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Sample records for beagle-based canine x-linked

  1. Comparative mapping of canine and human proximal Xq and genetic analysis of canine X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Deschenes, S.M.; Puck, J.M.; Dutra, A.S.

    1994-09-01

    Parallel genetic analysis of animal and human genetic diseases can facilitate the identification and characterization of the causative gene defects. For example, canine X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is characterized by clinical, pathological, and immunological manifestations similar to the most common form of human SCID. To derive a canine syntenic map including genes that in humans are located in proximal Xq, near human X-linked SCID, poly (TG) polymorphisms were identified at the canine phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) and choroideremia (CHM) loci. These plus a polymorphic poly (CAG) sequence in exon 1 of the canine androgen receptor gene (AR) were used to genotype members of the colony informative for X-linked SCID. No recombinations among SCIDX1, AR, PGK, or CHM were observed. Fluorescence in situ hybridization localized PGK and CHM to proximal Xq in the dog, in the same chromosomal location occupied by the human genes. Somatic cell hybrid analysis and methylation differences at AR demonstrated that female dogs carrying X-linked SCID have the same lymphocyte-limited skewed X-chromosome inactivation patterns as human carriers. These genetic and phenotypic findings provide evidence that mutations in the same gene, now identified as the {gamma} chain of the IL-2 receptor, cause canine and human X-linked SCID. This approach is an efficient method for comparative gene mapping and disease identification. 35 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  2. XLPRA: A canine retinal degeneration inherited as an X-linked trait

    SciTech Connect

    Acland, G.M.; Blanton, S.H.; Hershfield, B.; Aguirre, G.D.

    1994-08-01

    Breeding studies are reported of a previously undescribed hereditary retinal degeneration identified in the Siberian Husky breed of dog. This disorder clinically resembles the previously reported autosomal recessive canine hereditary retinal degenerations collectively termed progressive retinal atrophy (PRA). However, the pedigree of the propositus, a male Siberian Husky, exhibited an X-linked pattern of transmission. This dog was outcrossed to three phenotypically normal female laboratory Beagles and two of their F1 daughters were bred to a phenotypically normal male Beagle, producing affected males in the F2 generation. Subsequent inbreedings produced further affected males and affected females as well. X-linked transmission was established by exclusion of alternative modes of inheritance and, consequently, the disease has been termed X-linked progressive retinal atrophy (XLPRA). This is the first reported X-linked retinal degeneration in an animal. Because of the many similarities of PRA in dogs to retinitis pigmentosa (RP) in humans, this new disease may not only represent the first animal model of X-linked RP (XLRP) but may well be a true homolog of one of the XLRP loci (RP2, RP3, RP6). It is the first retinal degeneration in dogs that can be assigned to an identified canine chromosome, and the first for which linkage mapping offers a realistic approach to proceed by positional cloning towards identifying the responsible gene. 58 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  3. Gait Characteristics in a Canine Model of X-linked Myotubular Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Goddard, Melissa A.; Burlingame, Emily; Beggs, Alan H.; Buj-Bello, Anna; Childers, Martin K.; Marsh, Anthony P.; Kelly, Valerie E.

    2014-01-01

    X-linked myotubular myopathy (XLMTM) is a fatal pediatric disease where affected boys display profound weakness of the skeletal muscles. Possible therapies are under development but robust outcome measures in animal models are required for effective translation to human patients. We established a naturally-occuring canine model, where XLMTM dogs display clinical symptoms similar to those observed in humans. The aim of this study was to determine potential endpoints for the assessment of future treatments in this model. Video-based gait analysis was selected, as it is a well-established method of assessing limb function in neuromuscular disease and measures have been correlated to patient quality of life. XLMTM dogs (N=3) and their true littermate wild type controls (N=3) were assessed at 4–5 time points, beginning at 10 weeks and continuing through 17 weeks. Motion capture and an instrumented carpet were used separately to evaluate spatiotemporal and kinematic changes over time. XLMTM dogs walk more slowly and with shorter stride lengths than wild type dogs, and these differences became greater over time. However, there was no clear difference in angular measures between affected and unaffected dogs. These data demonstrate that spatiotemporal parameters capture functional changes in gait in an XLMTM canine model and support their utility in future therapeutic trials. PMID:25281397

  4. Mutation identification in a canine model of X-linked ectodermal dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Casal, Margret L.; Scheidt, Jennifer L.; Rhodes, James L.; Henthorn, Paula S.; Werner, Petra

    2012-01-01

    X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (XHED), an inherited disease recognized in humans, mice, and cattle, is characterized by hypotrichosis, a reduced number or absence of sweat glands, and missing or malformed teeth. In a subset of affected individuals and animals, mutations in the EDA gene (formerly EDI), coding for ectodysplasin, have been found to cause this phenotype. Ectodysplasin is a homotrimeric transmembrane protein with an extracellular TNF-like domain, which has been shown to be involved in the morphogenesis of hair follicles and tooth buds during fetal development. Some human XHED patients also have concurrent immunodeficiency, due to mutations in the NF-κB essential modulator protein (IKBKG; formerly NEMO), which is also encoded on the X chromosome. In a breeding colony of dogs with XHED, immune system defects had been suspected because of frequent pulmonary infections and unexpected deaths resulting from pneumonia. To determine if defects in EDA or IKBKG cause XHED in the dogs, linkage analysis and sequencing experiments were performed. A polymorphic marker near the canine EDA gene showed significant linkage to XHED. The canine EDA gene was sequenced and a nucleotide substitution (G to A) in the splice acceptor site of intron 8 was detected in affected dogs. In the presence of the A residue, a cryptic acceptor site within exon 9 is used, leading to a frame shift and use of a premature stop codon that truncates the translation of both isoforms, EDA-A1 and EDA-A2, resulting in the absence of the TNF-like homology domain, the receptor-binding site of ectodysplasin. PMID:16151697

  5. Gene Therapy Studies in a Canine Model of X-Linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    De Ravin, Suk See; Malech, Harry L.; Sorrentino, Brian P.; Burtner, Christopher; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Since the occurrence of T cell leukemias in the original human γ-retroviral gene therapy trials for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (XSCID), considerable effort has been devoted to developing safer vectors. This review summarizes gene therapy studies performed in a canine model of XSCID to evaluate the efficacy of γ-retroviral, lentiviral, and foamy viral vectors for treating XSCID and a novel method of vector delivery. These studies demonstrate that durable T cell reconstitution and thymopoiesis with no evidence of any serious adverse events and, in contrast to the human XSCID patients, sustained marking in myeloid cells and B cells with reconstitution of normal humoral immune function can be achieved for up to 5 years without any pretreatment conditioning. The presence of sustained levels of gene-marked T cells, B cells, and more importantly myeloid cells for almost 5 years is highly suggestive of transduction of either multipotent hematopoietic stem cells or very primitive committed progenitors. PMID:25603151

  6. Multi-exon Skipping Using Cocktail Antisense Oligonucleotides in the Canine X-linked Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kuraoka, Mutsuki; Lee, Joshua J.A.; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Yokota, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is one of the most common lethal genetic diseases worldwide, caused by mutations in the dystrophin (DMD) gene. Exon skipping employs short DNA/RNA-like molecules called antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) that restore the reading frame and produce shorter but functional proteins. However, exon skipping therapy faces two major hurdles: limited applicability (up to only 13% of patients can be treated with a single AON drug), and uncertain function of truncated proteins. These issues were addressed with a cocktail AON approach. While approximately 70% of DMD patients can be treated by single exon skipping (all exons combined), one could potentially treat more than 90% of DMD patients if multiple exon skipping using cocktail antisense drugs can be realized. The canine X-linked muscular dystrophy (CXMD) dog model, whose phenotype is more similar to human DMD patients, was used to test the systemic efficacy and safety of multi-exon skipping of exons 6 and 8. The CXMD dog model harbors a splice site mutation in intron 6, leading to a lack of exon 7 in dystrophin mRNA. To restore the reading frame in CXMD requires multi-exon skipping of exons 6 and 8; therefore, CXMD is a good middle-sized animal model for testing the efficacy and safety of multi-exon skipping. In the current study, a cocktail of antisense morpholinos targeting exon 6 and exon 8 was designed and it restored dystrophin expression in body-wide skeletal muscles. Methods for transfection/injection of cocktail oligos and evaluation of the efficacy and safety of multi-exon skipping in the CXMD dog model are presented. PMID:27285612

  7. Ultrasound assessment of the diaphragm: Preliminary study of a canine model of X-linked myotubular myopathy.

    PubMed

    Sarwal, Aarti; Cartwright, Michael S; Walker, Francis O; Mitchell, Erin; Buj-Bello, Anna; Beggs, Alan H; Childers, Martin K

    2014-10-01

    We tested the feasibility of using neuromuscular ultrasound for non-invasive real-time assessment of diaphragmatic structure and function in a canine model of X-linked myotubular myopathy (XLMTM). Ultrasound images in 3 dogs [wild-type (WT), n=1; XLMTM untreated, n=1; XLMTM post-AAV8-mediated MTM1 gene replacement, n=1] were analyzed for diaphragm thickness, change in thickness with respiration, muscle echogenicity, and diaphragm excursion amplitude during spontaneous breathing. Quantitative parameters of diaphragm structure were different among the animals. WT diaphragm was thicker and less echogenic than the XLMTM control, whereas the diaphragm measurements of the MTM1-treated XLMTM dog were comparable to those of the WT dog. This pilot study demonstrates the feasibility of using ultrasound for quantitative assessment of the diaphragm in a canine model. In the future, ultrasonography may replace invasive measures of diaphragm function in canine models and in humans for non-invasive respiratory monitoring and evaluation of neuromuscular disease. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. IL-2R{gamma} gene microdeletion demonstrates that canine X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency is a homologue of the human disease

    SciTech Connect

    Henthorn, P.S.; Fimiani, V.M.; Patterson, D.F.

    1994-09-01

    X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is characterized by profound defects in cellular and humoral immunity and, in humans, is associated with mutations in the gene for the {gamma} chain of the IL-2 receptor (IL-2R{gamma}). We have examined this gene in a colony of dogs established from a single X-linked SCID carrier female. Affected dogs have a 4-bp deletion in the first exon of the IL-2R{gamma} gene, which precludes the production of a functional protein, demonstrating that the canine disease is a true homologue of human X-linked SCID. 37 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Keratinocyte antiviral response to Poly(dA:dT) stimulation and papillomavirus infection in a canine model of X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Luff, Jennifer A; Yuan, Hang; Kennedy, Douglas; Schlegel, Richard; Felsburg, Peter; Moore, Peter F

    2014-01-01

    X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (XSCID) is caused by a genetic mutation within the common gamma chain (γc), an essential component of the cytokine receptors for interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-7, IL-9, IL-15, and IL-21. XSCID patients are most commonly treated with bone marrow transplants (BMT) to restore systemic immune function. However, BMT-XSCID humans and dogs remain at an increased risk for development of cutaneous papillomavirus (PV) infections and their associated neoplasms, most typically cutaneous papillomas. Since basal keratinocytes are the target cell for the initial PV infection, we wanted to determine if canine XSCID keratinocytes have a diminished antiviral cytokine response to poly(dA:dT) and canine papillomavirus-2 (CPV-2) upon initial infection. We performed quantitative RT-PCR for antiviral cytokines and downstream interferon stimulated genes (ISG) on poly(dA:dT) stimulated and CPV-2 infected monolayer keratinocyte cultures derived from XSCID and normal control dogs. We found that XSCID keratinocytes responded similarly to poly(dA:dT) as normal keratinocytes by upregulating antiviral cytokines and ISGs. CPV-2 infection of both XSCID and normal keratinocytes did not result in upregulation of antiviral cytokines or ISGs at 2, 4, or 6 days post infection. These data suggest that the antiviral response to initial PV infection of basal keratinocytes is similar between XSCID and normal patients, and is not the likely source for the remaining immunodeficiency in XSCID patients.

  10. Keratinocyte Antiviral Response to Poly(dA:dT) Stimulation and Papillomavirus Infection in a Canine Model of X-Linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Luff, Jennifer A.; Yuan, Hang; Kennedy, Douglas; Schlegel, Richard; Felsburg, Peter; Moore, Peter F.

    2014-01-01

    X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (XSCID) is caused by a genetic mutation within the common gamma chain (γc), an essential component of the cytokine receptors for interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-7, IL-9, IL-15, and IL-21. XSCID patients are most commonly treated with bone marrow transplants (BMT) to restore systemic immune function. However, BMT-XSCID humans and dogs remain at an increased risk for development of cutaneous papillomavirus (PV) infections and their associated neoplasms, most typically cutaneous papillomas. Since basal keratinocytes are the target cell for the initial PV infection, we wanted to determine if canine XSCID keratinocytes have a diminished antiviral cytokine response to poly(dA:dT) and canine papillomavirus-2 (CPV-2) upon initial infection. We performed quantitative RT-PCR for antiviral cytokines and downstream interferon stimulated genes (ISG) on poly(dA:dT) stimulated and CPV-2 infected monolayer keratinocyte cultures derived from XSCID and normal control dogs. We found that XSCID keratinocytes responded similarly to poly(dA:dT) as normal keratinocytes by upregulating antiviral cytokines and ISGs. CPV-2 infection of both XSCID and normal keratinocytes did not result in upregulation of antiviral cytokines or ISGs at 2, 4, or 6 days post infection. These data suggest that the antiviral response to initial PV infection of basal keratinocytes is similar between XSCID and normal patients, and is not the likely source for the remaining immunodeficiency in XSCID patients. PMID:25025687

  11. Profiles of Steroid Hormones in Canine X-Linked Muscular Dystrophy via Stable Isotope Dilution LC-MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    Martins-Júnior, Helio A.; Simas, Rosineide C.; Brolio, Marina P.; Ferreira, Christina R.; Perecin, Felipe; Nogueira, Guilherme de P.; Miglino, Maria A.; Martins, Daniele S.; Eberlin, Marcos N.; Ambrósio, Carlos E.

    2015-01-01

    Golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) provides the best animal model for characterizing the disease progress of the human disorder, Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). The purpose of this study was to determine steroid hormone concentration profiles in healthy golden retriever dogs (control group - CtGR) versus GRMD-gene carrier (CaGR) and affected female dogs (AfCR). Therefore, a sensitive and specific analytical method was developed and validated to determine the estradiol, progesterone, cortisol, and testosterone levels in the canine serum by isotope dilution liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). To more accurately understand the dynamic nature of the serum steroid profile, the fluctuating levels of these four steroid hormones over the estrous cycle were compared across the three experimental groups using a multivariate statistical analysis. The concentration profiles of estradiol, cortisol, progesterone, and testosterone revealed a characteristic pattern for each studied group at each specific estrous phase. Additionally, several important changes in the serum concentrations of cortisol and estradiol in the CaGR and AfCR groups seem to be correlated with the status and progression of the muscular dystrophy. A comprehensive and quantitative monitoring of steroid profiles throughout the estrous cycle of normal and GRMD dogs were achieved. Significant differences in these profiles were observed between GRMD and healthy animals, most notably for estradiol. These findings contribute to a better understanding of both dog reproduction and the muscular dystrophy pathology. Our data open new venues for hormonal behavior studies in dystrophinopathies and that may affect the quality of life of DMD patients. PMID:26010907

  12. Frequent respiratory tract infections in the canine model of X-linked ectodermal dysplasia are not caused by an immune deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Casal, Margret L.; Mauldin, Elizabeth A.; Ryan, Sara; Scheidt, Jennifer L.; Kennedy, Jeffrey; Moore, Peter F.; Felsburg, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    As in many human patients with X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (XHED), XHED dogs are at an increased risk for pulmonary disorders. Localized immune system defects had been suspected previously in affected dogs because of frequent infections and unexpected deaths due to opportunistic respiratory tract infections. Experiments were designed to examine systemic and localized humoral and cellular responses, development and function of T cells, and thymic morphology. All dogs used in these experiments were clinically healthy at the time of examination and their immune responses were compared to normal littermates. Serum immunoglobulin concentrations differed somewhat between normal dogs and dogs affected with XHED but they were all within normal ranges. The XHED dogs responded appropriately to vaccination with tetanus toxoid suggesting normal systemic B and plasma cell function. Thymic morphology was compared between normal and affected dogs and T cells were assessed for functionality. Numbers and phenotypes of T and B cells in blood and thymus of affected dogs were within normal limits suggesting normal development of T cells. Cytotoxic and phagocytic ability of macrophages and neutrophils was also normal in affected dogs. In contrast, the secretory IgA concentrations found in affected dogs were significantly higher than in normal dogs, while lacrimal secretions were significantly decreased. These results suggest a compensatory mechanism for secretory IgA, so that the total amount equals that in normal dogs. The results presented in this study indicate that the XHED dogs have a relatively intact immune system and suggest that the same is true for humans with the homologous form of XHED. PMID:15946744

  13. X linked mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Rejeb, Imen; Ben Jemaa, Lamia; Chaabouni, Habiba

    2009-05-01

    Mental retardation (MR) is a group of heterogeneous clinical conditions. There are more than 900 genetic disorders associated with MR and it affects around 3% of the general population. Many MR conditions described are syndromic, fragile X syndrome being the most common clinical entity among them. X linked mental retardation (XLMR) is subdivided in two categories: syndromic XLMR (MRXS) when MR is associated with clinical features and non-syndromic XLMR (MRX) when MR is isolated. The aim of this systematic review of the literature was to join together the results of several studies related to X linked mental retardation and to present various genes implicated in this disease. In this review, focus has been given on genes implicated in mental retardation, the clinical data and on phenotype-genotype correlations. An exhaustive electronic and library research of the recent literature was carried out on the Web sites "Science Direct" and "Interscience Wiley". The key words used were "mental retardation", "X chromosome", "gene", "syndromic mental retardation", "non-syndromic mental retardation". In this review a number of X linked genes, the clinical features associated with the gene abnormality, and the prevalence of the disease gene are discussed. We classified these genes by order of their first implication in MR. A table presented on the XLMR Update Web site who list the 82 known XLMR genes is available as XLMR Genes and corresponding proteins.

  14. [X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy].

    PubMed

    Aubourg, P

    2007-12-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) is a severe neurodegenerative disorder. ALD is characterized by progressive demyelination within the central and peripheral nervous system, adrenal insufficiency (Addison's disease) and accumulation of very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA) in plasma, fibroblasts and tissues. The overall incidence of ALD is 1:17,000 including hemizygotes and heterozygotes who are frequently symptomatic. There are two main ALD phenotypes: 1) a cerebral demyelinating form which affects boys between 5-12 years, but also 35% of adult males; 2) a form that mainly involves the spinal cord (adrenomyeloneuropathy, AMN) in adult males between 20-50 years and 50% of heterozygous women after the age of 40 years. AMN presents with progressive spastic paraparesis. Addison's disease may be the first symptom of ALD in boys and adult males. These patients are at risk to develop cerebral ALD or AMN for life. ALD results from mutations in the ABCD1 gene without correlation between genotype and phenotype. The diagnosis of ALD relies upon the measurement of plasma VLCFA levels that allows the identification of 100% affected males and of 80-95% heterozygous women. Because of these false-negative, it is therefore mandatory to search for a mutation in the ABCD1 gene in all women at risk to be heterozygous for ALD. The ABCD1 gene encodes a peroxisomal transmembrane protein (ALD protein) with the structure of an half ATP-binding cassette transporter. It is possible that ALD protein imports VLCFA or VLCFA-CoA into peroxisomes in which they are degraded by a peroxisomal beta-oxidation system. Elongation of VLCFAs is enhanced in fibroblasts from ALD patients and likely contributes to the load of VLCFA in tissues. The underlying mechanisms that lead to cerebral demyelination, axonal degeneration in spinal cord and adrenal insufficiency are unknown. The "toxic" role of VLCFA accumulation remains to be demonstrated. The mechanisms that lead to the inflammatory reaction in

  15. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked agammaglobulinemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Facebook Share on Twitter Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Search MENU Toggle navigation Home Page Search ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions X-linked agammaglobulinemia X-linked ...

  16. X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets.

    PubMed

    Azemi, Mehmedali; Berisha, Majlinda; Kolgeci, Selim; Ismaili-Jaha, Vlora; Hoxha, Rina; Hoxha-Kamberi, Teuta

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work was the presentation of one case with X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets. Diagnosis has been established based on the anamnesis, physical examination, anthropometric measurements, laboratory tests and radiological examination. A male patient (age 3 years) has been hospitalized due to the growth delay, bone deformity, bone pain and walking difficulties. The laboratory tests have revealed that the calcium value was in the reference range, that of phosphates was low (0.45 mmol/L), the alkaline phosphatase value was quite high (1864 IU/L), the value of parathyroid hormone and of 25- hydroxyvitamin D3 were in the reference ranges, whereas the value of 1,25- dihydroxyvitamin D3 was low. Radiographic changes were evident and typical in the distal metaphysis of radius and ulna as well as in the bones of the lower limbs. After treatment with synthetic analog of vitamin D3--calcitriol and phosphates, the above mentioned laboratory test values and the radiographic changes in bones withdrew. X- linked hypophosphatemic rickets is a rare disease inherited through X chromosome, and its treatment includes a constant use of calcitriol and phosphates with the aim of avoidance of clinical and laboratory manifestations.

  17. X-linked congenital retinoschisis.

    PubMed

    Kellner, U; Brümmer, S; Foerster, M H; Wessing, A

    1990-01-01

    The natural history and electrophysiological findings of 52 patients with X-linked congenital retinoschisis with a follow-up of up to 26 years are described. The mean visual acuity was reduced to 0.24 +/- 0.2 and remained unchanged in most patients during this time. If visual loss occurred, it usually happened in the first decennium. The complications were retinal detachments in 11% and vitreous hemorrhages in 4% of the eyes. In general, the vitreous hemorrhages resolved spontaneously. Retinal detachments were treated successfully with conventional buckling procedures. Redetachments occurred in about 40%. Prophylactic laser coagulation was of no use because it was complicated by detachment in 43% of our series. The electro-oculogram was usually normal. In addition to the known electrorentinographic findings of normal a-wave and reduced b-wave amplitudes, we found prolonged b-wave latencies and implicit times, as well as a reduced 30 Hz flicker response.

  18. X-linked mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Lisik, Małgorzata Zofia; Sieron, Aleksander L

    2008-11-01

    Mental retardation is a serious medical and social problem. The prevalence of mental retardation in Western countries is estimated to be between 2 and 3%. Establishing the cause of mental retardation is essential for prognosis, management, and genetic counseling. It is estimated that 25-35% of mental retardation might have a genetic background. Of these genetic causes, 25-30% are probably due to mutations on the X chromosome (X-linked mental retardation, XLMR). XLMR is a heterogeneous set of conditions involved in a large proportion of inherited mental retardation. More than 200 XLMR conditions have been reported and 76 genes has been linked to them. XLMR conditions are commonly subdivided into syndromic and nonsyndromic forms on the basis of clinical presentation. The distinction between these forms of XLMR is gradually becoming less clear as phenotypes are described for several of the genes. The spectrum of phenotypic variability in XLMR is so large that mutations in several XLMR genes have been found in both syndromic and nonsyndromic (XLMR) pedigrees. About 42% of patients from families with an XLMR history might have mutations in one of the known genes implicated in XLMR. However, in genetic counseling we have to use empiric recurrence risk.

  19. [X-linked mental retardation].

    PubMed

    Billuart, Pierre; Chelly, Jamel; Gilgenkrantz, Simone

    2005-11-01

    X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) affects 1.8 per thousand male births and is usually categorized as "syndromic" (MRXS) or "non-specific" (MRX) forms according to the presence or absence of specific signs in addition to the MR. Up to 60 genes have been implicated in XLMR and certain mutations can alternatively lead to MRXS or MRX. Indeed the extreme phenotypic and allelic heterogeneity of XLMR makes the classification of most genes difficult. Therefore, following identification of new genes, accurate retrospective clinical evaluation of patients and their families is necessary to aid the molecular diagnosis and the classification of this heterogeneous group of disorders. Analyses of the protein products corresponding to XLMR genes show a great diversity of cellular pathways involved in MR. Common mechanisms are beginning to emerge : a first group of proteins belongs to the Rho and Rab GTPase signaling pathways involved in neuronal differentiation and synaptic plasticity and a second group is related to the regulation of gene expression. In this review, we illustrate the complexity of XLMR conditions and present recent data about the FMR1, ARX and Oligophrenin 1 genes.

  20. Endocardial fibroelastosis: possible X linked inheritance.

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, S; Child, A; Dyson, M

    1987-01-01

    We report a pedigree in which six males died of cardiac failure within the first eight months of life. These males were related through healthy females, as with X linked recessive inheritance. There was no consanguinity. None of the affected boys had an anatomical cardiac abnormality. In two affected brothers, histological evidence for endomyocardial fibroelastosis was documented, and in one of these electron microscopy demonstrated abnormalities of the mitochondria as found in mitochondrial cytopathy. A review of published reports revealed five similar X linked pedigrees, and in two of these mitochondrial abnormalities were found. We suggest that these families may show an X linked recessive cardiomyopathy with mitochondrial abnormalities. Images PMID:3585935

  1. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked thrombocytopenia

    MedlinePlus

    ... able to respond to foreign invaders and immune problems such as infections, eczema, and autoimmune disorders can occur. Learn more about the gene associated with X-linked thrombocytopenia WAS Related Information What is a gene? What is a ...

  2. Mapping the x-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Skare, J.C.; Milunsky, A.; Byron, K.S.; Sullivan, J.L.

    1987-04-01

    The X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome is triggered by Epstein-Barr virus infection and results in fatal mononucleosis, immunodeficiency, and lymphoproliferative disorders. This study shows that the mutation responsible for X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome is genetically linked to a restriction fragment length polymorphism detected with the DXS42 probe (from Xq24-q27). The most likely recombination frequency between the loci is 4%, and the associated logarithm of the odds is 5.26. Haplotype analysis using flanking restriction fragment length polymorphism markers indicates that the locus for X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome is distal to probe DXS42 but proximal to probe DXS99 (from Xq26-q27). It is now possible to predict which members of a family with X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome are carrier females and to diagnose the syndrome prenatally.

  3. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... the expand/collapse boxes. Description X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy is a form of heart disease. Dilated cardiomyopathy ...

  4. A Simulation of X-Linked Inheritance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrell, Pamela Esprivalo

    1997-01-01

    Describes how to lead students through a classroom-based simulation to teach a variety of concepts such as X-linked traits, sex determination, and sex anomalies. The simulation utilizes inexpensive materials such as plastic eggs that twist apart to represent human eggs and sperm. (AIM)

  5. A Simulation of X-Linked Inheritance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrell, Pamela Esprivalo

    1997-01-01

    Describes how to lead students through a classroom-based simulation to teach a variety of concepts such as X-linked traits, sex determination, and sex anomalies. The simulation utilizes inexpensive materials such as plastic eggs that twist apart to represent human eggs and sperm. (AIM)

  6. X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Conley, M E

    1991-11-01

    Between a third and half of all males with SCID and no family history of immunodeficiency represent the first manifestation in their family of a new mutation of the gene that causes X-linked SCID. These patients, like boys with a positive family history of X-linked SCID, have markedly reduced numbers of T cells, elevated numbers of B cells, and hypogammaglobulinemia. The hypogammaglobulinemia is due, at least in part, to the expression of the gene defect in B cells as well as in T cells. Patients with X-linked SCID who are treated with bone marrow transplant tend to engraft T cells readily but they do not engraft B cells unless they are treated with cytoreductive therapy prior to transplant. B-cell function after transplant tends to be poor, even in patients who have received transplants from HLA matched siblings. Better transplant strategies are required to achieve optimum long-term results in patients with X-linked SCID.

  7. Roberts syndrome or "X-linked amelia"?

    PubMed

    Gershoni-Baruch, R; Drugan, A; Bronshtein, M; Zimmer, E Z

    1990-12-01

    We report on a syndrome of tetra-amelia, facial clefts, absence of ears, nose, and atresia ani, affecting 7 male infants or fetuses in one Arab Moslem kindred. The combination of anomalies described in each affected member is consistent with Roberts syndrome and the prevalence of intermarriage in this kindred could suggest an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. Alternatively, the existence of a new syndrome, namely, "X-linked amelia" is proposed.

  8. Advances in X-linked mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Roger E

    2005-12-01

    Mutations in genes on the X chromosome rival chromosome aberrations as a cause of mental retardation. Progress in the clinical and molecular delineation of X-linked mental retardation has outpaced progress in understanding autosomal mental retardation. This is a result in large part of the identification of large families in which mental retardation has segregated in an X-linked pattern and the greater ease with which molecular technologies can be applied to hemizygosity in males. About one-third of the estimated 165 genes associated with syndromal mutations of genes on the X chromosome and one-fourth of the estimated 100 genes associated with nonsyndromal mutations of genes on the X chromosome have been identified. In a number of instances, the same gene is responsible for syndromal and nonsyndromal mutations of genes on the X chromosome. The molecular delineation of mutations of genes on the X chromosome has allowed certain conditions to be lumped together on the basis of allelism and has caused others that appear clinical similar to remain separate. The clinical and molecular advances have allowed X-linked mental retardation to be more clearly delineated, have provided the means of confirmatory laboratory testing, and have ushered in an era of carrier testing, prenatal diagnosis, and prevention strategies.

  9. X-linked Adrenoleukodystrophy, The Tunisian Experience.

    PubMed

    Nasrallah, Fahmi; Kraoua, Ichraf; Zidi, Wiem; Omar, Souheil; Sanhaji, Haifa; Feki, Moncef; Ben Youssef, Ilhem Turki; Kaabachi, Naziha

    2015-01-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy is a genetic disease affecting the degradation of very long chain fatty acids. This study aims to describe the clinical phenotype and biochemical feature of Tunisian patients; it also seeks to describe recognition of pattern analysis on the level of very long chain fatty acids in plasma for the visual discrimination of X-linked patients from a healthy group. During the last 21 years, 19 patients were diagnosed with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy based on the clinical features combined with the area percentage of hexacosanoic acid (C26:0) as well as the ratio of C26:0 and lignoceric acid (C24:0) relative to behenic acid (C22:0) by gas chromatography. For the biochemical diagnosis of X-ALD with better accuracy, it has been desired to transform the numerical values of these biochemical markers into visually discriminating patterns. The clinical features of 19 patients aged between 4 to 47 years were classified into cerebral form (57.8%), adrenomyeloneuropathic (26.3%), and a few patients were asymptomatic. The ratio C24:0/C22:0 ranged from 1.12 to 2.41 (normal value: 0.46 - 0.9) and C26:0/C22:0 ratio ranged from 0.03 to 0.36 (normal value: 0.003 - 0.009). The concentration of fatty acids with 22 or more carbons in body fluid did not change with age in control subjects and patients. For the visual diagnostic of patients, the Scatter plot was a reliable method for the diagnostic patterns of very long chain fatty acids of patients with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy disorders. The incidence of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy disorders is under diagnosed in Tunisia. The diagnosis was confirmed by enzymatic activity study and molecular analysis but the analysis of very long chain fatty acids by gas chromatography remains a reliable tool for the diagnosis and early initiation of the treatment.

  10. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked congenital stationary night blindness

    MedlinePlus

    ... stationary night blindness X-linked congenital stationary night blindness Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... collapse boxes. Description X-linked congenital stationary night blindness is a disorder of the retina , which is ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked intellectual disability, Siderius type

    MedlinePlus

    ... linked intellectual disability, Siderius type X-linked intellectual disability, Siderius type Printable PDF Open All Close All ... the expand/collapse boxes. Description X-linked intellectual disability, Siderius type is a condition characterized by mild ...

  12. Alpha thalassaemia-mental retardation, X linked

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, Richard

    2006-01-01

    X-linked alpha thalassaemia mental retardation (ATR-X) syndrome in males is associated with profound developmental delay, facial dysmorphism, genital abnormalities and alpha thalassaemia. Female carriers are usually physically and intellectually normal. So far, 168 patients have been reported. Language is usually very limited. Seizures occur in about one third of the cases. While many patients are affectionate with their caregivers, some exhibit autistic-like behaviour. Patients present with facial hypotonia and a characteristic mouth. Genital abnormalities are observed in 80% of children and range from undescended testes to ambiguous genitalia. Alpha-thalassaemia is not always present. This syndrome is X-linked recessive and results from mutations in the ATRX gene. This gene encodes the widely expressed ATRX protein. ATRX mutations cause diverse changes in the pattern of DNA methylation at heterochromatic loci but it is not yet known whether this is responsible for the clinical phenotype. The diagnosis can be established by detection of alpha thalassaemia, identification of ATRX gene mutations, ATRX protein studies and X-inactivation studies. Genetic counselling can be offered to families. Management is multidisciplinary: young children must be carefully monitored for gastro-oesophageal reflux as it may cause death. A number of individuals with ATR-X are fit and well in their 30s and 40s. PMID:16722615

  13. X linked mental retardation: a clinical guide.

    PubMed

    Raymond, F L

    2006-03-01

    Mental retardation is more common in males than females in the population, assumed to be due to mutations on the X chromosome. The prevalence of the 24 genes identified to date is low and less common than expansions in FMR1, which cause Fragile X syndrome. Systematic screening of all other X linked genes in X linked families with mental retardation is currently not feasible in a clinical setting. The phenotypes of genes causing syndromic and non-syndromic mental retardation (NLGN3, NLGN4, RPS6KA3(RSK2), OPHN1, ATRX, SLC6A8, ARX, SYN1, AGTR2, MECP2, PQBP1, SMCX, and SLC16A2) are first discussed, as these may be the focus of more targeted mutation analysis. Secondly, the relative prevalence of genes causing only non-syndromic mental retardation (IL1RAPL1, TM4SF2, ZNF41, FTSJ1, DLG3, FACL4, PAK3, ARHGEF6, FMR2, and GDI) is summarised. Thirdly, the problem of recurrence risk where a molecular genetics diagnosis has not been made and what proportion of the male excess of mental retardation is due to monogenic disorders of the X chromosome are discussed.

  14. Biochemical aspects of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Stephan; Wanders, Ronald

    2010-07-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is the most common peroxisomal disorder. The disease is characterized by the accumulation of very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA; >C22) in plasma and tissues. X-ALD is caused by mutations in the ABCD1 gene encoding ALDP, an adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding-cassette (ABC) transporter located in the peroxisomal membrane. In this paper, we describe the current knowledge on the function of ALDP, its role in peroxisomal VLCFA beta-oxidation and the consequences of a defect in ALDP on VLCFA metabolism. Furthermore, we pay special attention to the role of the VLCFA elongation system in VLCFA homeostasis, with elongation of very long-chain fatty acids like-1 (ELOVL1) as key player, and its relevance to X-ALD.

  15. X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy: pathogenesis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Engelen, Marc; Kemp, Stephan; Poll-The, Bwee-Tien

    2014-10-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a puzzling inborn error of metabolism with a strikingly heterogeneous clinical spectrum. All patients have mutations in the ABCD1 gene and accumulate very long chain fatty acids in all tissues. Virtually all male X-ALD patients develop adrenocortical insufficiency in childhood and progressive myelopathy and peripheral neuropathy in adulthood. A subset of male patients, however, develops a fatal cerebral demyelinating disease, cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy. Female patients also develop progressive myelopathy and peripheral neuropathy, but generally at a later age than males. They only very rarely develop adrenocortical insufficiency or cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy. This review proposes to simplify the classification of the clinical spectrum of X-ALD and reviews the largely unresolved pathophysiological mechanisms and the current treatment options.

  16. X-linked agammaglobulinemia in northern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Trakultivakorn, Muthita; Ochs, Hans D

    2006-03-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a primary immunodeficiency characterized by a failure to generate immunoglobulins of all isotypes due to the absence of mature B cells and plasma cells, secondary to mutations in the Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) gene. We report six patients with XLA, confirmed by mutation analysis, from northern Thailand. The mean age of onset was 2.5 years and the mean age at diagnosis was 7.3 years. All patients had a history of otitis media, pneumonia and arthritis at the time of diagnosis, five patients had developed bronchiectasis and 3 patients septicemia. Other infections reported included sinusitis (5/6), pericarditis (1/6), meningitis (1/6) and pyoderma (1/6). Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus were isolated on multiple occasions. One patient died of sepsis at the age of 16 years. These observations demonstrate that early diagnosis and treatment can improve prognosis and quality of life.

  17. X-linked cardiomyopathy is heterogeneous

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, M.J.; Sillence, D.O.; Mulley, J.C.

    1994-09-01

    Two major loci of X-linked cardiomyopathy have been mapped by linkage analysis. The gene for X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy (XLCM) is mapped to the dystrophin locus at Xp21, while Barth syndrome has been localised to distal Xq28. XLCM usually presents in juvenile males with no skeletal disease but decreased dystrophin in cardiac muscle. Barth syndrome most often presents in infants and is characterized by skeletal myopathy, short stature and neutropenia in association with cardiomyopathy of variable severity. Prior to carrier or prenatal diagnosis in a family, delineation of the cardiomyopathy locus involved is essential. We report the linkage mapping of a large kindred in which several male infants have died with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. There is a family history of unexplained death of infant males less than 6 months old over 4 generations. Features of Barth syndrome such as short stature, skeletal myopathy and neutropenia have not been observed. Genotyping at 10 marker loci in Xq28 has revealed significant pairwise lod scores with the cardiomyopathy phenotype at DXS52 (Z=2.21 at {theta}=0.0), at markers p26 and p39 near DXS15 (Z=2.30 at {theta}=0.0) and at F8C (Z=2.24 at {theta}=0.0). A recombinant detected with DXS296 defines the proximal limit to the localization. No recombinants were detected at any of the loci distal to DXS296. The most distal marker in Xq28, DXS1108, is within 500 kb of the telomere. As the gene in this family is localized to Xq28, it is possible that this disorder is an allelic variant at the Barth syndrome locus.

  18. Gene Augmentation for X-Linked Retinitis Pigmentosa Caused by Mutations in RPGR

    PubMed Central

    Beltran, William A.; Cideciyan, Artur V.; Lewin, Alfred S.; Hauswirth, William W.; Jacobson, Samuel G.; Aguirre, Gustavo D.

    2015-01-01

    X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP) caused by mutations in the RPGR gene is a severe and early onset form of retinal degeneration, and no treatment is currently available. Recent evidence in two clinically relevant canine models shows that adeno-associated viral (AAV)-mediated RPGR gene transfer to rods and cones can prevent disease onset and rescue photoreceptors at early- and mid-stages of degeneration. There is thus a strong incentive for conducting long-term, preclinical efficacy and safety studies, while concomitantly pursuing the detailed phenotypic characterization of XLRP disease in patients that may benefit from such corrective therapy. PMID:25301933

  19. Cerebral inflammation in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    McGuinness, M C; Smith, K D

    1999-01-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is an inherited neurodegenerative disease that affects approximately 1 in 25 000 males. It is characterized by elevated levels of saturated very long chain fatty acids (VLCFA), i.e., >C22:0, particularly in ganglioside and cholesterol ester fractions of brain white matter and adrenal cortex. Failure of peroxisomal very long chain fatty acyl-CoA synthetase (VLCS) to activate these VLCFA prevents their degradation by peroxisomal beta-oxidation. X-ALD maps to Xq28 and the gene encodes a peroxisomal membrane protein and not the gene for VLCS. The two most common forms of X-ALD are the cerebral (CER) form, with an inflammatory demyelinating reaction that resembles multiple sclerosis (MS), and adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN), which involves the spinal cord and in which the inflammatory reaction is mild or absent. Investigations into the nature of the cerebral inflammatory demyelinating reaction in X-ALD will be the subject of this review.

  20. Mutation detection in X-linked hydrocephalus

    SciTech Connect

    Forrest, S.M.; Balnaves, M.E.; Rosenthal, A.

    1994-09-01

    X-linked hydrocephalus (XLH), which maps to Xq28, affects about 1 in 30,000 male births. A candidate gene, L1-CAM, which codes for a neural adhesion molecule, mapped to the same region of the X chromosome. Rosenthal et al. (1992) identified a patient with XLH that had aberrant splicing of L1-CAM. A mutation at a potential branch point signal in an intron was identified. The gene has a number of exons and encodes a 4.2 kb mRNA. We isolated RNA from lymphocytes or fibroblasts from five XLH patients. cDNA was synthesized and the gene was amplified in two overlapping fragments, 2.2 kb and 1.7 kb respectively. A nested PCR approach with two rounds of PCR amplification was employed. Patient 900124 did not have a full length 5{prime} fragment and 880022 did not have a full length 3{prime} product. Restriction digestions defined the region of the alteration in the messenger RNA and sequencing in this region showed the loss of exons 10 and 21, respectively. All 5{prime} and 3{prime} products were also digested with several restriction enzymes (e.g., Msp I, Taq I), which have CG in their recognition sites, in the hope that point mutations that alter these restriction enzyme sites might be identified. A point mutation creating an Msp I site was found in patient 930067.

  1. [Clinical heterogeneity of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy ].

    PubMed

    Rudenskaia, G E; Shekhter, O V; Zakharova, E Iu; Dadali, E L; Solokha, O A; Lomonosova, E Z; Goncharov, V M; Karmanov, M E

    2002-01-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a relatively common world spread disease characterized by significant clinical heterogeneity. Clinico-biochemical examination in the Medico-genetic research center identified, 20 X-ALD cases in 17 families over 5 years. Prevalence of children (60%) and adolescence (25%) cerebral forms is explained, in part, by patients referring for medical-genetic counseling. Adrenomyeloneuropathy was diagnosed in one patient. In two healthy siblings presymptomatic stage was found. A main X-ALD biochemical marker is an increase of very long chain fatty acids (VLCFA) level, which does not depend on clinical form of the disease. Most interesting appeared to be a family including 5 patients in 3 generations with intrafamilial combination of childhood and adolescence cerebral forms, and atypically mild disease course in proband. Regarding symptoms of childhood and adolescence cerebral forms, attention has been drawn to 3 patients with tics, which mask organic nature of the disease on its initial stage. X-ALD is so far incurable, but its timely diagnosis provides an adequate medico-genetic help on the base of modern prenatal diagnosis.

  2. Growth in X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets.

    PubMed

    Ariceta, Gema; Langman, Craig B

    2007-04-01

    Growth failure appears frequently in children with X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets (XLHR) due to hypophosphatemia, disease severity, body disproportion, and primary bone abnormality. Recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) increases phosphate tubular reabsorption and phosphate level in blood and, thus, constitutes an attractive but controversial therapy in short children with XLHR, those efficacy was demonstrated in small uncontrolled series. Our aim was to report our experience regarding growth in XLHR. Twenty-seven children with XLHR--20 girls, seven boys--diagnosed at a median (md) of 1.46 years of age, (range 0.39-8.5 years), were studied at 10.12 years of age (1.58-18.56), md (range). All received oral treatment with phosphate and calcitriol. At the first visit, grouped Z-height was -1; (-4.58; 0.54) md (range). After 5 years' follow-up (0.92-15.6), Z-height was -0.91 (- 4.56; 0.17), not different from that at baseline (P = 0.465). In 16 children entirely controlled in our program upon presentation, a "catch up" phenomenon after the rickets had healed (P = 0.823) or throughout the long-term was not observed (P = 0.995). Eight patients had a Z-height 2 years at diagnosis, male gender and non-adherence to treatment. Four children, all boys, received rhGH, and in two cases with sufficient follow up stature normalized. No rhGH side effects were observed, and phosphate and calcitriol doses remained stable. Linear growth failure appeared in a third of XLHR children. Efforts need to be made to reduce the age of diagnosis and to improve adherence to treatment. Treatment with rhGH should be considered early, after the rickets has been controlled, in those patients with impaired growth or delayed diagnosis.

  3. [Prenatal diagnosis of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy].

    PubMed

    Bao, Xin-hua; Ping, Li-li; Wang, Ai-hua; Pan, Hong; Wu, Ye; Xiong, Hui; Zhang, Yue-hua; Shi, Chun-yan; Qin, Jiong; Wu, Xiru

    2007-02-01

    To make prenatal dignosis of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) for the prevention of the disease. Eighteen amniocenteses were performed on 17 suspected carriers of X-ALD during 18-30 gestation weeks. The very long chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) levels of cultured amniocytes were tested by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The plasma VLCFAs levels were measured in 8 of the 18 prenatal diagnosed children when they were born or after abortion. ABCD1 gene mutation analysis was carried out in 8 cases by PCR and sequencing. ALDP of amniocytes was tested by Western blotting in 2 cases from a family, one female, another male, and the VLCFAs of cultured amniocytes were increased in both of them. Among the 18 fetuses, 10 were males and 8 were females. The VLCFAs levels of the cultured amniocytes were increased in 3 males and 4 females. The postnatal plasma VLCFAs were normal in 5 cases with normal VLCFAs levels of amniocytes, and increased in 3 cases with high VLCFAs levels of amniocytes. ABCD1 gene mutations were found in 4 cases with high VLCFAs levels of amniocytes, no mutation was found in other 4 cases with normal VLCFAs levels of amniocytes. ALDP of amniocytes could be detected in the female with high VLCFAs levels of amniocytes, and it could not be detected in the male with high VLCFAs levels of amniocytes. Three male fetuses with high VLCFAs levels of amniocytes were aborted. The others who were born were normal clinically so far. The prenatal diagnosis is very important for the prevention of ALD. Amniocyte VLCFAs level analysis combined with ABCD1 gene mutation analysis and ALDP test could make a proper prenatal diagnosis.

  4. Pathophysiology of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy☆

    PubMed Central

    Berger, J.; Forss-Petter, S.; Eichler, F.S.

    2014-01-01

    Currently the molecular basis for the clinical heterogeneity of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is poorly understood. The genetic bases for all different phenotypic variants of X-ALD are mutations in the gene encoding the peroxisomal ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, ABCD1 (formerly adrenoleukodystrophy protein, ALDP). ABCD1 transports CoA-activated very long-chain fatty acids from the cytosol into the peroxisome for degradation. The phenotypic variability is remarkable ranging from cerebral inflammatory demyelination of childhood onset, leading to death within a few years, to adults remaining pre-symptomatic through more than five decades. There is no general genotype–phenotype correlation in X-ALD. The default manifestation of mutations in ABCD1 is adrenomyeloneuropathy, a slowly progressive dying-back axonopathy affecting both ascending and descending spinal cord tracts as well as in some cases, a peripheral neuropathy. In about 60% of male X-ALD patients, either in childhood (35–40%) or in adulthood (20%), an initial, clinically silent, myelin destabilization results in conversion to a devastating, rapidly progressive form of cerebral inflammatory demyelination. Here, ABCD1 remains a susceptibility gene, necessary but not sufficient for inflammatory demyelination to occur. Although the accumulation of very long-chain fatty acids appears to be essential for the pathomechanism of all phenotypes, the molecular mechanisms underlying these phenotypes are fundamentally different. Cell autonomous processes such as oxidative stress and energy shortage in axons as well as non-cell autonomous processes involving axon–glial interactions seem pertinent to the dying-back axonopathy. Various dynamic mechanisms may underlie the initiation of inflammation, the altered immune reactivity, the propagation of inflammation, as well as the mechanisms leading to the arrest of inflammation after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. An improved understanding of

  5. Pathophysiology of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Berger, J; Forss-Petter, S; Eichler, F S

    2014-03-01

    Currently the molecular basis for the clinical heterogeneity of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is poorly understood. The genetic bases for all different phenotypic variants of X-ALD are mutations in the gene encoding the peroxisomal ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, ABCD1 (formerly adrenoleukodystrophy protein, ALDP). ABCD1 transports CoA-activated very long-chain fatty acids from the cytosol into the peroxisome for degradation. The phenotypic variability is remarkable ranging from cerebral inflammatory demyelination of childhood onset, leading to death within a few years, to adults remaining pre-symptomatic through more than five decades. There is no general genotype-phenotype correlation in X-ALD. The default manifestation of mutations in ABCD1 is adrenomyeloneuropathy, a slowly progressive dying-back axonopathy affecting both ascending and descending spinal cord tracts as well as in some cases, a peripheral neuropathy. In about 60% of male X-ALD patients, either in childhood (35-40%) or in adulthood (20%), an initial, clinically silent, myelin destabilization results in conversion to a devastating, rapidly progressive form of cerebral inflammatory demyelination. Here, ABCD1 remains a susceptibility gene, necessary but not sufficient for inflammatory demyelination to occur. Although the accumulation of very long-chain fatty acids appears to be essential for the pathomechanism of all phenotypes, the molecular mechanisms underlying these phenotypes are fundamentally different. Cell autonomous processes such as oxidative stress and energy shortage in axons as well as non-cell autonomous processes involving axon-glial interactions seem pertinent to the dying-back axonopathy. Various dynamic mechanisms may underlie the initiation of inflammation, the altered immune reactivity, the propagation of inflammation, as well as the mechanisms leading to the arrest of inflammation after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. An improved understanding of the

  6. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked juvenile retinoschisis

    MedlinePlus

    ... retinoschisis MalaCards: x-linked juvenile retinoschisis Merck Manual Consumer Version: Overview of Retinal Disorders Orphanet: X-linked ... juvenile retinoschisis (XLRS): a review of genotype-phenotype relationships. Semin Ophthalmol. 2013 Sep-Nov;28(5-6): ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 1

    MedlinePlus

    ... This condition is inherited in an X-linked recessive pattern . The gene associated with this condition is located on the ... Andria G, Meroni G, Parenti G. X-linked recessive chondrodysplasia punctata: spectrum of arylsulfatase E gene mutations and expanded clinical variability. Am J Med ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked myotubular myopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... myotubular myopathy is inherited in an X-linked recessive pattern . The gene associated with this condition is located on the ... females will have two altered copies of this gene, males are affected by X-linked recessive disorders much more frequently than females. A characteristic ...

  9. X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein deficiency: more than an X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, Claire; Latour, Sylvain

    2015-05-01

    X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) deficiency (also known as X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome type 2, XLP-2) is a rare primary immunodeficiency. Since the disease was first described in 2006, more than 70 patients suffering from XIAP-deficiency have been reported, thus extending the clinical presentations of the disease. The main clinical features of XLP-2 are (i) elevated susceptibility to hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH, frequently in response to infection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)), (ii) recurrent splenomegaly and (iii) inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) with the characteristics of Crohn's disease. XIAP deficiency is now considered to be one of the genetic causes of IBD in infancy. Although XIAP is an anti-apoptotic molecule, it is also involved in many other pathways, including the regulation of innate immunity and inflammation. XIAP is required for signaling through the Nod-like receptors NOD1 and 2, which are intracellular sensors of bacterial infection. XIAP-deficient T cells (including innate natural killer T cells and mucosal-associated invariant T cells) are overly sensitive to apoptosis. NOD2 function is impaired in XIAP-deficient monocytes. However, the physiopathological mechanisms underlying the clinical phenotypes in XIAP deficiency, notably the HLH and the EBV susceptibility, are not well understood. Here, we review the clinical aspects, molecular etiology and physiopathology of XIAP deficiency.

  10. Regulation of male fertility by X-linked genes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ke; Yang, Fang; Wang, Peijing Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    Infertility is a worldwide reproductive health problem, affecting men and women about equally. Mouse genetic studies demonstrate that more than 200 genes specifically or predominantly regulate fertility. However, few genetic causes of infertility in humans have been identified. Here, we focus on the regulation of male fertility by X-linked, germ cell-specific genes. Previous genomic studies reveal that the mammalian X chromosome is enriched for genes expressed in early spermatogenesis. Recent genetic studies in mice show that X-linked, germ cell-specific genes, such as A-kinase anchor protein 4 (Akap4), nuclear RNA export factor 2 (Nxf2), TBP-associated factor 7l (Taf7l), and testis-expressed gene 11 (Tex11), indeed play important roles in the regulation of male fertility. Moreover, we find that the Taf7l Tex11 double-mutant males exhibit much more severe defects in meiosis than either single mutant, suggesting that these 2 X-linked genes regulate male meiosis synergistically. The X-linked, germ cell-specific genes are particularly attractive in the study of male infertility in humans. Because males are hemizygous for X-linked genes, loss-of-function mutations in the single-copy X-linked genes, unlike in autosomal genes, would not be masked by a normal allele. The genetic studies of X-linked, germ cell-specific genes in mice have laid a foundation for mutational analysis of their human orthologues in infertile men.

  11. X-Linked ocular albinism; Nettleship-Falls ocular albinism.

    PubMed

    Booth, Alexandria V; Soldano, Anthony C; Levine, Jonathan; Pomeranz, Miriam

    2008-05-15

    A 39-year-old man with foveal hypoplasia, nystagmus, and decreased visual acuity was found to have multiple, cutaneous, hypopigmented macules. Macromelanosomes were demonstrated in normal skin on histopathologic examination. The patient's constellation of findings along with a strong X-linked inheritance pattern in family members led to the diagnosis of X-linked ocular albinism, which is an uncommon condition that is characterized by congenital nystagmus, iris translucency, hypopigmentation of the ocular fundus, strabismus, foveal hypoplasia, photophobia, and impaired vision.

  12. Prenatal diagnosis of X linked hydrocephalus without aqueductal stenosis.

    PubMed Central

    Váradi, V; Csécsei, K; Szeifert, G T; Tóth, Z; Papp, Z

    1987-01-01

    The outcome of four successive pregnancies in a woman heterozygous for X linked hydrocephalus is described. The last two were scanned by ultrasound. In one, a good prognosis was given; the fetus was male but there was no evidence of dilated cerebral ventricles. In the other, hydrocephalus was diagnosed. The absence of aqueductal stenosis in this case supports the hypothesis that in this X linked condition communicating hydrocephalus is the primary defect and aqueductal stenosis is secondary. Images PMID:3295245

  13. X chromosome inactivation and X-linked mental retardation

    SciTech Connect

    Willard, H.F. |

    1996-07-12

    The expression of X-linked genes in females heterozygous for X-linked defects can be modulated by epigenetic control mechanisms that constitute the X chromosome inactivation pathway. At least four different effects have been found to influence, in females, the phenotypic expression of genes responsible for X-linked mental retardation (XLMR). First, non-random X inactivation, due either to stochastic or genetic factors, can result in tissues in which one cell type (for example, that in which the X chromosome carrying a mutant XLMR gene is active) dominates, instead of the normal mosaic cell population expected as a result of random X inactivation. Second, skewed inactivation of the normal X in individuals carrying a deletion of part of the X chromosome has been documented in a number of mentally retarded females. Third, functional disomy of X-linked genes that are expressed inappropriately due to the absence of X inactivation has been found in mentally retarded females with structurally abnormal X chromosomes that do not contain the X inactivation center. And fourth, dose-dependent overexpression of X-linked genes that normally {open_quotes}escape{close_quotes} X inactivation may account for the mental and developmental delay associated with increasing numbers of otherwise inactive X chromosomes in individuals with X chromosome aneuploidy. 53 refs., 1 fig.

  14. The inner ear of dogs with X-linked nephritis provides clues to the pathogenesis of hearing loss in X-linked Alport syndrome.

    PubMed

    Harvey, S J; Mount, R; Sado, Y; Naito, I; Ninomiya, Y; Harrison, R; Jefferson, B; Jacobs, R; Thorner, P S

    2001-09-01

    Alport syndrome is an inherited disorder of type IV collagen with progressive nephropathy, ocular abnormalities, and high-tone sensorineural deafness. In X-linked Alport syndrome, mutations in the COL4A5 gene encoding the alpha5 chain of type IV collagen lead to loss of the alpha3/alpha4/alpha5 network and increased susceptibility of the glomerular basement membrane to long-term damage. The molecular defects that underlie the otopathology in this disease remain poorly understood. We used a canine model of X-linked Alport syndrome to determine the expression of type IV collagen alpha-chains in the inner ear. By 1 month in normal adult dogs, the alpha3, alpha4, and alpha5 chains were co-expressed in a thin continuous line extending along the basilar membrane and the internal and external sulci, with the strongest expression along the lateral aspect of the spiral ligament in the basal turn of the cochlea. Affected dogs showed complete absence of the alpha3/alpha4/alpha5 network. The lateral aspect of the spiral ligament is populated by tension fibroblasts that express alpha-smooth muscle actin and nonmuscle myosin and are postulated to generate radial tension on the basilar membrane via the extracellular matrix for reception of high frequency sound. We propose that in Alport syndrome, the loss of the alpha3/alpha4/alpha5 network eventually weakens the interaction of these cells with their extracellular matrix, resulting in reduced tension on the basilar membrane and the inability to respond to high frequency sounds.

  15. [DIAGNOSTIC VARIATIONS OF X-LINKED MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY WITH CONTRACTURES].

    PubMed

    Kvirkvelia, N; Shakarishvili, R; Gugutsidze, D; Khizanishvili, N

    2015-01-01

    Case report with review describes X-linked muscular dystrophy with contractures in 28 years old man and his cousin. The disease revealed itself in an early stage (age 5-10), the process was progressing with apparent tendons retraction and contraction, limited movement in the areas of the neck and back of spine, atrophy of shoulder and pelvic yard and back muscles. Intellect was intact. Cardyomyopathy was exhibited. CK was normal. EMG showed classic myopathic features. Muscle biopsy showed different caliber groups of muscle fibers, growth of endo-perimesial connective tissue. Clinical manifestations together with electrophysiological and histological data suggest consistency with Rotthauwe-Mortier-Bayer X-linked muscular dystrophy.

  16. Dental abnormalities associated with X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, JR; Reiter, AM; Mauldin, EA; Casal, ML

    2009-01-01

    Objectives X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (XLHED) occurs in several species, including humans, mice, cattle and dogs. The orofacial manifestations of ectodermal dysplasia in humans and mice have been extensively studied, but documentation of dental abnormalities in dogs is lacking. The current study describes the results of clinical and radiographic examinations of XLHED-affected dogs and demonstrates profound similarities to findings of XLHED-affected humans. Setting and sample population Section of Medical Genetics at the University of Pennsylvania, School of Veterinary Medicine. Clinical and radiographic oral examinations were performed on 17 dogs with XLHED, 3 normal dogs, and 2 dogs heterozygous for XLHED. Materials and methods The prevalence and severity of orofacial and dental abnormalities were evaluated by means of a sedated examination, photographs, and full-mouth intraoral radiographs. Results Crown and root abnormalities were common in dogs affected by XLHED, including hypodontia, oligodontia, conical crown shape, decreased number of cusps, decreased number of roots, and dilacerated roots. Persistent deciduous teeth were frequently encountered. Malocclusion was common, with Angle Class I mesioversion of the maxillary and/or mandibular canine teeth noted in 15 of 17 dogs. Angle Class III malocclusion (maxillary brachygnathism) was seen in one affected dog. Conclusion Dental abnormalities are common and severe in dogs with XLHED. Dental manifestations of canine XLHED share characteristics of brachyodont tooth type and diphyodont dentition, confirming this species to be an orthologous animal model for study of human disease. PMID:20078794

  17. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita

    MedlinePlus

    ... more common in particular ethnic groups? Genetic Changes Mutations in the NR0B1 gene cause X-linked adrenal ... glands control many important body functions. Some NR0B1 mutations result in the production of an inactive version ...

  18. [From gene to disease; X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy].

    PubMed

    Engelen, M; Kemp, S; van Geel, B M

    2008-04-05

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is the most common peroxisomal disorder, characterized by impaired peroxisomal beta-oxidation, subsequent accumulation of very long-chain fatty acids (> 22 carbon atoms), and mutations in the ABCD1 gene. Clinical manifestations, diagnostic procedures and treatment options are discussed.

  19. X-linked dominant retinitis pigmentosa in an American family

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, R.E.; Daiger, S.P.; Blanton, S.H.

    1994-09-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is a genetically heterogeneous disease with autosomal dominant (adRP), autosomal recessive and X-linked forms. At least 3 forms of X-linked retinitis pigmentosa have been reported: RP2 which maps to Xp11.4-p 11.23, RP3 which maps to Xp21.1 and RP6, which maps to Xp21.3-p21.1. The X-linked forms of retinitis pigmentosa are generally considered to be recessive as female carriers are not affected or are much less affected than males. Here we report a five generation American family with X-linked retinitis pigmentosa in which both males and females are significantly affected. The disease locus in this family appears to be distinct from RP2 and RP3. The American family (UTAD054) presents with early-onset retinitis pigmentosa. The family appeared to fit an autosomal dominant pattern; however, linkage testing excluded all known adRP loci. Absence of male-to-male transmission in the pedigree suggested the possibility of X-linked dominant inheritance. Thus we tested six microsatellite markers that map to Xp (DXS987, DXS989, DXS993, DXS999, DXS1003 and DXS1110). Of these, DXS989 showed tight linkage with one allele (199) showing a 100% concordance with disease status. The odds favoring an X-linked dominant mode of inheritance in this family, versus autosomal dominant, are 10{sup 5}:1. In addition, recombinations for DXS999, and dXS1110, the two markers flanking DXS989, were observed in affected individuals. These data map the disease locus in this family to a 9 mb region on the X chromosome between Xp22.11 and Xp21.41. In addition, the recombinant individuals exclude close linkage to RP2 and RP3. The observance of high penetrance in females indicates that this family has X-linked dominant retinitis pigmentosa. We suggest that this mode of inheritance should be considered in other families with dominant retinitis pigmentosa but an absence of male-to-male transmission.

  20. X-Linked Retinoschisis: Phenotypic Variability in a Chinese Family

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yangyan; Liu, Xiao; Tang, Luosheng; Wang, Xia; Coursy, Terry; Guo, Xiaojian; Li, Zhuo

    2016-01-01

    X-linked juvenile retinoschisis (XLRS), a leading cause of juvenile macular degeneration, is characterized by a spoke-wheel pattern in the macular region of the retina and splitting of the neurosensory retina. Our study is to describe the clinical characteristics of a four generations of this family (a total of 18 members)with X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) and detected a novel mutations of c.3G > A (p.M1?) in the initiation codon of the RS1 gene. by direct sequencing.Identification of this mutation in this family provides evidence about potential genetic or environmental factors on its phenotypic variance, as patients presented with different phenotypes regardless of having the same mutation. Importantly, OCT has proven vital for XLRS diagnosis in children. PMID:26823236

  1. X-linked inheritance of Alport syndrome: family P revisited.

    PubMed Central

    Hasstedt, S J; Atkin, C L

    1983-01-01

    Likelihood analysis using two autosomal/X-linked mixed models confirmed that Alport syndrome is an X-linked dominant disease in a large Utah kindred, family P. The penetrance was estimated as .85 in females and 1.0 in males. Previously reported abnormal segregation ratios were reexamined. No excess of affected offspring of affected parents was found. Nor was the penetrance in daughters of asymptomatic carrier mothers found to be lower than in the daughters of symptomatic mothers, although the sample size was small. However, there was an unexplained deficiency of sons of affected fathers. There was no deficiency of sons of affected mothers, nor was there a deficiency of males in the kindred. PMID:6650503

  2. Hereditary sideroblastic anaemia and ataxia: an X linked recessive disorder.

    PubMed

    Pagon, R A; Bird, T D; Detter, J C; Pierce, I

    1985-08-01

    We report two families in which a non-progressive spinocerebellar syndrome and a sideroblastic anaemia are segregating together in an X linked recessive fashion. Four males in two generations of one family and a fifth male from an unrelated family had both conditions. Both the sideroblastic anaemia and the spinocerebellar syndrome differ from those which have previously been reported to be inherited in an X linked recessive manner. The association of these two clinically distinct disorders in two unrelated families suggests that they are either two closely linked loci which have undergone simultaneous mutation or pleiotropic effects of an altered allele at a single locus. All the heterozygous women had normal neurological examinations and normal haematocrits and red cell indices. Some had ring sideroblasts on bone marrow examination, a dimorphic peripheral blood smear, and raised serum free erythrocyte protoporphyrin, suggesting that a proportion of heterozygotes can be detected by appropriate haematological studies.

  3. Hereditary sideroblastic anaemia and ataxia: an X linked recessive disorder.

    PubMed Central

    Pagon, R A; Bird, T D; Detter, J C; Pierce, I

    1985-01-01

    We report two families in which a non-progressive spinocerebellar syndrome and a sideroblastic anaemia are segregating together in an X linked recessive fashion. Four males in two generations of one family and a fifth male from an unrelated family had both conditions. Both the sideroblastic anaemia and the spinocerebellar syndrome differ from those which have previously been reported to be inherited in an X linked recessive manner. The association of these two clinically distinct disorders in two unrelated families suggests that they are either two closely linked loci which have undergone simultaneous mutation or pleiotropic effects of an altered allele at a single locus. All the heterozygous women had normal neurological examinations and normal haematocrits and red cell indices. Some had ring sideroblasts on bone marrow examination, a dimorphic peripheral blood smear, and raised serum free erythrocyte protoporphyrin, suggesting that a proportion of heterozygotes can be detected by appropriate haematological studies. PMID:4045952

  4. X-linked stapes gusher: CT findings in one patient.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Gaurav; Castillo, Mauricio; Buchman, Craig A

    2003-01-01

    A 31-year-old male patient presented with progressive mixed hearing loss since birth. A stapedectomy was attempted and was unsuccessful because of perilymph gushing. CT of the temporal bones showed bulbous dilatation of the fundi of the internal auditory canals and absence of the bone plates separating them from the base of the cochleas. This unusual abnormality was found after the attempted stapedectomy and explains the clinical findings. The findings in male patients are fairly typical X-linked congenital deafness.

  5. Neurological involvement in X-linked hypophosphataemic rickets.

    PubMed

    Bradbury, P G; Brenton, D P; Stern, G M

    1987-06-01

    X-linked hypophosphataemic rickets is a familial form of Vitamin D resistant rickets in which gross bony and ligamentous changes may occur. Two patients showing severe spinal disease with evidence of spinal cord compression requiring neurosurgical intervention are reported. The management of such lesions may be problematic as cord compression may be found at several levels at presentation, and further difficulties develop after neurosurgical treatment.

  6. [X-linked mental retardation--treatment scheme].

    PubMed

    Lisik, Małgorzata Z; Sieroń, Aleksander L

    2008-01-01

    Mental retardation is a serious medical and social problem. The prevalence of mental retardation is estimated at 2-3%. Establishing the cause of mental retardation is extremely important for prognosis, management, and genetic counseling. It is postulated that 25-35% of mental retardation cases may be of genetic background. Among the genetic causes 25-30% are probably result of mutations located in the X chromosome (X-linked mental retardation--XLMR). X-linked mental retardation is a heterogeneous set of conditions responsible for a large proportion of inherited mental retardation. More than 200 XLMR conditions and 45 cloned genes are listed in catalogue available on the Internet. Traditionally, based on clinical presentation, XLMR conditions were divided into specific and nonspecific forms or syndromic and nonsyndromic. The distinction between specific and non-specific forms of XLMR is gradually becoming less clear and spectrum of phenotypic variability is very large as both syndromic and nonsyndromic forms have been described for several of the XLMR genes. Mutations in patients suffering from X-linked mental retardation genes have been found only in a relatively limited number of cases. Up to 50% of the patients from XLMR families might have mutations in one of the known genes implicated in XLMR so far. However, current methods are generally too expensive or too unreliable to justify mutation screening of all known XLMR genes in diagnostic testing. Thus it is necessary to use empirical data of recurrence risk in genetic counseling of the family with mental retardation.

  7. CT and MRI findings in X-linked progressive deafness.

    PubMed

    Altay, Hakan; Savaş, Recep; Oğüt, Fatih; Kirazli, Tayfun; Alper, Hüdaver

    2008-09-01

    Congenital X-linked mixed deafness is a rare anomaly that has typical features and can be diagnosed on the basis of progressive mixed hearing loss and the typical imaging findings. Recognition of these findings may alter the course of treatment and perilymph gushing can be avoided. A 10-year-old male patient presented with a history of progressive hearing loss. Computed tomography of the temporal bones showed bulbous dilatation of the fundi of the internal auditory canals (IAC) and the absence of the bony plates separating the basal turn of the cochleas and IAC. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated obliteration of the labyrinthine spaces at the right side.

  8. [X-linked Kallmann's syndrome: intra and interfamilial heterogeneity].

    PubMed

    Vidal, Alfonso; Loidi, Lourdes; Colino, Esmeralda; del Carmen Miranda, María; Barrio, Raquel

    2007-05-26

    Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and anosmia characterize Kallmann's syndrome, whose X-linked form is due to mutations in the KAL1 gene. We studied a family with 6 affected members. We compare their clinical (chryptorchidism, micropenis, puberty, associated malformations), analytical (gonadotrophin releasing hormone test, and human chorionic gonadotropin test), genetic (cariotype), and radiological data of the described familiar cases with other reported sporadic cases. The described cases carried the R191X mutation. We found phenotypic heterogeneity between the patients. We report the first familiar cases of Kallmann's syndrome due to the R191X mutation. Probably other genes and/or epigenetic factors determine the phenotype.

  9. X-linked recessive torsion dystonia in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Kupke, K G; Lee, L V; Viterbo, G H; Arancillo, J; Donlon, T; Müller, U

    1990-06-01

    The occurrence of an X-linked form of torsion dystonia in the Philippines was demonstrated by the genetic and biochemical analysis of affected males and their relatives. Thirty-six affected males were ascertained in 21 families by clinical neurologic evaluation. The mean age-of-onset of dystonia was 37.9 years with a range from 12 to 52 years. Neurologic symptoms began focally and progressed to either segmental or generalized involvement in all cases. Generalized dystonia developed in 78% of the patients after a mean duration of 6.8 years from the onset of symptoms. A family history of dystonia was elicited in 17 of the 21 kindreds, accounting for a total of 64 males and one possibly affected female, distributed among 224 individuals in 33 sibships. In 18 of the 33 sibships, 2 or more brothers reportedly had dystonia. There were 12 kindreds with a history of multigenerational dystonia. In those, only males of maternal ancestry were affected, and in 7 of these families, maternal grandfathers reportedly had dystonia. There were no instances of male-to-male transmission. Cytogenetic analysis did not show any X chromosome abnormalities in 4 affected propositi. Several secondary causes of torsion dystonia were excluded, including Wilson disease, aminoacidopathies, organic acidurias, oligosaccharidoses, and chronic hexosaminidase A and B deficiency. These findings substantiate the existence of an X-linked recessive form of primary torsion dystonia.

  10. Optical coherence tomography in x-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Aquino, Jannelle J; Sotirchos, Elias S; Saidha, Shiv; Raymond, Gerald V; Calabresi, Peter A

    2013-09-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy is a metabolic disease caused by mutations in the ABCD1 gene, which codes for a peroxisomal membrane protein, leading to the accumulation of very long-chain fatty acids. Thinning of the retinal nerve fiber layer and macula has been described in adult-onset adrenomyeloneuropathy; however, assessment of these structures in the presymptomatic stage remains largely unexplored. Optical coherence tomography is a high-resolution medical imaging technology that has been widely used to assess ophthalmological diseases and more recently in neurological disease states to quantify the axonal and neuronal injury in the retina that results from demyelination of the optic nerve. Fourteen boys with presymptomatic X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy and 14 age-matched healthy controls underwent retinal imaging with optical coherence tomography. Optical coherence tomography-derived retinal thickness measures did not differ between adrenoleukodystrophy subjects and healthy controls. Our results suggest that structural retinal abnormalities are not detectable before the development of neurological manifestations in adrenoleukodystrophy. Further investigation of the utility of optical coherence tomography scanning in individuals with symptomatic disease should be considered to determine if its measures could be used as a biomarker of disease progression. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation of neuroinflammation in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ajay; Chugani, Harry T; Chakraborty, Pulak; Huq, A H M Mahbubul

    2011-02-01

    We present findings of (11)C-[R]-PK11195 positron emission tomography in a child with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. (11)C-[R]-PK11195 is a radioligand with a high and specific affinity for peripheral benzodiazepine receptors, expressed by activated microglia in cases of neuroinflammation, and therefore it is applicable to the in vivo detection of neuroinflammation with positron emission tomography. (11)C-[R]-PK11195 positron emission tomography demonstrated increased tracer binding in the occipital, parietal, and posterior temporal white matter, in the genu of the corpus callosum, the bilateral posterior thalami, most of the posterior limb of the internal capsule, the bilateral cerebral peduncles, and the brainstem, indicating underlying neuroinflammation. The rest of the brain, including the cerebral cortices and cerebellum, exhibited minimal (11)C-[R]-PK11195 binding. Our findings indicate significant neuroinflammation associated with white matter destruction in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy, which can be visualized in vivo with an (11)C-[R]-PK11195 positron emission tomography scan. (11)C-[R]-PK11195 positron emission tomography may also help evaluate the inflammatory burden and follow-up of the disease evolution. This technique may be particularly useful for evaluating treatment response, which is not easy with other imaging modalities, after white matter is significantly and extensively damaged. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. X-linked Inheritance in Females with Chronic Granulomatous Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Elaine L.; Rholl, Kenneth S.; Quie, Paul G.

    1980-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease in males is familial and its transmission is is usually clearly x-linked. The mode of inheritance in females with the syndrome is unknown and the carrier state difficult to identify. Defective polymorphonuclear leukocyte bactericidal activity in this disease is associated with an absence of the respiratory burst generated in stimulated phagocytes and may be detected by the chemiluminescence assay. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes from three of four females with chronic granulomatous disease had extremely low chemiluminescence production, their asymptomatic mothers had intermediate values, and their fathers were normal. Polymorphonuclear neutrophils of two affected males in these kinships generated no chemiluminescence, whereas two of seven female relatives had intermediate values, and all nonaffected males had normal values. In the three families in which leukocytes were studied by nitroblue tetrazolium reduction, two populations of neutrophils were demonstrated for the female patients and/or their mothers. The wide phenotypic variability for clinical disease, evidence of two leukocyte populations in the patients or their mothers, and low but detectable leukocyte chemiluminescence in the affected females is consistent with the Lyon hypothesis of x-chromosome inactivation in these families. The findings suggest an x-linked inheritance in these females with chronic granulomatous disease. Images PMID:7400319

  13. Mutations in MED12 Cause X-Linked Ohdo Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke T.; de Vries, Bert B.A.; van Bon, Bregje W.M.; Hoischen, Alexander; Ruiterkamp-Versteeg, Martina; Gilissen, Christian; Gao, Fangjian; van Zwam, Marloes; Harteveld, Cornelis L.; van Essen, Anthonie J.; Hamel, Ben C.J.; Kleefstra, Tjitske; Willemsen, Michèl A.A.P.; Yntema, Helger G.; van Bokhoven, Hans; Brunner, Han G.; Boyer, Thomas G.; de Brouwer, Arjan P.M.

    2013-01-01

    Ohdo syndrome comprises a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by intellectual disability (ID) and typical facial features, including blepharophimosis. Clinically, these blepharophimosis-ID syndromes have been classified in five distinct subgroups, including the Maat-Kievit-Brunner (MKB) type, which, in contrast to the others, is characterized by X-linked inheritance and facial coarsening at older age. We performed exome sequencing in two families, each with two affected males with Ohdo syndrome MKB type. In the two families, MED12 missense mutations (c.3443G>A [p.Arg1148His] or c.3493T>C [p.Ser1165Pro]) segregating with the phenotype were identified. Upon subsequent analysis of an additional cohort of nine simplex male individuals with Ohdo syndrome, one additional de novo missense change (c.5185C>A [p.His1729Asn]) in MED12 was detected. The occurrence of three different hemizygous missense mutations in three unrelated families affected by Ohdo syndrome MKB type shows that mutations in MED12 are the underlying cause of this X-linked form of Ohdo syndrome. Together with the recently described KAT6B mutations resulting in Ohdo syndrome Say/Barber/Biesecker/Young/Simpson type, our findings point to aberrant chromatin modification as being central to the pathogenesis of Ohdo syndrome. PMID:23395478

  14. Severe papillomavirus infection progressing to metastatic squamous cell carcinoma in bone marrow-transplanted X-linked SCID dogs.

    PubMed

    Goldschmidt, Michael H; Kennedy, Jeffrey S; Kennedy, Douglas R; Yuan, Hang; Holt, David E; Casal, Margret L; Traas, Anne M; Mauldin, Elizabeth A; Moore, Peter F; Henthorn, Paula S; Hartnett, Brian J; Weinberg, Kenneth I; Schlegel, Richard; Felsburg, Peter J

    2006-07-01

    Canine X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (XSCID) is due to mutations in the common gamma chain (gammac) gene and is identical clinically and immunologically to human XSCID, making it a true homologue of the human disease. Bone marrow-transplanted (BMT) XSCID dogs not only engraft donor T cells and reconstitute normal T-cell function but, in contrast to the majority of transplanted human XSCID patients, also engraft donor B cells and reconstitute normal humoral immune function. Shortly after our initial report of successful BMT of XSCID dogs, it soon became evident that transplanted XSCID dogs developed late-onset severe chronic cutaneous infections containing a newly described canine papillomavirus. This is analogous to the late-onset cutaneous papillomavirus infection recently described for human XSCID patients following BMT. Of 24 transplanted XSCID dogs followed for at least 1 year post-BMT, 71% developed chronic canine papillomavirus infection. Six of the transplanted dogs that developed cutaneous papillomas were maintained for >3 1/2 years post-BMT for use as breeders. Four of these six dogs (67%) developed invasive squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), with three of the dogs (75%) eventually developing metastatic SCC, an extremely rare consequence of SCC in the dog. This finding raises the question of whether SCC will develop in transplanted human XSCID patients later in life. Canine XSCID therefore provides an ideal animal model with which to study the role of the gammac-dependent signaling pathway in the response to papillomavirus infections and the progression of these viral infections to metastatic SCC.

  15. X-linked creatine transporter deficiency: clinical aspects and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    van de Kamp, Jiddeke M; Mancini, Grazia M; Salomons, Gajja S

    2014-09-01

    Creatine transporter deficiency was discovered in 2001 as an X-linked cause of intellectual disability characterized by cerebral creatine deficiency. This review describes the current knowledge regarding creatine metabolism, the creatine transporter and the clinical aspects of creatine transporter deficiency. The condition mainly affects the brain while other creatine requiring organs, such as the muscles, are relatively spared. Recent studies have provided strong evidence that creatine synthesis also occurs in the brain, leading to the intriguing question of why cerebral creatine is deficient in creatine transporter deficiency. The possible mechanisms explaining the cerebral creatine deficiency are discussed. The creatine transporter knockout mouse provides a good model to study the disease. Over the past years several treatment options have been explored but no treatment has been proven effective. Understanding the pathogenesis of creatine transporter deficiency is of paramount importance in the development of an effective treatment.

  16. X linked adrenoleukodystrophy: clinical presentation, diagnosis, and therapy

    PubMed Central

    van Geel, B. M; Assies, J.; Wanders, R.; Barth, P.

    1997-01-01

    X linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is an inherited disorder of peroxisomal metabolism, biochemically characterised by accumulation of saturated very long chain fatty acids. Accumulation of these fatty acids is associated with cerebral demyelination, peripheral nerve abnormalities, and adrenocortical and testicular insufficiency. The lowest estimated birth incidence is one per 100 000. At least six phenotypes can be distinguished, of which the two most frequent are childhood cerebral ALD and adrenomyeloneuropathy. The X-ALD gene has been identified, but thus far no relation between genotype and phenotype has been found. Diagnosis is relatively easy and can be confirmed reliably, and prenatal testing is possible in affected families. Several therapeutic options, some with promising perspectives, are available. Neurologists and other physicians seem not to be familiar with the many facets of X-ALD. In this review, the clinical presentation, the relative frequencies of the different phenotypes, and the diagnostic and therapeutic options are presented.

 PMID:9221959

  17. [Peroxisomal ABC transporters and X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy].

    PubMed

    Geillon, Flore; Trompier, Doriane; Gondcaille, Catherine; Lizard, Gérard; Savary, Stéphane

    2012-12-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a complex neurodegenerative disease associated with mutations in the ABCD1 gene, which encodes for a peroxisomal ABC transporter. Thanks to the efforts of the ELA foundation and to the recent successes of gene therapy published in Science in 2009, X-ALD is better known but still remains poorly understood. The exact role of ABCD1 and its homologs, as well as the exact link between the biochemical and metabolic peroxisomal defects and the clinical symptoms of the disease remain to be elucidated. This review summarizes the knowledge concerning the subfamily D of the ABC transporter family and concerning X-ALD, the most frequent peroxisomal disorder. © 2012 médecine/sciences – Inserm / SRMS.

  18. Potential application of gene therapy to X-linked agammaglobulinemia.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Thomas; Calmels, Boris; Barlogis, Vincent; Michel, Gérard; Tonnelle, Cécile; Chabannon, Christian

    2007-08-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA), or Bruton's disease, is the most common human primary humoral immunodeficiency. XLA is caused by mutations of the Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK), a key regulator of B-cell physiology. Since the mid 80's, substitutive therapy by intravenous gammaglobulin infusions has significantly improved XLA patient survival and quality of life. Nevertheless, some frequent affections persist despite treatment, and lead to handicapping and further to morbid clinical complications for XLA individuals. Development of gene therapy by transfer of the BTK gene into hematopoietic progenitors could represent an alternative strategy for the treatment of Bruton's disease, with the advantage of a definitive cure for XLA patients. Gene therapy of XLA could be considered as a paradigm for future expansion of gene therapy approaches for many other diseases, since future utilization may be strictly dependent on a marked improvement of risk-benefit ratio compared to pre-existing treatments.

  19. Visual acuity and X-linked color blindness.

    PubMed

    Jägle, Herbert; de Luca, Emanuela; Serey, Ludwig; Bach, Michael; Sharpe, Lindsay T

    2006-04-01

    Optimal sampling for visual acuity requires a fine array of cones with identical sensitivity. Thus, dichromats, whose inner fovea is made up of cones having the same spectral sensitivity, may have better than normal visual acuity. We investigated this by comparing the visual acuities of trichromats and X-linked dichromats, while taking into account the different molecular genetics underlying the disorder. Our subjects were age- and refraction-matched groups of normals (n=8) and X-linked dichromats (n=13). The dichromats (four protanopes and nine deuteranopes) were genotyped and classified according to whether they carried a single (n=6) or multiple (n=7) visual pigment genes on their X-chromosome. Visual acuity was measured in both eyes with the Freiburger Visual Acuity Test. Normal trichromats and ungenotyped dichromats do not significantly differ in visual acuity, nor do ungenotyped protanopes and deuteranopes. However, multi-gene dichromats, who possess more than one photopigment gene in the array, all of which encode for the same long- or middle-wavelength sensitive photopigment, have significantly higher visual acuity than either normal trichromats or dichromats who have only a single-gene. Multi-gene dichromats may benefit from a reduction in chromatic aberration and chromatic noise in the high acuity channel, normally a consequence of combining signals from different cone photoreceptor types and of cone-specific patterns of retinal image defocus and blur. Single-gene dichromats may not share in the advantage because of other molecular differences that influence the development of the retinal mosaic and/or its visual pathways.

  20. Glutathione imbalance in patients with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Petrillo, Sara; Piemonte, Fiorella; Pastore, Anna; Tozzi, Giulia; Aiello, Chiara; Pujol, Aurora; Cappa, Marco; Bertini, Enrico

    2013-08-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a genetic disorder of X-linked inheritance caused by a mutation in the ABCD1 gene which determines an accumulation of long-chain fatty acids in plasma and tissues. Recent evidence shows that oxidative stress may be a hallmark in the pathogenesis of X-ALD and glutathione plays an important role in the defense against free radicals. In this study we have analyzed glutathione homeostasis in lymphocytes of 14 patients with X-ALD and evaluated the balance between oxidized and reduced forms of glutathione, in order to define the role of this crucial redox marker in this condition. Lymphocytes, plasma and erythrocytes were obtained from the whole blood of 14 subjects with X-ALD and in 30 healthy subjects. Total, reduced and protein-bound glutathione levels were measured in lymphocytes by HPLC analysis. Erythrocyte free glutathione and antioxidant enzyme activities, plasma thiols and carbonyl content were determined by spectrophotometric assays. A significant decrease of total and reduced glutathione was found in lymphocytes of patients, associated to high levels of all oxidized glutathione forms. A decline of free glutathione was particularly significant in erythrocytes. The increased oxidative stress in X-ALD was additionally confirmed by the decrease of plasma thiols and the high level of carbonyls. Our results strongly support a role for oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of X-ALD and strengthen the importance of the balance among glutathione forms as a hallmark and a potential biomarker of the disease. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Glutathione imbalance in patients with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy☆

    PubMed Central

    Petrillo, Sara; Piemonte, Fiorella; Pastore, Anna; Tozzi, Giulia; Aiello, Chiara; Pujol, Aurora; Cappa, Marco; Bertini, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Background X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a genetic disorder of X-linked inheritance caused by a mutation in the ABCD1 gene which determines an accumulation of long-chain fatty acids in plasma and tissues. Recent evidence shows that oxidative stress may be a hallmark in the pathogenesis of X-ALD and glutathione plays an important role in the defense against free radicals. In this study we have analyzed glutathione homeostasis in lymphocytes of 14 patients with X-ALD and evaluated the balance between oxidized and reduced forms of glutathione, in order to define the role of this crucial redox marker in this condition. Methods Lymphocytes, plasma and erythrocytes were obtained from the whole blood of 14 subjects with X-ALD and in 30 healthy subjects. Total, reduced and protein-bound glutathione levels were measured in lymphocytes by HPLC analysis. Erythrocyte free glutathione and antioxidant enzyme activities, plasma thiols and carbonyl content were determined by spectrophotometric assays. Results A significant decrease of total and reduced glutathione was found in lymphocytes of patients, associated to high levels of all oxidized glutathione forms. A decline of free glutathione was particularly significant in erythrocytes. The increased oxidative stress in X-ALD was additionally confirmed by the decrease of plasma thiols and the high level of carbonyls. Conclusion Our results strongly support a role for oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of X-ALD and strengthen the importance of the balance among glutathione forms as a hallmark and a potential biomarker of the disease. PMID:23768953

  2. Next-generation sequencing in X-linked intellectual disability

    PubMed Central

    Tzschach, Andreas; Grasshoff, Ute; Beck-Woedl, Stefanie; Dufke, Claudia; Bauer, Claudia; Kehrer, Martin; Evers, Christina; Moog, Ute; Oehl-Jaschkowitz, Barbara; Di Donato, Nataliya; Maiwald, Robert; Jung, Christine; Kuechler, Alma; Schulz, Solveig; Meinecke, Peter; Spranger, Stephanie; Kohlhase, Jürgen; Seidel, Jörg; Reif, Silke; Rieger, Manuela; Riess, Angelika; Sturm, Marc; Bickmann, Julia; Schroeder, Christopher; Dufke, Andreas; Riess, Olaf; Bauer, Peter

    2015-01-01

    X-linked intellectual disability (XLID) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder with more than 100 genes known to date. Most genes are responsible for a small proportion of patients only, which has hitherto hampered the systematic screening of large patient cohorts. We performed targeted enrichment and next-generation sequencing of 107 XLID genes in a cohort of 150 male patients. Hundred patients had sporadic intellectual disability, and 50 patients had a family history suggestive of XLID. We also analysed a sporadic female patient with severe ID and epilepsy because she had strongly skewed X-inactivation. Target enrichment and high parallel sequencing allowed a diagnostic coverage of >10 reads for ~96% of all coding bases of the XLID genes at a mean coverage of 124 reads. We found 18 pathogenic variants in 13 XLID genes (AP1S2, ATRX, CUL4B, DLG3, IQSEC2, KDM5C, MED12, OPHN1, SLC9A6, SMC1A, UBE2A, UPF3B and ZDHHC9) among the 150 male patients. Thirteen pathogenic variants were present in the group of 50 familial patients (26%), and 5 pathogenic variants among the 100 sporadic patients (5%). Systematic gene dosage analysis for low coverage exons detected one pathogenic hemizygous deletion. An IQSEC2 nonsense variant was detected in the female ID patient, providing further evidence for a role of this gene in encephalopathy in females. Skewed X-inactivation was more frequently observed in mothers with pathogenic variants compared with those without known X-linked defects. The mutation rate in the cohort of sporadic patients corroborates previous estimates of 5–10% for X-chromosomal defects in male ID patients. PMID:25649377

  3. [X-linked alpha-thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome].

    PubMed

    Wada, Takahito

    2009-04-01

    X-linked alpha-thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome (ATR-X syndrome, OMIM #301040) is one of the syndromes associated with abnormal epigenetic gene regulation, including ICF(DNMT3B), Rett (MECP2), Rubinstein-Taybi (CBP), Coffin-Lowry (RSK2), and Sotos (NSD1) syndromes. It is a syndromic form of X-linked mental retardation, which affects males and is characterized by profound mental retardation, mild HbH disease (alpha-thalassemia), facial dysmorphism, skeletal abnormalities, and autistic behavior. ATR-X syndrome is caused by a mutation in the ATRX gene on the X chromosome (Xq13), which encodes ATRX protein, belonging to the SNF2 family of chromatin-remodeling proteins. The protein has two functionally important domains: an ADD (ATRX-DNMT3-DNMT3L) domain at the N-terminus, and chromatin-remodeling domain in the C-terminal half, where the ATRX gene mutations of most ATR-X patients reside. Perturbation in DNA methylation in the rDNA genes was repored in ATR-X patients, and ATRX protein is presumed to be involved in the establishment and maintenance of DNA methylation. Based on its various clinical phenotypes, the expressions of many genes, including alpha globin genes, seem to be abnormally regulated in ATR-X patients. However, the precise mechanism involving ATRX protein remains to be elucidated. Epigenetics can link environmental and genetic causes of many pathological conditions. The genes, which are abnormally regulated by a perturbed epigenetic mechanism, are, in themselves, structurally normal, and the elucidation of their mechanism may lead to the development of appropriate therapy.

  4. Gene therapy rescues photoreceptor blindness in dogs and paves the way for treating human X-linked retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Beltran, William A; Cideciyan, Artur V; Lewin, Alfred S; Iwabe, Simone; Khanna, Hemant; Sumaroka, Alexander; Chiodo, Vince A; Fajardo, Diego S; Román, Alejandro J; Deng, Wen-Tao; Swider, Malgorzata; Alemán, Tomas S; Boye, Sanford L; Genini, Sem; Swaroop, Anand; Hauswirth, William W; Jacobson, Samuel G; Aguirre, Gustavo D

    2012-02-07

    Hereditary retinal blindness is caused by mutations in genes expressed in photoreceptors or retinal pigment epithelium. Gene therapy in mouse and dog models of a primary retinal pigment epithelium disease has already been translated to human clinical trials with encouraging results. Treatment for common primary photoreceptor blindness, however, has not yet moved from proof of concept to the clinic. We evaluated gene augmentation therapy in two blinding canine photoreceptor diseases that model the common X-linked form of retinitis pigmentosa caused by mutations in the retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator (RPGR) gene, which encodes a photoreceptor ciliary protein, and provide evidence that the therapy is effective. After subretinal injections of adeno-associated virus-2/5-vectored human RPGR with human IRBP or GRK1 promoters, in vivo imaging showed preserved photoreceptor nuclei and inner/outer segments that were limited to treated areas. Both rod and cone photoreceptor function were greater in treated (three of four) than in control eyes. Histopathology indicated normal photoreceptor structure and reversal of opsin mislocalization in treated areas expressing human RPGR protein in rods and cones. Postreceptoral remodeling was also corrected: there was reversal of bipolar cell dendrite retraction evident with bipolar cell markers and preservation of outer plexiform layer thickness. Efficacy of gene therapy in these large animal models of X-linked retinitis pigmentosa provides a path for translation to human treatment.

  5. X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy: genes, mutations, and phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Smith, K D; Kemp, S; Braiterman, L T; Lu, J F; Wei, H M; Geraghty, M; Stetten, G; Bergin, J S; Pevsner, J; Watkins, P A

    1999-04-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a complex and perplexing neurodegenerative disorder. The metabolic abnormality, elevated levels of very long-chain fatty acids in tissues and plasma, and the biochemical defect, reduced peroxisomal very long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase (VLCS) activity, are ubiquitous features of the disease. However, clinical manifestations are highly variable with regard to time of onset, site of initial pathology and rate of progression. In addition, the abnormal gene in X-ALD is not the gene for VLCS. Rather, it encodes a peroxisomal membrane protein with homology to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transmembrane transporter superfamily of proteins. The X-ALD protein (ALDP) is closely related to three other peroxisomal membrane ABC proteins. In this report we summarize all known X-ALD mutations and establish the lack of an X-ALD genotype/phenotype correlation. We compare the evolutionary relationships among peroxisomal ABC proteins, demonstrate that ALDP forms homodimers with itself and heterodimers with other peroxisomal ABC proteins and present cDNA complementation studies suggesting that the peroxisomal ABC proteins have overlapping functions. We also establish that there are at least two peroxisomal VLCS activities, one that is ALDP dependent and one that is ALDP independent. Finally, we discuss variable expression of the peroxisomal ABC proteins and ALDP independent VLCS in relation to the variable clinical presentations of X-ALD.

  6. Diagnosis of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy in blood leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Unterberger, Ursula; Regelsberger, Günther; Sundt, Regina; Bernheimer, Hanno; Voigtländer, Till

    2007-09-01

    Our aim was to replace cultured skin fibroblasts in the diagnosis of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) by peripheral blood cells. Very long chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) were analyzed in leukocytes from X-ALD patients, heterozygotes, and controls using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Immunofluorescence for adrenoleukodystrophy protein (ALDP) was performed in mononuclear blood cell preparations of X-ALD patients known to be ALDP negative in fibroblasts, heterozygote relatives of these patients, and controls. All X-ALD patients were distinguishable from controls by VLCFA analysis in leukocytes. 91.7% of heterozygotes were identified by combined VLCFA analysis in leukocytes and plasma. All patients investigated lacked ALDP immunoreactivity in mononuclear cells, while heterozygotes showed mosaic patterns of positive and negative cells. Determination of VLCFAs by GC-MS in combination with ALDP immunofluorescence in peripheral blood cells provides a fast and minimally invasive diagnostic method for X-ALD, which, in contrast to plasma analysis, is independent of alimentary influences. Notably, joint evaluation of leukocytes and plasma considerably improves the identification of heterozygotes.

  7. X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy: clinical, biochemical and pathogenetic aspects.

    PubMed

    Berger, Johannes; Gärtner, Jutta

    2006-12-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a clinically heterogeneous disorder ranging from the severe childhood cerebral form to asymptomatic persons. The overall incidence is 1:16,800 including hemizygotes as well as heterozygotes. The principal molecular defect is due to inborn mutations in the ABCD1 gene encoding the adrenoleukodystrophy protein (ALDP), a transporter in the peroxisome membrane. ALDP is involved in the transport of substrates from the cytoplasm into the peroxisomal lumen. ALDP defects lead to characteristic accumulation of saturated very long-chain fatty acids, the diagnostic disease marker. The pathogenesis is unclear. Different molecular mechanisms seem to induce inflammatory demyelination, neurodegeneration and adrenocortical insufficiency involving the primary ABCD1 defect, environmental factors and modifier genes. Important information has been derived from the X-ALD mouse models; species differences however complicate the interpretation of results. So far, bone marrow transplantation is the only effective long-term treatment for childhood cerebral X-ALD, however, only when performed at an early-stage of disease. Urgently needed novel therapeutic strategies are under consideration ranging from dietary approaches to gene therapy.

  8. X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy: clinical, metabolic, genetic and pathophysiological aspects.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Stephan; Berger, Johannes; Aubourg, Patrick

    2012-09-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is the most frequent peroxisomal disease. The two main clinical phenotypes of X-ALD are adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN) and inflammatory cerebral ALD that manifests either in children or more rarely in adults. About 65% of heterozygote females develop symptoms by the age of 60years. Mutations in the ABCD1 gene affect the function of the encoded protein ALDP, an ATP-binding-cassette (ABC) transporter located in the peroxisomal membrane protein. ALDP deficiency impairs the peroxisomal beta-oxidation of very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA) and facilitates their further chain elongation by ELOVL1 resulting in accumulation of VLCFA in plasma and tissues. While all patients have mutations in the ABCD1 gene, there is no general genotype-phenotype correlation. Environmental factors and a multitude of modifying genes appear to determine the clinical manifestation in this monogenetic but multifactorial disease. This review focuses on the clinical, biochemical, genetic and pathophysiological aspects of X-ALD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Clinical aspects of X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, A; Phillips, D I; Brown, R; Harper, P S

    1987-01-01

    Boys with X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia and their families were studied. Many suffered severe illness in early childhood and nearly 30% died; many had feeding problems, severe fever, atopic disease, and recurrent respiratory infections. Some infants failed to thrive. We found no consistent common endocrine or immunological abnormality, although, most had abnormal immunoglobulin production. This may be related to the abnormal mucosa of the gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts which exacerbates the chronic obstructive airways disease found later in life in those who smoke. Mental handicap was not a feature, although convulsions sometimes occurred during fever. Early diagnosis is important to avoid attacks of severe fever and so that rational management may be planned for other problems that arise. Dental advice should be sought before school age and genetic counselling may also be required. Many female carriers may be recognised at clinical examination: their affected sons can then be diagnosed more readily. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:2445301

  10. X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy presenting as Addison’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Morell, Bernhard Kaspar; Teichler, Jens; Budak, Kemal; Vollenweider, Jörg; Pavlicek, Vojtech

    2010-01-01

    We report the case of a young man with a history of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and mild cognitive impairment who presented with chronic fatigue, anorexia and progressive darkening of the skin. On laboratory testing, severely depressed concentrations of morning cortisol, along with highly elevated values of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) revealed primary adrenal insufficiency as the primary cause of the patient’s symptomatology. Imaging of the brain showed altered signal intensities in the parieto-occipital regions of the brain. The demonstration of increased very long chain fatty acids (VLCFA) established the diagnosis of adolescent X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD). Presenting at an advanced yet slowly progressive stage the patient was not a suitable candidate for haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), and treatment focused on hormone replacement therapy, family counselling and supportive care. On follow-up visits within the following year, fatigue had diminished and there was no evidence of progressive neurological deficits. However, exacerbation of the psychiatric symptomatology resulted in admittance to a psychiatric ward. PMID:22753300

  11. Oxidative Stress in Patients with X-Linked Adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Deon, Marion; Marchetti, Desirèe P; Donida, Bruna; Wajner, Moacir; Vargas, Carmen

    2016-05-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is the most frequent peroxisomal disorder that is characterized by progressive demyelination of the white matter, adrenal insufficiency, and accumulation of very long-chain fatty acids in body fluid and tissues. This disorder is clinically heterogeneous with seven different phenotypes in male patients and five phenotypes in female carriers. An ultimate treatment for X-ALD is not available. Depending on the rate of the disease progression and the degree of an individual handicap, special needs and challenges vary greatly. The exact mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of this multifactorial neurodegenerative disorder remains obscure. Previous studies has been related oxidative stress with the pathogenesis of several disease that affecting the central nervous system, such as neurodegenerative disease, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer, and Parkinson diseases. In addition, oxidative damage has been observed in various in vivo and in vitro studies with inborn errors of metabolism, including X-ALD. In this context, this review is focused on oxidative stress in X-ALD, with emphasis on studies using biological samples from patients affected by this disease.

  12. Progression rate of myelopathy in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy heterozygotes.

    PubMed

    Habekost, Clarissa Troller; Pereira, Fernanda Santos; Vargas, Carmen Regla; Coelho, Daniella Moura; Torrez, Vitor; Oses, Jean Pierre; Portela, Luis Valmor; Schestatsky, Pedro; Felix, Vitor Torres; Matte, Ursula; Torman, Vanessa Leotti; Jardim, Laura Bannach

    2015-10-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy heterozygote women can present adult onset myeloneuropathy and little is known about its natural history. We aimed to describe the progression rate of the neurological impairment in the prospective follow-up of our cohort and to look for prognostic factors. The neurological scales Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) and Severity Score System for Progressive Myelopathy (SSPROM) were applied at baseline in 29 symptomatic carriers and in follow-up visits. Age at onset, disease duration, X inactivation pattern, determination of the allele expressed, plasma levels of the very long chain fatty acids and of the neuron-specific enolase, and somato-sensory evoked potentials, were taken at baseline. The slope of the linear regression of both JOA and SSPROM versus disease duration since the first symptom was estimated using mixed modeling. JOA and SSPROM decreased 0.42 and 1.87 points per year, respectively (p < 0.001). None of the parameters under study influenced these rates. We estimated that the number of carriers per arm needed in a future 12 month trial with 80% power and a 50% reduction in disease progression would be 225 women for JOA and 750 for SSPROM. The progression rates of the studied neurological scales were small, did not depend on any modifier factor known, and reflected the characteristically slow worsening of symptoms in X-ALD heterozygotes. Better biomarkers are still necessary for future studies.

  13. X-linked dystonia parkinsonism: clinical phenotype, genetics and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Rosales, Raymond L

    2010-10-01

    The clinical phenotype of X-Linked Dystonia Parkinsonism (XDP) is typically one that involves a Filipino adult male whose ancestry is mostly traced in the Philippine island of Panay. Dystonia usually starts focally in the lower limbs or oromandibular regions, then spreads to become generalized eventually. Parkinsonism sets in later into the disease and usually in combination with dystonia. /DYT3/ and /TAF1/ are the two genes associated with XDP. An SVA retrotransposon insertion in an intron of /TAF1/ may reduce neuron-specific expression of the /TAF1/ isoform in the caudate nucleus, and subsequently interfere with the transcription of many neuronal genes. Polypharmacy with oral benzodiazepines, anticholinergic agents and muscle relaxants leaves much to be desired in terms of efficacy. The medications to date that may appear beneficial, especially in disabling dystonias, are zolpidem, muscle afferent block with lidocaine-ethanol and botulinum toxin type A. Despite the few cases undergoing deep brain stimulation, this functional surgery has shown the greatest promise in XDP. An illustrative case of XDP in a family depicts the variable course of illness, including a bout of "status dystonicus," challenges in therapy, reckoning with the social impact of the disease, and eventual patient demise. Indeed, there remains some gaps in understanding some phenomenological, genetic and treatment aspects of XDP, the areas upon which future research directions may be worthwhile.

  14. [Gene mutation analysis of X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets].

    PubMed

    Song, Ying; Ma, Hong-Wei; Li, Fang; Hu, Man; Ren, Shuang; Yu, Ya-Fen; Zhao, Gui-Jie

    2013-11-01

    To investigate the frequency and type of PHEX gene mutations in children with X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets (XLH), the possible presence of mutational hot spots, and the relationship between genotype and clinical phenotype. Clinical data of 10 children with XLH was retrospectively reviewed. The relationship between gene mutation type and severity of XLH was evaluated. PHEX gene mutations were detected in all 10 children with XLH, including 6 cases of missense mutation, 2 cases of splice site mutation, 1 case of frameshift mutation, and 1 case of nonsense mutation. Two new mutations, c.2048T>C and IVS14+1delAG, were found. The type of PHEX gene mutation was not associated with the degree of short stature and leg deformity (P=0.571 and 0.467), and the mutation site was also not associated with the degree of short stature and leg deformity (P=0.400 and 1.000). Missense mutation is the most common type of PHEX gene mutation in children with XLH, and c.2048T>C and IVS14+1delAG are two new PHEX gene mutations. The type and site of PHEX gene mutation are not associated with the severity of XLH.

  15. Discordant phenotype in siblings with X-linked agammaglobulinemia

    SciTech Connect

    Bykowsky, M.J.; Veksler, K.S.; Sullivan, K.E.

    1996-03-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a congenital humoral immunodeficiency caused by a defect in a B-cell-specific signaling molecule, Btk. There has been little concordance of phenotype with genotype in this disorder, and defects in Btk cause immunodeficiencies that range from mild impairment to complete inability to produce antibodies. The factors modifying the phenotype of XLA are not understood. The current study is the first description of two male siblings with identical T{sup 134}{yields}C mutations in the translation initiation ATG of Btk who have different clinical phenotypes as well as different laboratory phenotypes. The proband lacks immunoglobulins and B cells and has recurrent infections, while the elder, affected brother has normal levels of IgG and IgM and very few infections. Both have undetectable levels of Btk kinase activity in circulating mononuclear cells. Complete sequencing of Btk gene transcripts in both brothers revealed no additional mutations to account for the discordant phenotypes. This description provides unequivocal evidence that the phenotype of XLA is influenced by factors additional to the Btk gene. 39 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Molecular and cellular pathogenesis of X-linked lymphoproliferative disease.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Kim E; Ma, Cindy S; Cannons, Jennifer L; Schwartzberg, Pamela L; Tangye, Stuart G

    2005-02-01

    X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) is an inherited immune defect caused by mutations in the Src homology 2 domain-containing gene 1A, which encodes the adapter protein, signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM)-associated protein (SAP). SAP is expressed in T cells, natural killer (NK) cells, and NKT cells, where it binds to the cytoplasmic domain of the surface receptor SLAM (CD150) and the related receptors, 2B4 (CD244), CD84, Ly9 (CD229), NK-T-B-antigen, and CD2-like receptor-activating cytotoxic T cells. SAP also binds to the Src family tyrosine kinase Fyn and recruits it to SLAM, which leads to the generation of downstream phosphotyrosine signals. While the roles of the SLAM family receptors are only beginning to be understood, experiments suggest that these molecules regulate important aspects of lymphocyte function, such as proliferation, cytokine secretion, cytotoxicity, and antibody production. Thus, in XLP patients who lack functional SAP, the SLAM family receptors may not signal properly. This property likely contributes to the phenotypes of XLP, including fulminant infectious mononucleosis, lymphoma, and hypogammaglobulinemia. Further studies of SAP and the SLAM family receptors will provide insights into XLP and elucidate the signaling events regulating lymphocyte ontogeny and function.

  17. Heterogeneity analysis in 40 X-linked retinitis pigmentosa families

    SciTech Connect

    Teague, P.W.; Aldred, M.A.; Dempster, M.; Harrison, C.; Carothers, A.D.; Hardwick, L.J.; Evans, H.J.; Wright, A.F.; Strain, L.; Brock, D.J.H. )

    1994-07-01

    Analysis of genetic heterogeneity in 40 kindreds with X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP), with 20 polymorphic markers, showed that significant heterogeneity is present (P=.001) and that 56% of kindreds are of RP3 type and that 26% are of RP2 type. The location of the RP3 locus was found to be 0.4 cM distal to OTC in the Xp21.1 region, and that of the RP2 locus was 6.5 cM proximal to DXS7 in Xp11.2-p11.3. Bayesian probabilities of linkage to RP2, RP3, or to neither locus were calculated. This showed that 20 of 40 kindreds could be assigned to one or the other locus, with a probability >.70 (14 kindreds with RP3 and 6 kindreds with RP2 disease). A further three kindreds were found to be unlinked to either locus, with a probability >.8. The remaining 17 kindreds could not be classified unambiguously. This highlights the difficulty of classifying families in the presence of genetic heterogeneity, where two loci are separated by an estimated 16 cM. 34 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  18. A novel locus for X-linked retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Tong, Zongzhong; Yang, Zhenglin; Meyer, J Jay; McInnes, Allen W; Xue, Lai; Azimi, Asif M; Baird, Jenn; Zhao, Yu; Pearson, Erik; Wang, Changguan; Chen, Yali; Zhang, Kang

    2006-07-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is the most prevalent group of inherited retinopathies and demonstrates considerable clinical and genetic heterogeneity, with wide variations in disease severity, progression, and gene involvement. We studied a large family with RP to determine the pattern of inheritance and to identify the disease-causing gene/locus. Ophthalmic examination was performed on 35 family members to identify affected individuals and carriers and to characterise the disease phenotype. Genetic linkage analysis was performed using short tandem repeat (STR) polymorphic markers encompassing the known loci for Xlinked RP (xlRP) including RP2, RP3, RP6, RP23, and RP24. Mutation screening was performed by direct sequencing of PCR-amplified genomic DNA of the RP2 and RPGR genes of the affected individuals. A highly penetrant, X-linked form of RP was observed in this family. Age of onset was from 5 to 8 years and visual acuity ranged from 20/25 in children to light perception in older adults. Linkage analysis and direct sequencing showed that no known loci/genes were associated with the phenotype in this kindred. A novel disease gene locus/loci is responsible for the xlRP phenotype in this family.

  19. Tubulointerstitial nephritis complicating IVIG therapy for X-linked agammaglobulinemia.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Keisuke; Nishi, Hitomi; Miyazawa, Tomoki; Wada, Norihisa; Izu, Akane; Enya, Takuji; Okada, Mitsuru; Takemura, Tsukasa

    2014-07-08

    Patients with X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) develop immune-complex induced diseases such as nephropathy only rarely, presumably because their immunoglobulin (Ig) G concentration is low. We encountered a patient with XLA who developed tubulointerstitial nephritis during treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). A 20-year-old man was diagnosed with XLA 3 months after birth and subsequently received periodic γ-globulin replacement therapy. Renal dysfunction developed at 19 years of age in association with high urinary β2-microglobulin (MG) concentrations. A renal biopsy specimen showed dense CD3-positive lymphocytic infiltration in the tubulointerstitium and tubular atrophy, while no IgG4-bearing cell infiltration was found. Fibrosclerosis and crescent formation were evident in some glomeruli. Fluorescent antibody staining demonstrated deposition of IgG and complement component C3 in tubular basement membranes. After pulse steroid therapy was initiated, urinary β2-MG and serum creatinine concentrations improved. Neither drug reactions nor collagen disease were likely causes of tubular interstitial disorder in this patient. Although BK virus was ruled out, IgG in the γ-globulin preparation might have reacted with a pathogen present in the patient to form low-molecular-weight immune complexes that were deposited in the tubular basement membrane.

  20. Tubulointerstitial nephritis complicating IVIG therapy for X-linked agammaglobulinemia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) develop immune-complex induced diseases such as nephropathy only rarely, presumably because their immunoglobulin (Ig) G concentration is low. We encountered a patient with XLA who developed tubulointerstitial nephritis during treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). Case presentation A 20-year-old man was diagnosed with XLA 3 months after birth and subsequently received periodic γ-globulin replacement therapy. Renal dysfunction developed at 19 years of age in association with high urinary β2-microglobulin (MG) concentrations. A renal biopsy specimen showed dense CD3-positive lymphocytic infiltration in the tubulointerstitium and tubular atrophy, while no IgG4-bearing cell infiltration was found. Fibrosclerosis and crescent formation were evident in some glomeruli. Fluorescent antibody staining demonstrated deposition of IgG and complement component C3 in tubular basement membranes. After pulse steroid therapy was initiated, urinary β2-MG and serum creatinine concentrations improved. Conclusion Neither drug reactions nor collagen disease were likely causes of tubular interstitial disorder in this patient. Although BK virus was ruled out, IgG in the γ-globulin preparation might have reacted with a pathogen present in the patient to form low-molecular-weight immune complexes that were deposited in the tubular basement membrane. PMID:25005715

  1. Recent developments in certain X-linked genetic eye disorders.

    PubMed

    Shastry, B S

    1993-09-08

    Over the past few years, genetic diseases of the ocular system have become very active and fast-growing research areas in the vision field. The rapid development of the recombinant DNA techniques together with somatic cell genetics, during the last two decades has fueled this progress. As a result, many genetic disease genes have been localized in the human chromosome and several of them have been isolated and characterized. These and other studies have profoundly enriched our basic understanding of genetic eye disorders. Although gene replacement therapy, prenatal diagnosis and carrier detection have not been extensively tried for genetic eye diseases, such attempts will now be feasible. Molecular analyses made it clear that there are many challenging problems that need attention. This report highlights some of these initial developments, particularly on the X-linked major genetic eye diseases. In order to help the beginners and general audience, a brief description of the clinical pathology and the molecular probes used to locate the genetic defects of certain disorders are presented. Disorders are arranged according to their linkage from telomere to telomere on the chromosome to give a coherent structure. It is hoped that this information is useful and of general interest for the beginners, established investigators and ophthalmologists.

  2. [Shifting cellulitis in a patient with X-linked hypogammaglobulinemia].

    PubMed

    Poizeau, F; Droitcourt, C; Saillard, C; Poirot, M; Le Gallou, T; Perlat, A; Dupuy, A

    2016-01-01

    In cases of immunodeficiency, a systemic infection may be revealed by atypical symptoms, particularly those involving the skin. The present case describes a 19-year-old male with X-linked hypogammaglobulinemia, or Bruton agammaglobulinemia, treated with intravenous immunoglobulin G antibodies. Over a 6-week period, the patient developed recurrent plaques in both legs, first on one and then on the other, without fever. Blood cultures were repeated and the fifth pair proved positive for Campylobacter jejuni. An abdominal scan showed appendicitis without intestinal signs. The patient was treated with azithromycin for 2 weeks, which resulted in full recovery from the skin lesions. Campylobacter bacteremia infections are severe and carry a 15% mortality rate at 30 days. The majority of affected patients present humoral immunodeficiency. The literature contains reports of 10 patients with C. jejuni-associated cellulitis, of whom 6 presented hypogammaglobulinemia. We postulate that the cutaneous manifestations were caused by septic metastases. The immunoglobulin replacement therapy mainly comprised IgG antibodies; IgA and IgM antibodies appear to play a key role in the response to C. jejuni infection, which could explain the susceptibility observed. The American guidelines recommend blood and skin cultures in patients with cellular immune defects. We suggest that this recommendation be extended to patients with humoral immunodeficiency. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. High-resolution genomic microarrays for X-linked mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Lugtenberg, Dorien; Veltman, Joris A; van Bokhoven, Hans

    2007-09-01

    Developments in genomic microarray technology have revolutionized the study of human genomic copy number variation. This has significantly affected many areas in human genetics, including the field of X-linked mental retardation (XLMR). Chromosome X-specific bacterial artificial chromosomes microarrays have been developed to specifically test this chromosome with a resolution of approximately 100 kilobases. Application of these microarrays in X-linked mental retardation studies has resulted in the identification of novel X-linked mental retardation genes, copy number variation at known X-linked mental retardation genes, and copy number variations harboring as yet unidentified X-linked mental retardation genes. Further enhancements in genomic microarray analysis will soon allow the reliable analysis of all copy number variations throughout this chromosome at the kilobase or single exon resolution. In this review, we describe the developments in this field and specifically highlight the impact of these microarray studies in the field of X-linked mental retardation.

  4. Altered expression of ALDP in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Watkins, P A; Gould, S J; Smith, M A; Braiterman, L T; Wei, H M; Kok, F; Moser, A B; Moser, H W; Smith, K D

    1995-08-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) is a neurodegenerative disorder with variable phenotypic expression that is characterized by elevated plasma and tissue levels of very long-chain fatty acids. However, the product of the gene defective in ALD (ALDP) is a membrane transporter of the ATP-binding cassette family of proteins and is not related to enzymes known to activate or oxidize fatty acids. We generated an antibody that specifically recognizes the C-terminal 18 amino acids of ALDP and can detect ALDP by indirect immunofluorescence. To better understand the mechanism by which mutations in ALDP lead to disease, we used this antibody to examine the subcellular distribution and relative abundance of ALDP in skin fibroblasts from normal individuals and ALD patients. Punctate immunoreactive material typical of fibroblast peroxisomes was observed in cells from seven normal controls and eight non-ALD patients. Of 35 ALD patients tested, 17 had the childhood-onset cerebral form of the disease, 13 had the milder adult phenotype adrenomyeloneuropathy, 3 had adrenal insufficiency only, and 2 were affected fetuses. More than two-thirds (69%) of all patients studied showed no punctate immunoreactive material. There was no correlation between the immunofluorescence pattern and clinical phenotype. We determined the mutation in the ALD gene in 15 of these patients. Patients with either a deletion or frameshift mutation lacked ALDP immunoreactivity, as expected. Four of 11 patients with missense mutations were also immunonegative, indicating that these mutations affected the stability or localization of ALDP. In the seven immunopositive patients with missense mutations, correlation of the location and nature of the amino acid substitution may provide new insights into the function of this peroxisomal membrane protein. Furthermore, the study of female relatives of immunonegative ALD probands may aid in the assessment of heterozygote status.

  5. Altered expression of ALDP in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, P.A.; Smith, M.A.; Moser, H.W.

    1995-08-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) is a neurodegenerative disorder with variable phenotypic expression that is characterized by elevated plasma and tissue levels of very long-chain fatty acids. However, the product of the gene defective in ALD (ALDP) is a membrane transporter of the ATP-binding cassette family of proteins and is not related to enzymes known to activate or oxidize fatty acids. We generated an antibody that specifically recognizes the C-terminal 18 amino acids of ALDP and can detect ALDP by indirect immunofluorecence. To better understand the mechanism by which mutations in ALDP lead to disease, we used this antibody to examine the subcellular distribution and relative abundance of ALDP in skin fibroblasts from normal individuals and ALD patients. Punctate immunoreactive material typical of fibroblast peroxisomes was observed in cells from seven normal controls and eight non-ALD patients. Of 35 ALD patients tested, 17 had the childhood-onset cerebral form of the disease, 13 had the milder adult phenotype adrenomyeloneuropathy, 3 had adrenal insufficiency only, and 2 were affected fetuses. More than two-thirds (69%) of all patients studied showed no punctate immunoreactive material. There was no correlation between the immunofluorescence pattern and clinical phenotype. We determined the mutation in the ALD gene in 15 of these patients. Patients with either a deletion or frameshift mutation lacked ALDP immunoreactivity, as expected. Four of 11 patients with misense mutations were also immunonegative, indicating that these mutations affected the stability or localization of ALDP. In the seven immunopositive patients with missense mutations, correlation of the location and nature of the amino acid substitution may provide new insights into the function of this peroxisomal membrane protein. Furthermore, the study of female relatives of immunonegative ALD probands may aid in the assessment of heterozygote status. 32 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Altered expression of ALDP in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, P A; Gould, S J; Smith, M A; Braiterman, L T; Wei, H M; Kok, F; Moser, A B; Moser, H W; Smith, K D

    1995-01-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) is a neurodegenerative disorder with variable phenotypic expression that is characterized by elevated plasma and tissue levels of very long-chain fatty acids. However, the product of the gene defective in ALD (ALDP) is a membrane transporter of the ATP-binding cassette family of proteins and is not related to enzymes known to activate or oxidize fatty acids. We generated an antibody that specifically recognizes the C-terminal 18 amino acids of ALDP and can detect ALDP by indirect immunofluorescence. To better understand the mechanism by which mutations in ALDP lead to disease, we used this antibody to examine the subcellular distribution and relative abundance of ALDP in skin fibroblasts from normal individuals and ALD patients. Punctate immunoreactive material typical of fibroblast peroxisomes was observed in cells from seven normal controls and eight non-ALD patients. Of 35 ALD patients tested, 17 had the childhood-onset cerebral form of the disease, 13 had the milder adult phenotype adrenomyeloneuropathy, 3 had adrenal insufficiency only, and 2 were affected fetuses. More than two-thirds (69%) of all patients studied showed no punctate immunoreactive material. There was no correlation between the immunofluorescence pattern and clinical phenotype. We determined the mutation in the ALD gene in 15 of these patients. Patients with either a deletion or frameshift mutation lacked ALDP immunoreactivity, as expected. Four of 11 patients with missense mutations were also immunonegative, indicating that these mutations affected the stability or localization of ALDP. In the seven immunopositive patients with missense mutations, correlation of the location and nature of the amino acid substitution may provide new insights into the function of this peroxisomal membrane protein. Furthermore, the study of female relatives of immunonegative ALD probands may aid in the assessment of heterozygote status. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure

  7. X-linked acrogigantism syndrome: clinical profile and therapeutic responses.

    PubMed

    Beckers, Albert; Lodish, Maya Beth; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Rostomyan, Liliya; Lee, Misu; Faucz, Fabio R; Yuan, Bo; Choong, Catherine S; Caberg, Jean-Hubert; Verrua, Elisa; Naves, Luciana Ansaneli; Cheetham, Tim D; Young, Jacques; Lysy, Philippe A; Petrossians, Patrick; Cotterill, Andrew; Shah, Nalini Samir; Metzger, Daniel; Castermans, Emilie; Ambrosio, Maria Rosaria; Villa, Chiara; Strebkova, Natalia; Mazerkina, Nadia; Gaillard, Stéphan; Barra, Gustavo Barcelos; Casulari, Luis Augusto; Neggers, Sebastian J; Salvatori, Roberto; Jaffrain-Rea, Marie-Lise; Zacharin, Margaret; Santamaria, Beatriz Lecumberri; Zacharieva, Sabina; Lim, Ee Mun; Mantovani, Giovanna; Zatelli, Maria Chaira; Collins, Michael T; Bonneville, Jean-François; Quezado, Martha; Chittiboina, Prashant; Oldfield, Edward H; Bours, Vincent; Liu, Pengfei; W de Herder, Wouter; Pellegata, Natalia; Lupski, James R; Daly, Adrian F; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2015-06-01

    X-linked acrogigantism (X-LAG) is a new syndrome of pituitary gigantism, caused by microduplications on chromosome Xq26.3, encompassing the gene GPR101, which is highly upregulated in pituitary tumors. We conducted this study to explore the clinical, radiological, and hormonal phenotype and responses to therapy in patients with X-LAG syndrome. The study included 18 patients (13 sporadic) with X-LAG and microduplication of chromosome Xq26.3. All sporadic cases had unique duplications and the inheritance pattern in two families was dominant, with all Xq26.3 duplication carriers being affected. Patients began to grow rapidly as early as 2-3 months of age (median 12 months). At diagnosis (median delay 27 months), patients had a median height and weight standard deviation scores (SDS) of >+3.9 SDS. Apart from the increased overall body size, the children had acromegalic symptoms including acral enlargement and facial coarsening. More than a third of cases had increased appetite. Patients had marked hypersecretion of GH/IGF1 and usually prolactin, due to a pituitary macroadenoma or hyperplasia. Primary neurosurgical control was achieved with extensive anterior pituitary resection, but postoperative hypopituitarism was frequent. Control with somatostatin analogs was not readily achieved despite moderate to high levels of expression of somatostatin receptor subtype-2 in tumor tissue. Postoperative use of adjuvant pegvisomant resulted in control of IGF1 in all five cases where it was employed. X-LAG is a new infant-onset gigantism syndrome that has a severe clinical phenotype leading to challenging disease management.

  8. Bullous X linked retinoschisis: clinical features and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Hinds, Anne-Marie; Fahim, Abigail; Moore, Anthony T; Wong, Sui Chien; Michaelides, Michel

    2017-08-28

    A subset of patients with X linked retinoschisis (XLRS) have bullous schisis cavities in the peripheral retina. This study describes the characteristics and prognosis of the bullous form of XLRS. A retrospective case series was performed of nine patients with molecularly proven bullous XLRS seen at a single tertiary centre. All cases of bullous peripheral schisis were bilateral, with one unilateral case at presentation which developed into bilateral bullous schisis over time. The mean age of onset was 1.9 years (range: 1 month-7 years, SD: 2.1 years) and at clinical diagnosis was 5.9 years (range: 1 month-27 years, SD: 9.0 years). Mean follow-up was 11 years (range: 6 months-36 years, SD: 10.8 years). Strabismus was the most common presentation (n=7). Other presenting complaints included decreased vision, floaters and an irregularly shaped pupil. The most frequently associated ocular features were strabismus (100%), vitreous haemorrhage (4/18 eyes, 22%), nystagmus (2/9, 22%) and persistent fetal vasculature (1/18, 6%). Localised tractional detachment was seen in 2/18 (11%) eyes, total detachment that underwent surgical repair in 1/18 (6%) and pigmented demarcation lines in a further 22% of the eyes. There was one eye with exudative retinal detachment. In XLRS, bullous schisis may be congenital or develop soon after birth and most commonly presents with strabismus. Cases may be complicated by some form of retinal detachment, which may be tractional or a Coats-like exudative detachment. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  9. Hypoperfusion predicts lesion progression in cerebral X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Musolino, Patricia Leonor; Rapalino, Otto; Caruso, Paul; Caviness, Verne Strudwick; Eichler, Florian Sebald

    2012-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging sequences such as diffusion and spectroscopy have been well studied in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy, but no data exist on magnetic resonance perfusion imaging. Since inflammation is known to modulate the microcirculation, we investigated the hypothesis that changes in the local perfusion might be one of the earliest signs of lesion development. Twenty patients with different phenotypes of adrenoleukodystrophy and seven age-matched controls were evaluated between 2006 and 2011. Fluid attenuated inversion recovery, post-contrast T(1)-weighted and normalized dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance perfusion cerebral blood volume maps were co-registered, segmented when cerebral lesion was present, and normalized cerebral blood volume values were analysed using a Food and Drug Association approved magnetic resonance perfusion software (NordicICE). Clinical and imaging data were reviewed to determine phenotype and status of progression. All eight patients with cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy had an average 80% decrease in normalized cerebral blood volume at the core of the lesion (P < 0.0001). Beyond the leading edge of contrast enhancement cerebral perfusion varied, patients with progressive lesions showed an average 60% decrease in normalized cerebral blood volume (adults P < 0.05; children P < 0.001), while one child with arrested progression normalized cerebral blood volume in this region. In six of seven patients with cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy lesions and follow-up imaging (2-24 month interval period), we found progression of contrast enhancement into the formerly hypoperfused perilesional zone. Asymptomatic, adrenomyeloneuropathy and female heterozygote patients had no significant changes in cerebral perfusion. Our data indicate that decreased brain magnetic resonance perfusion precedes leakage of the blood-brain barrier as demonstrated by contrast enhancement in cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy and is an early sign of lesion

  10. Hypoperfusion predicts lesion progression in cerebral X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Musolino, Patricia Leonor; Rapalino, Otto; Caruso, Paul; Caviness, Verne Strudwick

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging sequences such as diffusion and spectroscopy have been well studied in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy, but no data exist on magnetic resonance perfusion imaging. Since inflammation is known to modulate the microcirculation, we investigated the hypothesis that changes in the local perfusion might be one of the earliest signs of lesion development. Twenty patients with different phenotypes of adrenoleukodystrophy and seven age-matched controls were evaluated between 2006 and 2011. Fluid attenuated inversion recovery, post-contrast T1-weighted and normalized dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance perfusion cerebral blood volume maps were co-registered, segmented when cerebral lesion was present, and normalized cerebral blood volume values were analysed using a Food and Drug Association approved magnetic resonance perfusion software (NordicICE). Clinical and imaging data were reviewed to determine phenotype and status of progression. All eight patients with cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy had an average 80% decrease in normalized cerebral blood volume at the core of the lesion (P < 0.0001). Beyond the leading edge of contrast enhancement cerebral perfusion varied, patients with progressive lesions showed an average 60% decrease in normalized cerebral blood volume (adults P < 0.05; children P < 0.001), while one child with arrested progression normalized cerebral blood volume in this region. In six of seven patients with cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy lesions and follow-up imaging (2–24 month interval period), we found progression of contrast enhancement into the formerly hypoperfused perilesional zone. Asymptomatic, adrenomyeloneuropathy and female heterozygote patients had no significant changes in cerebral perfusion. Our data indicate that decreased brain magnetic resonance perfusion precedes leakage of the blood–brain barrier as demonstrated by contrast enhancement in cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy and is an early sign of lesion

  11. Gigantism: X-linked acrogigantism and GPR101 mutations.

    PubMed

    Iacovazzo, Donato; Korbonits, Márta

    X-linked acrogigantism (XLAG) is a recently identified condition of early-onset GH excess resulting from the germline or somatic duplication of the GPR101 gene on chromosome Xq26.3. Thirty patients have been formally reported so far. The disease affects mostly females, occurs usually sporadically, and is characterised by early onset and marked overgrowth. Most patients present with concomitant hyperprolactinaemia. Histopathology shows pituitary hyperplasia or pituitary adenoma with or without associated hyperplasia. XLAG-related pituitary adenomas present peculiar histopathological features that should contribute to raise the suspicion of this rare condition. Treatment is frequently challenging and multi-modal. While females present with germline mutations, the sporadic male patients reported so far were somatic mosaics with variable levels of mosaicism, although no differences in the clinical phenotype were observed between patients with germline or somatic duplication. The GPR101 gene encodes an orphan G protein-coupled receptor normally expressed in the central nervous system, and at particularly high levels in the hypothalamus. While the physiological function and the endogenous ligand of GPR101 are unknown, the high expression of GPR101 in the arcuate nucleus and the occurrence of increased circulating GHRH levels in some patients with XLAG, suggest that increased hypothalamic GHRH secretion could play a role in the pathogenesis of this condition. In this review, we summarise the published evidence on XLAG and GPR101 and discuss the results of recent studies that have investigated the potential role of GPR101 variants in the pathogenesis of pituitary adenomas. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. [Monogenic causes of X-linked mental retardation].

    PubMed

    Guillén-Navarro, E; Glóver-López, G

    2006-01-07

    The term X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) refers to a heterogeneous group of conditions that, on the basis of their presenting symptoms, have traditionally been classified as being syndromic (SMR) and non-syndromic or non-specific (XMR). The prevalence of XLMR in males is estimated to be 10%, excluding fragile X syndrome, which is the most common monogenic cause. There are over 100 genes involved in XLMR. In this work we review some of the phenotypes and genes involved in SMR. A small stature and coarse features indicate a suspected case of Coffin-Lowry syndrome, which is secondary to mutations of the RPS6KA3 or RSK2 genes. Cerebellar hypoplasia points towards alterations of the OPHN1 gene. In males with coarse features and genital abnormalities screening for alpha thalassemia must be carried out; this association results from mutations in the ATRX gene. Of the genes involved in mental retardation and epilepsy, the most notable are SLC6A8 (which triggers a deficit in creatine transport when altered and which is easily detected with respect to its biochemistry) and ARX (also associated to lissencephaly and dystonia of the hands). Mutations in the PQBP1 and JARID1C genes have been identified in patients with mental retardation associated to microcephaly and short stature. A high level of T3 hormone points towards defects in the SLC16A2 gene. Some of these genes have also been implicated in XMR, which makes this distinction less clear molecularly speaking. Systematic screening of all the genes involved in XLMR is not possible in clinical praxis today. It is important to search for differential phenotypic features in males with mental retardation that guide the study towards specific genes. Identification of the molecular defect will allow for correct genetic counselling. DNA microarrays for the study of different mutations in a large number of genes involved in mental retardation are the great hope for the future.

  13. X-linked inheritance in neuronal migration disorders (NMD)

    SciTech Connect

    Andermann, E.; Dubeau, F.; Tampieri, D.

    1994-09-01

    With the advent of MRI imaging, an increasing number of NMD have been identified in patients with epilepsy. Although most cases have been sporadic, families with these disorders have now been reported in several types of NMD. Furthermore, subcortical bank heterotopia (SBH) or {open_quotes}double cortex syndrome{close_quotes} and periventricular nodular heterotopia (PNH) have a marked female predominance. Two females with SBH, mild mental retardation and seizures had sons with lissencephaly, severe retardation and seizures, and daughters with SBH. X-linked lissencephaly has been observed in several other families, and one girl with lissencephaly was found to have a de novo X-autosomal translocation with a breakpoint in chromosome Xq22. We have studied three families with two or more generations affected by PNH in females, a high frequency of spontaneous abortions and abnormal sex ratios in sibships. The clinical manifestations include seizures and normal intelligence. Three other families with PNH in females have been reported in the literature. Bilateral perisylvian polymicrogyria has been reported in monozygotic twins and in siblings, and we have studied a brother and sister with an affected maternal uncle. These findings suggest sex-linked dominant inheritance with male lethality or severe expression in males. The three disorders described above may represent different mutations of a single gene or mutations in two or more genes on the X-chromosome. At least one gene is probably located in chromosome band Xq22. Genetic linkage studies in families with NMD as well as a search for candidate genes such as adhesion molecules known to map on the X-chromosome should lead to the identification of the gene(s) responsible for these disorders.

  14. A natural history study of X-linked myotubular myopathy.

    PubMed

    Amburgey, Kimberly; Tsuchiya, Etsuko; de Chastonay, Sabine; Glueck, Michael; Alverez, Rachel; Nguyen, Cam-Tu; Rutkowski, Anne; Hornyak, Joseph; Beggs, Alan H; Dowling, James J

    2017-08-25

    To define the natural history of X-linked myotubular myopathy (MTM). We performed a cross-sectional study that included an online survey (n = 35) and a prospective, 1-year longitudinal investigation using a phone survey (n = 33). We ascertained data from 50 male patients with MTM and performed longitudinal assessments on 33 affected individuals. Consistent with existing knowledge, we found that MTM is a disorder associated with extensive morbidities, including wheelchair (86.7% nonambulant) and ventilator (75% requiring >16 hours of support) dependence. However, unlike previous reports and despite the high burden of disease, mortality was lower than anticipated (approximate rate 10%/y). Seventy-six percent of patients with MTM enrolled (mean age 10 years 11 months) were alive at the end of the study. Nearly all deaths in the study were associated with respiratory failure. In addition, the disease course was more stable than expected, with few adverse events reported during the prospective survey. Few non-muscle-related morbidities were identified, although an unexpectedly high incidence of learning disability (43%) was noted. Conversely, MTM was associated with substantial burdens on patient and caregiver daily living, reflected by missed days of school and lost workdays. MTM is one of the most severe neuromuscular disorders, with affected individuals requiring extensive mechanical interventions for survival. However, among study participants, the disease course was more stable than predicted, with more individuals surviving infancy and early childhood. These data reflect the disease burden of MTM but offer hope in terms of future therapeutic intervention. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. on behalf of the American Academy of Neurology.

  15. Visual Function in Carriers of X-Linked Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Comander, Jason; Weigel-DiFranco, Carol; Sandberg, Michael A; Berson, Eliot L

    2015-09-01

    To determine the frequency and severity of visual function loss in female carriers of X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP). Case series. Two hundred seventy-six XLRP carriers with cross-sectional data (n = 242) and longitudinal data (n = 34; median follow-up, 16 years; follow-up range, 3-37 years). Half of the carriers were from RPGR- or RP2-genotyped families. Retrospective medical records review. Visual acuities, visual field areas, final dark adaptation thresholds, and full-field electroretinography (ERG) responses to 0.5-Hz and 30-Hz flashes. In genotyped families, 40% of carriers showed a baseline abnormality on at least 1 of 3 psychophysical tests. There was a wide range of function among carriers. For example, 3 of 121 (2%) genotyped carriers were legally blind because of poor visual acuity, some as young as 35 years. Visual fields were less affected than visual acuity. In all carriers, the average ERG amplitude to 30-Hz flashes was approximately 50% of normal, and the average exponential rate of amplitude loss over time was half that of XLRP males (3.7%/year vs. 7.4%/year, respectively). Among obligate carriers with affected fathers, sons, or both, 53 of 55 (96%) had abnormal baseline ERG results. Some carriers who initially had completely normal fundi in both eyes went on to experience moderately decreased vision, although not legal blindness. Among carriers with RPGR mutations, those with mutations in ORF15, compared with those in exons 1-14, had worse final dark adaptation thresholds and lower 0.5-Hz and 30-Hz ERG amplitudes. Most carriers of XLRP had mildly or moderately reduced visual function but rarely became legally blind. In most cases, obligate carriers could be identified by ERG testing. Carriers of RPGR ORF15 mutations tended to have worse visual function than carriers of RPGR exon 1 through 14 mutations. Because XLRP carrier ERG amplitudes and decay rates over time were on average half of those of affected men, these observations were

  16. An unusual presentation of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Suryawanshi, Avinash; Middleton, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    Summary X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a rare genetic condition caused by mutations in the ABCD1 gene that result in accumulation of very long chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) in various tissues. This leads to demyelination in the CNS and impaired steroidogenesis in the adrenal cortex and testes. A 57-year-old gentleman was referred for the assessment of bilateral gynaecomastia of 6 months duration. He had skin hyperpigmentation since 4 years of age and spastic paraparesis for the past 15 years. Physical examination findings included generalised hyperpigmentation (including skin, buccal mucosa and palmar creases), blood pressure of 90/60 mmHg, non-tender gynaecomastia and bilateral hypoplastic testes. Lower limb findings were those of a profoundly ataxic gait associated with significant paraparesis and sensory loss. Primary adrenal insufficiency was confirmed and investigations for gynaecomastia revealed normal testosterone with mildly elevated luteinising hormone level and normal prolactin. The combination of primary adrenal insufficiency (likely childhood onset), partial testicular failure (leading to gynaecomastia) and spastic paraparesis suggested X-ALD as a unifying diagnosis. A serum VLCFA panel was consistent with X-ALD. Subsequent genetic testing confirmed the diagnosis. Treatment with replacement doses of corticosteroid resulted in improvement in blood pressure and increased energy levels. We have reported the case of a 57-year-old man with a very late diagnosis of X-ALD manifested by childhood onset of primary adrenal insufficiency followed by paraparesis and primary hypogonadism in adulthood. Thus, X-ALD should be considered as a possibility in a patient with non-autoimmune primary adrenal insufficiency and neurological abnormalities. Learning points Adult patients with X-ALD may be misdiagnosed as having multiple sclerosis or idiopathic spastic paraparesis for many years before the correct diagnosis is identified. Screening for X-ALD with a VLCFA

  17. FARVATX: Family-Based Rare Variant Association Test for X-Linked Genes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sungkyoung; Lee, Sungyoung; Qiao, Dandi; Hardin, Megan; Cho, Michael H; Silverman, Edwin K; Park, Taesung; Won, Sungho

    2016-09-01

    Although the X chromosome has many genes that are functionally related to human diseases, the complicated biological properties of the X chromosome have prevented efficient genetic association analyses, and only a few significantly associated X-linked variants have been reported for complex traits. For instance, dosage compensation of X-linked genes is often achieved via the inactivation of one allele in each X-linked variant in females; however, some X-linked variants can escape this X chromosome inactivation. Efficient genetic analyses cannot be conducted without prior knowledge about the gene expression process of X-linked variants, and misspecified information can lead to power loss. In this report, we propose new statistical methods for rare X-linked variant genetic association analysis of dichotomous phenotypes with family-based samples. The proposed methods are computationally efficient and can complete X-linked analyses within a few hours. Simulation studies demonstrate the statistical efficiency of the proposed methods, which were then applied to rare-variant association analysis of the X chromosome in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Some promising significant X-linked genes were identified, illustrating the practical importance of the proposed methods. © 2016 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  18. Canine Distemper

    MedlinePlus

    ... and, often, the nervous systems of puppies and dogs. The virus also infects wild canids (e.g. ... How is Canine Distemper virus spread? Puppies and dogs usually become infected through airborne exposure to the ...

  19. Canine lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Madewell, B R

    1985-07-01

    This article presents an overview of the literature regarding canine malignant lymphoma. It includes a discussion of etiology, classification, systemic manifestations of disease, therapy, and supportive care for patient management.

  20. Telomerase RNA level limits telomere maintenance in X-linked dyskeratosis congenita

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Judy M.Y.; Collins, Kathleen

    2006-01-01

    Dyskeratosis congenita (DC) patients suffer a progressive and ultimately fatal loss of hematopoietic renewal correlating with critically short telomeres. The predominant X-linked form of DC results from substitutions in dyskerin, a protein required both for ribosomal RNA (rRNA) pseudouridine modification and for cellular accumulation of telomerase RNA (TER). Accordingly, alternative models have posited that the exhaustion of cellular renewal in X-linked DC arises as a primary consequence of ribosome deficiency or telomerase deficiency. Here we test, for the first time, whether X-linked DC patient cells are compromised for telomerase function at telomeres. We show that telomerase activation in family-matched control cells allows telomere elongation and telomere length maintenance, while telomerase activation in X-linked DC patient cells fails to prevent telomere erosion with proliferation. Furthermore, we demonstrate by phenotypic rescue that telomere defects in X-linked DC patient cells arise solely from reduced accumulation of TER. We also show that X-linked DC patient cells averted from premature senescence support normal levels of rRNA pseudouridine modification and normal kinetics of rRNA precursor processing, in contrast with phenotypes reported for a proposed mouse model of the human disease. These findings support the significance of telomerase deficiency in the pathology of X-linked DC. PMID:17015423

  1. Repeated transmission of X-linked ocular albinism type 1 by a carrier oocyte donor.

    PubMed

    Burns, W N; Schiaffino, M V; Lewis, R A

    1998-12-01

    To report the transmission of unsuspected X-linked ocular albinism in an oocyte donor program. Case report. University medical center. A 24-year-old white female oocyte donor and the outcomes of three recipient pregnancies. Clinical assessment and molecular diagnostic tests. Mutation detection. Demonstration of carrier status and multiple transmissions of a mutant allele. We describe the transmission of a mutant allele for X-linked ocular albinism from an unsuspected carrier female oocyte donor to three independent pregnancies. We emphasize the need for diligent inquisition to clarify any unusual history of ocular or constitutional signs that might signify an X-linked disorder.

  2. Canine gastritis.

    PubMed

    Webb, Craig; Twedt, David C

    2003-09-01

    Gastritis--inflammation of the stomach--is a frequently cited differential yet rarely characterized diagnosis in cases of canine anorexia and vomiting. Although the list of rule-outs for acute or chronic gastritis is extensive, a review of the veterinary literature reveals fewer than 15 articles that have focused on clinical cases of canine gastritis over the last 25 years. The dog frequently appears in the human literature as an experimentally manipulated model for the study of endoscopic techniques or the effect of medications on gastric mucosa. In the veterinary patient, cases of acute gastritis are rarely pursued with the complete diagnostic armamentarium, and cases of chronic gastritis are rarely found to occur as an entity isolated from the rest of the gastrointestinal tract. This article focuses on those findings most clinically relevant to cases of canine gastritis in veterinary medicine.

  3. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked hyper IgM syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... prognosis of a genetic condition? Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center Frequency X-linked hyper IgM syndrome is estimated to occur in 2 per million newborn boys. Related Information What information about a genetic condition can ...

  4. Genetic hetergoeneity in X-linked hydrocephalus: Linkage to markers within Xq27. 3

    SciTech Connect

    Strain, L.; Brock, D.J.H.; Bonthron, D.T. ); Gosden, C.M. )

    1994-02-01

    X-linked hydrocephalus is a well-defined disorder which accounts for [ge]70% of hydrocephalus in males. Pathologically, the conditions is characterized by stenosis or obliteration of the aqueduct of Sylvius. Previous genetic linkage studies have suggested likelihood of genetic homogeneity for this condition, with close linkage to the DXS52 and F8C markers in Xq28. The authors have investigated a family with typical X-linked aqueductal stenosis, in which no linkage to these markers was present. In this family, close linkage was established to the DXS548 and FRAXA loci in Xq27.3. The findings demonstrate that X-linked aqueductal stenosis may result from mutations at two different loci on the X chromosome. Caution is indicated in using linkage for the prenatal diagnosis of X-linked hydrocephalus. 43 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy in women: a cross-sectional cohort study.

    PubMed

    Engelen, Marc; Barbier, Mathieu; Dijkstra, Inge M E; Schür, Remmelt; de Bie, Rob M A; Verhamme, Camiel; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G W; Aubourg, Patrick A; Wanders, Ronald J A; van Geel, Bjorn M; de Visser, Marianne; Poll-The, Bwee T; Kemp, Stephan

    2014-03-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy is the most common peroxisomal disorder. The disease is caused by mutations in the ABCD1 gene that encodes the peroxisomal transporter of very long-chain fatty acids. A defect in the ABCD1 protein results in elevated levels of very long-chain fatty acids in plasma and tissues. The clinical spectrum in males with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy has been well described and ranges from isolated adrenocortical insufficiency and slowly progressive myelopathy to devastating cerebral demyelination. As in many X-linked diseases, it was assumed that female carriers remain asymptomatic and only a few studies addressed the phenotype of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy carriers. These studies, however, provided no information on the prevalence of neurological symptoms in the entire population of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy carriers, since data were acquired in small groups and may be biased towards women with symptoms. Our primary goal was to investigate the symptoms and their frequency in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy carriers. The secondary goal was to determine if the X-inactivation pattern of the ABCD1 gene was associated with symptomatic status. We included 46 X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy carriers in a prospective cross-sectional cohort study. Our data show that X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy carriers develop signs and symptoms of myelopathy (29/46, 63%) and/or peripheral neuropathy (26/46, 57%). Especially striking was the occurrence of faecal incontinence (13/46, 28%). The frequency of symptomatic women increased sharply with age (from 18% in women <40 years to 88% in women >60 years of age). Virtually all (44/45, 98%) X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy carriers had increased very long-chain fatty acids in plasma and/or fibroblasts, and/or decreased very long-chain fatty acids beta-oxidation in fibroblasts. We did not find an association between the X-inactivation pattern and symptomatic status. We conclude that X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy

  6. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked immunodeficiency with magnesium defect, Epstein-Barr virus infection, and neoplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... X-linked immunodeficiency with magnesium defect, Epstein-Barr virus infection, and neoplasia Printable PDF Open All Close ... X-linked immunodeficiency with magnesium defect, Epstein-Barr virus infection, and neoplasia (typically known by the acronym ...

  7. Refinement of the localization of the X-linked ocular albinism gene

    SciTech Connect

    Bergen, A.A.B.; Zijp, P.; Schuurman, E.J.M.; Bleeker-Wagemakers, E.M.; Apkarian, P. ); Ommen, G.J.B. van )

    1993-04-01

    Although physical and genetic mapping studies assigned the X-linked ocular albinism gene to Xp22.3, the exact gene order in this region is still unclear. The authors present additional genetic mapping data concerning X-linked ocular albinism that suggests the consensus order Xpter-STS-DXS237-KAL-(OA1, DXS143)- DXS85-DXS16-Xcen. 14 refs., 1 fig.

  8. Escape of X-linked miRNA genes from meiotic sex chromosome inactivation.

    PubMed

    Sosa, Enrique; Flores, Luis; Yan, Wei; McCarrey, John R

    2015-11-01

    Past studies have indicated that transcription of all X-linked genes is repressed by meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) during the meiotic phase of spermatogenesis in mammals. However, more recent studies have shown an increase in steady-state levels of certain X-linked miRNAs in pachytene spermatocytes, suggesting that either synthesis of these miRNAs increases or that degradation of these miRNAs decreases dramatically in these cells. To distinguish between these possibilities, we performed RNA-FISH to detect nascent transcripts from multiple miRNA genes in various spermatogenic cell types. Our results show definitively that Type I X-linked miRNA genes are subject to MSCI, as are all or most X-linked mRNA genes, whereas Type II and III X-linked miRNA genes escape MSCI by continuing ongoing, active transcription in primary spermatocytes. We corroborated these results by co-localization of RNA-FISH signals with both a corresponding DNA-FISH signal and an immunofluorescence signal for RNA polymerase II. We also found that X-linked miRNA genes that escape MSCI locate non-randomly to the periphery of the XY body, whereas genes that are subject to MSCI remain located within the XY body in pachytene spermatocytes, suggesting that the mechanism of escape of X-linked miRNA genes from MSCI involves their relocation to a position outside of the repressive chromatin domain associated with the XY body. The fact that Type II and III X-linked miRNA genes escape MSCI suggests an immediacy of function of the encoded miRNAs specifically required during the meiotic stages of spermatogenesis. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  9. Escape of X-linked miRNA genes from meiotic sex chromosome inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Sosa, Enrique; Flores, Luis; Yan, Wei; McCarrey, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Past studies have indicated that transcription of all X-linked genes is repressed by meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) during the meiotic phase of spermatogenesis in mammals. However, more recent studies have shown an increase in steady-state levels of certain X-linked miRNAs in pachytene spermatocytes, suggesting that either synthesis of these miRNAs increases or that degradation of these miRNAs decreases dramatically in these cells. To distinguish between these possibilities, we performed RNA-FISH to detect nascent transcripts from multiple miRNA genes in various spermatogenic cell types. Our results show definitively that Type I X-linked miRNA genes are subject to MSCI, as are all or most X-linked mRNA genes, whereas Type II and III X-linked miRNA genes escape MSCI by continuing ongoing, active transcription in primary spermatocytes. We corroborated these results by co-localization of RNA-FISH signals with both a corresponding DNA-FISH signal and an immunofluorescence signal for RNA polymerase II. We also found that X-linked miRNA genes that escape MSCI locate non-randomly to the periphery of the XY body, whereas genes that are subject to MSCI remain located within the XY body in pachytene spermatocytes, suggesting that the mechanism of escape of X-linked miRNA genes from MSCI involves their relocation to a position outside of the repressive chromatin domain associated with the XY body. The fact that Type II and III X-linked miRNA genes escape MSCI suggests an immediacy of function of the encoded miRNAs specifically required during the meiotic stages of spermatogenesis. PMID:26395485

  10. Dosage Compensation of X-Linked Muller Element F Genes but Not X-Linked Transgenes in the Australian Sheep Blowfly

    PubMed Central

    Linger, Rebecca J.; Belikoff, Esther J.; Scott, Maxwell J.

    2015-01-01

    In most animals that have X and Y sex chromosomes, chromosome-wide mechanisms are used to balance X-linked gene expression in males and females. In the fly Drosophila melanogaster, the dosage compensation mechanism also generally extends to X-linked transgenes. Over 70 transgenic lines of the Australian sheep blowfly Lucilia cuprina have been made as part of an effort to develop male-only strains for a genetic control program of this major pest of sheep. All lines carry a constitutively expressed fluorescent protein marker gene. In all 12 X-linked lines, female larvae show brighter fluorescence than male larvae, suggesting the marker gene is not dosage compensated. This has been confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR for selected lines. To determine if endogenous X-linked genes are dosage compensated, we isolated 8 genes that are orthologs of genes that are on the fourth chromosome in D. melanogaster. Recent evidence suggests that the D. melanogaster fourth chromosome, or Muller element F, is the ancestral X chromosome in Diptera that has reverted to an autosome in Drosophila species. We show by quantitative PCR of male and female DNA that 6 of the 8 linkage group F genes reside on the X chromosome in L. cuprina. The other two Muller element F genes were found to be autosomal in L. cuprina, whereas two Muller element B genes were found on the same region of the X chromosome as the L. cuprina orthologs of the D. melanogaster Ephrin and gawky genes. We find that the L. cuprina X chromosome genes are equally expressed in males and females (i.e., fully dosage compensated). Thus, unlike in Drosophila, it appears that the Lucilia dosage compensation system is specific for genes endogenous to the X chromosome and cannot be co-opted by recently arrived transgenes. PMID:26506426

  11. Dosage Compensation of X-Linked Muller Element F Genes but Not X-Linked Transgenes in the Australian Sheep Blowfly.

    PubMed

    Linger, Rebecca J; Belikoff, Esther J; Scott, Maxwell J

    2015-01-01

    In most animals that have X and Y sex chromosomes, chromosome-wide mechanisms are used to balance X-linked gene expression in males and females. In the fly Drosophila melanogaster, the dosage compensation mechanism also generally extends to X-linked transgenes. Over 70 transgenic lines of the Australian sheep blowfly Lucilia cuprina have been made as part of an effort to develop male-only strains for a genetic control program of this major pest of sheep. All lines carry a constitutively expressed fluorescent protein marker gene. In all 12 X-linked lines, female larvae show brighter fluorescence than male larvae, suggesting the marker gene is not dosage compensated. This has been confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR for selected lines. To determine if endogenous X-linked genes are dosage compensated, we isolated 8 genes that are orthologs of genes that are on the fourth chromosome in D. melanogaster. Recent evidence suggests that the D. melanogaster fourth chromosome, or Muller element F, is the ancestral X chromosome in Diptera that has reverted to an autosome in Drosophila species. We show by quantitative PCR of male and female DNA that 6 of the 8 linkage group F genes reside on the X chromosome in L. cuprina. The other two Muller element F genes were found to be autosomal in L. cuprina, whereas two Muller element B genes were found on the same region of the X chromosome as the L. cuprina orthologs of the D. melanogaster Ephrin and gawky genes. We find that the L. cuprina X chromosome genes are equally expressed in males and females (i.e., fully dosage compensated). Thus, unlike in Drosophila, it appears that the Lucilia dosage compensation system is specific for genes endogenous to the X chromosome and cannot be co-opted by recently arrived transgenes.

  12. Efficient Statistical Method for Association Analysis of X-Linked Variants.

    PubMed

    Jin, Heejin; Park, Taesung; Won, Sungho

    2017-08-16

    Unlike the gene-poor Y chromosome, the X chromosome contains over 1,000 genes that are essential for viability of cells. Females have 2 X chromosomes, and thus female X-linked gene expression would be expected to be twice that of males. To adjust this imbalance, one of the 2 X-linked genes is often inactivated, and this is known as X-chromosome inactivation (XCI). However, recent studies described that a gene can be nonrandomly selected for inactivation from 2 X-linked genes and that XCI is not observed in some X-linked genes. Since this complex biological process has prevented efficient statistical association analyses, we propose a new statistical method against this uncertain biological process. The proposed method consists of 2 steps. First, p values for various biological processes are calculated and then combined into a single p value with the modified Fisher method and a minimum p value. Our simulation results show that the proposed method is generally the most statistically efficient and is not sensitive to the unknown biological model. Therefore, we can conclude that the proposed approaches are robust against the various XCI processes for testing the association of X-linked single nucleotide polymorphisms with the disease of interest and the proposed method is a practical solution. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Many X-linked microRNAs escape meiotic sex chromosome inactivation.

    PubMed

    Song, Rui; Ro, Seungil; Michaels, Jason D; Park, Chanjae; McCarrey, John R; Yan, Wei

    2009-04-01

    Meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) during spermatogenesis is characterized by transcriptional silencing of genes on both the X and Y chromosomes in mid-to-late pachytene spermatocytes. MSCI is believed to result from meiotic silencing of unpaired DNA because the X and Y chromosomes remain largely unpaired throughout first meiotic prophase. However, unlike X-chromosome inactivation in female embryonic cells, where 25-30% of X-linked structural genes have been reported to escape inactivation, previous microarray- and RT-PCR-based studies of expression of >364 X-linked mRNA-encoding genes during spermatogenesis have failed to reveal any X-linked gene that escapes the silencing effects of MSCI in primary spermatocytes. Here we show that many X-linked miRNAs are transcribed and processed in pachytene spermatocytes. This unprecedented escape from MSCI by these X-linked miRNAs suggests that they may participate in a critical function at this stage of spermatogenesis, including the possibility that they contribute to the process of MSCI itself, or that they may be essential for post-transcriptional regulation of autosomal mRNAs during the late meiotic and early postmeiotic stages of spermatogenesis.

  14. Gene localisation of X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (C-S-T syndrome).

    PubMed

    MacDermot, K D; Winter, R M; Malcolm, S

    1986-10-01

    Genetic linkage studies were carried out in families with X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (C-S-T syndrome). A DNA probe DXYS1 (pDP34), which maps both to the proximal part of the long arm of the X chromosome, Xq13-Xq21, and proximally on Yp, was used to detect a TaqI restriction fragment length polymorphism of the X-chromosomal locus in the DNA samples from 11 families. This locus was found to be closely linked to the X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia locus, with a lod score of 2.66 at recombination fraction (theta) of 0.06 (90% confidence limits 0.01-0.26). Only one crossover was observed in nineteen meioses. This indicates that the probe DXYS1 is closely linked to the X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia locus and is likely to facilitate carrier detection and prenatal diagnosis tests.

  15. Inactivation of X-linked tumor suppressor genes in human cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Runhua; Kain, Mandy; Wang, Lizhong

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells silence autosomal tumor suppressor genes by Knudson’s two-hit mechanism in which loss-of-function mutations and then loss of heterozygosity occur at the tumor suppressor gene loci. However, the identification of X-linked tumor suppressor genes has challenged the traditional theory of “two-hit inactivation” in tumor suppressor genes, introducing the novel concept that a single genetic hit can cause loss of tumor suppressor function. The mechanism through which these genes are silenced in human cancer is unclear, but elucidating the details will greatly enhance our understanding of the pathogenesis of human cancer. Here, we review the identification of X-linked tumor suppressor genes and discuss the potential mechanisms of their inactivation. In addition, we also discuss how the identification of X-linked tumor suppressor genes can potentially lead to new approaches to cancer therapy. PMID:22515449

  16. Inactivation of X-linked tumor suppressor genes in human cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Runhua; Kain, Mandy; Wang, Lizhong

    2012-04-01

    Cancer cells silence autosomal tumor suppressor genes by Knudson's two-hit mechanism in which loss-of-function mutations and then loss of heterozygosity occur at the tumor suppressor gene loci. However, the identification of X-linked tumor suppressor genes has challenged the traditional theory of 'two-hit inactivation' in tumor suppressor genes, introducing the novel concept that a single genetic hit can cause loss of tumor suppressor function. The mechanism through which these genes are silenced in human cancer is unclear, but elucidating the details will greatly enhance our understanding of the pathogenesis of human cancer. Here, we review the identification of X-linked tumor suppressor genes and discuss the potential mechanisms of their inactivation. In addition, we also discuss how the identification of X-linked tumor suppressor genes can potentially lead to new approaches in cancer therapy.

  17. Pex gene deletions in Gy and Hyp mice provide mouse models for X-linked hypophosphatemia.

    PubMed

    Strom, T M; Francis, F; Lorenz, B; Böddrich, A; Econs, M J; Lehrach, H; Meitinger, T

    1997-02-01

    X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets in humans is caused by mutations in the PEX gene which codes for a protein homologous to neutral endopeptidases. Hyp and Gy mice both have X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets, although genetic data and the different phenotypic spectra observed have previously suggested that two different genes are mutated. In addition to the metabolic disorder observed in Hyp mice, male Gy mice are sterile and show circling behavior and reduced viability. We now report the cloning of the mouse homolog of PEX which is highly conserved between man and mouse. The 3' end of this gene is deleted in Hyp mice. In Gy mice, the first three exons and the promotor region are deleted. Thus, Hyp and Gy are allelic mutations and both provide mouse models for X-linked hypophosphatemia.

  18. Somatic Single-hits Inactivate the X-linked Tumor Suppressor FOXP3 in the Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lizhong; Liu, Runhua; Li, Weiquan; Chen, Chong; Katoh, Hiroto; Chen, Guo-Yun; McNally, Beth; Lin, Lin; Zhou, Penghui; Zuo, Tao; Cooney, Kathleen A.; Liu, Yang; Zheng, Pan

    2009-01-01

    Despite clear epidemiological and genetic evidence for X-linked prostate cancer risk, all prostate cancer genes identified are autosomal. Here we report somatic inactivating mutations and deletion of the X-linked FOXP3 gene residing at Xp11.23 in human prostate cancer. Lineage-specific ablation of FoxP3 in the mouse prostate epithelial cells leads to prostate hyperplasia and prostate intraepithelial neoplasia. In both normal and malignant prostate tissues, FOXP3 is both necessary and sufficient to transcriptionally repress cMYC, the most commonly over-expressed oncogene in prostate cancer as well as among the aggregates of other cancers. FOXP3 is an X-linked prostate tumor suppressor in the male. Since the male has only one X chromosome, our data represents a paradigm of “single-genetic-hit” inactivation-mediated carcinogenesis. PMID:19800578

  19. Lujan-Fryns syndrome (mental retardation, X-linked, marfanoid habitus).

    PubMed

    Van Buggenhout, Griet; Fryns, Jean-Pierre

    2006-07-10

    The Lujan-Fryns syndrome or X-linked mental retardation with marfanoid habitus syndrome is a syndromal X-linked form of mental retardation, affecting predominantly males. The prevalence is not known for the general population. The syndrome is associated with mild to moderate mental retardation, distinct facial dysmorphism (long narrow face, maxillary hypoplasia, small mandible and prominent forehead), tall marfanoid stature and long slender extremities, and behavioural problems. The genetic defect is not known. The diagnosis is based on the presence of the clinical manifestations. Genetic counselling is according to X-linked recessive inheritance. Prenatal testing is not possible. There is no specific treatment for this condition. Patients need special education and psychological follow-up, and attention should be given to diagnose early psychiatric disorders.

  20. Oxidative stress modulates mitochondrial failure and cyclophilin D function in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    López-Erauskin, Jone; Galino, Jorge; Bianchi, Patrizia; Fourcade, Stéphane; Andreu, Antoni L; Ferrer, Isidre; Muñoz-Pinedo, Cristina; Pujol, Aurora

    2012-12-01

    A common process associated with oxidative stress and severe mitochondrial impairment is the opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, as described in many neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, inhibition of mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening represents a potential target for inhibiting mitochondrial-driven cell death. Among the mitochondrial permeability transition pore components, cyclophilin D is the most studied and has been found increased under pathological conditions. Here, we have used in vitro and in vivo models of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy to investigate the relationship between the mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening and redox homeostasis. X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy is a neurodegenerative condition caused by loss of function of the peroxisomal ABCD1 transporter, in which oxidative stress plays a pivotal role. In this study, we provide evidence of impaired mitochondrial metabolism in a peroxisomal disease, as fibroblasts in patients with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy cannot survive when forced to rely on mitochondrial energy production, i.e. on incubation in galactose. Oxidative stress induced under galactose conditions leads to mitochondrial damage in the form of mitochondrial inner membrane potential dissipation, ATP drop and necrotic cell death, together with increased levels of oxidative modifications in cyclophilin D protein. Moreover, we show increased expression levels of cyclophilin D in the affected zones of brains in patients with adrenomyeloneuropathy, in spinal cord of a mouse model of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (Abcd1-null mice) and in fibroblasts from patients with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. Notably, treatment with antioxidants rescues mitochondrial damage markers in fibroblasts from patients with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy, including cyclophilin D oxidative modifications, and reverses cyclophilin D induction in vitro and in vivo. These findings provide mechanistic insight into the

  1. Oxidative stress modulates mitochondrial failure and cyclophilin D function in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    López-Erauskin, Jone; Galino, Jorge; Bianchi, Patrizia; Fourcade, Stéphane; Andreu, Antoni L.; Ferrer, Isidre; Muñoz-Pinedo, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    A common process associated with oxidative stress and severe mitochondrial impairment is the opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, as described in many neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, inhibition of mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening represents a potential target for inhibiting mitochondrial-driven cell death. Among the mitochondrial permeability transition pore components, cyclophilin D is the most studied and has been found increased under pathological conditions. Here, we have used in vitro and in vivo models of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy to investigate the relationship between the mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening and redox homeostasis. X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy is a neurodegenerative condition caused by loss of function of the peroxisomal ABCD1 transporter, in which oxidative stress plays a pivotal role. In this study, we provide evidence of impaired mitochondrial metabolism in a peroxisomal disease, as fibroblasts in patients with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy cannot survive when forced to rely on mitochondrial energy production, i.e. on incubation in galactose. Oxidative stress induced under galactose conditions leads to mitochondrial damage in the form of mitochondrial inner membrane potential dissipation, ATP drop and necrotic cell death, together with increased levels of oxidative modifications in cyclophilin D protein. Moreover, we show increased expression levels of cyclophilin D in the affected zones of brains in patients with adrenomyeloneuropathy, in spinal cord of a mouse model of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (Abcd1-null mice) and in fibroblasts from patients with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. Notably, treatment with antioxidants rescues mitochondrial damage markers in fibroblasts from patients with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy, including cyclophilin D oxidative modifications, and reverses cyclophilin D induction in vitro and in vivo. These findings provide mechanistic insight into the

  2. Drosophila X-Linked Genes Have Lower Translation Rates than Autosomal Genes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenguo; Presgraves, Daven C

    2016-02-01

    In Drosophila, X-linked and autosomal genes achieve comparable expression at the mRNA level. Whether comparable X-autosome gene expression is realized at the translational and, ultimately, the protein levels is, however, unknown. Previous studies suggest the possibility of higher translation rates for X-linked genes owing to stronger usage of preferred codons. In this study, we use public ribosome profiling data from Drosophila melanogaster to infer translation rates on the X chromosome versus the autosomes. We find that X-linked genes have consistently lower ribosome densities than autosomal genes in S2 cells, early embryos, eggs, and mature oocytes. Surprisingly, the lower ribosome densities of X-linked genes are not consistent with faster translation elongation but instead imply slower translation initiation. In particular, X-linked genes have sequence features known to slow translation initiation such as stronger mRNA structure near start codons and longer 5'-UTRs. Comparison to outgroup species suggests that stronger mRNA structure is an evolved feature of Drosophila X chromosomes. Finally, we find that the magnitude of the X-autosome difference in ribosome densities is smaller for genes encoding members of protein complexes, suggesting that stoichiometry constrains the evolution of translation rates. In sum, our analyses suggest that Drosophila X-linked genes have evolved lower translation rates than autosomal genes despite stronger usage of preferred codons. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Sex-specific silencing of X-linked genes by Xist RNA.

    PubMed

    Gayen, Srimonta; Maclary, Emily; Hinten, Michael; Kalantry, Sundeep

    2016-01-19

    X-inactive specific transcript (Xist) long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) is thought to catalyze silencing of X-linked genes in cis during X-chromosome inactivation, which equalizes X-linked gene dosage between male and female mammals. To test the impact of Xist RNA on X-linked gene silencing, we ectopically induced endogenous Xist by ablating the antisense repressor Tsix in mice. We find that ectopic Xist RNA induction and subsequent X-linked gene silencing is sex specific in embryos and in differentiating embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and epiblast stem cells (EpiSCs). A higher frequency of X(ΔTsix)Y male cells displayed ectopic Xist RNA coating compared with X(ΔTsix)X female cells. This increase reflected the inability of X(ΔTsix)Y cells to efficiently silence X-linked genes compared with X(ΔTsix)X cells, despite equivalent Xist RNA induction and coating. Silencing of genes on both Xs resulted in significantly reduced proliferation and increased cell death in X(ΔTsix)X female cells relative to X(ΔTsix)Y male cells. Thus, whereas Xist RNA can inactivate the X chromosome in females it may not do so in males. We further found comparable silencing in differentiating X(ΔTsix)Y and 39,X(ΔTsix) (X(ΔTsix)O) ESCs, excluding the Y chromosome and instead implicating the X-chromosome dose as the source of the sex-specific differences. Because X(ΔTsix)X female embryonic epiblast cells and EpiSCs harbor an inactivated X chromosome prior to ectopic inactivation of the active X(ΔTsix) X chromosome, we propose that the increased expression of one or more X-inactivation escapees activates Xist and, separately, helps trigger X-linked gene silencing.

  4. Sex-specific silencing of X-linked genes by Xist RNA

    PubMed Central

    Gayen, Srimonta; Maclary, Emily; Hinten, Michael; Kalantry, Sundeep

    2016-01-01

    X-inactive specific transcript (Xist) long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) is thought to catalyze silencing of X-linked genes in cis during X-chromosome inactivation, which equalizes X-linked gene dosage between male and female mammals. To test the impact of Xist RNA on X-linked gene silencing, we ectopically induced endogenous Xist by ablating the antisense repressor Tsix in mice. We find that ectopic Xist RNA induction and subsequent X-linked gene silencing is sex specific in embryos and in differentiating embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and epiblast stem cells (EpiSCs). A higher frequency of XΔTsixY male cells displayed ectopic Xist RNA coating compared with XΔTsixX female cells. This increase reflected the inability of XΔTsixY cells to efficiently silence X-linked genes compared with XΔTsixX cells, despite equivalent Xist RNA induction and coating. Silencing of genes on both Xs resulted in significantly reduced proliferation and increased cell death in XΔTsixX female cells relative to XΔTsixY male cells. Thus, whereas Xist RNA can inactivate the X chromosome in females it may not do so in males. We further found comparable silencing in differentiating XΔTsixY and 39,XΔTsix (XΔTsixO) ESCs, excluding the Y chromosome and instead implicating the X-chromosome dose as the source of the sex-specific differences. Because XΔTsixX female embryonic epiblast cells and EpiSCs harbor an inactivated X chromosome prior to ectopic inactivation of the active XΔTsix X chromosome, we propose that the increased expression of one or more X-inactivation escapees activates Xist and, separately, helps trigger X-linked gene silencing. PMID:26739568

  5. Screening for X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy among adult men with Addison's disease.

    PubMed

    Horn, Morten A; Erichsen, Martina M; Wolff, Anette S B; Månsson, Jan-Eric; Husebye, Eystein S; Tallaksen, Chantal M E; Skjeldal, Ola H

    2013-09-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy is an important cause of Addison's disease in boys, but less is known about its contribution to Addison's disease in adult men. After surveying all known cases of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy in Norway in a separate study, we aimed to look for any missed cases among the population of adult men with nonautoimmune Addison's disease. Among 153 adult men identified in a National Registry for Addison's Disease (75% of identified male cases of Addison's disease in Norway), those with negative indices for 21-hydroxylase autoantibodies were selected. Additionally, cases with low autoantibody indices (48-200) were selected. Sera from subjects included were analysed for levels of very long-chain fatty acids, which are diagnostic for X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy in men. Eighteen subjects had negative indices and 17 had low indices for 21-hydroxylase autoantibodies. None of those with low indices and only one of those with negative indices were found to have X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy; this subject had already been diagnosed because of the neurological symptoms. Cases of Addison's disease proved to be caused by X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy constitute 1·5% of all adult male cases in Norway; the proportion among nonautoimmune cases was 15%. We found X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy to be an uncommon cause of Addison's disease in adult men. However, this aetiological diagnosis has far-reaching consequences both for the patient and for his extended family. We therefore recommend that all adult men with nonautoimmune Addison's disease be analysed for levels of very long-chain fatty acids. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. A novel MED12 mutation associated with non-specific X-linked intellectual disability

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Shimojima, Keiko

    2015-01-01

    The mediator complex subunit 12 gene (MED12) is responsible for an X-linked recessive intellectual disability syndrome that is characterized by dysmorphic features such as a long, narrow face and blepharophimosis, which is now recognized as an MED12-related syndrome. We identified a novel non-synonymous single-nucleotide variant, p.Ile1023Val, in a male patient with non-specific X-linked intellectual disability (XLID). Our results, together with the existence of similar reports, suggest a relationship between MED12 variants and XLID. PMID:27081531

  7. Pyoderma Gangrenosum–Like Ulcer in a Patient With X-Linked Agammaglobulinemia

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Patrick R.; Jain, Ashish; Uzel, Gulbu; Ranken, Raymond; Ivy, Cristina; Blyn, Lawrence B.; Ecker, David J.; Sampath, Rangarajan; Lee, Chyi-Chia Richard; Turner, Maria L.

    2011-01-01

    Background Pyoderma gangrenosum–like ulcers and cellulitis of the lower extremities associated with recurrent fevers in patients with X-linked (Bruton) agammaglobulinemia have been reported to be caused by Helicobacter bilis (formerly classified as Flexispira rappini and then Helicobacter strain flexispira taxon 8). Consistent themes in these reports are the difficulty in recovering this organism in blood and wound cultures and in maintaining isolates in vitro. We confirmed the presence of this organism in a patient’s culture by using a novel application of gene amplification polymerase chain reaction and electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Observation An adolescent boy with X-linked agammaglobulinemia presented with indurated plaques and a chronic leg ulcer whose origin was strongly suspected to be an H bilis organism. Histologic analysis demonstrated positive Warthin-Starry staining of curvilinear rods, which grew in culture but failed to grow when sub-cultured. They could not be identified by conventional techniques. A combination of gene amplification by polymerase chain reaction and electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry confirmed the identity of this organism. Conclusions This novel technology was useful in the identification of a difficult-to-grow Helicobacter organism, the cause of pyoderma gangrenosum–like leg ulcers in patients with X-linked agammaglobulinemia. Correct identification of this organism as the cause of pyoderma gangrenosum–like ulcers in patients with X-linked agammaglobulinemia is of great importance for the early initiation of appropriate and curative antibiotic therapy. PMID:20479300

  8. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis of X-linked diseases examined by indirect linkage analysis.

    PubMed

    Borgulova, I; Putzova, M; Soldatova, I; Krautova, L; Pecnova, L; Mika, J; Kren, R; Potuznikova, P; Stejskal, D

    2015-01-01

    Many centers of assisted reproduction in the Czech Republic offer preimplantation genetic diagnosis with fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) to couples requiring preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) of X-linked diseases. However, this process results in discarding all male embryos and is not able to distinguish a carrier or healthy female embryo in X-linked recessive disorders. The main aim of this study was to summarize a six-year period of PGD of X-linked monogenic diseases using indirect linkage analysis. We wanted to accentuate the advantage indirect analysis of PGD using multiple displacement amplification (MDA) followed by short tandem repeat (STR) analysis. We present forty-six PGD cycles, including pre-case haplotyping (PGH) panel, for fifteen X-linked diseases. Embryo transfer was made thirty-eight times and gravidity was confirmed in thirteen female probands with a success rate of pregnancy calculated at 42 %. PGD procedure using MDA amplification followed by STR analysis provides help in identifying genetic defects within embryos prior to implantation. The reliability of the method was also supported by high pregnancy rate compared to other publications, which commonly achieved a 30-35 % success rate (Tab. 2, Fig. 1, Ref. 33).

  9. Sex Differences in Speed of Mental Rotation and the X-Linked Genetic Hypothesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Hoben; Kail, Robert

    1991-01-01

    Mental-rotation task response times from 12 studies involving 505 adults--251 males and 254 females--were used to evaluate 5 hypotheses concerning sex differences derived from an X-linked genetic model. The model assumes that task facilitation in speed of mental rotation is mediated by a recessive gene. Four hypotheses derived from the model were…

  10. Sex Differences in Spatial Ability: The X-Linked Gene Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blatter, Patricia

    1982-01-01

    Among the many theories attempting to explain sex differences in spatial ability, one of the most highly researched is the X-linked recessive gene theory. This is a review of the major research done on that theory and shows the conflicting nature of the results. (Author)

  11. X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia: linkage to phosphoglycerate kinase at Xq13.

    PubMed

    Raskind, W H; Wijsman, E; Pagon, R A; Cox, T C; Bawden, M J; May, B K; Bird, T D

    1991-02-01

    Molecular linkage analysis was performed on a kindred with X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia. Two-point analysis with a DNA probe for phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK1), which maps to Xq13, suggested linkage to the disorder by a lod score of at least 2.60 at a recombination fraction of zero. The disease in this kindred appears to be clinically and genetically distinct from that in previously reported families with X-linked hereditary ataxia or spastic paraparesis. No mapping data are available for inherited X-linked sideroblastic anemia without neurologic abnormalities. However, structural alterations of band Xq13 may be involved in the development of idiopathic acquired sideroblastic anemia. No alterations in the restriction patterns of two X-linked genes involved in erythrocyte formation-i.e., a DNA-binding protein (GF-1) and 5-aminolevulinate synthase (ALAS)-were detected in DNA from affected males, arguing against a large deletion in either of these candidate genes.

  12. Sex Differences in Speed of Mental Rotation and the X-Linked Genetic Hypothesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Hoben; Kail, Robert

    1991-01-01

    Mental-rotation task response times from 12 studies involving 505 adults--251 males and 254 females--were used to evaluate 5 hypotheses concerning sex differences derived from an X-linked genetic model. The model assumes that task facilitation in speed of mental rotation is mediated by a recessive gene. Four hypotheses derived from the model were…

  13. Sex Differences in Spatial Ability: The X-Linked Gene Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blatter, Patricia

    1982-01-01

    Among the many theories attempting to explain sex differences in spatial ability, one of the most highly researched is the X-linked recessive gene theory. This is a review of the major research done on that theory and shows the conflicting nature of the results. (Author)

  14. Abnormal Cortex-Muscle Interactions in Subjects with X-linked Kallmann's Syndrome and Mirror Movements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, S. F.; Harrison, L. M.; Mayston, M. J.; Parekh, A.; James, L. M.; Stephens, J. A.

    2004-01-01

    X-linked Kallmann's (XKS) subjects, who display mirror movements, have abnormal corticospinal tracts which innervate motoneurons of the left and right distal muscles of the upper limb. The size of the abnormal ipsilateral projection is variable. We have used coherence and cumulant analysis between EEG and first dorsal interosseous muscle (1DI) EMG…

  15. X-Linked Intellectual Disability: Unique Vulnerability of the Male Genome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Roger E.; Schwartz, Charles E.

    2009-01-01

    X-linked intellectual disability (XLID) accounts for approximately 16% of males with intellectual disability (ID). This is, in part, related to the fact that males have a single X chromosome. Progress in the clinical and molecular characterization of XLID has outpaced progress in the delineation of ID due to genes on the other 22 chromosomes.…

  16. Late-onset Zellweger spectrum disorder caused by PEX6 mutations mimicking X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Tran, Christel; Hewson, Stacy; Steinberg, Steven J; Mercimek-Mahmutoglu, Saadet

    2014-08-01

    Zellweger spectrum disorder is an autosomal recessively inherited multisystem disorder caused by one of the 13 different PEX gene defects resulting in defective peroxisomal assembly and multiple peroxisomal enzyme deficiencies. We report a new patient with late-onset Zellweger spectrum disorder mimicking X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. This 8.5-year-old boy with normal development until 6.5 years of age presented with bilateral sensorineural hearing loss during a school hearing test. He then developed acute-onset diplopia, clumsiness, and cognitive dysfunction at age 7 years. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed symmetric leukodystrophy, although without gadolinium enhancement. Elevated plasma very long chain fatty acid levels were suggestive of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy, but his ABCD1 gene had normal coding sequence and dosage. Additional studies of cultured skin fibroblasts were consistent with Zellweger spectrum disorder. Molecular testing identified disease-causing compound heterozygous mutations in the PEX6 gene supporting the Zellweger spectrum disorder diagnosis in this patient. We describe a new patient with late-onset Zellweger spectrum disorder caused by PEX6 mutations who presented with an acute neurodegenerative disease course mimicking X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. This finding provides an additional reason that molecular confirmation is important for the genetic counseling and management of patients with a clinical and biochemical diagnosis of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Pioglitazone halts axonal degeneration in a mouse model of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Morató, Laia; Galino, Jorge; Ruiz, Montserrat; Calingasan, Noel Ylagan; Starkov, Anatoly A; Dumont, Magali; Naudí, Alba; Martínez, Juan José; Aubourg, Patrick; Portero-Otín, Manuel; Pamplona, Reinald; Galea, Elena; Beal, M Flint; Ferrer, Isidre; Fourcade, Stéphane; Pujol, Aurora

    2013-08-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy is a neurometabolic disorder caused by inactivation of the peroxisomal ABCD1 transporter of very long-chain fatty acids. In mice, ABCD1 loss causes late onset axonal degeneration in the spinal cord in association with locomotor disability resembling the most common phenotype in patients, adrenomyeloneuropathy. Increasing evidence indicates that oxidative stress and bioenergetic failure play major roles in the pathogenesis of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. In this study, we aimed to evaluate whether mitochondrial biogenesis is affected in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. We demonstrated that Abcd1 null mice show reduced mitochondrial DNA concomitant with downregulation of mitochondrial biogenesis pathway driven by PGC-1α/PPARγ and reduced expression of mitochondrial proteins cytochrome c, NDUFB8 and VDAC. Moreover, we show that the oral administration of pioglitazone, an agonist of PPARγ, restored mitochondrial content and expression of master regulators of biogenesis, neutralized oxidative damage to proteins and DNA, and reversed bioenergetic failure in terms of ATP levels, NAD+/NADH ratios, pyruvate kinase and glutathione reductase activities. Most importantly, the treatment halted locomotor disability and axonal damage in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy mice. These results lend support to the use of pioglitazone in clinical trials with patients with adrenomyeloneuropathy and reveal novel molecular mechanisms of action of pioglitazone in neurodegeneration. Future studies should address the effects of this anti-diabetic drug on other axonopathies in which oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction are contributing factors.

  18. Clinical, biochemical, neuroimaging and molecular findings of X-linked Adrenoleukodystrophy patients in South China.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Min-yan; Cai, Yan-na; Liang, Cui-li; Peng, Min-zhi; Sheng, Hui-ying; Fan, Li-ping; Lin, Rui-zhu; Jiang, Hua; Huang, Yonglan; Liu, Li

    2015-12-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy is a common X-linked recessive peroxisomal disorder caused by the mutations in the ABCD1 gene. In this study, we analyzed 19 male patients and 9 female carriers with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy in South China. By sequencing the ABCD1 gene, 13 different mutations were identified, including 7 novel mutations, and 6 known mutations, and 1 reported polymorphism. Mutation c.1180delG was demonstrated to be de novo mutation. 26.3 % (5/19) patients carried the deletion c.1415_16delAG, which may be the mutational hot spot in South China population. In addition, 73.7 % (14/19) patients were type of childhood cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy, 26.3 %(5/19) were in Addison only. Half of the childhood cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy patients had the adrenocortical insufficiency preceded the onset of neurological symptoms. Furthermore, 5 of 19 cases underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Our data showed that hematopoietic stem cell transplantation performed at an advanced stage of the cerebral X- linked adrenoleukodystrophy would accelerate the progression of the disease. Good clinical outcome achieved when hematopoietic stem cell transplantation performed at the very early stage of the disease.

  19. Pioglitazone halts axonal degeneration in a mouse model of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Morató, Laia; Galino, Jorge; Ruiz, Montserrat; Calingasan, Noel Ylagan; Starkov, Anatoly A.; Dumont, Magali; Naudí, Alba; Martínez, Juan José; Aubourg, Patrick; Portero-Otín, Manuel; Pamplona, Reinald; Galea, Elena; Beal, M. Flint; Ferrer, Isidre; Fourcade, Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy is a neurometabolic disorder caused by inactivation of the peroxisomal ABCD1 transporter of very long-chain fatty acids. In mice, ABCD1 loss causes late onset axonal degeneration in the spinal cord in association with locomotor disability resembling the most common phenotype in patients, adrenomyeloneuropathy. Increasing evidence indicates that oxidative stress and bioenergetic failure play major roles in the pathogenesis of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. In this study, we aimed to evaluate whether mitochondrial biogenesis is affected in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. We demonstrated that Abcd1 null mice show reduced mitochondrial DNA concomitant with downregulation of mitochondrial biogenesis pathway driven by PGC-1α/PPARγ and reduced expression of mitochondrial proteins cytochrome c, NDUFB8 and VDAC. Moreover, we show that the oral administration of pioglitazone, an agonist of PPARγ, restored mitochondrial content and expression of master regulators of biogenesis, neutralized oxidative damage to proteins and DNA, and reversed bioenergetic failure in terms of ATP levels, NAD+/NADH ratios, pyruvate kinase and glutathione reductase activities. Most importantly, the treatment halted locomotor disability and axonal damage in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy mice. These results lend support to the use of pioglitazone in clinical trials with patients with adrenomyeloneuropathy and reveal novel molecular mechanisms of action of pioglitazone in neurodegeneration. Future studies should address the effects of this anti-diabetic drug on other axonopathies in which oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction are contributing factors. PMID:23794606

  20. New insights and unresolved issues regarding insertional mutagenesis in X-linked SCID gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Pike-Overzet, Karin; van der Burg, Mirjam; Wagemaker, Gerard; van Dongen, Jacques J M; Staal, Frank J T

    2007-11-01

    The oncogenic potential of retrovirus-mediated gene therapy has been re-emphasized because four patients developed T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL)-like disease from an otherwise successful gene therapy trial for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (X-linked SCID). X-linked SCID, a disease caused by inactivating mutations in the IL2Rgamma gene, is part of a heterogeneous group of SCIDs characterized by the lack of T cells in conjunction with the absence of B and/or natural killer (NK) cells. Gene therapy approaches are being developed for this group of diseases. In this review we discuss the various forms of SCID in relation to normal T-cell development. In addition, we consider the possible role of LMO2 and other T-ALL oncogenes in the development of adverse effects as seen in the X-linked SCID gene therapy trial. Furthermore, we debate whether the integration near the LMO2 locus is sufficient to result in T-ALL-like proliferations or whether the gamma-retroviral viral expression of the therapeutic IL2RG gene contributes to leukemogenesis. Finally, we review some newly developed murine models that may have added value for gene therapy safety studies.

  1. Abnormal Cortex-Muscle Interactions in Subjects with X-linked Kallmann's Syndrome and Mirror Movements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, S. F.; Harrison, L. M.; Mayston, M. J.; Parekh, A.; James, L. M.; Stephens, J. A.

    2004-01-01

    X-linked Kallmann's (XKS) subjects, who display mirror movements, have abnormal corticospinal tracts which innervate motoneurons of the left and right distal muscles of the upper limb. The size of the abnormal ipsilateral projection is variable. We have used coherence and cumulant analysis between EEG and first dorsal interosseous muscle (1DI) EMG…

  2. Influence of sex and genetic variability on expression of X-linked genes in human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Castagné, Raphaële; Zeller, Tanja; Rotival, Maxime; Szymczak, Silke; Truong, Vinh; Schillert, Arne; Trégouët, David-Alexandre; Münzel, Thomas; Ziegler, Andreas; Cambien, François; Blankenberg, Stefan; Tiret, Laurence

    2011-11-01

    In humans, the fraction of X-linked genes with higher expression in females has been estimated to be 5% from microarray studies, a proportion lower than the 25% of genes thought to escape X inactivation. We analyzed 715 X-linked transcripts in circulating monocytes from 1,467 subjects and found an excess of female-biased transcripts on the X compared to autosomes (9.4% vs 5.5%, p<2×10(-5)). Among the genes not previously known to escape inactivation, the most significant one was EFHC2 whose 20% of variability was explained by sex. We also investigated cis expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) by analyzing 15,703 X-linked SNPs. The frequency and magnitude of X-linked cis eQTLs were quite similar in males and females. Few genes exhibited a stronger genetic effect in females than in males (ARSD, DCX, POLA1 and ITM2A). These genes would deserve further investigation since they may contribute to sex pathophysiological differences. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Mutations in X-linked PORCN, a putative regulator of Wnt signaling, cause focal dermal hypoplasia

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Focal dermal hypoplasia is an X-linked dominant disorder characterized by patchy hypoplastic skin and digital, ocular, and dental malformations. We used array comparative genomic hybridization to identify a 219-kb deletion in Xp11.23 in two affected females. We sequenced genes in this region and fou...

  4. X-Linked Intellectual Disability: Unique Vulnerability of the Male Genome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Roger E.; Schwartz, Charles E.

    2009-01-01

    X-linked intellectual disability (XLID) accounts for approximately 16% of males with intellectual disability (ID). This is, in part, related to the fact that males have a single X chromosome. Progress in the clinical and molecular characterization of XLID has outpaced progress in the delineation of ID due to genes on the other 22 chromosomes.…

  5. Apparently previously undescribed X-linked dominant syndrome with facial and skeletal anomalies.

    PubMed

    Kapur, S; Swinford, A; Freimanis, A K; Lachman, R S

    1989-07-01

    We report on a syndrome of widow's peak, ptosis, skeletal abnormalities and other minor anomalies in a large family. The condition appears to be inherited in an X-linked dominant fashion. No similar cases have been found in the literature, suggesting that this is a "new" syndrome. Study of 5 generations of the family documents information on the natural history of the condition.

  6. Residual NADPH Oxidase Activity and Isolated Lung Involvement in X-Linked Chronic Granulomatous Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Maria J.; McSherry, George D.; Ishmael, Faoud T.; Horwitz, Alexandra A.; Nino, Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is characterized by inherited immune defects resulting from mutations in the NADPH oxidase complex genes. The X-linked type of CGD is caused by defects in the CYBB gene that encodes gp91-phox, a fundamental component of the NADPH oxidase complex. This mutation originates the most common and severe form of CGD, which typically has absence of NADPH oxidase function and aggressive multisystemic infections. We present the case of a 9-year-old child with a rare CYBB mutation that preserves some NADPH oxidase activity, resulting in an atypical mild form of X-linked CGD with isolated lung involvement. Although the clinical picture and partially preserved oxidase function suggested an autosomal recessive form of CGD, genetic testing demonstrated a mutation in the exon 3 of CYBB gene (c.252 G>A, p.Ala84Ala), an uncommon X-linked CGD variant that affects splicing. Atypical presentation and diagnostic difficulties are discussed. This case highlights that the diagnosis of mild forms of X-linked CGD caused by rare CYBB mutations and partially preserved NADPH function should be considered early in the evaluation of atypical and recurrent lung infections. PMID:23193493

  7. Self-induced vomiting in X-linked {alpha}-thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Kurosawa, Kenji; Akatsuka, Akira; Ochiai, Yukikatsu

    1996-06-14

    This report poses the question of whether the vomiting observed in X-linked {alpha}-thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome could be self-induced. The authors present a case history which seems to support this hypothesis. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  8. Genome-wide misexpression of X-linked versus autosomal genes associated with hybrid male sterility.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xuemei; Shapiro, Joshua A; Ting, Chau-Ti; Li, Yan; Li, Chunyan; Xu, Jin; Huang, Huanwei; Cheng, Ya-Jen; Greenberg, Anthony J; Li, Shou-Hsien; Wu, Mao-Lien; Shen, Yang; Wu, Chung-I

    2010-08-01

    Postmating reproductive isolation is often manifested as hybrid male sterility, for which X-linked genes are overrepresented (the so-called large X effect). In contrast, X-linked genes are significantly under-represented among testis-expressing genes. This seeming contradiction may be germane to the X:autosome imbalance hypothesis on hybrid sterility, in which the X-linked effect is mediated mainly through the misexpression of autosomal genes. In this study, we compared gene expression in fertile and sterile males in the hybrids between two Drosophila species. These hybrid males differ only in a small region of the X chromosome containing the Ods-site homeobox (OdsH) (also known as Odysseus) locus of hybrid sterility. Of genes expressed in the testis, autosomal genes were, indeed, more likely to be misexpressed than X-linked genes under the sterilizing action of OdsH. Since this mechanism of X:autosome interaction is only associated with spermatogenesis, a connection between X:autosome imbalance and the high rate of hybrid male sterility seems plausible.

  9. Canine lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1986-10-01

    Canine lymphoma has served as the ''workhorse'' for the development of veterinary oncology and as an important animal model for human non-Hodgkins lymphomas. Significant advances have been achieved in understanding the biological behavior of the disease and in its treatment. Although it is unlikely that a cure for lymphoma will be achieved, owners should be encouraged to treat their pets, provided they understand that only prolonged remissions and survivals are likely to result. Cooperative studies, employing large numbers of dogs, are needed to optimize and refine the classification scheme to provide a system with diagnostic and prognostic correlates and derive maximum benefit from therapeutic regimens. Such studies need to be prospective in nature, with a solid statistical base incorporated into their design. Rather than being content with what we have accomplished to date in treatment of canine lymphoma, the opportunity exists for the veterinary profession to make further significant contributions to the understanding and treatment of lymphoma in the dog. 10 refs., 4 tabs.

  10. The mouse rumpshaker mutation of the proteolipid protein in human X-linked recessive spastic paraplegia

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, H.; Hoffman, E.P.; Matise, T.C.

    1994-09-01

    X-linked recessive spastic paraplegia is a rare neurodegenerative disorder characterized by slowly progressive weakness and spasticity of the lower extremities. We have recently genetically analyzed the original X-linked recessive spastic paraplegia family reported by Johnston and McKusick in 1962. We employed a fluorescent multiplex CA repeat strategy using a 22 locus, 10 cM framework map of the human X chromosome and localized the gene within a 36 cM region of Xq2l.3-q24 which includes the PLP locus. Saugier-Veber et al. recently reported a point mutation (His139Tyr) in exon 3B of the PLP gene in an X-linked recessive spastic paraplegia family (SPG2). This family shows no optic atrophy, in contrast to the family we have studied. This data showed that SPG2 and Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease were allelic disorders. We investigated the PLP gene as a candidate gene for the original X-linked recessive spastic paraplegia family using SSCP and direct sequencing methods. We found a point mutation (T to C) in exon 4 of affected males which alters the amino-acid (Ile to Thr) at residue 186. This change was absent in the unaffected males of the family and in 40 unrelated control females (80 X chromosomes). Surprisingly, this mutation is identical to the mutation previously identified in the rumpshaker mouse model. The complete homology between both the mouse and human PLP sequence, and the mouse rumpshaker mutation and human spastic paraplegia mutation in our family, permit direct parallels to be drawn with regards to pathophysiology. Our data indicates that the well-documented and striking clinical differences between Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease and X-linked recessive spastic paraplegia is due to the specific effect of different mutations of the human PLP gene on oligodendrocyte differentiation and development and on later myelin production and maintenance.

  11. Fine Mapping of Dominant X-Linked Incompatibility Alleles in Drosophila Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Matute, Daniel R.; Gavin-Smyth, Jackie

    2014-01-01

    Sex chromosomes have a large effect on reproductive isolation and play an important role in hybrid inviability. In Drosophila hybrids, X-linked genes have pronounced deleterious effects on fitness in male hybrids, which have only one X chromosome. Several studies have succeeded at locating and identifying recessive X-linked alleles involved in hybrid inviability. Nonetheless, the density of dominant X-linked alleles involved in interspecific hybrid viability remains largely unknown. In this report, we study the effects of a panel of small fragments of the D. melanogaster X-chromosome carried on the D. melanogaster Y-chromosome in three kinds of hybrid males: D. melanogaster/D. santomea, D. melanogaster/D. simulans and D. melanogaster/D. mauritiana. D. santomea and D. melanogaster diverged over 10 million years ago, while D. simulans (and D. mauritiana) diverged from D. melanogaster over 3 million years ago. We find that the X-chromosome from D. melanogaster carries dominant alleles that are lethal in mel/san, mel/sim, and mel/mau hybrids, and more of these alleles are revealed in the most divergent cross. We then compare these effects on hybrid viability with two D. melanogaster intraspecific crosses. Unlike the interspecific crosses, we found no X-linked alleles that cause lethality in intraspecific crosses. Our results reveal the existence of dominant alleles on the X-chromosome of D. melanogaster which cause lethality in three different interspecific hybrids. These alleles only cause inviability in hybrid males, yet have little effect in hybrid females. This suggests that X-linked elements that cause hybrid inviability in males might not do so in hybrid females due to differing sex chromosome interactions. PMID:24743238

  12. Localisation of the gene for X-linked reticulate pigmentary disorder with systemic manifestations (PDR), previously known as X-linked cutaneous amyloidosis

    SciTech Connect

    Gedeon, A.K.; Mulley, J.C.; Kozman, H.; Donnelly, A.; Partington, M.W.

    1994-08-01

    X-linked reticulate pigmentary disorder (PDR), previously reported as X-linked cutaneous amyloidosis (MIM No. 301220), is characterized by brown pigmentation of the skin which follows the lines of Blaschko in females but appears as reticulate sheets in males. Males may suffer severe gastrointestinal disorders in infancy with failure to thrive and early death. Nowadays symptomatic treatment allows survival and other manifestations may appear such as corneal dystrophy with severe photophobia or chronic respiratory disease. Amyloid deposition in the skin may be no more than an age-dependent secondary manifestation. The PDR gene was localized by linkage analysis to Xp21-p22. The background genetic map is Xpter-DXS996-22.5-DXS207-3.3-DXS999-3.3-DXS365-14.2-DXS989-4.1-3`DMD-3.5-DXS997-1.0-STR44-9.3-DYSI-2.3-DXS1068-11.0-DXS228 with distances between markers given in cM. Recombinants detected with DXS999 distally and DXS228 proximally, define the limits to the localization. Linkage was found with several markers within this interval. Peak lod scores of 3.21 at {theta} = 0.0 were obtained between PDR and DXS989 and between PDR and 5`DYSI within the dystrophin locus. 29 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Convergence of Human Genetics and Animal Studies: Gene Therapy for X-Linked Retinoschisis.

    PubMed

    Bush, Ronald A; Wei, Lisa L; Sieving, Paul A

    2015-06-22

    Retinoschisis is an X-linked recessive genetic disease that leads to vision loss in males. X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) typically affects young males; however, progressive vision loss continues throughout life. Although discovered in 1898 by Haas in two brothers, the underlying biology leading to blindness has become apparent only in the last 15 years with the advancement of human genetic analyses, generation of XLRS animal models, and the development of ocular monitoring methods such as the electroretinogram and optical coherence tomography. It is now recognized that retinoschisis results from cyst formations within the retinal layers that interrupt normal visual neurosignaling and compromise structural integrity. Mutations in the human retinoschisin gene have been correlated with disease severity of the human XLRS phenotype. Introduction of a normal human retinoschisin cDNA into retinoschisin knockout mice restores retinal structure and improves neural function, providing proof-of-concept that gene replacement therapy is a plausible treatment for XLRS.

  14. Mapping of the X linked form of hyper IgM syndrome (HIGM1)

    PubMed

    Padayachee, M; Levinsky, R J; Kinnon, C; Finn, A; McKeown, C; Feighery, C; Notarangelo, L D; Hendriks, R W; Read, A P; Malcolm, S

    1993-03-01

    X linked immunodeficiency with hyperimmunoglobulinaemia M (HIGM1), which is characterised by agammaglobulinaemia together with excess IgM production reflecting an impairment of the immunoglobulin heavy chain class switch of B lymphocytes, has been mapped to Xq26. We report multipoint linkage data in six families with HIGM1 which show that the most likely position for the gene is close to HPRT with a maximum lod score of 4.89. The finding of recombinations between HIGM1 and both HPRT and DXS42 implies that HIGM1 is not allelic to X linked lymphoproliferative disease. These data will be useful in genetic counselling in families and will also be useful in testing candidate genes.

  15. Carrier determination for X-linked agammaglobulinemia using X inactivation analysis of purified B cells.

    PubMed

    Alterman, L A; de Alwis, M; Genet, S; Lovering, R; Middleton-Price, H; Morgan, G; Jones, A; Malcolm, S; Levinsky, R J; Kinnon, C

    1993-11-05

    We report the development of a relatively quick and simple method for the assessment of X inactivation status for carrier determination in families affected by X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA). This method utilises an immunomagnetic separation technique for B cell purification and a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based assay for the determination of methylation status at the androgen receptor (AR) gene locus to assess whether X inactivation is random or non-random at this locus. We report the results we have obtained using this assay to investigate females known to be carriers of various X-linked immunodeficiency disorders. In addition, we investigated four females from different families affected by XLA, two of whom were of unknown carrier status, and we discuss the results obtained with this and other X-inactivation assays. A similar assay has recently been described by Allen et al. (1992) and applied to members of one family affected by XLA.

  16. Molecular genetic and clinical evaluation of three Chinese families with X-linked ocular albinism.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xuan; Li, Hui; Yang, Lizhu; Sun, Zixi; Yuan, Zhisheng; Li, Huajin; Sui, Ruifang

    2017-02-17

    X-linked ocular albinism (OA1) is an X-linked inherited disease characterized by hypopigmentation of the fundus and nystagmus. Our study performed mutation analysis of the G protein-coupled receptor 143 gene (GPR143) and assessed the clinical characteristics of OA1 in three Chinese families. Three novel mutations, c.333_360+14del42insCTT, c.276G>A (p.W92X), and c.793C>T (p.R265X), were identified in GPR143 by PCR followed by Sanger sequencing in these families. All affected individuals presented with nystagmus, photophobia, poor visual acuity, foveal hypoplasia and varying degrees of hypopigmentation of the fundus. The fundus of female carriers showed pigmented streaks alternating with hypopigmented streaks. These results allowed us to expand the spectrum of mutations in GPR143 and phenotypes associated with ocular albinism.

  17. X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy in a 6-year-old boy initially presenting with psychiatric symptoms.

    PubMed

    İncecik, Faruk; Hergüner, M Özlem; Mert, Gülen; Önenli-Mungan, Neslihan; Ceylaner, Serdar; Kör, Deniz; Altunbaşak, Şakir

    2014-01-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) leads to demyelination of the nervous system, adrenal insufficiency and accumulation of long-chain fatty acids. Most young patients with X-linked ALD develop seizures and progressive neurologic deficits, and die within the first two decades of life. We present the case of a 6-year-old with childhood-onset ALD, first presenting with psychiatric symptoms and progressive gait difficulties, slurred speech and cognitive impairment. Genetic testing was performed and a p.R401Q (c.1202G>A) mutation detected in the ABCD1 gene. ALD should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with behavior changes and white matter disease in neuroimaging.

  18. Patulous Subarachnoid Space of the Optic Nerve Associated with X-Linked Hypophosphatemic Rickets.

    PubMed

    Galvez-Ruiz, Alberto; Chaudhry, Imtiaz

    2013-01-01

    Although the deficiency forms are the most common manifestations of rickets, there are other forms of rickets that are resistant to vitamin D. Of these, the most common is X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets. Rickets represents a group of multiple cranial bone disorders-craniosynostosis and the presence of Chari I malformation being the most notable-that explain the increase in intracranial pressure. We present a 4-year-old patient with an unusual association of X-linked hypophosphataemic rickets, bilateral proptosis, and prominent bilateral widening of the optic nerve sheaths. Although the association between intracranial hypertension and rickets is known, to the best of our knowledge, such a prominent distention of the subarachnoid space of the optic nerve without papilloedema has not been previously described.

  19. X-linked ocular albinism and sensorineural deafness: Linkage to Xp22. 3

    SciTech Connect

    Winship, I.M.; Babaya, M.; Ramesar, R.S. )

    1993-11-01

    X-linked ocular albinism with late-onset sensorineural deafness (OASD) is an autonomous disorder that poses significant clinical problems, causing affected individuals to be blind and deaf by early middle age. Classical X-linked ocular albinism (without deafness; OA1) has recently been linked to markers in the Xp22.2-Xp22.3 region of the human genome. In the present report, a large South African family with OASD was investigated at the molecular level and tight linkage was found to the DXS452 locus at Xp22.3 using 25 informative meioses, with a maximum lod score of 7.1 at a recombination fraction of 0.00. These findings suggest that OA1 and OASD are allelic variants or that they may be due to contiguous gene defects. 12 refs., 1 fig.

  20. Molecular genetic and clinical evaluation of three Chinese families with X-linked ocular albinism

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Xuan; Li, Hui; Yang, Lizhu; Sun, Zixi; Yuan, Zhisheng; Li, Huajin; Sui, Ruifang

    2017-01-01

    X-linked ocular albinism (OA1) is an X-linked inherited disease characterized by hypopigmentation of the fundus and nystagmus. Our study performed mutation analysis of the G protein-coupled receptor 143 gene (GPR143) and assessed the clinical characteristics of OA1 in three Chinese families. Three novel mutations, c.333_360+14del42insCTT, c.276G>A (p.W92X), and c.793C>T (p.R265X), were identified in GPR143 by PCR followed by Sanger sequencing in these families. All affected individuals presented with nystagmus, photophobia, poor visual acuity, foveal hypoplasia and varying degrees of hypopigmentation of the fundus. The fundus of female carriers showed pigmented streaks alternating with hypopigmented streaks. These results allowed us to expand the spectrum of mutations in GPR143 and phenotypes associated with ocular albinism. PMID:28211458

  1. X-linked ichthyosis without STS deficiency: Clinical, genetical, and molecular studies

    SciTech Connect

    Robledo, R.; Melis, P.; Schillinger, E.; Siniscalco, M.

    1995-11-06

    We report on a Sardinian pedigree with congenital ichthyosis associated with normal levels of steroid sulfatase and a normal molecular pattern, as detectable with a cDNA probe for the steroid sulfatase (STS) gene. Though the pattern of transmission of the disease is consistent with X-linked recessive inheritance, this form of ichthyosis was found to segregate independently of genetic polymorphisms detected by probes of the region Xp22.3, where the STS locus has been mapped. The search for close genetic linkages with other polymorphic markers scattered along the entire X chromosome has so far been fruitless. For the time being, the main conclusion derived from these data is that STS deficiency is not a sine qua non for X-linked ichthyosis which may also result from a mutational event at an X-chromosomal site genetically unlinked to the STS locus. 16 refs., 4 figs.

  2. May spina bifida result from an X-linked defect in a selective abortion mechanism?

    PubMed Central

    Burn, J; Gibbens, D

    1979-01-01

    It is suggested that the major genetic factor in determining the birth of children with neural tube defects may be a single X-linked gene. It acts as an X-linked dominant, not by producing neural tube defects, but by enabling the affected fetus to survive selective spontaneous abortion. This mechanism, mediated at the deciduoplacental junction, may be under the control of both maternal and fetal genes. With more mutant alleles, survival would become more likely, reaching a maximum in the homozygous affected female fetus of a homozygous affected mother. The female excess in anancephaly is greater than that in spina bifida because of its prenatal severity, thus requiring relatively more mutant alleles for survival. PMID:381663

  3. [Clinical and molecular study in a child with X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia].

    PubMed

    Callea, Michele; Yavuz, Izzet; Clarich, Gabriella; Cammarata-Scalisi, Francisco

    2015-12-01

    Ectodermal dysplasia encompasses more than 200 clinically distinct entities, which affect at least two structures derived from the ectoderm, including the skin, hair, nails, teeth, sweat glands, and sebaceous glands. X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia is the most common type and is caused by mutation of the EDA gene that encodes Ectodysplasin-A. It occurs in less than 1 in 100 000 individuals and is clinically characterized by hypodontia, hypohidrosis, hypotrichosis, and eye dis orders. We present a child evaluated in a multidisciplinary manner with clinical and molecular diagnosis of X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia with type missense mutation c.1133C> T; p.T378M in EDA gene.

  4. Molecular basis of X-linked non-specific mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Udai Bhan; Mittal, Balraj

    2004-06-01

    Mental retardation (MR) is a common disorder, affecting 1-3% of the total population. This condition results from failure to develop cognitive abilities and intelligence level appropriate for the age group. Mental retardation is basically a clinically as well as etiologically heterogeneous type of condition and both genetic and non-genetic factors have been found to be involved. There are more than 1000 entries in Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database under the name of mental retardation. In recent years 15 genes for X linked non-specific mental retardation have been identified which provide important clues regarding molecular and cellular processes involved in signal transduction cascade in central nervous system. Recent advancements in identification and characterization of X-linked non-specific mental retardation genes have been discussed in this review. Understanding of the molecular pathways of disease causing genes would be helpful in developing effective therapeutic approaches for mental retardation.

  5. Position effect on FGF13 associated with X-linked congenital generalized hypertrichosis.

    PubMed

    DeStefano, Gina M; Fantauzzo, Katherine A; Petukhova, Lynn; Kurban, Mazen; Tadin-Strapps, Marija; Levy, Brynn; Warburton, Dorothy; Cirulli, Elizabeth T; Han, Yujun; Sun, Xiaoyun; Shen, Yufeng; Shirazi, Maryam; Jobanputra, Vaidehi; Cepeda-Valdes, Rodrigo; Cesar Salas-Alanis, Julio; Christiano, Angela M

    2013-05-07

    X-linked congenital generalized hypertrichosis (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man 307150) is an extremely rare condition of hair overgrowth on different body sites. We previously reported linkage in a large Mexican family with X-linked congenital generalized hypertrichosis cosegregating with deafness and with dental and palate anomalies to Xq24-27. Using SNP oligonucleotide microarray analysis and whole-genome sequencing, we identified a 389-kb interchromosomal insertion at an extragenic palindrome site at Xq27.1 that completely cosegregates with the disease. Among the genes surrounding the insertion, we found that Fibroblast Growth Factor 13 (FGF13) mRNA levels were significantly reduced in affected individuals, and immunofluorescence staining revealed a striking decrease in FGF13 localization throughout the outer root sheath of affected hair follicles. Taken together, our findings suggest a role for FGF13 in hair follicle growth and in the hair cycle.

  6. A Novel Mutation in a Japanese Family with X-linked Alport Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Yoshifusa; Iyoda, Masayuki; Nozu, Kandai; Hibino, Satoshi; Hihara, Kei; Yamaguchi, Yutaka; Yamamura, Tomohiko; Minamikawa, Shogo; Iijima, Kazumoto; Shibata, Takanori; Itabashi, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    We herein report a novel mutation in a Japanese family with an X-linked Alport syndrome (AS) mutation in COL4A5. Patient 1 was a 2-year-old Japanese girl. She and her mother (patient 2) had a history of proteinuria and hematuria without renal dysfunction, deafness, or ocular abnormalities. Pathological findings were consistent with AS, and a genetic analysis revealed that both patients had a heterozygous mutation (c.2767G>C) in exon 32. In summary, the identification of mutations and characteristic pathological findings was useful in making a diagnosis of AS. For a close long-term follow-up, the early detection and treatment of women with X-linked AS are important. PMID:27725546

  7. Lupus erythematosus-like lesions in a carrier of X-linked chronic granulomatous disease.

    PubMed

    Córdoba-Guijarro, S; Feal, C; Daudén, E; Fraga, J; García-Díez, A

    2000-09-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is an inherited immunodeficiency disease. Carrier status of CGD has been reported in association with lupus erythematosus-type lesions. A 35-year-old woman, mother of a child with X-linked CGD presented an 8-year history of erythematous plaques with an arciform pattern on the upper trunk, back and arms. The nitroblue tetrazolium test revealed the carrier status of the patient. Haematological, biochemical and immunological tests (including ANA, DNA, SSA-Ro, SSB-La, RNP, SM and Jo1 antibodies) were normal or negative except for a polyclonal hypergammaglobulinaemia with high serum IgA. Histological examination showed a papillary and perifollicular lymphohistiocytic infiltrate. Direct immunofluorescence was negative. We report a female carrier of X-linked CGD who developed clinical subacute lupus erythematosus-like lesions. We review the literature and discuss the pathogenetic mechanisms involved in the condition.

  8. X-linked dominant chondrodysplasia punctata (CDPX2) caused by single gene mosaicism in a male.

    PubMed

    Aughton, David J; Kelley, Richard I; Metzenberg, Aida; Pureza, Vincent; Pauli, Richard M

    2003-01-30

    X-linked dominant chondrodysplasia punctata (CDPX2; Happle syndrome) is recognized almost exclusively in females, who display mosaic and asymmetric features, presumed to arise secondary to random X-inactivation. CDPX2 results from mutation of an X-linked gene coding for sterol-delta(8)-delta(7) isomerase (emopamil binding protein). We describe a boy with clinical features of CDPX2 (including those presumed to arise usually secondary to functional mosaicism in females). Biochemical and molecular studies demonstrate that he is mosaic for a sterol-delta(8)-delta(7) isomerase gene mutation. He is the first reported example of single gene mosaicism giving rise to CDPX2 in a male. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Refined genetic mapping of X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Fain, P.R.; Barker, D.F.; Chance, P.F. )

    1994-02-01

    Genetic linkage studies were conducted in four multigenerational families with X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMTX), using 12 highly polymorphic short-tandem-repeat markers for the pericentromeric region of the X Chromosome. Pairwise linkage analysis with individual markers confirmed tight linkage of CMTX to the pericentromeric region in each family. Multipoint analyses strongly support the order DXS337-CMTX-DXS441-(DXS56, PGK1). 38 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Molecular genetic analysis of patients with sporadic and X-linked infantile nystagmus

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hui; Huang, Xiu-Feng; Zheng, Zhi-Li; Deng, Wen-Li; Lei, Xin-Lan; Xing, Dong-Jun; Ye, Liang; Xu, Su-Zhong; Chen, Jie; Zhang, Fang; Yu, Xin-Ping; Jin, Zi-Bing

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Infantile nystagmus (IN) is a genetically heterogeneous condition characterised by involuntary rhythmic oscillations of the eyes accompanied by different degrees of vision impairment. Two genes have been identified as mainly causing IN: FRMD7 and GPR143. The aim of our study was to identify the genetic basis of both sporadic IN and X-linked IN. Design Prospective analysis. Patients Twenty Chinese patients, including 15 sporadic IN cases and 5 from X-linked IN families, were recruited and underwent molecular genetic analysis. We first performed PCR-based DNA sequencing of the entire coding region and the splice junctions of the FRMD7 and GPR143 genes in participants. Mutational analysis and co-segregation confirmation were then performed. Setting All clinical examinations and genetic experiments were performed in the Eye Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University. Results Two mutations in the FRMD7 gene, including one novel nonsense mutation (c.1090C>T, p.Q364X) and one reported missense mutation (c.781C>G, p.R261G), were identified in two of the five (40%) X-linked IN families. However, none of putative mutations were identified in FRMD7 or GPR143 in any of the sporadic cases. Conclusions The results suggest that mutations in FRMD7 appeared to be the major genetic cause of X-linked IN, but not of sporadic IN. Our findings provide further insights into FRMD7 mutations, which could be helpful for future genetic diagnosis and genetic counselling of Chinese patients with nystagmus. PMID:27036142

  11. Clinical and radiographic dental findings in X linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, P J; Aldred, M J; Clarke, A

    1991-01-01

    X linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia was studied in the dentition of both affected males and carrier females. Hypodontia was more severe in males than females and there were differences in the pattern of tooth absence between the sexes. Abnormal crown form, with the maximum diameter of the teeth being apically displaced, was noted particularly in the anterior teeth. Taurodontism was commonly seen radiographically. Images PMID:2051453

  12. Newborn Screening for X-linked Adrenoleukodystrophy: Further evidence high throughput screening is feasible

    PubMed Central

    Theda, Christiane; Gibbons, Katy; DeFor, Todd E.; Donohue, Pamela K.; Golden, W. Christopher; Kline, Antonie D.; Gulamali-Majid, Fizza; Panny, Susan R.; Hubbard, Walter C.; Jones, Richard O.; Liu, Anita K.; Moser, Ann B.; Raymond, Gerald V.

    2014-01-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) is characterized by adrenal insufficiency and neurologic involvement with onset at variable ages. Plasma very long chain fatty acids are elevated in ALD; even in asymptomatic patients. We demonstrated previously that liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry measuring C26:0 lysophosphatidylcholine reliably identifies affected males. We prospectively applied this method to 4689 newborn blood spot samples; no false positives were observed. We show that high throughput neonatal screening for ALD is methodologically feasible. PMID:24268529

  13. Successful hematopoietic cell transplantation in a patient with X-linked agammaglobulinemia and acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Abu-Arja, Rolla F; Chernin, Leah R; Abusin, Ghada; Auletta, Jeffery; Cabral, Linda; Egler, Rachel; Ochs, Hans D; Torgerson, Troy R; Lopez-Guisa, Jesus; Hostoffer, Robert W; Tcheurekdjian, Haig; Cooke, Kenneth R

    2015-09-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a primary immunodeficiency characterized by marked reduction in all classes of serum immunoglobulins and the near absence of mature CD19(+) B-cells. Although malignancy has been observed in patients with XLA, we present the first reported case of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in a patient with XLA. We also demonstrate the complete correction of the XLA phenotype following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for treatment of the patient's leukemia. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Successful Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in a Patient With X-linked Agammaglobulinemia and Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Arja, Rolla F.; Chernin, Leah R.; Abusin, Ghada; Auletta, Jeffery; Cabral, Linda; Egler, Rachel; Ochs, Hans D.; Torgerson, Troy R.; Lopez-Guisa, Jesus; Hostoffer, Robert W.; Tcheurekdjian, Haig; Cooke, Kenneth R.

    2016-01-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a primary immunodeficiency characterized by marked reduction in all classes of serum immunoglobulins and the near absence of mature CD19+ B-cells. Although malignancy has been observed in patients with XLA, we present the first reported case of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in a patient with XLA. We also demonstrate the complete correction of the XLA phenotype following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for treatment of the patient’s leukemia. PMID:25900577

  15. CRISPR/Cas9 Promotes Functional Study of Testis Specific X-Linked Gene In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xue; Chen, Yuxi; Zhang, Zhen; Zhang, Xiya; Liang, Puping; Zhan, Shaoquan; Cao, Shanbo; Songyang, Zhou; Huang, Junjiu

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian spermatogenesis is a highly regulated multistage process of sperm generation. It is hard to uncover the real function of a testis specific gene in vitro since the in vitro model is not yet mature. With the development of the CRISPR/Cas9 (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats/CRISPR-associated 9) system, we can now rapidly generate knockout mouse models of testis specific genes to study the process of spermatogenesis in vivo. SYCP3-like X-linked 2 (SLX2) is a germ cell specific component, which contains a Cor1 domain and belongs to the XLR (X-linked, lymphocyte regulated) family. Previous studies suggested that SLX2 might play an important role in mouse spermatogenesis based on its subcellular localization and interacting proteins. However, the function of SLX2 in vivo is still elusive. Here, to investigate the functions of SLX2 in spermatogenesis, we disrupted the Slx2 gene by using the CRISPR/Cas9 system. Since Slx2 is a testis specific X-linked gene, we obtained knockout male mice in the first generation and accelerated the study process. Compared with wild-type mice, Slx2 knockout mice have normal testis and epididymis. Histological observation of testes sections showed that Slx2 knockout affected none of the three main stages of spermatogenesis: mitosis, meiosis and spermiogenesis. In addition, we further confirmed that disruption of Slx2 did not affect the number of spermatogonial stem cells, meiosis progression or XY body formation by immunofluorescence analysis. As spermatogenesis was normal in Slx2 knockout mice, these mice were fertile. Taken together, we showed that Slx2 itself is not an essential gene for mouse spermatogenesis and CRISPR/Cas9 technique could speed up the functional study of testis specific X-linked gene in vivo. PMID:26599493

  16. Nonspecific X-linked mental retardation with macrocephaly and obesity: A further family

    SciTech Connect

    Baraitser, M.; Reardon, W.; Vijeratnam, S.

    1995-07-03

    The phenotypic nonspecificity of many forms of X-linked mental retardation has hampered attempts to classify them into clinically homogeneous groups. One such condition, described by Clark and Baraitser, has been the subject of a single pedigree report to date. We now describe a further pedigree whose affected members share many manifestations with those reported by Clark and Baraitser, and we consider the possible distinction between this condition and Atkin-Flaitz syndrome. 9 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Chronic polioencephalitis with cerebral atrophy in infantile X-linked hypogammaglobulineaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Liwnicz, B H; Marinkovich, V A

    1979-01-01

    The development of a chronic polioencephalitis is reported in a patient with infantile X-linked hypogammaglobulinaemia (IXH Bruton type agammaglobulinaemia). In early childhood, the patient had multiple episodes of purulent inflammation involving the meninges and respiratory tract. He was given continuous administration of gammaglobulin and intermittent treatment with antibiotics, and survived for 21 years. The neuropathological lesion, which revealed severe cerebral atrophy, is described. Images PMID:572414

  18. A novel UBE2A mutation causes X-linked intellectual disability type Nascimento.

    PubMed

    Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Ohashi, Ikuko; Enomoto, Yumi; Naruto, Takuya; Mitsui, Jun; Aida, Noriko; Kurosawa, Kenji

    2017-01-01

    X-linked intellectual disability (ID) type Nascimento (MIM #300860), also known as ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2 A (UBE2A) deficiency syndrome, is a congenital malformation syndrome characterized by moderate to severe ID, speech impairment, dysmorphic facial features, genital anomalies and skin abnormalities. Here, we report a Japanese patient with severe ID and congenital cataract. We identified a novel hemizygous mutation (c.76G>A, p.Gly26Arg) in UBE2A by whole-exome sequencing.

  19. Selection and mutation in X-linked recessive diseases epidemiological model.

    PubMed

    Verrilli, Francesca; Kebriaei, Hamed; Glielmo, Luigi; Corless, Martin; Del Vecchio, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    To describe the epidemiology of X-linked recessive diseases we developed a discrete time, structured, non linear mathematical model. The model allows for de novo mutations (i.e. affected sibling born to unaffected parents) and selection (i.e., distinct fitness rates depending on individual's health conditions). Applying Lyapunov direct method we found the domain of attraction of model's equilibrium point and studied the convergence properties of the degenerate equilibrium where only affected individuals survive.

  20. X-linked cataract and Nance-Horan syndrome are allelic disorders

    PubMed Central

    Coccia, Margherita; Brooks, Simon P.; Webb, Tom R.; Christodoulou, Katja; Wozniak, Izabella O.; Murday, Victoria; Balicki, Martha; Yee, Harris A.; Wangensteen, Teresia; Riise, Ruth; Saggar, Anand K.; Park, Soo-Mi; Kanuga, Naheed; Francis, Peter J.; Maher, Eamonn R.; Moore, Anthony T.; Russell-Eggitt, Isabelle M.; Hardcastle, Alison J.

    2009-01-01

    Nance-Horan syndrome (NHS) is an X-linked developmental disorder characterized by congenital cataract, dental anomalies, facial dysmorphism and, in some cases, mental retardation. Protein truncation mutations in a novel gene (NHS) have been identified in patients with this syndrome. We previously mapped X-linked congenital cataract (CXN) in one family to an interval on chromosome Xp22.13 which encompasses the NHS locus; however, no mutations were identified in the NHS gene. In this study, we show that NHS and X-linked cataract are allelic diseases. Two CXN families, which were negative for mutations in the NHS gene, were further analysed using array comparative genomic hybridization. CXN was found to be caused by novel copy number variations: a complex duplication–triplication re-arrangement and an intragenic deletion, predicted to result in altered transcriptional regulation of the NHS gene. Furthermore, we also describe the clinical and molecular analysis of seven families diagnosed with NHS, identifying four novel protein truncation mutations and a novel large deletion encompassing the majority of the NHS gene, all leading to no functional protein. We therefore show that different mechanisms, aberrant transcription of the NHS gene or no functional NHS protein, lead to different diseases. Our data highlight the importance of copy number variation and non-recurrent re-arrangements leading to different severity of disease and describe the potential mechanisms involved. PMID:19414485

  1. Paternal inheritance of classic X-linked bilateral periventricular nodular heterotopia.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Burkhard S; Kurzbuch, Katrin; Chang, Bernard S; Pauli, Elisabeth; Hamer, Hajo M; Winkler, Jürgen; Hehr, Ute

    2013-06-01

    Periventricular nodular heterotopia (PNH) is a developmental disorder of the central nervous system, characterized by heterotopic nodules of gray matter resulting from disturbed neuronal migration. The most common form of bilateral PNH is X-linked dominant inherited, caused by mutations in the Filamin A gene (FLNA) and associated with a wide variety of other clinical findings including congenital heart disease. The typical patient with FLNA-associated PNH is female and presents with difficult to treat seizures. In contrast, hemizygous FLNA loss of function mutations in males are reported to be perinatally lethal. In X-linked dominant traits like FLNA-associated PNH the causal mutation is commonly inherited from the mother. Here, we present an exceptional family with paternal transmission of classic bilateral FLNA-associated PNH from a mildly affected father with somatic and germline mosaicism for a c.5686G>A FLNA splice mutation to both daughters with strikingly variable clinical manifestation and PNH extent in cerebral MR imaging. Our observations emphasize the importance to consider in genetic counseling and risk assessment the rare genetic constellation of paternal transmission for families with X-linked dominant inherited FLNA-associated PNH.

  2. Mutational studies in X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMTX)

    SciTech Connect

    Cherryson, A.K.; Yeung, L.; Kennerson, M.L.; Nicholson, G.A.

    1994-09-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, also known as hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN), is a heterogeneous group of slowly progressive disorders of the peripheral nerve. X-linked CMT (CMTX) is characterized by slow motor nerve conduction velocities in affected males and the presence of mildly affected or normal carrier females with intermediate or normal nerve conduction velocities. CMTX, which has an incidence of 3.1 per 100,000 and accounts for approximately 10% of CMT cases, has been mapped to Xq13. One of the genes lying in this region, connexin 32, has been found to contain alterations in individuals affected with X-linked CMT. We have identified our X-linked families from dominant type 1 CMT families using the clinical criteria given above. These families were screened for point mutations in connexin 32. We have identified three missense mutations, a G{r_arrow}A transition at amino acid 35 (valine to methionine), a C{r_arrow}G transition at amino acid 158 (proline to alanine) and a T{r_arrow}A transition at amino acid 182 (serine to threonine). Another family showed a 18 bp deletion, which removed the amino acid 111 to 116 inclusive (histidine, glycine, aspartic acid, proline, leucine, histidine).

  3. Small nerve fiber involvement is frequent in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Horn, Morten A; Nilsen, Kristian B; Jørum, Ellen; Mellgren, Svein I; Tallaksen, Chantal M E

    2014-05-13

    To investigate the presence of small nerve fiber dysfunction in subjects with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. Cross-sectional study in which 11 Norwegian subjects (3 males, 8 females) with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy, phenotypes ranging from asymptomatic to wheelchair-bound with adrenomyeloneuropathy, were investigated with neurophysiologic studies including EMG, nerve conduction velocities, quantitative sensory testing, tests of autonomic function, and skin biopsy for intraepidermal nerve fiber density measurements. We found small nerve fiber dysfunction in 10 of 11 subjects, increasing with age and more pronounced in males. Low intraepidermal nerve fiber densities were found in 5 of 11 subjects, indicating a loss of thin unmyelinated nerve fibers peripherally. Five of 11 subjects showed small nerve fiber dysfunction despite normal nerve fiber densities, suggesting possible involvement of the spinothalamic tracts. Two subjects showed moderate abnormalities in autonomic function tests. Evidence of small nerve fiber dysfunction was widespread in this cohort of subjects with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy, with findings indicating loss of peripheral small nerve fibers and possibly also fibers of the spinothalamic tracts. The results support the theory of primary axonal degeneration in adrenomyeloneuropathy. Evidence of nervous system involvement was found in all heterozygotes, with severity increasing with age. Clinicians caring for these patients should be alert to signs of small nerve fiber involvement.

  4. Peroxisomal. beta. -oxidation enzyme proteins in adrenoleukodystrophy: distinction between x-linked adrenoleukodystrophy and neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, W.W.; Watkins, P.A.; Osumi, T.; Hashimoto, T.; Moser, H.W.

    1987-03-01

    Very long chain fatty acids, which accumulate in plasma and tissues in x-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD), neonatal ALD, and the Zellweger cerebrohepatorenal syndrome, are degraded by the peroxisomal ..beta..-oxidation pathway, consisting of acyl-CoA oxidase, the bifunctional enoyl-CoA hydratase/3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase, and ..beta..-ketothiolase. A marked deficiency of all three enzyme proteins was reported in livers from patients with the Zellweger syndrome, a disorder in which peroxisomes are decreased or absent. Peroxisomes are not as markedly decreased in neonatal ALD and appear normal in x-linked ALD. Immunoblot analysis of the peroxisomal ..beta..-oxidation enzymes revealed an almost complete lack of the bifunctional enzymes in neonatal ALD liver, similar to the finding in Zellweger tissues. In contrast, acyl-CoA oxidase and ..beta..-ketothiolase were present in neonatal ALD liver, although the thiolase appeared to be in precursor form (2-3 kDa larger than the mature enzyme) in neonatal ALD. Unlike either neonatal ALD or Zellweger syndrome, all three peroxisomal ..beta..-oxidation enzymes were present in x-linked ALD liver. Despite the absence in neonatal ALD liver of bifunctional enzyme protein, its mRNA was detected by RNA blot analysis in fibroblasts from these patients. These observations suggest that lack of bifunctional enzyme protein in neonatal ALD results from either abnormal translation of the mRNA or degradation of the enzyme prior to its entry into peroxisomes.

  5. Association Test for X-Linked QTL in Family-Based Designs

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Martin, Eden R.; Morris, Richard W.; Li, Yi-Ju

    2009-01-01

    Family-based association methods for detecting quantitative trait loci (QTL) have been developed primarily for autosomes, and comparable methods for X-linked QTL have received less attention. We have developed a family-based association test for quantitative traits, named XQTL, which uses X-linked markers in a nuclear family design. XQTL adopts the framework of the orthogonal model implemented in the QTDT program, modifying the sex-specific score for X-linked genotypes. XQTL also takes into account the dosage effect due to female X chromosome inactivation. Restricted maximum likelihood (REML) and Fisher's scoring method are used to estimate variance components of random effects. Fixed effects, derived from the phenotypic differences among and within families, are estimated by the least-squares method. Our proposed XQTL can perform allelic and two-locus haplotypic association tests and can provide estimates of additive genetic effects and variance components. Simulation studies show correct type I error rates under the null hypothesis and robust statistical power under alternative scenarios. The loss of power observed when parental genotypes are missing can be compensated by an increase of offspring number. By treating age at onset of Parkinson disease as a quantitative trait, we illustrate our method, using MAO polymorphisms in 780 families. PMID:19344875

  6. Meiotic drive impacts expression and evolution of x-linked genes in stalk-eyed flies.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, Josephine A; Brand, Cara L; Paczolt, Kimberly A; Johns, Philip M; Baker, Richard H; Wilkinson, Gerald S

    2014-01-01

    Although sex chromosome meiotic drive has been observed in a variety of species for over 50 years, the genes causing drive are only known in a few cases, and none of these cases cause distorted sex-ratios in nature. In stalk-eyed flies (Teleopsis dalmanni), driving X chromosomes are commonly found at frequencies approaching 30% in the wild, but the genetic basis of drive has remained elusive due to reduced recombination between driving and non-driving X chromosomes. Here, we used RNAseq to identify transcripts that are differentially expressed between males carrying either a driving X (XSR) or a standard X chromosome (XST), and found hundreds of these, the majority of which are X-linked. Drive-associated transcripts show increased levels of sequence divergence (dN/dS) compared to a control set, and are predominantly expressed either in testes or in the gonads of both sexes. Finally, we confirmed that XSR and XST are highly divergent by estimating sequence differentiation between the RNAseq pools. We found that X-linked transcripts were often strongly differentiated (whereas most autosomal transcripts were not), supporting the presence of a relatively large region of recombination suppression on XSR presumably caused by one or more inversions. We have identified a group of genes that are good candidates for further study into the causes and consequences of sex-chromosome drive, and demonstrated that meiotic drive has had a profound effect on sequence evolution and gene expression of X-linked genes in this species.

  7. X chromosome inactivation pattern in female carriers of X linked hypophosphataemic rickets.

    PubMed Central

    Orstavik, K H; Orstavik, R E; Halse, J; Knudtzon, J

    1996-01-01

    X linked hypophosphataemia (XLH) results from an abnormality of renal tubular phosphate reabsorption. The disorder is inherited as an X linked dominant trait and the gene has been mapped to Xp22.1-p22.2. A candidate gene (PEX) has recently been isolated. The most striking clinical features are growth retardation and skeletal abnormalities. As expected for X linked dominant disorders, females are less affected. However, such a gene dosage effect does not exist for renal phosphate reabsorption. Preferential X chromosome inactivation has been proposed as a possible explanation for this lack of gene dosage. We have examined the X inactivation pattern in peripheral blood cells from 12 females belonging to seven families with XLH using PCR analysis at the androgen receptor locus. The X inactivation pattern in these patients did not differ significantly from the pattern in 30 healthy females. The X inactivation pattern in peripheral blood cells does not necessarily reflect the X inactivation pattern in renal cells. However, the finding of a normal distribution of X inactivation in peripheral blood cells indicates that the similarity in the renal handling of phosphate in male and female patients is not related to a ubiquitous preferential X inactivation. Images PMID:8863165

  8. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis of X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease by indirect linkage analysis.

    PubMed

    Borgulová, Irena; Putzová, Martina; Soldatova, Inna; Stejskal, David

    2017-08-07

    To present methodical approach of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) as an option for an unaffected pregnancy in reproductive-age couples who have a genetic risk of the X-linked dominant peripheral neuropathy Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1 disease. We performed PGD of X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1 disease using haplotyping/indirect linkage analysis, when during analysis we reach to exclude embryos that carry a high-risk haplotype linked to the causal mutation p.Leu9Phe in the GJB1 gene. Within the PGD cycle, we examined 4 blastomeres biopsied from cleavage-stage embryos and recommended 3 embryos for transfer. Two embryos were implanted into the uterus; however, it resulted in a singleton pregnancy with a male descendant. Three years later, the couple returned again with spontaneous gravidity. A chorionic biopsy examination of this gravidity ascertained the female sex and a pericentric inversion of chromosome 5 in 70% of the cultivated foetal cells. Using indirect linkage analysis, PGD may help to identify genetic X-linked defects within embryos during screening, thereby circumventing the potential problems with abortion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Canine thymoma.

    PubMed

    Aronsohn, M

    1985-07-01

    Thymoma is an uncommon canine neoplasm of thymic epithelial cells. It is seen in various breeds but may occur more frequently in German Shepherd Dogs. Middle-aged or older dogs can be affected and no sex predilection exists. A paraneoplastic syndrome of myasthenia gravis, nonthymic malignant tumors, and/or polymyositis occurs in a significant number of dogs with thymoma. Clinical signs are variable and are related to a space-occupying cranial mediastinal mass and/or manifestations of the paraneo-plastic syndrome. Dyspnea is the most common presenting clinical sign. Thoracic radiographs usually show a cranial mediastinal mass. Lymphoma is the main differential diagnosis. A definitive diagnosis may be made by closed biopsy but is more likely to be confirmed by thoracotomy. Thymomas may be completely contained within the thymic capsule or may spread by local invasion or metastasis. A staging system allows for an accurate prognosis and a therapeutic plan. Surgical removal of encapsulated thymomas may result in long-term survival or cure. Invasive or metastatic thymomas carry a guarded prognosis. Manifestations of the paraneoplastic syndrome complicate treatment. Adjuvant radiation and chemotherapy may be of value for advanced cases; however, adequate clinical trials have not been done in the dog.

  10. Review of X-linked syndromes with arthrogryposis or early contractures-aid to diagnosis and pathway identification.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Jesse M; Kiefer, Jeff; Balak, Christopher D; Jooma, Sonya; Ahearn, Mary Ellen; Hall, Judith G; Baumbach-Reardon, Lisa

    2015-05-01

    The following is a review of 50 X-linked syndromes and conditions associated with either arthrogryposis or other types of early contractures. These entities are categorized as those with known responsible gene mutations, those which are definitely X-linked, but the responsible gene has not been identified, and those suspected from family history to be X-linked. Several important ontology pathways for known disease genes have been identified and are discussed in relevance to clinical characteristics. Tables are included which help to identify distinguishing clinical features of each of the conditions. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. A new nonsyndromic X-linked sensorineural hearing impairment linked to Xp21.2

    SciTech Connect

    Lalwani, A.K.; Brister, J.R.; Fex, J.; Grundfast, K.M.; Pikus, A.T.; Ploplis, B.; San Agustin, T.; Skarka, H.; Wilcox, E.R.

    1994-10-01

    X-linked deafness is a rare cause of hereditary hearing impairment. We have identified a family with X-linked dominant sensorineural hearing impairment, characterized by incomplete penetrance and variable expressivity in carrier females, that is linked to the Xp21.2, which contains the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) locus. The auditory impairment in affected males was congenital, bilateral, profound, sensorineural, affecting all frequencies, and without evidence of radiographic abnormality of the temporal bone. Adult carrier females manifested bilateral, mild-to-moderate high-frequency sensorineural hearing impairment of delayed onset during adulthood. Eighteen commercially available polymorphic markers from the X chromosome, generating a 10-15-cM map, were initially used for identification of a candidate region. DXS997, located within the DMD gene, generated a two-point LOD score of 2.91 at {theta} = 0, with every carrier mother heterozygous at this locus. Recombination events at DXS992 (located within the DMD locus, 3{prime} to exon 50 of the dystrophin gene) and at DXS1068 (5{prime} to the brain promoter of the dystrophin gene) were observed. No recombination events were noted with the following markers within the DMD locus: 5{prime}DYS II, intron 44, DXS997, and intron 50. There was no clinical evidence of Duchenne or Becker muscular dystrophy in any family member. It is likely that this family represents a new locus on the X chromosome, which when mutated results in nonsyndromic sensorineural hearing loss and is distinct from the heterogeneous group of X-linked hearing losses that have been previously described. 57 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  12. X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita: a case report and ethical dilemma.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Heba M; Rincon, Marielisa

    2014-07-01

    Our objective is to present the first case report of X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita in a child conceived by a donated egg and which also presented atypically, with initial mineralocorticoid deficiency. Case report with literature review. A late preterm fraternal twin male, conceived by in vitro fertilization of donated eggs, presented shortly after birth with feeding intolerance, hyponatremia, and hyperkalemia. Testing revealed a low aldosterone level, high plasma renin activity, normal cortisol level, and normal 17-hydroxyprogesterone level. He was diagnosed with 18-hydroxylase deficiency based on low 18-hydroxycorticosterone levels and was treated with mineralocorticoid successfully for 17 months. At age 18 months, he presented with dehydration secondary to herpetic gingivostomatitis and was found to be hypoglycemic, hyponatremic, hyperkalemic, and acidotic, with a low serum cortisol level. An adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) stimulation test revealed low levels of all adrenal cortex products, with an elevated ACTH level. He was started on glucocorticoids. Genetic testing confirmed X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita (AHC). His asymptomatic fraternal twin underwent genetic testing and the results were negative. The fertility center records indicated that the mother had donated eggs to other families, but none of the children were known to have this disorder. The egg donor was informed but did not pursue genetic testing. We report a case of X-linked AHC presenting in the context of extraordinary ethical considerations. Our case raises a question unique to the era of assisted reproduction: should routine genetic screening of gamete donors be done for rare but potentially life-threatening conditions?

  13. Heterogeneity in X-linked recessive Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Ionasescu, V V; Trofatter, J; Haines, J L; Summers, A M; Ionasescu, R; Searby, C

    1991-01-01

    Three families presenting with X-linked recessive Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathies (CMT) were studied both clinically and genetically. The disease phenotype in family 1 was typical of CMT type 1, except for an infantile onset; two of five affected individuals were mentally retarded, and obligate-carrier females were unaffected. Families 2 and 3 showed distal atrophy with weakness, juvenile onset, and normal intelligence. Motor-nerve conduction velocities were significantly slowed, and electromyography data were consistent with denervation in affected CMT males in all three families. Thirty X-linked RFLPs were tested for linkage studies against the CMT disease loci. Family 1 showed tight linkage (recombination fraction [theta] = 0) to Xp22.2 markers DXS16, DXS143, and DXS43, with peak lod scores of 1.75, 1.78, and 2.04, respectively. A maximum lod score of 3.48 at DXS16 (theta = 0) was obtained by multipoint linkage analysis of the map DXS143-DXS16-DXS43. In families 2 and 3 there was suggestion of tight linkage (theta = 0) to Xq26 markers DXS86, DXS144, and DXS105, with peak lod scores of 2.29, 1.33, and 2.32, respectively. The combined maximum multipoint lod score of 1.81 at DXS144 (theta = 0) for these two families occurred in the map DXS10-DXS144-DXS51-DXS105-DXS15-DXS52++ +. A joint homogeneity analysis including both regions (Xp22.2 and Xq26-28) provided evidence against homogeneity (chi 2 = 9.12, P less than .005). No linkage to Xp11.12-q22 markers was observed, as was reported for X-linked dominant CMT and the Cowchock CMT variant. Also, the chromosomes 1 and 17 CMT loci were excluded by pairwise linkage analysis in all three families. PMID:1674639

  14. Allelic variation in the squirrel monkey x-linked color vision gene: biogeographical and behavioral correlates.

    PubMed

    Cropp, Susan; Boinski, Sue; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2002-06-01

    Most Neotropical primate species possess a polymorphic X-linked and a monomorphic autosomal color vision gene. Consequently, populations are composed of both dichromatics and trichromatics. Most theories on the maintenance of this genetic system revolve around possible advantages for foraging ecology. To examine the issue from a different angle, we compared the numbers and relative frequencies of alleles at the X-linked locus among three species of Saimiri representing a wide range of geographical and behavioral variation in the genus. Exons 3, 4, and 5 of the X-linked opsin gene were sequenced for a large number of X chromosomes for all three species. Several synonymous mutations were detected in exons 4 and 5 for the originally reported alleles but only a single nonsynonymous change was detected. Two alleles were found that appeared to be the result of recombination events. The low occurrence of recombinant alleles and absence of mutations in the amino acids critical for spectral tuning indicates that stabilizing selection acts to maintain the combinations of critical sites specific to each allele. Allele frequencies were approximately the same for all Saimiri species, with a slight but significant difference between S. boliviensis and S. oerstedii. No apparent correlation exists between allele frequencies and behavioral or biogeographical differences between species, casting doubt on the speculation that the spectral sensitivities of the alleles have been maintained because they are specifically well-tuned to Saimiri visual ecology. Rather, the spectral tuning peaks might have been maintained because they are as widely spaced as possible within the limited range of middlewave to longwave spectra useful to all primates. This arrangement creates a balance between maximizing the distance between spectral tuning peaks (allowing the color opponency of the visual system to distinguish between peaks) and maximizing the number of alleles within a limited range (yielding

  15. Meiotic Drive Impacts Expression and Evolution of X-Linked Genes in Stalk-Eyed Flies

    PubMed Central

    Reinhardt, Josephine A.; Brand, Cara L.; Paczolt, Kimberly A.; Johns, Philip M.; Baker, Richard H.; Wilkinson, Gerald S.

    2014-01-01

    Although sex chromosome meiotic drive has been observed in a variety of species for over 50 years, the genes causing drive are only known in a few cases, and none of these cases cause distorted sex-ratios in nature. In stalk-eyed flies (Teleopsis dalmanni), driving X chromosomes are commonly found at frequencies approaching 30% in the wild, but the genetic basis of drive has remained elusive due to reduced recombination between driving and non-driving X chromosomes. Here, we used RNAseq to identify transcripts that are differentially expressed between males carrying either a driving X (XSR) or a standard X chromosome (XST), and found hundreds of these, the majority of which are X-linked. Drive-associated transcripts show increased levels of sequence divergence (dN/dS) compared to a control set, and are predominantly expressed either in testes or in the gonads of both sexes. Finally, we confirmed that XSR and XST are highly divergent by estimating sequence differentiation between the RNAseq pools. We found that X-linked transcripts were often strongly differentiated (whereas most autosomal transcripts were not), supporting the presence of a relatively large region of recombination suppression on XSR presumably caused by one or more inversions. We have identified a group of genes that are good candidates for further study into the causes and consequences of sex-chromosome drive, and demonstrated that meiotic drive has had a profound effect on sequence evolution and gene expression of X-linked genes in this species. PMID:24832132

  16. X-linked paroxysmal dyskinesia and severe global retardation caused by defective MCT8 gene.

    PubMed

    Brockmann, Knut; Dumitrescu, Alexandra M; Best, Thomas T; Hanefeld, Folker; Refetoff, Samuel

    2005-06-01

    We previously reported two unrelated boys aged 3 and 8 years with mutations in the thyroid hormone transporter gene MCT8 resulting in severe global retardation and an uncommon pattern of thyroid hormone abnormalities. We now further describe an unusual neurological phenotype associated with these mutations, namely paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesias (PKD), provoked by certain stimuli including changing of their clothes or diapers. It is not clear how the MCT8 defect causes PKDs. PKDs have been previously noted in patients with thyroid abnormalities. This novel X-linked condition widens the spectrum of secondary PKDs.

  17. Incontinentia pigmenti or Bloch-Sulzberger syndrome: a rare X-linked genodermatosis*

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Gabriela Franco; Tonello, Claudio Sampieri; Sousa, Juliana Martins Prazeres

    2014-01-01

    Incontinentia pigmenti is a rare X-linked genodermatosis that affects mainly female neonates. The first manifestation occurs in the early neonatal period and progresses through four stages: vesicular, verruciform, hyperpigmented and hypopigmented. Clinical features also manifest themselves through changes in the teeth, eyes, hair, central nervous system, bone structures, skeletal musculature and immune system. The authors report the case of a patient with cutaneous lesions and histological findings that are compatible with the vesicular stage, emphasizing the importance of early diagnosis and appropriate therapeutic management. PMID:24937825

  18. X-linked albinism-deafness syndrome and Waardenburg syndrome type II: A hypothesis

    SciTech Connect

    Zlotogora, J.

    1995-11-20

    Margolis reported on a large pedigree with a {open_quotes}new{close_quotes} X-linked syndrome of profound deafness and albinism (MIM 300700, albinism-deafness syndrome). The affected males presented with profound deafness and severe pigmentary abnormalities of the skin. At birth the skin appeared as almost albinotic except for areas of light pigmentation over the gluteal and scrotal areas, and thereafter pigmentation gradually increased over the body. Skin changes ultimately included areas of hypopigmentation and spots of hyperpigmentation. Some of the affected males also had blue irides, heterochromia, or segmental color iris changes. In carrier females, variable hearing impairment was documented without any pigmentary changes. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  19. Newborn screening for X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy: further evidence high throughput screening is feasible.

    PubMed

    Theda, Christiane; Gibbons, Katy; Defor, Todd E; Donohue, Pamela K; Golden, W Christopher; Kline, Antonie D; Gulamali-Majid, Fizza; Panny, Susan R; Hubbard, Walter C; Jones, Richard O; Liu, Anita K; Moser, Ann B; Raymond, Gerald V

    2014-01-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) is characterized by adrenal insufficiency and neurologic involvement with onset at variable ages. Plasma very long chain fatty acids are elevated in ALD; even in asymptomatic patients. We demonstrated previously that liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry measuring C26:0 lysophosphatidylcholine reliably identifies affected males. We prospectively applied this method to 4689 newborn blood spot samples; no false positives were observed. We show that high throughput neonatal screening for ALD is methodologically feasible. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Linking mutated primary structure of adrenoleukodystrophy protein with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shaomin; Wu, Guang

    2010-06-01

    The phenotype expression in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy is one of the most intriguing issues of the disease, because there is no general correlation between the type of ABCD1 gene mutation and the clinical phenotype. In this study, we use the cross-impact analysis to build a descriptively quantitative relationship between mutant adrenoleukodystrophy protein and classification of adrenoleukodystrophy with the amino-acid distribution probability, which is a quantitative measure sensitive to mutation. Then we determine the probability that the adrenoleukodystrophy can be classified under mutations with the help of a Bayesian equation.

  1. Diagnostic value of the skin lesions in immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked syndrome.

    PubMed

    Martín-Santiago, Ana; Hervás, Juan A; Hervás, Daniel; Rosell, Antonio; Caimari, María; de Carlos, Juan C; Matamoros, Nuria

    2013-01-01

    We report a child with immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked (IPEX) syndrome due to a de novo c.1190G>A (p.R397Q) mutation in exon 11 of the forkhead domain of the FOXP3 gene. He had chronic dermatitis with an eczematous and ichthyosiform appearance and had an allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. IPEX syndrome is a rare, often fatal recessive disease caused by mutations in the FOXP3 gene on the X chromosome (Xp11.23-q13.3).

  2. Late-onset of immunodysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, x-linked syndrome (IPEX) with intractable diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Zama, Daniele; Cocchi, Ilaria; Masetti, Riccardo; Specchia, Fernando; Alvisi, Patrizia; Gambineri, Eleonora; Lima, Mario; Pession, Andrea

    2014-10-18

    The syndrome of immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X linked (IPEX) is a rare disorder caused by mutations in the FOXP3 gene. Diarrhea, diabetes and dermatitis are the hallmark of the disease, with a typical onset within the first months of life. We describe the case of a twelve-year old male affected by a very late-onset IPEX with intractable enteropathy, which markedly improved after starting Sirolimus as second-line treatment. This case suggests that IPEX should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of watery intractable diarrhea, despite its unusual onset.

  3. Sweat testing to identify female carriers of X linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, A; Burn, J

    1991-01-01

    X linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (XHED) affects many epithelial functions, including sweat gland formation. Female carriers who manifest XHED may have defective dentition or a patchy distribution of sweating or both, as determined by starch and iodine sweat testing. Such sweat testing can be useful in assigning carrier status to at risk females in XHED families, and in obtaining an accurate diagnosis for isolated females who present with features of ectodermal dysplasia. The advantages of diagnosing female carriers of XHED include the optimisation of neonatal and paediatric care for affected male infants, who may be at substantial risk of death in infancy. Images PMID:1865470

  4. [Prenatal diagnosis of skeletal dysplasia in first trimester of pregnancy X-linked dominant chondrodysplasia punctata].

    PubMed

    Polák, P; Baxová, A; Křepelová, A; Balák, M

    2014-06-01

    Case report describes successful prenatal diagnosis of skeletal dysplasia in the first trimester of pregnancy in a female patient affected with X-linked dominat chondrodysplasia punctata (CDPX2). Her first pregnancy was terminated in the second trimester due to skeletal dysplasia of the foetus. The diagnosis in the following pregnancy was finished in the first trimester - before the end of the 13th gestational week. The diagnosis was established on the basis of ultrasonographic (US) examination and mutation analysis of the EBP gene in the material of chorionic villus sampling (CVS).

  5. [Progress on X-linked mental retardation related gene JARID1C].

    PubMed

    Lei, Xu; Gao, Xiao-Cai; Zhang, Fu-Chang

    2010-03-01

    JARID1C is one of the genes related to X-linked mental retardation. Its express product influences transcription and expression of the related genes in brain nervous system, and may be associated with human cognitive ability. Study on the functions of JARID1C not only helps to understand its molecular role in mental retardation and human cognitive ability, but also provides references for clinical diagnosis and prevention of mental retardation. This article reviews the progresses on JARID1C in location, isolation, physiological functions, and cognitive functions of its encoding product. The future re-search work of JARID1C is also discussed.

  6. A dental approach to carrier screening in X linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Spfaer, J A

    1981-01-01

    The frequency of carriers of X linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia among females with hypodontia of the permanent dentition (excluding third molars) could be as high as 1 in 500, and among females with deciduous hypodontia could be as high as 1 in 50. Since it may be possible to identify carriers form among female hypodontia cases in general by virtue of a reduced sweat pore count, the potential exists for a reasonably practical method of screening for carriers at the population level. PMID:7334506

  7. Phenotypic conservation in patients with X-linked retinitis pigmentosa caused by RPGR mutations.

    PubMed

    Zahid, Sarwar; Khan, Naheed; Branham, Kari; Othman, Mohammad; Karoukis, Athanasios J; Sharma, Nisha; Moncrief, Ashley; Mahmood, Mahdi N; Sieving, Paul A; Swaroop, Anand; Heckenlively, John R; Jayasundera, Thiran

    2013-08-01

    For patients with X-linked retinitis pigmentosa and clinicians alike, phenotypic variability can be challenging because it complicates counseling regarding patients' likely visual prognosis. To evaluate the clinical findings from patients with X-linked retinitis pigmentosa with 13 distinct RPGR mutations and assess for phenotypic concordance or variability. Retrospective medical record review of data collected from 1985 to 2011. Kellogg Eye Center, University of Michigan. A total of 42 patients with X-linked retinitis pigmentosa with mutations in RPGR. Age at first visit ranged from 4 to 53 years, with follow-up ranging from 1 to 11 visits (median follow-up time, 5.5 years; range, 1.4-32.7 years, for 23 patients with >1 visit). Clinical data assessed for concordance included visual acuity (VA), Goldmann visual fields (GVFs), and full-field electroretinography (ERG). Electroretinography phenotype (cone-rod vs rod-cone dysfunction) was defined by the extent of photopic vs scotopic abnormality. Qualitative GVF phenotype was determined by the GVF pattern, where central or peripheral loss suggested cone or rod dysfunction, respectively. Goldmann visual fields were also quantified and compared among patients. Each mutation was detected in 2 or more related or unrelated patients. Five mutations in 11 patients displayed strong concordance of VA, while 4 mutations in 16 patients revealed moderate concordance of VA. A definitive cone-rod or rod-cone ERG pattern consistent among patients was found in 6 of 13 mutations (46.2%); the remaining mutations were characterized by patients demonstrating both phenotypes or who had limited data or nonrecordable ERG values. Concordant GVF phenotypes (7 rod-cone pattern vs 4 cone-rod pattern) were seen in 11 of 13 mutations (84.6%). All 6 mutations displaying a constant ERG pattern within the mutation group revealed a GVF phenotype consistent with the ERG findings. While VA and ERG phenotypes are concordant in only some patients carrying

  8. X-linked mental retardation with heterozygous expression and macrocephaly: Pericentromeric gene localization

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, G.; Gedeon, A. |; Mulley, J.

    1994-07-15

    A family is described with X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) with affected males in 2 generations. The manifestations are macrocephaly and heterozygous expression. Linkage analysis gives a 2-point lod score of 3.31 ({theta} = 0.0) at the AR, DXS991, and MAOB marker loci. The gene is localized by recombination events between DXS1068 (Xp) and DXS1125 (Xq). This condition in this family may be similar to that described by Atkin et al., 1985. 9 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Evidence for compensatory upregulation of expressed X-linked genes in mammals, Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xinxian; Hiatt, Joseph B; Nguyen, Di Kim; Ercan, Sevinc; Sturgill, David; Hillier, LaDeana W; Schlesinger, Felix; Davis, Carrie A; Reinke, Valerie J; Gingeras, Thomas R; Shendure, Jay; Waterston, Robert H; Oliver, Brian; Lieb, Jason D; Disteche, Christine M

    2011-10-23

    Many animal species use a chromosome-based mechanism of sex determination, which has led to the coordinate evolution of dosage-compensation systems. Dosage compensation not only corrects the imbalance in the number of X chromosomes between the sexes but also is hypothesized to correct dosage imbalance within cells that is due to monoallelic X-linked expression and biallelic autosomal expression, by upregulating X-linked genes twofold (termed 'Ohno's hypothesis'). Although this hypothesis is well supported by expression analyses of individual X-linked genes and by microarray-based transcriptome analyses, it was challenged by a recent study using RNA sequencing and proteomics. We obtained new, independent RNA-seq data, measured RNA polymerase distribution and reanalyzed published expression data in mammals, C. elegans and Drosophila. Our analyses, which take into account the skewed gene content of the X chromosome, support the hypothesis of upregulation of expressed X-linked genes to balance expression of the genome.

  10. Ex Vivo γ-Retroviral Gene Therapy of Dogs with X-linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency and the Development of a Thymic T Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Douglas R.; Hartnett, Brian J.; Kennedy, Jeffrey S.; Vernau, William; Moore, Peter F.; O’Malley, Thomas; Burkly, Linda C.; Henthorn, Paula S.; Felsburg, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    We have previously shown that in vivo γ-retroviral gene therapy of dogs with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (XSCID) results in sustained T cell reconstitution and sustained marking in myeloid and B cells for up to 4 years with no evidence of any serious adverse effects. The purpose of this study was to determine whether ex vivo γ-retroviral gene therapy of XSCID dogs results in a similar outcome. Eight of 12 XSCID dogs treated with an average of dose of 5.8 × 106 transduced CD34+ cells/kg successfully engrafted producing normal numbers of gene-corrected CD45RA+ (naïve) T cells. However, this was followed by a steady decrease in CD45RA+ T cells, T cell diversity, and thymic output as measured by T cell receptor excision circles (TRECs) resulting in a T cell lymphopenia. None of the dogs survived past 11 months post treatment. At necropsy, few gene-corrected thymocytes were observed correlating with the TREC levels and one of the dogs was diagnosed with a thymic T cell lymphoma that was attributed to the gene therapy. This study highlights the outcome differences between the ex vivo and in vivo approach to γ-retroviral gene therapy and is the first to document a serious adverse event following gene therapy in a canine model of a human genetic disease. PMID:21536334

  11. X-linked recessive type of pure spastic paraplegia in a large pedigree: absence of detectable linkage with Xg.

    PubMed Central

    Zatz, M; Penha-Serrano, C; Otto, P A

    1976-01-01

    A family with 24 males affected by an X-linked type of spastic paraplegia is reported. Twelve affected members were personally examined showing the pure form of the disease. Half of the affected males had many descendants, all normal. Linkage studies strongly suggest that this X-linked form of spastic paraplegia and Xg loci are not at a measurable distance on the X chromosome. PMID:1084423

  12. Extremely low nucleotide diversity in the X-linked region of papaya caused by a strong selective sweep.

    PubMed

    VanBuren, Robert; Wai, Ching Man; Zhang, Jisen; Han, Jennifer; Arro, Jie; Lin, Zhicong; Liao, Zhenyang; Yu, Qingyi; Wang, Ming-Li; Zee, Francis; Moore, Richard C; Charlesworth, Deborah; Ming, Ray

    2016-11-28

    The papaya Y-linked region showed clear population structure, resulting in the detection of the ancestral male population that domesticated hermaphrodite papayas were selected from. The same populations were used to study nucleotide diversity and population structure in the X-linked region. Diversity is very low for all genes in the X-linked region in the wild dioecious population, with nucleotide diversity π syn = 0.00017, tenfold lower than the autosomal region (π syn = 0.0017) and 12-fold lower than the Y-linked region (π syn = 0.0021). Analysis of the X-linked sequences shows an undivided population, suggesting a geographically wide diversity-reducing event, whereas two subpopulations were observed in the autosomes separating gynodioecy and dioecy and three subpopulations in the Y-linked region separating three male populations. The extremely low diversity in the papaya X-linked region was probably caused by a recent, strong selective sweep before domestication, involving either the spread of a recessive mutation in an X-linked gene that is beneficial to males or a partially dominant mutation that benefitted females or both sexes. Nucleotide diversity in the domesticated X samples is about half that in the wild Xs, probably due to the bottleneck when hermaphrodites were selected during domestication. The extreme low nucleotide diversity in the papaya X-linked region is much greater than observed in humans, great apes, and the neo-X chromosome of Drosophila miranda, which show the expected pattern of Y-linked genes < X-linked genes < autosomal genes; papaya shows an unprecedented pattern of X-linked genes < autosomal genes < Y-linked genes.

  13. Linkage and candidate gene analysis of X-linked familial exudative vitreoretinopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Shastry, B.S.; Hartzer, M.K.; Hejtmancik, J.F.

    1995-05-20

    Familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR) is a hereditary eye disorder characterized by avascularity of the peripheral retina, retinal exudates, tractional detachment, and retinal folds. The disorder is most commonly transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait, but X-linked transmission also occurs. To initiate the process of identifying the gene responsible for the X-linked disorder, linkage analysis has been performed with three previously unreported three- or four-generation families. Two-point analysis showed linkage to MAOA (Z{sub max} = 2.1, {theta}{sub max} = 0) and DXS228 (Z{sub max} = 0.5, {theta}{sub max} = 0.11), and this was further confirmed by multipoint analysis with these same markers (Z{sub max} = 2.81 at MAOA), which both lie near the gene causing Norrie disease. Molecular genetic analysis further reveals a missense mutation (R121W) in the third exon of the Norrie`s disease gene that perfectly cosegregates with the disease through three generations in one family. This mutation was not detected in the unaffected family members and six normal unrelated controls, suggesting that it is likely to be the pathogenic mutation. Additionally, a polymorphic missense mutation (H127R) was detected in a severely affected patient. 21 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome: an X-linked encephalo-tropho-schisis syndrome. 1988.

    PubMed

    Neri, G; Marini, R; Cappa, M; Borrelli, P; Opitz, J M

    2013-11-01

    The following paper by Professor GiovanniNeri and colleagues was originally published in 1988, American Journal of Medical Genetics 30:287–299. This paper represented a seminal work at the time of publication as it not only reported a new family with a disorder that had been called the “gigantism-dysplasia syndrome”, but also suggested naming the condition the Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome. This eponym has clearly stood “the test of time”, and that designation is now widely accepted. This paper is graciously republished by Wiley-Blackwell in the Special Festschrift issue honoring Professor Neri. We report on another family with the so-called "gigantism-dysplasia syndrome", an X-linked condition characterized by pre-and postnatal overgrowth, characteristic face with apparent coarseness, dysplastic changes in several tissues, and mild intellectual impairment. This condition has been called the Golabi-Rosen syndrome; however, we agree that is the same entity as that described, in a milder form, by Simpson et al. in 1975 and by Behmel et al. in 1984. Therefore, we suggest that this entity be designated the Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome. The manifestations in affected individuals suggest that this condition represents an X-linked encephalo-tropho-schisis syndrome. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. RPL10 mutation segregating in a family with X-linked syndromic Intellectual Disability.

    PubMed

    Thevenon, Julien; Michot, Caroline; Bole, Christine; Nitschke, Patrick; Nizon, Mathilde; Faivre, Laurence; Munnich, Arnold; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Bonnefont, Jean-Paul; Portes, Vincent Des; Amiel, Jeanne

    2015-08-01

    Intellectual disability is a neurodevelopmental disorder of impaired adaptive skills and low intelligence quotient. The overall prevalence is estimated at 2-3% in the general population with extreme clinical and genetic heterogeneity, and it has been associated with possibly causative mutations in more than 700 identified genes. In a recent review, among over 100 X-linked intellectual disability causative genes, eight were reported as "awaiting replication." Exome sequencing in a large family identified a missense mutation in RPL10 highly suggestive of X-linked intellectual disability. Herein, we report on the clinical description of four affected males. All patients presented apparent intellectual disability (4/4), psychomotor delay (4/4) with syndromic features including amniotic fluid excess (3/4), microcephaly (2/4), urogenital anomalies (3/4), cerebellar syndrome (2/4), and facial dysmorphism. In the literature, two mutations were reported in three families with affected males presenting with autism. This report confirms the implication of RPL10 mutations in neurodevelopmental disorders and extends the associated clinical spectrum from autism to syndromic intellectual disability. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. X-chromosomal inactivation directly influences the phenotypic manifestation of X-linked protoporphyria

    PubMed Central

    Brancaleoni, V.; Balwani, M.; Granata, F.; Graziadei, G.; Missineo, P.; Fiorentino, V.; Fustinoni, S.; Cappellini, M.D.; Naik, H.; Desnick, R.J.; Di Pierro, E.

    2015-01-01

    X-linked protoporphyria (XLP), a rare erythropoietic porphyria, results from terminal exon gain-of-function mutations in the ALAS2 gene causing increased ALAS2 activity and markedly increased erythrocyte protoporphyrin levels. Patients present with severe cutaneous photosensitivity and may develop liver dysfunction. XLP was originally reported as X-linked dominant with 100% penetrance in males and females. We characterized 11 heterozygous females from six unrelated XLP families and show markedly varying phenotypic and biochemical heterogeneity, reflecting the degree of X-chromsomal inactivation of the mutant gene. ALAS2 sequencing identified the specific mutation and confirmed heterozygosity among the females. Clinical history, plasma and erythrocyte protoporphyrin levels were determined. Methylation assays of the androgen receptor and zinc-finger MYM type 3 short tandem repeat polymorphisms estimated each heterozygotes X-chromosomal inactivation pattern. Heterozygotes with equal or increased skewing, favoring expression of the wild-type allele had no clinical symptoms and only slightly increased erythrocyte protoporphyrin concentrations and/or frequency of protoporphyrin-containing peripheral blood fluorocytes. When the wild-type allele was preferentially inactivated, heterozygous females manifested the disease phenotype and had both higher erythrocyte protoporphyrin levels and circulating fluorocytes. These findings confirm that the previous dominant classification of XLP is inappropriate and genetically misleading, as the disorder is more appropriately designated XLP. PMID:25615817

  17. GPR143 Gene Mutations in Five Chinese Families with X-linked Congenital Nystagmus

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ruifang; Wang, Xiaojuan; Wang, Dongjie; Wang, Liming; Yuan, Zhongfang; Ying, Ming; Li, Ningdong

    2015-01-01

    The ocular albinism type I (OA1) is clinically characterized by impaired visual acuity, nystagmus, iris hypopigmentation with translucency, albinotic fundus, and macular hypoplasia together with normally pigmented skin and hair. However, it is easily misdiagnosed as congenital idiopathic nystagmus in some Chinese patients with OA1 caused by the G-protein coupled receptor 143 (GPR143) gene mutations. Mutations in the FERM domain–containing 7 (FRMD7) gene are responsible for the X-linked congenital idiopathic nystagmus. In this study, five Chinese families initially diagnosed as X-linked congenital nystagmus were recruited and patients underwent ophthalmological examinations. After direct sequencing of the FRMD7 and GPR143 genes, five mutations in GPR143 gene were detected in each of the five families, including a novel nonsense mutation of c.333G>A (p.W111X), two novel splicing mutations of c.360+1G>C and c.659-1G>A, a novel small deletion mutation of c.43_50dupGACGCAGC (p.L20PfsX25), and a previously reported missense mutation of c.703G>A (p.E235K). Optical coherence tomography (OCT) examination showed foveal hypoplasia in all the affected patients with nystagmus. Our study further expands the GPR143 mutation spectrum and contributes to the study of GPR143 molecular pathogenesis. Molecular diagnosis and optical coherence tomography (OCT) are two useful tools for differential diagnosis. PMID:26160353

  18. Refined mapping of X-linked reticulate pigmentary disorder and sequencing of candidate genes

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    X-linked reticulate pigmentary disorder with systemic manifestations in males (PDR) is very rare. Affected males are characterized by cutaneous and visceral symptoms suggestive of abnormally regulated inXammation. A genetic linkage study of a large Canadian kindred previously mapped the PDR gene to a greater than 40 Mb interval of Xp22–p21. The aim of this study was to identify the causative gene for PDR. The Canadian pedigree was expanded and additional PDR families recruited. Genetic linkage was performed using newer microsatellite markers. Positional and functional candidate genes were screened by PCR and sequencing of coding exons in affected males. The location of the PDR gene was narrowed to a ~4.9 Mb interval of Xp22.11–p21.3 between markers DXS1052 and DXS1061. All annotated coding exons within this interval were sequenced in one affected male from each of the three multiplex families as well as one singleton, but no causative mutation was identiWed. Sequencing of other X-linked genes outside of the linked interval also failed to identify the cause of PDR but revealed a novel nonsynonymous cSNP in the GRPR gene in the Maltese population. PDR is most likely due to a mutation within the linked interval not affecting currently annotated coding exons. PMID:18404279

  19. The X-linked F cell production locus: Genetic mapping and role in fetal hemoglobin production

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.C.; Smith, K.D.; Moore, R.D.

    1994-09-01

    Postnatal fetal hemoglobin (Hb F) production is confined to a subset of erythocytes termed F-cells. There is a 10-20 fold variation in F-cell production in sickle cell disease (SCD) and normal individuals. Most of the variation in F-cell production has been attributed to a diallelic (High, Low) X-linked gene, the F-cell production (FCP) locus that we recently mapped to Xp22.2-22.3 (LOD=4.56, theta=0.04). Using multiple regression analysis in 262 Jamaican SCD patients we determined the relative contribution of the FCP locus and other variables previously associated with variation in Hb F level (gender, age, beta-globin haplotypes, number of alpha-globin genes and the FCP locus phenotypes). When the FCP locus is in the regression model, the FCP locus alone accounts for approximately 40% of the variation in Hb F level while the contribution of age, alpha-globin gene number, and beta-globin haplotypes was insignificant. When individuals with High FCP allele are removed from the analysis, the beta globin haplotype now contribute to >10% of the Hb F variation. We conclude that the X-linked FCP locus is the major determinant of all known variables in Hb F production. Using 4 highly polymorphic dinucleotide repeat markers that we identified from cosmids in Xp22.2-22.3, have localized the FCP locus to a 1 Mb minimal candidate region between DXS143 and DXS410.

  20. Linkage localization of X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bergoffen, J. Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia ); Trofatter, J.; Haines, J.L. ); Pericak-Vance, M.A. ); Chance, P.F. ); Fischbeck, K.H. )

    1993-02-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), also known as hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy, is a heterogeneous group of slowly progressive, degenerative disorders of peripheral nerve. X-linked CMT (CMTX) (McKusick 302800), a subdivision of type I, or demyelinating, CMT is an X-linked dominant condition with variable penetrance. Previous linkage analysis using RFLPs demonstrated linkage to markers on the proximal long and short arms of the X chromosome, with the more likely localization on the proximal long arm of the X chromosome. Available variable simple-sequence repeats (VSSRs) broaden the possibilities for linkage analysis. This paper presents new linkage data and recombination analysis derived from work with four VSSR markers - AR, PGKP1, DXS453, and DXYS1X - in addition to analysis using RFLP markers described elsewhere. These studies localize the CMTX gene to the proximal Xq segment between PGKP1 (Xq11.2-12) and DXS72 (Xq21.1), with a combined maximum multipoint lod score of 15.3 at DXS453 ([theta] = 0). 32 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Severe X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata in nine new female fetuses.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Mathilde; Dufernez, Fabienne; Bruel, Ange-Line; Gonzales, Marie; Aral, Bernard; Saint-Onge, Judith; Gigot, Nadège; Desir, Julie; Daelemans, Caroline; Jossic, Frédérique; Schmitt, Sébastien; Mangione, Raphaele; Pelluard, Fanny; Vincent-Delorme, Catherine; Labaune, Jean-Marc; Bigi, Nicole; D'Olne, Dominique; Delezoide, Anne-Lise; Toutain, Annick; Blesson, Sophie; Cormier-Daire, Valérie; Thevenon, Julien; El Chehadeh, Salima; Masurel-Paulet, Alice; Joyé, Nicole; Vibert-Guigue, Claude; Rigonnot, Luc; Rousseau, Thierry; Vabres, Pierre; Hervé, Philippe; Lamazière, Antonin; Rivière, Jean-Baptiste; Faivre, Laurence; Laurent, Nicole; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel

    2015-07-01

    Conradi-Hünermann-Happle [X-linked dominant chondrodysplasia punctata 2 (CDPX2)] syndrome is a rare X-linked dominant skeletal dysplasia usually lethal in men while affected women show wide clinical heterogeneity. Different EBP mutations have been reported. Severe female cases have rarely been reported, with only six antenatal presentations. To better characterize the phenotype in female fetuses, we included nine antenatally diagnosed cases of women with EBP mutations. All cases were de novo except for two fetuses with an affected mother and one case of germinal mosaicism. The mean age at diagnosis was 22 weeks of gestation. The ultrasound features mainly included bone abnormalities: shortening (8/9 cases) and bowing of the long bones (5/9), punctuate epiphysis (7/9) and an irregular aspect of the spine (5/9). Postnatal X-rays and examination showed ichthyosis (8/9) and epiphyseal stippling (9/9), with frequent asymmetric short and bowed long bones. The X-inactivation pattern of the familial case revealed skewed X-inactivation in the mildly symptomatic mother and random X-inactivation in the severe fetal case. Differently affected skin samples of the same fetus revealed different patterns of X-inactivation. Prenatal detection of asymmetric shortening and bowing of the long bones and cartilage stippling should raise the possibility of CPDX2 in female fetuses, especially because the majority of such cases involve de novo mutations. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. X-linked intellectual disability related genes disrupted by balanced X-autosome translocations.

    PubMed

    Moysés-Oliveira, Mariana; Guilherme, Roberta Santos; Meloni, Vera Ayres; Di Battista, Adriana; de Mello, Claudia Berlim; Bragagnolo, Silvia; Moretti-Ferreira, Danilo; Kosyakova, Nadezda; Liehr, Thomas; Carvalheira, Gianna Maria; Melaragno, Maria Isabel

    2015-12-01

    Detailed molecular characterization of chromosomal rearrangements involving X-chromosome has been a key strategy in identifying X-linked intellectual disability-causing genes. We fine-mapped the breakpoints in four women with balanced X-autosome translocations and variable phenotypes, in order to investigate the corresponding genetic contribution to intellectual disability. We addressed the impact of the gene interruptions in transcription and discussed the consequences of their functional impairment in neurodevelopment. Three patients presented with cognitive impairment, reinforcing the association between the disrupted genes (TSPAN7-MRX58, KIAA2022-MRX98, and IL1RAPL1-MRX21/34) and intellectual disability. While gene expression analysis showed absence of TSPAN7 and KIAA2022 expression in the patients, the unexpected expression of IL1RAPL1 suggested a fusion transcript ZNF611-IL1RAPL1 under the control of the ZNF611 promoter, gene disrupted at the autosomal breakpoint. The X-chromosomal breakpoint definition in the fourth patient, a woman with normal intellectual abilities, revealed disruption of the ZDHHC15 gene (MRX91). The expression assays did not detect ZDHHC15 gene expression in the patient, thus questioning its involvement in intellectual disability. Revealing the disruption of an X-linked intellectual disability-related gene in patients with balanced X-autosome translocation is a useful tool for a better characterization of critical genes in neurodevelopment. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Seventh international workshop on the fragile X and X-linked mental retardation

    SciTech Connect

    Tranebjaerg, L.; Lubs, H.A.; Borghgraef, M.; Fryns, J.P.

    1996-07-12

    The Seventh International Workshop on the Fragile X and X-linked Mental Retardation was held at the University of Tromso in Norway on August 2-5, 1995. Approximately 120 participants from 20 countries attended the Workshop. By special invitation Dr. Felix de la Cruz, who initiated the first international Workshop on fragile X, attended this Workshop. For the first time, the workshop took place in Scandinavia and was hosted by Lisbeth Tranebjaerg and Herbert Lubs. For most participants this Workshop, held at the northernmost university in the world, presented a unique opportunity to visit this exotic place. Between sessions, the participants had a chance to experience 24 hours of daylight, codfishing, and extreme weather situations with excessive amounts of rain as well as spectacular changes in the light and rainbows. The format of the Workshop was a combination of platform presentations and poster presentations. In contrast to previous meetings, the Workshop opened with syndromal and non-syndromal X-linked mental retardation in order to allow time for discussion. 34 refs., 1 fig.

  4. Genetic analysis of a kindred with X-linked mental handicap and retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Aldred, M.A.; Dry, K.L.; Hardwick, L.J.; Teague, P.W.; Lester, D.H.; Brown, J.; Spowart, G.; Carothers, A.D.; Wright, A.F.; Knight-Jones, E.B.

    1994-11-01

    A kindred is described in which X-linked nonspecific mental handicap segregates together with retinitis pigmentosa. Carrier females are mentally normal but may show signs of the X-linked retinitis pigmentosa carrier state and become symptomatic in their later years. Analysis of polymorphic DNA markers at nine loci on the short arm of the X chromosome shows that no crossing-over occurs between the disease and Xp11 markers DXS255, TIMP, DXS426, MAOA, and DXS228. The 90% confidence limits show that the locus is in the Xp21-q21 region. Haplotype analysis is consistent with the causal gene being located proximal to the Xp21 loci DXS538 and 5{prime}-dystrophin on the short arm of the X chromosome. The posterior probability of linkage to the RP2 region of the X chromosome short arm (Xp11.4-p11.23) is .727, suggesting the possibility of a contiguous-gene-deletion syndrome. No cytogenetic abnormality has been identified. 33 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Long-term follow-up of a family with dominant X-linked retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Wu, D M; Khanna, H; Atmaca-Sonmez, P; Sieving, P A; Branham, K; Othman, M; Swaroop, A; Daiger, S P; Heckenlively, J R

    2010-05-01

    To document the progression of disease in male and female members of a previously described family with X-linked dominant retinitis pigmentosa (RP) caused by a de novo insertion after nucleotide 173 in exon ORF15 of RPGR. The clinical records of 19 members of family UTAD054 were reviewed. Their evaluations consisted of confirmation of family history, standardised electroretinograms (ERGs), Goldmann visual fields, and periodic ophthalmological examinations over a 23-year period. Male members of family UTAD054 had non-recordable to barely recordable ERGs from early childhood. The males showed contracted central fields and developed more severe retinopathy than the females. The female members showed a disease onset delayed to teenage years, recordable but diminishing photopic and scotopic ERG amplitudes in a cone-rod pattern, progressive loss and often asymmetric visual fields, and diffuse atrophic retinopathy with fewer pigment deposits compared with males. This insertion mutation in the RPGR exon ORF15 is associated with a RP phenotype that severely affects males early and females by 30 years of age, and is highly penetrant in female members. Families with dominant-acting RPGR mutations may be mistaken to have an autosomal mode of inheritance resulting in an incorrect prediction of recurrence risk and prognosis. Broader recognition of X-linked RP forms with dominant inheritance is necessary to facilitate appropriate counselling of these patients.

  6. RP2 phenotype and pathogenetic correlations in X-linked retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Jayasundera, Thiran; Branham, Kari E H; Othman, Mohammad; Rhoades, William R; Karoukis, Athanasios J; Khanna, Hemant; Swaroop, Anand; Heckenlively, John R

    2010-07-01

    To assess the phenotype of patients with X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP) with RP2 mutations and to correlate the findings with their genotype. Six hundred eleven patients with RP were screened for RP2 mutations. From this screen, 18 patients with RP2 mutations were evaluated clinically with standardized electroretinography, Goldmann visual fields, and ocular examinations. In addition, 7 well-documented cases from the literature were used to augment genotype-phenotype correlations. Of 11 boys younger than 12 years, 10 (91%) had macular involvement and 9 (82%) had best-corrected visual acuity worse than 20/50. Two boys from different families (aged 8 and 12 years) displayed a choroideremia-like fundus, and 9 boys (82%) were myopic (mean error, -7.97 diopters [D]). Of 10 patients with electroretinography data, 9 demonstrated severe rod-cone dysfunction. All 3 female carriers had macular atrophy in 1 or both eyes and were myopic (mean, -6.23 D). All 9 nonsense and frameshift and 5 of 7 missense mutations (71%) resulted in severe clinical presentations. Screening of the RP2 gene should be prioritized in patients younger than 16 years characterized by X-linked inheritance, decreased best-corrected visual acuity (eg, >20/40), high myopia, and early-onset macular atrophy. Patients exhibiting a choroideremia-like fundus without choroideremia gene mutations should also be screened for RP2 mutations. An identifiable phenotype for RP2-XLRP aids in clinical diagnosis and targeted genetic screening.

  7. Fragile X and X-linked intellectual disability: four decades of discovery.

    PubMed

    Lubs, Herbert A; Stevenson, Roger E; Schwartz, Charles E

    2012-04-06

    X-Linked intellectual disability (XLID) accounts for 5%-10% of intellectual disability in males. Over 150 syndromes, the most common of which is the fragile X syndrome, have been described. A large number of families with nonsyndromal XLID, 95 of which have been regionally mapped, have been described as well. Mutations in 102 X-linked genes have been associated with 81 of these XLID syndromes and with 35 of the regionally mapped families with nonsyndromal XLID. Identification of these genes has enabled considerable reclassification and better understanding of the biological basis of XLID. At the same time, it has improved the clinical diagnosis of XLID and allowed for carrier detection and prevention strategies through gamete donation, prenatal diagnosis, and genetic counseling. Progress in delineating XLID has far outpaced the efforts to understand the genetic basis for autosomal intellectual disability. In large measure, this has been because of the relative ease of identifying families with XLID and finding the responsible mutations, as well as the determined and interactive efforts of a small group of researchers worldwide.

  8. X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease predominates in a cohort of multiethnic Malaysian patients.

    PubMed

    Shahrizaila, Nortina; Samulong, Sarimah; Tey, Shelisa; Suan, Liaw Chiew; Meng, Lao Kah; Goh, Khean Jin; Ahmad-Annuar, Azlina

    2014-02-01

    Data regarding Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease is lacking in Southeast Asian populations. We investigated the frequency of the common genetic mutations in a multiethnic Malaysian cohort. Patients with features of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease or hereditary liability to pressure palsies were investigated for PMP22 duplication, deletion, and point mutations and GJB1, MPZ, and MFN2 point mutations. Over a period of 3 years, we identified 25 index patients. A genetic diagnosis was reached in 60%. The most common were point mutations in GJB1, accounting for X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (24% of the total patient population), followed by PMP22 duplication causing Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (20%). We also discovered 2 novel GJB1 mutations, c.521C>T (Proline174Leucine) and c.220G>A (Valine74Methionine). X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease was found to predominate in our patient cohort. We also found a better phenotype/genotype correlation when applying a more recently recommended genetic approach to Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. DKC1 gene mutation in a Taiwanese kindred with X-linked dyskeratosis congenita.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jeng-Hsien; Lee, J Yu-Yun; Tsao, Chao-Jung; Chao, Sheau-Chiou

    2002-11-01

    Dyskeratosis congenita (DKC) is a rare inherited disease characterized by the triad of abnormal skin pigmentation, nail dystrophy, and mucosal leukoplakia. Recent studies demonstrated mutations in the DKC1 gene encoding a protein named dyskerin, which is a component of human telomerase. In addition to the hypothesized function of pseudouridination in rRNA biosynthesis, ribosomal subunit assembly, and/or centromere/ microtubule binding, lower levels of telomerase activity in cells from patients with X-linked DKC have been observed. We report the mutation analysis of a Taiwanese family with X-linked DKC. The patient was a 19-year-old man who presented with progressive reticulate hyperpigmentation, nail dystrophy, alopecia, leukoplakia of the tongue, and pancytopenia. He died of enterocolitis and Escherichia coli sepsis at the age of 20 years. Only his mother's DNA was available for mutation analysis, which revealed a nucleotide transition of C to T (1058 C --> T), a hotspot mutation in DKC, resulting in an amino acid change from alanine to valine (A353V) in the DKC1 gene. Recent advances in the research of telomerase and its implications in the human aging process and cancer are discussed.

  10. New X linked spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia: report on eight affected males in the same family.

    PubMed Central

    Camera, G; Stella, G; Camera, A

    1994-01-01

    We report on a probably new form of spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia (SEMD) with an X linked inheritance pattern. Eight males were affected in the same family. We were able to examine three adult patients and we studied the skeletal radiological aspect of one of these patients at 2 years 6 months and at 9 years of age. The main clinical features are severe short trunked dwarfism, brachydactyly, normal facies, and normal intelligence. Radiologically, the diaphyses of all the long bones are short and broad. The epiphyses of the distal portion of the femora and those of the proximal and distal portions of the tibia are embedded in their metaphyses and there is marked narrowing of the intercondylar groove. There is moderate platyspondyly. Several vertebrae show an anterior tongue in infancy and severe irregularities of the upper and lower surfaces are present in adulthood. The 11th or 12th thoracic vertebra is wedge shaped. The pelvis is narrow. The distal ulnae and fibulae are disproportionately long. The hands show radial deviation and brachydactyly is present in the hands and feet. This X linked SEMD was not detectable at birth. Images PMID:8064814

  11. Characterization of mutations in 22 females with X-linked dominant chondrodysplasia punctata (Happle syndrome).

    PubMed

    Herman, Gail E; Kelley, Richard I; Pureza, V; Smith, D; Kopacz, Kevin; Pitt, James; Sutphen, Rebecca; Sheffield, Leslie J; Metzenberg, Aida B

    2002-01-01

    Human X-linked dominant chondrodysplasia punctata (CDPX2) or Happle syndrome is associated with mutations in the human emopamil binding protein (EBP), a delta8-delta7-sterol isomerase involved in cholesterol biosynthesis. The purpose of the current study was to determine the spectrum of EBP mutations in females with CDPX2 and the utility of biochemical screening for the disorder by analysis of plasma sterols. Genomic sequencing of the coding exons of the human delta8-delta7-sterol isomerase gene was performed on DNA from 26 females with suspected X-linked dominant chondrodysplasia punctata. Clinical data and sterol analyses were obtained for 24 and 23 of the patients, respectively. Mutations in the human EBP delta8-delta7-sterol isomerase gene were found in 22 (85%) of 26 females studied, including 20 (91%) of 22 patients who demonstrated an abnormal sterol profile. Thirteen of the mutations have not been reported previously. All of the females in whom mutations were found demonstrated typical skin manifestations of CDPX2, and all but one had a skeletal dysplasia. Plasma sterol analysis was a highly specific and sensitive indicator of the presence of an EBP mutation in females with suspected CDPX2, including a clinically unaffected mother of a sporadic case. No clear genotype/phenotype correlations were ascertained, probably because phenotypic expression is influenced substantially by the pattern of X-inactivation in an affected female.

  12. Localization of Impacted Canines

    PubMed Central

    Mehrotra, Praveen; Bhagchandani, Jitendra; Singh, Ashish; Garg, Aarti; Kumar, Snehi; Sharma, Ashish; Yadav, Harsh

    2015-01-01

    Impaction of maxillary canines is a frequently encountered clinical problem. The impaction of canine can be prevented in some situationsif the canine displacement is diagnosed in the early mixed dentition period and this would be extremely useful for the clinician. Hence,it is very important to focus on the means of early diagnosis and interception of this clinical situation. In the present article, the differentmodalities used to diagnose the impacted canine are reviewed with an insight into current 3-D modalities. PMID:25738100

  13. Clinical diversity and chromosomal localization of X-linked cone dystrophy (CODI)

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Hee-Kyung; Ferrell, R.E.; Gorin, M.B.

    1994-12-01

    X-linked progressive cone dystrophy (COD1) causes progressive deterioration of visual acuity, deepening of central scotomas, macular changes, and bull`s-eye lesions. The cone electroretinography (ERG) is variably abnormal in affected males, and the rod ERG may also be abnormal. The clinical picture of heterozygous females ranges from asymptomatic to a widespread spectrum of cone-mediated dysfunction. A prior linkage study demonstrated linkage between the COD1 locus and the marker locus DXS84, assigned to Xp21.1, with no recombination. In the present study, we have clinically characterized a large four-generation family with COD1 and have performed a linkage analysis using seven polymorphic markers on the short arm of the X chromosome. No recombination was observed between the disease and the marker loci DXS7 and MAOA, suggesting that the location of COD1 is in the region Xp11.3, distal to DXS84 and proximal to ARAF1.

  14. Distribution and cellular localization of adrenoleukodystrophy protein in human tissues: implications for X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Höftberger, Romana; Kunze, Markus; Weinhofer, Isabelle; Aboul-Enein, Fahmy; Voigtländer, Till; Oezen, Iris; Amann, Gabriele; Bernheimer, Hanno; Budka, Herbert; Berger, Johannes

    2007-11-01

    Defects of adrenoleukodystrophy protein (ALDP) lead to X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD), a disorder mainly affecting the nervous system white matter and the adrenal cortex. In the present study, we examine the expression of ALDP in various human tissues and cell lines by multiple-tissue RNA expression array analysis, Western blot analysis, and immunohistochemistry. ALDP-encoding mRNA is most abundant in tissues with high energy requirements such as heart, muscle, liver, and the renal and endocrine systems. ALDP selectively occurs in specific cell types of brain (hypothalamus and basal nucleus of Meynert), kidney (distal tubules), skin (eccrine gland, hair follicles, and fibroblasts), colon (ganglion cells and epithelium), adrenal gland (zona reticularis and fasciculata), and testis (Sertoli and Leydig cells). In pituitary gland, ALDP is confined to adrenocorticotropin-producing cells and is significantly reduced in individuals receiving long term cortisol treatment. This might indicate a functional link between ALDP and proopiomelanocortin-derived peptide hormones.

  15. Role of very-long-chain acyl-coenzyme A synthetase in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, S J; Kemp, S; Braiterman, L T; Watkins, P A

    1999-09-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is characterized biochemically by decreased ability of cells to activate (via very-long-chain acyl-coenzyme A synthetase [VLCS]) and subsequently degrade very-long-chain fatty acids in peroxisomes. It is noteworthy that the gene defective in X-ALD encodes ALDP, a peroxisomal membrane protein unrelated to VLCS. We cloned human VLCS (hVLCS) and found that peroxisomes from X-ALD fibroblasts contained immunoreactive hVLCS, refuting the earlier hypothesis that ALDP is required to anchor VLCS to the peroxisomal membrane. Furthermore, hVLCS was topographically oriented facing the peroxisomal matrix in both control and X-ALD fibroblasts, contradicting the alternative hypothesis that ALDP is required to translocate VLCS into peroxisomes. However, overexpression of both hVLCS and ALDP in X-ALD fibroblasts synergistically increased very-long-chain fatty acid beta-oxidation, indicating that these proteins interact functionally.

  16. ALDP expression in fetal cells and its application in prenatal diagnosis of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, M; Coll, M J; Pampols, T; Girós, M

    1997-07-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is due to an impairment in the peroxisomal beta-oxidation of very long straight chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) and the gene involved encodes a 75 kD protein (ALDP). Prenatal diagnosis is usually made by measurement of VLCFAs in cultured amniotic fluid cells (CAF) and chorionic villus cells (CCV), but some misdiagnoses have been reported. For this reason, some authors suggest the use of more than one strategy to minimize the risk of pitfalls. In this study we show, by immunochemical techniques, that ALDP is expressed in chorionic villi and amniotic cells and can be used for prenatal diagnosis of X-ALD in kindreds where ALDP is absent (69-84 per cent), together with VLCFA determination. Moreover, we demonstrate that the culture medium modifies ALDP expression; therefore, it is a factor that must be taken into account when a prenatal diagnosis is done.

  17. Evidence against an X-linked visual loss susceptibility locus in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Chalmers, R.M.; Davis, M.B.; Sweeney, M.G.; Wood, N.W.; Harding, A.E.

    1996-07-01

    Pedigree analysis of British families with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) closely fits a model in which a pathogenic mtDNA mutation interacts with an X-linked visual loss susceptibility locus (VLSL). This model predicts that 60% of affected females will show marked skewing of X inactivation. Linkage analysis in British and Italian families with genetically proven LHON has excluded the presence of such a VLSL over 169 cM of the X chromosome both when all families were analyzed together and when only families with the bp 11778 mutation were studied. Further, there was no excess skewing of X inactivation in affected females. There was no evidence for close linkage to three markers in the pseudoautosomal region of the sex chromosomes. The mechanism of incomplete penetrance and male predominance in LHON remains unclear. 27 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  18. Connexin mutations in X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bergoffen, J. ); Scherer, S.S.; Wang, S.; Scott, M.; Bone, L.J.; Chen, K.; Lensch, M.W.; Fischbeck, K.H. ); Paul, D.L. ); Change, P.F. )

    1993-12-24

    X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMTX) is a form of hereditary neuropathy with demyelination. Recently, this disorder was mapped to chromosome Xq13.1. The gene for the gap junction protein connexin32 is located in the same chromosomal segment, which led to its consideration as a candidate gene for CMTX. With the use of Northern (RNA) blot and immunohistochemistry techniques, it was found that connexin32 is normally expressed in myelinated peripheral nerve. Direct sequencing of the connexin32 gene showed seven different mutations in affected persons from eight CMTX families. These findings, a demonstration of inherited defects in a gap junction protein, suggest that connexin32 plays an important role in peripheral nerve.

  19. MBTPS2 mutations cause defective regulated intramembrane proteolysis in X-linked osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Lindert, Uschi; Cabral, Wayne A; Ausavarat, Surasawadee; Tongkobpetch, Siraprapa; Ludin, Katja; Barnes, Aileen M; Yeetong, Patra; Weis, Maryann; Krabichler, Birgit; Srichomthong, Chalurmpon; Makareeva, Elena N; Janecke, Andreas R; Leikin, Sergey; Röthlisberger, Benno; Rohrbach, Marianne; Kennerknecht, Ingo; Eyre, David R; Suphapeetiporn, Kanya; Giunta, Cecilia; Marini, Joan C; Shotelersuk, Vorasuk

    2016-07-06

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a collagen-related bone dysplasia. We identified an X-linked recessive form of OI caused by defects in MBTPS2, which encodes site-2 metalloprotease (S2P). MBTPS2 missense mutations in two independent kindreds with moderate/severe OI cause substitutions at highly conserved S2P residues. Mutant S2P has normal stability, but impaired functioning in regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) of OASIS, ATF6 and SREBP transcription factors, consistent with decreased proband secretion of type I collagen. Further, hydroxylation of the collagen lysine residue (K87) critical for crosslinking is reduced in proband bone tissue, consistent with decreased lysyl hydroxylase 1 in proband osteoblasts. Reduced collagen crosslinks presumptively undermine bone strength. Also, proband osteoblasts have broadly defective differentiation. These mutations provide evidence that RIP plays a fundamental role in normal bone development.

  20. X-linked agammaglobulinemia combined with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and invasive Klebsiella pneumoniae polyarticular septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zaihua; Kang, Yuli; Lin, Zhenlang; Huang, Yanjing; Lv, Huoyang; Li, Yasong

    2015-02-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a primary immunodeficiency disease caused by mutations in the Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) gene. XLA can also present in combination with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), the major chronic rheumatologic disease in children. We report herein the first known case of a juvenile patient diagnosed with XLA combined with JIA that later developed into invasive Klebsiella pneumoniae polyarticular septic polyarthritis. An additional comprehensive review of XLA combined with JIA and invasive K. pneumoniae septic arthritis is also presented. XLA was identified by the detection of BTK mutations while the diagnosis of JIA was established by clinical and laboratory assessments. Septic arthritis caused by invasive K. pneumoniae was confirmed by culturing of the synovia and gene detection of the isolates. Invasive K. pneumoniae infections can not only result in liver abscesses but also septic arthritis, although this is rare. XLA combined with JIA may contribute to invasive K. pneumoniae infection.

  1. A Japanese family with X-linked sideroblastic anemia affecting females and manifesting as macrocytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Katsurada, Tatsuya; Kawabata, Hiroshi; Kawabata, Daiki; Kawahara, Masahiro; Nakabo, Yukiharu; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi; Yoshida, Yataro

    2016-06-01

    X-linked sideroblastic anemia (XLSA) is a rare hereditary disorder that typically manifests in males as microcytic anemia. Here, we report a family with XLSA that affects females and manifests as macrocytic anemia. The proband was a Japanese woman harboring a heterozygous mutation c.679C>T in the ALAS2 gene. This mutation causes the amino acid substitution R227C, which disrupts the enzymatic activity of erythroid-specific δ-aminolevulinic acid synthase. The mutation was not detected in the ALAS2 complementary DNA from peripheral blood red blood cells of the proband, indicating that the cells were mostly derived from erythroblasts expressing wild-type ALAS2. The proband's mother, who had been diagnosed with myelodysplastic syndrome, also had XLSA with the same mutation. Clinicians should be aware that XLSA can occur not only in males but also in females, in whom it manifests as macrocytic anemia.

  2. Zebrafish model for the genetic basis of X-linked retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Raghupathy, Rakesh Kotapati; McCulloch, Daphne L; Akhtar, Saeed; Al-mubrad, Turki M; Shu, Xinhua

    2013-03-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) affects 1/4000 individuals in most populations, and X-linked RP (XLRP) is one of the most severe forms of human retinal degeneration. Mutations in both the retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator (RPGR) gene and retinitis pigmentosa 2 (RP2) gene account for almost all cases of XLRP. The functional roles of both RPGR and RP2 in the pathogenesis of XLRP are unclear. Due to the surprisingly high degree of functional conservation between human genes and their zebrafish orthologues, the zebrafish has become an important model for human retinal disorders. In this brief review, we summarize the functional characterization of XLRP-causing genes, RPGR and RP2, in zebrafish, and highlight recent studies that provide insight into the cellular functions of both genes. This will not only shed light on disease mechanisms in XLRP but will also provide a solid platform to test RP-causing mutants before proposing XLRP gene therapy trials.

  3. Development of three X-linked tetrameric microsatellite markers for forensic purposes.

    PubMed

    Dong, Chunnan; Fu, Lihong; Zhang, Xiaojing; Ma, Chunling; Yu, Feng; Li, Shujin; Cong, Bin

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we obtained sequence and population genetic data for three X-linked short tandem repeat markers (X-STRs; DXS7129, DXS2500, G10583). We investigated their population genetics and estimated their forensic parameters in 214 healthy unrelated individuals from the Han population of Northern China (105 males and 109 females). We showed that DXS2500 and G10583 were highly polymorphic and thus have potential for application in forensic medicine. We also estimated the overall linkage disequilibrium between pairs of loci, specific multiallelic or interallelic associations, and haplotype frequencies in males. We showed that the three X-STR loci segregate as stable haplotype blocks; this could be a powerful tool for haplotype analysis in kinship testing.

  4. Hematopoietic cell transplantation does not prevent myelopathy in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    van Geel, Björn M; Poll-The, Bwee Tien; Verrips, Aad; Boelens, Jaap-Jan; Kemp, Stephan; Engelen, Marc

    2015-03-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a peroxisomal metabolic disorder. Male patients develop adrenocortical insufficiency (80 % before 18 years), a chronic myelopathy (adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN); all in adulthood), or progressive cerebral demyelination (cerebral ALD; 40 % before 18 years). Cerebral ALD is treated with haematopoetic cell transplantation (HCT). It is unknown if AMN still develops in patients with X-ALD that underwent HCT for cerebral ALD in childhood. A retrospective observational study was performed by selecting all adult patients with X-ALD in our cohort that underwent HCT in childhood. This retrospective study found that three out of five patients in our cohort who underwent HCT in childhood developed signs of myelopathy in adulthood. These data suggest that HCT for cerebral ALD in childhood does not prevent the onset of AMN in X-ALD in adulthood.

  5. A novel ABCD1 gene mutation in a Chinese patient with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yan-na; Jiang, Min-yan; Liang, Cui-li; Peng, Min-zhi; Cheng, Jing; Sheng, Hui-ying; Fan, Li-ping; Chen, Xi-qing; Liu, Li

    2015-05-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) (OMIM: 300100) is a recessive neurodegenerative disorder caused by defects in the ABCD1 gene on chromosome Xq28. Childhood cerebral ALD (CCALD) is the most frequent phenotype. We describe an affected boy who developed normally until he was 8 years old then suffered progressive neurological deficits that ultimately led to death. Diagnosis was based on clinical symptoms, an abnormal very long chain fatty acid profile in plasma, typical CCALD MRI pattern, and molecular analysis. Direct sequencing of the ABCD1 gene in this patient identified a novel splicing mutation (IVS1+1G>A) in intron 1, which is considered to be the pathogenic mutation. We have identified a novel ABCD1 mutation as the likely cause of CCALD in a Chinese patient.

  6. PHEX gene mutation in a Chinese family with six cases of X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lili; Yang, Jianbin; Huang, Xinwen

    2013-01-01

    X-linked hypophosphatemic (XLH) rickets is caused by inactivating mutations in the PHEX gene, which encodes a metalloprotease that cleaves small peptide hormone. So far there are only a few reports on XLH patients from China. In the present study, we report on six XLH patients from one family. A PHEX missense mutation was found in exon 22, and a literature review on the mutations of Chinese patients was undertaken. The family included six XLH patients with five females and one male (the proband). All the patients showed a low serum phosphorus, increased blood alkaline phosphatase and normal calcium levels. Mutation analysis revealed a PHEX mutation in exon 22 (c.2237G>A). In total, 15 PHEX mutations have been reported in Chinese populations at this time. These data extend the spectrum of mutations in the PHEX gene in Chinese populations.

  7. Activity-dependent regulation of genes implicated in X-linked non-specific mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Boda, B; Mas, C; Muller, D

    2002-01-01

    X-linked forms of non-specific mental retardation are complex disorders, for which mutations in several genes have recently been identified. These include OPHN1, GDI1, PAK3, IL1RAPL, TM4SF2, FMR2 and RSK2. To investigate the mechanisms through which alterations of these gene products could result in cognitive impairment, we analyzed their expression using quantitative PCR technique in two in vitro models of activity-dependent gene regulation: kainate-induced seizures and long-term synaptic potentiation (LTP). We found that the level of expression of four genes, PAK3, IL1RAPL, RSK2 and TM4SF2, was significantly up-regulated following kainate treatment. Furthermore we observed a significant increase in mRNA levels of PAK3 and IL1RAPL following LTP induction. These results suggest a possible role for these four genes in activity-dependent brain plasticity.

  8. Bruton's Tyrosine Kinase: From X-Linked Agammaglobulinemia Toward Targeted Therapy for B-Cell Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Ponader, Sabine; Burger, Jan A.

    2014-01-01

    Discovery of Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) mutations as the cause for X-linked agammaglobulinemia was a milestone in understanding the genetic basis of primary immunodeficiencies. Since then, studies have highlighted the critical role of this enzyme in B-cell development and function, and particularly in B-cell receptor signaling. Because its deletion affects mostly B cells, BTK has become an attractive therapeutic target in autoimmune disorders and B-cell malignancies. Ibrutinib (PCI-32765) is the most advanced BTK inhibitor in clinical testing, with ongoing phase III clinical trials in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia and mantle-cell lymphoma. In this article, we discuss key discoveries related to BTK and clinically relevant aspects of BTK inhibitors, and we provide an outlook into clinical development and open questions regarding BTK inhibitor therapy. PMID:24778403

  9. A Review of X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Yin, Fei

    2016-05-01

    X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMTX) is the second common genetic variant of CMT. CMTX type 1 causes 90% of CMTX. The most important clinical features of CMTX are similar with other types of CMT; however, a few patients get the central nervous system involved with or without white matter lesions; males are more severely and earlier affected than females. In this review, the authors focus on the origin and classification of CMTX, the central nervous system manifestations of CMTX1, the possible mechanism by which GJB1 mutations cause CMT1X, and the emerging therapeutic strategies for CMTX. Moreover, several cases are presented to illustrate the central nervous system manifestations.

  10. Assessing interethnic admixture using an X-linked insertion-deletion multiplex.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro-Rodrigues, Elzemar Martins; dos Santos, Ney Pereira Carneiro; dos Santos, Andrea Kely Campos Ribeiro; Pereira, Rui; Amorim, António; Gusmão, Leonor; Zago, Marco Antonio; dos Santos, Sidney Emanuel Batista

    2009-01-01

    In this study, a PCR multiplex was optimized, allowing the simultaneous analysis of 13 X-chromosome Insertion/deletion polymorphisms (INDELs). Genetic variation observed in Africans, Europeans, and Native Americans reveals high inter-population variability. The estimated proportions of X-chromosomes in an admixed population from the Brazilian Amazon region show a predominant Amerindian contribution (approximately 41%), followed by European (approximately 32%) and African (approximately 27%) contributions. The proportion of Amerindian contribution based on X-linked data is similar to the expected value based on mtDNA and Y-chromosome information. The accuracy for assessing interethnic admixture, and the high differentiation between African, European, and Native American populations, demonstrates the suitability of this INDEL set to measure ancestry proportions in three-hybrid populations, as it is the case of Latin American populations.

  11. X-linked mental retardation: focus on synaptic function and plasticity.

    PubMed

    Humeau, Yann; Gambino, Frédéric; Chelly, Jamel; Vitale, Nicolas

    2009-04-01

    Among mental disorders, mental retardation has been shown to be caused by various factors including a large array of genetic mutations. On the basis of remarkable progress, the emerging view is that defects in the regulation of synaptic activity and morphogenesis of dendritic spines are apparently common features associated with mutations in several genes implicated in mental retardation. In this review, we will discuss X-linked MR-related gene products that are potentially involved in the normal structure and function of the synapses, with a particular focus on pre- and/or post-synaptic plasticity mechanisms. Progress in understanding the underlying conditions leading to mental retardation will undoubtedly be gained from a closer collaboration of geneticists, physiologists and cognitive neuroscientists, which should enable the establishment of standardized approaches.

  12. Application of carrier testing to genetic counseling for X-linked agammaglobulinemia

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R.C.; Nachtman, R.G.; Belmont, J.W.; Rosenblatt, H.M.

    1994-01-01

    Bruton X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a phenotypically recessive genetic disorder of B lymphocyte development. Female carriers of XLA, although asymptomatic, have a characteristic B cell lineage-specific skewing of the pattern of X inactivation. Skewing apparently results from defective growth and maturation of B cell precursors bearing a mutant active X chromosome. In this study, carrier status was tested in 58 women from 22 families referred with a history of agammaglobulinemia. Primary carrier analysis to examine patterns of X inactivation in CD19[sup +] peripheral blood cells (B lymphocytes) was conducted using quantitative PCR at the androgen-receptor locus. Obligate carriers of XLA demonstrated >95% skewing of X inactivation in peripheral blood CD19[sup +] cells but not in CD19[sup [minus

  13. Report on the X-linked lymphoproliferative disease in an Australian family.

    PubMed

    Turner, A M; Berdoukas, V A; Tobias, V H; Ziegler, J B; Toogood, I R; Mulley, J C; Skare, J; Purtilo, D T

    1992-04-01

    X-linked lymphoproliferative disease is characterized by immune deficiency, particularly to the Epstein-Barr virus and by a tendency to develop fatal infectious mononucleosis, acquired hypogammaglobulinaemia or malignant lymphoma. This disorder has been diagnosed in three boys, two brothers and a maternally related cousin, residing in Australia. The proband presented at 6 years of age with fulminating infectious mononucleosis. His 9 year old male cousin had developed an ileal Burkitt lymphoma one year earlier. Immunological and molecular genetic evidence is presented to support our view that his younger sibling is also affected with this condition. DNA linkage studies using probes to DXS10 and DXS37 provide confirmatory evidence for the diagnosis in the proband's brother and information on carrier status in female family members.

  14. Clinical and mutational features of X-linked agammaglobulinemia in Mexico.

    PubMed

    García-García, E; Staines-Boone, A T; Vargas-Hernández, A; González-Serrano, M E; Carrillo-Tapia, E; Mogica-Martínez, D; Berrón-Ruíz, L; Segura-Mendez, N H; Espinosa-Rosales, F J; Yamazaki-Nakashimada, M A; Santos-Argumedo, L; López-Herrera, G

    2016-04-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is caused by BTK mutations, patients typically show <2% of peripheral B cells and reduced levels of all immunoglobulins; they suffer from recurrent infections of bacterial origin; however, viral infections, autoimmune-like diseases, and an increased risk of developing gastric cancer are also reported. In this work, we report the BTK mutations and clinical features of 12 patients diagnosed with XLA. Furthermore, a clinical revision is also presented for an additional cohort of previously reported patients with XLA. Four novel mutations were identified, one of these located in the previously reported mutation refractory SH3 domain. Clinical data support previous reports accounting for frequent respiratory, gastrointestinal tract infections and other symptoms such as the occurrence of reactive arthritis in 19.2% of the patients. An equal proportion of patients developed septic arthritis; missense mutations and mutations in SH1, SH2 and PH domains predominated in patients who developed arthritis.

  15. Familial X-linked mental retardation and isolated growth hormone deficiency: Clinical and molecular findings

    SciTech Connect

    Hamel, B.C.J.; Smits, A.P.T.; Helm, B. van den

    1996-07-12

    We report on several members of a family with varying degrees of X-linked mental retardation (XLMR), isolated growth hormone deficiency (IGHD), and infantile behavior but without other consistent phenotypic abnormalities. Male patients continued to grow until well into their twenties and reached a height ranging from 135 to 159 cm. Except one, all female carriers were mentally normal; their adult height ranged from 159 to 168 cm. By linkage studies we have assigned the underlying genetic defect to the Xq24-q27.3 region, with a maximum lod score of Z = 3.26 at {theta} = 0.0 for the DXS294 locus. The XLMR-IGHD phenotype in these patients may be due to pleiotropic effects of a single gene or it may represent a contiguous gene syndrome. 18 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Hematologically important mutations: X-linked chronic granulomatous disease (third update)

    PubMed Central

    Roos, Dirk; Kuhns, Douglas B.; Maddalena, Anne; Roesler, Joachim; Lopez, Juan Alvaro; Ariga, Tadashi; Avcin, Tadej; de Boer, Martin; Bustamante, Jacinta; Condino-Neto, Antonio; Di Matteo, Gigliola; He, Jianxin; Hill, Harry R.; Holland, Steven M.; Kannengiesser, Caroline; Köker, M. Yavuz; Kondratenko, Irina; van Leeuwen, Karin; Malech, Harry L.; Marodi, László; Nunoi, Hiroyuki; Stasia, Marie-José; Maria Ventura, Anna; Witwer, Carl T.; Wolach, Baruch; Gallin, John I.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic Granulomatous Disease (CGD) is an immunodeficiency disorder affecting about 1 in 250,000 individuals. The disease is caused by a lack of superoxide production by the leukocyte enzyme NADPH oxidase. Superoxide is used to kill phagocytosed micro-organisms in neutrophils, eosinophils, monocytes and macrophages. The leukocyte NADPH oxidase is composed of five subunits, of which the enzymatic component is gp91-phox, also called Nox2. This protein is encoded by the CYBB gene on the × chromosome. Mutations in this gene are found in about 70% of all CGD patients. This article lists all mutations identified in CYBB in the X-linked form of CGD. Moreover, apparently benign polymorphisms in CYBB are also given, which should facilitate the recognition of future disease-causing mutations. PMID:20729109

  17. The immunogenetics of immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X linked (IPEX) syndrome.

    PubMed

    d'Hennezel, Eva; Bin Dhuban, Khalid; Torgerson, Troy; Piccirillo, Ciriaco A; Piccirillo, Ciriaco

    2012-05-01

    Immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X linked (IPEX) syndrome is a rare disorder in humans caused by germ-line mutations in the FOXP3 gene, a master transcriptional regulator for the development of CD4 regulatory T (Treg) cells. This T cell subset has global inhibitory functions that maintain immune homeostasis and mediate self-tolerance. Treg developmental deficiency or dysfunction is a hallmark of IPEX. It leads to severe, multi-organ, autoimmune phenomena including enteropathy, chronic dermatitis, endocrinopathy and other organ-specific diseases such as anaemia, thrombocytopenia, hepatitis and nephritis. In this review, the genetic, immunological and clinical characteristics of IPEX syndrome are described, and the impact of heritable mutations on the function of Treg cells highlighted.

  18. MBTPS2 mutations cause defective regulated intramembrane proteolysis in X-linked osteogenesis imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Lindert, Uschi; Cabral, Wayne A.; Ausavarat, Surasawadee; Tongkobpetch, Siraprapa; Ludin, Katja; Barnes, Aileen M.; Yeetong, Patra; Weis, Maryann; Krabichler, Birgit; Srichomthong, Chalurmpon; Makareeva, Elena N.; Janecke, Andreas R.; Leikin, Sergey; Röthlisberger, Benno; Rohrbach, Marianne; Kennerknecht, Ingo; Eyre, David R.; Suphapeetiporn, Kanya; Giunta, Cecilia; Marini, Joan C.; Shotelersuk, Vorasuk

    2016-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a collagen-related bone dysplasia. We identified an X-linked recessive form of OI caused by defects in MBTPS2, which encodes site-2 metalloprotease (S2P). MBTPS2 missense mutations in two independent kindreds with moderate/severe OI cause substitutions at highly conserved S2P residues. Mutant S2P has normal stability, but impaired functioning in regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) of OASIS, ATF6 and SREBP transcription factors, consistent with decreased proband secretion of type I collagen. Further, hydroxylation of the collagen lysine residue (K87) critical for crosslinking is reduced in proband bone tissue, consistent with decreased lysyl hydroxylase 1 in proband osteoblasts. Reduced collagen crosslinks presumptively undermine bone strength. Also, proband osteoblasts have broadly defective differentiation. These mutations provide evidence that RIP plays a fundamental role in normal bone development. PMID:27380894

  19. X-linked dominant inheritance of partial phosphorylase kinase deficiency in mice.

    PubMed

    Varsányi, M; Vrbica, A; Heilmeyer, L M

    1980-04-01

    A new mouse strain, the V strain, with a partial deficiency of phosphorylase kinase has been established. The deficiency is caused by an X-linked dominant gene (PhKc). Muscle extracts of homozygous and heterozygous females and hemizygous males have about 25% of the activity found in extracts of normal (C3H/HeHan) mice. This dominant phosphorylase kinase deficiency of the new V strain is different from that of the I-strain mice with the X-linked recessive deficiency of skeletal muscle phosphorylase kinase. The muscle extracts of V-strain and normal mice contain the same phosphorylase phosphatase activity of about 1 U/mg. Heart and liver extracts from V mice contained about 50% and 66%, respectively, of the phosphorylase kinase activity compared to that found in the same organs from the normal mice. The glycogen content of the skeletal muscle of the V strain was normal, i.e., 0.9 mg/g. Phosphorylase kinase was purified from the skeletal muscle of the V strain by (a) hydrophobic chromatography on methylamine Sepharose, (b) ammonium sulfate precipitation, and (c) gel filtration of Sepharose 4B. The enzyme has a similar structure to the normal murine and rabbit skeletal muscle enzyme, except that the proportion of the subunits differs. The molar ratio of the subunits of the V strain mice is (alpha + alpha'):beta:gamma=0.54:1:1.169, in comparison with that of the rabbit (alpha + alpha'):beta:gamma=1.1:1.0:1.0 and that of normal murine enzyme 0.9:1.0:0.7.

  20. Linkage analysis in three families with nonspecific X-linked mental retardation

    SciTech Connect

    Claes, S.; Gu, X.X.; Legius, E.

    1996-07-12

    Nonspecific X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) is a common disorder. The number of genes involved in this condition is not known, but it is estimated to be more than 10. We present a clinical and linkage study on 3 families with XLMR. All families were analyzed using highly polymorphic markers covering the X chromosome; screening for the fragile X mutation was negative. The first family (MRX 36) consisted of 1 female and 4 male patients in 3 generations and 7 healthy individuals. Considering the female as an expressing heterozygous carrier, a maximum LOD score of 3.41 was reached in region Xp21.2-Xp22.1. Considering her phenotype to be unknown, a LOD{sub max} of 1.97 was reached in the same region. The second family consisted of 5 affected and 6 healthy males with mild to borderline mental retardation. Linkage analysis using an X-linked recessive model with full penetrance and no phenocopies excluded linkage over almost the entire X chromosome. Using alternative models, including an affecteds-only analysis, a LOD{sub max} of 1.49 was found in region Xq24-28. The third family, consisting of 4 male patients with moderate mental retardation in 1 generation yielded a LOD{sub max} of 0.9 in region Xp22.13-11.3. However, even in this small pedigree, exclusion mapping was able to exclude very large parts of the X chromosome and in this way identify a likely candidate region. 34 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Cortical and trabecular bone density in X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Moira; Roschger, Paul; Klaushofer, Klaus; Veilleux, Louis-Nicolas; Roughley, Peter; Glorieux, Francis H; Rauch, Frank

    2013-05-01

    X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets is caused by mutations in PHEX. Even though the disease is characterized by disordered skeletal mineralization, detailed bone densitometric studies are lacking. The aim of the study was to assess volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) in X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets using forearm peripheral quantitative computed tomography. The study was conducted in the metabolic bone clinic of a pediatric orthopedic hospital. Thirty-four patients (age, 6 to 60 years; 24 female) with PHEX mutations were studied, of whom 7 children (age, 6 to 11 years) were actively being treated with calcitriol and phosphate supplementation. Twenty-one patients (age, 16 to 40 years) had received the same therapy before but had discontinued the treatment; 6 patients (age, 12 to 60 years) had never received this treatment. Trabecular and cortical vBMD of the radius. Trabecular vBMD was elevated (mean age-specific and sex-specific z-score: +1.0) when all patients were analyzed together, due to very high results in currently treated patients (mean z-score: +2.4) and slightly above-average mean values in the other patients. Cortical vBMD was low when the entire cohort was analyzed together (mean z-score: -3.3), but was higher in currently treated patients (mean z-score: -1.3) than in patients who had discontinued therapy (mean z-score: -3.8) or who had never been treated (mean z-score: -4.1). Patients with PHEX mutations have elevated trabecular vBMD at the distal radius while receiving calcitriol and phosphate supplementation, but low cortical vBMD at the radius diaphysis. Low cortical vBMD presumably reflects the underlying mineralization defect that is not entirely corrected by current treatment approaches.

  2. The occurrence of new mutants in the X-linked recessive Lesch-Nyhan disease.

    PubMed Central

    Francke, U; Felsenstein, J; Gartler, S M; Migeon, B R; Dancis, J; Seegmiller, J E; Bakay, F; Nyhan, W L

    1976-01-01

    In a population at equilibrium for a sex-linked lethal, one-third of the genes for that lethal must arise anew each generation. Therefore, one-third of all cases of Lesch-Nyhan disease, a severe X-linked recessive lethal disorder, should be new mutants. To test this hypothesis, we have collected 47 families, 20 with a single proband and 27 with multiple affected males in which the patients' mothers and other female relatives had been studied for heterozygosity. Available carrier detection tests identify heterozygous for HPRT deficiency in hair roots and skin fibroblasts. Only four mothers were found not to be carriers. This result deviates significantly from expected (P less than .001). Statistical tests for ascertainment effects indicated absence of bias for multiple proband families but strong bias in favor of families with many heterozygous females. When the analysis was limited to single proband families, the deviation from expected was still significant (P less than .01). The incidence of new mutants among the heterozygous mothers, as determined by the ratio of +/+ to +/- maternal grandmothers, should be one-half (see Appendix). Of all 20 maternal grandmothers studied, five were +/+ and 15 were +/- (P less than .05). Considering only the single proband families, the ratio of 5 +/+ to 8 +/- was not significantly different from expected. In four of the five cases in which the heterozygous mother of an affected individual was a new mutation, the age of her parents was considerably higher than the mean parental age in the population. This raises the possibility of a paternal age effect on X-linked mutations. There appears to be a true deficiency of new mutatnts among males but not among females. Data on additional Lesch-Nyhan families are needed before conclusions regarding a possible higher mutation rate in males can be drawn. PMID:1266847

  3. HDHD1, which is often deleted in X-linked ichthyosis, encodes a pseudouridine-5'-phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Preumont, Alice; Rzem, Rim; Vertommen, Didier; Van Schaftingen, Emile

    2010-10-15

    Pseudouridine, the fifth-most abundant nucleoside in RNA, is not metabolized in mammals, but is excreted intact in urine. The purpose of the present work was to search for an enzyme that would dephosphorylate pseudouridine 5'-phosphate, a potential intermediate in RNA degradation. We show that human erythrocytes contain a pseudouridine-5'-phosphatase displaying a Km ≤ 1 μM for its substrate. The activity of the partially purified enzyme was dependent on Mg2+, and was inhibited by Ca2+ and vanadate, suggesting that it belonged to the 'haloacid dehalogenase' family of phosphatases. Its low molecular mass (26 kDa) suggested that this phosphatase could correspond to the protein encoded by the HDHD1 (haloacid dehalogenase-like hydrolase domain-containing 1) gene, present next to the STS (steroid sulfatase) gene on human chromosome Xp22. Purified human recombinant HDHD1 dephosphorylated pseudouridine 5'-phosphate with a kcat of 1.6 s-1, a Km of 0.3 μM and a catalytic efficiency at least 1000-fold higher than that on which it acted on other phosphate esters, including 5'-UMP. The molecular identity of pseudouridine-5'-phosphatase was confirmed by the finding that its activity was negligible (<10% of controls) in extracts of B-cell lymphoblasts or erythrocytes from X-linked ichthyosis patients harbouring a combined deletion of the STS gene (the X-linked ichthyosis gene) and the HDHD1 gene. Furthermore, pseudouridine-5'-phosphatase activity was 1.5-fold higher in erythrocytes from women compared with men, in agreement with the HDHD1 gene undergoing only partial inactivation in females. In conclusion, HDHD1 is a phosphatase specifically involved in dephosphorylation of a modified nucleotide present in RNA.

  4. X-linked intellectual disability type Nascimento is a clinically distinct, probably underdiagnosed entity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    X-linked intellectual disability type Nascimento (MIM #300860), caused by mutations in UBE2A (MIM *312180), is characterized by craniofacial dysmorphism (synophrys, prominent supraorbital ridges, deep-set, almond-shaped eyes, depressed nasal bridge, prominent columella, hypoplastic alae nasi, and macrostomia), skin anomalies (hirsutism, myxedematous appearance, onychodystrophy), micropenis, moderate to severe intellectual disability (ID), motor delay, impaired/absent speech, and seizures. Hitherto only five familial point mutations and four different deletions including UBE2A have been reported in the literature. We present eight additional individuals from five families with UBE2A associated ID - three males from a consanguineous family, in whom we identified a small deletion of only 7.1 kb encompassing the first three exons of UBE2A, two related males with a UBE2A missense mutation in exon 4, a patient with a de novo nonsense mutation in exon 6, and two sporadic males with larger deletions including UBE2A. All affected male individuals share the typical clinical phenotype, all carrier females are unaffected and presented with a completely skewed X inactivation in blood. We conclude that 1.) X-linked intellectual disability type Nascimento is a clinically very distinct entity that might be underdiagnosed to date. 2.) So far, all females carrying a familial UBE2A aberration have a completely skewed X inactivation and are clinically unaffected. This should be taken in to account when counselling those families. 3.) The coverage of an array should be checked carefully prior to analysis since not all arrays have a sufficient resolution at specific loci, or alternative quantitative methods should be applied not to miss small deletions. PMID:24053514

  5. The Role of Neuronal Complexes in Human X-Linked Brain Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Laumonnier, Frédéric ; Cuthbert, Peter C. ; Grant, Seth G. N. 

    2007-01-01

    Beyond finding individual genes that are involved in medical disorders, an important challenge is the integration of sets of disease genes with the complexities of basic biological processes. We examine this issue by focusing on neuronal multiprotein complexes and their components encoded on the human X chromosome. Multiprotein signaling complexes in the postsynaptic terminal of central nervous system synapses are essential for the induction of neuronal plasticity and cognitive processes in animals. The prototype complex is the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor complex/membrane-associated guanylate kinase–associated signaling complex (NRC/MASC) comprising 185 proteins and embedded within the postsynaptic density (PSD), which is a set of complexes totaling ∼1,100 proteins. It is striking that 86% (6 of 7) of X-linked NRC/MASC genes and 49% (19 of 39) of X-chromosomal PSD genes are already known to be involved in human psychiatric disorders. Moreover, of the 69 known proteins mutated in X-linked mental retardation, 19 (28%) encode postsynaptic proteins. The high incidence of involvement in cognitive disorders is also found in mouse mutants and indicates that the complexes are functioning as integrated entities or molecular machines and that disruption of different components impairs their overall role in cognitive processes. We also noticed that NRC/MASC genes appear to be more strongly associated with mental retardation and autism spectrum disorders. We propose that systematic studies of PSD and NRC/MASC genes in mice and humans will give a high yield of novel genes important for human disease and new mechanistic insights into higher cognitive functions. PMID:17236127

  6. Silencing of X-Linked MicroRNAs by Meiotic Sex Chromosome Inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Royo, Hélène; Seitz, Hervé; ElInati, Elias; Peters, Antoine H. F. M.; Stadler, Michael B.; Turner, James M. A.

    2015-01-01

    During the pachytene stage of meiosis in male mammals, the X and Y chromosomes are transcriptionally silenced by Meiotic Sex Chromosome Inactivation (MSCI). MSCI is conserved in therian mammals and is essential for normal male fertility. Transcriptomics approaches have demonstrated that in mice, most or all protein-coding genes on the X chromosome are subject to MSCI. However, it is unclear whether X-linked non-coding RNAs behave in a similar manner. The X chromosome is enriched in microRNA (miRNA) genes, with many exhibiting testis-biased expression. Importantly, high expression levels of X-linked miRNAs (X-miRNAs) have been reported in pachytene spermatocytes, indicating that these genes may escape MSCI, and perhaps play a role in the XY-silencing process. Here we use RNA FISH to examine X-miRNA expression in the male germ line. We find that, like protein-coding X-genes, X-miRNAs are expressed prior to prophase I and are thereafter silenced during pachynema. X-miRNA silencing does not occur in mouse models with defective MSCI. Furthermore, X-miRNAs are expressed at pachynema when present as autosomally integrated transgenes. Thus, we conclude that silencing of X-miRNAs during pachynema in wild type males is MSCI-dependent. Importantly, misexpression of X-miRNAs during pachynema causes spermatogenic defects. We propose that MSCI represents a chromosomal mechanism by which X-miRNAs, and other potential X-encoded repressors, can be silenced, thereby regulating genes with critical late spermatogenic functions. PMID:26509798

  7. Silencing of X-Linked MicroRNAs by Meiotic Sex Chromosome Inactivation.

    PubMed

    Royo, Hélène; Seitz, Hervé; ElInati, Elias; Peters, Antoine H F M; Stadler, Michael B; Turner, James M A

    2015-10-01

    During the pachytene stage of meiosis in male mammals, the X and Y chromosomes are transcriptionally silenced by Meiotic Sex Chromosome Inactivation (MSCI). MSCI is conserved in therian mammals and is essential for normal male fertility. Transcriptomics approaches have demonstrated that in mice, most or all protein-coding genes on the X chromosome are subject to MSCI. However, it is unclear whether X-linked non-coding RNAs behave in a similar manner. The X chromosome is enriched in microRNA (miRNA) genes, with many exhibiting testis-biased expression. Importantly, high expression levels of X-linked miRNAs (X-miRNAs) have been reported in pachytene spermatocytes, indicating that these genes may escape MSCI, and perhaps play a role in the XY-silencing process. Here we use RNA FISH to examine X-miRNA expression in the male germ line. We find that, like protein-coding X-genes, X-miRNAs are expressed prior to prophase I and are thereafter silenced during pachynema. X-miRNA silencing does not occur in mouse models with defective MSCI. Furthermore, X-miRNAs are expressed at pachynema when present as autosomally integrated transgenes. Thus, we conclude that silencing of X-miRNAs during pachynema in wild type males is MSCI-dependent. Importantly, misexpression of X-miRNAs during pachynema causes spermatogenic defects. We propose that MSCI represents a chromosomal mechanism by which X-miRNAs, and other potential X-encoded repressors, can be silenced, thereby regulating genes with critical late spermatogenic functions.

  8. X-linked mental retardation: Linkage results in five unrelated families

    SciTech Connect

    Moraine, C.L.; Dessay, B.; Toutain, A.

    1994-09-01

    X-linked mental retardations are a very common cause of mental deficiency in males. Combined clinical and linkage studies in great families can help to distinguish between particular pathologies in this very heterogenous group. In five unrelated families, we have assigned the corresponding genes to Xp22.2-p21.2 for family 1, Xp21.2-p11.21 for family 2, Xp11.4-p11.23 for family 3, Xq12 for family 4, and Xq28.5-pter for family 5, respectively. Clinical features were characterized by severe hypotonia with seizures and distinctive facies (family 1), hypotonia and hypoactivity with severe mental deficiency but absence of neurological signs (family 2), neonatal hypotonia with poor sucking and moderate intrauterine growth retardation (family 3), severe neonatal hypotonia with visual impairment and profound mental deficiency and seizures (family 4), and non-specific moderate mental deficiency (family 5). These results confirm the frequent gene localizations in Xq28 and in the pericentromeric region. But more precise clinical description of so-called non-specific X-linked mental retardations is necessary (especially for the natural history of mental deficiency) with the intention to associate several families in a unique linkage study. However, the recent description of different clinical patterns in three families with mutation in the L1CAM gene suggests that allelism may be more frequent than expected, that the real number of X-L.M.R. genes could be less important than previously reported, and that testing of candidate genes by mRNA or genomic DNA studies appears as a necessary step.

  9. CASK mutations are frequent in males and cause X-linked nystagmus and variable XLMR phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Hackett, Anna; Tarpey, Patrick S; Licata, Andrea; Cox, James; Whibley, Annabel; Boyle, Jackie; Rogers, Carolyn; Grigg, John; Partington, Michael; Stevenson, Roger E; Tolmie, John; Yates, John Rw; Turner, Gillian; Wilson, Meredith; Futreal, Andrew P; Corbett, Mark; Shaw, Marie; Gecz, Jozef; Raymond, F Lucy; Stratton, Michael R; Schwartz, Charles E; Abidi, Fatima E

    2010-05-01

    Mutations of the calcium/calmodulin-dependent serine protein kinase (CASK) gene have recently been associated with X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) with microcephaly, optic atrophy and brainstem and cerebellar hypoplasia, as well as with an X-linked syndrome having some FG-like features. Our group has recently identified four male probands from 358 probable XLMR families with missense mutations (p.Y268H, p.P396S, p.D710G and p.W919R) in the CASK gene. Congenital nystagmus, a rare and striking feature, was present in two of these families. We screened a further 45 probands with either nystagmus or microcephaly and mental retardation (MR), and identified two further mutations, a missense mutation (p.Y728C) and a splice mutation (c.2521-2A>T) in two small families with nystagmus and MR. Detailed clinical examinations of all six families, including an ophthalmological review in four families, were undertaken to further characterise the phenotype. We report on the clinical features of 24 individuals, mostly male, from six families with CASK mutations. The phenotype was variable, ranging from non-syndromic mild MR to severe MR associated with microcephaly and dysmorphic facial features. Carrier females were variably affected. Congenital nystagmus was found in members of four of the families. Our findings reinforce the CASK gene as a relatively frequent cause of XLMR in females and males. We further define the phenotypic spectrum and demonstrate that affected males with missense mutations or in-frame deletions in CASK are frequently associated with congenital nystagmus and XLMR, a striking feature not previously reported.

  10. Genetic analysis and clinical phenotype of two Indian families with X-linked choroideremia

    PubMed Central

    Battu, Rajani; Jeyabalan, Nallathambi; Murthy, Praveen; Reddy, Kavita S; Schouten, Jan SAG; Webers, Caroll A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to describe the phenotype and genotype of two Indian families affected with X-linked choroideremia (CHM). Materials and Methods: In these two families, the affected individuals and unaffected family members underwent a comprehensive ophthalmic examination including an optical coherence tomography (OCT) and electroretinogram. Blood samples were collected from the families for genetic analysis. Next generation sequencing (NGS) was done using a panel of 184 genes, which covered previously associated genes with retinal dystrophies. Sequencing data were analyzed for the CHM, RPGR, and RP2 genes that have been implicated in CHM and X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP), respectively. The identified variants were confirmed by Sanger sequencing in available individuals and unrelated controls. Results: In two unrelated male patients, NGS analysis revealed a previously reported 3’-splice site change c.820-1G>C in the CHM gene in the first family and hemizygous mutation c.653G>C (p.Ser218X) in the second family. The asymptomatic family members were carriers for these mutations. Spectral domain-OCT showed loss of outer retina, preservation of the inner retina, and choroidal thinning in the affected males and retinal pigment epithelial changes in the asymptomatic carriers. The identified mutations were not present in 100 controls of Indian origin. There were no potential mutations found in XLRP-associated (RPGR and RP2) genes. Conclusion: This report describes the genotype and phenotype findings in patients with CHM from India. The identified genetic mutation leads to lack of Rab escort protein-1 (REP-1) or affects the production of a REP-1 protein that is likely to cause retinal abnormalities in patients. PMID:28112135

  11. Test–Retest Intervisit Variability of Functional and Structural Parameters in X-Linked Retinoschisis

    PubMed Central

    Jeffrey, Brett G.; Cukras, Catherine A.; Vitale, Susan; Turriff, Amy; Bowles, Kristin; Sieving, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To examine the variability of four outcome measures that could be used to address safety and efficacy in therapeutic trials with X-linked juvenile retinoschisis. Methods Seven men with confirmed mutations in the RS1 gene were evaluated over four visits spanning 6 months. Assessments included visual acuity, full-field electroretinograms (ERG), microperimetric macular sensitivity, and retinal thickness measured by optical coherence tomography (OCT). Eyes were separated into Better or Worse Eye groups based on acuity at baseline. Repeatability coefficients were calculated for each parameter and jackknife resampling used to derive 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results The threshold for statistically significant change in visual acuity ranged from three to eight letters. For ERG a-wave, an amplitude reduction greater than 56% would be considered significant. For other parameters, variabilities were lower in the Worse Eye group, likely a result of floor effects due to collapse of the schisis pockets and/or retinal atrophy. The criteria for significant change (Better/Worse Eye) for three important parameters were: ERG b/a-wave ratio (0.44/0.23), point wise sensitivity (10.4/7.0 dB), and central retinal thickness (31%/18%). Conclusions The 95% CI range for visual acuity, ERG, retinal sensitivity, and central retinal thickness relative to baseline are described for this cohort of participants with X-linked juvenile retinoschisis (XLRS). Translational Relevance A quantitative understanding of the variability of outcome measures is vital to establishing the safety and efficacy limits for therapeutic trials of XLRS patients. PMID:25346871

  12. Is X-linked methyl-CpG binding protein 2 a new target for the treatment of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Teng; Zhang, Jie; Yuan, Xianhou; Yang, Jing; Ding, Wei; Huang, Xin; Wu, Yong

    2013-01-01

    X-linked methyl-CpG binding protein 2 mutations can induce symptoms similar to those of Parkinson's disease and dopamine metabolism disorders, but the specific role of X-linked methyl-CpG binding protein 2 in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease remains unknown. In the present study, we used 6-hydroxydopamine-induced human neuroblastoma cell (SH-SY5Y cells) injury as a cell model of Parkinson's disease. The 6-hydroxydopamine (50 μmol/L) treatment decreased protein levels for both X-linked methyl-CpG binding protein 2 and tyrosine hydroxylase in these cells, and led to cell death. However, overexpression of X-linked methyl-CpG binding protein 2 was able to ameliorate the effects of 6-hydroxydopamine, it reduced 6-hydroxydopamine-induced apoptosis, and increased the levels of tyrosine hydroxylase in SH-SY5Y cells. These findings suggesting that X-linked methyl-CpG binding protein 2 may be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. PMID:25206503

  13. X-linked gene transcription patterns in female and male in vivo, in vitro and cloned porcine individual blastocysts.

    PubMed

    Park, Chi-Hun; Jeong, Young Hee; Jeong, Yeun-Ik; Lee, Se-Yeong; Jeong, Yeon-Woo; Shin, Taeyoung; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Jeung, Eui-Bae; Hyun, Sang-Hwan; Lee, Chang-Kyu; Lee, Eunsong; Hwang, Woo Suk

    2012-01-01

    To determine the presence of sexual dimorphic transcription and how in vitro culture environments influence X-linked gene transcription patterns in preimplantation embryos, we analyzed mRNA expression levels in in vivo-derived, in vitro-fertilized (IVF), and cloned porcine blastocysts. Our results clearly show that sex-biased expression occurred between female and male in vivo blastocysts in X-linked genes. The expression levels of XIST, G6PD, HPRT1, PGK1, and BEX1 were significantly higher in female than in male blastocysts, but ZXDA displayed higher levels in male than in female blastocysts. Although we found aberrant expression patterns for several genes in IVF and cloned blastocysts, similar sex-biased expression patterns (on average) were observed between the sexes. The transcript levels of BEX1 and XIST were upregulated and PGK1 was downregulated in both IVF and cloned blastocysts compared with in vivo counterparts. Moreover, a remarkable degree of expression heterogeneity was observed among individual cloned embryos (the level of heterogeneity was similar in both sexes) but only a small proportion of female IVF embryos exhibited variability, indicating that this phenomenon may be primarily caused by faulty reprogramming by the somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) process rather than in vitro conditions. Aberrant expression patterns in cloned embryos of both sexes were not ameliorated by treatment with Scriptaid as a potent HDACi, although the blastocyst rate increased remarkably after this treatment. Taken together, these results indicate that female and male porcine blastocysts produced in vivo and in vitro transcriptional sexual dimorphisms in the selected X-linked genes and compensation of X-linked gene dosage may not occur at the blastocyst stage. Moreover, altered X-linked gene expression frequently occurred in porcine IVF and cloned embryos, indicating that X-linked gene regulation is susceptible to in vitro culture and the SCNT process, which may

  14. Arrested rearrangement of TCR V[beta] genes in thymocytes from children with x-linked severe combined immunodeficiency disease

    SciTech Connect

    Sleasman, J.W.; Harville, T.O.; White, G.B.; Barrett, D.J. ); George, J.F. ); Goodenow, M.M. Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham, AL )

    1994-07-01

    Human X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID) is an immunodeficiency disorder in which T cell development is arrested in the thymic cortex. B lymphocytes in children with X-linked SCID seem to differentiate normally. X-linked SCID is associated with a mutation in the gene that encodes the IL-2R [gamma]-chain. Because TCR-[beta] gene recombination is a pivotal initial event in T lymphocyte onteogeny within the thymus, the authors hypothesized that a failure to express normal IL-2R[gamma] could lead to impaired TCR-[beta] gene recombination in early thymic development. PCR was used to determine the status of TCR-[beta] gene-segment rearrangements in thymic DNA that had been obtained from children with X-linked SCID. The initial step in TCR-[beta] gene rearrangement, that of D[beta] to J[beta] recombination, was readily detected in all thymus samples from children with X-linked SCID; in contrast, V[beta] to DJ[beta] gene rearrangements were undetectable in the same samples. Both D[beta] to J[beta] and V[beta] to DJ[beta] TCR genes were rearranged in the thymic tissues obtained from immunologically normal children. The authors conclude that TCR[beta]-chain gene rearrangement is arrested in children with X-linked SCID. The results suggest a causative relationship between the failure of TCR [beta]-chain gene arrangements to proceed beyond DJ[beta] rearrangements and the production of a nonfunctional IL-2R [gamma]-chain. 45 refs., 3 figs.

  15. X-linked immunodeficient mice exhibit enhanced susceptibility to Cryptococcus neoformans Infection.

    PubMed

    Szymczak, Wendy A; Davis, Michael J; Lundy, Steven K; Dufaud, Chad; Olszewski, Michal; Pirofski, Liise-anne

    2013-07-02

    ABSTRACT Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) is a signaling molecule that plays important roles in B-1 B cell development and innate myeloid cell functions and has recently been identified as a target for therapy of B cell lymphomas. We examined the contribution of B-1 B cells to resistance to Cryptococcus neoformans infection by utilizing X-linked immunodeficient (XID) mice (CBA-CaHN-XID), which possess a mutation in Btk. XID mice had significantly higher brain fungal burdens than the controls 6 weeks after infection with C. neoformans strain 52D (CN52D); however, consistent with the propensity for greater virulence of C. neoformans strain H99 (CNH99), CNH99-infected XID mice had higher lung and brain fungal burdens than the controls 3 weeks after infection. Further studies in a chronic CN52D model revealed markedly lower levels of total and C. neoformans-specific serum IgM in XID mice than in the control mice 1 and 6 weeks after infection. Alveolar macrophage phagocytosis was markedly impaired in CN52D-infected XID mice compared to the controls, with XID mice exhibiting a disorganized lung inflammatory pattern in which Gomori silver staining revealed significantly more enlarged, extracellular C. neoformans cells than the controls. Adoptive transfer of B-1 B cells to XID mice restored peritoneal B-1 B cells but did not restore IgM levels to those of the controls and had no effect on the brain fungal burden at 6 weeks. Taken together, our data support the hypothesis that IgM promotes fungal containment in the lungs by enhancing C. neoformans phagocytosis and restricting C. neoformans enlargement. However, peritoneal B-1 B cells are insufficient to reconstitute a protective effect in the lungs. IMPORTANCE Cryptococcus neoformans is a fungal pathogen that causes an estimated 600,000 deaths per year. Most infections occur in individuals who are immunocompromised, with the majority of cases occurring in those with HIV/AIDS, but healthy individuals also develop disease

  16. An X-linked homologue of the autosomal inprinted gene ZNF127 escapes X inactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Longstreet, M.; Nicholls, R.D.; Willard, H.F.

    1994-09-01

    The ZNF127 gene has been shown to be subject to parental imprinting in both humans and the mouse and maps to within the Prader-Willi/Angelman Syndrome critical region on chromosome 15. We have cloned two X-linked related loci, one of which, ZNFXp is a transcribed gene while the other, ZNFXq, is an untranscribed pseudogene. ZNFXp is 83.6% identical to ZNFXq and 65.4% identical to ZNF127 over 1.4 kb of open reading frame they share in common, Like ZNF127, the predicted protein sequence of ZNFXp contains a C{sub 3}HC{sub 4} zinc finger domain and C{sub 3}H zinc finger-like motifs. Whereas ZNF127 has three C{sub 3}H motifs, ZNFXp has four. A strong CpG island is located within 1 kb 5{prime} of the predicted amino terminus of ZNFXp. Expression of ZNFXp has been detected from mouse/human somatic cell hybrids containing either an active (n=2) or an inactive (n=4) chromosome, and thus escapes X inactivation. Probes made from the 3{prime} UTR of ZNFXp detect a number of related loci in both human and murine DNA, none of which is the ZNF127 locus on chromosome 15. None of the detectable murine bands shows dosage differences between males and females as would be expected for X-linked loci. This raises the possibility that ZNFXp inserted into the human X chromosome after its divergence from a common ancestor with the murine X. We have mapped ZNFXp to Xp11.4 by Southern blotting and PCR of hybrid DNAs and by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). ZNFXq maps within the X Inactivation Center (XIC) region on Xq13.2, approximately 300 kb distal to the XIST gene. We find it intriguing, and perhaps significant, that two members of this gene family are subject to epigenetic regulation -- one autosomal imprinting, and the other escape from X inactivation. These results could imply an evolutionary and mechanistic relationship between these two processes.

  17. 137 Hypogammaglobulinemia in a Boy: Consider Also X-linked Lymphoproliferative Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gamez, Luisa; Yamazaki, Marco Antonio; Espinosa, Sara; Lugo-Reyes, Saul; Hernandez, Victor

    2012-01-01

    Background X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) is a primary immunodeficiency presenting with a variety of clinical manifestations, the most common being dysgammaglobulinemia and B-cell lymphoma. The first gene causing XLP, when defective, was termed SH2D1A or SAP for signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM)-associated protein. The absence of SH2D1A leads to an overwhelming and uncontrolled TH1- shifted cytotoxic immune response, which might, at least in part, explain the severe clinical picture. A second gene, XIAP (X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis), was later identified. Methods An 8 year old Mexican boy was admitted in June 2008 for bronchopneumonia, with no previous history of recurrent or severe infections. He had a family history of a brother deceased at 7 years from fulminate hepatitis, who was diagnosed with agammaglobulinemia. A laboratory evaluation for primary immunodeficiency was made, including serum immunoglobulins: IgG 30 mg/dL, IgA <5 mg/dL IgM 8.6 mg/dL; and flow citometry for lymphocyte subpopulations: CD3+ 2590 mm3 (56%) CD4+ 1004 mm3 (42%), CD8+ 1267 mm3(53%) CD16/56 171mm3 (41%) CD19+ 1493 mm3 (35%). The patient was started on monthly intravenous gammaglobulin (IVIG) therapy. He was admitted in December 2008 with fever and severe abdominal pain; an exploratory laparotomy revealed a rectal-sigmoid tumor. The biopsy reported an atypical Burkitt lymphoma (Immunophenotype “B”: Bcl 2+, CD10+) with surgical margins negative for malignancy. Bone marrow aspirate and biopsy were negative for malignancy. In February 2009, management with chemotherapy was started with the diagnosis of Burkitt's lymphoma stage III. Patient received 6 courses of chemotherapy with complete response to induction; for consolidation, 4 doses of rituximab were given. PCR amplification and direct automated sequencing by the Sanger method was performed in both genes known to be responsible for XLP in chromosome X. Results A hemizygous splice-site deletion in SAP

  18. Overexpression of X-linked genes in T cells from women with lupus.

    PubMed

    Hewagama, Anura; Gorelik, Gabriela; Patel, Dipak; Liyanarachchi, Punsisi; McCune, W Joseph; Somers, Emily; Gonzalez-Rivera, Tania; Strickland, Faith; Richardson, Bruce

    2013-03-01

    Women develop lupus more frequently than men and the reason remains incompletely understood. Evidence that men with Klinefelter's Syndrome (XXY) develop lupus at approximately the same rate as women suggests that a second X chromosome contributes. However, since the second X is normally inactivated, how it predisposes to lupus is unclear. DNA methylation contributes to the silencing of one X chromosome in women, and CD4+ T cell DNA demethylation contributes to the development of lupus-like autoimmunity. This suggests that demethylation of genes on the inactive X may predispose women to lupus, and this hypothesis is supported by a report that CD40LG, an immune gene encoded on the X chromosome, demethylates and is overexpressed in T cells from women but not men with lupus. Overexpression of other immune genes on the inactive X may also predispose women to this disease. We therefore compared mRNA and miRNA expression profiles in experimentally demethylated T cells from women and men as well as in T cells from women and men with lupus. T cells from healthy men and women were treated with the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-azacytidine, then X-linked mRNAs were surveyed with oligonucleotide arrays, and X-linked miRNA's surveyed with PCR arrays. CD40LG, CXCR3, OGT, miR-98, let-7f-2*, miR 188-3p, miR-421 and miR-503 were among the genes overexpressed in women relative to men. MiRNA target prediction analyses identified CBL, which downregulates T cell receptor signaling and is decreased in lupus T cells, as a gene targeted by miR-188-3p and miR-98. Transfection with miR-98 and miR-188-3p suppressed CBL expression. The same mRNA and miRNA transcripts were also demethylated and overexpressed in CD4+ T cells from women relative to men with active lupus. Together these results further support a role for X chromosome demethylation in the female predisposition to lupus.

  19. Overexpression of X-Linked Genes in T Cells From Women With Lupus

    PubMed Central

    Hewagama, Anura; Gorelik, Gabriela; Patel, Dipak; Liyanarachchi, Punsisi; McCune, W. Joseph; Somers, Emily; Gonzalez-Rivera, Tania; Strickland, Faith; Richardson, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Women develop lupus more frequently than men and the reason remains incompletely understood. Evidence that men with Klinefelter’s Syndrome (XXY) develop lupus at approximately the same rate as women suggests that a second X chromosome contributes. However, since the second X is normally inactivated, how it predisposes to lupus is unclear. DNA methylation contributes to the silencing of one X chromosome in women, and CD4+ T cell DNA demethylation contributes to the development of lupus-like autoimmunity. This suggests that demethylation of genes on the inactive X may predispose women to lupus, and this hypothesis is supported by a report that CD40LG, an immune gene encoded on the X chromosome, demethylates and is overexpressed in T cells from women but not men with lupus. Overexpression of other immune genes on the inactive X may also predispose women to this disease. We therefore compared mRNA and miRNA expression profiles in experimentally demethylated T cells from women and men as well as in T cells from women and men with lupus. T cells from healthy men and women were treated with the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-azacytidine, then X-linked mRNAs were surveyed with oligonucleotide arrays, and X-linked miRNA’s surveyed with PCR arrays. CD40LG, CXCR3, OGT, miR-98, let-7f-2*, miR 188-3p, miR-421 and miR-503 were among the genes overexpressed in women relative to men. MiRNA target prediction analyses identified CBL, which downregulates T cell receptor signaling and is decreased in lupus T cells, as a gene targeted by miR-188-3p and miR-98. Transfection with miR-98 and miR-188-3p suppressed CBL expression. The same mRNA and miRNA transcripts were also demethylated and overexpressed in CD4+ T cells from women relative to men with active lupus. Together these results further support a role for X chromosome demethylation in the female predisposition to lupus. PMID:23434382

  20. X-linked MCT8 gene mutations: characterization of the pediatric neurologic phenotype.

    PubMed

    Holden, Kenton R; Zuñiga, Oscar F; May, Melanie M; Su, Humberto; Molinero, Marco R; Rogers, R Curtis; Schwartz, Charles E

    2005-10-01

    We report a family with X-linked mental retardation that has a novel mutation in the monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8) gene associated with a characteristic neurodevelopmental phenotype with early childhood hypotonia that progresses to spasticity and global developmental delays. Affected patients experience moderate to severe psychomotor delays and congenital hypotonia, develop a myopathic facies, have diminished muscle bulk and generalized muscle weakness, develop progressive spasticity and movement disorders, and have limited speech but alert, affable personalities. Acquired microcephaly and abnormal myelination on brain magnetic resonance imaging can be present. Normal monocarboxylate transporter 8 gene functioning appears to be necessary for normal thyroid-associated metabolism in neurons. Abnormal thyroid function tests appear to be a consistent finding in the absence of typical signs of thyroid dysfunction. Although the phenotype appears to be consistent, and although the neurotoxic effects of abnormal central and peripheral neuromuscular system thyroid metabolism might be partly or wholly responsible for the neurologic phenotype reported, the exact mechanism remains unclear.

  1. Regulation of X-linked gene expression during early mouse development by Rlim

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng; Shin, JongDae; Shea, Jeremy M; Yu, Jun; Bošković, Ana; Byron, Meg; Zhu, Xiaochun; Shalek, Alex K; Regev, Aviv; Lawrence, Jeanne B; Torres, Eduardo M; Zhu, Lihua J; Rando, Oliver J; Bach, Ingolf

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian X-linked gene expression is highly regulated as female cells contain two and male one X chromosome (X). To adjust the X gene dosage between genders, female mouse preimplantation embryos undergo an imprinted form of X chromosome inactivation (iXCI) that requires both Rlim (also known as Rnf12) and the long non-coding RNA Xist. Moreover, it is thought that gene expression from the single active X is upregulated to correct for bi-allelic autosomal (A) gene expression. We have combined mouse genetics with RNA-seq on single mouse embryos to investigate functions of Rlim on the temporal regulation of iXCI and Xist. Our results reveal crucial roles of Rlim for the maintenance of high Xist RNA levels, Xist clouds and X-silencing in female embryos at blastocyst stages, while initial Xist expression appears Rlim-independent. We find further that X/A upregulation is initiated in early male and female preimplantation embryos. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19127.001 PMID:27642011

  2. Role of ALDP (ABCD1) and mitochondria in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    McGuinness, M C; Lu, J-F; Zhang, H-P; Dong, G-X; Heinzer, A K; Watkins, P A; Powers, J; Smith, K D

    2003-01-01

    Peroxisomal disorders have been associated with malfunction of peroxisomal metabolic pathways, but the pathogenesis of these disorders is largely unknown. X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is associated with elevated levels of very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA; C(>22:0)) that have been attributed to reduced peroxisomal VLCFA beta-oxidation activity. Previously, our laboratory and others have reported elevated VLCFA levels and reduced peroxisomal VLCFA beta-oxidation in human and mouse X-ALD fibroblasts. In this study, we found normal levels of peroxisomal VLCFA beta-oxidation in tissues from ALD mice with elevated VLCFA levels. Treatment of ALD mice with pharmacological agents resulted in decreased VLCFA levels without a change in VLCFA beta-oxidation activity. These data indicate that ALDP does not determine the rate of VLCFA beta-oxidation and that VLCFA levels are not determined by the rate of VLCFA beta-oxidation. The rate of peroxisomal VLCFA beta-oxidation in human and mouse fibroblasts in vitro is affected by the rate of mitochondrial long-chain fatty acid beta-oxidation. We hypothesize that ALDP facilitates the interaction between peroxisomes and mitochondria, resulting, when ALDP is deficient in X-ALD, in increased VLCFA accumulation despite normal peroxisomal VLCFA beta-oxidation in ALD mouse tissues. In support of this hypothesis, mitochondrial structural abnormalities were observed in adrenal cortical cells of ALD mice.

  3. Mouse very long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Heinzer, Ann K; Kemp, Stephan; Lu, Jyh-Feng; Watkins, Paul A; Smith, Kirby D

    2002-08-09

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by accumulation of very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA). This accumulation has been attributed to decreased VLCFA beta-oxidation and peroxisomal very long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase (VLCS) activity. The X-ALD gene, ABCD1, encodes a peroxisomal membrane ATP binding cassette transporter, ALDP, that is hypothesized to affect VLCS activity in peroxisomes by direct interaction with the VLCS enzyme. Recently, a VLCS gene that encodes a protein with significant sequence identity to known rat and human peroxisomal VLCS protein has been identified in mice. We find that the mouse VLCS gene (Vlcs) encodes an enzyme (Vlcs) with VLCS activity that localizes to peroxisomes and is expressed in X-ALD target tissues. We show that the expression of Vlcs in the peroxisomes of X-ALD mouse fibroblasts improves VLCFA beta-oxidation in these cells, implying a role for this enzyme in the biochemical abnormality of X-ALD. X-ALD mice, which accumulate VLCFA in tissues, show no change in the expression of Vlcs, the subcellular localization of Vlcs, or general peroxisomal VLCS activity. These observations imply that ALDP is not necessary for the proper expression or localization of Vlcs protein, and the control of VLCFA levels does not depend on the direct interaction of Vlcs and ALDP.

  4. Role of ALDP (ABCD1) and Mitochondria in X-Linked Adrenoleukodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    McGuinness, M. C.; Lu, J.-F.; Zhang, H.-P.; Dong, G.-X.; Heinzer, A. K.; Watkins, P. A.; Powers, J.; Smith, K. D.

    2003-01-01

    Peroxisomal disorders have been associated with malfunction of peroxisomal metabolic pathways, but the pathogenesis of these disorders is largely unknown. X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is associated with elevated levels of very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA; C>22:0) that have been attributed to reduced peroxisomal VLCFA β-oxidation activity. Previously, our laboratory and others have reported elevated VLCFA levels and reduced peroxisomal VLCFA β-oxidation in human and mouse X-ALD fibroblasts. In this study, we found normal levels of peroxisomal VLCFA β-oxidation in tissues from ALD mice with elevated VLCFA levels. Treatment of ALD mice with pharmacological agents resulted in decreased VLCFA levels without a change in VLCFA β-oxidation activity. These data indicate that ALDP does not determine the rate of VLCFA β-oxidation and that VLCFA levels are not determined by the rate of VLCFA β-oxidation. The rate of peroxisomal VLCFA β-oxidation in human and mouse fibroblasts in vitro is affected by the rate of mitochondrial long-chain fatty acid β-oxidation. We hypothesize that ALDP facilitates the interaction between peroxisomes and mitochondria, resulting, when ALDP is deficient in X-ALD, in increased VLCFA accumulation despite normal peroxisomal VLCFA β-oxidation in ALD mouse tissues. In support of this hypothesis, mitochondrial structural abnormalities were observed in adrenal cortical cells of ALD mice. PMID:12509471

  5. X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy: phenotype distribution and expression of ALDP in Spanish kindreds.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, M; Coll, M J; Pàmpols, T; Girós, M

    1998-04-13

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by an impairment in peroxisomal beta-oxidation of very long straight-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs). Six clinical phenotypes have been delineated: childhood cerebral (CCALD), adolescent cerebral (AdolCALD), adult cerebral (ACALD), adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN), Addison-only (AO), and presymptomatic (PALD). The distribution of phenotypes varies in different countries. We have diagnosed biochemically 60 X-ALD Spanish patients belonging to 48 kindreds. Their phenotypic distribution was: CCALD plus AdolCALD, 33%; ACALD, 16%; AMN, 27%; AO, 12%; and PALD, 12%. These results contrast with the distribution described in other countries, due to a higher prevalence of the ACALD form. Regarding the expression of the protein product (ALDP), we studied 17 kindreds using immunochemical techniques and found absence of ALDP in 84% of cases. We also studied 13 females from 7 negative ALDP kindreds in order to correlate ALDP expression and the carrier status established by VLCFA measurement. In one case with normal VLCFA levels in serum and fibroblasts, we observed mosaicism in ALDP expression. This fact supports the use of this technique for identifying carriers.

  6. Skeletal Muscle Pathology in X-Linked Myotubular Myopathy: Review With Cross-Species Comparisons

    PubMed Central

    Lawlor, Michael W.; Beggs, Alan H.; Buj-Bello, Ana; Childers, Martin K.; Dowling, James J.; James, Emma S.; Meng, Hui; Moore, Steven A.; Prasad, Suyash; Schoser, Benedikt; Sewry, Caroline A.

    2016-01-01

    X-linked myotubular myopathy (XLMTM) is a devastating, rare, congenital myopathy caused by mutations in the MTM1 gene, resulting in a lack of or dysfunction of the enzyme myotubularin. This leads to severe perinatal weakness and distinctive muscle pathology. It was originally thought that XLMTM was related to developmental arrest in myotube maturation; however, the generation and characterization of several animal models have significantly improved our understanding of clinical and pathological aspects of this disorder. Myotubularin is now known to participate in numerous cellular processes including endosomal trafficking, excitation-contraction coupling, cytoskeletal organization, neuromuscular junction structure, autophagy, and satellite cell proliferation and survival. The available vertebrate models of XLMTM, which vary in severity from complete absence to reduced functional levels of myotubularin, recapitulate features of the human disease to a variable extent. Understanding how pathological endpoints in animals with XLMTM translate to human patients will be essential to interpret preclinical treatment trials and translate therapies into human clinical studies. This review summarizes the published animal models of XLMTM, including those of zebrafish, mice, and dogs, with a focus on their pathological features as compared to those seen in human XLMTM patients. PMID:26823526

  7. Cellular imaging demonstrates genetic mosaicism in heterozygous carriers of an X-linked ciliopathy gene

    PubMed Central

    Pyo Park, Sung; Hwan Hong, In; Tsang, Stephen H; Chang, Stanley

    2013-01-01

    X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP) is the least common genetic type of retinitis pigmentosa; however, it has extremely devastating consequences to patients' activities of daily living. RPGR and RP2 genes expressed in the photoreceptor sensory cilia are predominantly implicated in XLRP; however, the interpretation of genetic mutations and their correlation with clinical phenotypes remain unknown, and the role of these genes in photoreceptor cilia function is not completely elucidated. Therefore, we evaluated structural characteristics in five female obligate carriers of XLRP by using state-of-the-art non-invasive imaging methods, including adaptive optics (AO) scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO). In all five carriers examined, qualitative and quantitative analyses by AO SLO imaging revealed a mosaic pattern of cone disruption, even in the absence of visual symptoms, normal visual acuity and normal macular thickness, on optical coherence tomography and mildly subnormal full-field cone electroretinographic findings. As the technique is sensitive to the level of a single cone, the ability to visualize the cone cells in vivo should be especially useful in other retinal diseases. In addition, further investigation of XLRP carriers may yield insight into how cone structures change over time and ultimately enable understanding of the role of RPGR and RP2 in cone cell survival. PMID:23443027

  8. Oligophrenin-1 encodes a rhoGAP protein involved in X-linked mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Billuart, P; Bienvenu, T; Ronce, N; des Portes, V; Vinet, M C; Zemni, R; Roest Crollius, H; Carrié, A; Fauchereau, F; Cherry, M; Briault, S; Hamel, B; Fryns, J P; Beldjord, C; Kahn, A; Moraine, C; Chelly, J

    1998-04-30

    Primary or nonspecific X-linked mental retardation (MRX) is a heterogeneous condition in which affected patients do not have any distinctive clinical or biochemical features in common apart from cognitive impairment. Although it is present in approximately 0.15-0.3% of males, most of the genetic defects associated with MRX, which may involve more than ten different genes, remain unknown. Here we report the characterization of a new gene on the long arm of the X-chromosome (position Xq12) and the identification in unrelated individuals of different mutations that are predicted to cause a loss of function. This gene is highly expressed in fetal brain and encodes a protein of relative molecular mass 91K, named oligophrenin-1, which contains a domain typical of a Rho-GTPase-activating protein (rhoGAP). By enhancing their GTPase activity, GAP proteins inactivate small Rho and Ras proteins, so inactivation of rhoGAP proteins might cause constitutive activation of their GTPase targets. Such activation is known to affect cell migration and outgrowth of axons and dendrites in vivo. Our results demonstrate an association between cognitive impairment and a defect in a signalling pathway that depends on a Ras-like GTPase.

  9. Transcription Factor SOX3 Is Involved in X-Linked Mental Retardation with Growth Hormone Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Laumonnier, Frédéric; Ronce, Nathalie; Hamel, Ben C. J.; Thomas, Paul; Lespinasse, James; Raynaud, Martine; Paringaux, Christine; van Bokhoven, Hans; Kalscheuer, Vera; Fryns, Jean-Pierre; Chelly, Jamel; Moraine, Claude; Briault, Sylvain

    2002-01-01

    Physical mapping of the breakpoints of a pericentric inversion of the X chromosome (46,X,inv[X][p21q27]) in a female patient with mild mental retardation revealed localization of the Xp breakpoint in the IL1RAPL gene at Xp21.3 and the Xq breakpoint near the SOX3 gene (SRY [sex determining region Y]–box 3) (GenBank accession number NM_005634) at Xq26.3. Because carrier females with microdeletion in the IL1RAPL gene do not present any abnormal phenotype, we focused on the Xq breakpoint. However, we were unable to confirm the involvement of SOX3 in the mental retardation in this female patient. To validate SOX3 as an X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) gene, we performed mutation analyses in families with XLMR whose causative gene mapped to Xq26-q27. We show here that the SOX3 gene is involved in a large family in which affected individuals have mental retardation and growth hormone deficiency. The mutation results in an in-frame duplication of 33 bp encoding for 11 alanines in a polyalanine tract of the SOX3 gene. The expression pattern during neural and pituitary development suggests that dysfunction of the SOX3 protein caused by the polyalanine expansion might disturb transcription pathways and the regulation of genes involved in cellular processes and functions required for cognitive and pituitary development. PMID:12428212

  10. Transcription factor SOX3 is involved in X-linked mental retardation with growth hormone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Laumonnier, Frédéric; Ronce, Nathalie; Hamel, Ben C J; Thomas, Paul; Lespinasse, James; Raynaud, Martine; Paringaux, Christine; Van Bokhoven, Hans; Kalscheuer, Vera; Fryns, Jean-Pierre; Chelly, Jamel; Moraine, Claude; Briault, Sylvain

    2002-12-01

    Physical mapping of the breakpoints of a pericentric inversion of the X chromosome (46,X,inv[X][p21q27]) in a female patient with mild mental retardation revealed localization of the Xp breakpoint in the IL1RAPL gene at Xp21.3 and the Xq breakpoint near the SOX3 gene (SRY [sex determining region Y]-box 3) (GenBank accession number NM_005634) at Xq26.3. Because carrier females with microdeletion in the IL1RAPL gene do not present any abnormal phenotype, we focused on the Xq breakpoint. However, we were unable to confirm the involvement of SOX3 in the mental retardation in this female patient. To validate SOX3 as an X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) gene, we performed mutation analyses in families with XLMR whose causative gene mapped to Xq26-q27. We show here that the SOX3 gene is involved in a large family in which affected individuals have mental retardation and growth hormone deficiency. The mutation results in an in-frame duplication of 33 bp encoding for 11 alanines in a polyalanine tract of the SOX3 gene. The expression pattern during neural and pituitary development suggests that dysfunction of the SOX3 protein caused by the polyalanine expansion might disturb transcription pathways and the regulation of genes involved in cellular processes and functions required for cognitive and pituitary development.

  11. Skewed X-inactivation in a family with DLG3-associated X-linked intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Gieldon, Laura; Mackenroth, Luisa; Betcheva-Krajcir, Elitza; Rump, Andreas; Beck-Wödl, Stefanie; Schallner, Jens; Di Donato, Nataliya; Schröck, Evelin; Tzschach, Andreas

    2017-09-01

    Mutations in DLG3 are a rare cause of non-syndromic X-linked intellectual disability (XLID) (MRX90, OMIM *300189). Only ten DLG3 mutations have been reported to date. The majority of female heterozygous mutation carriers was healthy and had random X-inactivation patterns. We report on an XLID family with a novel DLG3 mutation. The 12-year-old male index patient had moderate intellectual disability (ID) and dysmorphic features. The mutation was also present in four female relatives. A maternal aunt had moderate ID and significantly skewed X-inactivation favorably inactivating the normal DLG3 allele. The proband's healthy mother also had skewed X-inactivation but in the opposite direction (i.e., inactivation of the mutated allele). Two other female relatives had intermediate cognitive phenotypes and random X-inactivation. This family broadens the mutational and phenotypical spectrum of DLG3-associated XLID and demonstrates that heterozygous female mutation carriers can be as severely affected as males. Reports of additional families will be needed to elucidate the causes of unfavorable skewing in female XLID patients. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. X-linked deafness: De novo deletion of a cosmid using dosage studies

    SciTech Connect

    Bitner-Glindzicz, M.; Pembrey, M.E.; deKok, Y.

    1994-09-01

    We have used three polymorphic microsatellite repeats at Xq21, (DXS986, DXS995 and DXS1002) to test for linkage in families with X-linked deafness. Close linkage was demonstrated between all three markers and the disease locus in families with and without a bony abnormality on the CT scan. DXS995 gave a maximum two point lod score of l0.37 with no recombinations. This marker was used to type an additional small sibship. Analysis showed that the two brothers, one deaf and one hearing, both inherited the same maternal allele indicating either the first recombination seen to date or a de novo mutation in the proband. Using a cosmid from the critical region, a deletion was detected in the proband of this sibship. By using a phoshorimager, dosage of an EcoR1 fragment from this cosmid and a control probe was compared to normal subjects and obligate carriers from another family with a similar deletion. Results show that the mother of this isolated case does not carry the deletion, confirming that it is de novo. These markers may be useful for carrier ascertainment in families with a radiological change on CT scan or a pedigree which is linked to Xq21.

  13. GPR143 mutational analysis in two Italian families with X-linked ocular albinism.

    PubMed

    Micale, Lucia; Augello, Bartolomeo; Fusco, Carmela; Turturo, Maria Giuseppina; Granatiero, Matteo; Piemontese, Maria Rosaria; Zelante, Leopoldo; Cecconi, Antonella; Merla, Giuseppe

    2009-08-01

    X-linked ocular albinism type 1 (OA1) is caused by mutations in G protein-coupled receptor 143 (GPR143) gene, which encodes a membrane glycoprotein localized to melanosomes. GPR143 mainly affects pigment production in the eye, resulting in optic changes associated with albinism, including hypopigmentation of the retina, nystagmus, strabismus, foveal hypoplasia, abnormal crossing of the optic fibers, and reduced visual acuity. We report the mutational analysis of the GPR143 gene on two unrelated families with OA1 using direct sequencing and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. We identified the c.564_565delCT, a 2-bp deletion in family 1, and we mapped the breakpoints at nucleotide level of the novel intragenic deletion g.5360_6371del1012, encompassing exon 2, in family 2. Our results confirm that GPR143 is the major locus for OA1 and that exon 2 is a region of high susceptibility to deletions. Finally, we emphasize the quantitative polymerase chain reaction as a valid tool for diagnosis of deletions in the GPR143 gene.

  14. X-linked macrocytic dyserythropoietic anemia in females with an ALAS2 mutation

    PubMed Central

    Sankaran, Vijay G.; Ulirsch, Jacob C.; Tchaikovskii, Vassili; Ludwig, Leif S.; Wakabayashi, Aoi; Kadirvel, Senkottuvelan; Lindsley, R. Coleman; Bejar, Rafael; Shi, Jiahai; Lovitch, Scott B.; Bishop, David F.; Steensma, David P.

    2015-01-01

    Macrocytic anemia with abnormal erythropoiesis is a common feature of megaloblastic anemias, congenital dyserythropoietic anemias, and myelodysplastic syndromes. Here, we characterized a family with multiple female individuals who have macrocytic anemia. The proband was noted to have dyserythropoiesis and iron overload. After an extensive diagnostic evaluation that did not provide insight into the cause of the disease, whole-exome sequencing of multiple family members revealed the presence of a mutation in the X chromosomal gene ALAS2, which encodes 5′-aminolevulinate synthase 2, in the affected females. We determined that this mutation (Y365C) impairs binding of the essential cofactor pyridoxal 5′-phosphate to ALAS2, resulting in destabilization of the enzyme and consequent loss of function. X inactivation was not highly skewed in wbc from the affected individuals. In contrast, and consistent with the severity of the ALAS2 mutation, there was a complete skewing toward expression of the WT allele in mRNA from reticulocytes that could be recapitulated in primary erythroid cultures. Together, the results of the X inactivation and mRNA studies illustrate how this X-linked dominant mutation in ALAS2 can perturb normal erythropoiesis through cell-nonautonomous effects. Moreover, our findings highlight the value of whole-exome sequencing in diagnostically challenging cases for the identification of disease etiology and extension of the known phenotypic spectrum of disease. PMID:25705881

  15. Females with a disorder phenotypically identical to X-linked agammaglobulinemia

    SciTech Connect

    Conley, M.E. ); Sweinberg, S.K. )

    1992-03-01

    Clinical and laboratory findings in two girls with a disorder phenotypically indistinguishable from typical X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) are described. To examine the possibility that subtle defects in the X chromosome might explain the findings, detailed genetic studies were performed on one of these patients. Cytogenetic studies showed a normal 46XX karyotype. Southern blot analysis of her DNA showed that she had inherited a maternal and a paternal allele at sites flanking the locus for typical XLA at Xq22, making a microdeletion or uniparental disomy unlikely. To determine whether both of her X chromosomes could function as the active X, somatic-cell hybrids that selectively retained the active X were produced from her activated T cells. A normal random pattern of X inactivation was seen. Of 21 T-cell hybrids, 3 retained both X chromosomes, 7 had one X as the active X, and 11 had the other X as the active X. The authors have interpreted these studies as indicating that there is an autosomal recessive disorder that is phenotypically identical to XLA.

  16. Identification of new mutations in Israeli patients with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Neumann, S; Topper, A; Mandel, H; Shapira, I; Golan, O; Gazit, E; Loewenthal, R

    2001-01-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) is a peroxisomal disorder characterized by impaired peroxisomal betaoxidation of very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs). This is probably due to reduced activation of the VLCFAs and results in demyelination of the nervous system and adrenocortical insufficiency. The ALD gene is localized on Xq28, has 10 exons and encodes a protein of 745 amino acids with significant homology to the membrane peroxisomal protein PMP70. Characterizing the disease causing mutations is of importance in prenatal diagnosis because 12-20% of women who are obligatory carriers show false-negative results when tested for VLCFA in plasma. We have analyzed DNA from blood samples of 7 Jewish (5 Sephardi and 2 Ashkenazi) and 3 Arab Israeli families suffering from ALD. Five missense-type mutations were identified: R104H, Y174C, L229P, R401Q, and G512C. A single mutation, R464X, was nonsense, and two, Y171 frameshift and E471 frameshift, were frameshift. Interestingly, a single mutation was identified in three families of Moroccan Jewish descent, probably due to a founder effect.

  17. A mouse model of X-linked intellectual disability associated with impaired removal of histone methylation

    PubMed Central

    Iwase, Shigeki; Brookes, Emily; Agarwal, Saurabh; Badeaux, Aimee I; Ito, Hikaru; Vallianatos, Christina N; Tomassy, Giulio Srubek; Kasza, Tomas; Lin, Grace; Thompson, Andrew; Gu, Lei; Kwan, Kenneth Y.; Chen, Chinfei; Sartor, Maureen A.; Egan, Brian; Xu, Jun; Shi, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in a number of chromatin modifiers are associated with human neurological disorders. KDM5C, a histone H3 lysine 4 di- and tri-methyl (H3K4me2/3)-specific demethylase, is frequently mutated in X-linked intellectual disability (XLID) patients. Here, we report that disruption of the mouse Kdm5c gene recapitulates adaptive and cognitive abnormalities observed in XLID, including impaired social behavior and memory, and aggression. Kdm5c-knockout brains exhibit impaired dendritic arborization, spine abnormalities, and altered transcriptomes. In neurons, Kdm5c is recruited to promoters that harbor CpG islands decorated with high levels of H3K4me3, where it fine-tunes H3K4me3 levels. Kdm5c predominantly represses these genes, which include members of key pathways that regulate the development and function of neuronal circuitries. In summary, our mouse behavioral data strongly suggests that KDM5C mutations are causal to XLID. Furthermore, our findings suggest that loss of KDM5C function may impact gene expression in multiple regulatory pathways relevant to the clinical phenotypes. PMID:26804915

  18. Scarcity of mutations detected in families with X linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia: diagnostic implications.

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, B M; Thomas, N S; Munoz, F; Morgan, D; Clarke, A; Zonana, J

    1998-01-01

    Indirect molecular diagnosis of X linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (XLHED), a congenital disorder of hair, teeth, and eccrine sweat glands, has been possible by linkage analysis. Direct mutation detection would enable carrier detection in female relatives of sporadic cases, as well as help distinguish XLHED from the rarer, clinically indistinguishable, autosomal recessive disorder ARHED. Recently, a candidate gene for XLHED has been identified. Genomic DNA from 162 affected males and 21 females, who were either obligate carriers or had manifestations of the disorder, were screened by SSCP analysis. A subset of the patients had been previously screened for large genomic deletions and had limited screening of a single exon by SSCP analysis. The two known exons were amplified using flanking primers. Approximately 7% of patients, all males, had putative mutations identified within exon 1, but no variants were found within exon 2. Ten different putative mutations and four probable polymorphisms were identified. Both of the known exons were sequenced in 10 patients who had no detectable SSCP changes, but no additional mutations were found. No correlation between phenotype and genotype was evident between either affected subjects or subjects with or without detectable mutations. The results of the study indicate that only a small minority of affected males can be diagnosed by direct mutation analysis, and that the remainder of the patients are likely to have mutations in as yet unidentified exons of the EDA gene. Linkage analysis, in informative situations, therefore remains the only practical diagnostic option available. PMID:9507389

  19. {open_quotes}Unspecific{close_quotes} X-linked mental retardation: Clinical, genetic and molecular studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ropers, H.H.; Maacel, S. van der; Knoers, N.

    1994-09-01

    Previous linkage studies have assigned a gene for non-syndromic X-linked mental retardation (XMR) to at least 8 different regions on the X-chromosome. The fragile X-syndrome (FRAXA) does not account for more than 40% of all cases; in most XMR families early diagnosis and prevention is not possible. As part of a systematic study into {open_quotes}unspecific{close_quotes} XMR involving more than 30 non-FRAXA families, linkage studies have enabled us to map the respective genes in 4 families to the Xp11.4-q12 interval with peak lod scores around the ALAS2 locus. In three other families, the gene defect could be assigned to the KAL-DMD, DXS424-FRAXAC2 and DSX52-Xqter intervals, respectively. In one of these families, small stature due to growth hormone deficiency was observed as a distinctive clinical feature. Molecular cloning of the breakpoint in a mentally retarded girl with a balanced t(Xq13;13q) translocation has enabled us to isolate an X-chromosomal gene which is disrupted in this patient and is highly expressed in brain. YAC cloning strategies are being employed to clone another XMR gene, which has been identified previously in the vicinity of the CHM locus and genes involved in mentally retarded patients with two different inversions, inv(X)(q21p11) and inv(X)(p21q24), respectively.

  20. Cerebral X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy: the international hematopoietic cell transplantation experience from 1982 to 1999.

    PubMed

    Peters, Charles; Charnas, Lawrence R; Tan, Ye; Ziegler, Richard S; Shapiro, Elsa G; DeFor, Todd; Grewal, Satkiran S; Orchard, Paul J; Abel, Susan L; Goldman, Anne I; Ramsay, Norma K C; Dusenbery, Kathryn E; Loes, Daniel J; Lockman, Lawrence A; Kato, Shunichi; Aubourg, Patrick R; Moser, Hugo W; Krivit, William

    2004-08-01

    Cerebral X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a disorder of very-long-chain fatty acid metabolism, adrenal insufficiency, and cerebral demyelination. Death occurs within 2 to 5 years of clinical onset without hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). One hundred twenty-six boys with X-ALD received HCT from 1982 to 1999. Survival, engraftment, and acute graft-versus-host disease were studied. Degree of disability associated with neurologic and neuropsychological function and cerebral demyelination were evaluated before and after HCT. Complete data were available and analyzed for 94 boys with cerebral X-ALD. The estimated 5- and 8-year survival was 56%. The leading cause of death was disease progression. Donor-derived engraftment occurred in 86% of patients. Demyelination involved parietal-occipital lobes in 90%, leading to visual and auditory processing deficits in many boys. Overall 5-year survival of 92% in patients with 0 or 1 neurologic deficits and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) severity score less than 9 before HCT was superior to survival for all others (45%; P <.01). Baseline neurologic and neuropsychological function, degree of disability, and neuroradiologic status predicted outcomes following HCT. In this first comprehensive report of the international HCT experience for X-ALD, we conclude that boys with early-stage disease benefit from HCT, whereas boys with advanced disease may be candidates for experimental therapies.

  1. Adenoassociated virus serotype 9-mediated gene therapy for x-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yi; Mu, Dakai; Prabhakar, Shilpa; Moser, Ann; Musolino, Patricia; Ren, JiaQian; Breakefield, Xandra O; Maguire, Casey A; Eichler, Florian S

    2015-05-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a devastating neurological disorder caused by mutations in the ABCD1 gene that encodes a peroxisomal ATP-binding cassette transporter (ABCD1) responsible for transport of CoA-activated very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA) into the peroxisome for degradation. We used recombinant adenoassociated virus serotype 9 (rAAV9) vector for delivery of the human ABCD1 gene (ABCD1) to mouse central nervous system (CNS). In vitro, efficient delivery of ABCD1 gene was achieved in primary mixed brain glial cells from Abcd1-/- mice as well as X-ALD patient fibroblasts. Importantly, human ABCD1 localized to the peroxisome, and AAV-ABCD1 transduction showed a dose-dependent effect in reducing VLCFA. In vivo, AAV9-ABCD1 was delivered to Abcd1-/- mouse CNS by either stereotactic intracerebroventricular (ICV) or intravenous (IV) injections. Astrocytes, microglia and neurons were the major target cell types following ICV injection, while IV injection also delivered to microvascular endothelial cells and oligodendrocytes. IV injection also yielded high transduction of the adrenal gland. Importantly, IV injection of AAV9-ABCD1 reduced VLCFA in mouse brain and spinal cord. We conclude that AAV9-mediated ABCD1 gene transfer is able to reach target cells in the nervous system and adrenal gland as well as reduce VLCFA in culture and a mouse model of X-ALD.

  2. Current and Future Pharmacological Treatment Strategies in X-Linked Adrenoleukodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Johannes; Pujol, Aurora; Aubourg, Patrick; Forss-Petter, Sonja

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in the ABCD1 gene cause the clinical spectrum of the neurometabolic disorder X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy/adrenomyeloneuropathy (X-ALD/AMN). Currently, the most efficient therapeutic opportunity for patients with the cerebral form of X-ALD is hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and possibly gene therapy of autologous hematopoietic stem cells. Both treatments, however, are only accessible to a subset of X-ALD patients, mainly because of the lack of markers that can predict the onset of cerebral demyelination. Moreover, for female or male X-ALD patients with AMN, currently only unsatisfying therapeutic opportunities are available. Thus, this review focuses on current and urgently needed future pharmacological therapies. The treatment of adrenal and gonadal insufficiency is well established, whereas applications of immunomodulatory and immunosuppressive drugs have failed to prevent progression of cerebral neuroinflammation. The use of Lorenzo's oil and the inefficacy of lovastatin to normalize very-long-chain fatty acids in clinical trials as well as currently experimental and therefore possible future therapeutic strategies are reviewed. The latter include pharmacological gene therapy mediated by targeted upregulation of ABCD2, the closest homolog of ABCD1, antioxidative drug treatment, small molecule histone deacetylase inhibitors such as butyrates and valproic acid, and other neuroprotective attempts. PMID:20626746

  3. Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage cooperatively fuel axonal degeneration in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Fourcade, Stéphane; López-Erauskin, Jone; Ruiz, Montserrat; Ferrer, Isidre; Pujol, Aurora

    2014-03-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is the most frequent inherited monogenic demyelinating disease (minimal incidence 1:17,000). It is often lethal and currently lacks a satisfactory therapy. The disease is caused by loss of function of the ABCD1 gene, a peroxisomal ATP-binding cassette transporter, resulting in the accumulation of VLCFA (very long-chain fatty acids) in organs and plasma. Understanding of the aetiopathogenesis is a prerequisite for the development of novel therapeutic strategies. Functional genomics analysis of an ABCD1 null mouse, a mouse model for adrenomyeloneuropathy, has revealed presymptomatic alterations in several metabolic pathways converging on redox and bioenergetic homeostasis, with failure of mitochondrial OXPHOS disruption and mitochondrial depletion. These defects could be major contributors to the neurodegenerative cascade, as has been reported in several neurodegenerative disorders. Drugs targeting the redox imbalance/mitochondria dysfunction interplay have shown efficacy at halting axonal degeneration and associated disability in the mouse, and thus offer therapeutic hope. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. The genetic landscape of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy: inheritance, mutations, modifier genes, and diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Wiesinger, Christoph; Eichler, Florian S; Berger, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is caused by mutations in the ABCD1 gene encoding a peroxisomal ABC transporter. In this review, we compare estimates of incidence derived from different populations in order to provide an overview of the worldwide incidence of X-ALD. X-ALD presents with heterogeneous phenotypes ranging from adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN) to inflammatory demyelinating cerebral ALD (CALD). A large number of different mutations has been described, providing a unique opportunity for analysis of functional domains within ABC transporters. Yet the molecular basis for the heterogeneity of clinical symptoms is still largely unresolved, as no correlation between genotype and phenotype exists in X-ALD. Beyond ABCD1, environmental triggers and other genetic factors have been suggested as modifiers of the disease course. Here, we summarize the findings of numerous reports that aimed at identifying modifier genes in X-ALD and discuss potential problems and future approaches to address this issue. Different options for prenatal diagnosis are summarized, and potential pitfalls when applying next-generation sequencing approaches are discussed. Recently, the measurement of very long-chain fatty acids in lysophosphatidylcholine for the identification of peroxisomal disorders was included in newborn screening programs. PMID:25999754

  5. A Thyroid Hormone-Based Strategy for Correcting the Biochemical Abnormality in X-Linked Adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Hartley, Meredith D; Kirkemo, Lisa L; Banerji, Tapasree; Scanlan, Thomas S

    2017-05-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a rare, genetic disorder characterized by adrenal insufficiency and central nervous system (CNS) demyelination. All patients with X-ALD have the biochemical abnormality of elevated blood and tissue levels of very long chain fatty acids (VLCFAs), saturated fatty acids with 24 to 26 carbons. X-ALD results from loss of function mutations in the gene encoding the peroxisomal transporter ABCD1, which is responsible for uptake of VLCFAs into peroxisomes for degradation by oxidation. One proposed therapeutic strategy for genetic complementation of ABCD1 is pharmacologic upregulation of ABCD2, a gene encoding a homologous peroxisomal transporter. Here, we show that thyroid hormone or sobetirome, a clinical-stage selective thyroid hormone receptor agonist, increases cerebral Abcd2 and lowers VLCFAs in blood, peripheral organs, and brains of mice with defective Abcd1. These results support an approach to treating X-ALD that involves a thyromimetic agent that reactivates VLCFA disposal both in the periphery and the CNS. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society.

  6. Adenoassociated Virus Serotype 9-Mediated Gene Therapy for X-Linked Adrenoleukodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Yi; Mu, Dakai; Prabhakar, Shilpa; Moser, Ann; Musolino, Patricia; Ren, JiaQian; Breakefield, Xandra O; Maguire, Casey A; Eichler, Florian S

    2015-01-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a devastating neurological disorder caused by mutations in the ABCD1 gene that encodes a peroxisomal ATP-binding cassette transporter (ABCD1) responsible for transport of CoA-activated very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA) into the peroxisome for degradation. We used recombinant adenoassociated virus serotype 9 (rAAV9) vector for delivery of the human ABCD1 gene (ABCD1) to mouse central nervous system (CNS). In vitro, efficient delivery of ABCD1 gene was achieved in primary mixed brain glial cells from Abcd1−/− mice as well as X-ALD patient fibroblasts. Importantly, human ABCD1 localized to the peroxisome, and AAV-ABCD1 transduction showed a dose-dependent effect in reducing VLCFA. In vivo, AAV9-ABCD1 was delivered to Abcd1−/− mouse CNS by either stereotactic intracerebroventricular (ICV) or intravenous (IV) injections. Astrocytes, microglia and neurons were the major target cell types following ICV injection, while IV injection also delivered to microvascular endothelial cells and oligodendrocytes. IV injection also yielded high transduction of the adrenal gland. Importantly, IV injection of AAV9-ABCD1 reduced VLCFA in mouse brain and spinal cord. We conclude that AAV9-mediated ABCD1 gene transfer is able to reach target cells in the nervous system and adrenal gland as well as reduce VLCFA in culture and a mouse model of X-ALD. PMID:25592337

  7. X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy: are signs of hypogonadism always due to testicular failure?

    PubMed

    Karapanou, Olga; Vlassopoulou, Barbara; Tzanela, Marinella; Papadopoulos, Dimitrios; Angelidakis, Panagiotis; Michelakakis, Helen; Ioannidis, George; Mihalatos, Markos; Kamakari, Smaragda; Tsagarakis, Stylianos

    2014-01-01

    We present the clinical and hormonal findings of a young male with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD), with special emphasis on the biochemical and clinical pattern of hypogonadism. A patient, with primary adrenal insufficiency since the age of 5 years, developed progressive neurological symptoms at the age of 29. Diagnosis of X-ALD was established by elevated serum very long chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) and genetic testing. His sexual body hair was sparse. Hormonal investigations revealed normal testosterone and inappropriately elevated LH levels. Androgen receptor gene analysis was negative for mutations or polymorphic variants associated with decreased receptor activity. Signs of hypogonadism in patients with confirmed X-ALD are not exclusively due to primary testicular failure. Tissue specific androgen resistance represents an alternative possibility. Since no loss-of-function mutations were detected in the androgen receptor, it is speculated that the patient's androgen resistance could be part of a functional defect mediated through VLCFA accumulation at the testosterone receptor and/or post-receptor levels.

  8. Determination of 30 X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy mutations, including 15 not previously described.

    PubMed

    Lachtermacher, M B; Seuánez, H N; Moser, A B; Moser, H W; Smith, K D

    2000-01-01

    X-linked Adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is the most frequent peroxisomal disease. It mainly involves the nervous system white matter, adrenal cortex and testes. Several distinct clinical phenotypes are known. The principal biochemical abnormality is the accumulation of saturated very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs : > C22:0, mainly C26:0), which is due to impaired capacity for beta-oxidation in peroxisomes. Diagnosis is usually based on the VLCFA levels in plasma or cultured skin fibroblasts in both patients and carriers. In 0.1% of affected males, however, the plasma C26:0 level is borderline normal, and 15% of obligate female carriers have normal results. Effective mutation detection in these families is therefore fundamental to unambiguously determine the genetic status of each individual at risk. Of particular concern are female members of kindreds segregating X-ALD mutations, because normal VLCFA levels do not guarantee lack of carrier status. We describe a fast method for detection of X-ALD mutations. The method is based on SSCP analysis of nested PCR fragments followed by sequence-determination reactions. Using this methodology we have found X-ALD mutations in 30 kindreds, including 15 not previously reported. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy: correlation between Loes score and diffusion tensor imaging parameters

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Sergio Eiji; de Carvalho Neto, Arnolfo; Gasparetto, Emerson Leandro; Coelho, Luiz Otávio de Mattos; Escuissato, Dante Luiz; Bonfim, Carmem Maria Sales; Ribeiro, Lisandro Lima

    2014-01-01

    Objective The present study was aimed at evaluating the correlation between diffusion tensor imaging parameters and Loes score as well as whether those parameters could indicate early structural alterations. Materials and Methods Diffusion tensor imaging measurements were obtained in 30 studies of 14 patients with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy and were correlated with Loes scores. A control group including 28 male patients was created to establish agematched diffusion tensor imaging measurements. Inter- and intraobserver statistical analyses were undertaken. Results Diffusion tensor imaging measurements presented strong Pearson correlation coefficients (r) of –0.86, 0.89, 0.89 and 0.84 for fractional anisotropy and mean, radial and axial diffusivities (p < 0.01). Analysis of changes in diffusion tensor measurements at early stage of the disease indicates that mean and radial diffusivities might be useful to predict the disease progression. Conclusion Measurements of diffusion tensor parameters can be used as an adjunct to the Loes score, aiding in the monitoring of the disease and alerting for possible Loes score progression in the range of interest for therapeutic decisions. PMID:25741116

  10. Immunohistochemical detection of antiapoptotic protein X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis in mammary carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Jaffer, Shabnam; Orta, Lurmag; Sunkara, Srinivas; Sabo, Edmond; Burstein, David E

    2007-06-01

    An immunohistochemical survey of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) expression in mammary carcinoma was performed. XIAP, the most potent of the inhibitor of apoptosis family of caspase inhibitors, has been linked to tumor aggressiveness and therapeutic resistance in several malignancies and is considered an attractive target for cancer drug discovery. Routinely processed sections from 94 ductal carcinomas, 9 lobular carcinomas, and 10 ductal carcinomas with lobular components or features were subjected to citrate-based antigen retrieval, immunostained with anti-XIAP (BD Biosciences, Franklin Lakes, NJ), Envision+ reagents (Dako, Carpinteria, CA), and diaminobenzidine. Positive staining was found in 22.7% of grade 1, 44% of grade 2, and 89.5% of grade 3 ductal carcinomas. Strong staining occurred in no cases of grade 1, 13% of grade 2, and 55.2% of grade 3 ductal carcinomas. XIAP staining increased overall with grade of ductal carcinoma in situ as well. The staining intensity of invasive carcinoma correlated with that of the corresponding ductal carcinoma in situ in 70% of cases. Ductal carcinomas overall showed more staining than lobular carcinomas. XIAP is most strongly and commonly detected in grade 3 ductal carcinoma. The degree of XIAP expression appears frequently to be determined in the preinvasive intraductal phase of tumorigenesis. These findings suggest a possible role of XIAP in the more aggressive clinical behavior of grade 3, compared with lower-grade ductal carcinomas.

  11. Bilateral coronal and sagittal synostosis in X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets: a case report.

    PubMed

    Freudlsperger, Christian; Hoffmann, Juergen; Castrillon-Oberndorfer, Gregor; Engel, Michael

    2013-12-01

    Craniosynostosis can be gene-linked, or caused by metabolic diseases, such as rickets, which results from a deficiency or impaired metabolism of vitamin D, magnesium, phosphorus or calcium leading to hypomineralization of the bone. X-linked dominant hypophosphatemic rickets (XLHR) is the most prevalent genetic type of hypophosphatemic rickets and is caused by germ line mutations in the PHEX-gene. In XLHR, only few case reports of craniosynostosis were described. Here, we present a clinical report of an 18 months old child with XLHR and bilateral coronal and sagittal synostosis who was treated by subtotal cranial vault remodelling with fronto-orbital advancement and right-angled Z-osteotomies. As a consequence of the child's diminished bone regeneration capacity, surgery that is performed after the age of 1 year requires more extensive craniectomy, multiple osteotomies and rigid fixation for calvarial vault remodelling to prevent extensive bone defects. Copyright © 2013 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The muscle-bone relationship in X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets.

    PubMed

    Veilleux, Louis-Nicolas; Cheung, Moira S; Glorieux, Francis H; Rauch, Frank

    2013-05-01

    We recently found that patients with X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets (XLH) have a muscle function deficit in the lower extremities. As muscle force and bone mass are usually closely related, we hypothesized that patients with XLH could also have a bone mass deficit in the lower extremities. The study objective was to assess the muscle-bone relationship in the lower extremities of patients with XLH. The study was carried out in the outpatients department of a pediatric orthopedic hospital. Thirty individuals with XLH (6 to 60 y; 9 male patients) and 30 age- and gender-matched controls participated. Calf muscle size and density as well as tibia bone mass and geometry were assessed by peripheral quantitative computed tomography. Muscle function was evaluated as peak force in the multiple 2-legged hopping test. Muscle force was significantly lower in XLH patients than in controls but muscle cross-sectional area did not differ (after adjustment for tibia length). External bone size, expressed as total bone cross-sectional area, was higher in the XLH group than in controls. The XLH cohort also had statistically significantly higher bone mineral content. Patients with XLH have increased bone mass and size at the distal tibia despite muscle function deficits.

  13. Genetic mapping of X-linked ocular albinism: Linkage analysis in a large Newfoundland kindred

    SciTech Connect

    Charles, S.J.; Moore, A.T.; Barton, D.E.; Yates, J.R.W. ); Green, J.S. )

    1993-04-01

    Genetic linkage studies in a large Newfoundland family affected by X-linked ocular albinism (OA1) showed linkage to markers from Xp22.3. One recombinant mapped the disease proximal to DXS143 (dic56) and two recombinants mapped the disease distal to DXS85 (782). Combining the data with that from 16 British families previously published confirmed close linkage between OA1 and DXS143 (dic56; Z[sub max] = 21.96 at [theta] = 0.01, confidence interval (CI) 0.0005--0.05) and linkage to DXS85 (782; Z[sub max] = 17.60 at [theta] = 0.07, CI = 0.03--0.13) and DXS237 (GMGX9; Z[sub max] = 15.20 at [theta] = 0.08, CI = 0.03--0.15). Multipoint analysis (LINKMAP) gave the most likely order as Xpter-XG-DXS237-DXS143-OA1-DXS85, with odds of 48:1 over the order Xpter-XG-DXS237-OA1-DXS143-DXS85, and odds exceeding 10[sup 10]:1 over other locations for the disease locus. 11 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  14. Phenotypic variability in X-linked ocular albinism: Relationship to linkage genotypes

    SciTech Connect

    Schnur, R.E. |; Wick, P.A.; Bailey, C.; Rebbeck, T.; Weleber, R.G.; Wagstaff, J.; Grix, A.W.; Pagon, R.A.; Hockey, A.; Edwards, M.J.

    1994-09-01

    One hundred nineteen individuals from 11 families with X-linked ocular albinism (OA1) were studied with respect to both their clinical phenotypes and their linkage genotypes. In a four-generation Australian family, two affected males and an obligatory carrier lacked cutaneous melanin macroglobules (MMGs); ocular features were identical to those of Nettleship-Falls OA1. Four other families had more unusual phenotypic features in addition to OA1. All OA1 families were genotyped at DXS16, DXS85, DXS143, STS, and DXS452 and for a CA-repeat polymorphism at the Kallmann syndrome locus (KAL). Separate two-point linkage analyses were performed for the following: group A, six families with biopsy-proved MMGs in at least one affected male; group B, four families whose biopsy status was not known; and group C, OA-9 only (16 samples), the family without MMGs. At the set of loci closest to OA1, there is no clear evidence in our data set for locus heterogeneity between groups A and C or among the four other families with complex phenotypes. Combined multipoint analysis (LINKMAP) in the 11 families and analysis of individual recombination events confirms that the major locus for OA1 resides within the DXS85-DXS143 interval. The authors suggest that more detailed clinical evaluations of OA1 individuals and families should be performed for future correlation with specific mutations in candidate OA1 genes. 29 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Mapping of the X-linked agammaglobulinemia locus by use of restriction fragment-length polymorphism.

    PubMed Central

    Kwan, S P; Kunkel, L; Bruns, G; Wedgwood, R J; Latt, S; Rosen, F S

    1986-01-01

    A molecular linkage analysis in 11 families with X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) localized the XLA gene to the proximal part of the long arm of the human X chromosome. Significant linkage was detected between XLA and loci defined by two polymorphic DNA probes called 19-2 for the DXS3 locus and S21 for the DXS17 locus. Both localize to the region Xq21.3-Xq22. Most likely recombination distances (theta) and associated logarithm of the odds (lod) scores for the XLA-DXS3 and XLA-DXS17 pairs were theta = 0.04 morgans (lod, 3.65) and theta = 0 (lod, 2.17), respectively. Tight linkage between XLA and the locus DXS43 defined by the X short arm probe D2 (localized to Xp22-Xp21) was strongly excluded and we obtained no evidence for significant linkage between XLA and any other X short arm probe. The probe pair 19-2 and S21 should be informative for molecular linkage-based analysis of XLA segregation in the majority of families afflicted with this disorder. Images PMID:3003164

  16. X-linked recessive nephrogenic diabetes insipidus: a clinico-genetic study.

    PubMed

    Hong, Che Ry; Kang, Hee Gyung; Choi, Hyun Jin; Cho, Min Hyun; Lee, Jung Won; Kang, Ju Hyung; Park, Hye Won; Koo, Ja Wook; Ha, Tae-Sun; Kim, Su-Yung; Il Cheong, Hae

    2014-01-01

    A retrospective genotype and phenotype analysis of X-linked congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) was conducted on a nationwide cohort of 25 (24 male, 1 female) Korean children with AVPR2 gene mutations, comparing non-truncating and truncating mutations. In an analysis of male patients, the median age at diagnosis was 0.9 years old. At a median follow-up of 5.4 years, urinary tract dilatations were evident in 62% of patients and their median glomerular filtration rate was 72 mL/min/1.73 m2. Weights and heights were under the 3rd percentile in 22% and 33% of patients, respectively. One patient had low intelligence quotient and another developed end-stage renal disease. No statistically significant genotype-phenotype correlation was found between non-truncating and truncating mutations. One patient was female; she was analyzed separately because inactivation and mosaicism of the X chromosome may influence clinical manifestations in female patients. Current unsatisfactory long-term outcome of congenital NDI necessitates a novel therapeutic strategy.

  17. Wilms tumor arising in a child with X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed

    El-Kares, Reyhan; Hueber, Pierre-Alain; Blumenkrantz, Miriam; Iglesias, Diana; Ma, Kim; Jabado, Nada; Bichet, Daniel G; Goodyer, Paul

    2009-07-01

    We report on a child with X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) who developed Wilms tumor (WT). Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus is caused by mutations of the arginine vasopressin receptor (AVPR2) or aquaporin-II (AQP2) genes. Wilms tumor is also genetically heterogeneous and is associated with mutations of WT1 (15-20%), WTX (20-30%) and other loci. The boy presented at 5 months with failure to thrive, polyuria, hypernatremia and abdominal mass. Analysis of leukocyte DNA showed a novel missense mutation (Q174H) of the AVPR2 gene, which was not present in his mother. In cells (WitS) isolated from the tumor, WTX mRNA expression and coding sequence were intact. However, we identified a 44-kb homozygous deletion of the WT1 gene spanning exons 4 to 10. The WT1 deletion was not present in leukocyte DNA from the patient or his mother. We also noted strong beta-catenin (CTNNB1) expression in the tumor cells and identified a heterozygote missense Ser45Cys mutation of exon 3 of CTNNB1. However, the mutation was absent both in the constitutional DNA of the patient and his mother. The concurrence of WT and NDI has not been previously reported and may be unrelated. Nevertheless, this case nicely illustrates the sequence of events leading to sporadic Wilms tumor.

  18. Renal amyloidosis in a patient with X-linked agammaglobulinemia (Bruton's disease) and bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Gonzalo-Garijo, M A; Sánchez-Vega, S; Pérez-Calderón, R; Pérez-Rangel, I; Corrales-Vargas, S; Fernández de Mera, J J; Robles, R

    2014-01-01

    We present a patient with Bruton's disease and bronchiectasis who developed renal AA amyloidosis. A 38 year-old man was diagnosed with X-linked agammaglobulinemia (Bruton's disease) when he was 3 years old, and he has been treated with parenteral immunoglobulin since then. Eighteen years later, he was diagnosed with central pulmonary bronchiectasis by computerized tomography (CT). In 2008, he gradually developed anemia, edema of lower limbs, and loss of weight. Laboratory studies revealed deterioration of renal function, normocytic normochromic anemia and nephrotic range proteinuria. Hepatitis B and C and HIV serology were negative. Ultrasound and CT of abdomen were normal. A renal biopsy revealed deposits with positive PAS and Congo red staining in glomeruli, interstitium, and vessel's walls. Immunohistochemistry showed positive staining of the A amyloid. Direct immunofluorescence was positive with thioflavin and showed focal and glomerular mesangial IgG deposits, suggesting renal AA amyloidosis. For 2 years the patient conducted pharmacological treatment and follow-up for the Nephrology department with poor prognosis and progression of renal function impairment. In January 2011 he began dialysis treatment with improvement, and he is currently on the waiting list for renal transplantation. We present a patient with Bruton's disease and bronchiectasis who developed renal AA amyloidosis a finding rarely reported.

  19. [Prenatal diagnosis of a case with X-linked spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda].

    PubMed

    Cao, Fang; Wang, Qiu-wei; Yu, Bin; Huang, Rui-ping; Hu, Ya-li; Zhang, Xiao-qing

    2013-10-01

    To analyze TRAPPC2 gene mutation in a family with X-linked spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda and to provide genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis. All of 4 exons of the TRAPPC2 gene and their flanking sequences in the proband and her father were analyzed with polymerase chain reaction and direct DNA sequencing. Genomic DNA of the probands' fetus was extracted from amniotic fluid sampled at 18th gestational week. Gender of the fetus was determined by the presence of SRY gene. The sequence of fetal TRAPPC2 gene was also analyzed. A c.209G>A mutation was identified in exon 4 of the TRAPPC2 gene in the proband and her father. The fetus of was determined to be a male and also have carried the c.209G>A mutation. A c.209G>A mutation of TRAPPC2 exon 4 probably underlies the clinical manifestations in this family. The proband is a carrier, and her fetus is a male carrying the same mutation. Prenatal diagnosis is an effective method for the prevention of the disease.

  20. [Early prenatal diagnosis for a family affected with X-linked spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda family].

    PubMed

    Gao, Chao; Wang, Huaili; Kong, Xiangdong; Shang, Qing; Duan, Jiali; Luo, Qiang

    2014-04-01

    X-linked spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda (SEDL) is a rare osteochondrodysplasia caused by mutations of SEDL gene, which usually onset in late childhood without systemic complications. In this study, we have provided prenatal diagnosis for an affected family with a combined strategy including direct sequencing, fetal-sex identification and microsatellite linkage analysis. Two amniotic fluid samples from carrier gravida and 7 blood samples from individuals in this SEDL pedigree were obtained. Genomic DNA was extracted from the samples using standard phenol-chloroform method. SRY and AMEL genes were employed to assess fetal sex. Microsatellite DXS16 was genotyped for linkage analysis. A pathogenic mutation of the SEDL gene was identified by bi-directionally direct sequencing of the third exon as well as its exon/intron boundaries. Two male fetuses were confirmed by fetal-sex assessment. The mutation of the SEDL gene was identified as a nucleotide substitution of the splice acceptor site in intron 2, IVS2-2A>C. DNA sequencing indicated that one fetus is hemizygote carrying the mutation, whilst another is not a carrier. Linkage analysis was identical with the sequencing results. Follow-up also confirmed the result of prenatal diagnosis. Fetal-sex assessment combined with microsatellite linkage analysis and bi-directionally direct sequencing is a more accurate and ready strategy for prenatal diagnosis of families affected with SEDL.

  1. The evolution of gene therapy in X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Rans, Tonya S; England, Ronald

    2009-05-01

    To review the evolution of gene therapy in infants with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (XL-SCID) and to evaluate the current challenges facing this evolving field. The MEDLINE, OVID, CINAHL, and HealthSTAR databases were searched to identify pertinent articles using the following keywords: gene therapy, XL-SCID, bone marrow transplant, and viral vectors. Journal articles were selected for their relevance to human gene therapy in patients with XL-SCID. Gene therapy with a retrovirus-derived vector has been used to treat 20 patients with XL-SCID internationally. Although most patients derived improvements in T- and B-cell immune numbers and function, severe adverse effects have occurred. After gene therapy, 5 of the 20 patients developed leukemia. This outcome has been associated with insertion of the corrected gene near the T-cell proto-oncogene LMO2. One of the 5 patients subsequently died. Within the past decade, effective improvements in vectorology and cell culture conditions have resulted in clinical success in some infants with SCID and have revived interest after many years of setbacks. However, clinical success and significant adverse events have been reported in patients with XL-SCID who have undergone gene therapy using a retroviral vector. As extensive research into improving safety through vector development and monitoring of gene therapy continues, further progress in gene therapy development can be anticipated.

  2. The brain expressed x-linked gene 1 (Bex1) regulates myoblast fusion

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Feng; Kuang, Shihuan

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle development (myogenesis) is a complex but precisely orchestrated process involving spatiotemporal regulation of the proliferation, differentiation and fusion of myogenic progenitor cells (myoblasts). Here we identify brain expressed x-linked gene 1 (Bex1) as a transient, developmentally regulated gene involved in myoblast fusion. Bex1 expression is undetectable in adult muscles or in quiescent muscle stem cells (satellite cells). During embryonic myogenesis, however, Bex1 is robustly expressed by myogenin+ differentiating myoblasts, but not by Pax7+ proliferating myoblasts. Interestingly, Bex1 is initially localized in the cytoplasm and then translocates into the nucleus. During adult muscle regeneration, Bex1 is highly expressed in newly regenerated myofibers and the expression is rapidly downregulated during maturation. Consistently, in cultured myoblasts, Bex1 is not expressed at the proliferation stage but transiently expressed upon induction of myogenic differentiation, following a similar cytoplasm to nucleus translocation pattern as seen in vivo. Using gain- and loss-of-function studies, we found that overexpression of Bex1 promotes the fusion of primary myoblasts without affecting myogenic differentiation and myogenin expression. Conversely, Bex1 knockout myoblasts exhibit obvious fusion defects, even though they express normal levels of myogenin and differentiate normally. These results elucidate a novel role of Bex1 in myogenesis through regulating myoblast fusion. PMID:26586200

  3. Epilepsy and mental retardation restricted to females: X-linked epileptic infantile encephalopathy of unusual inheritance.

    PubMed

    Duszyc, Kinga; Terczynska, Iwona; Hoffman-Zacharska, Dorota

    2015-02-01

    Epilepsy in females with mental retardation (EFMR) is a rare early infantile epileptic encephalopathy (EIEE), phenotypically resembling Dravet syndrome (DS). It is characterised by a variable degree of intellectual deficits and epilepsy. EFMR is caused by heterozygous mutations in the PCDH19 gene (locus Xq22.1) encoding protocadherin-19, a protein that is highly expressed during brain development. The protein is involved in cell adhesion and probably plays an important role in neuronal migration and formation of synaptic connections. EFMR is considered X-linked of variable mutations' penetrance. Mutations in the PCDH19 gene mainly arise de novo, but if inherited, they show a unique pattern of transmission. Females with heterozygous mutations are affected, while hemizygous males are not, regardless of mutation carriage. This singular mode might be explained by cell interference as a pathogenic molecular mechanism leading to neuronal dysfunction. Recently, PCDH19-related EIEE turned out to be more frequent than initially thought, contributing to around 16% of cases (25% in female groups) in the SCN1A-negative DS-like patients. Therefore, the PCDH19 gene is now estimated to be the second, after SCN1A, most clinically relevant gene in epilepsy.

  4. Lentiviral hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    De Ravin, Suk See; Wu, Xiaolin; Moir, Susan; Anaya-O'Brien, Sandra; Kwatemaa, Nana; Littel, Patricia; Theobald, Narda; Choi, Uimook; Su, Ling; Marquesen, Martha; Hilligoss, Dianne; Lee, Janet; Buckner, Clarissa M; Zarember, Kol A; O'Connor, Geraldine; McVicar, Daniel; Kuhns, Douglas; Throm, Robert E; Zhou, Sheng; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Hanson, I Celine; Cowan, Mort J; Kang, Elizabeth; Hadigan, Coleen; Meagher, Michael; Gray, John T; Sorrentino, Brian P; Malech, Harry L

    2016-04-20

    X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1) is a profound deficiency of T, B, and natural killer (NK) cell immunity caused by mutations inIL2RGencoding the common chain (γc) of several interleukin receptors. Gamma-retroviral (γRV) gene therapy of SCID-X1 infants without conditioning restores T cell immunity without B or NK cell correction, but similar treatment fails in older SCID-X1 children. We used a lentiviral gene therapy approach to treat five SCID-X1 patients with persistent immune dysfunction despite haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplant in infancy. Follow-up data from two older patients demonstrate that lentiviral vector γc transduced autologous HSC gene therapy after nonmyeloablative busulfan conditioning achieves selective expansion of gene-marked T, NK, and B cells, which is associated with sustained restoration of humoral responses to immunization and clinical improvement at 2 to 3 years after treatment. Similar gene marking levels have been achieved in three younger patients, albeit with only 6 to 9 months of follow-up. Lentiviral gene therapy with reduced-intensity conditioning appears safe and can restore humoral immune function to posthaploidentical transplant older patients with SCID-X1.

  5. Gene therapy model of X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency using a modified foamy virus vector.

    PubMed

    Horino, Satoshi; Uchiyama, Toru; So, Takanori; Nagashima, Hiroyuki; Sun, Shu-Lan; Sato, Miki; Asao, Atsuko; Haji, Yoichi; Sasahara, Yoji; Candotti, Fabio; Tsuchiya, Shigeru; Kure, Shigeo; Sugamura, Kazuo; Ishii, Naoto

    2013-01-01

    X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1) is an inherited genetic immunodeficiency associated with mutations in the common cytokine receptor γ chain (γc) gene, and characterized by a complete defect of T and natural killer (NK) cells. Gene therapy for SCID-X1 using conventional retroviral (RV) vectors carrying the γc gene results in the successful reconstitution of T cell immunity. However, the high incidence of vector-mediated T cell leukemia, caused by vector insertion near or within cancer-related genes has been a serious problem. In this study, we established a gene therapy model of mouse SCID-X1 using a modified foamy virus (FV) vector expressing human γc. Analysis of vector integration in a human T cell line demonstrated that the FV vector integration sites were significantly less likely to be located within or near transcriptional start sites than RV vector integration sites. To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy, bone marrow cells from γc-knockout (γc-KO) mice were infected with the FV vector and transplanted into γc-KO mice. Transplantation of the FV-treated cells resulted in the successful reconstitution of functionally active T and B cells. These data suggest that FV vectors can be effective and may be safer than conventional RV vectors for gene therapy for SCID-X1.

  6. Mutational analysis of the PEX gene in patients with X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets.

    PubMed

    Holm, I A; Huang, X; Kunkel, L M

    1997-04-01

    X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets (HYP) is a dominant disorder characterized by renal phosphate wasting and abnormal vitamin D metabolism. PEX, the gene that is defective in HYP and is located on Xp22.1, is homologous to members of the neutral endopeptidase family. However, the complete coding sequence of the PEX cDNA, the structure of the PEX gene, and the role that PEX plays in phosphate transport remain unknown. We determined the genomic structure of the published PEX gene, which was found to be composed of 18 short exons, and demonstrated that the genomic organization of PEX shares homology to members of the family of neutral endopeptidases. Primer sets were designed from the intron sequence, to amplify each PEX exon from genomic DNA of HYP patients. Mutations in PEX were identified in 9/22 unrelated HYP patients, confirming that defects in PEX are responsible for HYP. The mutations detected included three nonsense mutations, a 1-bp deletion leading to a frameshift, a donor splice-site mutation, and missense mutations in four patients. Although the entire PEX gene has not been identified and some mutations may have been missed, the lack of detection of mutations in the remaining 13 patients, especially in 1 patient who has an apparently balanced, de novo 9;13 translocation, implies that there may be other loci involved in the generation of the HYP phenotype.

  7. Distribution of mutations in the PEX gene in families with X-linked hypophosphataemic rickets (HYP).

    PubMed

    Rowe, P S; Oudet, C L; Francis, F; Sinding, C; Pannetier, S; Econs, M J; Strom, T M; Meitinger, T; Garabedian, M; David, A; Macher, M A; Questiaux, E; Popowska, E; Pronicka, E; Read, A P; Mokrzycki, A; Glorieux, F H; Drezner, M K; Hanauer, A; Lehrach, H; Goulding, J N; O'Riordan, J L

    1997-04-01

    Mutations in the PEX gene at Xp22.1 (phosphate-regulating gene with homologies to endopeptidases, on the X-chromosome), are responsible for X-linked hypophosphataemic rickets (HYP). Homology of PEX to the M13 family of Zn2+ metallopeptidases which include neprilysin (NEP) as prototype, has raised important questions regarding PEX function at the molecular level. The aim of this study was to analyse 99 HYP families for PEX gene mutations, and to correlate predicted changes in the protein structure with Zn2+ metallopeptidase gene function. Primers flanking 22 characterised exons were used to amplify DNA by PCR, and SSCP was then used to screen for mutations. Deletions, insertions, nonsense mutations, stop codons and splice mutations occurred in 83% of families screened for in all 22 exons, and 51% of a separate set of families screened in 17 PEX gene exons. Missense mutations in four regions of the gene were informative regarding function, with one mutation in the Zn2+-binding site predicted to alter substrate enzyme interaction and catalysis. Computer analysis of the remaining mutations predicted changes in secondary structure, N-glycosylation, protein phosphorylation and catalytic site molecular structure. The wide range of mutations that align with regions required for protease activity in NEP suggests that PEX also functions as a protease, and may act by processing factor(s) involved in bone mineral metabolism.

  8. X-Linked Recessive form of Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus in a 7-Year-Old Boy.

    PubMed

    Janchevska, A; Tasic, V; Gucev, Z; Krstevska-Konstantinova, M; Cheong, H I

    2014-12-01

    Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) is caused by the inability of renal collecting duct cells to respond to arginine vasopressin (AVP)/antidiuretic hormone (ADH). We present the case of a 7-year-old boy with a history of excretion of large amounts of dilute urine and polydipsia since infancy. The boy had several vomiting episodes with mild dehydration during the first 3 years of life. There was no evidence of headaches, dizziness or visual problems. He drinks between 2 and 3 L/day and has 24-hour diuresis of 2 liters, now. He has prepubertal appearance with appropriate weight [+0.85 standard deviation score (SDS)] and height (+0.15 SDS) for his age. His intelligence was also normal. The water deprivation test showed low urine osmolality after 8 hours of dehydration. After desmopressin administration, urine osmolality remained low. Serum osmolality was in the normal range for sex and age before and after desmopressin administration. This indicated a nephrogenic form of diabetes insipidus. Molecular analyses revealed a P286L [p.Pro(CCC)286Leu(CTC)] mutation in the AVPR2 gene, that was inherited from his mother. This patient is the first case with genetically confirmed X-linked inherited form of NDI in the Republic of Macedonia. Molecular analysis confirmed the clinical diagnosis and enabled genetic advice for this family.

  9. Regulation of X-linked gene expression during early mouse development by Rlim.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Shin, JongDae; Shea, Jeremy M; Yu, Jun; Bošković, Ana; Byron, Meg; Zhu, Xiaochun; Shalek, Alex K; Regev, Aviv; Lawrence, Jeanne B; Torres, Eduardo M; Zhu, Lihua J; Rando, Oliver J; Bach, Ingolf

    2016-09-19

    Mammalian X-linked gene expression is highly regulated as female cells contain two and male one X chromosome (X). To adjust the X gene dosage between genders, female mouse preimplantation embryos undergo an imprinted form of X chromosome inactivation (iXCI) that requires both Rlim (also known as Rnf12) and the long non-coding RNA Xist. Moreover, it is thought that gene expression from the single active X is upregulated to correct for bi-allelic autosomal (A) gene expression. We have combined mouse genetics with RNA-seq on single mouse embryos to investigate functions of Rlim on the temporal regulation of iXCI and Xist. Our results reveal crucial roles of Rlim for the maintenance of high Xist RNA levels, Xist clouds and X-silencing in female embryos at blastocyst stages, while initial Xist expression appears Rlim-independent. We find further that X/A upregulation is initiated in early male and female preimplantation embryos.

  10. X-Linked Retinoschisis in Juveniles: Follow-Up by Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Qin-rui; Huang, Lv-zhen; Xia, Hui-ka; Li, Tian-qi

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. To explore the structural progression of X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) in patients by using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Design. Retrospective, observational study. Methods. Patients who were diagnosed with XLRS by genetic testing underwent comprehensive ophthalmological examinations from December 2014 to October 2016. Each eye was measured by SD-OCT using the same clinical protocol. A correlation between best-corrected visual acuity (VA) and SD-OCT measurements was observed. Results. Six patients demonstrated retinoschisis (12 eyes) and typical foveal cyst-like cavities (10 eyes) on SD-OCT images with a mean logMAR VA of 0.48. The median age was 7.5 years at the initial visit. Their foveal retinal thickness (516.9 μm) and choroid thickness (351.4 μm) decreased at a rate of 38.1 and 7.5 μm, respectively, at the 10.5-month follow-up visit; however, there were no significant differences (P = 0.622 and P = 0.406, resp.). There was no significant correlation between VA, the foveal retinal thickness, and subfoveal choroid thickness. Conclusions. SD-OCT images for XLRS patients during the juvenile period revealed no significant changes in the fundus structure, including the foveal retinal thickness and choroid thickness within one-year follow-up. There was a lack of correlation between VA, foveal retinal thickness, and subfoveal choroid thickness. PMID:28286756

  11. Novel variants of RPGR in X-linked retinitis pigmentosa families and genotype-phenotype correlation.

    PubMed

    Parmeggiani, Francesco; Barbaro, Vanessa; Migliorati, Angelo; Raffa, Paolo; Nespeca, Patrizia; De Nadai, Katia; Del Vecchio, Claudia; Palù, Giorgio; Parolin, Cristina; Di Iorio, Enzo

    2017-03-10

    To identify novel mutations in the retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator (RPGR) gene and retinitis pigmentosa 2 (RP2) gene underlying X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP) and assess genotype-phenotype correlations. The patient cohort, consisting of 13 individuals from 3 unrelated XLRP families, underwent comprehensive ophthalmologic examination. The open reading frames of RPGR and RP2 were analyzed with Sanger sequencing in each patient. The identified genetic variants were defined as mutations or polymorphisms on the basis of their pathological effect. We found 3 genetic variants: a novel mutation c.1591G>T in exon 14 and a novel polymorphism c.1105C>T in exon 10, resulting in p.Glu531* and p.Arg369Cys of RPGR gene, respectively, and one already known mutation c.413A>G in exon 2, resulting in a p.Glu138Gly of RP2 gene. Considering our XLRP probands, RPGR-related phenotypic damages were similar and less severe than those of the patient with the RP2 mutation. On the other hand, the female carriers of XLRP variants showed different RPGR-related consequences, ranging from rods hypofunctionality in c.1591G>T nonsense heterozygosity to no retinal changes in c.1105C>T polymorphic heterozygosity. These findings broaden the spectrum of RPGR mutations and phenotypic variability of the disease, which will be useful for genetic consultation and diagnosis in the future.

  12. Disease mechanisms of X-linked retinitis pigmentosa due to RP2 and RPGR mutations.

    PubMed

    Lyraki, Rodanthi; Megaw, Roly; Hurd, Toby

    2016-10-15

    Photoreceptor degeneration is the prominent characteristic of retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a heterogeneous group of inherited retinal dystrophies resulting in blindness. Although abnormalities in many pathways can cause photoreceptor degeneration, one of the most important causes is defective protein transport through the connecting cilium, the structure that connects the biosynthetic inner segment with the photosensitive outer segment of the photoreceptors. The majority of patients with X-linked RP have mutations in the retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator (RPGR) or RP2 genes, the protein products of which are both components of the connecting cilium and associated with distinct mechanisms of protein delivery to the outer segment. RP2 and RPGR proteins are associated with severe diseases ranging from classic RP to atypical forms. In this short review, we will summarise current knowledge generated by experimental studies and knockout animal models, compare and discuss the prominent hypotheses about the two proteins' functions in retinal cell biology. © 2016 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  13. Towards isolation of the gene for X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (RP3)

    SciTech Connect

    Dry, K.L.; Aldred, M.A.; Hardwick, L.J.

    1994-09-01

    Until recently the region of interest containing the gene for X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (RP3) was thought to lie between CYBB (Xp21.1) and the proximal end of the deletion in patient BB (JBBprox). This region was thought to span 100-150 kb. Here we present new mapping data to show that the distance between the 5{prime} (most proximal) end of CYBB and JBBprox is only 50 kb. Recently Roux et al. (1994) have described the isolation of a gene within this region but this showed no disease-associated changes. Further evidence from mapping the deletion in patient NF (who suffered from McLead`s syndrome and CGD but not RP) and from linkage analysis of our RP3 families with a new dinucleotide repeat suggests that the gene must extend proximally from JBBprox. In order to extend the region of search we have constructed a YAC contig spanning 800 kb to OTC. We are continuing our search for the RP3 gene using a variety of strategies including exon trapping and cDNA enrichment as well as direct screening of cDNA libraries with subclones from this region.

  14. EIF2S3 Mutations Associated with Severe X-Linked Intellectual Disability Syndrome MEHMO.

    PubMed

    Skopkova, Martina; Hennig, Friederike; Shin, Byung-Sik; Turner, Clesson E; Stanikova, Daniela; Brennerova, Katarina; Stanik, Juraj; Fischer, Ute; Henden, Lyndal; Müller, Ulrich; Steinberger, Daniela; Leshinsky-Silver, Esther; Bottani, Armand; Kurdiova, Timea; Ukropec, Jozef; Nyitrayova, Olga; Kolnikova, Miriam; Klimes, Iwar; Borck, Guntram; Bahlo, Melanie; Haas, Stefan A; Kim, Joo-Ran; Lotspeich-Cole, Leda E; Gasperikova, Daniela; Dever, Thomas E; Kalscheuer, Vera M

    2017-04-01

    Impairment of translation initiation and its regulation within the integrated stress response (ISR) and related unfolded-protein response has been identified as a cause of several multisystemic syndromes. Here, we link MEHMO syndrome, whose genetic etiology was unknown, to this group of disorders. MEHMO is a rare X-linked syndrome characterized by profound intellectual disability, epilepsy, hypogonadism and hypogenitalism, microcephaly, and obesity. We have identified a C-terminal frameshift mutation (Ile465Serfs) in the EIF2S3 gene in three families with MEHMO syndrome and a novel maternally inherited missense EIF2S3 variant (c.324T>A; p.Ser108Arg) in another male patient with less severe clinical symptoms. The EIF2S3 gene encodes the γ subunit of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2), crucial for initiation of protein synthesis and regulation of the ISR. Studies in patient fibroblasts confirm increased ISR activation due to the Ile465Serfs mutation and functional assays in yeast demonstrate that the Ile465Serfs mutation impairs eIF2γ function to a greater extent than tested missense mutations, consistent with the more severe clinical phenotype of the Ile465Serfs male mutation carriers. Thus, we propose that more severe EIF2S3 mutations cause the full MEHMO phenotype, while less deleterious mutations cause a milder form of the syndrome with only a subset of the symptoms.

  15. Mediator links epigenetic silencing of neuronal gene expression with x-linked mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ning; Zhou, Haiying; Esteve, Pierre-Olivier; Chin, Hang Gyeong; Kim, Seokjoong; Xu, Xuan; Joseph, Sumy M; Friez, Michael J; Schwartz, Charles E; Pradhan, Sriharsa; Boyer, Thomas G

    2008-08-08

    Mediator occupies a central role in RNA polymerase II transcription as a sensor, integrator, and processor of regulatory signals that converge on protein-coding gene promoters. Compared to its role in gene activation, little is known regarding the molecular mechanisms and biological implications of Mediator as a transducer of repressive signals. Here we describe a protein interaction network required for extraneuronal gene silencing comprising Mediator, G9a histone methyltransferase, and the RE1 silencing transcription factor (REST; also known as neuron restrictive silencer factor, NRSF). We show that the MED12 interface in Mediator links REST with G9a-dependent histone H3K9 dimethylation to suppress neuronal genes in nonneuronal cells. Notably, missense mutations in MED12 causing the X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) disorders FG syndrome and Lujan syndrome disrupt its REST corepressor function. These findings implicate Mediator in epigenetic restriction of neuronal gene expression to the nervous system and suggest a pathologic basis for MED12-associated XLMR involving impaired REST-dependent neuronal gene regulation.

  16. Expression of X-linked Inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein in Neoplastic Thyroid Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Yim, Ji Hye; Kim, Sun A; Kim, Won Gu; Jeon, Min Ji; Han, Ji Min; Sung, Tae Yon; Kim, Tae Yong; Kim, Won Bae; Hong, Suck Joon; Shong, Young Kee; Gong, Gyungyub

    2011-01-01

    X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) is associated with tumor genesis, growth, progression and metastasis, and acts by blocking caspase-mediated apoptosis. In the present study, we sought to evaluate the expression patterns of XIAP in various neoplastic thyroid disorders and determine the association between XIAP expression and clinicopathologic factors. Expression of XIAP was evaluated with immunohistochemical staining using monoclonal anti-XIAP in 164 specimens of conventional papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) and 53 specimens of other malignant or benign thyroid tumors. XIAP positivity was observed in 128 (78%) of the 164 conventional PTC specimens. Positive rates of XIAP expression in follicular variant PTC, follicular, medullary, poorly differentiated, and anaplastic thyroid carcinoma specimens were 20%, 25%, 38%, 67%, and 38%, respectively. Six nodular hyperplasia specimens were negative and 1 of 7 follicular adenomas (8%) was positive for XIAP. Lateral neck lymph node metastases were more frequent in patients negative for XIAP expression (P = 0.01). Immunohistochemical staining for XIAP as a novel molecular marker may thus be helpful in the differential diagnosis of thyroid cancer. Moreover, high XIAP expression in conventional PTC is strongly associated with reduced risk of lateral neck lymph node metastasis. PMID:21935275

  17. Gene/cell therapy approaches for Immune Dysregulation Polyendocrinopathy Enteropathy X-linked syndrome.

    PubMed

    Passerini, Laura; Santoni de Sio, Francesca R; Porteus, Matthew H; Bacchetta, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    Immune dysregulation, Polyendocrinopathy, Enteropathy, X-linked (IPEX) syndrome is a rare autoimmune disease due to mutations in the gene encoding for Forkhead box P3 (FOXP3), a transcription factor fundamental for the function of thymus-derived (t) regulatory T (Treg) cells. The dysfunction of Treg cells results in the development of devastating autoimmune manifestations affecting multiple organs, eventually leading to premature death in infants, if not promptly treated by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Novel gene therapy strategies can be developed for IPEX syndrome as more definitive cure than allogeneic HSCT. Here we describe the therapeutic approaches, alternative to HSCT, currently under development. We described that effector T cells can be converted in regulatory T cells by LV-mediated FOXP3-gene transfer in differentiated T lymphocytes. Despite FOXP3 mutations mainly affect a highly specific T cell subset, manipulation of stem cells could be required for long-term remission of the disease. Therefore, we believe that a more comprehensive strategy should aim at correcting FOXP3-mutated stem cells. Potentials and hurdles of both strategies will be highlighted here.

  18. Clinical and molecular characteristics of Chinese patients with X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome type 1.

    PubMed

    An, Yun-Fei; Luo, Xiao-Bo; Yang, Xi; Wang, Jing; Li, Li; Zhao, Xiao-Dong

    2014-11-01

    X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome type 1 (XLP1) is a rare inherited, life-threatening immunodeficiency disorder caused by mutations in SH2D1A gene. It affect approximately two to three males per million. Fewer than 10 cases with definite gene mutations have been reported in Chinese mainland and no rapid diagnosis method has been established. We determined the clinical and molecular characteristics of five patients with XLP1. The SH2D1A gene were amplified by PCR and sequenced, the SAP expression was analyzed by flow cytometry. Two patients had novel SH2D1A mutations and three had mutations that have been previously reported. Three patients presented with fulminant infectious mononucleosis or hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis and one presented with lymphoma. Null or decreased SAP expression on PBMCs was noted. The remaining patient presented with unique, recurrent, nonfulminant infectious mononucleosis and bimodal intracellular SAP protein expression. The overall molecular characteristics and clinical phenotypes of Chinese patients with XLP1 matched previous reports. The unique bimodal intracellular SAP protein expression indicated the presence of some residual SAP-positive T cells that are able to respond to persistent Epstein-Barr virus infection and could explain the relatively mild clinical phenotype of this patient. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Barth syndrome: an X-linked cause of fetal cardiomyopathy and stillbirth

    PubMed Central

    Steward, C G; Newbury-Ecob, R A; Hastings, R; Smithson, S F; Tsai-Goodman, B; Quarrell, O W; Kulik, W; Wanders, R; Pennock, M; Williams, M; Cresswell, J L; Gonzalez, I L; Brennan, P

    2010-01-01

    Objective Barth Syndrome (BTHS) is an X-linked multisystem disorder (OMIM 302060) usually diagnosed in infancy and characterized by cardiac problems [dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) ± endocardial fibroelastosis (EFE) ± left ventricular non-compaction (LVNC)], proximal myopathy, feeding problems, growth retardation, neutropenia, organic aciduria and variable respiratory chain abnormalities. We wished to determine whether BTHS had a significant impact on fetal and perinatal health in a large cohort of family groups originating from a defined region. Method Case note review on 19 families originating from the UK and known to the Barth Syndrome Service of the Bristol Royal Hospital for Children. Results Details are presented on six kindreds (32%) with genetically and biochemically proven BTHS that demonstrate a wider phenotype including male fetal loss, stillbirth and severe neonatal illness or death. In these families, 9 males were stillborn and 14 died as neonates or infants but there were no losses of females. BTHS was definitively proven in five males with fetal onset of DCM ± hydrops/EFE/LVNC. Conclusion These findings stress the importance of considering BTHS in the differential diagnosis of unexplained male hydrops, DCM, EFE, LVNC or pregnancy loss, as well as in neonates with hypoglycemia, lactic acidosis and idiopathic mitochondrial disease. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:20812380

  20. A Mouse Model of X-linked Intellectual Disability Associated with Impaired Removal of Histone Methylation.

    PubMed

    Iwase, Shigeki; Brookes, Emily; Agarwal, Saurabh; Badeaux, Aimee I; Ito, Hikaru; Vallianatos, Christina N; Tomassy, Giulio Srubek; Kasza, Tomas; Lin, Grace; Thompson, Andrew; Gu, Lei; Kwan, Kenneth Y; Chen, Chinfei; Sartor, Maureen A; Egan, Brian; Xu, Jun; Shi, Yang

    2016-02-09

    Mutations in a number of chromatin modifiers are associated with human neurological disorders. KDM5C, a histone H3 lysine 4 di- and tri-methyl (H3K4me2/3)-specific demethylase, is frequently mutated in X-linked intellectual disability (XLID) patients. Here, we report that disruption of the mouse Kdm5c gene recapitulates adaptive and cognitive abnormalities observed in XLID, including impaired social behavior, memory deficits, and aggression. Kdm5c-knockout brains exhibit abnormal dendritic arborization, spine anomalies, and altered transcriptomes. In neurons, Kdm5c is recruited to promoters that harbor CpG islands decorated with high levels of H3K4me3, where it fine-tunes H3K4me3 levels. Kdm5c predominantly represses these genes, which include members of key pathways that regulate the development and function of neuronal circuitries. In summary, our mouse behavioral data strongly suggest that KDM5C mutations are causal to XLID. Furthermore, our findings suggest that loss of KDM5C function may impact gene expression in multiple regulatory pathways relevant to the clinical phenotypes.

  1. High-throughput sequencing reveals an altered T cell repertoire in X-linked agammaglobulinemia.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Manish; Simchoni, Noa; Hamm, David; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte

    2015-12-01

    To examine the T cell receptor structure in the absence of B cells, the TCR β CDR3 was sequenced from DNA of 15 X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) subjects and 18 male controls, using the Illumina HiSeq platform and the ImmunoSEQ analyzer. V gene usage and the V-J combinations, derived from both productive and non-productive sequences, were significantly different between XLA samples and controls. Although the CDR3 length was similar for XLA and control samples, the CDR3 region of the XLA T cell receptor contained significantly fewer deletions and insertions in V, D, and J gene segments, differences intrinsic to the V(D)J recombination process and not due to peripheral T cell selection. XLA CDR3s demonstrated fewer charged amino acid residues, more sharing of CDR3 sequences, and almost completely lacked a population of highly modified Vβ gene segments found in control DNA, suggesting both a skewed and contracted T cell repertoire in XLA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Genetic analysis and clinical features of X-linked retinoschisis in Chinese patients

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Qin-rui; Huang, Lv-zhen; Chen, Xiao-li; Xia, Hui-ka; Li, Tian-qi; Li, Xiao-xin

    2017-01-01

    Many mutations in the retinoschisis (RS1) gene have been identified, but there are limited clinical data relating to the different genotypes. This study investigated the genotype, clinical phenotype and therapies for X-linked juvenile retinoschisis (XLRS) patients in China to evaluate the effects of gene mutations and therapies on the prognosis of the disease. Thirty patients were recruited in the study. Genetic examination identified 8 novel RS1 gene mutations. Twenty-four patients were identified as missense mutation, which was the most common gene mutation in XLRS patients. Amino acids 102 and 209 were the most common mutation areas, accounting for a total 35.7% of all patients. Mutations affecting amino acid 102 were associated with poor results on the flash electroretinogram (ERG). Sixteen patients had various complications. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) drugs were given to four patients with hemorrhage or other complications, and serious adverse events did not occur. Our outcome demonstrates that missense mutation was the leading cause of XLRS and more than half of the patients with this missense had various complications. Anti-VEGF drugs may be an effective and safe way to prevent deterioration of XLRS with certain complications. There is wide genotypic and phenotypic variability in Chinese patients with XLRS. PMID:28272453

  3. Diagnosis of X-linked lymphoproliferative disease by analysis of SLAM-associated protein expression.

    PubMed

    Gilmour, K C; Cranston, T; Jones, A; Davies, E G; Goldblatt, D; Thrasher, A; Kinnon, C; Nichols, K E; Gaspar, H B

    2000-06-01

    X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) is an inherited immunodeficiency in which affected boys show abnormal responses to Epstein-Barr virus infection. The gene defective in XLP has been identified and designated SH2D1A and encodes a protein termed SLAM-associated protein (SAP). Mutation analysis in individuals with typical XLP presentations and family histories has only detected abnormalities in approximately 60% of patients. Thus, genetic analysis alone cannot confirm a diagnosis of XLP We have developed a SAP expression assay that can be used as a diagnostic indicator of XLP We show that SAP is constitutively expressed in normal individuals, in patients with severe sepsis and in patients with other primary immunodeficiencies. In six XLP patients, four with classical and two with atypical presentations, SAP expression was absent. In the latter two, who were previously assigned as having common variable immunodeficiency (CVID), the diagnosis of XLP was initially made using the protein expression assay. In two further patients in whom no mutation could be detected by genetic analysis, lack of SAP expression strongly suggests that these individuals have XLP. We therefore suggest that XLP should be suspected in certain boys previously diagnosed as having CVID and recommend that patients are investigated both by genetic analysis of SH2D1A and by expression of SAP protein.

  4. Gene Therapy for X-Linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency: Where Do We Stand?

    PubMed Central

    Cavazzana, Marina; Six, Emmanuelle; Lagresle-Peyrou, Chantal; André-Schmutz, Isabelle; Hacein-Bey-Abina, Salima

    2016-01-01

    More than 20 years ago, X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1) appeared to be the best condition to test the feasibility of hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy. The seminal SCID-X1 clinical studies, based on first-generation gammaretroviral vectors, demonstrated good long-term immune reconstitution in most treated patients despite the occurrence of vector-related leukemia in a few of them. This gene therapy has successfully enabled correction of the T cell defect. Natural killer and B cell defects were only partially restored, most likely due to the absence of a conditioning regimen. The success of these pioneering trials paved the way for the extension of gene-based treatment to many other diseases of the hematopoietic system, but the unfortunate serious adverse events led to extensive investigations to define the retrovirus integration profiles. This review puts into perspective the clinical experience of gene therapy for SCID-X1, with the development and implementation of new generations of safer vectors such as self-inactivating gammaretroviral or lentiviral vectors as well as major advances in integrome knowledge. PMID:26790362

  5. Gene Therapy Model of X-linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency Using a Modified Foamy Virus Vector

    PubMed Central

    Horino, Satoshi; Uchiyama, Toru; So, Takanori; Nagashima, Hiroyuki; Sun, Shu-lan; Sato, Miki; Asao, Atsuko; Haji, Yoichi; Sasahara, Yoji; Candotti, Fabio; Tsuchiya, Shigeru; Kure, Shigeo; Sugamura, Kazuo; Ishii, Naoto

    2013-01-01

    X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1) is an inherited genetic immunodeficiency associated with mutations in the common cytokine receptor γ chain (γc) gene, and characterized by a complete defect of T and natural killer (NK) cells. Gene therapy for SCID-X1 using conventional retroviral (RV) vectors carrying the γc gene results in the successful reconstitution of T cell immunity. However, the high incidence of vector-mediated T cell leukemia, caused by vector insertion near or within cancer-related genes has been a serious problem. In this study, we established a gene therapy model of mouse SCID-X1 using a modified foamy virus (FV) vector expressing human γc. Analysis of vector integration in a human T cell line demonstrated that the FV vector integration sites were significantly less likely to be located within or near transcriptional start sites than RV vector integration sites. To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy, bone marrow cells from γc-knockout (γc-KO) mice were infected with the FV vector and transplanted into γc-KO mice. Transplantation of the FV-treated cells resulted in the successful reconstitution of functionally active T and B cells. These data suggest that FV vectors can be effective and may be safer than conventional RV vectors for gene therapy for SCID-X1. PMID:23990961

  6. Parents of childhood X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy: high risk for depression and neurosis.

    PubMed

    Kuratsubo, Izumi; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Shimozawa, Nobuyuki; Kondo, Naomi

    2008-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess mental health in parents of patients with the childhood cerebral form of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (CCALD) and to investigate factors relating to psychological problems in order to improve clinical management and quality of life. Sixteen fathers and 21 mothers of patients with CCALD completed a battery of psychological examinations including the Beck Depression Inventory second edition (BDI-II), the General Health Questionnaire 60 (GHQ60), and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). Three fathers and 11 mothers showed high scores on the BDI-II, suggesting that they were in a depressive state. Depression in the mothers was serious as compared with previous reports. Six fathers and 11 mothers were considered to be in a state of neurosis, according to the results of the GHQ60. Four fathers and 8 mothers showed high levels of anxiety on the STAI. Health and social status of the mothers correlated with their mental health, and younger mothers with young patients tended to be more depressed. Thus, parents of patients with CCALD have a high risk of depression and neurosis. Understanding the mental state of these parents and improvements in the social support system including mental counseling, home nursing care, supports in workplace and community are necessary to prevent and treat psychological problems. Especially, early intervention for mental health problems should be provided for younger mothers with few years since the child's diagnosis.

  7. Clinical and mutational features of Vietnamese children with X-linked agammaglobulinemia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a primary immune deficiency characterized by recurrent bacterial infections and profoundly depressed serum immunoglobulin levels and circulating mature B cells. It is caused by mutations of the Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK) gene and is the most common form of inherited antibody deficiency. To our knowledge, this is the first report of XLA from Vietnam. Methods We investigated the BTK gene mutations and clinical features of four unrelated Vietnamese children. Results The mean ages at onset and at diagnosis were 2.5 and 8 years, respectively. All patients had a medical history of otitis media, pneumonia, and septicemia at the time of diagnosis. Other infections reported included sinusitis, bronchiectasis, arthritis, skin infections, meningitis, and recurrent diarrhea. We identified one previously reported mutation (c.441G >A) and three novel mutations: two frameshifts (c.1770delG and c.1742 delG), and one nonsense (c.1249A >T). Conclusions The delayed diagnosis may be attributable to insufficient awareness of this rare disease on the background of frequent infections even in the immunocompetent pediatric population in Vietnam. Our results further support the importance of molecular genetic testing in diagnosis of XLA. PMID:24885015

  8. How many X-linked genes for non-specific mental retardation (MRX) are there?

    SciTech Connect

    Gedeon, A.K.; Donnelly, A.J.; Mulley, J.C.

    1996-07-12

    X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) is that proportion of mental retardation (MR) showing the distinctive pattern of inheritance associated with the X chromosome. XLMR is subdivided into syndromal and non-specific (MRX) forms. MRX is clinically homogeneous but genetically heterogeneous. Affected males in families segregating MRX have no consistent phenotypic expression apart from their MR to distinguish them from unaffected males or affected males in other MRX families. Syndromal MRs have additional neurological or phenotypic characteristics that define a syndrome, and most of these syndromes are rare. Within some families an affected male may show {open_quotes}soft{close_quotes} syndromal signs, but where this is not evident in other affected males from the same family, the MR is diagnosed as non-specific. Delineation from fragile X syndrome or FRAXE MR can now be confidently made with the aid of direct molecular tests which detect the (CCG){sub n} expansion at either FRAXA or FRAXE. MRX can be expressed in carrier females but with milder manifestations. The gene in such cases could be partially dominant or result from a skewed X-inactivation pattern in neural tissue. 39 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  9. Newborn screening for X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy: evidence summary and advisory committee recommendation.

    PubMed

    Kemper, Alex R; Brosco, Jeffrey; Comeau, Anne Marie; Green, Nancy S; Grosse, Scott D; Jones, Elizabeth; Kwon, Jennifer M; Lam, Wendy K K; Ojodu, Jelili; Prosser, Lisa A; Tanksley, Susan

    2017-01-01

    The secretary of the US Department of Health and Human Services in February 2016 recommended that X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) be added to the recommended uniform screening panel for state newborn screening programs. This decision was informed by data presented on the accuracy of screening from New York, the only state that currently offers X-ALD newborn screening, and published and unpublished data showing health benefits of earlier treatment (hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and adrenal hormone replacement therapy) for the childhood cerebral form of X-ALD. X-ALD newborn screening also identifies individuals with later-onset disease, but poor genotype-phenotype correlation makes predicting health outcomes difficult and might increase the risk of unnecessary treatment. Few data are available regarding the harms of screening and presymptomatic identification. Significant challenges exist for implementing comprehensive X-ALD newborn screening, including incorporation of the test, coordinating follow-up diagnostic and treatment care, and coordination of extended family testing after case identification.Genet Med 19 1, 121-126.

  10. High nucleosome occupancy is encoded at X-linked gene promoters in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Ercan, Sevinç; Lubling, Yaniv; Segal, Eran; Lieb, Jason D.

    2011-01-01

    We mapped nucleosome occupancy by paired-end Illumina sequencing in C. elegans embryonic cells, adult somatic cells, and a mix of adult somatic and germ cells. In all three samples, the nucleosome occupancy of gene promoters on the X chromosome differed from autosomal promoters. While both X and autosomal promoters exhibit a typical nucleosome-depleted region upstream of transcript start sites and a well-positioned +1 nucleosome, X-linked gene promoters on average exhibit higher nucleosome occupancy relative to autosomal promoters. We show that the difference between X and autosomes does not depend on the somatic dosage compensation machinery. Instead, the chromatin difference at promoters is partly encoded by DNA sequence, because a model trained on nucleosome sequence preferences from S. cerevisiae in vitro data recapitulate nearly completely the experimentally observed difference between X and autosomal promoters. The model predictions also correlate very well with experimentally determined occupancy values genome-wide. The nucleosome occupancy differences observed on X promoters may bear on mechanisms of X chromosome dosage compensation in the soma, and chromosome-wide repression of X in the germline. PMID:21177966

  11. Linkage mapping of a severe X-linked mental retardation syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Malmgren, H.; Sundvall, M.; Steen-Bondeson, M.L.; Pettersson, U. ); Dahl, N. University Hospital, Uppsala ); Gustavson, K.H.; Anneren, G.; Wadelius, C. )

    1993-06-01

    A four-generation Swedish family with a new type of X-linked mental retardation syndrome was recently reported by Gustavson et al. The complex syndrome includes microcephaly, severe mental retardation, optical atrophy with decreased vision or blindness, severe hearing defect, characteristic facial features, spasticity, seizures, and restricted joint motility. The patients die during infancy or early in childhood. Twenty-one family members, including two affected males, were available for study. Linkage analysis was conducted in the family by using 11 RFLP markers and 10 VNTR markers spread along the X chromosome. A hypervariable short tandem repeat of DXS294 at Xq26 showed a peak two-point lod score of 3.35 at zero recombination fraction. Calculations using the same markers revealed a multipoint peak lod score of 3.65 at DXS294. Crossover events with the centromeric marker DXS424 and the telomeric marker DXS297 delimit a probable region for the gene localization. It is noteworthy that the disease loci of two other syndromes with overlapping clinical manifestations recently were shown by Turner et al. and Pettigrew et al. to be linked to markers at Xq26. 29 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. High-throughput sequencing reveals an altered T cell repertoire in X-linked agammaglobulinemia

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Manish; Simchoni, Noa; Hamm, David; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    To examine the T cell receptor structure in the absence of B cells, the TCR β CDR3 was sequenced from DNA of 15 X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) subjects and 18 male controls, using the Illumina HiSeq platform and the ImmunoSEQ analyzer. V gene usage and the V–J combinations, derived from both productive and nonproductive sequences, were significantly different between XLA samples and controls. Although the CDR3 length was similar for XLA and control samples, the CDR3 region of the XLA T cell receptor contained significantly fewer deletions and insertions in V, D, and J gene segments, differences intrinsic to the V(D)J recombination process and not due to peripheral T cell selection. XLA CDR3s demonstrated fewer charged amino acid residues, more sharing of CDR3 sequences, and almost completely lacked a population of highly modified Vβ gene segments found in control DNA, suggesting both a skewed and contracted T cell repertoire in XLA. PMID:26360253

  13. Osteopontin and the dento-osseous pathobiology of X-linked hypophosphatemia.

    PubMed

    Boukpessi, Tchilalo; Hoac, Betty; Coyac, Benjamin R; Leger, Thibaut; Garcia, Camille; Wicart, Philippe; Whyte, Michael P; Glorieux, Francis H; Linglart, Agnès; Chaussain, Catherine; McKee, Marc D

    2017-02-01

    Seven young patients with X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH, having inactivating PHEX mutations) were discovered to accumulate osteopontin (OPN) at the sites of defective bone mineralization near osteocytes - the so-called hallmark periosteocytic (lacunar) "halos" of XLH. OPN was also localized in the pericanalicular matrix extending beyond the osteocyte lacunae, as well as in the hypomineralized matrix of tooth dentin. OPN, a potent inhibitor of mineralization normally degraded by PHEX, is a member of a family of acidic, phosphorylated, calcium-binding, extracellular matrix proteins known to regulate dental, skeletal, and pathologic mineralization. Associated with the increased amount of OPN (along with inhibitory OPN peptide fragments) in XLH bone matrix, we found an enlarged, hypomineralized, lacuno-canalicular network - a defective pattern of skeletal mineralization that decreases stiffness locally at: i) the cell-matrix interface in the pericellular environment of the mechanosensing osteocyte, and ii) the osteocyte's dendritic network of cell processes extending throughout the bone. Our findings of an excess of inhibitory OPN near osteocytes and their cell processes, and in dentin, spatially correlates with the defective mineralization observed at these sites in the skeleton and teeth of XLH patients. These changes likely contribute to the dento-osseous pathobiology of XLH, and participate in the aberrant bone adaptation and remodeling seen in XLH.

  14. PROTECTIVE LEVELS OF VARICELLA-ZOSTER ANTIBODY DID NOT EFFECTIVELY PREVENT CHICKENPOX IN AN X-LINKED AGAMMAGLOBULINEMIA PATIENT.

    PubMed

    Nobre, Fernanda Aimée; Gonzalez, Isabela Garrido da Silva; de Moraes-Pinto, Maria Isabel; Costa-Carvalho, Beatriz Tavares

    2015-01-01

    We describe the case of an eight-year-old boy with X-linked agammaglobulinemia who developed mild varicella despite regular intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy. He maintained protective antibody levels against varicella and the previous batches of IVIG that he received had adequate varicella-specific IgG levels. The case illustrates that IVIG may not prevent VZV infection.

  15. Copy number gain of VCX, X-linked multi-copy gene, leads to cell proliferation and apoptosis during spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ji, Juan; Qin, Yufeng; Wang, Rong; Huang, Zhenyao; Zhang, Yan; Zhou, Ran; Song, Ling; Ling, Xiufeng; Hu, Zhibin; Miao, Dengshun; Shen, Hongbing; Xia, Yankai; Wang, Xinru; Lu, Chuncheng

    2016-11-29

    Male factor infertility affects one-sixth of couples worldwide, and non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA) is one of the most severe forms. In recent years there has been increasing evidence to implicate the participation of X chromosome in the process of spermatogenesis. To uncover the roles of X-linked multi-copy genes in spermatogenesis, we performed systematic analysis of X-linked gene copy number variations (CNVs) and Y chromosome haplogrouping in 447 idiopathic NOA patients and 485 healthy controls. Interestingly, the frequency of individuals with abnormal level copy of Variable charge, X-linked (VCX) was significantly different between cases and controls after multiple test correction (p = 5.10 × 10-5). To discriminate the effect of gain/loss copies in these genes, we analyzed the frequency of X-linked multi-copy genes in subjects among subdivided groups. Our results demonstrated that individuals with increased copy numbers of Nuclear RNA export factor 2 (NXF2) (p = 9.21 × 10-8) and VCX (p = 1.97 × 10-4) conferred the risk of NOA. In vitro analysis demonstrated that increasing copy number of VCX could upregulate the gene expression and regulate cell proliferation and apoptosis. Our study establishes a robust association between the VCX CNVs and NOA risk.

  16. Expression of type IV collagen alpha 3 and alpha 4 chain mRNA in X-linked Alport syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, K; Yoskikawa, N; Iijima, K; Nakamura, H

    1996-06-01

    X-Linked Alport syndrome is caused by mutations in the COL4A5 gene encoding the Type IV collagen alpha 5 chain (alpha 5(IV)). The authors' recent immunohistochemical study demonstrated abnormal expression of alpha 3(IV) and alpha 4(IV), as well as of alpha 5(IV), in patients with this syndrome, and a correlation between abnormal alpha 3(IV) and alpha 4(IV) expression and severity of the disease. The mechanism linking alpha 5(IV) mutations with abnormal alpha 3(IV) and alpha 4(IV) expression is unknown. To examine alpha 3(IV) and alpha 4(IV) mRNA expression in renal cortical tissues of patients with X-linked Alport syndrome, a nonradioisotopic, semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay (alpha 3(IV) and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), alpha 4(IV), and GAPDH coamplification) was performed. There were no significant differences among severely affected male (N = 3), mildly affected male (N = 2), and female (N = 1) X-linked Alport patients and control subjects (N = 2) with respect to alpha 3(IV) and alpha 4(IV) mRNA expression in renal cortical tissue. These findings indicate that alpha 3(IV) and alpha 4(IV) transcription is not turned off in X-linked Alport syndrome and suggest that abnormal expression of alpha 3(IV) and alpha 4(IV) proteins in this syndrome may be the result of failure of incorporation of alpha 3(IV) and alpha 4(IV) into the glomerular basement membrane.

  17. Copy number gain of VCX, X-linked multi-copy gene, leads to cell proliferation and apoptosis during spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhenyao; Zhang, Yan; Zhou, Ran; Song, Ling; Ling, Xiufeng; Hu, Zhibin; Miao, Dengshun; Shen, Hongbing; Xia, Yankai; Wang, Xinru; Lu, Chuncheng

    2016-01-01

    Male factor infertility affects one-sixth of couples worldwide, and non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA) is one of the most severe forms. In recent years there has been increasing evidence to implicate the participation of X chromosome in the process of spermatogenesis. To uncover the roles of X-linked multi-copy genes in spermatogenesis, we performed systematic analysis of X-linked gene copy number variations (CNVs) and Y chromosome haplogrouping in 447 idiopathic NOA patients and 485 healthy controls. Interestingly, the frequency of individuals with abnormal level copy of Variable charge, X-linked (VCX) was significantly different between cases and controls after multiple test correction (p = 5.10 × 10−5). To discriminate the effect of gain/loss copies in these genes, we analyzed the frequency of X-linked multi-copy genes in subjects among subdivided groups. Our results demonstrated that individuals with increased copy numbers of Nuclear RNA export factor 2 (NXF2) (p = 9.21 × 10−8) and VCX (p = 1.97 × 10−4) conferred the risk of NOA. In vitro analysis demonstrated that increasing copy number of VCX could upregulate the gene expression and regulate cell proliferation and apoptosis. Our study establishes a robust association between the VCX CNVs and NOA risk. PMID:27705943

  18. Evidence for compensatory upregulation of expressed X-linked genes in mammals, Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Xinxian; Hiatt, Joseph B; Nguyen, Di Kim; Ercan, Sevinc; Sturgill, David; Hillier, LaDeana W; Schlesinger, Felix; Davis, Carrie A; Reinke, Valerie J; Gingeras, Thomas R; Shendure, Jay; Waterston, Robert H; Oliver, Brian; Lieb, Jason D; Disteche, Christine M

    2012-01-01

    Many animal species use a chromosome-based mechanism of sex determination, which has led to the coordinate evolution of dosage-compensation systems. Dosage compensation not only corrects the imbalance in the number of X chromosomes between the sexes but also is hypothesized to correct dosage imbalance within cells that is due to monoallelic X-linked expression and biallelic autosomal expression, by upregulating X-linked genes twofold (termed ‘Ohno’s hypothesis’). Although this hypothesis is well supported by expression analyses of individual X-linked genes and by microarray-based transcriptome analyses, it was challenged by a recent study using RNA sequencing and proteomics. We obtained new, independent RNA-seq data, measured RNA polymerase distribution and reanalyzed published expression data in mammals, C. elegans and Drosophila. Our analyses, which take into account the skewed gene content of the X chromosome, support the hypothesis of upregulation of expressed X-linked genes to balance expression of the genome. PMID:22019781

  19. Canine hearing loss management.

    PubMed

    Scheifele, Lesa; Clark, John Greer; Scheifele, Peter M

    2012-11-01

    Dog owners and handlers are naturally concerned when suspicion of hearing loss arises for their dogs. Questions frequently asked of the veterinarian center on warning signs of canine hearing loss and what can be done for the dog if hearing loss is confirmed. This article addresses warning signs of canine hearing loss, communication training and safety awareness issues, and the feasibility of hearing aid amplification for dogs.

  20. An X-Linked Sex Ratio Distorter in Drosophila simulans That Kills or Incapacitates Both Noncarrier Sperm and Sons

    PubMed Central

    Rice, William R.

    2014-01-01

    Genomic conflict occurs when a genomic component gains a reproductive advantage at the expense of the organism as a whole. X-linked segregation distorters kill or incapacitate Y-bearing sperm, thereby gaining a transmission advantage but also reducing male fertility and generating a female-biased sex ratio. When some damaged, Y-bearing sperm survive and fertilize eggs, then the segregation distortion phenotype could be expanded by harming or killing sons in the next generation. X-linked son-killers are predicted by theory to be favored by natural selection and evolve when brothers and sisters compete for shared limiting resources and/or when brothers reduce the inclusive fitness of their sisters via sib-mating—a phenomenon called SA-zygotic drive. Here I develop and use a process-of-elimination screen to show that an unclassified X-linked sex ratio distorter (skew) in Drosophila simulans kills or incapacitates noncarrier sperm and also kills a substantial proportion of sons, i.e., it has both a segregation distortion and a SA-zygotic drive phenotype. There are three unique X-linked segregation distorters known to occur in D. simulans named Winters, Durham, and Paris. Autosomal-dominant suppressors of Winters (Nmy) and Durham (Tmy) failed to suppress skew. A Y-linked suppressor of Paris, however, did suppress skew, and a recombination test failed to detect recombinants between these two sex ratio distorters, indicating that they are tightly linked and plausibly identical or allelic. Son-killing may be an important yet unrecognized component of other X-linked segregation distorters. PMID:25081980

  1. OFD1 is mutated in X-linked Joubert syndrome and interacts with LCA5-encoded lebercilin.

    PubMed

    Coene, Karlien L M; Roepman, Ronald; Doherty, Dan; Afroze, Bushra; Kroes, Hester Y; Letteboer, Stef J F; Ngu, Lock H; Budny, Bartlomiej; van Wijk, Erwin; Gorden, Nicholas T; Azhimi, Malika; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel; Veltman, Joris A; Boink, Mireille; Kleefstra, Tjitske; Cremers, Frans P M; van Bokhoven, Hans; de Brouwer, Arjan P M

    2009-10-01

    We ascertained a multi-generation Malaysian family with Joubert syndrome (JS). The presence of asymptomatic obligate carrier females suggested an X-linked recessive inheritance pattern. Affected males presented with mental retardation accompanied by postaxial polydactyly and retinitis pigmentosa. Brain MRIs showed the presence of a "molar tooth sign," which classifies this syndrome as classic JS with retinal involvement. Linkage analysis showed linkage to Xpter-Xp22.2 and a maximum LOD score of 2.06 for marker DXS8022. Mutation analysis revealed a frameshift mutation, p.K948NfsX8, in exon 21 of OFD1. In an isolated male with JS, a second frameshift mutation, p.E923KfsX3, in the same exon was identified. OFD1 has previously been associated with oral-facial-digital type 1 (OFD1) syndrome, a male-lethal X-linked dominant condition, and with X-linked recessive Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome type 2 (SGBS2). In a yeast two-hybrid screen of a retinal cDNA library, we identified OFD1 as an interacting partner of the LCA5-encoded ciliary protein lebercilin. We show that X-linked recessive mutations in OFD1 reduce, but do not eliminate, the interaction with lebercilin, whereas X-linked dominant OFD1 mutations completely abolish binding to lebercilin. In addition, recessive mutations in OFD1 did not affect the pericentriolar localization of the recombinant protein in hTERT-RPE1 cells, whereas this localization was lost for dominant mutations. These findings offer a molecular explanation for the phenotypic spectrum observed for OFD1 mutations; this spectrum now includes OFD1 syndrome, SGBS2, and JS.

  2. X-Linked miRNAs Associated with Gender Differences in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Khalifa, Olfa; Pers, Yves-Marie; Ferreira, Rosanna; Sénéchal, Audrey; Jorgensen, Christian; Apparailly, Florence; Duroux-Richard, Isabelle

    2016-11-08

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease that predominantly affects women. MicroRNAs have emerged as crucial regulators of the immune system, whose expression is deregulated in RA. We aimed at quantifying the expression level of 14 miRNAs located on the X chromosome and at identifying whether differences are associated with disease and/or sex. A case-control study of 21 RA patients and 22 age- and sex-matched healthy controls was performed on peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The expression level of five miRNAs (miR-221, miR-222, miR-532, miR-106a, and miR-98) was significantly different between RA and controls when stratifying by sex, and the expression level of four miRNAs (miR-222, miR-532, miR-98, and miR-92a) was significantly different between RA females and males. The expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analysis revealed a significant gender effect of the FoxP3 promoter polymorphism rs3761548A/C on miR-221, miR-222 and miR-532 expression levels, and of the FoxP3 polymorphism rs2232365A/G on miR-221 expression levels in PBMC of RA patients. These data further support the involvement of the X chromosome in RA susceptibility. X-linked miRNAs, in the context of sex differences, might provide novel insight into new molecular mechanisms and potential therapeutic targets in RA for disease treatment and prevention.

  3. Cerebral Vasculitis in X-linked Lymphoproliferative Disease Cured by Matched Unrelated Cord Blood Transplant.

    PubMed

    Gray, Paul E; O'Brien, Tracey A; Wagle, Mayura; Tangye, Stuart G; Palendira, Umaimainthan; Roscioli, Tony; Choo, Sharon; Sutton, Rosemary; Ziegler, John B; Frith, Katie

    2015-10-01

    Vasculitis occurs rarely in association with X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP). There are four published cases of non-EBV XLP-associated cerebral vasculitis reported, none of whom have survived without major cognitive impairment. A 9-year old boy initially presented aged 5 years with a restrictive joint disease. He subsequently developed dysgammaglobulinemia, episodic severe pneumonitis, aplastic anaemia, gastritis and cerebral vasculitis. A diagnosis of XLP was made, based on flow cytometric analysis and the identification of a novel mutation in SH2D1A, c.96G>C. No peripheral blood lymphocyte clonal proliferation was identified and he was EBV negative, although human herpes virus-7 (HHV7) was detected repeatedly in his cerebrospinal fluid. He underwent a reduced intensity unrelated umbilical cord blood transplant, but failed to engraft. A second 5/6 matched cord gave 100 % donor engraftment. Complications included BK virus-associated haemorrhagic cystitis, a possible NK-cell mediated immune reconstitution syndrome and post-transplant anti-glomerular basement membrane disease, the latter treated with cyclophosphamide and rituximab. At +450 days post-transplant he is in remission from his vasculitis and anti-glomerular basement membrane disease, and HHV-7 has remained undetectable. This is the second published description of joint disease in XLP, and only the fourth case of non-EBV associated cerebral vasculitis in XLP, as well as being the first to be successfully treated for this manifestation. This case raises specific questions about vasculitis in XLP, in particular the potential relevance of HHV-7 to the pathogenesis.

  4. Response to Drs. Shastry and Trese: Phenotype-genotype correlations in X-linked retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, J.; Munnich, A.

    1996-11-11

    Shastry and Trese recently reported on a large kindred with X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP) characterized by a loss of central vision and preserved peripheral function. In their report, the disease had an early onset with severe myopia and a loss of central vision, while night blindness occurred later. Genetic analysis suggested that the disease was linked to the RP2 locus, and the authors raised the question of whether other cases linked to RP2 could display a similar loss of central vision. Three years ago, we reported on 4 large XLRP pedigrees with a very early onset with severe myopia and early loss of visual acuity, while in 5 other families the disease started later with night blindness. We showed that the first clinical form was linked to RP2, while the second was linked to RP3. Thus, the major difference between the two forms concerns the initial symptom, information which can be obtained from the parents and patients after careful questioning. By contrast, in adult life, no difference in either severity of disease or aspect of the fundus was observed in our series, regardless of the clinical subtype of XLRP. Some months later, Jacobson et al. reported on a pedigree with an RP2 genotype, and their data support the notion that in XLRP of RP2 type 1, cone dysfunction takes place first, and as the disease advances both rods and cones are affected. We were very happy, therefore, to read that the study of Shastry and Trese fully confirmed our previous findings. 3 refs.

  5. X-Linked Adrenoleukodystrophy: Molecular and Functional Analysis of the ABCD1 Gene in Argentinean Patients

    PubMed Central

    Amorosi, Cyntia Anabel; Myskóva, Helena; Monti, Mariela Roxana; Argaraña, Carlos Enrique; Morita, Masashi; Kemp, Stephan; de Kremer, Raquel Dodelson; Dvoráková, Lenka; de Ramírez, Ana María Oller

    2012-01-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is an inherited metabolic disease associated with mutations in the ABCD1 gene that encodes an ATP-binding cassette transporter protein, ALDP. The disease is characterized by increased concentrations of very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) in plasma and in adrenal, testicular and nervous tissues, due to a defect in peroxisomal VLCFA β-oxidation. In the present study, we analyzed 10 male patients and 17 female carriers from 10 unrelated pedigrees with X-ALD from Argentina. By sequencing the ABCD1 we detected 9 different mutations, 8 of which were novel. These new mutations were verified by a combination of methods that included both functional (western blot and peroxisomal VLCFA β-oxidation) and bioinformatics analysis. The spectrum of novel mutations consists of 3 frameshift (p.Ser284fs*16, p.Glu380Argfs*21 and p.Thr254Argfs*82); a deletion (p.Ser572_Asp575del); a splicing mutation (c.1081+5G>C) and 3 missense mutations (p.Ala341Asp, p.His420Pro and p.Tyr547Cys). In one patient 2 changes were found: a known missense (p.His669Arg) and an unpublished amino acid substitution (p.Ala19Ser). In vitro studies suggest that p.Ala19Ser is a polymorphism. Moreover, we identified two novel intronic polymorphisms and two amino acid polymorphisms. In conclusion, this study extends the spectrum of mutation in X-ALD and facilitates the identification of heterozygous females. PMID:23300730

  6. Mutational and protein analysis of patients and heterozygous women with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Feigenbaum, V; Lombard-Platet, G; Guidoux, S; Sarde, C O; Mandel, J L; Aubourg, P

    1996-06-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD), a neurodegenerative disorder associated with impaired beta-oxidation of very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA), is due to mutations in a gene encoding a peroxisomal ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter (ALD protein [ALDP]). We analyzed the open reading frame of the ALD gene in 44 French ALD kindred by using SSCP or denaturing gradient-gel electrophoresis and studied the effect of mutations on ALDP by immunocytofluorescence and western blotting of fibroblasts and/or white blood cells. Mutations were detected in 37 of 44 kindreds and were distributed over the whole protein-coding region, with the exception of the C terminus encoded in exon 10. Except for two mutations (delAG1801 and P560L) observed four times each, nearly every ALD family has a different mutation. Twenty-four of 37 mutations were missense mutations leading to amino acid changes located in or close to putative transmembrane segments (TMS 2, 3, 4, and 5), in the EAA-like motif and in the nucleotide fold of the ATP-binding domain of ALDP. Of 38 ALD patients tested, 27 (71%) lacked ALDP immunoreactivity in their fibroblasts and/or white blood cells. More than half of missense mutations studied (11 of 21) resulted in a complete lack of ALDP immunoreactivity, and six missense mutations resulted in decreased ALDP expression. The fibroblasts and/or white blood cells of 15 of 15 heterozygous carrier from ALD kindred with no ALDP showed a mixture of positive- and negative-ALDP immunoreactivity due to X-inactivation. Since 5%-15% of heterozygous women have normal VLCFA levels, the immunodetection of ALDP in white blood cells can be applicable in a majority of ALD kindred, to identify heterozygous women, particularly when the ALD gene mutation has not yet been identified.

  7. Mutational and protein analysis of patients and heterozygous women with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Feigenbaum, V.; Guidoux, S.; Aubourg, P.

    1996-06-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD), a neurodegenerative disorder associated with impaired {beta}-oxidation of very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA), is due to mutations in a gene encoding a peroxisomal ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter (ALD protein [ALDP]). We analyzed the open reading frame of the ALD gene in 44 French ALD kindred by using SSCP or denaturing gradient-gel electrophoresis and studied the effect of mutations on ALDP by immunocytofluorescence and western blotting of fibroblasts and/or white blood cells. Mutations were detected in 37 of 44 kindreds and were distributed over the whole protein-coding region, with the exception of the C terminus encoded in exon 10. Except for two mutations (delAG1801 and P560L) observed four times each, nearly every ALD family has a different mutation. Twenty-four of 37 mutations were missense mutations leading to amino acid changes located in or close to putative transmembrane segments (TMS 2, 3, 4, and 5), in the EAA-like motif and in the nucleotide fold of the ATP-binding domain of ALDP. Of 38 ALD patients tested, 27 (71%) lacked ALDP immunoreactivity in their fibroblasts and/or white blood cells. More than half of missense mutations studied (11 of 21) resulted in a complete lack of ALDP immunoreactivity, and six missense mutations resulted in decreased ALDP expression. The fibroblasts and/or white blood cells of 15 of 15 heterozygous carrier from ALD kindred with no ALDP showed a mixture of positive- and negative-ALDP immunoreactivity due to X-inactivation. Since 5%-15% of heterozygous women have normal VLCFA levels, the immunodetection of ALDP in white blood cells can be applicable in a majority of ALD kindred, to identify heterozygous women, particularly when the ALD gene mutation has not yet been identified. 35 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Evaluation of pharmacological induction of fatty acid beta-oxidation in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    McGuinness, M C; Zhang, H P; Smith, K D

    2001-01-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is an inherited neurometabolic disorder associated with elevated levels of saturated unbranched very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA; C > 22:0) in plasma and tissues, and reduced VLCFA beta-oxidation in fibroblasts, white blood cells, and amniocytes from X-ALD patients. The X-ALD gene (ABCD1) at Xq28 encodes the adrenoleukodystrophy protein (ALDP) that is related to the peroxisomal ATP-binding cassette (ABCD) transmembrane half-transporter proteins. The function of ALDP is unknown and its role in VLCFA accumulation unresolved. Previously, our laboratory has shown that sodium 4-phenylbutyrate (4PBA) treatment of X-ALD fibroblasts results in increased peroxisomal VLCFA beta-oxidation activity and increased expression of the X-ALD-related protein, ALDRP, encoded by the ABCD2 gene. In this study, the effect of various pharmacological agents on VLCFA beta-oxidation in ALD mouse fibroblasts is tested. 4PBA, styrylacetate and benzyloxyacetate (structurally related to 4PBA), and trichostatin A (functionally related to 4PBA) increase both VLCFA (peroxisomal) and long-chain fatty acid [LCFA (peroxisomal and mitochondrial)] beta-oxidation. Isobutyrate, zaprinast, hydroxyurea, and 5-azacytidine had no effect on VLCFA or LCFA beta-oxidation. Lovastatin had no effect on fatty acid beta-oxidation under normal tissue culture conditions but did result in an increase in both VLCFA and LCFA beta-oxidation when ALD mouse fibroblasts were cultured in the absence of cholesterol. The effect of trichostatin A on peroxisomal VLCFA beta-oxidation is shown to be independent of an increase in ALDRP expression, suggesting that correction of the biochemical abnormality in X-ALD is not dependent on pharmacological induction of a redundant gene (ABCD2). These studies contribute to a better understanding of the role of ALDP in VLCFA accumulation and may lead to the development of more effective pharmacological therapies. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  9. X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy: molecular and functional analysis of the ABCD1 gene in Argentinean patients.

    PubMed

    Amorosi, Cyntia Anabel; Myskóva, Helena; Monti, Mariela Roxana; Argaraña, Carlos Enrique; Morita, Masashi; Kemp, Stephan; Dodelson de Kremer, Raquel; Dvoráková, Lenka; Oller de Ramírez, Ana María

    2012-01-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is an inherited metabolic disease associated with mutations in the ABCD1 gene that encodes an ATP-binding cassette transporter protein, ALDP. The disease is characterized by increased concentrations of very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) in plasma and in adrenal, testicular and nervous tissues, due to a defect in peroxisomal VLCFA β-oxidation. In the present study, we analyzed 10 male patients and 17 female carriers from 10 unrelated pedigrees with X-ALD from Argentina. By sequencing the ABCD1 we detected 9 different mutations, 8 of which were novel. These new mutations were verified by a combination of methods that included both functional (western blot and peroxisomal VLCFA β-oxidation) and bioinformatics analysis. The spectrum of novel mutations consists of 3 frameshift (p.Ser284fs*16, p.Glu380Argfs*21 and p.Thr254Argfs*82); a deletion (p.Ser572_Asp575del); a splicing mutation (c.1081+5G>C) and 3 missense mutations (p.Ala341Asp, p.His420Pro and p.Tyr547Cys). In one patient 2 changes were found: a known missense (p.His669Arg) and an unpublished amino acid substitution (p.Ala19Ser). In vitro studies suggest that p.Ala19Ser is a polymorphism. Moreover, we identified two novel intronic polymorphisms and two amino acid polymorphisms. In conclusion, this study extends the spectrum of mutation in X-ALD and facilitates the identification of heterozygous females.

  10. Mutations in the gene for X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy in patients with different clinical phenotypes.

    PubMed Central

    Braun, A; Ambach, H; Kammerer, S; Rolinski, B; Stöckler, S; Rabl, W; Gärtner, J; Zierz, S; Roscher, A A

    1995-01-01

    Recently, the gene for the most common peroxisomal disorder, X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD), has been described encoding a peroxisomal membrane transporter protein. We analyzed the entire protein-coding sequence of this gene by reverse-transcription PCR, SSCP, and DNA sequencing in five patients with different clinical expression of X-ALD and in their female relatives; these clinical expressions were cerebral childhood ALD, adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN), and "Addison disease only" (ADO) phenotype. In the three patients exhibiting the classical picture of severe childhood ALD we identified in the 5' portion of the X-ALD gene a 38-bp deletion that causes a frameshift mutation, a 3-bp deletion leading to a deletion of an amino acid in the ATP-binding domain of the ALD protein, and a missense mutation. In the patient with the clinical phenotype of AMN, a nonsense mutation in codon 212, along with a second site mutation at codon 178, was observed. Analysis of the patient with the ADO phenotype revealed a further missense mutation at a highly conserved position in the ALDP/PMP70 comparison. The disruptive nature of two mutations (i.e., the frameshift and the nonsense mutation) in patients with biochemically proved childhood ALD and AMN further strongly supports the hypothesis that alterations in this gene play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of X-ALD. Since the current biochemical techniques for X-ALD carrier detection in affected families lack sufficient reliability, our procedure described for systematic mutation scanning is also capable of improving genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7717396

  11. Mutations in the gene for X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy in patients with different clinical phenotypes

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, A.; Ambach, H.; Kammerer, S.; Rolinski, B.; Roscher, A.; Rabl, W.; Stoeckler, S.; Gaertner, J.; Zierz, S.

    1995-04-01

    Recently, the gene for the most common peroxisomal disorder, X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD), has been described encoding a peroxisomal membrane transporter protein. We analyzed the entire protein-coding sequence of this gene by reverse-transcription PCR, SSCP, and DNA sequencing in five patients with different clinical expressions were cerebral childhood ALD, adrenomyecloneuropathy (AMN), and {open_quotes}Addison disease only{close_quotes} (AD) phenotype. In the three patients exhibiting the classical picture of severe childhood ALD we identified in the 5{prime} portion of the X-ALD gene a 38-bp deletion that causes a frameshift mutation, a 3-bp deletion leading to a deletion of an amino acid in the ATP-binding domain of the ALD protein, and a missense mutation. In the patient with the clinical phenotype of AMN, a nonsense mutation in codon 212, along with a second site mutation at codon 178, was observed. Analysis of the patient with the ADO phenotype revealed a further missense mutation at a highly conserved position in the ALDP/PMP70 comparison. The disruptive nature of two mutations (i.e., the frameshift and the nonsense mutation) in patients with biochemically proved childhood ALD and AMN further strongly supports the hypothesis that alterations in this gene play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of X-ALD. Since the current biochemical techniques for X-ALD carrier detection in affected families lack sufficient reliability, our procedure described for systematic mutation scanning is also capable of improving genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis. 19 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Phosphatase-Dead Myotubularin Ameliorates X-Linked Centronuclear Myopathy Phenotypes in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tronchère, Hélène; Hnia, Karim; Chicanne, Gaëtan; Rinaldi, Bruno; Cowling, Belinda S.; Ferry, Arnaud; Klaholz, Bruno; Payrastre, Bernard; Laporte, Jocelyn; Friant, Sylvie

    2012-01-01

    Myotubularin MTM1 is a phosphoinositide (PPIn) 3-phosphatase mutated in X-linked centronuclear myopathy (XLCNM; myotubular myopathy). We investigated the involvement of MTM1 enzymatic activity on XLCNM phenotypes. Exogenous expression of human MTM1 in yeast resulted in vacuolar enlargement, as a consequence of its phosphatase activity. Expression of mutants from patients with different clinical progression and determination of PtdIns3P and PtdIns5P cellular levels confirmed the link between vacuolar morphology and MTM1 phosphatase activity, and showed that some disease mutants retain phosphatase activity. Viral gene transfer of phosphatase-dead myotubularin mutants (MTM1C375S and MTM1S376N) significantly improved most histological signs of XLCNM displayed by a Mtm1-null mouse, at similar levels as wild-type MTM1. Moreover, the MTM1C375S mutant improved muscle performance and restored the localization of nuclei, triad alignment, and the desmin intermediate filament network, while it did not normalize PtdIns3P levels, supporting phosphatase-independent roles of MTM1 in maintaining normal muscle performance and organelle positioning in skeletal muscle. Among the different XLCNM signs investigated, we identified only triad shape and fiber size distribution as being partially dependent on MTM1 phosphatase activity. In conclusion, this work uncovers MTM1 roles in the structural organization of muscle fibers that are independent of its enzymatic activity. This underlines that removal of enzymes should be used with care to conclude on the physiological importance of their activity. PMID:23071445

  13. X-Linked Cone Dystrophy Caused by Mutation of the Red and Green Cone Opsins

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Jessica C.; Webb, Tom R.; Kanuga, Naheed; Robson, Anthony G.; Holder, Graham E.; Stockman, Andrew; Ripamonti, Caterina; Ebenezer, Neil D.; Ogun, Olufunmilola; Devery, Sophie; Wright, Genevieve A.; Maher, Eamonn R.; Cheetham, Michael E.; Moore, Anthony T.; Michaelides, Michel; Hardcastle, Alison J.

    2010-01-01

    X-linked cone and cone-rod dystrophies (XLCOD and XLCORD) are a heterogeneous group of progressive disorders that solely or primarily affect cone photoreceptors. Mutations in exon ORF15 of the RPGR gene are the most common underlying cause. In a previous study, we excluded RPGR exon ORF15 in some families with XLCOD. Here, we report genetic mapping of XLCOD to Xq26.1-qter. A significant LOD score was detected with marker DXS8045 (Zmax = 2.41 [θ = 0.0]). The disease locus encompasses the cone opsin gene array on Xq28. Analysis of the array revealed a missense mutation (c. 529T>C [p. W177R]) in exon 3 of both the long-wavelength-sensitive (LW, red) and medium-wavelength-sensitive (MW, green) cone opsin genes that segregated with disease. Both exon 3 sequences were identical and were derived from the MW gene as a result of gene conversion. The amino acid W177 is highly conserved in visual and nonvisual opsins across species. We show that W177R in MW opsin and the equivalent W161R mutation in rod opsin result in protein misfolding and retention in the endoplasmic reticulum. We also demonstrate that W177R misfolding, unlike the P23H mutation in rod opsin that causes retinitis pigmentosa, is not rescued by treatment with the pharmacological chaperone 9-cis-retinal. Mutations in the LW/MW cone opsin gene array can, therefore, lead to a spectrum of disease, ranging from color blindness to progressive cone dystrophy (XLCOD5). PMID:20579627

  14. Survey of the enthesopathy of X-linked hypophosphatemia and its characterization in Hyp mice.

    PubMed

    Liang, Guoying; Katz, Lee D; Insogna, Karl L; Carpenter, Thomas O; Macica, Carolyn M

    2009-09-01

    X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH) is characterized by rickets and osteomalacia as a result of an inactivating mutation of the PHEX (phosphate-regulating gene with homology to endopeptidases on the X chromosome) gene. PHEX encodes an endopeptidase that, when inactivated, results in elevated circulating levels of FGF-23, a novel phosphate-regulating hormone (a phosphatonin), thereby resulting in increased phosphate excretion and impaired bone mineralization. A generalized and severe mineralizing enthesopathy in patients with XLH was first reported in 1985; we likewise report a survey in which we found evidence of enthesopathy in fibrocartilaginous insertion sites, as well as osteophyte formation, in the majority of patients. Nonetheless, there has been very little focus on the progression and pathogenesis underlying the paradoxical heterotopic calcification of tendon and ligament insertion sites. Such studies have been hampered by lack of a model of mineralizing enthesopathy. We therefore characterized the involvement of the most frequently targeted fibrocartilaginous tendon insertion sites in Hyp mice, a murine model of the XLH mutation that phenocopies the human syndrome in every detail including hypophosphatemia and elevated FGF-23. Histological examination of the affected entheses revealed that mineralizing insertion sites, while thought to involve bone spur formation, were not due to bone-forming osteoblasts but instead to a significant expansion of mineralizing fibrocartilage. Our finding that enthesis fibrocartilage cells specifically express fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3)/Klotho suggests that the high circulating levels of FGF-23, characteristic of XLH and Hyp mice, may be part of the biochemical milieu that underlies the expansion of mineralizing enthesis fibrocartilage.

  15. X-Linked miRNAs Associated with Gender Differences in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Khalifa, Olfa; Pers, Yves-Marie; Ferreira, Rosanna; Sénéchal, Audrey; Jorgensen, Christian; Apparailly, Florence; Duroux-Richard, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease that predominantly affects women. MicroRNAs have emerged as crucial regulators of the immune system, whose expression is deregulated in RA. We aimed at quantifying the expression level of 14 miRNAs located on the X chromosome and at identifying whether differences are associated with disease and/or sex. A case–control study of 21 RA patients and 22 age- and sex-matched healthy controls was performed on peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The expression level of five miRNAs (miR-221, miR-222, miR-532, miR-106a, and miR-98) was significantly different between RA and controls when stratifying by sex, and the expression level of four miRNAs (miR-222, miR-532, miR-98, and miR-92a) was significantly different between RA females and males. The expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analysis revealed a significant gender effect of the FoxP3 promoter polymorphism rs3761548A/C on miR-221, miR-222 and miR-532 expression levels, and of the FoxP3 polymorphism rs2232365A/G on miR-221 expression levels in PBMC of RA patients. These data further support the involvement of the X chromosome in RA susceptibility. X-linked miRNAs, in the context of sex differences, might provide novel insight into new molecular mechanisms and potential therapeutic targets in RA for disease treatment and prevention. PMID:27834806

  16. Immune Dysregulation, Polyendocrinopathy, Enteropathy, X-Linked Syndrome: A Paradigm of Immunodeficiency with Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Barzaghi, Federica; Passerini, Laura; Bacchetta, Rosa

    2012-01-01

    Immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked (IPEX) syndrome is a rare monogenic primary immunodeficiency (PID) due to mutations of FOXP3, a key transcription factor for naturally occurring (n) regulatory T (Treg) cells. The dysfunction of Treg cells is the main pathogenic event leading to the multi-organ autoimmunity that characterizes IPEX syndrome, a paradigm of genetically determined PID with autoimmunity. IPEX has a severe early onset and can become rapidly fatal within the first year of life regardless of the type and site of the mutation. The initial presenting symptoms are severe enteritis and/or type-1 diabetes mellitus, alone or in combination with eczema and elevated serum IgE. Other autoimmune symptoms, such as hypothyroidism, cytopenia, hepatitis, nephropathy, arthritis, and alopecia can develop in patients who survive the initial acute phase. The current therapeutic options for IPEX patients are limited. Supportive and replacement therapies combined with pharmacological immunosuppression are required to control symptoms at onset. However, these procedures can allow only a reduction of the clinical manifestations without a permanent control of the disease. The only known effective cure for IPEX syndrome is hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, but it is always limited by the availability of a suitable donor and the lack of specific guidelines for bone marrow transplant in the context of this disease. This review aims to summarize the clinical histories and genomic mutations of the IPEX patients described in the literature to date. We will focus on the clinical and immunological features that allow differential diagnosis of IPEX syndrome and distinguish it from other PID with autoimmunity. The efficacy of the current therapies will be reviewed, and possible innovative approaches, based on the latest highlights of the pathogenesis to treat this severe primary autoimmune disease of childhood, will be discussed. PMID:23060872

  17. Mutations, Clinical Findings and Survival Estimates in South American Patients with X-Linked Adrenoleukodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Fernanda dos Santos; Matte, Ursula; Habekost, Clarissa Troller; de Castilhos, Raphael Machado; El Husny, Antonette Souto; Lourenço, Charles Marques; Vianna-Morgante, Angela M.; Giuliani, Liane; Galera, Marcial Francis; Honjo, Rachel; Kim, Chong Ae; Politei, Juan; Vargas, Carmen Regla; Jardim, Laura Bannach

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we analyzed the ABCD1 gene in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) patients and relatives from 38 unrelated families from South America, as well as phenotypic proportions, survival estimates, and the potential effect of geographical origin in clinical characteristics. Methods X- ALD patients from Brazil, Argentina and Uruguay were invited to participate in molecular studies to determine their genetic status, characterize the mutations and improve the genetic counseling of their families. All samples were screened by SSCP analysis of PCR fragments, followed by automated DNA sequencing to establish the specific mutation in each family. Age at onset and at death, male phenotypes, genetic status of women, and the effect of family and of latitude of origin were also studied. Results We identified thirty-six different mutations (twelve novel). This population had an important allelic heterogeneity, as only p.Arg518Gln was repeatedly found (three families). Four cases carried de novo mutations. Intra-familiar phenotype variability was observed in all families. Out of 87 affected males identified, 65% had the cerebral phenotype (CALD). The mean (95% CI) ages at onset and at death of the CALD were 10.9 (9.1–12.7) and 24.7 (19.8–29.6) years. No association was found between phenotypic manifestations and latitude of origin. One index-case was a girl with CALD who carried an ABCD1 mutation, and had completely skewed X inactivation. Conclusions This study extends the spectrum of mutations in X-ALD, confirms the high rates of de novo mutations and the absence of common mutations, and suggests a possible high frequency of cerebral forms in our population. PMID:22479560

  18. Long-term outcome of patients with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy: A retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Tran, Christel; Patel, Jaina; Stacy, Hewson; Mamak, Eva G; Faghfoury, Hanna; Raiman, Julian; Clarke, Joe T R; Blaser, Susan; Mercimek-Mahmutoglu, Saadet

    2017-07-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a peroxisomal disorder associated with leukodystrophy, myeloneuropathy and adrenocortical insufficiency. We performed a retrospective cohort study to evaluate long-term outcome of patients with X-ALD. All patients with X-ALD diagnosed between 1989 and 2012 were included. Electronic patient charts were reviewed for clinical features, biochemical investigations, molecular genetic testing, neuroimaging, long-term outcome and treatment. Forty-eight patients from 18 unrelated families were included (15 females; 33 males). Seventeen patients were symptomatic at the time of the biochemical diagnosis including 14 with neurocognitive dysfunction and 3 with Addison disease only. Thirty-one asymptomatic individuals were identified by positive family history of X-ALD. During follow-up, eight individuals developed childhood cerebral X-ALD (CCALD), one individual developed adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN), six individuals developed Addison disease only, and five individuals remained asymptomatic. Direct sequencing of ABCD1 confirmed the genetic diagnosis in 29 individuals. Seven patients with CCALD underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Nine patients lost the follow-up. There was no correlation between clinical severity score, Loes score and elevated degree of elevated very long chain fatty acid (VLCFA) levels in CCALD. Our study reports forty-eight new patients with X-ALD and their long-term outcome. Only 35% of the patients presented with neurological features or Addison disease. The remaining individuals were identified due to positive family history. Close monitoring of asymptomatic males resulted in early HSCT to prevent progressive lethal neurodegenerative disease. Identification of patients with X-ALD is important to improve neurodevelopmental outcome of asymptomatic males. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. X-linked sideroblastic anaemia due to ALAS₂ mutations in the Netherlands: a disease in disguise.

    PubMed

    Donker, A E; Raymakers, R A; Nieuwenhuis, H K; Coenen, M J H; Janssen, M C; MacKenzie, M A; Brons, P P T; Swinkels, D W

    2014-05-01

    X-linked sideroblastic anaemia (XLSA; OMIM#300751) is the most common inherited form of sideroblastic anaemia and is associated with several mutations in the erythroid specific 5-aminolevulinate synthase gene (ALAS₂). This gene encodes for aminolevulinic acid synthase 2 (ALAS₂), the catalytic enzyme involved in the first en rate-limiting step of haem biosynthesis.1-3 The disorder is characterised by mostly mild hypochromic microcytic anaemia with bone marrow ring sideroblasts. Even untransfused patients with mild or no anaemia are at risk for severe systemic iron overload due to ineffective erythropoiesis. To date, 61 different ALAS₂ mutations have been reported in 120 families with XLSA. Descriptions of molecularly confirmed case series from the Netherlands, however, are lacking. We reviewed age of presentation, clinical and biochemical features, ALAS₋₂ defects and treatment characteristics of 15 Dutch patients from 11 unrelated families diagnosed with XLSA. In one family a novel pathogenic c.1412G>A (p.Cys471Tyr) mutation was found. All other families shared the previously described c.1355G>A (p.Arg452His) mutation. Haplotype analysis in seven probands with the p.Arg452His mutation strongly suggests that six of them were ancestrally related. Nevertheless, their phenotype was very different. Our patients illustrate the phenotypical heterogeneity in the presentation of XLSA patients, the effectiveness of treatment regimens and the various pitfalls associated with the diagnosis, follow-up and treatment of the disease. A timely diagnosis avoids unnecessary investigations and allows adequate treatment that can prevent systemic iron load with subsequent severe life-threatening complications. Therefore, we suggest considering XLSA in both male and female patients with unexplained iron overload and÷or (mild) microcytic anaemia, also at older age.

  20. A De Novo Mutation in TEAD1 Causes Non-X-Linked Aicardi Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schrauwen, Isabelle; Szelinger, Szabolcs; Siniard, Ashley L; Corneveaux, Jason J; Kurdoglu, Ahmet; Richholt, Ryan; De Both, Matt; Malenica, Ivana; Swaminathan, Shanker; Rangasamy, Sampathkumar; Kulkarni, Neil; Bernes, Saunder; Buchhalter, Jeffrey; Ramsey, Keri; Craig, David W; Narayanan, Vinodh; Huentelman, Matthew J

    2015-06-01

    Aicardi syndrome (AIC) is a congenital neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by infantile spasms, agenesis of the corpus callosum, and chorioretinal lacunae. Variation in phenotype and disease severity is well documented, but chorioretinal lacunae represent the most constant pathological feature. Aicardi syndrome is believed to be an X-linked-dominant disorder occurring almost exclusively in females, although 46, XY males with AIC have been described. The purpose of this study is to identify genetic factors and pathways involved in AIC. We performed exome/genome sequencing of 10 children diagnosed with AIC and their parents and performed RNA sequencing on blood samples from nine cases, their parents, and unrelated controls. We identified a de novo mutation in autosomal gene TEAD1, expressed in the retina and brain, in a patient with AIC. Mutations in TEAD1 have previously been associated with Sveinsson's chorioretinal atrophy, characterized by chorioretinal degeneration. This demonstrates that TEAD1 mutations can lead to different chorioretinal complications. In addition, we found that altered expression of genes associated with synaptic plasticity, neuronal development, retinal development, and cell cycle control/apoptosis is an important underlying potential pathogenic mechanism shared among cases. Last, we found a case with skewed X inactivation, supporting the idea that nonrandom X inactivation might be important in AIC. We expand the phenotype of TEAD1 mutations, demonstrate its importance in chorioretinal complications, and propose the first putative pathogenic mechanisms underlying AIC. Our data suggest that AIC is a genetically heterogeneous disease and is not restricted to the X chromosome, and that TEAD1 mutations may be present in male patients.

  1. Mutations in noncoding regions of GJB1 are a major cause of X-linked CMT

    PubMed Central

    Tomaselli, Pedro J.; Rossor, Alexander M.; Horga, Alejandro; Jaunmuktane, Zane; Carr, Aisling; Saveri, Paola; Piscosquito, Giuseppe; Pareyson, Davide; Laura, Matilde; Blake, Julian C.; Poh, Roy; Polke, James; Houlden, Henry

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence and clinical and genetic characteristics of patients with X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) due to mutations in noncoding regions of the gap junction β-1 gene (GJB1). Methods: Mutations were identified by bidirectional Sanger sequence analysis of the 595 bases of the upstream promoter region, and 25 bases of the 3′ untranslated region (UTR) sequence in patients in whom mutations in the coding region had been excluded. Clinical and neurophysiologic data were retrospectively collected. Results: Five mutations were detected in 25 individuals from 10 kindreds representing 11.4% of all cases of CMTX1 diagnosed in our neurogenetics laboratory between 1996 and 2016. Four pathogenic mutations, c.-17G>A, c.-17+1G>T, c.-103C>T, and c.-146-90_146-89insT were detected in the 5′UTR. A novel mutation, c.*15C>T, was detected in the 3′ UTR of GJB1 in 2 unrelated families with CMTX1 and is the first pathogenic mutation in the 3′UTR of any myelin-associated CMT gene. Mutations segregated with the phenotype, were at sites predicted to be pathogenic, and were not present in the normal population. Conclusions: Mutations in noncoding DNA are a major cause of CMTX1 and highlight the importance of mutations in noncoding DNA in human disease. Next-generation sequencing platforms for use in inherited neuropathy should therefore include coverage of these regions. PMID:28283593

  2. Molecular mechanism of CHRDL1-mediated X-linked megalocornea in humans and in Xenopus model.

    PubMed

    Pfirrmann, Thorsten; Emmerich, Denise; Ruokonen, Peter; Quandt, Dagmar; Buchen, Renate; Fischer-Zirnsak, Björn; Hecht, Jochen; Krawitz, Peter; Meyer, Peter; Klopocki, Eva; Stricker, Sigmar; Lausch, Ekkehart; Seliger, Barbara; Hollemann, Thomas; Reinhard, Thomas; Auw-Haedrich, Claudia; Zabel, Bernhard; Hoffmann, Katrin; Villavicencio-Lorini, Pablo

    2015-06-01

    Chordin-Like 1 (CHRDL1) mutations cause non-syndromic X-linked megalocornea (XMC) characterized by enlarged anterior eye segments. Mosaic corneal degeneration, presenile cataract and secondary glaucoma are associated with XMC. Beside that CHRDL1 encodes Ventroptin, a secreted bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) antagonist, the molecular mechanism of XMC is not well understood yet. In a family with broad phenotypic variability of XMC, we identified the novel CHRDL1 frameshift mutation c.807_808delTC [p.H270Wfs*22] presumably causing CHRDL1 loss of function. Using Xenopus laevis as model organism, we demonstrate that chrdl1 is specifically expressed in the ocular tissue at late developmental stages. The chrdl1 knockdown directly resembles the human XMC phenotype and confirms CHRDL1 deficiency to cause XMC. Interestingly, secondary to this bmp4 is down-regulated in the Xenopus eyes. Moreover, phospho-SMAD1/5 is altered and BMP receptor 1A is reduced in a XMC patient. Together, we classify these observations as negative-feedback regulation due to the deficient BMP antagonism in XMC. As CHRDL1 is preferentially expressed in the limbal stem cell niche of adult human cornea, we assume that CHRDL1 plays a key role in cornea homeostasis. In conclusion, we provide novel insights into the molecular mechanism of XMC as well as into the specific role of CHRDL1 during cornea organogenesis, among others by the establishment of the first XMC in vivo model. We show that unravelling monogenic cornea disorders like XMC-with presumably disturbed cornea growth and differentiation-contribute to the identification of potential limbal stem cell niche factors that are promising targets for regenerative therapies of corneal injuries. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Three novel PHEX gene mutations in four Chinese families with X-linked dominant hypophosphatemic rickets

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Qing-lin; Xu, Jia; Zhang, Zeng; He, Jin-wei; Lu, Lian-song; Fu, Wen-zhen; Zhang, Zhen-lin

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In our study, all of the patients were of Han Chinese ethnicity, which were rarely reported. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We identified three novel PHEX gene mutations in four unrelated families with XLH. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found that the relationship between the phenotype and genotype of the PHEX gene was not invariant. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found that two PHEX gene sites, p.534 and p.731, were conserved. -- Abstract: Background: X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH), the most common form of inherited rickets, is a dominant disorder that is characterized by renal phosphate wasting with hypophosphatemia, abnormal bone mineralization, short stature, and rachitic manifestations. The related gene with inactivating mutations associated with XLH has been identified as PHEX, which is a phosphate-regulating gene with homologies to endopeptidases on the X chromosome. In this study, a variety of PHEX mutations were identified in four Chinese families with XLH. Methods: We investigated four unrelated Chinese families who exhibited typical features of XLH by using PCR to analyze mutations that were then sequenced. The laboratory and radiological investigations were conducted simultaneously. Results: Three novel mutations were found in these four families: one frameshift mutation, c.2033dupT in exon 20, resulting in p.T679H; one nonsense mutation, c.1294A > T in exon 11, resulting in p.K432X; and one missense mutation, c.2192T > C in exon 22, resulting in p.F731S. Conclusions: We found that the PHEX gene mutations were responsible for XLH in these Chinese families. Our findings are useful for understanding the genetic basis of Chinese patients with XLH.

  4. Growth in PHEX-associated X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets: the importance of early treatment.

    PubMed

    Quinlan, Catherine; Guegan, Katie; Offiah, Amaka; Neill, Richard O'; Hiorns, Melanie P; Ellard, Sian; Bockenhauer, Detlef; Hoff, William Van't; Waters, Aoife M

    2012-04-01

    Inactivating mutations in phosphate-regulating endopeptidase (PHEX) cause X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets (XLHR) characterized by phosphaturia, hypophosphatemia, bony deformities, and growth retardation. We assessed the efficacy of combined calcitriol and orally administered phosphate (Pi) therapy on longitudinal growth in relation to age at treatment onset in a retrospective, single-center review of children with XLHR and documented PHEX mutations. Growth was compared in those who started treatment before (G1; N = 10; six boys) and after (G2; N = 13; five boys) 1 year old. Median height standard deviation score (HSDS) at treatment onset was normal in G1: 0.1 [interquartile range (IR) -1.3 to 0.4) and significantly (p = 0.004) lower in G2 (IR -2.1 (-2.8 to -1.4). Treatment duration was similar [G1 8.5 (4.0-15.2) vs G2 11.9 (6.2-14.3) years; p = 0.56], as were prescribed phosphate and calcitriol doses. Recent HSDS was significantly (p = 0.009) better in G1 [-0.7 (-1.5 to 0.3)] vs G2 [-2.0 (-2.3 to -1.0)]. No effects of gender or genotype on growth could be identified. Children with PHEX-associated XLHR benefit from early treatment and can achieve normal growth. Minimal catchup growth was seen in those who started treatment later. Our findings emphasize the importance of early diagnosis to allow treatment before growth has been compromised.

  5. Spontaneous shaker rat mutant – a new model for X-linked tremor/ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, Karla P.; Paul, Sharan; Calì, Tito; Lopreiato, Raffaele; Karan, Sukanya; Frizzarin, Martina; Ames, Darren; Zanni, Ginevra; Brini, Marisa; Dansithong, Warunee; Milash, Brett; Scoles, Daniel R.; Carafoli, Ernesto; Pulst, Stefan M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The shaker rat is an X-linked recessive spontaneous model of progressive Purkinje cell (PC) degeneration exhibiting a shaking ataxia and wide stance. Generation of Wistar Furth (WF)/Brown Norwegian (BN) F1 hybrids and genetic mapping of F2 sib-sib offspring using polymorphic markers narrowed the candidate gene region to 26 Mbp denoted by the last recombinant genetic marker DXRat21 at 133 Mbp to qter (the end of the long arm). In the WF background, the shaker mutation has complete penetrance, results in a stereotypic phenotype and there is a narrow window for age of disease onset; by contrast, the F2 hybrid phenotype was more varied, with a later age of onset and likely non-penetrance of the mutation. By deep RNA-sequencing, five variants were found in the candidate region; four were novel without known annotation. One of the variants caused an arginine (R) to cysteine (C) change at codon 35 of the ATPase, Ca2+ transporting, plasma membrane 3 (Atp2b3) gene encoding PMCA3 that has high expression in the cerebellum. The variant was well supported by hundreds of overlapping reads, and was found in 100% of all affected replicas and 0% of the wild-type (WT) replicas. The mutation segregated with disease in all affected animals and the amino acid change was found in an evolutionarily conserved region of PMCA3. Despite strong genetic evidence for pathogenicity, in vitro analyses of PMCA3R35C function did not show any differences to WT PMCA3. Because Atp2b3 mutation leads to congenital ataxia in humans, the identified Atp2b3 missense change in the shaker rat presents a good candidate for the shaker rat phenotype based on genetic criteria, but cannot yet be considered a definite pathogenic variant owing to lack of functional changes. PMID:27013529

  6. Temporal frequency deficits in the electroretinogram of the cone system in X-linked retinoschisis.

    PubMed

    Alexander, K R; Fishman, G A; Grover, S

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the extent of, and basis for, abnormalities in the flicker electroretinogram (ERG) of the cone system of patients with X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS), a form of hereditary vitreoretinal degeneration. ERGs were recorded from six patients with XLRS and from six visually normal subjects using high-contrast sinusoidal flicker that ranged in temporal frequency from 8 to 96 Hz, and that was presented against a rod-desensitizing adapting field. Compared to the control subjects, the patients with XLRS showed a significant reduction in the amplitude of the ERG response fundamental at temporal frequencies of 32 Hz and higher. In addition, their response phases were at or below the lower limits of normal (representing a phase lag) for temporal frequencies greater than 8 Hz. The higher harmonics of the patients' ERG responses to a low frequency stimulus were attenuated over the same temporal frequency range as was the response fundamental. This finding indicates that a major component of the abnormal temporal filtering responsible for the ERG abnormalities in XLRS occurs beyond the level of the early retinal nonlinearity that generates the harmonic components of the ERG response, and therefore is most likely postreceptoral in origin. Consistent with this interpretation, the ERG waveforms of the XLRS patients showed a significant attenuation of the ON-response component, with a normal OFF response. The overall pattern of results suggests that the marked reduction of ERG response amplitudes and the phase lag at the higher temporal frequencies in XLRS stem, at least in part, from a predominant attenuation of the ON-bipolar cell contribution to the flicker ERG.

  7. Somatic Mosaicism Underlies X-linked Acrogigantism (XLAG) Syndrome in Sporadic Male Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Adrian F.; Yuan, Bo; Fina, Frederic; Caberg, Jean-Hubert; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Rostomyan, Liliya; de Herder, Wouter W.; Naves, Luciana A.; Metzger, Daniel; Cuny, Thomas; Rabl, Wolfgang; Shah, Nalini; Jaffrain-Rea, Marie-Lise; Zatelli, Maria Chiara; Faucz, Fabio R; Castermans, Emilie; Nanni-Metellus, Isabelle; Lodish, Maya; Muhammad, Ammar; Palmeira, Leonor; Potorac, Iulia; Mantovani, Giovanna; Neggers, Sebastian J.; Klein, Marc; Barlier, Anne; Liu, Pengfei; Ouafik, L'Houcine; Bours, Vincent; Lupski, James R.; Stratakis, Constantine A.; Beckers., Albert

    2016-01-01

    Somatic mosaicism has been implicated as a causative mechanism in a number of genetic and genomic disorders. X-linked acrogigantism (XLAG) syndrome is a recently characterized genomic form of pediatric gigantism due to aggressive pituitary tumors that is caused by submicroscopic chromosome Xq26.3 duplications that include GPR101. We studied XLAG syndrome patients (N=18) to determine if somatic mosaicism contributed to the genomic pathophysiology. Eighteen subjects with XLAG syndrome were identified with Xq26.3 duplications using high definition array comparative genome hybridization (HD-aCGH). We noted males with XLAG had a decreased log2 ratio compared with expected values, suggesting potential mosaicism, while females showed no such decrease. As compared with familial male XLAG cases, sporadic males had more marked evidence for mosaicism, with levels of Xq26.3 duplication between 16.1-53.8%. These characteristics were replicated using a novel, personalized breakpoint-junction specific quantification droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) technique. Using a separate ddPCR technique we studied the feasibility of identifying XLAG syndrome cases in a distinct patient population of 64 unrelated subjects with acromegaly/gigantism and identified one female gigantism patient that had increased copy number variation (CNV) threshold for GPR101 that was subsequently diagnosed as having XLAG syndrome on HD-aCGH. Employing a combination of HD-aCGH and novel ddPCR approaches, we have demonstrated, for the first time, that XLAG syndrome can be caused by variable degrees of somatic mosaicism for duplications at chromosome Xq26.3. Somatic mosaicism was shown to occur in sporadic males but not in females with XLAG syndrome, although the clinical characteristics of the disease were similarly severe in both sexes. PMID:26935837

  8. A modified γ-retrovirus vector for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Hacein-Bey-Abina, Salima; Pai, Sung-Yun; Gaspar, H Bobby; Armant, Myriam; Berry, Charles C; Blanche, Stephane; Bleesing, Jack; Blondeau, Johanna; de Boer, Helen; Buckland, Karen F; Caccavelli, Laure; Cros, Guilhem; De Oliveira, Satiro; Fernández, Karen S; Guo, Dongjing; Harris, Chad E; Hopkins, Gregory; Lehmann, Leslie E; Lim, Annick; London, Wendy B; van der Loo, Johannes C M; Malani, Nirav; Male, Frances; Malik, Punam; Marinovic, M Angélica; McNicol, Anne-Marie; Moshous, Despina; Neven, Benedicte; Oleastro, Matías; Picard, Capucine; Ritz, Jerome; Rivat, Christine; Schambach, Axel; Shaw, Kit L; Sherman, Eric A; Silberstein, Leslie E; Six, Emmanuelle; Touzot, Fabien; Tsytsykova, Alla; Xu-Bayford, Jinhua; Baum, Christopher; Bushman, Frederic D; Fischer, Alain; Kohn, Donald B; Filipovich, Alexandra H; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Cavazzana, Marina; Williams, David A; Thrasher, Adrian J

    2014-10-09

    In previous clinical trials involving children with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1), a Moloney murine leukemia virus-based γ-retrovirus vector expressing interleukin-2 receptor γ-chain (γc) complementary DNA successfully restored immunity in most patients but resulted in vector-induced leukemia through enhancer-mediated mutagenesis in 25% of patients. We assessed the efficacy and safety of a self-inactivating retrovirus for the treatment of SCID-X1. We enrolled nine boys with SCID-X1 in parallel trials in Europe and the United States to evaluate treatment with a self-inactivating (SIN) γ-retrovirus vector containing deletions in viral enhancer sequences expressing γc (SIN-γc). All patients received bone marrow-derived CD34+ cells transduced with the SIN-γc vector, without preparative conditioning. After 12.1 to 38.7 months of follow-up, eight of the nine children were still alive. One patient died from an overwhelming adenoviral infection before reconstitution with genetically modified T cells. Of the remaining eight patients, seven had recovery of peripheral-blood T cells that were functional and led to resolution of infections. The patients remained healthy thereafter. The kinetics of CD3+ T-cell recovery was not significantly different from that observed in previous trials. Assessment of insertion sites in peripheral blood from patients in the current trial as compared with those in previous trials revealed significantly less clustering of insertion sites within LMO2, MECOM, and other lymphoid proto-oncogenes in our patients. This modified γ-retrovirus vector was found to retain efficacy in the treatment of SCID-X1. The long-term effect of this therapy on leukemogenesis remains unknown. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and others; ClinicalTrials.gov numbers, NCT01410019, NCT01175239, and NCT01129544.).

  9. High-resolution mapping of the X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (EDA) locus

    PubMed Central

    Zonana, J.; Jones, M.; Browne, D.; Litt, M.; Kramer, P.; Becker, H. W.; Brockdorff, N.; Rastan, S.; Davies, K. P.; Clarke, A.; Thomas, N. S. T.

    1992-01-01

    The X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (EDA) locus has been previously localized to the subchromosomal region Xq11-q21.1. We have extended our previous linkage studies and analyzed linkage between the EDA locus and 10 marker loci, including five new loci, in 41 families. Four of the marker loci showed no recombination with the EDA locus, and six other loci were also linked to the EDA locus with recombination fractions of .009–.075. Multipoint analyses gave support to the placement of the PGK1P1 locus proximal to the EDA locus and the DXS453 and PGK1 loci distal to EDA. Further ordering of the loci could be inferred from a human/rodent somatic cell hybrid derived from an affected female with EDA and an X;9 translocation and from studies of an affected male with EDA and a submicroscopic deletion. Three of the proximal marker loci, which showed no recombination with the EDA locus, when used in combination, were informative in 92% of females. The closely linked flanking polymorphic loci DXS339 and DXS453 had heterozygosities of 72% and 76%, respectively, and when used jointly, they were doubly informative in 52% of females. The human DXS732 locus was defined by a conserved mouse probe pcos169E/4 (DXCrc169 locus) that cosegregates with the mouse tabby (Ta) locus, a potential homologue to the EDA locus. The absence of recombination between EDA and the DXS732 locus lends support to the hypothesis that the DXCrc169 locus in the mouse and the DXS732 locus in humans may contain candidate sequences for the Ta and EDA genes, respectively. PMID:1357963

  10. Extraordinary Sequence Divergence at Tsga8, an X-linked Gene Involved in Mouse Spermiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Good, Jeffrey M.; Vanderpool, Dan; Smith, Kimberly L.; Nachman, Michael W.

    2011-01-01

    The X chromosome plays an important role in both adaptive evolution and speciation. We used a molecular evolutionary screen of X-linked genes potentially involved in reproductive isolation in mice to identify putative targets of recurrent positive selection. We then sequenced five very rapidly evolving genes within and between several closely related species of mice in the genus Mus. All five genes were involved in male reproduction and four of the genes showed evidence of recurrent positive selection. The most remarkable evolutionary patterns were found at Testis-specific gene a8 (Tsga8), a spermatogenesis-specific gene expressed during postmeiotic chromatin condensation and nuclear transformation. Tsga8 was characterized by extremely high levels of insertion–deletion variation of an alanine-rich repetitive motif in natural populations of Mus domesticus and M. musculus, differing in length from the reference mouse genome by up to 89 amino acids (27% of the total protein length). This population-level variation was coupled with striking divergence in protein sequence and length between closely related mouse species. Although no clear orthologs had previously been described for Tsga8 in other mammalian species, we have identified a highly divergent hypothetical gene on the rat X chromosome that shares clear orthology with the 5′ and 3′ ends of Tsga8. Further inspection of this ortholog verified that it is expressed in rat testis and shares remarkable similarity with mouse Tsga8 across several general features of the protein sequence despite no conservation of nucleotide sequence across over 60% of the rat-coding domain. Overall, Tsga8 appears to be one of the most rapidly evolving genes to have been described in rodents. We discuss the potential evolutionary causes and functional implications of this extraordinary divergence and the possible contribution of Tsga8 and the other four genes we examined to reproductive isolation in mice. PMID:21186189

  11. Protective effect of antioxidants on DNA damage in leukocytes from X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy patients.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, Desirèe P; Donida, Bruna; da Rosa, Helen T; Manini, Paula R; Moura, Dinara J; Saffi, Jenifer; Deon, Marion; Mescka, Caroline P; Coelho, Daniella M; Jardim, Laura B; Vargas, Carmen R

    2015-06-01

    Toxic metabolites accumulation and oxidative stress have been associated to the pathophysiology of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD), an inborn error of peroxisome metabolism. Parameters of oxidative damage to proteins and lipids in X-ALD patients were already described in literature; however, DNA injuries were not studied yet. Considering that, the aims were to investigate DNA damage by comet assay in heterozygotes and symptomatic X-ALD patients, to look for associations between DNA damage and lipid peroxidation as measured by urinary 15-F2t-isoprostane; and to evaluate the in vitro effect of N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC), trolox (TRO) and rosuvastatin (RSV) on DNA damage in leukocytes from symptomatic patients. Symptomatic patients presented higher DNA damage levels than those found in heterozygotes and controls; heterozygotes and controls showed similar results. In order to investigate the in vitro antioxidant effect on DNA damage, whole blood cells from symptomatic patients were incubated with NAC (1 and 2.5mM), TRO (25 and 75 μM) and RSV (0.5, 2 and 5 μM) before DNA damage analysis. NAC, TRO and RSV, at all tested concentrations, were all capable to reduce DNA damage in symptomatic X-ALD patients until control levels. Finally, DNA damage correlated with urinary isoprostanes and plasmatic levels of TBA-RS and DCFH-DA, allowing to hypothesize that DNA damage might be induced by lipid peroxidation in symptomatic patients. The present work yields experimental evidence that NAC, TRO and RSV reduce the in vitro DNA injury in symptomatic X-ALD patients, what may suggest that the administration of these antioxidants might be considered as an adjuvant therapy for X-ALD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Impaired mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in the peroxisomal disease X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    López-Erauskin, J; Galino, J; Ruiz, M; Cuezva, J M; Fabregat, I; Cacabelos, D; Boada, J; Martínez, J; Ferrer, I; Pamplona, R; Villarroya, F; Portero-Otín, M; Fourcade, S; Pujol, A

    2013-08-15

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is an inherited metabolic disorder of the nervous system characterized by axonopathy in spinal cords and/or cerebral demyelination, adrenal insufficiency and accumulation of very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) in plasma and tissues. The disease is caused by malfunction of the ABCD1 gene, which encodes a peroxisomal transporter of VLCFAs or VLCFA-CoA. In the mouse, Abcd1 loss causes late onset axonal degeneration in the spinal cord, associated with locomotor disability resembling the most common phenotype in patients, adrenomyeloneuropathy. We have formerly shown that an excess of the VLCFA C26:0 induces oxidative damage, which underlies the axonal degeneration exhibited by the Abcd1(-) mice. In the present study, we sought to investigate the noxious effects of C26:0 on mitochondria function. Our data indicate that in X-ALD patients' fibroblasts, excess of C26:0 generates mtDNA oxidation and specifically impairs oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) triggering mitochondrial ROS production from electron transport chain complexes. This correlates with impaired complex V phosphorylative activity, as visualized by high-resolution respirometry on spinal cord slices of Abcd1(-) mice. Further, we identified a marked oxidation of key OXPHOS system subunits in Abcd1(-) mouse spinal cords at presymptomatic stages. Altogether, our results illustrate some of the mechanistic intricacies by which the excess of a fatty acid targeted to peroxisomes activates a deleterious process of oxidative damage to mitochondria, leading to a multifaceted dysfunction of this organelle. These findings may be of relevance for patient management while unveiling novel therapeutic targets for X-ALD.

  13. Elongation of very long-chain fatty acids is enhanced in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Stephan; Valianpour, Fredoen; Denis, Simone; Ofman, Rob; Sanders, Robert-Jan; Mooyer, Petra; Barth, Peter G; Wanders, Ronald J A

    2005-02-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the accumulation of saturated and mono-unsaturated very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA) and reduced peroxisomal VLCFA beta-oxidation activity. In this study, we investigated the role of VLCFA biosynthesis in X-ALD fibroblasts. Our data demonstrate that elongation of both saturated and mono-unsaturated VLCFAs is enhanced in fibroblasts from patients with peroxisomal beta-oxidation defects including X-ALD, and peroxisome biogenesis disorders. These data indicate that enhanced VLCFA elongation is a general phenomenon associated with an impairment in peroxisomal beta-oxidation, and not specific for X-ALD alone. Analysis of plasma samples from patients with X-ALD and different peroxisomal beta-oxidation deficiencies revealed increased concentrations of VLCFAs up to 32 carbons. We infer that enhanced elongation does not result from impaired peroxisomal beta-oxidation alone, but is due to the additional effect of unchecked chain elongation. We demonstrate that elongated VLCFAs are incorporated into complex lipids. The role of chain elongation was also studied retrospectively in samples from patients with X-ALD previously treated with "Lorenzo's oil." We found that the decrease in plasma C26:0 previously found is offset by the increase of mono-unsaturated VLCFAs, not measured previously during the trial. We conclude that evaluation of treatment protocols for disorders of peroxisomal beta-oxidation making use of plasma samples should include the measurement of saturated and unsaturated VLCFAs of chain lengths above 26 carbon atoms. We also conclude that chain elongation offers an interesting target to be studied as a possible mode of treatment for X-ALD and other peroxisomal beta-oxidation disorders.

  14. X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy: role of very long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhenzhen; Pei, Zhengtong; Li, Yuanyuan; Wei, Liumei; Smith, Kirby D; Watkins, Paul A

    2004-01-01

    The principal biochemical abnormality in the neurodegenerative disorder X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is elevated plasma and tissue levels of very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA). Enzymes with very long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase (VLACS) activity are required for VLCFA metabolism, including degradation by peroxisomal beta-oxidation or incorporation into complex lipids, and may also participate in VLCFA synthesis. Two enzymes with VLACS activity, ACSVL1 and BG1, were investigated for their potential role in X-ALD biochemical pathology. Skin fibroblast mRNA levels for ACSVL1, an enzyme previously shown to be in peroxisomes and to participate in VLCFA beta-oxidation, were not significantly different between normal controls, patients with childhood cerebral X-ALD, and patients with adrenomyeloneuropathy. Similar results were obtained with mRNA for BG1, a non-peroxisomal enzyme that is highly expressed in nervous system, adrenal gland, and testis, the principal tissues pathologically affected in X-ALD. No significant differences in the immunohistochemical staining patterns of tissues expressing either ACSVL1 or BG1 were observed when wild-type and X-ALD mice were compared. Western blot analysis of BG1 protein levels showed no differences between fibroblasts from controls, cerebral X-ALD, or adrenomyeloneuropathy patients. BG1 protein levels were similar in wild-type and X-ALD mouse brain, spinal cord, testis, and adrenal gland. We hypothesized that one function of BG1 was to direct VLCFA into the cholesterol ester synthesis pathway. However, BG1 depletion in Neuro2a cells using RNA interference did not decrease incorporation of labeled VLCFA into cholesterol esters. We conclude that the role, if any, of ACSVL1 and BG1 in X-ALD biochemical pathology is indirect.

  15. Cholesterol regulates ABCD2 expression: implications for the therapy of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Weinhofer, Isabelle; Forss-Petter, Sonja; Zigman, Mihaela; Berger, Johannes

    2002-10-15

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a severe neurodegenerative disorder with impaired very long-chain fatty acid (VLCFA) metabolism. The disease-associated ABCD1 (ALD) gene encodes a peroxisomal membrane protein, which belongs to the superfamily of ATP-binding cassette transporters. Several treatment regimes have been tried without satisfactory clinical benefit. Recently, the cholesterol-lowering drug lovastatin was reported to normalize VLCFA levels in two out of three clinical studies. This investigation aimed to disclose the molecular mechanism of successful reduction of VLCFA accumulation in order to fill in the gap in the understanding how dietary cholesterol lowering affects the levels of VLCFA in patients with X-ALD and to allow more efficacious treatment. Overexpression of ABCD2 (ALDR), the closest relative of ABCD1, restores VLCFA accumulation in cultured ABCD1-deficient cells. Here we show by real-time PCR that the ABCD2 gene is induced in cultured human fibroblasts and monocytes upon sterol depletion via a mechanism requiring the activation of sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs), a family of transcription factors that control the metabolism of cholesterol and fatty acids. This is unexpected and the first report that extends the mechanism of transcriptional regulation by SREBPs to a peroxisomal protein, thus providing a closer link between peroxisomes, cholesterol and fatty acid biosynthesis. Using reporter gene studies, site-directed mutagenesis and gel shift assays, we identified a functional sterol regulatory element in the proximal promoter region of ABCD2. Finally, we demonstrated that ABCD2 induction by sterol depletion significantly reduced the accumulation of VLCFA in X-ALD fibroblasts. Thus, lowering cholesterol leads to SREBP maturation, increased ABCD2 expression and reduced VLCFA accumulation.

  16. Survey of the Enthesopathy of X-Linked Hypophosphatemia and Its Characterization in Hyp Mice

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Guoying; Katz, Lee D.; Insogna, Karl L.; Carpenter, Thomas O.

    2010-01-01

    X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH) is characterized by rickets and osteomalacia as a result of an inactivating mutation of the PHEX (phosphate-regulating gene with homology to endopeptidases on the X chromosome) gene. PHEX encodes an endopeptidase that, when inactivated, results in elevated circulating levels of FGF-23, a novel phosphate-regulating hormone (a phosphatonin), thereby resulting in increased phosphate excretion and impaired bone mineralization. A generalized and severe mineralizing enthesopathy in patients with XLH was first reported in 1985; we likewise report a survey in which we found evidence of enthesopathy in fibrocartilaginous insertion sites, as well as osteophyte formation, in the majority of patients. Nonetheless, there has been very little focus on the progression and pathogenesis underlying the paradoxical heterotopic calcification of tendon and ligament insertion sites. Such studies have been hampered by lack of a model of mineralizing enthesopathy. We therefore characterized the involvement of the most frequently targeted fibrocartilaginous tendon insertion sites in Hyp mice, a murine model of the XLH mutation that phenocopies the human syndrome in every detail including hypophosphatemia and elevated FGF-23. Histological examination of the affected entheses revealed that mineralizing insertion sites, while thought to involve bone spur formation, were not due to bone-forming osteoblasts but instead to a significant expansion of mineralizing fibrocartilage. Our finding that enthesis fibrocartilage cells specifically express fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3)/Klotho suggests that the high circulating levels of FGF-23, characteristic of XLH and Hyp mice, may be part of the biochemical milieu that underlies the expansion of mineralizing enthesis fibrocartilage. PMID:19609735

  17. Two novel connexin32 mutations cause early onset X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

    PubMed Central

    Braathen, Geir J; Sand, Jette C; Bukholm, Geir; Russell, Michael B

    2007-01-01

    Background X-linked Charcot-Marie Tooth (CMT) is caused by mutations in the connexin32 gene that encodes a polypeptide which is arranged in hexameric array and form gap junctions. Methods We describe two novel mutations in the connexin32 gene in two Norwegian families. Results Family 1 had a c.225delG (R75fsX83) which causes a frameshift and premature stop codon at position 247. This probably results in a shorter non-functional protein structure. Affected individuals had an early age at onset usually in the first decade. The symptoms were more severe in men than women. All had severe muscle weakness in the legs. Several abortions were observed in this family. Family 2 had a c.536 G>A (C179Y) transition which causes a change of the highly conserved cysteine residue, i.e. disruption of at least one of three disulfide bridges. The mean age at onset was in the first decade. Muscle wasting was severe and correlated with muscle weakness in legs. The men and one woman also had symptom from their hands. The neuropathy is demyelinating and the nerve conduction velocities were in the intermediate range (25–49 m/s). Affected individuals had symmetrical clinical findings, while the neurophysiology revealed minor asymmetrical findings in nerve conduction velocity in 6 of 10 affected individuals. Conclusion The two novel mutations in the connexin32 gene are more severe than the majority of previously described mutations possibly due to the severe structural change of the gap junction they encode. PMID:17620124

  18. Deletion pattern of the STS gene in X-linked ichthyosis in a Mexican population.

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez Vaca, A. L.; Valdes-Flores, M. del R.; Rivera-Vega, M. R.; González-Huerta, L. M.; Kofman-Alfaro, S. H.; Cuevas-Covarrubias, S. A.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: X-linked ichthyosis (XLI) is an inherited disorder due to steroid sulfatase deficiency (STS). Most XLI patients (>90%) have complete deletion of the STS gene and flanking sequences. The presence of low copy number repeats (G1.3 and CRI-S232) on either side of the STS gene seems to play a role in the high frequency of these interstitial deletions. In the present study, we analyzed 80 Mexican patients with XLI and complete deletion of the STS gene. MATERIALS AND METHODS: STS activity was measured in the leukocytes using 7-[(3)H]-dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate as a substrate. Amplification of the regions telomeric-DXS89, DXS996, DXS1139, DXS1130, 5' STS, 3' STS, DXS1131, DXS1133, DXS237, DXS1132, DXF22S1, DXS278, DXS1134-centromeric was performed through PCR. RESULTS: No STS activity was detected in the XLI patients (0.00 pmoles/mg protein/h). We observed 3 different patterns of deletion. The first two groups included 25 and 32 patients, respectively, in which homologous sequences were involved. These subjects showed the 5' STS deletion at the sequence DXS1139, corresponding to the probe CRI-S232A2. The group of 32 patients presented the 3' STS rupture site at the sequence DXF22S1 (probe G1.3) and the remaining 25 patients had the 3' STS breakpoint at the sequence DXS278 (probe CRI-S232B2). The third group included 23 patients with the breakpoints at several regions on either side of the STS gene. No implication of the homologous sequences were observed in this group. CONCLUSION: These data indicate that more complex mechanisms, apart from homologous recombination, are occurring in the genesis of the breakpoints of the STS gene of XLI Mexican patients. PMID:11844872

  19. Immunohistochemical detection of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Nagi, Chandandeep; Xiao, Guang-Qing; Li, Gan; Genden, Eric; Burstein, David E

    2007-12-01

    The X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) is the most potent member of the IAP group of structurally related caspase inhibitors. Experimental and clinical evidence implicates XIAP in resistance to cancer therapy and in clinical aggressiveness of certain tumors. We examined the expression of XIAP in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Four-micrometer sections from 59 routinely processed specimens of head and neck SCC were subjected to citrate-based antigen retrieval, followed by incubation with monoclonal anti-XIAP antibody (BD Biosciences, San Jose, Calif) and EnVision Plus reagents (Dako, Carpinteria, Calif). Granular cytoplasmic staining was considered positive; the extent and intensity of staining were recorded. Normal squamous epithelium was either nonstaining (n=22), displayed generally weak basal staining (n=9), or moderate basal staining (n=1). Squamous dysplasia or carcinoma in situ was either nonstaining (10 of 18 cases) or displayed generally weak staining (8 of 18 cases). Varying degrees of XIAP positivity were found in 41 (69.5%) of 59 carcinomas. Most of the nonstaining and weakly staining carcinomas were well or moderately differentiated. In contrast, intense and extensive staining was most frequently found in poorly differentiated carcinomas. In keratinized tumor nests, staining was strongest peripherally and became diminished in central keratinized zones. New parameters of tumor aggressiveness are needed for more effective triaging of patients to appropriately aggressive therapies. The present findings suggest that the potent apoptotic inhibitor XIAP may be such a biomarker in head and neck SCCs, of resistance to apoptosis-inducing therapies, and, possibly, of responsiveness to a new class of XIAP-suppressive drugs presently in clinical trials for other malignancies or in preclinical development.

  20. A candidate gene for X-linked Ocular Albinism (OA1)

    SciTech Connect

    Bassi, M.T.; Schiaffino, V.; Rugarli, E.

    1994-09-01

    Ocular Albinism of the Nettleship-Fall type 1 (OA1) is the most common form of ocular albinism. It is transmitted as an X-linked recessive trait with affected males showing severe reduction of visual acuity, nystagmus, strabismus, photophobia. Ophthalmologic examination reveals foveal hypoplasia, hypopigmentation of the retina and iris translucency. Microscopic examination of melanocytes suggests that the underlying defect in OA1 is an abnormality in melanosome formation. Recently we assembled a 350 kb cosmid contig spanning the entire critical region on Xp22.3, which measures approximately 110 kb. A minimum set of cosmids was used to identify transcribed sequences using both cDNA selection and exon amplification. Two putative exons recovered by exon amplification strategy were found to be highly conserved throughout evolution and, therefore, they were used as probes for the screening of fetal and adult retina cDNA libraries. This led to the isolation of clones spanning a full-length cDNA which measures 7.6 kb. Sequence analysis revealed that the predicted protein product shows homology with syntrophines and a Xenopus laevis apical protein. The gene covers approximately 170 kb of DNA and spans the entire critical region for OA1, being deleted in two patients with contiguous gene deletion including OA1 and in one patient with isolated OA1. Therefore, this new gene represents a very strong candidate for involvement in OA1 (an alternative, but unlikely possibility to be considered is that the true OA1 gene lies within an intron of the former). Northern analysis revealed very high level of expression in retina and melanoma. Unlike most Xp22.3 genes, this gene is conserved in the mouse. We are currently performing SSCP analysis and direct sequencing of exons on DNAs from approximately 60 unrelated patients with OA1 for mutation detection.

  1. Clinical presentations of X-linked retinoschisis in Taiwanese patients confirmed with genetic sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Laura; Chen, Ho-Min; Tsai, Shawn; Chang, Tsong-Chi; Tsai, Tzu-Hsun; Yang, Chung-May; Chao, An-Ning; Chen, Kuan-Jen; Kao, Ling-Yuh; Yeung, Ling; Yeh, Lung-Kun; Hwang, Yih-Shiou; Wu, Wei-Chi; Lai, Chi-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the clinical characteristics of X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) and identify genetic mutations in Taiwanese patients with XLRS. Methods This study included 23 affected males from 16 families with XLRS. Fundus photography, spectral domain optical coherent tomography (SD-OCT), fundus autofluorescence (FAF), and full-field electroretinograms (ERGs) were performed. The coding regions of the RS1 gene that encodes retinoschisin were sequenced. Results The median age at diagnosis was 18 years (range 4–58 years). The best-corrected visual acuity ranged from no light perception to 20/25. The typical spoke-wheel pattern in the macula was present in 61% of the patients (14/23) while peripheral retinoschisis was present in 43% of the patients (10/23). Four eyes presented with vitreous hemorrhage, and two eyes presented with leukocoria that mimics Coats’ disease. Macular schisis was identified with SD-OCT in 82% of the eyes (31/38) while foveal atrophy was present in 18% of the eyes (7/38). Concentric area of high intensity was the most common FAF abnormality observed. Seven out of 12 patients (58%) showed electronegative ERG findings. Sequencing of the RS1 gene identified nine mutations, six of which were novel. The mutations are all located in exons 4–6, including six missense mutations, two nonsense mutations, and one deletion-caused frameshift mutation. Conclusions XLRS is a clinically heterogeneous disease with profound phenotypic inter- and intrafamiliar variability. Genetic sequencing is valuable as it allows a definite diagnosis of XLRS to be made without the classical clinical features and ERG findings. This study showed the variety of clinical features of XLRS and reported novel mutations. PMID:25999676

  2. Reproductive function in men affected by X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy/adrenomyeloneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Stradomska, T J; Kubalska, J; Janas, R; Tylki-Szymanska, A

    2012-02-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is the most frequent, severely neurodegenerative, clinically heterogeneous peroxisomal disorder, the signs of which are a consequence of myelin, adrenal cortex, and testes impairment. We studied testosterone, LH, and FSH levels in X-ALD/adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN) patients. We evaluate the ability to procreate of these patients by analysis of pedigree and family screening by detection of very long-chain fatty acid (VLCFA) levels. Seventeen patients with X-ALD/AMN (16 with AMN and one asymptomatic) aged 24-48 (mean±S.D., 34.7±5.9) years, were identified based on the clinical picture, magnetic resonance imaging, and the presence of increased serum VLCFA levels. Nine X-ALD/AMN patients' daughters, mean ages ±S.D.=7.7±3.8 years, were identified as heterozygote by elevated VLCFA levels. Serum VLCFA levels were determined as ester derivatives by a gas chromatography method. Serum testosterone, LH, and FSH levels in X-ALD/AMN patients were detected by IRMAs. Serum testosterone levels were at the lowest levels of normal range but serum LH and FSH concentrations were increased in 57.1 and in 42.9% of X-ALD/AMN patients respectively. Among the 11 investigated of X-ALD/AMN married adult men, nine had produced offspring, a total of 13 children. All patients' daughters showed elevated serum VLCFA at heterozygote levels. In this study, we report that in a group of X-ALD/AMN married adult men, we did not find a significant decrease in fertility compared with the Polish population (18.2 vs 15%).

  3. X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus: From the ship Hopewell to RFLP studies

    SciTech Connect

    Bichet, D.G.; Lonergan, M.; Arthus, M.F.; Ligier, S.; Kluge, R. ); Hendy, G.N.; Pausova, Z.; Zingg, H.; Morgan, K.; Saenger, P. )

    1992-11-01

    Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI; designated 304800 in Mendelian Inheritance in Man) is an X-linked disorder with abnormal renal and extrarenal V[sub 2] vasopression receptor responses. The mutant gene has been mapped to Xq28 by analysis of RFLPs, and tight linkage between DXS52 and DNI has been reported. In 1969, Bode and Crawford proposed, under the term, the Hopewell hypothesis' that most cases in North America could be traced to descendants of Ulster Scots who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1761 on the ship Hopewell. They also suggested a link between this family and a large Mormon pedigree. DNA samples obtained from 13 independent affected families, including 42 members of the Hopewell and Mormon pedigrees, were analyzed with probes in the Xq28 region. Genealogical reconstructions were performed. Linkage between NDI and DXS304 (probe U6:2.spl), DXS305 (St35-691), DXS52 (St14-1), DXS15 (DX13), and F8C (F814) showed no recombination in 12 families, with a maximum lod score of 13.5 for DXS52. A recombinant between NDI and DXS304, DXS305, was identified in one family. The haplotype segregating with the disease in the Hopewell pedigree was not shared by other North American families. PCR analysis of the St14 VNTR allowed the distinction of two alleles that were not distinguishable by Southern analysis. Carrier status was predicted in 24 of 26 at-risk females. The Hopewell hypothesis cannot explain the origin of NDI in many of the North American families, since they have no apparent relationship with the Hopewell earlier settlers, either by haplotype or by genealogical analysis. PCR analysis of the DXS52 VNTR in NDI families is very useful for carrier testing and presymptomatic diagnosis, which can prevent the first manifestations of dehydration. 39 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Narrowing in on the causative defect of an intriguing X-linked myopathy with excessive autophagy.

    PubMed

    Minassian, B A; Aiyar, R; Alic, S; Banwell, B; Villanova, M; Fardeau, M; Mandell, J W; Juel, V C; Rafii, M; Auranen, M; Kalimo, H

    2002-08-27

    X-Linked myopathy with excessive autophagy (XMEA) is a childhood-onset slowly progressive disease of skeletal muscle with no cardiac, nervous system, or other organ involvement. Pathology is distinctive: membrane-bound autophagic vacuoles, multifold reduplication of the basement membrane, and intense deposition of membrane attack complex and calcium at the myofiber surface. XMEA has been linked to the most telomeric 10.5 cM of Xq28. The authors now report identification of new families, refinement of the locus, mapping of genes to the region, and screening of candidate genes for mutations. Seven new families were ascertained, including an American family with XMEA. Using 11 new microsatellite genetic markers, the authors fine-mapped a recombination in this family and a common ancestral haplotype in two French families, which localized the gene in a 4.37-Mb region. Sequence data were assembled from public and private databases and a near-continuous sequence derived for the entire region. With this sequence, a gene map of 82 genes and 28 expressed sequence tag clusters was constructed; to date, 12 candidate genes have been screened for mutations. This study doubles the number of reported families with XMEA and more firmly establishes its distinctive clinicopathologic features. It also advances the search for the XMEA causative defect by reducing the disease locus to approximately half its previous size, assembling an almost complete sequence of the refined region, identifying all known genes in this sequence, and excluding the presence of mutations in 10% of these genes.

  5. X-linked lethal infantile spinal muscular atrophy: From clinical description to molecular mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Baumbach, L.; Schiavi, A.

    1994-09-01

    The proximal spinal muscular atrophies (PSMA), one of the most common forms of lower motor neuron disease in children, are characterized by progressive muscle weakness due to loss of anterior horn cells. All three autosomal recessive forms have been mapped to chromosome 5q11.2-11.3, implying an allelic association between these disorders. Recent evidence from our laboratories, as well as others, suggests that a distinct form of lethal neonatal spinal muscular atrophy, associated with early onset contractures, is determined by a gene on the X chromosome. We report our efforts in mapping this disease locus. Our original studies have focused on two unrelated multigenerational families with similar clinical presentations of severe hypotonia, muscle weakness, and a disease course similar to Werdnig Hoffman except for the additional finding of congenital or early onset contractures. Muscle biopsy and/or autopsy were indicative of anterior horn cell loss in affected males. Disease occurrence in each of the families was consistent with an X-linked recessive mode of inheritance. Subsequently, two additional families have been identified, as well as several sporadic male cases. Linkage analysis has been completed in one of these families using highly polymorphic repeats dispersed 10 cM on the X chromosome. Interpretation of results was achieved using an automated data acquisition program. Analysis of over 300 haplotypes generated using PCR-based DNA markers have identified two 16 cM regions on Xp with complete concordance to the disease phenotype. Our currents efforts are focused on the region surrounding the Kallman gene, in attempts to better define a candidate region, as well as analyze possible candidate genes within this region.

  6. Iron and fibroblast growth factor 23 in X-linked hypophosphatemia

    PubMed Central

    Imel, Erik A.; Gray, Amie; Padgett, Leah; Econs, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Excess fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) causes hypophosphatemia in autosomal dominant hypophosphatemic rickets (ADHR) and X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH). Iron status influences C-terminal FGF23 (incorporating fragments plus intact FGF23) in ADHR and healthy subjects, and intact FGF23 in ADHR. We hypothesized that in XLH serum iron would inversely correlate to C-terminal FGF23, but not to intact FGF23, mirroring the relationships in normal controls. Methods Subjects included 25 untreated outpatients with XLH at a tertiary medical center and 158 healthy adult controls. Serum iron and plasma intact FGF23 and C-terminal FGF23 were measured in stored samples. Results Intact FGF23 was greater than the control mean in 100% of XLH patients, and >2SD above the control mean in 88%, compared to 71% and 21% respectively for C-terminal FGF23. In XLH, iron correlated negatively to log-C-terminal FGF23 (r= −0.523, p<0.01), with a steeper slope than in controls (p<0.001). Iron was not related to log-intact FGF23 in either group. The log-ratio of intact FGF23 to C-terminal FGF23 was higher in XLH (0.00 ± 0.44) than controls (−0.28 ± 0.21, p<0.01), and correlated positively to serum iron (controls r= 0.276, p<0.001; XLH r= 0.428, p<0.05), with a steeper slope in XLH (p<0.01). Conclusion Like controls, serum iron in XLH is inversely related to C-terminal FGF23 but not intact FGF23. XLH patients are more likely to have elevated intact FGF23 than C-terminal FGF23. The relationships of iron to FGF23 in XLH suggest altered regulation of FGF23 cleaving may contribute to maintaining hypophosphatemia around an abnormal set-point. PMID:24325979

  7. Phenotypic characterization of X-linked retinoschisis: Clinical, electroretinography, and optical coherence tomography variables

    PubMed Central

    Neriyanuri, Srividya; Dhandayuthapani, Sudha; Arunachalam, Jayamuruga Pandian; Raman, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To study the phenotypic characteristics of X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) and report the clinical, electroretinogram (ERG), and optical coherence tomography (OCT) variables in Indian eyes. Design: A retrospective study. Materials and Methods: Medical records of 21 patients with retinoschisis who were genetically confirmed to have RS1 mutation were reviewed. The phenotype characterization included the age of onset, best-corrected visual acuity, refractive error, fundus findings, OCT, and ERG. Statistical Analysis Used: Data from both the eyes were used for analysis. A P < 0.05 was set as statistical significance. Data were not normally distributed (P < 0.05, Shapiro wilk); hence, nonparametric tests were used for statistical analysis. Results: All were males whose mean age of presentation was 9 years. Visual acuity was moderately impaired (median 0.6 logMAR, interquartile range: 0.47, 1) in these eyes with a hyperopic refractive error of median +1.75 Ds (interquartile range: +0.50 Ds, +4.25 Ds). About 54.7% of the eyes had both foveal and peripheral schisis, isolated foveal schisis was seen in 28.5% of the eyes, and schisis with retinal detachment was seen in 16.6% of the eyes. The inner nuclear layer was found to be commonly involved in the schisis, followed by outer nuclear and plexiform layers as evident on OCT. On ERG, a- and b-wave amplitudes were significantly reduced in eyes with foveal and peripheral schisis when compared to the eyes with only foveal schisis (P < 0.05). Conclusions: XLRS has phenotypic heterogeneity as evident on OCT, ERG, and clinical findings. PMID:27609164

  8. Juvenile retinoschisis: a model for molecular diagnostic testing of X-linked ophthalmic disease.

    PubMed Central

    Sieving, P A; Yashar, B M; Ayyagari, R

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: X-linked juvenile retinoschisis (RS) provides a starting point to define clinical paradigms and understand the limitations of diagnostic molecular testing. The RS phenotype is specific, but the broad severity range is clinically confusing. Molecular diagnostic testing obviates unnecessary examinations for boys at-risk and identifies carrier females who otherwise show no clinical signs. METHODS: The XLRS1 gene has 6 exons of 26-196 base-pair size. Each exon is amplified by a single polymerase chain reaction and then sequenced, starting with exons 4 through 6, which contain mutation "hot spots." RESULTS: The 6 XLRS1 exons are sequenced serially. If alterations are found, they are compared with mutations in our > 120 XLRS families and with the > 300 mutations reported worldwide. Point mutations, small deletions, or rearrangements are identified in nearly 90% of males with a clinical diagnosis of RS. XLRS1 has very few sequence polymorphisms. Carrier-state testing produces 1 of 3 results: (1) positive, in which the woman has the same mutation as an affected male relative or known in other RS families; (2) negative, in which she lacks the mutation of her affected male relative; and (3) uninformative, in which no known mutation is identified or no information exists about the familial mutation. CONCLUSIONS: Molecular RS screening is an effective diagnostic tool that complements the clinician's skills for early detection of at-risk males. Useful outcomes of carrier testing depend on several factors: (1) a male relative with a clear clinical diagnosis; (2) a well-defined inheritance pattern; (3) high disease penetrance; (4) size and organization of the gene; and (5) the types of disease-associated mutations. Ethical questions include molecular diagnostic testing of young at-risk females before the age of consent, the impact of this information on the emotional health of the patient and family, and issues of employability and insurance coverage

  9. Comparison of Bone Mineral Density in Common Variable Immunodeficiency and X-Linked Agammaglobulinaemia Patients.

    PubMed

    Mohebbi, Ali; Azizi, Gholamreza; Tavakolinia, Naeimeh; Abbasi, Farzaneh; Sayarifard, Fatemeh; Karimipour, Mehdi; Kiaee, Fatemeh; Yazdani, Reza; Ebrahimi, Sareh Sadat; Ebrahimi, Mehran; Rafiemanesh, Hosein; Tafaroji, Javad; Ziaee, Vahid; Abolhassani, Hassan; Aghamohammadi, Asghar

    2017-01-01

    Primary antibody deficiency (PAD) is the most common group of primary immunodeficiency disorders, resulting from different defects in the development and function of B cell lineage. Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) and X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) are two of the major types of PADs. Optimal growth and subsequently bone health could potentially compromise due to the interference of several factors in PAD with childhood onset. In the present study, our aim was to evaluate bone mineral density (BMD) of patients with CVID and XLA. BMD of 37 CVID and 19 XLA patients was examined. Total BMD was determined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and the calculated scores were compared internally and externally with age-sex matched and ethnic-specific reference. Related factors associated with bone density including immune-related complications, serum calcium, phosphate, total alkaline phosphatase, 25(OH) vitamin D and parathyroid hormone levels were recorded. The median age at the time of study was 20 years among all patients and was not statistically different between CVID and XLA groups and the mean of body mass index (BMI) was 19.4±4.6 kg/cm². Thirty-eight (67.9%) of total patients had normal BMD and 18 (32.1%) patients had a low BMD. BMI was positively correlated with BMD at lumbar spine and femoral neck. The number of low BMD patients in CVID (40.5%) group was more than the XLA (15.8%). Beside nutritional, gastrointestinal and infectious complications which are shared in both groups of patients, CVID patients are more prone to alteration of BMD due to association with lymphoproliferative and endocrine diseases. Therefore routine evaluation of bone density and treatment adjustment should be considered in all PAD patients particularly in CVID patients. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  10. Molecular genetics of X-linked retinitis pigmentosa: Progress towards cloning the RP3 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, R.; Yan, D.; McHenry, C.

    1994-09-01

    Our goal is to identify the X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP) gene RP3. The location of RP3 is genetically delimited to a region of 1 Mb, distal to DXS140, CYBB and tctex-1-like gene and proximal to the gene OTC. It is currently thought that RP3 is within 40 kb of the proximal deletion breakpoint of a patient BB. However, a more proximal location of the gene, closer to OTC, is not ruled out. We initiated the isolation of the genomic region between DXS140 to OTC in YACs. One of the clones from DXS140 region (55B) is 460 kb and spans about 200 kb at each side of BB patient`s proximal breakpoint. It contains CYBB, tctex-1-like genes and two additional CpG islands. The 55B clone has been covered by cosmid and phage subclones. Another YAC clone from the OTC region (OTCC) spans about 1 Mb and contains at least 5 CpG islands. In situ hybridization performed with OTCC showed its location in Xp21; however, several derivative cosmids map to chromosome 7, indicating that it is a chimeric YAC. No overlap is evident between 55B and OTCC. We have isolated the YAC end-sequences and isolation of clones to close the gap is in progress. Cosmids are being used for screening eye tissue cDNA libraries, mainly from retina. Screening is done by hybridization to replica filters or by cDNA enrichment methods. Several cDNA clones have been isolated and are being characterized. Exon-amplification is also being used with the cosmids and phages. Genetic analysis is being performed to determine RP3 patients from clinically indistinguishable RP2, located in Xp11.23-p11.4, and to reduce the genetic distance of current flanking markers. For this we are analyzing a number of XLRP families with established markers in the region and with new microsatellites.

  11. RP2 and RPGR mutations and clinical correlations in patients with X-linked retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Sharon, Dror; Sandberg, Michael A; Rabe, Vivian W; Stillberger, Melissa; Dryja, Thaddeus P; Berson, Eliot L

    2003-11-01

    We determined the mutation spectrum of the RP2 and RPGR genes in patients with X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP) and searched for correlations between categories of mutation and severity of disease. We screened 187 unrelated male patients for mutations, including 135 with a prior clinical diagnosis of XLRP, 11 with probable XLRP, 30 isolate cases suspected of having XLRP, and 11 with cone-rod degeneration. Mutation screening was performed by single-strand conformation analysis and by sequencing of all RP2 exons and RPGR exons 1-14, ORF15, and 15a. The refractive error, visual acuity, final dark-adapted threshold, visual field area, and 30-Hz cone electroretinogram (ERG) amplitude were measured in each patient. Among the 187 patients, we found 10 mutations in RP2, 2 of which are novel, and 80 mutations in RPGR, 41 of which are novel; 66% of the RPGR mutations were within ORF15. Among the 135 with a prior clinical diagnosis of XLRP, mutations in the RP2 and RPGR genes were found in 9 of 135 (6.7%) and 98 of 135 (72.6%), respectively, for a total of 79% of patients. Patients with RP2 mutations had, on average, lower visual acuity but similar visual field area, final dark-adapted threshold, and 30-Hz ERG amplitude compared with those with RPGR mutations. Among patients with RPGR mutations, those with ORF15 mutations had, on average, a significantly larger visual field area and a borderline larger ERG amplitude than did patients with RPGR mutations in exons 1-14. Among patients with ORF15 mutations, regression analyses showed that the final dark-adapted threshold became lower (i.e., closer to normal) and that the 30-Hz ERG amplitude increased as the length of the wild-type ORF15 amino acid sequence increased. Furthermore, as the length of the abnormal amino acid sequence following ORF15 frameshift mutations increased, the severity of disease increased.

  12. A population-based epidemiological and genetic study of X-linked retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Prokisch, Holger; Hartig, Monika; Hellinger, Rosa; Meitinger, Thomas; Rosenberg, Thomas

    2007-09-01

    To perform a nation-wide elucidation of the prevalence and the mutation spectrum in X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP), and to make genotype-phenotype comparisons. The study comprised 96 affected males and 149 female carriers from 42 families representing all identified XLRP individuals in the Danish population (5.4 million inhabitants). RPGR and RP2 were screened for mutations in 34 families, the medical files of the patients were scrutinized, and phenotype data were extracted. The prevalence of affected males was estimated to be 1:26,200 and 1:18,000 of female carriers. A rough estimate, however, indicates that the real prevalence of affected males was approximately 1:15,000. The cumulated life risk of development of XLRP in carriers was strongly age dependent and included one third of the carriers older than 60 years. Molecular analysis of RP2 and RPGR uncovered 28 different mutations in 33 of 34 index cases analyzed. Twelve patients carried a mutation in RP2, 12 in exons 1 to 14, and 9 in open reading frame (ORF) 15 of RPGR. Males with RP2 mutations tended to have higher degrees of myopia, lower visual acuities, and more preserved visual fields than did males with RPGR mutations at the same age. No significant differences in phenotype were found in age of onset and type of mutation in either RP2 or RPGR. A very high mutation detection rate in familial cases makes genetic testing a valuable clinical tool for genetic counseling and prenatal testing. The proportion of RP2-mediated XLRP in the Danish population is higher and the proportion of RPGR-ORF15 is lower than reported in other studies. Thus, strategies for diagnostic procedures should take into account the population-specific mutation spectrum.

  13. X-linked lymphoreticular disease in the scurfy (sf) mutant mouse.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, V L; Wilkinson, J E; Russell, L B

    1991-06-01

    Scurfy (sf) is a spontaneous, sex-linked, recessive mutation that maps to the extreme proximal portion of the X chromosome, about 2 centimorgans from sparse fur (spf). Hemizygotes for sf manifest several clinical disorders, evident at 14 days of age, including scaliness and crusting of the eyelids, ears, and tail, runting, reddening and swelling of the genital papilla, anemia, cachexia, and early death (average, 24 days). Our studies indicate that the phenotype of hemizygous scurfy is not, as has been suggested, a model for human X-linked ichthyosis, but appears to be a disease primarily affecting the lymphoreticular, and possibly the hematopoietic, systems. Gross lesions include marked splenomegaly, hepatomegaly, enlarged lymph nodes, and variable thickening of the ears. The characteristic histologic lesion is a lymphohistiocytic proliferation and infiltration of peripheral lymph nodes, spleen, liver, and skin. In routine hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections, these lesions efface lymph node architecture, thicken the dermis, and form nodular portal infiltrates in the liver. Scurfy lesions characteristically contain a population of large blastlike cells with round to oval nuclei, a vesicular chromatin pattern, and prominent single nucleoli. Mixed perivascular infiltrates of lymphocytes, macrophages, and granulocytes sometimes are found in kidney, heart, pancreas, lung, and mesenteries. There is excessive hematopoiesis in the liver and spleen. Cells expressing B220 or Thy-1 antigens localize to appropriate areas in the lymph nodes and spleen, but are rare in the portal infiltrates and are absent from the skin. There is a marked, polyclonal increase in serum IgG, severe Coombs'-positive anemia, and leukocytosis with atypical mononuclear cells. Scurfy mice are negative for antinuclear antibodies. Despite their morphologically aberrant lymphoreticular system, scurfy mice can exist in a conventional environment without evidence of opportunistic infection. Raising

  14. Pericentromeric genes for non-specific X-linked mental retardation (MRX)

    SciTech Connect

    Gedeon, A.; Kerr, B.; Mulley, J.; Turner, G.

    1994-07-15

    Extensive linkage analysis in three families with non-specific X-linked mental retardation (MRX) have localized the gene in each family to the pericentromeric region of the chromosome. The MRX17 gene is localized with a peak lod of 2.41 ({theta} = 0.0) with the trinucleotide repeat polymorphism at the androgen receptor (AR) gene locus. The gene lies in the interval between the markers DSX255 and DXS990, as defined by recombinants. The MRX18 gene maps to the interval between the markers DXS538 and DXS1126, with a peak lod score of 2.01 ({theta} = 0.0) at the PFC gene locus. In the third family (Family E) with insufficient informative meioses for assignment of an MRX acronym, the maximum lod score is 1.8 at a recombination fraction of zero for several marker loci between DXS207 and DXS426. Exclusions from the regions of marker loci spanning Xq support the localization of the MRX gene in Family E to the pericentromeric region. Localizations of these and other MRX genes have determined that MRX2 and MRX19 map to distal Xp, MRX3, and MRX6 map to distal Xq, whilst the majority cluster in the pericentromeric region. In addition, we confirm that there are at least two distinct MRX genes near the centromere as delineated by the non-overlapping regional localizations of MRX17 and MRX18. Determination of these non-overlapping localizations is currently the only means of classifying non-syndromal forms of mental retardation and determining the minimum number of MRX loci. 27 refs., 14 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. Mutations in noncoding regions of GJB1 are a major cause of X-linked CMT.

    PubMed

    Tomaselli, Pedro J; Rossor, Alexander M; Horga, Alejandro; Jaunmuktane, Zane; Carr, Aisling; Saveri, Paola; Piscosquito, Giuseppe; Pareyson, Davide; Laura, Matilde; Blake, Julian C; Poh, Roy; Polke, James; Houlden, Henry; Reilly, Mary M

    2017-04-11

    To determine the prevalence and clinical and genetic characteristics of patients with X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) due to mutations in noncoding regions of the gap junction β-1 gene (GJB1). Mutations were identified by bidirectional Sanger sequence analysis of the 595 bases of the upstream promoter region, and 25 bases of the 3' untranslated region (UTR) sequence in patients in whom mutations in the coding region had been excluded. Clinical and neurophysiologic data were retrospectively collected. Five mutations were detected in 25 individuals from 10 kindreds representing 11.4% of all cases of CMTX1 diagnosed in our neurogenetics laboratory between 1996 and 2016. Four pathogenic mutations, c.-17G>A, c.-17+1G>T, c.-103C>T, and c.-146-90_146-89insT were detected in the 5'UTR. A novel mutation, c.*15C>T, was detected in the 3' UTR of GJB1 in 2 unrelated families with CMTX1 and is the first pathogenic mutation in the 3'UTR of any myelin-associated CMT gene. Mutations segregated with the phenotype, were at sites predicted to be pathogenic, and were not present in the normal population. Mutations in noncoding DNA are a major cause of CMTX1 and highlight the importance of mutations in noncoding DNA in human disease. Next-generation sequencing platforms for use in inherited neuropathy should therefore include coverage of these regions. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. on behalf of the American Academy of Neurology.

  16. Defective Mineralization in X-Linked Hypophosphatemia Dental Pulp Cell Cultures.

    PubMed

    Coyac, B R; Hoac, B; Chafey, P; Falgayrac, G; Slimani, L; Rowe, P S; Penel, G; Linglart, A; McKee, M D; Chaussain, C; Bardet, C

    2017-09-01

    X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH) is a skeletal disease caused by inactivating mutations in the PHEX gene. Mutated or absent PHEX protein/enzyme leads to a decreased serum phosphate level, which cause mineralization defects in the skeleton and teeth (osteomalacia/odontomalacia). It is not yet altogether clear whether these manifestations are caused solely by insufficient circulating phosphate availability for mineralization or also by a direct, local intrinsic effect caused by impaired PHEX activity. Here, we evaluated the local role of PHEX in a 3-dimensional model of extracellular matrix (ECM) mineralization. Dense collagen hydrogels were seeded either with human dental pulp cells from patients with characterized PHEX mutations or with sex- and age-matched healthy controls and cultured up to 24 d using osteogenic medium with standard phosphate concentration. Calcium quantification, micro-computed tomography, and histology with von Kossa staining for mineral showed significantly lower mineralization in XLH cell-seeded scaffolds, using nonparametric statistical tests. While apatitic mineralization was observed along collagen fibrils by electron microscopy in both groups, Raman microspectrometry indicated that XLH cells harboring the PHEX mutation produced less mineralized scaffolds having impaired mineral quality with less carbonate substitution and lower crystallinity. In the XLH cultures, immunoblotting revealed more abundant osteopontin (OPN), dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1), and matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein (MEPE) than controls, as well as the presence of fragments of these proteins not found in controls, suggesting a role for PHEX in SIBLING protein degradation. Immunohistochemistry revealed altered OPN and DMP1 associated with an increased alkaline phosphatase staining in the XLH cultures. These results are consistent with impaired PHEX activity having local ECM effects in XLH. Future treatments for XLH should target both systemic and local

  17. Next-Generation Sequencing Reveals Novel Mutations in X-linked Intellectual Disability.

    PubMed

    Muthusamy, Babylakshmi; Selvan, Lakshmi Dhevi N; Nguyen, Thong T; Manoj, Jesna; Stawiski, Eric W; Jaiswal, Bijay S; Wang, Weiru; Raja, Remya; Ramprasad, Vedam Laxmi; Gupta, Ravi; Murugan, Sakthivel; Kadandale, Jayarama S; Prasad, T S Keshava; Reddy, Kavita; Peterson, Andrew; Pandey, Akhilesh; Seshagiri, Somasekar; Girimaji, Satish Chandra; Gowda, Harsha

    2017-05-01

    Robust diagnostics for many human genetic disorders are much needed in the pursuit of global personalized medicine. Next-generation sequencing now offers new promise for biomarker and diagnostic discovery, in developed as well as resource-limited countries. In this broader global health context, X-linked intellectual disability (XLID) is an inherited genetic disorder that is associated with a range of phenotypes impacting societies in both developed and developing countries. Although intellectual disability arises due to diverse causes, a substantial proportion is caused by genomic alterations. Studies have identified causal XLID genomic alterations in more than 100 protein-coding genes located on the X-chromosome. However, the causes for a substantial number of intellectual disability and associated phenotypes still remain unknown. Identification of causative genes and novel mutations will help in early diagnosis as well as genetic counseling of families. Advent of next-generation sequencing methods has accelerated the discovery of new genes involved in mental health disorders. In this study, we analyzed the exomes of three families from India with nonsyndromic XLID comprising seven affected individuals. The affected individuals had varying degrees of intellectual disability, microcephaly, and delayed motor and language milestones. We identified potential causal variants in three XLID genes, including PAK3 (V294M), CASK (complex structural variant), and MECP2 (P354T). Our findings reported in this study extend the spectrum of mutations and phenotypes associated with XLID, and calls for further studies of intellectual disability and mental health disorders with use of next-generation sequencing technologies.

  18. An X-linked three allele model of hand preference and hand posture for writing.

    PubMed

    McKeever, Walter F

    2004-04-01

    This paper describes a genetic model of hand preferences for writing and for handwriting posture (HWP). The challenge of devising an X-linked model for these aspects of human handedness was posed by the results of a large family handedness study (McKeever, 2000) that showed evidence of such linkage. Because X-linkage for handedness has been widely regarded as untenable, the prospects for developing such a model were not initially encouraging, but ultimately a viable model did suggest itself. Family studies of handedness and leading theories of handedness are briefly described, as is some of the research on HWP motivated by the theory of Levy and Nagylaki (1972). It is argued that there is evidence that HWP reflects a biological dictate and not just individual "choices" or "adaptations" to writing in a left-to-right direction with the left hand. The model proposes that inverted handwriting posture is not necessarily highly related to speech and language lateralities of sinistrals, but that it reveals an interhemispheric mediation of writing. It is hypothesised that it reflects a specialisation of the left angular gyrus (with some possible extension into the supramarginal gyrus) for the storage of movement and timing sequences of cursive writing, and right hemisphere motor programming of the motor output of writing. It is also argued that no family handedness study conducted to date is adequate for testing the predictions of extant handedness theories, and the often wide variations between the results of family handedness studies are noted. It is suggested that fMRI studies could definitively test the HWP hypotheses of the model and that the hypothesis of X-linkage could be tested definitively should studies of the human genome identify a gene for handedness.

  19. Efficacy of Gene Therapy for X-Linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Hacein-Bey-Abina, Salima; Hauer, Julia; Lim, Annick; Picard, Capucine; Wang, Gary P.; Berry, Charles C.; Martinache, Chantal; Rieux-Laucat, Frédéric; Latour, Sylvain; Belohradsky, Bernd H.; Leiva, Lily; Sorensen, Ricardo; Debré, Marianne; Casanova, Jean Laurent; Blanche, Stephane; Durandy, Anne; Bushman, Frederic D.; Fischer, Alain; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND The outcomes of gene therapy to correct congenital immunodeficiencies are unknown. We reviewed long-term outcomes after gene therapy in nine patients with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1), which is characterized by the absence of the cytokine receptor common γ chain. METHODS The nine patients, who lacked an HLA-identical donor, underwent ex vivo retrovirus-mediated transfer of γ chain to autologous CD34+ bone marrow cells between 1999 and 2002. We assessed clinical events and immune function on long-term follow-up. RESULTS Eight patients were alive after a median follow-up period of 9 years (range, 8 to 11). Gene therapy was initially successful at correcting immune dysfunction in eight of the nine patients. However, acute leukemia developed in four patients, and one died. Transduced T cells were detected for up to 10.7 years after gene therapy. Seven patients, including the three survivors of leukemia, had sustained immune reconstitution; three patients required immunoglobulin-replacement therapy. Sustained thymopoiesis was established by the persistent presence of naive T cells, even after chemotherapy in three patients. The T-cell–receptor repertoire was diverse in all patients. Transduced B cells were not detected. Correction of the immunodeficiency improved the patients’ health. CONCLUSIONS After nearly 10 years of follow-up, gene therapy was shown to have corrected the immunodeficiency associated with SCID-X1. Gene therapy may be an option for patients who do not have an HLA-identical donor for hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation and for whom the risks are deemed acceptable. This treatment is associated with a risk of acute leukemia. (Funded by INSERM and others.) PMID:20660403

  20. Inflammatory profile in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy patients: Understanding disease progression.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, Desirèe Padilha; Donida, Bruna; Jacques, Carlos Eduardo; Deon, Marion; Hauschild, Tatiane Cristina; Koehler-Santos, Patricia; de Moura Coelho, Daniella; Coitinho, Adriana Simon; Jardim, Laura Bannach; Vargas, Carmen Regla

    2017-07-19

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is an inherited disease characterized by progressive inflammatory demyelization in the brain, adrenal insufficiency, and an abnormal accumulation of very long chain fatty acids (VLCFA) in tissue and body fluids. Considering that inflammation might be involved in pathophysiology of X-ALD, we aimed to investigate pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in plasma from three different male phenotypes (CCER, AMN, and asymptomatic individuals). Our results showed that asymptomatic patients presented increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-2, IL-8, and TNF-α and the last one was also higher in AMN phenotype. Besides, asymptomatic patients presented higher levels of anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-4 and IL-10. AMN patients presented higher levels of IL-2, IL-5, and IL-4. We might hypothesize that inflammation in X-ALD is related to plasmatic VLCFA concentration, since there were positive correlations between C26:0 plasmatic levels and pro-inflammatory cytokines in asymptomatic and AMN patients and negative correlation between anti-inflammatory cytokine and C24:0/C22:0 ratio in AMN patients. The present work yields experimental evidence that there is an inflammatory imbalance associated Th1, (IL-2, IL-6, and IFN-γ), Th2 (IL-4 and IL-10), and macrophages response (TNF-α and IL-1β) in the periphery of asymptomatic and AMN patients, and there is correlation between VLCFA plasmatic levels and inflammatory mediators in X-ALD. Furthermore, we might also speculate that the increase of plasmatic cytokines in asymptomatic patients could be considered an early biomarker of brain damage and maybe also a predictor of disease progression. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Evidence for X-linked introgression between molecular forms of Anopheles gambiae from Angola.

    PubMed

    Choi, K S; Townson, H

    2012-06-01

    The M and S molecular forms of the African malaria vector Anopheles gambiae (Diptera: Culicidae) are morphologically identical incipient species in which reproductive isolation is incomplete, enabling low-level gene flow between forms. In an attempt to find differences between the M and S forms, sequence variation was studied at loci along the X chromosome in adult female An. gambiae from Angola. A high proportion of M form specimens from Angola (79% of the 456 X chromosomes sampled) were found to contain a 16-bp insertion in intron 4 of the X-linked GPRCCK1 locus, relative to the AgamP3 release of the An. gambiae PEST genome sequence. The insertion was in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in Angolan M form populations. The same insertion was found in all S form specimens examined, regardless of where in Africa they were sampled, but was absent from a sample of M form specimens collected in Ghana, Bioko and Mali. In M form specimens from Angola, there was an association between alleles at the GPRCCK1 locus and those at a microsatellite locus, AGXH678, close to the centromere of the X chromosome, with significant linkage disequilibrium between loci separated by 0.472 Mbp (P < 0.033). We show that the insertion results from introgression from the S form into the M form, rather than from the retention of an ancestral character. Gene flow from the S to M form could allow genes of adaptive value to be transferred, including those conferring insecticide resistance and others influencing ecology and behaviour, and thus malaria transmission and control. We discuss factors that may have led to this introgression event.

  2. 7 Tesla proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging in adult X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Ratai, Eva; Kok, Trina; Wiggins, Christopher; Wiggins, Graham; Grant, Ellen; Gagoski, Borjan; O'Neill, Gilmore; Adalsteinsson, Elfar; Eichler, Florian

    2010-01-01

    Background Adult patients with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) remain at risk for progressive neurological deterioration. Phenotypes vary in their pathology, ranging from axonal degeneration to inflammatory demyelination. The severity of symptoms is poorly explained by conventional imaging. Objective To test the hypothesis that neurochemistry in normal appearing brain differs among adult phenotypes of X-ALD, and that neurochemical changes correlate with the severity of symptoms. Patients and Methods Using a 7 Tesla scanner we performed structural and proton MRSI in 13 adult patients with X-ALD, including 4 patients with adult cerebral ALD (ACALD), 5 with adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN) and 4 female heterozygotes. Studies were also performed in nine healthy controls. Results Among adult X-ALD phenotypes, MI/Cr was 46% higher and Cho/Cr 21% higher in normal appearing white matter of ACALD compared to AMN (p < 0.05). Both NAA/Cr and Glu/Cr ratios were lower in AMN patients (p = 0.028 and p = 0.036, respectively) than in controls. There were no significant differences between AMN and female heterozygotes. In cortex, ACALD patients had lower values of NAA/Cr compared to female heterozygotes and controls (p = 0.022). The global MI/Cr ratio demonstrated a significant association with the EDSS (Spearman ρ = 0.66, p = 0.039). Conclusion 7 Tesla proton MRSI reveals differences in the neurochemistry of ACALD but is unable to distinguish AMN from female heterozygotes. MI/Cr correlates with the severity of the symptoms and may be a meaningful biomarker in adult X-ALD. PMID:19001168

  3. Juvenile retinoschisis: a model for molecular diagnostic testing of X-linked ophthalmic disease.

    PubMed

    Sieving, P A; Yashar, B M; Ayyagari, R

    1999-01-01

    X-linked juvenile retinoschisis (RS) provides a starting point to define clinical paradigms and understand the limitations of diagnostic molecular testing. The RS phenotype is specific, but the broad severity range is clinically confusing. Molecular diagnostic testing obviates unnecessary examinations for boys at-risk and identifies carrier females who otherwise show no clinical signs. The XLRS1 gene has 6 exons of 26-196 base-pair size. Each exon is amplified by a single polymerase chain reaction and then sequenced, starting with exons 4 through 6, which contain mutation "hot spots." The 6 XLRS1 exons are sequenced serially. If alterations are found, they are compared with mutations in our > 120 XLRS families and with the > 300 mutations reported worldwide. Point mutations, small deletions, or rearrangements are identified in nearly 90% of males with a clinical diagnosis of RS. XLRS1 has very few sequence polymorphisms. Carrier-state testing produces 1 of 3 results: (1) positive, in which the woman has the same mutation as an affected male relative or known in other RS families; (2) negative, in which she lacks the mutation of her affected male relative; and (3) uninformative, in which no known mutation is identified or no information exists about the familial mutation. Molecular RS screening is an effective diagnostic tool that complements the clinician's skills for early detection of at-risk males. Useful outcomes of carrier testing depend on several factors: (1) a male relative with a clear clinical diagnosis; (2) a well-defined inheritance pattern; (3) high disease penetrance; (4) size and organization of the gene; and (5) the types of disease-associated mutations. Ethical questions include molecular diagnostic testing of young at-risk females before the age of consent, the impact of this information on the emotional health of the patient and family, and issues of employability and insurance coverage.

  4. X-linked Acrogigantism (X-LAG) Syndrome: Clinical Profile and Therapeutic Responses

    PubMed Central

    Beckers, Albert; Lodish, Maya Beth; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Rostomyan, Liliya; Lee, Misu; Faucz, Fabio R; Yuan, Bo; Choong, Catherine S; Caberg, Jean-Hubert; Verrua, Elisa; Naves, Luciana Ansaneli; Cheetham, Tim D; Young, Jacques; Lysy, Philippe A; Petrossians, Patrick; Cotterill, Andrew; Shah, Nalini Samir; Metzger, Daniel; Castermans, Emilie; Ambrosio, Maria Rosaria; Villa, Chiara; Strebkova, Natalia; Mazerkina, Nadia; Gaillard, Stéphan; Barra, Gustavo Barcelos; Casulari, Luis Augusto; Neggers, Sebastian J.; Salvatori, Roberto; Jaffrain-Rea, Marie-Lise; Zacharin, Margaret; Santamaria, Beatriz Lecumberri; Zacharieva, Sabina; Lim, Ee Mun; Mantovani, Giovanna; Zatelli, Maria Chaira; Collins, Michael T; Bonneville, Jean-François; Quezado, Martha; Chittiboina, Prashant; Oldfield, Edward H.; Bours, Vincent; Liu, Pengfei; De Herder, Wouter; Pellegata, Natalia; Lupski, James R.; Daly, Adrian F.; Stratakis, Constantine A.

    2015-01-01

    X-linked acro-gigantism (X-LAG) is a new syndrome of pituitary gigantism, caused by microduplications on chromosome Xq26.3, encompassing the gene GPR101, which is highly upregulated in pituitary tumors. We conducted this study to explore the clinical, radiological and hormonal phenotype and responses to therapy in patients with X-LAG syndrome. The study included 18 patients (13 sporadic) with X-LAG and a microduplication in chromosome Xq26.3. All sporadic cases had unique duplications and the inheritance pattern in 2 families was dominant with all Xq26.3 duplication carriers being affected. Patients began to grow rapidly as early as 2–3 months of age (median 12 months). At diagnosis (median delay 27 months), patients had a median height and weight SDS score of >+3.9 SDS. Apart from the increased overall body size, the children had acromegalic symptoms including acral enlargement and facial coarsening. More than a third of cases had increased appetite. Patients had marked hypersecretion of GH/IGF-1 and prolactin, usually due to a pituitary macroadenoma or hyperplasia. Primary neurosurgical control was achieved with extensive anterior pituitary resection but postoperative hypopituitarism was frequent. Control with somatostatin analogs was not readily achieved despite moderate to high somatostatin receptor subtype-2 expression in tumor tissue. Postoperative adjuvant pegvisomant achieved control of IGF-1 all 5 cases in which it was employed. X-LAG is a new infant-onset gigantism syndrome that has a severe clinical phenotype leading to challenging disease management. PMID:25712922

  5. A Modified γ-Retrovirus Vector for X-Linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Hacein-Bey-Abina, S.; Pai, S.-Y.; Gaspar, H.B.; Armant, M.; Berry, C.C.; Blanche, S.; Bleesing, J.; Blondeau, J.; de Boer, H.; Buckland, K.F.; Caccavelli, L.; Cros, G.; De Oliveira, S.; Fernández, K.S.; Guo, D.; Harris, C.E.; Hopkins, G.; Lehmann, L.E.; Lim, A.; London, W.B.; van der Loo, J.C.M.; Malani, N.; Male, F.; Malik, P.; Marinovic, M.A.; McNicol, A.-M.; Moshous, D.; Neven, B.; Oleastro, M.; Picard, C.; Ritz, J.; Rivat, C.; Schambach, A.; Shaw, K.L.; Sherman, E.A.; Silberstein, L.E.; Six, E.; Touzot, F.; Tsytsykova, A.; Xu-Bayford, J.; Baum, C.; Bushman, F.D.; Fischer, A.; Kohn, D.B.; Filipovich, A.H.; Notarangelo, L.D.; Cavazzana, M.; Williams, D.A.; Thrasher, A.J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND In previous clinical trials involving children with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1), a Moloney murine leukemia virus–based γ-retrovirus vector expressing interleukin-2 receptor γ-chain (γc) complementary DNA successfully restored immunity in most patients but resulted in vector-induced leukemia through enhancer-mediated mutagenesis in 25% of patients. We assessed the efficacy and safety of a self-inactivating retrovirus for the treatment of SCID-X1. METHODS We enrolled nine boys with SCID-X1 in parallel trials in Europe and the United States to evaluate treatment with a self-inactivating (SIN) γ-retrovirus vector containing deletions in viral enhancer sequences expressing γc (SIN-γc). RESULTS All patients received bone marrow–derived CD34+ cells transduced with the SIN-γc vector, without preparative conditioning. After 12.1 to 38.7 months of follow-up, eight of the nine children were still alive. One patient died from an overwhelming adenoviral infection before reconstitution with genetically modified T cells. Of the remaining eight patients, seven had recovery of peripheral-blood T cells that were functional and led to resolution of infections. The patients remained healthy thereafter. The kinetics of CD3+ T-cell recovery was not significantly different from that observed in previous trials. Assessment of insertion sites in peripheral blood from patients in the current trial as compared with those in previous trials revealed significantly less clustering of insertion sites within LMO2 , MECOM, and other lymphoid proto-oncogenes in our patients. CONCLUSIONS This modified γ-retrovirus vector was found to retain efficacy in the treatment of SCID-X1. The long-term effect of this therapy on leukemogenesis remains unknown. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and others; ClinicalTrials.gov numbers, NCT01410019, NCT01175239, and NCT01129544.) PMID:25295500

  6. Somatic mosaicism underlies X-linked acrogigantism syndrome in sporadic male subjects.

    PubMed

    Daly, Adrian F; Yuan, Bo; Fina, Frederic; Caberg, Jean-Hubert; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Rostomyan, Liliya; de Herder, Wouter W; Naves, Luciana A; Metzger, Daniel; Cuny, Thomas; Rabl, Wolfgang; Shah, Nalini; Jaffrain-Rea, Marie-Lise; Zatelli, Maria Chiara; Faucz, Fabio R; Castermans, Emilie; Nanni-Metellus, Isabelle; Lodish, Maya; Muhammad, Ammar; Palmeira, Leonor; Potorac, Iulia; Mantovani, Giovanna; Neggers, Sebastian J; Klein, Marc; Barlier, Anne; Liu, Pengfei; Ouafik, L'Houcine; Bours, Vincent; Lupski, James R; Stratakis, Constantine A; Beckers, Albert

    2016-04-01

    Somatic mosaicism has been implicated as a causative mechanism in a number of genetic and genomic disorders. X-linked acrogigantism (XLAG) syndrome is a recently characterized genomic form of pediatric gigantism due to aggressive pituitary tumors that is caused by submicroscopic chromosome Xq26.3 duplications that include GPR101 We studied XLAG syndrome patients (n= 18) to determine if somatic mosaicism contributed to the genomic pathophysiology. Eighteen subjects with XLAG syndrome caused by Xq26.3 duplications were identified using high-definition array comparative genomic hybridization (HD-aCGH). We noted that males with XLAG had a decreased log2ratio (LR) compared with expected values, suggesting potential mosaicism, whereas females showed no such decrease. Compared with familial male XLAG cases, sporadic males had more marked evidence for mosaicism, with levels of Xq26.3 duplication between 16.1 and 53.8%. These characteristics were replicated using a novel, personalized breakpoint junction-specific quantification droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR) technique. Using a separate ddPCR technique, we studied the feasibility of identifying XLAG syndrome cases in a distinct patient population of 64 unrelated subjects with acromegaly/gigantism, and identified one female gigantism patient who had had increased copy number variation (CNV) threshold for GPR101 that was subsequently diagnosed as having XLAG syndrome on HD-aCGH. Employing a combination of HD-aCGH and novel ddPCR approaches, we have demonstrated, for the first time, that XLAG syndrome can be caused by variable degrees of somatic mosaicism for duplications at chromosome Xq26.3. Somatic mosaicism was shown to occur in sporadic males but not in females with XLAG syndrome, although the clinical characteristics of the disease were similarly severe in both sexes. © 2016 Society for Endocrinology.

  7. Childhood acromegaly due to X-linked acrogigantism: long term follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Rebecca J.; Bell, Jennifer; Chung, Wendy K.; David, Raphael; Oberfield, Sharon E.; Wardlaw, Sharon L.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Acromegaly in infancy is extremely rare. We describe a 32 year old woman who presented at 6 months of age with isolated macrocephaly, followed by accelerated linear growth. At 21 months of age, her head circumference was 55 cm (+5.5 SD), height was 97.6 cm (+4.4 SD) and weight was 20.6 kg (+6.2 SD). She had markedly elevated levels of growth hormone (GH) (135 ng/ml), IGF-1 (1540 ng/ml) and prolactin (370 ng/ml). A pituitary macroadenoma was surgically resected. Immunohistochemical staining was positive for GH. Post-operatively, she developed ACTH and TSH deficiency and diabetes insipidus. Methods Long term clinical follow-up and genetic testing with chromosomal microarray analysis. Results Despite GH deficiency, she grew well until 7 ½ years old, with subsequent decline in growth velocity, and received GH therapy for 5 years. Puberty was initiated with estrogen therapy. As an adult, she has no stigmata of acromegaly, with a height of 164.5 cm and non-acromegalic features. IGF-1 has remained in the low normal range. Prolactin has been mildly elevated. Serial MRIs have shown no evidence of tumor recurrence. She receives replacement therapy with hydrocortisone, levothyroxine and DDAVP. Chromosomal microarray analysis revealed that she has X-linked acrogigantism (X-LAG) due to a de novo duplication of Xq26.3 (516 kb). She recently became pregnant following ovarian stimulation and chorionic villus sampling revealed that she is carrying a male with the same duplication. Conclusion This report provides detailed long term clinical follow-up of a patient with X-LAG syndrome. PMID:27631333

  8. Mutations in btk in patients with presumed X-linked agammaglobulinemia.

    PubMed Central

    Conley, M E; Mathias, D; Treadaway, J; Minegishi, Y; Rohrer, J

    1998-01-01

    In 1993, two groups showed that X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) was due to mutations in a tyrosine kinase now called Btk. Most laboratories have been able to detect mutations in Btk in 80%-90% of males with presumed XLA. The remaining patients may have mutations in Btk that are difficult to identify, or they may have defects that are phenotypically similar to XLA but genotypically different. We analyzed 101 families in which affected males were diagnosed as having XLA. Mutations in Btk were identified in 38 of 40 families with more than one affected family member and in 56 of 61 families with sporadic disease. Excluding the patients in whom the marked decrease in B cell numbers characteristic of XLA could not be confirmed by immunofluorescence studies, mutations in Btk were identified in 43 of 46 patients with presumed sporadic XLA. Two of the three remaining patients had defects in other genes required for normal B cell development, and the third patient was unlikely to have XLA, on the basis of results of extensive Btk analysis. Our techniques were unable to identify a mutation in Btk in one male with both a family history and laboratory findings suggestive of XLA. DNA samples from 41 of 49 of the mothers of males with sporadic disease and proven mutations in Btk were positive for the mutation found in their son. In the other 8 families, the mutation appeared to arise in the maternal germ line. In 20 families, haplotype analysis showed that the new mutation originated in the maternal grandfather or great-grandfather. These studies indicate that 90%-95% of males with presumed XLA have mutations in Btk. The other patients are likely to have defects in other genes. PMID:9545398

  9. Role of the X-linked gene GPR174 in autoimmune Addison's disease.

    PubMed

    Napier, C; Mitchell, A L; Gan, E; Wilson, I; Pearce, S H S

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune endocrinopathies demonstrate a profound gender bias, but the reasons for this remain obscure. The 1000 genes on the X chromosome are likely to be implicated in this inherent susceptibility; various theories, including skewed X chromosome inactivation and fetal microchimerism, have been proposed. GPR174 is an Xq21 putative purinergic receptor that is widely expressed in lymphoid tissues. A single-nucleotide polymorphism, rs3827440, encoding Ser162Pro, has recently been associated with Graves' disease in Chinese and Polish populations, suggesting a role of this X chromosome gene in autoimmune disease. We investigated the role of rs3827440 in a UK cohort of patients with autoimmune Addison's disease (AAD). Samples from 286 AAD cases and 288 healthy controls were genotyped using TaqMan single-nucleotide polymorphism genotyping assays (C_25954273_10) on the Applied Biosystems 7900HT Fast real-time PCR system. Using a dominant (present/absent) model, the serine-encoding T allele of rs3827440 was present in 189 of 286 AAD patients (66%) compared with 132 of 288 unaffected controls (46%) [P = .010, odds ratio 1.80 (5%-95% confidence interval 1.22-2.67)]. An allele dosage model found a significant excess of the T allele in AAD patients compared with controls [P = .03, odds ratio 1.34 (5%-95% confidence interval 1.07-1.67)]. We have demonstrated a significant association of this X chromosome-encoded immunoreceptor with AAD for the first time. This X-linked gene could have a more generalized role in autoimmunity pathogenesis: G protein-coupled receptors are promising drugable targets, and further work to elucidate the functional role of GPR174 is now warranted.

  10. Mutations in apoptosis-inducing factor cause X-linked recessive auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder

    PubMed Central

    Zong, Liang; Guan, Jing; Ealy, Megan; Zhang, Qiujing; Wang, Dayong; Wang, Hongyang; Zhao, Yali; Shen, Zhirong; Campbell, Colleen A; Wang, Fengchao; Yang, Ju; Sun, Wei; Lan, Lan; Ding, Dalian; Xie, Linyi; Qi, Yue; Lou, Xin; Huang, Xusheng; Shi, Qiang; Chang, Suhua; Xiong, Wenping; Yin, Zifang; Yu, Ning; Zhao, Hui; Wang, Jun; Wang, Jing; Salvi, Richard J; Petit, Christine; Smith, Richard J H; Wang, Qiuju

    2015-01-01

    Background Auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder (ANSD) is a form of hearing loss in which auditory signal transmission from the inner ear to the auditory nerve and brain stem is distorted, giving rise to speech perception difficulties beyond that expected for the observed degree of hearing loss. For many cases of ANSD, the underlying molecular pathology and the site of lesion remain unclear. The X-linked form of the condition, AUNX1, has been mapped to Xq23-q27.3, although the causative gene has yet to be identified. Methods We performed whole-exome sequencing on DNA samples from the AUNX1 family and another small phenotypically similar but unrelated ANSD family. Results We identified two missense mutations in AIFM1 in these families: c.1352G>A (p.R451Q) in the AUNX1 family and c.1030C>T (p.L344F) in the second ANSD family. Mutation screening in a large cohort of 3 additional unrelated families and 93 sporadic cases with ANSD identified 9 more missense mutations in AIFM1. Bioinformatics analysis and expression studies support this gene as being causative of ANSD. Conclusions Variants in AIFM1 gene are a common cause of familial and sporadic ANSD and provide insight into the expanded spectrum of AIFM1-associated diseases. The finding of cochlear nerve hypoplasia in some patients was AIFM1-related ANSD implies that MRI may be of value in localising the site of lesion and suggests that cochlea implantation in these patients may have limited success. PMID:25986071

  11. High-resolution mapping of the x-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (EDA) locus

    SciTech Connect

    Zonana, J.; Jones, M.; Litt, M.; Kramer, P.; Browne, D.; Becker, H.W. ); Brockdorff, N.; Rastan, S. ); Davies, K.P.; Clarke, A. )

    1992-11-01

    The X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (EDA) locus has been previously localized to the subchromosomal region Xq11-q21.1. The authors have extended previous linkage studies and analyzed linkage between the EDA locus and 10 marker loci, including five new loci, in 41 families. Four of the marker loci showed no recombination with the EDA locus, and six other loci were also linked to the EDA locus with recombination fractions of .009-.075. Multipoint analysis gave support to the placement of the PGK1P1 locus proximal to the EDA locus and the DXS453 and PGK1 loci distal to EDA. Further ordering of the loci could be inferred from a human-rodent somatic cell hybrid derived from an affected female with EDA and an X;9 translocation and from studies of an affected male with EDA and a submicroscopic deletion. Three of the proximal marker loci, which showed no recombination with the EDA locus, when used in combination, were informative in 92% of females. The closely linked flanking polymorphic loci DXS339 and DXS453 had heterozygosites of 72% and 76%, respectively, and when used jointly, they were doubly informative in 52% of females. The human DXS732 locus was defined by a conserved mouse probe pcos169E/4 (DXCrc169 locus) that consegregates with the mouse tabby (Ta) locus, a potential homologue to the EDA locus. The absence of recombination between EDA and the DXSA732 locus lends support to the hypothesis that the DXCrc169 locus in the mouse and the DXS732 locus in humans may contain candidate sequences for the Ta and EDA genes, respectively. 36 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  12. Conventional Therapy in Adults With X-Linked Hypophosphatemia: Effects on Enthesopathy and Dental Disease.

    PubMed

    Connor, Jessica; Olear, Elizabeth A; Insogna, Karl L; Katz, Lee; Baker, Suher; Kaur, Raghbir; Simpson, Christine A; Sterpka, John; Dubrow, Robert; Zhang, Jane H; Carpenter, Thomas O

    2015-10-01

    Treatment of X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH) with active vitamin D metabolites and phosphate can partially correct skeletal deformities. It is unclear whether therapy influences the occurrence of two major long-term morbidities in XLH: enthesopathy and dental disease. The objective of the study was to investigate the relationship between treatment and enthesopathy and dental disease in adult XLH patients. The study was designed as observational and cross-sectional. The study was conducted at an academic medical center's hospital research unit. Fifty-two XLH patients aged 18 years or older at the time of the study participated in the study. There were no interventions. The number of enthesopathy sites identified by radiographic skeletal survey and dental disease severity (more than five or five or fewer dental abscesses), identified historically, were measured. Associations between proportion of adult life and total life with treatment and number of enthesopathy sites were assessed using multiple linear regression, whereas associations between these exposure variables and dental disease severity were assessed using multiple logistic regression. All models were adjusted for confounding factors. Neither proportion of adult nor total life with treatment was a significant predictor of extent of enthesopathy. In contrast, both of these treatment variables were significant predictors of dental disease severity (multivariate-adjusted global P = .0080 and P = .0010, respectively). Participants treated 0% of adulthood were more likely to have severe dental disease than those treated 100% of adulthood (adjusted odds ratio 25 [95% confidence interval 1.2-520]). As the proportion of adult life with treatment increased, the odds of having severe dental disease decreased (multivariate-adjusted P for trend = .015). Treatment in adulthood may not promote or prevent enthesopathy; however, it may be associated with a lower risk of experiencing severe dental disease.

  13. Mutational and protein analysis of patients and heterozygous women with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Feigenbaum, V.; Lombard-Platet, G.; Guidoux, S.; Sarde, C. O.; Mandel, J. L.; Aubourg, P.

    1996-01-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD), a neurodegenerative disorder associated with impaired beta-oxidation of very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA), is due to mutations in a gene encoding a peroxisomal ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter (ALD protein [ALDP]). We analyzed the open reading frame of the ALD gene in 44 French ALD kindred by using SSCP or denaturing gradient-gel electrophoresis and studied the effect of mutations on ALDP by immunocytofluorescence and western blotting of fibroblasts and/or white blood cells. Mutations were detected in 37 of 44 kindreds and were distributed over the whole protein-coding region, with the exception of the C terminus encoded in exon 10. Except for two mutations (delAG1801 and P560L) observed four times each, nearly every ALD family has a different mutation. Twenty-four of 37 mutations were missense mutations leading to amino acid changes located in or close to putative transmembrane segments (TMS 2, 3, 4, and 5), in the EAA-like motif and in the nucleotide fold of the ATP-binding domain of ALDP. Of 38 ALD patients tested, 27 (71%) lacked ALDP immunoreactivity in their fibroblasts and/or white blood cells. More than half of missense mutations studied (11 of 21) resulted in a complete lack of ALDP immunoreactivity, and six missense mutations resulted in decreased ALDP expression. The fibroblasts and/or white blood cells of 15 of 15 heterozygous carrier from ALD kindred with no ALDP showed a mixture of positive- and negative-ALDP immunoreactivity due to X-inactivation. Since 5%-15% of heterozygous women have normal VLCFA levels, the immunodetection of ALDP in white blood cells can be applicable in a majority of ALD kindred, to identify heterozygous women, particularly when the ALD gene mutation has not yet been identified. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8651290

  14. Hereditary spastic paraplegias with autosomal dominant, recessive, X-linked, or maternal trait of inheritance.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef; Löscher, Wolfgang; Quasthoff, Stefan; Wanschitz, Julia; Auer-Grumbach, Michaela; Stevanin, Giovanni

    2012-07-15

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (SPG) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders that are clinically characterised by progressive spasticity and weakness of the lower-limbs (pure SPG) and, majoritorian, additional more extensive neurological or non-neurological manifestations (complex or complicated SPG). Pure SPG is characterised by progressive spasticity and weakness of the lower-limbs, and occasionally sensory disturbances or bladder dysfunction. Complex SPGs additionally include cognitive impairment, dementia, epilepsy, extrapyramidal disturbances, cerebellar involvement, retinopathy, optic atrophy, deafness, polyneuropathy, or skin lesions in the absence of coexisting disorders. Nineteen SPGs follow an autosomal-dominant (AD-SPG), 27 an autosomal-recessive (AR-SPG), 5 X-linked (XL-SPG), and one a maternal trait of inheritance. SPGs are due to mutations in genes encoding for proteins involved in the maintenance of corticospinal tract neurons. Among the AD-SPGs, 40-45% of patients carry mutations in the SPAST-gene (SPG4) and 10% in the ATL1-gene (SPG3), while the other 9 genes are more rarely involved (NIPA1 (SPG6), KIAA0196 (SPG8), KIF5A (SPG10), RNT2 (SPG12), SPGD1 (SPG13), BSCL2 (SPG17), REEP1 (SPG31), ZFYVE27 (SPG33, debated), and SLC33A1 (SPG42, debated)). Among the AR-SPGs, ~20% of the patients carry mutations in the KIAA1840 (SPG11) gene whereas the 15 other genes are rarely mutated and account for SPGs in single families yet (CYP7B1 (SPG5), SPG7 (SPG7), ZFYVE26 (SPG15), ERLIN2 (SPG18), SPG20 (SPG20), ACP33 (SPG21), KIF1A (SPG30), FA2H (SPG35), NTE (SPG39), GJA12/GJC2 (SPG44), KIAA0415 (SPG48) and 4 genes encoding for the AP4-complex (SPG47)). Among the XL-SPGs, 3 causative genes have been identified (L1CAM (SPG1), PLP1 (SPG2), and SLC16A2 (SPG22)). The diagnosis of SPGs is based on clinical, instrumental and genetic investigations. Treatment is exclusively symptomatic.

  15. Streamlined determination of lysophosphatidylcholines in dried blood spots for newborn screening of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Turgeon, Coleman T; Moser, Ann B; Mørkrid, Lars; Magera, Mark J; Gavrilov, Dimitar K; Oglesbee, Devin; Raymond, Kimiyo; Rinaldo, Piero; Matern, Dietrich; Tortorelli, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Pre-symptomatic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is essential to achieve best possible outcomes for patients with the childhood cerebral form of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD). We describe a high-throughput method for measurement of C20-C26 lysophosphatidylcholines (LPCs) and biochemical diagnosis of X-ALD using the same dried blood spots (DBS) routinely used for newborn screening. LPCs are extracted from 3-mm DBS punch with methanol containing an isotopically labeled LPC as internal standard. This extract is transferred to a 96-well plate, evaporated and then reconstituted in mobile phase for flow injection analysis tandem mass spectrometry (FIA-MS/MS) in selected reaction monitoring mode for measurement of four different LPCs (C20, C22, C24, C26) and the internal standard (d4-C26-LPC). Analysis time is 1.5min per sample. The mean CVs from the intra- and inter-assay experiments for LPCs were 6.3-15.1% for C20-LPC, 4.4-18.6% for C22-LPC and 4.5-14.3% for C24-LPC. Limits of detection were determined for C20-LPC (LOD=0.03μg/mL), C22-LPC (0.03μg/mL), C24-LPC (0.03μg/mL) and C26-LPC (0.01μg/mL). Reference ranges were established from DBS of 130 newborns and 20 adults. Samples of patients with X-ALD (n=16), peroxisomal biogenesis disorders (n=8), and X-ALD carriers (n=12) were analyzed blindly and all were correctly identified. Analysis of LPC species by FIA-MS/MS is a fast, simple and reliable method to screen for X-ALD and other peroxisomal disorders in DBS. To maximize specificity, abnormal results can be verified by a 2nd tier assay using LC-MS/MS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [Screening for carrier and prenatal diagnosis of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ai-hua; Bao, Xin-hua; Xiong, Hui; Pan, Hong; Wu, Ye; Zhang, Yue-hua; Shi, Chun-yan; Qin, Jiong; Wu, Xi-ru

    2005-05-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is the most common peroxisomal disorder characterized by progressive demyelination of the central nervous system, adrenal cortex insufficiency and accumulation of saturated very long chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) in tissues and body fluids due to the impaired beta-oxidation in peroxisomes. X-ALD shows a wide range of phenotypic variation. Childhood cerebral form (CCER) is the most common phenotype with severe neurological symptoms and often the average interval from onset to total disability or death is 3 years. So far no effective treatment is available for the underlying defect. Screening for carriers of mutated relevant gene and prenatal diagnosis are very important for the prevention of the disease. In this study, the authors explored the method of carrier screening and prenatal diagnosis of X-ALD. The plasma VLCFAs levels of 83 suspected carriers for ALD were determined by using GC/MS and ABCD1 gene mutational analysis was performed in 31 of them. Amniocentesis was performed in 9 suspected carriers for ALD during 18 - 30 gestational weeks. The VLCFAs level of cultured amniocytes was tested with GC/MS. ABCD1 gene mutational analysis was performed on two cases (one was a male and the other a female) whose VLCFAs levels of amniocytes were found elevated. The plasma VLCFAs levels were measured in five of the nine prenatally diagnosed children when they were 1 day to 3.5 years old. Fifty-one of 83 suspected carriers had high plasma VLCFAs levels; 29 of 31 suspected carriers showed ABCD1 gene mutation. Among the nine fetuses, four were males and five were females. The VLCFAs levels of the cultured amniocytes were high in two cases, one was female and the other a male. ABCD1 gene mutational analysis of these two cases showed a 871G > A (E291K) mutation and a 726G > A (W242X) mutation, respectively, which confirmed the biochemical result. The VLCFAs levels were normal in the rest of cases and five of them were confirmed by postnatal

  17. Linkage analysis and physical mapping near the gene for x-linked agammaglobulinemia at Xq22

    SciTech Connect

    Parolini, O.; Lassiter, G.L.; Henry, M.J.; Conley, M.E. St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN ); Hejtmancik, J.F. ); Allen, R.C.; Belmont, J.W. ); Barker, D.F. )

    1993-02-01

    The gene for x-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) has been mapped to Xq22. No recombinations have been reported between the gene and the prob p212 at DXS178; however, this probe is informative in only 30-40% of women and the reported flanking markers, DXS3 and DXS94, and 10-15 cM apart. To identify additional probes that might be useful in genetic counseling, we examined 11 polymorphisms that have been mapped to the Xq21.3-q22 region in 13 families with XLA. In addition, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) were used to further characterize the segman of DNA within which the gene for SLA must lie. The results demonstrated that DXS366 and DXS442, which share a 430-kb pulsed-field fragment, could replace DXS3 as proximal flanking markers. Probes at DXS178 and DXS265 identified the same 145-kb pulsed-field fragment, and both loci were contained within a 200-kb YAC identified with the probe p212. A highly polymorphic CA repeat (DCS178CA) was isolated from one end of this YAC and used in linkage analysis. Probes at DXS101 and DXS328 shared several pulsed-field fragments, the smallest of which was 250 kb. No recombinations were seen between XLA and the DXS178-DXS265-DXS178CA complex, DXS101, DXS328, DXS87, or the gene for proteolipid protein (PLP). Key crossovers, when combined with the linkage data from families with Alport syndrome, suggested the following order of loci: cen-DXS3-DXS366-DXS442-(PLP, DXS101, DXS328, DXS178-DXS265-DXS178CA complex, XL)-(DXS87, DXS94)-DXS327-(DXS350, DXS362)-tel. Our studies also limit the segment of DNA within which the XLA gene must lie to the 3- to 4-cM distance between DCS442 and DXS94 and they identify and orient polymorphisms that can be used in genetic counseling not only for XLA but also for Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PLP deficiency), Alport syndrome (COL4A5 deficiency), and Fabry disease ([alpha]-galactosidase A difficiency). 31 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Clinical and Genetic Features of Chinese X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth Type 1 Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yuan-Yuan; Lyu, He; Jin, Su-Qin; Zuo, Yue-Huan; Liu, Jing; Wang, Zhao-Xia; Zhang, Wei; Yuan, Yun

    2017-01-01

    Background: X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1 (CMT1X) disease is one of the most common forms of inherited neuropathy caused by mutations in the gap junction beta-1 protein (GJB1) gene (also known as connexin 32). This study presented the clinical and genetic features of a series of Chinese patients with GJB1 gene mutations. Methods: A total of 22 patients from unrelated families, who were referred to Department of Neurology, Peking University First Hospital from January 2005 to January 2016, were identified with GJB1 mutations. Their clinical records and laboratory findings were retrospectively collected and reviewed. Mutations in the GJB1 gene were analyzed by targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS). Nucleotide alternations were confirmed with Sanger sequencing. Results: The CMT1X patients predominantly showed distal muscle weakness of lower limbs with mild sensory disturbance. The mean age of onset was 15.6 ± 8.7 years (ranging from 1 year to 42 years). The sudden onset of cerebral symptoms appeared in four patients (18.2%); two were initial symptoms. One case had constant central nervous system (CNS) signs. There were 19 different heterozygous mutations, including 15 known mutations and four novel mutations (c.115G>T, c.380T>A, c.263C>A, and c.818_819insGGGCT). Among the 22 Chinese patients with CMT1X, the frequency of the GJB1 mutation was 4.5% in transmembrane domain 1 (TM1), 4.5% in TM2, 22.7% in TM3, 9.1% in TM4, 4.5% in extracellular 1 (EC1), 27.3% in EC2, 9.1% in intracellular loop, 13.6% in the N-terminal domain, and 4.5% in the C-terminal domain. CMT1X with CNS impairment appeared in five (22.7%) of these patients. Conclusions: This study indicated that CNS impairment was not rare in Chinese CMT1X patients. Mutations in the EC2 domain of the GJB1 gene were hotspot in Chinese CMT1X patients. PMID:28469099

  19. Interaction of a Cyclic, Bivalent Smac Mimetic with the X-Linked Inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolovska-Coleska, Zaneta; Meagher, Jennifer L.; Jiang, Sheng; Yang, Chao-Yie; Qiu, Su; Roller, Peter P.; Stuckey, Jeanne A.; Wang, Shaomeng

    2009-02-25

    We have designed and synthesized a cyclic, bivalent Smac mimetic (compound 3) and characterized its interaction with the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP). Compound 3 binds to XIAP containing both BIR2 and BIR3 domains with a biphasic dose-response curve representing two binding sites with IC{sub 50} values of 0.5 and 406 nM, respectively. Compound 3 binds to XIAPs containing the BIR3-only and BIR2-only domain with K{sub i} values of 4 nM and 4.4 {mu}M, respectively. Gel filtration experiments using wild-type and mutated XIAPs showed that 3 forms a 1:2 stoichiometric complex with XIAP containing the BIR3-only domain. However, it forms a 1:1 stoichiometric complex with XIAP containing both BIR2 and BIR3 domains, and both BIR domains are involved in the binding. Compound 3 efficiently antagonizes inhibition of XIAP in a cell-free functional assay and is >200 times more potent than its corresponding monovalent compound 2. Determination of the crystal structure of 3 in complex with the XIAP BIR3 domain confirms that 3 induces homodimerization of the XIAP BIR3 domain and provides a structural basis for the cooperative binding of one molecule of compound 3 to two XIAP BIR3 molecules. On the basis of this crystal structure, a binding model of XIAP containing both BIR2 and BIR3 domains and 3 was constructed, which sheds light on the ability of 3 to relieve the inhibition of XIAP with not only caspase-9 but also caspase-3/-7. Compound 3 is cell-permeable, effectively activates caspases in whole cells, and potently inhibits cancer cell growth. Compound 3 is a useful biochemical and pharmacological tool for further elucidating the role of XIAP in regulation of apoptosis and represents a promising lead compound for the design of potent, cell-permeable Smac mimetics for cancer treatment.

  20. A novel mutation in the ABCD1 gene of a Moroccan patient with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy: case report.

    PubMed

    Karkar, Adnane; Barakat, Abdelhamid; Bakhchane, Amina; Fettah, Houda; Slassi, Ilham; Dorboz, Imen; Boespflug-Tanguy, Odile; Nadifi, Sellama

    2015-11-25

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD; OMIM: 300100) is the most common peroxisomal disease caused by mutations in the ATP-binding cassette, sub-family D member 1 gene or ABCD1 (geneID: 215), the coding gene for the adrenoleukodystrophy protein (ALDP), which is an ATP-binding transport protein associated to an active transport of very long chain fatty acids (VLCFAs). Dysfunction of ALDP induces an accumulation of VLCFAs in all tissues leading to a neurodegenerative disorder that involves the nervous system white matter. In our case report, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as well as the high levels of VLCFAs prompted the diagnosis the X-ALD. Molecular analysis of ABCD1 gene have shown a pathogenic homozygous nonsense mutation (c.1677C > G; p.(Tyr559*)) in exon 7. Thus, we identified here a novel mutation in the ABCD1 gene in a Moroccan patient causing X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

  1. Close linkage of random DNA fragments from Xq 21.3-22 to X-linked agammaglobulinaemia (XLA).

    PubMed

    Malcolm, S; de Saint Basile, G; Arveiler, B; Lau, Y L; Szabo, P; Fischer, A; Griscelli, C; Debre, M; Mandel, J L; Callard, R E

    1987-10-01

    Linkage analysis of 15 families affected by X-linked agammaglobulinaemia (XLA) showed close linkage with three probes located towards the centre of the long arm of the X chromosome. No cross-overs were found using pXG12 (DXS94) lod 6.6 or S21 (DXS17) lod 4.4. One cross-over was found with 19.2 (DXS3). This confirms and extends a previous linkage study (Kwan et al. 1986) which demonstrated linkage with S21 and 19.2. Of the families 14 were informative for either pXG12 or S21 and these probes should thus be of great diagnostic value. No evidence of heterogeneity was found in the XLA families but several cross-overs within this region were detected in a family with the X-linked hyper-IgM syndrome confirming this disease as a separate clinical entity.

  2. A gene for nonspecific X-linked mental retardation (MRX41) is located in the distal segment of Xq28

    SciTech Connect

    Hamel, B.C.J.; Kremer, H.; Helm, B. van den

    1996-07-12

    We report on a family in which non-syndromal mild to moderate mental retardation segregates as an X-linked trait (MRX41). Two point linkage analysis demonstrated linkage between the disorder and marker DXS3 in Xq21.33 with a lod score of 2.56 at {theta} = 0.0 and marker DXS1108 in Xq28 with a lod score of 3.82 at {theta} = 0.0. Multipoint linkage analysis showed that the odds for a location of the gene in Xq28 vs. Xq21.33 are 100:1. This is the fourth family with non-specific X-linked mental retardation with Xq28-qter as the most likely gene localization. 16 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  3. SLC9A6 mutations cause X-linked mental retardation, microcephaly, epilepsy, and ataxia, a phenotype mimicking Angelman syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gilfillan, Gregor D; Selmer, Kaja K; Roxrud, Ingrid; Smith, Raffaella; Kyllerman, Mårten; Eiklid, Kristin; Kroken, Mette; Mattingsdal, Morten; Egeland, Thore; Stenmark, Harald; Sjøholm, Hans; Server, Andres; Samuelsson, Lena; Christianson, Arnold; Tarpey, Patrick; Whibley, Annabel; Stratton, Michael R; Futreal, P Andrew; Teague, Jon; Edkins, Sarah; Gecz, Jozef; Turner, Gillian; Raymond, F Lucy; Schwartz, Charles; Stevenson, Roger E; Undlien, Dag E; Strømme, Petter

    2008-04-01

    Linkage analysis and DNA sequencing in a family exhibiting an X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) syndrome, characterized by microcephaly, epilepsy, ataxia, and absent speech and resembling Angelman syndrome, identified a deletion in the SLC9A6 gene encoding the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger NHE6. Subsequently, other mutations were found in a male with mental retardation (MR) who had been investigated for Angelman syndrome and in two XLMR families with epilepsy and ataxia, including the family designated as having Christianson syndrome. Therefore, mutations in SLC9A6 cause X-linked mental retardation. Additionally, males with findings suggestive of unexplained Angelman syndrome should be considered as potential candidates for SLC9A6 mutations.

  4. SLC9A6 Mutations Cause X-Linked Mental Retardation, Microcephaly, Epilepsy, and Ataxia, a Phenotype Mimicking Angelman Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gilfillan, Gregor D.; Selmer, Kaja K.; Roxrud, Ingrid; Smith, Raffaella; Kyllerman, Mårten; Eiklid, Kristin; Kroken, Mette; Mattingsdal, Morten; Egeland, Thore; Stenmark, Harald; Sjøholm, Hans; Server, Andres; Samuelsson, Lena; Christianson, Arnold; Tarpey, Patrick; Whibley, Annabel; Stratton, Michael R.; Futreal, P. Andrew; Teague, Jon; Edkins, Sarah; Gecz, Jozef; Turner, Gillian; Raymond, F. Lucy; Schwartz, Charles; Stevenson, Roger E.; Undlien, Dag E.; Strømme, Petter

    2008-01-01

    Linkage analysis and DNA sequencing in a family exhibiting an X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) syndrome, characterized by microcephaly, epilepsy, ataxia, and absent speech and resembling Angelman syndrome, identified a deletion in the SLC9A6 gene encoding the Na+/H+ exchanger NHE6. Subsequently, other mutations were found in a male with mental retardation (MR) who had been investigated for Angelman syndrome and in two XLMR families with epilepsy and ataxia, including the family designated as having Christianson syndrome. Therefore, mutations in SLC9A6 cause X-linked mental retardation. Additionally, males with findings suggestive of unexplained Angelman syndrome should be considered as potential candidates for SLC9A6 mutations. PMID:18342287

  5. Identification and partial characterization of a candidate gene for X-linked retinopathies using a lateral approach

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, P.; MacDonald, I.M.; Sood, R.; Smith, C.; Pilon, R.; Tenniswood, M. )

    1993-03-01

    Using library to library cross-screening the authors have identified a number of genomic clones that harbor X-linked sequences expressed in the human choroid/retina. They describe the characterization of one of these, designated XEH.8 (DXS542), which is localized to Xp11.3-q12. Isolation, partial sequencing, and Northern analysis of the cognate cDNA (XEH.8[sub c]), has shown that the cDNA has some homology to the dystrophin gene and hybridizes to a 10-kb mRNA present in the choroid and retina but not in fibroblasts. This expressed sequence maps to the same region of the X chromosome as several known X-linked ophthalmic diseases, including Norrie disease, retinitis pigmentosa 2, congenital night blindness and Aland Island eye disease. 24 refs., 6 figs.

  6. X-linked progressive mixed deafness: A new microdeletion that involves a more proximal region in Xq21

    SciTech Connect

    Piussan, C.; Mathieu, M.; Kolski, C.; Strunski, V.; Hanauer, A.; Dahl, N.; Biancalana, V.; Heyberger, S.

    1995-01-01

    We report a large two-generation pedigree with seven affected males segregating for an X-linked mixed conductive sensorineural deafness. The patients present with atypical Mondini-like dysplasia, dilated petrous facial canal, dilatation of the internal auditory meatus fully connected with enlarged cochlear canals, and, in one patient, a wide bulbous posterior labyrinth. Obligatory carrier females are mildly affected. Molecular characterization of this family revealed a deletion of locus DXS169, in Xq21.1. Loci DXS72 and DXS26, which, respectively, flank DXS169 proximally and distally, were intact. Since a gene responsible for X-linked progressive mixed deafness with perilymphatic gusher (DFN3) has previously been assigned by deletion mapping to a slightly more distal interval between DXS26 and DXS121, this study indicates either two different deafness genes or the involvement of a very large region in Xq21. 35 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  7. New domains of neural cell-adhesion molecule L1 implicated in X-linked hydrocephalus and MASA syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Jouet, M.; Kenwick, S.; Moncla, A.

    1995-06-01

    The neural cell-adhesion molecule L1 is involved in intercellular recognition and neuronal migration in the CNS. Recently, we have shown that mutations in the gene encoding L1 are responsible for three related disorders; X-linked hydrocephalus, MASA (mental retardation, aphasia, shuffling gait, and adducted thumbs) syndrome, and spastic paraplegia type I (SPG1). These three disorders represent a clinical spectrum that varies not only between families but sometimes also within families. To date, 14 independent L1 mutations have been reported and shown to be disease causing. Here we report nine novel L1 mutations in X-linked hydrocephalus and MASA-syndrome families, including the first examples of mutations affecting the fibronectin type III domains of the molecule. They are discussed in relation both to phenotypes and to the insights that they provide into L1 function. 39 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Deletion of the X-linked Opsin Gene Array Locus Control Region (LCR) Results in Disruption of the Cone Mosaic

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Joseph; Rossi, Ethan A.; Porter, Jason; Neitz, Jay; Roorda, Austin; Williams, David; Neitz, Maureen

    2010-01-01

    Blue-cone monochromacy (BCM) is an X-linked condition in which long- (L−) and middle- (M−) wavelength-sensitive cone function is absent. Due to the X-linked nature of the condition, female carriers are spared from a full manifestation of the associated defects but can show visual symptoms, including abnormal cone electroretinograms. Here we imaged the cone mosaic in four females carrying an L/M array with deletion of the locus control region, resulting in an absence of L/M opsin gene expression (effectively acting as a cone opsin knockout). On average, they had cone mosaics with reduced density and disrupted organization compared to normal trichromats. This suggests that the absence of opsin in a subset of cones results in their early degeneration, with X-inactivation the likely mechanism underlying phenotypic variability in BCM carriers. PMID:20638402

  9. Central precocious puberty in a patient with X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita and Xp21 contiguous gene deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Koh, Ji Won; Kang, So Young; Kim, Gu Hwan; Yoo, Han Wook; Yu, Jeesuk

    2013-06-01

    X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita is caused by the mutation of DAX-1 gene (dosage-sensitive sex reversal, adrenal hypoplasia critical region, on chromosome X, gene 1), and can occur as part of a contiguous gene deletion syndrome in association with glycerol kinase (GK) deficiency, Duchenne muscular dystrophy and X-linked interleukin-1 receptor accessory protein-like 1 (IL1RAPL1) gene deficiency. It is usually associated with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, although in rare cases, it has been reported to occur in normal puberty or even central precocious puberty. This study addresses a case in which central precocious puberty developed in a boy with X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita who had complete deletion of the genes DAX-1, GK and IL1RAPL1 (Xp21 contiguous gene deletion syndrome). Initially he was admitted for the management of adrenal crisis at the age of 2 months, and managed with hydrocortisone and florinef. At 45 months of age, his each testicular volumes of 4 mL and a penile length of 5 cm were noted, with pubic hair of Tanner stage 2. His bone age was advanced and a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) stimulation test showed a luteinizing hormone peak of 8.26 IU/L, confirming central precocious puberty. He was then treated with a GnRH agonist, as well as steroid replacement therapy. In Korea, this is the first case of central precocious puberty developed in a male patient with X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita.

  10. Striosomal dysfunction affects behavioral adaptation but not impulsivity-Evidence from X-linked dystonia-parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Beste, Christian; Mückschel, Moritz; Rosales, Raymond; Domingo, Aloysius; Lee, Lillian; Ng, Arlene; Klein, Christine; Münchau, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    Executive functions including behavioral adaptation and impulse control are commonly impaired in movement disorders caused by striatal pathology. However, as yet it is unclear what aspects of behavioral abnormalities are related to pathology in which striatal subcomponent, that is, the matrix and the striosomes. We therefore studied cognitive control in X-linked dystonia-parkinsonism, a model disease of striosomal degeneration, using behavioral paradigms and EEG. We studied genetically confirmed X-linked dystonia-parkinsonism patients (N = 21) in their early disease stages and healthy matched controls. Error-related behavioral adaptation was tested in a flanker task and response inhibition in a Go/Nogo paradigm during EEG. We focused on error-related negativity during error processing and the Nogo-N2 and Nogo-P3 in the response inhibition task. Source localization analyses were calculated. In addition, total wavelet power and phase-locking factor reflecting neural synchronization processes in time and frequency across trials were calculated. Error processing and behavioral adaptation predominantly engaging the anterior cingulate cortex was markedly impaired in X-linked dystonia-parkinsonism. This was reflected in abnormal reaction times correlating with error-related negativity amplitudes, error related theta band activity, and the phase-locking factor. Also, abnormal error processing correlated with dystonia severity but not with parkinsonism. Response inhibition and corresponding EEG activity were normal. This dissociable pattern of cognitive deficits most likely reflects predominant dysfunction of the striosomal compartment and its connections to the anterior cingulate cortex in X-linked dystonia-parkinsonism. The results underscore the importance of striosomes for cognitive function in humans and suggest that striosomes are relays of error-related behavioral adaptation but not inhibitory control. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society

  11. Refractory Chronic Pleurisy Caused by Helicobacter equorum-Like Bacterium in a Patient with X-Linked Agammaglobulinemia ▿

    PubMed Central

    Funato, Michinori; Kaneko, Hideo; Ohkusu, Kiyofumi; Sasai, Hideo; Kubota, Kazuo; Ohnishi, Hidenori; Kato, Zenichiro; Fukao, Toshiyuki; Kondo, Naomi

    2011-01-01

    We describe a 35-year-old man with X-linked agammaglobulinemia who had refractory chronic pleurisy caused by a Helicobacter equorum-like bacterium. Broad-range bacterial PCR targeting the 16S and 23S rRNA genes and in situ hybridization targeting the 16S rRNA gene of H. equorum confirmed the presence of this pathogen in a human for the first time. PMID:21677071

  12. H4K20me1 contributes to downregulation of X-linked genes for C. elegans dosage compensation.

    PubMed

    Vielle, Anne; Lang, Jackie; Dong, Yan; Ercan, Sevinc; Kotwaliwale, Chitra; Rechtsteiner, Andreas; Appert, Alex; Chen, Q Brent; Dose, Andrea; Egelhofer, Thea; Kimura, Hiroshi; Stempor, Przemyslaw; Dernburg, Abby; Lieb, Jason D; Strome, Susan; Ahringer, Julie

    2012-09-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans dosage compensation complex (DCC) equalizes X-chromosome gene dosage between XO males and XX hermaphrodites by two-fold repression of X-linked gene expression in hermaphrodites. The DCC localizes to the X chromosomes in hermaphrodites but not in males, and some subunits form a complex homologous to condensin. The mechanism by which the DCC downregulates gene expression remains unclear. Here we show that the DCC controls the methylation state of lysine 20 of histone H4, leading to higher H4K20me1 and lower H4K20me3 levels on the X chromosomes of XX hermaphrodites relative to autosomes. We identify the PR-SET7 ortholog SET-1 and the Suv4-20 ortholog SET-4 as the major histone methyltransferases for monomethylation and di/trimethylation of H4K20, respectively, and provide evidence that X-chromosome enrichment of H4K20me1 involves inhibition of SET-4 activity on the X. RNAi knockdown of set-1 results in synthetic lethality with dosage compensation mutants and upregulation of X-linked gene expression, supporting a model whereby H4K20me1 functions with the condensin-like C. elegans DCC to repress transcription of X-linked genes. H4K20me1 is important for mitotic chromosome condensation in mammals, suggesting that increased H4K20me1 on the X may restrict access of the transcription machinery to X-linked genes via chromatin compaction.

  13. A novel AVPR2 splice site mutation leads to partial X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in two brothers.

    PubMed

    Schernthaner-Reiter, Marie Helene; Adams, David; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Ramnitz, Mary Scott; Raygada, Margarita; Golas, Gretchen; Faucz, Fabio R; Nilsson, Ola; Nella, Aikaterini A; Dileepan, Kavitha; Lodish, Maya; Lee, Paul; Tifft, Cynthia; Markello, Thomas; Gahl, William; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2016-05-01

    X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI, OMIM#304800) is caused by mutations in the arginine vasopressin (AVP, OMIM*192340) receptor type 2 (AVPR2, OMIM*300538) gene. A 20-month-old boy and his 8-year-old brother presented with polyuria, polydipsia, and failure to thrive. Both boys demonstrated partial DDAVP (1-desamino-8-D AVP or desmopressin) responses; thus, NDI diagnosis was delayed. While routine sequencing of AVPR2 showed a potential splice site variant, it was not until exome sequencing confirmed the AVPR2 splice site variant and did not reveal any more likely candidates that the patients' diagnosis was made and proper treatment was instituted. Both patients were hemizygous for two AVPR2 variants predicted in silico to affect AVPR2 messenger RNA (mRNA) splicing. A minigene assay revealed that the novel AVPR2 c.276A>G mutation creates a novel splice acceptor site leading to 5' truncation of AVPR2 exon 2 in HEK293 human kidney cells. Both patients have been treated with high-dose DDAVP with a remarkable improvement of their symptoms and accelerated linear growth and weight gain. We present here a unique case of partial X-linked NDI due to an AVPR2 splice site mutation; patients with diabetes insipidus of unknown etiology may harbor splice site mutations that are initially underestimated in their pathogenicity on sequence analysis. • X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus is caused by AVPR2 mutations, and disease severity can vary depending on the functional effect of the mutation. What is New: • We demonstrate here that a splice site mutation in AVPR2 leads to partial X-linked NDI in two brothers. • Treatment with high-dose DDAVP led to improvement of polyuria and polydipsia, weight gain, and growth.

  14. Mutations in FRMD7, a newly identified member of the FERM family, cause X-linked idiopathic congenital nystagmus.

    PubMed

    Tarpey, Patrick; Thomas, Shery; Sarvananthan, Nagini; Mallya, Uma; Lisgo, Steven; Talbot, Chris J; Roberts, Eryl O; Awan, Musarat; Surendran, Mylvaganam; McLean, Rebecca J; Reinecke, Robert D; Langmann, Andrea; Lindner, Susanne; Koch, Martina; Jain, Sunila; Woodruff, Geoffrey; Gale, Richard P; Bastawrous, Andrew; Degg, Chris; Droutsas, Konstantinos; Asproudis, Ioannis; Zubcov, Alina A; Pieh, Christina; Veal, Colin D; Machado, Rajiv D; Backhouse, Oliver C; Baumber, Laura; Constantinescu, Cris S; Brodsky, Michael C; Hunter, David G; Hertle, Richard W; Read, Randy J; Edkins, Sarah; O'Meara, Sarah; Parker, Adrian; Stevens, Claire; Teague, Jon; Wooster, Richard; Futreal, P Andrew; Trembath, Richard C; Stratton, Michael R; Raymond, F Lucy; Gottlob, Irene

    2006-11-01

    Idiopathic congenital nystagmus is characterized by involuntary, periodic, predominantly horizontal oscillations of both eyes. We identified 22 mutations in FRMD7 in 26 families with X-linked idiopathic congenital nystagmus. Screening of 42 singleton cases of idiopathic congenital nystagmus (28 male, 14 females) yielded three mutations (7%). We found restricted expression of FRMD7 in human embryonic brain and developing neural retina, suggesting a specific role in the control of eye movement and gaze stability.

  15. Intra-amniotic rAAV-mediated microdystrophin gene transfer improves canine X-linked muscular dystrophy and may induce immune tolerance.

    PubMed

    Hayashita-Kinoh, Hiromi; Yugeta, Naoko; Okada, Hironori; Nitahara-Kasahara, Yuko; Chiyo, Tomoko; Okada, Takashi; Takeda, Shin'ichi

    2015-04-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe congenital disease due to mutations in the dystrophin gene. Supplementation of dystrophin using recombinant adenoassociated virus vector has promise as a treatment of DMD, although therapeutic benefit of the truncated dystrophin still remains to be elucidated. Besides, host immune responses against the vector as well as transgene products have been denoted in the clinical gene therapy studies. Here, we transduced dystrophic dogs fetuses to investigate the therapeutic effects of an AAV vector expressing microdystrophin under conditions of immune tolerance. rAAV-CMV-microdystrophin and a rAAV-CAG-luciferase were injected into the amniotic fluid surrounding fetuses. We also reinjected rAAV9-CMV-microdystrophin into the jugular vein of an infant dystrophic dog to induce systemic expression of microdystrophin. Gait and cardiac function significantly improved in the rAAV-microdystrophin-injected dystrophic dog, suggesting that an adequate treatment of rAAV-microdystrophin with immune modulation induces successful long-term transgene expression to analyze improved dystrophic phenotype.

  16. A POU3F4 Mutation Causes Nonsyndromic Hearing Loss in a Chinese X-linked Recessive Family

    PubMed Central

    Du, Wan; Han, Ming-Kun; Wang, Da-Yong; Han, Bing; Zong, Liang; Lan, Lan; Yang, Ju; Shen, Qi; Xie, Lin-Yi; Yu, Lan; Guan, Jing; Wang, Qiu-Ju

    2017-01-01

    Background: The molecular genetic research showed the association between X-linked hearing loss and mutations in POU3F4. This research aimed to identify a POU3F4 mutation in a nonsyndromic X-linked recessive hearing loss family. Methods: A series of clinical evaluations including medical history, otologic examinations, family history, audiologic testing, and a high-resolution computed tomography scan were performed for each patient. Bidirectional sequencing was carried out for all polymerase chain reaction products of the samples. Moreover, 834 controls with normal hearing were also tested. Results: The pedigree showed X-linkage recessive inheritance pattern, and pathogenic mutation (c.499C>T) was identified in the proband and his family member, which led to a premature termination prior to the entire POU domains. This mutation co-segregated with hearing loss in this family. No mutation of POU3F4 gene was found in 834 controls. Conclusions: A nonsense mutation is identified in a family displaying the pedigree consistent with X-linked recessive pattern in POU3F4 gene. In addition, we may provide molecular diagnosis and genetic counseling for this family. PMID:28051029

  17. A multipedigree linkage study of X-linked deafness: linkage to Xq13-q21 and evidence for genetic heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Reardon, W; Middleton-Price, H R; Sandkuijl, L; Phelps, P; Bellman, S; Luxon, L; Pembrey, M E; Malcolm, S

    1991-12-01

    A locus for X-linked nonsyndromic deafness has previously been allocated to the Xq13-q21 region based on linkage studies in two separate pedigrees. This has been substantiated by the observation of deafness as a clinical feature of male patients with cytogenetically detectable deletions across this region. The question of a second locus for deafness in this chromosomal region has been raised by the audiologically distinct nature of the deafness in some of the deleted patients compared to that observed in those patients upon whom the linkage data are based. We have performed detailed clinical evaluation and linkage studies on seven pedigrees with nonsyndromic X-linked deafness and conclude that there is evidence for at least two loci for this form of deafness, including one in the Xq13-q21 region. We have observed different radiological features among the pedigrees which map to Xq13-q21, suggesting that even among these pedigrees the deafness is due to different pathological processes. Given these findings, we suggest that the classification of nonsyndromic X-linked deafness based solely on audiological criteria may need to be reviewed.

  18. Variation in the X-Linked EFHC2 Gene Is Associated with Social Cognitive Abilities in Males

    PubMed Central

    Startin, Carla M.; Fiorentini, Chiara; de Haan, Michelle; Skuse, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Females outperform males on many social cognitive tasks. X-linked genes may contribute to this sex difference. Males possess one X chromosome, while females possess two X chromosomes. Functional variations in X-linked genes are therefore likely to impact more on males than females. Previous studies of X-monosomic women with Turner syndrome suggest a genetic association with facial fear recognition abilities at Xp11.3, specifically at a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP rs7055196) within the EFHC2 gene. Based on a strong hypothesis, we investigated an association between variation at SNP rs7055196 and facial fear recognition and theory of mind abilities in males. As predicted, males possessing the G allele had significantly poorer facial fear detection accuracy and theory of mind abilities than males possessing the A allele (with SNP variant accounting for up to 4.6% of variance). Variation in the X-linked EFHC2 gene at SNP rs7055196 is therefore associated with social cognitive abilities in males. PMID:26107779

  19. The stability of hexacosanoyl lysophosphatidylcholine in dried-blood spot quality control materials for X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy newborn screening.

    PubMed

    Haynes, Christopher A; De Jesús, Víctor R

    2015-01-01

    Newborn screening for X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy utilizes tandem mass spectrometry to analyze dried-blood spot specimens. Quality control materials (dried-blood spots enriched with hexacosanoyl lysophosphatidylcholine) were prepared and stored at different temperatures for up to 518days to evaluate the stability of this biomarker for X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. Dried-blood spot storage included desiccant (45, 171, and 518days) or omitted desiccant (53days at >90% relative humidity). Specimens were stored for 171 and 518days at -20°C, 4°C, ambient temperature, and 37°C. Each weekday for 45days, a bag of specimens stored at 4°C was warmed to ambient temperature and one specimen was removed for storage at -80°C. Specimens were analyzed by high-performance liquid-chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry and data was plotted as concentration (micromoles per liter) vs. time. Linear regression provided slope and y-intercept values for each storage condition. Small slope values (0.01 or less) and y-intercept values close to the enrichment indicated less than 11% loss of hexacosanoyl lysophosphatidylcholine under all storage conditions tested. Quality control materials for X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy are stable for at least 1year when stored with desiccant. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Combination of a Haploidentical Stem Cell Transplant With Umbilical Cord Blood for Cerebral X-Linked Adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hua; Jiang, Min-Yan; Liu, Sha; Cai, Yan-Na; Liang, Cui-Li; Liu, Li

    2015-08-01

    Childhood cerebral X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy is a rapidly progressive neurodegenerative disorder that affects central nervous system myelin and the adrenal cortex. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the best available curative therapy if performed during the early stages of disease. Only 30% of patients who might benefit from a hematopoietic stem cell transplant will have a full human leukocyte antigen-matched donor, which is considered to be the best choice. We present a 5-year-old boy with cerebral X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy whose brain magnetic resonance imaging severity score was 7 and who needed an immediate transplantation without an available full human leukocyte antigen-matched donor. We combined haploidentical and umbilical cord blood sources for transplantation and saw encouraging results. After transplantation, the patient showed neurological stability for 6 months and the level of very long chain fatty acids had decreased. By 1 year, the patient appeared to gradually develop cognition, motor, and visual disturbances resulting from possible mix chimerism. Transplantation of haploidentical stem cells combined with the infusion of umbilical cord blood is a novel approach for treating cerebral X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. It is critical to monitor posttransplant chimerism and carry out antirejection therapy timely for a beneficial clinical outcome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A Novel Ribosomopathy Caused by Dysfunction of RPL10 Disrupts Neurodevelopment and Causes X-Linked Microcephaly in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Susan S.; Wall, Alissa L.; Golzio, Christelle; Reid, David W.; Kondyles, Amalia; Willer, Jason R.; Botti, Christina; Nicchitta, Christopher V.; Katsanis, Nicholas; Davis, Erica E.

    2014-01-01

    Neurodevelopmental defects in humans represent a clinically heterogeneous group of disorders. Here, we report the genetic and functional dissection of a multigenerational pedigree with an X-linked syndromic disorder hallmarked by microcephaly, growth retardation, and seizures. Using an X-linked intellectual disability (XLID) next-generation sequencing diagnostic panel, we identified a novel missense mutation in the gene encoding 60S ribosomal protein L10 (RPL10), a locus associated previously with autism spectrum disorders (ASD); the p.K78E change segregated with disease under an X-linked recessive paradigm while, consistent with causality, carrier females exhibited skewed X inactivation. To examine the functional consequences of the p.K78E change, we modeled RPL10 dysfunction in zebrafish. We show that endogenous rpl10 expression is augmented in anterior structures, and that suppression decreases head size in developing morphant embryos, concomitant with reduced bulk translation and increased apoptosis in the brain. Subsequently, using in vivo complementation, we demonstrate that p.K78E is a loss-of-function variant. Together, our findings suggest that a mutation within the conserved N-terminal end of RPL10, a protein in close proximity to the peptidyl transferase active site of the 60S ribosomal subunit, causes severe defects in brain formation and function. PMID:25316788

  2. X-linked gene expression in the Virginia opossum: differences between the paternally derived Gpd and Pgk-A loci

    SciTech Connect

    Samollow, P.B.; Ford, A.L.; VandeBerg, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    Expression of X-linked glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and phosphoglycerate kinase-A (PGK-A) in the Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana) was studied electrophoretically in animals from natural populations and those produced through controlled laboratory crosses. Blood from most of the wild animals exhibited a common single-banded phenotype for both enzymes. Rare variant animals, regardless of sex, exhibited single-banded phenotypes different in mobility from the common mobility class of the respective enzyme. The laboratory crosses confirmed the allelic basis for the common and rare phenotypes. Transmission of PGK-A phenotypes followed the pattern of determinate (nonrandom) inactivation of the paternally derived Pgk-A allele, and transmission of G6PD also was consistent with this pattern. A survey of tissue-specific expression of G6PD phenotypes of heterozygous females revealed, in almost all tissues, three-banded patterns skewed in favor of the allele that was expressed in blood cells. Three-banded patterns were never observed in males or in putatively homozygous females. These patterns suggest simultaneous, but unequal, expression of the maternally and paternally derived Gpd alleles within individual cells. The absence of such partial expression was noted in a parallel survey of females heterozygous at the Pgd-A locus. Thus, it appears that Gpd and Pgk-A are X-linked in D. virginiana and subject to preferential paternal allele inactivation, but that dosage compensation may not be complete for all paternally derived X-linked genes.

  3. siRNAs from an X-linked satellite repeat promote X-chromosome recognition in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Menon, Debashish U; Coarfa, Cristian; Xiao, Weimin; Gunaratne, Preethi H; Meller, Victoria H

    2014-11-18

    Highly differentiated sex chromosomes create a lethal imbalance in gene expression in one sex. To accommodate hemizygosity of the X chromosome in male fruit flies, expression of X-linked genes increases twofold. This is achieved by the male- specific lethal (MSL) complex, which modifies chromatin to increase expression. Mutations that disrupt the X localization of this complex decrease the expression of X-linked genes and reduce male survival. The mechanism that restricts the MSL complex to X chromatin is not understood. We recently reported that the siRNA pathway contributes to localization of the MSL complex, raising questions about the source of the siRNAs involved. The X-linked 1.688 g/cm(3) satellite related repeats (1.688(X) repeats) are restricted to the X chromosome and produce small RNA, making them an attractive candidate. We tested RNA from these repeats for a role in dosage compensation and found that ectopic expression of single-stranded RNAs from 1.688(X) repeats enhanced the male lethality of mutants with defective X recognition. In contrast, expression of double-stranded hairpin RNA from a 1.688(X) repeat generated abundant siRNA and dramatically increased male survival. Consistent with improved survival, X localization of the MSL complex was largely restored in these males. The striking distribution of 1.688(X) repeats, which are nearly exclusive to the X chromosome, suggests that these are cis-acting elements contributing to identification of X chromatin.

  4. Evidence for increased SOX3 dosage as a risk factor for X-linked hypopituitarism and neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Bauters, Marijke; Frints, Suzanna G; Van Esch, Hilde; Spruijt, Liesbeth; Baldewijns, Marcella M; de Die-Smulders, Christine E M; Fryns, Jean-Pierre; Marynen, Peter; Froyen, Guy

    2014-08-01

    Genomic duplications of varying lengths at Xq26-q27 involving SOX3 have been described in families with X-linked hypopituitarism. Using array-CGH we detected a 1.1 Mb microduplication at Xq27 in a large family with three males suffering from X-linked hypopituitarism. The duplication was mapped from 138.7 to 139.8 Mb, harboring only two annotated genes, SOX3 and ATP11C, and was shown to be a direct tandem copy number gain. Unexpectedly, the microduplication did not fully segregate with the disease in this family suggesting that SOX3 duplications have variable penetrance for X-linked hypopituitarism. In the same family, a female fetus presenting with a neural tube defect was also shown to carry the SOX3 copy number gain. Since we also demonstrated increased SOX3 mRNA levels in amnion cells derived from an unrelated t(X;22)(q27;q11) female fetus with spina bifida, we propose that increased levels of SOX3 could be a risk factor for neural tube defects.

  5. Single-Exome sequencing identified a novel RP2 mutation in a child with X-linked retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hassol; Park, Young-Mi; Lee, Jong-Keuk; Taek Lim, Hyun

    2016-10-01

    To present an efficient and successful application of a single-exome sequencing study in a family clinically diagnosed with X-linked retinitis pigmentosa. Exome sequencing study based on clinical examination data. An 8-year-old proband and his family. The proband and his family members underwent comprehensive ophthalmologic examinations. Exome sequencing was undertaken in the proband using Agilent SureSelect Human All Exon Kit and Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. Bioinformatic analysis used Illumina pipeline with Burrows-Wheeler Aligner-Genome Analysis Toolkit (BWA-GATK), followed by ANNOVAR to perform variant functional annotation. All variants passing filter criteria were validated by Sanger sequencing to confirm familial segregation. Analysis of exome sequence data identified a novel frameshift mutation in RP2 gene resulting in a premature stop codon (c.665delC, p.Pro222fsTer237). Sanger sequencing revealed this mutation co-segregated with the disease phenotype in the child's family. We identified a novel causative mutation in RP2 from a single proband's exome sequence data analysis. This study highlights the effectiveness of the whole-exome sequencing in the genetic diagnosis of X-linked retinitis pigmentosa, over the conventional sequencing methods. Even using a single exome, exome sequencing technology would be able to pinpoint pathogenic variant(s) for X-linked retinitis pigmentosa, when properly applied with aid of adequate variant filtering strategy. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Ophthalmological Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. FG syndrome, an X-linked multiple congenital anomaly syndrome: the clinical phenotype and an algorithm for diagnostic testing.

    PubMed

    Clark, Robin Dawn; Graham, John M; Friez, Michael J; Hoo, Joe J; Jones, Kenneth Lyons; McKeown, Carole; Moeschler, John B; Raymond, F Lucy; Rogers, R Curtis; Schwartz, Charles E; Battaglia, Agatino; Lyons, Michael J; Stevenson, Roger E

    2009-11-01

    FG syndrome is a rare X-linked multiple congenital anomaly-cognitive impairment disorder caused by the p.R961W mutation in the MED12 gene. We identified all known patients with this mutation to delineate their clinical phenotype and devise a clinical algorithm to facilitate molecular diagnosis. We ascertained 23 males with the p.R961W mutation in MED12 from 9 previously reported FG syndrome families and 1 new family. Six patients are reviewed in detail. These 23 patients were compared with 48 MED12 mutation-negative patients, who had the clinical diagnosis of FG syndrome. Traits that best discriminated between these two groups were chosen to develop an algorithm with high sensitivity and specificity for the p.R961W MED12 mutation. FG syndrome has a recognizable dysmorphic phenotype with a high incidence of congenital anomalies. A family history of X-linked mental retardation, deceased male infants, and/or multiple fetal losses was documented in all families. The algorithm identifies the p.R961W MED12 mutation-positive group with 100% sensitivity and 90% specificity. The clinical phenotype of FG syndrome defines a recognizable pattern of X-linked multiple congenital anomalies and cognitive impairment. This algorithm can assist the clinician in selecting the patients for testing who are most likely to have the recurrent p.R961W MED12 mutation.

  7. [Contribution of genotyping for fetal sex determination in maternal serum for preimplantation genetic diagnosis of X-linked diseases].

    PubMed

    Tachdjian, G; Costa, J M; Frydman, N; Ray, P; Le Dû, A; Kerbrat, V; Ernault, P; Frydman, R

    2003-12-01

    Couples with a risk of transmitting X-linked diseases included in a preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) center need early and rapid fetal sex determination during pregnancy in two situations. The first situation corresponds to control of embryo sexing after PGD, the second one being that of couples in PGD program having a spontaneous pregnancy. Determination of fetal sex can be achieved by karyotyping using invasive procedures such as chorionic villus sampling (CVS), amniocentesis or cordocentesis and by non-invasive procedures such as ultrasound (US) examination. CVS is the earliest invasive procedure for fetal sex determination and molecular analysis of X-linked genetic disorders during the first trimester but it is associated with a risk of fetal loss. US allows reliable fetal sex determination only during the second trimester. Recently, reliable non-invasive fetal sex determination was realized by using SRY gene amplification in maternal serum. We report the prospective use of fetal sex determination in maternal serum in our PGD center. Management of pregnancies was performed using this non-invasive procedure in four cases of embryo sexing control and nine cases of spontaneous pregnancies in couples included in PGD program for X-linked diseases. Fetal sex results using SRY gene amplification on maternal serum were in complete concordance with fetal sex observed by cytogenetic analysis or US examination, as well as at birth. This new strategy allowed rapid sex determination during the first trimester and permitted to avoid performing invasive procedures in nine pregnancies.

  8. Variation in the X-linked EFHC2 gene is associated with social cognitive abilities in males.

    PubMed

    Startin, Carla M; Fiorentini, Chiara; de Haan, Michelle; Skuse, David H

    2015-01-01

    Females outperform males on many social cognitive tasks. X-linked genes may contribute to this sex difference. Males possess one X chromosome, while females possess two X chromosomes. Functional variations in X-linked genes are therefore likely to impact more on males than females. Previous studies of X-monosomic women with Turner syndrome suggest a genetic association with facial fear recognition abilities at Xp11.3, specifically at a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP rs7055196) within the EFHC2 gene. Based on a strong hypothesis, we investigated an association between variation at SNP rs7055196 and facial fear recognition and theory of mind abilities in males. As predicted, males possessing the G allele had significantly poorer facial fear detection accuracy and theory of mind abilities than males possessing the A allele (with SNP variant accounting for up to 4.6% of variance). Variation in the X-linked EFHC2 gene at SNP rs7055196 is therefore associated with social cognitive abilities in males.

  9. Vaccines for Canine Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Foroughi-Parvar, Faeze; Hatam, Gholamreza

    2014-01-01

    Leishmania infantum is the obligatory intracellular parasite of mammalian macrophages and causes zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis (ZVL). The presence of infected dogs as the main reservoir host of ZVL is regarded as the most important potential risk for human infection. Thus the prevention of canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL) is essential to stop the current increase of the Mediterranean visceral leishmaniasis. Recently considerable advances in achieving protective immunization of dogs and several important attempts for achieving an effective vaccine against CVL lead to attracting the scientists trust in its important role for eradication of ZVL. This paper highlights the recent advances in vaccination against canine visceral leishmaniasis from 2007 until now. PMID:25628897

  10. Canine distemper virus.

    PubMed

    Martella, Vito; Elia, Gabrielle; Buonavoglia, Canio

    2008-07-01

    Vaccine-based prophylaxis has greatly helped to keep distemper disease under control. Notwithstanding, the incidence of canine distemper virus (CDV)-related disease in canine populations throughout the world seems to have increased in the past decades, and several episodes of CDV disease in vaccinated animals have been reported, with nation-wide proportions in some cases. Increasing surveillance should be pivotal to identify new CDV variants and to understand the dynamics of CDV epidemiology. In addition, it is important to evaluate whether the efficacy of the vaccine against these new strains may somehow be affected.

  11. An ex vivo gene therapy approach in X-linked retinoschisis

    PubMed Central

    Bashar, Abu E.; Metcalfe, Andrew L.; Viringipurampeer, Ishaq A.; Yanai, Anat; Gregory-Evans, Cheryl Y.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) is juvenile-onset macular degeneration caused by haploinsufficiency of the extracellular cell adhesion protein retinoschisin (RS1). RS1 mutations can lead to either a non-functional protein or the absence of protein secretion, and it has been established that extracellular deficiency of RS1 is the underlying cause of the phenotype. Therefore, we hypothesized that an ex vivo gene therapy strategy could be used to deliver sufficient extracellular RS1 to reverse the phenotype seen in XLRS. Here, we used adipose-derived, syngeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) that were genetically modified to secrete human RS1 and then delivered these cells by intravitreal injection to the retina of the Rs1h knockout mouse model of XLRS. Methods MSCs were electroporated with two transgene expression systems (cytomegalovirus (CMV)-controlled constitutive and doxycycline-induced Tet-On controlled inducible), both driving expression of human RS1 cDNA. The stably transfected cells, using either constitutive mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) or inducible MSC cassettes, were assayed for their RS1 secretion profile. For single injection studies, 100,000 genetically modified MSCs were injected into the vitreous cavity of the Rs1h knockout mouse eye at P21, and data were recorded at 2, 4, and 8 weeks post-injection. The control groups received either unmodified MSCs or vehicle injection. For the multiple injection studies, the mice received intravitreal MSC injections at P21, P60, and P90 with data collection at P120. For the single- and multiple-injection studies, the outcomes were measured with electroretinography, optokinetic tracking responses (OKT), histology, and immunohistochemistry. Results Two lines of genetically modified MSCs were established and found to secrete RS1 at a rate of 8 ng/million cells/day. Following intravitreal injection, RS1-expressing MSCs were found mainly in the inner retinal layers. Two weeks after a single injection of MSCs, the

  12. An ex vivo gene therapy approach in X-linked retinoschisis.

    PubMed

    Bashar, Abu E; Metcalfe, Andrew L; Viringipurampeer, Ishaq A; Yanai, Anat; Gregory-Evans, Cheryl Y; Gregory-Evans, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) is juvenile-onset macular degeneration caused by haploinsufficiency of the extracellular cell adhesion protein retinoschisin (RS1). RS1 mutations can lead to either a non-functional protein or the absence of protein secretion, and it has been established that extracellular deficiency of RS1 is the underlying cause of the phenotype. Therefore, we hypothesized that an ex vivo gene therapy strategy could be used to deliver sufficient extracellular RS1 to reverse the phenotype seen in XLRS. Here, we used adipose-derived, syngeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) that were genetically modified to secrete human RS1