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Sample records for beagle-based canine x-linked

  1. XLPRA: A canine retinal degeneration inherited as an X-linked trait

    SciTech Connect

    Acland, G.M.; Blanton, S.H.; Hershfield, B.; Aguirre, G.D.

    1994-08-01

    Breeding studies are reported of a previously undescribed hereditary retinal degeneration identified in the Siberian Husky breed of dog. This disorder clinically resembles the previously reported autosomal recessive canine hereditary retinal degenerations collectively termed progressive retinal atrophy (PRA). However, the pedigree of the propositus, a male Siberian Husky, exhibited an X-linked pattern of transmission. This dog was outcrossed to three phenotypically normal female laboratory Beagles and two of their F1 daughters were bred to a phenotypically normal male Beagle, producing affected males in the F2 generation. Subsequent inbreedings produced further affected males and affected females as well. X-linked transmission was established by exclusion of alternative modes of inheritance and, consequently, the disease has been termed X-linked progressive retinal atrophy (XLPRA). This is the first reported X-linked retinal degeneration in an animal. Because of the many similarities of PRA in dogs to retinitis pigmentosa (RP) in humans, this new disease may not only represent the first animal model of X-linked RP (XLRP) but may well be a true homolog of one of the XLRP loci (RP2, RP3, RP6). It is the first retinal degeneration in dogs that can be assigned to an identified canine chromosome, and the first for which linkage mapping offers a realistic approach to proceed by positional cloning towards identifying the responsible gene. 58 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  2. Gait Characteristics in a Canine Model of X-linked Myotubular Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Goddard, Melissa A.; Burlingame, Emily; Beggs, Alan H.; Buj-Bello, Anna; Childers, Martin K.; Marsh, Anthony P.; Kelly, Valerie E.

    2014-01-01

    X-linked myotubular myopathy (XLMTM) is a fatal pediatric disease where affected boys display profound weakness of the skeletal muscles. Possible therapies are under development but robust outcome measures in animal models are required for effective translation to human patients. We established a naturally-occuring canine model, where XLMTM dogs display clinical symptoms similar to those observed in humans. The aim of this study was to determine potential endpoints for the assessment of future treatments in this model. Video-based gait analysis was selected, as it is a well-established method of assessing limb function in neuromuscular disease and measures have been correlated to patient quality of life. XLMTM dogs (N=3) and their true littermate wild type controls (N=3) were assessed at 4–5 time points, beginning at 10 weeks and continuing through 17 weeks. Motion capture and an instrumented carpet were used separately to evaluate spatiotemporal and kinematic changes over time. XLMTM dogs walk more slowly and with shorter stride lengths than wild type dogs, and these differences became greater over time. However, there was no clear difference in angular measures between affected and unaffected dogs. These data demonstrate that spatiotemporal parameters capture functional changes in gait in an XLMTM canine model and support their utility in future therapeutic trials. PMID:25281397

  3. Mutation identification in a canine model of X-linked ectodermal dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Casal, Margret L.; Scheidt, Jennifer L.; Rhodes, James L.; Henthorn, Paula S.; Werner, Petra

    2012-01-01

    X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (XHED), an inherited disease recognized in humans, mice, and cattle, is characterized by hypotrichosis, a reduced number or absence of sweat glands, and missing or malformed teeth. In a subset of affected individuals and animals, mutations in the EDA gene (formerly EDI), coding for ectodysplasin, have been found to cause this phenotype. Ectodysplasin is a homotrimeric transmembrane protein with an extracellular TNF-like domain, which has been shown to be involved in the morphogenesis of hair follicles and tooth buds during fetal development. Some human XHED patients also have concurrent immunodeficiency, due to mutations in the NF-κB essential modulator protein (IKBKG; formerly NEMO), which is also encoded on the X chromosome. In a breeding colony of dogs with XHED, immune system defects had been suspected because of frequent pulmonary infections and unexpected deaths resulting from pneumonia. To determine if defects in EDA or IKBKG cause XHED in the dogs, linkage analysis and sequencing experiments were performed. A polymorphic marker near the canine EDA gene showed significant linkage to XHED. The canine EDA gene was sequenced and a nucleotide substitution (G to A) in the splice acceptor site of intron 8 was detected in affected dogs. In the presence of the A residue, a cryptic acceptor site within exon 9 is used, leading to a frame shift and use of a premature stop codon that truncates the translation of both isoforms, EDA-A1 and EDA-A2, resulting in the absence of the TNF-like homology domain, the receptor-binding site of ectodysplasin. PMID:16151697

  4. Gene Therapy Studies in a Canine Model of X-Linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    De Ravin, Suk See; Malech, Harry L.; Sorrentino, Brian P.; Burtner, Christopher; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Since the occurrence of T cell leukemias in the original human γ-retroviral gene therapy trials for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (XSCID), considerable effort has been devoted to developing safer vectors. This review summarizes gene therapy studies performed in a canine model of XSCID to evaluate the efficacy of γ-retroviral, lentiviral, and foamy viral vectors for treating XSCID and a novel method of vector delivery. These studies demonstrate that durable T cell reconstitution and thymopoiesis with no evidence of any serious adverse events and, in contrast to the human XSCID patients, sustained marking in myeloid cells and B cells with reconstitution of normal humoral immune function can be achieved for up to 5 years without any pretreatment conditioning. The presence of sustained levels of gene-marked T cells, B cells, and more importantly myeloid cells for almost 5 years is highly suggestive of transduction of either multipotent hematopoietic stem cells or very primitive committed progenitors. PMID:25603151

  5. Multi-exon Skipping Using Cocktail Antisense Oligonucleotides in the Canine X-linked Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kuraoka, Mutsuki; Lee, Joshua J.A.; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Yokota, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is one of the most common lethal genetic diseases worldwide, caused by mutations in the dystrophin (DMD) gene. Exon skipping employs short DNA/RNA-like molecules called antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) that restore the reading frame and produce shorter but functional proteins. However, exon skipping therapy faces two major hurdles: limited applicability (up to only 13% of patients can be treated with a single AON drug), and uncertain function of truncated proteins. These issues were addressed with a cocktail AON approach. While approximately 70% of DMD patients can be treated by single exon skipping (all exons combined), one could potentially treat more than 90% of DMD patients if multiple exon skipping using cocktail antisense drugs can be realized. The canine X-linked muscular dystrophy (CXMD) dog model, whose phenotype is more similar to human DMD patients, was used to test the systemic efficacy and safety of multi-exon skipping of exons 6 and 8. The CXMD dog model harbors a splice site mutation in intron 6, leading to a lack of exon 7 in dystrophin mRNA. To restore the reading frame in CXMD requires multi-exon skipping of exons 6 and 8; therefore, CXMD is a good middle-sized animal model for testing the efficacy and safety of multi-exon skipping. In the current study, a cocktail of antisense morpholinos targeting exon 6 and exon 8 was designed and it restored dystrophin expression in body-wide skeletal muscles. Methods for transfection/injection of cocktail oligos and evaluation of the efficacy and safety of multi-exon skipping in the CXMD dog model are presented. PMID:27285612

  6. IL-2R{gamma} gene microdeletion demonstrates that canine X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency is a homologue of the human disease

    SciTech Connect

    Henthorn, P.S.; Fimiani, V.M.; Patterson, D.F.

    1994-09-01

    X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is characterized by profound defects in cellular and humoral immunity and, in humans, is associated with mutations in the gene for the {gamma} chain of the IL-2 receptor (IL-2R{gamma}). We have examined this gene in a colony of dogs established from a single X-linked SCID carrier female. Affected dogs have a 4-bp deletion in the first exon of the IL-2R{gamma} gene, which precludes the production of a functional protein, demonstrating that the canine disease is a true homologue of human X-linked SCID. 37 refs., 3 figs.

  7. Keratinocyte Antiviral Response to Poly(dA:dT) Stimulation and Papillomavirus Infection in a Canine Model of X-Linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Luff, Jennifer A.; Yuan, Hang; Kennedy, Douglas; Schlegel, Richard; Felsburg, Peter; Moore, Peter F.

    2014-01-01

    X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (XSCID) is caused by a genetic mutation within the common gamma chain (γc), an essential component of the cytokine receptors for interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-7, IL-9, IL-15, and IL-21. XSCID patients are most commonly treated with bone marrow transplants (BMT) to restore systemic immune function. However, BMT-XSCID humans and dogs remain at an increased risk for development of cutaneous papillomavirus (PV) infections and their associated neoplasms, most typically cutaneous papillomas. Since basal keratinocytes are the target cell for the initial PV infection, we wanted to determine if canine XSCID keratinocytes have a diminished antiviral cytokine response to poly(dA:dT) and canine papillomavirus-2 (CPV-2) upon initial infection. We performed quantitative RT-PCR for antiviral cytokines and downstream interferon stimulated genes (ISG) on poly(dA:dT) stimulated and CPV-2 infected monolayer keratinocyte cultures derived from XSCID and normal control dogs. We found that XSCID keratinocytes responded similarly to poly(dA:dT) as normal keratinocytes by upregulating antiviral cytokines and ISGs. CPV-2 infection of both XSCID and normal keratinocytes did not result in upregulation of antiviral cytokines or ISGs at 2, 4, or 6 days post infection. These data suggest that the antiviral response to initial PV infection of basal keratinocytes is similar between XSCID and normal patients, and is not the likely source for the remaining immunodeficiency in XSCID patients. PMID:25025687

  8. Frequent respiratory tract infections in the canine model of X-linked ectodermal dysplasia are not caused by an immune deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Casal, Margret L.; Mauldin, Elizabeth A.; Ryan, Sara; Scheidt, Jennifer L.; Kennedy, Jeffrey; Moore, Peter F.; Felsburg, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    As in many human patients with X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (XHED), XHED dogs are at an increased risk for pulmonary disorders. Localized immune system defects had been suspected previously in affected dogs because of frequent infections and unexpected deaths due to opportunistic respiratory tract infections. Experiments were designed to examine systemic and localized humoral and cellular responses, development and function of T cells, and thymic morphology. All dogs used in these experiments were clinically healthy at the time of examination and their immune responses were compared to normal littermates. Serum immunoglobulin concentrations differed somewhat between normal dogs and dogs affected with XHED but they were all within normal ranges. The XHED dogs responded appropriately to vaccination with tetanus toxoid suggesting normal systemic B and plasma cell function. Thymic morphology was compared between normal and affected dogs and T cells were assessed for functionality. Numbers and phenotypes of T and B cells in blood and thymus of affected dogs were within normal limits suggesting normal development of T cells. Cytotoxic and phagocytic ability of macrophages and neutrophils was also normal in affected dogs. In contrast, the secretory IgA concentrations found in affected dogs were significantly higher than in normal dogs, while lacrimal secretions were significantly decreased. These results suggest a compensatory mechanism for secretory IgA, so that the total amount equals that in normal dogs. The results presented in this study indicate that the XHED dogs have a relatively intact immune system and suggest that the same is true for humans with the homologous form of XHED. PMID:15946744

  9. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked agammaglobulinemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Facebook Share on Twitter Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Search MENU Toggle navigation Home Page Search ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions X-linked agammaglobulinemia X-linked ...

  10. X-linked congenital retinoschisis.

    PubMed

    Kellner, U; Brümmer, S; Foerster, M H; Wessing, A

    1990-01-01

    The natural history and electrophysiological findings of 52 patients with X-linked congenital retinoschisis with a follow-up of up to 26 years are described. The mean visual acuity was reduced to 0.24 +/- 0.2 and remained unchanged in most patients during this time. If visual loss occurred, it usually happened in the first decennium. The complications were retinal detachments in 11% and vitreous hemorrhages in 4% of the eyes. In general, the vitreous hemorrhages resolved spontaneously. Retinal detachments were treated successfully with conventional buckling procedures. Redetachments occurred in about 40%. Prophylactic laser coagulation was of no use because it was complicated by detachment in 43% of our series. The electro-oculogram was usually normal. In addition to the known electrorentinographic findings of normal a-wave and reduced b-wave amplitudes, we found prolonged b-wave latencies and implicit times, as well as a reduced 30 Hz flicker response.

  11. Endocardial fibroelastosis: possible X linked inheritance.

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, S; Child, A; Dyson, M

    1987-01-01

    We report a pedigree in which six males died of cardiac failure within the first eight months of life. These males were related through healthy females, as with X linked recessive inheritance. There was no consanguinity. None of the affected boys had an anatomical cardiac abnormality. In two affected brothers, histological evidence for endomyocardial fibroelastosis was documented, and in one of these electron microscopy demonstrated abnormalities of the mitochondria as found in mitochondrial cytopathy. A review of published reports revealed five similar X linked pedigrees, and in two of these mitochondrial abnormalities were found. We suggest that these families may show an X linked recessive cardiomyopathy with mitochondrial abnormalities. Images PMID:3585935

  12. Mapping the x-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Skare, J.C.; Milunsky, A.; Byron, K.S.; Sullivan, J.L.

    1987-04-01

    The X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome is triggered by Epstein-Barr virus infection and results in fatal mononucleosis, immunodeficiency, and lymphoproliferative disorders. This study shows that the mutation responsible for X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome is genetically linked to a restriction fragment length polymorphism detected with the DXS42 probe (from Xq24-q27). The most likely recombination frequency between the loci is 4%, and the associated logarithm of the odds is 5.26. Haplotype analysis using flanking restriction fragment length polymorphism markers indicates that the locus for X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome is distal to probe DXS42 but proximal to probe DXS99 (from Xq26-q27). It is now possible to predict which members of a family with X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome are carrier females and to diagnose the syndrome prenatally.

  13. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita

    MedlinePlus

    ... X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... Open All Close All Description X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita is a disorder that mainly affects males. ...

  14. X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Conley, M E

    1991-11-01

    Between a third and half of all males with SCID and no family history of immunodeficiency represent the first manifestation in their family of a new mutation of the gene that causes X-linked SCID. These patients, like boys with a positive family history of X-linked SCID, have markedly reduced numbers of T cells, elevated numbers of B cells, and hypogammaglobulinemia. The hypogammaglobulinemia is due, at least in part, to the expression of the gene defect in B cells as well as in T cells. Patients with X-linked SCID who are treated with bone marrow transplant tend to engraft T cells readily but they do not engraft B cells unless they are treated with cytoreductive therapy prior to transplant. B-cell function after transplant tends to be poor, even in patients who have received transplants from HLA matched siblings. Better transplant strategies are required to achieve optimum long-term results in patients with X-linked SCID.

  15. A Simulation of X-Linked Inheritance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrell, Pamela Esprivalo

    1997-01-01

    Describes how to lead students through a classroom-based simulation to teach a variety of concepts such as X-linked traits, sex determination, and sex anomalies. The simulation utilizes inexpensive materials such as plastic eggs that twist apart to represent human eggs and sperm. (AIM)

  16. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2

    MedlinePlus

    ... linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2 X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2 Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Close All Description X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2 is a disorder characterized by bone, skin, and ...

  17. X linked mental retardation: a clinical guide.

    PubMed

    Raymond, F L

    2006-03-01

    Mental retardation is more common in males than females in the population, assumed to be due to mutations on the X chromosome. The prevalence of the 24 genes identified to date is low and less common than expansions in FMR1, which cause Fragile X syndrome. Systematic screening of all other X linked genes in X linked families with mental retardation is currently not feasible in a clinical setting. The phenotypes of genes causing syndromic and non-syndromic mental retardation (NLGN3, NLGN4, RPS6KA3(RSK2), OPHN1, ATRX, SLC6A8, ARX, SYN1, AGTR2, MECP2, PQBP1, SMCX, and SLC16A2) are first discussed, as these may be the focus of more targeted mutation analysis. Secondly, the relative prevalence of genes causing only non-syndromic mental retardation (IL1RAPL1, TM4SF2, ZNF41, FTSJ1, DLG3, FACL4, PAK3, ARHGEF6, FMR2, and GDI) is summarised. Thirdly, the problem of recurrence risk where a molecular genetics diagnosis has not been made and what proportion of the male excess of mental retardation is due to monogenic disorders of the X chromosome are discussed.

  18. Alpha thalassaemia-mental retardation, X linked

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, Richard

    2006-01-01

    X-linked alpha thalassaemia mental retardation (ATR-X) syndrome in males is associated with profound developmental delay, facial dysmorphism, genital abnormalities and alpha thalassaemia. Female carriers are usually physically and intellectually normal. So far, 168 patients have been reported. Language is usually very limited. Seizures occur in about one third of the cases. While many patients are affectionate with their caregivers, some exhibit autistic-like behaviour. Patients present with facial hypotonia and a characteristic mouth. Genital abnormalities are observed in 80% of children and range from undescended testes to ambiguous genitalia. Alpha-thalassaemia is not always present. This syndrome is X-linked recessive and results from mutations in the ATRX gene. This gene encodes the widely expressed ATRX protein. ATRX mutations cause diverse changes in the pattern of DNA methylation at heterochromatic loci but it is not yet known whether this is responsible for the clinical phenotype. The diagnosis can be established by detection of alpha thalassaemia, identification of ATRX gene mutations, ATRX protein studies and X-inactivation studies. Genetic counselling can be offered to families. Management is multidisciplinary: young children must be carefully monitored for gastro-oesophageal reflux as it may cause death. A number of individuals with ATR-X are fit and well in their 30s and 40s. PMID:16722615

  19. X-linked cardiomyopathy is heterogeneous

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, M.J.; Sillence, D.O.; Mulley, J.C.

    1994-09-01

    Two major loci of X-linked cardiomyopathy have been mapped by linkage analysis. The gene for X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy (XLCM) is mapped to the dystrophin locus at Xp21, while Barth syndrome has been localised to distal Xq28. XLCM usually presents in juvenile males with no skeletal disease but decreased dystrophin in cardiac muscle. Barth syndrome most often presents in infants and is characterized by skeletal myopathy, short stature and neutropenia in association with cardiomyopathy of variable severity. Prior to carrier or prenatal diagnosis in a family, delineation of the cardiomyopathy locus involved is essential. We report the linkage mapping of a large kindred in which several male infants have died with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. There is a family history of unexplained death of infant males less than 6 months old over 4 generations. Features of Barth syndrome such as short stature, skeletal myopathy and neutropenia have not been observed. Genotyping at 10 marker loci in Xq28 has revealed significant pairwise lod scores with the cardiomyopathy phenotype at DXS52 (Z=2.21 at {theta}=0.0), at markers p26 and p39 near DXS15 (Z=2.30 at {theta}=0.0) and at F8C (Z=2.24 at {theta}=0.0). A recombinant detected with DXS296 defines the proximal limit to the localization. No recombinants were detected at any of the loci distal to DXS296. The most distal marker in Xq28, DXS1108, is within 500 kb of the telomere. As the gene in this family is localized to Xq28, it is possible that this disorder is an allelic variant at the Barth syndrome locus.

  20. Mutation detection in X-linked hydrocephalus

    SciTech Connect

    Forrest, S.M.; Balnaves, M.E.; Rosenthal, A.

    1994-09-01

    X-linked hydrocephalus (XLH), which maps to Xq28, affects about 1 in 30,000 male births. A candidate gene, L1-CAM, which codes for a neural adhesion molecule, mapped to the same region of the X chromosome. Rosenthal et al. (1992) identified a patient with XLH that had aberrant splicing of L1-CAM. A mutation at a potential branch point signal in an intron was identified. The gene has a number of exons and encodes a 4.2 kb mRNA. We isolated RNA from lymphocytes or fibroblasts from five XLH patients. cDNA was synthesized and the gene was amplified in two overlapping fragments, 2.2 kb and 1.7 kb respectively. A nested PCR approach with two rounds of PCR amplification was employed. Patient 900124 did not have a full length 5{prime} fragment and 880022 did not have a full length 3{prime} product. Restriction digestions defined the region of the alteration in the messenger RNA and sequencing in this region showed the loss of exons 10 and 21, respectively. All 5{prime} and 3{prime} products were also digested with several restriction enzymes (e.g., Msp I, Taq I), which have CG in their recognition sites, in the hope that point mutations that alter these restriction enzyme sites might be identified. A point mutation creating an Msp I site was found in patient 930067.

  1. Growth in X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets.

    PubMed

    Ariceta, Gema; Langman, Craig B

    2007-04-01

    Growth failure appears frequently in children with X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets (XLHR) due to hypophosphatemia, disease severity, body disproportion, and primary bone abnormality. Recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) increases phosphate tubular reabsorption and phosphate level in blood and, thus, constitutes an attractive but controversial therapy in short children with XLHR, those efficacy was demonstrated in small uncontrolled series. Our aim was to report our experience regarding growth in XLHR. Twenty-seven children with XLHR--20 girls, seven boys--diagnosed at a median (md) of 1.46 years of age, (range 0.39-8.5 years), were studied at 10.12 years of age (1.58-18.56), md (range). All received oral treatment with phosphate and calcitriol. At the first visit, grouped Z-height was -1; (-4.58; 0.54) md (range). After 5 years' follow-up (0.92-15.6), Z-height was -0.91 (- 4.56; 0.17), not different from that at baseline (P = 0.465). In 16 children entirely controlled in our program upon presentation, a "catch up" phenomenon after the rickets had healed (P = 0.823) or throughout the long-term was not observed (P = 0.995). Eight patients had a Z-height 2 years at diagnosis, male gender and non-adherence to treatment. Four children, all boys, received rhGH, and in two cases with sufficient follow up stature normalized. No rhGH side effects were observed, and phosphate and calcitriol doses remained stable. Linear growth failure appeared in a third of XLHR children. Efforts need to be made to reduce the age of diagnosis and to improve adherence to treatment. Treatment with rhGH should be considered early, after the rickets has been controlled, in those patients with impaired growth or delayed diagnosis.

  2. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked juvenile retinoschisis

    MedlinePlus

    ... retinoschisis MalaCards: x-linked juvenile retinoschisis Merck Manual Consumer Version: Overview of Retinal Disorders Orphanet: X-linked ... juvenile retinoschisis (XLRS): a review of genotype-phenotype relationships. Semin Ophthalmol. 2013 Sep-Nov;28(5-6): ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 1

    MedlinePlus

    ... This condition is inherited in an X-linked recessive pattern . The gene associated with this condition is located on the ... Andria G, Meroni G, Parenti G. X-linked recessive chondrodysplasia punctata: spectrum of arylsulfatase E gene mutations and expanded clinical variability. Am J Med ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked myotubular myopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... myotubular myopathy is inherited in an X-linked recessive pattern . The gene associated with this condition is located on the ... females will have two altered copies of this gene, males are affected by X-linked recessive disorders much more frequently than females. A characteristic ...

  5. Regulation of male fertility by X-linked genes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ke; Yang, Fang; Wang, Peijing Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    Infertility is a worldwide reproductive health problem, affecting men and women about equally. Mouse genetic studies demonstrate that more than 200 genes specifically or predominantly regulate fertility. However, few genetic causes of infertility in humans have been identified. Here, we focus on the regulation of male fertility by X-linked, germ cell-specific genes. Previous genomic studies reveal that the mammalian X chromosome is enriched for genes expressed in early spermatogenesis. Recent genetic studies in mice show that X-linked, germ cell-specific genes, such as A-kinase anchor protein 4 (Akap4), nuclear RNA export factor 2 (Nxf2), TBP-associated factor 7l (Taf7l), and testis-expressed gene 11 (Tex11), indeed play important roles in the regulation of male fertility. Moreover, we find that the Taf7l Tex11 double-mutant males exhibit much more severe defects in meiosis than either single mutant, suggesting that these 2 X-linked genes regulate male meiosis synergistically. The X-linked, germ cell-specific genes are particularly attractive in the study of male infertility in humans. Because males are hemizygous for X-linked genes, loss-of-function mutations in the single-copy X-linked genes, unlike in autosomal genes, would not be masked by a normal allele. The genetic studies of X-linked, germ cell-specific genes in mice have laid a foundation for mutational analysis of their human orthologues in infertile men.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked sideroblastic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... in hemochromatosis, which is another type of iron overload disorder. Learn more about the genes associated with X-linked sideroblastic anemia ALAS2 HFE Related Information What is a gene? What is a gene ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked dystonia-parkinsonism

    MedlinePlus

    ... This condition affects men much more often than women. Parkinsonism is usually the first sign of X-linked dystonia-parkinsonism . Parkinsonism is a group of movement abnormalities including tremors, unusually slow movement (bradykinesia), rigidity, ...

  8. X-Linked ocular albinism; Nettleship-Falls ocular albinism.

    PubMed

    Booth, Alexandria V; Soldano, Anthony C; Levine, Jonathan; Pomeranz, Miriam

    2008-05-15

    A 39-year-old man with foveal hypoplasia, nystagmus, and decreased visual acuity was found to have multiple, cutaneous, hypopigmented macules. Macromelanosomes were demonstrated in normal skin on histopathologic examination. The patient's constellation of findings along with a strong X-linked inheritance pattern in family members led to the diagnosis of X-linked ocular albinism, which is an uncommon condition that is characterized by congenital nystagmus, iris translucency, hypopigmentation of the ocular fundus, strabismus, foveal hypoplasia, photophobia, and impaired vision.

  9. Prenatal diagnosis of X linked hydrocephalus without aqueductal stenosis.

    PubMed Central

    Váradi, V; Csécsei, K; Szeifert, G T; Tóth, Z; Papp, Z

    1987-01-01

    The outcome of four successive pregnancies in a woman heterozygous for X linked hydrocephalus is described. The last two were scanned by ultrasound. In one, a good prognosis was given; the fetus was male but there was no evidence of dilated cerebral ventricles. In the other, hydrocephalus was diagnosed. The absence of aqueductal stenosis in this case supports the hypothesis that in this X linked condition communicating hydrocephalus is the primary defect and aqueductal stenosis is secondary. Images PMID:3295245

  10. The inner ear of dogs with X-linked nephritis provides clues to the pathogenesis of hearing loss in X-linked Alport syndrome.

    PubMed

    Harvey, S J; Mount, R; Sado, Y; Naito, I; Ninomiya, Y; Harrison, R; Jefferson, B; Jacobs, R; Thorner, P S

    2001-09-01

    Alport syndrome is an inherited disorder of type IV collagen with progressive nephropathy, ocular abnormalities, and high-tone sensorineural deafness. In X-linked Alport syndrome, mutations in the COL4A5 gene encoding the alpha5 chain of type IV collagen lead to loss of the alpha3/alpha4/alpha5 network and increased susceptibility of the glomerular basement membrane to long-term damage. The molecular defects that underlie the otopathology in this disease remain poorly understood. We used a canine model of X-linked Alport syndrome to determine the expression of type IV collagen alpha-chains in the inner ear. By 1 month in normal adult dogs, the alpha3, alpha4, and alpha5 chains were co-expressed in a thin continuous line extending along the basilar membrane and the internal and external sulci, with the strongest expression along the lateral aspect of the spiral ligament in the basal turn of the cochlea. Affected dogs showed complete absence of the alpha3/alpha4/alpha5 network. The lateral aspect of the spiral ligament is populated by tension fibroblasts that express alpha-smooth muscle actin and nonmuscle myosin and are postulated to generate radial tension on the basilar membrane via the extracellular matrix for reception of high frequency sound. We propose that in Alport syndrome, the loss of the alpha3/alpha4/alpha5 network eventually weakens the interaction of these cells with their extracellular matrix, resulting in reduced tension on the basilar membrane and the inability to respond to high frequency sounds.

  11. Genetics Home Reference: alpha thalassemia X-linked intellectual disability syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... alpha thalassemia X-linked intellectual disability syndrome alpha thalassemia X-linked intellectual disability syndrome Enable Javascript to ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Alpha thalassemia X-linked intellectual disability syndrome is an inherited ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked lymphoproliferative disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... 59. doi: 10.1007/s12026-008-8048-7. Review. Citation on PubMed GeneReview: Lymphoproliferative Disease, X-Linked ... Clin Immunol. 2007 Dec;7(6):510-4. Review. Citation on PubMed Marsh RA, Madden L, Kitchen ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked infantile spasm syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... A new paradigm for West syndrome based on molecular and cell biology. Epilepsy Res. 2006 Aug;70 Suppl 1:S87-95. Epub 2006 Jun 23. Review. Citation on PubMed Kossoff ... JL. Interneuron, interrupted: molecular pathogenesis of ARX mutations and X-linked infantile ...

  14. Hereditary sideroblastic anaemia and ataxia: an X linked recessive disorder.

    PubMed Central

    Pagon, R A; Bird, T D; Detter, J C; Pierce, I

    1985-01-01

    We report two families in which a non-progressive spinocerebellar syndrome and a sideroblastic anaemia are segregating together in an X linked recessive fashion. Four males in two generations of one family and a fifth male from an unrelated family had both conditions. Both the sideroblastic anaemia and the spinocerebellar syndrome differ from those which have previously been reported to be inherited in an X linked recessive manner. The association of these two clinically distinct disorders in two unrelated families suggests that they are either two closely linked loci which have undergone simultaneous mutation or pleiotropic effects of an altered allele at a single locus. All the heterozygous women had normal neurological examinations and normal haematocrits and red cell indices. Some had ring sideroblasts on bone marrow examination, a dimorphic peripheral blood smear, and raised serum free erythrocyte protoporphyrin, suggesting that a proportion of heterozygotes can be detected by appropriate haematological studies. PMID:4045952

  15. Hereditary sideroblastic anaemia and ataxia: an X linked recessive disorder.

    PubMed

    Pagon, R A; Bird, T D; Detter, J C; Pierce, I

    1985-08-01

    We report two families in which a non-progressive spinocerebellar syndrome and a sideroblastic anaemia are segregating together in an X linked recessive fashion. Four males in two generations of one family and a fifth male from an unrelated family had both conditions. Both the sideroblastic anaemia and the spinocerebellar syndrome differ from those which have previously been reported to be inherited in an X linked recessive manner. The association of these two clinically distinct disorders in two unrelated families suggests that they are either two closely linked loci which have undergone simultaneous mutation or pleiotropic effects of an altered allele at a single locus. All the heterozygous women had normal neurological examinations and normal haematocrits and red cell indices. Some had ring sideroblasts on bone marrow examination, a dimorphic peripheral blood smear, and raised serum free erythrocyte protoporphyrin, suggesting that a proportion of heterozygotes can be detected by appropriate haematological studies.

  16. X-Linked Retinoschisis: Phenotypic Variability in a Chinese Family

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yangyan; Liu, Xiao; Tang, Luosheng; Wang, Xia; Coursy, Terry; Guo, Xiaojian; Li, Zhuo

    2016-01-01

    X-linked juvenile retinoschisis (XLRS), a leading cause of juvenile macular degeneration, is characterized by a spoke-wheel pattern in the macular region of the retina and splitting of the neurosensory retina. Our study is to describe the clinical characteristics of a four generations of this family (a total of 18 members)with X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) and detected a novel mutations of c.3G > A (p.M1?) in the initiation codon of the RS1 gene. by direct sequencing.Identification of this mutation in this family provides evidence about potential genetic or environmental factors on its phenotypic variance, as patients presented with different phenotypes regardless of having the same mutation. Importantly, OCT has proven vital for XLRS diagnosis in children. PMID:26823236

  17. X-linked inheritance of Alport syndrome: family P revisited.

    PubMed Central

    Hasstedt, S J; Atkin, C L

    1983-01-01

    Likelihood analysis using two autosomal/X-linked mixed models confirmed that Alport syndrome is an X-linked dominant disease in a large Utah kindred, family P. The penetrance was estimated as .85 in females and 1.0 in males. Previously reported abnormal segregation ratios were reexamined. No excess of affected offspring of affected parents was found. Nor was the penetrance in daughters of asymptomatic carrier mothers found to be lower than in the daughters of symptomatic mothers, although the sample size was small. However, there was an unexplained deficiency of sons of affected fathers. There was no deficiency of sons of affected mothers, nor was there a deficiency of males in the kindred. PMID:6650503

  18. X-linked stapes gusher: CT findings in one patient.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Gaurav; Castillo, Mauricio; Buchman, Craig A

    2003-01-01

    A 31-year-old male patient presented with progressive mixed hearing loss since birth. A stapedectomy was attempted and was unsuccessful because of perilymph gushing. CT of the temporal bones showed bulbous dilatation of the fundi of the internal auditory canals and absence of the bone plates separating them from the base of the cochleas. This unusual abnormality was found after the attempted stapedectomy and explains the clinical findings. The findings in male patients are fairly typical X-linked congenital deafness.

  19. CT and MRI findings in X-linked progressive deafness.

    PubMed

    Altay, Hakan; Savaş, Recep; Oğüt, Fatih; Kirazli, Tayfun; Alper, Hüdaver

    2008-09-01

    Congenital X-linked mixed deafness is a rare anomaly that has typical features and can be diagnosed on the basis of progressive mixed hearing loss and the typical imaging findings. Recognition of these findings may alter the course of treatment and perilymph gushing can be avoided. A 10-year-old male patient presented with a history of progressive hearing loss. Computed tomography of the temporal bones showed bulbous dilatation of the fundi of the internal auditory canals (IAC) and the absence of the bony plates separating the basal turn of the cochleas and IAC. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated obliteration of the labyrinthine spaces at the right side.

  20. Mutations in MED12 Cause X-Linked Ohdo Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke T.; de Vries, Bert B.A.; van Bon, Bregje W.M.; Hoischen, Alexander; Ruiterkamp-Versteeg, Martina; Gilissen, Christian; Gao, Fangjian; van Zwam, Marloes; Harteveld, Cornelis L.; van Essen, Anthonie J.; Hamel, Ben C.J.; Kleefstra, Tjitske; Willemsen, Michèl A.A.P.; Yntema, Helger G.; van Bokhoven, Hans; Brunner, Han G.; Boyer, Thomas G.; de Brouwer, Arjan P.M.

    2013-01-01

    Ohdo syndrome comprises a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by intellectual disability (ID) and typical facial features, including blepharophimosis. Clinically, these blepharophimosis-ID syndromes have been classified in five distinct subgroups, including the Maat-Kievit-Brunner (MKB) type, which, in contrast to the others, is characterized by X-linked inheritance and facial coarsening at older age. We performed exome sequencing in two families, each with two affected males with Ohdo syndrome MKB type. In the two families, MED12 missense mutations (c.3443G>A [p.Arg1148His] or c.3493T>C [p.Ser1165Pro]) segregating with the phenotype were identified. Upon subsequent analysis of an additional cohort of nine simplex male individuals with Ohdo syndrome, one additional de novo missense change (c.5185C>A [p.His1729Asn]) in MED12 was detected. The occurrence of three different hemizygous missense mutations in three unrelated families affected by Ohdo syndrome MKB type shows that mutations in MED12 are the underlying cause of this X-linked form of Ohdo syndrome. Together with the recently described KAT6B mutations resulting in Ohdo syndrome Say/Barber/Biesecker/Young/Simpson type, our findings point to aberrant chromatin modification as being central to the pathogenesis of Ohdo syndrome. PMID:23395478

  1. Severe papillomavirus infection progressing to metastatic squamous cell carcinoma in bone marrow-transplanted X-linked SCID dogs.

    PubMed

    Goldschmidt, Michael H; Kennedy, Jeffrey S; Kennedy, Douglas R; Yuan, Hang; Holt, David E; Casal, Margret L; Traas, Anne M; Mauldin, Elizabeth A; Moore, Peter F; Henthorn, Paula S; Hartnett, Brian J; Weinberg, Kenneth I; Schlegel, Richard; Felsburg, Peter J

    2006-07-01

    Canine X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (XSCID) is due to mutations in the common gamma chain (gammac) gene and is identical clinically and immunologically to human XSCID, making it a true homologue of the human disease. Bone marrow-transplanted (BMT) XSCID dogs not only engraft donor T cells and reconstitute normal T-cell function but, in contrast to the majority of transplanted human XSCID patients, also engraft donor B cells and reconstitute normal humoral immune function. Shortly after our initial report of successful BMT of XSCID dogs, it soon became evident that transplanted XSCID dogs developed late-onset severe chronic cutaneous infections containing a newly described canine papillomavirus. This is analogous to the late-onset cutaneous papillomavirus infection recently described for human XSCID patients following BMT. Of 24 transplanted XSCID dogs followed for at least 1 year post-BMT, 71% developed chronic canine papillomavirus infection. Six of the transplanted dogs that developed cutaneous papillomas were maintained for >3 1/2 years post-BMT for use as breeders. Four of these six dogs (67%) developed invasive squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), with three of the dogs (75%) eventually developing metastatic SCC, an extremely rare consequence of SCC in the dog. This finding raises the question of whether SCC will develop in transplanted human XSCID patients later in life. Canine XSCID therefore provides an ideal animal model with which to study the role of the gammac-dependent signaling pathway in the response to papillomavirus infections and the progression of these viral infections to metastatic SCC.

  2. Potential application of gene therapy to X-linked agammaglobulinemia.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Thomas; Calmels, Boris; Barlogis, Vincent; Michel, Gérard; Tonnelle, Cécile; Chabannon, Christian

    2007-08-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA), or Bruton's disease, is the most common human primary humoral immunodeficiency. XLA is caused by mutations of the Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK), a key regulator of B-cell physiology. Since the mid 80's, substitutive therapy by intravenous gammaglobulin infusions has significantly improved XLA patient survival and quality of life. Nevertheless, some frequent affections persist despite treatment, and lead to handicapping and further to morbid clinical complications for XLA individuals. Development of gene therapy by transfer of the BTK gene into hematopoietic progenitors could represent an alternative strategy for the treatment of Bruton's disease, with the advantage of a definitive cure for XLA patients. Gene therapy of XLA could be considered as a paradigm for future expansion of gene therapy approaches for many other diseases, since future utilization may be strictly dependent on a marked improvement of risk-benefit ratio compared to pre-existing treatments.

  3. X linked adrenoleukodystrophy: clinical presentation, diagnosis, and therapy

    PubMed Central

    van Geel, B. M; Assies, J.; Wanders, R.; Barth, P.

    1997-01-01

    X linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is an inherited disorder of peroxisomal metabolism, biochemically characterised by accumulation of saturated very long chain fatty acids. Accumulation of these fatty acids is associated with cerebral demyelination, peripheral nerve abnormalities, and adrenocortical and testicular insufficiency. The lowest estimated birth incidence is one per 100 000. At least six phenotypes can be distinguished, of which the two most frequent are childhood cerebral ALD and adrenomyeloneuropathy. The X-ALD gene has been identified, but thus far no relation between genotype and phenotype has been found. Diagnosis is relatively easy and can be confirmed reliably, and prenatal testing is possible in affected families. Several therapeutic options, some with promising perspectives, are available. Neurologists and other physicians seem not to be familiar with the many facets of X-ALD. In this review, the clinical presentation, the relative frequencies of the different phenotypes, and the diagnostic and therapeutic options are presented.

 PMID:9221959

  4. X-linked creatine transporter deficiency: clinical aspects and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    van de Kamp, Jiddeke M; Mancini, Grazia M; Salomons, Gajja S

    2014-09-01

    Creatine transporter deficiency was discovered in 2001 as an X-linked cause of intellectual disability characterized by cerebral creatine deficiency. This review describes the current knowledge regarding creatine metabolism, the creatine transporter and the clinical aspects of creatine transporter deficiency. The condition mainly affects the brain while other creatine requiring organs, such as the muscles, are relatively spared. Recent studies have provided strong evidence that creatine synthesis also occurs in the brain, leading to the intriguing question of why cerebral creatine is deficient in creatine transporter deficiency. The possible mechanisms explaining the cerebral creatine deficiency are discussed. The creatine transporter knockout mouse provides a good model to study the disease. Over the past years several treatment options have been explored but no treatment has been proven effective. Understanding the pathogenesis of creatine transporter deficiency is of paramount importance in the development of an effective treatment.

  5. Next-generation sequencing in X-linked intellectual disability

    PubMed Central

    Tzschach, Andreas; Grasshoff, Ute; Beck-Woedl, Stefanie; Dufke, Claudia; Bauer, Claudia; Kehrer, Martin; Evers, Christina; Moog, Ute; Oehl-Jaschkowitz, Barbara; Di Donato, Nataliya; Maiwald, Robert; Jung, Christine; Kuechler, Alma; Schulz, Solveig; Meinecke, Peter; Spranger, Stephanie; Kohlhase, Jürgen; Seidel, Jörg; Reif, Silke; Rieger, Manuela; Riess, Angelika; Sturm, Marc; Bickmann, Julia; Schroeder, Christopher; Dufke, Andreas; Riess, Olaf; Bauer, Peter

    2015-01-01

    X-linked intellectual disability (XLID) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder with more than 100 genes known to date. Most genes are responsible for a small proportion of patients only, which has hitherto hampered the systematic screening of large patient cohorts. We performed targeted enrichment and next-generation sequencing of 107 XLID genes in a cohort of 150 male patients. Hundred patients had sporadic intellectual disability, and 50 patients had a family history suggestive of XLID. We also analysed a sporadic female patient with severe ID and epilepsy because she had strongly skewed X-inactivation. Target enrichment and high parallel sequencing allowed a diagnostic coverage of >10 reads for ~96% of all coding bases of the XLID genes at a mean coverage of 124 reads. We found 18 pathogenic variants in 13 XLID genes (AP1S2, ATRX, CUL4B, DLG3, IQSEC2, KDM5C, MED12, OPHN1, SLC9A6, SMC1A, UBE2A, UPF3B and ZDHHC9) among the 150 male patients. Thirteen pathogenic variants were present in the group of 50 familial patients (26%), and 5 pathogenic variants among the 100 sporadic patients (5%). Systematic gene dosage analysis for low coverage exons detected one pathogenic hemizygous deletion. An IQSEC2 nonsense variant was detected in the female ID patient, providing further evidence for a role of this gene in encephalopathy in females. Skewed X-inactivation was more frequently observed in mothers with pathogenic variants compared with those without known X-linked defects. The mutation rate in the cohort of sporadic patients corroborates previous estimates of 5–10% for X-chromosomal defects in male ID patients. PMID:25649377

  6. Gene therapy rescues photoreceptor blindness in dogs and paves the way for treating human X-linked retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Beltran, William A; Cideciyan, Artur V; Lewin, Alfred S; Iwabe, Simone; Khanna, Hemant; Sumaroka, Alexander; Chiodo, Vince A; Fajardo, Diego S; Román, Alejandro J; Deng, Wen-Tao; Swider, Malgorzata; Alemán, Tomas S; Boye, Sanford L; Genini, Sem; Swaroop, Anand; Hauswirth, William W; Jacobson, Samuel G; Aguirre, Gustavo D

    2012-02-07

    Hereditary retinal blindness is caused by mutations in genes expressed in photoreceptors or retinal pigment epithelium. Gene therapy in mouse and dog models of a primary retinal pigment epithelium disease has already been translated to human clinical trials with encouraging results. Treatment for common primary photoreceptor blindness, however, has not yet moved from proof of concept to the clinic. We evaluated gene augmentation therapy in two blinding canine photoreceptor diseases that model the common X-linked form of retinitis pigmentosa caused by mutations in the retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator (RPGR) gene, which encodes a photoreceptor ciliary protein, and provide evidence that the therapy is effective. After subretinal injections of adeno-associated virus-2/5-vectored human RPGR with human IRBP or GRK1 promoters, in vivo imaging showed preserved photoreceptor nuclei and inner/outer segments that were limited to treated areas. Both rod and cone photoreceptor function were greater in treated (three of four) than in control eyes. Histopathology indicated normal photoreceptor structure and reversal of opsin mislocalization in treated areas expressing human RPGR protein in rods and cones. Postreceptoral remodeling was also corrected: there was reversal of bipolar cell dendrite retraction evident with bipolar cell markers and preservation of outer plexiform layer thickness. Efficacy of gene therapy in these large animal models of X-linked retinitis pigmentosa provides a path for translation to human treatment.

  7. Recent developments in certain X-linked genetic eye disorders.

    PubMed

    Shastry, B S

    1993-09-08

    Over the past few years, genetic diseases of the ocular system have become very active and fast-growing research areas in the vision field. The rapid development of the recombinant DNA techniques together with somatic cell genetics, during the last two decades has fueled this progress. As a result, many genetic disease genes have been localized in the human chromosome and several of them have been isolated and characterized. These and other studies have profoundly enriched our basic understanding of genetic eye disorders. Although gene replacement therapy, prenatal diagnosis and carrier detection have not been extensively tried for genetic eye diseases, such attempts will now be feasible. Molecular analyses made it clear that there are many challenging problems that need attention. This report highlights some of these initial developments, particularly on the X-linked major genetic eye diseases. In order to help the beginners and general audience, a brief description of the clinical pathology and the molecular probes used to locate the genetic defects of certain disorders are presented. Disorders are arranged according to their linkage from telomere to telomere on the chromosome to give a coherent structure. It is hoped that this information is useful and of general interest for the beginners, established investigators and ophthalmologists.

  8. X-linked dystonia parkinsonism: clinical phenotype, genetics and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Rosales, Raymond L

    2010-10-01

    The clinical phenotype of X-Linked Dystonia Parkinsonism (XDP) is typically one that involves a Filipino adult male whose ancestry is mostly traced in the Philippine island of Panay. Dystonia usually starts focally in the lower limbs or oromandibular regions, then spreads to become generalized eventually. Parkinsonism sets in later into the disease and usually in combination with dystonia. /DYT3/ and /TAF1/ are the two genes associated with XDP. An SVA retrotransposon insertion in an intron of /TAF1/ may reduce neuron-specific expression of the /TAF1/ isoform in the caudate nucleus, and subsequently interfere with the transcription of many neuronal genes. Polypharmacy with oral benzodiazepines, anticholinergic agents and muscle relaxants leaves much to be desired in terms of efficacy. The medications to date that may appear beneficial, especially in disabling dystonias, are zolpidem, muscle afferent block with lidocaine-ethanol and botulinum toxin type A. Despite the few cases undergoing deep brain stimulation, this functional surgery has shown the greatest promise in XDP. An illustrative case of XDP in a family depicts the variable course of illness, including a bout of "status dystonicus," challenges in therapy, reckoning with the social impact of the disease, and eventual patient demise. Indeed, there remains some gaps in understanding some phenomenological, genetic and treatment aspects of XDP, the areas upon which future research directions may be worthwhile.

  9. X-linked inheritance in neuronal migration disorders (NMD)

    SciTech Connect

    Andermann, E.; Dubeau, F.; Tampieri, D.

    1994-09-01

    With the advent of MRI imaging, an increasing number of NMD have been identified in patients with epilepsy. Although most cases have been sporadic, families with these disorders have now been reported in several types of NMD. Furthermore, subcortical bank heterotopia (SBH) or {open_quotes}double cortex syndrome{close_quotes} and periventricular nodular heterotopia (PNH) have a marked female predominance. Two females with SBH, mild mental retardation and seizures had sons with lissencephaly, severe retardation and seizures, and daughters with SBH. X-linked lissencephaly has been observed in several other families, and one girl with lissencephaly was found to have a de novo X-autosomal translocation with a breakpoint in chromosome Xq22. We have studied three families with two or more generations affected by PNH in females, a high frequency of spontaneous abortions and abnormal sex ratios in sibships. The clinical manifestations include seizures and normal intelligence. Three other families with PNH in females have been reported in the literature. Bilateral perisylvian polymicrogyria has been reported in monozygotic twins and in siblings, and we have studied a brother and sister with an affected maternal uncle. These findings suggest sex-linked dominant inheritance with male lethality or severe expression in males. The three disorders described above may represent different mutations of a single gene or mutations in two or more genes on the X-chromosome. At least one gene is probably located in chromosome band Xq22. Genetic linkage studies in families with NMD as well as a search for candidate genes such as adhesion molecules known to map on the X-chromosome should lead to the identification of the gene(s) responsible for these disorders.

  10. X-linked acrogigantism syndrome: clinical profile and therapeutic responses.

    PubMed

    Beckers, Albert; Lodish, Maya Beth; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Rostomyan, Liliya; Lee, Misu; Faucz, Fabio R; Yuan, Bo; Choong, Catherine S; Caberg, Jean-Hubert; Verrua, Elisa; Naves, Luciana Ansaneli; Cheetham, Tim D; Young, Jacques; Lysy, Philippe A; Petrossians, Patrick; Cotterill, Andrew; Shah, Nalini Samir; Metzger, Daniel; Castermans, Emilie; Ambrosio, Maria Rosaria; Villa, Chiara; Strebkova, Natalia; Mazerkina, Nadia; Gaillard, Stéphan; Barra, Gustavo Barcelos; Casulari, Luis Augusto; Neggers, Sebastian J; Salvatori, Roberto; Jaffrain-Rea, Marie-Lise; Zacharin, Margaret; Santamaria, Beatriz Lecumberri; Zacharieva, Sabina; Lim, Ee Mun; Mantovani, Giovanna; Zatelli, Maria Chaira; Collins, Michael T; Bonneville, Jean-François; Quezado, Martha; Chittiboina, Prashant; Oldfield, Edward H; Bours, Vincent; Liu, Pengfei; W de Herder, Wouter; Pellegata, Natalia; Lupski, James R; Daly, Adrian F; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2015-06-01

    X-linked acrogigantism (X-LAG) is a new syndrome of pituitary gigantism, caused by microduplications on chromosome Xq26.3, encompassing the gene GPR101, which is highly upregulated in pituitary tumors. We conducted this study to explore the clinical, radiological, and hormonal phenotype and responses to therapy in patients with X-LAG syndrome. The study included 18 patients (13 sporadic) with X-LAG and microduplication of chromosome Xq26.3. All sporadic cases had unique duplications and the inheritance pattern in two families was dominant, with all Xq26.3 duplication carriers being affected. Patients began to grow rapidly as early as 2-3 months of age (median 12 months). At diagnosis (median delay 27 months), patients had a median height and weight standard deviation scores (SDS) of >+3.9 SDS. Apart from the increased overall body size, the children had acromegalic symptoms including acral enlargement and facial coarsening. More than a third of cases had increased appetite. Patients had marked hypersecretion of GH/IGF1 and usually prolactin, due to a pituitary macroadenoma or hyperplasia. Primary neurosurgical control was achieved with extensive anterior pituitary resection, but postoperative hypopituitarism was frequent. Control with somatostatin analogs was not readily achieved despite moderate to high levels of expression of somatostatin receptor subtype-2 in tumor tissue. Postoperative use of adjuvant pegvisomant resulted in control of IGF1 in all five cases where it was employed. X-LAG is a new infant-onset gigantism syndrome that has a severe clinical phenotype leading to challenging disease management.

  11. Canine Distemper

    MedlinePlus

    ... and, often, the nervous systems of puppies and dogs. The virus also infects wild canids (e.g. ... How is Canine Distemper virus spread? Puppies and dogs usually become infected through airborne exposure to the ...

  12. Canine lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Madewell, B R

    1985-07-01

    This article presents an overview of the literature regarding canine malignant lymphoma. It includes a discussion of etiology, classification, systemic manifestations of disease, therapy, and supportive care for patient management.

  13. An unusual presentation of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Suryawanshi, Avinash; Middleton, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    Summary X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a rare genetic condition caused by mutations in the ABCD1 gene that result in accumulation of very long chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) in various tissues. This leads to demyelination in the CNS and impaired steroidogenesis in the adrenal cortex and testes. A 57-year-old gentleman was referred for the assessment of bilateral gynaecomastia of 6 months duration. He had skin hyperpigmentation since 4 years of age and spastic paraparesis for the past 15 years. Physical examination findings included generalised hyperpigmentation (including skin, buccal mucosa and palmar creases), blood pressure of 90/60 mmHg, non-tender gynaecomastia and bilateral hypoplastic testes. Lower limb findings were those of a profoundly ataxic gait associated with significant paraparesis and sensory loss. Primary adrenal insufficiency was confirmed and investigations for gynaecomastia revealed normal testosterone with mildly elevated luteinising hormone level and normal prolactin. The combination of primary adrenal insufficiency (likely childhood onset), partial testicular failure (leading to gynaecomastia) and spastic paraparesis suggested X-ALD as a unifying diagnosis. A serum VLCFA panel was consistent with X-ALD. Subsequent genetic testing confirmed the diagnosis. Treatment with replacement doses of corticosteroid resulted in improvement in blood pressure and increased energy levels. We have reported the case of a 57-year-old man with a very late diagnosis of X-ALD manifested by childhood onset of primary adrenal insufficiency followed by paraparesis and primary hypogonadism in adulthood. Thus, X-ALD should be considered as a possibility in a patient with non-autoimmune primary adrenal insufficiency and neurological abnormalities. Learning points Adult patients with X-ALD may be misdiagnosed as having multiple sclerosis or idiopathic spastic paraparesis for many years before the correct diagnosis is identified. Screening for X-ALD with a VLCFA

  14. FARVATX: Family-Based Rare Variant Association Test for X-Linked Genes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sungkyoung; Lee, Sungyoung; Qiao, Dandi; Hardin, Megan; Cho, Michael H; Silverman, Edwin K; Park, Taesung; Won, Sungho

    2016-09-01

    Although the X chromosome has many genes that are functionally related to human diseases, the complicated biological properties of the X chromosome have prevented efficient genetic association analyses, and only a few significantly associated X-linked variants have been reported for complex traits. For instance, dosage compensation of X-linked genes is often achieved via the inactivation of one allele in each X-linked variant in females; however, some X-linked variants can escape this X chromosome inactivation. Efficient genetic analyses cannot be conducted without prior knowledge about the gene expression process of X-linked variants, and misspecified information can lead to power loss. In this report, we propose new statistical methods for rare X-linked variant genetic association analysis of dichotomous phenotypes with family-based samples. The proposed methods are computationally efficient and can complete X-linked analyses within a few hours. Simulation studies demonstrate the statistical efficiency of the proposed methods, which were then applied to rare-variant association analysis of the X chromosome in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Some promising significant X-linked genes were identified, illustrating the practical importance of the proposed methods.

  15. Canine gastritis.

    PubMed

    Webb, Craig; Twedt, David C

    2003-09-01

    Gastritis--inflammation of the stomach--is a frequently cited differential yet rarely characterized diagnosis in cases of canine anorexia and vomiting. Although the list of rule-outs for acute or chronic gastritis is extensive, a review of the veterinary literature reveals fewer than 15 articles that have focused on clinical cases of canine gastritis over the last 25 years. The dog frequently appears in the human literature as an experimentally manipulated model for the study of endoscopic techniques or the effect of medications on gastric mucosa. In the veterinary patient, cases of acute gastritis are rarely pursued with the complete diagnostic armamentarium, and cases of chronic gastritis are rarely found to occur as an entity isolated from the rest of the gastrointestinal tract. This article focuses on those findings most clinically relevant to cases of canine gastritis in veterinary medicine.

  16. Telomerase RNA level limits telomere maintenance in X-linked dyskeratosis congenita

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Judy M.Y.; Collins, Kathleen

    2006-01-01

    Dyskeratosis congenita (DC) patients suffer a progressive and ultimately fatal loss of hematopoietic renewal correlating with critically short telomeres. The predominant X-linked form of DC results from substitutions in dyskerin, a protein required both for ribosomal RNA (rRNA) pseudouridine modification and for cellular accumulation of telomerase RNA (TER). Accordingly, alternative models have posited that the exhaustion of cellular renewal in X-linked DC arises as a primary consequence of ribosome deficiency or telomerase deficiency. Here we test, for the first time, whether X-linked DC patient cells are compromised for telomerase function at telomeres. We show that telomerase activation in family-matched control cells allows telomere elongation and telomere length maintenance, while telomerase activation in X-linked DC patient cells fails to prevent telomere erosion with proliferation. Furthermore, we demonstrate by phenotypic rescue that telomere defects in X-linked DC patient cells arise solely from reduced accumulation of TER. We also show that X-linked DC patient cells averted from premature senescence support normal levels of rRNA pseudouridine modification and normal kinetics of rRNA precursor processing, in contrast with phenotypes reported for a proposed mouse model of the human disease. These findings support the significance of telomerase deficiency in the pathology of X-linked DC. PMID:17015423

  17. Genetic hetergoeneity in X-linked hydrocephalus: Linkage to markers within Xq27. 3

    SciTech Connect

    Strain, L.; Brock, D.J.H.; Bonthron, D.T. ); Gosden, C.M. )

    1994-02-01

    X-linked hydrocephalus is a well-defined disorder which accounts for [ge]70% of hydrocephalus in males. Pathologically, the conditions is characterized by stenosis or obliteration of the aqueduct of Sylvius. Previous genetic linkage studies have suggested likelihood of genetic homogeneity for this condition, with close linkage to the DXS52 and F8C markers in Xq28. The authors have investigated a family with typical X-linked aqueductal stenosis, in which no linkage to these markers was present. In this family, close linkage was established to the DXS548 and FRAXA loci in Xq27.3. The findings demonstrate that X-linked aqueductal stenosis may result from mutations at two different loci on the X chromosome. Caution is indicated in using linkage for the prenatal diagnosis of X-linked hydrocephalus. 43 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked hyper IgM syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... prognosis of a genetic condition? Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center Frequency X-linked hyper IgM syndrome is estimated to occur in 2 per million newborn boys. Related Information What information about a genetic condition can ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked immunodeficiency with magnesium defect, Epstein-Barr virus infection, and neoplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... X-linked immunodeficiency with magnesium defect, Epstein-Barr virus infection, and neoplasia Enable Javascript to view the ... X-linked immunodeficiency with magnesium defect, Epstein-Barr virus infection, and neoplasia (typically known by the acronym ...

  20. Escape of X-linked miRNA genes from meiotic sex chromosome inactivation.

    PubMed

    Sosa, Enrique; Flores, Luis; Yan, Wei; McCarrey, John R

    2015-11-01

    Past studies have indicated that transcription of all X-linked genes is repressed by meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) during the meiotic phase of spermatogenesis in mammals. However, more recent studies have shown an increase in steady-state levels of certain X-linked miRNAs in pachytene spermatocytes, suggesting that either synthesis of these miRNAs increases or that degradation of these miRNAs decreases dramatically in these cells. To distinguish between these possibilities, we performed RNA-FISH to detect nascent transcripts from multiple miRNA genes in various spermatogenic cell types. Our results show definitively that Type I X-linked miRNA genes are subject to MSCI, as are all or most X-linked mRNA genes, whereas Type II and III X-linked miRNA genes escape MSCI by continuing ongoing, active transcription in primary spermatocytes. We corroborated these results by co-localization of RNA-FISH signals with both a corresponding DNA-FISH signal and an immunofluorescence signal for RNA polymerase II. We also found that X-linked miRNA genes that escape MSCI locate non-randomly to the periphery of the XY body, whereas genes that are subject to MSCI remain located within the XY body in pachytene spermatocytes, suggesting that the mechanism of escape of X-linked miRNA genes from MSCI involves their relocation to a position outside of the repressive chromatin domain associated with the XY body. The fact that Type II and III X-linked miRNA genes escape MSCI suggests an immediacy of function of the encoded miRNAs specifically required during the meiotic stages of spermatogenesis.

  1. Escape of X-linked miRNA genes from meiotic sex chromosome inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Sosa, Enrique; Flores, Luis; Yan, Wei; McCarrey, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Past studies have indicated that transcription of all X-linked genes is repressed by meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) during the meiotic phase of spermatogenesis in mammals. However, more recent studies have shown an increase in steady-state levels of certain X-linked miRNAs in pachytene spermatocytes, suggesting that either synthesis of these miRNAs increases or that degradation of these miRNAs decreases dramatically in these cells. To distinguish between these possibilities, we performed RNA-FISH to detect nascent transcripts from multiple miRNA genes in various spermatogenic cell types. Our results show definitively that Type I X-linked miRNA genes are subject to MSCI, as are all or most X-linked mRNA genes, whereas Type II and III X-linked miRNA genes escape MSCI by continuing ongoing, active transcription in primary spermatocytes. We corroborated these results by co-localization of RNA-FISH signals with both a corresponding DNA-FISH signal and an immunofluorescence signal for RNA polymerase II. We also found that X-linked miRNA genes that escape MSCI locate non-randomly to the periphery of the XY body, whereas genes that are subject to MSCI remain located within the XY body in pachytene spermatocytes, suggesting that the mechanism of escape of X-linked miRNA genes from MSCI involves their relocation to a position outside of the repressive chromatin domain associated with the XY body. The fact that Type II and III X-linked miRNA genes escape MSCI suggests an immediacy of function of the encoded miRNAs specifically required during the meiotic stages of spermatogenesis. PMID:26395485

  2. Refinement of the localization of the X-linked ocular albinism gene

    SciTech Connect

    Bergen, A.A.B.; Zijp, P.; Schuurman, E.J.M.; Bleeker-Wagemakers, E.M.; Apkarian, P. ); Ommen, G.J.B. van )

    1993-04-01

    Although physical and genetic mapping studies assigned the X-linked ocular albinism gene to Xp22.3, the exact gene order in this region is still unclear. The authors present additional genetic mapping data concerning X-linked ocular albinism that suggests the consensus order Xpter-STS-DXS237-KAL-(OA1, DXS143)- DXS85-DXS16-Xcen. 14 refs., 1 fig.

  3. Drosophila X-Linked Genes Have Lower Translation Rates than Autosomal Genes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenguo; Presgraves, Daven C

    2016-02-01

    In Drosophila, X-linked and autosomal genes achieve comparable expression at the mRNA level. Whether comparable X-autosome gene expression is realized at the translational and, ultimately, the protein levels is, however, unknown. Previous studies suggest the possibility of higher translation rates for X-linked genes owing to stronger usage of preferred codons. In this study, we use public ribosome profiling data from Drosophila melanogaster to infer translation rates on the X chromosome versus the autosomes. We find that X-linked genes have consistently lower ribosome densities than autosomal genes in S2 cells, early embryos, eggs, and mature oocytes. Surprisingly, the lower ribosome densities of X-linked genes are not consistent with faster translation elongation but instead imply slower translation initiation. In particular, X-linked genes have sequence features known to slow translation initiation such as stronger mRNA structure near start codons and longer 5'-UTRs. Comparison to outgroup species suggests that stronger mRNA structure is an evolved feature of Drosophila X chromosomes. Finally, we find that the magnitude of the X-autosome difference in ribosome densities is smaller for genes encoding members of protein complexes, suggesting that stoichiometry constrains the evolution of translation rates. In sum, our analyses suggest that Drosophila X-linked genes have evolved lower translation rates than autosomal genes despite stronger usage of preferred codons.

  4. Dosage Compensation of X-Linked Muller Element F Genes but Not X-Linked Transgenes in the Australian Sheep Blowfly.

    PubMed

    Linger, Rebecca J; Belikoff, Esther J; Scott, Maxwell J

    2015-01-01

    In most animals that have X and Y sex chromosomes, chromosome-wide mechanisms are used to balance X-linked gene expression in males and females. In the fly Drosophila melanogaster, the dosage compensation mechanism also generally extends to X-linked transgenes. Over 70 transgenic lines of the Australian sheep blowfly Lucilia cuprina have been made as part of an effort to develop male-only strains for a genetic control program of this major pest of sheep. All lines carry a constitutively expressed fluorescent protein marker gene. In all 12 X-linked lines, female larvae show brighter fluorescence than male larvae, suggesting the marker gene is not dosage compensated. This has been confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR for selected lines. To determine if endogenous X-linked genes are dosage compensated, we isolated 8 genes that are orthologs of genes that are on the fourth chromosome in D. melanogaster. Recent evidence suggests that the D. melanogaster fourth chromosome, or Muller element F, is the ancestral X chromosome in Diptera that has reverted to an autosome in Drosophila species. We show by quantitative PCR of male and female DNA that 6 of the 8 linkage group F genes reside on the X chromosome in L. cuprina. The other two Muller element F genes were found to be autosomal in L. cuprina, whereas two Muller element B genes were found on the same region of the X chromosome as the L. cuprina orthologs of the D. melanogaster Ephrin and gawky genes. We find that the L. cuprina X chromosome genes are equally expressed in males and females (i.e., fully dosage compensated). Thus, unlike in Drosophila, it appears that the Lucilia dosage compensation system is specific for genes endogenous to the X chromosome and cannot be co-opted by recently arrived transgenes.

  5. Many X-linked microRNAs escape meiotic sex chromosome inactivation.

    PubMed

    Song, Rui; Ro, Seungil; Michaels, Jason D; Park, Chanjae; McCarrey, John R; Yan, Wei

    2009-04-01

    Meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) during spermatogenesis is characterized by transcriptional silencing of genes on both the X and Y chromosomes in mid-to-late pachytene spermatocytes. MSCI is believed to result from meiotic silencing of unpaired DNA because the X and Y chromosomes remain largely unpaired throughout first meiotic prophase. However, unlike X-chromosome inactivation in female embryonic cells, where 25-30% of X-linked structural genes have been reported to escape inactivation, previous microarray- and RT-PCR-based studies of expression of >364 X-linked mRNA-encoding genes during spermatogenesis have failed to reveal any X-linked gene that escapes the silencing effects of MSCI in primary spermatocytes. Here we show that many X-linked miRNAs are transcribed and processed in pachytene spermatocytes. This unprecedented escape from MSCI by these X-linked miRNAs suggests that they may participate in a critical function at this stage of spermatogenesis, including the possibility that they contribute to the process of MSCI itself, or that they may be essential for post-transcriptional regulation of autosomal mRNAs during the late meiotic and early postmeiotic stages of spermatogenesis.

  6. Pex gene deletions in Gy and Hyp mice provide mouse models for X-linked hypophosphatemia.

    PubMed

    Strom, T M; Francis, F; Lorenz, B; Böddrich, A; Econs, M J; Lehrach, H; Meitinger, T

    1997-02-01

    X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets in humans is caused by mutations in the PEX gene which codes for a protein homologous to neutral endopeptidases. Hyp and Gy mice both have X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets, although genetic data and the different phenotypic spectra observed have previously suggested that two different genes are mutated. In addition to the metabolic disorder observed in Hyp mice, male Gy mice are sterile and show circling behavior and reduced viability. We now report the cloning of the mouse homolog of PEX which is highly conserved between man and mouse. The 3' end of this gene is deleted in Hyp mice. In Gy mice, the first three exons and the promotor region are deleted. Thus, Hyp and Gy are allelic mutations and both provide mouse models for X-linked hypophosphatemia.

  7. Gene localisation of X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (C-S-T syndrome).

    PubMed

    MacDermot, K D; Winter, R M; Malcolm, S

    1986-10-01

    Genetic linkage studies were carried out in families with X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (C-S-T syndrome). A DNA probe DXYS1 (pDP34), which maps both to the proximal part of the long arm of the X chromosome, Xq13-Xq21, and proximally on Yp, was used to detect a TaqI restriction fragment length polymorphism of the X-chromosomal locus in the DNA samples from 11 families. This locus was found to be closely linked to the X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia locus, with a lod score of 2.66 at recombination fraction (theta) of 0.06 (90% confidence limits 0.01-0.26). Only one crossover was observed in nineteen meioses. This indicates that the probe DXYS1 is closely linked to the X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia locus and is likely to facilitate carrier detection and prenatal diagnosis tests.

  8. Lujan-Fryns syndrome (mental retardation, X-linked, marfanoid habitus).

    PubMed

    Van Buggenhout, Griet; Fryns, Jean-Pierre

    2006-07-10

    The Lujan-Fryns syndrome or X-linked mental retardation with marfanoid habitus syndrome is a syndromal X-linked form of mental retardation, affecting predominantly males. The prevalence is not known for the general population. The syndrome is associated with mild to moderate mental retardation, distinct facial dysmorphism (long narrow face, maxillary hypoplasia, small mandible and prominent forehead), tall marfanoid stature and long slender extremities, and behavioural problems. The genetic defect is not known. The diagnosis is based on the presence of the clinical manifestations. Genetic counselling is according to X-linked recessive inheritance. Prenatal testing is not possible. There is no specific treatment for this condition. Patients need special education and psychological follow-up, and attention should be given to diagnose early psychiatric disorders.

  9. Inactivation of X-linked tumor suppressor genes in human cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Runhua; Kain, Mandy; Wang, Lizhong

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells silence autosomal tumor suppressor genes by Knudson’s two-hit mechanism in which loss-of-function mutations and then loss of heterozygosity occur at the tumor suppressor gene loci. However, the identification of X-linked tumor suppressor genes has challenged the traditional theory of “two-hit inactivation” in tumor suppressor genes, introducing the novel concept that a single genetic hit can cause loss of tumor suppressor function. The mechanism through which these genes are silenced in human cancer is unclear, but elucidating the details will greatly enhance our understanding of the pathogenesis of human cancer. Here, we review the identification of X-linked tumor suppressor genes and discuss the potential mechanisms of their inactivation. In addition, we also discuss how the identification of X-linked tumor suppressor genes can potentially lead to new approaches to cancer therapy. PMID:22515449

  10. Inactivation of X-linked tumor suppressor genes in human cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Runhua; Kain, Mandy; Wang, Lizhong

    2012-04-01

    Cancer cells silence autosomal tumor suppressor genes by Knudson's two-hit mechanism in which loss-of-function mutations and then loss of heterozygosity occur at the tumor suppressor gene loci. However, the identification of X-linked tumor suppressor genes has challenged the traditional theory of 'two-hit inactivation' in tumor suppressor genes, introducing the novel concept that a single genetic hit can cause loss of tumor suppressor function. The mechanism through which these genes are silenced in human cancer is unclear, but elucidating the details will greatly enhance our understanding of the pathogenesis of human cancer. Here, we review the identification of X-linked tumor suppressor genes and discuss the potential mechanisms of their inactivation. In addition, we also discuss how the identification of X-linked tumor suppressor genes can potentially lead to new approaches in cancer therapy.

  11. Sex-specific silencing of X-linked genes by Xist RNA.

    PubMed

    Gayen, Srimonta; Maclary, Emily; Hinten, Michael; Kalantry, Sundeep

    2016-01-19

    X-inactive specific transcript (Xist) long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) is thought to catalyze silencing of X-linked genes in cis during X-chromosome inactivation, which equalizes X-linked gene dosage between male and female mammals. To test the impact of Xist RNA on X-linked gene silencing, we ectopically induced endogenous Xist by ablating the antisense repressor Tsix in mice. We find that ectopic Xist RNA induction and subsequent X-linked gene silencing is sex specific in embryos and in differentiating embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and epiblast stem cells (EpiSCs). A higher frequency of X(ΔTsix)Y male cells displayed ectopic Xist RNA coating compared with X(ΔTsix)X female cells. This increase reflected the inability of X(ΔTsix)Y cells to efficiently silence X-linked genes compared with X(ΔTsix)X cells, despite equivalent Xist RNA induction and coating. Silencing of genes on both Xs resulted in significantly reduced proliferation and increased cell death in X(ΔTsix)X female cells relative to X(ΔTsix)Y male cells. Thus, whereas Xist RNA can inactivate the X chromosome in females it may not do so in males. We further found comparable silencing in differentiating X(ΔTsix)Y and 39,X(ΔTsix) (X(ΔTsix)O) ESCs, excluding the Y chromosome and instead implicating the X-chromosome dose as the source of the sex-specific differences. Because X(ΔTsix)X female embryonic epiblast cells and EpiSCs harbor an inactivated X chromosome prior to ectopic inactivation of the active X(ΔTsix) X chromosome, we propose that the increased expression of one or more X-inactivation escapees activates Xist and, separately, helps trigger X-linked gene silencing.

  12. A novel MED12 mutation associated with non-specific X-linked intellectual disability

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Shimojima, Keiko

    2015-01-01

    The mediator complex subunit 12 gene (MED12) is responsible for an X-linked recessive intellectual disability syndrome that is characterized by dysmorphic features such as a long, narrow face and blepharophimosis, which is now recognized as an MED12-related syndrome. We identified a novel non-synonymous single-nucleotide variant, p.Ile1023Val, in a male patient with non-specific X-linked intellectual disability (XLID). Our results, together with the existence of similar reports, suggest a relationship between MED12 variants and XLID. PMID:27081531

  13. Canine lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1986-10-01

    Canine lymphoma has served as the ''workhorse'' for the development of veterinary oncology and as an important animal model for human non-Hodgkins lymphomas. Significant advances have been achieved in understanding the biological behavior of the disease and in its treatment. Although it is unlikely that a cure for lymphoma will be achieved, owners should be encouraged to treat their pets, provided they understand that only prolonged remissions and survivals are likely to result. Cooperative studies, employing large numbers of dogs, are needed to optimize and refine the classification scheme to provide a system with diagnostic and prognostic correlates and derive maximum benefit from therapeutic regimens. Such studies need to be prospective in nature, with a solid statistical base incorporated into their design. Rather than being content with what we have accomplished to date in treatment of canine lymphoma, the opportunity exists for the veterinary profession to make further significant contributions to the understanding and treatment of lymphoma in the dog. 10 refs., 4 tabs.

  14. New insights and unresolved issues regarding insertional mutagenesis in X-linked SCID gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Pike-Overzet, Karin; van der Burg, Mirjam; Wagemaker, Gerard; van Dongen, Jacques J M; Staal, Frank J T

    2007-11-01

    The oncogenic potential of retrovirus-mediated gene therapy has been re-emphasized because four patients developed T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL)-like disease from an otherwise successful gene therapy trial for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (X-linked SCID). X-linked SCID, a disease caused by inactivating mutations in the IL2Rgamma gene, is part of a heterogeneous group of SCIDs characterized by the lack of T cells in conjunction with the absence of B and/or natural killer (NK) cells. Gene therapy approaches are being developed for this group of diseases. In this review we discuss the various forms of SCID in relation to normal T-cell development. In addition, we consider the possible role of LMO2 and other T-ALL oncogenes in the development of adverse effects as seen in the X-linked SCID gene therapy trial. Furthermore, we debate whether the integration near the LMO2 locus is sufficient to result in T-ALL-like proliferations or whether the gamma-retroviral viral expression of the therapeutic IL2RG gene contributes to leukemogenesis. Finally, we review some newly developed murine models that may have added value for gene therapy safety studies.

  15. Abnormal Cortex-Muscle Interactions in Subjects with X-linked Kallmann's Syndrome and Mirror Movements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, S. F.; Harrison, L. M.; Mayston, M. J.; Parekh, A.; James, L. M.; Stephens, J. A.

    2004-01-01

    X-linked Kallmann's (XKS) subjects, who display mirror movements, have abnormal corticospinal tracts which innervate motoneurons of the left and right distal muscles of the upper limb. The size of the abnormal ipsilateral projection is variable. We have used coherence and cumulant analysis between EEG and first dorsal interosseous muscle (1DI) EMG…

  16. X-Linked Intellectual Disability: Unique Vulnerability of the Male Genome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Roger E.; Schwartz, Charles E.

    2009-01-01

    X-linked intellectual disability (XLID) accounts for approximately 16% of males with intellectual disability (ID). This is, in part, related to the fact that males have a single X chromosome. Progress in the clinical and molecular characterization of XLID has outpaced progress in the delineation of ID due to genes on the other 22 chromosomes.…

  17. Pioglitazone halts axonal degeneration in a mouse model of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Morató, Laia; Galino, Jorge; Ruiz, Montserrat; Calingasan, Noel Ylagan; Starkov, Anatoly A.; Dumont, Magali; Naudí, Alba; Martínez, Juan José; Aubourg, Patrick; Portero-Otín, Manuel; Pamplona, Reinald; Galea, Elena; Beal, M. Flint; Ferrer, Isidre; Fourcade, Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy is a neurometabolic disorder caused by inactivation of the peroxisomal ABCD1 transporter of very long-chain fatty acids. In mice, ABCD1 loss causes late onset axonal degeneration in the spinal cord in association with locomotor disability resembling the most common phenotype in patients, adrenomyeloneuropathy. Increasing evidence indicates that oxidative stress and bioenergetic failure play major roles in the pathogenesis of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. In this study, we aimed to evaluate whether mitochondrial biogenesis is affected in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. We demonstrated that Abcd1 null mice show reduced mitochondrial DNA concomitant with downregulation of mitochondrial biogenesis pathway driven by PGC-1α/PPARγ and reduced expression of mitochondrial proteins cytochrome c, NDUFB8 and VDAC. Moreover, we show that the oral administration of pioglitazone, an agonist of PPARγ, restored mitochondrial content and expression of master regulators of biogenesis, neutralized oxidative damage to proteins and DNA, and reversed bioenergetic failure in terms of ATP levels, NAD+/NADH ratios, pyruvate kinase and glutathione reductase activities. Most importantly, the treatment halted locomotor disability and axonal damage in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy mice. These results lend support to the use of pioglitazone in clinical trials with patients with adrenomyeloneuropathy and reveal novel molecular mechanisms of action of pioglitazone in neurodegeneration. Future studies should address the effects of this anti-diabetic drug on other axonopathies in which oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction are contributing factors. PMID:23794606

  18. X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia: linkage to phosphoglycerate kinase at Xq13.

    PubMed

    Raskind, W H; Wijsman, E; Pagon, R A; Cox, T C; Bawden, M J; May, B K; Bird, T D

    1991-02-01

    Molecular linkage analysis was performed on a kindred with X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia. Two-point analysis with a DNA probe for phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK1), which maps to Xq13, suggested linkage to the disorder by a lod score of at least 2.60 at a recombination fraction of zero. The disease in this kindred appears to be clinically and genetically distinct from that in previously reported families with X-linked hereditary ataxia or spastic paraparesis. No mapping data are available for inherited X-linked sideroblastic anemia without neurologic abnormalities. However, structural alterations of band Xq13 may be involved in the development of idiopathic acquired sideroblastic anemia. No alterations in the restriction patterns of two X-linked genes involved in erythrocyte formation-i.e., a DNA-binding protein (GF-1) and 5-aminolevulinate synthase (ALAS)-were detected in DNA from affected males, arguing against a large deletion in either of these candidate genes.

  19. Pyoderma Gangrenosum–Like Ulcer in a Patient With X-Linked Agammaglobulinemia

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Patrick R.; Jain, Ashish; Uzel, Gulbu; Ranken, Raymond; Ivy, Cristina; Blyn, Lawrence B.; Ecker, David J.; Sampath, Rangarajan; Lee, Chyi-Chia Richard; Turner, Maria L.

    2011-01-01

    Background Pyoderma gangrenosum–like ulcers and cellulitis of the lower extremities associated with recurrent fevers in patients with X-linked (Bruton) agammaglobulinemia have been reported to be caused by Helicobacter bilis (formerly classified as Flexispira rappini and then Helicobacter strain flexispira taxon 8). Consistent themes in these reports are the difficulty in recovering this organism in blood and wound cultures and in maintaining isolates in vitro. We confirmed the presence of this organism in a patient’s culture by using a novel application of gene amplification polymerase chain reaction and electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Observation An adolescent boy with X-linked agammaglobulinemia presented with indurated plaques and a chronic leg ulcer whose origin was strongly suspected to be an H bilis organism. Histologic analysis demonstrated positive Warthin-Starry staining of curvilinear rods, which grew in culture but failed to grow when sub-cultured. They could not be identified by conventional techniques. A combination of gene amplification by polymerase chain reaction and electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry confirmed the identity of this organism. Conclusions This novel technology was useful in the identification of a difficult-to-grow Helicobacter organism, the cause of pyoderma gangrenosum–like leg ulcers in patients with X-linked agammaglobulinemia. Correct identification of this organism as the cause of pyoderma gangrenosum–like ulcers in patients with X-linked agammaglobulinemia is of great importance for the early initiation of appropriate and curative antibiotic therapy. PMID:20479300

  20. Apparently previously undescribed X-linked dominant syndrome with facial and skeletal anomalies.

    PubMed

    Kapur, S; Swinford, A; Freimanis, A K; Lachman, R S

    1989-07-01

    We report on a syndrome of widow's peak, ptosis, skeletal abnormalities and other minor anomalies in a large family. The condition appears to be inherited in an X-linked dominant fashion. No similar cases have been found in the literature, suggesting that this is a "new" syndrome. Study of 5 generations of the family documents information on the natural history of the condition.

  1. Mutations in X-linked PORCN, a putative regulator of Wnt signaling, cause focal dermal hypoplasia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Focal dermal hypoplasia is an X-linked dominant disorder characterized by patchy hypoplastic skin and digital, ocular, and dental malformations. We used array comparative genomic hybridization to identify a 219-kb deletion in Xp11.23 in two affected females. We sequenced genes in this region and fou...

  2. Sex Differences in Speed of Mental Rotation and the X-Linked Genetic Hypothesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Hoben; Kail, Robert

    1991-01-01

    Mental-rotation task response times from 12 studies involving 505 adults--251 males and 254 females--were used to evaluate 5 hypotheses concerning sex differences derived from an X-linked genetic model. The model assumes that task facilitation in speed of mental rotation is mediated by a recessive gene. Four hypotheses derived from the model were…

  3. Sex Differences in Spatial Ability: The X-Linked Gene Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blatter, Patricia

    1982-01-01

    Among the many theories attempting to explain sex differences in spatial ability, one of the most highly researched is the X-linked recessive gene theory. This is a review of the major research done on that theory and shows the conflicting nature of the results. (Author)

  4. Influence of sex and genetic variability on expression of X-linked genes in human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Castagné, Raphaële; Zeller, Tanja; Rotival, Maxime; Szymczak, Silke; Truong, Vinh; Schillert, Arne; Trégouët, David-Alexandre; Münzel, Thomas; Ziegler, Andreas; Cambien, François; Blankenberg, Stefan; Tiret, Laurence

    2011-11-01

    In humans, the fraction of X-linked genes with higher expression in females has been estimated to be 5% from microarray studies, a proportion lower than the 25% of genes thought to escape X inactivation. We analyzed 715 X-linked transcripts in circulating monocytes from 1,467 subjects and found an excess of female-biased transcripts on the X compared to autosomes (9.4% vs 5.5%, p<2×10(-5)). Among the genes not previously known to escape inactivation, the most significant one was EFHC2 whose 20% of variability was explained by sex. We also investigated cis expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) by analyzing 15,703 X-linked SNPs. The frequency and magnitude of X-linked cis eQTLs were quite similar in males and females. Few genes exhibited a stronger genetic effect in females than in males (ARSD, DCX, POLA1 and ITM2A). These genes would deserve further investigation since they may contribute to sex pathophysiological differences.

  5. Genome-wide misexpression of X-linked versus autosomal genes associated with hybrid male sterility.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xuemei; Shapiro, Joshua A; Ting, Chau-Ti; Li, Yan; Li, Chunyan; Xu, Jin; Huang, Huanwei; Cheng, Ya-Jen; Greenberg, Anthony J; Li, Shou-Hsien; Wu, Mao-Lien; Shen, Yang; Wu, Chung-I

    2010-08-01

    Postmating reproductive isolation is often manifested as hybrid male sterility, for which X-linked genes are overrepresented (the so-called large X effect). In contrast, X-linked genes are significantly under-represented among testis-expressing genes. This seeming contradiction may be germane to the X:autosome imbalance hypothesis on hybrid sterility, in which the X-linked effect is mediated mainly through the misexpression of autosomal genes. In this study, we compared gene expression in fertile and sterile males in the hybrids between two Drosophila species. These hybrid males differ only in a small region of the X chromosome containing the Ods-site homeobox (OdsH) (also known as Odysseus) locus of hybrid sterility. Of genes expressed in the testis, autosomal genes were, indeed, more likely to be misexpressed than X-linked genes under the sterilizing action of OdsH. Since this mechanism of X:autosome interaction is only associated with spermatogenesis, a connection between X:autosome imbalance and the high rate of hybrid male sterility seems plausible.

  6. The mouse rumpshaker mutation of the proteolipid protein in human X-linked recessive spastic paraplegia

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, H.; Hoffman, E.P.; Matise, T.C.

    1994-09-01

    X-linked recessive spastic paraplegia is a rare neurodegenerative disorder characterized by slowly progressive weakness and spasticity of the lower extremities. We have recently genetically analyzed the original X-linked recessive spastic paraplegia family reported by Johnston and McKusick in 1962. We employed a fluorescent multiplex CA repeat strategy using a 22 locus, 10 cM framework map of the human X chromosome and localized the gene within a 36 cM region of Xq2l.3-q24 which includes the PLP locus. Saugier-Veber et al. recently reported a point mutation (His139Tyr) in exon 3B of the PLP gene in an X-linked recessive spastic paraplegia family (SPG2). This family shows no optic atrophy, in contrast to the family we have studied. This data showed that SPG2 and Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease were allelic disorders. We investigated the PLP gene as a candidate gene for the original X-linked recessive spastic paraplegia family using SSCP and direct sequencing methods. We found a point mutation (T to C) in exon 4 of affected males which alters the amino-acid (Ile to Thr) at residue 186. This change was absent in the unaffected males of the family and in 40 unrelated control females (80 X chromosomes). Surprisingly, this mutation is identical to the mutation previously identified in the rumpshaker mouse model. The complete homology between both the mouse and human PLP sequence, and the mouse rumpshaker mutation and human spastic paraplegia mutation in our family, permit direct parallels to be drawn with regards to pathophysiology. Our data indicates that the well-documented and striking clinical differences between Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease and X-linked recessive spastic paraplegia is due to the specific effect of different mutations of the human PLP gene on oligodendrocyte differentiation and development and on later myelin production and maintenance.

  7. A Novel Mutation in a Japanese Family with X-linked Alport Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Yoshifusa; Iyoda, Masayuki; Nozu, Kandai; Hibino, Satoshi; Hihara, Kei; Yamaguchi, Yutaka; Yamamura, Tomohiko; Minamikawa, Shogo; Iijima, Kazumoto; Shibata, Takanori; Itabashi, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    We herein report a novel mutation in a Japanese family with an X-linked Alport syndrome (AS) mutation in COL4A5. Patient 1 was a 2-year-old Japanese girl. She and her mother (patient 2) had a history of proteinuria and hematuria without renal dysfunction, deafness, or ocular abnormalities. Pathological findings were consistent with AS, and a genetic analysis revealed that both patients had a heterozygous mutation (c.2767G>C) in exon 32. In summary, the identification of mutations and characteristic pathological findings was useful in making a diagnosis of AS. For a close long-term follow-up, the early detection and treatment of women with X-linked AS are important. PMID:27725546

  8. Mapping of the X linked form of hyper IgM syndrome (HIGM1)

    PubMed

    Padayachee, M; Levinsky, R J; Kinnon, C; Finn, A; McKeown, C; Feighery, C; Notarangelo, L D; Hendriks, R W; Read, A P; Malcolm, S

    1993-03-01

    X linked immunodeficiency with hyperimmunoglobulinaemia M (HIGM1), which is characterised by agammaglobulinaemia together with excess IgM production reflecting an impairment of the immunoglobulin heavy chain class switch of B lymphocytes, has been mapped to Xq26. We report multipoint linkage data in six families with HIGM1 which show that the most likely position for the gene is close to HPRT with a maximum lod score of 4.89. The finding of recombinations between HIGM1 and both HPRT and DXS42 implies that HIGM1 is not allelic to X linked lymphoproliferative disease. These data will be useful in genetic counselling in families and will also be useful in testing candidate genes.

  9. Carrier determination for X-linked agammaglobulinemia using X inactivation analysis of purified B cells.

    PubMed

    Alterman, L A; de Alwis, M; Genet, S; Lovering, R; Middleton-Price, H; Morgan, G; Jones, A; Malcolm, S; Levinsky, R J; Kinnon, C

    1993-11-05

    We report the development of a relatively quick and simple method for the assessment of X inactivation status for carrier determination in families affected by X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA). This method utilises an immunomagnetic separation technique for B cell purification and a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based assay for the determination of methylation status at the androgen receptor (AR) gene locus to assess whether X inactivation is random or non-random at this locus. We report the results we have obtained using this assay to investigate females known to be carriers of various X-linked immunodeficiency disorders. In addition, we investigated four females from different families affected by XLA, two of whom were of unknown carrier status, and we discuss the results obtained with this and other X-inactivation assays. A similar assay has recently been described by Allen et al. (1992) and applied to members of one family affected by XLA.

  10. X-linked ichthyosis without STS deficiency: Clinical, genetical, and molecular studies

    SciTech Connect

    Robledo, R.; Melis, P.; Schillinger, E.; Siniscalco, M.

    1995-11-06

    We report on a Sardinian pedigree with congenital ichthyosis associated with normal levels of steroid sulfatase and a normal molecular pattern, as detectable with a cDNA probe for the steroid sulfatase (STS) gene. Though the pattern of transmission of the disease is consistent with X-linked recessive inheritance, this form of ichthyosis was found to segregate independently of genetic polymorphisms detected by probes of the region Xp22.3, where the STS locus has been mapped. The search for close genetic linkages with other polymorphic markers scattered along the entire X chromosome has so far been fruitless. For the time being, the main conclusion derived from these data is that STS deficiency is not a sine qua non for X-linked ichthyosis which may also result from a mutational event at an X-chromosomal site genetically unlinked to the STS locus. 16 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Lupus erythematosus-like lesions in a carrier of X-linked chronic granulomatous disease.

    PubMed

    Córdoba-Guijarro, S; Feal, C; Daudén, E; Fraga, J; García-Díez, A

    2000-09-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is an inherited immunodeficiency disease. Carrier status of CGD has been reported in association with lupus erythematosus-type lesions. A 35-year-old woman, mother of a child with X-linked CGD presented an 8-year history of erythematous plaques with an arciform pattern on the upper trunk, back and arms. The nitroblue tetrazolium test revealed the carrier status of the patient. Haematological, biochemical and immunological tests (including ANA, DNA, SSA-Ro, SSB-La, RNP, SM and Jo1 antibodies) were normal or negative except for a polyclonal hypergammaglobulinaemia with high serum IgA. Histological examination showed a papillary and perifollicular lymphohistiocytic infiltrate. Direct immunofluorescence was negative. We report a female carrier of X-linked CGD who developed clinical subacute lupus erythematosus-like lesions. We review the literature and discuss the pathogenetic mechanisms involved in the condition.

  12. Molecular genetic and clinical evaluation of three Chinese families with X-linked ocular albinism.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xuan; Li, Hui; Yang, Lizhu; Sun, Zixi; Yuan, Zhisheng; Li, Huajin; Sui, Ruifang

    2017-02-17

    X-linked ocular albinism (OA1) is an X-linked inherited disease characterized by hypopigmentation of the fundus and nystagmus. Our study performed mutation analysis of the G protein-coupled receptor 143 gene (GPR143) and assessed the clinical characteristics of OA1 in three Chinese families. Three novel mutations, c.333_360+14del42insCTT, c.276G>A (p.W92X), and c.793C>T (p.R265X), were identified in GPR143 by PCR followed by Sanger sequencing in these families. All affected individuals presented with nystagmus, photophobia, poor visual acuity, foveal hypoplasia and varying degrees of hypopigmentation of the fundus. The fundus of female carriers showed pigmented streaks alternating with hypopigmented streaks. These results allowed us to expand the spectrum of mutations in GPR143 and phenotypes associated with ocular albinism.

  13. May spina bifida result from an X-linked defect in a selective abortion mechanism?

    PubMed Central

    Burn, J; Gibbens, D

    1979-01-01

    It is suggested that the major genetic factor in determining the birth of children with neural tube defects may be a single X-linked gene. It acts as an X-linked dominant, not by producing neural tube defects, but by enabling the affected fetus to survive selective spontaneous abortion. This mechanism, mediated at the deciduoplacental junction, may be under the control of both maternal and fetal genes. With more mutant alleles, survival would become more likely, reaching a maximum in the homozygous affected female fetus of a homozygous affected mother. The female excess in anancephaly is greater than that in spina bifida because of its prenatal severity, thus requiring relatively more mutant alleles for survival. PMID:381663

  14. Position effect on FGF13 associated with X-linked congenital generalized hypertrichosis.

    PubMed

    DeStefano, Gina M; Fantauzzo, Katherine A; Petukhova, Lynn; Kurban, Mazen; Tadin-Strapps, Marija; Levy, Brynn; Warburton, Dorothy; Cirulli, Elizabeth T; Han, Yujun; Sun, Xiaoyun; Shen, Yufeng; Shirazi, Maryam; Jobanputra, Vaidehi; Cepeda-Valdes, Rodrigo; Cesar Salas-Alanis, Julio; Christiano, Angela M

    2013-05-07

    X-linked congenital generalized hypertrichosis (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man 307150) is an extremely rare condition of hair overgrowth on different body sites. We previously reported linkage in a large Mexican family with X-linked congenital generalized hypertrichosis cosegregating with deafness and with dental and palate anomalies to Xq24-27. Using SNP oligonucleotide microarray analysis and whole-genome sequencing, we identified a 389-kb interchromosomal insertion at an extragenic palindrome site at Xq27.1 that completely cosegregates with the disease. Among the genes surrounding the insertion, we found that Fibroblast Growth Factor 13 (FGF13) mRNA levels were significantly reduced in affected individuals, and immunofluorescence staining revealed a striking decrease in FGF13 localization throughout the outer root sheath of affected hair follicles. Taken together, our findings suggest a role for FGF13 in hair follicle growth and in the hair cycle.

  15. X-linked ocular albinism and sensorineural deafness: Linkage to Xp22. 3

    SciTech Connect

    Winship, I.M.; Babaya, M.; Ramesar, R.S. )

    1993-11-01

    X-linked ocular albinism with late-onset sensorineural deafness (OASD) is an autonomous disorder that poses significant clinical problems, causing affected individuals to be blind and deaf by early middle age. Classical X-linked ocular albinism (without deafness; OA1) has recently been linked to markers in the Xp22.2-Xp22.3 region of the human genome. In the present report, a large South African family with OASD was investigated at the molecular level and tight linkage was found to the DXS452 locus at Xp22.3 using 25 informative meioses, with a maximum lod score of 7.1 at a recombination fraction of 0.00. These findings suggest that OA1 and OASD are allelic variants or that they may be due to contiguous gene defects. 12 refs., 1 fig.

  16. Molecular genetic and clinical evaluation of three Chinese families with X-linked ocular albinism

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Xuan; Li, Hui; Yang, Lizhu; Sun, Zixi; Yuan, Zhisheng; Li, Huajin; Sui, Ruifang

    2017-01-01

    X-linked ocular albinism (OA1) is an X-linked inherited disease characterized by hypopigmentation of the fundus and nystagmus. Our study performed mutation analysis of the G protein-coupled receptor 143 gene (GPR143) and assessed the clinical characteristics of OA1 in three Chinese families. Three novel mutations, c.333_360+14del42insCTT, c.276G>A (p.W92X), and c.793C>T (p.R265X), were identified in GPR143 by PCR followed by Sanger sequencing in these families. All affected individuals presented with nystagmus, photophobia, poor visual acuity, foveal hypoplasia and varying degrees of hypopigmentation of the fundus. The fundus of female carriers showed pigmented streaks alternating with hypopigmented streaks. These results allowed us to expand the spectrum of mutations in GPR143 and phenotypes associated with ocular albinism. PMID:28211458

  17. Patulous Subarachnoid Space of the Optic Nerve Associated with X-Linked Hypophosphatemic Rickets.

    PubMed

    Galvez-Ruiz, Alberto; Chaudhry, Imtiaz

    2013-01-01

    Although the deficiency forms are the most common manifestations of rickets, there are other forms of rickets that are resistant to vitamin D. Of these, the most common is X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets. Rickets represents a group of multiple cranial bone disorders-craniosynostosis and the presence of Chari I malformation being the most notable-that explain the increase in intracranial pressure. We present a 4-year-old patient with an unusual association of X-linked hypophosphataemic rickets, bilateral proptosis, and prominent bilateral widening of the optic nerve sheaths. Although the association between intracranial hypertension and rickets is known, to the best of our knowledge, such a prominent distention of the subarachnoid space of the optic nerve without papilloedema has not been previously described.

  18. Convergence of Human Genetics and Animal Studies: Gene Therapy for X-Linked Retinoschisis.

    PubMed

    Bush, Ronald A; Wei, Lisa L; Sieving, Paul A

    2015-06-22

    Retinoschisis is an X-linked recessive genetic disease that leads to vision loss in males. X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) typically affects young males; however, progressive vision loss continues throughout life. Although discovered in 1898 by Haas in two brothers, the underlying biology leading to blindness has become apparent only in the last 15 years with the advancement of human genetic analyses, generation of XLRS animal models, and the development of ocular monitoring methods such as the electroretinogram and optical coherence tomography. It is now recognized that retinoschisis results from cyst formations within the retinal layers that interrupt normal visual neurosignaling and compromise structural integrity. Mutations in the human retinoschisin gene have been correlated with disease severity of the human XLRS phenotype. Introduction of a normal human retinoschisin cDNA into retinoschisin knockout mice restores retinal structure and improves neural function, providing proof-of-concept that gene replacement therapy is a plausible treatment for XLRS.

  19. Refined genetic mapping of X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Fain, P.R.; Barker, D.F.; Chance, P.F. )

    1994-02-01

    Genetic linkage studies were conducted in four multigenerational families with X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMTX), using 12 highly polymorphic short-tandem-repeat markers for the pericentromeric region of the X Chromosome. Pairwise linkage analysis with individual markers confirmed tight linkage of CMTX to the pericentromeric region in each family. Multipoint analyses strongly support the order DXS337-CMTX-DXS441-(DXS56, PGK1). 38 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Successful Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in a Patient With X-linked Agammaglobulinemia and Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Arja, Rolla F.; Chernin, Leah R.; Abusin, Ghada; Auletta, Jeffery; Cabral, Linda; Egler, Rachel; Ochs, Hans D.; Torgerson, Troy R.; Lopez-Guisa, Jesus; Hostoffer, Robert W.; Tcheurekdjian, Haig; Cooke, Kenneth R.

    2016-01-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a primary immunodeficiency characterized by marked reduction in all classes of serum immunoglobulins and the near absence of mature CD19+ B-cells. Although malignancy has been observed in patients with XLA, we present the first reported case of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in a patient with XLA. We also demonstrate the complete correction of the XLA phenotype following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for treatment of the patient’s leukemia. PMID:25900577

  1. Chronic polioencephalitis with cerebral atrophy in infantile X-linked hypogammaglobulineaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Liwnicz, B H; Marinkovich, V A

    1979-01-01

    The development of a chronic polioencephalitis is reported in a patient with infantile X-linked hypogammaglobulinaemia (IXH Bruton type agammaglobulinaemia). In early childhood, the patient had multiple episodes of purulent inflammation involving the meninges and respiratory tract. He was given continuous administration of gammaglobulin and intermittent treatment with antibiotics, and survived for 21 years. The neuropathological lesion, which revealed severe cerebral atrophy, is described. Images PMID:572414

  2. Molecular genetic analysis of patients with sporadic and X-linked infantile nystagmus

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hui; Huang, Xiu-Feng; Zheng, Zhi-Li; Deng, Wen-Li; Lei, Xin-Lan; Xing, Dong-Jun; Ye, Liang; Xu, Su-Zhong; Chen, Jie; Zhang, Fang; Yu, Xin-Ping; Jin, Zi-Bing

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Infantile nystagmus (IN) is a genetically heterogeneous condition characterised by involuntary rhythmic oscillations of the eyes accompanied by different degrees of vision impairment. Two genes have been identified as mainly causing IN: FRMD7 and GPR143. The aim of our study was to identify the genetic basis of both sporadic IN and X-linked IN. Design Prospective analysis. Patients Twenty Chinese patients, including 15 sporadic IN cases and 5 from X-linked IN families, were recruited and underwent molecular genetic analysis. We first performed PCR-based DNA sequencing of the entire coding region and the splice junctions of the FRMD7 and GPR143 genes in participants. Mutational analysis and co-segregation confirmation were then performed. Setting All clinical examinations and genetic experiments were performed in the Eye Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University. Results Two mutations in the FRMD7 gene, including one novel nonsense mutation (c.1090C>T, p.Q364X) and one reported missense mutation (c.781C>G, p.R261G), were identified in two of the five (40%) X-linked IN families. However, none of putative mutations were identified in FRMD7 or GPR143 in any of the sporadic cases. Conclusions The results suggest that mutations in FRMD7 appeared to be the major genetic cause of X-linked IN, but not of sporadic IN. Our findings provide further insights into FRMD7 mutations, which could be helpful for future genetic diagnosis and genetic counselling of Chinese patients with nystagmus. PMID:27036142

  3. Nonspecific X-linked mental retardation with macrocephaly and obesity: A further family

    SciTech Connect

    Baraitser, M.; Reardon, W.; Vijeratnam, S.

    1995-07-03

    The phenotypic nonspecificity of many forms of X-linked mental retardation has hampered attempts to classify them into clinically homogeneous groups. One such condition, described by Clark and Baraitser, has been the subject of a single pedigree report to date. We now describe a further pedigree whose affected members share many manifestations with those reported by Clark and Baraitser, and we consider the possible distinction between this condition and Atkin-Flaitz syndrome. 9 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  4. CRISPR/Cas9 Promotes Functional Study of Testis Specific X-Linked Gene In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xue; Chen, Yuxi; Zhang, Zhen; Zhang, Xiya; Liang, Puping; Zhan, Shaoquan; Cao, Shanbo; Songyang, Zhou; Huang, Junjiu

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian spermatogenesis is a highly regulated multistage process of sperm generation. It is hard to uncover the real function of a testis specific gene in vitro since the in vitro model is not yet mature. With the development of the CRISPR/Cas9 (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats/CRISPR-associated 9) system, we can now rapidly generate knockout mouse models of testis specific genes to study the process of spermatogenesis in vivo. SYCP3-like X-linked 2 (SLX2) is a germ cell specific component, which contains a Cor1 domain and belongs to the XLR (X-linked, lymphocyte regulated) family. Previous studies suggested that SLX2 might play an important role in mouse spermatogenesis based on its subcellular localization and interacting proteins. However, the function of SLX2 in vivo is still elusive. Here, to investigate the functions of SLX2 in spermatogenesis, we disrupted the Slx2 gene by using the CRISPR/Cas9 system. Since Slx2 is a testis specific X-linked gene, we obtained knockout male mice in the first generation and accelerated the study process. Compared with wild-type mice, Slx2 knockout mice have normal testis and epididymis. Histological observation of testes sections showed that Slx2 knockout affected none of the three main stages of spermatogenesis: mitosis, meiosis and spermiogenesis. In addition, we further confirmed that disruption of Slx2 did not affect the number of spermatogonial stem cells, meiosis progression or XY body formation by immunofluorescence analysis. As spermatogenesis was normal in Slx2 knockout mice, these mice were fertile. Taken together, we showed that Slx2 itself is not an essential gene for mouse spermatogenesis and CRISPR/Cas9 technique could speed up the functional study of testis specific X-linked gene in vivo. PMID:26599493

  5. Selection and mutation in X-linked recessive diseases epidemiological model.

    PubMed

    Verrilli, Francesca; Kebriaei, Hamed; Glielmo, Luigi; Corless, Martin; Del Vecchio, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    To describe the epidemiology of X-linked recessive diseases we developed a discrete time, structured, non linear mathematical model. The model allows for de novo mutations (i.e. affected sibling born to unaffected parents) and selection (i.e., distinct fitness rates depending on individual's health conditions). Applying Lyapunov direct method we found the domain of attraction of model's equilibrium point and studied the convergence properties of the degenerate equilibrium where only affected individuals survive.

  6. Canine thymoma.

    PubMed

    Aronsohn, M

    1985-07-01

    Thymoma is an uncommon canine neoplasm of thymic epithelial cells. It is seen in various breeds but may occur more frequently in German Shepherd Dogs. Middle-aged or older dogs can be affected and no sex predilection exists. A paraneoplastic syndrome of myasthenia gravis, nonthymic malignant tumors, and/or polymyositis occurs in a significant number of dogs with thymoma. Clinical signs are variable and are related to a space-occupying cranial mediastinal mass and/or manifestations of the paraneo-plastic syndrome. Dyspnea is the most common presenting clinical sign. Thoracic radiographs usually show a cranial mediastinal mass. Lymphoma is the main differential diagnosis. A definitive diagnosis may be made by closed biopsy but is more likely to be confirmed by thoracotomy. Thymomas may be completely contained within the thymic capsule or may spread by local invasion or metastasis. A staging system allows for an accurate prognosis and a therapeutic plan. Surgical removal of encapsulated thymomas may result in long-term survival or cure. Invasive or metastatic thymomas carry a guarded prognosis. Manifestations of the paraneoplastic syndrome complicate treatment. Adjuvant radiation and chemotherapy may be of value for advanced cases; however, adequate clinical trials have not been done in the dog.

  7. Mutational studies in X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMTX)

    SciTech Connect

    Cherryson, A.K.; Yeung, L.; Kennerson, M.L.; Nicholson, G.A.

    1994-09-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, also known as hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN), is a heterogeneous group of slowly progressive disorders of the peripheral nerve. X-linked CMT (CMTX) is characterized by slow motor nerve conduction velocities in affected males and the presence of mildly affected or normal carrier females with intermediate or normal nerve conduction velocities. CMTX, which has an incidence of 3.1 per 100,000 and accounts for approximately 10% of CMT cases, has been mapped to Xq13. One of the genes lying in this region, connexin 32, has been found to contain alterations in individuals affected with X-linked CMT. We have identified our X-linked families from dominant type 1 CMT families using the clinical criteria given above. These families were screened for point mutations in connexin 32. We have identified three missense mutations, a G{r_arrow}A transition at amino acid 35 (valine to methionine), a C{r_arrow}G transition at amino acid 158 (proline to alanine) and a T{r_arrow}A transition at amino acid 182 (serine to threonine). Another family showed a 18 bp deletion, which removed the amino acid 111 to 116 inclusive (histidine, glycine, aspartic acid, proline, leucine, histidine).

  8. X chromosome inactivation pattern in female carriers of X linked hypophosphataemic rickets.

    PubMed Central

    Orstavik, K H; Orstavik, R E; Halse, J; Knudtzon, J

    1996-01-01

    X linked hypophosphataemia (XLH) results from an abnormality of renal tubular phosphate reabsorption. The disorder is inherited as an X linked dominant trait and the gene has been mapped to Xp22.1-p22.2. A candidate gene (PEX) has recently been isolated. The most striking clinical features are growth retardation and skeletal abnormalities. As expected for X linked dominant disorders, females are less affected. However, such a gene dosage effect does not exist for renal phosphate reabsorption. Preferential X chromosome inactivation has been proposed as a possible explanation for this lack of gene dosage. We have examined the X inactivation pattern in peripheral blood cells from 12 females belonging to seven families with XLH using PCR analysis at the androgen receptor locus. The X inactivation pattern in these patients did not differ significantly from the pattern in 30 healthy females. The X inactivation pattern in peripheral blood cells does not necessarily reflect the X inactivation pattern in renal cells. However, the finding of a normal distribution of X inactivation in peripheral blood cells indicates that the similarity in the renal handling of phosphate in male and female patients is not related to a ubiquitous preferential X inactivation. Images PMID:8863165

  9. X-linked cataract and Nance-Horan syndrome are allelic disorders

    PubMed Central

    Coccia, Margherita; Brooks, Simon P.; Webb, Tom R.; Christodoulou, Katja; Wozniak, Izabella O.; Murday, Victoria; Balicki, Martha; Yee, Harris A.; Wangensteen, Teresia; Riise, Ruth; Saggar, Anand K.; Park, Soo-Mi; Kanuga, Naheed; Francis, Peter J.; Maher, Eamonn R.; Moore, Anthony T.; Russell-Eggitt, Isabelle M.; Hardcastle, Alison J.

    2009-01-01

    Nance-Horan syndrome (NHS) is an X-linked developmental disorder characterized by congenital cataract, dental anomalies, facial dysmorphism and, in some cases, mental retardation. Protein truncation mutations in a novel gene (NHS) have been identified in patients with this syndrome. We previously mapped X-linked congenital cataract (CXN) in one family to an interval on chromosome Xp22.13 which encompasses the NHS locus; however, no mutations were identified in the NHS gene. In this study, we show that NHS and X-linked cataract are allelic diseases. Two CXN families, which were negative for mutations in the NHS gene, were further analysed using array comparative genomic hybridization. CXN was found to be caused by novel copy number variations: a complex duplication–triplication re-arrangement and an intragenic deletion, predicted to result in altered transcriptional regulation of the NHS gene. Furthermore, we also describe the clinical and molecular analysis of seven families diagnosed with NHS, identifying four novel protein truncation mutations and a novel large deletion encompassing the majority of the NHS gene, all leading to no functional protein. We therefore show that different mechanisms, aberrant transcription of the NHS gene or no functional NHS protein, lead to different diseases. Our data highlight the importance of copy number variation and non-recurrent re-arrangements leading to different severity of disease and describe the potential mechanisms involved. PMID:19414485

  10. Meiotic drive impacts expression and evolution of x-linked genes in stalk-eyed flies.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, Josephine A; Brand, Cara L; Paczolt, Kimberly A; Johns, Philip M; Baker, Richard H; Wilkinson, Gerald S

    2014-01-01

    Although sex chromosome meiotic drive has been observed in a variety of species for over 50 years, the genes causing drive are only known in a few cases, and none of these cases cause distorted sex-ratios in nature. In stalk-eyed flies (Teleopsis dalmanni), driving X chromosomes are commonly found at frequencies approaching 30% in the wild, but the genetic basis of drive has remained elusive due to reduced recombination between driving and non-driving X chromosomes. Here, we used RNAseq to identify transcripts that are differentially expressed between males carrying either a driving X (XSR) or a standard X chromosome (XST), and found hundreds of these, the majority of which are X-linked. Drive-associated transcripts show increased levels of sequence divergence (dN/dS) compared to a control set, and are predominantly expressed either in testes or in the gonads of both sexes. Finally, we confirmed that XSR and XST are highly divergent by estimating sequence differentiation between the RNAseq pools. We found that X-linked transcripts were often strongly differentiated (whereas most autosomal transcripts were not), supporting the presence of a relatively large region of recombination suppression on XSR presumably caused by one or more inversions. We have identified a group of genes that are good candidates for further study into the causes and consequences of sex-chromosome drive, and demonstrated that meiotic drive has had a profound effect on sequence evolution and gene expression of X-linked genes in this species.

  11. Paternal inheritance of classic X-linked bilateral periventricular nodular heterotopia.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Burkhard S; Kurzbuch, Katrin; Chang, Bernard S; Pauli, Elisabeth; Hamer, Hajo M; Winkler, Jürgen; Hehr, Ute

    2013-06-01

    Periventricular nodular heterotopia (PNH) is a developmental disorder of the central nervous system, characterized by heterotopic nodules of gray matter resulting from disturbed neuronal migration. The most common form of bilateral PNH is X-linked dominant inherited, caused by mutations in the Filamin A gene (FLNA) and associated with a wide variety of other clinical findings including congenital heart disease. The typical patient with FLNA-associated PNH is female and presents with difficult to treat seizures. In contrast, hemizygous FLNA loss of function mutations in males are reported to be perinatally lethal. In X-linked dominant traits like FLNA-associated PNH the causal mutation is commonly inherited from the mother. Here, we present an exceptional family with paternal transmission of classic bilateral FLNA-associated PNH from a mildly affected father with somatic and germline mosaicism for a c.5686G>A FLNA splice mutation to both daughters with strikingly variable clinical manifestation and PNH extent in cerebral MR imaging. Our observations emphasize the importance to consider in genetic counseling and risk assessment the rare genetic constellation of paternal transmission for families with X-linked dominant inherited FLNA-associated PNH.

  12. Heterogeneity in X-linked recessive Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Ionasescu, V V; Trofatter, J; Haines, J L; Summers, A M; Ionasescu, R; Searby, C

    1991-01-01

    Three families presenting with X-linked recessive Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathies (CMT) were studied both clinically and genetically. The disease phenotype in family 1 was typical of CMT type 1, except for an infantile onset; two of five affected individuals were mentally retarded, and obligate-carrier females were unaffected. Families 2 and 3 showed distal atrophy with weakness, juvenile onset, and normal intelligence. Motor-nerve conduction velocities were significantly slowed, and electromyography data were consistent with denervation in affected CMT males in all three families. Thirty X-linked RFLPs were tested for linkage studies against the CMT disease loci. Family 1 showed tight linkage (recombination fraction [theta] = 0) to Xp22.2 markers DXS16, DXS143, and DXS43, with peak lod scores of 1.75, 1.78, and 2.04, respectively. A maximum lod score of 3.48 at DXS16 (theta = 0) was obtained by multipoint linkage analysis of the map DXS143-DXS16-DXS43. In families 2 and 3 there was suggestion of tight linkage (theta = 0) to Xq26 markers DXS86, DXS144, and DXS105, with peak lod scores of 2.29, 1.33, and 2.32, respectively. The combined maximum multipoint lod score of 1.81 at DXS144 (theta = 0) for these two families occurred in the map DXS10-DXS144-DXS51-DXS105-DXS15-DXS52++ +. A joint homogeneity analysis including both regions (Xp22.2 and Xq26-28) provided evidence against homogeneity (chi 2 = 9.12, P less than .005). No linkage to Xp11.12-q22 markers was observed, as was reported for X-linked dominant CMT and the Cowchock CMT variant. Also, the chromosomes 1 and 17 CMT loci were excluded by pairwise linkage analysis in all three families. PMID:1674639

  13. A new nonsyndromic X-linked sensorineural hearing impairment linked to Xp21.2

    SciTech Connect

    Lalwani, A.K.; Brister, J.R.; Fex, J.; Grundfast, K.M.; Pikus, A.T.; Ploplis, B.; San Agustin, T.; Skarka, H.; Wilcox, E.R.

    1994-10-01

    X-linked deafness is a rare cause of hereditary hearing impairment. We have identified a family with X-linked dominant sensorineural hearing impairment, characterized by incomplete penetrance and variable expressivity in carrier females, that is linked to the Xp21.2, which contains the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) locus. The auditory impairment in affected males was congenital, bilateral, profound, sensorineural, affecting all frequencies, and without evidence of radiographic abnormality of the temporal bone. Adult carrier females manifested bilateral, mild-to-moderate high-frequency sensorineural hearing impairment of delayed onset during adulthood. Eighteen commercially available polymorphic markers from the X chromosome, generating a 10-15-cM map, were initially used for identification of a candidate region. DXS997, located within the DMD gene, generated a two-point LOD score of 2.91 at {theta} = 0, with every carrier mother heterozygous at this locus. Recombination events at DXS992 (located within the DMD locus, 3{prime} to exon 50 of the dystrophin gene) and at DXS1068 (5{prime} to the brain promoter of the dystrophin gene) were observed. No recombination events were noted with the following markers within the DMD locus: 5{prime}DYS II, intron 44, DXS997, and intron 50. There was no clinical evidence of Duchenne or Becker muscular dystrophy in any family member. It is likely that this family represents a new locus on the X chromosome, which when mutated results in nonsyndromic sensorineural hearing loss and is distinct from the heterogeneous group of X-linked hearing losses that have been previously described. 57 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Meiotic Drive Impacts Expression and Evolution of X-Linked Genes in Stalk-Eyed Flies

    PubMed Central

    Reinhardt, Josephine A.; Brand, Cara L.; Paczolt, Kimberly A.; Johns, Philip M.; Baker, Richard H.; Wilkinson, Gerald S.

    2014-01-01

    Although sex chromosome meiotic drive has been observed in a variety of species for over 50 years, the genes causing drive are only known in a few cases, and none of these cases cause distorted sex-ratios in nature. In stalk-eyed flies (Teleopsis dalmanni), driving X chromosomes are commonly found at frequencies approaching 30% in the wild, but the genetic basis of drive has remained elusive due to reduced recombination between driving and non-driving X chromosomes. Here, we used RNAseq to identify transcripts that are differentially expressed between males carrying either a driving X (XSR) or a standard X chromosome (XST), and found hundreds of these, the majority of which are X-linked. Drive-associated transcripts show increased levels of sequence divergence (dN/dS) compared to a control set, and are predominantly expressed either in testes or in the gonads of both sexes. Finally, we confirmed that XSR and XST are highly divergent by estimating sequence differentiation between the RNAseq pools. We found that X-linked transcripts were often strongly differentiated (whereas most autosomal transcripts were not), supporting the presence of a relatively large region of recombination suppression on XSR presumably caused by one or more inversions. We have identified a group of genes that are good candidates for further study into the causes and consequences of sex-chromosome drive, and demonstrated that meiotic drive has had a profound effect on sequence evolution and gene expression of X-linked genes in this species. PMID:24832132

  15. Diagnostic value of the skin lesions in immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked syndrome.

    PubMed

    Martín-Santiago, Ana; Hervás, Juan A; Hervás, Daniel; Rosell, Antonio; Caimari, María; de Carlos, Juan C; Matamoros, Nuria

    2013-01-01

    We report a child with immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked (IPEX) syndrome due to a de novo c.1190G>A (p.R397Q) mutation in exon 11 of the forkhead domain of the FOXP3 gene. He had chronic dermatitis with an eczematous and ichthyosiform appearance and had an allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. IPEX syndrome is a rare, often fatal recessive disease caused by mutations in the FOXP3 gene on the X chromosome (Xp11.23-q13.3).

  16. Late-onset of immunodysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, x-linked syndrome (IPEX) with intractable diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Zama, Daniele; Cocchi, Ilaria; Masetti, Riccardo; Specchia, Fernando; Alvisi, Patrizia; Gambineri, Eleonora; Lima, Mario; Pession, Andrea

    2014-10-18

    The syndrome of immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X linked (IPEX) is a rare disorder caused by mutations in the FOXP3 gene. Diarrhea, diabetes and dermatitis are the hallmark of the disease, with a typical onset within the first months of life. We describe the case of a twelve-year old male affected by a very late-onset IPEX with intractable enteropathy, which markedly improved after starting Sirolimus as second-line treatment. This case suggests that IPEX should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of watery intractable diarrhea, despite its unusual onset.

  17. X-linked albinism-deafness syndrome and Waardenburg syndrome type II: A hypothesis

    SciTech Connect

    Zlotogora, J.

    1995-11-20

    Margolis reported on a large pedigree with a {open_quotes}new{close_quotes} X-linked syndrome of profound deafness and albinism (MIM 300700, albinism-deafness syndrome). The affected males presented with profound deafness and severe pigmentary abnormalities of the skin. At birth the skin appeared as almost albinotic except for areas of light pigmentation over the gluteal and scrotal areas, and thereafter pigmentation gradually increased over the body. Skin changes ultimately included areas of hypopigmentation and spots of hyperpigmentation. Some of the affected males also had blue irides, heterochromia, or segmental color iris changes. In carrier females, variable hearing impairment was documented without any pigmentary changes. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  18. Incontinentia pigmenti or Bloch-Sulzberger syndrome: a rare X-linked genodermatosis*

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Gabriela Franco; Tonello, Claudio Sampieri; Sousa, Juliana Martins Prazeres

    2014-01-01

    Incontinentia pigmenti is a rare X-linked genodermatosis that affects mainly female neonates. The first manifestation occurs in the early neonatal period and progresses through four stages: vesicular, verruciform, hyperpigmented and hypopigmented. Clinical features also manifest themselves through changes in the teeth, eyes, hair, central nervous system, bone structures, skeletal musculature and immune system. The authors report the case of a patient with cutaneous lesions and histological findings that are compatible with the vesicular stage, emphasizing the importance of early diagnosis and appropriate therapeutic management. PMID:24937825

  19. A dental approach to carrier screening in X linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Spfaer, J A

    1981-01-01

    The frequency of carriers of X linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia among females with hypodontia of the permanent dentition (excluding third molars) could be as high as 1 in 500, and among females with deciduous hypodontia could be as high as 1 in 50. Since it may be possible to identify carriers form among female hypodontia cases in general by virtue of a reduced sweat pore count, the potential exists for a reasonably practical method of screening for carriers at the population level. PMID:7334506

  20. Sweat testing to identify female carriers of X linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, A; Burn, J

    1991-01-01

    X linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (XHED) affects many epithelial functions, including sweat gland formation. Female carriers who manifest XHED may have defective dentition or a patchy distribution of sweating or both, as determined by starch and iodine sweat testing. Such sweat testing can be useful in assigning carrier status to at risk females in XHED families, and in obtaining an accurate diagnosis for isolated females who present with features of ectodermal dysplasia. The advantages of diagnosing female carriers of XHED include the optimisation of neonatal and paediatric care for affected male infants, who may be at substantial risk of death in infancy. Images PMID:1865470

  1. X-linked paroxysmal dyskinesia and severe global retardation caused by defective MCT8 gene.

    PubMed

    Brockmann, Knut; Dumitrescu, Alexandra M; Best, Thomas T; Hanefeld, Folker; Refetoff, Samuel

    2005-06-01

    We previously reported two unrelated boys aged 3 and 8 years with mutations in the thyroid hormone transporter gene MCT8 resulting in severe global retardation and an uncommon pattern of thyroid hormone abnormalities. We now further describe an unusual neurological phenotype associated with these mutations, namely paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesias (PKD), provoked by certain stimuli including changing of their clothes or diapers. It is not clear how the MCT8 defect causes PKDs. PKDs have been previously noted in patients with thyroid abnormalities. This novel X-linked condition widens the spectrum of secondary PKDs.

  2. Ex Vivo γ-Retroviral Gene Therapy of Dogs with X-linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency and the Development of a Thymic T Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Douglas R.; Hartnett, Brian J.; Kennedy, Jeffrey S.; Vernau, William; Moore, Peter F.; O’Malley, Thomas; Burkly, Linda C.; Henthorn, Paula S.; Felsburg, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    We have previously shown that in vivo γ-retroviral gene therapy of dogs with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (XSCID) results in sustained T cell reconstitution and sustained marking in myeloid and B cells for up to 4 years with no evidence of any serious adverse effects. The purpose of this study was to determine whether ex vivo γ-retroviral gene therapy of XSCID dogs results in a similar outcome. Eight of 12 XSCID dogs treated with an average of dose of 5.8 × 106 transduced CD34+ cells/kg successfully engrafted producing normal numbers of gene-corrected CD45RA+ (naïve) T cells. However, this was followed by a steady decrease in CD45RA+ T cells, T cell diversity, and thymic output as measured by T cell receptor excision circles (TRECs) resulting in a T cell lymphopenia. None of the dogs survived past 11 months post treatment. At necropsy, few gene-corrected thymocytes were observed correlating with the TREC levels and one of the dogs was diagnosed with a thymic T cell lymphoma that was attributed to the gene therapy. This study highlights the outcome differences between the ex vivo and in vivo approach to γ-retroviral gene therapy and is the first to document a serious adverse event following gene therapy in a canine model of a human genetic disease. PMID:21536334

  3. Evidence for compensatory upregulation of expressed X-linked genes in mammals, Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xinxian; Hiatt, Joseph B; Nguyen, Di Kim; Ercan, Sevinc; Sturgill, David; Hillier, LaDeana W; Schlesinger, Felix; Davis, Carrie A; Reinke, Valerie J; Gingeras, Thomas R; Shendure, Jay; Waterston, Robert H; Oliver, Brian; Lieb, Jason D; Disteche, Christine M

    2011-10-23

    Many animal species use a chromosome-based mechanism of sex determination, which has led to the coordinate evolution of dosage-compensation systems. Dosage compensation not only corrects the imbalance in the number of X chromosomes between the sexes but also is hypothesized to correct dosage imbalance within cells that is due to monoallelic X-linked expression and biallelic autosomal expression, by upregulating X-linked genes twofold (termed 'Ohno's hypothesis'). Although this hypothesis is well supported by expression analyses of individual X-linked genes and by microarray-based transcriptome analyses, it was challenged by a recent study using RNA sequencing and proteomics. We obtained new, independent RNA-seq data, measured RNA polymerase distribution and reanalyzed published expression data in mammals, C. elegans and Drosophila. Our analyses, which take into account the skewed gene content of the X chromosome, support the hypothesis of upregulation of expressed X-linked genes to balance expression of the genome.

  4. Localization of Impacted Canines

    PubMed Central

    Mehrotra, Praveen; Bhagchandani, Jitendra; Singh, Ashish; Garg, Aarti; Kumar, Snehi; Sharma, Ashish; Yadav, Harsh

    2015-01-01

    Impaction of maxillary canines is a frequently encountered clinical problem. The impaction of canine can be prevented in some situationsif the canine displacement is diagnosed in the early mixed dentition period and this would be extremely useful for the clinician. Hence,it is very important to focus on the means of early diagnosis and interception of this clinical situation. In the present article, the differentmodalities used to diagnose the impacted canine are reviewed with an insight into current 3-D modalities. PMID:25738100

  5. X-linked recessive type of pure spastic paraplegia in a large pedigree: absence of detectable linkage with Xg.

    PubMed Central

    Zatz, M; Penha-Serrano, C; Otto, P A

    1976-01-01

    A family with 24 males affected by an X-linked type of spastic paraplegia is reported. Twelve affected members were personally examined showing the pure form of the disease. Half of the affected males had many descendants, all normal. Linkage studies strongly suggest that this X-linked form of spastic paraplegia and Xg loci are not at a measurable distance on the X chromosome. PMID:1084423

  6. X-linked intellectual disability related genes disrupted by balanced X-autosome translocations.

    PubMed

    Moysés-Oliveira, Mariana; Guilherme, Roberta Santos; Meloni, Vera Ayres; Di Battista, Adriana; de Mello, Claudia Berlim; Bragagnolo, Silvia; Moretti-Ferreira, Danilo; Kosyakova, Nadezda; Liehr, Thomas; Carvalheira, Gianna Maria; Melaragno, Maria Isabel

    2015-12-01

    Detailed molecular characterization of chromosomal rearrangements involving X-chromosome has been a key strategy in identifying X-linked intellectual disability-causing genes. We fine-mapped the breakpoints in four women with balanced X-autosome translocations and variable phenotypes, in order to investigate the corresponding genetic contribution to intellectual disability. We addressed the impact of the gene interruptions in transcription and discussed the consequences of their functional impairment in neurodevelopment. Three patients presented with cognitive impairment, reinforcing the association between the disrupted genes (TSPAN7-MRX58, KIAA2022-MRX98, and IL1RAPL1-MRX21/34) and intellectual disability. While gene expression analysis showed absence of TSPAN7 and KIAA2022 expression in the patients, the unexpected expression of IL1RAPL1 suggested a fusion transcript ZNF611-IL1RAPL1 under the control of the ZNF611 promoter, gene disrupted at the autosomal breakpoint. The X-chromosomal breakpoint definition in the fourth patient, a woman with normal intellectual abilities, revealed disruption of the ZDHHC15 gene (MRX91). The expression assays did not detect ZDHHC15 gene expression in the patient, thus questioning its involvement in intellectual disability. Revealing the disruption of an X-linked intellectual disability-related gene in patients with balanced X-autosome translocation is a useful tool for a better characterization of critical genes in neurodevelopment. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Linkage localization of X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bergoffen, J. Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia ); Trofatter, J.; Haines, J.L. ); Pericak-Vance, M.A. ); Chance, P.F. ); Fischbeck, K.H. )

    1993-02-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), also known as hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy, is a heterogeneous group of slowly progressive, degenerative disorders of peripheral nerve. X-linked CMT (CMTX) (McKusick 302800), a subdivision of type I, or demyelinating, CMT is an X-linked dominant condition with variable penetrance. Previous linkage analysis using RFLPs demonstrated linkage to markers on the proximal long and short arms of the X chromosome, with the more likely localization on the proximal long arm of the X chromosome. Available variable simple-sequence repeats (VSSRs) broaden the possibilities for linkage analysis. This paper presents new linkage data and recombination analysis derived from work with four VSSR markers - AR, PGKP1, DXS453, and DXYS1X - in addition to analysis using RFLP markers described elsewhere. These studies localize the CMTX gene to the proximal Xq segment between PGKP1 (Xq11.2-12) and DXS72 (Xq21.1), with a combined maximum multipoint lod score of 15.3 at DXS453 ([theta] = 0). 32 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. The X-linked F cell production locus: Genetic mapping and role in fetal hemoglobin production

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.C.; Smith, K.D.; Moore, R.D.

    1994-09-01

    Postnatal fetal hemoglobin (Hb F) production is confined to a subset of erythocytes termed F-cells. There is a 10-20 fold variation in F-cell production in sickle cell disease (SCD) and normal individuals. Most of the variation in F-cell production has been attributed to a diallelic (High, Low) X-linked gene, the F-cell production (FCP) locus that we recently mapped to Xp22.2-22.3 (LOD=4.56, theta=0.04). Using multiple regression analysis in 262 Jamaican SCD patients we determined the relative contribution of the FCP locus and other variables previously associated with variation in Hb F level (gender, age, beta-globin haplotypes, number of alpha-globin genes and the FCP locus phenotypes). When the FCP locus is in the regression model, the FCP locus alone accounts for approximately 40% of the variation in Hb F level while the contribution of age, alpha-globin gene number, and beta-globin haplotypes was insignificant. When individuals with High FCP allele are removed from the analysis, the beta globin haplotype now contribute to >10% of the Hb F variation. We conclude that the X-linked FCP locus is the major determinant of all known variables in Hb F production. Using 4 highly polymorphic dinucleotide repeat markers that we identified from cosmids in Xp22.2-22.3, have localized the FCP locus to a 1 Mb minimal candidate region between DXS143 and DXS410.

  9. Fragile X and X-linked intellectual disability: four decades of discovery.

    PubMed

    Lubs, Herbert A; Stevenson, Roger E; Schwartz, Charles E

    2012-04-06

    X-Linked intellectual disability (XLID) accounts for 5%-10% of intellectual disability in males. Over 150 syndromes, the most common of which is the fragile X syndrome, have been described. A large number of families with nonsyndromal XLID, 95 of which have been regionally mapped, have been described as well. Mutations in 102 X-linked genes have been associated with 81 of these XLID syndromes and with 35 of the regionally mapped families with nonsyndromal XLID. Identification of these genes has enabled considerable reclassification and better understanding of the biological basis of XLID. At the same time, it has improved the clinical diagnosis of XLID and allowed for carrier detection and prevention strategies through gamete donation, prenatal diagnosis, and genetic counseling. Progress in delineating XLID has far outpaced the efforts to understand the genetic basis for autosomal intellectual disability. In large measure, this has been because of the relative ease of identifying families with XLID and finding the responsible mutations, as well as the determined and interactive efforts of a small group of researchers worldwide.

  10. Seventh international workshop on the fragile X and X-linked mental retardation

    SciTech Connect

    Tranebjaerg, L.; Lubs, H.A.; Borghgraef, M.; Fryns, J.P.

    1996-07-12

    The Seventh International Workshop on the Fragile X and X-linked Mental Retardation was held at the University of Tromso in Norway on August 2-5, 1995. Approximately 120 participants from 20 countries attended the Workshop. By special invitation Dr. Felix de la Cruz, who initiated the first international Workshop on fragile X, attended this Workshop. For the first time, the workshop took place in Scandinavia and was hosted by Lisbeth Tranebjaerg and Herbert Lubs. For most participants this Workshop, held at the northernmost university in the world, presented a unique opportunity to visit this exotic place. Between sessions, the participants had a chance to experience 24 hours of daylight, codfishing, and extreme weather situations with excessive amounts of rain as well as spectacular changes in the light and rainbows. The format of the Workshop was a combination of platform presentations and poster presentations. In contrast to previous meetings, the Workshop opened with syndromal and non-syndromal X-linked mental retardation in order to allow time for discussion. 34 refs., 1 fig.

  11. X-chromosomal inactivation directly influences the phenotypic manifestation of X-linked protoporphyria

    PubMed Central

    Brancaleoni, V.; Balwani, M.; Granata, F.; Graziadei, G.; Missineo, P.; Fiorentino, V.; Fustinoni, S.; Cappellini, M.D.; Naik, H.; Desnick, R.J.; Di Pierro, E.

    2015-01-01

    X-linked protoporphyria (XLP), a rare erythropoietic porphyria, results from terminal exon gain-of-function mutations in the ALAS2 gene causing increased ALAS2 activity and markedly increased erythrocyte protoporphyrin levels. Patients present with severe cutaneous photosensitivity and may develop liver dysfunction. XLP was originally reported as X-linked dominant with 100% penetrance in males and females. We characterized 11 heterozygous females from six unrelated XLP families and show markedly varying phenotypic and biochemical heterogeneity, reflecting the degree of X-chromsomal inactivation of the mutant gene. ALAS2 sequencing identified the specific mutation and confirmed heterozygosity among the females. Clinical history, plasma and erythrocyte protoporphyrin levels were determined. Methylation assays of the androgen receptor and zinc-finger MYM type 3 short tandem repeat polymorphisms estimated each heterozygotes X-chromosomal inactivation pattern. Heterozygotes with equal or increased skewing, favoring expression of the wild-type allele had no clinical symptoms and only slightly increased erythrocyte protoporphyrin concentrations and/or frequency of protoporphyrin-containing peripheral blood fluorocytes. When the wild-type allele was preferentially inactivated, heterozygous females manifested the disease phenotype and had both higher erythrocyte protoporphyrin levels and circulating fluorocytes. These findings confirm that the previous dominant classification of XLP is inappropriate and genetically misleading, as the disorder is more appropriately designated XLP. PMID:25615817

  12. GPR143 Gene Mutations in Five Chinese Families with X-linked Congenital Nystagmus

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ruifang; Wang, Xiaojuan; Wang, Dongjie; Wang, Liming; Yuan, Zhongfang; Ying, Ming; Li, Ningdong

    2015-01-01

    The ocular albinism type I (OA1) is clinically characterized by impaired visual acuity, nystagmus, iris hypopigmentation with translucency, albinotic fundus, and macular hypoplasia together with normally pigmented skin and hair. However, it is easily misdiagnosed as congenital idiopathic nystagmus in some Chinese patients with OA1 caused by the G-protein coupled receptor 143 (GPR143) gene mutations. Mutations in the FERM domain–containing 7 (FRMD7) gene are responsible for the X-linked congenital idiopathic nystagmus. In this study, five Chinese families initially diagnosed as X-linked congenital nystagmus were recruited and patients underwent ophthalmological examinations. After direct sequencing of the FRMD7 and GPR143 genes, five mutations in GPR143 gene were detected in each of the five families, including a novel nonsense mutation of c.333G>A (p.W111X), two novel splicing mutations of c.360+1G>C and c.659-1G>A, a novel small deletion mutation of c.43_50dupGACGCAGC (p.L20PfsX25), and a previously reported missense mutation of c.703G>A (p.E235K). Optical coherence tomography (OCT) examination showed foveal hypoplasia in all the affected patients with nystagmus. Our study further expands the GPR143 mutation spectrum and contributes to the study of GPR143 molecular pathogenesis. Molecular diagnosis and optical coherence tomography (OCT) are two useful tools for differential diagnosis. PMID:26160353

  13. Refined mapping of X-linked reticulate pigmentary disorder and sequencing of candidate genes

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    X-linked reticulate pigmentary disorder with systemic manifestations in males (PDR) is very rare. Affected males are characterized by cutaneous and visceral symptoms suggestive of abnormally regulated inXammation. A genetic linkage study of a large Canadian kindred previously mapped the PDR gene to a greater than 40 Mb interval of Xp22–p21. The aim of this study was to identify the causative gene for PDR. The Canadian pedigree was expanded and additional PDR families recruited. Genetic linkage was performed using newer microsatellite markers. Positional and functional candidate genes were screened by PCR and sequencing of coding exons in affected males. The location of the PDR gene was narrowed to a ~4.9 Mb interval of Xp22.11–p21.3 between markers DXS1052 and DXS1061. All annotated coding exons within this interval were sequenced in one affected male from each of the three multiplex families as well as one singleton, but no causative mutation was identiWed. Sequencing of other X-linked genes outside of the linked interval also failed to identify the cause of PDR but revealed a novel nonsynonymous cSNP in the GRPR gene in the Maltese population. PDR is most likely due to a mutation within the linked interval not affecting currently annotated coding exons. PMID:18404279

  14. New X linked spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia: report on eight affected males in the same family.

    PubMed Central

    Camera, G; Stella, G; Camera, A

    1994-01-01

    We report on a probably new form of spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia (SEMD) with an X linked inheritance pattern. Eight males were affected in the same family. We were able to examine three adult patients and we studied the skeletal radiological aspect of one of these patients at 2 years 6 months and at 9 years of age. The main clinical features are severe short trunked dwarfism, brachydactyly, normal facies, and normal intelligence. Radiologically, the diaphyses of all the long bones are short and broad. The epiphyses of the distal portion of the femora and those of the proximal and distal portions of the tibia are embedded in their metaphyses and there is marked narrowing of the intercondylar groove. There is moderate platyspondyly. Several vertebrae show an anterior tongue in infancy and severe irregularities of the upper and lower surfaces are present in adulthood. The 11th or 12th thoracic vertebra is wedge shaped. The pelvis is narrow. The distal ulnae and fibulae are disproportionately long. The hands show radial deviation and brachydactyly is present in the hands and feet. This X linked SEMD was not detectable at birth. Images PMID:8064814

  15. DKC1 gene mutation in a Taiwanese kindred with X-linked dyskeratosis congenita.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jeng-Hsien; Lee, J Yu-Yun; Tsao, Chao-Jung; Chao, Sheau-Chiou

    2002-11-01

    Dyskeratosis congenita (DKC) is a rare inherited disease characterized by the triad of abnormal skin pigmentation, nail dystrophy, and mucosal leukoplakia. Recent studies demonstrated mutations in the DKC1 gene encoding a protein named dyskerin, which is a component of human telomerase. In addition to the hypothesized function of pseudouridination in rRNA biosynthesis, ribosomal subunit assembly, and/or centromere/ microtubule binding, lower levels of telomerase activity in cells from patients with X-linked DKC have been observed. We report the mutation analysis of a Taiwanese family with X-linked DKC. The patient was a 19-year-old man who presented with progressive reticulate hyperpigmentation, nail dystrophy, alopecia, leukoplakia of the tongue, and pancytopenia. He died of enterocolitis and Escherichia coli sepsis at the age of 20 years. Only his mother's DNA was available for mutation analysis, which revealed a nucleotide transition of C to T (1058 C --> T), a hotspot mutation in DKC, resulting in an amino acid change from alanine to valine (A353V) in the DKC1 gene. Recent advances in the research of telomerase and its implications in the human aging process and cancer are discussed.

  16. A Review of X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Yin, Fei

    2016-05-01

    X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMTX) is the second common genetic variant of CMT. CMTX type 1 causes 90% of CMTX. The most important clinical features of CMTX are similar with other types of CMT; however, a few patients get the central nervous system involved with or without white matter lesions; males are more severely and earlier affected than females. In this review, the authors focus on the origin and classification of CMTX, the central nervous system manifestations of CMTX1, the possible mechanism by which GJB1 mutations cause CMT1X, and the emerging therapeutic strategies for CMTX. Moreover, several cases are presented to illustrate the central nervous system manifestations.

  17. Development of three X-linked tetrameric microsatellite markers for forensic purposes.

    PubMed

    Dong, Chunnan; Fu, Lihong; Zhang, Xiaojing; Ma, Chunling; Yu, Feng; Li, Shujin; Cong, Bin

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we obtained sequence and population genetic data for three X-linked short tandem repeat markers (X-STRs; DXS7129, DXS2500, G10583). We investigated their population genetics and estimated their forensic parameters in 214 healthy unrelated individuals from the Han population of Northern China (105 males and 109 females). We showed that DXS2500 and G10583 were highly polymorphic and thus have potential for application in forensic medicine. We also estimated the overall linkage disequilibrium between pairs of loci, specific multiallelic or interallelic associations, and haplotype frequencies in males. We showed that the three X-STR loci segregate as stable haplotype blocks; this could be a powerful tool for haplotype analysis in kinship testing.

  18. Evidence against an X-linked visual loss susceptibility locus in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Chalmers, R.M.; Davis, M.B.; Sweeney, M.G.; Wood, N.W.; Harding, A.E.

    1996-07-01

    Pedigree analysis of British families with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) closely fits a model in which a pathogenic mtDNA mutation interacts with an X-linked visual loss susceptibility locus (VLSL). This model predicts that 60% of affected females will show marked skewing of X inactivation. Linkage analysis in British and Italian families with genetically proven LHON has excluded the presence of such a VLSL over 169 cM of the X chromosome both when all families were analyzed together and when only families with the bp 11778 mutation were studied. Further, there was no excess skewing of X inactivation in affected females. There was no evidence for close linkage to three markers in the pseudoautosomal region of the sex chromosomes. The mechanism of incomplete penetrance and male predominance in LHON remains unclear. 27 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  19. Activity-dependent regulation of genes implicated in X-linked non-specific mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Boda, B; Mas, C; Muller, D

    2002-01-01

    X-linked forms of non-specific mental retardation are complex disorders, for which mutations in several genes have recently been identified. These include OPHN1, GDI1, PAK3, IL1RAPL, TM4SF2, FMR2 and RSK2. To investigate the mechanisms through which alterations of these gene products could result in cognitive impairment, we analyzed their expression using quantitative PCR technique in two in vitro models of activity-dependent gene regulation: kainate-induced seizures and long-term synaptic potentiation (LTP). We found that the level of expression of four genes, PAK3, IL1RAPL, RSK2 and TM4SF2, was significantly up-regulated following kainate treatment. Furthermore we observed a significant increase in mRNA levels of PAK3 and IL1RAPL following LTP induction. These results suggest a possible role for these four genes in activity-dependent brain plasticity.

  20. Connexin mutations in X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bergoffen, J. ); Scherer, S.S.; Wang, S.; Scott, M.; Bone, L.J.; Chen, K.; Lensch, M.W.; Fischbeck, K.H. ); Paul, D.L. ); Change, P.F. )

    1993-12-24

    X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMTX) is a form of hereditary neuropathy with demyelination. Recently, this disorder was mapped to chromosome Xq13.1. The gene for the gap junction protein connexin32 is located in the same chromosomal segment, which led to its consideration as a candidate gene for CMTX. With the use of Northern (RNA) blot and immunohistochemistry techniques, it was found that connexin32 is normally expressed in myelinated peripheral nerve. Direct sequencing of the connexin32 gene showed seven different mutations in affected persons from eight CMTX families. These findings, a demonstration of inherited defects in a gap junction protein, suggest that connexin32 plays an important role in peripheral nerve.

  1. Assessing interethnic admixture using an X-linked insertion-deletion multiplex.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro-Rodrigues, Elzemar Martins; dos Santos, Ney Pereira Carneiro; dos Santos, Andrea Kely Campos Ribeiro; Pereira, Rui; Amorim, António; Gusmão, Leonor; Zago, Marco Antonio; dos Santos, Sidney Emanuel Batista

    2009-01-01

    In this study, a PCR multiplex was optimized, allowing the simultaneous analysis of 13 X-chromosome Insertion/deletion polymorphisms (INDELs). Genetic variation observed in Africans, Europeans, and Native Americans reveals high inter-population variability. The estimated proportions of X-chromosomes in an admixed population from the Brazilian Amazon region show a predominant Amerindian contribution (approximately 41%), followed by European (approximately 32%) and African (approximately 27%) contributions. The proportion of Amerindian contribution based on X-linked data is similar to the expected value based on mtDNA and Y-chromosome information. The accuracy for assessing interethnic admixture, and the high differentiation between African, European, and Native American populations, demonstrates the suitability of this INDEL set to measure ancestry proportions in three-hybrid populations, as it is the case of Latin American populations.

  2. Report on the X-linked lymphoproliferative disease in an Australian family.

    PubMed

    Turner, A M; Berdoukas, V A; Tobias, V H; Ziegler, J B; Toogood, I R; Mulley, J C; Skare, J; Purtilo, D T

    1992-04-01

    X-linked lymphoproliferative disease is characterized by immune deficiency, particularly to the Epstein-Barr virus and by a tendency to develop fatal infectious mononucleosis, acquired hypogammaglobulinaemia or malignant lymphoma. This disorder has been diagnosed in three boys, two brothers and a maternally related cousin, residing in Australia. The proband presented at 6 years of age with fulminating infectious mononucleosis. His 9 year old male cousin had developed an ileal Burkitt lymphoma one year earlier. Immunological and molecular genetic evidence is presented to support our view that his younger sibling is also affected with this condition. DNA linkage studies using probes to DXS10 and DXS37 provide confirmatory evidence for the diagnosis in the proband's brother and information on carrier status in female family members.

  3. MBTPS2 mutations cause defective regulated intramembrane proteolysis in X-linked osteogenesis imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Lindert, Uschi; Cabral, Wayne A.; Ausavarat, Surasawadee; Tongkobpetch, Siraprapa; Ludin, Katja; Barnes, Aileen M.; Yeetong, Patra; Weis, Maryann; Krabichler, Birgit; Srichomthong, Chalurmpon; Makareeva, Elena N.; Janecke, Andreas R.; Leikin, Sergey; Röthlisberger, Benno; Rohrbach, Marianne; Kennerknecht, Ingo; Eyre, David R.; Suphapeetiporn, Kanya; Giunta, Cecilia; Marini, Joan C.; Shotelersuk, Vorasuk

    2016-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a collagen-related bone dysplasia. We identified an X-linked recessive form of OI caused by defects in MBTPS2, which encodes site-2 metalloprotease (S2P). MBTPS2 missense mutations in two independent kindreds with moderate/severe OI cause substitutions at highly conserved S2P residues. Mutant S2P has normal stability, but impaired functioning in regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) of OASIS, ATF6 and SREBP transcription factors, consistent with decreased proband secretion of type I collagen. Further, hydroxylation of the collagen lysine residue (K87) critical for crosslinking is reduced in proband bone tissue, consistent with decreased lysyl hydroxylase 1 in proband osteoblasts. Reduced collagen crosslinks presumptively undermine bone strength. Also, proband osteoblasts have broadly defective differentiation. These mutations provide evidence that RIP plays a fundamental role in normal bone development. PMID:27380894

  4. X-linked agammaglobulinemia combined with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and invasive Klebsiella pneumoniae polyarticular septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zaihua; Kang, Yuli; Lin, Zhenlang; Huang, Yanjing; Lv, Huoyang; Li, Yasong

    2015-02-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a primary immunodeficiency disease caused by mutations in the Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) gene. XLA can also present in combination with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), the major chronic rheumatologic disease in children. We report herein the first known case of a juvenile patient diagnosed with XLA combined with JIA that later developed into invasive Klebsiella pneumoniae polyarticular septic polyarthritis. An additional comprehensive review of XLA combined with JIA and invasive K. pneumoniae septic arthritis is also presented. XLA was identified by the detection of BTK mutations while the diagnosis of JIA was established by clinical and laboratory assessments. Septic arthritis caused by invasive K. pneumoniae was confirmed by culturing of the synovia and gene detection of the isolates. Invasive K. pneumoniae infections can not only result in liver abscesses but also septic arthritis, although this is rare. XLA combined with JIA may contribute to invasive K. pneumoniae infection.

  5. A Japanese family with X-linked sideroblastic anemia affecting females and manifesting as macrocytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Katsurada, Tatsuya; Kawabata, Hiroshi; Kawabata, Daiki; Kawahara, Masahiro; Nakabo, Yukiharu; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi; Yoshida, Yataro

    2016-06-01

    X-linked sideroblastic anemia (XLSA) is a rare hereditary disorder that typically manifests in males as microcytic anemia. Here, we report a family with XLSA that affects females and manifests as macrocytic anemia. The proband was a Japanese woman harboring a heterozygous mutation c.679C>T in the ALAS2 gene. This mutation causes the amino acid substitution R227C, which disrupts the enzymatic activity of erythroid-specific δ-aminolevulinic acid synthase. The mutation was not detected in the ALAS2 complementary DNA from peripheral blood red blood cells of the proband, indicating that the cells were mostly derived from erythroblasts expressing wild-type ALAS2. The proband's mother, who had been diagnosed with myelodysplastic syndrome, also had XLSA with the same mutation. Clinicians should be aware that XLSA can occur not only in males but also in females, in whom it manifests as macrocytic anemia.

  6. Clinical and mutational features of X-linked agammaglobulinemia in Mexico.

    PubMed

    García-García, E; Staines-Boone, A T; Vargas-Hernández, A; González-Serrano, M E; Carrillo-Tapia, E; Mogica-Martínez, D; Berrón-Ruíz, L; Segura-Mendez, N H; Espinosa-Rosales, F J; Yamazaki-Nakashimada, M A; Santos-Argumedo, L; López-Herrera, G

    2016-04-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is caused by BTK mutations, patients typically show <2% of peripheral B cells and reduced levels of all immunoglobulins; they suffer from recurrent infections of bacterial origin; however, viral infections, autoimmune-like diseases, and an increased risk of developing gastric cancer are also reported. In this work, we report the BTK mutations and clinical features of 12 patients diagnosed with XLA. Furthermore, a clinical revision is also presented for an additional cohort of previously reported patients with XLA. Four novel mutations were identified, one of these located in the previously reported mutation refractory SH3 domain. Clinical data support previous reports accounting for frequent respiratory, gastrointestinal tract infections and other symptoms such as the occurrence of reactive arthritis in 19.2% of the patients. An equal proportion of patients developed septic arthritis; missense mutations and mutations in SH1, SH2 and PH domains predominated in patients who developed arthritis.

  7. Silencing of X-Linked MicroRNAs by Meiotic Sex Chromosome Inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Royo, Hélène; Seitz, Hervé; ElInati, Elias; Peters, Antoine H. F. M.; Stadler, Michael B.; Turner, James M. A.

    2015-01-01

    During the pachytene stage of meiosis in male mammals, the X and Y chromosomes are transcriptionally silenced by Meiotic Sex Chromosome Inactivation (MSCI). MSCI is conserved in therian mammals and is essential for normal male fertility. Transcriptomics approaches have demonstrated that in mice, most or all protein-coding genes on the X chromosome are subject to MSCI. However, it is unclear whether X-linked non-coding RNAs behave in a similar manner. The X chromosome is enriched in microRNA (miRNA) genes, with many exhibiting testis-biased expression. Importantly, high expression levels of X-linked miRNAs (X-miRNAs) have been reported in pachytene spermatocytes, indicating that these genes may escape MSCI, and perhaps play a role in the XY-silencing process. Here we use RNA FISH to examine X-miRNA expression in the male germ line. We find that, like protein-coding X-genes, X-miRNAs are expressed prior to prophase I and are thereafter silenced during pachynema. X-miRNA silencing does not occur in mouse models with defective MSCI. Furthermore, X-miRNAs are expressed at pachynema when present as autosomally integrated transgenes. Thus, we conclude that silencing of X-miRNAs during pachynema in wild type males is MSCI-dependent. Importantly, misexpression of X-miRNAs during pachynema causes spermatogenic defects. We propose that MSCI represents a chromosomal mechanism by which X-miRNAs, and other potential X-encoded repressors, can be silenced, thereby regulating genes with critical late spermatogenic functions. PMID:26509798

  8. HDHD1, which is often deleted in X-linked ichthyosis, encodes a pseudouridine-5'-phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Preumont, Alice; Rzem, Rim; Vertommen, Didier; Van Schaftingen, Emile

    2010-10-15

    Pseudouridine, the fifth-most abundant nucleoside in RNA, is not metabolized in mammals, but is excreted intact in urine. The purpose of the present work was to search for an enzyme that would dephosphorylate pseudouridine 5'-phosphate, a potential intermediate in RNA degradation. We show that human erythrocytes contain a pseudouridine-5'-phosphatase displaying a Km ≤ 1 μM for its substrate. The activity of the partially purified enzyme was dependent on Mg2+, and was inhibited by Ca2+ and vanadate, suggesting that it belonged to the 'haloacid dehalogenase' family of phosphatases. Its low molecular mass (26 kDa) suggested that this phosphatase could correspond to the protein encoded by the HDHD1 (haloacid dehalogenase-like hydrolase domain-containing 1) gene, present next to the STS (steroid sulfatase) gene on human chromosome Xp22. Purified human recombinant HDHD1 dephosphorylated pseudouridine 5'-phosphate with a kcat of 1.6 s-1, a Km of 0.3 μM and a catalytic efficiency at least 1000-fold higher than that on which it acted on other phosphate esters, including 5'-UMP. The molecular identity of pseudouridine-5'-phosphatase was confirmed by the finding that its activity was negligible (<10% of controls) in extracts of B-cell lymphoblasts or erythrocytes from X-linked ichthyosis patients harbouring a combined deletion of the STS gene (the X-linked ichthyosis gene) and the HDHD1 gene. Furthermore, pseudouridine-5'-phosphatase activity was 1.5-fold higher in erythrocytes from women compared with men, in agreement with the HDHD1 gene undergoing only partial inactivation in females. In conclusion, HDHD1 is a phosphatase specifically involved in dephosphorylation of a modified nucleotide present in RNA.

  9. X-linked intellectual disability type Nascimento is a clinically distinct, probably underdiagnosed entity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    X-linked intellectual disability type Nascimento (MIM #300860), caused by mutations in UBE2A (MIM *312180), is characterized by craniofacial dysmorphism (synophrys, prominent supraorbital ridges, deep-set, almond-shaped eyes, depressed nasal bridge, prominent columella, hypoplastic alae nasi, and macrostomia), skin anomalies (hirsutism, myxedematous appearance, onychodystrophy), micropenis, moderate to severe intellectual disability (ID), motor delay, impaired/absent speech, and seizures. Hitherto only five familial point mutations and four different deletions including UBE2A have been reported in the literature. We present eight additional individuals from five families with UBE2A associated ID - three males from a consanguineous family, in whom we identified a small deletion of only 7.1 kb encompassing the first three exons of UBE2A, two related males with a UBE2A missense mutation in exon 4, a patient with a de novo nonsense mutation in exon 6, and two sporadic males with larger deletions including UBE2A. All affected male individuals share the typical clinical phenotype, all carrier females are unaffected and presented with a completely skewed X inactivation in blood. We conclude that 1.) X-linked intellectual disability type Nascimento is a clinically very distinct entity that might be underdiagnosed to date. 2.) So far, all females carrying a familial UBE2A aberration have a completely skewed X inactivation and are clinically unaffected. This should be taken in to account when counselling those families. 3.) The coverage of an array should be checked carefully prior to analysis since not all arrays have a sufficient resolution at specific loci, or alternative quantitative methods should be applied not to miss small deletions. PMID:24053514

  10. The Role of Neuronal Complexes in Human X-Linked Brain Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Laumonnier, Frédéric ; Cuthbert, Peter C. ; Grant, Seth G. N. 

    2007-01-01

    Beyond finding individual genes that are involved in medical disorders, an important challenge is the integration of sets of disease genes with the complexities of basic biological processes. We examine this issue by focusing on neuronal multiprotein complexes and their components encoded on the human X chromosome. Multiprotein signaling complexes in the postsynaptic terminal of central nervous system synapses are essential for the induction of neuronal plasticity and cognitive processes in animals. The prototype complex is the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor complex/membrane-associated guanylate kinase–associated signaling complex (NRC/MASC) comprising 185 proteins and embedded within the postsynaptic density (PSD), which is a set of complexes totaling ∼1,100 proteins. It is striking that 86% (6 of 7) of X-linked NRC/MASC genes and 49% (19 of 39) of X-chromosomal PSD genes are already known to be involved in human psychiatric disorders. Moreover, of the 69 known proteins mutated in X-linked mental retardation, 19 (28%) encode postsynaptic proteins. The high incidence of involvement in cognitive disorders is also found in mouse mutants and indicates that the complexes are functioning as integrated entities or molecular machines and that disruption of different components impairs their overall role in cognitive processes. We also noticed that NRC/MASC genes appear to be more strongly associated with mental retardation and autism spectrum disorders. We propose that systematic studies of PSD and NRC/MASC genes in mice and humans will give a high yield of novel genes important for human disease and new mechanistic insights into higher cognitive functions. PMID:17236127

  11. CASK mutations are frequent in males and cause X-linked nystagmus and variable XLMR phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Hackett, Anna; Tarpey, Patrick S; Licata, Andrea; Cox, James; Whibley, Annabel; Boyle, Jackie; Rogers, Carolyn; Grigg, John; Partington, Michael; Stevenson, Roger E; Tolmie, John; Yates, John Rw; Turner, Gillian; Wilson, Meredith; Futreal, Andrew P; Corbett, Mark; Shaw, Marie; Gecz, Jozef; Raymond, F Lucy; Stratton, Michael R; Schwartz, Charles E; Abidi, Fatima E

    2010-05-01

    Mutations of the calcium/calmodulin-dependent serine protein kinase (CASK) gene have recently been associated with X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) with microcephaly, optic atrophy and brainstem and cerebellar hypoplasia, as well as with an X-linked syndrome having some FG-like features. Our group has recently identified four male probands from 358 probable XLMR families with missense mutations (p.Y268H, p.P396S, p.D710G and p.W919R) in the CASK gene. Congenital nystagmus, a rare and striking feature, was present in two of these families. We screened a further 45 probands with either nystagmus or microcephaly and mental retardation (MR), and identified two further mutations, a missense mutation (p.Y728C) and a splice mutation (c.2521-2A>T) in two small families with nystagmus and MR. Detailed clinical examinations of all six families, including an ophthalmological review in four families, were undertaken to further characterise the phenotype. We report on the clinical features of 24 individuals, mostly male, from six families with CASK mutations. The phenotype was variable, ranging from non-syndromic mild MR to severe MR associated with microcephaly and dysmorphic facial features. Carrier females were variably affected. Congenital nystagmus was found in members of four of the families. Our findings reinforce the CASK gene as a relatively frequent cause of XLMR in females and males. We further define the phenotypic spectrum and demonstrate that affected males with missense mutations or in-frame deletions in CASK are frequently associated with congenital nystagmus and XLMR, a striking feature not previously reported.

  12. Genetic analysis and clinical phenotype of two Indian families with X-linked choroideremia

    PubMed Central

    Battu, Rajani; Jeyabalan, Nallathambi; Murthy, Praveen; Reddy, Kavita S; Schouten, Jan SAG; Webers, Caroll A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to describe the phenotype and genotype of two Indian families affected with X-linked choroideremia (CHM). Materials and Methods: In these two families, the affected individuals and unaffected family members underwent a comprehensive ophthalmic examination including an optical coherence tomography (OCT) and electroretinogram. Blood samples were collected from the families for genetic analysis. Next generation sequencing (NGS) was done using a panel of 184 genes, which covered previously associated genes with retinal dystrophies. Sequencing data were analyzed for the CHM, RPGR, and RP2 genes that have been implicated in CHM and X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP), respectively. The identified variants were confirmed by Sanger sequencing in available individuals and unrelated controls. Results: In two unrelated male patients, NGS analysis revealed a previously reported 3’-splice site change c.820-1G>C in the CHM gene in the first family and hemizygous mutation c.653G>C (p.Ser218X) in the second family. The asymptomatic family members were carriers for these mutations. Spectral domain-OCT showed loss of outer retina, preservation of the inner retina, and choroidal thinning in the affected males and retinal pigment epithelial changes in the asymptomatic carriers. The identified mutations were not present in 100 controls of Indian origin. There were no potential mutations found in XLRP-associated (RPGR and RP2) genes. Conclusion: This report describes the genotype and phenotype findings in patients with CHM from India. The identified genetic mutation leads to lack of Rab escort protein-1 (REP-1) or affects the production of a REP-1 protein that is likely to cause retinal abnormalities in patients. PMID:28112135

  13. Linkage analysis in three families with nonspecific X-linked mental retardation

    SciTech Connect

    Claes, S.; Gu, X.X.; Legius, E.

    1996-07-12

    Nonspecific X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) is a common disorder. The number of genes involved in this condition is not known, but it is estimated to be more than 10. We present a clinical and linkage study on 3 families with XLMR. All families were analyzed using highly polymorphic markers covering the X chromosome; screening for the fragile X mutation was negative. The first family (MRX 36) consisted of 1 female and 4 male patients in 3 generations and 7 healthy individuals. Considering the female as an expressing heterozygous carrier, a maximum LOD score of 3.41 was reached in region Xp21.2-Xp22.1. Considering her phenotype to be unknown, a LOD{sub max} of 1.97 was reached in the same region. The second family consisted of 5 affected and 6 healthy males with mild to borderline mental retardation. Linkage analysis using an X-linked recessive model with full penetrance and no phenocopies excluded linkage over almost the entire X chromosome. Using alternative models, including an affecteds-only analysis, a LOD{sub max} of 1.49 was found in region Xq24-28. The third family, consisting of 4 male patients with moderate mental retardation in 1 generation yielded a LOD{sub max} of 0.9 in region Xp22.13-11.3. However, even in this small pedigree, exclusion mapping was able to exclude very large parts of the X chromosome and in this way identify a likely candidate region. 34 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Silencing of X-Linked MicroRNAs by Meiotic Sex Chromosome Inactivation.

    PubMed

    Royo, Hélène; Seitz, Hervé; ElInati, Elias; Peters, Antoine H F M; Stadler, Michael B; Turner, James M A

    2015-10-01

    During the pachytene stage of meiosis in male mammals, the X and Y chromosomes are transcriptionally silenced by Meiotic Sex Chromosome Inactivation (MSCI). MSCI is conserved in therian mammals and is essential for normal male fertility. Transcriptomics approaches have demonstrated that in mice, most or all protein-coding genes on the X chromosome are subject to MSCI. However, it is unclear whether X-linked non-coding RNAs behave in a similar manner. The X chromosome is enriched in microRNA (miRNA) genes, with many exhibiting testis-biased expression. Importantly, high expression levels of X-linked miRNAs (X-miRNAs) have been reported in pachytene spermatocytes, indicating that these genes may escape MSCI, and perhaps play a role in the XY-silencing process. Here we use RNA FISH to examine X-miRNA expression in the male germ line. We find that, like protein-coding X-genes, X-miRNAs are expressed prior to prophase I and are thereafter silenced during pachynema. X-miRNA silencing does not occur in mouse models with defective MSCI. Furthermore, X-miRNAs are expressed at pachynema when present as autosomally integrated transgenes. Thus, we conclude that silencing of X-miRNAs during pachynema in wild type males is MSCI-dependent. Importantly, misexpression of X-miRNAs during pachynema causes spermatogenic defects. We propose that MSCI represents a chromosomal mechanism by which X-miRNAs, and other potential X-encoded repressors, can be silenced, thereby regulating genes with critical late spermatogenic functions.

  15. Arrested rearrangement of TCR V[beta] genes in thymocytes from children with x-linked severe combined immunodeficiency disease

    SciTech Connect

    Sleasman, J.W.; Harville, T.O.; White, G.B.; Barrett, D.J. ); George, J.F. ); Goodenow, M.M. Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham, AL )

    1994-07-01

    Human X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID) is an immunodeficiency disorder in which T cell development is arrested in the thymic cortex. B lymphocytes in children with X-linked SCID seem to differentiate normally. X-linked SCID is associated with a mutation in the gene that encodes the IL-2R [gamma]-chain. Because TCR-[beta] gene recombination is a pivotal initial event in T lymphocyte onteogeny within the thymus, the authors hypothesized that a failure to express normal IL-2R[gamma] could lead to impaired TCR-[beta] gene recombination in early thymic development. PCR was used to determine the status of TCR-[beta] gene-segment rearrangements in thymic DNA that had been obtained from children with X-linked SCID. The initial step in TCR-[beta] gene rearrangement, that of D[beta] to J[beta] recombination, was readily detected in all thymus samples from children with X-linked SCID; in contrast, V[beta] to DJ[beta] gene rearrangements were undetectable in the same samples. Both D[beta] to J[beta] and V[beta] to DJ[beta] TCR genes were rearranged in the thymic tissues obtained from immunologically normal children. The authors conclude that TCR[beta]-chain gene rearrangement is arrested in children with X-linked SCID. The results suggest a causative relationship between the failure of TCR [beta]-chain gene arrangements to proceed beyond DJ[beta] rearrangements and the production of a nonfunctional IL-2R [gamma]-chain. 45 refs., 3 figs.

  16. 137 Hypogammaglobulinemia in a Boy: Consider Also X-linked Lymphoproliferative Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gamez, Luisa; Yamazaki, Marco Antonio; Espinosa, Sara; Lugo-Reyes, Saul; Hernandez, Victor

    2012-01-01

    Background X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) is a primary immunodeficiency presenting with a variety of clinical manifestations, the most common being dysgammaglobulinemia and B-cell lymphoma. The first gene causing XLP, when defective, was termed SH2D1A or SAP for signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM)-associated protein. The absence of SH2D1A leads to an overwhelming and uncontrolled TH1- shifted cytotoxic immune response, which might, at least in part, explain the severe clinical picture. A second gene, XIAP (X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis), was later identified. Methods An 8 year old Mexican boy was admitted in June 2008 for bronchopneumonia, with no previous history of recurrent or severe infections. He had a family history of a brother deceased at 7 years from fulminate hepatitis, who was diagnosed with agammaglobulinemia. A laboratory evaluation for primary immunodeficiency was made, including serum immunoglobulins: IgG 30 mg/dL, IgA <5 mg/dL IgM 8.6 mg/dL; and flow citometry for lymphocyte subpopulations: CD3+ 2590 mm3 (56%) CD4+ 1004 mm3 (42%), CD8+ 1267 mm3(53%) CD16/56 171mm3 (41%) CD19+ 1493 mm3 (35%). The patient was started on monthly intravenous gammaglobulin (IVIG) therapy. He was admitted in December 2008 with fever and severe abdominal pain; an exploratory laparotomy revealed a rectal-sigmoid tumor. The biopsy reported an atypical Burkitt lymphoma (Immunophenotype “B”: Bcl 2+, CD10+) with surgical margins negative for malignancy. Bone marrow aspirate and biopsy were negative for malignancy. In February 2009, management with chemotherapy was started with the diagnosis of Burkitt's lymphoma stage III. Patient received 6 courses of chemotherapy with complete response to induction; for consolidation, 4 doses of rituximab were given. PCR amplification and direct automated sequencing by the Sanger method was performed in both genes known to be responsible for XLP in chromosome X. Results A hemizygous splice-site deletion in SAP

  17. An X-linked homologue of the autosomal inprinted gene ZNF127 escapes X inactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Longstreet, M.; Nicholls, R.D.; Willard, H.F.

    1994-09-01

    The ZNF127 gene has been shown to be subject to parental imprinting in both humans and the mouse and maps to within the Prader-Willi/Angelman Syndrome critical region on chromosome 15. We have cloned two X-linked related loci, one of which, ZNFXp is a transcribed gene while the other, ZNFXq, is an untranscribed pseudogene. ZNFXp is 83.6% identical to ZNFXq and 65.4% identical to ZNF127 over 1.4 kb of open reading frame they share in common, Like ZNF127, the predicted protein sequence of ZNFXp contains a C{sub 3}HC{sub 4} zinc finger domain and C{sub 3}H zinc finger-like motifs. Whereas ZNF127 has three C{sub 3}H motifs, ZNFXp has four. A strong CpG island is located within 1 kb 5{prime} of the predicted amino terminus of ZNFXp. Expression of ZNFXp has been detected from mouse/human somatic cell hybrids containing either an active (n=2) or an inactive (n=4) chromosome, and thus escapes X inactivation. Probes made from the 3{prime} UTR of ZNFXp detect a number of related loci in both human and murine DNA, none of which is the ZNF127 locus on chromosome 15. None of the detectable murine bands shows dosage differences between males and females as would be expected for X-linked loci. This raises the possibility that ZNFXp inserted into the human X chromosome after its divergence from a common ancestor with the murine X. We have mapped ZNFXp to Xp11.4 by Southern blotting and PCR of hybrid DNAs and by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). ZNFXq maps within the X Inactivation Center (XIC) region on Xq13.2, approximately 300 kb distal to the XIST gene. We find it intriguing, and perhaps significant, that two members of this gene family are subject to epigenetic regulation -- one autosomal imprinting, and the other escape from X inactivation. These results could imply an evolutionary and mechanistic relationship between these two processes.

  18. Overexpression of X-linked genes in T cells from women with lupus.

    PubMed

    Hewagama, Anura; Gorelik, Gabriela; Patel, Dipak; Liyanarachchi, Punsisi; McCune, W Joseph; Somers, Emily; Gonzalez-Rivera, Tania; Strickland, Faith; Richardson, Bruce

    2013-03-01

    Women develop lupus more frequently than men and the reason remains incompletely understood. Evidence that men with Klinefelter's Syndrome (XXY) develop lupus at approximately the same rate as women suggests that a second X chromosome contributes. However, since the second X is normally inactivated, how it predisposes to lupus is unclear. DNA methylation contributes to the silencing of one X chromosome in women, and CD4+ T cell DNA demethylation contributes to the development of lupus-like autoimmunity. This suggests that demethylation of genes on the inactive X may predispose women to lupus, and this hypothesis is supported by a report that CD40LG, an immune gene encoded on the X chromosome, demethylates and is overexpressed in T cells from women but not men with lupus. Overexpression of other immune genes on the inactive X may also predispose women to this disease. We therefore compared mRNA and miRNA expression profiles in experimentally demethylated T cells from women and men as well as in T cells from women and men with lupus. T cells from healthy men and women were treated with the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-azacytidine, then X-linked mRNAs were surveyed with oligonucleotide arrays, and X-linked miRNA's surveyed with PCR arrays. CD40LG, CXCR3, OGT, miR-98, let-7f-2*, miR 188-3p, miR-421 and miR-503 were among the genes overexpressed in women relative to men. MiRNA target prediction analyses identified CBL, which downregulates T cell receptor signaling and is decreased in lupus T cells, as a gene targeted by miR-188-3p and miR-98. Transfection with miR-98 and miR-188-3p suppressed CBL expression. The same mRNA and miRNA transcripts were also demethylated and overexpressed in CD4+ T cells from women relative to men with active lupus. Together these results further support a role for X chromosome demethylation in the female predisposition to lupus.

  19. Overexpression of X-Linked Genes in T Cells From Women With Lupus

    PubMed Central

    Hewagama, Anura; Gorelik, Gabriela; Patel, Dipak; Liyanarachchi, Punsisi; McCune, W. Joseph; Somers, Emily; Gonzalez-Rivera, Tania; Strickland, Faith; Richardson, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Women develop lupus more frequently than men and the reason remains incompletely understood. Evidence that men with Klinefelter’s Syndrome (XXY) develop lupus at approximately the same rate as women suggests that a second X chromosome contributes. However, since the second X is normally inactivated, how it predisposes to lupus is unclear. DNA methylation contributes to the silencing of one X chromosome in women, and CD4+ T cell DNA demethylation contributes to the development of lupus-like autoimmunity. This suggests that demethylation of genes on the inactive X may predispose women to lupus, and this hypothesis is supported by a report that CD40LG, an immune gene encoded on the X chromosome, demethylates and is overexpressed in T cells from women but not men with lupus. Overexpression of other immune genes on the inactive X may also predispose women to this disease. We therefore compared mRNA and miRNA expression profiles in experimentally demethylated T cells from women and men as well as in T cells from women and men with lupus. T cells from healthy men and women were treated with the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-azacytidine, then X-linked mRNAs were surveyed with oligonucleotide arrays, and X-linked miRNA’s surveyed with PCR arrays. CD40LG, CXCR3, OGT, miR-98, let-7f-2*, miR 188-3p, miR-421 and miR-503 were among the genes overexpressed in women relative to men. MiRNA target prediction analyses identified CBL, which downregulates T cell receptor signaling and is decreased in lupus T cells, as a gene targeted by miR-188-3p and miR-98. Transfection with miR-98 and miR-188-3p suppressed CBL expression. The same mRNA and miRNA transcripts were also demethylated and overexpressed in CD4+ T cells from women relative to men with active lupus. Together these results further support a role for X chromosome demethylation in the female predisposition to lupus. PMID:23434382

  20. Canine hearing loss management.

    PubMed

    Scheifele, Lesa; Clark, John Greer; Scheifele, Peter M

    2012-11-01

    Dog owners and handlers are naturally concerned when suspicion of hearing loss arises for their dogs. Questions frequently asked of the veterinarian center on warning signs of canine hearing loss and what can be done for the dog if hearing loss is confirmed. This article addresses warning signs of canine hearing loss, communication training and safety awareness issues, and the feasibility of hearing aid amplification for dogs.

  1. Linkage mapping of a severe X-linked mental retardation syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Malmgren, H.; Sundvall, M.; Steen-Bondeson, M.L.; Pettersson, U. ); Dahl, N. University Hospital, Uppsala ); Gustavson, K.H.; Anneren, G.; Wadelius, C. )

    1993-06-01

    A four-generation Swedish family with a new type of X-linked mental retardation syndrome was recently reported by Gustavson et al. The complex syndrome includes microcephaly, severe mental retardation, optical atrophy with decreased vision or blindness, severe hearing defect, characteristic facial features, spasticity, seizures, and restricted joint motility. The patients die during infancy or early in childhood. Twenty-one family members, including two affected males, were available for study. Linkage analysis was conducted in the family by using 11 RFLP markers and 10 VNTR markers spread along the X chromosome. A hypervariable short tandem repeat of DXS294 at Xq26 showed a peak two-point lod score of 3.35 at zero recombination fraction. Calculations using the same markers revealed a multipoint peak lod score of 3.65 at DXS294. Crossover events with the centromeric marker DXS424 and the telomeric marker DXS297 delimit a probable region for the gene localization. It is noteworthy that the disease loci of two other syndromes with overlapping clinical manifestations recently were shown by Turner et al. and Pettigrew et al. to be linked to markers at Xq26. 29 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Regulation of X-linked gene expression during early mouse development by Rlim

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng; Shin, JongDae; Shea, Jeremy M; Yu, Jun; Bošković, Ana; Byron, Meg; Zhu, Xiaochun; Shalek, Alex K; Regev, Aviv; Lawrence, Jeanne B; Torres, Eduardo M; Zhu, Lihua J; Rando, Oliver J; Bach, Ingolf

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian X-linked gene expression is highly regulated as female cells contain two and male one X chromosome (X). To adjust the X gene dosage between genders, female mouse preimplantation embryos undergo an imprinted form of X chromosome inactivation (iXCI) that requires both Rlim (also known as Rnf12) and the long non-coding RNA Xist. Moreover, it is thought that gene expression from the single active X is upregulated to correct for bi-allelic autosomal (A) gene expression. We have combined mouse genetics with RNA-seq on single mouse embryos to investigate functions of Rlim on the temporal regulation of iXCI and Xist. Our results reveal crucial roles of Rlim for the maintenance of high Xist RNA levels, Xist clouds and X-silencing in female embryos at blastocyst stages, while initial Xist expression appears Rlim-independent. We find further that X/A upregulation is initiated in early male and female preimplantation embryos. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19127.001 PMID:27642011

  3. Mutational analysis of the PEX gene in patients with X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets.

    PubMed

    Holm, I A; Huang, X; Kunkel, L M

    1997-04-01

    X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets (HYP) is a dominant disorder characterized by renal phosphate wasting and abnormal vitamin D metabolism. PEX, the gene that is defective in HYP and is located on Xp22.1, is homologous to members of the neutral endopeptidase family. However, the complete coding sequence of the PEX cDNA, the structure of the PEX gene, and the role that PEX plays in phosphate transport remain unknown. We determined the genomic structure of the published PEX gene, which was found to be composed of 18 short exons, and demonstrated that the genomic organization of PEX shares homology to members of the family of neutral endopeptidases. Primer sets were designed from the intron sequence, to amplify each PEX exon from genomic DNA of HYP patients. Mutations in PEX were identified in 9/22 unrelated HYP patients, confirming that defects in PEX are responsible for HYP. The mutations detected included three nonsense mutations, a 1-bp deletion leading to a frameshift, a donor splice-site mutation, and missense mutations in four patients. Although the entire PEX gene has not been identified and some mutations may have been missed, the lack of detection of mutations in the remaining 13 patients, especially in 1 patient who has an apparently balanced, de novo 9;13 translocation, implies that there may be other loci involved in the generation of the HYP phenotype.

  4. Distribution of mutations in the PEX gene in families with X-linked hypophosphataemic rickets (HYP).

    PubMed

    Rowe, P S; Oudet, C L; Francis, F; Sinding, C; Pannetier, S; Econs, M J; Strom, T M; Meitinger, T; Garabedian, M; David, A; Macher, M A; Questiaux, E; Popowska, E; Pronicka, E; Read, A P; Mokrzycki, A; Glorieux, F H; Drezner, M K; Hanauer, A; Lehrach, H; Goulding, J N; O'Riordan, J L

    1997-04-01

    Mutations in the PEX gene at Xp22.1 (phosphate-regulating gene with homologies to endopeptidases, on the X-chromosome), are responsible for X-linked hypophosphataemic rickets (HYP). Homology of PEX to the M13 family of Zn2+ metallopeptidases which include neprilysin (NEP) as prototype, has raised important questions regarding PEX function at the molecular level. The aim of this study was to analyse 99 HYP families for PEX gene mutations, and to correlate predicted changes in the protein structure with Zn2+ metallopeptidase gene function. Primers flanking 22 characterised exons were used to amplify DNA by PCR, and SSCP was then used to screen for mutations. Deletions, insertions, nonsense mutations, stop codons and splice mutations occurred in 83% of families screened for in all 22 exons, and 51% of a separate set of families screened in 17 PEX gene exons. Missense mutations in four regions of the gene were informative regarding function, with one mutation in the Zn2+-binding site predicted to alter substrate enzyme interaction and catalysis. Computer analysis of the remaining mutations predicted changes in secondary structure, N-glycosylation, protein phosphorylation and catalytic site molecular structure. The wide range of mutations that align with regions required for protease activity in NEP suggests that PEX also functions as a protease, and may act by processing factor(s) involved in bone mineral metabolism.

  5. Mapping of the X-linked agammaglobulinemia locus by use of restriction fragment-length polymorphism.

    PubMed Central

    Kwan, S P; Kunkel, L; Bruns, G; Wedgwood, R J; Latt, S; Rosen, F S

    1986-01-01

    A molecular linkage analysis in 11 families with X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) localized the XLA gene to the proximal part of the long arm of the human X chromosome. Significant linkage was detected between XLA and loci defined by two polymorphic DNA probes called 19-2 for the DXS3 locus and S21 for the DXS17 locus. Both localize to the region Xq21.3-Xq22. Most likely recombination distances (theta) and associated logarithm of the odds (lod) scores for the XLA-DXS3 and XLA-DXS17 pairs were theta = 0.04 morgans (lod, 3.65) and theta = 0 (lod, 2.17), respectively. Tight linkage between XLA and the locus DXS43 defined by the X short arm probe D2 (localized to Xp22-Xp21) was strongly excluded and we obtained no evidence for significant linkage between XLA and any other X short arm probe. The probe pair 19-2 and S21 should be informative for molecular linkage-based analysis of XLA segregation in the majority of families afflicted with this disorder. Images PMID:3003164

  6. Diagnosis of X-linked lymphoproliferative disease by analysis of SLAM-associated protein expression.

    PubMed

    Gilmour, K C; Cranston, T; Jones, A; Davies, E G; Goldblatt, D; Thrasher, A; Kinnon, C; Nichols, K E; Gaspar, H B

    2000-06-01

    X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) is an inherited immunodeficiency in which affected boys show abnormal responses to Epstein-Barr virus infection. The gene defective in XLP has been identified and designated SH2D1A and encodes a protein termed SLAM-associated protein (SAP). Mutation analysis in individuals with typical XLP presentations and family histories has only detected abnormalities in approximately 60% of patients. Thus, genetic analysis alone cannot confirm a diagnosis of XLP We have developed a SAP expression assay that can be used as a diagnostic indicator of XLP We show that SAP is constitutively expressed in normal individuals, in patients with severe sepsis and in patients with other primary immunodeficiencies. In six XLP patients, four with classical and two with atypical presentations, SAP expression was absent. In the latter two, who were previously assigned as having common variable immunodeficiency (CVID), the diagnosis of XLP was initially made using the protein expression assay. In two further patients in whom no mutation could be detected by genetic analysis, lack of SAP expression strongly suggests that these individuals have XLP. We therefore suggest that XLP should be suspected in certain boys previously diagnosed as having CVID and recommend that patients are investigated both by genetic analysis of SH2D1A and by expression of SAP protein.

  7. Gene Therapy for X-Linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency: Where Do We Stand?

    PubMed Central

    Cavazzana, Marina; Six, Emmanuelle; Lagresle-Peyrou, Chantal; André-Schmutz, Isabelle; Hacein-Bey-Abina, Salima

    2016-01-01

    More than 20 years ago, X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1) appeared to be the best condition to test the feasibility of hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy. The seminal SCID-X1 clinical studies, based on first-generation gammaretroviral vectors, demonstrated good long-term immune reconstitution in most treated patients despite the occurrence of vector-related leukemia in a few of them. This gene therapy has successfully enabled correction of the T cell defect. Natural killer and B cell defects were only partially restored, most likely due to the absence of a conditioning regimen. The success of these pioneering trials paved the way for the extension of gene-based treatment to many other diseases of the hematopoietic system, but the unfortunate serious adverse events led to extensive investigations to define the retrovirus integration profiles. This review puts into perspective the clinical experience of gene therapy for SCID-X1, with the development and implementation of new generations of safer vectors such as self-inactivating gammaretroviral or lentiviral vectors as well as major advances in integrome knowledge. PMID:26790362

  8. Gene Therapy Model of X-linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency Using a Modified Foamy Virus Vector

    PubMed Central

    Horino, Satoshi; Uchiyama, Toru; So, Takanori; Nagashima, Hiroyuki; Sun, Shu-lan; Sato, Miki; Asao, Atsuko; Haji, Yoichi; Sasahara, Yoji; Candotti, Fabio; Tsuchiya, Shigeru; Kure, Shigeo; Sugamura, Kazuo; Ishii, Naoto

    2013-01-01

    X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1) is an inherited genetic immunodeficiency associated with mutations in the common cytokine receptor γ chain (γc) gene, and characterized by a complete defect of T and natural killer (NK) cells. Gene therapy for SCID-X1 using conventional retroviral (RV) vectors carrying the γc gene results in the successful reconstitution of T cell immunity. However, the high incidence of vector-mediated T cell leukemia, caused by vector insertion near or within cancer-related genes has been a serious problem. In this study, we established a gene therapy model of mouse SCID-X1 using a modified foamy virus (FV) vector expressing human γc. Analysis of vector integration in a human T cell line demonstrated that the FV vector integration sites were significantly less likely to be located within or near transcriptional start sites than RV vector integration sites. To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy, bone marrow cells from γc-knockout (γc-KO) mice were infected with the FV vector and transplanted into γc-KO mice. Transplantation of the FV-treated cells resulted in the successful reconstitution of functionally active T and B cells. These data suggest that FV vectors can be effective and may be safer than conventional RV vectors for gene therapy for SCID-X1. PMID:23990961

  9. Gene/cell therapy approaches for Immune Dysregulation Polyendocrinopathy Enteropathy X-linked syndrome.

    PubMed

    Passerini, Laura; Santoni de Sio, Francesca R; Porteus, Matthew H; Bacchetta, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    Immune dysregulation, Polyendocrinopathy, Enteropathy, X-linked (IPEX) syndrome is a rare autoimmune disease due to mutations in the gene encoding for Forkhead box P3 (FOXP3), a transcription factor fundamental for the function of thymus-derived (t) regulatory T (Treg) cells. The dysfunction of Treg cells results in the development of devastating autoimmune manifestations affecting multiple organs, eventually leading to premature death in infants, if not promptly treated by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Novel gene therapy strategies can be developed for IPEX syndrome as more definitive cure than allogeneic HSCT. Here we describe the therapeutic approaches, alternative to HSCT, currently under development. We described that effector T cells can be converted in regulatory T cells by LV-mediated FOXP3-gene transfer in differentiated T lymphocytes. Despite FOXP3 mutations mainly affect a highly specific T cell subset, manipulation of stem cells could be required for long-term remission of the disease. Therefore, we believe that a more comprehensive strategy should aim at correcting FOXP3-mutated stem cells. Potentials and hurdles of both strategies will be highlighted here.

  10. Immunohistochemical detection of antiapoptotic protein X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis in mammary carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Jaffer, Shabnam; Orta, Lurmag; Sunkara, Srinivas; Sabo, Edmond; Burstein, David E

    2007-06-01

    An immunohistochemical survey of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) expression in mammary carcinoma was performed. XIAP, the most potent of the inhibitor of apoptosis family of caspase inhibitors, has been linked to tumor aggressiveness and therapeutic resistance in several malignancies and is considered an attractive target for cancer drug discovery. Routinely processed sections from 94 ductal carcinomas, 9 lobular carcinomas, and 10 ductal carcinomas with lobular components or features were subjected to citrate-based antigen retrieval, immunostained with anti-XIAP (BD Biosciences, Franklin Lakes, NJ), Envision+ reagents (Dako, Carpinteria, CA), and diaminobenzidine. Positive staining was found in 22.7% of grade 1, 44% of grade 2, and 89.5% of grade 3 ductal carcinomas. Strong staining occurred in no cases of grade 1, 13% of grade 2, and 55.2% of grade 3 ductal carcinomas. XIAP staining increased overall with grade of ductal carcinoma in situ as well. The staining intensity of invasive carcinoma correlated with that of the corresponding ductal carcinoma in situ in 70% of cases. Ductal carcinomas overall showed more staining than lobular carcinomas. XIAP is most strongly and commonly detected in grade 3 ductal carcinoma. The degree of XIAP expression appears frequently to be determined in the preinvasive intraductal phase of tumorigenesis. These findings suggest a possible role of XIAP in the more aggressive clinical behavior of grade 3, compared with lower-grade ductal carcinomas.

  11. The brain expressed x-linked gene 1 (Bex1) regulates myoblast fusion

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Feng; Kuang, Shihuan

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle development (myogenesis) is a complex but precisely orchestrated process involving spatiotemporal regulation of the proliferation, differentiation and fusion of myogenic progenitor cells (myoblasts). Here we identify brain expressed x-linked gene 1 (Bex1) as a transient, developmentally regulated gene involved in myoblast fusion. Bex1 expression is undetectable in adult muscles or in quiescent muscle stem cells (satellite cells). During embryonic myogenesis, however, Bex1 is robustly expressed by myogenin+ differentiating myoblasts, but not by Pax7+ proliferating myoblasts. Interestingly, Bex1 is initially localized in the cytoplasm and then translocates into the nucleus. During adult muscle regeneration, Bex1 is highly expressed in newly regenerated myofibers and the expression is rapidly downregulated during maturation. Consistently, in cultured myoblasts, Bex1 is not expressed at the proliferation stage but transiently expressed upon induction of myogenic differentiation, following a similar cytoplasm to nucleus translocation pattern as seen in vivo. Using gain- and loss-of-function studies, we found that overexpression of Bex1 promotes the fusion of primary myoblasts without affecting myogenic differentiation and myogenin expression. Conversely, Bex1 knockout myoblasts exhibit obvious fusion defects, even though they express normal levels of myogenin and differentiate normally. These results elucidate a novel role of Bex1 in myogenesis through regulating myoblast fusion. PMID:26586200

  12. Parents of childhood X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy: high risk for depression and neurosis.

    PubMed

    Kuratsubo, Izumi; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Shimozawa, Nobuyuki; Kondo, Naomi

    2008-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess mental health in parents of patients with the childhood cerebral form of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (CCALD) and to investigate factors relating to psychological problems in order to improve clinical management and quality of life. Sixteen fathers and 21 mothers of patients with CCALD completed a battery of psychological examinations including the Beck Depression Inventory second edition (BDI-II), the General Health Questionnaire 60 (GHQ60), and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). Three fathers and 11 mothers showed high scores on the BDI-II, suggesting that they were in a depressive state. Depression in the mothers was serious as compared with previous reports. Six fathers and 11 mothers were considered to be in a state of neurosis, according to the results of the GHQ60. Four fathers and 8 mothers showed high levels of anxiety on the STAI. Health and social status of the mothers correlated with their mental health, and younger mothers with young patients tended to be more depressed. Thus, parents of patients with CCALD have a high risk of depression and neurosis. Understanding the mental state of these parents and improvements in the social support system including mental counseling, home nursing care, supports in workplace and community are necessary to prevent and treat psychological problems. Especially, early intervention for mental health problems should be provided for younger mothers with few years since the child's diagnosis.

  13. Expression of X-linked Inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein in Neoplastic Thyroid Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Yim, Ji Hye; Kim, Sun A; Kim, Won Gu; Jeon, Min Ji; Han, Ji Min; Sung, Tae Yon; Kim, Tae Yong; Kim, Won Bae; Hong, Suck Joon; Shong, Young Kee; Gong, Gyungyub

    2011-01-01

    X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) is associated with tumor genesis, growth, progression and metastasis, and acts by blocking caspase-mediated apoptosis. In the present study, we sought to evaluate the expression patterns of XIAP in various neoplastic thyroid disorders and determine the association between XIAP expression and clinicopathologic factors. Expression of XIAP was evaluated with immunohistochemical staining using monoclonal anti-XIAP in 164 specimens of conventional papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) and 53 specimens of other malignant or benign thyroid tumors. XIAP positivity was observed in 128 (78%) of the 164 conventional PTC specimens. Positive rates of XIAP expression in follicular variant PTC, follicular, medullary, poorly differentiated, and anaplastic thyroid carcinoma specimens were 20%, 25%, 38%, 67%, and 38%, respectively. Six nodular hyperplasia specimens were negative and 1 of 7 follicular adenomas (8%) was positive for XIAP. Lateral neck lymph node metastases were more frequent in patients negative for XIAP expression (P = 0.01). Immunohistochemical staining for XIAP as a novel molecular marker may thus be helpful in the differential diagnosis of thyroid cancer. Moreover, high XIAP expression in conventional PTC is strongly associated with reduced risk of lateral neck lymph node metastasis. PMID:21935275

  14. Lentiviral hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    De Ravin, Suk See; Wu, Xiaolin; Moir, Susan; Anaya-O'Brien, Sandra; Kwatemaa, Nana; Littel, Patricia; Theobald, Narda; Choi, Uimook; Su, Ling; Marquesen, Martha; Hilligoss, Dianne; Lee, Janet; Buckner, Clarissa M; Zarember, Kol A; O'Connor, Geraldine; McVicar, Daniel; Kuhns, Douglas; Throm, Robert E; Zhou, Sheng; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Hanson, I Celine; Cowan, Mort J; Kang, Elizabeth; Hadigan, Coleen; Meagher, Michael; Gray, John T; Sorrentino, Brian P; Malech, Harry L

    2016-04-20

    X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1) is a profound deficiency of T, B, and natural killer (NK) cell immunity caused by mutations inIL2RGencoding the common chain (γc) of several interleukin receptors. Gamma-retroviral (γRV) gene therapy of SCID-X1 infants without conditioning restores T cell immunity without B or NK cell correction, but similar treatment fails in older SCID-X1 children. We used a lentiviral gene therapy approach to treat five SCID-X1 patients with persistent immune dysfunction despite haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplant in infancy. Follow-up data from two older patients demonstrate that lentiviral vector γc transduced autologous HSC gene therapy after nonmyeloablative busulfan conditioning achieves selective expansion of gene-marked T, NK, and B cells, which is associated with sustained restoration of humoral responses to immunization and clinical improvement at 2 to 3 years after treatment. Similar gene marking levels have been achieved in three younger patients, albeit with only 6 to 9 months of follow-up. Lentiviral gene therapy with reduced-intensity conditioning appears safe and can restore humoral immune function to posthaploidentical transplant older patients with SCID-X1.

  15. Gene therapy model of X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency using a modified foamy virus vector.

    PubMed

    Horino, Satoshi; Uchiyama, Toru; So, Takanori; Nagashima, Hiroyuki; Sun, Shu-Lan; Sato, Miki; Asao, Atsuko; Haji, Yoichi; Sasahara, Yoji; Candotti, Fabio; Tsuchiya, Shigeru; Kure, Shigeo; Sugamura, Kazuo; Ishii, Naoto

    2013-01-01

    X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1) is an inherited genetic immunodeficiency associated with mutations in the common cytokine receptor γ chain (γc) gene, and characterized by a complete defect of T and natural killer (NK) cells. Gene therapy for SCID-X1 using conventional retroviral (RV) vectors carrying the γc gene results in the successful reconstitution of T cell immunity. However, the high incidence of vector-mediated T cell leukemia, caused by vector insertion near or within cancer-related genes has been a serious problem. In this study, we established a gene therapy model of mouse SCID-X1 using a modified foamy virus (FV) vector expressing human γc. Analysis of vector integration in a human T cell line demonstrated that the FV vector integration sites were significantly less likely to be located within or near transcriptional start sites than RV vector integration sites. To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy, bone marrow cells from γc-knockout (γc-KO) mice were infected with the FV vector and transplanted into γc-KO mice. Transplantation of the FV-treated cells resulted in the successful reconstitution of functionally active T and B cells. These data suggest that FV vectors can be effective and may be safer than conventional RV vectors for gene therapy for SCID-X1.

  16. Regulation of X-linked gene expression during early mouse development by Rlim.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Shin, JongDae; Shea, Jeremy M; Yu, Jun; Bošković, Ana; Byron, Meg; Zhu, Xiaochun; Shalek, Alex K; Regev, Aviv; Lawrence, Jeanne B; Torres, Eduardo M; Zhu, Lihua J; Rando, Oliver J; Bach, Ingolf

    2016-09-19

    Mammalian X-linked gene expression is highly regulated as female cells contain two and male one X chromosome (X). To adjust the X gene dosage between genders, female mouse preimplantation embryos undergo an imprinted form of X chromosome inactivation (iXCI) that requires both Rlim (also known as Rnf12) and the long non-coding RNA Xist. Moreover, it is thought that gene expression from the single active X is upregulated to correct for bi-allelic autosomal (A) gene expression. We have combined mouse genetics with RNA-seq on single mouse embryos to investigate functions of Rlim on the temporal regulation of iXCI and Xist. Our results reveal crucial roles of Rlim for the maintenance of high Xist RNA levels, Xist clouds and X-silencing in female embryos at blastocyst stages, while initial Xist expression appears Rlim-independent. We find further that X/A upregulation is initiated in early male and female preimplantation embryos.

  17. A Mouse Model of X-linked Intellectual Disability Associated with Impaired Removal of Histone Methylation.

    PubMed

    Iwase, Shigeki; Brookes, Emily; Agarwal, Saurabh; Badeaux, Aimee I; Ito, Hikaru; Vallianatos, Christina N; Tomassy, Giulio Srubek; Kasza, Tomas; Lin, Grace; Thompson, Andrew; Gu, Lei; Kwan, Kenneth Y; Chen, Chinfei; Sartor, Maureen A; Egan, Brian; Xu, Jun; Shi, Yang

    2016-02-09

    Mutations in a number of chromatin modifiers are associated with human neurological disorders. KDM5C, a histone H3 lysine 4 di- and tri-methyl (H3K4me2/3)-specific demethylase, is frequently mutated in X-linked intellectual disability (XLID) patients. Here, we report that disruption of the mouse Kdm5c gene recapitulates adaptive and cognitive abnormalities observed in XLID, including impaired social behavior, memory deficits, and aggression. Kdm5c-knockout brains exhibit abnormal dendritic arborization, spine anomalies, and altered transcriptomes. In neurons, Kdm5c is recruited to promoters that harbor CpG islands decorated with high levels of H3K4me3, where it fine-tunes H3K4me3 levels. Kdm5c predominantly represses these genes, which include members of key pathways that regulate the development and function of neuronal circuitries. In summary, our mouse behavioral data strongly suggest that KDM5C mutations are causal to XLID. Furthermore, our findings suggest that loss of KDM5C function may impact gene expression in multiple regulatory pathways relevant to the clinical phenotypes.

  18. GPR143 mutational analysis in two Italian families with X-linked ocular albinism.

    PubMed

    Micale, Lucia; Augello, Bartolomeo; Fusco, Carmela; Turturo, Maria Giuseppina; Granatiero, Matteo; Piemontese, Maria Rosaria; Zelante, Leopoldo; Cecconi, Antonella; Merla, Giuseppe

    2009-08-01

    X-linked ocular albinism type 1 (OA1) is caused by mutations in G protein-coupled receptor 143 (GPR143) gene, which encodes a membrane glycoprotein localized to melanosomes. GPR143 mainly affects pigment production in the eye, resulting in optic changes associated with albinism, including hypopigmentation of the retina, nystagmus, strabismus, foveal hypoplasia, abnormal crossing of the optic fibers, and reduced visual acuity. We report the mutational analysis of the GPR143 gene on two unrelated families with OA1 using direct sequencing and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. We identified the c.564_565delCT, a 2-bp deletion in family 1, and we mapped the breakpoints at nucleotide level of the novel intragenic deletion g.5360_6371del1012, encompassing exon 2, in family 2. Our results confirm that GPR143 is the major locus for OA1 and that exon 2 is a region of high susceptibility to deletions. Finally, we emphasize the quantitative polymerase chain reaction as a valid tool for diagnosis of deletions in the GPR143 gene.

  19. X-linked macrocytic dyserythropoietic anemia in females with an ALAS2 mutation

    PubMed Central

    Sankaran, Vijay G.; Ulirsch, Jacob C.; Tchaikovskii, Vassili; Ludwig, Leif S.; Wakabayashi, Aoi; Kadirvel, Senkottuvelan; Lindsley, R. Coleman; Bejar, Rafael; Shi, Jiahai; Lovitch, Scott B.; Bishop, David F.; Steensma, David P.

    2015-01-01

    Macrocytic anemia with abnormal erythropoiesis is a common feature of megaloblastic anemias, congenital dyserythropoietic anemias, and myelodysplastic syndromes. Here, we characterized a family with multiple female individuals who have macrocytic anemia. The proband was noted to have dyserythropoiesis and iron overload. After an extensive diagnostic evaluation that did not provide insight into the cause of the disease, whole-exome sequencing of multiple family members revealed the presence of a mutation in the X chromosomal gene ALAS2, which encodes 5′-aminolevulinate synthase 2, in the affected females. We determined that this mutation (Y365C) impairs binding of the essential cofactor pyridoxal 5′-phosphate to ALAS2, resulting in destabilization of the enzyme and consequent loss of function. X inactivation was not highly skewed in wbc from the affected individuals. In contrast, and consistent with the severity of the ALAS2 mutation, there was a complete skewing toward expression of the WT allele in mRNA from reticulocytes that could be recapitulated in primary erythroid cultures. Together, the results of the X inactivation and mRNA studies illustrate how this X-linked dominant mutation in ALAS2 can perturb normal erythropoiesis through cell-nonautonomous effects. Moreover, our findings highlight the value of whole-exome sequencing in diagnostically challenging cases for the identification of disease etiology and extension of the known phenotypic spectrum of disease. PMID:25705881

  20. X-linked deafness: De novo deletion of a cosmid using dosage studies

    SciTech Connect

    Bitner-Glindzicz, M.; Pembrey, M.E.; deKok, Y.

    1994-09-01

    We have used three polymorphic microsatellite repeats at Xq21, (DXS986, DXS995 and DXS1002) to test for linkage in families with X-linked deafness. Close linkage was demonstrated between all three markers and the disease locus in families with and without a bony abnormality on the CT scan. DXS995 gave a maximum two point lod score of l0.37 with no recombinations. This marker was used to type an additional small sibship. Analysis showed that the two brothers, one deaf and one hearing, both inherited the same maternal allele indicating either the first recombination seen to date or a de novo mutation in the proband. Using a cosmid from the critical region, a deletion was detected in the proband of this sibship. By using a phoshorimager, dosage of an EcoR1 fragment from this cosmid and a control probe was compared to normal subjects and obligate carriers from another family with a similar deletion. Results show that the mother of this isolated case does not carry the deletion, confirming that it is de novo. These markers may be useful for carrier ascertainment in families with a radiological change on CT scan or a pedigree which is linked to Xq21.

  1. How many X-linked genes for non-specific mental retardation (MRX) are there?

    SciTech Connect

    Gedeon, A.K.; Donnelly, A.J.; Mulley, J.C.

    1996-07-12

    X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) is that proportion of mental retardation (MR) showing the distinctive pattern of inheritance associated with the X chromosome. XLMR is subdivided into syndromal and non-specific (MRX) forms. MRX is clinically homogeneous but genetically heterogeneous. Affected males in families segregating MRX have no consistent phenotypic expression apart from their MR to distinguish them from unaffected males or affected males in other MRX families. Syndromal MRs have additional neurological or phenotypic characteristics that define a syndrome, and most of these syndromes are rare. Within some families an affected male may show {open_quotes}soft{close_quotes} syndromal signs, but where this is not evident in other affected males from the same family, the MR is diagnosed as non-specific. Delineation from fragile X syndrome or FRAXE MR can now be confidently made with the aid of direct molecular tests which detect the (CCG){sub n} expansion at either FRAXA or FRAXE. MRX can be expressed in carrier females but with milder manifestations. The gene in such cases could be partially dominant or result from a skewed X-inactivation pattern in neural tissue. 39 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  2. {open_quotes}Unspecific{close_quotes} X-linked mental retardation: Clinical, genetic and molecular studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ropers, H.H.; Maacel, S. van der; Knoers, N.

    1994-09-01

    Previous linkage studies have assigned a gene for non-syndromic X-linked mental retardation (XMR) to at least 8 different regions on the X-chromosome. The fragile X-syndrome (FRAXA) does not account for more than 40% of all cases; in most XMR families early diagnosis and prevention is not possible. As part of a systematic study into {open_quotes}unspecific{close_quotes} XMR involving more than 30 non-FRAXA families, linkage studies have enabled us to map the respective genes in 4 families to the Xp11.4-q12 interval with peak lod scores around the ALAS2 locus. In three other families, the gene defect could be assigned to the KAL-DMD, DXS424-FRAXAC2 and DSX52-Xqter intervals, respectively. In one of these families, small stature due to growth hormone deficiency was observed as a distinctive clinical feature. Molecular cloning of the breakpoint in a mentally retarded girl with a balanced t(Xq13;13q) translocation has enabled us to isolate an X-chromosomal gene which is disrupted in this patient and is highly expressed in brain. YAC cloning strategies are being employed to clone another XMR gene, which has been identified previously in the vicinity of the CHM locus and genes involved in mentally retarded patients with two different inversions, inv(X)(q21p11) and inv(X)(p21q24), respectively.

  3. Females with a disorder phenotypically identical to X-linked agammaglobulinemia

    SciTech Connect

    Conley, M.E. ); Sweinberg, S.K. )

    1992-03-01

    Clinical and laboratory findings in two girls with a disorder phenotypically indistinguishable from typical X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) are described. To examine the possibility that subtle defects in the X chromosome might explain the findings, detailed genetic studies were performed on one of these patients. Cytogenetic studies showed a normal 46XX karyotype. Southern blot analysis of her DNA showed that she had inherited a maternal and a paternal allele at sites flanking the locus for typical XLA at Xq22, making a microdeletion or uniparental disomy unlikely. To determine whether both of her X chromosomes could function as the active X, somatic-cell hybrids that selectively retained the active X were produced from her activated T cells. A normal random pattern of X inactivation was seen. Of 21 T-cell hybrids, 3 retained both X chromosomes, 7 had one X as the active X, and 11 had the other X as the active X. The authors have interpreted these studies as indicating that there is an autosomal recessive disorder that is phenotypically identical to XLA.

  4. Cerebral X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy: the international hematopoietic cell transplantation experience from 1982 to 1999.

    PubMed

    Peters, Charles; Charnas, Lawrence R; Tan, Ye; Ziegler, Richard S; Shapiro, Elsa G; DeFor, Todd; Grewal, Satkiran S; Orchard, Paul J; Abel, Susan L; Goldman, Anne I; Ramsay, Norma K C; Dusenbery, Kathryn E; Loes, Daniel J; Lockman, Lawrence A; Kato, Shunichi; Aubourg, Patrick R; Moser, Hugo W; Krivit, William

    2004-08-01

    Cerebral X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a disorder of very-long-chain fatty acid metabolism, adrenal insufficiency, and cerebral demyelination. Death occurs within 2 to 5 years of clinical onset without hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). One hundred twenty-six boys with X-ALD received HCT from 1982 to 1999. Survival, engraftment, and acute graft-versus-host disease were studied. Degree of disability associated with neurologic and neuropsychological function and cerebral demyelination were evaluated before and after HCT. Complete data were available and analyzed for 94 boys with cerebral X-ALD. The estimated 5- and 8-year survival was 56%. The leading cause of death was disease progression. Donor-derived engraftment occurred in 86% of patients. Demyelination involved parietal-occipital lobes in 90%, leading to visual and auditory processing deficits in many boys. Overall 5-year survival of 92% in patients with 0 or 1 neurologic deficits and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) severity score less than 9 before HCT was superior to survival for all others (45%; P <.01). Baseline neurologic and neuropsychological function, degree of disability, and neuroradiologic status predicted outcomes following HCT. In this first comprehensive report of the international HCT experience for X-ALD, we conclude that boys with early-stage disease benefit from HCT, whereas boys with advanced disease may be candidates for experimental therapies.

  5. Genetic analysis and clinical features of X-linked retinoschisis in Chinese patients

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Qin-rui; Huang, Lv-zhen; Chen, Xiao-li; Xia, Hui-ka; Li, Tian-qi; Li, Xiao-xin

    2017-01-01

    Many mutations in the retinoschisis (RS1) gene have been identified, but there are limited clinical data relating to the different genotypes. This study investigated the genotype, clinical phenotype and therapies for X-linked juvenile retinoschisis (XLRS) patients in China to evaluate the effects of gene mutations and therapies on the prognosis of the disease. Thirty patients were recruited in the study. Genetic examination identified 8 novel RS1 gene mutations. Twenty-four patients were identified as missense mutation, which was the most common gene mutation in XLRS patients. Amino acids 102 and 209 were the most common mutation areas, accounting for a total 35.7% of all patients. Mutations affecting amino acid 102 were associated with poor results on the flash electroretinogram (ERG). Sixteen patients had various complications. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) drugs were given to four patients with hemorrhage or other complications, and serious adverse events did not occur. Our outcome demonstrates that missense mutation was the leading cause of XLRS and more than half of the patients with this missense had various complications. Anti-VEGF drugs may be an effective and safe way to prevent deterioration of XLRS with certain complications. There is wide genotypic and phenotypic variability in Chinese patients with XLRS. PMID:28272453

  6. EIF2S3 Mutations Associated with Severe X-Linked Intellectual Disability Syndrome MEHMO.

    PubMed

    Skopkova, Martina; Hennig, Friederike; Shin, Byung-Sik; Turner, Clesson E; Stanikova, Daniela; Brennerova, Katarina; Stanik, Juraj; Fischer, Ute; Henden, Lyndal; Müller, Ulrich; Steinberger, Daniela; Leshinsky-Silver, Esther; Bottani, Armand; Kurdiova, Timea; Ukropec, Jozef; Nyitrayova, Olga; Kolnikova, Miriam; Klimes, Iwar; Borck, Guntram; Bahlo, Melanie; Haas, Stefan A; Kim, Joo-Ran; Lotspeich-Cole, Leda E; Gasperikova, Daniela; Dever, Thomas E; Kalscheuer, Vera M

    2017-04-01

    Impairment of translation initiation and its regulation within the integrated stress response (ISR) and related unfolded-protein response has been identified as a cause of several multisystemic syndromes. Here, we link MEHMO syndrome, whose genetic etiology was unknown, to this group of disorders. MEHMO is a rare X-linked syndrome characterized by profound intellectual disability, epilepsy, hypogonadism and hypogenitalism, microcephaly, and obesity. We have identified a C-terminal frameshift mutation (Ile465Serfs) in the EIF2S3 gene in three families with MEHMO syndrome and a novel maternally inherited missense EIF2S3 variant (c.324T>A; p.Ser108Arg) in another male patient with less severe clinical symptoms. The EIF2S3 gene encodes the γ subunit of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2), crucial for initiation of protein synthesis and regulation of the ISR. Studies in patient fibroblasts confirm increased ISR activation due to the Ile465Serfs mutation and functional assays in yeast demonstrate that the Ile465Serfs mutation impairs eIF2γ function to a greater extent than tested missense mutations, consistent with the more severe clinical phenotype of the Ile465Serfs male mutation carriers. Thus, we propose that more severe EIF2S3 mutations cause the full MEHMO phenotype, while less deleterious mutations cause a milder form of the syndrome with only a subset of the symptoms.

  7. X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy: correlation between Loes score and diffusion tensor imaging parameters

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Sergio Eiji; de Carvalho Neto, Arnolfo; Gasparetto, Emerson Leandro; Coelho, Luiz Otávio de Mattos; Escuissato, Dante Luiz; Bonfim, Carmem Maria Sales; Ribeiro, Lisandro Lima

    2014-01-01

    Objective The present study was aimed at evaluating the correlation between diffusion tensor imaging parameters and Loes score as well as whether those parameters could indicate early structural alterations. Materials and Methods Diffusion tensor imaging measurements were obtained in 30 studies of 14 patients with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy and were correlated with Loes scores. A control group including 28 male patients was created to establish agematched diffusion tensor imaging measurements. Inter- and intraobserver statistical analyses were undertaken. Results Diffusion tensor imaging measurements presented strong Pearson correlation coefficients (r) of –0.86, 0.89, 0.89 and 0.84 for fractional anisotropy and mean, radial and axial diffusivities (p < 0.01). Analysis of changes in diffusion tensor measurements at early stage of the disease indicates that mean and radial diffusivities might be useful to predict the disease progression. Conclusion Measurements of diffusion tensor parameters can be used as an adjunct to the Loes score, aiding in the monitoring of the disease and alerting for possible Loes score progression in the range of interest for therapeutic decisions. PMID:25741116

  8. X-Linked Retinoschisis in Juveniles: Follow-Up by Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Qin-rui; Huang, Lv-zhen; Xia, Hui-ka; Li, Tian-qi

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. To explore the structural progression of X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) in patients by using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Design. Retrospective, observational study. Methods. Patients who were diagnosed with XLRS by genetic testing underwent comprehensive ophthalmological examinations from December 2014 to October 2016. Each eye was measured by SD-OCT using the same clinical protocol. A correlation between best-corrected visual acuity (VA) and SD-OCT measurements was observed. Results. Six patients demonstrated retinoschisis (12 eyes) and typical foveal cyst-like cavities (10 eyes) on SD-OCT images with a mean logMAR VA of 0.48. The median age was 7.5 years at the initial visit. Their foveal retinal thickness (516.9 μm) and choroid thickness (351.4 μm) decreased at a rate of 38.1 and 7.5 μm, respectively, at the 10.5-month follow-up visit; however, there were no significant differences (P = 0.622 and P = 0.406, resp.). There was no significant correlation between VA, the foveal retinal thickness, and subfoveal choroid thickness. Conclusions. SD-OCT images for XLRS patients during the juvenile period revealed no significant changes in the fundus structure, including the foveal retinal thickness and choroid thickness within one-year follow-up. There was a lack of correlation between VA, foveal retinal thickness, and subfoveal choroid thickness. PMID:28286756

  9. Genetic mapping of X-linked ocular albinism: Linkage analysis in a large Newfoundland kindred

    SciTech Connect

    Charles, S.J.; Moore, A.T.; Barton, D.E.; Yates, J.R.W. ); Green, J.S. )

    1993-04-01

    Genetic linkage studies in a large Newfoundland family affected by X-linked ocular albinism (OA1) showed linkage to markers from Xp22.3. One recombinant mapped the disease proximal to DXS143 (dic56) and two recombinants mapped the disease distal to DXS85 (782). Combining the data with that from 16 British families previously published confirmed close linkage between OA1 and DXS143 (dic56; Z[sub max] = 21.96 at [theta] = 0.01, confidence interval (CI) 0.0005--0.05) and linkage to DXS85 (782; Z[sub max] = 17.60 at [theta] = 0.07, CI = 0.03--0.13) and DXS237 (GMGX9; Z[sub max] = 15.20 at [theta] = 0.08, CI = 0.03--0.15). Multipoint analysis (LINKMAP) gave the most likely order as Xpter-XG-DXS237-DXS143-OA1-DXS85, with odds of 48:1 over the order Xpter-XG-DXS237-OA1-DXS143-DXS85, and odds exceeding 10[sup 10]:1 over other locations for the disease locus. 11 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  10. Phenotypic variability in X-linked ocular albinism: Relationship to linkage genotypes

    SciTech Connect

    Schnur, R.E. |; Wick, P.A.; Bailey, C.; Rebbeck, T.; Weleber, R.G.; Wagstaff, J.; Grix, A.W.; Pagon, R.A.; Hockey, A.; Edwards, M.J.

    1994-09-01

    One hundred nineteen individuals from 11 families with X-linked ocular albinism (OA1) were studied with respect to both their clinical phenotypes and their linkage genotypes. In a four-generation Australian family, two affected males and an obligatory carrier lacked cutaneous melanin macroglobules (MMGs); ocular features were identical to those of Nettleship-Falls OA1. Four other families had more unusual phenotypic features in addition to OA1. All OA1 families were genotyped at DXS16, DXS85, DXS143, STS, and DXS452 and for a CA-repeat polymorphism at the Kallmann syndrome locus (KAL). Separate two-point linkage analyses were performed for the following: group A, six families with biopsy-proved MMGs in at least one affected male; group B, four families whose biopsy status was not known; and group C, OA-9 only (16 samples), the family without MMGs. At the set of loci closest to OA1, there is no clear evidence in our data set for locus heterogeneity between groups A and C or among the four other families with complex phenotypes. Combined multipoint analysis (LINKMAP) in the 11 families and analysis of individual recombination events confirms that the major locus for OA1 resides within the DXS85-DXS143 interval. The authors suggest that more detailed clinical evaluations of OA1 individuals and families should be performed for future correlation with specific mutations in candidate OA1 genes. 29 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. X-linked recessive nephrogenic diabetes insipidus: a clinico-genetic study.

    PubMed

    Hong, Che Ry; Kang, Hee Gyung; Choi, Hyun Jin; Cho, Min Hyun; Lee, Jung Won; Kang, Ju Hyung; Park, Hye Won; Koo, Ja Wook; Ha, Tae-Sun; Kim, Su-Yung; Il Cheong, Hae

    2014-01-01

    A retrospective genotype and phenotype analysis of X-linked congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) was conducted on a nationwide cohort of 25 (24 male, 1 female) Korean children with AVPR2 gene mutations, comparing non-truncating and truncating mutations. In an analysis of male patients, the median age at diagnosis was 0.9 years old. At a median follow-up of 5.4 years, urinary tract dilatations were evident in 62% of patients and their median glomerular filtration rate was 72 mL/min/1.73 m2. Weights and heights were under the 3rd percentile in 22% and 33% of patients, respectively. One patient had low intelligence quotient and another developed end-stage renal disease. No statistically significant genotype-phenotype correlation was found between non-truncating and truncating mutations. One patient was female; she was analyzed separately because inactivation and mosaicism of the X chromosome may influence clinical manifestations in female patients. Current unsatisfactory long-term outcome of congenital NDI necessitates a novel therapeutic strategy.

  12. Wilms tumor arising in a child with X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed

    El-Kares, Reyhan; Hueber, Pierre-Alain; Blumenkrantz, Miriam; Iglesias, Diana; Ma, Kim; Jabado, Nada; Bichet, Daniel G; Goodyer, Paul

    2009-07-01

    We report on a child with X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) who developed Wilms tumor (WT). Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus is caused by mutations of the arginine vasopressin receptor (AVPR2) or aquaporin-II (AQP2) genes. Wilms tumor is also genetically heterogeneous and is associated with mutations of WT1 (15-20%), WTX (20-30%) and other loci. The boy presented at 5 months with failure to thrive, polyuria, hypernatremia and abdominal mass. Analysis of leukocyte DNA showed a novel missense mutation (Q174H) of the AVPR2 gene, which was not present in his mother. In cells (WitS) isolated from the tumor, WTX mRNA expression and coding sequence were intact. However, we identified a 44-kb homozygous deletion of the WT1 gene spanning exons 4 to 10. The WT1 deletion was not present in leukocyte DNA from the patient or his mother. We also noted strong beta-catenin (CTNNB1) expression in the tumor cells and identified a heterozygote missense Ser45Cys mutation of exon 3 of CTNNB1. However, the mutation was absent both in the constitutional DNA of the patient and his mother. The concurrence of WT and NDI has not been previously reported and may be unrelated. Nevertheless, this case nicely illustrates the sequence of events leading to sporadic Wilms tumor.

  13. X-linked MCT8 gene mutations: characterization of the pediatric neurologic phenotype.

    PubMed

    Holden, Kenton R; Zuñiga, Oscar F; May, Melanie M; Su, Humberto; Molinero, Marco R; Rogers, R Curtis; Schwartz, Charles E

    2005-10-01

    We report a family with X-linked mental retardation that has a novel mutation in the monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8) gene associated with a characteristic neurodevelopmental phenotype with early childhood hypotonia that progresses to spasticity and global developmental delays. Affected patients experience moderate to severe psychomotor delays and congenital hypotonia, develop a myopathic facies, have diminished muscle bulk and generalized muscle weakness, develop progressive spasticity and movement disorders, and have limited speech but alert, affable personalities. Acquired microcephaly and abnormal myelination on brain magnetic resonance imaging can be present. Normal monocarboxylate transporter 8 gene functioning appears to be necessary for normal thyroid-associated metabolism in neurons. Abnormal thyroid function tests appear to be a consistent finding in the absence of typical signs of thyroid dysfunction. Although the phenotype appears to be consistent, and although the neurotoxic effects of abnormal central and peripheral neuromuscular system thyroid metabolism might be partly or wholly responsible for the neurologic phenotype reported, the exact mechanism remains unclear.

  14. A mouse model of X-linked intellectual disability associated with impaired removal of histone methylation

    PubMed Central

    Iwase, Shigeki; Brookes, Emily; Agarwal, Saurabh; Badeaux, Aimee I; Ito, Hikaru; Vallianatos, Christina N; Tomassy, Giulio Srubek; Kasza, Tomas; Lin, Grace; Thompson, Andrew; Gu, Lei; Kwan, Kenneth Y.; Chen, Chinfei; Sartor, Maureen A.; Egan, Brian; Xu, Jun; Shi, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in a number of chromatin modifiers are associated with human neurological disorders. KDM5C, a histone H3 lysine 4 di- and tri-methyl (H3K4me2/3)-specific demethylase, is frequently mutated in X-linked intellectual disability (XLID) patients. Here, we report that disruption of the mouse Kdm5c gene recapitulates adaptive and cognitive abnormalities observed in XLID, including impaired social behavior and memory, and aggression. Kdm5c-knockout brains exhibit impaired dendritic arborization, spine abnormalities, and altered transcriptomes. In neurons, Kdm5c is recruited to promoters that harbor CpG islands decorated with high levels of H3K4me3, where it fine-tunes H3K4me3 levels. Kdm5c predominantly represses these genes, which include members of key pathways that regulate the development and function of neuronal circuitries. In summary, our mouse behavioral data strongly suggests that KDM5C mutations are causal to XLID. Furthermore, our findings suggest that loss of KDM5C function may impact gene expression in multiple regulatory pathways relevant to the clinical phenotypes. PMID:26804915

  15. High nucleosome occupancy is encoded at X-linked gene promoters in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Ercan, Sevinç; Lubling, Yaniv; Segal, Eran; Lieb, Jason D.

    2011-01-01

    We mapped nucleosome occupancy by paired-end Illumina sequencing in C. elegans embryonic cells, adult somatic cells, and a mix of adult somatic and germ cells. In all three samples, the nucleosome occupancy of gene promoters on the X chromosome differed from autosomal promoters. While both X and autosomal promoters exhibit a typical nucleosome-depleted region upstream of transcript start sites and a well-positioned +1 nucleosome, X-linked gene promoters on average exhibit higher nucleosome occupancy relative to autosomal promoters. We show that the difference between X and autosomes does not depend on the somatic dosage compensation machinery. Instead, the chromatin difference at promoters is partly encoded by DNA sequence, because a model trained on nucleosome sequence preferences from S. cerevisiae in vitro data recapitulate nearly completely the experimentally observed difference between X and autosomal promoters. The model predictions also correlate very well with experimentally determined occupancy values genome-wide. The nucleosome occupancy differences observed on X promoters may bear on mechanisms of X chromosome dosage compensation in the soma, and chromosome-wide repression of X in the germline. PMID:21177966

  16. Newborn screening for X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy: evidence summary and advisory committee recommendation.

    PubMed

    Kemper, Alex R; Brosco, Jeffrey; Comeau, Anne Marie; Green, Nancy S; Grosse, Scott D; Jones, Elizabeth; Kwon, Jennifer M; Lam, Wendy K K; Ojodu, Jelili; Prosser, Lisa A; Tanksley, Susan

    2017-01-01

    The secretary of the US Department of Health and Human Services in February 2016 recommended that X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) be added to the recommended uniform screening panel for state newborn screening programs. This decision was informed by data presented on the accuracy of screening from New York, the only state that currently offers X-ALD newborn screening, and published and unpublished data showing health benefits of earlier treatment (hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and adrenal hormone replacement therapy) for the childhood cerebral form of X-ALD. X-ALD newborn screening also identifies individuals with later-onset disease, but poor genotype-phenotype correlation makes predicting health outcomes difficult and might increase the risk of unnecessary treatment. Few data are available regarding the harms of screening and presymptomatic identification. Significant challenges exist for implementing comprehensive X-ALD newborn screening, including incorporation of the test, coordinating follow-up diagnostic and treatment care, and coordination of extended family testing after case identification.Genet Med 19 1, 121-126.

  17. Clinical and mutational features of Vietnamese children with X-linked agammaglobulinemia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a primary immune deficiency characterized by recurrent bacterial infections and profoundly depressed serum immunoglobulin levels and circulating mature B cells. It is caused by mutations of the Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK) gene and is the most common form of inherited antibody deficiency. To our knowledge, this is the first report of XLA from Vietnam. Methods We investigated the BTK gene mutations and clinical features of four unrelated Vietnamese children. Results The mean ages at onset and at diagnosis were 2.5 and 8 years, respectively. All patients had a medical history of otitis media, pneumonia, and septicemia at the time of diagnosis. Other infections reported included sinusitis, bronchiectasis, arthritis, skin infections, meningitis, and recurrent diarrhea. We identified one previously reported mutation (c.441G >A) and three novel mutations: two frameshifts (c.1770delG and c.1742 delG), and one nonsense (c.1249A >T). Conclusions The delayed diagnosis may be attributable to insufficient awareness of this rare disease on the background of frequent infections even in the immunocompetent pediatric population in Vietnam. Our results further support the importance of molecular genetic testing in diagnosis of XLA. PMID:24885015

  18. High-throughput sequencing reveals an altered T cell repertoire in X-linked agammaglobulinemia

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Manish; Simchoni, Noa; Hamm, David; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    To examine the T cell receptor structure in the absence of B cells, the TCR β CDR3 was sequenced from DNA of 15 X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) subjects and 18 male controls, using the Illumina HiSeq platform and the ImmunoSEQ analyzer. V gene usage and the V–J combinations, derived from both productive and nonproductive sequences, were significantly different between XLA samples and controls. Although the CDR3 length was similar for XLA and control samples, the CDR3 region of the XLA T cell receptor contained significantly fewer deletions and insertions in V, D, and J gene segments, differences intrinsic to the V(D)J recombination process and not due to peripheral T cell selection. XLA CDR3s demonstrated fewer charged amino acid residues, more sharing of CDR3 sequences, and almost completely lacked a population of highly modified Vβ gene segments found in control DNA, suggesting both a skewed and contracted T cell repertoire in XLA. PMID:26360253

  19. Osteopontin and the dento-osseous pathobiology of X-linked hypophosphatemia.

    PubMed

    Boukpessi, Tchilalo; Hoac, Betty; Coyac, Benjamin R; Leger, Thibaut; Garcia, Camille; Wicart, Philippe; Whyte, Michael P; Glorieux, Francis H; Linglart, Agnès; Chaussain, Catherine; McKee, Marc D

    2017-02-01

    Seven young patients with X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH, having inactivating PHEX mutations) were discovered to accumulate osteopontin (OPN) at the sites of defective bone mineralization near osteocytes - the so-called hallmark periosteocytic (lacunar) "halos" of XLH. OPN was also localized in the pericanalicular matrix extending beyond the osteocyte lacunae, as well as in the hypomineralized matrix of tooth dentin. OPN, a potent inhibitor of mineralization normally degraded by PHEX, is a member of a family of acidic, phosphorylated, calcium-binding, extracellular matrix proteins known to regulate dental, skeletal, and pathologic mineralization. Associated with the increased amount of OPN (along with inhibitory OPN peptide fragments) in XLH bone matrix, we found an enlarged, hypomineralized, lacuno-canalicular network - a defective pattern of skeletal mineralization that decreases stiffness locally at: i) the cell-matrix interface in the pericellular environment of the mechanosensing osteocyte, and ii) the osteocyte's dendritic network of cell processes extending throughout the bone. Our findings of an excess of inhibitory OPN near osteocytes and their cell processes, and in dentin, spatially correlates with the defective mineralization observed at these sites in the skeleton and teeth of XLH patients. These changes likely contribute to the dento-osseous pathobiology of XLH, and participate in the aberrant bone adaptation and remodeling seen in XLH.

  20. Evidence for compensatory upregulation of expressed X-linked genes in mammals, Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Xinxian; Hiatt, Joseph B; Nguyen, Di Kim; Ercan, Sevinc; Sturgill, David; Hillier, LaDeana W; Schlesinger, Felix; Davis, Carrie A; Reinke, Valerie J; Gingeras, Thomas R; Shendure, Jay; Waterston, Robert H; Oliver, Brian; Lieb, Jason D; Disteche, Christine M

    2012-01-01

    Many animal species use a chromosome-based mechanism of sex determination, which has led to the coordinate evolution of dosage-compensation systems. Dosage compensation not only corrects the imbalance in the number of X chromosomes between the sexes but also is hypothesized to correct dosage imbalance within cells that is due to monoallelic X-linked expression and biallelic autosomal expression, by upregulating X-linked genes twofold (termed ‘Ohno’s hypothesis’). Although this hypothesis is well supported by expression analyses of individual X-linked genes and by microarray-based transcriptome analyses, it was challenged by a recent study using RNA sequencing and proteomics. We obtained new, independent RNA-seq data, measured RNA polymerase distribution and reanalyzed published expression data in mammals, C. elegans and Drosophila. Our analyses, which take into account the skewed gene content of the X chromosome, support the hypothesis of upregulation of expressed X-linked genes to balance expression of the genome. PMID:22019781

  1. Copy number gain of VCX, X-linked multi-copy gene, leads to cell proliferation and apoptosis during spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhenyao; Zhang, Yan; Zhou, Ran; Song, Ling; Ling, Xiufeng; Hu, Zhibin; Miao, Dengshun; Shen, Hongbing; Xia, Yankai; Wang, Xinru; Lu, Chuncheng

    2016-01-01

    Male factor infertility affects one-sixth of couples worldwide, and non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA) is one of the most severe forms. In recent years there has been increasing evidence to implicate the participation of X chromosome in the process of spermatogenesis. To uncover the roles of X-linked multi-copy genes in spermatogenesis, we performed systematic analysis of X-linked gene copy number variations (CNVs) and Y chromosome haplogrouping in 447 idiopathic NOA patients and 485 healthy controls. Interestingly, the frequency of individuals with abnormal level copy of Variable charge, X-linked (VCX) was significantly different between cases and controls after multiple test correction (p = 5.10 × 10−5). To discriminate the effect of gain/loss copies in these genes, we analyzed the frequency of X-linked multi-copy genes in subjects among subdivided groups. Our results demonstrated that individuals with increased copy numbers of Nuclear RNA export factor 2 (NXF2) (p = 9.21 × 10−8) and VCX (p = 1.97 × 10−4) conferred the risk of NOA. In vitro analysis demonstrated that increasing copy number of VCX could upregulate the gene expression and regulate cell proliferation and apoptosis. Our study establishes a robust association between the VCX CNVs and NOA risk. PMID:27705943

  2. An X-Linked Sex Ratio Distorter in Drosophila simulans That Kills or Incapacitates Both Noncarrier Sperm and Sons

    PubMed Central

    Rice, William R.

    2014-01-01

    Genomic conflict occurs when a genomic component gains a reproductive advantage at the expense of the organism as a whole. X-linked segregation distorters kill or incapacitate Y-bearing sperm, thereby gaining a transmission advantage but also reducing male fertility and generating a female-biased sex ratio. When some damaged, Y-bearing sperm survive and fertilize eggs, then the segregation distortion phenotype could be expanded by harming or killing sons in the next generation. X-linked son-killers are predicted by theory to be favored by natural selection and evolve when brothers and sisters compete for shared limiting resources and/or when brothers reduce the inclusive fitness of their sisters via sib-mating—a phenomenon called SA-zygotic drive. Here I develop and use a process-of-elimination screen to show that an unclassified X-linked sex ratio distorter (skew) in Drosophila simulans kills or incapacitates noncarrier sperm and also kills a substantial proportion of sons, i.e., it has both a segregation distortion and a SA-zygotic drive phenotype. There are three unique X-linked segregation distorters known to occur in D. simulans named Winters, Durham, and Paris. Autosomal-dominant suppressors of Winters (Nmy) and Durham (Tmy) failed to suppress skew. A Y-linked suppressor of Paris, however, did suppress skew, and a recombination test failed to detect recombinants between these two sex ratio distorters, indicating that they are tightly linked and plausibly identical or allelic. Son-killing may be an important yet unrecognized component of other X-linked segregation distorters. PMID:25081980

  3. OFD1 is mutated in X-linked Joubert syndrome and interacts with LCA5-encoded lebercilin.

    PubMed

    Coene, Karlien L M; Roepman, Ronald; Doherty, Dan; Afroze, Bushra; Kroes, Hester Y; Letteboer, Stef J F; Ngu, Lock H; Budny, Bartlomiej; van Wijk, Erwin; Gorden, Nicholas T; Azhimi, Malika; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel; Veltman, Joris A; Boink, Mireille; Kleefstra, Tjitske; Cremers, Frans P M; van Bokhoven, Hans; de Brouwer, Arjan P M

    2009-10-01

    We ascertained a multi-generation Malaysian family with Joubert syndrome (JS). The presence of asymptomatic obligate carrier females suggested an X-linked recessive inheritance pattern. Affected males presented with mental retardation accompanied by postaxial polydactyly and retinitis pigmentosa. Brain MRIs showed the presence of a "molar tooth sign," which classifies this syndrome as classic JS with retinal involvement. Linkage analysis showed linkage to Xpter-Xp22.2 and a maximum LOD score of 2.06 for marker DXS8022. Mutation analysis revealed a frameshift mutation, p.K948NfsX8, in exon 21 of OFD1. In an isolated male with JS, a second frameshift mutation, p.E923KfsX3, in the same exon was identified. OFD1 has previously been associated with oral-facial-digital type 1 (OFD1) syndrome, a male-lethal X-linked dominant condition, and with X-linked recessive Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome type 2 (SGBS2). In a yeast two-hybrid screen of a retinal cDNA library, we identified OFD1 as an interacting partner of the LCA5-encoded ciliary protein lebercilin. We show that X-linked recessive mutations in OFD1 reduce, but do not eliminate, the interaction with lebercilin, whereas X-linked dominant OFD1 mutations completely abolish binding to lebercilin. In addition, recessive mutations in OFD1 did not affect the pericentriolar localization of the recombinant protein in hTERT-RPE1 cells, whereas this localization was lost for dominant mutations. These findings offer a molecular explanation for the phenotypic spectrum observed for OFD1 mutations; this spectrum now includes OFD1 syndrome, SGBS2, and JS.

  4. Mutations in apoptosis-inducing factor cause X-linked recessive auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder

    PubMed Central

    Zong, Liang; Guan, Jing; Ealy, Megan; Zhang, Qiujing; Wang, Dayong; Wang, Hongyang; Zhao, Yali; Shen, Zhirong; Campbell, Colleen A; Wang, Fengchao; Yang, Ju; Sun, Wei; Lan, Lan; Ding, Dalian; Xie, Linyi; Qi, Yue; Lou, Xin; Huang, Xusheng; Shi, Qiang; Chang, Suhua; Xiong, Wenping; Yin, Zifang; Yu, Ning; Zhao, Hui; Wang, Jun; Wang, Jing; Salvi, Richard J; Petit, Christine; Smith, Richard J H; Wang, Qiuju

    2015-01-01

    Background Auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder (ANSD) is a form of hearing loss in which auditory signal transmission from the inner ear to the auditory nerve and brain stem is distorted, giving rise to speech perception difficulties beyond that expected for the observed degree of hearing loss. For many cases of ANSD, the underlying molecular pathology and the site of lesion remain unclear. The X-linked form of the condition, AUNX1, has been mapped to Xq23-q27.3, although the causative gene has yet to be identified. Methods We performed whole-exome sequencing on DNA samples from the AUNX1 family and another small phenotypically similar but unrelated ANSD family. Results We identified two missense mutations in AIFM1 in these families: c.1352G>A (p.R451Q) in the AUNX1 family and c.1030C>T (p.L344F) in the second ANSD family. Mutation screening in a large cohort of 3 additional unrelated families and 93 sporadic cases with ANSD identified 9 more missense mutations in AIFM1. Bioinformatics analysis and expression studies support this gene as being causative of ANSD. Conclusions Variants in AIFM1 gene are a common cause of familial and sporadic ANSD and provide insight into the expanded spectrum of AIFM1-associated diseases. The finding of cochlear nerve hypoplasia in some patients was AIFM1-related ANSD implies that MRI may be of value in localising the site of lesion and suggests that cochlea implantation in these patients may have limited success. PMID:25986071

  5. X-linked lethal infantile spinal muscular atrophy: From clinical description to molecular mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Baumbach, L.; Schiavi, A.

    1994-09-01

    The proximal spinal muscular atrophies (PSMA), one of the most common forms of lower motor neuron disease in children, are characterized by progressive muscle weakness due to loss of anterior horn cells. All three autosomal recessive forms have been mapped to chromosome 5q11.2-11.3, implying an allelic association between these disorders. Recent evidence from our laboratories, as well as others, suggests that a distinct form of lethal neonatal spinal muscular atrophy, associated with early onset contractures, is determined by a gene on the X chromosome. We report our efforts in mapping this disease locus. Our original studies have focused on two unrelated multigenerational families with similar clinical presentations of severe hypotonia, muscle weakness, and a disease course similar to Werdnig Hoffman except for the additional finding of congenital or early onset contractures. Muscle biopsy and/or autopsy were indicative of anterior horn cell loss in affected males. Disease occurrence in each of the families was consistent with an X-linked recessive mode of inheritance. Subsequently, two additional families have been identified, as well as several sporadic male cases. Linkage analysis has been completed in one of these families using highly polymorphic repeats dispersed 10 cM on the X chromosome. Interpretation of results was achieved using an automated data acquisition program. Analysis of over 300 haplotypes generated using PCR-based DNA markers have identified two 16 cM regions on Xp with complete concordance to the disease phenotype. Our currents efforts are focused on the region surrounding the Kallman gene, in attempts to better define a candidate region, as well as analyze possible candidate genes within this region.

  6. Three novel PHEX gene mutations in four Chinese families with X-linked dominant hypophosphatemic rickets

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Qing-lin; Xu, Jia; Zhang, Zeng; He, Jin-wei; Lu, Lian-song; Fu, Wen-zhen; Zhang, Zhen-lin

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In our study, all of the patients were of Han Chinese ethnicity, which were rarely reported. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We identified three novel PHEX gene mutations in four unrelated families with XLH. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found that the relationship between the phenotype and genotype of the PHEX gene was not invariant. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found that two PHEX gene sites, p.534 and p.731, were conserved. -- Abstract: Background: X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH), the most common form of inherited rickets, is a dominant disorder that is characterized by renal phosphate wasting with hypophosphatemia, abnormal bone mineralization, short stature, and rachitic manifestations. The related gene with inactivating mutations associated with XLH has been identified as PHEX, which is a phosphate-regulating gene with homologies to endopeptidases on the X chromosome. In this study, a variety of PHEX mutations were identified in four Chinese families with XLH. Methods: We investigated four unrelated Chinese families who exhibited typical features of XLH by using PCR to analyze mutations that were then sequenced. The laboratory and radiological investigations were conducted simultaneously. Results: Three novel mutations were found in these four families: one frameshift mutation, c.2033dupT in exon 20, resulting in p.T679H; one nonsense mutation, c.1294A > T in exon 11, resulting in p.K432X; and one missense mutation, c.2192T > C in exon 22, resulting in p.F731S. Conclusions: We found that the PHEX gene mutations were responsible for XLH in these Chinese families. Our findings are useful for understanding the genetic basis of Chinese patients with XLH.

  7. Efficacy of Gene Therapy for X-Linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Hacein-Bey-Abina, Salima; Hauer, Julia; Lim, Annick; Picard, Capucine; Wang, Gary P.; Berry, Charles C.; Martinache, Chantal; Rieux-Laucat, Frédéric; Latour, Sylvain; Belohradsky, Bernd H.; Leiva, Lily; Sorensen, Ricardo; Debré, Marianne; Casanova, Jean Laurent; Blanche, Stephane; Durandy, Anne; Bushman, Frederic D.; Fischer, Alain; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND The outcomes of gene therapy to correct congenital immunodeficiencies are unknown. We reviewed long-term outcomes after gene therapy in nine patients with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1), which is characterized by the absence of the cytokine receptor common γ chain. METHODS The nine patients, who lacked an HLA-identical donor, underwent ex vivo retrovirus-mediated transfer of γ chain to autologous CD34+ bone marrow cells between 1999 and 2002. We assessed clinical events and immune function on long-term follow-up. RESULTS Eight patients were alive after a median follow-up period of 9 years (range, 8 to 11). Gene therapy was initially successful at correcting immune dysfunction in eight of the nine patients. However, acute leukemia developed in four patients, and one died. Transduced T cells were detected for up to 10.7 years after gene therapy. Seven patients, including the three survivors of leukemia, had sustained immune reconstitution; three patients required immunoglobulin-replacement therapy. Sustained thymopoiesis was established by the persistent presence of naive T cells, even after chemotherapy in three patients. The T-cell–receptor repertoire was diverse in all patients. Transduced B cells were not detected. Correction of the immunodeficiency improved the patients’ health. CONCLUSIONS After nearly 10 years of follow-up, gene therapy was shown to have corrected the immunodeficiency associated with SCID-X1. Gene therapy may be an option for patients who do not have an HLA-identical donor for hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation and for whom the risks are deemed acceptable. This treatment is associated with a risk of acute leukemia. (Funded by INSERM and others.) PMID:20660403

  8. An X-linked three allele model of hand preference and hand posture for writing.

    PubMed

    McKeever, Walter F

    2004-04-01

    This paper describes a genetic model of hand preferences for writing and for handwriting posture (HWP). The challenge of devising an X-linked model for these aspects of human handedness was posed by the results of a large family handedness study (McKeever, 2000) that showed evidence of such linkage. Because X-linkage for handedness has been widely regarded as untenable, the prospects for developing such a model were not initially encouraging, but ultimately a viable model did suggest itself. Family studies of handedness and leading theories of handedness are briefly described, as is some of the research on HWP motivated by the theory of Levy and Nagylaki (1972). It is argued that there is evidence that HWP reflects a biological dictate and not just individual "choices" or "adaptations" to writing in a left-to-right direction with the left hand. The model proposes that inverted handwriting posture is not necessarily highly related to speech and language lateralities of sinistrals, but that it reveals an interhemispheric mediation of writing. It is hypothesised that it reflects a specialisation of the left angular gyrus (with some possible extension into the supramarginal gyrus) for the storage of movement and timing sequences of cursive writing, and right hemisphere motor programming of the motor output of writing. It is also argued that no family handedness study conducted to date is adequate for testing the predictions of extant handedness theories, and the often wide variations between the results of family handedness studies are noted. It is suggested that fMRI studies could definitively test the HWP hypotheses of the model and that the hypothesis of X-linkage could be tested definitively should studies of the human genome identify a gene for handedness.

  9. X-linked lymphoreticular disease in the scurfy (sf) mutant mouse.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, V L; Wilkinson, J E; Russell, L B

    1991-06-01

    Scurfy (sf) is a spontaneous, sex-linked, recessive mutation that maps to the extreme proximal portion of the X chromosome, about 2 centimorgans from sparse fur (spf). Hemizygotes for sf manifest several clinical disorders, evident at 14 days of age, including scaliness and crusting of the eyelids, ears, and tail, runting, reddening and swelling of the genital papilla, anemia, cachexia, and early death (average, 24 days). Our studies indicate that the phenotype of hemizygous scurfy is not, as has been suggested, a model for human X-linked ichthyosis, but appears to be a disease primarily affecting the lymphoreticular, and possibly the hematopoietic, systems. Gross lesions include marked splenomegaly, hepatomegaly, enlarged lymph nodes, and variable thickening of the ears. The characteristic histologic lesion is a lymphohistiocytic proliferation and infiltration of peripheral lymph nodes, spleen, liver, and skin. In routine hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections, these lesions efface lymph node architecture, thicken the dermis, and form nodular portal infiltrates in the liver. Scurfy lesions characteristically contain a population of large blastlike cells with round to oval nuclei, a vesicular chromatin pattern, and prominent single nucleoli. Mixed perivascular infiltrates of lymphocytes, macrophages, and granulocytes sometimes are found in kidney, heart, pancreas, lung, and mesenteries. There is excessive hematopoiesis in the liver and spleen. Cells expressing B220 or Thy-1 antigens localize to appropriate areas in the lymph nodes and spleen, but are rare in the portal infiltrates and are absent from the skin. There is a marked, polyclonal increase in serum IgG, severe Coombs'-positive anemia, and leukocytosis with atypical mononuclear cells. Scurfy mice are negative for antinuclear antibodies. Despite their morphologically aberrant lymphoreticular system, scurfy mice can exist in a conventional environment without evidence of opportunistic infection. Raising

  10. Immunohistochemical detection of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Nagi, Chandandeep; Xiao, Guang-Qing; Li, Gan; Genden, Eric; Burstein, David E

    2007-12-01

    The X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) is the most potent member of the IAP group of structurally related caspase inhibitors. Experimental and clinical evidence implicates XIAP in resistance to cancer therapy and in clinical aggressiveness of certain tumors. We examined the expression of XIAP in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Four-micrometer sections from 59 routinely processed specimens of head and neck SCC were subjected to citrate-based antigen retrieval, followed by incubation with monoclonal anti-XIAP antibody (BD Biosciences, San Jose, Calif) and EnVision Plus reagents (Dako, Carpinteria, Calif). Granular cytoplasmic staining was considered positive; the extent and intensity of staining were recorded. Normal squamous epithelium was either nonstaining (n=22), displayed generally weak basal staining (n=9), or moderate basal staining (n=1). Squamous dysplasia or carcinoma in situ was either nonstaining (10 of 18 cases) or displayed generally weak staining (8 of 18 cases). Varying degrees of XIAP positivity were found in 41 (69.5%) of 59 carcinomas. Most of the nonstaining and weakly staining carcinomas were well or moderately differentiated. In contrast, intense and extensive staining was most frequently found in poorly differentiated carcinomas. In keratinized tumor nests, staining was strongest peripherally and became diminished in central keratinized zones. New parameters of tumor aggressiveness are needed for more effective triaging of patients to appropriately aggressive therapies. The present findings suggest that the potent apoptotic inhibitor XIAP may be such a biomarker in head and neck SCCs, of resistance to apoptosis-inducing therapies, and, possibly, of responsiveness to a new class of XIAP-suppressive drugs presently in clinical trials for other malignancies or in preclinical development.

  11. Mutations in noncoding regions of GJB1 are a major cause of X-linked CMT

    PubMed Central

    Tomaselli, Pedro J.; Rossor, Alexander M.; Horga, Alejandro; Jaunmuktane, Zane; Carr, Aisling; Saveri, Paola; Piscosquito, Giuseppe; Pareyson, Davide; Laura, Matilde; Blake, Julian C.; Poh, Roy; Polke, James; Houlden, Henry

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence and clinical and genetic characteristics of patients with X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) due to mutations in noncoding regions of the gap junction β-1 gene (GJB1). Methods: Mutations were identified by bidirectional Sanger sequence analysis of the 595 bases of the upstream promoter region, and 25 bases of the 3′ untranslated region (UTR) sequence in patients in whom mutations in the coding region had been excluded. Clinical and neurophysiologic data were retrospectively collected. Results: Five mutations were detected in 25 individuals from 10 kindreds representing 11.4% of all cases of CMTX1 diagnosed in our neurogenetics laboratory between 1996 and 2016. Four pathogenic mutations, c.-17G>A, c.-17+1G>T, c.-103C>T, and c.-146-90_146-89insT were detected in the 5′UTR. A novel mutation, c.*15C>T, was detected in the 3′ UTR of GJB1 in 2 unrelated families with CMTX1 and is the first pathogenic mutation in the 3′UTR of any myelin-associated CMT gene. Mutations segregated with the phenotype, were at sites predicted to be pathogenic, and were not present in the normal population. Conclusions: Mutations in noncoding DNA are a major cause of CMTX1 and highlight the importance of mutations in noncoding DNA in human disease. Next-generation sequencing platforms for use in inherited neuropathy should therefore include coverage of these regions. PMID:28283593

  12. X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus: From the ship Hopewell to RFLP studies

    SciTech Connect

    Bichet, D.G.; Lonergan, M.; Arthus, M.F.; Ligier, S.; Kluge, R. ); Hendy, G.N.; Pausova, Z.; Zingg, H.; Morgan, K.; Saenger, P. )

    1992-11-01

    Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI; designated 304800 in Mendelian Inheritance in Man) is an X-linked disorder with abnormal renal and extrarenal V[sub 2] vasopression receptor responses. The mutant gene has been mapped to Xq28 by analysis of RFLPs, and tight linkage between DXS52 and DNI has been reported. In 1969, Bode and Crawford proposed, under the term, the Hopewell hypothesis' that most cases in North America could be traced to descendants of Ulster Scots who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1761 on the ship Hopewell. They also suggested a link between this family and a large Mormon pedigree. DNA samples obtained from 13 independent affected families, including 42 members of the Hopewell and Mormon pedigrees, were analyzed with probes in the Xq28 region. Genealogical reconstructions were performed. Linkage between NDI and DXS304 (probe U6:2.spl), DXS305 (St35-691), DXS52 (St14-1), DXS15 (DX13), and F8C (F814) showed no recombination in 12 families, with a maximum lod score of 13.5 for DXS52. A recombinant between NDI and DXS304, DXS305, was identified in one family. The haplotype segregating with the disease in the Hopewell pedigree was not shared by other North American families. PCR analysis of the St14 VNTR allowed the distinction of two alleles that were not distinguishable by Southern analysis. Carrier status was predicted in 24 of 26 at-risk females. The Hopewell hypothesis cannot explain the origin of NDI in many of the North American families, since they have no apparent relationship with the Hopewell earlier settlers, either by haplotype or by genealogical analysis. PCR analysis of the DXS52 VNTR in NDI families is very useful for carrier testing and presymptomatic diagnosis, which can prevent the first manifestations of dehydration. 39 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Response to Drs. Shastry and Trese: Phenotype-genotype correlations in X-linked retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, J.; Munnich, A.

    1996-11-11

    Shastry and Trese recently reported on a large kindred with X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP) characterized by a loss of central vision and preserved peripheral function. In their report, the disease had an early onset with severe myopia and a loss of central vision, while night blindness occurred later. Genetic analysis suggested that the disease was linked to the RP2 locus, and the authors raised the question of whether other cases linked to RP2 could display a similar loss of central vision. Three years ago, we reported on 4 large XLRP pedigrees with a very early onset with severe myopia and early loss of visual acuity, while in 5 other families the disease started later with night blindness. We showed that the first clinical form was linked to RP2, while the second was linked to RP3. Thus, the major difference between the two forms concerns the initial symptom, information which can be obtained from the parents and patients after careful questioning. By contrast, in adult life, no difference in either severity of disease or aspect of the fundus was observed in our series, regardless of the clinical subtype of XLRP. Some months later, Jacobson et al. reported on a pedigree with an RP2 genotype, and their data support the notion that in XLRP of RP2 type 1, cone dysfunction takes place first, and as the disease advances both rods and cones are affected. We were very happy, therefore, to read that the study of Shastry and Trese fully confirmed our previous findings. 3 refs.

  14. Evidence for X-linked introgression between molecular forms of Anopheles gambiae from Angola.

    PubMed

    Choi, K S; Townson, H

    2012-06-01

    The M and S molecular forms of the African malaria vector Anopheles gambiae (Diptera: Culicidae) are morphologically identical incipient species in which reproductive isolation is incomplete, enabling low-level gene flow between forms. In an attempt to find differences between the M and S forms, sequence variation was studied at loci along the X chromosome in adult female An. gambiae from Angola. A high proportion of M form specimens from Angola (79% of the 456 X chromosomes sampled) were found to contain a 16-bp insertion in intron 4 of the X-linked GPRCCK1 locus, relative to the AgamP3 release of the An. gambiae PEST genome sequence. The insertion was in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in Angolan M form populations. The same insertion was found in all S form specimens examined, regardless of where in Africa they were sampled, but was absent from a sample of M form specimens collected in Ghana, Bioko and Mali. In M form specimens from Angola, there was an association between alleles at the GPRCCK1 locus and those at a microsatellite locus, AGXH678, close to the centromere of the X chromosome, with significant linkage disequilibrium between loci separated by 0.472 Mbp (P < 0.033). We show that the insertion results from introgression from the S form into the M form, rather than from the retention of an ancestral character. Gene flow from the S to M form could allow genes of adaptive value to be transferred, including those conferring insecticide resistance and others influencing ecology and behaviour, and thus malaria transmission and control. We discuss factors that may have led to this introgression event.

  15. Juvenile retinoschisis: a model for molecular diagnostic testing of X-linked ophthalmic disease.

    PubMed Central

    Sieving, P A; Yashar, B M; Ayyagari, R

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: X-linked juvenile retinoschisis (RS) provides a starting point to define clinical paradigms and understand the limitations of diagnostic molecular testing. The RS phenotype is specific, but the broad severity range is clinically confusing. Molecular diagnostic testing obviates unnecessary examinations for boys at-risk and identifies carrier females who otherwise show no clinical signs. METHODS: The XLRS1 gene has 6 exons of 26-196 base-pair size. Each exon is amplified by a single polymerase chain reaction and then sequenced, starting with exons 4 through 6, which contain mutation "hot spots." RESULTS: The 6 XLRS1 exons are sequenced serially. If alterations are found, they are compared with mutations in our > 120 XLRS families and with the > 300 mutations reported worldwide. Point mutations, small deletions, or rearrangements are identified in nearly 90% of males with a clinical diagnosis of RS. XLRS1 has very few sequence polymorphisms. Carrier-state testing produces 1 of 3 results: (1) positive, in which the woman has the same mutation as an affected male relative or known in other RS families; (2) negative, in which she lacks the mutation of her affected male relative; and (3) uninformative, in which no known mutation is identified or no information exists about the familial mutation. CONCLUSIONS: Molecular RS screening is an effective diagnostic tool that complements the clinician's skills for early detection of at-risk males. Useful outcomes of carrier testing depend on several factors: (1) a male relative with a clear clinical diagnosis; (2) a well-defined inheritance pattern; (3) high disease penetrance; (4) size and organization of the gene; and (5) the types of disease-associated mutations. Ethical questions include molecular diagnostic testing of young at-risk females before the age of consent, the impact of this information on the emotional health of the patient and family, and issues of employability and insurance coverage

  16. Two novel connexin32 mutations cause early onset X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

    PubMed Central

    Braathen, Geir J; Sand, Jette C; Bukholm, Geir; Russell, Michael B

    2007-01-01

    Background X-linked Charcot-Marie Tooth (CMT) is caused by mutations in the connexin32 gene that encodes a polypeptide which is arranged in hexameric array and form gap junctions. Methods We describe two novel mutations in the connexin32 gene in two Norwegian families. Results Family 1 had a c.225delG (R75fsX83) which causes a frameshift and premature stop codon at position 247. This probably results in a shorter non-functional protein structure. Affected individuals had an early age at onset usually in the first decade. The symptoms were more severe in men than women. All had severe muscle weakness in the legs. Several abortions were observed in this family. Family 2 had a c.536 G>A (C179Y) transition which causes a change of the highly conserved cysteine residue, i.e. disruption of at least one of three disulfide bridges. The mean age at onset was in the first decade. Muscle wasting was severe and correlated with muscle weakness in legs. The men and one woman also had symptom from their hands. The neuropathy is demyelinating and the nerve conduction velocities were in the intermediate range (25–49 m/s). Affected individuals had symmetrical clinical findings, while the neurophysiology revealed minor asymmetrical findings in nerve conduction velocity in 6 of 10 affected individuals. Conclusion The two novel mutations in the connexin32 gene are more severe than the majority of previously described mutations possibly due to the severe structural change of the gap junction they encode. PMID:17620124

  17. Phenotypic characterization of X-linked retinoschisis: Clinical, electroretinography, and optical coherence tomography variables

    PubMed Central

    Neriyanuri, Srividya; Dhandayuthapani, Sudha; Arunachalam, Jayamuruga Pandian; Raman, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To study the phenotypic characteristics of X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) and report the clinical, electroretinogram (ERG), and optical coherence tomography (OCT) variables in Indian eyes. Design: A retrospective study. Materials and Methods: Medical records of 21 patients with retinoschisis who were genetically confirmed to have RS1 mutation were reviewed. The phenotype characterization included the age of onset, best-corrected visual acuity, refractive error, fundus findings, OCT, and ERG. Statistical Analysis Used: Data from both the eyes were used for analysis. A P < 0.05 was set as statistical significance. Data were not normally distributed (P < 0.05, Shapiro wilk); hence, nonparametric tests were used for statistical analysis. Results: All were males whose mean age of presentation was 9 years. Visual acuity was moderately impaired (median 0.6 logMAR, interquartile range: 0.47, 1) in these eyes with a hyperopic refractive error of median +1.75 Ds (interquartile range: +0.50 Ds, +4.25 Ds). About 54.7% of the eyes had both foveal and peripheral schisis, isolated foveal schisis was seen in 28.5% of the eyes, and schisis with retinal detachment was seen in 16.6% of the eyes. The inner nuclear layer was found to be commonly involved in the schisis, followed by outer nuclear and plexiform layers as evident on OCT. On ERG, a- and b-wave amplitudes were significantly reduced in eyes with foveal and peripheral schisis when compared to the eyes with only foveal schisis (P < 0.05). Conclusions: XLRS has phenotypic heterogeneity as evident on OCT, ERG, and clinical findings. PMID:27609164

  18. Mutations in the gene for X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy in patients with different clinical phenotypes

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, A.; Ambach, H.; Kammerer, S.; Rolinski, B.; Roscher, A.; Rabl, W.; Stoeckler, S.; Gaertner, J.; Zierz, S.

    1995-04-01

    Recently, the gene for the most common peroxisomal disorder, X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD), has been described encoding a peroxisomal membrane transporter protein. We analyzed the entire protein-coding sequence of this gene by reverse-transcription PCR, SSCP, and DNA sequencing in five patients with different clinical expressions were cerebral childhood ALD, adrenomyecloneuropathy (AMN), and {open_quotes}Addison disease only{close_quotes} (AD) phenotype. In the three patients exhibiting the classical picture of severe childhood ALD we identified in the 5{prime} portion of the X-ALD gene a 38-bp deletion that causes a frameshift mutation, a 3-bp deletion leading to a deletion of an amino acid in the ATP-binding domain of the ALD protein, and a missense mutation. In the patient with the clinical phenotype of AMN, a nonsense mutation in codon 212, along with a second site mutation at codon 178, was observed. Analysis of the patient with the ADO phenotype revealed a further missense mutation at a highly conserved position in the ALDP/PMP70 comparison. The disruptive nature of two mutations (i.e., the frameshift and the nonsense mutation) in patients with biochemically proved childhood ALD and AMN further strongly supports the hypothesis that alterations in this gene play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of X-ALD. Since the current biochemical techniques for X-ALD carrier detection in affected families lack sufficient reliability, our procedure described for systematic mutation scanning is also capable of improving genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis. 19 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Extraordinary Sequence Divergence at Tsga8, an X-linked Gene Involved in Mouse Spermiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Good, Jeffrey M.; Vanderpool, Dan; Smith, Kimberly L.; Nachman, Michael W.

    2011-01-01

    The X chromosome plays an important role in both adaptive evolution and speciation. We used a molecular evolutionary screen of X-linked genes potentially involved in reproductive isolation in mice to identify putative targets of recurrent positive selection. We then sequenced five very rapidly evolving genes within and between several closely related species of mice in the genus Mus. All five genes were involved in male reproduction and four of the genes showed evidence of recurrent positive selection. The most remarkable evolutionary patterns were found at Testis-specific gene a8 (Tsga8), a spermatogenesis-specific gene expressed during postmeiotic chromatin condensation and nuclear transformation. Tsga8 was characterized by extremely high levels of insertion–deletion variation of an alanine-rich repetitive motif in natural populations of Mus domesticus and M. musculus, differing in length from the reference mouse genome by up to 89 amino acids (27% of the total protein length). This population-level variation was coupled with striking divergence in protein sequence and length between closely related mouse species. Although no clear orthologs had previously been described for Tsga8 in other mammalian species, we have identified a highly divergent hypothetical gene on the rat X chromosome that shares clear orthology with the 5′ and 3′ ends of Tsga8. Further inspection of this ortholog verified that it is expressed in rat testis and shares remarkable similarity with mouse Tsga8 across several general features of the protein sequence despite no conservation of nucleotide sequence across over 60% of the rat-coding domain. Overall, Tsga8 appears to be one of the most rapidly evolving genes to have been described in rodents. We discuss the potential evolutionary causes and functional implications of this extraordinary divergence and the possible contribution of Tsga8 and the other four genes we examined to reproductive isolation in mice. PMID:21186189

  20. Survey of the Enthesopathy of X-Linked Hypophosphatemia and Its Characterization in Hyp Mice

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Guoying; Katz, Lee D.; Insogna, Karl L.; Carpenter, Thomas O.

    2010-01-01

    X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH) is characterized by rickets and osteomalacia as a result of an inactivating mutation of the PHEX (phosphate-regulating gene with homology to endopeptidases on the X chromosome) gene. PHEX encodes an endopeptidase that, when inactivated, results in elevated circulating levels of FGF-23, a novel phosphate-regulating hormone (a phosphatonin), thereby resulting in increased phosphate excretion and impaired bone mineralization. A generalized and severe mineralizing enthesopathy in patients with XLH was first reported in 1985; we likewise report a survey in which we found evidence of enthesopathy in fibrocartilaginous insertion sites, as well as osteophyte formation, in the majority of patients. Nonetheless, there has been very little focus on the progression and pathogenesis underlying the paradoxical heterotopic calcification of tendon and ligament insertion sites. Such studies have been hampered by lack of a model of mineralizing enthesopathy. We therefore characterized the involvement of the most frequently targeted fibrocartilaginous tendon insertion sites in Hyp mice, a murine model of the XLH mutation that phenocopies the human syndrome in every detail including hypophosphatemia and elevated FGF-23. Histological examination of the affected entheses revealed that mineralizing insertion sites, while thought to involve bone spur formation, were not due to bone-forming osteoblasts but instead to a significant expansion of mineralizing fibrocartilage. Our finding that enthesis fibrocartilage cells specifically express fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3)/Klotho suggests that the high circulating levels of FGF-23, characteristic of XLH and Hyp mice, may be part of the biochemical milieu that underlies the expansion of mineralizing enthesis fibrocartilage. PMID:19609735

  1. Growth in PHEX-associated X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets: the importance of early treatment.

    PubMed

    Quinlan, Catherine; Guegan, Katie; Offiah, Amaka; Neill, Richard O'; Hiorns, Melanie P; Ellard, Sian; Bockenhauer, Detlef; Hoff, William Van't; Waters, Aoife M

    2012-04-01

    Inactivating mutations in phosphate-regulating endopeptidase (PHEX) cause X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets (XLHR) characterized by phosphaturia, hypophosphatemia, bony deformities, and growth retardation. We assessed the efficacy of combined calcitriol and orally administered phosphate (Pi) therapy on longitudinal growth in relation to age at treatment onset in a retrospective, single-center review of children with XLHR and documented PHEX mutations. Growth was compared in those who started treatment before (G1; N = 10; six boys) and after (G2; N = 13; five boys) 1 year old. Median height standard deviation score (HSDS) at treatment onset was normal in G1: 0.1 [interquartile range (IR) -1.3 to 0.4) and significantly (p = 0.004) lower in G2 (IR -2.1 (-2.8 to -1.4). Treatment duration was similar [G1 8.5 (4.0-15.2) vs G2 11.9 (6.2-14.3) years; p = 0.56], as were prescribed phosphate and calcitriol doses. Recent HSDS was significantly (p = 0.009) better in G1 [-0.7 (-1.5 to 0.3)] vs G2 [-2.0 (-2.3 to -1.0)]. No effects of gender or genotype on growth could be identified. Children with PHEX-associated XLHR benefit from early treatment and can achieve normal growth. Minimal catchup growth was seen in those who started treatment later. Our findings emphasize the importance of early diagnosis to allow treatment before growth has been compromised.

  2. Impaired mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in the peroxisomal disease X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    López-Erauskin, J; Galino, J; Ruiz, M; Cuezva, J M; Fabregat, I; Cacabelos, D; Boada, J; Martínez, J; Ferrer, I; Pamplona, R; Villarroya, F; Portero-Otín, M; Fourcade, S; Pujol, A

    2013-08-15

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is an inherited metabolic disorder of the nervous system characterized by axonopathy in spinal cords and/or cerebral demyelination, adrenal insufficiency and accumulation of very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) in plasma and tissues. The disease is caused by malfunction of the ABCD1 gene, which encodes a peroxisomal transporter of VLCFAs or VLCFA-CoA. In the mouse, Abcd1 loss causes late onset axonal degeneration in the spinal cord, associated with locomotor disability resembling the most common phenotype in patients, adrenomyeloneuropathy. We have formerly shown that an excess of the VLCFA C26:0 induces oxidative damage, which underlies the axonal degeneration exhibited by the Abcd1(-) mice. In the present study, we sought to investigate the noxious effects of C26:0 on mitochondria function. Our data indicate that in X-ALD patients' fibroblasts, excess of C26:0 generates mtDNA oxidation and specifically impairs oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) triggering mitochondrial ROS production from electron transport chain complexes. This correlates with impaired complex V phosphorylative activity, as visualized by high-resolution respirometry on spinal cord slices of Abcd1(-) mice. Further, we identified a marked oxidation of key OXPHOS system subunits in Abcd1(-) mouse spinal cords at presymptomatic stages. Altogether, our results illustrate some of the mechanistic intricacies by which the excess of a fatty acid targeted to peroxisomes activates a deleterious process of oxidative damage to mitochondria, leading to a multifaceted dysfunction of this organelle. These findings may be of relevance for patient management while unveiling novel therapeutic targets for X-ALD.

  3. A candidate gene for X-linked Ocular Albinism (OA1)

    SciTech Connect

    Bassi, M.T.; Schiaffino, V.; Rugarli, E.

    1994-09-01

    Ocular Albinism of the Nettleship-Fall type 1 (OA1) is the most common form of ocular albinism. It is transmitted as an X-linked recessive trait with affected males showing severe reduction of visual acuity, nystagmus, strabismus, photophobia. Ophthalmologic examination reveals foveal hypoplasia, hypopigmentation of the retina and iris translucency. Microscopic examination of melanocytes suggests that the underlying defect in OA1 is an abnormality in melanosome formation. Recently we assembled a 350 kb cosmid contig spanning the entire critical region on Xp22.3, which measures approximately 110 kb. A minimum set of cosmids was used to identify transcribed sequences using both cDNA selection and exon amplification. Two putative exons recovered by exon amplification strategy were found to be highly conserved throughout evolution and, therefore, they were used as probes for the screening of fetal and adult retina cDNA libraries. This led to the isolation of clones spanning a full-length cDNA which measures 7.6 kb. Sequence analysis revealed that the predicted protein product shows homology with syntrophines and a Xenopus laevis apical protein. The gene covers approximately 170 kb of DNA and spans the entire critical region for OA1, being deleted in two patients with contiguous gene deletion including OA1 and in one patient with isolated OA1. Therefore, this new gene represents a very strong candidate for involvement in OA1 (an alternative, but unlikely possibility to be considered is that the true OA1 gene lies within an intron of the former). Northern analysis revealed very high level of expression in retina and melanoma. Unlike most Xp22.3 genes, this gene is conserved in the mouse. We are currently performing SSCP analysis and direct sequencing of exons on DNAs from approximately 60 unrelated patients with OA1 for mutation detection.

  4. Clinical presentations of X-linked retinoschisis in Taiwanese patients confirmed with genetic sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Laura; Chen, Ho-Min; Tsai, Shawn; Chang, Tsong-Chi; Tsai, Tzu-Hsun; Yang, Chung-May; Chao, An-Ning; Chen, Kuan-Jen; Kao, Ling-Yuh; Yeung, Ling; Yeh, Lung-Kun; Hwang, Yih-Shiou; Wu, Wei-Chi; Lai, Chi-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the clinical characteristics of X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) and identify genetic mutations in Taiwanese patients with XLRS. Methods This study included 23 affected males from 16 families with XLRS. Fundus photography, spectral domain optical coherent tomography (SD-OCT), fundus autofluorescence (FAF), and full-field electroretinograms (ERGs) were performed. The coding regions of the RS1 gene that encodes retinoschisin were sequenced. Results The median age at diagnosis was 18 years (range 4–58 years). The best-corrected visual acuity ranged from no light perception to 20/25. The typical spoke-wheel pattern in the macula was present in 61% of the patients (14/23) while peripheral retinoschisis was present in 43% of the patients (10/23). Four eyes presented with vitreous hemorrhage, and two eyes presented with leukocoria that mimics Coats’ disease. Macular schisis was identified with SD-OCT in 82% of the eyes (31/38) while foveal atrophy was present in 18% of the eyes (7/38). Concentric area of high intensity was the most common FAF abnormality observed. Seven out of 12 patients (58%) showed electronegative ERG findings. Sequencing of the RS1 gene identified nine mutations, six of which were novel. The mutations are all located in exons 4–6, including six missense mutations, two nonsense mutations, and one deletion-caused frameshift mutation. Conclusions XLRS is a clinically heterogeneous disease with profound phenotypic inter- and intrafamiliar variability. Genetic sequencing is valuable as it allows a definite diagnosis of XLRS to be made without the classical clinical features and ERG findings. This study showed the variety of clinical features of XLRS and reported novel mutations. PMID:25999676

  5. High-resolution mapping of the x-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (EDA) locus

    SciTech Connect

    Zonana, J.; Jones, M.; Litt, M.; Kramer, P.; Browne, D.; Becker, H.W. ); Brockdorff, N.; Rastan, S. ); Davies, K.P.; Clarke, A. )

    1992-11-01

    The X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (EDA) locus has been previously localized to the subchromosomal region Xq11-q21.1. The authors have extended previous linkage studies and analyzed linkage between the EDA locus and 10 marker loci, including five new loci, in 41 families. Four of the marker loci showed no recombination with the EDA locus, and six other loci were also linked to the EDA locus with recombination fractions of .009-.075. Multipoint analysis gave support to the placement of the PGK1P1 locus proximal to the EDA locus and the DXS453 and PGK1 loci distal to EDA. Further ordering of the loci could be inferred from a human-rodent somatic cell hybrid derived from an affected female with EDA and an X;9 translocation and from studies of an affected male with EDA and a submicroscopic deletion. Three of the proximal marker loci, which showed no recombination with the EDA locus, when used in combination, were informative in 92% of females. The closely linked flanking polymorphic loci DXS339 and DXS453 had heterozygosites of 72% and 76%, respectively, and when used jointly, they were doubly informative in 52% of females. The human DXS732 locus was defined by a conserved mouse probe pcos169E/4 (DXCrc169 locus) that consegregates with the mouse tabby (Ta) locus, a potential homologue to the EDA locus. The absence of recombination between EDA and the DXSA732 locus lends support to the hypothesis that the DXCrc169 locus in the mouse and the DXS732 locus in humans may contain candidate sequences for the Ta and EDA genes, respectively. 36 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  6. X-Linked miRNAs Associated with Gender Differences in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Khalifa, Olfa; Pers, Yves-Marie; Ferreira, Rosanna; Sénéchal, Audrey; Jorgensen, Christian; Apparailly, Florence; Duroux-Richard, Isabelle

    2016-11-08

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease that predominantly affects women. MicroRNAs have emerged as crucial regulators of the immune system, whose expression is deregulated in RA. We aimed at quantifying the expression level of 14 miRNAs located on the X chromosome and at identifying whether differences are associated with disease and/or sex. A case-control study of 21 RA patients and 22 age- and sex-matched healthy controls was performed on peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The expression level of five miRNAs (miR-221, miR-222, miR-532, miR-106a, and miR-98) was significantly different between RA and controls when stratifying by sex, and the expression level of four miRNAs (miR-222, miR-532, miR-98, and miR-92a) was significantly different between RA females and males. The expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analysis revealed a significant gender effect of the FoxP3 promoter polymorphism rs3761548A/C on miR-221, miR-222 and miR-532 expression levels, and of the FoxP3 polymorphism rs2232365A/G on miR-221 expression levels in PBMC of RA patients. These data further support the involvement of the X chromosome in RA susceptibility. X-linked miRNAs, in the context of sex differences, might provide novel insight into new molecular mechanisms and potential therapeutic targets in RA for disease treatment and prevention.

  7. Spontaneous shaker rat mutant – a new model for X-linked tremor/ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, Karla P.; Paul, Sharan; Calì, Tito; Lopreiato, Raffaele; Karan, Sukanya; Frizzarin, Martina; Ames, Darren; Zanni, Ginevra; Brini, Marisa; Dansithong, Warunee; Milash, Brett; Scoles, Daniel R.; Carafoli, Ernesto; Pulst, Stefan M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The shaker rat is an X-linked recessive spontaneous model of progressive Purkinje cell (PC) degeneration exhibiting a shaking ataxia and wide stance. Generation of Wistar Furth (WF)/Brown Norwegian (BN) F1 hybrids and genetic mapping of F2 sib-sib offspring using polymorphic markers narrowed the candidate gene region to 26 Mbp denoted by the last recombinant genetic marker DXRat21 at 133 Mbp to qter (the end of the long arm). In the WF background, the shaker mutation has complete penetrance, results in a stereotypic phenotype and there is a narrow window for age of disease onset; by contrast, the F2 hybrid phenotype was more varied, with a later age of onset and likely non-penetrance of the mutation. By deep RNA-sequencing, five variants were found in the candidate region; four were novel without known annotation. One of the variants caused an arginine (R) to cysteine (C) change at codon 35 of the ATPase, Ca2+ transporting, plasma membrane 3 (Atp2b3) gene encoding PMCA3 that has high expression in the cerebellum. The variant was well supported by hundreds of overlapping reads, and was found in 100% of all affected replicas and 0% of the wild-type (WT) replicas. The mutation segregated with disease in all affected animals and the amino acid change was found in an evolutionarily conserved region of PMCA3. Despite strong genetic evidence for pathogenicity, in vitro analyses of PMCA3R35C function did not show any differences to WT PMCA3. Because Atp2b3 mutation leads to congenital ataxia in humans, the identified Atp2b3 missense change in the shaker rat presents a good candidate for the shaker rat phenotype based on genetic criteria, but cannot yet be considered a definite pathogenic variant owing to lack of functional changes. PMID:27013529

  8. Temporal frequency deficits in the electroretinogram of the cone system in X-linked retinoschisis.

    PubMed

    Alexander, K R; Fishman, G A; Grover, S

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the extent of, and basis for, abnormalities in the flicker electroretinogram (ERG) of the cone system of patients with X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS), a form of hereditary vitreoretinal degeneration. ERGs were recorded from six patients with XLRS and from six visually normal subjects using high-contrast sinusoidal flicker that ranged in temporal frequency from 8 to 96 Hz, and that was presented against a rod-desensitizing adapting field. Compared to the control subjects, the patients with XLRS showed a significant reduction in the amplitude of the ERG response fundamental at temporal frequencies of 32 Hz and higher. In addition, their response phases were at or below the lower limits of normal (representing a phase lag) for temporal frequencies greater than 8 Hz. The higher harmonics of the patients' ERG responses to a low frequency stimulus were attenuated over the same temporal frequency range as was the response fundamental. This finding indicates that a major component of the abnormal temporal filtering responsible for the ERG abnormalities in XLRS occurs beyond the level of the early retinal nonlinearity that generates the harmonic components of the ERG response, and therefore is most likely postreceptoral in origin. Consistent with this interpretation, the ERG waveforms of the XLRS patients showed a significant attenuation of the ON-response component, with a normal OFF response. The overall pattern of results suggests that the marked reduction of ERG response amplitudes and the phase lag at the higher temporal frequencies in XLRS stem, at least in part, from a predominant attenuation of the ON-bipolar cell contribution to the flicker ERG.

  9. Somatic mosaicism underlies X-linked acrogigantism syndrome in sporadic male subjects.

    PubMed

    Daly, Adrian F; Yuan, Bo; Fina, Frederic; Caberg, Jean-Hubert; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Rostomyan, Liliya; de Herder, Wouter W; Naves, Luciana A; Metzger, Daniel; Cuny, Thomas; Rabl, Wolfgang; Shah, Nalini; Jaffrain-Rea, Marie-Lise; Zatelli, Maria Chiara; Faucz, Fabio R; Castermans, Emilie; Nanni-Metellus, Isabelle; Lodish, Maya; Muhammad, Ammar; Palmeira, Leonor; Potorac, Iulia; Mantovani, Giovanna; Neggers, Sebastian J; Klein, Marc; Barlier, Anne; Liu, Pengfei; Ouafik, L'Houcine; Bours, Vincent; Lupski, James R; Stratakis, Constantine A; Beckers, Albert

    2016-04-01

    Somatic mosaicism has been implicated as a causative mechanism in a number of genetic and genomic disorders. X-linked acrogigantism (XLAG) syndrome is a recently characterized genomic form of pediatric gigantism due to aggressive pituitary tumors that is caused by submicroscopic chromosome Xq26.3 duplications that include GPR101 We studied XLAG syndrome patients (n= 18) to determine if somatic mosaicism contributed to the genomic pathophysiology. Eighteen subjects with XLAG syndrome caused by Xq26.3 duplications were identified using high-definition array comparative genomic hybridization (HD-aCGH). We noted that males with XLAG had a decreased log2ratio (LR) compared with expected values, suggesting potential mosaicism, whereas females showed no such decrease. Compared with familial male XLAG cases, sporadic males had more marked evidence for mosaicism, with levels of Xq26.3 duplication between 16.1 and 53.8%. These characteristics were replicated using a novel, personalized breakpoint junction-specific quantification droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR) technique. Using a separate ddPCR technique, we studied the feasibility of identifying XLAG syndrome cases in a distinct patient population of 64 unrelated subjects with acromegaly/gigantism, and identified one female gigantism patient who had had increased copy number variation (CNV) threshold for GPR101 that was subsequently diagnosed as having XLAG syndrome on HD-aCGH. Employing a combination of HD-aCGH and novel ddPCR approaches, we have demonstrated, for the first time, that XLAG syndrome can be caused by variable degrees of somatic mosaicism for duplications at chromosome Xq26.3. Somatic mosaicism was shown to occur in sporadic males but not in females with XLAG syndrome, although the clinical characteristics of the disease were similarly severe in both sexes.

  10. Survey of the enthesopathy of X-linked hypophosphatemia and its characterization in Hyp mice.

    PubMed

    Liang, Guoying; Katz, Lee D; Insogna, Karl L; Carpenter, Thomas O; Macica, Carolyn M

    2009-09-01

    X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH) is characterized by rickets and osteomalacia as a result of an inactivating mutation of the PHEX (phosphate-regulating gene with homology to endopeptidases on the X chromosome) gene. PHEX encodes an endopeptidase that, when inactivated, results in elevated circulating levels of FGF-23, a novel phosphate-regulating hormone (a phosphatonin), thereby resulting in increased phosphate excretion and impaired bone mineralization. A generalized and severe mineralizing enthesopathy in patients with XLH was first reported in 1985; we likewise report a survey in which we found evidence of enthesopathy in fibrocartilaginous insertion sites, as well as osteophyte formation, in the majority of patients. Nonetheless, there has been very little focus on the progression and pathogenesis underlying the paradoxical heterotopic calcification of tendon and ligament insertion sites. Such studies have been hampered by lack of a model of mineralizing enthesopathy. We therefore characterized the involvement of the most frequently targeted fibrocartilaginous tendon insertion sites in Hyp mice, a murine model of the XLH mutation that phenocopies the human syndrome in every detail including hypophosphatemia and elevated FGF-23. Histological examination of the affected entheses revealed that mineralizing insertion sites, while thought to involve bone spur formation, were not due to bone-forming osteoblasts but instead to a significant expansion of mineralizing fibrocartilage. Our finding that enthesis fibrocartilage cells specifically express fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3)/Klotho suggests that the high circulating levels of FGF-23, characteristic of XLH and Hyp mice, may be part of the biochemical milieu that underlies the expansion of mineralizing enthesis fibrocartilage.

  11. Mutations, Clinical Findings and Survival Estimates in South American Patients with X-Linked Adrenoleukodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Fernanda dos Santos; Matte, Ursula; Habekost, Clarissa Troller; de Castilhos, Raphael Machado; El Husny, Antonette Souto; Lourenço, Charles Marques; Vianna-Morgante, Angela M.; Giuliani, Liane; Galera, Marcial Francis; Honjo, Rachel; Kim, Chong Ae; Politei, Juan; Vargas, Carmen Regla; Jardim, Laura Bannach

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we analyzed the ABCD1 gene in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) patients and relatives from 38 unrelated families from South America, as well as phenotypic proportions, survival estimates, and the potential effect of geographical origin in clinical characteristics. Methods X- ALD patients from Brazil, Argentina and Uruguay were invited to participate in molecular studies to determine their genetic status, characterize the mutations and improve the genetic counseling of their families. All samples were screened by SSCP analysis of PCR fragments, followed by automated DNA sequencing to establish the specific mutation in each family. Age at onset and at death, male phenotypes, genetic status of women, and the effect of family and of latitude of origin were also studied. Results We identified thirty-six different mutations (twelve novel). This population had an important allelic heterogeneity, as only p.Arg518Gln was repeatedly found (three families). Four cases carried de novo mutations. Intra-familiar phenotype variability was observed in all families. Out of 87 affected males identified, 65% had the cerebral phenotype (CALD). The mean (95% CI) ages at onset and at death of the CALD were 10.9 (9.1–12.7) and 24.7 (19.8–29.6) years. No association was found between phenotypic manifestations and latitude of origin. One index-case was a girl with CALD who carried an ABCD1 mutation, and had completely skewed X inactivation. Conclusions This study extends the spectrum of mutations in X-ALD, confirms the high rates of de novo mutations and the absence of common mutations, and suggests a possible high frequency of cerebral forms in our population. PMID:22479560

  12. Immune Dysregulation, Polyendocrinopathy, Enteropathy, X-Linked Syndrome: A Paradigm of Immunodeficiency with Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Barzaghi, Federica; Passerini, Laura; Bacchetta, Rosa

    2012-01-01

    Immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked (IPEX) syndrome is a rare monogenic primary immunodeficiency (PID) due to mutations of FOXP3, a key transcription factor for naturally occurring (n) regulatory T (Treg) cells. The dysfunction of Treg cells is the main pathogenic event leading to the multi-organ autoimmunity that characterizes IPEX syndrome, a paradigm of genetically determined PID with autoimmunity. IPEX has a severe early onset and can become rapidly fatal within the first year of life regardless of the type and site of the mutation. The initial presenting symptoms are severe enteritis and/or type-1 diabetes mellitus, alone or in combination with eczema and elevated serum IgE. Other autoimmune symptoms, such as hypothyroidism, cytopenia, hepatitis, nephropathy, arthritis, and alopecia can develop in patients who survive the initial acute phase. The current therapeutic options for IPEX patients are limited. Supportive and replacement therapies combined with pharmacological immunosuppression are required to control symptoms at onset. However, these procedures can allow only a reduction of the clinical manifestations without a permanent control of the disease. The only known effective cure for IPEX syndrome is hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, but it is always limited by the availability of a suitable donor and the lack of specific guidelines for bone marrow transplant in the context of this disease. This review aims to summarize the clinical histories and genomic mutations of the IPEX patients described in the literature to date. We will focus on the clinical and immunological features that allow differential diagnosis of IPEX syndrome and distinguish it from other PID with autoimmunity. The efficacy of the current therapies will be reviewed, and possible innovative approaches, based on the latest highlights of the pathogenesis to treat this severe primary autoimmune disease of childhood, will be discussed. PMID:23060872

  13. Childhood acromegaly due to X-linked acrogigantism: long term follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Rebecca J.; Bell, Jennifer; Chung, Wendy K.; David, Raphael; Oberfield, Sharon E.; Wardlaw, Sharon L.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Acromegaly in infancy is extremely rare. We describe a 32 year old woman who presented at 6 months of age with isolated macrocephaly, followed by accelerated linear growth. At 21 months of age, her head circumference was 55 cm (+5.5 SD), height was 97.6 cm (+4.4 SD) and weight was 20.6 kg (+6.2 SD). She had markedly elevated levels of growth hormone (GH) (135 ng/ml), IGF-1 (1540 ng/ml) and prolactin (370 ng/ml). A pituitary macroadenoma was surgically resected. Immunohistochemical staining was positive for GH. Post-operatively, she developed ACTH and TSH deficiency and diabetes insipidus. Methods Long term clinical follow-up and genetic testing with chromosomal microarray analysis. Results Despite GH deficiency, she grew well until 7 ½ years old, with subsequent decline in growth velocity, and received GH therapy for 5 years. Puberty was initiated with estrogen therapy. As an adult, she has no stigmata of acromegaly, with a height of 164.5 cm and non-acromegalic features. IGF-1 has remained in the low normal range. Prolactin has been mildly elevated. Serial MRIs have shown no evidence of tumor recurrence. She receives replacement therapy with hydrocortisone, levothyroxine and DDAVP. Chromosomal microarray analysis revealed that she has X-linked acrogigantism (X-LAG) due to a de novo duplication of Xq26.3 (516 kb). She recently became pregnant following ovarian stimulation and chorionic villus sampling revealed that she is carrying a male with the same duplication. Conclusion This report provides detailed long term clinical follow-up of a patient with X-LAG syndrome. PMID:27631333

  14. X-Linked miRNAs Associated with Gender Differences in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Khalifa, Olfa; Pers, Yves-Marie; Ferreira, Rosanna; Sénéchal, Audrey; Jorgensen, Christian; Apparailly, Florence; Duroux-Richard, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease that predominantly affects women. MicroRNAs have emerged as crucial regulators of the immune system, whose expression is deregulated in RA. We aimed at quantifying the expression level of 14 miRNAs located on the X chromosome and at identifying whether differences are associated with disease and/or sex. A case–control study of 21 RA patients and 22 age- and sex-matched healthy controls was performed on peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The expression level of five miRNAs (miR-221, miR-222, miR-532, miR-106a, and miR-98) was significantly different between RA and controls when stratifying by sex, and the expression level of four miRNAs (miR-222, miR-532, miR-98, and miR-92a) was significantly different between RA females and males. The expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analysis revealed a significant gender effect of the FoxP3 promoter polymorphism rs3761548A/C on miR-221, miR-222 and miR-532 expression levels, and of the FoxP3 polymorphism rs2232365A/G on miR-221 expression levels in PBMC of RA patients. These data further support the involvement of the X chromosome in RA susceptibility. X-linked miRNAs, in the context of sex differences, might provide novel insight into new molecular mechanisms and potential therapeutic targets in RA for disease treatment and prevention. PMID:27834806

  15. Mutations in btk in patients with presumed X-linked agammaglobulinemia.

    PubMed Central

    Conley, M E; Mathias, D; Treadaway, J; Minegishi, Y; Rohrer, J

    1998-01-01

    In 1993, two groups showed that X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) was due to mutations in a tyrosine kinase now called Btk. Most laboratories have been able to detect mutations in Btk in 80%-90% of males with presumed XLA. The remaining patients may have mutations in Btk that are difficult to identify, or they may have defects that are phenotypically similar to XLA but genotypically different. We analyzed 101 families in which affected males were diagnosed as having XLA. Mutations in Btk were identified in 38 of 40 families with more than one affected family member and in 56 of 61 families with sporadic disease. Excluding the patients in whom the marked decrease in B cell numbers characteristic of XLA could not be confirmed by immunofluorescence studies, mutations in Btk were identified in 43 of 46 patients with presumed sporadic XLA. Two of the three remaining patients had defects in other genes required for normal B cell development, and the third patient was unlikely to have XLA, on the basis of results of extensive Btk analysis. Our techniques were unable to identify a mutation in Btk in one male with both a family history and laboratory findings suggestive of XLA. DNA samples from 41 of 49 of the mothers of males with sporadic disease and proven mutations in Btk were positive for the mutation found in their son. In the other 8 families, the mutation appeared to arise in the maternal germ line. In 20 families, haplotype analysis showed that the new mutation originated in the maternal grandfather or great-grandfather. These studies indicate that 90%-95% of males with presumed XLA have mutations in Btk. The other patients are likely to have defects in other genes. PMID:9545398

  16. A Modified γ-Retrovirus Vector for X-Linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Hacein-Bey-Abina, S.; Pai, S.-Y.; Gaspar, H.B.; Armant, M.; Berry, C.C.; Blanche, S.; Bleesing, J.; Blondeau, J.; de Boer, H.; Buckland, K.F.; Caccavelli, L.; Cros, G.; De Oliveira, S.; Fernández, K.S.; Guo, D.; Harris, C.E.; Hopkins, G.; Lehmann, L.E.; Lim, A.; London, W.B.; van der Loo, J.C.M.; Malani, N.; Male, F.; Malik, P.; Marinovic, M.A.; McNicol, A.-M.; Moshous, D.; Neven, B.; Oleastro, M.; Picard, C.; Ritz, J.; Rivat, C.; Schambach, A.; Shaw, K.L.; Sherman, E.A.; Silberstein, L.E.; Six, E.; Touzot, F.; Tsytsykova, A.; Xu-Bayford, J.; Baum, C.; Bushman, F.D.; Fischer, A.; Kohn, D.B.; Filipovich, A.H.; Notarangelo, L.D.; Cavazzana, M.; Williams, D.A.; Thrasher, A.J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND In previous clinical trials involving children with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1), a Moloney murine leukemia virus–based γ-retrovirus vector expressing interleukin-2 receptor γ-chain (γc) complementary DNA successfully restored immunity in most patients but resulted in vector-induced leukemia through enhancer-mediated mutagenesis in 25% of patients. We assessed the efficacy and safety of a self-inactivating retrovirus for the treatment of SCID-X1. METHODS We enrolled nine boys with SCID-X1 in parallel trials in Europe and the United States to evaluate treatment with a self-inactivating (SIN) γ-retrovirus vector containing deletions in viral enhancer sequences expressing γc (SIN-γc). RESULTS All patients received bone marrow–derived CD34+ cells transduced with the SIN-γc vector, without preparative conditioning. After 12.1 to 38.7 months of follow-up, eight of the nine children were still alive. One patient died from an overwhelming adenoviral infection before reconstitution with genetically modified T cells. Of the remaining eight patients, seven had recovery of peripheral-blood T cells that were functional and led to resolution of infections. The patients remained healthy thereafter. The kinetics of CD3+ T-cell recovery was not significantly different from that observed in previous trials. Assessment of insertion sites in peripheral blood from patients in the current trial as compared with those in previous trials revealed significantly less clustering of insertion sites within LMO2 , MECOM, and other lymphoid proto-oncogenes in our patients. CONCLUSIONS This modified γ-retrovirus vector was found to retain efficacy in the treatment of SCID-X1. The long-term effect of this therapy on leukemogenesis remains unknown. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and others; ClinicalTrials.gov numbers, NCT01410019, NCT01175239, and NCT01129544.) PMID:25295500

  17. Somatic Mosaicism Underlies X-linked Acrogigantism (XLAG) Syndrome in Sporadic Male Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Adrian F.; Yuan, Bo; Fina, Frederic; Caberg, Jean-Hubert; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Rostomyan, Liliya; de Herder, Wouter W.; Naves, Luciana A.; Metzger, Daniel; Cuny, Thomas; Rabl, Wolfgang; Shah, Nalini; Jaffrain-Rea, Marie-Lise; Zatelli, Maria Chiara; Faucz, Fabio R; Castermans, Emilie; Nanni-Metellus, Isabelle; Lodish, Maya; Muhammad, Ammar; Palmeira, Leonor; Potorac, Iulia; Mantovani, Giovanna; Neggers, Sebastian J.; Klein, Marc; Barlier, Anne; Liu, Pengfei; Ouafik, L'Houcine; Bours, Vincent; Lupski, James R.; Stratakis, Constantine A.; Beckers., Albert

    2016-01-01

    Somatic mosaicism has been implicated as a causative mechanism in a number of genetic and genomic disorders. X-linked acrogigantism (XLAG) syndrome is a recently characterized genomic form of pediatric gigantism due to aggressive pituitary tumors that is caused by submicroscopic chromosome Xq26.3 duplications that include GPR101. We studied XLAG syndrome patients (N=18) to determine if somatic mosaicism contributed to the genomic pathophysiology. Eighteen subjects with XLAG syndrome were identified with Xq26.3 duplications using high definition array comparative genome hybridization (HD-aCGH). We noted males with XLAG had a decreased log2 ratio compared with expected values, suggesting potential mosaicism, while females showed no such decrease. As compared with familial male XLAG cases, sporadic males had more marked evidence for mosaicism, with levels of Xq26.3 duplication between 16.1-53.8%. These characteristics were replicated using a novel, personalized breakpoint-junction specific quantification droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) technique. Using a separate ddPCR technique we studied the feasibility of identifying XLAG syndrome cases in a distinct patient population of 64 unrelated subjects with acromegaly/gigantism and identified one female gigantism patient that had increased copy number variation (CNV) threshold for GPR101 that was subsequently diagnosed as having XLAG syndrome on HD-aCGH. Employing a combination of HD-aCGH and novel ddPCR approaches, we have demonstrated, for the first time, that XLAG syndrome can be caused by variable degrees of somatic mosaicism for duplications at chromosome Xq26.3. Somatic mosaicism was shown to occur in sporadic males but not in females with XLAG syndrome, although the clinical characteristics of the disease were similarly severe in both sexes. PMID:26935837

  18. X-linked Acrogigantism (X-LAG) Syndrome: Clinical Profile and Therapeutic Responses

    PubMed Central

    Beckers, Albert; Lodish, Maya Beth; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Rostomyan, Liliya; Lee, Misu; Faucz, Fabio R; Yuan, Bo; Choong, Catherine S; Caberg, Jean-Hubert; Verrua, Elisa; Naves, Luciana Ansaneli; Cheetham, Tim D; Young, Jacques; Lysy, Philippe A; Petrossians, Patrick; Cotterill, Andrew; Shah, Nalini Samir; Metzger, Daniel; Castermans, Emilie; Ambrosio, Maria Rosaria; Villa, Chiara; Strebkova, Natalia; Mazerkina, Nadia; Gaillard, Stéphan; Barra, Gustavo Barcelos; Casulari, Luis Augusto; Neggers, Sebastian J.; Salvatori, Roberto; Jaffrain-Rea, Marie-Lise; Zacharin, Margaret; Santamaria, Beatriz Lecumberri; Zacharieva, Sabina; Lim, Ee Mun; Mantovani, Giovanna; Zatelli, Maria Chaira; Collins, Michael T; Bonneville, Jean-François; Quezado, Martha; Chittiboina, Prashant; Oldfield, Edward H.; Bours, Vincent; Liu, Pengfei; De Herder, Wouter; Pellegata, Natalia; Lupski, James R.; Daly, Adrian F.; Stratakis, Constantine A.

    2015-01-01

    X-linked acro-gigantism (X-LAG) is a new syndrome of pituitary gigantism, caused by microduplications on chromosome Xq26.3, encompassing the gene GPR101, which is highly upregulated in pituitary tumors. We conducted this study to explore the clinical, radiological and hormonal phenotype and responses to therapy in patients with X-LAG syndrome. The study included 18 patients (13 sporadic) with X-LAG and a microduplication in chromosome Xq26.3. All sporadic cases had unique duplications and the inheritance pattern in 2 families was dominant with all Xq26.3 duplication carriers being affected. Patients began to grow rapidly as early as 2–3 months of age (median 12 months). At diagnosis (median delay 27 months), patients had a median height and weight SDS score of >+3.9 SDS. Apart from the increased overall body size, the children had acromegalic symptoms including acral enlargement and facial coarsening. More than a third of cases had increased appetite. Patients had marked hypersecretion of GH/IGF-1 and prolactin, usually due to a pituitary macroadenoma or hyperplasia. Primary neurosurgical control was achieved with extensive anterior pituitary resection but postoperative hypopituitarism was frequent. Control with somatostatin analogs was not readily achieved despite moderate to high somatostatin receptor subtype-2 expression in tumor tissue. Postoperative adjuvant pegvisomant achieved control of IGF-1 all 5 cases in which it was employed. X-LAG is a new infant-onset gigantism syndrome that has a severe clinical phenotype leading to challenging disease management. PMID:25712922

  19. Mutational and protein analysis of patients and heterozygous women with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Feigenbaum, V.; Lombard-Platet, G.; Guidoux, S.; Sarde, C. O.; Mandel, J. L.; Aubourg, P.

    1996-01-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD), a neurodegenerative disorder associated with impaired beta-oxidation of very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA), is due to mutations in a gene encoding a peroxisomal ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter (ALD protein [ALDP]). We analyzed the open reading frame of the ALD gene in 44 French ALD kindred by using SSCP or denaturing gradient-gel electrophoresis and studied the effect of mutations on ALDP by immunocytofluorescence and western blotting of fibroblasts and/or white blood cells. Mutations were detected in 37 of 44 kindreds and were distributed over the whole protein-coding region, with the exception of the C terminus encoded in exon 10. Except for two mutations (delAG1801 and P560L) observed four times each, nearly every ALD family has a different mutation. Twenty-four of 37 mutations were missense mutations leading to amino acid changes located in or close to putative transmembrane segments (TMS 2, 3, 4, and 5), in the EAA-like motif and in the nucleotide fold of the ATP-binding domain of ALDP. Of 38 ALD patients tested, 27 (71%) lacked ALDP immunoreactivity in their fibroblasts and/or white blood cells. More than half of missense mutations studied (11 of 21) resulted in a complete lack of ALDP immunoreactivity, and six missense mutations resulted in decreased ALDP expression. The fibroblasts and/or white blood cells of 15 of 15 heterozygous carrier from ALD kindred with no ALDP showed a mixture of positive- and negative-ALDP immunoreactivity due to X-inactivation. Since 5%-15% of heterozygous women have normal VLCFA levels, the immunodetection of ALDP in white blood cells can be applicable in a majority of ALD kindred, to identify heterozygous women, particularly when the ALD gene mutation has not yet been identified. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8651290

  20. Hereditary spastic paraplegias with autosomal dominant, recessive, X-linked, or maternal trait of inheritance.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef; Löscher, Wolfgang; Quasthoff, Stefan; Wanschitz, Julia; Auer-Grumbach, Michaela; Stevanin, Giovanni

    2012-07-15

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (SPG) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders that are clinically characterised by progressive spasticity and weakness of the lower-limbs (pure SPG) and, majoritorian, additional more extensive neurological or non-neurological manifestations (complex or complicated SPG). Pure SPG is characterised by progressive spasticity and weakness of the lower-limbs, and occasionally sensory disturbances or bladder dysfunction. Complex SPGs additionally include cognitive impairment, dementia, epilepsy, extrapyramidal disturbances, cerebellar involvement, retinopathy, optic atrophy, deafness, polyneuropathy, or skin lesions in the absence of coexisting disorders. Nineteen SPGs follow an autosomal-dominant (AD-SPG), 27 an autosomal-recessive (AR-SPG), 5 X-linked (XL-SPG), and one a maternal trait of inheritance. SPGs are due to mutations in genes encoding for proteins involved in the maintenance of corticospinal tract neurons. Among the AD-SPGs, 40-45% of patients carry mutations in the SPAST-gene (SPG4) and 10% in the ATL1-gene (SPG3), while the other 9 genes are more rarely involved (NIPA1 (SPG6), KIAA0196 (SPG8), KIF5A (SPG10), RNT2 (SPG12), SPGD1 (SPG13), BSCL2 (SPG17), REEP1 (SPG31), ZFYVE27 (SPG33, debated), and SLC33A1 (SPG42, debated)). Among the AR-SPGs, ~20% of the patients carry mutations in the KIAA1840 (SPG11) gene whereas the 15 other genes are rarely mutated and account for SPGs in single families yet (CYP7B1 (SPG5), SPG7 (SPG7), ZFYVE26 (SPG15), ERLIN2 (SPG18), SPG20 (SPG20), ACP33 (SPG21), KIF1A (SPG30), FA2H (SPG35), NTE (SPG39), GJA12/GJC2 (SPG44), KIAA0415 (SPG48) and 4 genes encoding for the AP4-complex (SPG47)). Among the XL-SPGs, 3 causative genes have been identified (L1CAM (SPG1), PLP1 (SPG2), and SLC16A2 (SPG22)). The diagnosis of SPGs is based on clinical, instrumental and genetic investigations. Treatment is exclusively symptomatic.

  1. Canine distemper virus.

    PubMed

    Martella, Vito; Elia, Gabrielle; Buonavoglia, Canio

    2008-07-01

    Vaccine-based prophylaxis has greatly helped to keep distemper disease under control. Notwithstanding, the incidence of canine distemper virus (CDV)-related disease in canine populations throughout the world seems to have increased in the past decades, and several episodes of CDV disease in vaccinated animals have been reported, with nation-wide proportions in some cases. Increasing surveillance should be pivotal to identify new CDV variants and to understand the dynamics of CDV epidemiology. In addition, it is important to evaluate whether the efficacy of the vaccine against these new strains may somehow be affected.

  2. Close linkage of random DNA fragments from Xq 21.3-22 to X-linked agammaglobulinaemia (XLA).

    PubMed

    Malcolm, S; de Saint Basile, G; Arveiler, B; Lau, Y L; Szabo, P; Fischer, A; Griscelli, C; Debre, M; Mandel, J L; Callard, R E

    1987-10-01

    Linkage analysis of 15 families affected by X-linked agammaglobulinaemia (XLA) showed close linkage with three probes located towards the centre of the long arm of the X chromosome. No cross-overs were found using pXG12 (DXS94) lod 6.6 or S21 (DXS17) lod 4.4. One cross-over was found with 19.2 (DXS3). This confirms and extends a previous linkage study (Kwan et al. 1986) which demonstrated linkage with S21 and 19.2. Of the families 14 were informative for either pXG12 or S21 and these probes should thus be of great diagnostic value. No evidence of heterogeneity was found in the XLA families but several cross-overs within this region were detected in a family with the X-linked hyper-IgM syndrome confirming this disease as a separate clinical entity.

  3. A gene for nonspecific X-linked mental retardation (MRX41) is located in the distal segment of Xq28

    SciTech Connect

    Hamel, B.C.J.; Kremer, H.; Helm, B. van den

    1996-07-12

    We report on a family in which non-syndromal mild to moderate mental retardation segregates as an X-linked trait (MRX41). Two point linkage analysis demonstrated linkage between the disorder and marker DXS3 in Xq21.33 with a lod score of 2.56 at {theta} = 0.0 and marker DXS1108 in Xq28 with a lod score of 3.82 at {theta} = 0.0. Multipoint linkage analysis showed that the odds for a location of the gene in Xq28 vs. Xq21.33 are 100:1. This is the fourth family with non-specific X-linked mental retardation with Xq28-qter as the most likely gene localization. 16 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  4. X-linked progressive mixed deafness: A new microdeletion that involves a more proximal region in Xq21

    SciTech Connect

    Piussan, C.; Mathieu, M.; Kolski, C.; Strunski, V.; Hanauer, A.; Dahl, N.; Biancalana, V.; Heyberger, S.

    1995-01-01

    We report a large two-generation pedigree with seven affected males segregating for an X-linked mixed conductive sensorineural deafness. The patients present with atypical Mondini-like dysplasia, dilated petrous facial canal, dilatation of the internal auditory meatus fully connected with enlarged cochlear canals, and, in one patient, a wide bulbous posterior labyrinth. Obligatory carrier females are mildly affected. Molecular characterization of this family revealed a deletion of locus DXS169, in Xq21.1. Loci DXS72 and DXS26, which, respectively, flank DXS169 proximally and distally, were intact. Since a gene responsible for X-linked progressive mixed deafness with perilymphatic gusher (DFN3) has previously been assigned by deletion mapping to a slightly more distal interval between DXS26 and DXS121, this study indicates either two different deafness genes or the involvement of a very large region in Xq21. 35 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Deletion of the X-linked Opsin Gene Array Locus Control Region (LCR) Results in Disruption of the Cone Mosaic

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Joseph; Rossi, Ethan A.; Porter, Jason; Neitz, Jay; Roorda, Austin; Williams, David; Neitz, Maureen

    2010-01-01

    Blue-cone monochromacy (BCM) is an X-linked condition in which long- (L−) and middle- (M−) wavelength-sensitive cone function is absent. Due to the X-linked nature of the condition, female carriers are spared from a full manifestation of the associated defects but can show visual symptoms, including abnormal cone electroretinograms. Here we imaged the cone mosaic in four females carrying an L/M array with deletion of the locus control region, resulting in an absence of L/M opsin gene expression (effectively acting as a cone opsin knockout). On average, they had cone mosaics with reduced density and disrupted organization compared to normal trichromats. This suggests that the absence of opsin in a subset of cones results in their early degeneration, with X-inactivation the likely mechanism underlying phenotypic variability in BCM carriers. PMID:20638402

  6. New domains of neural cell-adhesion molecule L1 implicated in X-linked hydrocephalus and MASA syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Jouet, M.; Kenwick, S.; Moncla, A.

    1995-06-01

    The neural cell-adhesion molecule L1 is involved in intercellular recognition and neuronal migration in the CNS. Recently, we have shown that mutations in the gene encoding L1 are responsible for three related disorders; X-linked hydrocephalus, MASA (mental retardation, aphasia, shuffling gait, and adducted thumbs) syndrome, and spastic paraplegia type I (SPG1). These three disorders represent a clinical spectrum that varies not only between families but sometimes also within families. To date, 14 independent L1 mutations have been reported and shown to be disease causing. Here we report nine novel L1 mutations in X-linked hydrocephalus and MASA-syndrome families, including the first examples of mutations affecting the fibronectin type III domains of the molecule. They are discussed in relation both to phenotypes and to the insights that they provide into L1 function. 39 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Intra-amniotic rAAV-mediated microdystrophin gene transfer improves canine X-linked muscular dystrophy and may induce immune tolerance.

    PubMed

    Hayashita-Kinoh, Hiromi; Yugeta, Naoko; Okada, Hironori; Nitahara-Kasahara, Yuko; Chiyo, Tomoko; Okada, Takashi; Takeda, Shin'ichi

    2015-04-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe congenital disease due to mutations in the dystrophin gene. Supplementation of dystrophin using recombinant adenoassociated virus vector has promise as a treatment of DMD, although therapeutic benefit of the truncated dystrophin still remains to be elucidated. Besides, host immune responses against the vector as well as transgene products have been denoted in the clinical gene therapy studies. Here, we transduced dystrophic dogs fetuses to investigate the therapeutic effects of an AAV vector expressing microdystrophin under conditions of immune tolerance. rAAV-CMV-microdystrophin and a rAAV-CAG-luciferase were injected into the amniotic fluid surrounding fetuses. We also reinjected rAAV9-CMV-microdystrophin into the jugular vein of an infant dystrophic dog to induce systemic expression of microdystrophin. Gait and cardiac function significantly improved in the rAAV-microdystrophin-injected dystrophic dog, suggesting that an adequate treatment of rAAV-microdystrophin with immune modulation induces successful long-term transgene expression to analyze improved dystrophic phenotype.

  8. Central precocious puberty in a patient with X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita and Xp21 contiguous gene deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Koh, Ji Won; Kang, So Young; Kim, Gu Hwan; Yoo, Han Wook; Yu, Jeesuk

    2013-06-01

    X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita is caused by the mutation of DAX-1 gene (dosage-sensitive sex reversal, adrenal hypoplasia critical region, on chromosome X, gene 1), and can occur as part of a contiguous gene deletion syndrome in association with glycerol kinase (GK) deficiency, Duchenne muscular dystrophy and X-linked interleukin-1 receptor accessory protein-like 1 (IL1RAPL1) gene deficiency. It is usually associated with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, although in rare cases, it has been reported to occur in normal puberty or even central precocious puberty. This study addresses a case in which central precocious puberty developed in a boy with X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita who had complete deletion of the genes DAX-1, GK and IL1RAPL1 (Xp21 contiguous gene deletion syndrome). Initially he was admitted for the management of adrenal crisis at the age of 2 months, and managed with hydrocortisone and florinef. At 45 months of age, his each testicular volumes of 4 mL and a penile length of 5 cm were noted, with pubic hair of Tanner stage 2. His bone age was advanced and a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) stimulation test showed a luteinizing hormone peak of 8.26 IU/L, confirming central precocious puberty. He was then treated with a GnRH agonist, as well as steroid replacement therapy. In Korea, this is the first case of central precocious puberty developed in a male patient with X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita.

  9. H4K20me1 contributes to downregulation of X-linked genes for C. elegans dosage compensation.

    PubMed

    Vielle, Anne; Lang, Jackie; Dong, Yan; Ercan, Sevinc; Kotwaliwale, Chitra; Rechtsteiner, Andreas; Appert, Alex; Chen, Q Brent; Dose, Andrea; Egelhofer, Thea; Kimura, Hiroshi; Stempor, Przemyslaw; Dernburg, Abby; Lieb, Jason D; Strome, Susan; Ahringer, Julie

    2012-09-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans dosage compensation complex (DCC) equalizes X-chromosome gene dosage between XO males and XX hermaphrodites by two-fold repression of X-linked gene expression in hermaphrodites. The DCC localizes to the X chromosomes in hermaphrodites but not in males, and some subunits form a complex homologous to condensin. The mechanism by which the DCC downregulates gene expression remains unclear. Here we show that the DCC controls the methylation state of lysine 20 of histone H4, leading to higher H4K20me1 and lower H4K20me3 levels on the X chromosomes of XX hermaphrodites relative to autosomes. We identify the PR-SET7 ortholog SET-1 and the Suv4-20 ortholog SET-4 as the major histone methyltransferases for monomethylation and di/trimethylation of H4K20, respectively, and provide evidence that X-chromosome enrichment of H4K20me1 involves inhibition of SET-4 activity on the X. RNAi knockdown of set-1 results in synthetic lethality with dosage compensation mutants and upregulation of X-linked gene expression, supporting a model whereby H4K20me1 functions with the condensin-like C. elegans DCC to repress transcription of X-linked genes. H4K20me1 is important for mitotic chromosome condensation in mammals, suggesting that increased H4K20me1 on the X may restrict access of the transcription machinery to X-linked genes via chromatin compaction.

  10. Mutations in FRMD7, a newly identified member of the FERM family, cause X-linked idiopathic congenital nystagmus.

    PubMed

    Tarpey, Patrick; Thomas, Shery; Sarvananthan, Nagini; Mallya, Uma; Lisgo, Steven; Talbot, Chris J; Roberts, Eryl O; Awan, Musarat; Surendran, Mylvaganam; McLean, Rebecca J; Reinecke, Robert D; Langmann, Andrea; Lindner, Susanne; Koch, Martina; Jain, Sunila; Woodruff, Geoffrey; Gale, Richard P; Bastawrous, Andrew; Degg, Chris; Droutsas, Konstantinos; Asproudis, Ioannis; Zubcov, Alina A; Pieh, Christina; Veal, Colin D; Machado, Rajiv D; Backhouse, Oliver C; Baumber, Laura; Constantinescu, Cris S; Brodsky, Michael C; Hunter, David G; Hertle, Richard W; Read, Randy J; Edkins, Sarah; O'Meara, Sarah; Parker, Adrian; Stevens, Claire; Teague, Jon; Wooster, Richard; Futreal, P Andrew; Trembath, Richard C; Stratton, Michael R; Raymond, F Lucy; Gottlob, Irene

    2006-11-01

    Idiopathic congenital nystagmus is characterized by involuntary, periodic, predominantly horizontal oscillations of both eyes. We identified 22 mutations in FRMD7 in 26 families with X-linked idiopathic congenital nystagmus. Screening of 42 singleton cases of idiopathic congenital nystagmus (28 male, 14 females) yielded three mutations (7%). We found restricted expression of FRMD7 in human embryonic brain and developing neural retina, suggesting a specific role in the control of eye movement and gaze stability.

  11. A multipedigree linkage study of X-linked deafness: linkage to Xq13-q21 and evidence for genetic heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Reardon, W; Middleton-Price, H R; Sandkuijl, L; Phelps, P; Bellman, S; Luxon, L; Pembrey, M E; Malcolm, S

    1991-12-01

    A locus for X-linked nonsyndromic deafness has previously been allocated to the Xq13-q21 region based on linkage studies in two separate pedigrees. This has been substantiated by the observation of deafness as a clinical feature of male patients with cytogenetically detectable deletions across this region. The question of a second locus for deafness in this chromosomal region has been raised by the audiologically distinct nature of the deafness in some of the deleted patients compared to that observed in those patients upon whom the linkage data are based. We have performed detailed clinical evaluation and linkage studies on seven pedigrees with nonsyndromic X-linked deafness and conclude that there is evidence for at least two loci for this form of deafness, including one in the Xq13-q21 region. We have observed different radiological features among the pedigrees which map to Xq13-q21, suggesting that even among these pedigrees the deafness is due to different pathological processes. Given these findings, we suggest that the classification of nonsyndromic X-linked deafness based solely on audiological criteria may need to be reviewed.

  12. X-linked gene expression in the Virginia opossum: differences between the paternally derived Gpd and Pgk-A loci

    SciTech Connect

    Samollow, P.B.; Ford, A.L.; VandeBerg, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    Expression of X-linked glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and phosphoglycerate kinase-A (PGK-A) in the Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana) was studied electrophoretically in animals from natural populations and those produced through controlled laboratory crosses. Blood from most of the wild animals exhibited a common single-banded phenotype for both enzymes. Rare variant animals, regardless of sex, exhibited single-banded phenotypes different in mobility from the common mobility class of the respective enzyme. The laboratory crosses confirmed the allelic basis for the common and rare phenotypes. Transmission of PGK-A phenotypes followed the pattern of determinate (nonrandom) inactivation of the paternally derived Pgk-A allele, and transmission of G6PD also was consistent with this pattern. A survey of tissue-specific expression of G6PD phenotypes of heterozygous females revealed, in almost all tissues, three-banded patterns skewed in favor of the allele that was expressed in blood cells. Three-banded patterns were never observed in males or in putatively homozygous females. These patterns suggest simultaneous, but unequal, expression of the maternally and paternally derived Gpd alleles within individual cells. The absence of such partial expression was noted in a parallel survey of females heterozygous at the Pgd-A locus. Thus, it appears that Gpd and Pgk-A are X-linked in D. virginiana and subject to preferential paternal allele inactivation, but that dosage compensation may not be complete for all paternally derived X-linked genes.

  13. Evidence for increased SOX3 dosage as a risk factor for X-linked hypopituitarism and neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Bauters, Marijke; Frints, Suzanna G; Van Esch, Hilde; Spruijt, Liesbeth; Baldewijns, Marcella M; de Die-Smulders, Christine E M; Fryns, Jean-Pierre; Marynen, Peter; Froyen, Guy

    2014-08-01

    Genomic duplications of varying lengths at Xq26-q27 involving SOX3 have been described in families with X-linked hypopituitarism. Using array-CGH we detected a 1.1 Mb microduplication at Xq27 in a large family with three males suffering from X-linked hypopituitarism. The duplication was mapped from 138.7 to 139.8 Mb, harboring only two annotated genes, SOX3 and ATP11C, and was shown to be a direct tandem copy number gain. Unexpectedly, the microduplication did not fully segregate with the disease in this family suggesting that SOX3 duplications have variable penetrance for X-linked hypopituitarism. In the same family, a female fetus presenting with a neural tube defect was also shown to carry the SOX3 copy number gain. Since we also demonstrated increased SOX3 mRNA levels in amnion cells derived from an unrelated t(X;22)(q27;q11) female fetus with spina bifida, we propose that increased levels of SOX3 could be a risk factor for neural tube defects.

  14. Variation in the X-Linked EFHC2 Gene Is Associated with Social Cognitive Abilities in Males

    PubMed Central

    Startin, Carla M.; Fiorentini, Chiara; de Haan, Michelle; Skuse, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Females outperform males on many social cognitive tasks. X-linked genes may contribute to this sex difference. Males possess one X chromosome, while females possess two X chromosomes. Functional variations in X-linked genes are therefore likely to impact more on males than females. Previous studies of X-monosomic women with Turner syndrome suggest a genetic association with facial fear recognition abilities at Xp11.3, specifically at a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP rs7055196) within the EFHC2 gene. Based on a strong hypothesis, we investigated an association between variation at SNP rs7055196 and facial fear recognition and theory of mind abilities in males. As predicted, males possessing the G allele had significantly poorer facial fear detection accuracy and theory of mind abilities than males possessing the A allele (with SNP variant accounting for up to 4.6% of variance). Variation in the X-linked EFHC2 gene at SNP rs7055196 is therefore associated with social cognitive abilities in males. PMID:26107779

  15. siRNAs from an X-linked satellite repeat promote X-chromosome recognition in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Menon, Debashish U; Coarfa, Cristian; Xiao, Weimin; Gunaratne, Preethi H; Meller, Victoria H

    2014-11-18

    Highly differentiated sex chromosomes create a lethal imbalance in gene expression in one sex. To accommodate hemizygosity of the X chromosome in male fruit flies, expression of X-linked genes increases twofold. This is achieved by the male- specific lethal (MSL) complex, which modifies chromatin to increase expression. Mutations that disrupt the X localization of this complex decrease the expression of X-linked genes and reduce male survival. The mechanism that restricts the MSL complex to X chromatin is not understood. We recently reported that the siRNA pathway contributes to localization of the MSL complex, raising questions about the source of the siRNAs involved. The X-linked 1.688 g/cm(3) satellite related repeats (1.688(X) repeats) are restricted to the X chromosome and produce small RNA, making them an attractive candidate. We tested RNA from these repeats for a role in dosage compensation and found that ectopic expression of single-stranded RNAs from 1.688(X) repeats enhanced the male lethality of mutants with defective X recognition. In contrast, expression of double-stranded hairpin RNA from a 1.688(X) repeat generated abundant siRNA and dramatically increased male survival. Consistent with improved survival, X localization of the MSL complex was largely restored in these males. The striking distribution of 1.688(X) repeats, which are nearly exclusive to the X chromosome, suggests that these are cis-acting elements contributing to identification of X chromatin.

  16. Variation in the X-linked EFHC2 gene is associated with social cognitive abilities in males.

    PubMed

    Startin, Carla M; Fiorentini, Chiara; de Haan, Michelle; Skuse, David H

    2015-01-01

    Females outperform males on many social cognitive tasks. X-linked genes may contribute to this sex difference. Males possess one X chromosome, while females possess two X chromosomes. Functional variations in X-linked genes are therefore likely to impact more on males than females. Previous studies of X-monosomic women with Turner syndrome suggest a genetic association with facial fear recognition abilities at Xp11.3, specifically at a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP rs7055196) within the EFHC2 gene. Based on a strong hypothesis, we investigated an association between variation at SNP rs7055196 and facial fear recognition and theory of mind abilities in males. As predicted, males possessing the G allele had significantly poorer facial fear detection accuracy and theory of mind abilities than males possessing the A allele (with SNP variant accounting for up to 4.6% of variance). Variation in the X-linked EFHC2 gene at SNP rs7055196 is therefore associated with social cognitive abilities in males.

  17. A POU3F4 Mutation Causes Nonsyndromic Hearing Loss in a Chinese X-linked Recessive Family

    PubMed Central

    Du, Wan; Han, Ming-Kun; Wang, Da-Yong; Han, Bing; Zong, Liang; Lan, Lan; Yang, Ju; Shen, Qi; Xie, Lin-Yi; Yu, Lan; Guan, Jing; Wang, Qiu-Ju

    2017-01-01

    Background: The molecular genetic research showed the association between X-linked hearing loss and mutations in POU3F4. This research aimed to identify a POU3F4 mutation in a nonsyndromic X-linked recessive hearing loss family. Methods: A series of clinical evaluations including medical history, otologic examinations, family history, audiologic testing, and a high-resolution computed tomography scan were performed for each patient. Bidirectional sequencing was carried out for all polymerase chain reaction products of the samples. Moreover, 834 controls with normal hearing were also tested. Results: The pedigree showed X-linkage recessive inheritance pattern, and pathogenic mutation (c.499C>T) was identified in the proband and his family member, which led to a premature termination prior to the entire POU domains. This mutation co-segregated with hearing loss in this family. No mutation of POU3F4 gene was found in 834 controls. Conclusions: A nonsense mutation is identified in a family displaying the pedigree consistent with X-linked recessive pattern in POU3F4 gene. In addition, we may provide molecular diagnosis and genetic counseling for this family. PMID:28051029

  18. Apoptosis in canine distemper.

    PubMed

    Moro, L; de Sousa Martins, A; de Moraes Alves, C; de Araújo Santos, F G; dos Santos Nunes, J E; Carneiro, R A; Carvalho, R; Vasconcelos, A C

    2003-01-01

    Canine distemper is a systemic viral disease characterized by immunosuppression followed by secondary infections. Apoptosis is observed in several immunosuppressive diseases and its occurrence on canine distemper in vivo has not been published. In this study, the occurrence of apoptosis was determined in lymphoid tissues of thirteen naturally infected dogs and nine experimentally inoculated puppies. Healthy dogs were used as negative controls. Samples of lymph nodes, thymus, spleen and brain were collected for histopathological purposes. Sections, 5 microm thick, of retropharingeal lymph nodes were stained by HE, Shorr, Methyl Green-Pyronin and TUNEL reaction. Shorr stained sections were further evaluated by morphometry. Canine distemper virus nucleoprotein was detected by immunohistochemistry. Retropharingeal lymph nodes of naturally and experimentally infected dogs had more apoptotic cells per field than controls. In addition, DNA from thymus of infected dogs were more fragmented than controls. Therefore, apoptosis is increased in lymphoid depletion induced by canine distemper virus and consequently play a role in the immunosuppression seen in this disease.

  19. Clinical canine dental radiography.

    PubMed

    Bannon, Kristin M

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide small animal veterinarians in private practice a guideline for interpretation of the most common findings in canine intraoral radiology. Normal oral and dental anatomy is presented. A brief review of variations of normal, common periodontal and endodontic pathology findings and developmental anomalies is provided.

  20. An ex vivo gene therapy approach in X-linked retinoschisis

    PubMed Central

    Bashar, Abu E.; Metcalfe, Andrew L.; Viringipurampeer, Ishaq A.; Yanai, Anat; Gregory-Evans, Cheryl Y.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) is juvenile-onset macular degeneration caused by haploinsufficiency of the extracellular cell adhesion protein retinoschisin (RS1). RS1 mutations can lead to either a non-functional protein or the absence of protein secretion, and it has been established that extracellular deficiency of RS1 is the underlying cause of the phenotype. Therefore, we hypothesized that an ex vivo gene therapy strategy could be used to deliver sufficient extracellular RS1 to reverse the phenotype seen in XLRS. Here, we used adipose-derived, syngeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) that were genetically modified to secrete human RS1 and then delivered these cells by intravitreal injection to the retina of the Rs1h knockout mouse model of XLRS. Methods MSCs were electroporated with two transgene expression systems (cytomegalovirus (CMV)-controlled constitutive and doxycycline-induced Tet-On controlled inducible), both driving expression of human RS1 cDNA. The stably transfected cells, using either constitutive mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) or inducible MSC cassettes, were assayed for their RS1 secretion profile. For single injection studies, 100,000 genetically modified MSCs were injected into the vitreous cavity of the Rs1h knockout mouse eye at P21, and data were recorded at 2, 4, and 8 weeks post-injection. The control groups received either unmodified MSCs or vehicle injection. For the multiple injection studies, the mice received intravitreal MSC injections at P21, P60, and P90 with data collection at P120. For the single- and multiple-injection studies, the outcomes were measured with electroretinography, optokinetic tracking responses (OKT), histology, and immunohistochemistry. Results Two lines of genetically modified MSCs were established and found to secrete RS1 at a rate of 8 ng/million cells/day. Following intravitreal injection, RS1-expressing MSCs were found mainly in the inner retinal layers. Two weeks after a single injection of MSCs, the

  1. Vaccines for Canine Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Palatnik-de-Sousa, Clarisa B.

    2012-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is the third most important vector-borne disease worldwide. Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a severe and frequently lethal protozoan disease of increasing incidence and severity due to infected human and dog migration, new geographical distribution of the insect due to global warming, coinfection with immunosuppressive diseases, and poverty. The disease is an anthroponosis in India and Central Africa and a canid zoonosis (ZVL) in the Americas, the Middle East, Central Asia, China, and the Mediterranean. The ZVL epidemic has been controlled by one or more measures including the culling of infected dogs, treatment of human cases, and insecticidal treatment of homes and dogs. However, the use of vaccines is considered the most cost–effective control tool for human and canine disease. Since the severity of the disease is related to the generation of T-cell immunosuppression, effective vaccines should be capable of sustaining or enhancing the T-cell immunity. In this review we summarize the clinical and parasitological characteristics of ZVL with special focus on the cellular and humoral canine immune response and review state-of-the-art vaccine development against human and canine VL. Experimental vaccination against leishmaniasis has evolved from the practice of leishmanization with living parasites to vaccination with crude lysates, native parasite extracts to recombinant and DNA vaccination. Although more than 30 defined vaccines have been studied in laboratory models no human formulation has been licensed so far; however three second-generation canine vaccines have already been registered. As expected for a zoonotic disease, the recent preventive vaccination of dogs in Brazil has led to a reduction in the incidence of canine and human disease. The recent identification of several Leishmania proteins with T-cell epitopes anticipates development of a multiprotein vaccine that will be capable of protecting both humans and dogs against VL. PMID:22566950

  2. Do canine parvoviruses affect canine neurons? An immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Url, A; Schmidt, P

    2005-08-01

    In cats (most of which died from panleukopenia), cerebral neurons have recently been shown to be susceptible to canine parvovirus infection. In addition to positive immunostaining and distinct in situ hybridization signals, signs of neurodegeneration were identified by histopathology, mainly in the diencephalic area. Similar histological lesions of the diencephalic regions in dogs have also attracted attention; therefore, an immunohistochemical study was initiated to determine the possible infection of canine neurons with canine parvoviruses. The study was carried out on formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded brain tissue, with and without signs of neurodegeneration, from 40 dogs, most of them dying from parvovirus enteritis. Immunohistochemistry, using polyclonal antiserum against canine parvoviruses, was negative in all 40 cases, suggesting that, unlike cats, canine parvoviruses do not seem capable of infecting canine neurons.

  3. Viral vectors for targeting the canine retina: a review.

    PubMed

    Petersen-Jones, Simon M

    2012-09-01

    Clinical trials are currently underway using gene therapy to treat retinal disease such as Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA). Viral vectors that have been utilized to target retinal cells include adenoviruses, lentiviruses, and recombinant adeno-associated viruses (rAAV). Of the three classes, rAAV vectors show the greatest promise for retinal gene therapy. Recent developments in virus technology such as the development of hybrid and capsid mutant rAAV vectors mean that specific retinal cells can be targeted and faster stronger transgene expression is now possible compared to that achieved with the first generation of vectors. Gene therapy trials in dogs have been very important in the development of therapy for RPE65 LCA which is currently in phase I/II clinical trials in humans. Recent successes in using gene therapy to treat canine achromatopsia, X-linked progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) and the more severe rapid degenerations such as rod-cone dysplasia type 3 may lead also to the translation to human clinical trials. Dogs have played and continue to play an important role as animal models for proof-of-concept studies of retinal gene therapy. As modifications and improvements in gene therapy protocols are made from experience gathered from human clinical trials perhaps gene therapy for the treatment of canine clinical patients will become available to veterinary ophthalmologists.

  4. Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene therapy in the canine model.

    PubMed

    Duan, Dongsheng

    2015-03-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked lethal muscle disease caused by dystrophin deficiency. Gene therapy has significantly improved the outcome of dystrophin-deficient mice. Yet, clinical translation has not resulted in the expected benefits in human patients. This translational gap is largely because of the insufficient modeling of DMD in mice. Specifically, mice lacking dystrophin show minimum dystrophic symptoms, and they do not respond to the gene therapy vector in the same way as human patients do. Further, the size of a mouse is hundredfolds smaller than a boy, making it impossible to scale-up gene therapy in a mouse model. None of these limitations exist in the canine DMD (cDMD) model. For this reason, cDMD dogs have been considered a highly valuable platform to test experimental DMD gene therapy. Over the last three decades, a variety of gene therapy approaches have been evaluated in cDMD dogs using a number of nonviral and viral vectors. These studies have provided critical insight for the development of an effective gene therapy protocol in human patients. This review discusses the history, current status, and future directions of the DMD gene therapy in the canine model.

  5. X-linked familial exudative vitreoretinopathy caused by an arginine to leucine substitution in exon 3 of the Norrie gene

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K.; Perry, Y.M.; Ferrell, R.E.

    1994-09-01

    Familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR) is a disorder characterized by abnormal vascularization of the peripheral retina affecting both the retina and the vitreous body. This is a bilateral disorder and leads to a clinical phenotype resembling retinopathy of prematurity, but affected individuals experience a normal gestational period, and they do not have a history of oxygen therapy. Manifestations of the disorder may include retinal folds, retinal traction, sub- or intraretinal exudates, and in severe cases enophthalmos or phthisis ultimately leading to blindness. Autosomal dominant and X-linked patterns of segregation have been reported. We studied a large three-generation family in which FEVR segregated as an X-linked recessive trait. The Norrie gene was examined because of a prior report of mutation in this gene in a small X-linked FEVR family. Exons 1-3 of the Norrie gene were amplified and screened for mutations by single stranded conformational analysis. A variant conformer of exon 3 was observed in an affected male and in combination with the normal conformer in an obligate carrier female. Sequence analysis revealed a G{r_arrow}T transversion destroying an MspI restriction site. The mutation was present in all affected males, and all obligate carrier females were heterozygous for the mutation. The mutation was not present in unaffected males or in 108 randomly selected normal females. The G{r_arrow}T mutation leads to the substitution of a hydrophobic leucine residue for the positively charged arginine normally present at position 121 of the Norrie gene product. This study confirms that mutation in the Norrie gene can lead to the FEVR phenotype and the existence of allelic heterogeneity.

  6. Canine parvovirus: current perspective.

    PubMed

    Nandi, S; Kumar, Manoj

    2010-06-01

    Canine parvovirus 2 (CPV-2) has been considered to be an important pathogen of domestic and wild canids and has spread worldwide since its emergence in 1978. It has been reported from Asia, Australia, New Zealand, the Americas and Europe. Two distinct parvoviruses are now known to infect dogs-the pathogenic CPV-2 and CPV-1 or the minute virus of canine (MVC). CPV-2, the causative agent of acute hemorrhagic enteritis and myocarditis in dogs, is one of the most important pathogenic viruses with high morbidity (100%) and frequent mortality up to 10% in adult dogs and 91% in pups. The disease condition has been complicated further due to emergence of a number of variants namely CPV-2a, CPV-2b and CPV-2c over the years and involvement of domestic and wild canines. There are a number of different serological and molecular tests available for prompt, specific and accurate diagnosis of the disease. Further, both live attenuated and inactivated vaccines are available to control the disease in animals. Besides, new generation vaccines namely recombinant vaccine, peptide vaccine and DNA vaccine are in different stages of development and offer hope for better management of the disease in canines. However, new generation vaccines have not been issued license to be used in the field condition. Again, the presence of maternal antibodies often interferes with the active immunization with live attenuated vaccine and there always exists a window of susceptibility in spite of following proper immunization regimen. Lastly, judicious use of the vaccines in pet dogs, stray dogs and wild canids keeping in mind the new variants of the CPV-2 along with the proper sanitation and disinfection practices must be implemented for the successful control the disease.

  7. Association between X-linked mixed deafness and mutations in the POU domain gene POU3F4.

    PubMed

    de Kok, Y J; van der Maarel, S M; Bitner-Glindzicz, M; Huber, I; Monaco, A P; Malcolm, S; Pembrey, M E; Ropers, H H; Cremers, F P

    1995-02-03

    Deafness with fixation of the stapes (DFN3) is the most frequent X-linked form of hearing impairment. The underlying gene has been localized to a 500-kilobase segment of the Xq21 band. Here, it is reported that a candidate gene for this disorder, Brain 4 (POU3F4), which encodes a transcription factor with a POU domain, maps to the same interval. In five unrelated patients with DFN3 but not in 50 normal controls, small mutations were found that result in truncation of the predicted protein or in nonconservative amino acid substitutions. These findings indicate that POU3F4 mutations are a molecular cause of DFN3.

  8. X-linked Myotubular Myopathy in a Family with Two Infant Siblings: A Case with MTM1 Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Ji Hyun; Namgung, Ran; Park, Min Soo; Park, Kook In; Lee, Jin Sung; Kim, Se Hoon

    2011-01-01

    X-linked myotubular myopathy (XLMTM) is a rare congenital muscle disorder, caused by mutations in the MTM1 gene. Affected male infants present severe hypotonia, and generalized muscle weakness, and the disorder is most often complicated by respiratory failure. Herein, we describe a family with 2 infants with XLMTM which was diagnosed by gene analysis and muscle biopsy. In both cases, histological findings of muscle showed severely hypoplastic muscle fibers with centrally placed nuclei. From the family gene analysis, the Arg486STOP mutation in the MTM1 gene was confirmed. PMID:21488203

  9. [Canine histoplasmosis in Japan].

    PubMed

    Sano, Ayako; Miyaji, Makoto

    2003-01-01

    Histoplasmosis is a fungal infection caused by Histoplasma capsulatum and is distributed a worldwide. Although the disease has been treated as an imported mycosis, some autochthonous human, 1 equine and 4 canine cases suggested that the disease is endemic. Histoplasmosis is classified depending on the variety of causative agent. Histoplasmosis farciminosi known as pseudofarcy, is manifested only in Perissodactyla where it invades lymph nodes and lymph ducts, and is recognized by isolation from horses. Historically, Japan was one of the endemic areas of pseudofarcy before World War II, and more than 20,000 cases were recorded in horses used by the military. Interestingly, Japanese canine histoplasmosis uniformly showed skin ulcers and granulomatous lesions on the skin without pulmonary or gastrointestinal involvement, both of which were very similar to pseudofarcy. It was diagnosed as histoplasmosis by the detection of internal transcribed spacer legions of rRNA gene of H. capsulatum from paraffin embedded tissue samples. Furthermore, the fungal isolate from the human case with no history of going abroad or immigrating was identified as H. capsulatum var. farciminosum by a gene sequence. These facts indicated that pseudofarcy is not only an infectious disease in horses, but also a zoonotic fungal infection. Japanese autochthonous canine histoplasmosis might be a heteroecism of pseudofarcy because of its likeness to the human case, the similarity of clinical manifestations and the historical background at this stage.

  10. X-linked mixed deafness (DFN3): cloning and characterization of the critical region allows the identification of novel microdeletions.

    PubMed

    Huber, I; Bitner-Glindzicz, M; de Kok, Y J; van der Maarel, S M; Ishikawa-Brush, Y; Monaco, A P; Robinson, D; Malcolm, S; Pembrey, M E; Brunner, H G

    1994-07-01

    We have found that the microsatellite marker AFM207zg5 (DXS995) maps to all previously described deletions which are associated with X-linked mixed deafness (DFN3) with or without choroideremia and mental retardation. Employing this marker and pHU16 (DXS26) we have identified two partially overlapping yeast artificial chromosome clones which were used to construct a complete 850 kb cosmid contig. Cosmids from this contig have been tested by Southern blot analysis on DNA from 16 unrelated males with X-linked deafness. Two novel microdeletions were detected in patients which exhibit the characteristic DFN3 phenotype. Both deletions are completely contained within one of the known DFN3-deletions, but one of them does not overlap with two previously described deletions in patients with contiguous gene syndromes consisting of DFN3, choroideremia, and mental retardation. Assuming that only a single gene is involved, this suggests that the DFN3 gene spans a chromosomal region of at least 400 kb.

  11. Novel mutation of IL1RAPL1 gene in a nonspecific X-linked mental retardation (MRX) family.

    PubMed

    Nawara, Magdalena; Klapecki, Jakub; Borg, Katarzyna; Jurek, Marta; Moreno, Sarah; Tryfon, Jolanta; Bal, Jerzy; Chelly, Jamel; Mazurczak, Tadeusz

    2008-12-15

    Mental retardation (MR) affects approximately 2% of the population. About 10% of all MR cases result from defects of X-linked genes. Mutations in most of more than 20 known genes causing nonspecific form of X-linked MR (MRX) are very rare and may account for less than 0.5-1% of MR. Linkage studies in extended pedigrees followed by mutational analysis of known MRX genes in the linked interval are often the only way to identify a genetic cause of the disorder. We performed linkage analysis in several MRX families, and in one family with four males with MR we mapped the disease to an interval encompassing Xp21.2-22.11 (with a maximum LOD score of 2.71). Subsequent mutation analysis of genes located in this interval allowed us to identify a partial deletion of the IL1RAPL1 gene. Different nonoverlapping deletions involving IL1RAPL1 have been reported previously, suggesting that this region could be deletion-prone. In this report, we present the results of the molecular analyses and clinical examinations of four affected family members with the deletion in IL1RAPL1. Our data further confirm the importance and usefulness of linkage studies for gene mapping in MRX families and demonstrate that IL1RAPL1 plays an important role in the etiology of MRX. With the development of new methods (aCGH, MLPA), further rearrangements in this gene (including deletions and duplications) might be discovered in the nearest future.

  12. Localisation of a gene for non-specific X linked mental retardation (MRX46) to Xq25-q26.

    PubMed Central

    Yntema, H G; Hamel, B C; Smits, A P; van Roosmalen, T; van den Helm, B; Kremer, H; Ropers, H H; Smeets, D F; van Bokhoven, H

    1998-01-01

    We report linkage data on a new large family with non-specific X linked mental retardation (MRX), using 24 polymorphic markers covering the entire X chromosome. We could assign the underlying disease gene, denoted MRX46, to the Xq25-q26 region. MRX46 is tightly linked to the markers DXS8072, HPRT, and DXS294 with a maximum lod score of 5.12 at theta=0. Recombination events were observed with DXS425 in Xq25 and DXS984 at the Xq26-Xq27 boundary, which localises MRX46 to a 20.9 cM (12 Mb) interval. Several X linked mental retardation syndromes have been mapped to the same region of the X chromosome. In addition, the localisation of two MRX genes, MRX27 and MRX35, partially overlaps with the linkage interval obtained for MRX46. Although an extension of the linkage analysis for MRX35 showed only a minimal overlap with MRX46, it cannot be excluded that the same gene is involved in several of these MRX disorders. On the other hand, given the considerable genetic heterogeneity in MRX, one should be extremely cautious in using interfamilial linkage data to narrow down the localisation of MRX genes. Therefore, unless the underlying gene(s) is characterised by the analysis of candidate genes, MRX46 can be considered a new independent MRX locus. Images PMID:9783701

  13. Vascular and connective tissue anomalies associated with X-linked periventricular heterotopia due to mutations in Filamin A

    PubMed Central

    Reinstein, Eyal; Frentz, Sophia; Morgan, Tim; García-Miñaúr, Sixto; Leventer, Richard J; McGillivray, George; Pariani, Mitchel; van der Steen, Anthony; Pope, Michael; Holder-Espinasse, Muriel; Scott, Richard; Thompson, Elizabeth M; Robertson, Terry; Coppin, Brian; Siegel, Robert; Bret Zurita, Montserrat; Rodríguez, Jose I; Morales, Carmen; Rodrigues, Yuri; Arcas, Joaquín; Saggar, Anand; Horton, Margaret; Zackai, Elaine; Graham, John M; Rimoin, David L; Robertson, Stephen P

    2013-01-01

    Mutations conferring loss of function at the FLNA (encoding filamin A) locus lead to X-linked periventricular nodular heterotopia (XL-PH), with seizures constituting the most common clinical manifestation of this disorder in female heterozygotes. Vascular dilatation (mainly the aorta), joint hypermobility and variable skin findings are also associated anomalies, with some reports suggesting that this might represents a separate syndrome allelic to XL-PH, termed as Ehlers-Danlos syndrome-periventricular heterotopia variant (EDS-PH). Here, we report a cohort of 11 males and females with both hypomorphic and null mutations in FLNA that manifest a wide spectrum of connective tissue and vascular anomalies. The spectrum of cutaneous defects was broader than previously described and is inconsistent with a specific type of EDS. We also extend the range of vascular anomalies associated with XL-PH to included peripheral arterial dilatation and atresia. Based on these observations, we suggest that there is little molecular or clinical justification for considering EDS-PH as a separate entity from XL-PH, but instead propose that there is a spectrum of vascular and connective tissues anomalies associated with this condition for which all individuals with loss-of-function mutations in FLNA should be evaluated. In addition, since some patients with XL-PH can present primarily with a joint hypermobility syndrome, we propose that screening for cardiovascular manifestations should be offered to those patients when there are associated seizures or an X-linked pattern of inheritance. PMID:23032111

  14. A novel splicing site mutation of the GPR143 gene in a Chinese X-linked ocular albinism pedigree.

    PubMed

    Cai, C Y; Zhu, H; Shi, W; Su, L; Shi, O; Cai, C Q; Ling, C; Li, W D

    2013-11-18

    Ocular albinism is an X-linked inherited disease characterized by hypopigmentation of the iris and nystagmus. To identify a new disease-causing mutation of ocular albinism, we collected a Han Chinese pedigree with 7 male congenital nystagmus patients over 3 generations. Slit-lamp photography and optical coherence tomography were performed for the proband. Genomic DNA was extracted from a whole blood sample from the proband using the high-salt method. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) sequencing was carried out for GPR143 and FRMD7 genes. The three-dimensional structures of the wild-type and mutant GPR143 proteins were determined using SWISS-MODEL. The transmission of the disease in the pedigree clearly followed an X-linked pattern. The proband had significant iris and fundus hypopigmentation. Optical coherence tomography showed severe foveal hypoplasias in both eyes of the proband. A novel splicing site (G/C) mutation was found on the boundary of the 6th intron and the 7th exon of the GPR143 gene, resulting in a 9-amino-acid deletion (codons 257-265) in the 6th transmembrane domain of the GPR143 protein. In conclusion, a novel splicing site mutation of the GPR143 gene was found in a Han Chinese congenital ocular albinism pedigree.

  15. Mutations in the EDA gene are responsible for X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia and hypodontia in Chinese kindreds.

    PubMed

    Fan, Huali; Ye, Xiaoqian; Shi, Lisong; Yin, Wei; Hua, Bo; Song, Guangtai; Shi, Bin; Bian, Zhuan

    2008-10-01

    X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (XLHED, OMIM 305100) is a rare congenital disorder that results in the defective development of teeth, hair, nails, and eccrine sweat glands. Previous studies found that mutations in the ectodysplasin A (EDA) gene are associated with XLHED. In the present study, we investigated four Chinese families suffering from classical XLHED and investigated two additional families segregating hypodontia in an X-linked recessive manner. Mutations were characterized respectively in the EDA gene in all families, and five of these mutations were found to be novel. Among these mutations, five were missense (c.200A>T, c.463C>T, c.758T>C, c.926T>G, and c.491A>C) and located in the functional domain of EDA, and one was a splice donor site mutation in intron 5 (c.IVS5 + 1G>A), which may result in an alternative transcript derived from a new cryptic splice site. Our data further confirm that EDA mutations could cause both XLHED and isolated hypodontia and provide evidence that EDA is a strong candidate gene for tooth genesis.

  16. Photoreceptor Rescue by an Abbreviated Human RPGR Gene in a Murine Model of X-linked Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Pawlyk, Basil S.; Adamian, Michael; Sun, Xun; Bulgakov, Oleg V.; Shu, Xinhua; Smith, Alexander J.; Berson, Eliot L.; Ali, Robin R.; Khani, Shahrokh; F.Wright, Alan; Sandberg, Michael A.; Li, Tiansen

    2015-01-01

    The X-linked RP3 gene codes for the ciliary protein RPGR and accounts for over 10% of inherited retinal degenerations. The critical RPGR-ORF15 splice variant contains a highly repetitive purine-rich linker region that renders it unstable and difficult to adapt for gene therapy. To test the hypothesis that the precise length of the linker region is not critical for function, we evaluated whether AAV-mediated replacement gene therapy with a human ORF15 variant containing in-frame shortening of the linker region could reconstitute RPGR function in vivo. We delivered human RPGR-ORF15 replacement genes with deletion of most (314-codons, “short form”) or 1/3 (126-codons, “long form”) of the linker region to Rpgr null mice. Human RPGR-ORF15 expression was detected post-treatment with both forms of ORF15 transgenes. However, only the long form correctly localized to the connecting cilia and led to significant functional and morphological rescue of rods and cones. Thus the highly repetitive region of RPGR is functionally important but that moderate shortening of its length, which confers the advantage of added stability, preserves its function. These findings provide a theoretical basis for optimizing replacement gene design in clinical trials for X-linked RP3. PMID:26348595

  17. Restoration of missing or misplaced canines.

    PubMed

    Bower, C F; Reinhardt, R A

    1985-06-01

    Restorative treatments for canines were discussed to correct three clinical abnormalities: (1) fully erupted permanent canine in the lateral incisor position, (2) missing permanent canines, and (3) partially exposed canines in normal arch position. The primary concerns are the development of esthetics, anterior guidance, and adequate support for fixed restorations.

  18. X-linked FHL1 as a novel therapeutic target for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Ronghui; Lin, Lu; Wang, Xu; Xiao, Meng; Zhang, Chenping; Li, Jiang; Ji, Tong; Chen, Wantao

    2016-01-01

    To identify X-linked novel tumor suppressors could provide novel insights to improve prognostic prediction and therapeutic strategy for some cancers. Using bioinformatics and Venn analysis of gene transcriptional profiling, we identified downregulation of X-linked four-and-a-half LIM domains protein 1 (FHL1) gene in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). FHL1 functions were investigated and confirmed in vitro and in vivo. FHL1 downregulated mechanisms were analyzed in HNSCCs by using methylation specific PCR, bisulfate-based sequencing, 5-Aza-dC treatment and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Two independent HNSCC cohorts (the training cohort n = 105 and the validation cohort n = 101) were enrolled to evaluate clinical implications of FHL1 expression by using real-time PCR or immunohistochemistry. FHL1 mRNA and protein expressions were frequently decreased in HNSCCs. FHL1 overexpression or depletion gave rise to suppress or promote cell growth through Cyclin D1, Cyclin E and p27 dysregulations. Abundant occupy of EZH2 or H3K27Me3 was observed in FHL1 promoter except for DNA hypermethylation. Reduced FHL1 mRNA expression was notably associated with poor differentiation (p = 0.020). Multivariate analysis demonstrated FHL1 mRNA expression was identified as independent prognostic predictors of overall survival (OS) (p = 0.036; HR 0.520; Cl, 0.283–0.958) and disease-free survival (DFS) (p = 0.041; HR 0.527; Cl, 0.284–0.975), which was validated by another independent cohort (p = 0.021; HR 0.404; Cl, 0.187–0.871 for OS; p = 0.011; HR 0.407; Cl, 0.203–0.815 for DFS). These results suggest epigenetic silencing of X-linked FHL1 may have an important role in adjuvant therapeutic intervention of HNSCCs and is an independent prognostic factor in patients with HNSCCs. PMID:26908444

  19. A gene (PEX) with homologies to endopeptidases is mutated in patients with X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets. The HYP Consortium.

    PubMed

    1995-10-01

    X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets (HYP) is a dominant disorder characterised by impaired phosphate uptake in the kidney, which is likely to be caused by abnormal regulation of sodium phosphate cotransport in the proximal tubules. By positional cloning, we have isolated a candidate gene from the HYP region in Xp22.1. This gene exhibits homology to a family of endopeptidase genes, members of which are involved in the degradation or activation of a variety of peptide hormones. This gene (which we have called PEX) is composed of multiple exons which span at least five cosmids. Intragenic non-overlapping deletions from four different families and three mutations (two splice sites and one frameshift) have been detected in HYP patients, which suggest that the PEX gene is involved in the HYP disorder.

  20. Correlation between connexin 32 gene mutations and clinical phenotype in X-linked dominant Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Ionasescu, V.; Ionasescu, R.; Searby, C.

    1996-06-14

    We studied the relationship between the genotype and clinical phenotype in 27 families with dominant X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMTX1) neuropathy. Twenty-two families showed mutations in the coding region of the connexin32 (cx32) gene. The mutations include four nonsense mutations, eight missense mutations, two medium size deletions, and one insertion. Most missense mutations showed a mild clinical phenotype (five out of eight), whereas all nonsense mutations, the larger of the two deletions, and the insertion that produced frameshifts showed severe phenotypes. Five CMTX1 families with mild clinical phenotype showed no point mutations of the cx32 gene coding region. Three of these families showed positive genetic linkage with the markers of the Xq13.1 region. The genetic linkage of the remaining two families could not be evaluated because of their small size. 25 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  1. Multiprotein Complexes of Retinitis Pigmentosa GTPase Regulator (RPGR), a Ciliary Protein Mutated in X-Linked Retinitis Pigmentosa (XLRP)

    PubMed Central

    Murga-Zamalloa, Carlos; Swaroop, Anand

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in Retinitis Pigmentosa GTPase Regulator (RPGR) are a frequent cause of X-linked Retinitis Pigmentosa (XLRP). The RPGR gene undergoes extensive alternative splicing and encodes for distinct protein isoforms in the retina. Extensive studies using isoform-specific antibodies and mouse mutants have revealed that RPGR predominantly localizes to the transition zone to primary cilia and associates with selected ciliary and microtubule-associated assemblies in photoreceptors. In this chapter, we have summarized recent advances on understanding the role of RPGR in photoreceptor protein trafficking. We also provide new evidence that suggests the existence of discrete RPGR multiprotein complexes in photoreceptors. Piecing together the RPGR-interactome in different subcellular compartments should provide critical insights into the role of alternative RPGR isoforms in associated orphan and syndromic retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:20238008

  2. X-linked glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and autosomal 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD) polymorphisms in baboons

    SciTech Connect

    VandeBerg, J.L.; Aivaliotis, M.J.; Samollow, P.B. )

    1992-12-01

    Electrophoretic polymorphisms of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD) were examined in captive colonies of five subspecies of baboons (Papio hamadryas). Phenotype frequencies and family data verified the X-linked inheritance of the G6PD polymorphism. Insufficient family data were available to confirm autosomal inheritance of the 6PGD polymorphism, but the electrophoretic patterns of variant types (putative heterozygotes) suggested the codominant expression of alleles at an autosomal locus. Implications of the G6PD polymorphism are discussed with regard to its utility as a marker system for research on X-chromosome inactivation during baboon development and for studies of clonal cell proliferation and/or cell selection during the development of atherosclerotic lesions in the baboon model. 61 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  3. Analysis of RP2 and RPGR Mutations in Five X-Linked Chinese Families with Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jingjing; Wu, Xiaofei; Shen, Di; Dong, Lijin; Jiao, Xiaodong; Hejtmancik, J Fielding; Li, Ningdong

    2017-03-15

    Mutations in RP2 and RPGR genes are responsible for the X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP). In this study, we analyzed the RP2 and RPGR gene mutations in five Han Chinese families with XLRP. An approximately 17Kb large deletion including the exon 4 and exon 5 of RP2 gene was found in an XLRP family. In addition, four frameshift mutations including three novel mutations of c.1059 + 1 G > T, c.2002dupC and c.2236_2237del CT, as well as a previously reported mutation of c.2899delG were detected in the RPGR gene in the other four families. Our study further expands the mutation spectrum of RP2 and RPGR, and will be helpful for further study molecular pathogenesis of XLRP.

  4. The Gene for Hereditary Bullous Dystrophy, X-Linked Macular Type, Maps to the Xq27.3-qter Region

    PubMed Central

    Wijker, Mario; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J. L.; Schoute, Frans; Defesche, Joep C.; Pals, Gerard; Bolhuis, Pieter A; Ropers, Hans H.; Hulsebos, Theo J. M.; Menko, Fred H.; van Oost, Bernard A.; Lungarotti, M. Serena; Arwert, Fré

    1995-01-01

    Bullous dystrophy, hereditary macular type (McKusick 302000), is an X-linked disorder and was originally described in a single kindred in the Netherlands by Mendes da Costa and Van der Valk in 1908. To determine the location of the bullous dystrophy gene, segregation studies were performed in this family and in a recently described Italian family. Using informative polymorphic markers, the gene could initially be localized on the Xq27-q28 region. No recombinants were noted with loci in Xq27.3-q28. Fine mapping places the bullous dystrophy locus distal to DXS102 (Xq26.3) in the Italian family and distal to DXS998 (Xq27.3) in the Dutch family. PMID:7726164

  5. Variant of X-Linked Chronic Granulomatous Disease Revealed by a Severe Burkholderia cepacia Invasive Infection in an Infant

    PubMed Central

    Prando, Carolina; Blancas Galicia, Lizbeth; Hubeau, Marjorie; Blanche, Stéphane; Picard, Capucine; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Bustamante, Jacinta

    2013-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a primary immunodeficiency characterized by increased susceptibility to bacteria and fungi since early in life, caused by mutations in any of the five genes coding for protein subunits in NADPH oxidase. X-linked variant CGD can be missed during routine evaluation or present later in life due to hypomorphic mutations and a residual superoxide production. The case of a 10-month-old boy who died of pneumonia is reported. The isolation of Burkholderia cepacia from his lung, together with a marginally low nitroblue tetrazolium reduction assay (NBT), made us suspect and pursue the molecular diagnosis of CGD. A postmortem genetic analysis finally demonstrated CGD caused by a hypomorphic missense mutation with normal gp91phox expression. In a patient being investigated for unusually severe or recurrent infection, a high index of suspicion of immunodeficiency must be maintained. PMID:25374740

  6. Analysis of RP2 and RPGR Mutations in Five X-Linked Chinese Families with Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jingjing; Wu, Xiaofei; Shen, Di; Dong, Lijin; Jiao, Xiaodong; Hejtmancik, J. Fielding; Li, Ningdong

    2017-01-01

    Mutations in RP2 and RPGR genes are responsible for the X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP). In this study, we analyzed the RP2 and RPGR gene mutations in five Han Chinese families with XLRP. An approximately 17Kb large deletion including the exon 4 and exon 5 of RP2 gene was found in an XLRP family. In addition, four frameshift mutations including three novel mutations of c.1059 + 1 G > T, c.2002dupC and c.2236_2237del CT, as well as a previously reported mutation of c.2899delG were detected in the RPGR gene in the other four families. Our study further expands the mutation spectrum of RP2 and RPGR, and will be helpful for further study molecular pathogenesis of XLRP. PMID:28294154

  7. X-linked borderline mental retardation with prominent behavioral disturbance: Phenotype, genetic localization, and evidence for disturbed monoamine metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Brunner, H.G.; Nelen, M.R.; Zandvoort, P. van; Abeling, N.G.G.M.; Gennip, A.H. van; Ropers, H.H.; Oost, B.A. van ); Wolters, E.C.; Kuiper, M.A. )

    1993-06-01

    The authors have identified a large Dutch kindred with a new form of X-linked nondysmorphic mild mental retardation. All affected males in this family show very characteristic abnormal behavior, in particular aggressive and sometimes violent behavior. Other types of impulsive behavior include arson, attempted rape, and exhibitionism. Attempted suicide has been reported in a single case. The locus for this disorder could be assigned to the Xp11-21 interval between DXS7 and DXS77 by linkage analysis using markers spanning the X chromosome. A maximal multipoint lod score of 3.69 was obtained at the monoamine oxidase type A (MAOA) monoamine metabolism. These data are compatible with a primary defect in the structural gene for MAOA and/or monoamine oxidase type B (MAOB). Normal platelet MAOB activity suggests that the unusual behavior pattern in this family may be caused by isolated MAOA deficiency. 34 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Generation of Functional Neutrophils from a Mouse Model of X-Linked Chronic Granulomatous Disorder Using Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Sayandip; Santilli, Giorgia; Blundell, Michael P.; Navarro, Susana; Bueren, Juan A.; Thrasher, Adrian J.

    2011-01-01

    Murine models of human genetic disorders provide a valuable tool for investigating the scope for application of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC). Here we present a proof-of-concept study to demonstrate generation of iPSC from a mouse model of X-linked chronic granulomatous disease (X-CGD), and their successful differentiation into haematopoietic progenitors of the myeloid lineage. We further demonstrate that additive gene transfer using lentiviral vectors encoding gp91phox is capable of restoring NADPH-oxidase activity in mature neutrophils derived from X-CGD iPSC. In the longer term, correction of iPSC from human patients with CGD has therapeutic potential not only through generation of transplantable haematopoietic stem cells, but also through production of large numbers of autologous functional neutrophils. PMID:21408614

  9. Canine mammary gland tumors.

    PubMed

    Sorenmo, Karin

    2003-05-01

    The National Consensus Group recommends that all women with tumors larger than 1 cm be offered chemotherapy regardless of tumor histology of lymph node status. This recommendation is to ensure that everyone at risk for failing, even though the risk may be low in women with relatively small tumors and favorable histology, has a choice and receives the benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy. This type of treatment recommendation may also be made in dogs based on recognized, well-accepted prognostic factors such as tumor size, stage, type, and histologic differentiation. Based on the limited clinical information available in veterinary medicine, the drugs that are effective in human breast cancer, such as cyclophosphamide, 5-fluorouracil, and doxorubicin, may also have a role in the treatment of malignant mammary gland tumors in dogs. Randomized prospective studies are needed, however, to evaluate the efficacy of chemotherapy in dogs with high-risk mammary gland tumors and to determine which drugs and protocols are the most efficacious. Until such studies are performed, the treatment of canine mammary gland tumors will be based on the individual oncologist's understanding of tumor biology, experience, interpretation of the available studies, and a little bit of gut-feeling. Table 2 is a proposal for treatment guidelines for malignant canine mammary gland tumors according to established prognostic factors, results from published veterinary studies, and current recommendations for breast cancer treatment in women.

  10. Canine spinal cord glioma.

    PubMed

    Rissi, Daniel R; Barber, Renee; Burnum, Annabelle; Miller, Andrew D

    2017-01-01

    Spinal cord glioma is uncommonly reported in dogs. We describe the clinicopathologic and diagnostic features of 7 cases of canine spinal cord glioma and briefly review the veterinary literature on this topic. The median age at presentation was 7.2 y. Six females and 1 male were affected and 4 dogs were brachycephalic. The clinical course lasted from 3 d to 12 wk, and clinical signs were progressive and associated with multiple suspected neuroanatomic locations in the spinal cord. Magnetic resonance imaging of 6 cases revealed T2-weighted hyperintense lesions with variable contrast enhancement in the spinal cord. All dogs had a presumptive clinical diagnosis of intraparenchymal neoplasia or myelitis based on history, advanced imaging, and cerebrospinal fluid analysis. Euthanasia was elected in all cases because of poor outcome despite anti-inflammatory or immunosuppressive treatment or because of poor prognosis at the time of diagnosis. Tumor location during autopsy ranged from C1 to L6, with no clear predilection for a specific spinal cord segment. The diagnosis was based on histopathology and the immunohistochemistry expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein, oligodendrocyte lineage transcription factor 2, 2',3'-cyclic-nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase, neuron-specific enolase, synaptophysin, and Ki-67. Diagnoses consisted of 4 cases of oligodendroglioma, 2 cases of gliomatosis cerebri, and 1 astrocytoma. This case series further defines the clinicopathologic features of canine spinal glioma and highlights the need for comprehensive immunohistochemistry in addition to routine histopathology to confirm the diagnosis of these tumors.

  11. Affected Kindred Analysis of Human X Chromosome Exomes to Identify Novel X-Linked Intellectual Disability Genes

    PubMed Central

    Niranjan, Tejasvi S.; Skinner, Cindy; May, Melanie; Turner, Tychele; Rose, Rebecca; Stevenson, Roger; Schwartz, Charles E.; Wang, Tao

    2015-01-01

    X-linked Intellectual Disability (XLID) is a group of genetically heterogeneous disorders caused by mutations in genes on the X chromosome. Deleterious mutations in ~10% of X chromosome genes are implicated in causing XLID disorders in ~50% of known and suspected XLID families. The remaining XLID genes are expected to be rare and even private to individual families. To systematically identify these XLID genes, we sequenced the X chromosome exome (X-exome) in 56 well-established XLID families (a single affected male from 30 families and two affected males from 26 families) using an Agilent SureSelect X-exome kit and the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. To enrich for disease-causing mutations, we first utilized variant filters based on dbSNP, the male-restricted portions of the 1000 Genomes Project, or the Exome Variant Server datasets. However, these databases present limitations as automatic filters for enrichment of XLID genes. We therefore developed and optimized a strategy that uses a cohort of affected male kindred pairs and an additional small cohort of affected unrelated males to enrich for potentially pathological variants and to remove neutral variants. This strategy, which we refer to as Affected Kindred/Cross-Cohort Analysis, achieves a substantial enrichment for potentially pathological variants in known XLID genes compared to variant filters from public reference databases, and it has identified novel XLID candidate genes. We conclude that Affected Kindred/Cross-Cohort Analysis can effectively enrich for disease-causing genes in rare, Mendelian disorders, and that public reference databases can be used effectively, but cautiously, as automatic filters for X-linked disorders. PMID:25679214

  12. Novel Missense Mutation A789V in IQSEC2 Underlies X-Linked Intellectual Disability in the MRX78 Family

    PubMed Central

    Kalscheuer, Vera M.; James, Victoria M.; Himelright, Miranda L.; Long, Philip; Oegema, Renske; Jensen, Corinna; Bienek, Melanie; Hu, Hao; Haas, Stefan A.; Topf, Maya; Hoogeboom, A. Jeannette M.; Harvey, Kirsten; Walikonis, Randall; Harvey, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Disease gene discovery in neurodevelopmental disorders, including X-linked intellectual disability (XLID) has recently been accelerated by next-generation DNA sequencing approaches. To date, more than 100 human X chromosome genes involved in neuronal signaling pathways and networks implicated in cognitive function have been identified. Despite these advances, the mutations underlying disease in a large number of XLID families remained unresolved. We report the resolution of MRX78, a large family with six affected males and seven affected females, showing X-linked inheritance. Although a previous linkage study had mapped the locus to the short arm of chromosome X (Xp11.4-p11.23), this region contained too many candidate genes to be analyzed using conventional approaches. However, our X-chromosome exome resequencing, bioinformatics analysis and inheritance testing revealed a missense mutation (c.C2366T, p.A789V) in IQSEC2, encoding a neuronal GDP-GTP exchange factor for Arf family GTPases (ArfGEF) previously implicated in XLID. Molecular modeling of IQSEC2 revealed that the A789V substitution results in the insertion of a larger side-chain into a hydrophobic pocket in the catalytic Sec7 domain of IQSEC2. The A789V change is predicted to result in numerous clashes with adjacent amino acids and disruption of local folding of the Sec7 domain. Consistent with this finding, functional assays revealed that recombinant IQSEC2A789V was not able to catalyze GDP-GTP exchange on Arf6 as efficiently as wild-type IQSEC2. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that the A789V mutation in IQSEC2 is the underlying cause of XLID in the MRX78 family. PMID:26793055

  13. Prognostic Value of Glomerular Collagen IV Immunofluorescence Studies in Male Patients with X-Linked Alport Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gangemi, Concetta; Giannakakis, Kostas; Crisafi, Antonella; Faraggiana, Tullio; Fallerini, Chiara; Renieri, Alessandra; Muda, Andrea Onetti; Emma, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives X-linked Alport syndrome (X-AS) is caused by mutations of the COL4A5 gene, which encodes for the collagen IV α5 chain (α5[COLIV]), resulting in structural and functional abnormalities of the glomerular basement membrane (GBM) and leading to CKD. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the prognostic value of residual collagen IV chain expression in the GBM of patients with X-AS. Design, setting, participants, & measurements The medical records of 22 patients with X-AS from 21 unrelated families collected between 1987 and 2009 were reviewed (median age at last follow-up, 19.9 years; range, 5.4–35.1 years); GBM expression of α1, α3, and α5(COLIV) chains was assessed by immunofluorescence microscopy. Results GBM distribution of the α5(COLIV) chain was diffuse in 1 and segmental or absent in 21 of the 22 patients; the expression of the α3(COLIV) chain was diffuse in 5 of 22 patients and segmental or absent in 17 of 22 patients. Patients with diffuse staining for the α3(COLIV) chain presented with proteinuria significantly later (median age, 16.9 versus 6.1 years; P=0.02) and reached an estimated GFR < 90 ml/min per 1.73 m2 at an older age (median age, 27.0 versus 14.9 years; P=0.01) compared with patients with segmental or absent staining. Two thirds of patients with abnormal α3(COLIV) expression by immunofluorescence studies had null or truncating COL4A5 mutations, as opposed to none of the 4 tested patients with diffuse α3(COLIV) chain glomerular distribution. Conclusions These results indicate that maintained expression of the α3(COLIV) chain is an early positive prognostic marker in patients with X-linked Alport symdrome. PMID:23371956

  14. Novel X-Linked Genes Revealed by Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction in the Green Anole, Anolis carolinensis

    PubMed Central

    Rovatsos, Michail; Altmanová, Marie; Pokorná, Martina Johnson; Kratochvíl, Lukáš

    2014-01-01

    The green anole, Anolis carolinensis (ACA), is the model reptile for a vast array of biological disciplines. It was the first nonavian reptile to have its genome fully sequenced. During the genome project, the XX/XY system of sex chromosomes homologous to chicken chromosome 15 (GGA15) was revealed, and 106 X-linked genes were identified. We selected 38 genes located on eight scaffolds in ACA and having orthologs located on GGA15, then tested their linkage to ACA X chromosome by using comparative quantitative fluorescent real-time polymerase chain reaction applied to male and female genomic DNA. All tested genes appeared to be X-specific and not present on the Y chromosome. Assuming that all genes located on these scaffolds should be localized to the ACA X chromosome, we more than doubled the number of known X-linked genes in ACA, from 106 to 250. While demonstrating that the gene content of chromosome X in ACA and GGA15 is largely conserved, we nevertheless showed that numerous interchromosomal rearrangements had occurred since the splitting of the chicken and anole evolutionary lineages. The presence of many ACA X-specific genes localized to distinct contigs indicates that the ACA Y chromosome should be highly degenerated, having lost a large amount of its original gene content during evolution. The identification of novel genes linked to the X chromosome and absent on the Y chromosome in the model lizard species contributes to ongoing research as to the evolution of sex determination in reptiles and provides important information for future comparative and functional genomics. PMID:25172916

  15. Report of a kindred with x-linked (or autosomal dominant sex-limited) 46, XY partial gonadal dysgenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Fechner, P.Y.; Marcantonio, S.M.; Ogata, T.; Rosales, T.O.; Smith, K.D.; Goodfellow, P.N.; Migeon, C.J.; Berkovitz, G.D. )

    1993-05-01

    The condition termed 46, XY complete gonadal dysgenesis is characterized by the lack of testicular determination with resulting streak gonads, normal Mullerian structures, and female external genitalia. In the partial form, there is incomplete testicular determination with a wide range in the degree of ambiguous genitalia and sexual duct development. The authors evaluated a kindred in which a partial form of 46, XY gonadal dysgenesis occurred in four subjects from two generations. Pedigree analysis indicated an X-linked or possibly an autosomal sex-limited mode of inheritance. All affected subjects were ascertained because of ambiguous genitalia with minimal virilization. At 10 days of age, the proband had a subnormal plasma level of testosterone, and at 4 months, there was no rise in plasma T after stimulation with hCG. At laparotomy, a dysgenetic gonad was found on the right side, but no gonad was found on the left side. A vas deferens was present on the right, indicating the presence of functional leydig cells early in fetal life. In the other affected subjects, gonadal tissue was also limited to one side of the abdomen and showed poorly developed seminiferous tubules. The sex-determining region Y gene, which encodes the testis-determining factor, was present and unaltered in the genomic DNA of all affected subjects. Duplication of the distal short arm of the X-chromosome has been associated with 46, XY complete gonadal dysgenesis in some patients. In the authors studies, Southern blot analysis revealed that sequences of the distal short arm of the X-chromosome were present in single copy, excluding a large duplication in this area of the X. Several kindreds with familial 46, XY complete gonadal dysgenesis have been reported; five of them had evidence of an X-linked mode of inheritance. The authors study of a kindred with 46, XY partial gonadal dysgenesis further supports the role of an X chromosome gene in testicular determination. 44 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  16. Novel X-linked genes revealed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction in the green anole, Anolis carolinensis.

    PubMed

    Rovatsos, Michail; Altmanová, Marie; Pokorná, Martina Johnson; Kratochvíl, Lukáš

    2014-08-28

    The green anole, Anolis carolinensis (ACA), is the model reptile for a vast array of biological disciplines. It was the first nonavian reptile to have its genome fully sequenced. During the genome project, the XX/XY system of sex chromosomes homologous to chicken chromosome 15 (GGA15) was revealed, and 106 X-linked genes were identified. We selected 38 genes located on eight scaffolds in ACA and having orthologs located on GGA15, then tested their linkage to ACA X chromosome by using comparative quantitative fluorescent real-time polymerase chain reaction applied to male and female genomic DNA. All tested genes appeared to be X-specific and not present on the Y chromosome. Assuming that all genes located on these scaffolds should be localized to the ACA X chromosome, we more than doubled the number of known X-linked genes in ACA, from 106 to 250. While demonstrating that the gene content of chromosome X in ACA and GGA15 is largely conserved, we nevertheless showed that numerous interchromosomal rearrangements had occurred since the splitting of the chicken and anole evolutionary lineages. The presence of many ACA X-specific genes localized to distinct contigs indicates that the ACA Y chromosome should be highly degenerated, having lost a large amount of its original gene content during evolution. The identification of novel genes linked to the X chromosome and absent on the Y chromosome in the model lizard species contributes to ongoing research as to the evolution of sex determination in reptiles and provides important information for future comparative and functional genomics.

  17. Affected kindred analysis of human X chromosome exomes to identify novel X-linked intellectual disability genes.

    PubMed

    Niranjan, Tejasvi S; Skinner, Cindy; May, Melanie; Turner, Tychele; Rose, Rebecca; Stevenson, Roger; Schwartz, Charles E; Wang, Tao

    2015-01-01

    X-linked Intellectual Disability (XLID) is a group of genetically heterogeneous disorders caused by mutations in genes on the X chromosome. Deleterious mutations in ~10% of X chromosome genes are implicated in causing XLID disorders in ~50% of known and suspected XLID families. The remaining XLID genes are expected to be rare and even private to individual families. To systematically identify these XLID genes, we sequenced the X chromosome exome (X-exome) in 56 well-established XLID families (a single affected male from 30 families and two affected males from 26 families) using an Agilent SureSelect X-exome kit and the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. To enrich for disease-causing mutations, we first utilized variant filters based on dbSNP, the male-restricted portions of the 1000 Genomes Project, or the Exome Variant Server datasets. However, these databases present limitations as automatic filters for enrichment of XLID genes. We therefore developed and optimized a strategy that uses a cohort of affected male kindred pairs and an additional small cohort of affected unrelated males to enrich for potentially pathological variants and to remove neutral variants. This strategy, which we refer to as Affected Kindred/Cross-Cohort Analysis, achieves a substantial enrichment for potentially pathological variants in known XLID genes compared to variant filters from public reference databases, and it has identified novel XLID candidate genes. We conclude that Affected Kindred/Cross-Cohort Analysis can effectively enrich for disease-causing genes in rare, Mendelian disorders, and that public reference databases can be used effectively, but cautiously, as automatic filters for X-linked disorders.

  18. Deletion of the immunoglobulin domain of IL1RAPL1 results in nonsyndromic X-linked intellectual disability associated with behavioral problems and mild dysmorphism.

    PubMed

    Franek, Karl J; Butler, Julia; Johnson, John; Simensen, Richard; Friez, Michael J; Bartel, Frank; Moss, Tonya; DuPont, Barbara; Berry, Katherine; Bauman, Margaret; Skinner, Cindy; Stevenson, Roger E; Schwartz, Charles E

    2011-05-01

    X-Linked intellectual disability accounts for a significant fraction of males with cognitive impairment. Many of these males present with a non-syndromic phenotype and presently mutations in 17 X-linked genes are associated with these patients. Mutations in IL1RAPL1 have been found in multiple families with non-syndromic X-linked intellectual disability. All of the published mutations predict loss of function of the protein. We have identified an additional two families with deletions of a portion of the gene that give rise to cognitive impairment, as well as some behavioral problems and mild dysmorphism. Our clinical findings better delineate the phenotypic spectrum associated with IL1RAPL1 mutations.

  19. 9 CFR 113.305 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Type 2 Vaccine. 113.305 Section 113.305 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION... STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Live Virus Vaccines § 113.305 Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine. Canine Hepatitis Vaccine and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine shall be prepared from virus-bearing...

  20. 9 CFR 113.305 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Type 2 Vaccine. 113.305 Section 113.305 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION... STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Live Virus Vaccines § 113.305 Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine. Canine Hepatitis Vaccine and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine shall be prepared from virus-bearing...

  1. 9 CFR 113.202 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Type 2 Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.202 Section 113.202 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT...; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.202 Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine, Killed Virus. Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine, Killed...

  2. 9 CFR 113.202 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Type 2 Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.202 Section 113.202 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT...; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.202 Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine, Killed Virus. Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine, Killed...

  3. 9 CFR 113.202 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Type 2 Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.202 Section 113.202 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT...; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.202 Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine, Killed Virus. Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine, Killed...

  4. 9 CFR 113.305 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Type 2 Vaccine. 113.305 Section 113.305 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION... STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Live Virus Vaccines § 113.305 Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine. Canine Hepatitis Vaccine and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine shall be prepared from virus-bearing...

  5. 9 CFR 113.202 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Type 2 Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.202 Section 113.202 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT...; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.202 Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine, Killed Virus. Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine, Killed...

  6. 9 CFR 113.305 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Type 2 Vaccine. 113.305 Section 113.305 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION... STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Live Virus Vaccines § 113.305 Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine. Canine Hepatitis Vaccine and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine shall be prepared from virus-bearing...

  7. 9 CFR 113.202 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Type 2 Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.202 Section 113.202 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT...; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.202 Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine, Killed Virus. Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine, Killed...

  8. 9 CFR 113.305 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Type 2 Vaccine. 113.305 Section 113.305 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION... STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Live Virus Vaccines § 113.305 Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine. Canine Hepatitis Vaccine and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine shall be prepared from virus-bearing...

  9. Genetic Testing Confirmed the Early Diagnosis of X-Linked Hypophosphatemic Rickets in a 7-Month-Old Infant

    PubMed Central

    Poon, Kok Siong; Sng, Andrew Anjian; Ho, Cindy Weili; Koay, Evelyn Siew-Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the phosphate regulating gene with homologies to endopeptidases on the X-chromosome (PHEX) have been causally associated with X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets (XLHR). The early diagnosis of XLHR in infants is challenging when it is based solely on clinical features and biochemical findings. We report a 7-month-old boy with a family history of hypophosphatemic rickets., who demonstrated early clinical evidence of rickets, although serial biochemical findings could not definitively confirm rickets. A sequencing assay targeting the PHEX gene was first performed on the mother’s DNA to screen for mutations in the 5′UTR, 22 coding exons, and the exon-intron junctions. Targeted mutation analysis and mRNA studies were subsequently performed on the boys’ DNA to investigate the pathogenicity of the identified mutation. Genetic screening of the PHEX gene revealed a novel mutation, c.1080-2A>C, at the splice acceptor site in intron 9. The detection of an aberrant mRNA transcript with skipped (loss of) exon 10 establishes its pathogenicity and confirms the diagnosis of XLHR in this infant. Genetic testing of the PHEX gene resulted in early diagnosis of XLHR, thus enabling initiation of therapy and prevention of progressive rachitic changes in the infant. PMID:26904698

  10. Early signs of visual perception and evoked potentials in radiologically asymptomatic boys with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Furushima, Wakana; Inagaki, Masumi; Gunji, Atsuko; Inoue, Yuki; Kaga, Makiko; Mizutani, Shuki

    2009-08-01

    The aim was to identify the electrophysiological and psychological signs at a very early stage in asymptomatic boys with childhood cerebral X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. Flash visual evoked potentials, pattern reversal, and visual event-related potentials were recorded in 6 radiologically asymptomatic boys with adrenoleukodystrophy and 22 control boys. The latency and amplitude of P100 of visual evoked potentials and P1 of event-related potentials were evaluated. Though all patients had normal intelligence quotient, performance intelligence quotient was significantly lower than verbal intelligence quotient in 2 patients. Both P100 and P1 amplitudes were significantly greater in adrenoleukodystrophy than in controls. The difference between performance intelligence quotient and verbal intelligence quotient exhibited significant correlation with P100 amplitude. Enlargement of visual evoked potentials might be a sign of cerebral involvement preceding the appearance of abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging. Follow-up of asymptomatic boys with both electrophysiological and neuropsychological tests may serve as an aid for deciding the timing of therapeutic intervention.

  11. X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis inhibits apoptosis and preserves the blood-brain barrier after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Gao, Cheng; Yu, Hongwei; Yan, Cong; Zhao, Wenyang; Liu, Yao; Zhang, Dongdong; Li, Jingwei; Liu, Nan

    2017-03-22

    Early brain injury following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) strongly determines the prognosis of patients suffering from an aneurysm rupture, and apoptosis is associated with early brain injury after SAH. This study was designed to explore the role of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) in early brain injury following SAH. The expression of XIAP was detected using western blotting and real-time RT-PCR in an autologous blood injection model of SAH. We also studied the role of XIAP in early brain injury and detected apoptosis-related proteins. The results showed that XIAP was significantly up-regulated in the cortex and hippocampus and that XIAP was mainly expressed in neuronal cells following SAH. The inhibition of endogenous XIAP aggravated blood-brain barrier disruption, neurological deficits and brain edema. Recombinant XIAP preserved the blood-brain barrier, improved the neurological scores and ameliorated brain edema. Recombinant XIAP treatment also decreased the expression of cleaved caspase-3, caspase-8 and caspase-9, whereas there was no effect on the expression of p53, apoptosis-inducing factor or cytochrome c. These results show that XIAP acts as an endogenous neuroprotective and anti-apoptotic agent following SAH. The effects of XIAP on early brain injury was associated with the inhibition of the caspase-dependent apoptosis pathway.

  12. Retroviral Gene Therapy for X-linked Chronic Granulomatous Disease: Results From Phase I/II Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hyoung Jin; Bartholomae, Cynthia C; Paruzynski, Anna; Arens, Anne; Kim, Sujeong; Yu, Seung Shin; Hong, Youngtae; Joo, Chang-Wan; Yoon, Nam-Kyung; Rhim, Jung-Woo; Kim, Joong Gon; Von Kalle, Christof; Schmidt, Manfred; Kim, Sunyoung; Ahn, Hyo Seop

    2011-01-01

    X-linked chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is an inherited immunodeficiency caused by a defect in the gp91phox gene. In an effort to treat X-CGD, we investigated the safety and efficacy of gene therapy using a retroviral vector, MT-gp91. Two X-CGD patients received autologous CD34+ cells transduced with MT-gp91 after a conditioning regimen consisting of fludarabine and busulfan. The level of gene-marked cells was highest at day 21 (8.3 and 11.7% in peripheral blood cells) but decreased to 0.08 and 0.5%, respectively, 3 years after gene transfer. The level of functionally corrected cells, as determined by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase assay, reached a peak at day 17 (6.5% patient 1 (P1) and 14.3% patient 2 (P2) of total granulocytes) and declined to 0.05% (P1) and 0.21% (P2), 3 years later. Some retroviral vectors were found to have integrated within or close to the proto-oncogenes MDS1-EVI1, PRDM16, and CCND2; however, no abnormal cell expansion or related hematological malignancy was observed. Overall, the gene transfer procedure did not produce any serious adverse effects and was able to convert a significant fraction of blood cells to biologically functional cells, albeit for a short period of time. PMID:21878903

  13. A Splice Defect in the EDA Gene in Dogs with an X-Linked Hypohidrotic Ectodermal Dysplasia (XLHED) Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Waluk, Dominik P.; Zur, Gila; Kaufmann, Ronnie; Welle, Monika M.; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Drögemüller, Cord; Müller, Eliane J.; Leeb, Tosso; Galichet, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (XLHED) caused by variants in the EDA gene represents the most common ectodermal dysplasia in humans. We investigated three male mixed-breed dogs with an ectodermal dysplasia phenotype characterized by marked hypotrichosis and multifocal complete alopecia, almost complete absence of sweat and sebaceous glands, and altered dentition with missing and abnormally shaped teeth. Analysis of SNP chip genotypes and whole genome sequence data from the three affected dogs revealed that the affected dogs shared the same haplotype on a large segment of the X-chromosome, including the EDA gene. Unexpectedly, the whole genome sequence data did not reveal any nonsynonymous EDA variant in the affected dogs. We therefore performed an RNA-seq experiment on skin biopsies to search for changes in the transcriptome. This analysis revealed that the EDA transcript in the affected dogs lacked 103 nucleotides encoded by exon 2. We speculate that this exon skipping is caused by a genetic variant located in one of the large introns flanking this exon, which was missed by whole genome sequencing with the illumina short read technology. The altered EDA transcript splicing most likely causes the observed ectodermal dysplasia in the affected dogs. These dogs thus offer an excellent opportunity to gain insights into the complex splicing processes required for expression of the EDA gene, and other genes with large introns. PMID:27449516

  14. Genomic organization and characterization of mouse SAP, the gene that is altered in X-linked lymphoproliferative disease.

    PubMed

    Wu, C; Sayos, J; Wang, N; Howie, D; Coyle, A; Terhorst, C

    2000-08-01

    X-linked lymphoproliferative (XLP) disease is a fatal immunological disorder that renders the immune system unable to respond effectively to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. The gene that encodes a protein termed SAP or SH2D1A is either deleted or mutated in XLP patients, resulting in uncontrolled B- and T-cell proliferation upon EBV infection. Here, we report the cloning and characterization of the mouse SAP gene. It is localized on the mouse X chromosome and comprises four exons spanning approximately 25 kb. Its expression appears to be restricted to T lymphocytes. Whereas a high level of SAP expression is observed in Thl cells, only small amounts are detectable in Th2 cells. Moreover, SAP expression is down-regulated upon in vitro activation of T cells, including CD4+, CD8+ single-positive T cells, and Thl and Th2 cells. This study provides valuable information for in-depth genetic and biochemical analysis of the function of SAP in the immune system.

  15. Generation of Knockout Rats with X-Linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (X-SCID) Using Zinc-Finger Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Mashimo, Tomoji; Takizawa, Akiko; Voigt, Birger; Yoshimi, Kazuto; Hiai, Hiroshi; Kuramoto, Takashi; Serikawa, Tadao

    2010-01-01

    Background Although the rat is extensively used as a laboratory model, the inability to utilize germ line-competent rat embryonic stem (ES) cells has been a major drawback for studies that aim to elucidate gene functions. Recently, zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) were successfully used to create genome-specific double-stranded breaks and thereby induce targeted gene mutations in a wide variety of organisms including plants, drosophila, zebrafish, etc. Methodology/Principal Findings We report here on ZFN-induced gene targeting of the rat interleukin 2 receptor gamma (Il2rg) locus, where orthologous human and mouse mutations cause X-linked severe combined immune deficiency (X-SCID). Co-injection of mRNAs encoding custom-designed ZFNs into the pronucleus of fertilized oocytes yielded genetically modified offspring at rates greater than 20%, which possessed a wide variety of deletion/insertion mutations. ZFN-modified founders faithfully transmitted their genetic changes to the next generation along with the severe combined immune deficiency phenotype. Conclusions and Significance The efficient and rapid generation of gene knockout rats shows that using ZFN technology is a new strategy for creating gene-targeted rat models of human diseases. In addition, the X-SCID rats that were established in this study will be valuable in vivo tools for evaluating drug treatment or gene therapy as well as model systems for examining the treatment of xenotransplanted malignancies. PMID:20111598

  16. Importance of B cell co-stimulation in CD4+ T cell differentiation: X-linked agammaglobulinaemia, a human model

    PubMed Central

    Martini, H; Enright, V; Perro, M; Workman, S; Birmelin, J; Giorda, E; Quinti, I; Lougaris, V; Baronio, M; Warnatz, K; Grimbacher, B

    2011-01-01

    We were interested in the question of whether the congenital lack of B cells actually had any influence on the development of the T cell compartment in patients with agammaglobulinaemia. Sixteen patients with X-linked agammaglobulinaemia (XLA) due to mutations in Btk, nine patients affected by common variable immune deficiency (CVID) with <2% of peripheral B cells and 20 healthy volunteers were enrolled. The T cell phenotype was determined with FACSCalibur and CellQuest Pro software. Mann–Whitney two-tailed analysis was used for statistical analysis. The CD4 T cell memory compartment was reduced in patients with XLA of all ages. This T cell subset encompasses both CD4+CD45RO+ and CD4+CD45RO+CXCR5+ cells and both subsets were decreased significantly when compared to healthy controls: P = 0·001 and P < 0·0001, respectively. This observation was confirmed in patients with CVID who had <2% B cells, suggesting that not the lack of Bruton's tyrosine kinase but the lack of B cells is most probably the cause of the impaired CD4 T cell maturation. We postulate that this defect is a correlate of the observed paucity of germinal centres in XLA. Our results support the importance of the interplay between B and T cells in the germinal centre for the activation of CD4 T cells in humans. PMID:21488866

  17. Importance of B cell co-stimulation in CD4(+) T cell differentiation: X-linked agammaglobulinaemia, a human model.

    PubMed

    Martini, H; Enright, V; Perro, M; Workman, S; Birmelin, J; Giorda, E; Quinti, I; Lougaris, V; Baronio, M; Warnatz, K; Grimbacher, B

    2011-06-01

    We were interested in the question of whether the congenital lack of B cells actually had any influence on the development of the T cell compartment in patients with agammaglobulinaemia. Sixteen patients with X-linked agammaglobulinaemia (XLA) due to mutations in Btk, nine patients affected by common variable immune deficiency (CVID) with <2% of peripheral B cells and 20 healthy volunteers were enrolled. The T cell phenotype was determined with FACSCalibur and CellQuest Pro software. Mann-Whitney two-tailed analysis was used for statistical analysis. The CD4 T cell memory compartment was reduced in patients with XLA of all ages. This T cell subset encompasses both CD4(+)CD45RO(+) and CD4(+)CD45RO(+)CXCR5(+) cells and both subsets were decreased significantly when compared to healthy controls: P = 0·001 and P < 0·0001, respectively. This observation was confirmed in patients with CVID who had <2% B cells, suggesting that not the lack of Bruton's tyrosine kinase but the lack of B cells is most probably the cause of the impaired CD4 T cell maturation. We postulate that this defect is a correlate of the observed paucity of germinal centres in XLA. Our results support the importance of the interplay between B and T cells in the germinal centre for the activation of CD4 T cells in humans.

  18. IL1RAPL1 gene deletion as a cause of X-linked intellectual disability and dysmorphic features.

    PubMed

    Youngs, Erin L; Henkhaus, Rebecca; Hellings, Jessica A; Butler, Merlin G

    2012-01-01

    Intellectual disability affects approximately 2% of the population with males outnumbering females due to involvement of over 300 genes on the X chromosome. The most common form of X-linked intellectual disability (XLID) is fragile X syndrome. We report a family with an apparent XLID pattern with the proband, his mother and maternal half brother having an Xp21.3 deletion detected with chromosomal microarray analysis involving the interleukin 1 receptor accessory protein-like 1 (IL1RAPL1) gene. IL1RAPL1 is highly expressed in the postnatal brain, specifically hippocampus suggesting a specialized role in memory and learning abilities. The proband presented with intellectual disability, a broad face, prominent and wide nasal root, ptosis, a wide philtrum and a small mouth. XLID due to involvement of the IL1RAPL1 gene has been reported to cause nonsyndromic XLID. We report a new family with XLID due to partial deletion of IL1RAPL1, summarize reported literature and describe similar phenotypic similarities among the affected individuals in this family and those reported in the literature proposing that deletion of IL1RAPL1 may cause syndromic XLID. Additional reports are needed to further characterize whether syndromic features are related to disturbances of this gene.

  19. Altered fronto-striatal functions in the Gdi1-null mouse model of X-linked Intellectual Disability.

    PubMed

    Morè, Lorenzo; Künnecke, Basil; Yekhlef, Latefa; Bruns, Andreas; Marte, Antonella; Fedele, Ernesto; Bianchi, Veronica; Taverna, Stefano; Gatti, Silvia; D'Adamo, Patrizia

    2017-03-06

    RAB-GDP dissociation inhibitor 1 (GDI1) loss-of-function mutations are responsible for a form of non-specific X-linked Intellectual Disability (XLID) where the only clinical feature is cognitive impairment. GDI1 patients are impaired in specific aspects of executive functions and conditioned response, which are controlled by fronto-striatal circuitries. Previous molecular and behavioral characterization of the Gdi1-null mouse revealed alterations in the total number/distribution of hippocampal and cortical synaptic vesicles as well as hippocampal short-term synaptic plasticity, and memory deficits. In this study, we employed cognitive protocols with high translational validity to human condition that target the functionality of cortico-striatal circuitry such as attention and stimulus selection ability with progressive degree of complexity. We previously showed that Gdi1-null mice are impaired in some hippocampus-dependent forms of associative learning assessed by aversive procedures. Here, using appetitive-conditioning procedures we further investigated associative learning deficits sustained by the fronto-striatal system. We report that Gdi1-null mice are impaired in attention and associative learning processes, which are a key part of the cognitive impairment observed in XLID patients.

  20. Delineation of the KIAA2022 mutation phenotype: two patients with X-linked intellectual disability and distinctive features.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Yukiko; Ohashi, Ikuko; Naruto, Takuya; Ida, Kazumi; Enomoto, Yumi; Saito, Toshiyuki; Nagai, Jun-Ichi; Wada, Takahito; Kurosawa, Kenji

    2015-06-01

    Next-generation sequencing has enabled the screening for a causative mutation in X-linked intellectual disability (XLID). We identified KIAA2022 mutations in two unrelated male patients by targeted sequencing. We selected 13 Japanese male patients with severe intellectual disability (ID), including four sibling patients and nine sporadic patients. Two of thirteen had a KIAA2022 mutation. Patient 1 was a 3-year-old boy. He had severe ID with autistic behavior and hypotonia. Patient 2 was a 5-year-old boy. He also had severe ID with autistic behavior, hypotonia, central hypothyroidism, and steroid-dependent nephrotic syndrome. Both patients revealed consistent distinctive features, including upswept hair, narrow forehead, downslanting eyebrows, wide palpebral fissures, long nose, hypoplastic alae nasi, open mouth, and large ears. De novo KIAA2022 mutations (p.Q705X in Patient 1, p.R322X in Patient 2) were detected by targeted sequencing and confirmed by Sanger sequencing. KIAA2022 mutations and alterations have been reported in only four families with nonsyndromic ID and epilepsy. KIAA2022 is highly expressed in the fetal and adult brain and plays a crucial role in neuronal development. These additional patients support the evidence that KIAA2022 is a causative gene for XLID.

  1. Targeted gene addition in human CD34(+) hematopoietic cells for correction of X-linked chronic granulomatous disease.

    PubMed

    De Ravin, Suk See; Reik, Andreas; Liu, Pei-Qi; Li, Linhong; Wu, Xiaolin; Su, Ling; Raley, Castle; Theobald, Narda; Choi, Uimook; Song, Alexander H; Chan, Andy; Pearl, Jocelynn R; Paschon, David E; Lee, Janet; Newcombe, Hannah; Koontz, Sherry; Sweeney, Colin; Shivak, David A; Zarember, Kol A; Peshwa, Madhusudan V; Gregory, Philip D; Urnov, Fyodor D; Malech, Harry L

    2016-04-01

    Gene therapy with genetically modified human CD34(+) hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) may be safer using targeted integration (TI) of transgenes into a genomic 'safe harbor' site rather than random viral integration. We demonstrate that temporally optimized delivery of zinc finger nuclease mRNA via electroporation and adeno-associated virus (AAV) 6 delivery of donor constructs in human HSPCs approaches clinically relevant levels of TI into the AAVS1 safe harbor locus. Up to 58% Venus(+) HSPCs with 6-16% human cell marking were observed following engraftment into mice. In HSPCs from patients with X-linked chronic granulomatous disease (X-CGD), caused by mutations in the gp91phox subunit of the NADPH oxidase, TI of a gp91phox transgene into AAVS1 resulted in ∼15% gp91phox expression and increased NADPH oxidase activity in ex vivo-derived neutrophils. In mice transplanted with corrected HSPCs, 4-11% of human cells in the bone marrow expressed gp91phox. This method for TI into AAVS1 may be broadly applicable to correction of other monogenic diseases.

  2. Manifestations of X-linked congenital stationary night blindness in three daughters of an affected male: Demonstration of homozygosity

    SciTech Connect

    Bech-Hansen, N.T. Univ. of Calgary, Alberta ); Pearce, W.G. )

    1993-01-01

    X-linked congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB1) is a hereditary retinal disorder in which clinical features in affected males usually include myopia, nystagmus, and impaired visual acuity. Electroretinography demonstrates a marked reduction in b-wave amplitude. In the study of a large Mennonite family with CSNB1, three of five sisters in one sibship were found to have manifestations of CSNB1. All the sons of these three sisters were affected. Each of the two nonmanifesting sisters had at least one unaffected son. Analysis of Xp markers in the region Xp21.1-Xp11.22 showed that the two sisters who were unaffected had inherited the same maternal X chromosome (i.e., M2). Two of the daughters who manifested with CSNB had inherited the other maternal X chromosome (M1). The third manifesting sister inherited a recombinant X chromosome with a crossover between TIMP and DXS255, which suggests that the CSNB1 locus lies proximal to TIMP. One of the affected daughters' sons had inherited the maternal M1 X chromosome, a finding consistent with that chromosome carrying a mutant CSNB gene; the other affected sons inherited the grandfather's X chromosome (i.e., P). Molecular analysis of DNA from three sisters with manifestations of CSNB is consistent with their being homozygous at the CSNB1 locus and with their mother being a carrier of CSNB1. 23 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis inhibits apoptosis and preserves the blood-brain barrier after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Cheng; Yu, Hongwei; Yan, Cong; Zhao, Wenyang; Liu, Yao; Zhang, Dongdong; Li, Jingwei; Liu, Nan

    2017-01-01

    Early brain injury following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) strongly determines the prognosis of patients suffering from an aneurysm rupture, and apoptosis is associated with early brain injury after SAH. This study was designed to explore the role of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) in early brain injury following SAH. The expression of XIAP was detected using western blotting and real-time RT-PCR in an autologous blood injection model of SAH. We also studied the role of XIAP in early brain injury and detected apoptosis-related proteins. The results showed that XIAP was significantly up-regulated in the cortex and hippocampus and that XIAP was mainly expressed in neuronal cells following SAH. The inhibition of endogenous XIAP aggravated blood-brain barrier disruption, neurological deficits and brain edema. Recombinant XIAP preserved the blood-brain barrier, improved the neurological scores and ameliorated brain edema. Recombinant XIAP treatment also decreased the expression of cleaved caspase-3, caspase-8 and caspase-9, whereas there was no effect on the expression of p53, apoptosis-inducing factor or cytochrome c. These results show that XIAP acts as an endogenous neuroprotective and anti-apoptotic agent following SAH. The effects of XIAP on early brain injury was associated with the inhibition of the caspase-dependent apoptosis pathway. PMID:28327595

  4. GJB1-associated X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, a disorder affecting the central and peripheral nervous systems.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Charles K; Freidin, Mona

    2015-06-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is a group of inherited diseases characterized by exclusive or predominant involvement of the peripheral nervous system. Mutations in GJB1, the gene encoding Connexin 32 (Cx32), a gap-junction channel forming protein, cause the most common X-linked form of CMT, CMT1X. Cx32 is expressed in Schwann cells and oligodendrocytes, the myelinating glia of the peripheral and central nervous systems, respectively. Thus, patients with CMT1X have both central and peripheral nervous system manifestations. Study of the genetics of CMT1X and the phenotypes of patients with this disorder suggest that the peripheral manifestations of CMT1X are likely to be due to loss of function, while in the CNS gain of function may contribute. Mice with targeted ablation of Gjb1 develop a peripheral neuropathy similar to that seen in patients with CMT1X, supporting loss of function as a mechanism for the peripheral manifestations of this disorder. Possible roles for Cx32 include the establishment of a reflexive gap junction pathway in the peripheral and central nervous system and of a panglial syncitium in the central nervous system.

  5. Further linkage evidence for localization of mutational sites for nonsyndromic types of X-linked mental retardation at pericentromeric region

    SciTech Connect

    Robledo, R.; Melis, P.; Siniscalco, M.

    1996-07-12

    We used several microsatellite markers scattered along the X chromosome to search for linkage relationships in a large Sardinian pedigree segregating for nonspecific X-linked mental retardation (MRX). Markers DXS573 and AR, located at chromosomal subregions Xp11.4-p11.22 and Xq11.2-q12, respectively, were found to segregate in full concordance with the disease, leading to a LOD score of 4.21 at zero recombination value. Recombination with the disease was found with markers MAOB and DXS454 located at Xp11.4-p11.3 and Xq21.1-q22, respectively; accordingly, markers distal to Xp11.4 and Xq22 also segregated independently of the disease. These findings provide strong linkage evidence in favor of the localization of one MRX mutational site in the pericentromeric region of the human X chromosome, justifying the assignment of a new symbol (MRX26) to our pedigree. Finally, on the basis of the recombinational events observed in the Xq21-q22 region, we have been able to refine the assignment of marker DXS456 to Xq21.33-q22. 26 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  6. A quantitative real-time PCR method using an X-linked gene for sex typing in pigs.

    PubMed

    Ballester, Maria; Castelló, Anna; Ramayo-Caldas, Yuliaxis; Folch, Josep M

    2013-06-01

    At present, a wide range of molecular sex-typing protocols in wild and domestic animals are available. In pigs, most of these methods are based on PCR amplification of X-Y homologous genes followed by gel electrophoresis which is time-consuming and in some cases expensive. In this paper, we describe, for the first time, a SYBR green-based quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay using an X-linked gene, the glycoprotein M6B, for genetic sexing of pigs. Taking into account the differences in the glycoprotein M6B gene copy number between genders, we determine the correct sex of 54 pig samples from either diaphragm or hair follicle from different breeds using the 2(-ΔΔCT) method for relative quantification. Our qPCR assay represents a quick, inexpensive, and reliable tool for sex determination in pigs. This new protocol could be easily adapted to other species in which the sex determination was required.

  7. Zinc Finger and X-Linked Factor (ZFX) Binds to Human SET Transcript 2 Promoter and Transactivates SET Expression.

    PubMed

    Xu, Siliang; Duan, Ping; Li, Jinping; Senkowski, Tristan; Guo, Fengbiao; Chen, Haibin; Romero, Alberto; Cui, Yugui; Liu, Jiayin; Jiang, Shi-Wen

    2016-10-20

    SET (SE Translocation) protein carries out multiple functions including those for protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) inhibition, histone modification, DNA repair, and gene regulation. SET overexpression has been detected in brain neurons of patients suffering Alzheimer's disease, follicle theca cells of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) patients, and ovarian cancer cells, indicating that SET may play a pathological role for these disorders. SET transcript 2, produced by a specific promoter, represents a major transcript variant in different cell types. In this study, we characterized the transcriptional activation of human SET transcript 2 promoter in HeLa cells. Promoter deletion experiments and co-transfection assays indicated that ZFX, the Zinc finger and X-linked transcription factor, was able to transactivate the SET promoter. A proximal promoter region containing four ZFX-binding sites was found to be critical for the ZFX-mediated transactivation. Mutagenesis study indicated that the ZFX-binding site located the closest to the transcription start site accounted for most of the ZFX-mediated transactivity. Manipulation of ZFX levels by overexpression or siRNA knockdown confirmed the significance and specificity of the ZFX-mediated SET promoter activation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation results verified the binding of ZFX to its cognate sites in the SET promoter. These findings have led to identification of ZFX as an upstream factor regulating SET gene expression. More studies are required to define the in vivo significance of this mechanism, and specifically, its implication for several benign and malignant diseases related to SET dysregulation.

  8. Nonrandom X chromosome inactivation in natural killer cells from obligate carriers of X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Wengler, G.S.; Parolini, O.; Conley, M.E. St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN ); Allen, R.C. ); Smith, H. )

    1993-01-15

    X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (XSCID) is characterized by hypogammaglobulinemia, markedly reduced numbers of T cells, absent mitogen responses, decreased numbers of NK cells, and normal or elevated numbers of B cells. The abnormalities in the NK cell and B cell lineages could be attributed to dependence of these cell lineages on T cells or T cell-derived factors, or to expression of the XSCID gene defect in these cell lineages. In past experiments, the authors have examined X chromosome inactivation patterns in T cells and cultured B cells from female obligate carriers of XSCID and have found that both cell lineages demonstrate nonrandom X chromosome inactivation. This indicates that the gene defect is intrinsic to both of these cell lineages. In the present experiments, a polymerase chain reaction technique was used to evaluate X chromosome inactivation patterns in highly purified populations of freshly isolated NK cells, B cells, CD4[sup +] cells, and CD8[sup +] cells from three obligate carriers of XSCID. All four lymphoid cell populations from these three women exhibited exclusive use of a single X as the active X. In contrast, both X chromosomes were used as the active X in neutrophils and monocytes. These findings indicate that the XSCID gene is expressed in the NK cell lineage as well as in T cells and B cells. This observation makes it highly unlikely that the XSCID gene is involved in Ag receptor gene rearrangements. 21 refs., 4 figs.

  9. X-linked thrombocytopenia with thalassemia displays bone marrow reticulin fibrosis and enhanced angiogenesis: comparisons with primary myelofibrosis.

    PubMed

    Åström, Maria; Hahn-Strömberg, Victoria; Zetterberg, Eva; Vedin, Inger; Merup, Mats; Palmblad, Jan

    2015-03-01

    X-linked thrombocytopenia with thalassemia (XLTT) is caused by the mutation 216R > Q in exon 4 of the GATA1 gene. Male hemizygous patients display macrothrombocytopenia, splenomegaly, and a β-thalassemia trait. We describe two XLTT families where three males were initially misdiagnosed as having primary myelofibrosis (PMF) and all five investigated males showed mild-moderate bone marrow (BM) reticulin fibrosis. Comparative investigations were performed on blood samples and BM biopsies from males with XLTT, PMF patients and healthy controls. Like PMF, XLTT presented with high BM microvessel density, low GATA1 protein levels in megakaryocytes, and elevated blood CD34+ cell counts. But unlike PMF, the BM microvessel pericyte coverage was low in XLTT, and no collagen fibrosis was found. Further, as evaluated by immunohistochemistry, expressions of the growth factors VEGF, AGGF1, and CTGF were low in XLTT megakaryocytes and microvessels but high in PMF. Thus, although the reticulin fibrosis in XLTT might simulate PMF, opposing stromal and megakaryocyte features may facilitate differential diagnosis. Additional comparisons between these disorders may increase the understanding of mechanisms behind BM fibrosis in relation to pathological megakaryopoiesis.

  10. Inheritance of skewed X chromosome inactivation in a large family with an X-linked recessive deafness syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Orstavik, K.H.; Orstavik, R.E.; Eiklid, K.; Tranebjaerg, L.

    1996-07-12

    A new X-linked recessive deafness syndrome was recently reported and mapped to Xq22 (Mohr-Tranebjaeerg syndrome). In addition to deafness, the patients had visual impairment, dystonia, fractures, and mental deterioration. The female carriers did not have any significant manifestations of the syndrome. We examined X chromosome inactivation in 8 obligate and 12 possible carriers by using a polymerase chain reaction analysis of the methylation-dependent amplification of the polymorphic triplet repeat at the androgen receptor locus. Seven of 8 obligate carriers and 1 of 5 carriers by linkage analysis had an extremely skewed pattern in blood DNA not found in 30 normal females. The X inactivation pattern in fibroblast DNA from 2 of the carriers with the extremely skewed pattern was also skewed but to a lesser degree than in blood DNA. One obligate carrier had a random X inactivation pattern in both blood and fibroblast DNA. A selection mechanism for the skewed pattern is therefore not likely. The extremely skewed X inactivation in 8 females of 3 generations in this family may be caused by a single gene that influences skewing of X chromosome inactivation. 22 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  11. X-linked primary ciliary dyskinesia due to mutations in the cytoplasmic axonemal dynein assembly factor PIH1D3.

    PubMed

    Olcese, Chiara; Patel, Mitali P; Shoemark, Amelia; Kiviluoto, Santeri; Legendre, Marie; Williams, Hywel J; Vaughan, Cara K; Hayward, Jane; Goldenberg, Alice; Emes, Richard D; Munye, Mustafa M; Dyer, Laura; Cahill, Thomas; Bevillard, Jeremy; Gehrig, Corinne; Guipponi, Michel; Chantot, Sandra; Duquesnoy, Philippe; Thomas, Lucie; Jeanson, Ludovic; Copin, Bruno; Tamalet, Aline; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel; Papon, Jean-François; Garin, Antoine; Pin, Isabelle; Vera, Gabriella; Aurora, Paul; Fassad, Mahmoud R; Jenkins, Lucy; Boustred, Christopher; Cullup, Thomas; Dixon, Mellisa; Onoufriadis, Alexandros; Bush, Andrew; Chung, Eddie M K; Antonarakis, Stylianos E; Loebinger, Michael R; Wilson, Robert; Armengot, Miguel; Escudier, Estelle; Hogg, Claire; Amselem, Serge; Sun, Zhaoxia; Bartoloni, Lucia; Blouin, Jean-Louis; Mitchison, Hannah M

    2017-02-08

    By moving essential body fluids and molecules, motile cilia and flagella govern respiratory mucociliary clearance, laterality determination and the transport of gametes and cerebrospinal fluid. Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is an autosomal recessive disorder frequently caused by non-assembly of dynein arm motors into cilia and flagella axonemes. Before their import into cilia and flagella, multi-subunit axonemal dynein arms are thought to be stabilized and pre-assembled in the cytoplasm through a DNAAF2-DNAAF4-HSP90 complex akin to the HSP90 co-chaperone R2TP complex. Here, we demonstrate that large genomic deletions as well as point mutations involving PIH1D3 are responsible for an X-linked form of PCD causing disruption of early axonemal dynein assembly. We propose that PIH1D3, a protein that emerges as a new player of the cytoplasmic pre-assembly pathway, is part of a complementary conserved R2TP-like HSP90 co-chaperone complex, the loss of which affects assembly of a subset of inner arm dyneins.

  12. SAP gene transfer restores cellular and humoral immune function in a murine model of X-linked lymphoproliferative disease.

    PubMed

    Rivat, Christine; Booth, Claire; Alonso-Ferrero, Maria; Blundell, Michael; Sebire, Neil J; Thrasher, Adrian J; Gaspar, H Bobby

    2013-02-14

    X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP1) arises from mutations in the gene encoding SLAM-associated protein (SAP) and leads to abnormalities of NKT-cell development, NK-cell cytotoxicity, and T-dependent humoral function. Curative treatment is limited to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation. We tested whether HSC gene therapy could correct the multilineage defects seen in SAP(-/-) mice. SAP(-/-) murine HSCs were transduced with lentiviral vectors containing either SAP or reporter gene before transplantation into irradiated recipients. NKT-cell development was significantly higher and NK-cell cytotoxicity restored to wild-type levels in mice receiving the SAP vector in comparison to control mice. Baseline immunoglobulin levels were significantly increased and T-dependent humoral responses to NP-CGG, including germinal center formation, were restored in SAP-transduced mice.We demonstrate for the first time that HSC gene transfer corrects the cellular and humoral defects in SAP(-/-) mice providing proof of concept for gene therapy in XLP1.

  13. X-linked thrombocytopenia (XLT) due to WAS mutations: clinical characteristics, long-term outcome, and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Albert, Michael H; Bittner, Tanja C; Nonoyama, Shigeaki; Notarangelo, Lucia Dora; Burns, Siobhan; Imai, Kohsuke; Espanol, Teresa; Fasth, Anders; Pellier, Isabelle; Strauss, Gabriele; Morio, Tomohiro; Gathmann, Benjamin; Noordzij, Jeroen G; Fillat, Cristina; Hoenig, Manfred; Nathrath, Michaela; Meindl, Alfons; Pagel, Philipp; Wintergerst, Uwe; Fischer, Alain; Thrasher, Adrian J; Belohradsky, Bernd H; Ochs, Hans D

    2010-04-22

    A large proportion of patients with mutations in the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) protein gene exhibit the milder phenotype termed X-linked thrombocytopenia (XLT). Whereas stem cell transplantation at an early age is the treatment of choice for patients with WAS, therapeutic options for patients with XLT are controversial. In a retrospective multicenter study we defined the clinical phenotype of XLT and determined the probability of severe disease-related complications in patients older than 2 years with documented WAS gene mutations and mild-to-moderate eczema or mild, infrequent infections. Enrolled were 173 patients (median age, 11.5 years) from 12 countries spanning 2830 patient-years. Serious bleeding episodes occurred in 13.9%, life-threatening infections in 6.9%, autoimmunity in 12.1%, and malignancy in 5.2% of patients. Overall and event-free survival probabilities were not significantly influenced by the type of mutation or intravenous immunoglobulin or antibiotic prophylaxis. Splenectomy resulted in increased risk of severe infections. This analysis of the clinical outcome and molecular basis of patients with XLT shows excellent long-term survival but also a high probability of severe disease-related complications. These observations will allow better decision making when considering treatment options for individual patients with XLT.

  14. Early Diagnosis of Cerebral X-linked Adrenoleukodystrophy in Boys with Addison’s Disease Improves Survival and Neurological Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Polgreen, LE; Chahla, S; Miller, W; Rothman, S.; Tolar, J; Kivisto, T; Nascene, D.; Orchard, PJ; Petryk, A

    2011-01-01

    Approximately one-third of boys with X-linked adrenoleukodystophy (X-ALD) develop an acute, progressive inflammatory process of the central nervous system, resulting in rapid neurologic deterioration and death. Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) can halt the progression of neurologic disease if performed early in the course of the cerebral form of X-ALD. We describe a retrospective cohort study of 90 boys with X-ALD evaluated at our institution between 2000 and 2009, to determine if early diagnosis of X-ALD following the diagnosis of unexplained adrenal insufficiency (AI) improves outcomes. We describe 7 cases with a delay in the diagnosis of X-ALD, and compare their outcomes to 10 controls with the diagnosis of ALD made within 12 months following diagnosis of AI. At the time of evaluation for HCT, boys with a delay in the diagnosis of X-ALD had more extensive cerebral involvement and more limited functioning. These boys also were 3.9 times more likely to die, and had significant advancement of cerebral disease after HCT, compared to boys with a timely diagnosis of X-ALD. Conclusion Early diagnosis of cerebral X-ALD following the diagnosis of unexplained AI, and subsequent treatment with HCT, improves both neurological outcomes and survival in boys with cerebral X-ALD. PMID:21279382

  15. X-linked primary ciliary dyskinesia due to mutations in the cytoplasmic axonemal dynein assembly factor PIH1D3

    PubMed Central

    Olcese, Chiara; Patel, Mitali P.; Shoemark, Amelia; Kiviluoto, Santeri; Legendre, Marie; Williams, Hywel J.; Vaughan, Cara K.; Hayward, Jane; Goldenberg, Alice; Emes, Richard D.; Munye, Mustafa M.; Dyer, Laura; Cahill, Thomas; Bevillard, Jeremy; Gehrig, Corinne; Guipponi, Michel; Chantot, Sandra; Duquesnoy, Philippe; Thomas, Lucie; Jeanson, Ludovic; Copin, Bruno; Tamalet, Aline; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel; Papon, Jean- François; Garin, Antoine; Pin, Isabelle; Vera, Gabriella; Aurora, Paul; Fassad, Mahmoud R.; Jenkins, Lucy; Boustred, Christopher; Cullup, Thomas; Dixon, Mellisa; Onoufriadis, Alexandros; Bush, Andrew; Chung, Eddie M. K.; Antonarakis, Stylianos E.; Loebinger, Michael R.; Wilson, Robert; Armengot, Miguel; Escudier, Estelle; Hogg, Claire; Al-Turki, Saeed; Anderson, Carl; Antony, Dinu; Barroso, Inês; Beales, Philip L.; Bentham, Jamie; Bhattacharya, Shoumo; Carss, Keren; Chatterjee, Krishna; Cirak, Sebahattin; Cosgrove, Catherine; Allan, Daly; Durbin, Richard; Fitzpatrick, David; Floyd, Jamie; Foley, A. Reghan; Franklin, Chris; Futema, Marta; Humphries, Steve E.; Hurles, Matt; McCarthy, Shane; Muddyman, Dawn; Muntoni, Francesco; Parker, Victoria; Payne, Felicity; Plagnol, Vincent; Raymond, Lucy; Savage, David B.; Scambler, Peter J.; Schmidts, Miriam; Semple, Robert; Serra, Eva; Stalker, Jim; van Kogelenberg, Margriet; Vijayarangakannan, Parthiban; Walter, Klaudia; Amselem, Serge; Sun, Zhaoxia; Bartoloni, Lucia; Blouin, Jean-Louis; Mitchison, Hannah M.

    2017-01-01

    By moving essential body fluids and molecules, motile cilia and flagella govern respiratory mucociliary clearance, laterality determination and the transport of gametes and cerebrospinal fluid. Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is an autosomal recessive disorder frequently caused by non-assembly of dynein arm motors into cilia and flagella axonemes. Before their import into cilia and flagella, multi-subunit axonemal dynein arms are thought to be stabilized and pre-assembled in the cytoplasm through a DNAAF2–DNAAF4–HSP90 complex akin to the HSP90 co-chaperone R2TP complex. Here, we demonstrate that large genomic deletions as well as point mutations involving PIH1D3 are responsible for an X-linked form of PCD causing disruption of early axonemal dynein assembly. We propose that PIH1D3, a protein that emerges as a new player of the cytoplasmic pre-assembly pathway, is part of a complementary conserved R2TP-like HSP90 co-chaperone complex, the loss of which affects assembly of a subset of inner arm dyneins. PMID:28176794

  16. C26:0-Carnitine Is a New Biomarker for X-Linked Adrenoleukodystrophy in Mice and Man

    PubMed Central

    van de Beek, Malu-Clair; Dijkstra, Inge M. E.; van Lenthe, Henk; Ofman, Rob; Goldhaber-Pasillas, Dalia; Schauer, Nicolas; Schackmann, Martin; Engelen-Lee, Joo-Yeon; Vaz, Frédéric M.; Kulik, Wim; Wanders, Ronald J. A.; Engelen, Marc; Kemp, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD), a progressive neurodegenerative disease, is caused by mutations in ABCD1 and characterized by very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA) accumulation. Virtually all males develop progressive myelopathy (AMN). A subset of patients, however, develops a fatal cerebral demyelinating disease (cerebral ALD). Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is curative for cerebral ALD provided the procedure is performed in an early stage of the disease. Unfortunately, this narrow therapeutic window is often missed. Therefore, an increasing number of newborn screening programs are including ALD. To identify new biomarkers for ALD, we developed an Abcd1 knockout mouse with enhanced VLCFA synthesis either ubiquitous or restricted to oligodendrocytes. Biochemical analysis revealed VLCFA accumulation in different lipid classes and acylcarnitines. Both C26:0-lysoPC and C26:0-carnitine were highly elevated in brain, spinal cord, but also in bloodspots. We extended the analysis to patients and confirmed that C26:0-carnitine is also elevated in bloodspots from ALD patients. We anticipate that validation of C26:0-carnitine for the diagnosis of ALD in newborn bloodspots may lead to a faster inclusion of ALD in newborn screening programs in countries that already screen for other inborn errors of metabolism. PMID:27124591

  17. X-linked immunodeficient mice as a model for testing the protective efficacy of monoclonal antibodies against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Zweerink, H J; Gammon, M C; Hutchison, C F; Jackson, J J; Pier, G B; Puckett, J M; Sewell, T J; Sigal, N H

    1988-01-01

    (DBA/N[female] X CBA/2[male])F1 males have been reported to be deficient in producing antibodies against a number of antigens, including carbohydrates (I. Scher, Adv. Immunol. 35:1-71, 1982). We show that F1 male mice, in contrast to females, made less lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-specific antibodies after immunization with heat-inactivated Pseudomonas aeruginosa and had significantly less naturally occurring LPS-specific antibodies. Furthermore, neutropenic males were 50 to 1,000 times more sensitive to challenge with representative isolates belonging to the seven Fisher immunotypes. Administration to neutropenic F1 males of a human monoclonal antibody specific for the O carbohydrates of P. aeruginosa immunotype 2 LPS or administration of serum from rabbits immunized with heat-inactivated P. aeruginosa immunotype 1 raised the level of resistance to bacterial challenge close to that of females. The results show that the X-linked immunodeficient mouse is an excellent model with which to test the protective efficacy of P. aeruginosa-specific monoclonal antibodies. PMID:3128480

  18. X-linked spinal muscular atrophy in mice caused by autonomous loss of ATP7A in the motor neuron

    PubMed Central

    Hodgkinson, Victoria L.; Dale, Jeffery M.; Garcia, Michael L.; Weisman, Gary A.; Lee, Jaekwon; Gitlin, Jonathan D.; Petris, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    ATP7A is a copper transporting P-type ATPase that is essential for cellular copper homeostasis. Loss-of-function mutations in the ATP7A gene result in Menkes disease, a fatal neurodegenerative disorder resulting in seizures, hypotonia, and failure to thrive due to systemic copper deficiency. Most recently, rare missense mutations in ATP7A that do not impact systemic copper homeostasis have been shown to cause X-linked Spinal Muscular Atrophy type 3 (SMAX3), a distal hereditary motor neuropathy. An understanding of the mechanistic and pathophysiological basis of SMAX3 is currently lacking, in part because the disease-causing mutations have been shown to confer both loss- and gain-of-function properties to ATP7A, and because there is currently no animal model of the disease. In this study, the Atp7a gene was specifically deleted in the motor neurons of mice resulting in a degenerative phenotype consistent with the clinical features in affected patients with SMAX3, including the progressive deterioration of gait, age-dependent muscle atrophy, denervation of neuromuscular junctions, and a loss of motor neuron cell bodies. Taken together these data reveal autonomous requirements for ATP7A that reveal essential roles for copper in the maintenance and function of the motor neuron, and suggest that SMAX3 is caused by a loss of ATP7A function that specifically impacts in the spinal motor neuron. PMID:25639447

  19. X-Linked Alport Dogs Demonstrate Mesangial Filopodial Invasion of the Capillary Tuft as an Early Event in Glomerular Damage

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Sabrina D.; Nabity, Mary B.; Cianciolo, Rachel E.; Dufek, Brianna; Cosgrove, Dominic

    2016-01-01

    Background X-linked Alport syndrome (XLAS), caused by mutations in the type IV collagen COL4A5 gene, accounts for approximately 80% of human Alport syndrome. Dogs with XLAS have a similar clinical progression. Prior studies in autosomal recessive Alport mice demonstrated early mesangial cell invasion as the source of laminin 211 in the glomerular basement membrane (GBM), leading to proinflammatory signaling. The objective of this study was to verify this process in XLAS dogs. Methods XLAS dogs and WT littermates were monitored with serial clinicopathologic data and kidney biopsies. Biopsies were obtained at set milestones defined by the onset of microalbuminuria (MA), overt proteinuria, onset of azotemia, moderate azotemia, and euthanasia. Kidney biopsies were analyzed by histopathology, immunohistochemistry, and electron microscopy. Results XLAS dogs showed progressive decrease in renal function and progressive increase in interstitial fibrosis and glomerulosclerosis (based on light microscopy and immunostaining for fibronectin). The only identifiable structural abnormality at the time of microalbuminuria was ultrastructural evidence of mild segmental GBM multilamination, which was more extensive when overt proteinuria developed. Co-localization studies showed that mesangial laminin 211 and integrin α8β1 accumulated in the GBM at the onset of overt proteinuria and coincided with ultrastructural evidence of mild cellular interpositioning, consistent with invasion of the capillary loops by mesangial cell processes. Conclusion In a large animal model, the induction of mesangial filopodial invasion of the glomerular capillary loop leading to the irregular deposition of laminin 211 is an early initiating event in Alport glomerular pathology. PMID:27959966

  20. Effects of X-Monosomy and X-Linked Imprinting on Superior Temporal Gyrus Morphology in Turner Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kesler, Shelli R.; Blasey, Christine M.; Brown, Wendy E.; Yankowitz, Jerome; Zeng, She Min; Bender, Bruce G.; Reiss, Allan L.

    2011-01-01

    Background Turner syndrome (TS) results from complete or partial monosomy X. The cognitive phenotype of TS involves preservation of verbal skills with visuospatial functioning deficits. The superior temporal gyrus (STG), which is involved in language capacities, has not been investigated in TS. Methods The STG was measured in 30 female subjects (mean age = 14.73 ± 6.41; range = 7.56 –33.30) with TS and 30 age-matched control subjects (mean age = 14.63 ± 5.90; range = 6.35–32.65) using volumetric magnetic resonance imaging analyses. Results Right STG, including both gray and white matter volumes, was significantly larger in TS compared with control subjects. Overall left STG volume was not significantly different between groups, although left white matter volume was increased in the TS subjects. The TS subgroup with a maternally derived X chromosome (Xm) demonstrated more aberrant STG volumes compared with subjects with a paternally (Xp) derived X and control subjects. The difference in STG volumes between Xm and control subjects involved both white and gray matter. The Xm subjects differed from Xp subjects only in terms of gray matter. Conclusions These findings suggest that X-monosomy and X-linked imprinting negatively affect STG development, possibly by disrupting neural pruning mechanisms. PMID:13129659

  1. Genetic Testing Confirmed the Early Diagnosis of X-Linked Hypophosphatemic Rickets in a 7-Month-Old Infant.

    PubMed

    Poon, Kok Siong; Sng, Andrew Anjian; Ho, Cindy Weili; Koay, Evelyn Siew-Chuan; Loke, Kah Yin

    2015-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the phosphate regulating gene with homologies to endopeptidases on the X-chromosome (PHEX) have been causally associated with X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets (XLHR). The early diagnosis of XLHR in infants is challenging when it is based solely on clinical features and biochemical findings. We report a 7-month-old boy with a family history of hypophosphatemic rickets., who demonstrated early clinical evidence of rickets, although serial biochemical findings could not definitively confirm rickets. A sequencing assay targeting the PHEX gene was first performed on the mother's DNA to screen for mutations in the 5'UTR, 22 coding exons, and the exon-intron junctions. Targeted mutation analysis and mRNA studies were subsequently performed on the boys' DNA to investigate the pathogenicity of the identified mutation. Genetic screening of the PHEX gene revealed a novel mutation, c.1080-2A>C, at the splice acceptor site in intron 9. The detection of an aberrant mRNA transcript with skipped (loss of) exon 10 establishes its pathogenicity and confirms the diagnosis of XLHR in this infant. Genetic testing of the PHEX gene resulted in early diagnosis of XLHR, thus enabling initiation of therapy and prevention of progressive rachitic changes in the infant.

  2. Genetic forms of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI): Vasopressin receptor defect (X-linked) and aquaporin defect (autosomal recessive and dominant).

    PubMed

    Bichet, Daniel G; Bockenhauer, Detlef

    2016-03-01

    Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI), which can be inherited or acquired, is characterized by an inability to concentrate urine despite normal or elevated plasma concentrations of the antidiuretic hormone, arginine vasopressin (AVP). Polyuria with hyposthenuria and polydipsia are the cardinal clinical manifestations of the disease. About 90% of patients with congenital NDI are males with X-linked NDI who have mutations in the vasopressin V2 receptor (AVPR2) gene encoding the vasopressin V2 receptor. In less than 10% of the families studied, congenital NDI has an autosomal recessive or autosomal dominant mode of inheritance with mutations in the aquaporin-2 (AQP2) gene. When studied in vitro, most AVPR2 and AQP2 mutations lead to proteins trapped in the endoplasmic reticulum and are unable to reach the plasma membrane. Prior knowledge of AVPR2 or AQP2 mutations in NDI families and perinatal mutation testing is of direct clinical value and can avert the physical and mental retardation associated with repeated episodes of dehydration.

  3. A novel AVPR2 gene mutation of X-linked congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in an Asian pedigree.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wei-Hong; Li, Qiang; Wei, Hong-Yan; Lu, Hong-Yan; Qu, Hui-Qi; Zhu, Mei

    2016-08-25

    Polyuria and polydipsia are the characteristics of congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (CNDI). Approximately 90% of all patients with CNDI have X-linked hereditary disease, which is due to a mutation of the arginine vasopressin receptor 2 (AVPR2) gene. This case report describes a 54-year-old male with polyuria and polydipsia and several male members of his pedigree who had the same symptoms. The proband was diagnosed with diabetes insipidus using a water-deprivation and arginine vasopressin stimulation test. Genomic DNA from the patient and his family members was extracted and the AVPR2 gene was sequenced. A novel missense mutation of a cytosine to guanine transition at position 972 (c.972C > G) was found, which resulted in the substitution of isoleucine for methionine at amino acid position 324 (p.I324M) in the seventh transmembrane domain of the protein. The proband's mother and daughter were heterozygous for this mutation. The novel mutation of the AVPR2 gene further broadens the phenotypic spectrum of the AVPR2 gene.

  4. Brain-expressed X-linked 2 Is Pivotal for Hyperactive Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin (mTOR)-mediated Tumorigenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhongdong; Wang, Ying; Huang, Fuqiang; Chen, Rongrong; Li, Chunjia; Wang, Fang; Goto, June; Kwiatkowski, David J.; Wdzieczak-Bakala, Joanna; Tu, Pengfei; Liu, Jianmiao; Zha, Xiaojun; Zhang, Hongbing

    2015-01-01

    Frequent alteration of upstream proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes activates mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) and causes cancer. However, the downstream effectors of mTOR remain largely elusive. Here we report that brain-expressed X-linked 2 (BEX2) is a novel downstream effector of mTOR. Elevated BEX2 in Tsc2−/− mouse embryonic fibroblasts, Pten−/− mouse embryonic fibroblasts, Tsc2-deficient rat uterine leiomyoma cells, and brains of neuronal specific Tsc1 knock-out mice were abolished by mTOR inhibitor rapamycin. Furthermore, BEX2 was also increased in the liver of a hepatic specific Pten knock-out mouse and the kidneys of Tsc2 heterozygous deletion mice, and a patient with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). mTOR up-regulation of BEX2 was mediated in parallel by both STAT3 and NF-κB. BEX2 was involved in mTOR up-regulation of VEGF production and angiogenesis. Depletion of BEX2 blunted the tumorigenesis of cells with activated mTOR. Therefore, enhanced STAT3/NF-κB-BEX2-VEGF signaling pathway contributes to hyperactive mTOR-induced tumorigenesis. BEX2 may be targeted for the treatment of the cancers with aberrantly activated mTOR signaling pathway. PMID:26296882

  5. MRG-1, an autosome-associated protein, silences X-linked genes and protects germline immortality in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Takasaki, Teruaki; Liu, Zheng; Habara, Yasuaki; Nishiwaki, Kiyoji; Nakayama, Jun-Ichi; Inoue, Kunio; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Strome, Susan

    2007-02-01

    MRG15, a mammalian protein related to the mortality factor MORF4, is required for cell proliferation and embryo survival. Our genetic analysis has revealed that the Caenorhabditis elegans ortholog MRG-1 serves similar roles. Maternal MRG-1 promotes embryo survival and is required for proliferation and immortality of the primordial germ cells (PGCs). As expected of a chromodomain protein, MRG-1 associates with chromatin. Unexpectedly, it is concentrated on the autosomes and not detectable on the X chromosomes. This association is not dependent on the autosome-enriched protein MES-4. Focusing on possible roles of MRG-1 in regulating gene expression, we determined that MRG-1 is required to maintain repression in the maternal germ line of transgenes on extrachromosomal arrays, and of several X-linked genes previously shown to depend on MES-4 for repression. MRG-1 is not required for PGCs to acquire transcriptional competence or for the turn-on of expression of several PGC-expressed genes (pgl-1, glh-1, glh-4 and nos-1). By contrast to this result in PGCs, MRG-1 is required for ectopic expression of those germline genes in somatic cells lacking the NuRD complex component MEP-1. We discuss how an autosome-enriched protein might repress genes on the X chromosome, promote PGC proliferation and survival, and influence the germ versus soma distinction.

  6. MicroRNAs and intellectual disability (ID) in Down syndrome, X-linked ID, and Fragile X syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Siew, Wei-Hong; Tan, Kai-Leng; Babaei, Maryam Abbaspour; Cheah, Pike-See; Ling, King-Hwa

    2013-01-01

    Intellectual disability (ID) is one of the many features manifested in various genetic syndromes leading to deficits in cognitive function among affected individuals. ID is a feature affected by polygenes and multiple environmental factors. It leads to a broad spectrum of affected clinical and behavioral characteristics among patients. Until now, the causative mechanism of ID is unknown and the progression of the condition is poorly understood. Advancement in technology and research had identified various genetic abnormalities and defects as the potential cause of ID. However, the link between these abnormalities with ID is remained inconclusive and the roles of many newly discovered genetic components such as non-coding RNAs have not been thoroughly investigated. In this review, we aim to consolidate and assimilate the latest development and findings on a class of small non-coding RNAs known as microRNAs (miRNAs) involvement in ID development and progression with special focus on Down syndrome (DS) and X-linked ID (XLID) [including Fragile X syndrome (FXS)]. PMID:23596395

  7. Combination of secretin and fluvastatin ameliorates the polyuria associated with X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in mice.

    PubMed

    Procino, Giuseppe; Milano, Serena; Carmosino, Monica; Barbieri, Claudia; Nicoletti, Maria C; Li, Jian H; Wess, Jürgen; Svelto, Maria

    2014-07-01

    X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (X-NDI) is a disease caused by inactivating mutations of the vasopressin (AVP) type 2 receptor (V2R) gene. Loss of V2R function prevents plasma membrane expression of the AQP2 water channel in the kidney collecting duct cells and impairs the kidney concentration ability. In an attempt to develop strategies to bypass V2R signaling in X-NDI, we evaluated the effects of secretin and fluvastatin, either alone or in combination, on kidney function in a mouse model of X-NDI. The secretin receptor was found to be functionally expressed in the kidney collecting duct cells. Based on this, X-NDI mice were infused with secretin for 14 days but urinary parameters were not altered by the infusion. Interestingly, secretin significantly increased AQP2 levels in the collecting duct but the protein primarily accumulated in the cytosol. Since we previously reported that fluvastatin treatment increased AQP2 plasma membrane expression in wild-type mice, secretin-infused X-NDI mice received a single injection of fluvastatin. Interestingly, urine production by X-NDI mice treated with secretin plus fluvastatin was reduced by nearly 90% and the urine osmolality was doubled. Immunostaining showed that secretin increased intracellular stores of AQP2 and the addition of fluvastatin promoted AQP2 trafficking to the plasma membrane. Taken together, these findings open new perspectives for the pharmacological treatment of X-NDI.

  8. CD40 agonist antibody mediated improvement of chronic Cryptosporidium infection in patients with X- linked hyper IgM syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xiying; Upadhyaya, Bhaskar; Wu, Liming; Koh, Christopher; Santín-Durán, Mónica; Pittaluga, Stefania; Uzel, Gulbu; Kleiner, David; Williams, Ester; Ma, Chi A.; Bodansky, Aaron; Oliveira, Joao B.; Edmonds, Pamela; Hornung, Ronald; Wong, Duane W.; Fayer, Ronald; Fleisher, Tom; Heller, Theo; Prussin, Calman; Jain, Ashish

    2012-01-01

    X-linked hyper-IgM syndrome (XHM) is a combined immune deficiency disorder caused by mutations in CD40 ligand. We tested CP-870,893, a human CD40 agonist monoclonal antibody, in the treatment of two XHM patients with biliary Cryptosporidiosis. CP-870,893 activated B cells and APCs in vitro, restoring class switch recombination in XHM B cells and inducing cytokine secretion by monocytes. CP-870,893 infusions were well tolerated and showed significant activity in vivo, decreasing leukocyte concentration in peripheral blood. Although specific antibody responses were lacking, frequent dosing in one subject primed T cells to secrete IFN-g and suppressed oocyst shedding in the stool. Nevertheless, relapse occurred after discontinuation of therapy. The CD40 receptor was rapidly internalized following binding with CP-870,893, potentially explaining the limited capacity of CP-870,893 to mediate immune reconstitution. This study demonstrates that CP-870,893 suppressed oocysts shedding in XHM patients with biliary cryptosporidiosis. The continued study of CD40 agonists in XHM is warranted. PMID:22459705

  9. Redefining the Pediatric Phenotype of X-Linked Monocarboxylate Transporter 8 (MCT8) Deficiency: Implications for Diagnosis and Therapies.

    PubMed

    Matheus, Maria Gisele; Lehman, Rebecca K; Bonilha, Leonardo; Holden, Kenton R

    2015-10-01

    X-linked monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8) deficiency results from a loss-of-function mutation in the monocarboxylate transporter 8 gene, located on chromosome Xq13.2 (Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome). Affected boys present early in life with neurodevelopment delays but have pleasant dispositions and commonly have elevated serum triiodothyronine. They also have marked axial hypotonia and quadriparesis but surprisingly little spasticity early in their disease course. They do, however, have subtle involuntary movements, most often dystonia. The combination of hypotonia and dystonia presents a neurorehabilitation challenge and explains why spasticity-directed therapies have commonly produced suboptimal responses. Our aim was to better define the spectrum of motor disability and to elucidate the neuroanatomic basis of the motor impairments seen in MCT8 deficiency using clinical observation and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a cohort of 6 affected pediatric patients. Our findings identified potential imaging biomarkers and suggest that rehabilitation efforts targeting dystonia may be more beneficial than those targeting spasticity in the prepubertal pediatric MCT8 deficiency population.

  10. X inactivation as a mechanism of selection against lethal alleles: further investigation of incontinentia pigmenti and X linked lymphoproliferative disease.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, A; Collins, J; Vetrie, D; Cole, C; Bobrow, M

    1992-01-01

    Thirty-one females with incontinentia pigmenti (IP), 42 controls, and 11 females from four families segregating for X linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) were studied for evidence of skewed X inactivation by analysis of methylation at sites in the HPRT, PGK, and M27 beta (DXS255) regions of the X chromosome. Extensive skewing of X inactivation was present in blood from 4/42 (9.5%) control females and 11/31 (35%) of those with IP. This frequency of skewed inactivation was seen in both familial and sporadic cases of IP. Analysis of inactivation in mother/daughter pairs, both affected and control subjects, showed no familial consistency of pattern, arguing against specific mutations being associated with particular patterns of inactivation. In the only informative family where both mother and daughter were affected by IP and showed skewed inactivation, the IP mutation was on the active X chromosome. This argues against cell selection during early embryogenesis being the explanation for the skewed inactivation observed. These data confirm that skewed inactivation of one X is observed in lymphocytes from a significant minority of normal females, and is seen with raised frequency in IP heterozygotes. It is not, however, a universally observed phenomenon, and the relationship of X inactivity to the IP mutation appears to be complex. In the case of XLP, though skewed X inactivation patterns are seen in most disease carriers, the frequency with which this phenomenon occurs in normal females renders it an unreliable diagnostic marker for XLP carriers. Images PMID:1404291

  11. Identification of Three Novel Mutations in the FRMD7 Gene for X-linked Idiopathic Congenital Nystagmus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao; Ge, Xianglian; Yu, Ying; Zhang, Yilan; Wu, Yaming; Luan, Yin; Sun, Ji; Qu, Jia; Jin, Zi-Bing; Gu, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic congenital nystagmus (ICN) consists of involuntary and periodic ocular motility, often with seriously reduced visual acuity. To identify the genetic defects associated with X-linked ICN, we performed PCR-based DNA direct sequencing of two candidate genes, FRMD7 and GPR143, in four families. Mutation analysis led to identification of three novel mutations, p.S260R, p.Q487X, and p.V549Y fsX554, in FRMD7 in three of the recruited families. Results from structural modeling indicated that the p.S260R may potentially disrupt FRMD7 function through loss of a phosphorylation site and/or interference with protein-protein interactions. Both p.Q487X, and p.V549Y fsX554 mutations were predicted to generate nonfunctional truncated proteins. Using a capture next generation sequencing method, we excluded CASK as the responsible gene for the remaining family. Combining sequence analysis and structural modeling, we report three novel mutations in FRMD7 in three independent families with XLICN, and provide molecular insights for future XLICN diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24434814

  12. Identification of Three Novel Mutations in the FRMD7 Gene for X-linked Idiopathic Congenital Nystagmus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao; Ge, Xianglian; Yu, Ying; Zhang, Yilan; Wu, Yaming; Luan, Yin; Sun, Ji; Qu, Jia; Jin, Zi-Bing; Gu, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic congenital nystagmus (ICN) consists of involuntary and periodic ocular motility, often with seriously reduced visual acuity. To identify the genetic defects associated with X-linked ICN, we performed PCR-based DNA direct sequencing of two candidate genes, FRMD7 and GPR143, in four families. Mutation analysis led to identification of three novel mutations, p.S260R, p.Q487X, and p.V549Y fsX554, in FRMD7 in three of the recruited families. Results from structural modeling indicated that the p.S260R may potentially disrupt FRMD7 function through loss of a phosphorylation site and/or interference with protein-protein interactions. Both p.Q487X, and p.V549Y fsX554 mutations were predicted to generate nonfunctional truncated proteins. Using a capture next generation sequencing method, we excluded CASK as the responsible gene for the remaining family. Combining sequence analysis and structural modeling, we report three novel mutations in FRMD7 in three independent families with XLICN, and provide molecular insights for future XLICN diagnosis and treatment.

  13. Forensic potential of the STR DXYS156 in Mexican populations: inference of X-linked allele null.

    PubMed

    Torres-Rodríguez, M; Martínez-Cortes, G; Páez-Riberos, L A; Sandoval, L; Muñoz-Valle, J F; Ceballos-Quintal, J M; Pinto-Escalante, D; Rangel-Villalobos, H

    2006-01-01

    The pentanucleotide STR (TAAAA)n DXYS156 offers advantages for genetic identity testing. In addition to establish the gender, DXYS156 expands the DNA profile and is able to indicate the possible geographic origin of the individual. We analyzed DXYS156 in 757 individuals of both sexes from Mexican populations. We studied the cosmopolitan Mestizo population and six Mexican ethnic groups: Tarahumaras, Purépechas, Nahuas, Mayas, Huicholes and Mezcala Indians. The six shorter (4-10) and the three larger alleles (11-13) were specific for the X and Y-chromosomes, respectively. A random distribution of alleles into genotypes was observed in males and females from each population. We estimated the power of exclusion for paternity testing according to the son's gender, and the power of discrimination in forensic casework. In addition, we detected a relatively high frequency of an X-linked allele null, principally in Mexican-Mestizos (3.6%), which must be considered when DXYS156 be applied for identification purposes.

  14. 25-hydroxycholesterol contributes to cerebral inflammation of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy through activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jiho; Park, Sangjun; Jin Hur, Hye; Cho, Hyun-Ju; Hwang, Inhwa; Pyo Kang, Yun; Im, Isak; Lee, Hyunji; Lee, Eunju; Yang, Wonsuk; Kang, Hoon-Chul; Won Kwon, Sung; Yu, Je-Wook; Kim, Dong-Wook

    2016-01-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD), caused by an ABCD1 mutation, is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder associated with the accumulation of very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA). Cerebral inflammatory demyelination is the major feature of childhood cerebral ALD (CCALD), the most severe form of ALD, but its underlying mechanism remains poorly understood. Here, we identify the aberrant production of cholesterol 25-hydroxylase (CH25H) and 25-hydroxycholesterol (25-HC) in the cellular context of CCALD based on the analysis of ALD patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells and ex vivo fibroblasts. Intriguingly, 25-HC, but not VLCFA, promotes robust NLRP3 inflammasome assembly and activation via potassium efflux-, mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS)- and liver X receptor (LXR)-mediated pathways. Furthermore, stereotaxic injection of 25-HC into the corpus callosum of mouse brains induces microglial recruitment, interleukin-1β production, and oligodendrocyte cell death in an NLRP3 inflammasome-dependent manner. Collectively, our results indicate that 25-HC mediates the neuroinflammation of X-ALD via activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. PMID:27779191

  15. X-linked spinal muscular atrophy in mice caused by autonomous loss of ATP7A in the motor neuron.

    PubMed

    Hodgkinson, Victoria L; Dale, Jeffery M; Garcia, Michael L; Weisman, Gary A; Lee, Jaekwon; Gitlin, Jonathan D; Petris, Michael J

    2015-06-01

    ATP7A is a copper-transporting P-type ATPase that is essential for cellular copper homeostasis. Loss-of-function mutations in the ATP7A gene result in Menkes disease, a fatal neurodegenerative disorder resulting in seizures, hypotonia and failure to thrive, due to systemic copper deficiency. Most recently, rare missense mutations in ATP7A that do not impact systemic copper homeostasis have been shown to cause X-linked spinal muscular atrophy type 3 (SMAX3), a distal hereditary motor neuropathy. An understanding of the mechanistic and pathophysiological basis of SMAX3 is currently lacking, in part because the disease-causing mutations have been shown to confer both loss- and gain-of-function properties to ATP7A, and because there is currently no animal model of the disease. In this study, the Atp7a gene was specifically deleted in the motor neurons of mice, resulting in a degenerative phenotype consistent with the clinical features in affected patients with SMAX3, including the progressive deterioration of gait, age-dependent muscle atrophy, denervation of neuromuscular junctions and a loss of motor neuron cell bodies. Taken together, these data reveal autonomous requirements for ATP7A that reveal essential roles for copper in the maintenance and function of the motor neuron, and suggest that SMAX3 is caused by a loss of ATP7A function that specifically impacts the spinal motor neuron.

  16. Biochemical characterization of arylsulfatase E and functional analysis of mutations found in patients with X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata.

    PubMed Central

    Daniele, A; Parenti, G; d'Addio, M; Andria, G; Ballabio, A; Meroni, G

    1998-01-01

    X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata (CDPX) is a congenital disorder characterized by abnormalities in cartilage and bone development. Mutations leading to amino acid substitutions were identified recently in CDPX patients, in the coding region of the arylsulfatase E (ARSE) gene, a novel member of the sulfatase gene family. Transfection of the ARSE full-length cDNA, in Cos7 cells, allowed us to establish that its protein product is a 60-kD precursor, which is subject to N-glycosylation, to give a mature 68-kD form that, unique among sulfatases, is localized to the Golgi apparatus. Five missense mutations found in CDPX patients were introduced into wild-type ARSE cDNA by site-directed mutagenesis. These mutants were transfected into Cos7 cells, and the arylsulfatase activity and biochemical properties were determined, to study the effect of these substitutions on the ARSE protein. One of the mutants behaves as the wild-type protein. All four of the other mutations resulted in a complete lack of arylsulfatase activity, although the substitutions do not appear to affect the stability and subcellular localization of the protein. The loss of activity due to these mutations confirms their involvement in the clinical phenotype and points to the importance of these residues in the correct folding of a catalytically active ARSE enzyme. PMID:9497243

  17. Stability and Safety of an AAV Vector for Treating RPGR-ORF15 X-Linked Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wen-Tao; Dyka, Frank M; Dinculescu, Astra; Li, Jie; Zhu, Ping; Chiodo, Vince A; Boye, Sanford L; Conlon, Thomas J; Erger, Kirsten; Cossette, Travis; Hauswirth, William W

    2015-09-01

    Our collaborative successful gene replacement therapy using AAV vectors expressing a variant of human RPGR-ORF15 in two canine models provided therapeutic proof of concept for translation into human treatment. The ORF15 sequence contained within this AAV vector, however, has ORF15 DNA sequence variations compared to the published sequence that are likely due to its unusual composition of repetitive purine nucleotides. This mutability is a concern for AAV vector production and safety when contemplating a human trial. In this study, we establish the safety profile of AAV-hIRBP-hRPGR and AAV-hGRK1-hRPGR vectors used in the initial canine proof-of-principle experiments by demonstrating hRPGR-ORF15 sequence stability during all phases of manipulation, from plasmid propagation to vector production to its stability in vivo after subretinal administration to animals. We also evaluate potential toxicity in vivo by investigating protein expression, retinal structure and function, and vector biodistribution. Expression of hRPGR is detected in the inner segments and synaptic terminals of photoreceptors and is restricted to the connecting cilium when the vector is further diluted. Treated eyes exhibit no toxicity as assessed by retinal histopathology, immunocytochemistry, optical coherence tomography, fundoscopy, electroretinogram, and vector biodistribution. Therefore, the hRPGR-ORF15 variant in our AAV vectors appears to be a more stable form than the endogenous hRPGR cDNA when propagated in vitro. Its safety profile presented here in combination with its proven efficacy supports future gene therapy clinical trials.

  18. Genomic Sequence of Canine Papillomavirus 19

    PubMed Central

    Tisza, Michael J.; Yuan, Hang; Schlegel, Richard

    2016-01-01

    It is generally assumed that individual papillomas (warts) are caused by infection with individual papillomavirus types. Deep sequencing of virions extracted from a canine oral papilloma revealed the presence of canine papillomavirus 1 (CPV1), CPV2, and a novel canine papillomavirus, CPV19. This suggests that papillomas sometimes harbor multiple viral species. PMID:27932663

  19. Molecular and virological evidence of viral activation from chromosomally integrated human herpesvirus 6A in a patient with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Endo, Akifumi; Watanabe, Ken; Ohye, Tamae; Suzuki, Kyoko; Matsubara, Tomoyo; Shimizu, Norio; Kurahashi, Hiroki; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi; Katano, Harutaka; Inoue, Naoki; Imai, Kohsuke; Takagi, Masatoshi; Morio, Tomohiro; Mizutani, Shuki

    2014-08-15

    It has been unclear whether chromosomally integrated human herpesvirus 6 (ciHHV-6) can be activated with pathogenic effects on the human body. We present molecular and virological evidence of ciHHV-6A activation in a patient with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency. These findings have significant implications for the management of patients with ciHHV-6.

  20. Nonsyndromic X-linked intellectual deficiency in three brothers with a novel MED12 missense mutation [c.5922G>T (p.Glu1974His)

    PubMed Central

    Bouazzi, Habib; Lesca, Gaetan; Trujillo, Carlos; Alwasiyah, Mohammad Khalid; Munnich, Arnold

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message X-linked intellectual deficiency (XLID) is a large group of genetic disorders. MED12 gene causes syndromic and nonsyndromic forms of XLID. Only seven pathological mutations have been identified in this gene. Here, we report a novel mutation segregating with XLID phenotype. This mutation could be in favor of genotype–phenotype correlations. PMID:26273451

  1. Loss-of-function mutations in the X-linked biglycan gene cause a severe syndromic form of thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections

    PubMed Central

    Meester, Josephina A.N.; Vandeweyer, Geert; Pintelon, Isabel; Lammens, Martin; Van Hoorick, Lana; De Belder, Simon; Waitzman, Kathryn; Young, Luciana; Markham, Larry W.; Vogt, Julie; Richer, Julie; Beauchesne, Luc M.; Unger, Sheila; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Prsa, Milan; Dhillon, Rami; Reyniers, Edwin; Dietz, Harry C.; Wuyts, Wim; Mortier, Geert; Verstraeten, Aline; Van Laer, Lut; Loeys, Bart L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection (TAAD) is typically inherited in an autosomal dominant manner, but rare X-linked families have been described. So far the only known X-linked gene is FLNA, which is associated with the periventricular nodular heterotopia type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. However, mutations in this gene only explain a small number of X-linked TAAD families. Methods We performed targeted resequencing of 368 candidate genes in a cohort of 11 molecularly unexplained Marfan probands. Subsequently, Sanger sequencing of BGN in 360 male and 155 female molecularly unexplained TAAD probands was carried out. Results We found five individuals with loss-of-function mutations in BGN, encoding the small leucine-rich proteoglycan biglycan. The clinical phenotype is characterized by early onset aortic aneurysm and dissection. Other recurrent findings include hypertelorism, pectus deformity, joint hypermobility, contractures and mild skeletal dysplasia. Fluorescent stainings revealed an increase in TGF-β signalling, evidenced by an increase in nuclear pSMAD2 in aortic wall. Our results are in line with prior reports demonstrating that Bgn-deficient male BALB/cA mice die from aortic rupture. Conclusion In conclusion, BGN gene defects in humans cause an X-linked syndromic form of severe TAAD, associated with preservation of elastic fibres and increased TGF-β signalling. PMID:27632686

  2. X-inactivation patterns in female Leber`s hereditary optic neuropathy patients do not support a strong X-linked determinant

    SciTech Connect

    Pegoraro, E.; Hoffman, E.P.; Carelli, V.; Cortelli, P.

    1996-02-02

    Leber`s hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) accounts for about 3% of the cases of blindness in young adult males. The underlying mitochondrial pathogenesis of LHON has been well studied, with specific mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations of structural genes described and well characterized. However, enigmatic aspects of the disease are not explained by mutation data, such as the higher proportion of affected males, the later onset of the disease in females, and the presence of unaffected individuals with a high proportion of mutant mtDNA. A hypothesis which has been put forward to explain the unusual disease expression is a dual model of mtDNA and X-linked nuclear gene inheritance. If a nuclear X-linked modifier gene influences the expression of the mitochondrial-linked mutant gene then the affected females should be either homozygous for the nuclear determinant, or if heterozygous, lyonization should favor the mutant X. In order to determine if an X-linked gene predisposes to LHON phenotype we studied X-inactivation patterns in 35 females with known mtDNA mutations from 10 LHON pedigrees. Our results do not support a strong X-linked determinant in LHON cause: 2 of the 10 (20%) manifesting carriers showed skewing of X-inactivation, as did 3 of the 25 (12%) nonmanifesting carriers. 39 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  3. A previously unidentified deletion in G protein-coupled receptor 143 causing X-linked congenital nystagmus in a Chinese family

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Jia, Yanlei; Wang, Lejin; Bu, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Congenital nystagmus (CN) is characterized by conjugated, spontaneous, and involuntary ocular oscillations. It is an inherited disease and the most common inheritance pattern is X-linked CN. In this study, our aim is to identify the disease-causing mutation in a large sixth-generation Chinese family with X-linked CN. Methods: It has been reported that mutations in four-point-one, ezrin, radixin, moesin domain-containing 7 gene (FRMD7) and G protein-coupled receptor 143 gene (GPR143) account for the majority patients of X-linked nystagmus. We collected 8 ml blood samples from members of a large sixth-generation pedigree with X-linked CN and 100 normal controls. FRMD7 and GPR143 were scanned by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based DNA sequencing assays, and multiplex PCR assays were applied to detect deletions. Results: We identified a previously unreported deletion covering 7 exons in GPR143 in a Chinese family. The heterozygous deletion from exon 3 to exon 9 of GPR143 was detected in all affected males in the family, while it was not detected in other unaffected relatives or 100 normal controls. Conclusions: This is the first report of molecular characterization in GPR143 gene in the CN family. Our results expand the spectrum of GPR143 mutations causing CN and further confirm the role of GPR143 in the pathogenesis of CN. PMID:27958203

  4. BRAF Mutations in Canine Cancers.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Hiroyuki; Kennedy, Katherine; Shapiro, Susan G; Breen, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Activating mutations of the BRAF gene lead to constitutive activation of the MAPK pathway. Although many human cancers carry the mutated BRAF gene, this mutation has not yet been characterized in canine cancers. As human and canine cancers share molecular abnormalities, we hypothesized that BRAF gene mutations also exist in canine cancers. To test this hypothesis, we sequenced the exon 15 of BRAF, mutation hot spot of the gene, in 667 canine primary tumors and 38 control tissues. Sequencing analysis revealed that a single nucleotide T to A transversion at nucleotide 1349 occurred in 64 primary tumors (9.6%), with particularly high frequency in prostatic carcinoma (20/25, 80%) and urothelial carcinoma (30/45, 67%). This mutation results in the amino acid substitution of glutamic acid for valine at codon 450 (V450E) of canine BRAF, corresponding to the most common BRAF mutation in human cancer, V600E. The evolutional conservation of the BRAF V600E mutation highlights the importance of MAPK pathway activation in neoplasia and may offer opportunity for molecular diagnostics and targeted therapeutics for dogs bearing BRAF-mutated cancers.

  5. Array comparative genomic hybridisation analysis of boys with X linked hypopituitarism identifies a 3.9 Mb duplicated critical region at Xq27 containing SOX3

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, N; Ross, S; Morgan, T; Belsky, J; Hol, F; Karnes, P; Hopwood, N; Myers, S; Tan, A; Warne, G; Forrest, S; Thomas, P

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Array comparative genomic hybridisation (array CGH) is a powerful method that detects alteration of gene copy number with greater resolution and efficiency than traditional methods. However, its ability to detect disease causing duplications in constitutional genomic DNA has not been shown. We developed an array CGH assay for X linked hypopituitarism, which is associated with duplication of Xq26–q27. Methods: We generated custom BAC/PAC arrays that spanned the 7.3 Mb critical region at Xq26.1–q27.3, and used them to search for duplications in three previously uncharacterised families with X linked hypopituitarism. Results: Validation experiments clearly identified Xq26–q27 duplications that we had previously mapped by fluorescence in situ hybridisation. Array CGH analysis of novel XH families identified three different Xq26–q27 duplications, which together refine the critical region to a 3.9 Mb interval at Xq27.2–q27.3. Expression analysis of six orthologous mouse genes from this region revealed that the transcription factor Sox3 is expressed at 11.5 and 12.5 days after conception in the infundibulum of the developing pituitary and the presumptive hypothalamus. Discussion: Array CGH is a robust and sensitive method for identifying X chromosome duplications. The existence of different, overlapping Xq duplications in five kindreds indicates that X linked hypopituitarism is caused by increased gene dosage. Interestingly, all X linked hypopituitarism duplications contain SOX3. As mutation of this gene in human beings and mice results in hypopituitarism, we hypothesise that increased dosage of Sox3 causes perturbation of pituitary and hypothalamic development and may be the causative mechanism for X linked hypopituitarism. PMID:15342697

  6. Podoplanin Expression in Canine Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Ogasawara, Satoshi; Honma, Ryusuke; Kaneko, Mika K; Fujii, Yuki; Kagawa, Yumiko; Konnai, Satoru; Kato, Yukinari

    2016-12-01

    A type I transmembrane protein, podoplanin (PDPN), is expressed in several normal cells such as lymphatic endothelial cells or pulmonary type I alveolar cells. We recently demonstrated that anticanine PDPN monoclonal antibody (mAb), PMab-38, recognizes canine PDPN of squamous cell carcinomas, but does not react with lymphatic endothelial cells. Herein, we investigated whether PMab-38 reacts with canine melanoma. PMab-38 reacted with 90% of melanoma cells (9/10 cases) using immunohistochemistry. Of interest, PMab-38 stained the lymphatic endothelial cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts in melanoma tissues, although it did not stain any lymphatic endothelial cells in normal tissues. PMab-38 could be useful for uncovering the function of PDPN in canine melanomas.

  7. Canine "honing" in Australopithecus afarensis.

    PubMed

    Greenfield, L O

    1990-06-01

    The maxillary canines of Australopithecus afarensis show a distal wear facet that extends from the apex of the crown to a point near the distal cingulum. Although these facets bear a superficial resemblance to the honing facets found on the projecting portions of the canines of other anthropoids, a more detailed examination provided in this paper shows that they are not homologous or functionally equivalent. The facets are not related to the use of the maxillary canine as a weapon or as an additional masticatory surface. Instead, their presence in A. afarensis represented a blunting or dulling of the posterior edge of C so that its occlusion with P3 would be consistent with cheek tooth occlusion.

  8. Podoplanin Expression in Canine Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Ogasawara, Satoshi; Honma, Ryusuke; Kaneko, Mika K.; Fujii, Yuki; Kagawa, Yumiko; Konnai, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    A type I transmembrane protein, podoplanin (PDPN), is expressed in several normal cells such as lymphatic endothelial cells or pulmonary type I alveolar cells. We recently demonstrated that anticanine PDPN monoclonal antibody (mAb), PMab-38, recognizes canine PDPN of squamous cell carcinomas, but does not react with lymphatic endothelial cells. Herein, we investigated whether PMab-38 reacts with canine melanoma. PMab-38 reacted with 90% of melanoma cells (9/10 cases) using immunohistochemistry. Of interest, PMab-38 stained the lymphatic endothelial cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts in melanoma tissues, although it did not stain any lymphatic endothelial cells in normal tissues. PMab-38 could be useful for uncovering the function of PDPN in canine melanomas. PMID:27918691

  9. 125 INCOMPLETE COMPENSATORY UP-REGULATION OF X-LINKED GENES IN BOVINE GERMLINE, EARLY EMBRYOS, AND SOMATIC TISSUES.

    PubMed

    Duan, J; Jue, N K; Jiang, Z; O'Neill, R; Wolf, E; Blomberg, L A; Dong, H; Zheng, X; Chen, J; Tian, X

    2016-01-01

    The maintenance of a proper gene dosage is essential in cellular networks. To resolve the dosage imbalance between eutherian females (XX) and male (XY), X chromosome inactivation (XCI) occurs in females, while X-chromosome dosage compensation up-regulates the active X to balance its expression with that of autosome pairs [Ohno's hypothesis; Ohno 1967 Sex Chromosomes and Sex-linked Genes (Springer-Verlag), p. 99]. These phenomena have been well studied in humans and mice, despite many controversies over the existence of such up-regulation. Using RNA sequencing data, we determined X chromosome dosage compensation in the bovine by analysing the global expression profiles of germ cells, embryos, and somatic tissues. Eight bovine RNA-seq data sets were obtained in from the Gene Expression Omnibus, covering bovine immature/mature oocytes (GSE59186 and GSE52415), pre-implantation conceptuses (GSE59186, GSE52415, and GSE56513), extra-embryonic tissues (PRJNA229443), and male/female somatic tissues (GSE74076, GSE63509, PRJEB6377, and GSE65125). The RNAseq data were trimmed and non-uniquely (paralogs included) mapped to the bovine reference genome assembly UMD3.1.1 using Hisat2 (version 2.0.5) aligner. The mRNA level of each gene, estimated by transformed transcripts per kilobase million was quantified by IsoEM (version 1.1.5). These RNA-seq data sets represented 4 chromosome scenarios in cells: XXXX:AAAA (diploid immature oocyte with DNA duplication), XX:AA (haploid mature oocyte with DNA duplication), XX:AA and X:AA (gradual changed X status in bovine pre-implantation conceptuses), and X:AA (extra-embryonic tissues and somatic cells in female with one active X or XY male) were analysed for dosage compensation. A total of 959 X-linked genes and 20,316 autosome genes were used to calculate the relative X to autosomal gene (A) expression (RXE): log2 (X expression) - log2 (A expression). The following dosage determinations were made: RXE values ≥ 0: complete dosage

  10. Mandibular canine index in establishing sex identity.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Shishir; Nagabhushana, D; Rao, B Balaji; Mamatha, G P

    2002-01-01

    An investigation study on sex identity through mandibular canine index directed to detect sexual dimorphism using the Mesio-Distal width of mandibular permanent canines and inter canine and inter canine arch width in the mandible was conducted in the Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Bapuji Dental College and Hospital, Davangere. 360 patients were subjected to the mesio-distal measurement and inter canine arch width. Males were detected correctly in 83.3% and in females 81%. They were statistically significant and the related literatures reviewed.

  11. Human Erythroid 5-Aminolevulinate Synthase Mutations Associated with X-Linked Protoporphyria Disrupt Conformational Equilibrium and Enhance Product Release†

    PubMed Central

    Fratz, Erica J.; Clayton, Jerome; Hunter, Gregory A.; Ducamp, Sarah; Breydo, Leonid; Uversky, Vladimir N.; Deybach, Jean-Charles; Gouya, Laurent; Puy, Hervé; Ferreira, Gloria C.

    2015-01-01

    Regulation of 5-aminolevulinate synthase (ALAS) is at the origin of balanced heme production in mammals. Mutations in the C-terminal region of human erythroid-specific ALAS (hALAS2) are associated with X-linked protoporphyria (XLPP), a disease characterized by extreme photosensitivity, with elevated blood concentrations of free protoporphyrin IX and zinc protoporphyrin. To investigate the molecular basis for this disease, recombinant hALAS2 and variants of the enzyme harboring the gain-of-function XLPP mutations were constructed, purified, and analyzed kinetically, spectroscopically and thermodynamically. Enhanced activities of the XLPP variants resulted from accelerations in the rate at which the product 5-aminolevulinate (ALA) was released from the enzyme. Circular dichroism spectroscopy revealed that the XLPP mutations altered the microenvironment of the pyridoxal 5’-phosphate cofactor, which underwent further and specific alterations upon succinyl-CoA binding. Transient kinetic analyses of the variant-catalyzed reactions and protein fluorescence quenching upon ALA binding to the XLPP variants demonstrated that the protein conformational transition step associated with product release was predominantly affected. Of relevance, XLPP could also be modeled in cell culture. We propose that 1) the XLPP mutations destabilize the succinyl-CoA-induced hALAS2 closed conformation and thus accelerate ALA release, 2) the extended C-terminus of wild-type mammalian ALAS2 provides a regulatory role that allows for allosteric modulation of activity, thereby controlling the rate of erythroid heme biosynthesis, and 3) this control is disrupted in XLPP, resulting in porphyrin accumulation. PMID:26300302

  12. Immunohistochemical detection of the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) in cervical squamous intraepithelial neoplasia and squamous carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Burstein, David E; Idrees, Muhammad T; Li, Gon; Wu, Maoxin; Kalir, Tamara

    2008-04-01

    Premalignant and invasive squamous lesions of the uterine cervix were surveyed for the immunohistochemical detectability of the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP), believed to be the most potent of a novel group of proteins designated inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs). IAPs bind and prevent the activation of apoptosis-mediating caspases. Recent cancer biologic studies have implicated IAPs in therapeutic resistance and tumor aggressiveness. XIAP in particular is considered a highly promising target for drug discovery. Forty-four formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded archival tissue sections were deparaffinized; subjected to citrate-based antigen retrieval; and immunostained with anti-XIAP monoclonal antibody (clone 48, BD Biosciences, San Jose, Calif) diluted 1:250, 4 degrees C x 72 hours; and developed using EnVision-Plus (Dako, Carpinteria, Calif) and diaminobenzidine as chromagen. Particulate or heterogeneous cytoplasmic staining was considered positive. Normal squamous epithelium was XIAP-positive in 7 of 34 cases (20.6%). Preinvasive intraepithelial lesions were positively stained in 54.5% of cases. Nineteen of 22 invasive squamous carcinomas were positive (86.4%). The intensity and extensiveness of XIAP immunostaining varied among individual cases, but trended upward with loss of tumor differentiation: 8 of 9 cases with strong staining were poorly differentiated carcinomas. The present study suggests the characteristic link between poor tumor differentiation and more aggressive clinical behavior could in some malignancies be based upon the concomitant induction of XIAP. Induction of XIAP appears to occur in a subset of intraepithelial lesions; in others, XIAP is detected only upon progression to invasive carcinoma. Detection of enhanced XIAP expression may also pinpoint those lesions that might benefit from pharmacologic disruption of XIAP's actions.

  13. Novel mutations in the connexin 32 gene associated with X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, C.; Ainsworth, P. |

    1994-09-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease is a pathologically and genetically hetergenous group of disorders that cause a progressive neuropathy, defined pathologically by degeneration of the myelin (CMT 1) of the axon (CMT 2) of the peripheral nerves. An X-linked type of the demyelinating form of this disorder (CMT X) has recently been linked to mutations in the connexin 32 (Cx32) gene, which codes for a 284 amino acid gap junction protein found in myelinated peripheral nerve. To date some 7 different mutations in this gene have been identified as being responsible for CMT X. The majority of these predict nonconservative amino acid substitutions, while one is a frameshift mutation which predicts a premature stop at codon 21. We report the results of molecular studies on three further local CMT X kindreds. The Cx32 gene was amplified by PCR in three overlapping fragments 300-450 bp in length using leukocyte-derived DNA as template. These were either sequenced directly using a deaza dGTP sequencing protocol, or were cloned and sequenced using a TA vector. In two of the kindreds the affected members carried a point mutation which was predicted to effect a non-conservative amino acid change within the first transmembrane domain. Both of these mutations caused a restriction site alteration (the loss of an Nla III and the creation of a Pvu II, respectively), and the former mutation was observed to segregate with the clinicial phenotype in affected family members. Affected members of the third kindred, which was a very large multigenerational family that had been extensively studied previously, were shown to carry a point mutation predicted to cause a premature truncation of the Cx32 gene product in the intracellular carboxy terminus. This mutation obliterated an Rsa I site which allowed a rapid screen of several other family members.

  14. Targeted gene editing restores regulated CD40L function in X-linked hyper-IgM syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Nicholas; Hagin, David; Sommer, Karen; Song, Yumei; Khan, Iram; Clough, Courtnee; Ochs, Hans D; Rawlings, David J; Scharenberg, Andrew M; Torgerson, Troy R

    2016-05-26

    Loss of CD40 ligand (CD40L) expression or function results in X-linked hyper-immunoglobulin (Ig)M syndrome (X-HIGM), characterized by recurrent infections due to impaired immunoglobulin class-switching and somatic hypermutation. Previous attempts using retroviral gene transfer to correct murine CD40L expression restored immune function; however, treated mice developed lymphoproliferative disease, likely due to viral-promoter-dependent constitutive CD40L expression. These observations highlight the importance of preserving endogenous gene regulation in order to safely correct this disorder. Here, we report efficient, on-target, homology-directed repair (HDR) editing of the CD40LG locus in primary human T cells using a combination of a transcription activator-like effector nuclease-induced double-strand break and a donor template delivered by recombinant adeno-associated virus. HDR-mediated insertion of a coding sequence (green fluorescent protein or CD40L) upstream of the translation start site within exon 1 allowed transgene expression to be regulated by endogenous CD40LG promoter/enhancer elements. Additionally, inclusion of the CD40LG 3'-untranslated region in the transgene preserved posttranscriptional regulation. Expression kinetics of the transgene paralleled that of endogenous CD40L in unedited T cells, both at rest and in response to T-cell stimulation. The use of this method to edit X-HIGM patient T cells restored normal expression of CD40L and CD40-murine IgG Fc fusion protein (CD40-muIg) binding, and rescued IgG class switching of naive B cells in vitro. These results demonstrate the feasibility of engineered nuclease-directed gene repair to restore endogenously regulated CD40L, and the potential for its use in T-cell therapy for X-HIGM syndrome.

  15. X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein mediates tumor cell resistance to antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Evans, M K; Sauer, S J; Nath, S; Robinson, T J; Morse, M A; Devi, G R

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is the deadliest, distinct subtype of breast cancer. High expression of epidermal growth factor receptors [EGFR or human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)] in IBC tumors has prompted trials of anti-EGFR/HER2 monoclonal antibodies to inhibit oncogenic signaling; however, de novo and acquired therapeutic resistance is common. Another critical function of these antibodies is to mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), which enables immune effector cells to engage tumors and deliver granzymes, activating executioner caspases. We hypothesized that high expression of anti-apoptotic molecules in tumors would render them resistant to ADCC. Herein, we demonstrate that the most potent caspase inhibitor, X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP), overexpressed in IBC, drives resistance to ADCC mediated by cetuximab (anti-EGFR) and trastuzumab (anti-HER2). Overexpression of XIAP in parental IBC cell lines enhances resistance to ADCC; conversely, targeted downregulation of XIAP in ADCC-resistant IBC cells renders them sensitive. As hypothesized, this ADCC resistance is in part a result of the ability of XIAP to inhibit caspase activity; however, we also unexpectedly found that resistance was dependent on XIAP-mediated, caspase-independent suppression of reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, which otherwise occurs during ADCC. Transcriptome analysis supported these observations by revealing modulation of genes involved in immunosuppression and oxidative stress response in XIAP-overexpressing, ADCC-resistant cells. We conclude that XIAP is a critical modulator of ADCC responsiveness, operating through both caspase-dependent and -independent mechanisms. These results suggest that strategies targeting the effects of XIAP on caspase activation and ROS suppression have the potential to enhance the activity of monoclonal antibody-based immunotherapy. PMID:26821068

  16. β-Propeller protein-associated neurodegeneration: a new X-linked dominant disorder with brain iron accumulation.

    PubMed

    Hayflick, Susan J; Kruer, Michael C; Gregory, Allison; Haack, Tobias B; Kurian, Manju A; Houlden, Henry H; Anderson, James; Boddaert, Nathalie; Sanford, Lynn; Harik, Sami I; Dandu, Vasuki H; Nardocci, Nardo; Zorzi, Giovanna; Dunaway, Todd; Tarnopolsky, Mark; Skinner, Steven; Holden, Kenton R; Frucht, Steven; Hanspal, Era; Schrander-Stumpel, Connie; Mignot, Cyril; Héron, Delphine; Saunders, Dawn E; Kaminska, Margaret; Lin, Jean-Pierre; Lascelles, Karine; Cuno, Stephan M; Meyer, Esther; Garavaglia, Barbara; Bhatia, Kailash; de Silva, Rajith; Crisp, Sarah; Lunt, Peter; Carey, Martyn; Hardy, John; Meitinger, Thomas; Prokisch, Holger; Hogarth, Penelope

    2013-06-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders with high iron in the basal ganglia encompass an expanding collection of single gene disorders collectively known as neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation. These disorders can largely be distinguished from one another by their associated clinical and neuroimaging features. The aim of this study was to define the phenotype that is associated with mutations in WDR45, a new causative gene for neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation located on the X chromosome. The study subjects consisted of WDR45 mutation-positive individuals identified after screening a large international cohort of patients with idiopathic neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation. Their records were reviewed, including longitudinal clinical, laboratory and imaging data. Twenty-three mutation-positive subjects were identified (20 females). The natural history of their disease was remarkably uniform: global developmental delay in childhood and further regression in early adulthood with progressive dystonia, parkinsonism and dementia. Common early comorbidities included seizures, spasticity and disordered sleep. The symptoms of parkinsonism improved with l-DOPA; however, nearly all patients experienced early motor fluctuations that quickly progressed to disabling dyskinesias, warranting discontinuation of l-DOPA. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed iron in the substantia nigra and globus pallidus, with a 'halo' of T1 hyperintense signal in the substantia nigra. All patients harboured de novo mutations in WDR45, encoding a beta-propeller protein postulated to play a role in autophagy. Beta-propeller protein-associated neurodegeneration, the only X-linked disorder of neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation, is associated with de novo mutations in WDR45 and is recognizable by a unique combination of clinical, natural history and neuroimaging features.

  17. Rapid immunoblot and kinase assay tests for a syndromal form of X linked mental retardation: Coffin-Lowry syndrome.

    PubMed

    Merienne, K; Jacquot, S; Trivier, E; Pannetier, S; Rossi, A; Scott, C; Schinzel, A; Castellan, C; Kress, W; Hanauer, A

    1998-11-01

    Coffin-Lowry syndrome (CLS) is a syndromal form of X linked mental retardation, in which some associated facial, hand, and skeletal abnormalities are diagnostic features. Accurate diagnosis, critical for genetic counselling, is often difficult, especially in early childhood. We have recently shown that Coffin-Lowry syndrome is caused by mutations in the gene encoding RSK2, a growth factor regulated protein kinase. RSK2 mutations are very heterogeneous and most of them lead to premature termination of translation or to loss of phosphotransferase activity or both. In the present study, we have evaluated immunoblot and RSK2 kinase assays as a rapid and simple diagnostic test for CLS, using cultured lymphoblastoid or fibroblast cell lines. Western blot analysis failed to detect RSK2 in six patients, suggesting the presence of truncated proteins in these patients. This conclusion was confirmed in four patients, in whom the causative mutations, all leading to premature termination of translation, were identified. Of four patients showing a normal amount of RSK2 protein on western blot and tested for RSK2 phosphotransferase activity, one had a dramatically impaired activity. Analysis of the RSK2 cDNA sequence in this patient showed a mutation of a putative phosphorylation site that would be critical for RSK2 activity. Preliminary results show that, at least, the western blot protocol can be successfully applied to lymphocyte protein extracts prepared directly from blood samples. These assays promise to become important diagnostic tools for CLS, particularly with regard to very young patients with no family history of the condition.

  18. X-Linked Inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein – A Critical Death Resistance Regulator and Therapeutic Target for Personalized Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Obexer, Petra; Ausserlechner, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Defects in apoptosis regulation are one main cause of cancer development and may result from overexpression of anti-apoptotic proteins such as inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs). IAPs are cell death regulators that, among other functions, bind caspases, and interfere with apoptotic signaling via death receptors or intrinsic cell death pathways. All IAPs share one to three common structures, the so called baculovirus-IAP-repeat (BIR)-domains that allow them to bind caspases and other proteins. X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) is the most potent and best-defined anti-apoptotic IAP family member that directly neutralizes caspase-9 via its BIR3 domain and the effector caspases-3 and -7 via its BIR2 domain. A natural inhibitor of XIAP is SMAC/Diablo, which is released from mitochondria in apoptotic cells and displaces bound caspases from the BIR2/BIR3 domains of XIAP thereby reactivating cell death execution. The central apoptosis-inhibitory function of XIAP and its overexpression in many different types of advanced cancers have led to significant efforts to identify therapeutics that neutralize its anti-apoptotic effect. Most of these drugs are chemical derivatives of the N-terminal part of SMAC/Diablo. These “SMAC-mimetics” either specifically induce apoptosis in cancer cells or act as drug-sensitizers. Several “SMAC-mimetics” are currently tested by the pharmaceutical industry in Phase I and Phase II trials. In this review, we will discuss recent advances in understanding the function of IAPs in normal and malignant cells and focus on approaches to specifically neutralize XIAP in cancer cells. PMID:25120954

  19. Non-specific X-linked mental retardation: linkage analysis in MRX2 and MRX4 families revisited.

    PubMed

    Hu, L J; Blumenfeld-Heyberger, S; Hanauer, A; Weissenbach, J; Mandel, J L

    1994-07-15

    We have previously reported linkage analysis in 3 families with non-specific X-linked mental retardation (XLMR). This used RFLPs and was limited by the relatively low informativeness and density of markers available. We have performed a new linkage analysis using microsatellites (including new Genethon markers) in the two most informative families. In the MRX2 family, a lod score of 2.61 at theta = 0.05 had previously been obtained with DXS85 in Xp22.2. We now report a tighter linkage with AFM 135xe7 (DXS989, z = 4.62 at theta = 0.00) and established the order DXS85-DXS207-DXS999 (AFM234 y12)-MRX2, DXS365, DXS1052 (AFM 163yh2), DXS989-DXS1065 (AFM224zf2), DMD 3'. The localization of MRX2 in Xp22.2-p22.1 is thus clearly different from the more distal MRX gene defined by patients with contiguous gene syndromes. In the MRX4 family, a maximum lod score of 2.53 at theta = 0.00 had been obtained with DXS159 in Xq13. Our present study did not show recombination from ALAS2 in Xp11.21 to DXS441 in Xq13.3 (z = 3.38 at theta = 0.00 for the latter marker) and the closest flanking markers are DXS255 in Xp11.22 and DXYS1 in Xq21.3. Reduced recombination around the centromere prevents precise mapping. The localisation of MRX4 overlaps with that of several other MRX families.

  20. Decreased N-TAF1 expression in X-linked dystonia-parkinsonism patient-specific neural stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Naoto; Hendriks, William T.; Dhakal, Jyotsna; Vaine, Christine A.; Liu, Christina; Shin, David; Shin, Kyle; Wakabayashi-Ito, Noriko; Dy, Marisela; Multhaupt-Buell, Trisha; Sharma, Nutan; Breakefield, Xandra O.; Bragg, D. Cristopher

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT X-linked dystonia-parkinsonism (XDP) is a hereditary neurodegenerative disorder involving a progressive loss of striatal medium spiny neurons. The mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration are not known, in part because there have been few cellular models available for studying the disease. The XDP haplotype consists of multiple sequence variations in a region of the X chromosome containing TAF1, a large gene with at least 38 exons, and a multiple transcript system (MTS) composed of five unconventional exons. A previous study identified an XDP-specific insertion of a SINE-VNTR-Alu (SVA)-type retrotransposon in intron 32 of TAF1, as well as a neural-specific TAF1 isoform, N-TAF1, which showed decreased expression in post-mortem XDP brain compared with control tissue. Here, we generated XDP patient and control fibroblasts and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) in order to further probe cellular defects associated with this disease. As initial validation of the model, we compared expression of TAF1 and MTS transcripts in XDP versus control fibroblasts and iPSC-derived neural stem cells (NSCs). Compared with control cells, XDP fibroblasts exhibited decreased expression of TAF1 transcript fragments derived from exons 32-36, a region spanning the SVA insertion site. N-TAF1, which incorporates an alternative exon (exon 34′), was not expressed in fibroblasts, but was detectable in iPSC-differentiated NSCs at levels that were ∼threefold lower in XDP cells than in controls. These results support the previous findings that N-TAF1 expression is impaired in XDP, but additionally indicate that this aberrant transcription might occur in neural cells at relatively early stages of development that precede neurodegeneration. PMID:26769797

  1. Deficiency in circulating natural killer (NK) cell subsets in common variable immunodeficiency and X-linked agammaglobulinaemia.

    PubMed

    Aspalter, R M; Sewell, W A; Dolman, K; Farrant, J; Webster, A D

    2000-09-01

    Absolute and relative NK cell numbers were determined in peripheral whole blood by flow cytometry in patients with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) (n = 55) and X-linked agammaglobulinaemia (XLA) (n = 19) on regular immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy. Absolute CD3-CD16+ NK cell numbers were significantly reduced in CVID patients (median 108/microl, range 23-815), compared with normal subjects (n = 60) (289/microl, range 56-640, P < 0.001). Total lymphocyte concentrations were significantly lower in CVID (median 1587/microl, range 523-7519) compared with normal subjects (median 2019/microl, range 1124-3149, P = 0.004), with the percentage of NK cells also being significantly decreased (median 7.5%, range 3.0-33. 0%, compared with 14.2%, range 2.6-30.8%, P < 0.001). In XLA, absolute NK cell numbers (median 140/microl, range 32-551, P < 0. 001) but not relative numbers were significantly reduced compared with normal controls. We excluded the possibility that IVIG interferes with in vitro binding of CD16 MoAbs. Further analysis of NK cell subsets showed a deficiency of both CD16+ and CD56+ cells in CVID, most marked in the CD3-CD8dim subpopulation, which may be due to increased homing of these cells to the gut. Serial studies on a small number of patients suggest that IVIG therapy has no short-term effect on NK cells, although we cannot exclude an effect with prolonged use. Although there are no obvious clinical effects of the NK depletion in CVID and XLA, this may be a factor in their predisposition to cancer.

  2. Mapping of a possible X-linked form of familial developmental dysphasia (FDD) in a single large pedigree

    SciTech Connect

    Dunne, P.W.; Doody, R.S.; Epstein, H.F.

    1994-09-01

    Children diagnosed with developmental dysphasia develop speech very late without exhibiting sensory or motor dysfunction, and when they do begin to speak their grammar is abnormal. A large three-generation British pedigree was recently identified in which 16 out of 30 members were diagnosed as dysphasic. Assuming a dominant mode of inheritance with homogeneous phenotypic expression and complete penetrance among affected members, we showed by simulation analysis that this pedigree has the power to detect linkage to marker loci with an average maximum LOD score of 3.67 at {theta}=0.1. Given the absence of male-to-male transmission and a ratio of female to male affecteds (10/6) in this pedigree within the expected range for an X-linked dominant mode of inheritance, we decided to begin a genome-wide linkage analysis with microsatellite markers on the human X chromosome. Fifteen individuals (10 affected) from three generations were genotyped with 35 polymorphic STS`s (Research Genetics) which were approximately uniformly distributed along the X chromosome. Two-point linkage was assessed using the MLINK and ILINK programs from the LINKAGE package. Markers DXS1223, DXS987, DXS996 and DXS1060 on Xp22 showed consistent linkage to the disease locus with a maximum LOD score of 0.86 at a distance of 22 cM for DXS1060. If further analysis with additional markers and additional family members confirms X-linkage, such a localization would provide support for Lehrke`s hypothesis for X-linkage of major intellectual traits including verbal functioning.

  3. Extracellular matrix mineralization in periodontal tissues: Noncollagenous matrix proteins, enzymes, and relationship to hypophosphatasia and X-linked hypophosphatemia

    PubMed Central

    McKee, Marc D.; Hoac, Betty; Addison, William N.; Barros, Nilana M.T.; Millán, José Luis; Chaussain, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    As broadly demonstrated for the formation of a functional skeleton, proper mineralization of periodontal alveolar bone and teeth – where calcium phosphate crystals are deposited and grow within an extracellular matrix – is essential to dental function. Mineralization defects in tooth dentin and cementum of the periodontium invariably lead to a weak (soft or brittle) dentition such that teeth become loose and prone to infection and are lost prematurely. Mineralization of the extremities of periodontal ligament fibres (Sharpey's fibres) where they insert into tooth cementum and alveolar bone is also essential for the function of the tooth suspensory apparatus in occlusion and mastication. Molecular determinants of mineralization in these tissues include mineral ion concentrations (phosphate and calcium), pyrophosphate, small integrin-binding ligand N-linked glycoproteins (SIBLINGs), and matrix vesicles. Amongst the enzymes important in regulating these mineralization determinants, two are discussed at length here with clinical examples given, namely tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) and phosphate-regulating gene with homologies to endopeptidases on the X chromosome (PHEX). Inactivating mutations in these enzymes in humans and in mouse models lead to the soft bones and teeth characteristic of hypophosphatasia (HPP) and X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH), respectively, where levels of local and systemic circulating mineralization determinants are perturbed. In XLH, in addition to renal phosphate wasting causing low circulating phosphate levels, phosphorylated mineralization-regulating SIBLING proteins such as matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein (MEPE) and osteopontin (OPN), and the phosphorylated peptides proteolytically released from them such as the acidic serine- and aspartate-rich motif (ASARM) peptide, may accumulate locally to impair mineralization in this disease. PMID:23931057

  4. Cone Photoreceptor Structure in Patients With X-Linked Cone Dysfunction and Red-Green Color Vision Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Emily J.; Wilk, Melissa; Langlo, Christopher S.; Kasilian, Melissa; Ring, Michael; Hufnagel, Robert B.; Dubis, Adam M.; Tee, James J.; Kalitzeos, Angelos; Gardner, Jessica C.; Ahmed, Zubair M.; Sisk, Robert A.; Larsen, Michael; Sjoberg, Stacy; Connor, Thomas B.; Dubra, Alfredo; Neitz, Jay; Hardcastle, Alison J.; Neitz, Maureen; Michaelides, Michel; Carroll, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Mutations in the coding sequence of the L and M opsin genes are often associated with X-linked cone dysfunction (such as Bornholm Eye Disease, BED), though the exact color vision phenotype associated with these disorders is variable. We examined individuals with L/M opsin gene mutations to clarify the link between color vision deficiency and cone dysfunction. Methods We recruited 17 males for imaging. The thickness and integrity of the photoreceptor layers were evaluated using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. Cone density was measured using high-resolution images of the cone mosaic obtained with adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscopy. The L/M opsin gene array was characterized in 16 subjects, including at least one subject from each family. Results There were six subjects with the LVAVA haplotype encoded by exon 3, seven with LIAVA, two with the Cys203Arg mutation encoded by exon 4, and two with a novel insertion in exon 2. Foveal cone structure and retinal thickness was disrupted to a variable degree, even among related individuals with the same L/M array. Conclusions Our findings provide a direct link between disruption of the cone mosaic and L/M opsin variants. We hypothesize that, in addition to large phenotypic differences between different L/M opsin variants, the ratio of expression of first versus downstream genes in the L/M array contributes to phenotypic diversity. While the L/M opsin mutations underlie the cone dysfunction in all of the subjects tested, the color vision defect can be caused either by the same mutation or a gene rearrangement at the same locus. PMID:27447086

  5. A recombination outside the BB deletion refines the location of the X-linked retinitis pigmentosa locus RP3

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, R.; Bingham, E.; Forsythe, P.; McHenry, C.

    1996-07-01

    Genetic loci for X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP) have been mapped between Xp11.22 and Xp22.13 (RP2, RP3, RP6, and RP15). The RP3 gene, which is responsible for the predominant form of XLRP in most Caucasian populations, has been localized to Xp21.1 by linkage analysis and the map positions of chromosomal deletions associated with the disease. Previous linkage studies have suggested that RP3 is flanked by the markers DXS1110 (distal) and OTC (proximal). Patient BB was though to have RP because of a lesion at the RP3 locus, in addition to chronic granulomatous disease, Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), mild mental retardation, and the McLeod phenotype. This patient carried a deletion extending {approximately}3 Mb from DMD in Xp21.3 to Xp21.1, with the proximal breakpoint located {approximately}40 kb centromeric to DXS1110. The RP3 gene, therefore, is believed to reside between DXS1110 and the proximal breakpoint of the BB deletion. In order to refine the location of RP3 and to ascertain patients with RP3, we have been analyzing several XLRP families for linkage to Xp markers. Linkage analysis in an American family of 27 individuals demonstrates segregation of XLRP with markers in Xp21.1, consistent with the RP3 subtype. One affected male shows a recombination event proximal to DXS1110. Additional markers within the DXS1110-OTC interval show that the crossover is between two novel polymorphic markers, DXS8349 and M6, both of which are present in BB DNA and lie centromeric to the proximal breakpoint. This recombination places the XLRP mutation in this family outside the BB deletion and redefines the location of RP3. 22 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Identification and Glycerol-Induced Correction of Misfolding Mutations in the X-Linked Mental Retardation Gene CASK

    PubMed Central

    LaConte, Leslie E. W.; Chavan, Vrushali; Mukherjee, Konark

    2014-01-01

    The overwhelming amount of available genomic sequence variation information demands a streamlined approach to examine known pathogenic mutations of any given protein. Here we seek to outline a strategy to easily classify pathogenic missense mutations that cause protein misfolding and are thus good candidates for chaperone-based therapeutic strategies, using previously identified mutations in the gene CASK. We applied a battery of bioinformatics algorithms designed to predict potential impact on protein structure to five pathogenic missense mutations in the protein CASK that have been shown to underlie pathologies ranging from X-linked mental retardation to autism spectrum disorder. A successful classification of the mutations as damaging was not consistently achieved despite the known pathogenicity. In addition to the bioinformatics analyses, we performed molecular modeling and phylogenetic comparisons. Finally, we developed a simple high-throughput imaging assay to measure the misfolding propensity of the CASK mutants in situ. Our data suggests that a phylogenetic analysis may be a robust method for predicting structurally damaging mutations in CASK. Mutations in two evolutionarily invariant residues (Y728C and W919R) exhibited a strong propensity to misfold and form visible aggregates in the cytosolic milieu. The remaining mutations (R28L, Y268H, and P396S) showed no evidence of aggregation and maintained their interactions with known CASK binding partners liprin-α3 Mint-1, and Veli, indicating an intact structure. Intriguingly, the protein aggregation caused by the Y728C and W919R mutations was reversed by treating the cells with a chemical chaperone (glycerol), providing a possible therapeutic strategy for treating structural mutations in CASK in the future. PMID:24505460

  7. Aggressive tumor growth and clinical evolution in a patient with X-linked acro-gigantism syndrome.

    PubMed

    Naves, Luciana A; Daly, Adrian F; Dias, Luiz Augusto; Yuan, Bo; Zakir, Juliano Coelho Oliveira; Barra, Gustavo Barcellos; Palmeira, Leonor; Villa, Chiara; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Júnior, Armindo Jreige; Neto, Florêncio Figueiredo Cavalcante; Liu, Pengfei; Pellegata, Natalia S; Stratakis, Constantine A; Lupski, James R; Beckers, Albert

    2016-02-01

    X-linked acro-gigantism (X-LAG) syndrome is a newly described disease caused by microduplications on chromosome Xq26.3 leading to copy number gain of GPR101. We describe the clinical progress of a sporadic male X-LAG syndrome patient with an Xq26.3 microduplication, highlighting the aggressive natural history of pituitary tumor growth in the absence of treatment. The patient first presented elsewhere aged 5 years 8 months with a history of excessive growth for >2 years. His height was 163 cm, his weight was 36 kg, and he had markedly elevated GH and IGF-1. MRI showed a non-invasive sellar mass measuring 32.5 × 23.9 × 29.1 mm. Treatment was declined and the family was lost to follow-up. At the age of 10 years and 7 months, he presented again with headaches, seizures, and visual disturbance. His height had increased to 197 cm. MRI showed an invasive mass measuring 56.2 × 58.1 × 45.0 mm, with compression of optic chiasma, bilateral cavernous sinus invasion, and hydrocephalus. His thyrotrope, corticotrope, and gonadotrope axes were deficient. Surgery, somatostatin analogs, and cabergoline did not control vertical growth and pegvisomant was added, although vertical growth continues (currently 207 cm at 11 years 7 months of age). X-LAG syndrome is a new genomic disorder in which early-onset pituitary tumorigenesis can lead to marked overgrowth and gigantism. This case illustrates the aggressive nature of tumor evolution and the challenging clinical management in X-LAG syndrome.

  8. Genetic mapping of X-linked albinism-deafness syndrome (ADFN) to Xq26.3-q27.1

    PubMed Central

    Shiloh, Yosef; Litvak, Gilad; Ziv, Yael; Lehner, Thomas; Sandkuyl, Lodewijk; Hildesheimer, Minka; Buchris, Vered; Cremers, Frans P. M.; Szabo, Paul; White, Bradley N.; Holden, Jeanette J. A.; Ott, Jurg

    1990-01-01

    X-linked albinism-deafness syndrome (ADFN) was described in one Israeli Jewish family and is characterized by congenital nerve deafness and piebaldness. The ADFN mutation probably affects the migration of neural crest–derived precursors of the melanocytes. As a first step toward identifying the ADFN gene, a linkage study was performed to localize the disease locus on the X chromosome. The family was found to be informative for 11 of 107 RFLPs along the X, and two-point analysis showed four of them–factor 9 (F9), DXS91, DXS37, and DNF1–to have definite or suggestive linkage with ADFN. Multipoint linkage analysis indicated two possible orders within this cluster of loci, neither of which was preferable. In both orders F9 was the most distal, and the best estimate for the location of ADFN was between F9 and the next proximal marker (8.6 cM from F9 [Z = 8.1] or 8.3 cM from F9 [Z = 7.9]). These results suggest that the ADFN is at Xq26.3-q27.1. Disagreement between our data and previous localization of DXS91 at Xq11-q13 was resolved by hybridization of the probe pXG-17, which detects the DXS91 locus, to a panel of somatic cell hybrids containing different portions of the X chromosome. This experiment showed that this locus is definitely at Xq24-q26. Together with the linkage data, our results place DXS91 at Xq26 and underscore the importance of using more than one mapping method for the localization of molecular probes. ImagesFigure 2 PMID:2349949

  9. Canine tooth size variability in primates.

    PubMed

    Beauchamp, G

    1989-01-01

    I present an analysis of canine tooth size variability in male and female primates. The coefficient of variation (CV = SD X 100/mean) as an index of canine size variability proved to be dependent on mean canine size in males and, to a lower extent, in females. Therefore, variability tends to increase with increasing values of mean canine size. Using residuals from the regression of log SD on log mean canine size in male and female primates, I analysed the contribution of diet, habitat and mating system to canine size variability. Habitat and mating system are known to influence to a certain extent the degree of sexual dimorphism in canine size. Given the well-known relationship between sexual dimorphism and phenotypic variability, it was suggested that these factors might influence variability in canine size. Everything else being equal, males of polygynous species are characterized by more variable canine sizes than males of monogamous species. Habitat and diet did not contribute to the level of variability observed in either males or females. It is proposed that a high level of variability in canine size may be related to the likelihood that enlarged canines evolved as a result of male-male competition for mates in polygynous species.

  10. Canine and feline colostrum.

    PubMed

    Chastant-Maillard, S; Aggouni, C; Albaret, A; Fournier, A; Mila, H

    2016-11-30

    Puppy and kitten survival over the first weeks is particularly dependent on colostrum, a specific secretion of the mammary gland produced during the first 2 days post-partum. Colostrum is a source of nutrients and immunoglobulins. It also contributes to the digestive tract maturation. Colostrum differentiates from milk mainly based on its concentration in immunoglobulins G: 20-30 g/L in dog colostrum, 40-50 g/L in cats' vs <1 g/L in milk. IgG concentration rapidly drops after parturition (-50% in 24 hr). Immune quality of colostrum is highly variable between bitches, with no relationship with maternal blood IgG level, dam's age, breed size or litter size. In addition to systemic immune protection, colostrum also plays a major role for local digestive protection, due to IgA, lysozyme, lactoferrin, white blood cells and various cytokines. Energetic concentration of canine and feline colostrum is not superior to that of mature milk. It depends on colostrum fat concentration and is affected by breed size (higher in breeds <10 kg adult body weight). As puppies and kittens are almost agammaglobulinemic at birth, transfer of IgG from their digestive tract into their bloodstream is crucial for their survival, IgG absorption ending at 12-16 hr after birth. Energetic supply over the two first days of life, as evidenced by growth rate over the two first days of life, also affects risk of neonatal mortality. Early and sufficient suckling of colostrum is thus the very first care to be provided to newborns for their later health and survival.

  11. Current developments in canine genetics.

    PubMed

    Marschall, Yvonne; Distl, Ottmar

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, canine genetics had made huge progress. In 1999 the first complete karyotype and ideogram of the dog was published. Several linkage and RH maps followed. Using these maps, sets of microsatellite markers for whole genome scans were compiled. In 2003 the sequencing of the DNA of a female Boxer began. Now the second version of the dog genome assembly has been put online, and recently, a microchip SNP array became available. Parallel to these developments, some causal mutations for different traits have been identified. Most of the identified mutations were responsible for monogenic canine hereditary diseases. With the tools available now, it is possible to use the advantages of the population structure of the various dog breeds to unravel complex genetic traits. Furthermore, the dog is a suitable model for the research of a large number of human hereditary diseases and particularly for cancer genetics, heart and neurodegenerative diseases. There are some examples where it was possible to benefit from the knowledge of canine genetics for human research. The search for quantitative trait loci (QTL), the testing of candidate genes and genome-wide association studies can now be performed in dogs. QTL for skeletal size variations and for canine hip dysplasia have been already identified and for these complex traits the responsible genes and their possible interactions can now be identified.

  12. Rebound macular edema following oral acetazolamide therapy for juvenile X-linked retinoschisis in an Italian family

    PubMed Central

    Galantuomo, Maria Silvana; Fossarello, Maurizio; Cuccu, Alberto; Farci, Roberta; Preising, Markus N; Lorenz, Birgit; Napoli, Pietro Emanuele

    2016-01-01

    Background Juvenile X-linked retinoschisis (RS1, OMIM: 312700) is a hereditary vitreoretinal dystrophy characterized by bilateral foveal schisis and, in half of the patients, splitting through the nerve fiber layer in the peripheral retina. In the first decade of life, patients usually develop a decrease in visual acuity. Long-term visual outcomes can be poor due to the limited number of known successful treatments. Purpose The purposes of this study were to present, for the first time, a p.Arg197Cys missense mutation in the RS1 gene (OMIM: 300839) in a four-generation Italian family with RS1 and to examine the clinical response to the treatment with acetazolamide tablets alone or in combination with dorzolamide eye drops as assessed by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Methods Eleven individuals, including two brothers with RS1 (patients 1 and 2), underwent a full medical history examination and a comprehensive ocular assessment that involved SD-OCT, fluorescein angiography, electroretinography and DNA analysis. Each RS1 patient received oral acetazolamide (375 mg daily) during the first three months. Thereafter, patient 1 continued only with dorzolamide eyedrops three times a day for a period of three months, while patient 2 spontaneously stopped both medications. Results Sequence analysis of the RS1 gene identified a hemizygous c.589C>T (p.Arg197Cys) missense mutation in exon 6, which has not been previously reported in an Italian family. A different response to the medical therapy was observed in the four eyes of the two affected brothers hemizygous for this abnormality. Of note, after acetazolamide interruption, a rebound effect on cystoid macular edema reduced the beneficial effects of the initial therapy for RS1 from p.Arg197Cys mutation. Indeed, a minimal rebound effect on cystoid macular edema, and an improvement in visual acuity, was observed in patient 1 during the six months of treatment. Conversely, in patient 2, an initial

  13. Germline or somatic GPR101 duplication leads to X-linked acrogigantism: a clinico-pathological and genetic study.

    PubMed

    Iacovazzo, Donato; Caswell, Richard; Bunce, Benjamin; Jose, Sian; Yuan, Bo; Hernández-Ramírez, Laura C; Kapur, Sonal; Caimari, Francisca; Evanson, Jane; Ferraù, Francesco; Dang, Mary N; Gabrovska, Plamena; Larkin, Sarah J; Ansorge, Olaf; Rodd, Celia; Vance, Mary L; Ramírez-Renteria, Claudia; Mercado, Moisés; Goldstone, Anthony P; Buchfelder, Michael; Burren, Christine P; Gurlek, Alper; Dutta, Pinaki; Choong, Catherine S; Cheetham, Timothy; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Stratakis, Constantine A; Lopes, Maria-Beatriz; Grossman, Ashley B; Trouillas, Jacqueline; Lupski, James R; Ellard, Sian; Sampson, Julian R; Roncaroli, Federico; Korbonits, Márta

    2016-06-01

    Non-syndromic pituitary gigantism can result from AIP mutations or the recently identified Xq26.3 microduplication causing X-linked acrogigantism (XLAG). Within Xq26.3, GPR101 is believed to be the causative gene, and the c.924G > C (p.E308D) variant in this orphan G protein-coupled receptor has been suggested to play a role in the pathogenesis of acromegaly.We studied 153 patients (58 females and 95 males) with pituitary gigantism. AIP mutation-negative cases were screened for GPR101 duplication through copy number variation droplet digital PCR and high-density aCGH. The genetic, clinical and histopathological features of XLAG patients were studied in detail. 395 peripheral blood and 193 pituitary tumor DNA samples from acromegaly patients were tested for GPR101 variants.We identified 12 patients (10 females and 2 males; 7.8 %) with XLAG. In one subject, the duplicated region only contained GPR101, but not the other three genes in found to be duplicated in the previously reported patients, defining a new smallest region of overlap of duplications. While females presented with germline mutations, the two male patients harbored the mutation in a mosaic state. Nine patients had pituitary adenomas, while three had hyperplasia. The comparison of the features of XLAG, AIP-positive and GPR101&AIP-negative patients revealed significant differences in sex distribution, age at onset, height, prolactin co-secretion and histological features. The pathological features of XLAG-related adenomas were remarkably similar. These tumors had a sinusoidal and lobular architecture. Sparsely and densely granulated somatotrophs were admixed with lactotrophs; follicle-like structures and calcifications were commonly observed. Patients with sporadic of familial acromegaly did not have an increased prevalence of the c.924G > C (p.E308D) GPR101 variant compared to public databases.In conclusion, XLAG can result from germline or somatic duplication of GPR101. Duplication of GPR101

  14. Behavioural and Psychiatric Phenotypes in Men and Boys with X-Linked Ichthyosis: Evidence from a Worldwide Online Survey

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Sohini; Humby, Trevor; Davies, William

    2016-01-01

    Background X-linked ichthyosis (XLI) is a rare dermatological condition arising from deficiency for the enzyme steroid sulfatase (STS). Preliminary evidence in boys with XLI, and animal model studies, suggests that individuals lacking STS are at increased risk of developmental disorders and associated traits. However, the behavioural profile of children with XLI is poorly-characterised, and the behavioural profile of adults with XLI has not yet been documented at all. Materials and Methods Using an online survey, advertised worldwide, we collected detailed self- or parent-reported information on behaviour in adult (n = 58) and younger (≤18yrs, n = 24) males with XLI for comparison to data from their non-affected brothers, and age/gender-matched previously-published normative data. The survey comprised demographic and background information (including any prior clinical diagnoses) and validated questionnaires assaying phenotypes of particular interest (Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale v1.1, Barrett Impulsiveness Scale-11, adult and adolescent Autism Quotient, Kessler Psychological Distress Scales, and Disruptive Behaviour Disorder Rating Scale). Results Individuals with XLI generally exhibited normal sensory function. Boys with XLI were at increased risk of developmental disorder, whilst adults with the condition were at increased risk of both developmental and mood disorders. Both adult and younger XLI groups scored significantly more highly than male general population norms on measures of inattention, impulsivity, autism-related traits, psychological distress and disruptive behavioural traits. Conclusions These findings indicate that both adult and younger males with XLI exhibit personality profiles that are distinct from those of males within the general population, and suggest that individuals with XLI may be at heightened risk of psychopathology. The data are consistent with the notion that STS is important in neurodevelopment and ongoing brain function, and

  15. Ontogeny of canine dimorphism in extant hominoids.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, G T; Dean, C

    2001-07-01

    Many behavioral and ecological factors influence the degree of expression of canine dimorphism for different reasons. Regardless of its socioecological importance, we know virtually nothing about the processes responsible for the development of canine dimorphism. Our aim here is to describe the developmental process(es) regulating canine dimorphism in extant hominoids, using histological markers of tooth growth. Teeth preserve a permanent record of their ontogeny in the form of short- and long-period incremental markings in both enamel and dentine. We selected 52 histological sections of sexed hominoid canine teeth from a total sample of 115, from which we calculated the time and rate of cuspal enamel formation and the rate at which ameloblasts differentiate along the future enamel-dentine junction (EDJ) to the end of crown formation. Thus, we were able to reconstruct longitudinal growth curves for height attainment in male and female hominoid canines. Male hominoids consistently take longer to form canine crowns than do females (although not significantly so for our sample of Homo). Male orangutans and gorillas occasionally take up to twice as long as females to complete enamel formation. The mean ranges of female canine crown formation times are similar in Pan, Gorilla, and Pongo. Interspecific differences between female Pan canine crown heights and those of Gorilla and Pongo, which are taller, result from differences in rates of growth. Differences in canine crown heights between male Pan and the taller, more dimorphic male Gorilla and Pongo canines result both from differences in total time taken to form enamel and from faster rates of growth in Gorilla and Pongo. Although modern human canines do not emerge as significantly dimorphic in this study, it is well-known that sexual dimorphism in canine crown height exists. Larger samples of sexed modern human canines are therefore needed to identify clearly what underlies this.

  16. Hybridisation-based resequencing of 17 X-linked intellectual disability genes in 135 patients reveals novel mutations in ATRX, SLC6A8 and PQBP1

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Lars R; Chen, Wei; Moser, Bettina; Lipkowitz, Bettina; Schroeder, Christopher; Musante, Luciana; Tzschach, Andreas; Kalscheuer, Vera M; Meloni, Ilaria; Raynaud, Martine; van Esch, Hilde; Chelly, Jamel; de Brouwer, Arjan P M; Hackett, Anna; van der Haar, Sigrun; Henn, Wolfram; Gecz, Jozef; Riess, Olaf; Bonin, Michael; Reinhardt, Richard; Ropers, Hans-Hilger; Kuss, Andreas W

    2011-01-01

    X-linked intellectual disability (XLID), also known as X-linked mental retardation, is a highly genetically heterogeneous condition for which mutations in >90 different genes have been identified. In this study, we used a custom-made sequencing array based on the Affymetrix 50k platform for mutation screening in 17 known XLID genes in patients from 135 families and found eight single-nucleotide changes that were absent in controls. For four mutations affecting ATRX (p.1761M>T), PQBP1 (p.155R>X) and SLC6A8 (p.390P>L and p.477S>L), we provide evidence for a functional involvement of these changes in the aetiology of intellectual disability. PMID:21267006

  17. X-linked mental retardation with neonatal hypotonia in a French family (MRX15): Gene assignment to Xp11.22-Xp21.1

    SciTech Connect

    Raynaud, M.; Dessay, B.; Ayrault, A.D.

    1996-07-12

    Linkage analysis was performed in a family with non-specific X-linked mental retardation (MRX 15). Hypotonia in infancy was the most remarkable physical manifestation. The severity of mental deficiency was variable among the patients, but all of them had poor or absent speech. Significant lod scores at a recombination fraction of zero were detected with the marker loci DXS1126, DXS255, and DXS573 (Zmax = 2.01) and recombination was observed with the two flanking loci DXS164 (Xp21.1) and DXS988 (Xp11.22), identifying a 17 cM interval. This result suggests a new gene localization in the proximal Xp region. In numerous families with non-specific X-linked mental retardation (MRX), the corresponding gene has been localized to the paracentromeric region in which a low recombination rate impairs the precision of mapping. 58 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. A test of the hypothesis that age at onset in Huntington disease is controlled by an X-linked recessive modifier.

    PubMed Central

    Ridley, R M; Farrer, L A; Frith, C D; Conneally, P M

    1992-01-01

    Data from the Research Roster for Huntington Disease Patients and Families were used to assess the hypothesis that juvenile onset in Huntington disease is determined by an X-linked recessive modifying gene in the affected parent. The observed proportion of affected fathers to affected mothers who had such offspring was not compatible with this hypothesis. Furthermore, neither the excess of affected grandfathers nor the existence of juvenile-onset and adult-onset cases within a sibship would be predicted by this model. We also rejected a more general hypothesis that a major change in gene expression across generations, measured by the presence of juvenile onset and/or major anticipation, is determined by an X-linked modifier. However, the inheritance of a propensity toward juvenile onset via the affected male line could be due to an abnormal pattern of paternal genomic imprinting. PMID:1531730

  19. X-linked Alport syndrome: an SSCP-based mutation survey over all 51 exons of the COL4A5 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Renieri, A.; Bruttini, M.; Galli, L.; Zanelli, P.; Neri, T.; Rossetti, S.; Turco, A.; Heiskari, N.; Zhou, J.; Gusmano, R.; Massella, L.; Banfi, G.; Scolari, F.; Sessa, A.; Rizzoni, G.; Tryggvason, K.; Pignatti, P. F.; Savi, M.; Ballabio, A.; De Marchi, M.

    1996-01-01

    The COL4A5 gene encodes the alpha5 (type IV) collagen chain and is defective in X-linked Alport syndrome (AS). Here, we report the first systematic analysis of all 51 exons of COL4A5 gene in a series of 201 Italian AS patients. We have previously reported nine major rearrangements, as well as 18 small mutations identified in the same patient series by SSCP analysis of several exons. After systematic analysis of all 51 exons of COL4A5, we have now identified 30 different mutations: 10 glycine substitutions in the triple helical domain of the protein, 9 frameshift mutations, 4 in-frame deletions, 1 start codon, 1 nonsense, and 5 splice-site mutations. These mutations were either unique or found in two unrelated families, thus excluding the presence of a common mutation in the coding part of the gene. Overall, mutations were detected in only 45% of individuals with a certain or likely diagnosis of X-linked AS. This finding suggests that mutations in noncoding segments of COL4A5 account for a high number of X-linked AS cases. An alternative hypothesis is the presence of locus heterogeneity, even within the X-linked form of the disease. A genotype/phenotype comparison enabled us to better substantiate a significant correlation between the degree of predicted disruption of the alpha5 chain and the severity of phenotype in affected male individuals. Our study has significant implications in the diagnosis and follow-up of AS patients. PMID:8651296

  20. Two unique mutations in the interleukin-2 receptor gamma chain gene (IL2RG) cause X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency arising in opposite parental germ lines

    SciTech Connect

    Puck, J.M.; Pepper, A.E.

    1994-09-01

    The gene encoding the gamma chain of the lymphocyte receptor for IL-2 lies in human X13.1 and is mutated in males with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). 27 X-linked SCID mutations have been found in our laboratory. Single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of genomic DNA using primers flanking each of the 8 exons was followed by direct sequencing of abnormally migrating fragments from SCID patients and family members. A 9 bp in-frame duplication insertion was found in IL2RG exon 5 of a patient from a large X-linked SCID pedigree; the resulting duplication of 3 extracellular amino acids, including the first tryptophan of the {open_quotes}WSXWS{close_quotes} cytokine binding motif, is predicted to disrupt interaction of the cytokine receptor chain with its ligand. Genetic linkage studies demonstrated that the grandmaternal X chromosome associated with SCID was contributed to 3 daughters, 2 obligate carriers and 1 woman of unknown status. However, this grandmother`s genomic DNA did not contain the insertion mutation, nor did she have skewed X-chromosome inactivation in her lymphocytes. That both obligate carrier daughters, but not the third daughter, had the insertion proved the grandmother to be a germline mosaic. A second proband had X-linked SCID with a branch point mutation due to substitution of T for A 15 bp 5{prime} of the start of IL2RG exon 3. This mutation resulted in undetectable IL2RG mRNA by Northern blot. Linkage analysis and sequencing of IL2RG DNA in this family proved the mutation to have originated in the germline of the proband`s grandfather, an immunocompetent individual who contributed an X chromosome with normal IL2RG to one daughter and a mutated X to the another.

  1. A new resource for characterizing X-linked genes in Drosophila melanogaster: systematic coverage and subdivision of the X chromosome with nested, Y-linked duplications.

    PubMed

    Cook, R Kimberley; Deal, Megan E; Deal, Jennifer A; Garton, Russell D; Brown, C Adam; Ward, Megan E; Andrade, Rachel S; Spana, Eric P; Kaufman, Thomas C; Cook, Kevin R

    2010-12-01

    Interchromosomal duplications are especially important for the study of X-linked genes. Males inheriting a mutation in a vital X-linked gene cannot survive unless there is a wild-type copy of the gene duplicated elsewhere in the genome. Rescuing the lethality of an X-linked mutation with a duplication allows the mutation to be used experimentally in complementation tests and other genetic crosses and it maps the mutated gene to a defined chromosomal region. Duplications can also be used to screen for dosage-dependent enhancers and suppressors of mutant phenotypes as a way to identify genes involved in the same biological process. We describe an ongoing project in Drosophila melanogaster to generate comprehensive coverage and extensive breakpoint subdivision of the X chromosome with megabase-scale X segments borne on Y chromosomes. The in vivo method involves the creation of X inversions on attached-XY chromosomes by FLP-FRT site-specific recombination technology followed by irradiation to induce large internal X deletions. The resulting chromosomes consist of the X tip, a medial X segment placed near the tip by an inversion, and a full Y. A nested set of medial duplicated segments is derived from each inversion precursor. We have constructed a set of inversions on attached-XY chromosomes that enable us to isolate nested duplicated segments from all X regions. To date, our screens have provided a minimum of 78% X coverage with duplication breakpoints spaced a median of nine genes apart. These duplication chromosomes will be valuable resources for rescuing and mapping X-linked mutations and identifying dosage-dependent modifiers of mutant phenotypes.

  2. Confirmation of X-linked inheritance and provisional mapping of the keratosis follicularis spinulosa decalvans gene on Xp in a large Dutch family.

    PubMed

    Oosterwijk, J C; Nelen, M; Van Zandvoort, P M; Van Osch, L D; Oranje, A P; Wittebol-Post, D; Van Oost, B A

    1992-03-01

    In a large Dutch family with keratosis follicularis spinulosa decalvans (KFSD, MIM 308800), DNA linkage analysis was performed in order to locate the gene. Pedigree analysis and lod score calculation confirmed X-linked inheritance and revealed significant linkage to DNA markers on Xp. A maximum lod score of 5.70 at theta = 0.0 was obtained with DXS41 (p99.6). The KFSD gene is tentatively located on Xp21.2-p22.2.

  3. Autosomal and X-Linked Additive Genetic Variation for Lifespan and Aging: Comparisons Within and Between the Sexes in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Robert M; Schielzeth, Holger; Friberg, Urban

    2016-12-07

    Theory makes several predictions concerning differences in genetic variation between the X chromosome and the autosomes due to male X hemizygosity. The X chromosome should: (i) typically show relatively less standing genetic variation than the autosomes, (ii) exhibit more variation in males compared to females because of dosage compensation, and (iii) potentially be enriched with sex-specific genetic variation. Here, we address each of these predictions for lifespan and aging in Drosophila melanogaster To achieve unbiased estimates of X and autosomal additive genetic variance, we use 80 chromosome substitution lines; 40 for the X chromosome and 40 combining the two major autosomes, which we assay for sex-specific and cross-sex genetic (co)variation. We find significant X and autosomal additive genetic variance for both traits in both sexes (with reservation for X-linked variation of aging in females), but no conclusive evidence for depletion of X-linked variation (measured through females). Males display more X-linked variation for lifespan than females, but it is unclear if this is due to dosage compensation since also autosomal variation is larger in males. Finally, our results suggest that the X chromosome is enriched for sex-specific genetic variation in lifespan but results were less conclusive for aging overall. Collectively, these results suggest that the X chromosome has reduced capacity to respond to sexually concordant selection on lifespan from standing genetic variation, while its ability to respond to sexually antagonistic selection may be augmented.

  4. Detection of large gene rearrangements in X-linked genes by dosage analysis: identification of novel α-galactosidase A (GLA) deletions causing Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Dobrovolny, Robert; Nazarenko, Irina; Kim, Jungmin; Doheny, Dana; Desnick, Robert J

    2011-06-01

    For most Mendelian disorders, targeted genome sequencing is an effective method to detect causative mutations. However, sequencing PCR-amplified exonic regions and their intronic boundaries can miss large deletions or duplications and mutations that lead to PCR failures in autosomal dominant disorders and in heterozygote detection for X-linked diseases. Here, a method is described for detecting large (>50 bp) deletions/duplications in the X-linked α-galactosidase A (GLA) gene, which cause Fabry disease. Briefly, multiplex PCR mixtures were designed to amplify each GLA exon and an unrelated internal control exon to normalize GLA exonic amplicon peak heights. For each normalized GLA amplicon, the normal control female to male peak-height ratios were 1.8 to 2.2 (expected 2.0), whereas the expected ratios for deletions or duplications would be ∼1.0 or 3.0, respectively. Using this method, three novel deletions, c.369+3_547+954del4096insT, c.194+2049_369+773del2619insCG, and c.207_369+651del814ins231, were detected in unrelated women with signs and/or symptoms suggestive of Fabry disease, but no "sequencing-detectable" mutations. The deletions were confirmed by sequencing their respective GLA RT-PCR products. This method can identify gene rearrangements that may be cryptic to genomic DNA sequencing and can be readily adapted to other X-linked or autosomal dominant genes.

  5. Expanding phenotype of p.Ala140Val mutation in MECP2 in a 4 generation family with X-linked intellectual disability and spasticity.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Sophie; Maystadt, Isabelle; Boulanger, Sébastien; Vrielynck, Pascal; Destrée, Anne; Lederer, Damien; Moortgat, Stéphanie

    2016-10-01

    Mutations in MECP2 (MIM #312750), located on Xq28 and encoding a methyl CpG binding protein, are classically associated with Rett syndrome in female patients, with a lethal effect in hemizygous males. However, MECP2 mutations have already been reported in surviving males with severe neonatal-onset encephalopathy, or with X-linked intellectual disability associated with psychosis, pyramidal signs, parkinsonian features and macro-orchidism (PPM-X syndrome; MIM3 #300055). Here we report on the identification of the p.Ala140Val mutation in the MECP2 gene in 4 males and 3 females of a large Caucasian family affected with X-linked intellectual disability. Females present with mild cognitive impairment and speech difficulties. Males have moderate intellectual disability, impaired language development, friendly behavior, slowly progressive spastic paraparesis and dystonic movements of the hands. Two of them show microcephaly. The p.Ala140Val mutation is recurrent, as it was already described in 4 families with X-linked mental retardation and in three sporadic male patients with intellectual disability. We further delineate the phenotype associated with the p.Ala140Val mutation, illustrating a variable expressivity even within a given family, and we compare our patients with previous reported cases in the literature.

  6. Autosomal and X-Linked Additive Genetic Variation for Lifespan and Aging: Comparisons Within and Between the Sexes in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Robert M.; Schielzeth, Holger; Friberg, Urban

    2016-01-01

    Theory makes several predictions concerning differences in genetic variation between the X chromosome and the autosomes due to male X hemizygosity. The X chromosome should: (i) typically show relatively less standing genetic variation than the autosomes, (ii) exhibit more variation in males compared to females because of dosage compensation, and (iii) potentially be enriched with sex-specific genetic variation. Here, we address each of these predictions for lifespan and aging in Drosophila melanogaster. To achieve unbiased estimates of X and autosomal additive genetic variance, we use 80 chromosome substitution lines; 40 for the X chromosome and 40 combining the two major autosomes, which we assay for sex-specific and cross-sex genetic (co)variation. We find significant X and autosomal additive genetic variance for both traits in both sexes (with reservation for X-linked variation of aging in females), but no conclusive evidence for depletion of X-linked variation (measured through females). Males display more X-linked variation for lifespan than females, but it is unclear if this is due to dosage compensation since also autosomal variation is larger in males. Finally, our results suggest that the X chromosome is enriched for sex-specific genetic variation in lifespan but results were less conclusive for aging overall. Collectively, these results suggest that the X chromosome has reduced capacity to respond to sexually concordant selection on lifespan from standing genetic variation, while its ability to respond to sexually antagonistic selection may be augmented. PMID:27678519

  7. A silent mutation, C924T (G308G), in the L1CAM gene results in X linked hydrocephalus (HSAS).

    PubMed Central

    Du, Y Z; Dickerson, C; Aylsworth, A S; Schwartz, C E

    1998-01-01

    The L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1CAM) is a neuronal gene involved in the development of the nervous system. Mutations in L1CAM are known to cause several clinically overlapping X linked mental retardation conditions: X linked hydrocephalus (HSAS), MASA syndrome (mental retardation, aphasia, shuffling gait, adducted thumbs), spastic paraplegia type I (SPG1), and X linked agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACC). In an analysis of a family with HSAS, we identified a C-->T transition (C924T) in exon 8 that was initially thought to have no effect on the protein sequence as the alteration affected the third base of a codon (G308G). Extensive analysis of the other 27 exons showed no other alteration. A review of the sequence surrounding position 924 indicated that the C-->T transition created a potential 5' splice site consensus sequence, which would result in an in frame deletion of 69 bp from exon 8 and 23 amino acids of the L1CAM protein. RT-PCR of the RNA from an affected male fetus and subsequent sequence analysis confirmed the use of the new splice site. This is the first report of a silent nucleotide substitution in L1CAM giving rise to an alteration at the protein level. Furthermore, it shows that as mutation analysis plays an ever more important role in human genetics, the identification of a synonymous base change should not be routinely discounted as a neutral polymorphism. Images PMID:9643285

  8. Spectrum of X-linked hydrocephalus (HSAS), MASA syndrome, and complicated spastic paraplegia (SPG1): Clincal review with six additional families

    SciTech Connect

    Schrander-Stumpel, C.; Hoeweler, C.; Jones, M.

    1995-05-22

    X-linked hydrocephalus (HSAS) (MIM{sup *}307000), MASA syndrome (MIM {sup *}303350), and complicated spastic paraplegia (SPG1) (MIM {sup *}3129000) are closely related. Soon after delineation, SPG1 was incorporated into the spectrum of MASA syndrome. HSAS and MASA syndrome show great clinical overlap; DNA linkage analysis places the loci at Xq28. In an increasing number of families with MASA syndrome or HSAS, mutations in L1CAM, a gene located at Xq28, have been reported. In order to further delineate the clinical spectrum, we studied 6 families with male patients presenting with MASA syndrome, HSAS, or a mixed phenotype. We summarized data from previous reports and compared them with our data. Clinical variability appears to be great, even within families. Problems in genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis, the possible overlap with X-linked corpus callosum agenesis and FG syndrome, and the different forms of X-linked complicated spastic paraplegia are discussed. Since adducted thumbs and spastic paraplegia are found in 90% of the patients, the condition may be present in males with nonspecific mental retardation. We propose to abandon the designation MASA syndrome and use the term HSAS/MASA spectrum, incorporating SPG1. 79 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. High male: Female ratio of germ-line mutations: An alternative explanation for postulated gestational lethality in males in X-linked dominant disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G.H.

    1996-06-01

    In this paper I suggest that a vastly higher rate of de novo mutations in males than in females would explain some, if not most, X-linked dominant disorders associated with a low incidence of affected males. It is the inclusion of the impact of a high ratio of male:female de novo germ-line mutations that makes this model new and unique. Specifically, it is concluded that, if an X-linked disorder results in a dominant phenotype with a significant reproductive disadvantage (genetic lethality), affected females will, in virtually all cases, arise from de novo germ-line mutations inherited from their fathers rather than from their mothers. Under this hypothesis, the absence of affected males is explained by the simple fact that sons do not inherit their X chromosome (normal or abnormal) from their fathers. Because females who are heterozygous for a dominant disorder will be clinically affected and will, in most cases, either be infertile or lack reproductive opportunities, the mutant gene will not be transmitted by them to the next generation (i.e., it will be a genetic lethal). This, not gestational lethality in males, may explain the absence of affected males in most, if not all, of the 13 known X-linked dominant diseases characterized by high ratios of affected female to male individuals. Evidence suggesting that this mechanism could explain the findings in the Rett syndrome is reviewed in detail. 34 refs., 1 tab.

  10. Novel diabetes mellitus treatment: mature canine insulin production by canine striated muscle through gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Niessen, S J M; Fernandez-Fuente, M; Mahmoud, A; Campbell, S C; Aldibbiat, A; Huggins, C; Brown, A E; Holder, A; Piercy, R J; Catchpole, B; Shaw, J A M; Church, D B

    2012-07-01

    Muscle-targeted gene therapy using insulin genes has the potential to provide an inexpensive, low maintenance alternative or adjunctive treatment method for canine diabetes mellitus. A canine skeletal muscle cell line was established through primary culture, as well as through transdifferentiation of canine fibroblasts after infection with a myo-differentiation gene containing adenovirus vector. A novel mutant furin-cleavable canine preproinsulin gene insert (cppI4) was designed and created through de novo gene synthesis. Various cell lines, including the generated canine muscle cell line, were transfected with nonviral plasmids containing cppI4. Insulin and desmin immunostaining were used to prove insulin production by muscle cells and specific canine insulin ELISA to prove mature insulin secretion into the medium. The canine myoblast cultures proved positive on desmin immunostaining. All cells tolerated transfection with cppI4-containing plasmid, and double immunostaining for insulin and desmin proved present in the canine cells. Canine insulin ELISA assessment of medium of cppI4-transfected murine myoblasts and canine myoblast and fibroblast mixture proved presence of mature fully processed canine insulin, 24 and 48 h after transfection. The present study provides proof of principle that canine muscle cells can be induced to produce and secrete canine insulin on transfection with nonviral plasmid DNA containing a novel mutant canine preproinsulin gene that produces furin-cleavable canine preproinsulin. This technology could be developed to provide an alternative canine diabetes mellitus treatment option or to provide a constant source for background insulin, as well as C-peptide, alongside current treatment options.

  11. X-Linked and Autosomal Recessive Alport Syndrome: Pathogenic Variant Features and Further Genotype-Phenotype Correlations.

    PubMed

    Savige, Judith; Storey, Helen; Il Cheong, Hae; Gyung Kang, Hee; Park, Eujin; Hilbert, Pascale; Persikov, Anton; Torres-Fernandez, Carmen; Ars, Elisabet; Torra, Roser; Hertz, Jens Michael; Thomassen, Mads; Shagam, Lev; Wang, Dongmao; Wang, Yanyan; Flinter, Frances; Nagel, Mato

    2016-01-01

    Alport syndrome results from mutations in the COL4A5 (X-linked) or COL4A3/COL4A4 (recessive) genes. This study examined 754 previously- unpublished variants in these genes from individuals referred for genetic testing in 12 accredited diagnostic laboratories worldwide, in addition to all published COL4A5, COL4A3 and COL4A4 variants in the LOVD databases. It also determined genotype-phenotype correlations for variants where clinical data were available. Individuals were referred for genetic testing where Alport syndrome was suspected clinically or on biopsy (renal failure, hearing loss, retinopathy, lamellated glomerular basement membrane), variant pathogenicity was assessed using currently-accepted criteria, and variants were examined for gene location, and age at renal failure onset. Results were compared using Fisher's exact test (DNA Stata). Altogether 754 new DNA variants were identified, an increase of 25%, predominantly in people of European background. Of the 1168 COL4A5 variants, 504 (43%) were missense mutations, 273 (23%) splicing variants, 73 (6%) nonsense mutations, 169 (14%) short deletions and 76 (7%) complex or large deletions. Only 135 of the 432 Gly residues in the collagenous sequence were substituted (31%), which means that fewer than 10% of all possible variants have been identified. Both missense and nonsense mutations in COL4A5 were not randomly distributed but more common at the 70 CpG sequences (p<10-41 and p<0.001 respectively). Gly>Ala substitutions were underrepresented in all three genes (p< 0.0001) probably because of an association with a milder phenotype. The average age at end-stage renal failure was the same for all mutations in COL4A5 (24.4 ±7.8 years), COL4A3 (23.3 ± 9.3) and COL4A4 (25.4 ± 10.3) (COL4A5 and COL4A3, p = 0.45; COL4A5 and COL4A4, p = 0.55; COL4A3 and COL4A4, p = 0.41). For COL4A5, renal failure occurred sooner with non-missense than missense variants (p<0.01). For the COL4A3 and COL4A4 genes, age at renal failure

  12. X-Linked and Autosomal Recessive Alport Syndrome: Pathogenic Variant Features and Further Genotype-Phenotype Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Savige, Judith; Storey, Helen; Il Cheong, Hae; Gyung Kang, Hee; Park, Eujin; Hilbert, Pascale; Persikov, Anton; Torres-Fernandez, Carmen; Ars, Elisabet; Torra, Roser; Hertz, Jens Michael; Thomassen, Mads; Shagam, Lev; Wang, Dongmao; Wang, Yanyan; Flinter, Frances; Nagel, Mato

    2016-01-01

    Alport syndrome results from mutations in the COL4A5 (X-linked) or COL4A3/COL4A4 (recessive) genes. This study examined 754 previously- unpublished variants in these genes from individuals referred for genetic testing in 12 accredited diagnostic laboratories worldwide, in addition to all published COL4A5, COL4A3 and COL4A4 variants in the LOVD databases. It also determined genotype-phenotype correlations for variants where clinical data were available. Individuals were referred for genetic testing where Alport syndrome was suspected clinically or on biopsy (renal failure, hearing loss, retinopathy, lamellated glomerular basement membrane), variant pathogenicity was assessed using currently-accepted criteria, and variants were examined for gene location, and age at renal failure onset. Results were compared using Fisher’s exact test (DNA Stata). Altogether 754 new DNA variants were identified, an increase of 25%, predominantly in people of European background. Of the 1168 COL4A5 variants, 504 (43%) were missense mutations, 273 (23%) splicing variants, 73 (6%) nonsense mutations, 169 (14%) short deletions and 76 (7%) complex or large deletions. Only 135 of the 432 Gly residues in the collagenous sequence were substituted (31%), which means that fewer than 10% of all possible variants have been identified. Both missense and nonsense mutations in COL4A5 were not randomly distributed but more common at the 70 CpG sequences (p<10−41 and p<0.001 respectively). Gly>Ala substitutions were underrepresented in all three genes (p< 0.0001) probably because of an association with a milder phenotype. The average age at end-stage renal failure was the same for all mutations in COL4A5 (24.4 ±7.8 years), COL4A3 (23.3 ± 9.3) and COL4A4 (25.4 ± 10.3) (COL4A5 and COL4A3, p = 0.45; COL4A5 and COL4A4, p = 0.55; COL4A3 and COL4A4, p = 0.41). For COL4A5, renal failure occurred sooner with non-missense than missense variants (p<0.01). For the COL4A3 and COL4A4 genes, age at renal

  13. Mechanism of Deletion Removing All Dystrophin Exons in a Canine Model for DMD Implicates Concerted Evolution of X Chromosome Pseudogenes.

    PubMed

    VanBelzen, D Jake; Malik, Alock S; Henthorn, Paula S; Kornegay, Joe N; Stedman, Hansell H

    2017-03-17

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal, X-linked, muscle-wasting disorder caused by mutations in the large, 2.4-Mb dystrophin gene. The majority of DMD-causing mutations are sporadic, multi-exon, frameshifting deletions, with the potential for variable immunological tolerance to the dystrophin protein from patient to patient. While systemic gene therapy holds promise in the treatment of DMD, immune responses to vectors and transgenes must first be rigorously evaluated in informative preclinical models to ensure patient safety. A widely used canine model for DMD, golden retriever muscular dystrophy, expresses detectable amounts of near full-length dystrophin due to alternative splicing around an intronic point mutation, thereby confounding the interpretation of immune responses to dystrophin-derived gene therapies. Here we characterize a naturally occurring deletion in a dystrophin-null canine, the German shorthaired pointer. The deletion spans 5.6 Mb of the X chromosome and encompasses all coding exons of the DMD and TMEM47 genes. The sequences surrounding the deletion breakpoints are virtually identical, suggesting that the deletion occurred through a homologous recombination event. Interestingly, the deletion breakpoints are within loci that are syntenically conserved among mammals, yet the high homology among this subset of ferritin-like loci is unique to the canine genome, suggesting lineage-specific concerted evolution of these atypical sequence elements.

  14. Canine histiocytic neoplasia: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Fulmer, Amanda K.; Mauldin, Glenna E.

    2007-01-01

    Canine histiocytic neoplasms include cutaneous histiocytoma, as well as localized and disseminated histiocytic sarcoma. These tumors have variable biologic behavior, although the malignant disorders often have a poor prognosis. Immunohistochemistry plays an essential role in differentiating histiocytic tumors from other neoplasias that may have similar histological appearances. This allows a definitive diagnosis to be established and provides a more accurate prediction of prognosis. This article reviews the biologic behavior, diagnosis, and treatment of histiocytic tumors in the dog. PMID:17987966

  15. Sewage surveillance reveals the presence of canine GVII norovirus and canine astrovirus in Uruguay.

    PubMed

    Lizasoain, A; Tort, L F L; García, M; Gómez, M M; Leite, J P G; Miagostovich, M P; Cristina, J; Berois, M; Colina, R; Victoria, Matías

    2015-11-01

    Canine norovirus (NoV) and astrovirus (AstV) were studied in 20 domestic sewage samples collected in two cities in Uruguay. Four samples were characterized as canine AstV after phylogenetic analysis clustering with strains detected in Italy and Brazil in 2008 and 2012, respectively. One sample was characterized as canine NoV and clustered with a strain detected in Hong Kong and recently classified as GVII. This study shows the occurrence of a canine NoV GVII strain for the first time in the American continent and also warns about possible zoonotic infection, since canine strains were detected in domestic sewage.

  16. Canine adenovirus based rabies vaccines.

    PubMed

    Tordo, N; Foumier, A; Jallet, C; Szelechowski, M; Klonjkowski, B; Eloit, M

    2008-01-01

    Adenovirus based vectors are very attractive candidates for vaccination purposes as they induce in mammalian hosts potent humoral, mucosal and cellular immune responses to antigens encoded by the inserted genes. We have generated E1-deleted and replication-competent recombinant canine type-2 adenoviruses expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein (G). The effectiveness of both vectors to express a native G protein has been characterized in vitro in permissive cell lines. We compared the humoral and cellular immune responses induced in mice by intramuscular injection of the recombinant canine adenovirus vectors with those induced by a human (Ad5) E1-deleted virus expressing the same rabies G protein. Humoral responses specific to the adenoviruses or the rabies glycoprotein antigens were studied. The influence of the mouse strain was observed using replication-competent canine adenovirus. A high level of rabies neutralizing antibody was observed upon i.m. inoculation, and 100% of mice survived lethal challenge. These results are very promising in the perspective of oral vaccine for dog rabies control.

  17. Characterization of canine neutrophil granules.

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, R T; Andersen, B R

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to isolate distinct populations of canine neutrophil granules and to compare them with neutrophil granules from other species. Size, shape, density, and content of canine neutrophil granules were determined. Neutrophils obtained by Ficoll-Hypaque sedimentation were homogenized, and granule populations were separated by isopycnic centrifugation on a linear sucrose gradient (rho, 1.14 to 1.22 g/ml). The most dense granule population (rho, 1.197 g/ml) contained all of the myeloperoxidase, beta-glucuronidase, and elastase, more than half of the acid beta-glycerophosphatase, and most of the lysozyme. The population with intermediate density (rho, 1.179 g/ml) contained lactoferrin, vitamin B12-binding protein, and the remainder of the acid beta-glycerophosphatase and lysozyme. The least dense granule population did not contain a major peak of any of the enzymes or binding proteins tested but was distinguished by density and morphology. The size and shape of the granules were determined from scanning electron micrographs and assessment of shape was aided by transmission electron micrographs. By these methods three populations of canine neutrophil granules were characterized and named: myeloperoxidase granules, vitamin B12-binding protein granules, and low-density granules. Images PMID:6292095

  18. Loss-of-function mutation in the X-linked TBX22 promoter disrupts an ETS-1 binding site and leads to cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiazhou; Cheng, Yibin; Yuan, Jia; Huang, Chunhua; Cheng, Hanhua; Zhou, Rongjia

    2015-02-01

    The cleft palate only (CPO) is a common congenital defect with complex etiology in humans. The molecular etiology of the CPO remains unknown. Here, we report a loss-of-function mutation in X-linked TBX22 gene (T-box 22) in a six-generation family of the CPO with obvious phenotypes of both cleft palate and hyper-nasal speech. We identify a functional -73G>A mutation in the promoter of TBX22, which is located at the core-binding site of transcription factor ETS-1 (v-ets avian erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog 1). Phylogenetic analysis showed that the sequence around the -73G>A mutation site is specific in primates. The mutation was detected in all five affected male members cosegregating with the affected phenotype and heterozygote occurred only in some unaffected females of the family, suggesting an X-linked transmission of the mutation in the family. The -73G>A variant is a novel single nucleotide mutation. Cell co-transfections indicated that ETS-1 could activate the TBX22 promoter. Moreover, EMSA and ChIP assays demonstrated that the allele A disrupts the binding site of ETS-1, thus markedly decreases the activity of the TBX22 promoter, which is likely to lead to the birth defect of the CPO without ankyloglossia. These results suggest that a loss-of-function mutation in the X-linked TBX22 promoter may cause the cleft palate through disruption of TBX22-ETS-1 pathway.

  19. Congenital cataracts and other abnormalities in a female with 46.X, del(X)(q26q28)mat: A new locus for X-linked congenital cataract?

    SciTech Connect

    Babul, R.; Chitayat, D.; Teshima, I.

    1994-09-01

    Three forms of X-linked congenital cataracts have been delineated: congenital cataract with posterior Y-sutural opacities in heterozygotes, congenital cataract and microcornea or microphthalmia and congenital cataract-dental syndrome (Nance-Horan syndrome). Of these, only the Nance-Horan syndrome has been mapped to Xp22.3-p21.1. However, Warburg has suggested that these different forms of X-linked congenital cataracts are due to deletions of varying sizes, placing them in the vicinity of the Nance-Horan syndrome region. We report on a female patient born to a 29-year-old primigravida woman who at birth was found to have hypotonia, dysmorphic facial features, hydrocephalus and dense white congenital bilateral cataracts. Other ophthalmological findings included bilateral nystagmus and shallow orbits. Chromosome analysis revealed 46,X,del(X)(q26q28)mat. The mother, however, is phenotypically normal. Brain CT scan on the female infant revealed communicating hydrocephalus and a muscle biopsy showed congenital muscle fiber disproportion. An EMG and NCV were normal. At 4 years of age, her height and weight were below -3SD and her OFC was +2SD. Molecular studies using DNA markers located in Xq26-qter have revealed that the proximal breakpoint in the patient and her mother is defined by the HPRT locus while the distal breakpoint is defined by the locus DXS1108. This indicates that the deletion is not terminal but rather interstitial, retaining sequences proximal to the telomeric region. Other molecular studies are in progress to determine the X-inactivation status of the deleted chromosome in our patient and her mother as a possible explanation for the variation in the phenotype. These clinical and molecular findings suggest that another locus for X-linked congenital cataract exists at Xq26-28.

  20. Whole-genome sequencing identifies a novel ABCB7 gene mutation for X-linked congenital cerebellar ataxia in a large family of Mongolian ancestry

    PubMed Central

    Protasova, Maria S; Grigorenko, Anastasia P; Tyazhelova, Tatiana V; Andreeva, Tatiana V; Reshetov, Denis A; Gusev, Fedor E; Laptenko, Alexander E; Kuznetsova, Irina L; Goltsov, Andrey Y; Klyushnikov, Sergey A; Illarioshkin, Sergey N; Rogaev, Evgeny I

    2016-01-01

    X-linked congenital cerebellar ataxia is a heterogeneous nonprogressive neurodevelopmental disorder with onset in early childhood. We searched for a genetic cause of this condition, previously reported in a Buryat pedigree of Mongolian ancestry from southeastern Russia. Using whole-genome sequencing on Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform, we found a missense mutation in the ABCB7 (ABC-binding cassette transporter B7) gene, encoding a mitochondrial transporter, involved in heme synthesis and previously associated with sideroblastic anemia and ataxia. The mutation resulting in a substitution of a highly conserved glycine to serine in position 682 is apparently a major causative factor of the cerebellar hypoplasia/atrophy found in affected individuals of a Buryat family who had no evidence of sideroblastic anemia. Moreover, in these affected men we also found the genetic defects in two other genes closely linked to ABCB7 on chromosome X: a deletion of a genomic region harboring the second exon of copper-transporter gene (ATP7A) and a complete deletion of PGAM4 (phosphoglycerate mutase family member 4) retrogene located in the intronic region of the ATP7A gene. Despite the deletion, eliminating the first of six metal-binding domains in ATP7A, no signs for Menkes disease or occipital horn syndrome associated with ATP7A mutations were found in male carriers. The role of the PGAM4 gene has been previously implicated in human reproduction, but our data indicate that its complete loss does not disrupt male fertility. Our finding links cerebellar pathology to the genetic defect in ABCB7 and ATP7A structural variant inherited as X-linked trait, and further reveals the genetic heterogeneity of X-linked cerebellar disorders. PMID:26242992

  1. X-linked congenital hypertrichosis syndrome is associated with interchromosomal insertions mediated by a human-specific palindrome near SOX3.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongwen; Shang, Dandan; Sun, Miao; Choi, Sunju; Liu, Qing; Hao, Jiajie; Figuera, Luis E; Zhang, Feng; Choy, Kwong Wai; Ao, Yang; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Xiao-Lin; Yue, Fengzhen; Wang, Ming-Rong; Jin, Li; Patel, Pragna I; Jing, Tao; Zhang, Xue

    2011-06-10

    X-linked congenital generalized hypertrichosis (CGH), an extremely rare condition characterized by universal overgrowth of terminal hair, was first mapped to chromosome Xq24-q27.1 in a Mexican family. However, the underlying genetic defect remains unknown. We ascertained a large Chinese family with an X-linked congenital hypertrichosis syndrome combining CGH, scoliosis, and spina bifida and mapped the disease locus to a 5.6 Mb critical region within the interval defined by the previously reported Mexican family. Through the combination of a high-resolution copy-number variation (CNV) scan and targeted genomic sequencing, we identified an interchromosomal insertion at Xq27.1 of a 125,577 bp intragenic fragment of COL23A1 on 5q35.3, with one X breakpoint within and the other very close to a human-specific short palindromic sequence located 82 kb downstream of SOX3. In the Mexican family, we found an interchromosomal insertion at the same Xq27.1 site of a 300,036 bp genomic fragment on 4q31.2, encompassing PRMT10 and TMEM184C and involving parts of ARHGAP10 and EDNRA. Notably, both of the two X breakpoints were within the short palindrome. The two palindrome-mediated insertions fully segregate with the CGH phenotype in each of the families, and the CNV gains of the respective autosomal genomic segments are not present in the public database and were not found in 1274 control individuals. Analysis of control individuals revealed deletions ranging from 173 bp to 9104 bp at the site of the insertions with no phenotypic consequence. Taken together, our results strongly support the pathogenicity of the identified insertions and establish X-linked congenital hypertrichosis syndrome as a genomic disorder.

  2. Early prediction of maxillary canine impaction

    PubMed Central

    Storms, Ann-Sophie; Voet, Martine; Fieuws, Steffen; Willems, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to establish prediction criteria for maxillary canine impaction in young patients, based on angular and linear measurements on panoramic radiographs. Methods: From 828 records having at least 2 panoramic radiographs, both taken between the ages of 7 and 14 years, with a minimum 1-year and maximum 3-year interval (T1 and T2), a training data set consisting of 30 subjects with unilateral canine impaction (12 males and 18 females) was selected. The patients' mean age was 10.1 years [standard deviation (SD) 1.3 years] at T1 and 11.9 years (SD 1.1 years) at T2. The training data set also consisted of 30 maxillary canines from the contralateral sides and an additional 60 normal erupted canines from 30 subjects. Those 30 subjects of a test data set were selected based on displaying bilateral maxillary canine eruption at T2 and being matched for gender and age with the subjects of the training data set [12 males and 18 females; mean age at T1, 10.1 years (SD 1.3 years) and at T2, 11.1 years (SD 1.2 years)]. Angular and linear measurements were performed separately by two observers on the total study sample at T1. Linear measurements were expressed as a multiplication of the maxillary central incisor width at the non-impacted side. Results: Significant differences for linear and angular measurements and radiographic factors were found between the maxillary impacted canine and erupted maxillary canine. The three best-discriminating parameters were canine to first premolar angle, canine cusp to midline distance and canine cusp to maxillary plane distance. These three parameters were combined in a multiple logistic regression model to calculate the probability of impaction, yielding a high area under the curve (AUC) equal to 0.97 (95% confidence interval: 0.94–0.99), with 90% sensitivity and 94% specificity. Conclusions: Prediction of maxillary canine impaction from a combination of parameters relating to angles and distances measured

  3. Linkage Disequilibrium for Two X-Linked Genes in Sardinia and Its Bearing on the Statistical Mapping of the Human X Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Filippi, G.; Rinaldi, A.; Palmarino, R.; Seravalli, E.; Siniscalco, M.

    1977-01-01

    The distribution of four X-linked mutants (G6PD, Deutan, Protan and Xg) among lowland and once highly malarial populations of Sardinia discloses a clear-cut example of linkage disequilibrium between two of them (G6PD and Protan). In the same populations the distribution of G6PD-deficiency versus colorblindness of the Deutan type and the Xg blood-group is not significantly different from that expected at equilibrium. These data suggest indirectly that the loci for G6PD and Protan may be nearer to one another than those for G6PD and Deutan. PMID:301840

  4. JS-X syndrome: A multiple congenital malformation with vocal cord paralysis, ear deformity, hearing loss, shoulder musculature underdevelopment, and X-linked recessive inheritance.

    PubMed

    Hoeve, Hans L J; Brooks, Alice S; Smit, Liesbeth S

    2015-07-01

    We report on a family with a not earlier described multiple congenital malformation. Several male family members suffer from laryngeal obstruction caused by bilateral vocal cord paralysis, outer and middle ear deformity with conductive and sensorineural hearing loss, facial dysmorphisms, and underdeveloped shoulder musculature. The affected female members only have middle ear deformity and hearing loss. The pedigree is suggestive of an X-linked recessive inheritance pattern. SNP-array revealed a deletion and duplication on Xq28 in the affected family members. A possible aetiology is a neurocristopathy with most symptoms expressed in structures derived from branchial arches.

  5. Molecular signalling pathways in canine gliomas.

    PubMed

    Boudreau, C E; York, D; Higgins, R J; LeCouteur, R A; Dickinson, P J

    2017-03-01

    In this study, we determined the expression of key signalling pathway proteins TP53, MDM2, P21, AKT, PTEN, RB1, P16, MTOR and MAPK in canine gliomas using western blotting. Protein expression was defined in three canine astrocytic glioma cell lines treated with CCNU, temozolamide or CPT-11 and was further evaluated in 22 spontaneous gliomas including high and low grade astrocytomas, high grade oligodendrogliomas and mixed oligoastrocytomas. Response to chemotherapeutic agents and cell survival were similar to that reported in human glioma cell lines. Alterations in expression of key human gliomagenesis pathway proteins were common in canine glioma tumour samples and segregated between oligodendroglial and astrocytic tumour types for some pathways. Both similarities and differences in protein expression were defined for canine gliomas compared to those reported in human tumour counterparts. The findings may inform more defined assessment of specific signalling pathways for targeted therapy of canine gliomas.

  6. Concomitant canine distemper, infectious canine hepatitis, canine parvoviral enteritis, canine infectious tracheobronchitis, and toxoplasmosis in a puppy.

    PubMed

    Headley, Selwyn Arlington; Alfieri, Amauri Alcindo; Fritzen, Juliana Torres Tomazi; Garcia, João Luis; Weissenböck, Herbert; da Silva, Ana Paula; Bodnar, Livia; Okano, Werner; Alfieri, Alice Fernandes

    2013-01-01

    The concomitant infections of Canine distemper virus (CDV), Canine adenovirus A types 1 (CAdV-1) and 2 (CAdV-2), Canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2), and Toxoplasma gondii are described in a 43-day-old mixed-breed puppy. Clinically, there were convulsions and blindness with spontaneous death; 14 siblings of this puppy, born to a 10-month-old dam, which was seropositive (titer: 1,024) for T. gondii, also died. Necropsy revealed unilateral corneal edema (blue eye), depletion of intestinal lymphoid tissue, non-collapsible lungs, congestion of meningeal vessels, and a pale area in the myocardium. Histopathology demonstrated necrotizing myocarditis associated with intralesional apicomplexan protozoa; necrotizing and chronic hepatitis associated with rare intranuclear inclusion bodies within hepatocytes; necrotizing bronchitis and bronchiolitis; interstitial pneumonia associated with eosinophilic intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies within epithelial cells; atrophy and fusion of intestinal villi with cryptal necrosis; and white matter demyelination of the cerebrum and cerebellum associated with intranuclear inclusion bodies within astrocytes. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplified the partial fragments (bp) of the CDV N gene (290 bp), CPV-2c VP2 capsid protein gene (583 bp), and CAdV-1 (508 bp) and CAdV-2 (1,030 bp) E gene from urine and tissue samples. The PCR assays demonstrated that the apicomplexan protozoa observed within several organs contained DNA specific for T. gondii; genotyping revealed T. gondii type III. The findings support the characterization of concomitant infections of CDV, CAdV-1, CAdV-2, CPV-2, and T. gondii in this puppy. Further, seroreactivity to T. gondii of the dam in association with the systemic disease observed in the puppy described herein is suggestive of congenital toxoplasmosis.

  7. A review of canine pseudocyesis.

    PubMed

    Gobello, C; de la Sota, R L; Goya, R G

    2001-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the most relevant features of the physiology, clinical signs, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of canine pseudocyesis (PSC). This is a physiological syndrome, characterized by clinical signs such as: nesting, weight gain, mammary enlargement, lactation and maternal behaviour, which appears in non-pregnant bitches at the end of metaoestrus. PSC is a frequent finding in domestic dogs. Although it is generally admitted that prolactin (PRL) plays a central role in the appearance of PSC, its precise aetiophysiology is not completely understood yet. A number of clinical studies suggest that at some point of metaoestrus circulating PRL levels rise in overtly pseudopregnant bitches. Individual differences in sensitivity to PRL as well as the existence of molecular variants of canine PRL with different bioactivity versus immunoreactivity ratios may help clarify the aetiopathology of PSC. Diagnosis of PSC is based on the presence of typical clinical signs in metaoestrous non-pregnant bitches. Considering that PSC is a self limiting physiological state, mild cases usually need no treatment. Discouraging maternal behaviour and sometimes fitting Elizabethan collars to prevent licking of the mammary glands may suffice in these cases. Sex steroids (oestrogens, progestins and androgens) have been traditionally used to treat PSC but the side-effects usually outweigh the benefits of these medications. Inhibition of PRL release by ergot derivatives [bromocriptine (10-100 microg/kg per day for 10-14 days], cabergoline (5 microg/kg per day during 5-10 days), metergoline (0.2 mg/kg per day during 8-10 days) has proved to be effective for the treatment of canine PSC. Although some of these ergot derivatives present some untoward side-effects, they are transient and can usually be managed. Predisposed bitches not intended for breeding should be spayed as ovariectomy is the only permanent preventive measure.

  8. Association of CHRDL1 Mutations and Variants with X-linked Megalocornea, Neuhäuser Syndrome and Central Corneal Thickness

    PubMed Central

    Hysi, Pirro G.; Venturini, Cristina; Plagnol, Vincent; Ruddle, Jonathan B.; Ali, Hala; Carnt, Nicole; Gardner, Jessica C.; Hassan, Hala; Gade, Else; Kearns, Lisa; Jelsig, Anne Marie; Restori, Marie; Webb, Tom R.; Laws, David; Cosgrove, Michael; Hertz, Jens M.; Russell-Eggitt, Isabelle; Pilz, Daniela T.; Hammond, Christopher J.; Tuft, Stephen J.; Hardcastle, Alison J.

    2014-01-01

    We describe novel CHRDL1 mutations in ten families with X-linked megalocornea (MGC1). Our mutation-positive cohort enabled us to establish ultrasonography as a reliable clinical diagnostic tool to distinguish between MGC1 and primary congenital glaucoma (PCG). Megalocornea is also a feature of Neuhäuser or megalocornea-mental retardation (MMR) syndrome, a rare condition of unknown etiology. In a male patient diagnosed with MMR, we performed targeted and whole exome sequencing (WES) and identified a novel missense mutation in CHRDL1 that accounts for his MGC1 phenotype but not his non-ocular features. This finding suggests that MMR syndrome, in some cases, may be di- or multigenic. MGC1 patients have reduced central corneal thickness (CCT); however no X-linked loci have been associated with CCT, possibly because the majority of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) overlook the X-chromosome. We therefore explored whether variants on the X-chromosome are associated with CCT. We found rs149956316, in intron 6 of CHRDL1, to be the most significantly associated single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) (p = 6.81×10−6) on the X-chromosome. However, this association was not replicated in a smaller subset of whole genome sequenced samples. This study highlights the importance of including X-chromosome SNP data in GWAS to identify potential loci associated with quantitative traits or disease risk. PMID:25093588

  9. +2.71 LOD score at zero recombination is not sufficient for establishing linkage between X-linked mental retardation and X-chromosome markers

    SciTech Connect

    Robledo, R.; Melis, P.; Siniscalco, M.

    1996-07-12

    Nonspecific X-linked mental retardation (MRX) is the denomination attributed to the familial type of mental retardation compatible with X-linked inheritance but lacking specific phenotypic manifestations. It is thus to be expected that families falling under such broad definition are genetically heterogeneous in the sense that they may be due to different types of mutations occurring, most probably, at distinct X-chromosome loci. To facilitate a genetic classification of these conditions, the Nomenclature Committee of the Eleventh Human Gene Mapping Workshop proposed to assign a unique MRX-serial number to each family where evidence of linkage with one or more X-chromosome markers had been established with a LOD score of at least +2 at zero recombination. This letter is meant to emphasize the inadequacy of this criterion for a large pedigree where the segregation of the disease has been evaluated against the haplotype constitution of the entire X-chromosome carrying the mutation in question. 12 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Identification of novel X-linked gain-of-function RPGR-ORF15 mutation in Italian family with retinitis pigmentosa and pathologic myopia

    PubMed Central

    Parmeggiani, Francesco; Barbaro, Vanessa; De Nadai, Katia; Lavezzo, Enrico; Toppo, Stefano; Chizzolini, Marzio; Palù, Giorgio; Parolin, Cristina; Di Iorio, Enzo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe a new pathogenic variant in the mutational hot spot exon ORF15 of retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator (RPGR) gene within an Italian family with X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (RP), detailing its distinctive genotype-phenotype correlation with pathologic myopia (PM). All members of this RP-PM family underwent a complete ophthalmic examination. The entire open reading frames of RPGR and retinitis pigmentosa 2 genes were analyzed by Sanger sequencing. A novel frame-shift mutation in exon ORF15 of RPGR gene (c.2091_2092insA; p.A697fs) was identified as hemizygous variant in the male proband with RP, and as heterozygous variant in the females of this pedigree who invariably exhibited symmetrical PM in both eyes. The c.2091_2092insA mutation coherently co-segregated with the observed phenotypes. These findings expand the spectrum of X-linked RP variants. Interestingly, focusing on Caucasian ethnicity, just three RPGR mutations are hitherto reported in RP-PM families: one of these is located in exon ORF15, but none appears to be characterized by a high penetrance of PM trait as observed in the present, relatively small, pedigree. The geno-phenotypic attributes of this heterozygosity suggest that gain-of-function mechanism could give rise to PM via a degenerative cell-cell remodeling of the retinal structures. PMID:27995965

  11. Gene targeting study reveals unexpected expression of brain-expressed X-linked 2 in endocrine and tissue stem/progenitor cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Ito, Keiichi; Yamazaki, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Ryo; Tajima, Yoko; Yanagida, Ayaka; Kobayashi, Toshihiro; Kato-Itoh, Megumi; Kakuta, Shigeru; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Kamiya, Akihide

    2014-10-24

    Identification of genes specifically expressed in stem/progenitor cells is an important issue in developmental and stem cell biology. Genome-wide gene expression analyses in liver cells performed in this study have revealed a strong expression of X-linked genes that include members of the brain-expressed X-linked (Bex) gene family in stem/progenitor cells. Bex family genes are expressed abundantly in the neural cells and have been suggested to play important roles in the development of nervous tissues. However, the physiological role of its individual members and the precise expression pattern outside the nervous system remain largely unknown. Here, we focused on Bex2 and examined its role and expression pattern by generating knock-in mice; the enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) was inserted into the Bex2 locus. Bex2-deficient mice were viable and fertile under laboratory growth conditions showing no obvious phenotypic abnormalities. Through an immunohistochemical analysis and flow cytometry-based approach, we observed unique EGFP reporter expression patterns in endocrine and stem/progenitor cells of the liver, pyloric stomach, and hematopoietic system. Although Bex2 seems to play redundant roles in vivo, these results suggest the significance and potential applications of Bex2 in studies of endocrine and stem/progenitor cells.

  12. The Mid2 X-linked Intellectual Disability Ubiquitin Ligase Associates with Astrin and Regulates Astrin Levels to Promote Cell Division

    PubMed Central

    Gholkar, Ankur A.; Senese, Silvia; Lo, Yu-Chen; Vides, Edmundo; Contreras, Ely; Hodara, Emmanuelle; Capri, Joseph; Whitelegge, Julian P.; Torres, Jorge Z.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Mid1 and Mid2 are ubiquitin ligases that regulate microtubule dynamics and whose mutation is associated with X-linked developmental disorders. We show that Astrin, a microtubule-organizing protein, co-purifies with Mid1 and Mid2, has an overlapping localization with Mid1 and Mid2 at intercellular bridge microtubules, is ubiquitinated by Mid2 on lysine 409 and is degraded during cytokinesis. Mid2 depletion led to Astrin stabilization during cytokinesis, cytokinetic defects, multinucleated cells, and cell death. Similarly, expression of a K409A mutant Astrin in Astrin-depleted cells led to the accumulation of K409A on intercellular bridge microtubules and an increase in cytokinetic defects, multinucleated cells, and cell death. These results indicate that Mid2 regulates cell division through the ubiquitination of Astrin on K409, which is critical for its degradation and proper cytokinesis. These results may help explain how mutation of MID2 leads to misregulation of microtubule organization and the downstream disease pathology associated with X-linked intellectual disabilities. PMID:26748699

  13. The X-Linked Hypothesis of Brain Disorders: Can Gender Ratios Tell Us Anything About Cellular Etiology of Neurodegenerative and Psychiatric Diseases?

    PubMed

    Turkheimer, Federico E; Bodini, Benedetta; Politis, Marios; Pariante, Carmine M; Ciccarelli, Olga; Yeo, Ronald A

    2015-12-01

    In this article, we propose an X-linked hypothesis of brain disorders that postulates a neuronal origin of those neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders with a greater male prevalence. The hypothesis is based on the accumulated genetics and genomic evidence linking X chromosome genes and transcripts to neuronal cells. The behavioral genetics literature has long pointed to the link between postsynaptic protein complexes coded on chromosome X and mental retardation. More recently, novel genomic evidence has emerged of X-linked mRNA overexpression of neuronal source in the human brain. We review the evidence for this hypothesis and its consistency with the distribution across genders of brain disorders of known aetiology. We then provide examples of the utilization of this hypothesis in the investigation of the pathophysiology of complex brain disorders in both the stratification of disease cohorts and the development of realistic preclinical models. We conclude by providing a general framework for testing its validity, which will be exploited in future studies, and provide future directions for research.

  14. Successful allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in a boy with X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis deficiency presenting with hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ming-Yan; Guo, Xia; Sun, Shu-Wen; Li, Qiang; Zhu, Yi-Ping

    2016-01-01

    X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) deficiency, also known as X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome type 2 (XLP2), is a rare inherited primary immunodeficiency resulting from the XIAP (also known as BIRC4) mutation. XIAP deficiency is mainly associated with familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) phenotypes, and genetic testing is crucial in diagnosing this syndrome. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is currently the only successful strategy for the treatment of this disease; however, a limited number of studies has been published concerning the outcomes of allogeneic HSCT in patients with XIAP deficiency. The present study reported a successful allogeneic HSCT performed to treat XIAP deficiency in a Chinese boy presenting with HLH. Polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing were performed to confirm the diagnosis of XIAP deficiency, and allogeneic HSCT was performed. Genetic tests revealed a two-nucleotide deletion (c.1021_1022delAA) in the patient, which was inherited from his mother, and resulted in frameshift mutation and premature stop codon (p.N341fsX348); this is considered to be a disease-causing mutation. The XIAP deficiency patient underwent allogeneic HSCT, receiving busulfan-containing reduced intensity myeloablative conditioning regimen, with a good intermediate follow-up result obtained. Therefore, genetic testing is essential to confirm the diagnosis of XIAP deficiency and detect the carrier of mutation. The present case study may promote the investigation of allogeneic HSCT in patients with XIAP deficiency. PMID:27602064

  15. Human X-linked Intellectual Disability Factor CUL4B Is Required for Post-meiotic Sperm Development and Male Fertility

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chien-Yu; Chen, Chun-Yu; Yu, Chih-Hsiang; Yu, I-Shing; Lin, Shu-Rung; Wu, June-Tai; Lin, Ying-Hung; Kuo, Pao-Lin; Wu, Jui-Ching; Lin, Shu-Wha

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrate that an E3-ubiquitin ligase associated with human X-linked intellectual disability, CUL4B, plays a crucial role in post-meiotic sperm development. Initially, Cul4bΔ/Y male mice were found to be sterile and exhibited a progressive loss in germ cells, thereby leading to oligoasthenospermia. Adult Cul4b mutant epididymides also contained very low numbers of mature spermatozoa, and these spermatazoa exhibited pronounced morphological abnormalities. In post-meiotic spermatids, CUL4B was dynamically expressed and mitosis of spermatogonia and meiosis of spermatocytes both appeared unaffected. However, the spermatids exhibited significantly higher levels of apoptosis during spermiogenesis, particularly during the acrosome phase through the cap phase. Comparative proteomic analyses identified a large-scale shift between wild-type and Cul4b mutant testes during early post-meiotic sperm development. Ultrastructural pathology studies further detected aberrant acrosomes in spermatids and nuclear morphology. The protein levels of both canonical and non-canonical histones were also affected in an early spermatid stage in the absence of Cul4b. Thus, X-linked CUL4B appears to play a critical role in acrosomal formation, nuclear condensation, and in regulating histone dynamics during haploid male germ cell differentiation in relation to male fertility in mice. Thus, it is possible that CUL4B-selective substrates are required for post-meiotic sperm morphogenesis. PMID:26832838

  16. [Panel of X-linked single-nucleotide polymorphic markers for DNA identification (XSNPid) based on multiplex genotyping by multilocus PCR and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Stepanov, V A; Vagaitseva, K V; Kharkov, V N; Cherednichenko, A A; Bocharova, A V

    2016-01-01

    Human genetic markers linked with the X chromosome (X-linked) are used in the field of population and medical genetics, as well as for DNA identification of individuals in forensic science and forensic medicine. We proposed an XSNPid panel that consists of 66 unlinked single nucleotide X chromosome markers and developed a protocol for their multiplex genotyping using multilocus PCR and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. The XSNPid panel is genotyped within two multiplexes (36 and 30 markers). The developed protocol provides an efficient genotype reading; the fraction of determined genotypes is 98.29%. The high level of gene diversity (0.461) for the X-linked SNPs included in the panel is characteristic of the Russian population. A total of 63 out of 66 markers that provide a high efficiency of genotyping and independent inheritance are suitable for DNA identification purposes. The XSNPid panel is characterized by a very high discriminating ability when studying the Russian population. The probability of genotype coincidence in two unrelated individuals is 9 × 10^(-27) for women and 2 × 10^(-18) for men. Also, the XSNPid panel has a greater multiplex capacity in addition to a higher discriminating ability compared to the other closest analogues of the X chromosome SNP sets, which makes it more cost effective and less time consuming. The XSNPid panel is a convenient tool, not only for individual DNA identification, but also for population genetic studies.

  17. Localization to Xq22 and clinical update of a family with X-linked recessive mental retardation with progression sensorineural deafness, progressive tapeto-retinal degeneration and dystonia

    SciTech Connect

    Tranebjaerg, L.; Schwartz, C.; Huggins, K.; Barker, D.; Stevenson, R.; Arena, J.F.; Gedde-Dahl, T.; Mikkelsen, M.; Mellgren, S.; Anderson, K. ||||

    1994-07-15

    In a reinvestigation of a six-generation Norwegian family, originally reported with non-syndromic X-linked recessive deafness by Mohr and Mageroy, we have demonstrated several syndromic manifestations. The 10 clinically characterized affected males range in age from 14-61 years, and show progressive mental deterioration and visual disability. Ophthalmological and electrophysiological studies showed myopia, decreased visual acuity, combined cone-rod dystrophy as well as central areolar dystrophy by means of ERG. Brain CT-scans showed cortical and central atrophy without predilection to specific areas. Linkage analysis, using X-chromosomal RFLPs and CA-repeats, yielded a maximum LOD score of 4.37 with linkage to DXS17. DXS17 is localized to Xq22. One recombinant with COL4A5 (deficient in Alport syndrome) was observed. Results from the studies of this family will be important in reclassification of non-syndromic X-linked deafness since the family now represents syndromic deafness and XLMR with a specific phenotype.

  18. Deletion mapping of X-linked mixed deafness (DFN3) identified a 265-525-kb region centromeric of DXS26

    SciTech Connect

    Dahl, N.; Laporte, J.; Hu, L.; Biancalana, V.; Mandel, J.L.; Paslier, D.; Cohen, D.; Piussan, C.

    1995-04-01

    Nonsyndromic X-linked deafness is a rare cause of hereditary deafness accounting for {approximately}5% of all congenital deafness. The DFN3 locus (MIM 304400) has previously been mapped to the Xq13-21 region by linkage analyses and was further substantiated by the observation of deafness segregating with deletions involving this region. Molecular characterization of the deletions have indicated that the DFN3 gene is located in proximal Xq21, centromeric of the choroideremia locus (CHM). Several marker loci at Xq21 are located within the different deletions, and a critical region has been suggested around DXS232, giving the likely order Xqcen-DXS169-DXS26-(DXS232, DFN3)-DXS121. The lack of critical deletions and physical maps and clones covering the region has hampered a more accurate mapping of DFN3. In addition, the clinical heterogeneity of nonsyndromic X-linked deafness has been confirmed by linkage studies, suggesting the existence of two distinct loci in Xq13-q21. A recent report based on studies of several deletions estimates the DFN3 candidate region to {approximately}400 kb around DXS26. We report here physical cloning of a region associated with DFN3 in a YAC. Detailed mapping of three deletions associated with DFN3 has enabled us to further map a region centromeric of DXS26 involved in the disease. 16 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  19. Characterization of allele-specific expression of the X-linked gene MAO-A in trophectoderm cells of bovine embryos produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, A R; Aguiar Filho, L F C; Sousa, R V; Sartori, R; Franco, M M

    2015-10-05

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) may affect epigenetic mechanisms and alter the expression of genes related to embryo development and X chromosome inactivation (XCI). We characterized allele-specific expression of the X-linked gene monoamine oxidase type A (MAO-A) in the trophectoderm (TF) of embryos produced by SCNT. Total RNA was isolated from individual biopsies (N = 25), and the allele-specific expression assessed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Both paternal and maternal alleles were expressed in the trophectoderm. However, a higher frequency of the mono-allelic expression of a specific allele was observed (N = 17; 68%), with the remaining samples showing the presence of mRNA from both alleles (N = 8; 32%). Considering that MAO-A is subject to XCI in bovine, our results suggest that SCNT may influence XCI because neither an imprinted (mono-allelic expression in all samples) nor a random (presence of mRNA from both alleles in all samples) pattern of XCI was observed in TF. Due to the importance of XCI in mammalian embryo development and its sensitivity to in vitro conditions, X-linked genes subject to XCI are candidates for use in the development of embryo quality molecular markers for assisted reproduction.

  20. A healthy delivery of twins by assisted reproduction followed by preimplantation genetic screening in a woman with X-linked dominant incontinentia pigmenti

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myung Joo; Lyu, Sang Woo; Seok, Hyun Ha; Park, Ji Eun

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to report a successful twin pregnancy and delivery in a female patient with X-linked dominant incontinentia pigmenti (IP) who underwent assisted reproductive technology followed by preimplantation genetic screening (PGS). A 29-year-old female with IP had a previous history of recurrent spontaneous abortion. A molecular analysis revealed the patient had a de novo mutation, 1308_1309insCCCCTTG(p.Ala438ProfsTer26), in the inhibitor of the kappa B kinase gamma gene located in the Xq28 region. IVF/ICSI and PGS was performed, in which male embryos were sexed using array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). After IVF/ICSI and PGS using aCGH on seven embryos, two euploid male blastocysts were transferred with a 50% probability of a viable male pregnancy. The dizygotic twin pregnancy was confirmed and the amniocentesis results of each twin were normal with regard to the mutation found in the mother. The patient delivered healthy twin babies during the 37th week of gestation. This case shows the beneficial role of PGS in achieving a successful pregnancy through euploid male embryo gender selection in a woman with X-linked dominant IP with a history of multiple male miscarriages. PMID:25599040

  1. Human X-linked Intellectual Disability Factor CUL4B Is Required for Post-meiotic Sperm Development and Male Fertility.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chien-Yu; Chen, Chun-Yu; Yu, Chih-Hsiang; Yu, I-Shing; Lin, Shu-Rung; Wu, June-Tai; Lin, Ying-Hung; Kuo, Pao-Lin; Wu, Jui-Ching; Lin, Shu-Wha

    2016-02-02

    In this study, we demonstrate that an E3-ubiquitin ligase associated with human X-linked intellectual disability, CUL4B, plays a crucial role in post-meiotic sperm development. Initially, Cul4b(Δ)/Y male mice were found to be sterile and exhibited a progressive loss in germ cells, thereby leading to oligoasthenospermia. Adult Cul4b mutant epididymides also contained very low numbers of mature spermatozoa, and these spermatazoa exhibited pronounced morphological abnormalities. In post-meiotic spermatids, CUL4B was dynamically expressed and mitosis of spermatogonia and meiosis of spermatocytes both appeared unaffected. However, the spermatids exhibited significantly higher levels of apoptosis during spermiogenesis, particularly during the acrosome phase through the cap phase. Comparative proteomic analyses identified a large-scale shift between wild-type and Cul4b mutant testes during early post-meiotic sperm development. Ultrastructural pathology studies further detected aberrant acrosomes in spermatids and nuclear morphology. The protein levels of both canonical and non-canonical histones were also affected in an early spermatid stage in the absence of Cul4b. Thus, X-linked CUL4B appears to play a critical role in acrosomal formation, nuclear condensation, and in regulating histone dynamics during haploid male germ cell differentiation in relation to male fertility in mice. Thus, it is possible that CUL4B-selective substrates are required for post-meiotic sperm morphogenesis.

  2. cDNA cloning of the murine PEX gene implicated in X-linked hypophosphatemia and evidence for expression in bone

    SciTech Connect

    Du, L.; Desbarats, M.; Viel, J.

    1996-08-15

    The recently identified human PEX g ene apparently encodes for a neutral endopeptidase that is mutated in patients with X-linked hypophosphatemia. The 3{prime} and 5{prime} ends of the coding region of PEX have not been cloned, nor has the tissue expression of the gene been identified. Here we report the isolation and characterization of the complete open reading frame of the mouse Pex gene and the demonstration of its expression in bone. Mouse Pex cDNA is predicted to encode a protein of 749 amino acids with 95% identity to the available human PEX sequence and significant homology to members of the membrane-bound metalloendopeptidase family. Northern blot analysis revealed a 6.6-kb transcript in bone and in cultured osteoblasts from normal mice that was not detectable in samples from the Hyp mouse, the murine homolog of human X-linked hypophosphatemia. Pex transcripts were, however, detectable in Hyp bone by RT-PCR amplification. Of particular interest, a cDNA clone from rat incisor shows 93% sequence identity to the 5{prime} end of Pex cDNA, suggesting that Pex may be expressed in another calcified tissue, the tooth. The association of impaired mineralization of bone and teeth and disturbed renal phosphate reabsorption with altered expression of Pex suggests that the Pex gene product may play a critical role in these processes. 47 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  3. X-linked neurodegenerative syndrome with congenital ataxia, late-onset progressive myoclonic encephalopathy and selective macular degeneration, linked to Xp22.33-pter

    SciTech Connect

    Portes, V. des; Beldjord, C.; Bruels, T.

    1996-07-12

    Linkage analysis was performed in a previously described family segregating for an X-linked progressive neurological disorder. In three generations, the disease was inherited from the mothers in seven affected males. Five had severe congenital hypotonia and died during the first year of life. Two other boys (maternal cousins) were found to have severe congenital ataxia, late-onset progressive myoclonic encephalopathy, and selective macular degeneration; brain CT-scan showed moderate cerebellar vermis hypoplasia. Linkage analysis was carried out in 12 informative relatives using 35 microsatellite markers (Genethon) evenly distributed on the X chromosome. A multipoint analysis showed a significant linkage (Z > 2) between the disease and three markers in the Xp22.33 region: DYS403 (Z = 2.37, {theta} = 0) which maps in the pseudoautosomal region, DXS7099 (Z = 2.45, {theta} = 0), and DXS7100 (Z = 2.48, {theta} = 0). Further linkage analysis with more telomeric markers will refine the location of this severe X-linked encephalopathy. 12 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  4. A gene for X-linked optic atrophy is closely linked to the Xp11.4-Xp11.2 region of the X chromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Assink, J J; Tijmes, N T; ten Brink, J B; Oostra, R J; Riemslag, F C; de Jong, P T; Bergen, A A

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the chromosomal location of the disease-causing gene in a family apparently segregating X-linked optic atrophy. A large family of 45 individuals with a four-generation history of X-linked optic atrophy was reexamined in a full ophthalmic as well as electrophysiological examination. A DNA linkage analysis of the family was undertaken in order to identify the chromosomal location of the disease-causing gene. Linkage analysis was performed with 26 markers that spanned the entire X chromosome. The affected males showed very early onset and slow progression of the disease. Ophthalmic study of the female carriers did not reveal any abnormalities. Close linkage without recombination was found at the MAOB locus (maximum LOD score [Zmax] 4.19). The Zmax - 1 support interval was found at a recombination fraction of .076 distal and .018 proximal to MAOB. Multipoint linkage analysis placed the optic atrophy-causing gene in the Xp11.4-p11.21 interval between markers DXS993 and DXS991, whereas any other localization along the X chromosome could be excluded. PMID:9382106

  5. Definitive localization of X-linked Kallman syndrome (hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and anosmia) to Xp22.3: close linkage to the hypervariable repeat sequence CRI-S232.

    PubMed Central

    Meitinger, T; Heye, B; Petit, C; Levilliers, J; Golla, A; Moraine, C; Dalla Piccola, B; Sippell, W G; Murken, J; Ballabio, A

    1990-01-01

    Kallmann syndrome is a genetically heterogeneous disease characterized by hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and anosmia. Six families in which the disorder followed an X-linked inheritance were investigated by linkage analysis. Diagnostic criteria were uniformly applied and included tests for hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and anosmia. Close linkage was found by using the hypervariable repeated sequence CRI-S232 (DXS278) previously mapped to Xp22.3. At a maximum lod score of 6.5, the recombination fraction was calculated as .03. Of 30 fully informative meioses, one recombination between the disease locus and the loci recognized by probe CRI-S232 was observed. When an independent approach is used, these results confirm the X-linked Kallmann syndrome assignment previously made by deletion mapping, and allow definitive localization of the syndrome assignment previously made by deletion mapping, and allow definitive localization of the syndrome to the Xp22.3 region. This opens the way to carrier detection and to the identification of a gene responsible for this disorder. Images Figure 2 PMID:1977309

  6. Low maternal serum unconjugated estriol during prenatal screening as an indication of placental steroid sulfatase deficiency and X-linked ichthyosis.

    PubMed

    Keren, D F; Canick, J A; Johnson, M Z; Schaldenbrand, J D; Haning, R V; Hackett, R

    1995-04-01

    Placental sulfatase deficiency is an X-linked metabolic defect that occurs in about 1 in 2,000 to 5,000 males. It is associated with congenital ichthyosis. In this report, the authors document a case of placental sulfatase deficiency detected during routine prenatal screening of maternal serum by the triple test: serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), unconjugated estriol (uE3), and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). At 16-weeks gestation, her AFP was 20.9 IU/mL (multiple of the median [MOM] 0.83), hCG was 14.4 mIU/L (MOM 0.42) and her uE3 was 0.01 nmol/L (MOM 0.01). The extremely low uE3 indicated a possible placental sulfatase deficiency, congenital adrenal hypoplasia, or other unknown abnormality. On receiving this information, the obstetrician obtained a family history that was consistent with ichthyosis in the maternal grandfather and his siblings. Biochemical analysis of placenta documented the lack of sulfatase activity. This case illustrates that an extremely low level of maternal uE3 should prompt investigation of the family for evidence of X-linked ichthyosis associated with placental sulfatase deficiency.

  7. Canine size, shape, and bending strength in primates and carnivores.

    PubMed

    Plavcan, J Michael; Ruff, Christopher B

    2008-05-01

    Anthropoid primates are well known for their highly sexually dimorphic canine teeth, with males possessing canines that are up to 400% taller than those of females. Primate canine dimorphism has been extensively documented, with a consensus that large male primate canines serve as weapons for intrasexual competition, and some evidence that large female canines in some species may likewise function as weapons. However, apart from speculation that very tall male canines may be relatively weak and that seed predators have strong canines, the functional significance of primate canine shape has not been explored. Because carnivore canine shape and size are associated with killing style, this group provides a useful comparative baseline for primates. We evaluate primate maxillary canine tooth size, shape and relative bending strength against body size, skull size, and behavioral and demographic measures of male competition and sexual selection, and compare them to those of carnivores. We demonstrate that, relative to skull length and body mass, primate male canines are on average as large as or larger than those of similar sized carnivores. The range of primate female canine sizes embraces that of carnivores. Male and female primate canines are generally as strong as or stronger than those of carnivores. Although we find that seed-eating primates have relatively strong canines, we find no clear relationship between male primate canine strength and demographic or behavioral estimates of male competition or sexual selection, in spite of a strong relationship between these measures and canine crown height. This suggests either that most primate canines are selected to be very strong regardless of variation in behavior, or that primate canine shape is inherently strong enough to accommodate changes in crown height without compromising canine function.

  8. Evidence for canine rehabilitation and physical therapy.

    PubMed

    Millis, Darryl L; Ciuperca, Ionut Alexandru

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews some important studies regarding canine physical rehabilitation. Bones, cartilage, muscles, ligaments, and tendons undergo atrophy if loading is decreased. Knowledge of the changes that occur with immobilization and the time course of events helps in the development of a rehabilitation program to improve tissue integrity. Outcome assessment instruments are clinically useful indicators of patient progress and the success of rehabilitation programs. A number of physical modalities are used in canine rehabilitation, although there are relatively few canine-specific studies. Rehabilitation has specific benefits in the treatment of various orthopedic and neurologic conditions.

  9. Impaired Telomere Maintenance and Decreased Canonical WNT Signaling but Normal Ribosome Biogenesis in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from X-Linked Dyskeratosis Congenita Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Bai-Wei; Apicella, Marisa; Mills, Jason; Fan, Jian-Meng; Reeves, Dara A.; French, Deborah; Podsakoff, Gregory M.; Bessler, Monica; Mason, Philip J.

    2015-01-01

    Dyskeratosis congenita (DC) is an inherited bone marrow failure syndrome characterized by the presence of short telomeres at presentation. Mutations in ten different genes, whose products are involved in the telomere maintenance pathway, have been shown to cause DC. The X-linked form is the most common form of the disease and is caused by mutations in the gene DKC1, encoding the protein dyskerin. Dyskerin is required for the assembly and stability of telomerase and is also involved in ribosomal RNA (rRNA) processing where it converts specific uridines to pseudouridine. DC is thought to result from failure to maintain tissues, like blood, that are renewed by stem cell activity, but research into pathogenic mechanisms has been hampered by the difficulty of obtaining stem cells from patients. We reasoned that induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells from X-linked DC patients may provide information about the mechanisms involved. Here we describe the production of iPS cells from DC patients with DKC1 mutations Q31E, A353V and ΔL37. In addition we constructed “corrected” lines with a copy of the wild type dyskerin cDNA expressed from the AAVS1 safe harbor locus. We show that in iPS cells with DKC1 mutations telomere maintenance is compromised with short telomere lengths and decreased telomerase activity. The degree to which telomere lengths are affected by expression of telomerase during reprograming, or with ectopic expression of wild type dyskerin, is variable. The recurrent mutation A353V shows the most severe effect on telomere maintenance. A353V cells but not Q31E or ΔL37 cells, are refractory to correction by expression of wild type DKC1 cDNA. Because dyskerin is involved in both telomere maintenance and ribosome biogenesis it has been postulated that defective ribosome biogenesis and translation may contribute to the disease phenotype. Evidence from mouse and zebra fish models has supported the involvement of ribosome biogenesis but primary cells from human

  10. Estimating canine tooth crown height in early Australopithecus.

    PubMed

    Plavcan, J Michael; Ward, Carol V; Paulus, Faydre L

    2009-07-01

    Canine tooth size reduction and the associated reduction in canine dimorphism is a basal hominin character that also provides important evidence for models of behavioral evolution. Two specimens of Australopithecus anamensis (KNM-KP 29287 and KNM-KP 29283) that do not preserve the canine crown, but do preserve the root or alveolus, appear to suggest that canine size variation and canine dimorphism in this species may have been greater than in other hominins. We evaluate canine root and crown dimensions in a series of extant hominoids, and estimate canine crown height in Australopithecus afarensis and A. anamensis. Our results demonstrate that it is possible to generate estimates of canine crown height from basal canine crown and root dimensions with a moderate degree of accuracy. Estimates of maxillary canine crown size for A. anamensis are slightly larger than those of A. afarensis, and are approximately the same size as canines of modern female chimpanzees. Estimated mandibular canine crown height is very similar in the two species. Variation within the A. anamensis sample of estimated canine crown heights is similar to that of modern humans, suggesting a low degree of sexual dimorphism. Inclusion of estimates for KNM-KP 29287 and KNM-KP 29283 does not substantially increase either the estimate of overall canine size or variation for A. anamensis.

  11. Canine distemper virus infection of canine footpad epidermis.

    PubMed

    Gröne, Andrea; Doherr, Marcus G; Zurbriggen, Andreas

    2004-06-01

    Infection of the footpad epidermis can occur in natural canine distemper virus (CDV) infection of dogs. Footpads from 19 dogs experimentally inoculated with virulent distemper strain A75/17 and from two nonexposed dogs were examined histopathologically and assessed for the presence of viral antigen and nucleoprotein mRNA, as well as number of inflammatory and apoptotic cells. Dogs were divided into four groups based on inoculation status and postmortem examination: inoculated dogs with severe distemper (group 1, n = 7); inoculated dogs with mild distemper (group 2, n = 4); inoculated dogs without distemper (group 3, n = 8); and noninoculated dogs (group 4, n = 2). Footpads from dogs of all groups had a comparably thick epidermis. Eosinophilic viral inclusions and syncytial cells were present in footpad epidermis of one dog of group 1. Footpads of group 1 dogs contained viral antigen and mRNA in the epidermis with strongest staining in a subcorneal location. Additionally, in these dogs footpad dermal structures including eccrine glands and vascular walls were positive for virus particles. No CDV antigen or mRNA was present in the footpad epidermis and dermis of any other dog. Group 1 dogs had more CD3-positive cells and apoptotic cells within the basal layer of the epidermis when compared to the other groups. These findings demonstrate that in experimental infection CDV antigen and mRNA were colocalized in all layers of the infected canine footpad epidermis. The scarcity of overt pathological reactions with absence of keratinocyte degeneration indicates a noncytocidal persisting infection of footpad keratinocytes by CDV.

  12. Linkage of PGK1 to X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (IMD4) allows predictive testing in families with no surviving male.

    PubMed

    Goodship, J; Levinsky, R; Malcolm, S

    1989-12-01

    We present a linkage map of DNA probes around the X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (IMD4) locus at Xq11-13. DXS159 and PGK1 show no cross-overs with the disease locus (Lod 3.01 at theta = 0.00). The order of loci is DXS1-DXS106-(DXS159-PGK1-IMD4)-DXS72 -DXYS1. Members of families whose carrier status has been established by X-inactivation patterns were included in the analysis. As the probe (pSPT/PGK), which is used for investigation of X-inactivation patterns, has been shown to be linked to the disease itself, it is possible to assign phase in mothers of sporadic cases who have been shown to be carriers, even when they have no surviving male offspring.

  13. A novel X-linked recessive mental retardation syndrome comprising macrocephaly and ciliary dysfunction is allelic to oral-facial-digital type I syndrome.

    PubMed

    Budny, Bartlomiej; Chen, Wei; Omran, Heymut; Fliegauf, Manfred; Tzschach, Andreas; Wisniewska, Marzena; Jensen, Lars R; Raynaud, Martine; Shoichet, Sarah A; Badura, Magda; Lenzner, Steffen; Latos-Bielenska, Anna; Ropers, Hans-Hilger

    2006-09-01

    We report on a large family in which a novel X-linked recessive mental retardation (XLMR) syndrome comprising macrocephaly and ciliary dysfunction co-segregates with a frameshift mutation in the OFD1 gene. Mutations of OFD1 have been associated with oral-facial-digital type 1 syndrome (OFD1S) that is characterized by X-chromosomal dominant inheritance and lethality in males. In contrast, the carrier females of our family were clinically inconspicuous, and the affected males suffered from severe mental retardation, recurrent respiratory tract infections and macrocephaly. All but one of the affected males died from respiratory problems in infancy; and impaired ciliary motility was confirmed in the index patient by high-speed video microscopy examination of nasal epithelium. This family broadens the phenotypic spectrum of OFD1 mutations in an unexpected way and sheds light on the complexity of the underlying disease mechanisms.

  14. Nuclear localized protein-1 (Nulp1) increases cell death of human osteosarcoma cells and binds the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein

    SciTech Connect

    Steen, Hakan; Lindholm, Dan

    2008-02-08

    Nuclear localized protein-1 (Nulp1) is a recently identified gene expressed in mouse and human tissues particularly during embryonic development. Nulp1 belongs to the family of basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins that are important in development. The precise function of Nulp1 in cells is however not known. We observed that overexpression of Nulp1 induces a large increase in cell death of human osteosarcoma Saos2 cells with DNA fragmentation. In mouse N2A neuroblastoma cells Nulp1 affected cell proliferation and sensitized cells towards death induced by staurosporine. Staining using a novel antibody localized Nulp1 mainly to the cell nucleus and to some extent to the cytoplasm. Nulp1 binds the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) and this interaction was increased during cell death. These results indicate that Nulp1 plays a role in cell death control and may influence tumor growth.

  15. PPM-X: A new X-linked mental retardation syndrome with psychosis, pyramidal signs, and macroorchidism maps to Xq28

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsay, S.; Splitt, M.; Edney, S.

    1996-06-01

    We report a three-generation family manifesting a previously undescribed X-linked mental retardation syndrome. Four of the six moderately retarded males have had episodes of manic-depressive psychosis. The phenotype also includes pyramidal signs, Parkinsonian features, and macroorchidism, but there are no characteristic dysmorphic facial features. Affected males do not show fragile sites at distal Xq on cytogenetic analysis, nor do they have expansions of the CGG repeats at the FRAXA, FRAXE, or FRAXF loci. Linkage analyses were undertaken, and a maximal LOD score of 3.311 at {theta} = .0 was observed with the microsatellite marker DXS1123 in Xq28. A recombination was detected in one of the affected males with DXS1691 (Xq28), which gives the proximal boundary of the localization. No distal recombination has been detected at any of the loci tested. 31 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Evidence against an X-linked locus close to DXS7 determining visual loss susceptibility in British and Italian families with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, M.G.; Davis, M.B.; Lashwood, A.; Brockington, M.; Harding, A.E. ); Toscano, A. )

    1992-10-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is associated with mutations of mtDNA, but two features of LHON pedigrees are not explicable solely on the basis of mitochondrial inheritance. There is a large excess of affected males, and not all males at risk develop the disease. These observations could be explained by the existence of an X-linked visual loss susceptibility gene. This hypothesis was supported by linkage studies in Finland, placing the susceptibility locus at DXS7, with a maximum lod score of 2.48 at a recombination fraction of 0. Linkage studies in 1 Italian and 12 British families with LHON, analyzed either together or separately depending on the associated mtDNA mutation, have excluded the presence of such a locus from an interval of about 30 cM around DXS7 in these kindreds, with a total lod score of -26.51 at a recombination fraction of 0. 17 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Evidence against an X-linked locus close to DXS7 determining visual loss susceptibility in British and Italian families with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, M G; Davis, M B; Lashwood, A; Brockington, M; Toscano, A; Harding, A E

    1992-10-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is associated with mutations of mtDNA, but two features of LHON pedigrees are not explicable solely on the basis of mitochondrial inheritance. There is a large excess of affected males, and not all males at risk develop the disease. These observations could be explained by the existence of an X-linked visual loss susceptibility gene. This hypothesis was supported by linkage studies in Finland, placing the susceptibility locus at DXS7, with a maximum lod score of 2.48 at a recombination fraction of 0. Linkage studies in 1 Italian and 12 British families with LHON, analyzed either together or separately depending on the associated mtDNA mutation, have excluded the presence of such a locus from an interval of about 30 cM around DXS7 in these kindreds, with a total lod score of -26.51 at a recombination fraction of 0.

  18. Detection of T lymphocytes with a second-site mutation in skin lesions of atypical X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency mimicking Omenn syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wada, Taizo; Yasui, Masahiro; Toma, Tomoko; Nakayama, Yuko; Nishida, Mika; Shimizu, Masaki; Okajima, Michiko; Kasahara, Yoshihito; Koizumi, Shoichi; Inoue, Masami; Kawa, Keisei; Yachie, Akihiro

    2008-09-01

    X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (XSCID) is caused by mutations of the common gamma chain (gammac) and usually characterized by the absence of T and natural killer (NK) cells. Here, we report an atypical case of XSCID presenting with autologous T and NK cells and Omenn syndrome-like manifestations. The patient carried a splice-site mutation (IVS1+5G>A) that caused most of the mRNA to be incorrectly spliced but produced normally spliced transcript in lesser amount, leading to residual gammac expression and development of T and NK cells. The skin biopsy specimen showed massive infiltration of revertant T cells. Those T cells were found to have a second-site mutation and result in complete restoration of correct splicing. These findings suggest that the clinical spectrum of XSCID is quite broad and includes atypical cases mimicking Omenn syndrome, and highlight the importance of revertant mosaicism as a possible cause for variable phenotypic expression.

  19. [Fractures of the canines require attention].

    PubMed

    van Foreest, Andries

    2005-01-15

    Hardly any attention was paid to a barely visible fracture of a canine tooth (104) in an 18-month-old dog. When the dog was 6-years old, a fistulous opening was seen on the bridge of the nose. A year later, radiography revealed a periapical process. The investigations performed and treatment given are described, as is the correct way to handle fractures of the canines.

  20. [Nonsurgical endodontic treatment of an invaginated canine].

    PubMed

    Fernández Guerrero, F; Miñana Laliga, R; Bullon Fernandez, P

    1989-01-01

    We present a case of a maxillary canine with a dens invaginatus treated successfully. The patient had pain, swelling and a sinus tract coming from the inmature apex of the canine. The canals were enlarged and cleaned and the main canal was filled with Calcium Hydroxide to allow the root development. Seven months later, the patient was asymptomatic and the tooth was obturated with guttapercha. One year later it was confirm the success in the treatment.

  1. Canine adenovirus type 1 in a fennec fox (Vulpes zerda).

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeong-Won; Lee, Hyun-Kyoung; Kim, Seong-Hee; Kim, Yeon-Hee; Lee, Kyoung-Ki; Lee, Myoung-Heon; Oem, Jae-Ku

    2014-12-01

    A 10-mo-old female fennec fox (Vulpes zerda) with drooling suddenly died and was examined postmortem. Histologic examination of different tissue samples was performed. Vacuolar degeneration and diffuse fatty change were observed in the liver. Several diagnostic methods were used to screen for canine parvovirus, canine distemper virus, canine influenza virus, canine coronavirus, canine parainfluenza virus, and canine adenovirus (CAdV). Only CAdV type 1 (CAdV-1) was detected in several organs (liver, lung, brain, kidney, spleen, and heart), and other viruses were not found. CAdV-1 was confirmed by virus isolation and nucleotide sequencing.

  2. A truncating mutation in the IL1RAPL1 gene is responsible for X-linked mental retardation in the MRX21 family.

    PubMed

    Tabolacci, Elisabetta; Pomponi, M Grazia; Pietrobono, Roberta; Terracciano, Alessandra; Chiurazzi, Pietro; Neri, Giovanni

    2006-03-01

    X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) is a genetically heterogeneous condition, due to mutations in at least 50 genes, involved in functioning of the central nervous system and located on the X chromosome. Nonspecific XLMR (MRX) is characterized essentially by mental retardation transmitted by X-linked inheritance. More than 80 extended MRX pedigrees have been reported to date, which have been distinguished exclusively by physical position of the corresponding gene on the X chromosome, established by linkage analysis. One such family, MRX21, which was described by us in 1993 and localized to Xp11.4-pter, has now been reanalyzed with additional markers and after one more affected individual had became available. This extra information allowed a significant reduction of the linkage interval and, eventually, identification of the mutant gene. A stop mutation in exon 10 of the IL1RAPL1 gene (in Xp21) was found in the four affected males and in obligate carriers, allowing conclusive counseling of other family members of uncertain carrier status. The W487X mutation results in the production of a truncated IL1RAPL protein, comprised of the extracellular Ig-like domain and transmembrane tract, but lacking the last 210 aminoacids of the cytoplasmic domain. MRX21 is the first extended MRX family with a point mutation in IL1RAPL1 and the second with a stop mutation, which had been previously found only in a small family. Our report confirms the role of the IL1RAPL1 gene in causing nonspecific mental retardation in males and underlines the importance of detailed linkage analysis before candidate gene mutational screening.

  3. X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) neuropathies (CMTX1, CMTX2, CMTX3) show different clinical phenotype and molecular genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Ionasescu, V.V.; Searby, C.C.; Ionasescu, R.

    1994-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the X-linked dominant type CMTX1 (20 families) with X-linked recessive types CMTX2 and CMTX3 (2 families). The clinical phenotype was consistent with CMT peripheral neuropathy in all cases including distal weakness, atrophy and sensory loss, pes cavus and areflexia. Additional clinicial involvement of the central nervous system was present in one family with CMTX2 (mental retardation) and one family with CMTX3 (spastic paraparesis). Tight genetic linkage to Xq13.1 was present in 20 families with CMTX1 (Z=34.07 at {theta}=0) for the marker DXS453. Fifteen of the CMTX1 families showed point mutations of the connexin 32 coding region (5 nonsense mutations, 8 missense mutations, 2 deletions). Five CMTX1 neuropathy families showed no evidence of point mutations of the CX32 coding sequence. These findings suggest that the CMTX1 neuropathy genotype in these families may be the result of promoter mutations, 3{prime}-untranslated region mutations or exon/intron splice site mutations or a mutation with a different type of connexin but which has close structural similarities to CX32. No mutations of the CX32 coding region were found in the CMTX2 or CMTX3 families. Linkage to Xq13.1 was excluded in both families. Genetic linkage to Xp22.2 was present in the CMTX2 family (Z=3.54 at {theta}=0) for the markers DXS987 and DXS999. Suggestion of linkage to Xq26 (Z=1.81 at {theta}=0) for the marker DXS86 was present in the CMTX3 family.

  4. Identification and characterization of a novel X-linked AVPR2 mutation causing partial nephrogenic diabetes insipidus: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Neocleous, Vassos; Skordis, Nicos; Shammas, Christos; Efstathiou, Elisavet; Mastroyiannopoulos, Nikolaos P; Phylactou, Leonidas A

    2012-07-01

    X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) is a rare disease characterized by a malfunctioning renal response to the antidiuretic hormone arginine vasopressin (AVP) due to mutations in the AVPR2 gene. A limited number of mutations in the AVPR2 gene resulting in partial phenotype have been described so far. In this mini-review the retrospective analysis of 13 known AVPR2 mutations that have been previously shown in vitro to partially abolish AVPR2 function is described, along with a novel mutation diagnosed in a kindred with partial NDI. In the present study, a 14 year old male and his 73 year old maternal grandfather were diagnosed with partial NDI based on the clinical phenotype, the water deprivation test and the inadequate response to 1-desamino-8-d-arginine vasopressin (DDAVP) administration. Sequencing analysis of the AVPR2 gene revealed the novel missense mutation p.N317S (g.1417A > G) in both patients. This mutation was re-created by site directed mutagenesis in an AVPR2 cDNA expression vector and was functionally characterized, in terms of arginine vasopressin (AVP) and DDAVP response. AVPR2 activity of the p.N317S mutant receptor after the AVP and DDAVP administration, as assessed by cAMP production was reduced and impaired when compared to cells that expressed the wild type AVPR2 gene. In conclusion, the affected members of this family have X-linked NDI with partial resistance to AVP, due to a missense mutation in the AVPR2 gene.

  5. Cellular interference in craniofrontonasal syndrome: males mosaic for mutations in the X-linked EFNB1 gene are more severely affected than true hemizygotes

    PubMed Central

    Twigg, Stephen R.F.; Babbs, Christian; van den Elzen, Marijke E.P.; Goriely, Anne; Taylor, Stephen; McGowan, Simon J.; Giannoulatou, Eleni; Lonie, Lorne; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Akha, Elham Sadighi; Knight, Samantha J.L.; Zechi-Ceide, Roseli M.; Hoogeboom, Jeannette A.M.; Pober, Barbara R.; Toriello, Helga V.; Wall, Steven A.; Rita Passos-Bueno, M.; Brunner, Han G.; Mathijssen, Irene M.J.; Wilkie, Andrew O.M.

    2013-01-01

    Craniofrontonasal syndrome (CFNS), an X-linked disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations of EFNB1, exhibits a paradoxical sex reversal in phenotypic severity: females characteristically have frontonasal dysplasia, craniosynostosis and additional minor malformations, but males are usually more mildly affected with hypertelorism as the only feature. X-inactivation is proposed to explain the more severe outcome in heterozygous females, as this leads to functional mosaicism for cells with differing expression of EPHRIN-B1, generating abnormal tissue boundaries—a process that cannot occur in hemizygous males. Apparently challenging this model, males occasionally present with a more severe female-like CFNS phenotype. We hypothesized that such individuals might be mosaic for EFNB1 mutations and investigated this possibility in multiple tissue samples from six sporadically presenting males. Using denaturing high performance liquid chromatography, massively parallel sequencing and multiplex-ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) to increase sensitivity above standard dideoxy sequencing, we identified mosaic mutations of EFNB1 in all cases, comprising three missense changes, two gene deletions and a novel point mutation within the 5′ untranslated region (UTR). Quantification by Pyrosequencing and MLPA demonstrated levels of mutant cells between 15 and 69%. The 5′ UTR variant mutates the stop codon of a small upstream open reading frame that, using a dual-luciferase reporter construct, was demonstrated to exacerbate interference with translation of the wild-type protein. These results demonstrate a more severe outcome in mosaic than in constitutionally deficient males in an X-linked dominant disorder and provide further support for the cellular interference mechanism, normally related to X-inactivation in females. PMID:23335590

  6. Linkage analysis of X-linked cone-rod dystrophy: localization to Xp11.4 and definition of a locus distinct from RP2 and RP3.

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, A B; Dash-Modi, A; O'Connell, J R; Shaffer-Gordon, M; Mah, T S; Stefko, S T; Nagaraja, R; Brown, J; Kimura, A E; Ferrell, R E; Gorin, M B

    1998-01-01

    Progressive X-linked cone-rod dystrophy (COD1) is a retinal disease affecting primarily the cone photoreceptors. The COD1 locus originally was localized, by the study of three independent families, to a region between Xp11.3 and Xp21.1, encompassing the retinitis pigmentosa (RP) 3 locus. We have refined the COD1 locus to a limited region of Xp11.4, using two families reported elsewhere and a new extended family. Genotype analysis was performed by use of eight microsatellite markers (tel-M6CA, DXS1068, DXS1058, DXS993, DXS228, DXS1201, DXS1003, and DXS1055-cent), spanning a distance of 20 cM. Nine-point linkage analysis, by use of the VITESSE program for X-linked disorders, established a maximum LOD score (17.5) between markers DXS1058 and DXS993, spanning 4.0 cM. Two additional markers, DXS977 and DXS556, which map between DXS1058 and DXS993, were used to further narrow the critical region. The RP3 gene, RPGR, was excluded on the basis of two obligate recombinants, observed in two independent families. In a third family, linkage analysis did not exclude the RPGR locus. The entire coding region of the RPGR gene from two affected males from family 2 was sequenced and was found to be normal. Haplotype analysis of two family branches, containing three obligate recombinants, two affected and one unaffected, defined the COD1 locus as distal to DXS993 and proximal to DXS556, a distance of approximately 1.0 Mb. This study excludes COD1 as an allelic variant of RP3 and establishes a novel locus that is sufficiently defined for positional cloning. PMID:9443860

  7. Hyperexpression of the X chromosome in both sexes results in extensive female bias of X-linked genes in the flour beetle.

    PubMed

    Prince, Eldon G; Kirkland, Donna; Demuth, Jeffery P

    2010-07-12

    A genome's ability to produce two separate sexually dimorphic phenotypes is an intriguing biological mystery. Microarray-based studies of a handful of model systems suggest that much of the mystery can be explained by sex-biased gene expression evolved in response to sexually antagonistic selection. We present the first whole-genome study of sex-biased expression in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum. Tribolium is a model for the largest eukaryotic order, Coleoptera, and we show that in whole-body adults, approximately 20% of the transcriptome is differentially regulated between the sexes. Among T. castaneum, Drosophila melanogaster, and Anopheles gambiae, we identify 416 1:1:1 orthologs with conserved sex-biased expression. Overrepresented functional categories among sex-biased genes are primarily those involved in gamete production and development. The genomic distribution of sex-biased genes in T. castaneum is distinctly nonrandom, with the strongest deficit of male-biased genes on the X chromosome (9 of 793) of any species studied to date. Tribolium also shows a significant enrichment of X-linked female-biased genes (408 of 793). Our analyses suggest that the extensive female bias of Tribolium X chromosome gene expression is due to hyperexpression of X-linked genes in both males and females. We propose that the overexpression of X chromosomes in females is an evolutionary side effect of the need to dosage compensate in males and that mechanisms to reduce female X chromosome gene expression to autosomal levels are sufficient but imperfect.

  8. Accounting for eXentricities: analysis of the X chromosome in GWAS reveals X-linked genes implicated in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Chang, Diana; Gao, Feng; Slavney, Andrea; Ma, Li; Waldman, Yedael Y; Sams, Aaron J; Billing-Ross, Paul; Madar, Aviv; Spritz, Richard; Keinan, Alon

    2014-01-01

    Many complex human diseases are highly sexually dimorphic, suggesting a potential contribution of the X chromosome to disease risk. However, the X chromosome has been neglected or incorrectly analyzed in most genome-wide association studies (GWAS). We present tailored analytical methods and software that facilitate X-wide association studies (XWAS), which we further applied to reanalyze data from 16 GWAS of different autoimmune and related diseases (AID). We associated several X-linked genes with disease risk, among which (1) ARHGEF6 is associated with Crohn's disease and replicated in a study of ulcerative colitis, another inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Indeed, ARHGEF6 interacts with a gastric bacterium that has been implicated in IBD. (2) CENPI is associated with three different AID, which is compelling in light of known associations with AID of autosomal genes encoding centromere proteins, as well as established autosomal evidence of pleiotropy between autoimmune diseases. (3) We replicated a previous association of FOXP3, a transcription factor that regulates T-cell development and function, with vitiligo; and (4) we discovered that C1GALT1C1 exhibits sex-specific effect on disease risk in both IBDs. These and other X-linked genes that we associated with AID tend to be highly expressed in tissues related to immune response, participate in major immune pathways, and display differential gene expression between males and females. Combined, the results demonstrate the importance of the X chromosome in autoimmunity, reveal the potential of extensive XWAS, even based on existing data, and provide the tools and incentive to properly include the X chromosome in future studies.

  9. Whole Genome Sequencing Reveals Novel Non-Synonymous Mutation in Ectodysplasin A (EDA) Associated with Non-Syndromic X-Linked Dominant Congenital Tooth Agenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Tanmoy; Bansal, Rajesh; Das, Parimal

    2014-01-01

    Congenital tooth agenesis in human is characterized by failure of tooth development during tooth organogenesis. 300 genes in mouse and 30 genes in human so far have been known to regulate tooth development. However, candidature of only 5 genes viz. PAX9, MSX1, AXIN2, WNT10A and EDA have been experimentally established for congenitally missing teeth like hypodontia and oligodontia. In this study an Indian family with multiple congenital tooth agenesis was identified. Pattern of inheritance was apparently autosomal dominant type with a rare possibility to be X-linked. Whole genome sequencing of two affected individuals was carried out which revealed 119 novel non-synonymous single nucleotide variations (SNVs) distributed among 117 genes. Out of these only one variation (c.956G>T) located at exon 9 of X-linked EDA gene was considered as pathogenic and validated among all the affected and unaffected family members and unrelated controls. This variation leads to p.Ser319Ile change in the TNF homology domain of EDA (transcript variant 1) protein. In silico analysis predicts that this Ser319 is well conserved across different vertebrate species and a part of putative receptor binding site. Structure based homology modeling predicts that this amino acid residue along with four other amino acid residues nearby, those when mutated known to cause selective tooth agenesis, form a cluster that may have functional significance. Taken together these results suggest that c.956G>T (p.Ser319Ile) mutation plausibly reduces the receptor binding activity of EDA leading to distinct tooth agenesis in this family. PMID:25203534

  10. CANINE: a robotic mine dog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stancil, Brian A.; Hyams, Jeffrey; Shelley, Jordan; Babu, Kartik; Badino, Hernán.; Bansal, Aayush; Huber, Daniel; Batavia, Parag

    2013-01-01

    Neya Systems, LLC competed in the CANINE program sponsored by the U.S. Army Tank Automotive Research Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC) which culminated in a competition held at Fort Benning as part of the 2012 Robotics Rodeo. As part of this program, we developed a robot with the capability to learn and recognize the appearance of target objects, conduct an area search amid distractor objects and obstacles, and relocate the target object in the same way that Mine dogs and Sentry dogs are used within military contexts for exploration and threat detection. Neya teamed with the Robotics Institute at Carnegie Mellon University to develop vision-based solutions for probabilistic target learning and recognition. In addition, we used a Mission Planning and Management System (MPMS) to orchestrate complex search and retrieval tasks using a general set of modular autonomous services relating to robot mobility, perception and grasping.

  11. Environmental contamination by canine geohelminths.

    PubMed

    Traversa, Donato; Frangipane di Regalbono, Antonio; Di Cesare, Angela; La Torre, Francesco; Drake, Jason; Pietrobelli, Mario

    2014-02-13

    Intestinal nematodes affecting dogs, i.e. roundworms, hookworms and whipworms, have a relevant health-risk impact for animals and, for most of them, for human beings. Both dogs and humans are typically infected by ingesting infective stages, (i.e. larvated eggs or larvae) present in the environment. The existence of a high rate of soil and grass contamination with infective parasitic elements has been demonstrated worldwide in leisure, recreational, public and urban areas, i.e. parks, green areas, bicycle paths, city squares, playgrounds, sandpits, beaches. This review discusses the epidemiological and sanitary importance of faecal pollution with canine intestinal parasites in urban environments and the integrated approaches useful to minimize the risk of infection in different settings.

  12. Age estimation from canine volumes.

    PubMed

    De Angelis, Danilo; Gaudio, Daniel; Guercini, Nicola; Cipriani, Filippo; Gibelli, Daniele; Caputi, Sergio; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2015-08-01

    Techniques for estimation of biological age are constantly evolving and are finding daily application in the forensic radiology field in cases concerning the estimation of the chronological age of a corpse in order to reconstruct the biological profile, or of a living subject, for example in cases of immigration of people without identity papers from a civil registry. The deposition of teeth secondary dentine and consequent decrease of pulp chamber in size are well known as aging phenomena, and they have been applied to the forensic context by the development of age estimation procedures, such as Kvaal-Solheim and Cameriere methods. The present study takes into consideration canines pulp chamber volume related to the entire teeth volume, with the aim of proposing new regression formulae for age estimation using 91 cone beam computerized scans and a freeware open-source software, in order to permit affordable reproducibility of volumes calculation.

  13. Canine viral enteritis. Recent developments.

    PubMed

    Pollock, R V; Carmichael, L

    1979-05-01

    Two apparently novel viral gastroenteritides of dogs were recognized in 1978: one caused by a parvo-like virus (CPV) and one by a corona-like virus (CCV). A rotavirus has also been tentatively associated with neonatal pup enteritis. Canine viral enteritis is characterized by a sudden onset of vomiting and diarrhea, rapid spread and high morbidity. Treatment is only supportive but must be initiated promptly. Infected animals should be isolated immediately; the extremely contagious nature of these diseases makes them difficult to contain. Feces from infected dogs appear to be the primary means of transmission. Sodium hypochlorite solutions (eg, Clorox) are recommended for disinfection. The development of effective vaccines is an immediate and pressing problem.

  14. Biomarkers in canine parvovirus enteritis.

    PubMed

    Schoeman, J P; Goddard, A; Leisewitz, A L

    2013-07-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) enteritis has, since its emergence in 1978, remained a common and important cause of morbidity and mortality in young dogs. The continued incidence of parvoviral enteritis is partly due to the virus' capability to evolve into more virulent and resistant variants with significant local gastrointestinal and systemic inflammatory sequelae. This paper reviews current knowledge on historical-, signalment-, and clinical factors as well as several haematological-, biochemical- and endocrine parameters that can be used as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers in CPV enteritis. These factors include season of presentation, purebred nature, bodyweight, vomiting, leukopaenia, lymphopaenia, thrombocytopaenia, hypercoagulability, hypercortisolaemia, hypothyroxinaemia, hypoalbuminaemia, elevated C-reactive protein and tumour necrosis factor, hypocholesterolaemia and hypocitrullinaemia. Factors contributing to the manifestations of CPV infection are multiple with elements of host, pathogen, secondary infections, underlying stressors and environment affecting severity and outcome. The availability of several prognosticators has made identification of patients at high risk of death and their subsequent targeted management more rewarding.

  15. Environmental contamination by canine geohelminths

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal nematodes affecting dogs, i.e. roundworms, hookworms and whipworms, have a relevant health-risk impact for animals and, for most of them, for human beings. Both dogs and humans are typically infected by ingesting infective stages, (i.e. larvated eggs or larvae) present in the environment. The existence of a high rate of soil and grass contamination with infective parasitic elements has been demonstrated worldwide in leisure, recreational, public and urban areas, i.e. parks, green areas, bicycle paths, city squares, playgrounds, sandpits, beaches. This review discusses the epidemiological and sanitary importance of faecal pollution with canine intestinal parasites in urban environments and the integrated approaches useful to minimize the risk of infection in different settings. PMID:24524656

  16. Genetic and Biochemical Biomarkers in Canine Glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Graham, K L; McCowan, C; White, A

    2017-03-01

    In many health-related fields, there is great interest in the identification of biomarkers that distinguish diseased from healthy individuals. In addition to identifying the diseased state, biomarkers have potential use in predicting disease risk, monitoring disease progression, evaluating treatment efficacy, and informing pathogenesis. This review details the genetic and biochemical markers associated with canine primary glaucoma. While there are numerous molecular markers (biochemical and genetic) associated with glaucoma in dogs, there is no ideal biomarker that allows early diagnosis and/or identification of disease progression. Genetic mutations associated with canine glaucoma include those affecting ADAMTS10, ADAMTS17, Myocilin, Nebulin, COL1A2, RAB22A, and SRBD1. With the exception of Myocilin, there is very limited crossover in genetic biomarkers identified between human and canine glaucomas. Mutations associated with canine glaucoma vary between and within canine breeds, and gene discoveries therefore have limited overall effects as a screening tool in the general canine population. Biochemical markers of glaucoma include indicators of inflammation, oxidative stress, serum autoantibodies, matrix metalloproteinases, tumor necrosis factor-α, and transforming growth factor-β. These markers include those that indicate an adaptive or protective response, as well as those that reflect the damage arising from oxidative stress.

  17. Prevalence of asymmetric molar and canine relationship.

    PubMed

    Behbehani, Faraj; Roy, Rino; Al-Jame, Badreia

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence and severity of occlusal asymmetries in the molar and canine regions in a large population-based sample of adolescent Kuwaitis. Using a stratified cluster sampling method, 1299 Kuwaiti adolescents (674 boys mean age 13.3 years and 625 girls mean age 13.2 years), representing approximately 6.7 per cent of that age stratum in the population, were examined clinically for sagittal molar and canine relationships, with a view to recording half and full-step asymmetries. In this sample, 1244 subjects were examined clinically, while for the remaining 55, pre-treatment study models were assessed. All subjects were in the early permanent dentition stage. Descriptive statistical analyses were used to determine the proportion of different molar and canine asymmetries. Antero-posterior asymmetries were found to be a distinctive and common feature of the dental arches, with half-step outweighing full-step asymmetries both in the anterior and posterior regions. The total prevalence of an asymmetric molar or canine relationship was 29.7 and 41.4 per cent, respectively, with more than 95 per cent falling in the mild category. Patient gender did not influence the prevalence or magnitude of asymmetry. The results showed a clinically significant prevalence of asymmetric molar and canine relationships, which were mainly in the category of half-step asymmetry. Class II half and full-step asymmetries were more prevalent than Class III asymmetries in the molar and canine regions.

  18. Correlated response, competition, and female canine size in primates.

    PubMed

    Plavcan, J M

    1998-12-01

    Recently, comparative analyses of female canine tooth size in primates have yielded two hypotheses to explain interspecific variation in female relative canine size. Greenfield ([1992] Int. J. Primatol. 13:631-657; [1992] Yrbk. Phys. Anthropol. 35:153-184; [1996] J. Hum. Evol. 31:1-19) suggested that covariation in male and female canine size across species indicates that female canine size reflects correlated response (in which the expression of a trait in one sex causes the expression of the same trait in the other sex). Plavcan et al. ([1995] J. Hum. Evol. 28:245-276) noted that female canine size in primates is associated with variation in categorical estimates of the intensity of female-female agonistic competition, suggesting that selection favors large female canine size in many species. While it may seem that the two models are in conflict, they are not. To simultaneously evaluate these two models, this analysis examines the joint relations between male canine size, female canine size, and estimates of female-female competition in a sample of 108 primate species. Overall, female canine size is correlated with variation in male canine size. Controlling for variation in male canine size, female canine size is also correlated with estimates of the intensity of female-female agonistic competition. The relation between these variables differs strongly between anthropoid and strepsirhine primates. In anthropoids, the data suggest that selection for the development of large canines in females is not constrained by any affect of correlated response. In strepsirhines, the evidence suggests that sexual selection may affect male canine size but that correlated response affects female canine size, resulting in monomorphism for most species. These observations help reconcile the observations of Greenfield ([1992] Int. J. Primatol. 13:631-657; [1996] J. Hum. Evol. 31:1-19) and Plavcan et al. ([1995] J. Hum. Evol. 28:245-276) and provide a more precise model for

  19. Factors affecting self-eruption of displaced permanent maxillary canines.

    PubMed

    Smailienė, Dalia; Sidlauskas, Antanas; Lopatienė, Kristina; Guzevičienė, Vesta; Juodžbalys, Gintaras

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the possibility of the spontaneous eruption of displaced unerupted maxillary canines after the extraction of the deciduous canine and dental arch expansion and to determine the impact of initial canine position on treatment success rate. Materials and METHODS. The study sample included 50 patients (mean age, 13.5 years [SD, 2.2]) with unilaterally displaced unerupted maxillary canines. Deciduous canines were extracted, and the space for displaced canine was created at the beginning of the study. The follow-up period for the spontaneous eruption was 12 months. The initial vertical, horizontal, labio-palatal position and angle of inclination to the midline of the displaced canine were assessed on panoramic radiographs. RESULTS. Only 42% of displaced canines erupted spontaneously within one-year period (52.9% of labially displaced canines and 36.4% of palatally displaced canines). A significant difference of inclination was determined between spontaneously erupted and unerupted teeth in the labially displaced canine group (P<0.01), with no difference in the palatally displaced canine group. The receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that the critical angle of inclination for the spontaneous eruption of the retained canine was 20º (sensitivity 0.759; specificity 0.571; P<0.05). The majority of unerupted canines (75.9%) were inclined more than 20º. The initial height of canine was crucial for spontaneous eruption (sensitivity 0.966; specificity 0.81; P<0.001). This was true for both palatal and labial cases. CONCLUSIONS. The initial vertical position of the labially and palatally displaced canines and the inclination of the labially displaced canines were the most important predictors for spontaneous eruption of the cuspid.

  20. Role of canine circovirus in dogs with acute haemorrhagic diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Anderson, A; Hartmann, K; Leutenegger, C M; Proksch, A L; Mueller, R S; Unterer, S

    2017-02-27

    Canine circovirus (CanineCV) has been detected in some dogs with severe haemorrhagic diarrhoea, but its pathogenic role is unclear. This study evaluated a suspected association between the presence of CanineCV and acute haemorrhagic diarrhoea syndrome (AHDS) in dogs. The prevalence of CanineCV in dogs with AHDS was compared with that in healthy dogs and those infected with canine parvovirus (CPV). Additionally, time to recovery and mortality rate were compared between CanineCV-positive and CanineCV-negative dogs. Faecal samples of dogs with AHDS (n=55), healthy dogs (n=66) and dogs infected with CPV (n=54) were examined by two real-time TaqMan PCR assays targeting the replicase and capsid genes of CanineCV. CanineCV was detected in faecal samples of two dogs with AHDS, three healthy controls and seven dogs infected with CPV. Among the three groups, there was no significant difference in prevalence of CanineCV. CPV-infected animals that were coinfected with CanineCV had a significantly higher mortality rate compared with those negative for CanineCV. CanineCV does not appear to be the primary causative agent of AHDS in dogs, but might play a role as a negative co-factor in disease outcome in dogs with CPV infection.

  1. Long-Term Follow-up of Foamy Viral Vector-Mediated Gene Therapy for Canine Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Thomas R; Tuschong, Laura M; Calvo, Katherine R; Shive, Heather R; Burkholder, Tanya H; Karlsson, Eleanor K; West, Robert R; Russell, David W; Hickstein, Dennis D

    2013-01-01

    The development of leukemia following gammaretroviral vector-mediated gene therapy for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency disease and chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) has emphasized the need for long-term follow-up in animals treated with hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy. In this study, we report the long-term follow-up (4–7 years) of four dogs with canine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (CLAD) treated with foamy viral (FV) vector-mediated gene therapy. All four CLAD dogs previously received nonmyeloablative conditioning with 200 cGy total body irradiation followed by infusion of autologous, CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells transduced by a FV vector expressing canine CD18 from an internal Murine Stem Cell Virus (MSCV) promoter. CD18+ leukocyte levels were >2% following infusion of vector-transduced cells leading to ongoing reversal of the CLAD phenotype for >4 years. There was no clinical development of lymphoid or myeloid leukemia in any of the four dogs and integration site analysis did not reveal insertional oncogenesis. These results showing disease correction/amelioration of disease in CLAD without significant adverse events provide support for the use of a FV vector to treat children with leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1 (LAD-1) in a human gene therapy clinical trial. PMID:23531552

  2. Serological detection of infection with canine distemper virus, canine parvovirus and canine adenovirus in communal dogs from Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    McRee, Anna; Wilkes, Rebecca P; Dawson, Jessica; Parry, Roger; Foggin, Chris; Adams, Hayley; Odoi, Agricola; Kennedy, Melissa A

    2014-09-05

    Domestic dogs are common amongst communities in sub-Saharan Africa and may serve as important reservoirs for infectious agents that may cause diseases in wildlife. Two agents of concern are canine parvovirus (CPV) and canine distemper virus (CDV), which may infect and cause disease in large carnivore species such as African wild dogs and African lions, respectively. The impact of domestic dogs and their diseases on wildlife conservation is increasing in Zimbabwe, necessitating thorough assessment and implementation of control measures. In this study, domestic dogs in north-western Zimbabwe were evaluated for antibodies to CDV, CPV, and canine adenovirus (CAV). These dogs were communal and had no vaccination history. Two hundred and twenty-five blood samples were collected and tested using a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for antibodies to CPV, CDV, and CAV. Of these dogs, 75 (34%) had detectable antibodies to CDV, whilst 191 (84%) had antibodies to CPV. Antibodies to canine adenovirus were present in 28 (13%) dogs. Canine parvovirus had high prevalence in all six geographic areas tested. These results indicate that CPV is circulating widely amongst domestic dogs in the region. In addition, CDV is present at high levels. Both pathogens can infect wildlife species. Efforts for conservation of large carnivores in Zimbabwe must address the role of domestic dogs in disease transmission.

  3. Canine distemper virus infection: proliferation of canine footpad keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Gröne, A; Engelhardt, P; Zurbriggen, A

    2003-09-01

    The proliferation of footpad keratinocytes of canine distemper virus (CDV)-infected dogs was investigated. Footpads of 19 dogs inoculated experimentally with a virulent distemper strain (A75/17) and of two noninoculated control dogs were collected at necropsy. Dogs were divided into four groups according to results of the postmortem examination: dogs with severe distemper (group 1), dogs with mild distemper (group 2), inoculated dogs without distemper (group 3) and noninoculated dogs (group 4). There was no distinct difference of epidermal thickness among the four groups. Infection of the footpad epidermis with CDV was demonstrated using immunohistochemistry for viral nucleoprotein and in situ hybridization for nucleoprotein messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA). Only group 1 dogs had viral antigen and mRNA in the footpad epidermis with the same distribution. Footpad epidermis of group 1 dogs had more mitotic figures in the basal layer, and significantly more basal keratinocytes were positive for the proliferation markers Ki-67 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen. Double-staining for Ki-67 and viral nucleoprotein identified rare double-labeled basal keratinocytes. These findings suggest that the presence of CDV particles in the footpad epidermis is associated with keratinocyte proliferation.

  4. 9 CFR 113.316 - Canine Parainfluenza Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Canine Parainfluenza Vaccine. 113.316... Virus Vaccines § 113.316 Canine Parainfluenza Vaccine. Canine Parainfluenza Vaccine shall be prepared... immunogenic shall be used for preparing seeds for vaccine production. All serials of vaccine shall be...

  5. 9 CFR 113.316 - Canine Parainfluenza Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Canine Parainfluenza Vaccine. 113.316... Virus Vaccines § 113.316 Canine Parainfluenza Vaccine. Canine Parainfluenza Vaccine shall be prepared... immunogenic shall be used for preparing seeds for vaccine production. All serials of vaccine shall be...

  6. 9 CFR 113.316 - Canine Parainfluenza Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Canine Parainfluenza Vaccine. 113.316... Virus Vaccines § 113.316 Canine Parainfluenza Vaccine. Canine Parainfluenza Vaccine shall be prepared... immunogenic shall be used for preparing seeds for vaccine production. All serials of vaccine shall be...

  7. 9 CFR 113.201 - Canine Distemper Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Canine Distemper Vaccine, Killed Virus... REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.201 Canine Distemper Vaccine, Killed Virus. Canine Distemper Vaccine... been established as pure, safe, and immunogenic shall be used for vaccine production. All serials...

  8. 9 CFR 113.306 - Canine Distemper Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Canine Distemper Vaccine. 113.306... Virus Vaccines § 113.306 Canine Distemper Vaccine. Canine Distemper Vaccine shall be prepared from virus... as pure, safe, and immunogenic shall be used for preparing the production seed virus for...

  9. 9 CFR 113.306 - Canine Distemper Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Canine Distemper Vaccine. 113.306... Virus Vaccines § 113.306 Canine Distemper Vaccine. Canine Distemper Vaccine shall be prepared from virus... as pure, safe, and immunogenic shall be used for preparing the production seed virus for...

  10. 9 CFR 113.306 - Canine Distemper Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Canine Distemper Vaccine. 113.306... Virus Vaccines § 113.306 Canine Distemper Vaccine. Canine Distemper Vaccine shall be prepared from virus... as pure, safe, and immunogenic shall be used for preparing the production seed virus for...

  11. 9 CFR 113.201 - Canine Distemper Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Canine Distemper Vaccine, Killed Virus... REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.201 Canine Distemper Vaccine, Killed Virus. Canine Distemper Vaccine... been established as pure, safe, and immunogenic shall be used for vaccine production. All serials...

  12. 9 CFR 113.316 - Canine Parainfluenza Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Canine Parainfluenza Vaccine. 113.316... Virus Vaccines § 113.316 Canine Parainfluenza Vaccine. Canine Parainfluenza Vaccine shall be prepared... immunogenic shall be used for preparing seeds for vaccine production. All serials of vaccine shall be...

  13. 9 CFR 113.306 - Canine Distemper Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Canine Distemper Vaccine. 113.306... Virus Vaccines § 113.306 Canine Distemper Vaccine. Canine Distemper Vaccine shall be prepared from virus... as pure, safe, and immunogenic shall be used for preparing the production seed virus for...

  14. 9 CFR 113.201 - Canine Distemper Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Canine Distemper Vaccine, Killed Virus... REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.201 Canine Distemper Vaccine, Killed Virus. Canine Distemper Vaccine... been established as pure, safe, and immunogenic shall be used for vaccine production. All serials...

  15. 9 CFR 113.201 - Canine Distemper Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Canine Distemper Vaccine, Killed Virus... REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.201 Canine Distemper Vaccine, Killed Virus. Canine Distemper Vaccine... been established as pure, safe, and immunogenic shall be used for vaccine production. All serials...

  16. 9 CFR 113.201 - Canine Distemper Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Canine Distemper Vaccine, Killed Virus... REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.201 Canine Distemper Vaccine, Killed Virus. Canine Distemper Vaccine... been established as pure, safe, and immunogenic shall be used for vaccine production. All serials...

  17. 9 CFR 113.306 - Canine Distemper Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Canine Distemper Vaccine. 113.306... Virus Vaccines § 113.306 Canine Distemper Vaccine. Canine Distemper Vaccine shall be prepared from virus... as pure, safe, and immunogenic shall be used for preparing the production seed virus for...

  18. 9 CFR 113.316 - Canine Parainfluenza Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Canine Parainfluenza Vaccine. 113.316... Virus Vaccines § 113.316 Canine Parainfluenza Vaccine. Canine Parainfluenza Vaccine shall be prepared... immunogenic shall be used for preparing seeds for vaccine production. All serials of vaccine shall be...

  19. Antibody titers for canine parvovirus type-2, canine distemper virus, and canine adenovirus type-1 in adult household dogs.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Masayuki; Namikawa, Kazuhiko; Maruo, Takuya; Orito, Kensuke; Lynch, Jonathan; Sahara, Hiroeki

    2011-09-01

    Serum antibody titers for canine parvovirus type-2 (CPV-2), canine distemper virus (CDV) and canine adenovirus type-1 (CAV-1) were investigated in 1031 healthy adult household dogs (2 to 18 years old) given an annual inoculation in the previous 11 to 13 months. The number of dogs retaining significant titers of antibodies against CPV-2, CDV, and CAV-1 were 888 (86%), 744 (72%), and 732 (71%), respectively. There were no differences between males and females in antibody titers against the 3 viruses. Antibody titer for CPV-2 was significantly higher in younger dogs than in older dogs, CDV antibody was significantly higher in older dogs than in younger dogs, and CAV titer was not associated with age.

  20. Antibody titers for canine parvovirus type-2, canine distemper virus, and canine adenovirus type-1 in adult household dogs

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Masayuki; Namikawa, Kazuhiko; Maruo, Takuya; Orito, Kensuke; Lynch, Jonathan; Sahara, Hiroeki

    2011-01-01

    Serum antibody titers for canine parvovirus type-2 (CPV-2), canine distemper virus (CDV) and canine adenovirus type-1 (CAV-1) were investigated in 1031 healthy adult household dogs (2 to 18 years old) given an annual inoculation in the previous 11 to 13 months. The number of dogs retaining significant titers of antibodies against CPV-2, CDV, and CAV-1 were 888 (86%), 744 (72%), and 732 (71%), respectively. There were no differences between males and females in antibody titers against the 3 viruses. Antibody titer for CPV-2 was significantly higher in younger dogs than in older dogs, CDV antibody was significantly higher in older dogs than in younger dogs, and CAV titer was not associated with age. PMID:22379198