; Field, Chani R.; Hodgson, J. Graeme; Lustgarten, Stephanie; Rivera, Victor M.; Hughes, Timothy P.; Branford, Susan

    2016-01-01

    The third-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) ponatinib shows activity against all common BCR-ABL1 single mutants, including the highly resistant BCR-ABL1-T315I mutant, improving outcome for patients with refractory chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). However, responses are variable, and causal baseline factors have not been well-studied. The type and number of low-level BCR-ABL1 mutations present after imatinib resistance has prognostic significance for subsequent treatment with nilotinib or dasatinib as second-line therapy. We therefore investigated the impact of low-level mutations detected by sensitive mass-spectrometry before ponatinib initiation (baseline) on treatment response in 363 TKI-resistant patients enrolled in the PONATINIB for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Evaluation and Ph+ Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia trial, including 231 patients in chronic phase (CP-CML). Low-level mutations were detected in 53 patients (15%, including low-level T315I in 14 patients); most, however, did not undergo clonal expansion during ponatinib treatment and, moreover, no specific individual mutations were associated with inferior outcome. We demonstrate however, that the number of mutations detectable by mass spectrometry after TKI resistance is associated with response to ponatinib treatment and could be used to refine the therapeutic approach. Although CP-CML patients with T315I (63/231, 27%) had superior responses overall, those with multiple mutations detectable by mass spectrometry (20, 32%) had substantially inferior responses compared with those with T315I as the sole mutation detected (43, 68%). In contrast, for CP-CML patients without T315I, the inferior responses previously observed with nilotinib/dasatinib therapy for imatinib-resistant patients with multiple mutations were not seen with ponatinib treatment, suggesting that ponatinib may prove to be particularly advantageous for patients with multiple mutations detectable by mass spectrometry after TKI resistance

  5. NFATc2 (NFAT1) assists BCR-mediated anergy in anti-insulin B cells.

    PubMed

    Bonami, Rachel H; Wolfle, William T; Thomas, James W; Kendall, Peggy L

    2014-12-01

    NFAT transcription factors play critical roles in both the activation and repression of T and B lymphocyte responses. To understand the role of NFATc2 (NFAT1) in the maintenance of tolerance for anti-insulin B cells, functionally inactive NFATc2 (NFATc2(-/-)) was introduced into C57BL/6 mice that harbor anergic anti-insulin 125Tg B cells. The production and peripheral maturation of anti-insulin B cells into follicular and marginal zone subsets was not altered by the absence of functional NFATc2. Surface B cell receptor expression levels, important for tonic signaling and altered by anergy, were not altered in any spleen B cell subset. The levels of anti-insulin antibodies were not different in 125Tg/B6/NFATc2(-/-) mice and the anti-insulin response remained silenced following T cell dependent immunization. However, studies addressing in vitro proliferation reveal the anergic state of 125Tg B cells is relieved in 125Tg/B6/NFATc2(-/-) B cells in response to BCR stimulation. In contrast, anergy is not released in 125Tg/B6/NFATc2(-/-) B cells following stimulation with anti-CD40. The relief of anergy to BCR stimulation in 125Tg/B6/NFATc2(-/-) B cells is associated with increased transcription of both NFATc1 and NFATc3 while expression of these NFATs does not change in anti-IgM stimulated 125Tg/B6/NFATc2(+/+) B cells. The data suggest that NFATc2 plays a subtle and selective role in maintaining anergy for BCR stimulation by repressing the transcription of other NFAT family members. PMID:24507801

  6. Naïve and memory B cells exhibit distinct biochemical responses following BCR engagement.

    PubMed

    Moens, Leen; Kane, Alisa; Tangye, Stuart G

    2016-09-01

    Immunological memory is characterized by the rapid reactivation of memory B cells that produce large quantities of high-affinity antigen-specific antibodies. This contrasts the response of naïve B cells, and the primary immune response, which is much slower and of lower affinity. Memory responses are critical for protection against infectious diseases and form the basis of most currently available vaccines. Although we have known about the phenomenon of long-lived memory for centuries, the biochemical differences underlying these diverse responses of naïve and memory B cells is incompletely resolved. Here we investigated the nature of B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling in human splenic naïve, IgM(+) memory and isotype-switched memory B cells following multivalent BCR crosslinking. We observed comparable rapid and transient phosphorylation kinetics for proximal (phosphotyrosine and spleen tyrosine kinase) and propagation (B-cell linker, phospholipase Cγ2) signaling components in these different B-cell subsets. However, the magnitude of activation of downstream components of the BCR signaling pathway were greater in memory compared with naïve cells. Although no differences were observed in the magnitude of Ca(2+) mobilization between subsets, IgM(+) memory B cells exhibited a more rapid Ca(2+) mobilization and a greater depletion of the Ca(2+) endoplasmic reticulum stores, while IgG(+) memory B cells had a prolonged Ca(2+) uptake. Collectively, our findings show that intrinsic signaling features of B-cell subsets contribute to the robust response of human memory B cells over naïve B cells. This has implications for our understanding of memory B-cell responses and provides a framework to modulate these responses in the setting of vaccination and immunopathologies, such as immunodeficiency and autoimmunity. PMID:27101923

  7. Quantitative Trait Loci for Murine Growth

    PubMed Central

    Cheverud, J. M.; Routman, E. J.; Duarte, FAM.; van-Swinderen, B.; Cothran, K.; Perel, C.

    1996-01-01

    Body size is an archetypal quantitative trait with variation due to the segregation of many gene loci, each of relatively minor effect, and the environment. We examine the effects of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) on age-specific body weights and growth in the F(2) intercross of the LG/J and SM/J strains of inbred mice. Weekly weights (1-10 wk) and 75 microsatellite genotypes were obtained for 535 mice. Interval mapping was used to locate and measure the genotypic effects of QTLs on body weight and growth. QTL effects were detected on 16 of the 19 autosomes with several chromosomes carrying more than one QTL. The number of QTLs for age-specific weights varied from seven at 1 week to 17 at 10 wk. The QTLs were each of relatively minor, subequal effect. QTLs affecting early and late growth were generally distinct, mapping to different chromosomal locations indicating separate genetic and physiological systems for early and later murine growth. PMID:8846907

  8. Low expression of Abelson interactor-1 is linked to acquired drug resistance in Bcr-Abl-induced leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chorzalska, A; Salloum, I; Shafqat, H; Khan, S; Marjon, P; Treaba, D; Schorl, C; Morgan, J; Bryke, C R; Falanga, V; Zhao, T C; Reagan, J; Winer, E; Olszewski, A J; Al-Homsi, A S; Kouttab, N; Dubielecka, P M

    2014-11-01

    The basis for persistence of leukemic stem cells in the bone marrow microenvironment remains poorly understood. We present evidence that signaling cross-talk between α4 integrin and Abelson interactor-1 (Abi-1) is involved in the acquisition of an anchorage-dependent phenotype and drug resistance in Bcr-Abl-positive leukemia cells. Comparison of Abi-1 (ABI-1) and α4 integrin (ITGA4) gene expression in relapsing Bcr-Abl-positive CD34+progenitor cells demonstrated a reduction in Abi-1 and an increase in α4 integrin mRNA in the absence of Bcr-Abl mutations. This inverse correlation between Abi-1 and α4 integrin expression, as well as linkage to elevated phospho-Akt and phospho-Erk signaling, was confirmed in imatinib mesylate -resistant leukemic cells. These results indicate that the α4-Abi-1 signaling pathway may mediate acquisition of the drug-resistant phenotype of leukemic cells.

  9. BCR-ABL mutations in chronic myeloid leukemia treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors and impact on survival.

    PubMed

    Pagnano, Katia Borgia Barbosa; Bendit, Israel; Boquimpani, Carla; De Souza, Carmino Antonio; Miranda, Eliana C M; Zalcberg, Ilana; Larripa, Irene; Nardinelli, Luciana; Silveira, Rosana Antunes; Fogliatto, Laura; Spector, Nelson; Funke, Vaneuza; Pasquini, Ricardo; Hungria, Vania; Chiattone, Carlos Sérgio; Clementino, Nelma; Conchon, Monika; Moiraghi, Elena Beatriz; Lopez, Jose Luis; Pavlovsky, Carolina; Pavlovsky, Miguel A; Cervera, Eduardo E; Meillon, Luis Antonio; Simões, Belinda; Hamerschlak, Nelson; Bozzano, Alicia Helena Magarinos; Mayta, Ernesto; Cortes, Jorge; Bengió, Raquel M

    2015-01-01

    This is the largest Latin American study of BCR-ABL mutations in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients, resistant to imatinib (IM). In 195/467 (41%) patients, mutations were detected. The most frequent mutation was T315I (n = 31, 16%). Progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) at 5 years were lower in patients with BCR-ABL mutations (43% vs. 65%, p = 0.07 and 47% vs. 72%, p = 0.03, respectively) and in those with the T315I mutation (p = 0.003 and p = 0.03). OS and PFS were superior in subgroup who switched to second generation inhibitors (SGIs) after IM failure (OS: 50% vs. 39% p = 0.01; PFS: 48% vs. 30% p = 0.02). BCR-ABL mutations conferred a significant poor prognosis in CML patients. PMID:26288116

  10. BCR-ABL mutations in chronic myeloid leukemia treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors and impact on survival.

    PubMed

    Pagnano, Katia Borgia Barbosa; Bendit, Israel; Boquimpani, Carla; De Souza, Carmino Antonio; Miranda, Eliana C M; Zalcberg, Ilana; Larripa, Irene; Nardinelli, Luciana; Silveira, Rosana Antunes; Fogliatto, Laura; Spector, Nelson; Funke, Vaneuza; Pasquini, Ricardo; Hungria, Vania; Chiattone, Carlos Sérgio; Clementino, Nelma; Conchon, Monika; Moiraghi, Elena Beatriz; Lopez, Jose Luis; Pavlovsky, Carolina; Pavlovsky, Miguel A; Cervera, Eduardo E; Meillon, Luis Antonio; Simões, Belinda; Hamerschlak, Nelson; Bozzano, Alicia Helena Magarinos; Mayta, Ernesto; Cortes, Jorge; Bengió, Raquel M

    2015-01-01

    This is the largest Latin American study of BCR-ABL mutations in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients, resistant to imatinib (IM). In 195/467 (41%) patients, mutations were detected. The most frequent mutation was T315I (n = 31, 16%). Progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) at 5 years were lower in patients with BCR-ABL mutations (43% vs. 65%, p = 0.07 and 47% vs. 72%, p = 0.03, respectively) and in those with the T315I mutation (p = 0.003 and p = 0.03). OS and PFS were superior in subgroup who switched to second generation inhibitors (SGIs) after IM failure (OS: 50% vs. 39% p = 0.01; PFS: 48% vs. 30% p = 0.02). BCR-ABL mutations conferred a significant poor prognosis in CML patients.

  11. Major Quantitative Trait Loci and Putative Candidate Genes for Powdery Mildew Resistance and Fruit-Related Traits Revealed by an Intraspecific Genetic Map for Watermelon (Citrullus lanatus var. lanatus)

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwang-Hwan; Hwang, Ji-Hyun; Han, Dong-Yeup; Park, Minkyu; Kim, Seungill; Choi, Doil; Kim, Yongjae; Lee, Gung Pyo; Kim, Sun-Tae; Park, Young-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    An intraspecific genetic map for watermelon was constructed using an F2 population derived from ‘Arka Manik’ × ‘TS34’ and transcript sequence variants and quantitative trait loci (QTL) for resistance to powdery mildew (PMR), seed size (SS), and fruit shape (FS) were analyzed. The map consists of 14 linkage groups (LGs) defined by 174 cleaved amplified polymorphic sequences (CAPS), 2 derived-cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence markers, 20 sequence-characterized amplified regions, and 8 expressed sequence tag-simple sequence repeat markers spanning 1,404.3 cM, with a mean marker interval of 6.9 cM and an average of 14.6 markers per LG. Genetic inheritance and QTL analyses indicated that each of the PMR, SS, and FS traits is controlled by an incompletely dominant effect of major QTLs designated as pmr2.1, ss2.1, and fsi3.1, respectively. The pmr2.1, detected on chromosome 2 (Chr02), explained 80.0% of the phenotypic variation (LOD = 30.76). This QTL was flanked by two CAPS markers, wsb2-24 (4.00 cM) and wsb2-39 (13.97 cM). The ss2.1, located close to pmr2.1 and CAPS marker wsb2-13 (1.00 cM) on Chr02, explained 92.3% of the phenotypic variation (LOD = 68.78). The fsi3.1, detected on Chr03, explained 79.7% of the phenotypic variation (LOD = 31.37) and was flanked by two CAPS, wsb3-24 (1.91 cM) and wsb3-9 (7.00 cM). Candidate gene-based CAPS markers were developed from the disease resistance and fruit shape gene homologs located on Chr.02 and Chr03 and were mapped on the intraspecific map. Colocalization of these markers with the major QTLs indicated that watermelon orthologs of a nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeat class gene containing an RPW8 domain and a member of SUN containing the IQ67 domain are candidate genes for pmr2.1 and fsi3.1, respectively. The results presented herein provide useful information for marker-assisted breeding and gene cloning for PMR and fruit-related traits. PMID:26700647

  12. Major Quantitative Trait Loci and Putative Candidate Genes for Powdery Mildew Resistance and Fruit-Related Traits Revealed by an Intraspecific Genetic Map for Watermelon (Citrullus lanatus var. lanatus).

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwang-Hwan; Hwang, Ji-Hyun; Han, Dong-Yeup; Park, Minkyu; Kim, Seungill; Choi, Doil; Kim, Yongjae; Lee, Gung Pyo; Kim, Sun-Tae; Park, Young-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    An intraspecific genetic map for watermelon was constructed using an F2 population derived from 'Arka Manik' × 'TS34' and transcript sequence variants and quantitative trait loci (QTL) for resistance to powdery mildew (PMR), seed size (SS), and fruit shape (FS) were analyzed. The map consists of 14 linkage groups (LGs) defined by 174 cleaved amplified polymorphic sequences (CAPS), 2 derived-cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence markers, 20 sequence-characterized amplified regions, and 8 expressed sequence tag-simple sequence repeat markers spanning 1,404.3 cM, with a mean marker interval of 6.9 cM and an average of 14.6 markers per LG. Genetic inheritance and QTL analyses indicated that each of the PMR, SS, and FS traits is controlled by an incompletely dominant effect of major QTLs designated as pmr2.1, ss2.1, and fsi3.1, respectively. The pmr2.1, detected on chromosome 2 (Chr02), explained 80.0% of the phenotypic variation (LOD = 30.76). This QTL was flanked by two CAPS markers, wsb2-24 (4.00 cM) and wsb2-39 (13.97 cM). The ss2.1, located close to pmr2.1 and CAPS marker wsb2-13 (1.00 cM) on Chr02, explained 92.3% of the phenotypic variation (LOD = 68.78). The fsi3.1, detected on Chr03, explained 79.7% of the phenotypic variation (LOD = 31.37) and was flanked by two CAPS, wsb3-24 (1.91 cM) and wsb3-9 (7.00 cM). Candidate gene-based CAPS markers were developed from the disease resistance and fruit shape gene homologs located on Chr.02 and Chr03 and were mapped on the intraspecific map. Colocalization of these markers with the major QTLs indicated that watermelon orthologs of a nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeat class gene containing an RPW8 domain and a member of SUN containing the IQ67 domain are candidate genes for pmr2.1 and fsi3.1, respectively. The results presented herein provide useful information for marker-assisted breeding and gene cloning for PMR and fruit-related traits.

  13. Major Quantitative Trait Loci and Putative Candidate Genes for Powdery Mildew Resistance and Fruit-Related Traits Revealed by an Intraspecific Genetic Map for Watermelon (Citrullus lanatus var. lanatus).

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwang-Hwan; Hwang, Ji-Hyun; Han, Dong-Yeup; Park, Minkyu; Kim, Seungill; Choi, Doil; Kim, Yongjae; Lee, Gung Pyo; Kim, Sun-Tae; Park, Young-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    An intraspecific genetic map for watermelon was constructed using an F2 population derived from 'Arka Manik' × 'TS34' and transcript sequence variants and quantitative trait loci (QTL) for resistance to powdery mildew (PMR), seed size (SS), and fruit shape (FS) were analyzed. The map consists of 14 linkage groups (LGs) defined by 174 cleaved amplified polymorphic sequences (CAPS), 2 derived-cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence markers, 20 sequence-characterized amplified regions, and 8 expressed sequence tag-simple sequence repeat markers spanning 1,404.3 cM, with a mean marker interval of 6.9 cM and an average of 14.6 markers per LG. Genetic inheritance and QTL analyses indicated that each of the PMR, SS, and FS traits is controlled by an incompletely dominant effect of major QTLs designated as pmr2.1, ss2.1, and fsi3.1, respectively. The pmr2.1, detected on chromosome 2 (Chr02), explained 80.0% of the phenotypic variation (LOD = 30.76). This QTL was flanked by two CAPS markers, wsb2-24 (4.00 cM) and wsb2-39 (13.97 cM). The ss2.1, located close to pmr2.1 and CAPS marker wsb2-13 (1.00 cM) on Chr02, explained 92.3% of the phenotypic variation (LOD = 68.78). The fsi3.1, detected on Chr03, explained 79.7% of the phenotypic variation (LOD = 31.37) and was flanked by two CAPS, wsb3-24 (1.91 cM) and wsb3-9 (7.00 cM). Candidate gene-based CAPS markers were developed from the disease resistance and fruit shape gene homologs located on Chr.02 and Chr03 and were mapped on the intraspecific map. Colocalization of these markers with the major QTLs indicated that watermelon orthologs of a nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeat class gene containing an RPW8 domain and a member of SUN containing the IQ67 domain are candidate genes for pmr2.1 and fsi3.1, respectively. The results presented herein provide useful information for marker-assisted breeding and gene cloning for PMR and fruit-related traits. PMID:26700647

  14. Developing criteria and data to determine best options for expanding the core CODIS loci

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Recently, the Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) Core Loci Working Group established by the US Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) reviewed and recommended changes to the CODIS core loci. The Working Group identified 20 short tandem repeat (STR) loci (composed of the original CODIS core set loci (minus TPOX), four European recommended loci, PentaE, and DYS391) plus the Amelogenin marker as the new core set. Before selecting and finalizing the core loci, some evaluations are needed to provide guidance for the best options of core selection. Method The performance of current and newly proposed CODIS core loci sets were evaluated with simplified analyses for adventitious hit rates in reasonably large datasets under single-source profile comparisons, mixture comparisons and kinship searches, and for international data sharing. Informativeness (for example, match probability, average kinship index (AKI)) and mutation rates of each locus were some of the criteria to consider for loci selection. However, the primary factor was performance with challenged forensic samples. Results The current battery of loci provided in already validated commercial kits meet the needs for single-source profile comparisons and international data sharing, even with relatively large databases. However, the 13 CODIS core loci are not sufficiently powerful for kinship analyses and searching potential contributors of mixtures in larger databases; 19 or more autosomal STR loci perform better. Y-chromosome STR (Y-STR) loci are very useful to trace paternal lineage, deconvolve female and male mixtures, and resolve inconsistencies with Amelogenin typing. The DYS391 locus is of little theoretical or practical use. Combining five or six Y-chromosome STR loci with existing autosomal STR loci can produce better performance than the same number of autosomal loci for kinship analysis and still yield a sufficiently low match probability for single-source profile comparisons. Conclusion A more

  15. High-throughput identification of informative nuclear loci for shallow-scale phylogenetics and phylogeography.

    PubMed

    Lemmon, Alan R; Lemmon, Emily Moriarty

    2012-10-01

    One of the major challenges for researchers studying phylogeography and shallow-scale phylogenetics is the identification of highly variable and informative nuclear loci for the question of interest. Previous approaches to locus identification have generally required extensive testing of anonymous nuclear loci developed from genomic libraries of the target taxon, testing of loci of unknown utility from other systems, or identification of loci from the nearest model organism with genomic resources. Here, we present a fast and economical approach to generating thousands of variable, single-copy nuclear loci for any system using next-generation sequencing. We performed Illumina paired-end sequencing of three reduced-representation libraries (RRLs) in chorus frogs (Pseudacris) to identify orthologous, single-copy loci across libraries and to estimate sequence divergence at multiple taxonomic levels. We also conducted PCR testing of these loci across the genus Pseudacris and outgroups to determine whether loci developed for phylogeography can be extended to deeper phylogenetic levels. Prior to sequencing, we conducted in silico digestion of the most closely related reference genome (Xenopus tropicalis) to generate expectations for the number of loci and degree of coverage for a particular experimental design. Using the RRL approach, we: (i) identified more than 100,000 single-copy nuclear loci, 6339 of which were obtained for divergent conspecifics and 904 of which were obtained for heterospecifics; (ii) estimated average nuclear sequence divergence at 0.1% between alleles within an individual, 1.1% between conspecific individuals that represent two different clades, and 1.8% between species; and (iii) determined from PCR testing that 53% of the loci successfully amplify within-species and also many amplify to the genus-level and deeper in the phylogeny (16%). Our study effectively identified nuclear loci present in the genome that have levels of sequence divergence on

  16. Inverse regulation of bridging integrator 1 and BCR-ABL1 in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Trino, Stefania; De Luca, Luciana; Simeon, Vittorio; Laurenzana, Ilaria; Morano, Annalisa; Caivano, Antonella; La Rocca, Francesco; Pietrantuono, Giuseppe; Bianchino, Gabriella; Grieco, Vitina; Signorino, Elisabetta; Fragasso, Alberto; Bochicchio, Maria Teresa; Venturi, Claudia; Rosti, Gianantonio; Martinelli, Giovanni; Del Vecchio, Luigi; Cilloni, Daniela; Musto, Pellegrino

    2016-01-01

    Endocytosis is the major regulator process of tyrosine kinase receptor (RTK) functional activities. Bridging integrator 1 (BIN1) is a key protein involved in RTK intracellular trafficking. Here, we report, by studying 34 patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) at diagnosis, that BIN1 gene is downregulated in CML as compared to healthy controls, suggesting an altered endocytosis of RTKs. Rab interactor 1 (RIN1), an activator of BIN1, displayed a similar behavior. Treatment of 57 patients by tyrosine kinase inhibitors caused, along with BCR-ABL1 inactivation, an increase of BIN1 and RIN1 expression, potentially restoring endocytosis. There was a significant inverse correlation between BIN1-RIN1 and BCR-ABL1 expression. In vitro experiments on both CML and nontumorigenic cell lines treated with Imatinib confirmed these results. In order to provide another proof in favor of BIN1 and RIN1 endocytosis function in CML, we demonstrated that Imatinib induced, in K562 cell line, BIN1-RIN1 upregulation accompanied by a parallel AXL receptor internalization into cytoplasmic compartment. This study shows a novel deregulated mechanism in CML patients, indicating BIN1 and RIN1 as players in the maintenance of the abnormal RTK signaling in this hematological disease.

  17. A Cell-Based Assay for Measuring Endogenous BcrAbl Kinase Activity and Inhibitor Resistance.

    PubMed

    Ouellette, Steven B; Noel, Brett M; Parker, Laurie L

    2016-01-01

    Kinase enzymes are an important class of drug targets, particularly in cancer. Cell-based kinase assays are needed to understand how potential kinase inhibitors act on their targets in a physiologically relevant context. Current cell-based kinase assays rely on antibody-based detection of endogenous substrates, inaccurate disease models, or indirect measurements of drug action. Here we expand on previous work from our lab to introduce a 96-well plate compatible approach for measuring cell-based kinase activity in disease-relevant human chronic myeloid leukemia cell lines using an exogenously added, multi-functional peptide substrate. Our cellular models natively express the BcrAbl oncogene and are either sensitive or have acquired resistance to well-characterized BcrAbl tyrosine kinase inhibitors. This approach measures IC50 values comparable to established methods of assessing drug potency, and its robustness indicates that it can be employed in drug discovery applications. This medium-throughput assay could bridge the gap between single target focused, high-throughput in vitro assays and lower-throughput cell-based follow-up experiments. PMID:27598410

  18. A Cell-Based Assay for Measuring Endogenous BcrAbl Kinase Activity and Inhibitor Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Ouellette, Steven B.; Noel, Brett M.; Parker, Laurie L.

    2016-01-01

    Kinase enzymes are an important class of drug targets, particularly in cancer. Cell-based kinase assays are needed to understand how potential kinase inhibitors act on their targets in a physiologically relevant context. Current cell-based kinase assays rely on antibody-based detection of endogenous substrates, inaccurate disease models, or indirect measurements of drug action. Here we expand on previous work from our lab to introduce a 96-well plate compatible approach for measuring cell-based kinase activity in disease-relevant human chronic myeloid leukemia cell lines using an exogenously added, multi-functional peptide substrate. Our cellular models natively express the BcrAbl oncogene and are either sensitive or have acquired resistance to well-characterized BcrAbl tyrosine kinase inhibitors. This approach measures IC50 values comparable to established methods of assessing drug potency, and its robustness indicates that it can be employed in drug discovery applications. This medium-throughput assay could bridge the gap between single target focused, high-throughput in vitro assays and lower-throughput cell-based follow-up experiments. PMID:27598410

  19. LASP1 is a novel BCR-ABL substrate and a phosphorylation-dependent binding partner of CRKL in chronic myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Grunewald, Thomas G. P.; Schweigel, Hardy; Nollau, Peter; Ziermann, Janine; Clement, Joachim H.; La Rosée, Paul; Hochhaus, Andreas; Butt, Elke

    2014-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is characterized by a genomic translocation generating a permanently active BCR-ABL oncogene with a complex pattern of atypically tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins that drive the malignant phenotype of CML. Recently, the LIM and SH3 domain protein 1 (LASP1) was identified as a component of a six gene signature that is strongly predictive for disease progression and relapse in CML patients. However, the underlying mechanisms why LASP1 expression correlates with dismal outcome remained unresolved. Here, we identified LASP1 as a novel and overexpressed direct substrate of BCR-ABL in CML. We demonstrate that LASP1 is specifically phosphorylated by BCR-ABL at tyrosine-171 in CML patients, which is abolished by tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy. Further studies revealed that LASP1 phosphorylation results in an association with CRKL – another specific BCR-ABL substrate and bona fide biomarker for BCR-ABL activity. pLASP1-Y171 binds to non-phosphorylated CRKL at its SH2 domain. Accordingly, the BCR-ABL-mediated pathophysiological hyper-phosphorylation of LASP1 in CML disrupts normal regulation of CRKL and LASP1, which likely has implications on downstream BCR-ABL signaling. Collectively, our results suggest that LASP1 phosphorylation might serve as an additional candidate biomarker for assessment of BCR-ABL activity and provide a first step toward a molecular understanding of LASP1 function in CML. PMID:24913448

  20. Homothetic transformations and geometric loci: properties of triangles and quadrilaterals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flavia Mammana, Maria

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we use geometric transformations to find some interesting properties related with geometric loci. In particular, given a triangle or a cyclic quadrilateral, the locus generated by the centroid or by the orthocentre (for triangles) or by the anticentre (for cyclic quadrilaterals) when one vertex moves on the circumcircle of the figure are considered. These loci are studied in paragraphs 3 and 4. By means of the homothetic transformations some properties of triangles and quadrilaterals are found. The study of these properties can be used, with profit, in a classroom activity supported by Dynamic Geometry System.

  1. Homothetic Transformations and Geometric Loci: Properties of Triangles and Quadrilaterals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mammana, Maria Flavia

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we use geometric transformations to find some interesting properties related with geometric loci. In particular, given a triangle or a cyclic quadrilateral, the locus generated by the centroid or by the orthocentre (for triangles) or by the anticentre (for cyclic quadrilaterals) when one vertex moves on the circumcircle of the…

  2. Generalization of adiposity genetic loci to US Hispanic women

    PubMed Central

    Graff, M; Fernández-Rhodes, L; Liu, S; Carlson, C; Wassertheil-Smoller, S; Neuhouser, M; Reiner, A; Kooperberg, C; Rampersaud, E; Manson, J E; Kuller, L H; Howard, B V; Ochs-Balcom, H M; Johnson, K C; Vitolins, M Z; Sucheston, L; Monda, K; North, K E

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Obesity is a public health concern. Yet the identification of adiposity-related genetic variants among United States (US) Hispanics, which is the largest US minority group, remains largely unknown. OBJECTIVE: To interrogate an a priori list of 47 (32 overall body mass and 15 central adiposity) index single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) previously studied in individuals of European descent among 3494 US Hispanic women in the Women's Health Initiative SNP Health Association Resource (WHI SHARe). DESIGN: Cross-sectional analysis of measured body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC) and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) were inverse normally transformed after adjusting for age, smoking, center and global ancestry. WC and WHR models were also adjusted for BMI. Genotyping was performed using the Affymetrix 6.0 array. In the absence of an a priori selected SNP, a proxy was selected (r2⩾0.8 in CEU). RESULTS: Six BMI loci (TMEM18, NUDT3/HMGA1, FAIM2, FTO, MC4R and KCTD15) and two WC/WHR loci (VEGFA and ITPR2-SSPN) were nominally significant (P<0.05) at the index or proxy SNP in the corresponding BMI and WC/WHR models. To account for distinct linkage disequilibrium patterns in Hispanics and further assess generalization of genetic effects at each locus, we interrogated the evidence for association at the 47 surrounding loci within 1 Mb region of the index or proxy SNP. Three additional BMI loci (FANCL, TFAP2B and ETV5) and five WC/WHR loci (DNM3-PIGC, GRB14, ADAMTS9, LY86 and MSRA) displayed Bonferroni-corrected significant associations with BMI and WC/WHR. Conditional analyses of each index SNP (or its proxy) and the most significant SNP within the 1 Mb region supported the possible presence of index-independent signals at each of these eight loci as well as at KCTD15. CONCLUSION: This study provides evidence for the generalization of nine BMI and seven central adiposity loci in Hispanic women. This study expands the current knowledge of common adiposity-related

  3. WT1-mediated repression of the proapoptotic transcription factor ZNF224 is triggered by the BCR-ABL oncogene

    PubMed Central

    Montano, Giorgia; Vidovic, Karina; Palladino, Chiara; Cesaro, Elena; Sodaro, Gaetano; Quintarelli, Concetta; De Angelis, Biagio; Errichiello, Santa; Pane, Fabrizio; Izzo, Paola; Grosso, Michela; Gullberg, Urban; Costanzo, Paola

    2015-01-01

    The Kruppel-like protein ZNF224 is a co-factor of the Wilms’ tumor 1 protein, WT1. We have previously shown that ZNF224 exerts a specific proapoptotic role in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) K562 cells and contributes to cytosine arabinoside-induced apoptosis, by modulating WT1-dependent transcription of apoptotic genes. Here we demonstrate that ZNF224 gene expression is down-regulated both in BCR-ABL positive cell lines and in primary CML samples and is restored after imatinib and second generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors treatment. We also show that WT1, whose expression is positively regulated by BCR-ABL, represses transcription of the ZNF224 gene. Finally, we report that ZNF224 is significantly down-regulated in patients with BCR-ABL positive chronic phase-CML showing poor response or resistance to imatinib treatment as compared to high-responder patients. Taken as a whole, our data disclose a novel pathway activated by BCR-ABL that leads to inhibition of apoptosis through the ZNF224 repression. ZNF224 could thus represent a novel promising therapeutic target in CML. PMID:26320177

  4. Imatinib Analogs as Potential Agents for PET Imaging of Bcr-Abl/c-KIT Expression at a Kinase Level

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zhenghong; Maxwell, David S.; Sun, Duoli; Bhanu Prasad, Basvoju A.; Pal, Ashutosh; Wang, Shimei; Balatoni, Julius; Ghosh, Pradip; Lim, Seok T.; Volgin, Andrei; Shavrin, Aleksander; Alauddin, Mian M.; Gelovani, Juri G.; Bornmann, William G.

    2014-01-01

    We synthesized two series of imatinib mesylate (STI-571) analogs to develop a Bcr-Abl and c-KIT receptor-specific labeling agent for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging to measure Bcr-Abl and c-KIT expression levels in a mouse model. The methods of molecular modeling, synthesis of STI-571 and its analogs, in vitro kinase assays, and radiolabeling are described. Molecular modeling revealed that these analogs bind the same Bcr-Abl and c-KIT binding sites as those bound by STI-571. The analogs potently inhibit the tyrosine kinase activity of Bcr-Abl and c-KIT, similarly to STI-571. [18F]-labeled STI-571 was prepared with high specific activity (75 GBq/μmol) by nucleophilic displacement and an average radiochemical yield of 12%. [131I]-labeled STI-571 was prepared with high purity (>95%) and an average radiochemical yield of 23%. The uptake rates of [18F]-STI-571 in K562 cells expressing Abl and in U87WT cells overexpressing c-KIT were significantly higher than those in the U87 cell and could be inhibited by STI-71 (confirming the specificity of uptake). PET scans of K562 and U87WT tumor-bearing mice with [18F]-STI-571 as a contrast agent showed visible tumor uptake and tumor-to-non-target contrast. PMID:24280068

  5. FoxO Tumor Suppressors and BCR-ABL-Induced Leukemia: A Matter of Evasion of Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Jagani, Zainab; Singh, Amrik; Khosravi-Far, Roya

    2008-01-01

    Numerous studies have revealed that the BCR-ABL oncoprotein abnormally engages a multitude of signaling pathways, some of which may be important for its leukemogenic properties. Central to this has been the determination that the tyrosine kinase function of BCR-ABL is mainly responsible for its transforming potential, and can be targeted with small molecule inhibitors, such as imatinib mesylate (Gleevec, STI-571). Despite this apparent success, the development of clinical resistance to imatinib therapy, and the inability of imatinib to eradicate BCR-ABL-positive malignant hematopoietic progenitors demand detailed investigations of additional effector pathways that can be targeted for CML treatment. The promotion of cellular survival via the suppression of apoptotic pathways is a fundamental characteristic of tumor cells that enables resistance to anti-cancer therapies. As substrates of survival kinases such as Akt, the FoxO family of transcription factors, particularly FoxO3a, has emerged as playing an important role in the cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of hematopoietic cells. This review will discuss our current understanding of BCR-ABL signaling with a focus on apoptotic suppressive mechanisms and alternative approaches to CML therapy, as well as the potential for FoxO transcription factors as novel therapeutic targets. PMID:17980712

  6. WT1-mediated repression of the proapoptotic transcription factor ZNF224 is triggered by the BCR-ABL oncogene.

    PubMed

    Montano, Giorgia; Vidovic, Karina; Palladino, Chiara; Cesaro, Elena; Sodaro, Gaetano; Quintarelli, Concetta; De Angelis, Biagio; Errichiello, Santa; Pane, Fabrizio; Izzo, Paola; Grosso, Michela; Gullberg, Urban; Costanzo, Paola

    2015-09-29

    The Kruppel-like protein ZNF224 is a co-factor of the Wilms' tumor 1 protein, WT1. We have previously shown that ZNF224 exerts a specific proapoptotic role in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) K562 cells and contributes to cytosine arabinoside-induced apoptosis, by modulating WT1-dependent transcription of apoptotic genes. Here we demonstrate that ZNF224 gene expression is down-regulated both in BCR-ABL positive cell lines and in primary CML samples and is restored after imatinib and second generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors treatment. We also show that WT1, whose expression is positively regulated by BCR-ABL, represses transcription of the ZNF224 gene. Finally, we report that ZNF224 is significantly down-regulated in patients with BCR-ABL positive chronic phase-CML showing poor response or resistance to imatinib treatment as compared to high-responder patients. Taken as a whole, our data disclose a novel pathway activated by BCR-ABL that leads to inhibition of apoptosis through the ZNF224 repression. ZNF224 could thus represent a novel promising therapeutic target in CML. PMID:26320177

  7. Investigation of trace elements in agricultural soils by BCR sequential extraction method and its transfer to wheat plants.

    PubMed

    Bakircioglu, Dilek; Kurtulus, Yasemin Bakircioglu; Ibar, Hilmi

    2011-04-01

    In this study, soil samples were collected from Edirne, Turkey in both summer and winter seasons and subjected to the modified Community Bureau of Reference (BCR) sequential extraction procedure in order to investigate the chemical partitioning of metals in soils and to predict heavy metals uptake by wheat grains which grown at the same soils. The samples were subjected to a three stage extraction procedure proposed by the BCR. The three phases that were separated out in the following order: (1) carbonate, exchangeable, (2) Fe-Mn oxides, and (3) organic matter. Metal concentrations of soil fractions and grain samples were determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. The wheat samples were prepared to analysis using microwave acid digestion procedure. The pseudo-total concentrations of metals were determined after aqua regia digestion. The analytical accuracy of the method was evaluated by using the Standard Reference Materials (BCR 142R Light Sandy Soil, NIST 2711 Montana Soil, and NIST 2704 Buffalo River Sediment). The sum of the metal contents obtained from the modified BCR sequential extraction procedure and pseudo-total metal contents for soil samples were used to calculate recovery values. In order to evaluate the bioavailability of metals, the relationships between the wheat-metal and soil-extractable metal concentrations were compared.

  8. Cytoprotective effect of imatinib mesylate in non-BCR-ABL-expressing cells along with autophagosome formation

    SciTech Connect

    Ohtomo, Tadashi; Miyazawa, Keisuke; Naito, Munekazu; Moriya, Shota; Kuroda, Masahiko; Itoh, Masahiro; Tomoda, Akio

    2010-01-01

    Treatment with imatinib mesylate (IM) results in an increased viable cell number of non-BCR-ABL-expressing cell lines by inhibiting spontaneous apoptosis. Electron microscopy revealed an increase of autophagosomes in response to IM. IM attenuated the cytotoxic effect of cytosine arabinoside, as well as inhibiting cell death with serum-deprived culture. Cytoprotection with autophagosome formation by IM was observed in various leukemia and cancer cell lines as well as normal murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). Complete inhibition of autophagy by knockdown of atg5 in the Tet-off atg5{sup -/-} MEF system attenuated the cytoprotective effect of IM, indicating that the effect is partially dependent on autophagy. However, cytoprotection by IM was not mediated through suppression of ROS production via mitophagy, ER stress via ribophagy, or proapoptotic function of ABL kinase. Although the target tyrosine kinase(s) of IM remains unclear, our data provide novel therapeutic possibilities of using IM for cytoprotection.

  9. Transcription Factors Efg1 and Bcr1 Regulate Biofilm Formation and Virulence during Candida albicans-Associated Denture Stomatitis.

    PubMed

    Yano, Junko; Yu, Alika; Fidel, Paul L; Noverr, Mairi C

    2016-01-01

    Denture stomatitis (DS) is characterized by inflammation of the oral mucosa in direct contact with dentures and affects a significant number of otherwise healthy denture wearers. The disease is caused by Candida albicans, which readily colonizes and form biofilms on denture materials. While evidence for biofilms on abiotic and biotic surfaces initiating Candida infections is accumulating, a role for biofilms in DS remains unclear. Using an established model of DS in immunocompetent animals, the purpose of this study was to determine the role of biofilm formation in mucosal damage during pathogenesis using C. albicans or mutants defective in morphogenesis (efg1-/-) or biofilm formation (bcr1-/-). For in vivo analyses, rats fitted with custom dentures, consisting of fixed and removable parts, were inoculated with wild-type C. albicans, mutants or reconstituted strains and monitored weekly for fungal burden (denture and palate), body weight and tissue damage (LDH) for up to 8 weeks. C. albicans wild-type and reconstituted mutants formed biofilms on dentures and palatal tissues under in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo conditions as indicated by microscopy demonstrating robust biofilm architecture and extracellular matrix (ECM). In contrast, both efg1-/- and bcr1-/- mutants exhibited poor biofilm growth with little to no ECM. In addition, quantification of fungal burden showed reduced colonization throughout the infection period on dentures and palates of rats inoculated with efg1-/-, but not bcr1-/-, compared to controls. Finally, rats inoculated with efg1-/- and bcr1-/- mutants had minimal palatal tissue damage/weight loss while those inoculated with wild-type or reconstituted mutants showed evidence of tissue damage and exhibited stunted weight gain. These data suggest that biofilm formation is associated with tissue damage during DS and that Efg1 and Bcr1, both central regulators of virulence in C. albicans, have pivotal roles in pathogenesis of DS. PMID:27453977

  10. Transcription Factors Efg1 and Bcr1 Regulate Biofilm Formation and Virulence during Candida albicans-Associated Denture Stomatitis

    PubMed Central

    Yano, Junko; Yu, Alika; Fidel, Paul L.; Noverr, Mairi C.

    2016-01-01

    Denture stomatitis (DS) is characterized by inflammation of the oral mucosa in direct contact with dentures and affects a significant number of otherwise healthy denture wearers. The disease is caused by Candida albicans, which readily colonizes and form biofilms on denture materials. While evidence for biofilms on abiotic and biotic surfaces initiating Candida infections is accumulating, a role for biofilms in DS remains unclear. Using an established model of DS in immunocompetent animals, the purpose of this study was to determine the role of biofilm formation in mucosal damage during pathogenesis using C. albicans or mutants defective in morphogenesis (efg1-/-) or biofilm formation (bcr1-/-). For in vivo analyses, rats fitted with custom dentures, consisting of fixed and removable parts, were inoculated with wild-type C. albicans, mutants or reconstituted strains and monitored weekly for fungal burden (denture and palate), body weight and tissue damage (LDH) for up to 8 weeks. C. albicans wild-type and reconstituted mutants formed biofilms on dentures and palatal tissues under in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo conditions as indicated by microscopy demonstrating robust biofilm architecture and extracellular matrix (ECM). In contrast, both efg1-/- and bcr1-/- mutants exhibited poor biofilm growth with little to no ECM. In addition, quantification of fungal burden showed reduced colonization throughout the infection period on dentures and palates of rats inoculated with efg1-/-, but not bcr1-/-, compared to controls. Finally, rats inoculated with efg1-/- and bcr1-/- mutants had minimal palatal tissue damage/weight loss while those inoculated with wild-type or reconstituted mutants showed evidence of tissue damage and exhibited stunted weight gain. These data suggest that biofilm formation is associated with tissue damage during DS and that Efg1 and Bcr1, both central regulators of virulence in C. albicans, have pivotal roles in pathogenesis of DS. PMID:27453977

  11. Combined STAT3 and BCR-ABL1 Inhibition Induces Synthetic Lethality in Therapy-Resistant Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Clinton C.; Vellore, Nadeem A.; Resetca, Diana; Zabriskie, Matthew S.; Zhang, Tian Y.; Khorashad, Jamshid S.; Engar, Alexander J.; Reynolds, Kimberly R.; Anderson, David J.; Senina, Anna; Pomicter, Anthony D.; Arpin, Carolynn C.; Ahmad, Shazia; Heaton, William L.; Tantravahi, Srinivas K.; Todic, Aleksandra; Moriggl, Richard; Wilson, Derek J.; Baron, Riccardo

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the BCR-ABL1 kinase domain are an established mechanism of tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) resistance in Philadelphia chromosome-positive leukemia, but fail to explain many cases of clinical TKI failure. In contrast, it is largely unknown why some patients fail TKI therapy despite continued suppression of BCR-ABL1 kinase activity, a situation termed BCRABL1 kinase-independent TKI resistance. Here, we identified activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) by extrinsic or intrinsic mechanisms as an essential feature of BCR-ABL1 kinase-independent TKI resistance. By combining synthetic chemistry, in vitro reporter assays, and molecular dynamics-guided rational inhibitor design and high-throughput screening, we discovered BP-5-087, a potent and selective STAT3 SH2 domain inhibitor that reduces STAT3 phosphorylation and nuclear transactivation. Computational simulations, fluorescence polarization assays, and hydrogen-deuterium exchange assays establish direct engagement of STAT3 by BP-5-087 and provide a high-resolution view of the STAT3 SH2 domain/BP-5-087 interface. In primary cells from CML patients with BCR-ABL1 kinase-independent TKI resistance, BP-5-087 (1.0 μM) restored TKI sensitivity to therapy-resistant CML progenitor cells, including leukemic stem cells (LSCs). Our findings implicate STAT3 as a critical signaling node in BCR-ABL1 kinase-independent TKI resistance, and suggest that BP-5-087 has clinical utility for treating malignancies characterized by STAT3 activation. PMID:25134459

  12. BCR-ABL1 kinase inhibits uracil DNA glycosylase UNG2 to enhance oxidative DNA damage and stimulate genomic instability.

    PubMed

    Slupianek, A; Falinski, R; Znojek, P; Stoklosa, T; Flis, S; Doneddu, V; Pytel, D; Synowiec, E; Blasiak, J; Bellacosa, A; Skorski, T

    2013-03-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) revolutionized the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase (CML-CP). Unfortunately, 25% of TKI-naive patients and 50-90% of patients developing TKI-resistance carry CML clones expressing TKI-resistant BCR-ABL1 kinase mutants. We reported that CML-CP leukemia stem and progenitor cell populations accumulate high amounts of reactive oxygen species, which may result in accumulation of uracil derivatives in genomic DNA. Unfaithful and/or inefficient repair of these lesions generates TKI-resistant point mutations in BCR-ABL1 kinase. Using an array of specific substrates and inhibitors/blocking antibodies we found that uracil DNA glycosylase UNG2 were inhibited in BCR-ABL1-transformed cell lines and CD34(+) CML cells. The inhibitory effect was not accompanied by downregulation of nuclear expression and/or chromatin association of UNG2. The effect was BCR-ABL1 kinase-specific because several other fusion tyrosine kinases did not reduce UNG2 activity. Using UNG2-specific inhibitor UGI, we found that reduction of UNG2 activity increased the number of uracil derivatives in genomic DNA detected by modified comet assay and facilitated accumulation of ouabain-resistant point mutations in reporter gene Na(+)/K(+)ATPase. In conclusion, we postulate that BCR-ABL1 kinase-mediated inhibition of UNG2 contributes to accumulation of point mutations responsible for TKI resistance causing the disease relapse, and perhaps also other point mutations facilitating malignant progression of CML.

  13. Biological effects of T315I-mutated BCR-ABL in an embryonic stem cell-derived hematopoiesis model.

    PubMed

    Melkus, Michael; Bennaceur-Griscelli, Annelise; Valogne, Yannick; Flamant, Stephane; Chomel, Jean-Claude; Sorel, Nathalie; Bonnet, Marie-Laure; Deininger, Michael W; Mitjavila-Garcia, Maria-Teresa; Turhan, Ali G

    2013-04-01

    The occurrence of T315I mutation during the course of targeted therapies of chronic myeloid leukemia is a major concern because it confers resistance to all currently approved tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The exact phenotype of the hematopoietic stem cell and the hierarchical level of the occurrence of this mutation in leukemic hematopoiesis has not been determined. To study the effects of T315I-mutated breakpoint cluster region-abelson (BCR-ABL) in a primitive hematopoietic stem cell, we have used the murine embryonic stem cell (mESC)-derived hematopoiesis model. Native and T315I-mutated BCR-ABL were introduced retrovirally in mESC-derived embryonic bodies followed by induction of hematopoiesis. In several experiments, T315I-mutated and nonmutated BCR-ABL-transduced embryonic bodies rapidly generated hematopoietic cells on OP-9 feeders, with evidence of hematopoietic stem cell markers. After injection into NOD/SCID mice, these cells induced myeloid and lymphoid leukemias, whereas transplantation of control (nontransduced) hematopoietic cells failed to produce any hematopoietic reconstitution in vivo. Moreover, the expression of native and T315I-mutated BCR-ABL conferred to mESC-derived hematopoietic cells a self-renewal capacity demonstrated by the generation of leukemias after secondary transplantations. Secondary leukemias were more aggressive with evidence of extramedullary tumors. The expression of stem cell regulator Musashi-2 was found to be increased in bone marrow of leukemic mice. These data show that T315I-mutated BCR-ABL is functional at the stem cell level, conferring to mESC-derived leukemic cells a long-term hematopoietic repopulation ability. This model could be of interest to test the efficiency of drugs at the stem cell level in leukemias with T315I mutation.

  14. Transcription Factors Efg1 and Bcr1 Regulate Biofilm Formation and Virulence during Candida albicans-Associated Denture Stomatitis.

    PubMed

    Yano, Junko; Yu, Alika; Fidel, Paul L; Noverr, Mairi C

    2016-01-01

    Denture stomatitis (DS) is characterized by inflammation of the oral mucosa in direct contact with dentures and affects a significant number of otherwise healthy denture wearers. The disease is caused by Candida albicans, which readily colonizes and form biofilms on denture materials. While evidence for biofilms on abiotic and biotic surfaces initiating Candida infections is accumulating, a role for biofilms in DS remains unclear. Using an established model of DS in immunocompetent animals, the purpose of this study was to determine the role of biofilm formation in mucosal damage during pathogenesis using C. albicans or mutants defective in morphogenesis (efg1-/-) or biofilm formation (bcr1-/-). For in vivo analyses, rats fitted with custom dentures, consisting of fixed and removable parts, were inoculated with wild-type C. albicans, mutants or reconstituted strains and monitored weekly for fungal burden (denture and palate), body weight and tissue damage (LDH) for up to 8 weeks. C. albicans wild-type and reconstituted mutants formed biofilms on dentures and palatal tissues under in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo conditions as indicated by microscopy demonstrating robust biofilm architecture and extracellular matrix (ECM). In contrast, both efg1-/- and bcr1-/- mutants exhibited poor biofilm growth with little to no ECM. In addition, quantification of fungal burden showed reduced colonization throughout the infection period on dentures and palates of rats inoculated with efg1-/-, but not bcr1-/-, compared to controls. Finally, rats inoculated with efg1-/- and bcr1-/- mutants had minimal palatal tissue damage/weight loss while those inoculated with wild-type or reconstituted mutants showed evidence of tissue damage and exhibited stunted weight gain. These data suggest that biofilm formation is associated with tissue damage during DS and that Efg1 and Bcr1, both central regulators of virulence in C. albicans, have pivotal roles in pathogenesis of DS.

  15. Colorimetric assessment of BCR-ABL1 transcripts in clinical samples via gold nanoprobes.

    PubMed

    Vinhas, Raquel; Correia, Cláudia; Ribeiro, Patricia; Lourenço, Alexandra; Botelho de Sousa, Aida; Fernandes, Alexandra R; Baptista, Pedro V

    2016-07-01

    Gold nanoparticles functionalized with thiolated oligonucleotides (Au-nanoprobes) have been used in a range of applications for the detection of bioanalytes of interest, from ions to proteins and DNA targets. These detection strategies are based on the unique optical properties of gold nanoparticles, in particular, the intense color that is subject to modulation by modification of the medium dieletric. Au-nanoprobes have been applied for the detection and characterization of specific DNA sequences of interest, namely pathogens and disease biomarkers. Nevertheless, despite its relevance, only a few reports exist on the detection of RNA targets. Among these strategies, the colorimetric detection of DNA has been proven to work for several different targets in controlled samples but demonstration in real clinical bioanalysis has been elusive. Here, we used a colorimetric method based on Au-nanoprobes for the direct detection of the e14a2 BCR-ABL fusion transcript in myeloid leukemia patient samples without the need for retro-transcription. Au-nanoprobes directly assessed total RNA from 38 clinical samples, and results were validated against reverse transcription-nested polymerase chain reaction (RT-nested PCR) and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). The colorimetric Au-nanoprobe assay is a simple yet reliable strategy to scrutinize myeloid leukemia patients at diagnosis and evaluate progression, with obvious advantages in terms of time and cost, particularly in low- to medium-income countries where molecular screening is not routinely feasible. Graphical abstract Gold nanoprobe for colorimetric detection of BCR-ABL1 fusion transcripts originating from the Philadelphia chromosome. PMID:27225178

  16. The influence of class II HLA type on the lymphoproliferative response of normal donors to a bcr-abl fusion peptide.

    PubMed

    MacIntyre, A R; Christmas, S E; Clark, R E

    1996-09-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is characterized by a t(9;22) chromosomal translocation resulting in the expression of a novel bcr-abl fusion protein. The region spanning the fusion point is novel to the immune system and hence represents a potential leukemia-specific antigen. The ability of a 21-mer b3a2 fusion peptide to induce an in vitro lymphoproliferative response in a panel of 54 normal donors has been tested. This gave a mean stimulation index of 2.73 (95% CI 2.42-3.05) and 50/54 (93%) of donors gave responses that were greater than those with bcr or abl control peptides. The mean stimulation index relative to that of the control peptides was 1.80 (95% CI 1.63-1.97; p < 0.001). Responses were optimal at concentrations ranging from 0.3-150 micrograms/mL and in most cases peaked at 9 days. There was no clear relationship between level of responsiveness to the b3a2 fusion peptide and the presence of any single HLA-A, -B, -DR, or -DQ allele. HIA-DRB1*0404 was the only allele that was not associated with responsiveness. It is therefore likely that the b3a2 fusion peptide can be presented to T cells during a primary immune response in the context of several different class II HLA allelic products, albeit at low efficiency. The implications for specific active immunotherapy of CML patients are discussed.

  17. Comparative study of DNA damage, cell cycle and apoptosis in human K562 and CCRF-CEM leukemia cells: role of BCR/ABL in therapeutic resistance.

    PubMed

    Pytel, Dariusz; Wysocki, Tomasz; Majsterek, Ireneusz

    2006-09-01

    The Philadelphia translocation t(9;22) resulting in the bcr/abl fusion gene is the pathogenic principle of almost 95% of human chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). Imatinib mesylate (STI571) is a specific inhibitor of the BCR/ABL fusion tyrosine kinase that exhibits potent antileukemic effects in CML. BCR/ABL-positive K562 and -negative CCRF-CEM human leukemia cells were investigated. MTT survival assay and clonogenic test of the cell proliferation ability were used to estimate resistance against idarubicin. DNA damage after cell treatment with the drug at the concentrations from 0.001 to 3 microM with or without STI571 pre-treatment were examined by the alkaline comet assay. We found that the level of DNA damages was lower in K562 cells after STI571 pre-treatment. It is suggested that BCR/ABL activity may promote genomic instability, moreover K562 cells were found to be resistant to the drug treatment. Further, we provided evidence of apoptosis inhibition in BCR/ABL-positive cells using caspase-3 activity colorimetric assay and DAPI nuclear staining for chromatin condensation. We suggest that these processes associated with cell cycle arrest in G2/M checkpoint detected in K562 BCR/ABL-positive compared to CCRF-CEM cells without BCR/ABL expression might promote clone selection resistance to drug treatment.

  18. Ten microsatellite loci from Zamia integrifolia (Zamiaceae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ten microsatellite loci isolated from Zamia integrifolia are described. All 10 are polymorphic, with three to ten alleles across 36 members of a single population from South Florida. Heterozygosity ranged from 0.067 to 1. Two loci depart significantly from Hardy Weinberg Equilibrium, and exhibit het...

  19. Measurements of plutonium, 237Np, and 137Cs in the BCR 482 lichen reference material

    SciTech Connect

    Lavelle, Kevin B.; Miller, Jeffrey L.; Hanson, Susan K.; Connick, William B.; Spitz, Henry B.; Glover, Samuel E.; Oldham, Warren J.

    2015-10-01

    Select anthropogenic radionuclides were measured in lichen reference material, BCR 482. This material was originally collected in Axalp, Switzerland in 1991 and is composed of the epiphytic lichen Pseudevernia furfuracea. Samples from three separate bottles of BCR 482 were analyzed for uranium, neptunium, and plutonium isotopes by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and analyzed for cesium-137 by gamma-ray spectrometry. The isotopic composition of the radionuclides measured in BCR 482 suggests contributions from both global fallout resulting from historical nuclear weapons testing and more volatile materials released following the Chernobyl accident.

  20. Overdominant quantitative trait loci for yield and fitness in tomato

    PubMed Central

    Semel, Yaniv; Nissenbaum, Jonathan; Menda, Naama; Zinder, Michael; Krieger, Uri; Issman, Noa; Pleban, Tzili; Lippman, Zachary; Gur, Amit; Zamir, Dani

    2006-01-01

    Heterosis, or hybrid vigor, is a major genetic force that contributes to world food production. The genetic basis of heterosis is not clear, and the importance of loci with overdominant (ODO) effects is debated. One problem has been the use of whole-genome segregating populations, where interactions often mask the effects of individual loci. To assess the contribution of ODO to heterosis in the absence of epistasis, we carried out quantitative genetic and phenotypic analyses on a population of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) introgression lines (ILs), which carry single marker-defined chromosome segments from the distantly related wild species Solanum pennellii. The ILs revealed 841 quantitative trait loci (QTL) for 35 diverse traits measured in the field on homozygous and heterozygous plants. ILs showing greater reproductive fitness were characterized by the prevalence of ODO QTL, which were virtually absent for the nonreproductive traits. ODO can result from true ODO due to allelic interactions of a single gene or from pseudoODO that involves linked loci with dominant alleles in repulsion. The fact that we detected dominant and recessive QTL for all phenotypic categories but ODO only for the reproductive traits indicates that pseudoODO due to random linkage is unlikely to explain heterosis in the ILs. Thus, we favor the true ODO model involving a single functional Mendelian locus. We propose that the alliance of ODO QTL with higher reproductive fitness was selected for in evolution and was domesticated by man to improve yields of crop plants. PMID:16938842

  1. Overdominant quantitative trait loci for yield and fitness in tomato.

    PubMed

    Semel, Yaniv; Nissenbaum, Jonathan; Menda, Naama; Zinder, Michael; Krieger, Uri; Issman, Noa; Pleban, Tzili; Lippman, Zachary; Gur, Amit; Zamir, Dani

    2006-08-29

    Heterosis, or hybrid vigor, is a major genetic force that contributes to world food production. The genetic basis of heterosis is not clear, and the importance of loci with overdominant (ODO) effects is debated. One problem has been the use of whole-genome segregating populations, where interactions often mask the effects of individual loci. To assess the contribution of ODO to heterosis in the absence of epistasis, we carried out quantitative genetic and phenotypic analyses on a population of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) introgression lines (ILs), which carry single marker-defined chromosome segments from the distantly related wild species Solanum pennellii. The ILs revealed 841 quantitative trait loci (QTL) for 35 diverse traits measured in the field on homozygous and heterozygous plants. ILs showing greater reproductive fitness were characterized by the prevalence of ODO QTL, which were virtually absent for the nonreproductive traits. ODO can result from true ODO due to allelic interactions of a single gene or from pseudoODO that involves linked loci with dominant alleles in repulsion. The fact that we detected dominant and recessive QTL for all phenotypic categories but ODO only for the reproductive traits indicates that pseudoODO due to random linkage is unlikely to explain heterosis in the ILs. Thus, we favor the true ODO model involving a single functional Mendelian locus. We propose that the alliance of ODO QTL with higher reproductive fitness was selected for in evolution and was domesticated by man to improve yields of crop plants.

  2. Mapping of quantitative trait loci for canopy wilting trait in soybean (Glycine max L.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Drought stress adversely affects [Glycine max (L.) Merr] soybean at most developmental stages, which collectively results in yield reduction. Little information is available on relative contribution and chromosomal locations of quantitative trait loci (QTL) conditioning drought tolerance in soybean...

  3. Evolution of duplicated IgH loci in Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) locus possesses two parallel IgH isoloci (IGH-A and IGH-B), that are related to the genomic duplication event in the family Salmonidae. These duplicated IgH loci in Atlantic salmon provide a unique opportunity to examine the mechanisms of genome diversity and genome evolution of the IgH loci in vertebrates. In this study, we defined the structure of these loci in Atlantic salmon, and sequenced 24 bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones that were assembled into the IGH-A (1.1 Mb) and IGH-B (0.9 Mb) loci. In addition, over 7,000 cDNA clones from the IgH variable (VH) region have been sequenced and analyzed. Results The present study shows that the genomic organization of the duplicated IgH loci in Atlantic salmon differs from that in other teleosts and other vertebrates. The loci possess multiple Cτ genes upstream of the Cμ region, with three of the Cτ genes being functional. Moreover, the duplicated loci possess over 300 VH segments which could be classified into 18 families. This is the largest number of VH families currently defined in any vertebrate. There were significant structural differences between the two loci, indicating that both IGH-A and -B loci have evolved independently in the short time after the recent genome duplication approximately 60 mya. Conclusions Our results indicate that the duplication of the IgH loci in Atlantic salmon significantly contributes to the increased diversity of the antibody repertoire, as compared with the single IgH locus in other vertebrates. PMID:20813058

  4. Coexistence of p190 BCR/ABL Transcript and CALR 52-bp Deletion in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Blast Crisis: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Seghatoleslami, Mohammad; Ketabchi, Neda; Ordo, Alireza; Asl, Javad Mohammadi; Golchin, Neda; Saki, Najmaldin

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a 78-year-old woman presented with thrombocytosis and high blast count who had a history of splenectomy. Her cytogenetic analysis revealed aberrant chromosomal rearrangements in different clonal populations harboring 46XX karyotype with t(9;22) (q34;q11). RT-PCR assay detected the e1a2 BCR-ABL translocation resulting from rearrangement of the minor breakpoint cluster region (m-bcr) in BCR gene. Subsequent evaluation of the disease showed calreticulin (CALR) 52-bp deletion as well as the absence of JAK2 (V617F) heterozygous mutation in granulocyte population of peripheral blood using allele-specific PCR and bi-directional DNA sequencing. To our knowledge, this is the first case of a patient initially diagnosed as p190 BCR-ABL transcript positive CML in blast crisis characterized by a 52-bp deletion in CALR gene. PMID:26740863

  5. Non genomic loss of function of tumor suppressors in CML: BCR-ABL promotes IκBα mediated p53 nuclear exclusion.

    PubMed

    Crivellaro, Sabrina; Panuzzo, Cristina; Carrà, Giovanna; Volpengo, Alessandro; Crasto, Francesca; Gottardi, Enrico; Familiari, Ubaldo; Papotti, Mauro; Torti, Davide; Piazza, Rocco; Redaelli, Sara; Taulli, Riccardo; Guerrasio, Angelo; Saglio, Giuseppe; Morotti, Alessandro

    2015-09-22

    Tumor suppressor function can be modulated by subtle variation of expression levels, proper cellular compartmentalization and post-translational modifications, such as phosphorylation, acetylation and sumoylation. The non-genomic loss of function of tumor suppressors offers a challenging therapeutic opportunity. The reactivation of a tumor suppressor could indeed promote selective apoptosis of cancer cells without affecting normal cells. The identification of mechanisms that affect tumor suppressor functions is therefore essential. In this work, we show that BCR-ABL promotes the accumulation of the NFKBIA gene product, IκBα, in the cytosol through physical interaction and stabilization of the protein. Furthermore, BCR-ABL/IκBα complex acts as a scaffold protein favoring p53 nuclear exclusion. We therefore identify a novel BCR-ABL/IκBα/p53 network, whereby BCR-ABL functionally inactivates a key tumor suppressor. PMID:26295305

  6. Structure-Activity Relationship Studies of Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase Interacting Kinase (MNK) 1 and 2 and BCR-ABL1 Inhibitors Targeting Chronic Myeloid Leukemic Cells.

    PubMed

    Cherian, Joseph; Nacro, Kassoum; Poh, Zhi Ying; Guo, Samantha; Jeyaraj, Duraiswamy A; Wong, Yun Xuan; Ho, Melvyn; Yang, Hai Yan; Joy, Joma Kanikadu; Kwek, Zekui Perlyn; Liu, Boping; Wee, John Liang Kuan; Ong, Esther H Q; Choong, Meng Ling; Poulsen, Anders; Lee, May Ann; Pendharkar, Vishal; Ding, Li Jun; Manoharan, Vithya; Chew, Yun Shan; Sangthongpitag, Kanda; Lim, Sharon; Ong, S Tiong; Hill, Jeffrey; Keller, Thomas H

    2016-04-14

    Clinically used BCR-ABL1 inhibitors for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia do not eliminate leukemic stem cells (LSC). It has been shown that MNK1 and 2 inhibitors prevent phosphorylation of eIF4E and eliminate the self-renewal capacity of LSCs. Herein, we describe the identification of novel dual MNK1 and 2 and BCR-ABL1 inhibitors, starting from the known kinase inhibitor 2. Initial structure-activity relationship studies resulted in compound 27 with loss of BCR-ABL1 inhibition. Further modification led to orally bioavailable dual MNK1 and 2 and BCR-ABL1 inhibitors 53 and 54, which are efficacious in a mouse xenograft model and also reduce the level of phosphorylated eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E in the tumor tissues. Kinase selectivity of these compounds is also presented. PMID:27011159

  7. Ability of 3 extraction methods (BCR, Tessier and protease K) to estimate bioavailable metals in sediments from Huelva estuary (Southwestern Spain).

    PubMed

    Rosado, Daniel; Usero, José; Morillo, José

    2016-01-15

    The bioavailable fraction of metals (Zn, Cu, Cd, Mn, Pb, Ni, Fe, and Cr) in sediments of the Huelva estuary and its littoral of influence has been estimated carrying out the most popular methods of sequential extraction (BCR and Tessier) and a biomimetic approach (protease K extraction). Results were compared to enrichment factors found in Arenicola marina. The linear correlation coefficients (R(2)) obtained between the fraction mobilized by the first step of the BCR sequential extraction, by the sum of the first and second steps of the Tessier sequential extraction, and by protease K, and enrichment factors in A. marina, are at their highest for protease K extraction (0.709), followed by BCR first step (0.507) and the sum of the first and second steps of Tessier (0.465). This observation suggests that protease K represents the bioavailable fraction more reliably than traditional methods (BCR and Tessier), which have a similar ability.

  8. MPT0B169, a New Antitubulin Agent, Inhibits Bcr-Abl Expression and Induces Mitochondrion-Mediated Apoptosis in Nonresistant and Imatinib-Resistant Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Cells.

    PubMed

    Wong, Shuit-Mun; Liu, Fu-Hwa; Lee, Yueh-Lun; Huang, Huei-Mei

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a clonal disorder of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells that is caused by the Bcr-Abl oncoprotein. Clinical resistance to the Bcr-Abl inhibitor imatinib is a critical problem in treating CML. This study investigated the antitumor effect and mechanism of MPT0B169, a new antitubulin agent, in K562 CML cells and their derived imatinib-resistant cells, IMR2 and IMR3. IMR2 and IMR3 cells showed complete resistance to imatinib-induced growth inhibition and apoptosis. Resistance involved ERK1/2 overactivation and MDR1 overexpression. MPT0B169 inhibited the growth of K562, IMR2, and IMR3 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. MPT0B169 substantially inhibited the mRNA and protein levels of Bcr-Abl, followed by its downstream pathways including Akt, ERK1/2, and STAT3 in these cells. MPT0B169 treatment resulted in a decrease in the polymer form of tubulin according to Western blot analysis. It triggered cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase before apoptosis, which was related to the upregulation of the mitotic marker MPM2 and the cyclin B1 level, and a change in the phosphorylation of Cdk1. MPT0B169 induced apoptosis in nonresistant and imatinib-resistant cells via a mitochondrion-mediated caspase pathway. Further study showed that the agent led to a decrease in the antiapoptotic proteins Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, and Mcl-1 and an increase in the apoptotic protein Bax. Taken together, our results suggest that MPT0B169 might be a promising agent for overcoming imatinib resistance in CML cells.

  9. MPT0B169, a New Antitubulin Agent, Inhibits Bcr-Abl Expression and Induces Mitochondrion-Mediated Apoptosis in Nonresistant and Imatinib-Resistant Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Cells.

    PubMed

    Wong, Shuit-Mun; Liu, Fu-Hwa; Lee, Yueh-Lun; Huang, Huei-Mei

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a clonal disorder of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells that is caused by the Bcr-Abl oncoprotein. Clinical resistance to the Bcr-Abl inhibitor imatinib is a critical problem in treating CML. This study investigated the antitumor effect and mechanism of MPT0B169, a new antitubulin agent, in K562 CML cells and their derived imatinib-resistant cells, IMR2 and IMR3. IMR2 and IMR3 cells showed complete resistance to imatinib-induced growth inhibition and apoptosis. Resistance involved ERK1/2 overactivation and MDR1 overexpression. MPT0B169 inhibited the growth of K562, IMR2, and IMR3 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. MPT0B169 substantially inhibited the mRNA and protein levels of Bcr-Abl, followed by its downstream pathways including Akt, ERK1/2, and STAT3 in these cells. MPT0B169 treatment resulted in a decrease in the polymer form of tubulin according to Western blot analysis. It triggered cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase before apoptosis, which was related to the upregulation of the mitotic marker MPM2 and the cyclin B1 level, and a change in the phosphorylation of Cdk1. MPT0B169 induced apoptosis in nonresistant and imatinib-resistant cells via a mitochondrion-mediated caspase pathway. Further study showed that the agent led to a decrease in the antiapoptotic proteins Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, and Mcl-1 and an increase in the apoptotic protein Bax. Taken together, our results suggest that MPT0B169 might be a promising agent for overcoming imatinib resistance in CML cells. PMID:26815740

  10. Major Molecular Response Achievement in CML Patients Can Be Predicted by BCR-ABL1/ABL1 or BCR-ABL1/GUS Ratio at an Earlier Time Point of Follow-Up than Currently Recommended

    PubMed Central

    Huet, Sarah; Cony-Makhoul, Pascale; Heiblig, Maël; Tigaud, Isabelle; Gazzo, Sophie; Belhabri, Amine; Souche, Denis; Michallet, Mauricette; Magaud, Jean-Pierre; Hayette, Sandrine; Nicolini, Franck

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies demonstrate that early molecular response to tyrosine-kinase inhibitors is strongly predictive of outcome in chronic myeloid leukemia patients and that early response landmarks may identify patients at higher risk for transformation who would benefit from an early switch to second-line therapy. In this study, we evaluated the ability of the control gene GUS to identify relevant thresholds for known therapeutic decision levels (BCR-ABL1/ABL1IS  = 10% and 0.1%). We then defined the most relevant cut-offs for early molecular response markers (transcript level at 3 months, halving time and log reduction between diagnosis and 3 months of treatment) using GUS or ABL1. We demonstrated that, although both control genes could be used (in an equivalent way) to accurately assess early molecular response, the BCR-ABL1/GUS level at diagnosis is impacted by the higher GUS copy number over-expressed in CML cells, thus negatively impacting its ability to completely replace ABL1 at diagnosis. Furthermore, we pointed out, for the first time, that it would be helpful to monitor BCR-ABL1 levels at an earlier time point than that currently performed, in order to assess response to first-line tyrosine-kinase inhibitors and consider a potential switch of therapy as early as possible. We evaluated this optimal time point as being 19 days after the start of treatment in our cohort. PMID:25203717

  11. Inhibition of Aurora Kinase B Is Important for Biologic Activity of the Dual Inhibitors of BCR-ABL and Aurora Kinases R763/AS703569 and PHA-739358 in BCR-ABL Transformed Cells

    PubMed Central

    Illert, Anna L.; Seitz, Anna K.; Rummelt, Christoph; Kreutmair, Stefanie; Engh, Richard A.; Goodstal, Samantha; Peschel, Christian; Duyster, Justus; von Bubnoff, Nikolas

    2014-01-01

    ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) like Imatinib, Dasatinib and Nilotinib are the gold standard in conventional treatment of CML. However, the emergence of resistance remains a major problem. Alternative therapeutic strategies of ABL TKI-resistant CML are urgently needed. We asked whether dual inhibition of BCR-ABL and Aurora kinases A-C could overcome resistance mediated by ABL kinase mutations. We therefore tested the dual ABL and Aurora kinase inhibitors PHA-739358 and R763/AS703569 in Ba/F3- cells ectopically expressing wild type (wt) or TKI-resistant BCR-ABL mutants. We show that both compounds exhibited strong anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activity in ABL TKI resistant cell lines including cells expressing the strongly resistant T315I mutation. Cell cycle analysis indicated polyploidisation, a consequence of continued cell cycle progression in the absence of cell division by Aurora kinase inhibition. Experiments using drug resistant variants of Aurora B indicated that PHA-739358 acts on both, BCR-ABL and Aurora Kinase B, whereas Aurora kinase B inhibition might be sufficient for the anti-proliferative activity observed with R763/AS703569. Taken together, our data demonstrate that dual ABL and Aurora kinase inhibition might be used to overcome ABL TKI resistant CML. PMID:25426931

  12. Identification of nine novel loci associated with white blood cell subtypes in a Japanese population.

    PubMed

    Okada, Yukinori; Hirota, Tomomitsu; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Takahashi, Atsushi; Ohmiya, Hiroko; Kumasaka, Natsuhiko; Higasa, Koichiro; Yamaguchi-Kabata, Yumi; Hosono, Naoya; Nalls, Michael A; Chen, Ming Huei; van Rooij, Frank J A; Smith, Albert V; Tanaka, Toshiko; Couper, David J; Zakai, Neil A; Ferrucci, Luigi; Longo, Dan L; Hernandez, Dena G; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Harris, Tamara B; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Ganesh, Santhi K; Matsuda, Koichi; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Kubo, Michiaki; Nakamura, Yusuke; Tamari, Mayumi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Kamatani, Naoyuki

    2011-06-01

    White blood cells (WBCs) mediate immune systems and consist of various subtypes with distinct roles. Elucidation of the mechanism that regulates the counts of the WBC subtypes would provide useful insights into both the etiology of the immune system and disease pathogenesis. In this study, we report results of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and a replication study for the counts of the 5 main WBC subtypes (neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, basophils, and eosinophils) using 14,792 Japanese subjects enrolled in the BioBank Japan Project. We identified 12 significantly associated loci that satisfied the genome-wide significance threshold of P<5.0×10(-8), of which 9 loci were novel (the CDK6 locus for the neutrophil count; the ITGA4, MLZE, STXBP6 loci, and the MHC region for the monocyte count; the SLC45A3-NUCKS1, GATA2, NAALAD2, ERG loci for the basophil count). We further evaluated associations in the identified loci using 15,600 subjects from Caucasian populations. These WBC subtype-related loci demonstrated a variety of patterns of pleiotropic associations within the WBC subtypes, or with total WBC count, platelet count, or red blood cell-related traits (n = 30,454), which suggests unique and common functional roles of these loci in the processes of hematopoiesis. This study should contribute to the understanding of the genetic backgrounds of the WBC subtypes and hematological traits.

  13. [Atypical BCR-ABL transcripts in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia--the scheme for the diagnosis and monitoring of minimal residual disease].

    PubMed

    Link-Lenczowska, Dorota; Sacha, Tomasz; Zawada, Magdalena; Czekalska, Sylwia; Florek, Izabela; Skotnicki, Aleksander B

    2014-01-01

    More than 95% of patients with detected translocation t(9;22), is characterized by the fusion between exons e13 or e14 of BCR gene, which are located in major breakpoint cluster region (M-bcr) and exon a2 of ABL gene. These fusions are described as b2a2 (e13a2) and b3a2 (e14a2). Other fusions of exons e1, e6, e8, e12, e19, e20 of BCR gene with exons a2 or a3 of ABL gene occur very rarely and lead to formation of so called unusual fusion BCR-ABL genes. The aim of this study is to describe long-term observations of the occurrence and routine procedure in the diagnosis of atypical variants of the fusion gene BCR-ABL in a population of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). It was found that the vast majority of patients with detected BCR-ABL transcripts were b3a2 and b2a2. Other detected variants, which are described as rare were: e1a2, b2a3, b3a3, c3a2, e6a2, e6a3. At the stage of diagnosis as well as during monitoring of the effects of treatment, molecular methods which are based on polymerase chain reaction were used (multiplex RT-PCR, nested RT-PCR, RQ-PCR). Multiplex RT-PCR reaction gave possibility to detect variants of the fusion BCR-ABL gene in one reaction and was crucial in the selection of appropriate test used for further monitoring of the disease and the effectiveness of treatment. This paper proposes a scheme for dealing with the diagnosis and monitoring of minimal residual disease (MRD) in patients with CML treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in the presence of rare fusion of the BCR and ABL genes. PMID:25248240

  14. Purification of TAT-CC-HA protein under native condition, and its transduction analysis and biological effects on BCR-ABL positive cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhenglan; Ji, Maosheng; Peng, Zhi; Huang, Shifeng; Xiao, Qing; Li, Chunli; Zeng, Jianming; Gao, Miao; Feng, Wenli

    2011-06-01

    BCR-ABL oncoprotein is the cause of chronic myeloid leukemia. The homologous oligomerization of BCR-ABL protein mediated by BCR coiled-coil (CC) domain plays an important role in ABL kinase activation. The HIV-1 TAT peptide has been used extensively for the introduction of proteins into cells. We recombinated a TAT-CC-HA protein to interrupt the homologous oligomerization of BCR-ABL. The expression conditions for TAT-CC-HA were optimized. The TAT-CC-HA fusion protein was purified with Ni+-NTA resin. TAT-CC-HA fusion protein was added into the cultures of Ba/F3-p210, 32D-p210, K562, KU812, Ba/F3, 32D, and HL-60 cells. It was found that TAT-CC-HA could transduce into these cells. It was confirmed that TAT-CC-HA fusion protein was internalized by Ba/F3-p210, K562, and Ba/F3 cells and located in the cytoplasm observed by confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscope. The transduction of TAT-CC-HA fusion protein into K562 cells was in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. The result of coimmunoprecipitation assay indicated that TAT-CC-HA could interact with BCR-ABL in K562 cells. The effects of TAT-CC-HA fusion protein on cell growth and apoptosis were detected by MTT test and flow cytometry. Our findings suggested that TAT-CC-HA fusion protein could specifically inhibit the growth of BCR-ABL positive cells, and specifically induce apoptosis of BCR-ABL positive cells, while not affect the growth and apoptosis of BCR-ABL negative cells.

  15. c-Myb and its target Bmi1 are required for p190BCR/ABL leukemogenesis in mouse and human cells

    PubMed Central

    Waldron, Todd; De Dominici, Marco; Soliera, Angela Rachele; Audia, Alessandra; Iacobucci, Ilaria; Lonetti, Annalisa; Martinelli, Giovanni; Zhang, Ying; Martinez, Robert; Hyslop, Terry; Bender, Timothy P.; Calabretta, Bruno

    2011-01-01

    Expression of c-Myb is required for normal hematopoiesis and for proliferation of myeloid leukemia blasts and a subset of T cell leukemia but its role in B-cell leukemogenesis is unknown. We tested the role of c-Myb in p190BCR/ABL-dependent B-cell leukemia in mice transplanted with p190BCR/ABL-transduced marrow cells with a c-Myb allele (Mybf/d) and in double transgenic p190BCR/ABL/Mybw/d mice. In both models, loss of a c-Myb allele caused a less aggressive B-cell leukemia. In p190BCR/ABL expressing human B-cell leukemia lines, knockdown of c-Myb expression suppressed proliferation and colony formation. Compared to c-Mybw/f cells, expression of Bmi1, a regulator of stem cell proliferation and maintenance, was decreased in pre-B cells from Mybw/d p190BCR/ABL transgenic mice. Ectopic expression of a mutant c-Myb or Bmi1 enhanced the proliferation and colony formation of Mybw/d p190BCR/ABL B-cells; by contrast, Bmi1 downregulation inhibited colony formation of p190BCR/ABL-expressing murine B cells and human B-cell leukemia lines. Moreover, c-Myb interacted with a segment of the human Bmi1 promoter and enhanced its activity. In blasts from nineteen Ph1 adult ALL patients, levels of c-Myb and Bmi1 showed a positive correlation. Together, these findings support the existence of a c-Myb-Bmi1 transcription regulatory pathway required for p190BCR/ABL leukemogenesis. PMID:21960247

  16. [Isolation and characterization of twenty-one polymorphic microsatellite loci in the Tibetan macaque (Macaca thibetana)].

    PubMed

    Jia, X D; Yang, B D; Yue, B S; Yin, H L; Wang, H X; Zhang, X Y

    2011-07-01

    Twenty-one microsatellite loci were isolated from AC-enriched library of Tibetan macaque (Macaca thibetana). The number of alleles at the 21 microsatellite loci ranged from 8 to 15, with an average of 12.2 per locus. Polymorphism information content (PIC) ranged from 0.805 to 0.910 with an average of 0.873. The observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.208 to 0.792 and from 0.843 to 0.938, respectively. These microsatellite loci will be useful for future studies that relate to the genetic diversity and population structure of Tibetan macaque.

  17. Structural Mechanism of the Pan-BCR-ABL Inhibitor Ponatinib (AP24534): Lessons for Overcoming Kinase Inhibitor Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Tianjun; Commodore, Lois; Huang, Wei-Sheng; Wang, Yihan; Thomas, Mathew; Keats, Jeff; Xu, Qihong; Rivera, Victor M.; Shakespeare, William C.; Clackson, Tim; Dalgarno, David C.; Zhu, Xiaotian

    2012-01-20

    The BCR-ABL inhibitor imatinib has revolutionized the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia. However, drug resistance caused by kinase domain mutations has necessitated the development of new mutation-resistant inhibitors, most recently against the T315I gatekeeper residue mutation. Ponatinib (AP24534) inhibits both native and mutant BCR-ABL, including T315I, acting as a pan-BCR-ABL inhibitor. Here, we undertook a combined crystallographic and structure-activity relationship analysis on ponatinib to understand this unique profile. While the ethynyl linker is a key inhibitor functionality that interacts with the gatekeeper, virtually all other components of ponatinib play an essential role in its T315I inhibitory activity. The extensive network of optimized molecular contacts found in the DFG-out binding mode leads to high potency and renders binding less susceptible to disruption by single point mutations. The inhibitory mechanism exemplified by ponatinib may have broad relevance to designing inhibitors against other kinases with mutated gatekeeper residues.

  18. Incidence and clinical importance of BCR-ABL1 mutations in Iranian patients with chronic myeloid leukemia on imatinib.

    PubMed

    Rostami, Golale; Hamid, Mohammad; Yaran, Majid; Khani, Mohsen; Karimipoor, Morteza

    2015-05-01

    Mutations of the BCR-ABL1 kinase domain seem to be the most common cause of imatinib mesylate resistance in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). We screened BCR-ABL1 kinase domain mutations using nested reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and direct sequencing in 30 CML patients including 22 resistant patients and 8 patients with optimal response to imatinib. Three mutations of two different types were identified in 3 of 22 (13.6%) resistant patients. Two patients had p.E355G mutation in the catalytic domain, and the third patient had p.G398R in the activation loop that is reported here for the first time. No mutation was found in patients with optimal response to imatinib. The frequency of mutations was similar in patients with primary resistance compared with patients with secondary resistance (25 vs 11%; P=1). Mutation status had no impact on the overall survival and progression-free survival. p.E355G mutation was correlated with shorter survival (P=0.047) in resistant patients. We conclude that BCR- ABL1 mutations are associated with the clinical resistance, but may not be considered the only cause of resistance to imatinib. Mutational analysis may identify resistant patients at risk of disease progression. PMID:25740611

  19. Combined targeting of BCL-2 and BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase eradicates chronic myeloid leukemia stem cells.

    PubMed

    Carter, Bing Z; Mak, Po Yee; Mu, Hong; Zhou, Hongsheng; Mak, Duncan H; Schober, Wendy; Leverson, Joel D; Zhang, Bin; Bhatia, Ravi; Huang, Xuelin; Cortes, Jorge; Kantarjian, Hagop; Konopleva, Marina; Andreeff, Michael

    2016-09-01

    BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are effective against chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), but they rarely eliminate CML stem cells. Disease relapse is common upon therapy cessation, even in patients with complete molecular responses. Furthermore, once CML progresses to blast crisis (BC), treatment outcomes are dismal. We hypothesized that concomitant targeting of BCL-2 and BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase could overcome these limitations. We demonstrate increased BCL-2 expression at the protein level in bone marrow cells, particularly in Lin(-)Sca-1(+)cKit(+) cells of inducible CML in mice, as determined by CyTOF mass cytometry. Further, selective inhibition of BCL-2, aided by TKI-mediated MCL-1 and BCL-XL inhibition, markedly decreased leukemic Lin(-)Sca-1(+)cKit(+) cell numbers and long-term stem cell frequency and prolonged survival in a murine CML model. Additionally, this combination effectively eradicated CD34(+)CD38(-), CD34(+)CD38(+), and quiescent stem/progenitor CD34(+) cells from BC CML patient samples. Our results suggest that BCL-2 is a key survival factor for CML stem/progenitor cells and that combined inhibition of BCL-2 and BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase has the potential to significantly improve depth of response and cure rates of chronic-phase and BC CML. PMID:27605552

  20. Assaying Bcr-Abl kinase activity and inhibition in whole cell extracts by phosphorylation of substrates immobilized on agarose beads.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ding; Nair-Gill, Evan; Sher, Dorie A; Parker, Laurie L; Campbell, Jennifer M; Siddiqui, Mariah; Stock, Wendy; Kron, Stephen J

    2005-12-01

    There is a current and increasing demand for simple, robust, nonradioactive assays of protein tyrosine kinase activity with applications for clinical diagnosis and high-throughput screening of potential molecularly targeted therapeutic agents. One significant challenge is to detect and measure the activity of specific kinases with key roles in cell signaling as an approach to distinguish normal cells from cancer cells and as a means of evaluating targeted drug efficacy and resistance in cancer cells. Here, we describe a method in which kinase substrates fused to glutathione-S-transferase and immobilized on glutathione agarose beads are phosphorylated, eluted, and then assayed to detect kinase activity. The activity of recombinant, purified c-Abl kinase or Bcr-Abl kinase in whole cell extracts can be detected with equivalent specificity, sensitivity, and reproducibility. Similarly, inhibition of recombinant c-Abl or Bcr-Abl in cells or cell extracts by imatinib mesylate and other Bcr-Abl targeted kinase inhibitors is readily assayed. This simple kinase assay is sufficiently straightforward and robust for use in clinical laboratories and is potentially adaptable to high-throughput assay formats.

  1. Evidence that a BCR-ABL fusion peptide does not induce lymphocyte proliferation or cytokine production in vitro.

    PubMed

    Abu-Eisha, Hazem M; Butt, Nauman M; Clark, Richard E; Christmas, Stephen E

    2007-12-01

    The BCR-ABL fusion protein is characteristic of chronic myeloid leukaemia and may be an effective tumour-specific antigen. CD8+ T cell responses to BCR-ABL fusion peptides have been reported in normal subjects and CML patients but CD4+ T cell responses have been less well characterised. Here, the 23-mer e14a2 fusion peptide VHSATGFKQSSKALQRPVASDFE has been used to stimulate T cell responses. Most normal subjects and CML patients showed no proliferative responses to this peptide, with stimulation indices not significantly greater than 1.0. Following a second stimulation with the same peptide, small proliferative responses were obtained in normal subjects but not CML patients. These responses were not improved following a third stimulation with 23-mer peptide, nor by using mature autologous dendritic cells to present the peptide. Intracellular interferon-gamma production by CD4+ T cells was also not induced by the 23-mer e14a2 peptide. Hence, this e14a2 peptide does not stimulate CD4+ T cell proliferation in vitro in most normal subjects or CML patients. The precise sequence of amino acids may be critical in defining immunogenicity for CD4+ T cell responses against BCR-ABL peptides.

  2. b3a2 BCR-ABL fusion peptides as targets for cytotoxic T cells in chronic myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Norbury, L C; Clark, R E; Christmas, S E

    2000-06-01

    Peptide sequences spanning the BCR-ABL protein junction potentially constitute novel leukaemia-specific antigens. 9-mer b3a2 fusion peptides have been reported to bind with high affinity to HLA-A3, -A11 and -B8. We have studied the effect of b3a2 BCR-ABL junctional peptides on the cytotoxic T-cell (CTL) response against normal and chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) cells. Antigen-presenting cells (APCs) were prepared from HLA-A3- or -B8-positive peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) by incubation with phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) and interleukin (IL)-2 for 7 d. These APCs were pulsed with the respective b3a2 junctional peptide in the presence of beta2-microglobulin and were then used to challenge autologous PBMCs at 7-d intervals in the presence of IL-2, IL-6, IL-7 and IL-12. On subsequent exposure to target cells (either further pulsed normal APCs or unpulsed CML cells), specific HLA-restricted CTL responses were observed against all HLA-A3/-B8 matched normal target cells tested, but not to targets that were HLA mismatched. Cytotoxicity was also induced against HLA-A3/-B8 unpulsed CML cells, but not against unmatched CML cells. These data indicate (i) that endogenous BCR-ABL junctional peptides may be presented by CML cells and (ii) that exogenous peptides are potential stimulators of autologous antileukaemic CTLs.

  3. Use of the BCR sequential extraction procedure for the study of metal availability to plants.

    PubMed

    Li, Junhui; Lu, Ying; Shim, Hojae; Deng, Xianglian; Lian, Jin; Jia, Zhenglei; Li, Jianhua

    2010-02-01

    To investigate the mobility and availability of metals from soil to plant, concentrations of zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), mercury (Hg) and arsenic (As) in topsoils and plants (lettuce, scallion, celery, tomato, carambola, wampee and longan) collected from the area around a petrochemical complex in Guangzhou, China, were analyzed. The modified European Community Bureau of Reference (BCR) three-step sequential extraction procedure was applied to determine the concentration of metal fractions in soils. The results showed that the distribution of Zn, Cu, Pb and Cd in four fractions varied greatly among the soil samples, and 18.8% of vegetable and fruit samples for Cd and 5.8% for Pb exceeded the maximum permissible levels in food of China. Soil-to-plant transfer coefficients were in the order of Cd>Zn>Cu>Hg>As>Pb, suggesting Cd being the most mobile and available to plants among the metals studied. Principal component analysis indicated that metal fractions and soil physicochemical properties (pH, organic matter, cation exchange capacity, clay content and electrical conductivity) affected metal uptake by plants. Furthermore, atmospheric deposition may be another important factor for the accumulation of metals in plants.

  4. Migration of antibody secreting cells towards CXCL12 depends on the isotype that forms the BCR

    PubMed Central

    Achatz-Straussberger, Gertrude; Zaborsky, Nadja; Königsberger, Sebastian; Luger, Elke O.; Lamers, Marinus; Crameri, Reto; Achatz, Gernot

    2010-01-01

    Truncation of the cytoplasmic tail of membrane-bound IgE in vivo results in lower serum IgE levels, decreased numbers of IgE-secreting plasma cells and the abrogation of specific secondary immune responses. Here we present mouse strain KN1 that expresses a chimeric ε-γ1 BCR, consisting of the extracellular domains of the ε gene and the trans-membrane and cytoplasmic domains of the γ1 gene. Thus, differences in the IgE immune response of KN1 mice reflect the influence of the “γ1-mediated signalling” of mIgE bearing B cells. KN1 mice show an increased serum IgE level, resulting from an elevated number of IgE-secreting cells. Although the primary IgE immune response in KN1 mice is inconspicuous, the secondary response is far more robust. Most strikingly, IgE-antibody secreting cells with “γ1-signalling history” migrate more efficiently towards the chemokine CXCL12, which guides plasmablasts to plasma cell niches, than IgE-antibody secreting cells with WT “ε-signalling history”. We conclude that IgE plasmablasts have an intrinsic, lower chance to contribute to the long-lived plasma cell pool than IgG1 plasmablasts. PMID:18925577

  5. Identification of four novel susceptibility loci for oestrogen receptor negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Couch, Fergus J.; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Mendoza-Fandino, Gustavo A.; Nord, Silje; Lilyquist, Janna; Olswold, Curtis; Hallberg, Emily; Agata, Simona; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Ambrosone, Christine; Andrulis, Irene L.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Arun, Banu K.; Arver, Brita; Barile, Monica; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Barrowdale, Daniel; Beckmann, Lars; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Benitez, Javier; Blank, Stephanie V.; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Burwinkel, Barbara; Buys, Saundra S.; Caldes, Trinidad; Caligo, Maria A.; Canzian, Federico; Carpenter, Jane; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J.; Chung, Wendy K.; Claes, Kathleen B. M.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Czene, Kamila; Daly, Mary B.; Damiola, Francesca; Darabi, Hatef; de la Hoya, Miguel; Devilee, Peter; Diez, Orland; Ding, Yuan C.; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Domchek, Susan M.; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dumont, Martine; Dunning, Alison M.; Eccles, Diana M.; Ehrencrona, Hans; Ekici, Arif B.; Eliassen, Heather; Ellis, Steve; Fasching, Peter A.; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Försti, Asta; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D.; Friebel, Tara; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Gabrielson, Marike; Gammon, Marilie D.; Ganz, Patricia A.; Gapstur, Susan M.; Garber, Judy; Gaudet, Mia M.; Gayther, Simon A.; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ghoussaini, Maya; Giles, Graham G.; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K.; Goldberg, Mark S.; Goldgar, David E.; González-Neira, Anna; Greene, Mark H.; Gronwald, Jacek; Guénel, Pascal; Gunter, Marc; Haeberle, Lothar; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hamann, Ute; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Hart, Steven; Healey, Sue; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Henderson, Brian E.; Herzog, Josef; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hoover, Robert N.; Hopper, John L.; Humphreys, Keith; Hunter, David J.; Huzarski, Tomasz; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Isaacs, Claudine; Jakubowska, Anna; James, Paul; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M.; Jones, Michael; Kabisch, Maria; Kar, Siddhartha; Karlan, Beth Y.; Khan, Sofia; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kibriya, Muhammad G.; Knight, Julia A.; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kristensen, Vessela; Kwong, Ava; Laitman, Yael; Lambrechts, Diether; Lazaro, Conxi; Lee, Eunjung; Le Marchand, Loic; Lester, Jenny; Lindblom, Annika; Lindor, Noralane; Lindstrom, Sara; Liu, Jianjun; Long, Jirong; Lubinski, Jan; Mai, Phuong L.; Makalic, Enes; Malone, Kathleen E.; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Martens, John W. M.; McGuffog, Lesley; Meindl, Alfons; Miller, Austin; Milne, Roger L.; Miron, Penelope; Montagna, Marco; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Mulligan, Anna M.; Muranen, Taru A.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Offit, Kenneth; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Olson, Janet E.; Osorio, Ana; Park, Sue K.; Peeters, Petra H.; Peissel, Bernard; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Phelan, Catherine M.; Pilarski, Robert; Poppe, Bruce; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Rahman, Nazneen; Rantala, Johanna; Rappaport, Christine; Rennert, Gad; Richardson, Andrea; Robson, Mark; Romieu, Isabelle; Rudolph, Anja; Rutgers, Emiel J.; Sanchez, Maria-Jose; Santella, Regina M.; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Schmidt, Daniel F.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Scott, Rodney; Senter, Leigha; Sharma, Priyanka; Simard, Jacques; Singer, Christian F.; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Soucy, Penny; Southey, Melissa; Steinemann, Doris; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Swerdlow, Anthony; Szabo, Csilla I.; Tamimi, Rulla; Tapper, William; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Mary B.; Thomassen, Mads; Thompson, Deborah; Tihomirova, Laima; Toland, Amanda E.; Tollenaar, Robert A. E. M.; Tomlinson, Ian; Truong, Thérèse; Tsimiklis, Helen; Teulé, Alex; Tumino, Rosario; Tung, Nadine; Turnbull, Clare; Ursin, Giski; van Deurzen, Carolien H. M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wang, Zhaoming; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Whittemore, Alice; Wildiers, Hans; Winqvist, Robert; Yang, Xiaohong R.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Yao, Song; Zamora, M Pilar; Zheng, Wei; Hall, Per; Kraft, Peter; Vachon, Celine; Slager, Susan; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Monteiro, Alvaro A. N.; García-Closas, Montserrat; Easton, Douglas F.; Antoniou, Antonis C.

    2016-01-01

    Common variants in 94 loci have been associated with breast cancer including 15 loci with genome-wide significant associations (P<5 × 10−8) with oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer and BRCA1-associated breast cancer risk. In this study, to identify new ER-negative susceptibility loci, we performed a meta-analysis of 11 genome-wide association studies (GWAS) consisting of 4,939 ER-negative cases and 14,352 controls, combined with 7,333 ER-negative cases and 42,468 controls and 15,252 BRCA1 mutation carriers genotyped on the iCOGS array. We identify four previously unidentified loci including two loci at 13q22 near KLF5, a 2p23.2 locus near WDR43 and a 2q33 locus near PPIL3 that display genome-wide significant associations with ER-negative breast cancer. In addition, 19 known breast cancer risk loci have genome-wide significant associations and 40 had moderate associations (P<0.05) with ER-negative disease. Using functional and eQTL studies we implicate TRMT61B and WDR43 at 2p23.2 and PPIL3 at 2q33 in ER-negative breast cancer aetiology. All ER-negative loci combined account for ∼11% of familial relative risk for ER-negative disease and may contribute to improved ER-negative and BRCA1 breast cancer risk prediction. PMID:27117709

  6. Identification of four novel susceptibility loci for oestrogen receptor negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Couch, Fergus J; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Mendoza-Fandino, Gustavo A; Nord, Silje; Lilyquist, Janna; Olswold, Curtis; Hallberg, Emily; Agata, Simona; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Ambrosone, Christine; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Arun, Banu K; Arver, Brita; Barile, Monica; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Barrowdale, Daniel; Beckmann, Lars; Beckmann, Matthias W; Benitez, Javier; Blank, Stephanie V; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Burwinkel, Barbara; Buys, Saundra S; Caldes, Trinidad; Caligo, Maria A; Canzian, Federico; Carpenter, Jane; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J; Chung, Wendy K; Claes, Kathleen B M; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Cunningham, Julie M; Czene, Kamila; Daly, Mary B; Damiola, Francesca; Darabi, Hatef; de la Hoya, Miguel; Devilee, Peter; Diez, Orland; Ding, Yuan C; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Domchek, Susan M; Dorfling, Cecilia M; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dumont, Martine; Dunning, Alison M; Eccles, Diana M; Ehrencrona, Hans; Ekici, Arif B; Eliassen, Heather; Ellis, Steve; Fasching, Peter A; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Försti, Asta; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D; Friebel, Tara; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Gabrielson, Marike; Gammon, Marilie D; Ganz, Patricia A; Gapstur, Susan M; Garber, Judy; Gaudet, Mia M; Gayther, Simon A; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ghoussaini, Maya; Giles, Graham G; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K; Goldberg, Mark S; Goldgar, David E; González-Neira, Anna; Greene, Mark H; Gronwald, Jacek; Guénel, Pascal; Gunter, Marc; Haeberle, Lothar; Haiman, Christopher A; Hamann, Ute; Hansen, Thomas V O; Hart, Steven; Healey, Sue; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Henderson, Brian E; Herzog, Josef; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Hooning, Maartje J; Hoover, Robert N; Hopper, John L; Humphreys, Keith; Hunter, David J; Huzarski, Tomasz; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Isaacs, Claudine; Jakubowska, Anna; James, Paul; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M; Jones, Michael; Kabisch, Maria; Kar, Siddhartha; Karlan, Beth Y; Khan, Sofia; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kibriya, Muhammad G; Knight, Julia A; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kristensen, Vessela; Kwong, Ava; Laitman, Yael; Lambrechts, Diether; Lazaro, Conxi; Lee, Eunjung; Le Marchand, Loic; Lester, Jenny; Lindblom, Annika; Lindor, Noralane; Lindstrom, Sara; Liu, Jianjun; Long, Jirong; Lubinski, Jan; Mai, Phuong L; Makalic, Enes; Malone, Kathleen E; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Martens, John W M; McGuffog, Lesley; Meindl, Alfons; Miller, Austin; Milne, Roger L; Miron, Penelope; Montagna, Marco; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Mulligan, Anna M; Muranen, Taru A; Nathanson, Katherine L; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nussbaum, Robert L; Offit, Kenneth; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Olson, Janet E; Osorio, Ana; Park, Sue K; Peeters, Petra H; Peissel, Bernard; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Phelan, Catherine M; Pilarski, Robert; Poppe, Bruce; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Rahman, Nazneen; Rantala, Johanna; Rappaport, Christine; Rennert, Gad; Richardson, Andrea; Robson, Mark; Romieu, Isabelle; Rudolph, Anja; Rutgers, Emiel J; Sanchez, Maria-Jose; Santella, Regina M; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schmidt, Daniel F; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Schmutzler, Rita K; Schumacher, Fredrick; Scott, Rodney; Senter, Leigha; Sharma, Priyanka; Simard, Jacques; Singer, Christian F; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Soucy, Penny; Southey, Melissa; Steinemann, Doris; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Swerdlow, Anthony; Szabo, Csilla I; Tamimi, Rulla; Tapper, William; Teixeira, Manuel R; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Mary B; Thomassen, Mads; Thompson, Deborah; Tihomirova, Laima; Toland, Amanda E; Tollenaar, Robert A E M; Tomlinson, Ian; Truong, Thérèse; Tsimiklis, Helen; Teulé, Alex; Tumino, Rosario; Tung, Nadine; Turnbull, Clare; Ursin, Giski; van Deurzen, Carolien H M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wang, Zhaoming; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Whittemore, Alice; Wildiers, Hans; Winqvist, Robert; Yang, Xiaohong R; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Yao, Song; Zamora, M Pilar; Zheng, Wei; Hall, Per; Kraft, Peter; Vachon, Celine; Slager, Susan; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Pharoah, Paul D P; Monteiro, Alvaro A N; García-Closas, Montserrat; Easton, Douglas F; Antoniou, Antonis C

    2016-04-27

    Common variants in 94 loci have been associated with breast cancer including 15 loci with genome-wide significant associations (P<5 × 10(-8)) with oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer and BRCA1-associated breast cancer risk. In this study, to identify new ER-negative susceptibility loci, we performed a meta-analysis of 11 genome-wide association studies (GWAS) consisting of 4,939 ER-negative cases and 14,352 controls, combined with 7,333 ER-negative cases and 42,468 controls and 15,252 BRCA1 mutation carriers genotyped on the iCOGS array. We identify four previously unidentified loci including two loci at 13q22 near KLF5, a 2p23.2 locus near WDR43 and a 2q33 locus near PPIL3 that display genome-wide significant associations with ER-negative breast cancer. In addition, 19 known breast cancer risk loci have genome-wide significant associations and 40 had moderate associations (P<0.05) with ER-negative disease. Using functional and eQTL studies we implicate TRMT61B and WDR43 at 2p23.2 and PPIL3 at 2q33 in ER-negative breast cancer aetiology. All ER-negative loci combined account for ∼11% of familial relative risk for ER-negative disease and may contribute to improved ER-negative and BRCA1 breast cancer risk prediction.

  7. Identification of four novel susceptibility loci for oestrogen receptor negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Couch, Fergus J; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Mendoza-Fandino, Gustavo A; Nord, Silje; Lilyquist, Janna; Olswold, Curtis; Hallberg, Emily; Agata, Simona; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Ambrosone, Christine; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Arun, Banu K; Arver, Brita; Barile, Monica; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Barrowdale, Daniel; Beckmann, Lars; Beckmann, Matthias W; Benitez, Javier; Blank, Stephanie V; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Burwinkel, Barbara; Buys, Saundra S; Caldes, Trinidad; Caligo, Maria A; Canzian, Federico; Carpenter, Jane; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J; Chung, Wendy K; Claes, Kathleen B M; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Cunningham, Julie M; Czene, Kamila; Daly, Mary B; Damiola, Francesca; Darabi, Hatef; de la Hoya, Miguel; Devilee, Peter; Diez, Orland; Ding, Yuan C; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Domchek, Susan M; Dorfling, Cecilia M; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dumont, Martine; Dunning, Alison M; Eccles, Diana M; Ehrencrona, Hans; Ekici, Arif B; Eliassen, Heather; Ellis, Steve; Fasching, Peter A; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Försti, Asta; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D; Friebel, Tara; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Gabrielson, Marike; Gammon, Marilie D; Ganz, Patricia A; Gapstur, Susan M; Garber, Judy; Gaudet, Mia M; Gayther, Simon A; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ghoussaini, Maya; Giles, Graham G; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K; Goldberg, Mark S; Goldgar, David E; González-Neira, Anna; Greene, Mark H; Gronwald, Jacek; Guénel, Pascal; Gunter, Marc; Haeberle, Lothar; Haiman, Christopher A; Hamann, Ute; Hansen, Thomas V O; Hart, Steven; Healey, Sue; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Henderson, Brian E; Herzog, Josef; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Hooning, Maartje J; Hoover, Robert N; Hopper, John L; Humphreys, Keith; Hunter, David J; Huzarski, Tomasz; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Isaacs, Claudine; Jakubowska, Anna; James, Paul; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M; Jones, Michael; Kabisch, Maria; Kar, Siddhartha; Karlan, Beth Y; Khan, Sofia; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kibriya, Muhammad G; Knight, Julia A; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kristensen, Vessela; Kwong, Ava; Laitman, Yael; Lambrechts, Diether; Lazaro, Conxi; Lee, Eunjung; Le Marchand, Loic; Lester, Jenny; Lindblom, Annika; Lindor, Noralane; Lindstrom, Sara; Liu, Jianjun; Long, Jirong; Lubinski, Jan; Mai, Phuong L; Makalic, Enes; Malone, Kathleen E; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Martens, John W M; McGuffog, Lesley; Meindl, Alfons; Miller, Austin; Milne, Roger L; Miron, Penelope; Montagna, Marco; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Mulligan, Anna M; Muranen, Taru A; Nathanson, Katherine L; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nussbaum, Robert L; Offit, Kenneth; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Olson, Janet E; Osorio, Ana; Park, Sue K; Peeters, Petra H; Peissel, Bernard; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Phelan, Catherine M; Pilarski, Robert; Poppe, Bruce; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Rahman, Nazneen; Rantala, Johanna; Rappaport, Christine; Rennert, Gad; Richardson, Andrea; Robson, Mark; Romieu, Isabelle; Rudolph, Anja; Rutgers, Emiel J; Sanchez, Maria-Jose; Santella, Regina M; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schmidt, Daniel F; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Schmutzler, Rita K; Schumacher, Fredrick; Scott, Rodney; Senter, Leigha; Sharma, Priyanka; Simard, Jacques; Singer, Christian F; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Soucy, Penny; Southey, Melissa; Steinemann, Doris; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Swerdlow, Anthony; Szabo, Csilla I; Tamimi, Rulla; Tapper, William; Teixeira, Manuel R; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Mary B; Thomassen, Mads; Thompson, Deborah; Tihomirova, Laima; Toland, Amanda E; Tollenaar, Robert A E M; Tomlinson, Ian; Truong, Thérèse; Tsimiklis, Helen; Teulé, Alex; Tumino, Rosario; Tung, Nadine; Turnbull, Clare; Ursin, Giski; van Deurzen, Carolien H M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wang, Zhaoming; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Whittemore, Alice; Wildiers, Hans; Winqvist, Robert; Yang, Xiaohong R; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Yao, Song; Zamora, M Pilar; Zheng, Wei; Hall, Per; Kraft, Peter; Vachon, Celine; Slager, Susan; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Pharoah, Paul D P; Monteiro, Alvaro A N; García-Closas, Montserrat; Easton, Douglas F; Antoniou, Antonis C

    2016-01-01

    Common variants in 94 loci have been associated with breast cancer including 15 loci with genome-wide significant associations (P<5 × 10(-8)) with oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer and BRCA1-associated breast cancer risk. In this study, to identify new ER-negative susceptibility loci, we performed a meta-analysis of 11 genome-wide association studies (GWAS) consisting of 4,939 ER-negative cases and 14,352 controls, combined with 7,333 ER-negative cases and 42,468 controls and 15,252 BRCA1 mutation carriers genotyped on the iCOGS array. We identify four previously unidentified loci including two loci at 13q22 near KLF5, a 2p23.2 locus near WDR43 and a 2q33 locus near PPIL3 that display genome-wide significant associations with ER-negative breast cancer. In addition, 19 known breast cancer risk loci have genome-wide significant associations and 40 had moderate associations (P<0.05) with ER-negative disease. Using functional and eQTL studies we implicate TRMT61B and WDR43 at 2p23.2 and PPIL3 at 2q33 in ER-negative breast cancer aetiology. All ER-negative loci combined account for ∼11% of familial relative risk for ER-negative disease and may contribute to improved ER-negative and BRCA1 breast cancer risk prediction. PMID:27117709

  8. New basal cell carcinoma susceptibility loci

    PubMed Central

    Stacey, Simon N.; Helgason, Hannes; Gudjonsson, Sigurjon A.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Zink, Florian; Sigurdsson, Asgeir; Kehr, Birte; Gudmundsson, Julius; Sulem, Patrick; Sigurgeirsson, Bardur; Benediktsdottir, Kristrun R.; Thorisdottir, Kristin; Ragnarsson, Rafn; Fuentelsaz, Victoria; Corredera, Cristina; Gilaberte, Yolanda; Grasa, Matilde; Planelles, Dolores; Sanmartin, Onofre; Rudnai, Peter; Gurzau, Eugene; Koppova, Kvetoslava; Nexø, Bjørn A.; Tjønneland, Anne; Overvad, Kim; Jonasson, Jon G.; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Johannsdottir, Hrefna; Kristinsdottir, Anna M.; Stefansson, Hreinn; Masson, Gisli; Magnusson, Olafur T.; Halldorsson, Bjarni V.; Kong, Augustine; Rafnar, Thorunn; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Vogel, Ulla; Kumar, Rajiv; Nagore, Eduardo; Mayordomo, José I.; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F.; Olafsson, Jon H.; Stefansson, Kari

    2015-01-01

    In an ongoing screen for DNA sequence variants that confer risk of cutaneous basal cell carcinoma (BCC), we conduct a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 24,988,228 SNPs and small indels detected through whole-genome sequencing of 2,636 Icelanders and imputed into 4,572 BCC patients and 266,358 controls. Here we show the discovery of four new BCC susceptibility loci: 2p24 MYCN (rs57244888[C], OR=0.76, P=4.7 × 10−12), 2q33 CASP8-ALS2CR12 (rs13014235[C], OR=1.15, P=1.5 × 10−9), 8q21 ZFHX4 (rs28727938[G], OR=0.70, P=3.5 × 10−12) and 10p14 GATA3 (rs73635312[A], OR=0.74, P=2.4 × 10−16). Fine mapping reveals that two variants correlated with rs73635312[A] occur in conserved binding sites for the GATA3 transcription factor. In addition, expression microarrays and RNA-seq show that rs13014235[C] and a related SNP rs700635[C] are associated with expression of CASP8 splice variants in which sequences from intron 8 are retained. PMID:25855136

  9. Naturally segregating loci exhibit epistasis for fitness

    PubMed Central

    Monnahan, Patrick J.; Kelly, John K.

    2015-01-01

    The extent to which gene interaction or epistasis contributes to fitness variation within populations remains poorly understood, despite its importance to a myriad of evolutionary questions. Here, we report a multi-year field study estimating fitness of Mimulus guttatus genetic lines in which pairs of naturally segregating loci exist in an otherwise uniform background. An allele at QTL x5b—a locus originally mapped for its effect on flower size—positively affects survival if combined with one genotype at quantitative trait locus x10a (aa) but has negative effects when combined with the other genotypes (Aa and AA). The viability differences between genotypes parallel phenotypic differences for the time and node at which a plant flowers. Viability is negatively correlated with fecundity across genotypes, indicating antagonistic pleiotropy for fitness components. This trade-off reduces the genetic variance for total fitness relative to the individual fitness components and thus may serve to maintain variation. Additionally, we find that the effects of each locus and their interaction often vary with the environment. PMID:26246336

  10. Properties of multivariable root loci. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yagle, A. E.

    1981-01-01

    Various properties of multivariable root loci are analyzed from a frequency domain point of view by using the technique of Newton polygons, and some generalizations of the SISO root locus rules to the multivariable case are pointed out. The behavior of the angles of arrival and departure is related to the Smith-MacMillan form of G(s) and explicit equations for these angles are obtained. After specializing to first order and a restricted class of higher order poles and zeros, some simple equations for these angles that are direct generalizations of the SISO equations are found. The unusual behavior of root loci on the real axis at branch points is studied. The SISO root locus rules for break-in and break-out points are shown to generalize directly to the multivariable case. Some methods for computing both types of points are presented.

  11. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci for alligator gar (Atractosteus spatula) and their variability in two other species (Lepisosteus oculatus and L. osseus) of Lepisosteidae

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moyer, G.R.; Sloss, Brian L.; Kreiser, B.R.; Feldheim, K.A.

    2009-01-01

    We report on the isolation of 17 polymorphic microsatellite loci from alligator gar (Atractosteus spatula), a large-bodied species that has experienced population declines across much of its range. These loci possessed 2-19 alleles and observed heterozygosities of 0-0.974. All loci conformed to Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium expectations, and none exhibited linkage disequilibrium. Nine and eight of these loci were found to be polymorphic in the related species Lepisosteus oculatus and L. osseus, respectively. These microsatellite loci should prove useful in conservation efforts of A. spatula through the study of population structure and hatchery broodstock management. ?? 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci for alligator gar (Atractosteus spatula) and their variability in two other species (Lepisosteus oculatus and L. osseus) of Lepisosteidae.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Gregory R; Sloss, Brian L; Kreiser, Brian R; Feldheim, Kevin A

    2009-05-01

    We report on the isolation of 17 polymorphic microsatellite loci from alligator gar (Atractosteus spatula), a large-bodied species that has experienced population declines across much of its range. These loci possessed 2-19 alleles and observed heterozygosities of 0-0.974. All loci conformed to Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium expectations, and none exhibited linkage disequilibrium. Nine and eight of these loci were found to be polymorphic in the related species Lepisosteus oculatus and L. osseus, respectively. These microsatellite loci should prove useful in conservation efforts of A. spatula through the study of population structure and hatchery broodstock management. PMID:21564806

  13. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci for alligator gar (Atractosteus spatula) and their variability in two other species (Lepisosteus oculatus and L. osseus) of Lepisosteidae.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Gregory R; Sloss, Brian L; Kreiser, Brian R; Feldheim, Kevin A

    2009-05-01

    We report on the isolation of 17 polymorphic microsatellite loci from alligator gar (Atractosteus spatula), a large-bodied species that has experienced population declines across much of its range. These loci possessed 2-19 alleles and observed heterozygosities of 0-0.974. All loci conformed to Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium expectations, and none exhibited linkage disequilibrium. Nine and eight of these loci were found to be polymorphic in the related species Lepisosteus oculatus and L. osseus, respectively. These microsatellite loci should prove useful in conservation efforts of A. spatula through the study of population structure and hatchery broodstock management.

  14. Mapping of the Pim-1 oncogene in mouse t-haplotypes and its use to define the relative map positions of the tcl loci t0(t6) and tw12 and the marker tf (tufted).

    PubMed

    Ark, B; Gummere, G; Bennett, D; Artzt, K

    1991-06-01

    Pim-1 is an oncogene activated in mouse T-cell lymphomas induced by Moloney and AKR mink cell focus (MCF) viruses. Pim-1 was previously mapped to chromosome 17 by somatic cell hybrids, and subsequently to the region between the hemoglobin alpha-chain pseudogene 4 (Hba-4ps) and the alpha-crystalline gene (Crya-1) by Southern blot analysis of DNA obtained from panels of recombinant inbred strains. We have now mapped Pim-1 more accurately in t-haplotypes by analysis of recombinant t-chromosomes. The recombinants were derived from Tts6tf/t12 parents backcrossed to + tf/ + tf, and scored for recombination between the loci of T and tf. For simplicity all t-complex lethal genes properly named tcl-tx are shortened to tx. The Pim-1 gene was localized 0.6 cM proximal to the tw12 lethal gene, thus placing the Pim-1 gene 5.2 cM distal to the H-2 region in t-haplotypes. Once mapped, the Pim-1 gene was used as a marker for further genetic analysis of t-haplotypes. tw12 is so close to tf that even with a large number of recombinants it was not possible to determine whether it is proximal or distal to tf. Southern blot analysis of DNA from T-tf recombinants with a separation of tw12 and tf indicated that tw12 is proximal to tf. The mapping of two allelic t-lethals, t0 and t6 with respect to tw12 and tf has also been a problem.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Linkage relationships and haplotype polymorphism among cichlid Mhc class II B loci.

    PubMed Central

    Málaga-Trillo, E; Zaleska-Rutczynska, Z; McAndrew, B; Vincek, V; Figueroa, F; Sültmann, H; Klein, J

    1998-01-01

    The species flocks of cichlid fishes in the Great East African Lakes are paradigms of adaptive radiation and hence, of great interest to evolutionary biologists. Phylogenetic studies of these fishes have, however, been hampered by the lack of suitable polymorphic markers. The genes of the major histocompatibility complex hold the promise to provide, through their extensive polymorphism, a large number of such markers, but their use has been hampered by the complexity of the genetic system and the lack of definition of the individual loci. In this study we take the first substantial step to alleviate this problem. Using a combination of methods, including the typing of single sperm cells, gyno- or androgenetic individuals, and haploid embryos, as well as sequencing of class II B restriction fragments isolated from gels for Southern blots, we identify the previously characterized homology groups as distinct loci. At least 17 polymorphic class II B loci, all of which are presumably transcribed, have been found among the different species studied. Most of these loci are shared across the various cichlid species and genera. The number of loci per haplotype varies from individual to individual, ranging from 1 to 13. A total of 21 distinct haplotypes differing in the number of loci they carry has thus far been identified. All the polymorphic loci are part of the same cluster in which, however, distances between at least some of the loci (as indicated by recombination frequencies) are relatively large. Both the individual loci and the haplotypes can now be used to study phylogenetic relationships among the members of the species flocks and the mode in which speciation occurs during adaptive radiation. PMID:9649539

  16. Gambogic Acid Induces Apoptosis in Imatinib-Resistant Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Cells via Inducing Proteasome Inhibition and Caspase-Dependent Bcr-Abl Downregulation

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xianping; Chen, Xin; Li, Xiaofen; Lan, Xiaoying; Zhao, Chong; Liu, Shouting; Huang, Hongbiao; Liu, Ningning; Liao, Siyan; Song, Wenbin; Zhou, Ping; Wang, Shunqing; Xu, Li; Wang, Xuejun; Dou, Q. Ping; Liu, Jinbao

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is characterized by the constitutive activation of Bcr-Abl tyrosine kinase. Bcr-Abl-T315I is the predominant mutation that causes resistance to imatinib, cytotoxic drugs, and the second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The emergence of imatinib resistance in patients with CML leads to searching for novel approaches to the treatment of CML. Gambogic acid, a small molecule derived from Chinese herb gamboges, has been approved for phase II clinical trial for cancer therapy by the Chinese Food and Drug Administration (FDA). In this study, we investigated the effect of gambogic acid on cell survival or apoptosis in CML cells bearing Bcr-Abl-T315I or wild-type Bcr-Abl. Experimental Design CML cell lines (KBM5, KBM5-T315I, and K562), primary cells from patients with CML with clinical resistance to imatinib, and normal monocytes from healthy volunteers were treated with gambogic acid, imatinib, or their combination, followed by measuring the effects on cell growth, apoptosis, and signal pathways. The in vivo antitumor activity of gambogic acid and its combination with imatinib was also assessed with nude xenografts. Results Gambogic acid induced apoptosis and cell proliferation inhibition in CML cells and inhibited the growth of imatinib-resistant Bcr-Abl-T315I xenografts in nude mice. Our data suggest that GA-induced proteasome inhibition is required for caspase activation in both imatinib-resistant and -sensitive CML cells, and caspase activation is required for gambogic acid–induced Bcr-Abl downregulation and apoptotic cell death. Conclusions These findings suggest an alternative strategy to overcome imatinib resistance by enhancing Bcr-Abl downregulation with the medicinal compound gambogic acid, which may have great clinical significance in imatinib-resistant cancer therapy. PMID:24334603

  17. PECAM-1 is involved in BCR/ABL signaling and may downregulate imatinib-induced apoptosis of Philadelphia chromosome-positive leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Nan; Kurosu, Tetsuya; Oshikawa, Gaku; Nagao, Toshikage; Miura, Osamu

    2013-02-01

    PECAM-1 (CD31) is an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM)-containing surface glycoprotein expressed on various hematopoietic cells as well as on endothelial cells. PECAM-1 has been shown to play roles in regulation of adhesion, migration and apoptosis. The BCR/ABL fusion tyrosine kinase is expressed in chronic myeloid leukemia and Philadelphia-positive (Ph+) acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells, and its inhibition by the clinically used tyrosine kinase inhibitors imatinib or dasatinib induces apoptosis of these cells. In the present study, we demonstrate that PECAM-1 is tyrosine phospho-rylated in its ITIM motifs in various BCR/ABL-expressing cells including primary leukemia cells. Studies using imatinib and dasatinib as well as transient expression experiments in 293T cells revealed that PECAM-1 was phosphorylated directly by BCR/ABL, which was enhanced by the imatinib-resistant E255K and T315I mutations, or partly by the Src family tyrosine kinases, including Lyn, which were activated dependently or independently on BCR/ABL. We also demonstrate by using a substrate trapping mutant of SHP2 that tyrosine phosphorylated PECAM-1 binds SHP2 and is a major substrate for this tyrosine phosphatase in BCR/ABL-expressing cells. Overexpression of PECAM-1 in BCR/ABL-expressing cells, including K562 human leukemia cells, enhanced cell adhesion and partially inhibited imatinib-induced apoptosis involving mitochondria depolarization and caspase-3 cleavage, at least partly, in an ITIM-independent manner. These data suggest that PECAM-1 may play a role in regulation of apoptosis as well as adhesion of BCR/ABL-expressing cells to modulate their imatinib sensitivity and would be a possible candidate for therapeutic target in Ph+ leukemias. PMID:23233201

  18. Development of a Lac Operon Concept Inventory (LOCI)

    PubMed Central

    Stefanski, Katherine M.; Gardner, Grant E.; Seipelt-Thiemann, Rebecca L.

    2016-01-01

    Concept inventories (CIs) are valuable tools for educators that assess student achievement and identify misconceptions held by students. Results of student responses can be used to adjust or develop new instructional methods for a given topic. The regulation of gene expression in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes is an important concept in genetics and one that is particularly challenging for undergraduate students. As part of a larger study examining instructional methods related to gene regulation, the authors developed a 12-item CI assessing student knowledge of the lac operon. Using an established protocol, the authors wrote open-ended questions and conducted in-class testing with undergraduate microbiology and genetics students to discover common errors made by students about the lac operon and to determine aspects of item validity. Using these results, we constructed a 12-item multiple-choice lac operon CI called the Lac Operon Concept Inventory (LOCI), The LOCI was reviewed by two experts in the field for content validity. The LOCI underwent item analysis and was assessed for reliability with a sample of undergraduate genetics students (n = 115). The data obtained were found to be valid and reliable (coefficient alpha = 0.994) with adequate discriminatory power and item difficulty. PMID:27252300

  19. Immunochip analysis identifies multiple susceptibility loci for systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Mayes, Maureen D; Bossini-Castillo, Lara; Gorlova, Olga; Martin, José Ezequiel; Zhou, Xiaodong; Chen, Wei V; Assassi, Shervin; Ying, Jun; Tan, Filemon K; Arnett, Frank C; Reveille, John D; Guerra, Sandra; Teruel, María; Carmona, Francisco David; Gregersen, Peter K; Lee, Annette T; López-Isac, Elena; Ochoa, Eguzkine; Carreira, Patricia; Simeón, Carmen Pilar; Castellví, Iván; González-Gay, Miguel Ángel; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Padyukov, Leonid; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta; Wijmenga, Cisca; Brown, Matthew; Beretta, Lorenzo; Riemekasten, Gabriela; Witte, Torsten; Hunzelmann, Nicolas; Kreuter, Alexander; Distler, Jörg H W; Voskuyl, Alexandre E; Schuerwegh, Annemie J; Hesselstrand, Roger; Nordin, Annika; Airó, Paolo; Lunardi, Claudio; Shiels, Paul; van Laar, Jacob M; Herrick, Ariane; Worthington, Jane; Denton, Christopher; Wigley, Fredrick M; Hummers, Laura K; Varga, John; Hinchcliff, Monique E; Baron, Murray; Hudson, Marie; Pope, Janet E; Furst, Daniel E; Khanna, Dinesh; Phillips, Kristin; Schiopu, Elena; Segal, Barbara M; Molitor, Jerry A; Silver, Richard M; Steen, Virginia D; Simms, Robert W; Lafyatis, Robert A; Fessler, Barri J; Frech, Tracy M; Alkassab, Firas; Docherty, Peter; Kaminska, Elzbieta; Khalidi, Nader; Jones, Henry Niall; Markland, Janet; Robinson, David; Broen, Jasper; Radstake, Timothy R D J; Fonseca, Carmen; Koeleman, Bobby P; Martin, Javier

    2014-01-01

    In this study, 1,833 systemic sclerosis (SSc) cases and 3,466 controls were genotyped with the Immunochip array. Classical alleles, amino acid residues, and SNPs across the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region were imputed and tested. These analyses resulted in a model composed of six polymorphic amino acid positions and seven SNPs that explained the observed significant associations in the region. In addition, a replication step comprising 4,017 SSc cases and 5,935 controls was carried out for several selected non-HLA variants, reaching a total of 5,850 cases and 9,401 controls of European ancestry. Following this strategy, we identified and validated three SSc risk loci, including DNASE1L3 at 3p14, the SCHIP1-IL12A locus at 3q25, and ATG5 at 6q21, as well as a suggested association of the TREH-DDX6 locus at 11q23. The associations of several previously reported SSc risk loci were validated and further refined, and the observed peak of association in PXK was related to DNASE1L3. Our study has increased the number of known genetic associations with SSc, provided further insight into the pleiotropic effects of shared autoimmune risk factors, and highlighted the power of dense mapping for detecting previously overlooked susceptibility loci.

  20. Development of a Lac Operon Concept Inventory (LOCI).

    PubMed

    Stefanski, Katherine M; Gardner, Grant E; Seipelt-Thiemann, Rebecca L

    2016-01-01

    Concept inventories (CIs) are valuable tools for educators that assess student achievement and identify misconceptions held by students. Results of student responses can be used to adjust or develop new instructional methods for a given topic. The regulation of gene expression in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes is an important concept in genetics and one that is particularly challenging for undergraduate students. As part of a larger study examining instructional methods related to gene regulation, the authors developed a 12-item CI assessing student knowledge of the lac operon. Using an established protocol, the authors wrote open-ended questions and conducted in-class testing with undergraduate microbiology and genetics students to discover common errors made by students about the lac operon and to determine aspects of item validity. Using these results, we constructed a 12-item multiple-choice lac operon CI called the Lac Operon Concept Inventory (LOCI), The LOCI was reviewed by two experts in the field for content validity. The LOCI underwent item analysis and was assessed for reliability with a sample of undergraduate genetics students (n = 115). The data obtained were found to be valid and reliable (coefficient alpha = 0.994) with adequate discriminatory power and item difficulty. PMID:27252300

  1. Immunochip Analysis Identifies Multiple Susceptibility Loci for Systemic Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Mayes, Maureen D.; Bossini-Castillo, Lara; Gorlova, Olga; Martin, José Ezequiel; Zhou, Xiaodong; Chen, Wei V.; Assassi, Shervin; Ying, Jun; Tan, Filemon K.; Arnett, Frank C.; Reveille, John D.; Guerra, Sandra; Teruel, María; Carmona, Francisco David; Gregersen, Peter K.; Lee, Annette T.; López-Isac, Elena; Ochoa, Eguzkine; Carreira, Patricia; Simeón, Carmen Pilar; Castellví, Iván; González-Gay, Miguel Ángel; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; Ríos, Raquel; Callejas, José Luis; Navarrete, Nuria; García Portales, Rosa; Camps, María Teresa; Fernández-Nebro, Antonio; González-Escribano, María F.; Sánchez-Román, Julio; García-Hernández, Francisco José; Castillo, María Jesús; Aguirre, María Ángeles; Gómez-Gracia, Inmaculada; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Benjamín; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Luis; Vicente, Esther; Andreu, José Luis; Fernández de Castro, Mónica; García de la Peña, Paloma; López-Longo, Francisco Javier; Martínez, Lina; Fonollosa, Vicente; Espinosa, Gerard; Tolosa, Carlos; Pros, Anna; Rodríguez Carballeira, Mónica; Narváez, Francisco Javier; Rubio Rivas, Manel; Ortiz Santamaría, Vera; Díaz, Bernardino; Trapiella, Luis; Freire, María del Carmen; Sousa, Adrián; Egurbide, María Victoria; Fanlo Mateo, Patricia; Sáez-Comet, Luis; Díaz, Federico; Hernández, Vanesa; Beltrán, Emma; Román-Ivorra, José Andrés; Grau, Elena; Alegre Sancho, Juan José; Blanco García, Francisco J.; Oreiro, Natividad; Fernández Sueiro, Luis; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Padyukov, Leonid; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta; Wijmenga, Cisca; Brown, Matthew; Beretta, Lorenzo; Riemekasten, Gabriela; Witte, Torsten; Hunzelmann, Nicolas; Kreuter, Alexander; Distler, Jörg H.W.; Voskuyl, Alexandre E.; Schuerwegh, Annemie J.; Hesselstrand, Roger; Nordin, Annika; Airó, Paolo; Lunardi, Claudio; Shiels, Paul; van Laar, Jacob M.; Herrick, Ariane; Worthington, Jane; Denton, Christopher; Wigley, Fredrick M.; Hummers, Laura K.; Varga, John; Hinchcliff, Monique E.; Baron, Murray; Hudson, Marie; Pope, Janet E.; Furst, Daniel E.; Khanna, Dinesh; Phillips, Kristin; Schiopu, Elena; Segal, Barbara M.; Molitor, Jerry A.; Silver, Richard M.; Steen, Virginia D.; Simms, Robert W.; Lafyatis, Robert A.; Fessler, Barri J.; Frech, Tracy M.; AlKassab, Firas; Docherty, Peter; Kaminska, Elzbieta; Khalidi, Nader; Jones, Henry Niall; Markland, Janet; Robinson, David; Broen, Jasper; Radstake, Timothy R.D.J.; Fonseca, Carmen; Koeleman, Bobby P.; Martin, Javier

    2014-01-01

    In this study, 1,833 systemic sclerosis (SSc) cases and 3,466 controls were genotyped with the Immunochip array. Classical alleles, amino acid residues, and SNPs across the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region were imputed and tested. These analyses resulted in a model composed of six polymorphic amino acid positions and seven SNPs that explained the observed significant associations in the region. In addition, a replication step comprising 4,017 SSc cases and 5,935 controls was carried out for several selected non-HLA variants, reaching a total of 5,850 cases and 9,401 controls of European ancestry. Following this strategy, we identified and validated three SSc risk loci, including DNASE1L3 at 3p14, the SCHIP1-IL12A locus at 3q25, and ATG5 at 6q21, as well as a suggested association of the TREH-DDX6 locus at 11q23. The associations of several previously reported SSc risk loci were validated and further refined, and the observed peak of association in PXK was related to DNASE1L3. Our study has increased the number of known genetic associations with SSc, provided further insight into the pleiotropic effects of shared autoimmune risk factors, and highlighted the power of dense mapping for detecting previously overlooked susceptibility loci. PMID:24387989

  2. Evolutionary history of chloridoid grasses estimated from 122 nuclear loci.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Amanda E; Hasenstab, Kristen M; Bell, Hester L; Blaine, Ellen; Ingram, Amanda L; Columbus, J Travis

    2016-12-01

    Chloridoideae (chloridoid grasses) are a subfamily of ca. 1700 species with high diversity in arid habitats. Until now, their evolutionary relationships have primarily been studied with DNA sequences from the chloroplast, a maternally inherited organelle. Next-generation sequencing is able to efficiently recover large numbers of nuclear loci that can then be used to estimate the species phylogeny based upon bi-parentally inherited data. We sought to test our chloroplast-based hypotheses of relationships among chloridoid species with 122 nuclear loci generated through targeted-enrichment next-generation sequencing, sometimes referred to as hyb-seq. We targeted putative single-copy housekeeping genes, as well as genes that have been implicated in traits characteristic of, or particularly labile in, chloridoids: e.g., drought and salt tolerance. We recovered ca. 70% of the targeted loci (122 of 177 loci) in all 47 species sequenced using hyb-seq. We then analyzed the nuclear loci with Bayesian and coalescent methods and the resulting phylogeny resolves relationships between the four chloridoid tribes. Several novel findings with this data were: the sister lineage to Chloridoideae is unresolved; Centropodia+Ellisochloa are excluded from Chloridoideae in phylogenetic estimates using a coalescent model; Sporobolus subtilis is more closely related to Eragrostis than to other species of Sporobolus; and Tragus is more closely related to Chloris and relatives than to a lineage of mainly New World species. Relationships in Cynodonteae in the nuclear phylogeny are quite different from chloroplast estimates, but were not robust to changes in the method of phylogenetic analysis. We tested the data signal with several partition schemes, a concatenation analysis, and tests of alternative hypotheses to assess our confidence in this new, nuclear estimate of evolutionary relationships. Our work provides markers and a framework for additional phylogenetic studies that sample more

  3. Evolutionary history of chloridoid grasses estimated from 122 nuclear loci.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Amanda E; Hasenstab, Kristen M; Bell, Hester L; Blaine, Ellen; Ingram, Amanda L; Columbus, J Travis

    2016-12-01

    Chloridoideae (chloridoid grasses) are a subfamily of ca. 1700 species with high diversity in arid habitats. Until now, their evolutionary relationships have primarily been studied with DNA sequences from the chloroplast, a maternally inherited organelle. Next-generation sequencing is able to efficiently recover large numbers of nuclear loci that can then be used to estimate the species phylogeny based upon bi-parentally inherited data. We sought to test our chloroplast-based hypotheses of relationships among chloridoid species with 122 nuclear loci generated through targeted-enrichment next-generation sequencing, sometimes referred to as hyb-seq. We targeted putative single-copy housekeeping genes, as well as genes that have been implicated in traits characteristic of, or particularly labile in, chloridoids: e.g., drought and salt tolerance. We recovered ca. 70% of the targeted loci (122 of 177 loci) in all 47 species sequenced using hyb-seq. We then analyzed the nuclear loci with Bayesian and coalescent methods and the resulting phylogeny resolves relationships between the four chloridoid tribes. Several novel findings with this data were: the sister lineage to Chloridoideae is unresolved; Centropodia+Ellisochloa are excluded from Chloridoideae in phylogenetic estimates using a coalescent model; Sporobolus subtilis is more closely related to Eragrostis than to other species of Sporobolus; and Tragus is more closely related to Chloris and relatives than to a lineage of mainly New World species. Relationships in Cynodonteae in the nuclear phylogeny are quite different from chloroplast estimates, but were not robust to changes in the method of phylogenetic analysis. We tested the data signal with several partition schemes, a concatenation analysis, and tests of alternative hypotheses to assess our confidence in this new, nuclear estimate of evolutionary relationships. Our work provides markers and a framework for additional phylogenetic studies that sample more

  4. Synteny conservation of the Huntington's disease gene and surrounding loci on mouse Chromosome 5.

    PubMed

    Grosson, C L; MacDonald, M E; Duyao, M P; Ambrose, C M; Roffler-Tarlov, S; Gusella, J F

    1994-07-01

    The mouse homologs of the Huntington's disease (HD) gene and 17 other human Chromosome (Chr) 4 loci (including six previously unmapped) were localized by use of an interspecific cross. All loci mapped in a continuous linkage group on mouse Chr 5, distal to En2 and I16, whose human counterparts are located on Chr 7. The relative order of the loci on human Chr 4 and mouse Chr 5 was maintained, except for a break between D5H4S115E and Idua/rd, with relocation of the latter to the opposite end of the map. The mouse HD homolog (Hdh) mapped within a cluster of seven genes that were completely linked in our data set. In human these loci span a approximately 1.8 Mb stretch of human 4p16.3 that has been entirely cloned. To date, there is no phenotypic correspondence between human and mouse mutations mapping to this region of synteny conservation.

  5. GWAS identifies four novel eosinophilic esophagitis loci.

    PubMed

    Sleiman, Patrick M A; Wang, Mei-Lun; Cianferoni, Antonella; Aceves, Seema; Gonsalves, Nirmala; Nadeau, Kari; Bredenoord, Albert J; Furuta, Glenn T; Spergel, Jonathan M; Hakonarson, Hakon

    2014-11-19

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an allergic disorder characterized by infiltration of the oesophagus with eosinophils. We had previously reported association of the TSLP/WDR36 locus with EoE. Here we report genome-wide significant associations at four additional loci; c11orf30 and STAT6, which have been previously associated with both atopic and autoimmune diseases, and two EoE-specific loci, ANKRD27 that regulates the trafficking of melanogenic enzymes to epidermal melanocytes and CAPN14, that encodes a calpain whose expression is highly enriched in the oesophagus. The identification of five EoE loci, not only expands our aetiological understanding of the disease but may also represent new therapeutic targets to treat the most debilitating aspect of EoE, oesophageal inflammation and remodelling.

  6. Mapping autism risk loci using genetic linkage and chromosomal rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Szatmari, Peter; Paterson, Andrew; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Roberts, Wendy; Brian, Jessica; Liu, Xiao-Qing; Vincent, John; Skaug, Jennifer; Thompson, Ann; Senman, Lili; Feuk, Lars; Qian, Cheng; Bryson, Susan; Jones, Marshall; Marshall, Christian; Scherer, Stephen; Vieland, Veronica; Bartlett, Christopher; Mangin, La Vonne; Goedken, Rhinda; Segre, Alberto; Pericak-Vance, Margaret; Cuccaro, Michael; Gilbert, John; Wright, Harry; Abramson, Ruth; Betancur, Catalina; Bourgeron, Thomas; Gillberg, Christopher; Leboyer, Marion; Buxbaum, Joseph; Davis, Kenneth; Hollander, Eric; Silverman, Jeremy; Hallmayer, Joachim; Lotspeich, Linda; Sutcliffe, James; Haines, Jonathan; Folstein, Susan; Piven, Joseph; Wassink, Thomas; Sheffield, Val; Geschwind, Daniel; Bucan, Maja; Brown, Ted; Cantor, Rita; Constantino, John; Gilliam, Conrad; Herbert, Martha; Lajonchere, Clara; Ledbetter, David; Lese-Martin, Christa; Miller, Janet; Nelson, Stan; Samango-Sprouse, Carol; Spence, Sarah; State, Matthew; Tanzi, Rudolph; Coon, Hilary; Dawson, Geraldine; Devlin, Bernie; Estes, Annette; Flodman, Pamela; Klei, Lambertus; Mcmahon, William; Minshew, Nancy; Munson, Jeff; Korvatska, Elena; Rodier, Patricia; Schellenberg, Gerard; Smith, Moyra; Spence, Anne; Stodgell, Chris; Tepper, Ping Guo; Wijsman, Ellen; Yu, Chang-En; Rogé, Bernadette; Mantoulan, Carine; Wittemeyer, Kerstin; Poustka, Annemarie; Felder, Bärbel; Klauck, Sabine; Schuster, Claudia; Poustka, Fritz; Bölte, Sven; Feineis-Matthews, Sabine; Herbrecht, Evelyn; Schmötzer, Gabi; Tsiantis, John; Papanikolaou, Katerina; Maestrini, Elena; Bacchelli, Elena; Blasi, Francesca; Carone, Simona; Toma, Claudio; Van Engeland, Herman; De Jonge, Maretha; Kemner, Chantal; Koop, Frederieke; Langemeijer, Marjolein; Hijmans, Channa; Staal, Wouter; Baird, Gillian; Bolton, Patrick; Rutter, Michael; Weisblatt, Emma; Green, Jonathan; Aldred, Catherine; Wilkinson, Julie-Anne; Pickles, Andrew; Le Couteur, Ann; Berney, Tom; Mcconachie, Helen; Bailey, Anthony; Francis, Kostas; Honeyman, Gemma; Hutchinson, Aislinn; Parr, Jeremy; Wallace, Simon; Monaco, Anthony; Barnby, Gabrielle; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Lamb, Janine; Sousa, Ines; Sykes, Nuala; Cook, Edwin; Guter, Stephen; Leventhal, Bennett; Salt, Jeff; Lord, Catherine; Corsello, Christina; Hus, Vanessa; Weeks, Daniel; Volkmar, Fred; Tauber, Maïté; Fombonne, Eric; Shih, Andy; Meyer, Kacie

    2007-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are common, heritable neurodevelopmental conditions. The genetic architecture of ASD is complex, requiring large samples to overcome heterogeneity. Here we broaden coverage and sample size relative to other studies of ASD by using Affymetrix 10K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays and 1168 families with ≥ 2 affected individuals to perform the largest linkage scan to date, while also analyzing copy number variation (CNV) in these families. Linkage and CNV analyses implicate chromosome 11p12-p13 and neurexins, respectively, amongst other candidate loci. Neurexins team with previously-implicated neuroligins for glutamatergic synaptogenesis, highlighting glutamate-related genes as promising candidates for ASD. PMID:17322880

  7. Outcomes of Children With BCR-ABL1–Like Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treated With Risk-Directed Therapy Based on the Levels of Minimal Residual Disease

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Kathryn G.; Pei, Deqing; Campana, Dario; Payne-Turner, Debbie; Li, Yongjin; Cheng, Cheng; Sandlund, John T.; Jeha, Sima; Easton, John; Becksfort, Jared; Zhang, Jinghui; Coustan-Smith, Elaine; Raimondi, Susana C.; Leung, Wing H.; Relling, Mary V.; Evans, William E.; Downing, James R.; Mullighan, Charles G.; Pui, Ching-Hon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose BCR-ABL1–like acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a recently identified B-cell ALL (B-ALL) subtype with poor outcome that exhibits a gene expression profile similar to BCR-ABL1-positive ALL but lacks the BCR-ABL1 fusion protein. We examined the outcome of children with BCR-ABL1–like ALL treated with risk-directed therapy based on minimal residual disease (MRD) levels during remission induction. Patients and Methods Among 422 patients with B-ALL enrolled onto the Total Therapy XV study between 2000 and 2007, 344 had adequate samples for gene expression profiling. Next-generation sequencing and/or analysis of genes known to be altered in B-ALL were performed in patients with BCR-ABL1–like ALL who had available material. Outcome was compared between patients with and those without BCR-ABL1–like ALL. Results Forty (11.6%) of the 344 patients had BCR-ABL1–like ALL. They were significantly more likely to be male, have Down syndrome, and have higher MRD levels on day 19 and at the end of induction than did other patients with B-ALL. Among 25 patients comprehensively studied for genetic abnormalities, 11 harbored a genomic rearrangement of CRLF2, six had fusion transcripts responsive to ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitors or JAK inhibitors, and seven had mutations involving the Ras signaling pathway. There were no significant differences in event-free survival (90.0% ± 4.7% [SE] v 88.4% ± 1.9% at 5 years; P = .41) or in overall survival (92.5% ± 4.2% v 95.1% ± 1.3% at 5 years; P = .41) between patients with and without BCR-ABL1–like ALL. Conclusion Patients who have BCR-ABL1–like ALL with poor initial treatment response can be salvaged with MRD-based risk-directed therapy and may benefit from identification of kinase-activating lesions for targeted therapies. PMID:25049327

  8. Adaptation at Specific Loci. V. Metabolically Adjacent Enzyme Loci May Have Very Distinct Experiences of Selective Pressures

    PubMed Central

    Carter, P. A.; Watt, W. B.

    1988-01-01

    The polymorphic phosphoglucomutase (PGM) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) loci have been studied in parallel to experimental work on the phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI) polymorphism in Colias butterflies. PGI, PGM and G6PD are also autosomal in Colias. PGM and G6PD are loosely linked (and represent the first identified autosomal linkage group in Colias); they assort independently from PGI. Recombination occurs in both sexes. Neither PGM nor G6PD shows large, consistent differences in flight capacity through the day among its genotypes, as PGI does. PGM shows some change of allele frequencies, and match to Hardy-Weinberg expectation, with air temperature in middle and latter parts of the season, but not early in the season. G6PD may show some heterozygote excess over Hardy-Weinberg expectation early in the day, but more testing is needed. No evidence for differential survivorship was seen at PGM or G6PD, in contrast to PGI. At the PGM and G6PD loci, male heterozygotes are advantaged in mating with females, but without the evidence of female choice which occurs for PGI. These effects are not correlated among the three loci. There is no assortative mating at G6PD (nor at PGI). There is minor positive assortative mating of PGM heterozygotes, but it is too weak to account for the PGM-genotype-specific male mating advantage. No trends of multilocus genotype frequencies involving PGI are seen. Certain PGM-G6PD two-locus genotypes are over-represented, and others under-represented, in wild adult samples, particularly among males and uniformly among successfully mating males. Our results emphasize that enzyme loci sharing a substrate need not have common experience of the existence or strength of natural selection, and suggest initial food-resource processing and allocation as a possible context for fitness-related effects of the PGM and G6PD polymorphisms. PMID:2970419

  9. Evaluation of a novel multiplex RT-qPCR assay for the quantification of leukemia-associated BCR-ABL1 translocation.

    PubMed

    Kottwitz, D; El Hadi, H; El Amrani, M; Cabezas, S; Dehbi, H; Nadifi, S; Quessar, A; Colomer, D; Moumen, Abdeladim; Sefrioui, E L Hassan

    2015-09-01

    Although monitoring of BCR-ABL1 translocation has become an established practice in the management of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), the detection limit of the BCR-ABL1 transcripts needs more standardization. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the clinical performances of a novel assay for the quantification of BCR-ABL1 fusion transcripts (e13a2 and e14a2) and ABL1 in a single reaction. This assay is based on the real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) in multiplex format. In a retrospective comparative clinical study performed in a reference laboratory, RNA was extracted from 48 CML patient blood samples with various BCR-ABL1/ABL1 ratios and RT-qPCR was performed using either MAScIR assay or the RT-qPCR simplex reference assay used in routine clinical testing. The comparative clinical results showed high qualitative and quantitative concordance (correlation coefficient >0.95) between MAScIR and the reference assays. The present study illustrates the utility of MAScIR assay as a sensitive, rapid, and cost-effective quantitative device to monitor the BCR-ABL1 ratios by RT-qPCR on whole blood of diagnosed Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph+) leukemia patients. This test could be used as an aid in the assessment of molecular response to available treatments.

  10. Potentiation of antileukemic therapies by the dual PI3K/PDK-1 inhibitor, BAG956: effects on BCR-ABL– and mutant FLT3-expressing cells

    PubMed Central

    Weisberg, Ellen; Banerji, Lolita; Wright, Renee D.; Barrett, Rosemary; Ray, Arghya; Moreno, Daisy; Catley, Laurence; Jiang, Jingrui; Hall-Meyers, Elizabeth; Sauveur-Michel, Maira; Stone, Richard; Galinsky, Ilene; Fox, Edward; Kung, Andrew L.

    2008-01-01

    Mediators of PI3K/AKT signaling have been implicated in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Studies have shown that inhibitors of PI3K/AKT signaling, such as wortmannin and LY294002, are able to inhibit CML and AML cell proliferation and synergize with targeted tyrosine kinase inhi-bitors. We investigated the ability of BAG956, a dual PI3K/PDK-1 inhibitor, to be used in combination with inhibitors of BCR-ABL and mutant FLT3, as well as with the mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin, and the rapamycin derivative, RAD001. BAG956 was shown to block AKT phosphorylation induced by BCR-ABL–, and induce apoptosis of BCR-ABL–expressing cell lines and patient bone marrow cells at concentrations that also inhibit PI3K signaling. Enhancement of the inhibitory effects of the tyrosine kinase inhibitors, imatinib and nilotinib, by BAG956 was demonstrated against BCR-ABL expressing cells both in vitro and in vivo. We have also shown that BAG956 is effective against mutant FLT3-expressing cell lines and AML patient bone marrow cells. Enhancement of the inhibitory effects of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, PKC412, by BAG956 was demonstrated against mutant FLT3-expressing cells. Finally, BAG956 and rapamycin/RAD001 were shown to combine in a nonantagonistic fashion against BCR-ABL– and mutant FLT3-expressing cells both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:18184863

  11. Identification of novel tyrosine kinase inhibitors for drug resistant T315I mutant BCR-ABL: a virtual screening and molecular dynamics simulations study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banavath, Hemanth Naick; Sharma, Om Prakash; Kumar, Muthuvel Suresh; Baskaran, R.

    2014-11-01

    BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase plays a major role in the pathogenesis of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and is a proven target for drug development. Currently available drugs in the market are effective against CML; however, side-effects and drug-resistant mutations in BCR-ABL limit their full potential. Using high throughput virtual screening approach, we have screened several small molecule databases and docked against wild-type and drug resistant T315I mutant BCR-ABL. Drugs that are currently available, such as imatinib and ponatinib, were also docked against BCR-ABL protein to set a cutoff value for our screening. Selected lead compounds were further evaluated for chemical reactivity employing density functional theory approach, all selected ligands shows HLG value > 0.09900 and the binding free energy between protein-ligand complex interactions obtained was rescored using MM-GBSA. The selected compounds showed least ΔG score -71.53 KJ/mol to maximum -126.71 KJ/mol in both wild type and drug resistant T315I mutant BCR-ABL. Following which, the stability of the docking complexes were evaluated by molecular dynamics simulation (MD) using GROMACS4.5.5. Results uncovered seven lead molecules, designated with Drug-Bank and PubChem ids as DB07107, DB06977, ST013616, DB04200, ST007180 ST019342, and DB01172, which shows docking scores higher than imatinib and ponatinib.

  12. Frequency of p190 and p210 BCR-ABL rearrangements and survival in Brazilian adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    de França Azevedo, Ilana; da Silva Júnior, Rui Milton Patrício; de Vasconcelos, Audrey Violeta Martins; das Neves, Washington Batista; de Barros Correia Melo, Fárida Coeli; Melo, Raul Antônio Morais

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study investigated the occurrence of the p190 and p210 breakpoint cluster region-Abelson (BCR-ABL) rearrangements in adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and possible associations with clinical and laboratory characteristics and survival. Methods Forty-one over 18-year-old patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia of both genders followed-up between January 2008 and May 2012 were included in this study. Clinical and laboratory data were obtained from the medical charts of the patients. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using specific primers was employed to identify molecular rearrangements. Results At diagnosis, the median age was 33 years, and there was a predominance of males (61%). The most common immunophenotype was B lineage (76%). BCR-ABL rearrangements was detected in 14 (34%) patients with the following distribution: p190 (28%), p210 (50%) and double positive (22%). Overall survival of patients with a mean/median of 331/246 days of follow up was 39%, respectively, negative BCR-ABL (44%) and positive BCR-ABL (28%). Conclusion These results confirm the high frequency of BCR-ABL rearrangements and the low survival rate of adult Brazilian patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:25305168

  13. Quantitative trait loci affecting reproductive phenology in peach

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The reproductive phenology of perennial plants in temperate climates is largely conditioned by the duration of bud dormancy, and fruit developmental processes. Bud dormancy release and bud break depends on the perception of cumulative chilling and heat during the bud development. The objective of this work was to identify new quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated to temperature requirements for bud dormancy release and flowering and to fruit harvest date, in a segregating population of peach. Results We have identified QTLs for nine traits related to bud dormancy, flowering and fruit harvest in an intraspecific hybrid population of peach in two locations differing in chilling time accumulation. QTLs were located in a genetic linkage map of peach based on single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers for eight linkage groups (LGs) of the peach genome sequence. QTLs for chilling requirements for dormancy release and blooming clustered in seven different genomic regions that partially coincided with loci identified in previous works. The most significant QTL for chilling requirements mapped to LG1, close to the evergrowing locus. QTLs for heat requirement related traits were distributed in nine genomic regions, four of them co-localizing with QTLs for chilling requirement trait. Two major loci in LG4 and LG6 determined fruit harvest time. Conclusions We identified QTLs associated to nine traits related to the reproductive phenology in peach. A search of candidate genes for these QTLs rendered different genes related to flowering regulation, chromatin modification and hormone signalling. A better understanding of the genetic factors affecting crop phenology might help scientists and breeders to predict changes in genotype performance in a context of global climate change. PMID:24559033

  14. Molecular monitoring of BCR-ABL transcripts in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia: is high sensitivity of clinical value?

    PubMed

    Norkin, Maxim; Schiffer, Charles A

    2010-04-01

    Monitoring of disease response during treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors of patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia dramatically changed after the introduction of real-time PCR, which allows quantification of BCR-ABL transcript levels with high sensitivity and precision. However, its role in patients who have achieved complete cytogenetic response is not entirely clear; incorrect interpretation of results could lead to unnecessary changes from an effective treatment. This review discusses the current evidence regarding the benefits, uncertainties, and potential drawbacks of molecular monitoring in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia in chronic phase.

  15. Characterization of copy number variation in genomic regions containing STR loci using array comparative genomic hybridization.

    PubMed

    Repnikova, Elena A; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Bailes, Andrea; Weber, Cecilia; Erdman, Linda; McKinney, Aimee; Ramsey, Sarah; Hashimoto, Sayaka; Lamb Thrush, Devon; Astbury, Caroline; Reshmi, Shalini C; Shaffer, Lisa G; Gastier-Foster, Julie M; Pyatt, Robert E

    2013-09-01

    Short tandem repeat (STR) loci are commonly used in forensic casework, familial analysis for human identification, and for monitoring hematopoietic cell engraftment after bone marrow transplant. Unexpected genetic variation leading to sequence and length differences in STR loci can complicate STR typing, and presents challenges in casework interpretation. Copy number variation (CNV) is a relatively recently identified form of genetic variation consisting of genomic regions present at variable copy numbers within an individual compared to a reference genome. Large scale population studies have demonstrated that likely all individuals carry multiple regions with CNV of 1kb in size or greater in their genome. To date, no study correlating genomic regions containing STR loci with CNV has been conducted. In this study, we analyzed results from 32,850 samples sent for clinical array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analysis for the presence of CNV at regions containing the 13 CODIS (Combined DNA Index System) STR, and the Amelogenin X (AMELX) and Amelogenin Y (AMELY) loci. Thirty-two individuals with CNV involving STR loci on chromosomes 2, 4, 7, 11, 12, 13, 16, and 21, and twelve with CNV involving the AMELX/AMELY loci were identified. These results were correlated with data from publicly available databases housing information on CNV identified in normal populations and additional clinical cases. These collective results demonstrate the presence of CNV in regions containing 9 of the 13 CODIS STR and AMELX/Y loci. Further characterization of STR profiles within regions of CNV, additional cataloging of these variants in multiple populations, and contributing such examples to the public domain will provide valuable information for reliable use of these loci.

  16. Genetic analysis of two STR loci (VWA and TPOX) in the Iranian province of Khuzestan

    PubMed Central

    Foroughmand, Ali Mohammad; Jari, Maryam; Kazeminezhad, Seyed Reza; Abdollahi, Arezu; Ahmadi, Leila; Heidari, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): Short tandem repeat (STR) loci are the most informative DNA genetic markers for attempting to individualize biological material for application in paternity and forensic cases. Materials and Methods: Blood samples were collected and the total genomic DNA was extracted. The DNA samples were used for genotyping VWA and TPOX STR loci using PCR and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Results: This report presents allele frequency data and parameters of biological or legal interest, such as heterozygosity value, polymorphic information content (PIC), genetic diversity index (GD) and population parameter (θ) in Arab and non-Arab population of Khuzestan province (Iran) for the loci VWA and TPOX. Blood samples (N= 392 for VWA and N=308 for TPOX) were collected from individuals unrelated throughout Khuzestan province. The loci were genotyped using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) and silver staining. Chi-square test showed that neither STR loci were in agreement with the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Conclusion: The examined STR loci in this study have proven a relatively high genetic variation in the Iranian population. The data could be used for construction of a forensic genetic database for the Iranian population. PMID:25422751

  17. Prostate cancer susceptibility loci: finding the genes.

    PubMed

    Ostrander, Elanie A; Johannesson, Bo

    2008-01-01

    Studies to date suggest that PC is a genetically very heterogeneous disease. High-risk families, in which multiple men are affected likely, reflect the contributions of a number of genes, some that are rare and highly penetrant, while others are more common and weakly penetrant. In this review, we have discussed only the first type of loci, and found that the identification of such genomic regions is a formidable problem. Replication between seemingly similar data sets is weak, likely reflecting the older age of onset associated with the disease, the inability to collect affected individuals from more than two generations in a family, and the variation seen in disease presentation, in addition to the underlying locus heterogeneity. Indeed, the definition of PC is ever changing, as diagnostic criteria and tools for pinpointing early lesions improve. Are we making progress? Clearly the answer is yes. The ability to divide large data sets into homogenous subset of families likely to share common genetic under-pinnings has improved power to identify loci and reproducibility between loci is now more common. Indeed, several groups report linkage to loci on chromosomes 1, 17, 19, and 22. Key to our continued success is our ever increasing ability to understand the disease. Identifying the subset of men who are likely to get clinically significant disease is the goal of genetic studies like these, and identifying the underlying loci is the key for developing diagnostics. The willingness of the community to work together has been an important factor in the successes the community has enjoyed to date, and will likely be as important as we move forward to untangle the genetics of this complex and common disorder.

  18. Direct evidence that leukemic cells present HLA-associated immunogenic peptides derived from the BCR-ABL b3a2 fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Clark, R E; Dodi, I A; Hill, S C; Lill, J R; Aubert, G; Macintyre, A R; Rojas, J; Bourdon, A; Bonner, P L; Wang, L; Christmas, S E; Travers, P J; Creaser, C S; Rees, R C; Madrigal, J A

    2001-11-15

    The BCR-ABL oncogene is central in the pathogenesis of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Here, tandem nanospray mass spectrometry was used to demonstrate cell surface HLA-associated expression of the BCR-ABL peptide KQSSKALQR on class I-negative CML cells transfected with HLA-A*0301, and on primary CML cells from HLA-A3-positive patients. These patients mounted a cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response to KQSSKALQR that also killed autologous CML cells, and tetramer staining demonstrated the presence of circulating KQSSKALQR-specific T cells. The findings are the first demonstration that CML cells express HLA-associated leukemia-specific immunogenic peptides and provide a sound basis for immunization studies against BCR-ABL.

  19. Positive Selection on Loci Associated with Drug and Alcohol Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Sadler, Brooke; Haller, Gabe; Edenberg, Howard; Tischfield, Jay; Brooks, Andy; Kramer, John; Schuckit, Marc; Nurnberger, John; Goate, Alison

    2015-01-01

    Much of the evolution of human behavior remains a mystery, including how certain disadvantageous behaviors are so prevalent. Nicotine addiction is one such phenotype. Several loci have been implicated in nicotine related phenotypes including the nicotinic receptor gene clusters (CHRNs) on chromosomes 8 and 15. Here we use 1000 Genomes sequence data from 3 populations (Africans, Asians and Europeans) to examine whether natural selection has occurred at these loci. We used Tajima’s D and the integrated haplotype score (iHS) to test for evidence of natural selection. Our results provide evidence for strong selection in the nicotinic receptor gene cluster on chromosome 8, previously found to be significantly associated with both nicotine and cocaine dependence, as well as evidence selection acting on the region containing the CHRNA5 nicotinic receptor gene on chromosome 15, that is genome wide significant for risk for nicotine dependence. To examine the possibility that this selection is related to memory and learning, we utilized genetic data from the Collaborative Studies on the Genetics of Alcoholism (COGA) to test variants within these regions with three tests of memory and learning, the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) Block Design, WAIS Digit Symbol and WAIS Information tests. Of the 17 SNPs genotyped in COGA in this region, we find one significantly associated with WAIS digit symbol test results. This test captures aspects of reaction time and memory, suggesting that a phenotype relating to memory and learning may have been the driving force behind selection at these loci. This study could begin to explain why these seemingly deleterious SNPs are present at their current frequencies. PMID:26270548

  20. A certified plasmid reference material for the standardisation of BCR-ABL1 mRNA quantification by real-time quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    White, H; Deprez, L; Corbisier, P; Hall, V; Lin, F; Mazoua, S; Trapmann, S; Aggerholm, A; Andrikovics, H; Akiki, S; Barbany, G; Boeckx, N; Bench, A; Catherwood, M; Cayuela, J-M; Chudleigh, S; Clench, T; Colomer, D; Daraio, F; Dulucq, S; Farrugia, J; Fletcher, L; Foroni, L; Ganderton, R; Gerrard, G; Gineikienė, E; Hayette, S; El Housni, H; Izzo, B; Jansson, M; Johnels, P; Jurcek, T; Kairisto, V; Kizilors, A; Kim, D-W; Lange, T; Lion, T; Polakova, K M; Martinelli, G; McCarron, S; Merle, P A; Milner, B; Mitterbauer-Hohendanner, G; Nagar, M; Nickless, G; Nomdedéu, J; Nymoen, D A; Leibundgut, E O; Ozbek, U; Pajič, T; Pfeifer, H; Preudhomme, C; Raudsepp, K; Romeo, G; Sacha, T; Talmaci, R; Touloumenidou, T; Van der Velden, V H J; Waits, P; Wang, L; Wilkinson, E; Wilson, G; Wren, D; Zadro, R; Ziermann, J; Zoi, K; Müller, M C; Hochhaus, A; Schimmel, H; Cross, N C P; Emons, H

    2015-02-01

    Serial quantification of BCR-ABL1 mRNA is an important therapeutic indicator in chronic myeloid leukaemia, but there is a substantial variation in results reported by different laboratories. To improve comparability, an internationally accepted plasmid certified reference material (CRM) was developed according to ISO Guide 34:2009. Fragments of BCR-ABL1 (e14a2 mRNA fusion), BCR and GUSB transcripts were amplified and cloned into pUC18 to yield plasmid pIRMM0099. Six different linearised plasmid solutions were produced with the following copy number concentrations, assigned by digital PCR, and expanded uncertainties: 1.08±0.13 × 10(6), 1.08±0.11 × 10(5), 1.03±0.10 × 10(4), 1.02±0.09 × 10(3), 1.04±0.10 × 10(2) and 10.0±1.5 copies/μl. The certification of the material for the number of specific DNA fragments per plasmid, copy number concentration of the plasmid solutions and the assessment of inter-unit heterogeneity and stability were performed according to ISO Guide 35:2006. Two suitability studies performed by 63 BCR-ABL1 testing laboratories demonstrated that this set of 6 plasmid CRMs can help to standardise a number of measured transcripts of e14a2 BCR-ABL1 and three control genes (ABL1, BCR and GUSB). The set of six plasmid CRMs is distributed worldwide by the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (Belgium) and its authorised distributors (https://ec.europa.eu/jrc/en/reference-materials/catalogue/; CRM code ERM-AD623a-f). PMID:25036192

  1. A certified plasmid reference material for the standardisation of BCR-ABL1 mRNA quantification by real-time quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    White, H; Deprez, L; Corbisier, P; Hall, V; Lin, F; Mazoua, S; Trapmann, S; Aggerholm, A; Andrikovics, H; Akiki, S; Barbany, G; Boeckx, N; Bench, A; Catherwood, M; Cayuela, J-M; Chudleigh, S; Clench, T; Colomer, D; Daraio, F; Dulucq, S; Farrugia, J; Fletcher, L; Foroni, L; Ganderton, R; Gerrard, G; Gineikienė, E; Hayette, S; El Housni, H; Izzo, B; Jansson, M; Johnels, P; Jurcek, T; Kairisto, V; Kizilors, A; Kim, D-W; Lange, T; Lion, T; Polakova, K M; Martinelli, G; McCarron, S; Merle, P A; Milner, B; Mitterbauer-Hohendanner, G; Nagar, M; Nickless, G; Nomdedéu, J; Nymoen, D A; Leibundgut, E O; Ozbek, U; Pajič, T; Pfeifer, H; Preudhomme, C; Raudsepp, K; Romeo, G; Sacha, T; Talmaci, R; Touloumenidou, T; Van der Velden, V H J; Waits, P; Wang, L; Wilkinson, E; Wilson, G; Wren, D; Zadro, R; Ziermann, J; Zoi, K; Müller, M C; Hochhaus, A; Schimmel, H; Cross, N C P; Emons, H

    2015-02-01

    Serial quantification of BCR-ABL1 mRNA is an important therapeutic indicator in chronic myeloid leukaemia, but there is a substantial variation in results reported by different laboratories. To improve comparability, an internationally accepted plasmid certified reference material (CRM) was developed according to ISO Guide 34:2009. Fragments of BCR-ABL1 (e14a2 mRNA fusion), BCR and GUSB transcripts were amplified and cloned into pUC18 to yield plasmid pIRMM0099. Six different linearised plasmid solutions were produced with the following copy number concentrations, assigned by digital PCR, and expanded uncertainties: 1.08±0.13 × 10(6), 1.08±0.11 × 10(5), 1.03±0.10 × 10(4), 1.02±0.09 × 10(3), 1.04±0.10 × 10(2) and 10.0±1.5 copies/μl. The certification of the material for the number of specific DNA fragments per plasmid, copy number concentration of the plasmid solutions and the assessment of inter-unit heterogeneity and stability were performed according to ISO Guide 35:2006. Two suitability studies performed by 63 BCR-ABL1 testing laboratories demonstrated that this set of 6 plasmid CRMs can help to standardise a number of measured transcripts of e14a2 BCR-ABL1 and three control genes (ABL1, BCR and GUSB). The set of six plasmid CRMs is distributed worldwide by the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (Belgium) and its authorised distributors (https://ec.europa.eu/jrc/en/reference-materials/catalogue/; CRM code ERM-AD623a-f).

  2. Detection of a rare BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase fusion protein in H929 multiple myeloma cells using immunoprecipitation (IP)-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS).

    PubMed

    Breitkopf, Susanne B; Yuan, Min; Pihan, German A; Asara, John M

    2012-10-01

    Hypothesis directed proteomics offers higher throughput over global analyses. We show that immunoprecipitation (IP)-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in H929 multiple myeloma (MM) cancer cells led to the discovery of a rare and unexpected BCR-ABL fusion, informing a therapeutic intervention using imatinib (Gleevec). BCR-ABL is the driving mutation in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and is uncommon to other cancers. Three different IP-MS experiments central to cell signaling pathways were sufficient to discover a BCR-ABL fusion in H929 cells: phosphotyrosine (pY) peptide IP, p85 regulatory subunit of phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) IP, and the GRB2 adaptor IP. The pY peptides inform tyrosine kinase activity, p85 IP informs the activating adaptors and receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) involved in AKT activation and GRB2 IP identifies RTKs and adaptors leading to ERK activation. Integration of the bait-prey data from the three separate experiments identified the BCR-ABL protein complex, which was confirmed by biochemistry, cytogenetic methods, and DNA sequencing revealed the e14a2 fusion transcript. The tyrosine phosphatase SHP2 and the GAB2 adaptor protein, important for MAPK signaling, were common to all three IP-MS experiments. The comparative treatment of tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) drugs revealed only imatinib, the standard of care in CML, was inhibitory to BCR-ABL leading to down-regulation of pERK and pS6K and inhibiting cell proliferation. These data suggest a model for directed proteomics from patient tumor samples for selecting the appropriate TKI drug(s) based on IP and LC-MS/MS. The data also suggest that MM patients, in addition to CML patients, may benefit from BCR-ABL diagnostic screening.

  3. First and second line imatinib treatment in chronic myelogenous leukemia patients expressing rare e1a2 or e19a2 BCR-ABL transcripts.

    PubMed

    Andrikovics, Hajnalka; Nahajevszky, Sarolta; Szilvási, Anikó; Bors, András; Adám, Emma; Kozma, András; Kajtár, Béla; Barta, Anikó; Poros, Anna; Tordai, Attila

    2007-09-01

    During the formation of the Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome, in the majority of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) patients, the chromosome 22 breakpoint is located in the major breakpoint cluster region of the BCR gene (M-bcr). Minor and micro breakpoint cluster regions (m-bcr with e1a2 transcript and micro-bcr with e19a2 transcript) are rarely affected and have been suggested to be associated with peculiar CML phenotypes. Despite the different clinical characteristics, it is currently not established, whether different therapeutic options are preferably recommended for the treatment of e1a2 or e19a2 CML. Here we report two patients with e1a2 and one patient with e19a2 translocations, treated with different approaches including imatinib. First and second line imatinib treatments induced haematologic response in all of the three patients, and major cytogenetic response in one patient with e1a2, as well as in the patient with e19a2 CML. However, relapse occurred in the patient with e19a2 CML, possibly caused by the presence of additional chromosomal abnormalities such as an extra Ph chromosome, and loss of chromosome Y. Stem cell transplantation (SCT) therapy caused complete haematologic response with molecular remission; however, the patient died of infectious complication. We conclude that in patients with rare BCR-ABL variants, the effectiveness of imatininb treatment may be influenced by the CML stage besides the actual molecular type of the rare transcript. However, this conclusion cannot be generalized to larger patient groups with rare BCR-ABL variants for which further studies may be needed.

  4. Unmasking risk loci: DNA methylation illuminates the biology of cancer predisposition: analyzing DNA methylation of transcriptional enhancers reveals missed regulatory links between cancer risk loci and genes.

    PubMed

    Aran, Dvir; Hellman, Asaf

    2014-02-01

    Paradoxically, DNA sequence polymorphisms in cancer risk loci rarely correlate with the expression of cancer genes. Therefore, the molecular mechanism underlying an individual's susceptibility to cancer has remained largely unknown. However, recent evaluations of the correlations between DNA methylation and gene expression levels across healthy and cancerous genomes have revealed enrichment of disease-related DNA methylation variations within disease-associated risk loci. Moreover, it appears that transcriptional enhancers embedded in cancer risk loci often contain DNA methylation sites that closely define the expression of prominent cancer genes, despite the lack of significant correlations between gene expression levels and the surrounding disease-associated polymorphic sequences. We suggest that DNA methylation variations may obscure the effect of co-residing risk sequence alleles. Analysis of enhancer methylation data may help to reveal the regulatory circuits underlying predisposition to cancers and other common diseases.

  5. Implication of the Autologous Immune System in BCR-ABL Transcript Variations in Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Patients Treated with Imatinib.

    PubMed

    Clapp, Geoffrey D; Lepoutre, Thomas; El Cheikh, Raouf; Bernard, Samuel; Ruby, Jérémy; Labussière-Wallet, Hélène; Nicolini, Franck E; Levy, Doron

    2015-10-01

    Imatinib and other tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) have improved treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML); however, most patients are not cured. Deeper mechanistic understanding may improve TKI combination therapies to better control the residual leukemic cell population. In analyzing our patients' data, we found that many patients who otherwise responded well to imatinib therapy still showed variations in their BCR-ABL transcripts. To investigate this phenomenon, we applied a mathematical model that integrates CML and an autologous immune response to the patients' data. We define an immune window or a range of leukemic loads for which the autologous immune system induces an improved response. Our modeling results suggest that, at diagnosis, a patient's leukemic load is able to partially or fully suppress the autologous immune response developed in a majority of patients, toward the CML clone(s). Imatinib therapy drives the leukemic population into the "immune window," allowing the patient's autologous immune cells to expand and eventually mount an efficient recognition of the residual leukemic burden. This response drives the leukemic load below this immune window, allowing the leukemic population to partially recover until another weaker immune response is initiated. Thus, the autologous immune response may explain the oscillations in BCR-ABL transcripts regularly observed in patients on imatinib.

  6. Reactive Oxygen Species and Mitochondrial DNA Damage and Repair in BCR-ABL1 Cells Resistant to Imatinib.

    PubMed

    Blasiak, Janusz; Hoser, Grazyna; Bialkowska-Warzecha, Jolanta; Pawlowska, Elzbieta; Skorski, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Imatinib revolutionized the therapy of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), but the resistance to it became an emerging problem. We reported previously that CML cells expressing the BCR/ABL1 fusion gene, accumulated a high level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) due to deregulated mitochondrial electron transport chain, which in turn led to genomic instability, resulting in imatinib resistance. In the present work, we hypothesize that imatinib-resistant cells may show higher instability of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) than their sensitive counterparts. To verify this hypothesis, we checked the ROS level and mtDNA damage and repair in model CML cells sensitive and resistant to imatinib and exposed to doxorubicin (DOX), a DNA-damaging agent. The extent of endogenous ROS in imatinib-resistant cells was higher than in their sensitive counterparts and DOX potentiated this relationship. ROS level in cells with primary resistance, which resulted from the T315I mutation in BCR/ABL1, was higher than in cells with acquired resistance. DOX-induced mtDNA damage in T315I imatinib-resistant cells was more pronounced than in imatinib-sensitive cells. All kinds of cells were repairing mtDNA damage with similar kinetics. In conclusion, imatinib-resistant cells can show increased instability of mtDNA, which can result from increased ROS production. PMID:26309809

  7. Improvement of the BCR three step sequential extraction procedure prior to the certification of new sediment and soil reference materials.

    PubMed

    Rauret, G; López-Sánchez, J F; Sahuquillo, A; Rubio, R; Davidson, C; Ure, A; Quevauviller, P

    1999-02-01

    The Standards, Measurements and Testing Programme (formerly BCR) of the European Commission proposed a three-step sequential extraction procedure for sediment analysis, following extensive expert consultations and two interlaboratory studies. This scheme was recently used to certify the extractable trace element contents of a sediment reference material (CRM 601). Although this procedure offers a means to ensure the comparability of data in this field, some difficulties concerning the interlaboratory reproducibility still remain, and a new project is currently being conducted to determine the causes of poor reproducibility in the extraction scheme. The final objective of the project is the certification of new sediment and soil reference materials for their extractable contents of Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn. This paper presents the results of a small-scale interlaboratory study, which aimed to test a revised version of the extraction schemes by comparing the original and the modified protocols using the CRM 601 sample. This work offers an improvement to the BCR sequential extraction procedure through intercomparison exercises. This improved procedure will allow the obtaining of CRMs to validate analytical data in the analysis of soils and sediments, and it will also facilitate comparability of data in the European Union.

  8. Biosensing of BCR/ABL fusion gene using an intensity-interrogation surface plasmon resonance imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jiangling; Huang, Yu; Bian, Xintong; Li, DanDan; Cheng, Quan; Ding, Shijia

    2016-10-01

    In this work, a custom-made intensity-interrogation surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) system has been developed to directly detect a specific sequence of BCR/ABL fusion gene in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). The variation in the reflected light intensity detected from the sensor chip composed of gold islands array is proportional to the change of refractive index due to the selective hybridization of surface-bound DNA probes with target ssDNA. SPRi measurements were performed with different concentrations of synthetic target DNA sequence. The calibration curve of synthetic target sequence shows a good relationship between the concentration of synthetic target and the change of reflected light intensity. The detection limit of this SPRi measurement could approach 10.29 nM. By comparing SPRi images, the target ssDNA and non-complementary DNA sequence are able to be distinguished. This SPRi system has been applied for assay of BCR/ABL fusion gene extracted from real samples. This nucleic acid-based SPRi biosensor therefore offers an alternative high-effective, high-throughput label-free tool for DNA detection in biomedical research and molecular diagnosis.

  9. Allelic Expression Imbalance of JAK2 V617F Mutation in BCR-ABL Negative Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeo-Kyeoung; Kim, Hyeoung-Joon; Shin, Jong-Hee; Suh, Soon-Pal; Ryang, Dong-Wook; Shin, Myung-Geun

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of a single point mutation in the JAK2 gene in patients with BCR/ABL-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) has not only brought new insights and pathogenesis, but also has made the diagnosis of MPNs much easier. Although, to date, several mechanisms for the contribution of single JAK2V617F point mutation to phenotypic diversity of MPNs have been suggested in multiple studies, but it is not clear how a unique mutation can cause the phenotypic diversity of MPNs. In this study, our results show that allelic expression imbalance of JAK2 V617F mutant frequently occurs and contributes to phenotypic diversity of BCR-ABL-negative MPNs. The proportion of JAK2 V617F mutant allele was significantly augmented in RNA levels as compared with genomic DNA differently by distinct MPNs subtypes. In detail, preferential expression of JAK2 mutant allele showed threefold increase from the cDNA compared with the genomic DNA from patients with essential thrombocythemia and twofold increase in polycythemia vera. In conclusion, allelic expression imbalance of JAK2 V617F mutant proposes another plausible mechanism for the contribution of single JAK2 point mutation to phenotypic diversity of MPNs. PMID:23349688

  10. Speciation of heavy metals by modified BCR sequential extraction procedure in different depths of sediments from Sungai Buloh, Selangor, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Nemati, Keivan; Abu Bakar, Nor Kartini; Abas, Mhd Radzi; Sobhanzadeh, Elham

    2011-08-15

    The sequential extraction procedure proposed by the European Standard, Measurements and Testing (SM&T) program, formerly the Community Bureau of Reference (BCR), was applied for partitioning of heavy metals (HMs) in river sediments collected along the course of Sungai Buloh and the Straits of Malacca in Selangor, Malaysia. Eight elements (V, Pb, Cd, Cr, Co, Ni, Cu and Zn) from seven stations (S1-S7) and at different depths were analyzed using the modified BCR Sequential Extraction Procedure (SEP) in combination with ICP-MS to obtain the metal distribution patterns in this region. The results showed that heavy metal contaminations at S2 and S3 was more severe than at other sampling sites, especially for Zn, Cu, Ni and Pb. Nevertheless, the element concentrations from top to bottom layers decreased predominantly. The samples from the Straits of Malacca (S4-S7) the highest contamination factors obtained were for Co, Zn and Pb while the lowest were found for V and Cr, similar to Sungai Buloh sediments. The sediments showed a low risk for V, Cr, Cu and Pb with RAC values of less than 10%, but medium risk for Co, Zn (except S3), Cd at S1 and S2 and Ni at S1, S3 and S5. Zn at S3 and Cd at S3-S7 showed high risk to our sediment samples. There is not any element of very high risk conditions in the selected samples.

  11. BCR Signaling Inhibitors: an Overview of Toxicities Associated with Ibrutinib and Idelalisib in Patients with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Falchi, Lorenzo; Baron, Jessica M.; Orlikowski, Carrie Anne; Ferrajoli, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    The B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling inhibitors ibrutinib and idelalisib are revolutionizing the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and other B-cell malignancies. These oral agents, both alone and in combination with other drugs, have shown remarkable clinical activity in relapsed or refractory CLL across all risk groups, and have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for this indication. Preliminary data suggest that an even greater benefit can be expected in treatment-naïve CLL patients. Both ibrutinib and idelalisib are well tolerated by most patients, including older, frailer individuals. Toxicities are usually mild and self-resolving. Clinicians must, however, be aware of a number of peculiar adverse events, the effects of which can be severe enough to limit the clinical use of these agents. In this review, we survey the salient aspects of the pharmacology and clinical experience with the use of BCR signaling inhibitors for the treatment of patients with CLL. We next focus on both the most common and the most clinically significant toxicities associated with these drugs. PMID:26977270

  12. A thirty-five nucleotides BCR-ABL1 insertion mutation of controversial significance confers resistance to imatinib in a patient with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML).

    PubMed

    Marcé, Silvia; Cortés, Montserrat; Zamora, Lurdes; Cabezón, Marta; Grau, Javier; Millá, Fuensanta; Feliu, Evarist

    2015-08-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) have improved the management of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). However, a significant proportion of patients does not achieve the optimal response or are resistant to TKI. ABL1 kinase domain mutations have been extensively implicated in the pathogenesis of TKI resistance. Although deletion or insertion of nucleotides in BCR-ABL1 has rarely been described, we identified a CML patient with an already described 35 nucleotides insertion (BCR-ABL1(35INS)) of controversial significance, that confers resistance to imatinib but sensitivity to dasatinib. PMID:25913326

  13. Design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of 3-(1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-yl)benzamide derivatives as Potent Pan Bcr-Abl inhibitors including the threonine(315)→isoleucine(315) mutant.

    PubMed

    Li, Yupeng; Shen, Mengjie; Zhang, Zhang; Luo, Jinfeng; Pan, Xiaofen; Lu, Xiaoyun; Long, Huoyou; Wen, Donghai; Zhang, Fengxiang; Leng, Fang; Li, Yingjun; Tu, Zhengchao; Ren, Xiaomei; Ding, Ke

    2012-11-26

    A series of 3-(1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-yl)benzamide derivatives were designed and synthesized as new Bcr-Abl inhibitors by using combinational strategies of bioisosteric replacement, scaffold hopping, and conformational constraint. The compounds displayed significant inhibition against a broad spectrum of Bcr-Abl mutants including the gatekeeper T315I and p-loop mutations, which are associated with disease progression in CML. The most potent compounds 6q and 6qo strongly inhibited the kinase activities of Bcr-Abl(WT) and Bcr-Abl(T315I) with IC(50) values of 0.60, 0.36 and 1.12, 0.98 nM, respectively. They also potently suppressed the proliferation of K562, KU812 human CML cells, and a panel of murine Ba/F3 cells ectopically expressing either Bcr-Abl(WT) or any of a panel of other Bcr-Abl mutants that have been shown to contribute to clinical acquired resistance, including Bcr-Abl(T315I), with IC(50) values in low nanomolar ranges. These compounds may serve as lead compounds for further development of new Bcr-Abl inhibitors capable of overcoming clinical acquired resistance against imatinib.

  14. Microsatellite loci for genetic mapping in the turkey (Meleagris gallopavo).

    PubMed

    Reed, K M; Chaves, L D; Hall, M K; Knutson, T P; Rowe, J A; Torgerson, A J

    2003-11-01

    New microsatellite loci for the turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) were developed from two small insert DNA libraries. Polymorphism at these new loci was examined in domestic birds and two resource populations designed for genetic linkage mapping. The majority of loci (152 of 168) was polymorphic in domestic turkeys and informative in two mapping resource populations and thus will be useful for genetic linkage mapping.

  15. Radiation-induced mutation at minisatellite loci

    SciTech Connect

    Dubrova, Y.E. |; Nesterov, V.N.; Krouchinsky, N.G.

    1997-10-01

    We are studying the radiation-induced increase of mutation rate in minisatellite loci in mice and humans. Minisatellite mutations were scored by multilocus DNA fingerprint analysis in the progeny of {gamma}-irradiated and non-irradiated mice. The frequency of mutation in offspring of irradiated males was 1.7 higher that in the control group. Germline mutation at human minisatellite loci was studied among children born in heavily polluted areas of the Mogilev district of Belarus after the Chernobyl accident and in a control population. The frequency of mutation assayed both by DNA fingerprinting and by eight single locus probes was found to be two times higher in the exposed families than in the control group. Furthermore, mutation rate was correlated with the parental radiation dose for chronic exposure {sup 137}Cs, consistent with radiation-induction of germline mutation. The potential use of minisatellites in monitoring germline mutation in humans will be discussed.

  16. Characterization of Novel Microsatellite Loci for Primula poissonii (Primulaceae) Using High-Throughput Sequencing Technology.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun-Jiao; Zhang, Cai-Yun; Hao, Gang; Ge, Xue-Jun; Yan, Hai-Fei

    2016-05-09

    Primula poissonii (Primulaceae) is a perennial herb, widely distributed in the Hengduan Mountain region of Southwest China. In this study, Roche 454 pyrosequencing was used to isolate microsatellite markers. A total of 4528 unique sequences were identified from 68,070 unique reads. Of these, eighty-seven microsatellite loci were screened for utility using two criteria: successful PCR amplification and variation of these loci within three wild P. poissonii populations. Twenty loci were successfully amplified and exhibited polymorphic alleles. The number of observed alleles ranged from 1 to 9 with an average of 3.5. The observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.087 to 1.000 and from 0.124 to 0.828, respectively. Among these SSR loci, only the P69 locus could not be cross-amplified successfully in two closely related species P. wilsonii and P. anisodora. The microsatellite loci developed in this study will be useful for studying genetic diversity and speciation events between P. poissonii and closely related Primula species.

  17. Intraspecific polymorphism of ribosomal DNA loci number and morphology in Brachypodium pinnatum and Brachypodium sylvaticum.

    PubMed

    Breda, Ewa; Wolny, Elzbieta; Hasterok, Robert

    2012-12-01

    The genus Brachypodium has become the target of extensive cytomolecular studies since one of its representatives, B. distachyon, has been accepted as a model plant for temperate cereals and forage grasses. Recent preliminary studies suggested that intraspecific rDNA polymorphism can occur in at least two members of the genus, B. sylvaticum and B. pinnatum, so the aim of this study was to further analyse this phenomenon. FISH with 25S rDNA and 5S rDNA probes was performed on somatic metaphase chromosomes, supplemented by the silver staining technique which distinguishes transcriptionally active from inactive 18S-5.8S-25S rDNA loci. The number, size and chromosomal distribution of 5S rDNA loci were very constant: two loci were invariably observed in all studied diploid accessions of both species, while four 5S rDNA loci were present in the tetraploid B. pinnatum. In contrast to 5S rDNA loci, those of the 35S rDNA were more variable. Two or three loci were observed in the diploid B. pinnatum and four in tetraploid accessions. In chromosome complements of B. sylvaticum accessions from two to six 35S rDNA sites were detected. Regardless of total rDNA locus number, only two were transcriptionally active in diploid accessions of both species, while two or four were active in the tetraploid B. pinnatum. Additionally, the fluorescent CMA/DAPI banding method was used to identify the relation between rDNA sites and CMA+ bands. It was revealed that the number and chromosomal distribution of CMA+ bands are in congruence only with 35S rDNA loci which gave strong FISH signals. PMID:22893263

  18. Systematic evaluation of validated type 2 diabetes and glycaemic trait loci for association with insulin clearance

    PubMed Central

    Guo, X.; Cui, J.; Jones, M. R.; Haritunians, T.; Xiang, A. H.; Chen, Y.-D. I.; Taylor, K. D.; Buchanan, T. A.; Hsueh, W. A.; Raffel, L. J.; Rotter, J. I.

    2013-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Insulin clearance is a highly heritable trait, for which few quantitative trait loci have been discovered. We sought to determine whether validated type 2 diabetes and/or glycaemic trait loci are associated with insulin clearance. Methods Hyperinsulinaemic–euglycaemic clamps were performed in two Hispanic-American family cohorts totalling 1329 participants in 329 families. The Metabochip was used to fine-map about 50 previously identified loci for type 2 diabetes, fasting glucose, fasting insulin, 2 h glucose or HbA1c. This resulted in 17,930 variants, which were tested for association with clamp-derived insulin clearance via meta-analysis of the two cohorts. Results In the meta-analysis, 38 variants located within seven loci demonstrated association with insulin clearance (p < 0.001). The top signals for each locus were rs10241087 (DGKB/TMEM195 [TMEM195 also known as AGMO]) (p = 4.4 × 10−5); chr1:217605433 (LYPLAL1) (p = 3.25 × 10−4); rs2380949 (GLIS3) (p = 3.4 × 10−4); rs55903902 (FADS1) (p = 5.6 × 10−4); rs849334 (JAZF1) (p = 6.4 × 10−4); rs35749 (IGF1) (p = 6.7 × 10−4); and rs9460557 (CDKAL1) (p = 6.8 × 10−4). Conclusions/interpretation While the majority of validated loci for type 2 diabetes and related traits do not appear to influence insulin clearance in Hispanics, several of these loci do show evidence of association with this trait. It is therefore possible that these loci could have pleiotropic effects on insulin secretion, insulin sensitivity and insulin clearance. PMID:23494448

  19. In Vivo Imaging of Bcr-Abl Overexpressing Tumors with a Radiolabeled Imatinib Analog as an Imaging Surrogate for Imatinib

    PubMed Central

    Glekas, Athanasios P.; Pillarsetty, Nagavara Kishore; Punzalan, Blesida; Khan, Nahida; Smith-Jones, Peter; Larson, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Imatinib mesylate is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor that was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 2001 for treatment of many different stages of chronic myeloid leukemia and in 2002 for treatment of gastrointestinal stromal tumors. Imatinib is known to inhibit the dysregulated proliferation of chronic myeloid leukemia, which is associated with the Bcr-Abl kinase; in gastrointestinal stromal tumors, imatinib is known to act via c-Kit kinase inhibition. The objective of this study was to synthesize an 18F-labeled analog of imatinib not as a primary imaging agent but rather as a tracer for in vivo drug distribution and tracer concentration that can be used as a PET imaging surrogate for imatinib. Methods Molecular modeling studies based on the crystal structure of imatinib bound to the active site of Abl were performed for designing the fluorinated analog. A 2-fluoroethyl analog of imatinib (SKI696) was synthesized using well-established procedures. The selectivity and binding affinity of SKI696 were compared with those of imatinib in vitro. Mice bearing K562 tumor xenografts, which are known to overexpress Bcr-Abl, were imaged with 18F-SKI696 PET. A biodistribution study was also performed on K562 tumor–bearing mice to which our radiolabeled tracer was administered. Results The kinase assay verified that imatinib and SKI696 bind to the same targets with similar affinities. The feasibility of using 18F-SKI696 as a PET agent was examined in vivo, and 18F-SKI696 PET was shown to visualize K562 tumor xenografts in nude mice. The tumor was visible on PET 1 h after injection, with uptake of 1% of the injected dose. Biodistribution studies in K562-bearing mice were also performed, and the uptake of 18F-SKI696 (percentage injected dose per gram) for each organ was calculated. Conclusion The results of the binding assay showed that SKI696 has selectivity and binding affinity comparable to imatinib. Small-animal PET of K562 tumor–bearing mice using 18F-SKI696

  20. Evolution of BCR/ABL Gene Mutation in CML Is Time Dependent and Dependent on the Pressure Exerted by Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Vaidya, Shantashri; Vundinti, Babu Rao; Shanmukhaiah, Chandrakala; Chakrabarti, Prantar; Ghosh, Kanjaksha

    2015-01-01

    Background Mutations in the ABL kinase domain and SH3-SH2 domain of the BCR/ABL gene and amplification of the Philadelphia chromosome are the two important BCR/ABL dependent mechanisms of imatinib resistance. Here, we intended to study the role played by TKI, imatinib, in selection of gene mutations and development of chromosomal abnormalities in Indian CML patients. Methods Direct sequencing methodology was employed to detect mutations and conventional cytogenetics was done to identify Philadelphia duplication. Results Among the different mechanisms of imatinib resistance, kinase domain mutations (39%) of the BCR/ABL gene were seen to be more prevalent, followed by mutations in the SH3-SH2 domain (4%) and then BCR/ABL amplification with the least frequency (1%). The median duration of occurrence of mutation was significantly shorter for patients with front line imatinib than those pre-treated with hydroxyurea. Patients with high Sokal score (p = 0.003) showed significantly higher incidence of mutations, as compared to patients with low/intermediate score. Impact of mutations on the clinical outcome in AP and BC was observed to be insignificant. Of the 94 imatinib resistant patients, only 1 patient exhibited duplication of Philadelphia chromosome, suggesting a less frequent occurrence of this abnormality in Indian CML patients. Conclusion Close monitoring at regular intervals and proper analysis of the disease resistance would facilitate early detection of resistance and thus aid in the selection of the most appropriate therapy. PMID:25629972

  1. A novel Lyn-protein kinase Cδ/ε-protein kinase D axis is activated in B cells by signalosome-independent alternate pathway BCR signaling.

    PubMed

    Guo, Benchang; Rothstein, Thomas L

    2013-06-01

    BCR signaling initiates multiple activities critical for B-cell function. Recently, we identified an alternate BCR signaling pathway, induced by IL-4, that is signalosome-independent, unlike the classical signalosome-dependent pathway, and that leads to activation of the MAP kinase, ERK. Here we questioned whether alternate pathway signaling extends to other key downstream events, especially protein kinase D (PKD) activation. We found that in murine spleen-derived B cells the IL-4-induced alternate pathway for BCR signaling results in PKD and PKD substrate phosphorylation, and that alternate pathway phosphorylation of HDAC5/7 and other key substrates requires PKD. Furthermore, we found that tyrosine phosphorylation of PKCδ/ε occurs as a result of alternate but not classical pathway signaling and is required for phosphorylation of PKD and PKD substrates. This result identifies PKCδ/ε tyrosine phosphorylation as a unique outcome of the alternate pathway. The alternate pathway is mediated by Lyn that is not required for classical pathway signaling and we found that Lyn associates directly with PKCδ/ε and is required for phosphorylation of PKCδ/ε and of PKD. These findings indicate that IL-4 influences B-cell activation by inducing a novel signaling pathway from BCR to Lyn to PKCδ/ε to PKD.

  2. Clonality Analysis of Immunoglobulin Gene Rearrangement by Next-Generation Sequencing in Endemic Burkitt Lymphoma Suggests Antigen Drive Activation of BCR as Opposed to Sporadic Burkitt Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Amato, Teresa; Abate, Francesco; Piccaluga, Pierpaolo; Iacono, Michele; Fallerini, Chiara; Renieri, Alessandra; De Falco, Giulia; Ambrosio, Maria Raffaella; Mourmouras, Vaselious; Ogwang, Martin; Calbi, Valeria; Rabadan, Roul; Hummel, Michael; Pileri, Stefano; Bellan, Cristiana

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Recent studies using next-generation sequencing (NGS) analysis disclosed the importance of the intrinsic activation of the B-cell receptor (BCR) pathway in the pathogenesis of sporadic Burkitt lymphoma (sBL) due to mutations of TCF3/ID3 genes. Since no definitive data are available on the genetic landscape of endemic Burkitt (eBL), we first assessed the mutation frequency of TCF3/ID3 in eBL compared with sBL and subsequently the somatic hypermutation status of the BCR to answer whether an extrinsic activation of BCR signaling could also be demonstrated in Burkitt lymphoma. Methods: We assessed the mutations of TCF3/ID3 by RNAseq and the BCR status by NGS analysis of the immunoglobulin genes (IGs). Results: We detected mutations of TCF3/ID3 in about 30% of the eBL cases. This rate is significantly lower than that detected in sBL (64%). The NGS analysis of IGs revealed intraclonal diversity, suggesting an active targeted somatic hypermutation process in eBL compared with sBL. Conclusions: These findings support the view that the antigenic pressure plays a key role in the pathogenetic pathways of eBL, which may be partially distinct from those driving sBL development. PMID:26712879

  3. Isolation and characterization of 10 polymorphic microsatellite loci for the endangered Galapagos-endemic whitespotted sandbass (Paralabrax albomaculatus)

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Sarah M.; Truelove, Nathan K.; Box, Stephen J.; Preziosi, Richard F.; Salinas de Leon, Pelayo

    2015-01-01

    The white-spotted sandbass (Paralabrax albomaculatus) is a commercially important species in the Galapagos Marine Reserve, but is classified as endangered in the IUCN Red List. For this study, 10 microsatellite loci were isolated and characterized using Illumina paired-end sequencing. These loci can be used for genetic studies of population structure and connectivity to aid in the management of the white-spotted sandbass and other closely-related species. The 10 characterized loci were polymorphic, with 11–49 alleles per locus, and observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.575 to 0.964. This set of markers is the first to be developed for this species. PMID:26557418

  4. Isolation and characterization of 10 polymorphic microsatellite loci for the endangered Galapagos-endemic whitespotted sandbass (Paralabrax albomaculatus).

    PubMed

    Bertolotti, Alicia C; Griffiths, Sarah M; Truelove, Nathan K; Box, Stephen J; Preziosi, Richard F; Salinas de Leon, Pelayo

    2015-01-01

    The white-spotted sandbass (Paralabrax albomaculatus) is a commercially important species in the Galapagos Marine Reserve, but is classified as endangered in the IUCN Red List. For this study, 10 microsatellite loci were isolated and characterized using Illumina paired-end sequencing. These loci can be used for genetic studies of population structure and connectivity to aid in the management of the white-spotted sandbass and other closely-related species. The 10 characterized loci were polymorphic, with 11-49 alleles per locus, and observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.575 to 0.964. This set of markers is the first to be developed for this species. PMID:26557418

  5. Isolation and characterization of 10 polymorphic microsatellite loci for the endangered Galapagos-endemic whitespotted sandbass (Paralabrax albomaculatus).

    PubMed

    Bertolotti, Alicia C; Griffiths, Sarah M; Truelove, Nathan K; Box, Stephen J; Preziosi, Richard F; Salinas de Leon, Pelayo

    2015-01-01

    The white-spotted sandbass (Paralabrax albomaculatus) is a commercially important species in the Galapagos Marine Reserve, but is classified as endangered in the IUCN Red List. For this study, 10 microsatellite loci were isolated and characterized using Illumina paired-end sequencing. These loci can be used for genetic studies of population structure and connectivity to aid in the management of the white-spotted sandbass and other closely-related species. The 10 characterized loci were polymorphic, with 11-49 alleles per locus, and observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.575 to 0.964. This set of markers is the first to be developed for this species.

  6. Tetrandrine citrate eliminates imatinib-resistant chronic myeloid leukemia cells in vitro and in vivo by inhibiting Bcr-Abl/β-catenin axis*

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiao-hua; Gan, Yi-chao; Xu, Gen-bo; Chen, Ting; Zhou, Hong; Tang, Jin-fen; Gu, Ying; Xu, Fei; Xie, Ying-ying; Zhao, Xiao-ying; Xu, Rong-zhen

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of tetrandrine citrate, a novel tetrandrine salt with high water solubility, on the growth of imatinib (IM)-resistant chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in vitro and in vivo, and reveal action molecular mechanisms. Methods: Cell viability in vitro was measured using methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay. CML cell growth in vivo was assessed using a xenograft model in nude mice. Bcr-Abl and β-catenin protein levels were determined using Western blotting. Bcr-Abl messenger RNA (mRNA) was measured by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Flow cytometry (FCM) was used to determine cell cycle status. Results: Tetrandrine citrate inhibited the growth of IM-resistant K562 cells, primary leukemia cells, and primitive CD34+ leukemia cells, and their inhibition concentration that inhibited 50% of target cells (IC50) ranged from 1.20 to 2.97 μg/ml. In contrast, tetrandrine citrate did not affect normal blood cells under the same conditions, and IC50 values were about 10.12–13.11 μg/ml. Oral administration of tetrandrine citrate caused complete regression of IM-resistant K562 xenografts in nude mice without overt toxicity. Western blot results revealed that treatment of IM-resistant K562 cells with tetrandrine citrate resulted in a significant decrease of both p210Bcr-Abl and β-catenin proteins, but IM did not affect the Bcr-Abl protein levels. Proteasome inhibitor, MG132, did not prevent tetrandrine-mediated decrease of the p210Bcr-Abl protein. RT-PCR results showed that tetrandrine treatment caused a decrease of Bcr-Abl mRNA. FCM analysis indicated that tetrandrine induced gap 1 (G1) arrest in CML cells. Conclusions: Tetrandrine citrate is a novel orally active tetrandrine salt with potent anti-tumor activity against IM-resistant K562 cells and CML cells. Tetrandrine citrate-induced growth inhibition of leukemia cells may be involved in the depletion of p210Bcr-Abl mRNA and β-catenin protein. PMID:23125079

  7. The rice narrow leaf2 and narrow leaf3 loci encode WUSCHEL-related homeobox 3A (OsWOX3A) and function in leaf, spikelet, tiller and lateral root development.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung-Hwan; Yoo, Soo-Cheul; Zhang, Haitao; Pandeya, Devendra; Koh, Hee-Jong; Hwang, Ji-Young; Kim, Gyung-Tae; Paek, Nam-Chon

    2013-06-01

    · In order to understand the molecular genetic mechanisms of rice (Oryza sativa) organ development, we studied the narrow leaf2 narrow leaf3 (nal2 nal3; hereafter nal2/3) double mutant, which produces narrow-curly leaves, more tillers, fewer lateral roots, opened spikelets and narrow-thin grains. · We found that narrow-curly leaves resulted mainly from reduced lateral-axis outgrowth with fewer longitudinal veins and more, larger bulliform cells. Opened spikelets, possibly caused by marginal deformity in the lemma, gave rise to narrow-thin grains. · Map-based cloning revealed that NAL2 and NAL3 are paralogs that encode an identical OsWOX3A (OsNS) transcriptional activator, homologous to NARROW SHEATH1 (NS1) and NS2 in maize and PRESSED FLOWER in Arabidopsis. · OsWOX3A is expressed in the vascular tissues of various organs, where nal2/3 mutant phenotypes were displayed. Expression levels of several leaf development-associated genes were altered in nal2/3, and auxin transport-related genes were significantly changed, leading to pin mutant-like phenotypes such as more tillers and fewer lateral roots. OsWOX3A is involved in organ development in rice, lateral-axis outgrowth and vascular patterning in leaves, lemma and palea morphogenesis in spikelets, and development of tillers and lateral roots. PMID:23551229

  8. Suppression of E-protein activity interferes with the development of BCR-ABL-mediated myeloproliferative disease.

    PubMed

    Ko, Jinkyung; Patel, Nihal; Ikawa, Tomokatsu; Kawamoto, Hiroshi; Frank, Oliver; Rivera, Richard R; Van Etten, Richard A; Murre, Cornelis

    2008-09-01

    E-proteins are a class of helix-loop-helix (HLH) proteins, which play multiple roles throughout lymphoid development. The DNA binding activities of the E-proteins are regulated by a distinct class of antagonistic HLH proteins, named Id1-4. Here we demonstrate that Id2 deficient mice in a C57BL/6 genetic background exhibit increased cellularity in the granulocyte/myeloid progenitor compartment and show significantly higher numbers of maturing neutrophils. Within 6 months of age, Id2 deficient mice succumbed from overwhelming granulocytosis. The disease closely mimicked the distinctive features of human chronic myeloid leukemia: leukocytosis with maturing neutrophils, splenomegaly, hepatomegaly, and myeloid infiltration into peripheral tissues, including spleen, liver, and lungs. Strikingly, forced Id2 expression in murine bone marrow cells substantially delayed the onset of myeloproliferative disease (MPD). Collectively, these studies show that suppression of E-protein activity interferes with the development of BCR-ABL-mediated MPD.

  9. Compound mutations in BCR-ABL1 are not major drivers of primary or secondary resistance to ponatinib in CP-CML patients

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, J. Graeme; Shah, Neil P.; Cortes, Jorge E.; Kim, Dong-Wook; Nicolini, Franck E.; Talpaz, Moshe; Baccarani, Michele; Müller, Martin C.; Li, Jin; Parker, Wendy T.; Lustgarten, Stephanie; Clackson, Tim; Haluska, Frank G.; Guilhot, Francois; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Soverini, Simona; Hochhaus, Andreas; Hughes, Timothy P.; Rivera, Victor M.; Branford, Susan

    2016-01-01

    BCR-ABL1 kinase domain mutations can confer resistance to first- and second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). In preclinical studies, clinically achievable concentrations of the third-generation BCR-ABL1 TKI ponatinib inhibit T315I and all other single BCR-ABL1 mutants except T315M, which generates a single amino acid exchange, but requires 2 sequential nucleotide exchanges. In addition, certain compound mutants (containing ≥2 mutations in cis) confer resistance. Initial analyses based largely on conventional Sanger sequencing (SS) have suggested that the preclinical relationship between BCR-ABL1 mutation status and ponatinib efficacy is generally recapitulated in patients receiving therapy. Thus far, however, such analyses have been limited by the inability of SS to definitively identify compound mutations or mutations representing less than ∼20% of total alleles (referred to as “low-level mutations”), as well as limited patient follow-up. Here we used next-generation sequencing (NGS) to define the baseline BCR-ABL1 mutation status of 267 heavily pretreated chronic phase (CP)-CML patients from the PACE trial, and used SS to identify clonally dominant mutants that may have developed on ponatinib therapy (30.1 months median follow-up). Durable cytogenetic and molecular responses were observed irrespective of baseline mutation status and included patients with compound mutations. No single or compound mutation was identified that consistently conferred primary and/or secondary resistance to ponatinib in CP-CML patients. Ponatinib is effective in CP-CML irrespective of baseline mutation status. PMID:26603839

  10. Illegitimate RAG-mediated recombination events are involved in IKZF1 Δ3-6 deletion in BCR-ABL1 lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Dong, Y; Liu, F; Wu, C; Li, S; Zhao, X; Zhang, P; Jiao, J; Yu, X; Ji, Y; Zhang, M

    2016-09-01

    Breakpoint cluster region-Abelson murine leukaemia viral oncogene homologue 1 (BCR-ABL1), encoded by the Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome, is the characteristic of chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) and a subset of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). We demonstrated that expression of the Ik6 transcript, which lacked exons 3-6, was observed exclusively in BCR-ABL1(+) B ALL and lymphoid blast crisis CML (BC-CML) patients harbouring the IKZF1 Δ3-6 deletion. To confirm the hypothesis that illegitimate recombination activating gene protein (RAG)-mediated recombination events are involved in IKZF1 Δ3-6 deletion in BCR-ABL1 lymphoblastic leukaemia, we first demonstrated that the expression rates of RAG1 and RAG2, collectively called RAG, were higher in ALL and BC-CML (lymphoid). Notably, analysis of relationships among RAG, BCR-ABL1 and Ikaros 6 (Ik6) showed that Ik6 can be generated only if RAG and BCR-ABL1 are co-existing. The sequencing data showed that the deleted segments of introns 2 and 6 contained cryptic recombination signal sequences (cRSSs) and frequently had non-template nucleotides inserted between breakpoints. Furthermore, we used chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) technology and demonstrated that the sequences directly flanking IKZF1 Δ3-6 deletion breakpoints have significantly higher levels of histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) modifications. Overall, RAG expression, good-quality cRSS and a specific chromatin modification, H3K4me3, satisfy the conditions of RAG's off-target effects on IKZF1. Our work provides evidence for RAG-mediated IKZF1 Δ3-6 deletion. Our results raise the prospect that RAG is a valuable biomarker in disease surveillance. Dissecting the contribution of RAG should not only provide valuable mechanistic insights, but will also lead to a new therapeutic direction. PMID:27198500

  11. Subclones with the t(9;22)/BCR-ABL1 rearrangement occur in AML and seem to cooperate with distinct genetic alterations.

    PubMed

    Bacher, Ulrike; Haferlach, Torsten; Alpermann, Tamara; Zenger, Melanie; Hochhaus, Andreas; Beelen, Dietrich W; Uppenkamp, Michael; Rummel, Mathias; Kern, Wolfgang; Schnittger, Susanne; Haferlach, Claudia

    2011-03-01

    In AML, cooperation of mutations suppressing differentiation ('class-II-mutations') with 'class-I-mutations' increasing cell proliferation is frequent. In rare cases of myeloid malignancies, the BCR-ABL1 fusion was reported to cooperate as class-I-mutation with class-II-mutations, but most cases had to be classified as blast phase of chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML). We identified five cases of Philadelphia positive subclones in AML occurring in coincidence with other genetic lesions: 1:220 patients with inv(16)/CBFB-MYH11 (0·5%), 2:272 AML cases with t(8;21)/RUNX1-RUNX1T1 (0·7%), 1:1029 NPM1-mutated AML (0·1%), and one patient with s-AML following MDS with a 5q-deletion. Four patients had m-BCR (e1a2) BCR-ABL1 transcripts; one case only had an M-BCR (b3a2) breakpoint. These cases allow some interesting conclusions: The BCR-ABL1 rearrangement apparently can cooperate with the NPM1 mutation similar to other class-I-mutations. The identification of Philadelphia positive subclones in <1% of patients with CBF-leukaemias fits well with previous observations that most CBF-AML are accompanied by activating mutations in genes enhancing proliferation. Since we observed the occurrence of the Philadelphia positive subclones at diagnosis, at relapse, or throughout the disease, the time point of the emergence of Philadelphia subclones seems variable in AML. Clinical research should further concentrate on Philadelphia positive subclones in AML to assess the clinical impact. PMID:21275954

  12. Integrating evolutionary and functional approaches to infer adaptation at specific loci.

    PubMed

    Storz, Jay F; Wheat, Christopher W

    2010-09-01

    Inferences about adaptation at specific loci are often exclusively based on the static analysis of DNA sequence variation. Ideally,population-genetic evidence for positive selection serves as a stepping-off point for experimental studies to elucidate the functional significance of the putatively adaptive variation. We argue that inferences about adaptation at specific loci are best achieved by integrating the indirect, retrospective insights provided by population-genetic analyses with the more direct, mechanistic insights provided by functional experiments. Integrative studies of adaptive genetic variation may sometimes be motivated by experimental insights into molecular function, which then provide the impetus to perform population genetic tests to evaluate whether the functional variation is of adaptive significance. In other cases, studies may be initiated by genome scans of DNA variation to identify candidate loci for recent adaptation. Results of such analyses can then motivate experimental efforts to test whether the identified candidate loci do in fact contribute to functional variation in some fitness-related phenotype. Functional studies can provide corroborative evidence for positive selection at particular loci, and can potentially reveal specific molecular mechanisms of adaptation.

  13. Analysis of the features of 45 identified CRISPR loci in 32 Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Siyu; Liu, Jing; Shao, Fuye; Wang, Pengfei; Duan, Guangcai; Yang, Haiyan

    2015-08-28

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a common pathogen that can cause serious infections, even death. Because of the horizontal gene transfer (HGT) of antibiotic resistance genes, the drug resistant condition is becoming increasingly prevalent. Recently, an adaptive immunity system, named clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR), was discovered and demonstrated to confer a defense against foreign invading elements that may carry the antibiotic resistance genes. In this study, we reveal the features of 45 identified CRISPR loci and the CRISPR associated gene (Cas) in 32 S. aureus strains from CRISPR database. Five spacers of S. aureus 08BA02176 and MSHR1132 were homologous with foreign genetic sequences from phages or plasmids, even containing a spacer sequence identical to part of some phages' genomes containing lukPV gene that encodes the PVL toxin. Many S. aureus strains with the same CRISPR type shared the same MLST type. CRISPR loci that had 3 or more similar protein loci mostly belonged to the same CRISPR type. We came to the conclusion that the CRISPR/Cas of strains 08BA02176 and MSHR1132 were inherited from a common ancestor or recombined from Staphylococcus lugdunensis. CRISPR loci can be mobilized and can transfer among different but closely related species, and the same types of MLST strains exhibit a higher affinity to the same types of CRISPR loci. Bacteriophages may be the predominant challenge facing S. aureus. The CRISPR/Cas structure may limit the transmission of bacterial virulence among S. aureus.

  14. Comparative mapping reveals quantitative trait loci that affect spawning time in coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch)

    PubMed Central

    Araneda, Cristian; Díaz, Nelson F.; Gomez, Gilda; López, María Eugenia; Iturra, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Spawning time in salmonids is a sex-limited quantitative trait that can be modified by selection. In rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), various quantitative trait loci (QTL) that affect the expression of this trait have been discovered. In this study, we describe four microsatellite loci associated with two possible spawning time QTL regions in coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch). The four loci were identified in females from two populations (early and late spawners) produced by divergent selection from the same base population. Three of the loci (OmyFGT34TUF, One2ASC and One19ASC) that were strongly associated with spawning time in coho salmon (p < 0.0002) were previously associated with QTL for the same trait in rainbow trout; a fourth loci (Oki10) with a suggestive association (p = 0.00035) mapped 10 cM from locus OmyFGT34TUF in rainbow trout. The changes in allelic frequency observed after three generations of selection were greater than expected because of genetic drift. This work shows that comparing information from closely-related species is a valid strategy for identifying QTLs for marker-assisted selection in species whose genomes are poorly characterized or lack a saturated genetic map. PMID:22888302

  15. Perturbation of energy metabolism by fatty-acid derivative AIC-47 and imatinib in BCR-ABL-harboring leukemic cells.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Haruka; Kumazaki, Minami; Minami, Yosuke; Ito, Yuko; Sugito, Nobuhiko; Kuranaga, Yuki; Taniguchi, Kohei; Yamada, Nami; Otsuki, Yoshinori; Naoe, Tomoki; Akao, Yukihiro

    2016-02-01

    In Ph-positive leukemia, imatinib brought marked clinical improvement; however, further improvement is needed to prevent relapse. Cancer cells efficiently use limited energy sources, and drugs targeting cellular metabolism improve the efficacy of therapy. In this study, we characterized the effects of novel anti-cancer fatty-acid derivative AIC-47 and imatinib, focusing on cancer-specific energy metabolism in chronic myeloid leukemia cells. AIC-47 and imatinib in combination exhibited a significant synergic cytotoxicity. Imatinib inhibited only the phosphorylation of BCR-ABL; whereas AIC-47 suppressed the expression of the protein itself. Both AIC-47 and imatinib modulated the expression of pyruvate kinase M (PKM) isoforms from PKM2 to PKM1 through the down-regulation of polypyrimidine tract-binding protein 1 (PTBP1). PTBP1 functions as alternative splicing repressor of PKM1, resulting in expression of PKM2, which is an inactive form of pyruvate kinase for the last step of glycolysis. Although inactivation of BCR-ABL by imatinib strongly suppressed glycolysis, compensatory fatty-acid oxidation (FAO) activation supported glucose-independent cell survival by up-regulating CPT1C, the rate-limiting FAO enzyme. In contrast, AIC-47 inhibited the expression of CPT1C and directly fatty-acid metabolism. These findings were also observed in the CD34(+) fraction of Ph-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. These results suggest that AIC-47 in combination with imatinib strengthened the attack on cancer energy metabolism, in terms of both glycolysis and compensatory activation of FAO.

  16. Depletion of SAM50 Specifically Targets BCR-ABL-Expressing Leukemic Stem and Progenitor Cells by Interfering with Mitochondrial Functions.

    PubMed

    Capala, Marta E; Pruis, Maurien; Vellenga, Edo; Schuringa, Jan Jacob

    2016-03-01

    A high proliferation rate of malignant cells requires an increased energy production, both by anaerobic glucose metabolism and mitochondrial respiration. Moreover, increased levels of mitochondria-produced reactive oxygen species (ROS) promote survival of transformed cells and contribute to the disease progression both in solid tumors and leukemia. Consequently, interfering with mitochondrial metabolism has been used as a strategy to specifically target leukemic cells. SAM50 is a mitochondrial outer membrane protein involved in the formation of mitochondrial intermembrane space bridging (MIB) complex. Although the importance of SAM50 in maintaining MIB integrity and in the assembly of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes has been described, its specific role in the normal and leukemic hematopoietic cells remains unknown. We observed that human leukemic cells display a specific dependency on SAM50 expression, as downregulation of SAM50 in BCR-ABL-expressing, but not normal CD34(+) human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) caused a significant decrease in growth, colony formation, and replating capacity. Mitochondrial functions of BCR-ABL-expressing HSPCs were compromised, as seen by a decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and respiration. This effect of SAM50 downregulation was recapitulated in normal HSPCs exposed to cytokine-rich culture conditions that stimulate proliferation. Both oncogene-transduced and cytokine-stimulated HSPCs showed increased mitochondrial membrane potential and increased ROS levels compared to their normal counterparts. Therefore, we postulate that human leukemic HSPCs are highly dependent on the proper functioning of mitochondria and that disruption of mitochondrial integrity may aid in targeting leukemic cells. PMID:26855047

  17. Prospective molecular monitoring of BCR/ABL transcript in children with Ph+ acute lymphoblastic leukaemia unravels differences in treatment response.

    PubMed

    Cazzaniga, Giovanni; Lanciotti, Marina; Rossi, Vincenzo; Di Martino, Daniela; Aricò, Maurizio; Valsecchi, Maria Grazia; Basso, Giuseppe; Masera, Giuseppe; Micalizzi, Concetta; Biondi, Andrea

    2002-11-01

    Children with Philadelphia-chromosome-positive (Ph+) acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) represent a subgroup at very high risk for treatment failure, despite intensive chemotherapy. However, recent retrospective studies showed that Ph+ childhood ALL is a heterogeneous disease with regard to treatment response. We have prospectively monitored, by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) during follow-up, the presence of the BCR/ABL fusion transcript in Ph+ ALL children diagnosed in the Italian multicentre Associazione Italiana Ematologia Oncologia Pediatrica ALL-AIEOP-95 therapy protocol. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the evaluation of minimal residual disease (MRD) in childhood Ph+ ALL prospectively enrolled in an intensive, Berlin-Frankfurt-Munster (BFM)-type treatment protocol. Twenty-seven of 36 (75.0%) Ph+ patients consecutively enrolled into the high-risk group of the AIEOP-ALL protocol between May 1995 and October 1999 were successfully analysed. Twenty were good responders to the pre-phase of prednisone/intrathecal methotrexate treatment (PGR) and seven were poor responders (PPR). Within the PPR group, the RT-PCR monitoring constantly showed positivity for the BCR/ABL fusion transcript and all the patients died of disease progression. In contrast, highly sensitive qualitative RT-PCR monitoring revealed heterogeneity within the PGR group of Ph+ childhood ALL patients. Three different subgroups could be defined, according to the clearance of Ph+ cells within the first 5 months of treatment. This provides useful information on the capability of chemotherapy to reduce the leukaemic clone, with prognostic implications.

  18. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci for the endangered wetland plant Adenophora palustris (Campanulaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Otake, Kuniaki; Kondo, Toshiaki; Watanabe, Sonoko; Masumoto, Ikuko; Iwahori, Katsumi; Isagi, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Adenophora palustris (Campanulaceae) is an endangered wetland plant species in Japan. Although it is widely distributed in East Asia, only six extant populations are known in Japan, with fewer than 1000 individuals in total. We developed 15 microsatellite markers for this species and confirmed their utility for the closely related species A. triphylla var. japonica. Methods and Results: Ten polymorphic loci were characterized for genetic variation within three populations of A. palustris. The number of alleles per locus ranged from four to 15, with an average of 9.3; the expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.48 to 0.89, with an average of 0.74. Nine loci were successfully amplified in A. triphylla var. japonica, and three of these loci showed polymorphism. Conclusions: These markers are useful for investigating genetic diversity and gene flow within and among remnant populations of A. palustris in Japan, and the results will provide crucial information for conservation. PMID:27672523

  19. Novel loci affecting iron homeostasis and their effects in individuals at risk for hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Benyamin, Beben; Esko, Tonu; Ried, Janina S; Radhakrishnan, Aparna; Vermeulen, Sita H; Traglia, Michela; Gögele, Martin; Anderson, Denise; Broer, Linda; Podmore, Clara; Luan, Jian'an; Kutalik, Zoltan; Sanna, Serena; van der Meer, Peter; Tanaka, Toshiko; Wang, Fudi; Westra, Harm-Jan; Franke, Lude; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Hälldin, Jonas; Häldin, Jonas; Winkelmann, Juliane; Meitinger, Thomas; Thiery, Joachim; Peters, Annette; Waldenberger, Melanie; Rendon, Augusto; Jolley, Jennifer; Sambrook, Jennifer; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Sweep, Fred C; Sala, Cinzia F; Schwienbacher, Christine; Pichler, Irene; Hui, Jennie; Demirkan, Ayse; Isaacs, Aaron; Amin, Najaf; Steri, Maristella; Waeber, Gérard; Verweij, Niek; Powell, Joseph E; Nyholt, Dale R; Heath, Andrew C; Madden, Pamela A F; Visscher, Peter M; Wright, Margaret J; Montgomery, Grant W; Martin, Nicholas G; Hernandez, Dena; Bandinelli, Stefania; van der Harst, Pim; Uda, Manuela; Vollenweider, Peter; Scott, Robert A; Langenberg, Claudia; Wareham, Nicholas J; van Duijn, Cornelia; Beilby, John; Pramstaller, Peter P; Hicks, Andrew A; Ouwehand, Willem H; Oexle, Konrad; Gieger, Christian; Metspalu, Andres; Camaschella, Clara; Toniolo, Daniela; Swinkels, Dorine W; Whitfield, John B

    2014-01-01

    Variation in body iron is associated with or causes diseases, including anaemia and iron overload. Here, we analyse genetic association data on biochemical markers of iron status from 11 European-population studies, with replication in eight additional cohorts (total up to 48,972 subjects). We find 11 genome-wide-significant (P<5 × 10(-8)) loci, some including known iron-related genes (HFE, SLC40A1, TF, TFR2, TFRC, TMPRSS6) and others novel (ABO, ARNTL, FADS2, NAT2, TEX14). SNPs at ARNTL, TF, and TFR2 affect iron markers in HFE C282Y homozygotes at risk for hemochromatosis. There is substantial overlap between our iron loci and loci affecting erythrocyte and lipid phenotypes. These results will facilitate investigation of the roles of iron in disease. PMID:25352340

  20. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci for the endangered wetland plant Adenophora palustris (Campanulaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Otake, Kuniaki; Kondo, Toshiaki; Watanabe, Sonoko; Masumoto, Ikuko; Iwahori, Katsumi; Isagi, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Adenophora palustris (Campanulaceae) is an endangered wetland plant species in Japan. Although it is widely distributed in East Asia, only six extant populations are known in Japan, with fewer than 1000 individuals in total. We developed 15 microsatellite markers for this species and confirmed their utility for the closely related species A. triphylla var. japonica. Methods and Results: Ten polymorphic loci were characterized for genetic variation within three populations of A. palustris. The number of alleles per locus ranged from four to 15, with an average of 9.3; the expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.48 to 0.89, with an average of 0.74. Nine loci were successfully amplified in A. triphylla var. japonica, and three of these loci showed polymorphism. Conclusions: These markers are useful for investigating genetic diversity and gene flow within and among remnant populations of A. palustris in Japan, and the results will provide crucial information for conservation.

  1. Meta-analysis identifies six new susceptibility loci for atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Ellinor, Patrick T; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Albert, Christine M; Glazer, Nicole L; Ritchie, Marylyn D; Smith, Albert V; Arking, Dan E; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Krijthe, Bouwe P; Lubitz, Steven A; Bis, Joshua C; Chung, Mina K; Dörr, Marcus; Ozaki, Kouichi; Roberts, Jason D; Smith, J Gustav; Pfeufer, Arne; Sinner, Moritz F; Lohman, Kurt; Ding, Jingzhong; Smith, Nicholas L; Smith, Jonathan D; Rienstra, Michiel; Rice, Kenneth M; Van Wagoner, David R; Magnani, Jared W; Wakili, Reza; Clauss, Sebastian; Rotter, Jerome I; Steinbeck, Gerhard; Launer, Lenore J; Davies, Robert W; Borkovich, Matthew; Harris, Tamara B; Lin, Honghuang; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Milan, David J; Hofman, Albert; Boerwinkle, Eric; Chen, Lin Y; Soliman, Elsayed Z; Voight, Benjamin F; Li, Guo; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Kubo, Michiaki; Tedrow, Usha B; Rose, Lynda M; Ridker, Paul M; Conen, David; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Furukawa, Tetsushi; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Xu, Siyan; Kamatani, Naoyuki; Levy, Daniel; Nakamura, Yusuke; Parvez, Babar; Mahida, Saagar; Furie, Karen L; Rosand, Jonathan; Muhammad, Raafia; Psaty, Bruce M; Meitinger, Thomas; Perz, Siegfried; Wichmann, H-Erich; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Kao, W H Linda; Kathiresan, Sekar; Roden, Dan M; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Rivadeneira, Fernando; McKnight, Barbara; Sjögren, Marketa; Newman, Anne B; Liu, Yongmei; Gollob, Michael H; Melander, Olle; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Ch Stricker, Bruno H; Felix, Stephan B; Alonso, Alvaro; Darbar, Dawood; Barnard, John; Chasman, Daniel I; Heckbert, Susan R; Benjamin, Emelia J; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Kääb, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is a highly prevalent arrhythmia and a major risk factor for stroke, heart failure and death1. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in individuals of European ancestry, including 6,707 with and 52,426 without atrial fibrillation. Six new atrial fibrillation susceptibility loci were identified and replicated in an additional sample of individuals of European ancestry, including 5,381 subjects with and 1 0,030 subjects without atrial fibrillation (P < 5 × 10−8). Four of the loci identified in Europeans were further replicated in silico in a GWAS of Japanese individuals, including 843 individuals with and 3,350 individuals without atrial fibrillation. The identified loci implicate candidate genes that encode transcription factors related to cardiopulmonary development, cardiac-expressed ion channels and cell signaling molecules. PMID:22544366

  2. Novel loci affecting iron homeostasis and their effects in individuals at risk for hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Benyamin, Beben; Esko, Tonu; Ried, Janina S; Radhakrishnan, Aparna; Vermeulen, Sita H; Traglia, Michela; Gögele, Martin; Anderson, Denise; Broer, Linda; Podmore, Clara; Luan, Jian'an; Kutalik, Zoltan; Sanna, Serena; van der Meer, Peter; Tanaka, Toshiko; Wang, Fudi; Westra, Harm-Jan; Franke, Lude; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Hälldin, Jonas; Häldin, Jonas; Winkelmann, Juliane; Meitinger, Thomas; Thiery, Joachim; Peters, Annette; Waldenberger, Melanie; Rendon, Augusto; Jolley, Jennifer; Sambrook, Jennifer; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Sweep, Fred C; Sala, Cinzia F; Schwienbacher, Christine; Pichler, Irene; Hui, Jennie; Demirkan, Ayse; Isaacs, Aaron; Amin, Najaf; Steri, Maristella; Waeber, Gérard; Verweij, Niek; Powell, Joseph E; Nyholt, Dale R; Heath, Andrew C; Madden, Pamela A F; Visscher, Peter M; Wright, Margaret J; Montgomery, Grant W; Martin, Nicholas G; Hernandez, Dena; Bandinelli, Stefania; van der Harst, Pim; Uda, Manuela; Vollenweider, Peter; Scott, Robert A; Langenberg, Claudia; Wareham, Nicholas J; van Duijn, Cornelia; Beilby, John; Pramstaller, Peter P; Hicks, Andrew A; Ouwehand, Willem H; Oexle, Konrad; Gieger, Christian; Metspalu, Andres; Camaschella, Clara; Toniolo, Daniela; Swinkels, Dorine W; Whitfield, John B

    2014-10-29

    Variation in body iron is associated with or causes diseases, including anaemia and iron overload. Here, we analyse genetic association data on biochemical markers of iron status from 11 European-population studies, with replication in eight additional cohorts (total up to 48,972 subjects). We find 11 genome-wide-significant (P<5 × 10(-8)) loci, some including known iron-related genes (HFE, SLC40A1, TF, TFR2, TFRC, TMPRSS6) and others novel (ABO, ARNTL, FADS2, NAT2, TEX14). SNPs at ARNTL, TF, and TFR2 affect iron markers in HFE C282Y homozygotes at risk for hemochromatosis. There is substantial overlap between our iron loci and loci affecting erythrocyte and lipid phenotypes. These results will facilitate investigation of the roles of iron in disease.

  3. Expression quantitative trait loci: present and future

    PubMed Central

    Nica, Alexandra C.; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.

    2013-01-01

    The last few years have seen the development of large efforts for the analysis of genome function, especially in the context of genome variation. One of the most prominent directions has been the extensive set of studies on expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs), namely, the discovery of genetic variants that explain variation in gene expression levels. Such studies have offered promise not just for the characterization of functional sequence variation but also for the understanding of basic processes of gene regulation and interpretation of genome-wide association studies. In this review, we discuss some of the key directions of eQTL research and its implications. PMID:23650636

  4. The contribution of quantitative trait loci and neutral marker loci to the genetic variances and covariances among quantitative traits in random mating populations

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz, A.; Barbadilla, A.

    1995-01-01

    Using Cockerham`s approach of orthogonal scales, we develop genetic models for the effect of an arbitrary number of multiallelic quantitative trait loci (QTLs) or neutral marker loci (NMLs) upon any number of quantitative traits. These models allow the unbiased estimation of the contributions of a set of marker loci to the additive and dominance variances and covariances among traits in a random mating population. The method has been applied to an analysis of allozyme and quantitative data from the European oyster. The contribution of a set of marker loci may either be real, when the markers are actually QTLs, or apparent, when they are NMLs that are in linkage disequilibrium with hidden QTLs. Our results show that the additive and dominance variances contributed by a set of NMLs are always minimum estimates of the corresponding variances contributed by the associated QTLs. In contrast, the apparent contribution of the NMLs to the additive and dominance covariances between two traits may be larger than, equal to or lower than the actual contributions of the QTLs. We also derive an expression for the expected variance explained by the correlation between a quantitative trait and multilocus heterozygosity. This correlation explains only a part of the genetic variance contributed by the markers, i.e., in general, a combination of additive and dominance variances and, thus, provides only very limited information relative to the method supplied here. 94 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Genetic control of gene expression at novel and established chronic obstructive pulmonary disease loci

    PubMed Central

    Castaldi, Peter J.; Cho, Michael H.; Zhou, Xiaobo; Qiu, Weiliang; Mcgeachie, Michael; Celli, Bartolome; Bakke, Per; Gulsvik, Amund; Lomas, David A.; Crapo, James D.; Beaty, Terri H.; Rennard, Stephen; Harshfield, Benjamin; Lange, Christoph; Singh, Dave; Tal-Singer, Ruth; Riley, John H.; Quackenbush, John; Raby, Benjamin A.; Carey, Vincent J.; Silverman, Edwin K.; Hersh, Craig P.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic risk loci have been identified for a wide range of diseases through genome-wide association studies (GWAS), but the relevant functional mechanisms have been identified for only a small proportion of these GWAS-identified loci. By integrating results from the largest current GWAS of chronic obstructive disease (COPD) with expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) analysis in whole blood and sputum from 121 subjects with COPD from the ECLIPSE Study, this analysis identifies loci that are simultaneously associated with COPD and the expression of nearby genes (COPD eQTLs). After integrative analysis, 19 COPD eQTLs were identified, including all four previously identified genome-wide significant loci near HHIP, FAM13A, and the 15q25 and 19q13 loci. For each COPD eQTL, fine mapping and colocalization analysis to identify causal shared eQTL and GWAS variants identified a subset of sites with moderate-to-strong evidence of harboring at least one shared variant responsible for both the eQTL and GWAS signals. Transcription factor binding site (TFBS) analysis confirms that multiple COPD eQTL lead SNPs disrupt TFBS, and enhancer enrichment analysis for loci with the strongest colocalization signals showed enrichment for blood-related cell types (CD3 and CD4+ T cells, lymphoblastoid cell lines). In summary, integrative eQTL and GWAS analysis confirms that genetic control of gene expression plays a key role in the genetic architecture of COPD and identifies specific blood-related cell types as likely participants in the functional pathway from GWAS-associated variant to disease phenotype. PMID:25315895

  6. Mapping quantitative trait loci for plant adaptation and morphology traits in wheat using single nucleotide polymorphisms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) morphological and adaptation-related traits that are controlled by quantitative traits loci (QTL) define potential growing areas of a wheat cultivar. To dissect the QTL for heading date (HD), lodging resistance (LR), shattering resistance (SR), cold tolerance (CT), plant...

  7. Mapping of hybrid incompatibility loci in Nasonia.

    PubMed Central

    Gadau, J; Page, R E; Werren, J H

    1999-01-01

    According to theory, F(2) hybrid breakdown (lethality or sterility) is due to incompatibilities between interacting genes of the different species (i.e., the breaking up of coadapted gene complexes). Detection of such incompatibilities is particularly straightforward in haplodiploid species, because virgin F(1) hybrid females will produce haploid recombinant F(2) males. This feature allows for screening of the complete genome for recessive genetic incompatibilities. Crosses were performed between Nasonia vitripennis (v) and its sibling species N. giraulti (g). First, a linkage map was produced using RAPD markers. RAPD markers showed an overall bias toward vitripennis alleles, a pattern not predicted by the basic two-interactor Dobzhansky-Muller model. Recovery patterns of visible markers were consistent with those of linked RAPD markers. If particular genetic interactions between two loci are causing hybrid lethality, then those genotypes should be underrepresented or absent among adult F(2) males. Four sets of significant incompatibilities were detected by performing pairwise comparisons of markers on different chromosomes. Likely explanations for the observed patterns are maternal effect-zygotic gene incompatibilities or clustering of incompatibility loci. Due to the short generation time, advantages of haplodiploidy, and availability of markers, Nasonia promises to be a productive system for investigating the genetics of hybrid inviability. PMID:10581280

  8. Meta-analyses identify 13 novel loci associated with age at menopause and highlights DNA repair and immune pathways

    PubMed Central

    Stolk, Lisette; Perry, John RB; Chasman, Daniel I; He, Chunyan; Mangino, Massimo; Sulem, Patrick; Barbalic, Maja; Broer, Linda; Byrne, Enda M; Ernst, Florian; Esko, Tõnu; Franceschini, Nora; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Kraft, Peter; McArdle, Patick F; Porcu, Eleonora; Shin, So-Youn; Smith, Albert V; van Wingerden, Sophie; Zhai, Guangju; Zhuang, Wei V; Albrecht, Eva; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Aspelund, Thor; Bandinelli, Stefania; Lauc, Lovorka Barac; Beckmann, Jacques S; Boban, Mladen; Boerwinkle, Eric; Broekmans, Frank J; Burri, Andrea; Campbell, Harry; Chanock, Stephen J; Chen, Constance; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Corre, Tanguy; Coviello, Andrea D; d’Adamo, Pio; Davies, Gail; de Faire, Ulf; de Geus, Eco JC; Deary, Ian J; Dedoussis, George VZ; Deloukas, Panagiotis; Ebrahim, Shah; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Emilsson, Valur; Eriksson, Johan G; Fauser, Bart CJM; Ferreli, Liana; Ferrucci, Luigi; Fischer, Krista; Folsom, Aaron R; Garcia, Melissa E; Gasparini, Paolo; Gieger, Christian; Glazer, Nicole; Grobbee, Diederick E; Hall, Per; Haller, Toomas; Hankinson, Susan E; Hass, Merli; Hayward, Caroline; Heath, Andrew C; Hofman, Albert; Ingelsson, Erik; Janssens, A Cecile JW; Johnson, Andrew D; Karasik, David; Kardia, Sharon LR; Keyzer, Jules; Kiel, Douglas P; Kolcic, Ivana; Kutalik, Zoltán; Lahti, Jari; Lai, Sandra; Laisk, Triin; Laven, Joop SE; Lawlor, Debbie A; Liu, Jianjun; Lopez, Lorna M; Louwers, Yvonne V; Magnusson, Patrik KE; Marongiu, Mara; Martin, Nicholas G; Klaric, Irena Martinovic; Masciullo, Corrado; McKnight, Barbara; Medland, Sarah E; Melzer, David; Mooser, Vincent; Navarro, Pau; Newman, Anne B; Nyholt, Dale R; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Palotie, Aarno; Paré, Guillaume; Parker, Alex N; Pedersen, Nancy L; Peeters, Petra HM; Pistis, Giorgio; Plump, Andrew S; Polasek, Ozren; Pop, Victor JM; Psaty, Bruce M; Räikkönen, Katri; Rehnberg, Emil; Rotter, Jerome I; Rudan, Igor; Sala, Cinzia; Salumets, Andres; Scuteri, Angelo; Singleton, Andrew; Smith, Jennifer A; Snieder, Harold; Soranzo, Nicole; Stacey, Simon N; Starr, John M; Stathopoulou, Maria G; Stirrups, Kathleen; Stolk, Ronald P; Styrkarsdottir, Unnur; Sun, Yan V; Tenesa, Albert; Thorand, Barbara; Toniolo, Daniela; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Tsui, Kim; Ulivi, Sheila; van Dam, Rob M; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; van Gils, Carla H; van Nierop, Peter; Vink, Jacqueline M; Visscher, Peter M; Voorhuis, Marlies; Waeber, Gérard; Wallaschofski, Henri; Wichmann, H Erich; Widen, Elisabeth; Gent, Colette JM Wijnands-van; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilson, James F; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce HR; Wright, Alan F; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Zemunik, Tatijana; Zgaga, Lina; Zillikens, M. Carola; Zygmunt, Marek; Arnold, Alice M; Boomsma, Dorret I; Buring, Julie E.; Crisponi, Laura; Demerath, Ellen W; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Harris, Tamara B; Hu, Frank B; Hunter, David J; Launer, Lenore J; Metspalu, Andres; Montgomery, Grant W; Oostra, Ben A; Ridker, Paul M; Sanna, Serena; Schlessinger, David; Spector, Tim D; Stefansson, Kari; Streeten, Elizabeth A; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Uda, Manuela; Uitterlinden, André G; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Völzke, Henry; Murray, Anna; Murabito, Joanne M; Visser, Jenny A; Lunetta, Kathryn L

    2011-01-01

    To identify novel loci for age at natural menopause, we performed a meta-analysis of 22 genome-wide association studies in 38,968 women of European descent, with replication in up to 14,435 women. In addition to four known loci, we identified 13 new age at natural menopause loci (P < 5 × 10−8). The new loci included genes implicated in DNA repair (EXO1, HELQ, UIMC1, FAM175A, FANCI, TLK1, POLG, PRIM1) and immune function (IL11, NLRP11, BAT2). Gene-set enrichment pathway analyses using the full GWAS dataset identified exodeoxyribonuclease, NFκB signalling and mitochondrial dysfunction as biological processes related to timing of menopause. PMID:22267201

  9. In Vitro Recombinants of Antibiotic-Resistant Chlamydia trachomatis Strains Have Statistically More Breakpoints than Clinical Recombinants for the Same Sequenced Loci and Exhibit Selection at Unexpected Loci

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Tara; Bruno, William J.; Wan, Raymond; Yen, Albert; Duong, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Lateral gene transfer (LGT) is essential for generating between-strain genomic recombinants of Chlamydia trachomatis to facilitate the organism's evolution. Because there is no reliable laboratory-based gene transfer system for C. trachomatis, in vitro generation of recombinants from antibiotic-resistant strains is being used to study LGT. However, selection pressures imposed on in vitro recombinants likely affect statistical properties of recombination relative to naturally occurring clinical recombinants, including prevalence at particular loci. We examined multiple loci for 16 in vitro-derived recombinants of ofloxacin- and rifampin-resistant L1 and D strains, respectively, grown with both antibiotics, and compared these with the same sequenced loci among 11 clinical recombinants. Breakpoints and recombination frequency were examined using phylogenetics, bioinformatics, and statistics. In vitro and clinical isolates clustered perfectly into two groups, without misclassification, using Ward's minimum variance based on breakpoint data. As expected, gyrA (confers ofloxacin resistance) and rpoB (confers rifampin resistance) had significantly more breakpoints among in vitro recombinants than among clinical recombinants (P < 0.0001 and P = 0.02, respectively, using the Wilcoxon rank sum test). Unexpectedly, trpA also had significantly more breakpoints for in vitro recombinants (P < 0.0001). There was also significant selection at other loci. The strongest bias was for ompA in strain D (P = 3.3 × 10−8). Our results indicate that the in vitro model differs statistically from natural recombination events. Additional genomic studies are needed to determine the factors responsible for the observed selection biases at unexpected loci and whether these are important for LGT to inform approaches for genetically manipulating C. trachomatis. PMID:22123249

  10. MicroRNA-1301-Mediated RanGAP1 Downregulation Induces BCR-ABL Nuclear Entrapment to Enhance Imatinib Efficacy in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tsung-Yao; Chen, Ku-Chung; Liu, Hsing-Jin Eugene; Liu, Ann-Jeng; Wang, Kun-Li; Shih, Chwen-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative disease. Imatinib (IM), the first line treatment for CML, is excessively expensive and induces various side effects in CML patients. Therefore, it is essential to investigate a new strategy for improving CML therapy. Our immunoblot data revealed that RanGTPase activating protein 1 (RanGAP1) protein levels increased by approximately 30-fold in K562 cells compared with those in normal cells. RanGAP1 is one of the important components of RanGTPase system, which regulates the export of nuclear protein. However, whether RanGAP1 level variation influences BCR-ABL nuclear export is still unknown. In this report, using shRNA to downregulate RanGAP1 expression level augmented K562 cell apoptosis by approximately 40% after treatment with 250 nM IM. Immunofluorescence assay also indicated that three-fold of nuclear BCR-ABL was detected. These data suggest that BCR-ABL nuclear entrapment induced by RanGAP1 downregulation can be used to improve IM efficacy. Moreover, our qRT-PCR data indicated a trend of inverse correlation between the RanGAP1 and microRNA (miR)-1301 levels in CML patients. MiR-1301, targeting the RanGAP1 3' untranslated region, decreased by approximately 100-fold in K562 cells compared with that in normal cells. RanGAP1 downregulation by miR-1301 transfection impairs BCR-ABL nuclear export to increase approximately 60% of cell death after treatment of 250 nM IM. This result was almost the same as treatment with 1000 nM IM alone. Furthermore, immunofluorescence assay demonstrated that Tyr-99 of nuclear P73 was phosphorylated accompanied with nuclear entrapment of BCR-ABL after transfection with RanGAP1 shRNA or miR-1301 in IM-treated K562 cells. Altogether, we demonstrated that RanGAP1 downregulation can mediate BCR-ABL nuclear entrapment to activate P73-dependent apoptosis pathway which is a novel strategy for improving current IM treatment for CML. PMID:27228340

  11. MicroRNA-1301-Mediated RanGAP1 Downregulation Induces BCR-ABL Nuclear Entrapment to Enhance Imatinib Efficacy in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tsung-Yao; Chen, Ku-Chung; Liu, Hsing-Jin Eugene; Liu, Ann-Jeng; Wang, Kun-Li; Shih, Chwen-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative disease. Imatinib (IM), the first line treatment for CML, is excessively expensive and induces various side effects in CML patients. Therefore, it is essential to investigate a new strategy for improving CML therapy. Our immunoblot data revealed that RanGTPase activating protein 1 (RanGAP1) protein levels increased by approximately 30-fold in K562 cells compared with those in normal cells. RanGAP1 is one of the important components of RanGTPase system, which regulates the export of nuclear protein. However, whether RanGAP1 level variation influences BCR-ABL nuclear export is still unknown. In this report, using shRNA to downregulate RanGAP1 expression level augmented K562 cell apoptosis by approximately 40% after treatment with 250 nM IM. Immunofluorescence assay also indicated that three-fold of nuclear BCR-ABL was detected. These data suggest that BCR-ABL nuclear entrapment induced by RanGAP1 downregulation can be used to improve IM efficacy. Moreover, our qRT-PCR data indicated a trend of inverse correlation between the RanGAP1 and microRNA (miR)-1301 levels in CML patients. MiR-1301, targeting the RanGAP1 3′ untranslated region, decreased by approximately 100-fold in K562 cells compared with that in normal cells. RanGAP1 downregulation by miR-1301 transfection impairs BCR-ABL nuclear export to increase approximately 60% of cell death after treatment of 250 nM IM. This result was almost the same as treatment with 1000 nM IM alone. Furthermore, immunofluorescence assay demonstrated that Tyr-99 of nuclear P73 was phosphorylated accompanied with nuclear entrapment of BCR-ABL after transfection with RanGAP1 shRNA or miR-1301 in IM-treated K562 cells. Altogether, we demonstrated that RanGAP1 downregulation can mediate BCR-ABL nuclear entrapment to activate P73-dependent apoptosis pathway which is a novel strategy for improving current IM treatment for CML. PMID:27228340

  12. A taxonomy of bacterial microcompartment loci constructed by a novel scoring method

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Axen, Seth D.; Erbilgin, Onur; Kerfeld, Cheryl A.; Tanaka, Mark M.

    2014-10-23

    Bacterial microcompartments (BMCs) are proteinaceous organelles involved in both autotrophic and heterotrophic metabolism. All BMCs share homologous shell proteins but differ in their complement of enzymes; these are typically encoded adjacent to shell protein genes in genetic loci, or operons. To enable the identification and prediction of functional (sub)types of BMCs, we developed LoClass, an algorithm that finds putative BMC loci and inventories, weights, and compares their constituent pfam domains to construct a locus similarity network and predict locus (sub)types. In addition to using LoClass to analyze sequences in the Non-redundant Protein Database, we compared predicted BMC loci found inmore » seven candidate bacterial phyla (six from single-cell genomic studies) to the LoClass taxonomy. Together, these analyses resulted in the identification of 23 different types of BMCs encoded in 30 distinct locus (sub)types found in 23 bacterial phyla. These include the two carboxysome types and a divergent set of metabolosomes, BMCs that share a common catalytic core and process distinct substrates via specific signature enzymes. Furthermore, many Candidate BMCs were found that lack one or more core metabolosome components, including one that is predicted to represent an entirely new paradigm for BMC-associated metabolism, joining the carboxysome and metabolosome. By placing these results in a phylogenetic context, we provide a framework for understanding the horizontal transfer of these loci, a starting point for studies aimed at understanding the evolution of BMCs. This comprehensive taxonomy of BMC loci, based on their constituent protein domains, foregrounds the functional diversity of BMCs and provides a reference for interpreting the role of BMC gene clusters encoded in isolate, single cell, and metagenomic data. Many loci encode ancillary functions such as transporters or genes for cofactor assembly; this expanded vocabulary of BMC-related functions should

  13. Genome-wide association analysis identifies three new susceptibility loci for childhood body mass index.

    PubMed

    Felix, Janine F; Bradfield, Jonathan P; Monnereau, Claire; van der Valk, Ralf J P; Stergiakouli, Evie; Chesi, Alessandra; Gaillard, Romy; Feenstra, Bjarke; Thiering, Elisabeth; Kreiner-Møller, Eskil; Mahajan, Anubha; Pitkänen, Niina; Joro, Raimo; Cavadino, Alana; Huikari, Ville; Franks, Steve; Groen-Blokhuis, Maria M; Cousminer, Diana L; Marsh, Julie A; Lehtimäki, Terho; Curtin, John A; Vioque, Jesus; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S; Myhre, Ronny; Price, Thomas S; Vilor-Tejedor, Natalia; Yengo, Loïc; Grarup, Niels; Ntalla, Ioanna; Ang, Wei; Atalay, Mustafa; Bisgaard, Hans; Blakemore, Alexandra I; Bonnefond, Amelie; Carstensen, Lisbeth; Eriksson, Johan; Flexeder, Claudia; Franke, Lude; Geller, Frank; Geserick, Mandy; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Haworth, Claire M A; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Hofman, Albert; Holm, Jens-Christian; Horikoshi, Momoko; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Huang, Jinyan; Kadarmideen, Haja N; Kähönen, Mika; Kiess, Wieland; Lakka, Hanna-Maaria; Lakka, Timo A; Lewin, Alexandra M; Liang, Liming; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Ma, Baoshan; Magnus, Per; McCormack, Shana E; McMahon, George; Mentch, Frank D; Middeldorp, Christel M; Murray, Clare S; Pahkala, Katja; Pers, Tune H; Pfäffle, Roland; Postma, Dirkje S; Power, Christine; Simpson, Angela; Sengpiel, Verena; Tiesler, Carla M T; Torrent, Maties; Uitterlinden, André G; van Meurs, Joyce B; Vinding, Rebecca; Waage, Johannes; Wardle, Jane; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Zemel, Babette S; Dedoussis, George V; Pedersen, Oluf; Froguel, Philippe; Sunyer, Jordi; Plomin, Robert; Jacobsson, Bo; Hansen, Torben; Gonzalez, Juan R; Custovic, Adnan; Raitakari, Olli T; Pennell, Craig E; Widén, Elisabeth; Boomsma, Dorret I; Koppelman, Gerard H; Sebert, Sylvain; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Hyppönen, Elina; McCarthy, Mark I; Lindi, Virpi; Harri, Niinikoski; Körner, Antje; Bønnelykke, Klaus; Heinrich, Joachim; Melbye, Mads; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hakonarson, Hakon; Ring, Susan M; Smith, George Davey; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Timpson, Nicholas J; Grant, Struan F A; Jaddoe, Vincent W V

    2016-01-15

    A large number of genetic loci are associated with adult body mass index. However, the genetics of childhood body mass index are largely unknown. We performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of childhood body mass index, using sex- and age-adjusted standard deviation scores. We included 35 668 children from 20 studies in the discovery phase and 11 873 children from 13 studies in the replication phase. In total, 15 loci reached genome-wide significance (P-value < 5 × 10(-8)) in the joint discovery and replication analysis, of which 12 are previously identified loci in or close to ADCY3, GNPDA2, TMEM18, SEC16B, FAIM2, FTO, TFAP2B, TNNI3K, MC4R, GPR61, LMX1B and OLFM4 associated with adult body mass index or childhood obesity. We identified three novel loci: rs13253111 near ELP3, rs8092503 near RAB27B and rs13387838 near ADAM23. Per additional risk allele, body mass index increased 0.04 Standard Deviation Score (SDS) [Standard Error (SE) 0.007], 0.05 SDS (SE 0.008) and 0.14 SDS (SE 0.025), for rs13253111, rs8092503 and rs13387838, respectively. A genetic risk score combining all 15 SNPs showed that each additional average risk allele was associated with a 0.073 SDS (SE 0.011, P-value = 3.12 × 10(-10)) increase in childhood body mass index in a population of 1955 children. This risk score explained 2% of the variance in childhood body mass index. This study highlights the shared genetic background between childhood and adult body mass index and adds three novel loci. These loci likely represent age-related differences in strength of the associations with body mass index.

  14. A Taxonomy of Bacterial Microcompartment Loci Constructed by a Novel Scoring Method

    PubMed Central

    Kerfeld, Cheryl A.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial microcompartments (BMCs) are proteinaceous organelles involved in both autotrophic and heterotrophic metabolism. All BMCs share homologous shell proteins but differ in their complement of enzymes; these are typically encoded adjacent to shell protein genes in genetic loci, or operons. To enable the identification and prediction of functional (sub)types of BMCs, we developed LoClass, an algorithm that finds putative BMC loci and inventories, weights, and compares their constituent pfam domains to construct a locus similarity network and predict locus (sub)types. In addition to using LoClass to analyze sequences in the Non-redundant Protein Database, we compared predicted BMC loci found in seven candidate bacterial phyla (six from single-cell genomic studies) to the LoClass taxonomy. Together, these analyses resulted in the identification of 23 different types of BMCs encoded in 30 distinct locus (sub)types found in 23 bacterial phyla. These include the two carboxysome types and a divergent set of metabolosomes, BMCs that share a common catalytic core and process distinct substrates via specific signature enzymes. Furthermore, many Candidate BMCs were found that lack one or more core metabolosome components, including one that is predicted to represent an entirely new paradigm for BMC-associated metabolism, joining the carboxysome and metabolosome. By placing these results in a phylogenetic context, we provide a framework for understanding the horizontal transfer of these loci, a starting point for studies aimed at understanding the evolution of BMCs. This comprehensive taxonomy of BMC loci, based on their constituent protein domains, foregrounds the functional diversity of BMCs and provides a reference for interpreting the role of BMC gene clusters encoded in isolate, single cell, and metagenomic data. Many loci encode ancillary functions such as transporters or genes for cofactor assembly; this expanded vocabulary of BMC-related functions should be useful

  15. A taxonomy of bacterial microcompartment loci constructed by a novel scoring method

    SciTech Connect

    Axen, Seth D.; Erbilgin, Onur; Kerfeld, Cheryl A.; Tanaka, Mark M.

    2014-10-23

    Bacterial microcompartments (BMCs) are proteinaceous organelles involved in both autotrophic and heterotrophic metabolism. All BMCs share homologous shell proteins but differ in their complement of enzymes; these are typically encoded adjacent to shell protein genes in genetic loci, or operons. To enable the identification and prediction of functional (sub)types of BMCs, we developed LoClass, an algorithm that finds putative BMC loci and inventories, weights, and compares their constituent pfam domains to construct a locus similarity network and predict locus (sub)types. In addition to using LoClass to analyze sequences in the Non-redundant Protein Database, we compared predicted BMC loci found in seven candidate bacterial phyla (six from single-cell genomic studies) to the LoClass taxonomy. Together, these analyses resulted in the identification of 23 different types of BMCs encoded in 30 distinct locus (sub)types found in 23 bacterial phyla. These include the two carboxysome types and a divergent set of metabolosomes, BMCs that share a common catalytic core and process distinct substrates via specific signature enzymes. Furthermore, many Candidate BMCs were found that lack one or more core metabolosome components, including one that is predicted to represent an entirely new paradigm for BMC-associated metabolism, joining the carboxysome and metabolosome. By placing these results in a phylogenetic context, we provide a framework for understanding the horizontal transfer of these loci, a starting point for studies aimed at understanding the evolution of BMCs. This comprehensive taxonomy of BMC loci, based on their constituent protein domains, foregrounds the functional diversity of BMCs and provides a reference for interpreting the role of BMC gene clusters encoded in isolate, single cell, and metagenomic data. Many loci encode ancillary functions such as transporters or genes for cofactor assembly; this expanded vocabulary of BMC-related functions should be useful

  16. Tetranucleotide microsatellite loci from the black bear (Ursus americanus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanderlin, J.S.; Faircloth, B.C.; Shamblin, B.; Conroy, M.J.

    2009-01-01

    We describe primers and polymerase chain reaction conditions to amplify 21 tetranucleotide microsatellite DNA loci in black bears (Ursus americanus). We tested primers using individuals from two populations, one each in Georgia and Florida. Among individuals from Georgia (n = 29), primer pairs yielded an average of 2.9 alleles (range, one to four) and an average observed heterozygosity (HO) of 0.50 (range, 0.00 to 0.79). Among individuals from Florida (n = 19), primer pairs yielded an average of 5.7 alleles (range, one to 14) and an HO of 0.55 (range, 0.00 to 1.00). A comparison of previously developed markers with individuals from Georgia suggests that bear populations in Georgia and Florida have reduced allelic diversity relative to other populations. ?? 2008 The Authors.

  17. Complex germline architecture: two genes intertwined on two loci.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Shiuhyang; Chang, Wei-Jen; Landweber, Laura F

    2006-01-01

    The germline micronuclear genome of some ciliated protists can be scrambled, with coding segments disordered relative to the expressed macronuclear genome. Here, we report a surprisingly complex pair of genes that assemble from interwoven segments on two germline loci in the ciliate Uroleptus. This baroque organization requires two scrambled genes to be disentangled from each other from two clusters in the genome, one containing segments 1-2-4-5-6-8-11-13-15-16 and the other 7-9-3-10-12-14, with pieces 1-5 comprising the first gene and 6-16 the second gene. Both genes remain linked in the somatic genome on a 1.5-kb "nanochromosome." This study is the first to reveal that two genes can become scrambled during evolution with their coding segments intertwined. These twin scrambled genes underscore the beauty and exceptions of protist genome architecture, pointing to the critical need for evolutionary biologists to survey protist genomes broadly.

  18. The mating type-like loci of Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Yáñez-Carrillo, Patricia; Robledo-Márquez, Karina A; Ramírez-Zavaleta, Candy Y; De Las Peñas, Alejandro; Castaño, Irene

    2014-01-01

    Candida glabrata, a haploid and opportunistic fungal pathogen that has not known sexual cycle, has conserved the majority of the genes required for mating and cell type identity. The C. glabrata genome contains three mating-type-like loci called MTL1, MTL2 and MTL3. The three loci encode putative transcription factors, a1, α1 and α2 that regulate cell type identity and sexual reproduction in other fungi like the closely related Saccharomyces cerevisiae. MTL1 can contain either a or α information. MTL2, which contains a information and MTL3 with α information, are relatively close to two telomeres. MTL1 and MTL2 are transcriptionally active, while MTL3 is subject to an incomplete silencing nucleated at the telomere that depends on the silencing proteins Sir2, Sir3, Sir4, yKu70/80, Rif1, Rap1 and Sum1. C. glabrata does not seem to maintain cell type identity, as cell type-specific genes are expressed regardless of the type (or even absence) of mating information. These data highlight important differences in the control of mating and cell type identity between the non-pathogenic yeast S. cerevisiae and C. glabrata, which might explain the absence of a sexual cycle in C. glabrata. The fact that C. glabrata has conserved the vast majority of the genes involved in mating might suggest that some of these genes perhaps have been rewired to control other processes important for the survival inside the host as a commensal or as a human pathogen. This manuscript is part of the series of works presented at the "V International Workshop: Molecular genetic approaches to the study of human pathogenic fungi" (Oaxaca, Mexico, 2012).

  19. Identification of quantitative trait loci affecting cattle temperament.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Gil, Beatriz; Ball, Nia; Burton, Deborah; Haskell, Marie; Williams, John L; Wiener, Pamela

    2008-01-01

    In addition to its potential contribution to improving animal welfare, the study of the genetics of cattle behavior may provide more general insights into the genetic control of such complex traits. We carried out a genome scan in a Holstein x Charolais cross cattle population to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) influencing temperament-related traits. Individuals belonging to the second-generation of this population (F(2) and backcross individuals) were subjected to 2 behavioral tests. The flight from feeder (FF) test measured the distance at which the animal moved away from an approaching human observer, whereas the social separation (SS) test categorized different activities which the animal engaged in when removed from its penmates. The entire population was genotyped with 165 microsatellite markers. A regression interval mapping analysis identified 29 regions exceeding the 5% chromosome-wide significance level, which individually explained a relatively small fraction of the phenotypic variance of the traits (from 3.8% to 8.4%). One of the significant associations influencing an FF test trait on chromosome 29 reached the 5% genome-wide significance level. Eight other QTL, all associated with an SS test trait, reached the 1% chromosome-wide significance level. The location of some QTL coincided with other previously reported temperament QTL in cattle, whereas those that are reported for the first time here may represent general loci controlling temperament differences between cattle breeds. No overlapping QTL were identified for the traits measured by the 2 different tests, supporting the hypothesis that different genetic factors influence behavioral responses to different situations.

  20. Fourier models and the loci of adaptation.

    PubMed

    Makous, W L

    1997-09-01

    First measures of sensitivity and the need for a model to interpret them are addressed. Then modeling in the Fourier domain is promoted by a demonstration of how much an approach explains spatial sensitization and its dependence on luminance. Then the retinal illuminance and receptor absorptions produced by various stimuli are derived to foster interpretation of the neural mechanisms underlying various psychophysical phenomena. Finally, the sequence and the anatomical loci of the processes controlling visual sensitivity are addressed. It is concluded that multiplicative adaptation often has effects identical to response compression followed by subtractive adaptation and that, perhaps as a consequence, there is no evidence of retinal gain changes in human cone vision until light levels are well above those available in natural scenes and in most contemporary psychophysical experiments; that contrast gain control fine tunes sensitivity to patterns at all luminances; and that response compression, modulated by subtractive adaptation, predominates in the control of sensitivity in human cone vision.

  1. New genetic loci link adipose and insulin biology to body fat distribution.

    PubMed

    Shungin, Dmitry; Winkler, Thomas W; Croteau-Chonka, Damien C; Ferreira, Teresa; Locke, Adam E; Mägi, Reedik; Strawbridge, Rona J; Pers, Tune H; Fischer, Krista; Justice, Anne E; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Wu, Joseph M W; Buchkovich, Martin L; Heard-Costa, Nancy L; Roman, Tamara S; Drong, Alexander W; Song, Ci; Gustafsson, Stefan; Day, Felix R; Esko, Tonu; Fall, Tove; Kutalik, Zoltán; Luan, Jian'an; Randall, Joshua C; Scherag, André; Vedantam, Sailaja; Wood, Andrew R; Chen, Jin; Fehrmann, Rudolf; Karjalainen, Juha; Kahali, Bratati; Liu, Ching-Ti; Schmidt, Ellen M; Absher, Devin; Amin, Najaf; Anderson, Denise; Beekman, Marian; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L; Buyske, Steven; Demirkan, Ayse; Ehret, Georg B; Feitosa, Mary F; Goel, Anuj; Jackson, Anne U; Johnson, Toby; Kleber, Marcus E; Kristiansson, Kati; Mangino, Massimo; Mateo Leach, Irene; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Palmer, Cameron D; Pasko, Dorota; Pechlivanis, Sonali; Peters, Marjolein J; Prokopenko, Inga; Stančáková, Alena; Ju Sung, Yun; Tanaka, Toshiko; Teumer, Alexander; Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V; Yengo, Loïc; Zhang, Weihua; Albrecht, Eva; Ärnlöv, Johan; Arscott, Gillian M; Bandinelli, Stefania; Barrett, Amy; Bellis, Claire; Bennett, Amanda J; Berne, Christian; Blüher, Matthias; Böhringer, Stefan; Bonnet, Fabrice; Böttcher, Yvonne; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Carba, Delia B; Caspersen, Ida H; Clarke, Robert; Daw, E Warwick; Deelen, Joris; Deelman, Ewa; Delgado, Graciela; Doney, Alex S F; Eklund, Niina; Erdos, Michael R; Estrada, Karol; Eury, Elodie; Friedrich, Nele; Garcia, Melissa E; Giedraitis, Vilmantas; Gigante, Bruna; Go, Alan S; Golay, Alain; Grallert, Harald; Grammer, Tanja B; Gräßler, Jürgen; Grewal, Jagvir; Groves, Christopher J; Haller, Toomas; Hallmans, Goran; Hartman, Catharina A; Hassinen, Maija; Hayward, Caroline; Heikkilä, Kauko; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Helmer, Quinta; Hillege, Hans L; Holmen, Oddgeir; Hunt, Steven C; Isaacs, Aaron; Ittermann, Till; James, Alan L; Johansson, Ingegerd; Juliusdottir, Thorhildur; Kalafati, Ioanna-Panagiota; Kinnunen, Leena; Koenig, Wolfgang; Kooner, Ishminder K; Kratzer, Wolfgang; Lamina, Claudia; Leander, Karin; Lee, Nanette R; Lichtner, Peter; Lind, Lars; Lindström, Jaana; Lobbens, Stéphane; Lorentzon, Mattias; Mach, François; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Mahajan, Anubha; McArdle, Wendy L; Menni, Cristina; Merger, Sigrun; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Mills, Rebecca; Moayyeri, Alireza; Monda, Keri L; Mooijaart, Simon P; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Mulas, Antonella; Müller, Gabriele; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Nalls, Michael A; Narisu, Narisu; Glorioso, Nicola; Nolte, Ilja M; Olden, Matthias; Rayner, Nigel W; Renstrom, Frida; Ried, Janina S; Robertson, Neil R; Rose, Lynda M; Sanna, Serena; Scharnagl, Hubert; Scholtens, Salome; Sennblad, Bengt; Seufferlein, Thomas; Sitlani, Colleen M; Vernon Smith, Albert; Stirrups, Kathleen; Stringham, Heather M; Sundström, Johan; Swertz, Morris A; Swift, Amy J; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Tayo, Bamidele O; Thorand, Barbara; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Tomaschitz, Andreas; Troffa, Chiara; van Oort, Floor V A; Verweij, Niek; Vonk, Judith M; Waite, Lindsay L; Wennauer, Roman; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wojczynski, Mary K; Wong, Andrew; Zhang, Qunyuan; Hua Zhao, Jing; Brennan, Eoin P; Choi, Murim; Eriksson, Per; Folkersen, Lasse; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Gharavi, Ali G; Hedman, Åsa K; Hivert, Marie-France; Huang, Jinyan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Karpe, Fredrik; Keildson, Sarah; Kiryluk, Krzysztof; Liang, Liming; Lifton, Richard P; Ma, Baoshan; McKnight, Amy J; McPherson, Ruth; Metspalu, Andres; Min, Josine L; Moffatt, Miriam F; Montgomery, Grant W; Murabito, Joanne M; Nicholson, George; Nyholt, Dale R; Olsson, Christian; Perry, John R B; Reinmaa, Eva; Salem, Rany M; Sandholm, Niina; Schadt, Eric E; Scott, Robert A; Stolk, Lisette; Vallejo, Edgar E; Westra, Harm-Jan; Zondervan, Krina T; Amouyel, Philippe; Arveiler, Dominique; Bakker, Stephan J L; Beilby, John; Bergman, Richard N; Blangero, John; Brown, Morris J; Burnier, Michel; Campbell, Harry; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chines, Peter S; Claudi-Boehm, Simone; Collins, Francis S; Crawford, Dana C; Danesh, John; de Faire, Ulf; de Geus, Eco J C; Dörr, Marcus; Erbel, Raimund; Eriksson, Johan G; Farrall, Martin; Ferrannini, Ele; Ferrières, Jean; Forouhi, Nita G; Forrester, Terrence; Franco, Oscar H; Gansevoort, Ron T; Gieger, Christian; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Haiman, Christopher A; Harris, Tamara B; Hattersley, Andrew T; Heliövaara, Markku; Hicks, Andrew A; Hingorani, Aroon D; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hofman, Albert; Homuth, Georg; Humphries, Steve E; Hyppönen, Elina; Illig, Thomas; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Johansen, Berit; Jousilahti, Pekka; Jula, Antti M; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kee, Frank; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M; Kooner, Jaspal S; Kooperberg, Charles; Kovacs, Peter; Kraja, Aldi T; Kumari, Meena; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Kuusisto, Johanna; Lakka, Timo A; Langenberg, Claudia; Le Marchand, Loic; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Männistö, Satu; Marette, André; Matise, Tara C; McKenzie, Colin A; McKnight, Barbara; Musk, Arthur W; Möhlenkamp, Stefan; Morris, Andrew D; Nelis, Mari; Ohlsson, Claes; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Ong, Ken K; Palmer, Lyle J; Penninx, Brenda W; Peters, Annette; Pramstaller, Peter P; Raitakari, Olli T; Rankinen, Tuomo; Rao, D C; Rice, Treva K; Ridker, Paul M; Ritchie, Marylyn D; Rudan, Igor; Salomaa, Veikko; Samani, Nilesh J; Saramies, Jouko; Sarzynski, Mark A; Schwarz, Peter E H; Shuldiner, Alan R; Staessen, Jan A; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Stolk, Ronald P; Strauch, Konstantin; Tönjes, Anke; Tremblay, Angelo; Tremoli, Elena; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Völker, Uwe; Vollenweider, Peter; Wilson, James F; Witteman, Jacqueline C; Adair, Linda S; Bochud, Murielle; Boehm, Bernhard O; Bornstein, Stefan R; Bouchard, Claude; Cauchi, Stéphane; Caulfield, Mark J; Chambers, John C; Chasman, Daniel I; Cooper, Richard S; Dedoussis, George; Ferrucci, Luigi; Froguel, Philippe; Grabe, Hans-Jörgen; Hamsten, Anders; Hui, Jennie; Hveem, Kristian; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Kivimaki, Mika; Kuh, Diana; Laakso, Markku; Liu, Yongmei; März, Winfried; Munroe, Patricia B; Njølstad, Inger; Oostra, Ben A; Palmer, Colin N A; Pedersen, Nancy L; Perola, Markus; Pérusse, Louis; Peters, Ulrike; Power, Chris; Quertermous, Thomas; Rauramaa, Rainer; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Saaristo, Timo E; Saleheen, Danish; Sinisalo, Juha; Slagboom, P Eline; Snieder, Harold; Spector, Tim D; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Stumvoll, Michael; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uitterlinden, André G; Uusitupa, Matti; van der Harst, Pim; Veronesi, Giovanni; Walker, Mark; Wareham, Nicholas J; Watkins, Hugh; Wichmann, H-Erich; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Assimes, Themistocles L; Berndt, Sonja I; Boehnke, Michael; Borecki, Ingrid B; Deloukas, Panos; Franke, Lude; Frayling, Timothy M; Groop, Leif C; Hunter, David J; Kaplan, Robert C; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Qi, Lu; Schlessinger, David; Strachan, David P; Stefansson, Kari; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Willer, Cristen J; Visscher, Peter M; Yang, Jian; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Zillikens, M Carola; McCarthy, Mark I; Speliotes, Elizabeth K; North, Kari E; Fox, Caroline S; Barroso, Inês; Franks, Paul W; Ingelsson, Erik; Heid, Iris M; Loos, Ruth J F; Cupples, L Adrienne; Morris, Andrew P; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Mohlke, Karen L

    2015-02-12

    Body fat distribution is a heritable trait and a well-established predictor of adverse metabolic outcomes, independent of overall adiposity. To increase our understanding of the genetic basis of body fat distribution and its molecular links to cardiometabolic traits, here we conduct genome-wide association meta-analyses of traits related to waist and hip circumferences in up to 224,459 individuals. We identify 49 loci (33 new) associated with waist-to-hip ratio adjusted for body mass index (BMI), and an additional 19 loci newly associated with related waist and hip circumference measures (P < 5 × 10(-8)). In total, 20 of the 49 waist-to-hip ratio adjusted for BMI loci show significant sexual dimorphism, 19 of which display a stronger effect in women. The identified loci were enriched for genes expressed in adipose tissue and for putative regulatory elements in adipocytes. Pathway analyses implicated adipogenesis, angiogenesis, transcriptional regulation and insulin resistance as processes affecting fat distribution, providing insight into potential pathophysiological mechanisms. PMID:25673412

  2. New genetic loci link adipose and insulin biology to body fat distribution

    PubMed Central

    Strawbridge, Rona J; Pers, Tune H; Fischer, Krista; Justice, Anne E; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Wu, Joseph M.W.; Buchkovich, Martin L; Heard-Costa, Nancy L; Roman, Tamara S; Drong, Alexander W; Song, Ci; Gustafsson, Stefan; Day, Felix R; Esko, Tonu; Fall, Tove; Kutalik, Zoltán; Luan, Jian’an; Randall, Joshua C; Scherag, André; Vedantam, Sailaja; Wood, Andrew R; Chen, Jin; Fehrmann, Rudolf; Karjalainen, Juha; Kahali, Bratati; Liu, Ching-Ti; Schmidt, Ellen M; Absher, Devin; Amin, Najaf; Anderson, Denise; Beekman, Marian; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L; Buyske, Steven; Demirkan, Ayse; Ehret, Georg B; Feitosa, Mary F; Goel, Anuj; Jackson, Anne U; Johnson, Toby; Kleber, Marcus E; Kristiansson, Kati; Mangino, Massimo; Leach, Irene Mateo; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Palmer, Cameron D; Pasko, Dorota; Pechlivanis, Sonali; Peters, Marjolein J; Prokopenko, Inga; Stančáková, Alena; Sung, Yun Ju; Tanaka, Toshiko; Teumer, Alexander; Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V; Yengo, Loïc; Zhang, Weihua; Albrecht, Eva; Ärnlöv, Johan; Arscott, Gillian M; Bandinelli, Stefania; Barrett, Amy; Bellis, Claire; Bennett, Amanda J; Berne, Christian; Blüher, Matthias; Böhringer, Stefan; Bonnet, Fabrice; Böttcher, Yvonne; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Carba, Delia B; Caspersen, Ida H; Clarke, Robert; Daw, E Warwick; Deelen, Joris; Deelman, Ewa; Delgado, Graciela; Doney, Alex SF; Eklund, Niina; Erdos, Michael R; Estrada, Karol; Eury, Elodie; Friedrich, Nele; Garcia, Melissa E; Giedraitis, Vilmantas; Gigante, Bruna; Go, Alan S; Golay, Alain; Grallert, Harald; Grammer, Tanja B; Gräßler, Jürgen; Grewal, Jagvir; Groves, Christopher J; Haller, Toomas; Hallmans, Goran; Hartman, Catharina A; Hassinen, Maija; Hayward, Caroline; Heikkilä, Kauko; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Helmer, Quinta; Hillege, Hans L; Holmen, Oddgeir; Hunt, Steven C; Isaacs, Aaron; Ittermann, Till; James, Alan L; Johansson, Ingegerd; Juliusdottir, Thorhildur; Kalafati, Ioanna-Panagiota; Kinnunen, Leena; Koenig, Wolfgang; Kooner, Ishminder K; Kratzer, Wolfgang; Lamina, Claudia; Leander, Karin; Lee, Nanette R; Lichtner, Peter; Lind, Lars; Lindström, Jaana; Lobbens, Stéphane; Lorentzon, Mattias; Mach, François; Magnusson, Patrik KE; Mahajan, Anubha; McArdle, Wendy L; Menni, Cristina; Merger, Sigrun; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Mills, Rebecca; Moayyeri, Alireza; Monda, Keri L; Mooijaart, Simon P; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Mulas, Antonella; Müller, Gabriele; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Nalls, Michael A; Narisu, Narisu; Glorioso, Nicola; Nolte, Ilja M; Olden, Matthias; Rayner, Nigel W; Renstrom, Frida; Ried, Janina S; Robertson, Neil R; Rose, Lynda M; Sanna, Serena; Scharnagl, Hubert; Scholtens, Salome; Sennblad, Bengt; Seufferlein, Thomas; Sitlani, Colleen M; Smith, Albert Vernon; Stirrups, Kathleen; Stringham, Heather M; Sundström, Johan; Swertz, Morris A; Swift, Amy J; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Tayo, Bamidele O; Thorand, Barbara; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Tomaschitz, Andreas; Troffa, Chiara; van Oort, Floor VA; Verweij, Niek; Vonk, Judith M; Waite, Lindsay L; Wennauer, Roman; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wojczynski, Mary K; Wong, Andrew; Zhang, Qunyuan; Zhao, Jing Hua; Brennan, Eoin P.; Choi, Murim; Eriksson, Per; Folkersen, Lasse; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Gharavi, Ali G; Hedman, Åsa K; Hivert, Marie-France; Huang, Jinyan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Karpe, Fredrik; Keildson, Sarah; Kiryluk, Krzysztof; Liang, Liming; Lifton, Richard P; Ma, Baoshan; McKnight, Amy J; McPherson, Ruth; Metspalu, Andres; Min, Josine L; Moffatt, Miriam F; Montgomery, Grant W; Murabito, Joanne M; Nicholson, George; Nyholt, Dale R; Olsson, Christian; Perry, John RB; Reinmaa, Eva; Salem, Rany M; Sandholm, Niina; Schadt, Eric E; Scott, Robert A; Stolk, Lisette; Vallejo, Edgar E.; Westra, Harm-Jan; Zondervan, Krina T; Amouyel, Philippe; Arveiler, Dominique; Bakker, Stephan JL; Beilby, John; Bergman, Richard N; Blangero, John; Brown, Morris J; Burnier, Michel; Campbell, Harry; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chines, Peter S; Claudi-Boehm, Simone; Collins, Francis S; Crawford, Dana C; Danesh, John; de Faire, Ulf; de Geus, Eco JC; Dörr, Marcus; Erbel, Raimund; Eriksson, Johan G; Farrall, Martin; Ferrannini, Ele; Ferrières, Jean; Forouhi, Nita G; Forrester, Terrence; Franco, Oscar H; Gansevoort, Ron T; Gieger, Christian; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Haiman, Christopher A; Harris, Tamara B; Hattersley, Andrew T; Heliövaara, Markku; Hicks, Andrew A; Hingorani, Aroon D; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hofman, Albert; Homuth, Georg; Humphries, Steve E; Hyppönen, Elina; Illig, Thomas; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Johansen, Berit; Jousilahti, Pekka; Jula, Antti M; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kee, Frank; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M; Kooner, Jaspal S; Kooperberg, Charles; Kovacs, Peter; Kraja, Aldi T; Kumari, Meena; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Kuusisto, Johanna; Lakka, Timo A; Langenberg, Claudia; Le Marchand, Loic; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Männistö, Satu; Marette, André; Matise, Tara C; McKenzie, Colin A; McKnight, Barbara; Musk, Arthur W; Möhlenkamp, Stefan; Morris, Andrew D; Nelis, Mari; Ohlsson, Claes; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Ong, Ken K; Palmer, Lyle J; Penninx, Brenda W; Peters, Annette; Pramstaller, Peter P; Raitakari, Olli T; Rankinen, Tuomo; Rao, DC; Rice, Treva K; Ridker, Paul M; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Rudan, Igor; Salomaa, Veikko; Samani, Nilesh J; Saramies, Jouko; Sarzynski, Mark A; Schwarz, Peter EH; Shuldiner, Alan R; Staessen, Jan A; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Stolk, Ronald P; Strauch, Konstantin; Tönjes, Anke; Tremblay, Angelo; Tremoli, Elena; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Völker, Uwe; Vollenweider, Peter; Wilson, James F; Witteman, Jacqueline C; Adair, Linda S; Bochud, Murielle; Boehm, Bernhard O; Bornstein, Stefan R; Bouchard, Claude; Cauchi, Stéphane; Caulfield, Mark J; Chambers, John C; Chasman, Daniel I; Cooper, Richard S; Dedoussis, George; Ferrucci, Luigi; Froguel, Philippe; Grabe, Hans-Jörgen; Hamsten, Anders; Hui, Jennie; Hveem, Kristian; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Kivimaki, Mika; Kuh, Diana; Laakso, Markku; Liu, Yongmei; März, Winfried; Munroe, Patricia B; Njølstad, Inger; Oostra, Ben A; Palmer, Colin NA; Pedersen, Nancy L; Perola, Markus; Pérusse, Louis; Peters, Ulrike; Power, Chris; Quertermous, Thomas; Rauramaa, Rainer; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Saaristo, Timo E; Saleheen, Danish; Sinisalo, Juha; Slagboom, P Eline; Snieder, Harold; Spector, Tim D; Stefansson, Kari; Stumvoll, Michael; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uitterlinden, André G; Uusitupa, Matti; van der Harst, Pim; Veronesi, Giovanni; Walker, Mark; Wareham, Nicholas J; Watkins, Hugh; Wichmann, H-Erich; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Assimes, Themistocles L; Berndt, Sonja I; Boehnke, Michael; Borecki, Ingrid B; Deloukas, Panos; Franke, Lude; Frayling, Timothy M; Groop, Leif C; Hunter, David J.; Kaplan, Robert C; O’Connell, Jeffrey R; Qi, Lu; Schlessinger, David; Strachan, David P; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Willer, Cristen J; Visscher, Peter M; Yang, Jian; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Zillikens, M Carola; McCarthy, Mark I; Speliotes, Elizabeth K; North, Kari E; Fox, Caroline S; Barroso, Inês; Franks, Paul W; Ingelsson, Erik; Heid, Iris M; Loos, Ruth JF; Cupples, L Adrienne; Morris, Andrew P; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Mohlke, Karen L

    2014-01-01

    Body fat distribution is a heritable trait and a well-established predictor of adverse metabolic outcomes, independent of overall adiposity. To increase our understanding of the genetic basis of body fat distribution and its molecular links to cardiometabolic traits, we conducted genome-wide association meta-analyses of waist and hip circumference-related traits in up to 224,459 individuals. We identified 49 loci (33 new) associated with waist-to-hip ratio adjusted for body mass index (WHRadjBMI) and an additional 19 loci newly associated with related waist and hip circumference measures (P<5×10−8). Twenty of the 49 WHRadjBMI loci showed significant sexual dimorphism, 19 of which displayed a stronger effect in women. The identified loci were enriched for genes expressed in adipose tissue and for putative regulatory elements in adipocytes. Pathway analyses implicated adipogenesis, angiogenesis, transcriptional regulation, and insulin resistance as processes affecting fat distribution, providing insight into potential pathophysiological mechanisms. PMID:25673412

  3. New genetic loci link adipose and insulin biology to body fat distribution.

    PubMed

    Shungin, Dmitry; Winkler, Thomas W; Croteau-Chonka, Damien C; Ferreira, Teresa; Locke, Adam E; Mägi, Reedik; Strawbridge, Rona J; Pers, Tune H; Fischer, Krista; Justice, Anne E; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Wu, Joseph M W; Buchkovich, Martin L; Heard-Costa, Nancy L; Roman, Tamara S; Drong, Alexander W; Song, Ci; Gustafsson, Stefan; Day, Felix R; Esko, Tonu; Fall, Tove; Kutalik, Zoltán; Luan, Jian'an; Randall, Joshua C; Scherag, André; Vedantam, Sailaja; Wood, Andrew R; Chen, Jin; Fehrmann, Rudolf; Karjalainen, Juha; Kahali, Bratati; Liu, Ching-Ti; Schmidt, Ellen M; Absher, Devin; Amin, Najaf; Anderson, Denise; Beekman, Marian; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L; Buyske, Steven; Demirkan, Ayse; Ehret, Georg B; Feitosa, Mary F; Goel, Anuj; Jackson, Anne U; Johnson, Toby; Kleber, Marcus E; Kristiansson, Kati; Mangino, Massimo; Mateo Leach, Irene; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Palmer, Cameron D; Pasko, Dorota; Pechlivanis, Sonali; Peters, Marjolein J; Prokopenko, Inga; Stančáková, Alena; Ju Sung, Yun; Tanaka, Toshiko; Teumer, Alexander; Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V; Yengo, Loïc; Zhang, Weihua; Albrecht, Eva; Ärnlöv, Johan; Arscott, Gillian M; Bandinelli, Stefania; Barrett, Amy; Bellis, Claire; Bennett, Amanda J; Berne, Christian; Blüher, Matthias; Böhringer, Stefan; Bonnet, Fabrice; Böttcher, Yvonne; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Carba, Delia B; Caspersen, Ida H; Clarke, Robert; Daw, E Warwick; Deelen, Joris; Deelman, Ewa; Delgado, Graciela; Doney, Alex S F; Eklund, Niina; Erdos, Michael R; Estrada, Karol; Eury, Elodie; Friedrich, Nele; Garcia, Melissa E; Giedraitis, Vilmantas; Gigante, Bruna; Go, Alan S; Golay, Alain; Grallert, Harald; Grammer, Tanja B; Gräßler, Jürgen; Grewal, Jagvir; Groves, Christopher J; Haller, Toomas; Hallmans, Goran; Hartman, Catharina A; Hassinen, Maija; Hayward, Caroline; Heikkilä, Kauko; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Helmer, Quinta; Hillege, Hans L; Holmen, Oddgeir; Hunt, Steven C; Isaacs, Aaron; Ittermann, Till; James, Alan L; Johansson, Ingegerd; Juliusdottir, Thorhildur; Kalafati, Ioanna-Panagiota; Kinnunen, Leena; Koenig, Wolfgang; Kooner, Ishminder K; Kratzer, Wolfgang; Lamina, Claudia; Leander, Karin; Lee, Nanette R; Lichtner, Peter; Lind, Lars; Lindström, Jaana; Lobbens, Stéphane; Lorentzon, Mattias; Mach, François; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Mahajan, Anubha; McArdle, Wendy L; Menni, Cristina; Merger, Sigrun; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Mills, Rebecca; Moayyeri, Alireza; Monda, Keri L; Mooijaart, Simon P; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Mulas, Antonella; Müller, Gabriele; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Nalls, Michael A; Narisu, Narisu; Glorioso, Nicola; Nolte, Ilja M; Olden, Matthias; Rayner, Nigel W; Renstrom, Frida; Ried, Janina S; Robertson, Neil R; Rose, Lynda M; Sanna, Serena; Scharnagl, Hubert; Scholtens, Salome; Sennblad, Bengt; Seufferlein, Thomas; Sitlani, Colleen M; Vernon Smith, Albert; Stirrups, Kathleen; Stringham, Heather M; Sundström, Johan; Swertz, Morris A; Swift, Amy J; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Tayo, Bamidele O; Thorand, Barbara; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Tomaschitz, Andreas; Troffa, Chiara; van Oort, Floor V A; Verweij, Niek; Vonk, Judith M; Waite, Lindsay L; Wennauer, Roman; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wojczynski, Mary K; Wong, Andrew; Zhang, Qunyuan; Hua Zhao, Jing; Brennan, Eoin P; Choi, Murim; Eriksson, Per; Folkersen, Lasse; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Gharavi, Ali G; Hedman, Åsa K; Hivert, Marie-France; Huang, Jinyan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Karpe, Fredrik; Keildson, Sarah; Kiryluk, Krzysztof; Liang, Liming; Lifton, Richard P; Ma, Baoshan; McKnight, Amy J; McPherson, Ruth; Metspalu, Andres; Min, Josine L; Moffatt, Miriam F; Montgomery, Grant W; Murabito, Joanne M; Nicholson, George; Nyholt, Dale R; Olsson, Christian; Perry, John R B; Reinmaa, Eva; Salem, Rany M; Sandholm, Niina; Schadt, Eric E; Scott, Robert A; Stolk, Lisette; Vallejo, Edgar E; Westra, Harm-Jan; Zondervan, Krina T; Amouyel, Philippe; Arveiler, Dominique; Bakker, Stephan J L; Beilby, John; Bergman, Richard N; Blangero, John; Brown, Morris J; Burnier, Michel; Campbell, Harry; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chines, Peter S; Claudi-Boehm, Simone; Collins, Francis S; Crawford, Dana C; Danesh, John; de Faire, Ulf; de Geus, Eco J C; Dörr, Marcus; Erbel, Raimund; Eriksson, Johan G; Farrall, Martin; Ferrannini, Ele; Ferrières, Jean; Forouhi, Nita G; Forrester, Terrence; Franco, Oscar H; Gansevoort, Ron T; Gieger, Christian; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Haiman, Christopher A; Harris, Tamara B; Hattersley, Andrew T; Heliövaara, Markku; Hicks, Andrew A; Hingorani, Aroon D; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hofman, Albert; Homuth, Georg; Humphries, Steve E; Hyppönen, Elina; Illig, Thomas; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Johansen, Berit; Jousilahti, Pekka; Jula, Antti M; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kee, Frank; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M; Kooner, Jaspal S; Kooperberg, Charles; Kovacs, Peter; Kraja, Aldi T; Kumari, Meena; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Kuusisto, Johanna; Lakka, Timo A; Langenberg, Claudia; Le Marchand, Loic; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Männistö, Satu; Marette, André; Matise, Tara C; McKenzie, Colin A; McKnight, Barbara; Musk, Arthur W; Möhlenkamp, Stefan; Morris, Andrew D; Nelis, Mari; Ohlsson, Claes; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Ong, Ken K; Palmer, Lyle J; Penninx, Brenda W; Peters, Annette; Pramstaller, Peter P; Raitakari, Olli T; Rankinen, Tuomo; Rao, D C; Rice, Treva K; Ridker, Paul M; Ritchie, Marylyn D; Rudan, Igor; Salomaa, Veikko; Samani, Nilesh J; Saramies, Jouko; Sarzynski, Mark A; Schwarz, Peter E H; Shuldiner, Alan R; Staessen, Jan A; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Stolk, Ronald P; Strauch, Konstantin; Tönjes, Anke; Tremblay, Angelo; Tremoli, Elena; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Völker, Uwe; Vollenweider, Peter; Wilson, James F; Witteman, Jacqueline C; Adair, Linda S; Bochud, Murielle; Boehm, Bernhard O; Bornstein, Stefan R; Bouchard, Claude; Cauchi, Stéphane; Caulfield, Mark J; Chambers, John C; Chasman, Daniel I; Cooper, Richard S; Dedoussis, George; Ferrucci, Luigi; Froguel, Philippe; Grabe, Hans-Jörgen; Hamsten, Anders; Hui, Jennie; Hveem, Kristian; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Kivimaki, Mika; Kuh, Diana; Laakso, Markku; Liu, Yongmei; März, Winfried; Munroe, Patricia B; Njølstad, Inger; Oostra, Ben A; Palmer, Colin N A; Pedersen, Nancy L; Perola, Markus; Pérusse, Louis; Peters, Ulrike; Power, Chris; Quertermous, Thomas; Rauramaa, Rainer; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Saaristo, Timo E; Saleheen, Danish; Sinisalo, Juha; Slagboom, P Eline; Snieder, Harold; Spector, Tim D; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Stumvoll, Michael; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uitterlinden, André G; Uusitupa, Matti; van der Harst, Pim; Veronesi, Giovanni; Walker, Mark; Wareham, Nicholas J; Watkins, Hugh; Wichmann, H-Erich; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Assimes, Themistocles L; Berndt, Sonja I; Boehnke, Michael; Borecki, Ingrid B; Deloukas, Panos; Franke, Lude; Frayling, Timothy M; Groop, Leif C; Hunter, David J; Kaplan, Robert C; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Qi, Lu; Schlessinger, David; Strachan, David P; Stefansson, Kari; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Willer, Cristen J; Visscher, Peter M; Yang, Jian; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Zillikens, M Carola; McCarthy, Mark I; Speliotes, Elizabeth K; North, Kari E; Fox, Caroline S; Barroso, Inês; Franks, Paul W; Ingelsson, Erik; Heid, Iris M; Loos, Ruth J F; Cupples, L Adrienne; Morris, Andrew P; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Mohlke, Karen L

    2015-02-12

    Body fat distribution is a heritable trait and a well-established predictor of adverse metabolic outcomes, independent of overall adiposity. To increase our understanding of the genetic basis of body fat distribution and its molecular links to cardiometabolic traits, here we conduct genome-wide association meta-analyses of traits related to waist and hip circumferences in up to 224,459 individuals. We identify 49 loci (33 new) associated with waist-to-hip ratio adjusted for body mass index (BMI), and an additional 19 loci newly associated with related waist and hip circumference measures (P < 5 × 10(-8)). In total, 20 of the 49 waist-to-hip ratio adjusted for BMI loci show significant sexual dimorphism, 19 of which display a stronger effect in women. The identified loci were enriched for genes expressed in adipose tissue and for putative regulatory elements in adipocytes. Pathway analyses implicated adipogenesis, angiogenesis, transcriptional regulation and insulin resistance as processes affecting fat distribution, providing insight into potential pathophysiological mechanisms.

  4. Cell Treatment and Lysis in 96-Well Filter-Bottom Plates for Screening Bcr-Abl Activity and Inhibition in Whole-Cell Extracts

    PubMed Central

    MAND, MICHAEL R.; WU, DING; VEACH, DARREN R.; KRON, STEPHEN J.

    2015-01-01

    Although conventional high-throughput screens performed in vitro with purified protein kinases are powerful tools to discover new kinase inhibitors, they are far from ideal for determining efficacy in vivo. As a complementary approach, cell-based, target-driven secondary screens may help predict in vivo compound potency and specificity as well as evaluate bioavailability and toxicity. Here the authors report a simple protocol for treating K562 Bcr-Abl-expressing cells with small-molecule kinase inhibitors in 96-well filter-bottom plates followed by in-plate cell lysis. The lysates were assayed via a solid-phase kinase assay, allowing determination of apparent IC50 for known Bcr-Abl inhibitors as well as facilitating the screening of a small kinase inhibitor library. This approach may have further applications in generating lysates for analyzing kinase activity and inhibition in other nonadherent suspension cell lines. PMID:20237206

  5. Acquisition of genomic events leading to lymphoblastic transformation in a rare case of myeloproliferative neoplasm with BCR-JAK2 fusion transcript.

    PubMed

    Duployez, Nicolas; Nibourel, Olivier; Ducourneau, Benoît; Grardel, Nathalie; Boyer, Thomas; Bories, Claire; Darre, Stéphane; Coiteux, Valérie; Berthon, Céline; Preudhomme, Claude; Roche-Lestienne, Catherine

    2016-10-01

    We report a case of myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) with an atypical t(9;22;15)(p24;q11;q21) translocation, leading to a BCR-JAK2 fusion, associated with a trisomy of chromosome 8 in clonal evolution at karyotype. Patient's evolution was marked by an aggressive clinical course with rapid progression to blast phase within the first year after diagnosis. Examination of matched chronic phase and blast crisis samples by SNP-array karyotyping identified secondary acquired cryptic genetic events at the time of lymphoblastic transformation, including biallelic IKZF1 alteration and EBF1 and CDKN2A/B codeletions. This case is the first report describing acquisition of secondary genetic events leading to acute lymphoblastic progression in a rare MPN with BCR-JAK2 fusion. PMID:26935241

  6. The chimeric ubiquitin ligase SH2-U-box inhibits the growth of imatinib-sensitive and resistant CML by targeting the native and T315I-mutant BCR-ABL.

    PubMed

    Ru, Yi; Wang, Qinhao; Liu, Xiping; Zhang, Mei; Zhong, Daixing; Ye, Mingxiang; Li, Yuanchun; Han, Hua; Yao, Libo; Li, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is characterized by constitutively active fusion protein tyrosine kinase BCR-ABL. Although the tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) against BCR-ABL, imatinib, is the first-line therapy for CML, acquired resistance almost inevitably emerges. The underlying mechanism are point mutations within the BCR-ABL gene, among which T315I is notorious because it resists to almost all currently available inhibitors. Here we took use of a previously generated chimeric ubiquitin ligase, SH2-U-box, in which SH2 from the adaptor protein Grb2 acts as a binding domain for activated BCR-ABL, while U-box from CHIP functions as an E3 ubiquitin ligase domain, so as to target the ubiquitination and degradation of both native and T315I-mutant BCR-ABL. As such, SH2-U-box significantly inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in CML cells harboring either the wild-type or T315I-mutant BCR-ABL (K562 or K562R), with BCR-ABL-dependent signaling pathways being repressed. Moreover, SH2-U-box worked in concert with imatinib in K562 cells. Importantly, SH2-U-box-carrying lentivirus could markedly suppress the growth of K562-xenografts in nude mice or K562R-xenografts in SCID mice, as well as that of primary CML cells. Collectively, by degrading the native and T315I-mutant BCR-ABL, the chimeric ubiquitin ligase SH2-U-box may serve as a potential therapy for both imatinib-sensitive and resistant CML. PMID:27329306

  7. The chimeric ubiquitin ligase SH2-U-box inhibits the growth of imatinib-sensitive and resistant CML by targeting the native and T315I-mutant BCR-ABL

    PubMed Central

    Ru, Yi; Wang, Qinhao; Liu, Xiping; Zhang, Mei; Zhong, Daixing; Ye, Mingxiang; Li, Yuanchun; Han, Hua; Yao, Libo; Li, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is characterized by constitutively active fusion protein tyrosine kinase BCR-ABL. Although the tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) against BCR-ABL, imatinib, is the first-line therapy for CML, acquired resistance almost inevitably emerges. The underlying mechanism are point mutations within the BCR-ABL gene, among which T315I is notorious because it resists to almost all currently available inhibitors. Here we took use of a previously generated chimeric ubiquitin ligase, SH2-U-box, in which SH2 from the adaptor protein Grb2 acts as a binding domain for activated BCR-ABL, while U-box from CHIP functions as an E3 ubiquitin ligase domain, so as to target the ubiquitination and degradation of both native and T315I-mutant BCR-ABL. As such, SH2-U-box significantly inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in CML cells harboring either the wild-type or T315I-mutant BCR-ABL (K562 or K562R), with BCR-ABL-dependent signaling pathways being repressed. Moreover, SH2-U-box worked in concert with imatinib in K562 cells. Importantly, SH2-U-box-carrying lentivirus could markedly suppress the growth of K562-xenografts in nude mice or K562R-xenografts in SCID mice, as well as that of primary CML cells. Collectively, by degrading the native and T315I-mutant BCR-ABL, the chimeric ubiquitin ligase SH2-U-box may serve as a potential therapy for both imatinib-sensitive and resistant CML. PMID:27329306

  8. Discovery and Fine Mapping of Serum Protein Loci through Transethnic Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Franceschini, Nora; van Rooij, Frank J.A.; Prins, Bram P.; Feitosa, Mary F.; Karakas, Mahir; Eckfeldt, John H.; Folsom, Aaron R.; Kopp, Jeffrey; Vaez, Ahmad; Andrews, Jeanette S.; Baumert, Jens; Boraska, Vesna; Broer, Linda; Hayward, Caroline; Ngwa, Julius S.; Okada, Yukinori; Polasek, Ozren; Westra, Harm-Jan; Wang, Ying A.; Del Greco M., Fabiola; Glazer, Nicole L.; Kapur, Karen; Kema, Ido P.; Lopez, Lorna M.; Schillert, Arne; Smith, Albert V.; Winkler, Cheryl A.; Zgaga, Lina; Bandinelli, Stefania; Bergmann, Sven; Boban, Mladen; Bochud, Murielle; Chen, Y.D.; Davies, Gail; Dehghan, Abbas; Ding, Jingzhong; Doering, Angela; Durda, J. Peter; Ferrucci, Luigi; Franco, Oscar H.; Franke, Lude; Gunjaca, Grog; Hofman, Albert; Hsu, Fang-Chi; Kolcic, Ivana; Kraja, Aldi; Kubo, Michiaki; Lackner, Karl J.; Launer, Lenore; Loehr, Laura R.; Li, Guo; Meisinger, Christa; Nakamura, Yusuke; Schwienbacher, Christine; Starr, John M.; Takahashi, Atsushi; Torlak, Vesela; Uitterlinden, André G.; Vitart, Veronique; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wild, Philipp S.; Kirin, Mirna; Zeller, Tanja; Zemunik, Tatijana; Zhang, Qunyuan; Ziegler, Andreas; Blankenberg, Stefan; Boerwinkle, Eric; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Campbell, Harry; Deary, Ian J.; Frayling, Timothy M.; Gieger, Christian; Harris, Tamara B.; Hicks, Andrew A.; Koenig, Wolfgang; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; Fox, Caroline S.; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Reiner, Alex P.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Rudan, Igor; Snieder, Harold; Tanaka, Toshihiro; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gerard; Wilson, James F.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.M.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H.R.; Wright, Alan F.; Wu, Qingyu; Liu, Yongmei; Jenny, Nancy S.; North, Kari E.; Felix, Janine F.; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Perry, John R.B.; Morris, Andrew P.

    2012-01-01

    Many disorders are associated with altered serum protein concentrations, including malnutrition, cancer, and cardiovascular, kidney, and inflammatory diseases. Although these protein concentrations are highly heritable, relatively little is known about their underlying genetic determinants. Through transethnic meta-analysis of European-ancestry and Japanese genome-wide association studies, we identified six loci at genome-wide significance (p < 5 × 10−8) for serum albumin (HPN-SCN1B, GCKR-FNDC4, SERPINF2-WDR81, TNFRSF11A-ZCCHC2, FRMD5-WDR76, and RPS11-FCGRT, in up to 53,190 European-ancestry and 9,380 Japanese individuals) and three loci for total protein (TNFRS13B, 6q21.3, and ELL2, in up to 25,539 European-ancestry and 10,168 Japanese individuals). We observed little evidence of heterogeneity in allelic effects at these loci between groups of European and Japanese ancestry but obtained substantial improvements in the resolution of fine mapping of potential causal variants by leveraging transethnic differences in the distribution of linkage disequilibrium. We demonstrated a functional role for the most strongly associated serum albumin locus, HPN, for which Hpn knockout mice manifest low plasma albumin concentrations. Other loci associated with serum albumin harbor genes related to ribosome function, protein translation, and proteasomal degradation, whereas those associated with serum total protein include genes related to immune function. Our results highlight the advantages of transethnic meta-analysis for the discovery and fine mapping of complex trait loci and have provided initial insights into the underlying genetic architecture of serum protein concentrations and their association with human disease. PMID:23022100

  9. Importance of early and deeper responses to long-term survival in CML patients: Implications of BCR-ABL testing in management of CML in Indian setting

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Mohan B.

    2014-01-01

    The prognosis of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) has changed radically since the advent of imatinib mesylate, a selective inhibitor of BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase. Shortly thereafter, more potent BCR-ABL inhibitors (dasatinib and nilotinib) were introduced for use in patients resistant to or intolerant of imatinib. All three drugs are now approved for initial therapy for chronic phase CML. Response to tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) treatment is assessed with standardized quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (Q-RTPCR) and/or cytogenetics at 3, 6 and 12 months. Clinical trials have clearly demonstrated that early and deeper cytogenetic and molecular response to TKI therapy is associated with lower rate of disease progression and improved long-term outcomes. In recent times, molecular response as determined by BCR-ABL transcript levels at defined time points is rapidly gaining popularity as a predictive marker for subsequent outcomes in CML. Optimal response is defined as BCR-ABL transcript levels of ≤10% at 3 months, <1% at 6 months, and ≤0.1% from 12 months onward while >10% at 6 months and >1% from 12 months onward define failure. Patients who do not achieve molecular milestones at 3 or 6 months with 3 months being highly predictive are less likely to achieve cytogenetic responses eventually; early identification of such patients who have a low probability of achieving an adequate response are thus candidates for alternative treatment. Review of literature by electronic search of MEDline, Google Scholar was done using keywords and data was identified and systematically evaluated. PMID:25006277

  10. A Critical Review of Trials of First-Line BCR-ABL Inhibitor Treatment in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in Chronic Phase

    PubMed Central

    Jabbour, Elias; Lipton, Jeffrey H.

    2015-01-01

    The characteristic expression of the constitutively active oncoprotein, BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase, in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) was the basis for the development of BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitors for treatment. Three BCR-ABL inhibitors, imatinib, nilotinib, and dasatinib, have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for first-line treatment of patients with newly diagnosed CML in chronic phase (CML-CP). This article reviews the key phase III clinical trials supporting the use of first-line imatinib, nilotinib, and dasatinib in patients with CML-CP as well as findings of supportive phase II studies. At the time of its approval in 2001, imatinib induced unprecedented response rates in patients with CML-CP; however, resistance and intolerance to imatinib prevent 20% to 30% of patients from deriving full therapeutic benefit. Nilotinib and dasatinib, both approved in 2010 for first-line CML-CP treatment, are more potent than imatinib and less susceptible to imatinib resistance mechanisms. Comparative clinical trials of each agent with imatinib have shown that they are associated with significantly deeper and more rapid responses than standard-dose imatinib, without compromising safety. Given that evidence suggests achievement of an early response is predictive of improved long-term outcomes, earlier use of these compounds may lead to more rapid, deeper responses corresponding with improvements in patient outcome. Although future studies will benefit from more uniform definitions of endpoints and methods of analysis, data from published studies of first-line BCR-ABL inhibitor treatment for patients with newly diagnosed CML-CP support the use of either dasatinib or nilotinib in place of imatinib. PMID:24095296

  11. Incidence of BCR-ABL transcript variants in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia: Their correlation with presenting features, risk scores and response to treatment with imatinib mesylate

    PubMed Central

    Deb, Pratik; Chakrabarti, Prantar; Chakrabarty, Shila; Aich, Rajarshi; Nath, Uttam; Ray, Siddhartha Sankar; Chaudhuri, Utpal

    2014-01-01

    Context: The exact role of the different transcript variants of BCR-ABL in the pathogenesis of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and their impact on prognosis is yet to be definitely enumerated. Aims: In this study, we have tried to correlate the presenting features, risk scores and treatment response with the BCR-ABL variants detected in our patients. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional unicentric hospital-based study on 80 patients diagnosed to have CML by bone marrow cytogenetics and confirmed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Materials and Methods: RT-PCR for BCR-ABL was performed on consecutive patients with CML attending the CML clinic from January 2010 to December 2010. The medical charts of these patients were analyzed after a follow-up of 18 months in a retrospective manner. Statistical Analysis: Box plot and histogram was used to see the distribution of variables. t-test was performed to enumerate the difference between risk scores in two populations of patients carrying two different BCR-ABL transcript variants. Results: Nearly 56.25% of patients had b3a2 (e14a2) while 41.25% of patients showed b2a2 (e13a2) transcripts. The rest 2.5% (two patients) expressed the rare e19b2 variant. Patients with b2a2 presented with higher Sokal, Hasford and European Treatment and Outcomes Study score than their b3a2 counterpart. Different parameters such as the platelet count, leukocyte count, hemoglobin and splenomegaly showed a minor difference between the groups. More patients in the b2a2 group achieved complete hematologic response at 3 months, but it was not significant. Conclusions: Patients with b2a2 variant CML tend to present with higher risk score, but do not behave in a vastly different manner than their b3a2 counterparts. PMID:25006280

  12. BCR-ABL transcript variations in chronic phase chronic myelogenous leukemia patients on imatinib first-line: Possible role of the autologous immune system.

    PubMed

    Clapp, Geoffrey D; Lepoutre, Thomas; Nicolini, Franck E; Levy, Doron

    2016-05-01

    Many chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) patients in chronic phase who respond well to imatinib therapy show fluctuations in their leukemic loads in the long-term. We developed a mathematical model of CML that incorporates the intervention of an autologous immune response. Our results suggest that the patient's immune system plays a crucial role in imatinib therapy in maintaining disease control over time. The observed BCR-ABL/ABL oscillations in such patients provide a signature of the autologous immune response. PMID:27467931

  13. A study of loss of heterozygosity at 70 loci in anaplastic astrocytoma and glioblastoma multiforme with implications for tumor evolution.

    PubMed Central

    Wooten, E. C.; Fults, D.; Duggirala, R.; Williams, K.; Kyritsis, A. P.; Bondy, M. L.; Levin, V. A.; O'Connell, P.

    1999-01-01

    Cancers that arise from astrocytes in the adult CNS present as either anaplastic astrocytomas (AAs) or as more aggressive glioblastomas multiforme (GBMs). GBMs either form de novo or progress from AAs. We proposed to examine the molecular genetic relationship between these CNS tumors by conducting a genome-wide allelic imbalance analysis that included 70 loci on examples of AA and GBM. We found significant loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at 13 discrete chromosomal loci in both AAs and GBMs. Loss was significant in both AAs and GBMs at 9 of these loci. AAs show the highest rates of LOH at chromosomes 1p, 4q, 6p, 9p, 11p, 11q, 13q, 14q, 15p, 17p, 17q, and 19q. GBMs showed the greatest losses at 1p, 6q, 8p, 9p, 10p, 10q, 11p, 13q, 17p, 17q, 18p, 18q, and 19q. GBMs also demonstrated significant amplification at the epidermal growth factor receptor locus (7p12). These data suggest that there are three classes of loci involved in glioma evolution. First are loci that are likely involved in early events in the evolution of both AAs and GBMs. The second class consists of AA-specific loci, typified by higher LOH frequency than observed in GBMs (4q, 6p, 17p, 17q, 19q). The third class consists of GBM-specific loci (6q, 8p, 10, 18q). Damage at these loci may either lead to de novo GBMs or permit existing AAs to progress to GBMs. Glioma-related LOH profiles may have prognostic implications that could lead to better diagnosis and treatment of brain cancer patients. PMID:11550311

  14. Identification and Validation of Loci Governing Seed Coat Color by Combining Association Mapping and Bulk Segregation Analysis in Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yansong; Tian, Long; Li, Xinxiu; Li, Ying-Hui; Guan, Rongxia; Guo, Yong; Qiu, Li-Juan

    2016-01-01

    Soybean seed coat exists in a range of colors from yellow, green, brown, black, to bicolor. Classical genetic analysis suggested that soybean seed color was a moderately complex trait controlled by multi-loci. However, only a couple of loci could be detected using a single biparental segregating population. In this study, a combination of association mapping and bulk segregation analysis was employed to identify genes/loci governing this trait in soybean. A total of 14 loci, including nine novel and five previously reported ones, were identified using 176,065 coding SNPs selected from entire SNP dataset among 56 soybean accessions. Four of these loci were confirmed and further mapped using a biparental population developed from the cross between ZP95-5383 (yellow seed color) and NY279 (brown seed color), in which different seed coat colors were further dissected into simple trait pairs (green/yellow, green/black, green/brown, yellow/black, yellow/brown, and black/brown) by continuously developing residual heterozygous lines. By genotyping entire F2 population using flanking markers located in fine-mapping regions, the genetic basis of seed coat color was fully dissected and these four loci could explain all variations of seed colors in this population. These findings will be useful for map-based cloning of genes as well as marker-assisted breeding in soybean. This work also provides an alternative strategy for systematically isolating genes controlling relative complex trait by association analysis followed by biparental mapping. PMID:27404272

  15. Fast and Accurate Detection of Multiple Quantitative Trait Loci

    PubMed Central

    Nettelblad, Carl; Holmgren, Sverker

    2013-01-01

    Abstract We present a new computational scheme that enables efficient and reliable quantitative trait loci (QTL) scans for experimental populations. Using a standard brute-force exhaustive search effectively prohibits accurate QTL scans involving more than two loci to be performed in practice, at least if permutation testing is used to determine significance. Some more elaborate global optimization approaches, for example, DIRECT have been adopted earlier to QTL search problems. Dramatic speedups have been reported for high-dimensional scans. However, since a heuristic termination criterion must be used in these types of algorithms, the accuracy of the optimization process cannot be guaranteed. Indeed, earlier results show that a small bias in the significance thresholds is sometimes introduced. Our new optimization scheme, PruneDIRECT, is based on an analysis leading to a computable (Lipschitz) bound on the slope of a transformed objective function. The bound is derived for both infinite- and finite-size populations. Introducing a Lipschitz bound in DIRECT leads to an algorithm related to classical Lipschitz optimization. Regions in the search space can be permanently excluded (pruned) during the optimization process. Heuristic termination criteria can thus be avoided. Hence, PruneDIRECT has a well-defined error bound and can in practice be guaranteed to be equivalent to a corresponding exhaustive search. We present simulation results that show that for simultaneous mapping of three QTLS using permutation testing, PruneDIRECT is typically more than 50 times faster than exhaustive search. The speedup is higher for stronger QTL. This could be used to quickly detect strong candidate eQTL networks. PMID:23919387

  16. Hungarian population data on seven PCR-based loci.

    PubMed

    Budowle, B; Woller, J; Koons, B W; Furedi, S; Errera, J D; Padar, Z

    1996-07-01

    Hungarian population data for the loci LDLR, GYPA, HBGG, D7S8, Gc, HLA-DQA1, and D1S80 were generated. The genotype frequency distributions for the loci do not deviate from Hardy Weinberg expectations. Furthermore, there was little evidence for departures from expectations of independence between the loci. Using a test for homogeneity all the loci were similar between two Hungarian population samples and only the HLA-DQA1 locus was statistically different between Hungarians and US Caucasians. There generally would be little forensic differences, whether a Hungarian or a US Caucasian database was used, for estimating multiple locus profile frequencies for the seven PCR-based loci. PMID:8754580

  17. Development of eighteen microsatellite loci in walleye (Sander vitreus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coykendall, Dolly K.; Morrison, Cheryl L.; Stott, Wendy; Springmann, Marcus J.

    2014-01-01

    A suite of tri- and tetra-nucleotide microsatellite loci were developed for walleye (Sander vitreus) from 454 pyrosequencing data. Eighteen of the 50 primer sets tested amplified consistently in 35 walleye from two lakes on Isle Royale, Lake Superior: Chickenbone Lake and Whittlesey Lake. The loci displayed moderate levels of allelic diversity (average 5.5 alleles/locus) and heterozygosity (average 35.8 %). Levels of genetic diversity were sufficient to produce unique multi-locus genotypes and detect phylogeographic structuring as individuals assigned back to their population of origin. Cross-species amplification within S. canadensis (sauger) was successful for 15 loci, and 11 loci were diagnostic to species. The loci characterized here will be useful for detecting fine-scale spatial structuring, resolving the taxonomic status of Sander species and sub-species, and detecting walleye/sauger hybrids.

  18. Low Expression of miR-196b Enhances the Expression of BCR-ABL1 and HOXA9 Oncogenes in Chronic Myeloid Leukemogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yue; Zheng, Wenling; Song, Yanbin; Ma, Wenli; Yin, Hong

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) can function as tumor suppressors or oncogene promoters during tumor development. In this study, low levels of expression of miR-196b were detected in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia. Bisulfite genomic sequencing PCR and methylation-specific PCR were used to examine the methylation status of the CpG islands in the miR-196b promoter in K562 cells, patients with leukemia and healthy individuals. The CpG islands showed more methylation in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia compared with healthy individuals (P<0.05), which indicated that low expression of miR-196b may be associated with an increase in the methylation of CpG islands. The dual-luciferase reporter assay system demonstrated that BCR-ABL1 and HOXA9 are the target genes of miR-196b, which was consistent with predictions from bioinformatics software analyses. Further examination of cell function indicated that miR-196b acts to reduce BCR-ABL1 and HOXA9 protein levels, decrease cell proliferation rate and retard the cell cycle. A low level of expression of miR-196b can cause up-regulation of BCR-ABL1 and HOXA9 expression, which leads to the development of chronic myeloid leukemia. MiR-196b may represent an effective target for chronic myeloid leukemia therapy. PMID:23894305

  19. Bis-three-way junction nanostructure and DNA machineries for ultrasensitive and specific detection of BCR/ABL fusion gene by chemiluminescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yongjie; Bian, Xintong; Sang, Ye; Li, Yujian; Li, Dandan; Cheng, Wei; Yin, Yibing; Ju, Huangxian; Ding, Shijia

    2016-01-01

    A novel G-quadruplex DNAzyme-driven chemiluminescence (CL) imaging method has been developed for ultrasensitive and specific detection of BCR/ABL fusion gene based on bis-three-way junction (bis-3WJ) nanostructure and cascade DNA machineries. Bis-3WJ probes are designed logically to recognize BCR/ABL fusion gene, which forms the stable bis-3WJ nanostructure for the activation of polymerase/nicking enzyme machineries in cascade, resulting in synthesis of DNAzyme subunits. These DNAzyme subunits can form integrated DNAzyme by self-assembly to catalyze CL substrate, thus providing an amplified signal for the sensing events or outputs for AND logic operation. The imaging method achieved ultrasensitive detection of BCR/ABL fusion gene with a low detection limit down to 23 fM. And this method exhibited wide linear ranges over seven orders of magnitude and excellent discrimination ability toward target. In addition, an acceptable recovery was obtained in complex matrix. It is notable that this biosensing strategy possesses merits of homogenous, isothermal and label-free assay system. Therefore, these merits endow the developed imaging method with a potential tool for CML diagnosis. PMID:27577607

  20. The activation of IgM- or isotype-switched IgG- and IgE-BCR exhibits distinct mechanical force sensitivity and threshold

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Zhengpeng; Chen, Xiangjun; Chen, Haodong; Ji, Qinghua; Chen, Yingjia; Wang, Jing; Cao, Yiyun; Wang, Fei; Lou, Jizhong; Tang, Zhuo; Liu, Wanli

    2015-01-01

    B lymphocytes use B cell receptors (BCRs) to sense the physical features of the antigens. However, the sensitivity and threshold for the activation of BCRs resulting from the stimulation by mechanical forces are unknown. Here, we addressed this question using a double-stranded DNA-based tension gauge tether system serving as a predefined mechanical force gauge ranging from 12 to 56 pN. We observed that IgM-BCR activation is dependent on mechanical forces and exhibits a multi-threshold effect. In contrast, the activation of isotype-switched IgG- or IgE-BCR only requires a low threshold of less than 12 pN, providing an explanation for their rapid activation in response to antigen stimulation. Mechanistically, we found that the cytoplasmic tail of the IgG-BCR heavy chain is both required and sufficient to account for the low mechanical force threshold. These results defined the mechanical force sensitivity and threshold that are required to activate different isotyped BCRs. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06925.001 PMID:26258882

  1. Bis-three-way junction nanostructure and DNA machineries for ultrasensitive and specific detection of BCR/ABL fusion gene by chemiluminescence imaging

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yongjie; Bian, Xintong; Sang, Ye; Li, Yujian; Li, Dandan; Cheng, Wei; Yin, Yibing; Ju, Huangxian; Ding, Shijia

    2016-01-01

    A novel G-quadruplex DNAzyme-driven chemiluminescence (CL) imaging method has been developed for ultrasensitive and specific detection of BCR/ABL fusion gene based on bis-three-way junction (bis-3WJ) nanostructure and cascade DNA machineries. Bis-3WJ probes are designed logically to recognize BCR/ABL fusion gene, which forms the stable bis-3WJ nanostructure for the activation of polymerase/nicking enzyme machineries in cascade, resulting in synthesis of DNAzyme subunits. These DNAzyme subunits can form integrated DNAzyme by self-assembly to catalyze CL substrate, thus providing an amplified signal for the sensing events or outputs for AND logic operation. The imaging method achieved ultrasensitive detection of BCR/ABL fusion gene with a low detection limit down to 23 fM. And this method exhibited wide linear ranges over seven orders of magnitude and excellent discrimination ability toward target. In addition, an acceptable recovery was obtained in complex matrix. It is notable that this biosensing strategy possesses merits of homogenous, isothermal and label-free assay system. Therefore, these merits endow the developed imaging method with a potential tool for CML diagnosis. PMID:27577607

  2. Coupling a universal DNA circuit with graphene sheets/polyaniline/AuNPs nanocomposites for the detection of BCR/ABL fusion gene.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xueping; Wang, Li; Sheng, Shangchun; Wang, Teng; Yang, Juan; Xie, Guoming; Feng, Wenli

    2015-08-19

    This article described a novel method by coupling a universal DNA circuit with graphene sheets/polyaniline/AuNPs nanocomposites (GS/PANI/AuNPs) for highly sensitive and specific detection of BCR/ABL fusion gene (bcr/abl) in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). DNA circuit known as catalyzed hairpin assembly (CHA) is enzyme-free and can be simply operated to achieve exponential amplification, which has been widely employed in biosensing. However, application of CHA has been hindered by the need of specially redesigned sequences for each single-stranded DNA input. Herein, a transducer hairpin (HP) was designed to obtain a universal DNA circuit with favorable signal-to-background ratio. To further improve signal amplification, GS/PANI/AuNPs with excellent conductivity and enlarged effective area were introduced into this DNA circuit. Consequently, by combining the advantages of CHA and GS/PANI/AuNPs, bcr/abl could be detected in a linear range from 10 pM to 20 nM with a detection limit of 1.05 pM. Moreover, this protocol showed excellent specificity, good stability and was successfully applied for the detection of real sample, which demonstrated its great potential in clinical application.

  3. BCR-crosslinking induces a transcription of protein phosphatase component G5PR that is required for mature B-cell survival

    SciTech Connect

    Huq Ronny, Faisal Mahmudul; Igarashi, Hideya; Sakaguchi, Nobuo . E-mail: nobusaka@kaiju.medic.kumamoto-u.ac.jp

    2006-02-03

    BCR-crosslinking triggers activation-induced cell death (AICD) selectively in the restricted stage of B-cell differentiation. We examined the transcription of a protein phosphatase subunit G5PR in immature and mature B-cells, because absence of this factor augmented cell sensitivity to AICD, associated with increased activation of JNK and Bim. BCR-crosslinking-induced G5pr transcription in AICD-resistant mature splenic IgM{sup lo}IgD{sup hi} B-cells but not in AICD susceptible immature IgM{sup hi}IgD{sup lo} B-cells. Thus, G5pr induction correlated with the prevention of AICD; High in mature splenic CD23{sup hi} B-cells but low in immature B-cells of neonatal mice, sub-lethally irradiated mice, or xid mice. Lack of G5pr upregulation was associated with the prolonged activation of JNK. The G5pr cDNA transfection protected an immature B-cell line WEHI-231 from BCR-mediated AICD. The differential expression of G5PR might be responsible for the antigen-dependent selection of B-cells.

  4. Bleeding complications in BCR-ABL negative myeloproliferative neoplasms: prevalence, type, and risk factors in a single-center cohort.

    PubMed

    Kander, Elizabeth M; Raza, Sania; Zhou, Zheng; Gao, Juehua; Zakarija, Anaadriana; McMahon, Brandon J; Stein, Brady L

    2015-11-01

    The BCR-ABL1-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) share an increased risk of thrombotic and hemorrhagic complications. Risk factors for hemorrhage are less well defined than those for thrombosis. Because patients with CALR mutations have higher platelet counts compared to JAK2 V617F-mutated patients, bleeding rates may be increased in this group. Our aim was to retrospectively evaluate whether acquired von Willebrand disease (AvWD), thrombocytosis, mutational status, or treatment history are associated with bleeding in a cohort of MPN patients. Using an electronic database, MPN patients seen between 2005 and 2013 were retrospectively identified using ICD-9 codes and billing records. A bleeding event was defined as one that was identified in the medical record and graded based on the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Event (CTCAE) version 4.0. Among 351 MPN patients, 15.6 % experienced 64 bleeding event types. There was no association of bleeding with mutational status, gender, MPN subtype, aspirin use, prior thrombosis, or platelet count at presentation. There was an association between bleeding and older age at diagnosis. aVWD was identified in six patients. In this single-center retrospective study, bleeding events were identified in 15 % of patients, and associated with older age at diagnosis. aVWD was rarely tested for in this cohort.

  5. Effects of modified zeolite on the removal and stabilization of heavy metals in contaminated lake sediment using BCR sequential extraction.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jia; Yi, Yuanjie; Zeng, Guangming

    2016-08-01

    Sediment can be applied on land as a soil conditioner. However, toxic substances such as heavy metals within the sediment often lead to soil contamination if no proper management is conducted prior to land application. In order to reduce the bioavailable portion of heavy metals such as Pb, Cu, Zn and Cd, zeolite as a kind of stabilizer was investigated on the effect of metal stabilization in sediment. Zeolite was firstly modified and screened to get the best condition for removal of heavy metals. Results showed that the granulated zeolite with NaCl conditioning had the highest CEC and metal sorption. Using BCR sequential extraction, the selected modified zeolite effectively stabilized Pb, Cu, Zn and Cd in sediment to different extents. It was most suitable for Cd stabilization by reducing its acid exchangeable fraction while increasing the contents of the reducible and residual fractions. Modified zeolite also immobilized Cu, Zn and Pb in sediment by enhancing one stable fraction while decreasing the acid exchangeable fraction.

  6. Cytogenetic profile of 1,863 Ph/BCR-ABL-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia patients from the Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Mu, Qitian; Ma, Qiuling; Wang, Yungui; Chen, Zhimei; Tong, Xiangmin; Chen, Fei-Fei; Lu, Ying; Jin, Jie

    2012-07-01

    Cytogenetic analyses of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) have been performed previously in a large number of reports, but systematical research based on large sample sizes from the Chinese population is seldom available. In this study, we analyzed the cytogenetic profiles of 1,863 Philadelphia (Ph)/BCR-ABL-positive CML patients from a research center in China. Of 1,266 newly diagnosed CML patients, the median age was 41 years, which is younger than the median age of diagnosis in western populations. The incidence of additional chromosome abnormalities (ACA) was 3.1% in newly diagnosed chronic phase (CP), 9.1% in CP after therapy, 35.4% in accelerated phase, and 52.9% in blast crisis (BC), reflecting cytogenetic evolution with CML progression. A higher prevalence of ACA was observed in variant Ph translocations than in standard t(9;22) in the disease progression, especially in BC (88.2% vs. 50%, P = 0.002). Moreover, a hyperdiploid karyotype and trisomy 8 were closely correlated with myeloid BC, while a hypodiploid karyotype and monosomy 7 were associated with lymphoid-BC. Among subsets of myeloid-BC, myeloid-BC with minimal differentiation had a higher ACA rate than myeloid-BC with granulocytic differentiation (80% vs. 46.8%, P = 0.009) and myeloid-BC with monocytic differentiation (80% vs. 42.9%, P = 0.006). These data provide novel insights into cytogenetics of CML within the Chinese population.

  7. “Preleukemic or smoldering” chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML):BCR-ABL1 positive: A brief case report

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, John M.; Dsouza, Kevin G.; Patel, Mehul; O’Dwyer, Kristen

    2014-01-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), in the Chronic Phase (CP), is often suspected as a result of a complete blood count (CBC), which shows increased granulocytes, mostly mature including a peak in myelocytes, increased basophils, and rarely blasts and/or promyelocytes. Morphologic dysplasia is not present. CML is confirmed by detecting the characteristic Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)[t(9;22)(q34;q11.2)] by routine cytogenetics or fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) or molecular studies (RT-PCR) for the bcr-abl fusion gene. The most common feature of CML is an elevated WBC count, usually above 25×103/µL, and frequently above 100×103/µL. We report a case of confirmed Ph+CML with a normal CBC detected because of the presence of rare myelocytes and 2% basophils [Fig. 1]. Previous leukocyte counts for the preceding eight years were normal with the exception of one done four months prior to his presentation that showed an abnormal differential with 1% basophils, 2% metamyelocytes and 2% myelocytes. PMID:25709891

  8. Evaluation of Mobility, Bioavailability and Toxicity of Pb and Cd in Contaminated Soil Using TCLP, BCR and Earthworms

    PubMed Central

    Kede, Maria Luiza F. M.; Correia, Fabio V.; Conceição, Paulo F.; Salles Junior, Sidney F.; Marques, Marcia; Moreira, Josino C.; Pérez, Daniel V.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the reduction of mobility, availability and toxicity found in soil contaminated with lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) from Santo Amaro Municipality, Bahia, Brazil using two combined methods, commonly tested separately according to the literature: metal mobilization with phosphates and phytoextraction. The strategy applied was the treatment with two sources of phosphates (separately and mixed) followed by phytoremediation with vetiver grass (Vetiveria zizanioides (L.)). The treatments applied (in triplicates) were: T1—potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KH2PO4); T2—reactive natural phosphate fertilizer (NRP) and; T3—a mixture 1:1 of KH2PO4 and NRP. After this step, untreated and treated soils were planted with vetiver grass. The extraction procedures and assays applied to contaminated soil before and after the treatments included metal mobility test (TCLP); sequential extraction with BCR method; toxicity assays with Eisenia andrei. The soil-to-plant transfer factors (TF) for Pb and Cd were estimated in all cases. All treatments with phosphates followed by phytoremediation reduced the mobility and availability of Pb and Cd, being KH2PO4 (T1) plus phytoremediation the most effective one. Soil toxicity however, remained high after all treatments. PMID:25386955

  9. In vitro transformation of immature hematopoietic cells by the P210 BCR/ABL oncogene product of the Philadelphia chromosome

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, J.; Chianese, E.; Witte, O.N.

    1987-09-01

    The Philadelphia chromosome is the cytogenetic hallmark of human chronic myelogenous leukemia. RNA splicing joins sequences from a gene on chromosome 22 (BCR) across the translocation breakpoint to a portion of the ABL oncogene from chromosome 9, resulting in a chimeric protein (P210) that is an active tyrosine kinase. Although strongly correlated with this specific human neoplasm, and implicated as an oncogene by analogy to the gene product of the Abelson murine leukemia virus, the P210 gene had not been tested directly for oncogenic potential in hematopoietic cells. The authors have used a retroviral gene-transfer system to express P210 in mouse bone marrow cells. When infected bone marrow is plated under conditions for long-term culture of cells of the B-lymphoid lineage, cells expressing high amounts of P210 tyrosine kinase dominate the culture and rapidly lead to clonal outgrowths of immature lymphoid cells. Expression of P210 is growth-stimulatory but not sufficient for full oncogenic behavior. Some clonal lines progress toward a fully malignant phenotype as judged by increased cloning efficiency in agar suspension and frequency and rapidity of tumor induction in syngeneic mice. Such in vitro systems should be useful in evaluating the sequential and perhaps synergistic involvement of the P210 gene and other oncogenes as models for the progressive changes observed in human chronic myelogenous leukemia.

  10. Programmed cell death 4 and BCR-ABL fusion gene expression are negatively correlated in chronic myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xia; Liu, Riming; Huang, Baohua; Zhang, Xiaolu; Yu, Weijuan; Bao, Cuixia; Li, Jie; Sun, Chengming

    2016-01-01

    Programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4) is a tumor suppressor that inhibits carcinogenesis, tumor progression and invasion by preventing gene transcription and translation. Downregulation of PDCD4 expression has been identified in multiple types of human cancer, however, to date, the function of PDCD4 in leukemia has not been investigated. In the present study, PDCD4 mRNA and protein expression was investigated in 50 patients exhibiting various phases of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and 20 healthy individuals by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. PDCD4 expression and cell proliferation was also investigated following treatment with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, imatinib, in K562 cells. The results demonstrated that PDCD4 mRNA and protein expression was decreased in all CML samples when compared with healthy controls, who expressed high levels of PDCD4 mRNA and protein. No significant differences in PDCD4 expression were identified between chronic phase, accelerated phase and blast phase CML patients. In addition, PDCD4 expression was negatively correlated with BCR-ABL gene expression (r=−0.6716; P<0.001). Furthermore, K562 cells treated with imatinib exhibited significantly enhanced PDCD4 expression. These results indicate that downregulation of PDCD4 expression may exhibit a critical function in the progression and malignant proliferation of human CML.

  11. Gene duplication in tetraploid fish: model for gene silencing at unlinked duplicated loci.

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, G S; Poulter, R T; Stockwell, P A

    1978-01-01

    Several groups of fishes, including salmonids and catastomids, appear to have originated through genome duplication events. However, these two groups retain approximately 50% of the loci examined as functioning duplicates, despite the passage of 50 million years or more of mutation and selection. Although other effects are not excluded, this apparently slow rate of duplicate silencing can be explained in terms of the effects of selection against defective double homozygotes to unlinked duplicates. We have derived a computer simulation of genetic drift that affords direct evaluation of the effects of population size (N), mutation rate (micron), initial allele frequencies, back mutation, fitness, and time on the probability of fixation for null alleles at unlinked duplicate loci. The results show that this probability is approximately linearly related to population size for N greater than or equal to 10(3). Specifically, for naive populations, the time for 50% probability of gene silencing is approximately equal to 15N + micron-3/4 generations. The retention of 50% of the loci as functional duplicates may therefore result from the large effective size of salmonid and catastomid populations. The results also show that, under most conditions for populations of 2000--3000 or larger, unlinked duplicate loci will be sustained in the functional state longer than tandem (linked) duplicates and hence are available for evolution of new functions for a longer time. PMID:281706

  12. Genome-wide association analysis identifies three new breast cancer susceptibility loci

    PubMed Central

    Ghoussaini, Maya; Fletcher, Olivia; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Turnbull, Clare; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Dicks, Ed; Dennis, Joe; Wang, Qin; Humphreys, Manjeet K; Luccarini, Craig; Baynes, Caroline; Conroy, Don; Maranian, Melanie; Ahmed, Shahana; Driver, Kristy; Johnson, Nichola; Orr, Nicholas; Silva, Isabel dos Santos; Waisfisz, Quinten; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Irwanto, Astrid; Liu, Jianjun; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Lichtner, Peter; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hein, Rebecca; Nickels, Stefan; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Tsimiklis, Helen; Makalic, Enes; Schmidt, Daniel; Bui, Minh; Hopper, John L; Apicella, Carmel; Park, Daniel J; Southey, Melissa; Hunter, David J; Chanock, Stephen J; Broeks, Annegien; Verhoef, Senno; Hogervorst, Frans BL; Fasching, Peter A.; Lux, Michael P.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Ekici, Arif B.; Sawyer, Elinor; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael; Marme, Frederik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Burwinkel, Barbara; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Menegaux, Florence; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Flyger, Henrik; Milne, Roger L.; Alonso, M. Rosario; González-Neira, Anna; Benítez, Javier; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Bernstein, Leslie; Dur, Christina Clarke; Brenner, Hermann; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Justenhoven, Christina; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brüning, Thomas; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Eilber, Ursula; Dörk, Thilo; Schürmann, Peter; Bremer, Michael; Hillemanns, Peter; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Antonenkova, Natalia N.; Rogov, Yuri I.; Karstens, Johann H.; Bermisheva, Marina; Prokofieva, Darya; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Lambrechts, Diether; Yesilyurt, Betul T.; Floris, Giuseppe; Leunen, Karin; Manoukian, Siranoush; Bonanni, Bernardo; Fortuzzi, Stefano; Peterlongo, Paolo; Couch, Fergus J; Wang, Xianshu; Stevens, Kristen; Lee, Adam; Giles, Graham G.; Baglietto, Laura; Severi, Gianluca; McLean, Catriona; Alnæs, Grethe Grenaker; Kristensen, Vessela; Børrensen-Dale, Anne-Lise; John, Esther M.; Miron, Alexander; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kauppila, Saila; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Devilee, Peter; van Asperen, Christie J.; Tollenaar, Rob A.E.M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Figueroa, Jonine D; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Brinton, Louise; Lissowska, Jolanta; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Oldenburg, Rogier A.; van den Ouweland, Ans M.W.; Cox, Angela; Reed, Malcolm WR; Shah, Mitul; Jakubowska, Ania; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Jones, Michael; Schoemaker, Minouk; Ashworth, Alan; Swerdlow, Anthony; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Muir, Kenneth R; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Rattanamongkongul, Suthee; Chaiwerawattana, Arkom; Kang, Daehee; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong-Young; Shen, Chen-Yang; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Wu, Pei-Ei; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Perkins, Annie; Swann, Ruth; Velentzis, Louiza; Eccles, Diana M; Tapper, Will J; Gerty, Susan M; Graham, Nikki J; Ponder, Bruce A. J.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Lathrop, Mark; Dunning, Alison M.; Rahman, Nazneen; Peto, Julian; Easton, Douglas F

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. To date, 22 common breast cancer susceptibility loci have been identified accounting for ~ 8% of the heritability of the disease. We followed up 72 promising associations from two independent Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS) in ~70,000 cases and ~68,000 controls from 41 case-control studies and nine breast cancer GWAS. We identified three new breast cancer risk loci on 12p11 (rs10771399; P=2.7 × 10−35), 12q24 (rs1292011; P=4.3×10−19) and 21q21 (rs2823093; P=1.1×10−12). SNP rs10771399 was associated with similar relative risks for both estrogen receptor (ER)-negative and ER-positive breast cancer, whereas the other two loci were associated only with ER-positive disease. Two of the loci lie in regions that contain strong plausible candidate genes: PTHLH (12p11) plays a crucial role in mammary gland development and the establishment of bone metastasis in breast cancer, while NRIP1 (21q21) encodes an ER co-factor and has a role in the regulation of breast cancer cell growth. PMID:22267197

  13. Genome-wide association study identifies novel susceptibility loci for cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chahal, Harvind S.; Lin, Yuan; Ransohoff, Katherine J.; Hinds, David A.; Wu, Wenting; Dai, Hong-Ji; Qureshi, Abrar A.; Li, Wen-Qing; Kraft, Peter; Tang, Jean Y.; Han, Jiali; Sarin, Kavita Y.

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma represents the second most common cutaneous malignancy, affecting 7–11% of Caucasians in the United States. The genetic determinants of susceptibility to cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma remain largely unknown. Here we report the results of a two-stage genome-wide association study of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma, totalling 7,404 cases and 292,076 controls. Eleven loci reached genome-wide significance (P<5 × 10−8) including seven previously confirmed pigmentation-related loci: MC1R, ASIP, TYR, SLC45A2, OCA2, IRF4 and BNC2. We identify an additional four susceptibility loci: 11q23.3 CADM1, a metastasis suppressor gene involved in modifying tumour interaction with cell-mediated immunity; 2p22.3; 7p21.1 AHR, the dioxin receptor involved in anti-apoptotic pathways and melanoma progression; and 9q34.3 SEC16A, a putative oncogene with roles in secretion and cellular proliferation. These susceptibility loci provide deeper insight into the pathogenesis of squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:27424798

  14. Genome-wide association study identifies novel susceptibility loci for cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chahal, Harvind S; Lin, Yuan; Ransohoff, Katherine J; Hinds, David A; Wu, Wenting; Dai, Hong-Ji; Qureshi, Abrar A; Li, Wen-Qing; Kraft, Peter; Tang, Jean Y; Han, Jiali; Sarin, Kavita Y

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma represents the second most common cutaneous malignancy, affecting 7-11% of Caucasians in the United States. The genetic determinants of susceptibility to cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma remain largely unknown. Here we report the results of a two-stage genome-wide association study of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma, totalling 7,404 cases and 292,076 controls. Eleven loci reached genome-wide significance (P<5 × 10(-8)) including seven previously confirmed pigmentation-related loci: MC1R, ASIP, TYR, SLC45A2, OCA2, IRF4 and BNC2. We identify an additional four susceptibility loci: 11q23.3 CADM1, a metastasis suppressor gene involved in modifying tumour interaction with cell-mediated immunity; 2p22.3; 7p21.1 AHR, the dioxin receptor involved in anti-apoptotic pathways and melanoma progression; and 9q34.3 SEC16A, a putative oncogene with roles in secretion and cellular proliferation. These susceptibility loci provide deeper insight into the pathogenesis of squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:27424798

  15. Genetic loci for retinal arteriolar microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Sim, Xueling; Jensen, Richard A; Ikram, M Kamran; Cotch, Mary Frances; Li, Xiaohui; MacGregor, Stuart; Xie, Jing; Smith, Albert Vernon; Boerwinkle, Eric; Mitchell, Paul; Klein, Ronald; Klein, Barbara E K; Glazer, Nicole L; Lumley, Thomas; McKnight, Barbara; Psaty, Bruce M; de Jong, Paulus T V M; Hofman, Albert; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Aspelund, Thor; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Harris, Tamara B; Jonasson, Fridbert; Launer, Lenore J; Attia, John; Baird, Paul N; Harrap, Stephen; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Inouye, Michael; Rochtchina, Elena; Scott, Rodney J; Viswanathan, Ananth; Li, Guo; Smith, Nicholas L; Wiggins, Kerri L; Kuo, Jane Z; Taylor, Kent D; Hewitt, Alex W; Martin, Nicholas G; Montgomery, Grant W; Sun, Cong; Young, Terri L; Mackey, David A; van Zuydam, Natalie R; Doney, Alex S F; Palmer, Colin N A; Morris, Andrew D; Rotter, Jerome I; Tai, E Shyong; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Vingerling, Johannes R; Siscovick, David S; Wang, Jie Jin; Wong, Tien Y

    2013-01-01

    Narrow arterioles in the retina have been shown to predict hypertension as well as other vascular diseases, likely through an increase in the peripheral resistance of the microcirculatory flow. In this study, we performed a genome-wide association study in 18,722 unrelated individuals of European ancestry from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology consortium and the Blue Mountain Eye Study, to identify genetic determinants associated with variations in retinal arteriolar caliber. Retinal vascular calibers were measured on digitized retinal photographs using a standardized protocol. One variant (rs2194025 on chromosome 5q14 near the myocyte enhancer factor 2C MEF2C gene) was associated with retinal arteriolar caliber in the meta-analysis of the discovery cohorts at genome-wide significance of P-value <5×10(-8). This variant was replicated in an additional 3,939 individuals of European ancestry from the Australian Twins Study and Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (rs2194025, P-value = 2.11×10(-12) in combined meta-analysis of discovery and replication cohorts). In independent studies of modest sample sizes, no significant association was found between this variant and clinical outcomes including coronary artery disease, stroke, myocardial infarction or hypertension. In conclusion, we found one novel loci which underlie genetic variation in microvasculature which may be relevant to vascular disease. The relevance of these findings to clinical outcomes remains to be determined.

  16. Genetic loci for retinal arteriolar microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Sim, Xueling; Jensen, Richard A; Ikram, M Kamran; Cotch, Mary Frances; Li, Xiaohui; MacGregor, Stuart; Xie, Jing; Smith, Albert Vernon; Boerwinkle, Eric; Mitchell, Paul; Klein, Ronald; Klein, Barbara E K; Glazer, Nicole L; Lumley, Thomas; McKnight, Barbara; Psaty, Bruce M; de Jong, Paulus T V M; Hofman, Albert; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Aspelund, Thor; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Harris, Tamara B; Jonasson, Fridbert; Launer, Lenore J; Attia, John; Baird, Paul N; Harrap, Stephen; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Inouye, Michael; Rochtchina, Elena; Scott, Rodney J; Viswanathan, Ananth; Li, Guo; Smith, Nicholas L; Wiggins, Kerri L; Kuo, Jane Z; Taylor, Kent D; Hewitt, Alex W; Martin, Nicholas G; Montgomery, Grant W; Sun, Cong; Young, Terri L; Mackey, David A; van Zuydam, Natalie R; Doney, Alex S F; Palmer, Colin N A; Morris, Andrew D; Rotter, Jerome I; Tai, E Shyong; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Vingerling, Johannes R; Siscovick, David S; Wang, Jie Jin; Wong, Tien Y

    2013-01-01

    Narrow arterioles in the retina have been shown to predict hypertension as well as other vascular diseases, likely through an increase in the peripheral resistance of the microcirculatory flow. In this study, we performed a genome-wide association study in 18,722 unrelated individuals of European ancestry from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology consortium and the Blue Mountain Eye Study, to identify genetic determinants associated with variations in retinal arteriolar caliber. Retinal vascular calibers were measured on digitized retinal photographs using a standardized protocol. One variant (rs2194025 on chromosome 5q14 near the myocyte enhancer factor 2C MEF2C gene) was associated with retinal arteriolar caliber in the meta-analysis of the discovery cohorts at genome-wide significance of P-value <5×10(-8). This variant was replicated in an additional 3,939 individuals of European ancestry from the Australian Twins Study and Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (rs2194025, P-value = 2.11×10(-12) in combined meta-analysis of discovery and replication cohorts). In independent studies of modest sample sizes, no significant association was found between this variant and clinical outcomes including coronary artery disease, stroke, myocardial infarction or hypertension. In conclusion, we found one novel loci which underlie genetic variation in microvasculature which may be relevant to vascular disease. The relevance of these findings to clinical outcomes remains to be determined. PMID:23776548

  17. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci in Quercus fabri (Fagaceae).

    PubMed

    Xiao, Z Z; Chen, W W; Bao, W; Wang, R; Li, Y Y

    2016-01-01

    Quercus fabri is a pioneer species of secondary succession in evergreen broadleaved forests in China. In this study, we isolated and developed 12 polymorphic and 2 monomorphic microsatellite loci for Q. fabri using the biotin-streptavidin capture method. We characterized 12 polymorphic loci in 52 individuals from two populations. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 3 to 23. The observed and expected heterozygosities per locus were 0.033-0.773 and 0.138-0.924, respectively. These microsatellite loci will facilitate the studies on genetic variation, mating system, and gene flow of Q. fabri. PMID:27420954

  18. Characterization of microsatellite loci isolated in Mountain Plover (Charadrius montanus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    John, J. St; Kysela, R.F.; Oyler-McCance, S.J.

    2007-01-01

    Primers for 15 microsatellite loci were developed for Mountain Plover, a species whose distribution and abundance have been reduced drastically in the past 30 years. In a screen of 126 individuals collected from four breeding locales across the species' range, levels of polymorphism ranged from two to 13 alleles per locus. No two loci were found to be linked, although one locus revealed significant departures from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. These microsatellite loci can be used in population genetic studies, ultimately aiding in management efforts for Mountain Plover. Additionally, these markers can potentially be used in studies investigating the mating system of Mountain Plover. ?? 2007 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Polymorphic microsatellite loci for the crimson snapper (Lutjanus erythropterus).

    PubMed

    Liu, L; Lin, L; Li, C H; Xu, S N; Liu, Y; Zhou, Y B

    2014-07-24

    We isolated and characterized 22 polymorphic microsatellite loci in Lutjanus erythropterus using a (GT)13-enriched genomic library. We found between 2 and 8 alleles per locus, with a mean of 4.85. The observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.065 to 0.867 and from 0.085 to 0.832, respectively, with means of 0.461 and 0.529, respectively. Allele frequencies in three loci were found to deviate from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Evidence for null alleles was found for three loci. These markers will be useful for distinguishing released captive-bred L. erythropterus individuals from wild individuals.

  20. Refining susceptibility loci of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with lung eqtls.

    PubMed

    Lamontagne, Maxime; Couture, Christian; Postma, Dirkje S; Timens, Wim; Sin, Don D; Paré, Peter D; Hogg, James C; Nickle, David; Laviolette, Michel; Bossé, Yohan

    2013-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the fourth leading cause of mortality worldwide. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified robust susceptibility loci associated with COPD. However, the mechanisms mediating the risk conferred by these loci remain to be found. The goal of this study was to identify causal genes/variants within susceptibility loci associated with COPD. In the discovery cohort, genome-wide gene expression profiles of 500 non-tumor lung specimens were obtained from patients undergoing lung surgery. Blood-DNA from the same patients were genotyped for 1,2 million SNPs. Following genotyping and gene expression quality control filters, 409 samples were analyzed. Lung expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) were identified and overlaid onto three COPD susceptibility loci derived from GWAS; 4q31 (HHIP), 4q22 (FAM13A), and 19q13 (RAB4B, EGLN2, MIA, CYP2A6). Significant eQTLs were replicated in two independent datasets (n = 363 and 339). SNPs previously associated with COPD and lung function on 4q31 (rs1828591, rs13118928) were associated with the mRNA expression of HHIP. An association between mRNA expression level of FAM13A and SNP rs2045517 was detected at 4q22, but did not reach statistical significance. At 19q13, significant eQTLs were detected with EGLN2. In summary, this study supports HHIP, FAM13A, and EGLN2 as the most likely causal COPD genes on 4q31, 4q22, and 19q13, respectively. Strong lung eQTL SNPs identified in this study will need to be tested for association with COPD in case-control studies. Further functional studies will also be needed to understand the role of genes regulated by disease-related variants in COPD.

  1. Refining Susceptibility Loci of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease with Lung eqtls

    PubMed Central

    Lamontagne, Maxime; Couture, Christian; Postma, Dirkje S.; Timens, Wim; Sin, Don D.; Paré, Peter D.; Hogg, James C.; Nickle, David; Laviolette, Michel; Bossé, Yohan

    2013-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the fourth leading cause of mortality worldwide. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified robust susceptibility loci associated with COPD. However, the mechanisms mediating the risk conferred by these loci remain to be found. The goal of this study was to identify causal genes/variants within susceptibility loci associated with COPD. In the discovery cohort, genome-wide gene expression profiles of 500 non-tumor lung specimens were obtained from patients undergoing lung surgery. Blood-DNA from the same patients were genotyped for 1,2 million SNPs. Following genotyping and gene expression quality control filters, 409 samples were analyzed. Lung expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) were identified and overlaid onto three COPD susceptibility loci derived from GWAS; 4q31 (HHIP), 4q22 (FAM13A), and 19q13 (RAB4B, EGLN2, MIA, CYP2A6). Significant eQTLs were replicated in two independent datasets (n = 363 and 339). SNPs previously associated with COPD and lung function on 4q31 (rs1828591, rs13118928) were associated with the mRNA expression of HHIP. An association between mRNA expression level of FAM13A and SNP rs2045517 was detected at 4q22, but did not reach statistical significance. At 19q13, significant eQTLs were detected with EGLN2. In summary, this study supports HHIP, FAM13A, and EGLN2 as the most likely causal COPD genes on 4q31, 4q22, and 19q13, respectively. Strong lung eQTL SNPs identified in this study will need to be tested for association with COPD in case-control studies. Further functional studies will also be needed to understand the role of genes regulated by disease-related variants in COPD. PMID:23936167

  2. DNA barcodes from four loci provide poor resolution of taxonomic groups in the genus Crataegus

    PubMed Central

    Zarrei, Mehdi; Talent, Nadia; Kuzmina, Maria; Lee, Jeanette; Lund, Jensen; Shipley, Paul R.; Stefanović, Saša; Dickinson, Timothy A.

    2015-01-01

    DNA barcodes can facilitate identification of organisms especially when morphological characters are limited or unobservable. To what extent this potential is realized in specific groups of plants remains to be determined. Libraries of barcode sequences from well-studied authoritatively identified plants represented by herbarium voucher specimens are needed in order for DNA barcodes to serve their intended purpose, where this is possible, and to understand the reasons behind their failure to do so, when this occurs. We evaluated four loci, widely regarded as universal DNA barcodes for plants, for their utility in hawthorn species identification. Three plastid regions, matK, rbcLa and psbA-trnH, and the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) of nuclear ribosomal DNA discriminate only some of the species of Crataegus that can be recognized on the basis of their morphology etc. This is, in part, because in Rosaceae tribe Maleae most individual plastid loci yield relatively little taxonomic resolution and, in part, because the effects of allopolyploidization have not been eliminated by concerted evolution of the ITS regions. Although individual plastid markers provided generally poor resolution of taxonomic groups in Crataegus, a few species were notable exceptions. In contrast, analyses of concatenated sequences of the 3 plastid barcode loci plus 11 additional plastid loci gave a well-resolved maternal phylogeny. In the ITS2 tree, different individuals of some species formed groups with taxonomically unrelated species. This is a sign of lineage sorting due to incomplete concerted evolution in ITS2. Incongruence between the ITS2 and plastid trees is best explained by hybridization between different lineages within the genus. In aggregate, limited between-species variation in plastid loci, hybridization and a lack of concerted evolution in ITS2 all combine to limit the utility of standard barcoding markers in Crataegus. These results have implications for authentication

  3. DNA barcodes from four loci provide poor resolution of taxonomic groups in the genus Crataegus.

    PubMed

    Zarrei, Mehdi; Talent, Nadia; Kuzmina, Maria; Lee, Jeanette; Lund, Jensen; Shipley, Paul R; Stefanović, Saša; Dickinson, Timothy A

    2015-01-01

    DNA barcodes can facilitate identification of organisms especially when morphological characters are limited or unobservable. To what extent this potential is realized in specific groups of plants remains to be determined. Libraries of barcode sequences from well-studied authoritatively identified plants represented by herbarium voucher specimens are needed in order for DNA barcodes to serve their intended purpose, where this is possible, and to understand the reasons behind their failure to do so, when this occurs. We evaluated four loci, widely regarded as universal DNA barcodes for plants, for their utility in hawthorn species identification. Three plastid regions, matK, rbcLa and psbA-trnH, and the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) of nuclear ribosomal DNA discriminate only some of the species of Crataegus that can be recognized on the basis of their morphology etc. This is, in part, because in Rosaceae tribe Maleae most individual plastid loci yield relatively little taxonomic resolution and, in part, because the effects of allopolyploidization have not been eliminated by concerted evolution of the ITS regions. Although individual plastid markers provided generally poor resolution of taxonomic groups in Crataegus, a few species were notable exceptions. In contrast, analyses of concatenated sequences of the 3 plastid barcode loci plus 11 additional plastid loci gave a well-resolved maternal phylogeny. In the ITS2 tree, different individuals of some species formed groups with taxonomically unrelated species. This is a sign of lineage sorting due to incomplete concerted evolution in ITS2. Incongruence between the ITS2 and plastid trees is best explained by hybridization between different lineages within the genus. In aggregate, limited between-species variation in plastid loci, hybridization and a lack of concerted evolution in ITS2 all combine to limit the utility of standard barcoding markers in Crataegus. These results have implications for authentication

  4. miR-29b suppresses CML cell proliferation and induces apoptosis via regulation of BCR/ABL1 protein

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yajuan; Wang, Haixia; Tao, Kun; Xiao, Qing; Huang, Zhenglan; Zhong, Liang; Cao, Weixi; Wen, Jianping; Feng, Wenli

    2013-05-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small RNAs that regulate gene expression posttranscriptionally and are critical for many cellular pathways. Recent evidence has shown that aberrant miRNA expression profiles and unique miRNA signaling pathways are present in many cancers. Here, we demonstrate that miR-29b is markedly lower expressed in CML patient samples. Bioinformatics analysis reveals a conserved target site for miR-29b in the 3′-untranslated region (UTR) of ABL1. miR-29b significantly suppresses the activity of a luciferase reporter containing ABL1-3′UTR and this activity is not observed in cells transfected with mutated ABL1-3′UTR. Enforced expression of miR-29b in K562 cells inhibits cell growth and colony formation ability thereby inducing apoptosis through cleavage of procaspase 3 and PARP. Furthermore, K562 cells transfected with a siRNA targeting ABL1 show similar growth and apoptosis phenotypes as cells overexpression of miR-29b. Collectively, our results suggest that miR-29b may function as a tumor suppressor by targeting ABL1 and BCR/ABL1. - Highlights: ► miR-29b expression was downregulated in CML patients. ► ABL1 was identified as a direct target gene of miR-29b. ► Enforced expression of miR-29b inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis. ► miR-29b might be a therapeutic target to CML.

  5. The Sox4/Tcf7l1 axis promotes progression of BCR-ABL-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ma, Haiqing; Mallampati, Saradhi; Lu, Yue; Sun, Baohua; Wang, Enze; Leng, Xiaohong; Gong, Yun; Shen, Haifa; Yin, C Cameron; Jones, Dan; Amin, Hesham M; You, M James; Zweidler-McKay, Patrick; Ma, Yupo; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Arlinghaus, Ralph B; Glassman, Armand; Sun, Xiaoping

    2014-10-01

    The transcription factor Sox4 plays an indispensable role in the development of early progenitor B cells from hematopoietic stem cells. However, its role in B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, a malignant counterpart of normal progenitor B cells, is not fully understood. Here we show that SOX4 is highly expressed in human acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. To systematically study the function of Sox4 in acute lymphoblastic leukemia, we established a genetically defined mouse leukemia model by transforming progenitor B cells carrying a floxed Sox4 allele and inducing deletion of the allele by the self-excising Cre recombinase. This model allowed us to work with two groups of leukemic cells that had either one copy or both copies of Sox4 deleted. We found that depletion of Sox4 in transformed cells in vitro reduced cell growth in vitro and the progression of leukemia in vivo. Moreover, depletion of Sox4 in leukemic cells in vivo prolonged the survival of the mice, suggesting that it could be a potential target in acute lymphoblastic leukemia therapy. Our microarray and bioChIP studies revealed that Tcf7l1 was the key gene directly regulated by Sox4. Knockdown of Tcf7l1 reduced cell proliferation, just as did knockout of Sox4, and ectopic expression of Tcf7l1 could reverse the effect of Sox4 knockout on cell proliferation. These data suggest that Sox4 and Tcf7l1 form a functional axis that promotes the progression of BCR-ABL-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  6. Multiple interval mapping for quantitative trait loci.

    PubMed Central

    Kao, C H; Zeng, Z B; Teasdale, R D

    1999-01-01

    A new statistical method for mapping quantitative trait loci (QTL), called multiple interval mapping (MIM), is presented. It uses multiple marker intervals simultaneously to fit multiple putative QTL directly in the model for mapping QTL. The MIM model is based on Cockerham's model for interpreting genetic parameters and the method of maximum likelihood for estimating genetic parameters. With the MIM approach, the precision and power of QTL mapping could be improved. Also, epistasis between QTL, genotypic values of individuals, and heritabilities of quantitative traits can be readily estimated and analyzed. Using the MIM model, a stepwise selection procedure with likelihood ratio test statistic as a criterion is proposed to identify QTL. This MIM method was applied to a mapping data set of radiata pine on three traits: brown cone number, tree diameter, and branch quality scores. Based on the MIM result, seven, six, and five QTL were detected for the three traits, respectively. The detected QTL individually contributed from approximately 1 to 27% of the total genetic variation. Significant epistasis between four pairs of QTL in two traits was detected, and the four pairs of QTL contributed approximately 10.38 and 14.14% of the total genetic variation. The asymptotic variances of QTL positions and effects were also provided to construct the confidence intervals. The estimated heritabilities were 0.5606, 0.5226, and 0. 3630 for the three traits, respectively. With the estimated QTL effects and positions, the best strategy of marker-assisted selection for trait improvement for a specific purpose and requirement can be explored. The MIM FORTRAN program is available on the worldwide web (http://www.stat.sinica.edu.tw/chkao/). PMID:10388834

  7. Cytogenetic Analysis of Pseudolinkage of Ldh Loci in the Teleost Genus Salvelinus

    PubMed Central

    Davisson, Muriel Trask; Wright, James E.; Atherton, Louisa M.

    1973-01-01

    Cytological and genetic analyses provide evidence that spontaneous centric fusion and fission can account for curious patterns of pseudolinkage of two LDH loci in males of brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) and in the F1, F2 and backcross generations of lake trout (S. namaycush) x brook trout hybrids. Intraindividual polymorphisms for acrocentric and metacentric chromosomes in somatic and gonadal tissue of these fish have been related to the proposed polyploid evolution in Salmonidae. PMID:17248602

  8. Assembly of the mitochondrial membrane system. XVIII. Genetic loci on mitochondrial DNA involved in cytochrome b biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Tzagoloff, A; Foury, F; Akai, A

    1976-11-24

    1. Fourteen cytoplasmic mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with a specific deficiency of cytochrome b have been studied. The mutations have been shown to occur in two separate genetic loci, COB 1 and COB 2. These loci can be distinguished by mit- X mit- crosses. Pairwise crosses of cytochrome b mutants belonging to different loci yield 4-6% wild type recombinants corresponding to recombinational frequencies of 8-12%. In intra-locus crosses, the recombinational frequencies range from 1% to less than 0.01%. The two loci can also be distinguished by mit- X rho- crosses. Twenty rho- testers have been isolated of which ten preferentially restore mutations in COB 1 and ten others in COB 2. 2. The COB 1 and COB 2 loci have been localized on mitochondrial DNA between the two antibiotic resistance loci OLI 1 and OLI 2 in the order OLI 2-COB 2-COB 1-OLI 1. The results of mit- X mit- and mit- X rho- crosses have also been used to map the cytochrome b mutations relative to each other. The maps obtained by the two independent methods are in good agreement. 3. Mutations in COB 1 have been found to be linked to the OLI1 locus in some but not in other strains of S. cervisiae. This evidence suggests that there may be a spacer region between the two loci whose length varies from strain to strain. 4. Two mutations in COB 2 have been found to cause a loss of a mitochondrial translation product corresponding to the cytochrome b apoprotein. Instead of the wild type protein the mutants have a new low-molecular weight product which is probably a fragment of cytochrome b. The fact that the mutations revert suggests that they are nonsense mutations in the structural gene of cytochrome b. PMID:796670

  9. Discovery and Refinement of Loci Associated with Lipid Levels

    PubMed Central

    Peloso, Gina M.; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Ganna, Andrea; Chen, Jin; Buchkovich, Martin L.; Mora, Samia; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L.; Chang, Hsing-Yi; Demirkan, Ayşe; Den Hertog, Heleen M.; Do, Ron; Donnelly, Louise A.; Ehret, Georg B.; Esko, Tõnu; Feitosa, Mary F.; Ferreira, Teresa; Fischer, Krista; Fontanillas, Pierre; Fraser, Ross M.; Freitag, Daniel F.; Gurdasani, Deepti; Heikkilä, Kauko; Hyppönen, Elina; Isaacs, Aaron; Jackson, Anne U.; Johansson, Åsa; Johnson, Toby; Kaakinen, Marika; Kettunen, Johannes; Kleber, Marcus E.; Li, Xiaohui; Luan, Jian’an; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Magnusson, Patrik K.E.; Mangino, Massimo; Mihailov, Evelin; Montasser, May E.; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nolte, Ilja M.; O’Connell, Jeffrey R.; Palmer, Cameron D.; Perola, Markus; Petersen, Ann-Kristin; Sanna, Serena; Saxena, Richa; Service, Susan K.; Shah, Sonia; Shungin, Dmitry; Sidore, Carlo; Song, Ci; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Surakka, Ida; Tanaka, Toshiko; Teslovich, Tanya M.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Van den Herik, Evita G.; Voight, Benjamin F.; Volcik, Kelly A.; Waite, Lindsay L.; Wong, Andrew; Wu, Ying; Zhang, Weihua; Absher, Devin; Asiki, Gershim; Barroso, Inês; Been, Latonya F.; Bolton, Jennifer L.; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Brambilla, Paolo; Burnett, Mary S.; Cesana, Giancarlo; Dimitriou, Maria; Doney, Alex S.F.; Döring, Angela; Elliott, Paul; Epstein, Stephen E.; Ingi Eyjolfsson, Gudmundur; Gigante, Bruna; Goodarzi, Mark O.; Grallert, Harald; Gravito, Martha L.; Groves, Christopher J.; Hallmans, Göran; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hayward, Caroline; Hernandez, Dena; Hicks, Andrew A.; Holm, Hilma; Hung, Yi-Jen; Illig, Thomas; Jones, Michelle R.; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Kastelein, John J.P.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Eric; Klopp, Norman; Komulainen, Pirjo; Kumari, Meena; Langenberg, Claudia; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lin, Shih-Yi; Lindström, Jaana; Loos, Ruth J.F.; Mach, François; McArdle, Wendy L; Meisinger, Christa; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Müller, Gabrielle; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Narisu, Narisu; Nieminen, Tuomo V.M.; Nsubuga, Rebecca N.; Olafsson, Isleifur; Ong, Ken K.; Palotie, Aarno; Papamarkou, Theodore; Pomilla, Cristina; Pouta, Anneli; Rader, Daniel J.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Ridker, Paul M.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Ruokonen, Aimo; Samani, Nilesh; Scharnagl, Hubert; Seeley, Janet; Silander, Kaisa; Stančáková, Alena; Stirrups, Kathleen; Swift, Amy J.; Tiret, Laurence; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; van Pelt, L. Joost; Vedantam, Sailaja; Wainwright, Nicholas; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wild, Sarah H.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wilson, James F.; Young, Elizabeth H.; Zhao, Jing Hua; Adair, Linda S.; Arveiler, Dominique; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Bennett, Franklyn; Bochud, Murielle; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Bovet, Pascal; Burnier, Michel; Campbell, Harry; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chambers, John C.; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Collins, Francis S.; Cooper, Richard S.; Danesh, John; Dedoussis, George; de Faire, Ulf; Feranil, Alan B.; Ferrières, Jean; Ferrucci, Luigi; Freimer, Nelson B.; Gieger, Christian; Groop, Leif C.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Harris, Tamara B.; Hingorani, Aroon; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Hofman, Albert; Hovingh, G. Kees; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Humphries, Steve E.; Hunt, Steven C.; Hveem, Kristian; Iribarren, Carlos; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kesäniemi, Antero; Kivimaki, Mika; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Koudstaal, Peter J.; Krauss, Ronald M.; Kuh, Diana; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kyvik, Kirsten O.; Laakso, Markku; Lakka, Timo A.; Lind, Lars; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Martin, Nicholas G.; März, Winfried; McCarthy, Mark I.; McKenzie, Colin A.; Meneton, Pierre; Metspalu, Andres; Moilanen, Leena; Morris, Andrew D.; Munroe, Patricia B.; Njølstad, Inger; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Power, Chris; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Price, Jackie F.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Quertermous, Thomas; Rauramaa, Rainer; Saleheen, Danish; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanghera, Dharambir K.; Saramies, Jouko; Schwarz, Peter E.H.; Sheu, Wayne H-H; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Siegbahn, Agneta; Spector, Tim D.; Stefansson, Kari; Strachan, David P.; Tayo, Bamidele O.; Tremoli, Elena; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uusitupa, Matti; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Vollenweider, Peter; Wallentin, Lars; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Whitfield, John B.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H.R.; Ordovas, Jose M.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Palmer, Colin N.A.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Chasman, Daniel I.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Franks, Paul W.; Ripatti, Samuli; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Sandhu, Manjinder S.; Rich, Stephen S.

    2013-01-01

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, triglycerides, and total cholesterol are heritable, modifiable, risk factors for coronary artery disease. To identify new loci and refine known loci influencing these lipids, we examined 188,578 individuals using genome-wide and custom genotyping arrays. We identify and annotate 157 loci associated with lipid levels at P < 5×10−8, including 62 loci not previously associated with lipid levels in humans. Using dense genotyping in individuals of European, East Asian, South Asian, and African ancestry, we narrow association signals in 12 loci. We find that loci associated with blood lipids are often associated with cardiovascular and metabolic traits including coronary artery disease, type 2 diabetes, blood pressure, waist-hip ratio, and body mass index. Our results illustrate the value of genetic data from individuals of diverse ancestries and provide insights into biological mechanisms regulating blood lipids to guide future genetic, biological, and therapeutic research. PMID:24097068

  10. Discovery and refinement of loci associated with lipid levels.

    PubMed

    Willer, Cristen J; Schmidt, Ellen M; Sengupta, Sebanti; Peloso, Gina M; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Ganna, Andrea; Chen, Jin; Buchkovich, Martin L; Mora, Samia; Beckmann, Jacques S; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L; Chang, Hsing-Yi; Demirkan, Ayşe; Den Hertog, Heleen M; Do, Ron; Donnelly, Louise A; Ehret, Georg B; Esko, Tõnu; Feitosa, Mary F; Ferreira, Teresa; Fischer, Krista; Fontanillas, Pierre; Fraser, Ross M; Freitag, Daniel F; Gurdasani, Deepti; Heikkilä, Kauko; Hyppönen, Elina; Isaacs, Aaron; Jackson, Anne U; Johansson, Asa; Johnson, Toby; Kaakinen, Marika; Kettunen, Johannes; Kleber, Marcus E; Li, Xiaohui; Luan, Jian'an; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Mangino, Massimo; Mihailov, Evelin; Montasser, May E; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nolte, Ilja M; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Palmer, Cameron D; Perola, Markus; Petersen, Ann-Kristin; Sanna, Serena; Saxena, Richa; Service, Susan K; Shah, Sonia; Shungin, Dmitry; Sidore, Carlo; Song, Ci; Strawbridge, Rona J; Surakka, Ida; Tanaka, Toshiko; Teslovich, Tanya M; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Van den Herik, Evita G; Voight, Benjamin F; Volcik, Kelly A; Waite, Lindsay L; Wong, Andrew; Wu, Ying; Zhang, Weihua; Absher, Devin; Asiki, Gershim; Barroso, Inês; Been, Latonya F; Bolton, Jennifer L; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Brambilla, Paolo; Burnett, Mary S; Cesana, Giancarlo; Dimitriou, Maria; Doney, Alex S F; Döring, Angela; Elliott, Paul; Epstein, Stephen E; Eyjolfsson, Gudmundur Ingi; Gigante, Bruna; Goodarzi, Mark O; Grallert, Harald; Gravito, Martha L; Groves, Christopher J; Hallmans, Göran; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hayward, Caroline; Hernandez, Dena; Hicks, Andrew A; Holm, Hilma; Hung, Yi-Jen; Illig, Thomas; Jones, Michelle R; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Kastelein, John J P; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Eric; Klopp, Norman; Komulainen, Pirjo; Kumari, Meena; Langenberg, Claudia; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lin, Shih-Yi; Lindström, Jaana; Loos, Ruth J F; Mach, François; McArdle, Wendy L; Meisinger, Christa; Mitchell, Braxton D; Müller, Gabrielle; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Narisu, Narisu; Nieminen, Tuomo V M; Nsubuga, Rebecca N; Olafsson, Isleifur; Ong, Ken K; Palotie, Aarno; Papamarkou, Theodore; Pomilla, Cristina; Pouta, Anneli; Rader, Daniel J; Reilly, Muredach P; Ridker, Paul M; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Ruokonen, Aimo; Samani, Nilesh; Scharnagl, Hubert; Seeley, Janet; Silander, Kaisa; Stancáková, Alena; Stirrups, Kathleen; Swift, Amy J; Tiret, Laurence; Uitterlinden, Andre G; van Pelt, L Joost; Vedantam, Sailaja; Wainwright, Nicholas; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wild, Sarah H; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wilson, James F; Young, Elizabeth H; Zhao, Jing Hua; Adair, Linda S; Arveiler, Dominique; Assimes, Themistocles L; Bandinelli, Stefania; Bennett, Franklyn; Bochud, Murielle; Boehm, Bernhard O; Boomsma, Dorret I; Borecki, Ingrid B; Bornstein, Stefan R; Bovet, Pascal; Burnier, Michel; Campbell, Harry; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chambers, John C; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Collins, Francis S; Cooper, Richard S; Danesh, John; Dedoussis, George; de Faire, Ulf; Feranil, Alan B; Ferrières, Jean; Ferrucci, Luigi; Freimer, Nelson B; Gieger, Christian; Groop, Leif C; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Harris, Tamara B; Hingorani, Aroon; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Hofman, Albert; Hovingh, G Kees; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Humphries, Steve E; Hunt, Steven C; Hveem, Kristian; Iribarren, Carlos; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kesäniemi, Antero; Kivimaki, Mika; Kooner, Jaspal S; Koudstaal, Peter J; Krauss, Ronald M; Kuh, Diana; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Laakso, Markku; Lakka, Timo A; Lind, Lars; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Martin, Nicholas G; März, Winfried; McCarthy, Mark I; McKenzie, Colin A; Meneton, Pierre; Metspalu, Andres; Moilanen, Leena; Morris, Andrew D; Munroe, Patricia B; Njølstad, Inger; Pedersen, Nancy L; Power, Chris; Pramstaller, Peter P; Price, Jackie F; Psaty, Bruce M; Quertermous, Thomas; Rauramaa, Rainer; Saleheen, Danish; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanghera, Dharambir K; Saramies, Jouko; Schwarz, Peter E H; Sheu, Wayne H-H; Shuldiner, Alan R; Siegbahn, Agneta; Spector, Tim D; Stefansson, Kari; Strachan, David P; Tayo, Bamidele O; Tremoli, Elena; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uusitupa, Matti; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Vollenweider, Peter; Wallentin, Lars; Wareham, Nicholas J; Whitfield, John B; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H R; Ordovas, Jose M; Boerwinkle, Eric; Palmer, Colin N A; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Chasman, Daniel I; Rotter, Jerome I; Franks, Paul W; Ripatti, Samuli; Cupples, L Adrienne; Sandhu, Manjinder S; Rich, Stephen S; Boehnke, Michael; Deloukas, Panos; Kathiresan, Sekar; Mohlke, Karen L; Ingelsson, Erik; Abecasis, Gonçalo R

    2013-11-01

    Levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, triglycerides and total cholesterol are heritable, modifiable risk factors for coronary artery disease. To identify new loci and refine known loci influencing these lipids, we examined 188,577 individuals using genome-wide and custom genotyping arrays. We identify and annotate 157 loci associated with lipid levels at P < 5 × 10(-8), including 62 loci not previously associated with lipid levels in humans. Using dense genotyping in individuals of European, East Asian, South Asian and African ancestry, we narrow association signals in 12 loci. We find that loci associated with blood lipid levels are often associated with cardiovascular and metabolic traits, including coronary artery disease, type 2 diabetes, blood pressure, waist-hip ratio and body mass index. Our results demonstrate the value of using genetic data from individuals of diverse ancestry and provide insights into the biological mechanisms regulating blood lipids to guide future genetic, biological and therapeutic research.

  11. Linkage Mapping of 1454 New Maize Candidate Gene Loci

    PubMed Central

    Falque, Matthieu; Décousset, Laurent; Dervins, Delphine; Jacob, Anne-Marie; Joets, Johann; Martinant, Jean-Pierre; Raffoux, Xavier; Ribière, Nicolas; Ridel, Céline; Samson, Delphine; Charcosset, Alain; Murigneux, Alain

    2005-01-01

    Bioinformatic analyses of maize EST sequences have highlighted large numbers of candidate genes putatively involved in agriculturally important traits. To contribute to ongoing efforts toward mapping of these genes, we used two populations of intermated recombinant inbred lines (IRILs), which allow a higher map resolution than nonintermated RILs. The first panel (IBM), derived from B73 × Mo17, is publicly available from the Maize Genetics Cooperation Stock Center. The second panel (LHRF) was developed from F2 × F252 to map loci monomorphic on IBM. We built framework maps of 237 loci from the IBM panel and 271 loci from the LHRF panel. Both maps were used to place 1454 loci (1056 on map IBM_Gnp2004 and 398 on map LHRF_Gnp2004) that corresponded to 954 cDNA probes previously unmapped. RFLP was mostly used, but PCR-based methods were also performed for some cDNAs to map SNPs. Unlike in usual IRIL-based maps published so far, corrected meiotic centimorgan distances were calculated, taking into account the number of intermating generations undergone by the IRILs. The corrected sizes of our framework maps were 1825 cM for IBM_Gnp2004 and 1862 cM for LHRF_Gnp2004. All loci mapped on LHRF_Gnp2004 were also projected on a consensus map IBMconsensus_Gnp2004. cDNA loci formed clusters near the centromeres except for chromosomes 1 and 8. PMID:15937132

  12. Linkage mapping of 1454 new maize candidate gene Loci.

    PubMed

    Falque, Matthieu; Décousset, Laurent; Dervins, Delphine; Jacob, Anne-Marie; Joets, Johann; Martinant, Jean-Pierre; Raffoux, Xavier; Ribière, Nicolas; Ridel, Céline; Samson, Delphine; Charcosset, Alain; Murigneux, Alain

    2005-08-01

    Bioinformatic analyses of maize EST sequences have highlighted large numbers of candidate genes putatively involved in agriculturally important traits. To contribute to ongoing efforts toward mapping of these genes, we used two populations of intermated recombinant inbred lines (IRILs), which allow a higher map resolution than nonintermated RILs. The first panel (IBM), derived from B73 x Mo17, is publicly available from the Maize Genetics Cooperation Stock Center. The second panel (LHRF) was developed from F2 x F252 to map loci monomorphic on IBM. We built framework maps of 237 loci from the IBM panel and 271 loci from the LHRF panel. Both maps were used to place 1454 loci (1056 on map IBM_Gnp2004 and 398 on map LHRF_Gnp2004) that corresponded to 954 cDNA probes previously unmapped. RFLP was mostly used, but PCR-based methods were also performed for some cDNAs to map SNPs. Unlike in usual IRIL-based maps published so far, corrected meiotic centimorgan distances were calculated, taking into account the number of intermating generations undergone by the IRILs. The corrected sizes of our framework maps were 1825 cM for IBM_Gnp2004 and 1862 cM for LHRF_Gnp2004. All loci mapped on LHRF_Gnp2004 were also projected on a consensus map IBMconsensus_Gnp2004. cDNA loci formed clusters near the centromeres except for chromosomes 1 and 8.

  13. Pharmacophore modeling of nilotinib as an inhibitor of ATP-binding cassette drug transporters and BCR-ABL kinase using a three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship approach.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Suneet; Kouanda, Abdul; Silverton, Latoya; Talele, Tanaji T; Ambudkar, Suresh V

    2014-07-01

    Nilotinib (Tasigna) is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor approved by the FDA to treat chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia patients. It is also a transport substrate of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) drug efflux transporters ABCB1 (P-glycoprotein, P-gp) and ABCG2 (BCRP), which may have an effect on the pharmacokinetics and toxicity of this drug. The goal of this study was to identify pharmacophoric features of nilotinib in order to potentially develop specific inhibitors of BCR-ABL kinase with minimal interactions with ABC drug transporters. Three-dimensional pharmacophore modeling and quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) studies were carried out on a series of nilotinib analogues to identify chemical features that contribute to inhibitory activity of nilotinib against BCR-ABL kinase activity, P-gp, and ABCG2. Twenty-five derivatives of nilotinib were synthesized and were then tested to measure their activity to inhibit BCR-ABL kinase and to inhibit the function of ABC drug transporters. A set of in vitro experiments including kinase activity and cell-based transport assays and photolabeling of P-gp and ABCG2 with a transport substrate, [(125)I]-iodoarylazido-prazosin (IAAP), were carried out in isolated membranes to evaluate the potency of the derivatives to inhibit the function of ABC drug transporters and BCR-ABL kinase. Sixteen, fourteen, and ten compounds were selected as QSAR data sets, respectively, to generate PHASE v3.1 pharmacophore models for BCR-ABL kinase, ABCG2, and P-gp inhibitors. The IC50 values of these derivatives against P-gp, ABCG2, or BCR-ABL kinase were used to generate pharmacophore features required for optimal interactions with these targets. A seven-point pharmacophore (AADDRRR) for BCR-ABL kinase inhibitory activity, a six-point pharmacophore (ADHRRR) for ABCG2 inhibitory activity, and a seven-point pharmacophore (AADDRRR) for P-gp inhibitory activity were generated. The derived models clearly demonstrate high predictive power

  14. Genomic architecture of alpha-amylase activity in mature rye grain relative to that of preharvest sprouting.

    PubMed

    Masojć, Piotr; Wiśniewska, Magdalena; Łań, Anna; Milczarski, Paweł; Berdzik, Marcin; Pędziwiatr, Daniel; Pol-Szyszko, Magdalena; Gałęza, Monika; Owsianicki, Radosław

    2011-05-01

    Bi-directional selective genotyping (BSG) carried out on two opposite groups of F(9)(541 × Ot1-3) recombinant inbred lines (RILs) with extremely low and extremely high alpha-amylase activities in mature (dry) grain of rye, followed by molecular mapping, revealed a complex system of selection-responsive loci. Three classes of loci controlling alpha-amylase activity were discerned, including four major AAD loci on chromosomes 3R (three loci) and 6RL (one locus) responding to both directions of the disruptive selection, 20 AAR loci on chromosomes 2RL (three loci), 3R (three loci), 4RS (two loci), 5RL (three loci), 6R (two loci) and 7R (seven loci) responding to selection for low alpha-amylase activity and 17 AAE loci on chromosomes 1RL (seven loci), 2RS (two loci), 3R (two loci), 5R (two loci) and 6RL (four loci) affected by selection for high alpha-amylase activity. The majority of the discerned AA loci also showed responsiveness to selection for preharvest sprouting (PHS). Two AAD loci on chromosome arm 3RL coincided with PHSD loci. The AAD locus on chromosome arm 3RS was independent from PHS, whereas that on chromosome 6RL belonged to the PHSR class. AAR-PHSR loci were found on chromosomes 4RS (one locus) and 5R (two loci) and AAE-PHSE loci were identified on chromosomes 1RL (one locus) and 5RL (one locus). Some PHSD loci represented the AAE (chromosomes 1RL, 3RS and 3RL) or AAR classes (chromosome 5RL). AAR and AAE loci not related to PHS were found on chromosomes 1RL, 2R, 3RS, 4R, 6RL and 7RL. On the other hand, several PHS loci (1RL, 3RS, 5RL, 6RS and 7RS) had no effect on alpha-amylase activity. Allele originating from the parental line 541 mapped in six AA loci on chromosomes 2R (two loci), 5R (three loci) and 7R (one locus) exerted opposite effects on PHS and alpha-amylase activity. Differences between the AA and PHS systems of loci may explain the weak correlation between these two traits observed among recombinant inbred lines. Strategies for the

  15. P-LOCI: a computer program for choosing the most efficient set of loci for parentage assignment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Determining which and how many codominant marker loci are required for accurate parentage assignment is not straightforward because levels of marker polymorphism and linkage, allelic distributions among potential parents and other factors produce differences in the discriminatory power of individual...

  16. Protein-Protein Interaction Analysis Highlights Additional Loci of Interest for Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ragnedda, Giammario; Disanto, Giulio; Giovannoni, Gavin; Ebers, George C.; Sotgiu, Stefano; Ramagopalan, Sreeram V.

    2012-01-01

    Genetic factors play an important role in determining the risk of multiple sclerosis (MS). The strongest genetic association in MS is located within the major histocompatibility complex class II region (MHC), but more than 50 MS loci of modest effect located outside the MHC have now been identified. However, the relative candidate genes that underlie these associations and their functions are largely unknown. We conducted a protein-protein interaction (PPI) analysis of gene products coded in loci recently reported to be MS associated at the genome-wide significance level and in loci suggestive of MS association. Our aim was to identify which suggestive regions are more likely to be truly associated, which genes are mostly implicated in the PPI network and their expression profile. From three recent independent association studies, SNPs were considered and divided into significant and suggestive depending on the strength of the statistical association. Using the Disease Association Protein-Protein Link Evaluator tool we found that direct interactions among genetic products were significantly higher than expected by chance when considering both significant regions alone (p<0.0002) and significant plus suggestive (p<0.007). The number of genes involved in the network was 43. Of these, 23 were located within suggestive regions and many of them directly interacted with proteins coded within significant regions. These included genes such as SYK, IL-6, CSF2RB, FCLR3, EIF4EBP2 and CHST12. Using the gene portal BioGPS, we tested the expression of these genes in 24 different tissues and found the highest values among immune-related cells as compared to non-immune tissues (p<0.001). A gene ontology analysis confirmed the immune-related functions of these genes. In conclusion, loci currently suggestive of MS association interact with and have similar expression profiles and function as those significantly associated, highlighting the fact that more common variants remain to be

  17. Identification of major quantitative trait loci underlying floral pollination syndrome divergence in Penstemon.

    PubMed

    Wessinger, Carolyn A; Hileman, Lena C; Rausher, Mark D

    2014-08-01

    Distinct floral pollination syndromes have emerged multiple times during the diversification of flowering plants. For example, in western North America, a hummingbird pollination syndrome has evolved more than 100 times, generally from within insect-pollinated lineages. The hummingbird syndrome is characterized by a suite of floral traits that attracts and facilitates pollen movement by hummingbirds, while at the same time discourages bee visitation. These floral traits generally include large nectar volume, red flower colour, elongated and narrow corolla tubes and reproductive organs that are exerted from the corolla. A handful of studies have examined the genetic architecture of hummingbird pollination syndrome evolution. These studies find that mutations of relatively large effect often explain increased nectar volume and transition to red flower colour. In addition, they suggest that adaptive suites of floral traits may often exhibit a high degree of genetic linkage, which could facilitate their fixation during pollination syndrome evolution. Here, we explore these emerging generalities by investigating the genetic basis of floral pollination syndrome divergence between two related Penstemon species with different pollination syndromes--bee-pollinated P. neomexicanus and closely related hummingbird-pollinated P. barbatus. In an F2 mapping population derived from a cross between these two species, we characterized the effect size of genetic loci underlying floral trait divergence associated with the transition to bird pollination, as well as correlation structure of floral trait variation. We find the effect sizes of quantitative trait loci for adaptive floral traits are in line with patterns observed in previous studies, and find strong evidence that suites of floral traits are genetically linked. This linkage may be due to genetic proximity or pleiotropic effects of single causative loci. Interestingly, our data suggest that the evolution of floral traits

  18. Identification of major quantitative trait loci underlying floral pollination syndrome divergence in Penstemon.

    PubMed

    Wessinger, Carolyn A; Hileman, Lena C; Rausher, Mark D

    2014-08-01

    Distinct floral pollination syndromes have emerged multiple times during the diversification of flowering plants. For example, in western North America, a hummingbird pollination syndrome has evolved more than 100 times, generally from within insect-pollinated lineages. The hummingbird syndrome is characterized by a suite of floral traits that attracts and facilitates pollen movement by hummingbirds, while at the same time discourages bee visitation. These floral traits generally include large nectar volume, red flower colour, elongated and narrow corolla tubes and reproductive organs that are exerted from the corolla. A handful of studies have examined the genetic architecture of hummingbird pollination syndrome evolution. These studies find that mutations of relatively large effect often explain increased nectar volume and transition to red flower colour. In addition, they suggest that adaptive suites of floral traits may often exhibit a high degree of genetic linkage, which could facilitate their fixation during pollination syndrome evolution. Here, we explore these emerging generalities by investigating the genetic basis of floral pollination syndrome divergence between two related Penstemon species with different pollination syndromes--bee-pollinated P. neomexicanus and closely related hummingbird-pollinated P. barbatus. In an F2 mapping population derived from a cross between these two species, we characterized the effect size of genetic loci underlying floral trait divergence associated with the transition to bird pollination, as well as correlation structure of floral trait variation. We find the effect sizes of quantitative trait loci for adaptive floral traits are in line with patterns observed in previous studies, and find strong evidence that suites of floral traits are genetically linked. This linkage may be due to genetic proximity or pleiotropic effects of single causative loci. Interestingly, our data suggest that the evolution of floral traits

  19. Distinct characteristics of e13a2 versus e14a2 BCR-ABL1 driven chronic myeloid leukemia under first-line therapy with imatinib

    PubMed Central

    Hanfstein, Benjamin; Lauseker, Michael; Hehlmann, Rüdiger; Saussele, Susanne; Erben, Philipp; Dietz, Christian; Fabarius, Alice; Proetel, Ulrike; Schnittger, Susanne; Haferlach, Claudia; Krause, Stefan W.; Schubert, Jörg; Einsele, Hermann; Hänel, Mathias; Dengler, Jolanta; Falge, Christiane; Kanz, Lothar; Neubauer, Andreas; Kneba, Michael; Stegelmann, Frank; Pfreundschuh, Michael; Waller, Cornelius F.; Spiekermann, Karsten; Baerlocher, Gabriela M.; Pfirrmann, Markus; Hasford, Joerg; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Hochhaus, Andreas; Müller, Martin C.

    2014-01-01

    The vast majority of chronic myeloid leukemia patients express a BCR-ABL1 fusion gene mRNA encoding a 210 kDa tyrosine kinase which promotes leukemic transformation. A possible differential impact of the corresponding BCR-ABL1 transcript variants e13a2 (“b2a2”) and e14a2 (“b3a2”) on disease phenotype and outcome is still a subject of debate. A total of 1105 newly diagnosed imatinib-treated patients were analyzed according to transcript type at diagnosis (e13a2, n=451; e14a2, n=496; e13a2+e14a2, n=158). No differences regarding age, sex, or Euro risk score were observed. A significant difference was found between e13a2 and e14a2 when comparing white blood cells (88 vs. 65 × 109/L, respectively; P<0.001) and platelets (296 vs. 430 × 109/L, respectively; P<0.001) at diagnosis, indicating a distinct disease phenotype. No significant difference was observed regarding other hematologic features, including spleen size and hematologic adverse events, during imatinib-based therapies. Cumulative molecular response was inferior in e13a2 patients (P=0.002 for major molecular response; P<0.001 for MR4). No difference was observed with regard to cytogenetic response and overall survival. In conclusion, e13a2 and e14a2 chronic myeloid leukemia seem to represent distinct biological entities. However, clinical outcome under imatinib treatment was comparable and no risk prediction can be made according to e13a2 versus e14a2 BCR-ABL1 transcript type at diagnosis. (clinicaltrials.gov identifier:00055874) PMID:24837466

  20. Novel pathway in Bcr-Abl signal transduction involves Akt-independent, PLC-gamma1-driven activation of mTOR/p70S6-kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Markova, B; Albers, C; Breitenbuecher, F; Melo, J V; Brümmendorf, T H; Heidel, F; Lipka, D; Duyster, J; Huber, C; Fischer, T

    2010-02-01

    In chronic myeloid leukemia, activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway is crucial for survival and proliferation of leukemic cells. Essential downstream molecules involve mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and S6-kinase. Here, we present a comprehensive analysis of the molecular events involved in activation of these key signaling pathways. We provide evidence for a previously unrecognized phospholipase C-gamma1 (PLC-gamma1)-controlled mechanism of mTOR/p70S6-kinase activation, which operates in parallel to the classical Akt-dependent machinery. Short-term imatinib treatment of Bcr-Abl-positive cells caused dephosphorylation of p70S6-K and S6-protein without inactivation of Akt. Suppression of Akt activity alone did not affect phosphorylation of p70-S6K and S6. These results suggested the existence of an alternative mechanism for mTOR/p70S6-K activation. In Bcr-Abl-expressing cells, we detected strong PLC-gamma1 activation, which was suppressed by imatinib. Pharmacological inhibition and siRNA knockdown of PLC-gamma1 blocked p70S6-K and S6 phosphorylation. By inhibiting the Ca-signaling, CaMK and PKCs we demonstrated participation of these molecules in the pathway. Suppression of PLC-gamma1 led to inhibition of cell proliferation and enhanced apoptosis. The novel pathway proved to be essential for survival and proliferation of leukemic cells and almost complete cell death was observed upon combined PLC-gamma1 and Bcr-Abl inhibition. The pivotal role of PLC-gamma1 was further confirmed in a mouse leukemogenesis model.

  1. Comparative quantitative analysis of BCR-ABL transcripts with the T315I mutant clone by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-Invader method.

    PubMed

    Tadokoro, Kenichi; Ishikawa, Maho; Suzuki, Makoto; Saito, Tomoyoshi; Suzuki, Yoshie; Yamaguchi, Toshikazu; Yagasaki, Fumiharu

    2011-09-01

    Drug resistance is a serious complication in the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). The most common and best-characterized mechanism of secondary imatinib resistance in CML is the development of kinase domain mutations in the BCR-ABL gene. Second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors, such as dasatinib or nilotinib, overcome most of these mutations, but they are not effective against the T315I mutant. To determine whether these mutations contribute to clinical resistance, it is necessary to monitor the ratio of the mutant and wild-type forms. Here, we developed a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-Invader assay for comparative quantitative analysis (qPI assay) of BCR-ABL transcripts with the T315I mutant clone. T315I ratios were calculated for the wild-type and mutant fold-over-zero (FOZ) values. In examination with 2 kinds of plasmids containing wild-type or T315I mutant PCR amplicons, mutant FOZ values were detected down to 1% of the total. The results of 12 serial samples from 2 patients (case A: Philadelphia-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia and case B: CML) with the T315I mutant clone were compared with those of direct sequencing or 2 kinds of allele-specific oligonucleotide (ASO)-PCR. All samples showed the T315I mutation by qPI assay and ASO-PCR, and 10 samples showed it by direct sequencing. Significant correlation (correlation coefficient; r2 = 0.951) was noted between the qPI assay and quantitative ASO-PCR to analyze T315I mutant ratios. Thus, the qPI assay is a useful method for evaluating the T315I mutant clone in BCR-ABL transcripts.

  2. Comparative quantitative analysis of BCR-ABL transcripts with the T315I mutant clone by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-Invader method.

    PubMed

    Tadokoro, Kenichi; Ishikawa, Maho; Suzuki, Makoto; Saito, Tomoyoshi; Suzuki, Yoshie; Yamaguchi, Toshikazu; Yagasaki, Fumiharu

    2011-09-01

    Drug resistance is a serious complication in the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). The most common and best-characterized mechanism of secondary imatinib resistance in CML is the development of kinase domain mutations in the BCR-ABL gene. Second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors, such as dasatinib or nilotinib, overcome most of these mutations, but they are not effective against the T315I mutant. To determine whether these mutations contribute to clinical resistance, it is necessary to monitor the ratio of the mutant and wild-type forms. Here, we developed a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-Invader assay for comparative quantitative analysis (qPI assay) of BCR-ABL transcripts with the T315I mutant clone. T315I ratios were calculated for the wild-type and mutant fold-over-zero (FOZ) values. In examination with 2 kinds of plasmids containing wild-type or T315I mutant PCR amplicons, mutant FOZ values were detected down to 1% of the total. The results of 12 serial samples from 2 patients (case A: Philadelphia-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia and case B: CML) with the T315I mutant clone were compared with those of direct sequencing or 2 kinds of allele-specific oligonucleotide (ASO)-PCR. All samples showed the T315I mutation by qPI assay and ASO-PCR, and 10 samples showed it by direct sequencing. Significant correlation (correlation coefficient; r2 = 0.951) was noted between the qPI assay and quantitative ASO-PCR to analyze T315I mutant ratios. Thus, the qPI assay is a useful method for evaluating the T315I mutant clone in BCR-ABL transcripts. PMID:21867983

  3. Down-regulation of Thanatos-associated protein 11 by BCR-ABL promotes CML cell proliferation through c-Myc expression.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Satoki; Yokota, Daisuke; Tan, Lin; Nagata, Yasuyuki; Takemura, Tomonari; Hirano, Isao; Shigeno, Kazuyuki; Shibata, Kiyoshi; Fujisawa, Shinya; Ohnishi, Kazunori

    2012-03-01

    Bcr-Abl activates various signaling pathways in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cells. The proliferation of Bcr-Abl transformed cells is promoted by c-Myc through the activation of Akt, JAK2 and NF-κB. However, the mechanism by which c-Myc regulates CML cell proliferation is unclear. In our study, we investigated the role of Thanatos-associated protein 11 (THAP11), which inhibits c-Myc transcription, in CML cell lines and in hematopoietic progenitor cells derived from CML patients. The induction of THAP11 expression by Abl kinase inhibitors in CML cell lines and in CML-derived hematopoietic progenitor cells resulted in the suppression of c-Myc. In addition, over-expression of THAP11 inhibited CML cell proliferation. In colony forming cells derived from CML-aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH)(hi) /CD34(+) cells, treatment with Abl kinase inhibitors and siRNA depletion of Bcr-Abl induced THAP11 expression and reduced c-Myc expression, resulting in inhibited colony formation. Moreover, overexpression of THAP11 significantly decreased the colony numbers, and also inhibited the expression of c-myc target genes such as Cyclin D1, ODC and induced the expression of p21(Cip1) . The depletion of THAP11 inhibited JAK2 or STAT5 inactivation-mediated c-Myc reduction in ALDH(hi) /CD34(+) CML cells. Thus, the induced THAP11 might be one of transcriptional regulators of c-Myc expression in CML cell. Therefore, the induction of THAP11 has a potential possibility as a target for the inhibition of CML cell proliferation. PMID:21400515

  4. Distinct characteristics of e13a2 versus e14a2 BCR-ABL1 driven chronic myeloid leukemia under first-line therapy with imatinib.

    PubMed

    Hanfstein, Benjamin; Lauseker, Michael; Hehlmann, Rüdiger; Saussele, Susanne; Erben, Philipp; Dietz, Christian; Fabarius, Alice; Proetel, Ulrike; Schnittger, Susanne; Haferlach, Claudia; Krause, Stefan W; Schubert, Jörg; Einsele, Hermann; Hänel, Mathias; Dengler, Jolanta; Falge, Christiane; Kanz, Lothar; Neubauer, Andreas; Kneba, Michael; Stegelmann, Frank; Pfreundschuh, Michael; Waller, Cornelius F; Spiekermann, Karsten; Baerlocher, Gabriela M; Pfirrmann, Markus; Hasford, Joerg; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Hochhaus, Andreas; Müller, Martin C

    2014-09-01

    The vast majority of chronic myeloid leukemia patients express a BCR-ABL1 fusion gene mRNA encoding a 210 kDa tyrosine kinase which promotes leukemic transformation. A possible differential impact of the corresponding BCR-ABL1 transcript variants e13a2 ("b2a2") and e14a2 ("b3a2") on disease phenotype and outcome is still a subject of debate. A total of 1105 newly diagnosed imatinib-treated patients were analyzed according to transcript type at diagnosis (e13a2, n=451; e14a2, n=496; e13a2+e14a2, n=158). No differences regarding age, sex, or Euro risk score were observed. A significant difference was found between e13a2 and e14a2 when comparing white blood cells (88 vs. 65 × 10(9)/L, respectively; P<0.001) and platelets (296 vs. 430 × 10(9)/L, respectively; P<0.001) at diagnosis, indicating a distinct disease phenotype. No significant difference was observed regarding other hematologic features, including spleen size and hematologic adverse events, during imatinib-based therapies. Cumulative molecular response was inferior in e13a2 patients (P=0.002 for major molecular response; P<0.001 for MR4). No difference was observed with regard to cytogenetic response and overall survival. In conclusion, e13a2 and e14a2 chronic myeloid leukemia seem to represent distinct biological entities. However, clinical outcome under imatinib treatment was comparable and no risk prediction can be made according to e13a2 versus e14a2 BCR-ABL1 transcript type at diagnosis. (clinicaltrials.gov identifier:00055874). PMID:24837466

  5. Modeling the low-LET dose-response of BCR-ABL formation: predicting stem cell numbers from A-bomb data.

    PubMed

    Radivoyevitch, T; Hoel, D G

    1999-01-01

    Formation of the BCR-ABL chromosomal translocation t(9;22)(q34;q11) is essential to the genesis of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). An interest in the dose-response of radiation induced CML therefore leads naturally to an interest in the dose-response of BCR-ABL formation. To predict the BCR-ABL dose-response to low-linear energy transfer (LET) ionizing radiation, three models valid over three different dose ranges are examined: the first for doses greater than 80 Gy, the second for doses less than 5 Gy and the third for doses greater than 2 Gy. The first of the models, due to Holley and Chatterjee, ignores the accidental binary eurejoining of DNA double-strand break (DSB) free ends ('eurejoining' refers to the accidental restitution of DSB free ends with their own proper mates). As a result, the model is valid only in the limit of high doses. The second model is derived directly from cytogenetic data. This model has the attractive feature that it implicitly accounts for single-track effects at low doses. The third model, based on the Sax-Markov binary eurejoining/misrejoining (SMBE) algorithm, does not account for single-track effects and is therefore limited to moderate doses greater than approximately 2 Gy. Comparing the second model to lifetime excess CML risks expected after 1 Gy, estimates of the number of hematopoietic stem cells capable of causing CML were obtained for male and female atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The stem cell number estimates lie in the range of 5 x 10(7)-3 x 10(8) cells. PMID:10616282

  6. Thirty new loci for age at menarche identified by a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies

    PubMed Central

    Elks, Cathy E.; Perry, John R.B.; Sulem, Patrick; Chasman, Daniel I.; Franceschini, Nora; He, Chunyan; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Visser, Jenny A.; Byrne, Enda M.; Cousminer, Diana L.; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F.; Esko, Tõnu; Feenstra, Bjarke; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Koller, Daniel L.; Kutalik, Zoltán; Lin, Peng; Mangino, Massimo; Marongiu, Mara; McArdle, Patrick F.; Smith, Albert V.; Stolk, Lisette; van Wingerden, Sophie W.; Zhao, Jing Hua; Albrecht, Eva; Corre, Tanguy; Ingelsson, Erik; Hayward, Caroline; Magnusson, Patrik K.E.; Smith, Erin N.; Ulivi, Shelia; Warrington, Nicole M.; Zgaga, Lina; Alavere, Helen; Amin, Najaf; Aspelund, Thor; Bandinelli, Stefania; Barroso, Ines; Berenson, Gerald S.; Bergmann, Sven; Blackburn, Hannah; Boerwinkle, Eric; Buring, Julie E.; Busonero, Fabio; Campbell, Harry; Chanock, Stephen J.; Chen, Wei; Cornelis, Marilyn C.; Couper, David; Coviello, Andrea D.; d’Adamo, Pio; de Faire, Ulf; de Geus, Eco J.C.; Deloukas, Panos; Döring, Angela; Smith, George Davey; Easton, Douglas F.; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Emilsson, Valur; Eriksson, Johan; Ferrucci, Luigi; Folsom, Aaron R.; Foroud, Tatiana; Garcia, Melissa; Gasparini, Paolo; Geller, Frank; Gieger, Christian; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hall, Per; Hankinson, Susan E.; Ferreli, Liana; Heath, Andrew C.; Hernandez, Dena G.; Hofman, Albert; Hu, Frank B.; Illig, Thomas; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Johnson, Andrew D.; Karasik, David; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kiel, Douglas P.; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O.; Kolcic, Ivana; Kraft, Peter; Launer, Lenore J.; Laven, Joop S.E.; Li, Shengxu; Liu, Jianjun; Levy, Daniel; Martin, Nicholas G.; McArdle, Wendy L.; Melbye, Mads; Mooser, Vincent; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Murray, Sarah S.; Nalls, Michael A.; Navarro, Pau; Nelis, Mari; Ness, Andrew R.; Northstone, Kate; Oostra, Ben A.; Peacock, Munro; Palmer, Lyle J.; Palotie, Aarno; Paré, Guillaume; Parker, Alex N.; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Peltonen, Leena; Pennell, Craig E.; Pharoah, Paul; Polasek, Ozren; Plump, Andrew S.; Pouta, Anneli; Porcu, Eleonora; Rafnar, Thorunn; Rice, John P.; Ring, Susan M.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Sala, Cinzia; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanna, Serena; Schlessinger, David; Schork, Nicholas J.; Scuteri, Angelo; Segrè, Ayellet V.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Soranzo, Nicole; Sovio, Ulla; Srinivasan, Sathanur R.; Strachan, David P.; Tammesoo, Mar-Liis; Tikkanen, Emmi; Toniolo, Daniela; Tsui, Kim; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Tyrer, Jonathon; Uda, Manuela; van Dam, Rob M.; van Meurs, Joyve B.J.; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gerard; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Waterworth, Dawn M.; Weedon, Michael N.; Wichmann, H. Erich; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilson, James F.; Wright, Alan F.; Young, Lauren; Zhai, Guangju; Zhuang, Wei Vivian; Bierut, Laura J.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Boyd, Heather A.; Crisponi, Laura; Demerath, Ellen W.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Econs, Michael J.; Harris, Tamara B.; Hunter, David J.; Loos, Ruth J.F.; Metspalu, Andres; Montgomery, Grant W.; Ridker, Paul M.; Spector, Tim D.; Streeten, Elizabeth A.; Stefansson, Kari; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Uitterlinden, André G.; Widen, Elisabeth; Murabito, Joanne M.; Ong, Ken K.; Murray, Anna

    2011-01-01

    To identify loci for age at menarche, we performed a meta-analysis of 32 genome-wide association studies in 87,802 women of European descent, with replication in up to 14,731 women. In addition to the known loci at LIN28B (P=5.4×10−60) and 9q31.2 (P=2.2×10−33), we identified 30 novel menarche loci (all P<5×10−8) and found suggestive evidence for a further 10 loci (P<1.9×10−6). New loci included four previously associated with BMI (in/near FTO, SEC16B, TRA2B and TMEM18), three in/near other genes implicated in energy homeostasis (BSX, CRTC1, and MCHR2), and three in/near genes implicated in hormonal regulation (INHBA, PCSK2 and RXRG). Ingenuity and MAGENTA pathway analyses identified coenzyme A and fatty acid biosynthesis as biological processes related to menarche timing. PMID:21102462

  7. Admixture as a tool for finding linked genes and detecting that difference from allelic association between loci.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, R; Weiss, K M

    1988-12-01

    Admixture between genetically different populations may produce gametic association between gene loci as a function of the genetic difference between parental populations and the admixture rate. This association decays as a function of time since admixture and the recombination rate between the loci. Admixture between genetically long-separated human populations has been frequent in the centuries since the age of exploration and colonization, resulting in numerous hybrid descendant populations today, as in the Americas. This represents a natural experiment for genetic epidemiology and anthropology, in which to use polymorphic marker loci (e.g., restriction fragment length polymorphisms) and disequilibrium to infer a genetic basis for traits of interest. In this paper we show that substantial disequilibrium remains today under widely applicable situations, which can be detected without requiring inordinately close linkage between trait and marker loci. Very disparate parental allele frequencies produce large disequilibrium, but the sample size needed to detect such levels of disequilibrium can be large due to the skewed haplotype frequency distribution in the admixed population. Such situations, however, provide power to differentiate between disequilibrium due just to population mixing from that due to physical linkage of loci--i.e., to help map the genetic locus of the trait. A gradient of admixture levels between the same parental populations may be used to test genetic models by relating admixture to disequilibrium levels.

  8. Enrichment of Vitamin D response elements in RA associated loci supports a role for vitamin D in the pathogenesis of RA

    PubMed Central

    Yarwood, Annie; Martin, Paul; Bowes, John; Lunt, Mark; Worthington, Jane; Barton, Anne; Eyre, Steve

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the role of vitamin-D in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) pathogenesis by investigating enrichment of vitamin-D response elements (VDREs) in confirmed RA susceptibility loci and testing variants associated with vitamin-D levels for association with RA. Bioinformatically, VDRE genomic positions were overlaid with non HLA confirmed RA susceptibility regions. The number of VDREs at RA loci was compared to a randomly selected set of genomic loci to calculate an average relative risk (RR). SNPs in the DHCR7/NADSYN1 and CYP2R1 loci, previously associated with circulating vitamin-D levels, were tested in UK RA cases (n = 3870) and controls (n = 8430). Significant enrichment of VDREs was seen at RA loci (p=9.23×10−8) when regions were defined either by gene (RR 5.50) or position (RR 5.86). SNPs in the DHCR7/NADSYN1 locus showed evidence of positive association with RA, rs4944076 (p=0.008, OR 1.14 95% CI 1.03-1.24). The significant enrichment of VDREs at RA associated loci and the modest association of variants in loci controlling levels of circulating vitamin-D, supports the hypothesis that vitamin-D plays a role in the development of RA. PMID:23636220

  9. Genetic association studies in complex disease: disentangling additional predisposing loci from associated neutral loci using a constrained - permutation approach.

    PubMed

    Spijker, G T; Nolte, I M; Jansen, R C; Te Meerman, G J

    2005-01-01

    In the process of genetically mapping a complex disease, the question may arise whether a certain polymorphism is the only causal variant in a region. A number of methods can answer this question, but unfortunately these methods are optimal for bi-allelic loci only. We wanted to develop a method that is more suited for multi-allelic loci, such as microsatellite markers. We propose the Additional Disease Loci Test (ADLT): the alleles at an additional locus are permuted within the subsample of haplotypes that have identical alleles at the predisposing locus. The hypothesis being tested is, whether the predisposing locus is the sole factor predisposing to the trait that is in LD with the additional locus under study. We applied ADLT to simulated datasets and a published dataset on Type 1 Diabetes, genotyped for microsatellite markers in the HLA-region. The method showed the expected number of false-positive results in the absence of additional loci, but proved to be more powerful than existing methods in the presence of additional disease loci. ADLT was especially superior in datasets with less LD or with multiple predisposing alleles. We conclude that the ADLT can be useful in identifying additional disease loci.

  10. Quantitative trait loci underlying udder morphology traits in dairy sheep.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Gil, B; El-Zarei, M F; Alvarez, L; Bayón, Y; de la Fuente, L F; San Primitivo, F; Arranz, J J

    2008-09-01

    A genome scan was conducted on the basis of the daughter design to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) influencing udder morphology traits in Spanish Churra dairy sheep. A total of 739 ewes belonging to 11 half-sib families were genotyped for 182 microsatellite markers covering 3,248.2 cM (Kosambi) of the ovine autosomal genome. Phenotypic traits included scores for 5 linear udder traits: udder depth, udder attachment, teat placement, teat size, and udder shape. Quantitative measurements for the QTL analysis were calculated for each trait from evaluation scores using within-family yield deviations corrected for fixed environmental effects. Joint analysis of all families using Haley-Knott regression identified 5 regions that exceeded the 5% chromosome-wise significance threshold on chromosomes 7, 14, 15, 20, and 26. Based on the across-family results, a within-family analysis was carried out to identify families segregated according to the QTL and to estimate the QTL effect. The allelic substitution effect for individual families ranged from 0.47 to 1.7 phenotypic standard deviation units for udder shape on chromosome 15 and udder depth on chromosome 14, respectively. These QTL regions provide a starting point for further research aimed at the characterization of genetic variability involved in udder traits in Churra sheep. This paper presents the first report of a sheep genome scan for udder-related traits in a dairy sheep outbred population.

  11. Quantitative trait loci underlying milk production traits in sheep.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Gil, B; El-Zarei, M F; Alvarez, L; Bayón, Y; de la Fuente, L F; San Primitivo, F; Arranz, J-J

    2009-08-01

    Improvement of milk production traits in dairy sheep is required to increase the competitiveness of the industry and to maintain the production of high quality cheese in regions of Mediterranean countries with less favourable conditions. Additional improvement over classical selection could be reached if genes with significant effects on the relevant traits were specifically targeted by selection. However, so far, few studies have been undertaken to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) in dairy sheep. In this study, we present a complete genome scan performed in a commercial population of Spanish Churra sheep to identify chromosomal regions associated with phenotypic variation observed in milk production traits. Eleven half-sib families, including a total of 1213 ewes, were analysed following a daughter design. Genome-wise multi-marker regression analysis revealed a genome-wise significant QTL for milk protein percentage on chromosome 3. Eight other regions, localized on chromosomes 1, 2, 20, 23 and 25, showed suggestive significant linkage associations with some of the analysed traits. To our knowledge, this study represents the first complete genome scan for milk production traits reported in dairy sheep. The experiment described here shows that analysis of commercial dairy sheep populations has the potential to increase our understanding of the genetic determinants of complex production-related traits.

  12. Complex germline architecture: two genes intertwined on two loci.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Shiuhyang; Chang, Wei-Jen; Landweber, Laura F

    2006-01-01

    The germline micronuclear genome of some ciliated protists can be scrambled, with coding segments disordered relative to the expressed macronuclear genome. Here, we report a surprisingly complex pair of genes that assemble from interwoven segments on two germline loci in the ciliate Uroleptus. This baroque organization requires two scrambled genes to be disentangled from each other from two clusters in the genome, one containing segments 1-2-4-5-6-8-11-13-15-16 and the other 7-9-3-10-12-14, with pieces 1-5 comprising the first gene and 6-16 the second gene. Both genes remain linked in the somatic genome on a 1.5-kb "nanochromosome." This study is the first to reveal that two genes can become scrambled during evolution with their coding segments intertwined. These twin scrambled genes underscore the beauty and exceptions of protist genome architecture, pointing to the critical need for evolutionary biologists to survey protist genomes broadly. PMID:16162864

  13. Runs of homozygosity reveal highly penetrant recessive loci in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Lencz, Todd; Lambert, Christophe; DeRosse, Pamela; Burdick, Katherine E.; Morgan, T. Vance; Kane, John M.; Kucherlapati, Raju; Malhotra, Anil K.

    2007-01-01

    Evolutionarily significant selective sweeps may result in long stretches of homozygous polymorphisms in individuals from outbred populations. We developed whole-genome homozygosity association (WGHA) methodology to characterize this phenomenon in healthy individuals and to use this genomic feature to identify genetic risk loci for schizophrenia (SCZ). Applying WGHA to 178 SCZ cases and 144 healthy controls genotyped at 500,000 markers, we found that runs of homozygosity (ROHs), ranging in size from 200 kb to 15 mb, were common in unrelated Caucasians. Properties of common ROHs in healthy subjects, including chromosomal location and presence of nonancestral haplotypes, converged with prior reports identifying regions under selective pressure. This interpretation was further supported by analysis of multiethnic HapMap samples genotyped with the same markers. ROHs were significantly more common in SCZ cases, and a set of nine ROHs significantly differentiated cases from controls. Four of these 9 “risk ROHs” contained or neighbored genes associated with SCZ (NOS1AP, ATF2, NSF, and PIK3C3). Several of these risk ROHs were very rare in healthy subjects, suggesting that recessive effects of relatively high penetrance may explain a proportion of the genetic liability for SCZ. Other risk ROHs feature haplotypes that are also common in healthy individuals, possibly indicating a source of balancing selection. PMID:18077426

  14. The use of selection experiments for detecting quantitative trait loci.

    PubMed

    Ollivier, L; Messer, L A; Rothschild, M F; Legault, C

    1997-06-01

    Gene frequency changes following selection may reveal the existence of gene effects on the trait selected. Loci for the selected quantitative trait (SQTL) may thus be detected. Additionally, one can estimate the average effect (alpha) of a marker allele associated with an SQTL from the allele frequency change (delta q) due to selection of given intensity (i). In a sample of unrelated individuals, it is optimal to select the upper and lower 27% for generating delta q in order to estimate alpha. For a given number of individuals genotyped, this estimator is 0.25i2 times more efficient than the classical estimator of alpha, based on the regression of the trait on the genotype at the marker locus. The method is extended to selection criteria using information from relatives, showing that combined selection considerably increases the efficiency of estimation for traits of low heritability. The method has been applied to the detection of SQTL in a selection experiment in which the trait selected was pig litter size averaged over the first four parities, with i = 3. Results for four genes are provided, one of which yielded a highly significant effect. The conditions required for valid application of the method are discussed, including selection experiments over several generations. Additional advantages of the method can be anticipated from determining gene frequencies on pooled samples of blood or DNA.

  15. Variation in rDNA locus number and position among legume species and detection of 2 linked rDNA loci in the model Medicago truncatula by FISH.

    PubMed

    Abirached-Darmency, Mona; Prado-Vivant, Emilce; Chelysheva, Liudmila; Pouthier, Thomas

    2005-06-01

    Within Fabaceae, legume species have a variable genome size, chromosome number, and ploidy level. The genome distribution of ribosomal genes, easily detectable by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), is a good tool for anchoring physical and genetic comparative maps. The organisation of 45S rDNA and 5S loci was analysed by FISH in the 4 closely related species: Pisum sativum, Medicago truncatula, Medicago sativa (2 diploid taxa), and Lathyrus sativus. The 2 types of rDNA arrays displayed interspecific variation in locus number and location, but little intraspecific variation was detected. In the model legume, M. truncatula, the presence of 2 adjacent 45S rDNA loci was demonstrated, and the location of the rDNA loci was independent of the general evolution of the genome DNA. The different parameters relative to clustering of the rDNA loci in specific chromosome regions and the possible basis of rDNA instability are discussed. PMID:16121252

  16. Genome-wide association analysis identifies six new loci associated with forced vital capacity

    PubMed Central

    Loth, Daan W.; Artigas, María Soler; Gharib, Sina A.; Wain, Louise V.; Franceschini, Nora; Koch, Beate; Pottinger, Tess; Smith, Albert Vernon; Duan, Qing; Oldmeadow, Chris; Lee, Mi Kyeong; Strachan, David P.; James, Alan L.; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Vitart, Veronique; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Wang, Xin-Qun; Trochet, Holly; Kähönen, Mika; Flexeder, Claudia; Albrecht, Eva; Lopez, Lorna M.; de Jong, Kim; Thyagarajan, Bharat; Alves, Alexessander Couto; Enroth, Stefan; Omenaas, Ernst; Joshi, Peter K.; Fall, Tove; Viňuela, Ana; Launer, Lenore J.; Loehr, Laura R.; Fornage, Myriam; Li, Guo; Wilk, Jemma B.; Tang, Wenbo; Manichaikul, Ani; Lahousse, Lies; Harris, Tamara B.; North, Kari E.; Rudnicka, Alicja R.; Hui, Jennie; Gu, Xiangjun; Lumley, Thomas; Wright, Alan F.; Hastie, Nicholas D.; Campbell, Susan; Kumar, Rajesh; Pin, Isabelle; Scott, Robert A.; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H.; Surakka, Ida; Liu, Yongmei; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Schulz, Holger; Heinrich, Joachim; Davies, Gail; Vonk, Judith M.; Wojczynski, Mary; Pouta, Anneli; Johansson, Åsa; Wild, Sarah H.; Ingelsson, Erik; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Völzke, Henry; Hysi, Pirro G.; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Morrison, Alanna C.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Gao, Wei; Postma, Dirkje S.; White, Wendy B.; Rich, Stephen S.; Hofman, Albert; Aspelund, Thor; Couper, David; Smith, Lewis J.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Lohman, Kurt; Burchard, Esteban G.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Garcia, Melissa; Joubert, Bonnie R.; McArdle, Wendy L.; Musk, A. Bill; Hansel, Nadia; Heckbert, Susan R.; Zgaga, Lina; van Meurs, Joyce B.J.; Navarro, Pau; Rudan, Igor; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Redline, Susan; Jarvis, Deborah; Zhao, Jing Hua; Rantanen, Taina; O’Connor, George T.; Ripatti, Samuli; Scott, Rodney J.; Karrasch, Stefan; Grallert, Harald; Gaddis, Nathan C.; Starr, John M.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Minster, Ryan L.; Lederer, David J.; Pekkanen, Juha; Gyllensten, Ulf; Campbell, Harry; Morris, Andrew P.; Gläser, Sven; Hammond, Christopher J.; Burkart, Kristin M.; Beilby, John; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hancock, Dana B.; Williams, O. Dale; Polasek, Ozren; Zemunik, Tatijana; Kolcic, Ivana; Petrini, Marcy F.; Wjst, Matthias; Kim, Woo Jin; Porteous, David J.; Scotland, Generation; Smith, Blair H.; Viljanen, Anne; Heliövaara, Markku; Attia, John R.; Sayers, Ian; Hampel, Regina; Gieger, Christian; Deary, Ian J.; Boezen, H. Marike; Newman, Anne; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Wilson, James F.; Lind, Lars; Stricker, Bruno H.; Teumer, Alexander; Spector, Timothy D.; Melén, Erik; Peters, Marjolein J.; Lange, Leslie A.; Barr, R. Graham; Bracke, Ken R.; Verhamme, Fien M.; Sung, Joohon; Hiemstra, Pieter S.; Cassano, Patricia A.; Sood, Akshay; Hayward, Caroline; Dupuis, Josée; Hall, Ian P.; Brusselle, Guy G.; Tobin, Martin D.; London, Stephanie J.

    2014-01-01

    Forced vital capacity (FVC), a spirometric measure of pulmonary function, reflects lung volume and is used to diagnose and monitor lung diseases. We performed genome-wide association study meta-analysis of FVC in 52,253 individuals from 26 studies and followed up the top associations in 32,917 additional individuals of European ancestry. We found six new regions associated at genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10−8) with FVC in or near EFEMP1, BMP6, MIR-129-2/HSD17B12, PRDM11, WWOX, and KCNJ2. Two (GSTCD and PTCH1) loci previously associated with spirometric measures were related to FVC. Newly implicated regions were followed-up in samples of African American, Korean, Chinese, and Hispanic individuals. We detected transcripts for all six newly implicated genes in human lung tissue. The new loci may inform mechanisms involved in lung development and pathogenesis of restrictive lung disease. PMID:24929828

  17. Isolation and characterization of polymorphic microsatellite loci in Spondias radlkoferi (Anacardiaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar-Barajas, Esther; Sork, Victoria L.; González-Zamora, Arturo; Rocha-Ramírez, Víctor; Arroyo-Rodríguez, Víctor; Oyama, Ken

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Microsatellite markers were developed for Spondias radlkoferi to assess the impact of primate seed dispersal on the genetic diversity and structure of this important tree species of Anacardiaceae. • Methods and Results: Fourteen polymorphic loci were isolated from S. radlkoferi through 454 GS-FLX Titanium pyrosequencing of genomic DNA. The number of alleles ranged from three to 12. The observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.382 to 1.00 and from 0.353 to 0.733, respectively. The amplification was also successful in S. mombin and two genera of Anacardiaceae: Rhus aromatica and Toxicodendron radicans. • Conclusions: These microsatellite loci will be useful to assess the genetic diversity and population structure of S. radlkoferi and related species, and will allow us to investigate the effects of seed dispersal by spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi) on the genetic structure and diversity of S. radlkoferi populations in a fragmented rainforest. PMID:25383270

  18. Genome-wide association analysis identifies six new loci associated with forced vital capacity.

    PubMed

    Loth, Daan W; Soler Artigas, María; Gharib, Sina A; Wain, Louise V; Franceschini, Nora; Koch, Beate; Pottinger, Tess D; Smith, Albert Vernon; Duan, Qing; Oldmeadow, Chris; Lee, Mi Kyeong; Strachan, David P; James, Alan L; Huffman, Jennifer E; Vitart, Veronique; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Wareham, Nicholas J; Kaprio, Jaakko; Wang, Xin-Qun; Trochet, Holly; Kähönen, Mika; Flexeder, Claudia; Albrecht, Eva; Lopez, Lorna M; de Jong, Kim; Thyagarajan, Bharat; Alves, Alexessander Couto; Enroth, Stefan; Omenaas, Ernst; Joshi, Peter K; Fall, Tove; Viñuela, Ana; Launer, Lenore J; Loehr, Laura R; Fornage, Myriam; Li, Guo; Wilk, Jemma B; Tang, Wenbo; Manichaikul, Ani; Lahousse, Lies; Harris, Tamara B; North, Kari E; Rudnicka, Alicja R; Hui, Jennie; Gu, Xiangjun; Lumley, Thomas; Wright, Alan F; Hastie, Nicholas D; Campbell, Susan; Kumar, Rajesh; Pin, Isabelle; Scott, Robert A; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H; Surakka, Ida; Liu, Yongmei; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Schulz, Holger; Heinrich, Joachim; Davies, Gail; Vonk, Judith M; Wojczynski, Mary; Pouta, Anneli; Johansson, Asa; Wild, Sarah H; Ingelsson, Erik; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Völzke, Henry; Hysi, Pirro G; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Morrison, Alanna C; Rotter, Jerome I; Gao, Wei; Postma, Dirkje S; White, Wendy B; Rich, Stephen S; Hofman, Albert; Aspelund, Thor; Couper, David; Smith, Lewis J; Psaty, Bruce M; Lohman, Kurt; Burchard, Esteban G; Uitterlinden, André G; Garcia, Melissa; Joubert, Bonnie R; McArdle, Wendy L; Musk, A Bill; Hansel, Nadia; Heckbert, Susan R; Zgaga, Lina; van Meurs, Joyce B J; Navarro, Pau; Rudan, Igor; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Redline, Susan; Jarvis, Deborah L; Zhao, Jing Hua; Rantanen, Taina; O'Connor, George T; Ripatti, Samuli; Scott, Rodney J; Karrasch, Stefan; Grallert, Harald; Gaddis, Nathan C; Starr, John M; Wijmenga, Cisca; Minster, Ryan L; Lederer, David J; Pekkanen, Juha; Gyllensten, Ulf; Campbell, Harry; Morris, Andrew P; Gläser, Sven; Hammond, Christopher J; Burkart, Kristin M; Beilby, John; Kritchevsky, Stephen B; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hancock, Dana B; Williams, O Dale; Polasek, Ozren; Zemunik, Tatijana; Kolcic, Ivana; Petrini, Marcy F; Wjst, Matthias; Kim, Woo Jin; Porteous, David J; Scotland, Generation; Smith, Blair H; Viljanen, Anne; Heliövaara, Markku; Attia, John R; Sayers, Ian; Hampel, Regina; Gieger, Christian; Deary, Ian J; Boezen, H Marike; Newman, Anne; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Wilson, James F; Lind, Lars; Stricker, Bruno H; Teumer, Alexander; Spector, Timothy D; Melén, Erik; Peters, Marjolein J; Lange, Leslie A; Barr, R Graham; Bracke, Ken R; Verhamme, Fien M; Sung, Joohon; Hiemstra, Pieter S; Cassano, Patricia A; Sood, Akshay; Hayward, Caroline; Dupuis, Josée; Hall, Ian P; Brusselle, Guy G; Tobin, Martin D; London, Stephanie J

    2014-07-01

    Forced vital capacity (FVC), a spirometric measure of pulmonary function, reflects lung volume and is used to diagnose and monitor lung diseases. We performed genome-wide association study meta-analysis of FVC in 52,253 individuals from 26 studies and followed up the top associations in 32,917 additional individuals of European ancestry. We found six new regions associated at genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10(-8)) with FVC in or near EFEMP1, BMP6, MIR129-2-HSD17B12, PRDM11, WWOX and KCNJ2. Two loci previously associated with spirometric measures (GSTCD and PTCH1) were related to FVC. Newly implicated regions were followed up in samples from African-American, Korean, Chinese and Hispanic individuals. We detected transcripts for all six newly implicated genes in human lung tissue. The new loci may inform mechanisms involved in lung development and the pathogenesis of restrictive lung disease.

  19. Common variants in 22 loci are associated with QRS duration and cardiac ventricular conduction

    PubMed Central

    Sotoodehnia, Nona; Isaacs, Aaron; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Dörr, Marcus; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Nolte, Ilja M.; van der Harst, Pim; Müller, Martina; Eijgelsheim, Mark; Alonso, Alvaro; Hicks, Andrew A.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Hayward, Caroline; Smith, Albert Vernon; Polasek, Ozren; Giovannone, Steven; Fu, Jingyuan; Magnani, Jared W.; Marciante, Kristin D.; Pfeufer, Arne; Gharib, Sina A.; Teumer, Alexander; Li, Man; Bis, Joshua C.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Aspelund, Thor; Köttgen, Anna; Johnson, Toby; Rice, Kenneth; Sie, Mark P.S.; Wang, Amanda Ying; Klopp, Norman; Fuchsberger, Christian; Wild, Sarah H.; Leach, Irene Mateo; Estrada, Karol; Völker, Uwe; Wright, Alan F.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Qu, Jiaxiang; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Sinner, Moritz F.; Kors, Jan A.; Petersmann, Astrid; Harris, Tamara B.; Soliman, Elsayed Z.; Munroe, Patricia B.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Oostra, Ben A.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Perz, Siegfried; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Vözke, Henry; Spector, Timothy D.; Liu, Fang-Yu; Boerwinkle, Eric; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Rotter, Jerome I.; van Herpen, Gé; Levy, Daniel; Wichmann, H.-Erich; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.M.; Kroemer, Heyo K.; Kao, W.H. Linda; Heckbert, Susan R.; Meitinger, Thomas; Hofman, Albert; Campbell, Harry; Folsom, Aaron R.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Schwienbacher, Christine; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; Volpato, Claudia Beu; Caulfield, Mark J.; Connell, John M.; Launer, Lenore; Lu, Xiaowen; Franke, Lude; Fehrmann, Rudolf S.N.; te Meerman, Gerard; Groen, Harry J.M.; Weersma, Rinse K.; van den Berg, Leonard H.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Ophoff, Roel A.; Navis, Gerjan; Rudan, Igor; Snieder, Harold; Wilson, James F.; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Siscovick, David S.; Wang, Thomas J.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Felix, Stephan B.; Fishman, Glenn I.; Jamshidi, Yalda; Stricker, Bruno H Ch; Samani, Nilesh J.; Kääb, Stefan; Arking, Dan E.

    2010-01-01

    QRS interval on the electrocardiogram reflects ventricular depolarization and conduction time, and is a risk factor for mortality, sudden death, and heart failure. We performed a genome-wide association meta-analysis in 40,407 European-descent individuals from 14 studies, with further genotyping in 7170 additional Europeans, and identified 22 loci associated with QRS duration (P < 5 × 10−8). These loci map in or near genes in pathways with established roles in ventricular conduction such as sodium channels, transcription factors, and calcium-handling proteins, but also point to novel biologic processes, such as kinase inhibitors and genes related to tumorigenesis. We demonstrate that SCN10A, a gene at our most significant locus, is expressed in the mouse ventricular conduction system, and treatment with a selective SCN10A blocker prolongs QRS duration. These findings extend our current knowledge of ventricular depolarization and conduction. PMID:21076409

  20. Population genetics of 14 ethnic groups using phenotypic data from VNTR loci.

    PubMed

    Balazs, I

    1993-01-01

    Population genetic studies were performed using five VNTR loci (D2S44, D4S163, D14S13, D17S79, D18S27). The populations examined were Caucasian (Australia, Brazil and U.S.A.), Australian aborigine, Chinese, Amerindian (Cheyenne, Maya, Navajo, Pima, Tobas/Wicnis), North American Black, North American Hispanic (California, Miami, New York, Texas). The overall size range of the alleles for these loci, in PstI-digested DNA, was the same in all populations. The major difference among populations was the relative frequency of particular groups of alleles. These differences were small among similar ethnic groups, while sometimes varying several fold among some of the more distinct populations. However, groups of alleles that were rare in the major ethnic groups (Caucasian, Black, Chinese) were also rare in the other populations. The frequency databases generated by typing individuals for 4 loci were used to compare the random DNA profile frequencies among populations. The results show that the estimated frequency of any 4 locus profile is very low in all populations examined (e.g., median value < 10(-8)). Analysis of relative genetic similarity among populations was used to create the most likely clustering of these ethnic groups. Results show an uncanny similarity between the clusters generated and genetic distance measurements obtained with traditional calculations of conventional genetic markers. PMID:8104559