Science.gov

Sample records for beacons

  1. Personal Beacon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The MicroPLB (personal locator beacon) is a search and rescue satellite-aided tracking (SARSAT) transmitter. When activated it emits a distress signal to a constellation of internationally operated satellites. The endangered person's identity and location anywhere on Earth is automatically forwarded to central monitoring stations around the world. It is accurate to within just a few meters. The user uses the device to download navigation data from a global positioning satellite receiver. After the download is complete, the MicroPLB functions as a self-locating beacon. Also, it is the only PLB to use a safe battery. In the past, other PLB devices have used batteries that have enough volatility to explode with extreme force. It was developed by Microwave Monolithic, Inc. through SBIR funding from Glenn Research Center and Goddard Space Flight Center.

  2. Tester for Distress Beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, W. R.

    1986-01-01

    Distress beacons on aircraft and boats checked for proper operation with aid of onboard monitor. Monitor mounted in aircraft cockpit or at wheel of boat. Connected to beacon electronics by cable. Monitor used with interface circuitry in beacon, which acts as buffer so that operation of beacon is not adversely affected if monitor is removed or if connecting cable is accidentally short circuited.

  3. Tester for Distress Beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, W. R.

    1986-01-01

    Distress beacons on aircraft and boats checked for proper operation with aid of onboard monitor. Monitor mounted in aircraft cockpit or at wheel of boat. Connected to beacon electronics by cable. Monitor used with interface circuitry in beacon, which acts as buffer so that operation of beacon is not adversely affected if monitor is removed or if connecting cable is accidentally short circuited.

  4. Heliport Identification Beacon.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-04-01

    The International Civil Aviation Organization ( ICAO ) has proposed the adoption of a standard international heliport beacon. This beacon consists of...as an ICAO standard. Furthermore, there does not appear to be any compelling reason to change the present United States standard for heliport identification beacons at this time.

  5. Beacon College Project Directory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Lynn, Ed.

    The American Association of Community Colleges' Beacon College Project (BCP) uses funds from the Kellogg Foundation to award two-year grants to "Beacon" community colleges to form consortia with at least five associate colleges, designed to improve a specific aspect of institutional life. A total of 26 projects, many involving community…

  6. Great Plains Beacon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Mary-Margaret, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    The 7 newsletter issues presented here review the efforts of 10 Midwestern community colleges to achieve greater leadership diversity on their campuses. Called Beacon projects (or collectively, the Beacon Project) after the grant that provided the funding for these efforts, the projects described cover a wide range of approaches. Among them are…

  7. A digital beacon receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransome, Peter D.

    1988-01-01

    A digital satellite beacon receiver is described which provides measurement information down to a carrier/noise density ratio approximately 15 dB below that required by a conventional (phase locked loop) design. When the beacon signal fades, accuracy degrades gracefully, and is restored immediately (without hysteresis) on signal recovery, even if the signal has faded into the noise. Benefits of the digital processing approach used include the minimization of operator adjustments, stability of the phase measuring circuits with time, repeatability between units, and compatibility with equipment not specifically designed for propagation measuring. The receiver has been developed for the European Olympus satellite which has continuous wave (CW) beacons at 12.5 and 29.7 GHz, and a switched polarization beacon at 19.8 GHz approximately, but the system can be reconfigured for CW and polarization-switched beacons at other frequencies.

  8. A Beacon for Baltimore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-01-01

    High on the mainmast of the clipper Pride of Baltimore, crew members have installed a NASA-developed satellite beacon which enables continual tracking of the ship as she roams the seas on goodwill tours. The simple 10-pound beacon affixed to Pride's mainmast allows Baltimore's Operational Sail to keep track of the ship on its voyages to distant places. Once every minute, the compact, battery powered unit sends a radio signal to NASA's Nimbus-6 research satellite where the frequency shift of successive signals provides information for computing the ship's latitude and longitude.

  9. A Beacon for Baltimore

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    High on the mainmast of the clipper Pride of Baltimore, crew members have installed a NASA-developed satellite beacon which enables continual tracking of the ship as she roams the seas on goodwill tours. The simple 10-pound beacon affixed to Pride's mainmast allows Baltimore's Operational Sail to keep track of the ship on its voyages to distant places. Once every minute, the compact, battery powered unit sends a radio signal to NASA's Nimbus-6 research satellite where the frequency shift of successive signals provides information for computing the ship's latitude and longitude.

  10. Digital Controller For Emergency Beacon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.

    1990-01-01

    Prototype digital controller intended for use in 406-MHz emergency beacon. Undergoing development according to international specifications, 406-MHz emergency beacon system includes satellites providing worldwide monitoring of beacons, with Doppler tracking to locate each beacon within 5 km. Controller turns beacon on and off and generates binary codes identifying source (e.g., ship, aircraft, person, or vehicle on land). Codes transmitted by phase modulation. Knowing code, monitor attempts to communicate with user, monitor uses code information to dispatch rescue team appropriate to type and locations of carrier.

  11. Olympus beacon receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostergaard, Jens

    1988-01-01

    A medium-size Beacon Receiving System for reception and processing of the B1 (20 GHz) and B2 (30 GHz) beacons from Olympus has been developed. Integration of B1 and B2 receiving equipment into one system using one antenna and a common computer for control and data processing provides the advantages of a compact configuration and synchronization of the two receiver chains. Range for co-polar signal attenuation meaurement is about 30 dB for both beacons, increasing to 40 dB for B2 if the receivers are synchronized to B1. The accuracy is better than 0.5 dB. Cross-polarization discriminations of the order of 10 to 30 dB may be determined with an accuracy of 1 to 2 dB. A number of radiometers for complementary measurements of atmospheric attenuation of 13 to 30 GHz has also been constructed. A small multi-frequency system for operation around 22 GHz and 31 GHz is presently under development.

  12. Molecular beacon sequence design algorithm.

    PubMed

    Monroe, W Todd; Haselton, Frederick R

    2003-01-01

    A method based on Web-based tools is presented to design optimally functioning molecular beacons. Molecular beacons, fluorogenic hybridization probes, are a powerful tool for the rapid and specific detection of a particular nucleic acid sequence. However, their synthesis costs can be considerable. Since molecular beacon performance is based on its sequence, it is imperative to rationally design an optimal sequence before synthesis. The algorithm presented here uses simple Microsoft Excel formulas and macros to rank candidate sequences. This analysis is carried out using mfold structural predictions along with other free Web-based tools. For smaller laboratories where molecular beacons are not the focus of research, the public domain algorithm described here may be usefully employed to aid in molecular beacon design.

  13. Underwater Acoustic Beacon Location System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-23

    300087 1 of 31 UNDERWATER ACOUSTIC BEACON LOCATION SYSTEM [0001] The present application claims the benefit of United States Provisional...Application Serial Number 62/297,179 filed on February 19, 2016 by the inventor, Steven E. Crocker and entitled “Underwater Acoustic Beacon...None. BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION (1) Field of the Invention [0004] An acoustic detection system is provided in which the detection system can

  14. 47 CFR 97.203 - Beacon station.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Beacon station. 97.203 Section 97.203... SERVICE Special Operations § 97.203 Beacon station. (a) Any amateur station licensed to a holder of a Technician, General, Advanced or Amateur Extra Class operator license may be a beacon. A holder of a...

  15. 47 CFR 97.203 - Beacon station.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Beacon station. 97.203 Section 97.203... SERVICE Special Operations § 97.203 Beacon station. (a) Any amateur station licensed to a holder of a Technician, Technician Plus, General, Advanced or Amateur Extra Class operator license may be a beacon. A...

  16. 78 FR 75392 - American Beacon Funds, et al.; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-11

    ... COMMISSION American Beacon Funds, et al.; Notice of Application December 5, 2013. AGENCY: Securities and... (Jun. 25, 1996) (order). Applicants: American Beacon Funds and American Beacon Select Funds (collectively, the ``Trusts'') and American Beacon Advisors, Inc. (``American Beacon'' and collectively...

  17. Autonomous navigation using lunar beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khatib, A. R.; Ellis, J.; French, J.; Null, G.; Yunck, T.; Wu, S.

    1983-01-01

    The concept of using lunar beacon signal transmission for on-board navigation for earth satellites and near-earth spacecraft is described. The system would require powerful transmitters on the earth-side of the moon's surface and black box receivers with antennae and microprocessors placed on board spacecraft for autonomous navigation. Spacecraft navigation requires three position and three velocity elements to establish location coordinates. Two beacons could be soft-landed on the lunar surface at the limits of allowable separation and each would transmit a wide-beam signal with cones reaching GEO heights and be strong enough to be received by small antennae in near-earth orbit. The black box processor would perform on-board computation with one-way Doppler/range data and dynamical models. Alternatively, GEO satellites such as the GPS or TDRSS spacecraft can be used with interferometric techniques to provide decimeter-level accuracy for aircraft navigation.

  18. 14 CFR 171.269 - Marker beacon performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) NAVIGATIONAL FACILITIES NON-FEDERAL NAVIGATION FACILITIES Interim Standard Microwave Landing System (ISMLS) § 171.269 Marker beacon performance requirements. ISMLS marker beacon equipment...

  19. 14 CFR 171.269 - Marker beacon performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) NAVIGATIONAL FACILITIES NON-FEDERAL NAVIGATION FACILITIES Interim Standard Microwave Landing System (ISMLS) § 171.269 Marker beacon performance requirements. ISMLS marker beacon equipment...

  20. 14 CFR 171.269 - Marker beacon performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) NAVIGATIONAL FACILITIES NON-FEDERAL NAVIGATION FACILITIES Interim Standard Microwave Landing System (ISMLS) § 171.269 Marker beacon performance requirements. ISMLS marker beacon equipment...

  1. 33 CFR 62.23 - Beacons and buoys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Beacons and buoys. 62.23 Section... UNITED STATES AIDS TO NAVIGATION SYSTEM The U.S. Aids to Navigation System § 62.23 Beacons and buoys. (a... navigation. The primary components of the U.S. Aids to Navigation System are beacons and buoys. (b) Beacons...

  2. 33 CFR 62.23 - Beacons and buoys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Beacons and buoys. 62.23 Section... UNITED STATES AIDS TO NAVIGATION SYSTEM The U.S. Aids to Navigation System § 62.23 Beacons and buoys. (a... navigation. The primary components of the U.S. Aids to Navigation System are beacons and buoys. (b) Beacons...

  3. BBIS: Beacon Bus Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasim, Shahreen; Hafit, Hanayanti; Pei Juin, Kong; Afizah Afif, Zehan; Hashim, Rathiah; Ruslai, Husni; Jahidin, Kamaruzzaman; Syafwan Arshad, Mohammad

    2016-11-01

    Lack of bus information for example bus timetable, status of the bus and messy advertisement on bulletin board at the bus stop will give negative impact to tourist. Therefore, a real-time update bus information bulletin board provides all information needed so that passengers can save their bus information searching time. Supported with Android or iOS, Beacon Bus Information System (BBIS) provides bus information between Batu Pahat and Kluang area. BBIS is a system that implements physical web technology and interaction on demand. It built on Backend-as-a-Service, a cloud solution and Firebase non relational database as data persistence backend and syncs between user client in the real-time. People walk through bus stop with smart device and do not require any application. Bluetooth Beacon is used to achieve smart device's best performance of data sharing. Intellij IDEA 15 is one of the tools that that used to develop the BBIS system. Multi-language included front end and backend supported Integration development environment (IDE) helped to speed up integration process.

  4. Uncertainty evaluation in BEACON power distribution monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, T.; Goldstein, N.P. )

    1989-11-01

    BEACON is an advanced operational core support package that has a three-dimensional nodal code as its cornerstone. The three-dimensional calculation includes all necessary pressurized water reactor feedback effects. The generation of the measured power distribution from the core instrumentation is one of the primary functions of the core-monitoring software. The purpose of this paper is to discuss evaluation of the uncertainty in the measured assembly power from the BEACON system. The study covers not only the normal operating conditions, but off-normal situations to demonstrate BEACON's applicability for that condition.

  5. Searching for cost-optimized interstellar beacons.

    PubMed

    Benford, Gregory; Benford, James; Benford, Dominic

    2010-06-01

    What would SETI beacon transmitters be like if built by civilizations that had a variety of motives but cared about cost? In a companion paper, we presented how, for fixed power density in the far field, a cost-optimum interstellar beacon system could be built. Here, we consider how we should search for a beacon if it were produced by a civilization similar to ours. High-power transmitters could be built for a wide variety of motives other than the need for two-way communication; this would include beacons built to be seen over thousands of light-years. Extraterrestrial beacon builders would likely have to contend with economic pressures just as their terrestrial counterparts do. Cost, spectral lines near 1 GHz, and interstellar scintillation favor radiating frequencies substantially above the classic "water hole." Therefore, the transmission strategy for a distant, cost-conscious beacon would be a rapid scan of the galactic plane with the intent to cover the angular space. Such pulses would be infrequent events for the receiver. Such beacons built by distant, advanced, wealthy societies would have very different characteristics from what SETI researchers seek. Future searches should pay special attention to areas along the galactic disk where SETI searches have seen coherent signals that have not recurred on the limited listening time intervals we have used. We will need to wait for recurring events that may arrive in intermittent bursts. Several new SETI search strategies have emerged from these ideas. We propose a new test for beacons that is based on the Life Plane hypotheses.

  6. Laser Transmitter Aims At Laser Beacon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, Hamid; Lesh, James R.

    1993-01-01

    Transmitter part of developmental optical communication system. Compact, lightweight, partially-self-aiming laser transmitter built to verify some capabilities of developmental free-space optical communication system. Design capable of providing 0.5 Mbps data return over range equal to Moon-Earth distance. Breadboard of transmitting terminal constructed and tested in laboratory. Prototype transmitter includes receiving circuitry that keeps it aimed at beacon, once brought into initial alignment within about 1.7 degrees of line of sight to beacon.

  7. Searching for Cost-Optimized Interstellar Beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, Gregory; Benford, James; Benford, Dominic

    2010-01-01

    What would SETI beacon transmitters be like if built by civilizations that had a variety of motives but cared about cost? In a companion paper, we presented how, for fixed power density in the far field, a cost-optimum interstellar beacon system could be built. Here, we consider how we should search for a beacon if it were produced by a civilization similar to ours. High-power transmitters could be built for a wide variety of motives other than the need for two-way communication, this would include beacons built to be seen over thousands of light-years. Extraterrestrial beacon builders would likely have to contend with economic pressures just as their terrestrial counterparts do. Cost, spectral lines near 1GHz, and interstellar scintillation favor radiating frequencies substantially above the classic "water hole." Therefore, the transmission strategy for a distant, cost-conscious beacon would be a rapid scan of the galactic plane with the intent to cover the angular space. Such pulses would be infrequent events for the receiver. Such beacons built by distant, advanced, wealthy societies would have very different characteristics from what SETI researchers seek. Future searches should pay special attention to areas along the galactic disk where SETI searches have seen coherent signals that have not recurred on the limited listening time intervals we have used. We will need to wait for recurring events that may arrive in intermittent bursts. Several new SETI search strategies have emerged from these ideas. We propose a new test for beacons that is based on the Life Plane hypotheses.

  8. Searching for Cost-Optimized Interstellar Beacons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benford, Gregory; Benford, James; Benford, Dominic

    2010-06-01

    What would SETI beacon transmitters be like if built by civilizations that had a variety of motives but cared about cost? In a companion paper, we presented how, for fixed power density in the far field, a cost-optimum interstellar beacon system could be built. Here, we consider how we should search for a beacon if it were produced by a civilization similar to ours. High-power transmitters could be built for a wide variety of motives other than the need for two-way communication; this would include beacons built to be seen over thousands of light-years. Extraterrestrial beacon builders would likely have to contend with economic pressures just as their terrestrial counterparts do. Cost, spectral lines near 1 GHz, and interstellar scintillation favor radiating frequencies substantially above the classic "water hole." Therefore, the transmission strategy for a distant, cost-conscious beacon would be a rapid scan of the galactic plane with the intent to cover the angular space. Such pulses would be infrequent events for the receiver. Such beacons built by distant, advanced, wealthy societies would have very different characteristics from what SETI researchers seek. Future searches should pay special attention to areas along the galactic disk where SETI searches have seen coherent signals that have not recurred on the limited listening time intervals we have used. We will need to wait for recurring events that may arriarrive in intermittent bursts. Several new SETI search strategies have emerged from these ideas. We propose a new test for beacons that is based on the Life Plane hypotheses.

  9. Laser Transmitter Aims At Laser Beacon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, Hamid; Lesh, James R.

    1993-01-01

    Transmitter part of developmental optical communication system. Compact, lightweight, partially-self-aiming laser transmitter built to verify some capabilities of developmental free-space optical communication system. Design capable of providing 0.5 Mbps data return over range equal to Moon-Earth distance. Breadboard of transmitting terminal constructed and tested in laboratory. Prototype transmitter includes receiving circuitry that keeps it aimed at beacon, once brought into initial alignment within about 1.7 degrees of line of sight to beacon.

  10. Beacon data acquisition and display system

    DOEpatents

    Skogmo, David G.; Black, Billy D.

    1991-01-01

    A system for transmitting aircraft beacon information received by a secondary surveillance radar through telephone lines to a remote display includes a digitizer connected to the radar for preparing a serial file of data records containing position and identification information of the beacons detected by each sweep of the radar. This information is transmitted through the telephone lines to a remote computer where it is displayed.

  11. Beacon data acquisition and display system

    DOEpatents

    Skogmo, D.G.; Black, B.D.

    1991-12-17

    A system for transmitting aircraft beacon information received by a secondary surveillance radar through telephone lines to a remote display includes a digitizer connected to the radar for preparing a serial file of data records containing position and identification information of the beacons detected by each sweep of the radar. This information is transmitted through the telephone lines to a remote computer where it is displayed. 6 figures.

  12. Messaging with Cost-Optimized Interstellar Beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, James; Benford, Gregory; Benford, Dominic

    2010-01-01

    On Earth, how would we build galactic-scale beacons to attract the attention of extraterrestrials, as some have suggested we should do? From the point of view of expense to a builder on Earth, experience shows an optimum trade-off. This emerges by minimizing the cost of producing a desired power density at long range, which determines the maximum range of detectability of a transmitted signal. We derive general relations for cost-optimal aperture and power. For linear dependence of capital cost on transmitter power and antenna area, minimum capital cost occurs when the cost is equally divided between antenna gain and radiated power. For nonlinear power-law dependence, a similar simple division occurs. This is validated in cost data for many systems; industry uses this cost optimum as a rule of thumb. Costs of pulsed cost-efficient transmitters are estimated from these relations by using current cost parameters ($/W, $/sq m) as a basis. We show the scaling and give examples of such beacons. Galactic-scale beacons can be built for a few billion dollars with our present technology. Such beacons have narrow "searchlight" beams and short "dwell times" when the beacon would be seen by an alien observer in their sky. More-powerful beacons are more efficient and have economies of scale: cost scales only linearly with range R, not as R(exp 2), so number of stars radiated to increases as the square of cost. On a cost basis, they will likely transmit at higher microwave frequencies, -10 GHz. The natural corridor to broadcast is along the galactic radius or along the local spiral galactic arm we are in. A companion paper asks "If someone like us were to produce a beacon, how should we look for it?"

  13. Messaging with cost-optimized interstellar beacons.

    PubMed

    Benford, James; Benford, Gregory; Benford, Dominic

    2010-06-01

    On Earth, how would we build galactic-scale beacons to attract the attention of extraterrestrials, as some have suggested we should do? From the point of view of expense to a builder on Earth, experience shows an optimum trade-off. This emerges by minimizing the cost of producing a desired power density at long range, which determines the maximum range of detectability of a transmitted signal. We derive general relations for cost-optimal aperture and power. For linear dependence of capital cost on transmitter power and antenna area, minimum capital cost occurs when the cost is equally divided between antenna gain and radiated power. For nonlinear power-law dependence, a similar simple division occurs. This is validated in cost data for many systems; industry uses this cost optimum as a rule of thumb. Costs of pulsed cost-efficient transmitters are estimated from these relations by using current cost parameters ($/W, $/m(2)) as a basis. We show the scaling and give examples of such beacons. Galactic-scale beacons can be built for a few billion dollars with our present technology. Such beacons have narrow "searchlight" beams and short "dwell times" when the beacon would be seen by an alien observer in their sky. More-powerful beacons are more efficient and have economies of scale: cost scales only linearly with range R, not as R(2), so number of stars radiated to increases as the square of cost. On a cost basis, they will likely transmit at higher microwave frequencies, approximately 10 GHz. The natural corridor to broadcast is along the galactic radius or along the local spiral galactic arm we are in. A companion paper asks "If someone like us were to produce a beacon, how should we look for it?"

  14. Messaging with Cost-Optimized Interstellar Beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, James; Benford, Gregory; Benford, Dominic

    2010-01-01

    On Earth, how would we build galactic-scale beacons to attract the attention of extraterrestrials, as some have suggested we should do? From the point of view of expense to a builder on Earth, experience shows an optimum trade-off. This emerges by minimizing the cost of producing a desired power density at long range, which determines the maximum range of detectability of a transmitted signal. We derive general relations for cost-optimal aperture and power. For linear dependence of capital cost on transmitter power and antenna area, minimum capital cost occurs when the cost is equally divided between antenna gain and radiated power. For nonlinear power-law dependence, a similar simple division occurs. This is validated in cost data for many systems; industry uses this cost optimum as a rule of thumb. Costs of pulsed cost-efficient transmitters are estimated from these relations by using current cost parameters ($/W, $/sq m) as a basis. We show the scaling and give examples of such beacons. Galactic-scale beacons can be built for a few billion dollars with our present technology. Such beacons have narrow "searchlight" beams and short "dwell times" when the beacon would be seen by an alien observer in their sky. More-powerful beacons are more efficient and have economies of scale: cost scales only linearly with range R, not as R(exp 2), so number of stars radiated to increases as the square of cost. On a cost basis, they will likely transmit at higher microwave frequencies, -10 GHz. The natural corridor to broadcast is along the galactic radius or along the local spiral galactic arm we are in. A companion paper asks "If someone like us were to produce a beacon, how should we look for it?"

  15. Messaging with Cost-Optimized Interstellar Beacons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benford, James; Benford, Gregory; Benford, Dominic

    2010-06-01

    On Earth, how would we build galactic-scale beacons to attract the attention of extraterrestrials, as some have suggested we should do? From the point of view of expense to a builder on Earth, experience shows an optimum trade-off. This emerges by minimizing the cost of producing a desired power density at long range, which determines the maximum range of detectability of a transmitted signal. We derive general relations for cost-optimal aperture and power. For linear dependence of capital cost on transmitter power and antenna area, minimum capital cost occurs when the cost is equally divided between antenna gain and radiated power. For nonlinear power-law dependence, a similar simple division occurs. This is validated in cost data for many systems; industry uses this cost optimum as a rule of thumb. Costs of pulsed cost-efficient transmitters are estimated from these relations by using current cost parameters (/W, /m2) as a basis. We show the scaling and give examples of such beacons. Galactic-scale beacons can be built for a few billion dollars with our present technology. Such beacons have narrow "searchlight" beams and short "dwell times" when the beacon would be seen by an alien observer in their sky. More-powerful beacons are more efficient and have economies of scale: cost scales only linearly with range R, not as R2, so number of stars radiated to iincreases as the square of cost. On a cost basis, they will likely transmit at higher microwave frequencies, ˜10 GHz. The natural corridor to broadcast is along the galactic radius or along the local spiral galactic arm we are in. A companion paper asks "If someone like us were to produce a beacon, how should we look for it?"

  16. SERS beacons for multiplexed oligonucleotide detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jian; Cullum, Brian M.

    2007-09-01

    Gold-based surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) beacons have been developed, which represent a simple, biocompatible and rapid means of performing multiplexed DNA sequence detection in a non-arrayed format. These SERS beacons consist of a simple stem-loop oligonucleotide probe in its native form with one end attached to a SERS active dye molecule and the other to a gold nanoparticle, approximately 50 nm in diameter. The probe sequence is designed to achieve a stem-loop structure, with the loop portion complementary to the target sequence, similar to fluorescent molecular beacons. In the absence of the target DNA sequence, the SERS signal of the associated dye molecule is detected, representing the "ON" state of the probe. When the target sequence is hybridized to the probe, which results in an open conformation, its respective reporter dye is separated from the gold nanoparticle, producing diminished SERS signal. In this paper, the fabrication and characterization of these SERS beacons is described. We also demonstrate selective hybridization of a target sequence to one beacon in a mixture, revealing their potential for use in a multiplexed fashion.

  17. 14 CFR 171.269 - Marker beacon performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Marker beacon performance requirements. 171.269 Section 171.269 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Landing System (ISMLS) § 171.269 Marker beacon performance requirements. ISMLS marker beacon equipment...

  18. 14 CFR 171.269 - Marker beacon performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Marker beacon performance requirements. 171.269 Section 171.269 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Landing System (ISMLS) § 171.269 Marker beacon performance requirements. ISMLS marker beacon equipment...

  19. An aptamer beacon responsive to botulinum toxins.

    PubMed

    Bruno, John G; Richarte, Alicia M; Carrillo, Maria P; Edge, Allison

    2012-01-15

    Sixty candidate DNA aptamers were developed against botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) type A light chain (LC) from ten rounds of selection, resulting in several identical sequences. Secondary structures of the identical aptamers were compared to structures of previously reported BoNT A DNA aptamers. A series of ten candidate loop structures were selected from this comparison as potential binding pockets and aptamer beacons. These candidate beacons were synthesized with 5'-TYE 665 and 3'-Iowa Black quencher labels for comparison of fluorescence levels as a function of BoNT A LC concentration. Only three of the ten candidates exhibited any fluorescence response to increasing levels of BoNT A LC. However, of the two most responsive candidates, one represented a subset loop of the larger more intensely fluorescent double-looped structure, designated Beacon 10. This beacon yielded a lower limit of detection of 1 ng/mL in buffer using a spectrofluorometer and a portable handheld fluorometer, but also responded substantially to BoNT A, B, E holotoxins and heavy or light chain components even in a dilute soil suspension, but not in 50% human serum. Beacon 10 did not respond strongly to a variety of other divergent peptides, suggesting that it is relatively specific to the level of botulinum toxins and is only useful for environmental testing. Beacon 10 also shared short sequence segments with other published BoNT aptamer DNA sequences, suggesting that these may be points of physical contact between the aptamers and BoNTs.

  20. The Los Alamos beacon receiver array

    SciTech Connect

    Carlos, R.C.; Massey, R.S. )

    1994-07-01

    The authors are interested in studying both the natural background of acoustic and acoustic-gravity waves, for which the sources are not generally known, as well as waves produced by known sources such as large explosions and launches of large rockets. The authors describe radio receivers that monitor transmissions from beacons on geosynchronous satellites. The receivers can detect perturbations of a 300--3,000 s period in the electron density integrated from beacon to receiver, for amplitudes as low as (1--2) [times] 10[sup 13] m[sup [minus]2]. Data are used in studies of atmospheric acoustic and acoustic-gravity waves.

  1. Evaluation of Skylab earth laser beacon imagery. [spaceborne photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piech, K. R.; Schott, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    During the Skylab 3 and 4 missions the Skylab spacecraft was illuminated by a low power argon ion and dye laser. The earth laser beacon was studied visually by the astronauts. In addition, they collected 35 mm hand-held color photographs of the beacons. Photographs are shown that were obtained on Skylab 3 and Skylab 4. The imagery collected during the Skylab mission was analyzed to evaluate the utility of beacon lasers as terrestial 'artificial stars' for space navigation. The analyses of the imagery revealed two unusual features of the earth laser beacon: (1) The beacon, even though of a low power (approximately 1 watt), is considerably brighter than any other terrain feature and is readily visible on imagery at a distance in excess of 1500 km (900 miles). (2) Another feature of the beacon is its large size. The typical beacon extends over about 5 resolution areas with a characteristic dimension of about 200 m.

  2. Beacon Spacecraft Operations: Lessons in Automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherwood, R.; Schlutsmeyer, A.; Sue, M.; Szijjarto, J.; Wyatt, E. J.

    2000-01-01

    A new approach to mission operations has been flight validated on NASA's Deep Space One (DS1) mission that launched in October 1998. The beacon monitor operations technology is aimed at decreasing the total volume of downlinked engineering telemetry by reducing the frequency of downlink and the volume of data received per pass.

  3. Beacons of X-ray Light Animation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-10-08

    This image shows a neutron star -- the core of a star that exploded in a massive supernova. This particular neutron star is known as a pulsar because it sends out rotating beams of X-rays that sweep past Earth like lighthouse beacons.

  4. Antarctic field tests of SARSAT personal locater beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bindschadler, Robert

    1987-01-01

    Field tests of SARSAT personal locater beacons were conducted in the Antarctic to assess the viability of using these beacons to increase the safety of Antarctic field parties. Data were collected on the extent to which dry or wet snow, melting conditions, crevasse walls and snow bridges affected the ability of the SARSAT satellite to calculate an accurate position of the beacon. Average response time between beacon turn on and alert reception in McMurdo was between 4 and 5 hours for these tests. It is concluded that the SARSAT system is viable for Antarctic operations and it is recommended that it be implemented for future field operations. Because of obstruction of line-of-sight between beacon and satellite degrades the accuracy of the location calculation (particularly in wet snow), it is further recommended that field parties have sufficient numbers of beacons to insure that in an emergency, one will be able to operate from the surface.

  5. High-visibility infrared beacons for IFF and combat ID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pralle, Martin; Puscasu, Irina; Johnson, Edward; Loges, Peter; Melnyk, James

    2005-05-01

    A new kind of Identification Friend or Foe (IFF) infrared beacon has been demonstrated. The omni-directional beacon consists of a pyramidal array of 1W pulsIR thermal light sources. Operating at a total power of 84W, the beacon can be used to track and identify surface vehicles and personnel with a recognition range of up to 6 miles on the battlefield and in urban environments or the marine boundary layer. Advanced photonic technology enables the beacon to be seen only while using a 3-5 μm or 8-12 μm thermal imaging system. There is no visible or near-IR emission to betray the location of the beacon. The beacon is rugged and will operate from -40 to 50°C ambient temperature, 0-100% relative humidity, 0 - 10,000 ft altitude, and meets MIL-STD 810F and MIL-STD 461E.

  6. Localization with a mobile beacon in underwater acoustic sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sangho; Kim, Kiseon

    2012-01-01

    Localization is one of the most important issues associated with underwater acoustic sensor networks, especially when sensor nodes are randomly deployed. Given that it is difficult to deploy beacon nodes at predetermined locations, localization schemes with a mobile beacon on the sea surface or along the planned path are inherently convenient, accurate, and energy-efficient. In this paper, we propose a new range-free Localization with a Mobile Beacon (LoMoB). The mobile beacon periodically broadcasts a beacon message containing its location. Sensor nodes are individually localized by passively receiving the beacon messages without inter-node communications. For location estimation, a set of potential locations are obtained as candidates for a node's location and then the node's location is determined through the weighted mean of all the potential locations with the weights computed based on residuals.

  7. Localization with a Mobile Beacon in Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sangho; Kim, Kiseon

    2012-01-01

    Localization is one of the most important issues associated with underwater acoustic sensor networks, especially when sensor nodes are randomly deployed. Given that it is difficult to deploy beacon nodes at predetermined locations, localization schemes with a mobile beacon on the sea surface or along the planned path are inherently convenient, accurate, and energy-efficient. In this paper, we propose a new range-free Localization with a Mobile Beacon (LoMoB). The mobile beacon periodically broadcasts a beacon message containing its location. Sensor nodes are individually localized by passively receiving the beacon messages without inter-node communications. For location estimation, a set of potential locations are obtained as candidates for a node's location and then the node's location is determined through the weighted mean of all the potential locations with the weights computed based on residuals. PMID:22778597

  8. GaAs laser beacon for satellite communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, H. L.

    1981-01-01

    A low-power GaAs laser has been proposed as the beacon source for creating a high-data-rate laser communication link. GaAs sources have the necessary power output, stability and lifetime to provide relatively broad beamwidth beacon signals. Their signal strength permits adequate discrimination from background signals for beacon acquisition and lock-on during high-data-rate signal transmission. Link analysis is discussed in terms of a range equation identifying the power received on a low-earth-orbit satellite and indicating acceptable levels for the acquisition and tracking of the GaAs beacon source. Noise interference is discussed with reference to such sources as the galactic background, bright stars, and detector tube noise. Attention is likewise given to the signal source and the optical design of the beacon transmitter and beacon receiver.

  9. Beacon satellite receiver for ionospheric tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vierinen, J.; Norberg, J.; Lehtinen, M. S.; Amm, O.; Roininen, L.; Väänänen, A.; Erickson, P. J.; McKay-Bukowski, D.

    2014-12-01

    We introduce a new coherent dual-channel beacon satellite receiver intended for ionospheric tomography. The measurement equation includes neutral atmosphere and ionosphere propagation effects, relative errors in satellite and receiver clocks, and residual Doppler shifts caused by errors in the satellite ephemeris. We also investigate the distribution of errors for phase curve measurements and the use of phase curve measurements for limited angle tomography using the framework of statistical linear inverse problems. We describe the design of our beacon satellite receiver software and present one possible hardware configuration. Finally, we present results obtained using a network of four newly developed receivers and compare the results with those of an existing ionospheric tomography network at Sodankylä Geophysical Observatory.

  10. Validation of the Calypso Surface Beacon Transponder.

    PubMed

    Belanger, Maxwell; Saleh, Ziad; Volpe, Tom; Margiasso, Rich; Li, Xiang; Chan, Maria; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Tang, Xiaoli

    2016-07-08

    Calypso L-shaped Surface Beacon transponder has recently become available for clinical applications. We herein conduct studies to validate the Surface Beacon transponder in terms of stability, reproducibility, orientation sensitivity, cycle rate dependence, and respiratory waveform tracking accuracy. The Surface Beacon was placed on a Quasar respiratory phantom and positioned at the isocenter with its two arms aligned with the lasers. Breathing waveforms were simulated, and the motion of the transponder was tracked. Stability and drift analysis: sinusoidal waveforms (200 cycles) were produced, and the amplitudes of phases 0% (inhale) and 50% (exhale) were recorded at each breathing cycle. The mean and standard deviation (SD) of the amplitudes were calculated. Linear least-squares fitting was performed to access the possible amplitude drift over the breathing cycles. Reproducibility: similar setting to stability and drift analysis, and the phantom generated 100 cycles of the sinusoidal waveform per run. The Calypso system's was re-setup for each run. Recorded amplitude and SD of 0% and 50% phase were compared between runs to assess contribution of Calypso electromagnetic array setup variation. Beacon orientation sensitivity: the Calypso tracks sinusoidal phantom motion with a defined angular offset of the beacon to assess its effect on SD and peak-to-peak amplitude. Rate dependence: sinusoidal motion was generated at cycle rates of 1 Hz, .33 Hz, and .2 Hz. Peak-to-peak displacement and SDs were assessed. Respiratory waveform tracking accuracy: the phantom reproduced recorded breathing cycles (by volunteers and patients) were tracked by the Calypso system. Deviation in tracking position from produced waveform was used to calculate SD throughout entire breathing cycle. Stability and drift analysis: Mean amplitude ± SD of phase 0% or 50% were 20.01 ± 0.04 mm and -19.65 ± 0.08 mm, respectively. No clinically significant drift was detected with drift measured as 5.1

  11. Validation of the Calypso Surface Beacon Transponder

    PubMed Central

    Belanger, Maxwell; Saleh, Ziad; Volpe, Tom; Margiasso, Rich; Li, Xiang; Chan, Maria; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Tang, Xiaoli

    2017-01-01

    Calypso L-shaped Surface Beacon transponder has recently become available for clinical applications. We herein conduct studies to validate the Surface Beacon transponder in terms of stability, reproducibility, orientation sensitivity, cycle rate dependence, and respiratory waveform tracking accuracy. The Surface Beacon was placed on a Quasar respiratory phantom and positioned at the isocenter with its two arms aligned with the lasers. Breathing waveforms were simulated, and the motion of the transponder was tracked. Stability and drift analysis: sinusoidal waveforms (200 cycles) were produced, and the amplitudes of phases 0% (inhale) and 50% (exhale) were recorded at each breathing cycle. The mean and standard deviation (SD) of the amplitudes were calculated. Linear least-squares fitting was performed to access the possible amplitude drift over the breathing cycles. Reproducibility: similar setting to stability and drift analysis, and the phantom generated 100 cycles of the sinusoidal waveform per run. The Calypso system’s was re-setup for each run. Recorded amplitude and SD of 0% and 50% phase were compared between runs to assess contribution of Calypso electromagnetic array setup variation. Beacon orientation sensitivity: the Calypso tracks sinusoidal phantom motion with a defined angular offset of the beacon to assess its effect on SD and peak-to-peak amplitude. Rate dependence: sinusoidal motion was generated at cycle rates of 1 Hz, .33 Hz, and .2 Hz. Peak-to-peak displacement and SDs were assessed. Respiratory waveform tracking accuracy: the phantom reproduced recorded breathing cycles (by volunteers and patients) were tracked by the Calypso system. Deviation in tracking position from produced waveform was used to calculate SD throughout entire breathing cycle. Stability and drift analysis: Mean amplitude ± SD of phase 0% or 50% were 20.01 ± 0.04 mm and −19.65 ± 0.08 mm, respectively. No clinically significant drift was detected with drift measured as 5

  12. Validation of the Calypso Surface Beacon Transponder.

    PubMed

    Belanger, Maxwell; Saleh, Ziad; Volpe, Tom; Margiasso, Rich; Li, Xiang; Chan, Maria; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Tang, Xiaoli

    2016-07-01

    Calypso L-shaped Surface Beacon transponder has recently become available for clinical applications. We herein conduct studies to validate the Surface Beacon transponder in terms of stability, reproducibility, orientation sensitivity, cycle rate dependence, and respiratory waveform tracking accuracy. The Surface Beacon was placed on a Quasar respiratory phantom and positioned at the isocenter with its two arms aligned with the lasers. Breathing waveforms were simulated, and the motion of the transponder was tracked. Stability and drift analysis: sinusoidal waveforms (200 cycles) were produced, and the amplitudes of phases 0% (inhale) and 50% (exhale) were recorded at each breathing cycle. The mean and standard deviation (SD) of the amplitudes were calculated. Linear least-squares fitting was performed to access the possible amplitude drift over the breathing cycles. Reproducibility: similar setting to stability and drift analysis, and the phantom generated 100 cycles of the sinusoidal waveform per run. The Calypso system's was re-setup for each run. Recorded amplitude and SD of 0% and 50% phase were compared between runs to assess contribution of Calypso electromagnetic array setup variation. Beacon orientation sensitivity: the Calypso tracks sinusoidal phantom motion with a defined angular offset of the beacon to assess its effect on SD and peak-to-peak amplitude. Rate dependence: sinusoidal motion was generated at cycle rates of 1 Hz, .33 Hz, and .2 Hz. Peak-to-peak displacement and SDs were assessed. Respiratory waveform tracking accuracy: the phantom reproduced recorded breathing cycles (by volunteers and patients) were tracked by the Calypso system. Deviation in tracking position from produced waveform was used to calculate SD throughout entire breathing cycle. Stability and drift analysis: Mean amplitude ± SD of phase 0% or 50% were 20.01±0.04 mm and -19.65±0.08 mm, respectively. No clinically significant drift was detected with drift measured as 5.1

  13. Privacy Risks from Genomic Data-Sharing Beacons

    PubMed Central

    Shringarpure, Suyash S.; Bustamante, Carlos D.

    2015-01-01

    The human genetics community needs robust protocols that enable secure sharing of genomic data from participants in genetic research. Beacons are web servers that answer allele-presence queries—such as “Do you have a genome that has a specific nucleotide (e.g., A) at a specific genomic position (e.g., position 11,272 on chromosome 1)?”—with either “yes” or “no.” Here, we show that individuals in a beacon are susceptible to re-identification even if the only data shared include presence or absence information about alleles in a beacon. Specifically, we propose a likelihood-ratio test of whether a given individual is present in a given genetic beacon. Our test is not dependent on allele frequencies and is the most powerful test for a specified false-positive rate. Through simulations, we showed that in a beacon with 1,000 individuals, re-identification is possible with just 5,000 queries. Relatives can also be identified in the beacon. Re-identification is possible even in the presence of sequencing errors and variant-calling differences. In a beacon constructed with 65 European individuals from the 1000 Genomes Project, we demonstrated that it is possible to detect membership in the beacon with just 250 SNPs. With just 1,000 SNP queries, we were able to detect the presence of an individual genome from the Personal Genome Project in an existing beacon. Our results show that beacons can disclose membership and implied phenotypic information about participants and do not protect privacy a priori. We discuss risk mitigation through policies and standards such as not allowing anonymous pings of genetic beacons and requiring minimum beacon sizes. PMID:26522470

  14. Portable-Beacon Landing System for Helicopters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Thomas J.; Clary, George R.; Chisholm, John P.; Macdonald, Stanley L.

    1987-01-01

    Prototype beacon landing system (BLS) allows helicopters to make precise landings in all weather. BLS easily added to existing helicopter avionic equipment and readily deployed at remote sites. Small and light, system employs X-band radar and digital processing. Variety of beams pulsed sequentially by ground station after initial interrogation by weather radar of approaching helicopter. Airborne microprocessor processes pulses to determine glide slope, course deviation, and range.

  15. Experience with the BEACON core monitoring system

    SciTech Connect

    Beard, C.L. ); Icide, C.A. )

    1992-01-01

    The BEACON operational core support system was developed for use in pressurized water reactors to provide an integrated system to perform reactor core monitoring, core measurement reduction, core analysis and follow, and core predictions. It is based on the very fast and accurate three-dimensional SPNOVA nodal program. The experience to date has shown the importance of an accurate integrated system. The benefits accrued are greater for the total system than the benefits that are possible separately.

  16. Indoor location estimation using radio beacons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Uzair; Lee, Young-Koo; Lee, Sungyoug; Park, Chongkug

    2007-12-01

    We present a simple location estimation method for developing radio beacon based location system in the indoor environments. It employs an online learning approach for making large scale location systems in a short time collaboratively. The salient features of our method are low memory requirements and simple computations which make it suitable for both distributed location-aware applications based on client-server model as well as privacy sensitive applications residing on stand alone devices.

  17. Development of a universal RNA beacon for exogenous gene detection.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuanjian; Lu, Zhongju; Cohen, Ira Stephen; Scarlata, Suzanne

    2015-05-01

    Stem cell therapy requires a nontoxic and high-throughput method to achieve a pure cell population to prevent teratomas that can occur if even one cell in the implant has not been transformed. A promising method to detect and separate cells expressing a particular gene is RNA beacon technology. However, developing a successful, specific beacon to a particular transfected gene can take months to develop and in some cases is impossible. Here, we report on an off-the-shelf universal beacon that decreases the time and cost of applying beacon technology to select any living cell population transfected with an exogenous gene. ©AlphaMed Press.

  18. Development of a Universal RNA Beacon for Exogenous Gene Detection

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yuanjian; Lu, Zhongju; Cohen, Ira Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell therapy requires a nontoxic and high-throughput method to achieve a pure cell population to prevent teratomas that can occur if even one cell in the implant has not been transformed. A promising method to detect and separate cells expressing a particular gene is RNA beacon technology. However, developing a successful, specific beacon to a particular transfected gene can take months to develop and in some cases is impossible. Here, we report on an off-the-shelf universal beacon that decreases the time and cost of applying beacon technology to select any living cell population transfected with an exogenous gene. PMID:25769653

  19. Detecting the Beacons of Life with Exo-Life Beacon Space Telescope (ELBST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Airapetian, V. S.; Danchi, W. C.; Chen, P. C.; Rabin, D. M.; Carpenter, K. G.; Mlynczak, M. G.

    2017-02-01

    We propose a new observational strategy, the “Exo-Life Beacon Space Telescope,” for detecting the signatures of “beacons” of life defined as high signal and low spectral resolution thermal emission from molecules associated with life signatures.

  20. Project Beacon 1985-86. OEA Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn. Office of Educational Assessment.

    This report describes and evaluates the first year of Project Beacon, a bilingual program implemented at four high schools in Queens, New York, in 1985-86. Project Beacon provided instruction in English as a second language, in native language arts, in bilingual academic subjects, and in career-oriented subjects. It reached 570 Spanish-, Chinese-,…

  1. 54. DETAIL OF GENERAL ELECTRIC AIRBORNE BEACON EQUIPMENT TEST SET ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    54. DETAIL OF GENERAL ELECTRIC AIRBORNE BEACON EQUIPMENT TEST SET (LEFT) AND ASSOCIATED GOULD BRUSH CHART RECORDERS (RIGHT). ELAPSED TIME COUNTER SITS ATOP AIRBORNE BEACON EQUIPMENT TEST SET. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Operations Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  2. A search for optical beacons: implications of null results.

    PubMed

    Blair, David G; Zadnik, Marjan G

    2002-01-01

    Over the past few years a series of searches for interstellar radio beacons have taken place using the Parkes radio telescope. Here we report hitherto unpublished results from a search for optical beacons from 60 solar-type stars using the Perth-Lowell telescope. We discuss the significance of the null results from these searches, all of which were based on the interstellar contact channel hypothesis. While the null results of all searches to date can be explained simply by the nonexistence of electromagnetically communicating life elsewhere in the Milky Way, four other possible explanations that do not preclude its existence are proposed: (1) Extraterrestrial civilizations desiring to make contact through the use of electromagnetic beacons have a very low density in the Milky Way. (2) The interstellar contact channel hypothesis is incorrect, and beacons exist at frequencies that have not yet been searched. (3) The search has been incomplete in terms of sensitivity and/or target directions: Beacons exist, but more sensitive equipment and/or more searching is needed to achieve success. (4) The search has occurred before beacon signals can be expected to have arrived at the Earth, and beacon signals may be expected in the future. Based on consideration of the technology required for extraterrestrial civilizations to identify target planets, we argue that the fourth possibility is likely to be valid and that powerful, easily detectable beacons could be received in coming centuries.

  3. Beacons In Brief. P/PV In Brief. Issue 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blank, Susan; Farley, Chelsea

    2004-01-01

    This second issue in P/PV's "In Brief" series focuses on the San Francisco Beacon Initiative and P/PV's recently released evaluation results. The Beacon Initiative established after-school programs in eight public schools in low-income San Francisco neighborhoods. P/PV's 36-month evaluation examined key developmental and academic outcomes.…

  4. Beach Advisory and Closing Online Notification (BEACON) system

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Beach Advisory and Closing Online Notification system (BEACON) is a colletion of state and local data reported to EPA about beach closings and advisories. BEACON is the public-facing query of the Program tracking, Beach Advisories, Water quality standards, and Nutrients database (PRAWN) which tracks beach closing and advisory information.

  5. A Search for Optical Beacons: Implications of Null Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, David G.; Zadnik, Marjan G.

    2002-08-01

    Over the past few years a series of searches for interstellar radio beacons have taken place using the Parkes radio telescope. Here we report hitherto unpublished results from a search for optical beacons from 60 solar-type stars using the Perth-Lowell telescope. We discuss the significance of the null results from these searches, all of which were based on the interstellar contact channel hypothesis. While the null results of all searches to date can be explained simply by the nonexistence of electromagnetically communicating life elsewhere in the Milky Way, four other possible explanations that do not preclude its existence are proposed: (1) Extraterrestrial civilizations desiring to make contact through the use of electromagnetic beacons have a very low density in the Milky Way. (2) The interstellar contact channel hypothesis is incorrect, and beacons exist at frequencies that have not yet been searched. (3) The search has been incomplete in terms of sensitivity and/or target directions: Beacons exist, but more sensitive equipment and/or more searching is needed to achieve success. (4) The search has occurred before beacon signals can be expected to have arrived at the Earth, and beacon signals may be expected in the future. Based on consideration of the technology required for extraterrestrial civilizations to identify target planets, we argue that the fourth possibility is likely to be valid and that powerful, easily detectable beacons could be received in coming centuries.

  6. Beacons In Brief. P/PV In Brief. Issue 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blank, Susan; Farley, Chelsea

    2004-01-01

    This second issue in P/PV's "In Brief" series focuses on the San Francisco Beacon Initiative and P/PV's recently released evaluation results. The Beacon Initiative established after-school programs in eight public schools in low-income San Francisco neighborhoods. P/PV's 36-month evaluation examined key developmental and academic outcomes.…

  7. Evaluation of the New York City Beacons. Phase I Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Constancia; Brown, Prudence; Freudenberg, Nicholas

    This report presents findings from Phase 1 of an evaluation of the New York City Beacons initiative, a school-community-family partnership model initiated in 1991. Beacons are community centers within public schools that offer activities and services to people of all ages before and after school, in the evenings, and on weekends. Research included…

  8. Indoor Navigation using Direction Sensor and Beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, Joel; Jeganathan, Muthu

    2004-01-01

    A system for indoor navigation of a mobile robot includes (1) modulated infrared beacons at known positions on the walls and ceiling of a room and (2) a cameralike sensor, comprising a wide-angle lens with a position-sensitive photodetector at the focal plane, mounted in a known position and orientation on the robot. The system also includes a computer running special-purpose software that processes the sensor readings to obtain the position and orientation of the robot in all six degrees of freedom in a coordinate system embedded in the room.

  9. Determining Locations by Use of Networks of Passive Beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okino, Clayton; Gray, Andrew; Jennings, Esther

    2009-01-01

    Networks of passive radio beacons spanning moderate-sized terrain areas have been proposed to aid navigation of small robotic aircraft that would be used to explore Saturn s moon Titan. Such networks could also be used on Earth to aid navigation of robotic aircraft, land vehicles, or vessels engaged in exploration or reconnaissance in situations or locations (e.g., underwater locations) in which Global Positioning System (GPS) signals are unreliable or unavailable. Prior to use, it would be necessary to pre-position the beacons at known locations that would be determined by use of one or more precise independent global navigation system(s). Thereafter, while navigating over the area spanned by a given network of passive beacons, an exploratory robot would use the beacons to determine its position precisely relative to the known beacon positions (see figure). If it were necessary for the robot to explore multiple, separated terrain areas spanned by different networks of beacons, the robot could use a long-haul, relatively coarse global navigation system for the lower-precision position determination needed during transit between such areas. The proposed method of precise determination of position of an exploratory robot relative to the positions of passive radio beacons is based partly on the principles of radar and partly on the principles of radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags. The robot would transmit radar-like signals that would be modified and reflected by the passive beacons. The distance to each beacon would be determined from the roundtrip propagation time and/or round-trip phase shift of the signal returning from that beacon. Signals returned from different beacons could be distinguished by means of their RFID characteristics. Alternatively or in addition, the antenna of each beacon could be designed to radiate in a unique pattern that could be identified by the navigation system. Also, alternatively or in addition, sets of identical beacons could

  10. Diagnosis of Neisseria gonorrhoeae Using Molecular Beacon

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Achchhe Lal; Sonkar, Subash Chandra; Kumari, Indu; Saluja, Daman

    2015-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is an important sexually transmitted diseases (STD) causing pathogen worldwide. Due to absence of an affordable diagnostic assay, routine screening of gonococcal infection becomes impossible in developing countries where infection rates are maximum. Treatment is given on the basis of symptoms alone which leads to spread of infection. Thus, development of a rapid, sensitive, specific, and PCR based visual diagnostic assay suitable for developing countries, required for better disease management, is aimed at in present study. Endocervical swabs were collected from patients visiting gynecology department of various hospitals in Delhi. In-house PCR based assay was developed and modified to visual assay using molecular beacon for end-point detection. It was evaluated against Roche AMPLICOR NG kit and rmp gene. Specificity of beacon was confirmed by competition experiments. Diagnostic test was 98.21% specific and 99.59% sensitive whereas negative and positive predicted value were 99.40% and 98.78%, respectively. We also observed that twice the concentration (2X) of premix was stable at 4°C for 4 months and dry swab samples gave concordant results with that of wet swabs. These features make the test best suitable for routine diagnosis of genital infections in developing countries. PMID:25802857

  11. Molecular Beacon-Based MicroRNA Imaging During Neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jonghwan; Kim, Soonhag

    2016-01-01

    The fluorescence monitoring system for examining endogenous microRNA (miRNA) activity in cellular level provides crucial information on not only understanding a critical role of miRNA involving a variety of biological processes, but also evaluating miRNA expression patterns in a noninvasive manner. In this protocol, we report the details of a new procedure for a molecular beacon-based miRNA monitoring system, which includes the illustration scheme for miRNA detection strategy, exogenous miRNA detection, and measurement of endogenous miRNA expression level during neurogenesis. The fluorescence signal of miR-124a beacon quenched by BHQ2 was gradually recovered as increasing concentration of the miR-124a in tube. The functional work of miR-124a beacon was examined in intracellular environment, allowing for the internalization of the miR-124a beacon by lipofectamine, which resulted in activated fluorescent signals of the miR-124a beacon in the HeLa cells after the addition of synthetic miR-124a. The endogenous miR-124a expression level was detected by miR-124a beacon system during neurogenesis, showing brighter fluorescence intensity in cytoplasmic area of P19 cells after induction of neuronal differentiation by retinoic acid. The molecular beacon based-miRNA detection technique could be applicable to the simultaneous visualization of a variety of miRNA expression patterns using different fluorescence dyes. For the study of examining endogenous miRNA expression level using miRNA-beacon system, if cellular differentiation step is already prepared, transfection step of miR-124a beacon into P19 cells, and acquisition of activated fluorescence signal measured by confocal microscope can be conducted approximately within 6 h.

  12. High efficiency low cost monolithic module for SARSAT distress beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, Wendell C.; Siu, Daniel P.

    1992-01-01

    The program objectives were to develop a highly efficient, low cost RF module for SARSAT beacons; achieve significantly lower battery current drain, amount of heat generated, and size of battery required; utilize MMIC technology to improve efficiency, reliability, packaging, and cost; and provide a technology database for GaAs based UHF RF circuit architectures. Presented in viewgraph form are functional block diagrams of the SARSAT distress beacon and beacon RF module as well as performance goals, schematic diagrams, predicted performances, and measured performances for the phase modulator and power amplifier.

  13. HF beacon network for ionospheric specification in Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hysell, D. L.; Milla, M. A.; Vierinen, J.

    2016-12-01

    A growing network of HF beacon transmitters and receivers is being deployed in Peru for specifying the F region ionosphere regionally. The effort is motivated by ionospheric disturbances associated with equatorial spread F (ESF), especially disturbances arising under inauspicious ESF conditions. The beacons use dual frequencies (2.72 and 3.64 MHz). They incorporate PRN coding to afford group-delay measurements. Scatered power, Doppler shift, bearing, and polarization are also measured. An algorithm for inverting the beacon data combined with electron density profiles from Jicamarca is described. Data and representative solutions from recent campaigns will be reviewed.

  14. An underwater acoustic beacons positioning method using single hydrophone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jia; Xu, Feng; Zhang, Qian; Jiang, Lijun

    2017-08-01

    When an aircraft crashed the sound emitted by the beacon would help to detection and location the black box. While in the deep sea research, it is hardly to use the USBL, SBL and LBL as usual. In this paper a new method was introduced. In this method, the beacon could be located with only one hydrophone. The time difference of the hydrophone at different place was used to located the beacon. To verify the performance of this method, the simulation was processed. The results show that this method is effectively.

  15. GLAS: A Laser Beacon for the WHT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutten, R.

    2004-09-01

    In January 2004 the Nederlandse Organisatie voor Wetenschappelijk Onderzoek (NWO) announced its full support for the proposed development of a laser beacon for the NAOMI Adaptive Optics (AO) system on the 4.2-m William Herschel Telescope (WHT). Such a laser guide star system will amplify the fraction of sky available to AO observations at visible and infrared wavelengths from about one percent to nearly 100%. In terms of astronomical research, this translates into radical progress as it opens up high spatial resolution observations from the ground to nearly all types of science targets. In combination with the existing and planned instrumentation, the WHT will offer a highly competitive facility to the astronomical community, exploiting a window of opportunity before similar capability will exist on 8-m class telescopes.

  16. GaAs monolithic RF modules for SARSAT distress beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cauley, Michael A.

    1991-01-01

    Monolithic GaAs UHF components for use in SARSAT Emergency Distress beacons are under development by Microwave Monolithics, Inc., Simi Valley, CA. The components include a bi-phase modulator, driver amplifier, and a 5 watt power amplifier.

  17. Modeling on Bessel beam guide star beacon for wavefront sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Quan; Luo, Ruiyao; Yang, Yi; Wu, Wuming; Du, Shaojun; Ning, Yu

    2017-06-01

    Bessel beam has the advantages of reducing scattering artefacts and increasing the quality of the image and penetration. This paper proposed to generate a guide star by Bessel beam with vortex phase, and to use the beacon with special spot structure to measure the atmosphere turbulence aberrations. With the matching algorithm of measured characteristic spot in each subaperture, the detection accuracy of Hartmann wavefront sensor can be improved. Based on wave optics theory, the modeling of Bessel beam guide star and wavefront sensing system was built. The laser guide star beacon generated by Bessel beam with vortex phase and beacon echo wave measured by Hartmann sensor were both simulated. Compared with the results measured by echo wave from Gauss beam generated guide star beacon, this novel method can reduce the error of wavefront detection and increase the detection accuracy of Hartmann sensor.

  18. 6. DETAIL, SOUTHEAST FRONT, SECOND STAGE Mispillion Lighthouse, Beacon ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. DETAIL, SOUTHEAST FRONT, SECOND STAGE - Mispillion Lighthouse, Beacon Tower, South bank of Mispillion River at it confluence with Delaware River at northeast end of County Road 203, 7 miles east of Milford, Milford, Sussex County, DE

  19. 2. VIEW NORTHWEST, SOUTHEAST FRONT Mispillion Lighthouse, Beacon Tower, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW NORTHWEST, SOUTHEAST FRONT - Mispillion Lighthouse, Beacon Tower, South bank of Mispillion River at it confluence with Delaware River at northeast end of County Road 203, 7 miles east of Milford, Milford, Sussex County, DE

  20. 4. DETAIL, CASTIRON BASE, SOUTH CORNER Mispillion Lighthouse, Beacon ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. DETAIL, CAST-IRON BASE, SOUTH CORNER - Mispillion Lighthouse, Beacon Tower, South bank of Mispillion River at it confluence with Delaware River at northeast end of County Road 203, 7 miles east of Milford, Milford, Sussex County, DE

  1. Southeast (front) elevation Mispillion Lighthouse, Beacon Tower, South bank ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Southeast (front) elevation - Mispillion Lighthouse, Beacon Tower, South bank of Mispillion River at it confluence with Delaware River at northeast end of County Road 203, 7 miles east of Milford, Milford, Sussex County, DE

  2. Optical telecommunications: performance of the qualification model SILEX beacon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, Michel; Dobie, Paul J.; Gollier, Jacques; Heinrichs, Theo; Woszczyk, Pawel; Sobeczko, Andre

    1995-04-01

    The Beacon is a powerful non-coherent CW infra-red laser source which is developed under the Semi-conductor Inter-satellite Link Experiment (SILEX). It will provide a high divergence beam used during the first tracking acquisition sequence of the Spot 4/Artemis optical communication link. The Beacon uses high efficiency anamorphic couplers to deliver output from 19 laser diodes into a single multi-mode Mixing Fiber, the exit of which is integrated at the focal plane of a collimator. Beacon output is maintained at the required level during unit life using an Optical Monitoring System and a Beacon output Tele-Command. The Engineering Qualification Model is now complete and overall performance with respect to the SILEX requirements is presented.

  3. Micropatterning of Aptamer Beacons to Create Cytokine-Sensing Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Tuleuova, Nazgul

    2010-01-01

    Aptamer beacons are DNA or RNA probes that bind proteins or small molecules of interest and emit signal directly upon interaction with the target analyte. This paper describes micropatterning of aptamer beacons for detection of IFN-γ—an important inflammatory cytokine. The beacon consisted of a fluorophore-labeled aptamer strand hybridized with a shorter, quencher-carrying complementary strand. Cytokine molecules were expected to displace quenching strands of the beacon, disrupting FRET effect and resulting in fluorescence signal. The glass substrate was first micropatterned with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogel microwells (35 μm diameter individual wells) so as to define sites for attachment of beacon molecules. PEG microwell arrays were then incubated with avidin followed by biotin-aptamer-fluorophore constructs. Subsequent incubation with quencher-carrying complementary strands resulted in formation of DNA duplex and caused quenching of fluorescence due to FRET effect. When exposed to IFN-γ, microwells changed fluorescence from low (quencher hybridized with fluorophore-carrying strand) to high (quenching strand displaced by cytokine molecules). The fluorescence signal was confined to microwells, was changing in real-time and was dependent on the concentration of IFN-γ. In the future, we plan to co-localize aptamer beacons and cells on micropatterned surfaces in order to monitor in real-time cytokine secretion from immune cells in microwells. PMID:21170394

  4. Optical telecommunications: performance of the protoflight model SILEX beacon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, Michel; Dobie, Paul J.; Grodent, C.; Woszczyk, Pawel; Sobeczko, Andre

    1996-04-01

    The beacon is a powerful non-coherent cw infra-red laser source which will provide a high divergence beam used during the first tracking acquisition sequence of the Spot 4/Artemis optical communication link. The beacon uses high efficiency anamorphic couplers to deliver output from 19 laser diodes into a single multi-mode mixing fiber, the exit of which is integrated at the focal plane of a collimator. Beacon output is maintained at the required level (nominally 8 KW/Sr) during unit life using an optical monitoring system and a beacon output tele-command. Following successful environmental testing, the proto-flight model (PFM) has recently been delivered ready for integration onto the SILEX terminal. This paper describes the overall performance of the PFM beacon with respect to SILEX requirements. An improved beacon using 1.2 W laser diodes which will be capable of delivering up to 17 KW/Sr is currently under construction. An analysis of the design aspects to be considered when using high power laser diodes in this type of application is presented. Finally, a brief summary is given of SPACEBEL activities associated with high power and more compact optical communication units for future missions.

  5. Functional demonstration of accelerometer-assisted beacon tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Gerry G.; Portillo, Angel; Lee, Shinhak; Ceniceros, Juan M.

    2001-06-01

    NASA/JPL has been developing technologies to accurately point a laser beam from deep space with sub-micro-radian precision for data transmission systems. A novel approach to achieve this goal is based on using high bandwidth inertial sensors to compensate for jitter caused by spacecraft vibrations. The use of high bandwidth inertial sensors promises to enable the implementation of laser communication links anywhere within the solar system and beyond. A functional demonstration of closed-loop accelerometer- assisted beacon tracking under simulated spacecraft vibration was undertaken, in order to validate innovative concepts, technologies, sub-systems and algorithms that achieve the sub-micro-radian pointing accuracy necessary for optical communication systems from deep space. The laboratory demonstration included integration of the complete acquisition, tracking, and pointing system with inertial sensors (e.g. accelerometers). Double integration, bias and initial velocity estimation algorithms were developed, verified and implemented. Accelerometer performance was characterized and integrated to the system. A laser beacon was mounted on a platform that simulates spacecraft vibrations. Vibrations were introduced into the beacon and were simultaneously sampled by the accelerometer. These signals were used to close the pointing loop. Closed loop tracking of the vibrating beacon was achieved using the accelerometer information interlaced with a slow-rate reference update (laser beacon centroids). This presentation will describe the details of the functional demonstration of accelerometer-assisted beacon tracking and pointing in a laboratory environment under simulated spacecraft vibration.

  6. SPHERES ultrasound beacon tester floats in Node 1 during Expedition 8

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-03-24

    ISS008-E-19132 (24 March 2004) --- The Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) Beacon / Beacon Tester floats in the Unity node of the International Space Station.

  7. Semiconductor lasers for space beacons and communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kung, H.; Worland, D. P.; Nguyen, H.; Streifer, W.; Scifres, D. R.

    1989-06-01

    Semiconductor lasers have been packaged and qualified for various applications in space. In this paper two subsystems are discussed, both of which will be launched shortly. The first subsystem employs a partially coherent semiconductor laser array coupled to an optical fiber, and monitored by a photo-diode.This package is used in a highly reliable, moderate data rate, moderate length communications link. The fiber coupled output power is 28 mW and the package has been fully space qualified. That is, it is free of organics, hermetically sealed, and has been subjected to die shear, acceleration, thermal cycling, and other tests. The laser longevity exceeds 10 years of continuous operation. The second subsystem consists of 27 fiber coupled space qualified packaged lasers of the same type as above, but designed to operate at 200 mW power output from the fiber. Twenty-seven fibers are bundled to produce a source with a total power emission in excess of 5 watts cw. The subsystem is part of a beacon, which will be used very shortly in a polar satellite experiment. The lasers employed in the two subsystems described above are only partially coherent and therefore are insufficiently bright to operate in a long distance, high data rate link, except with a prohibitively large lens.

  8. Documentation of 9-PAC Beacon Target Detector processing function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gertz, Jeffrey L.; Elkin, Gabriel R.

    1994-07-01

    This project report documents the algorithms and flow of the beacon target detector (BTD) processing function incorporated as part of the ASR-9 processor augmentation card (9-PAC). The BTD function combines replies that arise from the same aircraft to form beacon targets, and sends these beacon targets to the 9-PAC merge process where they are combined with primary radar reports. The 9-PAC BTD process was designed to solve two problems with the ASR-9 array signal processor (ASP) BTD: identifying and removing false beacon targets due to reflections and preventing merging or splitting of targets due to reply overlap and garble. The BTD reflection processing algorithm marks each beacon target as either real or false, and provides this information to the 9-PAC merge process. Discrete Mode A reflection false targets are identified when duplicate code reports satisfying stringent conditions are located. In order to find nondiscrete Mode A code reflection false targets, the BTD builds an automated, dynamic reflector database based on the geography of pairs of discrete real and false targets.

  9. Development of Beacon technology. Quarterly report, July-September 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-06-01

    The BEACON process involves the catalytic deposition of carbon from a gas stream containing carbon monoxide, and subsequent exposure of this carbon to a gas stream containing hydrogen or steam at elevated temperature and pressure to produce methane. The steam gasification route currently is receiving the most attention. Multiple-cycle tests with K1 and K2 catalysts showed sustained activity and stable performance through thirty of the planned forty cycles. The tests will be completed next quarter. Steaming temperature screening tests on K2-based BEACON carbon supported the conclusion based on earlier testing with K1-based BEACON carbon that steam gasification at two temperature levels has significant advantages over steam gasification at a single temperature in terms of gasification rates and methane yields. Multiple-cycle testing of K2-based BEACON carbon was started in the 4-inch bench-scale fluid bed reactor. Catalyst C77 continued to have problems during multiple-cycle testing - loss of catalytic activity, possibly due to overheating, and poor fluidizability. Further modifications of the C77 catalyst preparation technique were tested. Catalyst C77-K2 showed no change in performance, and results with catalyst C77-K1 were generally disappointing. Laboratory experiments continued with catalyst C78. A variable differential pressure concept which does not require gas/solids separtion is now being considered for the transfer of BEACON solids between carbon deposition and carbon gasification reactors.

  10. 46 CFR 28.150 - Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacons (EPIRBs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacons (EPIRBs). 28... Indicating Radio Beacons (EPIRBs). Each vessel must be equipped with an emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB) as required by 46 CFR part 25, subpart 25.26. Note: Each vessel which uses radio...

  11. 46 CFR 28.150 - Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacons (EPIRBs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacons (EPIRBs). 28... Indicating Radio Beacons (EPIRBs). Each vessel must be equipped with an emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB) as required by 46 CFR part 25, subpart 25.26. Note: Each vessel which uses radio...

  12. 46 CFR 28.150 - Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacons (EPIRBs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacons (EPIRBs). 28... Indicating Radio Beacons (EPIRBs). Each vessel must be equipped with an emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB) as required by 46 CFR part 25, subpart 25.26. Note: Each vessel which uses radio...

  13. 14 CFR 171.321 - DME and marker beacon performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false DME and marker beacon performance... (MLS) § 171.321 DME and marker beacon performance requirements. (a) The DME equipment must meet the..._regulations/ibr_locations.html. (b) MLS marker beacon equipment must meet the performance requirements...

  14. A Place To Grow: Evaluation of the New York City Beacons. Summary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Constancia; Feist, Michelle; Nevarez, Nancy

    This study examined six Beacon centers, which are community centers located in public school buildings that offer a range of activities and services to participants of all ages, before and after school, in the evenings, and on weekends. Individual Beacons are managed by community-based organizations. The study examined how the Beacons provided…

  15. 76 FR 65216 - Beacon Medical Services, LLC, Aurora, CO; Notice of Negative Determination Regarding Application...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-20

    ... Employment and Training Administration Beacon Medical Services, LLC, Aurora, CO; Notice of Negative... apply for Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA) applicable to workers and former workers of Beacon Medical Services, LLC, Aurora, Colorado (Beacon Medical Services). The negative determination was issued on June 22...

  16. 46 CFR 28.150 - Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacons (EPIRBs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacons (EPIRBs). 28... Indicating Radio Beacons (EPIRBs). Each vessel must be equipped with an emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB) as required by 46 CFR part 25, subpart 25.26. Note: Each vessel which uses radio...

  17. A Place to Grow: Evaluation of the New York City Beacons. Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Constancia; Feist, Michelle; Nevarez, Nancy

    2002-01-01

    This study examined six Beacon centers, which are community centers located in public school buildings that offer a range of activities and services to participants of all ages, before and after school, in the evenings, and on weekends. Individual Beacons are managed by community-based organizations. The study examined how the Beacons provided…

  18. 14 CFR 171.321 - DME and marker beacon performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false DME and marker beacon performance... (MLS) § 171.321 DME and marker beacon performance requirements. (a) The DME equipment must meet the..._regulations/ibr_locations.html. (b) MLS marker beacon equipment must meet the performance requirements...

  19. 33 CFR 149.580 - What are the requirements for a radar beacon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What are the requirements for a radar beacon? 149.580 Section 149.580 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Navigation Miscellaneous § 149.580 What are the requirements for a radar beacon? (a) A radar beacon (RACON...

  20. 33 CFR 149.535 - What are the requirements for rotating beacons on platforms?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... rotating beacons on platforms? 149.535 Section 149.535 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... EQUIPMENT Aids to Navigation Lights on Platforms § 149.535 What are the requirements for rotating beacons on... rotating beacon that distinguishes the deepwater port from other surrounding offshore structures. The...

  1. 33 CFR 149.580 - What are the requirements for a radar beacon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the requirements for a radar beacon? 149.580 Section 149.580 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Navigation Miscellaneous § 149.580 What are the requirements for a radar beacon? (a) A radar beacon (RACON...

  2. 76 FR 17625 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Emergency Beacon Registrations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-30

    ... Beacon Registrations AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION... ships, aircraft, or individuals in distress if they are equipped with an emergency radio beacon. Persons purchasing a digital distress beacon, operating in the frequency range of 406.000 to 406.100 MHz, must...

  3. 77 FR 41271 - Safety Zone; Newburgh to Beacon Swim, Newburgh, Hudson River, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-13

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Newburgh to Beacon Swim, Newburgh, Hudson... Newburgh, NY for the annual Newburgh Beacon Swim event. This temporary safety zone is necessary to protect... Beacon Swim is an annual recurring event that has a permanent safety zone found at 33 CFR 165.160. The...

  4. 46 CFR 28.150 - Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacons (EPIRBs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacons (EPIRBs). 28... Indicating Radio Beacons (EPIRBs). Each vessel must be equipped with an emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB) as required by 46 CFR part 25, subpart 25.26. Note: Each vessel which uses radio...

  5. 33 CFR 149.535 - What are the requirements for rotating beacons on platforms?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... rotating beacons on platforms? 149.535 Section 149.535 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... EQUIPMENT Aids to Navigation Lights on Platforms § 149.535 What are the requirements for rotating beacons on... rotating beacon that distinguishes the deepwater port from other surrounding offshore structures. The...

  6. 33 CFR 149.580 - What are the requirements for a radar beacon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... radar beacon? 149.580 Section 149.580 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Navigation Miscellaneous § 149.580 What are the requirements for a radar beacon? (a) A radar beacon (RACON... Morse code character, the length of which does not exceed 25 percent of the radar range expected to be...

  7. 33 CFR 149.580 - What are the requirements for a radar beacon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... radar beacon? 149.580 Section 149.580 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Navigation Miscellaneous § 149.580 What are the requirements for a radar beacon? (a) A radar beacon (RACON... Morse code character, the length of which does not exceed 25 percent of the radar range expected to be...

  8. 33 CFR 149.580 - What are the requirements for a radar beacon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... radar beacon? 149.580 Section 149.580 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Navigation Miscellaneous § 149.580 What are the requirements for a radar beacon? (a) A radar beacon (RACON... Morse code character, the length of which does not exceed 25 percent of the radar range expected to be...

  9. Indoor localization and beacon calibration using ultrasonic and radio frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jeong-Yong; Jung, Kyoo-Sick; Shin, Dong-Hun

    2005-12-01

    Using the ultrasonic and the radio frequency, a method for the robot localization and calibration was presented. The distance between the receiver and a beacon can be computed by using the difference between times of flight. The presented method uses the gradient of the maximum amplitude of the ultrasonic in order to measure the time of flight precisely. The measured three distances between the receiver and the beacon were used to compute the robot position by the direct inverse method and the iterated least square approximation method. This paper defines the calibration as the problem to find the location of 3 beacons and 3 robots, and presents 3 methods for it and found the 2B2R method as the best among them.

  10. Comparison of BEACON and COMPARE reactor cavity subcompartment analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Burkett, M.W.; Idar, E.S.; Gido, R.G.; Lime, J.F.; Koestel, A.

    1984-04-01

    In this study, a more advanced best-estimate containment code, BEACON-MOD3A, was ued to calculate force and moment loads resulting from a high-energy blowdown for two reactor cavity geometries previously analyzed with the licensing computer code COMPARE-MOD1A. The BEACON force and moment loads were compared with the COMPARE results to determine the safety margins provided by the COMPARE code. The forces and moments calculated by the codes were found to be different, although not in any consistent manner, for the two reactor cavity geometries studied. Therefore, generic summary statements regarding margins cannot be made because of the effects of the detailed physical configuration. However, differences in the BEACON and COMPARE calculated forces and moments can be attributed to differences in the modeling assumptions used in the codes and the analyses.

  11. Radioactive minerals and the pre-Beacon erosion surface, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeller, Edward J.; Dreschhoff, Gisela A. M.

    Some similarities between Antarctica and other fragments of Gondwanaland have been revealed by a radiometric survey conducted in the Transantarctic Mountains. The survey examined in detail both the primary radioactive mineralization in the crystalline terranes upon which the pre- Beacon erosion surface is formed and the sediments that rest upon it. The primary deposits associated with the Granite Harbour Intrusives show similarities both in age and petrology to the Rossing uranium deposit in South West Africa (Namibia). Since these rocks were certainly exposed at the time of formation of the pre-Beacon surface, they may have served as a source for radioactive mineral deposition in the basal part of the Beacon Supergroup sediments which are stratigraphic equivalents of Cape System rocks. There is strong evidence that the paleoclimate that prevailed at the time of formation of the surface caused the geochemical separation of uranium and thorium. Detailed airborne radiometric surveys of the erosion surface along the Transantarctic Mountains from the Byrd Glacier to northern Victoria Land serve as a basis for assessment of its variability. Placer deposits of thorium-bearing minerals were found in the Brown Hills Conglomerate in the Darwin Glacier area, but only minor concentrations of uranium were detected in any of the basal Beacon sediments. In southern Victoria Land, outcrops of the Kukri Erosion Surface commonly occur on steep slopes and cliff faces. The radiation signature of different outcrops varies considerably, but some show uranium and thorium concentrations as high as those found in the Darwin Glacier area or in northern Victoria Land. Very extensive exposures of the pre-Beacon surface in northern Victoria Land were found to show uranium in the outliers of the basal Beacon sandstones at several localities where these sediments have been preserved.

  12. BEACON: automated tool for Bacterial GEnome Annotation ComparisON.

    PubMed

    Kalkatawi, Manal; Alam, Intikhab; Bajic, Vladimir B

    2015-08-18

    Genome annotation is one way of summarizing the existing knowledge about genomic characteristics of an organism. There has been an increased interest during the last several decades in computer-based structural and functional genome annotation. Many methods for this purpose have been developed for eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Our study focuses on comparison of functional annotations of prokaryotic genomes. To the best of our knowledge there is no fully automated system for detailed comparison of functional genome annotations generated by different annotation methods (AMs). The presence of many AMs and development of new ones introduce needs to: a/ compare different annotations for a single genome, and b/ generate annotation by combining individual ones. To address these issues we developed an Automated Tool for Bacterial GEnome Annotation ComparisON (BEACON) that benefits both AM developers and annotation analysers. BEACON provides detailed comparison of gene function annotations of prokaryotic genomes obtained by different AMs and generates extended annotations through combination of individual ones. For the illustration of BEACON's utility, we provide a comparison analysis of multiple different annotations generated for four genomes and show on these examples that the extended annotation can increase the number of genes annotated by putative functions up to 27%, while the number of genes without any function assignment is reduced. We developed BEACON, a fast tool for an automated and a systematic comparison of different annotations of single genomes. The extended annotation assigns putative functions to many genes with unknown functions. BEACON is available under GNU General Public License version 3.0 and is accessible at: http://www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/BEACON/ .

  13. Beacon Communities’ Public Health Initiatives: A Case Study Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Massoudi, Barbara L.; Marcial, Laura H.; Haque, Saira; Bailey, Robert; Chester, Kelley; Cunningham, Shellery; Riley, Amanda; Soper, Paula

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The Beacon Communities for Public Health (BCPH) project was launched in 2011 to gain a better understanding of the range of activities currently being conducted in population- and public health by the Beacon Communities. The project highlighted the successes and challenges of these efforts with the aim of sharing this information broadly among the public health community. Background: The Beacon Community Program, designed to showcase technology-enabled, community-based initiatives to improve outcomes, focused on: building and strengthening health information technology (IT) infrastructure and exchange capabilities; translating investments in health IT to measureable improvements in cost, quality, and population health; and, developing innovative approaches to performance measurement, technology, and care delivery. Methods: Four multimethod case studies were conducted based on a modified sociotechnical framework to learn more about public health initiative implementation and use in the Beacon Communities. Our methodological approach included using document review and semistructured key informant interviews. NACCHO Model Practice Program criteria were used to select the public health initiatives included in the case studies. Findings: Despite differences among the case studies, common barriers and facilitators were found to be present in all areas of the sociotechnical framework application including structure, people, technology, tasks, overarching considerations, and sustainability. Overall, there were many more facilitators (range = 7–14) present for each Beacon compared to barriers (range = 4–6). Discussion: Four influential promising practices were identified through the work: forging strong and sustainable partnerships; ensuring a good task-technology fit and a flexible and iterative design; fostering technology acceptance; and, providing education and demonstrating value. Conclusions: A common weakness was the lack of a framework or model for

  14. Beacon communities' public health initiatives: a case study analysis.

    PubMed

    Massoudi, Barbara L; Marcial, Laura H; Haque, Saira; Bailey, Robert; Chester, Kelley; Cunningham, Shellery; Riley, Amanda; Soper, Paula

    2014-01-01

    The Beacon Communities for Public Health (BCPH) project was launched in 2011 to gain a better understanding of the range of activities currently being conducted in population- and public health by the Beacon Communities. The project highlighted the successes and challenges of these efforts with the aim of sharing this information broadly among the public health community. The Beacon Community Program, designed to showcase technology-enabled, community-based initiatives to improve outcomes, focused on: building and strengthening health information technology (IT) infrastructure and exchange capabilities; translating investments in health IT to measureable improvements in cost, quality, and population health; and, developing innovative approaches to performance measurement, technology, and care delivery. Four multimethod case studies were conducted based on a modified sociotechnical framework to learn more about public health initiative implementation and use in the Beacon Communities. Our methodological approach included using document review and semistructured key informant interviews. NACCHO Model Practice Program criteria were used to select the public health initiatives included in the case studies. Despite differences among the case studies, common barriers and facilitators were found to be present in all areas of the sociotechnical framework application including structure, people, technology, tasks, overarching considerations, and sustainability. Overall, there were many more facilitators (range = 7-14) present for each Beacon compared to barriers (range = 4-6). Four influential promising practices were identified through the work: forging strong and sustainable partnerships; ensuring a good task-technology fit and a flexible and iterative design; fostering technology acceptance; and, providing education and demonstrating value. A common weakness was the lack of a framework or model for the Beacon Communities evaluation work. Sharing a framework or approach

  15. Frequency Estimator Performance for a Software-Based Beacon Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zemba, Michael J.; Morse, Jacquelynne Rose; Nessel, James A.; Miranda, Felix

    2014-01-01

    As propagation terminals have evolved, their design has trended more toward a software-based approach that facilitates convenient adjustment and customization of the receiver algorithms. One potential improvement is the implementation of a frequency estimation algorithm, through which the primary frequency component of the received signal can be estimated with a much greater resolution than with a simple peak search of the FFT spectrum. To select an estimator for usage in a QV-band beacon receiver, analysis of six frequency estimators was conducted to characterize their effectiveness as they relate to beacon receiver design.

  16. Remote beacon location from a single satellite pass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynn, J. J.; Schmid, P. E.

    1977-01-01

    This paper describes the techniques and associated dedicated hardware utilized in locating remote beacons via satellites. Applications include those associated with a 'distress' situation or for monitoring the location of floating data collection platforms. Results obtained from experiments involving the NASA Nimbus-6 and the Amateur Satellite Corporation (AMSAT) OSCAR spacecrafts indicate position accuracies on the order of one and two kilometers are possible. The geographical location of a low power VHF transmitter is determined from Doppler data collected during a single satellite pass. A dedicated microcomputer utilizes an efficient algorithm to provide beacon position coordinates within a minute after the end of the satellite pass.

  17. Frequency Estimator Performance for a Software-Based Beacon Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zemba, Michael J.; Morse, Jacquelynne R.; Nessel, James A.

    2014-01-01

    As propagation terminals have evolved, their design has trended more toward a software-based approach that facilitates convenient adjustment and customization of the receiver algorithms. One potential improvement is the implementation of a frequency estimation algorithm, through which the primary frequency component of the received signal can be estimated with a much greater resolution than with a simple peak search of the FFT spectrum. To select an estimator for usage in a Q/V-band beacon receiver, analysis of six frequency estimators was conducted to characterize their effectiveness as they relate to beacon receiver design.

  18. Omnidirectional beacon-localization using a catadioptric system.

    PubMed

    Shen, Thomas C; Drost, Robert J; Sadler, Brian M; Rzasa, John R; Davis, Christopher C

    2016-04-04

    We present a catadioptric beacon localization system that can provide mobile network nodes with omnidirectional situational awareness of neighboring nodes. In this system, a receiver composed of a hyperboloidal mirror and camera is used to estimate the azimuth, elevation, and range of an LED beacon. We provide a general framework for understanding the propagation of error in the angle-of-arrival estimation and then present an experimental realization of such a system. The situational awareness provided by the proposed system can enable the alignment of communication nodes in an optical wireless network, which may be particularly useful in addressing RF-denied environments.

  19. Earth laser beacon sensor for earth-oriented geosynchronous satellites.

    PubMed

    Sepp, G

    1975-07-01

    Geosynchronous satellites are often required to maintain accurately their orientation with respect to a selected point at the earth surface. Precise attitude determination of these satellites may be achieved using a laser beacon from ground to the satellite as a directional reference. Four simple implementations of this principle are analyzed, and the influence of the cloudy atmosphere on the laser beacon and, therefore, on the accuracy of the method is discussed. All-weather operation is not possible; for normal cloudiness conditions, however, two analyzed systems (pulsed Nd:YAG laser with photomultiplier and CO(2) laser with cryogenic detector) appear to be feasible.

  20. Evolution of stratospheric chemistry in the Saturn storm beacon region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, Julianne I.; Armstrong, Eleanor S.; Fletcher, Leigh N.; Friedson, A. James; Irwin, Patrick G. J.; Sinclair, James A.; Hesman, Brigette E.

    2015-11-01

    The giant northern-hemisphere storm that erupted on Saturn in December 2010 triggered significant changes in stratospheric temperatures and species abundances that persisted for more than a year after the original outburst. The stratospheric regions affected by the storm have been nicknamed "beacons" due to their prominent infrared-emission signatures (Fletcher, L.N. et al. [2011]. Science 332, 1413). The two beacon regions that were present initially merged in April 2011 to form a single, large, anticyclonic vortex (Fletcher, L.N. et al. [2012]. Icarus 221, 560). We model the expected photochemical evolution of the stratospheric constituents in the beacons from the initial storm onset through the merger and on out to March 2012. The results are compared with longitudinally resolved Cassini/CIRS spectra from May 2011. If we ignore potential changes due to vertical winds within the beacon, we find that C2H2, C2H6, and C3H8 remain unaffected by the increased stratospheric temperatures in the beacon, the abundance of the shorter-lived CH3C2H decreases, and the abundance of C2H4 increases significantly due to the elevated temperatures, the latter most notably in a secondary mixing-ratio peak located near mbar pressures. The C4H2 abundance in the model decreases by a factor of a few in the 0.01-10 mbar region but has a significant increase in the 10-30 mbar region due to evaporation of the previously condensed phase. The column abundances of C6H6 and H2O above ∼30 mbar also increase due to aerosol evaporation. Model-data comparisons show that models that consider temperature changes alone underpredict the abundance of C2Hx species by a factor of 2-7 in the beacon core in May 2011, suggesting that other processes not considered by the models, such as downwelling winds in the vortex, are affecting the species profiles. Additional calculations indicate that downwelling winds of order - 10 cm s-1 near ∼0.1 mbar need to be included in the photochemical models in order to

  1. Robot-Beacon Distributed Range-Only SLAM for Resource-Constrained Operation.

    PubMed

    Torres-González, Arturo; Martínez-de Dios, Jose Ramiro; Ollero, Anibal

    2017-04-20

    This work deals with robot-sensor network cooperation where sensor nodes (beacons) are used as landmarks for Range-Only (RO) Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM). Most existing RO-SLAM techniques consider beacons as passive devices disregarding the sensing, computational and communication capabilities with which they are actually endowed. SLAM is a resource-demanding task. Besides the technological constraints of the robot and beacons, many applications impose further resource consumption limitations. This paper presents a scalable distributed RO-SLAM scheme for resource-constrained operation. It is capable of exploiting robot-beacon cooperation in order to improve SLAM accuracy while meeting a given resource consumption bound expressed as the maximum number of measurements that are integrated in SLAM per iteration. The proposed scheme combines a Sparse Extended Information Filter (SEIF) SLAM method, in which each beacon gathers and integrates robot-beacon and inter-beacon measurements, and a distributed information-driven measurement allocation tool that dynamically selects the measurements that are integrated in SLAM, balancing uncertainty improvement and resource consumption. The scheme adopts a robot-beacon distributed approach in which each beacon participates in the selection, gathering and integration in SLAM of robot-beacon and inter-beacon measurements, resulting in significant estimation accuracies, resource-consumption efficiency and scalability. It has been integrated in an octorotor Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) and evaluated in 3D SLAM outdoor experiments. The experimental results obtained show its performance and robustness and evidence its advantages over existing methods.

  2. Overshadowing of geometric cues by a beacon in a spatial navigation task.

    PubMed

    Redhead, Edward S; Hamilton, Derek A; Parker, Matthew O; Chan, Wai; Allison, Craig

    2013-06-01

    In three experiments, we examined whether overshadowing of geometric cues by a discrete landmark (beacon) is due to the relative saliences of the cues. Using a virtual water maze task, human participants were required to locate a platform marked by a beacon in a distinctively shaped pool. In Experiment 1, the beacon overshadowed geometric cues in a trapezium, but not in an isosceles triangle. The longer escape latencies during acquisition in the trapezium control group with no beacon suggest that the geometric cues in the trapezium were less salient than those in the triangle. In Experiment 2, we evaluated whether generalization decrement, caused by the removal of the beacon at test, could account for overshadowing. An additional beacon was placed in an alternative corner. For the control groups, the beacons were identical; for the overshadow groups, they were visually unique. Overshadowing was again found in the trapezium. In Experiment 3, we tested whether the absence of overshadowing in the triangle was due to the geometric cues being more salient than the beacon. Following training, the beacon was relocated to a different corner. Participants approached the beacon rather than the trained platform corner, suggesting that the beacon was more salient. These results suggest that associative processes do not fully explain cue competition in the spatial domain.

  3. Robot-Beacon Distributed Range-Only SLAM for Resource-Constrained Operation

    PubMed Central

    Torres-González, Arturo; Martínez-de Dios, Jose Ramiro; Ollero, Anibal

    2017-01-01

    This work deals with robot-sensor network cooperation where sensor nodes (beacons) are used as landmarks for Range-Only (RO) Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM). Most existing RO-SLAM techniques consider beacons as passive devices disregarding the sensing, computational and communication capabilities with which they are actually endowed. SLAM is a resource-demanding task. Besides the technological constraints of the robot and beacons, many applications impose further resource consumption limitations. This paper presents a scalable distributed RO-SLAM scheme for resource-constrained operation. It is capable of exploiting robot-beacon cooperation in order to improve SLAM accuracy while meeting a given resource consumption bound expressed as the maximum number of measurements that are integrated in SLAM per iteration. The proposed scheme combines a Sparse Extended Information Filter (SEIF) SLAM method, in which each beacon gathers and integrates robot-beacon and inter-beacon measurements, and a distributed information-driven measurement allocation tool that dynamically selects the measurements that are integrated in SLAM, balancing uncertainty improvement and resource consumption. The scheme adopts a robot-beacon distributed approach in which each beacon participates in the selection, gathering and integration in SLAM of robot-beacon and inter-beacon measurements, resulting in significant estimation accuracies, resource-consumption efficiency and scalability. It has been integrated in an octorotor Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) and evaluated in 3D SLAM outdoor experiments. The experimental results obtained show its performance and robustness and evidence its advantages over existing methods. PMID:28425946

  4. 33 CFR 62.23 - Beacons and buoys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 62.23 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION UNITED STATES AIDS TO NAVIGATION SYSTEM The U.S. Aids to Navigation System § 62.23 Beacons and buoys. (a) Aids to navigation are placed on shore or on marine sites to assist a navigator to determine...

  5. 33 CFR 62.23 - Beacons and buoys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 62.23 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION UNITED STATES AIDS TO NAVIGATION SYSTEM The U.S. Aids to Navigation System § 62.23 Beacons and buoys. (a) Aids to navigation are placed on shore or on marine sites to assist a navigator to determine...

  6. 33 CFR 62.23 - Beacons and buoys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 62.23 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION UNITED STATES AIDS TO NAVIGATION SYSTEM The U.S. Aids to Navigation System § 62.23 Beacons and buoys. (a) Aids to navigation are placed on shore or on marine sites to assist a navigator to determine...

  7. Radiometer calibration procedure and beacon attenuation estimation reference level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crane, Robert K.

    1994-01-01

    The primary objectives are to compare radiometer attenuation with beacon attenuation and to compare sky temperature estimates with calculations using simultaneous meteorological data. Secondary objectives are: (1) noise diode and reference load measurements and (2) to adjust for outside temperature and component temperature changes.

  8. Caged molecular beacons: controlling nucleic acid hybridization with light.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunming; Zhu, Zhi; Song, Yanling; Lin, Hui; Yang, Chaoyong James; Tan, Weihong

    2011-05-28

    We have constructed a novel class of light-activatable caged molecular beacons (cMBs) that are caged by locking two stems with a photo-labile biomolecular interaction or covalent bond. With the cMBs, the nucleic acid hybridization process can be easily controlled with light, which offers the possibility for a high spatiotemporal resolution study of intracellular mRNAs.

  9. Epilithic lichens in the Beacon sandstone formation, Victoria Land, Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, M. E.; Friedmann, E. I. (Principal Investigator)

    1987-01-01

    The epilithic lichen flora on the Beacon sandstone formation in Victoria Land consists of seven species: Acarospora gwynnii Dodge & Rudolph, Buellia grisea Dodge & Baker, B. pallida Dodge & Baker, Carbonea capsulata (Dodge & Baker) Hale comb. nov., Lecanora fuscobrunnea Dodge & Baker, Lecidea cancriformis Dodge & Baker, and L. siplei Dodge & Baker. The typification of the species is given along with descriptions and distribution in Antarctica.

  10. COSPAS/SARSAT 406-MHz emergency beacon digital controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.

    1988-01-01

    The digital control portion of a low-cost 406-MHz COSPAS/SARSAT emergency beacon has been designed and breadboarded at the NASA Lewis Research Center. This report discusses the requirements and design tradeoffs of the digital controller and describes the hardware and software design, which is available only to United States citizens and companies.

  11. Design of a hybrid receiver for the OLYMPUS spacecraft beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweeney, D. G.; Mckeeman, J. C.

    1990-01-01

    The theory and design of a hybrid analogue/digital receiver which acquires and monitors the OLYMPUS satellite beacons is presented. The analogue portion of this receiver uses a frequency locked loop for signal tracking. A digital sampling detector operating at IF is used to obtain the I and Q outputs.

  12. Promoting Health in Hospitals: The Role of Beacon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitelaw, Sandy; Watson, Jonathan; Hennessy, Sue

    2004-01-01

    "Best practice" is currently being used to enable modernisation within the National Health Service (NHS) in the United Kingdom. One element of this is the Beacon programme where examples of hospitals that exemplify local "best practice" are supported to develop and disseminate learning across the wider NHS. The aims of this…

  13. Long Shelf Life of a Lyophilized DNA Aptamer Beacon Assay.

    PubMed

    Bruno, John G

    2017-03-01

    An aptamer beacon previously developed to detect C-telopeptide (CTx) from human bone collagen breakdown was lyophilized and shown to give a "lights on" concentration-dependent spectral fluorescence response essentially identical to that of the fresh reagent despite storage in a dark dry environment for the past 5.5 years.

  14. Promoting Health in Hospitals: The Role of Beacon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitelaw, Sandy; Watson, Jonathan; Hennessy, Sue

    2004-01-01

    "Best practice" is currently being used to enable modernisation within the National Health Service (NHS) in the United Kingdom. One element of this is the Beacon programme where examples of hospitals that exemplify local "best practice" are supported to develop and disseminate learning across the wider NHS. The aims of this…

  15. Epilithic lichens in the Beacon sandstone formation, Victoria Land, Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, M. E.; Friedmann, E. I. (Principal Investigator)

    1987-01-01

    The epilithic lichen flora on the Beacon sandstone formation in Victoria Land consists of seven species: Acarospora gwynnii Dodge & Rudolph, Buellia grisea Dodge & Baker, B. pallida Dodge & Baker, Carbonea capsulata (Dodge & Baker) Hale comb. nov., Lecanora fuscobrunnea Dodge & Baker, Lecidea cancriformis Dodge & Baker, and L. siplei Dodge & Baker. The typification of the species is given along with descriptions and distribution in Antarctica.

  16. Development of BEACON technology. Quarterly report, January-March 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-07-01

    The BEACON process involves the catalytic deposition of carbon from a gas stream containing carbon monoxide, and subsequent exposure of this carbon to a gas stream containing hydrogen or steam at elevated temperature and pressure to produce methane. The steam gasification route currently is receiving the most attention. Testing of steam gasification of BEACON carbon over a range of temperatures and pressures in bench-scale equipment has led to the conclusion that steam gasification at two temperature levels has significant advantages over steam gasification at a single temperature in terms of gasification rates and methane yields. Laboratory experiments with catalyst C77 investigated the effects of process variables, catalyst composition modifications, and feed gas compositions on carbon deposition and gasification rates, carbon monoxide and steam utilization, and cycle efficiency. Laboratory experiments to find materials that will promote the carbon deposition rate of BEACON catalysts were highly successful. Promoted catalysts showed significantly higher carbon deposition rates and carbon monoxide utilization than unpromoted catalysts. Multiple-cycle performance of BEACON catalysts also is reported.

  17. Leeway of Submarine Escape Rafts and Submarine Emergency Positioning Beacons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    that the raft was overturned for any reason. An upward-facing Novatech RF-700C1 combination VHF (154.585 – 160.785 MHz) radio beacon/ xenon flasher...unscrewing the CO2 canister, wrapping Teflon ® tape on the threads and reconnecting the canister to the inflation valve assembly. The Velcro® seal on the

  18. Standing on lightpost and day beacon, haer architect Christopher Marston ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Standing on lightpost and day beacon, haer architect Christopher Marston points to stone retaining wall at site of old monongahela navigation company lock & dam no. 7. - Monongahela Navigation Company Lock & Dam No. 7, River Mile No. 82.5, Greensboro, Greene County, PA

  19. Smartphone-Based Indoor Localization with Bluetooth Low Energy Beacons

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Yuan; Yang, Jun; Li, You; Qi, Longning; El-Sheimy, Naser

    2016-01-01

    Indoor wireless localization using Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) beacons has attracted considerable attention after the release of the BLE protocol. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that uses the combination of channel-separate polynomial regression model (PRM), channel-separate fingerprinting (FP), outlier detection and extended Kalman filtering (EKF) for smartphone-based indoor localization with BLE beacons. The proposed algorithm uses FP and PRM to estimate the target’s location and the distances between the target and BLE beacons respectively. We compare the performance of distance estimation that uses separate PRM for three advertisement channels (i.e., the separate strategy) with that use an aggregate PRM generated through the combination of information from all channels (i.e., the aggregate strategy). The performance of FP-based location estimation results of the separate strategy and the aggregate strategy are also compared. It was found that the separate strategy can provide higher accuracy; thus, it is preferred to adopt PRM and FP for each BLE advertisement channel separately. Furthermore, to enhance the robustness of the algorithm, a two-level outlier detection mechanism is designed. Distance and location estimates obtained from PRM and FP are passed to the first outlier detection to generate improved distance estimates for the EKF. After the EKF process, the second outlier detection algorithm based on statistical testing is further performed to remove the outliers. The proposed algorithm was evaluated by various field experiments. Results show that the proposed algorithm achieved the accuracy of <2.56 m at 90% of the time with dense deployment of BLE beacons (1 beacon per 9 m), which performs 35.82% better than <3.99 m from the Propagation Model (PM) + EKF algorithm and 15.77% more accurate than <3.04 m from the FP + EKF algorithm. With sparse deployment (1 beacon per 18 m), the proposed algorithm achieves the accuracies of <3.88 m at 90% of the

  20. Smartphone-Based Indoor Localization with Bluetooth Low Energy Beacons.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Yuan; Yang, Jun; Li, You; Qi, Longning; El-Sheimy, Naser

    2016-04-26

    Indoor wireless localization using Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) beacons has attracted considerable attention after the release of the BLE protocol. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that uses the combination of channel-separate polynomial regression model (PRM), channel-separate fingerprinting (FP), outlier detection and extended Kalman filtering (EKF) for smartphone-based indoor localization with BLE beacons. The proposed algorithm uses FP and PRM to estimate the target's location and the distances between the target and BLE beacons respectively. We compare the performance of distance estimation that uses separate PRM for three advertisement channels (i.e., the separate strategy) with that use an aggregate PRM generated through the combination of information from all channels (i.e., the aggregate strategy). The performance of FP-based location estimation results of the separate strategy and the aggregate strategy are also compared. It was found that the separate strategy can provide higher accuracy; thus, it is preferred to adopt PRM and FP for each BLE advertisement channel separately. Furthermore, to enhance the robustness of the algorithm, a two-level outlier detection mechanism is designed. Distance and location estimates obtained from PRM and FP are passed to the first outlier detection to generate improved distance estimates for the EKF. After the EKF process, the second outlier detection algorithm based on statistical testing is further performed to remove the outliers. The proposed algorithm was evaluated by various field experiments. Results show that the proposed algorithm achieved the accuracy of <2.56 m at 90% of the time with dense deployment of BLE beacons (1 beacon per 9 m), which performs 35.82% better than <3.99 m from the Propagation Model (PM) + EKF algorithm and 15.77% more accurate than <3.04 m from the FP + EKF algorithm. With sparse deployment (1 beacon per 18 m), the proposed algorithm achieves the accuracies of <3.88 m at 90% of the

  1. Development of BEACON technology. Quarterly report, October-December 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-04-01

    The BEACON process involves the catalytic deposition of a highly reactive form of carbon from a gas stream which contains carbon monoxide. The carbon-depleted gas is combusted with air to produce power, and the carbon is reacted with steam to produce methane or hydrogen. During the quarter both SOHIO and TRW worked on catalysts which would suppress methane formation during steaming thus increasing the amount of hydrogen formed. At SOHIO a C77-K2 catalyst promoted with a Class II compound showed promise in laboratory tests for suppressing methane. At TRW a K-1 unsupported catalyst promoted with 10% of Additive F maintained methane suppression over 30 cycles in laboratory scale tests. Shakedown of the Tandem Reactor Apparatus was completed and testing was initiated under quasi-continuous transfer of solids between reactors. Nine short term tests were performed with K-1 based BEACON solids. The data from these tests indicate that the Tandem Reactor concept is valid and BEACON solids can be transferred efficiently in the fluidized state between the deposition and gasification reactors. A preliminary analysis of the potential of a BEACON combined cycle/hydrogen system with a hydrogen fuel cell has been performed. The BEACON process can be used to coproduce hydrogen and electric power, and the efficiency of the overall system is quite high when the electricity is produced by a combined cycle power system. If fuel cells are used to convert the hydrogen to electricity then a system for making only electricity results, and such a system gives an overall efficiency of 54%. 7 figures, 14 tables.

  2. Single and multiple molecular beacon probes for DNA hybridization studies on a silica glass surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Xiaohong; Liu, Xiaojing; Tan, Weihong

    1999-05-01

    Surface immobilizable molecular beacons have been developed for DNA hybridization studies on a silica glass plate. Molecular beacons are a new class of oligonucleotide probes that have a loop-and-stem structure with a fluorophore and a quencher attached to the two ends of the stem. They only emit intense fluorescence when hybridize to their target molecules. This provides an excellent selectivity for the detection of DNA molecules. We have designed biotinylated molecular beacons which can be immobilized onto a solid surface. The molecular beacon is synthesized using DABCYL as the quencher and an optical stable dye, tetramethylrhodamine, as the fluorophore. Mass spectrometry is used to confirm the synthesized molecular beacon. The molecular beacons have been immobilized onto a silica surface through biotin-avidin binding. The surface immobilized molecular beacons have been used for the detection of target DNA with subnanomolar analytical sensitivity. have also immobilized two different molecular beacons on a silica surface in spatially resolved microscopic regions. The hybridization study of these two different molecular beacon probes has shown excellent selectivity for their target sequences. The newly designed molecular beacons are intended for DNA molecular interaction studies at an interface and for the development of ultrasensitive DNA sensors for a variety of applications including disease diagnosis, disease mechanism studies, new drug development, and in the investigation of molecular interactions between DNA molecules and other interesting biomolecules.

  3. IRTF/TEXES observations of Saturn’s stratospheric beacon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouchet, Thierry; Greathouse, T. K.; Richter, M. J.; Lacy, J.; Fletcher, L.; Spiga, A.

    2013-10-01

    On December 5th, 2010, a giant convective storm erupted in Saturn’s Northern Hemisphere as each Saturnian year at least since 1876. For the first time, a huge thermal and chemical stratospheric disturbance associated with this large convective event was detected from ground-based and Cassini observations (Fletcher et al. 2011). This stratospheric disturbance is named the beacon. Here, we present high spectral resolution observations of the beacon obtained by the Texas Echelon Cross Echelle Spectrograph (TEXES) mounted on the IRTF during 6 nights from July 15th, 2011 to July 20th, 2011. We targeted several different CH4 lines between 1230 and 1280 cm-1, probing the stratospheric temperature between 5 hPa and 0.05 hPa, and the H2 S(1) quadrupolar and collision-induced lines at 587 cm-1, probing the stratospheric temperature between 150 hPa and 5 hPa. The stratospheric temperatures are retrieved from the dataset using a forward radiative model coupled with a constrained linear inverse method. Within the core of the beacon the maximum temperature inferred from the data is 178K at 40°N, hence about 50K warmer than the mean temperature measured before the occurrence of the storm. However, the TEXES data unambiguously demonstrate that this warming is not vertically homogeneous but rather confined in a specific pressure range between 1-5 hPa, overhung by a cold layer between 0.1 and 1 hPa. This vertical behavior is evident from the CH4 line spectral profiles with the core of the lines in absorption and the wings in emission. Moreover, our data demonstrate that the altitude of the local temperature maximum increases northwards. We will present how this thermal structure can help deciphering the stratospheric heating sources. On the western side of the beacon, the stratospheric heating is concentrated at lower pressures, hence higher altitudes, than within the beacon, between 0.1 and 0.01 hPa. We interpret this structure as being caused by convective motions within the

  4. Evolution of Stratospheric Chemistry in the Saturn Storm Beacon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, Julianne I.; Armstrong, Eleanor S.; Fletcher, Leigh N.; Irwin, Patrick G.; Hesman, Brigette E.; Romani, Paul N.

    2014-11-01

    The colossal northern-hemisphere storm that erupted on Saturn in December 2010 triggered significant changes in stratospheric temperatures and species abundances that have persisted for several years (e.g., Fletcher et al. 2011, 2012; Hesman et al. 2012). These stratospheric regions have been dubbed "beacons" due to their prominent infrared-emission signatures; the two beacon regions that were initially present merged in April 2011 to form a single anticyclonic vortex (Fletcher et al. 2012). We model the expected photochemical evolution of the stratospheric constituents in the beacons from the initial storm onset through the merger and on out to March 2012. The results are compared with Cassini/CIRS spectra from May 2011. We find that C2H2, C2H6, and C3H8 remain unaffected by the increased stratospheric temperatures in the model, whereas the shorter-lived C3H4 abundance decreases slightly, and the C2H4 abundance increases significantly, most notably in a secondary mixing-ratio peak located near the 1 mbar level. The C4H2 abundance in the model decreases by a factor of a few in the 0.01-10 mbar region but has a significant increase in the 10-30 mbar region due to evaporation of the previously condensed phase. The column abundances of C6H6 and H2O above ~30 mbar also increase due to evaporation (significantly, for the case of water). Model-data comparisons show that the models underpredict the abundance of C2Hx species by a factor of 2-5 in the beacon center for the May 2011 date, suggesting that other processes not considered by the 1-D models, such as downwelling winds in the vortex, are affecting the species profiles. If we assume that the temperature increase in the beacon vortex is due to adiabatic compression from subsidence, we can estimate the necessary wind speeds. Adding such winds to the model does increase the C2Hx abundances slightly, but not to the extent needed. We will discuss these issues and the general chemical behavior of stratospheric species in

  5. Laser beacon adaptive optics for power beaming applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fugate, Robert Q.

    1994-05-01

    This paper discusses the laser beam control system requirements for power beaming applications. Power beaming applications include electric and thermal engine propulsion for orbit transfer, station changing, and recharging batteries. Beam control includes satellite acquisition, high accuracy tracking, higher order atmospheric compensation using adaptive optics, and precision point-ahead. Beam control may also include local laser beam clean-up with a low order adaptive optics system. This paper also presents results of tracking and higher-order correction experiments on astronomical objects. The results were obtained with a laser beacon adaptive optics system at Phillips Laboratory's Starfire Optical Range near Albuquerque, NM. At a wavelength of 0.85 micrometers , we have achieved Strehl ratios of approximately 0.50 using laser beacons and approximately 0.65 using natural stars for exposures longer than one minute on objects of approximately 8th magnitude. The resulting point spread function has a full width half maximum (FWHM) of 0.13 arcsec.

  6. SU-E-J-257: Image Artifacts Caused by Implanted Calypso Beacons in MRI Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Amro, H; Chetty, I; Gordon, J; Wen, N

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The presence of Calypso Beacon-transponders in patients can cause artifacts during MRI imaging studies. This could be a problem for post-treatment follow up of cancer patients using MRI studies to evaluate metastasis and for functional imaging studies.This work assesses (1) the volume immediately surrounding the transponders that will not be visualized by the MRI due to the beacons, and (2) the dependence of the non-visualized volume on beacon orientation, and scanning techniques. Methods: Two phantoms were used in this study (1) water filled box, (2) and a 2300 cc block of pork meat. Calypso beacons were implanted in the phantoms both in parallel and perpendicular orientations with respect to the MR scanner magnetic field. MR image series of the phantom were obtained with on a 1.0T high field open MR-SIM with multiple pulse sequences, for example, T1-weighted fast field echo and T2-weighted turbo spin echo. Results: On average, a no-signal region with 2 cm radius and 3 cm length was measured. Image artifacts are more significant when beacons are placed parallel to scanner magnetic field; the no-signal area around the beacon was about 0.5 cm larger in orthogonal orientation. The no-signal region surrounding the beacons slightly varies in dimension for the different pulse sequences. Conclusion: The use of Calypso beacons can prohibit the use of MRI studies in post-treatment assessments, especially in the immediate region surrounding the implanted beacon. A characterization of the MR scanner by identifying the no-signal regions due to implanted beacons is essential. This may render the use of Calypso beacons useful for some cases and give the treating physician a chance to identify those patients prior to beacon implantation.

  7. Q-Band (37-41 GHz) Satellite Beacon Architecture for RF Propagation Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, Rainee N.; Wintucky, Edwin G.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the design of a beacon transmitter that will be flown as a hosted payload on a geostationary satellite to enable propagation experiments at Q-band (37-41 GHz) frequencies is presented. The beacon uses a phased locked loop stabilized dielectric resonator oscillator and a solid-state power amplifier to achieve the desired output power. The satellite beacon antenna is configured as an offset-fed cut-paraboloidal reflector.

  8. Q-Band (37 to 41 GHz) Satellite Beacon Architecture for RF Propagation Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Wintucky, Edwin G.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the design of a beacon transmitter that will be flown as a hosted payload on a geostationary satellite to enable propagation experiments at Q-band (37 to 41 GHz) frequencies is presented. The beacon uses a phased locked loop stabilized dielectric resonator oscillator and a solid-state power amplifier to achieve the desired output power. The satellite beacon antenna is configured as an offset-fed cutparaboloidal reflector.

  9. Integrated Formulation of Beacon-Based Exception Analysis for Multimissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackey, Ryan; James, Mark; Park, Han; Zak, Mickail

    2003-01-01

    Further work on beacon-based exception analysis for multimissions (BEAM), a method of real-time, automated diagnosis of a complex electromechanical systems, has greatly expanded its capability and suitability of application. This expanded formulation, which fully integrates physical models and symbolic analysis, is described. The new formulation of BEAM expands upon previous advanced techniques for analysis of signal data, utilizing mathematical modeling of the system physics, and expert-system reasoning,

  10. SATCOM General Purpose Modem DSCS III SCT Beacon Telemetry Display

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-01

    Variables Used update, restart, data[, old[, FGCOLOR, *PRINTERUP, DISKLOGUP, S.BIRD, FIRST, IRIGUP, receiver, options, * quitnow , sat[], beaconport...data[], old[], FGCOLOR, *PRINTERUP, DISKLOGUP, BBIRD, FIRST, IRIGUP, receiver, options, * quitnow , sat[], beacon-port, gpmcontrol-port, remote-port...options = quitnow = FALSE; BBIRD = FIRST = TRUE; restart = IRIGUP = FALSE; receiver = 0; sat/O] 0 ’B’ sat/l] 𔃻’ sat[2] 𔃾’ /*****con port assignm

  11. Molecular beacons: nucleic acid hybridization and emerging applications.

    PubMed

    Antony, T; Subramaniam, V

    2001-12-01

    Molecular beacons (MBs) are a novel class of nucleic acid probes that become fluorescent when bound to a complementary sequence. Because of this characteristic, coupled with the sequence specificity of nucleic acid hybridization and the sensitivity of fluorescence techniques, MBs are very useful probes for a variety of applications requiring the detection of DNA or RNA. We survey various applications of MBs, including the monitoring of DNA triplex formation, and describe recent developments in MB design that enhance their sensitivity.

  12. Aftermath of bustamante attack on genomic beacon service.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Md Momin Al; Ghasemi, Reza; Waliullah, Md; Mohammed, Noman

    2017-07-26

    With the enormous need for federated eco-system for holding global genomic and clinical data, Global Alliance for Genomic and Health (GA4GH) has created an international website called beacon service which allows a researcher to find out whether a specific dataset can be utilized to his or her research beforehand. This simple webservice is quite useful as it allows queries like whether a certain position of a target chromosome has a specific nucleotide. However, the increased integration of individuals genomic data into clinical practice and research raised serious privacy concern. Though the answer of such queries are yes or no in Bacon network, it results in serious privacy implication as demonstrated in a recent work from Shringarpure and Bustamante. In their attack model, the authors demonstrated that with a limited number of queries, presence of an individual in any dataset can be determined. We propose two lightweight algorithms (based on randomized response) which captures the efficacy while preserving the privacy of the participants in a genomic beacon service. We also elaborate the strength and weakness of the attack by explaining some of their statistical and mathematical models using real world genomic database. We extend their experimental simulations for different adversarial assumptions and parameters. We experimentally evaluated the solutions on the original attack model with different parameters for better understanding of the privacy and utility tradeoffs provided by these two methods. Also, the statistical analysis further elaborates the different aspects of the prior attack which leads to a better risk management for the participants in a beacon service. The differentially private and lightweight solutions discussed here will make the attack much difficult to succeed while maintaining the fundamental motivation of beacon database network.

  13. Development of BEACON technology. Quarterly report, April-June 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-03-01

    The BEACON process involves the catalytic deposition of a highly reactive form of carbon from a gas stream which contains carbon monoxide. The carbon-depleted gas is combusted with air to produce power, and the carbon is reacted with steam to produce methane or hydrogen. Experiments were continued this quarter with the objective of improving the carbon deposition efficiency using a Paraho retort off-gas mixture. Analysis has shown that the use of the Paraho off-gas to make hydrogen would be attractive if the ratio of the heat content of the feedgas to the heat content of the hydrogen produced is less than 3. Experimental conditions to achieve this ratio have been established. Recent work had shown that the volume of a BEACON supported catalyst bed increased with an increase in carbon loading level. Four series of experiments were performed where sieve analyses were made after one or more BEACON process cycles. These tests showed that the volume expansion is due to an increase in the number and size of the larger catalyst particles. The bench-scale testing of unsupported catalysts concentrated in two areas: (a) the completion of batch testing in the 4-inch reactor, and (b) the construction of the Tandem Reactor Unit which will permit the transfer of solids between the carbon deposition and steam gasification reactors during testing. It was found that a second stage of steaming enhanced the methane yield. Approximately 80% of the construction and instrumentation of the Tandem Reactor Unit was completed during the quarter. A conceptual design was completed for an Integrated Test Facility (ITF) which would permit research on the BEACON process at a scale sufficient for scale-up. 17 figures, 14 tables.

  14. Rayleigh beacon for measuring the surface profile of a radio telescope.

    PubMed

    Padin, S

    2014-12-01

    Millimeter-wavelength Rayleigh scattering from water droplets in a cloud is proposed as a means of generating a bright beacon for measuring the surface profile of a radio telescope. A λ=3  mm transmitter, with an output power of a few watts, illuminating a stratiform cloud, can generate a beacon with the same flux as Mars in 10 GHz bandwidth, but the beacon has a narrow line width, so it is extremely bright. The key advantage of the beacon is that it can be used at any time, and positioned anywhere in the sky, as long as there are clouds.

  15. Rayleigh beacon for measuring the surface profile of a radio telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padin, S.

    2014-12-01

    Millimeter-wavelength Rayleigh scattering from water droplets in a cloud is proposed as a means of generating a bright beacon for measuring the surface profile of a radio telescope. A λ=3 mm transmitter, with an output power of a few watts, illuminating a stratiform cloud, can generate a beacon with the same flux as Mars in 10 GHz bandwidth, but the beacon has a narrow line width, so it is extremely bright. The key advantage of the beacon is that it can be used at any time, and positioned anywhere in the sky, as long as there are clouds.

  16. Detection of Toxoplasma gondii with a DNA molecular beacon probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Cun; Xu, Shichao; Yang, Juan; Zhang, Jimei; Dai, Zhao; Zheng, Guo; Sun, Bo; Sun, Shuqing; Feng, Teilin; Zi, Yan; Liang, Chu; Luo, Hao

    2009-07-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a kind of microscopic parasite that may infect humans, and there are increasing concerns on the early detection of latent Toxoplasma gondii infection in recent years. This research highlights a new type of molecular beacon (MB) fluorescent probe for Toxoplasma DNA testing. We combined high-efficiency fluorescent inorganic core-shell quantum dots-CdTe/ZnS (as fluorescent energy donor) and BHQ-2 (energy acceptor) to the single-strand DNA of Toxoplasma gondii, and a molecular beacon sensing system based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) was achieved. Core-shell quantum dots CdTe/ZnS was firstly prepared in aqueous solution, and the influencing factor of its fluorescent properties, including CdTe/Na2S/Zn(CH3COO)2 (v/v), dependence of reaction time, temperature, and pH, is investigated systematically. The synthesized quantum dots and molecular beacon were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometer (UV-vis), fluorescent spectrophotometer (FS), respectively. The TEM results showed that CdTe/ZnS core-shell quantum dots is ~11nm in size, and the quantum dots is water-soluble well. The sensing ability of target DNA of assembled MB was investigated, and results showed that the target Toxoplasma gonddi DNA can be successfully detected by measuring the change of fluorescence intensity. The results showed that the current sensing probe will be a useful and convenient tool in Toxoplasma gondii early detection.

  17. Beacon recognition and tracking based on omni-vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Baofeng; Liu, Yuli; Cao, Zuoliang

    2008-12-01

    Omnidirectional vision (Omni-vision) has the feature that an extremely wide view can be achieved simultaneously. The omni-image brings a highly unavoidable inherent distortion while it provides hemispherical field of views. In this paper, a method called Spherical Perspective Projection is used for correction of such distorted image. Omni-vision target recognition and tracking with fisheye lens for AGVs appears definite significant since its advantage of acquiring all vision information of the three-dimensional space once. A novel Beacon Model and Omni-vision tracker for mobile robots is described. At present, the research of target model has many different problems, such as outdoor illumination, target veiling, target losing. Specially, outdoor illumination and beacon veiling are the key problems which need an effective method to solve. The new beacon model which features particular topology shape can be recognized in the outdoors with part veiled of the object. In this paper an improved omni-vision object tracking method based on mean shift algorithm is proposed. The mean shift algorithm which is a powerful technique for tracking objects in image sequences with complex background has been proved to be successful for the fast computation and effective tracking problems. The recognition and tracking functions have been demonstrated on experimental platform.

  18. Health assessment for Beacon Heights Landfill site, Beacon Falls, Connecticut, Region 1. CERCLIS No. CTD072122062. Addendum. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-06-20

    The Beacon Heights Landfill National Priorities List (NPL) Site is located in Beacon Falls, Connecticut. From the 1920's to 1979, municipal and industrial wastes were disposed of at the landfill. Leachate from the landfill has migrated into the local groundwater aquifers. Two residential wells to the northwest of the site have been contaminated with site-related contaminants. This site is of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health resulting from possible exposure to hazardous substances at concentrations that may result in adverse health effects. As noted in Human Exposure Pathways Section below, human exposure to benzene, chlorobenzene, chloroethane, and methylene chloride may have occurred via ingestion, inhalation, and direct dermal contact with contaminated groundwater. No health study follow-up is indicated at this time.

  19. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 1): Beacon Heights Landfill, Beacon Falls, Connecticut, September 1985. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-09-23

    The Beacon Heights Landfill site is located two miles east of the intersection of Connecticut Routes 8 and 42 in Beacon Falls, Connecticut. From the 1920's until 1970 the site was known as Betkoski's Dump and consisted of approximately six acres on which active dumping occurred. According to records at the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection (CT DEP), waste accepted at the dump included municipal refuse, rubber, plastics, and industrial chemicals and sludges. Landfill operations consisted primarily of open burning along with burial of noncombustibles. In 1970, the Betkoski property and adjacent properties totaling 83 acres were purchased by the Murtha Trucking Company, and the name was changed to Beacon Heights, Inc. Landfill. At this time, the landfill area was expanded to approximately 30 acres. Records of the CT DEP, including a 1973 report by the landfill engineer, listed rubber, plastics, oils, hydrocarbons, chemical liquids and sludges, and solvents as being disposed of at the landfill by the trucking company. The selected remedial action for this site are included.

  20. 46 CFR 169.555 - Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). 169.555 Section 169.555 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS... Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). (a) Each vessel certificated for exposed waters must...

  1. 46 CFR 169.744 - Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). 169.744 Section 169.744 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS... position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). Each EPIRB must be marked with the vessel's name. ...

  2. 46 CFR 169.744 - Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). 169.744 Section 169.744 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS... position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). Each EPIRB must be marked with the vessel's name. ...

  3. 46 CFR 169.831 - Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). 169.831 Section 169.831 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS... radio beacon (EPIRB). The master shall ensure that— (a) The EPIRB required in § 169.555 of this...

  4. 46 CFR 169.555 - Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). 169.555 Section 169.555 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS... Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). (a) Each vessel certificated for exposed waters must...

  5. 46 CFR 169.831 - Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). 169.831 Section 169.831 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS... radio beacon (EPIRB). The master shall ensure that— (a) The EPIRB required in § 169.555 of this...

  6. 46 CFR 169.831 - Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). 169.831 Section 169.831 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS... radio beacon (EPIRB). The master shall ensure that— (a) The EPIRB required in § 169.555 of this...

  7. 46 CFR 169.555 - Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). 169.555 Section 169.555 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS... Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). (a) Each vessel certificated for exposed waters must...

  8. 46 CFR 169.744 - Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). 169.744 Section 169.744 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS... position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). Each EPIRB must be marked with the vessel's name. ...

  9. 14 CFR 171.321 - DME and marker beacon performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false DME and marker beacon performance requirements. 171.321 Section 171.321 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... (MLS) § 171.321 DME and marker beacon performance requirements. (a) The DME equipment must meet...

  10. 14 CFR 171.321 - DME and marker beacon performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false DME and marker beacon performance requirements. 171.321 Section 171.321 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... (MLS) § 171.321 DME and marker beacon performance requirements. (a) The DME equipment must meet...

  11. 14 CFR 171.321 - DME and marker beacon performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false DME and marker beacon performance requirements. 171.321 Section 171.321 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... (MLS) § 171.321 DME and marker beacon performance requirements. (a) The DME equipment must meet...

  12. Beacon Editor: Capturing Signal Transduction Pathways Using the Systems Biology Graphical Notation Activity Flow Language.

    PubMed

    Elmarakeby, Haitham; Arefiyan, Mostafa; Myers, Elijah; Li, Song; Grene, Ruth; Heath, Lenwood S

    2017-08-28

    The Beacon Editor is a cross-platform desktop application for the creation and modification of signal transduction pathways using the Systems Biology Graphical Notation Activity Flow (SBGN-AF) language. Prompted by biologists' requests for enhancements, the Beacon Editor includes numerous powerful features for the benefit of creation and presentation.

  13. Evaluation of the New York City Beacons. Summary of Phase I Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Constancia

    This report presents findings from Phase 1 of an evaluation of the New York City Beacons initiative, a model of school-community-family partnerships initiated in 1991. Beacons are community centers located in public schools, offering a range of activities and services to participants of all ages, before and after school, in the evenings, and on…

  14. 46 CFR 169.831 - Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). 169.831 Section 169.831 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS... radio beacon (EPIRB). The master shall ensure that— (a) The EPIRB required in § 169.555 of this...

  15. 46 CFR 169.555 - Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). 169.555 Section 169.555 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS... Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). (a) Each vessel certificated for exposed waters must...

  16. 46 CFR 169.831 - Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). 169.831 Section 169.831 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS... radio beacon (EPIRB). The master shall ensure that— (a) The EPIRB required in § 169.555 of this...

  17. 46 CFR 169.555 - Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). 169.555 Section 169.555 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS... Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). (a) Each vessel certificated for exposed waters must...

  18. The Development of Landmark and Beacon Use in Young Children: Evidence from a Touchscreen Search Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton, Jennifer E.

    2006-01-01

    Children ages 2, 3 and 4 years participated in a novel hide-and-seek search task presented on a touchscreen monitor. On beacon trials, the target hiding place could be located using a beacon cue, but on landmark trials, searching required the use of a nearby landmark cue. In Experiment 1, 2-year-olds performed less accurately than older children…

  19. Beacon- and Schema-Based Method for Recognizing Algorithms from Students' Source Code

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taherkhani, Ahmad; Malmi, Lauri

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present a method for recognizing algorithms from students programming submissions coded in Java. The method is based on the concept of "programming schemas" and "beacons". Schemas are high-level programming knowledge with detailed knowledge abstracted out, and beacons are statements that imply specific…

  20. 46 CFR 169.744 - Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). 169.744 Section 169.744 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS... position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). Each EPIRB must be marked with the vessel's name. ...

  1. What Happened to the Beacon Schools? Policy Reform and Educational Equity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Emma

    2015-01-01

    This paper considers the impact of the Beacon schools initiative on the social and academic characteristics of secondary schools in England. The Beacon schools programme ran from 1998 to 2004 and epitomised the (then) Labour government's focus on school improvement through diversity, collaboration and partnership. This paper looks at variation in…

  2. 46 CFR 169.744 - Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). 169.744 Section 169.744 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS... position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). Each EPIRB must be marked with the vessel's name. ...

  3. Weak beacon detection for air-to-ground optical wireless link establishment.

    PubMed

    Han, Yaoqiang; Dang, Anhong; Tang, Junxiong; Guo, Hong

    2010-02-01

    In an air-to-ground free-space optical communication system, strong background interference seriously affects the beacon detection, which makes it difficult to establish the optical link. In this paper, we propose a correlation beacon detection scheme under strong background interference conditions. As opposed to traditional beacon detection schemes, the beacon is modulated by an m-sequence at the transmitting terminal with a digital differential matched filter (DDMF) array introduced at the receiving end to detect the modulated beacon. This scheme is capable of suppressing both strong interference and noise by correlation reception of the received image sequence. In addition, the DDMF array enables each pixel of the image sensor to have its own DDMF of the same structure to process its received image sequence in parallel, thus it makes fast beacon detection possible. Theoretical analysis and an outdoor experiment have been demonstrated and show that the proposed scheme can realize fast and effective beacon detection under strong background interference conditions. Consequently, the required beacon transmission power can also be reduced dramatically.

  4. An Oasis in This Desert: Parents Talk about the New York City Beacons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nevarez, Nancy

    This report presents the findings of focus groups convened to determine what the parents of youth participants in the New York City Beacons think about the program. The Beacons initiative is a comprehensive model of school-community-family partnerships undertaken by New York City in 1991. The initiative originally enabled 10 community-based…

  5. The First Year of Beacon School Status: Maintaining Excellence and Sharing Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Neil; Brundrett, Mark

    2000-01-01

    During summer 1998, the British government's Department for Education and Employment recognized 74 schools as model "beacons of excellence." A recent survey reveals that effective communication, coupled with a clear sense of purpose and vision, has enabled Beacon schools to maintain educational excellence while facilitating other…

  6. 33 CFR 149.535 - What are the requirements for rotating beacons on platforms?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... rotating beacons on platforms? 149.535 Section 149.535 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... EQUIPMENT Aids to Navigation Lights on Platforms § 149.535 What are the requirements for rotating beacons on platforms? In addition to obstruction lights, the tallest platform of a deepwater port must have a lit...

  7. The Development of Landmark and Beacon Use in Young Children: Evidence from a Touchscreen Search Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton, Jennifer E.

    2006-01-01

    Children ages 2, 3 and 4 years participated in a novel hide-and-seek search task presented on a touchscreen monitor. On beacon trials, the target hiding place could be located using a beacon cue, but on landmark trials, searching required the use of a nearby landmark cue. In Experiment 1, 2-year-olds performed less accurately than older children…

  8. Beacon- and Schema-Based Method for Recognizing Algorithms from Students' Source Code

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taherkhani, Ahmad; Malmi, Lauri

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present a method for recognizing algorithms from students programming submissions coded in Java. The method is based on the concept of "programming schemas" and "beacons". Schemas are high-level programming knowledge with detailed knowledge abstracted out, and beacons are statements that imply specific…

  9. The First Year of Beacon School Status: Maintaining Excellence and Sharing Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Neil; Brundrett, Mark

    2000-01-01

    During summer 1998, the British government's Department for Education and Employment recognized 74 schools as model "beacons of excellence." A recent survey reveals that effective communication, coupled with a clear sense of purpose and vision, has enabled Beacon schools to maintain educational excellence while facilitating other…

  10. What Happened to the Beacon Schools? Policy Reform and Educational Equity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Emma

    2015-01-01

    This paper considers the impact of the Beacon schools initiative on the social and academic characteristics of secondary schools in England. The Beacon schools programme ran from 1998 to 2004 and epitomised the (then) Labour government's focus on school improvement through diversity, collaboration and partnership. This paper looks at variation in…

  11. Chimeric peptide beacons: a direct polypeptide analog of DNA molecular beacons†

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Kenneth J.; Cash, Kevin J.; Lubin, Arica A.

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a new biosensor architecture, which is comprised of a polypeptide–peptide nucleic acid tri-block copolymer and which we have termed chimeric peptide beacons (CPB), that generates an optical output via a mechanism analogous to that employed in DNA-based molecular beacons. PMID:18361352

  12. Detection of DNA damage by using hairpin molecular beacon probes and graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jie; Lu, Qian; Tong, Ying; Wei, Wei; Liu, Songqin

    2012-09-15

    A hairpin molecular beacon tagged with carboxyfluorescein in combination with graphene oxide as a quencher reagent was used to detect the DNA damage by chemical reagents. The fluorescence of molecular beacon was quenched sharply by graphene oxide; while in the presence of its complementary DNA the quenching efficiency decreased because their hybridization prevented the strong adsorbability of molecular beacon on graphene oxide. If the complementary DNA was damaged by a chemical reagent and could not form intact duplex structure with molecular beacon, more molecular beacon would adsorb on graphene oxide increasing the quenching efficiency. Thus, damaged DNA could be detected based on different quenching efficiencies afforded by damaged and intact complementary DNA. The damage effects of chlorpyrifos-methyl and three metabolites of styrene such as mandelieaeids, phenylglyoxylieaeids and epoxystyrene on DNA were studied as models. The method for detection of DNA damage was reliable, rapid and simple compared to the biological methods. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Addressing Beacon re-identification attacks: quantification and mitigation of privacy risks.

    PubMed

    Raisaro, Jean Louis; Tramèr, Florian; Ji, Zhanglong; Bu, Diyue; Zhao, Yongan; Carey, Knox; Lloyd, David; Sofia, Heidi; Baker, Dixie; Flicek, Paul; Shringarpure, Suyash; Bustamante, Carlos; Wang, Shuang; Jiang, Xiaoqian; Ohno-Machado, Lucila; Tang, Haixu; Wang, XiaoFeng; Hubaux, Jean-Pierre

    2017-07-01

    The Global Alliance for Genomics and Health (GA4GH) created the Beacon Project as a means of testing the willingness of data holders to share genetic data in the simplest technical context-a query for the presence of a specified nucleotide at a given position within a chromosome. Each participating site (or "beacon") is responsible for assuring that genomic data are exposed through the Beacon service only with the permission of the individual to whom the data pertains and in accordance with the GA4GH policy and standards.While recognizing the inference risks associated with large-scale data aggregation, and the fact that some beacons contain sensitive phenotypic associations that increase privacy risk, the GA4GH adjudged the risk of re-identification based on the binary yes/no allele-presence query responses as acceptable. However, recent work demonstrated that, given a beacon with specific characteristics (including relatively small sample size and an adversary who possesses an individual's whole genome sequence), the individual's membership in a beacon can be inferred through repeated queries for variants present in the individual's genome.In this paper, we propose three practical strategies for reducing re-identification risks in beacons. The first two strategies manipulate the beacon such that the presence of rare alleles is obscured; the third strategy budgets the number of accesses per user for each individual genome. Using a beacon containing data from the 1000 Genomes Project, we demonstrate that the proposed strategies can effectively reduce re-identification risk in beacon-like datasets. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association.

  14. The tick (Acari: Ixodidae) fauna of Herald's Beacon Islet, Australia.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Mackenzie L; Mintram, Kate

    2017-01-01

    A rare opportunity to travel to Herald's Beacon Islet with permission from the Australian government to collect ticks allowed for a survey of the tick fauna of the island to be undertaken for the first time. The avian fauna of the island, which serve as hosts, was also recorded and includes one new species record for the island. The seabird soft tick Ornithodoros capensis Neumann and the seabird hard tick Amblyomma loculosum Neumann were found to be present on the island. Images of the ticks present on the island are presented along with morphological characters for their identification.

  15. Laser beacon system for aircraft collision hazard determination.

    PubMed

    Miles, R B

    1980-07-01

    A laser beacon collision hazard determination system is capable of simultaneously determining range, bearing, and heading of threat aircraft. Calculations demonstrate that threat aircraft may be observed at > 10 km under good visibility conditions. When the visibility is limited to 5.6 km (3 nautical miles), the shortest possible warning time for aircraft below 3000 m (10,000 ft) can be > 15 sec. A wide variety of detection systems may be chosen based on cost, detection range, and sophistication. Traffic saturation is not a problem since closer aircraft produce easily distinguishable signals so traffic may be prioritized. Preliminary tests demonstrate that accurate range measurements are possible under daylight conditions.

  16. Shuttle orbiter C-band beacon antenna location study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsey, J. F.

    1975-01-01

    A recommendation for the location of the Space Shuttle C-Band Beacon Antenna(s) to be used during Approach and Landing Tests was made. The study has included an Orbiter-to-ground radar look angle evaluation, a vehicle shadowing evaluation and extensive 1/10-scale antenna pattern measurements. Locations were limited to the cutouts for the S-Band Quads and Hemis to minimize skin perturbation. The results show that a single C-Band Antenna located in the lower Hemi cutout will provide optimum coverage and eliminate the need for switching and the undesirable interferometer effects of two antennas.

  17. SETI Before Marconi - Sunlight Beacons and the Fermi Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, S.

    The strategies underlying the search for extraterrestrial intelligence are generally predicated on a model of civilisations with telecommunications technology searching for evidence of each other and making contact accordingly. It is argued that there is at least one plausible signalling type detectable to pre-radio civilisations: naked-eye `sunlight beacons'. A motive for attempting such communication could be the remote detection of the injection of greenhouse and other waste gases into a planetary atmosphere as a result of agricultural and early industrial activities. We may have been detectable, and contactable, since the Neolithic. An absence of such contacts is therefore a deepening of the Fermi Paradox.

  18. Power sources for search and rescue 406 MHz beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Attia, Alan I.; Perrone, David E.

    1987-01-01

    The results of a study directed at the selection of a commercially available, safe, low cost, light weight and long storage life battery for search and rescue (Sarsat) 406 MHz emergency beacons are presented. In the course of this work, five electrochemical systems (lithium-manganese dioxide, lithium-carbon monofluoride, lithium-silver vanadium oxide, alkaline cells, and cadmium-mercuric oxide) were selected for limited experimental studies to determine their suitability for this application. Two safe, commercially available batteries (lithium-manganese dioxide and lithium-carbon monofluoride) which meet the near term requirements and several alternatives for the long term were identified.

  19. Molecular Beacon CNT-based Detection of SNPs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorova, V. P.; Krylova, H. V.; Lipnevich, I. V.; Veligura, A. A.; Shulitsky, B. G.; Y Fedotenkova, L.

    2015-11-01

    An fluorescence quenching effect due to few-walled carbon nanotubes chemically modified by carboxyl groups has been utilized to discriminate Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP). It was shown that the complex obtained from these nanotube and singlestranded primer DNA is formed due to stacking interactions between the hexagons of the nanotubes and aromatic rings of nucleotide bases as well as due to establishing of hydrogen bonds between acceptor amine groups of nucleotide bases and donor carboxyl groups of the nanotubes. It has been demonstrated that these complexes may be used to make highly effective DNA biosensors detecting SNPs which operate as molecular beacons.

  20. Deep sea AUV navigation using multiple acoustic beacons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Da-xiong; Song, Wei; Zhao, Hong-yu; Liu, Jian

    2016-04-01

    Navigation is a critical requirement for the operation of Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs). To estimate the vehicle position, we present an algorithm using an extended Kalman filter (EKF) to integrate dead-reckoning position with acoustic ranges from multiple beacons pre-deployed in the operating environment. Owing to high latency, variable sound speed multipath transmissions and unreliability in acoustic measurements, outlier recognition techniques are proposed as well. The navigation algorithm has been tested by the recorded data of deep sea AUV during field operations in a variety of environments. Our results show the improved performance over prior techniques based on position computation.

  1. Power sources for search and rescue 406 MHz beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Attia, Alan I.; Perrone, David E.

    1987-01-01

    The results of a study directed at the selection of a commercially available, safe, low cost, light weight and long storage life battery for search and rescue (Sarsat) 406 MHz emergency beacons are presented. In the course of this work, five electrochemical systems (lithium-manganese dioxide, lithium-carbon monofluoride, lithium-silver vanadium oxide, alkaline cells, and cadmium-mercuric oxide) were selected for limited experimental studies to determine their suitability for this application. Two safe, commercially available batteries (lithium-manganese dioxide and lithium-carbon monofluoride) which meet the near term requirements and several alternatives for the long term were identified.

  2. Molecular Beacons: Powerful Tools for Imaging RNA in Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Monroy-Contreras, Ricardo; Vaca, Luis

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in RNA functional studies highlights the pivotal role of these molecules in cell physiology. Diverse methods have been implemented to measure the expression levels of various RNA species, using either purified RNA or fixed cells. Despite the fact that fixed cells offer the possibility to observe the spatial distribution of RNA, assays with capability to real-time monitoring RNA transport into living cells are needed to further understand the role of RNA dynamics in cellular functions. Molecular beacons (MBs) are stem-loop hairpin-structured oligonucleotides equipped with a fluorescence quencher at one end and a fluorescent dye (also called reporter or fluorophore) at the opposite end. This structure permits that MB in the absence of their target complementary sequence do not fluoresce. Upon binding to targets, MBs emit fluorescence, due to the spatial separation of the quencher and the reporter. Molecular beacons are promising probes for the development of RNA imaging techniques; nevertheless much work remains to be done in order to obtain a robust technology for imaging various RNA molecules together in real time and in living cells. The present work concentrates on the different requirements needed to use successfully MB for cellular studies, summarizing recent advances in this area. PMID:21876785

  3. Design and implementation of Bluetooth beacon in mobile payment system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Tiantian; Ding, Lei

    2017-08-01

    The current line of payment means, mainly in the following ways, cash payment, credit card payment, WeChat Alipay sweep payment. There are many inconvenience in Cash payment, large amounts of cash inconvenience to carry, count the money to spend time and effort, true and false banknotes difficult to distinguish, ticket settlement easy to go wrong. Credit card payment is relatively time-consuming, and WeChat Alipay sweep payment need to sweep. Therefore, the design of a convenient, fast payment to meet the line to pay the demand is particularly important. Based on the characteristics of BLE Bluetooth wireless communication technology, this paper designs a kind of payment method based on Bluetooth beacon. Through the Bluetooth beacon broadcast consumption, consumers only need to open the relevant APP in the Android client, and you can get Bluetooth via mobile phone Bluetooth the amount of consumption of the standard broadcast, in accordance with the corresponding payment platform to complete the payment process, which pay less time to improve the efficiency of payment.

  4. Laser beacon adaptive optics for power beaming applications

    SciTech Connect

    Fugate, R.Q.

    1994-12-31

    This paper discusses the laser beam control system requirements for power beaming applications. Power beaming applications include electric and thermal engine propulsion for orbit transfer, station changing, and recharging batteries. Beam control includes satellite acquisition, high accuracy tracking, higher order atmospheric compensation using adaptive optics, and precision point-ahead. Beam control may also include local laser beam clean-up with a low order adaptive optics system. This paper also presents results of tracking and higher-order correction experiments on astronomical objects. The results were obtained with a laser beacon adaptive optics system at Phillips Laboratory`s Starfire Optical Range near Albuquerque, NM. At a wavelength of 0.85 {mu}m, the author has achieved Strehl ratios of {approximately}0.50 using laser beacons and {approximately}0.65 using natural stars for exposures longer than one minute on objects of {approximately}8{sup th} magnitude. The resulting point spread function has a full width half maximum (FWHM) of 0.13 arcsec.

  5. Detection of MDR1 mRNA expression with optimized gold nanoparticle beacon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qiumei; Qian, Zhiyu; Gu, Yueqing

    2016-03-01

    MDR1 (multidrug resistance gene) mRNA expression is a promising biomarker for the prediction of doxorubicin resistance in clinic. However, the traditional technical process in clinic is complicated and cannot perform the real-time detection mRNA in living single cells. In this study, the expression of MDR1 mRNA was analyzed based on optimized gold nanoparticle beacon in tumor cells. Firstly, gold nanoparticle (AuNP) was modified by thiol-PEG, and the MDR1 beacon sequence was screened and optimized using a BLAST bioinformatics strategy. Then, optimized MDR1 molecular beacons were characterized by transmission electron microscope, UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopies. The cytotoxicity of MDR1 molecular beacon on L-02, K562 and K562/Adr cells were investigated by MTT assay, suggesting that MDR1 molecular beacon was low inherent cytotoxicity. Dark field microscope was used to investigate the cellular uptake of hDAuNP beacon assisted with ultrasound. Finally, laser scanning confocal microscope images showed that there was a significant difference in MDR1 mRNA expression in K562 and K562/Adr cells, which was consistent with the results of q-PCR measurement. In summary, optimized MDR1 molecular beacon designed in this study is a reliable strategy for detection MDR1 mRNA expression in living tumor cells, and will be a promising strategy for in guiding patient treatment and management in individualized medication.

  6. Pedestrian and motorists' actions at pedestrian hybrid beacon sites: findings from a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Pulugurtha, Srinivas S; Self, Debbie R

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on an analysis of pedestrian and motorists' actions at sites with pedestrian hybrid beacons and assesses their effectiveness in improving the safety of pedestrians. Descriptive and statistical analyses (one-tail two-sample T-test and two-proportion Z-test) were conducted using field data collected during morning and evening peak hours at three study sites in the city of Charlotte, NC, before and after the installation of pedestrian hybrid beacons. Further, an analysis was conducted to assess the change in pedestrian and motorists' actions over time (before the installation; 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, and 12 months after the installation). Results showed an increase in average traffic speed at one of the pedestrian hybrid beacon sites while no specific trends were observed at the other two pedestrian hybrid beacon sites. A decrease in the number of motorists not yielding to pedestrians, pedestrians trapped in the middle of the street, and pedestrian-vehicle conflicts were observed at all the three pedestrian hybrid beacon sites. The installation of pedestrian hybrid beacons did not have a negative effect on pedestrian actions at two out of the three sites. Improvements seem to be relatively more consistent 3 months after the installation of the pedestrian hybrid beacon.

  7. DNA aptamer beacon assay for C-telopeptide and handheld fluorometer to monitor bone resorption.

    PubMed

    Bruno, John Gordon; Carrillo, Maria P; Phillips, Taylor; Hanson, Douglas; Bohmann, Jonathan A

    2011-09-01

    A novel DNA aptamer beacon is described for quantification of a 26-amino acid C-telopeptide (CTx) of human type I bone collagen. One aptamer sequence and its reverse complement dominated the aptamer pool (31.6% of sequenced clones). Secondary structures of these aptamers were examined for potential binding pockets. Three-dimensional computer models which analyzed docking topologies and binding energies were in agreement with empirical fluorescence experiments used to select one candidate loop for beacon assay development. All loop structures from the aptamer finalists were end-labeled with TYE 665 and Iowa Black quencher for comparison of beacon fluorescence levels as a function of CTx concentration. The optimal beacon, designated CTx 2R-2h yielded a low ng/ml limit of detection using a commercially available handheld fluorometer. The CTx aptamer beacon bound full-length 26-amino acid CTx peptide, but not a shorter 8-amino acid segment of CTx peptide which is a common target for commercial CTx ELISA kits. The prototype assay was shown to detect CTx peptide from human urine after creatinine and urea were removed by size-exclusion chromatography to prevent nonspecific denaturing of the aptamer beacon. This work demonstrates the potential of aptamer beacons to be utilized for rapid and sensitive bone health monitoring in a handheld or point-of-care format.

  8. Fast molecular beacon hybridization in organic solvents with improved target specificity.

    PubMed

    Dave, Neeshma; Liu, Juewen

    2010-12-02

    DNA hybridization is of tremendous importance in biology, bionanotechnology, and biophysics. Molecular beacons are engineered DNA hairpins with a fluorophore and a quencher labeled on each of the two ends. A target DNA can open the hairpin to give an increased fluorescence signal. To date, the majority of molecular beacon detections have been performed only in aqueous buffers. We describe herein DNA detection in nine different organic solvents, methanol, ethanol, isopropanol, acetonitrile, formamide, dimethylformamide (DMF), dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), ethylene glycol, and glycerol, varying each up to 75% (v/v). In comparison with detection in water, the detection in organic solvents showed several important features. First, the molecular beacon hybridizes to its target DNA in the presence of all nine solvents up to a certain percentage. Second, the rate of this hybridization was significantly faster in most organic solvents compared with water. For example, in 56% ethanol, the beacon showed a 70-fold rate enhancement. Third, the ability of the molecular beacon to discriminate single-base mismatch is still maintained. Lastly, the DNA melting temperature in the organic solvents showed a solvent concentration-dependent decrease. This study suggests that molecular beacons can be used for applications where organic solvents must be involved or organic solvents can be intentionally added to improve the molecular beacon performance.

  9. Highly selective single nucleotide polymorphism recognition by a chiral (5S) PNA beacon.

    PubMed

    Totsingan, Filbert; Tedeschi, Tullia; Sforza, Stefano; Corradini, Roberto; Marchelli, Rosangela

    2009-01-01

    A chiral peptide nucleic acid (PNA) beacon containing a C-5 modified monomer based on L-lysine was synthesized. The terminal amino group of the lysine side chain was linked to a spacer for future applications on surfaces. The PNA beacon bears a carboxyfluorescein fluorophore and a dabcyl quencher at opposite ends. The DNA binding properties were compared with those of a homologous PNA beacon containing only achiral monomers. Both beacons underwent a fluorescence increase in the presence of complementary DNA, with higher efficiency and higher selectivity (evaluated using single mismatched DNA sequences) observed for the chiral monomer containing PNA. Ion exchange (IE) HPLC with fluorimetric detection was used in combination with the beacon for the selective detection of complementary DNA. A fluorescent peak corresponding to the PNA beacon:DNA duplex was observed at a very low detection limit (1 nM). The discriminating capacity of the chiral PNA beacon for a single mismatch was found to be superior to those observed with the unmodified one, thus confirming the potency of chirality for increasing the affinity and specificity of DNA recognition.

  10. Gold nanoparticle fluorescent molecular beacon for low-resolution DQ2 gene HLA typing.

    PubMed

    Beni, Valerio; Zewdu, Taye; Joda, Hamdi; Katakis, Ioanis; O'Sullivan, Ciara K

    2012-01-01

    Coeliac disease is an inflammation of the small intestine triggered by gluten ingestion. We present a fluorescent genosensor, exploiting molecular-beacon-functionalized gold nanoparticles, for the identification of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) DQ2 gene, a key genetic factor in coeliac disease. Optimization of sensor performance was achieved by tuning the composition of the oligonucleotide monolayer immobilized on the gold nanoparticle and the molecular beacon design. Co-immobilization of the molecular beacon with a spacing oligonucleotide (thiolated ten-thymine oligonucleotide) in the presence of ten-adenine oligonucleotides resulted in a significant increase of the sensor response owing to improved spacing of the molecular beacons and extension of the distance from the nanoparticle surface, which renders them more available for recognition. Further increase in the response (approximately 40%) was shown to be achievable when the recognition sequence of the molecular beacon was incorporated in the stem. Improvement of the specificity of the molecular beacons was also achieved by the incorporation within their recognition sequence of a one-base mismatch. Finally, gold nanoparticles functionalized with two molecular beacons targeting the DQA1*05* and DQB1*02* alleles allowed the low-resolution typing of the DQ2 gene at the nanomolar level.

  11. Preliminary performance analysis of an interplanetary navigation system using asteroid based beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jee, J. Rodney; Khatib, Ahmad R.; Muellerschoen, Ronald J.; Williams, Bobby G.; Vincent, Mark A.

    1988-01-01

    A futuristic interplanetary navigation system using transmitters placed on selected asteroids is introduced. This network of space beacons is seen as a needed alternative to the overly burdened Deep Space Network. Covariance analyses on the potential performance of these space beacons located on a candidate constellation of eight real asteroids are initiated. Simplified analytic calculations are performed to determine limiting accuracies attainable with the network for geometric positioning. More sophisticated computer simulations are also performed to determine potential accuracies using long arcs of range and Doppler data from the beacons. The results from these computations show promise for this navigation system.

  12. Fluorescent nanoparticle beacon for logic gate operation regulated by strand displacement.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Shen, Lingjing; Ma, Jingjing; Schlaberg, H Inaki; Liu, Shi; Xu, Jin; Zhang, Cheng

    2013-06-26

    A mechanism is developed to construct a logic system by employing DNA/gold nanoparticle (AuNP) conjugates as a basic work unit, utilizing a fluorescent beacon probe to detect output signals. To implement the logic circuit, a self-assembly DNA structure is attached onto nanoparticles to form the fluorescent beacon. Moreover, assisted by regulation of multilevel strand displacement, cascaded logic gates are achieved. The computing results are detected by methods using fluorescent signals, gel electrophoresis and transmission electron microscope (TEM). This work is expected to demonstrate the feasibility of the cascaded logic system based on fluorescent nanoparticle beacons, suggesting applications in DNA computation and biotechnology.

  13. Single-Strand Stacking Free Energy from DNA Beacon Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Aalberts, Daniel P.; Parman, John M.; Goddard, Noel L.

    2003-01-01

    DNA beacons are short single-stranded chains which can form closed hairpin shapes through complementary base pairing at their ends. Contrary to the common polymer theory assumption that only their loop length matters, experiments show that their closing kinetics depend on the loop composition. We have modeled the closing kinetics and in so doing have obtained stacking enthalpies and entropies for single-stranded nucleic acids. The resulting change of persistence length with temperature effects the dynamics. With a Monte Carlo study, we answer another polymer question of how the closing time scales with chain length, finding τ ∼ N2.44±0.02. There is a significant crossover for shorter chains, bringing the effective exponent into good agreement with experiment. PMID:12719250

  14. A Interference-Resistant Search for Extraterrestrial Microwave Beacons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leigh, Darren Laney

    1998-11-01

    The Billion-channel ExtraTerrestrial Assay (BETA) is a radioastronomical search for microwave beacons from intelligent civilizations. It searches the 1400-1720 MHz 'waterhole' region with 0.5 Hz resolution for narrow-band carriers. BETA incorporates several systems for terrestrial radio frequency interference mitigation: a terrestrial 'veto' feed, two sky feeds to detect sidereal motion, and adaptive filtering to reduce intermittent interference. The search has surveyed the entire sky from +60o to 30o declination twice and is starting a third. During this time it has sifted through ~101016 frequency bins, followed ~109 candidate features and archived 3500 of these which passed preliminary tests. No candidate has repeated or otherwise presents the assumed characteristics of an extraterrestrial intelligent origin.

  15. Directional pattern measurement of the BRAMS beacon antenna system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez Picar, A.; Marqué, C.; Anciaux, M.; Lamy, H.

    2015-01-01

    The typical methods for measuring antenna characteristics are mostly based on the use of remote transmitters or receivers. For antennas used in radio communications, calibrations are usually done on an antenna test stand using transmitters with known power output. In order to minimize the ground effects while performing measurements, it is necessary to place the transmitter or receiver high above ground with the aid of aircrafts. It is, however, necessary to determine precisely the coordinates of the airborne devices as well as to maintain high stability. This used to be excessively difficult to carry out, but recent advances in Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) technologies have brought a feasible option. In this paper, the results of using a low-cost system for measuring the directional pattern of BRAMS beacon antenna system based on an UAV are presented.

  16. Theory of continuous-wave excitation of the sodium beacon

    SciTech Connect

    Milonni, P.W.; Fearn, H.; Telle, J.M.; Fugate, R.Q.

    1999-10-01

    We extend our previous analysis of the sodium beacon [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A {bold 15}, 217 (1998)] to the case of continuous-wave excitation. Various effects that could be ignored in the case of pulsed excitation, such as the geomagnetic field, the recoil of the sodium atoms upon absorption and emission, and collisions of the sodium atoms with other mesospheric species, are included. Spin-relaxation collisions are among the most important of these effects for the cases considered. Analytical approximations to numerical results are presented, and using a semi-empirical estimate for Na-O{sub 2} spin relaxation, we compute photon returns in good agreement with recently reported measurements at the Steward Observatory. {copyright} 1999 Optical Society of America

  17. BEACON: A Summary Framework to Overcome Potential Reimbursement Hurdles.

    PubMed

    Dunlop, William C N; Mullins, C Daniel; Pirk, Olaf; Goeree, Ron; Postma, Maarten J; Enstone, Ashley; Heron, Louise

    2016-10-01

    To provide a framework for addressing payers' criteria during the development of pharmaceuticals. A conceptual framework was presented to an international health economic expert panel for discussion. A structured literature search (from 2010 to May 2015), using the following databases in Ovid: Medline(®) and Medline(®) In-Process (PubMed), Embase (Ovid), EconLit (EBSCOhost) and the National Health Service Economic Evaluation Database (NHS EED), and a 'grey literature' search, were conducted to identify existing criteria from the payer perspective. The criteria assessed by existing frameworks and guidelines were collated; the most commonly reported criteria were considered for inclusion in the framework. A mnemonic was conceived as a memory aide to summarise these criteria. Overall, 41 publications were identified as potentially relevant to the objective. Following further screening, 26 were excluded upon full-text review on the basis of no framework presented (n = 13), redundancy (n = 11) or abstract only (n = 2). Frameworks that captured criteria developed for or utilised by the pharmaceutical industry (n = 5) and reimbursement guidance (n = 10) were reviewed. The most commonly identified criteria-unmet need/patient burden, safety, efficacy, quality-of-life outcomes, environment, evidence quality, budget impact and comparator-were incorporated into the summary framework. For ease of communication, the following mnemonic was developed: BEACON (Burden/target population, Environment, Affordability/value, Comparator, Outcomes, Number of studies/quality of evidence). The BEACON framework aims to capture the 'essence' of payer requirements by addressing the most commonly described criteria requested by payers regarding the introduction of a new pharmaceutical.

  18. Improving adherence to the Epic Beacon ambulatory workflow.

    PubMed

    Chackunkal, Ellen; Dhanapal Vogel, Vishnuprabha; Grycki, Meredith; Kostoff, Diana

    2017-06-01

    Computerized physician order entry has been shown to significantly improve chemotherapy safety by reducing the number of prescribing errors. Epic's Beacon Oncology Information System of computerized physician order entry and electronic medication administration was implemented in Henry Ford Health System's ambulatory oncology infusion centers on 9 November 2013. Since that time, compliance to the infusion workflow had not been assessed. The objective of this study was to optimize the current workflow and improve the compliance to this workflow in the ambulatory oncology setting. This study was a retrospective, quasi-experimental study which analyzed the composite workflow compliance rate of patient encounters from 9 to 23 November 2014. Based on this analysis, an intervention was identified and implemented in February 2015 to improve workflow compliance. The primary endpoint was to compare the composite compliance rate to the Beacon workflow before and after a pharmacy-initiated intervention. The intervention, which was education of infusion center staff, was initiated by ambulatory-based, oncology pharmacists and implemented by a multi-disciplinary team of pharmacists and nurses. The composite compliance rate was then reassessed for patient encounters from 2 to 13 March 2015 in order to analyze the effects of the determined intervention on compliance. The initial analysis in November 2014 revealed a composite compliance rate of 38%, and data analysis after the intervention revealed a statistically significant increase in the composite compliance rate to 83% ( p < 0.001). This study supports a pharmacist-initiated educational intervention can improve compliance to an ambulatory, oncology infusion workflow.

  19. Remote tracking of a magnetic receiver using low frequency beacons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheinker, Arie; Ginzburg, Boris; Salomonski, Nizan; Frumkis, Lev; Kaplan, Ben-Zion

    2014-10-01

    Low frequency magnetic fields feature high penetration ability, which allows communication, localization, and tracking in environments where radio or acoustic waves are blocked or distorted by multipath interferences. In the present work, we propose a method for tracking a magnetic receiver using beacons of low frequency magnetic field, where the receiver includes a tri-axial search-coil magnetometer. Measuring the beacons’ magnetic fields and calculating the total-field signals enables localization without restrictions on magnetometer orientation, allowing on-the-move tracking. The total-field signals are used by a global search method, e.g., simulated annealing (SA) algorithm, to localize the receiver. The magnetic field produced by each beacon has a dipole structure and is governed by the beacon’s position and magnetic moment. We have investigated two different methods for estimating beacons’ magnetic moments prior to localization. The first method requires directional measurements, whereas for the second method the total-field signal is used. Effectiveness of these methods has been proved in numerous field tests. In the present work, we introduce a method for tracking a moving receiver by successive localizations. Using previous localization as a starting point of the search method for the next localization can reduce execution time and chances for divergence. The proposed method has been tested using numerous computer simulations. Successful system operation has been verified in field conditions. The good tracking capability together with simple implementation makes the proposed method attractive for real-time, low power field applications, such as mobile robots navigation.

  20. Digital beacon receiver for ionospheric TEC measurement developed with GNU Radio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, M.

    2008-11-01

    A simple digital receiver named GNU Radio Beacon Receiver (GRBR) was developed for the satellite-ground beacon experiment to measure the ionospheric total electron content (TEC). The open-source software toolkit for the software defined radio, GNU Radio, is utilized to realize the basic function of the receiver and perform fast signal processing. The software is written in Python for a LINUX PC. The open-source hardware called Universal Software Radio Peripheral (USRP), which best matches the GNU Radio, is used as a front-end to acquire the satellite beacon signals of 150 and 400 MHz. The first experiment was successful as results from GRBR showed very good agreement to those from the co-located analog beacon receiver. Detailed design information and software codes are open at the URL http://www.rish.kyoto-u.ac.jp/digitalbeacon/.

  1. Chemically directing d-block heterometallics to nanocrystal surfaces as molecular beacons of surface structure

    DOE PAGES

    Rosen, Evelyn L.; Gilmore, Keith; Sawvel, April M.; ...

    2015-07-28

    Our understanding of structure and bonding in nanoscale materials is incomplete without knowledge of their surface structure. Needed are better surveying capabilities responsive not only to different atoms at the surface, but also their respective coordination environments. We report here that d-block organometallics, when placed at nanocrystal surfaces through heterometallic bonds, serve as molecular beacons broadcasting local surface structure in atomic detail. This unique ability stems from their elemental specificity and the sensitivity of their d-orbital level alignment to local coordination environment, which can be assessed spectroscopically. Re-surfacing cadmium and lead chalcogenide nanocrystals with iron- or ruthenium-based molecular beacons ismore » readily accomplished with trimethylsilylated cyclopentadienyl metal carbonyls. For PbSe nanocrystals with iron-based beacons, we show how core-level X-ray spectroscopies and DFT calculations enrich our understanding of both charge and atomic reorganization at the surface when beacons are bound.« less

  2. 33 CFR 149.535 - What are the requirements for rotating beacons on platforms?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... beacon must: (a) Have an effective intensity of at least 15,000 candela; (b) Flash at least once every 20...) Be located: (1) At least 60 feet (about 18.3 meters) above mean high water; (2) Where the...

  3. 33 CFR 149.535 - What are the requirements for rotating beacons on platforms?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... beacon must: (a) Have an effective intensity of at least 15,000 candela; (b) Flash at least once every 20...) Be located: (1) At least 60 feet (about 18.3 meters) above mean high water; (2) Where the...

  4. GaAs monolithic R.F. modules for SARSAT distress beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cauley, Michael A.

    1991-01-01

    Monolithic GaAs UHF components for use in SARSAT Emergency Distress beacons are under development by Microwave Monolithics, Inc., Simi Valley, CA. The components include a bi-phase modulator, driver amplifier, and a 5 watt power amplifier.

  5. Chemically directing d-block heterometallics to nanocrystal surfaces as molecular beacons of surface structure

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, Evelyn L.; Gilmore, Keith; Sawvel, April M.; Hammack, Aaron T.; Doris, Sean E.; Aloni, Shaul; Altoe, Virginia; Nordlund, Dennis; Weng, Tsu -Chien; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Cohen, Bruce E.; Urban, Jeffrey J.; Ogletree, D. Frank; Milliron, Delia J.; Prendergast, David; Helms, Brett A.

    2015-07-28

    Our understanding of structure and bonding in nanoscale materials is incomplete without knowledge of their surface structure. Needed are better surveying capabilities responsive not only to different atoms at the surface, but also their respective coordination environments. We report here that d-block organometallics, when placed at nanocrystal surfaces through heterometallic bonds, serve as molecular beacons broadcasting local surface structure in atomic detail. This unique ability stems from their elemental specificity and the sensitivity of their d-orbital level alignment to local coordination environment, which can be assessed spectroscopically. Re-surfacing cadmium and lead chalcogenide nanocrystals with iron- or ruthenium-based molecular beacons is readily accomplished with trimethylsilylated cyclopentadienyl metal carbonyls. For PbSe nanocrystals with iron-based beacons, we show how core-level X-ray spectroscopies and DFT calculations enrich our understanding of both charge and atomic reorganization at the surface when beacons are bound.

  6. Highly sensitive and rapid bacteria detection using molecular beacon-Au nanoparticles hybrid nanoprobes.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jing; Feng, Chao; Liu, Yan; Wang, Shouyu; Liu, Fei

    2014-07-15

    Since many diseases are caused by pathogenic bacterial infections, accurate and rapid detection of pathogenic bacteria is in urgent need to timely apply appropriate treatments and to reduce economic costs. To end this, we designed molecular beacon-Au nanoparticle hybrid nanoprobes to improve the bacterial detection efficiency and sensitivity. Here, we show that the designed molecular beacon modified Au nanoparticles could specifically recognize synthetic DNAs targets and can readily detect targets in clinical samples. Moreover, the hybrid nanoprobes can recognize Escherichia coli within an hour at a concentration of 10(2) cfu/ml, which is 1000-folds sensitive than using molecular beacon directly. Our results show that the molecular beacon-Au nanoparticle hybrid nanoprobes have great potential in medical and biological applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Hybrid diagnostic system: beacon-based exception analysis for multimissions - Livingstone integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Han G.; Cannon, Howard; Bajwa, Anupa; Mackey, Ryan; James, Mark; Maul, William

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the initial integration of a hybrid reasoning system utilizing a continuous domain feature-based detector, Beacon-based Exceptions Analysis for Multimissions (BEAM), and a discrete domain model-based reasoner, Livingstone.

  8. The American Association of Critical Care Nurse's Beacon Award: a framework for quality.

    PubMed

    Reed, Kevin D

    2008-12-01

    The Beacon Award for Critical Care Excellence recognizes individual critical care units that have met rigid criteria for excellence, exhibiting high-quality standards and exceptional care of patients and their families. Used as a framework for quality, the award criteria focus on structure, process, and outcomes that enable quality to emerge in the critical care environment. The journey toward meeting Beacon Award criteria can produce long-lasting changes that transform unit-based culture and lead to sustained excellence.

  9. Precise locating approach of the beacon based on gray gradient segmentation interpolation in satellite optical communications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Liu, Yuefei; Chen, Yiqiang; Ma, Jing; Tan, Liying; Yu, Siyuan

    2017-03-01

    Accurate location computation for a beacon is an important factor of the reliability of satellite optical communications. However, location precision is generally limited by the resolution of CCD. How to improve the location precision of a beacon is an important and urgent issue. In this paper, we present two precise centroid computation methods for locating a beacon in satellite optical communications. First, in terms of its characteristics, the beacon is divided into several parts according to the gray gradients. Afterward, different numbers of interpolation points and different interpolation methods are applied in the interpolation area; we calculate the centroid position after interpolation and choose the best strategy according to the algorithm. The method is called a "gradient segmentation interpolation approach," or simply, a GSI (gradient segmentation interpolation) algorithm. To take full advantage of the pixels of the beacon's central portion, we also present an improved segmentation square weighting (SSW) algorithm, whose effectiveness is verified by the simulation experiment. Finally, an experiment is established to verify GSI and SSW algorithms. The results indicate that GSI and SSW algorithms can improve locating accuracy over that calculated by a traditional gray centroid method. These approaches help to greatly improve the location precision for a beacon in satellite optical communications.

  10. Visual detection of multidrug resistance gene in living cell using the molecular beacon imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qiumei; Ma, Yi; Gu, Yueqing

    2014-09-01

    A major problem in cancer treatment is the development of resistance to chemotherapeutic agents in tumor cells. Detection of effective prognostic biomarkers and targets are of crucial importance to the management of individualized therapies. However, quantitative analysis of the drug resistance gene had been difficult because of technical limitations. In this study, we designed and used a special hairpin deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), which served as a beacon for detecting human drug resistance indicater. Upon hybridizing with the target mRNA, the hairpin DNA modified gold nanoparticle beacons (hDAuNP beacons) release the fluorophores attached at 5'end of the oligonucleotide sequence. The fluorescence properties of the beacon before and after the hybridization with the complementary DNA were confirmed in vitro. The hDAuNP beacons could be taken up by living cells with low inherent cytotoxicity and higher stability. hDAuNP beacon imaged by confocal laser scanning microscopy to detect the resistance gene expression. The detected fluorescence in MCF7and MCF7/ADR cells correlates with the specific drug resistance gene expression, which is consistent with the result from Q-PCR. Thus, this approach overcame many of the challenges of previous techniques by creating highly sensitive and effective intracellular probes for monitoring gene expression.

  11. Accelerated Adoption of Advanced Health Information Technology in Beacon Community Health Centers.

    PubMed

    Jones, Emily; Wittie, Michael

    2015-01-01

    To complement national and state-level HITECH Act programs, 17 Beacon communities were funded to fuel community-wide use of health information technology to improve quality. Health centers in Beacon communities received supplemental funding. This article explores the association between participation in the Beacon program and the adoption of electronic health records. Using the 2010-2012 Uniform Data System, trends in health information technology adoption among health centers located within and outside of Beacon communities were explored using differences in mean t tests and multivariate logistic regression. Electronic health record adoption was widespread and rapidly growing in all health centers, especially quality improvement functionalities: structured data capture, order and results management, and clinical decision support. Adoption lagged for functionalities supporting patient engagement, performance measurement, care coordination, and public health. The use of advanced functionalities such as care coordination grew faster in Beacon health centers, and Beacon health centers had 1.7 times higher odds of adopting health records with basic safety and quality functionalities in 2010-2012. Three factors likely underlie these findings: technical assistance, community-wide activation supporting health information exchange, and the layering of financial incentives. Additional technical assistance and community-wide activation is needed to support the use of functionalities that are currently lagging. © Copyright 2015 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  12. Serum inverts and improves the fluorescence response of an aptamer beacon to various vitamin D analytes.

    PubMed

    Bruno, John G; Carrillo, Maria P; Phillips, Taylor; Edge, Allison

    2012-01-01

    A dominant aptamer loop structure from a library of nearly 100 candidate aptamer sequences developed against immobilized 25-hydroxyvitamin D(3) (calcidiol) was converted into a 5'-TYE 665 and 3'-Iowa black-labelled aptamer beacon. The aptamer beacon exhibited a mild 'lights on' reaction in buffer as a function of increasing concentrations of several vitamin D analogues and metabolites, with a limit of detection of approximately 200 ng/mL, and was not specific for any particular congener. In 10% or 50% human serum, the same aptamer beacon inverted its fluorescence behaviour to become a more intense 'lights off' reaction with an improved limit of detection in the range 4-16 ng/mL. We hypothesized that this drastic change in fluorescence behaviour was due to the presence of creatinine and urea in serum, which might destabilize the quenched beacon, causing an increase in fluorescence followed by decreasing fluorescence as a function of vitamin D concentrations that may bind and quench increasingly greater fractions of the denatured beacons. However, the results of several control experiments in the presence of physiological or greater concentrations of creatinine and urea, alone or combined in buffer, failed to produce the beacon fluorescence inversion. Other possible mechanistic hypotheses are also discussed. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. An Adaptive Scheme for Robot Localization and Mapping with Dynamically Configurable Inter-Beacon Range Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Torres-González, Arturo; Martinez-de Dios, Jose Ramiro; Ollero, Anibal

    2014-01-01

    This work is motivated by robot-sensor network cooperation techniques where sensor nodes (beacons) are used as landmarks for range-only (RO) simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM). This paper presents a RO-SLAM scheme that actuates over the measurement gathering process using mechanisms that dynamically modify the rate and variety of measurements that are integrated in the SLAM filter. It includes a measurement gathering module that can be configured to collect direct robot-beacon and inter-beacon measurements with different inter-beacon depth levels and at different rates. It also includes a supervision module that monitors the SLAM performance and dynamically selects the measurement gathering configuration balancing SLAM accuracy and resource consumption. The proposed scheme has been applied to an extended Kalman filter SLAM with auxiliary particle filters for beacon initialization (PF-EKF SLAM) and validated with experiments performed in the CONET Integrated Testbed. It achieved lower map and robot errors (34% and 14%, respectively) than traditional methods with a lower computational burden (16%) and similar beacon energy consumption. PMID:24776938

  14. An adaptive scheme for robot localization and mapping with dynamically configurable inter-beacon range measurements.

    PubMed

    Torres-González, Arturo; Martinez-de Dios, Jose Ramiro; Ollero, Anibal

    2014-04-25

    This work is motivated by robot-sensor network cooperation techniques where sensor nodes (beacons) are used as landmarks for range-only (RO) simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM). This paper presents a RO-SLAM scheme that actuates over the measurement gathering process using mechanisms that dynamically modify the rate and variety of measurements that are integrated in the SLAM filter. It includes a measurement gathering module that can be configured to collect direct robot-beacon and inter-beacon measurements with different inter-beacon depth levels and at different rates. It also includes a supervision module that monitors the SLAM performance and dynamically selects the measurement gathering configuration balancing SLAM accuracy and resource consumption. The proposed scheme has been applied to an extended Kalman filter SLAM with auxiliary particle filters for beacon initialization (PF-EKF SLAM) and validated with experiments performed in the CONET Integrated Testbed. It achieved lower map and robot errors (34% and 14%, respectively) than traditional methods with a lower computational burden (16%) and similar beacon energy consumption.

  15. Quick acquisition and recognition method for the beacon in deep space optical communications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Liu, Yuefei; Ma, Jing; Tan, Liying; Yu, Siyuan; Li, Changjiang

    2016-12-01

    In deep space optical communications, it is very difficult to acquire the beacon given the long communication distance. Acquisition efficiency is essential for establishing and holding the optical communication link. Here we proposed a quick acquisition and recognition method for the beacon in deep optical communications based on the characteristics of the deep optical link. To identify the beacon from the background light efficiently, we utilized the maximum similarity between the collecting image and the reference image for accurate recognition and acquisition of the beacon in the area of uncertainty. First, the collecting image and the reference image were processed by Fourier-Mellin. Second, image sampling and image matching were applied for the accurate positioning of the beacon. Finally, the field programmable gate array (FPGA)-based system was used to verify and realize this method. The experimental results showed that the acquisition time for the beacon was as fast as 8.1s. Future application of this method in the system design of deep optical communication will be beneficial.

  16. A beacon configuration optimization method based on Fisher information for Mars atmospheric entry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zeduan; Yu, Zhengshi; Cui, Pingyuan

    2017-04-01

    The navigation capability of the proposed Mars network based entry navigation system is directly related to the beacon number and the relative configuration between the beacons and the entry vehicle. In this paper, a new beacon configuration optimization method is developed based on the Fisher information theory and this method is suitable for any number of visible beacons. The proposed method can be used for the navigation schemes based on range measurements provided by radio transceivers or other sensors for Mars entry. The observability of specific state is defined as its Fisher information based on the observation model. The overall navigation capability is improved by maximizing the minimum average Fisher information, even though the navigation system is not fully observed. In addition, when there is only one beacon capable of entry navigation and the observation information is relatively limited, the optimization method can be modulated to maximize the Fisher information of the specific state which may be preferred for the guidance and control system to improve its estimation accuracy. Finally, navigation scenarios consisted of 1-3 beacons are tested to validate the effectiveness of the developed optimization method. The extended Kalman filter (EKF) is employed to derive the state estimation error covariance. The results also show that the zero-Fisher information situation should be avoided, especially when the dynamic system is highly nonlinear and the states change dramatically.

  17. Marking emergency exits and evacuation routes with sound beacons utilizing the precedence effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Wijngaarden, Sander J.; Bronkhorst, Adelbert W.; Boer, Louis C.

    2004-05-01

    Sound beacons can be extremely useful during emergency evacuations, especially when vision is obscured by smoke. When exits are marked with suitable sound sources, people can find these using only their capacity for directional hearing. Unfortunately, unless very explicit instructions were given, sound beacons currently commercially available (based on modulated noise) led to disappointing results during an evacuation experiment in a traffic tunnel. Only 19% out of 65 subjects were able to find an exit by ear. A signal designed to be more self-explanatory and less hostile-sounding (alternating chime signal and spoken message ``exit here'') increased the success rate to 86%. In a more complex environment-a mock-up of a ship's interior-routes to the exit were marked using multiple beacons. By applying carefully designed time delays between successive beacons, the direction of the route was marked, utilizing the precedence effect. Out of 34 subjects, 71% correctly followed the evacuation route by ear (compared to 24% for a noise signal as used in commercially available beacons). Even when subjects were forced to make a worst-case left-right decision at a T-junction, between two beacons differing only in arrival of the first wave front, 77% made the right decision.

  18. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 1): Beacon Heights Landfill site, Beacon Falls, CT. (First remedial action), September 1990. (Supplemental). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-28

    The 34-acre Beacon Heights Landfill site is on the northwest corner of an 82-acre property in Beacon Falls, Connecticut. The ROD supplements the 1985 ROD by resolving those determinations left open in the 1985 ROD, including the manner and locations of leachate treatment/disposal; cleanup levels for soil deemed impracticable to cap in areas contiguous to the landfill; and the need for air pollution controls on the landfill gas vents. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil, ground water, surface water, and air are VOCs, including benzene, toluene, and xylene.

  19. Aspect Determination Using a Beacon with a Spiral Wave Front: Modeling and Performance Analysis in Operational Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-19

    structure of the field propagating close to the z-axis therefore has a structure similar to a helicoidal beam .8 Using Eq. (1), a spiral beacon can be...technique. B. Out of plane results for the physically induced spiral This prototype beacon is designed to have a narrow beam pattern. The amplitude as...vehicle and at the beacon position. The acoustic data and GPS co- ordinates are collected and synchronized at either end by PCs. acquisition module’s

  20. Analytical performance of molecular beacons on surface immobilized gold nanoparticles of varying size and density.

    PubMed

    Uddayasankar, Uvaraj; Krull, Ulrich J

    2013-11-25

    The high quenching efficiency of metal nanoparticles has facilitated its use as quenchers in molecular beacons. To optimize this system, a good understanding of the many factors that influence molecular beacon performance is required. In this study, molecular beacon performance was evaluated as a function of gold nanoparticle size and its immobilization characteristics. Gold nanoparticles of 4 nm, 15 nm and 87 nm diameter, were immobilized onto glass slides. Each size regime offered distinctive optical properties for fluorescence quenching of molecular dyes that were conjugated to oligonucleotides that were immobilized to the gold nanoparticles. Rigid double stranded DNA was used as a model to place fluorophores at different distances from the gold nanoparticles. The effect of particle size and also the immobilization density of nanoparticles was evaluated. The 4 nm and 87 nm gold nanoparticles offered the highest sensitivity in terms of the change in fluorescence intensity as a function of distance (3-fold improvement for Cy5). The optical properties of the molecular fluorophore was of significance, with Cy5 offering higher contrast ratios than Cy3 due to the red-shifted emission spectrum relative to the plasmon peak. A high density of gold nanoparticles reduced contrast ratios, indicating preference for a monolayer of immobilized nanoparticles when considering analytical performance. Molecular beacon probes were then used in place of the double stranded oligonucleotides. There was a strong dependence of molecular beacon performance on the length of a linker used for attachment to the nanoparticle surface. The optimal optical performance was obtained with 4 nm gold nanoparticles that were immobilized as monolayers of low density (5.7×10(11)particles cm(-2)) on glass surfaces. These nanoparticle surfaces offered a 2-fold improvement in analytical performance of the molecular beacons when compared to other nanoparticle sizes investigated. The principles developed

  1. Quantum dot-based molecular beacon to monitor intracellular microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jonghwan; Moon, Sung Ung; Lee, Yong Seung; Ali, Bahy A; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A; Ali, Daoud; Ahmed, Javed; Al Salem, Abdullah M; Kim, Soonhag

    2015-06-02

    Fluorescence monitoring of endogenous microRNA (miRNA or miR) activity related to neuronal development using nano-sized materials provides crucial information on miRNA expression patterns in a noninvasive manner. In this study, we report a new method to monitor intracellular miRNA124a using quantum dot-based molecular beacon (R9-QD-miR124a beacon). The R9-QD-miR124a beacon was constructed using QDs and two probes, miR124a-targeting oligomer and arginine rich cell-penetrating peptide (R9 peptide). The miR124a-targeting oligomer contains a miR124a binging sequence and a black hole quencher 1 (BHQ1). In the absence of target miR124a, the R9-QD-miR124a beacon forms a partial duplex beacon and remained in quenched state because the BHQ1 quenches the fluorescence signal of the R9-QD-miR124a beacon. The binding of miR124a to the miR124a binding sequence of the miR124a-targeting oligomer triggered the separation of the BHQ1 quencher and subsequent signal-on of a red fluorescence signal. Moreover, enhanced cellular uptake was achieved by conjugation with the R9 peptide, which resulted in increased fluorescent signal of the R9-QD-miR124a beacons in P19 cells during neurogenesis due to the endogenous expression of miR124a.

  2. Detection of toxoplasma gondii with a DNA molecular beacon probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shichao; Yao, Cuicui; Wei, Shuoming; Zhang, Jimei; Sun, Bo; Zheng, Guo; Han, Qing; Hu, Fei; Zhou, Hongming

    2008-12-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a microscopic parasite that may infect humans, so there is an increasing concern on the early detection of latent Toxoplasma gondii infection in recent years. We currently report a rapid and sensitive method for Toxoplasma gondii based on molecular beacon (MB) probe. The probe based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) with a stem-loop DNA oligonucleotide was labeled with CdTe/ZnS quantum dots (energy donor) at 5' end and BHQ-2 (energy acceptor) at 3' end, respectively. The probe was synthesized in PBS buffer at pH 8.2, room temperature for 24 h. Then target DNA was injected under the condition of 37°C, hybridization for 2 h, in Tris-HCl buffer. The data from fluorescence spectrum (FS) showed that ca 65% of emitted fluorescence was quenched, and about 50% recovery of fluorescence intensity was observed after adding target DNA, which indicated that the target DNA was successfully detected by MB probe. The detecting limitation was determined as ca 5 nM. Moreover, specificity of the probe was investigated by adding target DNA with one-base-pair mismatch, the low fluorescence recovery indicated the high specificity. The results showed that the current sensing probe will be a useful and convenient tool in Toxoplasma gondii early detection.

  3. Image Features As Virtual Beacons For Local Navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, Antonie J.

    1989-03-01

    A technique for dynamic position correction using image features as virtual beacons is described. An algorithm which acquires new features, computes robot position correction vectors from tracked features, and maintains feature reliability statistics is detailed. The algorithm minimizes the use of matching to reduce computational expense and increase robustness. The principal inputs to the algorithm are the relative bearings observed between feature pairs. Unlike stereo-vision techniques it does not compute explicit feature range estimates. Unlike the bulk of vision based navigation methods, an accurate position estimate results from the integration of a large number of correction vectors derived from the low level analysis of many images. A control architecture for an autonomous mobile robot which makes use of this positioning technique is discussed. The general navigation problem of positioning, model building, path finding, and path execution is decomposed into local and global navigation. Local navigation is independent of high level representations, it is concerned with the immediately perceivable environment and deals with the bulk of the real-time constraints. Methods for coupling local and global navigation are explored. Simulation results showing the behavior of such a control system are presented. The motivation behind this research is the belief that a substantial subset of the navigation problem can be solved using only information obtained during early vision processing. This technique is expected to be more computationally tractable than methods based on optical flow field determination and more accurate than landmark based navigation methods.

  4. STEREO Space Weather and the Space Weather Beacon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biesecker, D. A.; Webb, D F.; SaintCyr, O. C.

    2007-01-01

    The Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) is first and foremost a solar and interplanetary research mission, with one of the natural applications being in the area of space weather. The obvious potential for space weather applications is so great that NOAA has worked to incorporate the real-time data into their forecast center as much as possible. A subset of the STEREO data will be continuously downlinked in a real-time broadcast mode, called the Space Weather Beacon. Within the research community there has been considerable interest in conducting space weather related research with STEREO. Some of this research is geared towards making an immediate impact while other work is still very much in the research domain. There are many areas where STEREO might contribute and we cannot predict where all the successes will come. Here we discuss how STEREO will contribute to space weather and many of the specific research projects proposed to address STEREO space weather issues. We also discuss some specific uses of the STEREO data in the NOAA Space Environment Center.

  5. Optical Fiber Nanotips Coated with Molecular Beacons for DNA Detection

    PubMed Central

    Giannetti, Ambra; Barucci, Andrea; Cosi, Franco; Pelli, Stefano; Tombelli, Sara; Trono, Cosimo; Baldini, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Optical fiber sensors, thanks to their compactness, fast response and real-time measurements, have a large impact in the fields of life science research, drug discovery and medical diagnostics. In recent years, advances in nanotechnology have resulted in the development of nanotools, capable of entering the single cell, resulting in new nanobiosensors useful for the detection of biomolecules inside living cells. In this paper, we provide an application of a nanotip coupled with molecular beacons (MBs) for the detection of DNA. The MBs were characterized by hybridization studies with a complementary target to prove their functionality both free in solution and immobilized onto a solid support. The solid support chosen as substrate for the immobilization of the MBs was a 30 nm tapered tip of an optical fiber, fabricated by chemical etching. With this set-up promising results were obtained and a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.57 nM was reached, opening up the possibility of using the proposed nanotip to detect mRNAs inside the cytoplasm of living cells. PMID:25919369

  6. Energy-Efficient BOP-Based Beacon Transmission Scheduling in Wireless Sensor Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Eui-Jik; Youm, Sungkwan; Choi, Hyo-Hyun

    Many applications in wireless sensor networks (WSNs) require the energy efficiency and scalability. Although IEEE 802.15.4/Zigbee which is being considered as general technology for WSNs enables the low duty-cycling with time synchronization of all the nodes in network, it still suffer from its low scalability due to the beacon frame collision. Recently, various algorithms to resolve this problem are proposed. However, their manners to implement are somewhat ambiguous and the degradation of energy/communication efficiency is serious by the additional overhead. This paper describes an Energy-efficient BOP-based Beacon transmission Scheduling (EBBS) algorithm. EBBS is the centralized approach, in which a resource-sufficient node called as Topology Management Center (TMC) allocates the time slots to transmit a beacon frame to the nodes and manages the active/sleep schedules of them. We also propose EBBS with Adaptive BOPL (EBBS-AB), to adjust the duration to transmit beacon frames in every beacon interval, adaptively. Simulation results show that by using the proposed algorithm, the energy efficiency and the throughput of whole network can be significantly improved. EBBS-AB is also more effective for the network performance when the nodes are uniformly deployed on the sensor field rather than the case of random topologies.

  7. A dual molecular beacon approach for fast detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chuan-Xing; Zhao, Zi-Yun; Lv, Jian-Xin; Zhu, Ling

    2013-02-01

    The main objectives of this study were to assess a dual molecular beacon approach for fast detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MT). MT beacon (Tb-B) was designed to target the unique IS6110 (114 bp) and rpoB (215 bp) fragment of the MT (H37Ra) genome, and the two fragments were inserted into the PMD-19T vector after purification, by PCR and sequencing, to construct plasmids. Different dilutions of positive plasmid standards were used for dual molecular beacon RT-PCR of rpoB and IS6110, and standard curves were established.The results show that the dual molecular beacon of rpoB and IS6110 detecting MT was stable (CV is 1.91-2.68 %) with a high amplification efficiency (95.6 %). In addition, the strains of non MT did not generate fluorescence signals, while strains of MT did, indicating that the primers and molecular beacons were specific, and only MT complex was amplified. The linear range was wide (10(3)-10(11) copies/mL), and clinical specimens presenting different bacterial counts can be detected.

  8. Quencher-free molecular beacon tethering 7-hydroxycoumarin detects targets through protonation/deprotonation.

    PubMed

    Kashida, Hiromu; Yamaguchi, Kyohei; Hara, Yuichi; Asanuma, Hiroyuki

    2012-07-15

    In this study, we synthesized a simple but efficient quencher-free molecular beacon tethering 7-hydroxycoumarin on D-threoninol based on its pK(a) change. The pK(a) of 7-hydroxycoumarin in a single strand was determined as 8.8, whereas that intercalated in the duplex was over 10. This large pK(a) shift (more than 1.2) upon hybridization could be attributed to the anionic and hydrophobic microenvironment inside the DNA duplex. Because 7-hydroxycoumarin quenches its fluorescence upon protonation, the emission intensity of the duplex at pH 8.5 was 1/15 that of the single strand. We applied this quenching mechanism to the preparation of a quencher-free molecular beacon by introducing the dye into the middle of the stem part. In the absence of the target, the stem region formed a duplex and fluorescence was quenched. However, when the target was added, the molecular beacon opened and the dye was deprotonated. As a result, the emission intensity of the molecular beacon with the target was 10 times higher than that without the target. Accordingly, a quencher-free molecular beacon utilizing the pK(a) change was successfully developed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. In vitro quantification of specific microRNA using molecular beacons

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Meredith B.; Bao, Gang; Searles, Charles D.

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), a class of non-coding RNAs, have become a major focus of molecular biology research because of their diverse genomic origin and ability to regulate an array of cellular processes. Although the biological functions of miRNA are yet to be fully understood, tissue levels of specific miRNAs have been shown to correlate with pathological development of disease. Here, we demonstrate that molecular beacons can readily distinguish mature- and pre-miRNAs, and reliably quantify miRNA expression. We found that molecular beacons with DNA, RNA and combined locked nucleic acid (LNA)–DNA backbones can all detect miRNAs of low (<1 nM) concentrations in vitro, with RNA beacons having the highest detection sensitivity. Furthermore, we found that molecular beacons have the potential to distinguish miRNAs that have slight variations in their nucleotide sequence. These results suggest that the molecular beacon-based approach to assess miRNA expression and distinguish mature and precursor miRNA species is quite robust, and has the promise for assessing miRNA levels in biological samples. PMID:22110035

  10. DNA Duplex-Based Photodynamic Molecular Beacon for Targeted Killing of Retinoblastoma Cell.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yanchun; Lu, Cuixia; Chen, Qun; Xing, Da

    2016-11-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB) is the most common primary intraocular malignancy of infancy. An alternative RB treatment protocol is proposed and tested. It is based on a photodynamic therapy (PDT) with a designed molecular beacon that specifically targets the murine double minute x (MDMX) high-expressed RB cells. A MDMX mRNA triggered photodynamic molecular beacon is designed by binding a photosensitizer molecule (pyropheophorbide-a, or PPa) and a black hole quencher-3 (BHQ3) through a complementary oligonucleotide sequence. Cells with and without MDMX high-expression are incubated with the beacon and then irradiated with a laser. The fluorescence and reactive oxygen species are detected in solution to verify the specific activation of PPa by the perfectly matched DNA targets. The cell viabilities are evaluated with CCK-8 and flow cytometry assay. The fluorescence and photo-cytoxicity of PPa is recovered and significantly higher in the MDMX high-expressed Y79 and WERI-Rb1 cells, compared to that with the MDMX low-expressed cells. The synthesized beacon exhibits high PDT efficiency toward MDMX high-expressed RB cells. The data suggest that the designed beacon may provide a potential alternative for RB therapy and secures the ground for future investigation.

  11. A spiral wave front beacon for underwater navigation: transducer prototypes and testing.

    PubMed

    Dzikowicz, Benjamin R; Hefner, Brian T

    2012-05-01

    Transducers for acoustic beacons which can produce outgoing signals with wave fronts whose horizontal cross sections are circular or spiral are studied experimentally. A remote hydrophone is used to determine its aspect relative to the transducers by comparing the phase of the circular signal to the phase of the spiral signal. The transducers for a "physical-spiral" beacon are made by forming a strip of 1-3 piezocomposite transducer material around either a circular or spiral backing. A "phased-spiral" beacon is made from an array of transducer elements which can be driven either in phase or staggered out of phase so as to produce signals with either a circular or spiral wave front. Measurements are made to study outgoing signals and their usefulness in determining aspect angle. Vertical beam width is also examined and phase corrections applied when the hydrophone is out of the horizontal plane of the beacon. While numerical simulations indicate that the discontinuity in the physical-spiral beacon introduces errors into the measured phase, damping observed at the ends of the piezocomposite material is a more significant source of error. This damping is also reflected in laser Doppler vibrometer measurements of the transducer's surface velocity.

  12. "Molecular beacon"-based fluorescent assay for selective detection of glutathione and cysteine.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hui; Hepel, Maria

    2011-02-01

    We report on the development of a fluorescence turn-on "molecular beacon" probe for the detection of glutathione (GSH) and cysteine (Cys). The method is based on a competitive ligation of Hg(2+) ions by GSH/Cys and thymine-thymine (T-T) mismatches in a DNA strand of the self-hybridizing beacon strand. The assay relies on the distance-dependent optical properties of the fluorophore/quencher pair attached to the ends of the molecular beacon DNA strand. In a very selective coordination of Hg(2+) to GSH/Cys, the fluorophore/quencher distance increases concomitantly with the dehybridization and dissociation of the beacon stem T-Hg(2+)-T due to the extraction of Hg(2+) ions. This process results in switching the molecular beacon to the "on" state. The concentration range of the probe is 4-200 nM with the limit of detection (LOD) of 4.1 nM for GSH and 4.2 nM Cys. The probe tested satisfactorily against interference for a range of amino acids including sulfur-containing methionine.

  13. Comparison of COMPARE and BEACON subcompartment analyses of Battelle-Frankfurt containment tests. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Idar, E.S.; Lime, J.F.; Gido, R.G.

    1983-01-01

    This report presents the results of computations performed with the COMPARE/MOD1 and BEACON/MOD3 computer codes for selected Battelle-Frankfurt loss-of-coolant accident experiments. COMPARE is used widely to perform nuclear power plant containment subcompartment analyses, and BEACON is an advanced multiphase, multidimensional best-estimate code. The objective of this study was to evaluate the margins of COMPARE calculations by comparing them with BEACON calculations and test data. The calculations were performed for the Battelle-Frankfurt D3, D6, and C9 tests. Descriptions of the two codes and the Battelle-Frankfurt experiments are included. Comparisons of the codes' calculations and experimental data for absolute pressure, differential pressure, and temperature are presented for margin evaluation. Evaluations of the sensitivity of BEACON calculations to variations in model noding, form loss, and vent area modeling are prsesented. Conclusions summarizing the results of the COMPARE margin evaluation and BEACON sensitivity studies are given as well.

  14. The dependence of the anisoplanatic Strehl of a compensated beam on the beacon distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Stroud, P.

    1992-02-07

    There are several applications for lasers where the effect of atmospheric turbulence is strong enough to require wavefront compensation, and the compensation can be made by an adaptive optics (AO) system which processes light returned from the target itself. The distribution of the target return light produces limitations to the performance of the AO system. The primary intent of this documentation is to present the new results of an analysis of the anisoplanatic effects arising from target return beacon geometries. It will also lay out the assumptions and steps in the analysis, so that the results can be validated or extended. The intent is to provide a self-consistent notation, simple physical interpretations of the mathematical formulations, and enough detail to reduce the investment of time required to become acquainted or reacquainted with the physics of laser propagation through turbulence, at a level needed to analyze anisoplanatic effects. A general formulation has been developed to calculate the anisoplanatic Strehl of a compensated beam for any beacon distribution and turbulence profile. Numerical calculations are also shown for several beacon geometries and turbulence profiles. The key result is that the spread of the beacon distribution has a much less deleterious effect than does the offset of the beacon centroid from the aimpoint.

  15. The dependence of the anisoplanatic Strehl of a compensated beam on the beacon distribution. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Stroud, P.

    1992-02-07

    There are several applications for lasers where the effect of atmospheric turbulence is strong enough to require wavefront compensation, and the compensation can be made by an adaptive optics (AO) system which processes light returned from the target itself. The distribution of the target return light produces limitations to the performance of the AO system. The primary intent of this documentation is to present the new results of an analysis of the anisoplanatic effects arising from target return beacon geometries. It will also lay out the assumptions and steps in the analysis, so that the results can be validated or extended. The intent is to provide a self-consistent notation, simple physical interpretations of the mathematical formulations, and enough detail to reduce the investment of time required to become acquainted or reacquainted with the physics of laser propagation through turbulence, at a level needed to analyze anisoplanatic effects. A general formulation has been developed to calculate the anisoplanatic Strehl of a compensated beam for any beacon distribution and turbulence profile. Numerical calculations are also shown for several beacon geometries and turbulence profiles. The key result is that the spread of the beacon distribution has a much less deleterious effect than does the offset of the beacon centroid from the aimpoint.

  16. 75 FR 20364 - Public Buildings Service; Key Largo Beacon Annex Site; Key Largo, FL; Transfer of Property

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION Public Buildings Service; Key Largo Beacon Annex Site; Key Largo, FL; Transfer of Property..., identified as Key Largo Beacon Annex Site, Key Largo, FL to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of...

  17. A molecular beacon-based DNA switch for reversible pH sensing in vesicles and live cells.

    PubMed

    Narayanaswamy, Nagarjun; Nair, Raji R; Suseela, Y V; Saini, Deepak Kumar; Govindaraju, T

    2016-07-05

    In this Communication, a molecular beacon-based DNA switch (LMB) is developed as an efficient and reversible pH sensing probe. Remarkably, LMB exhibited reversible structural transition between the closed (molecular beacon) and open (A-motif) states very efficiently in synthetic vesicles and live cells without the need for any transfection agents.

  18. Polarization Methods of Measuring the Roll Angle of an Object in Motion in Radio Beacon Navigation Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulko, V. L.; Mescheryakov, A. A.

    2016-06-01

    Polarization methods of measuring the roll angle of an object in motion with the help of radio beacon systems are considered. The polarization properties of the beacon signals received on board the object and amplitude-phase processing of their orthogonal polarized components are used to accomplish this goal.

  19. Wide field of view laser beacon system for three-dimensional aircraft position measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweet, L. M.; Miles, R. B.; Webb, S. G.; Wong, E. Y.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents a new wide field of view laser beacon system for measurement, in three dimensions, of aircraft or other remote objects. The system is developed for aircraft collision hazard warning independent of ground-based hardware, as well as for flight research, helicopter-assisted construction and rescue, and robotic manipulation applications. Accurate information describing the relative range, elevation, and azimuth of the aircraft are generated by the sweep of a low-power fan-shaped rotating laser beacon past an array of optical detectors. The system achieves a wide angle of acceptance of laser beacon light through use of compound parabolic concentrators, which collimate the light for spectral filtering to minimize solar interference. An on-board microprocessor system converts the pulse sequence to aircraft position in real time. System reliability and performance are enhanced through narrow pass filtering of the pulse signals, digital logic design to mask spurious signals, and adaptive modulation of trigger threshold levels.

  20. Wide field of view laser beacon system for three-dimensional aircraft position measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweet, L. M.; Miles, R. B.; Webb, S. G.; Wong, E. Y.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents a new wide field of view laser beacon system for measurement, in three dimensions, of aircraft or other remote objects. The system is developed for aircraft collision hazard warning independent of ground-based hardware, as well as for flight research, helicopter-assisted construction and rescue, and robotic manipulation applications. Accurate information describing the relative range, elevation, and azimuth of the aircraft are generated by the sweep of a low-power fan-shaped rotating laser beacon past an array of optical detectors. The system achieves a wide angle of acceptance of laser beacon light through use of compound parabolic concentrators, which collimate the light for spectral filtering to minimize solar interference. An on-board microprocessor system converts the pulse sequence to aircraft position in real time. System reliability and performance are enhanced through narrow pass filtering of the pulse signals, digital logic design to mask spurious signals, and adaptive modulation of trigger threshold levels.

  1. Development of satellite position location system for aircraft and boat distress beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahle, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    An international satellite system for the detection and location of distress beacons carried on aircraft and vessels is in its technical checkout phase. User demonstration and evaluation (D&E) will start in early 1983 and continue for two years. The D&E phase and a subsequent transition period will form the basis for improved search and rescue operations for the 1980's and beyond. The system, called COSPAS/SARSAT, has international participation involving the U.S., Canada, and France as SARSAT members and joint participation with the Soviet Union's COSPAS Project. Norway and the U.K. have recently joined as investigators. Average position location error of the satellite aided processing is expected to be from 10-20KM for the existing 121.5/243 MHz distress beacons and from 2-5KM for experimental beacons transmitting in the 406 MHz band.

  2. A Beacon Interval Shifting Scheme for Interference Mitigation in Body Area Networks

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seungku; Kim, Seokhwan; Kim, Jin-Woo; Eom, Doo-Seop

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the issue of interference avoidance in body area networks (BANs). IEEE 802.15 Task Group 6 presented several schemes to reduce such interference, but these schemes are still not proper solutions for BANs. We present a novel distributed TDMA-based beacon interval shifting scheme that reduces interference in the BANs. A design goal of the scheme is to avoid the wakeup period of each BAN coinciding with other networks by employing carrier sensing before a beacon transmission. We analyze the beacon interval shifting scheme and investigate the proper back-off length when the channel is busy. We compare the performance of the proposed scheme with the schemes presented in IEEE 802.15 Task Group 6 using an OMNeT++ simulation. The simulation results show that the proposed scheme has a lower packet loss, energy consumption, and delivery-latency than the schemes of IEEE 802.15 Task Group 6. PMID:23112639

  3. A beacon interval shifting scheme for interference mitigation in body area networks.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seungku; Kim, Seokhwan; Kim, Jin-Woo; Eom, Doo-Seop

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the issue of interference avoidance in body area networks (BANs). IEEE 802.15 Task Group 6 presented several schemes to reduce such interference, but these schemes are still not proper solutions for BANs. We present a novel distributed TDMA-based beacon interval shifting scheme that reduces interference in the BANs. A design goal of the scheme is to avoid the wakeup period of each BAN coinciding with other networks by employing carrier sensing before a beacon transmission. We analyze the beacon interval shifting scheme and investigate the proper back-off length when the channel is busy. We compare the performance of the proposed scheme with the schemes presented in IEEE 802.15 Task Group 6 using an OMNeT++ simulation. The simulation results show that the proposed scheme has a lower packet loss, energy consumption, and delivery-latency than the schemes of IEEE 802.15 Task Group 6.

  4. Use of Sloppy Molecular Beacon Probes for Identification of Mycobacterial Species ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    El-Hajj, Hiyam H.; Marras, Salvatore A. E.; Tyagi, Sanjay; Shashkina, Elena; Kamboj, Mini; Kiehn, Timothy E.; Glickman, Michael S.; Kramer, Fred Russell; Alland, David

    2009-01-01

    We report here the use of novel “sloppy” molecular beacon probes in homogeneous PCR screening assays in which thermal denaturation of the resulting probe-amplicon hybrids provides a characteristic set of amplicon melting temperature (Tm) values that identify which species is present in a sample. Sloppy molecular beacons possess relatively long probe sequences, enabling them to form hybrids with amplicons from many different species despite the presence of mismatched base pairs. By using four sloppy molecular beacons, each possessing a different probe sequence and each labeled with a differently colored fluorophore, four different Tm values can be determined simultaneously. We tested this technique with 27 different species of mycobacteria and found that each species generates a unique, highly reproducible signature that is unaffected by the initial bacterial DNA concentration. Utilizing this general paradigm, screening assays can be designed for the identification of a wide range of species. PMID:19171684

  5. Visual detection of Akt mRNA in living cell using gold nanoparticle beacon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yi; Tian, Caiping; Li, Siwen; Wang, Zhaohui; Gu, Yueqing

    2014-09-01

    PI3K-Akt signaling pathway plays the key role in cell apoptosis and survival, and the components of PI3K /Akt signaling pathway are often abnormally expressed in human tumors. Therefore, determination of the Akt (protein kinase B, PKB) messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expression is significantly important in understanding the mechanism of tumor progression. In this study, we designed a special hairpin deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) functionalized with gold nanoparticles and fluorescein isothiocyanate(FITC) as a beacon for detecting human Akt mRNA. Spectrofluorometer was used to detect the fluorescence quenching and recovery of the beacons, and laser confocal scanning microscopy was adopted to image Akt mRNA in cells. The results showed that this beacon could sensitively and quantitatively measure the Akt mRNA in living cells . This strategy is potentially useful for the cellular imaging of RNA or protein expression in living cells.

  6. Development of satellite position location system for aircraft and boat distress beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahle, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    An international satellite system for the detection and location of distress beacons carried on aircraft and vessels is in its technical checkout phase. User demonstration and evaluation (D&E) will start in early 1983 and continue for two years. The D&E phase and a subsequent transition period will form the basis for improved search and rescue operations for the 1980's and beyond. The system, called COSPAS/SARSAT, has international participation involving the U.S., Canada, and France as SARSAT members and joint participation with the Soviet Union's COSPAS Project. Norway and the U.K. have recently joined as investigators. Average position location error of the satellite aided processing is expected to be from 10-20KM for the existing 121.5/243 MHz distress beacons and from 2-5KM for experimental beacons transmitting in the 406 MHz band.

  7. Multi-gigabit Free-space Optical Communication System with Bidirectional Beacon Tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arimoto, Yoshinori

    The performance and design highlights of a multi-gigabit free-space optical communication system with fast and accurate beacon tracking are described. In order to achieve high data-rate as well as eye-safety, transmitting laser beam at a 1552 nm wavelength is collimated to be near diffraction limited and the beacon tracker, operated at a 980 nm wavelength with a Si quadrant photodetector, a miniature fast steering mirror and a wideband proportional-integral-derivative (PID) servo controller, is used to detect the receiving beacon direction and to point the transmitting laser beam to the opposite terminal. A preliminary result of a 10-Gbps bidirectional transmission experiment over 1-km distance at Waseda University and the corresponding link analysis are also presented.

  8. Time-Resolved Nucleic Acid Hybridization Beacons Utilizing Unimolecular and Toehold-Mediated Strand Displacement Designs.

    PubMed

    Massey, Melissa; Ancona, Mario G; Medintz, Igor L; Algar, W Russ

    2015-12-01

    Nucleic acid hybridization probes are sought after for numerous assay and imaging applications. These probes are often limited by the properties of fluorescent dyes, prompting the development of new probes where dyes are paired with novel or nontraditional luminescent materials. Luminescent terbium complexes are an example of such a material, and these complexes offer several unique spectroscopic advantages. Here, we demonstrate two nonstem-loop designs for light-up nucleic acid hybridization beacons that utilize time-resolved Förster resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) between a luminescent Lumi4-Tb cryptate (Tb) donor and a fluorescent reporter dye, where time-resolved emission from the dye provides an analytical signal. Both designs are based on probe oligonucleotides that are labeled at their opposite termini with Tb and a fluorescent reporter dye. In one design, a probe is partially blocked with a quencher dye-labeled oligonucleotide, and target hybridization is signaled through toehold-mediated strand displacement and loss of a competitive FRET pathway. In the other design, the intrinsic folding properties of an unblocked probe are utilized in combination with a temporal mechanism for signaling target hybridization. This temporal mechanism is based on a recently elucidated "sweet spot" for TR-FRET measurements and exploits distance control over FRET efficiencies to shift the Tb lifetime within or outside the time-gated detection window for measurements. Both the blocked and unblocked beacons offer nanomolar (femtomole) detection limits, response times on the order of minutes, multiplexing through the use of different reporter dyes, and detection in complex matrices such as serum and blood. The blocked beacons offer better mismatch selectivity, whereas the unblocked beacons are simpler in design. The temporal mechanism of signaling utilized with the unblocked beacons also plays a significant role with the blocked beacons and represents a new and effective

  9. Building and Strengthening Infrastructure for Data Exchange: Lessons from the Beacon Communities

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Gretchen W.; Swietek, Karen; Ubri, Petry S.; Singer, Rachel F.; Lowell, Kristina H.; Miller, Wilhelmine

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The Beacon Community Cooperative Agreement Program supports interventions, including care-delivery innovations, provider performance measurement and feedback initiatives, and tools for providers and consumers to enhance care. Using a learning health system framework, we examine the Beacon Communities’ processes in building and strengthening health IT (HIT) infrastructures, specifically successes and challenges in sharing patient information to improve clinical care. Background: In 2010, the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) launched the three-year program, which provided $250 million to 17 Beacon Communities to invest in HIT and health information exchange (HIE) infrastructure. Beacon Communities used this funding to develop and disseminate HIT-enabled quality improvement practices found effective in particular community and practice environments. Methods: NORC conducted 7 site visits, November 2012–March 2013, selecting Communities to represent diverse program features. From August–October 2013, NORC held discussions with the remaining 10 Communities. Following each visit or discussion, NORC summarized the information gathered, including transcripts, team observations, and other documents the Community provided, to facilitate a within-Community analysis of context and stakeholders, intervention strategies, enabling factors, and challenges. Results: Although each Community designed and implemented data-sharing strategies in a unique environment, similar challenges and enabling factors emerged across the Beacons. From a learning health system perspective, their strategies to build and strengthen data-sharing infrastructures address the following crosscutting priorities: promoting technical advances and innovations by helping providers adapt EHRs for data exchange and performance measurement with customizable IT and offering technical support to smaller, independent providers; engaging key stakeholders; and

  10. Development of an aptamer beacon for detection of interferon-gamma.

    PubMed

    Tuleuova, Nazgul; Jones, Caroline N; Yan, Jun; Ramanculov, Erlan; Yokobayashi, Yohei; Revzin, Alexander

    2010-03-01

    Traditional antibody-based affinity sensing strategies employ multiple reagents and washing steps and are unsuitable for real-time detection of analyte binding. Aptamers, on the other hand, may be designed to monitor binding events directly, in real-time, without the need for secondary labels. The goal of the present study was to design an aptamer beacon for fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based detection of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma)--an important inflammatory cytokine. Variants of DNA aptamer modified with biotin moieties and spacers were immobilized on avidin-coated surfaces and characterized by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The SPR studies showed that immobilization of aptamer via the 3' end resulted in the best binding IFN-gamma (K(d) = 3.44 nM). This optimal aptamer variant was then used to construct a beacon by hybridizing fluorophore-labeled aptamer with an antisense oligonucleotide strand carrying a quencher. SPR studies revealed that IFN-gamma binding with an aptamer beacon occurred within 15 min of analyte introduction--suggesting dynamic replacement of the quencher-complementary strand by IFN-gamma molecules. To further highlight biosensing applications, aptamer beacon molecules were immobilized inside microfluidic channels and challenged with varying concentration of analyte. Fluorescence microscopy revealed low fluorescence in the absence of analyte and high fluorescence after introduction of IFN-gamma. Importantly, unlike traditional antibody-based immunoassays, the signal was observed directly upon binding of analyte without the need for multiple washing steps. The surface immobilized aptamer beacon had a linear range from 5 to 100 nM and a lower limit of detection of 5 nM IFN-gamma. In conclusion, we designed a FRET-based aptamer beacon for monitoring of an inflammatory cytokine-IFN-gamma. In the future, this biosensing strategy will be employed to monitor dynamics of cytokine production by the immune cells.

  11. Building and strengthening infrastructure for data exchange: lessons from the beacon communities.

    PubMed

    Torres, Gretchen W; Swietek, Karen; Ubri, Petry S; Singer, Rachel F; Lowell, Kristina H; Miller, Wilhelmine

    2014-01-01

    The Beacon Community Cooperative Agreement Program supports interventions, including care-delivery innovations, provider performance measurement and feedback initiatives, and tools for providers and consumers to enhance care. Using a learning health system framework, we examine the Beacon Communities' processes in building and strengthening health IT (HIT) infrastructures, specifically successes and challenges in sharing patient information to improve clinical care. In 2010, the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) launched the three-year program, which provided $250 million to 17 Beacon Communities to invest in HIT and health information exchange (HIE) infrastructure. Beacon Communities used this funding to develop and disseminate HIT-enabled quality improvement practices found effective in particular community and practice environments. NORC conducted 7 site visits, November 2012-March 2013, selecting Communities to represent diverse program features. From August-October 2013, NORC held discussions with the remaining 10 Communities. Following each visit or discussion, NORC summarized the information gathered, including transcripts, team observations, and other documents the Community provided, to facilitate a within-Community analysis of context and stakeholders, intervention strategies, enabling factors, and challenges. Although each Community designed and implemented data-sharing strategies in a unique environment, similar challenges and enabling factors emerged across the Beacons. From a learning health system perspective, their strategies to build and strengthen data-sharing infrastructures address the following crosscutting priorities: promoting technical advances and innovations by helping providers adapt EHRs for data exchange and performance measurement with customizable IT and offering technical support to smaller, independent providers; engaging key stakeholders; and fostering transparent governance and stewardship

  12. Results from the northern New Mexico satellite-beacon radio interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Carlos, R.; Jacobson, A.; Massey, R.; Wu, G.

    1994-09-01

    An interferometer described in the Boston, 1992, meeting of the Beacon Satellite Symposium has been in full operation for over a year now. It consists of four autonomous stations; three are in a triangle 70 km on a side and one is in the center. The stations receive the VHF beacons from two geosynchronous satellites, GOES-2 and ATS-3. The phases of the beacons are tracked at each station by referring them to an extremely stable rubidium oscillator. The studies of the two satellites are virtually separate experiments. The received phase of the beacon is retarded by the increased Total-Electron-Content of the dense regions of waves in the ionosphere. By comparing the phase history at four spatially separated stations, the authors can determine the two-dimensional propagation vector of the waves. This array is optimal for wavelengths of 70--300 km (periods of 300--3,000 seconds). Since the measurement is of the phase of the signal rather than the difference between the O-mode and X-mode phases, and since the beacons are in the VHF rather than in the L-band of GPS beacons, the array is very sensitive. It has a noise level of 10{sup 13} electrons/m{sup 2}, or 10{sup {minus}4} of the normal daytime TEC. This has been verified by operating two stations in the same location, so that they saw the same ionosphere. The first interesting results from a year`s study is that the authors do not see the same TID`s when looking at the two satellites. One conclusion they draw is that they do not see evidence of ionospheric winds.

  13. Development of BEACON technology. Quarterly report, October-December 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-09-01

    The BEACON process involves the catalytic deposition of a highly reactive carbon from a gas stream containing carbon monoxide. The carbon-depleted gas is combusted with air to produce power, and the carbon is reacted with steam to produce methane. Laboratory multicycle tests with K1 and K2 catalysts were completed this quarter. Both catalysts were cycled through 40 deposition and steaming cycles. Both catalysts showed good stability. The K1-based material was found to be more active than the K2-based material, both for carbon deposition and for steaming. Gas conversion proceeded to near-equilibrium levels for both catalysts. Investigation of the effects of multicycle operation and carbon loading levels on catalyst C77-K2 stability continued this quarter. Testing in a 1-inch quartz fluid bed reactor showed no significant catalyst deterioration after 40 cycles at low carbon loadings. However, significant morphology changes occurred at higher carbon loadings. During testing in a new 1-1/2 inch diameter fluid bed reactor, there was evidence of inadequate mixing: large variations in carbon loading within the bed were observed, and the bed plugged at the higher carbon loadings. Multicycle testing of K1 and K2 catalysts continued in the 4-inch diameter fluid bed reactor. The K1 catalyst showed no decrease in catalytic activity after 9-1/2 of the planned 30 cycles. The K2 catalyst showed evidence of contamination from an undetermined source, and testing was discontinued after 9 cycles. A tandem reactor system which will circulate solids between a carbon deposition reactor and a carbon steaming reactor is now being designed for future catalyst testing. 19 figures, 21 tables.

  14. Molecular beacon anchored onto a graphene oxide substrate.

    PubMed

    Darbandi, Arash; Datta, Debopam; Patel, Krunal; Lin, Gary; Stroscio, Michael A; Dutta, Mitra

    2017-09-15

    In this article, we report a graphene oxide-based nanosensor incorporating semiconductor quantum dots linked to DNA-aptamers that functions as a 'turn-off' fluorescent nanosensor for detection of low concentrations of analytes. A specific demonstration of this turn-off aptasensor is presented for the case of the detection of mercury (II) ions. In this system, ensembles of aptamer-based quantum-dot sensors are anchored onto graphene oxide (GO) flakes which provide a platform for analyte detection in the vicinity of GO. Herein, the operation of this ensemble-based nanosensor is demonstrated for mercury ions, which upon addition of mercury, quenching of the emission intensity from the quantum dots is observed due to resonance energy transfer between quantum dots and the gold nanoparticle connected via a mercury target aptamer. A key result is that the usually dominant effect of quenching of the quantum dot due to close proximity to the GO can be reduced to negligible levels by using a linker molecule in conjunctions with the aptamer-based nanosensor. The effect of ionic concentration of the background matrix on the emission intensity was also investigated. The sensor system is found to be highly selective towards mercury and exhibits a linear behavior (r (2) > 0.99) in the nanomolar concentration range. The detection limit of the sensor towards mercury with no GO present was found to be 16.5 nM. With GO attached to molecular beacon via 14 base, 35 base, and 51 base long linker DNA, the detection limit was found to be 38.4 nM, 9.45 nM, and 11.38 nM; respectively.

  15. Molecular beacon anchored onto a graphene oxide substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darbandi, Arash; Datta, Debopam; Patel, Krunal; Lin, Gary; Stroscio, Michael A.; Dutta, Mitra

    2017-09-01

    In this article, we report a graphene oxide-based nanosensor incorporating semiconductor quantum dots linked to DNA-aptamers that functions as a ‘turn-off’ fluorescent nanosensor for detection of low concentrations of analytes. A specific demonstration of this turn-off aptasensor is presented for the case of the detection of mercury (II) ions. In this system, ensembles of aptamer-based quantum-dot sensors are anchored onto graphene oxide (GO) flakes which provide a platform for analyte detection in the vicinity of GO. Herein, the operation of this ensemble-based nanosensor is demonstrated for mercury ions, which upon addition of mercury, quenching of the emission intensity from the quantum dots is observed due to resonance energy transfer between quantum dots and the gold nanoparticle connected via a mercury target aptamer. A key result is that the usually dominant effect of quenching of the quantum dot due to close proximity to the GO can be reduced to negligible levels by using a linker molecule in conjunctions with the aptamer-based nanosensor. The effect of ionic concentration of the background matrix on the emission intensity was also investigated. The sensor system is found to be highly selective towards mercury and exhibits a linear behavior (r 2 > 0.99) in the nanomolar concentration range. The detection limit of the sensor towards mercury with no GO present was found to be 16.5 nM. With GO attached to molecular beacon via 14 base, 35 base, and 51 base long linker DNA, the detection limit was found to be 38.4 nM, 9.45 nM, and 11.38 nM; respectively.

  16. A complementary palette of NanoCluster Beacons.

    PubMed

    Obliosca, Judy M; Babin, Mark C; Liu, Cong; Liu, Yen-Liang; Chen, Yu-An; Batson, Robert A; Ganguly, Mainak; Petty, Jeffrey T; Yeh, Hsin-Chih

    2014-10-28

    NanoCluster Beacons (NCBs), which use few-atom DNA-templated silver clusters as reporters, are a type of activatable molecular probes that are low-cost and easy to prepare. While NCBs provide a high fluorescence enhancement ratio upon activation, their activation colors are currently limited. Here we report a simple method to design NCBs with complementary emission colors, creating a set of multicolor probes for homogeneous, separation-free detection. By systematically altering the position and the number of cytosines in the cluster-nucleation sequence, we have tuned the activation colors of NCBs to green (C8-8, 460 nm/555 nm); yellow (C5-5, 525 nm/585 nm); red (C3-4, 580 nm/635 nm); and near-infrared (C3-3, 645 nm/695 nm). At the same NCB concentration, the activated yellow NCB (C5-5) was found to be 1.3 times brighter than the traditional red NCB (C3-4). Three of the four colors (green, yellow, and red) were relatively spectrally pure. We also found that subtle changes in the linker sequence (down to the single-nucleotide level) could significantly alter the emission spectrum pattern of an NCB. When the length of linker sequences was increased, the emission peaks were found to migrate in a periodic fashion, suggesting short-range interactions between silver clusters and nucleobases. Size exclusion chromatography results indicated that the activated NCBs are more compact than their native duplex forms. Our findings demonstrate the unique photophysical properties and environmental sensitivities of few-atom DNA-templated silver clusters, which are not seen before in common organic dyes or luminescent crystals.

  17. Lunar radio-beacons and geodetic VLBI system for determination of physical libration of the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, Alexander; Hanada, Hideo; Kikuchi, Fuyuhiko; Matsumoto, Koji; Kosov, Alexander; Nefedyev, Yuri; Petrova, Natalia; Ping, Jinsong; Titov, Oleg

    Many space agencies plan a lunar missions, including scientific observations in the near lunar space and/or on the surface of the Moon. One of these experiments propose to place two landers with radio beacons on the Lunar near side and to launch one or more Orbiters on the Lunar orbit. The difference of the distances between two radio beacons and Earth will be assumed to be measured by the methods of Inverse VLBI: radio-signal from the various radio beacons will be sent to Earth antenna systems using the Orbiter. The estimation of the physical libration angle accuracy is made for various location and configuration of the radio beacons, which are in polar or equatorial zones of the Moon. The planned accuracy of difference distance determination for radio beacons at 60- 100 mm and the length of base line of 1700-3400 km in the Inverse VLBI experiment will be sufficient to improve accuracy of lunar physical libration, better than 10-30 msec of arc. Analogous estimation of latitude libration has shown the same results: location of the Radio Beacon I and Radio Beacon II in the vicinity of the Lunar limb equator and the prime meridian will give the best estimations for the physical libration angeles. For radio beacons experiment the best accuracy of longitudinal and latitudinal librations will be achieved in the equatorial limb and polar zones of the Moon. Geodetic VLBI network managed by the International VLBI Service provides high accurate positions of the reference radio sources, radio telescope coordinates, Earth Orientation Parameters (EOP), etc. A small radio telescope being installed on the Moon surface and incorporated to this existing network will help to improve these traditional IVS products by a factor of ten or even more. In addition, this new instrument will be able to detect some known effects with an unprecedented accuracy, and new effects which are not available for other ground-based instruments or space missions. The main navigational task is to

  18. Beacon communities aim to use health information technology to transform the delivery of care.

    PubMed

    Maxson, Emily R; Jain, Sachin H; McKethan, Aaron N; Brammer, Craig; Buntin, Melinda Beeuwkes; Cronin, Kelly; Mostashari, Farzad; Blumenthal, David

    2010-09-01

    The Beacon Community Program, authorized under the 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), aims to demonstrate the potential for health information technology to enable local improvements in health care quality, cost efficiency, and population health. If successful, these communitywide efforts will yield important lessons that will assist other communities seeking to harness technology to achieve and sustain health care improvements. This paper highlights key programmatic details that reflect the meaningful use of technology in the fifteen Beacon communities. It describes the innovations they propose and provides insight into current and future challenges.

  19. A transfection reporter for the prevention of false-negative results in molecular beacon experiments.

    PubMed

    Toga, Tatsuya; Kuraoka, Isao; Yasui, Akira; Iwai, Shigenori

    2013-09-01

    We previously developed a molecular beacon-type probe to detect the strand scission in cellular base excision repair and found that the phosphodiester linkages in the fluorophore/quencher linkers were cleaved. This reaction was applied to a transfection reporter, which contained the unmodified phosphodiester in the linker to another type of fluorophore. After cotransfection of cells with the probe and the reporter, the signals were used to detect the incision and to confirm the proper transfection, respectively. This method will contribute to the prevention of false-negative results in experiments using molecular beacon-type probes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Geostationary-satellite beacon-receiver array for studies of ionospheric irregularities

    SciTech Connect

    Carlos, R.C.; Jacobson, A.R.; Wu, Guanghui.

    1992-01-01

    Ionospheric irregularities can be studied by various techniques. These include widely spaced Doppler sounders or ionosondes, Faraday rotation polarimetry, and two-frequency differential Doppler, and radio interferometry. With geostationary satellites, one usually uses Faraday rotation of the beacon signal to measure the ionospheric TEC. With a network of polarimeters, the horizontal wave parameters of Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances (TIDS) can be deduced, but the shortcoming of this technique is its poor sensitivity. This paper describes a geostationary-satellite beacon-receiver array at Los Alamos, New Mexico, which will be employed for the studying of ionospheric irregularities, especially the fine-scale TIDS.

  1. Geostationary-satellite beacon-receiver array for studies of ionospheric irregularities

    SciTech Connect

    Carlos, R.C.; Jacobson, A.R.; Wu, Guanghui

    1992-09-01

    Ionospheric irregularities can be studied by various techniques. These include widely spaced Doppler sounders or ionosondes, Faraday rotation polarimetry, and two-frequency differential Doppler, and radio interferometry. With geostationary satellites, one usually uses Faraday rotation of the beacon signal to measure the ionospheric TEC. With a network of polarimeters, the horizontal wave parameters of Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances (TIDS) can be deduced, but the shortcoming of this technique is its poor sensitivity. This paper describes a geostationary-satellite beacon-receiver array at Los Alamos, New Mexico, which will be employed for the studying of ionospheric irregularities, especially the fine-scale TIDS.

  2. Health assessment for Beacon Heights Landfill National Priorities List (NPL) Site, Beacon Falls, Connecticut, Region 1. CERCLIS No. CTD001145671. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-26

    The Beacon Heights Landfill National Priorities List (NPL) Site is located in Beacon Falls, Connecticut. From the 1920's to 1979, municipal and industrial wastes were disposed of at the landfill. Leachate from the landfill has migrated into the local groundwater aquifers. Two residential wells to the northwest of the site have been contaminated with site-related contaminants. This site is of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health resulting from possible exposure to hazardous substances at concentrations that may result in adverse health effects. Human exposure to benzene, chlorobenzene, chloroethane, and methylene chloride may have occurred via ingestion, inhalation, and direct dermal contact with contaminated groundwater. No health study follow-up is indicated at this time.

  3. Geologic map of the Beacon Rock quadrangle, Skamania County, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evarts, Russell C.; Fleck, Robert J.

    2017-06-06

    The Beacon Rock 7.5′ quadrangle is located approximately 50 km east of Portland, Oregon, on the north side of the Columbia River Gorge, a scenic canyon carved through the axis of the Cascade Range by the Columbia River. Although approximately 75,000 people live within the gorge, much of the region remains little developed and is encompassed by the 292,500-acre Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area, managed by a consortium of government agencies “to pro­tect and provide for the enhancement of the scenic, cultural, recreational and natural resources of the Gorge and to protect and support the economy of the Columbia River Gorge area.” As the only low-elevation corridor through the Cascade Range, the gorge is a critical regional transportation and utilities corridor (Wang and Chaker, 2004). Major state and national highways and rail lines run along both shores of the Columbia River, which also provides important water access to ports in the agricultural interior of the Pacific Northwest. Transmission lines carry power from hydroelectric facilities in the gorge and farther east to the growing urban areas of western Oregon and Washington, and natural-gas pipelines transect the corridor (Wang and Chaker, 2004). These lifelines are highly vulnerable to disruption by earthquakes, landslides, and floods. A major purpose of the work described here is to identify and map geologic hazards, such as faults and landslide-prone areas, to provide more accurate assessments of the risks associated with these features.The steep canyon walls of the map area reveal exten­sive outcrops of Miocene flood-basalt flows of the Columbia River Basalt Group capped by fluvial deposits of the ances­tral Columbia River, Pliocene lavas erupted from the axis of the Cascade arc to the east, and volcanic rocks erupted from numerous local vents. The Columbia River Basalt Group unconformably rests on a sequence of late Oligocene and early Miocene rocks of the ancestral Cascade volcanic arc

  4. Toxoplasma gondii DNA detection with a magnetic molecular beacon probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shichao; Yao, Cuicui; Wei, Shuoming; Zhang, Jimei; Dai, Zhao; Zheng, Guo; Sun, Bo; Han, Qing; Hu, Fei; Zhou, Hongming

    2008-12-01

    Toxoplasma Gondii infection is widespread in humans worldwide and reported infection rates range from 3%-70%, depending on the populations or geographic areas, and it has been recognized as a potential food safety hazard in our daily life. A magnetic molecular beacon probe (mMBP), based on theory of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), was currently reported to detect Toxoplasma Gondii DNA. Nano-sized Fe3O4 were primarily prepared by coprecipitation method in aqueous phase with NaOH as precipitator, and was used as magnetic core. The qualified coreshell magnetic quantum dots (mQDs), i.e. CdTe(symbol)Fe3O4, were then achieved by layer-by-layer method when mol ratio of Fe3O4/CdTe is 1/3, pH at 6.0, 30 °C, and reactant solution was refluxed for 30 min, the size of mQDs were determined to be 12-15 nm via transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Over 70% overlap between emission spectrum of mQDs and absorbance spectrum of BHQ-2 was observed, this result suggests the synthesized mQDs and BHQ-2 can be utilized as energy donor and energy acceptor, respectively. The sensing probe was fabricated and a stem-loop Toxoplasma Gondii DNA oligonucleotide was labeled with mQDs at the 5' end and BHQ-2 at 3' end, respectively. Target Toxoplasma gondii DNA was detected under conditions of 37 °C, hybridization for 2h, at pH8.0 in Tris-HCl buffer. About 30% recovery of fluorescence intensity was observed via fluorescence spectrum (FS) after the Toxoplasma gondii DNA was added, which suggested that the Toxoplasma Gondii DNA was successfully detected. Specificity investigation of the mMBP indicated that relative low recovery of fluorescence intensity was obtained when the target DNA with one-base pair mismatch was added, this result indicated the high specificity of the sensing probe. Our research simultaneously indicated that mMBP can be conveniently separated from the unhybridized stem-loop DNA and target DNA, which will be meaningful in DNA sensing and purification process.

  5. Fusing Range Measurements from Ultrasonic Beacons and a Laser Range Finder for Localization of a Mobile Robot

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Nak Yong; Kuc, Tae-Yong

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a method for mobile robot localization in a partially unknown indoor environment. The method fuses two types of range measurements: the range from the robot to the beacons measured by ultrasonic sensors and the range from the robot to the walls surrounding the robot measured by a laser range finder (LRF). For the fusion, the unscented Kalman filter (UKF) is utilized. Because finding the Jacobian matrix is not feasible for range measurement using an LRF, UKF has an advantage in this situation over the extended KF. The locations of the beacons and range data from the beacons are available, whereas the correspondence of the range data to the beacon is not given. Therefore, the proposed method also deals with the problem of data association to determine which beacon corresponds to the given range data. The proposed approach is evaluated using different sets of design parameter values and is compared with the method that uses only an LRF or ultrasonic beacons. Comparative analysis shows that even though ultrasonic beacons are sparsely populated, have a large error and have a slow update rate, they improve the localization performance when fused with the LRF measurement. In addition, proper adjustment of the UKF design parameters is crucial for full utilization of the UKF approach for sensor fusion. This study contributes to the derivation of a UKF-based design methodology to fuse two exteroceptive measurements that are complementary to each other in localization. PMID:25970259

  6. Establishment of an accurate and fast detection method using molecular beacons in loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Huang, Simo; Liu, Ningwei; Dong, Derong; Yang, Zhan; Tang, Yue; Ma, Wen; He, Xiaoming; Ao, Da; Xu, Yaqing; Zou, Dayang; Huang, Liuyu

    2017-01-01

    This study established a constant-temperature fluorescence quantitative detection method, combining loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) with molecular beacons. The advantages of LAMP are its convenience and efficiency, as it does not require a thermocycler and results are easily visualized by the naked eye. However, a major disadvantage of current LAMP techniques is the use of indirect evaluation methods (e.g., electrophoresis, SYBR Green I dye, precipitation, hydroxynaphthol blue dye, the turbidimetric method, calcein/Mn2+ dye, and the composite probe method), which cannot distinguish between the desired products and products of nonspecific amplification, thereby leading to false positives. Use of molecular beacons avoids this problem because molecular beacons produce fluorescence signals only when binding to target DNA, thus acting as a direct indicator of amplification products. Our analyses determined the optimal conditions for molecular beacons as an evaluation tool in LAMP: beacon length of 25–45 bp, beacon concentration of 0.6–1 pmol/μL, and reaction temperature of 60–65 °C. In conclusion, we validated a novel molecular beacon loop-mediated isothermal amplification method (MB-LAMP), realizing the direct detection of LAMP product. PMID:28059137

  7. The Roles of Beaconing and Dead Reckoning in Human Virtual Navigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodily, Kent D.; Daniel, Thomas A.; Sturz, Bradley R.

    2012-01-01

    Beaconing is a process in which the distance between a visual landmark and current position is reduced in order to return to a location. In contrast, dead reckoning is a process in which vestibular, kinesthetic and/or optic flow cues are utilized to update speed of movement, elapsed time of movement, and direction of movement to return to a…

  8. Molecular-Beacon Multiplex Real-Time PCR Assay for Detection of Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Gubala, Aneta J.; Proll, David F.

    2006-01-01

    A multiplex real-time PCR assay was developed using molecular beacons for the detection of Vibrio cholerae by targeting four important virulence and regulatory genes. The specificity and sensitivity of this assay, when tested with pure culture and spiked environmental water samples, were high, surpassing those of currently published PCR assays for the detection of this organism. PMID:16957277

  9. Aero-Optic Measurements Using a Laser-Induced Air Breakdown Beacon (PrePrint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-04

    aberrations between the breakdown spark and the wavefront sensor. so Ihal the measured wavcfronts show baseline aherralions produced by the spark and...shown in Fig. 6 fo r different ratios ofji, D, ofthe lens used to collimate the light fro m Ihe beacon. The figure shows Ihal the 01𔃻)"", of the

  10. Time reversal ultrasound focusing to a point away from the beacon location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinelnikov, Yegor; Sutin, Alexander; Gandhi, Gaurav; Sarvazyan, Armen

    2012-10-01

    In percutaneous procedures there is often a need to focus therapeutic ultrasound to a predefined area without affecting surrounding tissues. Focusing based on Time Reversal Acoustics (TRA) principles constitutes a promising approach for generating high intensity ultrasound field tailored to the shape of the predefined area. Conventional TRA technique enables ultrasound focusing only at a site, where there is an ultrasound beacon, e.g. piezo-transducer mounted at the tip of a catheter. We developed a method of steering the focus away from the beacon location. The method is based on the measurements of impulse response (IR) in several reference points and calculating virtual IRs for the points outside the reference beacon location. The IR for the point away from the beacon is constructed based on mathematical extrapolation of the measured reference IRs frequency spectra, particularly phases. The effectiveness of extrapolated TRA focusing is explored experimentally and by computer simulation. Potential applications include ultrasounda-ssisted drug delivery, artery recanalization and tumor ablation.

  11. Leveraging Health IT to Reduce Disparities in Three Underserved Beacon Communities.

    PubMed

    Des Jardins, Terrisca; Drone, Shenetta A; Hashisaka, Susan; Hazzard, Jobyna; Hunt, Susan B; Massey, Kimberly; Rein, Alison; Schachter, Abigail; Turske, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Using health information technology (IT) can potentially address health disparities by increasing access to care, delivering higher-quality care, improving patient-provider communication, and enhancing patient safety. It describes challenges encountered by three underserved Beacon Communities that implemented health IT interventions, including inadequate connectivity infrastructure, technical support, expertise, and financial resources; provider shortages and staff turnover; and equipment theft.

  12. Beacon of Hope: The Promise of Early Head Start for America's Youngest Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lombardi, Joan, Ed.; Bogle, Mary M., Ed.

    2005-01-01

    Between 1995 and 2004, Early Head Start (EHS) grew from 68 to more than 700 programs nationwide, serving more than 62,000 children and securing the program's reputation as a beacon of hope for the nation's low-income families with infants and toddlers. According to a comprehensive 5-year national evaluation of EHS, children who participated in…

  13. The road to excellence: Magnet designation, the Beacon Award, and primary nursing.

    PubMed

    Mondino, Karen

    2005-06-01

    The potential to have a unit based on excellence is within every manager's reach. The ability to submit for the Beacon Award and Magnet hospital designation are two avenues to fulfill that potential. Successes from University of California Davis Medical Center are shared in this article in the hope of inspiring other managers and their staff.

  14. X/X/Ka-band prime focus feed antenna for the Mars Observer beacon spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanton, P.; Reilly, H.; Esquivel, M.

    1988-01-01

    The results of an X/X/Ka-band feed design concept demonstration are presented. The purpose is to show the feasibility of adding a Ka-band beacon to the Mars Observer spacecraft. Scale model radiation patterns were made and analyzed.

  15. Working Together To Build Beacon Centers in San Francisco: Evaluation Findings from 1998-2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Karen E.; Arbreton, Amy J. A.

    The Beacons Initiative aimed to transform eight public schools (five middle schools and three high schools) into youth and family centers in low-income neighborhoods in San Francisco, California. Using a coalition of local partners and funding from public agencies and foundations, the centers served 7,500 youth and adults between July 1, 1999, and…

  16. The New York City Beacons: Rebuilding Communities of Support in Urban Neighborhoods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleinbard, Peter

    2005-01-01

    The first ten New York City Beacons began operation in 1991 as a result of the recommendation of a commission appointed by then-mayor David N. Dinkins. Richard Murphy, commissioner of youth services, led the development and implementation. Michele Cahill served as a consultant in the design and created the Youth Development Institute (YDI) as part…

  17. The Effects of a Rectangular Rapid-Flashing Beacon on Vehicle Speed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanWagner, Michelle; Van Houten, Ron; Betts, Brian

    2011-01-01

    In 2008, nearly 31% of vehicle fatalities were related to failure to adhere to safe vehicle speeds (National Highway Traffic Safety Administration [NHTSA], 2009). The current study evaluated the effect of a rectangular rapid-flashing beacon (RRFB) triggered by excessive speed on vehicle speed using a combined alternating treatments and reversal…

  18. Ag Nanocluster-based Label-Free Catalytic and Molecular Beacons for Amplified Biosensing

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Liang; Kuai, Hailan; Ren, Songlei; Zhao, Xu-Hua; Huan, Shuang-Yan; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Tan, Weihong

    2016-01-01

    By employing DNAzyme as a recognition group and amplifier, and DNA-stabilized silver nanoclusters (DNA/AgNCs) as signal reporters, we for the first time reported a label-free catalytic and molecular beacon as an amplified biosensing platform for highly selective detection of cofactors such as Pb2+ and L-histidine. PMID:26120805

  19. Sequential strand displacement beacon for detection of DNA coverage on functionalized gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Paliwoda, Rebecca E; Li, Feng; Reid, Michael S; Lin, Yanwen; Le, X Chris

    2014-06-17

    Functionalizing nanomaterials for diverse analytical, biomedical, and therapeutic applications requires determination of surface coverage (or density) of DNA on nanomaterials. We describe a sequential strand displacement beacon assay that is able to quantify specific DNA sequences conjugated or coconjugated onto gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). Unlike the conventional fluorescence assay that requires the target DNA to be fluorescently labeled, the sequential strand displacement beacon method is able to quantify multiple unlabeled DNA oligonucleotides using a single (universal) strand displacement beacon. This unique feature is achieved by introducing two short unlabeled DNA probes for each specific DNA sequence and by performing sequential DNA strand displacement reactions. Varying the relative amounts of the specific DNA sequences and spacing DNA sequences during their coconjugation onto AuNPs results in different densities of the specific DNA on AuNP, ranging from 90 to 230 DNA molecules per AuNP. Results obtained from our sequential strand displacement beacon assay are consistent with those obtained from the conventional fluorescence assays. However, labeling of DNA with some fluorescent dyes, e.g., tetramethylrhodamine, alters DNA density on AuNP. The strand displacement strategy overcomes this problem by obviating direct labeling of the target DNA. This method has broad potential to facilitate more efficient design and characterization of novel multifunctional materials for diverse applications.

  20. Improved fixation quality provided by a Bessel beacon in an adaptive optics system.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Andrew J; Daly, Elizabeth M; Dainty, Christopher J

    2013-07-01

    We investigate whether a structured probe beam that creates the beacon for use in a retinal imaging adaptive optics system can provide useful side effects. In particular we investigate whether a Bessel beam that is seen by the subject as a set of concentric rings has a dampening effect on fixation variations of the subject under observation. This calming effect would allow longer periods of observation, particularly for patients with abnormal fixation. An experimental adaptive optics system developed for retinal imaging is used to monitor the fluctuations in aberrations for artificial and human subjects. The probe beam is alternated between a traditional beacon and one provided by a Bessel beam created by SLM. Time-frequency analysis is used to indicate the differences in power and time variation during fixation depending on whether the Bessel beam or the traditional beacon is employed. Comparison is made with the response for an artificial eye to discount systemic variations. Significant evidence is accrued to indicate the reduced fluctuations in fixation when the Bessel beam is employed to create the beacon. © 2013 The Authors Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics © 2013 The College of Optometrists.

  1. A Beacon Transmission Power Control Algorithm Based on Wireless Channel Load Forecasting in VANETs.

    PubMed

    Mo, Yuanfu; Yu, Dexin; Song, Jun; Zheng, Kun; Guo, Yajuan

    2015-01-01

    In a vehicular ad hoc network (VANET), the periodic exchange of single-hop status information broadcasts (beacon frames) produces channel loading, which causes channel congestion and induces information conflict problems. To guarantee fairness in beacon transmissions from each node and maximum network connectivity, adjustment of the beacon transmission power is an effective method for reducing and preventing channel congestion. In this study, the primary factors that influence wireless channel loading are selected to construct the KF-BCLF, which is a channel load forecasting algorithm based on a recursive Kalman filter and employs multiple regression equation. By pre-adjusting the transmission power based on the forecasted channel load, the channel load was kept within a predefined range; therefore, channel congestion was prevented. Based on this method, the CLF-BTPC, which is a transmission power control algorithm, is proposed. To verify KF-BCLF algorithm, a traffic survey method that involved the collection of floating car data along a major traffic road in Changchun City is employed. By comparing this forecast with the measured channel loads, the proposed KF-BCLF algorithm was proven to be effective. In addition, the CLF-BTPC algorithm is verified by simulating a section of eight-lane highway and a signal-controlled urban intersection. The results of the two verification process indicate that this distributed CLF-BTPC algorithm can effectively control channel load, prevent channel congestion, and enhance the stability and robustness of wireless beacon transmission in a vehicular network.

  2. Impacts of Fog Characteristics, Forward Illumination, and Warning Beacon Intensity Distribution on Roadway Hazard Visibility

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Warning beacons are critical for the safety of transportation, construction, and utility workers. These devices need to produce sufficient luminous intensity to be visible without creating glare to drivers. Published standards for the photometric performance of warning beacons do not address their performance in conditions of reduced visibility such as fog. Under such conditions light emitted in directions other than toward approaching drivers can create scattered light that makes workers and other hazards less visible. Simulations of visibility of hazards under varying conditions of fog density, forward vehicle lighting, warning beacon luminous intensity, and intensity distribution were performed to assess their impacts on visual performance by drivers. Each of these factors can influence the ability of drivers to detect and identify workers and hazards along the roadway in work zones. Based on the results, it would be reasonable to specify maximum limits on the luminous intensity of warning beacons in directions that are unlikely to be seen by drivers along the roadway, limits which are not included in published performance specifications. PMID:27314058

  3. Rapid identification of Candida dubliniensis using a species-specific molecular beacon.

    PubMed

    Park, S; Wong, M; Marras, S A; Cross, E W; Kiehn, T E; Chaturvedi, V; Tyagi, S; Perlin, D S

    2000-08-01

    Candida dubliniensis is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that has been linked to oral candidiasis in AIDS patients, although it has recently been isolated from other body sites. DNA sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) region of rRNA genes from reference Candida strains was used to develop molecular beacon probes for rapid, high-fidelity identification of C. dubliniensis as well as C. albicans. Molecular beacons are small nucleic acid hairpin probes that brightly fluoresce when they are bound to their targets and have a significant advantage over conventional nucleic acid probes because they exhibit a higher degree of specificity with better signal-to-noise ratios. When applied to an unknown collection of 23 strains that largely contained C. albicans and a smaller amount of C. dubliniensis, the species-specific probes were 100% accurate in identifying both species following PCR amplification of the ITS2 region. The results obtained with the molecular beacons were independently verified by random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis-based genotyping and by restriction enzyme analysis with enzymes BsmAI and NspBII, which cleave recognition sequences within the ITS2 regions of C. dubliniensis and C. albicans, respectively. Molecular beacons are promising new probes for the rapid detection of Candida species.

  4. The Effects of a Rectangular Rapid-Flashing Beacon on Vehicle Speed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanWagner, Michelle; Van Houten, Ron; Betts, Brian

    2011-01-01

    In 2008, nearly 31% of vehicle fatalities were related to failure to adhere to safe vehicle speeds (National Highway Traffic Safety Administration [NHTSA], 2009). The current study evaluated the effect of a rectangular rapid-flashing beacon (RRFB) triggered by excessive speed on vehicle speed using a combined alternating treatments and reversal…

  5. The New York City Beacons: Rebuilding Communities of Support in Urban Neighborhoods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleinbard, Peter

    2005-01-01

    The first ten New York City Beacons began operation in 1991 as a result of the recommendation of a commission appointed by then-mayor David N. Dinkins. Richard Murphy, commissioner of youth services, led the development and implementation. Michele Cahill served as a consultant in the design and created the Youth Development Institute (YDI) as part…

  6. Beacon of Hope: The Promise of Early Head Start for America's Youngest Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lombardi, Joan, Ed.; Bogle, Mary M., Ed.

    2005-01-01

    Between 1995 and 2004, Early Head Start (EHS) grew from 68 to more than 700 programs nationwide, serving more than 62,000 children and securing the program's reputation as a beacon of hope for the nation's low-income families with infants and toddlers. According to a comprehensive 5-year national evaluation of EHS, children who participated in…

  7. A Beacon Transmission Power Control Algorithm Based on Wireless Channel Load Forecasting in VANETs

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Yuanfu; Yu, Dexin; Song, Jun; Zheng, Kun; Guo, Yajuan

    2015-01-01

    In a vehicular ad hoc network (VANET), the periodic exchange of single-hop status information broadcasts (beacon frames) produces channel loading, which causes channel congestion and induces information conflict problems. To guarantee fairness in beacon transmissions from each node and maximum network connectivity, adjustment of the beacon transmission power is an effective method for reducing and preventing channel congestion. In this study, the primary factors that influence wireless channel loading are selected to construct the KF-BCLF, which is a channel load forecasting algorithm based on a recursive Kalman filter and employs multiple regression equation. By pre-adjusting the transmission power based on the forecasted channel load, the channel load was kept within a predefined range; therefore, channel congestion was prevented. Based on this method, the CLF-BTPC, which is a transmission power control algorithm, is proposed. To verify KF-BCLF algorithm, a traffic survey method that involved the collection of floating car data along a major traffic road in Changchun City is employed. By comparing this forecast with the measured channel loads, the proposed KF-BCLF algorithm was proven to be effective. In addition, the CLF-BTPC algorithm is verified by simulating a section of eight-lane highway and a signal-controlled urban intersection. The results of the two verification process indicate that this distributed CLF-BTPC algorithm can effectively control channel load, prevent channel congestion, and enhance the stability and robustness of wireless beacon transmission in a vehicular network. PMID:26571042

  8. Experimental Demonstration of Real Time Gradient Gain Correction for Sodium Beacon Laser Guide Star: Postprint

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    required IVFS gaillS. Tr~~.f" <UN" In •. ond y·le. cbfcng Ipet ~ "[ , . b a • · d c " - .............. ,..., - , .. _"" .. -,..., Fig. 4...The.l:- {///{/ y- IVFS gaills are difJerelll. Figure 5 shows ACS software simulation data for a high resolution SH camera for sodium beacon LGS with

  9. The Roles of Beaconing and Dead Reckoning in Human Virtual Navigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodily, Kent D.; Daniel, Thomas A.; Sturz, Bradley R.

    2012-01-01

    Beaconing is a process in which the distance between a visual landmark and current position is reduced in order to return to a location. In contrast, dead reckoning is a process in which vestibular, kinesthetic and/or optic flow cues are utilized to update speed of movement, elapsed time of movement, and direction of movement to return to a…

  10. Visual detection of STAT5B gene expression in living cell using the hairpin DNA modified gold nanoparticle beacon.

    PubMed

    Xue, Jianpeng; Shan, Lingling; Chen, Haiyan; Li, Yang; Zhu, Hongyan; Deng, Dawei; Qian, Zhiyu; Achilefu, Samuel; Gu, Yueqing

    2013-03-15

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5B (STAT5B) is an important protein in JAK-STAT signaling pathway that is responsible for the metastasis and proliferation of tumor cells. Determination of the STAT5B messenger Ribonucleic Acid (mRNA) relating to the STAT5B expression provides insight into the mechanism of tumor progression. In this study, we designed and used a special hairpin deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) for human STAT5B mRNA to functionalize gold nanoparticles, which served as a beacon for detecting human STAT5B expression. Up to 90% quenching efficiency was achieved. Upon hybridizing with the target mRNA, the hairpin DNA modified gold nanoparticle beacons (hDAuNP beacons) release the fluorophores attached at 5' end of the oligonucleotide sequence. The fluorescence properties of the beacon before and after the hybridization with the complementary DNA were confirmed in vitro. The stability of hDAuNP beacons against degradation by DNase I and GSH indicated that the prepared beacon is stable inside cells. The detected fluorescence in MCF-7 cancer cells correlates with the specific STAT5B mRNA expression, which is consistent with the result from PCR measurement. Fluorescence microscopy showed that the hDAuNP beacons internalized in cells without using transfection agents, with intracellular distribution in the cytoplasm rather than the nucleus. The results demonstrated that this beacon could directly provide quantitative measurement of the intracellular STAT5B mRNA in living cells. Compared to the previous approaches, this beacon has advantages of higher target to background ratio of detection and an increased resistance to nuclease degradation. The strategy reported in this study is a promising approach for the intracellular measurement of RNA or protein expression in living cells, and has great potential in the study of drug screening and discovery. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Low cost high efficiency GaAs monolithic RF module for SARSAT distress beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, W. C.; Siu, D. P.; Cook, H. F.

    1991-01-01

    Low cost high performance (5 Watts output) 406 MHz beacons are urgently needed to realize the maximum utilization of the Search and Rescue Satellite-Aided Tracking (SARSAT) system spearheaded in the U.S. by NASA. Although current technology can produce beacons meeting the output power requirement, power consumption is high due to the low efficiency of available transmitters. Field performance is currently unsatisfactory due to the lack of safe and reliable high density batteries capable of operation at -40 C. Low cost production is also a crucial but elusive requirement for the ultimate wide scale utilization of this system. Microwave Monolithics Incorporated (MMInc.) has proposed to make both the technical and cost goals for the SARSAT beacon attainable by developing a monolithic GaAs chip set for the RF module. This chip set consists of a high efficiency power amplifier and a bi-phase modulator. In addition to implementing the RF module in Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) form to minimize ultimate production costs, the power amplifier has a power-added efficiency nearly twice that attained with current commercial technology. A distress beacon built using this RF module chip set will be significantly smaller in size and lighter in weight due to a smaller battery requirement, since the 406 MHz signal source and the digital controller have far lower power consumption compared to the 5 watt power amplifier. All the program tasks have been successfully completed. The GaAs MMIC RF module chip set has been designed to be compatible with the present 406 MHz signal source and digital controller. A complete high performance low cost SARSAT beacon can be realized with only additional minor iteration and systems integration.

  12. Double-hairpin molecular-beacon-based amplification detection for gene diagnosis linked to cancer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huo; Zhang, Rongbo; Li, Feng; Zhou, Yingying; Peng, Ting; Wang, Xuedong; Shen, Zhifa

    2016-09-01

    A powerful double-hairpin molecular beacon (DHMB) was developed for cancer-related KRAS gene detection based on the one-to-two stoichiometry. During target DNA detection, DHMB can execute signal transduction even if no any exogenous element is involved. Unlike the conventional molecular beacon based on the one-to-one interaction, one target DNA not only hybridizes with one DHMB and opens its hairpin but also promotes the interaction between two DHMBs, causing the separation of two fluorophores from quenchers. This leads to an enhanced fluorescence signal. As a result, the target KRAS gene is able to be detected within a wide dynamic range from 0.05 to 200 nM with the detection limit of 50 pM, indicating a dramatic improvement compared with traditional molecular beacons. Moreover, the point mutations existing in target DNAs can be easily screened. The potential application for target species in real samples was indicated by the analysis of PCR amplicons of DNAs from the DNA extracted from SW620 cell. Besides becoming a promising candidate probe for molecular biology research and clinical diagnosis of genetic diseases, the DHMB is expected to provide a significant insight into the design of DNA probe-based homogenous sensing systems. Graphical Abstract A powerful double-hairpin molecular beacon (DHMB) was developed for cancer-related gene KRAS detection based on the one-to-two stoichiometry. Without the help of any exogenous probe, the point mutation is easily screened, and the target DNA can be quantified down to 50 pM, indicating a dramatic improvement compared with traditional molecular beacons.

  13. Dual Functional Roles of Molecular Beacon as a MicroRNA Detector and Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Li, Wai Ming; Chan, Ching-Man; Miller, Andrew L; Lee, Chow H

    2017-03-03

    MicroRNAs are essential in many cellular processes. The ability to detect microRNAs is important for understanding its function and biogenesis. This study is aimed at using a molecular beacon to detect miR-430 in developing zebrafish embryos as a proof of principle. miR-430 is crucial for the clearance of maternal mRNA during maternal zygotic transition in embryonic development. Despite its known function, the temporal and spatial expression of miR-430 remains unclear. We used various imaging techniques, including laser scanning confocal microscopy, spinning disk, and lightsheet microscopy, to study the localization of miR-430 and any developmental defects possibly caused by the molecular beacon. Our results show that miR-430 is expressed early in development and is localized in distinct cytoplasmic granules where its target mRNA can be detected. We also show that the designed molecular beacon can inhibit the function of miR-430 and cause developmental defect in the brain, notochord, heart, and kidney, depending on the delivery site within the embryo, suggesting that miR-430 plays a diverse role in embryonic morphogenesis. When compared with morpholino, molecular beacon is 2 orders of magnitude more potent in inhibiting miR-430. Thus, our results reveal that in addition to being used as a valuable tool for the detection of microRNAs in vivo, molecular beacons can also be employed to inhibit microRNAs in a specific manner. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. BEACON/MOD: a computer program for thermal-hydraulic analysis of nuclear reactor containments - user's manual

    SciTech Connect

    Broadus, C.R.; Doyle, R.J.; James, S.W.; Lime, J.F.; Mings, W.J.

    1980-04-01

    The BEACON code is a best-estimate, advanced containment code designed to perform a best-estimate analysis of the flow of a mixture of air, water, and steam in a nuclear reactor containment system under loss-of-coolant accident conditions. The code can simulate two-component, two-phase fluid flow in complex geometries using a combination of two-dimensional, one-dimensional, and lumped-parameter representations for the various parts of the system. The current version of BEACON, which is designated BEACON/MOD3, contains mass and heat transfer models for wall film and wall conduction. It is suitable for the evaluation of short-term transients in dry-containment systems. This manual describes the models employed in BEACON/MOD3 and specifies code implementation requirements. It provides application information for input data preparation and for output data interpretation.

  15. Conceptual development of a ground-based radio-beacon navigation system for use on the surface of the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beggins, Andrew J.; Canney, Lora M.; Dolezal, Anna Belle

    1988-01-01

    A spread-spectrum radio-beacon navigation system for use on the lunar surface is described. The subjects discussed are principle of operation and specifications to include power requirements, operating frequencies, weight, size, and range.

  16. The 406 MHz ELT/EPIRBs. [Emergency Locator Transmitters/Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacons (ELT/EPIRB)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flatow, F. S.; Gal, C.; Hayes, E. J.

    1984-01-01

    Specifications for the COSPAS/SARSAT beacons are presented and related design considerations are discussed. Critical design aspects having significant impact on cost and performance are highlighted. Among these is the oscillator, whose frequency drift specifications require stabilization by ovens or digital control. Design options are presented and their impact on cost and performance assessed. Beacon designs developed to meet COSPAS/SARSAT specifications are shown.

  17. Detection of SNP-containing human DNA sequences using a split sensor with a universal molecular beacon reporter.

    PubMed

    Gerasimova, Yulia V; Ballantyne, Jack; Kolpashchikov, Dmitry M

    2013-01-01

    Hybridization-based techniques have been extensively employed for the analysis of specific DNA/RNA sequences. Herein, we describe highly specific inexpensive smart hybridization-based sensor that takes advantage of a universal molecular beacon probe as a fluorescent reporter. The sensor has a straightforward design, and demonstrates improved selectivity and specificity of nucleic acid recognition. It is cost-efficient since it utilizes the same molecular beacon probe for the analysis of many nucleic acid sequences.

  18. Traveling-Wave Tube Amplifier Second Harmonic as Millimeter-Wave Beacon Source for Atmospheric Propagation Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Wintucky, Edwin G.

    2014-01-01

    The design and test results of a novel waveguide multimode directional coupler for a CW millimeter-wave satellite beacon source are presented. The coupler separates the second harmonic power from the fundamental output power of a traveling-wave tube amplifier. A potential application of the beacon source is for investigating the atmospheric effects on Q-band (37 to 42 GHz) and VW-band (71 to 76 GHz) satellite-to-ground signals.

  19. Traveling-Wave Tube Amplifier Second Harmonic as Millimeter-Wave Beacon Source for Atmospheric Propagation Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Wintucky, Edwin G.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the design and test results of a CW millimeter-wave satellite beacon source, based on the second harmonic from a traveling-wave tube amplifier and utilizes a novel waveguide multimode directional coupler. A potential application of the beacon source is for investigating the atmospheric effects on Q-band (37 to 42 GHz) and V/W-band (71 to 76 GHz) satellite-to-ground signals.

  20. Traveling-Wave Tube Amplifier Second Harmonic as Millimeter-Wave Beacon Source for Atmospheric Propagation Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Wintucky, Edwin G.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the design and test results of a CW millimeter-wave satellite beacon source, based on the second harmonic from a traveling-wave tube amplifier and utilizes a novel waveguide multimode directional coupler. A potential application of the beacon source is for investigating the atmospheric effects on Q-band (37-42 GHz) and V/W-band (71- 76 GHz) satellite-to-ground signals.

  1. The 406 MHz ELT/EPIRBs. [Emergency Locator Transmitters/Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacons (ELT/EPIRB)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flatow, F. S.; Gal, C.; Hayes, E. J.

    1984-01-01

    Specifications for the COSPAS/SARSAT beacons are presented and related design considerations are discussed. Critical design aspects having significant impact on cost and performance are highlighted. Among these is the oscillator, whose frequency drift specifications require stabilization by ovens or digital control. Design options are presented and their impact on cost and performance assessed. Beacon designs developed to meet COSPAS/SARSAT specifications are shown.

  2. The Chemistry of Ethene in the Storm Beacon Region on Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Eleanor S.; Moses, Julianne I.; Fletcher, Leigh N.; Irwin, Patrick G.; Hesman, Brigette E.; Romani , Paul N.

    2014-11-01

    The immense tropospheric storm that erupted in Saturn’s northern spring hemisphere was first observed on 5th December 2010 (Sanchez-Lavega et al. 2011, Nature 475, 71), and displayed typical storm signatures such as lightning activity and clouds (e.g., Fischer et al. 2011, Nature 475, 75). However, Cassini/CIRS also observed an unexpected stratospheric response consisting of elevated temperatures and molecular abundances, which has come to be known as the ‘beacon’ region (Fletcher et al. 2011, Science 332, 1413). Most significantly the abundance of ethene (C2H4; also called ethylene) was observed to have increased by a factor of ~100 in the stratospheric beacon region in May 2011, compared with photochemical models and observations from the same latitude before the storm (Hesman et al. 2012, ApJ. 760, 24). Our project seeks to replicate the abundances of C2H4 and other hydrocarbons observed in the Cassini/CIRS beacon data through photochemical modeling. The KINETICS code (Allen et al. 1981, JGR 86, 3617) has been used to solve the 1-D continuity equations for stratospheric hydrocarbon and oxygen species, assuming the "Model C" chemical reaction list of Moses et al. (2005; JGR 110, E08001), and time-variable beacon temperatures, retrieved from the Cassini/CIRS data by Fletcher et al. (2012; Icarus 221, 560). The models predict a greatly increased C2H4 abundance in the high-temperature beacon regions, with a distinct mixing-ratio peak near 1 mbar. This increase is the result of a highly temperature-dependent reaction that produces C2H4. No such increases were seen in the model for other major hydrocarbons such as C2H2 and C2H6. The predicted C2H4 emission from our models still falls short of reproducing the observed beacon emission for May 2011, but the multiplicative factor required to scale the model profile to reproduce the CIRS emission has been reduced to a factor of ~5 from the previous factor of ~100. The important chemical production and loss mechanisms

  3. Beacons and surface features differentially influence human reliance on global and local geometric cues when reorienting in a virtual environment.

    PubMed

    Bodily, Kent D; Kilday, Zachary A; Eastman, Caroline K; Gaskin, Katherine A; Graves, April A; Roberts, Jonathan E; Sturz, Bradley R

    2013-02-01

    In the reorientation literature, non-geometric cues include discrete objects (e.g., beacons) and surface-based features (e.g., colors, textures, and odors). To date, these types of non-geometric cues have been considered functionally similar, and it remains unknown whether beacons and surface features differentially influence the extent to which organisms reorient via global and local geometric cues. In the present experiment, we trained human participants to approach a location in a trapezoid-shaped enclosure uniquely specified by global and local geometric cues. We explored the role of beacons on the use of geometric cues by training participants in the presence or absence of uniquely-colored beacons. We explored the role of surface features on the use of geometric cues by recoloring two adjacent walls at the correct location and/or adding a line on the floor which corresponded to the major principal axis of the enclosure. All groups were then tested in novel-shaped enclosures in the absence of unique beacons and surface features to assess the relative use of global and local geometric cues. Results suggested that beacons facilitated the use of global geometric cues, whereas surface features either facilitated or hindered the use of geometric cues, depending on the feature. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Cleavable DNA-protein hybrid molecular beacon: A novel efficient signal translator for sensitive fluorescence anisotropy bioassay.

    PubMed

    Hu, Pan; Yang, Bin

    2016-01-15

    Due to its unique features such as high sensitivity, homogeneous format, and independence on fluorescent intensity, fluorescence anisotropy (FA) assay has become a hotspot of study in oligonucleotide-based bioassays. However, until now most FA probes require carefully customized structure designs, and thus are neither generalizable for different sensing systems nor effective to obtain sufficient signal response. To address this issue, a cleavable DNA-protein hybrid molecular beacon was successfully engineered for signal amplified FA bioassay, via combining the unique stable structure of molecular beacon and the large molecular mass of streptavidin. Compared with single DNA strand probe or conventional molecular beacon, the DNA-protein hybrid molecular beacon exhibited a much higher FA value, which was potential to obtain high signal-background ratio in sensing process. As proof-of-principle, this novel DNA-protein hybrid molecular beacon was further applied for FA bioassay using DNAzyme-Pb(2+) as a model sensing system. This FA assay approach could selectively detect as low as 0.5nM Pb(2+) in buffer solution, and also be successful for real samples analysis with good recovery values. Compatible with most of oligonucleotide probes' designs and enzyme-based signal amplification strategies, the molecular beacon can serve as a novel signal translator to expand the application prospect of FA technology in various bioassays. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluation design and technical assistance opportunities: early findings from the Beacon Community Program evaluation teams.

    PubMed

    Rein, Alison; Kennedy, Hilary; DeCoudres, Ben; Singer Cohen, Rebecca; Sabharwal, Raj; Fairbrother, Gerry

    2012-01-01

    The Beacon Community Cooperative Agreement Program is funding 17 communities to build and strengthen their health information technology (IT) capabilities to enhance care coordination, improve patient and population health, and reduce or restrain costs. Based on the experiences and evidence generated by these communities, the program hopes to illustrate the possibilities of leveraging health IT to achieve desired goals. Doing so requires rigorous evaluation work, which is the subject of this issue brief. Based on semistructured interviews with representatives from each Beacon Community, the brief outlines various study designs, evaluation approaches, outcome measures, and data sources in use. It also identifies some common challenges, including establishing governance models, determining baseline measures, and assessing impact in a relatively constrained timeframe. Technical assistance in disseminating and publishing findings and assessing return on investments will be offered in the coming year.

  6. Method and apparatus for a multibeam beacon laser assembly for optical communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Abhijit (Inventor); Sanji, Babak (Inventor); Wright, Malcolm W. (Inventor); Page, Norman Alan (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An optical beacon is comprised of a telescope having a primary focal plane or Coud? focal plane, a plurality of fiber coupled laser sources for generating a plurality of beams, a collimator for collimating the plurality of beams, and optics for combining and focusing the plurality of collimated beams onto the primary or Coud? focal plane of the telescope. The telescope propagates the optical beacon, which is arranged into a ring of incoherent plurality of collimated beams. The apparatus further comprises fiber splitters coupled to each laser source to provide at least eight beams from at least four laser sources. The optics comprises a prism assembly, a combiner lens, a focusing lens and a field lens for focusing the plurality of collimated beams onto the primary focal plane or Coud? focal plane of the telescope.

  7. Steranes and triterpanes in the Beacon Supergroup samples from southern Victoria Land in Antarctica

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Genki I.; Watanuki, Kunihiko ); Machihara, Tsutomu ); Suzuki, Noriyuki ); Funaki, Minoru )

    1987-10-01

    Steranes and triterpanes in Beacon Supergroup samples (sedimentary rock and silicified wood) from Allan Hills and Carapace Nunatak of southern Victoria Land in Antarctica were studied to elucidate sources of organic materials, sedimentary paleoenvironment and thermal history after deposition. Relative abundances of C{sub 27}, C{sub 28} and C{sub 29} steranes and visual kerogen results of Beacon Supergroup samples from Allan Hills imply that organic materials in the sedimentary paleoenvironments are contributed mainly by vascular plants with some influence of microorganisms, while those of the Carapace Nunatak sample may be largely due to fern spores. The pristane/phytane and pristane/heptadecane ratios of the samples were generally close to unity and between 0.50 and 0.99, respectively, suggesting that the sedimentary paleoenvironment was shallow lacustrine with alternating oxic and anoxic conditions.

  8. Automated Internet-Based Control of Spacecraft Groundstations: Beacon-Based Health Monitoring Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantwell, Brian; Twiggs, Robert; Swartwout, Michael

    1997-01-01

    This report serves as an update about the activities of Stanford University's Space Systems Development Laboratory (SSDL) in their beacon-based health monitoring experiment. Section 1 describes the goals of the project and the organization of the team. Section 2 provides an overview of the major components of the system, describing the general approach of automated health monitoring and the beacon signal relay. It also provides background about the SAPPHIRE spacecraft and ASSET operations system, which will be used for the experiment. Specific details about implementation and status of each element of the experiment are found in Section 3. Section 4 describes the experiment and future work, and references are contained in Section 5.

  9. Multi-Band Multi-Tone Tunable Millimeter-Wave Frequency Synthesizer For Satellite Beacon Transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Wintucky, Edwin G.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the design and test results of a multi-band multi-tone tunable millimeter-wave frequency synthesizer, based on a solid-state frequency comb generator. The intended application of the synthesizer is in a satellite beacon transmitter for radio wave propagation studies at K-band (18 to 26.5 GHz), Q-band (37 to 42 GHz), and E-band (71 to 76 GHz). In addition, the architecture for a compact beacon transmitter, which includes the multi-tone synthesizer, polarizer, horn antenna, and power/control electronics, has been investigated for a notional space-to-ground radio wave propagation experiment payload on a small satellite. The above studies would enable the design of robust high throughput multi-Gbps data rate future space-to-ground satellite communication links.

  10. Mars approach navigation using Doppler and range measurements to surface beacons and orbiting spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thurman, Sam W.; Estefan, Jeffrey A.

    1991-01-01

    Approximate analytical models are developed and used to construct an error covariance analysis for investigating the range of orbit determination accuracies which might be achieved for typical Mars approach trajectories. The sensitivity or orbit determination accuracy to beacon/orbiter position errors and to small spacecraft force modeling errors is also investigated. The results indicate that the orbit determination performance obtained from both Doppler and range data is a strong function of the inclination of the approach trajectory to the Martian equator, for surface beacons, and for orbiters, the inclination relative to the orbital plane. Large variations in performance were also observed for different approach velocity magnitudes; Doppler data in particular were found to perform poorly in determining the downtrack (along the direction of flight) component of spacecraft position. In addition, it was found that small spacecraft acceleration modeling errors can induce large errors in the Doppler-derived downtrack position estimate.

  11. A Telomerase-Specific Doxorubicin-Releasing Molecular Beacon for Cancer Theranostics.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yi; Wang, Zhaohui; Zhang, Min; Han, Zhihao; Chen, Dan; Zhu, Qiuyun; Gao, Weidong; Qian, Zhiyu; Gu, Yueqing

    2016-03-01

    A molecular beacon-based drug delivery system was designed for both detection of telomerase activity in living cells and telomerase-triggered drug release for precise cancer treatment. This system is composed of a gold nanoparticle core densely packed with FITC-labeled hairpin DNA sequences hybridized with telomerase primers. Molecules of the anticancer drug doxorubicin were intercalated into the stem region of the DNA sequence. The presence of telomerase will elongate the primers, leading to inner chain substitution followed by the release of the FITC fluorescence and the trapped doxorubicin. This molecular beacon could specifically distinguish tumor cells and normal cells based on telomerase activity, precisely release doxorubicin in response to telomerase activity in the tumor cells, and prevent toxicity to normal organs. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Design of a K/Q-Band Beacon Receiver for the Alphasat TDP#5 Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morse, Jacquelynne R.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the design and performance of a coherent KQ-band (2040 GHz) beacon receiver developed at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) that will be installed at the Politecnico di Milano (POLIMI) for use in the Alphasat Technology Demonstration Payload 5 (TDP5) beacon experiment. The goal of this experiment is to characterize rain fade attenuation at 40 GHz to improve the performance of existing statistical rain attenuation models in the Q-band. The ground terminal developed by NASA GRC utilizes an FFT-based frequency estimation receiver capable of characterizing total path attenuation effects due to gaseous absorption, clouds, rain, and scintillation. The receiver system has been characterized in the lab and demonstrates a system dynamic range performance of better than 58 dB at 1 Hz and better than 48 dB at 10 Hz rates.

  13. Design of a K/Q-band Beacon Receiver for the Alphasat TDP#5 Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nessel, James A.; Zemba, Michael J.; Morse, Jacquelynne R.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the design and performance of a coherent K/Q-band (20/40GHz) beacon receiver developed at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) that will be installed at the Politecnico di Milano (POLIMI) for use in the Alphasat Technology Demonstration Payload #5 (TDP#5) beacon experiment. The goal of this experiment is to characterize rain fade attenuation at 40GHz to improve the performance of existing statistical rain attenuation models in the Q-band. The ground terminal developed by NASA GRC utilizes an FFT-based frequency estimation receiver capable of characterizing total path attenuation effects due to gaseous absorption, clouds, rain, and scintillation. The receiver system has been characterized in the lab and demonstrates a system dynamic range performance of better than 58dB at 1Hz and better than 48dB at 10Hz rates.

  14. Nanosecond-level time synchronization of AERA using a beacon reference transmitter and commercial airplanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huege, Tim

    2017-03-01

    Radio detection of cosmic-ray air showers requires time synchronization of detectors on a nanosecond level, especially for advanced reconstruction algorithms based on the wavefront curvature and for interferometric analysis approaches. At the Auger Engineering Radio Array, the distributed, autonomous detector stations are time-synchronized via the Global Positioning System which, however, does not provide sufficient timing accuracy. We thus employ a dedicated beacon reference transmitter to correct for eventby-event clock drifts in our offline data analysis. In an independent cross-check of this "beacon correction" using radio pulses emitted by commercial airplanes, we have shown that the combined timing accuracy of the two methods is better than 2 nanoseconds.

  15. Molecular beacon probes combined with amplification by NASBA enable homogeneous, real-time detection of RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Leone, G; van Schijndel, H; van Gemen, B; Kramer, F R; Schoen, C D

    1998-01-01

    Molecular beacon probes can be employed in a NASBA amplicon detection system to generate a specific fluorescent signal concomitantly with amplification. A molecular beacon, designed to hybridize within the target sequence, was introduced into NASBA reactions that amplify the genomic RNA of potato leafroll virus (PLRV). During amplification, the probe anneals to the antisense RNA amplicon generated by NASBA, producing a specific fluorescent signal that can be monitored in real-time. The assay is rapid, sensitive and specific. As RNA amplification and detection can be carried out in unopened vessels, it minimizes the risk of carry-over contaminations. Robustness has been verified on real-world samples. This homogeneous assay, called AmpliDet RNA, is a significant improvement over current detection methods for NASBA amplicons and is suitable for one-tube applications ranging from high-throughput diagnostics to in vivo studies of biological activities. PMID:9547273

  16. Multi-beam laser beacon propagation over lunar distance: comparison of predictions and measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, A.; Piazzolla, S.

    2017-02-01

    A multi-beam beacon was transmitted from the Optical Communication Telescope Laboratory (OCTL) located at Table Mountain, CA to the Lunar Laser Space Terminal (LLST), on-board the Lunar Atmospheric Dust and Environment Explorer (LADEE) spacecraft, during NASA's recent Lunar Laser Communication Demonstration (LLCD). The laser beacon (1568+/-0.1 nm) was square wave modulated and sensed by a quadrant sensor on LLST. While link acquisition and tracking proceeded with the sensed signal, on-board processing extracted power incident on the quadrant sensor and telemetered it down over the optical downlink. Subsequently, post-processing of the codewords received at OCTL retrieved the power time series recorded at LLST. Analysis comparing measured and predicted mean irradiance delivered to LLST consistently agreed to within < 1 decibel (dB). Irradiance fluctuations detected at LLST were reconciled with an uplink wave-propagation simulation model using Kolmogorov phase screens.

  17. Decentralized Single-beacon Acoustic Navigation: Combined Communication and Navigation for Underwater Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    McCarthy 2002 [76] Multi-Beacon Range-Only SLAM P. Newman, J. Leonard 2003 [71] E. Olson, J. Leonard, S. Teller 2006 [72] G. Kantor and S. Singh 2002...error may be underestimated. Kantor and Singh, 2002 [51] This paper presents several estimation methods applied to the problem of robot localiza- tion...2006, vol. 25, ch. Further Results with Localization and Mapping Using Range from Radio, pp. 231–242. [24] J. Djugash, S. Singh, G. Kantor , and W. Zhang

  18. Effect of Coude Pupil Rotation on Sodium Laser Beacon Perspective Elongation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    OF COUDÉ PUPIL ROTATION ON SODIUM LASER BEACON PERSPECTIVE ELONGATION THESIS Presented to the Faculty Department of Electrical and Computer ...comparisons between alternate system configurations. From the computer model, it was determined that accounting for perspective elongation and rotation can...Maj. Jason Schmidt for his willingness to take me on as a student and for sharing his extensive knowledge in adaptive optics and computer simulations

  19. Dynamic omni-directional vision localization using a beacon tracker based on particle filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zuoliang; Liu, Shiyu

    2007-09-01

    Omni-directional vision navigation for AGVs appears definite significant since its advantage of panoramic sight with a single compact visual scene. This unique guidance technique involves target recognition, vision tracking, object positioning, path programming. An algorithm for omni-vision based global localization which utilizes two overhead features as beacon pattern is proposed in this paper. An approach for geometric restoration of omni-vision images has to be considered since an inherent distortion exists. The mapping between image coordinates and physical space parameters of the targets can be obtained by means of the imaging principle on the fisheye lens. The localization of the robot can be achieved by geometric computation. Dynamic localization employs a beacon tracker to follow the landmarks in real time during the arbitrary movement of the vehicle. The coordinate transformation is devised for path programming based on time sequence images analysis. The beacon recognition and tracking are a key procedure for an omni-vision guided mobile unit. The conventional image processing such as shape decomposition, description, matching and other usually employed technique are not directly applicable in omni-vision. Particle filter (PF) has been shown to be successful for several nonlinear estimation problems. A beacon tracker based on Particle Filter which offers a probabilistic framework for dynamic state estimation in visual tracking has been developed. We independently use two Particle Filters to track double landmarks but a composite algorithm on multiple objects tracking conducts for vehicle localization. We have implemented the tracking and localization system and demonstrated the relevant of the algorithm.

  20. Lessons Learned During Implementation and Early Operations of the DS1 Beacon Monitor Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherwood, Rob; Wyatt, Jay; Hotz, Henry; Schlutsmeyer, Alan; Sue, Miles

    1998-01-01

    A new approach to mission operations will be flight validated on NASA's New Millennium Program Deep Space One (DS1) mission which launched in October 1998. The Beacon Monitor Operations Technology is aimed at decreasing the total volume of downlinked engineering telemetry by reducing the frequency of downlink and the volume of data received per pass. Cost savings are achieved by reducing the amount of routine telemetry processing and analysis performed by ground staff. The technology is required for upcoming NASA missions to Pluto, Europa, and possibly some other missions. With beacon monitoring, the spacecraft will assess its own health and will transmit one of four beacon messages each representing a unique frequency tone to inform the ground how urgent it is to track the spacecraft for telemetry. If all conditions are nominal, the tone provides periodic assurance to ground personnel that the mission is proceeding as planned without having to receive and analyze downlinked telemetry. If there is a problem, the tone will indicate that tracking is required and the resulting telemetry will contain a concise summary of what has occurred since the last telemetry pass. The primary components of the technology are a tone monitoring technology, AI-based software for onboard engineering data summarization, and a ground response system. In addition, there is a ground visualization system for telemetry summaries. This paper includes a description of the Beacon monitor concept, the trade-offs with adapting that concept as a technology experiment, the current state of the resulting implementation on DS1, and our lessons learned during the initial checkout phase of the mission. Applicability to future missions is also included.

  1. Developing children's palliative care in Africa through beacon centres: lessons learnt.

    PubMed

    Downing, Julia D; Marston, Joan; Selwyn, Casey; Ross-Gakava, Laura

    2013-02-18

    Much progress has been made in the provision of palliative care across sub-Saharan Africa, however much still remains to be done, particularly in the area of children's palliative care (CPC). The Beacon Centres programme was set up in 2009, aimed at improving access to CPC in South Africa, Uganda and Tanzania through more and better-trained health professionals and CPC clinical services of a high standard. Having identified sites in each country to develop into CPC Beacon Centres, Navigators were identified who would be the 'champions' for CPC in those sites and lead a programme of training, mentorship and support. Five navigators (2 in Uganda and Tanzania and 1 in South Africa) were trained between September and December 2009. Following this they undertook CPC needs assessments at the 3 centres and set up and delivered a six-month CPC training programme, providing mentorship and support to students to enable them to integrate CPC into their workplaces. To date, 188 participants have commenced the six-month course, with 80 having completed it. CPC has been integrated into the activities of the centres and a CPC virtual resource centre set up in South Africa. The achievements from the Beacon project have been great and the work of the navigators immense, but as in all projects it has not been without its challenges. Lessons learnt include issues around: the focus of the project; the length and nature of the training; assessment; accreditation; the choice of navigators; mentoring; administrative support; co-ordination; the choice of project sites; and the integration of CPC into services. The need for CPC is not going to go away and it is therefore important that models of scaling-up are found that are not only practical, feasible, affordable and sustainable, but that focus on the outcome of improved CPC for all those who need it. It is hoped that the lessons shared from the Beacon Project will help in developing and implementing such models.

  2. Increased dose near the skin due to electromagnetic surface beacon transponder.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Kang-Hyun; Manger, Ryan; Halpern, Howard J; Aydogan, Bulent

    2015-05-08

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the increased dose near the skin from an electromagnetic surface beacon transponder, which is used for localization and tracking organ motion. The bolus effect due to the copper coil surface beacon was evaluated with radiographic film measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. Various beam incidence angles were evaluated for both 6 MV and 18 MV experimentally. We performed simulations using a general-purpose Monte Carlo code MCNPX (Monte Carlo N-Particle) to supplement the experimental data. We modeled the surface beacon geometry using the actual mass of the glass vial and copper coil placed in its L-shaped polyethylene terephthalate tubing casing. Film dosimetry measured factors of 2.2 and 3.0 enhancement in the surface dose for normally incident 6 MV and 18 MV beams, respectively. Although surface dose further increased with incidence angle, the relative contribution from the bolus effect was reduced at the oblique incidence. The enhancement factors were 1.5 and 1.8 for 6 MV and 18 MV, respectively, at an incidence angle of 60°. Monte Carlo simulation confirmed the experimental results and indicated that the epidermal skin dose can reach approximately 50% of the dose at dmax at normal incidence. The overall effect could be acceptable considering the skin dose enhancement is confined to a small area (~ 1 cm2), and can be further reduced by using an opposite beam technique. Further clinical studies are justified in order to study the dosimetric benefit versus possible cosmetic effects of the surface beacon. One such clinical situation would be intact breast radiation therapy, especially large-breasted women.

  3. Comparison of OLYMPUS beacon and radiometric attenuation measurements at Blacksburg, Virginia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snider, J. B.; Jacobson, M. D.; Beeler, R. H.; Hazen, D. A.

    1991-01-01

    Measurements of attenuation of the 20 and 30 GHz beacons onboard the OLYMPUS satellite are compared to simultaneous observations of atmospheric attenuation by a multichannel microwave radiometer along the same path. Departures from high correlation between the two measurements are believed to be related to differences in antenna beamwidths. Mean equivalent zenith attenuations derived from the slant path data are compared to zenith observations made at previous locations.

  4. Development of BEACON technology. Topical report: tandem reactor testing of hydrogen catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-06-01

    The BEACON process involves the catalytic deposition of a highly reactive form of carbon from a gas stream which contains carbon monoxide. The carbon-depleted gas is combusted with air to produce power, and the carbon is reacted with steam to produce methane or hydrogen. Both the methane production and hydrogen production processes from low Btu gases have been developed successfully through bench-scale under a Cooperative Agreement between the US Department of Energy and TRW, Inc. Bench-scale development of the methane process was completed during the second quarter of 1983. Also catalyst selection testing (screening tests) for hydrogen manufacturing was completed at the same time and the results reported in a Topical Report dated October 1983. This document summarizes the data generated at bench-scale on the production of hydrogen from low Btu gas. Bench-scale development of the BEACON hydrogen process was concluded with the completion of Task 3. The objective of Task 3 was to qualify through bench-scale a BEACON-type catalyst for the production of hydrogen from low Btu gases. Catalyst No. 11, a modified SNG BEACON catalyst which proved highly selective to hydrogen production during laboratory scale screening tests was subjected to a total of 265 hours of steady state operation at three pressures (50, 75 and 100 psig) in the fluidized bed Tandem Reactor apparatus (bench-scale). The catalyst met all the requirements of stability and selectivity cited above. Carbon deposition and carbon steaming to hydrogen took place at near equilibrium yields, methane suppression was greater than 80% at all pressures, and there was no significant build-up of inactive carbon residue on the catalyst. 19 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. NanoCluster Beacon - A New Molecular Probe for Homogeneous Detection of Nucleic Acid Targets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-01

    requires only a single preparation step (i.e. nanocluster formation on NC probes), but because there is no need to remove excess silver ions or...Oligonucleotide-templated nanoclusters consisting of a few atoms of silver (DNA/Ag NCs) have been made into a new molecular probe that “lights up...upon target DNA binding, termed a NanoCluster Beacon (NCB). We discovered that interactions between silver nanoclusters and a proximal, guanine- rich

  6. In situ single step detection of exosome microRNA using molecular beacon.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Hye; Kim, Jeong Ah; Kwon, Min Hee; Kang, Ji Yoon; Rhee, Won Jong

    2015-06-01

    In situ single step detection of microRNAs (miRNA) in a whole exosome has been developed as a novel diagnosis method that can be utilized for various diseases. Exosomes are small extracellular vesicles that contain biomarker miRNAs produced from their originating cells and are known to travel through the circulatory system. This makes exosomal miRNAs from the body fluids an attractive biomarker that can lead to a paradigm shift in the diagnosis of disease. However, current techniques, including real-time PCR analysis, are time-consuming and laborious, making them unsuitable for exosomal miRNA detection for diagnosis. Thus, the development of alternative methods is necessary. Herein, we have demonstrated that exosomal miRNAs can be detected directly using a nano-sized fluorescent oligonucleotide probe, molecular beacon. MiRNA-21 in exosomes from breast cancer cells were detected successfully by molecular beacons in a quantitative manner. Permeabilization by streptolysin O treatment further enhanced the delivery of molecular beacons into exosomes, giving significantly increased signals from target miRNAs. In addition, we selectively detected cancer cell-derived exosomal miRNA-21 among heterogeneous exosome mixtures and in human serum. The method developed in the article is simple, fast, and sensitive, so it will offer great opportunities for the high-throughput diagnosis and prognosis of diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Magnetic resonance beacon to detect intracellular microRNA during neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jonghwan; Jin, Yeon A; Ko, Hae Young; Lee, Yong Seung; Heo, Hyejung; Cho, Sujeong; Kim, Soonhag

    2015-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers great spatial resolution for viewing deep tissues and anatomy. We developed a self-assembling signal-on magnetic fluorescence nanoparticle to visualize intracellular microRNAs (miRNAs or miRs) during neurogenesis using MRI. The self-assembling nanoparticle (miR124a MR beacon) was aggregated by the incubation of three different oligonucleotides: a 3' adaptor, a 5' adaptor, and a linker containing miR124a-binding sequences. The T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) signal of the self-assembled nanoparticle was quenched when miR124a was absent from test tubes or was minimally expressed in cells and tissues. When miR124a was present in test tubes or highly expressed in vitro and in vivo during P19 cell neurogenesis, it hybridized with the miR124a MR beacon, causing the linker to detach, resulting in increased signal-on MRI intensity. This MR beacon can be used as a new imaging probe to monitor the miRNA-mediated regulation of cellular processes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A Microfluidic Love-Wave Biosensing Device for PSA Detection Based on an Aptamer Beacon Probe.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng; Li, Shuangming; Cao, Kang; Wang, Pengjuan; Su, Yan; Zhu, Xinhua; Wan, Ying

    2015-06-11

    A label-free and selective aptamer beacon-based Love-wave biosensing device was developed for prostate specific antigen (PSA) detection. The device consists of the following parts: LiTaO3 substrate with SiO2 film as wave guide layer, two set of inter-digital transducers (IDT), gold film for immobilization of the biorecongniton layer and a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic channels. DNA aptamer, or "artificial antibody", was used as the specific biorecognition probe for PSA capture. Some nucleotides were added to the 3'-end of the aptamer to form a duplex with the 3'-end, turning the aptamer into an aptamer-beacon. Taking advantage of the selective target-induced assembly changes arising from the "aptamer beacon", highly selective and specific detection of PSA was achieved. Furthermore, PDMS microfluidic channels were designed and fabricated to realize automated quantitative sample injection. After optimization of the experimental conditions, the established device showed good performance for PSA detection between 10 ng/mL to 1 μg/mL, with a detection limit of 10 ng/mL. The proposed sensor might be a promising alternative for point of care diagnostics.

  9. A multistatic HF beacon network for ionospheric specification in the Peruvian sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hysell, D. L.; Milla, M. A.; Vierinen, J.

    2016-05-01

    A small network of HF beacon transmitters and receivers has been deployed in Peru for specifying the F region ionosphere in the sector. The effort is motivated by ionospheric disturbances associated with equatorial spread F (ESF) and specifically disturbances arising under inauspicious conditions for ESF as determined by numerical simulations. The beacons operate at dual frequencies (2.72 and 3.64 MHz). They are CW but incorporate pseudorandom noise (PRN) coding so that the group delays of the links can be measured. Other observables are power, Doppler shift, bearing, and polarization. A transmitter is currently deployed at Ancon (11°46'37''S, 77°09'1''W, 51 m above sea level (asl)), while receivers are at Jicamarca (11°57'5.8''S, 76°52'27''W, 510 m asl) and Huancayo (12°02'30''S, 75°19'15''W, 3315 m asl). An algorithm for inverting the beacon data combined with electron density profiles from Jicamarca is described. Data and representative solutions from an experimental campaign held in August 2015 are presented and evaluated.

  10. Star Death Beacon at the Edge of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-09-01

    short flashes of energetic gamma-rays lasting from less than a second to several minutes. They release a tremendous quantity of energy in this short time making them the most powerful events since the Big Bang. It is now widely accepted that the majority of the gamma-ray bursts signal the explosion of very massive, highly evolved stars that collapse into black holes. This discovery not only sets a new astronomical record, it is also fundamental to the understanding of the very young Universe. Being such powerful emitters, these Gamma Ray Bursts serve as useful beacons, enabling the study of the physical conditions that prevailed in the early Universe. Indeed, since GRBs are so luminous, they have the potential to outshine the most distant known galaxies and may thus probe the Universe at higher redshifts than currently known. And because Gamma-ray Burst are thought to be associated with the catastrophic death of very massive stars that collapse into black holes, the existence of such objects so early in the life of the Universe provide astronomers with important information to better understand its evolution. The Gamma-Ray Burst GRB050904 was first detected on September 4, 2005, by the NASA/ASI/PPARC Swift satellite, which is dedicated to the discovery of these powerful explosions. Immediately after this detection, astronomers in observatories worldwide tried to identify the source by searching for the afterglow in the visible and/or near-infrared, and study it. First observations by American astronomers with the Palomar Robotic 60-inch Telescope failed to find the source. This sets a very stringent limit: in the visible, the afterglow should thus be at least a million times fainter than the faintest object that can be seen with the unaided eye (magnitude 21). But observations by another team of American astronomers detected the source in the near-infrared J-band with a magnitude 17.5, i.e. at least 25 times brighter than in the visible. This was indicative of the fact

  11. Development of a gold nano-particle-based fluorescent molecular beacon for detection of cystic fibrosis associated mutation.

    PubMed

    Beni, Valerio; Hayes, Karen; Lerga, Teresa Mairal; O'Sullivan, Ciara K

    2010-10-15

    Cystic fibrosis is one of the most common genetically inherited diseases in Northern Europe, consisting of an inherited defect of chloride transport in the epithelium. Of the several mutations related to CF, the ΔF508 mutation occurs in ca. 70% of the cases. In this work the use of a gold nano-particle supported fluorescence molecular beacon was investigated as an optical sensing platform for the detection of the ΔF508 cystic fibrosis associated mutation. Different parameters such as molecular beacon design, Au nano-particle size, molecular beacon-nano-particle conjugation protocol, molecular beacon loading as well as experimental conditions were evaluated. A 31-base long molecular beacon, containing a 15-base recognition sequence specific for the mutant target, was linked via a thiol modified poly thymine linker (10 bases long) to a 13 nm gold nano-particle and was exposed to mutant and wild type targets, and a clear differentiation was achieved at target concentrations as low as 1 nM. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Superfund explanation of significant difference for the record of decision (EPA Region 1): Beacon Heights Landfill, Beacon Falls, CT, September 9, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1999-03-01

    EPA issued a ROD on September 23, 1985 (PB86-134004), documenting the selected remedial actions for the Site. EPA issued the Supplemental ROD on September 28, 1990 (PB91-921418). The Supplemental ROD included an evaluation of alternatives for treatment and disposal of the leachate collected from the Site. These alternatives consisted of: treatment at the Beacon Falls Publicly Owned Treatment Works (POTW), treatment at the Naugatuck POTW, trucking the leachate off Site for treatment, and treatment on Site. As a direct result of events that developed after the completion of the ROD and the Supplemental ROD, decisions were made to change the selected location for leachate treatment, to modify the RCRA cap design, and to require the construction of compensatory wetlands.

  13. A distance-dependent metal-enhanced fluorescence sensing platform based on molecular beacon design.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhenpeng; Huang, Hongduan; Chen, Yang; Liu, Feng; Huang, Cheng Zhi; Li, Na

    2014-02-15

    A new metal-enhanced fluorescence (MEF) based platform was developed on the basis of distance-dependent fluorescence quenching-enhancement effect, which combined the easiness of Ag-thiol chemistry with the MEF property of noble-metal structures as well as the molecular beacon design. For the given sized AgNPs, the fluorescence enhancement factor was found to increase with a d(6) dependency in agreement with fluorescence resonance energy transfer mechanism at shorter distance and decrease with a d(-3) dependency in agreement with plasmonic enhancement mechanism at longer distance between the fluorophore and the AgNP surface. As a proof of concept, the platform was demonstrated by a sensitive detection of mercuric ions, using thymine-containing molecular beacon to tune silver nanoparticle (AgNP)-enhanced fluorescence. Mercuric ions were detected via formation of a thymine-mercuric-thymine structure to open the hairpin, facilitating fluorescence recovery and AgNP enhancement to yield a limit of detection of 1 nM, which is well below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulation of the Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (10nM) in drinking water. Since the AgNP functioned as not only a quencher to reduce the reagent blank signal but also an enhancement substrate to increase fluorescence of the open hairpin when target mercuric ions were present, the quenching-enhancement strategy can greatly improve the detection sensitivity and can in principle be a universal approach for various targets when combined with molecular beacon design. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Novel molecular beacon DNA probes for protein-nucleic acid interaction studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianwei J.; Perlette, John; Fang, Xiaohong; Kelley, Shannon; Tan, Weihong

    2000-03-01

    We report a novel approach to study protein-nucleic acid interactions by using molecular beacons (MBs). Molecular beacons are hairpin-shaped DNA oligonucleotide probes labeled with a fluorophore and a quencher, and can report the presence of target DNA/RNA sequences. MBs can also report the existence of single-stranded DNA binding proteins (SSB) through non-sequence specific binding. The interaction between SSB and MB has resulted in significant fluorescence restoration of the MB. The fluorescence enhancement brought by SSB and by complementary DNA is very comparable. The molar ratio of the binding between SSB and the molecular beacon is 1:1 with a binding constant of 2 X 107 M-1. Using the MB-SSB binding, we are able to determine SSB at 2 X 10-10 M with a conventional spectrometer. We have also applied MB DNA probes for the analysis of an enzyme lactic dehydrogenase (LDH), and for the investigation of its binding properties with ssDNA. The biding process between MB and different isoenzymes of LDH has been studied. We also show that there are significant differences in MB binding affinity to different proteins, which will enable selective binding studies of a variety of proteins. This new approach is potentially useful for protein-DNA/RNA interaction studies that require high sensitivity, speed and convenience. The results also open the possibility of using easily obtainable, custom designed, modified DNA molecules for studies of drug interactions and targeting. Our results demonstrate that MB can be effectively used for sensitive protein quantitation and for efficient protein-DNA interaction studies. MB has the signal transduction mechanism built within the molecule, and can thus be used for quick protein assay development and for real-time measurements.

  15. Making it local: Beacon Communities use health information technology to optimize care management.

    PubMed

    Allen, Amy; Des Jardins, Terrisca R; Heider, Arvela; Kanger, Chatrian R; Lobach, David F; McWilliams, Lee; Polello, Jennifer M; Rein, Alison L; Schachter, Abigail A; Singh, Ranjit; Sorondo, Barbara; Tulikangas, Megan C; Turske, Scott A

    2014-06-01

    Care management aims to provide cost-effective, coordinated, non-duplicative care to improve care quality, population health, and reduce costs. The 17 communities receiving funding from the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology through the Beacon Community Cooperative Agreement Program are leaders in building and strengthening their health information technology (health IT) infrastructure to provide more effective and efficient care management. This article profiles 6 Beacon Communities' health IT-enabled care management programs, highlighting the influence of local context on program strategy and design, and describing challenges, lessons learned, and policy implications for care delivery and payment reform. The unique needs (eg, disease burden, demographics), community partnerships, and existing resources and infrastructure all exerted significant influence on the overall priorities and design of each community's care management program. Though each Beacon Community needed to engage in a similar set of care management tasks--including patient identification, stratification, and prioritization; intervention; patient engagement; and evaluation--the contextual factors helped shape the specific strategies and tools used to carry out these tasks and achieve their objectives. Although providers across the country are striving to deliver standardized, high-quality care, the diverse contexts in which this care is delivered significantly influence the priorities, strategies, and design of community-based care management interventions. Gaps and challenges in implementing effective community-based care management programs include: optimizing allocation of care management services; lack of available technology tailored to care management needs; lack of standards and interoperability; integrating care management into care settings; evaluating impact; and funding and sustainability.

  16. Making It Local: Beacon Communities Use Health Information Technology to Optimize Care Management

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Amy; Des Jardins, Terrisca R.; Heider, Arvela; Kanger, Chatrian R.; Lobach, David F.; McWilliams, Lee; Polello, Jennifer M.; Schachter, Abigail A.; Singh, Ranjit; Sorondo, Barbara; Tulikangas, Megan C.; Turske, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Care management aims to provide cost-effective, coordinated, non-duplicative care to improve care quality, population health, and reduce costs. The 17 communities receiving funding from the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology through the Beacon Community Cooperative Agreement Program are leaders in building and strengthening their health information technology (health IT) infrastructure to provide more effective and efficient care management. This article profiles 6 Beacon Communities' health IT-enabled care management programs, highlighting the influence of local context on program strategy and design, and describing challenges, lessons learned, and policy implications for care delivery and payment reform. The unique needs (eg, disease burden, demographics), community partnerships, and existing resources and infrastructure all exerted significant influence on the overall priorities and design of each community's care management program. Though each Beacon Community needed to engage in a similar set of care management tasks—including patient identification, stratification, and prioritization; intervention; patient engagement; and evaluation—the contextual factors helped shape the specific strategies and tools used to carry out these tasks and achieve their objectives. Although providers across the country are striving to deliver standardized, high-quality care, the diverse contexts in which this care is delivered significantly influence the priorities, strategies, and design of community-based care management interventions. Gaps and challenges in implementing effective community-based care management programs include: optimizing allocation of care management services; lack of available technology tailored to care management needs; lack of standards and interoperability; integrating care management into care settings; evaluating impact; and funding and sustainability. (Population Health Management 2014;17:149–158) PMID

  17. Creating a Connected Community: Lessons Learned from the Western New York Beacon Community

    PubMed Central

    Maloney, Nancy; Heider, Arvela R.; Rockwood, Amy; Singh, Ranjit

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Secure exchange of clinical data among providers has the potential to improve quality, safety, efficiency, and reduce duplication. Many communities are experiencing challenges in building effective health information exchanges (HIEs). Previous studies have focused on financial and technical issues regarding HIE development. This paper describes the Western New York (WNY) HIE growth and lessons learned about accelerating progress to become a highly connected community. Methods: HEALTHeLINK, with funding from the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) under the Beacon Community Program, expanded HIE usage in eight counties. The communitywide transformation process used three main drivers: (1) a communitywide Electronic Health Record (EHR) adoption program; (2) clinical transformation partners; and (3) HIE outreach and infrastructure development. Results: ONC Beacon Community funding allowed WNY to achieve a new level in the use of interoperable HIE. Electronic delivery of results into the EHR expanded from 23 practices in 2010 to 222 practices in 2013, a tenfold increase. There were more than 12.5 million results delivered electronically (HL7 messages) to 222 practices’ EHRs via the HIE in 2013. Use of a secure portal and Virtual Health Record (VHR) to access reports (those not delivered directly to the EHR) also increased significantly, from 13,344 report views in 2010 to over 600,000 in 2013. Discussion and Conclusion: The WNY Beacon successfully expanded the sharing of clinical information among different sources of data and providers, creating a highly connected community to improve the quality and continuity of care. Technical, organizational, and community lessons described in this paper should prove beneficial to others as they pursue efforts to create connected communities. PMID:25848618

  18. Creating a connected community: lessons learned from the Western new york beacon community.

    PubMed

    Maloney, Nancy; Heider, Arvela R; Rockwood, Amy; Singh, Ranjit

    2014-01-01

    Secure exchange of clinical data among providers has the potential to improve quality, safety, efficiency, and reduce duplication. Many communities are experiencing challenges in building effective health information exchanges (HIEs). Previous studies have focused on financial and technical issues regarding HIE development. This paper describes the Western New York (WNY) HIE growth and lessons learned about accelerating progress to become a highly connected community. HEALTHeLINK, with funding from the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) under the Beacon Community Program, expanded HIE usage in eight counties. The communitywide transformation process used three main drivers: (1) a communitywide Electronic Health Record (EHR) adoption program; (2) clinical transformation partners; and (3) HIE outreach and infrastructure development. ONC Beacon Community funding allowed WNY to achieve a new level in the use of interoperable HIE. Electronic delivery of results into the EHR expanded from 23 practices in 2010 to 222 practices in 2013, a tenfold increase. There were more than 12.5 million results delivered electronically (HL7 messages) to 222 practices' EHRs via the HIE in 2013. Use of a secure portal and Virtual Health Record (VHR) to access reports (those not delivered directly to the EHR) also increased significantly, from 13,344 report views in 2010 to over 600,000 in 2013. The WNY Beacon successfully expanded the sharing of clinical information among different sources of data and providers, creating a highly connected community to improve the quality and continuity of care. Technical, organizational, and community lessons described in this paper should prove beneficial to others as they pursue efforts to create connected communities.

  19. Preliminary Results of the NASA Beacon Receiver for Alphasat Aldo Paraboni TDP5 Propagation Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nessel, James; Morse, Jacquelynne; Zemba, Michael; Riva, Carlo; Luini, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) and the Politecnico di Milano (POLIMI) have initiated a joint propagation campaign within the framework of the Alphasat propagation experiment to characterize rain attenuation, scintillation, and gaseous absorption effects of the atmosphere in the 40 GHz band. NASA GRC has developed and installed a K/Q-band (20/40 GHz) beacon receiver at the POLIMI campus in Milan, Italy, which receives the 20/40 GHz signals broadcast from the Alphasat Aldo Paraboni TDP#5 beacon payload. The primary goal of these measurements is to develop a physical model to improve predictions of communications systems performance within the Q-band. Herein, we describe the design and preliminary performance of the NASA propagation terminal, which has been installed and operating in Milan since May 2014. The receiver is based upon a validated Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) I/Q digital design approach utilized in other operational NASA propagation terminals, but has been modified to employ power measurement via a frequency estimation technique and to coherently track and measure the amplitude of the 20/40 GHz beacon signals. The system consists of a 1.2-m K-band and a 0.6-m Qband Cassegrain reflector employing synchronous open-loop tracking to track the inclined orbit of the Alphasat satellite. An 8 Hz sampling rate is implemented to characterize scintillation effects, with a 1-Hz measurement bandwidth dynamic range of 45 dB. A weather station with an optical disdrometer is also installed to characterize rain drop size distribution for correlation with physical based models.

  20. Simultaneous and multiplexed detection of exosome microRNAs using molecular beacons.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Hye; Kim, Jeong Ah; Jeong, Seunga; Rhee, Won Jong

    2016-12-15

    Simultaneous and multiplexed detection of microRNAs (miRNAs) in a whole exosome is developed, which can be utilized as a PCR-free efficient diagnosis method for various diseases. Exosomes are small extracellular vesicles that contain biomarker miRNAs from parental cells. Because they circulate throughout bodily fluids, exosomal biomarkers offer great advantages for diagnosis in many aspects. In general, PCR-based methods can be used for exosomal miRNA detection but they are laborious, expensive, and time-consuming, which make them unsuitable for high-throughput diagnosis of diseases. Previously, we reported that single miRNA in the exosomes can be detected specifically using an oligonucleotide probe or molecular beacon. Herein, we demonstrate for the first time that multiple miRNAs can be detected simultaneously in exosomes using miRNA-targeting molecular beacons. Exosomes from a breast cancer cell line, MCF-7, were used for the production of exosomes because MCF-7 has a high level of miR-21, miR-375, and miR-27a as target miRNAs. Molecular beacons successfully hybridized with multiple miRNAs in the cancer cell-derived exosomes even in the presence of high human serum concentration. In addition, it is noteworthy that the choice of fluorophores for multiplexing biomarkers in an exosome is crucial because of its small size. The proposed method described in this article is beneficial to high-throughput analysis for disease diagnosis, prognosis, and response to treatment because it is a time-, labor-, and cost-saving technique.

  1. Development of BEACON technology: Hydrogen catalyst selection and preparation: Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-10-01

    The BEACON process involves the catalytic deposition of a highly reactive form of carbon from a gas stream which contains carbon monoxide. The carbon-depleted gas is combusted with air to produce power, and the carbon is reacted with steam to produce methane or hydrogen. Bench scale development of the methane process was completed during the second quarter 1983 and the results reported to DOE. Bench scale development of the hydrogen process is currently underway. This document summarizes the effort expended in the selection and preparation of the primary and back-up hydrogen production catalysts to be used in multi-cycle testing at bench scale. The effort comprised the Task 1 experimentation of the current BEACON program and was six weeks in duration. From 20 catalysts screened at laboratory scale as candidates for hydrogen production from BEACON carbon, two were selected as promising for exhibiting good performance (activity and selectivity) at reaction pressures above ambient. These two catalysts, No. 6 and No. 11, were subjected to extensive carbon deposition-steaming testing at 50, 75 and 100 psig (3 to 5 cycles at each pressure); 10 to 20 gram batches of solids were used in these tests. Performance comparisons led to the selection of Catalyst No. 11 as the primary catalyst for the hydrogen process. Catalyst No. 6 performed well enough at pressures up to 50 psig to be considered as a potential replacement to Catalyst No. 11 should the latter fail multi-cycle testing (long-term activity tests at elevated pressures). The multi-cycle testing (a minimum operation of 250 hours of simultaneous carbon deposition and steaming to hydrogen) will be performed in the existing Tandem Reactor apparatus under Task 2 of this program. 2 figs., 7 tabs.

  2. Performance of the NASA Beacon Receiver for the Alphasat Aldo Paraboni TDP5 Propagation Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nessel, James; Morse, Jacquelynne; Zemba, Michael; Riva, Carlo; Luini, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) and the Politecnico di Milano (POLIMI) have initiated a joint propagation campaign within the framework of the Alphasat propagation experiment to characterize rain attenuation, scintillation, and gaseous absorption effects of the atmosphere in the 40 gigahertz band. NASA GRC has developed and installed a K/Q-band (20/40 gigahertz) beacon receiver at the POLIMI campus in Milan, Italy, which receives the 20/40 gigahertz signals broadcast from the Alphasat Aldo Paraboni Technology Demonstration Payload (TDP) no. 5 beacon payload. The primary goal of these measurements is to develop a physical model to improve predictions of communications systems performance within the Q-band. Herein, we describe the design and preliminary performance of the NASA propagation terminal, which has been installed and operating in Milan since June 2014. The receiver is based upon a validated Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) I/Q digital design approach utilized in other operational NASA propagation terminals, but has been modified to employ power measurement via a frequency estimation technique and to coherently track and measure the amplitude of the 20/40 gigahertz beacon signals. The system consists of a 1.2-meter K-band and a 0.6-meter Q-band Cassegrain reflector employing synchronous open-loop tracking to track the inclined orbit of the Alphasat satellite. An 8 hertz sampling rate is implemented to characterize scintillation effects, with a 1-hertz measurement bandwidth dynamic range of 45 decibels. A weather station with an optical disdrometer is also installed to characterize rain drop size distribution for correlation with physical based models.

  3. Specific survivin dual fluorescence resonance energy transfer molecular beacons for detection of human bladder cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi-qiang; Zhao, Jun; Zeng, Jin; Wu, Kai-jie; Chen, Yu-le; Wang, Xin-yang; Chang, Luke S; He, Da-lin

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Survivin molecular beacons can be used to detect bladder cancer cells in urine samples non-invasively. The aim of this study is to improve the specificity of detection of bladder cancer cells using survivin dual fluorescence resonance energy transfer molecular beacons (FRET MBs) that have fluorophores forming one donor-acceptor pair. Methods: Survivin-targeting dual fluorescence resonance energy transfer molecular beacons with unique target sequences were designed, which had no overlap with the other genes in the apoptosis inhibitor protein family. Human bladder cancer cell lines 5637, 253J and T24, as well as the exfoliated cells in the urine of healthy adults and patients with bladder cancer were examined. Images of cells were taken using a laser scanning confocal fluorescence microscope. For assays using dual FRET MBs, the excitation wavelength was 488 nm, and the emission detection wavelengths were 520±20 nm and 560±20 nm, respectively. Results: The human bladder cancer cell lines and exfoliated cells in the urine of patients with bladder cancer incubated with the survivin dual FRET MBs exhibited strong fluorescence signals. In contrast, no fluorescence was detected in the survivin-negative human dermal fibroblasts-adult (HDF-a) cells or exfoliated cells in the urine of healthy adults incubated with the survivin dual FRET MBs. Conclusion: The results suggest that the survivin dual FRET MBs may be used as a specific and non-invasive method for early detection and follow-up of patients with bladder cancer. PMID:22019956

  4. Rapid Detection of Rifampin Resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates from India and Mexico by a Molecular Beacon Assay

    PubMed Central

    Varma-Basil, Mandira; El-Hajj, Hiyam; Colangeli, Roberto; Hazbón, Manzour Hernando; Kumar, Sujeet; Bose, Mridula; Bobadilla-del-Valle, Miriam; García, Lourdes García; Hernández, Araceli; Kramer, Fred Russell; Osornio, Jose Sifuentes; Ponce-de-León, Alfredo; Alland, David

    2004-01-01

    We assessed the performance of a rapid, single-well, real-time PCR assay for the detection of rifampin-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis by using clinical isolates from north India and Mexico, regions with a high incidence of tuberculosis. The assay uses five differently colored molecular beacons to determine if a short region of the M. tuberculosis rpoB gene contains mutations that predict rifampin resistance in most isolates. Until now, the assay had not been sufficiently tested on samples from countries with a high incidence of tuberculosis. In the present study, the assay detected mutations in 16 out of 16 rifampin-resistant isolates from north India (100%) and in 55 of 64 rifampin-resistant isolates from Mexico (86%) compared to results with standard susceptibility testing. The assay did not detect mutations (a finding predictive of rifampin susceptibility) in 37 out of 37 rifampin-susceptible isolates from India (100%) and 125 out of 126 rifampin-susceptible isolates from Mexico (99%). DNA sequencing revealed that none of the nine rifampin-resistant isolates from Mexico, which were misidentified as rifampin susceptible by the molecular beacon assay, contained a mutation in the region targeted by the molecular beacons. The one rifampin-susceptible isolate from Mexico that appeared to be rifampin resistant by the molecular beacon assay contained an S531W mutation, which is usually associated with rifampin resistance. Of the rifampin-resistant isolates that were correctly identified in the molecular beacon assay, one contained a novel L530A mutation and another contained a novel deletion between codons 511 and 514. Overall, the molecular beacon assay appears to have sufficient sensitivity (89%) and specificity (99%) for use in countries with a high prevalence of tuberculosis. PMID:15583274

  5. MicroRNA Detection Using a Double Molecular Beacon Approach: Distinguishing Between miRNA and Pre-miRNA.

    PubMed

    James, Amanda Marie; Baker, Meredith B; Bao, Gang; Searles, Charles D

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, noncoding RNAs that post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression and are recognized for their roles both as modulators of disease progression and as biomarkers of disease activity, including neurological diseases, cancer, and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Commonly, miRNA abundance is assessed using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), however, qRT-PCR for miRNA can be labor intensive, time consuming, and may lack specificity for detection of mature versus precursor forms of miRNA. Here, we describe a novel double molecular beacon approach to miRNA assessment that can distinguish and quantify mature versus precursor forms of miRNA in a single assay, an essential feature for use of miRNAs as biomarkers for disease. Using this approach, we found that molecular beacons with DNA or combined locked nucleic acid (LNA)-DNA backbones can detect mature and precursor miRNAs (pre-miRNAs) of low (< 1 nM) abundance in vitro. The double molecular beacon assay was accurate in assessing miRNA abundance in a sample containing a mixed population of mature and precursor miRNAs. In contrast, qRT-PCR and the single molecular beacon assay overestimated miRNA abundance. Additionally, the double molecular beacon assay was less labor intensive than traditional qRT-PCR and had 10-25% increased specificity. Our data suggest that the double molecular beacon-based approach is more precise and specific than previous methods, and has the promise of being the standard for assessing miRNA levels in biological samples.

  6. MicroRNA Detection Using a Double Molecular Beacon Approach: Distinguishing Between miRNA and Pre-miRNA

    PubMed Central

    James, Amanda Marie; Baker, Meredith B.; Bao, Gang; Searles, Charles D.

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, noncoding RNAs that post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression and are recognized for their roles both as modulators of disease progression and as biomarkers of disease activity, including neurological diseases, cancer, and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Commonly, miRNA abundance is assessed using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), however, qRT-PCR for miRNA can be labor intensive, time consuming, and may lack specificity for detection of mature versus precursor forms of miRNA. Here, we describe a novel double molecular beacon approach to miRNA assessment that can distinguish and quantify mature versus precursor forms of miRNA in a single assay, an essential feature for use of miRNAs as biomarkers for disease. Using this approach, we found that molecular beacons with DNA or combined locked nucleic acid (LNA)-DNA backbones can detect mature and precursor miRNAs (pre-miRNAs) of low (< 1 nM) abundance in vitro. The double molecular beacon assay was accurate in assessing miRNA abundance in a sample containing a mixed population of mature and precursor miRNAs. In contrast, qRT-PCR and the single molecular beacon assay overestimated miRNA abundance. Additionally, the double molecular beacon assay was less labor intensive than traditional qRT-PCR and had 10-25% increased specificity. Our data suggest that the double molecular beacon-based approach is more precise and specific than previous methods, and has the promise of being the standard for assessing miRNA levels in biological samples. PMID:28255356

  7. [Modified molecular beacon-based dual real-time PCR for detection of SARS virus and its application].

    PubMed

    Hu, Qing-Hua; Liu, Xiao-Li; Zhuang, Zhi-Xiong; Shi, Xiao-Lu; He, Yaqing; Liu, Jianjun; Wang, Bing; Liu, Tao; Zhang, Yongyou; Li, Qingge; Zhao, Jin; He, Jianfan; Yang, Hong; Fang, Shisong; Zhang, Dan; Zhou, Jun'an

    2005-07-01

    To develop the modified molecular beacon-based dual fluorescent PCR assays for detection of SARS virus. The assay was applied to the early clinic diagnosis & animal tracking. On the basis of the obtained core sequence of open reading frame 1b of the coronavirus polymerase gene sequences, which was published in GenBank, using modified molecular beacon probe, artifical virus techinique and two different fragments amplification with different fluoresce, one set of primers and probe were designed. Then fluorescent PCR assays for specific and sensitive detection of the SARS virus was established, while the ELISA & the traditional method were used as control. 368 clinical specimens such as the throat swab, serum, feces, and urine from different cases, 52 cell cultures and 50 animal specimens were detected by the molecular beacon-based PCR. The sensitivity of real -time PCR was 10 - 100 copies/ml, there was no cross reaction to other respiratory viruses such as influenza virus etc. Of 368 specimens, 20 were positive by using molecular beacon-based fluorescence PCR. The positive rate of SARS case (10/47) were 21.27%, the positive rate of the throat swab of SARS cases (10/23) were 43.87% . Among 52 SARS cell cultures, 29 were positive. The positive rate of SARS cell cultures was 55.77% . Of 50 animal specimens, 23 were positive. The positive rate was 46%. Furthermore, SARS virus RNA was detected in feces and in serum during the acute phase. The molecular beacon-based PCR is sensitive and specific, it could be applied to the early diagnosis and animal tracking. This molecular beacon-based PCR kit is useful for the different units.

  8. Dual-band beacon experiment over Southeast Asia for ionospheric irregularity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watthanasangmechai, K.; Yamamoto, M.; Saito, A.; Saito, S.; Maruyama, T.; Tsugawa, T.; Nishioka, M.

    2013-12-01

    An experiment of dual-band beacon over Southeast Asia was started in March 2012 in order to capture and analyze ionospheric irregularities in equatorial region. Five GNU Radio Beacon Receivers (GRBRs) were aligned along 100 degree geographic longitude. The distances between the stations reach more than 500 km. The field of view of this observational network covers +/- 20 degree geomagnetic latitude including the geomagnetic equator. To capture ionospheric irregularities, the absolute TEC estimation technique was developed. The two-station method (Leitinger et al., 1975) is generally accepted as a suitable method to estimate TEC offsets of dual-band beacon experiment. However, the distances between the stations directly affect on the robustness of the technique. In Southeast Asia, the observational network is too sparse to attain a benefit of the classic two-station method. Moreover, the least-squares approch used in the two-station method tries too much to adjust the small scales of the TEC distribution which are the local minima. We thus propose a new technique to estimate the TEC offsets with the supporting data from absolute GPS-TEC from local GPS receivers and the ionospheric height from local ionosondes. The key of the proposed technique is to utilize the brute-force technique with weighting function to find the TEC offset set that yields a global minimum of RMSE in whole parameter space. The weight is not necessary when the TEC distribution is smooth, while it significantly improves the TEC estimation during the ESF events. As a result, the latitudinal TEC shows double-hump distribution because of the Equatorial Ionization Anomaly (EIA). In additions, the 100km-scale fluctuations from an Equatorial Spread F (ESF) are captured at night time in equinox seasons. The plausible linkage of the meridional wind with triggering of ESF is under invatigating and will be presented. The proposed method is successful to estimate the latitudinal TEC distribution from dual

  9. Prospects for the GLAS Rayleigh laser beacon on the 4.2-m WHT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutten, René; Blanken, Maarten; McDermid, Richard; Gregory, Thomas; Jolley, Paul; Morris, Tim; Myers, Richard; Pragt, Johan; Schoenmaker, Ton; Stuik, Remko; Talbot, Gordon

    2006-01-01

    The scientific exploitation of adaptive optics (AO) with natural guide stars is severely constrained by the limited presence of bright guide stars for wavefront sensing. Use of a laser beam as an alternative means to provide a source for wavefront sensing has the potential of drastically improving the sky coverage for AO. For this reason at the 4.2-m William Herschel Telescope a project was started to develop a Rayleigh laser beacon to work together with the existing NAOMI adaptive optics instrumentation and the OASIS integral field spectrograph. This paper presents the rationale for this development, highlights some of the technical aspects, and gives some expected performance measures.

  10. Progress on the GLAS Rayleigh Laser Beacon System for the William Herschel Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutten, R. G. M.; Talbot, G.

    2005-12-01

    Although natural guide star operation of the NAOMI adaptive optics system is now well established, the limited sky coverage for higher order operation has proven a serious limiting factor in its science use. For that reason in 2004 a project was embarked upon to develop a facility class general purpose Rayleigh laser beacon system. The project acronym, GLAS, stands for Ground-layer Laser Adaptive optics System. The overall scientific aim of the GLAS project is to drastically improve the sky coverage for high-order adaptive optics.

  11. Non-linear molecular pattern classification using molecular beacons with multiple targets.

    PubMed

    Lee, In-Hee; Lee, Seung Hwan; Park, Tai Hyun; Zhang, Byoung-Tak

    2013-12-01

    In vitro pattern classification has been highlighted as an important future application of DNA computing. Previous work has demonstrated the feasibility of linear classifiers using DNA-based molecular computing. However, complex tasks require non-linear classification capability. Here we design a molecular beacon that can interact with multiple targets and experimentally shows that its fluorescent signals form a complex radial-basis function, enabling it to be used as a building block for non-linear molecular classification in vitro. The proposed method was successfully applied to solving artificial and real-world classification problems: XOR and microRNA expression patterns. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. THE EFFECTS OF A RECTANGULAR RAPID-FLASHING BEACON ON VEHICLE SPEED

    PubMed Central

    Van Wagner, Michelle; Van Houten, Ron; Betts, Brian

    2011-01-01

    In 2008, nearly 31% of vehicle fatalities were related to failure to adhere to safe vehicle speeds (National Highway Traffic Safety Administration [NHTSA], 2009). The current study evaluated the effect of a rectangular rapid-flashing beacon (RRFB) triggered by excessive speed on vehicle speed using a combined alternating treatments and reversal design. The percentage of vehicles traveling above 41 mph (66 km per hour) decreased by 20%, and speed distributions showed a shift toward lower speeds during the RRFB condition. PMID:21941395

  13. Quick topological method for acquiring the beacon in inter-satellite laser communications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Ma, Jing; Tan, Liying; Yu, Siyuan

    2014-11-20

    Background starlight can lead to some spot noise in the image collected by a CCD, disturbing the beacon acquisition in inter-satellite laser communications. Removing the spot noise takes much time by using the existing method that is based on the reference star calendar table. We present a novel method to reduce the processing time in this paper. The key point is to use the topological characteristic of the spot noise in the graph that is obtained through threshold segmentation to the image on the CCD. The method helps to improve the acquisition probability and to save valuable onboard computing resources.

  14. Development of The Navigation System for The Visually Impaired by Using Optical Beacons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    20 21 22 23 24 25 Examination Room1 26 27 2A 2B 2C 2D 2E 2F 28 Reception of Sofa 05 Braille Block 03 Clinic Stairs Ophthalmology Block Examination...Room2 Sofa Sofa 1B 1A 15 Braille Area-1 Area-2 Fig. 5: An outline map of the testing eld and the ar- rangement of optical beacons on the training of...po- sition go out of service area of the navigation system. For example, setting of braille blocks solves this prob- lem. However, braille blocks are

  15. Steranes and triterpanes in the Beacon Supergroup samples from southern Victoria Land in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Genki I.; Machihara, Tsutomu; Suzuki, Noriyuki; Funaki, Minoru; Watanuki, Kunihiko

    1987-10-01

    Steranes and triterpanes in Beacon Supergroup samples (sedimentary rock and silicified wood) from Allan Hills and Carapace Nunatak of southern Victoria Land in Antarctica were studied to elucidate sources of organic materials, sedimentary paleoenvironment and thermal history after deposition. Relative abundances of C 27, C 28 and C 29 steranes and visual kerogen results of Beacon Supergroup samples from Allan Hills imply that organic materials in the sedimentary paleoenvironments are contributed mainly by vascular plants with some influence of microorganisms, while those of the Carapace Nunatak sample may be largely due to fern spores. The pristane/phytane and pristane/heptadecane ratios of the samples were generally close to unity and between 0.50 and 0.99, respectively, suggesting that the sedimentary paleoenvironment was shallow lacustrine with alternating oxic and anoxic conditions. The ( 22S/22R)-17α(H),21β(H)-C 31-C 33 triterpane ratios are approximately at thermal equilibrium values ( ca. 1.5) in most samples, while the ( 20S/20R)-5α(H), 14α(H), 17α(H)-C 29 sterane ratios and the (20R + 20S)-5α(H), 14β(H), 17β(H)/5α(H), 14α(H), 17α(H)-C 29 sterane ratios vary from 0.0 to 1.1 and from 0.0 to 1.4, respectively. Most of the ( 20S/20R)-5α(H), 14α(H), 17α(H)-C 29 sterane ratios did not reach thermal equilibrium values. The correlation coefficient between the ( 20S/20R)-5α(H), 14α(H), 17α(H)-C 29 sterane ratios and (20R + 20S)-5α(H), 14β(H), 17β(H)/5α(H), 14α(H), 17α(H)-C 29, sterane ratios is very high (0.96). These variable maturities probably reflect thermal effects of basaltic dikes on the Beacon Supergroup at Allan Hills and Carapace Nunatak during Jurassic time. Thermal stresses on the Beacon Supergroup prior to basaltic intrusion have been estimated to be quite low, so the paleotemperatures of this formation have been quite low.

  16. The Southeastern Minnesota Beacon Project for Community-driven Health Information Technology: Origins, Achievements, and Legacy.

    PubMed

    Chute, Christopher G; Hart, Lacey A; Alexander, Alex K; Jensen, Daniel W

    2014-01-01

    The Southeastern (SE) Minnesota Beacon organized all the health care providers, county public health organizations, and school districts in the deployment and integration of health information exchange (HIE) and targeted health communication around childhood asthma and diabetes. The community cooperated to establish a clinical data repository for all residents in the 11-county region. Through this community of practice approach that involved traditional and nontraditional providers, the SE Minnesota Beacon was able to realize unique applications of this technology. This manuscript overviews the associated organization and infrastructure of this community collaboration. The Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC), as part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) stimulus, established 17 projects throughout the United States targeting the introduction and meaningful use of health information technology (HIT). These 17 communities were intended to serve as an example of what could be accomplished. The SE Minnesota Beacon is one of these communities. The community ultimately opted for peer-to-peer HIE, using Nationwide Health Information Network (NwHIN) Connect software. The clinical data repository was established using the infrastructure developed by the Regenstrief Institute, which operated as a trusted third party. As an extension to HIE, the consortium of county public health departments created a patient data portal for use by school nurses and parents. Childhood asthma was addressed by creating, exchanging, and maintaining an "asthma action plan" for each affected child, shared throughout the community, including through the patient portal. Diabetes management introduced patient treatment decision tools and patient quality of life measures, facilitating care. Influenza vaccination was enhanced by large-scale community reporting in partnership with the state vaccination registry. The methodology and

  17. A mobile indoor positioning system based on iBeacon technology.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xin-Yu; Ho, Te-Wei; Fang, Cheng-Chung; Yen, Zui-Shen; Yang, Bey-Jing; Lai, Feipei

    2015-01-01

    To increase the efficiency in the emergency room, the goal of this research is to implement a mobile-based indoor positioning system using mobile applications (APP) with the iBeacon solution based on the Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) technology. We use the Received Signal Strength (RSS) based localization method to estimate the patients' locations. Our positioning algorithm achieves 97.22% (95% Confidence Interval = 95.90% - 98.55%) accuracy of classification. As the result, our mechanism is reliable enough to satisfy the need for medical staff to track the locations of their patients.

  18. Telemetry beacon for Polish payload on BRITE-PL-2 satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woźniak, Grzegorz; Stolarski, Marcin

    2013-10-01

    Small satellite missions are becoming more popular. To reduce costs of such projects COTS are used to build the spacecraft and amateur bands are utilized to communicate with it. Although using the hamradio frequencies is free of charge and requires only coordination procedures [1], it is good habit to include on satellite some service for radioamateur society in return. The BRITE-PL-2 Heweliusz [2] satellite - the second Polish satellite from BRITE constellation - will have an S-Band beacon transmitting Morse code signals.

  19. Controlling the signal: Practical privacy protection of genomic data sharing through Beacon services.

    PubMed

    Wan, Zhiyu; Vorobeychik, Yevgeniy; Kantarcioglu, Murat; Malin, Bradley

    2017-07-26

    Genomic data is increasingly collected by a wide array of organizations. As such, there is a growing demand to make summary information about such collections available more widely. However, over the past decade, a series of investigations have shown that attacks, rooted in statistical inference methods, can be applied to discern the presence of a known individual's DNA sequence in the pool of subjects. Recently, it was shown that the Beacon Project of the Global Alliance for Genomics and Health, a web service for querying about the presence (or absence) of a specific allele, was vulnerable. The Integrating Data for Analysis, Anonymization, and Sharing (iDASH) Center modeled a track in their third Privacy Protection Challenge on how to mitigate the Beacon vulnerability. We developed the winning solution for this track. This paper describes our computational method to optimize the tradeoff between the utility and the privacy of the Beacon service. We generalize the genomic data sharing problem beyond that which was introduced in the iDASH Challenge to be more representative of real world scenarios to allow for a more comprehensive evaluation. We then conduct a sensitivity analysis of our method with respect to several state-of-the-art methods using a dataset of 400,000 positions in Chromosome 10 for 500 individuals from Phase 3 of the 1000 Genomes Project. All methods are evaluated for utility, privacy and efficiency. Our method achieves better performance than all state-of-the-art methods, irrespective of how key factors (e.g., the allele frequency in the population, the size of the pool and utility weights) change from the original parameters of the problem. We further illustrate that it is possible for our method to exhibit subpar performance under special cases of allele query sequences. However, we show our method can be extended to address this issue when the query sequence is fixed and known a priori to the data custodian, so that they may plan stage their

  20. Developing children’s palliative care in Africa through beacon centres: lessons learnt

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Much progress has been made in the provision of palliative care across sub-Saharan Africa, however much still remains to be done, particularly in the area of children’s palliative care (CPC). The Beacon Centres programme was set up in 2009, aimed at improving access to CPC in South Africa, Uganda and Tanzania through more and better-trained health professionals and CPC clinical services of a high standard. Having identified sites in each country to develop into CPC Beacon Centres, Navigators were identified who would be the ‘champions’ for CPC in those sites and lead a programme of training, mentorship and support. Five navigators (2 in Uganda and Tanzania and 1 in South Africa) were trained between September and December 2009. Following this they undertook CPC needs assessments at the 3 centres and set up and delivered a six-month CPC training programme, providing mentorship and support to students to enable them to integrate CPC into their workplaces. To date, 188 participants have commenced the six-month course, with 80 having completed it. CPC has been integrated into the activities of the centres and a CPC virtual resource centre set up in South Africa. The achievements from the Beacon project have been great and the work of the navigators immense, but as in all projects it has not been without its challenges. Lessons learnt include issues around: the focus of the project; the length and nature of the training; assessment; accreditation; the choice of navigators; mentoring; administrative support; co-ordination; the choice of project sites; and the integration of CPC into services. The need for CPC is not going to go away and it is therefore important that models of scaling-up are found that are not only practical, feasible, affordable and sustainable, but that focus on the outcome of improved CPC for all those who need it. It is hoped that the lessons shared from the Beacon Project will help in developing and implementing such models. PMID:23419095

  1. The Southeastern Minnesota Beacon Project for Community-driven Health Information Technology: Origins, Achievements, and Legacy

    PubMed Central

    Chute, Christopher G.; Hart, Lacey A.; Alexander, Alex K.; Jensen, Daniel W.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The Southeastern (SE) Minnesota Beacon organized all the health care providers, county public health organizations, and school districts in the deployment and integration of health information exchange (HIE) and targeted health communication around childhood asthma and diabetes. The community cooperated to establish a clinical data repository for all residents in the 11-county region. Through this community of practice approach that involved traditional and nontraditional providers, the SE Minnesota Beacon was able to realize unique applications of this technology. This manuscript overviews the associated organization and infrastructure of this community collaboration. Background: The Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC), as part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) stimulus, established 17 projects throughout the United States targeting the introduction and meaningful use of health information technology (HIT). These 17 communities were intended to serve as an example of what could be accomplished. The SE Minnesota Beacon is one of these communities. Methods: The community ultimately opted for peer-to-peer HIE, using Nationwide Health Information Network (NwHIN) Connect software. The clinical data repository was established using the infrastructure developed by the Regenstrief Institute, which operated as a trusted third party. As an extension to HIE, the consortium of county public health departments created a patient data portal for use by school nurses and parents. Childhood asthma was addressed by creating, exchanging, and maintaining an “asthma action plan” for each affected child, shared throughout the community, including through the patient portal. Diabetes management introduced patient treatment decision tools and patient quality of life measures, facilitating care. Influenza vaccination was enhanced by large-scale community reporting in partnership with the state vaccination

  2. Flight Validation of On-Demand Operations: The Deep Space One Beacon Monitor Operations Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyatt, Jay; Sherwood, Rob; Sue, Miles; Szijjarto, John

    2000-01-01

    After a brief overview of the operational concept, this paper will provide a detailed description of the _as-flown_ flight software components, the DS1 experiment plan, and experiment results to date. Special emphasis will be given to experiment results and lessons learned since the basic system design has been previously reported. Mission scenarios where beacon operations is highly applicable will be described. Detailed cost savings estimates for a sample science mission will be provided as will cumulative savings that are possible over the next fifteen years of NASA missions.

  3. Intracellular delivery of molecular beacons by PMMA nanoparticles and carbon nanotubes for mRNA sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannetti, A.; Tombelli, S.; Trono, C.; Ballestri, M.; Giambastiani, G.; Guerrini, A.; Sotgiu, G.; Tuci, G.; Varchi, G.; Baldini, F.

    2013-02-01

    We describe here the use of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and polymeric nanoparticles made of a core of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) surrounded by a shell bearing cationic groups, as intracellular delivery tools of molecular beacons (MBs), particular fluorescent DNA probes, for the detection and localization of a specific mRNA. Survivin mRNA targeting MBs have been used with Atto647N and Blackberry 650 as fluorophore/quencher pair. The MB was anchored to the surface of CNTs and PMMA nanoparticles via a commercial sulfhydryl-reactive heterobifunctional crosslinker and the achieved nanomaterials were then characterized in vitro.

  4. Near field laser transmission with bidirectional beacon tracking for Tbps class wireless communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arimoto, Yoshinori

    2010-02-01

    This paper discusses a new concept of free-space optical (FSO) communication terminals, characterized as the mutual tracking of near field Gaussian beams and the direct single mode fiber coupling to achieve Tera-bit/seconds (Tbps) class FSO link in short range outdoor environments. It first shows the required optical configurations including beacon transmitters, tracking sensors and fast steering mirrors to construct the mutual tracking system and then discusses their capabilities and performance for this specific near field operation in which conventional tracking system is not enough to assure stable and reliable link performance. It also presents one of the simplest realizations of the new FSO terminals and their test results.

  5. A comparative fluorescent beacon-based method for serum microRNA quantification.

    PubMed

    Beta, Madhu; Krishnakumar, Subramanian; Elchuri, Sailaja V; Salim, Bindu; Narayanan, Janakiraman

    2015-01-01

    Circulating serum microRNAs (miRNAs) are promising biomarkers for disease diagnosis. The quantification of the serum miRNA copy number is a challenge due to the presence of low levels in the serum. Here, we report on a direct measurement of the miRNA copy number from human serum using a locked nucleic acid (LNA) modified beacon probe with a single step using fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy. We had used a minimum volume of 0.1 μL healthy human serum and retinoblastoma serum to show the biological variation of the miRNA copy number.

  6. In situ exposure to non-directional beacons for air traffic control.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Wout; Goeminne, Francis; Vermeeren, Günter; Verloock, Leen; Martens, Luc

    2012-04-01

    In situ electromagnetic field exposure of workers and the general public due to non-directional beacons (NDB) for air traffic control is assessed and characterized. For occupational exposure, the maximal measured electric field value is 881.6 V/m and the maximal magnetic field value is 9.1 A/m. The maximum electric fields exceed the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) reference levels at all seven NDB sites, and the magnetic fields at two of the seven NDB sites (occupational exposure). Recommendations and compliance distances for workers and the general public are provided. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 1): Town Garage Radio Beacon, Londonderry, NH. (First remedial action), September 1992. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-30

    The Town Garage Radio Beacon, NH, site includes the Holton Circle residential development of 23 homes, a town garage area, and an undeveloped hillslope and wetlands area in Londonderry, New Hampshire. From 1940 to 1968, the area was owned by the Department of Defense (DOD), who reportedly used it as a radio beacon facility from 1940 to 1947. The ROD provides a final remedy for the contaminated onsite ground water. No further remedial actions are anticipated for the site. The primary contaminants affecting the ground water are VOCs; and metals, including chromium.

  8. Design, Synthesis, and Application of Spinach Molecular Beacons Triggered by Strand Displacement

    PubMed Central

    Bhadra, Sanchita; Ellington, Andrew D.

    2015-01-01

    We describe design parameters for the synthesis and analytical application of a label-free RNA molecular beacon, termed Spinach.ST. The RNA aptamer Spinach fluoresces upon binding the small-molecule fluorophore DFHBI ((Z)-4-(3,5-difluoro-4-hydroxybenzylidene)-1,2-dimethyl-1H-imidazol-5(4H)-one). Spinach has been reengineered by extending its 5′- and 3′-ends to create Spinach.ST, which is predicted to fold into an inactive conformation that fails to bind DHFBI. Hybridization of a trigger oligonucleotide to a designed toehold on Spinach.ST initiates toehold-mediated strand displacement and restores the DFHBI-binding, fluorescence-enhancing conformation of Spinach. The versatile Spinach.ST sensor can detect DNA or RNA trigger sequences and can readily distinguish single-nucleotide mismatches in the trigger toehold. Primer design techniques are described that augment amplicons produced by enzymatic amplification with Spinach.ST triggers. Interaction between these triggers and Spinach.ST molecular beacons leads to the real-time, sequence-specific quantitation of these amplicons. The use of Spinach.ST with isothermal amplification reactions such as nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) may enable point-of-care applications. The same design principles could also be used to adapt Spinach reporters to the assay of nonnucleic acid analytes in trans. PMID:25605388

  9. Molecular beacon imaging of tumor marker gene expression in pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lily; Cao, Zehong; Lin, Yiming; Wood, William C; Staley, Charles A

    2005-05-01

    We have developed a fluorescence imaging-based approach to detect expression of tumor marker genes in pancreatic cancer cells using molecular beacons (MBs). MBs are short hairpin oligonucleotide probes that bind to specific oligonucleotide sequences and produce fluorescent signals. MBs targeting transcripts of two tumor marker genes, mutant K-ras and survivin, were synthesized and their specificity in detection of the expression of those genes in pancreatic cancer cells was examined. We found that K-ras MBs differentially bind to mutant K-ras mRNAs, resulting in strong fluorescent signals in pancreatic cancer cells with specific mutant K-ras genes but not in normal cells or cancer cells expressing either wild type or a different mutation of the K-ras gene. Additionally, MBs targeting survivin mRNA produced a bright fluorescent signal specifically in pancreatic cancer cells. We also demonstrated that MBs labeled with different fluorophores could detect survivin and mutant K-ras mRNAs simultaneously in single cancer cells. Furthermore, we showed that survivin and K-ras MBs have a high specificity in identifying cancer cells on frozen sections of pancreatic cancer tissues. In conclusion, molecular beacon-based imaging of expression of tumor marker genes has potential for the development of novel approaches for the detection of pancreatic cancer cells.

  10. Temporal change of EIA asymmetry revealed by a beacon receiver network in Southeast Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watthanasangmechai, Kornyanat; Yamamoto, Mamoru; Saito, Akinori; Maruyama, Takashi; Yokoyama, Tatsuhiro; Nishioka, Michi; Ishii, Mamoru

    2015-05-01

    To reveal the temporal change of the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) asymmetry, a multipoint satellite-ground beacon experiment was conducted along the meridional plane of the Thailand-Indonesia sector. The observation includes one station near the magnetic equator and four stations at off-equator latitudes. This is the first EIA asymmetry study with high spatial resolution using GNU Radio Beacon Receiver (GRBR) observations in Southeast Asia. GRBR-total electron contents (TECs) from 97 polar-orbit satellite passes in March 2012 were analyzed in this study. Successive passes captured rapid evolution of EIA asymmetry, especially during geomagnetic disturbances. The penetrating electric fields that occur during geomagnetic disturbed days are not the cause of the asymmetry. Instead, high background TEC associated with an intense electric field empowers the neutral wind to produce severe asymmetry of the EIA. Such rapid evolution of EIA asymmetry was not seen during nighttime, when meridional wind mainly controlled the asymmetric structures. Additional data are necessary to identify the source of the variations, i.e., atmospheric waves. Precisely capturing the locations of the crests and the evolution of the asymmetry enhances understanding of the temporal change of EIA asymmetry at the local scale and leads to a future local modeling for TEC prediction in Southeast Asia.

  11. Facility class Rayleigh beacon AO system for the 4.2m William Herschel telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutten, René G.; Clark, Paul; Myers, Richard M.; Wilson, Richard W.; Bingham, Richard G.; Emsellem, Eric; Gregory, Thomas; Humphreys, Ronald A.; Knapen, Johan; Moretto, Gilberto; Morris, Simon L.; Talbot, Gordon

    2003-02-01

    A rationale is presented for the use of a relatively low-altitude (15km) Rayleigh Laser Guide Star to provide partial adaptive optics correction across a large fraction of the sky on the 4.2m William Herschel Telescope. The scientific motivation in relation to the available instrumentation suite is discussed and supported by model performance calculations, based on observed atmospheric turbulence distributions at the site. The proposed implementation takes the form of a laser system, beam diagnostics, tip-tilt mirror and beacon launch telescope, together with a range-gated wavefront sensor and processing system. It is designed to operate in conjunction with the telescope"s existing facility-class natural guide star AO system, NAOMI. Aspects of the proposed implementation are described as well as the technical features related to the system model and the error budget. In a separate paper the NAOMI AO system itself is presented. Other papers describe a demonstrator system and preliminary Rayleigh beacon wavefront sensing measurements at the site.

  12. Secure Utilization of Beacons and UAVs in Emergency Response Systems for Building Fire Hazard.

    PubMed

    Seo, Seung-Hyun; Choi, Jung-In; Song, Jinseok

    2017-09-25

    An intelligent emergency system for hazard monitoring and building evacuation is a very important application area in Internet of Things (IoT) technology. Through the use of smart sensors, such a system can provide more vital and reliable information to first-responders and also reduce the incidents of false alarms. Several smart monitoring and warning systems do already exist, though they exhibit key weaknesses such as a limited monitoring coverage and security, which have not yet been sufficiently addressed. In this paper, we propose a monitoring and emergency response method for buildings by utilizing beacons and Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) on an IoT security platform. In order to demonstrate the practicability of our method, we also implement a proof of concept prototype, which we call the UAV-EMOR (UAV-assisted Emergency Monitoring and Response) system. Our UAV-EMOR system provides the following novel features: (1) secure communications between UAVs, smart sensors, the control server and a smartphone app for security managers; (2) enhanced coordination between smart sensors and indoor/outdoor UAVs to expand real-time monitoring coverage; and (3) beacon-aided rescue and building evacuation.

  13. A Two-Layer Method for Sedentary Behaviors Classification Using Smartphone and Bluetooth Beacons.

    PubMed

    Cerón, Jesús D; López, Diego M; Hofmann, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Among the factors that outline the health of populations, person's lifestyle is the more important one. This work focuses on the caracterization and prevention of sedentary lifestyles. A sedentary behavior is defined as "any waking behavior characterized by an energy expenditure of 1.5 METs (Metabolic Equivalent) or less while in a sitting or reclining posture". To propose a method for sedentary behaviors classification using a smartphone and Bluetooth beacons considering different types of classification models: personal, hybrid or impersonal. Following the CRISP-DM methodology, a method based on a two-layer approach for the classification of sedentary behaviors is proposed. Using data collected from a smartphones' accelerometer, gyroscope and barometer; the first layer classifies between performing a sedentary behavior and not. The second layer of the method classifies the specific sedentary activity performed using only the smartphone's accelerometer and barometer data, but adding indoor location data, using Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) beacons. To improve the precision of the classification, both layers implemented the Random Forest algorithm and the personal model. This study presents the first available method for the automatic classification of specific sedentary behaviors. The layered classification approach has the potential to improve processing, memory and energy consumption of mobile devices and wearables used.

  14. Analysis of rocket beacon transmissions for computerized reconstruction of ionospheric densities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernhardt, P. A.; Huba, J. D.; Chaturvedi, P. K.; Fulford, J. A.; Forsyth, P. A.; Anderson, D. N.; Zalesak, S. T.

    1993-01-01

    Three methods are described to obtain ionospheric electron densities from transionospheric, rocket-beacon TEC data. First, when the line-of-sight from a ground receiver to the rocket beacon is tangent to the flight trajectory, the electron concentration can be obtained by differentiating the TEC with respect to the distance to the rocket. A similar method may be used to obtain the electron-density profile if the layer is horizontally stratified. Second, TEC data obtained during chemical release experiments may be interpreted with the aid of physical models of the disturbed ionosphere to yield spatial maps of the modified regions. Third, computerized tomography (CT) can be used to analyze TEC data obtained along a chain of ground-based receivers aligned along the plane of the rocket trajectory. CT analysis of TEC data is used to reconstruct a 2D image of a simulated equatorial plume. TEC data is computed for a linear chain of nine receivers with adjacent spacings of either 100 or 200 km. The simulation data are analyzed to provide an F region reconstruction on a grid with 15 x 15 km pixels. Ionospheric rocket tomography may also be applied to rocket-assisted measurements of amplitude and phase scintillations and airglow intensities.

  15. Topical MMP beacon enabled fluorescence-guided resection of oral carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Laura; Chen, Juan; Wolter, Nikolaus E.; Wilson, Brian; Zheng, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Each year almost 300,000 individuals worldwide are diagnosed with oral cancer, more than 90% of these being oral carcinoma [N. Engl. J. Med. 328, 184 19938417385]. Surgical resection is the standard of care, but accurate delineation of the tumor boundaries is challenging, resulting in either under-resection with risk of local recurrence or over-resection with increased functional loss and negative impact on quality of life. This study evaluates, in two pre-clinical in vivo tumor models, the potential of fluorescence-guided resection using molecular beacons activated by metalloproteinases, which are frequently upregulated in human oral cancer. In both models there was rapid (<15 min) beacon activation upon local application, allowing clear fluoresecence imaging in vivo and confirmed by ex vivo fluorescence microscopy and HPLC, with minimal activation in normal oral tissues. Although the tissue penetration was limited using topical application, these findings support further development of this approach towards translation to first-in-human trials. PMID:27231609

  16. Mars final approach navigation using ground beacons and orbiters: An information propagation perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Yangwei; Zhang, Hongbo

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, the Mars final approach navigation is fulfilled using radiometric measurements from ground-based beacons and orbiters. In the navigation system, the beacons are fixed on the surface of the Mars and orbiters can be phased to cooperate with the probe. The trajectory of the Mars probe and the true anomalies of the orbiters are the design variables that should be optimized. The propagation process of the Fisher information in dynamical system is clarified, and the Fisher information matrix (FIM) at the final time contains the whole information accumulated from the measurements. The system's observability is optimized through maximizing the eigenvalues of the information matrix. Furthermore, the optimal geometrical configurations with three and four measurements are analytically solved for the first time. In simulations, an unscented Kalman filter (UKF) is applied to examine the navigation performance in different scenarios in which three and four measurements are applied. The results show that the position and velocity estimation accuracy can reach 10 m and 0.01 m/s respectively. The Fisher information increases the most when the geometrical configuration is in the vicinity of the optimal configuration.

  17. Near and far field beacon localization algorithm for wireless sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Ligeng; Li, Xueen; Duan, Bo; Han, Weijuan

    2013-03-01

    Localization plays an important role in wireless sensor network management. Currently, the approaches mainly fall into two categories: range-based and range-free. In this paper, the proposed work combines the advantages of the two types of methods (range-based and range-free) to introduce the near and far field characteristic of RSSI(NFC), which is 1) in the near field, there is a relatively stable relationship between RSSI and distance. 2) In the far field, a max range of the signal radiation exists. NFC provides a new method of distance measurement and node positioning. A new localization technique (NFCB) based on NFC is also proposed. In this algorithm, anchor nodes transmit beacons at different power levels, which can divide geographical regions into the rings with multiple near and far field combination. From the information received by each beacon heard, nodes can determine its position, which depends on the property of intersections of near-fields. NFCB can turn the nodes with high-precisions into anchor nodes. Without increasing the hardware, it can raise the density of anchor nodes, which greatly improve positioning accuracy. Simulation results demonstrate that the estimation error is lower than CAB APIT.

  18. Preliminary Statistics from the NASA Alphasat Beacon Receiver in Milan, Italy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nessel, James; Zemba, Michael; Morse, Jacquelynne; Luini, Lorenzo; Riva, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) and the Politecnico di Milano (POLIMI) have initiated a joint propagation campaign within the framework of the Alphasat propagation experiment to characterize rain attenuation, scintillation, and gaseous absorption effects of the atmosphere in the 40 gigahertz band. NASA GRC has developed and installed a K/Q-band (20/40 gigahertz) beacon receiver at the POLIMI campus in Milan, Italy, which receives the 20/40 gigahertz signals broadcast from the Alphasat Aldo Paraboni TDP no. 5 beacon payload. The primary goal of these measurements is to develop a physical model to improve predictions of communications systems performance within the Q-band. Herein, we provide an overview of the design and data calibration procedure, and present 6 months of preliminary statistics of the NASA propagation terminal, which has been installed and operating in Milan since May 2014. The Q-band receiver has demonstrated a dynamic range of 40 decibels at an 8-hertz sampling rate. A weather station with an optical disdrometer is also installed to characterize rain drop size distribution for correlation with physical based models.

  19. Preliminary Statistics from the NASA Alphasat Beacon Receiver in Milan, Italy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zemba, Michael J.; Nessel, James A.; Morse, Jacquelynne R.

    2015-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) and the Politecnico di Milano (POLIMI) have initiated a joint propagation campaign within the framework of the Alphasat propagation experiment to characterize rain attenuation, scintillation, and gaseous absorption effects of the atmosphere in the 40 GHz band. NASA GRC has developed and installed a KQ-band (20-40 GHz) beacon receiver at the POLIMI campus in Milan, Italy, which receives the 20-40 GHz signals broadcast from the Alphasat Aldo Paraboni TDP5 beacon payload. The primary goal of these measurements is to develop a physical model to improve predictions of communications systems performance within the Q-band. Herein, we provide an overview of the design and data calibration procedure, and present 6 months of preliminary statistics of the NASA propagation terminal, which has been installed and operating in Milan since May 2014. The Q-band receiver has demonstrated a dynamic range of 40 dB at an 8-Hz sampling rate. A weather station with an optical disdrometer is also installed to characterize rain drop size distribution for correlation with physical based models

  20. ATS-6 - Radio Beacon Experiment: The first years. [ionospheric and satellite-to-ground electron content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, K.; Fritz, R. B.; Grubb, R. N.; Jones, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    The Radio Beacon Experiment aboard Applications Technology Satellite-6 (ATS-6) is designed to measure the total electron content and the ionospheric electron content between the satellite and ground. The spaceborne beacon transmits signals on frequencies of 40, 140, and 360 MHz with amplitude modulations of 1 MHz and/or 0.1 MHz for the measurement of modulation phase, Faraday rotation, and amplitude. The modulation phase delays are calibrated in the satellite and in the ground equipment, and the polarization of the emitted signals are predetermined by standard antenna range techniques. The design of the ATS-6 receiver in Boulder, Colorado, is discussed. The antennae are of the short backfire type described by Ehrenspeck (1967), with nominal gains of 13, 19, and 22 dB at 40, 140, and 360 MHz, respectively. Data recording and overall supervision of the receiver is carried out by a 16-bit minicomputer with 8 k of memory. Overall performance of the system is satisfactory. Sample data on the monthly median hourly values of the total electron content, plasmospheric content, and shape factor show distinct seasonal and diurnal variations.

  1. May Small Digital PZT And Radio Beacons Improve The LPhL For Future Lunar Missions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ping, Jinsong; Su, Xiaoli; Hanada, Hideo; Gusev, Alexandra; Li, Jinling; Shi, Xian; Liu, Qinghui

    2012-08-01

    LLR is the current unique precise method to measure the LPhL since the Apollo missions. After 40years observations, the measu ring error of LPhL amplitudes have been reduced to about a couple of tens milli-arcseconds. To improve the measuring precision of LPhL, the new ideas of digital PZT (ILOM) and radio beacons are suggested by researchers from Japan, Russia and China for up - coming lunar missions. To promote above ideas in these mission s, we developed a prototype PZT, proposed radio beacons on CE - 3/4 lunar landing missions and on Lunar - Glob/Resource lunar landing missions. We are also developing the small VLBI antennas in Russia and China to prepare the possible LPhL joint in - beam radio observation from later 2013 or earlier 2014. The analyzing work of simulations have been carried out. Additionally, the newly developed digital PZT technique will also be used on measuring the local or regional plume line variation, which has been recently noticed closely related to the volcano and earthquake activities on the Earth (See Li et al. and Yang et al. in this meeting).

  2. Measurements of Tilt and Focus for Sodium Beacon Adaptive Optics on the Starfire 3.5 Meter Telescope

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    beacon and natural guide star operation. This approach, and a more complicated approach, are described in detail by Link and Foucault [3]. They show these...Astronomical Telescopes and Instrumentation Conference, Glasgow, Scotland, 21–25 June 2004. 3. Link D. and Foucault B., "Investigation of focus control

  3. A DNA tetrahedron-based molecular beacon for tumor-related mRNA detection in living cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, Nuli; Huang, Jin; Yang, Xiaohai; Yang, Yanjing; Quan, Ke; Wang, He; Ying, Le; Ou, Min; Wang, Kemin

    2016-02-07

    Due to its low cytotoxicity, high resistance to enzymatic degradation, and cellular permeability, a DNA tetrahedron-based molecular beacon (DTMB) is designed for tumor-related TK1 mRNA detection in living cells, where the target sequence can induce the tetrahedron from contraction to extension, resulting in fluorescence restoration.

  4. Guiding Math Students to Campus Services: An Impact Evaluation of the Beacon Program at South Texas College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Visher, Mary; Butcher, Kristin F.; Cerna, Oscar S.

    2011-01-01

    This research rigorously evaluates whether a low-cost intervention can improve students' performance in developmental math. The "Beacon Mentoring Program" was developed at South Texas College by professors, administrators, and staff at the college. Surveys of students revealed that many did not have someone on campus whom they felt they…

  5. Beacon Charter School Needs a School: A Case of Capital Outlay of Charters in a Public District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wronowski, Meredith L.

    2017-01-01

    The case study presented below is a representation of a real-world, ongoing situation involving a public school district's capital outlay for charter schools within its boundaries. One particular charter, Beacon Charter School, was promised a permanent building by the public school district that also acts as its authorizer. However, recent events…

  6. A molecular-beacon-based asymmetric PCR assay for easy visualization of amplicons in the diagnosis of trichomoniasis.

    PubMed

    Sonkar, Subash C; Sachdev, Divya; Mishra, Prashant K; Kumar, Anita; Mittal, Pratima; Saluja, Daman

    2016-12-15

    The currently available nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) for trichomoniasis are accurate, quick and confirmative with superior sensitivity than traditional culture-based microbiology assays. However, these assays are associated with problems of carry over contamination, false positive results, requirement of technical expertise for performance and detection of end product. Hence, a diagnostic assay with easy visualization of the amplified product will be profitable. An in-house, rapid, sensitive, specific molecular-beacon-based PCR assay, using primers against pfoB gene of Trichomonas vaginalis, was developed and evaluated using dry ectocervical swabs (n=392) from symptomatic females with vaginal discharge. Total DNA was isolated and used as template for the PCR assays. The performance and reproducibility of PCR assay was evaluated by composite reference standard (CRS). For easy visualization of the amplified product, molecular-beacon was designed and amplicons were visualized directly using fluorescent handheld dark reader or by Micro-Plate Reader. Molecular-beacons are single-stranded hairpin shaped nucleic acid probes composed of a stem, with fluorophore/quencher pair and a loop region complementary to the desired DNA. The beacon-based PCR assay designed in the present study is highly specific as confirmed by competition experiments and extremely sensitive with detection limit of 20fg of genomic DNA (3-4 pathogens). The minimum infrastructure requirement and ease to perform the assay makes this method highly useful for resource poor countries for better disease management. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Improving the detectability of oxygen saturation level targets for preterm neonates: A laboratory test of tremolo and beacon sonifications.

    PubMed

    Deschamps, Marie-Lys; Sanderson, Penelope; Hinckfuss, Kelly; Browning, Caitlin; Loeb, Robert G; Liley, Helen; Liu, David

    2016-09-01

    Recent guidelines recommend oxygen saturation (SpO2) levels of 90%-95% for preterm neonates on supplemental oxygen but it is difficult to discern such levels with current pulse oximetry sonifications. We tested (1) whether adding levels of tremolo to a conventional log-linear pulse oximetry sonification would improve identification of SpO2 ranges, and (2) whether adding a beacon reference tone to conventional pulse oximetry confuses listeners about the direction of change. Participants using the Tremolo (94%) or Beacon (81%) sonifications identified SpO2 range significantly more accurately than participants using the LogLinear sonification (52%). The Beacon sonification did not confuse participants about direction of change. The Tremolo sonification may have advantages over the Beacon sonification for monitoring SpO2 of preterm neonates, but both must be further tested with clinicians in clinically representative scenarios, and with different levels of ambient noise and distractions. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Analysis of space shuttle main engine data using Beacon-based exception analysis for multi-missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, H.; Mackey, R.; James, M.; Zak, M.; Kynard, M.; Sebghati, J.; Greene, W.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes analysis of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) sensor data using Beacon-based exception analysis for multimissions (BEAM), a new technology developed for sensor analysis and diagnostics in autonomous space systems by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL).

  9. Flight Software Implementation of the Beacon Monitor Expreiment On the NASA New Millennium Deep Space 1 (DS-1) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, R.; Schlutsmeyer, A.

    1997-01-01

    A new technology that can lower the cost of mission operations on future spacecraft will be tested on the NASA New Millennium Deep Space 1 (DS-1) Mission. This technology, the Beacon Monitor Experiment (BMOX), can be used to reduce the Deep Space Network (DSN) tracking time and its associated costs on future missions.

  10. Flight Software Implementation of the Beacon Monitor Expreiment On the NASA New Millennium Deep Space 1 (DS-1) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, R.; Schlutsmeyer, A.

    1997-01-01

    A new technology that can lower the cost of mission operations on future spacecraft will be tested on the NASA New Millennium Deep Space 1 (DS-1) Mission. This technology, the Beacon Monitor Experiment (BMOX), can be used to reduce the Deep Space Network (DSN) tracking time and its associated costs on future missions.

  11. To Light a Beacon: What Administrators Can Do To Make Schools Successful for All Students. ERIC/OSEP Topical Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Disabilities and Gifted Education, Arlington, VA. ERIC/OSEP Special Project.

    In some schools, students with disabilities achieve exemplary results. To find out what these schools do that set them apart, the U.S. Office of Special Education Programs sponsored a series of studies focused on "Beacons of Excellence Schools." This topical brief highlights results from three of these studies. The University of Maryland study…

  12. The Child Development Training Consortium. A Status Report on the San Juan College AACJC-Kellogg Beacon College Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beers, C. David; Ott, Richard W.

    The Child Development Training Consortium, a Beacon College Project directed by San Juan College (SJC) is a collaborative effort of colleges and universities in New Mexico and Arizona. The consortium's major objective is to create child development training materials for community college faculty who teach "at-risk" Native American and…

  13. Tiny Molecular Beacons: LNA/2'-O-methyl RNA Chimeric Probes for Imaging Dynamic mRNA Processes in Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Catrina, Irina E.; Marras, Salvatore A.E.; Bratu, Diana P.

    2012-01-01

    New approaches for imaging dynamic processes involving RNAs in living cells are continuously being developed and optimized. The use of molecular beacons synthesized from 2'-O-methylribonucleotides (which are resistant to cellular nucleases) is an established approach for visualizing native mRNAs in real time. In order to spatially and temporally resolve dynamic steps involving RNA in cells, molecular beacons need to efficiently hybridize to their RNA targets. To expand the repertoire of target sites accessible to molecular beacons, we decreased the length of their probe sequences and altered their backbone by the inclusion of LNA (locked nucleic acid) nucleotides. We named these new LNA/2'-O-methyl RNA chimera oligonucleotides, “tiny molecular beacons”. We analyzed these tiny molecular beacons and found that the incorporation of just a few LNA nucleotides enables these shorter probes to stably anneal to more structured regions of the RNA than is possible with conventional molecular beacons. The ease of synthesis of tiny molecular beacons, and the flexibility to couple them to a large variety of fluorophores and quenchers, renders them optimal for the detection of less abundant and/or highly structured RNAs. To determine their efficiency to detect endogenous mRNAs in live specimens, we designed tiny molecular beacons that were specific for oskar mRNA and microinjected them into living Drosophila melanogaster oocytes. We then imaged the live oocytes via spinning disc confocal microscopy. The results demonstrate that tiny molecular beacons hybridize to target mRNA at faster rates than classically designed molecular beacons, and are able to access previously inaccessible target regions. PMID:22738327

  14. Data governance and data sharing agreements for community-wide health information exchange: lessons from the beacon communities.

    PubMed

    Allen, Claudia; Des Jardins, Terrisca R; Heider, Arvela; Lyman, Kristin A; McWilliams, Lee; Rein, Alison L; Schachter, Abigail A; Singh, Ranjit; Sorondo, Barbara; Topper, Joan; Turske, Scott A

    2014-01-01

    Unprecedented efforts are underway across the United States to electronically capture and exchange health information to improve health care and population health, and reduce costs. This increased collection and sharing of electronic patient data raises several governance issues, including privacy, security, liability, and market competition. Those engaged in such efforts have had to develop data sharing agreements (DSAs) among entities involved in information exchange, many of whom are "nontraditional" health care entities and/or new partners. This paper shares lessons learned based on the experiences of six federally funded communities participating in the Beacon Community Cooperative Agreement Program, and offers guidance for navigating data governance issues and developing DSAs to facilitate community-wide health information exchange. While all entities involved in electronic data sharing must address governance issues and create DSAs accordingly, until recently little formal guidance existed for doing so - particularly for community-based initiatives. Despite this lack of guidance, together the Beacon Communities' experiences highlight promising strategies for navigating complex governance issues, which may be useful to other entities or communities initiating information exchange efforts to support delivery system transformation. For the past three years, AcademyHealth has provided technical assistance to most of the 17 Beacon Communities, 6 of whom contributed to this collaborative writing effort. Though these communities varied widely in terms of their demographics, resources, and Beacon-driven priorities, common themes emerged as they described their approaches to data governance and DSA development. The 6 Beacon Communities confirmed that DSAs are necessary to satisfy legal and market-based concerns, and they identified several specific issues, many of which have been noted by others involved in network data sharing initiatives. More importantly, these

  15. Beacon of Hope? Lessons Learned from Efforts to Reduce Civilian Deaths from Police Shootings in an Australian State.

    PubMed

    Saligari, Jessica; Evans, Richard

    2016-04-01

    In the 1990s, the police service in Victoria, Australia, faced a crisis of community confidence due to a spate of civilian deaths from police shootings. In that decade, twice as many civilians died at the hands of the police in Victoria than in every other Australian state combined. Most of those killed were mentally ill and affected by drugs and alcohol, and were rarely a serious threat except to themselves. The problem was also almost entirely an urban phenomenon. Shootings in rural communities, where mentally ill people were more likely to be personally known to local police, were (and remain) almost unknown. The large number of fatalities was recognised as a serious threat to public confidence, and Victoria Police introduced a ground-breaking training programme, Operation Beacon. Operating procedures and weapons training were fundamentally changed, to focus on de-escalation of conflict and avoiding or minimising police use of force. In the short term, Operation Beacon was successful. Shooting incidents were dramatically reduced. However, during the first decade of the new century, the number of civilians being killed again increased. This article examines Operation Beacon, both as a successful model for reducing civilian deaths at the hand of police and as a cautionary tale for police reform. We argue that the lessons of Operation Beacon have been gradually forgotten and that old habits and attitudes resurfaced. Fatal shootings of mentally ill civilians can be prevented, but if success is to be other than temporary, the Beacon philosophy must be continually reemphasised by police management.

  16. Beacon Beware.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sartorius, Tara Cady

    1999-01-01

    Addresses Edward Hopper's painting "Light at Two Lights" and the painting's real life subject, Cape Elizabeth Light (Maine). Discusses the fate of lighthouses; includes lessons in visual arts, mathematics and science, language arts, geography, and social studies; and lists internet sites for Edward Hopper and lighthouses. (CMK)

  17. What counts? For whom?: Cultural beacons and unexpected areas of programmatic impact.

    PubMed

    Durá, Lucía; Felt, Laurel J; Singhal, Arvind

    2014-06-01

    The present article was motivated by our observations that (1) current methods for gathering data do not wholly capture program-related transformations, and (2) grassroots ways of knowing yield legitimate data and can enrich programmatic efforts and evaluations. Accordingly, our work seeks to leverage grassroots knowledge in order to both recognize and respect cultural beacons (CBs) - culturally embedded, user-defined aids for understanding program-related change. Simply, these inductively gathered, locally identified CBs illuminate what to measure and/or how to measure it. Our analysis of participatory evaluations from four international, social change interventions offers four sites for detecting CBs: material possessions, community landscape features, social behaviors, and community-inspired art. We examine the methodological and relational contexts that facilitate CB discovery, discuss unexpected areas of programmatic impact, and utilize lessons learned across projects to make suggestions for continued exploration of CBs in monitoring and evaluation design and practice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Low elevation angle measurements of the ATS-6 beacons at 4 and 30 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webber, R. V.; McCormick, K. S.

    1980-12-01

    During the westward drift of the ATS-6 satellite in 1976, measurements were made, on the east coast of Newfoundland, of the received signal strengths of the satellite beacon at 4 and 30 GHz. Observations were continued for a total of about 50 h during the 11 day period in which the satellite rose from just below the horizon to about 10 deg above. Data analysis included signal strength distributions, medians, fading ranges and fading rates. No correlation was found between the fading of the two signals. Based on the measured values of fade depths, it is postulated that, for deep fades, the probability of a given fade depth is proportional to frequency. Fade depth statistics are compared with earlier data at 7.3 GHz which were measured at Ottawa

  19. Nanomechanical DNA origami 'single-molecule beacons' directly imaged by atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kuzuya, Akinori; Sakai, Yusuke; Yamazaki, Takahiro; Xu, Yan; Komiyama, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    DNA origami involves the folding of long single-stranded DNA into designed structures with the aid of short staple strands; such structures may enable the development of useful nanomechanical DNA devices. Here we develop versatile sensing systems for a variety of chemical and biological targets at molecular resolution. We have designed functional nanomechanical DNA origami devices that can be used as 'single-molecule beacons', and function as pinching devices. Using 'DNA origami pliers' and 'DNA origami forceps', which consist of two levers ~170 nm long connected at a fulcrum, various single-molecule inorganic and organic targets ranging from metal ions to proteins can be visually detected using atomic force microscopy by a shape transition of the origami devices. Any detection mechanism suitable for the target of interest, pinching, zipping or unzipping, can be chosen and used orthogonally with differently shaped origami devices in the same mixture using a single platform. PMID:21863016

  20. Engineering Novel Molecular Beacon Constructs to Study Intracellular RNA Dynamics and Localization.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhao; Wu, Xiaotian; Krueger, Christopher J; Chen, Antony K

    2017-09-21

    With numerous advancements in novel biochemical techniques, our knowledge of the role of RNAs in the regulation of cellular physiology and pathology has grown significantly over the past several decades. Nevertheless, detailed information regarding RNA processing, trafficking, and localization in living cells has been lacking due to technical limitations in imaging single RNA transcripts in living cells with high spatial and temporal resolution. In this review, we discuss techniques that have shown great promise for single RNA imaging, followed by highlights in our recent work in the development of molecular beacons (MBs), a class of nanoscale oligonucleotide-probes, for detecting individual RNA transcripts in living cells. With further refinement of MB design and development of more sophisticated fluorescence microscopy techniques, we envision that MB-based approaches could promote new discoveries of RNA functions and activities. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Detection of DNA damage based on metal-mediated molecular beacon and DNA strands displacement reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Yanxiang; Wei, Min; Wei, Wei; Yin, Lihong; Pu, Yuepu; Liu, Songqin

    2014-01-01

    DNA hairpin structure probes are usually designed by forming intra-molecular duplex based on Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds. In this paper, a molecular beacon based on silver ions-mediated cytosine-Ag+-cytosine base pairs was used to detect DNA. The inherent characteristic of the metal ligation facilitated the design of functional probe and the adjustment of its binding strength compared to traditional DNA hairpin structure probes, which make it be used to detect DNA in a simple, rapid and easy way with the help of DNA strands displacement reaction. The method was sensitive and also possesses the good specificity to differentiate the single base mismatched DNA from the complementary DNA. It was also successfully applied to study the damage effect of classic genotoxicity chemicals such as styrene oxide and sodium arsenite on DNA, which was significant in food science, environmental science and pharmaceutical science.

  2. Analysis of a Four-Station Doppler Tracking Method Using a Simple CW Beacon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fricke, Clifford L.; Watkins, Carl W. L.

    1961-01-01

    A Doppler tracking method is presented in which a very small, simple CW beacon transmitter is used with four Doppler receiving stations to obtain the position and velocity of a space research vehicle. The exact transmitter frequency need not be known, but an initial position is required, and Doppler frequencies must be measured with extreme accuracy. The errors in the system are analyzed and general formulas are derived for position and velocity errors. The proper location of receiving stations is discussed, a rule for avoiding infinite errors is given, and error charts for ideal station configurations are presented. The effect of the index of refraction is also investigated. The system is capable of determining transmitter position within 1,000 feet at a range of 200 miles.

  3. Receiving method of maritime light wireless communication based on LED beacons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Na; Zhong, Qiduan; Zhu, Jiang

    2008-11-01

    LEDs (light emitting diodes) can be applied in both illumination and communication. A system of maritime wireless communication with ships based on LED beacons is proposed in this paper. The communication space model and optical transmission model were set up, visible wireless communication manner was analyzed. An anti-fading method combining space and time diversity is adopted due to quick signal attenuation and large noise from nature light interference. After filtering and judgment, the received diversity signals are separated to do bit comparison using Hamming Perception Network. Through analysis and simulation, compared to ordinary space diversity or time diversity way, this kind of anti-fading method can increase reliable communication distance greatly, reduce equipment cost and improve bandwidth utilization rate.

  4. 16S rRNA beacons for bacterial monitoring during human space missions.

    PubMed

    Larios-Sanz, Maia; Kourentzi, Katerina D; Warmflash, David; Jones, Jeffrey; Pierson, Duane L; Willson, Richard C; Fox, George E

    2007-04-01

    Microorganisms are unavoidable in space environments and their presence has, at times, been a source of problems. Concerns about disease during human space missions are particularly important considering the significant changes the immune system incurs during spaceflight and the history of microbial contamination aboard the Mir space station. Additionally, these contaminants may have adverse effects on instrumentation and life-support systems. A sensitive, highly specific system to detect, characterize, and monitor these microbial populations is essential. Herein we describe a monitoring approach that uses 16S rRNA targeted molecular beacons to successfully detect several specific bacterial groupings. This methodology will greatly simplify in-flight monitoring by minimizing sample handling and processing. We also address and provide solutions to target accessibility problems encountered in hybridizations that target 16S rRNA.

  5. Study of flight data recorder, underwater locator beacon, data logger and flarm collision avoidance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timi, Purnota Hannan; Shermin, Saima; Rahman, Asifur

    2017-06-01

    Flight data recorder is one of the most important sources of flight data in event of aviation disaster which records a wide range of flight parameters including altitude, airspeed, heading etc. and also helps monitoring and analyzing aircraft performance. Cockpit voice recorder records radio microphone transmissions and sounds in the cockpit. These devices help to find out and understand the root causes of aircraft crashes and help building better aircraft systems and technical solutions to prevent similar type of crashes in future, which lead to improvement in safety of aircrafts and passengers. There are other devices also which enhance the aircraft safety and assists in emergency or catastrophic situations. This paper discusses the concept of Flight Data Recorder (FDR), Cockpit Voice Recorder (CVR), Underwater Locator Beacon (ULB), Data logger and flarm-collision avoidance system for aircraft and their applications in aviation.

  6. Specificity of SNP detection with molecular beacons is improved by stem and loop separation with spacers.

    PubMed

    Farzan, Valentina M; Markelov, Mikhail L; Skoblov, Alexander Yu; Shipulin, German A; Zatsepin, Timofei S

    2017-03-13

    Molecular beacons (MBs) are valuable tools in molecular biology, clinical diagnostics and analytical chemistry. Here we describe a novel approach for the design of MBs with nucleotide or non-nucleotide linkers between the stem and loop regions. Such modified MBs have significantly improved specificity and performance for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection. These advantages are especially distinct, when compared to the classic MBs, in the case of possible interactions between the stem and loop regions. We demonstrated the applicability of such modified MBs for the discrimination of common Factor V, NOS3 and ADRB2 SNPs in model plasmids and in clinical samples. The developed approach could be applicable not only to fluorescently labeled MBs, but also to other biosensors based on nucleic acids with stem-loop structures.

  7. Molecular Beacons of Xeno-Nucleic Acid for Detecting Nucleic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qi; Chen, Lei; Long, Yitao; Tian, He; Wu, Junchen

    2013-01-01

    Molecular beacons (MBs) of DNA and RNA have aroused increasing interest because they allow a continuous readout, excellent spatial and temporal resolution to observe in real time. This kind of dual-labeled oligonucleotide probes can differentiate between bound and unbound DNA/RNA in homogenous hybridization with a high signal-to-background ratio in living cells. This review briefly summarizes the different unnatural sugar backbones of oligonucleotides combined with fluorophores that have been employed to sense DNA/RNA. With different probes, we epitomize the fundamental understanding of driving forces and these recognition processes. Moreover, we will introduce a few novel and attractive emerging applications and discuss their advantages and disadvantages. We also highlight several perspective probes in the application of cancer therapeutics. PMID:23781286

  8. Molecular beacon-based enzyme-free strategy for amplified DNA detection.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiahao; Wu, Jueqi; Li, Zhigang

    2016-05-15

    We report an enzyme-free, sensitive strategy for DNA detections through fluorescence amplification. The sensing method employs molecular beacons (MBs) and two single-stranded helper DNA probes. In the presence of a DNA target, it binds and opens an MB. This triggers the hybridizations between the MB and helper probes, and consequently releases the DNA target, which becomes available to react with another MB and enhances the fluorescence emission of the MBs. The detection limit of the proposed strategy is 0.58 pM, which is about 3 orders of magnitude better than the conventional MB-based method. This method is also fast and exhibits good selectivity. It is superior to previous MB-based amplification approaches employing enzymes or nanomaterials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Pyrene functionalized molecular beacon with pH-sensitive i-motif in a loop.

    PubMed

    Dembska, Anna; Juskowiak, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we present a spectral characterization of pH-sensitive system, which combines the i-motif properties with the spatially sensitive fluorescence signal of pyrene molecules attached to hairpin ends. The excimer production (fluorescence max. ∼480 nm) by pyrene labels at the ends of the molecular beacon is driven by pH-dependent i-motif formation in the loop. To illustrate the performance and reversible work of our systems, we performed the experiments with repeatedly pH cycling between pH values of 7.5±0.3 and 6.5±0.3. The sensor gives analytical response in excimer-monomer switching mode in narrow pH range (1.5 pH units) and exhibits high pH resolution (0.1 pH unit).

  10. Isothermal amplification detection of nucleic acids by a double-nicked beacon.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chao; Zhou, Meiling; Pan, Mei; Zhong, Guilin; Ma, Cuiping

    2016-03-01

    Isothermal and rapid amplification detection of nucleic acids is an important technology in environmental monitoring, foodborne pathogen detection, and point-of-care clinical diagnostics. Here we have developed a novel method of isothermal signal amplification for single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) detection. The ssDNA target could be used as an initiator, coupled with a double-nicked molecular beacon, to originate amplification cycles, achieving cascade signal amplification. In addition, the method showed good specificity and strong anti-jamming capability. Overall, it is a one-pot and isothermal strand displacement amplification method without the requirement of a stepwise procedure, which greatly simplifies the experimental procedure and decreases the probability of contamination of samples. With its advantages, the method would be very useful to detect nucleic acids in point-of-care or field use. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Considerations for Community-Based mHealth Initiatives: Insights From Three Beacon Communities

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Mobile health (mHealth) is gaining widespread attention for its potential to engage patients in their health and health care in their daily lives. Emerging evidence suggests that mHealth interventions can be used effectively to support behavior change, but numerous challenges remain when implementing these programs at the community level. This paper provides an overview of considerations when implementing community-based mHealth initiatives, based on the experiences of three Beacon Communities across the United States that have launched text messaging (short message service, SMS) pilot programs aimed at diabetes risk reduction and disease management. The paper addresses lessons learned and suggests strategies to overcome challenges related to developing text message content, conducting marketing and outreach, enrolling participants, engaging providers, evaluating program effectiveness, and sustaining and scaling the programs. PMID:24128406

  12. Simple fluorescence-based detection of protein kinase A activity using a molecular beacon probe.

    PubMed

    Ma, Changbei; Lv, Xiaoyuan; Wang, Kemin; Jin, Shunxin; Liu, Haisheng; Wu, Kefeng; Zeng, Weimin

    2017-06-08

    Protein kinase A was detected by quantifying the amount of ATP used after a protein kinase reaction. The ATP assay was performed using the T4 DNA ligase and a molecular beacon (MB). In the presence of ATP, DNA ligase catalyzed the ligation of short DNA. The ligation product then hybridized to MB, resulting in a fluorescence enhancement of the MB. This assay was capable of determining protein kinase A in the range of 12.5∼150 nM, with a detection limit of 1.25 nM. Furthermore, this assay could also be used to investigate the effect of genistein on protein kinase A. It was a universal, non-radioisotopic, and homogeneous method for assaying protein kinase A.

  13. Ground-water appraisal of the Fishkill-Beacon area, Dutchess County, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snavely, Deborah S.

    1980-01-01

    The most productive aquifers in the Fishkill-Beacon area, Dutchess County, N.Y., are the sand and gravel beds in the northeast corner of the area and along the valleys of Fishkill and Clove Creeks. The average yield of these aquifers to wells is 190 gal/min (gallons per minute). The most productive bedrock aquifer is limestone, which yields an average of about 150 gal/min. Shale and granite each yield an average of less than 35 gal/min. About 4 billion gallons of available ground water is estimated to be in storage in the sand and gravel aquifers in the area. The area withdraws an average of 3.3 Mgal/d (million gallons per day) of water in June, July, and August and 2 Mgal/d during the remainder of the year. (USGS)

  14. Angular anisoplanatism of a focused beam using beacons over horizontal path

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wu-ming; Ning, Yu

    2016-01-01

    The performance of the achieve laser beam propagation through atmospheric turbulence with adaptive optics is degraded by the fact that the wavefront aberrations difference. This error is only include the angular anisoplanatism when there is separation between the achieve laser beam and beacon. In the paper we derive an analytic expression for the effective angular anisoplanatism as a function of displacement angular when the turbulence profile is uniform. It shows that the effective angular anisoplanatism becomes weaker as the diameter of laser beams and the Fried transverse coherence length increase. We report results from field experiments that the effective angular anisoplanatism of a focused beam over horizontal path. It is found that measured and theoretical results are consistent. The effective wavefront variance increases with the strength of atmospheric turbulence and the angular displacement. And the constant phase of angular anisoplanatism has no effect on the Strehl ratio of the beam.

  15. Beacon-Based Exception Analysis for Multimissions: Technology for Autonomous Self-Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackey, R.; James, M.; Park, H.; Zak, M.

    2000-10-01

    Beacon-Based Exception Analysis for Multimissions (BEAM) is an end-to-end method of data analysis intended for real-time fault detection and characterization. It provides a generic system analysis capability for potential application to deep-space probes and other highly automated systems. This article describes in brief the architecture, application, and operating theory of BEAM. BEAM provides a generalized formalism for diagnostics and prognostics in virtually any instrumented system. Consideration is given to all standard forms of data: time-varying (sensor or extracted feature) quantities and discrete measurements, embedded physical and symbolic models, and communication with other autonomy-enabling components such as planners and schedulers. This approach can be adapted to on-board or off- board implementations with no change to the basic operating theory. The approach is illustrated with an overview of application types, past validations, and ongoing efforts.

  16. Creating accessible science museums with user-activated environmental audio beacons (ping!).

    PubMed

    Landau, Steven; Wiener, William; Naghshineh, Koorosh; Giusti, Ellen

    2005-01-01

    In 2003, Touch Graphics Company carried out research on a new invention that promises to improve accessibility to science museums for visitors who are visually impaired. The system, nicknamed Ping!, allows users to navigate an exhibit area, listen to audio descriptions, and interact with exhibits using a cell phone-based interface. The system relies on computer telephony, and it incorporates a network of wireless environmental audio beacons that can be triggered by users wishing to travel to destinations they choose. User testing indicates that the system is effective, both as a way-finding tool and as a means of providing accessible information on museum content. Follow-up development projects will determine if this approach can be successfully implemented in other settings and for other user populations.

  17. NanoCluster Beacons as reporter probes in rolling circle enhanced enzyme activity detection.

    PubMed

    Juul, Sissel; Obliosca, Judy M; Liu, Cong; Liu, Yen-Liang; Chen, Yu-An; Imphean, Darren M; Knudsen, Birgitta R; Ho, Yi-Ping; Leong, Kam W; Yeh, Hsin-Chih

    2015-05-14

    As a newly developed assay for the detection of endogenous enzyme activity at the single-catalytic-event level, Rolling Circle Enhanced Enzyme Activity Detection (REEAD) has been used to measure enzyme activity in both single human cells and malaria-causing parasites, Plasmodium sp. Current REEAD assays rely on organic dye-tagged linear DNA probes to report the rolling circle amplification products (RCPs), the cost of which may hinder the widespread use of REEAD. Here we show that a new class of activatable probes, NanoCluster Beacons (NCBs), can simplify the REEAD assays. Easily prepared without any need for purification and capable of large fluorescence enhancement upon hybridization, NCBs are cost-effective and sensitive. Compared to conventional fluorescent probes, NCBs are also more photostable. As demonstrated in reporting the human topoisomerases I (hTopI) cleavage-ligation reaction, the proposed NCBs suggest a read-out format attractive for future REEAD-based diagnostics.

  18. Considerations for community-based mHealth initiatives: insights from three Beacon Communities.

    PubMed

    Abebe, Nebeyou A; Capozza, Korey L; Des Jardins, Terrisca R; Kulick, David A; Rein, Alison L; Schachter, Abigail A; Turske, Scott A

    2013-10-15

    Mobile health (mHealth) is gaining widespread attention for its potential to engage patients in their health and health care in their daily lives. Emerging evidence suggests that mHealth interventions can be used effectively to support behavior change, but numerous challenges remain when implementing these programs at the community level. This paper provides an overview of considerations when implementing community-based mHealth initiatives, based on the experiences of three Beacon Communities across the United States that have launched text messaging (short message service, SMS) pilot programs aimed at diabetes risk reduction and disease management. The paper addresses lessons learned and suggests strategies to overcome challenges related to developing text message content, conducting marketing and outreach, enrolling participants, engaging providers, evaluating program effectiveness, and sustaining and scaling the programs.

  19. Development of BEACON technology. Volume I. Final report, April 1980-April 1983

    SciTech Connect

    1983-08-01

    The BEACON process is based on the catalytic deposition of a highly reactive carbon from low heating value gases, primarily by the carbon monoxide disproportionation reaction. This carbon is subsequently reacted with steam to produce predominantly methane or hydrogen, depending on the catalyst formulation and operating conditions. Commercial application envisions an air-blown coal gasification combined-cycle power plant with a coproduct of either methane or hydrogen. Significant cost reductions are anticipated relative to corresponding oxygen-blown coal gasification systems. Excellent fluid bed catalysts have been developed which have retained initial activity for over 400 hours of steady state operation. This stability was demonstrated in a tandem reactor system which provides for semi-continuous catalyst circulation between the carbon deposition and steam gasification fluid bed reactors.

  20. Energy optimization for upstream data transfer in 802.15.4 beacon-enabled star formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hua; Krishnamachari, Bhaskar

    2008-08-01

    Energy saving is one of the major concerns for low rate personal area networks. This paper models energy consumption for beacon-enabled time-slotted media accessing control cooperated with sleeping scheduling in a star network formulation for IEEE 802.15.4 standard. We investigate two different upstream (data transfer from devices to a network coordinator) strategies: a) tracking strategy: the devices wake up and check status (track the beacon) in each time slot; b) non-tracking strategy: nodes only wake-up upon data arriving and stay awake till data transmitted to the coordinator. We consider the tradeoff between energy cost and average data transmission delay for both strategies. Both scenarios are formulated as optimization problems and the optimal solutions are discussed. Our results show that different data arrival rate and system parameters (such as contention access period interval, upstream speed etc.) result in different strategies in terms of energy optimization with maximum delay constraints. Hence, according to different applications and system settings, different strategies might be chosen by each node to achieve energy optimization for both self-interested view and system view. We give the relation among the tunable parameters by formulas and plots to illustrate which strategy is better under corresponding parameters. There are two main points emphasized in our results with delay constraints: on one hand, when the system setting is fixed by coordinator, nodes in the network can intelligently change their strategies according to corresponding application data arrival rate; on the other hand, when the nodes' applications are known by the coordinator, the coordinator can tune the system parameters to achieve optimal system energy consumption.

  1. "Molecular beacon"-directed fluorescence of Hoechst dyes for visual detection of Hg(II) and biothiols and its application for a logic gate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Le, Huynh-Nhu; Jiang, Xiao-Qin; Ye, Bang-Ce

    2013-03-14

    A molecular beacon (MB)-like DNA hairpin biosensor based on the reversible directing fluorescence of Hoechst dyes was developed for fluorescent detection of Hg(2+) and biothiols and furthermore for logic operation.

  2. Atmospheric tomography with Rayleigh laser beacons for correction of wide fields and 30-m-class telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angel, J. Roger P.; Lloyd-Hart, Michael

    2000-07-01

    Single sodium beacons will likely be the most convenient for adaptive systems to correct 6 - 10 m class telescopes over a small field of view (the isoplanatic angle), provided reliable, powerful 589 nm lasers become available and affordable. However, when adaptive optics are applied to extended fields of view and correction of telescopes as large as 32 m diameter, it seems likely that laser beacons produced by Rayleigh scattering will be preferred. For these more demanding applications which require atmospheric tomography, Rayleigh beacons come into their own for two reasons. First, the cone effect, which causes the high turbulence to be sampled at a different scale, is no longer problematic when multiple lasers are used and height dependence is solved for explicitly. Second, the tomographic solution can make use of the beacon created by a laser pulse during all of its journey through the upper atmosphere, not just scattering from a thin layer selected by range gating. In this way a laser that costs an order of magnitude less to buy and maintain than a sodium laser of the same power can yield a brighter beacon and more information about the atmospheric turbulence. This is important because both the number and brightness of beacons or stars must increase with the number of layers included in the tomographic solution. For the same reason, tomography with natural stars is unlikely to be valuable for very large telescopes because in general the number and required brightness of each star increase with corrected field angle, while current narrow-field adaptive optics systems relying on natural stars are already very limited in sky coverage. Our method for tomography to take advantage of Rayleigh scattering over a wide range of heights uses short pulses from near diffraction-limited, ultraviolet lasers, projected from a small aperture above the telescope's secondary mirror. Each pulse subtends less than 1 arcsec at any instant as it travels up through many kilometers. An

  3. Use of molecular beacons for the rapid analysis of DNA damage induced by exposure to an atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Kurita, Hirofumi E-mail: mizuno@ens.tut.ac.jp; Miyachika, Saki; Yasuda, Hachiro; Takashima, Kazunori; Mizuno, Akira E-mail: mizuno@ens.tut.ac.jp

    2015-12-28

    A rapid method for evaluating the damage caused to DNA molecules upon exposure to plasma is demonstrated. Here, we propose the use of a molecular beacon for rapid detection of DNA strand breaks induced by atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) irradiation. Scission of the molecular beacon by APPJ irradiation leads to separation of the fluorophore-quencher pair, resulting in an increase in fluorescence that directly correlates with the DNA strand breaks. The results show that the increase in fluorescence intensity is proportional to the exposure time and the rate of fluorescence increase is proportional to the discharge power. This simple and rapid method allows the estimation of DNA damage induced by exposure to a non-thermal plasma.

  4. Statistical results from the Virginia Tech propagation experiment using the Olympus 12, 20, and 30 GHz satellite beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stutzman, Warren L.; Safaai-Jazi, A.; Pratt, Timothy; Nelson, B.; Laster, J.; Ajaz, H.

    1993-01-01

    Virginia Tech has performed a comprehensive propagation experiment using the Olympus satellite beacons at 12.5, 19.77, and 29.66 GHz (which we refer to as 12, 20, and 30 GHz). Four receive terminals were designed and constructed, one terminal at each frequency plus a portable one with 20 and 30 GHz receivers for microscale and scintillation studies. Total power radiometers were included in each terminal in order to set the clear air reference level for each beacon and also to predict path attenuation. More details on the equipment and the experiment design are found elsewhere. Statistical results for one year of data collection were analyzed. In addition, the following studies were performed: a microdiversity experiment in which two closely spaced 20 GHz receivers were used; a comparison of total power and Dicke switched radiometer measurements, frequency scaling of scintillations, and adaptive power control algorithm development. Statistical results are reported.

  5. Design of a K/Q-Band Beacon Receiver for the Alphasat Technology Demonstration Payload (TDP) #5 Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morse, Jacquelynne R.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the design and performance of a coherent KQ-band (2040 GHz) beacon receiver developed at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) that will be installed at the Politecnico di Milano (POLIMI) for use in the Alphasat Technology Demonstration Payload 5 (TDP5) beacon experiment. The goal of this experiment is to characterize rain fade attenuation at 40 GHz to improve the performance of existing statistical rain attenuation models in the Q-band. The ground terminal developed by NASA GRC utilizes an FFT-based frequency estimation receiver capable of characterizing total path attenuation effects due to gaseous absorption, clouds, rain, and scintillation. The receiver system has been characterized in the lab and demonstrates a system dynamic range performance of better than 58 dB at 1 Hz and better than 48 dB at 10 Hz rates.

  6. Ice depolarization of the Comstar beacon at 28.56 GHz during low fades and correlation with radar backscatter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldhirsh, J.

    1982-01-01

    Radar correlation with significant ice depolarization events accompanied by low copolarization fades of the 28.56-GHz Comstar beacon signal are described for an experimental program at Wallops Island, VA. Using a Faraday switch at the front end of the receiver, the copolarization and cross-polarization levels of the 28.56-GHz beacon signal are sequentially monitored. A nearby high resolution S-band radar pointing along the earth-satellite path monitors the simultaneous ice and rain reflectivity. For a first case considered, excellent correlation is noted between the cross-polarization events and relatively large and extended ice reflectivities along a segment of the earth-satellite path at altitudes near and above the 0 C isotherm. In a second case, the radar and receiver data strongly suggest the cross-polarization mechanism is due to a hailshaft which intersects the path at altitudes well below the 0 deg isotherm.

  7. Drift-parallax determination of the altitude of traveling ionospheric disturbances observed with the Los Alamos radio-beacon interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkland, M.W.; Jacobson, A.R.

    1998-11-01

    From 1993 to 1997, the Los Alamos very long baseline interferometer was routinely employed to detect traveling ionospheric disturbances (TID) and inner plasmaspheric irregularities by measuring the change in the electrical phase of several satellite beacon signals that backlit the inner plasmasphere and ionosphere from geosynchronous orbit. The fortuitous placement of two satellite beacons nearly in the Los Alamos geographic meridian, in late 1995, permits us to infer the nominal altitude of each TID event by employing a novel parallax ranging technique. In the context of this paper, the nominal altitude of a TID refers to the altitude at which the slant-path averaged, amplitude-weighted phase perturbation existed along the lines of sight from the interferometer to the satellite. In this paper, we outline the method and present validation results. {copyright} 1998 American Geophysical Union

  8. Multicolour hybrid nanoprobes of molecular beacon conjugated quantum dots: FRET and gel electrophoresis assisted target DNA detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Joong Hyun; Chaudhary, Sumit; Ozkan, Mihrimah

    2007-05-01

    We have developed multicolour hybrid DNA probes employing green, yellow and orange colour quantum dot conjugated molecular beacons with black hole quencher 2. Optical and electrophoretic characterization revealed fluorescent energy transfer that follows the FRET mechanism with single nucleotide discrimination. Target DNA identification was observed to be highly sensitive up to 8 ng in gel electrophoresis. Comparison with the conventional organic dye SYBR Gold™ showed that our hybrid nanoprobes exhibit more stable performance with less background signal.

  9. A FRET-enabled molecular peptide beacon with a significant red shift for the ratiometric detection of nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Maity, Debabrata; Jiang, Juanjuan; Ehlers, Martin; Wu, Junchen; Schmuck, Carsten

    2016-05-04

    A cationic molecular peptide beacon NAP1 functionalized with a fluorescence resonance energy transfer-pair at its ends allows the ratiometric detection of ds-DNA with a preference for AT rich sequences. NAP1 most likely binds in a folded form into the minor groove of ds-DNA, which results in a remarkable change in its fluorescence properties. As NAP1 exhibits quite low cytotoxicity, it can also be used for imaging of nuclear DNA in cells.

  10. Frequency of common HFE variants in the Saudi population: a high throughput molecular beacon-based study

    PubMed Central

    Alsmadi, Osama A; Al-Kayal, Fadi; Al-Hamed, Mohamed; Meyer, Brian F

    2006-01-01

    Background Hereditary Hemochromatosis (HH) is an autosomal recessive disorder highlighted byiron-overload. Two popular mutations in HFE, p.C282Y and p.H63D, have been discovered and found to associate with HH in different ethnic backgrounds. p.C282Y and p.H63D diagnosis is usually made byrestriction enzyme analysis. However, the use of this technique is largelylimited to research laboratories because they are relativelyexpensive, time-consuming, and difficult to transform into a high throughput format. Methods Single nucleotide variations in target DNA sequences can be readily identified using molecular beacon fluorescent probes. These are quenched probes with loop and hairpin structure, and they become fluorescent upon specific target recognition. We developed high throughput homogeneous real-time PCR assays using molecular beacon technology, to genotype p.C282Y and p.H63D variants. Representative samples of different genotypes for these variants were assayed by restriction enzyme analysis and direct sequencing as bench mark methods for comparison with the newly developed molecular beacon-based real-time PCR assay. Results Complete concordance was achieved by all three assay formats. Homozygotes (mutant and wildtype) and heterozygotes were readily differentiated by the allele specific molecular beacons as reported by the associated fluorophore in the real-time assay developed in this study. Additionally, these assays were used in a high throughput format to establish the allele frequency of C282Y and H63D in Saudis for the first time. Conclusion These assays may be reliably applied as a diagnostic test or large scale method for population screening. PMID:16672055

  11. Direct detection of microRNAs using isothermal amplification and molecular beacon with excellent sensitivity and specificity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wancun; Zhang, Qi; Qian, Zhiyu; Gu, Yueqing

    2017-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in a wide range of biological processes, including proliferation, development, metabolism, immunological response, tumorigenesis, and viral infection. The detection of miRNAs is imperative for gaining a better understanding of the functions of these biomolecules and has great potential for the early diagnosis of human disease as well as the discovery of new drugs through the use of miRNAs as targets. In this article, we develop a highly sensitive, and specific miRNA assay based on the two-stage isothermal amplification reactions and molecular beacon. The two-stage isothermal amplification reactions involves two templates and two-stage amplification reactions under isothermal conditions. The first template enables the amplification of miRNA, and the second template enables the conversion of miRNA to the reporter oligonucleotide(Y). Importantly, different miRNAs can be converted to the same Y seperately, which can hybridize with the same set of molecular beacon to generate fluorescent signals. This assay is highly sensitive and specific with a detection limit of 1 fM and can even discriminate single-nucleotide differences. Moreover, in combination with the specific templates, this method can be applied for multiplex miRNA assay by simply using the same molecular beacon. This method has potential to become a promising miRNA quantification method in biomedical research and clinical diagnosis.

  12. Optimized Detection of Plasmodium falciparum Topoisomerase I Enzyme Activity in a Complex Biological Sample by the Use of Molecular Beacons

    PubMed Central

    Givskov, Asger; Kristoffersen, Emil L.; Vandsø, Kamilla; Ho, Yi-Ping; Stougaard, Magnus; Knudsen, Birgitta R.

    2016-01-01

    The so-called Rolling Circle Amplification allows for amplification of circular DNA structures in a manner that can be detected in real-time using nucleotide-based molecular beacons that unfold upon recognition of the DNA product, which is being produced during the amplification process. The unfolding of the molecular beacons results in a fluorescence increase as the Rolling Circle Amplification proceeds. This can be measured in a fluorometer. In the current study, we have investigated the possibility of using two different molecular beacons to detect two distinct Rolling Circle Amplification reactions proceeding simultaneously and in the same reaction tube by measurement of fluorescence over time. We demonstrate the application of this fluorometric readout method, for automated and specific detection of the activity of the type IB topoisomerase from the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum in the presence of human cell extract containing the related topoisomerase I from humans. The obtained results point towards a future use of the presented assay setup for malaria diagnostics or drug screening purposes. In longer terms the method may be applied more broadly for real-time sensing of various Rolling Circle Amplification reactions. PMID:27854277

  13. Molecular beacon probes–base multiplex NASBA Real-time for detection of HIV-1 and HCV

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi-Yeganeh, S; Paryan, M; Mirab Samiee, S; Kia, V; Rezvan, H

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives Developed in 1991, nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) has been introduced as a rapid molecular diagnostic technique, where it has been shown to give quicker results than PCR, and it can also be more sensitive. This paper describes the development of a molecular beacon-based multiplex NASBA assay for simultaneous detection of HIV-1 and HCV in plasma samples. Materials and Methods A well-conserved region in the HIV-1 pol gene and 5’-NCR of HCV genome were used for primers and molecular beacon design. The performance features of HCV/HIV-1 multiplex NASBA assay including analytical sensitivity and specificity, clinical sensitivity and clinical specificity were evaluated. Results The analysis of scalar concentrations of the samples indicated that the limit of quantification of the assay was <1000 copies/ml for HIV-1 and <500 copies/ml for HCV with 95% confidence interval. Multiplex NASBA assay showed a 98% sensitivity and 100% specificity. The analytical specificity study with BLAST software demonstrated that the primers do not attach to any other sequences except for that of HIV-1 or HCV. The primers and molecular beacon probes detected all HCV genotypes and all major variants of HIV-1. Conclusion This method may represent a relatively inexpensive isothermal method for detection of HIV-1/HCV co-infection in monitoring of patients. PMID:22973469

  14. Molecular beacon probes-base multiplex NASBA Real-time for detection of HIV-1 and HCV.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi-Yeganeh, S; Paryan, M; Mirab Samiee, S; Kia, V; Rezvan, H

    2012-06-01

    Developed in 1991, nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) has been introduced as a rapid molecular diagnostic technique, where it has been shown to give quicker results than PCR, and it can also be more sensitive. This paper describes the development of a molecular beacon-based multiplex NASBA assay for simultaneous detection of HIV-1 and HCV in plasma samples. A well-conserved region in the HIV-1 pol gene and 5'-NCR of HCV genome were used for primers and molecular beacon design. The performance features of HCV/HIV-1 multiplex NASBA assay including analytical sensitivity and specificity, clinical sensitivity and clinical specificity were evaluated. The analysis of scalar concentrations of the samples indicated that the limit of quantification of the assay was <1000 copies/ml for HIV-1 and <500 copies/ml for HCV with 95% confidence interval. Multiplex NASBA assay showed a 98% sensitivity and 100% specificity. The analytical specificity study with BLAST software demonstrated that the primers do not attach to any other sequences except for that of HIV-1 or HCV. The primers and molecular beacon probes detected all HCV genotypes and all major variants of HIV-1. This method may represent a relatively inexpensive isothermal method for detection of HIV-1/HCV co-infection in monitoring of patients.

  15. Sensitive detection of transcription factors in cell nuclear extracts by using a molecular beacons based amplification strategy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai; Wang, Ke; Zhu, Xue; Xie, Minhao

    2016-03-15

    Monitoring transcription factor (TF) levels provides an important assessment of the state of cell populations. Unfortunately, traditional methods for monitoring TF concentration are generally cumbersome and time-consuming. We developed an ultrasensitive one-pot TF detection method that uses target-molecular beacons-dependent amplification (TMDA) fluorescence strategy to circumvent the aforementioned limitations in TF detection. In this assay, we employed a DNA1/DNA2 duplex as the reporting probe and a stem-loop DNA molecular beacon (MB) as the signaling probe. The integration of protein-DNA1/DNA2 duplex and exonuclease III (Exo III) digestion can convert the detection of transcription factors to the detection of reporter oligonucleotides. The subsequent hybridization of the reporter oligonucleotides with the molecular beacons opens the stem-loop structure. The formation of the DNA complex triggers amplification reaction and the recovery of the fluorescence. This assay exhibits high sensitivity with a detection limit of 2.2 pM and a detection range of 3 orders of magnitude, which is superior to most currently used methods for transcription factor detection. More importantly, this method is suitable for the direct detection of TFs in crude nuclear extracts of cancer cells.

  16. DNA-templated silver nanoclusters based label-free fluorescent molecular beacon for the detection of adenosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai; Wang, Ke; Xie, Minhao; Zhu, Xue; Xu, Lan; Yang, Runlin; Huang, Biao; Zhu, Xiaoli

    2014-02-15

    A general and reliable fluorescent molecular beacon is proposed in this work utilizing DNA-templated silver nanoclusters (AgNCs). The fluorescent molecular beacon has been employed for sensitive determination of the concentration of adenosine deaminase (ADA) and its inhibition. A well-designed oligonucleotide containing three functional regions (an aptamer region for adenosine assembly, a sequence complementary to the region of the adenosine aptamer, and an inserted six bases cytosine-loop) is adopted as the core element in the strategy. The enzymatic reaction of adenosine catalyzed by ADA plays a key role as well in the regulation of the synthesis of the DNA-templated AgNCs, i.e. the signal indicator. The intensity of the fluorescence signal may thereby determine the concentration of the enzyme and its inhibitor. The detection limit of the ADA can be lowered to 0.05 UL(-1). Also, 100 fM of a known inhibitor erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl) adenine hydrochloride (EHNA) is enough to present distinguishable fluorescence emission. Moreover, since the fluorescent signal indicator is not required to be bound with the oligonucleotide, this fluorescent molecular beacon may integrate the advantages of both the label-free and signal-on strategies.

  17. NanoCluster Beacons as reporter probes in rolling circle enhanced enzyme activity detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juul, Sissel; Obliosca, Judy M.; Liu, Cong; Liu, Yen-Liang; Chen, Yu-An; Imphean, Darren M.; Knudsen, Birgitta R.; Ho, Yi-Ping; Leong, Kam W.; Yeh, Hsin-Chih

    2015-04-01

    As a newly developed assay for the detection of endogenous enzyme activity at the single-catalytic-event level, Rolling Circle Enhanced Enzyme Activity Detection (REEAD) has been used to measure enzyme activity in both single human cells and malaria-causing parasites, Plasmodium sp. Current REEAD assays rely on organic dye-tagged linear DNA probes to report the rolling circle amplification products (RCPs), the cost of which may hinder the widespread use of REEAD. Here we show that a new class of activatable probes, NanoCluster Beacons (NCBs), can simplify the REEAD assays. Easily prepared without any need for purification and capable of large fluorescence enhancement upon hybridization, NCBs are cost-effective and sensitive. Compared to conventional fluorescent probes, NCBs are also more photostable. As demonstrated in reporting the human topoisomerases I (hTopI) cleavage-ligation reaction, the proposed NCBs suggest a read-out format attractive for future REEAD-based diagnostics.As a newly developed assay for the detection of endogenous enzyme activity at the single-catalytic-event level, Rolling Circle Enhanced Enzyme Activity Detection (REEAD) has been used to measure enzyme activity in both single human cells and malaria-causing parasites, Plasmodium sp. Current REEAD assays rely on organic dye-tagged linear DNA probes to report the rolling circle amplification products (RCPs), the cost of which may hinder the widespread use of REEAD. Here we show that a new class of activatable probes, NanoCluster Beacons (NCBs), can simplify the REEAD assays. Easily prepared without any need for purification and capable of large fluorescence enhancement upon hybridization, NCBs are cost-effective and sensitive. Compared to conventional fluorescent probes, NCBs are also more photostable. As demonstrated in reporting the human topoisomerases I (hTopI) cleavage-ligation reaction, the proposed NCBs suggest a read-out format attractive for future REEAD-based diagnostics. Electronic

  18. Beacon-like/ubiquitin-5-like immunoreactivity is highly expressed in human hypothalamus and increased in haloperidol-treated schizophrenics and a rat model of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Hans-Gert; Lendeckel, Uwe; Dobrowolny, Henrik; Stauch, Renate; Steiner, Johann; Grecksch, Gisela; Becker, Axel; Jirikowski, Gustav F; Bogerts, Bernhard

    2008-04-01

    The beacon gene is involved in the regulation of energy metabolism, food intake, and obesity. We localized its gene product, beacon-/ubiquitin 5-like immunoreactivity in brains of normal-weight, non-psychotic individuals, adipose (BMI over 32), non-psychotic individuals, and haloperidol-treated schizophrenics. The protein was found to be highly expressed in many neurons of the paraventricular and supraoptic hypothalamic nuclei. Besides, it was detected in neurons of other hypothalamic areas (suprachiasmatic, arcuate, and ventromedial nuclei) as well as outside the hypothalamus (Nuc. basalis Meynert, thalamus, hippocampus, and some neocortical areas). A morphometric analysis of beacon-immunoreactive hypothalamic and neocortical neurons revealed that compared to normal-weight controls in haloperidol-treated schizophrenics, there was a significant increase of protein-expressing supraoptic, paraventricular, and orbitofrontal neurons. However, a significant increase in beacon-expressing supraoptic neurons was also seen in adipose, non-psychotic individuals in comparison with normal-weight controls. Haloperidol at different doses has no effect on beacon expression in SHSY5Y neuroblastoma cells, which makes the assumption unlikely that haloperidol per se is responsible for the increased neuronal expression of the peptide in schizophrenics. In rats with a neonatal lesion of the ventral hippocampus (a widely used animal model of schizophrenia), we found an increased neuronal expression of beacon in the paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei. We suppose that elevated hypothalamic expression of beacon-like protein in non-obese schizophrenics is not primarily related to metabolic alterations, but to a certain role in schizophrenia, which is possibly unrelated to aspects of weight gain and obesity. The latter assumption finds some support by data obtained in rats with ventral hippocampus lesion.

  19. A quantum dot-aptamer beacon using a DNA intercalating dye as the FRET reporter: application to label-free thrombin detection.

    PubMed

    Chi, Chun-Wei; Lao, Yeh-Hsing; Li, Yi-Shan; Chen, Lin-Chi

    2011-03-15

    A new quantum dot (QD)-aptamer (apt) beacon that acts by folding-induced dissociation of a DNA intercalating dye, BOBO-3(B), is demonstrated with label-free thrombin detection. The beacon, denoted as QD-apt:B, is constructed by (1) coupling of a single-stranded thrombin aptamer to Qdot 565 via EDC/Sulfo-NHS chemistry and (2) staining the duplex regions of the aptamer on QD with excess BOBO-3 before thrombin binding. When mixing a thrombin sample with QD-apt:B, BOBO-3 is competed away from the beacon due to target-induced aptamer folding, which then causes a decrease in QD fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-mediated BOBO-3 emission and achieves thrombin quantitation. In this work, the effects of Mg(2+), coupling time, and aptamer type on the beacon's performances are investigated and discussed thoroughly with various methods, including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and two-color differential gel electrophoresis. Using the best aptamer beacon (HTQ37), we attain highly specific and wide-range detection (from nM to μM) of thrombin in buffer, and the beacon can sense nM-range thrombin in 15% diluted serum. Compared to the reported QD aptamer assays, our method is advantageous from the aspect of using a simple sensory unit design without losing the detection sensitivity. Therefore, we consider the QD-apt:B beacon a potential alternative to immuno-reagents and an effective tool to study nucleic acid folding on QD as well. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Data Governance and Data Sharing Agreements for Community-Wide Health Information Exchange: Lessons from the Beacon Communities

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Claudia; Des Jardins, Terrisca R.; Heider, Arvela; Lyman, Kristin A.; McWilliams, Lee; Rein, Alison L.; Schachter, Abigail A.; Singh, Ranjit; Sorondo, Barbara; Topper, Joan; Turske, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Unprecedented efforts are underway across the United States to electronically capture and exchange health information to improve health care and population health, and reduce costs. This increased collection and sharing of electronic patient data raises several governance issues, including privacy, security, liability, and market competition. Those engaged in such efforts have had to develop data sharing agreements (DSAs) among entities involved in information exchange, many of whom are “nontraditional” health care entities and/or new partners. This paper shares lessons learned based on the experiences of six federally funded communities participating in the Beacon Community Cooperative Agreement Program, and offers guidance for navigating data governance issues and developing DSAs to facilitate community-wide health information exchange. Innovation: While all entities involved in electronic data sharing must address governance issues and create DSAs accordingly, until recently little formal guidance existed for doing so – particularly for community-based initiatives. Despite this lack of guidance, together the Beacon Communities’ experiences highlight promising strategies for navigating complex governance issues, which may be useful to other entities or communities initiating information exchange efforts to support delivery system transformation. Credibility: For the past three years, AcademyHealth has provided technical assistance to most of the 17 Beacon Communities, 6 of whom contributed to this collaborative writing effort. Though these communities varied widely in terms of their demographics, resources, and Beacon-driven priorities, common themes emerged as they described their approaches to data governance and DSA development. Conclusions: The 6 Beacon Communities confirmed that DSAs are necessary to satisfy legal and market-based concerns, and they identified several specific issues, many of which have been noted by others involved in

  1. Measuring atomic emission from beacons for long-distance chemical signaling.

    PubMed

    LaFratta, Christopher N; Pelse, Ian; Falla, Jose Luis; Liu, Yi; Palacios, Manuel A; Manesse, Mael; Whitesides, George M; Walt, David R

    2013-10-01

    In an effort to exploit chemistry for information science, we have constructed a system to send a message powered by a combustion reaction. Our system uses the thermal excitation of alkali metals to transmit an encoded signal over long distances. A message is transmitted by burning a methanol-soaked cotton string embedded with combinations of high, low, or zero levels of potassium, rubidium, and/or cesium ions. By measuring the intensities at the characteristic emission wavelengths of each metal in the near-infrared, 19 unique signals can be distinguished. We have built a custom telescope to detect these signals from 1 km away for nearly 10 min. The signal is isotropic, is self-powered, and has a low background. A potential application of this platform is for search and rescue signaling where another layer of information can be transmitted, in addition to the location of the beacon. This work, which seeks to encode and transmit information using chemistry instead of electronics, is part of the new field of "infochemistry".

  2. Molecular beacons with a homo-DNA stem: improving target selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Crey-Desbiolles, Caroline; Ahn, Dae-Ro; Leumann, Christian J.

    2005-01-01

    Molecular beacons (MBs) are stem–loop DNA probes used for identifying and reporting the presence and localization of nucleic acid targets in vitro and in vivo via target-dependent dequenching of fluorescence. A drawback of conventional MB design is present in the stem sequence that is necessary to keep the MBs in a closed conformation in the absence of a target, but that can participate in target binding in the open (target-on) conformation, giving rise to the possibility of false-positive results. In order to circumvent these problems, we designed MBs in which the stem was replaced by an orthogonal DNA analog that does not cross-pair with natural nucleic acids. Homo-DNA seemed to be specially suited, as it forms stable adenine-adenine base pairs of the reversed Hoogsteen type, potentially reducing the number of necessary building blocks for stem design to one. We found that MBs in which the stem part was replaced by homo-adenylate residues can easily be synthesized using conventional automated DNA synthesis. As conventional MBs, such hybrid MBs show cooperative hairpin to coil transitions in the absence of a DNA target, indicating stable homo-DNA base pair formation in the closed conformation. Furthermore, our results show that the homo-adenylate stem is excluded from DNA target binding, which leads to a significant increase in target binding selectivity. PMID:15879349

  3. VLC-beacon detection with an under-sampled ambient light sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Jacob; Pérez-Olivas, Huetzin; Martínez-Díaz, Saúl; García-Márquez, Jorge; Domínguez-González, Carlos; Santiago-Montero, Raúl; Guan, Hongyu; Rozenblat, Marc; Topsu, Suat

    2017-08-01

    LEDs will replace in a near future the current worldwide lighting mainly due to their low production-cost and energy-saving assets. Visible light communications (VLC) will turn gradually the existing lighting network into a communication network. Nowadays VLC transceivers can be found in some commercial centres in Europe; some of them broadcast continuously an identification tag that contains its coordinate position. In such a case, the transceiver acts as a geolocation beacon. Nevertheless, mobile transceivers represent a challenge in the VLC communication chain, as smartphones have not integrated yet a VLC customized detection stage. In order to make current smartphones capable to detect VLC broadcasted signals, their Ambient Light Sensor (ALS) is adapted as a VLC detector. For this to be achieved, lighting transceivers need to adapt their modulation scheme. For instance, frequencies representing start bit, 1, and 0 logic values can be set to avoid flicker from illumination and to permit detecting the under-sampled signal. Decoding the signal requires a multiple steps real-time signal processing as shown here.

  4. Phthalocyanine dimerization-based molecular beacons using near-IR fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Nesterova, Irina V.; Erdem, S. Sibel; Pakhomov, Serhii; Hammer, Robert P.; Soper, Steven A.

    2009-01-01

    Herein we demonstrate the use of a novel dimerization-based molecular beacon (MB) probe consisting of two metallo-phthalocyanine (Pc) fluorophores that use near-IR fluorescence, appropriate for highly specific and sensitive in-vivo and/or in-vitro DNA/RNA detection. Pc’s possess a propensity to form non-fluorescent H-dimers that is utilized as the molecular “off” switch in the closed MB conformation. The “on” switch, which is generated when the solution target binds to the loop of the MB forming the open form, also provides two fluorophores for transduction resulting in a doubling of the extinction coefficient and improving the resulting fluorescence yield compared to a classical single-fluorophore/quencher MB system. In addition, the Pc-based MBs possess high thermal, photo and chemical stabilities that are essential for many highly sensitive applications, such as molecular imaging. The dimer-based MBs were obtained using a simple single-step synthesis procedure and demonstrated excellent quenching efficiencies (98%) as well as a high signal-to-background ratio (~60) exceeding the performance characteristics of many conventionally-available MB probes. PMID:19191492

  5. The use of Molecular Beacons to Directly Measure Bacterial mRNA Abundances and Transcript Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Kuechenmeister, Lisa J.; Anderson, Kelsi L.; Morrison, John M.; Dunman, Paul M.

    2009-01-01

    The regulation of mRNA turnover is a dynamic means by which bacteria regulate gene expression. Although current methodologies allow characterization of the stability of individual transcripts, procedures designed to measure alterations in transcript abundance/turnover on a high throughput scale are lacking. In the current report, we describe the development of a rapid and simplified molecular beacon-based procedure to directly measure the mRNA abundances and mRNA degradation properties of well-characterized Staphylococcus aureus pathogenicity factors. This method does not require any PCR-based amplification, can monitor the abundances of multiple transcripts within a single RNA sample, and was successfully implemented into a high throughput screen of transposon mutant library members to detect isolates with altered mRNA turnover properties. It is expected that the described methodology will provide great utility in characterizing components of bacterial RNA degradation processes and can be used to directly measure the mRNA levels of virtually any bacterial transcript. PMID:18992285

  6. A reversible fluorescent logic gate for sensing mercury and iodide ions based on a molecular beacon.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xu; Chen, Jiao; Zhao, Julia Xiaojun

    2013-09-21

    A simple, rapid, and reversible fluorescent DNA INHIBIT logic gate has been developed for sensing mercury (Hg(2+)) and iodide (I(-)) ions based on a molecular beacon (MB). In this logic gate, a mercury ion was introduced as the first input into the MB logic gate system to assist in the hybridization of the MB with an assistant DNA probe through the thymine-Hg(2+)-thymine interaction, which eventually restored the fluorescence of MB as the output. With this signal-on process, mercury ions can be detected with a limit of detection as low as 7.9 nM. Furthermore, when iodide ions were added to the Hg(2+)/MB system as the second input, the fluorescence intensity decreased because Hg(2+) in the thymine-Hg(2+)-thymine complex was grabbed by I(-) due to a stronger binding force. Iodide ions can be detected with a limit of detection of 42 nM. Meanwhile, we studied the feasibility and basic performance of the DNA INHIBIT logic gate, optimized the logic gate conditions, and investigated its sensitivity and selectivity. The results showed that the MB based logic gate is highly selective and sensitive for the detection of Hg(2+) and I(-) over other interfering cations and anions.

  7. Learning from Health Information Exchange Technical Architecture and Implementation in Seven Beacon Communities

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Douglas B.; Propp, Karen; Cohen, Alexander; Sabharwal, Raj; Schachter, Abigail A.; Rein, Alison L.

    2014-01-01

    As health care providers adopt and make “meaningful use” of health information technology (health IT), communities and delivery systems must set up the infrastructure to facilitate health information exchange (HIE) between providers and numerous other stakeholders who have a role in supporting health and care. By facilitating better communication and coordination between providers, HIE has the potential to improve clinical decision-making and continuity of care, while reducing unnecessary use of services. When implemented as part of a broader strategy for health care delivery system and payment reform, HIE capability also can enable the use of analytic tools needed for population health management, patient engagement in care, and continuous learning and improvement. The diverse experiences of seven communities that participated in the three-year federal Beacon Community Program offer practical insight into factors influencing the technical architecture of exchange infrastructure and its role in supporting improved care, reduced cost, and a healthier population. The case studies also document challenges faced by the communities, such as significant time and resources required to harmonize variations in the interpretation of data standards. Findings indicate that their progress developing community-based HIE strategies, while driven by local needs and objectives, is also influenced by broader legal, policy, and market conditions. PMID:25848591

  8. Learning from health information exchange technical architecture and implementation in seven beacon communities.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Douglas B; Propp, Karen; Cohen, Alexander; Sabharwal, Raj; Schachter, Abigail A; Rein, Alison L

    2014-01-01

    As health care providers adopt and make "meaningful use" of health information technology (health IT), communities and delivery systems must set up the infrastructure to facilitate health information exchange (HIE) between providers and numerous other stakeholders who have a role in supporting health and care. By facilitating better communication and coordination between providers, HIE has the potential to improve clinical decision-making and continuity of care, while reducing unnecessary use of services. When implemented as part of a broader strategy for health care delivery system and payment reform, HIE capability also can enable the use of analytic tools needed for population health management, patient engagement in care, and continuous learning and improvement. The diverse experiences of seven communities that participated in the three-year federal Beacon Community Program offer practical insight into factors influencing the technical architecture of exchange infrastructure and its role in supporting improved care, reduced cost, and a healthier population. The case studies also document challenges faced by the communities, such as significant time and resources required to harmonize variations in the interpretation of data standards. Findings indicate that their progress developing community-based HIE strategies, while driven by local needs and objectives, is also influenced by broader legal, policy, and market conditions.

  9. Fluorescence detection of adenosine triphosphate through an aptamer-molecular beacon multiple probe.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiaodan; Zhang, Xiaoling; Yang, Wen; Jia, Hongying; Li, Yamin

    2012-05-01

    An aptamer-molecular beacon (MB) multiple fluorescent probe for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) assay is proposed in this article. The ATP aptamer was used as a molecular recognition part, and an oligonucleotide (short strand, SS) partially complementary with the aptamer and an MB was used as the other part. In the presence of ATP, the aptamer bound with it, accompanied by the hybridization of MB and SS and the fluorescence recovering. Wherever there is only very weak fluorescence can be measured in the absence of ATP. Based on the relationship of recovering fluorescence and the concentration of ATP, a method for quantifying ATP has been developed. The fluorescence intensity was proportional to the concentration of ATP in the range of 10 to 500 nM with a detection limit of 0.1 nM. Moreover, this method was able to detect ATP with high selectivity in the presence of guanosine triphosphate (GTP), cytidine triphosphate (CTP), and uridine triphosphate (UTP). This method is proved to be simple with high sensitivity, selectivity, and specificity.

  10. New hairpin-structured DNA probes: alternatives to classical molecular beacons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, Achim; Habl, Gregor; Sauer, Markus; Wolfrum, Jürgen; Hoheisel, Jörg; Marmé, Nicole; Knemeyer, Jens-Peter

    2007-02-01

    In this article we report on two different classes of self-quenching hairpin-structured DNA probes that can be used as alternatives to Molecular Beacons. Compared to other hairpin-structured DNA probes, the so-called smart probes are labeled with only one extrinsic dye. The fluorescence of this dye is efficiently quenched by intrinsic guanine bases via a photo-induced electron transfer reaction in the closed hairpin. After hybridization to a target DNA, the distance between dye and the guanines is enlarged and the fluorescence is restored. The working mechanism of the second class of hairpin DNA probes is similar, but the probe oligonucleotide is labeled at both ends with an identical chromophore and thus the fluorescence of the closed hairpin is reduced due to formation of non-fluorescent dye dimers. Both types of probes are appropriate for the identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms and in combination with confocal single-molecule spectroscopy sensitivities in the picomolar range can be achieved.

  11. Quantitative rRNA-targeted solution-based hybridization assay using peptide nucleic acid molecular beacons.

    PubMed

    Li, Xu; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2008-12-01

    The potential of a solution-based hybridization assay using peptide nucleic acid (PNA) molecular beacon (MB) probes to quantify 16S rRNA of specific populations in RNA extracts of environmental samples was evaluated by designing PNA MB probes for the genera Dechloromonas and Dechlorosoma. In a kinetic study with 16S rRNA from pure cultures, the hybridization of PNA MB to target 16S rRNA exhibited a higher final hybridization signal and a lower apparent rate constant than the hybridizations to nontarget 16S rRNAs. A concentration of 10 mM NaCl in the hybridization buffer was found to be optimal for maximizing the difference between final hybridization signals from target and nontarget 16S rRNAs. Hybridization temperatures and formamide concentrations in hybridization buffers were optimized to minimize signals from hybridizations of PNA MB to nontarget 16S rRNAs. The detection limit of the PNA MB hybridization assay was determined to be 1.6 nM of 16S rRNA. To establish proof for the application of PNA MB hybridization assays in complex systems, target 16S rRNA from Dechlorosoma suillum was spiked at different levels to RNA isolated from an environmental (bioreactor) sample, and the PNA MB assay enabled effective quantification of the D. suillum RNA in this complex mixture. For another environmental sample, the quantitative results from the PNA MB hybridization assay were compared with those from clone libraries.

  12. Matrix metalloproteinase-based photodynamic molecular beacons for targeted destruction of bone metastases in vivo.

    PubMed

    Liu, T W; Akens, M K; Chen, J; Wilson, B C; Zheng, G

    2016-03-01

    The metastatic spread of cancer from the primary site or organ is one of its most devastating aspects, being responsible for up to 90% of cancer-associated mortality. Bone is one of the common sites of metastatic spread, including the vertebrae. Regardless of the treatment strategy, the clinical goals for patients with vertebral metastases are to improve the quality of life by preventing neurologic decline, to achieve durable pain relief and enhance local tumor control. However, in part due to the close proximity of the spinal cord, current treatment options are limited. We propose a novel therapeutic strategy with the use of photodynamic molecular beacons (PMBs) for targeted destruction of spinal metastases, particularly to de-bulk lesions as an adjuvant to vertebroplasty or kyphoplasty in order to mechanically stabilize weak or fractured vertebrae. The PDT efficacy of a matrix metalloproteinase-specific PMB is reported in a metstatic model that recapitulates the clinical features of tumor growth within the bone. We demonstrate that not only does tumor cell destruction occur but also the killing of bone stromal cells. The potential of PMB-PDT to destroy metastatic tumors, disrupt the osteolytic cycle and better preserve critical organs with an increased therapeutic window compared with conventional photosensitizers is demonstrated.

  13. Diversity reception of COMSTAR SHF beacons with the Tampa triad, 1978 - 1981

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, D.; Tang, D. D.

    1982-01-01

    The results of 19 GHz downlink rain attenuation diversity measurements in Tampa over a 29 month period (1978-1980), and the results of a 20 GHz diversity study during the summer of 1981, using the remaining COMSTAR beacon are presented. At 19 GHz, site separations of 11, 16, and 20 km were used, with reception at high elevation angle (about 57 deg). At 29 GHz, only the 16 km baseline was employed, with elevation angle about 32 deg. Almost identical long term performance of the two longer baselines indicates that for separations above about 15 km diversity improvement was not sensitive to baseline length or direction. Diversity improvement at 29 GHz with the 16 km baseline was similar to that predicted by scaling the 19 GHz results of the previous seasons. Also discussed are the type of attenuation distributions and typical fade durations to be found under persistent convective conditions. For rain climates like Tampa's, site diversity in some form will be required for high reliability SHF satellite links. The diversity data may be helpful in designing schemes for resource sharing among numbers of links.

  14. Quasi-omnidirectional transducers for ultrasonic electronic-beacon guidance of invasive devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilkomerson, David H. R.; Gardineer, Bayard; Hojeibane, Hickmat

    1992-11-01

    A rapidly expanding area of medical treatment is using small invasive devices, e.g., balloon angioplasty catheters, to eliminate the need for conventional open surgery. The usual x-ray guidance requires patient and physician irradiation and the injection of contrast media, both undesirable. Ultrasound guidance, which would eliminate these hazards, has not been used because of the difficulty in determining with certainty the exact location of a particular point on the invasive device. By placing a transducer at such a point to act as a beacon, exact positioning by ultrasound imaging has been achieved. The required transducer's response must be almost omnidirectional, so that it detects the imaging system's beam independently of angle; the size of the transducer must be small, so that the device can penetrate into the body easily; finally, the cost of the transducer must be low, so that it may be thrown away after one use. We show how the transducer is designed to achieve the required angular response and size, and outline how the required transducers can be fabricated at low cost.

  15. Quantification of Salmonella Typhi in water and sediments by molecular-beacon based qPCR.

    PubMed

    Rani, Neetika; Vajpayee, Poornima; Bhatti, Saurabh; Singh, Smriti; Shanker, Rishi; Gupta, Kailash Chand

    2014-10-01

    A molecular-beacon based qPCR assay targeting staG gene was designed for specific detection and quantification of S. Typhi and validated against water and sediment samples collected from the river Ganga, Yamuna and their confluence on two days during Mahakumbha mela 2012-2013 (a) 18 December, 2012: before six major religious holy dips (Makar Sankranti, Paush Poornima, Mauni Amavasya, Basant Panchami, Maghi Poornima and Mahashivratri) (b) 10 February, 2013: after the holy dip was taken by over 3,00,00,000 devotees led by ascetics of Hindu sects at Sangam on 'Mauni Amavasya' (the most auspicious day of ritualistic mass bathing). The assay could detect linearly lowest 1 genomic equivalent per qPCR and is highly sensitive and selective for S. Typhi detection in presence of non specific DNA from other bacterial strains including S. Paratyphi A and S. Typhimurium. It has been observed that water and sediment samples exhibit S. Typhi. The mass holy dip by devotees significantly affected the water and sediment quality by enhancing the number of S. Typhi in the study area. The qPCR developed in the study might be helpful in planning the intervention and prevention strategies for control of enteric fever outbreaks in endemic regions.

  16. Entropy Beacon: A Hairpin-Free DNA Amplification Strategy for Efficient Detection of Nucleic Acids.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yifan; Cui, Liang; Peng, Ruizi; Zhao, Zilong; Qiu, Liping; Chen, Huapei; Jin, Cheng; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Tan, Weihong

    2015-12-01

    Here, we propose an efficient strategy for enzyme- and hairpin-free nucleic acid detection called an entropy beacon (abbreviated as Ebeacon). Different from previously reported DNA hybridization/displacement-based strategies, Ebeacon is driven forward by increases in the entropy of the system, instead of free energy released from new base-pair formation. Ebeacon shows high sensitivity, with a detection limit of 5 pM target DNA in buffer and 50 pM in cellular homogenate. Ebeacon also benefits from the hairpin-free amplification strategy and zero-background, excellent thermostability from 20 °C to 50 °C, as well as good resistance to complex environments. In particular, based on the huge difference between the breathing rate of a single base pair and two adjacent base pairs, Ebeacon also shows high selectivity toward base mutations, such as substitution, insertion, and deletion and, therefore, is an efficient nucleic acid detection method, comparable to most reported enzyme-free strategies.

  17. On the progress of four decades of radio beacon studies in India - a brief review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rama Rao, Paluri V. S.

    Forty years of progress in the Radio Beacon research of the ionosphere carried out in India using the signals from both orbiting as well as geostationary satellites by various researchers has been briefly reviewed. Several features in the typical equatorial and low latitude characteristics on the occurrence and morphological behaviour of the Total Electron Content (TEC) and the ionospheric scintillations with particular reference to the Pre-reversal enhancement in the vertical drifts and the Equatorial Ionization Anomaly (EIA) are presented. The need for the measurement of absolute TEC, its real time prediction as well as the prediction in the onset of scintillations, their amplitudes and durations, in the context of the possible application of these space weather phenomena in the satellite based communication and navigation systems, with reference to the effective implementation of the programmes such as GPS Aided Geo Augmented Navigation (GAGAN) are discussed. Also, the local time dependant response of equatorial ionosphere to geomagnetic storms has been discussed in the context development/inhibition of ESF.

  18. A molecular beacon microarray based on a quantum dot label for detecting single nucleotide polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qingsheng; Bai, Zhixiong; Liu, Yuqian; Sun, Qingjiang

    2016-03-15

    In this work, we report the application of streptavidin-coated quantum dot (strAV-QD) in molecular beacon (MB) microarray assays by using the strAV-QD to label the immobilized MB, avoiding target labeling and meanwhile obviating the use of amplification. The MBs are stem-loop structured oligodeoxynucleotides, modified with a thiol and a biotin at two terminals of the stem. With the strAV-QD labeling an "opened" MB rather than a "closed" MB via streptavidin-biotin reaction, a sensitive and specific detection of label-free target DNA sequence is demonstrated by the MB microarray, with a signal-to-background ratio of 8. The immobilized MBs can be perfectly regenerated, allowing the reuse of the microarray. The MB microarray also is able to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms, exhibiting genotype-dependent fluorescence signals. It is demonstrated that the MB microarray can perform as a 4-to-2 encoder, compressing the genotype information into two outputs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The use of nanocrystal quantum dot as fluorophore reporters in molecular beacon-based assays.

    PubMed

    Adegoke, Oluwasesan; Park, Enoch Y

    2016-01-01

    The utilization of molecular beacon (MB) biosensor probes to detect nucleic acid targets has received enormous interest within the scientific community. This interest has been stimulated by the operational qualities of MB-based probes with respect to their unique sensitivity and specificity. The design of MB biosensors entails not only optimizing the sequence of the loop to hybridize with the nucleic acid target or optimization of the length of the stem to tune the sensitivity but also the selection of the appropriate fluorophore reporter to generate the signal transduction read-out upon hybridization of the probe with the target sequence. Traditional organic fluorescent dyes are mostly used for signal reporting in MB assays but their optical properties in comparison to semiconductor fluorescent quantum dot (Qdot) nanocrystals are at a disadvantage. This review highlights the progress made in exploiting Qdot as fluorophore reporters in MB-based assays with the aim of instigating further development in the field of Qdot-MB technology. The development reported to date indicates that unparalleled fluorescence signal reporting in MB-based assays can be achieved using well-constructed Qdot fluorophores.

  20. Single palindromic molecular beacon-based amplification for genetic analysis of cancers.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Zhao, Hui; Wang, Zheng-Yong; Wu, Zai-Sheng; Yang, Zhe; Li, Cong-Cong; Xu, Huo; Lyu, Jian-Xin; Shen, Zhi-Fa

    2017-05-15

    The detection of biomarkers is of crucial importance in reducing the morbidity and mortality of complex diseases. Thus, there is a great desire to develop highly efficient and simple sensing methods to fulfill the different diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. Herein, using tumor suppressor p53 gene as model target DNA, we developed a novel palindromic fragment-incorporated molecular beacon (P-MB) that can perform multiple functions, including recognition element, signal reporter, polymerization template and primer. Upon specific hybridization with target DNA, P-MBs can interact with each other and are extended by polymerase without any additional probes. As a result, hybridized targets are peeled off from P-MBs and initiate the next round of reactions, leading to the unique strand displacement amplification (SDA). The newly-proposed enzymatic amplification displays the detection limit as low as 100pM and excellent selectivity in distinguishing single-base mutation with the linear response range from 100pM to 75nM. This is the simplest SDA sensing system so far because of only involving one type of DNA probe. This impressive sensing paradigm is expected to provide new insight into developing new-type of DNA probes that hold tremendous potential with important applications in molecular biology research and clinical diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Noninvasive Monitoring of Three-Dimensional Chondrogenic Constructs Using Molecular Beacon Nanosensors.

    PubMed

    Tay, Li Min; Wiraja, Christian; Yeo, David C; Wu, Yingnan; Yang, Zheng; Chuah, Yon Jin; Lee, Eng Hin; Kang, Yuejun; Xu, Chenjie

    2017-01-01

    Chondrogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in three-dimensional hydrogel holds promise as a method for repairing injured articular cartilage. Given MSC plasticity (its potential to mature into alternative lineages), nondestructive monitoring is critical for the optimization of chondrogenic differentiation conditions and the evaluation of the final product. However, conventional validation/assessments of the differentiation process (i.e., quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction [qRT-PCR] and histology) are end-point assays requiring disruption of the sample. This report introduces molecular beacon (MB)-based nanosensors to achieve noninvasive monitoring of chondrogenic differentiation. These nanosensors consist of biodegradable poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles (PLGA NPs) encapsulating MBs to detect Type II Collagen (Col2) and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) mRNAs that serve as lineage-specific and housekeeping biomarkers, respectively. The sustainable release of MBs from MB-NPs allows longitudinal monitoring of MSCs undergoing chondrogenic differentiation over a period of 28 days. Dual-colored MB loading ensures accurate assessment of Col2 mRNA expression level, where potential heterogeneity in nanosensor uptake and retention by MSCs are taken into account. When normalized nanosensor signal was compared against qRT-PCR result, a tight correlation was observed (R(2) = 0.9301). Finally, nanosensor usage was compatible with MSC potency with minimal influence on chondrogenic, adipogenic, and osteogenic differentiation.

  2. A molecular beacon biosensor based on the nanostructured aluminum oxide surface.

    PubMed

    Che, Xiangchen; He, Yuan; Yin, Haocheng; Que, Long

    2015-10-15

    A new class of molecular beacon biosensors based on the nanostructured aluminum oxide or anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) surface is reported. In this type of sensor, the AAO surface is used to enhance the fluorescent signals of the fluorophore-labeled hairpin DNA. When a target DNA with a complementary sequence to that of the hairpin DNA is applied on the sensor, the fluorophores are forced to move away from the AAO surface due to the hybridization between the hairpin DNA and the target DNA, resulting in the significant decrease of the fluorescent signals. The observed signal reduction is sufficient to achieve a demonstrated detection limit of 10nM, which could be further improved by optimizing the AAO surface. The control experiments have also demonstrated that the bioassay used in the experiments has excellent specificity and selectivity, indicating the great promise of this type of sensor for diagnostic applications. Since the arrayed AAO micropatterns can be fabricated on a single chip in a cost-effective manner, the arrayed sensors could provide an ideal technical platform for studying fundamental biological process and monitoring disease biomarkers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Near Infrared Optical Proteolytic Beacons for In Vivo Imaging of Matrix Metalloproteinase Activity

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, J. Oliver; Scherer, Randy L.; Matrisian, Lynn M.

    2010-01-01

    The exuberant expression of proteinases by tumor cells has long been associated with the breakdown of the extracellular matrix, tumor invasion, and metastasis to distant organs. There is both epidemiological and experimental data that support a causative role for proteinases of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family in tumor progression. Optical imaging techniques provide an extraordinary opportunity for non-invasive “molecular imaging” of tumor-associated proteolytic activity. The application of optical proteolytic beacons for the detection of specific proteinase activities associated with tumors has several potential purposes: 1) Detection of small, early-stage tumors with increased sensitivity due to the catalytic nature of proteolytic activity, 2) Diagnosis and Prognosis to distinguished tumors that require particularly aggressive therapy or those that will not benefit from therapy, 3) Identification of tumors appropriate for specific anti-proteinase therapeutics and optimization of drug and dose based on determination of target modulation, and 4) as an indicator of efficacy of proteolytically-activated pro-drugs. This chapter describes the synthesis, characterization, and application of reagents that use visible and near infrared fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) fluorophore pairs to detect and measure MMP-referable proteolytic activity in tumors in mouse models of cancer. PMID:20135290

  4. Visualization and Detection of Infectious Coxsackievirus Replication Using a Combined Cell Culture-Molecular Beacon Assay

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Aijun; Salazar, Andre M.; Yates, Marylynn V.; Mulchandani, Ashok; Chen, Wilfred

    2005-01-01

    Rapid detection of infectious viruses is of central importance for public health risk assessment. By directly visualizing newly synthesized viral RNA with molecular beacons (MBs), we have developed a generalized method for the rapid and sensitive detection of infectious viruses from cell culture. An MB, CVB1, specifically targeting the 5′ noncoding region of the enterovirus genome was designed and synthesized. Introduction of MB CVB1 into permeabilized cells highly infected with coxsackievirus B6 resulted in brightly fluorescent cells that can be easily visualized with a fluorescence microscope. In contrast, no detectable signal was observed with noninfected cells or with nonspecific MBs. The number of fluorescent cells also increased in a dose-responsive manner, enabling the direct quantification of infectious viral dosages by direct counting of fluorescent foci. As little as 1 PFU of infectious coxsackievirus B6 was detected within 6 h postinfection. When combined with nuclease-resistant MBs, this method could be useful not only for the real-time detection of infectious viruses but is also useful to study the life cycle of viral processing in vivo. PMID:16332827

  5. Beacon Hill end moraine, Boston: new explanation of an important urban feature

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kaye, Clifford A.; Coates, Donald R.

    1976-01-01

    The usefulness of geology to engineers is in direct proportion to how well it helps us predict the subsurface; these predictions, in turn, depend on our knowledge of the geomorphic processes that molded the terrain. The uncertainties of interpretation are particularly great in glaciated terrain because our understanding of both glacial processes and history is so incomplete, a fact well illustrated in Beacon Hill. Recent construction activities in the eastern part of the hill, until now classified as a drumlin, have shown that it is better interpreted as an end moraine formed by a Wisconsonian glacial readvance. Instead of the firm till that was anticipated as foundation material, excavations exposed a complex of sand, gravel, and clay, with only minor zones of till. The structure of these deposits strongly suggests that originally they were plates of the glacial bed that froze to the glacier and were transported englacially. Thrust faulting and other deformations are glacial structures formed within the ice in the glacier's terminal zone. In spite of the complex englacial history, these deposits lost little of their original appearance and intergranular relationships. Upon deglaciation, the frozen moraine thawed, and slumping formed complex secondary structures on the ridge's lower flanks.

  6. The use of nanocrystal quantum dot as fluorophore reporters in molecular beacon-based assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adegoke, Oluwasesan; Park, Enoch Y.

    2016-12-01

    The utilization of molecular beacon (MB) biosensor probes to detect nucleic acid targets has received enormous interest within the scientific community. This interest has been stimulated by the operational qualities of MB-based probes with respect to their unique sensitivity and specificity. The design of MB biosensors entails not only optimizing the sequence of the loop to hybridize with the nucleic acid target or optimization of the length of the stem to tune the sensitivity but also the selection of the appropriate fluorophore reporter to generate the signal transduction read-out upon hybridization of the probe with the target sequence. Traditional organic fluorescent dyes are mostly used for signal reporting in MB assays but their optical properties in comparison to semiconductor fluorescent quantum dot (Qdot) nanocrystals are at a disadvantage. This review highlights the progress made in exploiting Qdot as fluorophore reporters in MB-based assays with the aim of instigating further development in the field of Qdot-MB technology. The development reported to date indicates that unparalleled fluorescence signal reporting in MB-based assays can be achieved using well-constructed Qdot fluorophores.

  7. A Catalytic Beacon Sensor for Uranium with Parts-per-Trillion Sensitivity and Millionfold Selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Juewen; Brown, Andrea K.; Meng, Xiangli; Cropek, Donald M.; IstokD., Jonathan; Watson, David B; Liu, Yi

    2007-01-01

    Here, we report a catalytic beacon sensor for uranyl (UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}) based on an in vitro-selected UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}-specific DNAzyme. The sensor consists of a DNA enzyme strand with a 3' quencher and a DNA substrate with a ribonucleotide adenosine (rA) in the middle and a fluorophore and a quencher at the 5' and 3' ends, respectively. The presence of UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} causes catalytic cleavage of the DNA substrate strand at the rA position and release of the fluorophore and thus dramatic increase of fluorescence intensity. The sensor has a detection limit of 11 parts per trillion (45 pM), a dynamic range up to 400 nM, and selectivity of >1-million-fold over other metal ions. The most interfering metal ion, Th(IV), interacts with the fluorescein fluorophore, causing slightly enhanced fluorescence intensity, with an apparent dissociation constant of {approx}230 {micro}M. This sensor rivals the most sensitive analytical instruments for uranium detection, and its application in detecting uranium in contaminated soil samples is also demonstrated. This work shows that simple, cost-effective, and portable metal sensors can be obtained with similar sensitivity and selectivity as much more expensive and sophisticated analytical instruments. Such a sensor will play an important role in environmental remediation of radionuclides such as uranium.

  8. DNA molecular beacon-based plastic biochip: a versatile and sensitive scanometric detection platform.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaoli; Wen, Jing; Li, Yunchao; Zheng, Yue; Zhou, Jianjun; Li, Xiaohong; Yu, Hua-Zhong

    2014-12-24

    In this paper, we report a novel DNA molecular beacon (MB)-based plastic biochip platform for scanometric detection of a range of analytical targets. Hairpin DNA strands, which are dually modified with amino and biotin groups at their two ends are immobilized on a disposable plastic (polycarbonate) substrate as recognition element and gold nanoparticle-assisted silver-staining as signal reading protocol. Initially, the immobilized DNA probes are in their folded forms; upon target binding the hairpin secondary structure of the probe strand is "forced" open (i.e., converted to the unfolded state). Nanogold-streptavidin conjugates can then bind the terminal biotin groups and promote the deposition of rather large silver particles which can be either directly visualized or quantified with a standard flatbed scanner. We demonstrate that with properly designed probe sequences and optimized preparation conditions, a range of molecular targets, such as DNA strands, proteins (thrombin) and heavy metal ions (Hg(2+)), can be detected with high sensitivity and excellent selectivity. The detection can be done in both standard physiological buffers and real world samples. This constitutes a platform technology for performing rapid, sensitive, cost-effective, and point-of-care (POC) chemical analysis and medical diagnosis.

  9. Beacon-based (bbFISH®) technology for rapid pathogens identification in blood cultures.

    PubMed

    Sakarikou, Christina; Parisato, Martina; Lo Cascio, Giuliana; Fontana, Carla

    2014-04-22

    Diagnosis and treatment of bloodstream infections (BSI) are often hampered by the delay in obtaining the final results of blood cultures. Rapid identification of pathogens involved in BSI is of great importance in order to improve survival of septic patients. Beacon-based fluorescent in situ hybridization (hemoFISH® Gram positive and hemoFISH® Gram negative test kits, miacom diagnostics GmbH Düsseldorf, Germany) accelerates the identification of most frequent bacterial pathogens of sepsis. In this study a total of 558 blood culture (377 blood culture positive and 181 negative) were tested with the hemoFISH® method and the results were evaluated in comparison with the traditional culture based methods. The overall sensitivity and specificity of the hemoFISH® tests were 94.16% and 100%, while, the PPV and NPV were 100 and 89.16%, respectively. As the hemoFISH® results were obtained within 45 mins, the time difference between the final results of the traditional culture method and the hemoFISH® assay was about two days. Considering the good sensitivity and specificity of the hemoFISH® assays as well as the significant time saving in obtaining the final results (p-value 0.0001), the introduction of the system could be rialable in the microbiology laboratories, even alongside the traditional systems.

  10. The Keys to Governance and Stakeholder Engagement: The Southeast Michigan Beacon Community Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Des Jardins, Terrisca R.

    2014-01-01

    Community-based health information exchanges (HIEs) and efforts to consolidate and house data are growing, given the advent of Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) under the Affordable Care Act and other similar population health focused initiatives. The Southeast Michigan Beacon Community (SEMBC) can be looked to as one case study that offers lessons learned, insights on challenges faced and accompanying workarounds related to governance and stakeholder engagement. The SEMBC case study employs an established Data Warehouse Governance Framework to identify and explain the necessary governance and stakeholder engagement components, particularly as they relate to community-wide data sharing and data warehouses or repositories. Perhaps the biggest lesson learned through the SEMBC experience is that community-based work is hard. It requires a great deal of community leadership, collaboration and resources. SEMBC found that organizational structure and guiding principles needed to be continually revisited and nurtured in order to build the relationships and trust needed among stakeholder organizations. SEMBC also found that risks and risk mitigation tactics presented challenges and opportunities at the outset and through the duration of the three year pilot period. Other communities across the country embarking on similar efforts need to consider realistic expectations about community data sharing infrastructures and the accompanying and necessary governance and stakeholder engagement fundamentals. PMID:25848612

  11. A color-tunable molecular beacon to sense miRNA-9 expression during neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ko, Hae Young; Lee, Jonghwan; Joo, Jin Young; Lee, Yong Seung; Heo, Hyejung; Ko, Jung Jae; Kim, Soonhag

    2014-04-09

    A typical molecular beacon (MB) composing of a fluorophore and a quencher has been used to sense various intracellular biomolecules including microRNAs (miRNA, miR). However, the on/off-tunable miRNA MB is difficult to distinguish whether the observed low fluorescence brightness results from low miRNA expression or low transfection of the miRNA MB. We developed a color-tunable miRNA-9 MB (ColoR9 MB) to sense miR-9 expression-dependent color change. The ColoR9 MB was synthesized by a partially double-stranded DNA oligonucleotide containing a miR-9 binding site and a reporter probe with Cy3/black hole quencher 1 (BHQ1) at one end and a reference probe with Cy5.5 at the other end. The ColoR9 MB visualized CHO and P19 cells with red color in the absence of miR-9 and yellow color in the presence of miR-9. In vivo imaging demonstrated that the green fluorescence recovery of the reporter probe from the ColoR9 MB increased gradually during neuronal differentiation of P19 cells, whereas red fluorescence activity of the reference probe remained constant. These results showed the great specificity of sensing miR-9 expression- and neurogenesis-dependent color change.

  12. Observations of inner plasmasphere irregularities with a satellite-beacon radio-interferometer array

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, A.R.; Hoogeveen, G.; Carlos, R.C.; Wu, G.; Fejer, B.G.; Kelley, M.C.

    1996-09-01

    A radio-interferometer array illuminated by 136-MHz beacons of several geosynchronous satellites has been used to study small ({ge}10{sup 13} m{sup {minus}2}) transient disturbances in the total electron content along the lines of sight to the satellites. High-frequency (f{gt}3 mHz) electron content oscillations are persistently observed, particularly during night and particularly during geomagnetically disturbed periods. The oscillations move across the array plane at speeds in the range 200{endash}2000 m/s, with propagation azimuths that are strongly peaked in lobes toward the western half-plane. Detailed analysis of this azimuth behavior, involving comparison between observations on various satellite positions, indicates compellingly that the phase oscillations originate in radio refraction due to geomagnetically aligned plasma density perturbations in the inner plasmasphere. The motion of the phase perturbations across the array plane is caused by {bold EXB} drift of the plasma medium in which the irregularities are embedded. We review the statistics of 2.5 years of around-the-clock data on the local time, magnetic disturbance, seasonal, and line-of-sight variations of these observed irregularities. We compare the irregularities{close_quote} inferred electrodynamic drifts to what is known about midlatitude plasma drift from incoherent scatter. Finally, we show in detail how the observation of these irregularities provides a unique and complementary monitor of inner plasmasphere irregularity incidence and zonal drift.{copyright} 1996 American Geophysical Union

  13. Gold nanoparticle-based beacon to detect STAT5b mRNA expression in living cells: a case optimized by bioinformatics screen.

    PubMed

    Deng, Dawei; Li, Yang; Xue, Jianpeng; Wang, Jie; Ai, Guanhua; Li, Xin; Gu, Yueqing

    2015-01-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA), a single-strand ribonucleic acid with functional gene information is usually abnormally expressed in cancer cells and has become a promising biomarker for the study of tumor progress. Hairpin DNA-coated gold nanoparticle (hDAuNP) beacon containing a bare gold nanoparticle (AuNP) as fluorescence quencher and thiol-terminated fluorescently labeled stem-loop-stem oligonucleotide sequences attached by Au-S bond is currently a new nanoscale biodiagnostic platform capable of mRNA detection, in which the design of the loop region sequence is crucial for hybridizing with the target mRNA. Hence, in this study, to improve the sensitivity and selectivity of hDAuNP beacon simultaneously, the loop region of hairpin DNA was screened by bioinformatics strategy. Here, signal transducer and activator of transcription 5b (STAT5b) mRNA was selected and used as a practical example. The results from the combined characterizations using optical techniques, flow cytometry assay, and cell microscopic imaging showed that after optimization, the as-prepared hDAuNP beacon had higher selectivity and sensitivity for the detection of STAT5b mRNA in living cells, as compared with our previous beacon. Thus, the bioinformatics method may be a promising new strategy for assisting in the designing of the hDAuNP beacon, extending its application in the detection of mRNA expression and the resultant mRNA-based biological processes and disease pathogenesis.

  14. Application of a molecular beacon based real-time isothermal amplification (MBRTIA) technology for simultaneous detection of Bacillus cereus and Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Mandappa, I M; Joglekar, Prasanna; Manonmani, H K

    2015-07-01

    A multiplex real-time isothermal amplification assay was developed using molecular beacons for the detection of Bacillus cereus and Staphylococcus aureus by targeting four important virulence genes. A correlation between targeting highly accessible DNA sequences and isothermal amplification based molecular beacon efficiency and sensitivity was demonstrated using phi(Φ)29 DNA polymerase at a constant isothermal temperature of 30 °C. It was very selective and consistently detected down to 10(1) copies of DNA. The specificity and sensitivity of this assay, when tested with pure culture were high, surpassing those of currently used PCR assays for the detection of these organisms. The molecular beacon based real-time isothermal amplification (MBRTIA) assay could be carried out entirely in 96 well plates or well strips, enabling a rapid and high-throughput detection of food borne pathogens.

  15. Use of molecular beacons to verify that the serine hydroxymethyltransferase pseudogene SHMT-ps1 is unique to the order Primates

    PubMed Central

    Devor, Eric J

    2001-01-01

    Background: The serine hydroxymethyltransferase processed pseudogene SHMT-ps1 has been suggested to be unique to the order Primates because of the failure to amplify this sequence by PCR from genomic DNAs of any non-primate mammal species. Here, 'molecular beacon' probes specific to SHMT-ps1 were used in an attempt to verify this suggestion. Results: In a search for SHMT-ps1-specific sequences using molecular beacons across a range of mammalian species, SHMT-ps1 was only found in primates. The molecular beacon assays also showed that SHMT-ps1 is present in both Old World and New World species but not among prosimians. Conclusions: These results suggest that SHMT-ps1 originated close to the origin of the Anthropoidea, some 40 to 50 million years ago. PMID:11182889

  16. Ultra-Stable Beacon Source for Laboratory Testing of Optical Tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aso, Yoichi; Marka, Szabolcs; Kovalik, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    The ultra-stable beacon source (USBS) provides a laser-beam output with a very low angular jitter and can be used as an absolute angular reference to simulate a beacon in the laboratory. The laser is mounted on the top of a very short (approximately equal to 1 m) inverted pendulum (IP) with its optical axis parallel to the carbon fiber pendulum leg. The 85-cm, carbon fiber rods making up the leg are very lightweight and rigid, and are supported by a flex-joint at the bottom (see figure). The gimbal-mounted laser is a weight-adjustable load of about 1.5 kg with its center of rotation co-located with the center of percussion of the inverted pendulum. This reduces the coupling of transverse motion at the base of the pendulum to angular motion of the laser at the top. The inverted pendulum is mounted on a gimbal with its center of rotation coinciding with the pivot position of the inverted pendulum flexure joint. This reduces coupling of ground tilt at the inverted pendulum base to motion of the laser mounted at the top. The mass of the top gimbal is adjusted to give the pendulum a very low resonant frequency (approximately equal to 10 mHz) that filters transverse seismic disturbances from the ground where the base is attached. The motion of the IP is monitored by an optical-lever sensor. The laser light is reflected by the mirror on the IP, and then is detected by a quadrant photo-detector (QPD). The position of the beam spot on the QPD corresponds to the tilt of the IP. Damping of this motion is provided by two coil and magnet pairs. The bottom gimbal mount consists of two plates. The IP is mounted on the second plate. The first plate is supported by two posts through needles and can be rotated about the axis connecting the tips of the needles. The second plate hangs from the first plate and can be rotated about the axis perpendicular to the first plate. As a result, the second plate acts as a two-axis rotation stage. Its center of rotation is located at the

  17. The CERTO Beacon on CASSIOPE/e-POP and Experiments Using High-Power HF Ionospheric Heaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siefring, Carl L.; Bernhardt, Paul A.; James, H. Gordon; Parris, Richard Todd

    2015-06-01

    A new Coherent Electromagnetic Radio Tomography (CERTO) beacon is on the CASSIOPE satellite and part of the enhanced-Polar Outflow Probe (e-POP) suite of scientific instruments. CERTO signals can be used to measure ionospheric Total Electron Content (TEC) and radio scintillations along propagation paths between CERTO and receivers. The combination of CERTO and the array of e-POP in-situ diagnostics form a powerful tool for studying ionospheric plasma processes that have not been previously possible. Of note, the combination CERTO and the Radio Receiver Instrument (RRI), a modern digital receiver, which measures between 10 Hz to 18 MHz in selectable bands allows for innovative High Frequency (HF) radio propagation experiments. The use of high-power HF ionospheric heating facilities for such experiments further allows for repeatable studies of a number of important plasma processes. The new CERTO beacon transmits un-modulated, phase-coherent waves at 150, 400, and 1067 MHz with either right-hand-circular or linear polarization and TEC is measured using either differential phase and/or Faraday rotation. With a linear array of CERTO receivers, TEC data can be used for tomographic imaging of the ionosphere yielding two-dimensional maps of the plasma below the satellite orbit. In addition, the three CERTO frequencies cover a wide range for determination of radio scintillation effects caused by diffraction from propagation through ionospheric irregularities. We will describe the CERTO beacon and several potential innovative experiments using HF heating facilities in conjunction with CERTO, the RRI and other e-POP instruments.

  18. Label-free molecular beacons-based cascade amplification DNA machine for sensitive detection of telomerase activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Kan; Wang, Lei; Xu, Xiaowen; Jiang, Wei

    2017-05-15

    Sensitive detection of telomerase activity is critical to cancer diagnosis, screening of anticancer drugs and evaluation of cancer therapy. Herein, a label-free molecular beacons-based DNA machine was developed for sensitive detection of telomerase activity. The DNA machine consisted of T7 exonuclease (T7 Exo), label-free recognition molecular beacon (RMB) and signal molecular beacon (SMB) with projecting 5'-terminuses, which can protect RMB and SMB from being digested by T7 Exo. Firstly, telomerase elongated telomerase substrate (TS) primer, generating a telomerase elongation production (TEP) with tandem repeats (TTAGGG)n. Next, TEP activated the DNA machine by hybridizing with RMB, unfolding RMB with a recessed 5'-terminus, making RMB deprotection from T7 Exo. Then T7 Exo-assisted cycling cleavage was incurred, releasing intact TEP and numerous DNA fragments (trigger DNA), which got recycling I. Subsequently, trigger DNA specifically opened SMB and was recycled by T7 Exo, liberating multiple G-quadruplex (G4) structures, which got recycling II. Finally, TEP and the liberative G4 structures strongly interacted with N-methyl-mesoporphyrin IX (NMM), yielding a significantly enhanced fluorescence together. In this way, per telomerase-mediated elongation event was efficiently converted into the greatly amplified fluorescence signals. Telomerase activity in crude HeLa cells extracts equivalent to 50 cells/mL was successfully measured with a linear range from 50 cells/mL to 2000 cells/mL. Besides, the strategy was also successfully used to assay the inhibition effect of a telomerase-inhibiting drug, demonstrating the strategy holds the potential to screen telomerase inhibitors.

  19. Broadly targeted triplex real-time PCR detection of influenza A, B and C viruses based on the nucleoprotein gene and a novel "MegaBeacon" probe strategy.

    PubMed

    Muradrasoli, Shaman; Mohamed, Nahla; Belák, Sándor; Czifra, György; Herrmann, Björn; Berencsi, George; Blomberg, Jonas

    2010-02-01

    A PCR assay that covers animal and human influenza A, B and C viruses, i.e., most of Orthomyxoviridae, is needed. Influenza types are distinguished based on differences in the nucleoprotein (NP) present in the virus. Conserved NP regions were therefore used to design a TaqMan-based triplex reverse transcription real-time PCR method. Variability of influenza A within the probe target region mandated the development of a novel molecular beacon, the "Mega" molecular beacon (MegaBeacon; MegB), for the detection of influenza A with this method. MegaBeacon is a mismatch-tolerant molecular beacon that is also a TaqMan probe. The triplex method (3QPCR-MegB) was evaluated with influenza A isolates covering 18 HxNx combinations, two influenza B isolates, and five Japanese influenza C isolates, as well as influenza A, B and C synthetic DNA targets. One to ten viral RNA and cDNA genome equivalents were detected per PCR reaction for influenza A, B and C. Seventy-one human nasopharyngeal aspirates from respiratory infections yielded 30 influenza A, 11 influenza B and 0 influenza C with 3QPCR-MegB, where immunofluorescence (IF) found 28 influenza A and 10 influenza B. 3QPCR-MegB was more mismatch-tolerant than a variant PCR with an influenza A TaqMan probe (3QPCR) and is a sensitive and rational method to detect influenza viruses of animal and human origin. MegaBeacon probes hold promise for variable target nucleic acids.

  20. Electro-optic testbed utilizing a dynamic range gated Rayleigh beacon for atmospheric turbulence profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuraski, Steven M.; Fiorino, Steven T.; Beecher, Elizabeth A.; Figlewski, Nathan M.; Schmidt, Jason D.; McCrae, Jack E.

    2016-10-01

    The Photometry Analysis and Optical Tracking and Evaluation System (PANOPTES) Quad Axis Telescope is a unique four axis mount Ritchey-Chretien 24 inch telescope capable of tracking objects through the zenith without axes rotation delay (no Dead Zone). This paper describes enhancement components added to the quad axis mount telescope that will enable measurements supporting novel research and field testing focused on `three-dimensional' characterization of turbulent atmospheres, mitigation techniques, and new sensing modalities. These all support research and operational techniques relating to astronomical imaging and electro-optical propagation though the atmosphere, relative to sub-meter class telescopes in humid, continental environments. This effort will use custom designed and commercial off the shelf hardware; sub-system components discussed will include a wavefront sensor system, a co-aligned beam launch system, and a fiber coupled research laser. The wavefront sensing system has the ability to take measurements from a dynamic altitude adjustable laser beacon scattering spot, a key concept that enables rapid turbulence structure parameter measurements over an altitude varied integrated atmospheric volume. The sub-components are integrated with the overall goal of measuring a height-resolved volumetric profile for the atmospheric turbulence structure parameter at the site, and developing mobile techniques for such measurements. The design concept, part selection optimization, baseline component lab testing, and initial field measurements, will be discussed in the main sections of this paper. This project is a collaborative effort between the Air Force Research Labs Sensors Directorate and the Air Force Institute of Technology Center for Directed Energy.